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Sample records for genotypes lost alleles

  1. A genotype probability index for multiple alleles and haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, A; Kinghorn, B P

    2005-12-01

    We use linear algebra to calculate an index of information content in genotype probabilities which has previously been calculated using trigonometry. The new method can be generalized allowing the index to be calculated for loci with more than two alleles. Applications of this index include its use in genotyping strategies, strategies to manage genetic disorders and in estimation of genotype effects.

  2. ABO genotyping in leukemia patients reveals new ABO variant alleles

    OpenAIRE

    Novaretti,M.C.Z.; DOMINGUES, A. E.; MANHANI, R.; Pinto, E M; Dorlhiac-Llacer, P.E.; Chamone, D.A.F.

    2008-01-01

    The ABO blood group is the most important blood group system in transfusion medicine and organ transplantation. To date, more than 160 ABO alleles have been identified by molecular investigation. Almost all ABO genotyping studies have been performed in blood donors and families and for investigation of ABO subgroups detected serologically. The aim of the present study was to perform ABO genotyping in patients with leukemia. Blood samples were collected from 108 Brazilian patients with chronic...

  3. The loss-of-allele assay for ES cell screening and mouse genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frendewey, David; Chernomorsky, Rostislav; Esau, Lakeisha; Om, Jinsop; Xue, Yingzi; Murphy, Andrew J; Yancopoulos, George D; Valenzuela, David M

    2010-01-01

    Targeting vectors used to create directed mutations in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells consist, in their simplest form, of a gene for drug selection flanked by mouse genomic sequences, the so-called homology arms that promote site-directed homologous recombination between the vector and the target gene. The VelociGene method for the creation of targeted mutations in ES cells employs targeting vectors, called BACVecs, that are based on bacterial artificial chromosomes. Compared with conventional short targeting vectors, BacVecs provide two major advantages: (1) their much larger homology arms promote high targeting efficiencies without the need for isogenicity or negative selection strategies; and (2) they enable deletions and insertions of up to 100kb in a single targeting event, making possible gene-ablating definitive null alleles and other large-scale genomic modifications. Because of their large arm sizes, however, BACVecs do not permit screening by conventional assays, such as long-range PCR or Southern blotting, that link the inserted targeting vector to the targeted locus. To exploit the advantages of BACVecs for gene targeting, we inverted the conventional screening logic in developing the loss-of-allele (LOA) assay, which quantifies the number of copies of the native locus to which the mutation was directed. In a correctly targeted ES cell clone, the LOA assay detects one of the two native alleles (for genes not on the X or Y chromosome), the other allele being disrupted by the targeted modification. We apply the same principle in reverse as a gain-of-allele assay to quantify the copy number of the inserted targeting vector. The LOA assay reveals a correctly targeted clone as having lost one copy of the native target gene and gained one copy of the drug resistance gene or other inserted marker. The combination of these quantitative assays makes LOA genotyping unequivocal and amenable to automated scoring. We use the quantitative polymerase chain reaction

  4. A high-throughput method for genotyping S-RNase alleles in apple

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bjarne; Ørgaard, Marian; Toldam-Andersen, Torben Bo

    2016-01-01

    We present a new efficient screening tool for detection of S-alleles in apple. The protocol using general and multiplexed primers for PCR reaction and fragment detection on an automatized capillary DNA sequencer exposed a higher number of alleles than any previous studies. Analysis of alleles...... is made on basis of three individual fragment sizes making the allele interpretation highly accurate. The method was employed to genotype 432 Malus accessions and exposed 25 different S-alleles in a selection of Malus domestica cultivars of mainly Danish origin (402 accessions) as well as a selection...

  5. Allele-Specific Quantitative PCR for Accurate, Rapid, and Cost-Effective Genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han B; Schwab, Tanya L; Koleilat, Alaa; Ata, Hirotaka; Daby, Camden L; Cervera, Roberto Lopez; McNulty, Melissa S; Bostwick, Hannah S; Clark, Karl J

    2016-06-01

    Customizable endonucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) enable rapid generation of mutant strains at genomic loci of interest in animal models and cell lines. With the accelerated pace of generating mutant alleles, genotyping has become a rate-limiting step to understanding the effects of genetic perturbation. Unless mutated alleles result in distinct morphological phenotypes, mutant strains need to be genotyped using standard methods in molecular biology. Classic restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) or sequencing is labor-intensive and expensive. Although simpler than RFLP, current versions of allele-specific PCR may still require post-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) handling such as sequencing, or they are more expensive if allele-specific fluorescent probes are used. Commercial genotyping solutions can take weeks from assay design to result, and are often more expensive than assembling reactions in-house. Key components of commercial assay systems are often proprietary, which limits further customization. Therefore, we developed a one-step open-source genotyping method based on quantitative PCR. The allele-specific qPCR (ASQ) does not require post-PCR processing and can genotype germline mutants through either threshold cycle (Ct) or end-point fluorescence reading. ASQ utilizes allele-specific primers, a locus-specific reverse primer, universal fluorescent probes and quenchers, and hot start DNA polymerase. Individual laboratories can further optimize this open-source system as we completely disclose the sequences, reagents, and thermal cycling protocol. We have tested the ASQ protocol to genotype alleles in five different genes. ASQ showed a 98-100% concordance in genotype scoring with RFLP or Sanger sequencing outcomes. ASQ is time-saving because a single qPCR without post-PCR handling suffices to score

  6. Accounting for genotype uncertainty in the estimation of allele frequencies in autopolyploids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blischak, Paul D; Kubatko, Laura S; Wolfe, Andrea D

    2016-05-01

    Despite the increasing opportunity to collect large-scale data sets for population genomic analyses, the use of high-throughput sequencing to study populations of polyploids has seen little application. This is due in large part to problems associated with determining allele copy number in the genotypes of polyploid individuals (allelic dosage uncertainty-ADU), which complicates the calculation of important quantities such as allele frequencies. Here, we describe a statistical model to estimate biallelic SNP frequencies in a population of autopolyploids using high-throughput sequencing data in the form of read counts. We bridge the gap from data collection (using restriction enzyme based techniques [e.g. GBS, RADseq]) to allele frequency estimation in a unified inferential framework using a hierarchical Bayesian model to sum over genotype uncertainty. Simulated data sets were generated under various conditions for tetraploid, hexaploid and octoploid populations to evaluate the model's performance and to help guide the collection of empirical data. We also provide an implementation of our model in the R package polyfreqs and demonstrate its use with two example analyses that investigate (i) levels of expected and observed heterozygosity and (ii) model adequacy. Our simulations show that the number of individuals sampled from a population has a greater impact on estimation error than sequencing coverage. The example analyses also show that our model and software can be used to make inferences beyond the estimation of allele frequencies for autopolyploids by providing assessments of model adequacy and estimates of heterozygosity.

  7. Rapid ABO genotyping by high-speed droplet allele-specific PCR using crude samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Chiaki; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Takeichi, Naoya; Furukawa, Satomi; Sugano, Mitsutoshi; Uehara, Takeshi; Okumura, Nobuo; Honda, Takayuki

    2017-03-13

    ABO genotyping has common tools for personal identification of forensic and transplantation field. We developed a new method based on a droplet allele-specific PCR (droplet-AS-PCR) that enabled rapid PCR amplification. We attempted rapid ABO genotyping using crude DNA isolated from dried blood and buccal cells. We designed allele-specific primers for three SNPs (at nucleotides 261, 526, and 803) in exons 6 and 7 of the ABO gene. We pretreated dried blood and buccal cells with proteinase K, and obtained crude DNAs without DNA purification. Droplet-AS-PCR allowed specific amplification of the SNPs at the three loci using crude DNA, with results similar to those for DNA extracted from fresh peripheral blood. The sensitivity of the methods was 5%-10%. The genotyping of extracted DNA and crude DNA were completed within 8 and 9 minutes, respectively. The genotypes determined by the droplet-AS-PCR method were always consistent with those obtained by direct sequencing. The droplet-AS-PCR method enabled rapid and specific amplification of three SNPs of the ABO gene from crude DNA treated with proteinase K. ABO genotyping by the droplet-AS-PCR has the potential to be applied to various fields including a forensic medicine and transplantation medical care. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Genotype and allele frequency of CYP2C19*17 in a healthy Iranian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payan, Maryam; Tajik, Nader; Rouini, Mohammad Reza; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) is important in metabolism of wide range of drugs. CYP2C19*17 is a novel variant allele which increases gene transcription and therefore results in ultra-rapid metabolizer phenotype (URM). Distribution of this variant allele has not been well studied worldwide. The aim of present study was to investigate allele and genotype frequencies of CYP2C19*17 in a healthy Iranian population and compare them with other ethnic groups. One hundred eighty healthy unrelated Iranian volunteer took part in this study and were genotyped for CYP2C19 *2, *3, *17 (-3402) by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and CYP2C19*17 (-806) by a nested-PCR assays. The distribution of CYP2C19*17 polymorphism in Iranian population was then compared with other ethnic groups. The CYP2C19*17 allele frequency was 21.6% in Iranian population. Among studied subjects 5.5% were homozygous for CYP2C19*17 and phenotyped as ultra-rapid metabolizers; 28.8% were genotyped as CYP2C19*1*17 (extensive metabolizers) and 3.3% as CYP2C19*2*17 (intermediate metabolizers). The CYP2C19*17 genetic distribution in Iranian population is similar to Middle East or European countries. The high frequency of CYP2C19*17 in Iranian population highlights the importance of this new variant allele in metabolism of CYP2C19 substrates. Thus, future association studies are required to reveal clinical consequence of this genetic polymorphism in carrier individuals.

  9. High-speed droplet-allele-specific polymerase chain reaction for genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Honda, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide alternations such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or single nucleotide mutations are useful genetic markers for molecular diagnosis, prognosis, drug response, and predisposition to diseases. Rapid identification of SNPs or mutations is clinically important, especially for determining drug responses and selection of molecular-targeted therapy. Here, we describe a rapid genotyping assay based on the allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) by using our droplet-PCR machine (droplet-AS-PCR).

  10. Interrogation of allelic chromatin states in human cells by high-density ChIP-genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Nicholas; Adoue, Véronique; Ge, Bing; Chen, Shu-Huang; Kwan, Tony; Pastinen, Tomi

    2014-09-01

    Allele-specific (AS) assessment of chromatin has the potential to elucidate specific cis-regulatory mechanisms, which are predicted to underlie the majority of the known genetic associations to complex disease. However, development of chromatin landscapes at allelic resolution has been challenging since sites of variable signal strength require substantial read depths not commonly applied in sequencing based approaches. In this study, we addressed this by performing parallel analyses of input DNA and chromatin immunoprecipitates (ChIP) on high-density Illumina genotyping arrays. Allele-specificity for the histone modifications H3K4me1, H3K4me3, H3K27ac, H3K27me3, and H3K36me3 was assessed using ChIP samples generated from 14 lymphoblast and 6 fibroblast cell lines. AS-ChIP SNPs were combined into domains and validated using high-confidence ChIP-seq sites. We observed characteristic patterns of allelic-imbalance for each histone-modification around allele-specifically expressed transcripts. Notably, we found H3K4me1 to be significantly anti-correlated with allelic expression (AE) at transcription start sites, indicating H3K4me1 allelic imbalance as a marker of AE. We also found that allelic chromatin domains exhibit population and cell-type specificity as well as heritability within trios. Finally, we observed that a subset of allelic chromatin domains is regulated by DNase I-sensitive quantitative trait loci and that these domains are significantly enriched for genome-wide association studies hits, with autoimmune disease associated SNPs specifically enriched in lymphoblasts. This study provides the first genome-wide maps of allelic-imbalance for five histone marks. Our results provide new insights into the role of chromatin in cis-regulation and highlight the need for high-depth sequencing in ChIP-seq studies along with the need to improve allele-specificity of ChIP-enrichment.

  11. Reducing Bias of Allele Frequency Estimates by Modeling SNP Genotype Data with Informative Missingness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Yu eLin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of missing single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotypes is common in genetic data. For studies with low-density SNPs, the most commonly used approach to deal with genotype missingness is to simply remove the observations with missing genotypes from the analyses. This naïve method is straightforward but is appropriate only when the missingness is random. However, a given assay often has a different capability in genotyping heterozygotes and homozygotes, causing the phenomenon of ‘differential dropout’ in the sense that the missing rates of heterozygotes and homozygotes are different. In practice, differential dropout among genotypes exists in even carefully designed studies, such as the data from the HapMap project and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. In this study, we propose a statistical method to model the differential dropout among different genotypes. Compared with the naïve method, our method provides more accurate allele frequency estimates when the differential dropout is present. To demonstrate its practical use, we further apply our method to the HapMap data and a scleroderma data set.

  12. Allele and genotype frequencies of CYP2B6 in a Turkish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuce-Artun, Nazan; Kose, Gulcin; Suzen, H Sinan

    2014-06-01

    Increasing interest in cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6) genetic polymorphism was stimulated by revelations of a specific CYP2B6 genotype significantly affecting the metabolism of various drugs in common clinical use in terms of increasing drug efficacy and avoiding adverse drug reactions. The present study aimed to determine the frequencies of CYP2B6*4 CYP2B6*5, CYP2B6*6, CYP2B6*7 and CYP2B6*9 alleles in healthy Turkish individuals (n = 172). Frequencies of three single nucleotide polymorphisms were 516G>T (28%), 785A>G (33%), and 1459C>T (12%). The frequencies of CYP2B6*1, *4, *5, *6, *7, and *9 alleles were 54.3 (95% CI 49.04-59.56), 6.4% (95% CI 3.81-8.99), 11% (95% CI 7.69-14.31), 25.3% (95% CI 20.71-29.89), 0.87% (95% CI -0.11-1.85) and 2.0% (95% CI 0.52-3.48), respectively. Allele *6 was more frequent (25.3%) than the other variant alleles in Turkish subjects. The frequencies of CYP2B6*4, *5, *6, *7, and *9 alleles were similar to European populations but significantly different from that reported for Asian populations. This is the first study to document the frequencies of the CYP2B6*4, *5, *6, *7, *9 alleles in the healthy Turkish individuals and our results could provide clinically useful information on drug metabolism by CYP2B6 in Turkish population.

  13. Disagreement in genotyping results of drug resistance alleles of the Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) gene by allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) assays and Sanger sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Divya; Lather, Manila; Dykes, Cherry L; Dang, Amita S; Adak, Tridibes; Singh, Om P

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of antimalarial drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum over the past few decades has necessitated intensive monitoring of such resistance for an effective malaria control strategy. P. falciparum dihydropteroate synthase (Pfdhps) and P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) genes act as molecular markers for resistance against the antimalarial drugs sulphadoxine and pyrimethamine, respectively. Resistance to pyrimethamine which is used as a partner drug in artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is associated with several mutations in the Pfdhfr gene, namely A16V, N51I, C59R, S108N/T and I164L. Therefore, routine monitoring of Pfdhfr-drug-resistant alleles in a population may help in effective drug resistance management. Allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) is one of the commonly used methods for molecular genotyping of these alleles. In this study, we genotyped 55 samples of P. falciparum for allele discrimination at four codons of Pfdhfr (N51, C59, S108 and I164) by ASPCR using published methods and by Sanger's DNA sequencing method. We found that the ASPCR identified a significantly higher number of mutant alleles as compared to the DNA sequencing method. Such discrepancies arise due to the non-specificity of some of the allele-specific primer sets and due to the lack of sensitivity of Sanger's DNA sequencing method to detect minor alleles present in multiple clone infections. This study reveals the need of a highly specific and sensitive method for genotyping and detecting minor drug-resistant alleles present in multiple clonal infections.

  14. Dissecting Allele Architecture of Early Onset IBD Using High-Density Genotyping.

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    David J Cutler

    Full Text Available The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD are common, complex disorders in which genetic and environmental factors are believed to interact leading to chronic inflammatory responses against the gut microbiota. Earlier genetic studies performed in mostly adult population of European descent identified 163 loci affecting IBD risk, but most have relatively modest effect sizes, and altogether explain only ~20% of the genetic susceptibility. Pediatric onset represents about 25% of overall incident cases in IBD, characterized by distinct disease physiology, course and risks. The goal of this study is to compare the allelic architecture of early onset IBD with adult onset in population of European descent.We performed a fine mapping association study of early onset IBD using high-density Immunochip genotyping on 1008 pediatric-onset IBD cases (801 Crohn's disease; 121 ulcerative colitis and 86 IBD undetermined and 1633 healthy controls. Of the 158 SNP genotypes obtained (out of the 163 identified in adult onset, this study replicated 4% (5 SNPs out of 136 of the SNPs identified in the Crohn's disease (CD cases and 0.8% (1 SNP out of 128 in the ulcerative colitis (UC cases. Replicated SNPs implicated the well known NOD2 and IL23R. The point estimate for the odds ratio (ORs for NOD2 was above and outside the confidence intervals reported in adult onset. A polygenic liability score weakly predicted the age of onset for a larger collection of CD cases (p< 0.03, R2= 0.007, but not for the smaller number of UC cases.The allelic architecture of common susceptibility variants for early onset IBD is similar to that of adult onset. This immunochip genotyping study failed to identify additional common variants that may explain the distinct phenotype that characterize early onset IBD. A comprehensive dissection of genetic loci is necessary to further characterize the genetic architecture of early onset IBD.

  15. Are men carrying the apolipoprotein epsilon 4- or epsilon 2 allele less fertile than epsilon 3 epsilon 3 genotypes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Lars Ulrik; Gerdes, C; Hansen, P S;

    1996-01-01

    The epsilon 3 allele in the human gene coding for apolipoprotein E (apoE) is the most common worldwide, but epsilon 4 is probably the ancestral allele. Since apoE is involved in many important biological processes, selection forces could have favoured epsilon 3. We hypothesized that apoE genotypes...... may affect reproductive efficiency, and we therefore compared the distributions of 40-year-old married men with known genotypes by the numbers of their biological children. The distributions were statistically significantly different (P = 0.0026). On average, men with the epsilon 3 epsilon 3 genotype...... (n = 212) had 1.93 children, men with the epsilon 3 epsilon 4 or epsilon 4 epsilon 4 genotype (n = 105) had 1.50, and men with the epsilon 3 epsilon 2 or epsilon 2 epsilon 2 genotypes (n = 53) had 1.66 children. Of the men in the three groups, 6%, 26% and 19%, respectively, reported being childless...

  16. Identification of null alleles and deletions from SNP genotypes for an intercross between domestic and wild chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Lucy; Carlborg, Örjan; Marklund, Stefan; Johansson, Anna M

    2013-08-07

    We analyzed genotypes from ~10K single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in two families of an F2 intercross between Red Junglefowl and White Leghorn chickens. Possible null alleles were found by patterns of incompatible and missing genotypes. We estimated that 2.6% of SNPs had null alleles compared with 2.3% with genotyping errors and that 40% of SNPs in which a parent and offspring were genotyped as different homozygotes had null alleles. Putative deletions were identified by null alleles at adjacent markers. We found two candidate deletions that were supported by fluorescence intensity data from a 60K SNP chip. One of the candidate deletions was from the Red Junglefowl, and one was present in both the Red Junglefowl and White Leghorn. Both candidate deletions spanned protein-coding regions and were close to a previously detected quantitative trait locus affecting body weight in this population. This study demonstrates that the ~50K SNP genotyping arrays now available for several agricultural species can be used to identify null alleles and deletions in data from large families. We suggest that our approach could be a useful complement to linkage analysis in experimental crosses.

  17. Genotype and allele frequencies of isoniazid-metabolizing enzymes NAT2 and GSTM1 in Latvian tuberculosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igumnova, Viktorija; Capligina, Valentina; Krams, Alvils; Cirule, Andra; Elferts, Didzis; Pole, Ilva; Jansone, Inta; Bandere, Dace; Ranka, Renate

    2016-07-01

    Pharmacogenomic testing of tuberculosis drug-metabolizing enzyme genes was proposed as a strategy to identify patients at risk for suboptimal responses to medications. However, variations of the genotype frequencies among ethnic groups exist and new alleles are been identified. The aim of this study was to identify polymorphisms of genes encoding metabolic enzymes NAT2 and GSTM1 in tuberculosis patients in Latvia and to estimate the frequency of NAT2 slow acetylator and GSTM1 null genotypes. In total, 85 DNA samples were genotyped, all individuals were Caucasian. An ethnic heterogeneity reflecting the multiethnic population of the country was observed. 49 patients were Latvians, 30 were Russians and 6 of other ethnicity. In total, 7 NAT2 alleles were identified: *4, *5, *6, *7, *11, *12, * and *13. The most frequent was the slow acetylation allele NAT2*6 (frequency 0.388) followed by the slow acetylation allele NAT2*5 and the rapid acetylation allele NAT2*4 (frequencies 0.306 and 0.194, respectively). The predominance of slow (51.8%) and intermediate (43.5%) acetylators compared with rapid acetylators (4.7%) was observed. The GSTM1 null genotype was detected in 48.2% of tuberculosis patients. When subgroup analysis was performed according to ethnicity, the results showed that neither NAT2 allele frequencies nor GSTM1 null genotype frequency did not differ significantly in TB patients of Latvian or Russian ethnicity. Overall, genotyping results were similar with previous reports of a NAT2 gene variation and GSTM1 null genotype frequency in Caucasians. Our findings have a contribution for the pharmacogenetics-based tuberculosis therapy in Latvia in future.

  18. Comprehensive genotyping in two homogeneous Graves' disease samples reveals major and novel HLA association alleles.

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    Pei-Lung Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Graves' disease (GD is the leading cause of hyperthyroidism and thyroid eye disease inherited as a complex trait. Although geoepidemiology studies showed relatively higher prevalence of GD in Asians than in Caucasians, previous genetic studies were contradictory concerning whether and/or which human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles are associated with GD in Asians. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a case-control association study (499 unrelated GD cases and 504 controls and a replication in an independent family sample (419 GD individuals and their 282 relatives in 165 families. To minimize genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity, we included only ethnic Chinese Han population in Taiwan and excluded subjects with hypothyroidism. We performed direct and comprehensive genotyping of six classical HLA loci (HLA-A, -B, -C, -DPB1, -DQB1 and -DRB1 to 4-digit resolution. Combining the data of two sample populations, we found that B*46:01 (odds ratio under dominant model [OR]  = 1.33, Bonferroni corrected combined P [P(Bc]  = 1.17 x 10⁻², DPB1*05:01 (OR  = 2.34, P(Bc = 2.58 x 10⁻¹⁰, DQB1*03:02 (OR  = 0.62, P(Bc  = 1.97 x 10⁻², DRB1*15:01 (OR  = 1.68, P(Bc = 1.22 x 10⁻² and DRB1*16:02 (OR  = 2.63, P(Bc  = 1.46 x 10⁻⁵ were associated with GD. HLA-DPB1*05:01 is the major gene of GD in our population and singly accounts for 48.4% of population-attributable risk. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These GD-associated alleles we identified in ethnic Chinese Hans, and those identified in other Asian studies, are totally distinct from the known associated alleles in Caucasians. Identification of population-specific association alleles is the critical first step for individualized medicine. Furthermore, comparison between different susceptibility/protective alleles across populations could facilitate generation of novel hypothesis about GD pathophysiology and indicate a new direction for future

  19. Genotypic and allelic frequencies of gene polymorphisms associated with meat tenderness in Nellore beef cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, M E; Eler, J P; Bonin, M N; Rezende, F M; Biase, F H; Meirelles, F V; Regitano, L C A; Coutinho, L L; Balieiro, J C C; Ferraz, J B S

    2017-02-16

    The objectives of this study were to characterize the allelic and genotypic frequencies of polymorphisms in the µ-calpain and calpastatin genes, and to assess their association with meat tenderness and animal growth in Nellore cattle. We evaluated 605 Nellore animals at 24 months of age, on average, at slaughter. The polymorphisms were determined for the molecular markers CAPN316, CAPN530, CAPN4751, CAPN4753, and UOGACAST1. Analyses of meat tenderness at 7, 14, and 21 days of maturation were performed in samples of longissimus thoracis obtained between the 12th and 13th rib and sheared using a Warner Bratzler Shear Force. Significant effects were observed for meat tenderness at days 7, 14, and 21 of maturation for the marker CAPN4751, at day 21 for the marker CAPN4753, and at days 14 and 21 for the marker UOGCAST1. For genotypic combinations of markers, the results were significant for the combination CAPN4751/UOGCAST1 in the three maturation periods and CAPN4753/UOGCAST1 at days 14 and 21 of maturation.

  20. Genotype-phenotype correlation and functional studies in patients with cystic fibrosis bearing CFTR complex alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terlizzi, Vito; Castaldo, Giuseppe; Salvatore, Donatello; Lucarelli, Marco; Raia, Valeria; Angioni, Adriano; Carnovale, Vincenzo; Cirilli, Natalia; Casciaro, Rosaria; Colombo, Carla; Di Lullo, Antonella Miriam; Elce, Ausilia; Iacotucci, Paola; Comegna, Marika; Scorza, Manuela; Lucidi, Vincenzina; Perfetti, Anna; Cimino, Roberta; Quattrucci, Serena; Seia, Manuela; Sofia, Valentina Maria; Zarrilli, Federica; Amato, Felice

    2017-04-01

    The effect of complex alleles in cystic fibrosis (CF) is poorly defined for the lack of functional studies. To describe the genotype-phenotype correlation and the results of either in vitro and ex vivo studies performed on nasal epithelial cells (NEC) in a cohort of patients with CF carrying cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) complex alleles. We studied 70 homozygous, compound heterozygous or heterozygous for CFTR mutations: p.[Arg74Trp;Val201Met;Asp1270Asn], n=8; p.[Ile148Thr;Ile1023_Val1024del], n=5; p.[Arg117Leu;Leu997Phe], n=6; c.[1210-34TG[12];1210-12T[5];2930C>T], n=3; p.[Arg74Trp;Asp1270Asn], n=4; p.Asp1270Asn, n=2; p.Ile148Thr, n=6; p.Leu997Phe, n=36. In 39 patients, we analysed the CFTR gating activity on NEC in comparison with patients with CF (n=8) and carriers (n=4). Finally, we analysed in vitro the p.[Arg74Trp;Val201Met;Asp1270Asn] complex allele. The p.[Ile148Thr;Ile1023_Val1024del] caused severe CF in five compound heterozygous with a class I-II mutation. Their CFTR activity on NEC was comparable with patients with two class I-II mutations (mean 7.3% vs 6.9%). The p.[Arg74Trp;Asp1270Asn] and the p.Asp1270Asn have scarce functional effects, while p.[Arg74Trp;Val201Met;Asp1270Asn] caused mild CF in four of five subjects carrying a class I-II mutation in trans, or CFTR-related disorders (CFTR-RD) in three having in trans a class IV-V mutation. The p.[Arg74Trp;Val201Met;Asp1270Asn] causes significantly (pT] and a class I-II mutation had mild CF or CFTR-RD (gating activity: 18.5-19.0%). The effect of complex alleles partially depends on the mutation in trans. Although larger studies are necessary, the CFTR activity on NEC is a rapid contributory tool to classify patients with CFTR dysfunction. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. The GL service: Web service to exchange GL string encoded HLA & KIR genotypes with complete and accurate allele and genotype ambiguity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milius, Robert P; Heuer, Michael; George, Mike; Pollack, Jane; Hollenbach, Jill A; Mack, Steven J; Maiers, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Genotype list (GL) Strings use a set of hierarchical character delimiters to represent allele and genotype ambiguity in HLA and KIR genotypes in a complete and accurate fashion. A RESTful web service called genotype list service was created to allow users to register a GL string and receive a unique identifier for that string in the form of a URI. By exchanging URIs and dereferencing them through the GL service, users can easily transmit HLA genotypes in a variety of useful formats. The GL service was developed to be secure, scalable, and persistent. An instance of the GL service is configured with a nomenclature and can be run in strict or non-strict modes. Strict mode requires alleles used in the GL string to be present in the allele database using the fully qualified nomenclature. Non-strict mode allows any GL string to be registered as long as it is syntactically correct. The GL service source code is free and open source software, distributed under the GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) version 3 or later.

  2. The GL Service: Web Service to Exchange GL String Encoded HLA & KIR Genotypes With Complete and Accurate Allele and Genotype Ambiguity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milius, Robert P.; Heuer, Michael; George, Mike; Pollack, Jane; Hollenbach, Jill A.; Mack, Steven J.; Maiers, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Genotype List (GL) Strings use a set of hierarchical character delimiters to represent allele and genotype ambiguity in HLA and KIR genotypes in a complete and accurate fashion. A RESTful web service called Genotype List Service was created to allow users to register a GL String and receive a unique identifier for that string in the form of a URI. By exchanging URIs and dereferencing them through the GL Service, users can easily transmit HLA genotypes in a variety of useful formats. The GL Service was developed to be secure, scalable, and persistent. An instance of the GL Service is configured with a nomenclature and can be run in strict or non-strict modes. Strict mode requires alleles used in the GL String to be present in the allele database using the fully qualified nomenclature. Non-strict mode allows any GL String to be registered as long as it is syntactically correct. The GL Service source code is free and open source software, distributed under the GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) version 3 or later. PMID:26621609

  3. Identification of All Genotypes in Tetraploid Ryegrass (Lolium spp.) Segregating for Four Alleles in a Pgi-Enzyme Locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel

    1980-01-01

    A phosphoglucoisomerase locus (Pgi-2) segregates for four alleles in chromosome-doubled plants of the two ryegrasses, Lolium perenne and L. multiflorum. After separation by starch gel electrophoresis, all the possible 35 genotypes have been identified by means of the gene dosage effect on the iso...

  4. The ACE DD genotype and D-allele are associated with exceptional longevity: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garatachea, Nuria; Marín, Pedro J; Lucia, Alejandro

    2013-09-01

    The ACE I/D polymorphism has been associated with longevity, although not consistently. The objective of this study was to detect the possible unequal distribution of the alleles and genotypes of this polymorphism among centenarians and younger segments of the population. Relevant data were extracted from studies in the literature, comparing genotype and allele frequencies between centenarians and younger controls. The association of ACE I/D polymorphism with exceptional longevity was analyzed in a total of 1803 centenarians and 10,484 controls using the chi-square test with the Yates correction. We conducted combined analyses for all ethnic groups studied in the literature (Caucasian, Chinese and Korean) as well as for Caucasians only. The DD genotype (odds ratio (OR): 1.25 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02-1.54), P=0.032) and the D-allele were more frequent in Caucasian centenarians compared with their younger controls (OR: 1.16 (95% CI: 1.05-1.28), P0.05). The present meta-analysis indicates that the ACE D-allele and the DD genotype might confer a modest, albeit significant advantage to reach exceptional longevity.

  5. Imputation of microsatellite alleles from dense SNP genotypes for parentage verification across multiple Bos taurus and Bos indicus breeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Matthew C.; Sonstegard, Tad S.; Wiggans, George R.; Van Eenennaam, Alison L.; Weber, Kristina L.; Penedo, Cecilia T.; Berry, Donagh P.; Flynn, John; Garcia, Jose F.; Carmo, Adriana S.; Regitano, Luciana C. A.; Albuquerque, Milla; Silva, Marcos V. G. B.; Machado, Marco A.; Coffey, Mike; Moore, Kirsty; Boscher, Marie-Yvonne; Genestout, Lucie; Mazza, Raffaele; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Schnabel, Robert D.; Simpson, Barry; Marques, Elisa; McEwan, John C.; Cromie, Andrew; Coutinho, Luiz L.; Kuehn, Larry A.; Keele, John W.; Piper, Emily K.; Cook, Jim; Williams, Robert; Van Tassell, Curtis P.

    2013-01-01

    To assist cattle producers transition from microsatellite (MS) to single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping for parental verification we previously devised an effective and inexpensive method to impute MS alleles from SNP haplotypes. While the reported method was verified with only a limited data set (N = 479) from Brown Swiss, Guernsey, Holstein, and Jersey cattle, some of the MS-SNP haplotype associations were concordant across these phylogenetically diverse breeds. This implied that some haplotypes predate modern breed formation and remain in strong linkage disequilibrium. To expand the utility of MS allele imputation across breeds, MS and SNP data from more than 8000 animals representing 39 breeds (Bos taurus and B. indicus) were used to predict 9410 SNP haplotypes, incorporating an average of 73 SNPs per haplotype, for which alleles from 12 MS markers could be accurately be imputed. Approximately 25% of the MS-SNP haplotypes were present in multiple breeds (N = 2 to 36 breeds). These shared haplotypes allowed for MS imputation in breeds that were not represented in the reference population with only a small increase in Mendelian inheritance inconsistancies. Our reported reference haplotypes can be used for any cattle breed and the reported methods can be applied to any species to aid the transition from MS to SNP genetic markers. While ~91% of the animals with imputed alleles for 12 MS markers had ≤1 Mendelian inheritance conflicts with their parents' reported MS genotypes, this figure was 96% for our reference animals, indicating potential errors in the reported MS genotypes. The workflow we suggest autocorrects for genotyping errors and rare haplotypes, by MS genotyping animals whose imputed MS alleles fail parentage verification, and then incorporating those animals into the reference dataset. PMID:24065982

  6. Imputation of Microsatellite Alleles from Dense SNP Genotypes for Parentage Verification Across Multiple Bos taurus and Bos indicus breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Charles Mcclure

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available To assist cattle producers transition from microsatellite (MS to single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotyping for parental verification we previously devised an effective and inexpensive method to impute MS alleles from SNP haplotypes. While the reported method was verified with only a limited data set (N=479 from Brown Swiss, Guernsey, Holstein, and Jersey cattle, some of the MS-SNP haplotype associations were concordant across these phylogenetically diverse breeds. This implied that some haplotypes predate modern breed formation and remain in strong linkage disequilibrium. To expand the utility of MS allele imputation across breeds, MS and SNP data from more than 8,000 animals representing 39 breeds (Bos taurus and B. indicus were used to predict 9,410 SNP haplotypes, incorporating an average of 73 SNPs per haplotype, for which alleles for 12 MS markers could be accurately be imputed. Approximately 25% of the MS-SNP haplotypes were present in multiple breeds (N=2 to 36 breeds. These shared haplotypes allowed for MS imputation in breeds that were not represented in the reference population with only a small increase in Mendelian inheritance inconsistancies. Our reported reference haplotypes can be used for any cattle breed and the reported methods can be applied to any species to aid the transition from MS to SNP genetic markers. While ~91% of the animals with imputed alleles for 12 MS markers had <1 Mendelian inheritance conflicts with their parents’ reported MS genotypes, this figure was 96% for our reference animals, indicating potential errors in the reported MS genotypes. The workflow we suggest autocorrects for genotyping errors and rare haplotypes, by MS genotyping animals whose imputed MS alleles fail parentage verification, and then incorporating those animals into the reference dataset.

  7. Divergent allele advantage at MHC-DRB through direct and maternal genotypic effects and its consequences for allele pool composition and mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Tobias L; Mueller, Birte; Trillmich, Fritz; Wolf, Jochen B W

    2013-07-07

    It is still debated whether main individual fitness differences in natural populations can be attributed to genome-wide effects or to particular loci of outstanding functional importance such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). In a long-term monitoring project on Galápagos sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki), we collected comprehensive fitness and mating data for a total of 506 individuals. Controlling for genome-wide inbreeding, we find strong associations between the MHC locus and nearly all fitness traits. The effect was mainly attributable to MHC sequence divergence and could be decomposed into contributions of own and maternal genotypes. In consequence, the population seems to have evolved a pool of highly divergent alleles conveying near-optimal MHC divergence even by random mating. Our results demonstrate that a single locus can significantly contribute to fitness in the wild and provide conclusive evidence for the 'divergent allele advantage' hypothesis, a special form of balancing selection with interesting evolutionary implications.

  8. Resolving microsatellite genotype ambiguity in populations of allopolyploid and diploidized autopolyploid organisms using negative correlations between allelic variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Lindsay V; Schreier, Andrea Drauch

    2016-11-21

    A major limitation in the analysis of genetic marker data from polyploid organisms is non-Mendelian segregation, particularly when a single marker yields allelic signals from multiple, independently segregating loci (isoloci). However, with markers such as microsatellites that detect more than two alleles, it is sometimes possible to deduce which alleles belong to which isoloci. Here, we describe a novel mathematical property of codominant marker data when it is recoded as binary (presence/absence) allelic variables: under random mating in an infinite population, two allelic variables will be negatively correlated if they belong to the same locus, but uncorrelated if they belong to different loci. We present an algorithm to take advantage of this mathematical property, sorting alleles into isoloci based on correlations, then refining the allele assignments after checking for consistency with individual genotypes. We demonstrate the utility of our method on simulated data, as well as a real microsatellite data set from a natural population of octoploid white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus). Our methodology is implemented in the R package polysat version 1.6.

  9. Toward fully automated genotyping: Allele assignment, pedigree construction, phase determination, and recombination detection in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlin, M.W.; Burks, M.B. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Hoop, R.C.; Hoffman, E.P. [Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Human genetic maps have made quantum leaps in the past few years, because of the characterization of >2,000 CA dinucleotide repeat loci: these PCR-based markers offer extraordinarily high PIC, and within the next year their density is expected to reach intervals of a few centimorgans per marker. These new genetic maps open new avenues for disease gene research, including large-scale genotyping for both simple and complex disease loci. However, the allele patterns of many dinucleotide repeat loci can be complex and difficult to interpret, with genotyping errors a recognized problem. Furthermore, the possibility of genotyping individuals at hundreds or thousands of polymorphic loci requires improvements in data handling and analysis. The automation of genotyping and analysis of computer-derived haplotypes would remove many of the barriers preventing optimal use of dense and informative dinucleotide genetic maps. Toward this end, we have automated the allele identification, genotyping, phase determinations, and inheritance consistency checks generated by four CA repeats within the 2.5-Mbp, 10-cM X-linked dystrophin gene, using fluorescein-labeled multiplexed PCR products analyzed on automated sequencers. The described algorithms can deconvolute and resolve closely spaced alleles, despite interfering stutter noise; set phase in females; propagate the phase through the family; and identify recombination events. We show the implementation of these algorithms for the completely automated interpretation of allele data and risk assessment for five Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy families. The described approach can be scaled up to perform genome-based analyses with hundreds or thousands of CA-repeat loci, using multiple fluorophors on automated sequencers. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Genotype-phenotype correlation in cystic fibrosis patients bearing [H939R;H949L] allele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Polizzi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is caused by CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene mutations. We ascertained five patients with a novel complex CFTR allele, with two mutations, H939R and H949L, inherited in cis in the same exon of CFTR gene, and one different mutation per patient inherited in trans in a wide population of 289 Caucasian CF subjects from South Italy. The genotype-phenotype relationship in patients bearing this complex allele was investigated. The two associated mutations were related to classical severe CF phenotypes.

  11. Prion protein genotype survey confirms low frequency of scrapie-resistant K222 allele in British goat herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, W; Marier, E; Stewart, P; Konold, T; Street, S; Langeveld, J; Windl, O; Ortiz-Pelaez, A

    2016-02-13

    Scrapie in goats is a transmissible, fatal prion disease, which is endemic in the British goat population. The recent success in defining caprine PRNP gene variants that provide resistance to experimental and natural classical scrapie has prompted the authors to conduct a survey of PRNP genotypes in 10 goat breeds and 52 herds to find goats with the resistant K222 allele. They report here the frequencies in 1236 tested animals of the resistance-associated K222 and several other alleles by breed and herd. Eight animals were found to be heterozygous QK222 goats (0.64 per cent genotype frequency, 95 per cent CI 0.28 to 1.27 per cent) but no homozygous KK222 goats were detected. The K222 allele was found in Saanen, Toggenburg and Anglo-Nubian goats. The fact that only a few goats with the K222 allele have been identified does not preclude the possibility to design and implement successful breeding programmes at national level.

  12. Use of allele-specific FAIRE to determine functional regulatory polymorphism using large-scale genotyping arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Frank Andrew; Howard, Philip; Shah, Sonia;

    2012-01-01

    identified an allele-specific regulatory polymorphism within NR1H3 (coding for LXR-α), rs7120118, coinciding with a previously GWAS-identified SNP for HDL-C levels. This finding was confirmed using FAIRE-gen with the 200,000 SNP Illumina Metabochip and verified with the established method of TaqMan allelic...... variants, we describe the technique of allele-specific FAIRE, utilising large-scale genotyping technology (FAIRE-gen) to determine allelic effects on chromatin accessibility and regulatory potential. FAIRE-gen was explored using lymphoblastoid cells and the 50,000 SNP Illumina CVD BeadChip. The technique...... discrimination. Examination of this SNP in two prospective Caucasian cohorts comprising 15,000 individuals confirmed the association with HDL-C levels (combined beta = 0.016; p = 0.0006), and analysis of gene expression identified an allelic association with LXR-α expression in heart tissue. Using increasingly...

  13. Analysis of HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1 allelic, genotypic, and haplotypic frequencies in colombian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazmin Rocío Árias-Murillo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The high polymorphism of the HLA system allows its typification to be used as valuable tool in establishing association to various illnesses, immune and genetic profiles; it also provides a guide to identifying compatibility among donors and receptors of organs transplants.Objective: To establish HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA.DRB1 allele, genotype and haplotype frequencies among patients treated at Clinica Colsanitas SA.Methods: 561 patients coming from different regions in Colombia, who were attended in 8 centers of the clinical laboratory of the Clinica Colsanitas in different cities of the country from January 2004 to August 2008, were included in this study. All were HLA-A,-B, and -DRB1 typified via SSP PCR. Allele, genotype and haplotype frequencies were estimated with STATA Software Version 9.0 and the GENEPOP genetic analysis package.Results: 19, 28, and 15 different alleles were identified for loci HLA-A,-B and -DRB1, respectively. Alleles found most frequently were A*24 (26.2%, A*02 (26%, B*35(22.7%, and DRB1*04 (24%. The most frequent genotypes were A*02,24 (14.2%, B*07,35 (5.5%, DRB1*01,04, and DRB1*04,04 (6.9%; while most the frequent haplotypes were HLA A*24, B*35 (9.2%, A*24, DRB1*04 (8.1%; B*35, DRB1*04 (7.8%, A*2 DRB1*04 (7.4%.Conclusion: The results obtained provide a useful reference framework for the population studied, allowing compatibility probability calculations to be performed for organ transplants.

  14. Genotype and allelic frequencies of CYP2E1*5B polymorphism in the southwest population of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Zanganeh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1 is a main enzyme which plays a major role in activating and detoxifying many xenobiotics, carcinogens and drugs. Available studies suggest that CYP2E1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are involved in the risk of developing certain cancers after exposure to carcinogens. The purpose of the present study was to assess genotype and allele frequencies of polymorphic CYP2E1*5B in the Iranian population. Material and Methods: This study was performed on 200 healthy individuals (female: 100, male: 100 in medical laboratories of Ahvaz during 2011. The CYP2E1 *5B (rs3813867 G-1293C assessment was carried out using PCR-RFLP method. The data were analyzed with ĸ2 and hardy-Weinberg Equation statistically methods. Results: The frequency of *1A/*1A (c1/c1, *1A/*5B (c1/c2 and *5B/*5B (c2/c2 genotypes was computed 97, 3 and 0 percent, respectively. The frequency of *1A (c1 and *5B (c2 alleles was computed 98.5 and 1.5 percent, respectively. No statistically significant difference was between two genders (p>0.05. Conclusion: The genotype distribution and allele frequencies of CYP2E1*5B polymorphism were similar to Turkish and some of the European populations. However, there are significant interethnic differences when the Iranian population is compared with the Eastern Asian, American and some of the European populations. The allelic distribution of this polymorphism did not vary with gender.

  15. Analysis of HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1 allelic, genotypic, and haplotypic frequencies in colombian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamín Rocío Arias-Murillo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The high polymorphism of the HLA system allows its typification to be used as valuable tool in establishing association to various illnesses, immune and genetic profiles; it also provides a guide to identifying compatibility among donors and receptors of organs transplants. Objective: To establish HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA.DRB1 allele, genotype and haplotype frequencies among patients treated at Clinica Colsanitas SA. Methods: 561 patients coming from different regions in Colombia, who were attended in 8 centers of the clinical laboratory of the Clinica Colsanitas in different cities of the country from January 2004 to August 2008, were included in this study. All were HLA-A,-B, and -DRB1 typified via SSP PCR. Allele, genotype and haplotype frequencies were estimated with STATA Software Version 9.0 and the GENEPOP genetic analysis package. Results: 19, 28, and 15 different alleles were identified for loci HLA-A,-B and -DRB1, respectively. Alleles found most frequently were A*24 (26.2%, A*02 (26%, B*35(22.7%, and DRB1*04 (24%. The most frequent genotypes were A*02,24 (14.2%, B*07,35 (5.5%, DRB1*01,04, and DRB1*04,04 (6.9%; while most the frequent haplotypes were HLA A*24, B*35 (9.2%, A*24, DRB1*04 (8.1%; B*35, DRB1*04 (7.8%, A*2 DRB1*04 (7.4%. Conclusion: The results obtained provide a useful reference framework for the population studied, allowing compatibility probability calculations to be performed for organ transplants.

  16. Multi-allele genotyping platform for the simultaneous detection of mutations in the Wilson disease related ATP7B gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amvrosiadou, Maria; Petropoulou, Margarita; Poulou, Myrto; Tzetis, Maria; Kanavakis, Emmanuel; Christopoulos, Theodore K; Ioannou, Penelope C

    2015-12-01

    Wilson's disease is an inherited disorder of copper transport in the hepatocytes with a wide range of genotype and phenotype characteristics. Mutations in the ATP7B gene are responsible for the disease. Approximately, over 500 mutations in the ATP7B gene have been described to date. We report a method for the simultaneous detection of the ten most common ATP7B gene mutations in Greek patients. The method comprises 3 simple steps: (i) multiplex PCR amplification of fragments in the ATP7B gene flanking the mutations (ii) multiplex primer extension reaction of the unpurified amplification products using allele-specific primers and (iii) visual detection of the primer extension reaction products within minutes by means of dry-reagent multi-allele dipstick assay using anti-biotin conjugated gold nanoparticles. Optimization studies on the efficiency and specificity of the PEXT reaction were performed. The method was evaluated by genotyping 46 DNA samples of known genotype and 34 blind samples. The results were fully concordant with those obtained by reference methods. The method is simple, rapid, cost-effective and it does not require specialized instrumentation or highly qualified personnel.

  17. Viral genotype and HLA class II alleles influence on extra-hepatic manifestations of chronic HCV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Galeazzi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To test whether an association between HCV genotype, HLA class II alleles distribution and extra-hepatic manifestations (EHM can be demonstrated in a group of Italian patients with chronic HCV infection . Methods: Sixty patients affected by HCV infection with EHM were consecutively enrolled. 163 HCV patients without EHM were tested as controls for the prevalence of HCV genotypes, while we referred to literature as to the controls for HLA distribution. HCV-RNA was quantified by a RT-PCR. HLA class II alleles typing was performed using a standard microlymphocytotoxicity assay. We used chi-square or Fisher test (p<0.05 significant. Odds Ratio (OR was performed by 2X2 contingency table. Results: HCV 2c genotype was found in 63.46% of patients compared to 19.63% of controls (p<0.0001; OR=7.11. Furthermore, it correlated with carpal tunnel syndrome (p=0.03; OR=4.5 and autoimmune thyroiditis (p=0.02; OR=9.2. On the contrary, 1b genotype protected from EHM in toto (p=0.0004; OR=0.21 and particularly from carpal tunnel syndrome (p=0.0014; OR=0.07. Moreover, 3a genotype prevented HCV people from having cryoglobulinemia (p=0.05; OR=0.11. As to HLA, DR6 seemed to facilitate EHM in HCV patients (p=0.041; OR=1.61, while DQ2 (p=0.03; OR=0.5 and DQ3 (p=0.002; OR= 0.5 may play a protective role. In addition, HLA DR3 was associated with cryoglobulinemia (p=0.02; OR=9.5. Conclusions: According to our findings, 2c genotype can be considered as a major risk factor for developing HCVrelated EHM, while 1b genotype seems to prevent their onset; there are also evidences suggesting that HLA might play a role in chronic HCV infected patients.

  18. Genome Wide Allele Frequency Fingerprints (GWAFFs) of populations via genotyping by sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrne, Stephen; Czaban, Adrian; Studer, Bruno;

    2013-01-01

    is an outbreeding species, and breeding programs are based upon selection on populations. We tested two restriction enzymes for their efficiency in complexity reduction of the perennial ryegrass genome. The resulting profiles have been termed Genome Wide Allele Frequency Fingerprints (GWAFFs), and we have shown how......-wide scale would be very powerful, examples include the breeding of outbreeding species, varietal protection in outbreeding species, monitoring changes in population allele frequencies. This motivated us to test the potential to use GBS to evaluate allele frequencies within populations. Perennial ryegrass...... these fingerprints can be used to distinguish between plant populations. Even at current costs and throughput, using sequencing to directly evaluate populations on a genome-wide scale is viable. GWAFFs should find many applications, from varietal development in outbreeding species right through to playing a role...

  19. HLA-DRB1 alleles genotyping in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in Chinese.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To explore the role of HLA-DRB1 genes in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the correlations between HLA-DR alleles and clinical manifestations of patients with RA. Methods: 86 patients and 106 race matched controls in whom HLADR typing was performed by the method of DNA amplification with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP)

  20. Pedigree genotyping: a new pedigree-based approach of QTL identification and allele mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weg, van de W.E.; Voorrips, R.E.; Finkers, H.J.; Kodde, L.P.; Jansen, J.; Bink, M.C.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    To date, molecular markers are available for many economically important traits. Unfortunately, lack of knowledge of the allelic variation of the related genes hampers their full exploitation in commercial breeding programs. These markers have usually been identified in one single cross. Consequentl

  1. Genotype and allele frequencies of heme oxygenase-1 promoter region in a Greek cohort

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eleni P. Katana; Lemonia G. Skoura; Zacharias G Scouras; Michail A. Daniilidis

    2011-01-01

    Background Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an enzyme,which catabolizes heme into carbon monoxide,biliverdin and free iron.The induction of this enzyme is an important cytoprotective mechanism,which occurs as an adaptive and beneficial response to a wide variety of oxidant stimuli.HO-1 inducibility is mainly modulated by a (GT)n polymorphism in the promoter region,and has been shown that short (S) repeats are associated with greater up-regulation of HO-1,compared with long (L) repeats.Methods In the present study,250 healthy Greek individuals have been screened in order to estimate the frequencies of (GT)n alleles in the HO-1 gene.Results Nineteen different alleles,ranging from 17 to 39 repeats,with (GT)23 and (GT)30 being the most common ones,were identified.Conclusion The possible role of this polymorphism in disease states is discussed.

  2. Genotyping by Sequencing Using Specific Allelic Capture to Build a High-Density Genetic Map of Durum Wheat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Holtz

    Full Text Available Targeted sequence capture is a promising technology which helps reduce costs for sequencing and genotyping numerous genomic regions in large sets of individuals. Bait sequences are designed to capture specific alleles previously discovered in parents or reference populations. We studied a set of 135 RILs originating from a cross between an emmer cultivar (Dic2 and a recent durum elite cultivar (Silur. Six thousand sequence baits were designed to target Dic2 vs. Silur polymorphisms discovered in a previous RNAseq study. These baits were exposed to genomic DNA of the RIL population. Eighty percent of the targeted SNPs were recovered, 65% of which were of high quality and coverage. The final high density genetic map consisted of more than 3,000 markers, whose genetic and physical mapping were consistent with those obtained with large arrays.

  3. Genotyping by Sequencing Using Specific Allelic Capture to Build a High-Density Genetic Map of Durum Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtz, Yan; Ardisson, Morgane; Ranwez, Vincent; Besnard, Alban; Leroy, Philippe; Poux, Gérard; Roumet, Pierre; Viader, Véronique; Santoni, Sylvain; David, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Targeted sequence capture is a promising technology which helps reduce costs for sequencing and genotyping numerous genomic regions in large sets of individuals. Bait sequences are designed to capture specific alleles previously discovered in parents or reference populations. We studied a set of 135 RILs originating from a cross between an emmer cultivar (Dic2) and a recent durum elite cultivar (Silur). Six thousand sequence baits were designed to target Dic2 vs. Silur polymorphisms discovered in a previous RNAseq study. These baits were exposed to genomic DNA of the RIL population. Eighty percent of the targeted SNPs were recovered, 65% of which were of high quality and coverage. The final high density genetic map consisted of more than 3,000 markers, whose genetic and physical mapping were consistent with those obtained with large arrays.

  4. Variation of DAT1 VNTR alleles and genotypes among old ethnic groups in Mesopotamia to the Oxus region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banoei, Mohammad Mehdi; Chaleshtori, Morteza Hashemzadeh; Sanati, Mohammad Hossein; Shariati, Parvin; Houshmand, Massoud; Majidizadeh, Tayebeh; Soltani, Niloofar Jahangir; Golalipour, Massoud

    2008-02-01

    Variation of a VNTR in the DAT1 gene in seven ethnic groups of the Middle East was used to infer the history and affinities of these groups. The populations consisted of Assyrian, Jewish, Zoroastrian, Armenian, Turkmen, and Arab peoples of Iran, Iraq, and Kuwait. Three hundred forty subjects from these seven ethnic groups were screened for DAT1. DAT1 VNTR genotyping showed 3, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 alleles in the samples. Analysis of these data revealed differentiation and relationship among the populations. In this region, which covers an area of 2-2.5 million km2, the influence of geography and especially of linguistic characteristics has had potentially major effects on differentiation. Religion also has played a major role in imposing restrictions on some ethnic groups, who as a consequence have maintained their community. Overall, these ethnic groups showed greater heterogeneity compared to other populations.

  5. Genotype and allele frequencies of polymorphic cytochromes P450 CYP1A2 and CYP2E1 in Mexicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Cantú, Ania; Castorena-Torres, Fabiola; Bermudez, Mario; Martínez-Hernández, Roberto; Ortega, Arturo; Salinas, Juan E; Albores, Arnulfo

    2004-01-01

    CYP1A2 and CYP2E1 are two of the main cytochrome P450 isoforms involved in the metabolism of commonly used drugs and xenobiotic compounds considered to be responsible for or possible participants in the development of several human diseases. Individual susceptibility to developing these pathologies relies, among other factors, on genetic polymorphism which depends on ethnic differences, as the frequency of mutant genotypes varies in different human populations. Thus the aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of CYP1A2 5'-flanking region and CYP2E1 Rsa I/Pst I polymorphisms in Mexicans by PCR-RFLP methods. The DNA of 159 subjects was analysed and mutant allele frequencies of 30% for CYP2E1 Rsa I/Pst I sites and 43% for CYP1A2 5'-flanking region were found. These frequencies are higher than those previously reported for other human populations.

  6. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 17: Report of a family with reduced penetrance of an unstable Gln49 TBP allele, haplotype analysis supporting a founder effect for unstable alleles and comparative analysis of SCA17 genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwinger Eberhard

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 (SCA17, a neurodegenerative disorder in man, is caused by an expanded polymorphic polyglutamine-encoding trinucleotide repeat in the gene for TATA-box binding protein (TBP, a main transcription factor. Observed pathogenic expansions ranged from 43 – 63 glutamine (Gln codons (Gln43–63. Reduced penetrance is known for Gln43–48 alleles. In the vast majority of families with SCA17 an expanded CAG repeat interrupted by a CAA CAG CAA element is inherited stably. Results Here, we report the first pedigree with a Gln49 allele that is a not interrupted, b unstable upon transmission, and c associated with reduced penetrance or very late age of onset. The 76-year-old father of two SCA17 patients carries the Gln49 TBP allele but presents without obvious neurological symptoms. His children with Gln53 and Gln52 developed ataxia at the age of 41 and 50. Haplotype analysis of this and a second family both with uninterrupted expanded and unstable pathological SCA17 alleles revealed a common core genotype not present in the interrupted expansion of an unrelated SCA17 patient. Review of the literature did not present instability in SCA17 families with expanded alleles interrupted by the CAA CAG CAA element. Conclusion The presence of a Gln49 SCA17 allele in an asymptomatic 76-year-old male reams the discussion of reduced penetrance and genotypes producing very late disease onset. In SCA17, uninterrupted expanded alleles of TBP are associated with repeat instability and a common founder haplotype. This suggests for uninterrupted expanded alleles a mutation mechanism and some clinical genetic features distinct from those alleles interrupted by a CAA CAG CAA element.

  7. Simultaneous genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in alcoholism-related genes using duplex and triplex allele-specific PCR with two-step thermal cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasu, Naoto; Kuroki, Masahide

    2014-01-01

    We developed a time- and cost-effective multiplex allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) method based on the two-step PCR thermal cycles for genotyping single-nucleotide polymorphisms in three alcoholism-related genes: alcohol dehydrogenase 1B, aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 and μ-opioid receptor. Applying MightyAmp(®) DNA polymerase with optimized AS-primers and PCR conditions enabled us to achieve effective and selective amplification of the target alleles from alkaline lysates of a human hair root, and simultaneously to determine the genotypes within less than 1.5 h using minimal lab equipment.

  8. Variation in ion leakage parameters of two wheat genotypes with different Rht-B1 alleles in response to drought

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Konstantina V Kocheva; Svetlana P Landjeva; Georgi I Georgiev

    2014-12-01

    The reaction to soil drying was evaluated in two Triticum aestivum near-isogenic lines carrying different alleles of the height-reducing gene Rht-B1 based on an improved method for assessment of electrolyte leakage. The two lines were previously shown to differ in their physiological responses to induced water deficit stress. Drought was imposed for 6 days on 10-day-old seedlings. Ion efflux from leaves was measured conductometrically in multiple time points during the 24 h incubation period, and the obtained biphasic kinetics was interpreted according to a previously developed theoretical model proposing different leakage rates through the apoplast and the symplast. Most of the model parameters were able to properly differentiate the two closely related genotypes. The mutant Rht-B1c displayed lower and slower electrolyte leakage in comparison with the wild-type Rht-B1a. It was speculated that the Rht genes expressing defective DELLA proteins might be involved in water stress response through modulation of cell wall stiffness, which influences its capacity for ions retention, and also by their contribution to ROS detoxification, thus indirectly stabilizing cellular membranes. The presented analytical approach relating processes of ion and water flow in and out of the cell could be used for characterization of membrane and cell wall properties of different genotypes under normal and stress conditions.

  9. HLA-DRB1 ALLELES GENOTYPING IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS IN CHINESE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵岩; 董怡; 朱席林; 邱长春

    1996-01-01

    Objective. To explore the role of HLA-DRB1 genes in the development of rheumatoid arthritis(RA) and the correlations between HLA-DR alleles and clinical manifestations of patients with RA.Methods. 86 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 106 race matched controls were studied in whom HLA-DR typing was perfomed by the method of DNA amplification with sequence-specific primers(PCR-SSP). The subtypes of HLA-DR4 were determined by the method of hybridization of PCR products with sequence-specific oligonucletides(PCR SSO). The absence or presence of the patients.Results.Compared with controls,an increased gene frequency of HLA-DR4(48.8% vs 17.9%,P<0.001) and a decreased frequency of HLA-DR7(16.3% vs 27.4%,P=0.06) were found.The DRB1 0405 account for 61.9% of DR4+RA patients with respect to age,sex,duration of disease,rheumatoid factor(RF),extra-articular manifestations including secondary Sjogren's syndrome.According to the wrisr X-ray stage,the patlents of DR4+were more severe than that of DR4-P(P<0.05).Conclusion.HLA-DR4 and DR4 subtype of DRB1 0405 are related to the development of RA in Chinese.HLA-DR4 can be a useful prognosric marker in the patients with RA.

  10. Allele and genotype frequency of a genetic variant in ataxia telangiectasia mutated gene affecting glycemic response to metformin in South Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saranya Vilvanathan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Allele and genotype frequency of a genetic variant in ATM gene affecting glycemic response to metformin in South Indian population . Context: The novel polymorphism in ATM gene (rs11212617, which is implicated to have association with metformin response, exhibits inter-ethnic variability in the allele and genotype frequency distribution . Aims and Design: The objective of the present study is to establish the allele and genotype frequency of rs11212617 single nucleotide polymorphism in ATM gene, in South Indian population and to find if this variant has any role in the etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus . Materials and Methods: The study was performed in 2 cohorts of populations, 112 healthy volunteers and 118 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leucocytes by phenol-chloroform method and genotyping was performed by real-time polymerase chain reaction using TaqMan assay. Results: In South Indian population, the frequency of major A allele was 0.65 and the minor C allele was 0.35. AA and CC are the homozygous genotypes with frequency of 0.39 and 0.09 respectively. The frequency of heterozygous genotype AC (0.52 was found to be higher than the homozygotes. There was no significant difference in the frequency distribution in the diabetic population, which implies that this variant does not have any causative role in the disease etiology. The frequency distributions were found to be significantly different from the distributions in other ethnic populations such as Caucasians, Chinese, Japanese and Africans. But there was no significant difference when compared with the Gujarati Indians of Houston. Conclusion: The frequency distribution of this novel variant in South Indian population forms a framework for further gene disease association studies to establish the association of this variant with metformin response. Our study could not find any association of this variant with

  11. Using Allele-Specific PCR with Molecular Beams as a Means for Genotyping the Diallelic Indels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doktycz, M.J.; Weber, J.L. (Marshfield Medical Research Foundation)

    2000-06-01

    The first Specific Aim for this grant was to identify and characterize an average of 500 human insertion/deletion polymorphisms per grant year (1500 total). This task was carried out entirely at MMRF. They substantially exceeded this goal by confirming about 2,300 diallelic indels. Complete characterization information for these polymorphisms is available from the Marshfield web site. A manuscript describing results for the first 2,000 diallelic indels was published earlier this year in the American Journal of Human Genetics. The Second Specific Aim of the grant was to investigate and develop improved methods for analysis of diallelic polymorphisms using miniaturized DNA arrays. The initial genotyping technology efforts focused on various hybridization and extension protocols with oligo arrays on flow-through channel glass. Channel glass is a porous material that permits reagents to be passed through the arrays. They devoted roughly 19 months at the beginning of the grant in pursuit of this methodology, but for various technological reasons, progress was limited.

  12. The investigation of allele and genotype frequencies of CYP3A5 (1/3) and P2Y12 (T744C) in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarpira, N; Namazi, S; Khalili, A; Tabesh, M

    2011-11-01

    Research on the frequency of the highly functional mutations of genes coding required for metabolizing enzymes has shown significant ethnic variations. However, few studies, if any, have examined the frequency distribution of major allelic variations in the context of Iran. In this regard, the present study focused on the genotype profile of Southern Iranians in order to compare allele frequencies of their CYP3A5 and P2Y12 (T744C) which have been shown to have roles in metabolizing clopidogrel, with those of other populations. Therefore, genotyping was carried out on 112 unrelated individuals by PCR-RFLP. The CYP3A5*3 allele was found in 185 persons with allelic frequency 0.82, which is the most common allele among Caucasians (90-95%). The frequency of 82% is different from other Caucasians (90-94%), Indians (67%), Vietnam (67%) and Africans (15%). but lower than frequency in Chinese populations (74%) and Korean (76%). The allele frequency of the -744T (4%) is different from frequencies of Caucasian, American, Chinese, Korean, and Subsahara population. This study confirmed significant inter-ethnic differences in CYP3A5 and P2Y12 frequencies between Iranians and other ethnic groups. The results of this study will be useful for clinical pharmacokinetic investigations and drug dosage recommendations especially antiplatelet drugs such as Clopidogrel, for Iranians.

  13. Genotyping BoLA-DRB3 alleles in Brazilian Dairy Gir cattle (Bos indicus) by temperature-gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) and direct sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Mota, A F; Martinez, M L; Coutinho, L L

    2004-02-01

    BoLA-DRB3 is a gene of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in cattle. The product of the BoLA-DRB3 gene is a beta chain of an MHC class II molecule, a glycoprotein expressed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Responses of CD4+ T lymphocytes to peptides are dependent on the presentation of peptide ligands bound to class II molecules on APCs. Genotyping of the BoLA-DRB3 gene is relatively complex due to the extensive polymorphism of this locus. Current techniques for assignment of genotypes are polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), direct sequencing of PCR products, cloning-sequencing, polymerase chain reaction using sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (PCR-SSOP), and denaturant-gradient gel electrophoresis. These techniques are time-consuming, do not discriminate all possible alleles, or are not readily reproducible. The objective of this study was to genotype BoLA-DRB3 using temperature-gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) to separate alleles before sequencing. PCRs using 28 DNA samples from Gir Dairy cattle (a Brazilian breed of Bos indicus) were submitted to TGGE. New PCR products were generated from separated alleles, purified, and sequenced. Allele separation was possible in 21 out of 26 heterozygote samples (81%). Results indicate that two sequence reads (forward and reverse) were sufficient for accurate genotyping of BoLA-DRB3 alleles. Separation of alleles by TGGE provides high-throughput, reliable typing of BoLA-DRB3, which is critical in disease association studies in cattle.

  14. Ancestry of the Timorese: age-related macular degeneration associated genotype and allele sharing among human populations from throughout the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Margaux A.; Magalhaes, Tiago R.; Ramke, Jacqueline; Smith, Silvia E.; Ennis, Sean; Simpson, Claire L.; Portas, Laura; Murgia, Federico; Ahn, Jeeyun; Dardenne, Caitlin; Mayne, Katie; Robinson, Rosann; Morgan, Denise J.; Brian, Garry; Lee, Lucy; Woo, Se J.; Zacharaki, Fani; Tsironi, Evangelia E.; Miller, Joan W.; Kim, Ivana K.; Park, Kyu H.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Stambolian, Dwight; DeAngelis, Margaret M.

    2015-01-01

    We observed that the third leading cause of blindness in the world, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), occurs at a very low documented frequency in a population-based cohort from Timor-Leste. Thus, we determined a complete catalog of the ancestry of the Timorese by analysis of whole exome chip data and haplogroup analysis of SNP genotypes determined by sequencing the Hypervariable I and II regions of the mitochondrial genome and 17 genotyped YSTR markers obtained from 535 individuals. We genotyped 20 previously reported AMD-associated SNPs in the Timorese to examine their allele frequencies compared to and between previously documented AMD cohorts of varying ethnicities. For those without AMD (average age > 55 years), genotype and allele frequencies were similar for most SNPs with a few exceptions. The major risk allele of HTRA1 rs11200638 (10q26) was at a significantly higher frequency in the Timorese, as well as 3 of the 5 protective CFH (1q32) SNPs (rs800292, rs2284664, and rs12066959). Additionally, the most commonly associated AMD-risk SNP, CFH rs1061170 (Y402H), was also seen at a much lower frequency in the Korean and Timorese populations than in the assessed Caucasian populations (C ~7 vs. ~40%, respectively). The difference in allele frequencies between the Timorese population and the other genotyped populations, along with the haplogroup analysis, also highlight the genetic diversity of the Timorese. Specifically, the most common ancestry groupings were Oceanic (Melanesian and Papuan) and Eastern Asian (specifically Han Chinese). The low prevalence of AMD in the Timorese population (2 of 535 randomly selected participants) may be due to the enrichment of protective alleles in this population at the 1q32 locus. PMID:26217379

  15. Analysis of HLA-DRB3 alleles and supertypical genotypes in the MHC Class II region in sporadic inclusion body myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojana-udomsart, Arada; Mitrpant, Chalermchai; James, Ian; Witt, Campbell; Needham, Merrilee; Day, Timothy; Kiers, Lynette; Corbett, Alastair; Martinez, Patricia; Wilton, Steve D; Mastaglia, Frank L

    2013-01-15

    We compared the carriage frequencies of HLA-DRB3 and its major alleles and of HLA-DRB4 and HLA-DRB5 in an Australian sIBM cohort and a population control group who had previously been genotyped for the HLA-DRB1*03:01 risk allele. There was a strong disease association with the carriage of the DRB3*01:01 allele which was accounted for by its linkage disequilibrium with DRB1*03:01. The carriage of HLA-DRB4 was found to be strongly protective and abrogated the risk effect of HLA-DRB1*03:01. The findings indicate that haplotypic combinations of alleles at the HLA-DRB1 and secondary HLA-DRB loci have important risk modifying effects in sIBM.

  16. Real-time PCR genotyping assay for canine progressive rod-cone degeneration and mutant allele frequency in Toy Poodles, Chihuahuas and Miniature Dachshunds in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohyama, Moeko; Tada, Naomi; Mitsui, Hiroko; Tomioka, Hitomi; Tsutsui, Toshihiko; Yabuki, Akira; Rahman, Mohammad Mahbubur; Kushida, Kazuya; Mizukami, Keijiro; Yamato, Osamu

    2016-03-01

    Canine progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD) is a middle- to late-onset, autosomal recessive, inherited retinal disorder caused by a substitution (c.5G>A) in the canine PRCD gene that has been identified in 29 or more purebred dogs. In the present study, a TaqMan probe-based real-time PCR assay was developed and evaluated for rapid genotyping and large-scale screening of the mutation. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of the three most popular breeds in Japan (Toy Poodles, Chihuahuas and Miniature Dachshunds) to determine the current mutant allele frequency. The assay separated all the genotypes of canine PRCD rapidly, indicating its suitability for large-scale surveys. The results of the survey showed that the mutant allele frequency in Toy Poodles was high enough (approximately 0.09) to allow the establishment of measures for the prevention and control of this disorder in breeding kennels. The mutant allele was detected in Chihuahuas for the first time, but the frequency was lower (approximately 0.02) than that in Toy Poodles. The mutant allele was not detected in Miniature Dachshunds. This assay will allow the selective breeding of dogs from the two most popular breeds (Toy Poodle and Chihuahua) in Japan and effective prevention or control of the disorder.

  17. Novel, Non-Radioactive, Simple and Multiplex PCR-cRFLP Methods for Genotyping Human SP-A and SP-D Marker Alleles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan DiAngelo

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously identified an allele of the human SP-A2 gene that occurs with greater frequency in an RDS population [12]. Because of the importance of SP-A in normal lung function and its newly emerging role in innate host defense and regu-lation of inflammatory processes, we wish to better characterize genotypes of both SP-A1 and SP-A2 genes. It has been determined that SP-D shares similar roles in immune response. Therefore, in this report we 1 describe a novel, non radioactive PCR based-cRFLP method for genotyping both SP-A and SP-D; 2 describe two previously unpublished biallelic polymorphisms within the SP-D gene; 3 present the partial sequence of one new SP-A1 allele (6A14 and describe other new SP-A1 and SP-A2 alleles; and 4 describe additional methodologies for SP-A genotype assessment. The ability to more accurately and efficiently genotype samples from individuals with various pulmonary diseases will facilitate population and family based association studies. Genetic poly-morphisms may be identified that partially explain individual disease susceptibility and/or treatment effectiveness.

  18. Real-time PCR genotyping assay for GM2 gangliosidosis variant 0 in toy poodles and the mutant allele frequency in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Mahbubur; Yabuki, Akira; Kohyama, Moeko; Mitani, Sawane; Mizukami, Keijiro; Uddin, Mohammad Mejbah; Chang, Hye-Sook; Kushida, Kazuya; Kishimoto, Miori; Yamabe, Remi; Yamato, Osamu

    2014-03-01

    GM2 gangliosidosis variant 0 (Sandhoff disease, SD) is a fatal, progressive neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations of the HEXB gene. In canine SD, a pathogenic mutation (c.283delG) of the canine HEXB gene has been identified in toy poodles. In the present study, a TaqMan probe-based real-time PCR genotyping assay was developed and evaluated for rapid and large-scale genotyping and screening for this mutation. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of toy poodles in Japan to determine the current mutant allele frequency. The real-time PCR assay clearly showed all genotypes of canine SD. The assay was suitable for large-scale survey as well as diagnosis, because of its high throughput and rapidity. The genotyping survey demonstrated a carrier frequency of 0.2%, suggesting that the current mutant allele frequency is low in Japan. However, there may be population stratification in different places, because of the founder effect by some carriers. Therefore, this new assay will be useful for the prevention and control of SD in toy poodles.

  19. Enhanced specificity of TPMT*2 genotyping using unidirectional wild-type and mutant allele-specific scorpion primers in a single tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Yang, Zhao; Xia, Han; Huang, Jun-Fu; Zhang, Yang; Jiang, Tian-Nun; Wang, Gui-Yu; Chuai, Zheng-Ran; Fu, Wei-Ling; Huang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Genotyping of thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) is recommended for predicting the adverse drug response of thiopurines. In the current study, a novel version of allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR), termed competitive real-time fluorescent AS-PCR (CRAS-PCR) was developed to analyze the TPMT*2 genotype in ethnic Chinese. This technique simultaneously uses wild-type and mutant allele-specific scorpion primers in a single reaction. To determine the optimal conditions for both traditional AS-PCR and CRAS-PCR, we used the Taguchi method, an engineering optimization process that balances the concentrations of all components using an orthogonal array rather than a factorial array. Instead of running up to 264 experiments with the conventional factorial method, the Taguchi method achieved the same optimization using only 16 experiments. The optimized CRAS-PCR system completely avoided non-specific amplification occurring in traditional AS-PCR and could be performed at much more relaxed reaction conditions at 1% sensitivity, similar to traditional AS-PCR. TPMT*2 genotyping of 240 clinical samples was consistent with published data. In conclusion, CRAS-PCR is a novel and robust genotyping method, and the Taguchi method is an effective tool for the optimization of molecular analysis techniques.

  20. Data on IL-6 c.-174 G>C genotype and allele frequencies in patients with coronary heart disease in dependence of cardiovascular outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Reichert

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this data article we present data on the distribution of alleles and genotypes of the interleukin (IL-6 c.-174 G>C polymorphism (rs 1800795 in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD in dependence of the incidence of new cardiovascular events (combined endpoint: myocardial infarction, stroke/TIA, cardiac death, death according to stroke within three years follow-up. Moreover, we investigated putative associations between individual expression of IL-6 genotypes and IL-6 serum level. This investigation is a subanalysis of the article entitled “The Interleukin 6 c.-174 CC genotype is a predictor for new cardiovascular events in patients with coronary heart disease within three years follow-up“ (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01045070 (Reichert et al., 2016 [1].

  1. A Theoretical Framework for Association Studies in F2 Family Pools Using Allele Frequencies from Genotyping-By-Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janss, Luc L; Ashraf, Bilal H; Greve-Pedersen, Morten

    a sequencing approach to obtain Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) frequencies is considered here. In this work we develop the theoretical framework to perform association studies using allele frequencies from such F2 family pools. We show that expected allele frequencies in the F2 families will have...

  2. A population-wide applicable HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 genotyping using DNA from dried blood spots and duplex allele-specific qPCR amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguayo-Patrón, Sandra; Beltrán-Sauceda, Lizbeth; Calderón de la Barca, Ana María

    2016-11-01

    Genotyping of HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 haplotypes is important for diagnosis or for screening of early risk detection of celiac disease or type 1 diabetes. Usually, venous blood DNA extraction and expensive and time consuming amplification are used, that hinder population-wide studies. We assayed a friendly HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 genotyping procedure using a combination of DNA from dried blood spot (DBS) and duplex allele-specific qPCR amplification using SYBR Green. DNA was extracted using home-made buffers and compared to an extraction commercial kit. Duplex reactions by qPCR were designed using each Tm allele amplicon for reference samples (positive HLA-DQ2 or DQ8) with allele-specific primers. DBS samples from 558 children (7.99 ± 2.47 y) were collected. The DNA final yield obtained by the home-made extractive procedure was higher than from the commercial kit (1.11 ± 0.56 vs 0.23 ± 0.14 μg), while the quality was similar for both DNA samples. There was concordance in the amplification profiles for DNA samples obtained with both methods. All of four alleles from DQ2 and DQ8 haplotypes were accurately identified in duplex reactions. By using DBS samples and DNA extraction home-made procedure, the costs were reduced by 60%. The whole procedure is cost-effective for HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 genotyping.

  3. A rapid and robust sequence-based genotyping method for BoLA-DRB3 alleles in large numbers of heterozygous cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, R; Hastings, N; Law, A; Glass, E J

    2008-10-01

    The BoLA-DRB3 gene is a highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex class II gene of cattle with over one hundred alleles reported. Most of the polymorphisms are located in exon 2, which encodes the peptide-binding cleft, and these sequence differences play a role in variability of immune responsiveness and disease resistance. However, the high degree of polymorphism in exon 2 leads to difficulty in accurately genotyping cattle, especially heterozygous animals. In this study, we have improved and simplified an earlier sequence-based typing method to easily and reliably genotype cattle for BoLA-DRB3. In contrast to the earlier method, which used a nested primer set to amplify exon 2 followed by sequencing with internal primers, the new method uses only internal primers for both amplification and sequencing, which results in high-quality sequence across the entire exon. The haplofinder software, which assigns alleles from the heterozygous sequence, now has a pre-processing step that uses a consensus of all known alleles and checks for errors in base calling, thus improving the ability to process large numbers of samples. In addition, advances in sequencing technology have reduced the requirement for manual editing and improved the clarity of heterozygous base calls, resulting in longer and clearer sequence reads. Taken together, this has resulted in a rapid and robust method for genotyping large numbers of heterozygous samples for BoLA-DRB3 polymorphisms. Over 400 Holstein-Charolais cattle have now been genotyped for BoLA-DRB3 using this approach.

  4. Novel rapid genotyping assays for neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in Border Collie dogs and high frequency of the mutant allele in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Chang, Hye-Sook; Yabuki, Akira; Kawamichi, Takuji; Kawahara, Natsuko; Hayashi, Daisuke; Hossain, Mohammad A; Rahman, Mohammad M; Uddin, Mohammad M; Yamato, Osamu

    2011-11-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) constitutes a group of recessively inherited lysosomal storage diseases that primarily affect neuronal cells. Such diseases share certain clinical and pathologic features in human beings and animals. Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in Border Collie dogs was first detected in Australia in the 1980s, and the pathogenic mutation was shown to be a nonsense mutation (c.619C>T) in exon 4 in canine CLN5 gene. In the present study, novel rapid genotyping assays including polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism, PCR primer-induced restriction analysis, mutagenically separated PCR, and real-time PCR with TaqMan minor groove binder probes, were developed. The utility of microchip electrophoresis was also evaluated. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of Border Collies in Japan using these assays to determine the current allele frequency in Japan, providing information to control and prevent this disease in the next stage. All assays developed in the current study are available to discriminate these genotypes, and microchip electrophoresis showed a timesaving advantage over agarose gel electrophoresis. Of all assays, real-time PCR was the most suitable for large-scale examination because of its high throughput. The genotyping survey demonstrated that the carrier frequency was 8.1%. This finding suggested that the mutant allele frequency of NCL in Border Collies is high enough in Japan that measures to control and prevent the disease would be warranted. The genotyping assays developed in the present study could contribute to the prevention of NCL in Border Collies.

  5. Helicobacter pylori genotyping from American indigenous groups shows novel Amerindian vacA and cagA alleles and Asian, African and European admixture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Camorlinga-Ponce

    Full Text Available It is valuable to extend genotyping studies of Helicobacter pylori to strains from indigenous communities across the world to better define adaption, evolution, and associated diseases. We aimed to genetically characterize both human individuals and their infecting H. pylori from indigenous communities of Mexico, and to compare them with those from other human groups. We studied individuals from three indigenous groups, Tarahumaras from the North, Huichols from the West and Nahuas from the center of Mexico. Volunteers were sampled at their community site, DNA was isolated from white blood cells and mtDNA, Y-chromosome, and STR alleles were studied. H. pylori was cultured from gastric juice, and DNA extracted for genotyping of virulence and housekeeping genes. We found Amerindian mtDNA haplogroups (A, B, C, and D, Y-chromosome DYS19T, and Amerindian STRs alleles frequent in the three groups, confirming Amerindian ancestry in these Mexican groups. Concerning H.pylori cagA phylogenetic analyses, although most isolates were of the Western type, a new Amerindian cluster neither Western nor Asian, was formed by some indigenous Mexican, Colombian, Peruvian and Venezuelan isolates. Similarly, vacA phylogenetic analyses showed the existence of a novel Amerindian type in isolates from Alaska, Mexico and Colombia. With hspA strains from Mexico and other American groups clustered within the three major groups, Asian, African or European. Genotyping of housekeeping genes confirmed that Mexican strains formed a novel Asian-related Amerindian group together with strains from remote Amazon Aborigines. This study shows that Mexican indigenous people with Amerindian markers are colonized with H. pylori showing admixture of Asian, European and African strains in genes known to interact with the gastric mucosa. We present evidence of novel Amerindian cagA and vacA alleles in indigenous groups of North and South America.

  6. Helicobacter pylori Genotyping from American Indigenous Groups Shows Novel Amerindian vacA and cagA Alleles and Asian, African and European Admixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Perez-Perez, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Valencia, Gerardo; Mendoza, Irma; Peñaloza-Espinosa, Rosenda; Ramos, Irma; Kersulyte, Dangeruta; Reyes-Leon, Adriana; Romo, Carolina; Granados, Julio; Muñoz, Leopoldo; Berg, Douglas E.; Torres, Javier

    2011-01-01

    It is valuable to extend genotyping studies of Helicobacter pylori to strains from indigenous communities across the world to better define adaption, evolution, and associated diseases. We aimed to genetically characterize both human individuals and their infecting H. pylori from indigenous communities of Mexico, and to compare them with those from other human groups. We studied individuals from three indigenous groups, Tarahumaras from the North, Huichols from the West and Nahuas from the center of Mexico. Volunteers were sampled at their community site, DNA was isolated from white blood cells and mtDNA, Y-chromosome, and STR alleles were studied. H. pylori was cultured from gastric juice, and DNA extracted for genotyping of virulence and housekeeping genes. We found Amerindian mtDNA haplogroups (A, B, C, and D), Y-chromosome DYS19T, and Amerindian STRs alleles frequent in the three groups, confirming Amerindian ancestry in these Mexican groups. Concerning H.pylori cagA phylogenetic analyses, although most isolates were of the Western type, a new Amerindian cluster neither Western nor Asian, was formed by some indigenous Mexican, Colombian, Peruvian and Venezuelan isolates. Similarly, vacA phylogenetic analyses showed the existence of a novel Amerindian type in isolates from Alaska, Mexico and Colombia. With hspA strains from Mexico and other American groups clustered within the three major groups, Asian, African or European. Genotyping of housekeeping genes confirmed that Mexican strains formed a novel Asian-related Amerindian group together with strains from remote Amazon Aborigines. This study shows that Mexican indigenous people with Amerindian markers are colonized with H. pylori showing admixture of Asian, European and African strains in genes known to interact with the gastric mucosa. We present evidence of novel Amerindian cagA and vacA alleles in indigenous groups of North and South America. PMID:22073291

  7. The HLA-G 14-base pair deletion allele and the deletion/deletion genotype are associated with persistent HBe antigenemia in chronic hepatis B infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Sandro da Costa; Chachá, Silvana Gama Florêncio; Souza, Fernanda Fernandes; Teixeira, Andreza Corrêa; Santana, Rodrigo de Carvalho; Deghaide, Neifi Hassan Saloun; Rodrigues, Sandra; Marano, Leonardo A; Mendes-Junior, Celso Teixeira; Ramalho, Leandra Naira Zambelli; Zucoloto, Sérgio; Donadi, Eduardo Antônio; Martinelli, Ana de Lourdes Candolo

    2017-02-01

    HLA-G has well-recognized immunomodulatory properties, and this molecule is frequently expressed in the livers of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patients. Because the HLA-G 14 bp-insertion/deletion polymorphism (rs371194629) has been associated with the magnitude of HLA-G expression, we evaluated this polymorphism in the recognized evolutionary forms of chronic HBV infection. We studied 196 chronic HBV-infected patients (118 HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis, 53 HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis and 25 inactive carriers exhibiting low levels of serum HBVDNA and persistently normal ALT levels), and 202 healthy individuals. Chronic hepatitis HLA-G typing was performed using PCR-amplified DNA hybridized with specific primers. The frequencies of the insertion/deletion alleles and genotypes were very similar in patients and controls. After patient stratification according to the evolutionary form of the chronic HBV infection, the frequencies of the deletion allele (P=0.0460; OR=1.26; 95%CI=1.01-1.45) and of the deletion/deletion genotype (P=0.0356; OR=2.08; 95%CI=1.05-4.09) were overrepresented in HBeAg-positive patients when compared to HBeAg-negative patients. No differences were observed when HBV inactive carriers were compared to HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis patients. Because the 14-bp deletion allele has been associated with increased HLA-G production and because HLA-G may down regulate the cytotoxic activity of TCD8 and NK cells, patients exhibiting the 14-bp deletion allele at single or double doses are at increased risk for developing chronic forms of HBV associated with persistent viremia and worse prognoses. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Isolation of S-locus F-box alleles in Prunus avium and their application in a novel method to determine self-incompatibility genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, S P; Russell, K; Sargent, D J; Tobutt, K R

    2006-03-01

    This study characterises a series of 12 S-locus haplotype-specific F-box protein genes (SFB) in cherry (Prunus avium) that are likely candidates for the pollen component of gametophytic self-incompatibility in this species. Primers were designed to amplify 12 SFB alleles,including the introns present in the 50 untranslated region;sequences representing the S-alleles S1, S2, S3, S4, S40, S5,S6, S7, S10, S12, S13 and S16 were cloned and characterized. [The nucleotide sequences reported in this paper have been submitted to the EMBL/GenBank database under the following accession numbers: PaSFB1(AY805048), PaSFB2 (AY805049), PaSFB3 (AY805057),PaSFB4 (AY649872), PaSFB40 (AY649873), PaSFB5(AY805050), PaSFB6 (AY805051), PaSFB7 (AY805052),PaSFB10 (AY805053), PaSFB12 (AY805054), PaSFB13(AY805055), PaSFB16 (AY805056).] Though the coding regions of six of these alleles have been reported previously,the intron sequence has previously been reported only for S6. Analysis of the introns revealed sequence and length polymorphisms. A novel, PCR-based method to genotype cultivars and wild accessions was developed which combines fluorescently labelled primers amplifying the intron of SFB with similar primers for the first intron of S-RNase alleles. Intron length polymorphisms were then ascertained using a semi-automated sequencer. The convenience and reliability of this method for the determination of the self-incompatibility (SI) genotype was demonstrated both in sweet cherry cultivars representing alleles S1 to S16 and in individuals from a wild population encompassing S-alleles S17 to S22. This method will greatly expedite SI characterisation in sweet cherry and also facilitate large-scale studies of self-incompatibility in wild cherry and other Prunus populations.

  9. Significant Association of HLA-B Alleles and Genotypes in Thai Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apichaya Puangpetch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder. Many susceptible causative genes have been identified. Most of the previous reports showed the relationship between the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA gene and etiology of autism. In order to identify HLA-B alleles associated with autism in Thai population, we compared the frequency of HLA-B allele in 364 autistic subjects with 952 normal subjects by using a two-stage sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe system (PCR-SSOP method based on flow-cytometry technology. HLA-B⁎13:02 (P=0.019, OR = 2.229, HLA-B⁎38:02 (P=0.049, OR = 1.628, HLA-B⁎44:03 (P=0.016, OR = 1.645, and HLA-B⁎56:01 (P = 1.78 × 10−4, OR = 4.927 alleles were significantly increased in autistic subjects compared with normal subjects. Moreover, we found that the HLA-B⁎18:02 (P=0.016, OR = 0.375 and HLA-B⁎46:12 (P=0.008, OR = 0.147 alleles were negatively associated with autism when compared to normal controls. Both alleles might have a protective role in disease development. In addition, four HLA-B genotypes of autistic patients had statistically significant relationship with control groups, consisting of HLA-B⁎3905/⁎5801 (P=0.032, OR = 24.697, HLA-B⁎2704/⁎5801 (P=0.022, OR = 6.872, HLA-B⁎3501/⁎4403 (P=0.021, OR = 30.269, and HLA-B⁎1801/⁎4402 (P = 0.017, OR = 13.757. This is the first report on HLA-B associated with Thai autism and may serve as a marker for genetic susceptibility to autism in Thai population.

  10. Pedigree genotyping: a new pedigree-based approach of QTL identification and allele mining by exploiting breeding material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weg, van de W.E.; Voorrips, R.E.; Finkers, H.J.; Kodde, L.P.; Meulenbroek, E.J.; Jansen, J.; Bink, M.C.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    To date, molecular markers have been made available for many economically important traits. Unfortunately, lack of knowledge of their allelic variation hampers their full exploitation in commercial breeding programs. These markers have usually been identified in one single cross. Consequently, only

  11. Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency in south Italy: Genotype-phenotype correlations, identification of a novel mutant PAH allele and prediction of BH4 responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trunzo, Roberta; Santacroce, Rosa; D'Andrea, Giovanna; Longo, Vittoria; De Girolamo, Giuseppe; Dimatteo, Claudia; Leccese, Angelica; Bafunno, Valeria; Lillo, Vincenza; Papadia, Francesco; Margaglione, Maurizio

    2015-10-23

    We investigated the mutation spectrum of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene (PAH) in a cohort of patients from 33 Italian PKU families. Mutational screening of the known coding region, including conventional intron splice sites, was performed by direct sequencing of the patients' genomic DNA. Thirty-three different disease causing mutations were identified in our patient group, including 19 missense, 6 splicing, 3 nonsense, 5 deletions, with a detection rate of 100%. The most prevalent mutation was the IVS10-11G>A, accounting for 12.1% of PKU alleles studied. Other frequent mutations were: p.R261Q (9.1%), p.P281L (7.6%), and p.R408W (6.1%). We also identified one novel missense mutation, p.H290Q. A spectrum of 31 different genotypes was observed and a genotype based predictions of BH4-responsiveness were assessed. Among all genotypes, 13 were predicted to be BH4-responsive represented by thirteen PKU families. In addition, genotype-phenotype correlations were performed. This study reveals the importance of a full genotyping of PKU patients and the prediction of BH4-responsiveness, not only because of the definitive diagnosis and prediction of the optimal diet, but also to point out those patients that could benefit from new therapeutic approach. They may potentially benefit from BH4 therapy which, combined with a less strict diet, or eventually in special cases as monotherapy, may contribute to reduce nutritional deficiencies and minimize neurological and psychological dysfunctions.

  12. Interleukin-28B rs12979860 C allele: Protective against advanced fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitson, Matthew T; George, Jacob; Dore, Gregory J; Leung, Reynold; Button, Peter; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Grawford, Darrell H G; Siebert, William; Weltman, Martin D; Cheng, Wendy S C; Roberts, Stuart K

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: While genetic polymorphisms upstream of the interleukin-28B(IL28B) gene are associated with necroinflammatory activity grade in chronic hepatitis C virus genotype 1 (HCV-1) infection, any association with fibrosis is less definitive. Pretreatment liver biopsies in a cohort of treatment-naïve patients with HCV-1 were analyzed to evaluate associations between liver histology, and the rs12979860 and rs8099917 IL28B single nucleotide polymorphisms.Methods: Two hundred sixty-six patients with HCV-1 infection and pretreatment liver biopsy were tested for the rs12979860 and rs8099917 single nucleotide polymorphisms.Predictors of advanced fibrosis (METAVIR F3/4) and high activity grade (A2/3) were identified using multivariable logistic regression analysis.Results: Forty-four patients (16.5%) had advanced fibrosis and 141 patients (53.0%) high activity grade. Prevalence of rs12979860 IL28B genotype was: CC 45.7%, CT 42.7%, and TT 11.6%. Prevalence of advanced fibrosis was lower in those with IL28B CC genotype compared with those without (11.0% vs 21.3%; P = 0.03), with an increasing number of Talleles associated with a higher frequency of advanced fibrosis: CC 11.0%, CT 18.0%, TT33.3% (P = 0.01). Predictors of advanced fibrosis on multivariate analysis were platelet count (odds ratio [OR] 0.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.97–0.99; P < 0.0001), high activity grade (OR 5.68, 95% CI% 1.86–17.32; P = 0.002), IL28B rs12979860 CC genotype(OR 0.36, 95% CI 0.14–0.93; P = 0.03), and aspartate aminotransferase (OR 1.02,95% CI 1.00–1.03; P = 0.046). No association was found between rs8099917 IL28B genotype and liver histology.Conclusions: IL28B rs12979860 CC genotype appears to be independently associated with a lower prevalence of advanced fibrosis stage in HCV-1 infection. This association warrants further evaluation.

  13. DNA-PCR system FGA (FIBRA)--genotype and allele frequencies in a sample of western Germany (Düsseldorf region).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckenbeck, W; Scheil, H G; Kuntze, K

    1999-12-01

    Frequency data for the STR system FGA (HumFibra) were obtained from a Caucasoid German population sample (Düsseldorf area) of 424 unrelated individuals. PCR products were detected by horizontal polyacrylamid gel electrophoresis and a total of 16 alleles was identified by side-by-side comparison with a commercially available sequenced ladder. The observed genotype distribution showed no significant deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The high information content (pooled German data: rate of heterozygosity = 0.8626; probability of match = 0.0344; mean exclusion chance = 0.7240) render this system a useful tool not only in forensic casework (criminal and paternity cases) but in population genetics too.

  14. Lost parcel

    CERN Multimedia

    FP Department

    2009-01-01

    A parcel containing 20 boxes of DECAdry business cards, weighing about 5.5 kg, has been lost. It had been placed on the red file shelves in the Library. Anyone finding this parcel is urgently requested to call 16 06 02. Thank you for your assistance. FP Department

  15. Sequence-Based Genotyping of Expressed Swine Leukocyte Antigen Class I Alleles by Next-Generation Sequencing Reveal Novel Swine Leukocyte Antigen Class I Haplotypes and Alleles in Belgian, Danish, and Kenyan Fattening Pigs and Göttingen Minipigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Maria Rathmann; Ilsøe, Mette; Strube, Mikael Lenz; Bishop, Richard; Erbs, Gitte; Hartmann, Sofie Bruun; Jungersen, Gregers

    2017-01-01

    The need for typing of the swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) is increasing with the expanded use of pigs as models for human diseases and organ-transplantation experiments, their use in infection studies, and for design of veterinary vaccines. Knowledge of SLA sequences is furthermore a prerequisite for the prediction of epitope binding in pigs. The low number of known SLA class I alleles and the limited knowledge of their prevalence in different pig breeds emphasizes the need for efficient SLA typing methods. This study utilizes an SLA class I-typing method based on next-generation sequencing of barcoded PCR amplicons. The amplicons were generated with universal primers and predicted to resolve 68–88% of all known SLA class I alleles dependent on amplicon size. We analyzed the SLA profiles of 72 pigs from four different pig populations; Göttingen minipigs and Belgian, Kenyan, and Danish fattening pigs. We identified 67 alleles, nine previously described haplotypes and 15 novel haplotypes. The highest variation in SLA class I profiles was observed in the Danish pigs and the lowest among the Göttingen minipig population, which also have the highest percentage of homozygote individuals. Highlighting the fact that there are still numerous unknown SLA class I alleles to be discovered, a total of 12 novel SLA class I alleles were identified. Overall, we present new information about known and novel alleles and haplotypes and their prevalence in the tested pig populations. PMID:28670315

  16. Sequence-Based Genotyping of Expressed Swine Leukocyte Antigen Class I Alleles by Next-Generation Sequencing Reveal Novel Swine Leukocyte Antigen Class I Haplotypes and Alleles in Belgian, Danish, and Kenyan Fattening Pigs and Göttingen Minipigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Maria Rathmann; Ilsøe, Mette; Strube, Mikael Lenz

    2017-01-01

    for the prediction of epitope binding in pigs. The low number of known SLA class I alleles and the limited knowledge of their prevalence in different pig breeds emphasizes the need for efficient SLA typing methods. This study utilizes an SLA class I-typing method based on next-generation sequencing of barcoded PCR...

  17. Effects of an MHC-DRB genotype and allele number on the load of gut parasites in the bank vole Myodes glareolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloch, Agnieszka; Babik, Wiesław; Bajer, Anna; Siński, Edward; Radwan, Jacek

    2010-03-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes code for the proteins responsible for pathogen recognition. The MHC class II DRB gene is multiplicated in the bank vole, Myodes glareolus, with different numbers of loci found in different individuals. Possessing large numbers of loci should increase the probability of pathogen recognition, but according to the optimality hypothesis, there is a cost of possessing too many MHC alleles. Using 454 technology, we determined the individual DRB allelic diversity and related it to the load of intestinal parasites in voles collected from three sites separated by a distance of 12 to 27 km. The analysis of six microsatellite loci revealed significant population structure (F(ST) = 0.07). The sites differed significantly in the prevalence and abundance of nematode species as well. We found two significant associations between MHC alleles and the intensity of the infection with the most prevalent nematode, Aspiculuris tetraptera. One of these associations was population-specific. This result suggests that the directions of selection can differ between populations connected by a low level of gene flow, which may contribute to the maintenance of high DRB allele diversity. In accordance with the optimality hypothesis, individuals with an intermediate number of alleles carried the lowest number of nematode species and had the lowest prevalence of A. tetraptera. However, the intensity of infection with A. tetraptera was linearly and negatively associated with the number of alleles.

  18. Sequence-based genotyping of expressed SLA class I alleles by Next Generation Sequencing reveal novel SLA class I haplotypes and alleles in Belgian, Danish and Kenyan fattening pigs and Göttingen minipigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Maria Rathmann; Ilsøe, Mette; Strube, Mikael Lenz

    The need for typing of the swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) is increasing with the expanded use of pigs as models for human diseases and organ-transplantation experiments, their use in infection studies, and for design of veterinary vaccines. Knowledge of SLA sequences is furthermore a prerequisite...... for the prediction of CTL epitopes based on predicted MHC binding in pigs. The low number of known SLA class I alleles and the limited knowledge of their prevalence in different pig breeds, emphasizes the need for efficient SLA typing methods. Here we obtain SLA class I–typing and –expression based on Illumina Mi......Seq Next Generation Sequencing of barcoded PCR amplicons. Universal primers were designed to generate amplicons spanning exon 2 and exon 3 of the SLA class I genes and predicted to resolve 68% to 88% of all known SLA class I alleles dependent on amplicon size. Based on whole blood mRNA we analyzed the c...

  19. Genome-wide high-throughput SNP discovery and genotyping for understanding natural (functional) allelic diversity and domestication patterns in wild chickpea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Deepak; Das, Shouvik; Badoni, Saurabh; Kumar, Vinod; Singh, Mohar; Bansal, Kailash C.; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2015-01-01

    We identified 82489 high-quality genome-wide SNPs from 93 wild and cultivated Cicer accessions through integrated reference genome- and de novo-based GBS assays. High intra- and inter-specific polymorphic potential (66–85%) and broader natural allelic diversity (6–64%) detected by genome-wide SNPs among accessions signify their efficacy for monitoring introgression and transferring target trait-regulating genomic (gene) regions/allelic variants from wild to cultivated Cicer gene pools for genetic improvement. The population-specific assignment of wild Cicer accessions pertaining to the primary gene pool are more influenced by geographical origin/phenotypic characteristics than species/gene-pools of origination. The functional significance of allelic variants (non-synonymous and regulatory SNPs) scanned from transcription factors and stress-responsive genes in differentiating wild accessions (with potential known sources of yield-contributing and stress tolerance traits) from cultivated desi and kabuli accessions, fine-mapping/map-based cloning of QTLs and determination of LD patterns across wild and cultivated gene-pools are suitably elucidated. The correlation between phenotypic (agromorphological traits) and molecular diversity-based admixed domestication patterns within six structured populations of wild and cultivated accessions via genome-wide SNPs was apparent. This suggests utility of whole genome SNPs as a potential resource for identifying naturally selected trait-regulating genomic targets/functional allelic variants adaptive to diverse agroclimatic regions for genetic enhancement of cultivated gene-pools. PMID:26208313

  20. Genotyping of the 19-bp insertion/deletion polymorphism in the 5' flank of beta-hydroxylase gene by dissociation analysis of allele-specific PCR products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Werge, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    DNA fragments. Mistyping of heterozygote samples due to preferential allele amplification was prevented by use of an optimized concentration of Mg(2+), addition of dimethyl sulfoxide and annealing/extension at an appropriate temperature. Comparison of results achieved by the closed-tube assay...

  1. The lost p1 allele in sh2 sweet corn: Quantitative effects of p1 and a1 genes on the concentrations of maysin, apimaysin, methoxymaysin, and chlorogenic acid in maize silk, and the antibiotic activity against corn earworm

    Science.gov (United States)

    The flavor of sh2 super-sweet corn is preferred by consumers. Unfortunately, sh2 sweet corn has very little genetic variation for resistance to insects. This presentation will review and summarize the studies of the functions of two loci, p1 and a1. The P1 allele can have a major role in the resista...

  2. Allele and genotype frequencies of the polymorphic cytochrome P450 genes (CYP1A1, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP2C9 and CYP2C19) in the Jordanian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Al-Motassem; Bulatova, Nailya R; Newman, William; Hakooz, Nancy; Ismail, Said; Qusa, Hisham; Zahran, Farah; Anwar Ababneh, Nidaa; Hasan, Farah; Zaloom, Imad; Khayat, Ghada; Al-Zmili, Rawan; Naffa, Randa; Al-Diab, Ola

    2012-10-01

    Drug metabolizing enzymes participate in the neutralizing of xenobiotics and biotransformation of drugs. Human cytochrome P450, particularly CYP1A1, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP3A4 and CYP3A5, play an important role in drug metabolism. The genes encoding the CYP enzymes are polymorphic, and extensive data have shown that certain alleles confer reduced enzymatic function. The goal of this study was to determine the frequencies of important allelic variants of CYP1A1, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 in the Jordanian population and compare them with the frequency in other ethnic groups. Genotyping of CYP1A1(m1 and m2), CYP2C9 (2 and 3), CYP2C19 (2 and 3), CYP3A4 5, CYP3A5 (3 and 6), was carried out on Jordanian subjects. Different variants allele were determined using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). CYP1A1 allele frequencies in 290 subjects were 0.764 for CYP1A1 1, 0.165 for CYP1A1 2A and 0.071 for CYP1A1 2C. CYP2C9 allele frequencies in 263 subjects were 0.797 for CYP2C9 1, 0.135 for CYP2C9 2 and 0.068 for CYP2C9 3. For CYP2C19, the frequencies of the wild type (CYP2C19 1) and the nonfunctional (2 and 3) alleles were 0.877, 0.123 and 0, respectively. Five subjects (3.16 %) were homozygous for 2/2. Regarding CYP3A4 1B, only 12 subjects out of 173 subjects (6.9 %) were heterozygote with none were mutant for this polymorphism. With respect to CYP3A5, 229 were analyzed, frequencies of CYP3A5 1, 3 and 6 were 0.071, 0.925 and 0.0022, respectively. Comparing our data with that obtained in several Caucasian, African-American and Asian populations, Jordanians are most similar to Caucasians with regard to allelic frequencies of the tested variants of CYP1A1, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP3A4 and CYP3A5.

  3. Allele coding in genomic evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Standen, Ismo; Christensen, Ole Fredslund

    2011-01-01

    Genomic data are used in animal breeding to assist genetic evaluation. Several models to estimate genomic breeding values have been studied. In general, two approaches have been used. One approach estimates the marker effects first and then, genomic breeding values are obtained by summing marker...... effects. In the second approach, genomic breeding values are estimated directly using an equivalent model with a genomic relationship matrix. Allele coding is the method chosen to assign values to the regression coefficients in the statistical model. A common allele coding is zero for the homozygous...... genotype of the first allele, one for the heterozygote, and two for the homozygous genotype for the other allele. Another common allele coding changes these regression coefficients by subtracting a value from each marker such that the mean of regression coefficients is zero within each marker. We call...

  4. Genotyping of the 19-bp insertion/deletion polymorphism in the 5' flank of beta-hydroxylase gene by dissociation analysis of allele-specific PCR products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Werge, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The 19-bp insertion/deletion polymorphism in the 5' flank of the dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) gene has been associated with psychiatric disorders. We have developed a simple, reliable and inexpensive closed-tube assay for genotyping of this polymorphism based upon T(m) determination of amplified...... and a conventional approach based upon agarose gel electrophoresis of amplified fragments revealed complete concordance between the two procedures. The insights obtained in this study may be utilized to develop assays based upon dissociation analysis of PCR products for genotyping of other insertion...

  5. Genotyping of a tri-allelic polymorphism by a novel melting curve assay in MTHFD1L: an association study of nonsyndromic Cleft in Ireland

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Minguzzi, Stefano

    2012-04-20

    AbstractBackgroundPolymorphisms within the MTHFD1L gene were previously associated with risk of neural tube defects in Ireland. We sought to test the most significant MTHFD1L polymorphisms for an association with risk of cleft in an Irish cohort. This required the development of a new melting curve assay to genotype the technically challenging MTHFD1L triallelic deletion\\/insertion polymorphism (rs3832406).MethodsMelting curve analysis was used to genotype the MTHFD1L triallelic deletion\\/insertion polymorphism (rs3832406) and a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism rs17080476 in an Irish cohort consisting of 981 Irish case-parent trios and 1,008 controls. Tests for association with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate and cleft palate included case\\/control analysis, mother\\/control analysis and Transmission Disequilibrium Tests of case-parent trios.ResultsA successful melting curve genotyping assay was developed for the deletion\\/insertion polymorphism (rs3832406). The TDT analysis initially showed that the rs3832406 polymorphism was associated with isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate. However, corrected p-values indicated that this association was not significant.ConclusionsMelting Curve Analysis can be employed to successfully genotype challenging polymorphisms such as the MTHFD1L triallelic deletion\\/insertion polymorphism (DIP) reported here (rs3832406) and is a viable alternative to capillary electrophoresis. Corrected p-values indicate no association between MTHFD1L and risk of cleft in an Irish cohort.

  6. MNSs genotyping by MALDI-TOF MS shows high concordance with serology, allows gene copy number testing and reveals new St(a) alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Stefan; Vollmert, Caren; Trost, Nadine; Sigurdardottir, Sonja; Portmann, Claudia; Gottschalk, Jochen; Ries, Judith; Markovic, Alexander; Infanti, Laura; Buser, Andreas; Amar El Dusouqui, Soraya; Rigal, Emmanuel; Castelli, Damiano; Weingand, Bettina; Maier, Andreas; Mauvais, Simon M; Sarraj, Amira; Braisch, Monica C; Thierbach, Jutta; Hustinx, Hein; Frey, Beat M; Gassner, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    Results of genotyping with true high-throughput capability for MNSs antigens are underrepresented, probably because of technical issues, due to the high level of nucleotide sequence homology of the paralogous genes GYPA, GYPB and GYPE. Eight MNSs-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were detected using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in 5800 serologically M/N and S/s pre-typed Swiss blood donors and 50 individuals of known or presumptive black African ethnicity. Comparison of serotype with genotype delivered concordance rates of 99·70% and 99·90% and accuracy of genotyping alone of 99·88% and 99·95%, for M/N and S/s, respectively. The area under the curve of peak signals was measured in intron 1 of the two highly homologous genes GYPB and GYPE and allowed for gene copy number variation estimates in all individuals investigated. Elevated GYPB:GYPE ratios accumulated in several carriers of two newly observed GYP*401 variants, termed type G and H, both encoding for the low incidence antigen St(a). In black Africans, reduced GYPB gene contents were proven in pre-typed S-s-U- phenotypes and could be reproduced in unknown specimens. Quantitative gene copy number estimates represented a highly attractive supplement to conventional genotyping, solely based on MNSs SNPs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Resting-state brain and the FTO obesity risk allele: default mode, sensorimotor and salience network connectivity underlying different somatosensory integration and reward processing between genotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia eOlivo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO gene are linked to obesity, but how these SNPs influence resting-state neural activation is unknown. Few brain-imaging studies have investigated the influence of obesity-related SNPs on neural activity, and no study has investigated resting-state connectivity patterns. We tested connectivity within three, main resting-state networks: default mode (DMN, sensorimotor (SMN, and salience network (SN in thirty male participants, grouped based on genotype for the rs9939609 FTO SNP, as well as punishment and reward sensitivity measured by the Behavioral Inhibition (BIS and Behavioral Activation System (BAS questionnaires. Because obesity is associated with anomalies in both systems, we calculated a BIS/BAS ratio (BBr accounting for features of both scores. A prominence of BIS over BAS (higher BBr resulted in increased connectivity in frontal and paralimbic regions. These alterations were more evident in the obesity-associated AA genotype, where a high BBr was also associated with increased SN connectivity in dopaminergic circuitries, and in a subnetwork involved in somatosensory integration regarding food. Participants with AA genotype and high BBr, compared to corresponding participants in the TT genotype, also showed greater DMN connectivity in regions involved in the processing of food cues, and in the SMN for regions involved in visceral perception and reward-based learning. These findings suggest that neural connectivity patterns influence the sensitivity toward punishment and reward more closely in the AA carriers, predisposing them to developing obesity. Our work explains a complex interaction between genetics, neural patterns, and behavioral measures in determining the risk for obesity and may help develop individually-tailored strategies for obesity prevention.

  8. Allele mining across DREB1A and DREB1B in diverse rice genotypes suggest a highly conserved pathway inducible by low temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Clarissa Challam; Tapu Ghosh; Mayank Rai; Wricha Tyagi

    2015-06-01

    Low temperature stress is one of the major limiting factors affecting rice productivity in higher altitudes. DREB1A and DREB1B, are two transcription factors that have been reported to play key regulatory role in low temperature tolerance. In order to understand whether natural genetic variation in these two loci leads to cold tolerance or susceptibility, OsDREB1A and OsDREB1B were targeted across several rice genotypes showing differential response to low temperature. Expression data suggests induction of gene expression in shoots in response to low temperature in both tolerant and susceptible genotypes. Upon sequence analysis of 20 rice genotypes, eight nucleotide changes were identified including two in the coding region and six in the $5'$UTR. None of the discovered novel variations lie in the conserved region of the genes under study, thereby causing little or no changes in putative function of the corresponding proteins. In silico analysis using a diverse set of 400 O. sativa revealed much lower nucleotide diversity estimates across two DREB loci and one other gene (MYB2) involved in DREB pathway than those observed for other rice genes. None of the changes showed association with seedling stage cold tolerance, suggesting that nucleotide changes in DREB loci are unlikely to contribute to low temperature tolerance. So far, data concerning the physiological role and regulation of DREB1 in different genetic background are very limited; it is to be expected that they will be studied extensively in the near future.

  9. Allele-specific PCR genotyping of the HSP70 gene polymorphism discriminating the green and red color variants sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jung-Ha Kang; Ki Hwan Yu; Jung-Youn Park; Chul-Min An; Je-Cheon Jun; Sang-Jun Lee

    2011-01-01

    Color variation is a well-known feature of sea cucumbers (Apostichopus japonicus),which are classified into three groups based on their colors of red,green and black.It is also one of the most important traits related to how they taste,and it thereby affects their market price.Attempts were made to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and to analyze differences associated with SNP genotypes between green and red color variants using HSP70 as the target gene.The HSP70 gene,which is found universally in organisms from bacteria to humans,is one of the most evolutionarily conserved genes and the most widely studied biomarker of stress response.DNA fragments of 1074 bp covering a partial sequence of the sea cucumber HSP70 gene,were amplified from both red and green variants,and subsequently analyzed for the presence of SNPs.Twenty-seven polymorphic sites in total,including heterozygous sites,were observed.Of these,six sites were found to be significantly different SNP genotypes between green and red variants.Furthermore,PCR with an internal primer designed to include an allelespecific SNP at the 3' end (site 443) showed differentiation between the two variants,100% and 4.2% amplification in green and red variants,respectively.The validated SNPs may serve as informative genetic markers that can be used to distinguish variants at the early developmental stage,prior to color differentiation.

  10. Allele coding in genomic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christensen Ole F

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic data are used in animal breeding to assist genetic evaluation. Several models to estimate genomic breeding values have been studied. In general, two approaches have been used. One approach estimates the marker effects first and then, genomic breeding values are obtained by summing marker effects. In the second approach, genomic breeding values are estimated directly using an equivalent model with a genomic relationship matrix. Allele coding is the method chosen to assign values to the regression coefficients in the statistical model. A common allele coding is zero for the homozygous genotype of the first allele, one for the heterozygote, and two for the homozygous genotype for the other allele. Another common allele coding changes these regression coefficients by subtracting a value from each marker such that the mean of regression coefficients is zero within each marker. We call this centered allele coding. This study considered effects of different allele coding methods on inference. Both marker-based and equivalent models were considered, and restricted maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods were used in inference. Results Theoretical derivations showed that parameter estimates and estimated marker effects in marker-based models are the same irrespective of the allele coding, provided that the model has a fixed general mean. For the equivalent models, the same results hold, even though different allele coding methods lead to different genomic relationship matrices. Calculated genomic breeding values are independent of allele coding when the estimate of the general mean is included into the values. Reliabilities of estimated genomic breeding values calculated using elements of the inverse of the coefficient matrix depend on the allele coding because different allele coding methods imply different models. Finally, allele coding affects the mixing of Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms, with the centered coding being

  11. High allelic burden of four obesity SNPs is associated with poorer weight loss outcomes following gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still, Christopher D; Wood, G Craig; Chu, Xin; Erdman, Robert; Manney, Christina H; Benotti, Peter N; Petrick, Anthony T; Strodel, William E; Mirshahi, Uyenlinh L; Mirshahi, Tooraj; Carey, David J; Gerhard, Glenn S

    2011-08-01

    Genome-wide association and linkage studies have identified multiple susceptibility loci for obesity. We hypothesized that such loci may affect weight loss outcomes following dietary or surgical weight loss interventions. A total of 1,001 white individuals with extreme obesity (BMI >35 kg/m(2)) who underwent a preoperative diet/behavioral weight loss intervention and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery were genotyped for single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in or near the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO), insulin induced gene 2 (INSIG2), melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R), and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 1 (PCSK1) obesity genes. Association analysis was performed using recessive and additive models with pre- and postoperative weight loss data. An increasing number of obesity SNP alleles or homozygous SNP genotypes was associated with increased BMI (P weight (P weight lost from a short-term dietary intervention and any individual obesity SNP or cumulative number of obesity SNP alleles or homozygous SNP genotypes was observed. Linear mixed regression analysis revealed significant differences in postoperative weight loss trajectories across groups with low, intermediate, and high numbers of obesity SNP alleles or numbers of homozygous SNP genotypes (P weight loss with initial BMI metabolic rate, binge eating behavior, and other clinical parameters were not associated with genotype. These data suggest that response to a surgical weight loss intervention is influenced by genetic susceptibility and BMI.

  12. Lost spoiler practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gürsimsek, Ödül; Drotner, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    and collective content production, thus negotiating purposes and interpretive practices with producers and amongst themselves. Through critical discourse analysis of key instances where the Lost community collaborates over resources beyond the official Lost transmedia narratives, this article argues...

  13. Susceptibility of biallelic haplotype and genotype frequencies to genotyping error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskvina, Valentina; Schmidt, Karl Michael

    2006-12-01

    With the availability of fast genotyping methods and genomic databases, the search for statistical association of single nucleotide polymorphisms with a complex trait has become an important methodology in medical genetics. However, even fairly rare errors occurring during the genotyping process can lead to spurious association results and decrease in statistical power. We develop a systematic approach to study how genotyping errors change the genotype distribution in a sample. The general M-marker case is reduced to that of a single-marker locus by recognizing the underlying tensor-product structure of the error matrix. Both method and general conclusions apply to the general error model; we give detailed results for allele-based errors of size depending both on the marker locus and the allele present. Multiple errors are treated in terms of the associated diffusion process on the space of genotype distributions. We find that certain genotype and haplotype distributions remain unchanged under genotyping errors, and that genotyping errors generally render the distribution more similar to the stable one. In case-control association studies, this will lead to loss of statistical power for nondifferential genotyping errors and increase in type I error for differential genotyping errors. Moreover, we show that allele-based genotyping errors do not disturb Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the genotype distribution. In this setting we also identify maximally affected distributions. As they correspond to situations with rare alleles and marker loci in high linkage disequilibrium, careful checking for genotyping errors is advisable when significant association based on such alleles/haplotypes is observed in association studies.

  14. Clinical features and MUT gene mutation spectrum in Chinese patients with isolated methylmalonic acidemia: identification of ten novel allelic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lian-Shu; Huang, Zhuo; Han, Feng; Ye, Jun; Qiu, Wen-Juan; Zhang, Hui-Wen; Wang, Yu; Gong, Zhu-Wen; Gu, Xue-Fan

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to study MUT gene mutation spectrum in Chinese patients with isolated methylmalonic academia (MMA) and their clinical features for the potential genotype-phenotype correlation. Forty-three patients were diagnosed with isolated MMA by elevated blood propionylcarnitine, propionylcarnitine to acetylcarnitine ratio, and urine methylmalonate without hyperhomocysteinemia. The MUT gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and directly sequenced. Those patients with at least one variant allele were included. The novel missense mutations were assessed by bioinformatic analysis and screened against alleles sequenced from 50 control participants. Among the 43 patients, 38 had typical clinical presentations, and the majority (30/38) experienced earlyonset MMA. Eight patients died and seven were lost to follow-up. Twenty patients had poor outcomes and eight showed normal development. The 43 identified MUT gene mutations had at least one variant allele, whereas 35 had two mutant alleles. Of the 33 mutations reported before, eight recurrent mutations were identified in 32 patients, and c.729_730insTT (p.D244Lfs*39) was the most common (12/78) in the mutant alleles. Of the 10 novel mutations, six were missense mutations and four were premature termination codon mutations. The six novel missense mutations seemed to be pathogenic. A total of 10 novel MUT mutations were detected in the Chinese population. c.729_730insTT (p.D244Lfs*39) was the most frequent mutation. A genotype-phenotype correlation could not be found, but the genotypic characterization indicated the need of genetic counseling for MMA patients and early prenatal diagnoses for high-risk families.

  15. Comparison of CYP2D6 genotyping by allele-specific PCR with DXT phe-notype and gene chip testing%CYP2D6 PCR基因型与DXT表型和基因芯片检测的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    目的:为了评价CYP2D6的基因型和表型的联系以及基因芯片在CYP2D6多基因分析中的应用.方法:242健康志愿者,口服dextromethorphan后收集尿液测定其代谢率,收集20ml血提取DNA,并通过基因特异性PCR和/(或)基因芯片分析CYP2D6*2--*11,*17和多拷贝CYP2D6基因,其中5个基因(*3、*4、*6、*7和*9)用PCR和CYD450基因芯片同时分析.结果:CYP2D6基因型比表型更富有信息和更能反映CYP2D6酶的表达.CYP2D6*3、*4、*6、*7和*9的基因检测在CYP450基因芯片和基因特异性PCR中显示高度的一致性.结论:基因芯片在检测基因多位点的多基因中是一个有发展前途和可靠的方法.%To evaluate association of genotype and phenotype of CYP2D6 and the application of oligonucleotide microarray hybridization genetic testing in CYP2D6 multiple alleles analyses. METHODS: Two hundred forty-two healthy volunteers were recruited, and a 60 mg oral dose of dextromethorphan (DXT) was administered to each for assessment of the DXT metabolic ratio [ MR]. A 20 ml blood sample was also collected for DNA isolation and testing. CYP2D6 alleles * 2-*11; * 17 and multiple CYP2D6 gene copies were tested by allele-specific PCR and/or the affymetrix CYP450 gene chip assay. Five of the CYP2D6 alleles ( * 3, * 4, *6, * 7, and * 9) were evaluated by both PCR and the CYP450 gene chip assay. RESULTS: The CYP2D6genotype was more informative and reflective in CYP2D6 enzyme expression than a phenotype. Genetic tests for the CYP2D6 * 3, * 4, * 6, * 7 and * 9 alleles showed a high degree of concordance between the CYP450 gene chip and AS-PCR methods. CONCLUSION: Oligonucleotide microarray hybridization is a promising and reliable approach for detecting multiple alleles at gene loci.

  16. Lost in transformation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norlyk, Annelise; Haahr, Anita; Dreyer, Pia

    2017-01-01

    and values from evidence-based medicine are being lost in the transformation into the current evidence-based hospital culture which potentially leads to a McDonaldization of nursing practice reflected as ‘one best way’. We argue for reviving ethics of care perspectives in today’s evidence practice...

  17. Estimating and testing the effect of allelic recombination on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-01-21

    Jan 21, 2011 ... Key words: Allele, genotype, regression, correlation, F-ratio, analysis of ... correlation coefficient. .... from their true values of the measurements using the ... We may also wish to test the null hypothesis that ... Uche PI (2004).

  18. Discovery of novel variants in genotyping arrays improves genotype retention and reduces ascertainment bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didion John P

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-density genotyping arrays that measure hybridization of genomic DNA fragments to allele-specific oligonucleotide probes are widely used to genotype single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in genetic studies, including human genome-wide association studies. Hybridization intensities are converted to genotype calls by clustering algorithms that assign each sample to a genotype class at each SNP. Data for SNP probes that do not conform to the expected pattern of clustering are often discarded, contributing to ascertainment bias and resulting in lost information - as much as 50% in a recent genome-wide association study in dogs. Results We identified atypical patterns of hybridization intensities that were highly reproducible and demonstrated that these patterns represent genetic variants that were not accounted for in the design of the array platform. We characterized variable intensity oligonucleotide (VINO probes that display such patterns and are found in all hybridization-based genotyping platforms, including those developed for human, dog, cattle, and mouse. When recognized and properly interpreted, VINOs recovered a substantial fraction of discarded probes and counteracted SNP ascertainment bias. We developed software (MouseDivGeno that identifies VINOs and improves the accuracy of genotype calling. MouseDivGeno produced highly concordant genotype calls when compared with other methods but it uniquely identified more than 786000 VINOs in 351 mouse samples. We used whole-genome sequence from 14 mouse strains to confirm the presence of novel variants explaining 28000 VINOs in those strains. We also identified VINOs in human HapMap 3 samples, many of which were specific to an African population. Incorporating VINOs in phylogenetic analyses substantially improved the accuracy of a Mus species tree and local haplotype assignment in laboratory mouse strains. Conclusion The problems of ascertainment bias and missing

  19. Discovery of novel variants in genotyping arrays improves genotype retention and reduces ascertainment bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didion, John P; Yang, Hyuna; Sheppard, Keith; Fu, Chen-Ping; McMillan, Leonard; de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel; Churchill, Gary A

    2012-01-19

    High-density genotyping arrays that measure hybridization of genomic DNA fragments to allele-specific oligonucleotide probes are widely used to genotype single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genetic studies, including human genome-wide association studies. Hybridization intensities are converted to genotype calls by clustering algorithms that assign each sample to a genotype class at each SNP. Data for SNP probes that do not conform to the expected pattern of clustering are often discarded, contributing to ascertainment bias and resulting in lost information - as much as 50% in a recent genome-wide association study in dogs. We identified atypical patterns of hybridization intensities that were highly reproducible and demonstrated that these patterns represent genetic variants that were not accounted for in the design of the array platform. We characterized variable intensity oligonucleotide (VINO) probes that display such patterns and are found in all hybridization-based genotyping platforms, including those developed for human, dog, cattle, and mouse. When recognized and properly interpreted, VINOs recovered a substantial fraction of discarded probes and counteracted SNP ascertainment bias. We developed software (MouseDivGeno) that identifies VINOs and improves the accuracy of genotype calling. MouseDivGeno produced highly concordant genotype calls when compared with other methods but it uniquely identified more than 786000 VINOs in 351 mouse samples. We used whole-genome sequence from 14 mouse strains to confirm the presence of novel variants explaining 28000 VINOs in those strains. We also identified VINOs in human HapMap 3 samples, many of which were specific to an African population. Incorporating VINOs in phylogenetic analyses substantially improved the accuracy of a Mus species tree and local haplotype assignment in laboratory mouse strains. The problems of ascertainment bias and missing information due to genotyping errors are widely recognized as

  20. A molecular method for S-allele identification in apple based on allele-specific PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, G A; Goderis, I J; Broekaert, W F; Broothaerts, W

    1995-09-01

    cDNA sequences corresponding to two self-incompatibility alleles (S-alleles) of the apple cv 'Golden Delicious' have previously been described, and now we report the identification of three additional S-allele cDNAs of apple, one of which was isolated from a pistil cDNA library of cv 'Idared' and two of which were obtained by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) on pistil RNA of cv 'Queen's Cox'. A comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of these five S-allele cDNAs revealed an average homology of 69%. Based on the nucleotide sequences of these S-allele cDNAs, we developed a molecular technique for the diagnostic identification of the five different S-alleles in apple cultivars. The method used consists of allele-specific PCR amplification of genomic DNA followed by digestion of the amplification product with an allele-specific restriction endonuclease. Analysis of a number of apple cultivars with known S-phenotype consistently showed coincidence of phenotypic and direct molecular data of the S-allele constitution of the cultivars. It is concluded that the S-allele identification approach reported here provides a rapid and useful method to determine the S-genotype of apple cultivars.

  1. Most parsimonious haplotype allele sharing determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jiaofen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The "common disease – common variant" hypothesis and genome-wide association studies have achieved numerous successes in the last three years, particularly in genetic mapping in human diseases. Nevertheless, the power of the association study methods are still low, in particular on quantitative traits, and the description of the full allelic spectrum is deemed still far from reach. Given increasing density of single nucleotide polymorphisms available and suggested by the block-like structure of the human genome, a popular and prosperous strategy is to use haplotypes to try to capture the correlation structure of SNPs in regions of little recombination. The key to the success of this strategy is thus the ability to unambiguously determine the haplotype allele sharing status among the members. The association studies based on haplotype sharing status would have significantly reduced degrees of freedom and be able to capture the combined effects of tightly linked causal variants. Results For pedigree genotype datasets of medium density of SNPs, we present two methods for haplotype allele sharing status determination among the pedigree members. Extensive simulation study showed that both methods performed nearly perfectly on breakpoint discovery, mutation haplotype allele discovery, and shared chromosomal region discovery. Conclusion For pedigree genotype datasets, the haplotype allele sharing status among the members can be deterministically, efficiently, and accurately determined, even for very small pedigrees. Given their excellent performance, the presented haplotype allele sharing status determination programs can be useful in many downstream applications including haplotype based association studies.

  2. Allele-specific PCR detection of sweet cherry self-incompatibility (S) alleles S1 to S16 using consensus and allele-specific primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneveld, T; Tobutt, K R; Robbins, T P

    2003-10-01

    PCR-based identification of all 13 known self-incompatibility (S) alleles of sweet cherry is reported. Two pairs of consensus primers were designed from our previously published cDNA sequences of S(1) to S(6) S-RNases, the stylar components of self-incompatibility, to reveal length variation of the first and the second introns. With the exception of the first intron of S(13), these also amplified S(7) to S(14) and an allele previously referred to as S(x), which we now label S(16). The genomic PCR products were cloned and sequenced. The partial sequence of S(11) matched that of S(7) and the alleles were shown to have the same functional specificity. Allele-specific primers were designed for S(7) to S(16), so that allele-specific primers are now available for all 13 S alleles of cherry (S(8), S(11) and S(15) are duplicates). These can be used to distinguish between S alleles with introns of similar size and to confirm genotypes determined with consensus primers. The reliability of the PCR with allele-specific primers was improved by the inclusion of an internal control. The use of the consensus and allele-specific primers was demonstrated by resolving conflicting genotypes that have been published recently and by determining genotypes of 18 new cherry cultivars. Two new groups are proposed, Group XXIII (S(3) S(16)), comprising 'Rodmersham Seedling' and 'Strawberry Heart', and Group XXIV (S(6) S(12)), comprising 'Aida' and 'Flamentiner'. Four new self-compatibility genotypes, S(3) S(3)', S(4)' S(6), S(4)' S(9) and S(4)' S(13), were found. The potential use of the consensus primers to reveal incompatibility alleles in other cherry species is also demonstrated.

  3. Lost in Location

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Koefoed

    2009-01-01

    The article investigates how users of personal satellite navigation devices (often referred to as sat-nav) are sometimes lost and led astray and argues that the satnav's aim to remove every insecurity about the correct route seems to remove the individual's conscious perception of the space...... performance, the article examines how the growing locative media industry can learn from the location-aware performative strategies employed by artists who create situated and urban performances for the curious participant. The academic frames employed in the analysis draw on psychogeography, site...

  4. Crowdsourcing Lost Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulou, E. K.; Georgopoulos, A.; Panagiotopoulos, G.; Kaliampakos, D.

    2015-08-01

    Cultural Heritage all over the world is at high risk. Natural and human activities endanger the current state of monuments and sites, whereas many of them have already been destroyed especially during the last years. Preventive actions are of utmost importance for the protection of human memory and the prevention of irreplaceable. These actions may be carried out either in situ or virtually. Very often in situ preventive, or protective or restoration actions are difficult or even impossible, as e.g. in cases of earthquakes, fires or war activity. Digital preservation of cultural heritage is a challenging task within photogrammetry and computer vision communities, as efforts are taken to collect digital data, especially of the monuments that are at high risk. Visit to the field and data acquisition is not always feasible. To overcome the missing data problem, crowdsourced imagery is used to create a visual representation of lost cultural heritage objects. Such digital representations may be 2D or 3D and definitely help preserve the memory and history of the lost heritage. Sometimes they also assist studies for their reconstruction. An initiative to collect imagery data from the public and create a visual 3D representation of a recently destroyed stone bridge almost 150 years old is being discussed in this study. To this end, a crowdsourcing platform has been designed and the first images collected have been processed with the use of SfM algorithms.

  5. Getting Lost in Tokyo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Lucas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the potential for using alternative forms of inscriptive practice to describe the urban space of the Tokyo Subway. I begin with an account of the process of getting lost in Shinjuku Subway Station in the heart of Tokyo. This station represents a limit condition of place, being dense and complex beyond the powers of traditional architectural representation. The station is explored through serial translations, beginning with narrative, moving to a flowchart diagram, Laban dance notation, recurring motifs and archetypes, architectural drawing, photography, and cartography. As Claudia Brodsky Lacour and Tim Ingold describe, the form our inscriptive practices take are crucial to the ways in which we conceptualise those places. How much of the experience of a place is lost in the traditional inscriptive practices of the architect? This description of the urban space of the Tokyo subway forms the basis for an extended study exploring the description of this experience of place, and the power of such description to theorise space. The ultimate aim of this is to shift the focus of urban design away from geometric principles and towards the experiences that might be enjoyed in such places.

  6. The Impacts of Complex Allele Structure on Genotyping Accuracy of Microsatellite: a Lesson from Bear Microsatellites UamD116 and UamB1%微卫星复杂结构对分型的影响:以熊UamD116和UamB1为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小芳; 杨淑慧; 马跃; 徐艳春; 宋伟杰

    2012-01-01

    群体遗传学结论.%Objective: Microsatellite refers to a kind of polymorphic. DNA fragments on the genome which contains variable number of tandem repeats of a short specific sequence of nucleotides (motif). The polymorphism of micorsatellite is reflected by variation of repeating number of motifs resulting in variation of fragment length among alleles. Therefore, routine genotyping approach is based on the fragment length of amplified alleles using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Tetra-nucleotide microsatellites are preferable than di-nucleotide ones because of the influence of stutters on genotyping of the later. However, tetra-nucleotide microsatellites often contain complex motif structure potentially impacting genotyping and such problem is-usually ignored in studies. To address the impacts of complex allele structure on the genotyping, we genotyped two tetra-nucleotide loci of the Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus), UamDl 16 and UamBl, using fragment length based approach and sequence based approach, and compared the results. Methods: A total of 96 samples including muscle, blood and hair were used in the experiments. PCR using fluorescently labeled upper primers were performed for each sample. PCR products were isolated using capillary electrophoresis on an automated DNA sequencer. Results: UamDl 16 contained multiple types of motifs, and mono-, di- tri-nucloetide insertions between motifs. Meanwhile, a 1-bp deletion occurred in the downstream flanking region of some alleles. Fragment length based genotyping was not able to discriminate the differences and sorted different alleles with similar length as a single one. UamBl contained 2 types of alleles, one type contained a 3-bp insertion resulting in the shifts of size difference between the two types of alleles from 4 bp to 1 bp. In addition, alleles with different motifs had similar size. Fragment length based genotyping identified 8 alleles, while sequence based approach identified 12 ones. Conclusion: For complex tetra

  7. FTO Genotype Interacts with Improvement in Aerobic Fitness on Body Weight Loss During Lifestyle Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Sailer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Not every participant responds with a comparable body weight loss to lifestyle intervention, despite the same compliance. Genetic factors may explain parts of this difference. Variation in fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO is the strongest common genetic determinant of body weight. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of FTO genotype differences in the link between improvement of fitness and reduction of body weight during a lifestyle intervention. Methods: We genotyped 292 healthy subjects for FTO rs8050136. Participants underwent a 9-month lifestyle intervention. Before and after intervention, aerobic fitness was tested by bicycle (VO2max and treadmill spiroergometry (individual anaerobic threshold (IAT, subgroup of N = 192. Results: Participants lost body weight (p FTO genotype (p = 0.5. There was a significant correlation between improvement in VO2max and decrease in body weight (p FTO genotype interacted with this relationship (p = 0.0042 for VO2max, p = 0.0049 for IAT. When stratifying the cohort according to their improvement in VO2max, FTO obesity-risk A-allele carriers in the higher quartiles of improvement in fitness lost significantly less body weight. Conclusions: Our data reveal that genetic variation in FTO impacts on body weight reduction during lifestyle intervention only in subjects with marked improvement in aerobic fitness.

  8. Estimating Relatedness in the Presence of Null Alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kang; Ritland, Kermit; Dunn, Derek W; Qi, Xiaoguang; Guo, Songtao; Li, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    Studies of genetics and ecology often require estimates of relatedness coefficients based on genetic marker data. However, with the presence of null alleles, an observed genotype can represent one of several possible true genotypes. This results in biased estimates of relatedness. As the numbers of marker loci are often limited, loci with null alleles cannot be abandoned without substantial loss of statistical power. Here, we show how loci with null alleles can be incorporated into six estimators of relatedness (two novel). We evaluate the performance of various estimators before and after correction for null alleles. If the frequency of a null allele is 0.5, the potency of estimation is too low and such a locus should be excluded. We make available a software package entitled PolyRelatedness v1.6, which enables researchers to optimize these estimators to best fit a particular data set.

  9. Clinical features andMUT gene mutation spectrum in Chinese patients with isolated methylmalonic acidemia:identifi cation of ten novel allelic variants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian-Shu Han; Zhuo Huang; Feng Han; Jun Ye; Wen-Juan Qiu; Hui-Wen Zhang; Yu Wang; Zhu-Wen Gong; Xue-Fan Gu

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aims to studyMUT gene mutation spectrum in Chinese patients with isolated methylmalonic academia (MMA) and their clinical features for the potential genotype-phenotype correlation. Methods: Forty-three patients were diagnosed with isolated MMA by elevated blood propionylcarnitine, propionylcarnitine to acetylcarnitine ratio, and urine methylmalonate without hyperhomocysteinemia. The MUT gene was amplifi ed by polymerase chain reaction and directly sequenced. Those patients with at least one variant allele were included. The novel missense mutations were assessed by bioinformatic analysis and screened against alleles sequenced from 50 control participants. Results: Among the 43 patients, 38 had typical clinical presentations, and the majority (30/38) experienced early-onset MMA. Eight patients died and seven were lost to follow-up. Twenty patients had poor outcomes and eight showed normal development. The 43 identifi edMUT gene mutations had at least one variant allele, whereas 35 had two mutant alleles. Of the 33 mutations reported before, eight recurrent mutations were identified in 32 patients, and c.729_730insTT (p.D244Lfs*39) was the most common (12/78) in the mutant alleles. Of the 10 novel mutations, six were missense mutations and four were premature termination codon mutations. The six novel missense mutations seemed to be pathogenic. Conclusions: A total of 10 novelMUT mutations were detected in the Chinese population. c.729_730insTT (p.D244Lfs*39) was the most frequent mutation. A genotype-phenotype correlation could not be found, but the genotypic characterization indicated the need of genetic counseling for MMA patients and early prenatal diagnoses for high-risk families.

  10. Nostalgia and lost identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourtova, Elena

    2013-02-01

    Nostalgia for the Soviet Union is a major social phenomenon in Russia today due to the irrevocable losses of the recent past in which Soviet citizens involuntarily became immigrants in their own country. With reference to discussions of nostalgia in philosophical and psychoanalytic literature, I suggest that nostalgia may represent either a defensive regression to the past or a progressive striving for wholeness through re-connecting with what has been lost in the service of a greater integration. I compare this with the processes of adaptation seen in immigrants and provide a clinical illustration of a young man coming to terms with loss and change in the post-Soviet era. When nostalgia is recognized as a legitimate emotional experience it may facilitate mourning and enable the integration of the past with the present and the development of a new identity.

  11. Tri-allelic pattern at the TPOX locus: a familial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picanço, Juliane Bentes; Raimann, Paulo Eduardo; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Alvarez, Luís; Amorim, António; Batista Dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2014-02-10

    Alleles at the TPOX STR locus have 6-14 different numbers of a four-nucleotide (AATG) repeat motif arranged in tandem. Although tri-allelic genotypes are generally rare, the TPOX tri-allelic pattern has a higher frequency, varying widely among populations. Despite this, there are few accurate reports to disclose the nature of the TPOX third allele. In this work we present data obtained from 45 individuals belonging to the same pedigree, in which there are cases of tri-allelic TPOX genotypes. The subjects were apparently healthy with a normal biological development. We noticed six tri-allelic cases in this family, and all of them were women. Karyotype analysis showed no occurrence of partial 2p trisomy. All the tri-allelic cases had the genotype 8-10-11, probably due to three copies of the TPOX STR sequence in all cells (Type 2 tri-allelic pattern). Based on previous data we assumed the allele 10 as the TPOX third allele. The pedigree analyses show evidences that the TPOX extra-allele was the allele10, it is placed far from the main TPOX locus, and that there is a potential linkage of the TPOX extra-allele-10 with Xq. This was the first study that included a large pedigree analysis in order to understand the nature TPOX tri-allelic pattern. © 2013.

  12. Spotted phenotypes in horses lost attractiveness in the Middle Ages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wutke, Saskia; Benecke, Norbert; Sandoval-Castellanos, Edson

    2016-01-01

    were influenced by humans. Our results from genotype analyses show a significant increase in spotted coats in early domestic horses (Copper Age to Iron Age). In contrast, medieval horses carried significantly fewer alleles for these phenotypes, whereas solid phenotypes (i.e., chestnut) became dominant...

  13. Assignment of SNP allelic configuration in polyploids using competitive allele-specific PCR: application to citrus triploid progeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, José; Aleza, Pablo; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyploidy is a major component of eukaryote evolution. Estimation of allele copy numbers for molecular markers has long been considered a challenge for polyploid species, while this process is essential for most genetic research. With the increasing availability and whole-genome coverage of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, it is essential to implement a versatile SNP genotyping method to assign allelic configuration efficiently in polyploids. Scope This work evaluates the usefulness of the KASPar method, based on competitive allele-specific PCR, for the assignment of SNP allelic configuration. Citrus was chosen as a model because of its economic importance, the ongoing worldwide polyploidy manipulation projects for cultivar and rootstock breeding, and the increasing availability of SNP markers. Conclusions Fifteen SNP markers were successfully designed that produced clear allele signals that were in agreement with previous genotyping results at the diploid level. The analysis of DNA mixes between two haploid lines (Clementine and pummelo) at 13 different ratios revealed a very high correlation (average = 0·9796; s.d. = 0·0094) between the allele ratio and two parameters [θ angle = tan−1 (y/x) and y′ = y/(x + y)] derived from the two normalized allele signals (x and y) provided by KASPar. Separated cluster analysis and analysis of variance (ANOVA) from mixed DNA simulating triploid and tetraploid hybrids provided 99·71 % correct allelic configuration. Moreover, triploid populations arising from 2n gametes and interploid crosses were easily genotyped and provided useful genetic information. This work demonstrates that the KASPar SNP genotyping technique is an efficient way to assign heterozygous allelic configurations within polyploid populations. This method is accurate, simple and cost-effective. Moreover, it may be useful for quantitative studies, such as relative allele-specific expression analysis and bulk segregant analysis

  14. Lost in Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass, Wiebke; Reusswig, Fritz

    2014-05-01

    Lost in Translation? Introducing Planetary Boundaries into Social Systems. Fritz Reusswig, Wiebke Lass Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany Identifying and quantifying planetary boundaries by interdisciplinary science efforts is a challenging task—and a risky one, as the 1972 Limits to Growth publication has shown. Even if we may be assured that scientific understanding of underlying processes of the Earth system has significantly improved since then, the challenge of translating these findings into the social systems of the planet remains crucial for any kind of action, and in many respects far more challenging. We would like to conceptualize what could also be termed a problem of coupling social and natural systems as a nested set of social translation processes, well aware of the limited applicability of the language-related translation metaphor. Societies must, first, perceive these boundaries, and they have to understand their relevance. This includes, among many other things, the organization of transdisciplinary scientific cooperation. They will then have to translate this understood perception into possible actions, i.e. strategies for different local bodies, actors, and institutional settings. This implies a lot of 'internal' translation processes, e.g. from the scientific subsystem to the mass media, the political and the economic subsystem. And it implies to develop subsystem-specific schemes of evaluation for these alternatives, e.g. convincing narratives, cost-benefit analyses, or ethical legitimacy considerations. And, finally, societies do have to translate chosen action alternatives into monitoring and evaluation schemes, e.g. for agricultural production or renewable energies. This process includes the continuation of observing and re-analyzing the planetary boundary concept itself, as a re-adjustment of these boundaries in the light of new scientific insights cannot be excluded. Taken all together, societies may well

  15. Smartphone lost - Privacy gone

    CERN Multimedia

    Computer Security Team

    2012-01-01

    Who doesn't own an iPhone, Android or Blackberry mobile phone today? Lucky you if you don’t! In previous issues (Issue 06/07, 2012 and Issue 32/33/34, 2011) we have pointed out their lack of security. But what happens if you lose your smartphone or it gets stolen?   Today, a smartphone clones your personality into the digital world. Your phone archives all your emails and messaging communications with your family, friends, peers and colleagues; contains photos and videos of the top moments of your life; holds your favourite music and movies and zillions of other bits of personal information stored in the apps of your choice (like GPS information of your jogging paths, a vault of your passwords, access to your Facebook or Twitter profiles, bank access information, flight and hotel bookings). In the future, your phone might also be used for making payments in shops. Have you ever thought of how you would feel if you lost your smartphone or it got stolen? Nak...

  16. Lost in Fathoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondeur, Anaïs; Chomaz, Jean-Marc

    2014-11-01

    In 2012, at the very point where two continents collided, the island of Nuuk disappeared without trace. At the same time, in Brisbane, the 34th International Geological Congress advanced a new era-the Anthropocene: an age where mankind has become a global telluric force. Was the disappearance of Nuuk island a one-off or a direct consequence of the emergence of the Anthropocene? This project was developed during a year of research as an artist-in-residence at LadHyX and has evolved from an expedition of the emergent part of the Mid-Atlantic ridge and the region of deep oceanic water dive. This talk will present Lost In fathoms a narratives composed of installations, drawings and photographs by the means of which we investigate the causes involved in the disappearance of Nuuk island. It challenges the perception of oceanic and geologic time scales and human's impact on the environment. This project is exhibited from October 16th to November 29th 2014, at GV Art Gallery in London, a contemporary art gallery devoted to art and science shows. Acknowledgment: GV Art Gallery London, Chaire DDX École Polytechnique, LaSIPS Université Paris-Saclay.

  17. Comparison of HLA allelic imputation programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Christian M.; Bastarache, Lisa; Gaudieri, Silvana; Glazer, Andrew M.; Steiner, Heidi E.; Mosley, Jonathan D.; Mallal, Simon; Denny, Joshua C.; Phillips, Elizabeth J.; Roden, Dan M.

    2017-01-01

    Imputation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles from SNP-level data is attractive due to importance of HLA alleles in human disease, widespread availability of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data, and expertise required for HLA sequencing. However, comprehensive evaluations of HLA imputations programs are limited. We compared HLA imputation results of HIBAG, SNP2HLA, and HLA*IMP:02 to sequenced HLA alleles in 3,265 samples from BioVU, a de-identified electronic health record database coupled to a DNA biorepository. We performed four-digit HLA sequencing for HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DPB1, and -DQB1 using long-read 454 FLX sequencing. All samples were genotyped using both the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip platform and a GWAS platform. Call rates and concordance rates were compared by platform, frequency of allele, and race/ethnicity. Overall concordance rates were similar between programs in European Americans (EA) (0.975 [SNP2HLA]; 0.939 [HLA*IMP:02]; 0.976 [HIBAG]). SNP2HLA provided a significant advantage in terms of call rate and the number of alleles imputed. Concordance rates were lower overall for African Americans (AAs). These observations were consistent when accuracy was compared across HLA loci. All imputation programs performed similarly for low frequency HLA alleles. Higher concordance rates were observed when HLA alleles were imputed from GWAS platforms versus the HumanExome BeadChip, suggesting that high genomic coverage is preferred as input for HLA allelic imputation. These findings provide guidance on the best use of HLA imputation methods and elucidate their limitations. PMID:28207879

  18. Lost circulation technology development status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glowka, D.A.; Schafer, D.M.; Loeppke, G.E.; Scott, D.D.; Wernig, M.D.; Wright, E.K.

    1992-07-01

    Lost circulation is the loss of drilling fluid from the wellbore to fractures or pores in the rock formation. In geothermal drilling, lost circulation is often a serious problem that contributes greatly to the cost of the average geothermal well. The Lost Circulation Technology Development Program is sponsored at Sandia National Laboratories by the US Department of Energy. The goal of the program is to reduce lost circulation costs by 30--50% through the development of mitigation and characterization technology. This paper describes the technical progress made in this program during the period April 1991--March 1992. 8 refs.

  19. QuASAR: quantitative allele-specific analysis of reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Chris T; Moyerbrailean, Gregory A; Davis, Gordon O; Wen, Xiaoquan; Luca, Francesca; Pique-Regi, Roger

    2015-04-15

    Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies have discovered thousands of genetic variants that regulate gene expression, enabling a better understanding of the functional role of non-coding sequences. However, eQTL studies are costly, requiring large sample sizes and genome-wide genotyping of each sample. In contrast, analysis of allele-specific expression (ASE) is becoming a popular approach to detect the effect of genetic variation on gene expression, even within a single individual. This is typically achieved by counting the number of RNA-seq reads matching each allele at heterozygous sites and testing the null hypothesis of a 1:1 allelic ratio. In principle, when genotype information is not readily available, it could be inferred from the RNA-seq reads directly. However, there are currently no existing methods that jointly infer genotypes and conduct ASE inference, while considering uncertainty in the genotype calls. We present QuASAR, quantitative allele-specific analysis of reads, a novel statistical learning method for jointly detecting heterozygous genotypes and inferring ASE. The proposed ASE inference step takes into consideration the uncertainty in the genotype calls, while including parameters that model base-call errors in sequencing and allelic over-dispersion. We validated our method with experimental data for which high-quality genotypes are available. Results for an additional dataset with multiple replicates at different sequencing depths demonstrate that QuASAR is a powerful tool for ASE analysis when genotypes are not available. http://github.com/piquelab/QuASAR. fluca@wayne.edu or rpique@wayne.edu Supplementary Material is available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Identification of the third/extra allele for forensic application in cases with TPOX tri-allelic pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picanço, Juliane Bentes; Raimann, Paulo Eduardo; Motta, Carlos Henrique Ares Silveira da; Rodenbusch, Rodrigo; Gusmão, Leonor; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2015-05-01

    Genotyping of polymorphic short tandem repeats (STRs) loci is widely used in forensic DNA analysis. STR loci eventually present tri-allelic pattern as a genotyping irregularity and, in that situation, the doubt about the tri-allele locus frequency calculation can reduce the analysis strength. In the TPOX human STR locus, tri-allelic genotypes have been reported with a widely varied frequency among human populations. We investigate whether there is a single extra allele (the third allele) in the TPOX tri-allelic pattern, what it is, and where it is, aiming to understand its genomic anatomy and to propose the knowledge of this TPOX extra allele from genetic profile, thus preserving the two standard TPOX alleles in forensic analyses. We looked for TPOX tri-allelic subjects in 75,113 Brazilian families. Considering only the parental generation (mother+father) we had 150,226 unrelated subjects evaluated. From this total, we found 88 unrelated subjects with tri-allelic pattern in the TPOX locus (0.06%; 88/150,226). Seventy three of these 88 subjects (73/88; 83%) had the Clayton's original Type 2 tri-allelic pattern (three peaks of even intensity). The remaining 17% (15/88) show a new Type 2 derived category with heterozygote peak imbalance (one double dose peak plus one regular sized peak). In this paper we present detailed data from 66 trios (mother+father+child) with true biological relationships. In 39 of these families (39/66; 59%) the extra TPOX allele was transmitted either from the mother or from the father to the child. Evidences indicated the allele 10 as the extra TPOX allele, and it is on the X chromosome. The present data, which support the previous Lane hypothesis, improve the knowledge about tri-allelic pattern of TPOX CODIS' locus allowing the use of TPOX profile in forensic analyses even when with tri-allelic pattern. This evaluation is now available for different forensic applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Lost Foam Casting in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Sheng-ping; WU Zhi-chao

    2006-01-01

    @@ 1. Lost Foam Casting Committee of Foundry Institution of Chinese Mechanical Engineering Society (FICMES) From the beginning of the 1990s, China entered a research and expansion climax in lost foam casting technology realm after the United States, Germany, and Japan etc.

  2. G-quadruplex structures and CpG methylation cause drop-out of the maternal allele in polymerase chain reaction amplification of the imprinted MEST gene promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron J Stevens

    Full Text Available We observed apparent non-Mendelian behaviour of alleles when genotyping a region in a CpG island at the 5' end of the maternally imprinted human MEST isoform. This region contains three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in total linkage disequilibrium, such that only two haplotypes occur in the human population. Only one haplotype was detectable in each subject, never both, despite the use of multiple primers and several genotyping methods. We observed that this region contains motifs capable of forming several G-quadruplex structures. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis confirmed that at least three G-quadruplexes form in vitro in the presence of potassium ions, and one of these structures has a Tm of greater than 99°C in polymerase chain reaction (PCR buffer. We demonstrate that it is the methylated maternal allele that is always lost during PCR amplification, and that formation of G-quadruplexes and presence of methylated cytosines both contributed to this phenomenon. This observed parent-of-origin specific allelic drop-out has important implications for analysis of imprinted genes in research and diagnostic settings.

  3. G-Quadruplex Structures and CpG Methylation Cause Drop-Out of the Maternal Allele in Polymerase Chain Reaction Amplification of the Imprinted MEST Gene Promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cree, Simone L.; Gibb, Andrew; Miller, Allison L.; Doudney, Kit; Aitchison, Alan; Eccles, Michael R.; Joyce, Peter R.; Filichev, Vyacheslav V.; Kennedy, Martin A.

    2014-01-01

    We observed apparent non-Mendelian behaviour of alleles when genotyping a region in a CpG island at the 5′ end of the maternally imprinted human MEST isoform. This region contains three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in total linkage disequilibrium, such that only two haplotypes occur in the human population. Only one haplotype was detectable in each subject, never both, despite the use of multiple primers and several genotyping methods. We observed that this region contains motifs capable of forming several G-quadruplex structures. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis confirmed that at least three G-quadruplexes form in vitro in the presence of potassium ions, and one of these structures has a Tm of greater than 99°C in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) buffer. We demonstrate that it is the methylated maternal allele that is always lost during PCR amplification, and that formation of G-quadruplexes and presence of methylated cytosines both contributed to this phenomenon. This observed parent-of-origin specific allelic drop-out has important implications for analysis of imprinted genes in research and diagnostic settings. PMID:25437198

  4. amamutdb.no: A relational database for MAN2B1 allelic variants that compiles genotypes, clinical phenotypes, and biochemical and structural data of mutant MAN2B1 in α-mannosidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riise Stensland, Hilde Monica Frostad; Frantzen, Gabrio; Kuokkanen, Elina; Buvang, Elisabeth Kjeldsen; Klenow, Helle Bagterp; Heikinheimo, Pirkko; Malm, Dag; Nilssen, Øivind

    2015-06-01

    α-Mannosidosis is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the MAN2B1 gene, encoding lysosomal α-mannosidase. The disorder is characterized by a range of clinical phenotypes of which the major manifestations are mental impairment, hearing impairment, skeletal changes, and immunodeficiency. Here, we report an α-mannosidosis mutation database, amamutdb.no, which has been constructed as a publicly accessible online resource for recording and analyzing MAN2B1 variants (http://amamutdb.no). Our aim has been to offer structured and relational information on MAN2B1 mutations and genotypes along with associated clinical phenotypes. Classifying missense mutations, as pathogenic or benign, is a challenge. Therefore, they have been given special attention as we have compiled all available data that relate to their biochemical, functional, and structural properties. The α-mannosidosis mutation database is comprehensive and relational in the sense that information can be retrieved and compiled across datasets; hence, it will facilitate diagnostics and increase our understanding of the clinical and molecular aspects of α-mannosidosis. We believe that the amamutdb.no structure and architecture will be applicable for the development of databases for any monogenic disorder.

  5. Visible Genotype Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Imai

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A visible sensor array system for simultaneous multiple SNP genotyping has been developed using a new plastic base with specific surface chemistry. Discrimination of SNP alleles is carried out by an allele-specific extension reaction using immobilized oligonucleotide primers. The 3’-ends of oligonucleotide primers are modified with a locked nucleic acid to enhance their efficiency in allelic discrimination. Biotin-dUTPs included in the reaction mixture are selectively incorporated into extending primer sequences and are utilized as tags for alkaline phosphatase-mediated precipitation of colored chemical substrates onto the surface of the plastic base. The visible precipitates allow immediate inspection of typing results by the naked eye and easy recording by a digital camera equipped on a commercial mobile phone. Up to four individuals can be analyzed on a single sensor array and multiple sensor arrays can be handled in a single operation. All of the reactions can be performed within one hour using conventional laboratory instruments. This visible genotype sensor array is suitable for “focused genomics” that follows “comprehensive genomics”.

  6. Determination of DQB1 alleles using PCR amplification and allele-specific primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepage, V; Ivanova, R; Loste, M N; Mallet, C; Douay, C; Naoumova, E; Charron, D

    1995-10-01

    Molecular genotyping of HLA class II genes is commonly carried out using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in combination with sequence-specific oligotyping (PCR-SSO) or a combination of the PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism methods (PCR-RFLP). However, the identification of the DQB1 type by PCR-SSO and PCR-RFLP is very time-consuming which is disadvantageous for the typing of cadaveric organ donors. We have developed a DQB1 typing method using PCR in combination with allele-specific amplification (PCR-ASA), which allows the identification of the 17 most frequent alleles in one step using seven amplification mixtures. PCR allele-specific amplification HLA-DQB1 typing is easy to perform, and the results are easy to interpret in routine clinical practice. The PCR-ASA method is therefore better suited to DQB1 typing for organ transplantation than other methods.

  7. Genotyping with TaqMAMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baohui; Kadura, Ibrahim; Fu, Dong-Jing; Watson, David E

    2004-02-01

    TaqMAMA combines the quantitative strengths of TaqMan with the allele-specific PCR of MAMA. In this article we develop TaqMAMA as a technique for screening human DNA samples for known genetic polymorphisms. In the first set of experiments, plasmids that model all types of genetic polymorphisms were used to understand the relationship between TaqMAMA primer/template mismatches and their strength of allelic discrimination. These data can be used to improve allelic discrimination of other primer extension genotyping methodologies through directed use of nucleotide mismatches. We used the data to derive a guide for TaqMAMA primer design and DNA strand selection for TaqMAMA genotyping assays. The guide was then used to develop assays for 11 known and novel human genetic polymorphisms. Genotypes were assigned quickly and accurately in all cases. TaqMAMA genotyping assays require minimal development time, have a high probability of success, produce reliable data that are straightforward to analyze, and are very cost-competitive.

  8. Lost in a Transmedia Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Smith

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo (previamente publicado como um capítulo de minha tese analisa os mecanismos transmidiáticos de storytelling por trás da narrativa do seriado Lost, da ABC. Por ter sua narrativa sustentada em uma complexa mitologia, Lost faz um grande esforço para suplementar a narrativa de seu programa de TV através de valiosas e distintas extensões narrativas. Em um primeiro momento, eu examino como as técnicas de construção de mundo em Lost encorajam os fãs mais ávidos a “jogar” com o espaço narrativo. Eu então faço avaliações sobre as extensões que Lost oferece como opcionais, através de experiências convincentes em seus textos expandido. Ao  ser muito bem-sucedida ao balancear seus fãs mais ávidos com os casuais espectadores, Lost representa o futuro de muitos programas de televisão que se propõem a colocar os fãs em situações imersivas, usando um vasto universo transmídia, ao mesmo tempo prometendo um programa de televisão coerente em seu interior

  9. Using multi-locus allelic sequence data to estimate genetic divergence among four Lilium (Liliaceae) cultivars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahin, A.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Tuyl, van J.M.; Arens, P.F.P.; Bakker, F.T.

    2014-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) may enable estimating relationships among genotypes using allelic variation of multiple nuclear genes simultaneously. We explored the potential and caveats of this strategy in four genetically distant Lilium cultivars to estimate their genetic divergence from transcr

  10. A novel B(var) allele (547 G>A) demonstrates differential expression depending on the co-inherited ABO allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, D; Kim, S H; Ki, C S; Choi, K L; Cho, Y G; Song, J W; Shin, J H; Suh, S P; Yazer, M H; Ryang, D W

    2004-10-01

    Genetic analysis of group B donors in Korea was performed. Exons 6 and 7 were sequenced in 12 phenotypically B3 donors 6 B3, 6 A1B3. Consensus sequences all B3 and 2/6 A1B3 donors were present. Four A1B3 donors demonstrated a novel B allele, B(var), in the context of A101/ or A102/B(var) genotypes. Family studies based on an A1B3 donor with the B(var) allele and on another unrelated subject with identical genotype and phenotype revealed B(var)/O01 genotypes with full B-antigen expression. B(var) allele is subject to differential expression, depending on the co-inherited ABO allele.

  11. Association between the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele and late onset of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Timm, Sally; Wang, August G;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The 32-bp deletion allele in chemokine receptor CCR5 has been associated with several immune-mediated diseases and might be implicated in schizophrenia as well. METHOD: The authors genotyped DNA samples from 268 schizophrenia patients and 323 healthy subjects. Age at first admission......-onset schizophrenia) and healthy subjects differed significantly. This was reflected in an increased frequency of the deletion allele in the patient subgroup. Patients with ages at first admission below and above 40 years significantly differed in distribution of genotypes and alleles, with an overrepresentation...... of the deletion allele in the latter subgroup of patients. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele is a susceptibility factor for schizophrenia with late onset. Alternatively, the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele may act as a modifier by delaying the onset of schizophrenia without...

  12. Population samples and genotyping technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, S J; Sanchez-Mazas, A; Single, R M; Meyer, D; Hill, J; Dron, H A; Jani, A J; Thomson, G; Erlich, H A

    2007-04-01

    The 14th International HLA (human leukocyte antigen) Immunogenetics Workshop (14th-IHIWS) Biostatistics and Anthropology/Human Genetic Diversity project continues the population sampling, genotype data generation, and biostatistic analyses of the 13th International Histocompatibility Workshop Anthropology/Human Genetic Diversity Component, with the overall goal of further characterizing global HLA allele and haplotype diversity and better describing the relationships between major histocompatibility complex diversity, geography, linguistics, and population history. Since the 13th Workshop, new investigators have and continue to be recruited to the project and new high-resolution class I and class II genotype data are being generated for 112 population samples from around the world.

  13. How allele frequency and study design affect association test statistics with misrepresentation errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escott-Price, Valentina; Ghodsi, Mansoureh; Schmidt, Karl Michael

    2014-04-01

    We evaluate the effect of genotyping errors on the type-I error of a general association test based on genotypes, showing that, in the presence of errors in the case and control samples, the test statistic asymptotically follows a scaled non-central $\\chi ^2$ distribution. We give explicit formulae for the scaling factor and non-centrality parameter for the symmetric allele-based genotyping error model and for additive and recessive disease models. They show how genotyping errors can lead to a significantly higher false-positive rate, growing with sample size, compared with the nominal significance levels. The strength of this effect depends very strongly on the population distribution of the genotype, with a pronounced effect in the case of rare alleles, and a great robustness against error in the case of large minor allele frequency. We also show how these results can be used to correct $p$-values.

  14. The Lost and Regained Paradise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙甜

    2007-01-01

    The Bible is an abundant source for modern literature.D.H.Lawrence seems to have a special preference for the LostParadise.Seeking for a new world is the expression of his ideal of the reconstruction of the Garden of Eden.

  15. Alcobaça allele and genotypic backgrounds affect yield and fruit shelf life of tomato hybrids O alelo alcobaça e o background genotípico afetam a produtividade e a conservação de híbridos de tomateiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Túlio José Mendes Dias

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-harvest shelf life of tomato fruit may be increased by deploying mutant alleles which affect the natural ripening process and/or by a favorable genotypic background. Among the several ripening mutant genes, alcobaça (alc has proved to be highly efficient in increasing shelf life of commercial tomato fruits, especially in heterozygosis, a state at which no limiting deleterious effects upon fruit color occur. The effects of heterozygosity in the alcobaça locus (alc+/alc on yield and fruit quality traits of tomato hybrids with three genotypic backgrounds. We evaluated three pairs of hybrids obtained from crosses between the near-isogenic pollen source lines Flora-Dade (alc+/alc+ and TOM-559 (alc/alc, and three maternal lines (Stevens, NC-8276 and Piedmont. The six treatments were factorial combinations of two different status in the alc locus (alc+/alc and alc+/alc+ versus three different genotypic backgrounds (maternal lines. Fruits were harvested at the breaker stage of maturation and stored in shelves at 21ºC for 14 days. Yield and fruit quality traits were then evaluated. Regardless of the background, the alc allele in heterozygosis (alc+/alc did not interfere with the total yield, commercial yield, average mass per fruit, average mass per commercial fruit, fruit shape, or with fruit peduncular scar diameter. The alc+/alc genotype reduced the rate of firmness loss and delayed evolution of the red color of the fruit, thus contributing to an increase of the post-harvest shelf life for all three genotypic backgrounds.A vida de prateleira dos frutos de tomate pode ser extendida, seja empregando-se alelos mutantes que afetam o processo natural de amadurecimento, seja por meio de background genotípico favorável. O alelo alcobaça (alc em heterozigose tem-se mostrado bastante eficiente no sentido de prolongar o período de conservação dos frutos em pós-colheita, sem que ocorra prejuízo na coloração. Avaliaram-se os efeitos do alelo

  16. Common breast cancer risk alleles and risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Näslund-Koch, C; Nordestgaard, B G; Bojesen, S E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that common breast cancer risk alleles are associated with incidences of breast cancer and other cancers in the general population, and identify low risk women among those invited for screening mammography. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: 35,441 individuals from the Danish...... general population were followed in Danish health registries for up to 21 years after blood sampling. After genotyping 72 breast cancer risk loci, each with 0-2 alleles, the sum for each individual was calculated. We used the simple allele sum instead of the conventional polygenic risk score......, as it is likely more sensitive in detecting associations with risks of other endpoints than breast cancer. RESULTS: Breast cancer incidence in the 19,010 women was increased across allele sum quintiles (log-rank trend test; p=1*10(-12)), but not incidence of other cancers (p=0.41). Age- and study-adjusted hazard...

  17. 7个砂梨品种S基因型的确定及1个新S-RNase基因的分离鉴定%Determination of S-Genotypes of Seven Cultivars and Identification of a Novel S-RNase Allele in Pyrus pyrifolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琳; 谭晓风; 周建; 何小勇; 袁德义; 胡姣; 龙洪旭

    2008-01-01

    砂梨是重要的经济树种,表现出典型的配子体自交不亲和性,在生产和育种上需鉴定品种的S基因犁以确定品种间的亲和性.选取7个砂梨品种为试验材料,使用梨S-RNase(S基因)通用引物进行基因组PCR扩增,产物通过1.8%的琼脂糖凝胶电泳分析.结果表明:‘楚比香'等4个品种中产生了预期的2条电泳条带,而其他3个品种都只产生1条带产物,通过6%的聚丙烯酰胺电泳对该3个品种的PCR产物进一步分析,结果产物被成功分离.将7个品种中分离到的14个条带分别回收、克隆、测序及序列分析,从中鉴别出10个具有梨S-RNase基因序列特征的S基因,其中‘政和大雪梨'中494 bp的基因片段被鉴定为新的S基因,暂命名为S43-RNase(GenBank接受号EF566873).RT-PCR试验证明S43-RNase仅在化柱中特异表达,符合S-RNase的表达特征.通过比对S43-RNase的基因组序列和cDNA序列,确定其内含子大小为294 bp.在推导氨基酸水平上,S43-RNase与苹果亚科其他S-RNase表现出65%~92%的相似性.%Pyrus pyrifolia is a commercially important fruit tree which exhibits gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI). It is necessary to identify S-genotypes of cultivars for determination of cross-compatible combination prior to performing pear plantation and breeding programs. In this study, seven cultivars of P. pyrifolia were used for S-genotype analysis by PCR-based molecular method with primers designed from conserved sequences of known pear S-RNases. Amplified products were analyzed by 1.8% agarose gel electrophoresis. In each of the four cultivars ' Chubixiang', ' Huangpishui', ' Zhenghedaxueli' and ' Hongtaiyang', two expected bands were generated. The amplified products in the other three cultivars did not show length polymorphism, and therefore were further separated by 6% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). A total of 14 purified fragments from the seven cultivars were cloned and sequenced. Sequence

  18. Mannose-binding lectin variant alleles and HLA-DR4 alleles are associated with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Soren; Baslund, Bo; Madsen, Hans O.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether variant alleles of the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) gene causing low serum concentrations of MBL and/or polymorphisms of HLA-DRB1 are associated with increased susceptibility to polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) and giant cell arteritis (GCA) or particular clinical...... phenotypes of PMR/GCA. METHODS: MBL and HLA-DRB1 alleles were determined by polymerase chain reaction in 102 Danish patients with PMR (n = 37) or GCA (n = 65). Two hundred fifty and 193 healthy individuals served as controls for MBL and HLA genotyping, respectively. RESULTS: The prevalence of MBL variant...... alleles in controls, patients with PMR only, and patients with GCA was 37, 32, and 53% (p = 0.01), respectively. HLA-DRB1*04 was found in 47% of patients with PMR only and in 54% of patients with GCA, which differed significantly from the 35% found in controls (p = 0.01). HLA-DR4 alleles were...

  19. Identification of blast resistance expression in rice genotypes using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-14

    Jun 14, 2010 ... genotypes were evaluated for resistance to blast disease under induced epiphytotic conditions obtained in the ..... desirable changes in the population through selection ..... that resistance sources are non-allelic for resistance.

  20. Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase Genotypes in Pediatric Migraine Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saygi, Semra; Erol, İlknur; Alehan, Füsun; Yalçın, Yaprak Yılmaz; Kubat, Gözde; Ataç, Fatma Belgin

    2015-10-01

    This study compared superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) alleles in 97 consecutive children and adolescents with migraine to 96 healthy children and adolescents. Isolated genomic DNA was used as a template for SOD1 (35 A/C), SOD2 16 C/T, and CAT2 [(-262 C/T) and (-21 A/T)] allele genotyping. The SOD2 16 C/T genotype and C allele frequency differed significantly between controls and migraine (P = .047; P = .038). CAT -21 AA genotype and A allele frequency were significantly higher in both migraine with aura patients (P = .013; P = .004) and migraine without aura patients (P = .003; P = .001) compared to controls. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of differences in SOD and CAT genotypes between pediatric migraine patients and age-matched controls. Further studies on the functional implications of these genetic variants on neural antioxidant capacity and the use of antioxidant modulators for migraine treatment are warranted.

  1. A new analysis tool for individual-level allele frequency for genomic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Wen-Harn

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allele frequency is one of the most important population indices and has been broadly applied to genetic/genomic studies. Estimation of allele frequency using genotypes is convenient but may lose data information and be sensitive to genotyping errors. Results This study utilizes a unified intensity-measuring approach to estimating individual-level allele frequencies for 1,104 and 1,270 samples genotyped with the single-nucleotide-polymorphism arrays of the Affymetrix Human Mapping 100K and 500K Sets, respectively. Allele frequencies of all samples are estimated and adjusted by coefficients of preferential amplification/hybridization (CPA, and large ethnicity-specific and cross-ethnicity databases of CPA and allele frequency are established. The results show that using the CPA significantly improves the accuracy of allele frequency estimates; moreover, this paramount factor is insensitive to the time of data acquisition, effect of laboratory site, type of gene chip, and phenotypic status. Based on accurate allele frequency estimates, analytic methods based on individual-level allele frequencies are developed and successfully applied to discover genomic patterns of allele frequencies, detect chromosomal abnormalities, classify sample groups, identify outlier samples, and estimate the purity of tumor samples. The methods are packaged into a new analysis tool, ALOHA (Allele-frequency/Loss-of-heterozygosity/Allele-imbalance. Conclusions This is the first time that these important genetic/genomic applications have been simultaneously conducted by the analyses of individual-level allele frequencies estimated by a unified intensity-measuring approach. We expect that additional practical applications for allele frequency analysis will be found. The developed databases and tools provide useful resources for human genome analysis via high-throughput single-nucleotide-polymorphism arrays. The ALOHA software was written in R and R GUI and

  2. Apolipoprotein-E genotypes and myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhail, Hamid; Soundararajan, Christhunesa C; Vivekanandhan, Subbiah; Singh, Sumit; Behari, Madhuri

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune myasthenia gravis (MG) is a disorder of neuromuscular junction. Possible role of multiple genes in the development of the MG has been documented. This case-control study, studied the association of apolipoprotein E (Apo-E) alleles with MG. Anti-AChR antibody was measured using radio receptor immunoassay. Apo-E genotypes were analyzed in 120 MG patients and 120 healthy subjects. Comparison between patients with MG and controls showed no significant association with Apo-E allelic variants. However, a significant association of Apo-E4 allele with AChR-antibody positive patients was observed (P = 0.007). Also, among seropositive patients, a significant association was seen between female gender and Apo-E4 allele (P = 0.023). Our results suggest that the presence of Apo-E4 allele might influence seropositive status in patients with MG and seems an associated susceptible factor in female patients.

  3. GROWTH HORMONE GENE GENOTYPING BY Msp I RESTRICTION ENZYME AND PCR-RFLP METHODS IN ACEH CATTLE BREED AT INDRAPURI DISTRICT OF ACEH PROVINCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.P.B. Putra

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to identify growth hormone (GH genes genotype in selectedAceh cattle at Indrapuri’s Breeding and Forage Centre (IBFC of Aceh Cattle. Fourty one cattleconsisting of 21 male and 20 female cattle were used in this study. The genomic DNA was extractedfrom blood using Sambrook et al. (1989 methods. Polymerase Chain Reaction - Restriction FragmentLength Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP and mehod of sequencing was used to detect MspI site on GH gene.Based on sequencing results, it can be concluded that all cattle were monomorphism. The frequency ofTT genotype were 1.00 and same as T allele frequency. The transition of C (cytosine into T (thymineon 1548 bp caused the lost of restriction site.

  4. Construction of a library of cloned short tandem repeat (STR) alleles as universal templates for allelic ladder preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Le; Zhao, Xing-Chun; Ye, Jian; Liu, Jin-Jie; Chen, Ting; Bai, Xue; Zhang, Jian; Ou, Yuan; Hu, Lan; Jiang, Bo-Wei; Wang, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) genotyping methods are widely used for human identity testing applications, including forensic DNA analysis. Samples of DNA containing the length-variant STR alleles are typically separated and genotyped by comparison to an allelic ladder. Here, we describe a newly devised library of cloned STR alleles. The library covers alleles X and Y for the sex-determining locus Amelogenin and 259 other alleles for 22 autosomal STR loci (TPOX, D3S1358, FGA, D5S818, CSF1PO, D7S820, D8S1179, TH01, vWA, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D21S11, D2S1338, D6S1043, D12S391, Penta E, D19S433, D11S4463, D17S974, D3S4529 and D12ATA63). New primers were designed for all these loci to construct recombinant plasmids so that the library retains core repeat elements of STR as well as 5'- and 3'-flanking sequences of ∼500 base pairs. Since amplicons of commercial STR genotyping kits and systems developed in laboratories are usually distributed from 50 to STR alleles. The sequencing results showed all repeat structures we obtained for TPOX, CSF1PO, D7S820, TH01, D16S539, D18S51 and Penta E were the same as reported. However, we identified 102 unreported repeat structures from the other 15 STR loci, supplementing our current knowledge of repeat structures and leading to further understanding of these widely used loci.

  5. Multi-primer target PCR for rapid identification of bovine DRB3 alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledwidge, S A; Mallard, B A; Gibson, J P; Jansen, G B; Jiang, Z H

    2001-08-01

    Multi-primer target polymerase chain reaction (MPT-PCR) is a rapid method for the identification of specific BoLA-DRB3 alleles. In a single PCR reaction, the presence of two alleles associated with increased risk, DRB3.2*23 (DRB3*2701-2703, 2705-2707) and decreased risk, DRB3.2*16 (DRB3*1501, 1502), of mastitis in Canadian Holstein can be detected. Two outer primers amplify exon 2 of DRB3. Simultaneously, two inner, allele-specific primers amplify individual alleles. Initially, 40 cows previously typed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) were genotyped using the multi-primer approach. An additional 30 cows were first genotyped by multi-primer target PCR, then by PCR-RFLP. All animals were correctly identified and there were no false positives. This technique can readily be modified to identify other BoLA alleles of interest.

  6. Association between the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele and late onset of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, H.B.; Timm, S.; Wang, A.G.;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The 32-bp deletion allele in chemokine receptor CCR5 has been associated with several immune-mediated diseases and might be implicated in schizophrenia as well. METHOD: The authors genotyped DNA samples from 268 schizophrenia patients and 323 healthy subjects. Age at first admission...... of the deletion allele in the latter subgroup of patients. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele is a susceptibility factor for schizophrenia with late onset. Alternatively, the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele may act as a modifier by delaying the onset of schizophrenia without...

  7. Desmanthus GENOTYPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ HENRIQUE DE ALBUQUERQUE RANGEL

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Desmanthus is a genus of forage legumes with potential to improve pastures and livestock produc-tion on clay soils of dry tropical and subtropical regions such as the existing in Brazil and Australia. Despite this patterns of natural or enforced after-ripening of Desmanthus seeds have not been well established. Four year old seed banks of nine Desmanthus genotypes at James Cook University were accessed for their patterns of seed softe-ning in response to a range of temperatures. Persistent seed banks were found to exist under all of the studied ge-notypes. The largest seeds banks were found in the genotypes CPI 78373 and CPI 78382 and the smallest in the genotypes CPI’s 37143, 67643, and 83563. An increase in the percentage of softened seeds was correlated with higher temperatures, in two patterns of response: in some accessions seeds were not significantly affected by tempe-ratures below 80º C; and in others, seeds become soft when temperature rose to as little as 60 ºC. At 80 °C the heat started to depress germination. High seed production of Desmanthus associated with dependence of seeds on eleva-ted temperatures to softening can be a very important strategy for plants to survive in dry tropical regions.

  8. Empirical evaluation of selective DNA pooling to map QTL in dairy cattle using a half-sib design by comparison to individual genotyping and interval mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Nicholas

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study represents the first attempt at an empirical evaluation of the DNA pooling methodology by comparing it to individual genotyping and interval mapping to detect QTL in a dairy half-sib design. The findings indicated that the use of peak heights from the pool electropherograms without correction for stutter (shadow product and preferential amplification performed as well as corrected estimates of frequencies. However, errors were found to decrease the power of the experiment at every stage of the pooling and analysis. The main sources of errors include technical errors from DNA quantification, pool construction, inconsistent differential amplification, and from the prevalence of sire alleles in the dams. Additionally, interval mapping using individual genotyping gains information from phenotypic differences between individuals in the same pool and from neighbouring markers, which is lost in a DNA pooling design. These errors cause some differences between the markers detected as significant by pooling and those found significant by interval mapping based on individual selective genotyping. Therefore, it is recommended that pooled genotyping only be used as part of an initial screen with significant results to be confirmed by individual genotyping. Strategies for improving the efficiency of the DNA pooling design are also presented.

  9. Reintroduction of a Homocysteine Level-Associated Allele into East Asians by Neanderthal Introgression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ya; Ding, Qiliang; He, Yungang; Xu, Shuhua; Jin, Li

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present an analysis of Neanderthal introgression at the dipeptidase 1 gene, DPEP1. A Neanderthal origin for the putative introgressive haplotypes was demonstrated using an established three-step approach. This introgression was under positive natural selection, reached a frequency of >50%, and introduced a homocysteine level- and pigmentation-associated allele (rs460879-T) into East Asians. However, the same allele was also found in non-East Asians, but not from Neanderthal introgression. It is likely that rs460879-T was lost in East Asians and was reintroduced subsequently through Neanderthal introgression. Our findings suggest that Neanderthal introgression could reintroduce an important previously existing allele into populations where the allele had been lost. This study sheds new light on understanding the contribution of Neanderthal introgression to the adaptation of non-Africans.

  10. Genotyping of FCN and MBL2 polymorphisms using pyrosequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munthe-Fog, Lea; Madsen, Hans O.; Garred, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Pyrosequencing represents one of the most thorough methods used to analyze polymorphisms. One advantage of using pyrosequencing for genotyping is the ability to identify not only single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) but also tri-allelic variations, insertions and deletions (InDels). In contrast...... to most other genotyping assays the sequence surrounding the polymorphism provides an internal control making this method highly reliable....

  11. Apolipoprotein E genotype, cardiovascular biomarkers and risk of stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Tauseef A; Shah, Tina; Prieto, David;

    2013-01-01

    At the APOE gene, encoding apolipoprotein E, genotypes of the ε2/ε3/ε4 alleles associated with higher LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels are also associated with higher coronary risk. However, the association of APOE genotype with other cardiovascular biomarkers and risk of ischaemic stroke is less...

  12. Pooled DNA genotyping on Affymetrix SNP genotyping arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen Michael J

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genotyping technology has advanced such that genome-wide association studies of complex diseases based upon dense marker maps are now technically feasible. However, the cost of such projects remains high. Pooled DNA genotyping offers the possibility of applying the same technologies at a fraction of the cost, and there is some evidence that certain ultra-high throughput platforms also perform with an acceptable accuracy. However, thus far, this conclusion is based upon published data concerning only a small number of SNPs. Results In the current study we prepared DNA pools from the parents and from the offspring of 30 parent-child trios that have been extensively genotyped by the HapMap project. We analysed the two pools with Affymetrix 10 K Xba 142 2.0 Arrays. The availability of the HapMap data allowed us to validate the performance of 6843 SNPs for which we had both complete individual and pooled genotyping data. Pooled analyses averaged over 5–6 microarrays resulted in highly reproducible results. Moreover, the accuracy of estimating differences in allele frequency between pools using this ultra-high throughput system was comparable with previous reports of pooling based upon lower throughput platforms, with an average error for the predicted allelic frequencies differences between the two pools of 1.37% and with 95% of SNPs showing an error of Conclusion Genotyping thousands of SNPs with DNA pooling using Affymetrix microarrays produces highly accurate results and can be used for genome-wide association studies.

  13. LOST CREEK ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffler, L.J. Patrick; Campbell, Harry W.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic and mineral-resource investigations identified no mineral-resource potential in the Lost Creek Roadless Area, California. Sand and gravel have been mined from alluvial flood-plain deposits less than 1 mi outside the roadless area; these deposits are likely to extend into the roadless area beneath a Holocene basalt flow that may be as much as 40 ft thick. An oil and gas lease application which includes the eastern portion of the roadless area is pending. Abundant basalt in the area can be crushed and used as aggregate, but similar deposits of volcanic cinders or sand and gravel in more favorable locations are available outside the roadless area closer to major markets. No indication of coal or geothermal energy resources was identified.

  14. Lost Baryons at Low Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Mathur, Smita; Williams, Rik J

    2007-01-01

    We review our attempts to discover lost baryons at low redshift with ``X-ray forest'' of absorption lines from the warm-hot intergalactic medium. We discuss the best evidence to date along the Mrk 421 sightline. We then discuss the missing baryons in the Local Group and the significance of the z=0 absorption systems in X-ray spectra. We argue that the debate over the Galactic vs. extragalactic origin of the z=0 systems is premature as these systems likely contain both components. Observations with next generation X-ray missions such as Constellation-X and XEUS will be crucial to map out the warm-hot intergalactic medium.

  15. Conditional Allele Mouse Planner (CAMP): software to facilitate the planning and design of breeding strategies involving mice with conditional alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffert, Jason D; Pisitkun, Trairak; Miller, R Lance

    2012-06-01

    Transgenic and conditional knockout mouse models play an important role in biomedical research and their use has grown exponentially in the last 5-10 years. Generating conditional knockouts often requires breeding multiple alleles onto the background of a single mouse or group of mice. Breeding these mice depends on parental genotype, litter size, transmission frequency, and the number of breeding rounds. Therefore, a well planned breeding strategy is critical for keeping costs to a minimum. However, designing a viable breeding strategy can be challenging. With so many different variables this would be an ideal task for a computer program. To facilitate this process, we created a Java-based program called Conditional Allele Mouse Planner (CAMP). CAMP is designed to provide an estimate of the number of breeders, amount of time, and costs associated with generating mice of a particular genotype. We provide a description of CAMP, how to use it, and offer it freely as an application.

  16. The protease inhibitor PI*S allele and COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersh, C P; Ly, N P; Berkey, C S

    2005-01-01

    In many countries, the protease inhibitor (SERPINA1) PI*S allele is more common than PI*Z, the allele responsible for most cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to severe alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency. However, the risk of COPD due to the PI*S allele is not clear. The current...... authors located studies that addressed the risk of COPD or measured lung function in individuals with the PI SZ, PI MS and PI SS genotypes. A separate meta-analysis for each genotype was performed. Aggregating data from six studies, the odds ratio (OR) for COPD in PI SZ compound heterozygotes compared...... with PI MM (normal) individuals was significantly increased at 3.26 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.24-8.57). In 17 cross-sectional and case-control studies, the OR for COPD in PI MS heterozygotes was 1.19 (95%CI: 1.02-1.38). However, PI MS genotype was not associated with COPD risk after correcting...

  17. Short mucin 6 alleles are associated with H pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thai V Nguyen; Marcel JR Janssen; Paulien Gritters; René HM te Morsche; Joost PH Drenth; Henri van Asten; Robert JF Laheij; Jan BMJ Jansen

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between mucin 6(MUC6) VNTR length and H pylori infection.METHODS: Blood samples were collected from patients visiting the Can Tho General Hospital for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. DNA was isolated from whole blood, the repeated section was cut out using a restriction enzyme (Pvu Ⅱ) and the length of the allele fragments was determined by Southern blotting. H pylori infection was diagnosed by 14C urea breath test. For analysis, MUC6 allele fragment length was dichotomized as being either long (> 13.5 kbp) or short (≤ 13.5 kbp)and patients were classified according to genotype [long-long (LL), long-short (LS), short-short (SS)].RESULTS: 160 patients were studied (mean age 43years, 36% were males, 58% H pylori positive). MUC6Pvu Ⅱ-restricted allele fragment lengths ranged from 7 to 19 kbp. Of the patients with the LL, LS, SS MUC6genotype, 43% (24/56), 57% (25/58) and 76% (11/46)were infected with H pylori, respectively (P = 0.003).CONCLUSION: Short MUC6 alleles are associated with H pylori infection.

  18. Allelic Prevalence of ABO Blood Group Genes in Iranian Azari Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Nojavan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: ABO blood group system is the most important blood group in transfusion and has been widely used in population studies. Several molecular techniques for ABO allele’s detection are widely used for distinguishing various alleles of glycosyl transferase locus on chromosome 9. Methods: 744 randomly selected samples from Azari donors of East Azerbaijan province (Iran were examined using well-adjusted multiplex allele- specific PCR ABO genotyping technique. Results: The results were consistent for all individuals. The ABO blood group genotype of 744 healthy Azari blood donors was: 25.8% AA/AO (2, 7.6% AO (1, 1.6% BB, 11.3% B0 (1, 10% AB, 9.3% 0(10(1 and 15.3%0(10(2. The highest genotype frequency belonged to O01/O02 genotype (15.3% and the lowest frequency belonged to A101/A102 genotype (0.4%. Conclusions: The frequencies of ABO alleles didn’t show significant differences between East Azerbaijan province population and that of other areas of the country. Meanwhile, statistical analysis of frequencies of A and B alleles between East Azerbaijan province population and neighbor countries showed significant differences whereas the frequency of allele O between them did not show significant difference (P>0.05.

  19. Variants in glucose- and circadian rhythm-related genes affect the response of energy expenditure to weight-loss diets: the POUNDS LOST Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Khadijeh; Xu, Min; Qi, Qibin; de Jonge, Lilian; Bray, George A; Sacks, Frank; Qi, Lu

    2014-02-01

    Circadian rhythm has been shown to be related to glucose metabolism and risk of diabetes, probably through effects on energy balance. Recent genome-wide association studies identified variants in circadian rhythm-related genes (CRY2 and MTNR1B) associated with glucose homeostasis. We tested whether CRY2 and MTNR1B genotypes affected changes in measures of energy expenditure in response to a weight-loss diet intervention in a 2-y randomized clinical trial, the POUNDS (Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies) LOST Trial. The variants CRY2 rs11605924 (n = 721) and MTNR1B rs10830963 (n = 722) were genotyped in overweight or obese adults who were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 weight-loss diets that differed in their proportions of macronutrients. Respiratory quotient (RQ) and resting metabolic rate (RMR) were measured. By 2 y of diet intervention, the A allele of CRY2 rs11605924 was significantly associated with a greater reduction in RQ (P = 0.03) and a greater increase in RMR and RMR/kg (both P = 0.04). The G allele of MTNR1B rs10830963 was significantly associated with a greater increase in RQ (P = 0.01) but was not related to changes in RMR and RMR/kg. In addition, we found significant gene-diet fat interactions for both CRY2 (P-interaction = 0.02) and MTNR1B (P-interaction genes CRY2 and MTNR1B may affect long-term changes in energy expenditure, and dietary fat intake may modify the genetic effects. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00072995.

  20. Genotypes of Candida albicans isolated from healthy individuals and their distribution in patients with oral candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Yuki; Fukano, Hideo; Shimozato, Kazuo; Tanaka, Reiko; Horii, Toshinobu; Kawamoto, Fumihiko; Kanbe, Toshio

    2013-12-01

    For the study of Candida albicans genotypes involved in development of candidiasis, Candida albicans isolates were collected from healthy volunteers and patients with oral candidiasis and genotyped on the basis of 25S rDNA and microsatellite polymorphisms. In the microsatellite analysis using two microsatellite markers (CDC3 and CAI), 63 healthy volunteer isolates were classified into 35 genotypes (allelic relations to CDC3 alleles 1:2/CAI alleles 1:2), among which genotypes II (115:119/23:23), III (115:123/18:27), and V (123:127/32:41) were found at frequencies of 12.7%, 7.9%, and 7.9%, respectively. In 68 oral candidiasis isolates classified into 39 genotypes, genotypes II and III were identified in 4.4% and 20.6% of the isolates, respectively. The frequency of genotype III was higher in the candidiasis isolates than in the healthy isolates (p oral candidiasis.

  1. Angiotensin converting enzyme genotype in cardiovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, K.M.; Huggard, P.R.; West, M.J. [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) catalyses formation of angiotensin II and degradation of bradykinin, vasoactive peptides with opposing properties. The result of ACE action is to promote vasoconstriction and cell growth. PCR is used to detect a common polymorphism due to the insertion of an Alu repeat element of 287 bp into intron 16. ACE genotype has been implicated in risk for myocardial infarction (MI) and hypertension in humans. We have studied a group of 640 patients (61% male aged 64 {plus_minus} 11 years) with myocardial ischaemic syndromes, followed for 12 months after initial hospital admission. In this group, the frequency of the insertion (I) allele was 0.47 (N=1170 chromosomes), not significantly higher than the frequency of 0.46 in 112 local blood donors (50% male aged 59 {plus_minus}5 years). In the 300 patients with diagnosed MI, I allele frequency was 0.48. This is significantly higher ({chi}{sup 2}=5.78, P=0.015) than the frequency of 0.42 reported in a multi-centre study of ACE genotype in 600 male European patients with MI . There was a non-significant increase in the frequency of a cardiac event within 6 months of hospital admission in those of II genotype (N=464, 47 events to date). These results suggest that in our population, the I allele and/or II genotype may be associated with risk of MI. This contrasts with the study cited above, where the D (deletion) allele and DD genotype frequency were raised in patients compared with controls. Hypertension is associated with the ACE D allele, and does not explain the heart disease risk, which may be associated with the I allele, in this group of survivors of myocardial ischaemic disease. The difference between our results and the previous study may be due to ascertainment or ethnic differences or to problems amplifying the I allele in some heterozygotes. Clearly, the role of ACE genotype in these diseases is complex.

  2. MICA/B genotyping of Tujias from Zhangjiajie, Hunan Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y J; Zhang, N J; Chen, E; Chen, C J; Bu, Y H; Yu, P

    2016-04-01

    One hundred eighty-seven Tujia individuals from Zhangjiajie, Hunan Province, China were genotyped at the MICA and MICB loci using polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific priming and sequencing-based typing methods. MICA and MCB genotypes are consistent with expected HW proportions. These genotype data are available in the Allele Frequencies Net Database.

  3. Relationship between s alleles of vacA gene of Helicobacter pylori and gastroduodenal diseases in Iran: a brief report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Latifi-Navid

    2014-02-01

    Conclusion: It is proposed that the H. pylori vacA s1 genotype could not be considered as an important determinant of gastroduodenal diseases in Iranian population and probably if s1 allele is associated with other virulence alleles of this gene, it will cause diseases.

  4. Automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeat markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)]|[Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The dinucleotide repeats (i.e., microsatellites) such as CA-repeats are a highly polymorphic, highly abundant class of PCR-amplifiable markers that have greatly streamlined genetic mapping experimentation. It is expected that over 30,000 such markers (including tri- and tetranucleotide repeats) will be characterized for routine use in the next few years. Since only size determination, and not sequencing, is required to determine alleles, in principle, dinucleotide repeat genotyping is easily performed on electrophoretic gels, and can be automated using DNA sequencers. Unfortunately, PCR stuttering with these markers generates not one band for each allele, but a pattern of bands. Since closely spaced alleles must be disambiguated by human scoring, this poses a key obstacle to full automation. We have developed methods that overcome this obstacle. Our model is that the observed data is generated by arithmetic superposition (i.e., convolution) of multiple allele patterns. By quantitatively measuring the size of each component band, and exploiting the unique stutter pattern associated with each marker, closely spaced alleles can be deconvolved; this unambiguously reconstructs the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} allele bands, with stutter artifact removed. We used this approach in a system for automated diagnosis of (X-linked) Duchenne muscular dystrophy; four multiplexed CA-repeats within the dystrophin gene were assayed on a DNA sequencer. Our method accurately detected small variations in gel migration that shifted the allele size estimate. In 167 nonmutated alleles, 89% (149/167) showed no size variation, 9% (15/167) showed 1 bp variation, and 2% (3/167) showed 2 bp variation. We are currently developing a library of dinucleotide repeat patterns; together with our deconvolution methods, this library will enable fully automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeats from sizing data.

  5. Choreography of Ig allelic exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedar, Howard; Bergman, Yehudit

    2008-06-01

    Allelic exclusion guarantees that each B or T cell only produces a single antigen receptor, and in this way contributes to immune diversity. This process is actually initiated in the early embryo when the immune receptor loci become asynchronously replicating in a stochastic manner with one early and one late allele in each cell. This distinct differential replication timing feature then serves an instructive mark that directs a series of allele-specific epigenetic events in the immune system, including programmed histone modification, nuclear localization and DNA demethylation that ultimately bring about preferred rearrangement on a single allele, and this decision is temporally stabilized by feedback mechanisms that inhibit recombination on the second allele. In principle, these same molecular components are also used for controlling monoallelic expression at other genomic loci, such as those carrying interleukins and olfactory receptor genes that require the choice of one gene out of a large array. Thus, allelic exclusion appears to represent a general epigenetic phenomenon that is modeled on the same basis as X chromosome inactivation.

  6. Transmedia storytelling and Lost path to success

    OpenAIRE

    Matsunaga Sasaki, Daniella

    2012-01-01

    This thesis analyses the transmedia storytelling strategy applied to promote the TV series Lost. As transmedia storytelling one may understand it as a story told throughout different media, with exclusive content pointing back to the main narrative, working as a potential new audience entry-point. “Which transmedia elements of the Lost formula could be transferable to other cases?” is the research question proposed and in order to answer it, all Lost transmedia events and other marketing elem...

  7. FTO genotype and weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livingstone, Katherine M; Celis-Morales, Carlos; Papandonatos, George D;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of the FTO genotype on weight loss after dietary, physical activity, or drug based interventions in randomised controlled trials. DESIGN: Systematic review and random effects meta-analysis of individual participant data from randomised controlled trials. DATA SOURCES...... well to dietary, physical activity, or drug based weight loss interventions and thus genetic predisposition to obesity associated with the FTO minor allele can be at least partly counteracted through such interventions. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42015015969.......: Ovid Medline, Scopus, Embase, and Cochrane from inception to November 2015. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA FOR STUDY SELECTION: Randomised controlled trials in overweight or obese adults reporting reduction in body mass index, body weight, or waist circumference by FTO genotype (rs9939609 or a proxy) after...

  8. Pervasive Genotypic Mosaicism in Founder Mice Derived from Genome Editing through Pronuclear Injection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Oliver

    Full Text Available Genome editing technologies, especially the Cas9/CRISPR system, have revolutionized biomedical research over the past several years. Generation of novel alleles has been simplified to unprecedented levels, allowing for rapid expansion of available genetic tool kits for researchers. However, the issue of genotypic mosaicism has become evident, making stringent analyses of the penetrance of genome-edited alleles essential. Here, we report that founder mice, derived from pronuclear injection of ZFNs or a mix of guidance RNAs and Cas9 mRNAs, display consistent genotypic mosaicism for both deletion and insertion alleles. To identify founders with greater possibility of transmitting the mutant allele through the germline, we developed an effective germline genotyping method. The awareness of the inherent genotypic mosaicism issue with genome editing will allow for a more efficient implementation of the technologies, and the germline genotyping method will save valuable time and resources.

  9. Pervasive Genotypic Mosaicism in Founder Mice Derived from Genome Editing through Pronuclear Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Daniel; Yuan, Shuiqiao; McSwiggin, Hayden; Yan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Genome editing technologies, especially the Cas9/CRISPR system, have revolutionized biomedical research over the past several years. Generation of novel alleles has been simplified to unprecedented levels, allowing for rapid expansion of available genetic tool kits for researchers. However, the issue of genotypic mosaicism has become evident, making stringent analyses of the penetrance of genome-edited alleles essential. Here, we report that founder mice, derived from pronuclear injection of ZFNs or a mix of guidance RNAs and Cas9 mRNAs, display consistent genotypic mosaicism for both deletion and insertion alleles. To identify founders with greater possibility of transmitting the mutant allele through the germline, we developed an effective germline genotyping method. The awareness of the inherent genotypic mosaicism issue with genome editing will allow for a more efficient implementation of the technologies, and the germline genotyping method will save valuable time and resources.

  10. Human platelet antigen genotyping of platelet donors in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merzoni, J; Fagundes, I S; Lunardi, L W; Lindenau, J D-R; Gil, B C; Jobim, M; Dias, V G; Merzoni, L; Sekine, L; Onsten, T G H; Jobim, L F

    2015-10-01

    Human platelet antigens (HPA) are immunogenic structures that result from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) leading to single amino acid substitutions. This study sought to determine the allele and genotype frequencies of HPA-1, HPA-2, HPA-3, HPA-4, HPA-5 and HPA-15 in platelet donors from the state of Rio Grande do Sul (RS), Brazil, and compare their allele frequencies to those observed in other populations. HPA genotyping was performed by PCR-SSP method. The study sample comprised 201 platelet donors (167 Caucasians and 34 non-Caucasians). Allele 'a' was that most commonly found for HPA-1 to 5 in both groups. The HPA-15ab genotype predominated over homozygous genotypes of this system. Fisher's exact test revealed statistically significant differences for the HPA-5 system, with a greater prevalence of the HPA-5b allele in non-Caucasians. The neighbour-joining method and principal components analysis revealed genetic proximity between our Caucasian group and European populations. We conclude that the allele frequencies of HPA-1 to 5 and HPA-15 found in our Caucasian sample are similar to those reported for European populations. These findings corroborate the ethnic makeup of the population of RS. The higher frequency of the HPA-5b allele found in the non-Caucasian group of our sample suggests the possibility of allosensitization in patients who receive platelet transfusions from genetically incompatible donors.

  11. Estimation of allele frequency and association mapping using next-generation sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersen Gitte

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimation of allele frequency is of fundamental importance in population genetic analyses and in association mapping. In most studies using next-generation sequencing, a cost effective approach is to use medium or low-coverage data (e.g., X. However, SNP calling and allele frequency estimation in such studies is associated with substantial statistical uncertainty because of varying coverage and high error rates. Results We evaluate a new maximum likelihood method for estimating allele frequencies in low and medium coverage next-generation sequencing data. The method is based on integrating over uncertainty in the data for each individual rather than first calling genotypes. This method can be applied to directly test for associations in case/control studies. We use simulations to compare the likelihood method to methods based on genotype calling, and show that the likelihood method outperforms the genotype calling methods in terms of: (1 accuracy of allele frequency estimation, (2 accuracy of the estimation of the distribution of allele frequencies across neutrally evolving sites, and (3 statistical power in association mapping studies. Using real re-sequencing data from 200 individuals obtained from an exon-capture experiment, we show that the patterns observed in the simulations are also found in real data. Conclusions Overall, our results suggest that association mapping and estimation of allele frequencies should not be based on genotype calling in low to medium coverage data. Furthermore, if genotype calling methods are used, it is usually better not to filter genotypes based on the call confidence score.

  12. Reelin gene alleles and susceptibility to autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H; Liu, X; Zhang, C; Mundo, E; Macciardi, F; Grayson, D R; Guidotti, A R; Holden, J J A

    2002-01-01

    A polymorphic trinucleotide repeat (CGG/GCC) within the human Reelin gene (RELN) was examined as a candidate gene for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). This gene encodes a large extracellular matrix protein that orchestrates neuronal positioning during corticogenesis. The CGG-repeat within the 5' untranslated region of RELN exon 1 was examined in 126 multiple-incidence families. The number of CGG repeats varied from three to 16 in affected individuals and controls, with no expansion or contraction observed during maternal (n = 291) or paternal (n = 287) transmissions in families with autistic probands. Although the frequencies of the RELN alleles and genotypes in affected children were not different from those in the comparison group, a family-based association test (FBAT) showed that the larger RELN alleles (> or = 11 repeats) were transmitted more often than expected to affected children (S = 43, E(S) = 34.5, P = 0.035); this was particularly the case for the 13-repeat RELN allele (S = 22, E(S) = 16, P = 0.034). Affected sib-pair (ASP) analysis found no evidence of excess sharing of RELN alleles in affected siblings. The impact of genotypes with large alleles (> or = 11 repeats) on the phenotypes in individuals with ASD was analyzed by ANOVA in a subset of the families for which results of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised were available. Children with large RELN alleles did not show any difference in scores for questions related to the core symptoms of autistic disorder, but there was a tendency for children with at least one large RELN allele to have an earlier age at first phrase (chi(2) = 3.538, P = 0.06). Thus, although the case-control and affected sib-pair findings did not support a role for RELN in susceptibility to ASD, the more powerful family-based association study demonstrated that RELN alleles with larger numbers of CGG repeats may play a role in the etiology of some cases of ASD, especially in children without delayed phrase speech.

  13. Lost-sales inventory theory : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijvank, Marco; Vis, Iris F. A.

    2011-01-01

    In classic inventory models it is common to assume that excess demand is backordered. However, studies analyzing customer behavior in practice show that most unfulfilled demand is lost or an alternative item/location is looked for in many retail environments. Inventory systems that include this lost

  14. TRPV6 alleles do not influence prostate cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flockerzi Veit

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transient receptor potential, subfamily V, member 6 (TRPV6 is a Ca2+ selective cation channel. Several studies have shown that TRPV6 transcripts are expressed in locally advanced prostatic adenocarcinoma, metastatic and androgen-insensitive prostatic lesions but are undetectable in healthy prostate tissue and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Two allelic variants of the human trpv6 gene have been identified which are transcribed into two independent mRNAs, TRPV6a and TRPV6b. We now asked, whether the trpv6a allele is correlated with the onset of prostate cancer, with the Gleason score and the tumour stage. Methods Genomic DNA of prostate cancer patients and control individuals was isolated from resections of prostatic adenocarcinomas and salivary fluid respectively. Genotyping of SNPs of the TRPV6 gene was performed by restriction length polymorphism or by sequencing analysis. RNA used for RT-PCR was isolated from prostate tissue. Data sets were analyzed by Chi-Square test. Results We first characterized in detail the five polymorphisms present in the protein coding exons of the trpv6 gene and show that these polymorphisms are coupled and are underlying the TRPV6a and the TRPV6b variants. Next we analysed the frequencies of the two TRPV6 alleles using genomic DNA from saliva samples of 169 healthy individuals. The homozygous TRPV6b genotype predominated with 86%, whereas no homozygous TRPV6a carriers could be identified. The International HapMap Project identified a similar frequency for an Utah based population whereas in an African population the a-genotype prevailed. The incidence of prostate cancer is several times higher in African populations than in non-African and we then investigated the TRPV6a/b frequencies in 141 samples of prostatic adenocarcinoma. The TRPV6b allele was found in 87% of the samples without correlation with Gleason score and tumour stage. Conclusion Our results show that the frequencies of trpv6

  15. Toward fully automated genotyping: Genotyping microsatellite markers by deconvolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlin, M.W.; Lancia, G.; See-Kiong, Ng [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Dense genetic linkage maps have been constructed for the human and mouse genomes, with average densities of 2.9 cM and 0.35 cM, respectively. These genetic maps are crucial for mapping both Mendelian and complex traits and are useful in clinical genetic diagnosis. Current maps are largely comprised of abundant, easily assayed, and highly polymorphic PCR-based microsatellite markers, primarily dinucleotide (CA){sub n} repeats. One key limitation of these length polymorphisms is the PCR stutter (or slippage) artifact that introduces additional stutter bands. With two (or more) closely spaced alleles, the stutter bands overlap, and it is difficult to accurately determine the correct alleles; this stutter phenomenon has all but precluded full automation, since a human must visually inspect the allele data. We describe here novel deconvolution methods for accurate genotyping that mathematically remove PCR stutter artifact from microsatellite markers. These methods overcome the manual interpretation bottleneck and thereby enable full automation of genetic map construction and use. New functionalities, including the pooling of DNAs and the pooling of markers, are described that may greatly reduce the associated experimentation requirements. 32 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Molecular identification of rare FY*Null and FY*X alleles in Caucasian thalassemic family from Sardinia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfroi, Silvia; Scarcello, Antonio; Pagliaro, Pasqualepaolo

    2015-10-01

    Molecular genetic studies on Duffy blood group antigens have identified mutations underlying rare FY*Null and FY*X alleles. FY*Null has a high frequency in Blacks, especially from sub-Saharan Africa, while its frequency is not defined in Caucasians. FY*X allele, associated with Fy(a-b+w) phenotype, has a frequency of 2-3.5% in Caucasian people while it is absent in Blacks. During the project of extensive blood group genotyping in patients affected by hemoglobinopathies, we identified FY*X/FY*Null and FY*A/FY*Null genotypes in a Caucasian thalassemic family from Sardinia. We speculate on the frequency of FY*X and FY*Null alleles in Caucasian and Black people; further, we focused on the association of FY*X allele with weak Fyb antigen expression on red blood cells and its identification performing high sensitivity serological typing methods or genotyping.

  17. THE USE OF NEW REAGENT KITS FOR DETECTION AND DESCRIPTION OF ADDITIONAL ALLELES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Loginova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During the screening typing of recruited volunteers with Volga Federal District for unrelated hematopoietic stem cell registry on the loci (HLA-A, B, DRB1, DRB345 in sample No 1758 identified a new allele at locus A. The use of basic kit AlleleSEQR HLA-A Sequencing in combination with HARP – A2F98A allowed to determine the genotype of this sample – А*30:01:01, a new allele А*25, В*13, 44, DRB1*03, 09, DRB3*02, DRB4*01. 

  18. Blood Group ABO Genotyping in Paternity Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugert, Peter; Rink, Gabriele; Kemp, Katharina; Klüter, Harald

    2012-06-01

    BACKGROUND: The ABO blood groups result from DNA sequence variations, predominantly single nucleotide and insertion/deletion polymorphisms (SNPs and indels), in the ABO gene encoding a glycosyltransferase. The ABO blood groups A(1), A(2), B and O predominantly result from the wild type allele A1 and the major gene variants that are characterized by four diallelic markers (261G>del, 802G>A, 803G>C, 1061C>del). Here, we were interested to evaluate the impact of ABO genotyping compared to ABO phenotyping in paternity testing. METHODS: The major ABO alleles were determined by PCR amplification with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) in a representative sample of 1,335 blood donors. The genotypes were compared to the ABO blood groups registered in the blood donor files. Then, the ABO phenotypes and genotypes were determined in 95 paternity trio cases that have been investigated by 12 short tandem repeat (STR) markers before. We compared statistical parameters (PL, paternity likelihood; PE, power of exclusion) of both blood grouping approaches. RESULTS: The prevalence of the major ABO alleles and genotypes corresponded to the expected occurrence of ABO blood groups in a Caucasian population. The low resolution genotyping of 4 diallelic markers revealed a correct genotype-phenotype correlation in 1,331 of 1,335 samples (99.7%). In 60 paternity trios with confirmed paternity of the alleged father based on STR analysis both PL and PE of the ABO genotype was significantly higher than of the ABO phenotype. In 12 of 35 exclusion cases (34.3%) the ABO genotype also excluded the alleged father, whereas the ABO phenotype excluded the alleged father only in 7 cases (20%). CONCLUSION: In paternity testing ABO genotyping is superior to ABO phenotyping with regard to PL and PE, however, ABO genotyping is not sufficient for valid paternity testing. Due to the much lower mutation rate compared to STR markers, blood group SNPs in addition to anonymous SNPs could be considered for

  19. Blood Group ABO Genotyping in Paternity Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugert, Peter; Rink, Gabriele; Kemp, Katharina; Klüter, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Background The ABO blood groups result from DNA sequence variations, predominantly single nucleotide and insertion/deletion polymorphisms (SNPs and indels), in the ABO gene encoding a glycosyltransferase. The ABO blood groups A1, A2, B and O predominantly result from the wild type allele A1 and the major gene variants that are characterized by four diallelic markers (261G>del, 802G>A, 803G>C, 1061C>del). Here, we were interested to evaluate the impact of ABO genotyping compared to ABO phenotyping in paternity testing. Methods The major ABO alleles were determined by PCR amplification with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) in a representative sample of 1,335 blood donors. The genotypes were compared to the ABO blood groups registered in the blood donor files. Then, the ABO phenotypes and genotypes were determined in 95 paternity trio cases that have been investigated by 12 short tandem repeat (STR) markers before. We compared statistical parameters (PL, paternity likelihood; PE, power of exclusion) of both blood grouping approaches. Results The prevalence of the major ABO alleles and genotypes corresponded to the expected occurrence of ABO blood groups in a Caucasian population. The low resolution genotyping of 4 diallelic markers revealed a correct genotype-phenotype correlation in 1,331 of 1,335 samples (99.7%). In 60 paternity trios with confirmed paternity of the alleged father based on STR analysis both PL and PE of the ABO genotype was significantly higher than of the ABO phenotype. In 12 of 35 exclusion cases (34.3%) the ABO genotype also excluded the alleged father, whereas the ABO phenotype excluded the alleged father only in 7 cases (20%). Conclusion In paternity testing ABO genotyping is superior to ABO phenotyping with regard to PL and PE, however, ABO genotyping is not sufficient for valid paternity testing. Due to the much lower mutation rate compared to STR markers, blood group SNPs in addition to anonymous SNPs could be considered for future

  20. Allele-specific enzymatic amplification of. beta. -globin genomic DNA for diagnosis of sickle cell anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, D.Y.; Ugozzoli, L.; Pal, B.K.; Wallace, B. (Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope, Duarte, CA (USA))

    1989-04-01

    A rapid nonradioactive approach to the diagnosis of sickle cell anemia is described based on an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (ASPCR). This method allows direct detection of the normal or the sickle cell {beta}-globin allele in genomic DNA without additional steps of probe hybridization, ligation, or restriction enzyme cleavage. Two allele-specific oligonucleotide primers, one specific for the sickle cell allele and one specific for the normal allele, together with another primer complementary to both alleles were used in the polymerase chain reaction with genomic DNA templates. The allele-specific primers differed from each other in their terminal 3{prime} nucleotide. Under the proper annealing temperature and polymerase chain reaction conditions, these primers only directed amplification on their complementary allele. In a single blind study of DNA samples from 12 individuals, this method correctly and unambiguously allowed for the determination of the genotypes with no false negatives or positives. If ASPCR is able to discriminate all allelic variation (both transition and transversion mutations), this method has the potential to be a powerful approach for genetic disease diagnosis, carrier screening, HLA typing, human gene mapping, forensics, and paternity testing.

  1. Tracking origins and spread of sulfadoxine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum dhps alleles in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Tauqeer; Vinayak, Sumiti; Congpuong, Kanungnit; Wongsrichanalai, Chansuda; Satimai, Wichai; Slutsker, Laurence; Escalante, Ananias A; Barnwell, John W; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2011-01-01

    The emergence and spread of drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum have been a major impediment for the control of malaria worldwide. Earlier studies have shown that similar to chloroquine (CQ) resistance, high levels of pyrimethamine resistance in P. falciparum originated independently 4 to 5 times globally, including one origin at the Thailand-Cambodia border. In this study we describe the origins and spread of sulfadoxine-resistance-conferring dihydropteroate synthase (dhps) alleles in Thailand. The dhps mutations and flanking microsatellite loci were genotyped for P. falciparum isolates collected from 11 Thai provinces along the Burma, Cambodia, and Malaysia borders. Results indicated that resistant dhps alleles were fixed in Thailand, predominantly being the SGEGA, AGEAA, and SGNGA triple mutants and the AGKAA double mutant (mutated codons are underlined). These alleles had different geographical distributions. The SGEGA alleles were found mostly at the Burma border, while the SGNGA alleles occurred mainly at the Cambodia border and nearby provinces. Microsatellite data suggested that there were two major genetic lineages of the triple mutants in Thailand, one common for SGEGA/SGNGA alleles and another one independent for AGEAA. Importantly, the newly reported SGNGA alleles possibly originated at the Thailand-Cambodia border. All parasites in the Yala province (Malaysia border) had AGKAA alleles with almost identical flanking microsatellites haplotypes. They were also identical at putatively neutral loci on chromosomes 2 and 3, suggesting a clonal nature of the parasite population in Yala. In summary, this study suggests multiple and independent origins of resistant dhps alleles in Thailand.

  2. Novel alleles of 31-bp VNTR polymorphism in the human cystathionine -synthase (CBS) gene were detected in healthy Asians

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yik-Yuen Gan; Chuan-Fei Chen

    2010-12-01

    A 31-bp variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphism of the cystathionine -synthase (CBS) gene was earlier reported in Caucasians of predominantly European descent and Indo–Caucasoid populations.We report here for the first time, the detection of allele 20, which was absent in Caucasian and Indo–Caucasoid populations, as a common allele present in Singaporean Chinese (6.25%), Indians (11.7%), and Malays (11.5%). Hence, allele 20 might be a specific allele for Asian populations. A relatively common allele 19 found in the Caucasian and Indo–Caucasoid populations (10.4%–10.6%) was absent in the Asian samples of this study. Therefore, allele 19 might be a specific allele for the Caucasian populations. A novel and rare allele 13, which was not reported before in the Caucasian and Indo–Caucasoid populations, was found in 0.5% of Singaporean Chinese as genotype 13/17 heterozygotes. The presence of alleles 13 and 20 were verified by DNA sequencing. There were five new genotypes (13/17, 16/20, 17/20, 18/20 and 20/20) not reported before in the Caucasian and Indo–Caucasoid populations, detected in this study. Nine genotypes (15/18, 16/18, 16/21, 17/19, 18/19, 18/21, 19/19, 19/21 and 21/21) which were present in the Caucasian and/or Indo–Caucasoid populations were absent in this study. Our results showed that CBS 31-bp VNTR polymorphism has a distinct genetic difference in allele and genotype frequencies between the European Caucasians, Indo–Caucasoid and Asian populations.

  3. megasat: automated inference of microsatellite genotypes from sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Luyao; Paterson, Ian G; Fraser, Bonnie A; Watson, Beth; Bradbury, Ian R; Nadukkalam Ravindran, Praveen; Reznick, David; Beiko, Robert G; Bentzen, Paul

    2017-03-01

    megasat is software that enables genotyping of microsatellite loci using next-generation sequencing data. Microsatellites are amplified in large multiplexes, and then sequenced in pooled amplicons. megasat reads sequence files and automatically scores microsatellite genotypes. It uses fuzzy matches to allow for sequencing errors and applies decision rules to account for amplification artefacts, including nontarget amplification products, replication slippage during PCR (amplification stutter) and differential amplification of alleles. An important feature of megasat is the generation of histograms of the length-frequency distributions of amplification products for each locus and each individual. These histograms, analogous to electropherograms traditionally used to score microsatellite genotypes, enable rapid evaluation and editing of automatically scored genotypes. megasat is written in Perl, runs on Windows, Mac OS X and Linux systems, and includes a simple graphical user interface. We demonstrate megasat using data from guppy, Poecilia reticulata. We genotype 1024 guppies at 43 microsatellites per run on an Illumina MiSeq sequencer. We evaluated the accuracy of automatically called genotypes using two methods, based on pedigree and repeat genotyping data, and obtained estimates of mean genotyping error rates of 0.021 and 0.012. In both estimates, three loci accounted for a disproportionate fraction of genotyping errors; conversely, 26 loci were scored with 0-1 detected error (error rate ≤0.007). Our results show that with appropriate selection of loci, automated genotyping of microsatellite loci can be achieved with very high throughput, low genotyping error and very low genotyping costs.

  4. Increased prevalence of mutant null alleles that cause hereditary fructose intolerance in the American population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffee, Erin M; Yerkes, Laura; Ewen, Elizabeth P; Zee, Tiffany; Tolan, Dean R

    2010-02-01

    Mutations in the aldolase B gene (ALDOB) impairing enzyme activity toward fructose-1-phosphate cleavage cause hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). Diagnosis of the disease is possible by identifying known mutant ALDOB alleles in suspected patients; however, the frequencies of mutant alleles can differ by population. Here, 153 American HFI patients with 268 independent alleles were analyzed to identify the prevalence of seven known HFI-causing alleles (A149P, A174D, N334K, Delta4E4, R59Op, A337V, and L256P) in this population. Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization analysis was performed on polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified genomic DNA from these patients. In the American population, the missense mutations A149P and A174D are the two most common alleles, with frequencies of 44% and 9%, respectively. In addition, the nonsense mutations Delta4E4 and R59Op are the next most common alleles, with each having a frequency of 4%. Together, the frequencies of all seven alleles make up 65% of HFI-causing alleles in this population. Worldwide, these same alleles make up 82% of HFI-causing mutations. This difference indicates that screening for common HFI alleles is more difficult in the American population. Nevertheless, a genetic screen for diagnosing HFI in America can be improved by including all seven alleles studied here. Lastly, identification of HFI patients presenting with classic symptoms and who have homozygous null genotypes indicates that aldolase B is not required for proper development or metabolic maintenance.

  5. Multivariate Analysis of Genotype-Phenotype Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitteroecker, Philipp; Cheverud, James M; Pavlicev, Mihaela

    2016-04-01

    With the advent of modern imaging and measurement technology, complex phenotypes are increasingly represented by large numbers of measurements, which may not bear biological meaning one by one. For such multivariate phenotypes, studying the pairwise associations between all measurements and all alleles is highly inefficient and prevents insight into the genetic pattern underlying the observed phenotypes. We present a new method for identifying patterns of allelic variation (genetic latent variables) that are maximally associated-in terms of effect size-with patterns of phenotypic variation (phenotypic latent variables). This multivariate genotype-phenotype mapping (MGP) separates phenotypic features under strong genetic control from less genetically determined features and thus permits an analysis of the multivariate structure of genotype-phenotype association, including its dimensionality and the clustering of genetic and phenotypic variables within this association. Different variants of MGP maximize different measures of genotype-phenotype association: genetic effect, genetic variance, or heritability. In an application to a mouse sample, scored for 353 SNPs and 11 phenotypic traits, the first dimension of genetic and phenotypic latent variables accounted for >70% of genetic variation present in all 11 measurements; 43% of variation in this phenotypic pattern was explained by the corresponding genetic latent variable. The first three dimensions together sufficed to account for almost 90% of genetic variation in the measurements and for all the interpretable genotype-phenotype association. Each dimension can be tested as a whole against the hypothesis of no association, thereby reducing the number of statistical tests from 7766 to 3-the maximal number of meaningful independent tests. Important alleles can be selected based on their effect size (additive or nonadditive effect on the phenotypic latent variable). This low dimensionality of the genotype-phenotype map

  6. ALLELE FREQUENCIES IN MULTIGENE FAMILIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Padmadisastra

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Results on allelle frequencies in three chromosomes, drawn at randomfrom a diploid population, evolving in equilibrium, at a particular generation, arepresented in this paper. The genes on each chromosome are subject to unbiased andreciprocal gene conversion and mutation. Using the coalescent approach we find theprobability distribution of the allelic configurations in the three chromosomes, andthe moments of the allelic numbers that exist in one of the three chromosomes orin a pair of chromosomes. We also consider the identity coefficients of two genesdrawn at random, one from each of two chromosomes, and the probability that allgenes in the three chromosomes are monomorphic. Numerical examples are alsogiven together with simulation results, and they agree well.

  7. Microevolution of S-allele frequencies in wild cherry populations: respective impacts of negative frequency dependent selection and genetic drift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckel, Solenn; Klein, Etienne K; Oddou-Muratorio, Sylvie; Musch, Brigitte; Mariette, Stéphanie

    2012-02-01

    Negative frequency dependent selection (NFDS) is supposed to be the main force controlling allele evolution at the gametophytic self-incompatibility locus (S-locus) in strictly outcrossing species. Genetic drift also influences S-allele evolution. In perennial sessile organisms, evolution of allelic frequencies over two generations is mainly shaped by individual fecundities and spatial processes. Using wild cherry populations between two successive generations, we tested whether S-alleles evolved following NFDS qualitative and quantitative predictions. We showed that allelic variation was negatively correlated with parental allelic frequency as expected under NFDS. However, NFDS predictions in finite population failed to predict more than half S-allele quantitative evolution. We developed a spatially explicit mating model that included the S-locus. We studied the effects of self-incompatibility and local drift within populations due to pollen dispersal in spatially distributed individuals, and variation in male fecundity on male mating success and allelic frequency evolution. Male mating success was negatively related to male allelic frequency as expected under NFDS. Spatial genetic structure combined with self-incompatibility resulted in higher effective pollen dispersal. Limited pollen dispersal in structured distributions of individuals and genotypes and unequal pollen production significantly contributed to S-allele frequency evolution by creating local drift effects strong enough to counteract the NFDS effect on some alleles.

  8. The effect of wild card designations and rare alleles in forensic DNA database searches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Bright, Jo-Anne; Buckleton, John S; Curran, James M; Morling, Niels

    2015-05-01

    Forensic DNA databases are powerful tools used for the identification of persons of interest in criminal investigations. Typically, they consist of two parts: (1) a database containing DNA profiles of known individuals and (2) a database of DNA profiles associated with crime scenes. The risk of adventitious or chance matches between crimes and innocent people increases as the number of profiles within a database grows and more data is shared between various forensic DNA databases, e.g. from different jurisdictions. The DNA profiles obtained from crime scenes are often partial because crime samples may be compromised in quantity or quality. When an individual's profile cannot be resolved from a DNA mixture, ambiguity is introduced. A wild card, F, may be used in place of an allele that has dropped out or when an ambiguous profile is resolved from a DNA mixture. Variant alleles that do not correspond to any marker in the allelic ladder or appear above or below the extent of the allelic ladder range are assigned the allele designation R for rare allele. R alleles are position specific with respect to the observed/unambiguous allele. The F and R designations are made when the exact genotype has not been determined. The F and R designation are treated as wild cards for searching, which results in increased chance of adventitious matches. We investigated the probability of adventitious matches given these two types of wild cards.

  9. Association of BLV infection profiles with alleles of the BoLA-DRB3.2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliarena, M A; Poli, M; Sala, L; Ceriani, C; Gutierrez, S; Dolcini, G; Rodríguez, E M; Mariño, B; Rodríguez-Dubra, C; Esteban, E N

    2008-08-01

    Bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) causes lymphosarcoma and persistent lymphocytosis (PL). Some MHC class II gene polymorphisms have been associated with resistance and susceptibility to the development of lymphosarcoma and PL, as well as with a reduced number of circulating BLV-infected lymphocytes. Previously, 230 BLV-infected Holstein cattle were classified into two infection profiles characterized by low and high proviral loads (LPL and HPL respectively). Here, the influence of the polymorphism at the BoLA-DRB3.2* gene of these animals was examined. After genotyping, the association between the BoLA-DRB3.2* alleles and the BLV infection profile was determined as the odds ratio (OR). Two subtypes of allele *11 were identified (ISAG*0901 and *0902). Allele ISAG*0902 showed a stronger association with the LPL profile (OR = 8.24; P DRB3.2* alleles were assigned to three categories: resistant (R), susceptible (S) and neutral (N). Based on their DRB3 genotypes, cattle were classified as homozygous or heterozygous. The RR and RN genotypes were associated with the LPL profile, while the SS and NS genotypes were associated with the HPL profile. The RS genotype could not be associated with any particular profile. Our results show that allele ISAG*0902 appears to be the best BLV resistance marker in Holstein cattle.

  10. GACT: a Genome build and Allele definition Conversion Tool for SNP imputation and meta-analysis in genetic association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulovari, Arvis; Li, Dawei

    2014-07-19

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified genes associated with complex human diseases. Although much of the heritability remains unexplained, combining single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes from multiple studies for meta-analysis will increase the statistical power to identify new disease-associated variants. Meta-analysis requires same allele definition (nomenclature) and genome build among individual studies. Similarly, imputation, commonly-used prior to meta-analysis, requires the same consistency. However, the genotypes from various GWAS are generated using different genotyping platforms, arrays or SNP-calling approaches, resulting in use of different genome builds and allele definitions. Incorrect assumptions of identical allele definition among combined GWAS lead to a large portion of discarded genotypes or incorrect association findings. There is no published tool that predicts and converts among all major allele definitions. In this study, we have developed a tool, GACT, which stands for Genome build and Allele definition Conversion Tool, that predicts and inter-converts between any of the common SNP allele definitions and between the major genome builds. In addition, we assessed several factors that may affect imputation quality, and our results indicated that inclusion of singletons in the reference had detrimental effects while ambiguous SNPs had no measurable effect. Unexpectedly, exclusion of genotypes with missing rate > 0.001 (40% of study SNPs) showed no significant decrease of imputation quality (even significantly higher when compared to the imputation with singletons in the reference), especially for rare SNPs. GACT is a new, powerful, and user-friendly tool with both command-line and interactive online versions that can accurately predict, and convert between any of the common allele definitions and between genome builds for genome-wide meta-analysis and imputation of genotypes from SNP-arrays or deep

  11. Metformin resistance alleles in polycystic ovary syndrome: pattern and association with glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweighofer, Natascha; Lerchbaum, Elisabeth; Trummer, Olivia; Schwetz, Verena; Pieber, Thomas; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara

    2014-02-01

    Insulin-sensitizer treatment with metformin is common in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). OCT alleles were investigated in PCOS patients to identify genetic 'bad responders' and 'nonresponders' to metformin including their possible effects on glucose metabolism without treatment. We genotyped eight SNPs in OCT1, OCT2 and ATM genes in 676 women with PCOS and 90 control women, we also measured oral glucose tolerance tests prior to treatment. Nonfunctional alleles were present in 29.8% and low-functional alleles in 57.9% of our PCOS cohort. OCT variants were significantly associated with elevated baseline and glucose-induced C-peptide levels in PCOS. Metformin bad responders or nonresponders based on OCT genotypes might be relevant in clinical practice - their modulation of metformin pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and metformin-independent glucose effects remain to be elucidated.

  12. The acylphosphatase (Acyp) alleles associate with male hybrid sterility in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, Pawel; Ma, Daina

    2008-06-15

    Hybrid defects are believed to result from genetic incompatibilities between genes that have evolved in separate parental lineages. These genetic dysfunctions on the hybrid genomic background, also known as Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities, can be an incipient signature of speciation, and as such - a subject of active research. Here we present evidence that Acyp locus (CG16870) that encodes acylphosphatase, a small enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of acylphosphates and participates in ion transport across biological membranes, is involved in genetic incompatibilities leading to male sterility in hybrids between Drosophila simulans and D. mauritiana. There is a strong association between Acyp alleles (genotype) and the sterility/fertility pattern (phenotype), as well as between the phenotype, the genotype and its transcriptional activity. Allele-specific expression in hybrids heterozygous for Acyp suggests a cis-type regulation of this gene, where an allele from one of the parental species (D. simulans) is consistently overexpressed.

  13. Analysis of Variance Components for Genetic Markers with Unphased Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    An ANOVA type general multi-allele (GMA) model was proposed in Wang (2014) on analysis of variance components for quantitative trait loci or genetic markers with phased or unphased genotypes. In this study, by applying the GMA model, we further examine estimation of the genetic variance components for genetic markers with unphased genotypes based on a random sample from a study population. In one locus and two loci cases, we first derive the least square estimates (LSE) of model parameters in fitting the GMA model. Then we construct estimators of the genetic variance components for one marker locus in a Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium population and two marker loci in an equilibrium population. Meanwhile, we explore the difference between the classical general linear model (GLM) and GMA based approaches in association analysis of genetic markers with quantitative traits. We show that the GMA model can retain the same partition on the genetic variance components as the traditional Fisher's ANOVA model, while the GLM cannot. We clarify that the standard F-statistics based on the partial reductions in sums of squares from GLM for testing the fixed allelic effects could be inadequate for testing the existence of the variance component when allelic interactions are present. We point out that the GMA model can reduce the confounding between the allelic effects and allelic interactions at least for independent alleles. As a result, the GMA model could be more beneficial than GLM for detecting allelic interactions.

  14. Tri-allelic pattern of short tandem repeats identifies the murderer among identical twins and suggests an embryonic mutational origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Feng; Yang, Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Nan; Quan, Xiao-Liang; Wu, Yuan-Ming

    2015-05-01

    Monozygotic twins can be co-identified by genotyping of short tandem repeats (STRs); however, for distinguishing them, STR genotyping is ineffective, especially in the case of murder. Here, a rarely occurring tri-allelic pattern in the vWA locus (16, 18, 19) was identified only in the DNA of one identical twin, which could help to exonerate the innocent twin in a murder charge. This mutation was defined as primary through genotyping of the family and could be detected in blood, buccal and semen samples from the individual; however, two alternative allele-balanced di-allelic patterns (16, 18 or 16, 19) were detected in hair root sheath cells. Such a kind of segregation indicates a one-step mutation occurs in cell mitosis, which is after embryonic zygote formation and during the early development of the individual after the division of the blastocyte. Sequencing revealed the insertion between the allele 18 and 19 is a repeat unit of TAGA/TCTA (plus/minus strand), which belongs to "AGAT/ATCT"-based core repeats identified from all tri-allelic pattern reports recorded in the STR base and a detailed model was proposed for STR repeat length variation caused by false priming during DNA synthesis. Our model illustrates the possible origination of allele-balanced and unbalanced tri-allelic pattern, clarifies that the genotypes of parent-child mismatches, aberrant di-allelic patterns, and type 1 or 2 tri-allelic patterns should be considered as independent, but interconnected forms of STR mutation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Noninvasive Genotyping and Mendelian Analysis of Microsatellites in African Savannah Elephants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okello, John Bosco A.; Wittemyer, G.; Rasmussen, H. B.;

    2005-01-01

    mismatch error rate of 2.06%, a possible result of null alleles, mutations, genotyping errors, or inaccuracy in maternity assignment. We detected no evidence for large allele dropout, stuttering, or scoring error in the dataset and significant Hardy-Weinberg deviations at only two loci due...

  16. Changes in disease gene frequency over time with differential genotype fitness and various control strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, P.N.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    A spreadsheet model was constructed to describe the change in allelic frequency over time for a lethal recessive mutation in an animal population. The model allowed relative fitness to differ between genotypes, between sexes, and over time. Whereas a lethal recessive allele is naturally eliminated v

  17. Multicenter collaborative study for standardization of Candida albicans genotyping using a polymorphic microsatellite marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Hermoso, Dea; MacCallum, Donna M; Lott, Timothy J; Sampaio, Paula; Serna, Maria-José Buitrago; Grenouillet, Fréderic; Klaassen, Corné H W; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2010-07-01

    Microsatellite-based genotyping for Candida albicans can give discrepant results between laboratories when expressed in fragment sizes, because their determination depends on electrophoretic conditions. The interlaboratory reproducibility was assessed in six laboratories provided with an allelic ladder. Despite variations in size determinations, alleles were correctly assigned, making data transportable between laboratories.

  18. Changes in disease gene frequency over time with differential genotypic fitness and various control strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, P.N.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.; Arendonk, J.A.M. van

    2006-01-01

    A spreadsheet model was constructed to describe the change in allelic frequency over time for a lethal recessive mutation in an animal population. The model allowed relative fitness to differ between genotypes, between sexes, and over time. Whereas a lethal recessive allele is naturally eliminated v

  19. Allele-specific amplification and electrochemiluminescence method for single nucleotide polymorphism analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new approach combined the specificity of allele-specific amplification (ASA) with the sensitivity of electrochemiluminescence (ECL) assay for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis was proposed. Briefly, target gene was amplified by a biotin-labeled allele-specific forward primer and a Ru(bpy)32+ (TBR)-labeled universal reverse primer. Then, the amplicon was captured onto streptavidin-coated paramagnetic beads through biotin label, and detected by measuring the ECL signal of TBR label. Different genotypes were distinguished according to the ECL values of the amplicons by different genotypic primers. K-ras oncogene was used as a target to validate the feasibility of the method. The experiment results show that the different genotypes can be clearly distinguished by ASA-ECL assay. The method is useful in SNP analysis due to its sensitivity,safety, and simplicity.(C) 2007 Da Xing. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Genomic evaluations with many more genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiggans George R

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic evaluations in Holstein dairy cattle have quickly become more reliable over the last two years in many countries as more animals have been genotyped for 50,000 markers. Evaluations can also include animals genotyped with more or fewer markers using new tools such as the 777,000 or 2,900 marker chips recently introduced for cattle. Gains from more markers can be predicted using simulation, whereas strategies to use fewer markers have been compared using subsets of actual genotypes. The overall cost of selection is reduced by genotyping most animals at less than the highest density and imputing their missing genotypes using haplotypes. Algorithms to combine different densities need to be efficient because numbers of genotyped animals and markers may continue to grow quickly. Methods Genotypes for 500,000 markers were simulated for the 33,414 Holsteins that had 50,000 marker genotypes in the North American database. Another 86,465 non-genotyped ancestors were included in the pedigree file, and linkage disequilibrium was generated directly in the base population. Mixed density datasets were created by keeping 50,000 (every tenth of the markers for most animals. Missing genotypes were imputed using a combination of population haplotyping and pedigree haplotyping. Reliabilities of genomic evaluations using linear and nonlinear methods were compared. Results Differing marker sets for a large population were combined with just a few hours of computation. About 95% of paternal alleles were determined correctly, and > 95% of missing genotypes were called correctly. Reliability of breeding values was already high (84.4% with 50,000 simulated markers. The gain in reliability from increasing the number of markers to 500,000 was only 1.6%, but more than half of that gain resulted from genotyping just 1,406 young bulls at higher density. Linear genomic evaluations had reliabilities 1.5% lower than the nonlinear evaluations with 50

  1. Partial loss-of-function alleles reveal a role for GNOM in auxin transport-related, post-embryonic development of Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geldner, Niko; Richter, Sandra; Vieten, Anne

    2004-01-01

    characterised newly isolated weak gnom alleles as well as trans-heterozygotes of complementing strong alleles. These genotypes form a phenotypic series of GNOM activity in post-embryonic development, with auxin-related defects, especially in the maintenance of primary root meristem activity...

  2. SEQUENCE OF THE STRUCTURAL GENE FOR GRANULE-BOUND STARCH SYNTHASE OF POTATO (SOLANUM-TUBEROSUM L) AND EVIDENCE FOR A SINGLE POINT DELETION IN THE AMF ALLELE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Leij, Feike R.; VISSER, RGF; Ponstein, Anne S.; Jacobsen, Evert; Feenstra, Willem

    1991-01-01

    The genomic sequence of the potato gene for starch granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS; "waxy protein") has been determined for the wild-type allele of a monoploid genotype from which an amylose-free (amf) mutant was derived, and for the mutant part of the amf allele. Comparison of the wild-type seq

  3. How to Write a Lost Property

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慧明

    2004-01-01

    寻物启事(Lost Property)是一种应用文体:考试时不常出现。LostProperty有两个意思。一是寻物启事。即失主丢失东西后,写的寻物启事。通常是一个表格。下面写上Please contact the owner if you foundany of the things listed 或 Please telephone the person(s) listed if you have foundany of the things shown on

  4. Filaggrin null alleles are not associated with hand eczema or contact allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørkov, Anne Lerbæk; Bisgaard, H; Agner, T;

    2007-01-01

    association with hand eczema or contact allergy are unexplored. OBJECTIVES: To explore associations between the variant alleles, hand eczema, contact allergy and atopic dermatitis. METHODS: In total, 183 adult individuals participated in a clinical examination of the hands, patch testing and filaggrin...... genotyping. Children without any evidence of atopic dermatitis from the Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC) study were used as controls. The chi(2) test was used for comparison of allele frequencies. RESULTS: The majority (73%) had hand eczema, 25% had contact allergy and 14% had...... a diagnosis of atopic dermatitis. The association between atopic dermatitis and the filaggrin variant alleles was confirmed (odds ratio 3.5, P = 0.015). Allele frequencies in individuals with hand eczema or contact allergy were not statistically significantly increased. CONCLUSION: There is no association...

  5. Using multi-locus allelic sequence data to estimate genetic divergence among four Lilium (Liliaceae) cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, Arwa; Smulders, Marinus J M; van Tuyl, Jaap M; Arens, Paul; Bakker, Freek T

    2014-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) may enable estimating relationships among genotypes using allelic variation of multiple nuclear genes simultaneously. We explored the potential and caveats of this strategy in four genetically distant Lilium cultivars to estimate their genetic divergence from transcriptome sequences using three approaches: POFAD (Phylogeny of Organisms from Allelic Data, uses allelic information of sequence data), RAxML (Randomized Accelerated Maximum Likelihood, tree building based on concatenated consensus sequences) and Consensus Network (constructing a network summarizing among gene tree conflicts). Twenty six gene contigs were chosen based on the presence of orthologous sequences in all cultivars, seven of which also had an orthologous sequence in Tulipa, used as out-group. The three approaches generated the same topology. Although the resolution offered by these approaches is high, in this case there was no extra benefit in using allelic information. We conclude that these 26 genes can be widely applied to construct a species tree for the genus Lilium.

  6. Using multi-locus allelic sequence data to estimate genetic divergence among four Lilium (Liliaceae cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arwa eShahin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Next Generation Sequencing (NGS may enable estimating relationships among genotypes using allelic variation of multiple nuclear genes simultaneously. We explored the potential and caveats of this strategy in four genetically distant Lilium cultivars to estimate their genetic divergence from transcriptome sequences using three approaches: POFAD (Phylogeny of Organisms from Allelic Data, uses allelic information of sequence data, RAxML (Randomized Accelerated Maximum Likelihood, tree building based on concatenated consensus sequences and Consensus Network (constructing a network summarizing among gene tree conflicts. Twenty six gene contigs were chosen based on the presence of orthologous sequences in all cultivars, seven of which also had an orthologous sequence in Tulipa, used as out-group. The three approaches generated the same topology. Although the resolution offered by these approaches is high, in this case there was no extra benefit in using allelic information. We conclude that these 26 genes can be widely applied to construct a species tree for the genus Lilium.

  7. Study on the association of BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles with clinical mastitis in Norwegian Red cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulberg, S; Heringstad, B; Guttersrud, O A; Olsaker, I

    2007-08-01

    Genotyping of bovine leucocyte antigen DRB3.2 (BoLA-DRB3.2) in a total of 523 Norwegian Red (NR) cows from two groups selected for high protein yield and low clinical mastitis, respectively, identified 27 previously reported BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles across the groups. Significant differences in BoLA-DRB3.2 allele frequencies were found between the selection groups. Alleles *13, *18, *22 and *27 had a significantly higher frequency in cows selected for low clinical mastitis, while alleles *3, *9, *11 and *26 had a higher frequency in cows selected for high protein yield. Associations between BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles and clinical mastitis were analysed based on mastitis data from 741,072 first-lactation NR cows, of which 452 were genotyped. Alleles *22 and *26 were found to be associated with increased clinical mastitis, while alleles *7, *11, *18 and *24 had a favourable effect on mastitis resistance. Contradictory results from different studies investigating associations between BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles and mastitis indicate that future studies should focus on associations of mastitis with BoLA haplotypes rather than with single BoLA genes.

  8. RFLP patterns of gliadin alleles in Triticum aestivum L.: implications for analysis of the organization and evolution of complex loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccino, P; Metakovsky, E V

    1995-02-01

    A correspondence between RFLP patterns and gliadin alleles at the Gli-1 and Gli-2 loci was established in a set of 70 common wheat (T.aestivum L.) cultivars using γ-gliadin (K32) and α-gliadin (pTU1) specific probes. All Gli-B1 and Gli-D1 alleles which differed in encoded γ-gliadins showed definite RFLP patterns after hybridization with the K32 probe. Two groups of Gli-B1 alleles, Gli-B1b-like and Gli-B1e-like, were identified, and these could originate from distinct genotypes of the presumptive donor of the B-genome. Intralocus recombination and/or gene conversion as well as small deletions, gene silencing and gene amplification were assumed to be responsible for the origin of new gliadin alleles. Silent γ-gliadin sequences were shown to exist in all of the genotypes studied. K32 also differentiated Gli-A1a from all other Gli-A1 alleles as well as the Gli-B11 allele in cultivars carrying the 1B/1R (wheat/rye) translocation. PTU1 was shown to recognize several Gli-A2 alleles, but not the Gli-B2 or Gli-D2 alleles. Moreover, this probe hybridized to chromosome 1R sequences suggesting the existence of rye gene(s), probably silent, for α-gliadin-like proteins on chromosome 1R.

  9. HLA-DRB1 and -DRB3 allele frequencies and haplotypic associations in Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Eun Young; Park, Hyejin; Roh, Eun Youn; Park, Myoung Hee

    2004-03-01

    We have investigated the frequencies of human leukocyte antigen-DRB1 (HLA-DRB1) and -DRB3 alleles and DRB1-DRB3 haplotypic associations in 800 Koreans. DRB1 genotyping was done using polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific oligonucleotide (PCR-SSO) and PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) methods. DRB3 genotyping was done on 447 samples carrying DRB3-associated DRB1 alleles (DRB1*03, *11, *12, *13, and *14) using PCR-SSCP method. The allele frequencies of DRB3*0101, DRB3*0202, and DRB3*0301 were 0.073, 0.136, and 0.120, respectively, and we found one case of a probable new allele (DRB3*01new, 0.001). DRB1-DRB3 haplotypes with frequency (HF) > 0.005 exhibited strong associations between DRB3*0101 and DRB1*1201, *1301, and *1403; between DRB3*0301 and DRB1*1202 and *1302; between DRB3*0202 and DRB1*0301, *1101, *1401, *1405, and *1406 alleles. Most of the DRB1 alleles with frequency > 0.005 were exclusively associated with particular DRB3 alleles with relative linkage disequilibrium values of 1.0, except for DRB1*1201, *1202 and *1301; the rare presence (HF DRB3*0202 associations were observed for these DRB1 alleles. We also investigated and presented rare DRB1-DRB3 associations in additional 6000 Koreans. Comparison with other ethnic groups revealed that DRB1*0301 and *1301 related DRB1-DRB3 haplotypes vary among different populations, in that Koreans and other Asian populations show less diversity compared with Caucasoids or African Americans.

  10. Major histocompatibility complex class I chain related (MIC) A gene, TNFa microsatellite alleles and TNFB alleles in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients from Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina Zake, Liene; Cimdina, Ija; Rumba, Ingrida; Dabadghao, Preethi; Sanjeevi, Carani B

    2002-05-01

    In order to analyze involvement of major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) and tumor necrosis factor a (TNFa) microsatellite polymorphisms as well as TNFB gene in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), we studied 128 patients divided into groups according to clinical features [monoarthritis (n = 14), oligoarthritis (n = 58), polyarthritis (n = 50), and systemic (n = 6)], and 114 age- and sex-matched healthy controls from Latvia. DNA samples were amplified with specific primers and used for genotyping of MICA and TNFa microsatellite. Typing for a biallelic NcoI polymerase chain reaction RFLP polymorphism located at the first intron of TNFB gene was done as follows: restriction digests generated fragments of 555bp and 185bp for TNFB*1 allele, and 740bp for TNFB*2 allele. The results were compared between cases and controls. We found significant increase of MICA allele A4 (p = 0.009; odds ratio [OR] = 2.3) and allele TNFa2 (p = 0.0001; OR = 4.4) in patients compared with controls. The frequency of allele TNFa9 was significantly decreased (p = 0.0001; OR = 0.1) in patients with JIA. No significant differences of TNFB allele frequency were found. Our data suggest that MICA and TNFa microsatellite polymorphisms may be used as markers for determination of susceptibility and protection from JIA.

  11. Genotyping of FCN and MBL2 Polymorphisms Using Pyrosequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munthe-Fog, Lea; Madsen, Hans Ole; Garred, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Pyrosequencing represents one of the most thorough methods used to analyze polymorphisms. One advantage of using pyrosequencing for genotyping is the ability to identify not only single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) but also tri-allelic variations, insertions and deletions (InDels). In contrast...

  12. Tracing pastoralist migrations to southern Africa with lactase persistence alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macholdt, Enrico; Lede, Vera; Barbieri, Chiara; Mpoloka, Sununguko W; Chen, Hua; Slatkin, Montgomery; Pakendorf, Brigitte; Stoneking, Mark

    2014-04-14

    Although southern African Khoisan populations are often assumed to have remained largely isolated during prehistory, there is growing evidence for a migration of pastoralists from eastern Africa some 2,000 years ago, prior to the arrival of Bantu-speaking populations in southern Africa. Eastern Africa harbors distinctive lactase persistence (LP) alleles, and therefore LP alleles in southern African populations may be derived from this eastern African pastoralist migration. We sequenced the lactase enhancer region in 457 individuals from 18 Khoisan and seven Bantu-speaking groups from Botswana, Namibia, and Zambia and additionally genotyped four short tandem repeat (STR) loci that flank the lactase enhancer region. We found nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms, of which the most frequent is -14010(∗)C, which was previously found to be associated with LP in Kenya and Tanzania and to exhibit a strong signal of positive selection. This allele occurs in significantly higher frequency in pastoralist groups and in Khoe-speaking groups in our study, supporting the hypothesis of a migration of eastern African pastoralists that was primarily associated with Khoe speakers. Moreover, we find a signal of ongoing positive selection in all three pastoralist groups in our study, as well as (surprisingly) in two foraging groups.

  13. Molecular strain typing of Brucella abortus isolates from Italy by two VNTR allele sizing technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, Riccardo; Ancora, Massimo; De Massis, Fabrizio; Ciammaruconi, Andrea; Zilli, Katiuscia; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta; Pittiglio, Valentina; Fillo, Silvia; Lista, Florigio

    2013-10-01

    Brucellosis, one of the most important re-emerging zoonoses in many countries, is caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Brucella. Furthermore these bacteria represent potential biological warfare agents and the identification of species and biovars of field strains may be crucial for tracing back source of infection, allowing to discriminate naturally occurring outbreaks instead of bioterrorist events. In the last years, multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) has been proposed as complement of the classical biotyping methods and it has been applied for genotyping large collections of Brucella spp. At present, the MLVA band profiles may be resolved by automated or manual procedures. The Lab on a chip technology represents a valid alternative to standard genotyping techniques (as agarose gel electrophoresis) and it has been previously used for Brucella genotyping. Recently, a new high-throughput genotyping analysis system based on capillary gel electrophoresis, the QIAxcel, has been described. The aim of the study was to evaluate the ability of two DNA sizing equipments, the QIAxcel System and the Lab chip GX, to correctly call alleles at the sixteen loci including one frequently used MLVA assay for Brucella genotyping. The results confirmed that these technologies represent a meaningful advancement in high-throughput Brucella genotyping. Considering the accuracy required to confidently resolve loci discrimination, QIAxcel shows a better ability to measure VNTR allele sizes compared to LabChip GX.

  14. Modeling Being "Lost": Imperfect Situation Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Victor E.

    2011-01-01

    Being "lost" is an exemplar of imperfect Situation Awareness/Situation Understanding (SA/SU) -- information/knowledge that is uncertain, incomplete, and/or just wrong. Being "lost" may be a geo-spatial condition - not knowing/being wrong about where to go or how to get there. More broadly, being "lost" can serve as a metaphor for uncertainty and/or inaccuracy - not knowing/being wrong about how one fits into a larger world view, what one wants to do, or how to do it. This paper discusses using agent based modeling (ABM) to explore imperfect SA/SU, simulating geo-spatially "lost" intelligent agents trying to navigate in a virtual world. Each agent has a unique "mental map" -- its idiosyncratic view of its geo-spatial environment. Its decisions are based on this idiosyncratic view, but behavior outcomes are based on ground truth. Consequently, the rate and degree to which an agent's expectations diverge from ground truth provide measures of that agent's SA/SU.

  15. 'Lost' Ladybugs Found Again in South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this article is to give a first-person account of involvement in research directly related to the NSF-sponsored Lost Ladybug Project. I have summarized research findings in in which three previously common kinds of lady beetles have become difficult to detect in eastern states, but c...

  16. Lost-sales inventory theory : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijvank, Marco; Vis, Iris F. A.

    2011-01-01

    In classic inventory models it is common to assume that excess demand is backordered. However, studies analyzing customer behavior in practice show that most unfulfilled demand is lost or an alternative item/location is looked for in many retail environments. Inventory systems that include this

  17. Determination of allele frequency in pooled DNA: comparison of three PCR-based methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkening, Stefan; Hemminki, Kari; Thirumaran, Ranjit Kumar; Bermejo, Justo Lorenzo; Bonn, Stefan; Försti, Asta; Kumar, Rajiv

    2005-12-01

    Determination of allele frequency in pooled DNA samples is a powerful and efficient tool for large-scale association studies. In this study, we tested and compared three PCR-based methods for accuracy, reproducibility, cost, and convenience. The methods compared were: (i) real-time PCR with allele-specific primers, (ii) real-time PCR with allele-specific TaqMan probes, and (iii) quantitative sequencing. Allele frequencies of three single nucleotide polymorphisms in three different genes were estimated from pooled DNA. The pools were made of genomic DNA samples from 96 cases with basal cell carcinoma of the skin and 96 healthy controls with known genotypes. In this study, the allele frequency estimation made by real-time PCR with allele-specific primers had the smallest median deviation (MD) from the real allele frequency with 1.12% (absolute percentage points) and was also the cheapest method. However; this method required the most time for optimization and showed the highest variation between replicates (SD = 6.47%). Quantitative sequencing, the simplest method, was found to have intermediate accuracies (MD = 1.44%, SD = 4.2%). Real-time PCR with TaqMan probes, a convenient but very expensive method, had an MD of 1.47% and the lowest variation between replicates (SD = 3.18%).

  18. Allelic discrimination in naturalized ovine from Pantanal Sul-Matogrossense by means of microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crispim Bruno do Amaral

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The molecular biology techniques that are used in allelic discrimination for individual and sheep breeds characterization are important tools in breeding programs and conservation of genetic resources. The use of microsatellite markers allows allelic differentiation, which in turn allows us to infer the genetic variability of sample populations. The study aimed to test the sensitivity and efficiency of fluorescent capillary electrophoresis, using microsatellite primers, for allelic discrimination of the Crioulo breed from Pantanal sul-matogrossense, as well as verify the possibility of using the products of sequencing in genetic variability analysis. For this test, were used blood samples from Pantaneira breed sheep. The allelic discrimination of eight microsatellites was determined by capillary electrophoresis in automatic sequencer and the results analyses were performed on the programs CERVUS and Dendro-UPGMA. The results indicated the possibility of using this technique for the individual genotyping of all loci tested in electrophoretic analysis and its potential to allelic discrimination even in case of difference between two pairs of bases between the alleles. The resulting dendrogram based on the distance matrix by the UPGMA assembly method, indicated medium similarity coefficient of 0.72 in the group of animals. It was concluded that there is the viability and efficiency of the microsatellite molecular markers technique using capillary electrophoresis for allelic discrimination and the utility of results for studies of genetic variability, paternity diagnosis and characterization of the Crioulo sheep herd from Pantanal sul-matogrossense.

  19. The Met-allele of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism enhances task switching in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, Patrick D; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus; Falkenstein, Michael; Beste, Christian

    2011-12-01

    In this study we examined the relevance of the functional brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphism as a modulator of task-switching performance in healthy elderly by using behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) measures. Task switching was examined in a cue-based and a memory-based paradigm. Val/Val carriers were generally slower, showed enhanced reaction time variability and higher error rates, particularly during memory-based task switching than the Met-allele individuals. On a neurophysiological level these dissociative effects were reflected by variations in the N2 and P3 ERP components. The task switch-related N2 was increased while the P3 was decreased in Met-allele carriers, while the Val/Val genotype group revealed the opposite pattern of results. In cue-based task-switching no behavioral and ERP differences were seen between the genotypes. These data suggest that superior memory-based task-switching performance in elderly Met-allele carriers may emerge due to more efficient response selection processes. The results implicate that under special circumstances the Met-allele renders cognitive processes more efficient than the Val/Val genotype in healthy elderly, corroborating recent findings in young subjects.

  20. Two-temperature LATE-PCR endpoint genotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reis Arthur H

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In conventional PCR, total amplicon yield becomes independent of starting template number as amplification reaches plateau and varies significantly among replicate reactions. This paper describes a strategy for reconfiguring PCR so that the signal intensity of a single fluorescent detection probe after PCR thermal cycling reflects genomic composition. The resulting method corrects for product yield variations among replicate amplification reactions, permits resolution of homozygous and heterozygous genotypes based on endpoint fluorescence signal intensities, and readily identifies imbalanced allele ratios equivalent to those arising from gene/chromosomal duplications. Furthermore, the use of only a single colored probe for genotyping enhances the multiplex detection capacity of the assay. Results Two-Temperature LATE-PCR endpoint genotyping combines Linear-After-The-Exponential (LATE-PCR (an advanced form of asymmetric PCR that efficiently generates single-stranded DNA and mismatch-tolerant probes capable of detecting allele-specific targets at high temperature and total single-stranded amplicons at a lower temperature in the same reaction. The method is demonstrated here for genotyping single-nucleotide alleles of the human HEXA gene responsible for Tay-Sachs disease and for genotyping SNP alleles near the human p53 tumor suppressor gene. In each case, the final probe signals were normalized against total single-stranded DNA generated in the same reaction. Normalization reduces the coefficient of variation among replicates from 17.22% to as little as 2.78% and permits endpoint genotyping with >99.7% accuracy. These assays are robust because they are consistent over a wide range of input DNA concentrations and give the same results regardless of how many cycles of linear amplification have elapsed. The method is also sufficiently powerful to distinguish between samples with a 1:1 ratio of two alleles from samples comprised of

  1. Two-temperature LATE-PCR endpoint genotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, J Aquiles; Abramowitz, Jessica D; Salk, Jesse J; Reis, Arthur H; Rice, John E; Pierce, Kenneth E; Wangh, Lawrence J

    2006-01-01

    Background In conventional PCR, total amplicon yield becomes independent of starting template number as amplification reaches plateau and varies significantly among replicate reactions. This paper describes a strategy for reconfiguring PCR so that the signal intensity of a single fluorescent detection probe after PCR thermal cycling reflects genomic composition. The resulting method corrects for product yield variations among replicate amplification reactions, permits resolution of homozygous and heterozygous genotypes based on endpoint fluorescence signal intensities, and readily identifies imbalanced allele ratios equivalent to those arising from gene/chromosomal duplications. Furthermore, the use of only a single colored probe for genotyping enhances the multiplex detection capacity of the assay. Results Two-Temperature LATE-PCR endpoint genotyping combines Linear-After-The-Exponential (LATE)-PCR (an advanced form of asymmetric PCR that efficiently generates single-stranded DNA) and mismatch-tolerant probes capable of detecting allele-specific targets at high temperature and total single-stranded amplicons at a lower temperature in the same reaction. The method is demonstrated here for genotyping single-nucleotide alleles of the human HEXA gene responsible for Tay-Sachs disease and for genotyping SNP alleles near the human p53 tumor suppressor gene. In each case, the final probe signals were normalized against total single-stranded DNA generated in the same reaction. Normalization reduces the coefficient of variation among replicates from 17.22% to as little as 2.78% and permits endpoint genotyping with >99.7% accuracy. These assays are robust because they are consistent over a wide range of input DNA concentrations and give the same results regardless of how many cycles of linear amplification have elapsed. The method is also sufficiently powerful to distinguish between samples with a 1:1 ratio of two alleles from samples comprised of 2:1 and 1:2 ratios of the

  2. Serotonin transporter genotype (5-HTTLPR predicts utilitarian moral judgments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail A Marsh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The psychological and neurobiological processes underlying moral judgment have been the focus of extensive recent research. Here we show that serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR genotype predicts responses to moral dilemmas featuring foreseen harm to an innocent. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Participants in this study judged the acceptability of actions that would unintentionally or intentionally harm an innocent victim in order to save others' lives. An analysis of variance revealed a genotype × scenario interaction, F(2, 63 = 4.52, p = .02. Results showed that, relative to long allele homozygotes (LL, carriers of the short (S allele showed particular reluctance to endorse utilitarian actions resulting in foreseen harm to an innocent individual. LL genotype participants rated perpetrating unintentional harm as more acceptable (M = 4.98, SEM = 0.20 than did SL genotype participants (M = 4.65, SEM = 0.20 or SS genotype participants (M = 4.29, SEM = 0.30. No group differences in moral judgments were observed in response to scenarios featuring intentional harm. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results indicate that inherited variants in a genetic polymorphism that influences serotonin neurotransmission influence utilitarian moral judgments as well. This finding is interpreted in light of evidence that the S allele is associated with elevated emotional responsiveness.

  3. SNPMClust: Bivariate Gaussian Genotype Clustering and Calling for Illumina Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen W. Erickson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available SNPMClust is an R package for genotype clustering and calling with Illumina microarrays. It was originally developed for studies using the GoldenGate custom genotyping platform but can be used with other Illumina platforms, including Infinium BeadChip. The algorithm first rescales the fluorescent signal intensity data, adds empirically derived pseudo-data to minor allele genotype clusters, then uses the package mclust for bivariate Gaussian model fitting. We compared the accuracy and sensitivity of SNPMClust to that of GenCall, Illumina's proprietary algorithm, on a data set of 94 whole-genome amplified buccal (cheek swab DNA samples. These samples were genotyped on a custom panel which included 1064 SNPs for which the true genotype was known with high confidence. SNPMClust produced uniformly lower false call rates over a wide range of overall call rates.

  4. The Lost Generation and its significance to American Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹剑波; 刘佳

    2007-01-01

    The Lost Generation is actually a group of American writers who were rebelling against what America had become by the 1900s. The Lost generation tendency and Lost generation writers are of great importance to the American and world literature. This article serves as a brief introduction to the Lost generation and its significant writers.

  5. Simultaneous SNP identification and assessment of allele-specific bias from ChIP-seq data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Yunyun

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have been associated with many aspects of human development and disease, and many non-coding SNPs associated with disease risk are presumed to affect gene regulation. We have previously shown that SNPs within transcription factor binding sites can affect transcription factor binding in an allele-specific and heritable manner. However, such analysis has relied on prior whole-genome genotypes provided by large external projects such as HapMap and the 1000 Genomes Project. This requirement limits the study of allele-specific effects of SNPs in primary patient samples from diseases of interest, where complete genotypes are not readily available. Results In this study, we show that we are able to identify SNPs de novo and accurately from ChIP-seq data generated in the ENCODE Project. Our de novo identified SNPs from ChIP-seq data are highly concordant with published genotypes. Independent experimental verification of more than 100 sites estimates our false discovery rate at less than 5%. Analysis of transcription factor binding at de novo identified SNPs revealed widespread heritable allele-specific binding, confirming previous observations. SNPs identified from ChIP-seq datasets were significantly enriched for disease-associated variants, and we identified dozens of allele-specific binding events in non-coding regions that could distinguish between disease and normal haplotypes. Conclusions Our approach combines SNP discovery, genotyping and allele-specific analysis, but is selectively focused on functional regulatory elements occupied by transcription factors or epigenetic marks, and will therefore be valuable for identifying the functional regulatory consequences of non-coding SNPs in primary disease samples.

  6. CYP2D6 allele distribution in Macedonians, Albanians and Romanies in the Republic of Macedonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmanovska, M; Dimishkovska, M; Maleva Kostovska, I; Noveski, P; Sukarova Stefanovska, E; Plaseska-Karanfilska, D

    2015-12-01

    Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is an enzyme of great importance for the metabolism of clinically used drugs. More than 100 variants of the CYP2D6 gene have been identified so far. The aim of this study was to investigate the allele distribution of CYP2D6 gene variants in 100 individuals of each of the Macedonian, Albanian and Romany population, by genotyping using long range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and a multiplex single base extension method. The most frequent variants and almost equally distributed in the three groups were the fully functional alleles *1 and *2. The most common non functional allele in all groups was *4 that was found in 22.5% of the Albanians. The most common allele with decreased activity was *41 which was found in 23.0% of the Romany ethnic group, in 11.0% of the Macedonians and in 10.5% of the Albanians. Seven percent of the Albanians, 6.0% of the Romani and 4.0% of the Macedonians were poor metabolizers, while 5.0% of the Macedonians, 1.0% of Albanians and 1.0% of the Romanies were ultrarapid metabolizers. We concluded that the CYP2D6 gene locus is highly heterogeneous in these groups and that the prevalence of the CYP2D6 allele variants and genotypes in the Republic of Macedonia is in accordance with that of other European populations.

  7. Apolipoprotein E4 allele and the risk of left ventricular dysfunction in thalassemia major

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    M Bazrgar

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Left ventricular (LV failure is the main cause of death in thalassemia. Iron overload in thesepatients leads to formation of oxygen free radicals. Apolipoprotein (ApoE E4 allele is the least efficient inoxidative stress condition compared with apoE2 and apoE3 alleles. This study was performed to determinethe association of three different ApoE alleles with LV dysfunction in thalassemia major patients in southernIran.Methods: The present study comprised 202 patients with thalassemia major divided into three groups accordingto echocardiographic findings: Group 1 (n=135 had no cardiac impairment; Group 2 (n=38 exhibitedLV dilatation but normal LV systolic function and Group 3 (n=29 showed LV systolic dysfunction.DNA was obtained from all patients and 198 healthy control subjects for ApoE genotyping.Results: Frequency of both apoE3/E4 genotype and apoE4 allele in Group 3 were higher than the controlgroup with corresponding values of P<0.05, Odds Ratio=2.97, 1.06<8.32 and P<0.01, OR=3.01,1.15<7.69, respectively and confidence Interval of 95%. There were no differences observed betweencontrols and patient groups in relation to other genotype and allele frequencies. Interventricular septumthickness and LV end diastolic diameter in apoE4/- patients were more than those of apoE3/E3 patients.Conclusion: ApoE4 allele increases the risk of LV impairment in thalassemia major.

  8. HLA class II alleles and risk for peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetes patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmad Marzban; Javad Kiani; Mehrdad Hajilooi; Hamzeh Rezaei; Zohreh Kahramfar; Ghasem Solgi

    2016-01-01

    The potential impact of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype variations on development of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is not well determined. hTis study aimed to identify the association of HLA class II alleles with DPN in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. Totally 106 T2D patients, 49 with DPN and 57 without DPN, and 100 ethnic-matched healthy controls were analyzed. Both groups of the patients were matched based on sex, age, body mass index (BMI) and duration of T2D. Polyneuropathy was diagnosed using electrodiagnostic methods. HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 genotyping was performed in all subjects by the polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) method. T2D patients with DPN showed higher frequencies of HLA-DRB1*10 and DRB1*12 alleles compared to control group (P = 0.04). HLA-DQB1*02 allele and HLA-DRB1*07-DQB1*02 haplotype were associated with a decreased risk for developing DPN in T2D patients (P = 0.02 andP = 0.05 respectively). Also, patients with severe neurop-athy showed higher frequencies of DRB1*07 (P = 0.003) and DQB1*02 (P = 0.02) alleles than those with mild-to-moderate form of neuropathy. The distribution of DRB1 and DQB1 alleles and haplotypes were not statistically different between all patients and healthy controls. Our ifndings implicate a possible protective role of HLA-DQB1*02 allele and HLA-DRB1*07-DQB1*02 haplotype against development of peripheral neuropathy in T2D patients. Therefore, variations in HLA genotypes might be used as genetic markers for prediction and potentially management of neuropathy in T2D patients.

  9. Associations between the IL-4 -590 T allele and Plasmodium falciparum infection prevalence in asymptomatic Fulani of Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafa, Manijeh; Maiga, Bakary; Berzins, Klavs; Hayano, Masashi; Bereczky, Sandor; Dolo, Amagana; Daou, Modibo; Arama, Charles; Kouriba, Bourema; Färnert, Anna; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Troye-Blomberg, Marita

    2007-07-01

    In this study, we compared the genotype and allele frequencies of the IL-10 -1087 A/G and IL-4 -590 C/T single nucleotide polymorphisms in asymptomatic subjects of two sympatric ethnic tribes differing in susceptibility to malaria, the Fulani and the Dogon in Mali. The genotype data was correlated with ethnicity and malariometric indexes. A statistically significant inter-ethnic difference in allele and genotype frequency for both loci was noted (PDogon. Inter-ethnic differences in spleen rates, higher in the Fulani than the Dogon, were seen between T carriers (TT and CT) of both groups (PDogon. No associations between IL-10 genotypes and studied malariometric indexes were observed in any of the two communities.

  10. Inheritance of 15 microsatellites in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas: segregation and null allele identification for linkage analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Li; GUO Ximing; ZHANG Guofan

    2009-01-01

    Microsatellites were screened in a backcross family of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. Fifteen microsatellite loci were distinguishable and polymorphic with 6 types of allele-combinations. Null alleles were detected in 46.7% of loci, accounting for 11.7% of the total alleles. Four loci did not segregate in Mendelian Ratios. Three linkage groups were identified among 7 of the 15 segregating loci. Fluorescence-based automated capillary electrophoresis (ABI 310 Genetic Analyzer) that used to detect the microsatellite loci, has been proved a fast, precise, and reliable method in microsatellite genotyping.

  11. 78 FR 20146 - Lost Creek ISR, LLC, Lost Creek Uranium In-Situ Recovery Project, Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    ... COMMISSION Lost Creek ISR, LLC, Lost Creek Uranium In-Situ Recovery Project, Sweetwater County, Wyoming... in-situ recovery (ISR) of uranium at the Lost Creek Project in Sweetwater County, Wyoming. ADDRESSES.... Introduction Lost Creek ISR, LLC (LCI) is proposing to install two rotary vacuum dryers in the...

  12. Genotyping-in-Thousands by sequencing (GT-seq): A cost effective SNP genotyping method based on custom amplicon sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Nathan R; Harmon, Stephanie A; Narum, Shawn R

    2015-07-01

    Genotyping-in-Thousands by sequencing (GT-seq) is a method that uses next-generation sequencing of multiplexed PCR products to generate genotypes from relatively small panels (50-500) of targeted single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for thousands of individuals in a single Illumina HiSeq lane. This method uses only unlabelled oligos and PCR master mix in two thermal cycling steps for amplification of targeted SNP loci. During this process, sequencing adapters and dual barcode sequence tags are incorporated into the amplicons enabling thousands of individuals to be pooled into a single sequencing library. Post sequencing, reads from individual samples are split into individual files using their unique combination of barcode sequences. Genotyping is performed with a simple perl script which counts amplicon-specific sequences for each allele, and allele ratios are used to determine the genotypes. We demonstrate this technique by genotyping 2068 individual steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) samples with a set of 192 SNP markers in a single library sequenced in a single Illumina HiSeq lane. Genotype data were 99.9% concordant to previously collected TaqMan(™) genotypes at the same 192 loci, but call rates were slightly lower with GT-seq (96.4%) relative to Taqman (99.0%). Of the 192 SNPs, 187 were genotyped in ≥90% of the individual samples and only 3 SNPs were genotyped in <70% of samples. This study demonstrates amplicon sequencing with GT-seq greatly reduces the cost of genotyping hundreds of targeted SNPs relative to existing methods by utilizing a simple library preparation method and massive efficiency of scale.

  13. Genotype adaptability and stability

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    Dimitrijević Miodrag

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the primary concerns in breeding programs is a small genotype reaction to environmental factor variation for better usage of yield genetic potential. Particularly if one takes in consideration that yield could van greatly because of more and more variable meteorological conditions. Studies conducted to observe genotype and environmental relations relay on numerous mathematical models, but genotype behavior in various ecological conditions is not, still, precisely defined Major sources of variation influencing genotype behavior in different environments are genotype/environment interaction, genetic background and environmental conditions. These factors could play an important role in establishing growth regions for maximal realization of genotype genetic potential, as well as in selection of genotypes having better response to complex requirements of particular growth region. Stability, the genotype ability to perform high, uniform yield no meter of different environmental conditions, and adaptability, genotype ability to give uniform yield in a different environmental conditions, are two common terms used to define genotype reaction in a consequence of environmental changes. Most of the models dealing with stability and adaptability are based on variation sources appearing under the influence of treatment, multivariate effects and residue. No meter which statistical model is used for GE interaction estimation, there is an opinion that no solid proof for the existence of stable genotypes obtained in breeding programs, which make some space for further investigations. There are still questions to answer dealing with definitions, sources of variation, usage value of existent models and interpretation of the results. .

  14. Japan's lost decade: Lessons for other economies

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshino, Naoyuki; Taghizadeh-Hesary, Farhad

    2015-01-01

    Japan has suffered from sluggish economic growth and recession since the 1990s, a phenomenon dubbed "Japan's Lost Decade." The People's Republic of China, many countries in the eurozone, and the United States may face similar problems in future and they have been concerned by Japan's long-term recession. This paper will address why Japan's economy has stagnated since the bursting of its economic bubble. Our empirical analysis challenges the beliefs of some western economists, such as Paul Kru...

  15. Lost lake - restoration of a Carolina bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanlin, H.G.; McLendon, J.P. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology; Wike, L.D. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology]|[Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Technology Center; Dietsch, B.M. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology]|[Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Carolina bays are shallow wetland depressions found only on the Atlantic Coastal Plain. Although these isolated interstream wetlands support many types of communities, they share the common features of having a sandy margin, a fluctuating water level, an elliptical shape, and a northwest to southeast orientation. Lost Lake, an 11.3 hectare Carolina bay, was ditched and drained for agricultural production before establishment of the Savannah River Site in 1950. Later it received overflow from a seepage basin containing a variety of chemicals, primarily solvents and some heavy metals. In 1990 a plan was developed for the restoration of Lost Lake, and restoration activities were complete by mid-1991. Lost Lake is the first known project designed for the restoration and recovery of a Carolina bay. The bay was divided into eight soil treatment zones, allowing four treatments in duplicate. Each of the eight zones was planted with eight species of native wetland plants. Recolonization of the bay by amphibians and reptiles is being evaluated by using drift fences with pitfall traps and coverboard arrays in each of the treatment zones. Additional drift fences in five upland habitats were also established. Hoop turtle traps, funnel minnow traps, and dip nets were utilized for aquatic sampling. The presence of 43 species common to the region has been documented at Lost Lake. More than one-third of these species show evidence of breeding populations being established. Three species found prior to the restoration activity and a number of species common to undisturbed Carolina bays were not encountered. Colonization by additional species is anticipated as the wetland undergoes further succession.

  16. Microarray-based estimation of SNP allele-frequency in pooled DNA using the Langmuir kinetic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Bang-Ce

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High throughput genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for genome-wide association requires technologies for generating millions of genotypes with relative ease but also at a reasonable cost and with high accuracy. In this work, we have developed a theoretical approach to estimate allele frequency in pooled DNA samples, based on the physical principles of DNA immobilization and hybridization on solid surface using the Langmuir kinetic model and quantitative analysis of the allelic signals. Results This method can successfully distinguish allele frequencies differing by 0.01 in the actual pool of clinical samples, and detect alleles with a frequency as low as 2%. The accuracy of measuring known allele frequencies is very high, with the strength of correlation between measured and actual frequencies having an r2 = 0.9992. These results demonstrated that this method could allow the accurate estimation of absolute allele frequencies in pooled samples of DNA in a feasible and inexpensive way. Conclusion We conclude that this novel strategy for quantitative analysis of the ratio of SNP allelic sequences in DNA pools is an inexpensive and feasible alternative for detecting polymorphic differences in candidate gene association studies and genome-wide linkage disequilibrium scans.

  17. Allele-specific enzymatic amplification of beta-globin genomic DNA for diagnosis of sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D Y; Ugozzoli, L; Pal, B K; Wallace, R B

    1989-04-01

    A rapid nonradioactive approach to the diagnosis of sickle cell anemia is described based on an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (ASPCR). This method allows direct detection of the normal or the sickle cell beta-globin allele in genomic DNA without additional steps of probe hybridization, ligation, or restriction enzyme cleavage. Two allele-specific oligonucleotide primers, one specific for the sickle cell allele and one specific for the normal allele, together with another primer complementary to both alleles were used in the polymerase chain reaction with genomic DNA templates. The allele-specific primers differed from each other in their terminal 3' nucleotide. Under the proper annealing temperature and polymerase chain reaction conditions, these primers only directed amplification on their complementary allele. In a single blind study of DNA samples from 12 individuals, this method correctly and unambiguously allowed for the determination of the genotypes with no false negatives or positives. If ASPCR is able to discriminate all allelic variation (both transition and transversion mutations), this method has the potential to be a powerful approach for genetic disease diagnosis, carrier screening, HLA typing, human gene mapping, forensics, and paternity testing.

  18. The lost art of finding our way

    CERN Document Server

    Huth, Edward John

    2013-01-01

    Long before GPS, Google Earth, and global transit, humans traveled vast distances using only environmental clues and simple instruments. John Huth asks what is lost when modern technology substitutes for our innate capacity to find our way. Encyclopedic in breadth, weaving together astronomy, meteorology, oceanography, and ethnography, The Lost Art of Finding Our Way puts us in the shoes, ships, and sleds of early navigators for whom paying close attention to the environment around them was, quite literally, a matter of life and death. Haunted by the fate of two young kayakers lost in a fogbank off Nantucket, Huth shows us how to navigate using natural phenomena—the way the Vikings used the sunstone to detect polarization of sunlight, and Arab traders learned to sail into the wind, and Pacific Islanders used underwater lightning and “read” waves to guide their explorations. Huth reminds us that we are all navigators capable of learning techniques ranging from the simplest to the most sophisticated skil...

  19. APOL1 null alleles from a rural village in India do not correlate with glomerulosclerosis.

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    Duncan B Johnstone

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Among African-Americans, genome wide association revealed a strong correlation between the G1 and G2 alleles of APOL1 (apolipoproteinL1, also called trypanolytic factor and kidney diseases including focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis, HIV-associated nephropathy and hypertensive nephrosclerosis. In the prevailing hypothesis, heterozygous APOL1 G1 and G2 alleles increase resistance against Trypanosoma that cause African sleeping sickness, resulting in positive selection of these alleles, but when homozygous the G1 and G2 alleles predispose to glomerulosclerosis. While efforts are underway to screen patients for G1 and G2 alleles and to better understand "APOL1 glomerulopathy," no data prove that these APOL1 sequence variants cause glomerulosclerosis. G1 and G2 correlate best with glomerulosclerosis as recessive alleles, which suggests a loss of function mutation for which proof of causality is commonly tested with homozygous null alleles. This test cannot be performed in rodents as the APOL gene cluster evolved only in primates. However, there is a homozygous APOL1 null human being who lives in a village in rural India. This individual and his family offer a unique opportunity to test causality between APOL1 null alleles and glomerulosclerosis. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We obtained clinical data, blood and urine from this APOL1 null patient and 50 related villagers. Based on measurements of blood pressure, BUN, creatinine, albuminuria, genotyping and immunoblotting, this APOL1 null individual does not have glomerulosclerosis, nor do his relatives who carry APOL1 null alleles. CONCLUSIONS: This small study cannot provide definitive conclusions but the absence of glomerulosclerosis in this unique population is consistent with the possibility that African-American glomerulosclerosis is caused, not by loss of APOL1 function, but by other mechanisms including a subtle gain of function or by the "genetic hitchhiking" of deleterious mutations

  20. A majority of Huntington's disease patients may be treatable by individualized allele-specific RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Maria Stella; Jaspers, Leonie; Spronkmans, Christine; Gellera, Cinzia; Taroni, Franco; Di Maria, Emilio; Donato, Stefano Di; Kaemmerer, William F

    2009-06-01

    Use of RNA interference to reduce huntingtin protein (htt) expression in affected brain regions may provide an effective treatment for Huntington disease (HD), but it remains uncertain whether suppression of both wild-type and mutant alleles in a heterozygous patient will provide more benefit than harm. Previous research has shown suppression of just the mutant allele is achievable using siRNA targeted to regions of HD mRNA containing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). To determine whether more than a minority of patients may be eligible for an allele-specific therapy, we genotyped DNA from 327 unrelated European Caucasian HD patients at 26 SNP sites in the HD gene. Over 86% of the patients were found to be heterozygous for at least one SNP among those tested. Because the sites are genetically linked, one cannot use the heterozygosity rates of the individual SNPs to predict how many sites (and corresponding allele-specific siRNA) would be needed to provide at least one treatment possibility for this percentage of patients. By computing all combinations, we found that a repertoire of allele-specific siRNA corresponding to seven sites can provide at least one allele-specific siRNA treatment option for 85.6% of our sample. Moreover, we provide evidence that allele-specific siRNA targeting these sites are readily identifiable using a high throughput screening method, and that allele-specific siRNA identified using this method indeed show selective suppression of endogenous mutant htt protein in fibroblast cells from HD patients. Therefore, allele-specific siRNA are not so rare as to be impractical to find and use therapeutically.

  1. Reliability assessment of null allele detection: inconsistencies between and within different methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowski, M J; Pilot, M; Kruczyk, M; Żmihorski, M; Umer, H M; Gliwicz, J

    2014-03-01

    Microsatellite loci are widely used in population genetic studies, but the presence of null alleles may lead to biased results. Here, we assessed five methods that indirectly detect null alleles and found large inconsistencies among them. Our analysis was based on 20 microsatellite loci genotyped in a natural population of Microtus oeconomus sampled during 8 years, together with 1200 simulated populations without null alleles, but experiencing bottlenecks of varying duration and intensity, and 120 simulated populations with known null alleles. In the natural population, 29% of positive results were consistent between the methods in pairwise comparisons, and in the simulated data set, this proportion was 14%. The positive results were also inconsistent between different years in the natural population. In the null-allele-free simulated data set, the number of false positives increased with increased bottleneck intensity and duration. We also found a low concordance in null allele detection between the original simulated populations and their 20% random subsets. In the populations simulated to include null alleles, between 22% and 42% of true null alleles remained undetected, which highlighted that detection errors are not restricted to false positives. None of the evaluated methods clearly outperformed the others when both false-positive and false-negative rates were considered. Accepting only the positive results consistent between at least two methods should considerably reduce the false-positive rate, but this approach may increase the false-negative rate. Our study demonstrates the need for novel null allele detection methods that could be reliably applied to natural populations.

  2. A simple and rapid approach for screening of SARS-coronavirus genotypes: an evaluation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Yongjie

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS was a newly emerged infectious disease which caused a global epidemic in 2002–2003. Sequence analysis of SARS-coronavirus isolates revealed that specific genotypes predominated at different periods of the epidemic. This information can be used as a footprint for tracing the epidemiology of infections and monitor viral evolution. However, direct sequencing analysis of a large number of clinical samples is cumbersome and time consuming. We present here a simple and rapid assay for the screening of SARS-coronavirus genotypes based on the use of fluorogenic oligonucleotide probes for allelic discrimination. Methods Thirty SARS patients were recruited. Allelic discrimination assays were developed based on the use of fluorogenic oligonucleotide probes (TaqMan. Genotyping of the SARS-coronavirus isolates obtained from these patients were carried out by the allelic discrimination assays and confirmed by direct sequencing. Results Genotyping based on the allelic discrimination assays were fully concordant with direct sequencing. All of the 30 SARS-coronavirus genotypes studied were characteristic of genotypes previously documented to be associated with the latter part of the epidemic. Seven of the isolates contained a previously reported major deletion but in patients not epidemiologically related to the previously studied cohort. Conclusion We have developed a simple and accurate method for the characterization and screening of SARS-coronavirus genotypes. It is a promising tool for the study of epidemiological relationships between documented cases during an outbreak.

  3. Allele dropout caused by a non-primer-site SNV affecting PCR amplification--a call for next-generation primer design algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Ching-wan; Mak, Chloe Miu

    2013-06-05

    PCR-based technology is indispensable for genetic diagnosis. On the other hand, allele dropout is one significant cause of genotyping errors. Most allele dropout mechanisms are related to annealing failure caused by single nucleotide variant (SNV) situated inside the primer sequences. Here, we demonstrate a novel allele dropout mechanism caused by a non-primer-binding-site SNV. We demonstrate that the apparent homozygosity of NM_000137.1(FAH):c.1035_1037del was caused by allele dropout. The non-primer-binding-site SNV causes a strong secondary hairpin structure formation of the PCR products and leads to amplification failure. SNV check of the primer sequences per se during primer design is not adequate to avoid allele dropout. The next-generation primer design software should analyze the secondary structure of primers and template sequence taking SNV in both sequences into account in order to avoid genotyping errors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Diversity Outbred Mice at 21: Maintaining Allelic Variation in the Face of Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elissa J. Chesler

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Multi-parent populations (MPPs capture and maintain the genetic diversity from multiple inbred founder strains to provide a resource for high-resolution genetic mapping through the accumulation of recombination events over many generations. Breeding designs that maintain a large effective population size with randomized assignment of breeders at each generation can minimize the impact of selection, inbreeding, and genetic drift on allele frequencies. Small deviations from expected allele frequencies will have little effect on the power and precision of genetic analysis, but a major distortion could result in reduced power and loss of important functional alleles. We detected strong transmission ratio distortion in the Diversity Outbred (DO mouse population on chromosome 2, caused by meiotic drive favoring transmission of the WSB/EiJ allele at the R2d2 locus. The distorted region harbors thousands of polymorphisms derived from the seven non-WSB founder strains and many of these would be lost if the sweep was allowed to continue. To ensure the utility of the DO population to study genetic variation on chromosome 2, we performed an artificial selection against WSB/EiJ alleles at the R2d2 locus. Here, we report that we have purged the WSB/EiJ allele from the drive locus while preserving WSB/EiJ alleles in the flanking regions. We observed minimal disruption to allele frequencies across the rest of the autosomal genome. However, there was a shift in haplotype frequencies of the mitochondrial genome and an increase in the rate of an unusual sex chromosome aneuploidy. The DO population has been restored to genome-wide utility for genetic analysis, but our experience underscores that vigilant monitoring of similar genetic resource populations is needed to ensure their long-term utility.

  5. Early detection of nonnative alleles in fish populations: When sample size actually matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croce, Patrick Della; Poole, Geoffrey C.; Payne, Robert A.; Gresswell, Bob

    2017-01-01

    Reliable detection of nonnative alleles is crucial for the conservation of sensitive native fish populations at risk of introgression. Typically, nonnative alleles in a population are detected through the analysis of genetic markers in a sample of individuals. Here we show that common assumptions associated with such analyses yield substantial overestimates of the likelihood of detecting nonnative alleles. We present a revised equation to estimate the likelihood of detecting nonnative alleles in a population with a given level of admixture. The new equation incorporates the effects of the genotypic structure of the sampled population and shows that conventional methods overestimate the likelihood of detection, especially when nonnative or F-1 hybrid individuals are present. Under such circumstances—which are typical of early stages of introgression and therefore most important for conservation efforts—our results show that improved detection of nonnative alleles arises primarily from increasing the number of individuals sampled rather than increasing the number of genetic markers analyzed. Using the revised equation, we describe a new approach to determining the number of individuals to sample and the number of diagnostic markers to analyze when attempting to monitor the arrival of nonnative alleles in native populations.

  6. Low and high expressing alleles of the LMNA gene: implications for laminopathy disease development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofía Rodríguez

    Full Text Available Today, there are at least a dozen different genetic disorders caused by mutations within the LMNA gene, and collectively, they are named laminopathies. Interestingly, the same mutation can cause phenotypes with different severities or even different disorders and might, in some cases, be asymptomatic. We hypothesized that one possible contributing mechanism for this phenotypic variability could be the existence of high and low expressing alleles in the LMNA locus. To investigate this hypothesis, we developed an allele-specific absolute quantification method for lamin A and lamin C transcripts using the polymorphic rs4641(C/TLMNA coding SNP. The contribution of each allele to the total transcript level was investigated in nine informative human primary dermal fibroblast cultures from Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS and unaffected controls. Our results show differential expression of the two alleles. The C allele is more frequently expressed and accounts for ∼70% of the lamin A and lamin C transcripts. Analysis of samples from six patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome showed that the c.1824C>T, p.G608G mutation is located in both the C and the T allele, which might account for the variability in phenotype seen among HGPS patients. Our method should be useful for further studies of human samples with mutations in the LMNA gene and to increase the understanding of the link between genotype and phenotype in laminopathies.

  7. The lipoprotein lipase gene in combined hyperlipidemia: evidence of a protective allele depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malloy Mary J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL, a key enzyme in lipid metabolism, catalyzes the hydrolysis of triglycerides (TG from TG-rich lipoproteins, and serves a bridging function that enhances the cellular uptake of lipoproteins. Abnormalities in LPL function are associated with pathophysiological conditions, including familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCH. Whereas two LPL susceptibility alleles were found to co-segregate in a few FCH kindred, a role for common, protective alleles remains unexplored. The LPL Ser447Stop (S447X allele is associated with anti-atherogenic lipid profiles and a modest reduction in risk for coronary disease. We hypothesize that significant depletion of the 447X allele exists in combined hyperlipidemia cases versus controls. A case-control design was employed. The polymorphism was assessed by restriction assay in 212 cases and 161 controls. Genotypic, allelic, and phenotypic associations were examined. Results We found evidence of significant allelic (447Xcontrol: 0.130 vs. 447Xcase: 0.031, χ2 = 29.085; 1df; p 2 = 26.09; 1df; p Conclusion These findings suggest a role for the S447X polymorphism in combined hyperlipidemia and demonstrate the importance of evaluating both susceptibility and protective genetic risk factors.

  8. Strongyloides stercoralis genotypes in humans in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schär, Fabian; Guo, Li; Streit, Adrian; Khieu, Virak; Muth, Sinuon; Marti, Hanspeter; Odermatt, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Little is known about the genetic variability of the soil-transmitted nematode, Strongyloides stercoralis, in humans. We sequenced portions of the small subunit rDNA (SSU), including the hyper variable regions (HVR) I and IV from S. stercoralis larvae derived from individuals living in a rural setting in Cambodia. We identified three polymorphic positions, including a previously reported one within the HVR I. HVR IV was invariable. Six different SSU alleles existed in our sample. Although different genotypes of S. stercoralis were found in the same individuals, no heterozygous larvae were found. This indicates that there is no or very little interbreeding between the different genotypes. Further studies are needed to examine if this is because sexual reproduction, which is facultative, is rare in our study area's S. stercoralis population or because what is considered to be S. stercoralis today is actually a complex of closely related species or subspecies.

  9. Novel and established CYP2A6 alleles impair in vivo nicotine metabolism in a population of Black African descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwenifumbo, Jill C; Al Koudsi, Nael; Ho, Man Ki; Zhou, Qian; Hoffmann, Ewa B; Sellers, Edward M; Tyndale, Rachel F

    2008-05-01

    Cytochrome P450 2A6 (CYP2A6) is a human enzyme best known for metabolizing tobacco-related compounds, such as nicotine, cotinine (COT), and nitrosamine procarcinogens. CYP2A6 genetic variants have been associated with smoking status, cigarette consumption, and tobacco-related cancers. Our objective was to functionally characterize four nonsynonymous CYP2A6 sequence variants with respect to their haplotype, allele frequency, and association with in vivo CYP2A6 activity. In vivo, nicotine was administered orally to 281 volunteers of Black African descent. Blood samples were collected for kinetic phenotyping and CYP2A6 genotyping. In vitro, nicotine C-oxidation catalytic efficiencies of heterologously expressed variant enzymes were assessed. The four uncharacterized sequence variants were found in seven novel alleles CYP2A6(*)24A&B ; (*)25, (*)26, (*)27, and *28A&B, most were associated with impaired in vivo CYP2A6 activity. Nicotine metabolism groupings, based on the in vivo data of variant alleles, were created. Mean trans-3'-hydroxycotinine/cotinine (3HC/COT) differed (P<0.001) between normal (100%), intermediate (64%), and slow (40%) groups. Systemic exposure to nicotine following oral administration also differed (P<0.001) between normal (100%), intermediate (139%), and slow (162%) metabolism groups. In addition, alleles of individuals with unusual phenotype-genotype relationships were sequenced, resulting in the discovery of five novel uncharacterized alleles and at least one novel duplication allele. A total of 7% of this population of Black African descent had at least one of the eight novel characterized alleles and 29% had at least one previously established allele. These findings are important for increasing the accuracy of association studies between CYP2A6 genotype and behavioral, disease, or pharmacological phenotypes.

  10. ACTN3 allele frequency in humans covaries with global latitudinal gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M Friedlander

    Full Text Available A premature stop codon in ACTN3 resulting in α-actinin-3 deficiency (the ACTN3 577XX genotype is common in humans and reduces strength, muscle mass, and fast-twitch fiber diameter, but increases the metabolic efficiency of skeletal muscle. Linkage disequilibrium data suggest that the ACTN3 R577X allele has undergone positive selection during human evolution. The allele has been hypothesized to be adaptive in environments with scarce resources where efficient muscle metabolism would be selected. Here we test this hypothesis by using recently developed comparative methods that account for evolutionary relatedness and gene flow among populations. We find evidence that the ACTN3 577XX genotype evolved in association with the global latitudinal gradient. Our results suggest that environmental variables related to latitudinal variation, such as species richness and mean annual temperature, may have influenced the adaptive evolution of ACTN3 577XX during recent human history.

  11. Hypermethylated SUPERMAN epigenetic alleles in arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, S E; Meyerowitz, E M

    1997-08-22

    Mutations in the SUPERMAN gene affect flower development in Arabidopsis. Seven heritable but unstable sup epi-alleles (the clark kent alleles) are associated with nearly identical patterns of excess cytosine methylation within the SUP gene and a decreased level of SUP RNA. Revertants of these alleles are largely demethylated at the SUP locus and have restored levels of SUP RNA. A transgenic Arabidopsis line carrying an antisense methyltransferase gene, which shows an overall decrease in genomic cytosine methylation, also contains a hypermethylated sup allele. Thus, disruption of methylation systems may yield more complex outcomes than expected and can result in methylation defects at known genes. The clark kent alleles differ from the antisense line because they do not show a general decrease in genomic methylation.

  12. High-resolution genotyping of chromosome 8 in colon adenocarcinomas reveals recurrent break point but no gene mutation in the 8p21 region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourra, Najat; Zeitoun, Guy; Portier, Guillaume; Blanche, Hélène; Tubacher, Emmanuel; Gressin, Laetitia; Flejou, Jean-François; Tiret, Emmanuel; Thomas, Gilles; Olschwang, Sylviane

    2008-06-01

    The prognosis of patients with colorectal cancer is largely determined by the tumor stage. In this respect, colorectal cancer with lymph node metastases has the worst prognosis. Accordingly, there is considerable clinical interest in understanding the genetic mechanisms underlying metastasis formation. The short arm of chromosome 8 is often lost in colorectal cancer and has been associated with the advanced stages. A common region of deletion has been identified in 8p21, and we investigate here the localization of the putative tumor suppressor gene. A series of 683 sporadic microsatellite stability colorectal tumor samples has been genotyped on 12 microsatellite loci encompassing the common deleted region. Allelic losses were identified in 50% of the cases and 10 break points have been evidenced between D8S1734 and D8S1810, reducing the region of interest to D8S1771-D8S131. Among the 21 genes mapped in this interval, 14 candidate genes have been retained for the sequencing analysis of 48 tumors with 8p allelic loss. No mutation was found, suggesting more complex mechanisms of inactivation or side effects of chromosome arm 8q duplication, which might be up-regulating oncogenes not located within the deleted region.

  13. Lost City and the Search For Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    Since their discovery in 1979, high-temperature hot springs fueled by submarine volcanoes have served as models in the search for life elsewhere in the solar system. The early recognition of hot microbial biospheres associated with active volcanism along global mid-ocean ridges fundamentally shifted concepts of how planets and life co-evolve. These metal-rich, acidic systems were thought to represent the most extreme conditions on Earth, hosting novel life based on chemosynthesis. In 2000, this paradigm was profoundly impacted by the discovery of the Lost City hydrothermal field, characterized by conditions never before seen. Here, 60 m-tall limestone chimneys vent pH 10-11, metal-poor, 90°C fluids rich in hydrogen and abiotically-produced methane and formate. The fluid chemistry is driven, not by volcanic heat, but by fluid-rock reactions in underlying ultramafic basement at up to ~ 200°C. These peridotite-hosted biotopes differ significantly from volcanic-hosted vent systems in which carbon dioxide is a dominant volatile species. Instead, serpentinzation reactions yield high hydrogen and low molecular-weight hydrocarbons that result in energy-rich habitats with cell concentrations that reach 109cells/gram carbonate. The absence of volcanism, and on-going serpentinization reactions result in a remarkably stable system with venting active for >150,000 years. With the discovery of Lost City, it is clear that high temperature volcanic activity is not a prerequisite for life. Exothermic serpentinization reactions occur under a wide-range of temperatures and can result in up to a 40% volume of expansion, which may both close and open fractures. Hence, Lost City may serve as a model in the search for life on other planets and moons with rocky, undifferentiated terranes and overlying oceans. Within such systems, interior cooling, coupled with tidally-induced heating may induce hydrothermal flow, and perhaps life-sustaining environments in the absence of volcanism.

  14. HIV-1 disease-influencing effects associated with ZNRD1, HCP5 and HLA-C alleles are attributable mainly to either HLA-A10 or HLA-B*57 alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Catano

    Full Text Available A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS suggested that polymorphisms in or around the genes HCP5, HLA-C and ZNRD1 confer restriction against HIV-1 viral replication or disease progression. Here, we also find that these alleles are associated with different aspects of HIV disease, albeit mainly in European Americans. Additionally, we offer that because the GWAS cohort was a subset of HIV-positive individuals, selected based in part on having a low viral load, the observed associations for viral load are magnified compared with those we detect in a large well-characterized prospective natural history cohort of HIV-1-infected persons. We also find that because of linkage disequilibrium (LD patterns, the dominant viral load- and disease-influencing associations for the ZNRD1 or HLA-C and HCP5 alleles are apparent mainly when these alleles are present in HLA-A10- or HLA-B*57-containing haplotypes, respectively. ZNRD1 alleles lacking HLA-A10 did not confer disease protection whereas ZNRD1-A10 haplotypes did. When examined in isolation, the HCP5-G allele associates with a slow disease course and lower viral loads. However, in multivariate models, after partitioning out the protective effects of B*57, the HCP5-G allele associates with disease-acceleration and enhanced viral replication; these associations for HCP5-G are otherwise obscured because of the very strong LD between this allele and a subset of protective B*57 alleles. Furthermore, HCP5 and HLA-C alleles stratify B*57-containing genotypes into those that associate with either striking disease retardation or progressive disease, providing one explanation for the long-standing conundrum of why some HLA-B*57-carrying individuals are long-term non-progressors, whereas others exhibit progressive disease. Collectively, these data generally underscore the strong dependence of genotype-phenotype relationships upon cohort design, phenotype selection, LD patterns and populations studied. They

  15. LHRH and LHR genotypes and prostate cancer incidence and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingles, Sue Ann; Liu, Stephen V; Pinski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Despite their crucial role in initiating steroid-hormone synthesis, the hypothalamic and pituitary hormones (LH, LHRH) and their receptors have received scant attention in genetic studies of hormone-related diseases. This study included 1,170 men diagnosed with prostate cancer (PC) in Los Angeles County between 1999 and 2003. LHRH and LH receptor genotypes were examined for association with PC survival. Additionally, associations with PC incidence were examined by comparing PC cases to control men of similar age and race/ethnicity. The LHR 312 G allele was found to be associated with increased PC mortality (p=0.01). Ten years after diagnosis, 16% of men carrying two copies of the G allele (genotype GG) had died of PC, compared to 11% of those with genotype AG and 9% of those with AA. In a case-control comparison, this same allele was significantly associated with decreased PC risk: OR=0.68 (95% CI: 0.49, 0.93) for genotype GG vs. AA. These results suggest that androgens may play opposing roles in PC initiation and progression, and highlight the need to include these important but overlooked genes in future studies of PC etiology, prognosis, and treatment.

  16. On Steganography in Lost Audio Packets

    CERN Document Server

    Mazurczyk, Wojciech; Szczypiorski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a new hidden data insertion procedure based on estimated probability of the remaining time of the call for steganographic method called LACK (Lost Audio PaCKets steganography). LACK provides hidden communication for real-time services like Voice over IP. The analytical results presented in this paper concern the influence of LACK's hidden data insertion procedures on the method's impact on quality of voice transmission and its resistance to steganalysis. The proposed hidden data insertion procedure is also compared to previous steganogram insertion approach based on estimated remaining average call duration.

  17. Atomic Collapse in Graphene: Lost of Unitarity

    CERN Document Server

    Valenzuela, David; Loewe, Marcelo; Raya, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    We explore the problem of atomic collapse in graphene by monopole impurities, both electric and magnetic, within the context of supersymmetric quantum mechanics. For electric impurities, upon factorizing the radial Dirac Hamiltonian and identifying the supercharges, existence of a critical charge that makes the ground state {\\em fall-into-the-center} translates into lost of unitarity for the corresponding Hamiltonian. For the problem of magnetic monopole impurities, preservation of unitarity for all values of the parameters of the corresponding potential translates into the absence of atomic collapse in this case.

  18. Allelic determinants of vitamin d insufficiency, bone mineral density, and bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trummer, Olivia; Schwetz, Verena; Walter-Finell, Daniela; Lerchbaum, Elisabeth; Renner, Wilfried; Gugatschka, Markus; Dobnig, Harald; Pieber, Thomas R; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara

    2012-07-01

    Low 25-hydroxycholecalciferol [25(OH) vitamin D] status is known to play an important role in many diseases with focus on bone health. Based on recently reported genetic determinants of vitamin D insufficiency, we aimed to analyze genetic variants of group-specific component (GC), 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7), and cytochrome P450IIR-1 (CYP2R1) for association with vitamin D levels, bone mineral density (BMD), and bone fractures. We conducted a cross-sectional BMD and fracture study and a prospective cohort study. The cross-sectional study comprised participants of a BMD screening study, and the prospective cohort study comprised nursing home subjects. The cross-sectional study included 342 subjects (mean age, 55.3 ± 12.0 yr), and the prospective study included 1093 subjects (mean age, 84.0 ± 6.0 yr). Patients were stratified by GC, DHCR7, and CYP2R1 genotypes. For each gene, the allele associated with lower 25(OH) vitamin D levels was designated as "risk allele." The potential role of these risk alleles in fracture risk was analyzed by logistic regression analysis including age and sex as confounders. We measured BMD and fractures. GC genotypes were significantly associated with lower mean 25(OH) vitamin D levels in both cohorts (P = 0.001 and P = 0.048, respectively). There was no significant association of BMD with any of the genotypes. None of the alleles was associated with past fractures, whereas the DHCR7 G-allele was significantly associated with prospective fractures (odds ratio, 0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.51-0.92; P = 0.011). The DHCR7 gene polymorphism may be a predictor for fracture risk.

  19. Polyembryony in non-apomictic citrus genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleza, Pablo; Juárez, José; Ollitrault, Patrick; Navarro, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Adventitious embryony from nucellar cells is the mechanism leading to apomixis in Citrus sp. However, singular cases of polyembryony have been reported in non-apomictic genotypes as a consequence of 2x × 4x hybridizations and in vitro culture of isolated nucelli. The origin of the plants arising from the aforementioned processes remains unclear. Methods The genetic structure (ploidy and allelic constitution with microsatellite markers) of plants obtained from polyembryonic seeds arising from 2x × 4x sexual hybridizations and those regenerated from nucellus culture in vitro was systematically analysed in different non-apomictic citrus genotypes. Histological studies were also conducted to try to identify the initiation process underlying polyembryony. Key Results All plants obtained from the same undeveloped seed in 2x × 4x hybridizations resulted from cleavage of the original zygotic embryo. Also, the plants obtained from in vitro nucellus culture were recovered by somatic embryogenesis from cells that shared the same genotype as the zygotic embryos of the same seed. Conclusions It appears that in non-apomictic citrus genotypes, proembryos or embryogenic cells are formed by cleavage of the zygotic embryos and that the development of these adventitious embryos, normally hampered, can take place in vivo or in vitro as a result of two different mechanisms that prevent the dominance of the initial zygotic embryo. PMID:20675656

  20. Variant alleles of the CYP1B1 gene are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility

    OpenAIRE

    Trubicka Joanna; Grabowska-Kłujszo Ewa; Suchy Janina; Masojć Bartłomiej; Serrano-Fernandez Pablo; Kurzawski Grzegorz; Cybulski Cezary; Górski Bohdan; Huzarski Tomasz; Byrski Tomasz; Gronwald Jacek; Złowocka Elżbieta; Kładny Józef; Banaszkiewicz Zbigniew; Wiśniowski Rafał

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background CYP1B1 is a P450 enzyme which is involved in the activation of pro-carcinogens to carcinogens as well as sex hormone metabolism. Because differences in the activity of the enzyme have been correlated with variant alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), it represents an attractive candidate gene for studies into colorectal cancer susceptibility. Methods We genotyped 597 cancer patients and 597controls for three CYP1B1 SNPs, which have previously been shown to be ...

  1. Bsn-t Alleles from French Field Strains of Agaricus bisporus

    OpenAIRE

    Callac, Philippe; Hocquart, Sophie; Imbernon, Micheline; Desmerger, Christophe; Olivier, Jean-Marc

    1998-01-01

    In the Agaricus bisporus desert population in California, the dominant Bsn-t allele determines the production of tetrasporic basidia and homokaryotic spores (n) that characterize a heterothallic life cycle. Strains belonging to a French population have the Bsn-b/b genotype that results in bisporic basidia that produce heterokaryotic spores (n + n) which characterize a pseudohomothallic life cycle. More recombination occurs in the tetrasporic population than in the bisporic population. In Fran...

  2. DD genotype of ACE gene in boys: may it be a risk factor for minimal change nephrotic syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alasehirli, Belgin; Balat, Ayşe; Büyükçelik, Mithat

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism affects the circulating and cellular levels of ACE and may be a risk factor in several renal diseases. We analyzed the association of ACE gene I/D polymorphism with the clinical presentation of minimal change nephrotic syndrome (MCNS) in a Turkish child population. This study consisted of 97 children with MCNS and 144 healthy controls. Genotyping of ACE gene was performed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The distributions of ACE genotypes were II in 13%, ID in 49%, and DD in 38% in patient group, and 9%, 49%, and 42% in control group, respectively. The frequency of the D allele was 63% and that of the I allele was 37% in patients. There were no relevant differences in the allele frequencies and genotypes of ACE I/D polymorphism between patients and controls. However, DD genotype was higher in boys in children with MCNS (78.4%. vs. 50.0%, p = 0.004). The frequencies of DD genotype and D allele in boys were 7.25 and 2.56 times higher than II genotype and I allele in the patient group, respectively. We suggest that DD genotype in boys may be one of the risk factors for MCNS.

  3. Divergent patterns of allelic diversity from similar origins: the case of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) in China and Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S; Nelson, M N; Ghamkhar, K; Fu, T; Cowling, W A

    2008-01-01

    Oilseed rape (Brassica napus) in Australia and China have similar origins, with introductions from Europe, Canada, and Japan in the mid 20th century, and there has been some interchange of germplasm between China and Australia since that time. Allelic diversity of 72 B. napus genotypes representing contemporary germplasm in Australia and China, including samples from India, Europe, and Canada, was characterized by 55 polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers spanning the entire B. napus genome. Hierarchical clustering and two-dimensional multidimensional scaling identified a Chinese group (China-1) that was separated from "mixed group" of Australian, Chinese (China-2), European, and Canadian lines. A small group from India was distinctly separated from all other B. napus genotypes. Chinese genotypes, especially in the China-1 group, have inherited unique alleles from interspecific crossing, primarily with B. rapa, and the China-2 group has many alleles in common with Australian genotypes. The concept of "private alleles" is introduced to describe both the greater genetic diversity and the genetic distinctiveness of Chinese germplasm, compared with Australian germplasm, after 50 years of breeding from similar origins.

  4. APOL1 Risk Alleles Are Associated With More Severe Arteriosclerosis in Renal Resistance Vessels With Aging and Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Hughson

    2016-05-01

    Discussion: With the limitation of the small number of subjects contributing to the positive results, the findings imply that APOL1 risk alleles recessively augment small-vessel arteriosclerosis in conjunction with age and hypertension. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis was not a significant finding, indicating that in the early stages of arterionephrosclerosis, the primary pathologic influence of APOL1 genotype is vascular rather than glomerular.

  5. Genetic structure, diversity, and allelic richness in composite collection and reference set in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gowda Cholenahalli LL

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant genetic resources (PGR are the basic raw materials for future genetic progress and an insurance against unforeseen threats to agricultural production. An extensive characterization of PGR provides an opportunity to dissect structure, mine allelic variations, and identify diverse accessions for crop improvement. The Generation Challenge Program http://www.generationcp.org conceptualized the development of "composite collections" and extraction of "reference sets" from these for more efficient tapping of global crop-related genetic resources. In this study, we report the genetic structure, diversity and allelic richness in a composite collection of chickpea using SSR markers, and formation of a reference set of 300 accessions. Results The 48 SSR markers detected 1683 alleles in 2915 accessions, of which, 935 were considered rare, 720 common and 28 most frequent. The alleles per locus ranged from 14 to 67, averaged 35, and the polymorphic information content was from 0.467 to 0.974, averaged 0.854. Marker polymorphism varied between groups of accessions in the composite collection and reference set. A number of group-specific alleles were detected: 104 in Kabuli, 297 in desi, and 69 in wild Cicer; 114 each in Mediterranean and West Asia (WA, 117 in South and South East Asia (SSEA, and 10 in African region accessions. Desi and kabuli shared 436 alleles, while wild Cicer shared 17 and 16 alleles with desi and kabuli, respectively. The accessions from SSEA and WA shared 74 alleles, while those from Mediterranean 38 and 33 alleles with WA and SSEA, respectively. Desi chickpea contained a higher proportion of rare alleles (53% than kabuli (46%, while wild Cicer accessions were devoid of rare alleles. A genotype-based reference set captured 1315 (78% of the 1683 composite collection alleles of which 463 were rare, 826 common, and 26 the most frequent alleles. The neighbour-joining tree diagram of this reference set represents

  6. PAX6 mutations: genotype-phenotype correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanson Isabel M

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The PAX6 protein is a highly conserved transcriptional regulator that is important for normal ocular and neural development. In humans, heterozygous mutations of the PAX6 gene cause aniridia (absence of the iris and related developmental eye diseases. PAX6 mutations are archived in the Human PAX6 Allelic Variant Database, which currently contains 309 records, 286 of which are mutations in patients with eye malformations. Results We examined the records in the Human PAX6 Allelic Variant Database and documented the frequency of different mutation types, the phenotypes associated with different mutation types, the contribution of CpG transitions to the PAX6 mutation spectrum, and the distribution of chain-terminating mutations in the open reading frame. Mutations that introduce a premature termination codon into the open reading frame are predominantly associated with aniridia; in contrast, non-aniridia phenotypes are typically associated with missense mutations. Four CpG dinucleotides in exons 8, 9, 10 and 11 are major mutation hotspots, and transitions at these CpG's account for over half of all nonsense mutations in the database. Truncating mutations are distributed throughout the PAX6 coding region, except for the last half of exon 12 and the coding part of exon 13, where they are completely absent. The absence of truncating mutations in the 3' part of the coding region is statistically significant and is consistent with the idea that nonsense-mediated decay acts on PAX6 mutant alleles. Conclusion The PAX6 Allelic Variant Database is a valuable resource for studying genotype-phenotype correlations. The consistent association of truncating mutations with the aniridia phenotype, and the distribution of truncating mutations in the PAX6 open reading frame, suggests that nonsense-mediated decay acts on PAX6 mutant alleles.

  7. Maternal and fetal human leukocyte antigen class Ia and II alleles in severe preeclampsia and eclampsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmery, J.; Hachmon, R.; Pyo, C. W.;

    2016-01-01

    and -DPB1) alleles and the risk of developing severe preeclampsia/eclampsia were investigated in a detailed and large-scale study. In total, 259 women diagnosed with severe preeclampsia or eclampsia and 260 matched control women with no preeclampsia, together with their neonates, were included in the study....... HLA genotyping for mothers and neonates was performed using next-generation sequencing. The HLA-DPB1*04:01:01G allele was significantly more frequent (Pc=0.044) among women diagnosed with severe preeclampsia/eclampsia compared with controls, and the DQA1*01:02:01G allele frequency was significantly...... lower (Pc=0.042) among newborns born by women with severe preeclampsia/eclampsia compared with controls. In mothers with severe preeclampsia/eclampsia, homozygosity was significantly more common compared with controls at the HLA-DPB1 locus (Pc=0.0028). Although the current large study shows some...

  8. The Association Analysis of Immune System Genes Allelic Variants With Embryonic Infection of Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Vladimirovna Mashkina

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the association of marker genes and their polymorphisms with increased risk of embryonic infection (EI- of the fetus and of the nervous system lesions development of different severity. Methods: The TLR2, TLR6, IL1ß, TNFa, IL10 genotypes and alleles frequencies were studied in three groups of infants of Rostov region with EI followed by hypoxic lesions of the central nervous system. Results: In our study the allelic variants of IL1ß and TNFa genes are characterized by a high level of expression, while the allelic variant of the IL10 gene results in a decrease in the corresponding mRNA level. Conclusion: The importance of the Ser249Pro (TLR6, -308G/A (TNFa and -31C/T (IL1ß interactions in changing the risk of the EI development was established

  9. Finding long-lost Comet Lexell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegert, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Comet D/1770 L1 (Lexell) made the closest observed pass by a comet to the Earth at approximately 0.015 AU on 1 July 1770. A naked-eye object observed by many astronomers of the time, it was subsequently lost: the best contemporary estimates had it removed from its 1770 orbit by Jupiter in 1779 and sent to the outer Solar System.Near-Earth asteroid 2010 JL33 has an orbit similar to that followed by Lexell's comet during its observed apparition. However, this NEA's nominal orbit, which is well-known on the basis of a decade-long arc which includes radar observations, does not approach the Earth at the correct time to be Lexell's comet. That is, unless modest non-gravitational forces are applied, in which case the famous near-miss can be reproduced.Modern measurements of 2010 JL33 together with those Lexell's comet made in the 18th century -which include motion exceeding 40 degrees per day on the sky at closest approach- provide exquisite constraints on the dynamical processes at work, cometary, Yarkovsky or other. I will discuss the implications of and the conditions required for asteroid 2010 JL33 to be, in fact, long-lost comet Lexell.

  10. Identification of Alleles of Puroindoline Genes and Their Effect on Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Grain Texture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klára Štiasna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Grain hardness is one of the most important quality characteristics of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.. It is a significant property of wheat grains and relates to milling quality and end product quality. Grain hardness is caused by the presence of puroindoline genes (Pina and Pinb. A collection of 25 genotypes of wheat with unusual grain colour (blue aleurone, purple and white pericarp, yellow endosperm was studied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR for the diversity within Pina and Pinb (alleles: Pina-D1a, Pina-D1b, Pinb-D1a, Pinb- -D1b, Pinb-D1c and Pinb-D1d. The endosperm structure was determined by a non-destructive method using light transfl ectance meter and grain hardness by a texture analyser. Genotype Novosibirskaya 67 and isogenic ANK lines revealed hitherto unknown alleles at the locus for the annealing of primers of Pinb-D1. Allele Pinb-D1c was found to be absent from each genotype. The mealy endosperm ranged from 0 to 100 % and grain hardness from 15.10 to 26.87 N per sample.

  11. Molecular methods for genotyping complex copy number polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantsilieris, Stuart; Baird, Paul N; White, Stefan J

    2013-02-01

    Genome structural variation shows remarkable complexity with respect to copy number, sequence content and distribution. While the discovery of copy number polymorphisms (CNP) has increased exponentially in recent years, the transition from discovery to genotyping has proved challenging, particularly for CNPs embedded in complex regions of the genome. CNPs that are collectively common in the population and possess a dynamic range of copy numbers have proved the most difficult to genotype in association studies. This is in some part due to technical limitations of genotyping assays and the sequence properties of the genomic region being analyzed. Here we describe in detail the basis of a number of molecular techniques used to genotype complex CNPs, compare and contrast these approaches for determination of multi-allelic copy number, and discuss the potential application of these techniques in genetic studies.

  12. Allelic polymorphism of Ovar-DRB1 exon2 gene and parasite resistance in two dairy sheep breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavros Spetsarias

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Ovar-DRB1 gene locus is one of the most polymorphic genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (Ovar-MHC and holds a functional role to antigen presentation. The aim of this study was: a to describe the Ovar-DRB1 locus variability in two dairy Greek sheep breeds and b to investigate associations between this variability with resistance to gastrointestinal parasitosis. Blood and faecal samples were collected from 231 and 201 animals of Arta and Kalarrytiko breeds, respectively. The identification of alleles was performed using the sequence–base method. Faecal egg counting (FEC of the gastrointestinal parasites and measures of blood plasma pepsinogen levels were performed in order to evaluate parasitological parameters. From this study in the overall examined animals, thirty-nine Ovar-DRB1 alleles were identified, among them, ten new alleles, reported for the first time in the literature. In Arta breed a total of twenty-four alleles were found. Among the detected alleles, ten were breed specific and five were new. Regarding the Kalarrytiko breed, twenty-nine alleles were found, fifteen of them were unique and nine were new. The studied breeds differed in their allelic profile, with only 12 common from the total of 134 different recorded genotypes. A higher number of animals with high parasitic load and high plasma pepsinogen values were found in Kalarrytiko. Associations between Ovar-DRB1 alleles with FEC values were found with certain heterozygous genotypes to present significantly reduced FEC values. The large number of detected alleles with low frequencies and the fact that the majority of animals were heterozygous, make hard to find strong associations

  13. Predictable allele frequency changes due to habitat fragmentation in the Glanville fritillary butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, Toby; Nieminen, Marko; Sirén, Jukka; Wong, Swee Chong; Hanski, Ilkka

    2016-03-08

    Describing the evolutionary dynamics of now extinct populations is challenging, as their genetic composition before extinction is generally unknown. The Glanville fritillary butterfly has a large extant metapopulation in the Åland Islands in Finland, but declined to extinction in the nearby fragmented southwestern (SW) Finnish archipelago in the 20th century. We genotyped museum samples for 222 SNPs across the genome, including SNPs from candidate genes and neutral regions. SW Finnish populations had significantly reduced genetic diversity before extinction, and their allele frequencies gradually diverged from those in contemporary Åland populations over 80 y. We identified 15 outlier loci among candidate SNPs, mostly related to flight, in which allele frequencies have changed more than the neutral expectation. At outlier loci, allele frequencies in SW Finland shifted in the same direction as newly established populations deviated from old local populations in contemporary Åland. Moreover, outlier allele frequencies in SW Finland resemble those in fragmented landscapes as opposed to continuous landscapes in the Baltic region. These results indicate selection for genotypes associated with good colonization capacity in the highly fragmented landscape before the extinction of the populations. Evolutionary response to habitat fragmentation may have enhanced the viability of the populations, but it did not save the species from regional extinction in the face of severe habitat loss and fragmentation. These results highlight a potentially common situation in changing environments: evolutionary changes are not strong enough to fully compensate for the direct adverse effects of environmental change and thereby rescue populations from extinction.

  14. Ultra-deep Illumina sequencing accurately identifies MHC class IIb alleles and provides evidence for copy number variation in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lighten, Jackie; van Oosterhout, Cock; Paterson, Ian G; McMullan, Mark; Bentzen, Paul

    2014-07-01

    We address the bioinformatic issue of accurately separating amplified genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) from artefacts generated during high-throughput sequencing workflows. We fit observed ultra-deep sequencing depths (hundreds to thousands of sequences per amplicon) of allelic variants to expectations from genetic models of copy number variation (CNV). We provide a simple, accurate and repeatable method for genotyping multigene families, evaluating our method via analyses of 209 b of MHC class IIb exon 2 in guppies (Poecilia reticulata). Genotype repeatability for resequenced individuals (N = 49) was high (100%) within the same sequencing run. However, repeatability dropped to 83.7% between independent runs, either because of lower mean amplicon sequencing depth in the initial run or random PCR effects. This highlights the importance of fully independent replicates. Significant improvements in genotyping accuracy were made by greatly reducing type I genotyping error (i.e. accepting an artefact as a true allele), which may occur when using low-depth allele validation thresholds used by previous methods. Only a small amount (4.9%) of type II error (i.e. rejecting a genuine allele as an artefact) was detected through fully independent sequencing runs. We observed 1-6 alleles per individual, and evidence of sharing of alleles across loci. Variation in the total number of MHC class II loci among individuals, both among and within populations was also observed, and some genotypes appeared to be partially hemizygous; total allelic dosage added up to an odd number of allelic copies. Collectively, observations provide evidence of MHC CNV and its complex basis in natural populations.

  15. Distribution and genotype frequency of the C1431T and pro12ala polymorphisms of the peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma gene in an Iranian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooki, Hassan; Haerian, Monir-Sadat; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Ebrahimi, Mahmoud; Mirhafez, Reza; Ferns, Gordon; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Zali, Mohammad-Reza

    2013-10-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a nuclear transcription factor regulating multiple genes involved in cell growth, differentiation, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and energy production. Several genetic variations in the PPARγ gene have been identified to be associated with diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and coronary artery disease. The present study was designed to explore the distribution of two common single nucleotide polymorphisms of the PPARγ gene (C1431T and Pro12Ala) in an Iranian population. Genotype frequencies for these two polymorphisms were compared for 160 healthy Iranian individuals with reports from other populations. The Genotyping was performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The genotype distribution of the C1431T PPARγ polymorphism was 0.869 for the CC genotype, 0.119 for the CT genotype and 0.013 for uncommon TT genotype. Allelic frequencies were 0.93 for C and 0.07 for T allele respectively. For the Pro12Ala polymorphism of PPARγ gene, genotypic distributions and allelic frequencies were, 0.813 for CC, 0.181 for CG and 0.06 for GG and 0.903 for C and 0.097 for G respectively. Allelic and genotypic frequencies for both polymorphisms of PPARγ gene were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Iran is a country with an ethnically diverse population and a comparison of allelic and genotypic frequencies of PPARγ C1431T and Pro12Ala polymorphisms between our population and others showed significant differences.

  16. Growth hormone genotyping by MspI restriction enzyme and PCR-RFLP method in Aceh cattle breed at Indrapuri District, Aceh Province, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WIDYA PINTAKA BAYU PUTRA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Putra WPB, Hartatik T, Sumadi. 2014. Growth hormone genotyping by MspI restriction enzyme and PCR-RFLP method in Aceh cattle breed at Indrapuri District, Aceh Province, Indonesia. Biodiversitas 15: 1-5. The objective of this research was to identify growth hormone (GH gene in Aceh cattle at Indrapuri’s Breeding and Forage Centre (IBFC of Aceh Cattle. Fourty one cattle consisting of 21 male and 20 female cattle were used in this study. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR - Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP and sequencing method was used to detect MspI site on GH gene. Based on the sequencing, it can be concluded that all cattle were monomorphic. The frequency of TT genotype and T allele were 1.00 relatively. The transition of C (cytosine into T (thymine on 1549 position caused the lost of restriction site. The insertion of T and G (guanine on 1542 and 1552 position caused the length of GH gene were 329 bp in Aceh cattle.

  17. 50 CFR 25.22 - Lost and found articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lost and found articles. 25.22 Section 25.22 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Lost and found articles. Lost articles or money found on a national wildlife refuge are to...

  18. 78 FR 28897 - Lost Creek ISR, LLC, Lost Creek Uranium In-Situ Recovery Project; Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Lost Creek ISR, LLC, Lost Creek Uranium In-Situ Recovery Project; Sweetwater County, Wyoming AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Environmental assessment and finding of no...

  19. Genetic analysis of allelic variants, single-step mutations, three allelic variants of the 15 STR loci in the population of Northeast Bosnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadžiavdić Vesna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversity of nuclear DNA microsatellite markers were analyzed in a reference sample of the population of northeast Bosnia. 437 samples taken from unrelated individuals were processed and three samples of paternity proof were shown. Detection effectiveness profile of the research, points to a valid choice of method of extraction, amplification and genotyping STR loci with PowerPlextm16. Genetic analysis of allelic variants of the 15 STR loci detected 17 samples determined as microvariants. Samples were divided into 15 different allelic variants at 7 different loci, and are: in locus D7S820, D16S539, D3S1358, D18S51, PENTA D, PENTA E and in locus vWA. Genetic analysis of mutations in cases of paternity determined three examples of single-step mutations in the loci FGA, Penta D and D3S1358. Genetic analysis of observed STR loci detected three allelic variant of genotype combination 7/10/11.3 in locus D7S820 Type II.

  20. Whole genome amplification of DNA for genotyping pharmacogenetics candidate genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh ePhilips

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Whole genome amplification (WGA technologies can be used to amplify genomic DNA when only small amounts of DNA are available. The Multiple Displacement Amplification Phi polymerase based amplification has been shown to accurately amplify DNA for a variety of genotyping assays; however, it has not been tested for genotyping many of the clinically relevant genes important for pharmacogenetic studies, such as the cytochrome P450 genes, that are typically difficult to genotype due to multiple pseudogenes, copy number variations, and high similarity to other related genes. We evaluated whole genome amplified samples for Taqman™ genotyping of SNPs in a variety of pharmacogenetic genes. In 24 DNA samples from the Coriell human diversity panel, the call rates and concordance between amplified (~200-fold amplification and unamplified samples was 100% for two SNPs in CYP2D6 and one in ESR1. In samples from a breast cancer clinical trial (Trial 1, we compared the genotyping results in samples before and after WGA for four SNPs in CYP2D6, one SNP in CYP2C19, one SNP in CYP19A1, two SNPs in ESR1, and two SNPs in ESR2. The concordance rates were all >97%. Finally, we compared the allele frequencies of 143 SNPs determined in Trial 1 (whole genome amplified DNA to the allele frequencies determined in unamplified DNA samples from a separate trial (Trial 2 that enrolled a similar population. The call rates and allele frequencies between the two trials were 98% and 99.7%, respectively. We conclude that the whole genome amplified DNA is suitable for Taqman™ genotyping for a wide variety of pharmacogenetically relevant SNPs.

  1. GST M1-T1 null allele frequency patterns in geographically assorted human populations: a phylogenetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasthurinaidu, Senthilkumar Pitchalu; Ramasamy, Thirumurugan; Ayyavoo, Jayachitra; Dave, Dhvani Kirtikumar; Adroja, Divya Anantray

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diversity in drug metabolism and disposition is mainly considered as the outcome of the inter-individual genetic variation in polymorphism of drug-xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME). Among the XMEs, glutathione-S-transferases (GST) gene loci are an important candidate for the investigation of diversity in allele frequency, as the deletion mutations in GST M1 and T1 genotypes are associated with various cancers and genetic disorders of all major Population Affiliations (PAs). Therefore, the present population based phylogenetic study was focused to uncover the frequency distribution pattern in GST M1 and T1 null genotypes among 45 Geographically Assorted Human Populations (GAHPs). The frequency distribution pattern for GST M1 and T1 null alleles have been detected in this study using the data derived from literatures representing 44 populations affiliated to Africa, Asia, Europe, South America and the genome of PA from Gujarat, a region in western India. Allele frequency counting for Gujarat PA and scattered plot analysis for geographical distribution among the PAs were performed in SPSS-21. The GST M1 and GST T1 null allele frequencies patterns of the PAs were computed in Seqboot, Gendist program of Phylip software package (3.69 versions) and Unweighted Pair Group method with Arithmetic Mean in Mega-6 software. Allele frequencies from South African Xhosa tribe, East African Zimbabwe, East African Ethiopia, North African Egypt, Caucasian, South Asian Afghanistan and South Indian Andhra Pradesh have been identified as the probable seven patterns among the 45 GAHPs investigated in this study for GST M1-T1 null genotypes. The patternized null allele frequencies demonstrated in this study for the first time addresses the missing link in GST M1-T1 null allele frequencies among GAHPs.

  2. GST M1-T1 null allele frequency patterns in geographically assorted human populations: a phylogenetic approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthilkumar Pitchalu Kasthurinaidu

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity in drug metabolism and disposition is mainly considered as the outcome of the inter-individual genetic variation in polymorphism of drug-xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME. Among the XMEs, glutathione-S-transferases (GST gene loci are an important candidate for the investigation of diversity in allele frequency, as the deletion mutations in GST M1 and T1 genotypes are associated with various cancers and genetic disorders of all major Population Affiliations (PAs. Therefore, the present population based phylogenetic study was focused to uncover the frequency distribution pattern in GST M1 and T1 null genotypes among 45 Geographically Assorted Human Populations (GAHPs. The frequency distribution pattern for GST M1 and T1 null alleles have been detected in this study using the data derived from literatures representing 44 populations affiliated to Africa, Asia, Europe, South America and the genome of PA from Gujarat, a region in western India. Allele frequency counting for Gujarat PA and scattered plot analysis for geographical distribution among the PAs were performed in SPSS-21. The GST M1 and GST T1 null allele frequencies patterns of the PAs were computed in Seqboot, Gendist program of Phylip software package (3.69 versions and Unweighted Pair Group method with Arithmetic Mean in Mega-6 software. Allele frequencies from South African Xhosa tribe, East African Zimbabwe, East African Ethiopia, North African Egypt, Caucasian, South Asian Afghanistan and South Indian Andhra Pradesh have been identified as the probable seven patterns among the 45 GAHPs investigated in this study for GST M1-T1 null genotypes. The patternized null allele frequencies demonstrated in this study for the first time addresses the missing link in GST M1-T1 null allele frequencies among GAHPs.

  3. Pistil-function breakdown in a new S-allele of European pear, S21*, confers self-compatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzol, Javier

    2009-03-01

    European pear exhibits RNase-based gametophytic self-incompatibility controlled by the polymorphic S-locus. S-allele diversity of cultivars has been extensively investigated; however, no mutant alleles conferring self-compatibility have been reported. In this study, two European pear cultivars, 'Abugo' and 'Ceremeño', were classified as self-compatible after fruit/seed setting and pollen tube growth examination. S-genotyping through S-PCR and sequencing identified a new S-RNase allele in the two cultivars, with identical deduced amino acid sequence as S(21), but differing at the nucleotide level. Test-pollinations and analysis of descendants suggested that the new allele is a self-compatible pistil-mutated variant of S(21), so it was named S(21)*. S-genotypes assigned to 'Abugo' and 'Ceremeño' were S(10)S(21)* and S(21)*S(25) respectively, of which S(25) is a new functional S-allele of European pear. Reciprocal crosses between cultivars bearing S(21) and S(21)* indicated that both alleles exhibit the same pollen function; however, cultivars bearing S(21)* had impaired pistil-S function as they failed to reject either S(21) or S (21)* pollen. RT-PCR analysis showed absence of S(21)* -RNase gene expression in styles of 'Abugo' and 'Ceremeño', suggesting a possible origin for S(21)* pistil dysfunction. Two polymorphisms found within the S-RNase genomic region (a retrotransposon insertion within the intron of S(21)* and indels at the 3'UTR) might explain the different pattern of expression between S(21) and S(21)*. Evaluation of cultivars with unknown S-genotype identified another cultivar 'Azucar Verde' bearing S(21)*, and pollen tube growth examination confirmed self-compatibility for this cultivar as well. This is the first report of a mutated S-allele conferring self-compatibility in European pear.

  4. Advanced lost foam from casting technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, C. E.; Littleton, H. E.; Askeland, D.; Griffin, J.; Miller, B. A.; Sheldon, D. S.

    1996-05-01

    Previous research made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional research was needed to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. The current project focused on five areas listed as follows: Task 1: Precision Pattern Production Task 2: Pattern Coating Consistency Task 3: Sand Fill and Compaction Effects Task 4: Pattern Gating Task 5: Mechanical Properties of Castings. This report summarizes the work done under the current contract in all five areas in the period of October 1, 1994 through December 31, 1995. Twenty-eight (28) companies jointly participate in the project. These companies represent a variety of disciplines, including pattern designers, pattern producers, coating manufacturers, plant design companies, compaction equipment manufacturers, casting producers, and casting buyers.

  5. Sociology: a lost connection in social psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Shigehiro; Kesebir, Selin; Snyder, Benjamin H

    2009-11-01

    For the first half of the 20th century, sociology was one of the closest allies of social psychology. Over the past four decades, however, the connection with sociology has weakened, whereas new connections with neighboring disciplines (e.g., biology, economics, political science) have formed. Along the way, the sociological perspective has been largely lost in mainstream social psychology in the United States. Most social psychologists today are not concerned with collective phenomena and do not investigate social structural factors (e.g., residential mobility, socioeconomic status, dominant religion, political systems). Even when the social structural factors are included in the analysis, psychologists typically treat them as individual difference variables. Sociologist C. Wright Mills famously promoted sociological imagination, or the ability to see distal yet important social forces operating in a larger societal context. By comparing sociological perspectives to psychological perspectives, this article highlights the insights that the sociological perspective and sociological imagination can bring to social psychology.

  6. Lost Causes in and Beyond Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Streater, R F

    2007-01-01

    Lost Causes in and Beyond Physics deals with a selection of research topics mostly from theoretical physics that have been shown to be a dead-end or continue at least to be highly controversial. Nevertheless, whether it is about Bohmian mechanics, physics from Fisher information or the quantum theory of the brain, small but dedicated research communities continue to work on these issues. R.F. Streater, renowned mathematical physicist and co-author of the famous book "PCT, Spin and Statistics, and all that", in a series of essays describes the work and struggle of these research commnities, as well as the chances of any breakthrough in these areas. This book is written as both an entertainment and serious study and should be accessible to anyone with a background in theoretical physics and mathematics.

  7. Nucleotide variation and identification of novel blast resistance alleles of Pib by allele mining strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkumar, G; Madhav, M S; Devi, S J S Rama; Prasad, M S; Babu, V Ravindra

    2015-04-01

    Pib is one of significant rice blast resistant genes, which provides resistance to wide range of isolates of rice blast pathogen, Magnaporthe oryzae. Identification and isolation of novel and beneficial alleles help in crop enhancement. Allele mining is one of the best strategies for dissecting the allelic variations at candidate gene and identification of novel alleles. Hence, in the present study, Pib was analyzed by allele mining strategy, and coding and non-coding (upstream and intron) regions were examined to identify novel Pib alleles. Allelic sequences comparison revealed that nucleotide polymorphisms at coding regions affected the amino acid sequences, while the polymorphism at upstream (non-coding) region affected the motifs arrangements. Pib alleles from resistant landraces, Sercher and Krengosa showed better resistance than Pib donor variety, might be due to acquired mutations, especially at LRR region. The evolutionary distance, Ka/Ks and phylogenetic analyzes also supported these results. Transcription factor binding motif analysis revealed that Pib (Sr) had a unique motif (DPBFCOREDCDC3), while five different motifs differentiated the resistance and susceptible Pib alleles. As the Pib is an inducible gene, the identified differential motifs helps to understand the Pib expression mechanism. The identified novel Pib resistant alleles, which showed high resistance to the rice blast, can be used directly in blast resistance breeding program as alternative Pib resistant sources.

  8. Effects of the BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism and Met Allele Load on Declarative Memory Related Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dodds, Chris M; Henson, Richard N; Suckling, John;

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism modulates episodic memory performance via effects on hippocampal neural circuitry. However, fMRI studies have yielded inconsistent results in this respect. Moreover, very few studies have examined the effect of met allele load on activation...... of memory circuitry. In the present study, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of the effects of the BDNF polymorphism on brain responses during episodic memory encoding and retrieval, including an investigation of the effect of met allele load on memory related activation in the medial temporal lobe....... In contrast to previous studies, we found no evidence for an effect of BDNF genotype or met load during episodic memory encoding. Met allele carriers showed increased activation during successful retrieval in right hippocampus but this was contrast-specific and unaffected by met allele load. These results...

  9. Pooled deep sequencing of Plasmodium falciparum isolates: an efficient and scalable tool to quantify prevailing malaria drug-resistance genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Steve M; Parobek, Christian M; Aragam, Nash; Ngasala, Billy E; Mårtensson, Andreas; Meshnick, Steven R; Juliano, Jonathan J

    2013-12-15

    Molecular surveillance for drug-resistant malaria parasites requires reliable, timely, and scalable methods. These data may be efficiently produced by genotyping parasite populations using second-generation sequencing (SGS). We designed and validated a SGS protocol to quantify mutant allele frequencies in the Plasmodium falciparum genes dhfr and dhps in mixed isolates. We applied this new protocol to field isolates from children and compared it to standard genotyping using Sanger sequencing. The SGS protocol accurately quantified dhfr and dhps allele frequencies in a mixture of parasite strains. Using SGS of DNA that was extracted and then pooled from individual isolates, we estimated mutant allele frequencies that were closely correlated to those estimated by Sanger sequencing (correlations, >0.98). The SGS protocol obviated most molecular steps in conventional methods and is cost saving for parasite populations >50. This SGS genotyping method efficiently and reproducibly estimates parasite allele frequencies within populations of P. falciparum for molecular epidemiologic studies.

  10. Allelic expression analysis of the osteoarthritis susceptibility locus that maps to MICAL3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratnayake Madhushika

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A genome-wide association scan with subsequent replication study that involved over 67,000 individuals of European ancestry has produced evidence of association of single nucleotide polymorphism rs2277831 to primary osteoarthritis (OA with a P-value of 2.9 × 10-5. rs2277831, an A/G transition, is located in an intron of MICAL3. This gene is located on chromosome 22q11.21 and the association signal encompasses two additional genes, BCL2L13 and BID. It is becoming increasingly apparent that many common complex traits are mediated by cis-acting regulatory polymorphisms that influence, in a tissue-specific manner, gene expression or transcript stability. Methods We used total and allelic expression analysis to assess whether the OA association to rs2277831 is mediated by an influence on MICAL3, BCL2L13 or BID expression. Using RNA extracted from joint tissues of 60 patients who had undergone elective joint replacement surgery, we assessed whether rs2277831 correlated with allelic expression of either of the three genes by: 1 measuring the expression of each gene by quantitative PCR and then stratifying the data by genotype at rs2277831 and 2 accurately discriminating and quantifying the mRNA synthesised from the alleles of OA patients using allelic-quantitative PCR. Results We found no evidence for a correlation between gene expression and genotype at rs2277831, with P-values of 0.09 for BCL2L13, 0.07 for BID and 0.33 for MICAL3. In the allelic expression analysis we observed several examples of significant (p BCL2L13 (P = 0.004, 2.09 at BID (P = 0.001 and the most extreme case being at MICAL3, with an allelic expression ratio of 5.47 (P = 0.001. However, there was no correlation observed between the pattern of allelic expression and the genotype at rs2277831. Conclusions In the tissues that we have studied, our data do not support our hypothesis that the association between rs2277831 and OA is due to the effect this SNP has on

  11. HLA alleles and haplotypes among the Lakota Sioux: report of the ASHI minority workshops, part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffell, Mary S; Fallin, M Daniele; Hildebrand, William H; Cavett, Joshua W; Iglehart, Brian A; Zachary, Andrea A

    2004-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II alleles were defined for 302 Lakota Sioux American Indians as part of the American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics coordinated studies on minority populations. The study group was comprised of adult volunteers from the Cheyenne River and Ogala Sioux tribes residing, respectively, on the Cheyenne River and Pine Ridge Reservations in South Dakota. Of the participants, 263 (87%) claimed full American Indian ancestry through both maternal and paternal grandparents. The study group included 25 nuclear families that were informative for genotyping. HLA phenotypes from 202 adults with no other known first-degree relative included in the study were used for calculation of allele and haplotype frequencies by maximum likelihood estimation. HLA-A, -B, and -Cw alleles were found to be in Hardy Weinberg equilibrium. Deviation from equilibrium was observed for DRB1 alleles (p=0.01), but could be attributed to the sample size and the occurrence of some genotypes with low expected frequencies. Polymorphism among the Sioux was limited with four to seven alleles comprising >80% of those observed at each locus. Several alleles were found at high frequency (0.05-0.30) among the Sioux that are also prevalent in other Native Americans and Alaska Natives, including: A*2402, *3101, and *0206; B*3501,*3901, *5101, and *2705; Cw*0702, *0404, and *03041; DRB1*0407, *0404, *1402, and *16021; and DQB1*0301, *0302, and *0402. DRB1*0811, which has been only previously described in Navajo and Tlingit Indians, was found to occur at a frequency of 0.119 among the Sioux. Two new alleles were defined among the Sioux: Cw*0204 and DRB1*040703, which were found in two and four individuals, respectively. In the haplotype analyses, significant linkage disequilibrium (p<0.00001) was seen in all pairwise comparisons of loci and numerous two and three locus haplotypes were found to have strong, positive linkage disequilibrium values. The two most

  12. Molecular characterization of glutenin alleles at the Glu-Dl locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vapa Ljiljana B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the composition of high-molecular-weight (HMW glutenin subunits impacts the bread making quality. The HMW subunits 1Dx5-1Dyl0 are typically associated with high dough strength and good bread making quality contrary to 1Dx2-lDyl2 subunits. Bread wheat cultivars from Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops in Novi Sad have been screened for the alleles present at Glu-Dl locus using traditional SDS PAG electrophoresis method and a new PCR based approach. The Glu-Dl locus was screened for two main x-type alleles which code for HMW glutenins 2 and 5, and two main y-type alleles which code for HMW glutenin subunits 10 and 12. Among the analyzed cultivars 55.6% expressed the presence of 1Dx5 and 1Dy10 alleles at the Glu-Dl locus. These results confirmed that by using marker-assisted selection (MAS it is possible to identify genotypes with alleles for good bread making quality which could be successfully used in wheat breeding programs.

  13. Identification of zoonotic genotypes of Giardia duodenalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprong, Hein; Cacciò, Simone M; van der Giessen, Joke W B

    2009-12-01

    Giardia duodenalis, originally regarded as a commensal organism, is the etiologic agent of giardiasis, a gastrointestinal disease of humans and animals. Giardiasis causes major public and veterinary health concerns worldwide. Transmission is either direct, through the faecal-oral route, or indirect, through ingestion of contaminated water or food. Genetic characterization of G. duodenalis isolates has revealed the existence of seven groups (assemblages A to G) which differ in their host distribution. Assemblages A and B are found in humans and in many other mammals, but the role of animals in the epidemiology of human infection is still unclear, despite the fact that the zoonotic potential of Giardia was recognised by the WHO some 30 years ago. Here, we performed an extensive genetic characterization of 978 human and 1440 animal isolates, which together comprise 3886 sequences from 4 genetic loci. The data were assembled into a molecular epidemiological database developed by a European network of public and veterinary health Institutions. Genotyping was performed at different levels of resolution (single and multiple loci on the same dataset). The zoonotic potential of both assemblages A and B is evident when studied at the level of assemblages, sub-assemblages, and even at each single locus. However, when genotypes are defined using a multi-locus sequence typing scheme, only 2 multi-locus genotypes (MLG) of assemblage A and none of assemblage B appear to have a zoonotic potential. Surprisingly, mixtures of genotypes in individual isolates were repeatedly observed. Possible explanations are the uptake of genetically different Giardia cysts by a host, or subsequent infection of an already infected host, likely without overt symptoms, with a different Giardia species, which may cause disease. Other explanations for mixed genotypes, particularly for assemblage B, are substantial allelic sequence heterogeneity and/or genetic recombination. Although the zoonotic

  14. Stepwise threshold clustering: a new method for genotyping MHC loci using next-generation sequencing technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E Stutz

    Full Text Available Genes of the vertebrate major histocompatibility complex (MHC are of great interest to biologists because of their important role in immunity and disease, and their extremely high levels of genetic diversity. Next generation sequencing (NGS technologies are quickly becoming the method of choice for high-throughput genotyping of multi-locus templates like MHC in non-model organisms. Previous approaches to genotyping MHC genes using NGS technologies suffer from two problems:1 a "gray zone" where low frequency alleles and high frequency artifacts can be difficult to disentangle and 2 a similar sequence problem, where very similar alleles can be difficult to distinguish as two distinct alleles. Here were present a new method for genotyping MHC loci--Stepwise Threshold Clustering (STC--that addresses these problems by taking full advantage of the increase in sequence data provided by NGS technologies. Unlike previous approaches for genotyping MHC with NGS data that attempt to classify individual sequences as alleles or artifacts, STC uses a quasi-Dirichlet clustering algorithm to cluster similar sequences at increasing levels of sequence similarity. By applying frequency and similarity based criteria to clusters rather than individual sequences, STC is able to successfully identify clusters of sequences that correspond to individual or similar alleles present in the genomes of individual samples. Furthermore, STC does not require duplicate runs of all samples, increasing the number of samples that can be genotyped in a given project. We show how the STC method works using a single sample library. We then apply STC to 295 threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus samples from four populations and show that neighboring populations differ significantly in MHC allele pools. We show that STC is a reliable, accurate, efficient, and flexible method for genotyping MHC that will be of use to biologists interested in a variety of downstream applications.

  15. Frequency of CYP2C9 alleles in Koreans and their effects on Iosartan pharmacokinetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jung-woo BAE; Byung-sung KANG; Hye-in LEE; Yun-jeong LEE; Hyun-joo PARK; Ji-hey HA; Hee-jung SHIN; Young-hoon KIM; Han-sung NA; Myeon-woo CHUNG; Soon-young HAN; Chang-ik CHOI; Seung-hee KIM; Choon-gon JANG; Seok-yong LEE; Mi-jeong KIM; Da-hee OH; Seul-ki KEUM; Jung-in PARK; Bo-hye KIM; Hye-kyoung BANG; Sung-gon OH

    2011-01-01

    Aim:CYP2C9 enzyme metabolizes numerous clinically important drugs.The aim of this study is to investigate the frequencies of CYP2C9 genotypes and the effects of selected alleles on Iosartan pharmacokinetics in a large sample of the Korean population.Methods:The CYP2C9 gene was genotyped in 1796 healthy Korean subjects.CYP2C9 alleles (CYP2C9*1,*2,*3,and *13 alleles)were measured using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay and direct sequencing assay.The enzymatic activity of each CYP2C9 genotype was evaluated using losartan as the substrate.Results:The frequencies of CYP2C9*1,*3,and *13 allele were 0.952 (95% confidence interval 0.945-0.959),0.044 (95% CI 0.037-0.051),and 0.005 (95% CI 0.003-0.007),respectively.The frequencies of the CYP2C9*1/*1,*1/*3,*1/*13,and *3/*3 genotypes were 0.904 (95% CI 0.890-0.918),0.085 (95% CI 0.072-0.098),0.009 (95% CI 0.005-0.013),and 0.001 (95% CI 0.000-0.002),respectively.In the pharmacokinetics studies,the AUC0-∞ of losartan in CYP2C9*3/*3 subject was 1.42-fold larger than that in CYP2C9*1/*1 subjects,and the AUC0-∞ of E-3174,a more active metaboiite of Iosartan,in CYP2C9*3/*3 subject was only 12% of that in CYP2C9*1/*1 subjects.Conclusion:The results confirmed the frequencies of CYP2C9 genotypes in a large cohort of Koreans,and detected the CYP2C9*3/*3 genotype.CYP2C9*3/*3 subjects metabolized much less losartan into E-3174 than CYP2C9*1/*1 subjects.

  16. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol A Soderlund

    Full Text Available Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor, where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense, and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available

  17. Comparison of methods for analysis of selective genotyping survival data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dekkers Jack CM

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Survival traits and selective genotyping datasets are typically not normally distributed, thus common models used to identify QTL may not be statistically appropriate for their analysis. The objective of the present study was to compare models for identification of QTL associated with survival traits, in particular when combined with selective genotyping. Data were simulated to model the survival distribution of a population of chickens challenged with Marek disease virus. Cox proportional hazards (CPH, linear regression (LR, and Weibull models were compared for their appropriateness to analyze the data, ability to identify associations of marker alleles with survival, and estimation of effects when all individuals were genotyped (full genotyping and when selective genotyping was used. Little difference in power was found between the CPH and the LR model for low censoring cases for both full and selective genotyping. The simulated data were not transformed to follow a Weibull distribution and, as a result, the Weibull model generally resulted in less power than the other two models and overestimated effects. Effect estimates from LR and CPH were unbiased when all individuals were genotyped, but overestimated when selective genotyping was used. Thus, LR is preferred for analyzing survival data when the amount of censoring is low because of ease of implementation and interpretation. Including phenotypic data of non-genotyped individuals in selective genotyping analysis increased power, but resulted in LR having an inflated false positive rate, and therefore the CPH model is preferred for this scenario, although transformation of the data may also make the Weibull model appropriate for this case. The results from the research presented herein are directly applicable to interval mapping analyses.

  18. Prediction of HLA class II alleles using SNPs in an African population.

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    Fasil Tekola Ayele

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA gene locus in research and clinical practice, direct HLA typing is laborious and expensive. Furthermore, the analysis requires specialized software and expertise which are unavailable in most developing country settings. Recently, in silico methods have been developed for predicting HLA alleles using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. However, the utility of these methods in African populations has not been systematically evaluated.In the present study, we investigate prediction of HLA class II (HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles using SNPs in the Wolaita population, southern Ethiopia. The subjects comprised 297 Ethiopians with genome-wide SNP data, of whom 188 had also been HLA typed and were used for training and testing the model. The 109 subjects with SNP data alone were used for empirical prediction using the multi-allelic gene prediction method. We evaluated accuracy of the prediction, agreement between predicted and HLA typed alleles, and discriminative ability of the prediction probability supplied by the model. We found that the model predicted intermediate (two-digit resolution for HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles at accuracy levels of 96% and 87%, respectively. All measures of performance showed high accuracy and reliability for prediction. The distribution of the majority of HLA alleles in the study was similar to that previously reported for the Oromo and Amhara ethnic groups from Ethiopia.We demonstrate that HLA class II alleles can be predicted from SNP genotype data with a high level of accuracy at intermediate (two-digit resolution in an African population. This finding offers new opportunities for HLA studies of disease epidemiology and population genetics in developing countries.

  19. Computational analysis of whole-genome differential allelic expression data in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, James R; Ge, Bing; Pokholok, Dmitry; Gunderson, Kevin L; Pastinen, Tomi; Blanchette, Mathieu

    2010-07-08

    Allelic imbalance (AI) is a phenomenon where the two alleles of a given gene are expressed at different levels in a given cell, either because of epigenetic inactivation of one of the two alleles, or because of genetic variation in regulatory regions. Recently, Bing et al. have described the use of genotyping arrays to assay AI at a high resolution (approximately 750,000 SNPs across the autosomes). In this paper, we investigate computational approaches to analyze this data and identify genomic regions with AI in an unbiased and robust statistical manner. We propose two families of approaches: (i) a statistical approach based on z-score computations, and (ii) a family of machine learning approaches based on Hidden Markov Models. Each method is evaluated using previously published experimental data sets as well as with permutation testing. When applied to whole genome data from 53 HapMap samples, our approaches reveal that allelic imbalance is widespread (most expressed genes show evidence of AI in at least one of our 53 samples) and that most AI regions in a given individual are also found in at least a few other individuals. While many AI regions identified in the genome correspond to known protein-coding transcripts, others overlap with recently discovered long non-coding RNAs. We also observe that genomic regions with AI not only include complete transcripts with consistent differential expression levels, but also more complex patterns of allelic expression such as alternative promoters and alternative 3' end. The approaches developed not only shed light on the incidence and mechanisms of allelic expression, but will also help towards mapping the genetic causes of allelic expression and identify cases where this variation may be linked to diseases.

  20. Allelic associations of two polymorphic microsatellites in intron 40 of the human von Willebrand factor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, S.D.J.; De Souza, K.T. (Nucleo de Genetica Medica de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil)); De Andrade, M.; Chakraborty, R. (Univ. of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX (United States))

    1994-01-18

    At intron 40 of the von Willebrand factor (vWF) gene, two GATA-repeat polymorphic sites exist that are physically separated by 212 bp. At the first site (vWF1 locus), seven segregating repeat alleles were observed in a Brazilian Caucasian population, and at the second (vWF2 locus) there were eight alleles, detected through PCR amplifications of this DNA region. Haplotype analysis of individuals revealed 36 different haplotypes in a sample of 338 chromosomes examined. Allele frequencies between generations and gender at each locus were not significantly different, and the genotype frequencies were consistent with their Hardy-Weinberg expectations. Linkage disequilibrium between loci is highly significant with positive allele size association; that is, large alleles at the loci tend to occur together, and so do the same alleles. Variability at each locus appeared to have arisen in a stepwise fashion, suggesting replication slippage as a possible mechanism of production of new alleles. However, the authors observed an increased number of haplotypes, in contrast with the predictions of a stepwise production of variation in the entire region, suggesting some form of cooperative changes between loci that could be due to either gene conversion, or a common control mechanism of production of new variation at these repeat polymorphism sites. The high degree of polymorphism (gene diversity values of 72% and 78% at vWF1 and vWF2, respectively, and of 93% at the haplotype level) makes these markers informative for paternity testing, genetic counseling, and individual-identification purposes.

  1. Evidence of cryptic introgression in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) based on wild tomato species alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labate, Joanne A; Robertson, Larry D

    2012-08-07

    Many highly beneficial traits (e.g. disease or abiotic stress resistance) have been transferred into crops through crosses with their wild relatives. The 13 recognized species of tomato (Solanum section Lycopersicon) are closely related to each other and wild species genes have been extensively used for improvement of the crop, Solanum lycopersicum L. In addition, the lack of geographical barriers has permitted natural hybridization between S. lycopersicum and its closest wild relative Solanum pimpinellifolium in Ecuador, Peru and northern Chile. In order to better understand patterns of S. lycopersicum diversity, we sequenced 47 markers ranging in length from 130 to 1200 bp (total of 24 kb) in genotypes of S. lycopersicum and wild tomato species S. pimpinellifolium, Solanum arcanum, Solanum peruvianum, Solanum pennellii and Solanum habrochaites. Between six and twelve genotypes were comparatively analyzed per marker. Several of the markers had previously been hypothesized as carrying wild species alleles within S. lycopersicum, i.e., cryptic introgressions. Each marker was mapped with high confidence (etomato whole genome shotgun chromosomes (SL2.40) database. Neighbor-joining trees showed high mean bootstrap support (86.8 ± 2.34%) for distinguishing red-fruited from green-fruited taxa for 38 of the markers. Hybridization and parsimony splits networks, genomic map positions of markers relative to documented introgressions, and historical origins of accessions were used to interpret evolutionary patterns at nine markers with putatively introgressed alleles. Of the 47 genetic markers surveyed in this study, four were involved in linkage drag on chromosome 9 during introgression breeding, while alleles at five markers apparently originated from natural hybridization with S. pimpinellifolium and were associated with primitive genotypes of S. lycopersicum. The positive identification of introgressed genes within crop species such as S. lycopersicum will help

  2. Allelic Interaction between CRELD1 and VEGFA in the Pathogenesis of Cardiac Atrioventricular Septal Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redig, Jennifer K.; Fouad, Gameil T.; Babcock, Darcie; Reshey, Benjamin; Feingold, Eleanor; Reeves, Roger H.; Maslen, Cheryl L.

    2014-01-01

    Atrioventricular septal defects (AVSD) are highly heritable, clinically significant congenital heart malformations. Genetic and environmental modifiers of risk are thought to work in unknown combinations to cause AVSD. Approximately 5–10% of simplex AVSD cases carry a missense mutation in CRELD1. However, CRELD1 mutations are not fully penetrant and require interactions with other risk factors to result in AVSD. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGFA) is a well-characterized modulator of heart valve development. A functional VEGFA polymorphism, VEGFA c.–634C, which causes constitutively increased VEGFA expression, has been associated with cardiac septal defects suggesting it may be a genetic risk factor. To determine if there is an allelic association with AVSD we genotyped the VEGFA c.–634 SNP in a simplex AVSD study cohort. Over-representation of the c.–634C allele in the AVSD group suggested that this genotype may increase risk. Correlation of CRELD1 and VEGFA genotypes revealed that potentially pathogenic missense mutations in CRELD1 were always accompanied by the VEGFA c.–634C allele in individuals with AVSD suggesting a potentially pathogenic allelic interaction. We used a Creld1 knockout mouse model to determine the effect of deficiency of Creld1 combined with increased VEGFA on atrioventricular canal development. Morphogenic response to VEGFA was abnormal in Creld1-deficient embryonic hearts, indicating that interaction between CRELD1 and VEGFA has the potential to alter atrioventricular canal morphogenesis. This supports our hypothesis that an additive effect between missense mutations in CRELD1 and a functional SNP in VEGFA contributes to the pathogenesis of AVSD. PMID:25328912

  3. Allelic Interaction between CRELD1 and VEGFA in the Pathogenesis of Cardiac Atrioventricular Septal Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer K. Redig

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Atrioventricular septal defects (AVSD are highly heritable, clinically significant congenital heart malformations. Genetic and environmental modifiers of risk are thought to work in unknown combinations to cause AVSD. Approximately 5–10% of simplex AVSD cases carry a missense mutation in CRELD1. However, CRELD1 mutations are not fully penetrant and require interactions with other risk factors to result in AVSD. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGFA is a well-characterized modulator of heart valve development. A functional VEGFA polymorphism, VEGFA c.-634C, which causes constitutively increased VEGFA expression, has been associated with cardiac septal defects suggesting it may be a genetic risk factor. To determine if there is an allelic association with AVSD we genotyped the VEGFA c.-634 SNP in a simplex AVSD study cohort. Over-representation of the c.-634C allele in the AVSD group suggested that this genotype may increase risk. Correlation of CRELD1 and VEGFA genotypes revealed that potentially pathogenic missense mutations in CRELD1 were always accompanied by the VEGFA c.-634C allele in individuals with AVSD suggesting a potentially pathogenic allelic interaction. We used a Creld1 knockout mouse model to determine the effect of deficiency of Creld1 combined with increased VEGFA on atrioventricular canal development. Morphogenic response to VEGFA was abnormal in Creld1-deficient embryonic hearts, indicating that interaction between CRELD1 and VEGFA has the potential to alter atrioventricular canal morphogenesis. This supports our hypothesis that an additive effect between missense mutations in CRELD1 and a functional SNP in VEGFA contributes to the pathogenesis of AVSD.

  4. APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... of choice to decrease the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) . However, there is a wide variability in ...

  5. Allelic diversity of a beer haze active protein gene in cultivated and Tibetan wild barley and development of allelic specific markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lingzhen; Dai, Fei; Qiu, Long; Sun, Dongfa; Zhang, Guoping

    2011-07-13

    The formation of haze is a serious quality problem in beer production. It has been shown that the use of silica elute (SE)-ve malt (absence of molecular weight (MW) ∼14000 Da) for brewing can improve haze stability in the resultant beer, and the protein was identified as a barley trypsin inhibitor of the chloroform/methanol type (BTI-CMe). The objectives of this study were to determine (1) the allelic diversity of the gene controlling BTI-CMe in cultivated and Tibetan wild barley and (2) allele-specific (AS) markers for screening SE protein type. A survey of 172 Tibetan annual wild barley accessions and 71 cultivated barley genotypes was conducted, and 104 wild accessions and 35 cultivated genotypes were identified as SE+ve and 68 wild accessions and 36 cultivated genotypes as SE-ve. The allelic diversity of the gene controlling BTI-CMe was investigated by cloning, alignment, and association analysis. It was found that there were significant differences between the SE+ve and SE-ve types in single-nucleotide polymorphisms at 234 (SNP(234)), SNP(313), and SNP(385.) Furthermore, two sets of AS markers were developed to screen SE protein type based on SNP(313). AS-PCR had results very similar to those obtained by immunoblot method. Mapping analysis showed that the gene controlling the MW∼14 kDa band was located on the short arm of chromosome 3H, at the position of marker BPB-0527 (33.302 cM) in the Franklin/Yerong DH population.

  6. Inverse association between obesity predisposing FTO genotype and completed suicide.

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    Izabela Chojnicka

    Full Text Available The A allele of rs9939609 in the FTO gene predisposes to increased body mass index (BMI and obesity. Recently we showed an inverse association between the obesity related A allele of rs9939609 and alcohol dependence which was replicated by others. Since this finding raises a possibility that FTO may be associated with other psychiatric phenotypes, we aimed to examine association of rs9939609 with completed suicide. We genotyped rs9939609 in 912 suicide victims and 733 controls using TaqMan approach. We observed an inverse association between suicide and the rs9939609 A allele (OR = 0.80, P = 0.002, Pcor = 0.006 with genotype distribution suggesting a co-dominant effect. Given the link between alcoholism and suicide under influence of alcohol reported in Polish population, confounding by alcohol addiction was unlikely due to apparently similar effect size among cases who were under influence of ethanol at the time of death (OR = 0.76, P = 0.003, N = 361 and those who were not (OR = 0.80, P = 0.007, N = 469. The search for genotype-phenotype correlations did not show significant results. In conclusion, our study proves that there is an inverse association between rs9939609 polymorphism in FTO gene and completed suicide which is independent from association between FTO and alcohol addiction.

  7. Identification of polymorphic inversions from genotypes

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    Cáceres Alejandro

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphic inversions are a source of genetic variability with a direct impact on recombination frequencies. Given the difficulty of their experimental study, computational methods have been developed to infer their existence in a large number of individuals using genome-wide data of nucleotide variation. Methods based on haplotype tagging of known inversions attempt to classify individuals as having a normal or inverted allele. Other methods that measure differences between linkage disequilibrium attempt to identify regions with inversions but unable to classify subjects accurately, an essential requirement for association studies. Results We present a novel method to both identify polymorphic inversions from genome-wide genotype data and classify individuals as containing a normal or inverted allele. Our method, a generalization of a published method for haplotype data 1, utilizes linkage between groups of SNPs to partition a set of individuals into normal and inverted subpopulations. We employ a sliding window scan to identify regions likely to have an inversion, and accumulation of evidence from neighboring SNPs is used to accurately determine the inversion status of each subject. Further, our approach detects inversions directly from genotype data, thus increasing its usability to current genome-wide association studies (GWAS. Conclusions We demonstrate the accuracy of our method to detect inversions and classify individuals on principled-simulated genotypes, produced by the evolution of an inversion event within a coalescent model 2. We applied our method to real genotype data from HapMap Phase III to characterize the inversion status of two known inversions within the regions 17q21 and 8p23 across 1184 individuals. Finally, we scan the full genomes of the European Origin (CEU and Yoruba (YRI HapMap samples. We find population-based evidence for 9 out of 15 well-established autosomic inversions, and for 52 regions

  8. Geographical distribution of GmTfl1 alleles in Chinese soybean varieties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guifeng; Liu; Lin; Zhao; Benjamin; J.Averitt; Ying; Liu; Bo; Zhang; Ruzhen; Chang; Yansong; Ma; Xiaoyan; Luan; Rongxia; Guan; Lijuan; Qiu

    2015-01-01

    Stem growth habit is an important agronomic trait in soybean and is subject to artificial selection. This study aimed to provide a theory for genotypic selection of stem growth habit for breeding purposes by analyzing the alleles of Gm Tfl1 gene in Chinese soybean varieties and establishing a database of Gm Tfl1 variation. Using knowledge of insertion and deletion(Indel) in the non-coding region and four single-nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs) in the coding sequences of the Gm Tfl1 gene, four CAPS and one Indel markers were developed and used to test 1120 Chinese soybean varieties. We found that the dominant Gm Tfl1 allele was prevalent in accessions from the Northern ecoregion, whereas the recessive allele, Gmtfl1, was more common in the Southern ecoregion, and the proportions of Gm Tfl1 and recessive alleles were respectively 40.1% and 59.9% in the Huang-Huai ecoregion. The proportion of Gm Tfl1 decreased and that of Gmtfl1 increased, gradually from north to south. Allele Gm Tfl1-a was present in higher proportions in the Huang-Huai spring, Huang-Huai summer, and Northern spring sub-ecoregions than that in the other sub-ecoregions. Gm Tfl1-b was common in the Northeast spring, Northern spring and Southern summer sub-ecoregions. Gmtfl1-ta was found mainly in the Huang-Huai spring,Huang-Huai summer and Southern spring sub-ecoregions. The Gmtfl1-ab allele was distributed in all six soybean sub-ecoregions. The Gmtfl1-bb allele was distributed mainly in the Huang-Huai spring and summer and Southern spring and summer sub-ecoregions,but the Gmtfl1-tb allele was detected only in the Huang-Huai summer sub-ecoregion. The distributions of Gm Tfl1 and Gmtfl1 have shown no large changes in nearly 60 years of breeding, but the frequency of the recessive genotype Gmtfl1 has shown a rising trend in the last 20 years. This study provides a theoretical foundation for breeding new soybean varieties for different ecoregions.

  9. The lost honour of Henrietta Leavitt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Puerto, C.

    2011-11-01

    The first scene opens with the music of Shirley Bassey. The astronomer Henrietta Swan Leavitt is writing a diary when visited by the famous CBS reporter Edward Roscoe Murrow. Henrietta is surprised that this American television channel should want to pay such a tribute to her, but she agrees to be interviewed. Annie Jump Cannon, her friend and colleague from Harvard College Observatory, accompanies her during most of the sessions. Everything goes so well that the journalist tries to touch on certain issues that Henrietta seems to want to keep secret, such as her relationship with Edward Charles Pickering, Director of the Observatory, and the reason why she failed to get the recognition for her work that she deserved.This is the argument of the play The Lost Honor of Henrietta Leavitt, a project of the Museo de la Ciencia y el Cosmos (Museum of Science and the Cosmos), run by the Organismo Autonomo de Museos y Centros of Cabildo de Tenerife (Autonomous Organism of Museums and Centres of the island government, Cabildo of Tenerife), with funding from the Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology (FECYT) and designed for the International Year of Astronomy 2009. The play, written and directed by the author, Carmen del Puerto, has been staged eight times in Tenerife and Pamplona. The poster values this experience as a resource for scientific popularization.

  10. Advanced Lost Foam Casting Technology - Phase V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanliang Sun; Harry E. Littleton; Charles E. Bates

    2004-04-29

    Previous research, conducted under DOE Contracts DE-FC07-89ID12869, DE-FC07-93ID12230 and DE-FC07-95ID113358 made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional developments were needed to improve the process and make it more functional in industrial environments. The current project focused on eight tasks listed as follows: Task 1--Computational Model for the Process and Data Base to Support the Model; Task 2--Casting Dimensional Accuracy; Task 3--Pattern Production; Task 4--Improved Pattern Materials; Task 5--Coating Control; Task 6--In-Plant Case Studies; Task 7--Energy and the Environmental Data; and Task 8--Technology Transfer. This report summarizes the work done on all tasks in the period of October 1, 1999 through September 30, 2004. The results obtained in each task and subtask are summarized in this Executive Summary and details are provided in subsequent sections of the report.

  11. A novel FUT1 allele was identified in a Chinese individual with para-Bombay phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X; Tao, S; Ying, Y; Hong, X; He, Y; Zhu, F; Lv, H; Yan, L

    2011-12-01

    The para-Bombay phenotype is characterised by H-deficient or H partially deficient red blood cells (RBCs) in individuals who secrete ABH antigens in their saliva. Samples from an individual whose RBCs had an apparent para-Bombay phenotype and his family members were investigated and a novel FUT1 allele was identified. RBCs' phenotype was characterised by standard serologic technique. Genomic DNA was sequenced with primers that amplified the coding sequence of FUT1 and FUT2, respectively. Routine ABO genotyping analysis was performed. Haplotypes of FUT1 were identified by TOPO cloning sequencing. Recombination expression vectors of FUT1 mutation alleles were constructed and transfected into COS-7 cells. The pα-(1,2)-fucosyltransferase activity of expression protein was determined. B101/O02 genotype of the proband was correlated with ABH substances in saliva. The proband carried a new FUT1 allele which showed 35C/T, 235G/C and 682A/G heterozygote by directly DNA sequencing. Two haplotypes, 235C and 35T+682G, were identified by TOPO cloning sequencing and COS-7 cells transfected with five recombination vectors including wild-type, 35T, 235C, 682G and 35T+682G alleles were established respectively. The α-(1,2)-fucosyltransferase activities of cell lysates which had transfected with 35T, 235C, 682G and 35T+682G recombination vectors showed 79·45, 16·23, 80·32 and 24·59%, respectively, compared with that of the wild-type FUT1-transfected cell lysates. A novel FUT1 allele 235C was identified, which greatly diminished the activity of α-(1,2)-fucosyltransferase. © 2011 The Authors. Transfusion Medicine © 2011 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  12. Distribution of CYP2D6 Alleles and Phenotypes in the Brazilian Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sortica, Vinicius A.; Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme; de Moraes, Maria Elizabete; Pena, Sergio D. J.; dos Santos, Ândrea K. Ribeiro; Romano-Silva, Marco A.; Hutz, Mara H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The CYP2D6 enzyme is one of the most important members of the cytochrome P450 superfamily. This enzyme metabolizes approximately 25% of currently prescribed medications. The CYP2D6 gene presents a high allele heterogeneity that determines great inter-individual variation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the variability of CYP2D6 alleles, genotypes and predicted phenotypes in Brazilians. Eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms and CYP2D6 duplications/multiplications were genotyped by TaqMan assays in 1020 individuals from North, Northeast, South, and Southeast Brazil. Eighteen CYP2D6 alleles were identified in the Brazilian population. The CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*2 alleles were the most frequent and widely distributed in different geographical regions of Brazil. The highest number of CYPD6 alleles observed was six and the frequency of individuals with more than two copies ranged from 6.3% (in Southern Brazil) to 10.2% (Northern Brazil). The analysis of molecular variance showed that CYP2D6 is homogeneously distributed across different Brazilian regions and most of the differences can be attributed to inter-individual differences. The most frequent predicted metabolic status was EM (83.5%). Overall 2.5% and 3.7% of Brazilians were PMs and UMs respectively. Genomic ancestry proportions differ only in the prevalence of intermediate metabolizers. The IM predicted phenotype is associated with a higher proportion of African ancestry and a lower proportion of European ancestry in Brazilians. PM and UM classes did not vary among regions and/or ancestry proportions therefore unique CYP2D6 testing guidelines for Brazilians are possible and could potentially avoid ineffective or adverse events outcomes due to drug prescriptions. PMID:25329392

  13. Combined Effects of GSTM1 Null Allele and APOL1 Renal Risk Alleles in CKD Progression in the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodonyi-Kovacs, Gabor; Ma, Jennie Z; Chang, Jamison; Lipkowitz, Michael S; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Winkler, Cheryl Ann; Le, Thu H

    2016-10-01

    Apolipoprotein L-1 (APOL1) high-risk alleles and the glutathione-S-transferase-μ1 (GSTM1) null allele have been shown separately to associate with CKD progression in the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) trial participants. Here, we determined combined effects of GSTM1 null and APOL1 high-risk alleles on clinical outcomes in 682 AASK participants who were classified into four groups by GSTM1 null or active genotype and APOL1 high- or low-risk genotype. We assessed survival differences among these groups by log-rank test and Cox regression adjusted for important clinical variables for time to GFR event (change in GFR of 50% or 25-ml/min per 1.73 m(2) decline), incident ESRD, death, or composite outcomes. The groups differed significantly in event-free survival for incident ESRD and composite outcomes (P≤0.001 by log-rank test). Compared with the reference GSTM1 active/APOL1 low-risk group, other groups had these hazard ratios for the composite outcome of incident ESRD and change in GFR: GSTM1 active/APOL1 high-risk hazard ratio, 2.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.76 to 5.90 (P=0.15); GSTM1 null/APOL1 low-risk hazard ratio, 2.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.08 to 3.88 (P=0.03); and GSTM1 null/APOL1 high-risk hazard ratio, 3.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.51 to 5.96 (P=0.002). In conclusion, GSTM1 null and APOL1 high-risk alleles deleteriously affect CKD progression among blacks with hypertension, and subjects with both GSTM1 null and APOL1 high-risk genotypes had highest risk of adverse renal outcomes. Larger cohorts are needed to fully explore interactions of GSTM1 and APOL1 genotypes in other subgroups.

  14. Lactase persistence genotypes and malaria susceptibility in Fulani of Mali

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    Dolo Amagana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fulani are a widely spread African ethnic group characterized by lower susceptibility to Plasmodium falciparum, clinical malaria morbidity and higher rate of lactase persistence compared to sympatric tribes. Lactase non-persistence, often called lactose intolerance, is the normal condition where lactase activity in the intestinal wall declines after weaning. Lactase persistence, common in Europe, and in certain African people with traditions of raising cattle, is caused by polymorphisms in the enhancer region approximately 14 kb upstream of the lactase gene. Methods To evaluate the relationship between malaria and lactase persistence genotypes, a 400 bp region surrounding the main European C/T-13910 polymorphism upstream of the lactase gene was sequenced. DNA samples used in the study originated from 162 Fulani and 79 Dogon individuals from Mali. Results Among 79 Dogon only one heterozygote of the lactase enhancer polymorphism was detected, whereas all others were homozygous for the ancestral C allele. Among the Fulani, the main European polymorphism at locus C/T-13910 was by far the most common polymorphism, with an allele frequency of 37%. Three other single-nucleotide polymorphisms were found with allele frequencies of 3.7%, 1.9% and 0.6% each. The novel DNA polymorphism T/C-13906 was seen in six heterozygous Fulani. Among the Fulani with lactase non-persistence CC genotypes at the C/T-13910 locus, 24% had malaria parasites detectable by microscopy compared to 18% for lactase persistent genotypes (P = 0.29. Pooling the lactase enhancer polymorphisms to a common presumptive genotype gave 28% microscopy positives for non-persistent and 17% for others (P = 0.11. Conclusions Plasmodium falciparum parasitaemia in asymptomatic Fulani is more common in individuals with lactase non-persistence genotypes, but this difference is not statistically significant. The potential immunoprotective properties of dietary cow milk as a reason

  15. Lactase persistence genotypes and malaria susceptibility in Fulani of Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokki, A Inkeri; Järvelä, Irma; Israelsson, Elisabeth; Maiga, Bakary; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Dolo, Amagana; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Meri, Seppo; Holmberg, Ville

    2011-01-14

    Fulani are a widely spread African ethnic group characterized by lower susceptibility to Plasmodium falciparum, clinical malaria morbidity and higher rate of lactase persistence compared to sympatric tribes. Lactase non-persistence, often called lactose intolerance, is the normal condition where lactase activity in the intestinal wall declines after weaning. Lactase persistence, common in Europe, and in certain African people with traditions of raising cattle, is caused by polymorphisms in the enhancer region approximately 14 kb upstream of the lactase gene. To evaluate the relationship between malaria and lactase persistence genotypes, a 400 bp region surrounding the main European C/T-13910 polymorphism upstream of the lactase gene was sequenced. DNA samples used in the study originated from 162 Fulani and 79 Dogon individuals from Mali. Among 79 Dogon only one heterozygote of the lactase enhancer polymorphism was detected, whereas all others were homozygous for the ancestral C allele. Among the Fulani, the main European polymorphism at locus C/T-13910 was by far the most common polymorphism, with an allele frequency of 37%. Three other single-nucleotide polymorphisms were found with allele frequencies of 3.7%, 1.9% and 0.6% each. The novel DNA polymorphism T/C-13906 was seen in six heterozygous Fulani. Among the Fulani with lactase non-persistence CC genotypes at the C/T-13910 locus, 24% had malaria parasites detectable by microscopy compared to 18% for lactase persistent genotypes (P = 0.29). Pooling the lactase enhancer polymorphisms to a common presumptive genotype gave 28% microscopy positives for non-persistent and 17% for others (P = 0.11). Plasmodium falciparum parasitaemia in asymptomatic Fulani is more common in individuals with lactase non-persistence genotypes, but this difference is not statistically significant. The potential immunoprotective properties of dietary cow milk as a reason for the partial malaria resistance of Fulani warrant further

  16. Genotyping and surveillance for scrapie in Finnish sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hautaniemi Maria

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The progression of scrapie is known to be influenced by the amino acid polymorphisms of the host prion protein (PrP gene. There is no breeding programme for TSE resistance in sheep in Finland, but a scrapie control programme has been in place since 1995. In this study we have analysed PrP genotypes of total of 928 purebred and crossbred sheep together with the data of scrapie survey carried out in Finland during 2002–2008 in order to gain knowledge of the genotype distribution and scrapie prevalence in Finnish sheep. Results The ARQ/ARQ genotype was the most common genotype in all breeds studied. ARR allele frequency was less than 12% in purebred Finnish sheep and in most genotypes heterozygous for ARR, the second allele was ARQ. The VRQ allele was not detected in the Grey race sheep of Kainuu or in the Aland sheep, and it was present in less than 6% of the Finnish Landrace sheep. Leucine was the most prominent amino acid found in codon 141. In addition, one novel prion dimorphisms of Q220L was detected. During the scrapie survey of over 15 000 sheep in 2002–2008, no classical scrapie cases and only five atypical scrapie cases were detected. Conclusions The results indicate that the Finnish sheep populations have genetically little resistance to classical scrapie, but no classical scrapie was detected during an extensive survey in 2002–2008. However, five atypical scrapie cases emerged; thus, the disease is present in the Finnish sheep population at a low level.

  17. EcoTILLING-based association mapping efficiently delineates functionally relevant natural allelic variants of candidate genes governing agronomic traits in chickpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak eBajaj

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The large-scale mining and high-throughput genotyping of novel gene-based allelic variants in natural mapping population are essential for association mapping to identify functionally relevant molecular tags governing useful agronomic traits in chickpea. The present study employs an alternative time-saving, non-laborious and economical pool-based EcoTILLING approach coupled with agarose gel detection assay to discover 1133 novel SNP allelic variants from diverse coding and regulatory sequence components of 1133 transcription factor (TF genes by genotyping in 192 diverse desi and kabuli chickpea accessions constituting a seed weight association panel. Integrating these SNP genotyping data with seed weight field phenotypic information of 192 structured association panel identified eight SNP alleles in the eight TF genes regulating seed weight of chickpea. The associated individual and combination of all SNPs explained 10-15 and 31% phenotypic variation for seed weight, respectively. The EcoTILLING-based large-scale allele mining and genotyping strategy implemented for association mapping is found much effective for a diploid genome crop species like chickpea with narrow genetic base and low genetic polymorphism. This optimized approach thus can be deployed for various genomics-assisted breeding applications with optimal expense of resources in domesticated chickpea. The seed weight-associated natural allelic variants and candidate TF genes delineated have potential to accelerate marker-assisted genetic improvement of chickpea.

  18. Justification for setting the individual animal genotype call rate threshold at eighty-five percent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purfield, D C; McClure, M; Berry, D P

    2016-11-01

    Data quality of SNP arrays impacts the accuracy and precision of downstream data analyses. One such quality control measure often imposed is a threshold on individual animal call rate. Different call rate thresholds have been applied across studies; little is known, however, about the impact of these thresholds on the quality of the genotype data. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of different call rate thresholds on the integrity of the genotypes but also to quantify the contribution of different factors to the variability in animal call rate. Data included 142,342 samples genotyped on a custom Illumina genotype panel from 141,591 dairy and beef cattle; the number of Illumina SNP on the panel was 14,371. The mean animal call rate across all samples was 99.09%; 487 animals had both a low call rate (call rate (≥99%) after resampling and regenotyping. Several factors were associated ( call rate including animal sex, the sampling herd, the date of genotyping, the genotyping plate, and the plate well. The genotype and allele concordance between the genotypes of the 487 low- and high-call rate individuals improved at a diminishing rate as mean animal call rate increased. Mean genotype and allele concordance rates of 0.987 and 0.997, respectively, existed when animal call rate was between 85 and 90%, increasing to 0.998 and 0.999, respectively, when animal call rate was between 95 and call rate animals increased when animal call rate improved; an allele concordance rate of 1.00 was achieved when animal call rate was between 85 and call rate animals improved as animal call rate increased; the mean genotype concordance rate of the imputed nonobserved SNP was 0.41 when animal call rate was call rate was between 95 and call rate was call rate threshold of 85%.

  19. Analysis of PRLR and BF Genotypes Associated with Litter Size in Beijing Black Pig Population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xing-ping; WANG Li-xian; LUO RENG; SUN Shi-duo

    2008-01-01

    This study is aimed at using the DNA mutations in the prolactin receptor (PRLR) and properdin (BF) genes to determine associations between the genotype and litter size in the Beijing Black pig population. A total of 321 Beijing Black pig sows were genotyped using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method, with the Alu I and Sma I for PRLR and BF genes, respectively. Two different alleles of PRLR and BF genes were identified: allele A (0.25) and B (0.75) of the PRLR gene, allele A (0.13) and B (0.86) of the BF gene. The association analysis between the genotypes and the litter size were estimated with the method of the general linear model. The analysis results of PRLR showed that in first parity, sows with genotype AA had a larger litter size than sows with genotype AB and BB, but the difference was statistically not significant. In later parities, statistically significant (P<0.05) differences were seen between sows with genotypes AA and AB, and BB of the PRLR gene. The associated analysis results between genotypes and litter size (total number born, TNB, and number born alive, NBA) showed that there were no significant differences in the first parity sows with different genotypes of the BF gene, but significant differences appeared in NBA between the sows of genotypes AB and BB, in later parity, for which significantly higher values were observed in the offspring of heterozygotes. Considering the consistent genotypic effect on the litter size of both sows in first parity and later parity, it was concluded that the locus of the PRLR gene, digested with Alu I, could be the gene maker for the litter size in Beijing Black pigs.

  20. TrueAllele casework on Virginia DNA mixture evidence: computer and manual interpretation in 72 reported criminal cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlin, Mark W; Dormer, Kiersten; Hornyak, Jennifer; Schiermeier-Wood, Lisa; Greenspoon, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Mixtures are a commonly encountered form of biological evidence that contain DNA from two or more contributors. Laboratory analysis of mixtures produces data signals that usually cannot be separated into distinct contributor genotypes. Computer modeling can resolve the genotypes up to probability, reflecting the uncertainty inherent in the data. Human analysts address the problem by simplifying the quantitative data in a threshold process that discards considerable identification information. Elevated stochastic threshold levels potentially discard more information. This study examines three different mixture interpretation methods. In 72 criminal cases, 111 genotype comparisons were made between 92 mixture items and relevant reference samples. TrueAllele computer modeling was done on all the evidence samples, and documented in DNA match reports that were provided as evidence for each case. Threshold-based Combined Probability of Inclusion (CPI) and stochastically modified CPI (mCPI) analyses were performed as well. TrueAllele's identification information in 101 positive matches was used to assess the reliability of its modeling approach. Comparison was made with 81 CPI and 53 mCPI DNA match statistics that were manually derived from the same data. There were statistically significant differences between the DNA interpretation methods. TrueAllele gave an average match statistic of 113 billion, CPI averaged 6.68 million, and mCPI averaged 140. The computer was highly specific, with a false positive rate under 0.005%. The modeling approach was precise, having a factor of two within-group standard deviation. TrueAllele accuracy was indicated by having uniformly distributed match statistics over the data set. The computer could make genotype comparisons that were impossible or impractical using manual methods. TrueAllele computer interpretation of DNA mixture evidence is sensitive, specific, precise, accurate and more informative than manual interpretation alternatives

  1. Molecular genetic analysis of para-Bombay phenotypes in Chinese: a novel non-functional FUT1 allele is identified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, S P; Chee, K Y; Chan, P Y; Chow, E Y D; Wong, H F

    2002-10-01

    The para-Bombay phenotype (also known as H-deficient secretor) is characterized by a lack of ABH antigens on red cells, but ABH substances are found in saliva. Molecular genetic analysis was performed for five Chinese individuals serologically typed as para-Bombay. ABO genotyping and mutational analysis of both FUT1 (or H) and FUT2 (or Se) loci were performed for these individuals using the polymerase chain reaction, single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct DNA sequencing. The ABO genotypes of these para-Bombay individuals correlated with the types of ABH substances found in the saliva. Their FUT1 genotypes were h1h2 (three individuals), h2h2 (one individual) and h2h6 (one individual). Alleles h1 (547-552delAG) and h2 (880-882delTT) were known frameshift mutations, while h6 (522C > A) was a missense mutation (Phe174Leu) not previously reported. These three mutations were rare sequence variations, each with an allele frequency of less than 0.005. Phe174 might be functionally important because this residue is conserved from mouse to human. Their FUT2 genotypes were Se357se357,385 for the h2h6 individual and Se357Se357) for the others. Both FUT2 alleles were known: one functional (Se357) and one weakly functional (se357,385). That they carried at least one copy of a functional FUT2 allele was consistent with their secretor status. As FUT1 and FUT2 are adjacent on 19q13.3, there are three possible haplotypes in these para-Bombay individuals: h1-Se357; h2-Se357; and h6-se357,385. A novel non-functional FUT1 allele (522C > A, or Phe174Leu) was identified in a para-Bombay individual and on a se357,385 haplotype background.

  2. TrueAllele casework on Virginia DNA mixture evidence: computer and manual interpretation in 72 reported criminal cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W Perlin

    Full Text Available Mixtures are a commonly encountered form of biological evidence that contain DNA from two or more contributors. Laboratory analysis of mixtures produces data signals that usually cannot be separated into distinct contributor genotypes. Computer modeling can resolve the genotypes up to probability, reflecting the uncertainty inherent in the data. Human analysts address the problem by simplifying the quantitative data in a threshold process that discards considerable identification information. Elevated stochastic threshold levels potentially discard more information. This study examines three different mixture interpretation methods. In 72 criminal cases, 111 genotype comparisons were made between 92 mixture items and relevant reference samples. TrueAllele computer modeling was done on all the evidence samples, and documented in DNA match reports that were provided as evidence for each case. Threshold-based Combined Probability of Inclusion (CPI and stochastically modified CPI (mCPI analyses were performed as well. TrueAllele's identification information in 101 positive matches was used to assess the reliability of its modeling approach. Comparison was made with 81 CPI and 53 mCPI DNA match statistics that were manually derived from the same data. There were statistically significant differences between the DNA interpretation methods. TrueAllele gave an average match statistic of 113 billion, CPI averaged 6.68 million, and mCPI averaged 140. The computer was highly specific, with a false positive rate under 0.005%. The modeling approach was precise, having a factor of two within-group standard deviation. TrueAllele accuracy was indicated by having uniformly distributed match statistics over the data set. The computer could make genotype comparisons that were impossible or impractical using manual methods. TrueAllele computer interpretation of DNA mixture evidence is sensitive, specific, precise, accurate and more informative than manual

  3. The Phenotype/Genotype Correlation of Lactase Persistence among Omani Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahim Al-Abri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the correlation of lactase persistence phenotype with genotype in Omani adults.Methods: Lactase persistence phenotype was tested by hydrogen breath test in 52 Omani Adults using the Micro H2 analyzer. Results were checked against genotyping using direct DNA sequencing.Results: Forty one individuals with C/C-13910 and T/T-13915 genotypes had positive breath tests (≥20 ppm; while eight of nine individuals with T/C-13910 or T/G-13915 genotypes had negative breath tests (<20 ppm and two subjects were non-hydrogen producers. The agreement between phenotype and genotype using Kappa value was very good (0.93.Conclusion: Genotyping both T/C-13910 and T/G-13915 alleles can be used to assist diagnosis and predict lactose intolerance in the Omani population.

  4. Silhouette scores for assessment of SNP genotype clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonsson Mats

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs generates large amounts of data. In many SNP genotyping assays, the genotype assignment is based on scatter plots of signals corresponding to the two SNP alleles. In a robust assay the three clusters that define the genotypes are well separated and the distances between the data points within a cluster are short. "Silhouettes" is a graphical aid for interpretation and validation of data clusters that provides a measure of how well a data point was classified when it was assigned to a cluster. Thus "Silhouettes" can potentially be used as a quality measure for SNP genotyping results and for objective comparison of the performance of SNP assays at different circumstances. Results We created a program (ClusterA for calculating "Silhouette scores", and applied it to assess the quality of SNP genotype clusters obtained by single nucleotide primer extension ("minisequencing" in the Tag-microarray format. A Silhouette score condenses the quality of the genotype assignment for each SNP assay into a single numeric value, which ranges from 1.0, when the genotype assignment is unequivocal, down to -1.0, when the genotype assignment has been arbitrary. In the present study we applied Silhouette scores to compare the performance of four DNA polymerases in our minisequencing system by analyzing 26 SNPs in both DNA polarities in 16 DNA samples. We found Silhouettes to provide a relevant measure for the quality of SNP assays at different reaction conditions, illustrated by the four DNA polymerases here. According to our result, the genotypes can be unequivocally assigned without manual inspection when the Silhouette score for a SNP assay is > 0.65. All four DNA polymerases performed satisfactorily in our Tag-array minisequencing system. Conclusion "Silhouette scores" for assessing the quality of SNP genotyping clusters is convenient for evaluating the quality of SNP genotype

  5. Interactions between SNP Alleles at Multiple Loci Contribute to Skin Color Differences between Caucasoid and Mongoloid Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumiko Anno, Takashi Abe, Takushi Yamamoto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP alleles at multiple loci associated with racial differences in skin color using SNP genotyping. A total of 122 Caucasians in Toledo, Ohio and 100 Mongoloids in Japan were genotyped for 20 SNPs in 7 candidate genes, encoding the Agouti signaling protein (ASIP, tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TYRP1, tyrosinase (TYR, melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R, oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF, and myosin VA (MYO5A. Data were used to analyze associations between the 20 SNP alleles using linkage disequilibrium (LD. Combinations of SNP alleles were jointly tested under LD for associations with racial groups by performing a χ2 test for independence. Results showed that SNP alleles at multiple loci can be considered the haplotype that contributes to significant differences between the two population groups and suggest a high probability of LD. Confirmation of these findings requires further study with other ethnic groups to analyze the associations between SNP alleles at multiple loci and skin color variation among races.

  6. Application of pooled genotyping to scan candidate regions for association with HDL cholesterol levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinds David A

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Association studies are used to identify genetic determinants of complex human traits of medical interest. With the large number of validated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs currently available, two limiting factors in association studies are genotyping capability and costs. Pooled DNA genotyping has been proposed as an efficient means of screening SNPs for allele frequency differences in case-control studies and for prioritising them for subsequent individual genotyping analysis. Here, we apply quantitative pooled genotyping followed by individual genotyping and replication to identify associations with human serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol levels. The DNA from individuals with low and high HDL cholesterol levels was pooled separately, each pool was amplified by polymerase chain reaction in triplicate and each amplified product was separately hybridised to a high-density oligonucleotide array. Allele frequency differences between case and control groups with low and high HDL cholesterol levels were estimated for 7,283 SNPs distributed across 71 candidate gene regions spanning a total of 17.1 megabases. A novel method was developed to take advantage of independently derived haplotype map information to improve the pooled estimates of allele frequency differences. A subset of SNPs with the largest estimated allele frequency differences between low and high HDL cholesterol groups was chosen for individual genotyping in the study population, as well as in a separate replication population. Four SNPs in a single haplotype block within the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP gene interval were significantly associated with HDL cholesterol levels in both populations. Our study is among the first to demonstrate the application of pooled genotyping followed by confirmation with individual genotyping to identify genetic determinants of a complex trait.

  7. MASTR: A Technique for Mosaic Mutant Analysis with Spatial and Temporal Control of Recombination Using Conditional Floxed Alleles in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin Lao

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mosaic mutant analysis, the study of cellular defects in scattered mutant cells in a wild-type environment, is a powerful approach for identifying critical functions of genes and has been applied extensively to invertebrate model organisms. A highly versatile technique has been developed in mouse: MASTR (mosaic mutant analysis with spatial and temporal control of recombination, which utilizes the increasing number of floxed alleles and simultaneously combines conditional gene mutagenesis and cell marking for fate analysis. A targeted allele (R26MASTR was engineered; the allele expresses a GFPcre fusion protein following FLP-mediated recombination, which serves the dual function of deleting floxed alleles and marking mutant cells with GFP. Within 24 hr of tamoxifen administration to R26MASTR mice carrying an inducible FlpoER transgene and a floxed allele, nearly all GFP-expressing cells have a mutant allele. The fate of single cells lacking FGF8 or SHH signaling in the developing hindbrain was analyzed using MASTR, and it was revealed that there is only a short time window when neural progenitors require FGFR1 for viability and that granule cell precursors differentiate rapidly when SMO is lost. MASTR is a powerful tool that provides cell-type-specific (spatial and temporal marking of mosaic mutant cells and is broadly applicable to developmental, cancer, and adult stem cell studies.

  8. Diversity of Lactase Persistence Alleles in Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, BL; Raga, TO; Liebert, Anke

    2013-01-01

    The persistent expression of lactase into adulthood in humans is a recent genetic adaptation that allows the consumption of milk from other mammals after weaning. In Europe, a single allele (−13910∗T, rs4988235) in an upstream region that acts as an enhancer to the expression of the lactase gene...... LCT is responsible for lactase persistence and appears to have been under strong directional selection in the last 5,000 years, evidenced by the widespread occurrence of this allele on an extended haplotype. In Africa and the Middle East, the situation is more complicated and at least three other...... alleles (−13907∗G, rs41525747; −13915∗G, rs41380347; −14010∗C, rs145946881) in the same LCT enhancer region can cause continued lactase expression. Here we examine the LCT enhancer sequence in a large lactose-tolerance-tested Ethiopian cohort of more than 350 individuals. We show that a further SNP...

  9. Cause-specific measures of life years lost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Per Kragh; Canudas-Romo, Vladimir; Keiding, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Background: A new measure of the number of life years lost due to specific causes of death is introduced. Methods: This measure is based on the cumulative incidence of death, it does not require "independence" of causes, and it satisfies simple balance equations: "total number of life years lost...... = sum of cause-specific life years lost", and "total number of life years lost before age x + temporary life expectancy between birth and age x = x". Results: The measure is contrasted to alternatives suggested in the demographic literature and all methods are illustrated using Danish and Russian...

  10. Considering lost sale in inventory routing problems for perishable goods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirzaei, Samira; Seifi, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    , the average optimality gaps are less than 10.9% and 13.4% using linear and exponential lost sale functions, respectively. Furthermore, we show that the optimality gaps found by CPLEX grow exponentially with the problem size while those obtained by the proposed meta-heuristic algorithm increase linearly....... is considered as lost sale. The proposed model balances the transportation cost, the cost of inventory holding and lost sale. In addition to the usual inventory routing constraints, we consider the cost of lost sale as a linear or an exponential function of the inventory age. The proposed model is solved...

  11. Cause-specific measures of life years lost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Kragh Andersen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: A new measure of the number of life years lost due to specific causes of death is introduced. Methods: This measure is based on the cumulative incidence of death, it does not require "independence" of causes, and it satisfies simple balance equations: "total number of life years lost = sum of cause-specific life years lost", and "total number of life years lost before age x + temporary life expectancy between birth and age x = x". Results: The measure is contrasted to alternatives suggested in the demographic literature and allmethods are illustrated using Danish and Russian multiple decrement life-tables.

  12. Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD): Automatically generated, permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Neste, Christophe; Van Criekinge, Wim; Deforce, Dieter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to predict if and when massively parallel sequencing of forensic STR loci will replace capillary electrophoresis as the new standard technology in forensic genetics. The main benefits of sequencing are increased multiplexing scales and SNP detection. There is not yet a consensus on how sequenced profiles should be reported. We present the Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD) service, made freely available on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/. It offers permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles (STR or SNP) and their microvariants for use in forensic allele nomenclature. Analogous to Genbank, its aim is to provide permanent identifiers for forensically relevant allele sequences. Researchers that are developing forensic sequencing kits or are performing population studies, can register on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/ and add loci and allele sequences with a short and simple application interface (API).

  13. America’s Lost Innocence and Cinema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja Włodek

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In my paper America’s Lost Innocence I intend to focus on American cinema of the ’50s, part of ’60s, and contemporary throwbacks to those decades. The ’50s have been called “the last decade of American innocence”, “the happiest decade in America’s history – when things were going on – that everybody misses” (by Jean Baudrillard. That era symbolically ceased on 22 November 1963; however, many scholars and publicists undermine the belief in its very existence. Michael Wood calls the ’50s a time of “self-deception”; therefore, the question raised is – has America ever been innocent? By concentrating on the message conveyed by mostly genre (e.g. drama, melodrama, musical, romantic comedy and mainstream movies made in the ’50s and early ’60s (e.g. A Place In the Sun, Cat on the Hot, Tin Roof, Home From the Hill, I intend to analyze the portrait of American society of that time, it’s rules and expectations towards individuals and system as a whole. In the second part of my paper I will focus on contemporary throwbacks to those times depicted mostly in movies made in the 21st century, although not exclusively (e.g. Far From Heaven, The Hours, Revolutionary Road, the TV series Mad Men [2007–], Pleasantville. Using those and other movies as examples, I intend to prove the thesis that the phenomenon of retro and contemporary retromania are not always and not by definition conservative, and can serve as a means to a critical approach towards society.

  14. HLA class II allele and haplotype frequencies in Ethiopian Amhara and Oromo populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, M; de Stefano, G F; Cambon-Thomsen, A; Giraldo-Alvarez, P; Dugoujon, J M; Ohayon, E; Scano, G; Abbal, M

    1998-04-01

    HLA class II alleles were identified in 181 healthy unrelated Ethiopian children of both sexes and in 350 European controls from the South of France. The Ethiopian individuals belonged to the two major ethnic groups of the country: Oromo (N=83) and Amhara (N=98). In both panels, genetic polymorphism of HLA class II alleles was analysed for the first time by molecular typing of DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 loci. Allelic and phenotypic frequencies were compared with those of European controls and other African populations. Construction of HLA class II three-locus haplotypes was also performed. The study revealed some differences between the two groups. Characteristic features of Central and North African populations appeared on the Ethiopian HLA genotypes. Surprisingly, DRB1*11 presented one of the lowest gene frequencies in both Ethiopian ethnic groups in contrast to Europeans and West Africans. Furthermore, this decrease was more marked than those observed using serological techniques in other geographically close East African countries. Oromo and Amhara only showed minor differences in spite of their different origins and histories. One significant difference consisted of a lower DRB1*01 gene frequency in Oromo as reported in most West African people. Some new or rare haplotypes were also observed in the Oromo group. Our results underline the distinctive features of the Ethiopian populations among the few HLA genotyping data available for East African groups and emphasise the major interest of such investigations in this region of Africa.

  15. Involvement of the FGFR4 Arg388 allele in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Sylvia; Bange, Johannes; Fichtner, Alexander; Ihrler, Stephan; Issing, Wolfgang; Ullrich, Axel

    2004-08-20

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) have been implicated in various forms of human hyperproliferative disorders such as cancers of the cervix and bladder. We investigated the expression pattern of FGFR4 and the clinical significance of the recently identified Gly/Arg polymorphism (388) in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) of the oral cavity and the oropharynx. Sections from 104 paraffin-embedded tumors were analyzed by a restriction fragment length polymorphism-based method to determine the FGFR4 genotypes. Protein expression was investigated immunohistochemically and graded into a low, intermediate, or high degree of staining. FGFR4 expression was scored as high in 17, as intermediate in 59 and as low in 28 cases. The FGFR4 Arg388 allele was found in 59 tumors, 46 of them having heterozygous and 13 homozygous genotypes. High expression of the FGFR4 Arg388 allele was significantly associated with reduced overall survival (p = 0.032) and with an advanced tumor stage (p = 0.023), whereas expression of the FGFR4 Gly388 had no impact on disease progression. Our findings indicate that high expression of FGFR4 in connection with the Arg388 allele is associated with poor clinical outcome and support the significance of FGFR4 as a diagnostic marker and a target for therapeutic intervention in human HNSCC.

  16. QTL detection and elite alleles mining for stigma traits in Oryza sativa by association mapping

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    Xiaojing Dang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Stigma traits are very important for hybrid seed production in Oryza sativa, which is a self-pollinated crop; however, the genetic mechanism controlling the traits is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the phenotypic data of 227 accessions across two years and assessed their genotypic variation with 249 simple sequence repeat (SSR markers. By combining phenotypic and genotypic data, a genome-wide association (GWA map was generated. Large phenotypic variations in stigma length (STL, stigma brush-shaped part length (SBPL and stigma non-brush-shaped part length (SNBPL were found. Significant positive correlations were identified among stigma traits. In total, 2,072 alleles were detected among 227 accessions, with an average of 8.3 alleles per SSR locus. GWA mapping detected 6 quantitative trait loci (QTLs for the STL, 2 QTLs for the SBPL and 7 QTLs for the SNBPL. Eleven, 5, and 12 elite alleles were found for the STL, SBPL and SNBPL, respectively. Optimal cross designs were predicted for improving the target traits. The detected genetic variation in stigma traits and QTLs provides helpful information for cloning candidate STL genes and breeding rice cultivars with longer STLs in the future.

  17. Inferring haplotypes and parental genotypes in larger full sib-ships and other pedigrees with missing or erroneous genotype data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nettelblad Carl

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many contexts, pedigrees for individuals are known even though not all individuals have been fully genotyped. In one extreme case, the genotypes for a set of full siblings are known, with no knowledge of parental genotypes. We propose a method for inferring phased haplotypes and genotypes for all individuals, even those with missing data, in such pedigrees, allowing a multitude of classic and recent methods for linkage and genome analysis to be used more efficiently. Results By artificially removing the founder generation genotype data from a well-studied simulated dataset, the quality of reconstructed genotypes in that generation can be verified. For the full structure of repeated matings with 15 offspring per mating, 10 dams per sire, 99.89%of all founder markers were phased correctly, given only the unphased genotypes for offspring. The accuracy was reduced only slightly, to 99.51%, when introducing a 2% error rate in offspring genotypes. When reduced to only 5 full-sib offspring in a single sire-dam mating, the corresponding percentage is 92.62%, which compares favorably with 89.28%from the leading Merlin package. Furthermore, Merlin is unable to handle more than approximately 10 sibs, as the number of states tracked rises exponentially with family size, while our approach has no such limit and handles 150 half-sibs with ease in our experiments. Conclusions Our method is able to reconstruct genotypes for parents when genotype data is only available for offspring individuals, as well as haplotypes for all individuals. Compared to the Merlin package, we can handle larger pedigrees and produce superior results, mainly due to the fact that Merlin uses the Viterbi algorithm on the state space to infer the genotype sequence. Tracking of haplotype and allele origin can be used in any application where the marker set does not directly influence genotype variation influencing traits. Inference of genotypes can also reduce the

  18. Evolutionary dynamics of sporophytic self-incompatibility alleles in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, M H; Vekemans, X; Christiansen, F B

    1997-01-01

    The stationary frequency distribution and allelic dynamics in finite populations are analyzed through stochastic simulations in three models of single-locus, multi-allelic sporophytic self-incompatibility. The models differ in the dominance relationships among alleles. In one model, alleles act c...

  19. Identifying neutral allele Sb at pollen-sterility loci in cultivated rice with Oryza rufipogon origin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI LeiGang; LIU XiangDong; LIU Bo; ZHAO XingJuan; WANG Lan; LI JinQuan; LU YongGen

    2009-01-01

    Pollen sterility is commonly found in the intra-specific hybrids of indica and japonica rice, which is one of the main constrains for the utilization of heterosis between indica and japonica. Six loci controlling the pollen sterility of F1 between indica and japonica have been identified from previous studies. Neu-tral alleles at each locus are potential to overcome the F1 pollen sterility associated with the locus. Therefore, exploitation and utilization of neutral alleles are of significant importance. The present re-search was based on fine mapping of the F_1 pollen-sterility gene Sb and the abundant genetic diversity of Oryza rufipogon Griff. indigenous to Gaozhou, Guangdong Province (referred to as Gaozhou wild rice). Crosses were made using Taichung65 (with the genotype of S_b~jS_b~j and referred to as E_1) and its near-isogenic line of F_1 pollen sterility gene Sb(with the genotype of S_b~iS_b~i, E_2) as female parents, and 12 different accessions of Gaozhou wild rice as male parents. F_1 pollen fertility was examined to identify the materials having the neutral alleles at the F_1 pollen-sterility locus. Segregation of 4 molecular markers tightly linked with the Sb locus was analyzed in the F_2 populations derived from the F_1s car-rying the neutral gene. The pollen fertility related to the 3 genotypes of the molecular markers was also checked by statistical test to determine whether it was consistent with the hypothesis. The results showed that the pollen fertility of two F_1s from one accession of Gaozhou wild rice (GZW099) with E_1 and E_2 was (89.22±1.07)% and (85.65±1.05)%, respectively. Both of them were fertile and showed no significant difference by t-test. Segregation of the 3 genotypes of the 4 molecular markers followed the expected Mendelian ratio (1:2:1) in the F_2 populations. There was no significant difference for the av-eraged pollen fertility of the plants related to the 3 genotypes, suggesting that no interaction exists between the

  20. Serotonin transporter genotype linked to adolescent substance use treatment outcome through externalizing behavior

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    Tammy eChung

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Meta-analyses suggest that the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR short (S allele, relative to the long (L allele, is associated with risk for alcohol dependence, particularly among individuals with early onset antisocial alcoholism. Youth in substance use treatment tend to show antisocial or externalizing behaviors, such as conduct problems, which predict worse treatment outcome. This study examined a pathway in which 5-HTTLPR genotype is associated with externalizing behavior, and the intermediate phenotype of externalizing behavior serves as a link between 5-HTTLPR genotype and substance use treatment outcome in youth. Adolescents (n=142 who were recruited from addictions treatment were genotyped for 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms (S and LG carriers vs. LALA, assessed for externalizing and internalizing behaviors shortly after starting treatment, and followed over 6-months. 5-HTTLPR genotype was not associated with internalizing behaviors, and was not directly associated with 6-month substance use outcomes. However, 5-HTTLPR genotype was associated with externalizing behaviors (S and LG > LALA, and externalizing behaviors predicted alcohol and marijuana problem severity at 6-month follow-up. Results indicated an indirect (p<.05 and non-specific (i.e., both alcohol and marijuana severity effect of 5-HTTLPR genotype on youth substance use treatment outcomes, with externalizing behaviors as an important linking factor. Adolescents in substance use treatment with low expressing (S and LG 5-HTTLPR alleles and externalizing behavior might benefit from intervention that addresses serotonergic functioning, externalizing behaviors, and substance use to improve outcomes.

  1. Haemoglobin polymorphism in Gadus morhua: Genotypic differences in maturing age and within-season gonad maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mork, J.; Giskeödegård, R.; Sundnes, G.

    1983-09-01

    276 specimens of Atlantic cod ( Gadus morhua L.) were caught during spawning in a restricted area of the Trondheimsfjord, Norway, in April and May 1979. Genotypes at the polymorphic haemoglobin locus Hbl differed significantly with respect to mean age at maturation (in males) and mean gonadic development stage (in females). There was no indication of population mixing in the genotypic composition at Hbl or at any of the 4 polymorphic tissue enzyme loci investigated ( LDH-3, IDH-1, PGM, and PGI-1. The findings obtained were considered with regard to temperature-related differences in the functional properties of Hbl molecules, and genotypic differences in growth, age at maturation, and fishing mortality. At the present stage of investigation, the natural selection pattern seems directional and strong. However, the Hbl allele frequencies observed in cod from the examined areas reveal no detectable changes over a period of two decades (˜ 4 generations). The current pattern of commercial exploitation causes, through size selection, a modification of the rate of erosion of the inferior allele, but additional factors must be in force, which play a role in its current abundance in an evolutionary perspective. The observed Hbl genotypic differences in the exact within-season time for spawning might be one such factor. A potential sexual difference in genotypic fitness might be another, but this has yet to be confirmed. The apparent existence of considerable natural and artificial selection forces acting upon cod haemoglobin genotypes makes Hbl allele frequencies unreliable for use in population structure analyses.

  2. The microcephalin ancestral allele in a Neanderthal individual.

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    Martina Lari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The high frequency (around 0.70 worldwide and the relatively young age (between 14,000 and 62,000 years of a derived group of haplotypes, haplogroup D, at the microcephalin (MCPH1 locus led to the proposal that haplogroup D originated in a human lineage that separated from modern humans >1 million years ago, evolved under strong positive selection, and passed into the human gene pool by an episode of admixture circa 37,000 years ago. The geographic distribution of haplogroup D, with marked differences between Africa and Eurasia, suggested that the archaic human form admixing with anatomically modern humans might have been Neanderthal. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report the first PCR amplification and high-throughput sequencing of nuclear DNA at the microcephalin (MCPH1 locus from Neanderthal individual from Mezzena Rockshelter (Monti Lessini, Italy. We show that a well-preserved Neanderthal fossil dated at approximately 50,000 years B.P., was homozygous for the ancestral, non-D, allele. The high yield of Neanderthal mtDNA sequences of the studied specimen, the pattern of nucleotide misincorporation among sequences consistent with post-mortem DNA damage and an accurate control of the MCPH1 alleles in all personnel that manipulated the sample, make it extremely unlikely that this result might reflect modern DNA contamination. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The MCPH1 genotype of the Monti Lessini (MLS Neanderthal does not prove that there was no interbreeding between anatomically archaic and modern humans in Europe, but certainly shows that speculations on a possible Neanderthal origin of what is now the most common MCPH1 haplogroup are not supported by empirical evidence from ancient DNA.

  3. Comparative analysis of minor histocompatibility antigens genotyping methods

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    A. S. Vdovin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The wide range of techniques could be employed to find mismatches in minor histocompatibility antigens between transplant recipients and their donors. In the current study we compared three genotyping methods based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR for four minor antigens. Three of the tested methods: allele-specific PCR, restriction fragment length polymorphism and real-time PCR with TaqMan probes demonstrated 100% reliability when compared to Sanger sequencing for all of the studied polymorphisms. High resolution melting analysis was unsuitable for genotyping of one of the tested minor antigens (HA-1 as it has linked synonymous polymorphism. Obtained data could be used to select the strategy for large-scale clinical genotyping.

  4. Clinical utility of thiopurine S-methyltransferase genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corominas, Hèctor; Baiget, Montserrat

    2004-01-01

    Thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) is a cytosolic enzyme that plays a major role in the metabolism of thiopurine drugs such as mercaptopurine and azathioprine. The interindividual differences in response to thiopurine administration is in part due to the presence of genetic polymorphisms in the gene that regulates TPMT activity. TPMT genotype correlates well with the in vivo enzyme activity within erythrocytes. Patients with genetically determined decreased TPMT activity develop severe myelosuppression when treated with standard doses of thiopurine drugs because an excess of thioguanine nucleotides accumulates in hematopoietic tissues. TPMT genotyping provides clinicians with a reliable method for identifying TPMT-deficient patients who can benefit from low doses of thiopurine drugs in order to reduce the risk of developing adverse effects. Moreover, the administration of higher doses of the drug could improve therapeutic response in patients in whom the TPMT genotyping demonstrates the absence of mutated alleles.

  5. Identification of BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles in Korean native cattle (Hanwoo) and Holstein populations using a next generation sequencer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bo-Young; Hur, Tai-Young; Jung, Young-Hun; Kim, Heebal

    2012-08-01

    Bovine leucocyte antigen (encoded by BoLA) has been widely studied to identify the association with many traits related to immunity. Exon2 of BoLA-DRB3 is extremely polymorphic, and more than 100 alleles have been identified. We investigated polymorphisms of BoLA-DRB3.2 in Korean native cattle and Holstein populations using a next generation sequencer of the GS-FLX Titanium system. We found 38 alleles including 11 new alleles (BoLA-DRB3*1303, *4702, *7101, *7501, *7201, *7301, *7601, *1104, *7701, *7401 and *50021) in Hanwoo, and nine alleles including one new allele (BoLA-DRB3*7601) in Holstein. The 454 sequencing method is a promising alternative technology for high throughput genotyping of BoLA-DRB3.2 because of its technical advantages that allow it to overcome the disadvantages of sequence-based typing methods.

  6. Influence of Atg5 mutation in SLE depends on functional IL-10 genotype.

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    Patricia López

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence supports the involvement of autophagy in the etiopathology of autoimmune diseases. Despite the identification of autophagy-related protein (Atg-5 as one of the susceptibility loci in systemic Lupus erythematosus (SLE, the consequences of the carriage of these mutations for patients remain unclear. The present work analyzed the association of Atg5 rs573775 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP with SLE susceptibility, IFNα, TNFα and IL-10 serum levels, and clinical features, in 115 patients and 170 healthy individuals. Patients who where carriers of the rs573775 T* minor allele presented lower IFNα levels than those with the wild genotype, whereas the opposite result was detected for IL-10. Thus, since IL-10 production was regulated by rs1800896 polymorphisms, we evaluated the effect of this Atg5 mutation in genetically high and low IL-10 producers. Interestingly, we found that the rs573775 T* allele was a risk factor for SLE in carriers of the high IL-10 producer genotype, but not among genetically low producers. Moreover, IL-10 genotype influences SLE features in patients presenting the Atg5 mutated allele. Specifically, carriage of the rs573775 T* allele led to IL-10 upregulation, reduced IFNα and TNFα production and a low frequency of cytopenia in patients with the high IL-10 producer genotype, whereas patients with the same Atg5 allele that were low IL-10 producers presented reduced amounts of all these cytokines, had a lower prevalence of anti-dsDNA antibodies and the latest onset age. In conclusion, the Atg5 rs573775 T* allele seems to influence SLE susceptibility, cytokine production and disease features depending on other factors such as functional IL-10 genotype.

  7. Natural Allelic Diversity, Genetic Structure and Linkage Disequilibrium Pattern in Wild Chickpea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujur, Alice; Das, Shouvik; Badoni, Saurabh; Kumar, Vinod; Singh, Mohar; Bansal, Kailash C.; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2014-01-01

    Characterization of natural allelic diversity and understanding the genetic structure and linkage disequilibrium (LD) pattern in wild germplasm accessions by large-scale genotyping of informative microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers is requisite to facilitate chickpea genetic improvement. Large-scale validation and high-throughput genotyping of genome-wide physically mapped 478 genic and genomic microsatellite markers and 380 transcription factor gene-derived SNP markers using gel-based assay, fluorescent dye-labelled automated fragment analyser and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass array have been performed. Outcome revealed their high genotyping success rate (97.5%) and existence of a high level of natural allelic diversity among 94 wild and cultivated Cicer accessions. High intra- and inter-specific polymorphic potential and wider molecular diversity (11–94%) along with a broader genetic base (13–78%) specifically in the functional genic regions of wild accessions was assayed by mapped markers. It suggested their utility in monitoring introgression and transferring target trait-specific genomic (gene) regions from wild to cultivated gene pool for the genetic enhancement. Distinct species/gene pool-wise differentiation, admixed domestication pattern, and differential genome-wide recombination and LD estimates/decay observed in a six structured population of wild and cultivated accessions using mapped markers further signifies their usefulness in chickpea genetics, genomics and breeding. PMID:25222488

  8. Chimpanzee Personality and the Arginine Vasopressin Receptor 1A Genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, V A D; Weiss, A; Humle, T; Morimura, N; Udono, T; Idani, G; Matsuzawa, T; Hirata, S; Inoue-Murayama, M

    2017-03-01

    Polymorphisms of the arginine vasopressin receptor 1a (AVPR1a) gene have been linked to various measures related to human social behavior, including sibling conflict and agreeableness. In chimpanzees, AVPR1a polymorphisms have been associated with traits important for social interactions, including sociability, joint attention, dominance, conscientiousness, and hierarchical personality dimensions named low alpha/stability, disinhibition, and negative emotionality/low dominance. We examined associations between AVPR1a and six personality domains and hierarchical personality dimensions in 129 chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) living in Japan or in a sanctuary in Guinea. We fit three linear and three animal models. The first model included genotype, the second included sex and genotype, and the third included genotype, sex, and sex × genotype. All personality phenotypes were heritable. Chimpanzees possessing the long form of the allele were higher in conscientiousness, but only in models that did not include the other predictors; however, additional analyses suggested that this may have been a consequence of study design. In animal models that included sex and sex × genotype, chimpanzees homozygous for the short form of the allele were higher in extraversion. Taken with the findings of previous studies of chimpanzees and humans, the findings related to conscientiousness suggest that AVPR1a may be related to lower levels of impulsive aggression. The direction of the association between AVPR1a genotype and extraversion ran counter to what one would expect if AVPR1a was related to social behaviors. These results help us further understand the genetic basis of personality in chimpanzees.

  9. Sex-specific allelic transmission bias suggests sexual conflict at MC1R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducret, Valérie; Gaigher, Arnaud; Simon, Céline; Goudet, Jérôme; Roulin, Alexandre

    2016-09-01

    Sexual conflict arises when selection in one sex causes the displacement of the other sex from its phenotypic optimum, leading to an inevitable tension within the genome - called intralocus sexual conflict. Although the autosomal melanocortin-1-receptor gene (MC1R) can generate colour variation in sexually dichromatic species, most previous studies have not considered the possibility that MC1R may be subject to sexual conflict. In the barn owl (Tyto alba), the allele MC1RWHITE is associated with whitish plumage coloration, typical of males, and the allele MC1RRUFOUS is associated with dark rufous coloration, typical of females, although each sex can express any phenotype. Because each colour variant is adapted to specific environmental conditions, the allele MC1RWHITE may be more strongly selected in males and the allele MC1RRUFOUS in females. We therefore investigated whether MC1R genotypes are in excess or deficit in male and female fledglings compared with the expected Hardy-Weinberg proportions. Our results show an overall deficit of 7.5% in the proportion of heterozygotes in males and of 12.9% in females. In males, interannual variation in assortative pairing with respect to MC1R explained the year-specific deviations from Hardy-Weinberg proportions, whereas in females, the deficit was better explained by the interannual variation in the probability of inheriting the MC1RWHITE or MC1RRUFOUS allele. Additionally, we observed that sons inherit the MC1RRUFOUS allele from their fathers on average slightly less often than expected under the first Mendelian law. Transmission ratio distortion may be adaptive in this sexually dichromatic species if males and females are, respectively, selected to display white and rufous plumages.

  10. Genetic exchange of fimbrial alleles exemplifies the adaptive virulence strategy of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E Kerr

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram-negative anaerobic bacterium, a member of the human oral microbiome, and a proposed "keystone" pathogen in the development of chronic periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the gingiva. P. gingivalis is a genetically diverse species, and is able to exchange chromosomal DNA between strains by natural competence and conjugation. In this study, we investigate the role of horizontal DNA transfer as an adaptive process to modify behavior, using the major fimbriae as our model system, due to their critical role in mediating interactions with the host environment. We show that P. gingivalis is able to exchange fimbrial allele types I and IV into four distinct strain backgrounds via natural competence. In all recombinants, we detected a complete exchange of the entire fimA allele, and the rate of exchange varies between the different strain backgrounds. In addition, gene exchange within other regions of the fimbrial genetic locus was identified. To measure the biological implications of these allele swaps we compared three genotypes of fimA in an isogenic background, strain ATCC 33277. We demonstrate that exchange of fimbrial allele type results in profound phenotypic changes, including the quantity of fimbriae elaborated, membrane blebbing, auto-aggregation and other virulence-associated phenotypes. Replacement of the type I allele with either the type III or IV allele resulted in increased invasion of gingival fibroblast cells relative to the isogenic parent strain. While genetic variability is known to impact host-microbiome interactions, this is the first study to quantitatively assess the adaptive effect of exchanging genes within the pan genome cloud. This is significant as it presents a potential mechanism by which opportunistic pathogens may acquire the traits necessary to modify host-microbial interactions.

  11. RANTES In1.1C allele polymorphisms in 13 Chinese ethnic populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Yuan; SUN Hao; CHU Jia-you

    2009-01-01

    Background The In1.1C single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele results in reduced RANTES transcription, which is associated with increased frequency of HIV-1 infection, and rapid progression to AIDS among HIV-1-infected individuals. This study aimed to study the mutant frequency and polymorphism of RANTES in Chinese populations.Methods The genotypes of RANTES In1.1C were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) with the digestion of restriction endonuclease Mbo Ⅱ.Results Of the 617 individuals, 290 (47%) were carriers of the RANTES In1.1C allele, 52 of whom were homozygotes,whereas 238 were heterozygotes. The frequency of the RANTES In1.1C allele in those tested individuals was 0.2840.The frequencies of Inl.lC allele vaded from 0.07-0.27 in most of the populations in South-west China except for the two Lisu populations, while the frequencies of In1.1C spans from 0.35 to 0.45 in North-west China. The prevalence of the allele varied substantially between the South-west groups and North-west groups (X2=7.838, P=0.006).Conclusions The prevalence of the RANTES In1.1C allele varies substantially between the South-west groups and North-west groups. There is no significant difference between the groups with different languages, which suggests that language relationship is not consistent with the genetic relationship. These results have important implications for the design, assessment, and implementation of HIV-1 vaccines.

  12. Allele frequencies of the human platelet antigen-1 in the Egyptian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Kyudong

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human platelet alloantigen system HPA-1 in the Egyptian population was examined by polymerase chain reaction using sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the allele frequency of HPA-1a and -1b in healthy Egyptian individuals and compare these with the international literature. Human platelet antigen (HPA systems are associated with alloimmunization and organ transplantation rejection as well as the development of cardiovascular disease. Of the various HPA systems, HPA-1 specifically has been considered to be the most important antigenic system implicated in the Caucasian population. No study has yet examined this system in the Egyptian populations, however. We therefore investigated the allele frequency of the HPA-1 system in the Egyptian population. Findings To determine the allele frequency of the HPA-1a and -1b, we tested genomic DNAs from 206 healthy, unrelated Egyptian individuals using PCR-SSP. Our results showed that the 1a/1a genotype was the most predominant (59.22% followed by 1a/1b (34.95% and 1b/1b (5.83% with allele frequencies for 1a and 1b of 0.77 and 0.23, respectively, in the population. Conclusion As compared with other geographic groups, a relatively high allele frequency of the HPA-1b in the Egyptian population may indicate a higher risk of alloimmunization. This study is the first to investigate the allele frequency of the HPA-1 system in the Egyptian population and serves as an outline for future clinical research associated with platelet disorders in this group.

  13. Cytochrome P450 2D6 variants in a Caucasian population: Allele frequencies and phenotypic consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachse, C.; Brockmoeller, J.; Bauer, S.; Roots, I. [Humboldt Univ., Berlin (Germany)

    1997-02-01

    Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) metabolizes many important drugs. CYP2D6 activity ranges from complete deficiency to ultrafast metabolism, depending on at least 16 different known alleles. Their frequencies were determined in 589 unrelated German volunteers and correlated with enzyme activity measured by phenotyping with dextromethorphan or debrisoquine. For genotyping, nested PCR-RFLP tests from a PCR amplificate of the entire CYP2D6 gene were developed. The frequency of the CYP2D6*1 allele coding for extensive metabolizer (EM) phenotype was .364. The alleles coding for slightly (CYP2D6*2) or moderately (*9 and *10) reduced activity (intermediate metabolizer phenotype [IM]) showed frequencies of .324, .018, and .015, respectively. By use of novel PCR tests for discrimination, CYP2D6 gene duplication alleles were found with frequencies of.005 (*1 x 2), .013 (* 2 x 2), and .001 (*4 x 2). Frequencies of alleles with complete deficiency (poor metabolizer phenotype [PM]) were .207 (*4), .020 (*3 and *5), .009 (*6), and .001 (*7, *15, and *16). The defective CYP2D6 alleles *8, *11, *12, *13, and *14 were not found. All 41 PMs (7.0%) in this sample were explained by five mutations detected by four PCR-RFLP tests, which may suffice, together with the gene duplication test, for clinical prediction of CYP2D6 capacity. Three novel variants of known CYP2D6 alleles were discovered: *1C (T{sub 1957}C), *2B (additional C{sub 2558}T), and *4E (additional C{sub 2938}T). Analysis of variance showed significant differences in enzymatic activity measured by the dextromethorphan metabolic ratio (MR) between carriers of EN/PM (mean MR = .006) and IM/PM (mean MR = .014) alleles and between carriers of one (mean MR = .009) and two (mean MR = .003) functional alleles. The results of this study provide a solid basis for prediction of CYP2D6 capacity, as required in drug research and routine drug treatment. 35 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Temporal dynamics and subpopulation analysis of Theileria orientalis genotypes in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, C; Micallef, M; Alex, S M; Collins, D; Djordjevic, S P; Bogema, D R

    2015-06-01

    In Australia, outbreaks of clinical theileriosis caused by Theileria orientalis have been largely associated with the Ikeda genotype which can occur as a sole infection, or more commonly, as a mixture of genotypes. The most prevalent genotype, Chitose, frequently co-occurs with type Ikeda, however the role of this genotype in clinical disease has not been clearly established. Furthermore, the dynamics of individual genotypes in field infection of cattle have not been examined. In this study we developed quantitative PCR (qPCR) and genotyping methods to examine the role of the Chitose genotype in clinical disease and to investigate the temporal dynamics of T. orientalis Ikeda, Chitose and Buffeli genotypes in naïve animals introduced to a T. orientalis-endemic area. Analysis of the major piroplasm surface protein (MPSP) genes of Chitose isolates revealed the presence of two distinct phylogenetic clusters, Chitose A and Chitose B. A genotyping assay aimed at determining Chitose A/B allele frequency revealed that the Chitose A phylogenetic cluster is strongly associated with clinical disease but nearly always co-occurs with the Ikeda genotype. qPCR revealed that the Chitose genotype (particularly Chitose A), undergoes temporal switching in conjunction with the Ikeda genotype and contributes substantially to the overall parasite burden. The benign Buffeli genotype can also undergo temporal switching but levels of this genotype appear to remain low relative to the Ikeda and Chitose types. Interplay between vector and host immunological factors is presumed to be critical to the population dynamics observed in this study. Genotypic switching likely contributes to the persistence of T. orientalis in the host.

  15. Linkage disequilibrium between TNF-α-308 G/A promoter and histocompatibility leukocyte antigen alleles in Han-nationality lung transplant recipients from Eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijun, Mu; Ji, Zhang; Ping, Xie; Jingyu, Chen; Bin, Zhang

    2013-06-01

    Genes encoding histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA) and proinflammatory cytokines are involved in rejection after organ transplant. The authors explored the association between HLA alleles and the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)- α-308 G/A promoter region in lung transplant recipients of Han nationality from East China. They also evaluated the correlation between TNF-α-308 G/A and the onset of acute rejection after lung transplant. All lung transplant recipients of Han nationality who were admitted into our hospital between August 2004 and July 2011 were included. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the presence or absence of acute rejection episodes. Genotypes of HLA and single nucleotide polymorphisms of TNF-α-308 G/A were determined using polymerase chain reaction-single specific primer kits. A total of 106 lung transplant recipients were investigated. HLA-A*2 allele was in linkage disequilibrium with TNF-α-308 G allele. HLA-A*33, -B*58 and -DRB1*03 alleles were in linkage disequilibrium with TNF-α-308 A allele. Notably, TNF-α-308 A allele was in complete linkage disequilibrium with HLA-B*58 allele. Furthermore, TNF-α-308 A allele was in linkage disequilibrium with the HLA-A*33-DRB1*03 and HLA-B*58-DRB1*03 haplotypes. Clinical analysis indicated that TNF-α-308 G/A was not associated with onset of acute rejection after lung transplant. TNF-α-308 G/A polymorphism was strongly associated with HLA-A*2, -A*33, -B*58, and -DRB1*03 alleles in our population. HLA genotyping can identify lung transplant recipients carrying the highly productive phenotype of TNF-α-308 A allele, which may provide information on rejection after transplant. However, the authors found that TNF-α-308 A subtype has no correlation with acute rejection after lung transplant.

  16. Quantification of Allele Dosage in tetraploid Roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vukosavljev, M.; Guardo, Di M.; Weg, van de W.E.; Arens, P.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Many important crops (wheat, potato, strawberry, rose, etc.) are polyploid. This complicates genetic analyses, as the same locus can be present on multiple homologous or homoeologous chromosomes. SSR markers are suitable for mapping in segregating populations of polyploids as they are multi-allelic,

  17. Lost and Found:For Free or For a Fee?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Recently,a company dealing in lost-and-found property started up in Nanjing. Company employees say lost property is sent to the company by finders such as dustmen, who can receive 30 percent of a finder’s fee.

  18. 20 CFR 322.6 - Pay for time lost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... REMUNERATION § 322.6 Pay for time lost. (a) Definition. The term “pay for time lost” means any payment made to... by such pay. The amount allocated to time lost is remuneration for every day in the period of time... evidence to the contrary, be considered sufficient for a finding that remuneration is payable with...

  19. Lost-sales inventory systems with a service level criterion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijvank, Marco; Vis, Iris F. A.

    2012-01-01

    Competitive retail environments are characterized by service levels and lost sales in case of excess demand. We contribute to research on lost-sales models with a service level criterion in multiple ways. First, we study the optimal replenishment policy for this type of inventory system as well as

  20. Errnest Hemingway—The Speaker of the Lost Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang; Yi

    2015-01-01

    The lost generation is a group of people losing their former beliefs in the past World War I years.Hemingway is one of them and his two great novels The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms are the representations of the lost generation.

  1. Errnest Hemingway-The Speaker of the Lost Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yi

    2015-01-01

    The lost generation is a group of people losing their former beliefs in the past World War I years.Hemingway is one of them and his two great novels The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms are the representations of the lost generation.

  2. 36 CFR 327.16 - Lost and found articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lost and found articles. 327... CHIEF OF ENGINEERS § 327.16 Lost and found articles. All articles found shall be deposited by the finder at the Manager's office or with a ranger. All such articles shall be disposed of in accordance...

  3. An overview on the allelic variant of CYP2D6 genotype

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    to metabolize as many as 20% of commonly prescribed drugs. Its substrates ... an affordable molecular diagnostic technology and is already in use in ..... involves competition with another drug for the enzyme ... dose escalation trials. This can ...

  4. Allelic and genotypic frequencies of ASIP and MC1R genes in four ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gabriel

    2012-09-27

    Sep 27, 2012 ... DOI: 10.5897/AJB11.4031 ... Although, no routine methods for detection of the genetic basis of the ... Key words: Sheep, coat colour, MC1R gene, ASIP gene, Burkina .... only involves variation in the coding sequence (homo- ... differences in expression of the ASIP gene (Royo et al., ... Molecular Cloning: A.

  5. Genotyping of vacA alleles of Helicobacter pylori strains recovered ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pharmacotherapy Group, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Benin, Benin City, 300001 Nigeria ... Recorded data show that 17 to 86 % of patients .... obtained in a UVIdoc gel documentation systems .... Food safety regulations as well as quality.

  6. Interleukin-6 genotypes and serum levels in Chinese Hui population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shu-Ping; Liang, Shu; Pan, Min; Sun, Rong-Liang; Chen, Chu; Luan, Hong; Jiang, Min-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a key pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in different physiologic and pathophysiologic processes, and circulating levels of IL-6 differ greatly between individuals. The Chinese Hui is one of the largest ethnic minorities, little is known about the distribution of IL-6 genetic variations and their effects on serum levels in Hui population. The aim of the present study is to determine the prevalence of -174G/C (rs1800795), -597G/A (rs1800797), and -634C/G (rs1800796) polymorphisms in the IL-6 gene promoter region and their association with IL-6 serum levels in the Ningxia Hui population. A total of 96 Hui subjects, (57 men and 39 women; mean age 49.65 ± 19.73 years) unrelated nationality residents in Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region were enrolled. Genotyping of the three polymorphisms were performed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) combined with gel electrophoresis and then confirmed by direct sequencing. The -174G/C (97.92% GG, 2.08% GC, and 0% CC) and -597G/A (98.96% GG, 1.04% GA, and 0% AA) polymorphisms were rare. The frequencies of -634C/G genotypes CC, CG, and GG were found to be 54.17%, 40.62%, and 5.21%, respectively in total studied subjects, the derived allele frequencies for the C and G alleles were 74.48% and 25.52%. Increased IL-6 levels were correlated with the IL-6 -634G allele carriers (CG+GG genotypes). The results suggest that IL-6 -174G/C and -597G/A are rare but -634C/G is common in the Ningxia Hui population, and the -634G allele is associated with circulating levels of IL-6.

  7. Laboratory Information Management Software for genotyping workflows: applications in high throughput crop genotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanth VP

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the advances in DNA sequencer-based technologies, it has become possible to automate several steps of the genotyping process leading to increased throughput. To efficiently handle the large amounts of genotypic data generated and help with quality control, there is a strong need for a software system that can help with the tracking of samples and capture and management of data at different steps of the process. Such systems, while serving to manage the workflow precisely, also encourage good laboratory practice by standardizing protocols, recording and annotating data from every step of the workflow. Results A laboratory information management system (LIMS has been designed and implemented at the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT that meets the requirements of a moderately high throughput molecular genotyping facility. The application is designed as modules and is simple to learn and use. The application leads the user through each step of the process from starting an experiment to the storing of output data from the genotype detection step with auto-binning of alleles; thus ensuring that every DNA sample is handled in an identical manner and all the necessary data are captured. The application keeps track of DNA samples and generated data. Data entry into the system is through the use of forms for file uploads. The LIMS provides functions to trace back to the electrophoresis gel files or sample source for any genotypic data and for repeating experiments. The LIMS is being presently used for the capture of high throughput SSR (simple-sequence repeat genotyping data from the legume (chickpea, groundnut and pigeonpea and cereal (sorghum and millets crops of importance in the semi-arid tropics. Conclusion A laboratory information management system is available that has been found useful in the management of microsatellite genotype data in a moderately high throughput genotyping

  8. Estimating the probability of allelic drop-out of STR alleles in forensic genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Mogensen, Helle Smidt;

    2009-01-01

    In crime cases with available DNA evidence, the amount of DNA is often sparse due to the setting of the crime. In such cases, allelic drop-out of one or more true alleles in STR typing is possible. We present a statistical model for estimating the per locus and overall probability of allelic drop......-out using the results of all STR loci in the case sample as reference. The methodology of logistic regression is appropriate for this analysis, and we demonstrate how to incorporate this in a forensic genetic framework....

  9. Simple procedure for automatic detection of unstable alleles in the myotonic dystrophy and Huntington's disease loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, M; Vojtísková, M; Lukás, Z; Kroupová, I; Froster, U

    2006-01-01

    Human neurodegenerative and neuromuscular disorders are associated with a class of gene mutations represented by expansion of trinucleotide repeats. DNA testing is important for the diagnosis of these diseases because clinical discrimination is complicated by their late onset and frequently overlapping symptomatology. However, detection of pathologic alleles expanded up to several thousand trinucleotides poses a challenge for the introduction of rapid, fully automatic, and simple DNA diagnostic procedures. Here we propose a simple two-step polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol for rapid molecular diagnostics of myotonic dystrophy, Huntington's disease, and possibly also other triplet expansion diseases. Standard PCR amplification with target repeat flanking primers is used for the detection of alleles of up to 100 repeats; next, triplet-primed PCR is applied for detection of larger expansions. Automated capillary electrophoresis of amplicons allows rapid discrimination between normal, premutated and expanded (CTG/CAG)(n) alleles. Using the suggested protocol, the expanded allele was successfully detected in all test DNA samples with known genotypes. Our experience demonstrates that the suggested two-step PCR protocol provides high sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility; is significantly less time-consuming; is easier to perform; and provides a better basis for automation than previous methods requiring Southern analysis. Therefore, it can be used for confirmation of uncertain clinical diagnoses, for prenatal testing in at-risk families, and, generally in research on these diseases.

  10. Allelic Imbalance of mRNA Associated with α2-HS Glycoprotein (Fetuin-A Polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Inaoka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha 2-HS glycoprotein (AHSG, also designated as fetuin-A, exhibits polymorphism in population genetics consisting of two major alleles of AHSG∗1 and AHSG∗2. The serum level in the AHSG∗1 homozygote is significantly higher than that of the AHSG∗2 homozygote. This study examined the molecular mechanism for the cis-regulatory expression. To quantitate allele-specific mRNA in intra-assays of the heterozygote, RT-PCR method employing primers that were incorporated to the two closely located SNPs was developed. The respective magnitudes of AHSG∗1 to AHSG∗2 in the liver tissues and hepatic culture cells of PLC/PRF/5 were determined quantitatively as 2.5-fold and 6.2-fold. The mRNA expressional difference of two major alleles was observed, which is consistent with that in the serum level. The culture cells carried heterozygous genotypes in rs4917 and rs4918, but homozygous one in rs2248690. It was unlikely that the imbalance was derived from the SNP located in the promotor site. Furthermore, to investigate the effect of mRNA degradation, RNA synthesis in the cell culture was inhibited potently by the addition of actinomycin-D. No marked change was apparent between the two alleles. The results indicated that the cis-regulatory expressional difference is expected to occur at the level of transcription or splicing of mRNA.

  11. Allelic Imbalance of mRNA Associated with α2-HS Glycoprotein (Fetuin-A) Polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaoka, Yoshihiko; Osawa, Motoki; Mukasa, Nahoko; Miyashita, Keiko; Satoh, Fumiko; Kakimoto, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Alpha 2-HS glycoprotein (AHSG), also designated as fetuin-A, exhibits polymorphism in population genetics consisting of two major alleles of AHSG(∗) 1 and AHSG(∗) 2. The serum level in the AHSG(∗) 1 homozygote is significantly higher than that of the AHSG(∗) 2 homozygote. This study examined the molecular mechanism for the cis-regulatory expression. To quantitate allele-specific mRNA in intra-assays of the heterozygote, RT-PCR method employing primers that were incorporated to the two closely located SNPs was developed. The respective magnitudes of AHSG(∗) 1 to AHSG(∗) 2 in the liver tissues and hepatic culture cells of PLC/PRF/5 were determined quantitatively as 2.5-fold and 6.2-fold. The mRNA expressional difference of two major alleles was observed, which is consistent with that in the serum level. The culture cells carried heterozygous genotypes in rs4917 and rs4918, but homozygous one in rs2248690. It was unlikely that the imbalance was derived from the SNP located in the promotor site. Furthermore, to investigate the effect of mRNA degradation, RNA synthesis in the cell culture was inhibited potently by the addition of actinomycin-D. No marked change was apparent between the two alleles. The results indicated that the cis-regulatory expressional difference is expected to occur at the level of transcription or splicing of mRNA.

  12. Association of the Apolipoprotein E 2 Allele with Concurrent Occurrence of Endometrial Hyperplasia and Endometrial Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana I. Ivanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Genes encoding proteins with antioxidant properties may influence susceptibility to endometrial hyperplasia (EH and endometrial carcinoma (ECa. Patients with EH (n = 89, EH concurrent with ECa (n = 76, ECa (n = 186, and healthy controls (n = 1110 were genotyped for five polymorphic variants in the genes involved in metabolism of lipoproteins (APOE Cys112Arg and Arg158Cys, iron (HFE Cys282Tyr and His63Asp, and catecholamines (COMT Val158Met. Patients and controls were matched by ethnicity (all Caucasians, age, body mass index (BMI, and incidence of hypertension and diabetes. The frequency of the APOE E 2 allele (158Cys was higher in patients with EH + ECa than in controls (P = 0.0012, PBonferroni = 0.018, OR = 2.58, 95% CI 1.49–4.45. The APOE E 4 allele (112Arg was more frequently found in patients with EH than in controls and HFE minor allele G (63Asp had a protective effect in the ECa group, though these results appeared to be nonsignificant after correction for multiple comparisons. The results of the study indicate that E 2 allele might be associated with concurrent occurrence of EH and ECa.

  13. The distribution of Tap2 alleles among laboratory rat RT1 haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, E; Deverson, E V; Coadwell, J W; Günther, E; Howard, J C; Butcher, G W

    1994-01-01

    We are reporting the cDNA sequences of Tap2 from two cima and two cimb rat strains. Comparison of the cDNA sequences shows that these alleles fall into two groups, which we refer to as Tap2-A and Tap2-B. We found that alleles from the Tap2-B group are more closely related to the mouse homologue than are Tap2-A alleles, and among the 48 nucleotides which differ between the Tap2-A and Tap2-B cDNAs, three affect restriction sites. We defined pairs of oligonucleotides which allow amplification of the regions bearing these restriction sites from genomic DNA or cDNA, and this technique has been successful for the genotyping of all of the 56 laboratory strains of Rattus norvegicus tested and for five cell lines tested so far. All 14 known RT1 standard haplotypes were tested, and 7 found to belong to the Tap2-B group, and 7 to Tap2-A. We also found that intron sizes among the alleles of the Tap2-B group fall into two subgroups, providing further insight into the phylogeny of these various haplotypes.

  14. Nonfunctional alleles of long-day suppressor genes independently regulate flowering time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ming Zheng; Li Feng; Junrui Wang; Weihua Qiao; Lifang Zhang; Yunlian Cheng; Qingwen Yang

    2016-01-01

    Due to the remarkable adaptability to various environments, rice varieties with diverse flowering times have been domesticated or improved from Oryza rufipogon. Detailed knowledge of the genetic factors controlling flower-ing time will facilitate understanding the adaptation mecha-nism in cultivated rice and enable breeders to design appropriate genotypes for distinct preferences. In this study, four genes (Hd1, DTH8, Ghd7 and OsPRR37) in a rice long-day suppression pathway were collected and sequenced in 154, 74, 69 and 62 varieties of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) respectively. Under long-day conditions, varieties with non-functional alleles flowered significantly earlier than those with functional alleles. However, the four genes have different genetic effects in the regulation of flowering time: Hd1 and OsPRR37 are major genes that generally regulate rice flowering time for all varieties, while DTH8 and Ghd7 only regulate regional rice varieties. Geographic analysis and network studies suggested that the nonfunctional alleles of these suppression loci with regional adaptability were derived recently and independently. Alleles with regional adaptability should be taken into consideration for genetic improvement. The rich genetic variations in these four genes, which adapt rice to different environments, provide the flexi-bility needed for breeding rice varieties with diverse flowering times.

  15. CYP2C9*2 allele increases risk for hypoglycemia in POR*1/*1 type 2 diabetic patients treated with sulfonylureas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragia, G; Tavridou, A; Elens, L; Van Schaik, R H N; Manolopoulos, V G

    2014-01-01

    It is previously shown that carriers of the defective allele CYP2C9*3 that leads to impaired sulfonylurea metabolism are at increased sulfonylurea-induced hypoglycemia risk due to diminished drug metabolism, whereas no effect of CYP2C9*2 allele was found. Recently, a polymorphism in P450 oxidoreductase (POR) gene, assigned as POR*28 allele, was associated with increased CYP2C9 activity. The aim of this study was to assess i) the effect of POR*28 allele on sulfonylurea-induced hypoglycemia risk and ii) the association of CYP2C9*2 allele with hypoglycemia risk in non-carriers of POR*28 allele. The study group consisted of 176 patients with diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treated with sulfonylureas, of whom 92 patients had experienced at least one drug-associated hypoglycemic event (cases), while 84 had never experienced a hypoglycemic event (controls). POR*28 allele was detected by use of real-time TaqMan PCR. POR*28 allele was not associated with sulfonyl-urea-induced hypoglycemia. In POR*1/*1 patients, CYP2C9*1/*2 genotype was more common in cases than in controls (32.7 vs. 14.3%, p=0.041). In a model adjusted for age, BMI, duration of T2DM and renal function, and POR*1/*1 entered as a selection variable, CYP2C9*2 allele increased the hypoglycemia risk in response to sulfonylurea (odds ratio: 3.218, p=0.031). In conclusion, our results suggest that POR*28 allele is masking the association of CYP2C9*2 allele with sulfonyl-urea-induced hypoglycemia. Therefore, POR*28 allele is an important source of CYP2C9 activity variability and combined with CYP2C9 gene poly-morphisms may explain individual variability in the effect of sulfonylureas.

  16. Myeloperoxidase genotype, fruit and vegetable consumption, and breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jiyoung; Gammon, Marilie D; Santella, Regina M; Gaudet, Mia M; Britton, Julie A; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Terry, Mary Beth; Neugut, Alfred I; Josephy, P David; Ambrosone, Christine B

    2004-10-15

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), an antimicrobial enzyme in the breast, generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) endogenously. An MPO G463A polymorphism exists in the promoter region, with the variant A allele conferring lower transcription activity than the common G allele. Because oxidative stress may play a role in breast carcinogenesis, we evaluated MPO genotypes in relation to breast cancer risk among 1,011 cases and 1,067 controls from the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project (1996-1997). We also assessed the potential modifying effects of dietary antioxidants and hormonally related risk factors on these relationships. Women over 20 years with incident breast cancer who were residents of Nassau and Suffolk Counties, NY, were identified as potential cases. Population-based controls were frequency matched by 5-year age groups. Genotyping was performed with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) technology, and suspected breast cancer risk factors and usual dietary intake were assessed during an in-person interview. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Having at least one A allele was associated with an overall 13% reduction in breast cancer risk. When consumption of fruits and vegetables and specific dietary antioxidants were dichotomized at the median, inverse associations with either GA or AA genotypes were most pronounced among women who consumed higher amounts of total fruits and vegetables (odds ratio, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.58-0.97); this association was not noted among the low-consumption group (P for interaction = 0.04). Relationships were strongest among premenopausal women. Results from this first study of MPO genotypes and breast cancer risk indicate that MPO variants, related to reduced generation of ROS, are associated with decreased breast cancer risk, and emphasize the importance of fruit and vegetable consumption in reduction of breast

  17. Patterns of human genetic variation inferred from comparative analysis of allelic mutations in blood group antigen genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Santosh Kumar; Blumenfeld, Olga O

    2011-03-01

    Comparative analysis of allelic variation of a gene sheds light on the pattern and process of its diversification at the population level. Gene families for which a large number of allelic forms have been verified by sequencing provide a useful resource for such studies. In this regard, human blood group-encoding genes are unique in that differences of cell surface traits among individuals and populations can be readily detected by serological screening, and correlation between the variant cell surface phenotype and the genotype is, in most cases, unequivocal. Here, we perform a comprehensive analysis of allelic forms, compiled in the Blood Group Antigen Gene Mutation database, of ABO, RHD/CE, GYPA/B/E and FUT1/2 gene families that encode the ABO, RH, MNS, and H/h blood group system antigens, respectively. These genes are excellent illustrative examples showing distinct mutational patterns among the alleles, and leading to speculation on how their origin may have been driven by recurrent but different molecular mechanisms. We illustrate how alignment of alleles of a gene may provide an additional insight into the DNA variation process and its pathways, and how this approach may serve to catalog alleles of a gene, simplifying the task and content of mutation databases.

  18. Axiom turkey genotyping array

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Axiom®Turkey Genotyping Array interrogates 643,845 probesets on the array, covering 643,845 SNPs. The array development was led by Dr. Julie Long of the USDA-ARS Beltsville Agricultural Research Center under a public-private partnership with Hendrix Genetics, Aviagen, and Affymetrix. The Turk...

  19. (Brassica napus L.) genotypes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... The genetic diversity and relationships among rapeseed genotypes were ... dent of environment and plant growth stage, unlimited ..... interactions that lead to the expression of particular traits .... thesis, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Novi Sad. ... in the U.S. hard red winter wheat cultivars as reveled by.

  20. Recent Development of Lost Foam Casting Technology Comment on the 7th Chinese Lost Foam Casting Symposium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zi-li

    2006-01-01

    @@ The 7th Chinese Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Symposium & the 1st LFC Technology Exposition were held on May 21-23 at Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics (NUAA), and the conference theme . was "Recent development of lost foam casting technology".

  1. Genotyping of the CCR5 chemokine receptor by isothermal NASBA amplification and differential probe hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, J W; Tetali, S; Lee, E M; Shurtliff, R N; Wang, X P; Pahwa, S; Kaplan, M H; Ginocchio, C C

    1999-11-01

    The human CCR5 chemokine receptor functions as a coreceptor with CD4 for infection by macrophage-tropic isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). A mutated CCR5 allele which encodes a protein that does not function as a coreceptor for HIV-1 has been identified. Thus, expression of the wild-type and/or mutation allele is relevant to determining the infectability of patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and affects disease progression in vivo. We developed a qualitative CCR5 genotyping assay using NASBA, an isothermal nucleic acid amplification technology. The method involves three enzymes and two oligonucleotides and targets the CCR5 mRNA, which is expressed in PBMC at a copy number higher than 2, the number of copies of DNA present encoding the gene. The single oligonucleotide set amplifies both alleles, and genotyping is achieved by separate hybridizations of wild-type- and mutation-specific probes directly to the single-stranded RNA amplification product. Assay sensitivity and specificity were demonstrated with RNAs produced in vitro from plasmid clones bearing the DNA encoding each allele. No detectable cross-reactivity between wild-type and mutation probes was found, and 50 copies of each allele were readily detectable. Analysis of patient samples found that 20% were heterozygous and 1% were homozygous for the CCR5 mutation. Thus, NASBA is a sensitive and specific means of rapidly determining CCR5 genotype and provides several technical advantages over alternative assay systems.

  2. Identification of 23 new prostate cancer susceptibility loci using the iCOGS custom genotyping array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eeles, Rosalind A; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Benlloch, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in males in developed countries. To identify common prostate cancer susceptibility alleles, we genotyped 211,155 SNPs on a custom Illumina array (iCOGS) in blood DNA from 25,074 prostate cancer cases and 24,272 controls from the internationa...

  3. Correlation between relatives given complete genotypes: from identity by descent to identity by function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverdlov, Serge; Thompson, Elizabeth A

    2013-09-01

    In classical quantitative genetics, the correlation between the phenotypes of individuals with unknown genotypes and a known pedigree relationship is expressed in terms of probabilities of IBD states. In existing approaches to the inverse problem where genotypes are observed but pedigree relationships are not, dependence between phenotypes is either modeled as Bayesian uncertainty or mapped to an IBD model via inferred relatedness parameters. Neither approach yields a relationship between genotypic similarity and phenotypic similarity with a probabilistic interpretation corresponding to a generative model. We introduce a generative model for diploid allele effect based on the classic infinite allele mutation process. This approach motivates the concept of IBF (Identity by Function). The phenotypic covariance between two individuals given their diploid genotypes is expressed in terms of functional identity states. The IBF parameters define a genetic architecture for a trait without reference to specific alleles or population. Given full genome sequences, we treat a gene-scale functional region, rather than a SNP, as a QTL, modeling patterns of dominance for multiple alleles. Applications demonstrated by simulation include phenotype and effect prediction and association, and estimation of heritability and classical variance components. A simulation case study of the Missing Heritability problem illustrates a decomposition of heritability under the IBF framework into Explained and Unexplained components.

  4. Differential effects of the ApoE4 genotype on brain structure and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matura, S.; Prvulovic, D.; Jurcoane, A.; Hartmann, D.; Miller, J.; Scheibe, M.; O'Dwyer, L.G.; Oertel-Knochel, V.; Knochel, C.; Reinke, B.; Karakaya, T.; Fusser, F.; Pantel, J.

    2014-01-01

    The apolipoprotein E epsilon4 allele is a well established genetic risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer's disease. It is associated with structural and functional brain changes in healthy young, middle-aged and elderly subjects. In the current study, we assessed the impact of the ApoE genotype on

  5. Rapid genotyping assays for the identification and differentiation of Yersinia ruckeri biotype 2 strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel assays for the identification and differentiation of biotype 2 phenotype-causing alleles among emerging strains of Yersinia ruckeri are presented. Assays were validated against isolates previously genotyped by DNA sequencing. The methods employed are simple to perform and interpret and thus co...

  6. Differential effects of the ApoE4 genotype on brain structure and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matura, S.; Prvulovic, D.; Jurcoane, A.; Hartmann, D.; Miller, J.; Scheibe, M.; O'Dwyer, L.G.; Oertel-Knochel, V.; Knochel, C.; Reinke, B.; Karakaya, T.; Fusser, F.; Pantel, J.

    2014-01-01

    The apolipoprotein E epsilon4 allele is a well established genetic risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer's disease. It is associated with structural and functional brain changes in healthy young, middle-aged and elderly subjects. In the current study, we assessed the impact of the ApoE genotype on brai

  7. Prevalence of the HPA-18w to -21w alleles in the Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Hong, X; Xu, X; Ying, Y; He, J; Zhu, F; Lv, H; Yan, L

    2013-04-01

    Recently, four new platelet alloantigen (HPA) systems HPA-18w to-21w were identified. However, genotyping for HPA-18w to -21w alleles was rarely reported. Here, we established a polymerase chain reaction sequence-based typing (PCR-SBT) method and investigated the distribution of HPA-18w to -21w alleles in the Chinese Han population. The specific primers of HPA-18w, -19w, -20w and -21w were designed, and the PCR products were bidirectionally sequenced. 855 randomly selected platelet donors were genotyped for HPA-18w to -21w with the PCR-SBT method. The results showed that all individuals were monomorphic for HPA-18w to HPA-20w with a/a homozygous frequency of 1.0 and absence of HPA-18bw to -20bw alleles. The frequencies of the HPA-21a/21a and HPA-21a/21b genotypes were 0.981(839/855) and 0.019(16/855), respectively. Seven mutations were confirmed on sequenced region separate from HPA polymorphisms, including ITGA2 (IVS17+48G>A and IVS17+72G>A), ITGA2B (IVS19-26C>G) and ITGB3 (IVS4+234C>T, IVS11-19 T>C, IVS11-104T>C and GT repeats from IVS11-131 to IVS11-109). These data will provide useful information for diagnosis, prevention and treatment of alloimmune thrombocytopaenia.

  8. Comparison of acetaminophen toxicity in primary hepatocytes isolated from transgenic mice with different appolipoprotein E alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezera, V; Kucera, O; Moravcova, A; Peterova, E; Rousar, T; Rychtrmoc, D; Sobotka, O; Cervinkova, Z

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor, important for combating electrophilic and oxidative stress in the liver and other organs. This encompasses detoxification of hepatotoxic drugs, including acetaminophen (APAP). Recently, an association between apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotype and Nrf2 expression was described. We compared the toxicity of APAP on primary culture hepatocytes isolated from transgenic mice carrying two different human ApoE alleles and wild-type controls. The cells were exposed to APAP in concentrations from 0.5 to 4 mM for up to 24 hours. APAP led to a dose-dependent hepatotoxicity from 1 mM after 16 h exposure in all mice tested. The toxicity was higher in hepatocytes isolated from both transgenic strains than in wild-type controls and most pronounced in ApoE3 mice. Concurrently, there was a decline in mitochondrial membrane potential, especially in ApoE3 hepatocytes. The formation of reactive oxygen species was increased after 24 hours with 2.5 mM APAP in hepatocytes of all strains tested, with the highest increase being in the ApoE3 genotype. The activity of caspases 3 and 7 did not differ among groups and was minimal after 24 hour incubation with 4 mM APAP. We observed higher lipid accumulation in hepatocytes isolated from both transgenic strains than in wild-type controls. The expression of Nrf2-dependent genes was higher in ApoE3 than in ApoE4 hepatocytes and some of these genes were induced by APAP treatment. In conclusion, transgenic mice with ApoE4 and ApoE3 alleles displayed higher susceptibility to acute APAP toxicity in vitro than wild-type mice. Of the two transgenic genotypes tested, ApoE3 allele carriers were more prone to injury.

  9. Allele-specific amplification in cancer revealed by SNP array analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas LaFramboise

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Amplification, deletion, and loss of heterozygosity of genomic DNA are hallmarks of cancer. In recent years a variety of studies have emerged measuring total chromosomal copy number at increasingly high resolution. Similarly, loss-of-heterozygosity events have been finely mapped using high-throughput genotyping technologies. We have developed a probe-level allele-specific quantitation procedure that extracts both copy number and allelotype information from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array data to arrive at allele-specific copy number across the genome. Our approach applies an expectation-maximization algorithm to a model derived from a novel classification of SNP array probes. This method is the first to our knowledge that is able to (a determine the generalized genotype of aberrant samples at each SNP site (e.g., CCCCT at an amplified site, and (b infer the copy number of each parental chromosome across the genome. With this method, we are able to determine not just where amplifications and deletions occur, but also the haplotype of the region being amplified or deleted. The merit of our model and general approach is demonstrated by very precise genotyping of normal samples, and our allele-specific copy number inferences are validated using PCR experiments. Applying our method to a collection of lung cancer samples, we are able to conclude that amplification is essentially monoallelic, as would be expected under the mechanisms currently believed responsible for gene amplification. This suggests that a specific parental chromosome may be targeted for amplification, whether because of germ line or somatic variation. An R software package containing the methods described in this paper is freely available at http://genome.dfci.harvard.edu/~tlaframb/PLASQ.

  10. Association of IL8 and IL10 gene allelic variants with ischemic stroke risk and prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kucherenko A. M.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Evaluating a role of IL8 gene –781 C/T, and IL10 gene –592C/A polymorphisms as genetic markers of ischemic stroke risk. Methods. A case group consisted of 183 patients with ischemic stroke, which were treated in the Brain Vascular Pathology unit of SI «Institute of Gerontology of NAMS of Ukraine». A control group included 88 healthy individuals older than 65 years without any history of ischemic stroke. Genotyping was performed using PCR followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Results. Significantly (P < 0,05 higher frequency of IL8 –781T allele carriers in the case group (81,6 % comparing to the control (70,1% was revealed. –781T allele carriers have nearly 2-fold increased ischemic stroke development risk (OR = 1.886; 95 % CI: 1.041–3.417. Significantly (P < 0,05 higher frequency of IL10 gene –592C allele carriers was observed in the patients with ischemic stroke (98,2% comparing to the control (90,7 %. The ischemic stroke development risk in such individuals is 5-fold increased (OR = 5.71; 95 % CI: 1.48–22.11. It was revealed that –592C allele homozygotes with ischemic stroke have more than 2-fold higher improvement (according to the Rankin scale chances during the first fortnight of treatment (OR = 2,76; 95 % CI: 1,26–6,07. Conclusions. On the basis of the obtained significant differences, IL8 gene –781T and IL10 gene –592C variants may be considered the factors of ischemic stroke hereditary susceptibility. Besides, IL10 gene –592CC genotype is a genetic marker of the patients state positive dynamics during first two weeks of treatment.

  11. The ACTN3 R577X nonsense allele is under-represented in elite-level strength athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Stephen M; Walsh, Sean; Liu, Dongmei; Metter, E Jeffrey; Ferrucci, Luigi; Hurley, Ben F

    2008-03-01

    Previous reports have shown a lower proportion of the ACTN3 X/X genotype (R577X nonsense polymorphism) in sprint-related athletes compared to the general population, possibly attributed to impairment of muscle function related to alpha-actinin-3 deficiency. In the present study, we examined the frequency of the X/X genotype in both Black and White elite-level bodybuilders and strength athletes in comparison to the general population. A reference population of 668 Whites (363 men and 305 women) and 208 Blacks (98 men and 110 women) was genotyped for the ACTN3 R577X polymorphism. Strength athletes (52 white and 23 black; 4 women) consisting predominantly of world class and locally competitive bodybuilders, and elite powerlifters were recruited and similarly genotyped. Significantly lower X/X genotype frequencies were observed in the athletes (6.7%) vs controls (16.3%; P=0.005). The X/X genotype was significantly lower in White athletes (9.7%) vs controls (19.9%; P=0.018). No black athletes (0%) were observed with the X/X genotype, though this finding only approached statistical significance vs controls (4.8%; P=0.10). The results indicate that the ACTN3 R577X nonsense allele (X) is under-represented in elite strength athletes, consistent with previous reports indicating that alpha-actinin-3 deficiency appears to impair muscle performance.

  12. HLA-B alleles of the Cayapa of Ecuador: New B39 and B15 alleles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garber, T.L.; Butler, L.M.; Watkins, D.I. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Recent data suggest that HLA-B locus alleles can evolve quickly in native South American populations. To investigate further this phenomenon of new HLA-B variants among Amerindians, we studied samples from another South American tribe, the Cayapa from Ecuador. We selected individuals for HLA-B molecular typing based upon their HLA class II typing results. Three new variants of HLA-B39 and one new variant of HLA-B15 were found in the Cayapa: HLA-B*3905, HLA-B*3906, HLA-B*3907, and HLA-B*1522. A total of thirteen new HLA-B alleles have now been found in the four South American tribes studied. Each of these four tribes studied, including the Cayapa, had novel alleles that were not found in any of the other tribes, suggesting that many of these new HLA-B alleles may have evolved since the Paleo-Indians originally populated South America. Each of these 13 new alleles contained predicted amino acid replacements that were located in the peptide binding site. These amino acid replacements may affect the sequence motif of the bound peptides, suggesting that these new alleles have been maintained by selection. New allelic variants have been found for all common HLA-B locus antigenic groups present in South American tribes with the exception of B48. In spite of its high frequency in South American tribes, no evidence for variants of B48 has been found in all the Amerindians studied, suggesting that B48 may have unique characteristics among the B locus alleles. 70 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. HLA-B alleles of the Cayapa of Ecuador: new B39 and B15 alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, T L; Butler, L M; Trachtenberg, E A; Erlich, H A; Rickards, O; De Stefano, G; Watkins, D I

    1995-01-01

    Recent data suggest that HLA-B locus alleles can evolve quickly in native South American populations. To investigate further this phenomenon of new HLA-B variants among Amerindians, we studied samples from another South American tribe, the Cayapa from Ecuador. We selected individuals for HLA-B molecular typing based upon their HLA class II typing results. Three new variants of HLA-B39 and one new variant of HLA-B15 were found in the Cayapa: HLA-B*3905, HLA-B*3906, HLA-B*3907, and HLA-B*1522. A total of thirteen new HLA-B alleles have now been found in the four South American tribes studied. Each of these four tribes studied, including the Cayapa, had novel alleles that were not found in any of the other tribes, suggesting that many of these new HLA-B alleles may have evolved since the Paleo-Indians originally populated South America. Each of these 13 new alleles contained predicted amino acid replacements that were located in the peptide binding site. These amino acid replacements may affect the sequence motif of the bound peptides, suggesting that these new alleles have been maintained by selection. New allelic variants have been found for all common HLA-B locus antigenic groups present in South American tribes with the exception of B48. In spite of its high frequency in South American tribes, no evidence for variants of B48 has been found in all the Amerindians studied, suggesting that B48 may have unique characteristics among the B locus alleles.

  14. Helicobacter pylori vacA s1a and s1b alleles from clinical isolates from different regions of Chile show a distinct geographic distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MI Díaz; A Kirberg; E Hebel; J Fierro; R Bravo; F Siegel; G Leon; G Klapp; A Venegas; A Valdivia; P Martínez; JL Palacios; P Harris; J Novales; E Garrido; D Valderrama; C Shilling

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To establish the most common vacA alleles in Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) strains isolated from Chilean patients and its relationship with gastritis and gastroduodenal ulcers.METHODS: Two hundred and forty five H pylori clinical isolates were obtained from 79 biopsies from Chilean infected patients suffering from gastrointestinal diseases. An average of 2-3 strains per patient was isolated and the vacA genotype was analyzed by PCR and 3% agarose electrophoresis. Some genotypes were checked by DNA sequencing.RESULTS: The most prevalent vacA genotype inChilean patients was s1b m1 (76%), followed by s1a m1 (21%). In contrast, the s2 m2 genotype was scarcely represented (3%).The s1b m1 genotype was found most frequently linked to gastropathies (P<0.05) rather than ulcers. Ulcers were found more commonly in male and older patients. Curiously, patients living in cities located North and far South of Santiago, the capital and largest Chilean city, carried almost exclusively strains with the s1b m1 genotype. In contrast, patients from Santiago and cities located South of Santiago carried strains with either one or both s1a m1 and s1b m1 genotypes.Regarding the s2 m2 genotype, comparison with GenBank sequences revealed that Chilean s2 sequence was identical to those of Australian, American, and Colombian strains but quite different from those of Alaska and India.CONCLUSION: Differences in geographic distribution of the s and m vaccA alleles in Chile and a relationship of s1b m1 genotype with gastritis were found. Sequence data in part support a hispanic origin for the vacA genotype.Asymmetric distribution of genotypes s1b m1 and s2 m2recedes H Pyloristrain distribution in Spain and Portugal.

  15. Comparison of allele frequencies of eight STR loci from Argentinian Amerindian and European populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, A; Penacino, G; Corach, D

    1998-10-01

    Eight STR systems (THO1, FABP, VWA, FES/FPS, HPRTB, F13A1, CSF1PO, and D6S366) were investigated in different ethnic groups of Argentina. Allele and genotype frequencies, power of exclusion, and discriminative power were investigated. Hardy-Weinberg expectations were calculated from heterozygosity levels. FST and G tests demonstrated that significant differences exist among the investigated populations for some of the eight STRs markers. The Wichi Indians are clearly separated from the Mapuche and Tehuelche, who in turn are closer to the European population, suggesting non-Amerindian admixture.

  16. Composition and functional analysis of low-molecular-weight glutenin alleles with Aroona near-isogenic lines of bread wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiaofei

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (LMW-GS strongly influence the bread-making quality of bread wheat. These proteins are encoded by a multi-gene family located at the Glu-A3, Glu-B3 and Glu-D3 loci on the short arms of homoeologous group 1 chromosomes, and show high allelic variation. To characterize the genetic and protein compositions of LMW-GS alleles, we investigated 16 Aroona near-isogenic lines (NILs using SDS-PAGE, 2D-PAGE and the LMW-GS gene marker system. Moreover, the composition of glutenin macro-polymers, dough properties and pan bread quality parameters were determined for functional analysis of LMW-GS alleles in the NILs. Results Using the LMW-GS gene marker system, 14–20 LMW-GS genes were identified in individual NILs. At the Glu-A3 locus, two m-type and 2–4 i-type genes were identified and their allelic variants showed high polymorphisms in length and nucleotide sequences. The Glu-A3d allele possessed three active genes, the highest number among Glu-A3 alleles. At the Glu-B3 locus, 2–3 m-type and 1–3 s-type genes were identified from individual NILs. Based on the different compositions of s-type genes, Glu-B3 alleles were divided into two groups, one containing Glu-B3a, B3b, B3f and B3g, and the other comprising Glu-B3c, B3d, B3h and B3i. Eight conserved genes were identified among Glu-D3 alleles, except for Glu-D3f. The protein products of the unique active genes in each NIL were detected using protein electrophoresis. Among Glu-3 alleles, the Glu-A3e genotype without i-type LMW-GS performed worst in almost all quality properties. Glu-B3b, B3g and B3i showed better quality parameters than the other Glu-B3 alleles, whereas the Glu-B3c allele containing s-type genes with low expression levels had an inferior effect on bread-making quality. Due to the conserved genes at Glu-D3 locus, Glu-D3 alleles showed no significant differences in effects on all quality parameters. Conclusions This work

  17. Serotonin transporter genotype modulates the association between depressive symptoms and amygdala activity among psychiatrically healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillihan, Seth J; Rao, Hengyi; Brennan, Lauretta; Wang, Danny J J; Detre, John A; Sankoorikal, Geena Mary V; Brodkin, Edward S; Farah, Martha J

    2011-09-30

    Recent attempts to understand the biological bases of depression vulnerability have revealed that both the short allele of the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and activity in the amygdala are associated with depression. Other studies have reported amygdala hyperactivity associated with the 5-HTTLPR short allele, linking the genetic and neuroimaging lines of research and suggesting a mechanism whereby the short allele confers depression risk. However, fewer investigations have examined the associations among depression, 5-HTTLPR variability, and amygdala activation in a single study. The current study thus investigated whether 5-HTTLPR genotype modulates the association between depressive symptoms and amygdala activity among psychiatrically healthy adults. Regional cerebral blood flow was measured with perfusion fMRI during a task-free scan. We hypothesized differential associations between depressive symptoms and amygdala activity among individuals homozygous for the short allele and individuals homozygous for the long allele. Both whole brain analyses and region-of-interest analyses confirmed this prediction, revealing a significant negative association among the long allele group and a trend of positive association among the short allele group. These results complement existing reports of short allele related amygdala hyperactivity and suggest an additional neurobiological mechanism whereby the 5-HTTLPR is associated with psychiatric outcomes.

  18. Inheritance of S-genotypes in Paviot × Kabaasi apricot F1 progenies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Tuğba Murathan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Self-incompatibility plays an important role in the fertilization of fruit species such as apricot. Apricot (Prunus armeniaca L. shows gametophytic self-incompatibility, which is controlled by a multi-allelic S-locus. In this study, S-alleles of 77 F1 progenies derived from Paviot, which is one of the French local cultivars, and Kabaasi, one of the most important Turkish dried apricot cultivars, parents were identified by S-RNase intron regions polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification and DNA sequencing. The results from the S-allele PCR analysis revealed that the Paviot female parent had an ScS2 genotype and the Kabaasi male parent had S1S9 alleles. Forty-three of the F1 progenies showed self-compatibility allele (Sc by having either ScS9 or ScS1 alleles. Thirty-four of the F1 progenies were self-incompatible by having either S2S1 or S2S9 alleles. The distributions of detected alleles in F1 progenies were determined as follows: ScS1 31.2%, S1S2 27.3%, ScS9 24.7% and S2S9 16.8%. The results from the study are relevant for the data obtained in apricot breeding programmes in the selection of crossing combinations and in the establishment of commercial orchards.

  19. Spatial proximity of homologous alleles and long noncoding RNAs regulate a switch in allelic gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratigi, Kalliopi; Kapsetaki, Manouela; Aivaliotis, Michalis; Town, Terrence; Flavell, Richard A.; Spilianakis, Charalampos G.

    2015-01-01

    Physiological processes rely on the regulation of total mRNA levels in a cell. In diploid organisms, the transcriptional activation of one or both alleles of a gene may involve trans-allelic interactions that provide a tight spatial and temporal level of gene expression regulation. The mechanisms underlying such interactions still remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that lipopolysaccharide stimulation of murine macrophages rapidly resulted in the actin-mediated and transient homologous spatial proximity of Tnfα alleles, which was necessary for the mono- to biallelic switch in gene expression. We identified two new complementary long noncoding RNAs transcribed from the TNFα locus and showed that their knockdown had opposite effects in Tnfα spatial proximity and allelic expression. Moreover, the observed spatial proximity of Tnfα alleles depended on pyruvate kinase muscle isoform 2 (PKM2) and T-helper-inducing POZ-Krüppel-like factor (ThPOK). This study suggests a role for lncRNAs in the regulation of somatic homologous spatial proximity and allelic expression control necessary for fine-tuning mammalian immune responses. PMID:25770217

  20. Paradise Lost Dressed in the Costume of History: John Martin’s Rendition of Paradise Lost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laleh Atashi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The story of the loss of paradise has been read and interpreted in different ages. Commentary on Milton's Paradise Lost is not limited to verbal texts; painters and illustrators have contributed greatly to the poem by presenting their own time-bound readings and interpretations of the poem through their illustrations that are far beyond mere decorations. John Martin, in the aftermath of the Industrial Revolution, deletes the Father and the Son from his illustrations. Only angels such as Raphael are the representations of deity and are as powerless and tiny as Adam and Eve. Adam and Eve, after the Fall seem as small, powerless and as subjugated to the natural surrounding as they were before the Fall. Satan is the only powerful figure in his elegant palace. Through a new historical outlook, the researchers aim at exposing the workings of ideology and dominant discourses that informed John Martin's pictorial reading of Milton's poem in the early 19th century

  1. SLA-DRB1 and -DQB1 genotyping by the PCR-SSOP-Luminex method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, A; Shigenari, A; Ota, M; Sada, M; Kawata, H; Azuma, F; Kojima-Shibata, C; Nakajoh, M; Suzuki, K; Uenishi, H; Kulski, J K; Inoko, H

    2011-07-01

    A simple and novel genotyping method was developed to detect alleles at the swine leukocyte antigen (SLA)-DRB1 and -DQB1 class II loci by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-fluorescently labeled sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (SSOPs) and Luminex 100 xMAP detection. The PCR-SSOP-Luminex method exhibited accuracy of 95% for both SLA-DRB1 and -DQB1 in 6 homozygous and 16 heterozygous pig samples as confirmed by sequencing the PCR products of the same samples. In addition, 12 low-resolution SLA class II haplotypes consisting of 7 and 9 DRB1 and DQB1 alleles were identified, respectively, in one population of 283 Landrace pigs. This genotyping method facilitates the rapid and accurate identification of two- or four-digit alleles at the SLA-DRB1 and -DQB1 loci. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Steady-state pharmacokinetics of metformin is independent of the OCT1 genotype in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Marie Hougaard; Højlund, Kurt; Hother-Nielsen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to determine the steady-state pharmacokinetics of metformin in healthy volunteers with different numbers of reduced-function alleles in the organic cation transporter 1 gene (OCT1). METHODS: The study was conducted as part of a randomized cross-over trial. Thirty......-four healthy volunteers with known OCT1 genotypes (12 with two wild-type alleles, 13 with one and 9 with two reduced-function alleles) were included. In one of the study periods, they were titrated to steady-state with 1 g metformin twice daily. RESULTS: Neither AUC(0-12), C(max) nor Cl(renal) were...... volunteers, we found no impact of different OCT1 genotypes on metformin steady-state pharmacokinetics....

  3. Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayhan Azadmanesh

    2005-09-01

    the ultimate source of the virus's genetic diversity. HCV circulates as a heterogeneous population of genetically different but closely related genomes known as the quasispecies(15.As only 30-35% of nucleotides actually differ, there is obviously considerable heterogeneity in evolutionary rates among nucleotide sites in the genome. This heterogeneity is the result of variable evolutionary constraints. The 5'-UTR contains extensive secondary RNA structure and is correspondingly the slowest evolving genomic region(16. The next slowest region is the C (Core gene, which evolves three times faster than the 5'- UTR. The envelope genes E1 and E2 constitute the most diverse genome region and evolve about nine times faster than the 5'-UTR(16, probably as a result of their presumed role in evading the host immune response. Genomic Heterogeneity and ClassificationSystemsShortly after its discovery in 1989, it became clear that HCV had substantial nucleotide sequence diversity, with only 66 to 80% overall sequencesimilarity among strains belonging to different genotypes or subtypes(17. HCV isolates show four levels of genomic variations: types, subtypes, isolates, andquasispecies. The overall sequence similarities over complete genomic sequences are at least 91% within quasispecies, approximately 79% (range, 77 to 80% between subtypes, and about 68% (range, 66 to 69% between different types. This quasispecies is composed of a group of heterogeneous RNA sequences centered around a dominant nucleotide sequence that changes, throughout the course of the infection, under the selective pressure of the host immune system(18. More than one genotype can be found in the circulations of some HCV-infected patients, particularly in individuals who have received multiple transfusions and intravenous drug users. These are referred to as mixed-genotype infections(19, 20.The lack of a routinely available cell culture system and an easily available animal model has rendered classification of HCV

  4. Initial invasion of gametophytic self-incompatibility alleles in the absence of tight linkage between pollen and pistil S alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Satoki; Wakoh, Haluka

    2014-08-01

    In homomorphic self-incompatibility (SI) systems of plants, the loci controlling the pollen and pistil types are tightly linked, and this prevents the generation of compatible combinations of alleles expressing pollen and pistil types, which would result in self-fertilization. We modeled the initial invasion of the first pollen and pistil alleles in gametophytic SI to determine whether these alleles can stably coexist in a population without tight linkage. We assume pollen and pistil loci each carry an incompatibility allele S and an allele without an incompatibility function N. We assume that pollen with an S allele are incompatible with pistils carrying S alleles, whereas other crosses are compatible. Ovules in pistils carrying an S allele suffer viability costs because recognition consumes resources. We found that the cost of carrying a pistil S allele allows pollen and pistil S alleles to coexist in a stable equilibrium if linkage is partial. This occurs because parents that carry pistil S alleles but are homozygous for pollen N alleles cannot avoid self-fertilization; however, they suffer viability costs. Hence, pollen N alleles are selected again. When pollen and pistil S alleles can coexist in a polymorphic equilibrium, selection will favor tighter linkage.

  5. NEW GENOTYPES AND TECHNOLOGICAL INDICATORS OF WINTER TRITICALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Z.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to conduct basic screening of new lines and cultivars of winter hexaploid triticale by the technological and molecular genetics indicators. Molecular and genetic research conducted by polymerase chain reaction allelic variants of gene loci Wx-A1, Wx-B1, and quality parameters of grain, flour and bread – on technological markers. The new cultivars and lines of winter hexaploid triticale of Nosivka Breeding and Research Station of Remeslo Myronivka Institute of Wheat by technological indicators of grain, flour and bread quality were studied. According to representative criteria’s the most promising genotypes, which are the main products in terms Forest-Steppe ecotypes’ and a high-quality raw materials for bakeries and bioethanol were identified. Molecular and genetic identifications of allelic variants of genes loci Wx-A1, Wx-B1 triticale, which in the early stages of ontogenesis to predict targeted uses genotypes were conducted. The first among a series of triticale cultivars and lines Forest-Steppe ecotypes and biotypes with nonfunctional b gene allele WxA1, which defines a high content of amylopectin of starch, an important release for more ethanol was identified. It was found that technological characteristics of grain, flour and bread of new cultivars and lines of winter triticale meet the modern requirements production dietetic food and bioenergy products is important and relevant in the context of food security of Ukraine.

  6. The APOE Genotype in Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Yang

    Full Text Available Amyloid plaque has been reported in brain biopsies from patients with idiopathic normal-pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH and proposed as a significant feature of the pathophysiology. Presence of the apolipoprotein E ε4 (APOE ε4 allele is associated with increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD.To compare the distribution of APOE genotype in iNPH patients with an age-matched population-based control group and with Alzheimer's disease (AD patients.APOE genotype frequencies were determined in 77 iNPH patients (50 men and 27 women, mean age 71.7 years diagnosed with iNPH, a sample of 691 AD patients and 638 age-matched population controls (299 men and 339 women from the INTERGENE cohort.The APOE distribution did not differ significantly between the iNPH patients and the control population. The per e4-allele odds-ratio (OR of iNPH was given by OR = 0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI = (0.50, 1.60 that was considerably smaller than the per-allele OR of AD, OR = 5.34 (4.10, 7.00.The results suggest that the APOE-related risk of AD in patients with iNPH is not higher than in the general population.

  7. Genomic analyses of RH alleles to improve transfusion therapy in patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Marion E; Halter Hipsky, Christine; Hue-Roye, Kim; Hoppe, Carolyn

    2014-04-01

    Red cell (RBC) blood group alloimmunization remains a major problem in transfusion medicine. Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) are at particularly high risk for developing alloantibodies to RBC antigens compared to other multiply transfused patient populations. Hemagglutination is the classical method used to test for blood group antigens, but depending on the typing methods and reagents used may result in discrepancies that preclude interpretation based on serologic reactivity alone. Molecular methods, including customized DNA microarrays, are increasingly used to complement serologic methods in predicting blood type. The purpose of this study was to determine the diversity and frequency of RH alleles in African Americans and to assess the performance of a DNA microarray for RH allele determination. Two sets of samples were tested: (i) individuals with known variant Rh types and (ii) randomly selected African American donors and patients with SCD. Standard hemagglutination tests were used to establish the Rh phenotype, and cDNA- and gDNA-based analyses (sequencing, PCR-RFLP, and customized RHD and RHCE microarrays were used to predict the genotype). In a total of 829 samples (1658 alleles), 72 different alleles (40 RHD and 32 RHCE) were identified, 22 of which are novel. DNA microarrays detected all nucleotides probed, allowing for characterization of over 900 alleles. High-throughput DNA testing platforms provide a means to test a relatively large number of donors and potentially prevent immunization by changing the way antigen-negative blood is provided to patients. Because of the high RH allelic diversity found in the African American population, determination of an accurate Rh phenotype often requires DNA testing, in conjunction with serologic testing. Allele-specific microarrays offer a means to perform high-throughput donor Rh typing and serve as a valuable adjunct to serologic methods to predict Rh type. Because DNA microarrays test for only a fixed

  8. Association of HLA class II alleles and CTLA-4 polymorphism with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana J EI Wafai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is a progressive complex autoimmune disease in which combinations of environmental as well as genetic factors contribute to T-cell mediated destruction of insulin-secreting β-cells of the pancreas. HLA class II alleles on chromosome 6p21 [insulin dependent diabetes mellitus 1 (IDDM1], especially DR and DQ, show strong association with T1DM. In addition, several studies have suggested that polymorphisms in the CTLA-4 gene (IDDM12 on chromosome 2q33 form part of the genetic susceptibility for type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to analyze HLA alleles of the DQB1 and DRB1 genes using polymerase chain reaction using sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP technique and to investigate the asso-ciation of the A49G CTLA-4 polymorphism using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP analysis in Lebanese T1DM patients. The study was conduc-ted on 39 Lebanese T1DM patients. Results of HLA typing showed an increased frequency of the HLA-DQB1FNx010201, HLA-DQB1FNx010302, HLA-DRB1FNx010301 and HLA-DRB1FNx010401 alleles, sugges-ting risk association and thus can be considered as susceptibility alleles. On the other hand, strong protection against the disease was conferred by the HLA-DRB1FNx01110101, HLA-DQB1FNx010301 and HLADQB1FNx010601 alleles. RFLP analysis of the A49G polymorphism showed a significant increase in the G allele and GG genotype frequencies in patients, suggesting that CTLA-4 may be considered as a susceptibility gene for the development of T1DM in the Lebanese population. Analysis of the two polymorphisms showed no detectable association between the two genes. However, a significant negative association of the G allele with the DQB1FNx010201 allele was ob-served. This might indicate that the two genetic risk factors, namely HLA and CTLA-4, act independently of each other with no additive effect.

  9. The Lost Work in Dissipative Self-Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koper, G. J. M.; Boekhoven, J.; Hendriksen, W. E.; van Esch, J. H.; Eelkema, R.; Pagonabarraga, I.; Rubí, J. M.; Bedeaux, D.

    2013-07-01

    A general thermodynamic analysis is given of dissipative self-assembly (DSA). Subsequently, the analysis is used to quantify the lost work in a recently published chemical realization of DSA (Boekhoven et al., Angew Chem Int Ed 49:4825, 2010) where a formation reaction produces the monomers that subsequently self-assemble and are finally annihilated by means of a destruction reaction. For this example, the work lost in self-assembly itself is found to be negligibly small compared to the work lost in the reactions driving the non-spontaneous formation reaction and the kinetically hindered destruction reaction.

  10. A new h allele detected in Europe has a missense mutationin alpha(1,2)-fucosyltransferase motif II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, T; Vadon, M; Staudacher, E; Schmarda, A; Gassner, C; Helmberg, W; Lanzer, G; Flegel, W A; Wagner, F F

    2001-01-01

    The FUT1 gene encodes an alpha(1,2)-fucosyltransferase (H transferase), which determines the blood group H. Nonfunctional alleles of this gene, called h alleles and carrying loss-of-function mutations, are observed in the exceedingly rare Bombay phenotype. Twenty-three distinct h alleles have been characterized at the molecular level in various populations. The FUT2 (SE) gene is highly homologous to FUT1 (H:). The FUT1 gene of an Austrian proband with the Bombay phenotype was characterized by nucleotide sequencing of the full-length coding sequence. A PCR method using sequence-specific primers for FUT2 genotyping in whites was developed. The plasma alpha(1,2)-fucosyltransferase activity was determined. The distribution of the mutations underlying 24 h alleles and 7 se alleles was analyzed. The proband carried a new h allele. Two nucleotide changes, G785A and C786A, in codon 262 of the FUT1 gene resulted in the replacement of serine by lysine. No alpha(1,2)-fucosyltransferase activity was detected in the proband's plasma. The proband was homozygous for the seG428A allele. Six of 17 missense mutations in nonfunctional h and se alleles occurred in highly conserved fucosyltransferase motifs. No loss-of-function mutation was observed in the aminoterminal section encompassing the transmembraneous helix. The missense mutation S262K in the FUT1 gene caused the loss of H transferase activity. The analysis of the distribution of mutations in nonfunctional FUT1 and FUT2 genes can point to functionally important domains in the H transferase.

  11. [Cloning and sequencing of KIR2DL1 framework gene cDNA and identification of a novel allele].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ge; Wang, Chang; Zhen, Jianxin; Zhang, Guobin; Xu, Yunping; Deng, Zhihui

    2016-10-01

    To develop an assay for cDNA cloning and haplotype sequencing of KIR2DL1 framework gene and determine the genotype of an ethnic Han from southern China. Total RNA was isolated from peripheral blood sample, and complementary DNA (cDNA) transcript was synthesized by RT-PCR. The entire coding sequence of the KIR2DL1 framework gene was amplified with a pair of KIR2DL1-specific PCR primers. The PCR products with a length of approximately 1.2 kb were then subjected to cloning and haplotype sequencing. A specific target fragment of the KIR2DL1 framework gene was obtained. Following allele separation, a wild-type KIR2DL1*00302 allele and a novel variant allele, KIR2DL1*031, were identified. Sequence alignment with KIR2DL1 alleles from the IPD-KIR Database showed that the novel allele KIR2DL1*031 has differed from the closest allele KIR2DL1*00302 by a non-synonymous mutation at CDS nt 188A>G (codon 42 GAG>GGG) in exon 4, which has caused an amino acid change Glu42Gly. The sequence of the novel allele KIR2DL1*031 was submitted to GenBank under the accession number KP025960 and to the IPD-KIR Database under the submission number IWS40001982. A name KIR2DL1*031 has been officially assigned by the World Health Organization (WHO) Nomenclature Committee. An assay for cDNA cloning and haplotype sequencing of KIR2DL1 has been established, which has a broad applications in KIR studies at allelic level.

  12. GENETIC DIVERSITY OF S3 MAIZE GENOTYPES RESISTANT TO DOWNY MILDEW BASED ON SSR MARKERS

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    Amran Muis

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The compulsory requirement for releasing new high yielding maize varieties is resistance to downy mildew. The study aimed to determine the level of homozygosity, genetic diversity, and  genetic distance of 30 S3 genotypes of maize. Number of primers to be used were 30 polymorphic SSR loci which are distributed over the entire maize genomes. The S3 genotypes used were resistant to downy mildew with homozygosity level of >80%, genetic distance between the test and tester strains >0.7, and anthesis silking interval (ASI between inbred lines and tester lines was maximum 3 days. The results showed that 30 SSR primers used were spread evenly across the maize genomes which were manifested in the representation of SSR loci on each chromosome of a total of 10 chromosomes. The levels of polymorphism ranged from 0.13 to 0.78, an average of 0.51, and the number of alleles ranged from 2 to 8 alleles per SSR locus, an average of 4 alleles per SSR locus. The size of nucleotides in each locus also varied from 70 to 553 bp. Cophenetic correlation value (r at 0.67 indicated that the Unweighted Pair-Group Method Using Arithmetic Averages (UPGMA was less reliable for differentiating genotypes in five groups. Of the total of 30 genotypes analyzed, 17 genotypes had homozygosity level of >80% so it can be included in the hybrid assembly program.

  13. Multiplex minisequencing screening for PTC genotype associated with bitter taste perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagong, Borum; Bae, Jae Woong; Rhyu, Mee Ra; Kim, Un-Kyung; Ye, Mi-Kyung

    2014-03-01

    Sensitivity to phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) has a bimodal distribution pattern and the genotype of the TAS2R38 gene, which is composed of combinations of three coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), p.A49P (c.145G>C), p.V262A (c.785T>C) and p.I296 V (c.886A>G), determines the ability or inability to taste PTC. In this study, we developed a tool for genotyping of these SNPs in the TAS2R38 gene using SNaPshot minisequencing and investigated the accuracy of the tool in 100 subjects who were genotyped by Sanger sequencing. The minor allele frequencies of the three SNPs were 0.39, and these genotypes corresponded to those determined by direct sequencing. In conclusion, we successfully developed a precise and rapid genetic tool for analysis of PTC genotype associated with bitter taste perception.

  14. HLA alleles influence the clinical signature of amoxicillin-clavulanate hepatotoxicity.

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    Camilla Stephens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: The genotype-phenotype interaction in drug-induced liver injury (DILI is a subject of growing interest. Previous studies have linked amoxicillin-clavulanate (AC hepatotoxicity susceptibility to specific HLA alleles. In this study we aimed to examine potential associations between HLA class I and II alleles and AC DILI with regards to phenotypic characteristics, severity and time to onset in Spanish AC hepatotoxicity cases. METHODS: High resolution genotyping of HLA loci A, B, C, DRB1 and DQB1 was performed in 75 AC DILI cases and 885 controls. RESULTS: The distributions of class I alleles A*3002 (P/Pc = 2.6E-6/5E-5, OR 6.7 and B*1801 (P/Pc = 0.008/0.22, OR 2.9 were more frequently found in hepatocellular injury cases compared to controls. In addition, the presence of the class II allele combination DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 (P/Pc = 5.1E-4/0.014, OR 3.0 was significantly increased in cholestatic/mixed cases. The A*3002 and/or B*1801 carriers were found to be younger (54 vs 65 years, P = 0.019 and were more frequently hospitalized than the DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 carriers. No additional alleles outside those associated with liver injury patterns were found to affect potential severity as measured by Hy's Law criteria. The phenotype frequencies of B*1801 (P/Pc = 0.015/0.42, OR 5.2 and DRB1*0301-DQB1*0201 (P/Pc = 0.0026/0.07, OR 15 were increased in AC DILI cases with delayed onset compared to those corresponding to patients without delayed onset, while the opposite applied to DRB1*1302-DQB1*0604 (P/Pc = 0.005/0.13, OR 0.07. CONCLUSIONS: HLA class I and II alleles influence the AC DILI signature with regards to phenotypic expression, latency presentation and severity in Spanish patients.

  15. HLA Alleles Influence the Clinical Signature of Amoxicillin-Clavulanate Hepatotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Camilla; López-Nevot, Miguel-Ángel; Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco; Ulzurrun, Eugenia; Soriano, Germán; Romero-Gómez, Manuel; Moreno-Casares, Antonia; Lucena, M. Isabel; Andrade, Raúl J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim The genotype-phenotype interaction in drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a subject of growing interest. Previous studies have linked amoxicillin-clavulanate (AC) hepatotoxicity susceptibility to specific HLA alleles. In this study we aimed to examine potential associations between HLA class I and II alleles and AC DILI with regards to phenotypic characteristics, severity and time to onset in Spanish AC hepatotoxicity cases. Methods High resolution genotyping of HLA loci A, B, C, DRB1 and DQB1 was performed in 75 AC DILI cases and 885 controls. Results The distributions of class I alleles A*3002 (P/Pc = 2.6E-6/5E-5, OR 6.7) and B*1801 (P/Pc = 0.008/0.22, OR 2.9) were more frequently found in hepatocellular injury cases compared to controls. In addition, the presence of the class II allele combination DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 (P/Pc = 5.1E-4/0.014, OR 3.0) was significantly increased in cholestatic/mixed cases. The A*3002 and/or B*1801 carriers were found to be younger (54 vs 65 years, P = 0.019) and were more frequently hospitalized than the DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 carriers. No additional alleles outside those associated with liver injury patterns were found to affect potential severity as measured by Hy’s Law criteria. The phenotype frequencies of B*1801 (P/Pc = 0.015/0.42, OR 5.2) and DRB1*0301-DQB1*0201 (P/Pc = 0.0026/0.07, OR 15) were increased in AC DILI cases with delayed onset compared to those corresponding to patients without delayed onset, while the opposite applied to DRB1*1302-DQB1*0604 (P/Pc = 0.005/0.13, OR 0.07). Conclusions HLA class I and II alleles influence the AC DILI signature with regards to phenotypic expression, latency presentation and severity in Spanish patients. PMID:23874514

  16. Grain legume genetic resources for allele mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequencing capacities for higher throughput at significantly lower costs have enabled larger scale genotyping of plant genetic resources. One challenge to sequencing the USDA grain legume collections of pea, chickpea and lentil core accessions is the amount of heterogeneity in the landrace accessio...

  17. The NQO1 allelic frequency in hindu population of central India varies from that of other Asian populations

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    Parihar Sher

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The enzymes encoded by the polymorphic genes NAD (P H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1 play an important role in the activation and inactivation of xenobiotics. This enzyme has been associated with xenobiotic related diseases, such as cancer, therapeutic failure and abnormal effects of drugs. Aim: The aim of the present study was to determine the allelic and genotypic frequencies of NQO Hinf I polymorphisms in a Hindu population of Central India. Settings and Design: Polymorphisms of NQO1 were determined in 311 unrelated Hindu individuals. Materials and Methods: Polymerase chain reaction- Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP analysis in peripheral blood DNA for NQO1 Hinf I polymorphism was used in 311 unrelated Hindu individuals. Statistical Analysis: Allele frequencies were calculated by direct counting. Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium was evaluated using a Chi-square goodness of fit test. Results: The observed allelic frequency was 81% for C (wild and 19% for T (mutant in the total sample. Conclusions: The allelic frequency of "C" was higher than in other Asians (57%, but similar to Caucasians (81%. The genotype distributions for Hinf I polymorphisms were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.

  18. Allele diversity for abiotic stress responsive candidate genes in chickpea reference set using gene based SNP markers

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    Manish eRoorkiwal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chickpea is an important food legume crop for the semi-arid regions, however, its productivity is adversely affected by various biotic and abiotic stresses. Identification of candidate genes associated with abiotic stress response will help breeding efforts aiming to enhance its productivity. With this objective, 10 abiotic stress responsive candidate genes were selected on the basis of prior knowledge of this complex trait. These 10 genes were subjected to allele specific sequencing across a chickpea reference set comprising 300 genotypes including 211 accessions of chickpea mini core collection. A total of 1.3 Mbp sequence data were generated. Multiple sequence alignment revealed 79 SNPs and 41 indels in nine genes while the CAP2 gene was found to be conserved across all the genotypes. Among ten candidate genes, the maximum number of SNPs (34 was observed in abscisic acid stress and ripening (ASR gene including 22 transitions, 11 transversions and one tri-allelic SNP. Nucleotide diversity varied from 0.0004 to 0.0029 while PIC values ranged from 0.01 (AKIN gene to 0.43 (CAP2 promoter. Haplotype analysis revealed that alleles were represented by more than two haplotype blocks, except alleles of the CAP2 and sucrose synthase (SuSy gene, where only one haplotype was identified. These genes can be used for association analysis and if validated, may be useful for enhancing abiotic stress, including drought tolerance, through molecular breeding.

  19. Apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 allele distribution in Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome with or without global intellectual deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, T; Kato, M; Matsui, T; Yoshimasu, H; Yoshino, A; Matsushita, S; Higuchi, S; Kashima, H

    1997-01-01

    Recent genetic studies show that the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) epsilon 4 allele is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whether this allele is associated with other dementing diseases is the next important question. The information could provide a clue to the pathogenetic role of ApoE. In the present study, patients with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) of alcoholic etiology were divided into two groups according to the severity of intellectual deficits, i.e., those of "classical" Korsakoff patients with preserved intellectual function other than amnesia and those with global intellectual deficits. Genotyping showed that the frequency of ApoE epsilon 4 allele was significantly higher in the patients with global deficits, suggesting the involvement of this allele in the intellectual decline of WKS. In contrast, distributions of other two markers, alpha 1-antichymotrypsin and presenilin-1, did not differ between the two groups. These results added further support to the notion that the consequence of acute insult to the brain is influenced by the ApoE genotype, and suggested ApoE's role in the development of a certain group of "alcoholic dementia."

  20. Association between Neurocognitive Impairment and the Short Allele of the 5-HTT Promoter Polymorphism in Depression: A Pilot Study

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    Hely Kalska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Depression has been shown to be associated with cognitive deficits in various cognitive domains. However, it is still unclear which factors contribute to cognitive impairment. The objective of this study was to find out whether a functional polymorphism in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR gene is associated with the impairment of cognitive functioning among depressed patients. In a pilot study, a sample of 19 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD and 19 healthy controls was investigated with an extensive psychiatric and neuropsychological examination. All participants were genotyped for 5-HTTLPR. Depressed patients with the short allele of the 5-HTT promoter region exhibited inferior cognitive performance compared to patients with the long allele polymorphism. In healthy controls, no association between genotype and cognitive performance was found. The result suggests that in MDD patients with the short allele of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism the vulnerability to cognitive impairment is increased compared to MDD patients without the short allele inheritance. These preliminary findings need to be confirmed in a larger cohort of MDD patients.

  1. Sequence-based in silico analysis of well studied Hepatitis C Virus epitopes and their variants in other genotypes (particularly genotype 5a against South African human leukocyte antigen backgrounds

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    Prabdial-Sing Nishi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Host genetics influence the outcome of HCV disease. HCV is also highly mutable and escapes host immunity. HCV genotypes are geographically distributed and HCV subtypes have been shown to have distinct repertoires of HLA-restricted viral epitopes which explains the lack of cross protection across genotypes observed in some studies. Despite this, immune databases and putative epitope vaccines concentrate almost exclusively on HCV genotype 1 class I-epitopes restricted by the HLA-A*02 allele. While both genotype and allele predominate in developed countries, we hypothesise that HCV variation and population genetics will affect the efficacy of proposed epitope vaccines in South Africa. This in silico study investigates HCV viral variability within well-studied epitopes identified in genotype 1 and uses algorithms to predict the immunogenicity of their variants from other less studied genotypes and thus rate the most promising vaccine candidates for the South African population. Six class I- and seven class II- restricted epitope sequences within the core, NS3, NS4B and NS5B regions were compared across the six HCV genotypes using local genotype 5a sequence data together with global data. Common HLA alleles in the South African population are A30:01, A02:01, B58:02, B07:02; DRB1*13:01 and DRB1*03:01. Epitope binding to 13 class I- and 8 class –II alleles were described using web-based prediction servers, Immune Epitope Database, (IEDB and Propred. Online population coverage tools were used to assess vaccine efficacy. Results Despite the homogeneity of genotype 1 and genotype 5 over the epitopes, there was limited promiscuity to local HLA-alleles.Host differences will make a putative vaccine less effective in South Africa. Of the 6 well-characterized class I- epitopes, only 2 class I- epitopes were promiscuous and 3 of the 7 class-II epitopes were better conserved and promiscuous. By fine tuning the putative vaccine using an

  2. Differential fitness of allelic isozymes in the marine gastropods Littorina punctata and Littorina neritoides, exposed to the environmental stress of the combined effects of cadmium and mercury pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavie, Batia; Nevo, Eviatar

    1987-07-01

    The present study tested the separate and the interactive pollution effects of cadmium and mercury on the electrophoretically detected allelic isozyme frequencies of the enzyme phosphoglucose isomerase for two species of littoral marine gastropods — Littorina punctata and L. neritoides — and the enzyme amino peptidase for L. neritoides. Our results indicate differential survivorship of allelic isozyme genotypes specific for each type of pollutant and for their interaction, as well as trends common to all pollutants. Theoretically the results reflect the adaptive nature of at least some allozymic genotypes in these marine gastropods and seem inconsistent with the neutral theory of allozyme polymorphisms. Practically, the results reinforce earlier conclusions that changes in the frequency of allelic isozymes may be used as a genetic monitor of pollution.

  3. Repeated measurement sampling in genetic association analysis with genotyping errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Renzhen; Zhang, Hong; Yang, Yaning

    2007-02-01

    Genotype misclassification occurs frequently in human genetic association studies. When cases and controls are subject to the same misclassification model, Pearson's chi-square test has the correct type I error but may lose power. Most current methods adjusting for genotyping errors assume that the misclassification model is known a priori or can be assessed by a gold standard instrument. But in practical applications, the misclassification probabilities may not be completely known or the gold standard method can be too costly to be available. The repeated measurement design provides an alternative approach for identifying misclassification probabilities. With this design, a proportion of the subjects are measured repeatedly (five or more repeats) for the genotypes when the error model is completely unknown. We investigate the applications of the repeated measurement method in genetic association analysis. Cost-effectiveness study shows that if the phenotyping-to-genotyping cost ratio or the misclassification rates are relatively large, the repeat sampling can gain power over the regular case-control design. We also show that the power gain is not sensitive to the genetic model, genetic relative risk and the population high-risk allele frequency, all of which are typically important ingredients in association studies. An important implication of this result is that whatever the genetic factors are, the repeated measurement method can be applied if the genotyping errors must be accounted for or the phenotyping cost is high.

  4. Normal ATXN3 allele but not CHIP polymorphisms modulates age at onset in Machado-Joseph Disease

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    Marcondes C. França Jr

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Age at onset (AO in Machado-Joseph disease (MJD is closely associated with the length of the CAG repeat at the mutant ATXN3 allele, but there are other intervening factors. Experimental evidence indicates that the normal ATXN3 allele and the C-terminal heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP may be genetic modifiers of AO in MJD. Methods: To investigate this hypothesis, we determined the length of normal and expanded CAG repeats at the ATXN3 gene in 210 unrelated patients with MJD. In addition, we genotyped five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within the CHIP gene. We first compared the frequencies of the different genotypes in two subgroups of patients who were highly discordant for AO after correction for the length of the expanded CAG allele. The possible modifier effect of each gene was then evaluated in a stepwise multiple linear regression model. Results: AO was associated with the length of the expanded CAG allele (r2 = 0.596, p<0.001. Frequencies of the normal CAG repeats at the ATXN3 gene and of CHIP polymorphisms did not differ significantly between groups with highly discordant ages at onset. However, addition of the normal allele improved the model fit for prediction of AO (r2 = 0.604, p=0.014. Indeed, we found that the normal CAG allele at ATXN3 had a positive independent effect on AO. Conclusion: The normal CAG repeat at the ATXN3 gene has a small but significant influence on AO of MJD.

  5. Does sex trade with violence among genotypes in Drosophila melanogaster?

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    Larry G Cabral

    Full Text Available The evolutionary forces shaping the ability to win competitive interactions, such as aggressive encounters, are still poorly understood. Given a fitness advantage for competitive success, variance in aggressive and sexual display traits should be depleted, but a great deal of variation in these traits is consistently found. While life history tradeoffs have been commonly cited as a mechanism for the maintenance of variation, the variability of competing strategies of conspecifics may mean there is no single optimum strategy. We measured the genetically determined outcomes of aggressive interactions, and the resulting effects on mating success, in a panel of diverse inbred lines representing both natural variation and artificially selected genotypes. Males of one genotype which consistently lost territorial encounters with other genotypes were nonetheless successful against males that were artificially selected for supernormal aggression and dominated all other lines. Intransitive patterns of territorial success could maintain variation in aggressive strategies if there is a preference for territorial males. Territorial success was not always associated with male mating success however and females preferred 'winners' among some male genotypes, and 'losers' among other male genotypes. This suggests that studying behaviour from the perspective of population means may provide limited evolutionary and genetic insight. Overall patterns of competitive success among males and mating transactions between the sexes are consistent with mechanisms proposed for the maintenance of genetic variation due to nonlinear outcomes of competitive interactions.

  6. Distribution of composite CYP1A1 genotypes in Africans, African-Americans and Caucasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garte, S J; Trachman, J; Crofts, F; Toniolo, P; Buxbaum, J; Bayo, S; Taioli, E

    1996-01-01

    We present the genotype distribution of the CYP1A1 gene in a sample of over 300 subjects of various ethnic origins. Genotypes are presented as composites of eight possible alleles, taking into account the three major polymorphisms, including a recently described African-American-specific MspI RFLP. A new nomenclature system is presented for clarifying the various haplotypes. Interesting interracial differences in allelic frequencies and admixture rates were observed for the three polymorphisms. Because of the importance of the CYP1A1 gene (which encodes the aromatic hydrocarbon hydroxylase) as a biomarker of genetic susceptibility to environmental carcinogens such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, these data may provide a useful reference for future studies of relationships between CYP1A1 genotype and disease susceptibility.

  7. Identification of zoonotic genotypes of Giardia duodenalis.

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    Hein Sprong

    Full Text Available Giardia duodenalis, originally regarded as a commensal organism, is the etiologic agent of giardiasis, a gastrointestinal disease of humans and animals. Giardiasis causes major public and veterinary health concerns worldwide. Transmission is either direct, through the faecal-oral route, or indirect, through ingestion of contaminated water or food. Genetic characterization of G. duodenalis isolates has revealed the existence of seven groups (assemblages A to G which differ in their host distribution. Assemblages A and B are found in humans and in many other mammals, but the role of animals in the epidemiology of human infection is still unclear, despite the fact that the zoonotic potential of Giardia was recognised by the WHO some 30 years ago. Here, we performed an extensive genetic characterization of 978 human and 1440 animal isolates, which together comprise 3886 sequences from 4 genetic loci. The data were assembled into a molecular epidemiological database developed by a European network of public and veterinary health Institutions. Genotyping was performed at different levels of resolution (single and multiple loci on the same dataset. The zoonotic potential of both assemblages A and B is evident when studied at the level of assemblages, sub-assemblages, and even at each single locus. However, when genotypes are defined using a multi-locus sequence typing scheme, only 2 multi-locus genotypes (MLG of assemblage A and none of assemblage B appear to have a zoonotic potential. Surprisingly, mixtures of genotypes in individual isolates were repeatedly observed. Possible explanations are the uptake of genetically different Giardia cysts by a host, or subsequent infection of an already infected host, likely without overt symptoms, with a different Giardia species, which may cause disease. Other explanations for mixed genotypes, particularly for assemblage B, are substantial allelic sequence heterogeneity and/or genetic recombination. Although the

  8. SNP genotyping technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Studer, Bruno; Kölliker, Roland

    2013-01-01

    for this is the availability of high-throughput platforms for multiplexed SNP genotyping. Advancements in these technologies have enabled increased flexibility and throughput, allowing for the generation of adequate SNP marker data at very competitive cost per data point.......In the recent years, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers have emerged as the marker technology of choice for plant genetics and breeding applications. Besides the efficient technologies available for SNP discovery even in complex genomes, one of the main reasons...

  9. SNP genotyping technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Studer, Bruno; Kölliker, Roland

    2013-01-01

    In the recent years, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers have emerged as the marker technology of choice for plant genetics and breeding applications. Besides the efficient technologies available for SNP discovery even in complex genomes, one of the main reasons...... for this is the availability of high-throughput platforms for multiplexed SNP genotyping. Advancements in these technologies have enabled increased flexibility and throughput, allowing for the generation of adequate SNP marker data at very competitive cost per data point....

  10. Association of BoLA DRB3 and DQA1 alleles with susceptibility to Neospora caninum and reproductive outcome in Quebec Holstein cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Anne E; Geary, Timothy G; Baillargeon, Paul; Schwab, Andreas J; Fecteau, Gilles

    2009-10-28

    The BoLA DRB3 and DQA1 genes are part of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II in cattle. These genes are highly polymorphic and have been associated with resistance to several diseases, such as mastitis, Bovine Leukemia Virus (BLV) and dermatophilis. Sequenced based typing of these genes has been carried out extensively from blood samples; however it is often impractical or expensive to obtain such samples. Repositories of well-characterized serum from cattle are readily available in many veterinary research facilities. This paper reports a retrospective analysis of BoLA class II genotypes of cattle obtained from stored serum samples from Holstein cattle from Québec dairy farms, which were obtained as part of a previous study on bovine neosporosis. It was possible to genotype 56 cattle with known infection status for Neospora caninum. We identified 14 different DRB3 and 10 different DQA1 alleles in this population. The allele frequency distribution was consistent with previously studied cattle populations, and alleles known to be associated with BLV and mastitis were present. No association was found between allele frequency distribution of DRB3 or DQA genes and infection with N. caninum. However, an association of allele DRB3*1001 and allele DRB3*2703 with resistance and susceptibility to pregnancy loss, irrespective of infection status, was identified.

  11. Angiogenin levels and ANG genotypes: dysregulation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

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    Russell Lewis McLaughlin

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine whether 5 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associate with ALS in 3 different populations. We also assessed the contribution of genotype to angiogenin levels in plasma and CSF. METHODS: Allelic association statistics were calculated for polymorphisms in the ANG gene in 859 patients and 1047 controls from Sweden, Ireland and Poland. Plasma, serum and CSF angiogenin levels were quantified and stratified according to genotypes across the ANG gene. The contribution of SNP genotypes to variance in circulating angiogenin levels was estimated in patients and controls. RESULTS: All SNPs showed association with ALS in the Irish group. The SNP rs17114699 replicated in the Swedish cohort. No SNP associated in the Polish cohort. Age- and sex-corrected circulating angiogenin levels were significantly lower in patients than in controls (p<0.001. An allele dose-dependent regulation of angiogenin levels was observed in controls. This regulation was attenuated in the ALS cohort. A significant positive correlation between CSF plasma angiogenin levels was present in controls and abolished in ALS. CONCLUSIONS: ANG variants associate with ALS in the Irish and Swedish populations, but not in the Polish. There is evidence of dysregulation of angiogenin expression in plasma and CSF in sporadic ALS. Angiogenin expression is likely to be important in the pathogenesis of ALS.

  12. S-Genotype Profiles of Turkish Apricot Germplasm

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    Kadir Ugurtan YILMAZ

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In flowering plants, gametophytic self-incompatibility, controlled by a single locus with several allelic variants, is one of the major problems preventing self-fertilization. Among fruit trees, apricots show to a high degree self-incompatibility, especially in Middle-Asian and Iranian-Caucasian eco-geographical groups. In the present study, self-(incompatibility characteristics of a total of 236 apricot genotypes (218 Turkish and 18 foreign found within the National Apricot Germplasms of Apricot Research Institute in Malatya, Turkey was studied. Analyses were carried out by using four primer pairs (SRc-F and SRc-R, EM-PC2consFD and EM-PC3consRD, AprSC8-R and PaConsI-F, AprFBC8-F and AprFBC8-R. A total of 11 S-RNase alleles (S2, S3, S6, S7, S8, S9, S11, S12, S13, S20 and Sc were determined in the 236 apricot genotypes. As Turkish and foreign apricot genotypes are determined mostly self-incompatible, the data obtained hereby might be of good use for apricot breeding programs and more practically, for apricot new plantations; thus pollinator cultivars should be considered when self-incompatible apricot cultivars are being used.

  13. Distinction of Plasmodium falciparum recrudescence and re-infection by MSP2 genotyping: A caution about unstandardized classification criteria

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    Thuma Philip E

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum genotyping with molecular polymorphic markers is widely employed to distinguish recrudescence from re-infection in antimalarial drug efficacy monitoring programmes. However, limitations occur on agarose gel DNA measurements used to resolve the polymorphisms. Without empirical data, the current distinction of pre- and post-treatment bands, as persistent or new infection, is subjective and often varying by author. This study measures empirical tolerance limits for classifying different-sized bands as same or different alleles during MSP2 genotyping. Methods P. falciparum field samples from 161 volunteers were genotyped by nested PCR using polymorphic MSP2 family-specific primers. Data were analysed to determine variability of band size measurements between identical MSP2 alleles randomized into different agarose lanes. Results The mean (95% CI paired difference in band size between identical alleles was 9.8 bp (1.48 – 18.16 bp, p = 0.022 for 3D7/IC and 2.54 (-3.04 – 8.05 bp, p = 0.362 for FC27. Based on these findings, pre- and post-treatment samples with 3D7/IC alleles showing less than 18 bp difference corresponded to recrudescence, with 95% confidence, while greater difference indicated new infection. FC27 allele differences were much narrower. For both 3D7/IC and FC27 amplicon, allele detection sensitivity was significantly higher with 13 μl compared to 20 μl or 30 μl lane loading volumes. Conclusion During MSP genotyping, it is useful to standardize classifications against measurement of background variability on identical alleles, in order to obtain reliable findings. It is critical to use a fixed optimal lane loading volume for constant allele patency, to avoid the disappearance or false appearance of new infection.

  14. Low-risk susceptibility alleles in 40 human breast cancer cell lines

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    Klijn Jan GM

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low-risk breast cancer susceptibility alleles or SNPs confer only modest breast cancer risks ranging from just over 1.0 to1.3 fold. Yet, they are common among most populations and therefore are involved in the development of essentially all breast cancers. The mechanism by which the low-risk SNPs confer breast cancer risks is currently unclear. The breast cancer association consortium BCAC has hypothesized that the low-risk SNPs modulate expression levels of nearby located genes. Methods Genotypes of five low-risk SNPs were determined for 40 human breast cancer cell lines, by direct sequencing of PCR-amplified genomic templates. We have analyzed expression of the four genes that are located nearby the low-risk SNPs, by using real-time RT-PCR and Human Exon microarrays. Results The SNP genotypes and additional phenotypic data on the breast cancer cell lines are presented. We did not detect any effect of the SNP genotypes on expression levels of the nearby-located genes MAP3K1, FGFR2, TNRC9 and LSP1. Conclusion The SNP genotypes provide a base line for functional studies in a well-characterized cohort of 40 human breast cancer cell lines. Our expression analyses suggest that a putative disease mechanism through gene expression modulation is not operative in breast cancer cell lines.

  15. Apolipoprotein E and Alzheimer disease: Genotype-specific risks by age and sex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bickeboeller, H. [INSERM, Paris (France)]|[IMSE, Munich (Germany); Babron, M.C.; Clerget-Darpoux, F. [INSERM, Paris (France)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    The distribution of apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotypes as a function of age and sex has been examined in a French population of 417 Alzheimer disease (AD) patients and 1,030 control subjects. When compared to the APOE {epsilon}3 allele, an increased risk associated with the APOE {epsilon}4 allele (odds ratio [OR] [{epsilon}4] = 2.7 with 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.0-3.6; P < .001) and a protective effect of the APOE {epsilon}2 allele (OR[{epsilon}2] = 0.5 with 95% CI = 0.3-0.98; P = .012) were retrieved. An effect of the {epsilon}4 allele dosage on susceptibility was confirmed (OR[{epsilon}4/{epsilon}4] vs. the {epsilon}3/{epsilon}3 genotype = 11.2 [95% CI = 4.0-31.6]; OR[{epsilon}3/{epsilon}4] vs. the {epsilon}3/{epsilon}3 genotype = 2.2 [95% Cl = 1.5-3.5]). The frequency of the {epsilon}4 allele was lower in male cases than in female cases, but, since a similar difference was found in controls, this does not lead to a difference in OR between sex. ORs for the {epsilon}4 allele versus the {epsilon}3 allele, OR({epsilon}4), were not equal in all age classes: OR({epsilon}4) in the extreme groups with onset at < 60 years or > 79 years were significantly lower than those from the age groups 60-79 years. In {epsilon}3/{epsilon}4 individuals, sex-specific lifetime risk estimates by age 85 years (i.e., sex-specific penetrances by age 85 years) were 0.14 (95% CI 0.04-0.30) for men and 0.17 (95% CI 0.09-0.28) for women. 53 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  16. Evaluating the impact of genotype errors on rare variant tests of association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Kaitlyn; Benitez, Alejandra; Fu, Casey; Tintle, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The new class of rare variant tests has usually been evaluated assuming perfect genotype information. In reality, rare variant genotypes may be incorrect, and so rare variant tests should be robust to imperfect data. Errors and uncertainty in SNP genotyping are already known to dramatically impact statistical power for single marker tests on common variants and, in some cases, inflate the type I error rate. Recent results show that uncertainty in genotype calls derived from sequencing reads are dependent on several factors, including read depth, calling algorithm, number of alleles present in the sample, and the frequency at which an allele segregates in the population. We have recently proposed a general framework for the evaluation and investigation of rare variant tests of association, classifying most rare variant tests into one of two broad categories (length or joint tests). We use this framework to relate factors affecting genotype uncertainty to the power and type I error rate of rare variant tests. We find that non-differential genotype errors (an error process that occurs independent of phenotype) decrease power, with larger decreases for extremely rare variants, and for the common homozygote to heterozygote error. Differential genotype errors (an error process that is associated with phenotype status), lead to inflated type I error rates which are more likely to occur at sites with more common homozygote to heterozygote errors than vice versa. Finally, our work suggests that certain rare variant tests and study designs may be more robust to the inclusion of genotype errors. Further work is needed to directly integrate genotype calling algorithm decisions, study costs and test statistic choices to provide comprehensive design and analysis advice which appropriately accounts for the impact of genotype errors.

  17. Temperature Switch PCR (TSP: Robust assay design for reliable amplification and genotyping of SNPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mather Diane E

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many research and diagnostic applications rely upon the assay of individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Thus, methods to improve the speed and efficiency for single-marker SNP genotyping are highly desirable. Here, we describe the method of temperature-switch PCR (TSP, a biphasic four-primer PCR system with a universal primer design that permits amplification of the target locus in the first phase of thermal cycling before switching to the detection of the alleles. TSP can simplify assay design for a range of commonly used single-marker SNP genotyping methods, and reduce the requirement for individual assay optimization and operator expertise in the deployment of SNP assays. Results We demonstrate the utility of TSP for the rapid construction of robust and convenient endpoint SNP genotyping assays based on allele-specific PCR and high resolution melt analysis by generating a total of 11,232 data points. The TSP assays were performed under standardised reaction conditions, requiring minimal optimization of individual assays. High genotyping accuracy was verified by 100% concordance of TSP genotypes in a blinded study with an independent genotyping method. Conclusion Theoretically, TSP can be directly incorporated into the design of assays for most current single-marker SNP genotyping methods. TSP provides several technological advances for single-marker SNP genotyping including simplified assay design and development, increased assay specificity and genotyping accuracy, and opportunities for assay automation. By reducing the requirement for operator expertise, TSP provides opportunities to deploy a wider range of single-marker SNP genotyping methods in the laboratory. TSP has broad applications and can be deployed in any animal and plant species.

  18. Lost Trail National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative : Calendar Year 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lost Trail National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2000 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  19. Lost Trail National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative : Calendar Year 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lost Trail National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1999 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  20. Environmental Assessment of hunting on Lost Trail National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to evaluate the feasibility of establishing a hunting program on Lost Trail National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge)....

  1. Dylan and Jamie and the Lost Ladybug Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    A narrated coloring book has been developed to emphasize the citizen science aspects of the Lost Ladybug Project. The text focuses on the various common lady beetles that might be found, as well as how to identify less common species....

  2. SBE primer : multiplexing minisequencing-based genotyping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaderali, L. (Lars); Deshpande, A. (Alina); Uribe-Romeo, F. J. (Francisco J.); Schliep, A.; Torney, D. C. (David C.)

    2002-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis is a powerful tool for mapping and diagnosing disease-related alleles. Most of the known genetic diseases are caused by point mutations, and a growing number of SNPs will be routinely analyzed to diagnose genetic disorders. Mutation analysis by polymerase mediated single-base primer extension (minisequencing) can be massively parallelized using for example DNA microchips or flow cytometry with microspheres as solid support. By adding a unique oligonucleotide tag to the 5-inch end of the minisequencing primer and attaching the complementary anti-tag to the array or bead surface, the assay can be 'demultiplexed'. However, such high-throughput scoring of SNPs requires a high level of primer multiplexing in order to analyze multiple loci in one assay, thus enabling inexpensive and fast polymorphism scoring. Primers can be chosen from either the plus or the minus strand, and primers used in the same experiment must not bind to one another. To genotype a given number of polymorphic sites, the question is which primer to use for each SNP, and which primers to group into the same experiment. Furthermore, a crosshybridization-free tag/anti-tag code is required in order to sort the extended primers to the corresponding microspheres or chip spots. These problems pose challenging algorithmic questions. We present a computer program lo automate the design process for the assay. Oligonucleotide primers for the reaction are automatically selected by the software, a unique DNA tag/anti-tag system is generated, and the pairing of primers and DNA-Tags is automatically done in a way to avoid any crossreactivity. We report first results on a 45-plex genotyping assay, indicating that minisequencing can be adapted to be a powerful tool for high-throughput, massively parallel genotyping.

  3. ANALYSIS OF POLYMORPHISM OF BETA CASEIN OF SLOVAK PINZGAU CATTLE BY PCR-RFLP FOR ALLELS A1 AND A2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARTINA MILUCHOVÁ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The work was oriented to identification of -casein gene polymorphism and analysis of genotype structure in population of Slovak Pinzgau cattle. The material involved 89 cattle. Bovine genomic DNA was isolated by fenol-chlorophorm deprotenization and ethanol precipitation and used in order to estimate  - casein genotypes by means of PCR-RFLP method. The PCR products were digested with DdeI restriction enzyme. In the population included in the study there were homozygote genotype A1A1 (27 animals, heterozygote genotype A1A2 (46 animals and homozygote genotype A2A2 (16 animals. In the total population of cattle heterozygotes A1A2 – 0.5168 were the most frequent, while homozygotes A2A2 – 0.1798 were the least frequent ones. This suggests a slight superiority of allele A1– 0.5618.

  4. Allele specific expression and methylation in the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoë Lonsdale

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The social hymenoptera are emerging as models for epigenetics. DNA methylation, the addition of a methyl group, is a common epigenetic marker. In mammals and flowering plants methylation affects allele specific expression. There is contradictory evidence for the role of methylation on allele specific expression in social insects. The aim of this paper is to investigate allele specific expression and monoallelic methylation in the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris. We found nineteen genes that were both monoallelically methylated and monoallelically expressed in a single bee. Fourteen of these genes express the hypermethylated allele, while the other five express the hypomethylated allele. We also searched for allele specific expression in twenty-nine published RNA-seq libraries. We found 555 loci with allele-specific expression. We discuss our results with reference to the functional role of methylation in gene expression in insects and in the as yet unquantified role of genetic cis effects in insect allele specific methylation and expression.

  5. Allelic Variation at the Rht8 Locus in a 19th Century Wheat Collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnéa Asplund

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wheat breeding during the 20th century has put large efforts into reducing straw length and increasing harvest index. In the 1920s an allele of Rht8 with dwarfing effects, found in the Japanese cultivar “Akakomugi,” was bred into European cultivars and subsequently spread over the world. Rht8 has not been cloned, but the microsatellite marker WMS261 has been shown to be closely linked to it and is commonly used for genotyping Rht8. The “Akakomugi” allele is strongly associated with WMS261-192bp. Numerous screens of wheat cultivars with different geographical origin have been performed to study the spread and influence of the WMS261-192bp during 20th century plant breeding. However, the allelic diversity of WMS261 in wheat cultivars before modern plant breeding and introduction of the Japanese dwarfing genes is largely unknown. Here, we report a study of WMS261 allelic diversity in a historical wheat collection from 1865 representing worldwide major wheats at the time. The majority carried the previously reported 164 bp or 174 bp allele, but with little geographical correlation. In a few lines, a rare 182 bp fragment was found. Although straw length was recognized as an important character already in the 19th century, Rht8 probably played a minor role for height variation. The use of WMS261 and other functional markers for analyses of historical specimens and characterization of historic crop traits is discussed.

  6. Apolipoprotein E-epsilon 4 allele and familial risk in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G; Silverman, J M; Altstiel, L D; Haroutunian, V; Perl, D P; Purohit, D; Birstein, S; Lantz, M; Mohs, R C; Davis, K L

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies have found an association between presence of apolipoprotein E (APOE) epsilon 4 allele and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study compared the cumulative risk of primary progressive dementia (PPD) in relatives of AD probands carrying at least one copy of the epsilon 4 allele with the relatives of AD probands not carrying epsilon 4 and with relatives of non-demented controls. Our aim was to determine whether the familial aggregation of PPD in relatives of AD probands is primarily due to those carrying epsilon 4. Seventy-seven neuropathologically diagnosed AD patients were obtained as probands through our Alzheimer's Disease Research Center Brain Bank. AD probands were genotyped for APOE. As a comparison group, 198 non-demented probands were also included. Through family informants, demographic and diagnostic data were collected on 382 first-degree relatives (age > or = 45 years) of AD probands and 848 relatives of the controls. We found that the cumulative risk of PPD in both relatives of AD probands with and without the epsilon 4 allele was significantly higher than that in the relatives of non-demented controls. However, the increased risk in the relatives of AD probands with the epsilon 4 allele was marginally, but not significantly, lower than the risk in the relatives of probands without epsilon 4. A greater likelihood of death by heart diseases over developing PPD in relatives of AD probands with epsilon 4 (3.1-fold increase) was found compared to relatives of probands without epsilon 4 (1.7-fold increase), especially prior to age 70, although the difference was not statistically significant. The increased familial risk for PPD in the relatives of AD probands with the APOE-epsilon 4 allele relative to controls suggests that familial factors in addition to APOE-epsilon 4 are risk factors for AD. Differential censorship from increased mortality of heart diseases may have prevented a higher incidence of PPD among the relatives of probands with

  7. Allelic variation in CRHR1 predisposes to panic disorder: evidence for biased fear processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, H; Richter, J; Straube, B; Lueken, U; Domschke, K; Schartner, C; Klauke, B; Baumann, C; Pané-Farré, C; Jacob, C P; Scholz, C-J; Zwanzger, P; Lang, T; Fehm, L; Jansen, A; Konrad, C; Fydrich, T; Wittmann, A; Pfleiderer, B; Ströhle, A; Gerlach, A L; Alpers, G W; Arolt, V; Pauli, P; Wittchen, H-U; Kent, L; Hamm, A; Kircher, T; Deckert, J; Reif, A

    2016-06-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is a major regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Binding to its receptor CRHR1 triggers the downstream release of the stress response-regulating hormone cortisol. Biochemical, behavioral and genetic studies revealed CRHR1 as a possible candidate gene for mood and anxiety disorders. Here we aimed to evaluate CRHR1 as a risk factor for panic disorder (PD). Allelic variation of CRHR1 was captured by 9 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which were genotyped in 531 matched case/control pairs. Four SNPs were found to be associated with PD, in at least one sub-sample. The minor allele of rs17689918 was found to significantly increase risk for PD in females after Bonferroni correction and furthermore decreased CRHR1 mRNA expression in human forebrains and amygdalae. When investigating neural correlates underlying this association in patients with PD using functional magnetic resonance imaging, risk allele carriers of rs17689918 showed aberrant differential conditioning predominantly in the bilateral prefrontal cortex and safety signal processing in the amygdalae, arguing for predominant generalization of fear and hence anxious apprehension. Additionally, the risk allele of rs17689918 led to less flight behavior during fear-provoking situations but rather increased anxious apprehension and went along with increased anxiety sensitivity. Thus reduced gene expression driven by CRHR1 risk allele leads to a phenotype characterized by fear sensitization and hence sustained fear. These results strengthen the role of CRHR1 in PD and clarify the mechanisms by which genetic variation in CRHR1 is linked to this disorder.

  8. Detection of ancestry informative HLA alleles confirms the admixed origins of Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Mitsunaga, Shigeki; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Shyh-Yuh, Liou; Sawamoto, Taiji; Fujiwara, Tsutomu; Tsutsui, Naohisa; Suematsu, Koji; Shinagawa, Akira; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Ituro

    2013-01-01

    The polymorphisms in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region are powerful tool for studying human evolutionary processes. We investigated genetic structure of Japanese by using five-locus HLA genotypes (HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DPB1) of 2,005 individuals from 10 regions of Japan. We found a significant level of population substructure in Japanese; particularly the differentiation between Okinawa Island and mainland Japanese. By using a plot of the principal component scores, we identified ancestry informative alleles associated with the underlying population substructure. We examined extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between pairs of HLA alleles on the haplotypes that were differentiated among regions. The LDs were strong and weak for pairs of HLA alleles characterized by low and high frequencies in Okinawa Island, respectively. The five-locus haplotypes whose alleles exhibit strong LD were unique to Japanese and South Korean, suggesting that these haplotypes had been recently derived from the Korean Peninsula. The alleles characterized by high frequency in Japanese compared to South Korean formed segmented three-locus haplotype that was commonly found in Aleuts, Eskimos, and North- and Meso-Americans but not observed in Korean and Chinese. The serologically equivalent haplotype was found in Orchid Island in Taiwan, Mongol, Siberia, and Arctic regions. It suggests that early Japanese who existed prior to the migration wave from the Korean Peninsula shared ancestry with northern Asian who moved to the New World via the Bering Strait land bridge. These results may support the admixture model for peopling of Japanese Archipelago.

  9. Heterozygosity for the alpha1-antitrypsin Z allele may confer genetic risk of cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalache, F; Höblinger, A; Grünhage, F; Krawczyk, M; Gärtner, B C; Acalovschi, M; Sauerbruch, T; Lammert, F; Zimmer, V

    2011-02-01

    Alpha1-antitrypsin (α1AT) deficiency caused by Z allele homozygosity represents a well-established risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma. Previous studies have also implicated α1AT Z heterozygosity in cholangiocarcinogenesis. To assess the 'common' Z and S alleles as well as the promoter variant rs8004738 for association with cholangiocarcinoma. We genotyped 182 Caucasian patients and 350 controls for rs28929474 (Z), rs17580 (S) and the variant rs8004738. Exploratory analyses were performed in relation to gender and cholangiocarcinoma localisation. rs28929474 was significantly enriched in the cholangiocarcinoma group (4.1 vs. 1.7%; OR 2.46, 95% CI 1.14-5.32; Bonferroni corrected p(c) = 0.036), reinforced by Armitage trend testing (OR 2.53; p(c) = 0.032). The rs8004738 (promoter) minor allele tended to be overrepresented in Z heterozygotes (30.0 vs. 16.7%: P = 0.13). Exploratory data analyses suggested a high genetic risk for extrahepatic tumour localisation (OR 3.0; p(c) = 0.016) and potentially female Z allele carriers (OR 3.37; unadjusted P = 0.022, p(c) = 0.088). These data point to a novel role of α1AT Z heterozygosity as a potential genetic susceptibility factor for cholangiocarcinoma formation and suggest a contribution of aberrant α1AT function in biliary carcinogenesis. However, given the overall low rs28929474 minor allele frequency, larger studies are warranted to confirm and extend our findings. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Evaluation of a DLA-79 allele associated with multiple immune-mediated diseases in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedenberg, Steven G; Buhrman, Greg; Chdid, Lhoucine; Olby, Natasha J; Olivry, Thierry; Guillaumin, Julien; O'Toole, Theresa; Goggs, Robert; Kennedy, Lorna J; Rose, Robert B; Meurs, Kathryn M

    2016-03-01

    Immune-mediated diseases are common and life-threatening disorders in dogs. Many canine immune-mediated diseases have strong breed predispositions and are believed to be inherited. However, the genetic mutations that cause these diseases are mostly unknown. As many immune-mediated diseases in humans share polymorphisms among a common set of genes, we conducted a candidate gene study of 15 of these genes across four immune-mediated diseases (immune-mediated hemolytic anemia, immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, immune-mediated polyarthritis (IMPA), and atopic dermatitis) in 195 affected and 206 unaffected dogs to assess whether causative or predictive polymorphisms might exist in similar genes in dogs. We demonstrate a strong association (Fisher's exact p = 0.0004 for allelic association, p = 0.0035 for genotypic association) between two polymorphic positions (10 bp apart) in exon 2 of one allele in DLA-79, DLA-79*001:02, and multiple immune-mediated diseases. The frequency of this allele was significantly higher in dogs with immune-mediated disease than in control dogs (0.21 vs. 0.12) and ranged from 0.28 in dogs with IMPA to 0.15 in dogs with atopic dermatitis. This allele has two non-synonymous substitutions (compared with the reference allele, DLA-79*001:01), resulting in F33L and N37D amino acid changes. These mutations occur in the peptide-binding pocket of the protein, and based upon our computational modeling studies, are likely to affect critical interactions with the peptide N-terminus. Further studies are warranted to confirm these findings more broadly and to determine the specific mechanism by which the identified variants alter canine immune system function.

  11. Increased risk of the abdominal aortic aneurysm in carriers of the MTHFR 677T allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Ewa; Waliszewski, Krzysztof; Gabriel, Marcin; Zapalski, Stanisław; Pawlak, Andrzej L

    2003-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) presents itself as a progressive dilation of the abdominal aorta, leading--if untreated--to rupture. It is a common disease of the elderly, with a complex etiology. Several genetic, biochemical and environmental factors are recognized as relevant for the pathogenesis of AAA. We determined the polymorphism of the MTHFR (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase) gene within the fourth exon (C677T) in 63 patients with AAA and compared it to that in 75 subjects of the population sample. The frequencies of the C/C, C/T and T/T genotypes were 65%, 27%, and 8% in the population sample and 33%, 60%, and 6% in the patients. This corresponds to a 4.4-fold greater risk of AAA in subjects who have the 677C/T variant of MTHFR, as compared with those who are 677C/C (p < 0.0001; 95% CI=2.11-9.34). The frequency of allele MTHFR 677T in patients (0.37) was higher than in the population sample (0.21; p < 0.007). This association between the common allele of the MTHFR gene--MTHFR 677T--and the development of AAA suggests that elevated homocysteine (Hcy) may disturb the function of the aortic wall. The disturbance may involve enhancement of elastin degradation, the process enhanced by mild hyperhomocysteinemia in minipigs. The magnitude of this effect, which refers to the AAA patients unselected for familial occurrence, indicates that the disturbance of aortic wall physiology caused by the presence of the MTHFR 677T allele is greater than the effect of the earlier described allele disequilibrium at the polymorphic alleles of the PAI1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor 1) gene seen only in familial cases of AAA.

  12. The Ethics of Gender in Milton's Paradise Lost

    OpenAIRE

    Erickson, Sandra S. Fernandes

    2010-01-01

    ERICKSON, Sandra S.Fernandes. The ethics of gender in Milton's paradise lost. Principios: revista de filosofia. Natal (RN). v. 5, n. 6, p. 155-170. 1998. ISSN 1983-2109. Disponivel em: . Acesso em: 04 out. 2010. Existe uma acirrada discussao entre os estudiosos do classico ingles Paradise Lost (John Milton, 1674) sobre o suposto misogenismo do autor. A maioria dos estudiosos, inclusive mulheres sustentam que niio. A analise da Eva Miltoniana apresentada abaixo deixa claro que niio...

  13. Predicting the consequences of selecting on PrP genotypes on PrP frequencies, performance and inbreeding in commercial meat sheep populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boulton Kay

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Selection programmes based on prion protein (PrP genotypes are being implemented for increasing resistance to scrapie. Commercial meat sheep populations participating in sire-referencing schemes were simulated to investigate the effect of selection on PrP genotypes on ARR and VRQ allele frequencies, inbreeding and genetic gain in a performance trait under selection. PrP selection strategies modelled included selection against the VRQ allele and in favour of the ARR allele. Assuming realistic initial PrP frequencies, selection against the VRQ allele had a minimal impact on performance and inbreeding. However, when selection was also in favour of the ARR allele and the frequency of this allele was relatively low, there was a loss of up to three to four years of genetic gain over the 15 years of selection. Most loss in gain occurred during the first five years. In general, the rate of inbreeding was reduced when applying PrP selection. Since animals were first selected on their PrP genotype before being selected on the performance trait, the intensity of selection on performance was weaker under PrP selection (compared with no PrP selection. Eradication of the VRQ allele or fixation of the ARR allele within 15 years of selection was possible only with PrP selection targeting all breeding animals.

  14. A fasting insulin-raising allele at IGF1 locus is associated with circulating levels of IGF-1 and insulin sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Chiara Mannino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A meta-analysis of genome-wide data reported the discovery of the rs35767 polymorphism near IGF1 with genome-wide significant association with fasting insulin levels. However, it is unclear whether the effects of this polymorphism on fasting insulin are mediated by a reduced insulin sensitivity or impaired insulin clearance. We investigated the effects of the rs35767 polymorphism on circulating IGF-1 levels, insulin sensitivity, and insulin clearance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two samples of adult nondiabetic white Europeans were studied. In sample 1 (n=569, IGF-1 levels were lower in GG genotype carriers compared with A allele carriers (190±77 vs. 218±97 ng/ml, respectively; P=0.007 after adjusting for age, gender, and BMI. Insulin sensitivity assessed by euglycaemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp was lower in GG genotype carriers compared with A allele carriers (8.9±4.1 vs. 10.1±5.1 mg x Kg(-1 free fat mass x min(-1, respectively; P=0.03 after adjusting for age, gender, and BMI. The rs35767 polymorphism did not show significant association with insulin clearance. In sample 2 (n=859, IGF-1 levels were lower in GG genotype carriers compared with A allele carriers (155±60 vs. 164±63 ng/ml, respectively; P=0.02 after adjusting for age, gender, and BMI. Insulin sensitivity, as estimated by the HOMA index, was lower in GG genotype carriers compared with A allele carriers (2.8±2.2 vs. 2.5±1.3, respectively; P=0.03 after adjusting for age, gender, and BMI. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The rs35767 polymorphism near IGF1 was associated with circulating IGF-1 levels, and insulin sensitivity with carriers of the GG genotype exhibiting lower IGF-1 concentrations and insulin sensitivity as compared with subjects carrying the A allele.

  15. A fasting insulin-raising allele at IGF1 locus is associated with circulating levels of IGF-1 and insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, Gaia Chiara; Greco, Annalisa; De Lorenzo, Carlo; Andreozzi, Francesco; Marini, Maria A; Perticone, Francesco; Sesti, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    A meta-analysis of genome-wide data reported the discovery of the rs35767 polymorphism near IGF1 with genome-wide significant association with fasting insulin levels. However, it is unclear whether the effects of this polymorphism on fasting insulin are mediated by a reduced insulin sensitivity or impaired insulin clearance. We investigated the effects of the rs35767 polymorphism on circulating IGF-1 levels, insulin sensitivity, and insulin clearance. Two samples of adult nondiabetic white Europeans were studied. In sample 1 (n=569), IGF-1 levels were lower in GG genotype carriers compared with A allele carriers (190±77 vs. 218±97 ng/ml, respectively; P=0.007 after adjusting for age, gender, and BMI). Insulin sensitivity assessed by euglycaemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp was lower in GG genotype carriers compared with A allele carriers (8.9±4.1 vs. 10.1±5.1 mg x Kg(-1) free fat mass x min(-1), respectively; P=0.03 after adjusting for age, gender, and BMI). The rs35767 polymorphism did not show significant association with insulin clearance. In sample 2 (n=859), IGF-1 levels were lower in GG genotype carriers compared with A allele carriers (155±60 vs. 164±63 ng/ml, respectively; P=0.02 after adjusting for age, gender, and BMI). Insulin sensitivity, as estimated by the HOMA index, was lower in GG genotype carriers compared with A allele carriers (2.8±2.2 vs. 2.5±1.3, respectively; P=0.03 after adjusting for age, gender, and BMI). The rs35767 polymorphism near IGF1 was associated with circulating IGF-1 levels, and insulin sensitivity with carriers of the GG genotype exhibiting lower IGF-1 concentrations and insulin sensitivity as compared with subjects carrying the A allele.

  16. Effects of composite casein and beta-lactoglobulin genotypes on renneting properties and composition of bovine milk by assuming an animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. IKONEN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of kappa-beta-casein genotypes and b-lactoglobulin genotypes on the renneting properties and composition of milk were estimated for 174 and 155 milk samples of 59 Finnish Ayrshire and 55 Finnish Friesian cows, respectively. As well as the random additive genetic and permanent environmental effects of a cow, the model included the fixed effects for parity, lactation stage, season, kappa-beta-casein genotypes and b-lactoglobulin genotypes. Favourable renneting properties were associated with kappa-beta-casein genotypes ABA 1 A 2 , ABA 1 A 1 and AAA 1 A 2 in the Finnish Ayrshire, and with ABA 2 B, AAA 1 A 3 , AAA 2 A 3 , ABA 1 A 2 and ABA 2 A 2 in the Finnish Friesian. The favourable effect of these genotypes on curd firming time and on firmness of the curd was partly due to their association with a high kappa-casein concentration in the milk. The effect of the kappa-casein E allele on renneting properties was unfavourable compared with that of the kappa-casein B allele, and possibly with that of the A allele. The beta-lactoglobulin genotypes had no effect on renneting properties but they had a clear effect on the protein composition of milk. The beta-lactoglobulin AA genotype was associated with a high whey protein % and beta-lactoglobulin concentration and the BB genotype with a high casein % and casein number.;

  17. Triglyceride associated polymorphisms of the APOA5 gene have very different allele frequencies in Pune, India compared to Europeans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandak Giriraj R

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The APOA5 gene variants, -1131T>C and S19W, are associated with altered triglyceride concentrations in studies of subjects of Caucasian and East Asian descent. There are few studies of these variants in South Asians. We investigated whether the two APOA5 variants also show similar association with various lipid parameters in Indian population as in the UK white subjects. Methods We genotyped 557 Indian adults from Pune, India, and 237 UK white adults for -1131T>C and S19W variants in the APOA5 gene, compared their allelic and genotype frequency and determined their association with fasting serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL and LDL cholesterol levels using univariate general linear analysis. APOC3 SstI polymorphism was also analyzed in 175 Pune Indian subjects for analysis of linkage disequilibrium with the APOA5 variants. Results The APOA5 -1131C allele was more prevalent in Indians from Pune (Pune Indians compared to UK white subjects (allele frequency 20% vs. 4%, p = 0.00001, whereas the 19W allele was less prevalent (3% vs. 6% p = 0.0015. Patterns of linkage disequilibrium between the two variants were similar between the two populations and confirmed that they occur on two different haplotypes. In Pune Indians, the presence of -1131C allele and the 19W allele was associated with a 19% and 15% increase respectively in triglyceride concentrations although only -1131C was significant (p = 0.0003. This effect size was similar to that seen in the UK white subjects. Analysis of the APOC3 SstI polymorphism in 175 Pune Indian subjects showed that this variant is not in appreciable linkage disequilibrium with the APOA5 -1131T>C variant (r2 = 0.07. Conclusion This is the first study to look at the role of APOA5 in Asian Indian subjects that reside in India. The -1131C allele is more prevalent and the 19W allele is less prevalent in Pune Indians compared to UK Caucasians. We confirm that the APOA5 variants are associated

  18. Significance of Lewis Phenotyping Using Saliva and Gastric Tissue: Comparison with the Lewis Phenotype Inferred from Lewis and Secretor Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Ji Hong

    2014-01-01

    , and le59 alleles was 74.6%, 21.3%, 3.1%, and 1.0%, respectively, among 418 alleles. The saliva Lewis phenotype was completely consistent with the Lewis phenotype inferred from Lewis and Secretor genotypes, but that of gastric mucosa could not be predicted from genotypes. Lewis phenotyping using erythrocytes is only adequate for transfusion needs. Saliva testing for the Lewis phenotype is a more reliable method for determining the peripheral Lewis phenotype of an individual and the gastric Lewis phenotype must be used for the study on the association between Helicobacter pylori and the Lewis phenotype.

  19. Alleles versus mutations: Understanding the evolution of genetic architecture requires a molecular perspective on allelic origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, David L

    2015-12-01

    Perspectives on the role of large-effect quantitative trait loci (QTL) in the evolution of complex traits have shifted back and forth over the past few decades. Different sets of studies have produced contradictory insights on the evolution of genetic architecture. I argue that much of the confusion results from a failure to distinguish mutational and allelic effects, a limitation of using the Fisherian model of adaptive evolution as the lens through which the evolution of adaptive variation is examined. A molecular-based perspective reveals that allelic differences can involve the cumulative effects of many mutations plus intragenic recombination, a model that is supported by extensive empirical evidence. I discuss how different selection regimes could produce very different architectures of allelic effects under a molecular-based model, which may explain conflicting insights on genetic architecture from studies of variation within populations versus between divergently selected populations. I address shortcomings of genome-wide association study (GWAS) practices in light of more suitable models of allelic evolution, and suggest alternate GWAS strategies to generate more valid inferences about genetic architecture. Finally, I discuss how adopting more suitable models of allelic evolution could help redirect research on complex trait evolution toward addressing more meaningful questions in evolutionary biology. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  20. CYP2D6 genotype and phenotype in Amerindians of Tepehuano origin and Mestizos of Durango, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Macías, Martha; Elizondo, Guillermo; Flores-Pérez, Carmen; Flores-Pérez, Janet; Bradley-Alvarez, Francisco; Alanis-Bañuelos, Ruth E; Lares-Asseff, Ismael

    2006-05-01

    Although the drug-metabolizing enzyme CYP2D6 has been studied extensively in subjects of differing ethnicities, limited CYP2D6 pharmacogenetic data are available for the Amerindian population and Mestizos of Mexico. Dextromethorphan hydroxylation phenotype was studied in Tepehuano Amerindian (n = 58) and Mestizo (n = 88) subjects, and 195 individuals (85 Tepehuano Amerindians and 110 Mestizos) were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism methods to identify the frequencies of the CYP2D6*3, *4, *6, and *10 alleles. Tepehuano Amerindian subjects lacked the poor metabolizer (PM) phenotype, whereas in Mestizos the PM phenotype frequency was 6.8%. The CYP2D6*3, *6, and *10 alleles were not found in Tepehuano Amerindians. The CYP2D6*4 allele had a low frequency (0.006) in this Amerindian group. In the Mestizo group, the CYP2D6*3, *4, and *10 alleles had frequencies of 0.009, 0.131, and 0.023, respectively. The CYP2D6*6 allele was not found in Mestizos. The genotype-phenotype association was strongly statistically significant (r(2) = .45; P = .005) in Mestizos. The Tepehuano population was found to have a low phenotypic and genotypic CYP2D6 diversity and differed from other Amerindian groups. On the other hand, the frequencies of the CYP2D6 variant alleles in Mestizos were similar to those reported for whites.

  1. APOE genotype influences functional status among elderly without dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, S.M.; Jacobs, D.M.; Stern, Y. [Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center, New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-18

    The presence of apolipoprotein-{epsilon}4 (APOE-{epsilon}4) significantly increases the risk of Alzheimer`s disease (AD). The association between APOE-{epsilon}4 status and functional abilities was explored further in a multicultural sample of community-dwelling, nondemented elders. The sample was limited to cognitively-intact, community-dwelling elders, who were free of stroke or other neurologic disability. In 218 elders who met research criteria, the presence of APOE-{epsilon}4 was associated with poorer functional status, apart from the effects of neuropsychological performance, gender, age, and education (OR = 2.5, 95% CI: 1.3, 4.9). In 158 subjects without an APOE-{epsilon}4 allele, 50% reported no functional limitation; in the 60 subjects with an {epsilon}4 allele, only 28% reported no functional limitation (P < .01). The relationship was not explained by the distribution of co-morbidities. The association between poorer function and the presence of an APOE-{epsilon}4 allele was evident in each ethnic group. In path analyses, the presence of an APOE-{epsilon}4 allele was associated with decreased functional ability in non-demented elders not simply through an association with poorer cognitive status, but also independently. These results suggest that the APOE-{epsilon}4 genotype is associated with functional deficit in people with normal neuropsychological profiles. 29 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  2. Genotypes of Invasive Pneumococcal Isolates Recently Recovered from Italian Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicuonzo, Giordano; Gherardi, Giovanni; Gertz, Robert E.; D'Ambrosio, Fabio; Goglio, Antonio; Lorino, Giulia; Recchia, Simona; Pantosti, Annalisa; Beall, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    We examined 73 recent invasive pneumococcal isolates within selected areas of Italy for genotypic variability. Thirty-three genomic macrorestriction types were found, three of which represented multiple serotypes. Restriction fragment patterns of pbp2b, pbp2x, and pspA were conserved within the majority of isolates that shared macrorestriction types. Of the nine macrorestriction types found among the 22 penicillin-nonsusceptible Streptococus pneumoniae (PNSP) isolates, seven comprised isolates with allelic profiles showing five to seven allelic matches to profiles in the multilocus sequence typing database (www.mlst.net); however, three of the seven profiles represented serotypes not previously associated with these clonal clusters. Two PNSP macrorestriction types represented new clones with unique allelic profiles. Allelic profiles obtained from isolates of 3 of the 25 macrorestriction types found among the 51 penicillin-susceptible S. pneumoniae (PSSP) isolates were closely related to previously described profiles. One PSSP isolate was a novel type 24F isolate related to the multiresistant clone France9V-3. This work reports new PNSP strains and new serotype-clone associations. PMID:12354862

  3. Genotype-dependent participation of coat color gene loci in the behavioral traits of laboratory mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamuro, Yutaka; Shiraishi, Aya

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate if loci responsible for coat color phenotypes contribute to behavioral characteristics, we specified novel gene loci associated with social exploratory behavior and examined the effects of the frequency of each allele at distinct loci on behavioral expression. We used the F2 generation, which arose from the mating of F1 mice obtained by interbreeding DBA/2 and ICR mice. Phenotypic analysis indicated that the agouti and albino loci affect behavioral traits. A genotype-based analysis revealed that novel exploratory activity was suppressed in a manner dependent on the frequency of the dominant wild-type allele at the agouti, but not albino, locus. The allele-dependent suppression was restricted to colored mice and was not seen in albino mice. The present results suggest that the agouti locus contributes to a particular behavioral trait in the presence of a wild-type allele at the albino locus, which encodes a structural gene for tyrosinase.

  4. A case–control study on the effect of Apolipoprotein E genotypes on gastric cancer risk and progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Feo Emma

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apolipoprotein E (ApoE is a multifunctional protein playing both a key role in the metabolism of cholesterol and triglycerides, and in tissue repair and inflammation. The ApoE gene (19q13.2 has three major isoforms encoded by ε2, ε3 and ε4 alleles with the ε4 allele associated with hypercholesterolemia and the ε2 allele with the opposite effect. An inverse relationship between cholesterol levels and gastric cancer (GC has been previously reported, although the relationship between apoE genotypes and GC has not been explored so far. Methods One hundred and fifty-six gastric cancer cases and 444 hospital controls were genotyped for apoE polymorphism (ε2, ε3, ε4 alleles. The relationship between GC and putative risk factors was measured using the adjusted odds ratios (ORs and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs from logistic regression analysis. A gene-environment interaction analysis was performed. The effect of the apoE genotypes on survival from GC was explored by a Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard regression model. Results Subjects carrying at least one apoE ε2 allele have a significant 60% decrease of GC risk (OR=0.40, 95% CI: 0.19 – 0.84 compared with ε3 homozygotes. No significant interaction emerged between the ε4 or ε2 allele and environmental exposures, nor ε2 or ε4 alleles affected the median survival times, even after correcting for age, gender and stadium. Conclusions Our study reports for the first time a protective effect of the ε2 allele against GC, that might be partly attributed to the higher antioxidant properties of ε2 compared with the ε3 or ε4 alleles. Given the study’s sample size, further studies are required to confirm our findings.

  5. LAPTM4B allele *2 is a marker of poor prognosis following hepatic tumor resection for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lysosomal protein transmembrane 4 beta (LAPTM4B is a gene related to hepatocellular carcinoma that has two alleles designated LAPTM4B*1 and LAPTM4B*2. This study aimed to investigate the correlation of LAPTM4B genotype with prognosis and clinicopathologic features in patients who have undergone resection for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The LAPTM4B genotype was analyzed by PCR in 68 patients who had undergone curative hepatic resection for hepatocellular carcinoma. The correlation of LAPTM4B genotype with clinicopathologic parameters was assessed with the Chi-squared test. Differences in patient survival were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analysis of prognostic factors was carried out with Cox regression analysis. Patients with LAPTM4B *2 had both significantly shorter overall survival (OS and shorter disease-free survival (DFS (both P<0.001. Multivariate analysis showed that LAPTM4B genotype is an independent prognostic factor for OS and DFS (both P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Allele *2 of LAPTM4B is a risk factor associated with poor prognosis in patients with resected HCC. LAPTM4B status may be useful preoperatively as an adjunct in evaluation of the operability of HCC.

  6. Analysis and frequency of bovine lymphocyte antigen (BoLA-DRB3) alleles in Iranian Holstein cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassiry, M R; Shahroodi, F Eftekhar; Mosafer, J; Mohammadi, A; Manshad, E; Ghazanfari, S; Mohammad Abadi, M R; Sulimova, G E

    2005-06-01

    The bovine lymphocyte antigen (BoLA-DRB3) gene encodes cell surface glycoproteins that initiate immune response by presenting processed antigenic peptides to CD4 T helper cells. DRB3 is the most polymorphic bovine MHC class II gene which encodes the peptide-binding groove. DRB3 gene has been extensively evaluated as a candidate marker for association with various bovine diseases and immunological traits. This study describes genetic variability in the BoLA-DRB3 in Iranian Holstein cattle. This is the first study of the DNA polymorphism of the BoLA-DRB3 gene in Iranian Holstein cattle. Hemi-nested PCR-RFLP method is used for identification the frequency of BoLA-DRB3 alleles. The BoLA-DRB3 locus is highly polymorphic in the studied herd (26 alleles). Almost 67% of the alleles were accounted for four alleles (BoLA-DRB3.2*8, *24, *11 and *16) in Iranian Holstein cattle. The DRB3.2*8 allele frequency (26.6%) was higher than the others. The frequencies of the DRB3.2*54, *37, *36, *28, *25, *14, *13, *10, *1 alleles were lower than 1%. Significant distinctions have been found between Iranian Holstein cattle and other cattle breeds studied. In Iranian Holstein cattle the alleles (BoLA-DRB3.2*22, *2 and *16) associated with a lower risk of cystic ovarian disease in Holstein cattle are found. The alleles associated with the resistance to mastitis and to bovine leukemia virus infection BoLA-DRB3.2*11 and *23 are detected with the frequencies 10.4% and 4.4%, respectively. Thus in the Iranian Holstein cows studied are found alleles which are associated with resistance to various diseases. The method of DNA-typing of animals can be used in agricultural practice for BoLA-DRB3 allele genotyping of cattle in order to reduce spreading of alleles providing susceptibility to mastitis or leukemia in cattle herds.

  7. Dideoxy single allele-specific PCR - DSASP new method to discrimination allelic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonidas Moura Lima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer (GC is a multifactorial disease with a high mortality rate in Brazil and worldwide. This work aimed to evaluate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP rs1695, in the Glutathione S-Transferase Pi (GSTP1 gene in GC samples by comparative analysis Specific PCR - ASP and Dideoxy Single Allele-Specific PCR - DSASP methods. The DSASP is the proposed new method for allelic discrimination. This work analyzed 60 GC samples, 26 diffuse and 34 intestinal types. The SNP rs1695 of the GSTP1 gene was significantly associated with GC analyzed by DSASP method (χ2 = 9.7, P 0.05. These results suggest that the SNP rs1695 of the GSTP1 gene was a risk factor associated with gastric carcinogens is and the DSASP method was a new successfully low-cost strategy to study allelic discrimination.

  8. Discovering the desirable alleles contributing to the lignocellulosic biomass traits in Saccharum germplasm collections for energy cane improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jianping [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sandhu, Hardev [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2017-03-23

    1) The success in crop improvement programs depends largely on the extent of genetic variability available. Germplasm collections assembles all the available genetic resources and are critical for long-term crop improvement. This world sugarcane germplasm collection contains enormous genetic variability for various morphological traits, biomass yield components, adaptation and many quality traits, prospectively imbeds a large number of valuable alleles for biofuel traits such as high biomass yield, quantity and quality of lignocelluloses, stress tolerance, and nutrient use efficiency. The germplasm collection is of little value unless it is characterized and utilized for crop improvement. In this project, we phenotypically and genotypically characterized the sugarcane world germplasm collection (The results were published in two papers already and another two papers are to be published). This data will be made available for public to refer to for germplasm unitization specifically in the sugarcane and energy cane breeding programs. In addition, we are identifying the alleles contributing to the biomass traits in sugarcane germplasm. This part of project is very challenging due to the large genome and highly polyploid level of this crop. We firstly established a high throughput sugarcane genotyping pipeline in the genome and bioinformatics era (a paper is published in 2016). We identified and modified a software for genome-wide association analysis of polyploid species. The results of the alleles associated to the biomass traits will be published soon, which will help the scientific community understand the genetic makeup of the biomass components of sugarcane. Molecular breeders can develop markers for marker assisted selection of biomass traits improvement. Further, the development and release of new energy cane cultivars through this project not only improved genetic diversity but also improved dry biomass yields and resistance to diseases. These new cultivars

  9. Analysis of population structure and genetic diversity of Egyptian and exotic rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Khaled F M; Sallam, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the population structure and genetic diversity is a very important goal to improve the economic value of crops. In rice, a loss of genetic diversity in the last few centuries is observed. To address this challenge, a set of 22 lines from three different regions - India (two), and Philippines (six), and Egypt (14) - were used to assess the genetic diversity and the features of population structure. These genotypes were analyzed using 106 SSR alleles that showed a clear polymorphism among the lines. Genetic diversity was estimated based on the number of different alleles, polymorphism information content (PIC), and gene diversity. A total of 106 SSR alleles was identified from the 23 SSR loci and used to study the population structure and carry out a cluster analysis. All SSR loci showed a wide range of the number of different alleles extended from two (one loci) to seven alleles (three loci). Five and eight loci showed high PIC and gene diversity (≥0.70), respectively. The results of population structure are in agreement with cluster analysis results. Both analyses revealed two different subpopulations (G1 and G2) with different genetic properties in number of private alleles, number of different alleles (Na), number of effective alleles (Ne), expected heterozygosity (He), and Shannon's Information Index (SII). Our findings indicate that five SSR loci (RM 111, RM 307, RM 22, RM 19, and RM 271) could be used in breeding programs to enhance the marker-assisted selection through QTL mapping and association studies. A high genetic diversity found between genotypes which can be exploited to improve and produce rice cultivars for important traits (e.g. high agronomic features and tolerance to biotic or/and abiotic stresses).

  10. Distributions of allele combination in single and cross loci among patients with several kinds of chronic diseases and the normal population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Li-ping; Liu, Hui; Cui, Jing-hui; Ji, Na; Ding, Xiao-dong; Sun, Cui; Yu, Lai-shui

    2015-03-01

    Genetic research has progressed along with scientific and technological developments. However, it is difficult to identify frequency differences in a particular allele distribution at a single locus. Such differences can be identified by examining the allele combination distribution. We explored different mathematical methods for statistical analyses to assess the association between the genotype and phenotype. We investigated the frequency distributions of alleles, combinations of single-locus genes, and combinations of cross-loci genes at 15 loci using 447 blood samples of 200 normal subjects, 72 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary resistance, 50 liver cancers, 75 stomach cancers and 50 hematencephalon and identified each population as having a unique gene distribution and that the distribution followed certain rules. The probability of illness followed different rules and had apparent specificity. Differences obtained using statistics of combinations of cross-loci genes are superior to single-locus gene statistics, and combinations of single-locus gene statistics are better than allelic statistics.

  11. Modulation of defensive reactivity by GLRB allelic variation: converging evidence from an intermediate phenotype approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueken, U; Kuhn, M; Yang, Y; Straube, B; Kircher, T; Wittchen, H-U; Pfleiderer, B; Arolt, V; Wittmann, A; Ströhle, A; Weber, H; Reif, A; Domschke, K; Deckert, J; Lonsdorf, T B

    2017-09-05

    Representing a phylogenetically old and very basic mechanism of inhibitory neurotransmission, glycine receptors have been implicated in the modulation of behavioral components underlying defensive responding toward threat. As one of the first findings being confirmed by genome-wide association studies for the phenotype of panic disorder and agoraphobia, allelic variation in a gene coding for the glycine receptor beta subunit (GLRB) has recently been associated with increased neural fear network activation and enhanced acoustic startle reflexes. On the basis of two independent healthy control samples, we here aimed to further explore the functional significance of the GLRB genotype (rs7688285) by employing an intermediate phenotype approach. We focused on the phenotype of defensive system reactivity across the levels of brain function, structure, and physiology. Converging evidence across both samples was found for increased neurofunctional activation in the (anterior) insular cortex in GLRB risk allele carriers and altered fear conditioning as a function of genotype. The robustness of GLRB effects is demonstrated by consistent findings across different experimental fear conditioning paradigms and recording sites. Altogether, findings provide translational evidence for glycine neurotransmission as a modulator of the brain's evolutionary old dynamic defensive system and provide further support for a strong, biologically plausible candidate intermediate phenotype of defensive reactivity. As such, glycine-dependent neurotransmission may open up new avenues for mechanistic research on the etiopathogenesis of fear and anxiety disorders.

  12. Allelic structure and distribution of 103 STR loci in a Southern Tunisian population

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abdellatif Maalej; Ahmed Rebai; Adnen Ayadi; Jomaa Jouida; Hafedh Makni; Hammadi Ayadi

    2004-04-01

    Genotypes of 103 short tandem repeat (STR) markers distributed at an average of 40 cM intervals throughout the genome were determined for 40 individuals from the village of BirEl Hfai (BEH). This village of approximately 31.000 individuals is localized in the south-west of Tunisia. The allele frequency distributions in BEH were compared with those obtained for individuals in the CEPH (Centre d’Etude du Polymorphisme Humain) data using a Kolmogorov–Smirnov two-sample test. Fourteen out of the 103 markers (13.2%) showed significant differences ($P\\lt 0.05$) in distribution between the two populations. Population heterogeneity in BEH was indicated by an excess of observed homozygosity deviations from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium at 3 loci ($P\\lt 0.0005$). No evidence for genotypic disequilibrium was found for any of the marker pairs. This demonstrated that in spite of a high inbreeding level in the population, few markers showed evidence for a different pattern of allelic distribution compared to CEPH.

  13. Pharmacogenetic relevance of the CYP2C9*3 allele in a tenoxicam bioequivalence study performed on Spaniards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiró, A M; Novalbos, J; Zapater, P; Moreu, R; López-Rodríguez, R; Rodríguez, V; Abad-Santos, F; Horga, J F

    2009-01-01

    We performed a study to quantify CYP2C9 and CYP2C8 alleles influence on the variability observed in tenoxicam pharmacokinetic (PK) and implication in a bioequivalence study design performed on Spaniards. Eighteen healthy volunteers were included in an open, randomized, crossover, phase I bioequivalence study. Significant increases were found in CYP2C9*3 alleles vs. *1 and *2 in AUC(0-infinity) (median (min-max)): 256 (230-516) vs. 150 (100-268) and 169 (124-197) microg h/mL (p<0.01) and half-life time (t1/2) 102 (79-36) vs. 56 (45-94) and 64 (60-80)h (p<0.01). Non-significant differences were observed in C(max) 1.9 (1.8-2.9) vs. 2.4 (1.7-3.4), 2.5 (1.6-2.9) microg/mL or in according to CYP2C8 alleles presence. CYP2C9*3 allele is associated to a longer elimination time of tenoxicam. PK parameters calculated in bioequivalence studies (AUC(0-infinity), t1/2) may be influenced by the presence of CYP2C9*3 allele resulting in a high variability. Thus, bioequivalence studies of tenoxicam formulations should be designed considering genotype profile.

  14. The clinical presentation of Marfan syndrome is modulated by expression of wild-type FBN1 allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubart, Mélodie; Gross, Marie-Sylvie; Hanna, Nadine; Zabot, Marie-Thérèse; Sznajder, Marc; Detaint, Delphine; Gouya, Laurent; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine; Stheneur, Chantal

    2015-05-15

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder mainly caused by mutations within FBN1 gene. The disease displays large variability in age of onset or severity and very poor phenotype/genotype correlations have been demonstrated. We investigated the hypothesis that phenotype severity could be related to the variable expression level of fibrillin-1 (FBN1) synthesized from the wild-type (WT) allele. Quantitative reverse-transcription and polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate FBN1 levels in skin fibroblasts from 80 Marfan patients with premature termination codons and in skin fibroblasts from 80 controls. Results in controls showed a 3.9-fold variation in FBN1 mRNA synthesis level between subjects. A similar 4.4-fold variation was found in the Marfan population, but the mean level of FBN1 mRNA was a half of the control population. Differential allelic expression analysis in Marfan fibroblasts showed that over 90% of FBN1 mRNA was transcribed from the wild allele and the mutated allele was not detected. In the control population, independently of the expression level of FBN1, we observed steady-state equilibrium between the two allelic-mRNAs suggesting that FBN1 expression mainly depends on trans-acting regulators. Finally, we show that a low level of residual WT FBN1 mRNA accounts for a high risk of ectopia lentis and pectus abnormality and tends to increase the risk of aortic dilatation.

  15. Genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii isolates in Egyptian feral cats reveals new genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kappany, Y M; Rajendran, C; Abu-Elwafa, S A; Hilali, M; Su, C; Dubey, J P

    2010-12-01

    Cats are important in the epidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii because they are the only hosts that excrete environmentally resistant oocysts in feces. In the present study, 115 viable T. gondii isolates from tissues of cats from Egypt were genotyped using 10 PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism markers (SAG1, SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, and Apico) and DNA from tachyzoites. Seven genotypes were recognized including the clonal Type II, Type III (2 genotypes), and 4 atypical genotypes. Ninety percent (103 of 115) of isolates were clonal, i.e., Type II (n  =  61) and Type III (n  =  42) strains. Of the 61 Type II strains, all had the Type II alleles at all loci, except for 2 strains that had allele I at Apico. Eight isolates were divided into 4 atypical genotypes. One of these genotypes (with 4 isolates) was previously reported in dogs from Sri Lanka and in sand cats from the United Arab Emirates. Four isolates had mixed infections. These results revealed a strong clonal population structure with the dominance of clonal Type II and III lineages of T. gondii in feral cats from Egypt.

  16. ACE DD genotype is unfavorable to Korean short-term muscle power athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C-H; Cho, J-Y; Jeon, J Y; Koh, Y G; Kim, Y-M; Kim, H-J; Park, M; Um, H-S; Kim, C

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the ACE DD genotype is unfavorably associated with the ultimate power-oriented performance. To test the hypothesis we recruited a total of 848 subjects including 55 international level power-oriented athletes (High-performance), 100 national level power-oriented athletes (Mid-performance) and 693 healthy controls (Control) in Korea. Then the distributions of ACE polymorphism throughout these groups were analyzed. As a result, there was a gradual decrease of frequencies of the DD genotype with advancing levels of performance (Control vs. Mid-performance vs. High-performance=17.2% vs. 10.0% vs. 5.5%, p=0.002). Also, the frequencies of D allele decreased gradually with advancing levels of performance (Control vs. Mid-performance vs. High-performance=42.6% vs. 35.0% vs. 30.9%, pDD genotype and the D allele. This finding gave 3.83 times lower probability of success in power-oriented sports for individuals with t