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Sample records for genotypes lost alleles

  1. Procedures for identifying S-allele genotypes of Brassica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, D H

    1979-11-01

    Procedures are described for efficient selection of: (1) homozygous and heterozygous S-allele genotypes; (2) homozygous inbreds with the strong self- and sib-incompatibility required for effective seed production of single-cross F1 hybrids; (3) heterozygous genotypes with the high self- and sib-incompatibility required for effective seed production of 3- and 4-way hybrids.From reciprocal crosses between two first generation inbred (I1) plants there are three potential results: both crosses are incompatible; one is incompatible and the other compatible; and both are compatible. Incompatibility of both crosses is useful information only when combined with data from other reciprocal crosses. Each compatible cross, depending on whether its reciprocal is incompatible or compatible, dictates alternative reasoning and additional reciprocal crosses for efficiently and simultaneously identifying: (A) the S-allele genotype of all individual I1 plants, and (B) the expressions of dominance or codominance in pollen and stigma (sexual organs) of an S-allele heterozygous genotype. Reciprocal crosses provide the only efficient means of identifying S-allele genotypes and also the sexual-organ x S-allele-interaction types.Fluorescent microscope assay of pollen tube penetration into the style facilitates quantitation within 24-48 hours of incompatibility and compatibility of the reciprocal crosses. A procedure for quantitating the reciprocal difference is described that maximizes informational content of the data about interactions between S alleles in pollen and stigma of the S-allele-heterozygous genotype.Use of the non-inbred Io generation parent as a 'known' heterozygous S-allele genotype in crosses with its first generation selfed (I1) progeny usually reduces at least 7 fold the effort required for achieving objectives 1, 2, and 3, compared to the method of making reciprocal crosses only among I1 plants.Identifying the heterozygous and both homozygous S-allele genotypes during

  2. Genotype calling in tetraploid species from bi-allelic marker data using mixture models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorrips, R.E.; Gort, G.; Vosman, B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Automated genotype calling in tetraploid species was until recently not possible, which hampered genetic analysis. Modern genotyping assays often produce two signals, one for each allele of a bi-allelic marker. While ample software is available to obtain genotypes (homozygous for either

  3. The loss-of-allele assay for ES cell screening and mouse genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frendewey, David; Chernomorsky, Rostislav; Esau, Lakeisha; Om, Jinsop; Xue, Yingzi; Murphy, Andrew J; Yancopoulos, George D; Valenzuela, David M

    2010-01-01

    Targeting vectors used to create directed mutations in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells consist, in their simplest form, of a gene for drug selection flanked by mouse genomic sequences, the so-called homology arms that promote site-directed homologous recombination between the vector and the target gene. The VelociGene method for the creation of targeted mutations in ES cells employs targeting vectors, called BACVecs, that are based on bacterial artificial chromosomes. Compared with conventional short targeting vectors, BacVecs provide two major advantages: (1) their much larger homology arms promote high targeting efficiencies without the need for isogenicity or negative selection strategies; and (2) they enable deletions and insertions of up to 100kb in a single targeting event, making possible gene-ablating definitive null alleles and other large-scale genomic modifications. Because of their large arm sizes, however, BACVecs do not permit screening by conventional assays, such as long-range PCR or Southern blotting, that link the inserted targeting vector to the targeted locus. To exploit the advantages of BACVecs for gene targeting, we inverted the conventional screening logic in developing the loss-of-allele (LOA) assay, which quantifies the number of copies of the native locus to which the mutation was directed. In a correctly targeted ES cell clone, the LOA assay detects one of the two native alleles (for genes not on the X or Y chromosome), the other allele being disrupted by the targeted modification. We apply the same principle in reverse as a gain-of-allele assay to quantify the copy number of the inserted targeting vector. The LOA assay reveals a correctly targeted clone as having lost one copy of the native target gene and gained one copy of the drug resistance gene or other inserted marker. The combination of these quantitative assays makes LOA genotyping unequivocal and amenable to automated scoring. We use the quantitative polymerase chain reaction

  4. Allele and genotype frequencies of -β lactoglobulin gene in Iranian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... Blood samples were supplied from 80 Najdi cattle and 80 buffalo from different cities of Khouzestan province. ... The allele B of β-Lactoglobulin occurred at a higher frequency than the allele A in both. Najdi cattle and buffalo. .... that of the B allele in both groups of animals studied. Expected heterozygosity ...

  5. Genotyping of vacA alleles of Helicobacter pylori strains recovered ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genotyping of vacA alleles of Helicobacter pylori strains recovered from some Iranian food items. ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... Conclusion: The presence of similar genotypes in H. pylori strains of foods and those of human clinical samples suggest that contaminated foods may be the source of bacteria ...

  6. Interlaboratory comparison of fig (Ficus carica L. microsatellite genotyping data and determination of reference alleles

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    Matjaž HLADNIK

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellites have been identified as the marker of choice in plant genotyping projects. However, due to length discrepancies obtained between different laboratories for the same allele, interlaboratory comparison of fingerprinting results is often a difficult task. The objectives of this study were to compare genotyping results of two laboratories, to evaluate genetic parameters of microsatellite markers and to determine reference allele sizes for fig cultivars from the Istrian peninsula.Genotyping results of ninety fig (Ficus carica L. accessions were comparable between the laboratories despite differences observed when comparing electropherograms of different capillary electrophoresis systems. Differences in lengths of the same alleles were detected due to different PCR methods and laboratory equipment, but the distances between alleles of the same locus were preserved. However, locus FSYC01 exhibited one allele dropout which led to misidentification of 28 heterozygotes as homozygote individuals suggesting this locus as unreliable. Allele dropout was assigned to the tail PCR technology or to a touchdown PCR protocol.Genotypes of twenty-four reference cultivars from the Istrian peninsula were confirmed by both laboratories. These results will contribute to the usage of markers with greater reliability, discrimination power and consequently, to more reliable standardization with other fig genotyping projects.

  7. On coding genotypes for genetic markers with multiple alleles in genetic association study of quantitative traits

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    Wang Tao

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In genetic association study of quantitative traits using F∞ models, how to code the marker genotypes and interpret the model parameters appropriately is important for constructing hypothesis tests and making statistical inferences. Currently, the coding of marker genotypes in building F∞ models has mainly focused on the biallelic case. A thorough work on the coding of marker genotypes and interpretation of model parameters for F∞ models is needed especially for genetic markers with multiple alleles. Results In this study, we will formulate F∞ genetic models under various regression model frameworks and introduce three genotype coding schemes for genetic markers with multiple alleles. Starting from an allele-based modeling strategy, we first describe a regression framework to model the expected genotypic values at given markers. Then, as extension from the biallelic case, we introduce three coding schemes for constructing fully parameterized one-locus F∞ models and discuss the relationships between the model parameters and the expected genotypic values. Next, under a simplified modeling framework for the expected genotypic values, we consider several reduced one-locus F∞ models from the three coding schemes on the estimability and interpretation of their model parameters. Finally, we explore some extensions of the one-locus F∞ models to two loci. Several fully parameterized as well as reduced two-locus F∞ models are addressed. Conclusions The genotype coding schemes provide different ways to construct F∞ models for association testing of multi-allele genetic markers with quantitative traits. Which coding scheme should be applied depends on how convenient it can provide the statistical inferences on the parameters of our research interests. Based on these F∞ models, the standard regression model fitting tools can be used to estimate and test for various genetic effects through statistical contrasts with the

  8. Alleles versus genotypes: Genetic interactions and the dynamics of selection in sexual populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neher, Richard

    2010-03-01

    Physical interactions between amino-acids are essential for protein structure and activity, while protein-protein interactions and regulatory interactions are central to cellular function. As a consequence of these interactions, the combined effect of two mutations can differ from the sum of the individual effects of the mutations. This phenomenon of genetic interaction is known as epistasis. However, the importance of epistasis and its effects on evolutionary dynamics are poorly understood, especially in sexual populations where recombination breaks up existing combinations of alleles to produce new ones. Here, we present a computational model of selection dynamics involving many epistatic loci in a recombining population. We demonstrate that a large number of polymorphic interacting loci can, despite frequent recombination, exhibit cooperative behavior that locks alleles into favorable genotypes leading to a population consisting of a set of competing clones. As the recombination rate exceeds a certain critical value this ``genotype selection'' phase disappears in an abrupt transition giving way to ``allele selection'' - the phase where different loci are only weakly correlated as expected in sexually reproducing populations. Clustering of interacting sets of genes on a chromosome leads to the emergence of an intermediate regime, where localized blocks of cooperating alleles lock into genetic modules. Large populations attain highest fitness at a recombination rate just below critical, suggesting that natural selection might tune recombination rates to balance the beneficial aspect of exploration of genotype space with the breaking up of synergistic allele combinations.

  9. Haptoglobin genotyping of Vietnamese: global distribution of HP del, complete deletion allele of the HP gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soejima, Mikiko; Agusa, Tetsuro; Iwata, Hisato; Fujihara, Junko; Kunito, Takashi; Takeshita, Haruo; Lan, Vi Thi Mai; Minh, Tu Binh; Takahashi, Shin; Trang, Pham Thi Kim; Viet, Pham Hung; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Koda, Yoshiro

    2015-01-01

    The haptoglobin (HP) gene deletion allele (HP(del)) is responsible for anhaptoglobinemia and a genetic risk factor for anaphylaxis reaction after transfusion due to production of the anti-HP antibody. The distribution of this allele has been explored by several groups including ours. Here, we studied the frequency of HP(del) in addition to the distribution of common HP genotypes in 293 Vietnamese. The HP(del) was encountered with the frequency of 0.020. The present result suggested that this deletion allele is restricted to East and Southeast Asians. Thus, this allele seems to be a potential ancestry informative marker for these populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Neuropeptide Y genotype, central obesity, and abdominal fat distribution: the POUNDS LOST trial.

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    Lin, Xiaochen; Qi, Qibin; Zheng, Yan; Huang, Tao; Lathrop, Mark; Zelenika, Diana; Bray, George A; Sacks, Frank M; Liang, Liming; Qi, Lu

    2015-08-01

    Neuropeptide Y is a key peptide affecting adiposity and has been related to obesity risk. However, little is known about the role of NPY variations in diet-induced change in adiposity. The objective was to examine the effects of NPY variant rs16147 on central obesity and abdominal fat distribution in response to dietary interventions. We genotyped a functional NPY variant rs16147 among 723 participants in the Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies trial. Changes in waist circumference (WC), total abdominal adipose tissue, visceral adipose tissue, and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) from baseline to 6 and 24 mo were evaluated with respect to the rs16147 genotypes. Genotype-dietary fat interaction was also examined. The rs16147 C allele was associated with a greater reduction in WC at 6 mo (P fat in relation to WC and SAT (P-interaction = 0.01 and 0.04): the association was stronger in individuals with high-fat intake than in those with low-fat intake. At 24 mo, the association remained statistically significant for WC in the high-fat diet group (P = 0.02), although the gene-dietary fat interaction became nonsignificant (P = 0.30). In addition, we found statistically significant genotype-dietary fat interaction on the change in total abdominal adipose tissue, visceral adipose tissue, and SAT at 24 mo (P = 0.01, 0.05, and 0.04): the rs16147 T allele appeared to associate with more adverse change in the abdominal fat deposition in the high-fat diet group than in the low-fat diet group. Our data indicate that the NPY rs16147 genotypes affect the change in abdominal adiposity in response to dietary interventions, and the effects of the rs16147 single-nucleotide polymorphism on central obesity and abdominal fat distribution were modified by dietary fat. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  11. Rapid ABO genotyping by high-speed droplet allele-specific PCR using crude samples.

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    Taira, Chiaki; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Takeichi, Naoya; Furukawa, Satomi; Sugano, Mitsutoshi; Uehara, Takeshi; Okumura, Nobuo; Honda, Takayuki

    2018-01-01

    ABO genotyping has common tools for personal identification of forensic and transplantation field. We developed a new method based on a droplet allele-specific PCR (droplet-AS-PCR) that enabled rapid PCR amplification. We attempted rapid ABO genotyping using crude DNA isolated from dried blood and buccal cells. We designed allele-specific primers for three SNPs (at nucleotides 261, 526, and 803) in exons 6 and 7 of the ABO gene. We pretreated dried blood and buccal cells with proteinase K, and obtained crude DNAs without DNA purification. Droplet-AS-PCR allowed specific amplification of the SNPs at the three loci using crude DNA, with results similar to those for DNA extracted from fresh peripheral blood. The sensitivity of the methods was 5%-10%. The genotyping of extracted DNA and crude DNA were completed within 8 and 9 minutes, respectively. The genotypes determined by the droplet-AS-PCR method were always consistent with those obtained by direct sequencing. The droplet-AS-PCR method enabled rapid and specific amplification of three SNPs of the ABO gene from crude DNA treated with proteinase K. ABO genotyping by the droplet-AS-PCR has the potential to be applied to various fields including a forensic medicine and transplantation medical care. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Reducing Bias of Allele Frequency Estimates by Modeling SNP Genotype Data with Informative Missingness

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    Wan-Yu eLin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of missing single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotypes is common in genetic data. For studies with low-density SNPs, the most commonly used approach to deal with genotype missingness is to simply remove the observations with missing genotypes from the analyses. This naïve method is straightforward but is appropriate only when the missingness is random. However, a given assay often has a different capability in genotyping heterozygotes and homozygotes, causing the phenomenon of ‘differential dropout’ in the sense that the missing rates of heterozygotes and homozygotes are different. In practice, differential dropout among genotypes exists in even carefully designed studies, such as the data from the HapMap project and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. In this study, we propose a statistical method to model the differential dropout among different genotypes. Compared with the naïve method, our method provides more accurate allele frequency estimates when the differential dropout is present. To demonstrate its practical use, we further apply our method to the HapMap data and a scleroderma data set.

  13. Genotype distribution and allele frequencies of the genes associated with body composition and locomotion traits in Myanmar native horses.

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    Okuda, Yu; Moe, Hla Hla; Moe, Kyaw Kyaw; Shimizu, Yuki; Nishioka, Kenji; Shimogiri, Takeshi; Mannen, Hideyuki; Kanemaki, Misao; Kunieda, Tetsuo

    2017-08-01

    Myanmar native horses are small horses used mainly for drafting carts or carriages in rural areas and packing loads in mountainy areas. In the present study, we investigated genotype distributions and allele frequencies of the LCORL/NCAPG, MSTN and DMRT3 genes, which are associated with body composition and locomotion traits of horses, in seven local populations of Myanmar native horses. The genotyping result of LCORL/NCAPG showed that allele frequencies of C allele associated with higher withers height ranged from 0.08 to 0.27, and 0.13 in average. For MSTN, allele frequencies of C allele associated with higher proportion of Type 2B muscular fiber ranged from 0.05 to 0.23, and 0.09 in average. For DMRT3, allele frequencies of A allele associated with ambling gait ranged from 0 to 0.04, and 0.01 in average. The presences of the minor alleles of these genes at low frequencies suggest a possibility that these horse populations have not been under strong selection pressure for particular locomotion traits and body composition. Our findings of the presence of these minor alleles in Southeast Asian native horses are also informative for considering the origins of these minor alleles associated with body composition and locomotion traits in horse populations. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  14. Genotypic and allelic variability in CYP19A1 among populations of African and European ancestry.

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    Athena Starlard-Davenport

    Full Text Available CYP19A1 facilitates the bioconversion of estrogens from androgens. CYP19A1 intron single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs may alter mRNA splicing, resulting in altered CYP19A1 activity, and potentially influencing disease susceptibility. Genetic studies of CYP19A1 SNPs have been well documented in populations of European ancestry; however, studies in populations of African ancestry are limited. In the present study, ten 'candidate' intronic SNPs in CYP19A1 from 125 African Americans (AA and 277 European Americans (EA were genotyped and their frequencies compared. Allele frequencies were also compared with HapMap and ASW 1000 Genomes populations. We observed significant differences in the minor allele frequencies between AA and EA in six of the ten SNPs including rs10459592 (p<0.0001, rs12908960 (p<0.0001, rs1902584 (p = 0.016, rs2470144 (p<0.0001, rs1961177 (p<0.0001, and rs6493497 (p = 0.003. While there were no significant differences in allele frequencies between EA and CEU in the HapMap population, a 1.2- to 19-fold difference in allele frequency for rs10459592 (p = 0.004, rs12908960 (p = 0.0006, rs1902584 (p<0.0001, rs2470144 (p = 0.0006, rs1961177 (p<0.0001, and rs6493497 (p = 0.0092 was observed between AA and the Yoruba (YRI population. Linkage disequilibrium (LD blocks and haplotype clusters that is unique to the EA population but not AA was also observed. In summary, we demonstrate that differences in the allele frequencies of CYP19A1 intron SNPs are not consistent between populations of African and European ancestry. Thus, investigations into whether CYP19A1 intron SNPs contribute to variations in cancer incidence, outcomes and pharmacological response seen in populations of different ancestry may prove beneficial.

  15. A Maximum-Likelihood Method to Correct for Allelic Dropout in Microsatellite Data with No Replicate Genotypes

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    Wang, Chaolong; Schroeder, Kari B.; Rosenberg, Noah A.

    2012-01-01

    Allelic dropout is a commonly observed source of missing data in microsatellite genotypes, in which one or both allelic copies at a locus fail to be amplified by the polymerase chain reaction. Especially for samples with poor DNA quality, this problem causes a downward bias in estimates of observed heterozygosity and an upward bias in estimates of inbreeding, owing to mistaken classifications of heterozygotes as homozygotes when one of the two copies drops out. One general approach for avoiding allelic dropout involves repeated genotyping of homozygous loci to minimize the effects of experimental error. Existing computational alternatives often require replicate genotyping as well. These approaches, however, are costly and are suitable only when enough DNA is available for repeated genotyping. In this study, we propose a maximum-likelihood approach together with an expectation-maximization algorithm to jointly estimate allelic dropout rates and allele frequencies when only one set of nonreplicated genotypes is available. Our method considers estimates of allelic dropout caused by both sample-specific factors and locus-specific factors, and it allows for deviation from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium owing to inbreeding. Using the estimated parameters, we correct the bias in the estimation of observed heterozygosity through the use of multiple imputations of alleles in cases where dropout might have occurred. With simulated data, we show that our method can (1) effectively reproduce patterns of missing data and heterozygosity observed in real data; (2) correctly estimate model parameters, including sample-specific dropout rates, locus-specific dropout rates, and the inbreeding coefficient; and (3) successfully correct the downward bias in estimating the observed heterozygosity. We find that our method is fairly robust to violations of model assumptions caused by population structure and by genotyping errors from sources other than allelic dropout. Because the data sets

  16. Neuropeptide Y genotype, central obesity, and abdominal fat distribution: the POUNDS LOST trial1,2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaochen; Qi, Qibin; Zheng, Yan; Huang, Tao; Lathrop, Mark; Zelenika, Diana; Bray, George A; Sacks, Frank M; Liang, Liming; Qi, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neuropeptide Y is a key peptide affecting adiposity and has been related to obesity risk. However, little is known about the role of NPY variations in diet-induced change in adiposity. Objective: The objective was to examine the effects of NPY variant rs16147 on central obesity and abdominal fat distribution in response to dietary interventions. Design: We genotyped a functional NPY variant rs16147 among 723 participants in the Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies trial. Changes in waist circumference (WC), total abdominal adipose tissue, visceral adipose tissue, and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) from baseline to 6 and 24 mo were evaluated with respect to the rs16147 genotypes. Genotype–dietary fat interaction was also examined. Results: The rs16147 C allele was associated with a greater reduction in WC at 6 mo (P fat in relation to WC and SAT (P-interaction = 0.01 and 0.04): the association was stronger in individuals with high-fat intake than in those with low-fat intake. At 24 mo, the association remained statistically significant for WC in the high-fat diet group (P = 0.02), although the gene–dietary fat interaction became nonsignificant (P = 0.30). In addition, we found statistically significant genotype–dietary fat interaction on the change in total abdominal adipose tissue, visceral adipose tissue, and SAT at 24 mo (P = 0.01, 0.05, and 0.04): the rs16147 T allele appeared to associate with more adverse change in the abdominal fat deposition in the high-fat diet group than in the low-fat diet group. Conclusion: Our data indicate that the NPY rs16147 genotypes affect the change in abdominal adiposity in response to dietary interventions, and the effects of the rs16147 single-nucleotide polymorphism on central obesity and abdominal fat distribution were modified by dietary fat. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00072995. PMID:26156739

  17. Allele and Genotype Distributions of DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms in South Indian Healthy Population

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    Katiboina Srinivasa Rao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Various DNA repair pathways protect the structural and chemical integrity of the human genome from environmental and endogenous threats. Polymorphisms of genes encoding the proteins involved in DNA repair have been found to be associated with cancer risk and chemotherapeutic response. In this study, we aim to establish the normative frequencies of DNA repair genes in South Indian healthy population and compare with HapMap populations. Genotyping was done on 128 healthy volunteers from South India, and the allele and genotype distributions were established. The minor allele frequency of Xeroderma pigmentosum group A ( XPA G23A, Excision repair cross-complementing 2 ( ERCC2 /Xeroderma pigmentosum group D ( XPD Lys751Gln, Xeroderma pigmentosum group G ( XPG His46His, XPG Asp1104His, and X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 ( XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphisms were 49.2%, 36.3%, 48.0%, 23.0%, and 34.0% respectively. Ethnic variations were observed in the frequency distribution of these polymorphisms between the South Indians and other HapMap populations. The present work forms the groundwork for cancer association studies and biomarker identification for treatment response and prognosis.

  18. Allelic variance among ABO blood group genotypes in a population from the western region of Saudi Arabia.

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    Mohamed, Abdularahman B O; Hindawi, Salwa Ibrahim; Al-Harthi, Sameer; Alam, Qamre; Alam, Mohammad Zubair; Haque, Absarul; Ahmad, Waseem; Damanhouri, Ghazi A

    2016-12-01

    Characterization of the ABO blood group at the phenotype and genotype levels is clinically essential for transfusion, forensics, and population studies. This study elucidated ABO phenotypes and genotypes, and performed an evaluation of their distribution in individuals from the western region of Saudi Arabia. One-hundred and seven samples underwent standard serological techniques for ABO blood group phenotype analysis. ABO alleles and genotypes were identified using multiplex polymerase chain reaction, and electrophoretic analysis was performed to evaluate the highly polymorphic ABO locus. A phenotype distribution of 37.4%, 30.8%, 24.3%, and 7.5% was found for blood groups O, A, B, and AB respectively in our study cohort. Genotype analysis identified 10 genotype combinations with the O01/O02 and A102/O02 genotypes being the most frequent with frequencies of 33.6% and 14.95%, respectively. Common genotypes such as A101/A101 , A101/A102 , A101/B101 , B101/B101 , and O01/O01 were not detected. Similarly, the rare genotypes, cis-AB01/O02 , cis-AB01/O01 , and cis-AB01/A102 were not found in our cohort. The most frequently observed allele was O02 (35.98%) followed by the A102 allele (17.76%). Furthermore, our findings are discussed in reference to ABO allele and genotype frequencies found in other ethnic groups. The study has a significant implication on the management of blood bank and transfusion services in Saudi Arabian patients.

  19. Imputation of microsatellite alleles from dense SNP genotypes for parental verification

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    Matthew eMcclure

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellite (MS markers have recently been used for parental verification and are still the international standard despite higher cost, error rate, and turnaround time compared with Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP-based assays. Despite domestic and international interest from producers and research communities, no viable means currently exist to verify parentage for an individual unless all familial connections were analyzed using the same DNA marker type (MS or SNP. A simple and cost-effective method was devised to impute MS alleles from SNP haplotypes within breeds. For some MS, imputation results may allow inference across breeds. A total of 347 dairy cattle representing 4 dairy breeds (Brown Swiss, Guernsey, Holstein, and Jersey were used to generate reference haplotypes. This approach has been verified (>98% accurate for imputing the International Society of Animal Genetics (ISAG recommended panel of 12 MS for cattle parentage verification across a validation set of 1,307 dairy animals.. Implementation of this method will allow producers and breed associations to transition to SNP-based parentage verification utilizing MS genotypes from historical data on parents where SNP genotypes are missing. This approach may be applicable to additional cattle breeds and other species that wish to migrate from MS- to SNP- based parental verification.

  20. Ultra-high resolution HLA genotyping and allele discovery by highly multiplexed cDNA amplicon pyrosequencing

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    Lank Simon M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-resolution HLA genotyping is a critical diagnostic and research assay. Current methods rarely achieve unambiguous high-resolution typing without making population-specific frequency inferences due to a lack of locus coverage and difficulty in exon-phase matching. Achieving high-resolution typing is also becoming more challenging with traditional methods as the database of known HLA alleles increases. Results We designed a cDNA amplicon-based pyrosequencing method to capture 94% of the HLA class I open-reading-frame with only two amplicons per sample, and an analogous method for class II HLA genes, with a primary focus on sequencing the DRB loci. We present a novel Galaxy server-based analysis workflow for determining genotype. During assay validation, we performed two GS Junior sequencing runs to determine the accuracy of the HLA class I amplicons and DRB amplicon at different levels of multiplexing. When 116 amplicons were multiplexed, we unambiguously resolved 99%of class I alleles to four- or six-digit resolution, as well as 100% unambiguous DRB calls. The second experiment, with 271 multiplexed amplicons, missed some alleles, but generated high-resolution, concordant typing for 93% of class I alleles, and 96% for DRB1 alleles. In a third, preliminary experiment we attempted to sequence novel amplicons for other class II loci with mixed success. Conclusions The presented assay is higher-throughput and higher-resolution than existing HLA genotyping methods, and suitable for allele discovery or large cohort sampling. The validated class I and DRB primers successfully generated unambiguously high-resolution genotypes, while further work is needed to validate additional class II genotyping amplicons.

  1. Genotype-phenotype correlation and functional studies in patients with cystic fibrosis bearing CFTR complex alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terlizzi, Vito; Castaldo, Giuseppe; Salvatore, Donatello; Lucarelli, Marco; Raia, Valeria; Angioni, Adriano; Carnovale, Vincenzo; Cirilli, Natalia; Casciaro, Rosaria; Colombo, Carla; Di Lullo, Antonella Miriam; Elce, Ausilia; Iacotucci, Paola; Comegna, Marika; Scorza, Manuela; Lucidi, Vincenzina; Perfetti, Anna; Cimino, Roberta; Quattrucci, Serena; Seia, Manuela; Sofia, Valentina Maria; Zarrilli, Federica; Amato, Felice

    2017-04-01

    The effect of complex alleles in cystic fibrosis (CF) is poorly defined for the lack of functional studies. To describe the genotype-phenotype correlation and the results of either in vitro and ex vivo studies performed on nasal epithelial cells (NEC) in a cohort of patients with CF carrying cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator ( CFTR ) complex alleles. We studied 70 homozygous, compound heterozygous or heterozygous for CFTR mutations: p.[Arg74Trp;Val201Met;Asp1270Asn], n=8; p.[Ile148Thr;Ile1023_Val1024del], n=5; p.[Arg117Leu;Leu997Phe], n=6; c.[1210-34TG[12];1210-12T[5];2930C>T], n=3; p.[Arg74Trp;Asp1270Asn], n=4; p.Asp1270Asn, n=2; p.Ile148Thr, n=6; p.Leu997Phe, n=36. In 39 patients, we analysed the CFTR gating activity on NEC in comparison with patients with CF (n=8) and carriers (n=4). Finally, we analysed in vitro the p.[Arg74Trp;Val201Met;Asp1270Asn] complex allele. The p.[Ile148Thr;Ile1023_Val1024del] caused severe CF in five compound heterozygous with a class I-II mutation. Their CFTR activity on NEC was comparable with patients with two class I-II mutations (mean 7.3% vs 6.9%). The p.[Arg74Trp;Asp1270Asn] and the p.Asp1270Asn have scarce functional effects, while p.[Arg74Trp;Val201Met;Asp1270Asn] caused mild CF in four of five subjects carrying a class I-II mutation in trans , or CFTR-related disorders (CFTR-RD) in three having in trans a class IV-V mutation. The p.[Arg74Trp;Val201Met;Asp1270Asn] causes significantly (pT] and a class I-II mutation had mild CF or CFTR-RD (gating activity: 18.5-19.0%). The effect of complex alleles partially depends on the mutation in trans . Although larger studies are necessary, the CFTR activity on NEC is a rapid contributory tool to classify patients with CFTR dysfunction. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Use of the LUS in sequence allele designations to facilitate probabilistic genotyping of NGS-based STR typing results.

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    Just, Rebecca S; Irwin, Jodi A

    2018-05-01

    Some of the expected advantages of next generation sequencing (NGS) for short tandem repeat (STR) typing include enhanced mixture detection and genotype resolution via sequence variation among non-homologous alleles of the same length. However, at the same time that NGS methods for forensic DNA typing have advanced in recent years, many caseworking laboratories have implemented or are transitioning to probabilistic genotyping to assist the interpretation of complex autosomal STR typing results. Current probabilistic software programs are designed for length-based data, and were not intended to accommodate sequence strings as the product input. Yet to leverage the benefits of NGS for enhanced genotyping and mixture deconvolution, the sequence variation among same-length products must be utilized in some form. Here, we propose use of the longest uninterrupted stretch (LUS) in allele designations as a simple method to represent sequence variation within the STR repeat regions and facilitate - in the nearterm - probabilistic interpretation of NGS-based typing results. An examination of published population data indicated that a reference LUS region is straightforward to define for most autosomal STR loci, and that using repeat unit plus LUS length as the allele designator can represent greater than 80% of the alleles detected by sequencing. A proof of concept study performed using a freely available probabilistic software demonstrated that the LUS length can be used in allele designations when a program does not require alleles to be integers, and that utilizing sequence information improves interpretation of both single-source and mixed contributor STR typing results as compared to using repeat unit information alone. The LUS concept for allele designation maintains the repeat-based allele nomenclature that will permit backward compatibility to extant STR databases, and the LUS lengths themselves will be concordant regardless of the NGS assay or analysis tools

  3. Genotyping of vacA alleles of Helicobacter pylori strains recovered ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    commonly detected genotypes in the meat-based foods, viz, vegetable sandwich and ready to eat fish, were vacA ... Keywords: Helicobacter pylori, VacA genotypes, Genotyping, Food items ..... Microbiology and Quality Control, Islamic Azad.

  4. Use of allele-specific FAIRE to determine functional regulatory polymorphism using large-scale genotyping arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J P Smith

    Full Text Available Following the widespread use of genome-wide association studies (GWAS, focus is turning towards identification of causal variants rather than simply genetic markers of diseases and traits. As a step towards a high-throughput method to identify genome-wide, non-coding, functional regulatory variants, we describe the technique of allele-specific FAIRE, utilising large-scale genotyping technology (FAIRE-gen to determine allelic effects on chromatin accessibility and regulatory potential. FAIRE-gen was explored using lymphoblastoid cells and the 50,000 SNP Illumina CVD BeadChip. The technique identified an allele-specific regulatory polymorphism within NR1H3 (coding for LXR-α, rs7120118, coinciding with a previously GWAS-identified SNP for HDL-C levels. This finding was confirmed using FAIRE-gen with the 200,000 SNP Illumina Metabochip and verified with the established method of TaqMan allelic discrimination. Examination of this SNP in two prospective Caucasian cohorts comprising 15,000 individuals confirmed the association with HDL-C levels (combined beta = 0.016; p = 0.0006, and analysis of gene expression identified an allelic association with LXR-α expression in heart tissue. Using increasingly comprehensive genotyping chips and distinct tissues for examination, FAIRE-gen has the potential to aid the identification of many causal SNPs associated with disease from GWAS.

  5. HLA Class II Allele, Haplotype, and Genotype Associations with Type 1 Diabetes in Benin: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaossarath A. Fagbemi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Several studies have reported the implication of HLA-DR/DQ loci in the susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (T1D. Since no such study has yet been performed in Benin, this pilot one aimed at assessing HLA class II allele, haplotype, and genotype associations with T1D. Material and Methods. Class II HLA genotyping was performed in 51 patients with T1D and 51 healthy unrelated controls by means of the PCR-SSP method. The diagnosis of T1D was set up according to American Diabetes Association criteria. Odds ratio (OR and its 95% confidence interval (95% CI were calculated to assess the associations between T1D and HLA alleles, haplotypes, and genotypes. Results. Participants were aged 1–24 years. T1D was significantly associated with DR3, DQA1∗05:01, DQB1∗02:01, and DR3-DR4. No significant associations were observed with DR4, DQB1∗03:02, and DQB1∗06:02. Conclusion. Certain HLA class II alleles, haplotypes, and genotypes were related to T1D and may be used as genetic susceptibility markers to T1D in Benin.

  6. Toward fully automated genotyping: Allele assignment, pedigree construction, phase determination, and recombination detection in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlin, M.W.; Burks, M.B. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Hoop, R.C.; Hoffman, E.P. [Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Human genetic maps have made quantum leaps in the past few years, because of the characterization of >2,000 CA dinucleotide repeat loci: these PCR-based markers offer extraordinarily high PIC, and within the next year their density is expected to reach intervals of a few centimorgans per marker. These new genetic maps open new avenues for disease gene research, including large-scale genotyping for both simple and complex disease loci. However, the allele patterns of many dinucleotide repeat loci can be complex and difficult to interpret, with genotyping errors a recognized problem. Furthermore, the possibility of genotyping individuals at hundreds or thousands of polymorphic loci requires improvements in data handling and analysis. The automation of genotyping and analysis of computer-derived haplotypes would remove many of the barriers preventing optimal use of dense and informative dinucleotide genetic maps. Toward this end, we have automated the allele identification, genotyping, phase determinations, and inheritance consistency checks generated by four CA repeats within the 2.5-Mbp, 10-cM X-linked dystrophin gene, using fluorescein-labeled multiplexed PCR products analyzed on automated sequencers. The described algorithms can deconvolute and resolve closely spaced alleles, despite interfering stutter noise; set phase in females; propagate the phase through the family; and identify recombination events. We show the implementation of these algorithms for the completely automated interpretation of allele data and risk assessment for five Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy families. The described approach can be scaled up to perform genome-based analyses with hundreds or thousands of CA-repeat loci, using multiple fluorophors on automated sequencers. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. A high-throughput method for genotyping S-RNase alleles in apple

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bjarne; Ørgaard, Marian; Toldam-Andersen, Torben Bo

    2016-01-01

    We present a new efficient screening tool for detection of S-alleles in apple. The protocol using general and multiplexed primers for PCR reaction and fragment detection on an automatized capillary DNA sequencer exposed a higher number of alleles than any previous studies. Analysis of alleles...

  8. The Study of Morphological Traits and Identification of Self-incompatibility Alleles in Almond Cultivars and Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousa Rasouli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of an almond collection using morphological variables and identification of self-incompatibility genotype  is useful for selecting pollinizers and for the design of crossing in almond breeding programs. In this study, important morphological traits and self-incompatibilities in 71 almond cultivars and genotypes were studied. Simple and multiplex specific PCR analyses were used in order to identify self-incompatibility alleles. Based on the results, cultivars and genotypes including ‘Dir Ras–e-Savojbolagh’, ‘D-124’, ‘D-99’, ‘Shahrood 12’, ‘Tuono’, ‘Nonpareil’, ‘Price’, ‘Mirpanj-e-Tehran’, ‘Pakotahe-e- Taleghan’, ‘V-13-34’, ‘V-16-8, ‘V-11-10’, ‘Zarghan 10’, ‘Uromiyeh 68’, ‘Barg dorosht-e-Hamedan’ and ‘Yazd 60’ were late flowering and had the highest quality of nut and kernel characters. The result of the PCR method using combined primers AS1II and AmyC5R showed amplification of ten self-incompatibility alleles (S1, S2, S3, S5, S6, S7, S8, S10, S12,and S unknown allele and three Sfalleles. Moreover, S1 had the highest frequencies in comparison with other known S-alleles. Also, unknown alleles with different sizes were detected and 58 new bands were found in some cultivars.

  9. Analysis of HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1 allelic, genotypic, and haplotypic frequencies in colombian population

    OpenAIRE

    Yazmin Rocío Árias-Murillo; Miguel Ángel Castro-Jiménez; María Fernanda Ríos-Espinosa; Juan Javier López-Rivera; Sandra Johanna Echeverry-Coral; Oscar Martínez-Nieto

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The high polymorphism of the HLA system allows its typification to be used as valuable tool in establishing association to various illnesses, immune and genetic profiles; it also provides a guide to identifying compatibility among donors and receptors of organs transplants. Objective: To establish HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA.DRB1 allele, genotype and haplotype frequencies among patients treated at Clinica Colsanitas SA. Methods: 561 patients coming from different regions in Col...

  10. Prion protein genotype survey confirms low frequency of scrapie-resistant K222 allele in British goat herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, W; Marier, E; Stewart, P; Konold, T; Street, S; Langeveld, J; Windl, O; Ortiz-Pelaez, A

    2016-02-13

    Scrapie in goats is a transmissible, fatal prion disease, which is endemic in the British goat population. The recent success in defining caprine PRNP gene variants that provide resistance to experimental and natural classical scrapie has prompted the authors to conduct a survey of PRNP genotypes in 10 goat breeds and 52 herds to find goats with the resistant K222 allele. They report here the frequencies in 1236 tested animals of the resistance-associated K222 and several other alleles by breed and herd. Eight animals were found to be heterozygous QK222 goats (0.64 per cent genotype frequency, 95 per cent CI 0.28 to 1.27 per cent) but no homozygous KK222 goats were detected. The K222 allele was found in Saanen, Toggenburg and Anglo-Nubian goats. The fact that only a few goats with the K222 allele have been identified does not preclude the possibility to design and implement successful breeding programmes at national level. British Veterinary Association.

  11. Genotype and allelic frequencies of CYP2E1*5B polymorphism in the southwest population of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Zanganeh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1 is a main enzyme which plays a major role in activating and detoxifying many xenobiotics, carcinogens and drugs. Available studies suggest that CYP2E1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are involved in the risk of developing certain cancers after exposure to carcinogens. The purpose of the present study was to assess genotype and allele frequencies of polymorphic CYP2E1*5B in the Iranian population. Material and Methods: This study was performed on 200 healthy individuals (female: 100, male: 100 in medical laboratories of Ahvaz during 2011. The CYP2E1 *5B (rs3813867 G-1293C assessment was carried out using PCR-RFLP method. The data were analyzed with ĸ2 and hardy-Weinberg Equation statistically methods. Results: The frequency of *1A/*1A (c1/c1, *1A/*5B (c1/c2 and *5B/*5B (c2/c2 genotypes was computed 97, 3 and 0 percent, respectively. The frequency of *1A (c1 and *5B (c2 alleles was computed 98.5 and 1.5 percent, respectively. No statistically significant difference was between two genders (p>0.05. Conclusion: The genotype distribution and allele frequencies of CYP2E1*5B polymorphism were similar to Turkish and some of the European populations. However, there are significant interethnic differences when the Iranian population is compared with the Eastern Asian, American and some of the European populations. The allelic distribution of this polymorphism did not vary with gender.

  12. SNP calling, genotype calling, and sample allele frequency estimation from new-generation sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand; Albrechtsen, Anders

    2012-01-01

    We present a statistical framework for estimation and application of sample allele frequency spectra from New-Generation Sequencing (NGS) data. In this method, we first estimate the allele frequency spectrum using maximum likelihood. In contrast to previous methods, the likelihood function is cal...... be extended to various other cases including cases with deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. We evaluate the statistical properties of the methods using simulations and by application to a real data set....

  13. Genome Wide Allele Frequency Fingerprints (GWAFFs) of populations via genotyping by sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrne, Stephen; Czaban, Adrian; Studer, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    -wide scale would be very powerful, examples include the breeding of outbreeding species, varietal protection in outbreeding species, monitoring changes in population allele frequencies. This motivated us to test the potential to use GBS to evaluate allele frequencies within populations. Perennial ryegrass...... these fingerprints can be used to distinguish between plant populations. Even at current costs and throughput, using sequencing to directly evaluate populations on a genome-wide scale is viable. GWAFFs should find many applications, from varietal development in outbreeding species right through to playing a role...... in protecting plant breeders’ rights....

  14. Alleles conferring improved fiber quality from EMS mutagenesis of elite cotton genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The elite gene pool of cotton (Gossypium spp.) has less diversity than those of most other major crops, making identification of novel alleles important to ongoing crop improvement. A total of 3,164 M5 lines resulting from ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis of two G. hirsutum breeding lines, TAM 94L...

  15. Marker-Assisted Selection for Recognizing Wheat Mutant Genotypes Carrying HMW Glutenin Alleles Related to Baking Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Zamani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Allelic diversity of HMW glutenin loci in several studies revealed that allelic combinations affect dough quality. Dx5 + Dy10 subunits are related to good baking quality and Dx2 + Dy12 are related to undesirable baking quality. One of the most regular methods to evaluate the baking quality is SDS-PAGE which is used to improve baking quality labs. Marker-assisted selection is the method which can recognize the alleles related to baking quality and this method is based on polymerase chain reaction. 10 pairs of specific primers related to Dx2, Dx2.1, Dx5, Dy10, and Dy12 subunits were used for recognizing baking quality of some wheat varieties and some mutant genotypes. Only 5 pairs of them could show the specific bands. All subunits were recognized by the primers except Dx2.1. Some of the primers were extracted from previous studies and the others were designed based on D genome subunits of wheat. SDS-PAGE method accomplished having confidence in these marker’s results. To realize the effect of mutation, seed storage proteins were measured. It showed that mutation had effect on the amount of seed storage protein on the mutant seeds (which showed polymorphism.

  16. Marker-assisted selection for recognizing wheat mutant genotypes carrying HMW glutenin alleles related to baking quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Mohammad Javad; Bihamta, Mohammad Reza; Naserian Khiabani, Behnam; Tahernezhad, Zahra; Hallajian, Mohammad Taher; Shamsi, Marzieh Varasteh

    2014-01-01

    Allelic diversity of HMW glutenin loci in several studies revealed that allelic combinations affect dough quality. Dx5 + Dy10 subunits are related to good baking quality and Dx2 + Dy12 are related to undesirable baking quality. One of the most regular methods to evaluate the baking quality is SDS-PAGE which is used to improve baking quality labs. Marker-assisted selection is the method which can recognize the alleles related to baking quality and this method is based on polymerase chain reaction. 10 pairs of specific primers related to Dx2, Dx2.1, Dx5, Dy10, and Dy12 subunits were used for recognizing baking quality of some wheat varieties and some mutant genotypes. Only 5 pairs of them could show the specific bands. All subunits were recognized by the primers except Dx2.1. Some of the primers were extracted from previous studies and the others were designed based on D genome subunits of wheat. SDS-PAGE method accomplished having confidence in these marker's results. To realize the effect of mutation, seed storage proteins were measured. It showed that mutation had effect on the amount of seed storage protein on the mutant seeds (which showed polymorphism).

  17. Allelic state at the microsatellite locus Xgwm261 marking the dwarfing gene Rht8 in Egyptian bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L. genotypes released from 1947 to 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem Khaled F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rht8 is widely used in dry environments such as Mediterranean regions where it increases plant adaptability. Variation at the Gatersleben wheat microsatellite Xgwm261 locus, whose 192-bp allele closely linked to the dwarfing gene Rht8, on chromosome 2D within 0.6 cM, was used to screen thirty Egyptian bread wheat genotypes released from (1947-2004 to assess the variation at this locus. There were three microsatellite allelic variants based on size. Screening of this wheat collection showed that the three alleles Xgwm261-165, Xgwm261-174 and Xgwm261-192 bp were the most frequent. The highest allele frequency was observed for a Xgwm261-165 bp fragment (65.52% followed by a Xgwm261-174 bp fragment (24.14%. However, the allele frequency of a Xgwm261-192 bp fragment among these wheat genotypes was 10.34%. The percentage distribution of dwarfing alleles for the microsatellite locus Xgwm261 in the Egyptian wheat breeding programs was 30, 20, 20 and 30% for the wheat breeding program Giza, Sakha, Gemmiza and Sids, respectively. PIC for Xgwm261 was 0.527. Genetic heritage of Egyptian genotypes at the microsatellite locus Xgwm261 is consequence of new parental components usage, carriers short plant and early maturity attributes and consequent selection progeny with these traits in breeding programs. The present study will be helpful in characterization Egyptian wheat genotypes, as well as in accurate selection of parents for wheat breeding program in Egypt.

  18. TumorBoost: Normalization of allele-specific tumor copy numbers from a single pair of tumor-normal genotyping microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuvial Pierre

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput genotyping microarrays assess both total DNA copy number and allelic composition, which makes them a tool of choice for copy number studies in cancer, including total copy number and loss of heterozygosity (LOH analyses. Even after state of the art preprocessing methods, allelic signal estimates from genotyping arrays still suffer from systematic effects that make them difficult to use effectively for such downstream analyses. Results We propose a method, TumorBoost, for normalizing allelic estimates of one tumor sample based on estimates from a single matched normal. The method applies to any paired tumor-normal estimates from any microarray-based technology, combined with any preprocessing method. We demonstrate that it increases the signal-to-noise ratio of allelic signals, making it significantly easier to detect allelic imbalances. Conclusions TumorBoost increases the power to detect somatic copy-number events (including copy-neutral LOH in the tumor from allelic signals of Affymetrix or Illumina origin. We also conclude that high-precision allelic estimates can be obtained from a single pair of tumor-normal hybridizations, if TumorBoost is combined with single-array preprocessing methods such as (allele-specific CRMA v2 for Affymetrix or BeadStudio's (proprietary XY-normalization method for Illumina. A bounded-memory implementation is available in the open-source and cross-platform R package aroma.cn, which is part of the Aroma Project (http://www.aroma-project.org/.

  19. Real-time PCR genotyping assay for canine progressive rod-cone degeneration and mutant allele frequency in Toy Poodles, Chihuahuas and Miniature Dachshunds in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohyama, Moeko; Tada, Naomi; Mitsui, Hiroko; Tomioka, Hitomi; Tsutsui, Toshihiko; Yabuki, Akira; Rahman, Mohammad Mahbubur; Kushida, Kazuya; Mizukami, Keijiro; Yamato, Osamu

    2016-03-01

    Canine progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD) is a middle- to late-onset, autosomal recessive, inherited retinal disorder caused by a substitution (c.5G>A) in the canine PRCD gene that has been identified in 29 or more purebred dogs. In the present study, a TaqMan probe-based real-time PCR assay was developed and evaluated for rapid genotyping and large-scale screening of the mutation. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of the three most popular breeds in Japan (Toy Poodles, Chihuahuas and Miniature Dachshunds) to determine the current mutant allele frequency. The assay separated all the genotypes of canine PRCD rapidly, indicating its suitability for large-scale surveys. The results of the survey showed that the mutant allele frequency in Toy Poodles was high enough (approximately 0.09) to allow the establishment of measures for the prevention and control of this disorder in breeding kennels. The mutant allele was detected in Chihuahuas for the first time, but the frequency was lower (approximately 0.02) than that in Toy Poodles. The mutant allele was not detected in Miniature Dachshunds. This assay will allow the selective breeding of dogs from the two most popular breeds (Toy Poodle and Chihuahua) in Japan and effective prevention or control of the disorder.

  20. Rapid genotyping assays for the 4-base pair deletion of canine MDR1/ABCB1 gene and low frequency of the mutant allele in Border Collie dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Chang, Hye-Sook; Yabuki, Akira; Kawamichi, Takuji; Hossain, Mohammad A; Rahman, Mohammad M; Uddin, Mohammad M; Yamato, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    P-glycoprotein, encoded by the MDR1 or ABCB1 gene, is an integral component of the blood-brain barrier as an efflux pump for xenobiotics crucial in limiting drug uptake into the central nervous system. Dogs homozygous for a 4-base pair deletion of the canine MDR1 gene show altered expression or function of P-glycoprotein, resulting in neurotoxicosis after administration of the substrate drugs. In the present study, the usefulness of microchip electrophoresis for genotyping assays detecting this deletion mutation was evaluated. Mutagenically separated polymerase chain reaction (MS-PCR) and real-time PCR assays were newly developed and evaluated. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of Border Collies dogs in Japan to determine the allele frequency in this breed. Microchip electrophoresis showed advantages in detection sensitivity and time saving over other modes of electrophoresis. The MS-PCR assay clearly discriminated all genotypes. Real-time PCR assay was most suitable for a large-scale survey due to its high throughput and rapidity. The genotyping survey demonstrated that the carrier and mutant allele frequencies were 0.49% and 0.25%, respectively, suggesting that the mutant allele frequency in Border Collies is markedly low compared to that in the susceptible dog breeds such as rough and smooth Collies.

  1. Macronutrient Intake-Associated FGF21 Genotype Modifies Effects of Weight-Loss Diets on 2-Year Changes of Central Adiposity and Body Composition: The POUNDS Lost Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heianza, Yoriko; Ma, Wenjie; Huang, Tao; Wang, Tiange; Zheng, Yan; Smith, Steven R; Bray, George A; Sacks, Frank M; Qi, Lu

    2016-11-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is involved in the regulation of energy balance and adipose metabolism. Our previous genome-wide association study identified genetic variants in the FGF21 region associated with macronutrient intake preference. We investigated whether the FGF21 genotype modified effects of weight-loss diets varying in macronutrient intake on changes in adiposity in a 2-year randomized diet intervention trial. We genotyped FGF21 rs838147 in 715 overweight or obese individuals who were assigned to one of four diets varying in macronutrient contents. A DEXA scan was performed to evaluate body composition. We observed a significant interaction between the FGF21 genotype and carbohydrate/fat intake on 2-year changes in waist circumference (WC), percentage of total fat mass, and percentage of trunk fat (P = 0.049, P = 0.001, and P = 0.003 for interaction, respectively). In response to the low-carbohydrate/high-fat diet, carrying the carbohydrate intake-decreasing C allele of rs838147 was marginally associated with less reduction in WC (P = 0.08) and significantly associated with less reduction of total fat mass (P = 0.01) and trunk fat (P = 0.02). Opposite genetic associations with these outcomes were observed among the high-carbohydrate/low-fat diet group; carrying the C allele was associated with a greater reduction of WC, total body fat mass, and trunk fat. Our data suggest that FGF21 genotypes may interact with dietary carbohydrate/fat intake on changes in central adiposity and body fat composition. A low-calorie, high-carbohydrate/low-fat diet was beneficial for overweight or obese individuals carrying the carbohydrate intake-decreasing allele of the FGF21 variant to improve body composition and abdominal obesity. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  2. Human Leukocyte Antigen Class II Alleles (DQB1 and DRB1 as Predictors for Response to Interferon Therapy in HCV Genotype 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfat Shaker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigens class II play an important role in immune response against HCV. We investigated whether HLA class II alleles influence susceptibility to HCV infection and response to interferon therapy. HLA-DRB1 and -DQB1 loci were genotyped using PCR-SSO Luminex technology. According to our regimen, 41 (66% of patients achieved sustained virological response to combined treatment of IFN and ribavirin. Frequencies of DQB1*0313 allele and DRB1*04-DRB1*11, DQB1*0204-DQB1*0313, DQB1*0309-DQB1*0313, and DQB1*0313-DQB1*0319 haplotypes were significantly more frequent in nonresponders than in responders. In contrast, DQB1*02, DQB1*06, DRB1*13, and DRB1*15 alleles were significantly more frequent in responders than in nonresponders. Similarly, DRB1*1301, DRB1*1361, and DRB1*1369 alleles and DRB1*1301-DRB1*1328, DRB1*1301-DRB1*1361, DRB1*1301-DRB1*1369, DRB1*1328-DRB1*1361, and DRB1*1328-DRB1*1369 haplotypes were significantly found only in responders. Some alleles and linkages showed significantly different distributions between patient and healthy groups. These alleles may be used as predictors for response to treatment or to susceptibility to HCV infection in the Egyptian population.

  3. Impact of QTL minor allele frequency on genomic evaluation using real genotype data and simulated phenotypes in Japanese Black cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemoto, Yoshinobu; Sasaki, Shinji; Kojima, Takatoshi; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Watanabe, Toshio

    2015-11-19

    Genetic variance that is not captured by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is due to imperfect linkage disequilibrium (LD) between SNPs and quantitative trait loci (QTLs), and the extent of LD between SNPs and QTLs depends on different minor allele frequencies (MAF) between them. To evaluate the impact of MAF of QTLs on genomic evaluation, we performed a simulation study using real cattle genotype data. In total, 1368 Japanese Black cattle and 592,034 SNPs (Illumina BovineHD BeadChip) were used. We simulated phenotypes using real genotypes under different scenarios, varying the MAF categories, QTL heritability, number of QTLs, and distribution of QTL effect. After generating true breeding values and phenotypes, QTL heritability was estimated and the prediction accuracy of genomic estimated breeding value (GEBV) was assessed under different SNP densities, prediction models, and population size by a reference-test validation design. The extent of LD between SNPs and QTLs in this population was higher in the QTLs with high MAF than in those with low MAF. The effect of MAF of QTLs depended on the genetic architecture, evaluation strategy, and population size in genomic evaluation. In genetic architecture, genomic evaluation was affected by the MAF of QTLs combined with the QTL heritability and the distribution of QTL effect. The number of QTL was not affected on genomic evaluation if the number of QTL was more than 50. In the evaluation strategy, we showed that different SNP densities and prediction models affect the heritability estimation and genomic prediction and that this depends on the MAF of QTLs. In addition, accurate QTL heritability and GEBV were obtained using denser SNP information and the prediction model accounted for the SNPs with low and high MAFs. In population size, a large sample size is needed to increase the accuracy of GEBV. The MAF of QTL had an impact on heritability estimation and prediction accuracy. Most genetic variance can be captured

  4. Novel procedure for genotyping of the human serotonin transporter gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR)--a region with a high level of allele diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik B; Werge, Thomas M

    2007-01-01

    determination. After having developed a 5-HTTLPR genotyping assay, we examined all samples of DNA in two separate rounds of analyses and found complete agreement between the results from these two rounds. CONCLUSION: On the basis of simultaneous analysis of tandem repeat size variation and variation of single......BACKGROUND: The serotonin transporter, the target of a group of antidepressant drugs, is involved in the regulation of the availability and reuptake of serotonin. A variable number of tandem repeats in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene, designated 5-HTTLPR, affects...... for detailed genotyping of 5-HTTLPR based upon simultaneous analysis of tandem repeat size variation and single nucleotide variations. METHODS: We elaborated a list of all known 5-HTTLPR alleles to provide an overview of the allele repertoire at this polymorphic locus. Fragments of 5-HTTLPR were PCR...

  5. Enhanced specificity of TPMT*2 genotyping using unidirectional wild-type and mutant allele-specific scorpion primers in a single tube.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Chen

    Full Text Available Genotyping of thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT is recommended for predicting the adverse drug response of thiopurines. In the current study, a novel version of allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR, termed competitive real-time fluorescent AS-PCR (CRAS-PCR was developed to analyze the TPMT*2 genotype in ethnic Chinese. This technique simultaneously uses wild-type and mutant allele-specific scorpion primers in a single reaction. To determine the optimal conditions for both traditional AS-PCR and CRAS-PCR, we used the Taguchi method, an engineering optimization process that balances the concentrations of all components using an orthogonal array rather than a factorial array. Instead of running up to 264 experiments with the conventional factorial method, the Taguchi method achieved the same optimization using only 16 experiments. The optimized CRAS-PCR system completely avoided non-specific amplification occurring in traditional AS-PCR and could be performed at much more relaxed reaction conditions at 1% sensitivity, similar to traditional AS-PCR. TPMT*2 genotyping of 240 clinical samples was consistent with published data. In conclusion, CRAS-PCR is a novel and robust genotyping method, and the Taguchi method is an effective tool for the optimization of molecular analysis techniques.

  6. A Theoretical Framework for Association Studies in F2 Family Pools Using Allele Frequencies from Genotyping-By-Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janss, Luc L; Ashraf, Bilal H; Greve-Pedersen, Morten

    a sequencing approach to obtain Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) frequencies is considered here. In this work we develop the theoretical framework to perform association studies using allele frequencies from such F2 family pools. We show that expected allele frequencies in the F2 families will have...

  7. Marker-Assisted Selection for Recognizing Wheat Mutant Genotypes Carrying HMW Glutenin Alleles Related to Baking Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Zamani, Mohammad Javad; Bihamta, Mohammad Reza; Naserian Khiabani, Behnam; Tahernezhad, Zahra; Hallajian, Mohammad Taher; Shamsi, Marzieh Varasteh

    2014-01-01

    Allelic diversity of HMW glutenin loci in several studies revealed that allelic combinations affect dough quality. Dx5 + Dy10 subunits are related to good baking quality and Dx2 + Dy12 are related to undesirable baking quality. One of the most regular methods to evaluate the baking quality is SDS-PAGE which is used to improve baking quality labs. Marker-assisted selection is the method which can recognize the alleles related to baking quality and this method is based on polymerase chain reac...

  8. Are men carrying the apolipoprotein epsilon 4- or epsilon 2 allele less fertile than epsilon 3 epsilon 3 genotypes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Lars Ulrik; Gerdes, C; Hansen, P S

    1996-01-01

    may affect reproductive efficiency, and we therefore compared the distributions of 40-year-old married men with known genotypes by the numbers of their biological children. The distributions were statistically significantly different (P = 0.0026). On average, men with the epsilon 3 epsilon 3 genotype....... These findings are unlikely to be due to gross error in the reported prevalence of childlessness, differences in socioeconomic status or other likely sources of bias. They are compatible with higher fertility in men with the epsilon 3 epsilon 3 genotype than in those with the other common apoE genotypes....

  9. Novel rapid genotyping assays for neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in Border Collie dogs and high frequency of the mutant allele in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Chang, Hye-Sook; Yabuki, Akira; Kawamichi, Takuji; Kawahara, Natsuko; Hayashi, Daisuke; Hossain, Mohammad A; Rahman, Mohammad M; Uddin, Mohammad M; Yamato, Osamu

    2011-11-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) constitutes a group of recessively inherited lysosomal storage diseases that primarily affect neuronal cells. Such diseases share certain clinical and pathologic features in human beings and animals. Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in Border Collie dogs was first detected in Australia in the 1980s, and the pathogenic mutation was shown to be a nonsense mutation (c.619C>T) in exon 4 in canine CLN5 gene. In the present study, novel rapid genotyping assays including polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism, PCR primer-induced restriction analysis, mutagenically separated PCR, and real-time PCR with TaqMan minor groove binder probes, were developed. The utility of microchip electrophoresis was also evaluated. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of Border Collies in Japan using these assays to determine the current allele frequency in Japan, providing information to control and prevent this disease in the next stage. All assays developed in the current study are available to discriminate these genotypes, and microchip electrophoresis showed a timesaving advantage over agarose gel electrophoresis. Of all assays, real-time PCR was the most suitable for large-scale examination because of its high throughput. The genotyping survey demonstrated that the carrier frequency was 8.1%. This finding suggested that the mutant allele frequency of NCL in Border Collies is high enough in Japan that measures to control and prevent the disease would be warranted. The genotyping assays developed in the present study could contribute to the prevention of NCL in Border Collies.

  10. Prion protein genotype survey confirms low frequency of scrapie-resistant K222 allele in British goat herds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldmann, W.; Stewart, P.; Marier, E.; Konold, T.; Street, S.; Windl, O.; Ortiz-Pelaez, A.; Langeveld, J.

    2016-01-01

    Scrapie in goats is a transmissible, fatal prion disease, which is endemic in the British goat population. The recent success in defining caprine PRNP gene variants that provide resistance to experimental and natural classical scrapie has prompted the authors to conduct a survey of PRNP genotypes

  11. Use of allele-specific FAIRE to determine functional regulatory polymorphism using large-scale genotyping arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Frank Andrew; Howard, Philip; Shah, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    Following the widespread use of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), focus is turning towards identification of causal variants rather than simply genetic markers of diseases and traits. As a step towards a high-throughput method to identify genome-wide, non-coding, functional regulatory...... discrimination. Examination of this SNP in two prospective Caucasian cohorts comprising 15,000 individuals confirmed the association with HDL-C levels (combined beta = 0.016; p = 0.0006), and analysis of gene expression identified an allelic association with LXR-α expression in heart tissue. Using increasingly...

  12. Evaluation of PRNP Expression Based on Genotypes and Alleles of Two Indel Loci in the Medulla Oblongata of Japanese Black and Japanese Brown Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msalya, George; Shimogiri, Takeshi; Ohno, Shotaro; Okamoto, Shin; Kawabe, Kotaro; Minezawa, Mitsuru; Maeda, Yoshizane

    2011-01-01

    Background Prion protein (PrP) level plays the central role in bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) susceptibility. Increasing the level of PrP decreases incubation period for this disease. Therefore, studying the expression of the cellular PrP or at least the messenger RNA might be used in selection for preventing the propagation of BSE and other prion diseases. Two insertion/deletion (indel) variations have been tentatively associated with susceptibility/resistance of cattle to classical BSE. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied the expression of each genotype at the two indel sites in Japanese Black (JB) and Japanese Brown (JBr) cattle breeds by a standard curve method of real-time PCR. Five diplotypes subdivided into two categories were selected from each breed. The two cattle breeds were considered differently. Expression of PRNP was significantly (p0.05). Conclusion Our results suggest that the del/del genotype or at least its del allele may modulate the expression of PRNP at the 23-bp locus in the medulla oblongata of these cattle breeds. PMID:21611160

  13. Homozygosity for HLA group 2 alleles predicts treatment failure with interferon-α and ribavirin in chronic hepatitis C virus genotype 1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collison, Meadhbh; Chin, Jun Liong; Abu Shanab, Ahmed; Mac Nicholas, Ross; Segurado, Ricardo; Coughlan, Suzie; Connell, Jeff; Carr, Michael J; Merriman, Raphael B; McCormick, P Aiden; Hall, William W

    2015-02-01

    Host genetic factors influence treatment responses to antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We retrospectively investigated associations between host genetic markers and treatment-induced virologic responses to dual therapy with interferon-α and ribavirin in chronically infected HCV genotype 1 (g1)- and genotype 3 (g3)-infected individuals. A total of 171 patients (89 HCV g1 and 82 HCV g3 infected) were investigated for genetic markers influencing treatment-induced sustained virologic response (SVR). Overall, SVR was observed for 46/89 (52%) HCV g1- and 57/82 (70%) HCV g3-infected patients. Of the 4 interleukin 28B (IL28B) single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs12979860 was the host genetic marker most significantly associated with failure to achieve an SVR in HCV g1-infected individuals [P=3.83×10(-4); odds ratio (OR)=5.61; confidence interval (CI)=2.07-15.18] and gave a positive predictive value for treatment failure of 81.3% for minor homozygotes (TT). Using additive (P=3.54×10(-4)) and dominant models (P=3.83×10(-4)), a dosage effect of the T allele was observed, with the dominance term not significant for this SNP. Logistic regression showed an association between HLA-C1/C1 and rapid virologic response in HCV g1 infections with an OR relative to the heterozygote of 10.0 (95% CI: 1.6-62.5, P=0.014). HLA-C2 homozygosity was a significant predictor of nonresponse to treatment in HCV g1-infected individuals (P=0.023).

  14. Assessment of the myostatin Q204X allele using an allelic discrimination assay

    OpenAIRE

    Sifuentes-Rincón,Ana M.; Puentes-Montiel,Herlinda E.; Moreno-Medina,Víctor R.; Rosa-Reyna,Xóchitl F. de la

    2006-01-01

    An allelic discrimination assay was designed and used to determine the genotypic and allelic frequencies of the myostatin (MSTN) gene Q204X allele from two Mexican Full-French herds. The assay is a simple high throughput genotyping method that could be applied to investigate the effect of the Q204X allele on the Charolais breed.

  15. Towards a molecular taxonomic key of the Aurantioideae subfamily using chloroplastic SNP diagnostic markers of the main clades genotyped by competitive allele-specific PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oueslati, Amel; Ollitrault, Frederique; Baraket, Ghada; Salhi-Hannachi, Amel; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2016-08-18

    Chloroplast DNA is a primary source of molecular variations for phylogenetic analysis of photosynthetic eukaryotes. However, the sequencing and analysis of multiple chloroplastic regions is difficult to apply to large collections or large samples of natural populations. The objective of our work was to demonstrate that a molecular taxonomic key based on easy, scalable and low-cost genotyping method should be developed from a set of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) diagnostic of well-established clades. It was applied to the Aurantioideae subfamily, the largest group of the Rutaceae family that includes the cultivated citrus species. The publicly available nucleotide sequences of eight plastid genomic regions were compared for 79 accessions of the Aurantioideae subfamily to search for SNPs revealing taxonomic differentiation at the inter-tribe, inter-subtribe, inter-genus and interspecific levels. Diagnostic SNPs (DSNPs) were found for 46 of the 54 clade levels analysed. Forty DSNPs were selected to develop KASPar markers and their taxonomic value was tested by genotyping 108 accessions of the Aurantioideae subfamily. Twenty-seven markers diagnostic of 24 clades were validated and they displayed a very high rate of transferability in the Aurantioideae subfamily (only 1.2 % of missing data on average). The UPGMA from the validated markers produced a cladistic organisation that was highly coherent with the previous phylogenetic analysis based on the sequence data of the eight plasmid regions. In particular, the monophyletic origin of the "true citrus" genera plus Oxanthera was validated. However, some clarification remains necessary regarding the organisation of the other wild species of the Citreae tribe. We validated the concept that with well-established clades, DSNPs can be selected and efficiently transformed into competitive allele-specific PCR markers (KASPar method) allowing cost-effective highly efficient cladistic analysis in large collections at

  16. Sequence-Based Genotyping of Expressed Swine Leukocyte Antigen Class I Alleles by Next-Generation Sequencing Reveal Novel Swine Leukocyte Antigen Class I Haplotypes and Alleles in Belgian, Danish, and Kenyan Fattening Pigs and Göttingen Minipigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Maria Rathmann; Ilsøe, Mette; Strube, Mikael Lenz

    2017-01-01

    for the prediction of epitope binding in pigs. The low number of known SLA class I alleles and the limited knowledge of their prevalence in different pig breeds emphasizes the need for efficient SLA typing methods. This study utilizes an SLA class I-typing method based on next-generation sequencing of barcoded PCR...

  17. Allele coding in genomic evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Standen, Ismo; Christensen, Ole Fredslund

    2011-01-01

    Genomic data are used in animal breeding to assist genetic evaluation. Several models to estimate genomic breeding values have been studied. In general, two approaches have been used. One approach estimates the marker effects first and then, genomic breeding values are obtained by summing marker...... effects. In the second approach, genomic breeding values are estimated directly using an equivalent model with a genomic relationship matrix. Allele coding is the method chosen to assign values to the regression coefficients in the statistical model. A common allele coding is zero for the homozygous...... genotype of the first allele, one for the heterozygote, and two for the homozygous genotype for the other allele. Another common allele coding changes these regression coefficients by subtracting a value from each marker such that the mean of regression coefficients is zero within each marker. We call...

  18. Genotyping of the 19-bp insertion/deletion polymorphism in the 5' flank of beta-hydroxylase gene by dissociation analysis of allele-specific PCR products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Werge, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The 19-bp insertion/deletion polymorphism in the 5' flank of the dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) gene has been associated with psychiatric disorders. We have developed a simple, reliable and inexpensive closed-tube assay for genotyping of this polymorphism based upon T(m) determination of amplified...... and a conventional approach based upon agarose gel electrophoresis of amplified fragments revealed complete concordance between the two procedures. The insights obtained in this study may be utilized to develop assays based upon dissociation analysis of PCR products for genotyping of other insertion...

  19. Real-time PCR genotyping assay for canine progressive rod-cone degeneration and mutant allele frequency in Toy Poodles, Chihuahuas and Miniature Dachshunds in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    KOHYAMA, Moeko; TADA, Naomi; MITSUI, Hiroko; TOMIOKA, Hitomi; TSUTSUI, Toshihiko; YABUKI, Akira; RAHMAN, Mohammad Mahbubur; KUSHIDA, Kazuya; MIZUKAMI, Keijiro; YAMATO, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Canine progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD) is a middle- to late-onset, autosomal recessive, inherited retinal disorder caused by a substitution (c.5G>A) in the canine PRCD gene that has been identified in 29 or more purebred dogs. In the present study, a TaqMan probe-based real-time PCR assay was developed and evaluated for rapid genotyping and large-scale screening of the mutation. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of the three most popular breeds in Japan...

  20. Genotyping of a tri-allelic polymorphism by a novel melting curve assay in MTHFD1L: an association study of nonsyndromic Cleft in Ireland

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Minguzzi, Stefano

    2012-04-20

    AbstractBackgroundPolymorphisms within the MTHFD1L gene were previously associated with risk of neural tube defects in Ireland. We sought to test the most significant MTHFD1L polymorphisms for an association with risk of cleft in an Irish cohort. This required the development of a new melting curve assay to genotype the technically challenging MTHFD1L triallelic deletion\\/insertion polymorphism (rs3832406).MethodsMelting curve analysis was used to genotype the MTHFD1L triallelic deletion\\/insertion polymorphism (rs3832406) and a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism rs17080476 in an Irish cohort consisting of 981 Irish case-parent trios and 1,008 controls. Tests for association with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate and cleft palate included case\\/control analysis, mother\\/control analysis and Transmission Disequilibrium Tests of case-parent trios.ResultsA successful melting curve genotyping assay was developed for the deletion\\/insertion polymorphism (rs3832406). The TDT analysis initially showed that the rs3832406 polymorphism was associated with isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate. However, corrected p-values indicated that this association was not significant.ConclusionsMelting Curve Analysis can be employed to successfully genotype challenging polymorphisms such as the MTHFD1L triallelic deletion\\/insertion polymorphism (DIP) reported here (rs3832406) and is a viable alternative to capillary electrophoresis. Corrected p-values indicate no association between MTHFD1L and risk of cleft in an Irish cohort.

  1. Resting-State Brain and the FTO Obesity Risk Allele: Default Mode, Sensorimotor, and Salience Network Connectivity Underlying Different Somatosensory Integration and Reward Processing between Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivo, Gaia; Wiemerslage, Lyle; Nilsson, Emil K; Solstrand Dahlberg, Linda; Larsen, Anna L; Olaya Búcaro, Marcela; Gustafsson, Veronica P; Titova, Olga E; Bandstein, Marcus; Larsson, Elna-Marie; Benedict, Christian; Brooks, Samantha J; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2016-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) gene are linked to obesity, but how these SNPs influence resting-state neural activation is unknown. Few brain-imaging studies have investigated the influence of obesity-related SNPs on neural activity, and no study has investigated resting-state connectivity patterns. We tested connectivity within three, main resting-state networks: default mode (DMN), sensorimotor (SMN), and salience network (SN) in 30 male participants, grouped based on genotype for the rs9939609 FTO SNP, as well as punishment and reward sensitivity measured by the Behavioral Inhibition (BIS) and Behavioral Activation System (BAS) questionnaires. Because obesity is associated with anomalies in both systems, we calculated a BIS/BAS ratio (BBr) accounting for features of both scores. A prominence of BIS over BAS (higher BBr) resulted in increased connectivity in frontal and paralimbic regions. These alterations were more evident in the obesity-associated AA genotype, where a high BBr was also associated with increased SN connectivity in dopaminergic circuitries, and in a subnetwork involved in somatosensory integration regarding food. Participants with AA genotype and high BBr, compared to corresponding participants in the TT genotype, also showed greater DMN connectivity in regions involved in the processing of food cues, and in the SMN for regions involved in visceral perception and reward-based learning. These findings suggest that neural connectivity patterns influence the sensitivity toward punishment and reward more closely in the AA carriers, predisposing them to developing obesity. Our work explains a complex interaction between genetics, neural patterns, and behavioral measures in determining the risk for obesity and may help develop individually-tailored strategies for obesity prevention.

  2. Lost P1 allele in sh2 sweet corn: quantitative effects of p1 and a1 genes on concentrations of maysin, apimaysin, methoxymaysin, and chlorogenic acid in maize silk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, B Z; Zhang, Z J; Butrón, A; Widstrom, N W; Snook, M E; Lynch, R E; Plaisted, D

    2004-12-01

    In the United States, insecticide is used extensively in the production of sweet corn due to consumer demand for zero damage to ears and to a sweet corn genetic base with little or no resistance to ear-feeding insects. Growers in the southern United States depend on scheduled pesticide applications to control ear-feeding insects. In a study of quantitative genetic control over silk maysin, AM-maysin (apimaysin and methoxymaysin), and chlorogenic acid contents in an F2 population derived from GE37 (dent corn, P1A1) and 565 (sh2 sweet corn, p1a1), we demonstrate that the P1 allele from field corn, which was selected against in the development of sweet corn, has a strong epistatic interaction with the a1 allele in sh2 sweet corn. We detected that the p1 gene has significant effects (P silk maysin concentrations but also on AM-maysin, and chlorogenic acid concentrations. The a1 gene also has significant (P silk antibiotic chemicals. Successful selection from the fourth and fifth selfed backcrosses for high-maysin individuals of sweet corn homozygous for the recessive a1 allele (tightly linked to sh2) and the dominant P1 allele has been demonstrated. These selected lines have much higher (2 to 3 times) concentrations of silk maysin and other chemicals (AM-maysin and chlorogenic acid) than the donor parent GE37 and could enhance sweet corn resistance to corn earworm and reduce the number of applications of insecticide required to produce sweet corn.

  3. Rapid identification of tomato Sw-5 resistance-breaking isolates of Tomato spotted wilt virus using high resolution melting and TaqMan SNP Genotyping assays as allelic discrimination techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina di Rienzo

    Full Text Available In tomato, resistance to Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV is conferred by the dominant gene, designated Sw-5. Virulent Sw-5 resistance breaking (SRB mutants of TSWV have been reported on Sw-5 tomato cultivars. Two different PCR-based allelic discrimination techniques, namely Custom TaqMan™ SNP Genotyping and high-resolution melting (HRM assays, were developed and compared for their ability to distinguish between avirulent (Sw-5 non-infecting, SNI and SRB biotypes. TaqMan assays proved to be more sensitive (threshold of detection in a range of 50-70 TSWV RNA copies and more reliable than HRM, assigning 25 TSWV isolates to their correct genotype with an accuracy of 100%. Moreover, the TaqMan SNP assays were further improved developing a rapid and simple protocol that included crude leaf extraction for RNA template preparations. On the other hand, HRM assays showed higher levels of sensitivity than TaqMan when used to co-detect both biotypes in different artificial mixtures. These diagnostic assays contributed to gain preliminary information on the epidemiology of TSWV isolates in open field conditions. In fact, the presented data suggest that SRB isolates are present as stable populations established year round, persisting on both winter (globe artichoke and summer (tomato crops, in the same cultivated areas of Southern Italy.

  4. Allele coding in genomic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christensen Ole F

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic data are used in animal breeding to assist genetic evaluation. Several models to estimate genomic breeding values have been studied. In general, two approaches have been used. One approach estimates the marker effects first and then, genomic breeding values are obtained by summing marker effects. In the second approach, genomic breeding values are estimated directly using an equivalent model with a genomic relationship matrix. Allele coding is the method chosen to assign values to the regression coefficients in the statistical model. A common allele coding is zero for the homozygous genotype of the first allele, one for the heterozygote, and two for the homozygous genotype for the other allele. Another common allele coding changes these regression coefficients by subtracting a value from each marker such that the mean of regression coefficients is zero within each marker. We call this centered allele coding. This study considered effects of different allele coding methods on inference. Both marker-based and equivalent models were considered, and restricted maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods were used in inference. Results Theoretical derivations showed that parameter estimates and estimated marker effects in marker-based models are the same irrespective of the allele coding, provided that the model has a fixed general mean. For the equivalent models, the same results hold, even though different allele coding methods lead to different genomic relationship matrices. Calculated genomic breeding values are independent of allele coding when the estimate of the general mean is included into the values. Reliabilities of estimated genomic breeding values calculated using elements of the inverse of the coefficient matrix depend on the allele coding because different allele coding methods imply different models. Finally, allele coding affects the mixing of Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms, with the centered coding being

  5. Phenotype-genotype variability in the human CYP3A locus as assessed by the probe drug quinine and analyses of variant CYP3A4 alleles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Antona, Cristina; Sayi, Jane G.; Gustafsson, Lars L.; Bertilsson, Leif; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2005-01-01

    The human cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) enzymes, which metabolize 50% of currently used therapeutic drugs, exhibit great interindividual differences in activity that have a major impact on drug treatment outcome, but hitherto no genetic background importantly contributing to this variation has been identified. In this study we show that CYP3A4 mRNA and hnRNA contents with a few exceptions vary in parallel in human liver, suggesting that mechanisms affecting CYP3A4 transcription, such as promoter polymorphisms, are relevant for interindividual differences in CYP3A4 expression. Tanzanian (n = 143) healthy volunteers were phenotyped using quinine as a CYP3A probe and the results were used for association studies with CYP3A4 genotypes. Carriers of CYP3A4*1B had a significantly lower activity than those with CYP3A4*1 whereas no differences were seen for five other SNPs investigated. Nuclear proteins from the B16A2 hepatoma cells were found to bind with less affinity to the CYP3A4*1B element around -392 bp as compared to CYP3A4*1. The data indicate the existence of a genetic CYP3A4 polymorphism with functional importance for interindividual differences in enzyme expression

  6. Comparison of Direct Sequencing, Real-Time PCR-High Resolution Melt (PCR-HRM) and PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) Analysis for Genotyping of Common Thiopurine Intolerant Variant Alleles NUDT15 c.415C>T and TPMT c.719A>G (TPMT*3C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Wai-Ying; Ho, Chi-Chun; Poon, Wing-Tat

    2017-05-12

    Thiopurine intolerance and treatment-related toxicity, such as fatal myelosuppression, is related to non-function genetic variants encoding thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) and Nudix hydrolase 15 (NUDT15). Genetic testing of the common variants NUDT15:NM_018283.2:c.415C>T (Arg139Cys, dbSNP rs116855232 T allele) and TPMT: NM_000367.4:c.719A>G (TPMT*3C, dbSNP rs1142345 G allele) in East Asians including Chinese can potentially prevent treatment-related complications. Two complementary genotyping approaches, real-time PCR-high resolution melt (PCR-HRM) and PCR-restriction fragment length morphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis were evaluated using conventional PCR and Sanger sequencing genotyping as the gold standard. Sixty patient samples were tested, revealing seven patients (11.7%) heterozygous for NUDT15 c.415C>T, one patient homozygous for the variant and one patient heterozygous for the TPMT*3C non-function allele. No patient was found to harbor both variants. In total, nine out of 60 (15%) patients tested had genotypic evidence of thiopurine intolerance, which may require dosage adjustment or alternative medication should they be started on azathioprine, mercaptopurine or thioguanine. The two newly developed assays were more efficient and showed complete concordance (60/60, 100%) compared to the Sanger sequencing results. Accurate and cost-effective genotyping assays by real-time PCR-HRM and PCR-RFLP for NUDT15 c.415C>T and TPMT*3C were successfully developed. Further studies may establish their roles in genotype-informed clinical decision-making in the prevention of morbidity and mortality due to thiopurine intolerance.

  7. allelic variation of hmw glutenin subunits of ethiopian bread wheat

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    journal

    High molecular weight glutenins are often effective in identifying wheat (Triticum ... There were highly significant differences between genotypes and banding ... was without deliberate selection pressure towards high Glu-1 scoring alleles ...

  8. Estimating and testing the effect of allelic recombination on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-01-21

    Jan 21, 2011 ... The significance of the correlation coefficient as well as the fitted regression model was obtained using. Analysis of Variance method. Key words: Allele, genotype, regression, correlation, F-ratio, analysis of variance. INTRODUCTION .... while if the allelic replacement is being made on an Aa individual the ...

  9. Apolipoprotein E4 allele does not influence serum triglyceride ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated how the APOε4 allele affects the serum triglyceride response after a fatmeal in apparently healthy black South African young adults. Sixty students were successfully screened for APOE genotype using Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) and were divided into four groups; the ε2 allele ...

  10. Discovery of novel variants in genotyping arrays improves genotype retention and reduces ascertainment bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didion John P

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-density genotyping arrays that measure hybridization of genomic DNA fragments to allele-specific oligonucleotide probes are widely used to genotype single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in genetic studies, including human genome-wide association studies. Hybridization intensities are converted to genotype calls by clustering algorithms that assign each sample to a genotype class at each SNP. Data for SNP probes that do not conform to the expected pattern of clustering are often discarded, contributing to ascertainment bias and resulting in lost information - as much as 50% in a recent genome-wide association study in dogs. Results We identified atypical patterns of hybridization intensities that were highly reproducible and demonstrated that these patterns represent genetic variants that were not accounted for in the design of the array platform. We characterized variable intensity oligonucleotide (VINO probes that display such patterns and are found in all hybridization-based genotyping platforms, including those developed for human, dog, cattle, and mouse. When recognized and properly interpreted, VINOs recovered a substantial fraction of discarded probes and counteracted SNP ascertainment bias. We developed software (MouseDivGeno that identifies VINOs and improves the accuracy of genotype calling. MouseDivGeno produced highly concordant genotype calls when compared with other methods but it uniquely identified more than 786000 VINOs in 351 mouse samples. We used whole-genome sequence from 14 mouse strains to confirm the presence of novel variants explaining 28000 VINOs in those strains. We also identified VINOs in human HapMap 3 samples, many of which were specific to an African population. Incorporating VINOs in phylogenetic analyses substantially improved the accuracy of a Mus species tree and local haplotype assignment in laboratory mouse strains. Conclusion The problems of ascertainment bias and missing

  11. Lost in Location

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Koefoed

    2009-01-01

    traversed. While becoming destination aware, the individual loses her location awareness. The article proposes that the reason people get lost when using sat-nav is due to a wrong location-performative paradigm. As an alternative, the article introduces and analyzes two performance-related examples...... that illustrate an alternative location-performative paradigm: Meredith Warner's Lost/Found knitting series and Etter and Schecht's Melodious Walkabout. In both examples, the artist's hand becomes the intermediary between alien and location. Thus, by exploring how wayfinding can be a poetically situated...... performance, the article examines how the growing locative media industry can learn from the location-aware performative strategies employed by artists who create situated and urban performances for the curious participant. The academic frames employed in the analysis draw on psychogeography, site...

  12. Assigning breed origin to alleles in crossbred animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenplas, Jérémie; Calus, Mario P L; Sevillano, Claudia A; Windig, Jack J; Bastiaansen, John W M

    2016-08-22

    For some species, animal production systems are based on the use of crossbreeding to take advantage of the increased performance of crossbred compared to purebred animals. Effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may differ between purebred and crossbred animals for several reasons: (1) differences in linkage disequilibrium between SNP alleles and a quantitative trait locus; (2) differences in genetic backgrounds (e.g., dominance and epistatic interactions); and (3) differences in environmental conditions, which result in genotype-by-environment interactions. Thus, SNP effects may be breed-specific, which has led to the development of genomic evaluations for crossbred performance that take such effects into account. However, to estimate breed-specific effects, it is necessary to know breed origin of alleles in crossbred animals. Therefore, our aim was to develop an approach for assigning breed origin to alleles of crossbred animals (termed BOA) without information on pedigree and to study its accuracy by considering various factors, including distance between breeds. The BOA approach consists of: (1) phasing genotypes of purebred and crossbred animals; (2) assigning breed origin to phased haplotypes; and (3) assigning breed origin to alleles of crossbred animals based on a library of assigned haplotypes, the breed composition of crossbred animals, and their SNP genotypes. The accuracy of allele assignments was determined for simulated datasets that include crosses between closely-related, distantly-related and unrelated breeds. Across these scenarios, the percentage of alleles of a crossbred animal that were correctly assigned to their breed origin was greater than 90 %, and increased with increasing distance between breeds, while the percentage of incorrectly assigned alleles was always less than 2 %. For the remaining alleles, i.e. 0 to 10 % of all alleles of a crossbred animal, breed origin could not be assigned. The BOA approach accurately assigns

  13. QuASAR: quantitative allele-specific analysis of reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Chris T; Moyerbrailean, Gregory A; Davis, Gordon O; Wen, Xiaoquan; Luca, Francesca; Pique-Regi, Roger

    2015-04-15

    Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies have discovered thousands of genetic variants that regulate gene expression, enabling a better understanding of the functional role of non-coding sequences. However, eQTL studies are costly, requiring large sample sizes and genome-wide genotyping of each sample. In contrast, analysis of allele-specific expression (ASE) is becoming a popular approach to detect the effect of genetic variation on gene expression, even within a single individual. This is typically achieved by counting the number of RNA-seq reads matching each allele at heterozygous sites and testing the null hypothesis of a 1:1 allelic ratio. In principle, when genotype information is not readily available, it could be inferred from the RNA-seq reads directly. However, there are currently no existing methods that jointly infer genotypes and conduct ASE inference, while considering uncertainty in the genotype calls. We present QuASAR, quantitative allele-specific analysis of reads, a novel statistical learning method for jointly detecting heterozygous genotypes and inferring ASE. The proposed ASE inference step takes into consideration the uncertainty in the genotype calls, while including parameters that model base-call errors in sequencing and allelic over-dispersion. We validated our method with experimental data for which high-quality genotypes are available. Results for an additional dataset with multiple replicates at different sequencing depths demonstrate that QuASAR is a powerful tool for ASE analysis when genotypes are not available. http://github.com/piquelab/QuASAR. fluca@wayne.edu or rpique@wayne.edu Supplementary Material is available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Spotted phenotypes in horses lost attractiveness in the Middle Ages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wutke, Saskia; Benecke, Norbert; Sandoval-Castellanos, Edson

    2016-01-01

    were influenced by humans. Our results from genotype analyses show a significant increase in spotted coats in early domestic horses (Copper Age to Iron Age). In contrast, medieval horses carried significantly fewer alleles for these phenotypes, whereas solid phenotypes (i.e., chestnut) became dominant...

  15. Lost spoiler practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gürsimsek, Ödül; Drotner, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    narratives, and viewers through tracing, dismantling – and sometimes questioning – content in order to create coherent meanings in the maze of narratives. Online audiences, such as spoiler communities, may uncover components of transmedia storytelling, discuss their validity and enhance them with individual...... and documents that interactions between Lost audiences and producers operate as forms of social participation when spoiler-seeking audiences work to unravel, challenge and predict the narrative while the producers seek to orchestrate transmedia storytelling experiences. Our results serve as a sobering empirical...

  16. The Lost Guidewire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Shah

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 44-year-old female called 911 complaining of abdominal pain, but was unresponsive upon arrival by emergency medical services (EMS. She presented to the emergency department (ED as a full cardiac arrest and had return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and epinephrine. The patient had a splenic embolization 1 week prior to presentation. Bedside ultrasound demonstrated free fluid throughout the abdomen. As part of the resuscitation, femoral central venous access was obtained by the Emergency Department (ED physician, and a medical student was allowed to place a Cordis over the guidewire. The attending was next to the student, though became distracted when the patient again lost pulses. The student lost control of the guidewire upon re-initiation of CPR. Another Cordis was placed in the same location by the ED physician after the guidewire was seen on a chest radiograph. The patient was taken to the operating room with massive transfusion protocol, and the guidewire was left in the vena caval system until the patient could be stabilized. Two days later, interventional radiology removed the guidewire via a right internal jugular (IJ approach without complications. The patient had a prolonged and complicated course, but was discharged home two weeks later at her baseline. Significant findings: Initial chest radiograph shows a guidewire in the inferior vena cava (IVC, superior vena cava (SVC, and right IJ veins. Discussion: Central line complications include failure to place the catheter, improper catheter location, hemothorax from vascular injury, infection, arrhythmia, and cardiac arrest1. Complications from lost guidewires include cardiac dysrhythmias, cardiac conduction abnormalities, perforation of vessels/heart chambers, kinking/looping/knotting of the wire, entanglement of previously placed intravascular devices, breakage of the tip of the wire and subsequent embolization and

  17. amamutdb.no: A relational database for MAN2B1 allelic variants that compiles genotypes, clinical phenotypes, and biochemical and structural data of mutant MAN2B1 in α-mannosidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riise Stensland, Hilde Monica Frostad; Frantzen, Gabrio; Kuokkanen, Elina; Buvang, Elisabeth Kjeldsen; Klenow, Helle Bagterp; Heikinheimo, Pirkko; Malm, Dag; Nilssen, Øivind

    2015-06-01

    α-Mannosidosis is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the MAN2B1 gene, encoding lysosomal α-mannosidase. The disorder is characterized by a range of clinical phenotypes of which the major manifestations are mental impairment, hearing impairment, skeletal changes, and immunodeficiency. Here, we report an α-mannosidosis mutation database, amamutdb.no, which has been constructed as a publicly accessible online resource for recording and analyzing MAN2B1 variants (http://amamutdb.no). Our aim has been to offer structured and relational information on MAN2B1 mutations and genotypes along with associated clinical phenotypes. Classifying missense mutations, as pathogenic or benign, is a challenge. Therefore, they have been given special attention as we have compiled all available data that relate to their biochemical, functional, and structural properties. The α-mannosidosis mutation database is comprehensive and relational in the sense that information can be retrieved and compiled across datasets; hence, it will facilitate diagnostics and increase our understanding of the clinical and molecular aspects of α-mannosidosis. We believe that the amamutdb.no structure and architecture will be applicable for the development of databases for any monogenic disorder. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  18. Nostalgia and lost identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourtova, Elena

    2013-02-01

    Nostalgia for the Soviet Union is a major social phenomenon in Russia today due to the irrevocable losses of the recent past in which Soviet citizens involuntarily became immigrants in their own country. With reference to discussions of nostalgia in philosophical and psychoanalytic literature, I suggest that nostalgia may represent either a defensive regression to the past or a progressive striving for wholeness through re-connecting with what has been lost in the service of a greater integration. I compare this with the processes of adaptation seen in immigrants and provide a clinical illustration of a young man coming to terms with loss and change in the post-Soviet era. When nostalgia is recognized as a legitimate emotional experience it may facilitate mourning and enable the integration of the past with the present and the development of a new identity. © 2013, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  19. Lost in translation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granas, Anne Gerd; Nørgaard, Lotte Stig; Sporrong, Sofia Kälvemark

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The "Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire" (BMQ) assess balance of necessity and concern of medicines. The BMQ has been translated from English to many languages. However, the original meaning of statements, such as "My medicine is a mystery to me", may be lost in translation. The aim...... of this study is to compare three Scandinavian translations of the BMQ. (1) How reliable are the translations? (2) Are they still valid after translation? METHODS: Translated Norwegian, Swedish and Danish versions of the BMQ were scrutinized by three native Scandinavian researchers. Linguistic differences...... and ambiguities in the 5-point Likert scale and the BMQ statements were compared. RESULTS: In the Scandinavian translations, the Likert scale expanded beyond the original version at one endpoint (Swedish) or both endpoints (Danish). In the BMQ statements, discrepancies ranged from smaller inaccuracies toward...

  20. Lost in transformation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norlyk, Annelise; Haahr, Anita; Dreyer, Pia

    2017-01-01

    and values from evidence-based medicine are being lost in the transformation into the current evidence-based hospital culture which potentially leads to a McDonaldization of nursing practice reflected as ‘one best way’. We argue for reviving ethics of care perspectives in today’s evidence practice...... as the fundamental values of nursing may potentially bridge conflicts between evidence-based practice and the ideals of patient participation thus preventing a practice of ‘McNursing’. Key words: nursing practice, evidence-based practice, nursing theory, nursing theorists, ethics of care, hospital culture, patient......Drawing on our previous empirical research, we provide an exemplary narrative to illustrate how patients have experienced hospital care organized according to evidence-based fast-track programmes. The aim of this paper is to analyse and discuss if and how it is possible to include patients...

  1. [Analysis of allele dropout at TH01 locus in paternity testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Li; Shen, Xiao-li; Xue, Shi-jie; Hu, Jie

    2013-10-01

    To analyze allele dropout at TH01 locus in paternity testing in order to determine the accurate genotype. To use a two STR loci genotyping system to verify an abnormal genotype for the TH01 locus with PCR using specific primers, cloning and DNA sequencing. A rare allele at TH01 locus named 5.2, which was undetectable with PowerPlex 21 system, was detected with an Identifiler system. Genetic variations may result in rare alleles and loci loss. To avoid misjudgment, laboratories should have a variety of methods for detecting loci loss.

  2. RHD alleles in the Tunisian population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchari, Mouna; Jemni-Yaacoub, Saloua; Chakroun, Taher; Abdelkefi, Saida; Houissa, Batoul; Hmida, Slama

    2013-01-01

    Background: A comprehensive survey of RHD alleles in Tunisia population was lacking. The aim of this study was to use a multiplex RHD typing assay for simultaneous detection of partial D especially with RHD/RHCE deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence exchange mechanism and some weak D alleles. Materials and Methods: Six RHD specific primer sets were designed to amplify RHD exons 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 9. DNA from 2000 blood donors (1777 D+ and 223 D-) from several regions was selected for RHD genotyping using a PCR multiplex assay. Further molecular investigations were done to characterize the RHD variants that were identified by the PCR multiplex assay. Results: In the 1777 D+ samples, only 10 individuals showed the absence of amplification of exons 4 and 5 that were subsequently identified by PCR-SSP as weak D type 4 variants. No hybrid allele was detected. In the 223 D-, RHD amplification of some exons was observed only in 5 samples: 4 individuals expressed only RHD exon 9, and one subject lacking exons 4 and 5. These samples were then screened by PCR-SSPs on d(C) ces and weak D type 4, respectively. Conclusion: The weak D type 4 appears to be the most common D variant allele. We have not found any partial D variant. Findings also indicated that RHD gene deletion is the most prevalent cause of the D- phenotype in the Tunisian population. PMID:24014941

  3. Lost in Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass, Wiebke; Reusswig, Fritz

    2014-05-01

    Lost in Translation? Introducing Planetary Boundaries into Social Systems. Fritz Reusswig, Wiebke Lass Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany Identifying and quantifying planetary boundaries by interdisciplinary science efforts is a challenging task—and a risky one, as the 1972 Limits to Growth publication has shown. Even if we may be assured that scientific understanding of underlying processes of the Earth system has significantly improved since then, the challenge of translating these findings into the social systems of the planet remains crucial for any kind of action, and in many respects far more challenging. We would like to conceptualize what could also be termed a problem of coupling social and natural systems as a nested set of social translation processes, well aware of the limited applicability of the language-related translation metaphor. Societies must, first, perceive these boundaries, and they have to understand their relevance. This includes, among many other things, the organization of transdisciplinary scientific cooperation. They will then have to translate this understood perception into possible actions, i.e. strategies for different local bodies, actors, and institutional settings. This implies a lot of 'internal' translation processes, e.g. from the scientific subsystem to the mass media, the political and the economic subsystem. And it implies to develop subsystem-specific schemes of evaluation for these alternatives, e.g. convincing narratives, cost-benefit analyses, or ethical legitimacy considerations. And, finally, societies do have to translate chosen action alternatives into monitoring and evaluation schemes, e.g. for agricultural production or renewable energies. This process includes the continuation of observing and re-analyzing the planetary boundary concept itself, as a re-adjustment of these boundaries in the light of new scientific insights cannot be excluded. Taken all together, societies may well

  4. DRD4 dopamine receptor allelic diversity in various primate species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, M.; Higley, D. [NIAAA, Rockville, MD (United States); O`Brien, S. [NCI, Frederick, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The DRD4 dopamine receptor is uniquely characterized by a 48 bp repeating segment within the coding region, located in exon III. Different DRD4 alleles are produced by the presence of additional 48 bp repeats, each of which adds 16 amino acids to the length of the 3rd intracytoplasmic loop of the receptor. The DRD4 receptor is therefore an intriguing candidate gene for behaviors which are influenced by dopamine function. In several human populations, DRD4 alleles with 2-8 and 10 repeats have previously been identified, and the 4 and 7 repeat alleles are the most abundant. We have determined DRD4 genotypes in the following nonhuman primate species: chimpanzee N=2, pygmy chimpanzee N=2, gorilla N=4, siamang N=2, Gelada baboon N=1, gibbon N=1, orangutan (Bornean and Sumatran) N=62, spider monkey N=4, owl monkey N=1, Colobus monkey N=1, Patas monkey N=1, ruffed lemur N=1, rhesus macaque N=8, and vervet monkey N=28. The degree of DRD4 polymorphism and which DRD4 alleles were present both showed considerable variation across primate species. In contrast to the human, rhesus macaque monkeys were monomorphic. The 4 and 7 repeat allels, highly abundant in the human, may not be present in certain other primates. For example, the four spider monkeys we studied showed the 7, 8 and 9 repeat length alleles and the only gibbon we analyzed was homozygous for the 9 repeat allele (thus far not observed in the human). Genotyping of other primate species and sequencing of the individual DRD4 repeat alleles in different species may help us determine the ancestral DRD4 repeat length and identify connections between DRD4 genotype and phenotype.

  5. Smartphone lost - Privacy gone

    CERN Multimedia

    Computer Security Team

    2012-01-01

    Who doesn't own an iPhone, Android or Blackberry mobile phone today? Lucky you if you don’t! In previous issues (Issue 06/07, 2012 and Issue 32/33/34, 2011) we have pointed out their lack of security. But what happens if you lose your smartphone or it gets stolen?   Today, a smartphone clones your personality into the digital world. Your phone archives all your emails and messaging communications with your family, friends, peers and colleagues; contains photos and videos of the top moments of your life; holds your favourite music and movies and zillions of other bits of personal information stored in the apps of your choice (like GPS information of your jogging paths, a vault of your passwords, access to your Facebook or Twitter profiles, bank access information, flight and hotel bookings). In the future, your phone might also be used for making payments in shops. Have you ever thought of how you would feel if you lost your smartphone or it got stolen? Nak...

  6. Lost by Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciacci, Luca; Reck, Barbara K; Nassar, N T; Graedel, T E

    2015-08-18

    In some common uses metals are lost by intent-copper in brake pads, zinc in tires, and germanium in retained catalyst applications being examples. In other common uses, metals are incorporated into products in ways for which no viable recycling approaches exist, examples include selenium in colored glass and vanadium in pigments. To determine quantitatively the scope of these "losses by design", we have assessed the major uses of 56 metals and metalloids, assigning each use to one of three categories: in-use dissipation, currently unrecyclable when discarded, or potentially recyclable when discarded. In-use dissipation affects fewer than a dozen elements (including mercury and arsenic), but the spectrum of elements dissipated increases rapidly if applications from which they are currently unrecyclable are considered. In many cases the resulting dissipation rates are higher than 50%. Among others, specialty metals (e.g., gallium, indium, and thallium) and some heavy rare earth elements are representative of modern technology, and their loss provides a measure of the degree of unsustainability in the contemporary use of materials and products. Even where uses are currently compatible with recycling technologies and approaches, end of life recycling rates are in most cases well below those that are potentially achievable. The outcomes of this research provide guidance in identifying product design approaches for reducing material losses so as to increase element recovery at end-of-life.

  7. An Analysis of Lost Sales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey E. Jarrett

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this manuscript is to shed light on problems associated with lost sales and the incurring of cost associated with lost sales. An investigation is made to determine if seasonality in sales and lost sales have effects on the efficient operations of supply chains. Optimization is always a goal of management supply chains, but cost increases due to insufficient inventory, low-quality product and the like lead to customers not returning. These are lost sales that occur for many reasons. We study a data set to determine if the ignoring of time series component also has an effect on the variation in lost sales. If so, can we measure the magnitude of the effects of seasonal variation in lost sales, and what are their consequences?

  8. Allelic prevalence of intron 3 insertion/deletion genetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leila Fallahzadeh-Abarghooei

    2015-03-18

    Mar 18, 2015 ... Tabriz (East Azerbaijan province; belong to Azaris), and Yasuj (Kohgiluyeh va Boyer-Ahmad pro- vince; belong to Lurs), respectively. Genotypic analysis of the Ins/Del XRCC4 polymorphism was detected by the PCR method. Results: The prevalence of the Del allele in Shiraz, Abarku, Tabriz, and Yasuj was ...

  9. Association between the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele and late onset of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, H.B.; Timm, S.; Wang, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The 32-bp deletion allele in chemokine receptor CCR5 has been associated with several immune-mediated diseases and might be implicated in schizophrenia as well. METHOD: The authors genotyped DNA samples from 268 schizophrenia patients and 323 healthy subjects. Age at first admission...... to a psychiatric hospital department served as a measure of disease onset. RESULTS: Patients and comparison subjects differed marginally in their genotype distribution, with a slightly higher frequency of the deletion allele seen in the patients. The authors found the deletion allele to be associated with higher......-onset schizophrenia) and healthy subjects differed significantly. This was reflected in an increased frequency of the deletion allele in the patient subgroup. Patients with ages at first admission below and above 40 years significantly differed in distribution of genotypes and alleles, with an overrepresentation...

  10. The lost children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S

    1999-03-01

    Women who have lost children to perinatal complications, are subjected to pain and grief continuously; however their agony increases on remembrance days such as birthdate, or on Mother's Day. Fathers, siblings and grandparents suffer too. Common disorders of pregnancy, such as pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), or the more serious pre-eclampsia, HELLP syndrome, or eclampsia, can lead to devastating effects such as miscarriage, stillbirth, or neonatal death; or at the very least, a sick infant. With many of these consequences, the loss of the dreams, hopes and plans that parents have made is imminent. The investigation of the psychosocial aspects of 'high-risk' pregnancy has never been fully addressed. However, the threat of loss, or the actual experience, may provoke the onset of a potential psychological crisis during the perinatal period. Therefore, it is important that these issues be addressed by the nurse in order to aid the development of coping mechanisms to enable women and their families to deal with what may happen. This may be done by predicting the stages of the bereavement process experienced by these women and their family members, as outlined in the Kubler-Ross model of bereavement (1969), which is indicative of many types of grief reactions. Other issues including the restriction in activity, uncertainty of pregnancy outcomes, disruption in work or career activities, financial strains, and reduced labour and birthing options, become concerns for high-risk pregnant women. The way women deal with these issues and the pathways nurses can take to help these women develop effective coping strategies, will be addressed also.

  11. Using multi-locus allelic sequence data to estimate genetic divergence among four Lilium (Liliaceae) cultivars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahin, A.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Tuyl, van J.M.; Arens, P.F.P.; Bakker, F.T.

    2014-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) may enable estimating relationships among genotypes using allelic variation of multiple nuclear genes simultaneously. We explored the potential and caveats of this strategy in four genetically distant Lilium cultivars to estimate their genetic divergence from

  12. Allele mining across DREB1A and DREB1B in diverse rice ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Low temperature stress is one of the major limiting factors affecting rice productivity in higher altitudes. DREB1A and ..... to isolate useful alleles from related genotypes. A total of ... work also suggests that DREB induction and cold response.

  13. HLA Dr beta 1 alleles in Pakistani patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqi, N.; Ahmed, T.A.; Bashir, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine frequencies of HLA DR beta 1 alleles in rheumatoid arthritis in Pakistani patients. Study Design: Cross sectional / analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Immunology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi in collaboration with Rheumatology departments of Military Hospital, Rawalpindi and Fauji Foundation Hospital, Rawalpindi, from January 2009 to January 2010. Methodology: HLA DR beta 1 genotyping of one hundred Pakistani patients, diagnosed as having RA as per American College of Rheumatology revised criteria 1987, was done. HLA DR beta 1 genotyping was carried out at allele group level (DR beta 1*01-DR beta 1*16) by sequence specific primers in RA patients. Comparison of HLA DR beta 1 allele frequencies between patients and control groups was made using Pearson's chi-square test to find possible association of HLA DR?1 alleles with RA in Pakistani rheumatoid patients. Results: HLA DR beta 1*04 was expressed with significantly increased frequency in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (p <0.05). HLA DR?1*11 was expressed statistically significantly more in control group as compared to rheumatoid patients indicating a possible protective effect. There was no statistically significant difference observed in frequencies of HLA DR beta 1 allele *01, DR beta 1 allele *03, DR beta 1 allele *07, DR beta 1 allele *08, DR beta 1 allele *09, DR beta 1 allele *10, DR beta 1 allele *12, DR beta 1 allele *13, DR beta 1 allele *14, DR?1 allele *15 and DR beta 1 allele *16 between patients and control groups. Conclusion: The identification of susceptible HLA DR beta 1 alleles in Pakistani RA patients may help physicians to make early decisions regarding initiation of early intensive therapy with disease modifying anti rheumatic medicines and biological agents decreasing disability in RA patients. (author)

  14. Alcobaça allele and genotypic backgrounds affect yield and fruit shelf life of tomato hybrids O alelo alcobaça e o background genotípico afetam a produtividade e a conservação de híbridos de tomateiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Túlio José Mendes Dias

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-harvest shelf life of tomato fruit may be increased by deploying mutant alleles which affect the natural ripening process and/or by a favorable genotypic background. Among the several ripening mutant genes, alcobaça (alc has proved to be highly efficient in increasing shelf life of commercial tomato fruits, especially in heterozygosis, a state at which no limiting deleterious effects upon fruit color occur. The effects of heterozygosity in the alcobaça locus (alc+/alc on yield and fruit quality traits of tomato hybrids with three genotypic backgrounds. We evaluated three pairs of hybrids obtained from crosses between the near-isogenic pollen source lines Flora-Dade (alc+/alc+ and TOM-559 (alc/alc, and three maternal lines (Stevens, NC-8276 and Piedmont. The six treatments were factorial combinations of two different status in the alc locus (alc+/alc and alc+/alc+ versus three different genotypic backgrounds (maternal lines. Fruits were harvested at the breaker stage of maturation and stored in shelves at 21ºC for 14 days. Yield and fruit quality traits were then evaluated. Regardless of the background, the alc allele in heterozygosis (alc+/alc did not interfere with the total yield, commercial yield, average mass per fruit, average mass per commercial fruit, fruit shape, or with fruit peduncular scar diameter. The alc+/alc genotype reduced the rate of firmness loss and delayed evolution of the red color of the fruit, thus contributing to an increase of the post-harvest shelf life for all three genotypic backgrounds.A vida de prateleira dos frutos de tomate pode ser extendida, seja empregando-se alelos mutantes que afetam o processo natural de amadurecimento, seja por meio de background genotípico favorável. O alelo alcobaça (alc em heterozigose tem-se mostrado bastante eficiente no sentido de prolongar o período de conservação dos frutos em pós-colheita, sem que ocorra prejuízo na coloração. Avaliaram-se os efeitos do alelo

  15. A national survey on the allelic, genotypic, and haplotypic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to be an important factor in preventing disease recurrence. (Goldmann ... objective of this study is to examine sequence variants of the. PRNP gene in ..... Fund. References. Belt P. B., Muileman I. H., Schreuder B. E., Bos-de Ruijter J.,. Gielkens ...

  16. Allele and genotype frequencies of -lactoglobulin gene in Iranian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In modern programmes of animal breeding, the polymorphism of the milk proteins can be used as marker systems. -Lactoglobulin is the major milk whey protein in the ruminants. Studies have indicated that this protein is polymorphic in the many breeds of cattle. This is the result of a single base pair substitution in the ...

  17. A matching-allele model explains host resistance to parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luijckx, Pepijn; Fienberg, Harris; Duneau, David; Ebert, Dieter

    2013-06-17

    The maintenance of genetic variation and sex despite its costs has long puzzled biologists. A popular idea, the Red Queen Theory, is that under rapid antagonistic coevolution between hosts and their parasites, the formation of new rare host genotypes through sex can be advantageous as it creates host genotypes to which the prevailing parasite is not adapted. For host-parasite coevolution to lead to an ongoing advantage for rare genotypes, parasites should infect specific host genotypes and hosts should resist specific parasite genotypes. The most prominent genetics capturing such specificity are matching-allele models (MAMs), which have the key feature that resistance for two parasite genotypes can reverse by switching one allele at one host locus. Despite the lack of empirical support, MAMs have played a central role in the theoretical development of antagonistic coevolution, local adaptation, speciation, and sexual selection. Using genetic crosses, we show that resistance of the crustacean Daphnia magna against the parasitic bacterium Pasteuria ramosa follows a MAM. Simulation results show that the observed genetics can explain the maintenance of genetic variation and contribute to the maintenance of sex in the facultatively sexual host as predicted by the Red Queen Theory. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of the APOE ε2 Allele on Mortality and Cognitive Function in the Oldest Old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune; Tan, Qihua; Mengel-From, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    Some studies indicate that the APOE ε2 allele may have a protective effect on mortality and mental health among the elderly adults. We investigated the effect of the APOE ε2 allele on cognitive function and mortality in 1651 members of the virtually extinct Danish 1905 birth cohort. We found...... no protective effect of the APOE ε2 allele on mortality compared with the APOE ε3 allele. The point estimates indicated an increased protection against cognitive decline over time for persons with the APOE ε2 allele. Cognitive score did not significantly modify the mortality risk of the various APOE genotypes....... We did not find a protective effect of the APOE ε2 allele on mortality among the oldest old, but in agreement with our previous findings, we found a 22% increased mortality risk for APOE ε4 carriers. The APOE ε2 allele may be protective on cognitive decline among the oldest old....

  19. Tri-allelic SNP markers enable analysis of mixed and degraded DNA samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westen, Antoinette A; Matai, Anuska S; Laros, Jeroen F J; Meiland, Hugo C; Jasper, Mandy; de Leeuw, Wiljo J F; de Knijff, Peter; Sijen, Titia

    2009-09-01

    For the analysis of degraded DNA in disaster victim identification (DVI) and criminal investigations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been recognized as promising markers mainly because they can be analyzed in short sized amplicons. Most SNPs are bi-allelic and are thereby ineffective to detect mixtures, which may lead to incorrect genotyping. We developed an algorithm to find non-binary (i.e. tri-allelic or tetra-allelic) SNPs in the NCBI dbSNP database. We selected 31 potential tri-allelic SNPs with a minor allele frequency of at least 10%. The tri-allelic nature was confirmed for 15 SNPs residing on 14 different chromosomes. Multiplex SNaPshot assays were developed, and the allele frequencies of 16 SNPs were determined among 153 Dutch and 111 Netherlands Antilles reference samples. Using these multiplex SNP assays, the presence of a mixture of two DNA samples in a ratio up to 1:8 could be recognized reliably. Furthermore, we compared the genotyping efficiency of the tri-allelic SNP markers and short tandem repeat (STR) markers by analyzing artificially degraded DNA and DNA from 30 approximately 500-year-old bone and molar samples. In both types of degraded DNA samples, the larger sized STR amplicons failed to amplify whereas the tri-allelic SNP markers still provided valuable information. In conclusion, tri-allelic SNP markers are suited for the analysis of degraded DNA and enable the detection of a second DNA source in a sample.

  20. Detecting imbalanced expression of SNP alleles by minisequencing on microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahlgren Andreas

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Each of the human genes or transcriptional units is likely to contain single nucleotide polymorphisms that may give rise to sequence variation between individuals and tissues on the level of RNA. Based on recent studies, differential expression of the two alleles of heterozygous coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs may be frequent for human genes. Methods with high accuracy to be used in a high throughput setting are needed for systematic surveys of expressed sequence variation. In this study we evaluated two formats of multiplexed, microarray based minisequencing for quantitative detection of imbalanced expression of SNP alleles. We used a panel of ten SNPs located in five genes known to be expressed in two endothelial cell lines as our model system. Results The accuracy and sensitivity of quantitative detection of allelic imbalance was assessed for each SNP by constructing regression lines using a dilution series of mixed samples from individuals of different genotype. Accurate quantification of SNP alleles by both assay formats was evidenced for by R2 values > 0.95 for the majority of the regression lines. According to a two sample t-test, we were able to distinguish 1–9% of a minority SNP allele from a homozygous genotype, with larger variation between SNPs than between assay formats. Six of the SNPs, heterozygous in either of the two cell lines, were genotyped in RNA extracted from the endothelial cells. The coefficient of variation between the fluorescent signals from five parallel reactions was similar for cDNA and genomic DNA. The fluorescence signal intensity ratios measured in the cDNA samples were compared to those in genomic DNA to determine the relative expression levels of the two alleles of each SNP. Four of the six SNPs tested displayed a higher than 1.4-fold difference in allelic ratios between cDNA and genomic DNA. The results were verified by allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridisation and

  1. Association between the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele and late onset of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Timm, Sally; Wang, August G

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The 32-bp deletion allele in chemokine receptor CCR5 has been associated with several immune-mediated diseases and might be implicated in schizophrenia as well. METHOD: The authors genotyped DNA samples from 268 schizophrenia patients and 323 healthy subjects. Age at first admission...... of the deletion allele in the latter subgroup of patients. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele is a susceptibility factor for schizophrenia with late onset. Alternatively, the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele may act as a modifier by delaying the onset of schizophrenia without...

  2. Lost in a Transmedia Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Smith

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo (previamente publicado como um capítulo de minha tese analisa os mecanismos transmidiáticos de storytelling por trás da narrativa do seriado Lost, da ABC. Por ter sua narrativa sustentada em uma complexa mitologia, Lost faz um grande esforço para suplementar a narrativa de seu programa de TV através de valiosas e distintas extensões narrativas. Em um primeiro momento, eu examino como as técnicas de construção de mundo em Lost encorajam os fãs mais ávidos a “jogar” com o espaço narrativo. Eu então faço avaliações sobre as extensões que Lost oferece como opcionais, através de experiências convincentes em seus textos expandido. Ao  ser muito bem-sucedida ao balancear seus fãs mais ávidos com os casuais espectadores, Lost representa o futuro de muitos programas de televisão que se propõem a colocar os fãs em situações imersivas, usando um vasto universo transmídia, ao mesmo tempo prometendo um programa de televisão coerente em seu interior

  3. Apolipoprotein E genotype, cardiovascular biomarkers and risk of stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Tauseef A; Shah, Tina; Prieto, David

    2013-01-01

    At the APOE gene, encoding apolipoprotein E, genotypes of the ε2/ε3/ε4 alleles associated with higher LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels are also associated with higher coronary risk. However, the association of APOE genotype with other cardiovascular biomarkers and risk of ischaemic stroke is less c...

  4. The protease inhibitor PI*S allele and COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersh, C P; Ly, N P; Berkey, C S

    2005-01-01

    In many countries, the protease inhibitor (SERPINA1) PI*S allele is more common than PI*Z, the allele responsible for most cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to severe alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency. However, the risk of COPD due to the PI*S allele is not clear. The current...... authors located studies that addressed the risk of COPD or measured lung function in individuals with the PI SZ, PI MS and PI SS genotypes. A separate meta-analysis for each genotype was performed. Aggregating data from six studies, the odds ratio (OR) for COPD in PI SZ compound heterozygotes compared...... with PI MM (normal) individuals was significantly increased at 3.26 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.24-8.57). In 17 cross-sectional and case-control studies, the OR for COPD in PI MS heterozygotes was 1.19 (95%CI: 1.02-1.38). However, PI MS genotype was not associated with COPD risk after correcting...

  5. Desmanthus GENOTYPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ HENRIQUE DE ALBUQUERQUE RANGEL

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Desmanthus is a genus of forage legumes with potential to improve pastures and livestock produc-tion on clay soils of dry tropical and subtropical regions such as the existing in Brazil and Australia. Despite this patterns of natural or enforced after-ripening of Desmanthus seeds have not been well established. Four year old seed banks of nine Desmanthus genotypes at James Cook University were accessed for their patterns of seed softe-ning in response to a range of temperatures. Persistent seed banks were found to exist under all of the studied ge-notypes. The largest seeds banks were found in the genotypes CPI 78373 and CPI 78382 and the smallest in the genotypes CPI’s 37143, 67643, and 83563. An increase in the percentage of softened seeds was correlated with higher temperatures, in two patterns of response: in some accessions seeds were not significantly affected by tempe-ratures below 80º C; and in others, seeds become soft when temperature rose to as little as 60 ºC. At 80 °C the heat started to depress germination. High seed production of Desmanthus associated with dependence of seeds on eleva-ted temperatures to softening can be a very important strategy for plants to survive in dry tropical regions.

  6. Empirical evaluation of selective DNA pooling to map QTL in dairy cattle using a half-sib design by comparison to individual genotyping and interval mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Nicholas

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study represents the first attempt at an empirical evaluation of the DNA pooling methodology by comparing it to individual genotyping and interval mapping to detect QTL in a dairy half-sib design. The findings indicated that the use of peak heights from the pool electropherograms without correction for stutter (shadow product and preferential amplification performed as well as corrected estimates of frequencies. However, errors were found to decrease the power of the experiment at every stage of the pooling and analysis. The main sources of errors include technical errors from DNA quantification, pool construction, inconsistent differential amplification, and from the prevalence of sire alleles in the dams. Additionally, interval mapping using individual genotyping gains information from phenotypic differences between individuals in the same pool and from neighbouring markers, which is lost in a DNA pooling design. These errors cause some differences between the markers detected as significant by pooling and those found significant by interval mapping based on individual selective genotyping. Therefore, it is recommended that pooled genotyping only be used as part of an initial screen with significant results to be confirmed by individual genotyping. Strategies for improving the efficiency of the DNA pooling design are also presented.

  7. D1S80 (pMCT118) allele frequencies in a Malay population sample from Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, C L; Lim, M E; Ng, H S; Sam, C K

    1997-01-01

    The D1S80 allele frequencies in 124 unrelated Malays from the Malaysian population were determined and 51 genotypes and 19 alleles were encountered. The D1S80 frequency distribution met Hardy-Weinberg expectations. The observed heterozygosity was 0.80 and the power of discrimination was 0.96.

  8. Jungmann's translation of Paradise Lost

    OpenAIRE

    Janů, Karel

    2014-01-01

    This thesis examines Josef Jungmann's translation of John Milton's Paradise Lost. Josef Jungmann was one of the leading figures of the Czech National Revival and translated Milton 's poem between the years 1800 and 1804. The thesis covers Jungmann's theoretical model of translation and presents Jungmann's motives for translation of Milton's epic poem. The paper also describes the aims Jungmann had with his translation and whether he has achieved them. The reception Jungmann's translation rece...

  9. Common breast cancer risk alleles and risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Näslund-Koch, C; Nordestgaard, B G; Bojesen, S E

    2017-01-01

    general population were followed in Danish health registries for up to 21 years after blood sampling. After genotyping 72 breast cancer risk loci, each with 0-2 alleles, the sum for each individual was calculated. We used the simple allele sum instead of the conventional polygenic risk score......, as it is likely more sensitive in detecting associations with risks of other endpoints than breast cancer. RESULTS: Breast cancer incidence in the 19,010 women was increased across allele sum quintiles (log-rank trend test; p=1*10(-12)), but not incidence of other cancers (p=0.41). Age- and study-adjusted hazard...... ratio for the 5(th) vs. 1(st) allele sum quintile was 1.82(95% confidence interval;1.53-2.18). Corresponding hazard ratios per allele were 1.04(1.03-1.05) and 1.05(1.02-1.08) for breast cancer incidence and mortality, similar across risk factors. In 50-year old women, the starting age for screening...

  10. Automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeat markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)]|[Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The dinucleotide repeats (i.e., microsatellites) such as CA-repeats are a highly polymorphic, highly abundant class of PCR-amplifiable markers that have greatly streamlined genetic mapping experimentation. It is expected that over 30,000 such markers (including tri- and tetranucleotide repeats) will be characterized for routine use in the next few years. Since only size determination, and not sequencing, is required to determine alleles, in principle, dinucleotide repeat genotyping is easily performed on electrophoretic gels, and can be automated using DNA sequencers. Unfortunately, PCR stuttering with these markers generates not one band for each allele, but a pattern of bands. Since closely spaced alleles must be disambiguated by human scoring, this poses a key obstacle to full automation. We have developed methods that overcome this obstacle. Our model is that the observed data is generated by arithmetic superposition (i.e., convolution) of multiple allele patterns. By quantitatively measuring the size of each component band, and exploiting the unique stutter pattern associated with each marker, closely spaced alleles can be deconvolved; this unambiguously reconstructs the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} allele bands, with stutter artifact removed. We used this approach in a system for automated diagnosis of (X-linked) Duchenne muscular dystrophy; four multiplexed CA-repeats within the dystrophin gene were assayed on a DNA sequencer. Our method accurately detected small variations in gel migration that shifted the allele size estimate. In 167 nonmutated alleles, 89% (149/167) showed no size variation, 9% (15/167) showed 1 bp variation, and 2% (3/167) showed 2 bp variation. We are currently developing a library of dinucleotide repeat patterns; together with our deconvolution methods, this library will enable fully automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeats from sizing data.

  11. Delimiting Allelic Imbalance of TYMS by Allele-Specific Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboa-Beltrán, Emilia; Cruz, Raquel; Carracedo, Angel; Barros, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Allelic imbalance of thymidylate synthase (TYMS) is attributed to polymorphisms in the 5'- and 3'-untranslated region (UTR). These polymorphisms have been related to the risk of suffering different cancers, for example leukemia, breast or gastric cancer, and response to different drugs, among which are methotrexate glutamates, stavudine, and specifically 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), as TYMS is its direct target. A vast literature has been published in relation to 5-FU, even suggesting the sole use of these polymorphisms to effectively manage 5-FU dosage. Estimates of the extent to which these polymorphisms influence in TYMS expression have in the past been based on functional analysis by luciferase assays and quantification of TYMS mRNA, but both these studies, as the association studies with cancer risk or with toxicity or response to 5-FU, are very contradictory. Regarding functional assays, the artificial genetic environment created in luciferase assay and the problems derived from quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCRs), for example the use of a reference gene, may have distorted the results. To avoid these sources of interference, we have analyzed the allelic imbalance of TYMS by allelic-specific analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients.Allelic imbalance in PBMCs, taken from 40 patients with suspected myeloproliferative haematological diseases, was determined by fluorescent fragment analysis (for the 3'-UTR polymorphism), Sanger sequencing and allelic-specific qPCR in multiplex (for the 5'-UTR polymorphisms).For neither the 3'- nor the 5'-UTR polymorphisms did the observed allelic imbalance exceed 1.5 fold. None of the TYMS polymorphisms is statistically associated with allelic imbalance.The results acquired allow us to deny the previously established assertion of an influence of 2 to 4 fold of the rs45445694 and rs2853542 polymorphisms in the expression of TYMS and narrow its allelic imbalance to 1.5 fold, in our population

  12. Molecular genotyping of ABO blood groups in some population groups from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sabita; Gorakshakar, Ajit C; Vasantha, K; Nadkarni, Anita; Italia, Yazdi; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2014-01-01

    Indian population is characterized by the presence of various castes and tribal groups. Various genetic polymorphisms have been used to differentiate among these groups. Amongst these, the ABO blood group system has been extensively studied. There is no information on molecular genotyping of ABO blood groups from India. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to characterize the common A, B and O alleles by molecular analysis in some Indian population groups. One hundred samples from the mixed population from Mumbai, 101 samples from the Dhodia tribe and 100 samples from the Parsi community were included in this study. Initially, the samples were phenotyped by standard serologic techniques. PCR followed by single strand conformational polymorphsim (SSCP) was used for molecular ABO genotyping. Samples showing atypical SSCP patterns were further analysed by DNA sequencing to characterize rare alleles. Seven common ABO alleles with 19 different genotypes were found in the mixed population. The Dhodias showed 12 different ABO genotypes and the Parsis revealed 15 different ABO genotypes with six common ABO alleles identified in each of them. Two rare alleles were also identified. This study reports the distribution of molecular genotypes of ABO alleles among some population groups from India. Considering the extremely heterogeneous nature of the Indian population, in terms of various genotype markers like blood groups, red cell enzymes, etc., many more ABO alleles are likely to be encountered.

  13. Pervasive Genotypic Mosaicism in Founder Mice Derived from Genome Editing through Pronuclear Injection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Oliver

    Full Text Available Genome editing technologies, especially the Cas9/CRISPR system, have revolutionized biomedical research over the past several years. Generation of novel alleles has been simplified to unprecedented levels, allowing for rapid expansion of available genetic tool kits for researchers. However, the issue of genotypic mosaicism has become evident, making stringent analyses of the penetrance of genome-edited alleles essential. Here, we report that founder mice, derived from pronuclear injection of ZFNs or a mix of guidance RNAs and Cas9 mRNAs, display consistent genotypic mosaicism for both deletion and insertion alleles. To identify founders with greater possibility of transmitting the mutant allele through the germline, we developed an effective germline genotyping method. The awareness of the inherent genotypic mosaicism issue with genome editing will allow for a more efficient implementation of the technologies, and the germline genotyping method will save valuable time and resources.

  14. TRPV6 alleles do not influence prostate cancer progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, Thorsten; Wissenbach, Ulrich; Grobholz, Rainer; Flockerzi, Veit

    2009-01-01

    The transient receptor potential, subfamily V, member 6 (TRPV6) is a Ca 2+ selective cation channel. Several studies have shown that TRPV6 transcripts are expressed in locally advanced prostatic adenocarcinoma, metastatic and androgen-insensitive prostatic lesions but are undetectable in healthy prostate tissue and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Two allelic variants of the human trpv6 gene have been identified which are transcribed into two independent mRNAs, TRPV6a and TRPV6b. We now asked, whether the trpv6a allele is correlated with the onset of prostate cancer, with the Gleason score and the tumour stage. Genomic DNA of prostate cancer patients and control individuals was isolated from resections of prostatic adenocarcinomas and salivary fluid respectively. Genotyping of SNPs of the TRPV6 gene was performed by restriction length polymorphism or by sequencing analysis. RNA used for RT-PCR was isolated from prostate tissue. Data sets were analyzed by Chi-Square test. We first characterized in detail the five polymorphisms present in the protein coding exons of the trpv6 gene and show that these polymorphisms are coupled and are underlying the TRPV6a and the TRPV6b variants. Next we analysed the frequencies of the two TRPV6 alleles using genomic DNA from saliva samples of 169 healthy individuals. The homozygous TRPV6b genotype predominated with 86%, whereas no homozygous TRPV6a carriers could be identified. The International HapMap Project identified a similar frequency for an Utah based population whereas in an African population the a-genotype prevailed. The incidence of prostate cancer is several times higher in African populations than in non-African and we then investigated the TRPV6a/b frequencies in 141 samples of prostatic adenocarcinoma. The TRPV6b allele was found in 87% of the samples without correlation with Gleason score and tumour stage. Our results show that the frequencies of trpv6 alleles in healthy control individuals and prostate cancer patients

  15. TRPV6 alleles do not influence prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Thorsten; Wissenbach, Ulrich; Grobholz, Rainer; Flockerzi, Veit

    2009-10-26

    The transient receptor potential, subfamily V, member 6 (TRPV6) is a Ca(2+) selective cation channel. Several studies have shown that TRPV6 transcripts are expressed in locally advanced prostatic adenocarcinoma, metastatic and androgen-insensitive prostatic lesions but are undetectable in healthy prostate tissue and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Two allelic variants of the human trpv6 gene have been identified which are transcribed into two independent mRNAs, TRPV6a and TRPV6b. We now asked, whether the trpv6a allele is correlated with the onset of prostate cancer, with the Gleason score and the tumour stage. Genomic DNA of prostate cancer patients and control individuals was isolated from resections of prostatic adenocarcinomas and salivary fluid respectively. Genotyping of SNPs of the TRPV6 gene was performed by restriction length polymorphism or by sequencing analysis. RNA used for RT-PCR was isolated from prostate tissue. Data sets were analyzed by Chi-Square test. We first characterized in detail the five polymorphisms present in the protein coding exons of the trpv6 gene and show that these polymorphisms are coupled and are underlying the TRPV6a and the TRPV6b variants. Next we analysed the frequencies of the two TRPV6 alleles using genomic DNA from saliva samples of 169 healthy individuals. The homozygous TRPV6b genotype predominated with 86%, whereas no homozygous TRPV6a carriers could be identified. The International HapMap Project identified a similar frequency for an Utah based population whereas in an African population the a-genotype prevailed. The incidence of prostate cancer is several times higher in African populations than in non-African and we then investigated the TRPV6a/b frequencies in 141 samples of prostatic adenocarcinoma. The TRPV6b allele was found in 87% of the samples without correlation with Gleason score and tumour stage. Our results show that the frequencies of trpv6 alleles in healthy control individuals and prostate cancer patients

  16. TRPV6 alleles do not influence prostate cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flockerzi Veit

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transient receptor potential, subfamily V, member 6 (TRPV6 is a Ca2+ selective cation channel. Several studies have shown that TRPV6 transcripts are expressed in locally advanced prostatic adenocarcinoma, metastatic and androgen-insensitive prostatic lesions but are undetectable in healthy prostate tissue and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Two allelic variants of the human trpv6 gene have been identified which are transcribed into two independent mRNAs, TRPV6a and TRPV6b. We now asked, whether the trpv6a allele is correlated with the onset of prostate cancer, with the Gleason score and the tumour stage. Methods Genomic DNA of prostate cancer patients and control individuals was isolated from resections of prostatic adenocarcinomas and salivary fluid respectively. Genotyping of SNPs of the TRPV6 gene was performed by restriction length polymorphism or by sequencing analysis. RNA used for RT-PCR was isolated from prostate tissue. Data sets were analyzed by Chi-Square test. Results We first characterized in detail the five polymorphisms present in the protein coding exons of the trpv6 gene and show that these polymorphisms are coupled and are underlying the TRPV6a and the TRPV6b variants. Next we analysed the frequencies of the two TRPV6 alleles using genomic DNA from saliva samples of 169 healthy individuals. The homozygous TRPV6b genotype predominated with 86%, whereas no homozygous TRPV6a carriers could be identified. The International HapMap Project identified a similar frequency for an Utah based population whereas in an African population the a-genotype prevailed. The incidence of prostate cancer is several times higher in African populations than in non-African and we then investigated the TRPV6a/b frequencies in 141 samples of prostatic adenocarcinoma. The TRPV6b allele was found in 87% of the samples without correlation with Gleason score and tumour stage. Conclusion Our results show that the frequencies of trpv6

  17. Nitric oxide synthase gene G298 allele

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagib El-Kilany, Galal E.; Nayel, Ehab; Hazzaa, Sahar

    2004-01-01

    Background: Nitric oxide (NO) has an important effect on blood pressure, arterial wall, and the basal release of endothelial NO in hypertension (HPN) may be reduced. Until now, there is no solid data revealing the potential role of the polymorphism of the nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS) in patients with HPN and microvascular angina. Aim: The aim of the present study is to investigate the gene of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), as the polymorphism of this gene may be a putative candidate for HPN and initiate the process of atherosclerosis. Methods: Sixty participants were recruited for this study; 50 were hypertensive patients complaining of chest pain [30 of them have electrocardiogram (EKG) changes of ischemia], 20 had isolated HPN, and 10 healthy volunteers served as control. All patients underwent stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and coronary angiography. Genotyping of eNOS for all patients and controls was performed. The linkages between HPN, microvascular angina and eNOS gene polymorphism were investigated. Results: MPI and coronary angiography revealed that 15 patients had chest pain with true ischemia and reversible myocardial perfusion defects (multiple and mild) but normal epicardial coronary arteries (microvascular angina), while 15 patients had significant coronary artery disease (CAD), and 20 hypertensive patients showed normal perfusion scan and coronary angiography. The prevalence of the NOS G 298 allele was higher in the hypertensive group with microvascular angina (documented by MPI) than it was among the control participants (P<.005). The eNOS allele was significantly higher in the hypertensive group than in the control participants, but there was no significant difference in homozygote mutants among hypertensive participants, x-syndrome and patients with CAD. Conclusion: eNOS gene polymorphism is proved to be an important etiology in microvascular angina (x-syndrome) among hypertensive patients. In addition, the eNOS mutant

  18. Population differentiation in allele frequencies of obesity-associated SNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Linyong; Fang, Yayin; Campbell, Michael; Southerland, William M

    2017-11-10

    Obesity is emerging as a global health problem, with more than one-third of the world's adult population being overweight or obese. In this study, we investigated worldwide population differentiation in allele frequencies of obesity-associated SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms). We collected a total of 225 obesity-associated SNPs from a public database. Their population-level allele frequencies were derived based on the genotype data from 1000 Genomes Project (phase 3). We used hypergeometric model to assess whether the effect allele at a given SNP is significantly enriched or depleted in each of the 26 populations surveyed in the 1000 Genomes Project with respect to the overall pooled population. Our results indicate that 195 out of 225 SNPs (86.7%) possess effect alleles significantly enriched or depleted in at least one of the 26 populations. Populations within the same continental group exhibit similar allele enrichment/depletion patterns whereas inter-continental populations show distinct patterns. Among the 225 SNPs, 15 SNPs cluster in the first intron region of the FTO gene, which is a major gene associated with body-mass index (BMI) and fat mass. African populations exhibit much smaller blocks of LD (linkage disequilibrium) among these15 SNPs while European and Asian populations have larger blocks. To estimate the cumulative effect of all variants associated with obesity, we developed the personal composite genetic risk score for obesity. Our results indicate that the East Asian populations have the lowest averages of the composite risk scores, whereas three European populations have the highest averages. In addition, the population-level average of composite genetic risk scores is significantly correlated (R 2 = 0.35, P = 0.0060) with obesity prevalence. We have detected substantial population differentiation in allele frequencies of obesity-associated SNPs. The results will help elucidate the genetic basis which may contribute to population

  19. Toward fully automated genotyping: Genotyping microsatellite markers by deconvolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlin, M.W.; Lancia, G.; See-Kiong, Ng [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Dense genetic linkage maps have been constructed for the human and mouse genomes, with average densities of 2.9 cM and 0.35 cM, respectively. These genetic maps are crucial for mapping both Mendelian and complex traits and are useful in clinical genetic diagnosis. Current maps are largely comprised of abundant, easily assayed, and highly polymorphic PCR-based microsatellite markers, primarily dinucleotide (CA){sub n} repeats. One key limitation of these length polymorphisms is the PCR stutter (or slippage) artifact that introduces additional stutter bands. With two (or more) closely spaced alleles, the stutter bands overlap, and it is difficult to accurately determine the correct alleles; this stutter phenomenon has all but precluded full automation, since a human must visually inspect the allele data. We describe here novel deconvolution methods for accurate genotyping that mathematically remove PCR stutter artifact from microsatellite markers. These methods overcome the manual interpretation bottleneck and thereby enable full automation of genetic map construction and use. New functionalities, including the pooling of DNAs and the pooling of markers, are described that may greatly reduce the associated experimentation requirements. 32 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Semiparametric Allelic Tests for Mapping Multiple Phenotypes: Binomial Regression and Mahalanobis Distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Arunabha; Witte, John S; Ghosh, Saurabh

    2015-12-01

    Binary phenotypes commonly arise due to multiple underlying quantitative precursors and genetic variants may impact multiple traits in a pleiotropic manner. Hence, simultaneously analyzing such correlated traits may be more powerful than analyzing individual traits. Various genotype-level methods, e.g., MultiPhen (O'Reilly et al. []), have been developed to identify genetic factors underlying a multivariate phenotype. For univariate phenotypes, the usefulness and applicability of allele-level tests have been investigated. The test of allele frequency difference among cases and controls is commonly used for mapping case-control association. However, allelic methods for multivariate association mapping have not been studied much. In this article, we explore two allelic tests of multivariate association: one using a Binomial regression model based on inverted regression of genotype on phenotype (Binomial regression-based Association of Multivariate Phenotypes [BAMP]), and the other employing the Mahalanobis distance between two sample means of the multivariate phenotype vector for two alleles at a single-nucleotide polymorphism (Distance-based Association of Multivariate Phenotypes [DAMP]). These methods can incorporate both discrete and continuous phenotypes. Some theoretical properties for BAMP are studied. Using simulations, the power of the methods for detecting multivariate association is compared with the genotype-level test MultiPhen's. The allelic tests yield marginally higher power than MultiPhen for multivariate phenotypes. For one/two binary traits under recessive mode of inheritance, allelic tests are found to be substantially more powerful. All three tests are applied to two different real data and the results offer some support for the simulation study. We propose a hybrid approach for testing multivariate association that implements MultiPhen when Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) is violated and BAMP otherwise, because the allelic approaches assume HWE

  1. Study on the association of BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles with clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-04-12

    Apr 12, 2010 ... analysis (HA) in a non-denaturing gel, successfully detected the resistant genotype to ... PHS, polish heath sheep; PLS polish lowland sheep; SCC, ... of the MHC genes and their possible role in disease ... alleles with clinical mastitis in Sarabi and Iranian Holstein cattle, ..... Nomenclature for factors of the.

  2. Distribution of coat-color-associated alleles in the domestic horse population and Przewalski's horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reissmann, Monika; Musa, Lutfi; Zakizadeh, Sonia; Ludwig, Arne

    2016-11-01

    Considering the hidden mode of inheritance of some coat-color-associated alleles, we investigated the presence/absence of coat-color-associated alleles in 1093 domestic horses of 55 breeds and 20 specimens of Przewalski's horse. For coat-color genotyping, allele specific PCR, pyrosequencing and Li-Cor analyses were conducted on 12 coat-color-associated alleles of five genes. Our data provide deep insight into the distribution of coat-color-associated alleles within breeds. We found that the alleles for the basic colorations (bay, black, and chestnut) are widely distributed and occur in nearly all breeds. Alleles leading to dilutions or patterns are rare in domestic breeds and were not found in Przewalski's horse. Higher frequencies of these alleles are only found in breeds that are selected for their expressed phenotypes (e.g., Kinsky horse, Lewitzer, Tinker). Nevertheless, our study produced strong evidence that molecular testing of the coat color is necessary for well-defined phenotyping to avoid unexpected colorations of offspring that can result in legal action.

  3. Characterization of a Weak Allele of Zebrafish cloche Mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Huang, Zhibin; Chen, Xiaohui; He, Fei; Wang, Kun; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Linfeng; Xu, Xiangmin; Liao, Wangjun; Ruan, Hua; Luo, Shenqiu; Zhang, Wenqing

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is a complicated and dynamic process about which the molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Danio rerio (zebrafish) is an excellent vertebrate system for studying hematopoiesis and developmental mechanisms. In the previous study, we isolated and identified a cloche 172 (clo 172) mutant, a novel allele compared to the original cloche (clo) mutant, through using complementation test and initial mapping. Here, according to whole mount in-situ hybridization, we report that the endothelial cells in clo 172 mutant embryos, although initially developed, failed to form the functional vascular system eventually. In addition, further characterization indicates that the clo 172 mutant exhibited weaker defects instead of completely lost in primitive erythroid cells and definitive hematopoietic cells compared with the clo s5 mutant. In contrast, primitive myeloid cells were totally lost in clo 172 mutant. Furthermore, these reappeared definitive myeloid cells were demonstrated to initiate from the remaining hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in clo 172 mutant, confirmed by the dramatic decrease of lyc in clo 172 runx1w84x double mutant. Collectively, the clo 172 mutant is a weak allele compared to the clo s5 mutant, therefore providing a model for studying the early development of hematopoietic and vascular system, as well as an opportunity to further understand the function of the cloche gene. PMID:22132109

  4. The acylphosphatase (Acyp) alleles associate with male hybrid sterility in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, Pawel; Ma, Daina

    2008-06-15

    Hybrid defects are believed to result from genetic incompatibilities between genes that have evolved in separate parental lineages. These genetic dysfunctions on the hybrid genomic background, also known as Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities, can be an incipient signature of speciation, and as such - a subject of active research. Here we present evidence that Acyp locus (CG16870) that encodes acylphosphatase, a small enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of acylphosphates and participates in ion transport across biological membranes, is involved in genetic incompatibilities leading to male sterility in hybrids between Drosophila simulans and D. mauritiana. There is a strong association between Acyp alleles (genotype) and the sterility/fertility pattern (phenotype), as well as between the phenotype, the genotype and its transcriptional activity. Allele-specific expression in hybrids heterozygous for Acyp suggests a cis-type regulation of this gene, where an allele from one of the parental species (D. simulans) is consistently overexpressed.

  5. GACT: a Genome build and Allele definition Conversion Tool for SNP imputation and meta-analysis in genetic association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulovari, Arvis; Li, Dawei

    2014-07-19

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified genes associated with complex human diseases. Although much of the heritability remains unexplained, combining single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes from multiple studies for meta-analysis will increase the statistical power to identify new disease-associated variants. Meta-analysis requires same allele definition (nomenclature) and genome build among individual studies. Similarly, imputation, commonly-used prior to meta-analysis, requires the same consistency. However, the genotypes from various GWAS are generated using different genotyping platforms, arrays or SNP-calling approaches, resulting in use of different genome builds and allele definitions. Incorrect assumptions of identical allele definition among combined GWAS lead to a large portion of discarded genotypes or incorrect association findings. There is no published tool that predicts and converts among all major allele definitions. In this study, we have developed a tool, GACT, which stands for Genome build and Allele definition Conversion Tool, that predicts and inter-converts between any of the common SNP allele definitions and between the major genome builds. In addition, we assessed several factors that may affect imputation quality, and our results indicated that inclusion of singletons in the reference had detrimental effects while ambiguous SNPs had no measurable effect. Unexpectedly, exclusion of genotypes with missing rate > 0.001 (40% of study SNPs) showed no significant decrease of imputation quality (even significantly higher when compared to the imputation with singletons in the reference), especially for rare SNPs. GACT is a new, powerful, and user-friendly tool with both command-line and interactive online versions that can accurately predict, and convert between any of the common allele definitions and between genome builds for genome-wide meta-analysis and imputation of genotypes from SNP-arrays or deep

  6. Null alleles and sequence variations at primer binding sites of STR loci within multiplex typing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yining; Yang, Qinrui; Shao, Chengchen; Liu, Baonian; Zhou, Yuxiang; Xu, Hongmei; Zhou, Yueqin; Tang, Qiqun; Xie, Jianhui

    2018-01-01

    Rare variants are widely observed in human genome and sequence variations at primer binding sites might impair the process of PCR amplification resulting in dropouts of alleles, named as null alleles. In this study, 5 cases from routine paternity testing using PowerPlex ® 21 System for STR genotyping were considered to harbor null alleles at TH01, FGA, D5S818, D8S1179, and D16S539, respectively. The dropout of alleles was confirmed by using alternative commercial kits AGCU Expressmarker 22 PCR amplification kit and AmpFℓSTR ® . Identifiler ® Plus Kit, and sequencing results revealed a single base variation at the primer binding site of each STR locus. Results from the collection of previous reports show that null alleles at D5S818 were frequently observed in population detected by two PowerPlex ® typing systems and null alleles at D19S433 were mostly observed in Japanese population detected by two AmpFℓSTR™ typing systems. Furthermore, the most popular mutation type appeared the transition from C to T with G to A, which might have a potential relationship with DNA methylation. Altogether, these results can provide helpful information in forensic practice to the elimination of genotyping discrepancy and the development of primer sets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Linking genotypes database with locus-specific database and genotype-phenotype correlation in phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wettstein, Sarah; Underhaug, Jarl; Perez, Belen; Marsden, Brian D; Yue, Wyatt W; Martinez, Aurora; Blau, Nenad

    2015-03-01

    The wide range of metabolic phenotypes in phenylketonuria is due to a large number of variants causing variable impairment in phenylalanine hydroxylase function. A total of 834 phenylalanine hydroxylase gene variants from the locus-specific database PAHvdb and genotypes of 4181 phenylketonuria patients from the BIOPKU database were characterized using FoldX, SIFT Blink, Polyphen-2 and SNPs3D algorithms. Obtained data was correlated with residual enzyme activity, patients' phenotype and tetrahydrobiopterin responsiveness. A descriptive analysis of both databases was compiled and an interactive viewer in PAHvdb database was implemented for structure visualization of missense variants. We found a quantitative relationship between phenylalanine hydroxylase protein stability and enzyme activity (r(s) = 0.479), between protein stability and allelic phenotype (r(s) = -0.458), as well as between enzyme activity and allelic phenotype (r(s) = 0.799). Enzyme stability algorithms (FoldX and SNPs3D), allelic phenotype and enzyme activity were most powerful to predict patients' phenotype and tetrahydrobiopterin response. Phenotype prediction was most accurate in deleterious genotypes (≈ 100%), followed by homozygous (92.9%), hemizygous (94.8%), and compound heterozygous genotypes (77.9%), while tetrahydrobiopterin response was correctly predicted in 71.0% of all cases. To our knowledge this is the largest study using algorithms for the prediction of patients' phenotype and tetrahydrobiopterin responsiveness in phenylketonuria patients, using data from the locus-specific and genotypes database.

  8. SEQUENCE OF THE STRUCTURAL GENE FOR GRANULE-BOUND STARCH SYNTHASE OF POTATO (SOLANUM-TUBEROSUM L) AND EVIDENCE FOR A SINGLE POINT DELETION IN THE AMF ALLELE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Leij, Feike R.; VISSER, RGF; Ponstein, Anne S.; Jacobsen, Evert; Feenstra, Willem

    The genomic sequence of the potato gene for starch granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS; "waxy protein") has been determined for the wild-type allele of a monoploid genotype from which an amylose-free (amf) mutant was derived, and for the mutant part of the amf allele. Comparison of the wild-type

  9. Noninvasive Genotyping and Mendelian Analysis of Microsatellites in African Savannah Elephants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okello, John Bosco A.; Wittemyer, G.; Rasmussen, H. B.

    2005-01-01

    mismatch error rate of 2.06%, a possible result of null alleles, mutations, genotyping errors, or inaccuracy in maternity assignment. We detected no evidence for large allele dropout, stuttering, or scoring error in the dataset and significant Hardy-Weinberg deviations at only two loci due...

  10. Demystifying communication signal lost for network redundancy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These studies report on the communication signal lost factors that were analyzed and supported by evidences on coverage analysis activities for Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) systems. We have categorized the influential signal lost factors into four core elements that were concluded based on our field measurement ...

  11. CYP2D6 genotype and phenotype relationship in South Indians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen A

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Genotypes of the drug-metabolizing enzyme CYP2D6 influence plasma levels of 25% of commonlyprescribed drugs. This is the first study in India to investigate the genotype-phenotype relationship of CYP2D6. Aim : To study the influence of some CYP2D6 genotypes on the metabolism of its substrate dextromethorphanin healthy South Indian volunteers and to assess the contribution of the CYP2D6FNx0110 and CYP2D6FNx014 alleles. Materials and Methods : Twenty-six subjects from a previous CYP2D6 genotyping study of healthy volunteerswere included for phenotyping in this study. Selected volunteers belonged to any one of three genotype groups:Group I - two normal activity alleles, Group II - one reduced activity allele and one normal activity allele andGroup III - one loss of function allele along with either a wild type or reduced activity allele. Volunteers werephenotyped for the CYP2D6 enzyme using dextromethorphan as probe drug. Concentrations of the parent drugand metabolite dextrorphan were estimated using high performance liquid chromatography. Metabolic ratioswere calculated as the ratio of parent drug to metabolite in 0-8h urine samples. Statistical Analysis : Metabolic ratios from each genotype group were compared using the Mann-Whitney testat 5% significance, to observe their difference between genotype groups. Results : The mean metabolic ratios±SD in Groups I, II and III were 0.0039±0.0031, 0.0032±0.0017 and0.0391±0.0331 respectively. The mean metabolic ratio of Group III was significantly higher when comparedwith Groups I or II. In heterozygous individuals, the FNx011 or FNx012 alleles compensated for the reduced enzymeactivity due to the FNx0110 allele. However, if a heterozygous individual had a FNx014 allele, the reduced enzyme activitycould not be compensated by the FNx011 or FNx012 alleles. Conclusions : The CYP2D6 enzyme activity was found to be decreased in individuals carrying FNx014 or FNx015 alleles.The FNx011 or FNx

  12. Molecular strain typing of Brucella abortus isolates from Italy by two VNTR allele sizing technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, Riccardo; Ancora, Massimo; De Massis, Fabrizio; Ciammaruconi, Andrea; Zilli, Katiuscia; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta; Pittiglio, Valentina; Fillo, Silvia; Lista, Florigio

    2013-10-01

    Brucellosis, one of the most important re-emerging zoonoses in many countries, is caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Brucella. Furthermore these bacteria represent potential biological warfare agents and the identification of species and biovars of field strains may be crucial for tracing back source of infection, allowing to discriminate naturally occurring outbreaks instead of bioterrorist events. In the last years, multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) has been proposed as complement of the classical biotyping methods and it has been applied for genotyping large collections of Brucella spp. At present, the MLVA band profiles may be resolved by automated or manual procedures. The Lab on a chip technology represents a valid alternative to standard genotyping techniques (as agarose gel electrophoresis) and it has been previously used for Brucella genotyping. Recently, a new high-throughput genotyping analysis system based on capillary gel electrophoresis, the QIAxcel, has been described. The aim of the study was to evaluate the ability of two DNA sizing equipments, the QIAxcel System and the Lab chip GX, to correctly call alleles at the sixteen loci including one frequently used MLVA assay for Brucella genotyping. The results confirmed that these technologies represent a meaningful advancement in high-throughput Brucella genotyping. Considering the accuracy required to confidently resolve loci discrimination, QIAxcel shows a better ability to measure VNTR allele sizes compared to LabChip GX.

  13. Genomic evaluations with many more genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiggans George R

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic evaluations in Holstein dairy cattle have quickly become more reliable over the last two years in many countries as more animals have been genotyped for 50,000 markers. Evaluations can also include animals genotyped with more or fewer markers using new tools such as the 777,000 or 2,900 marker chips recently introduced for cattle. Gains from more markers can be predicted using simulation, whereas strategies to use fewer markers have been compared using subsets of actual genotypes. The overall cost of selection is reduced by genotyping most animals at less than the highest density and imputing their missing genotypes using haplotypes. Algorithms to combine different densities need to be efficient because numbers of genotyped animals and markers may continue to grow quickly. Methods Genotypes for 500,000 markers were simulated for the 33,414 Holsteins that had 50,000 marker genotypes in the North American database. Another 86,465 non-genotyped ancestors were included in the pedigree file, and linkage disequilibrium was generated directly in the base population. Mixed density datasets were created by keeping 50,000 (every tenth of the markers for most animals. Missing genotypes were imputed using a combination of population haplotyping and pedigree haplotyping. Reliabilities of genomic evaluations using linear and nonlinear methods were compared. Results Differing marker sets for a large population were combined with just a few hours of computation. About 95% of paternal alleles were determined correctly, and > 95% of missing genotypes were called correctly. Reliability of breeding values was already high (84.4% with 50,000 simulated markers. The gain in reliability from increasing the number of markers to 500,000 was only 1.6%, but more than half of that gain resulted from genotyping just 1,406 young bulls at higher density. Linear genomic evaluations had reliabilities 1.5% lower than the nonlinear evaluations with 50

  14. Allelic inhibition of displacement activity: a simplified one tube allele-specific PCR for evaluation of ITPA polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galmozzi, E; Facchetti, F; Degasperi, E; Aghemo, A; Lampertico, P

    2013-02-01

    Recently, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have identified two functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the inosine triphosphatase (ITPA) gene, that are associated strongly and independently with hemolytic anemia in patients exposed to pegylated-interferon (Peg-IFN) plus ribavirin (RBV) combined therapy. Here has been developed a simplified allele discrimination polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay named allelic inhibition of displacement activity (AIDA) for evaluation of ITPA polymorphisms. AIDA system relies on three unlabeled primers only, two outer common primers and one inner primer with allele-specific 3' terminus mismatch. DNA samples from 192 patients with chronic HCV infection were used to validate the AIDA system and results were compared with the gold standard TaqMan(®) SNP genotyping assay. Concordant data were obtained for all samples, granting for high specificity of the method. In conclusion, AIDA is a practical one-tube method to reproducibly and to assess accurately rs7270101 and rs1127354 ITPA SNPs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Distortion of maternal-fetal angiotensin II type 1 receptor allele transmission in pre-eclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, L; Crawshaw, S; Baker, P N; Brookfield, J F; Broughton Pipkin, F; Kalsheker, N

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the fetal angiotensin II type 1 receptor genotype in pre-eclampsia. DESIGN: Case-control study. POPULATION: Forty-one maternal-fetal pairs from pre-eclamptic pregnancies and 80 maternal-fetal pairs from normotensive pregnancies. METHODS: Maternal and fetal DNA was genotyped at three diallelic polymorphisms, at nucleotides 573, 1062, and 1166, in the coding exon of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene, and at a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in its 3' flanking region. RESULTS: Allele and genotype frequencies at the four polymorphic regions investigated did not differ between pre-eclamptic and normotensive groups, in either fetal or maternal samples. Mothers heterozygous for the dinucleotide repeat allele designated A4 transmitted this allele to the fetus in 15 of 18 informative pre-eclamptic pregnancies and in eight of 26 normotensive pregnancies. This was greater than the expected probability in pre-eclamptic pregnancies (p=0.04) and less than expected in normotensive pregnancies (p<0.005). The 573T variant, which is in partial linkage disequilibrium with the A4 allele, showed a similar distortion of maternal-fetal transmission. CONCLUSION: Angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene expression in the fetus may contribute to the aetiology of pre-eclampsia. It is unclear whether susceptibility is conferred by the fetal genotype acting alone, or by allele sharing by mother and fetus. Possible mechanisms for the effect of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene are suggested by the association of the 573T variant with low levels of surface receptor expression on platelets. If receptor expression is similarly genetically determined in the placenta, responsiveness to angiotensin II may be affected, with the potential to influence placentation or placental prostaglandin secretion. PMID:9719367

  16. Simultaneous SNP identification and assessment of allele-specific bias from ChIP-seq data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Yunyun

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have been associated with many aspects of human development and disease, and many non-coding SNPs associated with disease risk are presumed to affect gene regulation. We have previously shown that SNPs within transcription factor binding sites can affect transcription factor binding in an allele-specific and heritable manner. However, such analysis has relied on prior whole-genome genotypes provided by large external projects such as HapMap and the 1000 Genomes Project. This requirement limits the study of allele-specific effects of SNPs in primary patient samples from diseases of interest, where complete genotypes are not readily available. Results In this study, we show that we are able to identify SNPs de novo and accurately from ChIP-seq data generated in the ENCODE Project. Our de novo identified SNPs from ChIP-seq data are highly concordant with published genotypes. Independent experimental verification of more than 100 sites estimates our false discovery rate at less than 5%. Analysis of transcription factor binding at de novo identified SNPs revealed widespread heritable allele-specific binding, confirming previous observations. SNPs identified from ChIP-seq datasets were significantly enriched for disease-associated variants, and we identified dozens of allele-specific binding events in non-coding regions that could distinguish between disease and normal haplotypes. Conclusions Our approach combines SNP discovery, genotyping and allele-specific analysis, but is selectively focused on functional regulatory elements occupied by transcription factors or epigenetic marks, and will therefore be valuable for identifying the functional regulatory consequences of non-coding SNPs in primary disease samples.

  17. Allelic Imbalance Is a Prevalent and Tissue-Specific Feature of the Mouse Transcriptome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinter, Stefan F.; Colognori, David; Beliveau, Brian J.; Sadreyev, Ruslan I.; Payer, Bernhard; Yildirim, Eda; Wu, Chao-ting; Lee, Jeannie T.

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, several classes of monoallelic genes have been identified, including those subject to X-chromosome inactivation (XCI), genomic imprinting, and random monoallelic expression (RMAE). However, the extent to which these epigenetic phenomena are influenced by underlying genetic variation is unknown. Here we perform a systematic classification of allelic imbalance in mouse hybrids derived from reciprocal crosses of divergent strains. We observe that deviation from balanced biallelic expression is common, occurring in ∼20% of the mouse transcriptome in a given tissue. Allelic imbalance attributed to genotypic variation is by far the most prevalent class and typically is tissue-specific. However, some genotype-based imbalance is maintained across tissues and is associated with greater genetic variation, especially in 5′ and 3′ termini of transcripts. We further identify novel random monoallelic and imprinted genes and find that genotype can modify penetrance of parental origin even in the setting of large imprinted regions. Examination of nascent transcripts in single cells from inbred parental strains reveals that genes showing genotype-based imbalance in hybrids can also exhibit monoallelic expression in isogenic backgrounds. This surprising observation may suggest a competition between alleles and/or reflect the combined impact of cis- and trans-acting variation on expression of a given gene. Our findings provide novel insights into gene regulation and may be relevant to human genetic variation and disease. PMID:25858912

  18. Hidden costs, value lost: uninsurance in America

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on the Consequences of Uninsurance

    2003-01-01

    Hidden Cost, Value Lost , the fifth of a series of six books on the consequences of uninsurance in the United States, illustrates some of the economic and social losses to the country of maintaining...

  19. Lost Cause: an interactive movie project

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    One of the challenges in designing an interactive cinematic experience is to offer interactive choices which do not distract from immersion into the story. The interactive movie project, Lost Cause focuses on the life of the main character explored through the inter-related perspectives of three other characters. Lost Cause supports an immersive interactive story experience through its correlated design of an interface, narrative content and narrative structure. The movie project is examined ...

  20. Two-temperature LATE-PCR endpoint genotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reis Arthur H

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In conventional PCR, total amplicon yield becomes independent of starting template number as amplification reaches plateau and varies significantly among replicate reactions. This paper describes a strategy for reconfiguring PCR so that the signal intensity of a single fluorescent detection probe after PCR thermal cycling reflects genomic composition. The resulting method corrects for product yield variations among replicate amplification reactions, permits resolution of homozygous and heterozygous genotypes based on endpoint fluorescence signal intensities, and readily identifies imbalanced allele ratios equivalent to those arising from gene/chromosomal duplications. Furthermore, the use of only a single colored probe for genotyping enhances the multiplex detection capacity of the assay. Results Two-Temperature LATE-PCR endpoint genotyping combines Linear-After-The-Exponential (LATE-PCR (an advanced form of asymmetric PCR that efficiently generates single-stranded DNA and mismatch-tolerant probes capable of detecting allele-specific targets at high temperature and total single-stranded amplicons at a lower temperature in the same reaction. The method is demonstrated here for genotyping single-nucleotide alleles of the human HEXA gene responsible for Tay-Sachs disease and for genotyping SNP alleles near the human p53 tumor suppressor gene. In each case, the final probe signals were normalized against total single-stranded DNA generated in the same reaction. Normalization reduces the coefficient of variation among replicates from 17.22% to as little as 2.78% and permits endpoint genotyping with >99.7% accuracy. These assays are robust because they are consistent over a wide range of input DNA concentrations and give the same results regardless of how many cycles of linear amplification have elapsed. The method is also sufficiently powerful to distinguish between samples with a 1:1 ratio of two alleles from samples comprised of

  1. SNPMClust: Bivariate Gaussian Genotype Clustering and Calling for Illumina Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen W. Erickson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available SNPMClust is an R package for genotype clustering and calling with Illumina microarrays. It was originally developed for studies using the GoldenGate custom genotyping platform but can be used with other Illumina platforms, including Infinium BeadChip. The algorithm first rescales the fluorescent signal intensity data, adds empirically derived pseudo-data to minor allele genotype clusters, then uses the package mclust for bivariate Gaussian model fitting. We compared the accuracy and sensitivity of SNPMClust to that of GenCall, Illumina's proprietary algorithm, on a data set of 94 whole-genome amplified buccal (cheek swab DNA samples. These samples were genotyped on a custom panel which included 1064 SNPs for which the true genotype was known with high confidence. SNPMClust produced uniformly lower false call rates over a wide range of overall call rates.

  2. KChIP2 genotype dependence of transient outward current (Ito) properties in cardiomyocytes isolated from male and female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldschmidt, Lara; Junkereit, Vera; Bähring, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The transient outward current (Ito) in cardiomyocytes is largely mediated by Kv4 channels associated with Kv Channel Interacting Protein 2 (KChIP2). A knockout model has documented the critical role of KChIP2 in Ito expression. The present study was conducted to characterize in both sexes the dependence of Ito properties, including current magnitude, inactivation kinetics, recovery from inactivation and voltage dependence of inactivation, on the number of functional KChIP2 alleles. For this purpose we performed whole-cell patch-clamp experiments on isolated left ventricular cardiomyocytes from male and female mice which had different KChIP2 genotypes; i.e., wild-type (KChIP2+/+), heterozygous knockout (KChIP2+/-) or complete knockout of KChIP2 (KChIP2-/-). We found in both sexes a KChIP2 gene dosage effect (i.e., a proportionality between number of alleles and phenotype) on Ito magnitude, however, concerning other Ito properties, KChIP2+/- resembled KChIP2+/+. Only in the total absence of KChIP2 (KChIP2-/-) we observed a slowing of Ito kinetics, a slowing of recovery from inactivation and a negative shift of a portion of the voltage dependence of inactivation. In a minor fraction of KChIP2-/- myocytes Ito was completely lost. The distinct KChIP2 genotype dependences of Ito magnitude and inactivation kinetics, respectively, seen in cardiomyocytes were reproduced with two-electrode voltage-clamp experiments on Xenopus oocytes expressing Kv4.2 and different amounts of KChIP2. Our results corroborate the critical role of KChIP2 in controlling Ito properties. They demonstrate that the Kv4.2/KChIP2 interaction in cardiomyocytes is highly dynamic, with a clear KChIP2 gene dosage effect on Kv4 channel surface expression but not on inactivation gating.

  3. Rapid detection of the CYP2A6*12 hybrid allele by Pyrosequencing® technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallagher Margaret L

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of CYP2A6 alleles associated with reduced enzyme activity is important in the study of inter-individual differences in drug metabolism. CYP2A6*12 is a hybrid allele that results from unequal crossover between CYP2A6 and CYP2A7 genes. The 5' regulatory region and exons 1–2 are derived from CYP2A7, and exons 3–9 are derived from CYP2A6. Conventional methods for detection of CYP2A6*12 consist of two-step PCR protocols that are laborious and unsuitable for high-throughput genotyping. We developed a rapid and accurate method to detect the CYP2A6*12 allele by Pyrosequencing technology. Methods A single set of PCR primers was designed to specifically amplify both the CYP2A6*1 wild-type allele and the CYP2A6*12 hybrid allele. An internal Pyrosequencing primer was used to generate allele-specific sequence information, which detected homozygous wild-type, heterozygous hybrid, and homozygous hybrid alleles. We first validated the assay on 104 DNA samples that were also genotyped by conventional two-step PCR and by cycle sequencing. CYP2A6*12 allele frequencies were then determined using the Pyrosequencing assay on 181 multi-ethnic DNA samples from subjects of African American, European Caucasian, Pacific Rim, and Hispanic descent. Finally, we streamlined the Pyrosequencing assay by integrating liquid handling robotics into the workflow. Results Pyrosequencing results demonstrated 100% concordance with conventional two-step PCR and cycle sequencing methods. Allele frequency data showed slightly higher prevalence of the CYP2A6*12 allele in European Caucasians and Hispanics. Conclusion This Pyrosequencing assay proved to be a simple, rapid, and accurate alternative to conventional methods, which can be easily adapted to the needs of higher-throughput studies.

  4. Diversity Outbred Mice at 21: Maintaining Allelic Variation in the Face of Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elissa J. Chesler

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Multi-parent populations (MPPs capture and maintain the genetic diversity from multiple inbred founder strains to provide a resource for high-resolution genetic mapping through the accumulation of recombination events over many generations. Breeding designs that maintain a large effective population size with randomized assignment of breeders at each generation can minimize the impact of selection, inbreeding, and genetic drift on allele frequencies. Small deviations from expected allele frequencies will have little effect on the power and precision of genetic analysis, but a major distortion could result in reduced power and loss of important functional alleles. We detected strong transmission ratio distortion in the Diversity Outbred (DO mouse population on chromosome 2, caused by meiotic drive favoring transmission of the WSB/EiJ allele at the R2d2 locus. The distorted region harbors thousands of polymorphisms derived from the seven non-WSB founder strains and many of these would be lost if the sweep was allowed to continue. To ensure the utility of the DO population to study genetic variation on chromosome 2, we performed an artificial selection against WSB/EiJ alleles at the R2d2 locus. Here, we report that we have purged the WSB/EiJ allele from the drive locus while preserving WSB/EiJ alleles in the flanking regions. We observed minimal disruption to allele frequencies across the rest of the autosomal genome. However, there was a shift in haplotype frequencies of the mitochondrial genome and an increase in the rate of an unusual sex chromosome aneuploidy. The DO population has been restored to genome-wide utility for genetic analysis, but our experience underscores that vigilant monitoring of similar genetic resource populations is needed to ensure their long-term utility.

  5. ACTN3 allele frequency in humans covaries with global latitudinal gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M Friedlander

    Full Text Available A premature stop codon in ACTN3 resulting in α-actinin-3 deficiency (the ACTN3 577XX genotype is common in humans and reduces strength, muscle mass, and fast-twitch fiber diameter, but increases the metabolic efficiency of skeletal muscle. Linkage disequilibrium data suggest that the ACTN3 R577X allele has undergone positive selection during human evolution. The allele has been hypothesized to be adaptive in environments with scarce resources where efficient muscle metabolism would be selected. Here we test this hypothesis by using recently developed comparative methods that account for evolutionary relatedness and gene flow among populations. We find evidence that the ACTN3 577XX genotype evolved in association with the global latitudinal gradient. Our results suggest that environmental variables related to latitudinal variation, such as species richness and mean annual temperature, may have influenced the adaptive evolution of ACTN3 577XX during recent human history.

  6. Genetic structure, diversity, and allelic richness in composite collection and reference set in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gowda Cholenahalli LL

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant genetic resources (PGR are the basic raw materials for future genetic progress and an insurance against unforeseen threats to agricultural production. An extensive characterization of PGR provides an opportunity to dissect structure, mine allelic variations, and identify diverse accessions for crop improvement. The Generation Challenge Program http://www.generationcp.org conceptualized the development of "composite collections" and extraction of "reference sets" from these for more efficient tapping of global crop-related genetic resources. In this study, we report the genetic structure, diversity and allelic richness in a composite collection of chickpea using SSR markers, and formation of a reference set of 300 accessions. Results The 48 SSR markers detected 1683 alleles in 2915 accessions, of which, 935 were considered rare, 720 common and 28 most frequent. The alleles per locus ranged from 14 to 67, averaged 35, and the polymorphic information content was from 0.467 to 0.974, averaged 0.854. Marker polymorphism varied between groups of accessions in the composite collection and reference set. A number of group-specific alleles were detected: 104 in Kabuli, 297 in desi, and 69 in wild Cicer; 114 each in Mediterranean and West Asia (WA, 117 in South and South East Asia (SSEA, and 10 in African region accessions. Desi and kabuli shared 436 alleles, while wild Cicer shared 17 and 16 alleles with desi and kabuli, respectively. The accessions from SSEA and WA shared 74 alleles, while those from Mediterranean 38 and 33 alleles with WA and SSEA, respectively. Desi chickpea contained a higher proportion of rare alleles (53% than kabuli (46%, while wild Cicer accessions were devoid of rare alleles. A genotype-based reference set captured 1315 (78% of the 1683 composite collection alleles of which 463 were rare, 826 common, and 26 the most frequent alleles. The neighbour-joining tree diagram of this reference set represents

  7. Association between diabetes type 1 and DQB1 alleles in a case-control study conducted in Montevideo, Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimbacas, Adriana; Pérez-Bravo, Francisco; Hidalgo, Pedro C; Javiel, Gerardo; Pisciottano, Carmen; Grignola, Rosario; Jorge, Ana María; Gallino, Juan Pablo; Gasagoite, Jackeline; Cardoso, Horacio

    2003-03-31

    We studied HLA DQB1 allele frequencies and the relative risk (RR) of various genotypes in 72 type 1 diabetic patients and 40 control individuals in Uruguay. This is a tri-racial (Caucasian, Black and Indo-American) mixed population. The products of the polymerase chain reaction amplifications were hybridized with oligonucleotides by allele-specific oligonucleotide reverse or dot blot methods. Significant differences between these two groups were observed only for allele DQB1*0302 (35%, RR = 7.34, P<0.001). The frequency of the alleles carrying a non-aspartic acid residue at position 57 was significantly higher in the diabetic patients (85 vs 53%, P<0.001). In contrast, the frequency of Asp alleles was negatively associated with type 1 diabetes (RR = 0.20, P<0.001). The genotype DQB1*0302/DQB1*0201 (33%, RR = 5.41, P<0.05) was positively associated with this disease. The genotype frequencies associated with type 1 diabetes in our population were significantly different from what is known for Caucasian and Black populations as well as compared with another admixed population, from Chile.

  8. Screening for SNPs with Allele-Specific Methylation based on Next-Generation Sequencing Data

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Bo; Ji, Yuan; Xu, Yaomin; Ting, Angela H

    2013-01-01

    Allele-specific methylation (ASM) has long been studied but mainly documented in the context of genomic imprinting and X chromosome inactivation. Taking advantage of the next-generation sequencing technology, we conduct a high-throughput sequencing experiment with four prostate cell lines to survey the whole genome and identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with ASM. A Bayesian approach is proposed to model the counts of short reads for each SNP conditional on its genotypes of multip...

  9. Deducing the pathogenic contribution of recessive ABCA4 alleles in an outbred population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Emily I; Nylen, Erik L; Ko, Audrey C; Affatigato, Louisa M; Heggen, Andrew C; Wang, Kai; Sheffield, Val C; Stone, Edwin M

    2010-10-01

    Accurate prediction of the pathogenic effects of specific genotypes is important for the design and execution of clinical trials as well as for meaningful counseling of individual patients. However, for many autosomal recessive diseases, it can be difficult to deduce the relative pathogenic contribution of individual alleles because relatively few affected individuals share the same two disease-causing variations. In this study, we used multiple regression analysis to estimate the pathogenicity of specific alleles of ABCA4 in patients with retinal phenotypes ranging from Stargardt disease to retinitis pigmentosa. This analysis revealed quantitative allelic effects on two aspects of the visual phenotype, visual acuity (P disease and will also aid in the optimal selection of subjects for clinical trials of new therapies.

  10. Maternal and fetal human leukocyte antigen class Ia and II alleles in severe preeclampsia and eclampsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmery, J.; Hachmon, R.; Pyo, C. W.

    2016-01-01

    and -DPB1) alleles and the risk of developing severe preeclampsia/eclampsia were investigated in a detailed and large-scale study. In total, 259 women diagnosed with severe preeclampsia or eclampsia and 260 matched control women with no preeclampsia, together with their neonates, were included in the study....... HLA genotyping for mothers and neonates was performed using next-generation sequencing. The HLA-DPB1*04:01:01G allele was significantly more frequent (Pc=0.044) among women diagnosed with severe preeclampsia/eclampsia compared with controls, and the DQA1*01:02:01G allele frequency was significantly...... lower (Pc=0.042) among newborns born by women with severe preeclampsia/eclampsia compared with controls. In mothers with severe preeclampsia/eclampsia, homozygosity was significantly more common compared with controls at the HLA-DPB1 locus (Pc=0.0028). Although the current large study shows some...

  11. Microsatellite D21D210 (GT-12) allele frequencies in sporadic Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lannfelt, L.; Lilius, L.; Viitanen, M.; Winblad, B.; Basun, H.; Houlden, H.; Rossor, M.; Hardy, J.

    1995-01-01

    Four disease-causing mutations have so far been described in the amyloid precursor protein gene on chromosome 21 in familial early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Linkage analysis with a fourteen-allele microsatellite at D21S210 named GT-12 has proven useful in the elucidation of amyloid presursor protein gene involvement in Alzheimer's disease families, as it is closely linked to the gene. Most cases of Alzheimer's disease are thought to be sporadic and not familial. However, evidence from earlier studies suggests an important genetic contribution also in sporadic cases, where gene-environment interaction may contribute to the disease. We have determined frequencies of the GT-12 alleles in 78 Swedish and 49 British sporadic Alzheimer's disease cases and 104 healthy elderly control subjects, to investigate if the disease associates with a particular genotype in GT-12. However, no differences in allele frequencies were observed between any of the groups. (au) (26 refs.)

  12. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori vacuolating cytotoxin and its allelic mosaicism as a predictive marker for Iranian dyspeptic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammadi, M; Oghalaie, A; Mohajerani, N

    2003-01-01

    can serve as screening markers for such a population, H. pylori strains were isolated from one hundred and thirty two dyspeptic patients. H. pylori genomic DNA was extracted and underwent PCR-amplification for the cytotoxin alleles. Genotyping of the signal sequence region of the vacA gene identified...

  13. APOL1 Risk Alleles Are Associated With More Severe Arteriosclerosis in Renal Resistance Vessels With Aging and Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Hughson

    2016-05-01

    Discussion: With the limitation of the small number of subjects contributing to the positive results, the findings imply that APOL1 risk alleles recessively augment small-vessel arteriosclerosis in conjunction with age and hypertension. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis was not a significant finding, indicating that in the early stages of arterionephrosclerosis, the primary pathologic influence of APOL1 genotype is vascular rather than glomerular.

  14. Gamma-radiation Mutagenesis in Genetically Unstable Barley Mutants. Pt. 3. Effects of Aging in Various Genotypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balchiuniene, L.

    1995-01-01

    Gamma-irradiation effect was tested on the grain material of normal-initial barley c. 'Auksiniai II' and allelic mutants tw 1 and tw 2 . Dependence of the aging effects on genotype was obvious, especially in survival test. Differences were observed even on allelic mutants. These observations are important for the preservation strategy of plant genetical resources. (author). 11 refs., 3 tabs

  15. Identification of Alleles of Puroindoline Genes and Their Effect on Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Grain Texture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klára Štiasna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Grain hardness is one of the most important quality characteristics of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.. It is a significant property of wheat grains and relates to milling quality and end product quality. Grain hardness is caused by the presence of puroindoline genes (Pina and Pinb. A collection of 25 genotypes of wheat with unusual grain colour (blue aleurone, purple and white pericarp, yellow endosperm was studied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR for the diversity within Pina and Pinb (alleles: Pina-D1a, Pina-D1b, Pinb-D1a, Pinb- -D1b, Pinb-D1c and Pinb-D1d. The endosperm structure was determined by a non-destructive method using light transfl ectance meter and grain hardness by a texture analyser. Genotype Novosibirskaya 67 and isogenic ANK lines revealed hitherto unknown alleles at the locus for the annealing of primers of Pinb-D1. Allele Pinb-D1c was found to be absent from each genotype. The mealy endosperm ranged from 0 to 100 % and grain hardness from 15.10 to 26.87 N per sample.

  16. HLA-DR alleles among Pakistani patients of coeliac disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, N.; Ahmed, T.A.; Bashir, M.; Ali, S.; Iqbal, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate whether certain DR alleles might also contribute to the genetic susceptibility among Coeliac disease patients in Pakistan. Methods: The case-control study was conducted at the Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, from October 2011 to January 2012, and analysed 25 children diagnosed to have coeliac disease as per the criteria set by the European Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, which included histopathological alterations in duodenal biopsies, clinical response to gluten withdrawal, and presence of anti-endomyseal antibodies. Patients were compared with a group of 150 healthy subjects. Dioxyribonucleic acid was extracted from peripheral blood collected in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid.K3. Human leukocyte antigen DRB1 typing was carried out on allele level (DRB1*01 - DRB1*16) using sequence specific primers. Human leukocyte antigen type was determined by agarose gel electrophoresis and results were recorded. Phenotype frequency of various alleles among the patient group and the control group was calculated by direct counting, and significance of their association was determined by Fisher Exact Test. Results: A total of 11 (44%) female paediatric coeliac patients in age range 1-9 (mean 7.2+-4.8 years) and 14 (56%) male paediatric patients in the age range 6-14 (mean 8.6+-5.1 years) were genotyped for HLA-DRB1 loci. A statistically significant positive association of the disease with HLA-DRB1*03 (n=23; 92% versus n=31; 21% in controls, p <0.01) was observed. Conclusion: HLA-DRB1*03 is associated with increased risk of developing coeliac disease. (author)

  17. Estimating the numbers of malaria infections in blood samples using high-resolution genotyping data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Ross

    Full Text Available People living in endemic areas often habour several malaria infections at once. High-resolution genotyping can distinguish between infections by detecting the presence of different alleles at a polymorphic locus. However the number of infections may not be accurately counted since parasites from multiple infections may carry the same allele. We use simulation to determine the circumstances under which the number of observed genotypes are likely to be substantially less than the number of infections present and investigate the performance of two methods for estimating the numbers of infections from high-resolution genotyping data. The simulations suggest that the problem is not substantial in most datasets: the disparity between the mean numbers of infections and of observed genotypes was small when there was 20 or more alleles, 20 or more blood samples, a mean number of infections of 6 or less and where the frequency of the most common allele was no greater than 20%. The issue of multiple infections carrying the same allele is unlikely to be a major component of the errors in PCR-based genotyping. Simulations also showed that, with heterogeneity in allele frequencies, the observed frequencies are not a good approximation of the true allele frequencies. The first method that we proposed to estimate the numbers of infections assumes that they are a good approximation and hence did poorly in the presence of heterogeneity. In contrast, the second method by Li et al estimates both the numbers of infections and the true allele frequencies simultaneously and produced accurate estimates of the mean number of infections.

  18. DD genotype of ACE gene in boys: may it be a risk factor for minimal change nephrotic syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alasehirli, Belgin; Balat, Ayşe; Büyükçelik, Mithat

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism affects the circulating and cellular levels of ACE and may be a risk factor in several renal diseases. We analyzed the association of ACE gene I/D polymorphism with the clinical presentation of minimal change nephrotic syndrome (MCNS) in a Turkish child population. This study consisted of 97 children with MCNS and 144 healthy controls. Genotyping of ACE gene was performed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The distributions of ACE genotypes were II in 13%, ID in 49%, and DD in 38% in patient group, and 9%, 49%, and 42% in control group, respectively. The frequency of the D allele was 63% and that of the I allele was 37% in patients. There were no relevant differences in the allele frequencies and genotypes of ACE I/D polymorphism between patients and controls. However, DD genotype was higher in boys in children with MCNS (78.4%. vs. 50.0%, p = 0.004). The frequencies of DD genotype and D allele in boys were 7.25 and 2.56 times higher than II genotype and I allele in the patient group, respectively. We suggest that DD genotype in boys may be one of the risk factors for MCNS.

  19. Lost-sales inventory theory : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijvank, Marco; Vis, Iris F. A.

    2011-01-01

    In classic inventory models it is common to assume that excess demand is backordered. However, studies analyzing customer behavior in practice show that most unfulfilled demand is lost or an alternative item/location is looked for in many retail environments. Inventory systems that include this

  20. Retail inventory management with lost sales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curseu - Stefanut, A.

    2012-01-01

    The inventory control problem of traditional store-based grocery retailers has several challenging features. Demand for products is stochastic, and is typically lost when no inventory is available on the shelves. As the consumer behavior studies reveal, only a small percentage of customers are

  1. Concern about Lost Talent: Support Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Joanna; Saha, Lawrence J.

    2011-01-01

    This document was produced by the authors based on their research for the report "Lost talent? The occupational ambitions and attainments of young Australians", and is an added resource for further information. The purpose of this supplement is to provide greater detail about the background of research into the topic of human talent in…

  2. Clubbed fingers: the claws we lost?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, A.A.M.; Vermeij-Keers, C.; Zoelen, E.J.J. van; Gooren, L.J.G.

    2004-01-01

    Clubbed digits resemble the human embryonic fingers and toes, which took like the digits of a claw. Clubbed digits, thus, may represent the return of the embryonic claw and may even represent the claws man has lost during evolution, if ontogenesis realty recapitulates phylogenesis. We put forward

  3. HPV has left the building – the absence of detectable HPV DNA and the presence of r allele/s for the P72R polymorphism in the TP53 gene may call for more aggressive therapeutic approach in HPV-associated tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petkova, Rumena; Chelenkova, Pavlina; Yemendzhiev, Husein; Tsekov, Iliya; Kalvatchev, Zlatko; Chakarov, Stoyan

    2013-01-01

    HPV infection is a major pathogenetic factor in cervical carcinoma as well as in many of the squamous cancers of head and neck and other epithelial cancers. Persistence of HPV DNA detectable by routine methods is considered to be a risk factor for advanced CIN and, in patients treated by surgery or non-surgical treatment modalities (radiotherapy, chemotherapy), HPV persistence is believed to be associated with increased risk for local recurrence. In terms of survival, however, it has been repeatedly proven that patients with cervical cancer and other HPV-associated cancers with detectable HPV DNA tend to have better outcomes than patients with HPV-negative tumours. The P72R polymorphism in the human TP53 gene has been contemplated as an independent phenotype modifier in cancers, especially the R allele which has been shown to confer higher pro-apoptotic properties to the resultant p53 protein. It has been demonstrated, however, that RR homozygotes were much more common in study groups with HPV-associated tumours than the other two genotypes and that the P allele in P/R heterozygotes was preferentially lost while the R allele was preferentially retained and mutated. It is possible that HPV-dependent carcinogenesis strictly relies on the presence of HPV and the expression of the E6 and E7 onco proteins only in the initial phases of transformation of infected cells (e.g. CIN). It may be associated with activation of latent HPV that would create a background of decreased control over the integrity of the genome of the host cell. The process can develop further by mechanisms independent of the presence of HPV and if the virus clears at some later point, that would not halt the already ongoing neoplastic transformation. Absence of HPV DNA in cervical tumours, whether before or after treatment, is not a reason to decrease vigilant monitoring and rule out the need for further treatment, as it may be quite possible that the TP53 gene of the infected cells has already been

  4. pfmdr1 Amplification and Fixation of pfcrt Chloroquine Resistance Alleles in Plasmodium falciparum in Venezuela ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffing, Sean; Syphard, Luke; Sridaran, Sankar; McCollum, Andrea M.; Mixson-Hayden, Tonya; Vinayak, Sumiti; Villegas, Leopoldo; Barnwell, John W.; Escalante, Ananias A.; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2010-01-01

    Molecular tools are valuable for determining evolutionary history and the prevalence of drug-resistant malaria parasites. These tools have helped to predict decreased sensitivity to antimalarials and fixation of multidrug resistance genotypes in some regions. In order to assess how historical drug policies impacted Plasmodium falciparum in Venezuela, we examined molecular changes in genes associated with drug resistance. We examined pfmdr1 and pfcrt in samples from Sifontes, Venezuela, and integrated our findings with earlier work describing dhfr and dhps in these samples. We characterized pfmdr1 genotypes and copy number variation, pfcrt genotypes, and proximal microsatellites in 93 samples originating from surveillance from 2003 to 2004. Multicopy pfmdr1 was found in 12% of the samples. Two pfmdr1 alleles, Y184F/N1042D/D1246Y (37%) and Y184F/S1034C/N1042D/D1246Y (63%), were found. These alleles share ancestry, and no evidence of strong selective pressure on mutations was found. pfcrt chloroquine resistance alleles are fixed with two alleles: StctVMNT (91%) and SagtVMNT (9%). These alleles are associated with strong selection. There was also an association between pfcrt, pfmdr1, dhfr, and dhps genotypes/haplotypes. Duplication of pfmdr1 suggests a potential shift in mefloquine sensitivity in this region, which warrants further study. A bottleneck occurred in P. falciparum in Sifontes, Venezuela, and multidrug resistance genotypes are present. This population could be targeted for malaria elimination programs to prevent the possible spread of multidrug-resistant parasites. PMID:20145087

  5. Allele-specific deletions in mouse tumors identify Fbxw7 as germline modifier of tumor susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Perez-Losada

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have been successful in finding associations between specific genetic variants and cancer susceptibility in human populations. These studies have identified a range of highly statistically significant associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and susceptibility to development of a range of human tumors. However, the effect of each SNP in isolation is very small, and all of the SNPs combined only account for a relatively minor proportion of the total genetic risk (5-10%. There is therefore a major requirement for alternative routes to the discovery of genetic risk factors for cancer. We have previously shown using mouse models that chromosomal regions harboring susceptibility genes identified by linkage analysis frequently exhibit allele-specific genetic alterations in tumors. We demonstrate here that the Fbxw7 gene, a commonly mutated gene in a wide range of mouse and human cancers, shows allele-specific deletions in mouse lymphomas and skin tumors. Lymphomas from three different F1 hybrids show 100% allele-specificity in the patterns of allelic loss. Parental alleles from 129/Sv or Spretus/Gla mice are lost in tumors from F1 hybrids with C57BL/6 animals, due to the presence of a specific non-synonymous coding sequence polymorphism at the N-terminal portion of the gene. A specific genetic test of association between this SNP and lymphoma susceptibility in interspecific backcross mice showed a significant linkage (p = 0.001, but only in animals with a functional p53 gene. These data therefore identify Fbxw7 as a p53-dependent tumor susceptibility gene. Increased p53-dependent tumor susceptibility and allele-specific losses were also seen in a mouse skin model of skin tumor development. We propose that analysis of preferential allelic imbalances in tumors may provide an efficient means of uncovering genetic variants that affect mouse and human tumor susceptibility.

  6. Replacement of Lost Lgr5-Positive Stem Cells through Plasticity of Their Enterocyte-Lineage Daughters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetteh, Paul W; Basak, Onur; Farin, Henner F; Wiebrands, Kay; Kretzschmar, Kai; Begthel, Harry; van den Born, Maaike; Korving, Jeroen; de Sauvage, Frederic; van Es, Johan H; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Clevers, Hans

    2016-02-04

    Intestinal crypts display robust regeneration upon injury. The relatively rare secretory precursors can replace lost stem cells, but it is unknown if the abundant enterocyte progenitors that express the Alkaline phosphate intestinal (Alpi) gene also have this capacity. We created an Alpi-IRES-CreERT2 (Alpi(CreER)) knockin allele for lineage tracing. Marked clones consist entirely of enterocytes and are all lost from villus tips within days. Genetic fate-mapping of Alpi(+) cells before or during targeted ablation of Lgr5-expressing stem cells generated numerous long-lived crypt-villus "ribbons," indicative of dedifferentiation of enterocyte precursors into Lgr5(+) stems. By single-cell analysis of dedifferentiating enterocytes, we observed the generation of Paneth-like cells and proliferative stem cells. We conclude that the highly proliferative, short-lived enterocyte precursors serve as a large reservoir of potential stem cells during crypt regeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Microangiopathic complications related to different alleles of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Egyptian Journal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Journal Home ... Microangiopathic complications related to different alleles of manganese superoxide dismutase gene in diabetes mellitus type 1. TM EL Masry ... 23(2) 2005: 155-167 ...

  8. GST M1-T1 null allele frequency patterns in geographically assorted human populations: a phylogenetic approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthilkumar Pitchalu Kasthurinaidu

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity in drug metabolism and disposition is mainly considered as the outcome of the inter-individual genetic variation in polymorphism of drug-xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME. Among the XMEs, glutathione-S-transferases (GST gene loci are an important candidate for the investigation of diversity in allele frequency, as the deletion mutations in GST M1 and T1 genotypes are associated with various cancers and genetic disorders of all major Population Affiliations (PAs. Therefore, the present population based phylogenetic study was focused to uncover the frequency distribution pattern in GST M1 and T1 null genotypes among 45 Geographically Assorted Human Populations (GAHPs. The frequency distribution pattern for GST M1 and T1 null alleles have been detected in this study using the data derived from literatures representing 44 populations affiliated to Africa, Asia, Europe, South America and the genome of PA from Gujarat, a region in western India. Allele frequency counting for Gujarat PA and scattered plot analysis for geographical distribution among the PAs were performed in SPSS-21. The GST M1 and GST T1 null allele frequencies patterns of the PAs were computed in Seqboot, Gendist program of Phylip software package (3.69 versions and Unweighted Pair Group method with Arithmetic Mean in Mega-6 software. Allele frequencies from South African Xhosa tribe, East African Zimbabwe, East African Ethiopia, North African Egypt, Caucasian, South Asian Afghanistan and South Indian Andhra Pradesh have been identified as the probable seven patterns among the 45 GAHPs investigated in this study for GST M1-T1 null genotypes. The patternized null allele frequencies demonstrated in this study for the first time addresses the missing link in GST M1-T1 null allele frequencies among GAHPs.

  9. Genetic variation of european maize genotypes (zea mays l. Detected using ssr markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Vivodík

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The SSR molecular markers were used to assess genetic diversity in 40 old European maize genotypes. Ten SSR primers revealed a total of 65 alleles ranging from 4 (UMC1060 to 8 (UMC2002 and UMC1155 alleles per locus with a mean value of 6.50 alleles per locus. The PIC values ranged from 0.713 (UMC1060 to 0.842 (UMC2002 with an average value of 0.810 and the DI value ranged from 0.734 (UMC1060 to 0.848 (UMC2002 with an average value of 0.819. 100% of used SSR markers had PIC and DI values higher than 0.7 that means high polymorphism of chosen markers used for analysis. Probability of identity (PI was low ranged from 0.004 (UMC1072 to 0.022 (UMC1060 with an average of 0.008. A dendrogram was constructed from a genetic distance matrix based on profiles of the 10 maize SSR loci using the unweighted pair-group method with the arithmetic average (UPGMA. According to analysis, the collection of 40 diverse accessions of maize was clustered into four clusters. The first cluster contained nine genotypes of maize, while the second cluster contained the four genotypes of maize. The third cluster contained 5 maize genotypes. Cluster 4 contained five genotypes from Hungary (22.73%, two genotypes from Poland (9.10%, seven genotypes of maize from Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (31.81%, six genotypes from Czechoslovakia (27.27%, one genotype from Slovak Republic (4.55% and one genotype of maize is from Yugoslavia (4.55%. We could not distinguish 4 maize genotypes grouped in cluster 4, (Voroneskaja and Kocovska Skora and 2 Hungarian maize genotypes - Feheres Sarga Filleres and Mindszentpusztai Feher, which are genetically the closest.

  10. Allele-specific physical interactions regulate the heterotic traits in hybrids of Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babita Singh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Heterosis is an important phenomenon for the breeding in agricultural crops as it influences yield related traits such as biomass yield, seed number and weight, adaptive and reproductive traits. However, the level of heterosis greatly varies for different traits and different genotypes. The present study focuses on identification of physical interactions between alleles and their role in transcriptional regulation in heterotic plants. Here, we used two Arabidopsis ecotypes; Col-0 and C24 as parent for crosses. We performed crossing between these ecotypes and screened the F1 hybrids on the basis of different SSR markers. Further, we used Hi-C to capture intra- and inter-chromosomal physical interactions between alleles on genome-wide level. Then, we identified allele-specific chromatin interactions and constructed genome-wide allele-specific contact maps at different resolutions for the entire chromosome. We also performed RNA-seq of hybrids and their parents. RNA-seq analysis identified several differentially expressed genes and non-additively expressed genes in hybrids with respect to their parents. Further, to understand the biological significance of these chromatin interactions, we annotated these interactions and correlated with the transcriptome data. Thus, our study provides alleles-specific chromatin interactions in genome-wide fashion which play a crucial role in regulation of different genes that may be important for heterosis.

  11. Highly preferential association of NonF508del CF mutations with the M470 allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciminelli, B M; Bonizzato, A; Bombieri, C; Pompei, F; Gabaldo, M; Ciccacci, C; Begnini, A; Holubova, A; Zorzi, P; Piskackova, T; Macek, M; Castellani, C; Modiano, G; Pignatti, P F

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of previous findings on random individuals, we hypothesized a preferential association of CF causing mutations with the M allele of the M470V polymorphic site of the CFTR gene. We have determined the M/V-CF mutation haplotype in a series of 201 North East Italian and 73 Czech CF patients who were not F508del homozygotes, as F508del was already known to be fully associated with the M allele. Out of 358 not F508del CF genes, 84 carried the V allele and 274 the less common M allele. In the N-E Italian population, MM subjects have a risk of carrying a CF causing mutation 6.9x greater than VV subjects when F508del is excluded and 15.4x when F508del is included. In the Czech population a similar, although less pronounced, association is observed. Besides the possible biological significance of this association, the possibility of exploiting it for a pilot screening program has been explored in a local North East Italian population for which CF patients were characterized for their CF mutation. General M470V genotyping followed by common CF mutation screening limited to couples in which each partner carries at least one M allele would need testing only 39% of the couples, which contribute 89% of the total risk, with a cost benefit.

  12. Rules for resolving Mendelian inconsistencies in nuclear pedigrees typed for two-allele markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad Ahmad Khan

    Full Text Available Gene-mapping studies, regularly, rely on examination for Mendelian transmission of marker alleles in a pedigree as a way of screening for genotyping errors and mutations. For analysis of family data sets, it is, usually, necessary to resolve or remove the genotyping errors prior to consideration. At the Center of Inherited Disease Research (CIDR, to deal with their large-scale data flow, they formalized their data cleaning approach in a set of rules based on PedCheck output. We scrutinize via carefully designed simulations that how well CIDR's data cleaning rules work in practice. We found that genotype errors in siblings are detected more often than in parents for less polymorphic SNPs and vice versa for more polymorphic SNPs. Through computer simulations, we conclude that some of the CIDR's rules work poorly in some circumstances, and we suggest a set of modified data cleaning rules that may work better than CIDR's rules.

  13. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol A Soderlund

    Full Text Available Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor, where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense, and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available

  14. Abnormal segregation of alleles in CEPH pedigree DNAs arising from allele loss in lymphoblastoid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, N J; Armour, J A; Crosier, M; Jeffreys, A J

    1993-01-01

    Somatic events that result in the reduction to hemi- or homozygosity at all loci affected by the event have been identified in lymphoblastoid DNA from mothers of two CEPH families. Using suitably informative probes, the allele deficiencies were detected by the abnormal transmission of alleles from grandparents to grandchildren, with the apparent absence of the alleles from the parent. Undetected somatic deficiencies in family DNAs could result in misscoring of recombination events and consequently introduce errors into linkage analysis.

  15. Methods for MHC genotyping in non-model vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babik, W

    2010-03-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are considered a paradigm of adaptive evolution at the molecular level and as such are frequently investigated by evolutionary biologists and ecologists. Accurate genotyping is essential for understanding of the role that MHC variation plays in natural populations, but may be extremely challenging. Here, I discuss the DNA-based methods currently used for genotyping MHC in non-model vertebrates, as well as techniques likely to find widespread use in the future. I also highlight the aspects of MHC structure that are relevant for genotyping, and detail the challenges posed by the complex genomic organization and high sequence variation of MHC loci. Special emphasis is placed on designing appropriate PCR primers, accounting for artefacts and the problem of genotyping alleles from multiple, co-amplifying loci, a strategy which is frequently necessary due to the structure of the MHC. The suitability of typing techniques is compared in various research situations, strategies for efficient genotyping are discussed and areas of likely progress in future are identified. This review addresses the well established typing methods such as the Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP), Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE), Reference Strand Conformational Analysis (RSCA) and cloning of PCR products. In addition, it includes the intriguing possibility of direct amplicon sequencing followed by the computational inference of alleles and also next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies; the latter technique may, in the future, find widespread use in typing complex multilocus MHC systems. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Response to imazapyr and dominance relationships of two imidazolinone-tolerant alleles at the Ahasl1 locus of sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Carlos A; Bulos, Mariano; Altieri, Emiliano; Weston, Brigitte

    2012-02-01

    Imisun and CLPlus are two imidazolinone (IMI) tolerance traits in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) determined by the expression of different alleles at the same locus, Ahasl1-1 and Ahasl1-3, respectively. This paper reports the level of tolerance expressed by plants containing both alleles in a homozygous, heterozygous and in a heterozygous stacked state to increasing doses of IMI at the enzyme and whole plant levels. Six genotypes of the Ahasl1 gene were compared with each other in three different genetic backgrounds. These materials were treated at the V2-V4 stage with increasing doses of imazapyr (from 0 to 480 g a.i. ha(-1)) followed by an assessment of the aboveground biomass and herbicide phytotoxicity. The estimated dose of imazapyr required to reduce biomass accumulation by 50% (GR(50)) differed statistically for the six genotypes of the Ahasl1 gene. Homozygous CLPlus (Ahasl1-3/Ahasl1-3) genotypes and materials containing a combination of both tolerant alleles (Imisun/CLPlus heterozygous stack, Ahasl1-1/Ahasl1-3) showed the highest values of GR(50), 300 times higher than the susceptible genotypes and more than 2.5 times higher than homozygous Imisun materials (Ahasl1-1/Ahasl1-1). In vitro AHAS enzyme activity assays using increasing doses of herbicide (from 0 to 100 μM) showed similar trends, where homozygous CLPlus materials and those containing heterozygous stacks of Imisun/CLPlus were statistically similar and showed the least level of inhibition of enzyme activity to increasing doses of herbicide. The degree of dominance for the accumulation of biomass after herbicide application calculated for the Ahasl1-1 allele indicated that it is co-dominant to recessive depending on the imazapyr dose used. By the contrary, the Ahasl1-3 allele showed dominance to semi dominance according to the applied dose. This last allele is dominant over Ahasl1-1 over the entire range of herbicide rates tested. At the level of enzymatic activity, however, both alleles showed

  17. Has Microfinance Lost its Moral Compass?

    OpenAIRE

    David Hulme; Mathilde Maitrot

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This paper argues that microfinance in South Asia, like mainstream finance in North America and Europe, "has lost its moral compass". Our particular concern is with microloans to vulnerable clients. Microfinance institutions (MFIs) have increasingly focussed on financial performance and have neglected their declared social mission of poverty reduction and empowerment. Loans officers in the field are under enormous pressure to achieve individual financial targets and now routinely mis...

  18. Lost lake - restoration of a Carolina bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanlin, H.G.; McLendon, J.P. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology; Wike, L.D. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology]|[Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Technology Center; Dietsch, B.M. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology]|[Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Carolina bays are shallow wetland depressions found only on the Atlantic Coastal Plain. Although these isolated interstream wetlands support many types of communities, they share the common features of having a sandy margin, a fluctuating water level, an elliptical shape, and a northwest to southeast orientation. Lost Lake, an 11.3 hectare Carolina bay, was ditched and drained for agricultural production before establishment of the Savannah River Site in 1950. Later it received overflow from a seepage basin containing a variety of chemicals, primarily solvents and some heavy metals. In 1990 a plan was developed for the restoration of Lost Lake, and restoration activities were complete by mid-1991. Lost Lake is the first known project designed for the restoration and recovery of a Carolina bay. The bay was divided into eight soil treatment zones, allowing four treatments in duplicate. Each of the eight zones was planted with eight species of native wetland plants. Recolonization of the bay by amphibians and reptiles is being evaluated by using drift fences with pitfall traps and coverboard arrays in each of the treatment zones. Additional drift fences in five upland habitats were also established. Hoop turtle traps, funnel minnow traps, and dip nets were utilized for aquatic sampling. The presence of 43 species common to the region has been documented at Lost Lake. More than one-third of these species show evidence of breeding populations being established. Three species found prior to the restoration activity and a number of species common to undisturbed Carolina bays were not encountered. Colonization by additional species is anticipated as the wetland undergoes further succession.

  19. Lower Frequency of HLA-DRB1 Type 1 Diabetes Risk Alleles in Pediatric Patients with MODY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, Inés; Martínez, Rosa; López-Euba, Tamara; Velayos, Teresa; Martínez de LaPiscina, Idoia; Bilbao, José Ramón; Rica, Itxaso; Castaño, Luis

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of susceptible HLA-DRB1 alleles for type 1 diabetes in a cohort of pediatric patients with a confirmed genetic diagnosis of MODY. 160 families with a proband diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and 74 families with a molecular diagnosis of MODY (61 GCK-MODY and 13 HNF1A-MODY) were categorized at high definition for HLA-DRB1 locus. According to the presence or absence of the susceptible HLA-DRB1 alleles for type 1 diabetes, we considered three different HLA-DRB1 genotypes: 0 risk alleles (no DR3 no DR4); 1 risk allele (DR3 or DR4); 2 risk alleles (DR3 and/or DR4). Compared with type 1 diabetes, patients with MODY carried higher frequency of 0 risk alleles, OR 22.7 (95% CI: 10.7-48.6) and lower frequency of 1 or 2 risk alleles, OR 0.53 (95% CI: 0.29-0.96) and OR 0.06 (95% CI: 0.02-0.18), respectively. The frequency of HLA-DRB1 risk alleles for type 1 diabetes is significantly lower in patients with MODY. In children and adolescents with diabetes, the presence of 2 risk alleles (DR3 and/or DR4) reduces the probability of MODY diagnosis, whereas the lack of risk alleles increases it. Therefore, we might consider that HLA-DRB1 provides additional information for the selection of patients with high probability of monogenic diabetes.

  20. Lower Frequency of HLA-DRB1 Type 1 Diabetes Risk Alleles in Pediatric Patients with MODY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Urrutia

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of susceptible HLA-DRB1 alleles for type 1 diabetes in a cohort of pediatric patients with a confirmed genetic diagnosis of MODY.160 families with a proband diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and 74 families with a molecular diagnosis of MODY (61 GCK-MODY and 13 HNF1A-MODY were categorized at high definition for HLA-DRB1 locus. According to the presence or absence of the susceptible HLA-DRB1 alleles for type 1 diabetes, we considered three different HLA-DRB1 genotypes: 0 risk alleles (no DR3 no DR4; 1 risk allele (DR3 or DR4; 2 risk alleles (DR3 and/or DR4.Compared with type 1 diabetes, patients with MODY carried higher frequency of 0 risk alleles, OR 22.7 (95% CI: 10.7-48.6 and lower frequency of 1 or 2 risk alleles, OR 0.53 (95% CI: 0.29-0.96 and OR 0.06 (95% CI: 0.02-0.18, respectively.The frequency of HLA-DRB1 risk alleles for type 1 diabetes is significantly lower in patients with MODY. In children and adolescents with diabetes, the presence of 2 risk alleles (DR3 and/or DR4 reduces the probability of MODY diagnosis, whereas the lack of risk alleles increases it. Therefore, we might consider that HLA-DRB1 provides additional information for the selection of patients with high probability of monogenic diabetes.

  1. The lost art of finding our way

    CERN Document Server

    Huth, Edward John

    2013-01-01

    Long before GPS, Google Earth, and global transit, humans traveled vast distances using only environmental clues and simple instruments. John Huth asks what is lost when modern technology substitutes for our innate capacity to find our way. Encyclopedic in breadth, weaving together astronomy, meteorology, oceanography, and ethnography, The Lost Art of Finding Our Way puts us in the shoes, ships, and sleds of early navigators for whom paying close attention to the environment around them was, quite literally, a matter of life and death. Haunted by the fate of two young kayakers lost in a fogbank off Nantucket, Huth shows us how to navigate using natural phenomena—the way the Vikings used the sunstone to detect polarization of sunlight, and Arab traders learned to sail into the wind, and Pacific Islanders used underwater lightning and “read” waves to guide their explorations. Huth reminds us that we are all navigators capable of learning techniques ranging from the simplest to the most sophisticated skil...

  2. Years of life lost through Down's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M B

    1979-10-01

    A congenital genetic condition does not act either as a cause of death or at the time of death only. Hence, years of life lost through such a conditon cannot be calculated in the same way as for a conventional cause of death. The main difference is that a cause of death acting at age x cuts off as many years of life as the dead person might otherwise have expected to live (life expectancy at age x), whereas a congenital genetic condition exposes an affected person to a different schedule of life-threatening risks from birth onwards. In the latter case, years of life lost is calculated as the difference in life expectancy at birth for affected and non-affected persons. This reasoning is worked out in algebraic form and then applied to Down's syndrome. The data base is provided by two large and recent studies, one in Massachusetts and the other in Denmark, of mortality rates among all cases of Down's syndrome, whether in an institution or not, born during a given period of years or living at a given point in time in a fixed geographical area. So calculated, years of life lost through Down's syndrome relative to the United States general population in 1970 was 53.6 years per 1000 livebirths. Prenatal mortality is also discussed.

  3. Evidence of cryptic introgression in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) based on wild tomato species alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labate, Joanne A; Robertson, Larry D

    2012-08-07

    Many highly beneficial traits (e.g. disease or abiotic stress resistance) have been transferred into crops through crosses with their wild relatives. The 13 recognized species of tomato (Solanum section Lycopersicon) are closely related to each other and wild species genes have been extensively used for improvement of the crop, Solanum lycopersicum L. In addition, the lack of geographical barriers has permitted natural hybridization between S. lycopersicum and its closest wild relative Solanum pimpinellifolium in Ecuador, Peru and northern Chile. In order to better understand patterns of S. lycopersicum diversity, we sequenced 47 markers ranging in length from 130 to 1200 bp (total of 24 kb) in genotypes of S. lycopersicum and wild tomato species S. pimpinellifolium, Solanum arcanum, Solanum peruvianum, Solanum pennellii and Solanum habrochaites. Between six and twelve genotypes were comparatively analyzed per marker. Several of the markers had previously been hypothesized as carrying wild species alleles within S. lycopersicum, i.e., cryptic introgressions. Each marker was mapped with high confidence (etomato whole genome shotgun chromosomes (SL2.40) database. Neighbor-joining trees showed high mean bootstrap support (86.8 ± 2.34%) for distinguishing red-fruited from green-fruited taxa for 38 of the markers. Hybridization and parsimony splits networks, genomic map positions of markers relative to documented introgressions, and historical origins of accessions were used to interpret evolutionary patterns at nine markers with putatively introgressed alleles. Of the 47 genetic markers surveyed in this study, four were involved in linkage drag on chromosome 9 during introgression breeding, while alleles at five markers apparently originated from natural hybridization with S. pimpinellifolium and were associated with primitive genotypes of S. lycopersicum. The positive identification of introgressed genes within crop species such as S. lycopersicum will help

  4. Association between the DRD2 A1 allele and response to methadone and buprenorphine maintenance treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt, Daniel T; Coller, Janet K; Somogyi, Andrew A

    2006-06-05

    The TaqI A polymorphism (A(1)) of the dopamine D(2) receptor gene (DRD2), although not a specific predictor of opioid dependence, has been strongly associated with high levels of prior heroin use and poor treatment outcomes among methadone maintenance patients. The aims of this study were to confirm these findings via a retrospective analysis of A(1) allele frequency in methadone (n = 46) and buprenorphine (n = 25) patients, and non-opioid-dependent controls (n = 95). Subjects were genotyped at the DRD2 TaqI A locus using PCR amplification followed by TaqI restriction enzyme digestion and gel electrophoresis. For methadone and buprenorphine subjects, heroin use (prior to treatment), treatment outcomes, and withdrawal occurrence were determined from comprehensive case notes. No significant differences in A(1) allele frequency (%) were observed between: methadone (19.6%), buprenorphine (18.0%), and control (17.9%) groups (P > 0.7); successful and poor treatment outcome groups, methadone: 20.0% and 19.2%, respectively (P = 1.0); buprenorphine: 18.4% and 20.0%, respectively (P = 1.0). Also, there were no significant relationships between TaqI A genotype and prior heroin use (P = 0.47). However, among the successful methadone subjects, significantly fewer A(1) allele carriers experienced withdrawal than non-A(1) carriers (P = 0.04). In conclusion, the DRD2 genotype effects did not affect opioid maintenance treatment outcomes. This suggests the need for a further prospective investigation into the role of the DRD2 A(1) allele in heroin use and response to maintenance pharmacotherapies for opioid dependence.

  5. Association of primary biliary cirrhosis with the allele HLA-DPB1*0301 in a German population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mella, J G; Roschmann, E; Maier, K P; Volk, B A

    1995-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex class II alleles at the HLA-DPB1 locus were investigated in 32 German Caucasoid patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and compared with those from 47 normal control patients using molecular genotyping techniques. The second exon of the HLA-DPB1 gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and hybridized with 25 sequence-specific oligonucleotides (SSOs) to assign the HLA-DPB1 alleles on the basis of known sequence variations, according to the protocols of the Eleventh International Histocompatibility Workshop. A strong association of PBC was found with the allele HLA-DPB1*0301. The allele HLA DPB1*0301 was present in 50% (16 of 32) of the patients with PBC compared with 13% (6 of 47) of normal controls (P corrected < .015), whereas the other HLA-DPB1 alleles showed no significant differences in both groups. The relative risk (RR) estimate for the allele HLA-DPB1*0301 was 6.8 (95% confidence limits: 2.27 to 20.57). In summary, this study clearly demonstrates an association of PBC with the HLA-DPB1*0301 allele in German Caucasoids and may add new data to the immunogenetic background of PBC, suggesting a contribution of the HLA-DPB1 gene to the genetic susceptibility of the disease.

  6. Identification, genetic localization, and allelic diversity of selectively amplified microsatellite polymorphic loci in lettuce and wild relatives (Lactuca spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witsenboer, H; Michelmore, R W; Vogel, J

    1997-12-01

    Selectively amplified microsatellite polymorphic locus (SAMPL) analysis is a method of amplifying microsatellite loci using generic PCR primers. SAMPL analysis uses one AFLP primer in combination with a primer complementary to microsatellite sequences. SAMPL primers based on compound microsatellite sequences provided the clearest amplification patterns. We explored the potential of SAMPL analysis in lettuce to detect PCR-based codominant microsatellite markers. Fifty-eight SAMPLs were identified and placed on the genetic map. Seventeen were codominant. SAMPLs were dispersed with RFLP markers on 11 of the 12 main linkage groups in lettuce, indicating that they have a similar genomic distribution. Some but not all fragments amplified by SAMPL analysis were confirmed to contain microsatellite sequences by Southern hybridization. Forty-five cultivars of lettuce and five wild species of Lactuca were analyzed to determine the allelic diversity for codominant SAMPLs. From 3 to 11 putative alleles were found for each SAMPL; 2-6 alleles were found within Lactuca sativa and 1-3 alleles were found among the crisphead genotypes, the most genetically homogeneous plant type of L. sativa. This allelic diversity is greater than that found for RFLP markers. Numerous new alleles were observed in the wild species; however, there were frequent null alleles. Therefore, SAMPL analysis is more applicable to intraspecific than to interspecific comparisons. A phenetic analysis based on SAMPLs resulted in a dendrogram similar to those based on RFLP and AFLP markers.

  7. A rare FANCA gene variation as a breast cancer susceptibility allele in an Iranian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Sakineh; Rasouli, Mina

    2017-06-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by congenital abnormalities, progressive bone marrow failure and Fanconi anemia complementation group A (FANCA) is also a potential breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene. A novel allele with tandem duplication of 13 base pair sequence in promoter region was identified. To investigate whether the 13 base pair sequence of tandem duplication in promoter region of the FANCA gene is of high penetrance in patients with breast cancer and to determine if the presence of the duplicated allele was associated with an altered risk of breast cancer, the present study screened DNA in blood samples from 304 breast cancer patients and 295 normal individuals as controls. The duplication allele had a frequency of 35.4 and 21.2% in patients with breast cancer and normal controls, respectively. There was a significant increase in the frequency of the duplication allele in patients with familial breast cancer compared with controls (45.1%, P=0.001). Furthermore, the estimated risk of breast cancer in individuals with a homozygote [odds ratio (OR), 4.093; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 1.957‑8.561] or heterozygote duplicated genotype (OR, 3.315; 95% CI, 1.996‑5.506) was higher compared with the corresponding normal homozygote genotype. In conclusion, the present study indicated that the higher the frequency of the duplicated allele, the higher the risk of breast cancer. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to report FANCA gene duplication in patients with breast cancer.

  8. Stepwise threshold clustering: a new method for genotyping MHC loci using next-generation sequencing technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E Stutz

    Full Text Available Genes of the vertebrate major histocompatibility complex (MHC are of great interest to biologists because of their important role in immunity and disease, and their extremely high levels of genetic diversity. Next generation sequencing (NGS technologies are quickly becoming the method of choice for high-throughput genotyping of multi-locus templates like MHC in non-model organisms. Previous approaches to genotyping MHC genes using NGS technologies suffer from two problems:1 a "gray zone" where low frequency alleles and high frequency artifacts can be difficult to disentangle and 2 a similar sequence problem, where very similar alleles can be difficult to distinguish as two distinct alleles. Here were present a new method for genotyping MHC loci--Stepwise Threshold Clustering (STC--that addresses these problems by taking full advantage of the increase in sequence data provided by NGS technologies. Unlike previous approaches for genotyping MHC with NGS data that attempt to classify individual sequences as alleles or artifacts, STC uses a quasi-Dirichlet clustering algorithm to cluster similar sequences at increasing levels of sequence similarity. By applying frequency and similarity based criteria to clusters rather than individual sequences, STC is able to successfully identify clusters of sequences that correspond to individual or similar alleles present in the genomes of individual samples. Furthermore, STC does not require duplicate runs of all samples, increasing the number of samples that can be genotyped in a given project. We show how the STC method works using a single sample library. We then apply STC to 295 threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus samples from four populations and show that neighboring populations differ significantly in MHC allele pools. We show that STC is a reliable, accurate, efficient, and flexible method for genotyping MHC that will be of use to biologists interested in a variety of downstream applications.

  9. Polymorphism of proteins in selected slovak winter wheat genotypes using SDS-PAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Miháliková

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Winter wheat is especially used for bread-making. The specific composition of the grain storage proteins and the representation of individual subunits determines the baking quality of wheat. The aim of this study was to analyze 15 slovak varieties of the winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. based on protein polymorphism and to predict their technological quality. SDS-PAGE method by ISTA was used to separate glutenin protein subunits. Glutenins were separated into HMW-GS (15.13% and LMW-GS (65.89% on the basis of molecular weight in SDS-PAGE. At the locus Glu-A1 was found allele Null (53% of genotypes and allele 1 (47% of genotypes. The locus Glu-B1 was represented by the HMW-GS subunits 6+8 (33% of genotypes, 7+8 (27% of genotypes, 7+9 (40% of genotypes. At the locus Glu-D1 were detected two subunits, 2+12 (33% of genotypes and 5+10 (67% of genotypes which is correlated with good bread-making properties. The Glu – score was ranged from 4 (genotype Viglanka to 10 (genotypes Viola, Vladarka. According to the representation of individual glutenin subunits in samples, the dendrogram of genetic similarity was constructed. By the prediction of quality the results showed that the best technological quality was significant in the varieties Viola and Vladarka which are suitable for use in food processing.

  10. Association of the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region genotype with lower bone mineral density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapid, M I; Kung, S; Frye, M A; Biernacka, J M; Geske, J R; Drake, M T; Jankowski, M D; Clarke, B L

    2017-08-22

    The serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) S allele is linked to pathogenesis of depression and slower response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs); depression and SSRIs are independently associated with bone loss. We aimed to determine whether 5-HTTLPR was associated with bone loss. This cross-sectional study included psychiatric patients with both 5-HTTLPR analysis and bone mineral density (BMD) assessment (hip and spine Z-scores if age <50 years and T-scores if ⩾50 years). BMD association with 5-HTTLPR was evaluated under models with additive allele effects and dominant S allele effects using linear regression models. Patients were stratified by age (<50 and ⩾50 years) and sex. Of 3016 patients with 5-HTTLPR genotyping, 239 had BMD assessments. Among the younger patients, the S allele was associated with lower Z-scores at the hip (P=0.002, dominant S allele effects; P=0.004, additive allele effects) and spine (P=0.0006, dominant S allele effects; P=0.01, additive allele effects). In sex-stratified analyses, the association of the S allele with lower BMD in the younger patients was also significant in the subset of women (P⩽0.003 for both hip and spine BMD under the additive allele effect model). In the small group of men younger than 50 years, the S allele was marginally associated with higher spine BMD (P=0.05). BMD T-scores were not associated with 5-HTTLPR genotypes in patients 50 years or older. The 5-HTTLPR variants may modify serotonin effects on bone with sex-specific effects.

  11. Effects of apolipoprotein E genotype on cortical neuropathology in senile dementia of the Lewy body and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, R; Leake, A; Ince, P G; Perry, R H; McKeith, I G; Edwardson, J A; Morris, C M

    1995-12-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APO E) genotypes were determined in a UK population of neuropathologically confirmed control cases, and in cases of Lewy body dementia (SDLT) and late onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). APO E epsilon 4 allele frequency was significantly elevated in both SDLT and AD groups with a concomitant reduction in the APO E epsilon 3 allele frequency. The epsilon 2 allele frequency in the AD group was only 25% of the control population, though because of the relatively small sample size this reduction was not significant; the epsilon 2 allele frequency in the SDLT group was normal. No significant association was found between senile plaque density and neurofibrillary tangle density in the neocortex and APO E allele dose in either SDLT or AD. Although the possession of APO E epsilon 4 is associated with an increased risk of developing SDLT and AD, actual APO E genotype does not appear to affect the burden of pathology.

  12. CYP1A1, CYP1A2, SULT1A1 AND SULT1E1 ALLELIC POLYMORPHISM IN CASE OF GENITAL ENDOMETRIOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Sergeevich Kublinskiy

    2016-02-01

    Up-to-date molecular and genetic analyses reveal that women predisposed to genital endometriosis possess Allele G and Genotypes AG and GG of the polymorphic option A-4889G of the CYP1A1 gene and Allele A and Genotypes CA and AA of the polymorphic option C-734A of the CYP1A2 gene. The polymorphism of the promoter regions of the SULT1A1 (G-638A and SULT1E1 (C-174T genes is not associated with genital endometriosis in women.

  13. Estimated allele substitution effects underlying genomic evaluation models depend on the scaling of allele counts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, Aniek C.; Hayes, Ben J.; Calus, Mario P.L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Genomic evaluation is used to predict direct genomic values (DGV) for selection candidates in breeding programs, but also to estimate allele substitution effects (ASE) of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Scaling of allele counts influences the estimated ASE, because scaling of

  14. Audioprofiles and antioxidant enzyme genotypes in presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, Simon I; Bared, Anthony; Ouyang, Xiaomei; Du, Li Lin; Yan, Denise; Zhong Liu, Xue

    2012-11-01

    Audiometric patterns have been shown to indirectly provide information regarding the pathophysiology of presbycusis and be useful in the phenotyping of hereditary deafness. Hospital-based cohort study of adults with presbycusis, comparing the association of audiometric patterns and polymorphisms of antioxidant enzymes that have been linked to presbycusis: GSTT1, GSTM1 and NAT2. All subjects underwent a clinical evaluation and completed questionnaires regarding ototoxicity and noise exposure. Pure-tone threshold audiometry was obtained and subjects' audiograms were classified into specific patterns. DNA was extracted from blood and the polymorphisms of GSTT1, GSTM1, and the NAT2 variants (NAT2* 5A; NAT2* 6A,B) were analyzed by PCR. The audiometric patterns that were more prevalent in our cohort were "High-Frequency Steeply Sloping" or HFSS (33%), "High-Frequency Gently Sloping" or HFGS (31%), and "Flat" (27%), with other patterns being rare. We did not find a statistical significant effect of gender, age, hearing level, and ear side on the audiometric pattern. Subjects with mutant alleles for GSTT1 were more likely to have a HFSS audiogram than subjects with the wild type genotype. In this cohort, there was a similar prevalence for the three audiometric configurations HFSS, HFGS, and Flat, with other configurations being rare. Subjects with mutant alleles for GSTT1 were more likely to have a HFSS audiogram than subjects with the wild type genotype, suggesting that the basal turn of the cochlea is susceptible to GSTT1 regulated oxidative stress. However, further studies of audioprofiles with larger sample sizes may be needed to establish phenotype-genotype correlations in presbycusis. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  15. TrueAllele casework on Virginia DNA mixture evidence: computer and manual interpretation in 72 reported criminal cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W Perlin

    Full Text Available Mixtures are a commonly encountered form of biological evidence that contain DNA from two or more contributors. Laboratory analysis of mixtures produces data signals that usually cannot be separated into distinct contributor genotypes. Computer modeling can resolve the genotypes up to probability, reflecting the uncertainty inherent in the data. Human analysts address the problem by simplifying the quantitative data in a threshold process that discards considerable identification information. Elevated stochastic threshold levels potentially discard more information. This study examines three different mixture interpretation methods. In 72 criminal cases, 111 genotype comparisons were made between 92 mixture items and relevant reference samples. TrueAllele computer modeling was done on all the evidence samples, and documented in DNA match reports that were provided as evidence for each case. Threshold-based Combined Probability of Inclusion (CPI and stochastically modified CPI (mCPI analyses were performed as well. TrueAllele's identification information in 101 positive matches was used to assess the reliability of its modeling approach. Comparison was made with 81 CPI and 53 mCPI DNA match statistics that were manually derived from the same data. There were statistically significant differences between the DNA interpretation methods. TrueAllele gave an average match statistic of 113 billion, CPI averaged 6.68 million, and mCPI averaged 140. The computer was highly specific, with a false positive rate under 0.005%. The modeling approach was precise, having a factor of two within-group standard deviation. TrueAllele accuracy was indicated by having uniformly distributed match statistics over the data set. The computer could make genotype comparisons that were impossible or impractical using manual methods. TrueAllele computer interpretation of DNA mixture evidence is sensitive, specific, precise, accurate and more informative than manual

  16. CARAT: A novel method for allelic detection of DNA copy number changes using high density oligonucleotide arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishikawa Shumpei

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA copy number alterations are one of the main characteristics of the cancer cell karyotype and can contribute to the complex phenotype of these cells. These alterations can lead to gains in cellular oncogenes as well as losses in tumor suppressor genes and can span small intervals as well as involve entire chromosomes. The ability to accurately detect these changes is central to understanding how they impact the biology of the cell. Results We describe a novel algorithm called CARAT (Copy Number Analysis with Regression And Tree that uses probe intensity information to infer copy number in an allele-specific manner from high density DNA oligonuceotide arrays designed to genotype over 100, 000 SNPs. Total and allele-specific copy number estimations using CARAT are independently evaluated for a subset of SNPs using quantitative PCR and allelic TaqMan reactions with several human breast cancer cell lines. The sensitivity and specificity of the algorithm are characterized using DNA samples containing differing numbers of X chromosomes as well as a test set of normal individuals. Results from the algorithm show a high degree of agreement with results from independent verification methods. Conclusion Overall, CARAT automatically detects regions with copy number variations and assigns a significance score to each alteration as well as generating allele-specific output. When coupled with SNP genotype calls from the same array, CARAT provides additional detail into the structure of genome wide alterations that can contribute to allelic imbalance.

  17. Apolipoprotein E genotypes associated with Alzheimer disease and concomitant stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekih-Mrissa, Najiba; Klai, Sarra; Mrad, Meriem; Mansour, Malek; Zaouali, Jamel; Gritli, Nasreddine; Mrissa, Ridha

    2014-04-01

    The ɛ4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene is a well-characterized genetic risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD). The association between stroke and a higher risk for AD has also been reported. Our study sought to determine the relationship between the APOE gene and AD and the comorbid risk of stroke. The subjects of this study consisted of 48 patients with AD and 48 members of a control group. All subjects were genotyped for APOE. The results clearly show a significant increased risk of AD in carriers of the APOE ε3/ε4 genotype (P = .003, odds ratio [OR] = 4.1) or ε4 allele (P = .001, OR = 4.2). The risk for stroke in AD patients was also increased for carriers of the APOE ε3/ε4 genotype (P = .02, OR = 9.0) and for carriers of the APOE ε4 allele (P = .004, OR = 5.5). The present study is the first to establish a relationship between APOE ε4 and concomitant AD and stroke in the Tunisian population. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of Genotypes on Economic Traits in Chinese Dairy Goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. P. Yue

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate allele frequencies at the CSN1S2 locus in two Chinese dairy goat breeds and the effects of its variation on dairy goat economic traits. Seven hundred and eight goats from Xinong Saanen (XS, n = 268 and Guanzhong (GZ, N = 440 breeds were selected. The milk samples of 268 XS goats were collected during the middle of lactation, body size parameters (708 goats and daily milk yield (202 goats were registered. The RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism and SSCP (single strand conformation polymorphism were used to detect the polymorphisms in CSN1S2. The Hardy-Weinberg (HW equilibrium and the associations between body size, milk yield and composition and the genotypes were calculated. The results revealed that only A and F CSN1S2 alleles were found in the two Chinese dairy goat breeds. Allelic frequencies of A and F were 0.795, 0.205 and 0.739, 0.261 in Xinong Saanen and Guanzhong population respectively. Xinong Saanen breed was in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, while Guanzhong breed deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (p<0.05. The association of polymorphism with economic traits indicated that the goats with FF genotype have higher milk fat and total solid concentration than those with AA and AF genotypes (p<0.05.

  19. Apolipoprotein E and presenilin-1 genotypes in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panas, M; Avramopoulos, D; Karadima, G; Petersen, M B; Vassilopoulos, D

    1999-07-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant degenerative disease of the central nervous system manifested by involuntary movements (chorea), psychiatric manifestations, and cognitive impairment with a variable age at onset. This variability is mainly attributed to genetic factors. The so-called aging genes [e.g., those for apolipoprotein E (APOE) and presenilin-1 (PS-1) have been implicated in determining the age at onset of Alzheimer's disease, a disease sharing common clinical features with HD. In 60 unrelated patients suffering from HD (mean age at onset 40.1 years, range 20-65) we determined number of CAG repeats and the distribution of the APOE alleles (epsilon2, epsilon3, epsilon4) and PS-1 alleles. The results showed that: (a) The age at onset was higher in the group of patients with the epsilon4 allele (51.6 vs. 38.0 P<0.002), (b) The correlation between the age at onset and the number of CAG repeats was strong in patients with the epsilon3/epsilon3 genotype while it was not detected in patients with epsilon3/epsilon4 genotype. (c) No correlation was found between age at onset and PS-1 alleles. In conclusion, APOE seems to be a significant factor influencing the age at onset of Huntington's disease.

  20. Allelic genealogies in sporophytic self-incompatibility systems in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, Mikkel Heide; Vekemans, Xavier; Christiansen, Freddy Bugge

    1998-01-01

    , alleles act codominantly in both pollen and style, in the SSIdom model, alleles form a dominance hierarchy, and in SSIdomcod, alleles are codominant in the style and show a dominance hierarchy in the pollen. Coalescence times of alleles rarely differ more than threefold from those under gametophytic self...

  1. QTL detection and elite alleles mining for stigma traits in Oryza sativa by association mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Dang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Stigma traits are very important for hybrid seed production in Oryza sativa, which is a self-pollinated crop; however, the genetic mechanism controlling the traits is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the phenotypic data of 227 accessions across two years and assessed their genotypic variation with 249 simple sequence repeat (SSR markers. By combining phenotypic and genotypic data, a genome-wide association (GWA map was generated. Large phenotypic variations in stigma length (STL, stigma brush-shaped part length (SBPL and stigma non-brush-shaped part length (SNBPL were found. Significant positive correlations were identified among stigma traits. In total, 2,072 alleles were detected among 227 accessions, with an average of 8.3 alleles per SSR locus. GWA mapping detected 6 quantitative trait loci (QTLs for the STL, 2 QTLs for the SBPL and 7 QTLs for the SNBPL. Eleven, 5, and 12 elite alleles were found for the STL, SBPL and SNBPL, respectively. Optimal cross designs were predicted for improving the target traits. The detected genetic variation in stigma traits and QTLs provides helpful information for cloning candidate STL genes and breeding rice cultivars with longer STLs in the future.

  2. Identification of polymorphic inversions from genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cáceres Alejandro

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphic inversions are a source of genetic variability with a direct impact on recombination frequencies. Given the difficulty of their experimental study, computational methods have been developed to infer their existence in a large number of individuals using genome-wide data of nucleotide variation. Methods based on haplotype tagging of known inversions attempt to classify individuals as having a normal or inverted allele. Other methods that measure differences between linkage disequilibrium attempt to identify regions with inversions but unable to classify subjects accurately, an essential requirement for association studies. Results We present a novel method to both identify polymorphic inversions from genome-wide genotype data and classify individuals as containing a normal or inverted allele. Our method, a generalization of a published method for haplotype data 1, utilizes linkage between groups of SNPs to partition a set of individuals into normal and inverted subpopulations. We employ a sliding window scan to identify regions likely to have an inversion, and accumulation of evidence from neighboring SNPs is used to accurately determine the inversion status of each subject. Further, our approach detects inversions directly from genotype data, thus increasing its usability to current genome-wide association studies (GWAS. Conclusions We demonstrate the accuracy of our method to detect inversions and classify individuals on principled-simulated genotypes, produced by the evolution of an inversion event within a coalescent model 2. We applied our method to real genotype data from HapMap Phase III to characterize the inversion status of two known inversions within the regions 17q21 and 8p23 across 1184 individuals. Finally, we scan the full genomes of the European Origin (CEU and Yoruba (YRI HapMap samples. We find population-based evidence for 9 out of 15 well-established autosomic inversions, and for 52 regions

  3. America’s Lost Innocence and Cinema

    OpenAIRE

    Patrycja Włodek

    2015-01-01

    In my paper America’s Lost Innocence I intend to focus on American cinema of the ’50s, part of ’60s, and contemporary throwbacks to those decades. The ’50s have been called “the last decade of American innocence”, “the happiest decade in America’s history – when things were going on – that everybody misses” (by Jean Baudrillard). That era symbolically ceased on 22 November 1963; however, many scholars and publicists undermine the belief in its very existence. Michael Wood calls the ’50s a tim...

  4. Genotyping and surveillance for scrapie in Finnish sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hautaniemi Maria

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The progression of scrapie is known to be influenced by the amino acid polymorphisms of the host prion protein (PrP gene. There is no breeding programme for TSE resistance in sheep in Finland, but a scrapie control programme has been in place since 1995. In this study we have analysed PrP genotypes of total of 928 purebred and crossbred sheep together with the data of scrapie survey carried out in Finland during 2002–2008 in order to gain knowledge of the genotype distribution and scrapie prevalence in Finnish sheep. Results The ARQ/ARQ genotype was the most common genotype in all breeds studied. ARR allele frequency was less than 12% in purebred Finnish sheep and in most genotypes heterozygous for ARR, the second allele was ARQ. The VRQ allele was not detected in the Grey race sheep of Kainuu or in the Aland sheep, and it was present in less than 6% of the Finnish Landrace sheep. Leucine was the most prominent amino acid found in codon 141. In addition, one novel prion dimorphisms of Q220L was detected. During the scrapie survey of over 15 000 sheep in 2002–2008, no classical scrapie cases and only five atypical scrapie cases were detected. Conclusions The results indicate that the Finnish sheep populations have genetically little resistance to classical scrapie, but no classical scrapie was detected during an extensive survey in 2002–2008. However, five atypical scrapie cases emerged; thus, the disease is present in the Finnish sheep population at a low level.

  5. Lactase persistence genotypes and malaria susceptibility in Fulani of Mali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolo Amagana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fulani are a widely spread African ethnic group characterized by lower susceptibility to Plasmodium falciparum, clinical malaria morbidity and higher rate of lactase persistence compared to sympatric tribes. Lactase non-persistence, often called lactose intolerance, is the normal condition where lactase activity in the intestinal wall declines after weaning. Lactase persistence, common in Europe, and in certain African people with traditions of raising cattle, is caused by polymorphisms in the enhancer region approximately 14 kb upstream of the lactase gene. Methods To evaluate the relationship between malaria and lactase persistence genotypes, a 400 bp region surrounding the main European C/T-13910 polymorphism upstream of the lactase gene was sequenced. DNA samples used in the study originated from 162 Fulani and 79 Dogon individuals from Mali. Results Among 79 Dogon only one heterozygote of the lactase enhancer polymorphism was detected, whereas all others were homozygous for the ancestral C allele. Among the Fulani, the main European polymorphism at locus C/T-13910 was by far the most common polymorphism, with an allele frequency of 37%. Three other single-nucleotide polymorphisms were found with allele frequencies of 3.7%, 1.9% and 0.6% each. The novel DNA polymorphism T/C-13906 was seen in six heterozygous Fulani. Among the Fulani with lactase non-persistence CC genotypes at the C/T-13910 locus, 24% had malaria parasites detectable by microscopy compared to 18% for lactase persistent genotypes (P = 0.29. Pooling the lactase enhancer polymorphisms to a common presumptive genotype gave 28% microscopy positives for non-persistent and 17% for others (P = 0.11. Conclusions Plasmodium falciparum parasitaemia in asymptomatic Fulani is more common in individuals with lactase non-persistence genotypes, but this difference is not statistically significant. The potential immunoprotective properties of dietary cow milk as a reason

  6. MASTR: A Technique for Mosaic Mutant Analysis with Spatial and Temporal Control of Recombination Using Conditional Floxed Alleles in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin Lao

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mosaic mutant analysis, the study of cellular defects in scattered mutant cells in a wild-type environment, is a powerful approach for identifying critical functions of genes and has been applied extensively to invertebrate model organisms. A highly versatile technique has been developed in mouse: MASTR (mosaic mutant analysis with spatial and temporal control of recombination, which utilizes the increasing number of floxed alleles and simultaneously combines conditional gene mutagenesis and cell marking for fate analysis. A targeted allele (R26MASTR was engineered; the allele expresses a GFPcre fusion protein following FLP-mediated recombination, which serves the dual function of deleting floxed alleles and marking mutant cells with GFP. Within 24 hr of tamoxifen administration to R26MASTR mice carrying an inducible FlpoER transgene and a floxed allele, nearly all GFP-expressing cells have a mutant allele. The fate of single cells lacking FGF8 or SHH signaling in the developing hindbrain was analyzed using MASTR, and it was revealed that there is only a short time window when neural progenitors require FGFR1 for viability and that granule cell precursors differentiate rapidly when SMO is lost. MASTR is a powerful tool that provides cell-type-specific (spatial and temporal marking of mosaic mutant cells and is broadly applicable to developmental, cancer, and adult stem cell studies.

  7. The Microcephalin Ancestral Allele in a Neanderthal Individual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lari, Martina; Rizzi, Ermanno; Milani, Lucio; Corti, Giorgio; Balsamo, Carlotta; Vai, Stefania; Catalano, Giulio; Pilli, Elena; Longo, Laura; Condemi, Silvana; Giunti, Paolo; Hänni, Catherine; De Bellis, Gianluca; Orlando, Ludovic; Barbujani, Guido; Caramelli, David

    2010-01-01

    Background The high frequency (around 0.70 worlwide) and the relatively young age (between 14,000 and 62,000 years) of a derived group of haplotypes, haplogroup D, at the microcephalin (MCPH1) locus led to the proposal that haplogroup D originated in a human lineage that separated from modern humans >1 million years ago, evolved under strong positive selection, and passed into the human gene pool by an episode of admixture circa 37,000 years ago. The geographic distribution of haplogroup D, with marked differences between Africa and Eurasia, suggested that the archaic human form admixing with anatomically modern humans might have been Neanderthal. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report the first PCR amplification and high- throughput sequencing of nuclear DNA at the microcephalin (MCPH1) locus from Neanderthal individual from Mezzena Rockshelter (Monti Lessini, Italy). We show that a well-preserved Neanderthal fossil dated at approximately 50,000 years B.P., was homozygous for the ancestral, non-D, allele. The high yield of Neanderthal mtDNA sequences of the studied specimen, the pattern of nucleotide misincorporation among sequences consistent with post-mortem DNA damage and an accurate control of the MCPH1 alleles in all personnel that manipulated the sample, make it extremely unlikely that this result might reflect modern DNA contamination. Conclusions/Significance The MCPH1 genotype of the Monti Lessini (MLS) Neanderthal does not prove that there was no interbreeding between anatomically archaic and modern humans in Europe, but certainly shows that speculations on a possible Neanderthal origin of what is now the most common MCPH1 haplogroup are not supported by empirical evidence from ancient DNA. PMID:20498832

  8. Introgressive hybridization: brown bears as vectors for polar bear alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailer, Frank

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics and consequences of introgression can inform about numerous evolutionary processes. Biologists have therefore long been interested in hybridization. One challenge, however, lies in the identification of nonadmixed genotypes that can serve as a baseline for accurate quantification of admixture. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Cahill et al. (2015) analyse a genomic data set of 28 polar bears, eight brown bears and one American black bear. Polar bear alleles are found to be introgressed into brown bears not only near a previously identified admixture zone on the Alaskan Admiralty, Baranof and Chichagof (ABC) Islands, but also far into the North American mainland. Elegantly contrasting admixture levels at autosomal and X chromosomal markers, Cahill and colleagues infer that male-biased dispersal has spread these introgressed alleles away from the Late Pleistocene contact zone. Compared to a previous study on the ABC Island population in which an Alaskan brown bear served as a putatively admixture-free reference, Cahill et al. (2015) utilize a newly sequenced Swedish brown bear as admixture baseline. This approach reveals that brown bears have been impacted by introgression from polar bears to a larger extent (up to 8.8% of their genome), than previously known, including the bear that had previously served as admixture baseline. No evidence for introgression of brown bear into polar bear is found, which the authors argue could be a consequence of selection. Besides adding new exciting pieces to the puzzle of polar/brown bear evolutionary history, the study by Cahill and colleagues highlights that wildlife genomics is moving from analysing single genomes towards a landscape genomics approach. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The microcephalin ancestral allele in a Neanderthal individual.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Lari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The high frequency (around 0.70 worldwide and the relatively young age (between 14,000 and 62,000 years of a derived group of haplotypes, haplogroup D, at the microcephalin (MCPH1 locus led to the proposal that haplogroup D originated in a human lineage that separated from modern humans >1 million years ago, evolved under strong positive selection, and passed into the human gene pool by an episode of admixture circa 37,000 years ago. The geographic distribution of haplogroup D, with marked differences between Africa and Eurasia, suggested that the archaic human form admixing with anatomically modern humans might have been Neanderthal. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report the first PCR amplification and high-throughput sequencing of nuclear DNA at the microcephalin (MCPH1 locus from Neanderthal individual from Mezzena Rockshelter (Monti Lessini, Italy. We show that a well-preserved Neanderthal fossil dated at approximately 50,000 years B.P., was homozygous for the ancestral, non-D, allele. The high yield of Neanderthal mtDNA sequences of the studied specimen, the pattern of nucleotide misincorporation among sequences consistent with post-mortem DNA damage and an accurate control of the MCPH1 alleles in all personnel that manipulated the sample, make it extremely unlikely that this result might reflect modern DNA contamination. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The MCPH1 genotype of the Monti Lessini (MLS Neanderthal does not prove that there was no interbreeding between anatomically archaic and modern humans in Europe, but certainly shows that speculations on a possible Neanderthal origin of what is now the most common MCPH1 haplogroup are not supported by empirical evidence from ancient DNA.

  10. APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic At a ... help understand the role of genetic factors in cardiovascular disease . However, the testing is sometimes used in clinical ...

  11. Radiosensitivity of fingermillet genotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raveendran, T S; Nagarajan, C; Appadurai, R; Prasad, M N; Sundaresan, N [Tamil Nadu Agricultural Univ., Coimbatore (India)

    1984-07-01

    Varietal differences in radiosensitivity were observed in a study involving 4 genotypes of fingermillet (Eleusine coracana (Linn.) Gaertn.) subjected to gamma-irradiation. Harder seeds were found to tolerate a higher dose of the mutagen.

  12. Application of pooled genotyping to scan candidate regions for association with HDL cholesterol levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinds David A

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Association studies are used to identify genetic determinants of complex human traits of medical interest. With the large number of validated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs currently available, two limiting factors in association studies are genotyping capability and costs. Pooled DNA genotyping has been proposed as an efficient means of screening SNPs for allele frequency differences in case-control studies and for prioritising them for subsequent individual genotyping analysis. Here, we apply quantitative pooled genotyping followed by individual genotyping and replication to identify associations with human serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol levels. The DNA from individuals with low and high HDL cholesterol levels was pooled separately, each pool was amplified by polymerase chain reaction in triplicate and each amplified product was separately hybridised to a high-density oligonucleotide array. Allele frequency differences between case and control groups with low and high HDL cholesterol levels were estimated for 7,283 SNPs distributed across 71 candidate gene regions spanning a total of 17.1 megabases. A novel method was developed to take advantage of independently derived haplotype map information to improve the pooled estimates of allele frequency differences. A subset of SNPs with the largest estimated allele frequency differences between low and high HDL cholesterol groups was chosen for individual genotyping in the study population, as well as in a separate replication population. Four SNPs in a single haplotype block within the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP gene interval were significantly associated with HDL cholesterol levels in both populations. Our study is among the first to demonstrate the application of pooled genotyping followed by confirmation with individual genotyping to identify genetic determinants of a complex trait.

  13. The Phenotype/Genotype Correlation of Lactase Persistence among Omani Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahim Al-Abri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the correlation of lactase persistence phenotype with genotype in Omani adults.Methods: Lactase persistence phenotype was tested by hydrogen breath test in 52 Omani Adults using the Micro H2 analyzer. Results were checked against genotyping using direct DNA sequencing.Results: Forty one individuals with C/C-13910 and T/T-13915 genotypes had positive breath tests (≥20 ppm; while eight of nine individuals with T/C-13910 or T/G-13915 genotypes had negative breath tests (<20 ppm and two subjects were non-hydrogen producers. The agreement between phenotype and genotype using Kappa value was very good (0.93.Conclusion: Genotyping both T/C-13910 and T/G-13915 alleles can be used to assist diagnosis and predict lactose intolerance in the Omani population.

  14. Cytochrome P450 2D6 variants in a Caucasian population: Allele frequencies and phenotypic consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachse, C.; Brockmoeller, J.; Bauer, S.; Roots, I. [Humboldt Univ., Berlin (Germany)

    1997-02-01

    Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) metabolizes many important drugs. CYP2D6 activity ranges from complete deficiency to ultrafast metabolism, depending on at least 16 different known alleles. Their frequencies were determined in 589 unrelated German volunteers and correlated with enzyme activity measured by phenotyping with dextromethorphan or debrisoquine. For genotyping, nested PCR-RFLP tests from a PCR amplificate of the entire CYP2D6 gene were developed. The frequency of the CYP2D6*1 allele coding for extensive metabolizer (EM) phenotype was .364. The alleles coding for slightly (CYP2D6*2) or moderately (*9 and *10) reduced activity (intermediate metabolizer phenotype [IM]) showed frequencies of .324, .018, and .015, respectively. By use of novel PCR tests for discrimination, CYP2D6 gene duplication alleles were found with frequencies of.005 (*1 x 2), .013 (* 2 x 2), and .001 (*4 x 2). Frequencies of alleles with complete deficiency (poor metabolizer phenotype [PM]) were .207 (*4), .020 (*3 and *5), .009 (*6), and .001 (*7, *15, and *16). The defective CYP2D6 alleles *8, *11, *12, *13, and *14 were not found. All 41 PMs (7.0%) in this sample were explained by five mutations detected by four PCR-RFLP tests, which may suffice, together with the gene duplication test, for clinical prediction of CYP2D6 capacity. Three novel variants of known CYP2D6 alleles were discovered: *1C (T{sub 1957}C), *2B (additional C{sub 2558}T), and *4E (additional C{sub 2938}T). Analysis of variance showed significant differences in enzymatic activity measured by the dextromethorphan metabolic ratio (MR) between carriers of EN/PM (mean MR = .006) and IM/PM (mean MR = .014) alleles and between carriers of one (mean MR = .009) and two (mean MR = .003) functional alleles. The results of this study provide a solid basis for prediction of CYP2D6 capacity, as required in drug research and routine drug treatment. 35 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Sex-specific allelic transmission bias suggests sexual conflict at MC1R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducret, Valérie; Gaigher, Arnaud; Simon, Céline; Goudet, Jérôme; Roulin, Alexandre

    2016-09-01

    Sexual conflict arises when selection in one sex causes the displacement of the other sex from its phenotypic optimum, leading to an inevitable tension within the genome - called intralocus sexual conflict. Although the autosomal melanocortin-1-receptor gene (MC1R) can generate colour variation in sexually dichromatic species, most previous studies have not considered the possibility that MC1R may be subject to sexual conflict. In the barn owl (Tyto alba), the allele MC1RWHITE is associated with whitish plumage coloration, typical of males, and the allele MC1RRUFOUS is associated with dark rufous coloration, typical of females, although each sex can express any phenotype. Because each colour variant is adapted to specific environmental conditions, the allele MC1RWHITE may be more strongly selected in males and the allele MC1RRUFOUS in females. We therefore investigated whether MC1R genotypes are in excess or deficit in male and female fledglings compared with the expected Hardy-Weinberg proportions. Our results show an overall deficit of 7.5% in the proportion of heterozygotes in males and of 12.9% in females. In males, interannual variation in assortative pairing with respect to MC1R explained the year-specific deviations from Hardy-Weinberg proportions, whereas in females, the deficit was better explained by the interannual variation in the probability of inheriting the MC1RWHITE or MC1RRUFOUS allele. Additionally, we observed that sons inherit the MC1RRUFOUS allele from their fathers on average slightly less often than expected under the first Mendelian law. Transmission ratio distortion may be adaptive in this sexually dichromatic species if males and females are, respectively, selected to display white and rufous plumages. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Genetic exchange of fimbrial alleles exemplifies the adaptive virulence strategy of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E Kerr

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram-negative anaerobic bacterium, a member of the human oral microbiome, and a proposed "keystone" pathogen in the development of chronic periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the gingiva. P. gingivalis is a genetically diverse species, and is able to exchange chromosomal DNA between strains by natural competence and conjugation. In this study, we investigate the role of horizontal DNA transfer as an adaptive process to modify behavior, using the major fimbriae as our model system, due to their critical role in mediating interactions with the host environment. We show that P. gingivalis is able to exchange fimbrial allele types I and IV into four distinct strain backgrounds via natural competence. In all recombinants, we detected a complete exchange of the entire fimA allele, and the rate of exchange varies between the different strain backgrounds. In addition, gene exchange within other regions of the fimbrial genetic locus was identified. To measure the biological implications of these allele swaps we compared three genotypes of fimA in an isogenic background, strain ATCC 33277. We demonstrate that exchange of fimbrial allele type results in profound phenotypic changes, including the quantity of fimbriae elaborated, membrane blebbing, auto-aggregation and other virulence-associated phenotypes. Replacement of the type I allele with either the type III or IV allele resulted in increased invasion of gingival fibroblast cells relative to the isogenic parent strain. While genetic variability is known to impact host-microbiome interactions, this is the first study to quantitatively assess the adaptive effect of exchanging genes within the pan genome cloud. This is significant as it presents a potential mechanism by which opportunistic pathogens may acquire the traits necessary to modify host-microbial interactions.

  17. Genetic exchange of fimbrial alleles exemplifies the adaptive virulence strategy of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Jennifer E; Abramian, Jared R; Dao, Doan-Hieu V; Rigney, Todd W; Fritz, Jamie; Pham, Tan; Gay, Isabel; Parthasarathy, Kavitha; Wang, Bing-yan; Zhang, Wenjian; Tribble, Gena D

    2014-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram-negative anaerobic bacterium, a member of the human oral microbiome, and a proposed "keystone" pathogen in the development of chronic periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the gingiva. P. gingivalis is a genetically diverse species, and is able to exchange chromosomal DNA between strains by natural competence and conjugation. In this study, we investigate the role of horizontal DNA transfer as an adaptive process to modify behavior, using the major fimbriae as our model system, due to their critical role in mediating interactions with the host environment. We show that P. gingivalis is able to exchange fimbrial allele types I and IV into four distinct strain backgrounds via natural competence. In all recombinants, we detected a complete exchange of the entire fimA allele, and the rate of exchange varies between the different strain backgrounds. In addition, gene exchange within other regions of the fimbrial genetic locus was identified. To measure the biological implications of these allele swaps we compared three genotypes of fimA in an isogenic background, strain ATCC 33277. We demonstrate that exchange of fimbrial allele type results in profound phenotypic changes, including the quantity of fimbriae elaborated, membrane blebbing, auto-aggregation and other virulence-associated phenotypes. Replacement of the type I allele with either the type III or IV allele resulted in increased invasion of gingival fibroblast cells relative to the isogenic parent strain. While genetic variability is known to impact host-microbiome interactions, this is the first study to quantitatively assess the adaptive effect of exchanging genes within the pan genome cloud. This is significant as it presents a potential mechanism by which opportunistic pathogens may acquire the traits necessary to modify host-microbial interactions.

  18. Evaluation of Pakistani wheat germplasm for bread quality based on allelic variation in HMW glutenin subunits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabasum, A; Iqbal, N; Hameed, A; Arshad, R [Nuclear Institute for Agriculture and Biology, Faisalabad (Pakistan)

    2011-06-15

    Seventy six Pakistani wheat genotypes including land races were investigated for Bread quality (BQ) based on allelic variation in HMW glutenin subunits at the Glu-1 loci through SDS- polyacrylamide gel electropherosis. Twenty five different allelic combinations were detected with a total of 14 Glu-1 loci. Highest polymorphism was revealed by Glu-B locus and some single/ rare sub units were also screened out. The frequencies of dominant subunits were 50% for 2*, 42.11% for subunit pair 17+18 and 48.68% for 5+10 and 2+12 respectively. The quality scores displayed a range from 4 to 10, however generally good quality score of eight was more frequent (39. 47%). The highest quality scores of 10 and 9 were observed in 22.36% and 19.74% of genotypes respectively. The UPGMA analysis grouped genotypes into three major with two additional sub clusters for each. The cluster 'a' 'b' and 'C' were separated at 73% genetic distance which was further differentiated at a genetic distance of 50% into their sub clusters. Pakistani wheat varieties/land races exhibited large variation in term of HMW-GS. The generated information will lead to the pyrimiding of sub units for high BQ through mission oriented marker assisted breeding programmes for quality improvement of wheat. (author)

  19. Evaluation of Pakistani wheat germplasm for bread quality based on allelic variation in HMW glutenin subunits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabasum, A.; Iqbal, N.; Hameed, A.; Arshad, R.

    2011-01-01

    Seventy six Pakistani wheat genotypes including land races were investigated for Bread quality (BQ) based on allelic variation in HMW glutenin subunits at the Glu-1 loci through SDS- polyacrylamide gel electropherosis. Twenty five different allelic combinations were detected with a total of 14 Glu-1 loci. Highest polymorphism was revealed by Glu-B locus and some single/ rare sub units were also screened out. The frequencies of dominant subunits were 50% for 2*, 42.11% for subunit pair 17+18 and 48.68% for 5+10 and 2+12 respectively. The quality scores displayed a range from 4 to 10, however generally good quality score of eight was more frequent (39. 47%). The highest quality scores of 10 and 9 were observed in 22.36% and 19.74% of genotypes respectively. The UPGMA analysis grouped genotypes into three major with two additional sub clusters for each. The cluster 'a' 'b' and 'C' were separated at 73% genetic distance which was further differentiated at a genetic distance of 50% into their sub clusters. Pakistani wheat varieties/land races exhibited large variation in term of HMW-GS. The generated information will lead to the pyrimiding of sub units for high BQ through mission oriented marker assisted breeding programmes for quality improvement of wheat. (author)

  20. Diversity of Lactase Persistence Alleles in Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, BL; Raga, TO; Liebert, Anke

    2013-01-01

    The persistent expression of lactase into adulthood in humans is a recent genetic adaptation that allows the consumption of milk from other mammals after weaning. In Europe, a single allele (−13910∗T, rs4988235) in an upstream region that acts as an enhancer to the expression of the lactase gene ...

  1. HLA Genotyping in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease Waiting For Cadaveric Renal Transplantation in Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elma Fejzić

    2017-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Based on our results and previous research, there were no observed differences between allelic frequencies and genotypes of healthy people and people with ESRD. Differences between allelic groups occurred, but they were not statistically significant, except HLA-C*01 (p = 0.020.

  2. Next-generation sequencing can reveal in vitro-generated PCR crossover products: some artifactual sequences correspond to HLA alleles in the IMGT/HLA database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, C L; Rastrou, M; Williams, T C; Goodridge, D; Lazaro, A M; Tilanus, M; Erlich, H A

    2014-01-01

    The high-resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotyping assay that we developed using 454 sequencing and Conexio software uses generic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers for DRB exon 2. Occasionally, we observed low abundance DRB amplicon sequences that resulted from in vitro PCR 'crossing over' between DRB1 and DRB3/4/5. These hybrid sequences, revealed by the clonal sequencing property of the 454 system, were generally observed at a read depth of 5%-10% of the true alleles. They usually contained at least one mismatch with the IMGT/HLA database, and consequently, were easily recognizable and did not cause a problem for HLA genotyping. Sometimes, however, these artifactual sequences matched a rare allele and the automatic genotype assignment was incorrect. These observations raised two issues: (1) could PCR conditions be modified to reduce such artifacts? and (2) could some of the rare alleles listed in the IMGT/HLA database be artifacts rather than true alleles? Because PCR crossing over occurs during late cycles of PCR, we compared DRB genotypes resulting from 28 and (our standard) 35 cycles of PCR. For all 21 cell line DNAs amplified for 35 cycles, crossover products were detected. In 33% of the cases, these hybrid sequences corresponded to named alleles. With amplification for only 28 cycles, these artifactual sequences were not detectable. To investigate whether some rare alleles in the IMGT/HLA database might be due to PCR artifacts, we analyzed four samples obtained from the investigators who submitted the sequences. In three cases, the sequences were generated from true alleles. In one case, our 454 sequencing revealed an error in the previously submitted sequence. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Estimating the probability of allelic drop-out of STR alleles in forensic genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Mogensen, Helle Smidt

    2009-01-01

    In crime cases with available DNA evidence, the amount of DNA is often sparse due to the setting of the crime. In such cases, allelic drop-out of one or more true alleles in STR typing is possible. We present a statistical model for estimating the per locus and overall probability of allelic drop......-out using the results of all STR loci in the case sample as reference. The methodology of logistic regression is appropriate for this analysis, and we demonstrate how to incorporate this in a forensic genetic framework....

  4. Serotonin transporter genotype linked to adolescent substance use treatment outcome through externalizing behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy eChung

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Meta-analyses suggest that the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR short (S allele, relative to the long (L allele, is associated with risk for alcohol dependence, particularly among individuals with early onset antisocial alcoholism. Youth in substance use treatment tend to show antisocial or externalizing behaviors, such as conduct problems, which predict worse treatment outcome. This study examined a pathway in which 5-HTTLPR genotype is associated with externalizing behavior, and the intermediate phenotype of externalizing behavior serves as a link between 5-HTTLPR genotype and substance use treatment outcome in youth. Adolescents (n=142 who were recruited from addictions treatment were genotyped for 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms (S and LG carriers vs. LALA, assessed for externalizing and internalizing behaviors shortly after starting treatment, and followed over 6-months. 5-HTTLPR genotype was not associated with internalizing behaviors, and was not directly associated with 6-month substance use outcomes. However, 5-HTTLPR genotype was associated with externalizing behaviors (S and LG > LALA, and externalizing behaviors predicted alcohol and marijuana problem severity at 6-month follow-up. Results indicated an indirect (p<.05 and non-specific (i.e., both alcohol and marijuana severity effect of 5-HTTLPR genotype on youth substance use treatment outcomes, with externalizing behaviors as an important linking factor. Adolescents in substance use treatment with low expressing (S and LG 5-HTTLPR alleles and externalizing behavior might benefit from intervention that addresses serotonergic functioning, externalizing behaviors, and substance use to improve outcomes.

  5. 21 CFR 1305.26 - Lost electronic orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lost electronic orders. 1305.26 Section 1305.26... CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Electronic Orders § 1305.26 Lost electronic orders. (a) If a purchaser determines that an unfilled electronic order has been lost before or after receipt, the purchaser must provide, to...

  6. 50 CFR 25.22 - Lost and found articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lost and found articles. 25.22 Section 25.22 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Lost and found articles. Lost articles or money found on a national wildlife refuge are to be...

  7. Lost Talent? The Occupational Ambitions and Attainments of Young Australians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Joanna; Saha, Lawrence J.

    2011-01-01

    Given ongoing interest in increasing productivity and participation in the workforce, understanding when talent is lost is a useful exercise. The term "lost talent" describes the underutilisation or wastage of human potential. Focusing on young people, Sikora and Saha define lost talent as occurring when students in the top 50% of…

  8. Root biomass response to foliar application of imazapyr for two imidazolinone tolerant alleles of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Carlos A; Bulos, Mariano; Altieri, Emiliano; Ramos, María Laura

    2012-09-01

    Imisun and CLPlus are two imidazolinone tolerance traits in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) determined by the expression of two alleles at the locus Ahasl1. Both traits differed in their tolerance level to imazapyr -a type of imidazolinone herbicide- when aboveground biomass is considered, but the concomitant herbicide effect over the root system has not been reported. The objective of this work was to quantify the root biomass response to increased doses of imazapyr in susceptible (ahasl1/ahasl1), Imisun (Ahasl1-1/Ahasl1-1) and CLPlus (Ahasl1-3/Ahasl1-3) homozygous sunflower genotypes. These materials were sprayed at the V2-V4 stage with increased doses of imazapyr (from 0 to 480 g active ingredient ha(-1)) and 14 days after treatment root biomass of each plant was assessed. Genotype at the Ahasl1 locus, dose of imazapyr and their interaction significantly contributed (P < 0.001) to explain the reduction in root biomass accumulation after herbicide application. Estimated dose of imazapyr required to reduce root biomass accumulation by fifty percent (GR(50)) differed statistically for the three genotypes under study (P < 0.001). CLPlus genotypes showed the highest values of GR(50), 300 times higher on average than the susceptible genotypes, and almost 8 times higher than Imisun materials, demonstrating that both alleles differ in their root biomass response to foliar application of increased doses of imazapyr.

  9. CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 in Papua New Guinea: High frequency of previously uncharacterized CYP2D6 alleles and heterozygote excess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ahsen, Nicolas; Tzvetkov, Mladen; Karunajeewa, Harin A; Gomorrai, Servina; Ura, Alice; Brockmöller, Jürgen; Davis, Timothy M E; Mueller, Ivo; Ilett, Kenneth F; Oellerich, Michael

    2010-08-18

    A high frequency of previously unknown CYP2D6 alleles have been reported in Oceania populations. Genetic and functional properties of these alleles remain unknown. We performed analyses of the genetic variability of CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 genes using AmpliChip genotyping in cohorts from two distinct Papua New Guinea (PNG) populations (Kunjingini, n=88; Alexishafen, n=84) focussing on the genetic characterisation of PNG-specific alleles by re-sequencing. Previously unknown CYP2D6 alleles have population frequencies of 24% (Kunjingini) and 12% (Alexishafen). An allele similar to CYP2D6*1, but carrying the 1661G>C substitution, was the second most frequent CYP2D6 allele (20% Kunjingini and 10% Alexishafen population frequency). Sequencing suggests the CYP2D6* 1661G>C allele originated from a cross-over between CYP2D6*1 and *2 and thus is predicted to confer fully active CYP2D6 enzyme. Two additional predicted full activity alleles [1661G>C;4180G>C] and 31G>A were found in the Kunjingini cohort (frequencies 3 c/c and 1%, respectively) and a novel predicted reduced activity allele [100C>T;1039C>T] was found in the Alexishafen cohort (frequency 2%). A high frequency of ultra-rapid (15%) and notably low frequencies of intermediate and poor CYP2D6 metabolizers (exogamy and recent introduction of alleles by migration that are yet to reach HWE in relatively isolated populations. The CYP2D6*1661 allele common in Oceania may be regarded as functionally equivalent to the full activity CYP2D6*1 allele.

  10. Comparative analysis of minor histocompatibility antigens genotyping methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Vdovin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The wide range of techniques could be employed to find mismatches in minor histocompatibility antigens between transplant recipients and their donors. In the current study we compared three genotyping methods based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR for four minor antigens. Three of the tested methods: allele-specific PCR, restriction fragment length polymorphism and real-time PCR with TaqMan probes demonstrated 100% reliability when compared to Sanger sequencing for all of the studied polymorphisms. High resolution melting analysis was unsuitable for genotyping of one of the tested minor antigens (HA-1 as it has linked synonymous polymorphism. Obtained data could be used to select the strategy for large-scale clinical genotyping.

  11. HLA-A, -B, -DRB1 allele and haplotype frequencies of 920 cord blood units from Central Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Christian; Sauter, Jürgen; Riethmüller, Tobias; Kashi, Zahra Mehdizadeh; Schmidt, Alexander H; Barriga, Francisco J

    2016-08-01

    We present human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotype and allele/antigenic group frequencies derived from a data set of 920 umbilical cord blood units collected in Central Chile. HLA-A and -B genotypes were typed using sequence specific oligonucleotide probe methods while HLA-DRB1 genotypes were obtained from sequencing-based typing. The most frequent haplotype is A*29~B*44~DRB1*07:01 with an estimated frequency of 2.1%. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Lost Causes in and Beyond Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Streater, R F

    2007-01-01

    Lost Causes in and Beyond Physics deals with a selection of research topics mostly from theoretical physics that have been shown to be a dead-end or continue at least to be highly controversial. Nevertheless, whether it is about Bohmian mechanics, physics from Fisher information or the quantum theory of the brain, small but dedicated research communities continue to work on these issues. R.F. Streater, renowned mathematical physicist and co-author of the famous book "PCT, Spin and Statistics, and all that", in a series of essays describes the work and struggle of these research commnities, as well as the chances of any breakthrough in these areas. This book is written as both an entertainment and serious study and should be accessible to anyone with a background in theoretical physics and mathematics.

  13. Lost in the mall: misrepresentations and misunderstandings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Elizabeth F

    1999-01-01

    Readers of Ethics and Behavior have been treated to a misrepresentation of my research on planting false memories, to a misstatement of the actual empirical finidngs, and to a distortion of the history of the development of the idea for this line of research. The partisan essay by Crook and Dean which appears in this issue ("'Lost in a Shopping Mall' -- A Breach of Professional Ethics") is disturbing not only because of its errors, exaggerations, and omissions, but because, in some instances, the quality of the argument makes one wonder whether these were innocent mistakes or a deliberate attempt to distort my work. Some of these errors can be explained by simple lack of scientific competence. However, others are sufficiently bizarre that they cast doubt on the process that led to the acceptance of a manuscript written by an individual who has continually made her animosity toward me very publicly known (e.g., Boerner, 1996; Neimark, 1996).

  14. An overview on the allelic variant of CYP2D6 genotype

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    plants, fungi, slime molds, bacteria and archaea. More than 7700 distinct CYP sequences are known. ... SIGNIFICANCE OF CYTOCHROME P450 IN HUMANS. Human CYPs are primarily membrane-associated proteins, ..... Evolution of a highly polymorphic human cytochrome P450 gene cluster: CYP2D6. Genomics.

  15. Composition and functional analysis of low-molecular-weight glutenin alleles with Aroona near-isogenic lines of bread wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiaofei

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (LMW-GS strongly influence the bread-making quality of bread wheat. These proteins are encoded by a multi-gene family located at the Glu-A3, Glu-B3 and Glu-D3 loci on the short arms of homoeologous group 1 chromosomes, and show high allelic variation. To characterize the genetic and protein compositions of LMW-GS alleles, we investigated 16 Aroona near-isogenic lines (NILs using SDS-PAGE, 2D-PAGE and the LMW-GS gene marker system. Moreover, the composition of glutenin macro-polymers, dough properties and pan bread quality parameters were determined for functional analysis of LMW-GS alleles in the NILs. Results Using the LMW-GS gene marker system, 14–20 LMW-GS genes were identified in individual NILs. At the Glu-A3 locus, two m-type and 2–4 i-type genes were identified and their allelic variants showed high polymorphisms in length and nucleotide sequences. The Glu-A3d allele possessed three active genes, the highest number among Glu-A3 alleles. At the Glu-B3 locus, 2–3 m-type and 1–3 s-type genes were identified from individual NILs. Based on the different compositions of s-type genes, Glu-B3 alleles were divided into two groups, one containing Glu-B3a, B3b, B3f and B3g, and the other comprising Glu-B3c, B3d, B3h and B3i. Eight conserved genes were identified among Glu-D3 alleles, except for Glu-D3f. The protein products of the unique active genes in each NIL were detected using protein electrophoresis. Among Glu-3 alleles, the Glu-A3e genotype without i-type LMW-GS performed worst in almost all quality properties. Glu-B3b, B3g and B3i showed better quality parameters than the other Glu-B3 alleles, whereas the Glu-B3c allele containing s-type genes with low expression levels had an inferior effect on bread-making quality. Due to the conserved genes at Glu-D3 locus, Glu-D3 alleles showed no significant differences in effects on all quality parameters. Conclusions This work

  16. Allele variants of HLA II genes DRB1 and DQB1 regarding risk for type 1 diabetes mellitus in population of Bashkortostan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamilevna Avzaletdinova

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To estimate significance of HLA II DRB1 and DRB2 allele variants for development of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM in Bashkortostanpopulation (ethnical Russians, Tatar, Bashkir. Materials and methods. We analyzed DNA of 323 patients with T1DM and 683 healthy controls. DNA was derived from venous bloodsamples by phenol-chloroform extraction. DRB1 and DQB1 gene typing was performed by PCR method. Amplification products wereidentified with electrophoresis on a 1% agarose gel. Statistica for Windows v6.0 and MS Excel 98 software were applied for statisticalprocessing of acquired data. Results. Common markers of high risk for T1DM were found to be DRB1*04, DRB1*17, genotype DRB1*04/*17. On the contrary,lower risk was associated with DRB1*15 allele. In ethnical Russians lower risk of T1DM is also determined by DRB1*11 allele andDRB1*01 in Tatars. Predisposition by DQB1-alleles in Russians and Bashkir realizes only within DRB1*04/*17 genotype. However,in Tatar subpopulation DQB1*0302 is an independent risk marker of T1DM development. Conclusion. Common low risk markers for all three ethnic groups are DQB1*0301, DQB1*0602-08 alleles. Their presence negates riskof disease in all studied subpopulations even within DRB1*04/*17-genotype.

  17. Association of the C47T Polymorphism in SOD2 with Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease in Carriers of the APOEε4 Allele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gamarra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays an important part in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI, the prodromal phase of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Recent evidence shows that polymorphisms in the SOD2 gene affect the elimination of the reactive oxygen species (ROS generated in mitochondria. The aim of this study was to determine whether the functional rs4880 SNP in the SOD2 gene is a risk factor associated with aMCI and sporadic AD. 216 subjects with aMCI, 355 with AD, and 245 controls have been studied. The SNP rs4880 of the SOD2 gene was genotyped by RT-PCR and the APOE genotype was determined by PCR and RFLPs. Different multinomial logistic regression models were used to determine the risk levels for aMCI and AD. Although the T allele of the SOD2 rs4880 SNP gene (rs4880-T is not an independent risk for aMCI or AD, this allele increases the risk to aMCI patients carrying at least one APOEε4 allele. Moreover, rs4880-T allele and APOEε4 allele combination has been found to produce an increased risk for AD compared to aMCI reference patients. These results suggest that APOEε4 and rs4880-T genotype may be a risk for aMCI and a predictor of progression from aMCI to AD.

  18. Allele doses of apolipoprotein E type {epsilon}4 in sporadic late-onset Alzheimer`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucotte, G.; Aouizerate, A.; Gerard, N. [Regional Center of Neurogenetics, Paris (France)] [and others

    1995-12-18

    Apoliprotein E, type {epsilon}4 allele (ApoE-{epsilon}4) is associated with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease (AD). We have found that the cumulative probability of remaining unaffected over time decreases for each dose of ApoE-{epsilon}4 in sporadic, late-onset French AD. The effect of genotypes on age at onset of AD was analyzed using the product limit method, to compare unaffected groups during aging. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Distribution of photoperiod-insensitive alleles Ppd-B1a and Ppd-D1a and their effect on heading time in Japanese wheat cultivars

    OpenAIRE

    Seki, Masako; Chono, Makiko; Matsunaka, Hitoshi; Fujita, Masaya; Oda, Shunsuke; Kubo, Katashi; Kiribuchi-Otobe, Chikako; Kojima, Hisayo; Nishida, Hidetaka; Kato, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    The genotypes of photoperiod response genes Ppd-B1 and Ppd-D1 in Japanese wheat cultivars were determined by a PCR-based method, and heading times were compared among genotypes. Most of the Japanese wheat cultivars, except those from the Hokkaido region, carried the photoperiod-insensitive allele Ppd-D1a, and heading was accelerated 10.3 days compared with the Ppd-D1b genotype. Early cultivars with Ppd-D1a may have been selected to avoid damage from preharvest rain. In the Hokkaido region, Pp...

  20. Association studies using family pools of outcrossing crops based on allele-frequency estimates from DNA sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashraf, Bilal; Jensen, Just; Asp, Torben

    2014-01-01

    effect from F2-family pools was verified and it was shown that the underestimation of the allele effect is correctly described. The optimal design for an association study when sequencing budget would be fixed is obtained using large sample size and lower sequence depth, and using higher SNP density......F2 families are frequently used in breeding of outcrossing species, for instance to obtain trait measurements on plots. We propose to perform association studies by obtaining a matching “family genotype” from sequencing a pooled sample of the family, and to directly use allele frequencies computed...... (resulting in higher LD with causative mutations) and lower sequencing depth. Therefore, association studies using genotyping by sequencing are optimal and use low sequencing depth per sample. The developed framework for association studies using allele frequencies from sequencing can be modified for other...

  1. Allele-specific gene expression patterns in primary leukemic cells reveal regulation of gene expression by CpG site methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milani, Lili; Lundmark, Anders; Nordlund, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    To identify genes that are regulated by cis-acting functional elements in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) we determined the allele-specific expression (ASE) levels of 2, 529 genes by genotyping a genome-wide panel of single nucleotide polymorphisms in RNA and DNA from bone marrow and blood...

  2. Laboratory Information Management Software for genotyping workflows: applications in high throughput crop genotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanth VP

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the advances in DNA sequencer-based technologies, it has become possible to automate several steps of the genotyping process leading to increased throughput. To efficiently handle the large amounts of genotypic data generated and help with quality control, there is a strong need for a software system that can help with the tracking of samples and capture and management of data at different steps of the process. Such systems, while serving to manage the workflow precisely, also encourage good laboratory practice by standardizing protocols, recording and annotating data from every step of the workflow. Results A laboratory information management system (LIMS has been designed and implemented at the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT that meets the requirements of a moderately high throughput molecular genotyping facility. The application is designed as modules and is simple to learn and use. The application leads the user through each step of the process from starting an experiment to the storing of output data from the genotype detection step with auto-binning of alleles; thus ensuring that every DNA sample is handled in an identical manner and all the necessary data are captured. The application keeps track of DNA samples and generated data. Data entry into the system is through the use of forms for file uploads. The LIMS provides functions to trace back to the electrophoresis gel files or sample source for any genotypic data and for repeating experiments. The LIMS is being presently used for the capture of high throughput SSR (simple-sequence repeat genotyping data from the legume (chickpea, groundnut and pigeonpea and cereal (sorghum and millets crops of importance in the semi-arid tropics. Conclusion A laboratory information management system is available that has been found useful in the management of microsatellite genotype data in a moderately high throughput genotyping

  3. [Cloning and sequencing of KIR2DL1 framework gene cDNA and identification of a novel allele].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ge; Wang, Chang; Zhen, Jianxin; Zhang, Guobin; Xu, Yunping; Deng, Zhihui

    2016-10-01

    To develop an assay for cDNA cloning and haplotype sequencing of KIR2DL1 framework gene and determine the genotype of an ethnic Han from southern China. Total RNA was isolated from peripheral blood sample, and complementary DNA (cDNA) transcript was synthesized by RT-PCR. The entire coding sequence of the KIR2DL1 framework gene was amplified with a pair of KIR2DL1-specific PCR primers. The PCR products with a length of approximately 1.2 kb were then subjected to cloning and haplotype sequencing. A specific target fragment of the KIR2DL1 framework gene was obtained. Following allele separation, a wild-type KIR2DL1*00302 allele and a novel variant allele, KIR2DL1*031, were identified. Sequence alignment with KIR2DL1 alleles from the IPD-KIR Database showed that the novel allele KIR2DL1*031 has differed from the closest allele KIR2DL1*00302 by a non-synonymous mutation at CDS nt 188A>G (codon 42 GAG>GGG) in exon 4, which has caused an amino acid change Glu42Gly. The sequence of the novel allele KIR2DL1*031 was submitted to GenBank under the accession number KP025960 and to the IPD-KIR Database under the submission number IWS40001982. A name KIR2DL1*031 has been officially assigned by the World Health Organization (WHO) Nomenclature Committee. An assay for cDNA cloning and haplotype sequencing of KIR2DL1 has been established, which has a broad applications in KIR studies at allelic level.

  4. Identification of the Rare, Four Repeat Allele of IL-4 Intron-3 VNTR Polymorphism in Indian Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Henu Kumar; Jha, Aditya Nath; Khodiar, Prafulla Kumar; Patra, Pradeep Kumar; Bhaskar, Lakkakula Venkata Kameswara Subrahmanya

    2016-06-01

    Cytokines are cell signaling molecules which upon release by cells facilitate the recruitment of immune-modulatory cells towards the sites of inflammation. Genetic variations in cytokine genes are shown to regulate their production and affect the risk of infectious as well as autoimmune diseases. Intron-3 of interleukin-4 gene (IL-4) harbors 70-bp variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) that may alter the expression level of IL-4 gene. To determine the distribution of IL-4 70-bp VNTR polymorphism in seven genetically heterogeneous populations of Chhattisgarh, India and their comparison with the finding of other Indian and world populations. A total of 371 healthy unrelated individuals from 5 caste and 2 tribal populations were included in the present study. The IL-4 70-bp VNTR genotyping was carried out using PCR and electrophoresis. Overall, 3 alleles of IL-4 70-bp VNTR (a2, a3 and a4) were detected. The results demonstrated the variability of the IL-4 70-bp VNTR polymorphism in Chhattisgarh populations. Allele a3 was the most common allele at the 70-bp VNTR locus in all populations followed by a2 allele. This study reports the presence four repeat allele a4 at a low frequency in the majority of the Chhattisgarh populations studied. Further, the frequency of the minor allele (a2) in Chhattisgarh populations showed similarity with the frequencies of European populations but not with the East Asian populations where the a2 allele is a major allele. Our study provides a baseline for future research into the role of the IL-4 locus in diseases linked to inflammation in Indian populations.

  5. Genetic diversity in South African maize ( Zea mays L.) genotypes as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One thousand and forty three (1043) maize genotypes including white and yellow maize inbred lines as well as hybrids from the public germplasm collection were characterized with 80 microsatellite markers distributed throughout the genome. A total of 1874 alleles were amplified and used in the genetic diversity analysis.

  6. Differential effects of the ApoE4 genotype on brain structure and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matura, S.; Prvulovic, D.; Jurcoane, A.; Hartmann, D.; Miller, J.; Scheibe, M.; O'Dwyer, L.G.; Oertel-Knochel, V.; Knochel, C.; Reinke, B.; Karakaya, T.; Fusser, F.; Pantel, J.

    2014-01-01

    The apolipoprotein E epsilon4 allele is a well established genetic risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer's disease. It is associated with structural and functional brain changes in healthy young, middle-aged and elderly subjects. In the current study, we assessed the impact of the ApoE genotype on

  7. Identification of 23 new prostate cancer susceptibility loci using the iCOGS custom genotyping array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eeles, Rosalind A; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Benlloch, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in males in developed countries. To identify common prostate cancer susceptibility alleles, we genotyped 211,155 SNPs on a custom Illumina array (iCOGS) in blood DNA from 25,074 prostate cancer cases and 24,272 controls from the internationa...

  8. Comprehensive genotyping for 18 blood group systems using a multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay shows a high degree of accuracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haer-Wigman, Lonneke; Ji, Yanli; Lodén, Martin; de Haas, Masja; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Veldhuisen, Barbera

    2013-01-01

    In recent years genotyping methods have been implemented in blood banks as alternative to comprehensive serologic typing. We evaluated a newly developed assay for convenient and comprehensive genotyping of blood group alleles based on multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA)

  9. Determination of allele frequencies in nine short tandem repeat loci ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-17

    Apr 17, 2008 ... the normal cellular process of replication of DNA molecules. ... probability of a certain genetic variant (alleles) occuring in ... have preservatives that hinder spoilage and are easily packaged .... Allele distribution at Nine STR.

  10. A new electrophoresis technique to separate microsatellite alleles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A new electrophoresis technique to separate microsatellite alleles* ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... with the CEQTM 8000 Genetic Analysis System and ABI 3130xl DNA Sequencer easily separated products and determined allelic size, ...

  11. Allele specific expression and methylation in the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoë Lonsdale

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The social hymenoptera are emerging as models for epigenetics. DNA methylation, the addition of a methyl group, is a common epigenetic marker. In mammals and flowering plants methylation affects allele specific expression. There is contradictory evidence for the role of methylation on allele specific expression in social insects. The aim of this paper is to investigate allele specific expression and monoallelic methylation in the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris. We found nineteen genes that were both monoallelically methylated and monoallelically expressed in a single bee. Fourteen of these genes express the hypermethylated allele, while the other five express the hypomethylated allele. We also searched for allele specific expression in twenty-nine published RNA-seq libraries. We found 555 loci with allele-specific expression. We discuss our results with reference to the functional role of methylation in gene expression in insects and in the as yet unquantified role of genetic cis effects in insect allele specific methylation and expression.

  12. Comparative frequency and allelic distribution of ABO and Rh (D ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gourab Dewan

    2015-02-18

    Feb 18, 2015 ... desh and having borders with India and Myanmar (Fig. 1). It is a hilly area with ..... calculated allelic frequencies for ABO/Rh systems previously. Therefore, allelic .... in backward caste population of Uttar Pradesh, India. Not Sci.

  13. Association mapping and favourable QTL alleles for fibre quality ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cheng-Guang Dong

    A total of 201 markers were polymorphic and generated 394 allele loci, and 403 ... identified as containing favourable allele loci related to fibre quality traits. The identified .... environment. Field management followed respective local practices.

  14. Induction of Terpene Biosynthesis in Berries of Microvine Transformed with VvDXS1 Alleles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza Dalla Costa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Terpenoids, especially monoterpenes, are major aroma-impact compounds in grape and wine. Previous studies highlighted a key regulatory role for grapevine 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase 1 (VvDXS1, the first enzyme of the methylerythritol phosphate pathway for isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis. Here, the parallel analysis of VvDXS1 genotype and terpene concentration in a germplasm collection demonstrated that VvDXS1 sequence has a very high predictive value for the accumulation of monoterpenes and also has an influence on sesquiterpene levels. A metabolic engineering approach was applied by expressing distinct VvDXS1 alleles in the grapevine model system “microvine” and assessing the effects on downstream pathways at transcriptional and metabolic level in different organs and fruit developmental stages. The underlying goal was to investigate two potential perturbation mechanisms, the former based on a significant over-expression of the wild-type (neutral VvDXS1 allele and the latter on the ex-novo expression of an enzyme with increased catalytic efficiency from the mutated (muscat VvDXS1 allele. The integration of the two VvDXS1 alleles in distinct microvine lines was found to alter the expression of several terpenoid biosynthetic genes, as assayed through an ad hoc developed TaqMan array based on cDNA libraries of four aromatic cultivars. In particular, enhanced transcription of monoterpene, sesquiterpene and carotenoid pathway genes was observed. The accumulation of monoterpenes in ripe berries was higher in the transformed microvines compared to control plants. This effect is predominantly attributed to the improved activity of the VvDXS1 enzyme coded by the muscat allele, whereas the up-regulation of VvDXS1 plays a secondary role in the increase of monoterpenes.

  15. Detection of ancestry informative HLA alleles confirms the admixed origins of Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Mitsunaga, Shigeki; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Shyh-Yuh, Liou; Sawamoto, Taiji; Fujiwara, Tsutomu; Tsutsui, Naohisa; Suematsu, Koji; Shinagawa, Akira; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Ituro

    2013-01-01

    The polymorphisms in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region are powerful tool for studying human evolutionary processes. We investigated genetic structure of Japanese by using five-locus HLA genotypes (HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DPB1) of 2,005 individuals from 10 regions of Japan. We found a significant level of population substructure in Japanese; particularly the differentiation between Okinawa Island and mainland Japanese. By using a plot of the principal component scores, we identified ancestry informative alleles associated with the underlying population substructure. We examined extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between pairs of HLA alleles on the haplotypes that were differentiated among regions. The LDs were strong and weak for pairs of HLA alleles characterized by low and high frequencies in Okinawa Island, respectively. The five-locus haplotypes whose alleles exhibit strong LD were unique to Japanese and South Korean, suggesting that these haplotypes had been recently derived from the Korean Peninsula. The alleles characterized by high frequency in Japanese compared to South Korean formed segmented three-locus haplotype that was commonly found in Aleuts, Eskimos, and North- and Meso-Americans but not observed in Korean and Chinese. The serologically equivalent haplotype was found in Orchid Island in Taiwan, Mongol, Siberia, and Arctic regions. It suggests that early Japanese who existed prior to the migration wave from the Korean Peninsula shared ancestry with northern Asian who moved to the New World via the Bering Strait land bridge. These results may support the admixture model for peopling of Japanese Archipelago.

  16. Allelic Variation at the Rht8 Locus in a 19th Century Wheat Collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnéa Asplund

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wheat breeding during the 20th century has put large efforts into reducing straw length and increasing harvest index. In the 1920s an allele of Rht8 with dwarfing effects, found in the Japanese cultivar “Akakomugi,” was bred into European cultivars and subsequently spread over the world. Rht8 has not been cloned, but the microsatellite marker WMS261 has been shown to be closely linked to it and is commonly used for genotyping Rht8. The “Akakomugi” allele is strongly associated with WMS261-192bp. Numerous screens of wheat cultivars with different geographical origin have been performed to study the spread and influence of the WMS261-192bp during 20th century plant breeding. However, the allelic diversity of WMS261 in wheat cultivars before modern plant breeding and introduction of the Japanese dwarfing genes is largely unknown. Here, we report a study of WMS261 allelic diversity in a historical wheat collection from 1865 representing worldwide major wheats at the time. The majority carried the previously reported 164 bp or 174 bp allele, but with little geographical correlation. In a few lines, a rare 182 bp fragment was found. Although straw length was recognized as an important character already in the 19th century, Rht8 probably played a minor role for height variation. The use of WMS261 and other functional markers for analyses of historical specimens and characterization of historic crop traits is discussed.

  17. The lost honour of Henrietta Leavitt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Puerto, C.

    2011-11-01

    The first scene opens with the music of Shirley Bassey. The astronomer Henrietta Swan Leavitt is writing a diary when visited by the famous CBS reporter Edward Roscoe Murrow. Henrietta is surprised that this American television channel should want to pay such a tribute to her, but she agrees to be interviewed. Annie Jump Cannon, her friend and colleague from Harvard College Observatory, accompanies her during most of the sessions. Everything goes so well that the journalist tries to touch on certain issues that Henrietta seems to want to keep secret, such as her relationship with Edward Charles Pickering, Director of the Observatory, and the reason why she failed to get the recognition for her work that she deserved.This is the argument of the play The Lost Honor of Henrietta Leavitt, a project of the Museo de la Ciencia y el Cosmos (Museum of Science and the Cosmos), run by the Organismo Autonomo de Museos y Centros of Cabildo de Tenerife (Autonomous Organism of Museums and Centres of the island government, Cabildo of Tenerife), with funding from the Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology (FECYT) and designed for the International Year of Astronomy 2009. The play, written and directed by the author, Carmen del Puerto, has been staged eight times in Tenerife and Pamplona. The poster values this experience as a resource for scientific popularization.

  18. [How much water is lost during breathing?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieliński, Jakub; Przybylski, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    Arising from the Antoine equation and the ideal gas law, the volume of exhaled water has been calculated. Air temperature, humidity and minute ventilation has been taken into account. During physical exercise amount of exhaled H(2)O is linear, but not proportional to heart rate. And so at the heart rate of 140 bpm amount of exhaled water is approximately four times higher than during the rest and equals about 60-70 ml/h. The effect of external temperature and humidity on water lost via lungs was assessed as well. When temperature of inspired air and its humidity is 35°C an 75% respectively loss of water is 7 ml/h. Whereas when above parameters are changed to minus 10°C and 25% lung excretion of H(2)O increases up to 20 ml/h. The obtained results may become the basis for the assessment of osmolarity changes on the surface of the lower airways. The increase of which is recently considered as one of the factors responsible for exercise induced bronchospasm.

  19. Low-risk susceptibility alleles in 40 human breast cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riaz, Muhammad; Elstrodt, Fons; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Dehghan, Abbas; Klijn, Jan GM; Schutte, Mieke

    2009-01-01

    Low-risk breast cancer susceptibility alleles or SNPs confer only modest breast cancer risks ranging from just over 1.0 to1.3 fold. Yet, they are common among most populations and therefore are involved in the development of essentially all breast cancers. The mechanism by which the low-risk SNPs confer breast cancer risks is currently unclear. The breast cancer association consortium BCAC has hypothesized that the low-risk SNPs modulate expression levels of nearby located genes. Genotypes of five low-risk SNPs were determined for 40 human breast cancer cell lines, by direct sequencing of PCR-amplified genomic templates. We have analyzed expression of the four genes that are located nearby the low-risk SNPs, by using real-time RT-PCR and Human Exon microarrays. The SNP genotypes and additional phenotypic data on the breast cancer cell lines are presented. We did not detect any effect of the SNP genotypes on expression levels of the nearby-located genes MAP3K1, FGFR2, TNRC9 and LSP1. The SNP genotypes provide a base line for functional studies in a well-characterized cohort of 40 human breast cancer cell lines. Our expression analyses suggest that a putative disease mechanism through gene expression modulation is not operative in breast cancer cell lines

  20. NEW GENOTYPES AND TECHNOLOGICAL INDICATORS OF WINTER TRITICALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Z.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to conduct basic screening of new lines and cultivars of winter hexaploid triticale by the technological and molecular genetics indicators. Molecular and genetic research conducted by polymerase chain reaction allelic variants of gene loci Wx-A1, Wx-B1, and quality parameters of grain, flour and bread – on technological markers. The new cultivars and lines of winter hexaploid triticale of Nosivka Breeding and Research Station of Remeslo Myronivka Institute of Wheat by technological indicators of grain, flour and bread quality were studied. According to representative criteria’s the most promising genotypes, which are the main products in terms Forest-Steppe ecotypes’ and a high-quality raw materials for bakeries and bioethanol were identified. Molecular and genetic identifications of allelic variants of genes loci Wx-A1, Wx-B1 triticale, which in the early stages of ontogenesis to predict targeted uses genotypes were conducted. The first among a series of triticale cultivars and lines Forest-Steppe ecotypes and biotypes with nonfunctional b gene allele WxA1, which defines a high content of amylopectin of starch, an important release for more ethanol was identified. It was found that technological characteristics of grain, flour and bread of new cultivars and lines of winter triticale meet the modern requirements production dietetic food and bioenergy products is important and relevant in the context of food security of Ukraine.

  1. The APOE Genotype in Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Yang

    Full Text Available Amyloid plaque has been reported in brain biopsies from patients with idiopathic normal-pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH and proposed as a significant feature of the pathophysiology. Presence of the apolipoprotein E ε4 (APOE ε4 allele is associated with increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD.To compare the distribution of APOE genotype in iNPH patients with an age-matched population-based control group and with Alzheimer's disease (AD patients.APOE genotype frequencies were determined in 77 iNPH patients (50 men and 27 women, mean age 71.7 years diagnosed with iNPH, a sample of 691 AD patients and 638 age-matched population controls (299 men and 339 women from the INTERGENE cohort.The APOE distribution did not differ significantly between the iNPH patients and the control population. The per e4-allele odds-ratio (OR of iNPH was given by OR = 0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI = (0.50, 1.60 that was considerably smaller than the per-allele OR of AD, OR = 5.34 (4.10, 7.00.The results suggest that the APOE-related risk of AD in patients with iNPH is not higher than in the general population.

  2. Directional Positive Selection on an Allele of Arbitrary Dominance

    OpenAIRE

    Teshima, Kosuke M.; Przeworski, Molly

    2006-01-01

    Most models of positive directional selection assume codominance of the beneficial allele. We examine the importance of this assumption by implementing a coalescent model of positive directional selection with arbitrary dominance. We find that, for a given mean fixation time, a beneficial allele has a much weaker effect on diversity at linked neutral sites when the allele is recessive.

  3. Dye shift: a neglected source of genotyping error in molecular ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Jolene T; Robertson, Bruce C; Jamieson, Ian G

    2011-05-01

    Molecular ecologists must be vigilant in detecting and accounting for genotyping error, yet potential errors stemming from dye-induced mobility shift (dye shift) may be frequently neglected and largely unknown to researchers who employ 3-primer systems with automated genotyping. When left uncorrected, dye shift can lead to mis-scoring alleles and even to falsely calling new alleles if different dyes are used to genotype the same locus in subsequent reactions. When we used four different fluorophore labels from a standard dye set to genotype the same set of loci, differences in the resulting size estimates for a single allele ranged from 2.07 bp to 3.68 bp. The strongest effects were associated with the fluorophore PET, and relative degree of dye shift was inversely related to locus size. We found little evidence in the literature that dye shift is regularly accounted for in 3-primer studies, despite knowledge of this phenomenon existing for over a decade. However, we did find some references to erroneous standard correction factors for the same set of dyes that we tested. We thus reiterate the need for strict quality control when attempting to reduce possible sources of genotyping error, and in cases where different dyes are applied to a single locus, perhaps mistakenly, we strongly discourage researchers from assuming generic correction patterns. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. GENETIC DIVERSITY OF S3 MAIZE GENOTYPES RESISTANT TO DOWNY MILDEW BASED ON SSR MARKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amran Muis

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The compulsory requirement for releasing new high yielding maize varieties is resistance to downy mildew. The study aimed to determine the level of homozygosity, genetic diversity, and  genetic distance of 30 S3 genotypes of maize. Number of primers to be used were 30 polymorphic SSR loci which are distributed over the entire maize genomes. The S3 genotypes used were resistant to downy mildew with homozygosity level of >80%, genetic distance between the test and tester strains >0.7, and anthesis silking interval (ASI between inbred lines and tester lines was maximum 3 days. The results showed that 30 SSR primers used were spread evenly across the maize genomes which were manifested in the representation of SSR loci on each chromosome of a total of 10 chromosomes. The levels of polymorphism ranged from 0.13 to 0.78, an average of 0.51, and the number of alleles ranged from 2 to 8 alleles per SSR locus, an average of 4 alleles per SSR locus. The size of nucleotides in each locus also varied from 70 to 553 bp. Cophenetic correlation value (r at 0.67 indicated that the Unweighted Pair-Group Method Using Arithmetic Averages (UPGMA was less reliable for differentiating genotypes in five groups. Of the total of 30 genotypes analyzed, 17 genotypes had homozygosity level of >80% so it can be included in the hybrid assembly program.

  5. Variant mannose-binding lectin alleles are not associated with susceptibility to or outcome of invasive pneumococcal infection in randomly included patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Gitte; Weis, Nina; Madsen, Hans O

    2002-01-01

    for pneumococcal infections. To assess the influence of MBL genotypes on the course and outcome of invasive pneumococcal disease, clinical data for 141 adult patients were collected prospectively and their genotypes were determined. All patients included had positive blood cultures for Streptococcus pneumoniae....... The distribution of variant MBL alleles related to low MBL serum concentrations was similar among the patients and healthy individuals, and MBL genotype was not associated with infection outcome. Thus, in a random adult population with invasive pneumococcal infection, MBL does not seem to play a role......Invasive pneumococcal disease is a serious infection that primarily affects very young children and elderly or immunocompromised individuals but also affects previously healthy people. Variant mannose-binding lectin (MBL) alleles are associated with recurrent infections and may be a risk factor...

  6. Extreme MHC class I diversity in the sedge warbler (Acrocephalus schoenobaenus); selection patterns and allelic divergence suggest that different genes have different functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedrzycka, Aleksandra; O'Connor, Emily; Sebastian, Alvaro; Migalska, Magdalena; Radwan, Jacek; Zając, Tadeusz; Bielański, Wojciech; Solarz, Wojciech; Ćmiel, Adam; Westerdahl, Helena

    2017-07-05

    Recent work suggests that gene duplications may play an important role in the evolution of immunity genes. Passerine birds, and in particular Sylvioidea warblers, have highly duplicated major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, which are key in immunity, compared to other vertebrates. However, reasons for this high MHC gene copy number are yet unclear. High-throughput sequencing (HTS) allows MHC genotyping even in individuals with extremely duplicated genes. This HTS data can reveal evidence of selection, which may help to unravel the putative functions of different gene copies, i.e. neofunctionalization. We performed exhaustive genotyping of MHC class I in a Sylvioidea warbler, the sedge warbler, Acrocephalus schoenobaenus, using the Illumina MiSeq technique on individuals from a wild study population. The MHC diversity in 863 genotyped individuals by far exceeds that of any other bird species described to date. A single individual could carry up to 65 different alleles, a large proportion of which are expressed (transcribed). The MHC alleles were of three different lengths differing in evidence of selection, diversity and divergence within our study population. Alleles without any deletions and alleles containing a 6 bp deletion showed characteristics of classical MHC genes, with evidence of multiple sites subject to positive selection and high sequence divergence. In contrast, alleles containing a 3 bp deletion had no sites subject to positive selection and had low divergence. Our results suggest that sedge warbler MHC alleles that either have no deletion, or contain a 6 bp deletion, encode classical antigen presenting MHC molecules. In contrast, MHC alleles containing a 3 bp deletion may encode molecules with a different function. This study demonstrates that highly duplicated MHC genes can be characterised with HTS and that selection patterns can be useful for revealing neofunctionalization. Importantly, our results highlight the need to consider the

  7. Pyramiding genes and alleles for improving energy cane biomass yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, Ray [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Nagai, Chifumi [Hawaii Agriculture Research Center; Yu, Qingyi [Texas A & M AgriLife Research

    2018-03-23

    The overall goal of this project is to identify genes and gene interaction networks contributed to the extreme segregants with 30 folds biomass yield difference in sugarcane F2 populations. Towards achieving this goal, yield trials of 108 F2 extreme segregants from S. officinarum LA Purple and S. robustum MOL5829 (LM population) were carried out in two locations in three years. A yield trial of the second F2 population from S. officinarum LA Purple and S. spontaneum US56-14-4 (LU population) was installed in the summer of 2014 and the first set of yield component data was collected. For genotyping, transcriptomes from leaves and stalks of 70 extreme segregants of the LM F2 population and 119 individuals of the LU F2 populations were sequenced. The genomes of 91 F1 individuals from the LM populations are being sequenced to construct ultra-high density genetic maps for each of the two parents for both assisting the LA Purple genome assembling and for testing a hypothesis of female restitution. The genomes of 110 F2 individuals from single F1 in the LU population, a different set from the 119 F2 individuals used for transcriptome sequencing, are being sequenced for mapping genes and QTLs affecting biomass yield and for testing a hypothesis of female restitution. Gene expression analysis between extreme segregants of high and low biomass yield showed up-regulation of cellulose synthase, cellulose, and xylan synthase in high biomass yield segregants among 3,274 genes differentially expressed between the two extremes. Our transcriptome results revealed not only the increment of cell wall biosynthesis pathway is essential, but the rapid turnover of certain cell wall polymers as well as carbohydrate partitioning are also important for recycling and energy conservation during rapid cell growth in high biomass sugarcane. Seventeen differentially expressed genes in auxin, one in ethylene and one in gibberellin related signaling and biosynthesis pathways were identified, which

  8. America’s Lost Innocence and Cinema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja Włodek

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In my paper America’s Lost Innocence I intend to focus on American cinema of the ’50s, part of ’60s, and contemporary throwbacks to those decades. The ’50s have been called “the last decade of American innocence”, “the happiest decade in America’s history – when things were going on – that everybody misses” (by Jean Baudrillard. That era symbolically ceased on 22 November 1963; however, many scholars and publicists undermine the belief in its very existence. Michael Wood calls the ’50s a time of “self-deception”; therefore, the question raised is – has America ever been innocent? By concentrating on the message conveyed by mostly genre (e.g. drama, melodrama, musical, romantic comedy and mainstream movies made in the ’50s and early ’60s (e.g. A Place In the Sun, Cat on the Hot, Tin Roof, Home From the Hill, I intend to analyze the portrait of American society of that time, it’s rules and expectations towards individuals and system as a whole. In the second part of my paper I will focus on contemporary throwbacks to those times depicted mostly in movies made in the 21st century, although not exclusively (e.g. Far From Heaven, The Hours, Revolutionary Road, the TV series Mad Men [2007–], Pleasantville. Using those and other movies as examples, I intend to prove the thesis that the phenomenon of retro and contemporary retromania are not always and not by definition conservative, and can serve as a means to a critical approach towards society.

  9. Cause-specific measures of life years lost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Kragh Andersen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: A new measure of the number of life years lost due to specific causes of death is introduced. Methods: This measure is based on the cumulative incidence of death, it does not require "independence" of causes, and it satisfies simple balance equations: "total number of life years lost = sum of cause-specific life years lost", and "total number of life years lost before age x + temporary life expectancy between birth and age x = x". Results: The measure is contrasted to alternatives suggested in the demographic literature and allmethods are illustrated using Danish and Russian multiple decrement life-tables.

  10. Considering lost sale in inventory routing problems for perishable goods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirzaei, Samira; Seifi, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    , the average optimality gaps are less than 10.9% and 13.4% using linear and exponential lost sale functions, respectively. Furthermore, we show that the optimality gaps found by CPLEX grow exponentially with the problem size while those obtained by the proposed meta-heuristic algorithm increase linearly....... is considered as lost sale. The proposed model balances the transportation cost, the cost of inventory holding and lost sale. In addition to the usual inventory routing constraints, we consider the cost of lost sale as a linear or an exponential function of the inventory age. The proposed model is solved...

  11. Predicting genotypes environmental range from genome-environment associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manel, Stéphanie; Andrello, Marco; Henry, Karine; Verdelet, Daphné; Darracq, Aude; Guerin, Pierre-Edouard; Desprez, Bruno; Devaux, Pierre

    2018-05-17

    Genome-environment association methods aim to detect genetic markers associated with environmental variables. The detected associations are usually analysed separately to identify the genomic regions involved in local adaptation. However, a recent study suggests that single-locus associations can be combined and used in a predictive way to estimate environmental variables for new individuals on the basis of their genotypes. Here, we introduce an original approach to predict the environmental range (values and upper and lower limits) of species genotypes from the genetic markers significantly associated with those environmental variables in an independent set of individuals. We illustrate this approach to predict aridity in a database constituted of 950 individuals of wild beets and 299 individuals of cultivated beets genotyped at 14,409 random Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs). We detected 66 alleles associated with aridity and used them to calculate the fraction (I) of aridity-associated alleles in each individual. The fraction I correctly predicted the values of aridity in an independent validation set of wild individuals and was then used to predict aridity in the 299 cultivated individuals. Wild individuals had higher median values and a wider range of values of aridity than the cultivated individuals, suggesting that wild individuals have higher ability to resist to stress-aridity conditions and could be used to improve the resistance of cultivated varieties to aridity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Temperature Switch PCR (TSP: Robust assay design for reliable amplification and genotyping of SNPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mather Diane E

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many research and diagnostic applications rely upon the assay of individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Thus, methods to improve the speed and efficiency for single-marker SNP genotyping are highly desirable. Here, we describe the method of temperature-switch PCR (TSP, a biphasic four-primer PCR system with a universal primer design that permits amplification of the target locus in the first phase of thermal cycling before switching to the detection of the alleles. TSP can simplify assay design for a range of commonly used single-marker SNP genotyping methods, and reduce the requirement for individual assay optimization and operator expertise in the deployment of SNP assays. Results We demonstrate the utility of TSP for the rapid construction of robust and convenient endpoint SNP genotyping assays based on allele-specific PCR and high resolution melt analysis by generating a total of 11,232 data points. The TSP assays were performed under standardised reaction conditions, requiring minimal optimization of individual assays. High genotyping accuracy was verified by 100% concordance of TSP genotypes in a blinded study with an independent genotyping method. Conclusion Theoretically, TSP can be directly incorporated into the design of assays for most current single-marker SNP genotyping methods. TSP provides several technological advances for single-marker SNP genotyping including simplified assay design and development, increased assay specificity and genotyping accuracy, and opportunities for assay automation. By reducing the requirement for operator expertise, TSP provides opportunities to deploy a wider range of single-marker SNP genotyping methods in the laboratory. TSP has broad applications and can be deployed in any animal and plant species.

  13. Geostatistical analysis of allele presence patterns among American black bears in eastern North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, L.M.; Van Manen, F.T.; King, T.L.

    2005-01-01

    Highways are one of the leading causes of wildlife habitat fragmentation and may particularly affect wide-ranging species, such as American black bears (Ursus americanus). We initiated a research project in 2000 to determine potential effects of a 4-lane highway on black bear ecology in Washington County, North Carolina. The research design included a treatment area (highway construction) and a control area and a pre- and post-construction phase. We used data from the pre-construction phase to determine whether we could detect scale dependency or directionality among allele occurrence patterns using geostatistics. Detection of such patterns could provide a powerful tool to measure the effects of landscape fragmentation on gene flow. We sampled DNA from roots of black bear hair at 70 hair-sampling sites on each study area for 7 weeks during fall of 2000. We used microsatellite analysis based on 10 loci to determine unique multi-locus genotypes. We examined all alleles sampled at ???25 sites on each study area and mapped their presence or absence at each hair-sample site. We calculated semivariograms, which measure the strength of statistical correlation as a function of distance, and adjusted them for anisotropy to determine the maximum direction of spatial continuity. We then calculated the mean direction of spatial continuity for all examined alleles. The mean direction of allele frequency variation was 118.3?? (SE = 8.5) on the treatment area and 172.3?? (SE = 6.0) on the control area. Rayleigh's tests showed that these directions differed from random distributions (P = 0.028 and P < 0.001, respectively), indicating consistent directional patterns for the alleles we examined in each area. Despite the small spatial scale of our study (approximately 11,000 ha for each study area), we observed distinct and consistent patterns of allele occurrence, suggesting different directions of gene flow between the study areas. These directions seemed to coincide with the

  14. Beta2-adrenergic receptor allele frequencies in the Quechua, a high altitude native population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupert, J L; Monsalve, M V; Devine, D V; Hochachka, P W

    2000-03-01

    The beta2-adrenergic receptor is involved in the control of numerous physiological processes and, as the primary catecholamine receptor in the lungs, is of particular importance in the regulation of pulmonary function. There are several polymorphic loci in the beta2-adrenergic receptor gene that have alleles that alter receptor function, including two (A/G46, G/C79) that increase agonist sensitivity. As such a phenotype may increase vaso and bronchial dilation, thereby facilitating air and blood flow through the lungs, we hypothesized that selection may have favoured these alleles in high altitude populations as part of an adaptive strategy to deal with the hypoxic conditions characteristic of such environments. We tested this hypothesis by determining the allele frequencies for these two polymorphisms, as well one additional missense mutation (C/T491) and two silent mutations (G/A252 and C/A523) in 63 Quechua speaking natives from communities located between 3200 and 4200 m on the Peruvian altiplano. These frequencies were compared with those of two lowland populations, one native American (Na-Dene from the west coast of Canada) and one Caucasian of Western European descent. The Quechua manifest many of the pulmonary characteristics of high altitude populations and differences in allele frequencies between the Quechua and lowlanders could be indicative of a selective advantage conferred by certain genotypes in high altitude environments. Allele frequencies varied between populations at some loci and patterns of linkage disequilibrium differed between the old-world and new-world samples; however, as these populations are not closely related, significant variation would be expected due to stochastic effects alone. Neither of the alleles associated with increased receptor sensitivity (A46, G79) was significantly over-represented in the Quechua compared with either lowland group. The Quechua were monomorphic for the C allele at base 79. This variant has been

  15. Identification of zoonotic genotypes of Giardia duodenalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hein Sprong

    Full Text Available Giardia duodenalis, originally regarded as a commensal organism, is the etiologic agent of giardiasis, a gastrointestinal disease of humans and animals. Giardiasis causes major public and veterinary health concerns worldwide. Transmission is either direct, through the faecal-oral route, or indirect, through ingestion of contaminated water or food. Genetic characterization of G. duodenalis isolates has revealed the existence of seven groups (assemblages A to G which differ in their host distribution. Assemblages A and B are found in humans and in many other mammals, but the role of animals in the epidemiology of human infection is still unclear, despite the fact that the zoonotic potential of Giardia was recognised by the WHO some 30 years ago. Here, we performed an extensive genetic characterization of 978 human and 1440 animal isolates, which together comprise 3886 sequences from 4 genetic loci. The data were assembled into a molecular epidemiological database developed by a European network of public and veterinary health Institutions. Genotyping was performed at different levels of resolution (single and multiple loci on the same dataset. The zoonotic potential of both assemblages A and B is evident when studied at the level of assemblages, sub-assemblages, and even at each single locus. However, when genotypes are defined using a multi-locus sequence typing scheme, only 2 multi-locus genotypes (MLG of assemblage A and none of assemblage B appear to have a zoonotic potential. Surprisingly, mixtures of genotypes in individual isolates were repeatedly observed. Possible explanations are the uptake of genetically different Giardia cysts by a host, or subsequent infection of an already infected host, likely without overt symptoms, with a different Giardia species, which may cause disease. Other explanations for mixed genotypes, particularly for assemblage B, are substantial allelic sequence heterogeneity and/or genetic recombination. Although the

  16. Effects of composite casein and beta-lactoglobulin genotypes on renneting properties and composition of bovine milk by assuming an animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. IKONEN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of kappa-beta-casein genotypes and b-lactoglobulin genotypes on the renneting properties and composition of milk were estimated for 174 and 155 milk samples of 59 Finnish Ayrshire and 55 Finnish Friesian cows, respectively. As well as the random additive genetic and permanent environmental effects of a cow, the model included the fixed effects for parity, lactation stage, season, kappa-beta-casein genotypes and b-lactoglobulin genotypes. Favourable renneting properties were associated with kappa-beta-casein genotypes ABA 1 A 2 , ABA 1 A 1 and AAA 1 A 2 in the Finnish Ayrshire, and with ABA 2 B, AAA 1 A 3 , AAA 2 A 3 , ABA 1 A 2 and ABA 2 A 2 in the Finnish Friesian. The favourable effect of these genotypes on curd firming time and on firmness of the curd was partly due to their association with a high kappa-casein concentration in the milk. The effect of the kappa-casein E allele on renneting properties was unfavourable compared with that of the kappa-casein B allele, and possibly with that of the A allele. The beta-lactoglobulin genotypes had no effect on renneting properties but they had a clear effect on the protein composition of milk. The beta-lactoglobulin AA genotype was associated with a high whey protein % and beta-lactoglobulin concentration and the BB genotype with a high casein % and casein number.;

  17. Allele-dependent differences in quorum-sensing dynamics result in variant expression of virulence genes in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisinger, Edward; Chen, John; Novick, Richard P

    2012-06-01

    Agr is an autoinducing, quorum-sensing system that functions in many Gram-positive species and is best characterized in the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, in which it is a global regulator of virulence gene expression. Allelic variations in the agr genes have resulted in the emergence of four quorum-sensing specificity groups in S. aureus, which correlate with different strain pathotypes. The basis for these predilections is unclear but is hypothesized to involve the phenomenon of quorum-sensing interference between strains of different agr groups, which may drive S. aureus strain isolation and divergence. Whether properties intrinsic to each agr allele directly influence virulence phenotypes within S. aureus is unknown. In this study, we examined group-specific differences in agr autoinduction and virulence gene regulation by utilizing congenic strains, each harboring a unique S. aureus agr allele, enabling a dissection of agr locus-dependent versus genotype-dependent effects on quorum-sensing dynamics and virulence factor production. Employing a reporter fusion to the principal agr promoter, P3, we observed allele-dependent differences in the timing and magnitude of agr activation. These differences were mediated by polymorphisms within the agrBDCA genes and translated to significant variations in the expression of a key transcriptional regulator, Rot, and of several important exoproteins and surface factors involved in pathogenesis. This work uncovers the contribution of divergent quorum-sensing alleles to variant expression of virulence determinants within a bacterial species.

  18. Construction and application of a Korean reference panel for imputing classical alleles and amino acids of human leukocyte antigen genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwangwoo; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variations of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus are strongly associated with disease susceptibility and prognosis for many diseases, including many autoimmune diseases. In this study, we developed a Korean HLA reference panel for imputing classical alleles and amino acid residues of several HLA genes. An HLA reference panel has potential for use in identifying and fine-mapping disease associations with the MHC locus in East Asian populations, including Koreans. A total of 413 unrelated Korean subjects were analyzed for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the MHC locus and six HLA genes, including HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DPB1, and -DQB1. The HLA reference panel was constructed by phasing the 5,858 MHC SNPs, 233 classical HLA alleles, and 1,387 amino acid residue markers from 1,025 amino acid positions as binary variables. The imputation accuracy of the HLA reference panel was assessed by measuring concordance rates between imputed and genotyped alleles of the HLA genes from a subset of the study subjects and East Asian HapMap individuals. Average concordance rates were 95.6% and 91.1% at 2-digit and 4-digit allele resolutions, respectively. The imputation accuracy was minimally affected by SNP density of a test dataset for imputation. In conclusion, the Korean HLA reference panel we developed was highly suitable for imputing HLA alleles and amino acids from MHC SNPs in East Asians, including Koreans.

  19. Construction and application of a Korean reference panel for imputing classical alleles and amino acids of human leukocyte antigen genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwangwoo Kim

    Full Text Available Genetic variations of human leukocyte antigen (HLA genes within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC locus are strongly associated with disease susceptibility and prognosis for many diseases, including many autoimmune diseases. In this study, we developed a Korean HLA reference panel for imputing classical alleles and amino acid residues of several HLA genes. An HLA reference panel has potential for use in identifying and fine-mapping disease associations with the MHC locus in East Asian populations, including Koreans. A total of 413 unrelated Korean subjects were analyzed for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs at the MHC locus and six HLA genes, including HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DPB1, and -DQB1. The HLA reference panel was constructed by phasing the 5,858 MHC SNPs, 233 classical HLA alleles, and 1,387 amino acid residue markers from 1,025 amino acid positions as binary variables. The imputation accuracy of the HLA reference panel was assessed by measuring concordance rates between imputed and genotyped alleles of the HLA genes from a subset of the study subjects and East Asian HapMap individuals. Average concordance rates were 95.6% and 91.1% at 2-digit and 4-digit allele resolutions, respectively. The imputation accuracy was minimally affected by SNP density of a test dataset for imputation. In conclusion, the Korean HLA reference panel we developed was highly suitable for imputing HLA alleles and amino acids from MHC SNPs in East Asians, including Koreans.

  20. Apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 allele and outcomes of traumatic spinal cord injury in a Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chongyi; Ji, Guangrong; Liu, Qingpeng; Yao, Meng

    2011-10-01

    The association between apolipoprotein E (APOE) epsilon 4 (ε4) allele and outcomes of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is still controversial and ambiguous. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that APOE polymorphisms are associated with outcomes after SCI in Chinese Han patients. APOE polymorphisms were determined in 100 patients with cervical SCI (C3-C8). The genotype frequency of this polymorphism was determined by using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. Patients with an APOE ε4 allele had significantly less motor recovery during rehabilitation than did patients without an APOE ε4 allele (mean 3.7 vs. 6.1; P = 0.04) and a longer rehabilitation length of stay (LOS) (mean 117.4 vs. 94.5; P = 0.02), but better sensory-pinprick recovery (mean 6.1 vs. 4.0; P = 0.03). There were no significant differences by APOE ε4 allele status in sensory-light touch recovery or acute LOS. This study suggests that the APOE ε4 allele is associated with outcomes after SCI and longer rehabilitation LOS in Chinese Han patients.

  1. Discovering the desirable alleles contributing to the lignocellulosic biomass traits in Saccharum germplasm collections for energy cane improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jianping [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sandhu, Hardev [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2017-03-23

    1) The success in crop improvement programs depends largely on the extent of genetic variability available. Germplasm collections assembles all the available genetic resources and are critical for long-term crop improvement. This world sugarcane germplasm collection contains enormous genetic variability for various morphological traits, biomass yield components, adaptation and many quality traits, prospectively imbeds a large number of valuable alleles for biofuel traits such as high biomass yield, quantity and quality of lignocelluloses, stress tolerance, and nutrient use efficiency. The germplasm collection is of little value unless it is characterized and utilized for crop improvement. In this project, we phenotypically and genotypically characterized the sugarcane world germplasm collection (The results were published in two papers already and another two papers are to be published). This data will be made available for public to refer to for germplasm unitization specifically in the sugarcane and energy cane breeding programs. In addition, we are identifying the alleles contributing to the biomass traits in sugarcane germplasm. This part of project is very challenging due to the large genome and highly polyploid level of this crop. We firstly established a high throughput sugarcane genotyping pipeline in the genome and bioinformatics era (a paper is published in 2016). We identified and modified a software for genome-wide association analysis of polyploid species. The results of the alleles associated to the biomass traits will be published soon, which will help the scientific community understand the genetic makeup of the biomass components of sugarcane. Molecular breeders can develop markers for marker assisted selection of biomass traits improvement. Further, the development and release of new energy cane cultivars through this project not only improved genetic diversity but also improved dry biomass yields and resistance to diseases. These new cultivars

  2. FTO genotype is associated with exercise training-induced changes in body composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankinen, Tuomo; Rice, Treva; Teran-Garcia, Margarita; Rao, D.C.; Bouchard, Claude

    2010-01-01

    The fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) gene is the first obesity-susceptibility gene identified by genome-wide association scans and confirmed in several follow-up studies. Homozygotes for the risk allele (A/A) have 1.67 times greater risk of obesity than those who do not have the allele. However, it is not known if regular exercise-induced changes in body composition are influenced by the FTO genotype. The purpose of our study was to test if the FTO genotype is associated with exercise-induced changes in adiposity. Body composition was derived from underwater weighing before and after a 20-week endurance training program in 481 previously sedentary white subjects of the HERITAGE Family Study. FTO SNP rs8050136 was genotyped using Illumina GoldenGate assay. In the sedentary state, the A/A homozygotes were significantly heavier and fatter than the heterozygotes and the C/C homozygotes in men (p=0.004) but not in women (p=0.331; gene-by-sex interaction p=0.0053). The FTO genotype was associated with body fat responses to regular exercise (p<0.005; adjusted for age, sex, and baseline value of response trait): carriers of the C-allele showed three times greater fat mass and %body fat losses than the A/A homozygotes. The FTO genotype explained 2% of the variance in adiposity changes. Our data suggest that the FTO obesity-susceptibility genotype influences the body fat responses to regular exercise. Resistance to exercise-induced reduction in total adiposity may represent one mechanism by which the FTO A allele promotes overweight and obesity. PMID:19543202

  3. A case–control study on the effect of Apolipoprotein E genotypes on gastric cancer risk and progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Feo, Emma; Boccia, Stefania; Simone, Benedetto; Persiani, Roberto; Cananzi, Ferdinando; Biondi, Alberto; Arzani, Dario; Amore, Rosarita; D’Ugo, Domenico; Ricciardi, Gualtiero

    2012-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is a multifunctional protein playing both a key role in the metabolism of cholesterol and triglycerides, and in tissue repair and inflammation. The ApoE gene (19q13.2) has three major isoforms encoded by ε2, ε3 and ε4 alleles with the ε4 allele associated with hypercholesterolemia and the ε2 allele with the opposite effect. An inverse relationship between cholesterol levels and gastric cancer (GC) has been previously reported, although the relationship between apoE genotypes and GC has not been explored so far. One hundred and fifty-six gastric cancer cases and 444 hospital controls were genotyped for apoE polymorphism (ε2, ε3, ε4 alleles). The relationship between GC and putative risk factors was measured using the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) from logistic regression analysis. A gene-environment interaction analysis was performed. The effect of the apoE genotypes on survival from GC was explored by a Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard regression model. Subjects carrying at least one apoE ε2 allele have a significant 60% decrease of GC risk (OR=0.40, 95% CI: 0.19 – 0.84) compared with ε3 homozygotes. No significant interaction emerged between the ε4 or ε2 allele and environmental exposures, nor ε2 or ε4 alleles affected the median survival times, even after correcting for age, gender and stadium. Our study reports for the first time a protective effect of the ε2 allele against GC, that might be partly attributed to the higher antioxidant properties of ε2 compared with the ε3 or ε4 alleles. Given the study’s sample size, further studies are required to confirm our findings

  4. Preliminary Evaluation of Some Elicited Apple Genotypes Candidate as Cultivars Using Morphological and Molecular Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayan Muzher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary evaluation of 5 apple genotypes produced by seed selection in the germplasm of seed rootstocks in Sweida- Syria was carried out between 2005 and 2012, to study date of full flowering, maturity time, morphological characters of tree, shoots, leaves, flowers, and fruits, including chemical analysis. On the other hand, yield efficiency, fruit storability and the susceptibility to pests and physiological disorders were evaluated. Molecular characterization was achieved by using 8 pairs of SSR primers for the 5th genotypes in comparison with the two main commercial cultivars "Golden Delicious" and "Starking Delicious" to determine the genetic relationship between the studied genotypes and cultivars. The results divided the studied genotypes depending on the time of ripening into three groups: early, intermediate and late genotypes. All studied genotypes gave efficient and regular yield, and showed fixable fruit shape and size with variable storability due to maturity time. Molecular characterization reveled the ability of SSR technique to determine the genetic variation between the studied genotypes, the 8 primer pairs produced 22 alleles, 21 of them were polymorphic (95.45%. Cluster analysis divided the studied genotypes into 2 clusters, the first cluster included the two commercial cultivars Starking delicious and Golden delicious with one genotypes, while the second cluster contained the four remaining genotypes. Finally, the studied genotypes revealed high desired quantitative and qualitative traits, which assess to distribute these genotypes as new cultivars, and SSR technique was able to identify and revealed the genetic distance between the studied genotypes and commercial cultivars.INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTVolume-5, Issue-2, March-May 2016, page: 98-109

  5. Contribution of X-Ray Repair Complementing Defective Repair in Chinese Hamster Cells 3 (XRCC3) Genotype to Leiomyoma Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Shin; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Wang, Ju-Yu; Ying, Tsung-Ho; Hsiao, Tsan-Seng; Chuang, Chin-Liang; Yueh, Te-Cheng; Liao, Cheng-Hsi; Hsu, Chin-Mu; Liu, Shih-Ping; Gong, Chi-Li; Tsai, Chang-Hai; Bau, Da-Tian

    2015-09-01

    The present study aimed at investigating whether X-ray repair cross complementing protein 3 (XRCC3) genotype may serve as a useful marker for detecting leiomyoma and predicting risk. A total of 640 women (166 patients with leiomyoma and 474 healthy controls) were examined for their XRCC3 rs1799794, rs45603942, rs861530, rs3212057, rs1799796, rs861539, rs28903081 genotype. The distributions of genotypic and allelic frequencies between the two groups were compared. The results showed that the CT and TT genotypes of XRCC3 rs861539 were associated with increased leiomyoma risk (odds ratio=2.19, 95% confidence interval=1.23-3.90; odds ratio=3.72, 95% confidence interval=1.23-11.26, respectively). On allelic frequency analysis, we found a significant difference in the distribution of the T allelic frequency of the XRCC3 rs861539 (p=5.88 × 10(-5)). None of the other six single nucleotide polymorphisms were associated with altered leiomyoma susceptibility. The T allele (CT and TT genotypes) of XRCC3 rs861539 contributes to increased risk of leiomyoma among Taiwanese women and may serve as a early detection and predictive marker. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  6. Allelic Diversity and Geographical Distribution of the Gene Encoding Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Surface Protein-3 in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaswong, Vorthon; Simpalipan, Phumin; Siripoon, Napaporn; Harnyuttanakorn, Pongchai; Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn

    2015-04-01

    Merozoite surface proteins (MSPs) of malaria parasites play critical roles during the erythrocyte invasion and so are potential candidates for malaria vaccine development. However, because MSPs are often under strong immune selection, they can exhibit extensive genetic diversity. The gene encoding the merozoite surface protein-3 (MSP-3) of Plasmodium falciparum displays 2 allelic types, K1 and 3D7. In Thailand, the allelic frequency of the P. falciparum msp-3 gene was evaluated in a single P. falciparum population in Tak at the Thailand and Myanmar border. However, no study has yet looked at the extent of genetic diversity of the msp-3 gene in P. falciparum populations in other localities. Here, we genotyped the msp-3 alleles of 63 P. falciparum samples collected from 5 geographical populations along the borders of Thailand with 3 neighboring countries (Myanmar, Laos, and Cambodia). Our study indicated that the K1 and 3D7 alleles coexisted, but at different proportions in different Thai P. falciparum populations. K1 was more prevalent in populations at the Thailand-Myanmar and Thailand-Cambodia borders, whilst 3D7 was more prevalent at the Thailand-Laos border. Global analysis of the msp-3 allele frequencies revealed that proportions of K1 and 3D7 alleles of msp-3 also varied in different continents, suggesting the divergence of malaria parasite populations. In conclusion, the variation in the msp-3 allelic patterns of P. falciparum in Thailand provides fundamental knowledge for inferring the P. falciparum population structure and for the best design of msp-3 based malaria vaccines.

  7. Plasminogen alleles influence susceptibility to invasive aspergillosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee K Zaas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis (IA is a common and life-threatening infection in immunocompromised individuals. A number of environmental and epidemiologic risk factors for developing IA have been identified. However, genetic factors that affect risk for developing IA have not been clearly identified. We report that host genetic differences influence outcome following establishment of pulmonary aspergillosis in an exogenously immune suppressed mouse model. Computational haplotype-based genetic analysis indicated that genetic variation within the biologically plausible positional candidate gene plasminogen (Plg; Gene ID 18855 correlated with murine outcome. There was a single nonsynonymous coding change (Gly110Ser where the minor allele was found in all of the susceptible strains, but not in the resistant strains. A nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (Asp472Asn was also identified in the human homolog (PLG; Gene ID 5340. An association study within a cohort of 236 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT recipients revealed that alleles at this SNP significantly affected the risk of developing IA after HSCT. Furthermore, we demonstrated that plasminogen directly binds to Aspergillus fumigatus. We propose that genetic variation within the plasminogen pathway influences the pathogenesis of this invasive fungal infection.

  8. Interactions Between SNP Alleles at Multiple Loci and Variation in Skin Pigmentation in 122 Caucasians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumiko Anno

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to clarify the molecular basis for human skin color variation and the environmental adaptability to ultraviolet irradiation, with the ultimate goal of predicting the impact of changes in future environments on human health risk. One hundred twenty-two Caucasians living in Toledo, Ohio participated. Back and cheek skin were assayed for melanin as a quantitative trait marker. Buccal cell samples were collected and used for DNA extraction. DNA was used for SNP genotyping using the Masscode™ system, which entails two-step PCR amplification and a platform chemistry which allows cleavable mass spectrometry tags. The results show gene-gene interaction between SNP alleles at multiple loci (not necessarily on the same chromosome contributes to inter-individual skin color variation while suggesting a high probability of linkage disequilibrium. Confirmation of these findings requires further study with other ethic groups to analyze the associations between SNP alleles at multiple loci and human skin color variation. Our overarching goal is to use remote sensing data to clarify the interaction between atmospheric environments and SNP allelic frequency and investigate human adaptability to ultraviolet irradiation. Such information should greatly assist in the prediction of the health effects of future environmental changes such as ozone depletion and increased ultraviolet exposure. If such health effects are to some extent predictable, it might be possible to prepare for such changes in advance and thus reduce the extent of their impact.

  9. Microsatellite D21D210 (GT-12) allele frequencies in sporadic Alzheimer`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lannfelt, L; Lilius, L; Viitanen, M; Winblad, B; Basun, H [Huddinge Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Dept. of Geriatric Medicine, (Sweden); Houlden, H; Rossor, M [St. Mary` s Hospital, Dept. of Neurology, Medical School, London (United Kingdom); Hardy, J [University of South Florida, Suncoast Alzheimer` s Disease Research Labs, Department of Psychiatry, Tampa (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Four disease-causing mutations have so far been described in the amyloid precursor protein gene on chromosome 21 in familial early-onset Alzheimer`s disease. Linkage analysis with a fourteen-allele microsatellite at D21S210 named GT-12 has proven useful in the elucidation of amyloid presursor protein gene involvement in Alzheimer`s disease families, as it is closely linked to the gene. Most cases of Alzheimer`s disease are thought to be sporadic and not familial. However, evidence from earlier studies suggests an important genetic contribution also in sporadic cases, where gene-environment interaction may contribute to the disease. We have determined frequencies of the GT-12 alleles in 78 Swedish and 49 British sporadic Alzheimer`s disease cases and 104 healthy elderly control subjects, to investigate if the disease associates with a particular genotype in GT-12. However, no differences in allele frequencies were observed between any of the groups. (au) (26 refs.).

  10. Parkinson’s disease and low frequency alleles found together throughout LRRK2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paisán-Ruiz, Coro; Washecka, Nicole; Nath, Priti; Singleton, Andrew B.; Corder, Elizabeth H.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations within LRRK2, most notably p.G2019S, cause Parkinson’s disease (PD) in rare monogenic families, and sporadic occurrences in diverse populations. We investigated variation throughout LRRK2 (84 SNPs; genotype or diplotype found for 49 LD blocks) for 275 cases (European ancestry, onset at age 60 or older) and 275 neurologically healthy control subjects (NINDS Neurogenetics Repository). Three grade-of-membership groups, i.e. genetic risk sets, were identified that exactly matched many subjects (cases: 46, 4, 137; controls: 0, 178, 0), and distinguished 94% of the subjects (i.e. > 50% likeness to one set). Set I, affected, carried certain low frequency alleles located in multiple functional domains. Set II was unaffected. Set III, also affected, resembled II except for slightly elevated frequencies of minor alleles not defining set I. We conclude that certain low frequency alleles distributed throughout LRRK2 are a genetic background to a third of cases, defining a distinct subset. PMID:19489756

  11. The C allele of JAK2 rs4495487 is an additional candidate locus that contributes to myeloproliferative neoplasm predisposition in the Japanese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohyashiki Junko H

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polycythemia vera (PV, essential thrombocythemia (ET, and primary myelofibrosis (PMF are myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs characterized in most cases by a unique somatic mutation, JAK2 V617F. Recent studies revealed that JAK2 V617F occurs more frequently in a specific JAK2 haplotype, named JAK2 46/1 or GGCC haplotype, which is tagged by rs10974944 (C/G and/or rs12343867 (T/C. This study examined the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of the JAK2 locus on MPNs in a Japanese population. Methods We sequenced 24 JAK2 SNPs in Japanese patients with PV. We then genotyped 138 MPN patients (33 PV, 96 ET, and 9 PMF with known JAK2 mutational status and 107 controls for a novel SNP, in addition to two SNPs known to be part of the 46/1 haplotype (rs10974944 and rs12343867. Associations with risk of MPN were estimated by odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals using logistic regression. Results A novel locus, rs4495487 (T/C, with a mutated T allele was significantly associated with PV. Similar to rs10974944 and rs12343867, rs4495487 in the JAK2 locus is significantly associated with JAK2-positive MPN. Based on the results of SNP analysis of the three JAK2 locus, we defined the "GCC genotype" as having at least one minor allele in each SNP (G allele in rs10974944, C allele in rs4495487, and C allele in rs12343867. The GCC genotype was associated with increased risk of both JAK2 V617F-positive and JAK2 V617F-negative MPN. In ET patients, leukocyte count and hemoglobin were significantly associated with JAK2 V617F, rather than the GCC genotype. In contrast, none of the JAK2 V617F-negative ET patients without the GCC genotype had thrombosis, and splenomegaly was frequently seen in this subset of ET patients. PV patients without the GCC genotype were significantly associated with high platelet count. Conclusions Our results indicate that the C allele of JAK2 rs4495487, in addition to the 46/1 haplotype, contributes

  12. Does Sex Trade with Violence among Genotypes in Drosophila melanogaster?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Larry G.; Foley, Brad R.; Nuzhdin, Sergey V.

    2008-01-01

    The evolutionary forces shaping the ability to win competitive interactions, such as aggressive encounters, are still poorly understood. Given a fitness advantage for competitive success, variance in aggressive and sexual display traits should be depleted, but a great deal of variation in these traits is consistently found. While life history tradeoffs have been commonly cited as a mechanism for the maintenance of variation, the variability of competing strategies of conspecifics may mean there is no single optimum strategy. We measured the genetically determined outcomes of aggressive interactions, and the resulting effects on mating success, in a panel of diverse inbred lines representing both natural variation and artificially selected genotypes. Males of one genotype which consistently lost territorial encounters with other genotypes were nonetheless successful against males that were artificially selected for supernormal aggression and dominated all other lines. Intransitive patterns of territorial success could maintain variation in aggressive strategies if there is a preference for territorial males. Territorial success was not always associated with male mating success however and females preferred ‘winners’ among some male genotypes, and ‘losers’ among other male genotypes. This suggests that studying behaviour from the perspective of population means may provide limited evolutionary and genetic insight. Overall patterns of competitive success among males and mating transactions between the sexes are consistent with mechanisms proposed for the maintenance of genetic variation due to nonlinear outcomes of competitive interactions. PMID:18414669

  13. Positive selection of deleterious alleles through interaction with a sex-ratio suppressor gene in African Buffalo: a plausible new mechanism for a high frequency anomaly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pim van Hooft

    Full Text Available Although generally rare, deleterious alleles can become common through genetic drift, hitchhiking or reductions in selective constraints. Here we present a possible new mechanism that explains the attainment of high frequencies of deleterious alleles in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer population of Kruger National Park, through positive selection of these alleles that is ultimately driven by a sex-ratio suppressor. We have previously shown that one in four Kruger buffalo has a Y-chromosome profile that, despite being associated with low body condition, appears to impart a relative reproductive advantage, and which is stably maintained through a sex-ratio suppressor. Apparently, this sex-ratio suppressor prevents fertility reduction that generally accompanies sex-ratio distortion. We hypothesize that this body-condition-associated reproductive advantage increases the fitness of alleles that negatively affect male body condition, causing genome-wide positive selection of these alleles. To investigate this we genotyped 459 buffalo using 17 autosomal microsatellites. By correlating heterozygosity with body condition (heterozygosity-fitness correlations, we found that most microsatellites were associated with one of two gene types: one with elevated frequencies of deleterious alleles that have a negative effect on body condition, irrespective of sex; the other with elevated frequencies of sexually antagonistic alleles that are negative for male body condition but positive for female body condition. Positive selection and a direct association with a Y-chromosomal sex-ratio suppressor are indicated, respectively, by allele clines and by relatively high numbers of homozygous deleterious alleles among sex-ratio suppressor carriers. This study, which employs novel statistical techniques to analyse heterozygosity-fitness correlations, is the first to demonstrate the abundance of sexually-antagonistic genes in a natural mammal population. It also has

  14. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II alleles which confer susceptibility or protection in the Morphea in Adults and Children (MAC) cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobe, Heidi; Ahn, Chul; Arnett, Frank; Reveille, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine human leukocyte antigen class I (HLA-class I) and II (HLA-class II) alleles associated with morphea (localized scleroderma) in the Morphea in Adults and Children (MAC) cohort by a nested case–control association study. Methods Morphea patients were included from MAC cohort and matched controls from the NIH/NIAMS Scleroderma Family Registry and DNA Repository and Division of Rheumatology at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. HLA- Class II genotyping and SSCP typing was performed of HLA-A, -B, -C alleles. Associations between HLA-Class I and II alleles and morphea as well as its subphenotypes were determined. Results There were 211 cases available for HLA-class I typing with 726 matched controls and 158 cases available for HLA Class-II typing with 1108 matched controls. The strongest associations were found with DRB1*04:04 (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.4–4.0 P=0.002) and HLA-B*37 conferred the highest OR among Class I alleles (3.3, 95% CI 1.6–6.9, P= 0.0016). Comparison with risk alleles in systemic sclerosis determined using the same methods and control population revealed one common allele (DRB*04:04). Conclusion Results of the present study demonstrate specific HLA Class I and II alleles are associated with morphea and likely generalized and linear subtypes. The associated morphea alleles are different than in scleroderma, implicating morphea is also immunogenetically distinct. Risk alleles in morphea are also associated with conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other autoimmune conditions. Population based studies indicate patients with RA have increased risk of morphea, implicating a common susceptibility allele. PMID:25223600

  15. Association of autoimmune Addison's disease with alleles of STAT4 and GATA3 in European cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna L Mitchell

    Full Text Available Gene variants known to contribute to Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD susceptibility include those at the MHC, MICA, CIITA, CTLA4, PTPN22, CYP27B1, NLRP-1 and CD274 loci. The majority of the genetic component to disease susceptibility has yet to be accounted for.To investigate the role of 19 candidate genes in AAD susceptibility in six European case-control cohorts.A sequential association study design was employed with genotyping using Sequenom iPlex technology. In phase one, 85 SNPs in 19 genes were genotyped in UK and Norwegian AAD cohorts (691 AAD, 715 controls. In phase two, 21 SNPs in 11 genes were genotyped in German, Swedish, Italian and Polish cohorts (1264 AAD, 1221 controls. In phase three, to explore association of GATA3 polymorphisms with AAD and to determine if this association extended to other autoimmune conditions, 15 SNPs in GATA3 were studied in UK and Norwegian AAD cohorts, 1195 type 1 diabetes patients from Norway, 650 rheumatoid arthritis patients from New Zealand and in 283 UK Graves' disease patients. Meta-analysis was used to compare genotype frequencies between the participating centres, allowing for heterogeneity.We report significant association with alleles of two STAT4 markers in AAD cohorts (rs4274624: P = 0.00016; rs10931481: P = 0.0007. In addition, nominal association of AAD with alleles at GATA3 was found in 3 patient cohorts and supported by meta-analysis. Association of AAD with CYP27B1 alleles was also confirmed, which replicates previous published data. Finally, nominal association was found at SNPs in both the NF-κB1 and IL23A genes in the UK and Italian cohorts respectively.Variants in the STAT4 gene, previously associated with other autoimmune conditions, confer susceptibility to AAD. Additionally, we report association of GATA3 variants with AAD: this adds to the recent report of association of GATA3 variants with rheumatoid arthritis.

  16. DQB1*06:02 allele-specific expression varies by allelic dosage, not narcolepsy status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiner Lachmi, Karin; Lin, Ling; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek

    2012-01-01

    The association of narcolepsy-cataplexy, a sleep disorder caused by the loss of hypocretin/orexin neurons in the hypothalamus, with DQA1*01:02-DQB1*06:02 is one of the tightest known single-allele human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations. In this study, we explored genome-wide expression...

  17. 36 CFR 327.16 - Lost and found articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lost and found articles. 327... CHIEF OF ENGINEERS § 327.16 Lost and found articles. All articles found shall be deposited by the finder at the Manager's office or with a ranger. All such articles shall be disposed of in accordance with...

  18. Lost circulation technology workshop, October 9-10, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, B.C. (ed.)

    1985-03-01

    This report summarizes the presentations and discussions of a workshop on lost circulation technology. The workshop identified and defined lost circulation problem areas in field operations, materials, mud effects, and standards. Problem solution needs were also categorized as requiring analytical evaluation and procedure, instrument, and material development.

  19. 42 CFR 102.32 - Benefits for lost employment income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 102.32 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES SMALLPOX... pay for lost employment income or to provide disability or retirement benefits to the requester. As provided in § 102.84, the Secretary retains the right to recover benefits for lost employment income paid...

  20. 32 CFR 635.31 - Lost, abandoned, or unclaimed property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Lost, abandoned, or unclaimed property. 635.31 Section 635.31 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Offense Reporting § 635.31 Lost, abandoned, or unclaimed property. This is...

  1. Genotyping of polymorphic effectors of Toxoplasma gondii isolates from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weisheng Cheng

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toxoplasma gondii is an opportunistic protozoan apicomplexan and obligate intracellular parasite that infects a wide range of animals and humans. Rhoptry proteins 5 (ROP5, ROP16, ROP18 and dense granules 15 (GRA15 are the important effectors secreted by T. gondii which link to the strain virulence for mice and modulate the host’s response to the parasite. Little has been known about these molecules as well as GRA3 in type Chinese 1 strains that show polymorphism among strains of archetypical genotypes. This study examined the genetic diversity of these effectors and its correlated virulence in mice among T. gondii isolates from China. Results Twenty-one isolates from stray cats were detected, of which 15 belong to Chinese 1, and 6 to ToxoDB #205. Wh6 isolate, a Chinese 1 strain, has an avirulent phenotype. PCR-RFLP results of ROP5 and ROP18 presented few variations among the strains. Genotyping of GRA15 and ROP16 revealed that all the strains belong to type II allele except Xz7 which carries type I allele. ROP16 amino acid alignment at 503 locus demonstrated that 17 isolates are featured as type I or type III (ROP16I/III, and the other 4 as type II (ROP16II. The strains investigated may be divided into four groups based on GRA3 amino acid alignment, and all isolates of type Chinese 1 belong to the μ-1 allele except Wh6 which is identical to type II strain. Conclusions PCR-RFLP and sequence alignment analyses of ROP5, ROP16, ROP18, GRA3, and GRA15 in T. gondii revealed that strains with the same genotype may have variations in some of their key genes. GRA3 variation exhibited by Wh6 strain may be associated with the difference in phenotype and pathogenesis.

  2. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation in pregnancy differentially modulates arachidonic acid and DHA status across FADS genotypes in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtz, S A; Kerling, E H; Shaddy, D J; Li, S; Thodosoff, J M; Colombo, J; Carlson, S E

    2015-03-01

    Some FADS alleles are associated with lower DHA and ARA status assessed by the relative amount of arachidonic acid (ARA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in plasma and red blood cell (RBC) phospholipids (PL). We determined two FADS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a cohort of pregnant women and examined the relationship of FADS1rs174533 and FADS2rs174575 to DHA and ARA status before and after supplementation with 600mg per day of DHA. The 205 pregnant women studied were randomly assigned to placebo (mixed soy and corn oil) (n=96) or 600mg algal DHA (n=109) in 3 capsules per day for the last two trimesters of pregnancy. Women homozygous for the minor allele of FADS1rs174533 (but not FADS2rs174575) had lower DHA and ARA status at baseline. At delivery, minor allele homozygotes of FADS1rs174533 in the placebo group had lower RBC-DHA compared to major-allele carriers (P=0.031), while in the DHA-supplemented group, all genotypes had higher DHA status compared to baseline (P=0.001) and status did not differ by genotype (P=0.941). Surprisingly, DHA but not the placebo decreased ARA status of minor allele homozygotes of both FADS SNPs but not major allele homozygotes at delivery. Any physiological effects of changing the DHA to ARA ratio by increasing DHA intake appears to be greater in minor allele homozygotes of some FADS SNPs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii isolates in Egyptian feral cats reveals new genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kappany, Y M; Rajendran, C; Abu-Elwafa, S A; Hilali, M; Su, C; Dubey, J P

    2010-12-01

    Cats are important in the epidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii because they are the only hosts that excrete environmentally resistant oocysts in feces. In the present study, 115 viable T. gondii isolates from tissues of cats from Egypt were genotyped using 10 PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism markers (SAG1, SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, and Apico) and DNA from tachyzoites. Seven genotypes were recognized including the clonal Type II, Type III (2 genotypes), and 4 atypical genotypes. Ninety percent (103 of 115) of isolates were clonal, i.e., Type II (n  =  61) and Type III (n  =  42) strains. Of the 61 Type II strains, all had the Type II alleles at all loci, except for 2 strains that had allele I at Apico. Eight isolates were divided into 4 atypical genotypes. One of these genotypes (with 4 isolates) was previously reported in dogs from Sri Lanka and in sand cats from the United Arab Emirates. Four isolates had mixed infections. These results revealed a strong clonal population structure with the dominance of clonal Type II and III lineages of T. gondii in feral cats from Egypt.

  4. ACE DD genotype is unfavorable to Korean short-term muscle power athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C-H; Cho, J-Y; Jeon, J Y; Koh, Y G; Kim, Y-M; Kim, H-J; Park, M; Um, H-S; Kim, C

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the ACE DD genotype is unfavorably associated with the ultimate power-oriented performance. To test the hypothesis we recruited a total of 848 subjects including 55 international level power-oriented athletes (High-performance), 100 national level power-oriented athletes (Mid-performance) and 693 healthy controls (Control) in Korea. Then the distributions of ACE polymorphism throughout these groups were analyzed. As a result, there was a gradual decrease of frequencies of the DD genotype with advancing levels of performance (Control vs. Mid-performance vs. High-performance=17.2% vs. 10.0% vs. 5.5%, p=0.002). Also, the frequencies of D allele decreased gradually with advancing levels of performance (Control vs. Mid-performance vs. High-performance=42.6% vs. 35.0% vs. 30.9%, pDD genotype and the D allele. This finding gave 3.83 times lower probability of success in power-oriented sports for individuals with the DD genotype than those with the II+ ID genotype. In conclusion, these results indicate that Korean power-oriented athletes with a lower frequency of the DD genotype had a lower probability of success in power-oriented sports. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  5. Convergent and divergent effects of apolipoprotein E ε4 and ε2 alleles on amygdala functional networks in nondemented older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Liang; Shu, Hao; He, Cancan; Ye, Qing; Bai, Feng; Xie, Chunming; Zhang, Zhijun

    2017-06-01

    Traditionally, in the context of Alzheimer's disease, the apolipoprotein E ε2 (APOEε2) allele is a protective factor and the APOEε4 allele is a destructive factor. However, this inverse relationship has recently been challenged, and the neural mechanisms underlying the effects of APOE genotype on Alzheimer's disease remain unclear. A resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study was conducted to investigate the effects of APOE genotype and age on amygdala functional connectivity (AFC) networks in 84 patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment and 124 cognitively normal order adults. The results indicated that the APOEε2 and APOEε4 alleles produced convergent effects in the right AFC network but divergent effects in the left AFC network. As age increased, APOEε2 carriers showed stable AFC, whereas APOEε4 carriers exhibited decreased AFC in all participants. Furthermore, mediation analysis revealed that connectivity strength regulates the effects of APOE genotype and age on cognitive function in amnestic mild cognitive impairment patients. Our findings suggest that the APOEε2 and APOEε4 alleles produce both convergent and divergent topological effects on brain function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Association of Matrix Metalloproteinase-7 Genotypes to the Risk of Oral Cancer in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Liang-Chun; Li, Ching-Hao; Sun, Kuo-Ting; Chen, Liang-Yu; Hsu, Che-Lun; Hung, Yi-Wen; Wu, Cheng-Nan; Hsia, Te-Chun; Shen, Te-Chun; Chang, Wen-Shin; Shih, Tzu-Ching; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Bau, DA-Tian

    2018-04-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a critical role in inflammation and carcinogenesis, and the expression of mRNA MMP7 in oral squamous cell carcinoma tissues was higher than in the oral lichen planus or normal oral mucosa. However, the genotypic role of MMP7 has never been examined in oral cancer. Therefore, in the current study we aimed to examine the contribution of genotypic variants in the promoter region of MMP7 (A-181G and C-153T) to oral cancer risk in Taiwan. In this hospital-based case-control study, 788 patients with oral cancer and 956 gender-and age-matched healthy controls were genotyped for MMP7 A-181G and C-153T via polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) methodology. The distribution pattern of AA, AG and GG for MMP7 promoter A-181G genotype was 88.2, 10.4 and 1.4% in the oral cancer patient group and 89.0, 9.3 and 1.7% in the healthy control group, respectively (p for trend=0.6779), non-significantly differentially distributed between the two groups. There is no polymorphic genotype for MMP7 C-153T among Taiwanese. The comparisons in allelic frequency distribution also support the findings that G allele may not be the risk determinant allele for oral cancer. There is no interaction between the genotypes of MMP7 with age, gender, smoking, alcohol or betel quid consumption on oral cancer risk. Our results indicate that the MMP7 promoter genotypes only play an indirect role in determining the personal susceptibility to oral cancer in Taiwan. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  7. The Contribution of Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Genotype to Oral Cancer Susceptibility in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kuo-Ting; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chang, Wen-Shin; Shih, Liang-Chun; Chen, Liang-Yu; Tsai, Ming-Hsiu; Ji, Hong-Xue; Hsiao, Chieh-Lun; Liu, Yu-Cheng; Li, Chi-Yuan; Bau, DA-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of multifunctional proteins which have been shown to be up-regulated in various types of cancer. However, the contribution of MMP1 genotype to oral cancer has not been elucidated. This study aimed to evaluate the contribution of MMP1 promoter 1607 genotype to the risk of oral cancer. In this case-control study, MMP1 genotype and its interaction with consumption of areca, cigarettes, and alcohol in determining oral cancer risk were investigated in 788 patients with oral cancer and 956 gender-matched healthy controls. The distribution of 2G/2G, 1G/2G and 1G/1G for MMP1 promoter 1607 genotype was 36.8%, 40.2% and 23.0% in the oral cancer group and 34.3%, 44.9% and 20.8% in the non-cancer control group, respectively (p for trend=0.1454). We also analyzed the allelic frequency distributions and found that the variant 1G allele of MMP1 promoter 1607 conferred similar oral cancer susceptibility as the wild-type 2G allele (odds ratio=0.99, 95% confidence interval=0.87-1.14, p=0.9199). As for the gene-lifestyle interaction, there was an obvious protective effect of MMP1 promoter 1607 1G/2G genotype on the risk of oral cancer among smokers (odds ratio=0.71, 95% confidence interval=0.55-0.91, p=0.0076), but not non-smokers. There was no interaction between MMP1 promoter 1607 genotype and areca chewing or alcohol drinking habits. The 1G/2G genotype of MMP1 promoter 1607 may have a protective effect on oral cancer risk for smokers. The detailed mechanisms involved in this require further investigation. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  8. An easy and efficient strategy for KEL genotyping in a multiethnic population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine Prisco Arnoni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Kell blood group system expresses high and low frequency antigens with the most important in relation to transfusion including the antithetic KEL1 and KEL2; KEL3 and KEL4; KEL6 and KEL7 antigens. Kell is a clinically relevant system, as it is highly immunogenic and anti-KEL antibodies are associated with hemolytic transfusion reactions and hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Although required in some situations, Kell antigen phenotyping is restricted due to technical limitations. In these cases, molecular approaches maybe a solution. This study proposes three polymerase chain reaction genotyping protocols to analyze the single nucleotide polymorphisms responsible for six Kell antithetic antigens expressed in a Brazilian population. METHODS: DNA was extracted from 800 blood donor samples and three polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism protocols were used to genotype the KEL*1/KEL*2, KEL*3/KEL*4 and KEL*6/KEL*7 alleles. KEL*3/KEL*4 and KEL*6/KEL*7 genotyping was standardized using the NlaIII and MnlI restriction enzymes and validated using sequencing. KEL*1/KEL*2 genotyping was performed using a previously reported assay. RESULTS: KEL genotyping was successfully implemented in the service; the following distribution of KEL alleles was obtained for a population from southeastern Brazil: KEL*1 (2.2%, KEL*2 (97.8%, KEL*3 (0.69%, KEL*4 (99.31%, KEL*6 (2.69% and KEL*7 (97.31%. Additionally, two individuals with rare genotypes, KEL*1/KEL*1 and KEL*3/KEL*3, were identified. CONCLUSION: KEL allele genotyping using these methods proved to be reliable and applicable to predict Kell antigen expressions in a Brazilian cohort. This easy and efficient strategy can be employed to provide safer transfusions and to help in rare donor screening.

  9. PeakSeeker: a program for interpreting genotypes of mononucleotide repeats

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    Salipante Stephen J

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mononucleotide repeat microsatellites are abundant, highly polymorphic DNA sequences, having the potential to serve as valuable genetic markers. Use of mononucleotide microsatellites has been limited by their tendency to produce "stutter", confounding signals from insertions and deletions within the mononucleotide tract that occur during PCR, which complicates interpretation of genotypes by masking the true position of alleles. Consequently, microsatellites with larger repeating subunits (dinucleotide and trinucleotide motifs are used, which produce less stutter but are less genetically heterogeneous and less informative. A method to interpret the genotypes of mononucleotide repeats would permit the widespread use of those highly informative microsatellites in genetic research. Findings We have developed an approach to interpret genotypes of mononucleotide repeats using a software program, named PeakSeeker. PeakSeeker interprets experimental electropherograms as the most likely product of signals from individual alleles. Because mononucleotide tracts demonstrate locus-specific patterns of stutter peaks, this approach requires that the genotype pattern from a single allele is defined for each marker, which can be approximated by genotyping single DNA molecules or homozygotes. We have evaluated the program's ability to discriminate various types of homozygous and heterozygous mononucleotide loci using simulated and experimental data. Conclusion Mononucleotide tracts offer significant advantages over di- and tri-nucleotide microsatellite markers traditionally employed in genetic research. The PeakSeeker algorithm provides a high-throughput means to type mononucleotide tracts using conventional and widely implemented fragment length polymorphism genotyping. Furthermore, the PeakSeeker algorithm could potentially be adapted to improve, and perhaps to standardize, the analysis of conventional microsatellite genotypes.

  10. Analysis of HFE gene mutations and HLA-A alleles in Brazilian patients with iron overload

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    Rodolfo Delfini Cançado

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Hemochromatosis is a common inherited disorder of iron metabolism and one of the most important causes of iron overload. The objective was to analyze the presence of C282Y, H63D and S65C mutations in the HFE gene and HLA-A alleles for a group of Brazilian patients with iron overload, and to correlate genotype with clinical and laboratory variables. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective study, in Discipline of Hematology and Oncology, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas da Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo. METHODS: We studied 35 patients with iron overload seen at our outpatient unit between January 2001 and December 2003. Fasting levels of serum iron and ferritin, and total iron-binding capacity, were assayed using standard techniques. Determinations of C282Y, H63D and S65C mutations in the HFE gene and of HLA-A alleles were performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. RESULTS: Twenty-six out of 35 patients (74% presented at least one of the HFE gene mutations analyzed. Among these, five (14% were C282Y/C282Y, four (11% C282Y/H63D, one (3% H63D/H63D, six (17% C282Y/WT and ten (29% H63D/WT. No patients had the S65C mutation and nine (25% did not present any of the three HFE mutations. Four out of five patients with C282Y/C282Y genotype (80% and three out of four patients with C282Y/H63D genotype (75% were HLA A*03. CONCLUSION: Analysis of HFE gene mutations constitutes an important procedure in identifying patients with hereditary hemochromatosis, particularly for patients with iron overload.

  11. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and Alzheimer disease in the presence of the apolipoprotein E4 allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wendy Wei Qiao; Lai, Angela; Mon, Timothy; Mwamburi, Mkaya; Taylor, Warren; Rosenzweig, James; Kowall, Neil; Stern, Robert; Zhu, Haihao; Steffens, David C

    2014-02-01

    The effect of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors on Alzheimer disease (AD) remains unclear, with conflicting results reported. We studied the interaction of the Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotype and ACE inhibitors on AD. This was a cross-sectional study of homebound elderly with an AD diagnosis and documentation of medications taken. ApoE genotype was determined. A total of 355 subjects with status on ApoE alleles and cognitive diagnoses were studied. The average age (mean ± SD) of this population was 73.3 ± 8.3 years old, and 73% were female. Cross-sectionally, there was no difference in the number of AD cases between ApoE4 carriers and ApoE4 non-carriers or between ACE inhibitor users and non-users in the homebound elderly. ApoE4 carriers treated with ACE inhibitors, however, had more diagnoses of AD compared with those who did not have the treatment (28% versus 6%, p = 0.01) or ApoE4 non-carriers treated with an ACE inhibitor (28% versus 10%, p = 0.03). ACE inhibitor use was associated with AD diagnosis only in the presence of an E4 allele. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, we found that in diagnosed AD cases there was a significant interaction between ApoE4 and ACE inhibitor use (odds ratio: 20.85; 95% confidence interval: 3.08-140.95; p = 0.002) after adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, and education. The effects of ACE inhibitors on AD may be different depending on ApoE genotype. A prospective study is needed to determine whether ACE inhibitor use accelerates or poorly delays AD development in ApoE4 carriers compared with ApoE4 non-carriers. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Nonrandom association of a type II procollagen genotype with achondroplasia

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Achondroplasia is an autosomal dominant disorder that involves defective endochondral bone formation. Type II collagen is the predominant collagen of cartilage. We found a HindIII polymorphic site in the normal Caucasian population by using the type II procollagen gene probe pgHCol(II)A. The presence of this site yields a 7.0-kilobase (kb) band; its absence yields a 14.0-kb band. We found a significant deviation in genotype distribution and allele frequencies in a population of unrelated indi...

  13. Genetic potentiality of indigenous rice genotypes from Eastern India with reference to submergence tolerance and deepwater traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayani Goswami

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Submergence tolerance in rice varieties is crucial for maintaining stable yields in low land areas, where recurrence of flooding is a constant phenomenon during monsoon. We have conducted detailed physiological and genotyping studies of 27 rice genotypes and one wild rice relative, popularly grown in low land areas of the two major rice growing states of eastern India, West Bengal and Odisha with a focus on submergence tolerance traits and Sub1 loci. We found that these genotypes show varying degree (50–100% survival rate during post submergence recovery period, and high degree of polymorphism in the Sub1 linked rice microsatellite loci RM219 and RM7175. Detailed allelic diversity study of Sub1A loci suggests that rice varieties IR42, Panibhasha, Khoda and Kalaputia share a common allele that is different from FR13A, Keralasundari, Bhashakalmi, Kumrogore. Two other genotypes Meghi and Khoda shares both alleles of Sub1A loci (present in IR42 and FR13A groups in addition to a new variant. Detailed sequence analysis of the amplified product for the Sub1A loci from these genotypes showed several single nucleotide changes with respect to reference Oryza sativa Sub1A loci (DQ011598. Three rice genotypes (Meghi, Bhashakalmi and Keralasundari showed beneficial properties in relation to induced submergence stress and can be considered as valuable genetic source in context of utilization of natural rice genetic resources in breeding program for submergence tolerance.

  14. Identification of internal variation in the pseudoautosomal VNTR DXYS17, with nonrandom distribution of the alleles on the X and the Y chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decorte, R.; Wu, R.; Marynen, P.; Cassiman, J.J.

    1994-03-01

    The PCR technique was used to analyze the DXYS17 locus in the pseudoautosomal region of the X and the Y chromosomes. Analysis on an automated DNA sequencer allowed for sensitive and highly accurate typing of 16 different alleles with a size between 480 and 1,100 bp. Two DXYS17 alleles migrated with the same size on agarose or denaturing polyacrylamide gels but with different mobilities on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels. Sequence analysis showed that, while an identical number of repeats were present in both alleles, differences in the composition of the units were observed. The origin of these differences was found in the 28- and 33-bp units, which only had a specific repeat pattern at the 5' and 3' ends of the region. The genotype distribution for DXYS17 in a Caucasian population did not deviate from the values expected under Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. However, the frequency of one allele and one genotype was significantly different between males and females. Segregation analysis showed that this difference was the result of a nonrandom distribution of certain alleles on the sex chromosomes in males. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Genotyping of presenilin-1 polymorphism in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panas, M; Karadima, G; Kalfakis, N; Psarrou, O; Floroskoufi, P; Kladi, A; Petersen, M B; Vassilopoulos, D

    2000-12-01

    The mechanisms underlying motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are not fully understood. Recent studies suggest that apoptosis is involved in the abnormal neural death that occurs in this devastating disease. Presenilin-1, a transmembrane protein, seems to be implicated in apoptosis. To determine whether presenilin-1 intron 8 polymorphism has an influence in the course of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, we examined this polymorphism genotypes in a large group of patients (n = 72) with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and in a random sample of 213 healthy individuals. The results showed a significant difference in genotype (P < 0.04) and allele (P < 0.03) distribution between patients controls. These results suggest a possible intervention of presenilin-1 in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  16. DRD2 A1 allele and P300 abnormalities in obesity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, K. [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)]|[PATH Foundation, Princeton, NJ (United States); Wood, R.; Sheridan, L.P.J. [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Obesity is a heterogeneous and prevalent disorder having both inheritable and environmental components. The role of the dopamine system in P300 has been implicated. We genotyped 193 neuropsychiatrically ill patients with and without comorbid drug and alcohol/abuse/dependence and obesity for the prevalence of the A1 allele of the DRD2 gene. We found a significant linear trend ({chi}{sup 2} = 40.4, df=1, p<0.00001) where the percent prevalence of the A1 increased with increasing polysubstance abuse. Where the A1 allele was found in 44% of 40 obese subjects, the A1 allele prevalence was found in as much as 91% of 11 obese subjects with comorbid polysubstance abuse. 53 obese subjects having a mean body weight (BMI) of 34.6{+-}8.2 were mapped for brain electrical activity and compared with 15 controls with a BMI of 22.3{+-}3.0 (P<.001). The P3 amplitude was significantly different (two tailed; t=3.24, df=16.2, P = 0.005), whereas P3 latency was not significant. Preliminarily, we found a significant decreased P3 amplitude correlated with parental polysubstance abuse (p=0.4) with prolongation of P3 latency correlated with the three risk factors of parental substance abuse, chemical dependency and carbohydrate bingeing (P<0.02). Finally, in a small sample, the A1 allele was present in 25% of probands having 0 risk compared to 66% in those obese subjects with any risk. This work represents the first electrophysiological data to implicate P3 abnormalities in a subset of obesity and further confirms an association of the DRD2 gene and a electrophysiological marker previously indicated to have predictive value in vulnerability to addictive behaviors.

  17. Forensic genetic informativeness of an SNP panel consisting of 19 multi-allelic SNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zehua; Chen, Xiaogang; Zhao, Yuancun; Zhao, Xiaohong; Zhang, Shu; Yang, Yiwen; Wang, Yufang; Zhang, Ji

    2018-05-01

    Current research focusing on forensic personal identification, phenotype inference and ancestry information on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has been widely reported. In the present study, we focused on tetra-allelic SNPs in the Chinese Han population. A total of 48 tetra-allelic SNPs were screened out from the Chinese Han population of the 1000 Genomes Database, including Chinese Han in Beijing (CHB) and Chinese Han South (CHS). Considering the forensic genetic requirement for the polymorphisms, only 11 tetra-allelic SNPs with a heterozygosity >0.06 were selected for further multiplex panel construction. In order to meet the demands of personal identification and parentage identification, an additional 8 tri-allelic SNPs were combined into the final multiplex panel. To ensure application in the degraded DNA analysis, all the PCR products were designed to be 87-188 bp. Employing multiple PCR reactions and SNaPshot minisequencing, 511 unrelated Chinese Han individuals from Sichuan were genotyped. The combined match probability (CMP), combined discrimination power (CDP), and cumulative probability of exclusion (CPE) of the panel were 6.07 × 10 -11 , 0.9999999999393 and 0.996764, respectively. Based on the population data retrieved from the 1000 Genomes Project, Fst values between Chinese Han in Sichuan (SCH) and all the populations included in the 1000 Genomes Project were calculated. The results indicated that two SNPs in this panel may contain ancestry information and may be used as markers of forensic biogeographical ancestry inference. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical relevance of apolipoprotein E genotyping based on a family history of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckhoff, Hilmar K; Brand, Theresa; van Velden, Dawid P; Kidd, Martin; Fisher, Leslie R; van Rensburg, Susan J; Kotze, Maritha J

    2015-01-01

    Having a family history of Alzheimer' s disease (AD) may potentiate cumulative risk associated with phenotypic expression of the ε-4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene. In this study, we compared the genotype distribution and allele frequencies of APOE ε-2 (rs7412) and ε -4 (rs429358) in 537 South African individuals participating in a chronic disease screening program, in order to establish whether AD family history modulates the expression of their dyslipidemic effects. Significant differences in the genotype distribution for APOE ε-2 (p=0.034) as well as APOE ε-4 (p=0.038) were found between study participants with (n=67) and without (n=470) a family history of AD. LDL cholesterol levels were inversely associated with physical activity in the study group with a positive family history of AD (pfamilial hypercholesterolemia, clinical inquiry regarding family history was identified as an important determinant of eligibility for APOE genotyping performed in the context of chronic disease risk management. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate the modulating influence of AD family history on expression of a dyslipidemic phenotype associated with the APOE ε-4 allele. Our findings provide the scientific rationale supporting a novel clinical application for APOE genotyping as a means of identifying a genetic subgroup of dyslipidemic patients set to derive the greatest benefit from early lifestyle-based interventions aimed at decreasing cumulative risk for cardiovascular disease and prevention of AD later in life.

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met genotype modulates amygdala habituation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Rodriguez, M Mercedes; New, Antonia S; Goldstein, Kim E; Rosell, Daniel; Yuan, Qiaoping; Zhou, Zhifeng; Hodgkinson, Colin; Goldman, David; Siever, Larry J; Hazlett, Erin A

    2017-05-30

    A deficit in amygdala habituation to repeated emotional stimuli may be an endophenotype of disorders characterized by emotion dysregulation, such as borderline personality disorder (BPD). Amygdala reactivity to emotional stimuli is genetically modulated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) variants. Whether amygdala habituation itself is also modulated by BDNF genotypes remains unknown. We used imaging-genetics to examine the effect of BDNF Val66Met genotypes on amygdala habituation to repeated emotional stimuli. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 57 subjects (19 BPD patients, 18 patients with schizotypal personality disorder [SPD] and 20 healthy controls [HC]) during a task involving viewing of unpleasant, neutral, and pleasant pictures, each presented twice to measure habituation. Amygdala responses across genotypes (Val66Met SNP Met allele-carriers vs. Non-Met carriers) and diagnoses (HC, BPD, SPD) were examined with ANOVA. The BDNF 66Met allele was significantly associated with a deficit in amygdala habituation, particularly for emotional pictures. The association of the 66Met allele with a deficit in habituation to unpleasant emotional pictures remained significant in the subsample of BPD patients. Using imaging-genetics, we found preliminary evidence that deficient amygdala habituation may be modulated by BDNF genotype. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Genetic Diversity Among Historical Olive (Olea europaea L.) Genotypes from Southern Anatolia Based on SSR Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakar, Ebru; Unver, Hulya; Ercisli, Sezai

    2016-12-01

    Olive (Olea europaea) is an ancient and important crop in both olive oil production and table use. It is important to identify the genetic diversity of olive genetic resources for cultivar development and evaluation of olive germplasm. In the study, 14 microsatellite markers (UDO4, UDO8, UDO9, UDO11, UDO12, UDO22, UDO24, UDO26, UDO28, DCA9, DCA11, DCA13, DCA15, and DCA18) were used to assess the genetic variation on 76 olive (Olea europaea L.) genotypes from Mardin province together with 6 well-known Turkish and 4 well-known foreign reference cultivars. All microsatellite markers showed polymorphism and the number of alleles varied between 9 and 22, with an average of 14.57. The most informative loci were DCA 11 (22 alleles) and DCA 9 (21 alleles). Dendrogram based on genetic distances was constructed for the 86 olive genotypes/cultivars, which revealed the existence of different clusters. The high genetic similarity was evident between Bakırkire2 and Zinnar5 (0.74) genotypes, while the most genetically divergent genotypes were Gürmeşe5 and Yedikardeşler2 (0.19). It was concluded that there was abundant SSR polymorphism in olive germplasm in southern Anatolia in Turkey and could be important for future breeding activities.

  1. In search for the lost identity: a post-modern look at Lost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Gomes Thimóteo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses the American television show Lost, in order to establish a relationship among technological advances, media and configuration of the contemporary subject, based on phenomenon of convergence as a possibility that integrates and modifies the subject. The analysis focuses on two moments. The first characterizes its structure as a transmedia narrative, resulting in a format called convergence culture, that emerges nowadays with the mass of content and media that surround us. In the second moment, some elements are observed in the series that are correlated to themes addressed by postmodernity. Thus we intend to demonstrate how the narrative presented portrays situations of reality in fiction, providing an identification of the post-modern subject with the show.

  2. Paradise Lost Dressed in the Costume of History: John Martin’s Rendition of Paradise Lost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laleh Atashi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The story of the loss of paradise has been read and interpreted in different ages. Commentary on Milton's Paradise Lost is not limited to verbal texts; painters and illustrators have contributed greatly to the poem by presenting their own time-bound readings and interpretations of the poem through their illustrations that are far beyond mere decorations. John Martin, in the aftermath of the Industrial Revolution, deletes the Father and the Son from his illustrations. Only angels such as Raphael are the representations of deity and are as powerless and tiny as Adam and Eve. Adam and Eve, after the Fall seem as small, powerless and as subjugated to the natural surrounding as they were before the Fall. Satan is the only powerful figure in his elegant palace. Through a new historical outlook, the researchers aim at exposing the workings of ideology and dominant discourses that informed John Martin's pictorial reading of Milton's poem in the early 19th century

  3. Impaired cognitive flexibility during sleep deprivation among carriers of the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Val66Met allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Leilah K; Cain, Sean W; Chang, Anne-Marie; Saxena, Richa; Czeisler, Charles A; Anderson, Clare

    2018-02-15

    Accumulating evidence points to a genetic contribution to explain inter-individual vulnerability to sleep deprivation. A functional polymorphism in the BDNF gene, which causes a valine (Val) to methionine (Met) amino acid substitution at Codon 66, has been associated with cognitive impairment, particularly in populations with impaired frontal functioning. We hypothesised that sleep deprivation, which affects frontal function, may lead to cognitive dysfunction in Met allele carriers. To examine this, we investigated, in different BDNF genotypes, the effects of sleep deprivation on cognitive flexibility, as measured by response inhibition using the Stroop Color Naming Task. Thirty healthy, adults of European ancestry, including 12 heterozygous Met allele carriers and 18 Val/Val homozygotes, underwent 30-h of extended wakefulness under constant routine conditions. A computerised Stroop task was administered every 2h. Error rate and reaction times increased with time awake for all individuals. Participants with the Val/Met genotype made more errors on incongruent trials after 20h awake. While Val/Met participants also took significantly longer to respond when inhibiting a prepotent response irrespective of time awake, this was particularly evident during the biological night. Our study shows that carriers of the BDNF Met allele are more vulnerable to the impact of prolonged wakefulness and the biological night on a critical component of executive function, as measured by response inhibition on the Stroop task. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene 4G/5G alleles frequency distribution in the Lebanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shammaa, Dina M R; Sabbagh, Amira S; Taher, Ali T; Zaatari, Ghazi S; Mahfouz, Rami A R

    2008-09-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is an inhibitor of fibrinolysis. Increased plasma PAI-1 levels play an essential role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular risk and other diseases associated with thrombosis. The 4G/5G polymorphism of the PAI-1 promoter region has been extensively studied in different populations. We studied 160 healthy unrelated Lebanese individuals using a reverse hybridization PCR assay to detect the 5G/5G, 4G/5G and, 4G/4G genotypes of the PAI-1 gene and the frequencies of the 4G and 5G alleles. We found that 4G/5G genotype was the most prevalent (45.6%) followed by 5G/5G (36.9%) and 4G/4G (17.5%). The frequencies of the 4G and 5G alleles were calculated to be 0.403 and 0.597, respectively. Compared to other ethnic communities, the Lebanese population was found to harbour a relatively high prevalence of the rare 4G allele. This, in turn, may predispose this population to develop cardiovascular diseases and other thrombotic clinical conditions. This study aids to enhance our understanding of the genetic features of the Lebanese population.

  5. Allelic frequencies and association with carcass traits of six genes in local subpopulations of Japanese Black cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimaki, Takahiro; Ibi, Takayuki; Siqintuya; Kobayashi, Naohiko; Matsuhashi, Tamako; Akiyama, Takayuki; Yoshida, Emi; Imai, Kazumi; Matsui, Mayu; Uemura, Keiichi; Eto, Hisayoshi; Watanabe, Naoto; Fujita, Tatsuo; Saito, Yosuke; Komatsu, Tomohiko; Hoshiba, Hiroshi; Mannen, Hideyuki; Sasazaki, Shinji; Kunieda, Tetsuo

    2016-04-01

    Marker-assisted selection (MAS) is expected to accelerate the genetic improvement of Japanese Black cattle. However, verification of the effects of the genes for MAS in different subpopulations is required prior to the application of MAS. In this study, we investigated the allelic frequencies and genotypic effects for carcass traits of six genes, which can be used in MAS, in eight local subpopulations. These genes are SCD, FASN and SREBP1, which are associated with the fatty acid composition of meat, and NCAPG, MC1R and F11, which are associated with carcass weight, coat color and blood coagulation abnormality, respectively. The frequencies of desirable alleles of SCD and FASN were relatively high and that of NCAPG was relatively low, and NCAPG was significantly associated with several carcass traits, including carcass weight. The proportions of genotypic variance explained by NCAPG to phenotypic variance were 4.83 for carcass weight. We thus confirmed that NCAPG is a useful marker for selection of carcass traits in these subpopulations. In addition, we found that the desirable alleles of six genes showed no negative effects on carcass traits. Therefore, selection using these genes to improve target traits should not have negative impacts on carcass traits. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  6. Advantage of using allele-specific copy numbers when testing for association in regions with common copy number variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Marenne

    Full Text Available Copy number variants (CNV can be called from SNP-arrays; however, few studies have attempted to combine both CNV and SNP calls to test for association with complex diseases. Even when SNPs are located within CNVs, two separate association analyses are necessary, to compare the distribution of bi-allelic genotypes in cases and controls (referred to as SNP-only strategy and the number of copies of a region (referred to as CNV-only strategy. However, when disease susceptibility is actually associated with allele specific copy-number states, the two strategies may not yield comparable results, raising a series of questions about the optimal analytical approach. We performed simulations of the performance of association testing under different scenarios that varied genotype frequencies and inheritance models. We show that the SNP-only strategy lacks power under most scenarios when the SNP is located within a CNV; frequently it is excluded from analysis as it does not pass quality control metrics either because of an increased rate of missing calls or a departure from fitness for Hardy-Weinberg proportion. The CNV-only strategy also lacks power because the association testing depends on the allele which copy number varies. The combined strategy performs well in most of the scenarios. Hence, we advocate the use of this combined strategy when testing for association with SNPs located within CNVs.

  7. Allele Frequency - JSNP | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nd 39 SNPs are assayed in three (POP_*) and two (RIKEN_japanese_*) panels, respectively. Derived from Flat f... assay (JBIC-allele and RIKEN_japanese_*), TaqMan assay (RIKEN-allele) or direct sequencing / allelic discri...unteers under informed consent RIKEN_japanese_normal_weight - 711 unrelated japanese normal weight volunteer...s ( body mass index RIKEN_japanese_obese - 796 unrelated japanese obese patients

  8. Validation of Genotyping-By-Sequencing Analysis in Populations of Tetraploid Alfalfa by 454 Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocher, Solen; Jean, Martine; Castonguay, Yves; Belzile, François

    2015-01-01

    Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) is a relatively low-cost high throughput genotyping technology based on next generation sequencing and is applicable to orphan species with no reference genome. A combination of genome complexity reduction and multiplexing with DNA barcoding provides a simple and affordable way to resolve allelic variation between plant samples or populations. GBS was performed on ApeKI libraries using DNA from 48 genotypes each of two heterogeneous populations of tetraploid alfalfa (Medicago sativa spp. sativa): the synthetic cultivar Apica (ATF0) and a derived population (ATF5) obtained after five cycles of recurrent selection for superior tolerance to freezing (TF). Nearly 400 million reads were obtained from two lanes of an Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencer and analyzed with the Universal Network-Enabled Analysis Kit (UNEAK) pipeline designed for species with no reference genome. Following the application of whole dataset-level filters, 11,694 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci were obtained. About 60% had a significant match on the Medicago truncatula syntenic genome. The accuracy of allelic ratios and genotype calls based on GBS data was directly assessed using 454 sequencing on a subset of SNP loci scored in eight plant samples. Sequencing depth in this study was not sufficient for accurate tetraploid allelic dosage, but reliable genotype calls based on diploid allelic dosage were obtained when using additional quality filtering. Principal Component Analysis of SNP loci in plant samples revealed that a small proportion (<5%) of the genetic variability assessed by GBS is able to differentiate ATF0 and ATF5. Our results confirm that analysis of GBS data using UNEAK is a reliable approach for genome-wide discovery of SNP loci in outcrossed polyploids. PMID:26115486

  9. Genotyping of β-Lactoglobulin gene by PCR-RFLP in Sahiwal and Tharparkar cattle breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Neelam

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improvement of efficiency and economic returns is an important goal in dairy farming, as in any agricultural enterprise. The primary goal of dairy industry has been to identify an efficient and economical way of increasing milk production and its constituents without increasing the size of the dairy herd. Selection of animals with desirable genotypes and mating them to produce the next generation has been the basis of livestock improvement and this would continue to remain the same in the coming years. The use of polymorphic genes as detectable molecular markers is a promising alternative to the current methods of trait selection once these genes are proven to be associated with traits of interest in animals. The point mutations in exon IV of bovine β-Lactoglobulin gene determine two allelic variants A and B. These variants were distinguished by Polymerase Chain Reaction and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP analysis in two indigenous Bos indicus breeds viz. Sahiwal and Tharparkar cattle. DNA samples (228 in Sahiwal and 86 in Tharparkar were analyzed for allelic variants of β-Lactoglobulin gene. Polymorphism was detected by digestion of PCR amplified products with Hae III enzyme, and separation on 12% non-denaturing gels and resolved by silver staining. Results The allele B of β-Lactoglobulin occurred at a higher frequency than the allele A in both Sahiwal and Tharparkar breeds. The genotypic frequencies of AA, AB, and BB in Sahiwal and Tharparkar breeds were 0.031, 0.276, 0.693 and 0.023, 0.733, 0.244 respectively. Frequencies of A and B alleles were 0.17 and 0.83, and 0.39 and 0.61 in Sahiwal and Tharparkar breeds respectively. The Chi-square test results (at one degree of freedom at one per cent level revealed that the Tharparkar population was not in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium as there was a continuous migration of animals in the herd studied, where as, the results are not significant for the Sahiwal

  10. Persistent HPV16/18 infection in Indian women with the A-allele (rs6457617) of HLA-DQB1 and T-allele (rs16944) of IL-1β -511 is associated with development of cervical carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sankhadeep; Chakraborty, Chandraditya; Mandal, Ranajit Kumar; Basu, Partha; Biswas, Jaydip; Roychoudhury, Susanta; Panda, Chinmay Kumar

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the association of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16/18 infection and polymorphisms in the HLA-DQB1 (rs6457617) and IL-1β -511 (rs16944) loci with the development of uterine cervical cancer (CaCx). The distribution of HLA-DQB1 G > A and IL-1β -511 C/T polymorphisms was determined in HPV-negative cervical swabs from normal women (N = 111) and compared with cervical swabs of HPV-cleared normal women (once HPV infected followed by natural clearance of the infection, N = 86), HPV16/18-positive cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN, N = 41) and CaCx biopsies (N = 107). The A-allele containing genotypes (i.e. G/A and A/A) of HLA-DQB1 was significantly associated with CaCx compared with HPV-negative [OR = 2.56(1.42-4.62), p = 0.001] or HPV-cleared [OR = 2.07(1.12-3.87), p = 0.01] normal women, whereas the T-allele containing genotypes (i.e. C/T and T/T) of IL-1β showed increased risk of CIN [OR = 3.68(0.97-16.35), p = 0.03; OR = 3.59(0.92-16.38), p = 0.03] and CaCx development [OR = 2.03(1.03-5.2), p = 0.02; OR = 2.25(0.96-5.31), p = 0.04] compared with HPV-negative or HPV-cleared normal women. Considering these two loci together, it was evident that the T- and A-alleles rendered significantly increased susceptibility for development of CIN and CaCx compared with HPV-negative and HPV-cleared normal women. Moreover, the T-allele of IL-1β showed increased susceptibility for CIN [OR = 3.62(0.85-17.95), p = 0.04] and CaCx [OR = 2.39(0.91-6.37), p = 0.05] development compared with the HPV-cleared women, even in the presence of the HLA-DQB1 G-allele. Thus, our data suggest that persistent HPV16/18 infection in the cervix due to the presence of the HLA-DQB1 A-allele and chronic inflammation due to the presence of the IL-1β -511 T-allele might predispose women to CaCx development.

  11. Database for the ampC alleles in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil Karah

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is a troublesome opportunistic pathogen with a high capacity for clonal dissemination. We announce the establishment of a database for the ampC locus in A. baumannii, in which novel ampC alleles are differentiated based on the occurrence of ≥ 1 nucleotide change, regardless of whether it is silent or missense. The database is openly accessible at the pubmlst platform for A. baumannii (http://pubmlst.org/abaumannii/. Forty-eight distinctive alleles of the ampC locus have so far been identified and deposited in the database. Isolates from clonal complex 1 (CC1, according to the Pasteur multilocus sequence typing scheme, had a variety of the ampC locus alleles, including alleles 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 17, and 18. On the other hand, isolates from CC2 had the ampC alleles 2, 3, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 27, 28, and 46. Allele 3 was characteristic for sequence types ST3 or ST32. The ampC alleles 10, 16, and 25 were characteristic for CC10, ST16, and CC25, respectively. Our study points out that novel gene databases, in which alleles are numbered based on differences in their nucleotide identities, should replace traditional records that use amino acid substitutions to define new alleles.

  12. Partitioning of copy-number genotypes in pedigrees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andelfinger Gregor U

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Copy number variations (CNVs and polymorphisms (CNPs have only recently gained the genetic community's attention. Conservative estimates have shown that CNVs and CNPs might affect more than 10% of the genome and that they may be at least as important as single nucleotide polymorphisms in assessing human variability. Widely used tools for CNP analysis have been implemented in Birdsuite and PLINK for the purpose of conducting genetic association studies based on the unpartitioned total number of CNP copies provided by the intensities from Affymetrix's Genome-Wide Human SNP Array. Here, we are interested in partitioning copy number variations and polymorphisms in extended pedigrees for the purpose of linkage analysis on familial data. Results We have developed CNGen, a new software for the partitioning of copy number polymorphism using the integrated genotypes from Birdsuite with the Affymetrix platform. The algorithm applied to familial trios or extended pedigrees can produce partitioned copy number genotypes with distinct parental alleles. We have validated the algorithm using simulations on a complex pedigree structure using frequencies calculated from a real dataset of 300 genotyped samples from 42 pedigrees segregating a congenital heart defect phenotype. Conclusions CNGen is the first published software for the partitioning of copy number genotypes in pedigrees, making possible the use CNPs and CNVs for linkage analysis. It was implemented with the Python interpreter version 2.5.2. It was successfully tested on current Linux, Windows and Mac OS workstations.

  13. Idiopathic focal epilepsies: the "lost tribe".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Deb K; Ferrie, Colin; Addis, Laura; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Caraballo, Roberto; de Saint-Martin, Anne; Fejerman, Natalio; Guerrini, Renzo; Hamandi, Khalid; Helbig, Ingo; Ioannides, Andreas A; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Lal, Dennis; Lesca, Gaetan; Muhle, Hiltrud; Neubauer, Bernd A; Pisano, Tiziana; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Seegmuller, Caroline; Shibata, Takashi; Smith, Anna; Striano, Pasquale; Strug, Lisa J; Szepetowski, Pierre; Valeta, Thalia; Yoshinaga, Harumi; Koutroumanidis, Michalis

    2016-09-01

    epigenetic factors involved that might also explain low observed twin concordance? The genetic (and epigenetic) models for different IFEs, their comorbidities, and their similarities to other neurodevelopmental disorders deserve investigation in the coming years. In so doing, we will probably learn much about normal brain functioning. This is because these disorders, perhaps more than any other human brain disease, are disorders of functional brain systems (even though these functional networks may not yet be fully defined). In June 2012, an international group of clinical and basic science researchers met in London under the auspices of the Waterloo Foundation to discuss and debate these issues in relation to IFEs. This Waterloo Foundation Symposium on the Idiopathic Focal Epilepsies: Phenotype to Genotype witnessed presentations that explored the clinical phenomenology, phenotypes and endophenotypes, and genetic approaches to investigation of these disorders. In parallel, the impact of these epilepsies on children and their families was reviewed. The papers in this supplement are based upon these presentations. They represent an updated state-of-the-art thinking on the topics explored. The symposium led to the formation of international working groups under the umbrella of "Luke's Idiopathic Focal Epilepsy Project" to investigate various aspects of the idiopathic focal epilepsies including: semiology and classification, genetics, cognition, sleep, high-frequency oscillations, and parental resources (see www.childhood-epilepsy.org). The next sponsored international workshop, in June 2014, was on randomised controlled trials in IFEs and overnight learning outcome measures.

  14. Ancient DNA Investigation of a Medieval German Cemetery Confirms Long-Term Stability of CCR5-Δ32 Allele Frequencies in Central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwman, Abigail; Shved, Natallia; Akgül, Gülfirde; Rühli, Frank; Warinner, Christina

    2017-04-01

    The CCR5-Δ32 mutation present in European populations is among the most prominently debated cases of recent positive selection in humans. This allele, a 32-bp deletion that renders the T-cell CCR5 receptor nonfunctional, has important epidemiological and public health significance, as homozygous carriers are resistant to several HIV strains. However, although the function of this allele in preventing HIV infection is now well described, its human evolutionary origin is poorly understood. Initial attempts to determine the emergence of the CCR5-Δ32 allele pointed to selection during the 14th-century Black Death pandemic; however, subsequent analyses suggest that the allele rose in frequency more than 5,000 years ago, possibly through drift. Recently, three studies have identified populations predating the 14th century CE that are positive for the CCR5-Δ32 allele, supporting the claim for a more ancient origin. However, these studies also suggest poorly understood regional differences in the recent evolutionary history of the CCR5-Δ32 allele. Here a new hydrolysis-probe-based real-time PCR assay was designed to ascertain CCR5 allele frequency in 53 individuals from a 10th- to 12th-century CE church and convent complex in central Germany that predates outbreaks of the Black Death pandemic. High-confidence genotypes were obtained for 32 individuals, and results show that CCR5-Δ32 allele frequency has remained unchanged in this region of Central Europe over the last millennium, suggesting that there has been no strong positive selective pressure over this time period and confirming a more ancient origin for the allele.

  15. Polymorphism of κ-Casein in Italian Goat Breeds: A New ACRS-PCR Designed DNA Test for Discrimination of A and B Alleles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlatka Cubric-Curik

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to develop a DNA test for rapid characterisation of goat κ-casein (κ-CN A and B variants and to study this polymorphism in Italian goat breeds. Genetic polymorphism of κ-CN gene was, in addition to isoelectric focusing, analysed according to a new technique designated as amplification created restriction site. Two alleles that differ in one nucleotide mutation (G Ø A in exon 4 were characterised. The 167-bp PCR product surrounding the nucleotide mutation was amplified from genomic DNA and the PCR product was digested with MaeIII. After digestion the A allele gives three fragments of 77, 65 and 25 bp in comparison with the B allele which gives two fragments of 90 and 77 bp. The analysis of allele frequency distribution at κ-CN locus, based on 401 individual samples, revealed significant differences among three goat breeds from the north of Italy (Nera di Verzasca, Frontalasca and Alpine with frequency of κ-CN B allele around 0.3, versus two goat breeds from the south of Italy (Maltese and Sarda with frequency of κ-CN B allele around 0.5. While two goat breeds (Maltese and Nera di Verzasca did not show significant deviations from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, a highly significant excess of heterozygote genotype (AB was observed in Alpine, Frontalasca and Sarda goats. Here the developed DNA method and observed relatively high frequency of κ-CN B allele give a prerequisite for the assessment of research related to the simultaneous estimation of the effects of composite αs1/κ-CN genotypes on milk production and cheese-making properties.

  16. The short (S) allele of the serotonin transporter polymorphism and acute tryptophan depletion both increase impulsivity in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walderhaug, Espen; Herman, Aryeh Isaac; Magnusson, Andres; Morgan, Michael John; Landrø, Nils Inge

    2010-04-12

    Reduced serotonergic neurotransmission is implicated in impulsive behavior. We studied the triallelic system of the serotonin transporter gene linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and acute manipulation of serotonin together to further delineate the mechanisms by which serotonergic neurotransmission affects impulsivity. Fifty-two healthy participants (38 men and 14 women) underwent acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) or placebo in a randomized, double-blind, parallel group experiment. Impulsive response style was measured on two versions of the Continuous Performance Task (CPT), and calculated using signal detection theory. We observed a dose-dependent effect for the short (S') allele of the 5-HTTLPR on impulsive response style. Individuals who had the S'/S' genotype were more impulsive than individuals with the L/S' genotype. Participants with the L/S' genotype were more impulsive than those with the L/L genotype. ATD increased impulsivity in men, and decreased impulsivity in women. These data demonstrate for the first time that reduced serotonergic tone as a result of either 5-HTTLPR genotype, or experimental ATD, are both independently and additively, associated with elevated impulsive response style in Caucasian men. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic variation of the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene: increased frequency of the insertion allele in Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, S H; Kang, B Y; Park, W H; Kim, J Q; Lee, C C

    1997-01-01

    In view of the clinical importance of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) as a major marker for cardiovascular diseases, we investigated insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the ACE gene in Koreans. Genotype frequencies were examined by polymerase chain reaction in 171 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and 120 healthy subjects. Allele frequencies of ACE polymorphism in Koreans were not significantly different between patient and control groups. In addition, association between ACE genotypes and the number of stenosed coronary arteries was not detected. ACE genotypes in the CAD group were not associated with body mass index and plasma lipid levels. Thus, our results suggest that, at least in Koreans, I/D polymorphism of the gene is unlikely to be a useful marker for CAD subjects. However, the I allele frequency of Koreans (0.58) was higher than that of Caucasian populations (0.47) but lower than that of Samoan (0.91) and Yanomami (0.85) populations. Here, we discuss the clinical and ethnic importance of ACE polymorphism.

  18. KASPTM genotyping technology and its use in gene­tic-breeding programs (a study of maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Н. Е. Волкова

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To review publications relating to the key point of the genotyping technology that is competitive allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (which is called now Kompetitive Allele Specific PCR, KASPTM and its use in various genetic-breeding researching (a study of maize. Results. The essence of KASP-genotyping, its advantages are highlighted. The requirements for matrix DNA are presented, since the success of the KASP-analysis depends on its qua­lity and quantity. Examples of global projects of plant breeding for increasing crop yields using the KASP genoty­ping technology are given. The results of KASP genotyping and their introduction into breeding and seed production, in particular, for determining genetic identity, genetic purity, origin check, marker-assisted selection, etc. are presented using maize as an example. It is demonstrated how geno­mic selection according to KASP genotyping technology can lead to rapid genetic enhancement of drought resistance in maize. Comparison of the effectiveness of creating lines with certain traits (for example, combination of high grain yield and drought resistance using traditional breeding approaches (phenotype selection and molecular genetic methods (selection by markers was proved that it takes four seasons (two years in case of greenhouses in order to unlock the potential of the plant genotype using traditional self-pollination, test-crossing and definitions, while using markers, the population was enriched with target alleles during one season. At the same time, there was no need for a stress factor. Conclusions. KASP genotyping technology is a high-precision and effective tool for modern genetics and breeding, which is successfully used to study genetic diversity, genetic relationship, population structure, gene­tic identity, genetic purity, origin check, quantitative locus mapping, allele mapping, marker-assisted selection, marker-assisted breeding. It is expedient and timely to

  19. Recognition of Y Fragment Deletion by Genotyping Graphs after Amplified by PowerPlex® 21 Detection Kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S C; Ding, M M; Wei, X L; Zhang, T; Yao, F

    2016-06-01

    To recognize the possibility of Y fragment deletion of Amelogenin gene intuitively and simply according to the genotyping graphs. By calculating the ratio of total peak height of genotyping graphs, the statistics of equilibrium distribution between Amelogenin and D3S1358 loci, Amelogenin X-gene and Amelogenin Y-gene, and different alleles of D3S1358 loci from 1 968 individuals was analyzed after amplified by PowerPlex ® 21 detection kit. Sum of peak height of Amelogenin X allele was not less than 60% that of D3S1358 loci alleles in 90.8% female samples, and sum of peak height of Amelogenin X allele was not higher than 70% that of D3S1358 loci alleles in 94.9% male samples. The result of genotyping after amplified by PowerPlex ® 21 detection kit shows that the possibility of Y fragment deletion should be considered when only Amelogenin X-gene of Amelogenin is detected and the peak height of Amelogenin X-gene is not higher than 70% of the total peak height of D3S1358 loci. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Forensic Medicine

  20. [Work days lost due to health problems in industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Sylvia Regina Trindade; Santana, Vilma Sousa

    2012-05-01

    This cross-sectional study estimated the prevalence of work days lost due to health problems and associated factors among industrial workers. The study population was a simple random cluster sample of 3,403 workers from 16 to 65 years of age in the city of Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil. Data were collected with individual home interviews. Among industrial workers, one-year prevalence of work days lost to health problems was 12.5%, of which 5.5% were directly work-related and 4.1% aggravated by work. There were no statistically significant differences when compared to other worker categories. Self-perceived workplace hazards, history of work-related injury, and poor self-rated health were associated with work days lost due to work-related injuries/diseases. The findings showed that work days lost are common among both industrial and non-industrial workers, thereby affecting productivity and requiring prevention programs.

  1. Ship Track for Lost City 2005 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ship track of the NOAA ship Ronald H. Brown during the "Lost City 2005" expedition sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Office of...

  2. AllelicImbalance: An R/ bioconductor package for detecting, managing, and visualizing allele expression imbalance data from RNA sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gådin, Jesper R.; van't Hooft, Ferdinand M.; Eriksson, Per

    2015-01-01

    the possible biases. Results: We present AllelicImblance, a software program that is designed to detect, manage, and visualize allelic imbalances comprehensively. The purpose of this software is to allow users to pose genetic questions in any RNA sequencing experiment quickly, enhancing the general utility...... of RNA sequencing. The visualization features can reveal notable, non-trivial allelic imbalance behavior over specific regions, such as exons. Conclusions: The software provides a complete framework to perform allelic imbalance analyses of aligned RNA sequencing data, from detection to visualization...

  3. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Christopher L; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9+/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape.

  4. Distribution of photoperiod-insensitive alleles Ppd-B1a and Ppd-D1a and their effect on heading time in Japanese wheat cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Masako; Chono, Makiko; Matsunaka, Hitoshi; Fujita, Masaya; Oda, Shunsuke; Kubo, Katashi; Kiribuchi-Otobe, Chikako; Kojima, Hisayo; Nishida, Hidetaka; Kato, Kenji

    2011-12-01

    The genotypes of photoperiod response genes Ppd-B1 and Ppd-D1 in Japanese wheat cultivars were determined by a PCR-based method, and heading times were compared among genotypes. Most of the Japanese wheat cultivars, except those from the Hokkaido region, carried the photoperiod-insensitive allele Ppd-D1a, and heading was accelerated 10.3 days compared with the Ppd-D1b genotype. Early cultivars with Ppd-D1a may have been selected to avoid damage from preharvest rain. In the Hokkaido region, Ppd-D1a frequency was lower and heading date was late regardless of Ppd-D1 genotype, suggesting another genetic mechanism for late heading in Hokkaido cultivars. In this study, only 11 cultivars proved to carry Ppd-B1a, and all of them carried another photoperiod-insensitive allele, Ppd-D1a. The Ppd-B1a/Ppd-D1a genotype headed 6.7 days earlier than the Ppd-B1b/Ppd-D1a genotype, indicating a significant effect of Ppd-B1a in the genetic background with Ppd-D1a. Early-maturity breeding in Japan is believed to be accelerated by the introduction of the Ppd-B1a allele into medium-heading cultivars carrying Ppd-D1a. Pedigree analysis showed that Ppd-B1a in three extra-early commercial cultivars was inherited from 'Shiroboro 21' by early-heading Chugoku lines bred at the Chugoku Agriculture Experimental Station.

  5. Development of a Laboratory Project to Determine Human ABO Genotypes--Limitations Lead to Further Student Explorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Theresa A.

    2009-01-01

    A multiplex allele-specific PCR analysis was developed to identify six "common" genotypes: AA, AO, BB, BO, OO, and AB. This project included a pre-laboratory exercise that provided active learning experiences and developed critical thinking skills. This laboratory resulted in many successful analyses, which were verified by student knowledge of…

  6. Apolipoprotein E genotype, cardiovascular biomarkers and risk of stroke : Systematic review and meta-analysis of 14 015 stroke cases and pooled analysis of primary biomarker data from up to 60 883 individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, Tauseef A.; Shah, Tina; Prieto, David; Zhang, Weili; Price, Jackie; Fowkes, Gerald R.; Cooper, Jackie; Talmud, Philippa J.; Humphries, Steve E.; Sundstrom, Johan; Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Ebrahim, Shah; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Abdollahi, Mohammad R.; Slooter, Arjen J. C.; Szolnoki, Zoltan; Sandhu, Manjinder; Wareham, Nicholas; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Fillenbaum, Gerda; Heijmans, Bastiaan T.; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Gromadzka, Grazyna; Singleton, Andrew; Ferrucci, Luigi; Hardy, John; Worrall, Bradford; Rich, Stephen S.; Matarin, Mar; Whittaker, John; Gaunt, Tom R.; Whincup, Peter; Morris, Richard; Deanfield, John; Donald, Ann; Smith, George Davey; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Smeeth, Liam; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Nalls, Michael; Meschia, James; Sun, Kai; Hui, Rutai; Day, Ian; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Casas, Juan P.

    Background At the APOE gene, encoding apolipoprotein E, genotypes of the epsilon 2/epsilon 3/epsilon 4 alleles associated with higher LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels are also associated with higher coronary risk. However, the association of APOE genotype with other cardiovascular biomarkers and risk

  7. Common genotypes of hepatitis B virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idrees, M.; Khan, S.; Riazuddin, S.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To find out the frequency of common genotypes of hepatitis-B virus (HBV). Subjects and Methods: HBV genotypes were determined in 112 HBV DNA positive sera by a simple and precise molecular genotyping system base on PCR using type-specific primers for the determination of genotypes of HBV A through H. Results: Four genotypes (A,B,C and D) out of total eight reported genotypes so far were identified. Genotypes A, B and C were predominant. HBV genotype C was the most predominant in this collection, appearing in 46 samples (41.7%). However, the genotypes of a total of 5 (4.46%) samples could not be determined with the present genotyping system. Mixed genotypes were seen in 8(7.14% HBV) isolates. Five of these were infected with genotypes A/D whereas two were with genotypes C/D. One patient was infected with 4 genotypes (A/B/C/D). Genotype A (68%) was predominant in Sindh genotype C was most predominant in North West Frontier Province (NWFP) (68.96) whereas genotype C and B were dominant in Punjab (39.65% and 25.86% respectively). Conclusion: All the four common genotypes of HBV found worldwide (A,B,C and D) were isolated. Genotype C is the predominant Genotypes B and C are predominant in Punjab and N.W.F.P. whereas genotype A is predominant in Sindh. (author)

  8. Measurement of water lost from heated geologic salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohlfelder, J.J.

    1979-07-01

    This report describes three methods used to measure the rate at which water is lost from heated geologic salt. The three methods were employed in each of a series of proof tests which were performed to evaluate instrumentation designed to measure the water-loss rate. It was found that the water lost from heated, 1-kg salt specimens which were measured according to these three methods was consistent to within an average 9 percent

  9. Lost in Location:- on how (not) to situate aliens

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Lone Koefoed

    2009-01-01

    Udgivelsesdato: June The article investigates how users of personal satellite navigation devices (often referred to as sat-nav) are sometimes lost and led astray and argues that the satnav's aim to remove every insecurity about the correct route seems to remove the individual's conscious perception of the space traversed. While becoming destination aware, the individual loses her location awareness. The article proposes that the reason people get lost when using sat-nav is due to a wrong l...

  10. A Simple, High-Throughput Assay for Fragile X Expanded Alleles Using Triple Repeat Primed PCR and Capillary Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Elaine; Laver, Thomas; Yu, Ping; Jama, Mohamed; Young, Keith; Zoccoli, Michael; Marlowe, Natalia

    2010-01-01

    Population screening has been proposed for Fragile X syndrome to identify premutation carrier females and affected newborns. We developed a PCR-based assay capable of quickly detecting the presence or absence of an expanded FMR1 allele with high sensitivity and specificity. This assay combines a triplet repeat primed PCR with high-throughput automated capillary electrophoresis. We evaluated assay performance using archived samples sent for Fragile X diagnostic testing representing a range of Fragile X CGG-repeat expansions. Two hundred five previously genotyped samples were tested with the new assay. Data were analyzed for the presence of a trinucleotide “ladder” extending beyond 55 repeats, which was set as a cut-off to identify expanded FMR1 alleles. We identified expanded FMR1 alleles in 132 samples (59 premutation, 71 full mutation, 2 mosaics) and normal FMR1 alleles in 73 samples. We found 100% concordance with previous results from PCR and Southern blot analyses. In addition, we show feasibility of using this assay with DNA extracted from dried-blood spots. Using a single PCR combined with high-throughput fragment analysis on the automated capillary electrophoresis instrument, we developed a rapid and reproducible PCR-based laboratory assay that meets many of the requirements for a first-tier test for population screening. PMID:20431035

  11. Association of HLA-DRB1 alleles with susceptibility to mixed connective tissue disease in Polish patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradowska-Gorycka, A; Stypińska, B; Olesińska, M; Felis-Giemza, A; Mańczak, M; Czuszynska, Z; Zdrojewski, Z; Wojciechowicz, J; Jurkowska, M

    2016-01-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a systemic autoimmune disease, originally defined as a connective tissue inflammatory syndrome with overlapping features of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM) and systemic sclerosis (SSc), characterized by the presence of antibodies against components of the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U1snRNP). The aim of the study was to assess the frequency of (high-resolution-typed) DRB1 alleles in a cohort of Polish patients with MCTD (n = 103). Identification of the variants potentially associated with risk and protection was carried out by comparison with the DKMS Polish Bone Marrow Donor Registry (41306 alleles). DRB1*15:01 (odds ratio (OR): 6.06; 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.55-8.06), DRB1*04 (OR: 3.69; 95% CI 2.69-5.01) and *09:01 (OR: 8.12; 95% CI 2.15-21.75) were identified as risk alleles for MCTD, while HLA-DRB1*07:01 allele was found to be protective (OR: 0.50; 95% CI 0.28-0.83). The carrier frequency of the DRB1*01 was higher in MCTD patients compared with controls, although the differences were not statistically significant. Our results confirm the modulating influence of HLA-DRB1 genotypes on development of connective tissue diseases such as MCTD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Effects of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and met allele load on declarative memory related neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, Chris M; Henson, Richard N; Suckling, John; Miskowiak, Kamilla W; Ooi, Cinly; Tait, Roger; Soltesz, Fruzsina; Lawrence, Phil; Bentley, Graham; Maltby, Kay; Skeggs, Andrew; Miller, Sam R; McHugh, Simon; Bullmore, Edward T; Nathan, Pradeep J

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism modulates episodic memory performance via effects on hippocampal neural circuitry. However, fMRI studies have yielded inconsistent results in this respect. Moreover, very few studies have examined the effect of met allele load on activation of memory circuitry. In the present study, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of the effects of the BDNF polymorphism on brain responses during episodic memory encoding and retrieval, including an investigation of the effect of met allele load on memory related activation in the medial temporal lobe. In contrast to previous studies, we found no evidence for an effect of BDNF genotype or met load during episodic memory encoding. Met allele carriers showed increased activation during successful retrieval in right hippocampus but this was contrast-specific and unaffected by met allele load. These results suggest that the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism does not, as previously claimed, exert an observable effect on neural systems underlying encoding of new information into episodic memory but may exert a subtle effect on the efficiency with which such information can be retrieved.

  13. Effects of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and met allele load on declarative memory related neural networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris M Dodds

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism modulates episodic memory performance via effects on hippocampal neural circuitry. However, fMRI studies have yielded inconsistent results in this respect. Moreover, very few studies have examined the effect of met allele load on activation of memory circuitry. In the present study, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of the effects of the BDNF polymorphism on brain responses during episodic memory encoding and retrieval, including an investigation of the effect of met allele load on memory related activation in the medial temporal lobe. In contrast to previous studies, we found no evidence for an effect of BDNF genotype or met load during episodic memory encoding. Met allele carriers showed increased activation during successful retrieval in right hippocampus but this was contrast-specific and unaffected by met allele load. These results suggest that the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism does not, as previously claimed, exert an observable effect on neural systems underlying encoding of new information into episodic memory but may exert a subtle effect on the efficiency with which such information can be retrieved.

  14. Myotonic dystrophy type 1: role of CCG, CTC and CGG interruptions within DMPK alleles in the pathogenesis and molecular diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, M; Masciullo, M; Silvestri, G; Novelli, G; Botta, A

    2017-10-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a multisystem neuromuscular disease caused by a CTG triplet expansion in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of DMPK gene. This CTG array is usually uninterrupted in both healthy and DM1 patients, but recent studies identified pathological variant expansions containing unstable CCG, CTC and CGG interruptions with a prevalence of 3-5% of cases. In this review, we will describe the clinical, molecular and genetic issues related to the occurrence of variant expansions associated with DM1. Indeed, the identification of these complex DMPK alleles leads to practical consequences in DM1 genetic counseling and testing, because these exams can give false negative results. Moreover, DM1 patients carrying interrupted alleles can manifest either additional atypical neurological symptoms or, conversely, mild, late-onset forms. Therefore, the prognosis of the disease in these patients is difficult to determine because of the great uncertainty about the genotype-phenotype correlations. We will discuss the putative effects of the variant DM1 alleles on the pathogenic disease mechanisms, including mitotic and meiotic repeats instability and splicing alteration typical of DM1 tissues. Interruptions within the DMPK expanded alleles could also interfere with the chromatin structure, the transcriptional activity of the DM1 locus and the interaction with RNA CUG-binding proteins. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Absence of the HLA-G*0113N allele in Amerindian populations from the Brazilian Amazon region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes-Junior, Celso T; Castelli, Erick C; Moreau, Philippe; Simões, Aguinaldo L; Donadi, Eduardo A

    2010-04-01

    The HLA-G gene is predominantly expressed at the maternal-fetal interface and has been associated with maternal-fetal tolerance. The HLA-G*0113N is a null allele defined by the insertion of a premature stop codon at exon 2, observed in a single Ghanaian individual. Likewise the G*0105N allele, the occurrence of the HLA-G*0113N in a population from an area with high pathogen load suggests that the reduced HLA-G expression in G*0113N heterozygous placentas could improve the intrauterine defense against infections. The presence of the G*0113N allele here was investigated in 150 Amerindians from five isolated tribes that inhabit the Central Amazon and in 295 admixed individuals from the State of São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, previously genotyped for HLA-G. No copy of the G*0113N null allele was found in both population samples by exon 2 sequence-based analysis, reinforcing its restricted occurrence in Africa.

  16. Absence of kdr resistance alleles in the Union of the Comoros, East Africa [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5fw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoosook Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Knockdown resistance (kdr and CYP9K1 genotypes were detected by a MOLDI-TOF based SNP genotyping assay (Sequenom iPLEX in samples of Anopheles gambiae collected at 13 sites throughout the Union of the Comoros and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania during February and March 2011. All A. gambiae specimens collected in the Comoros were homozygous for the susceptible kdr alleles (+/+ while 96% of A. gambiae from Dar es Salaam were homozygous for the East African kdr resistant genotype (E/E. In contrast, all specimens from Dar es Salaam and the Comoros were homozygous for the cyp3 allele (c3/c3 at the CYP9K1 locus; the locus has been implicated in metabolic resistance against pyrethroid insecticides in West Africa. All specimens had typical A. gambiae genotypes for SNPs within the divergence Islands on all three chromosomes. Although further spatial and temporal studies are needed, the distribution of kdr genotypes between the Comoros and Tanzania further supports isolation of the Comoros populations from A. gambiae populations on mainland Africa.

  17. Distribution of photoperiod-insensitive allele Ppd-A1a and its effect on heading time in Japanese wheat cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Masako; Chono, Makiko; Nishimura, Tsutomu; Sato, Mikako; Yoshimura, Yasuhiro; Matsunaka, Hitoshi; Fujita, Masaya; Oda, Shunsuke; Kubo, Katashi; Kiribuchi-Otobe, Chikako; Kojima, Hisayo; Nishida, Hidetaka; Kato, Kenji

    2013-09-01

    The Ppd-A1 genotype of 240 Japanese wheat cultivars and 40 foreign cultivars was determined using a PCR-based method. Among Japanese cultivars, only 12 cultivars, all of which were Hokkaido winter wheat, carried the Ppd-A1a allele, while this allele was not found in Hokkaido spring wheat cultivars or Tohoku-Kyushu cultivars. Cultivars with a photoperiod-insensitive allele headed 6.9-9.8 days earlier in Kanto and 2.5 days earlier in Hokkaido than photoperiod-sensitive cultivars. The lower effect of photoperiod-insensitive alleles observed in Hokkaido could be due to the longer day-length at the spike formation stage compared with that in Kanto. Pedigree analysis showed that 'Purple Straw' and 'Tohoku 118' were donors of Ppd-A1a and Ppd-D1a in Hokkaido wheat cultivars, respectively. Wheat cultivars recently developed in Hokkaido carry photoperiod-insensitive alleles at a high frequency. For efficient utilization of Ppd-1 alleles in the Hokkaido wheat-breeding program, the effect of Ppd-1 on growth pattern and grain yield should be investigated. Ppd-A1a may be useful as a unique gene source for fine tuning the heading time in the Tohoku-Kyushu region since the effect of Ppd-A1a on photoperiod insensitivity appears to differ from the effect of Ppd-B1a and Ppd-D1a.

  18. Lack of association between TaqI A1 Allele of dopamine D2 receptor gene and alcohol-use disorders in Atayal natives of Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chia-Hsiang Chen [Cheng Hsin Rehabilitation and Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Shih-Hsiang Chien; Hai-Gwo Hwu [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-09-20

    Association studies between the A1 allele of the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene TaqI A polymorphism and alcoholism remain controversial. A recent study from Japan demonstrated that the A1 allele is associated with severe alcoholism in the Japanese population. We were interested in knowing if this association also exists in the Atayals of Taiwan, who were found to have a higher prevalence of alcohol-use disorders than the Han Chinese in Taiwan. Genotype and allele frequencies were determined in alcohol-abusing, alcohol-dependent, and nonalcoholic control Atayal natives in Taiwan. A1 allele frequencies in alcohol-dependent, alcohol-abusing, and normal control Atayals were 0.39, 0.42, and 0.39, respectively. No difference in A1 allele frequency was found among these three groups. Our data do not support the hypothesis that the A1 allele of the TaqI A polymorphism of the DRD2 gene increases susceptibility to alcohol-use disorders in the Atayals of Taiwan. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  19. Genome-wide association study in discordant sibships identifies multiple inherited susceptibility alleles linked to lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, Antonella; Falvella, Felicia S; Frullanti, Elisa; Spinola, Monica; Incarbone, Matteo; Nosotti, Mario; Santambrogio, Luigi; Conti, Barbara; Pastorino, Ugo; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Dragani, Tommaso A

    2010-03-01

    We analyzed a series of young (median age = 52 years) non-smoker lung cancer patients and their unaffected siblings as controls, using a genome-wide 620 901 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array analysis and a case-control DNA pooling approach. We identified 82 putatively associated SNPs that were retested by individual genotyping followed by use of the sib transmission disequilibrium test, pointing to 36 SNPs associated with lung cancer risk in the discordant sibs series. Analysis of these 36 SNPs in a polygenic model characterized by additive and interchangeable effects of rare alleles revealed a highly statistically significant dosage-dependent association between risk allele carrier status and proportion of cancer cases. Replication of the same 36 SNPs in a population-based series confirmed the association with lung cancer for three SNPs, suggesting that phenocopies and genetic heterogeneity can play a major role in the complex genetics of lung cancer risk in the general population.

  20. Population genetics of Phytophthora infestans in Denmark reveals dominantly clonal populations and specific alleles linked to metalaxyl-M resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montes, M. S.; Nielsen, Bent Jørgen; Schmidt, S. G.

    2016-01-01

    population of P. infestans was characterized over the course of the 2013 growing season, as was the population genetic structure, using simple sequence repeat (SSR) genotypes and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based mitochondrial haplotyping of over 80 isolates. Both mating types A1 and A2 were present...... in most fields, but tests for recombination showed that clonal reproduction dominates in Danish populations. Genotype was not linked to haplotype and no differentiation was observed at the haplotype level, but rather between fields. Resistance phenotypes were linked to specific SSR alleles, demonstrating...

  1. Positive Association of D Allele of ACE Gene With High Altitude Pulmonary Edema in Indian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagi, Shuchi; Srivastava, Swati; Tomar, Arvind; Bala Singh, Shashi; Sarkar, Soma

    2015-06-01

    High altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a potentially fatal high altitude illness occurring as a result of hypobaric hypoxia with an unknown underlying genetic mechanism. Recent studies have shown a possible association between HAPE and polymorphisms in genes of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), which play a key role in sensitivity of an individual toward HAPE. For the present investigation, study groups consisted of HAPE patients (HAPE) and acclimatized control subjects (rCON). Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis in genes of the RAAS pathway, specifically, renin (REN) C(-4063)T (rs41317140) and RENi8-83 (rs2368564), angiotensin (AGT) M(235)T (rs699), and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) insertion/deletion (I/D) (rs1799752). Only the I/D polymorphism of the ACE gene showed a significant difference between the HAPE and rCON groups. The frequency of the D allele was found to be significantly higher in the HAPE group. Arterial oxygen saturation levels were significantly lower in the HAPE group compared with the rCON group and also decreased in the I/D and D/D genotypes compared with the I/I genotype in these groups. The other polymorphisms occurring in the REN and AGT genes were not significantly different between the 2 groups. These findings demonstrate a possible association of the I/D polymorphism of the ACE gene with the development of HAPE, with D/D being the at-risk genotype. Copyright © 2015 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Low Penetrance Alleles in Colorectal Cancer: the arachidonic acid pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L.E. Siezen

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIn summary, we can conclude that we have successfully identified low penetrance alleles in the PPAR., PLA2G2A and ALOX15 genes, conferring differential colorectal adenoma risk, and two such alleles in the PTGS2 gene, one of which is also involved in colorectal cancer risk. These

  3. Comparison of bovine lymphocyte antigen DRB3.2 allele ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-04

    Aug 4, 2008 ... The bovine lymphocyte antigen (BoLA-DRB3) gene encodes cell ... alleles were more resistant to clinical mastitis. ... DRB3.2 allele pattern in two Iranian Holstein cow .... observed and the number of immune parameters with.

  4. Evolutionary dynamics of sporophytic self-incompatibility alleles in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, Mikkel Heide; Vekemans, Xavier; Christiansen, Freddy Bugge

    1997-01-01

    codominantly in both pollen and style (SSIcod), in the second, alleles form a dominance hierarchy in pollen and style (SSIdom). In the third model, alleles interact codominantly in the style and form a dominance hierarchy in the pollen (SSIdomcod). The SSIcod model behaves similarly to the model...

  5. Human minisatellite alleles detectable only after PCR amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J A; Crosier, M; Jeffreys, A J

    1992-01-01

    We present evidence that a proportion of alleles at two human minisatellite loci is undetected by standard Southern blot hybridization. In each case the missing allele(s) can be identified after PCR amplification and correspond to tandem arrays too short to detect by hybridization. At one locus, there is only one undetected allele (population frequency 0.3), which contains just three repeat units. At the second locus, there are at least five undetected alleles (total population frequency 0.9) containing 60-120 repeats; they are not detected because these tandem repeats give very poor signals when used as a probe in standard Southern blot hybridization, and also cross-hybridize with other sequences in the genome. Under these circumstances only signals from the longest tandemly repeated alleles are detectable above the nonspecific background. The structures of these loci have been compared in human and primate DNA, and at one locus the short human allele containing three repeat units is shown to be an intermediate state in the expansion of a monomeric precursor allele in primates to high copy number in the longer human arrays. We discuss the implications of such loci for studies of human populations, minisatellite isolation by cloning, and the evolution of highly variable tandem arrays.

  6. Comparative frequency and allelic distribution of ABO and Rh (D ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Allelic distribution of major blood groups (ABO and rhesus) has not been defined in Bangladeshi population. Determinants of blood group frequency in this region have not been studied properly. Aim: To determine ABO and rhesus blood group frequency and allelic distribution in a multiethnic area of ...

  7. HBV genotypic variability in Cuba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen L Loureiro

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity of HBV in human population is often a reflection of its genetic admixture. The aim of this study was to explore the genotypic diversity of HBV in Cuba. The S genomic region of Cuban HBV isolates was sequenced and for selected isolates the complete genome or precore-core sequence was analyzed. The most frequent genotype was A (167/250, 67%, mainly A2 (149, 60% but also A1 and one A4. A total of 77 isolates were classified as genotype D (31%, with co-circulation of several subgenotypes (56 D4, 2 D1, 5 D2, 7 D3/6 and 7 D7. Three isolates belonged to genotype E, two to H and one to B3. Complete genome sequence analysis of selected isolates confirmed the phylogenetic analysis performed with the S region. Mutations or polymorphisms in precore region were more common among genotype D compared to genotype A isolates. The HBV genotypic distribution in this Caribbean island correlates with the Y lineage genetic background of the population, where a European and African origin prevails. HBV genotypes E, B3 and H isolates might represent more recent introductions.

  8. HBV Genotypic Variability in Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Carmen L.; Aguilar, Julio C.; Aguiar, Jorge; Muzio, Verena; Pentón, Eduardo; Garcia, Daymir; Guillen, Gerardo; Pujol, Flor H.

    2015-01-01

    The genetic diversity of HBV in human population is often a reflection of its genetic admixture. The aim of this study was to explore the genotypic diversity of HBV in Cuba. The S genomic region of Cuban HBV isolates was sequenced and for selected isolates the complete genome or precore-core sequence was analyzed. The most frequent genotype was A (167/250, 67%), mainly A2 (149, 60%) but also A1 and one A4. A total of 77 isolates were classified as genotype D (31%), with co-circulation of several subgenotypes (56 D4, 2 D1, 5 D2, 7 D3/6 and 7 D7). Three isolates belonged to genotype E, two to H and one to B3. Complete genome sequence analysis of selected isolates confirmed the phylogenetic analysis performed with the S region. Mutations or polymorphisms in precore region were more common among genotype D compared to genotype A isolates. The HBV genotypic distribution in this Caribbean island correlates with the Y lineage genetic background of the population, where a European and African origin prevails. HBV genotypes E, B3 and H isolates might represent more recent introductions. PMID:25742179

  9. The TGFBR1*6A allele is not associated with susceptibility to colorectal cancer in a Spanish population: a case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillejo, Adela; Guillén-Ponce, Carmen; Carrato, Alfredo; Soto, José-Luís; Mata-Balaguer, Trinidad; Montenegro, Paola; Ochoa, Enrique; Lázaro, Rafael; Martínez-Cantó, Ana; Castillejo, María-Isabel; Guarinos, Carla; Barberá, Víctor-Manuel

    2009-01-01

    TGF-β receptor type I is a mediator of growth inhibitory signals. TGFBR1*6A (rs11466445) is a common polymorphic variant of the TGF-β receptor I gene and has been associated with tumour susceptibility. Nevertheless, the role of this polymorphism as a risk factor for colorectal cancer is controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the association between TGFBR1*6A and colorectal cancer, age, sex, tumour location and tumour stage in a Spanish population. The case-control study involved 800 Spanish subjects: 400 sporadic colorectal cancer patients and 400 age-, sex-, and ethnic-matched controls. The odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) for the TGFBR1*6A polymorphism were calculated using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age and sex. Analysis of somatic mutations at the GCG repeat of TGFBR1 exon 1 and germline allele-specific expression were also conducted to obtain further information on the contribution of the TGFBR1*6A allele to CRC susceptibility. There was no statistically significant association between the TGFBR1*6A allele and CRC (p > 0.05). The OR was 1.147 (95% CI: 0.799–1.647) for carriers of the TGFBR1*6A allele and 0.878 (95% CI: 0.306–2.520) for homozygous TGFBR1*6A individuals compared with the reference. The frequency of the polymorphism was not affected by age, sex or tumour stage. The TGFBR1*6A allele was more prevalent among colon tumour patients than among rectal tumour patients. Tumour somatic mutations were found in only two of 69 cases (2.9%). Both cases involved a GCG deletion that changed genotype 9A/9A in normal DNA to genotype 9A/8A. Interestingly, these two tumours were positive for microsatellite instability, suggesting that these mutations originated because of a deficient DNA mismatch repair system. Allele-specific expression of the 9A allele was detected in seven of the 14 heterozygous 9A/6A tumour cases. This could have been caused by linkage disequilibrium of the TGFBR1*6A allele with

  10. Joint genome-wide prediction in several populations accounting for randomness of genotypes: A hierarchical Bayes approach. I: Multivariate Gaussian priors for marker effects and derivation of the joint probability mass function of genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Carlos Alberto; Khare, Kshitij; Banerjee, Arunava; Elzo, Mauricio A

    2017-03-21

    It is important to consider heterogeneity of marker effects and allelic frequencies in across population genome-wide prediction studies. Moreover, all regression models used in genome-wide prediction overlook randomness of genotypes. In this study, a family of hierarchical Bayesian models to perform across population genome-wide prediction modeling genotypes as random variables and allowing population-specific effects for each marker was developed. Models shared a common structure and differed in the priors used and the assumption about residual variances (homogeneous or heterogeneous). Randomness of genotypes was accounted for by deriving the joint probability mass function of marker genotypes conditional on allelic frequencies and pedigree information. As a consequence, these models incorporated kinship and genotypic information that not only permitted to account for heterogeneity of allelic frequencies, but also to include individuals with missing genotypes at some or all loci without the need for previous imputation. This was possible because the non-observed fraction of the design matrix was treated as an unknown model parameter. For each model, a simpler version ignoring population structure, but still accounting for randomness of genotypes was proposed. Implementation of these models and computation of some criteria for model comparison were illustrated using two simulated datasets. Theoretical and computational issues along with possible applications, extensions and refinements were discussed. Some features of the models developed in this study make them promising for genome-wide prediction, the use of information contained in the probability distribution of genotypes is perhaps the most appealing. Further studies to assess the performance of the models proposed here and also to compare them with conventional models used in genome-wide prediction are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Allele-specific DNA methylation of disease susceptibility genes in Japanese patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Hirofumi; Kakuta, Yoichi; Kinouchi, Yoshitaka; Kawai, Yosuke; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Nagao, Munenori; Naito, Takeo; Onodera, Motoyuki; Moroi, Rintaro; Kuroha, Masatake; Kanazawa, Yoshitake; Kimura, Tomoya; Shiga, Hisashi; Endo, Katsuya; Negoro, Kenichi; Nagasaki, Masao; Unno, Michiaki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2018-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has an unknown etiology; however, accumulating evidence suggests that IBD is a multifactorial disease influenced by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. The influence of genetic variants on DNA methylation in cis and cis effects on expression have been demonstrated. We hypothesized that IBD susceptibility single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) regulate susceptibility gene expressions in cis by regulating DNA methylation around SNPs. For this, we determined cis-regulated allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM) around IBD susceptibility genes in CD4+ effector/memory T cells (Tem) in lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs) in patients with IBD and examined the association between the ASM SNP genotype and neighboring susceptibility gene expressions. CD4+ effector/memory T cells (Tem) were isolated from LPMCs in 15 Japanese IBD patients (ten Crohn's disease [CD] and five ulcerative colitis [UC] patients). ASM analysis was performed by methylation-sensitive SNP array analysis. We defined ASM as a changing average relative allele score ([Formula: see text]) >0.1 after digestion by methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes. Among SNPs showing [Formula: see text] >0.1, we extracted the probes located on tag-SNPs of 200 IBD susceptibility loci and around IBD susceptibility genes as candidate ASM SNPs. To validate ASM, bisulfite-pyrosequencing was performed. Transcriptome analysis was examined in 11 IBD patients (seven CD and four UC patients). The relation between rs36221701 genotype and neighboring gene expressions were analyzed. We extracted six candidate ASM SNPs around IBD susceptibility genes. The top of [Formula: see text] (0.23) was rs1130368 located on HLA-DQB1. ASM around rs36221701 ([Formula: see text] = 0.14) located near SMAD3 was validated using bisulfite pyrosequencing. The SMAD3 expression was significantly associated with the rs36221701 genotype (p = 0.016). We confirmed the existence of cis-regulated ASM around

  12. Allele-specific DNA methylation of disease susceptibility genes in Japanese patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Hirofumi; Kakuta, Yoichi; Kinouchi, Yoshitaka; Kawai, Yosuke; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Nagao, Munenori; Naito, Takeo; Onodera, Motoyuki; Moroi, Rintaro; Kuroha, Masatake; Kanazawa, Yoshitake; Kimura, Tomoya; Shiga, Hisashi; Endo, Katsuya; Negoro, Kenichi; Nagasaki, Masao; Unno, Michiaki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2018-01-01

    Background Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has an unknown etiology; however, accumulating evidence suggests that IBD is a multifactorial disease influenced by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. The influence of genetic variants on DNA methylation in cis and cis effects on expression have been demonstrated. We hypothesized that IBD susceptibility single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) regulate susceptibility gene expressions in cis by regulating DNA methylation around SNPs. For this, we determined cis-regulated allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM) around IBD susceptibility genes in CD4+ effector/memory T cells (Tem) in lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs) in patients with IBD and examined the association between the ASM SNP genotype and neighboring susceptibility gene expressions. Methods CD4+ effector/memory T cells (Tem) were isolated from LPMCs in 15 Japanese IBD patients (ten Crohn's disease [CD] and five ulcerative colitis [UC] patients). ASM analysis was performed by methylation-sensitive SNP array analysis. We defined ASM as a changing average relative allele score (ΔRAS¯) >0.1 after digestion by methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes. Among SNPs showing ΔRAS¯ >0.1, we extracted the probes located on tag-SNPs of 200 IBD susceptibility loci and around IBD susceptibility genes as candidate ASM SNPs. To validate ASM, bisulfite-pyrosequencing was performed. Transcriptome analysis was examined in 11 IBD patients (seven CD and four UC patients). The relation between rs36221701 genotype and neighboring gene expressions were analyzed. Results We extracted six candidate ASM SNPs around IBD susceptibility genes. The top of ΔRAS¯ (0.23) was rs1130368 located on HLA-DQB1. ASM around rs36221701 (ΔRAS¯ = 0.14) located near SMAD3 was validated using bisulfite pyrosequencing. The SMAD3 expression was significantly associated with the rs36221701 genotype (p = 0.016). Conclusions We confirmed the existence of cis-regulated ASM around IBD

  13. CYP21A2 polymorphisms in patients with autoimmune Addison's disease, and linkage disequilibrium to HLA risk alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brønstad, Ingeborg; Skinningsrud, Beate; Bratland, Eirik; Løvås, Kristian; Undlien, Dag; Sverre Husebye, Eystein; Wolff, Anette Susanne Bøe

    2014-12-01

    Steroid 21-hydroxylase, encoded by CYP21A2, is the major autoantigen in autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD). CYP21A2 is located in the region of the HLA complex on chromosome 6p21.3, which harbours several risk alleles for AAD. The objective was to investigate whether CYP21A2 gene variants confer risk of AAD independently of other risk alleles in the HLA loci. DNA samples from 381 Norwegian patients with AAD and 340 healthy controls (HC) previously genotyped for the HLA-A, -B, -DRB1, and -DQB1 and MICA loci were used for genotyping of CYP21A2. Genotyping of CYP21A2 was carried out by direct sequencing. Linkage of CYP21A2 to the HLA loci was assessed using UNPHASED version 3.0.10 and PHASE version 2.1. Heterozygotes of the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs397515394, rs6467, rs6474, rs76565726 and rs6473 were detected significantly more frequently in AAD patients compared with HC (P<0.005), but all SNPs were in a linkage disequilibrium (LD) with high-risk HLA-DRB1 haplotypes. rs6472C protected against AAD (odds ratio=0.15, 95% CI (0.08-0.30), P=3.8×10(-10)). This SNP was not in an LD with HLA loci (P=0.02), but did not increase protection when considering the effect of HLA-DRB1 alleles. Mutations causing congenital adrenal hyperplasia were found in heterozygosity in <1.5% of the cases in both groups. Genetic variants of CYP21A2 associated to AAD are in LD with the main AAD risk locus HLA-DRB1, and CYP21A2 does not constitute an independent susceptibility locus. © 2014 European Society of Endocrinology.

  14. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Allele Loci in the Qatari Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L O'Beirne

    Full Text Available The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D is increasing in the Middle East. However, the genetic risk factors for T2D in the Middle Eastern populations are not known, as the majority of studies of genetic risk for T2D are in Europeans and Asians.All subjects were ≥3 generation Qataris. Cases with T2D (n = 1,124 and controls (n = 590 were randomly recruited and assigned to the 3 known Qatari genetic subpopulations [Bedouin (Q1, Persian/South Asian (Q2 and African (Q3]. Subjects underwent genotyping for 37 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 29 genes known to be associated with T2D in Europeans and/or Asian populations, and an additional 27 tag SNPs related to these susceptibility loci. Pre-study power analysis suggested that with the known incidence of T2D in adult Qataris (22%, the study population size would be sufficient to detect significant differences if the SNPs were risk factors among Qataris, assuming that the odds ratio (OR for T2D SNPs in Qatari's is greater than or equal to the SNP with highest known OR in other populations.Haplotype analysis demonstrated that Qatari haplotypes in the region of known T2D risk alleles in Q1 and Q2 genetic subpopulations were similar to European haplotypes. After Benjamini-Hochberg adjustment for multiple testing, only two SNPs (rs7903146 and rs4506565, both associated with transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2, achieved statistical significance in the whole study population. When T2D subjects and control subjects were assigned to the known 3 Qatari subpopulations, and analyzed individually and with the Q1 and Q2 genetic subpopulations combined, one of these SNPs (rs4506565 was also significant in the admixed group. No other SNPs associated with T2D in all Qataris or individual genetic subpopulations.With the caveats of the power analysis, the European/Asian T2D SNPs do not contribute significantly to the high prevalence of T2D in the Qatari population, suggesting that the genetic risks for T2D are

  15. Influence of COMT val158met genotype on the depressed brain during emotional processing and working memory.

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    Esther M Opmeer

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder (MDD has been associated with abnormal prefrontal-limbic interactions and altered catecholaminergic neurotransmission. The val158met polymorphism on the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT gene has been shown to influence prefrontal cortex (PFC activation during both emotional processing and working memory (WM. Although COMT-genotype is not directly associated with MDD, it may affect MDD pathology by altering PFC activation, an endophenotype associated with both COMT and MDD. 125 participants, including healthy controls (HC, n=28 and MDD patients were genotyped for the COMT val158met polymorphism and underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI-neuroimaging during emotion processing (viewing of emotional facial expressions and a WM task (visuospatial planning. Within HC, we observed a positive correlation between the number of met-alleles and right inferior frontal gyrus activation during emotional processing, whereas within patients the number of met-alleles was not correlated with PFC activation. During WM a negative correlation between the number of met-alleles and middle frontal gyrus activation was present in the total sample. In addition, during emotional processing there was an effect of genotype in a cluster including the amygdala and hippocampus. These results demonstrate that COMT genotype is associated with relevant endophenotypes for MDD. In addition, presence of MDD only interacts with genotype during emotional processing and not working memory.

  16. Very high resolution single pass HLA genotyping using amplicon sequencing on the 454 next generation DNA sequencers: Comparison with Sanger sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, F; Höglund, B; Fernandez-Vina, M; Tyan, D; Rastrou, M; Williams, T; Moonsamy, P; Goodridge, D; Anderson, M; Erlich, H A; Holcomb, C L

    2015-12-01

    Compared to Sanger sequencing, next-generation sequencing offers advantages for high resolution HLA genotyping including increased throughput, lower cost, and reduced genotype ambiguity. Here we describe an enhancement of the Roche 454 GS GType HLA genotyping assay to provide very high resolution (VHR) typing, by the addition of 8 primer pairs to the original 14, to genotype 11 HLA loci. These additional amplicons help resolve common and well-documented alleles and exclude commonly found null alleles in genotype ambiguity strings. Simplification of workflow to reduce the initial preparation effort using early pooling of amplicons or the Fluidigm Access Array™ is also described. Performance of the VHR assay was evaluated on 28 well characterized cell lines using Conexio Assign MPS software which uses genomic, rather than cDNA, reference sequence. Concordance was 98.4%; 1.6% had no genotype assignment. Of concordant calls, 53% were unambiguous. To further assess the assay, 59 clinical samples were genotyped and results compared to unambiguous allele assignments obtained by prior sequence-based typing supplemented with SSO and/or SSP. Concordance was 98.7% with 58.2% as unambiguous calls; 1.3% could not be assigned. Our results show that the amplicon-based VHR assay is robust and can replace current Sanger methodology. Together with software enhancements, it has the potential to provide even higher resolution HLA typing. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. A risk allele for nicotine dependence in CHRNA5 is a protective allele for cocaine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grucza, Richard A; Wang, Jen C; Stitzel, Jerry A; Hinrichs, Anthony L; Saccone, Scott F; Saccone, Nancy L; Bucholz, Kathleen K; Cloninger, C Robert; Neuman, Rosalind J; Budde, John P; Fox, Louis; Bertelsen, Sarah; Kramer, John; Hesselbrock, Victor; Tischfield, Jay; Nurnberger, John I; Almasy, Laura; Porjesz, Bernice; Kuperman, Samuel; Schuckit, Marc A; Edenberg, Howard J; Rice, John P; Goate, Alison M; Bierut, Laura J

    2008-12-01

    A nonsynonymous coding polymorphism, rs16969968, of the CHRNA5 gene that encodes the alpha-5 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been found to be associated with nicotine dependence. The goal of this study was to examine the association of this variant with cocaine dependence. Genetic association analysis was performed in two independent samples of unrelated case and control subjects: 1) 504 European Americans participating in the Family Study on Cocaine Dependence (FSCD) and 2) 814 European Americans participating in the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA). In the FSCD, there was a significant association between the CHRNA5 variant and cocaine dependence (odds ratio = .67 per allele, p = .0045, assuming an additive genetic model), but in the reverse direction compared with that previously observed for nicotine dependence. In multivariate analyses that controlled for the effects of nicotine dependence, both the protective effect for cocaine dependence and the previously documented risk effect for nicotine dependence were statistically significant. The protective effect for cocaine dependence was replicated in the COGA sample. In COGA, effect sizes for habitual smoking, a proxy phenotype for nicotine dependence, were consistent with those observed in FSCD. The minor (A) allele of rs16969968, relative to the major G allele, appears to be both a risk factor for nicotine dependence and a protective factor for cocaine dependence. The biological plausibility of such a bidirectional association stems from the involvement of nAChRs with both excitatory and inhibitory modulation of dopamine-mediated reward pathways.

  18. KIR genotyping in the selected population in Andhra Pradesh (India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishnav, G; Krupanidhi, S; Sanjeevi, C B

    2014-01-01

    The population is not always homogeneous in relation to the representation and functioning of genes. Therefore, the presence of allogenicity is a universal phenomenon. The profound variability is noticed among the members of the human population with reference to the resistance against infections and late onset of diseases. In this line, a few sets of alleles which come under the domain of immune function namely KIRs (Killer immunoglobulin-like receptor genes) and HLA-I have been chosen to report in the population of Puttaparthi (India). The genotyping of the population is the current ongoing focus of our team wherein the distribution of the following alleles has been taken up in the mixed ethnic groups of Puttaparthi as a prelude to earmark them as genotypic markers in future studies relating to susceptible diseases. The PCR protocols for the identified immune related genes viz., KIR- 2DL1, 2DL2, 2DL3, 2DL4, 2DL5, 3DL1, 3DL2, 3DL3, 3DS1, 2DS1, 2DS2, 2DS3, 2DS4, 2DS5, 2DP1, 3DP1; HLA- C1 and HLA-C2 have been standardized. In the present study, except KIR 2DL2, the other non-framework inhibitory KIR genes were represented at higher percentage and ranged from 57% to 80% in the chosen population which would suggest its higher survival adaptation. Interestingly, the majority of activating KIR genes were least represented and varied between 5% to 32.5% which is also in compliance with the survival adaptation of the chosen population. The carrier gene frequencies of KIRs were compared with the other populations' viz., Chinese Mongolian, Chinese Han, Greek and Brazilian data. The expected heterozygosity of KIR alleles and their rank in gene diversity among the population of Puttaparthi were also discussed.

  19. Screening for SNPs with Allele-Specific Methylation based on Next-Generation Sequencing Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bo; Ji, Yuan; Xu, Yaomin; Ting, Angela H

    2013-05-01

    Allele-specific methylation (ASM) has long been studied but mainly documented in the context of genomic imprinting and X chromosome inactivation. Taking advantage of the next-generation sequencing technology, we conduct a high-throughput sequencing experiment with four prostate cell lines to survey the whole genome and identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with ASM. A Bayesian approach is proposed to model the counts of short reads for each SNP conditional on its genotypes of multiple subjects, leading to a posterior probability of ASM. We flag SNPs with high posterior probabilities of ASM by accounting for multiple comparisons based on posterior false discovery rates. Applying the Bayesian approach to the in-house prostate cell line data, we identify 269 SNPs as candidates of ASM. A simulation study is carried out to demonstrate the quantitative performance of the proposed approach.

  20. The TT genotype of the STAT4 rs7574865 polymorphism is associated with high disease activity and disability in patients with early arthritis.

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    Amalia Lamana

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The number of copies of the HLA-DRB1 shared epitope, and the minor alleles of the STAT4 rs7574865 and the PTPN22 rs2476601 polymorphisms have all been linked with an increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of these genetic variants on disease activity and disability in patients with early arthritis. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: We studied 640 patients with early arthritis (76% women; median age, 52 years, recording disease-related variables every 6 months during a 2-year follow-up. HLA-DRB1 alleles were determined by PCR-SSO, while rs7574865 and rs2476601 were genotyped with the Taqman 5' allelic discrimination assay. Multivariate analysis was performed using generalized estimating equations for repeated measures. After adjusting for confounding variables such as gender, age and ACPA, the TT genotype of rs7574865 in STAT4 was associated with increased disease activity (DAS28 as compared with the GG genotype (β coefficient [95% confidence interval] = 0.42 [0.01-0.83], p = 0.044. Conversely, the presence of the T allele of rs2476601 in PTPN22 was associated with diminished disease activity during follow-up in a dose-dependent manner (CT genotype = -0.27 [-0.56- -0.01], p = 0.042; TT genotype = -0.68 [-1.64- -0.27], p = 0.162. After adjustment for gender, age and disease activity, homozygosity for the T allele of rs7574865 in STAT4 was associated with greater disability as compared with the GG genotype. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that patients with early arthritis who are homozygous for the T allele of rs7574865 in STAT4 may develop a more severe form of the disease with increased disease activity and disability.

  1. The TT genotype of the STAT4 rs7574865 polymorphism is associated with high disease activity and disability in patients with early arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamana, Amalia; Balsa, Alejandro; Rueda, Blanca; Ortiz, Ana M; Nuño, Laura; Miranda-Carus, Maria Eugenia; Gonzalez-Escribano, Maria F; Lopez-Nevot, Miguel A; Pascual-Salcedo, Dora; Martin, Javier; González-Álvaro, Isidoro

    2012-01-01

    The number of copies of the HLA-DRB1 shared epitope, and the minor alleles of the STAT4 rs7574865 and the PTPN22 rs2476601 polymorphisms have all been linked with an increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of these genetic variants on disease activity and disability in patients with early arthritis. We studied 640 patients with early arthritis (76% women; median age, 52 years), recording disease-related variables every 6 months during a 2-year follow-up. HLA-DRB1 alleles were determined by PCR-SSO, while rs7574865 and rs2476601 were genotyped with the Taqman 5' allelic discrimination assay. Multivariate analysis was performed using generalized estimating equations for repeated measures. After adjusting for confounding variables such as gender, age and ACPA, the TT genotype of rs7574865 in STAT4 was associated with increased disease activity (DAS28) as compared with the GG genotype (β coefficient [95% confidence interval] = 0.42 [0.01-0.83], p = 0.044). Conversely, the presence of the T allele of rs2476601 in PTPN22 was associated with diminished disease activity during follow-up in a dose-dependent manner (CT genotype = -0.27 [-0.56- -0.01], p = 0.042; TT genotype = -0.68 [-1.64- -0.27], p = 0.162). After adjustment for gender, age and disease activity, homozygosity for the T allele of rs7574865 in STAT4 was associated with greater disability as compared with the GG genotype. Our data suggest that patients with early arthritis who are homozygous for the T allele of rs7574865 in STAT4 may develop a more severe form of the disease with increased disease activity and disability.

  2. High frequency of NAT2 slow acetylator alleles in the Malay population of Indonesia: an awareness to the anti-tuberculosis drug induced liver injury and cancer

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    Retno W. Susilowati

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Arylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2 polymorphism was previously reported to have association with the risk of drug toxicities and the development of various diseases. Previous research on the Indonesian population, especially Javanese and Sundanese, showed that there were 33% NAT2 slow acetylator phenotype. The aim of this study was to map the NAT2 variation in the Malay ethnic to gain a deeper insight into NAT2 haplotypic composition in this ethnic.Methods: 50 healthy samples from the Indonesian Malay ethnic were obtained. They were interviewed about their ethnic backgrounds for the last three generations. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and NAT2 genotyping was done using the PCR direct Sequencing. Data were compiled according to the genotype and allele frequencies estimated from the observed numbers of each specific allele. Haplotype reconstruction was performed using PHASE v2.1.1 software.Results: We found 7 haplotypes consisting of 6 SNPs and 14 NAT2 genotype variations in Indonesian Malay population. The most frequent allele was NAT2*6A (38% which was classified as a slow acetylator allele. According to bimodal distribution, the predicted phenotype of the Malay population was composed of 62% rapid acetylator and 38% slow acetylator. According to trimodal distribution, the predicted phenotypes for rapid, intermediate and slow acetylators were 10%, 52% and 38% respectively.Conclusion: Our result indicates the presence of the allelic distribution and revealed the most frequent acetylator status and phenotype for the Indonesian Malay population. The result of this study will be helpful for future epidemiological or clinical studies and for understanding the genetic basis of acetylation polymorphism in Indonesia.

  3. Performance and precision of double digestion RAD (ddRAD) genotyping in large multiplexed datasets of marine fish species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maroso, F.; Hillen, J E J; Pardo, B. G.

    2018-01-01

    ; (ii) the discrepancy between expected and observed tag length and coverage; (iii) the performances of reference based vs. de novo approaches; (iv) the sources of potential genotyping errors of the library preparation/bioinformatics protocol, by comparing technical replicates. Our results showed use...... a standardized protocol. A common bioinformatics pipeline based on STACKS was established, with and without the use of a reference genome. We performed analyses throughout the production and analysis of ddRAD data in order to explore (i) the loss of information due to heterogeneous raw read number across samples...... of downstream analysis carried out with ddRAD vs single SNP allele specific assay genotypes provided information about the levels of genotyping imprecision that can have a significant impact on allele frequency estimations and population assignment. The results and insights presented here will help to select...

  4. [The differences of the effects of Vrd1 and Ppd-D1 gene alleles on winterhardiness, frost resistance, and yield in winter wheat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokanu, N V; Faĭt, V I

    2008-01-01

    The influence of allelic differences of Vrd1 and Ppd-D1 genes on winterhardiness, frost resistance, yield and its components was studied in recombinant-inbred F5 lines of Odesskaya 16/Bezostaya 1. From 9 to 15% differences in the resistance of recombinant-inbred lines were determined by alternative alleles of Vrd1 gene and 10-16% of Ppd-D1 gene. Interaction of vrd1 and Ppd-D1a alleles led to the higher winterhardiness and frost resistance of tillered plants during the winter. At the same time the significant increase of the period to heading, plant height and the tendency of yield reduction were revealed for vrd1 vrd1 Ppd-D1a Ppd-D1a lines when compared to the lines of Vrd1 Vrd1 Ppd-D1a Ppd-D1a genotype.

  5. A putative Alzheimer's disease risk allele in PCK1 influences brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis.

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    Zongqi Xia

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Brain atrophy and cognitive dysfunction are neurodegenerative features of Multiple Sclerosis (MS. We used a candidate gene approach to address whether genetic variants implicated in susceptibility to late onset Alzheimer's Disease (AD influence brain volume and cognition in MS patients.MS subjects were genotyped for five single nucleotide polymorphisms (snps associated with susceptibility to AD: PICALM, CR1, CLU, PCK1, and ZNF224. We assessed brain volume using Brain Parenchymal Fraction (BPF measurements obtained from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI data and cognitive function using the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT. Genotypes were correlated with cross-sectional BPF and SDMT scores using linear regression after adjusting for sex, age at symptom onset, and disease duration. 722 MS patients with a mean (±SD age at enrollment of 41 (±10 years were followed for 44 (±28 months. The AD risk-associated allele of a non-synonymous SNP in the PCK1 locus (rs8192708G is associated with a smaller average brain volume (P=0.0047 at the baseline MRI, but it does not impact our baseline estimate of cognition. PCK1 is additionally associated with higher baseline T2-hyperintense lesion volume (P=0.0088. Finally, we provide technical validation of our observation in a subset of 641 subjects that have more than one MRI study, demonstrating the same association between PCK1 and smaller average brain volume (P=0.0089 at the last MRI visit.Our study provides suggestive evidence for greater brain atrophy in MS patients bearing the PCK1 allele associated with AD-susceptibility, yielding new insights into potentially shared neurodegenerative process between MS and late onset AD.

  6. Genetic Variance Partitioning and Genome-Wide Prediction with Allele Dosage Information in Autotetraploid Potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endelman, Jeffrey B; Carley, Cari A Schmitz; Bethke, Paul C; Coombs, Joseph J; Clough, Mark E; da Silva, Washington L; De Jong, Walter S; Douches, David S; Frederick, Curtis M; Haynes, Kathleen G; Holm, David G; Miller, J Creighton; Muñoz, Patricio R; Navarro, Felix M; Novy, Richard G; Palta, Jiwan P; Porter, Gregory A; Rak, Kyle T; Sathuvalli, Vidyasagar R; Thompson, Asunta L; Yencho, G Craig

    2018-05-01

    As one of the world's most important food crops, the potato ( Solanum tuberosum L.) has spurred innovation in autotetraploid genetics, including in the use of SNP arrays to determine allele dosage at thousands of markers. By combining genotype and pedigree information with phenotype data for economically important traits, the objectives of this study were to (1) partition the genetic variance into additive vs. nonadditive components, and (2) determine the accuracy of genome-wide prediction. Between 2012 and 2017, a training population of 571 clones was evaluated for total yield, specific gravity, and chip fry color. Genomic covariance matrices for additive ( G ), digenic dominant ( D ), and additive × additive epistatic ( G # G ) effects were calculated using 3895 markers, and the numerator relationship matrix ( A ) was calculated from a 13-generation pedigree. Based on model fit and prediction accuracy, mixed model analysis with G was superior to A for yield and fry color but not specific gravity. The amount of additive genetic variance captured by markers was 20% of the total genetic variance for specific gravity, compared to 45% for yield and fry color. Within the training population, including nonadditive effects improved accuracy and/or bias for all three traits when predicting total genotypic value. When six F 1 populations were used for validation, prediction accuracy ranged from 0.06 to 0.63 and was consistently lower (0.13 on average) without allele dosage information. We conclude that genome-wide prediction is feasible in potato and that it will improve selection for breeding value given the substantial amount of nonadditive genetic variance in elite germplasm. Copyright © 2018 by the Genetics Society of America.

  7. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) genotype, smoking habit, metastasis and oral cancer in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Wen; Hsu, Chia-Fang; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Tsou, Yung-An; Hua, Chun-Hung; Chang, Wen-Shin; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Bau, Da-Tian

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association and interaction of genotypic polymorphism in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) with smoking habits and oral cancer in Taiwan. Two well-known polymorphic variants of MTHFR, C677T (rs1801133) and A1298C (rs1801131), were analyzed in association with oral cancer risk, and their joint effects with individual smoking habits on oral cancer risk are discussed. In total, 620 oral cancer patients and 620 non-cancer controls in central Taiwan were recruited and genotyped. The MTHFR C677T genotype, but not the A1298C, was differently distributed between the oral cancer and control groups. The T allele of MTHFR C677T was significantly more frequently found in controls than in oral cancer patients. Joint effects of smoking and MTHFR C677T genotype significantly affected oral cancer susceptibility. The MTHFR C677T CT and TT genotypes in association with smoking conferred lower odds ratios of 0.66 and 0.54 (95% confidence interval=0.49-0.82 and 0.39-0.86), respectively. Those patients with MTHFR C677T CT and TT genotypes also had a lower risk of oral cancer metastasis. MTHFR C677T genotype may have joint effects with smoking on oral carcinogenesis, and may be a useful biomarker for prediction and prognosis of oral cancer.

  8. Histoimmunogenetics Markup Language 1.0: Reporting next generation sequencing-based HLA and KIR genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milius, Robert P; Heuer, Michael; Valiga, Daniel; Doroschak, Kathryn J; Kennedy, Caleb J; Bolon, Yung-Tsi; Schneider, Joel; Pollack, Jane; Kim, Hwa Ran; Cereb, Nezih; Hollenbach, Jill A; Mack, Steven J; Maiers, Martin

    2015-12-01

    We present an electronic format for exchanging data for HLA and KIR genotyping with extensions for next-generation sequencing (NGS). This format addresses NGS data exchange by refining the Histoimmunogenetics Markup Language (HML) to conform to the proposed Minimum Information for Reporting Immunogenomic NGS Genotyping (MIRING) reporting guidelines (miring.immunogenomics.org). Our refinements of HML include two major additions. First, NGS is supported by new XML structures to capture additional NGS data and metadata required to produce a genotyping result, including analysis-dependent (dynamic) and method-dependent (static) components. A full genotype, consensus sequence, and the surrounding metadata are included directly, while the raw sequence reads and platform documentation are externally referenced. Second, genotype ambiguity is fully represented by integrating Genotype List Strings, which use a hierarchical set of delimiters to represent allele and genotype ambiguity in a complete and accurate fashion. HML also continues to enable the transmission of legacy methods (e.g. site-specific oligonucleotide, sequence-specific priming, and Sequence Based Typing (SBT)), adding features such as allowing multiple group-specific sequencing primers, and fully leveraging techniques that combine multiple methods to obtain a single result, such as SBT integrated with NGS. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Increased NBCn1 expression, Na+/HCO3 co-transport and intracellular pH in human vascular smooth muscle cells with a risk allele for hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ng, Fu Liang; Boedtkjer, Ebbe; Witkowska, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    cultures of vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells. In both cell types, we found genotype-dependent differences for rs13082711 in DNA-nuclear protein interactions, where the risk allele is associated with increased SLC4A7 expression level, NBCn1 availability and function as reflected in elevated...

  10. Osteoradionecrosis in Head-and-Neck Cancer Has a Distinct Genotype-Dependent Cause

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, Andrew J., E-mail: Andrew.Lyons@gstt.nhs.uk [Head and Neck Unit, Guy' s and St. Thomas' Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); West, Catharine M. [University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Risk, Janet M. [Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Slevin, Nick J.; Chan, Clara [Department of Clinical Oncology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Crichton, Siobhan [Division of Health and Social Care Research, King' s College, London (United Kingdom); Rinck, Gabrielle; Howell, Dawn [Laboratory 21, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Shaw, Richard J. [Liverpool CR-UK Centre, Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We performed a case-control study to establish whether the development of osteoradionecrosis (ORN) was related to a variant allele substituting T for C at -509 of the transforming growth factor-{beta}1 gene (TGF-{beta}1). Patients and Methods: A total of 140 patients, 39 with and 101 without ORN, who underwent radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer with a minimum of 2 years follow-up, were studied. None of the patients had clinical evidence of recurrence at this time. DNA extracted from blood was genotyped for the -509 C-T variant allele of the TGF-{beta}1 gene. Results: There were no significant differences in patient, cancer treatment, or tumor characteristics between the two groups. Of the 39 patients who developed ORN, 9 were homozygous for the common CC allele, 19 were heterozygous, and 11 were homozygous for the rare TT genotype. Of the 101 patients without ORN, the distribution was 56 (CC), 33 (CT), and 12 (TT). The difference in distribution was significant, giving an increased risk of ORN of 5.7 (95% CI, 1.7-19.2) for homozygote TT patients (p = 0.001) and 3.6 (95% CI, 1.3-10.0) for heterozygotes (p = 0.004) when compared with patients with the CC genotype. Postradiotherapy dentoalveolar surgery preceding the development of ORN was associated with the CC genotype (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Our findings support the postulate that the development of ORN is related to the presence of the T variant allele at -509 within the TGF-{beta}1 gene.

  11. Osteoradionecrosis in Head-and-Neck Cancer Has a Distinct Genotype-Dependent Cause

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, Andrew J.; West, Catharine M.; Risk, Janet M.; Slevin, Nick J.; Chan, Clara; Crichton, Siobhan; Rinck, Gabrielle; Howell, Dawn; Shaw, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We performed a case-control study to establish whether the development of osteoradionecrosis (ORN) was related to a variant allele substituting T for C at -509 of the transforming growth factor-β1 gene (TGF-β1). Patients and Methods: A total of 140 patients, 39 with and 101 without ORN, who underwent radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer with a minimum of 2 years follow-up, were studied. None of the patients had clinical evidence of recurrence at this time. DNA extracted from blood was genotyped for the -509 C-T variant allele of the TGF-β1 gene. Results: There were no significant differences in patient, cancer treatment, or tumor characteristics between the two groups. Of the 39 patients who developed ORN, 9 were homozygous for the common CC allele, 19 were heterozygous, and 11 were homozygous for the rare TT genotype. Of the 101 patients without ORN, the distribution was 56 (CC), 33 (CT), and 12 (TT). The difference in distribution was significant, giving an increased risk of ORN of 5.7 (95% CI, 1.7–19.2) for homozygote TT patients (p = 0.001) and 3.6 (95% CI, 1.3–10.0) for heterozygotes (p = 0.004) when compared with patients with the CC genotype. Postradiotherapy dentoalveolar surgery preceding the development of ORN was associated with the CC genotype (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Our findings support the postulate that the development of ORN is related to the presence of the T variant allele at -509 within the TGF-β1 gene.

  12. Table 1. Details of SSR loci genotyped in E. tereticornis (Et86)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Welcome

    Details of SSR loci genotyped in E. tereticornis (Et86) × E. grandis (Eg9) mapping population showing allelic pattern, annealing temperature (oC) and linkage group (LG). Marker name. Et86. Eg9. Annealing temperature. (oC). LG. 1. EMBRA2 ab cd. 56. 11. 2. EMBRA9 nn np. 57. 5. 3. EMBRA17 lm ll. 56. 9. 4. EMBRA19 lm.

  13. Disclosure of APOE genotype for risk of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert C; Roberts, J Scott; Cupples, L Adrienne; Relkin, Norman R; Whitehouse, Peter J; Brown, Tamsen; Eckert, Susan LaRusse; Butson, Melissa; Sadovnick, A Dessa; Quaid, Kimberly A; Chen, Clara; Cook-Deegan, Robert; Farrer, Lindsay A

    2009-07-16

    The apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype provides information on the risk of Alzheimer's disease, but the genotyping of patients and their family members has been discouraged. We examined the effect of genotype disclosure in a prospective, randomized, controlled trial. We randomly assigned 162 asymptomatic adults who had a parent with Alzheimer's disease to receive the results of their own APOE genotyping (disclosure group) or not to receive such results (nondisclosure group). We measured symptoms of anxiety, depression, and test-related distress 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year after disclosure or nondisclosure. There were no significant differences between the two groups in changes in time-averaged measures of anxiety (4.5 in the disclosure group and 4.4 in the nondisclosure group, P=0.84), depression (8.8 and 8.7, respectively; P=0.98), or test-related distress (6.9 and 7.5, respectively; P=0.61). Secondary comparisons between the nondisclosure group and a disclosure subgroup of subjects carrying the APOE epsilon4 allele (which is associated with increased risk) also revealed no significant differences. However, the epsilon4-negative subgroup had a significantly lower level of test-related distress than did the epsilon4-positive subgroup (P=0.01). Subjects with clinically meaningful changes in psychological outcomes were distributed evenly among the nondisclosure group and the epsilon4-positive and epsilon4-negative subgroups. Baseline scores for anxiety and depression were strongly associated with post-disclosure scores of these measures (Pdisclosure of APOE genotyping results to adult children of patients with Alzheimer's disease did not result in significant short-term psychological risks. Test-related distress was reduced among those who learned that they were APOE epsilon4-negative. Persons with high levels of emotional distress before undergoing genetic testing were more likely to have emotional difficulties after disclosure. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT

  14. Association of HLA-BFNx011502 allele and carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome among Indians

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    Mehta Timir

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS and toxic epidermal necrolysis are severe cutaneous reactions caused by certain drugs, including antiepileptic carbamazepine. A strong association has been reported between human leucocyte antigen (HLA-BFNx011502 and carbamazepine-induced SJS in Han Chinese patients. European studies suggested that HLA-BFNx011502 is not a universal marker but is ethnicity-specific for Asians. Aim: To study the association between HLA-BFNx011502 and carbamazepine-induced SJS in Indian patients. Methods: Eight individuals who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of SJS induced by carbamazepine were identified and HLA-B molecular typing was performed. HLA-B genotyping was carried out by polymerase chain reaction using sequence-specific primers. Results: Out of eight patients studied for genotype, six patients were found to have the HLA-BFNx011502 allele. Conclusion: This study suggests an association between HLA-BFNx011502 and carbamazepine-induced SJS in Indian patients.

  15. Net lost revenue from DSM: State policies that work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, L.W.

    1995-07-01

    A key utility regulatory reform undertaken since 1989 allows utilities to recover the lost revenue incurred through successful operation of demand-side management (DSM) programs. Net lost revenue adjustment (NLRA) mechanisms are states preferred approach to lost revenue recovery from DSM programs. This paper examines the experiences states and utilities are having with the NLRA approach. The paper has three objectives: (1) determine whether NLRA is a feasible and effective approach to the lost-revenue disincentive for utility DSM programs, (2) identify the conditions linked to effective implementation of NLRA mechanisms and assess whether NLRA has changed utility investment behavior, and (3) suggest improvements to NLRA mechanisms. Contrary to the concerns raised by some industry analysts, our results indicate NLRA is a feasible approach. Seven of the ten states we studied report no substantial problems with their approach. We observe several conditions linked to effective NLRA implementation. Observed changes in utility investment behavior occur after implementation of DSM rate reforms, which include deployment of NLRA mechanisms. Utilities in states with lost revenue recovery invest more than twice as much in DSM as do utilities in other states.

  16. Years of life lost due to external radiation exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raičević Jagoš J.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new approach for calculation of the years of life lost per excess death due to stochastic health effects is applied to external exposure pathways. The short-term external exposures are due to the passage of radioactive cloud and due to the skin and clothes contamination. The long-term external exposure is the one from the radioactive material deposited on the ground (groundshine. Three nuclides, 131I, 137Cs, and 239Pu, and with the extremely wide range of half-life are considered in order to examine their possible influence on the calculated values of years of life lost. For each of these nuclides, the number of years of life lost has been found as a decreasing function of the age at the expo sure and presented graphically in this paper. For protracted exposures, the fully averaged number of years of life lost is negative correlated with the nuclide’s half-life. On the other hand, the short-term external exposures do not depend on the nuclide’s half-life. In addition, a weak years of life lost dependence of the dose has been commented.

  17. Olive oil DNA fingerprinting by multiplex SNP genotyping on fluorescent microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogianni, Despina P; Bazakos, Christos; Boutsika, Lemonia M; Targem, Mehdi Ben; Christopoulos, Theodore K; Kalaitzis, Panagiotis; Ioannou, Penelope C

    2015-04-01

    Olive oil cultivar verification is of primary importance for the competitiveness of the product and the protection of consumers and producers from fraudulence. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have emerged as excellent DNA markers for authenticity testing. This paper reports the first multiplex SNP genotyping assay for olive oil cultivar identification that is performed on a suspension of fluorescence-encoded microspheres. Up to 100 sets of microspheres, with unique "fluorescence signatures", are available. Allele discrimination was accomplished by primer extension reaction. The reaction products were captured via hybridization on the microspheres and analyzed, within seconds, by a flow cytometer. The "fluorescence signature" of each microsphere is assigned to a specific allele, whereas the signal from a reporter fluorophore denotes the presence of the allele. As a model, a panel of three SNPs was chosen that enabled identification of five common Greek olive cultivars (Adramytini, Chondrolia Chalkidikis, Kalamon, Koroneiki, and Valanolia).

  18. Genetic diversity among Juglans regia L. genotypes assessed by morphological traits and microsatellite markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoodi, R.; Rahmani, F.; Rezaee, R.

    2013-06-01

    In this study, genetic diversity was assayed among 16 accessions and five cultivars of Persian walnut (Juglans regia L.) using morphological traits and nine simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Samples were collected from Agriculture Research Center of Urmia city (North West Iran). Study on important morphological traits revealed genetic similarity of -0.6 to 0.99 based on CORR coefficient. The microsatellite marker system produced 34 alleles in range of 160-290 bp. The minimum (2) and maximum (7) number of alleles were obtained from WGA71 and WGA202 genetic loci, respectively. The mean number of alleles per locus was 4.25. Jaccards similarity coefficient ranged from 0.13 to 0.76. The results of this paper indicate high diversity among these genotypes which could be used for breeding management. (Author) 28 refs.

  19. Genotyping microarray (gene chip) for the ABCR (ABCA4) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaakson, K; Zernant, J; Külm, M; Hutchinson, A; Tonisson, N; Glavac, D; Ravnik-Glavac, M; Hawlina, M; Meltzer, M R; Caruso, R C; Testa, F; Maugeri, A; Hoyng, C B; Gouras, P; Simonelli, F; Lewis, R A; Lupski, J R; Cremers, F P M; Allikmets, R

    2003-11-01

    Genetic variation in the ABCR (ABCA4) gene has been associated with five distinct retinal phenotypes, including Stargardt disease/fundus flavimaculatus (STGD/FFM), cone-rod dystrophy (CRD), and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Comparative genetic analyses of ABCR variation and diagnostics have been complicated by substantial allelic heterogeneity and by differences in screening methods. To overcome these limitations, we designed a genotyping microarray (gene chip) for ABCR that includes all approximately 400 disease-associated and other variants currently described, enabling simultaneous detection of all known ABCR variants. The ABCR genotyping microarray (the ABCR400 chip) was constructed by the arrayed primer extension (APEX) technology. Each sequence change in ABCR was included on the chip by synthesis and application of sequence-specific oligonucleotides. We validated the chip by screening 136 confirmed STGD patients and 96 healthy controls, each of whom we had analyzed previously by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technology and/or heteroduplex analysis. The microarray was >98% effective in determining the existing genetic variation and was comparable to direct sequencing in that it yielded many sequence changes undetected by SSCP. In STGD patient cohorts, the efficiency of the array to detect disease-associated alleles was between 54% and 78%, depending on the ethnic composition and degree of clinical and molecular characterization of a cohort. In addition, chip analysis suggested a high carrier frequency (up to 1:10) of ABCR variants in the general population. The ABCR genotyping microarray is a robust, cost-effective, and comprehensive screening tool for variation in one gene in which mutations are responsible for a substantial fraction of retinal disease. The ABCR chip is a prototype for the next generation of screening and diagnostic tools in ophthalmic genetics, bridging clinical and scientific research. Copyright 2003 Wiley

  20. Using high-resolution human leukocyte antigen typing of 11,423 randomized unrelated individuals to determine allelic varieties, deduce probable human leukocyte antigen haplotypes, and observe linkage disequilibria between human leukocyte antigen-B and-C and human leukocyte antigen-DRB1 and-DQB1 alleles in the Taiwanese Chinese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Liang Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We report here the human leukocyte antigen (HLA allelic variety and haplotype composition in a cohort of the Taiwanese Chinese population and their patterns of linkage disequilibria on HLA-B: HLA-C alleles and HLA-DRB1: HLA-DQB1 alleles at a high-resolution level. Materials and Methods: Peripheral whole blood from 11,423 Taiwanese Chinese unrelated individuals was collected in acid citrate dextrose. Genomic DNA was extracted using the QIAamp DNA Blood Mini Kit. The DNA material was subjected to HLA genotyping for HLA-A,-B,-C,-DRB1, and-DQB1 loci using a commercial polymerase chain reaction-sequence-based typing (PCR-SBT kit, the SeCore® A/B/C/DRB1/DQB1 Locus Sequencing kit. High-resolution allelic sequencing was performed as previously described. Results: The number of individual HLA-B alleles detected was greater than the number of alleles recognized in the both the HLA-A and-DRB1 loci. Several novel alleles were discovered as a result of employing the SBT method and the high number of donors tested. In addition, we observed a genetic polymorphic feature of association between HLA-A and-B, HLA-B and-C, and HLA-DRB1 and-DQB1 alleles. Further, the homozygous haplotype frequencies of HLA-A and-B; HLA-A,-C, and-B; HLA-A,-C,-B, and-DRB1; and HLA-A,-C,-B,-DRB1, and-DQB1 in Taiwanese Chinese population are presented. Conclusion: As increasing number of HLA alleles are being discovered, periodic HLA profile investigation in a given population is essential to recognize the HLA complexity in that population. Population study can also provide an up-to-date strategic plan for future needs in terms of compatibility measurement for HLA matching between transplant donors and patients.

  1. Modulatory effects of the piccolo genotype on emotional memory in health and depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Woudstra

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder (MDD has been associated with biased memory formation for mood-congruent information, which may be related to altered monoamine levels. The piccolo (PCLO gene, involved in monoaminergic neurotransmission, has previously been linked to depression in a genome-wide association study. Here, we investigated the role of the PCLO risk allele on functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI correlates of emotional memory in a sample of 89 MDD patients (64 PCLO risk allele carriers and 29 healthy controls (18 PCLO risk allele carriers. During negative word encoding, risk allele carriers showed significant lower activity relative to non-risk allele carriers in the insula, and trend-wise in the anterior cingulate cortex and inferior frontal gyrus. Moreover, depressed risk allele carriers showed significant lower activity relative to non-risk allele carriers in the striatum, an effect which was absent in healthy controls. Finally, amygdalar response during processing new positive words vs. known words was blunted in healthy PCLO+ carriers and in MDD patients irrespective of genotype, which may indicate that signalling of salient novel information does not occur to the same extent in PCLO+ carriers and MDD patients. The PCLO risk allele may increase vulnerability for MDD by modulating local brain function with regard to responsiveness to salient stimuli (i.e. insula and processing novel negative information. Also, depression-specific effects of PCLO on dorsal striatal activation during negative word encoding and the absence of amygdalar salience signalling for novel positive information further suggest a role of PCLO in symptom maintenance in MDD.

  2. Significant genotype difference in the CYP2E1 PstI polymorphism of indigenous groups in Sabah, Malaysia with Asian and non-Asian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Lucky Poh Wah; Chong, Eric Tzyy Jiann; Chua, Kek Heng; Chuah, Jitt Aun; Lee, Ping-Chin

    2014-01-01

    CYP2E1 PstI polymorphism G-1259C (rs3813867) genotype distributions vary significantly among different populations and are associated with both diseases, like cancer, and adverse drug effects. To date, there have been limited genotype distributions and allele frequencies of this polymorphism reported in the three major indigenous ethnic groups (KadazanDusun, Bajau, and Rungus) in Sabah, also known as North Borneo. The aim of this study was to investigate the genotype distributions and allele frequencies of the CYP2E1 PstI polymorphism G-1259C in these three major indigenous peoples in Sabah. A total of 640 healthy individuals from the three dominant indigenous groups were recruited for this study. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) at G-1259C polymorphic site of CYP2E1 gene was performed using the Pst I restriction enzyme. Fragments were analyzed using agarose gel electrophoresis and confirmed by direct sequencing. Overall, the allele frequencies were 90.3% for c1 allele and 9.7% for c2 allele. The genotype frequencies for c1/c1, c1/c2 and c2/c2 were observed as 80.9%, 18.8%, and 0.3%, respectively. A highly statistical significant difference (ppopulations. However, among these three indigenous groups, there was no statistical significant difference (p>0.001) in their genotype distributions. The three major indigenous ethnic groups in Sabah show unique genotype distributions when compared with other populations. This finding indicates the importance of establishing the genotype distributions of CYP2E1 PstI polymorphism in the indigenous populations.

  3. Characterization of class II alpha genes and DLA-D region allelic associations in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, U M; Storb, R F

    1988-10-01

    Human major histocompatibility complex (HLA) cDNA probes were used to analyze the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the alpha genes of the DLA-D region in dogs. Genomic DNA from peripheral blood leucocytes of 23 unrelated DLA-D homozygous dogs representing nine DLA-D types (defined by mixed leucocyte reaction) was digested with restriction enzymes (BamHI, EcoRI, Hind III, Pvu II, Taq I, Rsa I, Msp I, Pst I and Bgl II), separated by agarose gel electrophoresis and transferred onto Biotrace membrane. The Southern blots were successively hybridized with radiolabelled HLA cDNA probes corresponding to DQ, DP, DZ and DR alpha genes. Clear evidence was obtained for the canine homologues of DQ and DR alpha genes with simple bi- or tri-allelic polymorphism respectively. Evidence for a single, nonpolymorphic DP alpha gene was also obtained. However, the presence of a DZ alpha gene could not be clearly demonstrated in canine genomic DNA. This report extends our previous RFLP analysis documenting polymorphism of DLA class II beta genes in the same panel of homozygous typing cell dogs, and provides the basis for DLA-D genotyping at a population level. This study also characterizes the RFLP-defined preferential allelic associations across the DLA-D region in nine different homozygous typing cell specificities.

  4. Impact of population structure, effective bottleneck time, and allele frequency on linkage disequilibrium maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weihua; Collins, Andrew; Gibson, Jane; Tapper, William J; Hunt, Sarah; Deloukas, Panos; Bentley, David R; Morton, Newton E

    2004-12-28

    Genetic maps in linkage disequilibrium (LD) units play the same role for association mapping as maps in centimorgans provide at much lower resolution for linkage mapping. Association mapping of genes determining disease susceptibility and other phenotypes is based on the theory of LD, here applied to relations with three phenomena. To test the theory, markers at high density along a 10-Mb continuous segment of chromosome 20q were studied in African-American, Asian, and Caucasian samples. Population structure, whether created by pooling samples from divergent populations or by the mating pattern in a mixed population, is accurately bioassayed from genotype frequencies. The effective bottleneck time for Eurasians is substantially less than for migration out of Africa, reflecting later bottlenecks. The classical dependence of allele frequency on mutation age does not hold for the generally shorter time span of inbreeding and LD. Limitation of the classical theory to mutation age justifies the assumption of constant time in a LD map, except for alleles that were rare at the effective bottleneck time or have arisen since. This assumption is derived from the Malecot model and verified in all samples. Tested measures of relative efficiency, support intervals, and localization error determine the operating characteristics of LD maps that are applicable to every sexually reproducing species, with implications for association mapping, high-resolution linkage maps, evolutionary inference, and identification of recombinogenic sequences.

  5. Allele-specific marker generation and linkage mapping on the Xiphophorus sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolcock, B; Kazianis, S; Lucito, R; Walter, R B; Kallman, K D; Morizot, D C; Vielkind, J R

    2006-01-01

    There is great interest in the sex chromosomes of Xiphophorus fishes because both WY/YY and XX/XY sex-determining mechanisms function in these species, with at least one taxon possessing all three types of sex chromosomes, and because in certain interspecific hybrids melanoma arises as a consequence of inheritance of the sex-linked macromelanophore determining locus (MDL). Representational difference analysis (RDA) has been used to clone two sequences from the sex-determining region of X. maculatus, including a cholinergic receptor, nicotinic, delta polypeptide (CHRND) orthologue. Allele-specific assays for these sequences, as well as for the sex-linked XMRK1 and XMRK2 genes, were developed to distinguish W, X, and Y chromosomes derived from a X. maculatus (XX/XY) strain and a X. helleri (WY/YY) strain. Linkage mapping localized these markers to linkage group (LG) 24. No recombinants were observed between XMRK2 and MDL, confirming a role for XMRK2 in macromelanophore development. Although the master sex-determining (SD) locus certainly resides on Xiphophorus LG 24, autosomal loci are probably involved in sex determination as well, as indicated by the abnormal sex ratios in the backcross hybrids that contrast theoretical predictions based on LG 24 genotyping. Marker development and allelic discrimination on the Xiphophorus sex chromosomes should prove highly useful for studies that utilize this genus as an animal model.

  6. Association of an INSIG2 obesity allele with cardiovascular phenotypes is gender and age dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdman Robert

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The INSIG2 gene has been implicated in cholesterol metabolism and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP near INSIG2 has been shown to be associated with obesity. We sought to determine the relationship of the INSIG2 SNP to cardiovascular disease (CVD related phenotypes. Methods and Results Nine hundred forty six patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI in wave 5 of the multicenter NHLBI Dynamic Registry were genotyped using RT-PCR/TaqMan/allelic discrimination for the rs7566605 SNP near the INSIG2 gene. Clinical variables analyzed include demographics, medical history, and procedural details. The prevalence of peripheral vascular disease (PVD was significantly higher in older men (≥65 years who were either homozygous or carriers of the obesity/lipid risk allele ("C" compared to non-carriers (odds ratio 3.4, p = 0.013 using a logistic regression model incorporating history of hypercholesterolemia, history of hypertension, cerebrovascular disease, history of diabetes, and BMI. A similar relationship with cerebrovascular disease was found in older (>65 women (odds ratio 3.4, p = 0.013. The INSIG2 SNP was not associated with BMI, nor with other clinical variables. Conclusion Age and gender may influence the association of the INSIG2 obesity SNP with PVD and cerebrovascular disease in patients with pre-existing CVD.

  7. Allelic heterogeneity and trade-off shape natural variation for response to soil micronutrient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seifollah Poormohammad Kiani

    Full Text Available As sessile organisms, plants have to cope with diverse environmental constraints that may vary through time and space, eventually leading to changes in the phenotype of populations through fixation of adaptive genetic variation. To fully comprehend the mechanisms of evolution and make sense of the extensive genotypic diversity currently revealed by new sequencing technologies, we are challenged with identifying the molecular basis of such adaptive variation. Here, we have identified a new variant of a molybdenum (Mo transporter, MOT1, which is causal for fitness changes under artificial conditions of both Mo-deficiency and Mo-toxicity and in which allelic variation among West-Asian populations is strictly correlated with the concentration of available Mo in native soils. In addition, this association is accompanied at different scales with patterns of polymorphisms that are not consistent with neutral evolution and show signs of diversifying selection. Resolving such a case of allelic heterogeneity helps explain species-wide phenotypic variation for Mo homeostasis and potentially reveals trade-off effects, a finding still rarely linked to fitness.

  8. HLA Alleles are Genetic Markers for Susceptibility and Resistance towards Leprosy in a Mexican Mestizo Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Medina, Maribel; Escamilla-Tilch, Monica; Frías-Castro, Luis Octavio; Romero-Quintana, Geovanni; Estrada-García, Iris; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Granados, Julio; Arambula Meraz, Eliakym; Sánchez-Schmitz, Guzman; Khader, Shabaana Abdul; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Ramos-Payán, Rosalío

    2017-01-01

    Despite the use of multidrug therapy, leprosy remains endemic in some countries. The association of several human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and gene polymorphisms with leprosy has been demonstrated in many populations, but the major immune contributors associated to the spectrum of leprosy have not been defined yet. In this study, genotyping of HLA-A, -B, -DR, and -DQ alleles was performed in leprosy patients (n = 113) and control subjects (n = 117) from the region with the highest incidence for the disease in México. The odds of developing leprosy and lepromatous subtype were 2.12- and 2.74-fold higher in carriers of HLA-A*28, and 2.48- and 4.14-fold higher for leprosy and dimorphic subtype in carriers of DQB1*06. Interestingly, DQB1*07 was overrepresented in healthy individuals, compared to patients with leprosy (OR = 0.08) and the lepromatous subtype (OR = 0.06). These results suggest that HLA-A*28 is a marker for predisposition to leprosy and the lepromatous subtype and DQB1*06 to leprosy and the dimorphic subtype, while DQB1*07 might be a resistance marker in this Mestizo population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  9. The impact of the CACNA1C risk allele on limbic structures and facial emotions recognition in bipolar disorder subjects and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeiro-de-Souza, Márcio Gerhardt; Otaduy, Maria Concepción Garcia; Dias, Carolina Zadres; Bio, Danielle S; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Moreno, Ricardo Alberto

    2012-12-01

    Impairments in facial emotion recognition (FER) have been reported in bipolar disorder (BD) during all mood states. FER has been the focus of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies evaluating differential activation of limbic regions. Recently, the α1-C subunit of the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (CACNA1C) gene has been described as a risk gene for BD and its Met allele found to increase CACNA1C mRNA expression. In healthy controls, the CACNA1C risk (Met) allele has been reported to increase limbic system activation during emotional stimuli and also to impact on cognitive function. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of CACNA1C genotype on FER scores and limbic system morphology in subjects with BD and healthy controls. Thirty-nine euthymic BD I subjects and 40 healthy controls were submitted to a FER recognition test battery and genotyped for CACNA1C. Subjects were also examined with a 3D 3-Tesla structural imaging protocol. The CACNA1C risk allele for BD was associated to FER impairment in BD, while in controls nothing was observed. The CACNA1C genotype did not impact on amygdala or hippocampus volume neither in BD nor controls. Sample size. The present findings suggest that a polymorphism in calcium channels interferes FER phenotype exclusively in BD and doesn't interfere on limbic structures morphology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The rs10993994 risk allele for prostate cancer results in clinically relevant changes in microseminoprotein-beta expression in tissue and urine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayley C Whitaker

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Microseminoprotein-beta (MSMB regulates apoptosis and using genome-wide association studies the rs10993994 single nucleotide polymorphism in the MSMB promoter has been linked to an increased risk of developing prostate cancer. The promoter location of the risk allele, and its ability to reduce promoter activity, suggested that the rs10993994 risk allele could result in lowered MSMB in benign tissue leading to increased prostate cancer risk.MSMB expression in benign and malignant prostate tissue was examined using immunohistochemistry and compared with the rs10993994 genotype. Urinary MSMB concentrations were determined by ELISA and correlated with urinary PSA, the presence or absence of cancer, rs10993994 genotype and age of onset. MSMB levels in prostate tissue and urine were greatly reduced with tumourigenesis. Urinary MSMB was better than urinary PSA at differentiating men with prostate cancer at all Gleason grades. The high risk allele was associated with heterogeneity of MSMB staining and loss of MSMB in both tissue and urine in benign prostate.These data show that some high risk alleles discovered using genome-wide association studies produce phenotypic effects with potential clinical utility. We provide the first link between a low penetrance polymorphism for prostate cancer and a potential test in human tissue and bodily fluids. There is potential to develop tissue and urinary MSMB for a biomarker of prostate cancer risk, diagnosis and disease monitoring.

  11. The rs10993994 risk allele for prostate cancer results in clinically relevant changes in microseminoprotein-beta expression in tissue and urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Hayley C; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Ross-Adams, Helen; Warren, Anne Y; Burge, Johanna; George, Anne; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Jhavar, Sameer; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Saunders, Edward; Page, Elizabeth; Mitra, Anita; Mitchell, Gillian; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Evans, D Gareth; Blanco, Ignacio; Mercer, Catherine; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Clowes, Virginia; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Walker, Lisa; Donaldson, Alan; Izatt, Louise; Dorkins, Huw; Male, Alison; Tucker, Kathy; Stapleton, Alan; Lam, Jimmy; Kirk, Judy; Lilja, Hans; Easton, Douglas; Cooper, Colin; Eeles, Rosalind; Neal, David E

    2010-10-13

    Microseminoprotein-beta (MSMB) regulates apoptosis and using genome-wide association studies the rs10993994 single nucleotide polymorphism in the MSMB promoter has been linked to an increased risk of developing prostate cancer. The promoter location of the risk allele, and its ability to reduce promoter activity, suggested that the rs10993994 risk allele could result in lowered MSMB in benign tissue leading to increased prostate cancer risk. MSMB expression in benign and malignant prostate tissue was examined using immunohistochemistry and compared with the rs10993994 genotype. Urinary MSMB concentrations were determined by ELISA and correlated with urinary PSA, the presence or absence of cancer, rs10993994 genotype and age of onset. MSMB levels in prostate tissue and urine were greatly reduced with tumourigenesis. Urinary MSMB was better than urinary PSA at differentiating men with prostate cancer at all Gleason grades. The high risk allele was associated with heterogeneity of MSMB staining and loss of MSMB in both tissue and urine in benign prostate. These data show that some high risk alleles discovered using genome-wide association studies produce phenotypic effects with potential clinical utility. We provide the first link between a low penetrance polymorphism for prostate cancer and a potential test in human tissue and bodily fluids. There is potential to develop tissue and urinary MSMB for a biomarker of prostate cancer risk, diagnosis and disease monitoring.

  12. [High frequency of ancestral allele of the TJP1 polymorphism rs2291166 in Mexican population, conformational effect and applications in surgery and medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Garcia, Sergio Alberto; Flores-Alvarado, Luis Javier; Topete-González, Luz Rosalba; Charles-Niño, Claudia; Mazariegos-Rubi, Manuel; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Nory Omayra

    2016-01-01

    TJP1 gene encodes a ZO-1 protein that is required for the recruitment of occludins and claudins in tight junction, and is involved in cell polarisation. It has different variations, the frequency of which has been studied in different populations. In Mexico there are no studies of this gene. These are required because their polymorphisms can be used in studies associated with medicine and surgery. Therefore, the aim of this study was to estimate the frequency of alleles and genotypes of rs2291166 gene polymorphism TJP1 in Mexico Mestizos population, and to estimate the conformational effect of an amino acid change. A total of 473 individuals were included. The rs2291166 polymorphism was identified PASA PCR-7% PAGE, and stained with silver nitrate. The conformational effect of amino acid change was performed in silico, and was carried out with servers ProtPraram Tool and Search Database with Fasta. The most frequent allele in the two populations is the ancestral allele (T). A genotype distribution similar to other populations was found. The polymorphism is in Hardy-Weinberg, p>0.05. Changing aspartate to alanine produced a conformational change. The study reveals a high frequency of the ancestral allele at rs2291166 polymorphism in the Mexican population. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  13. Allele-specific gene expression in a wild nonhuman primate population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, J.; Akinyi, M. Y.; Mutura, S.; Altmann, J.; Wray, G. A.; Alberts, S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Natural populations hold enormous potential for evolutionary genetic studies, especially when phenotypic, genetic and environmental data are all available on the same individuals. However, untangling the genotype-phenotype relationship in natural populations remains a major challenge. Here, we describe results of an investigation of one class of phenotype, allele-specific gene expression (ASGE), in the well-studied natural population of baboons of the Amboseli basin, Kenya. ASGE measurements identify cases in which one allele of a gene is overexpressed relative to the alternative allele of the same gene, within individuals, thus providing a control for background genetic and environmental effects. Here, we characterize the incidence of ASGE in the Amboseli baboon population, focusing on the genetic and environmental contributions to ASGE in a set of eleven genes involved in immunity and defence. Within this set, we identify evidence for common ASGE in four genes. We also present examples of two relationships between cis-regulatory genetic variants and the ASGE phenotype. Finally, we identify one case in which this relationship is influenced by a novel gene-environment interaction. Specifically, the dominance rank of an individual’s mother during its early life (an aspect of that individual’s social environment) influences the expression of the gene CCL5 via an interaction with cis-regulatory genetic variation. These results illustrate how environmental and ecological data can be integrated into evolutionary genetic studies of functional variation in natural populations. They also highlight the potential importance of early life environmental variation in shaping the genetic architecture of complex traits in wild mammals. PMID:21226779

  14. Suspension Array for Multiplex Detection of Eight Fungicide-Resistance Related Alleles in Botrytis cinerea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A simple and high-throughput assay to detect fungicide resistance is required for large-scale monitoring of the emergence of resistant strains of Botrytis cinerea. Using suspension array technology performed on a Bio-Plex 200 System, we developed a single-tube allele-specific primer extension (ASPE assay that can simultaneously detect eight alleles in one reaction. These eight alleles include E198 and 198A of the β-Tubulin gene (BenA, H272 and 272Y of the Succinate dehydrogenase iron–sulfur subunit gene (SdhB, I365 and 365S of the putative osmosensor histidine kinase gene (BcOS1, and F412 and 412S of the 3-ketoreductase gene (erg27. This assay was first established and optimized with eight plasmid templates containing the DNA sequence variants BenA-E198, BenA-198A, SdhB-H272, SdhB-272Y, BcOS1-I365, BcOS1-365S, erg27-F412, and erg27-412S. Results indicated that none of the probes showed cross-reactivity with one another. The minimum limit of detection for these genotypes was one copy per test. Four mutant plasmids were mixed with 10 ng/μL wild-type genomic DNA in different ratios. Detection sensitivity of mutant loci was 0.45% for BenA-E198A, BcOS1-I365S, and erg27-F412S, and was 4.5% for SdhB-H272Y. A minimum quantity of 0.1 ng of genomic DNA was necessary to obtain reliable results. This is the first reported assay that can simultaneously detect mutations in BenA, SdhB, BcOS1, and erg27.

  15. Suspension Array for Multiplex Detection of Eight Fungicide-Resistance Related Alleles in Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Xie, Fei; Lv, Baobei; Zhao, Pengxiang; Ma, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    A simple and high-throughput assay to detect fungicide resistance is required for large-scale monitoring of the emergence of resistant strains of Botrytis cinerea . Using suspension array technology performed on a Bio-Plex 200 System, we developed a single-tube allele-specific primer extension assay that can simultaneously detect eight alleles in one reaction. These eight alleles include E198 and 198A of the β-Tubulin gene ( BenA ), H272 and 272Y of the Succinate dehydrogenase iron-sulfur subunit gene ( SdhB) , I365 and 365S of the putative osmosensor histidine kinase gene ( BcOS1 ), and F412 and 412S of the 3-ketoreductase gene ( erg27 ). This assay was first established and optimized with eight plasmid templates containing the DNA sequence variants BenA- E198, BenA- 198A, SdhB- H272, SdhB- 272Y, BcOS1- I365, BcOS1- 365S, erg27 -F412, and erg27 -412S. Results indicated that none of the probes showed cross-reactivity with one another. The minimum limit of detection for these genotypes was one copy per test. Four mutant plasmids were mixed with 10 ng/μL wild-type genomic DNA in different ratios. Detection sensitivity of mutant loci was 0.45% for BenA- E198A, BcOS1- I365S, and erg27 -F412S, and was 4.5% for SdhB- H272Y. A minimum quantity of 0.1 ng of genomic DNA was necessary to obtain reliable results. This is the first reported assay that can simultaneously detect mutations in BenA , SdhB , BcOS1 , and erg27 .

  16. Echinococcus granulosus genotypes in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafi, Seyedeh Maryam; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Moazeni, Mohammad; Yousefi, Morteza; Saneie, Behnam; Hosseini-Safa, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Hydatidosis, caused by Echinococcus granulosus is one of the most important zoonotic diseases, throughout most parts of the world. Hydatidosis is endemic in Iran and responsible for approximately 1% of admission to surgical wards. There are extensive genetic variations within E. granulosus and 10 different genotypes (G1–G10) within this parasite have been reported. Identification of strains is important for improvement of control and prevention of the disease. No new review article presented the situation of Echinococcus granulosus genotypes in Iran in the recent years; therefore in this paper we reviewed the different studies regarding Echinococcus granulosus genotypes in Iran. PMID:24834298

  17. Allele frequencies in the VRN-A1, VRN-B1 and VRN-D1 vernalization response and PPD-B1 and PPD-D1 photoperiod sensitivity genes, and their effects on heading in a diverse set of wheat cultivars (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Tibor; Balla, Krisztina; Veisz, Ottó; Láng, László; Bedő, Zoltán; Griffiths, Simon; Isaac, Peter; Karsai, Ildikó

    2014-01-01

    Heading of cereals is determined by complex genetic and environmental factors in which genes responsible for vernalization and photoperiod sensitivity play a decisive role. Our aim was to use diagnostic molecular markers to determine the main allele types in VRN - A1 , VRN - B1 , VRN - D1 , PPD - B1 and PPD - D1 in a worldwide wheat collection of 683 genotypes and to investigate the effect of these alleles on heading in the field. The dominant VRN - A1 , VRN - B1 and VRN - D1 alleles were present at a low frequency. The PPD - D1a photoperiod-insensitive allele was carried by 57 % of the cultivars and was most frequent in Asian and European cultivars. The PPD - B1 photoperiod-insensitive allele was carried by 22 % of the genotypes from Asia, America and Europe. Nine versions of the PPD - B1 -insensitive allele were identified based on gene copy number and intercopy structure. The allele compositions in PPD - D1 , PPD - B1 and VRN - D1 significantly influenced heading and together explained 37.5 % of the phenotypic variance. The role of gene model increased to 39.1 % when PPD - B1 intercopy structure was taken into account instead of overall PPD - B1 type (sensitive vs. insensitive). As a single component, PPD - D1 had the most important role (28.0 % of the phenotypic variance), followed by PPD - B1 (12.3 % for PPD - B1 _overall, and 15.1 % for PPD - B1 _intercopy) and VRN - D1 (2.2 %). Significant gene interactions were identified between the marker alleles within PPD - B1 and between VRN - D1 and the two PPD1 genes. The earliest heading genotypes were those with the photoperiod-insensitive allele in PPD - D1 and PPD - B1 , and with the spring allele for VRN - D1 and the winter alleles for VRN - A1 and VRN - B1 . This combination could only be detected in genotypes from Southern Europe and Asia. Late-heading genotypes had the sensitivity alleles for both PPD1 genes, regardless of the allelic composition of the VRN1 genes. There was a 10-day difference in

  18. Genotyping in the Brazilian Criollo Horse Stud Book: resources and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, M A P; Bressel, R M C; Almeida, D B; Oliveira, P A; Bassini, L N; Moreira, C G A; Manzke, V H B; Siewerdt, F; Moreira, H L M

    2010-08-24

    The goal of this research was to evaluate the ability of the genotyping information available in the Brazilian Criollo Horse Stud Book to describe the genetic variability of the breed and the exclusion probability determined in comparative tests. Altogether, two softwares were used in the analyses of the available genotypes: Cervus 3.0.3 and Genepop 4.0. Eight microsatellite markers totaled 109 alleles, with an average of 13.6 +/- 0.6 alleles per locus. Large differences between expected and observed heterozygosity were ubiquitous (0.821 +/- 0.07 and 0.470 +/- 0.17, respectively). Although the estimated null allele frequency caused initial concern (0.284 +/- 0.199), it is likely that it was a reflection of the inbreeding coefficients found (0.432 +/- 0.184). All loci showed significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, with heterozygote deficit (P < 0.0001) and genotypic linkage disequilibrium with at least one marker. The high polymorphic information content (0.798 +/- 0.088) could not warrant exclusion power for three loci (HMS7, HMS6 and HTG4) above 50% (0.491 +/- 0.158). However, combined exclusion probability reached 99.61%, a level close to ideal. The results demonstrate the excellent performance of the markers assessed in describing the genetic status of the breed and suggest the considerable ability to establish parentage.

  19. Simplification of genotyping techniques of the ABO blood type experiment and exploration of population genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian; Zhou, Yi-ren; Ding, Jia-lin; Wang, Zhi-yuan; Liu, Ling; Wang, Ye-kai; Lou, Hui-ling; Qiao, Shou-yi; Wu, Yan-hua

    2017-05-20

    The ABO blood type is one of the most common and widely used genetic traits in humans. Three glycosyltransferase-encoding gene alleles, I A , I B and i, produce three red blood cell surface antigens, by which the ABO blood type is classified. By using the ABO blood type experiment as an ideal case for genetics teaching, we can easily introduce to the students several genetic concepts, including multiple alleles, gene interaction, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and gene evolution. Herein we have innovated and integrated our ABO blood type genetics experiments. First, in the section of Molecular Genetics, a new method of ABO blood genotyping was established: specific primers based on SNP sites were designed to distinguish three alleles through quantitative real-time PCR. Next, the experimental teaching method of Gene Evolution was innovated in the Population Genetics section: a gene-evolution software was developed to simulate the evolutionary tendency of the ABO genotype encoding alleles under diverse conditions. Our reform aims to extend the contents of genetics experiments, to provide additional teaching approaches, and to improve the learning efficiency of our students eventually.

  20. The Influence of Host and Bacterial Genotype on the Development of Disseminated Disease with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caws, Maxine; Thwaites, Guy; Dunstan, Sarah; Hawn, Thomas R.; Thi Ngoc Lan, Nguyen; Thuong, Nguyen Thuy Thuong; Stepniewska, Kasia; Huyen, Mai Nguyet Thu; Bang, Nguyen Duc; Huu Loc, Tran; Gagneux, Sebastien; van Soolingen, Dick; Kremer, Kristin; van der Sande, Marianne; Small, Peter; Thi Hoang Anh, Phan; Chinh, Nguyen Tran; Thi Quy, Hoang; Thi Hong Duyen, Nguyen; Quang Tho, Dau; Hieu, Nguyen T.; Torok, Estee; Hien, Tran Tinh; Dung, Nguyen Huy; Thi Quynh Nhu, Nguyen; Duy, Phan Minh; van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Farrar, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    The factors that govern the development of tuberculosis disease are incompletely understood. We hypothesized that some strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) are more capable of causing disseminated disease than others and may be associated with polymorphisms in host genes responsible for the innate immune response to infection. We compared the host and bacterial genotype in 187 Vietnamese adults with tuberculous meningitis (TBM) and 237 Vietnamese adults with uncomplicated pulmonary tuberculosis. The host genotype of tuberculosis cases was also compared with the genotype of 392 cord blood controls from the same population. Isolates of M. tuberculosis were genotyped by large sequence polymorphisms. The hosts were defined by polymorphisms in genes encoding Toll-interleukin 1 receptor domain containing adaptor protein (TIRAP) and Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR-2). We found a significant protective association between the Euro-American lineage of M. tuberculosis and pulmonary rather than meningeal tuberculosis (Odds ratio (OR) for causing TBM 0.395, 95% confidence intervals (C.I.) 0.193–0.806, P = 0.009), suggesting these strains are less capable of extra-pulmonary dissemination than others in the study population. We also found that individuals with the C allele of TLR-2 T597C allele were more likely to have tuberculosis caused by the East-Asian/Beijing genotype (OR = 1.57 [95% C.I. 1.15–2.15]) than other individuals. The study provides evidence that M. tuberculosis genotype influences clinical disease phenotype and demonstrates, for the first time, a significant interaction between host and bacterial genotypes and the development of tuberculosis. PMID:18369480

  1. The influence of host and bacterial genotype on the development of disseminated disease with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxine Caws

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The factors that govern the development of tuberculosis disease are incompletely understood. We hypothesized that some strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis are more capable of causing disseminated disease than others and may be associated with polymorphisms in host genes responsible for the innate immune response to infection. We compared the host and bacterial genotype in 187 Vietnamese adults with tuberculous meningitis (TBM and 237 Vietnamese adults with uncomplicated pulmonary tuberculosis. The host genotype of tuberculosis cases was also compared with the genotype of 392 cord blood controls from the same population. Isolates of M. tuberculosis were genotyped by large sequence polymorphisms. The hosts were defined by polymorphisms in genes encoding Toll-interleukin 1 receptor domain containing adaptor protein (TIRAP and Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR-2. We found a significant protective association between the Euro-American lineage of M. tuberculosis and pulmonary rather than meningeal tuberculosis (Odds ratio (OR for causing TBM 0.395, 95% confidence intervals (C.I. 0.193-0.806, P = 0.009, suggesting these strains are less capable of extra-pulmonary dissemination than others in the study population. We also found that individuals with the C allele of TLR-2 T597C allele were more likely to have tuberculosis caused by the East-Asian/Beijing genotype (OR = 1.57 [95% C.I. 1.15-2.15] than other individuals. The study provides evidence that M. tuberculosis genotype influences clinical disease phenotype and demonstrates, for the first time, a significant interaction between host and bacterial genotypes and the development of tuberculosis.

  2. Effect of knowledge of APOE genotype on subjective and objective memory performance in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineweaver, Tara T; Bondi, Mark W; Galasko, Douglas; Salmon, David P

    2014-02-01

    The knowledge that one carries the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele risk factor for Alzheimer's disease was recently found to have little short-term psychological risk. The authors investigated the impact of knowledge of carrying the risk allele on subjective ratings of memory and objective memory test performance of older adults. Using a nested case-control design, the authors administered objective verbal and visual memory tests and self-rating scales of memory function to 144 cognitively normal older adults (ages 52-89) with known APOE genotype who knew (ε4+, N=25; ε4-, N=49) or did not know (ε4+, N=25; ε4-, N=45) their genotype and genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease prior to neuropsychological evaluation. Significant genotype-by-disclosure interaction effects were observed on several memory rating scales and tests of immediate and delayed verbal recall. Older adults who knew their ε4+ genotype judged their memory more harshly and performed worse on an objective verbal memory test than did ε4+ adults who did not know. In contrast, older adults who knew their ε4- genotype judged their memory more positively than did ε4- adults who did not know, but these groups did not differ in objective memory test performance. Informing older adults that they have an APOE genotype associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease can have adverse consequences on their perception of their memory abilities and their performance on objective memory tests. The patient's knowledge of his or her genotype and risk of Alzheimer's disease should be considered when evaluating cognition in the elderly.

  3. A Joint Replenishment Inventory Model with Lost Sales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devy, N. L.; Ai, T. J.; Astanti, R. D.

    2018-04-01

    This paper deals with two items joint replenishment inventory problem, in which the demand of each items are constant and deterministic. Inventory replenishment of items is conducted periodically every T time intervals. Among of these replenishments, joint replenishment of both items is possible. It is defined that item i is replenished every ZiT time intervals. Replenishment of items are instantaneous. All of shortages are considered as lost sales. The maximum allowance for lost sales of item i is Si. Mathematical model is formulated in order to determining the basic time cycle T, replenishment multiplier Zi , and maximum lost sales Si in order to minimize the total cost per unit time. A solution methodology is proposed for solve the model and a numerical example is provided for demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  4. Preventing customer defection and stimulating return of the lost customers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senić Radoslav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Customers represent company's most valuable asset. Company can assure its survival, further growth and development by retaining existing, attracting new and returning lost customers. Retaining existing, loyal customers is the most profitable business activity, attracting new ones is the most expensive, while returning lost and frequently forgotten customers is a type of business activity that still generates modest interest among researchers and practitioners. So far, marketing strategies have been mainly directed towards the first two categories of customers. The objective of this paper is dedicated to customer defection and returning lost customers. Paper discusses customer relationship life-cycle and the significance of managing customer return within it, types of customer defections, the process of managing return, as well as, the reasons that led to customer defection.

  5. ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME GENOTYPE AFFECTS SKELETAL MUSCLE STRENGTH IN ELITE ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Matos Costa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have associated angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE D allele with variability in the skeletal muscle baseline strength, though conclusions have been inconsistent across investigations. The purpose of this study was to examine the possible association between ACE genotype and skeletal muscle baseline strength in elite male and female athletes involved in different event expertise. A group of 58 elite athletes, designated as Olympic candidates, were studied: 35 swimmers (19 males and 16 females, 18.8 ± 3.2 years and 23 triathletes (15 males and 8 females, 18.7 ± 3.0 years. The athletes were classified as: short (< 200m and middle (400m to 1500m distance athletes, respectively. For each subject the grip strength in both hands was measure using an adjustable mechanical hand dynamometer. The maximum height in both squat jump (SJ and counter movement jump (CMJ were also assessed, using a trigonometric carpet (Ergojump Digitime 1000; Digitest, Jyvaskyla, Finland. DNA extraction was obtained with Chelex 100® and genotype determination by PCR-RFLP methods. Both males and females showed significantly higher right grip strength in D allele carriers compared to II homozygote's. We found that allelic frequency differs significantly by event distance specialization in both genders (p < 0.05. In fact, sprinter D allele carriers showed the superior scores in nearly all strength measurements (p < 0.05, in both genders. Among endurance athletes, the results also demonstrated that female D allele carriers exhibited the higher performance right grip and CMJ scores (p < 0.05. In conclusion, the ACE D allele seems associated with skeletal muscle baseline strength in elite athletes, being easily identified in females

  6. Race moderates the association of Catechol-O-methyltransferase genotype and posttraumatic stress disorder in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Kathryn L; Scheeringa, Michael S; Drury, Stacy S

    2014-10-01

    The present study sought to replicate previous findings of an association between the Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) val158met polymorphism with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and symptomatology in a novel age group, preschool children. COMT genotype was determined in a sample of 171 3-6-year-old trauma-exposed children. PTSD was assessed with a semistructured interview. Accounting for sex, trauma type, and age, genotype was examined in relation to categorical and continuous measures of PTSD both controlling for race and within the two largest racial categories (African American [AA] and European American [EA]). Race significantly moderated the association between genotype and PTSD. Specifically, the genotype associated with increased PTSD symptoms in one racial group had the opposite association in the other racial group. For AA children the met/met genotype was associated with more PTSD symptoms. However, for EA children, val allele carriers had more PTSD symptoms. Whereas every AA child with the met/met genotype met criteria for PTSD, none of the EA children with the met/met genotype did. This genetic association with COMT genotype, in both races but in opposite directions, was most associated with increased arousal symptoms. These findings replicate previous findings in participants of African descent, highlight the moderating effect of race on the association between COMT genotype and PTSD, and provide direct evidence that consideration of population stratification within gene-by-environment studies is valuable to prevent false negative findings.

  7. Allelic variant in the anti-Müllerian hormone gene leads to autosomal and temperature-dependent sex reversal in a selected Nile tilapia line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Wessels

    Full Text Available Owing to the demand for sustainable sex-control protocols in aquaculture, research in tilapia sex determination is gaining momentum. The mutual influence of environmental and genetic factors hampers disentangling the complex sex determination mechanism in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus. Previous linkage analyses have demonstrated quantitative trait loci for the phenotypic sex on linkage groups 1, 3, and 23. Quantitative trait loci for temperature-dependent sex reversal similarly reside on linkage group 23. The anti-Müllerian hormone gene (amh, located in this genomic region, is important for sexual fate in higher vertebrates, and shows sexually dimorphic expression in Nile tilapia. Therefore this study aimed at detecting allelic variants and marker-sex associations in the amh gene. Sequencing identified six allelic variants. A significant effect on the phenotypic sex for SNP ss831884014 (p<0.0017 was found by stepwise logistic regression. The remaining variants were not significantly associated. Functional annotation of SNP ss831884014 revealed a non-synonymous amino acid substitution in the amh protein. Consequently, a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET based genotyping assay was developed and validated with a representative sample of fish. A logistic linear model confirmed a highly significant effect of the treatment and genotype on the phenotypic sex, but not for the interaction term (treatment: p<0.0001; genotype: p<0.0025. An additive genetic model proved a linear allele substitution effect of 12% in individuals from controls and groups treated at high temperature, respectively. Moreover, the effect of the genotype on the male proportion was significantly higher in groups treated at high temperature, giving 31% more males on average of the three genotypes. In addition, the groups treated at high temperature showed a positive dominance deviation (+11.4% males. In summary, marker-assisted selection for amh variant ss831884014

  8. Distribution of Human Leukocyte Antigen alleles in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus patients with Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion Polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nageen Hussain

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is one of the classic examples of autoimmune diseases among human beings and is a rare disease in Pakistani population. Clinically it is a quite diverse and complicated autoimmune disease in a sense that it involves multiple organs of the body and mimics with other diseases as well. This study focused on the distribution of HLA alleles in SLE patients with ACE I/D Polymorphism. A total of 122 individuals were enrolled in this study, 61 were the SLE patients who fulfilled revised ACR criteria and 61 were the healthy controls. Mean age of SLE patients at diagnosis was 30.35 ± 1.687 years (12-68 years. ACE gene I/D polymorphism was performed by nested PCR and DNA based HLA typing technique was used. ACE gene I/D polymorphism of Intron16 was studied and found to be involved in the activity of SLE. There is high frequency of HLA-A*01, HLA-B*40, HLA-DRB1*01 alleles in SLE patients with ACE DD genotype. The distribution of HLA-A, -B, -DRB1 alleles was analyzed in SLE patients with various disease phenotypes. HLA-A*01 and HLA-B*40 was the most common allele found in SLE patients with the involvement of skin. HLA-A*01, -A*03, HLA-B*13 and -B*46 were common in SLE patients with arthritis while HLA-A*26 and -A*69 were commonly found in Lupus nephritis cases. SLE patients involving both skin and kidney had an allele HLA-DRB1*01 common in them.

  9. Association between allelic variants of the human glucocorticoid receptor gene and autoimmune diseases: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Cristian; Marcos, Miguel; Carbonell, Cristina; Mirón-Canelo, José Antonio; Espinosa, Gerard; Cervera, Ricard; Chamorro, Antonio-Javier

    2018-05-01

    The human glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1) is considered to play a role in the differences and sensitivities of the glucocorticoid response in individuals with autoimmune diseases. The objective of this study was to examine by means of a systematic review previous findings regarding allelic variants of NR3C1 in relation to the risk of developing systemic autoimmune diseases. Studies that analysed the genotype distribution of NR3C1 allelic variants among patients with systemic autoimmune diseases were retrieved. A meta-analysis was conducted with a random effects model. Odds ratios (ORs) and their confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. In addition, sub-analysis by ethnicity, sensitivity analysis and tests for heterogeneity of the results were performed. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria for meta-analysis. We found no evidence that the analysed NR3C1 polymorphisms, rs6198, rs56149945, and rs6189/rs6190, modulate the risk of developing a systemic autoimmune disease. Nonetheless, a protective role for the minor allele of rs41423247 was found among Caucasians (OR=0.78; 95% CI: 0.65, 0.92; P=0.004). A subgroup analysis according to underlying diseases revealed no significant association either for Behçet's disease or rheumatoid arthritis, while correlations between NR3C1 polymorphisms and disease activity or response to glucocorticoids could not be evaluated due to insufficient data. There is no clear evidence that the analysed NR3C1 allelic variants confer a risk for developing systemic autoimmune diseases although the minor G allele of rs41423247 may be protective among Caucasians. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessment of genetic diversity, population structure and relationships in Indian and non-Indian genotypes of finger millet (Eleusine coracana (L.) Gaertn) using genomic SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, M; Antony Ceasar, S; Duraipandiyan, V; Al-Dhabi, N A; Ignacimuthu, S

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the genetic variation and population structure in Indian and non-Indian genotypes of finger millet using 87 genomic SSR primers. The 128 finger millet genotypes were collected and genomic DNA was isolated. Eighty-seven genomic SSR primers with 60-70 % GC contents were used for PCR analysis of 128 finger millet genotypes. The PCR products were separated and visualized on a 6 % polyacrylamide gel followed by silver staining. The data were used to estimate major allele frequency using Power Marker v3.0. Dendrograms were constructed based on the Jaccard's similarity coefficient. Statistical fitness and population structure analyses were performed to find the genetic diversity. The mean major allele frequency was 0.92; the means of polymorphic alleles were 2.13 per primer and 1.45 per genotype; the average polymorphism was 59.94 % per primer and average PIC value was 0.44 per primer. Indian genotypes produced an additional 0.21 allele than non-Indian genotypes. Gene diversity was in the range from 0.02 to 0.35. The average heterozygosity was 0.11, close to 100 % homozygosity. The highest inbreeding coefficient was observed with SSR marker UGEP67. The Jaccard's similarity coefficient value ranged from 0.011 to 0.836. The highest similarity value was 0.836 between genotypes DPI009-04 and GPU-45. Indian genotypes were placed in Eleusine coracana major cluster (EcMC) 1 along with 6 non-Indian genotypes. AMOVA showed that molecular variance in genotypes from various geographical regions was 4 %; among populations it was 3 % and within populations it was 93 %. PCA scatter plot analysis showed that GPU-28, GPU-45 and DPI009-04 were closely dispersed in first component axis. In structural analysis, the genotypes were divided into three subpopulations (SP1, SP2 and SP3). All the three subpopulations had an admixture of alleles and no pure line was observed. These analyses confirmed that all the genotypes were genetically diverse and had been grouped based on

  11. MILTON’S PARADISE LOST AND A POSTCOLONIAL FALL

    OpenAIRE

    LUIZ FERNANDO FERREIRA DE SÁ

    2006-01-01

    In John Milton’s Paradise Lost epic and empire are dissociated. Contrary to many misreadings, this all-important work of the English Renaissance intersects postcolonial thinking in a number of ways. By using Gayatri Spivak’s circuit of postcolonial theory and practice, this paper enacts a counterpointal (mis)reading of Milton’s text: Paradise Lost may at last free its (post-)colonial (dis)content. Since every reading is a misreading, my (mis)reading of Milton’s paradis...

  12. Mannose-binding lectin variant alleles and HLA-DR4 alleles are associated with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Soren; Baslund, Bo; Madsen, Hans O.

    2002-01-01

    /GCA, MBL variant alleles were associated with signs of increased inflammatory activity and clinical signs of arteritic manifestations. This was not found for HLA-DR4 alleles. These findings indicate that HLA-DR4 and MBL are contributing to the pathophysiology of GCA at different levels in the disease...... alleles in controls, patients with PMR only, and patients with GCA was 37, 32, and 53% (p = 0.01), respectively. HLA-DRB1*04 was found in 47% of patients with PMR only and in 54% of patients with GCA, which differed significantly from the 35% found in controls (p = 0.01). HLA-DR4 alleles were...... not associated with any clinical phenotypes of PMR/GCA, whereas MBL variant alleles were associated with cranial arteritis, high erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and low B-hemoglobin. CONCLUSION: We found MBL variant alleles and HLA-DR4 alleles to be weak susceptibility markers for GCA. In patients with PMR...

  13. Genotyping Applications for Transplantation and Transfusion Management: The Emory Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Ross M; Sullivan, Harold Cliff; Bray, Robert A; Gebel, Howard M; Meyer, Erin K; Winkler, Annie M; Josephson, Cassandra D; Stowell, Sean R; Sandy Duncan, Alexander; Roback, John D

    2017-03-01

    Current genotyping methodologies for transplantation and transfusion management employ multiplex systems that allow for simultaneous detection of multiple HLA antigens, human platelet antigens, and red blood cell (RBC) antigens. The development of high-resolution, molecular HLA typing has led to improved outcomes in unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplants by better identifying compatible alleles of the HLA-A, B, C, DRB1, and DQB1 antigens. In solid organ transplantation, the combination of high-resolution HLA typing with solid-phase antibody identification has proven of value for highly sensitized patients and has significantly reduced incompatible crossmatches at the time of organ allocation. This database-driven, combined HLA antigen/antibody testing has enabled routine implementation of "virtual crossmatching" and may even obviate the need for physical crossmatching. In addition, DNA-based testing for RBC antigens provides an alternative typing method that mitigates many of the limitations of hemagglutination-based phenotyping. Although RBC genotyping has utility in various transfusion settings, it has arguably been most useful for minimizing alloimmunization in the management of transfusion-dependent patients with sickle cell disease or thalassemia. The availability of high-throughput RBC genotyping for both individuals and large populations of donors, along with coordinated informatics systems to compare patients' antigen profiles with available antigen-negative and/or rare blood-typed donors, holds promise for improving the efficiency, reliability, and extent of RBC matching for this population.

  14. Breed traceability of buffalo meat using microsatellite genotyping technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannur, Bheemashankar H; Fairoze, Md Nadeem; Girish, P S; Karabasanavar, Nagappa; Rudresh, B H

    2017-02-01

    Although buffalo has emerged as a major meat producing animal in Asia, major research on breed traceability has so far been focused on cattle (beef). This research gap on buffalo breed traceability has impelled development and validation of buffalo breed traceability using a set of eight microsatellite (STR) markers in seven Indian buffalo breeds (Bhadawari, Jaffaarabadi, Murrah, Mehsana, Nagpuri, Pandharpuri and Surti). Probability of sharing same profile by two individuals at a specific locus was computed considering different STR numbers, allele pooling in breed and population. Match probabilities per breed were considered and six most polymorphic loci were genotyped. Out of eight microsatellite markers studied, markers CSSMO47, DRB3 and CSSM060 were found most polymorphic. Developed technique was validated with known and unknown, blood and meat samples; wherein, samples were genetically traced in 24 out of 25 samples tested. Results of this study showed potential applications of the methodology and encourage other researchers to address the problem of buffalo traceability so as to create a world-wide archive of breed specific genotypes. This work is the first report of breed traceability of buffalo meat utilizing microsatellite genotyping technique.

  15. Differential survival among sSOD-1* genotypes in Chinook Salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Michael C.; Reisenbichler, Reginald R.; Rubin, Stephen P.; Wetzel, Lisa A.; Marshall , Anne R.

    2011-01-01

    Differential survival and growth were tested in Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha expressing two common alleles, *–100 and *–260, at the superoxide dismutase locus (sSOD-1*). These tests were necessary to support separate studies in which the two alleles were used as genetic marks under the assumption of mark neutrality. Heterozygous adults were used to produce progeny with –100/–100, –100/–260, and –260/–260 genotypes that were reared in two natural streams and two hatcheries in the states of Washington and Oregon. The latter also were evaluated as returning adults. In general, the genotype ratios of juveniles reared at hatcheries were consistent with high survival and little or no differential survival in the hatchery. Adult returns at one hatchery were significantly different from the expected proportions, and the survival of the –260/–260 genotype was 0.56–0.89 times that of the –100/–100 genotype over four year-classes. Adult returns at a second hatchery (one year-class) were similar but not statistically significant: survival of the –260/–260genotype relative to the –100/–100 genotype was 0.76. The performance of the heterozygote group was intermediate at both hatcheries. Significant differences in growth were rarely observed among hatchery fish (one year-class of juveniles and one age-class of adult males) but were consistent with greater performance for the –100/–100 genotype. Results from two groups of juveniles reared in streams (one year-class from each stream) suggested few differences in growth, but the observed genotype ratios were significantly different from the expected ratios in one stream. Those differences were consistent with the adult data; survival for the –260/–260 genotype was 76% of that of the –100/–100 genotype. These results, which indicate nonneutrality among sSOD-1* genotypes, caused us to modify our related studies and suggest caution in the interpretation of results and analyses in

  16. A genome-wide scan for common alleles affecting risk for autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anney, Richard; Klei, Lambertus; Pinto, Dalila; Regan, Regina; Conroy, Judith; Magalhaes, Tiago R.; Correia, Catarina; Abrahams, Brett S.; Sykes, Nuala; Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Almeida, Joana; Bacchelli, Elena; Bailey, Anthony J.; Baird, Gillian; Battaglia, Agatino; Berney, Tom; Bolshakova, Nadia; Bölte, Sven; Bolton, Patrick F.; Bourgeron, Thomas; Brennan, Sean; Brian, Jessica; Carson, Andrew R.; Casallo, Guillermo; Casey, Jillian; Chu, Su H.; Cochrane, Lynne; Corsello, Christina; Crawford, Emily L.; Crossett, Andrew; Dawson, Geraldine; de Jonge, Maretha; Delorme, Richard; Drmic, Irene; Duketis, Eftichia; Duque, Frederico; Estes, Annette; Farrar, Penny; Fernandez, Bridget A.; Folstein, Susan E.; Fombonne, Eric; Freitag, Christine M.; Gilbert, John; Gillberg, Christopher; Glessner, Joseph T.; Goldberg, Jeremy; Green, Jonathan; Guter, Stephen J.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Heron, Elizabeth A.; Hill, Matthew; Holt, Richard; Howe, Jennifer L.; Hughes, Gillian; Hus, Vanessa; Igliozzi, Roberta; Kim, Cecilia; Klauck, Sabine M.; Kolevzon, Alexander; Korvatska, Olena; Kustanovich, Vlad; Lajonchere, Clara M.; Lamb, Janine A.; Laskawiec, Magdalena; Leboyer, Marion; Le Couteur, Ann; Leventhal, Bennett L.; Lionel, Anath C.; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Lord, Catherine; Lotspeich, Linda; Lund, Sabata C.; Maestrini, Elena; Mahoney, William; Mantoulan, Carine; Marshall, Christian R.; McConachie, Helen; McDougle, Christopher J.; McGrath, Jane; McMahon, William M.; Melhem, Nadine M.; Merikangas, Alison; Migita, Ohsuke; Minshew, Nancy J.; Mirza, Ghazala K.; Munson, Jeff; Nelson, Stanley F.; Noakes, Carolyn; Noor, Abdul; Nygren, Gudrun; Oliveira, Guiomar; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Parr, Jeremy R.; Parrini, Barbara; Paton, Tara; Pickles, Andrew; Piven, Joseph; Posey, David J; Poustka, Annemarie; Poustka, Fritz; Prasad, Aparna; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Renshaw, Katy; Rickaby, Jessica; Roberts, Wendy; Roeder, Kathryn; Roge, Bernadette; Rutter, Michael L.; Bierut, Laura J.; Rice, John P.; Salt, Jeff; Sansom, Katherine; Sato, Daisuke; Segurado, Ricardo; Senman, Lili; Shah, Naisha; Sheffield, Val C.; Soorya, Latha; Sousa, Inês; Stoppioni, Vera; Strawbridge, Christina; Tancredi, Raffaella; Tansey, Katherine; Thiruvahindrapduram, Bhooma; Thompson, Ann P.; Thomson, Susanne; Tryfon, Ana; Tsiantis, John; Van Engeland, Herman; Vincent, John B.; Volkmar, Fred; Wallace, Simon; Wang, Kai; Wang, Zhouzhi; Wassink, Thomas H.; Wing, Kirsty; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Wood, Shawn; Yaspan, Brian L.; Zurawiecki, Danielle; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Betancur, Catalina; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cantor, Rita M.; Cook, Edwin H.; Coon, Hilary; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Gallagher, Louise; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Gill, Michael; Haines, Jonathan L.; Miller, Judith; Monaco, Anthony P.; Nurnberger, John I.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Szatmari, Peter; Vicente, Astrid M.; Vieland, Veronica J.; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Devlin, Bernie; Ennis, Sean; Hallmayer, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Although autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have a substantial genetic basis, most of the known genetic risk has been traced to rare variants, principally copy number variants (CNVs). To identify common risk variation, the Autism Genome Project (AGP) Consortium genotyped 1558 rigorously defined ASD families for 1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and analyzed these SNP genotypes for association with ASD. In one of four primary association analyses, the association signal for marker rs4141463, located within MACROD2, crossed the genome-wide association significance threshold of P < 5 × 10−8. When a smaller replication sample was analyzed, the risk allele at rs4141463 was again over-transmitted; yet, consistent with the winner's curse, its effect size in the replication sample was much smaller; and, for the combined samples, the association signal barely fell below the P < 5 × 10−8 threshold. Exploratory analyses of phenotypic subtypes yielded no significant associations after correction for multiple testing. They did, however, yield strong signals within several genes, KIAA0564, PLD5, POU6F2, ST8SIA2 and TAF1C. PMID:20663923

  17. A genome-wide scan for common alleles affecting risk for autism.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Anney, Richard

    2010-10-15

    Although autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have a substantial genetic basis, most of the known genetic risk has been traced to rare variants, principally copy number variants (CNVs). To identify common risk variation, the Autism Genome Project (AGP) Consortium genotyped 1558 rigorously defined ASD families for 1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and analyzed these SNP genotypes for association with ASD. In one of four primary association analyses, the association signal for marker rs4141463, located within MACROD2, crossed the genome-wide association significance threshold of P < 5 × 10(-8). When a smaller replication sample was analyzed, the risk allele at rs4141463 was again over-transmitted; yet, consistent with the winner\\'s curse, its effect size in the replication sample was much smaller; and, for the combined samples, the association signal barely fell below the P < 5 × 10(-8) threshold. Exploratory analyses of phenotypic subtypes yielded no significant associations after correction for multiple testing. They did, however, yield strong signals within several genes, KIAA0564, PLD5, POU6F2, ST8SIA2 and TAF1C.

  18. A genome-wide scan for common alleles affecting risk for autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anney, Richard; Klei, Lambertus; Pinto, Dalila; Regan, Regina; Conroy, Judith; Magalhaes, Tiago R; Correia, Catarina; Abrahams, Brett S; Sykes, Nuala; Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Almeida, Joana; Bacchelli, Elena; Bailey, Anthony J; Baird, Gillian; Battaglia, Agatino; Berney, Tom; Bolshakova, Nadia; Bölte, Sven; Bolton, Patrick F; Bourgeron, Thomas; Brennan, Sean; Brian, Jessica; Carson, Andrew R; Casallo, Guillermo; Casey, Jillian; Chu, Su H; Cochrane, Lynne; Corsello, Christina; Crawford, Emily L; Crossett, Andrew; Dawson, Geraldine; de Jonge, Maretha; Delorme, Richard; Drmic, Irene; Duketis, Eftichia; Duque, Frederico; Estes, Annette; Farrar, Penny; Fernandez, Bridget A; Folstein, Susan E; Fombonne, Eric; Freitag, Christine M; Gilbert, John; Gillberg, Christopher; Glessner, Joseph T; Goldberg, Jeremy; Green, Jonathan; Guter, Stephen J; Hakonarson, Hakon; Heron, Elizabeth A; Hill, Matthew; Holt, Richard; Howe, Jennifer L; Hughes, Gillian; Hus, Vanessa; Igliozzi, Roberta; Kim, Cecilia; Klauck, Sabine M; Kolevzon, Alexander; Korvatska, Olena; Kustanovich, Vlad; Lajonchere, Clara M; Lamb, Janine A; Laskawiec, Magdalena; Leboyer, Marion; Le Couteur, Ann; Leventhal, Bennett L; Lionel, Anath C; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Lord, Catherine; Lotspeich, Linda; Lund, Sabata C; Maestrini, Elena; Mahoney, William; Mantoulan, Carine; Marshall, Christian R; McConachie, Helen; McDougle, Christopher J; McGrath, Jane; McMahon, William M; Melhem, Nadine M; Merikangas, Alison; Migita, Ohsuke; Minshew, Nancy J; Mirza, Ghazala K; Munson, Jeff; Nelson, Stanley F; Noakes, Carolyn; Noor, Abdul; Nygren, Gudrun; Oliveira, Guiomar; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Parr, Jeremy R; Parrini, Barbara; Paton, Tara; Pickles, Andrew; Piven, Joseph; Posey, David J; Poustka, Annemarie; Poustka, Fritz; Prasad, Aparna; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Renshaw, Katy; Rickaby, Jessica; Roberts, Wendy; Roeder, Kathryn; Roge, Bernadette; Rutter, Michael L; Bierut, Laura J; Rice, John P; Salt, Jeff; Sansom, Katherine; Sato, Daisuke; Segurado, Ricardo; Senman, Lili; Shah, Naisha; Sheffield, Val C; Soorya, Latha; Sousa, Inês; Stoppioni, Vera; Strawbridge, Christina; Tancredi, Raffaella; Tansey, Katherine; Thiruvahindrapduram, Bhooma; Thompson, Ann P; Thomson, Susanne; Tryfon, Ana; Tsiantis, John; Van Engeland, Herman; Vincent, John B; Volkmar, Fred; Wallace, Simon; Wang, Kai; Wang, Zhouzhi; Wassink, Thomas H; Wing, Kirsty; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Wood, Shawn; Yaspan, Brian L; Zurawiecki, Danielle; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Betancur, Catalina; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Cantor, Rita M; Cook, Edwin H; Coon, Hilary; Cuccaro, Michael L; Gallagher, Louise; Geschwind, Daniel H; Gill, Michael; Haines, Jonathan L; Miller, Judith; Monaco, Anthony P; Nurnberger, John I; Paterson, Andrew D; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Scherer, Stephen W; Sutcliffe, James S; Szatmari, Peter; Vicente, Astrid M; Vieland, Veronica J; Wijsman, Ellen M; Devlin, Bernie; Ennis, Sean; Hallmayer, Joachim

    2010-10-15

    Although autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have a substantial genetic basis, most of the known genetic risk has been traced to rare variants, principally copy number variants (CNVs). To identify common risk variation, the Autism Genome Project (AGP) Consortium genotyped 1558 rigorously defined ASD families for 1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and analyzed these SNP genotypes for association with ASD. In one of four primary association analyses, the association signal for marker rs4141463, located within MACROD2, crossed the genome-wide association significance threshold of P < 5 × 10(-8). When a smaller replication sample was analyzed, the risk allele at rs4141463 was again over-transmitted; yet, consistent with the winner's curse, its effect size in the replication sample was much smaller; and, for the combined samples, the association signal barely fell below the P < 5 × 10(-8) threshold. Exploratory analyses of phenotypic subtypes yielded no significant associations after correction for multiple testing. They did, however, yield strong signals within several genes, KIAA0564, PLD5, POU6F2, ST8SIA2 and TAF1C.

  19. Association mapping and favorable QTL alleles for fiber quality traits ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A total of 201 markers were polymorphic and generated 394 ... identified favorable QTL alleles and typical accessions for fiber quality are excellent genetic resources for future cotton .... Field management followed respective local practices.

  20. Apolipoprotein e4 allele and cognitive decline in elderly men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feskens, E.J.M.; Havekes, L.M.; Kalmijn, S.; Knijff, P. de; Launer, L.J.; Kromhout, D.

    1994-01-01

    Objectives - To determine whether polymorphism of apolipoprotein E - notably, the e4 allele - predicts cognitive deterioration in the general population. Design - Population based cohort investigated in 1990 and in 1993. Setting - Zutphen, the Netherlands. Subjects - Representative cohort of 538

  1. The HLA-B*39 allele increases type 1 diabetes risk conferred by HLA-DRB1*04:04-DQB1*03:02 and HLA-DRB1*08-DQB1*04 class II haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikk, M-L; Kiviniemi, M; Laine, A-P; Härkönen, T; Veijola, R; Simell, O; Knip, M; Ilonen, J

    2014-01-01

    To further characterise the effect of the HLA-B*39 allele on type 1 diabetes risk we assessed its role in different HLA-DR/DQ haplotypes and genotypes using 1764 nuclear families with a diabetic child collected in the framework of the Finnish Paediatric Diabetes Register. HLA assays were based on sequence specific hybridization using lanthanide labelled oligonucleotide probes. Transmissions of major HLA-DR/DQ haplotypes with and without the HLA-B*39 allele to diabetic index cases were analysed by direct haplotype and allele counting. The HLA-B*39 allele significantly increased the disease risk conferred by DRB1*04:04-DQA1*03-DQB1*03:02 and (DR8)-DQB1*04 haplotypes. The same effect was observed on genotype level as disease association for the HLA-B*39 allele was observed in multiple genotypes containing DRB1*04:04-DQA1*03-DQB1*03:02 or (DR8)-DQB1*04 haplotypes. Finally we considered the two common subtypes of the HLA-B*39 allele, B*39:01 and B*39:06 and observed their unequal distribution when stratified for specific DR-DQ haplotypes. The risk for type 1 diabetes conferred by certain DR/DQ haplotypes is modified by the presence of the HLA-B*39 and this confirms the independent disease predisposing effect of the HLA-B*39 allele. The results can be applied in enhancing the sensitivity and specificity of DR/DQ based screening programs for subjects at disease risk. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. DD Genotype of ACE I/D Polymorphism Might Confer Protection against Dental Caries in Polish Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszowski, Tomasz; Adler, Grażyna; Janiszewska-Olszowska, Joanna; Safranow, Krzysztof; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the frequencies of the genotypes and alleles of ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism and their association with dental caries in a sample of Polish children. The study subjects were 120 children with dental caries experience (cases) and 41 caries-free individuals (controls). The genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction. The genotype distributions of ACE I/D polymorphism were not statistically different between carious and control children. However, we found a borderline overrepresentation of the II + ID genotypes versus the DD genotype in the carious compared to the control group (69.2% and 51.2%, respectively, p = 0.057). Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age and sex revealed that I allele carriage was a significant predictor of dental caries susceptibility (OR = 2.14, 95% CI = 1.02-4.49, p = 0.041). In conclusion, the DD genotype of ACE I/D polymorphism might be protective against dental caries in Polish children. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Allele frequency distribution for 21 autosomal STR loci in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraaijenbrink, T; van Driem, G L; Opgenort, J R M L; Tuladhar, N M; de Knijff, P

    2007-05-24

    The allele frequency distributions of 21 autosomal loci contained in the AmpFlSTR Identifiler, the Powerplex 16 and the FFFL multiplex PCR kits, was studied in 953 unrelated individuals from Nepal. Several new alleles (i.e. not yet reported in the NIST Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet DataBase [http://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech/strbase/]) have been detected in the process.

  4. SSR based genetic diversity of pigmented and aromatic rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes of the western Himalayan region of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Humaira; Husaini, Amjad M; Ashraf Bhat, M; Parray, G A; Khan, Salim; Ganai, Nazir A

    2016-10-01

    A set of 24 of SSR markers were used to estimate the genetic diversity in 16 rice genotypes found in Western Himalayas of Kashmir and Himachal Pradesh, India. The level of polymorphism among the genotypes of rice was evaluated from the number of alleles and PIC value for each of the 24 SSR loci. A total of 68 alleles were detected across the 16 genotypes through the use of these 24 SSR markers The number of alleles per locus generated varied from 2 (RM 338, RM 452, RM 171) to 6 (RM 585, RM 249, RM 481, RM 162). The PIC values varied from 0.36 (RM 1) to 0.86 (RM 249) with an average of 0.62 per locus. Based on information generated, the genotypes got separated in six different clusters. Cluster 1 comprised of 4 genotypes viz; Zag 1, Zag 13, Pusa sugandh 3, and Zag 14, separated from each other at a similarity value of 0.40. Cluster second comprised of 3 landraces viz; Zag 2. Zag 4 and Zag10 separated from each other at a similarity value of 0.45. Cluster third comprised of 3 genotypes viz; Grey rice, Mushk budji and Kamad separated from each other at a similarity value of 0.46. Cluster fourth had 2 landraces viz; Kawa kreed and Loual anzul, and was not sub clustered. Fifth cluster had 3 genotypes viz; Zag 12, Purple rice and Jhelum separated from each other at a similarity value of 0.28. Cluster 6 comprised of a single popular variety i.e. Shalimar rice 1 with independent lineage.

  5. ALEA: a toolbox for allele-specific epigenomics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younesy, Hamid; Möller, Torsten; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Cheng, Jeffrey B; Costello, Joseph F; Lorincz, Matthew C; Karimi, Mohammad M; Jones, Steven J M

    2014-04-15

    The assessment of expression and epigenomic status using sequencing based methods provides an unprecedented opportunity to identify and correlate allelic differences with epigenomic status. We present ALEA, a computational toolbox for allele-specific epigenomics analysis, which incorporates allelic variation data within existing resources, allowing for the identification of significant associations between epigenetic modifications and specific allelic variants in human and mouse cells. ALEA provides a customizable pipeline of command line tools for allele-specific analysis of next-generation sequencing data (ChIP-seq, RNA-seq, etc.) that takes the raw sequencing data and produces separate allelic tracks ready to be viewed on genome browsers. The pipeline has been validated using human and hybrid mouse ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data. The package, test data and usage instructions are available online at http://www.bcgsc.ca/platform/bioinfo/software/alea CONTACT: : mkarimi1@interchange.ubc.ca or sjones@bcgsc.ca Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Allele-specific MMP-3 transcription under in vivo conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaoyong, Zhu [Atherosclerosis Research Unit, King Gustav V Research Institute, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Odeberg, Jacob [Atherosclerosis Research Unit, King Gustav V Research Institute, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Biotechnology, AlbaNova University Center, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Hamsten, Anders [Atherosclerosis Research Unit, King Gustav V Research Institute, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Eriksson, Per [Atherosclerosis Research Unit, King Gustav V Research Institute, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-09-29

    A common matrix metalloproteinases-3 (MMP-3) -1612 5A/6A promoter polymorphism is associated with risk for cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and other diseases. Here we used the haplotype chromatin immunoprecipitation method to study allele-specific MMP-3 expression under in vivo conditions in heterozygous THP-1 cells. Pyrosequencing was used to analyse the ratio of 5A-allele to 6A-allele after chromatin immunoprecipitation using an antibody against phosphorylated active RNA polymerase II. There was no allele-specific difference in transcriptional activity during basal conditions, i.e., in unstimulated monocytic THP-1 cells. However, after stimulation of MMP-3 expression by monocyte differentiation or incubation with IL-1{beta}, the haplotype containing the 5A-allele was associated with higher transcriptional activity compared with the 6A-containing haplotype. Electromobility shift assay demonstrated increased binding of nuclear proteins to the 5A-allele after monocyte differentiation. In conclusion, the common MMP-3 5A/6A promoter polymorphism appears to be functional only during specific environmental conditions involving inflammation.

  7. SSR allelic variation in almond (Prunus dulcis Mill.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hua; Sui, Yi; Chang, Feng-Qi; Xu, Yong; Ma, Rong-Cai

    2006-01-01

    Sixteen SSR markers including eight EST-SSR and eight genomic SSRs were used for genetic diversity analysis of 23 Chinese and 15 international almond cultivars. EST- and genomic SSR markers previously reported in species of Prunus, mainly peach, proved to be useful for almond genetic analysis. DNA sequences of 117 alleles of six of the 16 SSR loci were analysed to reveal sequence variation among the 38 almond accessions. For the four SSR loci with AG/CT repeats, no insertions or deletions were observed in the flanking regions of the 98 alleles sequenced. Allelic size variation of these loci resulted exclusively from differences in the structures of repeat motifs, which involved interruptions or occurrences of new motif repeats in addition to varying number of AG/CT repeats. Some alleles had a high number of uninterrupted repeat motifs, indicating that SSR mutational patterns differ among alleles at a given SSR locus within the almond species. Allelic homoplasy was observed in the SSR loci because of base substitutions, interruptions or compound repeat motifs. Substitutions in the repeat regions were found at two SSR loci, suggesting that point mutations operate on SSRs and hinder the further SSR expansion by introducing repeat interruptions to stabilize SSR loci. Furthermore, it was shown that some potential point mutations in the flanking regions are linked with new SSR repeat motif variation in almond and peach.

  8. Origin of allelic diversity in antirrhinum S locus RNases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Y; Carpenter, R; Dickinson, H G; Coen, E S

    1996-01-01

    In many plant species, self-incompatibility (SI) is genetically controlled by a single multiallelic S locus. Previous analysis of S alleles in the Solanaceae, in which S locus ribonucleases (S RNases) are responsible for stylar expression of SI, has demonstrated that allelic diversity predated speciation within this family. To understand how allelic diversity has evolved, we investigated the molecular basis of gametophytic SI in Antirrhinum, a member of the Scrophulariaceae, which is closely related to the Solanaceae. We have characterized three Antirrhinum cDNAs encoding polypeptides homologous to S RNases and shown that they are encoded by genes at the S locus. RNA in situ hybridization revealed that the Antirrhinum S RNase are primarily expressed in the stylar transmitting tissue. This expression is consistent with their proposed role in arresting the growth of self-pollen tubes. S alleles from the Scrophulariaceae form a separate group from those of the Solanaceae, indicating that new S alleles have been generated since these families separated (approximately 40 million years). We propose that the recruitment of an ancestral RNase gene into SI occurred during an early stage of angiosperm evolution and that, since that time, new alleles subsequently have arisen at a low rate. PMID:8672882

  9. 32 CFR 310.50 - Lost, stolen, or compromised information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Official for Privacy within 24 hours of discovering that a breach of personally identifiable information... Privacy Office of the breach within 48 hours upon being notified that a loss, theft, or compromise has... (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DOD PRIVACY PROGRAM Privacy Act Violations § 310.50 Lost, stolen, or compromised...

  10. Lost in localization: A solution with neuroinformatics 2.0?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup

    2009-01-01

    The commentary by Derrfuss and Mar (Derrfuss, J., Mar, R.A., 2009. Lost in localization: The need for a universal coordinate database. NeuroImage, doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2009.01.053.) discusses some of the limitations of the present databases and calls for a universal coordinate database. Here I...

  11. Lost but Not Forgotten: Finding Pages on the Unarchived Web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huurdeman, H.C.; Kamps, J.; Samar, T.; de Vries, A.P.; Ben-David, A.; Rogers, R.A.

    2015-01-01

    Web archives attempt to preserve the fast changing web, yet they will always be incomplete. Due to restrictions in crawling depth, crawling frequency, and restrictive selection policies, large parts of the Web are unarchived and, therefore, lost to posterity. In this paper, we propose an approach to

  12. Lost but not forgotten: finding pages on the unarchived web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.C. Huurdeman; J. Kamps; T. Samar (Thaer); A.P. de Vries (Arjen); A. Ben-David; R.A. Rogers (Richard)

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractWeb archives attempt to preserve the fast changing web, yet they will always be incomplete. Due to restrictions in crawling depth, crawling frequency, and restrictive selection policies, large parts of the Web are unarchived and, therefore, lost to posterity. In this paper, we propose an

  13. Transforming Dance History: The Lost History of Rehearsals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodes, Stuart

    1989-01-01

    Explains that an important aspect of dance history is lost by not recording dance rehearsals. Argues that recording rehearsals can reveal the creative process and illuminate the environment that engendered this art form. Concludes that a transformed dance history will influence curriculum development. (GG)

  14. Paradise Lost: Introducing Students to Climate Change through Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennon, Brady

    2013-01-01

    "This country has been the basis of my being. And when it's no longer there, you know, it's unthinkable." Ueantabo Mackenzie's haunting words in the PBS NOW documentary "Paradise Lost" shook the author. He knew he wanted to teach a unit on global warming, especially after participating in the Portland-area Rethinking Schools…

  15. Notes from the Lost Property Department. Bridget Pitt. Cape Town ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    as a loss of motor-skills and memory, and changes in behaviour. Bridget Pitt's Notes from the Lost Property Department (2015) is primarily concerned with the ways in which these invisible wounds cause dis- junctions in personal identity and fissures in relationships. ... together her cracked sense of self, all the time keeping ...

  16. Frequency of the MDR1 mutant allele associated with multidrug sensitivity in dogs from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monobe MM

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Marina M Monobe,1 João P Araujo Junior,2 Kari V Lunsford,3 Rodrigo C Silva,4 Camilo Bulla41Department of Veterinary Clinics, School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, 2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Biosciences Institute, Sao Paulo State University (UNESP, Botucatu, Brazil; 3Department of Clinical Sciences and Animal Health Center, 4Department of Pathobiology and Population Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi, MS, USAAbstract: To date, a 4-bp deletion in the MDR1 gene has been detected in more than ten dog breeds, as well as in mixed breed dogs, in several countries, however information regarding this mutation in dogs from Brazil is lacking. For this reason, 103 Collies, 77 Border Collies, 76 Shetland Sheepdogs, 20 Old English Sheepdogs, 55 German Shepherds, 16 Australian Shepherds, and 53 Whippets from Brazil were screened for the presence of the mutation. The heterozygous mutated genotype, MDR1 (+/−, frequency found for Collies, Australian Shepherd, and Shetland Sheepdog was 50.5% (95% CI =41.1%–59.9%, 31.3% (95% CI =8.6%–53.2%, and 15.8% (95% CI =7.7%–23.9%, respectively. Homozygous mutated genotype, MDR1 (−/−, was detected only in Collies 35.9%. The MDR1 allele mutant frequency found for Collies, Australian Shepherd, and Shetland Sheepdog was 61.2% (95% CI =54.8%–67.5%, 15.6% (95% CI =3.1%–28.2%, and 7.9% (95% CI =3.7%–12.1%, respectively. Additionally, even free of the mutant allele, the maximum mutant prevalence (MMP in that population, with 95% CI, was 3.8%, 5.2%, 5.4%, and 13.8% for Border Collies, German Shepherds, Whippets, and Old English Sheepdogs, respectively. In this way, this information is important, not only for MDR1 genotype-based breeding programs and international exchange of breeding animals of predisposed breeds, but also for modification of drug therapy for breeds at risk.Keywords: P-glycoprotein, MDR1 mutation, ivermectin, dog, drug

  17. The Contribution of Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Promoter Genotypes in Taiwan Lung Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Te-Chun; Chang, Wen-Shin; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chao, Che-Yi; Lin, Yi-Ting; Hsiao, Chieh-Lun; Hsu, Che-Lun; Chen, Wei-Chun; Hsia, Te-Chun; Bau, DA-Tian

    2018-01-01

    Up-regulation of metallo-proteinase (MMP) proteins has been shown in various types of solid cancers and the genotype of MMP1 has been associated with the risk of solid cancers. The contribution of MMP1 genotype to lung cancer has been investigated in various countries, though, to our knowledge, not in Taiwan. Therefore, in this study, we focused on the contribution of a polymorphism in the promoter region of MMP1 to lung cancer risk in Taiwan population. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood of 358 patients with lung cancer and 716 healthy individuals (non-cancer patients). MMP1 rs1799750 polymorphic genotypes of each sample were determined using the typical methodology of polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). The percentages of 2G/2G, 1G/2G, and 1G/1G for MMP1 -1607 genotypes were 34.4%, 41.3% and 24.3% in the disease group and 33.9%, 44.0%, and 22.1% in the control group (p trend=0.6298), respectively. The results of carrier comparisons in dominant and recessive models also support the findings that 1G or 2G appears not to be a determinant allelic biomarker for Taiwan lung cancer. The MMP1 -1607 1G allele is a non-significant protective biomarker for lung cancer in Taiwan. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  18. Angiotensin converting enzyme genotype affects development and course of sarcoidosis in Asian Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Mohammad; Sharma, S K; Ashraf, Shazia; Mishra, Hemant K

    2007-09-01

    Studies of serum angiotensin converting enzyme (SACE) activity and its association with ACE gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in relation to sarcoidosis have yielded variable results. This has been attributed to possible ethnic differences. Present study was designed to evaluate the relationship between I/D polymorphism and susceptibility to develop sarcoidosis and its effect on SACE activity and disease course in Asian Indian patients with sarcoidosis. ACE genotyping was performed in 72 consecutive patients with sarcoidosis and 199 controls (96 normal healthy individuals and 103 tuberculosis patients taken as disease controls). SACE activity was determined in all patients with sarcoidosis. Various parameters were compared amongst patients with different genotypes as well as between sarcoidosis and control groups. Gene frequency of I and D in control group was 0.6 and 0.4, whereas in patients with sarcoidosis it was 0.35 and 0.65 respectively (p SACE activity was highest in patients with DD genotype and followed an order of DD > ID > II. Good response to initial corticosteroids was seen in 6 of 6 (100%) patients with II genotype whereas in only 32 of 37 (84%) with ID and 16 of 25 (64%) with DD (p = 0.013). In Asian Indian population 'D' allele is associated with an increased risk for development of sarcoidosis and patients with 'D' allele show poor response to corticosteroids.

  19. Early effect of ApoE-epsilon 4 allele on cognitive results in a group of highly performing subjects: the EVA study. Etude sur le Vieillissement Artériel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berr, C; Dufouil, C; Brousseau, T; Richard, F; Amouyel, P; Marceteau, E; Alpérovitch, A

    1996-10-25

    We examined the association between apolipoprotein E (ApoE) epsilon 4 allele and cognitive performances in a population sample of 1174 high functioning volunteers aged 59-71 years. The neuropsychological battery included the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and nine tests assessing visual attention, verbal memory, visual processing, logical reasoning, psychomotor rapidity, visual memory, auditory attention and verbal fluency. The ratio of genotypes with zero, one or two epsilon 4 alleles was 70.6%, 21.4% and 1.9%, respectively. The epsilon 4 allele was significantly associated with lower scores for visual attention, psychomotor rapidity and MMSE. In the best performer subgroup (MMSE score above 25, n = 1028), all relationships persisted. Our findings demonstrate that the ApoE-epsilon 4 allele is early associated with low normal cognitive performances in areas which are not specifically affected at the subclinical onset of dementia.

  20. Identification of SSR and RAPD markers linked to a resistance allele for angular leaf spot in the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris line ESAL 550

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilvan Ferreira da Silva

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify RAPD and SSR markers associated with a resistant allele for angular leaf spot (Phaeoisariopsis griseola from the line 'ESAL 550', derived from the Andean 'Jalo EEP 558' cultivar, to assist selection of resistant genotypes. The resistant line 'ESAL 550' and the susceptible cultivar 'Carioca MG' were crossed to generate F1 and F2 populations. One hundred and twenty F2:3 families were evaluated. The DNA of the 12 most resistant families was bulked and the same was done with the DNA of the 10 most susceptible, generating two contrasting bulks. One RAPD and one SSR marker was found to be linked in coupling phase to the resistant allele. The SSR marker was amplified by the primer PV-atct001(282C, and its distance from the resistant allele was 7.6 cM. This is the most useful marker for indirect selection of resistant plants in segregating populations. The RAPD marker was amplified by the primer OPP07(857C linked in coupling phase to the resistant allele, and distant 24.4 cM. Therefore, this RAPD marker is not so useful in assisting selection because it is too far from the resistant allele.

  1. Parasites and parallel divergence of the number of individual MHC alleles between sympatric three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus morphs in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsopoulou, M E; Pálsson, S; Ólafsdóttir, G Á

    2012-10-01

    Two pairs of sympatric three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus morphs and two single morph populations inhabiting mud and lava or rocky benthic habitats in four Icelandic lakes were screened for parasites and genotyped for MHC class IIB diversity. Parasitic infection differed consistently between G. aculeatus from different benthic habitats. Gasterosteus aculeatus from the lava or rocky habitats were more heavily infected in all lakes. A parallel pattern was also found in individual MHC allelic variation with lava G. aculeatus morphs exhibiting lower levels of variation than the mud morphs. Evidence for selective divergence in MHC allele number is ambiguous but supported by two findings in addition to the parallel pattern observed. MHC allele diversity was not consistent with diversity reported at neutral markers (microsatellites) and in Þingvallavatn the most common number of alleles in each morph was associated with lower infection levels. In the Þingvallavatn lava morph, lower infection levels by the two most common parasites, Schistocephalus solidus and Diplostomum baeri, were associated with different MHC allele numbers. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2012 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  2. Association of the insertion allele of the common ACE gene polymorphism with type 2 diabetes mellitus among Kuwaiti cardiovascular disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Serri, Ahmad; Ismael, Fatma G; Al-Bustan, Suzanne A; Al-Rashdan, Ibrahim

    2015-12-01

    The D allele of the common angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) I/D gene polymorphism (rs4646994) predisposes to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, results on which allele predisposes to disease susceptibility remain controversial in Asian populations. This study was performed to evaluate the association of the common ACE I/D gene polymorphism with both T2DM and CVD susceptibility in an Arab population. We genotyped the ACE I/D polymorphisms by direct allele-specific PCR in 183 healthy controls and 400 CVD patients with diabetes (n=204) and without (n=196). Statistical analysis comparing between the different groups were conducted using R statistic package "SNPassoc". Two genetic models were used: the additive and co-dominant models. The I allele was found to be associated with T2DM (OR=1.84, p=0.00009) after adjusting for age, sex and body mass index. However, there was no association with CVD susceptibility (p>0.05). The ACE I allele is found to be associated with T2DM; however, no association was observed with CVD. The inconsistency between studies is suggested to be attributed to genetic diversity due to the existence of sub-populations found in Asian populations. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Linkage disequilibrium between an allele at the dopamine D4 receptor locus and Tourette syndrome, by the transmission-disequilibrium test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grice, D.E.; Gelernter, J. [Veterans Administration Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT (United States); Leckman, J.F.; Pauls, D.L. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Dopaminergic abnormalities are implicated in the pathogenesis of Tourette syndrome (TS) and chronic multiple tics. We used the transmission-disequilibrium test (TDT) method to test for linkage disequilibrium between a specific allele (the seven-repeat allele (DRD4*7R) of the exon 3 VNTR polymorphic site) at the D4 dopamine receptor locus (DRD4) and expression of chronic multiple tics and TS. This particular allele had been shown in functional studies to have different binding properties compared with the other common alleles in this DRD4 polymorphic system. We studied 64 family trios (consisting of an affected person and two parents, at least one heterozygous for DRD4*7R), including 12 nuclear family trios and 52 trios from four large TS kindreds. The DRD4*7R allele was transmitted significantly more frequently than expected ({chi}{sup 2}{sub TDT} ranging from 8.47 [P < .004] to 10.80 [P = .001], depending on breadth of disease definition and inclusion or exclusion of inferred genotypes). Confirmation of this finding will depend on either replication in other samples or the identification of a transmitted functional mutation within this sample. 56 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. The allele frequency of two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene in the Taiwanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Chen, Hui-Ju; Shu, Wei-Pang; Tsai, Yi-Chang; Lai, Yen-Chein

    2011-10-01

    The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene located on chromosome 3p25-26 is implicated in VHL disease. Two informative single nucleotide polymorphisms are at positions 19 and 1149 on the nucleotide sequence from Gene Bank NM_000551. In this study we examined the allele frequencies at these two loci in the Taiwanese population and compared the results to those from European ethnic populations. The allele frequency was examined in 616 healthy individuals including 301 university students and 315 neonates. Both A/G polymorphisms were investigated using restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis created by restriction enzymes, BsaJ I and Acc I. Among these subjects, the allele frequencies at 19 SNP and 1149 SNP for variant G were 0.130 and 0.133, respectively. And these results were significant differences from those of the Caucasian populations. In addition, 90% of the tested subjects had identical genotypes at these two loci suggesting the existence of nonrandom association of alleles. We found that the G allele frequency at these two loci in the Taiwanese population is much lower than that in people from Western countries. This phenomenon may be attributed to ethnic effects. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Transforming microbial genotyping: a robotic pipeline for genotyping bacterial strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian O'Farrell

    Full Text Available Microbial genotyping increasingly deals with large numbers of samples, and data are commonly evaluated by unstructured approaches, such as spread-sheets. The efficiency, reliability and throughput of genotyping would benefit from the automation of manual manipulations within the context of sophisticated data storage. We developed a medium- throughput genotyping pipeline for MultiLocus Sequence Typing (MLST of bacterial pathogens. This pipeline was implemented through a combination of four automated liquid handling systems, a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS consisting of a variety of dedicated commercial operating systems and programs, including a Sample Management System, plus numerous Python scripts. All tubes and microwell racks were bar-coded and their locations and status were recorded in the LIMS. We also created a hierarchical set of items that could be used to represent bacterial species, their products and experiments. The LIMS allowed reliable, semi-automated, traceable bacterial genotyping from initial single colony isolation and sub-cultivation through DNA extraction and normalization to PCRs, sequencing and MLST sequence trace evaluation. We also describe robotic sequencing to facilitate cherrypicking of sequence dropouts. This pipeline is user-friendly, with a throughput of 96 strains within 10 working days at a total cost of 200,000 items were processed by two to three people. Our sophisticated automated pipeline can be implemented by a small microbiology group without extensive external support, and provides a general framework for semi-automated bacterial genotyping of large numbers of samples at low cost.

  6. Ovine progressive pneumonia provirus levels are unaffected by the prion 171R allele in an Idaho sheep flock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Robert D; Herrmann-Hoesing, Lynn M; White, Stephen N; O'Rourke, Katherine I; Knowles, Donald P

    2009-01-22

    Selective breeding of sheep for arginine (R) at prion gene (PRNP) codon 171 confers resistance to classical scrapie. However, other effects of 171R selection are uncertain. Ovine progressive pneumonia/Maedi-Visna virus (OPPV) may infect up to 66% of a flock thus any affect of 171R selection on OPPV susceptibility or disease progression could have major impact on the sheep industry. Hypotheses that the PRNP 171R allele is 1) associated with the presence of OPPV provirus and 2) associated with higher provirus levels were tested in an Idaho ewe flock. OPPV provirus was found in 226 of 358 ewes by quantitative PCR. The frequency of ewes with detectable provirus did not differ significantly among the 171QQ, 171QR, and 171RR genotypes (p > 0.05). Also, OPPV provirus levels in infected ewes were not significantly different among codon 171 genotypes (p > 0.05). These results show that, in the flock examined, the presence of OPPV provirus and provirus levels are not related to the PRNP 171R allele. Therefore, a genetic approach to scrapie control is not expected to increase or decrease the number of OPPV infected sheep or the progression of disease. This study provides further support to the adoption of PRNP 171R selection as a scrapie control measure.

  7. Ovine progressive pneumonia provirus levels are unaffected by the prion 171R allele in an Idaho sheep flock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrmann-Hoesing Lynn M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Selective breeding of sheep for arginine (R at prion gene (PRNP codon 171 confers resistance to classical scrapie. However, other effects of 171R selection are uncertain. Ovine progressive pneumonia/Maedi-Visna virus (OPPV may infect up to 66% of a flock thus any affect of 171R selection on OPPV susceptibility or disease progression could have major impact on the sheep industry. Hypotheses that the PRNP 171R allele is 1 associated with the presence of OPPV provirus and 2 associated with higher provirus levels were tested in an Idaho ewe flock. OPPV provirus was found in 226 of 358 ewes by quantitative PCR. The frequency of ewes with detectable provirus did not differ significantly among the 171QQ, 171QR, and 171RR genotypes (p > 0.05. Also, OPPV provirus levels in infected ewes were not significantly different among codon 171 genotypes (p > 0.05. These results show that, in the flock examined, the presence of OPPV provirus and provirus levels are not related to the PRNP 171R allele. Therefore, a genetic approach to scrapie control is not expected to increase or decrease the number of OPPV infected sheep or the progression of disease. This study provides further support to the adoption of PRNP 171R selection as a scrapie control measure.

  8. HLA-DRB1 allele association with rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility and severity in Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourad, Jamil; Monem, Fawza

    2013-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a complex multifactorial chronic disease. The importance of human leukocyte antigen as a major genetic risk factor for RA was studied worldwide. Although it is widely distributed in different Syrian areas, studies of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles' role are absent. The aim of our study was to determine the association of HLA-DRB1 alleles with the susceptibility and severity of RA in Syria. Eighty-six RA patients and 200 healthy controls from Syria were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP). Anti-CCP antibodies were measured by ELISA. Rheumatoid factor (RF), C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and disease activity score 28 (DAS-28) values were obtained from patients' medical records. DAS-28 was used to assess the clinical severity of the patients. The HLA-DRB1*01, *04, and *10 frequencies showed a strong association with the disease susceptibility (OR = 2.29, 95% CI = 1.11-4.75, P = 0.022; OR = 3.16, 95% CI = 2.0 -4.8, P < 0.0001; OR = 2.43, 95% CI = 1.07-5.51, P = 0.029 respectively), while the frequencies of HLA-DRB1*11, and *13 were significantly lower in RA patients than in controls (OR = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.3-0.8, P = 0.004; OR = 0.32, 95% CI = 0.15-0.69, P = 0.002, respectively). The other HLA-DRB1 alleles showed no significant difference. The frequency of anti-CCP antibodies was higher in shared epitope (SE) positive patients compared with SE-negative patients (OR = 5.5, 95% CI = 2-15.1, P = 0.00054). DAS-28 of RA patients didn't show significant difference between the SE negative and the SE positive groups. Our results indicate that HLA-DRB1*01, *04, and *10 alleles are related with RA, while HLA-DRB1*11 and *13 protect against RA in the Syrian population.

  9. Correlation Between HLA-A, B and DRB1 Alleles and Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Jun Ding

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS is an emerging hemorrhagic fever caused by a tick-borne bunyavirus (SFTSV in East Asian countries. The role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA in resistance and susceptibility to SFTSV is not known. We investigated the correlation of HLA locus A, B and DRB1 alleles with the occurrence of SFTS.A total of 84 confirmed SFTS patients (patient group and 501 unrelated non-SFTS patients (healthy individuals as control group from Shandong Province were genotyped by PCR-sequence specific oligonucleotide probe (PCR-SSOP for HLA-A, B and DRB1 loci.Allele frequency was calculated and compared using χ2 test or the Fisher's exact test. A corrected P value was calculated with a bonferronis correction. Odds Ratio (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated by Woolf's method.A total of 11 HLA-A, 23 HLA-B and 12 HLA-DRB1 alleles were identified in the patient group, whereas 15 HLA-A, 30 HLA-B and 13 HLA-DRB1 alleles were detected in the control group. The frequencies of A*30 and B*13 in the SFTS patient group were lower than that in the control group (P = 0.0341 and 0.0085, Pc = 0.5115 and 0.252. The ORs of A*30 and B*13 in the SFTS patient group were 0.54 and 0.49, respectively. The frequency of two-locus haplotype A*30-B*13 was lower in the patient group than in the control group(5.59% versus 12.27%, P = 0.037,OR = 0.41, 95%CI = 0.18-0.96 without significance(Pc>0.05. A*30-B*13-DRB1*07 and A*02-B*15-DRB1*04 had strong associations with SFTS resistance and susceptibility respectively (Pc = 0.0412 and 0.0001,OR = 0.43 and 5.07.The host HLA class I polymorphism might play an important role with the occurrence of SFTS. Negative associations were observed with HLA-A*30, HLA-B*13 and Haplotype A*30-B*13, although the associations were not statistically significant. A*30-B*13-DRB1*07 had negative correlation with the occurrence of SFTS; in contrast, haplotype A*02-B*15-DRB1*04 was positively correlated with SFTS.

  10. Interaction of 5-HTTLPR genotype and unipolar major depression in the emergence of aggressive/hostile traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Xenia; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N; Csukly, Gabor; Bagdy, Gyorgy; Pap, Dorottya; Molnár, Eszter; Laszik, Andras; Lazary, Judit; Sarosi, Andrea; Faludi, Gabor; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria; Szekely, Anna; Rihmer, Zoltan

    2011-08-01

    The 5-HTTLPR polymorphism has been associated both with depression and aggression/hostility. The multidirectional association between depression, aggression and the s allele may be important, since all these phenomena are related to suicidal behavior. Our aim was to investigate the association between 5-HTTLPR and aggressive/hostile traits in depressed patients and controls. 137 depressive and 118 control women completed the Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory and were genotyped for 5-HTTLPR. BDHI scores in the different groups were investigated by Generalized Linear Model Analysis. Association between dependent and independent variables in the model was tested by the likelihood ratio Chi-square statistic. Diagnosis and genotype showed a significant association with several aggressive/hostile traits. Interaction of the two main effects was also significant in case of several subscales. Post hoc analyses indicated a significant association between BDHI subscales and s allele only in the depressed group. Only women were studied and since gender differences are present both in aggressive behavior and putatively in the behavioral effects of 5-HTTLPR genotype, our findings pertain only to females. Our results indicate a robust relationship between aggression/hostility and 5-HTTLPR genotype, but this association is more marked in the presence of depression. The presence of the s allele thus not only contributes to a higher risk of depression, but in depressives also leads to higher aggression/hostility. Our results have important implications for suicide research, since the s allele is associated with violent suicide, and this association may be mediated through the emergence of increased aggression/hostility in depressed patients carrying the s allele. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Novel alleles of 31-bp VNTR polymorphism in the human ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-12-06

    Dec 6, 2010 ... verts the potentially toxic Hcy to cysteine (Cys). Under nor- mal physiological conditions, nearly half of the Hcy con- sumed is cleaved in this way ..... studied the relationship between the genotypes and plasma total Hcy levels and found that individuals with 16/17 and. 17/18 genotypes had a significantly ...

  12. Length of FMR1 repeat alleles within the normal range does not substantially affect the risk of early menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Katherine S.; Bennett, Claire E.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Weedon, Michael N.; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Murray, Anna

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Is the length of FMR1 repeat alleles within the normal range associated with the risk of early menopause? SUMMARY ANSWER The length of repeat alleles within the normal range does not substantially affect risk of early menopause. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY There is a strong, well-established relationship between length of premutation FMR1 alleles and age at menopause, suggesting that this relationship could continue into the normal range. Within the normal range, there is conflicting evidence; differences in ovarian reserve have been identified with FMR1 repeat allele length, but a recent population-based study did not find any association with age at menopause as a quantitative trait. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION We analysed cross-sectional baseline survey data collected at recruitment from 2004 to 2010 from a population-based, prospective epidemiological cohort study of >110 000 women to investigate whether repeat allele length was associated with early menopause. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHOD We included 4333 women from the Breakthrough Generations Study (BGS), of whom 2118 were early menopause cases (menopause under 46 years) and 2215 were controls. We analysed the relationship between length of FMR1 alleles and early menopause using logistic regression with allele length as continuous and categorical variables. We also conducted analyses with the outcome age at menopause as a quantitative trait as well as appropriate sensitivity and exploratory analyses. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE There was no association of the shorter or longer FMR1 allele or their combined genotype with the clinically relevant end point of early menopause in our main analysis. Likewise, there were no associations with age at menopause as a quantitative trait in our secondary analysis. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION Women with homozygous alleles in the normal range may have undetected FMR1 premutation alleles, although there was no evidence to suggest this. We

  13. Angiotensin-converting enzyme genotype and arterial oxygen saturation at high altitude in Peruvian Quechua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigham, Abigail W; Kiyamu, Melisa; León-Velarde, Fabiola; Parra, Esteban J; Rivera-Ch, Maria; Shriver, Mark D; Brutsaert, Tom D

    2008-01-01

    The I-allele of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism has been associated with performance benefits at high altitude (HA). In n = 142 young males and females of largely Quechua origins in Peru, we evaluated 3 specific hypotheses with regard to the HA benefits of the I-allele: (1) the I-allele is associated with higher arterial oxygen saturation (Sa(O(2))) at HA, (2) the I-allele effect depends on the acclimatization state of the subjects, and (3) the putative I-allele effect on Sa(O(2)) is mediated by the isocapnic hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR, l/min(1)/% Sa(O(2))(1)). The subject participants comprised two different study groups including BLA subjects (born at low altitude) who were lifelong sea-level residents transiently exposed to hypobaric hypoxia (<24 h) and BHA subjects (born at HA) who were lifelong residents of HA. To control for the possibility of population stratification, Native American ancestry proportion (NAAP) was estimated as a covariate for each individual using a panel of 70 ancestry-informative molecular markers (AIMS). At HA, resting and exercise Sa(O(2)) was strongly associated with the ACE genotype, p = 0.008 with approximately 4% of the total variance in Sa(O(2)) attributed to ACE genotype. Moreover, I/I individuals maintained approximately 2.3 percentage point higher Sa(O(2)) compared to I/D and D/D. This I-allele effect was evident in both BLA and BHA groups, suggesting that acclimatization state has little influence on the phenotypic expression of the ACE gene. Finally, ACE genotype was not associated with the isocapnic HVR, although HVR had a strong independent effect on Sa(O(2)) (p = 0.001). This suggests that the I-allele effect on Sa(O(2)) is not mediated by the peripheral control of breathing, but rather by some other central cardiopulmonary effect of the ACE gene on the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS).

  14. [Genotyping of ABO Blood Group in Partial Population of Yunnan Province by SNaPshot Technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, S X; Zeng, F M; Jin, Y Z; Wan, H J; Zhai, D; Xing, Y M; Cheng, B W

    2017-06-01

    To detect the genotype of ABO blood group by SNaPshot technology. DNA were extracted from the peripheral blood samples with known blood groups (obtained by serology) of 107 unrelated individuals in Yunnan. Six SNP loci of the 261th, 297th, 681th, 703th, 802th, and 803th nucleotide positions were detected by SNaPshot Multiplex kit, and relevant genetics parameters were calculated. In 107 blood samples, the allele frequencies of types A, B, O A , and O G were 0.355 1, 0.168 2, 0.230 0 and 0.247 6, respectively, while that of types A G and cis AB were not detected. The genotyping results of ABO blood group were consistent with that of serologic testing. SNaPshot technology can be adapted for genotyping of ABO blood group. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Forensic Medicine

  15. Genomic Selection Using Genotyping-By-Sequencing Data with Different Coverage Depth in Perennial Ryegrass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cericola, Fabio; Fé, Dario; Janss, Luc

    2015-01-01

    the diagonal elements by estimating the amount of genetic variance caused by the reduction of the coverage depth. Secondly we developed a method to scale the relationship matrix by taking into account the overall amount of pairwise non-missing loci between all families. Rust resistance and heading date were......Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) allows generating up to millions of molecular markers with a cost per sample which is proportional to the level of multiplexing. Increasing the sample multiplexing decreases the genotyping price but also reduces the numbers of reads per marker. In this work we...... investigated how this reduction of the coverage depth affects the genomic relationship matrices used to estimated breeding value of F2 family pools in perennial ryegrass. A total of 995 families were genotyped via GBS providing more than 1.8M allele frequency estimates for each family with an average coverage...

  16. RSCA genotyping of MHC for high-throughput evolutionary studies in the model organism three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Tobias L; Eizaguirre, Christophe; Becker, Sven; Reusch, Thorsten BH

    2009-01-01

    Background In all jawed vertebrates, highly polymorphic genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encode antigen presenting molecules that play a key role in the adaptive immune response. Their polymorphism is composed of multiple copies of recently duplicated genes, each possessing many alleles within populations, as well as high nucleotide divergence between alleles of the same species. Experimental evidence is accumulating that MHC polymorphism is a result of balancing selection by parasites and pathogens. In order to describe MHC diversity and analyse the underlying mechanisms that maintain it, a reliable genotyping technique is required that is suitable for such highly variable genes. Results We present a genotyping protocol that uses Reference Strand-mediated Conformation Analysis (RSCA), optimised for recently duplicated MHC class IIB genes that are typical for many fish and bird species, including the three-spined stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus. In addition we use a comprehensive plasmid library of MHC class IIB alleles to determine the nucleotide sequence of alleles represented by RSCA allele peaks. Verification of the RSCA typing by cloning and sequencing demonstrates high congruency between both methods and provides new insight into the polymorphism of classical stickleback MHC genes. Analysis of the plasmid library additionally reveals the high resolution and reproducibility of the RSCA technique. Conclusion This new RSCA genotyping protocol offers a fast, but sensitive and reliable way to determine the MHC allele repertoire of three-spined sticklebacks. It therefore provides a valuable tool to employ this highly polymorphic and adaptive marker in future high-throughput studies of host-parasite co-evolution and ecological speciation in this emerging model organism. PMID:19291291

  17. RSCA genotyping of MHC for high-throughput evolutionary studies in the model organism three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker Sven

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In all jawed vertebrates, highly polymorphic genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC encode antigen presenting molecules that play a key role in the adaptive immune response. Their polymorphism is composed of multiple copies of recently duplicated genes, each possessing many alleles within populations, as well as high nucleotide divergence between alleles of the same species. Experimental evidence is accumulating that MHC polymorphism is a result of balancing selection by parasites and pathogens. In order to describe MHC diversity and analyse the underlying mechanisms that maintain it, a reliable genotyping technique is required that is suitable for such highly variable genes. Results We present a genotyping protocol that uses Reference Strand-mediated Conformation Analysis (RSCA, optimised for recently duplicated MHC class IIB genes that are typical for many fish and bird species, including the three-spined stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus. In addition we use a comprehensive plasmid library of MHC class IIB alleles to determine the nucleotide sequence of alleles represented by RSCA allele peaks. Verification of the RSCA typing by cloning and sequencing demonstrates high congruency between both methods and provides new insight into the polymorphism of classical stickleback MHC genes. Analysis of the plasmid library additionally reveals the high resolution and reproducibility of the RSCA technique. Conclusion This new RSCA genotyping protocol offers a fast, but sensitive and reliable way to determine the MHC allele repertoire of three-spined sticklebacks. It therefore provides a valuable tool to employ this highly polymorphic and adaptive marker in future high-throughput studies of host-parasite co-evolution and ecological speciation in this emerging model organism.

  18. Association of yield-related traits in founder genotypes and derivatives of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Guo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yield improvement is an ever-important objective of wheat breeding. Studying and understanding the phenotypes and genotypes of yield-related traits has potential for genetic improvement of crops. Results The genotypes of 215 wheat cultivars including 11 founder parents and 106 derivatives were analyzed by the 9 K wheat SNP iSelect assay. A total of 4138 polymorphic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP loci were detected on 21 chromosomes, of which 3792 were mapped to single chromosome locations. All genotypes were phenotyped for six yield-related traits including plant height (PH, spike length (SL, spikelet number per spike (SNPS, kernel number per spike (KNPS, kernel weight per spike (KWPS, and thousand kernel weight (TKW in six irrigated environments. Genome-wide association analysis detected 117 significant associations of 76 SNPs on 15 chromosomes with phenotypic explanation rates (R 2 ranging from 2.03 to 12.76%. In comparing allelic variation between founder parents and their derivatives (106 and other cultivars (98 using the 76 associated SNPs, we found that the region 116.0–133.2 cM on chromosome 5A in founder parents and derivatives carried alleles positively influencing kernel weight per spike (KWPS, rarely found in other cultivars. Conclusion The identified favorable alleles could mark important chromosome regions in derivatives that were inherited from founder parents. Our results unravel the genetic of yield in founder genotypes, and provide tools for marker-assisted selection for yield improvement.

  19. Physical and verbal aggressive behavior and COMT genotype: Sensitivity to the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuvblad, Catherine; Narusyte, Jurgita; Comasco, Erika; Andershed, Henrik; Andershed, Anna-Karin; Colins, Olivier F; Fanti, Kostas A; Nilsson, Kent W

    2016-07-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) genotype has been implicated as a vulnerability factor for several psychiatric diseases as well as aggressive behavior, either directly, or in interaction with an adverse environment. The present study aimed at investigating the susceptibility properties of COMT genotype to adverse and favorable environment in relation to physical and verbal aggressive behavior. The COMT Val158Met polymorphism was genotyped in a Swedish population-based cohort including 1,783 individuals, ages 20-24 years (47% males). A significant three-way interaction was found, after correction for multiple testing, between COMT genotype, exposure to violence, and parent