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Sample records for genotypes impact native

  1. Ecological impacts of non-native species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Non-native species are considered one of the greatest threats to freshwater biodiversity worldwide (Drake et al. 1989; Allen and Flecker 1993; Dudgeon et al. 2005). Some of the first hypotheses proposed to explain global patterns of amphibian declines included the effects of non-native species (Barinaga 1990; Blaustein and Wake 1990; Wake and Morowitz 1991). Evidence for the impact of non-native species on amphibians stems (1) from correlative research that relates the distribution or abundance of a species to that of a putative non-native species, and (2) from experimental tests of the effects of a non-native species on survival, growth, development or behaviour of a target species (Kats and Ferrer 2003). Over the past two decades, research on the effects of non-native species on amphibians has mostly focused on introduced aquatic predators, particularly fish. Recent research has shifted to more complex ecological relationships such as influences of sub-lethal stressors (e.g. contaminants) on the effects of non-native species (Linder et al. 2003; Sih et al. 2004), non-native species as vectors of disease (Daszak et al. 2004; Garner et al. 2006), hybridization between non-natives and native congeners (Riley et al. 2003; Storfer et al. 2004), and the alteration of food-webs by non-native species (Nystrom et al. 2001). Other research has examined the interaction of non-native species in terms of facilitation (i.e. one non-native enabling another to become established or spread) or the synergistic effects of multiple non-native species on native amphibians, the so-called invasional meltdown hypothesis (Simerloff and Von Holle 1999). Although there is evidence that some non-native species may interact (Ricciardi 2001), there has yet to be convincing evidence that such interactions have led to an accelerated increase in the number of non-native species and cumulative impacts are still uncertain (Simberloff 2006). Applied research on the control, eradication, and

  2. Defining the Impact of Non-Native Species

    OpenAIRE

    Jeschke, Jonathan M; Bacher, Sven; Tim M Blackburn; Dick, Jaimie T. A.; Essl, Franz; Evans, Thomas; Gaertner, Mirijam; Hulme, Philip E.; Kühn, Ingolf; Mrugała, Agata; Pergl, Jan; Pyšek, Petr; Rabitsch, Wolfgang; Ricciardi, Anthony; Richardson, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Non-native species cause changes in the ecosystems to which they are introduced. These changes, or some of them, are usually termed impacts; they can be manifold and potentially damaging to ecosystems and biodiversity. However, the impacts of most non-native species are poorly understood, and a synthesis of available information is being hindered because authors often do not clearly define impact. We argue that explicitly defining the impact of non-native species will promote progress toward ...

  3. [Genotypic Diversity of Wolbachia pipientis in Native and Invasive Harmonia axyridis Pall., 1773 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) Populations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryacheva, I I; Blekhman, A V; Andrianov, B V; Gorelova, T V; Zakharov, I A

    2015-08-01

    The distribution and variability of reproductive symbiotic Wolbachia pipientis bacteria were studied in seven native and six invasive H. axyridis populations. Wolbachia-infected individuals were found in two invasive and two native populations. We demonstrated for the first time an infection of invasive H. axyridis populations with Wolbachia. Two new molecular forms of Wolbachia were detected by a system of multilocus typing. The supergroup A Wolbachia was found for the first time in H. axyridis. The detected genotypic diversity of Wolbachia indicates repeated and independent infection events in the evolutionary past of H. axyridis.

  4. Impact of Non-Native Birds on Native Ecosystems: A Global Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Albarracin, Valeria L; Amico, Guillermo C; Simberloff, Daniel; Nuñez, Martin A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and naturalization of non-native species is one of the most important threats to global biodiversity. Birds have been widely introduced worldwide, but their impacts on populations, communities, and ecosystems have not received as much attention as those of other groups. This work is a global synthesis of the impact of nonnative birds on native ecosystems to determine (1) what groups, impacts, and locations have been best studied; (2) which taxonomic groups and which impacts have greatest effects on ecosystems, (3) how important are bird impacts at the community and ecosystem levels, and (4) what are the known benefits of nonnative birds to natural ecosystems. We conducted an extensive literature search that yielded 148 articles covering 39 species belonging to 18 families -18% of all known naturalized species. Studies were classified according to where they were conducted: Africa, Asia, Australasia, Europe, North America, South America, Islands of the Indian, of the Pacific, and of the Atlantic Ocean. Seven types of impact on native ecosystems were evaluated: competition, disease transmission, chemical, physical, or structural impact on ecosystem, grazing/ herbivory/ browsing, hybridization, predation, and interaction with other non-native species. Hybridization and disease transmission were the most important impacts, affecting the population and community levels. Ecosystem-level impacts, such as structural and chemical impacts were detected. Seven species were found to have positive impacts aside from negative ones. We provide suggestions for future studies focused on mechanisms of impact, regions, and understudied taxonomic groups.

  5. Molecular diversity of native rhizobia trapped by five field pea genotypes in Indian soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, K; Dudeja, S S; Yadav, R K

    2011-02-01

    Five pea cultivars; HFP 4, HVP 3-5, HFP 9426, Jayanti and Hariyal, being grown in CCS Haryana Agricultural University farm were used to isolate native rhizobia. Selected 54 rhizobia, from all cultivars, were authenticated as rhizobia by plant infectivity test. Along with nodulation, symbiotic effectiveness in terms of symbiotic ratios showed wide range of effectiveness of pea rhizobia from 1.11 to 5.0. DNA of all the 54 rhizobia was extracted and amplified by PCR, using ERIC and 16S rDNA primers. Dendrogram based on ERIC profiles of these 54 rhizobia showed the formation of 13 subclusters at 80% level of similarity. Dendrogram based on RFLP of 16S rDNA by three restriction endonucleases; Msp I, Csp 6I and Rsa I; also formed 13 subclusters at 80% level of similarity. However, positioning of subclusters was different from that of ERIC based dendrogram. Majority of the isolates i.e. 64.8% by ERIC profiles and 44.4% by RFLP of 16S rDNA formed one cluster. Isolates from same nodule were not 100% similar. Considering each cluster representing a rhizobial genotype, both techniques used to assess molecular diversity indicated the presence of 13 genotypes of field pea rhizobia in CCS Haryana Agricultural University farm soil. Two pea rhizobial genotypes were able to nodulate all the five pea cultivars. Furthermore, high strain richness index (0.43-0.5) of field pea rhizobia was observed by both the techniques.

  6. Defining the impact of non-native species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Jonathan M; Bacher, Sven; Blackburn, Tim M; Dick, Jaimie T A; Essl, Franz; Evans, Thomas; Gaertner, Mirijam; Hulme, Philip E; Kühn, Ingolf; Mrugała, Agata; Pergl, Jan; Pyšek, Petr; Rabitsch, Wolfgang; Ricciardi, Anthony; Richardson, David M; Sendek, Agnieszka; Vilà, Montserrat; Winter, Marten; Kumschick, Sabrina

    2014-10-01

    Non-native species cause changes in the ecosystems to which they are introduced. These changes, or some of them, are usually termed impacts; they can be manifold and potentially damaging to ecosystems and biodiversity. However, the impacts of most non-native species are poorly understood, and a synthesis of available information is being hindered because authors often do not clearly define impact. We argue that explicitly defining the impact of non-native species will promote progress toward a better understanding of the implications of changes to biodiversity and ecosystems caused by non-native species; help disentangle which aspects of scientific debates about non-native species are due to disparate definitions and which represent true scientific discord; and improve communication between scientists from different research disciplines and between scientists, managers, and policy makers. For these reasons and based on examples from the literature, we devised seven key questions that fall into 4 categories: directionality, classification and measurement, ecological or socio-economic changes, and scale. These questions should help in formulating clear and practical definitions of impact to suit specific scientific, stakeholder, or legislative contexts. © 2014 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc., on behalf of the Society for Conservation Biology.

  7. 76 FR 72436 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Protecting and Restoring Native Ecosystems by Managing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ...; 2310-0057-422] Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Protecting and Restoring Native Ecosystems by... Restoring Native Ecosystems by Managing Non-Native Ungulates. SUMMARY: The National Park Service (NPS... Restoring Native Ecosystems by Managing Non-Native Ungulates, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii. The...

  8. Assessing the impact of non-native freshwater fishes on native species using relative weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannetto D.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to test relative weight (Wr, a condition index which allows evaluation of fish well-being, as a tool to investigate the impact of the presence of non native species (NNS on the condition of the key native species (NS of the Tiber River basin (Italy: Barbustyberinus Bonaparte, Leuciscus cephalus (Linnaeus, Leuciscus lucumonis Bianco, Rutilus rubilio (Bonaparte and Telestes muticellus (Bonaparte. By means of Canonical Correlation Analysis, data from 130 sampling sites, distributed throughout Tiber River basin, were examined. Wr of NS was related to densities of NNS and to environmental variables. Moreover, the correlation between Wr of NS and density of NNS was investigated through linear regression analysis and covariance analysis. Preliminary results encourage the use of Wr as a tool to assess the relationship between NS and ecological factors (such as the presence of NNS and to explain the changes that occur along the longitudinal gradient of a river.

  9. 78 FR 7450 - Final Environmental Impact Statement for Protecting and Restoring Native Ecosystems by Managing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... National Park Service Final Environmental Impact Statement for Protecting and Restoring Native Ecosystems... a Final Environmental Impact Statement for Protecting and Restoring Native Ecosystems by Managing... a manner that supports long-term ecosystem protection, supports natural ecosystem recovery and...

  10. NIS occurrence - Non-native species impacts on threatened and endangered salmonids

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The objectives of this project: a) Identify the distribution of non-natives in the Columbia River Basin b) Highlight the impacts of non-natives on salmonids c)...

  11. Defining the Impact of Non-Native Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Jonathan M; Bacher, Sven; Blackburn, Tim M; Dick, Jaimie T A; Essl, Franz; Evans, Thomas; Gaertner, Mirijam; Hulme, Philip E; Kühn, Ingolf; Mrugała, Agata; Pergl, Jan; Pyšek, Petr; Rabitsch, Wolfgang; Ricciardi, Anthony; Richardson, David M; Sendek, Agnieszka; VilÀ, Montserrat; Winter, Marten; Kumschick, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Non-native species cause changes in the ecosystems to which they are introduced. These changes, or some of them, are usually termed impacts; they can be manifold and potentially damaging to ecosystems and biodiversity. However, the impacts of most non-native species are poorly understood, and a synthesis of available information is being hindered because authors often do not clearly define impact. We argue that explicitly defining the impact of non-native species will promote progress toward a better understanding of the implications of changes to biodiversity and ecosystems caused by non-native species; help disentangle which aspects of scientific debates about non-native species are due to disparate definitions and which represent true scientific discord; and improve communication between scientists from different research disciplines and between scientists, managers, and policy makers. For these reasons and based on examples from the literature, we devised seven key questions that fall into 4 categories: directionality, classification and measurement, ecological or socio-economic changes, and scale. These questions should help in formulating clear and practical definitions of impact to suit specific scientific, stakeholder, or legislative contexts. Definiendo el Impacto de las Especies No-Nativas Resumen Las especies no-nativas pueden causar cambios en los ecosistemas donde son introducidas. Estos cambios, o algunos de ellos, usualmente se denominan como impactos; estos pueden ser variados y potencialmente dañinos para los ecosistemas y la biodiversidad. Sin embargo, los impactos de la mayoría de las especies no-nativas están pobremente entendidos y una síntesis de información disponible se ve obstaculizada porque los autores continuamente no definen claramente impacto. Discutimos que definir explícitamente el impacto de las especies no-nativas promoverá el progreso hacia un mejor entendimiento de las implicaciones de los cambios a la biodiversidad y los

  12. Retention of low-fitness genotypes over six decades of admixture between native and introduced tiger salamanders

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    Shaffer H Bradley

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Introductions of non-native tiger salamanders into the range of California tiger salamanders have provided a rare opportunity to study the early stages of secondary contact and hybridization. We produced first- and second-generation hybrid salamanders in the lab and measured viability among these early-generation hybrid crosses to determine the strength of the initial barrier to gene exchange. We also created contemporary-generation hybrids in the lab and evaluated the extent to which selection has affected fitness over approximately 20 generations of admixture. Additionally, we examined the inheritance of quantitative phenotypic variation to better understand how evolution has progressed since secondary contact. Results We found significant variation in the fitness of hybrids, with non-native backcrosses experiencing the highest survival and F2 hybrids the lowest. Contemporary-generation hybrids had similar survival to that of F2 families, contrary to our expectation that 20 generations of selection in the wild would eliminate unfit genotypes and increase survival. Hybrid survival clearly exhibited effects of epistasis, whereas size and growth showed mostly additive genetic variance, and time to metamorphosis showed substantial dominance. Conclusions Based on first- and second- generation cross types, our results suggest that the initial barrier to gene flow between these two species was relatively weak, and subsequent evolution has been generally slow. The persistence of low-viability recombinant hybrid genotypes in some contemporary populations illustrates that while hybridization can provide a potent source of genetic variation upon which natural selection can act, the sorting of fit from unfit gene combinations might be inefficient in highly admixed populations. Spatio-temporal fluctuation in selection or complex genetics has perhaps stalled adaptive evolution in this system despite selection for admixed genotypes within

  13. Effect of alcohol dehydrogenase 1C (ADH1C genotype on vitamin A restriction and marbling in Korean native steers

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    Dong Qiao Peng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective This work was to find the correlation of alcohol dehydrogenase 1C (ADH1C genotype with vitamin A reduction and carcass traits during the vitamin A restriction period. Methods In study 1, 60 Korean native steers were fed a diet (890 IU/kg with 8,000 IU and 0 IU of supplemental premix vitamin A/kg of dry matter (DM for control and treatment group, respectively. The levels of serum vitamin A were analyzed through high preparative performance liquid chromatography, and the ADH1C genotype was analyzed based on polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP; 78.1% TT type, 21.9% TC type; however, CC type was not found. Then, the interaction between ADH1C and carcass traits on the vitamin A restriction was investigated in study 2. A total of 136 Korean native steers were fed a diet that included 930 IU/kg vitamin A of DM. Results Serum vitamin A in treatment was reduced to 112.4 IU/dL in steers with TT type of ADH1C, while for steers with TC type the concentration of serum vitamin A was dropped to 79.5 IU/dL (p<0.1 in study 1. This showed that TC type had the potential to lower serum vitamin A concentration during vitamin A restriction compared to TT type. In study 2 we found that eye muscle area, marbling and carcass weight in Korean native steers with TC type were higher than in steers with TT type (p<0.05. Conclusion The interaction between vitamin A restriction and TC type of ADH1C gene could have the potential of increasing the marbling in Korean native steers. These results indicated that steers with TC type of the ADH1C gene were more sensitive to the change of serum vitamin A than TT types. Furthermore, this finding has the potential to enable a higher marbling score under the condition of vitamin A restriction in Korean native steers.

  14. Impact of hydroelectric development upon a northern Manitoba native community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldram, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    This dissertation describes the process of underdevelopment among the Cree Indian people of South Indian Lake, in Northern Manitoba, Canada, following the construction of the Churchill-Nelson River Hydro Project in 1975. The dissertation seeks to link the ecological, political, economic, socio-cultural and health aspects of the impact of the hydro project within the framework of the historical process of underdevelopment as it has occurred in Latin America, among Native people in the United States, and among Native people in Northern Canada. Utilizing both qualitative and quantitative data, a process of increased dependence is described as the product of two related processes. The first process is the impairment of the local commercial and domestic economy caused by the flooding of Southern Indian Lake, which has resulted in a decline in local productivity. The second process is the enhancement of consumerism through rising consumer expectations and a post-project increase in available goods and services which the people are increasingly unable to afford. The overall result has been a process of economic divergence at the local level. The dissertation concludes that the process of underdevelopment which has occurred in South Indian Lake has been the result primarily of changes in the local ecological system caused by the construction of the hydro project. These ecological changes have, in turn, resulted in secondary changes in the socio-economic system.

  15. A Reassessment of the Impact of European Contact on the Structure of Native American Genetic Diversity.

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    Hunley, Keith; Gwin, Kiela; Liberman, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Our current understanding of pre-Columbian history in the Americas rests in part on several trends identified in recent genetic studies. The goal of this study is to reexamine these trends in light of the impact of post-Columbian admixture and the methods used to study admixture. The previously-published data consist of 645 autosomal microsatellite genotypes from 1046 individuals in 63 populations. We used STRUCTURE to estimate ancestry proportions and tested the sensitivity of these estimates to the choice of the number of clusters, K. We used partial correlation analyses to examine the relationship between gene diversity and geographic distance from Beringia, controlling for non-Native American ancestry (from Africa, Europe and East Asia), and taking into account alternative paths of migration. Principal component analysis and multidimensional scaling were used to investigate the relationships between Andean and non-Andean populations and to explore gene-language correspondence. We found that 1) European and East Asian ancestry estimates decline as K increases, especially in Native Canadian populations, 2) a north-south decline in gene diversity is driven by low diversity in Amazonian and Paraguayan populations, not serial founder effects from Beringia, 3) controlling for non-Native American ancestry, populations in the Andes and Mesoamerica have higher gene diversity than populations in other regions, and 4) patterns of genetic and linguistic diversity are poorly correlated. We conclude that patterns of diversity previously attributed to pre-Columbian processes may in part reflect post-Columbian admixture and the choice of K in STRUCTURE analyses. Accounting for admixture, the pattern of diversity is inconsistent with a north-south founder effect process, though the genetic similarities between Mesoamerican and Andean populations are consistent with rapid dispersal along the western coast of the Americas. Further, even setting aside the disruptive effects of

  16. Genotype x environment interactions for postweaning performance in crossbred calves grazing winter wheat pasture or dormant native prairie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, W A; Brown, M A; Brown, A H; Coleman, S W

    2001-06-01

    Data from 403 calves from Angus, Brahman, and reciprocal-cross cows sired by Polled Hereford bulls were used to evaluate the impact of postweaning backgrounding forages on postweaning BW, gains, and carcass traits. Calves were born (spring of 1991 through 1994) and reared on either endophyte-infected tall fescue or common bermudagrass pastures. After weaning, calves were transported 360 km to the Grazinglands Research Laboratory, west of El Reno, OK, and, within breed and preweaning forage, were assigned to one of the following winter stocker treatments: 1) winter wheat pasture or 2) dormant native prairie plus supplemental CP. In March, winter stocker treatments were ended and calves were grazed as a single group on cool-season grasses until early July (1992, 1993, and 1994) or late May (1995), when the feedlot phase began. In the feedlot, calves were fed a high concentrate diet for an average of 120 d until a backfat thickness of > 10 mm was reached. Calves were shipped in truck load lots to Amarillo, TX (350 km), for processing and collection of carcass data. Averaged over calf breed group, calves wintered on wheat pasture gained faster (P carcass weights (337 vs 315 kg); larger (P carcass traits. Calves wintered on native prairie were restricted in growth and expressed compensatory gain during the feedlot phase but not during the spring stocker phase. Dormant native grasses can be used to winter stocker calves excess to the winter wheat pasture needs, but ownership of these calves would have to be retained through the feedlot phase to realize any advantage of built-in compensatory gain. Finally, these data suggest that expression of maternal heterosis for weight gain is more likely in calves backgrounded on native prairie than in calves grazed on winter wheat.

  17. IDH Mutations: Genotype-Phenotype Correlation and Prognostic Impact

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    Xiao-Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available IDH1/2 mutation is the most frequent genomic alteration found in gliomas, affecting 40% of these tumors and is one of the earliest alterations occurring in gliomagenesis. We investigated a series of 1305 gliomas and showed that IDH mutation is almost constant in 1p19q codeleted tumors. We found that the distribution of IDH1R132H, IDH1nonR132H, and IDH2 mutations differed between astrocytic, mixed, and oligodendroglial tumors, with an overrepresentation of IDH2 mutations in oligodendroglial phenotype and an overrepresentation of IDH1nonR132H in astrocytic tumors. We stratified grade II and grade III gliomas according to the codeletion of 1p19q and IDH mutation to define three distinct prognostic subgroups: 1p19q and IDH mutated, IDH mutated—which contains mostly TP53 mutated tumors, and none of these alterations. We confirmed that IDH mutation with a hazard ratio = 0.358 is an independent prognostic factor of good outcome. These data refine current knowledge on IDH mutation prognostic impact and genotype-phenotype associations.

  18. RESPONSE OF COWPEA (VIGNA UNGUICULATA L. GENOTYPES TO NATIVE SOIL RHIZOBIA FOR NODULATION, YIELD AND SOIL PROPERTIES

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    SONAM BINJOLA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was conducted on sandy loam soil, on comparision of both the check varieties, COCP-702 performed significantly better than RC-101 in most of the characters under study. The highest soil microbial biomass carbon, i.e., 234.70 μg g-1, soil available N, i.e., 256.56 kg ha-1 and K, i.e., 205.00 kg ha-1 was shown by check variety COCP-702. PGCP-4 recorded significantly more number of nodules plant-1, i.e., 74.33, N concentration in grain, i.e., 4.76%. PGCP-6 gave significantly more grain yield, i.e., 1893.75 kg ha-1, plant N, i.e., 2.15 %, plant protein content, i.e., 13.43 %. This variety also recorded highest N uptake by grain, i.e., 81.81 kg ha-1 and total plant uptake, i.e., 97.64 kg ha-1. Response of COCP-702, PGCP-4 and PGCP-6 to native soil rhizobia were found to be significantly more than the other cowpea genotypes.

  19. The Impact of Native Language Use on Second Language Vocabulary Learning by Saudi EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Saleem

    2016-01-01

    This paper strives to explore the impact of Native Language use on Foreign Language vocabulary learning on the basis of empirical and available data. The study is carried out with special reference to the English Language Programme students in Buraydah Community College, Qassim University, Saudi Arabia. The Native Language of these students is…

  20. Initial screening transferrin saturation values, serum ferritin concentrations, and HFE genotypes in Native Americans and whites in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening Study

    OpenAIRE

    Barton, JC; Acton, RT; Lovato, L; Speechley, MR; McLaren, CE; Harris, EL; Reboussin, DM; Adams, PC; Dawkins, FW; Gordeuk, VR; Walker, AP; Dixon, D.; Ferguson, S; Jones, R.; McKnight, J

    2006-01-01

    We compared initial screening transferrin saturation (TfSat) and serum ferritin (SF) phenotypes and HFE C282Y and H63D genotypes of 645 Native American and 43,453 white Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening Study participants who did not report a previous diagnosis of hemochromatosis or iron overload. Elevated measurements were defined as TfSat >50% in men and >45% in women and SF>300 ng/ml in men and >200 ng/ml in women. Mean TfSat was 31% in Native American men and 32% in white men (p...

  1. The impact in older women of ovarian FMR1 genotypes and sub-genotypes on ovarian reserve.

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    Norbert Gleicher

    Full Text Available We recently associated ovarian FMR1genotypes and sub-genotypes with distinct ovarian aging patterns. How they impact older females is, however, unknown. We, therefore, investigated 217 consecutive first in vitro fertilization (IVF cycles in women >40 assessing oocyte yields, stratified for better (anti-Müllerian hormone, AMH >1.05 ng/mL or poorer (AMH ≤ 1.05 ng/mL functional reserve (FOR. Mean age was 42.4 ± 2.0 years, mean AMH 0.76 ± 0.92 ng/mL and mean oocyte yield 5.3 ± 5.4. Overall, and in women with better FOR, FMR1 did not affect oocyte yields. With poorer FOR (AMH ≤ 1.05 ng/mL women with het-norm/high, however, demonstrated higher oocyte yields (5.0 ± 3.8 than those with het-norm/low sub-genotype 3.1 ± 2.5; P = 0.03, confirmed after log conversion. Known associated with low FOR at young age, het-norm/high, thus, appears to preserve FOR into older age, and both het sub-genotypes appear to expand female reproductive lifespan into opposite directions.

  2. Native Internal Migration and the Labor Market Impact of Immigration

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    Borjas, George J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical and empirical study of how immigration influences the joint determination of the wage structure and internal migration behavior for native-born workers in local labor markets. Using data from the 1960-2000 decennial censuses, the study shows that immigration is associated with lower in-migration rates, higher…

  3. Native Internal Migration and the Labor Market Impact of Immigration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borjas, George J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical and empirical study of how immigration influences the joint determination of the wage structure and internal migration behavior for native-born workers in local labor markets. Using data from the 1960-2000 decennial censuses, the study shows that immigration is associated with lower in-migration rates, higher…

  4. Assessing the impact of differential genotyping errors on rare variant tests of association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Jochimsen, Morgan; Fast, Shannon; Tintle, Nathan L

    2013-01-01

    Genotyping errors are well-known to impact the power and type I error rate in single marker tests of association. Genotyping errors that happen according to the same process in cases and controls are known as non-differential genotyping errors, whereas genotyping errors that occur with different processes in the cases and controls are known as differential genotype errors. For single marker tests, non-differential genotyping errors reduce power, while differential genotyping errors increase the type I error rate. However, little is known about the behavior of the new generation of rare variant tests of association in the presence of genotyping errors. In this manuscript we use a comprehensive simulation study to explore the effects of numerous factors on the type I error rate of rare variant tests of association in the presence of differential genotyping error. We find that increased sample size, decreased minor allele frequency, and an increased number of single nucleotide variants (SNVs) included in the test all increase the type I error rate in the presence of differential genotyping errors. We also find that the greater the relative difference in case-control genotyping error rates the larger the type I error rate. Lastly, as is the case for single marker tests, genotyping errors classifying the common homozygote as the heterozygote inflate the type I error rate significantly more than errors classifying the heterozygote as the common homozygote. In general, our findings are in line with results from single marker tests. To ensure that type I error inflation does not occur when analyzing next-generation sequencing data careful consideration of study design (e.g. use of randomization), caution in meta-analysis and using publicly available controls, and the use of standard quality control metrics is critical.

  5. Evaluating the impact of genotype errors on rare variant tests of association.

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    Cook, Kaitlyn; Benitez, Alejandra; Fu, Casey; Tintle, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The new class of rare variant tests has usually been evaluated assuming perfect genotype information. In reality, rare variant genotypes may be incorrect, and so rare variant tests should be robust to imperfect data. Errors and uncertainty in SNP genotyping are already known to dramatically impact statistical power for single marker tests on common variants and, in some cases, inflate the type I error rate. Recent results show that uncertainty in genotype calls derived from sequencing reads are dependent on several factors, including read depth, calling algorithm, number of alleles present in the sample, and the frequency at which an allele segregates in the population. We have recently proposed a general framework for the evaluation and investigation of rare variant tests of association, classifying most rare variant tests into one of two broad categories (length or joint tests). We use this framework to relate factors affecting genotype uncertainty to the power and type I error rate of rare variant tests. We find that non-differential genotype errors (an error process that occurs independent of phenotype) decrease power, with larger decreases for extremely rare variants, and for the common homozygote to heterozygote error. Differential genotype errors (an error process that is associated with phenotype status), lead to inflated type I error rates which are more likely to occur at sites with more common homozygote to heterozygote errors than vice versa. Finally, our work suggests that certain rare variant tests and study designs may be more robust to the inclusion of genotype errors. Further work is needed to directly integrate genotype calling algorithm decisions, study costs and test statistic choices to provide comprehensive design and analysis advice which appropriately accounts for the impact of genotype errors.

  6. Metadiscourse markers in biological research articles and journal impact factor: Non-native writers vs. native writers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Javad; Ilghami, Roghayeh

    2016-07-08

    Metadiscourse markers (MDMs) are lexical resources that writers employ to organize their discourse and state their stance towards the content or the reader. This study investigated the frequency with which interactive and interactional MDMs were employed in biological research articles (RAs). It also explored the possible relationship between the frequency of these markers and Impact Factor (IF) of journals as an index of quality. Moreover, it aimed at finding out the difference(s) between two groups of authors (Iranian and American) in their use of these markers. Forty biological RAs published in years 2008-2011 written by Iranian non-native authors and published in four ISI journals with different IFs and 40 articles with the same characteristics published by American native authors were selected and examined for the use of the markers. The results showed that there was a strong positive correlation between the frequency of MDMs and IF of the journals. Regarding the frequency of MDMs, it was observed that Iranian authors employed interactive and interactional markers slightly more than their American counterparts. These results may provisionally confirm the considerable role of MDMs in enhancing the coherence and organization of articles for possible publication in high-impact journals. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):349-360, 2016.

  7. Competitive replacement of invasive congeners may relax impact on native species: interactions among zebra, quagga, and native unionid mussels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubov E Burlakova

    Full Text Available Determining when and where the ecological impacts of invasive species will be most detrimental and whether the effects of multiple invaders will be superadditive, or subadditive, is critical for developing global management priorities to protect native species in advance of future invasions. Over the past century, the decline of freshwater bivalves of the family Unionidae has been greatly accelerated by the invasion of Dreissena. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the current infestation rates of unionids by zebra (Dreissena polymorpha and quagga (D. rostriformis bugensis mussels in the lower Great Lakes region 25 years after they nearly extirpated native unionids. In 2011-2012, we collected infestation data for over 4000 unionids from 26 species at 198 nearshore sites in lakes Erie, Ontario, and St. Clair, the Detroit River, and inland Michigan lakes and compared those results to studies from the early 1990 s. We found that the frequency of unionid infestation by Dreissena recently declined, and the number of dreissenids attached to unionids in the lower Great Lakes has fallen almost ten-fold since the early 1990s. We also found that the rate of infestation depends on the dominant Dreissena species in the lake: zebra mussels infested unionids much more often and in greater numbers. Consequently, the proportion of infested unionids, as well as the number and weight of attached dreissenids were lower in waterbodies dominated by quagga mussels. This is the first large-scale systematic study that revealed how minor differences between two taxonomically and functionally related invaders may have large consequences for native communities they invade.

  8. Competitive replacement of invasive congeners may relax impact on native species: Interactions among zebra, quagga, and native unionid mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlakova, Lyubov E.; Tulumello, Brianne L.; Karatayev, Alexander Y.; Krebs, Robert A.; Schloesser, Donald W.; Paterson, Wendy L.; Griffith, Traci A.; Scott, Mariah W.; Crail, Todd D.; Zanatta, David T

    2014-01-01

    Determining when and where the ecological impacts of invasive species will be most detrimental and whether the effects of multiple invaders will be superadditive, or subadditive, is critical for developing global management priorities to protect native species in advance of future invasions. Over the past century, the decline of freshwater bivalves of the family Unionidae has been greatly accelerated by the invasion of Dreissena. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the current infestation rates of unionids by zebra (Dreissena polymorpha) and quagga (D. rostriformis bugensis) mussels in the lower Great Lakes region 25 years after they nearly extirpated native unionids. In 2011–2012, we collected infestation data for over 4000 unionids from 26 species at 198 nearshore sites in lakes Erie, Ontario, and St. Clair, the Detroit River, and inland Michigan lakes and compared those results to studies from the early 1990s. We found that the frequency of unionid infestation by Dreissena recently declined, and the number of dreissenids attached to unionids in the lower Great Lakes has fallen almost ten-fold since the early 1990s. We also found that the rate of infestation depends on the dominant Dreissena species in the lake: zebra mussels infested unionids much more often and in greater numbers. Consequently, the proportion of infested unionids, as well as the number and weight of attached dreissenids were lower in waterbodies dominated by quagga mussels. This is the first large-scale systematic study that revealed how minor differences between two taxonomically and functionally related invaders may have large consequences for native communities they invade.

  9. HRTEM study of Popigai impact diamond: heterogeneous diamond nanostructures in native amorphous carbon matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Viktoria K.; Shumilova, Tatyana; Masaitis, Victor

    2016-07-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy was applied for the detailed nanostructural investigation of Popigai impact diamonds with the aim of revealing the nature of the amorphous carbon of the matrix. The successful application of two complementary specimen preparation methods, focused ion beam (FIB) milling and mechanical cleavage, allowed direct imaging of nanotwinned nanodiamond crystals embedded in a native amorphous carbon matrix for the first time. Based on its stability under the electron beam, native amorphous carbon can be easily distinguished from the amorphous carbon layer produced by FIB milling during specimen preparation. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of the native amorphous carbon revealed the dominance of sp 2-bonded carbon and the presence of a small amount of oxygen. The heterogeneous size distribution and twin density of the nanodiamond crystals and the structural properties of the native amorphous carbon are presumably related to non-graphitic (organic) carbon precursor material.

  10. The impact of the home learning environment in native- vs. second-language acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højen, Anders; Bleses, Dorthe; Dale, Philip S.

    ., 2007). However, little is known about the relative importance of the HLE for native- vs. second-language acquisition. This question was examined in 1,200 second-language and 8,000 native-language learners of Danish. The parents of the 3-5-year-old children completed a HLE questionnaire......The home literacy environment (HLE) has been shown to impact language and literacy skills in preschool-aged children via factors such as availability of books, frequency of reading and child age when parents began reading to the child (Burgess, Hecht, & Lonigan, 2002; Payne, Whitehurst, & Angell......, 1994). Many dual language learners (DLL) rely on interactions in the second language outside the home to acquire second-language proficiency, but the HLE also influences second-language development in DLL, whether the native language or the second language is the primary home language (Duursma et al...

  11. Economic impacts of non-native forest insects in the continental United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliann E Aukema

    Full Text Available Reliable estimates of the impacts and costs of biological invasions are critical to developing credible management, trade and regulatory policies. Worldwide, forests and urban trees provide important ecosystem services as well as economic and social benefits, but are threatened by non-native insects. More than 450 non-native forest insects are established in the United States but estimates of broad-scale economic impacts associated with these species are largely unavailable. We developed a novel modeling approach that maximizes the use of available data, accounts for multiple sources of uncertainty, and provides cost estimates for three major feeding guilds of non-native forest insects. For each guild, we calculated the economic damages for five cost categories and we estimated the probability of future introductions of damaging pests. We found that costs are largely borne by homeowners and municipal governments. Wood- and phloem-boring insects are anticipated to cause the largest economic impacts by annually inducing nearly $1.7 billion in local government expenditures and approximately $830 million in lost residential property values. Given observations of new species, there is a 32% chance that another highly destructive borer species will invade the U.S. in the next 10 years. Our damage estimates provide a crucial but previously missing component of cost-benefit analyses to evaluate policies and management options intended to reduce species introductions. The modeling approach we developed is highly flexible and could be similarly employed to estimate damages in other countries or natural resource sectors.

  12. A native plant growth promoting bacterium, Bacillus megaterium B55, rescues growth performance of an ethylene insensitive plant genotype in nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothea Gertrud Meldau

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Many plants have intimate relationships with soil microbes that through a variety of mechanisms improve the plant’s growth and fitness. Bacillus megaterium is a natural endophyte isolated from Nicotiana attenuata plant roots growing in native soils. A particular isolate (B55, was found to have dramatic plant growth promoting (PGP effects on wild type (WT and transgenic plants impaired in ethylene (ET perception (35S-etr1, the genotype from which this bacteria was first isolated. B55 not only improves N. attenuata growth under in vitro, glasshouse and field conditions, but it also rescues many of the deleterious phenotypes associated with ET insensitivity. Most notably, B55 dramatically increases the growth and survival of 35S-etr1 plants under field conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a PGP effect in a native plant-microbe association under natural conditions. Our study demonstrates that this facultative mutualistic plant-microbe interaction should be viewed as part of the plant’s extended phenotype. Possible modalities of recruitment and mechanisms of PGP are discussed.

  13. A native plant growth promoting bacterium, Bacillus sp. B55, rescues growth performance of an ethylene-insensitive plant genotype in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldau, Dorothea G; Long, Hoang H; Baldwin, Ian T

    2012-01-01

    Many plants have intimate relationships with soil microbes, which improve the plant's growth and fitness through a variety of mechanisms. Bacillus sp. isolates are natural root-associated bacteria, isolated from Nicotiana attenuata plant roots growing in native soils. A particular isolate B55, was found to have dramatic plant growth promotion (PGP) effects on wild type (WT) and transgenic plants impaired in ethylene (ET) perception (35S-etr1), the genotype from which this bacterium was first isolated. B55 not only improves N. attenuata growth under in vitro, glasshouse, and field conditions, but it also "rescues" many of the deleterious phenotypes associated with ET insensitivity. Most notably, B55 dramatically increases the growth and survival of 35S-etr1 plants under field conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a PGP effect in a native plant-microbe association under natural conditions. Our study demonstrates that this facultative mutualistic plant-microbe interaction should be viewed as part of the plant's extended phenotype. Possible modalities of recruitment and mechanisms of PGP are discussed.

  14. A native plant competitor mediates the impact of above- and belowground damage on an invasive tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Juli; Siemann, Evan

    2016-10-01

    Plant competition may mediate the impacts of herbivory on invasive plant species through effects on plant growth and defense. This may predictably depend on whether herbivory occurs above or below ground and on relative plant competitive ability. We simulated the potential impact of above- or belowground damage by biocontrol agents on the growth of a woody invader (Chinese tallow tree, Triadica sebifera) through artificial herbivory, with or without competition with a native grass, little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium). We measured two defense responses of Triadica through quantifying constitutive and induced extrafloral nectar production and tolerance of above- and belowground damage (root and shoot biomass regrowth). We examined genetic variation in plant growth and defense across native (China) and invasive (United States) Triadica populations. Without competition, aboveground damage had a greater impact than belowground damage on Triadica performance, whereas with competition and above- and belowground damage impacted Triadica similarly. Whole plant tolerance to damage below ground was negatively associated with tolerance to grass competitors indicating tradeoffs in the ability to tolerate herbivory vs. compete. Competition reduced investment in defensive extrafloral nectar (EFN) production. Aboveground damage inhibited rather than induced EFN production while belowground plant damage did not impact aboveground nectar production. We found some support for the evolution of increased competitive ability hypothesis for invasive plants as United States plants were larger than native China plants and were more plastic in their response to biotic stressors than China plants (they altered their root to shoot ratios dependent on herbivory and competition treatments). Our results indicate that habitat type and the presence of competitors may be a larger determinant of herbivory impact than feeding mode and suggest that integrated pest management strategies including

  15. Predicting climate change impacts on native and invasive tree species using radial growth and twenty-first century climate scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    González-Muñoz, N.; Linares, J.C.; Castro-Díez, P.; Sass-Klaassen, U.G.W.

    2014-01-01

    The climatic conditions predicted for the twenty-first century may aggravate the extent and impacts of plant invasions, by favouring those invaders more adapted to altered conditions or by hampering the native flora. We aim to predict the fate of native and invasive tree species in the oak forests o

  16. Predicting climate change impacts on native and invasive tree species using radial growth and twenty-first century climate scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    González-Muñoz, N.; Linares, J.C.; Castro-Díez, P.; Sass-Klaassen, U.G.W.

    2014-01-01

    The climatic conditions predicted for the twenty-first century may aggravate the extent and impacts of plant invasions, by favouring those invaders more adapted to altered conditions or by hampering the native flora. We aim to predict the fate of native and invasive tree species in the oak forests

  17. Extreme High Prevalence of a Defective Mannose-Binding Lectin (MBL2) Genotype in Native South American West Andean Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandoval, José Raul; Madsen, Hans O; De Stefano, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    ), and Ecuador (n = 182) (Region of Esmeraldas and Santo Domingo de los Colorados). The distribution of MBL2 genotypes among the populations showed that the defective variant LYPB haplotype was very common. It showed the highest frequencies in Puno (Taquile (0.80), Amantani (0.80) and Anapia (0.58) islander...... of the MBL2 LYPB variant causing low levels of functional MBL in serum may mainly reflect a random distribution due to a population bottleneck in the founder populations.......Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is one of the five recognition molecules in the lectin complement pathway. Common variant alleles in the promoter and structural regions of the human MBL gene (MBL2) influence the stability and serum concentration of the protein. Epidemiological studies have shown...

  18. Native bees buffer the negative impact of climate warming on honey bee pollination of watermelon crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Romina; Reilly, James; Bartomeus, Ignasi; Winfree, Rachael

    2013-10-01

    If climate change affects pollinator-dependent crop production, this will have important implications for global food security because insect pollinators contribute to production for 75% of the leading global food crops. We investigate whether climate warming could result in indirect impacts upon crop pollination services via an overlooked mechanism, namely temperature-induced shifts in the diurnal activity patterns of pollinators. Using a large data set on bee pollination of watermelon crops, we predict how pollination services might change under various climate change scenarios. Our results show that under the most extreme IPCC scenario (A1F1), pollination services by managed honey bees are expected to decline by 14.5%, whereas pollination services provided by most native, wild taxa are predicted to increase, resulting in an estimated aggregate change in pollination services of +4.5% by 2099. We demonstrate the importance of native biodiversity in buffering the impacts of climate change, because crop pollination services would decline more steeply without the native, wild pollinators. More generally, our study provides an important example of how biodiversity can stabilize ecosystem services against environmental change. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Impact of Three Illumina Library Construction Methods on GC Bias and HLA Genotype Calling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, James H; Yin, Yuxin; Reed, Elaine F; Moua, Kevin; Thomas, Kimberly; Zhang, Qiuheng

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is increasingly recognized for its ability to overcome allele ambiguity and deliver high-resolution typing in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system. Using this technology, non-uniform read distribution can impede the reliability of variant detection, which renders high-confidence genotype calling particularly difficult to achieve in the polymorphic HLA complex. Recently, library construction has been implicated as the dominant factor in instigating coverage bias. To study the impact of this phenomenon on HLA genotyping, we performed long-range PCR on 12 samples to amplify HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DQB1, and compared the relative contribution of three Illumina library construction methods (TruSeq Nano, Nextera, Nextera XT) in generating downstream bias. Here, we show high GC% to be a good predictor of low sequencing depth. Compared to standard TruSeq Nano, GC bias was more prominent in transposase-based protocols, particularly Nextera XT, likely through a combination of transposase insertion bias being coupled with a high number of PCR enrichment cycles. Importantly, our findings demonstrate non-uniform read depth can have a direct and negative impact on the robustness of HLA genotyping, which has clinical implications for users when choosing a library construction strategy that aims to balance cost and throughput with data quality. PMID:25543015

  20. Investigation of the genotype III to genotype I shift in Japanese encephalitis virus and the impact on human cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Na; Adams, James; Fang, Wei; Liu, Si-Qing; Rayner, Simon

    2015-08-01

    Japanese encephalitis is a mosquito borne disease and is the leading cause of viral encephalitis in the Asia-Pacific area. The causative agent, Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) can be phylogenetically classified into five genotypes based on nucleotide sequence. In recent years, genotype I (GI) has displaced genotype III (GIII) as the dominant lineage, but the mechanisms behind this displacement event requires elucidation. In an earlier study, we compared host variation over time between the two genotypes and observed that GI appears to have evolved to achieve more efficient infection in hosts in the replication cycle, with the tradeoff of reduced infectivity in secondary hosts such as humans. To further investigate this phenomenon, we collected JEV surveillance data on human cases and, together with sequence data, and generated genotype/case profiles from seven Asia-Pacific countries and regions to characterize the GI/GIII displacement event. We found that, when comprehensive and consistent vaccination and surveillance data was available, and the GIII to GI shift occurred within a well-defined time period, there was a statistically significant drop in JEV human cases. Our findings provide further support for the argument that GI is less effective in infecting humans, who represent a dead end host. However, experimental investigation is necessary to confirm this hypothesis. The study highlights the value of alternative approaches to investigation of epidemics, as well as the importance of effective data collection for disease surveillance and control.

  1. Extreme high prevalence of a defective mannose-binding lectin (MBL2 genotype in native South American West Andean populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Raul Sandoval

    Full Text Available Mannose-binding lectin (MBL is one of the five recognition molecules in the lectin complement pathway. Common variant alleles in the promoter and structural regions of the human MBL gene (MBL2 influence the stability and serum concentration of the protein. Epidemiological studies have shown that MBL2 variant alleles are associated with susceptibility to and the course of different types of infectious and inflammatory conditions. However, it has been suggested that these alleles are maintained in different populations due to selected advantages for carriers. We investigated the MBL2 allelic variation in indigenous individuals from 12 different West Central South America localities spanning from the desert coast, high altitude Andean plates and the Amazon tropical forest within the territories of Peru (n = 249 (Departments of Loreto, Ucayali, Lambayeque, Junin, Ayacucho, Huancayo and Puno, and Ecuador (n = 182 (Region of Esmeraldas and Santo Domingo de los Colorados. The distribution of MBL2 genotypes among the populations showed that the defective variant LYPB haplotype was very common. It showed the highest frequencies in Puno (Taquile (0.80, Amantani (0.80 and Anapia (0.58 islander communities of the Lake Titicaca, but lower frequencies of 0.22 in Junin (Central Andean highland and Ucayali (Central Amazonian forest, as well as 0.27 and 0.24 in the Congoma and Cayapa/Chachis populations in the Amazonian forest in Ecuador were also observed. Our results suggest that the high prevalence of the MBL2 LYPB variant causing low levels of functional MBL in serum may mainly reflect a random distribution due to a population bottleneck in the founder populations.

  2. Extreme high prevalence of a defective mannose-binding lectin (MBL2) genotype in native South American West Andean populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, José Raul; Madsen, Hans O; De Stefano, Gianfranco; Descailleaux-Dulanto, Jaime; Velazquez-Reinoso, Margarita; Ñique, Cesar; Fujita, Ricardo; Garred, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is one of the five recognition molecules in the lectin complement pathway. Common variant alleles in the promoter and structural regions of the human MBL gene (MBL2) influence the stability and serum concentration of the protein. Epidemiological studies have shown that MBL2 variant alleles are associated with susceptibility to and the course of different types of infectious and inflammatory conditions. However, it has been suggested that these alleles are maintained in different populations due to selected advantages for carriers. We investigated the MBL2 allelic variation in indigenous individuals from 12 different West Central South America localities spanning from the desert coast, high altitude Andean plates and the Amazon tropical forest within the territories of Peru (n = 249) (Departments of Loreto, Ucayali, Lambayeque, Junin, Ayacucho, Huancayo and Puno), and Ecuador (n = 182) (Region of Esmeraldas and Santo Domingo de los Colorados). The distribution of MBL2 genotypes among the populations showed that the defective variant LYPB haplotype was very common. It showed the highest frequencies in Puno (Taquile (0.80), Amantani (0.80) and Anapia (0.58) islander communities of the Lake Titicaca), but lower frequencies of 0.22 in Junin (Central Andean highland) and Ucayali (Central Amazonian forest), as well as 0.27 and 0.24 in the Congoma and Cayapa/Chachis populations in the Amazonian forest in Ecuador were also observed. Our results suggest that the high prevalence of the MBL2 LYPB variant causing low levels of functional MBL in serum may mainly reflect a random distribution due to a population bottleneck in the founder populations.

  3. Impact of Genotype on EPA and DHA Status and Responsiveness to Increased Intakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Marie Minihane

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available At a population level, cardioprotective and cognitive actions of the fish oil (FO derived long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA have been extensively demonstrated. In addition to dietary intake, which is limited for many individuals, EPA and DHA status is dependent on the efficiency of their biosynthesis from α-linolenic acid. Gender and common gene variants have been identified as influencing the rate-limiting desaturase and elongase enzymes. Response to a particular intake or status is also highly heterogeneous and likely influenced by genetic variants which impact on EPA and DHA metabolism and tissue partitioning, transcription factor activity, or physiological end-point regulation. Here, available literature relating genotype to tissue LC n-3 PUFA status and response to FO intervention is considered. It is concluded that the available evidence is relatively limited, with much of the variability unexplained, though APOE and FADS genotypes are emerging as being important. Although genotype × LC n-3 PUFA interactions have been described for a number of phenotypes, few have been confirmed in independent studies. A more comprehensive understanding of the genetic, physiological and behavioural modulators of EPA and DHA status and response to intervention is needed to allow refinement of current dietary LC n-3 PUFA recommendations and stratification of advice to “vulnerable” and responsive subgroups.

  4. Disentangling herbivore impacts on Populus tremuloides: a comparison of native ungulates and cattle in Canada's Aspen Parkland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bork, Edward W; Carlyle, Cameron N; Cahill, James F; Haddow, Rae E; Hudson, Robert J

    2013-11-01

    Ungulates impact woody species' growth and abundance but little is understood about the comparative impacts of different ungulate species on forest expansion in savanna environments. Replacement of native herbivore guilds with livestock [i.e., beef cattle (Bos taurus)] has been hypothesized as a factor facilitating trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) encroachment into grasslands of the Northern Great Plains. We used a controlled herbivory study in the Parklands of western Canada to compare the impact of native ungulates and cattle on aspen saplings. Native ungulate treatments included a mixed species guild and sequences of herbivory by different ungulates [bison (Bison bison subsp. bison), elk (Cervus elaphus) then deer (Odocoileus hemionus); or deer, elk, then bison]. Herbivory treatments were replicated in three pastures, within which sets of 40 marked aspen saplings (aspen stand. Stems were assessed for mortality and incremental damage (herbivory, leader breakage, stem abrasion and trampling). Final mortality was greater with exposure to any type of herbivore, but remained similar between ungulate treatments. However, among all treatments, the growth of aspen was highest with exposure only to cattle. Herbivory of aspen was attributed primarily to elk within the native ungulate treatments, with other forms of physical damage, and ultimately sapling mortality, associated with exposure to bison. Overall, these results indicate that native ungulates, specifically elk and bison, have more negative impacts on aspen saplings and provide evidence that native and domestic ungulates can have different functional effects on woody plant dynamics in savanna ecosystems.

  5. Efficacy of 'indigenous vaccine' using native 'Indian bison type' genotype of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis for the control of clinical Johne's disease in an organized goat herd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, K; Chandel, B S; Chauhan, H C; Dadawala, A; Singh, S V; Singh, P K

    2013-06-01

    Therapeutic efficacy of a new 'Indigenous vaccine' prepared from native highly pathogenic 'Indian Bison Type' genotype of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) of goat origin has been evaluated with respect to control of clinical Johne's disease in naturally infected Mehsana breed of goat in North Gujarat. Fifty goats from Sheep and Goats Research Station, Sardarkrushinagar Dantiwada Agricultural University, Sardarkrushinagar, were randomly divided into 2 groups viz.,'Vaccinated'(n = 35) and 'Control'(n = 15). After vaccination, goats were monitored for physical condition, morbidity, mortality, body weights, shedding of MAP in feces, internal condition, gross lesions and humoral immune responses up to 120 days (at each interval of 30 days). At the end of 120 days trial, there was marked overall improvement in physical condition and body weights of vaccinated goats as compared to 'Control' goats. Vaccinated goats gained significantly (P vaccinated goats were positive for MAP DNA in faecal PCR and blood PCR before vaccination. However, all were found as negative at 120 days post vaccination (DPV). Overall vaccine exhibited effective in restriction of MAP infection and significant improvement in production parameters and reduction in mortality and morbidity due to JD. The trial in the herd will be continued.

  6. Impact of non-native terrestrial mammals on the structure of the terrestrial mammal food web of Newfoundland, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin S Strong

    Full Text Available The island of Newfoundland is unique because it has as many non-native terrestrial mammals as native ones. The impacts of non-native species on native flora and fauna can be profound and invasive species have been identified as one of the primary drivers of species extinction. Few studies, however, have investigated the effects of a non-native species assemblage on community and ecosystem properties. We reviewed the literature to build the first terrestrial mammal food web for the island of Newfoundland and then used network analyses to investigate how the timing of introductions and trophic position of non-native species has affected the structure of the terrestrial mammal food web in Newfoundland. The first non-native mammals (house mouse and brown rat became established in Newfoundland with human settlement in the late 15th and early 16th centuries. Coyotes and southern red-backed voles are the most recent mammals to establish themselves on the island in 1985 and 1998, respectively. The fraction of intermediate species increased with the addition of non-native mammals over time whereas the fraction of basal and top species declined over time. This increase in intermediate species mediated by non-native species arrivals led to an overall increase in the terrestrial mammal food web connectance and generality (i.e. mean number of prey per predator. This diverse prey base and sources of carrion may have facilitated the natural establishment of coyotes on the island. Also, there is some evidence that the introduction of non-native prey species such as the southern red-backed vole has contributed to the recovery of the threatened American marten. Long-term monitoring of the food web is required to understand and predict the impacts of the diverse novel interactions that are developing in the terrestrial mammal food web of Newfoundland.

  7. Impact of non-native terrestrial mammals on the structure of the terrestrial mammal food web of Newfoundland, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Justin S; Leroux, Shawn J

    2014-01-01

    The island of Newfoundland is unique because it has as many non-native terrestrial mammals as native ones. The impacts of non-native species on native flora and fauna can be profound and invasive species have been identified as one of the primary drivers of species extinction. Few studies, however, have investigated the effects of a non-native species assemblage on community and ecosystem properties. We reviewed the literature to build the first terrestrial mammal food web for the island of Newfoundland and then used network analyses to investigate how the timing of introductions and trophic position of non-native species has affected the structure of the terrestrial mammal food web in Newfoundland. The first non-native mammals (house mouse and brown rat) became established in Newfoundland with human settlement in the late 15th and early 16th centuries. Coyotes and southern red-backed voles are the most recent mammals to establish themselves on the island in 1985 and 1998, respectively. The fraction of intermediate species increased with the addition of non-native mammals over time whereas the fraction of basal and top species declined over time. This increase in intermediate species mediated by non-native species arrivals led to an overall increase in the terrestrial mammal food web connectance and generality (i.e. mean number of prey per predator). This diverse prey base and sources of carrion may have facilitated the natural establishment of coyotes on the island. Also, there is some evidence that the introduction of non-native prey species such as the southern red-backed vole has contributed to the recovery of the threatened American marten. Long-term monitoring of the food web is required to understand and predict the impacts of the diverse novel interactions that are developing in the terrestrial mammal food web of Newfoundland.

  8. Impacts of Climate Change on Native Landcover: Seeking Future Climatic Refuges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, Marina; Mangabeira Albernaz, Ana Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is a driver for diverse impacts on global biodiversity. We investigated its impacts on native landcover distribution in South America, seeking to predict its effect as a new force driving habitat loss and population isolation. Moreover, we mapped potential future climatic refuges, which are likely to be key areas for biodiversity conservation under climate change scenarios. Climatically similar native landcovers were aggregated using a decision tree, generating a reclassified landcover map, from which 25% of the map's coverage was randomly selected to fuel distribution models. We selected the best geographical distribution models among twelve techniques, validating the predicted distribution for current climate with the landcover map and used the best technique to predict the future distribution. All landcover categories showed changes in area and displacement of the latitudinal/longitudinal centroid. Closed vegetation was the only landcover type predicted to expand its distributional range. The range contractions predicted for other categories were intense, even suggesting extirpation of the sparse vegetation category. The landcover refuges under future climate change represent a small proportion of the South American area and they are disproportionately represented and unevenly distributed, predominantly occupying five of 26 South American countries. The predicted changes, regardless of their direction and intensity, can put biodiversity at risk because they are expected to occur in the near future in terms of the temporal scales of ecological and evolutionary processes. Recognition of the threat of climate change allows more efficient conservation actions.

  9. The Impact of Non-Native English Teachers' Linguistic Insecurity on Learners' Productive Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daftari, Giti Ehtesham; Tavil, Zekiye Müge

    2017-01-01

    The discrimination between native and non-native English speaking teachers is reported in favor of native speakers in literature. The present study examines the linguistic insecurity of non-native English speaking teachers (NNESTs) and investigates its influence on learners' productive skills by using SPSS software. The eighteen teachers…

  10. Modeling prey consumption by native and non-native piscivorous fishes: implications for competition and impacts on shared prey in an ultraoligotrophic lake in Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juncos, Romina; Beauchamp, David A.; Viglianoc, Pablo H.

    2013-01-01

    We examined trophic interactions of the nonnative salmonids Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, Brown Trout Salmo trutta, and Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalisand the main native predator Creole Perch Percichthys trucha in Lake Nahuel Huapi (Patagonia, Argentina) to determine the relative impact of each predator on their forage base and to evaluate the potential vulnerability of each predator to competitive impacts by the others. Using bioenergetics simulations, we demonstrated the overall importance of galaxiids and decapods to the energy budgets of nonnative salmonids and Creole Perch. Introduced salmonids, especially Rainbow Trout, exerted considerably heavier predatory demands on shared resources than did the native Creole Perch on both a per capita basis and in terms of relative population impacts. Rainbow Trout consumed higher quantities and a wider size range of Small Puyen (also known as Inanga) Galaxias maculatus than the other predators, including early pelagic life stages of that prey; as such, this represents an additional source of mortality for the vulnerable early life stages of Small Puyen before and during their transition from pelagic to benthic habitats. All predators were generally feeding at high feeding rates (above 40% of their maximum physiological rates), suggesting that competition for prey does not currently limit either Creole Perch or the salmonids in this lake. This study highlights the importance of keystone prey for the coexistence of native species with nonnative top predators. It provides new quantitative and qualitative evidence of the high predation pressure exerted on Small Puyen, the keystone prey species, during the larval to juvenile transition from pelagic to littoral-benthic habitat in Patagonian lakes. This study also emphasizes the importance of monitoring salmonid and Creole Perch population dynamics in order to detect signs of potential impacts through competition and shows the need to carefully consider the rationale

  11. Native American Students' Experiences of Cultural Differences in College: Influence and Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Leslie E.

    2012-01-01

    The culture of most colleges and universities is very different for Native American students with close ties to their traditional communities. "Traditional," in a Native American sense, means multiple interconnections of emotional, physical, intellectual, and spiritual identity that combine to define expectations for the Native American…

  12. Hepatitis B virus genotype G: prevalence and impact in patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Doan Y; Balko, Jody; Attar, Nahid; Neak, Enayet; Yuan, He-Jun; Lee, William M; Jain, Mamta K

    2011-09-01

    Relatively little is known about the role of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype G (HBV/G) in patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and HBV. This study examined the prevalence and association of HBV/G to liver fibrosis in co-infected patients. HBV genotypes were determined by direct sequencing of the HBV surface gene or Trugene® HBV 1.0 assay in 133 patients infected with HIV/HBV. Quantitative testing of HBV-DNA, HBeAg, and anti-HBe were performed using the Versant® HBV 3.0 (for DNA) and the ADVIA®Centaur assay. The non-invasive biomarkers Fib-4 and APRI were used to assess fibrosis stage. Genotype A was present in 103/133 (77%) of the cohort, genotype G in 18/133 (14%) with genotypes D in 8/133, (6%), F 2/133 (1.5%), and H 2/133 (1.5%). Genotype G was associated with hepatitis B e antigen-positivity and high HBV-DNA levels. Additionally, HBV/G (OR 8.25, 95% CI 2.3-29.6, P = 0.0012) was associated with advanced fibrosis score using Fib-4, whereas, being black was not (OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.05-0.07, P = 0.01). HBV/G in this population exhibited a different phenotype than expected for pure G genotypes raising the question of recombination or mixed infections. The frequent finding of HBV/G in co-infected patients and its association with more advanced fibrosis, suggests that this genotype leads to more rapid liver disease progression. Further studies are needed to understand why this genotype occurs more frequently and what impact it has on liver disease progression in patients with HBV/HIV.

  13. Using ApoE Genotyping to Promote Healthy Lifestyles in Finland - Psychological Impacts: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietaranta-Luoma, H-L; Luomala, H T; Puolijoki, H; Hopia, A

    2015-12-01

    Common health recommendations often incite very little public response, as people instead require individualized information. The purpose of this study was to assess the psychological effects of personal genetic information, provided by different apoE genotypes, as a tool to promote lifestyle changes. This study was a one-year intervention study using healthy adults, aged 20-67 years (n = 107). Their experiences of state anxiety, threat and stage of change were measured three times over a 12 months period. These psychological experiences were assessed, during the genetic information gathering, for three groups: a high-risk group (Ɛ4+, n = 16); a low-risk group (Ɛ4-, n = 35); and a control group (n = 56). The psychological effects of personal genetic risk information were shown to be short-term, although the levels of state anxiety and threat experiences in the high-risk group both remained at a slightly higher level than in the baseline. Threat experiences differed almost significantly (alpha = 0.017) between the Ɛ4+ and Ɛ4- groups (p = 0.034). Information on the apoE genotype impacted the experience of cardiovascular threat; this effect was most intense immediately after genetic feedback was received. However, fears of threat and anxiety may not be an obstacle for using gene information to motivate healthy, stable adults towards making lifestyle changes. Further studies should thus focus on how to utilize genetic screening in prevention of lifestyle-related diseases.

  14. Saliva sampling in global clinical studies: the impact of low sampling volume on performance of DNA in downstream genotyping experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The collection of viable DNA samples is an essential element of any genetics research programme. Biological samples for DNA purification are now routinely collected in many studies with a variety of sampling methods available. Initial observation in this study suggested a reduced genotyping success rate of some saliva derived DNA samples when compared to blood derived DNA samples prompting further investigation. Methods Genotyping success rate was investigated to assess the suitability of using saliva samples in future safety and efficacy pharmacogenetics experiments. The Oragene® OG-300 DNA Self-Collection kit was used to collect and extract DNA from saliva from 1468 subjects enrolled in global clinical studies. Statistical analysis evaluated the impact of saliva sample volume of collection on the quality, yield, concentration and performance of saliva DNA in genotyping assays. Results Across 13 global clinical studies that utilized the Oragene® OG-300 DNA Self-Collection kit there was variability in the volume of saliva sample collection with ~31% of participants providing 0.5 mL of saliva, rather than the recommended 2 mL. While the majority of saliva DNA samples provided high quality genotype data, collection of 0.5 mL volumes of saliva contributed to DNA samples being significantly less likely to pass genotyping quality control standards. Assessment of DNA sample characteristics that may influence genotyping outcomes indicated that saliva sample volume, DNA purity and turbidity were independently associated with sample genotype pass rate, but that saliva collection volume had the greatest effect. Conclusion When employing saliva sampling to obtain DNA, it is important to encourage all study participants to provide sufficient sample to minimize potential loss of data in downstream genotyping experiments. PMID:23759220

  15. Impacts of fire on non-native plant recruitment in black spruce forests of interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Alexandra J.; Jean, Mélanie

    2017-01-01

    Climate change is expected to increase the extent and severity of wildfires throughout the boreal forest. Historically, black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.) forests in interior Alaska have been relatively free of non-native species, but the compounding effects of climate change and an altered fire regime could facilitate the expansion of non-native plants. We tested the effects of wildfire on non-native plant colonization by conducting a seeding experiment of non-native plants on different substrate types in a burned black spruce forest, and surveying for non-native plants in recently burned and mature black spruce forests. We found few non-native plants in burned or mature forests, despite their high roadside presence, although invasion of some burned sites by dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) indicated the potential for non-native plants to move into burned forest. Experimental germination rates were significantly higher on mineral soil compared to organic soil, indicating that severe fires that combust much of the organic layer could increase the potential for non-native plant colonization. We conclude that fire disturbances that remove the organic layer could facilitate the invasion of non-native plants providing there is a viable seed source and dispersal vector. PMID:28158284

  16. Depression in Racial and Ethnic Minorities: the Impact of Nativity and Discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhwani, Henna; Hearld, Kristine Ria; Chavez-Yenter, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    This research examines factors associated with lifetime major depressive disorder in racial and ethnic minorities residing in the USA, with an emphasis on the impact of nativity, discrimination, and health lifestyle behaviors. The Healthy Migrant Effect and Health Lifestyle Theory were used to inform the design of this project. The use of these frameworks not only provides insightful results but also expands their application in mental health disparities research. Logistic regression models were implemented to examine risk factors associated with lifetime major depressive disorder, comparing immigrants to their American-born counterparts as well as to American-born Whites. Data were derived from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys (n = 17,249). Support was found for the hypothesis that certain immigrants, specifically Asian and Afro-Caribbean, have lower odds of depression as compared their non-immigrant counterparts. Although, Hispanic immigrants directionally had lower odds of depression, this finding was not statistically significant. Furthermore, engaging in excessive alcohol consumption was associated with higher rates of depression (odds ratio (OR) = 2.09, p discrimination on depression was found to be significant, even when controlling for demographics. Of all racial and ethnic groups, foreign-born Afro-Caribbeans had the lowest rate of depression at 7 % followed by foreign-born Asians at 8 %.

  17. Impact of targeted health promotion on cardiovascular knowledge among American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brega, Angela G; Pratte, Katherine A; Jiang, Luohua; Mitchell, Christina M; Stotz, Sarah A; Loudhawk-Hedgepeth, Crystal; Morse, Brad D; Noe, Tim; Moore, Kelly R; Beals, Janette

    2013-06-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute developed the Honoring the Gift of Heart Health (HGHH) curriculum to promote cardiovascular knowledge and heart-healthy lifestyles among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs). Using data from a small randomized trial designed to reduce diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among overweight/obese AI/ANs, we evaluated the impact of an adapted HGHH curriculum on cardiovascular knowledge. We also assessed whether the curriculum was effective across levels of health literacy (defined as the 'capacity to obtain, process and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions'). We examined change in knowledge from baseline to 3 months for two groups: HGHH (N = 89) and control (N = 50). Compared with controls, HGHH participants showed significant improvement in heart attack knowledge and marginally significant improvement in stroke and general CVD knowledge. HGHH participants attending ≥1 class showed significantly greater improvement than controls on all three measures. Although HGHH participants with inadequate health literacy had worse heart attack and stroke knowledge at baseline and 3 months than did participants with adequate skills, the degree of improvement in knowledge did not differ by health literacy level. HGHH appears to improve cardiovascular knowledge among AI/ANs across health literacy levels.

  18. Applying the collective impact approach to address non-native species: A case study of the Great Lakes Phragmites Collaborative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, H. B.; Kowalski, Kurt P.; Hollins, K.

    2016-01-01

    To address the invasion of non-native Phragmites in the Great Lakes, researchers at the U.S. Geological Survey—Great Lakes Science Center partnered with the Great Lakes Commission in 2012 to establish the Great Lakes Phragmites Collaborative (GLPC). The GLPC is a regional-scale partnership established to improve collaboration among stakeholders and increase the effectiveness of non-native Phragmites management and research. Rather than forming a traditional partnership with a narrowly defined goal, the GLPC follows the principles of collective impact to engage stakeholders, guide progress, and align resources to address this complex, regional challenge. In this paper, the concept and tenets of collective impact are described, the GLPC is offered as a model for other natural resource-focused collective impact efforts, and steps for establishing collaboratives are presented. Capitalizing on the interactive collective impact approach, the GLPC is moving toward a broadly accepted common agenda around which agencies and individuals will be able to better align their actions and generate measureable progress in the regional campaign to protect healthy, diverse ecosystems from damage caused by non-native Phragmites.

  19. Assessing the impact of Native American elders as co-educators for university students in STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkholy, Sarah Omar

    Introduction: Minorities are underrepresented in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce, post-secondary STEM education, and show high academic attrition rates. Academic performance and retention improve when culturally relevant support is provided. The interface of Western Science and Indigenous Science provides an opportunity for bridging this divide. This three parts project is an example of Community-based participatory research (CBPR) that aims to support academic institutions that serve minority students in STEM, and implement educational components (pedagogy) to serve the needs of the underserved community. Method: Part 1: was a cross-sectional used a survey given to participants designed to assess prevalence of natural health products use by students, and to determine how students learn about NHPs. Part 2: was a longitudinal survey pilot study based upon an online STEM course offer at four universities to determine the differences between U.S. vs. Canadian and minority vs. non-minority university students regarding their perceptions of traditional Elders as STEM co-educators, interest in STEM, and science identity by using a pre-and post- course survey. Part 3: was a longitudinal quasi-experiment based upon an online STEM course offered at four universities show what Indigenous science claims regarding: Elders are viewed as valuable STEM co-educators; Elders increase student interest in STEM; students exposed to Indigenous science improve their identity as a scientist; students exposed to Indigenous Science/Elders show improved learning outcomes. Result: We found that Native/Aboriginal students learn information about natural health products from traditional Elders significantly more so than non-Native/Aboriginal students. There were no statistically significant results from the pilot study. Findings from the quasi-experiment show that students taught with Indigenous science Elder co-educators have significantly greater

  20. Finding the right coverage : The impact of coverage and sequence quality on SNP genotyping error rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fountain, Emily D; Pauli, Jonathan N; Reid, Brendan N; Palsbøll, Per J; Peery, M Zachariah

    2016-01-01

    Restriction-enzyme-based sequencing methods enable the genotyping of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci in non-model organisms. However, in contrast to traditional genetic markers, genotyping error rates in SNPs derived from restriction-enzyme-based methods remain largely unknown

  1. Impact of Native and Invasive Earthworm Activity on Forest Soil Organic Matter Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top, Sara; Filley, Timothy

    2010-05-01

    Many northern North American forests are experiencing the introduction of exotic European lumbricid species earthworms with documented losses in litter layers, expansion of A-horizons, loss of the organic horizon, changes in fine root density, and shifts in microbial populations as a result. Some of these forests were previously devoid of these ecosystem engineers. We compare the soil isotope and molecular chemistry from two free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) forest experiments (aspen FACE at Rhinelander, Wisconsin and sweet gum FACE at Oak Ridge National Lab, Tennessee) that lie within the zones of earthworm invasion. These sites exhibit differences in amounts of exotic and native species as well as endogeic (predominantly mineral soil dwelling) and epigeic (litter and organic matter horizon dwelling) types. We investigated the impact of earthworm activity by tracking the relative abundance and stable carbon isotope compositions of lignin and substituted fatty acids extracted from isolated earthworms and their fecal pellets and from host soils. Additionally, 15N-labeled additions to the soil provide additional methods for tracking earthworm impacts. Indications of root vs leaf input to earthworm casts and fecal matter were derived from differences in the chemical composition of cutin, suberin, and lignin. The isotopically depleted CO2 used in FACE and the resulting isotopically depleted plant organic matter afford an excellent opportunity to assess biopolymer-specific turnover dynamics. We find that endogeic species are proportionately more responsible for fine root cycling while some epigeic species are responsible for microaggregation of foliar cutin. CSIA of fecal pellet lignin and SFA indicate how these biopolymer pools can be derived from variable sources, roots, background soil, foliar tissue within one earthworm. Additionally, CSIA indicates the distinct roles that different earthworm types have in "aging" surface soil biopolymer pools through encapsulation and

  2. Impacts of Carpobrotus edulis (L. N.E.Br. on the germination, establishment and survival of native plants: a clue for assessing its competitive strength.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Novoa

    Full Text Available Does Carpobrotus edulis have an impact on native plants? How do C. edulis' soil residual effects affect the maintenance of native populations? What is the extent of interspecific competition in its invasion process? In order to answer those questions, we established pure and mixed cultures of native species and C. edulis on soil collected from invaded and native areas of Mediterranean coastal dunes in the Iberian Peninsula. We examined the impact of the invader on the germination, growth and survival of seeds and adult plants of two native plant species (Malcolmia littorea (L. R.Br, and Scabiosa atropurpurea L. growing with ramets or seeds of C. edulis. Residual effects of C. edulis on soils affected the germination process and early growth of native plants in different ways, depending on plant species and density. Interspecific competition significantly reduced the germination and early growth of native plants but this result was soil, density, timing and plant species dependent. Also, at any density of adult individuals of C. edulis, established native adult plants were not competitive. Moreover, ramets of C. edulis had a lethal effect on native plants, which died in a short period of time. Even the presence of C. edulis seedlings prevents the recruitment of native species. In conclusion, C. edulis have strong negative impacts on the germination, growth and survival of the native species M. littorea and S. atropurpurea. These impacts were highly depended on the development stages of native and invasive plants. Our findings are crucial for new strategies of biodiversity conservation in coastal habitats.

  3. Invasive rats on tropical islands: Their population biology and impacts on native species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant A. Harper

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The three most invasive rat species, black or ship rat Rattus rattus, brown or Norway rats, R. norvegicus and Pacific rat, R. exulans have been incrementally introduced to islands as humans have explored the world’s oceans. They have caused serious deleterious effects through predation and competition, and extinction of many species on tropical islands, many of which are biodiversity hotspots. All three rat species are found in virtually all habitat types, including mangrove and arid shrub land. Black rats tend to dominate the literature but despite this the population biology of invasive rats, particularly Norway rats, is poorly researched on tropical islands. Pacific rats can often exceed population densities of well over 100 rats ha−1 and black rats can attain densities of 119 rats ha−1, which is much higher than recorded on most temperate islands. High densities are possibly due to high recruitment of young although the data to support this are limited. The generally aseasonally warm climate can lead to year-round breeding but can be restricted by either density-dependent effects interacting with resource constraints often due to aridity. Apparent adverse impacts on birds have been well recorded and almost all tropical seabirds and land birds can be affected by rats. On the Pacific islands, black rats have added to declines and extinctions of land birds caused initially by Pacific rats. Rats have likely caused unrecorded extinctions of native species on tropical islands. Further research required on invasive rats on tropical islands includes the drivers of population growth and carrying capacities that result in high densities and how these differ to temperate islands, habitat use of rats in tropical vegetation types and interactions with other tropical species, particularly the reptiles and invertebrates, including crustaceans.

  4. Effects of Hybrid and Non-hybrid Epichloë Endophytes and Their Associated Host Genotypes on the Response of a Native Grass to Varying Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Tong; Oberhofer, Martina; Shymanovich, Tatsiana; Faeth, Stanley H

    2016-07-01

    Asexual Epichloë endophytes are prevalent in cool season grasses, and many are of hybrid origin. Hybridization of asexual endophytes is thought to provide a rapid influx of genetic variation that may be adaptive to endophyte-host grass symbiota in stressful environments. For Arizona fescue (Festuca arizonica), hybrid symbiota are commonly found in resource-poor environments, whereas non-hybrid symbiota are more common in resource-rich environments. There have been very few experimental tests where infection, hybrid and non-hybrid status, and plant genotype have been controlled to tease apart their effects on host phenotype and fitness in different environments. We conducted a greenhouse experiment where hybrid (H) and non-hybrid (NH) endophytes were inoculated into plant genotypes that were originally uninfected (E-) or once infected with either the H or NH endophytes. Nine endophyte and plant genotypic group combinations were grown under low and high water and nutrient treatments. Inoculation with the resident H endophyte enhanced growth and altered allocation to roots and shoots, but these effects were greatest in resource-rich environments, contrary to expectations. We found no evidence of co-adaptation between endophyte species and their associated host genotypes. However, naturally E- plants performed better when inoculated with the hybrid endophyte, suggesting these plants were derived from H infected lineages. Our results show complex interactions between endophyte species of hybrid and non-hybrid origin with their host plant genotypes and environmental factors.

  5. Biological impacts of "hot-spot" mutations of hepatitis B virus X proteins are genotype B and C differentiated

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Lin; Xiao Xu; Qing-Ling Huang; Yu-Qing Liu; Da-Li Zheng; Wan-Nan Chen; Jian-Yin Lin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the biological impacts of "hot-spot"mutations on genotype B and C HBV X proteins (HBx).METHODS: Five types of"hot-spot" mutations of genotype B or C HBV X genes, which sequentially lead to the amino acid substitutions of HBx as I127T, F132Y, K130M+V131I,I127T+K130M+V131I, or K130M+V131I+F132Y, respectively,were generated by means of site-directed mutagenesis.To evaluate the anti-proliferative effects, HBx or related mutants' expression vectors were transfected separately to the Chang cells by lipofectamine, and the cells were cultured in hygromycin selective medium for 14 d, drug-resistant colonies were fixed with cold methanol, stained with Giemsa dyes and scored (increase of the colonies indicated the reduction of the anti-proliferation activity,and vice versa). Different types of HBx expression vectors were co-transfected separately with the reporter plasmid pCMVβ to Chang cells, which were lysed 48 h post-transfection and the intra-cellular β-galactosidase activities were monitored (increase of the β-galactosidase activities indicated the reduction of the transactivation activity, and vice versa). All data obtained were calculated by paired-samples t-test.RESULTS: As compared to standard genotype B HBx,mutants of I127T and I127T+K130M+V131I showed higher transactivation and anti-proliferative activities, while the mutants of F132Y, K130M+V131I, and K130M+V131I+F132Y showed lower activities. As compared to standard genotype C HBx, I127T mutant showed higher transactivation activity, while the other four types of mutants showed no differences. With regard to anti-proliferative activity,compared to standard genotype C HBx, F132Y and K130M+V131I mutants showed lower activities, and K130M+V131I +F132Y mutant, on the other hand, showed higher activity,while the mutants of I127T and I127T+K130M+V131I showed no differences.CONCLUSION: "Hot-spot" mutations affect the antiproliferation and transactivation activities of genotype B and/or C HBx, and

  6. Avian malaria Plasmodium relictum in native Hawaiian forest birds: epizootiology and demographic impacts on ‵apapane Himatione sanguinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Carter T.; Samuel, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    The role of introduced avian malaria Plasmodium relictum in the decline and extinction of native Hawaiian forest birds has become a classic example of the potential effect of invasive diseases on biological diversity of naïve populations. However, empirical evidence describing the impact of avian malaria on fitness of Hawai‵i's endemic forest birds is limited, making it difficult to determine the importance of disease among the suite of potential limiting factors affecting the distribution and abundance of this threatened avifauna. We combined epidemiological force-of-infection with multistate capture––recapture models to evaluate a 7-year longitudinal study of avian malaria in ‵apapane, a relatively common native honeycreeper within mid-elevation Hawaiian forests. We found that malaria transmission was seasonal in this mid-elevation forest; transmission peaked during fall and during some years produced epizootic mortality events. Estimated annual mortality of hatch-year birds typically exceeded 50% and mortality of adults exceeded 25% during epizootics. The substantial impact of avian malaria on this relatively common native species demonstrates the key role this disease has played in the decline and extinction of Hawaiian forest birds.

  7. The Landscape Ecological Impact of Afforestation on the British Uplands and Some Initiatives to Restore Native Woodland Cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunce Robert G. H.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The majority of forest cover in the British Uplands had been lost by the beginning of the Nineteenth Century, because of felling followed by overgrazing by sheep and deer. The situation remained unchanged until a government policy of afforestation, mainly by exotic conifers, after the First World War up to the present day. This paper analyses the distribution of these predominantly coniferous plantations, and shows how they occupy specific parts of upland landscapes in different zones throughout Britain Whilst some landscapes are dominated by these new forests, elsewhere the blocks of trees are more localised. Although these forests virtually eliminate native ground vegetation, except in rides and unplanted land, the major negative impacts are at the landscape level. For example, drainage systems are altered and ancient cultural landscape patterns are destroyed. These impacts are summarised and possible ways of amelioration are discussed. By contrast, in recent years, a series of projects have been set up to restore native forest cover, as opposed to the extensive plantations of exotic species. Accordingly, the paper then provides three examples of such initiatives designed to restore native forests to otherwise bare landscapes, as well as setting them into a policy context. Whilst such projects cover a limited proportion of the British Uplands they nevertheless restore forest to landscapes at a local level.

  8. Overview of the Distribution, Habitat Association and Impact of Exotic Ants on Native Ant Communities in New Caledonia.

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    Maïa Berman

    Full Text Available Ants are among the most ubiquitous and harmful invaders worldwide, but there are few regional studies of their relationships with habitat and native ant communities. New Caledonia has a unique and diverse ant fauna that is threatened by exotic ants, but broad-scale patterns of exotic and native ant community composition in relation to habitat remain poorly documented. We conducted a systematic baiting survey of 56 sites representing the main New Caledonian habitat types: rainforest on ultramafic soils (15 sites, rainforest on volcano-sedimentary soils (13, maquis shrubland (15, Melaleuca-dominated savannas (11 and Acacia spirorbis thickets (2. We collected a total of 49 species, 13 of which were exotic. Only five sites were free of exotic species, and these were all rainforest. The five most abundant exotic species differed in their habitat association, with Pheidole megacephala associated with rainforests, Brachymyrmex cf. obscurior with savanna, and Wasmannia auropunctata and Nylanderia vaga present in most habitats. Anoplolepis gracilipes occurred primarily in maquis-shrubland, which contrasts with its rainforest affinity elsewhere. Multivariate analysis of overall ant species composition showed strong differentiation of sites according to the distribution of exotic species, and these patterns were maintained at the genus and functional group levels. Native ant composition differed at invaded versus uninvaded rainforest sites, in the absence of differences in habitat variables. Generalised Myrmicinae and Forest Opportunists were particularly affected by invasion. There was a strong negative relationship between the abundance of W. auropunctata and native ant abundance and richness. This emphasizes that, in addition to dominating many ant communities numerically, some exotic species, and in particular W. auropunctata, have a marked impact on native ant communities.

  9. Overview of the Distribution, Habitat Association and Impact of Exotic Ants on Native Ant Communities in New Caledonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Maïa; Andersen, Alan N; Hély, Christelle; Gaucherel, Cédric

    2013-01-01

    Ants are among the most ubiquitous and harmful invaders worldwide, but there are few regional studies of their relationships with habitat and native ant communities. New Caledonia has a unique and diverse ant fauna that is threatened by exotic ants, but broad-scale patterns of exotic and native ant community composition in relation to habitat remain poorly documented. We conducted a systematic baiting survey of 56 sites representing the main New Caledonian habitat types: rainforest on ultramafic soils (15 sites), rainforest on volcano-sedimentary soils (13), maquis shrubland (15), Melaleuca-dominated savannas (11) and Acacia spirorbis thickets (2). We collected a total of 49 species, 13 of which were exotic. Only five sites were free of exotic species, and these were all rainforest. The five most abundant exotic species differed in their habitat association, with Pheidole megacephala associated with rainforests, Brachymyrmex cf. obscurior with savanna, and Wasmannia auropunctata and Nylanderia vaga present in most habitats. Anoplolepis gracilipes occurred primarily in maquis-shrubland, which contrasts with its rainforest affinity elsewhere. Multivariate analysis of overall ant species composition showed strong differentiation of sites according to the distribution of exotic species, and these patterns were maintained at the genus and functional group levels. Native ant composition differed at invaded versus uninvaded rainforest sites, in the absence of differences in habitat variables. Generalised Myrmicinae and Forest Opportunists were particularly affected by invasion. There was a strong negative relationship between the abundance of W. auropunctata and native ant abundance and richness. This emphasizes that, in addition to dominating many ant communities numerically, some exotic species, and in particular W. auropunctata, have a marked impact on native ant communities.

  10. Successful treatment of an MTBE-impacted aquifer using a bioreactor self-colonized by native aquifer bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Kristin A; Schmidt, Radomir; Nickelsen, Michael G; Boyle, Susan L; Baker, Jeffrey M; Tornatore, Paul M; Hristova, Krassimira R; Scow, Kate M

    2014-02-01

    A field-scale fixed bed bioreactor was used to successfully treat an MTBE-contaminated aquifer in North Hollywood, CA without requiring inoculation with introduced bacteria. Native bacteria from the MTBE-impacted aquifer rapidly colonized the bioreactor, entering the bioreactor in the contaminated groundwater pumped from the site, and biodegraded MTBE with greater than 99 % removal efficiency. DNA sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene identified MTBE-degrading bacteria Methylibium petroleiphilum in the bioreactor. Quantitative PCR showed M. petroleiphilum enriched by three orders of magnitude in the bioreactor above densities pre-existing in the groundwater. Because treatment was carried out by indigenous rather than introduced organisms, regulatory approval was obtained for implementation of a full-scale bioreactor to continue treatment of the aquifer. In addition, after confirmation of MTBE removal in the bioreactor to below maximum contaminant limit levels (MCL; MTBE = 5 μg L(-1)), treated water was approved for reinjection back into the aquifer rather than requiring discharge to a water treatment system. This is the first treatment system in California to be approved for reinjection of biologically treated effluent into a drinking water aquifer. This study demonstrated the potential for using native microbial communities already present in the aquifer as an inoculum for ex-situ bioreactors, circumventing the need to establish non-native, non-acclimated and potentially costly inoculants. Understanding and harnessing the metabolic potential of native organisms circumvents some of the issues associated with introducing non-native organisms into drinking water aquifers, and can provide a low-cost and efficient remediation technology that can streamline future bioremediation approval processes.

  11. The effects of an invasive seaweed on native communities vary along a gradient of land-based human impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Bulleri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The difficulty in teasing apart the effects of biological invasions from those of other anthropogenic perturbations has hampered our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning the global biodiversity crisis. The recent elaboration of global-scale maps of cumulative human impacts provides a unique opportunity to assess how the impact of invaders varies among areas exposed to different anthropogenic activities. A recent meta-analysis has shown that the effects of invasive seaweeds on native biota tend to be more negative in relatively pristine than in human-impacted environments. Here, we tested this hypothesis through the experimental removal of the invasive green seaweed, Caulerpa cylindracea, from rocky reefs across the Mediterranean Sea. More specifically, we assessed which out of land-based and sea-based cumulative impact scores was a better predictor of the direction and magnitude of the effects of this seaweed on extant and recovering native assemblages. Approximately 15 months after the start of the experiment, the removal of C. cylindracea from extant assemblages enhanced the cover of canopy-forming macroalgae at relatively pristine sites. This did not, however, result in major changes in total cover or species richness of native assemblages. Preventing C. cylindracea re-invasion of cleared plots at pristine sites promoted the recovery of canopy-forming and encrusting macroalgae and hampered that of algal turfs, ultimately resulting in increased species richness. These effects weakened progressively with increasing levels of land-based human impacts and, indeed, shifted in sign at the upper end of the gradient investigated. Thus, at sites exposed to intense disturbance from land-based human activities, the removal of C. cylindracea fostered the cover of algal turfs and decreased that of encrusting algae, with no net effect on species richness. Our results suggests that competition from C. cylindracea is an important determinant of

  12. The effects of an invasive seaweed on native communities vary along a gradient of land-based human impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulleri, Fabio; Badalamenti, Fabio; Iveša, Ljiljana; Mikac, Barbara; Musco, Luigi; Jaklin, Andrej; Rattray, Alex; Vega Fernández, Tomás; Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro

    2016-01-01

    The difficulty in teasing apart the effects of biological invasions from those of other anthropogenic perturbations has hampered our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning the global biodiversity crisis. The recent elaboration of global-scale maps of cumulative human impacts provides a unique opportunity to assess how the impact of invaders varies among areas exposed to different anthropogenic activities. A recent meta-analysis has shown that the effects of invasive seaweeds on native biota tend to be more negative in relatively pristine than in human-impacted environments. Here, we tested this hypothesis through the experimental removal of the invasive green seaweed, Caulerpa cylindracea, from rocky reefs across the Mediterranean Sea. More specifically, we assessed which out of land-based and sea-based cumulative impact scores was a better predictor of the direction and magnitude of the effects of this seaweed on extant and recovering native assemblages. Approximately 15 months after the start of the experiment, the removal of C. cylindracea from extant assemblages enhanced the cover of canopy-forming macroalgae at relatively pristine sites. This did not, however, result in major changes in total cover or species richness of native assemblages. Preventing C. cylindracea re-invasion of cleared plots at pristine sites promoted the recovery of canopy-forming and encrusting macroalgae and hampered that of algal turfs, ultimately resulting in increased species richness. These effects weakened progressively with increasing levels of land-based human impacts and, indeed, shifted in sign at the upper end of the gradient investigated. Thus, at sites exposed to intense disturbance from land-based human activities, the removal of C. cylindracea fostered the cover of algal turfs and decreased that of encrusting algae, with no net effect on species richness. Our results suggests that competition from C. cylindracea is an important determinant of benthic assemblage

  13. Soil chemicals properties and wheat genotype impact on micronutrient and toxic elements content in wheat integral flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krunoslav Karalić

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim To determine impact of soil chemical properties and different wheat genotypes in Croatia on micronutrient and toxic elements content in wheat integral flour. Methods Research was conducted and soil samples were collected from two different production areas in the Republic of Croatia: Ovčara and Dalj. Besides soil samples, grain samples of four different Croatian wheat genotypes were also collected and analyzed. In total, 40 samples of soil and 40 samples of wheat grain were analysed for total (aqua regia and plant available (EDTA extraction heavy metal content of Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd. Results Determined soil pHKCl ranged from 5.63 to 6.25 at Ovčara and from 6.95 to 7.37 at Dalj sampling sites. The highest total concentration of heavy metals in soil were determined for Fe, followed by Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb and the lowest total concentration wasrecorded for Cd. The highest EDTA concentrations in soil were determined for Mn, than followed by Fe, Cu, Pb, and the lowest EDTA concentration was recorded for Cd. The highest concentration in integral wheat flour was found for Fe, than lower for Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb and the lowest concentration was found for Cd. If consumers in Croatia used daily 203 g of bread made of integral flour, they would take 2.31 to 8.44 µg Cd daily, depending on soil and wheat genotype.Conclusion The analysed soil and winter wheat genotypes have significant impact on potential daily intake of toxic and essentialheavy metals by integral flour or bread.

  14. The Presence or Absence of Definiteness in the Native Language and Its Impact on ESL Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Melhim Abdel-Rahman

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if first language interference does play a significant role in the use of articles in English by native speakers of Arabic as compared to other ESL learners. An error analysis was conducted on the use of English articles in essays taken from two groups of advanced ESL learners. The essays were composed by…

  15. Hepatitis B virus genotype has no impact on hepatitis B e antigen seroconversion after lamivudine treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Henry Lik-Yuen Chan; May-Ling Wong; Alex Yui Hui; Angel Mei-Ling Chim; Ada Mei-Ling Tse; Lawrence Cheung-Tsui Hung; Francis Ka-Leung Chan; Joseph Jao-Yiu Sung

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype and HBeAg seroconversion after nucleotide analogue treatment.METHODS: Chronic hepatitis B patients receiving lamivudine followed up for at least 6 months post-treatment were studied. Consecutive treatment-naive patients who were prospectively followed up in the clinic for at least 18 months were studied as controls. HBeAg seroconversion was defined as loss of HBeAg, appearance of anti-HBe and normalization of alanine aminotransferase for at least 6 months.RESULTS: Thirty-five patients on lamivudine and 96 control patients followed up for 39 (18-49) months were studied.Lamivudine was given for 12 (10-18) months, and patients were followed up for 15 (6-34) months after drug cessation.Genotype B and C HBV were found in 43 and 88 patients and HBeAg seroconversion occurred in 12 (28 %) and 16(18 %) patients, respectively (P=0.30). There was no difference in HBeAg seroconversion between patients infected by genotype B and C HBV in the control (35 % vs 21%, P=0.25) and lamivudine-treated (14 % vs 10 %,P=1.00) groups.CONCLUSION: HBeAg seroconversion after treatment by lamivudine was not influenced by the HBV genotype.

  16. Impact of genotype on clinical course in arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy-associated mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhonsale, Aditya; Groeneweg, Judith A.; James, Cynthia A.; Dooijes, Dennis; Tichnell, Crystal; Jongbloed, Jan D. H.; Murray, Brittney; Riele, Anneline S. J. M. te; van den Berg, Maarten P.; Bikker, Hennie; Atsma, Douwe E.; de Groot, Natasja M.; Houweling, Arjan C.; van der Heijden, Jeroen F.; Russell, Stuart D.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; van Veen, Toon A.; Tandri, Harikrishna; Wilde, Arthur A.; Judge, Daniel P.; van Tintelen, J. Peter; Calkins, Hugh; Hauer, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: We sought to determine the influence of genotype on clinical course and arrhythmic outcome among arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C)-associated mutation carriers. METHODS AND RESULTS: Pathogenic mutations in desmosomal and non-desmosomal genes were identified in

  17. Synergistic impacts by an invasive amphipod and an invasive fish explain native gammarid extinction

    OpenAIRE

    Beggel, S.; Brandner, J.; Cerwenka, A. F.; Geist, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Worldwide freshwater ecosystems are increasingly affected by invasive alien species. In particular, Ponto-Caspian gobiid fishes and amphipods are suspected to have pronounced effects on aquatic food webs. However, there is a lack of systematic studies mechanistically testing the potential synergistic effects of invasive species on native fauna. In this study we investigated the interrelations between the invasive amphipod Dikerogammarus villosus and the invasive fish species Neogob...

  18. Impact of adaptive functioning on readmission to alcohol detoxification among Alaska Native People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Running Bear, Ursula; Anderson, Heather; Manson, Spero M; Shore, Jay H; Prochazka, Allan V; Novins, Douglas K

    2014-07-01

    This study examined predictors associated with readmission to detoxification in a sample of adult Alaska Native patients admitted to inpatient alcohol detoxification. Even though Alaska Native people diagnosed with alcoholism have been identified as frequent utilizers of the health care system and at elevated risk of death, little is known about factors associated with readmission to detoxification for this group. We sought to predict readmission using a retrospective cohort study. The sample included 383 adult Alaska Native patients admitted to an inpatient detoxification unit and diagnosed with alcohol withdrawal during 2006 and 2007. Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to estimate unadjusted and adjusted associations with time to readmission within one year. Forty-two percent of the patients were readmitted within one year. Global Assessment Functioning (GAF; Axis V in the multi-axial diagnostic system of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders [DSM IV]) score measured at the time of intake was associated with readmission. A one point increase in the GAF score (HR=.96, 95% CL=.94, .99, P=.002) was associated with a four percent decrease in readmission. The results also indicated that the GAF mediated the relationship between readmission and: employment and housing status. The GAF measures both illness severity and adaptive functioning, is part of standard behavioral health assessments, and is easy to score. Readmission rates potentially could be decreased by creating clinical protocols that account for differences in adaptive functioning and illness severity during detoxification treatment and aftercare. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of osmotic stress on seedling growth observations, membrane characteristics and antioxidant defense system of different wheat genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bardees M. Mickky

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to find out a straightforward technique for screening the tolerance of ten wheat genotypes to two levels of osmotic stress at early seedling stage. Data revealed that polyethylene glycol-induced drought had general negative effect on seedling morphological characters indicated by plumule and radicle length, number of adventitious roots as well as seedling biomass and water content. Water deficit could also suppress membrane integrity by stimulating lipid peroxidation with marked increase in membrane leakage and subsequent decrease in its stability index. For all the addressed germination parameters and seedling membrane features, the impact of severe drought was more pronounced than that of moderate drought. Simultaneously, moderate stress could activate peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase and ascorbic peroxidase of the studied genotypes; but these enzymes were inhibited by severe stress. The activity of catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase was conversely retarded by drought whether at moderate or severe level. More interestingly, a novel function “Stress Impact Index; SII” was introduced to rank the estimated morpho-physiological traits (SIItrait as well as the considered genotypes (SIIgenotype according to their sensitivity to stress. Values of SIItrait implied that germination parameters were generally affected by drought more intensively than membrane characteristics and finally came the antioxidant enzymes with the least degree of suppression when applying stress. Based on the magnitudes of SIIgenotype, Sids 13 seemed to be the most drought-tolerant wheat cultivar while Shandawel 1 could be the most sensitive one at their juvenile growth stage.

  20. The impact of low-carbohydrate diet on glycemic control in Native Americans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairi S

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Shafaq Khairi,1 Babak Torabi Sagvand,2 Syed Kamal Nasser3 1Southeastern Regional Physician Services, Lumberton, NC, 2Neuroendocrine Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 3Southeastern Regional Medical Center, Lumberton, NC, USA Abstract: Many studies have shown that a low-carbohydrate diet (LCD is a safe and effective intervention to improve glycemic control. However, published data are limited regarding the use of carbohydrate restriction in the treatment and prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM in the Native Americans, in a real-world clinical practice setting. We evaluated the efficacy of an LCD on 50 obese Native Americans with either type 2 DM or impaired fasting blood glucose (IFG in a primary care/obesity medicine practice. The primary intervention was an LCD defined as an intake of <20 g of carbohydrates per day. The intervention involved providing an educational handout and behavioral counseling assisted by a dedicated weight loss coordinator. We evaluated the effects of this intervention on hemoglobin A1c, body weight, blood pressure, and lipid parameters. The subjects were evaluated at baseline and 6 months. The subjects underwent additional safety and counseling visits throughout the study. Subjects were considered completers if they had baseline and 6-month measurements. The mean age was 55.0±10.9 years, and 66.7% were female. Subjects had significant improvements in hemoglobin A1c (-1.4%±0.9%, in subjects with DM, P<0.0001, fasting blood glucose (-15±4.9 mg/dL, in subjects with IFG, P<0.0001, and body mass index (-4.0±1.7 kg/m2, P<0.0001. An LCD can lead to clinically and statistically significant improvement in glycemic control and body weight among obese subjects with type 2 DM or IFG over a 6-month period. The results suggest that carbohydrate restriction can be an effective real-world intervention in a primarily Native American clinical practice. However, further studies are needed

  1. Habitat connectivity and resident shared predators determine the impact of invasive bullfrogs on native frogs in farm ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atobe, Takashi; Osada, Yutaka; Takeda, Hayato; Kuroe, Misako; Miyashita, Tadashi

    2014-07-07

    Habitat connectivity is considered to have an important role on the persistence of populations in the face of habitat fragmentation, in particular, for species with conservation concern. However, it can also impose indirect negative effects on native species through the spread of invasive species. Here, we investigated direct and indirect effects of habitat connectivity on populations of invasive bullfrogs and native wrinkled frogs and how these effects are modified by the presence of common carp, a resident shared predator, in a farm pond system in Japan. The distribution pattern analysis using a hierarchical Bayesian modelling indicated that bullfrogs had negative effects on wrinkled frogs, and that these negative effects were enhanced with increasing habitat connectivity owing to the metapopulation structure of bullfrogs. The analysis also suggested that common carp mitigated these impacts, presumably owing to a top-down trophic cascade through preferential predation on bullfrog tadpoles. These presumed interspecific interactions were supported by evidence from laboratory experiments, i.e. predation by carp was more intense on bullfrog tadpoles than on wrinkled frog tadpoles owing to the difference in refuge use. Our results indicate that metacommunity perspectives could provide useful insights for establishing effective management strategies of invasive species living in patchy habitats.

  2. Impact of the CYP2D6 genotype on post-operative intravenous oxycodone analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, S T; Enggaard, T P; Mikkelsen, S

    2009-01-01

    Background: Oxycodone is a semi-synthetic opioid with a mu-receptor agonist-mediated effect in several pain conditions, including post-operative pain. Oxycodone is metabolized to its active metabolite oxymorphone by O-demethylation via the polymorphic CYP2D6. The aim of this study was to investig......Background: Oxycodone is a semi-synthetic opioid with a mu-receptor agonist-mediated effect in several pain conditions, including post-operative pain. Oxycodone is metabolized to its active metabolite oxymorphone by O-demethylation via the polymorphic CYP2D6. The aim of this study...... for the first time in patients that the oxymorphone formation depends on CYP2D6, but we found no difference in the post-operative analgesic effect of intravenous oxycodone between the two CYP2D6 genotypes....

  3. The impact of mineralocorticoid receptor ISO/VAL genotype (rs5522) and stress on reward learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, R; Perlis, R H; Fagerness, J; Pizzagalli, D A

    2010-08-01

    Research suggests that stress disrupts reinforcement learning and induces anhedonia. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) determines the sensitivity of the stress response, and the missense iso/val polymorphism (Ile180Val, rs5522) of the MR gene (NR3C2) has been associated with enhanced physiological stress responses, elevated depressive symptoms and reduced cortisol-induced MR gene expression. The goal of these studies was to evaluate whether rs5522 genotype and stress independently and interactively influence reward learning. In study 1, participants (n = 174) completed a probabilistic reward task under baseline (i.e. no-stress) conditions. In study 2, participants (n = 53) completed the task during a stress (threat-of-shock) and no-stress condition. Reward learning, i.e. the ability to modulate behavior as a function of reinforcement history, was the main variable of interest. In study 1, in which participants were evaluated under no-stress conditions, reward learning was enhanced in val carriers. In study 2, participants developed a weaker response bias toward a more frequently rewarded stimulus under the stress relative to no-stress condition. Critically, stress-induced reward learning deficits were largest in val carriers. Although preliminary and in need of replication due to small sample size, findings indicate that psychiatrically healthy individuals carrying the MR val allele, gene, which has been recently linked to depression, showed a reduced ability to modulate behavior as a function of reward when facing an acute, uncontrollable stressor. Future studies are warranted to evaluate whether rs5522 genotype interacts with naturalistic stressors to increase the risk of depression and whether stress-induced anhedonia might moderate such risk.

  4. ECOLOGICAL IMPACT ON NATIVE BEES BY THE INVASIVE AFRICANIZED HONEY BEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROUBIK DAVID

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT

    Very little effort has been made to investigate bee population dynamics among intact wilderness areas. The presence of newly-arrived feral Africanized honey bee (AHB, Apis mellifera (Apidae, populations was studied for 10-17 years in areas previously with few or no escaped European apiary honey bees. Here I describe and interpret the major results from studies in three neotropical forests: French Guiana, Panama and Yucatan, Mexico (5° to 19° N. latitude. The exotic Africanized honey bees did not produce a negative effect on native bees, including species that were solitary or highly eusocial. Major differences over time were found in honey bee abundance on flowers near habitat experiencing the greatest degree of disturbance, compared to deep forest areas. At the population level, sampled at nest blocks, or at flower patches, or at light traps, there was no sudden decline in bees after AHB arrival, and relatively steady or sinusoidal population dynamics. However, the native bees shifted their foraging time or floral species. A principal conclusion is that such competition is silent, in floristically rich habitats, because bees compensate behaviorally for competition. Other factors limit their populations.

    Key words: Africanized honey bee, native bees, competition, population dynamics, neotropical forests

    RESUMEN Pocos estudios han considerado la dinámica de poblaciones de abejas en bosques o hábitats no alterados por el hombre. La presencia de abejas silvestres Africanizadas de Apis mellifera (Apidae fue estudiado por 10-17 años en áreas previamente sin esta especie. Aquí presento e interpreto resultados de tres bosques neotropicales: Guyana Francesa, Panamá y Yucatán, México (5° a 19° N. latitud. La abeja Africanizada exótica no produjo efecto negativo en las abejas nativas, incluyendo especies altamente sociales y solitarias. Diferencias mayores a través del tiempo fueron encontradas en

  5. Impact of FTO genotypes on BMI and weight in polycystic ovary syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, P; Lipowska, A; Rys, P; Ewens, K G; Franks, S; Tan, S; Lerchbaum, E; Vcelak, J; Attaoua, R; Straczkowski, M; Azziz, R; Barber, T M; Hinney, A; Obermayer-Pietsch, B; Lukasova, P; Bendlova, B; Grigorescu, F; Kowalska, I; Goodarzi, M O; Strauss, J F; McCarthy, M I; Malecki, M T

    2012-10-01

    FTO gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been shown to be associated with obesity-related traits and type 2 diabetes. Several small studies have suggested a greater than expected effect of the FTO rs9939609 SNP on weight in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). We therefore aimed to examine the impact of FTO genotype on BMI and weight in PCOS. A systematic search of medical databases (PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane CENTRAL) was conducted up to the end of April 2011. Seven studies describing eight distinct PCOS cohorts were retrieved; seven were genotyped for SNP rs9939609 and one for SNP rs1421085. The per allele effect on BMI and body weight increase was calculated and subjected to meta-analysis. A total of 2,548 women with PCOS were included in the study; 762 were TT homozygotes, 1,253 had an AT/CT genotype, and 533 were AA/CC homozygotes. Each additional copy of the effect allele (A/C) increased the BMI by a mean of 0.19 z score units (95% CI 0.13, 0.24; p = 2.26 × 10(-11)) and body weight by a mean of 0.20 z score units (95% CI 0.14, 0.26; p = 1.02 × 10(-10)). This translated into an approximately 3.3 kg/m(2) increase in BMI and an approximately 9.6 kg gain in body weight between TT and AA/CC homozygotes. The association between FTO genotypes and BMI was stronger in the cohorts with PCOS than in the general female populations from large genome-wide association studies. Deviation from an additive genetic model was observed in heavier populations. The effect of FTO SNPs on obesity-related traits in PCOS seems to be more than two times greater than the effect found in large population-based studies. This suggests an interaction between FTO and the metabolic context or polygenic background of PCOS.

  6. THE IMPACT OF ACTIVE LEARNING APPROACH ON IMPROVING THE READING SKILLS IN NATIVE LANGUAGE TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Güneyli

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effectiveness of active learning approach in native language education has been emphasized. This research is an experimental one that is used by Turkish Teaching organized by active learning approach for determining learning levels of the students concerning their reading comprehension skills. Data have been obtained by utilizing “Turkish Reading Comprehension Skill Test”. The research was conducted at fifth class level in ªehit Tuncer and Geçitkale primary schools by getting permission from Ministry of Education and it lasted for fourteen weeks in the second term of 2005-2006 education semester. In Turkish teaching, there is a meaningful difference in favor of the active learning group between the experiment group’s (that active learning approach is applied to and control group’s (that traditional method is applied to average of the reading comprehension skill points. The results of the study indicated that the active learning approach is more effective than the traditional approach.

  7. Obesity and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Population Profiles > Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Obesity Obesity and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders Native Hawaiians/Pacific ... youthonline . [Accessed 05/25/2016] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY More than 80 percent of people with type ...

  8. Impact of Stoichiometry Representation on Simulation of Genotype-Phenotype Relationships in Metabolic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochado, Ana Rita; Andrejev, Sergej; Maranas, Costas D.; Patil, Kiran R.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic networks provide a comprehensive structural framework for modeling genotype-phenotype relationships through flux simulations. The solution space for the metabolic flux state of the cell is typically very large and optimization-based approaches are often necessary for predicting the active metabolic state under specific environmental conditions. The objective function to be used in such optimization algorithms is directly linked with the biological hypothesis underlying the model and therefore it is one of the most relevant parameters for successful modeling. Although linear combination of selected fluxes is widely used for formulating metabolic objective functions, we show that the resulting optimization problem is sensitive towards stoichiometry representation of the metabolic network. This undesirable sensitivity leads to different simulation results when using numerically different but biochemically equivalent stoichiometry representations and thereby makes biological interpretation intrinsically subjective and ambiguous. We hereby propose a new method, Minimization of Metabolites Balance (MiMBl), which decouples the artifacts of stoichiometry representation from the formulation of the desired objective functions, by casting objective functions using metabolite turnovers rather than fluxes. By simulating perturbed metabolic networks, we demonstrate that the use of stoichiometry representation independent algorithms is fundamental for unambiguously linking modeling results with biological interpretation. For example, MiMBl allowed us to expand the scope of metabolic modeling in elucidating the mechanistic basis of several genetic interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:23133362

  9. Impact of stoichiometry representation on simulation of genotype-phenotype relationships in metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochado, Ana Rita; Andrejev, Sergej; Maranas, Costas D; Patil, Kiran R

    2012-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic networks provide a comprehensive structural framework for modeling genotype-phenotype relationships through flux simulations. The solution space for the metabolic flux state of the cell is typically very large and optimization-based approaches are often necessary for predicting the active metabolic state under specific environmental conditions. The objective function to be used in such optimization algorithms is directly linked with the biological hypothesis underlying the model and therefore it is one of the most relevant parameters for successful modeling. Although linear combination of selected fluxes is widely used for formulating metabolic objective functions, we show that the resulting optimization problem is sensitive towards stoichiometry representation of the metabolic network. This undesirable sensitivity leads to different simulation results when using numerically different but biochemically equivalent stoichiometry representations and thereby makes biological interpretation intrinsically subjective and ambiguous. We hereby propose a new method, Minimization of Metabolites Balance (MiMBl), which decouples the artifacts of stoichiometry representation from the formulation of the desired objective functions, by casting objective functions using metabolite turnovers rather than fluxes. By simulating perturbed metabolic networks, we demonstrate that the use of stoichiometry representation independent algorithms is fundamental for unambiguously linking modeling results with biological interpretation. For example, MiMBl allowed us to expand the scope of metabolic modeling in elucidating the mechanistic basis of several genetic interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  10. Impacts of non-native plant removal on vertebrates along the Middle Rio Grande (New Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather L. Bateman; Alice Chung-MacCoubrey; Deborah M. Finch; Howard L. Snell; David L. Hawksworth

    2008-01-01

    The Middle Rio Grande and its riparian forest in central New Mexico are the focus of restoration activities to reverse or lessen negative anthropogenic impacts. The riparian forest is the largest gallery cottonwood (Populus deltoides) forest in the Southwest (Hink and Ohmart 1984). Historically, the river was free to meander across the floodplain,...

  11. Impact of Reducing Complement Inhibitor Binding on the Immunogenicity of Native Neisseria meningitidis Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Daniels-Treffandier

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis recruits host human complement inhibitors to its surface to down-regulate complement activation and enhance survival in blood. We have investigated whether such complement inhibitor binding occurs after vaccination with native outer membrane vesicles (nOMVs, and limits immunogenicity of such vaccines. To this end, nOMVs reactogenic lipopolysaccharide was detoxified by deletion of the lpxl1 gene (nOMVlpxl1. nOMVs unable to bind human complement factor H (hfH were generated by additional deletions of the genes encoding factor H binding protein (fHbp and neisserial surface protein A (NspA (nOMVdis. Antibody responses elicited in mice with nOMVdis were compared to those elicited with nOMVlpxl1 in the presence of hfH. Results demonstrate that the administration of human fH to mice immunized with fHbp containing OMVlpxl1 decreased immunogenicity against fHbp (but not against the OMV as a whole. The majority of the OMV-induced bactericidal immune response (OMVlpxl1 or OMVdis was versus PorA. Despite a considerable reduction of hfH binding to nOMVdis, and the absence of the vaccine antigen fHbp, immunogenicity in mice was not different from nOMVlpxl1, in the absence or presence of hfH (serum bactericidal titers of 1:64 vs 1:128 after one dose in the nOMVdis and nOMVlpxl1-immunized groups respectively. Therefore, partial inhibition of fH binding did not enhance immunity in this model.

  12. Impact of host IL28B rs12979860, rs8099917 in interferon responsiveness and advanced liver disease in chronic genotype 3 hepatitis C patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rushna Firdaus

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Genetic polymorphisms near interleukin 28B gene are associated with spontaneous and treatment induced clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of interleukin 28B single nucleotide polymorphism (rs12979860, rs8099917 variability in HCV genotype 3 infected populations. METHODS: 400 hepatitis C seroreactive patients from different population groups in Eastern and North Eastern part of India were assessed for host and viral genotypic analysis. 83 HCV genotype 3 infected patients were administered pegylated interferon- ribavirin therapy. Viral genotyping was performed using nested reverse transcriptase-PCR followed by direct sequencing methods. Host interleukin 28B genotyping was performed using real-time PCR based single nucleotide polymorphism analysis. RESULTS: Out of 400 hepatitis C seroreactive individuals, 73.25% were found to be RNA positive. HCV genotype 3 (65.87% was found to be the major circulating strain in this region followed by genotype 1 (32.08%. rs12979860 CC genotype was significantly associated with sustained virological response in HCV genotype 3 infected population. In patients achieving rapid virological response, favourable CC/TT allele at rs12979860, rs8099917 was found to be predominant at both the alleles at 77%, 73.2% respectively; whereas in case of patients with relapsed HCV infection CT, TG alleles were found to be predominant. Additionally, CC genotypes at rs12979860 were found to be associated with sustained virological response in patients with high viral load (OR = 6.75, 0.05genotypes were found to be predominant in patients with advanced stages of liver disease. CONCLUSION: CC, TT the two favourable markers at SNPs rs12979860 and rs8099917 are strongly associated with sustained virological response

  13. Non-native freshwater fishes in the Iberian Southeast: black list and potential impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima Amat-Trigo

    2015-10-01

    At least, sixteen species had been introduced the Southeast Iberian by the beginning of the 20th century, but the rate of introduction is highly elevated in the last two decades, with the majority of introductions since 2000. Most studies reviewed reported only potential impacts. Failed introductions are poorly documented and existing information is scattered in regional publications, reports and other grey literature. Due to the interbasin water transfers (Tajo-Segura channel, the number of translocated species is high, however, information about these fishes is not regarded by researchers and their potential impacts are neglected. We established a black list with sixteen cited species and nineteen potential invasive species. Additionally, research needs and management priority measures are evaluated.

  14. Impact on parents of hla-dq/dq8 genotyping in healthy children from coeliac families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, M.M.S.; Vriezinga, S.L.; Koletzko, S.; Werkstetter, K.; Castillejo-De Villasante, G.; Shamir, R.; Hartman, C.; Putter, H.; Pal, S.M. van der; Wijmenga, C.; Bravi, E.; Mearin, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the association of coeliac disease and HLA-specificities DQ2 and DQ8, HLA-typing can be used for risk determination of the disease. This study was designed to evaluate the knowledge of parents from coeliac families regarding HLA-typing and the impact of HLA-typing on the perception of the hea

  15. Hybrid vigor between native and introduced salamanders raises new challenges for conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Benjamin M; Shaffer, H Bradley

    2007-10-02

    Hybridization between differentiated lineages can have many different consequences depending on fitness variation among hybrid offspring. When introduced organisms hybridize with natives, the ensuing evolutionary dynamics may substantially complicate conservation decisions. Understanding the fitness consequences of hybridization is an important first step in predicting its evolutionary outcome and conservation impact. Here, we measured natural selection caused by differential viability of hybrid larvae in wild populations where native California Tiger Salamanders (Ambystoma californiense) and introduced Barred Tiger Salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum mavortium) have been hybridizing for 50-60 years. We found strong evidence of hybrid vigor; mixed-ancestry genotypes had higher survival rates than genotypes containing mostly native or mostly introduced alleles. Hybrid vigor may be caused by heterozygote advantage (overdominance) or recombinant hybrid vigor (due to epistasis or complementation). These genetic mechanisms are not mutually exclusive, and we find statistical support for both overdominant and recombinant contributions to hybrid vigor in larval tiger salamanders. Because recombinant homozygous genotypes can breed true, a single highly fit genotype with a mosaic of native and introduced alleles may eventually replace the historically pure California Tiger Salamander (listed as Threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act). The management implications of this outcome are complex: Genetically pure populations may not persist into the future, but average fitness and population viability of admixed California Tiger Salamanders may be enhanced. The ecological consequences for other native species are unknown.

  16. Impact of Hydraulic Well Restoration on Native Bacterial Communities in Drinking Water Wells

    OpenAIRE

    Karwautz, Clemens; Lueders, Tillmann

    2014-01-01

    The microbial monitoring of drinking water production systems is essential to assure water quality and minimize possible risks. However, the comparative impact of microbes from the surrounding aquifer and of those established within drinking water wells on water parameters remains poorly understood. High pressure jetting is a routine method to impede well clogging by fine sediments and also biofilms. In the present study, bacterial communities were investigated in a drinking water production ...

  17. Predicting the impacts of climate change on the potential distribution of major native non-food bioenergy plants in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenguo Wang

    Full Text Available Planting non-food bioenergy crops on marginal lands is an alternative bioenergy development solution in China. Native non-food bioenergy plants are also considered to be a wise choice to reduce the threat of invasive plants. In this study, the impacts of climate change (a consensus of IPCC scenarios A2a for 2080 on the potential distribution of nine non-food bioenergy plants native to China (viz., Pistacia chinensis, Cornus wilsoniana, Xanthoceras sorbifolia, Vernicia fordii, Sapium sebiferum, Miscanthus sinensis, M. floridulus, M. sacchariflorus and Arundo donax were analyzed using a MaxEnt species distribution model. The suitable habitats of the nine non-food plants were distributed in the regions east of the Mongolian Plateau and the Tibetan Plateau, where the arable land is primarily used for food production. Thus, the large-scale cultivation of those plants for energy production will have to rely on the marginal lands. The variables of "precipitation of the warmest quarter" and "annual mean temperature" were the most important bioclimatic variables for most of the nine plants according to the MaxEnt modeling results. Global warming in coming decades may result in a decrease in the extent of suitable habitat in the tropics but will have little effect on the total distribution area of each plant. The results indicated that it will be possible to grow these plants on marginal lands within these areas in the future. This work should be beneficial for the domestication and cultivation of those bioenergy plants and should facilitate land-use planning for bioenergy crops in China.

  18. Predicting the impacts of climate change on the potential distribution of major native non-food bioenergy plants in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenguo; Tang, Xiaoyu; Zhu, Qili; Pan, Ke; Hu, Qichun; He, Mingxiong; Li, Jiatang

    2014-01-01

    Planting non-food bioenergy crops on marginal lands is an alternative bioenergy development solution in China. Native non-food bioenergy plants are also considered to be a wise choice to reduce the threat of invasive plants. In this study, the impacts of climate change (a consensus of IPCC scenarios A2a for 2080) on the potential distribution of nine non-food bioenergy plants native to China (viz., Pistacia chinensis, Cornus wilsoniana, Xanthoceras sorbifolia, Vernicia fordii, Sapium sebiferum, Miscanthus sinensis, M. floridulus, M. sacchariflorus and Arundo donax) were analyzed using a MaxEnt species distribution model. The suitable habitats of the nine non-food plants were distributed in the regions east of the Mongolian Plateau and the Tibetan Plateau, where the arable land is primarily used for food production. Thus, the large-scale cultivation of those plants for energy production will have to rely on the marginal lands. The variables of "precipitation of the warmest quarter" and "annual mean temperature" were the most important bioclimatic variables for most of the nine plants according to the MaxEnt modeling results. Global warming in coming decades may result in a decrease in the extent of suitable habitat in the tropics but will have little effect on the total distribution area of each plant. The results indicated that it will be possible to grow these plants on marginal lands within these areas in the future. This work should be beneficial for the domestication and cultivation of those bioenergy plants and should facilitate land-use planning for bioenergy crops in China.

  19. Treatment of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 with peginterferon alfa-2a: Impact of bilharziasis and fibrosis stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MF Derbala; A Bener; SR Al Kaabi; NZ El Dweik; F Pasic; MT Butt; R Yakoob; A Al-Marri; AM Amer; N Morad

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate pegylated interferon alpha2a (PegIFN-α2a) in Egyptian patients with HCV genotype 4, and the impact of pretreatment viral load, co-existent bilharziasis and histological liver changes on response rate.METHODS: A total of 73 na(i)ve patients (61 with history of bilharziasis) with compensated chronic HCV genotype 4 were enrolled into: group A (38 patients) who received 180 mg PegIFN-alpha2a subcutaneously once weekly for a year and group B (35 patients) recved IFN alpha-2a 3 MU 3 times weekly. Ribavirin was added to each regimen at a dose of 1200 mg. Patients were followed for 72 wk and sustained response was assessed.RESULTS: Significant improvement in both end of treatment response (ETR) (P < 0.002) and sustained response (SR) (P < 0.05) was noted with pegylated interferon, where ETR was achieved in 29 (76.3%) and 14 patients (40%) in both groups respectively, and 25 patients in group A (65.8%) and 9 (25.7%) in group B could retain negative viraemia by the end of follow up period. Sustained virological response (SVR) showed a significant negative correlation with age and positive correlation with pretreatment inflammation in patients receiving PegIFN. Viral clearance after 3 mo of therapy was associated with high incidence of ETR and SR (P <0.001), but without significant difference between both forms of interferon. Significant improvement in response was achieved in patients with high grade fibrosis (grade 3 and 4) with PegIFN-α2a, where SR was seen in 5 out of 13 patients in group A, but none in group B. There was no significant difference in response between bilharzial and non-bilharzial patients in both groups. In terms of safety and tolerability, neutropenia was the predominant side effect; both drugs were comparable.CONCLUSION: PegIFN-α2a combined with ribavirin results in improvement in sustained response in HCV genotype 4, irrespective of history of bilharzial infestation.

  20. CYP2D6-Genotyping in clinical practice: Impact of genotype on serum concentrations of psychiatric CYP2D6-substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Plodeck, Verena

    2010-01-01

    Cytochrom P450 2D6 spielt beim Abbau vieler Psychopharmaka eine wichtige Rolle. Es ist seit längerem bekannt, dass für CYP2D6 ein genetischer Polymorphismus existiert. Dieser führt dazu, dass die metabolischen Kapazitäten interindividuell stark variieren. Man spricht in diesem Zusammenhang von poor, intermediate, extensive und ultra-fast metabolizern. Das Ziel dieser Arbeit war es, die Auswirkungen des Genotyps auf die Serumkonzentrationen und somit auch die Verträglichkeit bzw. den Therapiee...

  1. WHAT INFLUENCES OUR COMPREHENSION OF ENGLISH IDIOMS? — A STUDY MEASURING THE IMPACT OF CROSS-CULTURAL DIFFERENCES AND THE ROLE OF NATIVE LANGUAGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LinWeiyan

    2004-01-01

    The study reported in this article investigated the impact ofcross-cultural differences and the role of native language ( NL )in the comprehension of target language idioms. Comprehensionof 10 unlearnt idioms was tested by asking the subjects to writedown the meanings of the selected idioms without any contextualclues in 15 minutes. Results indicated that idioms sharing thesame metaphoric themes in NL and target language (TL)cultures were more easily understood than those sharing differentmetaphoric themes. The result also strengthens the point that acognitive semantic view can facilitate the learning of idioms fornon-native speakers.

  2. Impact of hydraulic well restoration on native bacterial communities in drinking water wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwautz, Clemens; Lueders, Tillmann

    2014-01-01

    The microbial monitoring of drinking water production systems is essential to assure water quality and minimize possible risks. However, the comparative impact of microbes from the surrounding aquifer and of those established within drinking water wells on water parameters remains poorly understood. High pressure jetting is a routine method to impede well clogging by fine sediments and also biofilms. In the present study, bacterial communities were investigated in a drinking water production system before, during, and after hydraulic purging. Variations were observed in bacterial communities between different wells of the same production system before maintenance, despite them having practically identical water chemistries. This may have reflected the distinct usage practices of the different wells, and also local aquifer heterogeneity. Hydraulic jetting of one well preferentially purged a subset of the dominating taxa, including lineages related to Diaphorobacter, Nitrospira, Sphingobium, Ralstonia, Alkanindiges, Janthinobacterium, and Pseudomonas spp, suggesting their tendency for growth in well-associated biofilms. Lineages of potential drinking water concern (i.e. Legionellaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, and Acinetobacter spp.) reacted distinctly to hydraulic jetting. Bacterial diversity was markedly reduced in drinking water 2 weeks after the cleaning procedure. The results of the present study provide a better understanding of drinking water wells as a microbial habitat, as well as their role in the microbiology of drinking water systems.

  3. Microhabitat interactions of non-native pumpkinseed Lepomis gibbosus in a Mediterranean-type stream suggest no evidence for impact on endemic fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Top Nildeniz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The pumpkinseed Lepomis gibbosus was introduced to Europe and parts of the Mediterranean Region more than 100 years ago. However, relatively little is known of its potential ecological impacts on the native species and freshwater ecosystems of Anatolia (Turkey, where the species is currently established in ponds and rivers. In this study, interactions between L. gibbosus and native and non-native stream fishes were investigated between June 2009 and May 2010 in Sarıçay Stream, a Mediterranean-type water course. Microhabitat preferences for depth, substratum composition, distance from bank and from vegetation, plant cover, velocity, turbidity and light intensity were studied by Constrained Quadratic Ordination. The species sampled in larger frequency of occurrence (and for which microhabitat relationships could be investigated comprised endemic Smyrna chub Petroleuciscus smyrnaeus and Aegean chub Squalius fellowesii, and non-native L. gibbosus (both juveniles and adults and topmouth gudgeon Pseudorasbora parva. Adult L. gibbosus were found to prefer locations closer to the bank with less turbid water, plant cover, light intensity, woody structure and with sandy substratum whilst avoiding riffle habitats with coarser debris, deeper water, dense submersed aquatic vegetation and higher velocities. These preferences overlapped with those for the other non-native species P. parva, but not with those for the endemic species and for L. gibbosus juveniles. The results of this study suggest that the potential for adverse impacts through competition for habitat of adult L. gibbosus with the native fish fauna is not apparent in Sarıçay Stream.

  4. Potential impacts of sea level rise on native plant communities and associated cultural sites in coastal areas of the main Hawaiian Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, James D.; Warshauer, Frederick R.

    2017-01-01

    Hawaiian coastal vegetation is comprised of plant species that are adapted to growing in extremely harsh conditions (salt spray, wave wash, wind, and substrates with limited nutrients) found in this habitat zone. Prior to human colonization of Hawai‘i coastal vegetation extended as a continuous ring around each of the islands, broken only by stretches of recent lava flows or unstable cliff faces. However, since humans arrived in Hawai‘i many areas that originally supported native coastal plant communities have been highly altered or the native vegetation totally removed for agriculture, housing, or resort development, destroyed by fire, displaced by invasive plants, eaten by introduced mammals, or damaged by recreational use. This study was focused on identifying sites that still retain relatively intact and highly diverse native coastal plant communities throughout the main Hawaiian Islands that may be further impacted by projected sea level rise. Approximately 40 percent of Hawai‘i’s coastlines were found to still contain high quality native coastal plant communities. Most of these sites were located in areas where the coastal vegetation can still migrate inshore in response to rising sea level and associated inundation by waves. However, six sites with high-quality native coastal vegetation were found on low-lying offshore islets that will be totally inundated with a one meter increase in sea level and thirty sites were found to have some type of fixed barrier, such as a paved road or structure, which would restrict the plants from colonizing the adjacent inland areas. Many of these sites also have other cultural resources that are fixed in place and will definitely be impacted by rising sea level. The results of this study can help refine our understanding of Hawai‘i’s remaining native coastal vegetation and aid with the development of management and restoration strategies to ensure the long-term survival of these unique plant communities.

  5. Finding the right coverage: the impact of coverage and sequence quality on single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping error rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, Emily D; Pauli, Jonathan N; Reid, Brendan N; Palsbøll, Per J; Peery, M Zachariah

    2016-07-01

    Restriction-enzyme-based sequencing methods enable the genotyping of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci in nonmodel organisms. However, in contrast to traditional genetic markers, genotyping error rates in SNPs derived from restriction-enzyme-based methods remain largely unknown. Here, we estimated genotyping error rates in SNPs genotyped with double digest RAD sequencing from Mendelian incompatibilities in known mother-offspring dyads of Hoffman's two-toed sloth (Choloepus hoffmanni) across a range of coverage and sequence quality criteria, for both reference-aligned and de novo-assembled data sets. Genotyping error rates were more sensitive to coverage than sequence quality and low coverage yielded high error rates, particularly in de novo-assembled data sets. For example, coverage ≥5 yielded median genotyping error rates of ≥0.03 and ≥0.11 in reference-aligned and de novo-assembled data sets, respectively. Genotyping error rates declined to ≤0.01 in reference-aligned data sets with a coverage ≥30, but remained ≥0.04 in the de novo-assembled data sets. We observed approximately 10- and 13-fold declines in the number of loci sampled in the reference-aligned and de novo-assembled data sets when coverage was increased from ≥5 to ≥30 at quality score ≥30, respectively. Finally, we assessed the effects of genotyping coverage on a common population genetic application, parentage assignments, and showed that the proportion of incorrectly assigned maternities was relatively high at low coverage. Overall, our results suggest that the trade-off between sample size and genotyping error rates be considered prior to building sequencing libraries, reporting genotyping error rates become standard practice, and that effects of genotyping errors on inference be evaluated in restriction-enzyme-based SNP studies.

  6. Impact of HIV-1 subtype and antiretroviral therapy on protease and reverse transcriptase genotype: results of a global collaboration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Kantor

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The genetic differences among HIV-1 subtypes may be critical to clinical management and drug resistance surveillance as antiretroviral treatment is expanded to regions of the world where diverse non-subtype-B viruses predominate.To assess the impact of HIV-1 subtype and antiretroviral treatment on the distribution of mutations in protease and reverse transcriptase, a binomial response model using subtype and treatment as explanatory variables was used to analyze a large compiled dataset of non-subtype-B HIV-1 sequences. Non-subtype-B sequences from 3,686 persons with well characterized antiretroviral treatment histories were analyzed in comparison to subtype B sequences from 4,769 persons. The non-subtype-B sequences included 461 with subtype A, 1,185 with C, 331 with D, 245 with F, 293 with G, 513 with CRF01_AE, and 618 with CRF02_AG. Each of the 55 known subtype B drug-resistance mutations occurred in at least one non-B isolate, and 44 (80% of these mutations were significantly associated with antiretroviral treatment in at least one non-B subtype. Conversely, of 67 mutations found to be associated with antiretroviral therapy in at least one non-B subtype, 61 were also associated with antiretroviral therapy in subtype B isolates.Global surveillance and genotypic assessment of drug resistance should focus primarily on the known subtype B drug-resistance mutations.

  7. Impact of Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1b Infection on Triglyceride Concentration in Serum Lipoprotein Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohisa Nagano

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Reduced low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol level is a characteristic feature of dyslipidemia in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. However, abnormality in serum triglyceride (TG has not been fully investigated. To clarify the impact of HCV genotype 1b (G1b infection and advanced fibrosis on serum TG profiles, TG concentrations in lipoprotein fractions were examined in fasting sera from 185 subjects with active or cleared HCV infection by high-performance liquid chromatography. Serum lipoproteins were fractionated into four classes: chylomicron, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL, LDL, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL. Then, the significance of HCV G1b infection on TG levels in each lipoprotein fraction was determined using multiple regression models. We found that active HCV G1b infection was positively associated with high HDL-TG levels and low VLDL-TG levels, independent of other factors included in the regression model. In VLDL sub-fractions, active HCV infection was only found to be associated with low levels of large VLDL-TG. Similarly, advanced liver fibrosis in chronic HCV G1b infection was associated with high levels of LDL-TG, HDL-TG, and small VLDL-TG, independent of other clinical factors. These findings indicate that active HCV G1b infection and advanced fibrosis are closely associated with abnormal serum TG profiles.

  8. Impact of Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1b Infection on Triglyceride Concentration in Serum Lipoprotein Fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Tomohisa; Seki, Nobuyoshi; Tomita, Yoichi; Sugita, Tomonori; Aida, Yuta; Itagaki, Munenori; Sutoh, Satoshi; Abe, Hiroshi; Tsubota, Akihito; Aizawa, Yoshio

    2015-08-31

    Reduced low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level is a characteristic feature of dyslipidemia in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, abnormality in serum triglyceride (TG) has not been fully investigated. To clarify the impact of HCV genotype 1b (G1b) infection and advanced fibrosis on serum TG profiles, TG concentrations in lipoprotein fractions were examined in fasting sera from 185 subjects with active or cleared HCV infection by high-performance liquid chromatography. Serum lipoproteins were fractionated into four classes: chylomicron, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), LDL, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Then, the significance of HCV G1b infection on TG levels in each lipoprotein fraction was determined using multiple regression models. We found that active HCV G1b infection was positively associated with high HDL-TG levels and low VLDL-TG levels, independent of other factors included in the regression model. In VLDL sub-fractions, active HCV infection was only found to be associated with low levels of large VLDL-TG. Similarly, advanced liver fibrosis in chronic HCV G1b infection was associated with high levels of LDL-TG, HDL-TG, and small VLDL-TG, independent of other clinical factors. These findings indicate that active HCV G1b infection and advanced fibrosis are closely associated with abnormal serum TG profiles.

  9. Impact of HIV-1 subtype and antiretroviral therapy on protease and reverse transcriptase genotype: results of a global collaboration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Kantor

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The genetic differences among HIV-1 subtypes may be critical to clinical management and drug resistance surveillance as antiretroviral treatment is expanded to regions of the world where diverse non-subtype-B viruses predominate. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To assess the impact of HIV-1 subtype and antiretroviral treatment on the distribution of mutations in protease and reverse transcriptase, a binomial response model using subtype and treatment as explanatory variables was used to analyze a large compiled dataset of non-subtype-B HIV-1 sequences. Non-subtype-B sequences from 3,686 persons with well characterized antiretroviral treatment histories were analyzed in comparison to subtype B sequences from 4,769 persons. The non-subtype-B sequences included 461 with subtype A, 1,185 with C, 331 with D, 245 with F, 293 with G, 513 with CRF01_AE, and 618 with CRF02_AG. Each of the 55 known subtype B drug-resistance mutations occurred in at least one non-B isolate, and 44 (80% of these mutations were significantly associated with antiretroviral treatment in at least one non-B subtype. Conversely, of 67 mutations found to be associated with antiretroviral therapy in at least one non-B subtype, 61 were also associated with antiretroviral therapy in subtype B isolates. CONCLUSION: Global surveillance and genotypic assessment of drug resistance should focus primarily on the known subtype B drug-resistance mutations.

  10. Metabolite Profiling of Barley Grains Subjected to Water Stress: To Explain the Genotypic Difference in Drought-Induced Impacts on Malting Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojian Wu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Grain weight and protein content will be reduced and increased, respectively, when barley is subjected to water stress after anthesis, consequently deteriorating the malt quality. However, such adverse impact of water stress differs greatly among barley genotypes. In this study, two Tibetan wild barley accessions and two cultivated varieties differing in water stress tolerance were used to investigate the genotypic difference in metabolic profiles during grain-filling stage under drought condition. Totally, 71 differently accumulated metabolites were identified, including organic acids, amino acids/amines, and sugars/sugar alcohols. Their relative contents were significantly affected by water stress for all genotypes and differed distinctly between the wild and cultivated barleys. The principal component analysis of metabolites indicated that the Tibetan wild barley XZ147 possessed a unique response to water stress. When subjected to water stress, the wild barley XZ147 showed the most increase of β-amylase activity among the four genotypes, as a result of its higher lysine content, less indole-3-acetic acid (IAA biosynthesis, more stable H2O2 homeostasis, and more up-regulation of BMY1 gene. On the other hand, XZ147 had the most reduction of β-glucan content under water stress than the other genotypes, which could be explained by the faster grain filling process and the less expression of β-glucan synthase gene GSL7. All these results indicated a great potential for XZ147 in barley breeding for improving water stress tolerance.

  11. Finding the right coverage : The impact of coverage and sequence quality on single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping error rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fountain, Emily D.; Pauli, Jonathan N.; Reid, Brendan N.; Palsboll, Per J.; Peery, M. Zachariah

    2016-01-01

    Restriction-enzyme-based sequencing methods enable the genotyping of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci in nonmodel organisms. However, in contrast to traditional genetic markers, genotyping error rates in SNPs derived from restriction-enzyme-based methods remain largely unknown.

  12. Phytoremediation potential and ecological and phenological changes of native pioneer plants from weathered oil spill-impacted sites at tropical wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma-Cruz, Felipe de J; Pérez-Vargas, Josefina; Rivera Casado, Noemí Araceli; Gómez Guzmán, Octavio; Calva-Calva, Graciano

    2016-08-01

    Pioneer native plant species from weathered oil spill-affected sites were selected to study their potential for phytoremediation on the basis of their ecological and phenological changes during the phytoremediation process. Experiments were conducted in field and in greenhouse. In field, native plants from aged oil spill-impacted sites with up 400 g of weathered petroleum hydrocarbons per kilogram soil were selected. In the impacted sites, the principal dominant plant species with potential for hydrocarbons removal were Cyperus laxus, Cyperus esculentus, and Ludwigia peploides. In greenhouse, the phenology of the selected plant species was drastically affected by the hydrocarbons level above 325 g total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) per kilogram soil after 2 years of phytoremediation of soils from the aged oil spill-impacted sites. From the phytoremediation treatments, a mix-culture of C. laxus, C. esculentus, and L. peploides in soil containing 325 g TPH/kg soil, from which 20.3 % were polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and 34.2 % were asphaltenes (ASF), was able to remove up 93 % of the TPH, while in unvegetated soil the TPH removal was 12.6 %. Furthermore, evaluation of the biodiversity and life forms of plant species in the impacted sites showed that phytoremediation with C. esculentus, alone or in a mix-culture with C. laxus and L. peploides, reduces the TPH to such extent that the native plant community was progressively reestablished by replacing the cultivated species resulting in the ecological recovery of the affected soil. These results demonstrate that native Cyperus species from weathered oil spill-affected sites, specifically C. esculentus and C. laxus, alone or in a mix-culture, have particular potential for phytoremediation of soils from tropical wetlands contaminated with weathered oil hydrocarbons.

  13. Impact of urban and industrial sewage discharges on the trophic ecology of two wild native cyprinids in a Mediterranean stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Vargas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mediterranean Rivers have experienced a long-history of anthropogenic impacts. Water pollution is still one of the major threats to freshwater biota despite the marked investments in sewage treatment plants (STPs in recent decades. This is attributed, in part, to the reduced water flow of these systems due to climate and water abstractions, coupled to some illegal spills and agricultural run-off. The present study examined the potential effects of the effluents from urban and industrial STPs on the trophic ecology of the Mediterranean barbel (Barbus meridionalis and the Ebro chub (Squalius laietanus in a small Mediterranean stream. Fish were collected in summer 2012 and their gut contents were compared between three reference and three polluted sites and related to the water quality. In all sampling sites, the composition of prey consumed by both fish species was compatible with ommivory, including macro-invertebrates, plants and detritus. However, the two fish species ingested a higher richness and diversity prey in the baseline compared to the polluted sites. These differences were also mirrored in the taxonomic composition of preys consumed, reflecting the replacement of sensitive species with tolerant ones along a pollution gradient. Specifically, fish diet was dominated in reference sites by water beetles and plant matter, whereas two typical representatives of polluted waters, snails and chironomids, were the predominant prey type downstream the STPs inputs. No major differences in richness, diversity and taxonomic composition were observed in the prey consumed within polluted or reference sites. Our results are consistent with the generalist trophic ecology of native cyprinids in Mediterranean rivers, and suggest a similar trophic position for B. meridionalis and S. laietanus. However, differences in the taxonomic composition of prey consumed between polluted and reference sites suggest that STP inputs may have altered the energy fluxes

  14. Adding fuel to the fire: the impacts of non-native grass invasion on fire management at a regional scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha A Setterfield

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Widespread invasion by non-native plants has resulted in substantial change in fire-fuel characteristics and fire-behaviour in many of the world's ecosystems, with a subsequent increase in the risk of fire damage to human life, property and the environment. Models used by fire management agencies to assess fire risk are dependent on accurate assessments of fuel characteristics but there is little evidence that they have been modified to reflect landscape-scale invasions. There is also a paucity of information documenting other changes in fire management activities that have occurred to mitigate changed fire regimes. This represents an important limitation in information for both fire and weed risk management. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We undertook an aerial survey to estimate changes to landscape fuel loads in northern Australia resulting from invasion by Andropogon gayanus (gamba grass. Fuel load within the most densely invaded area had increased from 6 to 10 t ha(-1 in the past two decades. Assessment of the effect of calculating the Grassland Fire Danger Index (GFDI for the 2008 and 2009 fire seasons demonstrated that an increase from 6 to 10 t ha(-1 resulted in an increase from five to 38 days with fire risk in the 'severe' category in 2008 and from 11 to 67 days in 2009. The season of severe fire weather increased by six weeks. Our assessment of the effect of increased fuel load on fire management practices showed that fire management costs in the region have increased markedly (∼9 times in the past decade due primarily to A. gayanus invasion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrated the high economic cost of mitigating fire impacts of an invasive grass. This study demonstrates the need to quantify direct and indirect invasion costs to assess the risk of further invasion and to appropriately fund fire and weed management strategies.

  15. Greater impact of dietary fat manipulation than apolipoprotein E genotype on ex vivo cytokine production - insights from the SATgenε study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsos, Athanasios; Jackson, Kim G; Lockyer, Stacey; Carvalho-Wells, Andrew; Minihane, Anne M; Lovegrove, Julie A

    2014-04-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype is believed to play an important role in cardiovascular risk. APOE4 carriers have been associated with higher blood lipid levels and a more pro-inflammatory state compared with APOE3/E3 individuals. Although dietary fat composition has been considered to modulate the inflammatory state in humans, very little is known about how APOE genotype can impact on this response. In a follow-up to the main SATgenε study, we aimed to explore the effects of APOE genotype, as well as, dietary fat manipulation on ex vivo cytokine production. Blood samples were collected from a subset of SATgenε participants (n=52/88), prospectively recruited according to APOE genotype (n=26 E3/E3 and n=26 E3/E4) after low-fat (LF), high saturated fat (HSF) and HSF with 3.45g docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) dietary periods (each diet eight weeks in duration assigned in the same order) for the measurement of ex vivo cytokine production using whole blood culture (WBC). Concentrations of IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-alpha were measured in WBC supernatant samples after stimulation for 24h with either 0.05 or 1μg/ml of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Cytokine levels were not influenced by genotype, whereas, dietary fat manipulation had a significant impact on TNF-α and IL-10 production; TNF-α concentration was higher after consumption of the HSF diet compared with baseline and the LF diet (PTNF-α and IL-10 by ex vivo LPS-stimulated WBC samples obtained from normolipidaemic subjects.

  16. Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, N. G.

    2003-12-01

    The Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop was held on October 28 through November 01, 1998, as part of a series of workshops being held around the U.S. to improve the understanding of the potential consequences of climate variability and change for the Nation. This workshop was specifically designed by Native Peoples to examine the impacts of climate change and extreme weather variability on Native Peoples and Native Homelands from an indigenous cultural and spiritual perspective and to develop recommendations as well as identify potential response actions. The workshop brought together interested Native Peoples, representatives of Tribal governments, traditional elders, Tribal leaders, natural resource managers, Tribal College faculty and students, and climate scientists from government agencies and universities. It is clear that Tribal colleges and universities play a unique and critical role in the success of these emerging partnerships for decision-making in addition to the important education function for both Native and non-Native communities such as serving as a culturally- appropriate vehicle for access, analysis, control, and protection of indigenous cultural and intellectual property. During the discussions between scientists and policy-makers from both Native and non-Native communities, a number of important lessons emerged which are key to building more effective partnerships between Native and non-Native communities for collaboration and decision-making for a more sustainable future. This talk summarizes the key issues, recommendations, and lessons learned during this workshop.

  17. Impact of amylosucrase modification on the structural and physicochemical properties of native and acid-thinned waxy corn starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Zhou, Xing; He, Jian; Wang, Tao; Luo, Xiaohu; Wang, Li; Wang, Ren; Chen, Zhengxing

    2017-04-01

    Recombinant amylosucrase from Neisseria polysaccharea was utilized to modify native and acid-thinned starches. The molecular structures and physicochemical properties of modified starches were investigated. Acid-thinned starch displayed much lower viscosity after gelatinization than did the native starch. However, the enzyme exhibited similar catalytic efficiency for both forms of starch. The modified starches had higher proportions of long (DP>33) and intermediate chains (DP 13-33), and X-ray diffraction showed a B-type crystalline structure for all modified starches. With increasing reaction time, the relative crystallinity and endothermic enthalpy of the modified starches gradually decreased, whereas the melting peak temperatures and resistant starch contents increased. Slight differences were observed in thermal parameters, relative crystallinity, and branch chain length distribution between the modified native and acid-thinned starches. Moreover, the digestibility of the modified starches was not affected by acid hydrolysis pretreatment, but was affected by the percentage of intermediate and long chains.

  18. Simulated Impact of Climate Change on Fremont Native American Maize Farming in Utah at the MCA-LIA Transition, ca. 12-14th c. CE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, M. J.; MacDonald, G. M.

    2016-12-01

    We present the results of a computational crop modeling experiment for ancient Fremont Native American Zea mays farming in the Uinta Basin, Utah, at the Medieval Climate Anomaly to Little Ice Age (MCA-LIA) transition, ca. 850-1450 CE. This period coincides with the rapid disappearance of complex Native American cultures from the American Southwest. The crop model (the Environment Policy Impact Calculator, EPIC) was driven by statistically downscaled precipitation, temperature and shortwave radiative flux from the Community Earth System Model Last Millennium Ensemble (CESM LME). We found that maize yield responded to changes in the model-reconstructed temperature and precipitation; and periods of reduced maize yields corresponded to the abandonment of higher elevation Fremont 14C-dated archaeological sites. EPIC produces good agreement between modeled and historically reported maize yields for the 19th century.

  19. Native American population data based on the Globalfiler(®) autosomal STR loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Jillian; Oldt, Robert F; McCulloh, Kelly L; Weise, Jessica A; Viray, Joy; Budowle, Bruce; Smith, David Glenn; Kanthaswamy, Sreetharan

    2016-09-01

    Native American population data are limited and thus impact computing accurate statistical parameters for forensic investigations. Thus, additional information should be generated from geographically representative tribes in North America, particularly from those that are not included in existing population databases for forensic use. The Globafiler(®) PCR Amplification kit was used to produce STR genotypic data for 533 individuals who represent 31 Native American tribal populations derived from eight geographically diverse regions in North America. Population genetic estimates from 21 autosomal STRs are reported.

  20. Genotypic and functional impact of HIV-1 adaptation to its host population during the North American epidemic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A Cotton

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available HLA-restricted immune escape mutations that persist following HIV transmission could gradually spread through the viral population, thereby compromising host antiviral immunity as the epidemic progresses. To assess the extent and phenotypic impact of this phenomenon in an immunogenetically diverse population, we genotypically and functionally compared linked HLA and HIV (Gag/Nef sequences from 358 historic (1979-1989 and 382 modern (2000-2011 specimens from four key cities in the North American epidemic (New York, Boston, San Francisco, Vancouver. Inferred HIV phylogenies were star-like, with approximately two-fold greater mean pairwise distances in modern versus historic sequences. The reconstructed epidemic ancestral (founder HIV sequence was essentially identical to the North American subtype B consensus. Consistent with gradual diversification of a "consensus-like" founder virus, the median "background" frequencies of individual HLA-associated polymorphisms in HIV (in individuals lacking the restricting HLA[s] were ∼ 2-fold higher in modern versus historic HIV sequences, though these remained notably low overall (e.g. in Gag, medians were 3.7% in the 2000s versus 2.0% in the 1980s. HIV polymorphisms exhibiting the greatest relative spread were those restricted by protective HLAs. Despite these increases, when HIV sequences were analyzed as a whole, their total average burden of polymorphisms that were "pre-adapted" to the average host HLA profile was only ∼ 2% greater in modern versus historic eras. Furthermore, HLA-associated polymorphisms identified in historic HIV sequences were consistent with those detectable today, with none identified that could explain the few HIV codons where the inferred epidemic ancestor differed from the modern consensus. Results are therefore consistent with slow HIV adaptation to HLA, but at a rate unlikely to yield imminent negative implications for cellular immunity, at least in North America

  1. Oral Language Skills of Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners: The Impact of High-Quality Native Language Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamez, Perla B.; Levine, Susan C.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relation between young English language learners' (ELL) native oral language skills and their language input in transitional bilingual education kindergarten classrooms. Spanish-speaking ELLs' ("n" = 101) Spanish expressive language skills were assessed using the memory for sentences and picture vocabulary…

  2. Oral Language Skills of Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners: The Impact of High-Quality Native Language Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamez, Perla B.; Levine, Susan C.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relation between young English language learners' (ELL) native oral language skills and their language input in transitional bilingual education kindergarten classrooms. Spanish-speaking ELLs' ("n" = 101) Spanish expressive language skills were assessed using the memory for sentences and picture vocabulary…

  3. Impact of non-native plant removal on lizards in riparian habitats in the southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather L. Bateman; Alice Chung-MacCoubrey; Howard L. Snell

    2008-01-01

    Many natural processes in the riparian cottonwood (Populus deltoides) forest of the Middle Rio Grande (MRG) in the southwestern United States have been disrupted or altered, allowing non-native plants such as saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) and Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia) to establish. We investigated...

  4. The impact of patient and provider factors on depression screening of american Indian and alaska native people in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillard, Denise A; Muller, Clemma J; Smith, Julia J; Hiratsuka, Vanessa Y; Manson, Spero M

    2012-04-01

    The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends routine depression screening in primary care, yet regular screening does not occur in most health systems serving Alaska Native and American Indian people. The authors examined factors associated with administration of depression screening among Alaska Native and American Indian people in a large urban clinic. Medical records of 18 625 Alaska Native and American Indian adults were examined 1 year after implementation of a depression screening initiative. Multilevel logistic regression models examined associations between patient and provider factors and administration of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Forty-seven percent of patients were screened. Women were more likely than men to be screened (50% vs 43%, P substance abuse disorders or prior antidepressant dispensation. Women previously diagnosed with depression had higher odds of screening (P = .002). Men seen by male providers had higher odds of screening than did men seen by female providers (P = .040). Screening rates peaked among providers with 2 to 5 years of employment with the clinic. Cross-sectional analysis of medical record data was of unknown reliability; there were limited sociodemographic data. Even with significant organizational support for annual depression screening, primary care providers systematically missed men and patients with infrequent primary care visits. Outreach to male patients and additional supports for primary care providers, especially in the first years of practice, may improve screening and treatment for depression among Alaska Native and American Indian people.

  5. Impact of an Alien Invasive Shrub on Ecology of Native and Alien Invasive Mosquito Species (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muturi, Ephantus J; Gardner, Allison M; Bara, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-01

    We examined how leaf litter of alien invasive honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii Rupr.) either alone or in combination with leaf litter of one of two native tree species, sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marshall) and northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), affects the ecology of Culex restuans Theobald, Ochlerotatus triseriatus Say, and Ochlerotatus japonicus Theobald. Experimental mesocosms containing single species litter or a mixture of honeysuckle and one of two native tree species litter were established at South Farms and Trelease Woods study sites in Urbana, IL, and examined for their effect on 1) oviposition site selection by the three mosquito species, and 2) adult production and body size of Oc. triseriatus and Oc. japonicus. There were no significant effects of study site and leaf treatment on Oc. japonicus and Oc. triseriatus oviposition preference and adult production. In contrast, significantly more Cx. restuans eggs rafts were collected at South Farms relative to Trelease Woods and in honeysuckle litter relative to native tree species litter. Significantly larger adult females of Oc. japonicus and Oc. triseriatus were collected at South Farms relative to Trelease Woods and in honeysuckle litter relative to native tree species litter. Combining honeysuckle litter with native tree species litter had additive effects on Cx. restuans oviposition preference and Oc. japonicus and Oc. triseriatus body size, with the exception of honeysuckle and northern red oak litter combination, which had antagonistic effects on Oc. triseriatus body size. We conclude that input of honeysuckle litter into container aquatic habitats may alter the life history traits of vector mosquito species. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Impact of water regimes on an experimental community of four desert arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) species, as affected by the introduction of a non-native AMF species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symanczik, Sarah; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel; Boller, Thomas; Wiemken, Andres; Al-Yahya'ei, Mohamed N

    2015-11-01

    Field studies have revealed the impact of changing water regimes on the structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) communities, but it is not known what happens to the abundance of individual AMF species within the community when the water conditions in the rhizosphere change. The behavior of four AMF species isolated from the Arabian desert (Diversispora aurantia, Diversispora omaniana, Septoglomus africanum, and an undescribed Paraglomus species) was investigated when assembled in microcosms containing Sorghum bicolor as host plant, and treated with various water regimes. Furthermore, the impact of invasion of these assemblages by Rhizophagus irregularis, an AMF species widely used in commercial inocula, was studied. The abundance of each AMF species in sorghum roots was measured by determining the transcript numbers of their large ribosomal subunit (rLSU) by real-time PCR, using cDNA and species-specific primers. Plant biomass and length of AMF extraradical hyphae were also measured. The abundance of each AMF species within the sorghum roots was influenced by both the water regime and the introduction of R. irregularis. Under dry conditions, the introduction of R. irregularis reduced the total abundance of all native AMF species in roots and also led to a reduction in the amount of extraradical mycelium, as well as to a partial decrease in plant biomass. The results indicate that both water regime and the introduction of an invasive AMF species can strongly alter the structure of an AMF native assemblage with a consequent impact on the entire symbiotic mycorrhizal relationship.

  7. IMPACT OF JUTE RETTING ON NATIVE FISH DIVERSITY AND AQUATIC HEALTH OF ROADSIDE TRANSITORY WATER BODIES: AN ASSESSMENT IN EASTERN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipankar Ghosh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Roadside transitory water bodies being manmade depressions have a great ecological and socio-economic importance from years. The effects of agricultural runoffs, jute retting, macro-phytes infestations and inadequate rainfall in changed climate often degrade transitory water bodies’ environment while the biodiversity have impacted severely because of population pressure, over exploitation and indiscriminate use of fine meshed fishing gears as a whole. Physico-chemical and biological analysis with fish species composition, relative abundance, diversity indices like species richness, evenness and Shannon-Wiener index were carried out for pre-, during and post-jute retting season and for year mean as a whole to assess impact of jute retting on the roadside transitory water body’s environmental health and indigenous fish diversity at Sahebnagar village in Nadia District, India. All the physico-chemical parameters barring biochemical oxygen demand and water transparency remained more or less same or marginally got little changed during those three seasons. As much as 19 native fish species with varied relative abundances and dominances were identified. Jute retting impacted lower native fish diversity indices like Shannon-Wiener index values (1.94 to 2.68 clearly indicated poor to moderate pollution status of the transitory water body in that area during monsoon in particular and throughout the year in general. So we opined there should be some control over the intense jute retting in the road side transitory water bodies for sustainable management of these manmade resources.

  8. Soils mediate the impact of fine woody debris on invasive and native grasses as whole trees are mechanically shredded into firebreaks in piñon-juniper woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aanderud, Zachary T.; Schoolmaster, Donald R.; Rigby, Deborah; Bybee, Jordon; Campbell, Tayte; Roundy, Bruce A.

    2017-01-01

    To stem wildfires, trees are being mechanically shredded into firebreaks with the resulting fine woody debris (FWD) potentially exerting immense control over soil and plants. We linked FWD-induced changes in microbial activity and nutrient availability to the frequency of Bromus tectorum and three native, perennial grasses across 31 piñon-juniper woodlands, UT, USA. Using a series of mixed models, we found that FWD increased the frequency of three of the four grasses by at least 12%. Deep, as opposed to shallow, soils mediated frequencies following FWD additions but only partially explained the variation in Bromus and Pseudoroegneria spicata. Although fertile areas associated with tree-islands elicited no response, FWD-induced increases in nitrogen mineralization in deep soils (15–17 cm) caused the frequency of the exotic and Pseudoroegneria to rise. Higher phosphorus availability in FWD-covered surface soils (0–2 cm) had no impact on grasses. FWD altered deep soil respiration, and deep and shallow microbial biomass structuring Pseudoroegneria frequencies, suggesting that microorganism themselves regulated Pseudoroegneria. The positive effects of FWD on grass frequencies intensified over time for natives but diminished for Bromus. Our results demonstrate that microorganisms in deeper soils helped mediate species-specific responses to disturbance both facilitating exotic invasion and promoting native establishment.

  9. Randomized Trial Evaluating the Impact of Ribavirin Mono-Therapy and Double Dosing on Viral Kinetics, Ribavirin Pharmacokinetics and Anemia in Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Waldenström

    Full Text Available In this pilot study (RibaC, 58 hepatitis C virus (HCV genotype 1 infected treatment-naïve patients were randomized to (i 2 weeks ribavirin double dosing concomitant with pegylated interferon-α (pegIFN-α, (ii 4 weeks ribavirin mono-therapy prior to adding pegIFN-α, or (iii standard-of-care (SOC ribavirin dosing concurrent with pegIFN-α. Four weeks of ribavirin mono-therapy resulted in a mean 0.46 log(10 IU/mL HCV RNA reduction differentially regulated across IL28B genotypes (0.89 vs. 0.21 log(10 IU/mL for CC and CT/TT respectively; P = 0.006, increased likelihood of undetectable HCV RNA week 4 after initiating pegIFN-α and thus shortened treatment duration (P<0.05, and decreased median IP-10 concentration from 550 to 345 pg/mL (P<0.001. Both experimental strategies impacted on ribavirin concentrations, and high levels were achieved after one week of double dosing. However, by day 14, double dosing entailed a greater hemoglobin decline as compared to SOC (2.2 vs. 1.4 g/dL; P = 0.03. Conclusion: Ribavirin down-regulates IP-10, and may have an anti-viral effect differently regulated across IL28B genotypes.

  10. Native and European haplotypes of Phragmites Australis (common reed) in the central Platte River, Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, D.L.; Galatowitsch, S.M.; Larson, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Phragmites australis (common reed) is known to have occurred along the Platte River historically, but recent rapid increases in both distribution and density have begun to impact habitat for migrating sandhill cranes and nesting piping plovers and least terns. Invasiveness in Phragmites has been associated with the incursion of a European genotype (haplotype M) in other areas; determining the genotype of Phragmites along the central Platte River has implications for proper management of the river system. In 2008 we sampled Phragmites patches along the central Platte River from Lexington to Chapman, NE, stratified by bridge segments, to determine the current distribution of haplotype E (native) and haplotype M genotypes. In addition, we did a retrospective analysis of historical Phragmites collections from the central Platte watershed (1902-2006) at the Bessey Herbarium. Fresh tissue from the 2008 survey and dried tissue from the herbarium specimens were classified as haplotype M or E using the restriction fragment length polymorphism procedure. The European haplotype was predominant in the 2008 samples: only 14 Phragmites shoots were identified as native haplotype E; 224 were non-native haplotype M. The retrospective analysis revealed primarily native haplotype individuals. Only collections made in Lancaster County, near Lincoln, NE, were haplotype M, and the earliest of these was collected in 1973. ?? 2011 Copyright by the Center for Great Plains Studies, University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

  11. African-Brazilians and Natives in an Elite University: The Impact of Affirmative Action on Students in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The best Brazilian universities are public, free of charge, and highly selective. At the beginning of the twentyfirst century, many public universities began to allocate places on all of their courses to underrepresented groups. The targets of these affirmative action policies were usually African-Brazilian and Native students coming from public schools. This article introduces data on Brazil’s higher education system since its early beginnings: its expansion, the segmentation between public ...

  12. Assessing plant community composition fails to capture impacts of white-tailed deer on native and invasive plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, Victoria; Dávalos, Andrea; Blossey, Bernd

    2017-07-01

    Excessive herbivory can have transformative effects on forest understory vegetation, converting diverse communities into depauperate ones, often with increased abundance of non-native plants. White-tailed deer are a problematic herbivore throughout much of eastern North America and alter forest understory community structure. Reducing (by culling) or eliminating (by fencing) deer herbivory is expected to return understory vegetation to a previously diverse condition. We examined this assumption from 1992 to 2006 at Fermilab (Batavia, IL) where a cull reduced white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) abundance in 1998/1999 by 90 % from 24.6 to 2.5/km(2), and at West Point, NY, where we assessed interactive effects of deer, earthworms, and invasive plants using 30 × 30 m paired fenced and open plots in 12 different forests from 2009 to 2012. We recorded not only plant community responses (species presence and cover) within 1 m(2) quadrats, but also responses of select individual species (growth, reproduction). At Fermilab, introduced Alliaria petiolata abundance initially increased as deer density increased, but then declined after deer reduction. The understory community responded to the deer cull by increased cover, species richness and height, and community composition changed but was dominated by early successional native forbs. At West Point plant community composition was affected by introduced earthworm density but not deer exclusion. Native plant cover increased and non-native plant cover decreased in fenced plots, thus keeping overall plant cover similar. At both sites native forb cover increased in response to deer reduction, but the anticipated response of understory vegetation failed to materialize at the community level. Deer-favoured forbs (Eurybia divaricata, Maianthemum racemosum, Polygonatum pubescens and Trillium recurvatum) grew taller and flowering probability increased in the absence of deer. Plant community monitoring fails to capture

  13. Aquatic macroinvertebrate responses to native and non-native predators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haddaway N. R.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-native species can profoundly affect native ecosystems through trophic interactions with native species. Native prey may respond differently to non-native versus native predators since they lack prior experience. Here we investigate antipredator responses of two common freshwater macroinvertebrates, Gammarus pulex and Potamopyrgus jenkinsi, to olfactory cues from three predators; sympatric native fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus, sympatric native crayfish (Austropotamobius pallipes, and novel invasive crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus. G. pulex responded differently to fish and crayfish; showing enhanced locomotion in response to fish, but a preference for the dark over the light in response to the crayfish. P.jenkinsi showed increased vertical migration in response to all three predator cues relative to controls. These different responses to fish and crayfish are hypothesised to reflect the predators’ differing predation types; benthic for crayfish and pelagic for fish. However, we found no difference in response to native versus invasive crayfish, indicating that prey naiveté is unlikely to drive the impacts of invasive crayfish. The Predator Recognition Continuum Hypothesis proposes that benefits of generalisable predator recognition outweigh costs when predators are diverse. Generalised responses of prey as observed here will be adaptive in the presence of an invader, and may reduce novel predators’ potential impacts.

  14. Indigenous Food Systems and Climate Change: Impacts of climatic shifts on the production and processing of native and traditional crops in the Bolivian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alder eKeleman Saxena

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Inhabitants of the high-mountain Andes have already begun to experience changes in the timing, severity, and patterning of annual weather cycles. These changes have important implications for agriculture, for human health, and for the conservation of biodiversity in the region. This paper examines the implications of climate-driven changes for native and traditional crops in the municipality of Colomi, Cochabamba, Bolivia. Data was collected between 2012 and 2014 via mixed-methods, qualitative fieldwork, including participatory workshops with female farmers and food preparers, semi-structured interviews with local agronomists, and participant observation. Drawing from this data, the paper describes a the observed impacts of changing weather patterns on agricultural production in the municipality of Colomi, Bolivia; and b the role of local environmental resources and conditions, including clean running water, temperature, and humidity, in the household processing techniques used to conserve and sometimes detoxify native crop and animal species, including potato (Solanum sp., oca (Oxalis tuberosa, tarwi (Lupinus mutabilis, papalisa (Ullucus tuberosus, and charkay (llama or sheep jerky. Analysis suggests that the effects of climatic changes on agriculture go beyond reductions in yield, also influencing how farmers make choices about the timing of planting, soil management, the use and spatial distribution of particular crop varieties. Further, household processing techniques to preserve and detoxify native foods rely on key environmental and climatic resources, which may be vulnerable to climatic shifts. While these findings are drawn from a single case-study, we suggest that Colomi agriculture characterizes larger patterns in what might be termed, indigenous food systems. Such systems are underrepresented in aggregate models of the impacts of climate change on world agriculture, and may be under different, more direct, and more immediate threat

  15. Indigenous Food Systems and Climate Change: Impacts of Climatic Shifts on the Production and Processing of Native and Traditional Crops in the Bolivian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keleman Saxena, Alder; Cadima Fuentes, Ximena; Gonzales Herbas, Rhimer; Humphries, Debbie L

    2016-01-01

    Inhabitants of the high-mountain Andes have already begun to experience changes in the timing, severity, and patterning of annual weather cycles. These changes have important implications for agriculture, for human health, and for the conservation of biodiversity in the region. This paper examines the implications of climate-driven changes for native and traditional crops in the municipality of Colomi, Cochabamba, Bolivia. Data were collected between 2012 and 2014 via mixed methods, qualitative fieldwork, including participatory workshops with female farmers and food preparers, semi-structured interviews with local agronomists, and participant observation. Drawing from this data, the paper describes (a) the observed impacts of changing weather patterns on agricultural production in the municipality of Colomi, Bolivia and (b) the role of local environmental resources and conditions, including clean running water, temperature, and humidity, in the household processing techniques used to conserve and sometimes detoxify native crop and animal species, including potato (Solanum sp.), oca (Oxalis tuberosa), tarwi (Lupinus mutabilis), papalisa (Ullucus tuberosus), and charke (llama or sheep jerky). Analysis suggests that the effects of climatic changes on agriculture go beyond reductions in yield, also influencing how farmers make choices about the timing of planting, soil management, and the use and spatial distribution of particular crop varieties. Furthermore, household processing techniques to preserve and detoxify native foods rely on key environmental and climatic resources, which may be vulnerable to climatic shifts. Although these findings are drawn from a single case study, we suggest that Colomi agriculture characterizes larger patterns in what might be termed, "indigenous food systems." Such systems are underrepresented in aggregate models of the impacts of climate change on world agriculture and may be under different, more direct, and more immediate threat

  16. Impacts of Stream Flow and Climate Variability on Native and Invasive Woody Species in a Riparian Ecosystem of a Semi-Arid Region of the Great Plains, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolaut, K.; Awada, T.; Cherubini, P.; Schapaugh, A.

    2012-12-01

    Riparian ecosystems support diverse plant communities that exert direct and indirect biological, physical and chemical influence on, and are influenced by, adjacent water through both above and below-ground interactions. Historically, riparian areas of the northern Great Plains, US have been dominated by the native Populus deltoides (eastern cottonwood). This species relies on regular floods for regeneration and groundwater access for success. Over the past sixty years, changes in flow management and agricultural practices, coupled with climate variability and drought have altered stream flow and caused a dramatic decline in stream water yields and levels of groundwater. These and other biotic and biotic factors have promoted the expansion of the upland native woody species Juniperus virginiana (eastern redcedar), and the invasion of the non-native (introduced) Elaeagnus angustifolia (Russian olive) into riparian ecosystems. This invasion has further altered the water balance in the system and exasperated the problem of water scarcity with negative feedback on ecosystem services and growth of native woody species. The ability of P. deltoides to re-establish and grow is of concern for natural resource managers. Tree ring analysis of annual growth rates were used to determine 1) the responses P. deltoides and invasive J. virginiana and E. angustifulia to climate variability and stream flow regulation, and 2) the impacts of the two invasive species on the growth of native P. deltoides. Results show a dependency of growth for P. deltoides on the previous year summer temperature, and a less significant correlation to annual stream flow. J. virginiana showed the highest correlation to annual stream flow, as well as some dependency on the previous growing season precipitation. While the growth of both P. deltoides and J. virginiana displayed greater dependence on climatic factors, E. angustifolia displayed the lowest mean basal area growth and deviation from the growth. E

  17. The impact of cardiac surgery in native valve infective endocarditis: Can euroSCORE guide patient selection?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Bruun, Louise E; Lund, Jens

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Decision making regarding surgical intervention in native valve endocarditis (NVE) is often complex and surgery is withheld in a number of patients either because medical treatment is considered the best treatment or because the risk of operation is considered too high. The objective....../contraindication for surgery. The additive and logistic euroSCORE was calculated and the observed and predicted mortality was compared. RESULTS: Cardiac surgery was associated with a good prognosis, in-hospital and after 12months, compared to conservative treatment. After adjustment for confounders surgery was associated...

  18. Large-scale impacts of multiple co-occurring invaders on monkey puzzle forest regeneration, native seed predators and their ecological interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Tella

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Most ecosystems of the world are being increasingly invaded by a variety of alien species. However, little is known about the combined ecological impacts of multiple co-occurring invaders. We assessed the impact of a community of exotic mammals (five domestic and four wild on forests of monkey puzzle (Araucaria araucana, a globally endangered tree restricted to ca 400 km2 on the slopes of the Andes in Chile and Argentina. Seeds of monkey puzzles provide food during winter to a small community of native mice and Austral parakeets (Enicognathus ferrugineus. We recorded the number of uneaten seeds and the number of young seedlings at the end of winter under 516 female monkey puzzle trees located across the species’ distribution, and identified the signals of native and exotic species that visited the under-canopy of each tree. Moreover, we studied the diet and foraging behavior of Austral parakeets to explore the potential indirect effects of exotic mammals through the disruption of a key ecosystem service (seed dispersal supposedly provided by parakeets. All but one tree were visited by at least one seed predator species. Austral parakeets and mice predated seeds from 85% and at least 45% of the trees, respectively, and both the number of remaining seeds and seedlings were significantly larger when only parakeets or mice predated seeds than when exotic mammals also visited the trees. At least 90% of trees were visited by one or more exotic species, and the number of seeds and seedlings dropped drastically when at least two and four exotic species visited the tree, respectively. Austral parakeets mostly foraged on monkey puzzle trees during the winter period and dispersed their seeds in most feeding instances once seeds fell to the ground. The proliferation of exotic mammals may reduce the populations of native seed-predators in the long-term as well as the regeneration of monkey puzzle forests, directly through a reduction of seed availability

  19. IMPACT OF CO2 ENHANCEMENT ON PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND PROTEIN PROFILE -RESPONSE STUDIES WITH A CO2 RESPONSIVE BLACK GRAM GENOTYPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sathish

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Black gram (Vigna mungo (L. Hepper var. IC-282009 - a highly CO2 responsive genotype for biomass and seed yield was grown in Open top chambers (OTCs under three levels of CO2 i.e. ambient (390 ppm and two elevated levels 550ppm and 700ppm to assess photosynthetic acclimation to elevated CO2. Net photosynthetic rate (PN, change in leaf soluble protein profile and leaf carbohydrate constituents such as total soluble sugars, reducing sugars and starch content in leaves was quantified at all three CO2 concentrations. Photosynthetic rate was enhanced by 78% and 30% at flowering stage with 550ppm and 700ppm CO2 as compared with ambient control. It was also observed a higher accumulation of starch, total soluble sugars and reducing sugars in leaves at elevated CO2 levels. However, the leaf protein content recorded a decrease and altered the profile of ploy peptides with enhanced CO2 levels. At elevated CO2 concentrations significant differences were observed in ploy peptide profile at vegetative and flowering stages, the intensity of 260 kDa poly peptide increased at vegetative stage, whereas 72 kDa polypeptide increased at flowering stage, while 52 kDa poly peptide decreased at both stages. Enhanced CO2 concentrations improved the PN though certain polypeptides of leaf protein are down regulated and necessitate further experimentation to confirm their involvement in responsiveness of the selected black gram genotype

  20. The impact of cardiac surgery in native valve infective endocarditis: Can euroSCORE guide patient selection?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Bruun, Louise E; Lund, Jens

    2010-01-01

    /contraindication for surgery. The additive and logistic euroSCORE was calculated and the observed and predicted mortality was compared. RESULTS: Cardiac surgery was associated with a good prognosis, in-hospital and after 12months, compared to conservative treatment. After adjustment for confounders surgery was associated...... with a survival benefit (hazard ratio (HR) 0.45, 95% CI: 0.27-0.76%; p=0.003). When propensity score was used in regression adjustment, cardiac surgery was still associated with a better outcome after 12months (HR 0.41, 95% CI: 0.25-0.68; p......BACKGROUND: Decision making regarding surgical intervention in native valve endocarditis (NVE) is often complex and surgery is withheld in a number of patients either because medical treatment is considered the best treatment or because the risk of operation is considered too high. The objective...

  1. Evaluating impacts of fire management strategies on native and invasive plants using an individual-based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangur, Alexander N.; Fill, Jennifer M.; Northfield, Tobin D.; van de Wiel, Marco

    2017-04-01

    The capacity for species to coexist and potentially exclude one another can broadly be attributed to drivers that influence fitness differences (such as competitive ability) and niche differences (such as environmental change). These drivers, and thus the determinants of coexistence they influence, can interact and fluctuate both spatially and temporally. Understanding the spatiotemporal variation in niche and fitness differences in systems prone to fluctuating drivers, such as fire, can help to inform the management of invasive species. In the Cape floristic region of South Africa, invasive Pinus pinaster seedlings are strong competitors in the post-burn environment of the fire-driven Fynbos vegetation. In this, system native Protea spp. are especially vulnerable to unseasonal burns, but seasonal prescribed (Summer) burns are thought to present a high safety risk. Together, these issues have limited the appeal of prescribed burn management as an alternative to costly manual eradication of P. pinaster. Using a spatially-explicit field-of-neighbourhood individual-based model, we represent the drivers of spatiotemporal variation in niche differences (driven by fire regimes) and fitness differences (driven by competitive ability). In doing so, we evaluate optimal fire management strategies to a) control invasive P. pinaster in the Cape floristic region of South Africa, while b) minimizing deleterious effects of management on native Protea spp. The scarcity of appropriate data for model calibration has been problematic for models in invasion biology, but we use recent advances in Approximate Bayesian Computing techniques to overcome this limitation. We present early conclusions on the viability of prescribed burn management to control P. pinaster in South Africa.

  2. Desmanthus GENOTYPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ HENRIQUE DE ALBUQUERQUE RANGEL

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Desmanthus is a genus of forage legumes with potential to improve pastures and livestock produc-tion on clay soils of dry tropical and subtropical regions such as the existing in Brazil and Australia. Despite this patterns of natural or enforced after-ripening of Desmanthus seeds have not been well established. Four year old seed banks of nine Desmanthus genotypes at James Cook University were accessed for their patterns of seed softe-ning in response to a range of temperatures. Persistent seed banks were found to exist under all of the studied ge-notypes. The largest seeds banks were found in the genotypes CPI 78373 and CPI 78382 and the smallest in the genotypes CPI’s 37143, 67643, and 83563. An increase in the percentage of softened seeds was correlated with higher temperatures, in two patterns of response: in some accessions seeds were not significantly affected by tempe-ratures below 80º C; and in others, seeds become soft when temperature rose to as little as 60 ºC. At 80 °C the heat started to depress germination. High seed production of Desmanthus associated with dependence of seeds on eleva-ted temperatures to softening can be a very important strategy for plants to survive in dry tropical regions.

  3. Trial Protocol: Using genotype to tailor prescribing of nicotine replacement therapy: a randomised controlled trial assessing impact of communication upon adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prevost A Toby

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The behavioural impact of pharmacogenomics is untested; informing smokers of genetic test results for responsiveness to smoking cessation medication may increase adherence to this medication. The objective of this trial is to estimate the impact upon adherence to nicotine replacement therapy (NRT of informing smokers that their oral dose of NRT has been tailored to a DNA analysis. Hypotheses to be tested are as follows: IAdherence to NRT is greater among smokers informed that their oral dose of NRT is tailored to an analysis of DNA (genotype, compared to one tailored to nicotine dependence questionnaire score (phenotype. II Amongst smokers who fail to quit at six months, motivation to make another quit attempt is lower when informed that their oral dose of NRT was tailored to genotype rather than phenotype. Methods/Design An open label, parallel groups randomised trial in which 630 adult smokers (smoking 10 or more cigarettes daily using National Health Service (NHS stop smoking services in primary care are randomly allocated to one of two groups: i. NRT oral dose tailored by DNA analysis (OPRM1 gene (genotype, or ii. NRT oral dose tailored by nicotine dependence questionnaire score (phenotype The primary outcome is proportion of prescribed NRT consumed in the first 28 days following an initial quit attempt, with the secondary outcome being motivation to make another quit attempt, amongst smokers not abstinent at six months. Other outcomes include adherence to NRT in the first seven days and biochemically validated smoking abstinence at six months. The primary outcome will be collected on 630 smokers allowing sufficient power to detect a 7.5% difference in mean proportion of NRT consumed using a two-tailed test at the 5% level of significance between groups. The proportion of all NRT consumed in the first four weeks of quitting will be compared between arms using an independent samples t-test and by estimating the 95

  4. The role of habitat-selection in restricting invasive blue mussel advancement to protect native populations in San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, N.; Saarman, N. P.; Pogson, G.

    2013-12-01

    Introduced species contribute to decline of biodiversity and ecosystem services. Introduced species threaten native species by increasing competition for space and resources, changing their habitat, and disrupting species interactions. Protecting native species is crucial to preserving ecosystem services (i.e. medicinal, agricultural, ecological, and cultural benefits) for future generations. In marine communities, the number of invasive species is dramatically increasing every year, further magnifying the negative impact on native species. This research determines if habitat-specific selection can protect native species from their invasive relatives, and could allow targeted habitat restoration for native species to maintain high levels of biodiversity. Blue mussels provide an ideal system for studying the impact of an invasive species (Mytilus galloprovincialis) on native mussels (M. trossulus), because M. galloprovincialis is marked as one of the world's 100 worst invasive species. Hybridization between M. galloprovincialis and M. trossulus occurs wherever their distributions overlap (i.e. Japan, Puget Sound, and central California). In central California, hybrids form in a broad variety of habitats ever since M. galloprovincialis was introduced about 100 years ago. The current level of threat posed to native mussels in central California is unknown. When population growth rate of an invasive species is higher than the native within a hybrid zone, the invader's genes become more prominent in the hybrids than the native species' genes. This uneven mix of genes and decrease of pure native mussels threatens to drive M. trossulus to extinction. Therefore, it is important to research which environment fosters highest success of pure native species. We conducted a field experiment in San Francisco Bay where mussels were reared in different habitats. We then collected samples and extracted DNA from each treatment, and genotyped them by a next-generation sequencing

  5. BDNF Val 66 Met and 5-HTTLPR genotype moderate the impact of early psychosocial adversity on plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor and depressive symptoms: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchmann, Arlette F; Hellweg, Rainer; Rietschel, Marcella; Treutlein, Jens; Witt, Stephanie H; Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Schmidt, Martin H; Esser, Günter; Banaschewski, Tobias; Laucht, Manfred; Deuschle, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Recent studies have emphasized an important role for neurotrophins, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), in regulating the plasticity of neural circuits involved in the pathophysiology of stress-related diseases. The aim of the present study was to examine the interplay of the BDNF Val⁶⁶Met and the serotonin transporter promoter (5-HTTLPR) polymorphisms in moderating the impact of early-life adversity on BDNF plasma concentration and depressive symptoms. Participants were taken from an epidemiological cohort study following the long-term outcome of early risk factors from birth into young adulthood. In 259 individuals (119 males, 140 females), genotyped for the BDNF Val⁶⁶Met and the 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms, plasma BDNF was assessed at the age of 19 years. In addition, participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Early adversity was determined according to a family adversity index assessed at 3 months of age. Results indicated that individuals homozygous for both the BDNF Val and the 5-HTTLPR L allele showed significantly reduced BDNF levels following exposure to high adversity. In contrast, BDNF levels appeared to be unaffected by early psychosocial adversity in carriers of the BDNF Met or the 5-HTTLPR S allele. While the former group appeared to be most susceptible to depressive symptoms, the impact of early adversity was less pronounced in the latter group. This is the first preliminary evidence indicating that early-life adverse experiences may have lasting sequelae for plasma BDNF levels in humans, highlighting that the susceptibility to this effect is moderated by BDNF Val⁶⁶Met and 5-HTTLPR genotype.

  6. Invasive species' leaf traits and dissimilarity from natives shape their impact on nitrogen cycling: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Marissa R; Bernhardt, Emily S; van Bodegom, Peter M; Cornelissen, J Hans C; Kattge, Jens; Laughlin, Daniel C; Niinemets, Ülo; Peñuelas, Josep; Reich, Peter B; Yguel, Benjamin; Wright, Justin P

    2017-01-01

    Many exotic species have little apparent impact on ecosystem processes, whereas others have dramatic consequences for human and ecosystem health. There is growing evidence that invasions foster eutrophication. We need to identify species that are harmful and systems that are vulnerable to anticipate these consequences. Species' traits may provide the necessary insights. We conducted a global meta-analysis to determine whether plant leaf and litter functional traits, and particularly leaf and litter nitrogen (N) content and carbon: nitrogen (C : N) ratio, explain variation in invasive species' impacts on soil N cycling. Dissimilarity in leaf and litter traits among invaded and noninvaded plant communities control the magnitude and direction of invasion impacts on N cycling. Invasions that caused the greatest increases in soil inorganic N and mineralization rates had a much greater litter N content and lower litter C : N in the invaded than the reference community. Trait dissimilarities were better predictors than the trait values of invasive species alone. Quantifying baseline community tissue traits, in addition to those of the invasive species, is critical to understanding the impacts of invasion on soil N cycling. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. The impact of drying on structure of sedimentary organic matter in wetlands: Probing with native and amended polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zucheng; Liu, Zhanfei; Liu, Min; Xu, Kehui; Mayer, Lawrence M

    2016-10-15

    Wetland sediments undergo dry-wet cycles that may change their structural properties and affect geochemical behavior of associated organic compounds. In this study, we examined the effect of drying on particle size distributions and the rapid (24h) sorption reactions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with salt marsh sediments in Nueces Delta, South Texas. Drying reduced the fraction of fine particles in organically richer sediments, indicating structural rearrangement of organic matter and mineral aggregates. Among the 16 EPA priority PAHs examined, dried sediment preferentially released 1.0-7.5% of phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene to added seawater (solid: water mass ratio of 1/100) - significantly greater than release from sediments maintained in the wet state. On the other hand, drying also increased the affinity of sedimentary organic matter (SOM) for experimentally amended (deuterated) phenanthrene relative to continually wet sediments. Further, deuterated phenanthrene was even more effectively retained when it was added to wet sediment that was subsequently dried and rewetted. These apparently contradictory results can be reconciled and explained by SOM having a heterogeneous distribution of hydrophobic and hydrophilic zones - e.g., a zonal model. We propose that drying changed the orientation of amphiphilic SOM, exposing hydrophobic zones and promoting the release of some of their native PAHs to water. Freshly amended PAHs were only able to penetrate into the surface hydrophobic zone and/or deeper but rapidly accessible ("kinetic") zone in wet sediments due to the brief adsorption contact time. Subsequent drying presumably then induced structural changes in SOM that isolated these amended PAHs in sites inaccessible to water exchange in the next rewetting. These results provide insights into structural changes of SOM upon drying, and help predict the fate of compounds such as organic contaminants during drought/flood oscillations.

  8. Impact on parents of HLA-DQ2/DQ8 genotyping in healthy children from coeliac families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, Margreet M. S.; Vriezinga, Sabine L.; Koletzko, Sybille; Werkstetter, Katharina; Castillejo-De Villasante, Gemma; Shamir, Raanan; Hartman, Corina; Putter, Hein; van der Pal, Sylvia M.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Bravi, Enzo; Mearin, M. Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Due to the association of coeliac disease and HLA-specificities DQ2 and DQ8, HLA-typing can be used for risk determination of the disease. This study was designed to evaluate the knowledge of parents from coeliac families regarding HLA-typing and the impact of HLA-typing on the perception of the hea

  9. Genotype-phenotype correlation in a cohort of Portuguese patients comprising the entire spectrum of VWD types: impact of NGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidalgo, Teresa; Salvado, Ramon; Corrales, Irene; Pinto, Silva Catarina; Borràs, Nina; Oliveira, Ana; Martinho, Patricia; Ferreira, Gisela; Almeida, Helena; Oliveira, Cristina; Marques, Dalila; Gonçalves, Elsa; Diniz, MJoão; Antunes, Margarida; Tavares, Alice; Caetano, Gonçalo; Kjöllerström, Paula; Maia, Raquel; Sevivas, Teresa S; Vidal, Francisco; Ribeiro, Leticia

    2016-07-01

    The diagnosis of von Willebrand disease (VWD), the most common inherited bleeding disorder, is characterised by a variable bleeding tendency and heterogeneous laboratory phenotype. The sequencing of the entire VWF coding region has not yet become a routine practice in diagnostic laboratories owing to its high costs. Nevertheless, next-generation sequencing (NGS) has emerged as an alternative to overcome this limitation. We aimed to determine the correlation of genotype and phenotype in 92 Portuguese individuals from 60 unrelated families with VWD; therefore, we directly sequenced VWF. We compared the classical Sanger sequencing approach and NGS to assess the value-added effect on the analysis of the mutation distribution in different types of VWD. Sixty-two different VWF mutations were identified, 27 of which had not been previously described. NGS detected 26 additional mutations, contributing to a broad overview of the mutant alleles present in each VWD type. Twenty-nine probands (48.3 %) had two or more mutations; in addition, mutations with pleiotropic effects were detected, and NGS allowed an appropriate classification for seven of them. Furthermore, the differential diagnosis between VWD 2B and platelet type VWD (n = 1), Bernard-Soulier syndrome and VWD 2B (n = 1), and mild haemophilia A and VWD 2N (n = 2) was possible. NGS provided an efficient laboratory workflow for analysing VWF. These findings in our cohort of Portuguese patients support the proposal that improving VWD diagnosis strategies will enhance clinical and laboratory approaches, allowing to establish the most appropriate treatment for each patient.

  10. 政府采购的本土创新效应研究%The Impact of Government Procurement on Native Innovation Capabilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜彩楼; 查颖

    2016-01-01

    政府采购是创新实践领域的重要工具。分析了我国政府采购制度演化历程,将研发活动分为两个阶段,以2002-2011年我国内地29个省级单位的面板数据为样本,构建计量模型检验了政府采购对我国本土创新的影响。研究结果表明,政府采购有效促进了本土创新过程中的研发设计和产品转化,国内私人需求、国外市场需求和研发投入也有效促进了本土创新;研发人力资本投入对研发设计创新有显著的抑制作用,对产品转化创新有显著的促进作用。最后,根据研究结果,提出了相应的建议。%Government procurement is important policy instrument in innovation practice.This study analyzes the evolution of government procurement.The innovation process is divided into two parts,and the paper tests the impact of govern-ment procurement on native innovation capabilities with based 29 provincial-level samples from 2002 to 2011 with econo-metrics model.The results show that government procurement has promoted the native innovation capabilities,as well as the domestic market,overseas markets and R&D inputs.The R&D talent inputs has depressed the R&D capabilities, while promoted the transfer capabilities.Some policy suggests are given in the end.

  11. Impact of γ-rays on seed germination/short-term storage in four native alpine species: Correlation with free radical and antioxidant profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zani, Deborah; Dondi, Daniele; Araújo, Susana; Mondoni, Andrea; Balestrazzi, Alma

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the impact of gamma (γ) radiation on seeds was investigated in four native alpine species, Campanula barbata L., Cirsium spinosissinum (L.) Scop., Plantago alpina L., and Silene vulgaris (Moench) Garcke. Seeds were γ-irradiated with 100 and 200 Gy total doses delivered at a high dose rate of 2.7 Gy min-1. Irradiated and non-irradiated seeds were used immediately, and subsequently 7 and 14 days after drying (15% Relative Humidity, 15 °C) to assess their response to standard seed bank processing. Germination rates, seedling length and weight, antioxidant activity and phenolics content were measured, while free radical accumulation profiles were acquired by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Germination was only hampered in irradiated C. barbata seeds. C. barbata and C. spinosissinum seedlings obtained from irradiated seeds suffered a decrease in length and weight, while growth was not affected in P. alpina and S. vulgaris, when compared to non-irradiated control. Although profiles of seed antioxidant activity were not influenced immediately after γ-irradiation, subsequent drying under seed bank standards induced changes in seed antioxidant activity, depending on the species. According to EPR data, C. barbata and C. Spinosissinum seeds revealed high free radical levels in non-irradiated samples, which were further enhanced by γ-irradiation. An opposite behaviour was observed in P. alpina and S. vulgaris. The four alpine species showed different profiles of γ-ray sensitivity. The reported data encourage future research to test inter-specific variability in the plant response to γ-rays based on a multidisciplinary approach which integrates environmental data. Considering that seeds of alpine plants are short-lived in storage, γ-irradiation could emerge as a promissory priming tool for native endangered species.

  12. Ecological aspects and potential impacts of the non-native hydromedusa Blackfordia virginica in a temperate estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Filipa; Angélico, Maria Manuel; Costa, José Lino; Teodósio, Maria Alexandra; Presado, Patrícia; Fernandes, António; Chainho, Paula; Domingos, Isabel

    2017-10-01

    The hydrozoan Blackfordia virginica has been reported over a wide geographical area, although it is mainly restricted to scattered records within estuarine areas of temperate and tropical regions. The aim of this study was to understand the spatial and temporal variability of an established population of this non-indigenous species on a temperate estuarine ecosystem, and its impacts over the plankton community. Sampling was conducted from 2011 to 2013 in the Mira estuary (Portugal) and higher densities were observed during the summer of 2013, with a maximum of 1689.3 medusae.m-3. Spatially, higher abundances of medusae were associated with sites of higher abundance of oyster shells and higher percentage of hard substrate in the river bed. Smaller jellyfish were sampled in the vicinity of these hard substrate locations, suggesting these might be habitats for polyp fixation. A higher potential predation impact on the copepod population along the estuary was estimated for the summer of 2013, with a median half life of 6.1 days.

  13. Native iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Charles Kent

    2015-01-01

    , a situation unique in the Solar System. In such a world, iron metal is unstable and, as we all know, oxidizes to the ferric iron compounds we call 'rust'. If we require iron metal it must be produced at high temperatures by reacting iron ore, usually a mixture of ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) oxides (Fe2O3......, hematite, or FeO.Fe2O3, magnetite), with carbon in the form of coke. This is carried out in a blast furnace. Although the Earth's core consists of metallic iron, which may also be present in parts of the mantle, this is inaccessible to us, so we must make our own. In West Greenland, however, some almost...... unique examples of iron metal, otherwise called 'native iron' or 'telluric iron', occur naturally....

  14. Muddied waters: suspended sediment impacts on gill structure and aerobic scope in an endangered native and an invasive freshwater crayfish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosewarne, P.J.; Svendsen, Jon Christian; Mortimer, R.J.G.

    2014-01-01

    Suspended sediment (SS) loadings in freshwater habitats have increased over the past century and SS is now a significant environmental stressor. Greater tolerance to environmental stressors has been proposed as a factor in the success of aquatic invasive species. Further, parasites may interact...... with environmental stressors to increase host susceptibility to loss of fitness and mortality. We compared the effects of SS exposure on the gill structure and aerobic scope of the endangered white-clawed crayfish (Austropotamobius pallipes), and the invasive signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus), and assessed...... impacts in relation to parasite burden. SS caused gill fouling and reduction in aerobic scope in both species, though A. pallipes was more susceptible than invasive P. leniusculus. The parasite Branchiobdella astaci, a crayfish worm that infests the gills, interacted with the sediment to affect gill...

  15. Host heterogeneity influences the impact of a non-native disease invasion on populations of a foundation tree species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jules, Erik S.; Carroll, Allyson L.; Garcia, Andrea M.; Steenbock, Christopher M.; Kauffman, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Invasive pathogens are becoming increasingly important in forested ecosystems, yet they are often difficult to study because of their rapid transmission. The rate and extent of pathogen spread are thought to be partially controlled by variation in host characteristics, such as when host size and location influence susceptibility. Few host-pathogen systems, however, have been used to test this prediction. We used Port Orford cedar (Chamaecyparis lawsoniana), a foundation tree species in riparian areas of California and Oregon (USA), and the invasive oomycete Phytophthora lateralis to assess pathogen impacts and the role of host characteristics on invasion. Across three streams that had been infected for 13–18 years by P. lateralis, we mapped 2241 trees and determined whether they had been infected using dendrochronology. The infection probability of trees was governed by host size (diameter at breast height [DBH]) and geomorphic position (e.g., active channel, stream bank, floodplain, etc.) similarly across streams. For instance, only 23% of trees DBH were infected, while 69% of trees ≥20 cm DBH were infected. Presumably, because spores of P. lateralis are transported downstream in water, they are more likely to encounter well-developed root systems of larger trees. Also because of this water-transport of spores, differences in infection probability were found across the geomorphic positions: 59% of cedar in the active channel and the stream bank (combined) were infected, while 23% of trees found on higher geomorphic types were infected. Overall, 32% of cedar had been infected across the three streams. However, 63% of the total cedar basal area had been killed, because the greatest number of trees, and the largest trees, were found in the most susceptible positions. In the active channel and stream bank, 91% of the basal area was infected, while 46% was infected across higher geomorphic positions. The invasion of Port Orford cedar populations by

  16. Impacts of prescribed burning on soil greenhouse gas fluxes in a suburban native forest of south-eastern Queensland, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Prescribed burning is a forest management practice that is widely used in Australia to reduce the risk of damaging wildfires. It can affect both carbon (C and nitrogen (N cycling in the forest and thereby influence the soil–atmosphere exchange of major greenhouse gases, i.e. carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O. To quantify the impact of a prescribed burning (conducted on 27 May 2014 on greenhouse gas exchange and the potential controlling mechanisms, we carried out a series of field measurements before (August 2013 and after (August 2014 and November 2014 the fire. Gas exchange rates were determined at 4 replicate sites which were burned during the combustion and another 4 adjacent unburned sites located in green islands, using a set of static chambers. Surface soil properties including temperature, pH, moisture, soil C and N pools were also determined either by in situ measurement or by analysing surface 10 cm soil samples. All of the chamber measurements indicated a net sink of atmospheric CH4, with mean CH4 uptake ranging from 1.15 to 1.99 mg m−2 day−1. The burning significantly enhanced CH4 uptake as indicated by the significant higher CH4 uptake rates at the burned sites measured in August 2014. While within the next 3 months the CH4 uptake rate was recovered to pre-burning levels. Mean CO2 emission from forest soils ranged from 2721.76 to 7113.49 mg m−2 day−1. The effect of prescribed burning on CO2 emission was limited within the first 3 months, as no significant difference was observed between the burned and the adjacent unburned sites in both August and November 2014. The temporal dynamics of the CO2 emission presented more seasonal variations, rather than burning effects. The N2O emission at the studied sites was quite low, and no significant impact of burning was observed. The changes in understory plants and litter layers, surface soil temperature, C and N substrate availability and microbial activities

  17. The Clinical and Economic Impact of Genotype Testing at First-line Antiretroviral Therapy Failure for HIV-Infected Patients in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levison, Julie H.; Wood, Robin; Scott, Callie A.; Ciaranello, Andrea L.; Martinson, Neil A.; Rusu, Corina; Losina, Elena; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Walensky, Rochelle P.

    2013-01-01

    Background. In resource-limited settings, genotype testing at virologic failure on first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) may identify patients with wild-type (WT) virus. After adherence counseling, these patients may safely and effectively continue first-line ART, thereby delaying more expensive second-line ART. Methods. We used the Cost-Effectiveness of Preventing AIDS Complications International model of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease to simulate a South African cohort of HIV-infected adults at first-line ART failure. Two strategies were examined: no genotype vs genotype, assuming availability of protease inhibitor–based second-line ART. Model inputs at first-line ART failure were mean age 38 years, mean CD4 173/µL, and WT virus prevalence 20%; genotype cost was $300 per test and delay to results, 3 months. Outcomes included life expectancy, per-person costs (2010 US dollars), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (dollars per years of life saved [YLS]). Results. No genotype had a projected life expectancy of 106.1 months, which with genotype increased to 108.3 months. Per-person discounted lifetime costs were $16 360 and $16 540, respectively. Compared to no genotype, genotype was very cost-effective, by international guidance, at $900/YLS. The cost-effectiveness of genotype was sensitive to prevalence of WT virus (very cost-effective when prevalence ≥12%), CD4 at first-line ART failure, and ART efficacy. Genotype-associated delays in care ≥5 months decreased survival and made no genotype the preferred strategy. When the test cost was ART failure is very cost-effective in South Africa. The cost-effectiveness of this strategy will depend on prevalence of WT virus and timely response to genotype results. PMID:23087386

  18. Evaluation of impacted Brazilian estuaries using the native oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae: Branchial carbonic anhydrase as a biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo-Linhares, Maristela; Freire, Carolina A

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the use of branchial carbonic anhydrase activity in a sessile filter feeding species, the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae, as a biomarker. The oysters were collected in three human impacted Brazilian estuaries, following a crescent latitudinal gradient: in Pernambuco state (Itamaracá), in Espírito Santo state (Piraquê), and in Paraná state (Paranaguá), in August/2003 (Winter in the southern hemisphere) and February/2004 (Summer). Three sites were chosen in each estuary for oyster sampling: Reference (R), Contaminated 1 (C1, close to industrial/harbor contamination), and Contaminated 2 (C2, near to sewage discharges). Comparing to values in oysters sampled in reference sites, there was apparent inhibition in carbonic anhydrase activity (CAA) in gills of oysters from C1 of Itamaracá and from C2 of Piraquê, both cases in Summer. On the other hand, increased CAA was noted in C2 oysters of Itamaracá in winter, and of Paranaguá, in both seasons. Branchial CAA in C. rhizophorae was thus very responsive to coastal contamination. Data are consistent with its usefulness as a supporting biomarker for inexpensive and rapid analysis in the assessment of estuaries using a sessile osmoconformer species, but preferably allied to other biomarkers and with knowledge on the suite of contaminants present. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Geographical Distribution of Trypanosoma cruzi Genotypes in Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Hernán J.; Segovia, Maikell; Llewellyn, Martin S.; Morocoima, Antonio; Urdaneta-Morales, Servio; Martínez, Cinda; Martínez, Clara E.; Garcia, Carlos; Rodríguez, Marlenes; Espinosa, Raul; de Noya, Belkisyolé A.; Díaz-Bello, Zoraida; Herrera, Leidi; Fitzpatrick, Sinead; Yeo, Matthew; Miles, Michael A.; Feliciangeli, M. Dora

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease is an endemic zoonosis native to the Americas and is caused by the kinetoplastid protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The parasite is also highly genetically diverse, with six discrete typing units (DTUs) reported TcI – TcVI. These DTUs broadly correlate with several epidemiogical, ecological and pathological features of Chagas disease. In this manuscript we report the most comprehensive evaluation to date of the genetic diversity of T. cruzi in Venezuela. The dataset includes 778 samples collected and genotyped over the last twelve years from multiple hosts and vectors, including nine wild and domestic mammalian host species, and seven species of triatomine bug, as well as from human sources. Most isolates (732) can be assigned to the TcI clade (94.1%); 24 to the TcIV group (3.1%) and 22 to TcIII (2.8%). Importantly, among the 95 isolates genotyped from human disease cases, 79% belonged to TcI - a DTU common in the Americas, however, 21% belonged to TcIV- a little known genotype previously thought to be rare in humans. Furthermore, were able to assign multiple oral Chagas diseases cases to TcI in the area around the capital, Caracas. We discuss our findings in the context of T. cruzi DTU distributions elsewhere in the Americas, and evaluate the impact they have on the future of Chagas disease control in Venezuela. PMID:22745843

  20. Impact of mechanical stress on ion transport in native lung epithelium (Xenopus laevis): short-term activation of Na+, Cl (-) and K+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Roman; Veith, Christine; Clauss, Wolfgang; Fronius, Martin

    2008-09-01

    Epithelia, in general, and the lung epithelium, in particular, are exposed to mechanical forces, but little is known about their impact on pulmonary ion transport. In our present study, we employed transepithelial ion transport measurements on Xenopus lung preparations using custom-built Ussing chambers. Tissues were exposed to mechanical stress by increasing the water column (5 cm) at one side of the tissues. Apical exposure to hydrostatic pressure significantly decreased the short circuit current (I (SC): 24 +/- 1%, n = 152), slightly decreased the transepithelial resistance (R (T): 7 +/- 2%, n = 152), but increased the apical membrane capacitance (C (M): 16 +/- 6%, n = 9). The pressure-induced effect was sensitive to Na+ (amiloride), Cl(-) (DIDS, NFA, NPPB) and K+ channel blockers (Ba2+), glibenclamide). Further on, it was accompanied by increased extracellular ATP levels. The results show that mechanical stress leads to an activation of Na+, Cl(-), and K+ conductances in a native pulmonary epithelium resulting in a net decrease of ion absorption. This could be of considerable interest, since an altered ion transport may contribute to pathophysiological conditions, e.g., the formation of pulmonary edema during artificial ventilation.

  1. The Impact of Anjir –tangeh Coal Washing Plant on Concentration of Some Heavy Metals in the Native Vegetation, Mazandaran Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Safari Sinegani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A large volume of tailings has been produced in Anjir-tangeh coal washing plant for 22 years of human activity. The coal washing activities have reduced plant diversity near the plant. The environmental impact of coal washing plant on the vegetation around the factory was studied in two seasons. The concentrations of Pb, Cd and Cr, measured in different native plant species, were in normal ranges in summer. In fall, the concentrations of Pb, Cd and Cr in the plants around the factory were similar to those in plants in the control area. In summer, however, the metal concentrations were considerably higher in plants grown near the factory than in the plants of the control area. This difference was statistically significant at 0.01 levels for Cd, but not for Pb and Cr. Among the studied plant species, Oxalis Sphad the highest Cd concentration (0.409 ppm, but Chenopodium album L had the lowest Cr concentration in summer. Season was an effective factor in the uptake of heavy metals by plants; metal concentration in plants was considerably higher in fall than in summer.

  2. Will climate change impact the potential distribution of a native vine (Merremia peltata) which is behaving invasively in the Pacific region?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Subhashni; Kumar, Lalit

    2016-02-01

    Merremia peltata is a species with uncertain status in the island nations of the Pacific region. It has been designated introduced and invasive in some countries whereas it is considered native in others. Recent increase in its abundance across some island landscapes have led to calls for its designation as an invasive species of environmental concern with biological control being suggested as a control strategy. Climate change will add to the complications of managing this species since changes in climate will influence its range limits. In this study, we develop a process-oriented niche model of M. peltata using CLIMEX to investigate the impacts of climate change on its potential distribution. Information on the climatic requirements of M. peltata and its current geographic distribution were used to calibrate the model. The results indicate that under current climate, 273,132 km(2) of the land area in the region is climatically unsuitable or marginal for M. peltata whereas 664,524 km(2) is suitable to highly suitable. Under current climate, areas of climatic suitability for M. peltata were identified on the archipelagos of Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu. By the end of the century, some archipelagos like Fiji, Hawaii, New Caledonia and Vanuatu will probably become more suitable while PNG and Solomon Islands become less suitable for M. peltata. The results can be used to inform biosecurity planning, management and conservation strategies on islands.

  3. The INCA trial (Impact of NOD2 genotype-guided antibiotic prevention on survival in patients with liver Cirrhosis and Ascites): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Markus; Mengel, Martin; Fuhrmann, Christine; Herrmann, Eva; Appenrodt, Beate; Schiedermaier, Peter; Reichert, Matthias; Bruns, Tony; Engelmann, Cornelius; Grünhage, Frank; Lammert, Frank

    2015-03-08

    Patients with liver cirrhosis have a highly elevated risk of developing bacterial infections that significantly decrease survival rates. One of the most relevant infections is spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP). Recently, NOD2 germline variants were found to be potential predictors of the development of infectious complications and mortality in patients with cirrhosis. The aim of the INCA (Impact of NOD2 genotype-guided antibiotic prevention on survival in patients with liver Cirrhosis and Ascites) trial is to investigate whether survival of this genetically defined high-risk group of patients with cirrhosis defined by the presence of NOD2 variants is improved by primary antibiotic prophylaxis of SBP. The INCA trial is a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial with two parallel treatment arms (arm 1: norfloxacin 400 mg once daily; arm 2: placebo once daily; 12-month treatment and observational period). Balanced randomization of 186 eligible patients with stratification for the protein content of the ascites (INCA trial is first in the field of hepatology aimed at rapidly transferring and validating information on individual genetic risk into clinical decision algorithms. German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00005616 . Registered 22 January 2014. EU Clinical Trials Register EudraCT 2013-001626-26 . Registered 26 January 2015.

  4. Native Americans with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read the MMWR Science Clips Native Americans with Diabetes Better diabetes care can decrease kidney failure Language: ... between 1996 and 2013. Problem Kidney failure from diabetes was highest among Native Americans. Native Americans are ...

  5. Impact Of Thermotherapy And Chlorothalonil On Plantlets Production Of Some Genotypes Of Cassava Manihot Esculenta Crantz Produce In Benin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cassava Manihot esculenta is a starchy root plant of great economic importance in sub-Saharan Africa and particularly in Benin. Its production is confronted to virus diseases which cause a considerable losses of yield. This work aims to determine the impact of thermotherapy and chlorothalonil in the production of cassava material of plantation. Cuttings of four varieties RB89509 BEN86052 9102319 92B0057 are cultivated under two conditions of thermotherapy and a control under greenhouse during 4 weeks. These different conditions are a closed drying oven with 16 hours photoperiod at 40 C the day and 36C the night a drying oven Binder with photoperiod of 12 hours at 38C the day and 28C the night and the control carried out under the conditions of the greenhouse. The media used was Murashige and Skoog MS added with various amounts of chlorothalonil 0.6 gl and 2gl and control without chlorothalonil. Both techniques of thermotherapy eliminate the virus symptoms of cassava at the rate of 0 seedling infected in thermotherapy against 16 seedlings in natural condition. The technique of closed drying oven significantly favors the production of nodes at 5 level p0.000 and shoots p0.02 on the other hand Binder drying oven has no significant effect on the production of shoots p0.68. The chlorothalonil had a positive effect on in vitro infestations elimination of cassava p0.05 but influenced the growth and development of cassava explants by reducing of nodes production p0.01 without a lethal effect on the plantlets until the dose of 2gl.

  6. Impact on parents of HLA-DQ2/DQ8 genotyping in healthy children from coeliac families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Margreet M S; Vriezinga, Sabine L; Koletzko, Sybille; Werkstetter, Katharina; Castillejo-De Villasante, Gemma; Shamir, Raanan; Hartman, Corina; Putter, Hein; van der Pal, Sylvia M; Wijmenga, Cisca; Bravi, Enzo; Mearin, M Luisa

    2015-03-01

    Due to the association of coeliac disease and HLA-specificities DQ2 and DQ8, HLA-typing can be used for risk determination of the disease. This study was designed to evaluate the knowledge of parents from coeliac families regarding HLA-typing and the impact of HLA-typing on the perception of the health of their children. A structured questionnaire was sent to the Dutch, Spanish and German parents participating with their child in the European PreventCD study on disease prevention in high-risk families, addressing parents' understanding of and attitude towards HLA-typing, distress related to HLA-typing and perceived health and health-related quality of life of their children. Sixty-eight percent of parents of 515 children returned the questionnaires, with 85% of children being DQ2/DQ8 positive. The majority of all parents answered the questions on knowledge correctly. Forty-eight percent of parents of DQ2/DQ8-negative children thought their child could develop coeliac disease. More distress was reported by parents of DQ2/DQ8-positive children (Pparents showed few regrets and would repeat HLA-typing in future children. Perceived health and health-related quality of life were similar. In conclusion, we can say that misinterpretation of DQ2/DQ8-negative results by parents is frequent. DQ2/DQ8-positive results do not affect perceived health and health-related quality of life of children but may cause temporary negative feelings among parents. Parents of coeliac families seem to support HLA-typing.

  7. Sociocultural Variables That Impact High School Students' Perceptions of Native Fauna: a Study on the Species Component of the Biodiversity Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Gonzalo M. A.; Battistón, Luisina V.; García Capocasa, María C.; De Longhi, Ana L.

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates the influence of school sector (private versus state schools) and student gender on knowledge of native fauna. Our main objectives were (a) to describe the knowledge of high school students from the province of Cordoba, Argentina with respect to native animal species, (b) to determine if any exotic species (introduced or domestic) are considered native, and (c) to analyze the effects of school sector and gender on the students' knowledge of the native fauna. In total, 321 students aged 15-18 from 14 urban schools (8 state and 6 private schools) were asked to write down ten animals native to Córdoba, Argentina, in a free-list questionnaire. Relative frequencies and Generalized Linear Mixed Models (GLMM) were used to analyze the categorized (animal names) and continuous answers (quantity of responses, number of native animals, etc.), with the 25 most frequently mentioned species showing a predominance of native ones, of which "Puma" ( Puma concolor) and "Andean condor" ( Vultur gryphus) were the most prominent. An overrepresentation of mammalian species compared to other classes of chordates was also found, with high school students mentioning native and domestic species higher on the free-list. Using GLMM, we found that school sector had a significant effect on the number of native animals mentioned at both national and local levels, and on domestic and mixed species. Finally, male students mentioned more species and more native animals than their female counterparts. These findings were interpreted and discussed in light of sociocultural and traditional ecological knowledge theories, from which several implications arose related to research and practice.

  8. Short-term impacts of soil amendments on belowground C cycling and soil nutrition in two contrasting Pinus taeda L. genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael C Tyree; John R Seiler; Christopher Maier

    2011-01-01

    We monitored two Pinus taeda L. genotypes, planted in 170 L lysimeters, subjected to different combinations of fertilization and logging residue (LR) incorporation for 1 year. The objectives were to elucidate how soil amendments modified soil biological properties and belowground C cycling, and secondly, to determine if planting of contrasting genotypes have a...

  9. Walking in Balance: Native American Recovery Programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Owen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews Native American ritual practices, frameworks and key concepts employed by several substance abuse treatments centres in the U.S. and Canada. It also examines the way Alcoholics Anonymous’ Twelve Step programme has been modified to attract and serve the needs of Native Americans and First Nations and its potential impact on the ritual practices. Native concepts of wellbeing are highlighted and linked to the idea of living in “balance”.

  10. Impact of genotype-specific herd immunity on the circulatory dynamism of norovirus: a 10-year longitudinal study of viral acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakon, Naomi; Yamazaki, Kenji; Nakata, Keiko; Kanbayashi, Daiki; Yoda, Tomoko; Mantani, Masanobu; Kase, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Kazuo; Komano, Jun

    2015-03-15

    Human norovirus is a major cause of viral acute gastroenteritis worldwide. However, the transition of endemic norovirus genotypes remains poorly understood. The characteristics of natural immunity against norovirus are unclear because few studies have been performed in the natural infection setting. This prospective 10-year surveillance study of acute gastroenteritis in the province of Osaka, Japan, revealed that norovirus spread shows temporal, geographic, and age group-specific features in the humans. Genogroup II genotype 4 (GII.4) was detected in most sporadic pediatric cases, as well as in foodborne and nursing home outbreaks, respectively. The dominant genotypes in outbreaks at childcare facilities and schools shifted every season and involved GI, GII.2, GII.3, GII.4, and GII.6. Evidence at both the facility and individual levels indicated that genotype-specific herd immunity lasted long enough to influence the endemic norovirus genotype in the next season. Thus, norovirus circulates through human populations in a uniquely dynamic fashion.

  11. Sero-prevalence of bovine Johne's disease in buffaloes and cattle population of North India using indigenous ELISA kit based on native Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis 'Bison type' genotype of goat origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S V; Singh, A V; Singh, R; Sharma, S; Shukla, N; Misra, S; Singh, P K; Sohal, J S; Kumar, H; Patil, P K; Misra, P; Sandhu, K S

    2008-09-01

    Present pilot study is the first attempt in the country to estimate sero-prevalence of Bovine Johne's disease (BJD) by screening cattle and buffaloes representing large population belonging to farmer's and farm herds in the home tracts (Uttar Pradesh (UP) and Punjab) of Hariana cattle and Murrah buffaloes in North India. Indigenous and in-house plate ELISA kit (using protoplasmic antigen from native Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis 'Bison type' strain of goat origin), originally developed for goats and sheep was standardized in bovines and used for screening. For this study, 33 villages of south and west UP were randomly selected and surveyed from 2001 to 2003. There were 7943 farmer's families having 38,251 livestock, including cattle, buffaloes, goats and sheep (per family 4.8% livestock). Numerically, buffaloes and cattle were 54.7% and 22.1%, respectively. Serum samples were collected from 726 animals (4.2% of 16, 981 livestock with 4375 farmer's families) located in 33 randomly surveyed villages. Serum samples (699), submitted to Epidemiology Department of Veterinary College (Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana), in the year 2004 by farmer's and organized farm herds (Buffaloes, 372, Cattle, 327), were screened by this ELISA kit. Soluble protoplasmic antigen was prepared from Map (S 5) 'Bison type' strain isolated from a terminally sick goat with Johne's disease. Of the total 1425 bovine (Buffaloes and cattle) serum samples screened using indigenous ELISA kit, sero-prevalence of Johne's disease was 29.0% (28.6% in buffalo and 29.8% in cattle) in Northern India. State-wise sero-prevalence was 31.9% and 23.3% in UP and Punjab, respectively. In UP, of the 601 randomly sampled buffaloes, sero-prevalence was 40.3% (16.6% in young and 40.9% adults) and 25.5% (10.5% in young and 26.3% adults) in south and west UP, respectively. Of the 125 cattle screened, sero-prevalence was 42.6% (nil in young and 44.4% adults) and 30.0% (nil in young and 30.6% adults

  12. Educational outreach and impacts of white-tailed deer browse on native and invasive plants at the Crooked Creek Environmental Learning Center, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Lisa O.

    Overabundance of deer can assist the intrusion of invasive plants through browse, leading to homogenization of plant communities. Public attitudes towards native and invasive plant species and white-tailed deer browse related to personal experiences, can be changed through education focusing public awareness of ramifications of deer browse on native and invasive plants. I developed an interactive, interpretive Self-Guided Walking Tour brochure of the "You Can Trail" to provide an educational outreach program for visitors of Crooked Creek Environmental Learning Center that includes ecologically important native and invasive plants species from my investigation. This research study focuses on the overall abundance of native and invasive plant species once Odocoileus virginianus have been removed from the landscape during collection periods in June and September 2013 from exclosure and access plots that were maintained for seven years. Similarity of abundance were found in native and invasive abundance of forbs, bushes and percentage of ground cover. Differences included native bush volume being greater than invasive bush volume in the access plot in June with opposing results in the exclosure plot, being greater in invasive bush volume. However, in September, native and invasive bush volume was similar within the exclosure plot, while invasive bush volume decreased in the access plot. Invasive vines recorded in the June access plot were absent in the September collection period.

  13. Integrating subsistence practice and species distribution modeling: assessing invasive elodea’s potential impact on Native Alaskan subsistence of Chinook salmon and whitefish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luizza, Matthew; Evangelista, Paul; Jarnevich, Catherine S.; West, Amanda; Stewart, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Alaska has one of the most rapidly changing climates on earth and is experiencing an accelerated rate of human disturbance, including resource extraction and transportation infrastructure development. Combined, these factors increase the state’s vulnerability to biological invasion, which can have acute negative impacts on ecological integrity and subsistence practices. Of growing concern is the spread of Alaska’s first documented freshwater aquatic invasive plant Elodea spp. (elodea). In this study, we modeled the suitable habitat of elodea using global and state-specific species occurrence records and environmental variables, in concert with an ensemble of model algorithms. Furthermore, we sought to incorporate local subsistence concerns by using Native Alaskan knowledge and available statewide subsistence harvest data to assess the potential threat posed by elodea to Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and whitefish (Coregonus nelsonii) subsistence. State models were applied to future climate (2040–2059) using five general circulation models best suited for Alaska. Model evaluations indicated that our results had moderate to strong predictability, with area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve values above 0.80 and classification accuracies ranging from 66 to 89 %. State models provided a more robust assessment of elodea habitat suitability. These ensembles revealed different levels of management concern statewide, based on the interaction of fish subsistence patterns, known spawning and rearing sites, and elodea habitat suitability, thus highlighting regions with additional need for targeted monitoring. Our results suggest that this approach can hold great utility for invasion risk assessments and better facilitate the inclusion of local stakeholder concerns in conservation planning and management.

  14. Assessing the impacts of river regulation on native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi) habitats in the upper Flathead River, Montana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Jones, Leslie A.; Kotter, D.; Miller, William J.; Geise, Doran; Tohtz, Joel; Marotz, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork Flathead River, Montana, USA, has modified the natural flow regimen for power generation, flood risk management and flow augmentation for anadromous fish recovery in the Columbia River. Concern over the detrimental effects of dam operations on native resident fishes prompted research to quantify the impacts of alternative flow management strategies on threatened bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi) habitats. Seasonal and life‐stage specific habitat suitability criteria were combined with a two‐dimensional hydrodynamic habitat model to assess discharge effects on usable habitats. Telemetry data used to construct seasonal habitat suitability curves revealed that subadult (fish that emigrated from natal streams to the river system) bull trout move to shallow, low‐velocity shoreline areas at night, which are most sensitive to flow fluctuations. Habitat time series analyses comparing the natural flow regimen (predam, 1929–1952) with five postdam flow management strategies (1953–2008) show that the natural flow conditions optimize the critical bull trout habitats and that the current strategy best resembles the natural flow conditions of all postdam periods. Late summer flow augmentation for anadromous fish recovery, however, produces higher discharges than predam conditions, which reduces the availability of usable habitat during this critical growing season. Our results suggest that past flow management policies that created sporadic streamflow fluctuations were likely detrimental to resident salmonids and that natural flow management strategies will likely improve the chances of protecting key ecosystem processes and help to maintain and restore threatened bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout populations in the upper Columbia River Basin.

  15. Integrating subsistence practice and species distribution modeling: assessing invasive elodea's potential impact on Native Alaskan subsistence of Chinook salmon and whitefish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luizza, Matthew W.; Evangelista, Paul H.; Jarnevich, Catherine S.; West, Amanda; Stewart, Heather

    2016-07-01

    Alaska has one of the most rapidly changing climates on earth and is experiencing an accelerated rate of human disturbance, including resource extraction and transportation infrastructure development. Combined, these factors increase the state's vulnerability to biological invasion, which can have acute negative impacts on ecological integrity and subsistence practices. Of growing concern is the spread of Alaska's first documented freshwater aquatic invasive plant Elodea spp. (elodea). In this study, we modeled the suitable habitat of elodea using global and state-specific species occurrence records and environmental variables, in concert with an ensemble of model algorithms. Furthermore, we sought to incorporate local subsistence concerns by using Native Alaskan knowledge and available statewide subsistence harvest data to assess the potential threat posed by elodea to Chinook salmon ( Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and whitefish ( Coregonus nelsonii) subsistence. State models were applied to future climate (2040-2059) using five general circulation models best suited for Alaska. Model evaluations indicated that our results had moderate to strong predictability, with area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve values above 0.80 and classification accuracies ranging from 66 to 89 %. State models provided a more robust assessment of elodea habitat suitability. These ensembles revealed different levels of management concern statewide, based on the interaction of fish subsistence patterns, known spawning and rearing sites, and elodea habitat suitability, thus highlighting regions with additional need for targeted monitoring. Our results suggest that this approach can hold great utility for invasion risk assessments and better facilitate the inclusion of local stakeholder concerns in conservation planning and management.

  16. Impact of obesity on the bioavailability of peginterferon-α2a and ribavirin and treatment outcome for chronic hepatitis C genotype 2 or 3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åsa Alsiö

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Having a body mass index above or equal to 30 kg/m(2 in conjunction with chronic hepatitis C virus infection is associated with non-responsiveness to treatment with interferon and ribavirin, but details regarding the mechanisms whereby obesity reduces the efficacy of therapy remain unclear. METHODS: This study evaluated impact of obesity on outcome as well as interferon and ribavirin concentrations following standard-of-care fixed dosing with peginterferon-α2a 180 µg once weekly and ribavirin 800 mg daily among 303 HCV genotype 2/3-infected patients enrolled in the per-protocol analysis of a recently completed phase III trial (NORDynamIC. RESULTS: Patients with BMI ≥30 kg/m(2 showed poorer outcome following 24 weeks of therapy (SVR 62% vs. 89% for BMI ≥30 vs. <30; P = 0.006 along with significantly higher steatosis grade (P = 0.002, HOMA-IR (P<0.0001, triglyceride levels (P = 0.0002, and baseline viral load (P = 0.028. Obesity was also significantly associated with lower plasma interferon concentrations on days 3, 7, and 29 (P = 0.02, P = 0.0017, and P<0.0001, respectively and lower plasma ribavirin concentrations day 29 (P = 0.025, and lower concentration of interferon in turn was associated with a poorer first phase reduction in HCV RNA (P<0.0001. In multivariate analysis, ribavirin concentrations week 12, interferon concentrations day 29, and baseline HCV RNA levels were independent predictors of achieving SVR among patients treated for 24 weeks (n = 140. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced bioavailability of interferon and ribavirin along with higher baseline viral load are dominant risk factors for treatment failure in obese patients with chronic hepatitis C.

  17. Circulating Fibroblast Growth Factor-23 Level and Paraoxonase-1 Lactonase Activity in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients: Their Impact on the Incidence of Native AV Fistula Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohny, Samir F; El-Fattah, Mahmoud Abd; Khan, Jalaluddin A

    2016-10-14

    Thrombosis of native arteriovenous (AV) fistula is an important cause of complications in hemodialysis (HD) patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness of measuring circulating fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) level and paraoxonase-1 (PON1) lactonase activity as potential predictors of native AV fistula thrombosis in chronic HD patients. This study included 83 HD patients (48 with thrombosed and 35 with non-thrombosed native AV fistulas) and 38 healthy volunteers. Serum FGF-23 level was measured using the ELISA technique, while serum PON1 lactonase activity was measured spectrophotometrically using gamma-thiobutyrolactone as a substrate. FGF-23 was significantly increased while PON1 lactonase was markedly decreased in both thrombosed and non-thrombosed HD patients compared with controls (P AV fistulas compared with HD patients with non-thrombosed native AV fistulas (P = 0.001 and 0.002, respectively). A significant negative correlation was found between FGF-23 and PON1 lactonase in HD patients with thrombosed native AV fistulas (r = -0.342, P = 0.017). This study shows a potential value of FGF-23 and PON1 lactonase as predictors of native AV fistula thrombosis in HD patients.

  18. Vapour pressure deficit during growth has little impact on genotypic differences of transpiration efficiency at leaf and whole-plant level: an example from Populus nigra L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheed, Fahad; Dreyer, Erwin; Richard, Béatrice; Brignolas, Franck; Brendel, Oliver; Le Thiec, Didier

    2015-04-01

    Poplar genotypes differ in transpiration efficiency (TE) at leaf and whole-plant level under similar conditions. We tested whether atmospheric vapour pressure deficit (VPD) affected TE to the same extent across genotypes. Six Populus nigra genotypes were grown under two VPD. We recorded (1) (13)C content in soluble sugars; (2) (18)O enrichment in leaf water; (3) leaf-level gas exchange; and (4) whole-plant biomass accumulation and water use. Whole-plant and intrinsic leaf TE and (13)C content in soluble sugars differed significantly among genotypes. Stomatal conductance contributed more to these differences than net CO2 assimilation rate. VPD increased water use and reduced whole-plant TE. It increased intrinsic leaf-level TE due to a decline in stomatal conductance. It also promoted higher (18)O enrichment in leaf water. VPD had no genotype-specific effect. We detected a deviation in the relationship between (13)C in leaf sugars and (13)C predicted from gas exchange and the standard discrimination model. This may be partly due to genotypic differences in mesophyll conductance, and to its lack of sensitivity to VPD. Leaf-level (13)C discrimination was a powerful predictor of the genetic variability of whole-plant TE irrespective of VPD during growth. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Native American Student Resiliency within Southwestern Tribal Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralez, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the degree to which Native American culture impacts the resiliency of Native American students earning degrees at three tribal colleges in the southwestern part of the United States. This study was a qualitative case study that was based on the following research question: "How does Native American…

  20. Irrigation to enhance native seed production for Great Basin restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton C. Shock; Erik B. G. Feibert; Nancy L. Shaw; Myrtle P. Shock; Lamont D. Saunders

    2015-01-01

    Native shrublands and their associated grasses and forbs have been disappearing from the Great Basin as a result of grazing practices, exotic weed invasions, altered fire regimes, climate change and other human impacts. Native forb seed is needed to restore these areas. The irrigation requirements for maximum seed production of four key native forb species (Eriogonum...

  1. Tolerance of native and non-native fish species to chemical stress: a case study for the River Rhine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Fedorenkova; J.A. Vonk; A.M. Breure; A.J. Hendriks; R.S.E.W. Leuven

    2013-01-01

    Freshwater ecosystems can be impacted by invasive species. Non-native species can become invasive due to their high tolerance to environmental stressors (e.g., pollution and habitat modifications). Yet, tolerance of native and non-native fish species exposed simultaneously to multiple chemical stres

  2. Native Health Research Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... APP WITH JAVASCRIPT TURNED OFF. THE NATIVE HEALTH DATABASE REQUIRES JAVASCRIPT IN ORDER TO FUNCTION. PLEASE ENTER ... To learn more about searching the Native Health Database, click here. Keywords Title Author Source of Publication ...

  3. Natural enemies and their impacts on emerald ash borer populations in its native range, with new records of parasitism by two species of beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    To investigate the natural enemies of the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), and their role in regulating the pest population dynamics, we conducted field surveys at multiple forest sites with variable host densities in the pest’s native range (north an...

  4. The impact of genotyping-by-sequencing pipelines on SNP discovery and identification of markers associated verticillium wilt resistance in autotetraploid alfalfa (sedicago sativa l.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verticillium wilt (VW) of alfalfa is a soilborne disease that causes severe yield loss in alfalfa. To identify molecular markers associated with VW resistance, an integrated framework of genome-wide association study (GWAS) with high-throughput genotyping by sequencing (GBS) was used for mapping lo...

  5. Impact of IL28B-Related Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms on Liver Histopathology in Chronic Hepatitis C Genotype 2 and 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rembeck, Karolina; Alsiö, Asa; Christensen, Peer Brehm

    2012-01-01

    Recently, several genome-wide association studies have revealed that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in proximity to IL28B predict spontaneous clearance of HCV infection as well as outcome following peginterferon and ribavirin therapy among HCV genotype 1 infected patients. The present stu...

  6. Randomized Trial Evaluating the Impact of Ribavirin Mono-Therapy and Double Dosing on Viral Kinetics, Ribavirin Pharmacokinetics and Anemia in Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldenström, Jesper; Westin, Johan; Nyström, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    In this pilot study (RibaC), 58 hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infected treatment-naïve patients were randomized to (i) 2 weeks ribavirin double dosing concomitant with pegylated interferon-α (pegIFN-α), (ii) 4 weeks ribavirin mono-therapy prior to adding pegIFN-α, or (iii) standard-of-care (...

  7. A Europe-wide experiment for assessing the impact of genotype-environment interactions on the vitality and performance of honey bee colonies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, Cecilia; Büchler, Ralph; Berg, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    An international experiment to estimate the importance of genotype-environment interactions on vitality and performance of honey bees and on colony losses was run between July 2009 and March 2012. Altogether 621 bee colonies, involving 16 different genetic origins of European honey bees, were tes...

  8. 外来寄生虫入侵及其对土著宿主的影响%Invasion of Alien Parasites and Its Impacts on Native Hosts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔萌萌; 李文祥

    2016-01-01

    Biological invasion is a major threat to native species and biodiversity.Invasive parasites are introduced with the alien hosts and also considered as invasive species.In this paper,parasites invading processes including species introduction,population establishment and host switching were summarized by analyzing invasion cases of exotic parasites.Generally,the invasive parasites were more virulent in native hosts than in the co-introduced alien host.Some invasive parasites resulted in direct or indirect death of native hosts and some species decreased repro-duction ability of native hosts populations,consequently decreasing community diversity of native hosts.We also discussed the control and management of parasite invasion according to the invasive process of parasites:firstly,to avoid translocation of parasites with the introduction of hosts by taking early warning measures,including transporta-tion management and introduced species management ;then,to prevent establishment of parasite population by e-radicating reservoir hosts,controlling vectors,vaccinating susceptible hosts and implementing habitat management;finally,to take mitigation measures such as managing native host and vector population,cutting off corridors to limit further invasive spread.%生物入侵严重威胁着土著物种和生物多样性,外来物种带来的寄生虫入侵问题也应该引起相应的重视。结合外来寄生虫的入侵案例,阐述了寄生虫的引入、种群建立和宿主转移等入侵过程。通常寄生虫入侵后,致病力会变得更大,有些会直接引起土著宿主的死亡,有些间接引起宿主死亡,有的则引起繁殖力下降,从而降低土著宿主的群落多样性,讨论了寄生虫入侵的管理和控制。

  9. NATIVE VS NON-NATIVE ENGLISH TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masrizal Masrizal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the majority of English language teachers worldwide are non-native English speakers (NNS, no research was conducted on these teachers until recently. A pioneer research by Peter Medgyes in 1994 took quite a long time until the other researchers found their interests in this issue. There is a widespread stereotype that a native speaker (NS is by nature the best person to teach his/her foreign language. In regard to this assumption, we then see a very limited room and opportunities for a non native teacher to teach language that is not his/hers. The aim of this article is to analyze the differences among these teachers in order to prove that non-native teachers have equal advantages that should be taken into account. The writer expects that the result of this short article could be a valuable input to the area of teaching English as a foreign language in Indonesia.

  10. Invasive prey indirectly increase predation on their native competitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castorani, Max C N; Hovel, Kevin A

    2015-07-01

    Ecological theory predicts that invasive prey can interact with native prey directly by competing for shared resources or indirectly by changing the abundance or behavior of shared native predators. However, both the study and management of invasive prey have historically overlooked indirect effects. In southern California estuaries, introduction of the Asian nest mussel Arcuatula senhousia has been linked to profound changes in native bivalve assemblages, but the mechanisms of these interactions remain unclear. We performed three field experiments to assess the mechanisms of competition between Arcuatula and native bivalves, and evaluated the potential for Arcuatula to indirectly mediate native predator-prey dynamics. We found that Arcuatula reduces the diversity, abundance, and size of native bivalve recruits by preemptively exploiting space in surface sediments. When paired with native shallow-dwelling clams (Chione undatella and Laevicardium substriatum), Arcuatula reduces adult survival through overgrowth competition. However, Arcuatula also attracts native predators, causing apparent competition by indirectly increasing predation of native clams, especially for poorly defended species. Therefore, invasive prey can indirectly increase predation rates on native competitors by changing the behavior of shared native predators, but the magnitude of apparent competition strongly depends on the vulnerability of natives to predation. Interestingly, our results indicate that the vulnerability of invasive prey to predation can greatly exacerbate impacts on their native competitors. Our findings suggest that consideration of both direct and indirect effects of invasive prey, as well as native predator-prey relationships, should lead to more effective invasive species management.

  11. Positive effects of non-native grasses on the growth of a native annual in a southern california ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pec, Gregory J; Carlton, Gary C

    2014-01-01

    Fire disturbance is considered a major factor in the promotion of non-native plant species. Non-native grasses are adapted to fire and can alter environmental conditions and reduce resource availability in native coastal sage scrub and chaparral communities of southern California. In these communities persistence of non-native grasses following fire can inhibit establishment and growth of woody species. This may allow certain native herbaceous species to colonize and persist beneath gaps in the canopy. A field manipulative experiment with control, litter, and bare ground treatments was used to examine the impact of non-native grasses on growth and establishment of a native herbaceous species, Cryptantha muricata. C. muricata seedling survival, growth, and reproduction were greatest in the control treatment where non-native grasses were present. C. muricata plants growing in the presence of non-native grasses produced more than twice the number of flowers and more than twice the reproductive biomass of plants growing in the treatments where non-native grasses were removed. Total biomass and number of fruits were also greater in the plants growing in the presence of non-native grasses. Total biomass and reproductive biomass was also greater in late germinants than early germinants growing in the presence of non-native grasses. This study suggests a potential positive effect of non-native grasses on the performance of a particular native annual in a southern California ecosystem.

  12. Positive Effects of Non-Native Grasses on the Growth of a Native Annual in a Southern California Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pec, Gregory J.; Carlton, Gary C.

    2014-01-01

    Fire disturbance is considered a major factor in the promotion of non-native plant species. Non-native grasses are adapted to fire and can alter environmental conditions and reduce resource availability in native coastal sage scrub and chaparral communities of southern California. In these communities persistence of non-native grasses following fire can inhibit establishment and growth of woody species. This may allow certain native herbaceous species to colonize and persist beneath gaps in the canopy. A field manipulative experiment with control, litter, and bare ground treatments was used to examine the impact of non-native grasses on growth and establishment of a native herbaceous species, Cryptantha muricata. C. muricata seedling survival, growth, and reproduction were greatest in the control treatment where non-native grasses were present. C. muricata plants growing in the presence of non-native grasses produced more than twice the number of flowers and more than twice the reproductive biomass of plants growing in the treatments where non-native grasses were removed. Total biomass and number of fruits were also greater in the plants growing in the presence of non-native grasses. Total biomass and reproductive biomass was also greater in late germinants than early germinants growing in the presence of non-native grasses. This study suggests a potential positive effect of non-native grasses on the performance of a particular native annual in a southern California ecosystem. PMID:25379790

  13. Genotype adaptability and stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Miodrag

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the primary concerns in breeding programs is a small genotype reaction to environmental factor variation for better usage of yield genetic potential. Particularly if one takes in consideration that yield could van greatly because of more and more variable meteorological conditions. Studies conducted to observe genotype and environmental relations relay on numerous mathematical models, but genotype behavior in various ecological conditions is not, still, precisely defined Major sources of variation influencing genotype behavior in different environments are genotype/environment interaction, genetic background and environmental conditions. These factors could play an important role in establishing growth regions for maximal realization of genotype genetic potential, as well as in selection of genotypes having better response to complex requirements of particular growth region. Stability, the genotype ability to perform high, uniform yield no meter of different environmental conditions, and adaptability, genotype ability to give uniform yield in a different environmental conditions, are two common terms used to define genotype reaction in a consequence of environmental changes. Most of the models dealing with stability and adaptability are based on variation sources appearing under the influence of treatment, multivariate effects and residue. No meter which statistical model is used for GE interaction estimation, there is an opinion that no solid proof for the existence of stable genotypes obtained in breeding programs, which make some space for further investigations. There are still questions to answer dealing with definitions, sources of variation, usage value of existent models and interpretation of the results. .

  14. Genotypic Tannin Levels in Populus tremula Impact the Way Nitrogen Enrichment Affects Growth and Allocation Responses for Some Traits and Not for Others.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Bandau

    Full Text Available Plant intraspecific variability has been proposed as a key mechanism by which plants adapt to environmental change. In boreal forests where nitrogen availability is strongly limited, nitrogen addition happens indirectly through atmospheric N deposition and directly through industrial forest fertilization. These anthropogenic inputs of N have numerous environmental consequences, including shifts in plant species composition and reductions in plant species diversity. However, we know less about how genetic differences within plant populations determine how species respond to eutrophication in boreal forests. According to plant defense theories, nitrogen addition will cause plants to shift carbon allocation more towards growth and less to chemical defense, potentially enhancing vulnerability to antagonists. Aspens are keystone species in boreal forests that produce condensed tannins to serve as chemical defense. We conducted an experiment using ten Populus tremula genotypes from the Swedish Aspen Collection that express extreme levels of baseline investment into foliar condensed tannins. We investigated whether investment into growth and phenolic defense compounds in young plants varied in response to two nitrogen addition levels, corresponding to atmospheric N deposition and industrial forest fertilization. Nitrogen addition generally caused growth to increase, and tannin levels to decrease; however, individualistic responses among genotypes were found for height growth, biomass of specific tissues, root:shoot ratios, and tissue lignin and N concentrations. A genotype's baseline ability to produce and store condensed tannins also influenced plant responses to N, although this effect was relatively minor. High-tannin genotypes tended to grow less biomass under low nitrogen levels and more at the highest fertilization level. Thus, the ability in aspen to produce foliar tannins is likely associated with a steeper reaction norm of growth responses

  15. Genotypic Tannin Levels in Populus tremula Impact the Way Nitrogen Enrichment Affects Growth and Allocation Responses for Some Traits and Not for Others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandau, Franziska; Decker, Vicki Huizu Guo; Gundale, Michael J; Albrectsen, Benedicte Riber

    2015-01-01

    Plant intraspecific variability has been proposed as a key mechanism by which plants adapt to environmental change. In boreal forests where nitrogen availability is strongly limited, nitrogen addition happens indirectly through atmospheric N deposition and directly through industrial forest fertilization. These anthropogenic inputs of N have numerous environmental consequences, including shifts in plant species composition and reductions in plant species diversity. However, we know less about how genetic differences within plant populations determine how species respond to eutrophication in boreal forests. According to plant defense theories, nitrogen addition will cause plants to shift carbon allocation more towards growth and less to chemical defense, potentially enhancing vulnerability to antagonists. Aspens are keystone species in boreal forests that produce condensed tannins to serve as chemical defense. We conducted an experiment using ten Populus tremula genotypes from the Swedish Aspen Collection that express extreme levels of baseline investment into foliar condensed tannins. We investigated whether investment into growth and phenolic defense compounds in young plants varied in response to two nitrogen addition levels, corresponding to atmospheric N deposition and industrial forest fertilization. Nitrogen addition generally caused growth to increase, and tannin levels to decrease; however, individualistic responses among genotypes were found for height growth, biomass of specific tissues, root:shoot ratios, and tissue lignin and N concentrations. A genotype's baseline ability to produce and store condensed tannins also influenced plant responses to N, although this effect was relatively minor. High-tannin genotypes tended to grow less biomass under low nitrogen levels and more at the highest fertilization level. Thus, the ability in aspen to produce foliar tannins is likely associated with a steeper reaction norm of growth responses, which suggests a

  16. The Impact of Genotyping-by-Sequencing Pipelines on SNP Discovery and Identification of Markers Associated with Verticillium Wilt Resistance in Autotetraploid Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Long-Xi; Zheng, Ping; Bhamidimarri, Suresh; Liu, Xiang-Ping; Main, Dorie

    2017-01-01

    Verticillium wilt (VW) of alfalfa is a soilborne disease causing severe yield loss in alfalfa. To identify molecular markers associated with VW resistance, we used an integrated framework of genome-wide association study (GWAS) with high-throughput genotyping by sequencing (GBS) to identify loci associated with VW resistance in an F1 full-sib alfalfa population. Phenotyping was performed using manual inoculation of the pathogen to cloned plants of each individual and disease severity was scored using a standard scale. Genotyping was done by GBS, followed by genotype calling using three bioinformatics pipelines including the TASSEL-GBS pipeline (TASSEL), the Universal Network Enabled Analysis Kit (UNEAK), and the haplotype-based FreeBayes pipeline (FreeBayes). The resulting numbers of SNPs, marker density, minor allele frequency (MAF) and heterozygosity were compared among the pipelines. The TASSEL pipeline generated more markers with the highest density and MAF, whereas the highest heterozygosity was obtained by the UNEAK pipeline. The FreeBayes pipeline generated tetraploid genotypes, with the least number of markers. SNP markers generated from each pipeline were used independently for marker-trait association. Markers significantly associated with VW resistance identified by each pipeline were compared. Similar marker loci were found on chromosomes 5, 6, and 7, whereas different loci on chromosome 1, 2, 3, and 4 were identified by different pipelines. Most significant markers were located on chromosome 6 and they were identified by all three pipelines. Of those identified, several loci were linked to known genes whose functions are involved in the plants’ resistance to pathogens. Further investigation on these loci and their linked genes would provide insight into understanding molecular mechanisms of VW resistance in alfalfa. Functional markers closely linked to the resistance loci would be useful for MAS to improve alfalfa cultivars with enhanced resistance

  17. Randomized Trial Evaluating the Impact of Ribavirin Mono-Therapy and Double Dosing on Viral Kinetics, Ribavirin Pharmacokinetics and Anemia in Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldenström, Jesper; Westin, Johan; Nyström, Kristina;

    2016-01-01

    In this pilot study (RibaC), 58 hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infected treatment-naïve patients were randomized to (i) 2 weeks ribavirin double dosing concomitant with pegylated interferon-α (pegIFN-α), (ii) 4 weeks ribavirin mono-therapy prior to adding pegIFN-α, or (iii) standard-of-care (......In this pilot study (RibaC), 58 hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infected treatment-naïve patients were randomized to (i) 2 weeks ribavirin double dosing concomitant with pegylated interferon-α (pegIFN-α), (ii) 4 weeks ribavirin mono-therapy prior to adding pegIFN-α, or (iii) standard......, by day 14, double dosing entailed a greater hemoglobin decline as compared to SOC (2.2 vs. 1.4 g/dL; P = 0.03). Conclusion: Ribavirin down-regulates IP-10, and may have an anti-viral effect differently regulated across IL28B genotypes....

  18. Maximal stomatal conductance to water and plasticity in stomatal traits differ between native and invasive introduced lineages of Phragmites australis in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douhovnikoff, V; Taylor, S H; Hazelton, E L G; Smith, C M; O'Brien, J

    2016-01-27

    The fitness costs of reproduction by clonal growth can include a limited ability to adapt to environmental and temporal heterogeneity. Paradoxically, some facultatively clonal species are not only able to survive, but colonize, thrive and expand in heterogeneous environments. This is likely due to the capacity for acclimation (sensu stricto) that compensates for the fitness costs and complements the ecological advantages of clonality. Introduced Phragmites australis demonstrates great phenotypic plasticity in response to temperature, nutrient availability, geographic gradient, water depths, habitat fertility, atmospheric CO2, interspecific competition and intraspecific competition for light. However, no in situ comparative subspecies studies have explored the difference in plasticity between the non-invasive native lineage and the highly invasive introduced lineage. Clonality of the native and introduced lineages makes it possible to control for genetic variation, making P. australis a unique system for the comparative study of plasticity. Using previously identified clonal genotypes, we investigated differences in their phenotypic plasticity through measurements of the lengths and densities of stomata on both the abaxial (lower) and adaxial (upper) surfaces of leaves, and synthesized these measurements to estimate impacts on maximum stomatal conductance to water (gwmax). Results demonstrated that at three marsh sites, invasive lineages have consistently greater gwmax than their native congeners, as a result of greater stomatal densities and smaller stomata. Our analysis also suggests that phenotypic plasticity, determined as within-genotype variation in gwmax, of the invasive lineage is similar to, or exceeds, that shown by the native lineage.

  19. Reconstructing Native American population history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, David; Patterson, Nick; Campbell, Desmond; Tandon, Arti; Mazieres, Stéphane; Ray, Nicolas; Parra, Maria V; Rojas, Winston; Duque, Constanza; Mesa, Natalia; García, Luis F; Triana, Omar; Blair, Silvia; Maestre, Amanda; Dib, Juan C; Bravi, Claudio M; Bailliet, Graciela; Corach, Daniel; Hünemeier, Tábita; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Salzano, Francisco M; Petzl-Erler, María Luiza; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Riba, Laura; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Lopez-Alarcón, Mardia; Coral-Vazquez, Ramón; Canto-Cetina, Thelma; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Fernandez-Lopez, Juan Carlos; Contreras, Alejandra V; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Gómez-Vázquez, Maria José; Molina, Julio; Carracedo, Angel; Salas, Antonio; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Witonsky, David B; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Sukernik, Rem I; Osipova, Ludmila; Fedorova, Sardana A; Vasquez, René; Villena, Mercedes; Moreau, Claudia; Barrantes, Ramiro; Pauls, David; Excoffier, Laurent; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Larrouy, Georges; Klitz, William; Labuda, Damian; Kidd, Judith; Kidd, Kenneth; Di Rienzo, Anna; Freimer, Nelson B; Price, Alkes L; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2012-08-16

    The peopling of the Americas has been the subject of extensive genetic, archaeological and linguistic research; however, central questions remain unresolved. One contentious issue is whether the settlement occurred by means of a single migration or multiple streams of migration from Siberia. The pattern of dispersals within the Americas is also poorly understood. To address these questions at a higher resolution than was previously possible, we assembled data from 52 Native American and 17 Siberian groups genotyped at 364,470 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Here we show that Native Americans descend from at least three streams of Asian gene flow. Most descend entirely from a single ancestral population that we call 'First American'. However, speakers of Eskimo-Aleut languages from the Arctic inherit almost half their ancestry from a second stream of Asian gene flow, and the Na-Dene-speaking Chipewyan from Canada inherit roughly one-tenth of their ancestry from a third stream. We show that the initial peopling followed a southward expansion facilitated by the coast, with sequential population splits and little gene flow after divergence, especially in South America. A major exception is in Chibchan speakers on both sides of the Panama isthmus, who have ancestry from both North and South America.

  20. Reconstructing Native American Population History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, David; Patterson, Nick; Campbell, Desmond; Tandon, Arti; Mazieres, Stéphane; Ray, Nicolas; Parra, Maria V.; Rojas, Winston; Duque, Constanza; Mesa, Natalia; García, Luis F.; Triana, Omar; Blair, Silvia; Maestre, Amanda; Dib, Juan C.; Bravi, Claudio M.; Bailliet, Graciela; Corach, Daniel; Hünemeier, Tábita; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Salzano, Francisco M.; Petzl-Erler, María Luiza; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Riba, Laura; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Lopez-Alarcón, Mardia; Coral-Vazquez, Ramón; Canto-Cetina, Thelma; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Fernandez-Lopez, Juan Carlos; Contreras, Alejandra V.; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Gómez-Vázquez, María José; Molina, Julio; Carracedo, Ángel; Salas, Antonio; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Witonsky, David B.; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Sukernik, Rem I.; Osipova, Ludmila; Fedorova, Sardana; Vasquez, René; Villena, Mercedes; Moreau, Claudia; Barrantes, Ramiro; Pauls, David; Excoffier, Laurent; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Dugoujon, Jean Michel; Larrouy, Georges; Klitz, William; Labuda, Damian; Kidd, Judith; Kidd, Kenneth; Rienzo, Anna Di; Freimer, Nelson B.; Price, Alkes L.; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    The peopling of the Americas has been the subject of extensive genetic, archaeological and linguistic research; however, central questions remain unresolved1–5. One contentious issue is whether the settlement occurred via a single6–8 or multiple streams of migration from Siberia9–15. The pattern of dispersals within the Americas is also poorly understood. To address these questions at higher resolution than was previously possible, we assembled data from 52 Native American and 17 Siberian groups genotyped at 364,470 single nucleotide polymorphisms. We show that Native Americans descend from at least three streams of Asian gene flow. Most descend entirely from a single ancestral population that we call “First American”. However, speakers of Eskimo-Aleut languages from the Arctic inherit almost half their ancestry from a second stream of Asian gene flow, and the Na-Dene-speaking Chipewyan from Canada inherit roughly one-tenth of their ancestry from a third stream. We show that the initial peopling followed a southward expansion facilitated by the coast, with sequential population splits and little gene flow after divergence, especially in South America. A major exception is in Chibchan-speakers on both sides of the Panama Isthmus, who have ancestry from both North and South America. PMID:22801491

  1. MBS Native Plant Communities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This data layer contains results of the Minnesota County Biological Survey (MCBS). It includes polygons representing the highest quality native plant communities...

  2. A Japanese encephalitis virus genotype 5 molecular clone is highly neuropathogenic in a mouse model: impact of the structural protein region on virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wispelaere, Mélissanne; Frenkiel, Marie-Pascale; Desprès, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) strains can be separated into 5 genotypes (g1 to g5) based on sequence similarity. JEV g5 strains have been rarely isolated and are poorly characterized. We report here the full characterization of a g5 virus generated using a cDNA-based technology and its comparison with a widely studied g3 strain. We did not observe any major differences between those viruses when their infectious cycles were studied in various cell lines in vitro. Interestingly, the JEV g5 strain was highly pathogenic when inoculated to BALB/c mice, which are known to be largely resistant to JEV g3 infection. The study of chimeric viruses between JEV g3 and g5 showed that there was a poor viral clearance of viruses that express JEV g5 structural proteins in BALB/c mice blood, which correlated with viral invasion of the central nervous system and encephalitis. In addition, using an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier, we were able to show that JEV g5 does not have an enhanced capacity for entering the central nervous system, compared to JEV g3. Overall, in addition to providing a first characterization of the understudied JEV g5, our work highlights the importance of sustaining an early viremia in the development of JEV encephalitis. Genotype 5 viruses are genetically and serologically distinct from other JEV genotypes and can been associated with human encephalitis, which warrants the need for their characterization. In this study, we characterized the in vitro and in vivo properties of a JEV g5 strain and showed that it was more neuropathogenic in a mouse model than a well-characterized JEV g3 strain. The enhanced virulence of JEV g5 was associated with poor viral clearance but not with enhanced crossing of the blood-brain barrier, thus providing new insights into JEV pathogenesis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Genotypic Tannin Levels in Populus tremula Impact the Way Nitrogen Enrichment Affects Growth and Allocation Responses for Some Traits and Not for Others

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandau, Franziska; Decker, Vicki Huizu Guo; Gundale, Michael J.; Albrectsen, Benedicte Riber

    2015-01-01

    Plant intraspecific variability has been proposed as a key mechanism by which plants adapt to environmental change. In boreal forests where nitrogen availability is strongly limited, nitrogen addition happens indirectly through atmospheric N deposition and directly through industrial forest fertilization. These anthropogenic inputs of N have numerous environmental consequences, including shifts in plant species composition and reductions in plant species diversity. However, we know less about how genetic differences within plant populations determine how species respond to eutrophication in boreal forests. According to plant defense theories, nitrogen addition will cause plants to shift carbon allocation more towards growth and less to chemical defense, potentially enhancing vulnerability to antagonists. Aspens are keystone species in boreal forests that produce condensed tannins to serve as chemical defense. We conducted an experiment using ten Populus tremula genotypes from the Swedish Aspen Collection that express extreme levels of baseline investment into foliar condensed tannins. We investigated whether investment into growth and phenolic defense compounds in young plants varied in response to two nitrogen addition levels, corresponding to atmospheric N deposition and industrial forest fertilization. Nitrogen addition generally caused growth to increase, and tannin levels to decrease; however, individualistic responses among genotypes were found for height growth, biomass of specific tissues, root:shoot ratios, and tissue lignin and N concentrations. A genotype’s baseline ability to produce and store condensed tannins also influenced plant responses to N, although this effect was relatively minor. High-tannin genotypes tended to grow less biomass under low nitrogen levels and more at the highest fertilization level. Thus, the ability in aspen to produce foliar tannins is likely associated with a steeper reaction norm of growth responses, which suggests a

  4. Does Human-Induced Habitat Modification Influence the Impact of Introduced Species? A Case Study on Cavity-Nesting by the Introduced Common Myna ( Acridotheres tristis) and Two Australian Native Parrots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grarock, Kate; Lindenmayer, David B.; Wood, Jeffrey T.; Tidemann, Christopher R.

    2013-10-01

    Introduced species pose a major threat to biodiversity across the globe. Understanding the impact of introduced species is critical for effective management. Many species around the world are reliant on tree cavities, and competition for these resources can be intense: threatening the survival of native species. Through the establishment of 225 nest boxes, we examined the relationship between tree density and the abundance and nesting success of three bird species in Canberra, Australia. The common myna ( Acridotheres tristis) is an introduced species in Australia, and the crimson rosella ( Platycercus elegans) and eastern rosella ( Platycercus eximius) are native species. We then investigated the impact of common myna nest box occupation on crimson rosella and eastern rosella abundance. Tree density significantly influenced the abundance and cavity-nesting of all three species. Common myna abundance (birds per square kilometer) was greatest at low tree density sites (101.9 ± 22.4) and declined at medium (45.4 ± 10.1) and high (9.7 ± 3.6) tree density sites. The opposite pattern was observed for the crimson rosella, with greater abundance (birds per square kilometer) at high tree density sites (83.9 ± 9.3), declining over medium (61.6 ± 6.4) and low (31.4 ± 3.9) tree density sites. The eastern rosella was more abundant at medium tree density sites (48.6 ± 8.0 birds per square kilometer). Despite the strong influence of tree density, we found a significant negative relationship between common myna nest box occupancy and the abundance of the crimson rosella ( F 1,13 = 7.548, P = 0.017) and eastern rosella ( F 1,13 = 9.672, P < 0.001) at some sites. We also observed a slight increase in rosella nesting interruptions by the common myna at lower tree densities (high: 1.3 % ± 1.3, medium: 6.6 % ± 2.2, low: 12.7 % ± 6.2), although this increase was not statistically significant ( F 2,40 = 2.435, P = 0.100). Our study provides the strongest evidence to date for

  5. An analysis of the impact of native oxide, surface contamination and material density on total electron yield in the absence of surface charging effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Susumu; Ohya, Kaoru; Hirano, Ryoichi; Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2016-10-01

    The effects of the presence of a native oxide film or surface contamination as well as variations in material density on the total electron yield (TEY) of Ru and B4C were assessed in the absence of any surface charging effect. The experimental results were analyzed using semi-empirical Monte Carlo simulations and demonstrated that a native oxide film increased the TEY, and that this effect varied with film thickness. These phenomena were explained based on the effect of the backscattered electrons (BSEs) at the interface between Ru and RuO2, as well as the lower potential barrier of RuO2. Deviations in the material density from the theoretical values were attributed to the film deposition procedure based on fitting simulated TEY curves to experimental results. In the case of B4C, the TEY was enhanced by the presence of a 0.8-nm-thick surface contamination film consisting of oxygenated hydrocarbons. The effect of the low potential barrier of the contamination film was found to be significant, as the density of the B4C was much lower than that of the Ru. Comparing the simulation parameters generated in the present work with Joy's database, it was found that the model and the input parameters used in the simulations were sufficiently accurate.

  6. Market perceptions and opportunities for native plant production on the southern Colorado Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donna L. Peppin; Peter Z. Fule; Janet C. Lynn; Anne L. Mottek-Lucas; Carolyn Hull Sieg

    2010-01-01

    Increases in revegetation activities have created a large demand for locally adapted native plant materials (NPM) in the southwestern United States. Currently, there is a minimal supply of local genotypes to meet this demand. We investigated the potential for the initiation of a native plant market in the southern Colorado Plateau. Through a literature search,...

  7. Tamarix (Tamaricaceae) hybrids: most dominant invasive genotype in southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hybridization can potentially enhance invasiveness. Tamarix (Tamaricaceae) hybrids appear to be the dominant genotypes in their invasions. Exotic Tamarix are declared invasive in South Africa and the exotic T. chinensis and T. ramosissima are known to hybridize between themselves, and with the nativ...

  8. Hepatitis B virus genotypes circulating in Brazil: molecular characterization of genotype F isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgolino Helaine A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV isolates have been classified in eight genotypes, A to H, which exhibit distinct geographical distributions. Genotypes A, D and F are predominant in Brazil, a country formed by a miscegenated population, where the proportion of individuals from Caucasian, Amerindian and African origins varies by region. Genotype F, which is the most divergent, is considered indigenous to the Americas. A systematic molecular characterization of HBV isolates from different parts of the world would be invaluable in establishing HBV evolutionary origins and dispersion patterns. A large-scale study is needed to map the region-by-region distribution of the HBV genotypes in Brazil. Results Genotyping by PCR-RFLP of 303 HBV isolates from HBsAg-positive blood donors showed that at least two of the three genotypes, A, D, and F, co-circulate in each of the five geographic regions of Brazil. No other genotypes were identified. Overall, genotype A was most prevalent (48.5%, and most of these isolates were classified as subgenotype A1 (138/153; 90.2%. Genotype D was the most common genotype in the South (84.2% and Central (47.6% regions. The prevalence of genotype F was low (13% countrywide. Nucleotide sequencing of the S gene and a phylogenetic analysis of 32 HBV genotype F isolates showed that a great majority (28/32; 87.5% belonged to subgenotype F2, cluster II. The deduced serotype of 31 of 32 F isolates was adw4. The remaining isolate showed a leucine-to-isoleucine substitution at position 127. Conclusion The presence of genotypes A, D and F, and the absence of other genotypes in a large cohort of HBV infected individuals may reflect the ethnic origins of the Brazilian population. The high prevalence of isolates from subgenotype A1 (of African origin indicates that the African influx during the colonial slavery period had a major impact on the circulation of HBV genotype A currently found in Brazil. Although most genotype F

  9. Listen to the Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prensky, Marc

    2006-01-01

    "Digital natives" refer to today's students because they are native speakers of technology, fluent in the digital language of computers, video games, and the Internet. Those who were not born into the digital world are referred to as digital immigrants. Educators, considered digital immigrants, have slid into the 21st century--and into the digital…

  10. Sockeye salmon repatriation leads to population re-establishment and rapid introgression with native kokanee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, Andrew J; Russello, Michael A

    2016-12-01

    Re-establishing salmonid populations to areas historically occupied has the substantial potential for conservation gains; however, such interventions also risk negatively impacting native resident stocks. Here, we assessed the success of the hatchery-assisted reintroduction of anadromous sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) into Skaha Lake, British Columbia, Canada, and evaluated the genetic consequences for native kokanee, a freshwater-obligate ecotype, using single nucleotide polymorphism genotypic data collected from the reference samples of spawning Okanagan River sockeye and Skaha Lake kokanee presockeye reintroduction, along with annual trawl survey and angler-caught samples obtained over an eight-year period. Significant differentiation was detected between sockeye and kokanee reference samples, with >99% stock assignment. Low proportions of sockeye and hybrids were detected within 2008 and 2010 age-0 trawl samples; however, by 2012, 28% were sockeye, rising to 41% in 2014. The number of hybrids detected rose proportionally with the increase in sockeye and exhibited an intermediate phenotype. Our results indicate that the reintroduction of anadromous sockeye to Skaha Lake is succeeding, with large numbers returning to spawn. However, hybridization with native kokanee is of concern due to the potential for demographic or genetic swamping, with ongoing genetic monitoring necessary to assess the long-term effects of introgression and to support interactive fisheries management.

  11. Measuring Phenological Changes due to Defoliation of the Non-Native Species, Saltcedar (Tamarisk) Following Episodic Foliage Removal by the Beetle Diorhabda elongate and Phenological Impacts on Forage Quality for Insectivorous Birds on the Dolores River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagler, P. L.; Dennison, P. E.; Hultine, K. R.; van Riper, C.; Glenn, E. P.

    2008-12-01

    Since its introduction to the western U.S. more than a century ago, tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) has become dominant or sub-dominant over many major arid, and semi-arid river systems and their tributaries. The presence of tamarisk has been cited for reducing water availability for human enterprise and biodiversity, displacing native vegetation and for reducing habitat quality for wildlife. With increasing emphasis by public and private sectors on controlling saltcedar (Tamarix chinensis) in the western US, there will likely be a dramatic change in riparian vegetation composition over the course of the next several decades. The rates at which these changes will occur, and the resultant effects on riparian insects and birds that utilize insects for food, are presently unknown. Effects on riparian vegetation communities, resulting from changes in host plant species composition, will likely include changes in plant biomass, microclimate changes, and plant species diversity. These changes could potentially have a profound impact on migratory and breeding birds within riparian corridors throughout the southwest. Recently, the saltcedar leaf beetle (Diorhabda elongata) was released as a tamarisk biocontrol agent. This beetle has successfully defoliated tamarisk where it has been introduced, but there are currently no comprehensive programs in place for monitoring the rapid spread of Diorhabda, the impact of defoliation on habitat and water resources, or the long-term impact of defoliation on tamarisk. We used higher spatial resolution ASTER data and coarser MODIS data for monitoring defoliation caused by Diorhabda elongata and subsequent changes in evapotranspiration (ET). Widespread tamarisk defoliation was observed in an eastern Utah study area during summers 2007, 2008. We measured stem sap flux, leaf carbon isotope ratios, leaf area, LAI, and vegetation indices from mounted visible and infrared cameras and satellite imagery. The cameras were paired on towers installed 30

  12. Impact of Mg content on native point defects in Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}O (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.56)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, J.; Foster, G. M. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 191 West Woodruff Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Myer, M.; Mehra, S. [Columbus School for Girls, 56 S. Columbia Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43209 (United States); Chauveau, J. M. [Centre de Recherche sur l’Hetero-Epitaxie et ses Applications, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CRHEA-CNRS), Rue B. Gregory, F-06560 Valbonne Sophia Antipolis (France); University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Parc Valrose, F-06102 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Hierro, A. [Dpto. Ingeniería Electrónica and ISOM, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Redondo-Cubero, A. [Dpto. Física Aplicada y Centro de Micro-Análisis de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Windl, W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2041 College Road N., Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Brillson, L. J., E-mail: brillson.1@osu.edu [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 191 West Woodruff Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2015 Neil Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1272 (United States); Center for Materials Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    We used depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy and surface photovoltage spectroscopy to measure the densities, energy levels, and spatial distributions of zinc/magnesium cation and oxygen vacancies in isostructural, single-phase, non-polar Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}O alloys over a wide (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.56) range. Within this wide range, both defect types exhibit strong Mg content-dependent surface segregation and pronounced bulk density minima corresponding to unit cell volume minima, which can inhibit defect formation due to electrostatic repulsion. Mg in ZnO significantly reduces native defect densities and their non-polar surface segregation, both major factors in carrier transport and doping of these oxide semiconductors.

  13. The Impact of IL28B Genotype and Liver Fibrosis on the Hepatic Expression of IP10, IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 and Their Association with Treatment Outcomes in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagalski, Krzysztof; Pawłowska, Małgorzata; Kozielewicz, Dorota; Dybowska, Dorota; Tretyn, Andrzej; Halota, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    The strong impact of interleukin 28B (IL28B) polymorphisms on sustained virological response (SVR) after peginterferon and ribavirin treatment in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is well-known. We investigated IL28B variability and hepatic expression of IP10, IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 in CHC patients, the relation of each with their clinical characteristics, and how they associated with responses to combined therapy. Genotyping and gene expression analysis were conducted in a selected cohort of treatment-naïve patients who underwent interferon and ribavirin treatment. Differential expression of IP10, IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 genes was assessed from pretreatment liver biopsies using quantitative PCR. Histopathological evaluation of liver specimens was performed on the basis of the Scheuer's modified scale. We showed that hepatic IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 expression was lower in the IL28B CC 12979860 and TT rs8099917 groups than in the CT-TT rs12979860 and TG-GG rs8099917 groups (P 0.05); in contrast, IP10 expression was significantly affected by the progression of fibrosis (P = 0.007). We showed that the rs12979860 CC genotype was associated with successful treatment when compared to the rs12979860 CT-TT genotype (P = 0.004). Additionally, the expression levels of IP10, IFI27 and ISG15, but not MX1, were significantly higher in non-SVR patients than in SVR patients. The effect of variation in IL28B on the results of IFN-based treatment may be associated with changes in IFI27 and ISG15, but not with IP10. Silencing of IP10 is positive and independent from IL28B prediction of SVR, which is strongly associated with liver fibrosis in CHC patients.

  14. The Impact of IL28B Genotype and Liver Fibrosis on the Hepatic Expression of IP10, IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 and Their Association with Treatment Outcomes in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Domagalski

    Full Text Available The strong impact of interleukin 28B (IL28B polymorphisms on sustained virological response (SVR after peginterferon and ribavirin treatment in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC is well-known. We investigated IL28B variability and hepatic expression of IP10, IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 in CHC patients, the relation of each with their clinical characteristics, and how they associated with responses to combined therapy. Genotyping and gene expression analysis were conducted in a selected cohort of treatment-naïve patients who underwent interferon and ribavirin treatment. Differential expression of IP10, IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 genes was assessed from pretreatment liver biopsies using quantitative PCR. Histopathological evaluation of liver specimens was performed on the basis of the Scheuer's modified scale. We showed that hepatic IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 expression was lower in the IL28B CC 12979860 and TT rs8099917 groups than in the CT-TT rs12979860 and TG-GG rs8099917 groups (P 0.05; in contrast, IP10 expression was significantly affected by the progression of fibrosis (P = 0.007. We showed that the rs12979860 CC genotype was associated with successful treatment when compared to the rs12979860 CT-TT genotype (P = 0.004. Additionally, the expression levels of IP10, IFI27 and ISG15, but not MX1, were significantly higher in non-SVR patients than in SVR patients. The effect of variation in IL28B on the results of IFN-based treatment may be associated with changes in IFI27 and ISG15, but not with IP10. Silencing of IP10 is positive and independent from IL28B prediction of SVR, which is strongly associated with liver fibrosis in CHC patients.

  15. Dephytinisation of soyabean protein isolate with low native phytic acid content has limited impact on mineral and trace element absorption in healthy infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidsson, Lena; Ziegler, Ekhard E; Kastenmayer, Peter; van Dael, Peter; Barclay, Denis

    2004-02-01

    Infant formulas based on soyabean protein isolate are often used as an alternative to cows'-based formulas. However, the presence of phytic acid in soya formulas has raised concern about the absorption of trace elements and minerals from these products. The aim of the present study was to evaluate mineral and trace element absorption from regular and dephytinised soya formula in healthy infants. Soyabean protein isolate with a relatively low native content of phytic acid was used for production of a regular soya formula (300 mg phytic acid/kg liquid formula) and an experimental formula was based on dephytinised soya protein isolate (absorptions were measured by a stable isotope technique based on 72 h faecal excretion of non-absorbed stable isotopes (Zn, Fe, Cu and Ca) and by the chemical balance technique (Mn, Zn, Cu and Ca) in nine infants (69-191 d old). Fe absorption was also measured by erythrocyte incorporation 14 d after intake. The results from the present study demonstrated that Zn absorption, measured by a stable isotope technique, was significantly greater after dephytinisation (mean value 16.7 v. 22.6 %; P=0.03). No other statistically significant differences between the two formulas were observed. The nutritional benefit of dephytinisation was marginal in the present study. Based on these results, the use of soyabean protein isolate with low native content of phytic acid should be promoted for production of soya formulas and adequate addition of ascorbic acid to enhance Fe absorption should be ensured in the products.

  16. The impact of phenotypic and genotypic G6PD deficiency on risk of plasmodium vivax infection: a case-control study amongst Afghan refugees in Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toby Leslie

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The most common form of malaria outside Africa, Plasmodium vivax, is more difficult to control than P. falciparum because of the latent liver hypnozoite stage, which causes multiple relapses and provides an infectious reservoir. The African (A- G6PD (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency confers partial protection against severe P. falciparum. Recent evidence suggests that the deficiency also confers protection against P. vivax, which could explain its wide geographical distribution in human populations. The deficiency has a potentially serious interaction with antirelapse therapies (8-aminoquinolines such as primaquine. If the level of protection was sufficient, antirelapse therapy could become more widely available. We therefore tested the hypothesis that G6PD deficiency is protective against vivax malaria infection. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A case-control study design was used amongst Afghan refugees in Pakistan. The frequency of phenotypic and genotypic G6PD deficiency in individuals with vivax malaria was compared against controls who had not had malaria in the previous two years. Phenotypic G6PD deficiency was less common amongst cases than controls (cases: 4/372 [1.1%] versus controls 42/743 [5.7%]; adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.18 [95% confidence interval (CI 0.06-0.52], p = 0.001. Genetic analysis demonstrated that the G6PD deficiency allele identified (Mediterranean type was associated with protection in hemizygous deficient males (AOR = 0.12 [95% CI 0.02-0.92], p = 0.041. The deficiency was also protective in females carrying the deficiency gene as heterozygotes or homozygotes (pooled AOR = 0.37 [95% CI 0.15-0.94], p = 0.037. CONCLUSIONS: G6PD deficiency (Mediterranean type conferred significant protection against vivax malaria infection in this population whether measured by phenotype or genotype, indicating a possible evolutionary role for vivax malaria in the selective retention of the G6PD deficiency trait in human

  17. Predictive and prognostic impact of TP53 mutations and MDM2 promoter genotype in primary breast cancer patients treated with epirubicin or paclitaxel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjan Chrisanthar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: TP53 mutations have been associated with resistance to anthracyclines but not to taxanes in breast cancer patients. The MDM2 promoter single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP T309G increases MDM2 activity and may reduce wild-type p53 protein activity. Here, we explored the predictive and prognostic value of TP53 and CHEK2 mutation status together with MDM2 SNP309 genotype in stage III breast cancer patients receiving paclitaxel or epirubicin monotherapy. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Each patient was randomly assigned to treatment with epirubicin 90 mg/m(2 (n = 109 or paclitaxel 200 mg/m(2 (n = 114 every 3rd week as monotherapy for 4-6 cycles. Patients obtaining a suboptimal response on first-line treatment requiring further chemotherapy received the opposite regimen. Time from last patient inclusion to follow-up censoring was 69 months. Each patient had snap-frozen tumor tissue specimens collected prior to commencing chemotherapy. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: While TP53 and CHEK2 mutations predicted resistance to epirubicin, MDM2 status did not. Neither TP53/CHEK2 mutations nor MDM2 status was associated with paclitaxel response. Remarkably, TP53 mutations (p = 0.007 but also MDM2 309TG/GG genotype status (p = 0.012 were associated with a poor disease-specific survival among patients having paclitaxel but not patients having epirubicin first-line. The effect of MDM2 status was observed among individuals harbouring wild-type TP53 (p = 0.039 but not among individuals with TP53 mutated tumors (p>0.5. CONCLUSION: TP53 and CHEK2 mutations were associated with lack of response to epirubicin monotherapy. In contrast, TP53 mutations and MDM2 309G allele status conferred poor disease-specific survival among patients treated with primary paclitaxel but not epirubicin monotherapy.

  18. Antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 replication in HepG2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omran Moataza H

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C (HCV viral infection is a serious medical problem in Egypt and it has a devastating impact on the Egyptian economy. It is estimated that over 15% of Egyptians are infected by the virus and thus finding a cure for this disease is of utmost importance. Current therapies for hepatitis C virus (HCV genotype 4 with interferon/ribavirin have not been successful and thus the development of alternative therapy for this genotype is disparately needed. Results Although previous studies utilizing viral subgenomic or full cDNA fragments linked to reporter genes transfected into adhered cells or in a cell free system showed promise, demonstration of efficient viral replication was lacking. Thus, we utilized HepG2 cells infected with native HCV RNA genomes in a replication competent system and used antisense phosphorothioate Oligonucleotides (S-ODN against stem loop IIId and the AUG translation start site of the viral polyprotein precursor to monitor viral replication. We were able to show complete arrest of intracellular replication of HCV-4 at 1 uM S-ODN, thus providing a proof of concept for the potential antiviral activity of S-ODN on native genomic replication of HCV genotype 4. Conclusion We have successfully demonstrated that by using two S-ODNs [(S-ODN1 (nt 326–348 and S-ODN-2 (nt 264–282], we were able to completely inhibit viral replication in culture, thus confirming earlier reports on subgenomic constructs and suggesting a potential therapeutic value in HCV type 4.

  19. Evaluating the quantity of native H2 in Enceladus' plumes with the Cassini-INMS closed source data: constraints from modeling of ice grains impact in the instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquet, A.; Brockwell, T.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Chocron, S.; Teolis, B. D.; Perryman, R.; Walker, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    The data from the closed source of the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) at Enceladus' plumes shows a signal of H2 in significant quantities (15% mole fraction for low speed flybys). H2 would be considered a "smoking gun" for the suspected hydrothermal activity in Enceladus' ocean. However the H2 quantity varies with the speed of the flyby, which is attributed to the presence of ice grains in the plumes hitting the walls of the titanium antechamber of INMS and exposing fresh titanium that may react with water to form hydrogen. The large number of small ice grains arriving during a single INMS integration period creates a back-ground signal in addition to large grains causing punctual spikes. We have developed a surface chemistry model of the INMS, taking into account adsorption and chemisorption of species of interest to determine how much H2 is produced from the expected ice grains distribution for each flyby (given by Cassini CAPS data ). CTH simulations have been used to assess the contribution of grains of different size in terms of titanium produced. We show that the spikes in the mass 2 channel can be explained by microns-sized grains, and that smaller grains (below 500 nm) are the major contributors to reactions with titanium, accounting for most of the non-spike signal. We find that the mass 2 background signal due to titanium is strongly driven by the water available, and therefore its shape versus time can't follow the sharp rises in the data (see Figure). This makes the structures seen in flyby E18 either the product of several big grains or the observation of locally high density of H2 (jets). We will analyze the effect of grains on other mass channels and comparison to CDA data to de-termine whether the peaks can be attributed to multiple ice grains or to native H2. The work will be extended to the E17 and E14 flybys to reach a definitive assessment of the native H2 abundance in the Enceladus plume.

  20. Abejas cleptoparasitas, con énfasis en las abejas hospederas colectoras de aceites (Hymenoptera: Apoidea ECOLOGICAL IMPACT ON NATIVE BEES BY THE INVASIVE AFRICANIZED HONEY BEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAVID W ROUBIK

    Full Text Available Pocos estudios han considerado la dinámica de poblaciones de abejas en bosques o hábitats no alterados por el hombre. La presencia de abejas silvestres Africanizadas de Apis mellifera (Apidae fue estudiado por 10-17 años en áreas previamente sin esta especie. Aquí presento e interpreto resultados de tres bosques neotropicales: Guyana Francesa, Panamá y Yucatán, México (5° a 19° N. latitud. La abeja Africanizada exótica no produjo efecto negativo en las abejas nativas, incluyendo especies altamente sociales y solitarias. Diferencias mayores a través del tiempo fueron encontradas en la abundancia de las abejas de miel en flores cerca de hábitat con mayor grado de disturbio, comparado con el bosque espeso. Al nivel poblacional, muestreado en bloques de nidos trampa, en flores o con trampas ultravioletas de insectos, no hubo disminución pronta de abejas, y sí hubo una población relativamente estable o sinusoidal. Sin embargo, las abejas nativas cambiaron su hora de buscar provisiones o su selección de especies florales. Una conclusión principal es que esta competencia por los recursos es ‘silenciosa';, en las áreas florísticamente ricas estudiadas, porque las mismas abejas compensan con su comportamiento. Otros factores rigen sus poblaciones.Very little effort has been made to investigate bee population dynamics among intact wilderness areas. The presence of newly-arrived feral Africanized honey bee (AHB, Apis mellifera (Apidae, populations was studied for 10-17 years in areas previously with few or no escaped European apiary honey bees. Here I describe and interpret the major results from studies in three neotropical forests: French Guiana, Panama and Yucatan, Mexico (5° to 19° N. latitude. The exotic Africanized honey bees did not produce a negative effect on native bees, including species that were solitary or highly eusocial. Major differences over time were found in honey bee abundance on flowers near habitat

  1. 植物入侵对城市湿地生态系统中本地植物的影响%The Impacts of Plant Invasion on the Native Plants in Urban Wetland Ecosystems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琼; 宋垚彬; 蒋跃平; 林金昌; 董鸣

    2014-01-01

    城市湿地不仅有着重要的生态和经济价值,同时还服务于城市居民的人文、审美需求等社会和文化的各个方面。然而随着经济全球一体化的发展,外来植物入侵对城市湿地生态环境和物种多样性已构成不可避免的威胁。城市湿地入侵植物对城市湿地生态系统中本地植物个体适合度、生理特性、种群遗传结构、种群数量、群落种间关系、本地植物多样性以及本地植物所处的生境等多方面造成严重影响。因此,应根据城市湿地本地植物遭受的影响,加强对城市湿地外来入侵植物的有效管理及对退化城市湿地生态系统的修复。%Urban wetlands are of important values in terms of urban ecology and economy ,and also in social and cultural aspects .However ,due to economic globalization and rapid urbanization ,exotic plants seriously threaten urban wetland ecosystems and species diversity .The invasive plants have serious impacts on the native plants in urban wetlands ,including individual fitness , physiological characters , population genetic structure , population size , interspecies relations , species diversity and habitats of the native plants .Therefore ,it should enhance efficient management of invasive plants in urban wetlands and restore the degraded urban wetland ecosystems according to the impacts that the native plants in urban wetland ecosystems suffer .

  2. Trophic consequences of non-native pumpkinseed Lepomis gibbosus for native pond fishes

    OpenAIRE

    Copp, G. H.; Britton, J R; Guo, Z.; Edmonds-Brown, V; Pegg, Josie; L. VILIZZI; Davison, P.

    2017-01-01

    Introduced non-native fishes can cause considerable adverse impacts on freshwater ecosystems. The pumpkinseed Lepomis gibbosus, a North American centrarchid, is one of the most widely distributed non-native fishes in Europe, having established self-sustaining populations in at least 28 countries, including the U.K. where it is predicted to become invasive under warmer climate conditions. To predict the consequences of increased invasiveness, a field experiment was completed over a summer peri...

  3. Impact of topographic aspect and vegetation (native and reforested areas) on soil organic carbon and nitrogen budgets in Mediterranean natural areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-García, Beatriz; Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Brevik, Eric C

    2016-02-15

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) plays a critical role in the global carbon (C) cycle, and C sequestration in forest soils can represent a C sink. A relevant question is how does SOC changes in space and time; consequently, the study of the influence of topographic aspect on SOC stocks (SOCS) is very important to build a complete understanding of the soil system. In this line, four topographic aspects, north (N), south (S), east (E) and west (W) were studied under two different plant communities; native forests (NF) and reforested areas (RF) in the Despeñaperros Natural Park (S Spain). Five soil profiles were sampled at each of six different sites, 2 sites for NF (N and E) and 4 sites for RF (N, S, E and W). Soil properties were studied at different depths using soil control sections (S1: 0-25 cm; S2: 25-50 cm; S3: 50-75 cm). The results indicate that RF (N: 147.1 Mg ha(-1); E: 137.3 Mg ha(-1); W: 124.9 Mg ha(-1) and S: 87.0 Mg ha(-1)) had increased total SOCS compared to NF (N: 110.4 Mg ha(-1) and E: 80.9 Mg ha(-1)), and that SOCS in the N position were higher than in the other topographic aspects. Therefore, the results suggest that topographic aspect should be included in SOCS models and estimations at local and regional scales.

  4. Native grasslands fertilize themselves

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — News article about Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge and how the native soils and plants function to stimulate the system, creating a more productive grassland.

  5. Incorporating Social Oriented Agent and Interactive Simulation in E-learning: Impact on Learning, Perceptions, Experiences to Non-Native English Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballera, Melvin; Elssaedi, Mosbah Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    There is an unrealized potential in the use of socially-oriented pedagogical agent and interactive simulation in e-learning system. In this paper, we investigate the impact of having a socially oriented tutor agent and the incorporation of interactive simulation in e-learning into student performances, perceptions and experiences for non-native…

  6. APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... of choice to decrease the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) . However, there is a wide variability in ...

  7. Pathways of equality through education: impact of gender (in)equality and maternal education on exclusive breastfeeding among natives and migrants in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlinden, Karen; Van de Putte, Bart

    2017-04-01

    Even though breastfeeding is typically considered the preferred feeding method for infants worldwide, in Belgium, breastfeeding rates remain low across native and migrant groups while the underlying determinants are unclear. Furthermore, research examining contextual effects, especially regarding gender (in)equality and ideology, has not been conducted. We hypothesized that greater gender equality scores in the country of origin will result in higher breastfeeding chances. Because gender equality does not operate only at the contextual level but can be mediated through individual level resources, we hypothesized the following for maternal education: higher maternal education will be an important positive predictor for exclusive breastfeeding chances in Belgium, but its effects will differ over subsequent origin countries. Based on IKAROS data (GeÏntegreerd Kind Activiteiten en Regio Ondersteunings Systeem), we perform multilevel analyses on 27 936 newborns. Feeding method is indicated by exclusive breastfeeding 3 months after childbirth. We measure gender (in)equality using Global Gender Gap scores from the mother's origin country. Maternal education is a metric variable based on International Standard Classification of Education indicators. Results show that 3.6% of the variation in breastfeeding can be explained by differences between the migrant mother's country of origin. However, the effect of gender (in)equality appears to be non-significant. After adding maternal education, the effect for origin countries scoring low on gender equality turns significant. Maternal education on its own shows strong positive association with exclusive breastfeeding and, furthermore, has different effects for different origin countries. Possible explanations are discussed in-depth setting direction for further research regarding the different pathways gender (in)equality and maternal education affect breastfeeding. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons

  8. Sensor data as a measure of native freshwater mussel impact on nitrate formation and food digestion in continuous-flow mesocosms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bril, Jeremy S.; Durst, Jonathan J.; Hurley, Brion M.; Just, Craig L.; Newton, Teresa J.

    2014-01-01

    Native freshwater mussels can influence the aquatic N cycle, but the mechanisms and magnitude of this effect are not fully understood. We assessed the effects of Amblema plicata and Lampsilis cardium on N transformations over 72 d in 4 continuous-flow mesocosms, with 2 replicates of 2 treatments (mesocosms with and without mussels), equipped with electronic water-chemistry sensors. We compared sensor data to discrete sample data to assess the effect of additional sensor measurements on the ability to detect mussel-related effects on NO3– formation. Analysis of 624 sensor-based data points detected a nearly 6% increase in NO3– concentration in overlying water of mesocosms with mussels relative to mesocosms without mussels (p 3– between treatments. Mussels also significantly increased NO2– concentrations in the overlying water, but no significant difference in total N was observed. We used the sensor data for phytoplankton-N and NH4+ to infer that digestion times in mussels were 13 ± 6 h. The results suggest that rapid increases in phytoplankton-N levels in the overlying water can lead to decreased lag times between phytoplankton-N and NH4+ maxima. This result indicates that mussels may adjust their digestion rates in response to increased levels of food. The adjustment in digestion time suggests that mussels have a strong response to food availability that can disrupt typical circadian rhythms. Use of sensor data to measure directly and to infer mussel effects on aquatic N transformations at the mesocosm scale could be useful at larger scales in the future.

  9. Native listening: The flexibility dimension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, A.

    2012-01-01

    The way we listen to spoken language is tailored to the specific benefit of native-language speech input. Listening to speech in non-native languages can be significantly hindered by this native bias. Is it possible to determine the degree to which a listener is listening in a native-like manner? Pr

  10. Costs and benefits to European shipping of ballast-water and hull-fouling treatment: Impacts of native and non-indigenous species

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Jose A.; Santos, Lionel; Vance, Thomas; Fileman, Tim; Smith, David Stanley; Smith, David; Bishop, John D. D.; Viard, Frédérique; Queirós, Ana M.; Merino, Gorka; Buisman, Erik; Austen, Melanie C.

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Maritime transport and shipping are impacted negatively by biofouling, which can result in increased fuel consumption. Thus, costs for fouling reduction can be considered an investment to reduce fuel consumption. Anti-fouling measures also reduce the rate of introduction of non-indigenous species (NIS). Further mitigation measures to reduce the transport of NIS within ballast water and sediments impose additional costs. The estimated operational cost of NIS mitigation ...

  11. How Native American Success and Leadership Is Cultivated at the Corporate Level: A Native American Employee Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    One Feather, Sandra

    2003-01-01

    A Chippewa-Cree engineer helps educate Native American college students on how to adjust to the corporate environment and become successful employees and leaders. Issues include differences between Native and corporate cultures, impact of cultural differences on group dynamics, business etiquette, and the importance of workplace mentors. Corporate…

  12. In Situ Persistence and Migration of Biochar Carbon and Its Impact on Native Carbon Emission in Contrasting Soils under Managed Temperate Pastures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupinder Pal Singh

    Full Text Available Pyrogenic carbon (PyC is an important component of the global soil carbon (C pool, but its fate, persistence, and loss dynamics in contrasting soils and environments under planted field conditions are poorly understood. To fill this knowledge gap, a 13C-labelled biochar, as a surrogate material for PyC, produced from Eucalyptus saligna by slow pyrolysis (450°C; δ13C -36.7‰ was surface (0-10 cm applied in C3 dominated temperate pasture systems across Arenosol, Cambisol and Ferralsol. The results show a low proportion of the applied biochar-C mineralised over 12 months in a relatively clay- and C-poor Arenosol (i.e., 2.0% loss via mineralisation, followed by a clay- and C-rich Cambisol (4.6%, and clay-, C- and earthworm-rich Ferralsol (7.0%. The biochar-C mean residence time (MRT, estimated by different models, varied between 44-1079 (Arenosol, 18-172 (Cambisol, and 11-29 (Ferralsol years, with the shorter MRT estimated by a one-pool exponential and the longer MRT by an infinite-pool power or a two-pool exponential model. The two-pool model was best fitted to biochar-C mineralisation. The biochar-C recovery in the 12-30 cm soil layer varied from between 1.2% (Arenosol, 2.5-2.7% (Cambisol and 13.8-15.7% (Ferralsol of the applied biochar-C after 8-12 months. There was a further migration of biochar-C below the 50-cm depth in the Arenosol, as the combined biochar-C recovery in the mineralised pool and soil profile (up to 30 or 50 cm was 82%, in contrast to 101% in the Cambisol and 104% in the Ferralsol after 12 months. These results indicate that the downward migration of biochar-C was greatest in the Arenosol (cf. Cambisol and Ferralsol. Cumulative CO2-C emission from native soil-plant sources was lower (p <0.10 in the biochar-amended vs. non-amended Ferralsol. This field-based study shows that the downward migration of biochar-C exceeded its loss via mineralisation in the Arenosol and Ferralsol, but not in the Cambisol. It is thus important to

  13. In Situ Persistence and Migration of Biochar Carbon and Its Impact on Native Carbon Emission in Contrasting Soils under Managed Temperate Pastures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhupinder Pal; Fang, Yunying; Boersma, Mark; Collins, Damian; Van Zwieten, Lukas; Macdonald, Lynne M

    2015-01-01

    Pyrogenic carbon (PyC) is an important component of the global soil carbon (C) pool, but its fate, persistence, and loss dynamics in contrasting soils and environments under planted field conditions are poorly understood. To fill this knowledge gap, a 13C-labelled biochar, as a surrogate material for PyC, produced from Eucalyptus saligna by slow pyrolysis (450°C; δ13C -36.7‰) was surface (0-10 cm) applied in C3 dominated temperate pasture systems across Arenosol, Cambisol and Ferralsol. The results show a low proportion of the applied biochar-C mineralised over 12 months in a relatively clay- and C-poor Arenosol (i.e., 2.0% loss via mineralisation), followed by a clay- and C-rich Cambisol (4.6%), and clay-, C- and earthworm-rich Ferralsol (7.0%). The biochar-C mean residence time (MRT), estimated by different models, varied between 44-1079 (Arenosol), 18-172 (Cambisol), and 11-29 (Ferralsol) years, with the shorter MRT estimated by a one-pool exponential and the longer MRT by an infinite-pool power or a two-pool exponential model. The two-pool model was best fitted to biochar-C mineralisation. The biochar-C recovery in the 12-30 cm soil layer varied from between 1.2% (Arenosol), 2.5-2.7% (Cambisol) and 13.8-15.7% (Ferralsol) of the applied biochar-C after 8-12 months. There was a further migration of biochar-C below the 50-cm depth in the Arenosol, as the combined biochar-C recovery in the mineralised pool and soil profile (up to 30 or 50 cm) was 82%, in contrast to 101% in the Cambisol and 104% in the Ferralsol after 12 months. These results indicate that the downward migration of biochar-C was greatest in the Arenosol (cf. Cambisol and Ferralsol). Cumulative CO2-C emission from native soil-plant sources was lower (p <0.10) in the biochar-amended vs. non-amended Ferralsol. This field-based study shows that the downward migration of biochar-C exceeded its loss via mineralisation in the Arenosol and Ferralsol, but not in the Cambisol. It is thus important to

  14. Invasion of an asexual American water flea clone throughout Africa and rapid displacement of a native sibling species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergeay, Joachim; Verschuren, Dirk; De Meester, Luc

    2006-11-22

    The huge ecological and economic impact of biological invasions creates an urgent need for knowledge of traits that make invading species successful and factors helping indigenous populations to resist displacement by invading species or genotypes. High genetic diversity is generally considered to be advantageous in both processes. Combined with sex, it allows rapid evolution and adaptation to changing environments. We combined paleogenetic analysis with continent-wide survey of genetic diversity at nuclear and mitochondrial loci to reconstruct the invasion history of a single asexual American water flea clone (hybrid Daphnia pulexxDaphnia pulicaria) in Africa. Within 60 years of the original introduction of this invader, it displaced the genetically diverse, sexual population of native D. pulex in Lake Naivasha (Kenya), despite a formidable numerical advantage of the local population and continuous replenishment from a large dormant egg bank. Currently, the invading clone has spread throughout the range of native African D. pulex, where it appears to be the only occurring genotype. The absence of genetic variation did not hamper either the continent-wide establishment of this exotic lineage or the effective displacement of an indigenous and genetically diverse sibling species.

  15. Budget impact analysis of the use of daclatasvir in Italy for the treatment of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV genotype 3 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Restelli

    2016-03-01

    CONCLUSIONS: The use of DCV is likely to have a short term impact on the INHS budget increasing resources use compared to the sole use of INF-α+RBV+SOF. However, a trend of reduction of the costs increase is observed due to the management of health states and adverse events which may lead to the possibility to reduce costs in the long term.

  16. Shortening of treatment duration in patients with chronic hepatitis C genotype 2 and 3 - impact of ribavirin dose - a randomized multicentre trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bischof Martin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic hepatitis C (CHC Patients, infected with genotype (GT 2 or 3 are treated with Peg-IFN and ribavirin (RBV (800 mg/day for 24 weeks. Treatment duration can be shortened to 12-16 weeks if a higher dose of RBV (1.000/1.200 mg/day was used without considerable loss of responsiveness or increased risk of relapse. Previously we have shown that in patients with CHC, GT 2/3 RBV can be reduced to 400 mg/day if administered for 24 weeks without an increase in relapse rates. Therefore we investigated the efficacy of a reduced RBV dosage of 400 mg/day with shorter treatment duration (16 weeks. Methods Treatment naïve patients with CHC, GT 2/3 were randomized to receive 180 μg peginterferonα2a/week in combination with either 800 (group C or 400 mg/d (group D for 16 weeks. The primary endpoint was SVR. Results 12 months after the first patient was randomized a inferior outcome of group D as compared to group C was noted, therefore the study was terminated. At study termination 89 patients were enrolled (group C: 31, D: 51. The SVR rate was statistically different in the two study groups with 51.6% in group C and 28.4% in group D (p = 0.038. Patients with low viral load had higher SVR rates (C: 67%, D: 33% than those with high viral load (C: 33%, D: 21%. Conclusion Both treatment duration and the dose of RBV play a major role to optimize outcome of patients with GT3. If one intends to shorten the treatment weight based RBV dose should be used, if lower RBV doses are used patients should be treated for at least 24 weeks as. A treatment regimen with a reduced RBV dosage and shortened treatment duration is associated with low SVR rates due to high relapse rates. Trial registration NCT01258101

  17. Water in the Native World: Hydrological Impacts of Future Land Use and Climate Change in the Lumbee River Watershed and Implications for Ecosystems and Indigenous Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, R. E.; Singh, N.; Painter, J.; Sikes, J. A.; Vose, J. M.; Wear, D. N.; Martin, K. L.

    2016-12-01

    In the coming decades, the southeastern US will likely experience substantial shifts in land use due to population growth, food and energy production, and other factors. In the same period, climate change is expected to alter ecohydrological processes in terrestrial landscapes while contributing to further land use change. Increasingly, these changes will challenge the ability of the region's freshwater resources to support natural ecosystems and human communities. The impacts of land use and climate change on water are of particular concern to rural indigenous communities of the southeastern US. For these communities, the cultural significance of land and water, together with historical legacies of discrimination, marginalization and other factors, combine to create unique vulnerabilities to environmental change. Assessments of land use and climate impacts on water resources of the southeastern US tend to focus on quantity and quality concerns of large cities or on waters of special economic concern (e.g. estuaries and coastal fisheries). The potential impacts of land use and climate change on American Indian communities are largely overlooked or unknown. With this in mind, we used a semi-distributed hydrological model (SWAT) to assess impacts of climate and land use change on streamflow regimes in the Lumbee (aka Lumber) River, North Carolina (USA). This coastal plain blackwater river is a significant natural and cultural resource for indigenous people of the Lumbee Tribe, and its watershed, containing extensive riparian wetlands and agriculture-dominated uplands, is home to more than 30,000 tribal citizens. We ran SWAT with statistically downscaled output from four general circulation models (GCMs) for the mid-21st century (RCP8.5 scenario), together with a mid-century land use scenario from the US Forest Service's Southern Forest Futures Project. We used these inputs to simulate daily streamflows on the Lumbee River for the 2040-2060 period with uncertainty

  18. Immigrants and Native Workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Mette; Peri, Giovanni

    Using a database that includes the universe of individuals and establishments in Denmark over the period 1991-2008 we analyze the effect of a large inflow of non-European (EU) immigrants on Danish workers. We first identify a sharp and sustained supply-driven increase in the inflow of non......-EU immigrants in Denmark, beginning in 1995 and driven by a sequence of international events such as the Bosnian, Somalian and Iraqi crises. We then look at the response of occupational complexity, job upgrading and downgrading, wage and employment of natives in the short and long run. We find...... that the increased supply of non-EU low skilled immigrants pushed native workers to pursue more complex occupations. This reallocation happened mainly through movement across firms. Immigration increased mobility of natives across firms and across municipalities but it did not increase their probability...

  19. Impact of fat and selected profiles of fatty acids contained in the colostrum and milk of sows of native breeds on piglet rearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypczak, Ewa; Waśkiewicz, Agnieszka; Beszterda, Monika; Goliński, Piotr; Szulc, Karolina; Buczyński, Janusz T; Babicz, Marek

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the level of fat and selected fatty acids found in the milk of sows on the rearing of native breed piglets. Simultaneously, in order to improve the accuracy of the performed analyses, atomic absorption spectrometry was employed in the applied analytic methodology. The experimental animal material comprised 60 sows of the indigenous White Złotnicka breed. Colostrum and milk were collected on the first and 14th days of lactation. In all, 240 samples were collected. The following parameters were determined in the course of the experiment: number and weight of piglets, body weight gains as well as deaths of piglets. A total of 1270 born piglets was subjected to investigations. The performed experiments demonstrated that, with the progress of the lactation period, the content of fat and saturated fatty acids (SFA) turned out to be statistically significant and showed a growing tendency. Fat increased by about 2% and palmitic acid (C16:0) increased most, that is by 5%. Linolic (C18:2) and linolenic (C18:3) acids revealed decreasing trends. Irrespective of the day of lactation, the level of unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) determined in sows' colostrum and milk was higher in comparison with that of SFA, and the UFA to SFA ratio ranged from 1.84% to 1.33%. Proportions of n-6 to n-3 fatty acids were determined at the level of about 1.6:1.0 in the colostrum and 1.3:10 in milk. The highest daily body weight gains were recorded in the case of piglets derived from sows with the highest fat level - 294 g, while in the case of stearic acid (C18:0), the smaller its concentration in the colostrum and milk of the experimental sows, the better body weight gains of piglets - 262 g. At the same time, stearic acid (C18:0) was found to exert a statistically significant effect on piglet mortality at the level of P ≤ 0.05. Its highest concentration caused the highest proportion of deaths among piglets - 16.23%. The performed

  20. Impact of two common polymorphisms in the PPARgamma gene on glucose tolerance and plasma insulin profiles in monozygotic and dizygotic twins: thrifty genotype, thrifty phenotype, or both?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Pernille; Andersen, Gitte; Fenger, Mogens

    2003-01-01

    The Pro12Ala polymorphism in the PPARgamma2 gene has been associated with reduced risk of type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. Recently, an association between dizygotic twinning and PPARgamma gene polymorphisms has been proposed. We investigated the phenotypic appearance of the two...... polymorphisms (Pro12Ala and exon 6 C-->T) in PPARgamma among elderly twins (207 monozygotic [MZ] and 342 dizygotic [DZ]) and evaluated whether they could explain previously reported differences in plasma glucose and insulin profiles among MZ and DZ twins. We demonstrated a significant impact of the Pro12Ala...

  1. Effects of noise, reverberation and foreign accent on native and non-native listeners' performance of English speech comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Z Ellen; Wang, Lily M

    2016-05-01

    A large number of non-native English speakers may be found in American classrooms, both as listeners and talkers. Little is known about how this population comprehends speech in realistic adverse acoustical conditions. A study was conducted to investigate the effects of background noise level (BNL), reverberation time (RT), and talker foreign accent on native and non-native listeners' speech comprehension, while controlling for English language abilities. A total of 115 adult listeners completed comprehension tasks under 15 acoustic conditions: three BNLs (RC-30, RC-40, and RC-50) and five RTs (from 0.4 to 1.2 s). Fifty-six listeners were tested with speech from native English-speaking talkers and 59 with native Mandarin-Chinese-speaking talkers. Results show that, while higher BNLs were generally more detrimental to listeners with lower English proficiency, all listeners experienced significant comprehension deficits above RC-40 with native English talkers. This limit was lower (i.e., above RC-30), however, with Chinese talkers. For reverberation, non-native listeners as a group performed best with RT up to 0.6 s, while native listeners performed equally well up to 1.2 s. A matched foreign accent benefit has also been identified, where the negative impact of higher reverberation does not exist for non-native listeners who share the talker's native language.

  2. Variability of traits quinoa introduced genotypes (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.)

    OpenAIRE

    Dražić, Slobodan; ŽIVANOVIĆ, Tomislav; Maletić, Radojka; Glamočlija, Đorđe; Žarković, Branka; Dražić, Milena

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed variability and influence of investigated factors on grain yield of quinoa during three year period (2009, 2010, 2011). The experiment was conducted at two locations (Nova Pazova and Surduk), using two introduced genotypes of quinoa: KVL 37 and KVL 52. We detected that location and genotype had important impact. Grain yield varied according to years of study (1224 kg/ha to 1671 kg/ha). Results of regression and correlation analysis indicate on variation of the impact of plant heig...

  3. Direct and Indirect Influence of Non-Native Neighbours on Pollination and Fruit Production of a Native Plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Montero-Castaño

    Full Text Available Entomophilous non-native plants can directly affect the pollination and reproductive success of native plant species and also indirectly, by altering the composition and abundance of floral resources in the invaded community. Separating direct from indirect effects is critical for understanding the mechanisms underlying the impacts of non-native species on recipient communities.Our aims are: (a to explore both the direct effect of the non-native Hedysarum coronarium and its indirect effect, mediated by the alteration of floral diversity, on the pollinator visitation rate and fructification of the native Leopoldia comosa and (b to distinguish whether the effects of the non-native species were due to its floral display or to its vegetative interactions.We conducted field observations within a flower removal experimental setup (i.e. non-native species present, absent and with its inflorescences removed at the neighbourhood scale.Our study illustrates the complexity of mechanisms involved in the impacts of non-native species on native species. Overall, Hedysarum increased pollinator visitation rates to Leopoldia target plants as a result of direct and indirect effects acting in the same direction. Due to its floral display, Hedysarum exerted a direct magnet effect attracting visits to native target plants, especially those made by the honeybee. Indirectly, Hedysarum also increased the visitation rate of native target plants. Due to the competition for resources mediated by its vegetative parts, it decreased floral diversity in the neighbourhoods, which was negatively related to the visitation rate to native target plants. Hedysarum overall also increased the fructification of Leopoldia target plants, even though such an increase was the result of other indirect effects compensating for the observed negative indirect effect mediated by the decrease of floral diversity.

  4. Is Nativism Sufficient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braine, Martin D. S.

    1994-01-01

    Provides a brief history of the empiricism-nativism issue, considering present-day intellectual roots of nativist and empiricist inclinations. A schema is proposed for explaining the ontogenetic origin of an innate attribute or principle relevant to language. An attempt is made to explain the origin of primitives as derived by learning. (Contains…

  5. Non-native seagrass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tussenbroek, B.I.; van Katwijk, M.M.; Bouma, T.J.; van der Heide, T.; Govers, L.L.; Leuven, R.S.E.W.

    2016-01-01

    Seagrasses comprise 78 species and are rarely invasive. But the seagrass Halophila stipulacea, firstly recorded in the Caribbean in the year 2002, has spread quickly throughout the region. Previous works have described this species as invasive in the Caribbean, forming dense mats that exclude native

  6. Blood Group ABO Genotyping in Paternity Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugert, Peter; Rink, Gabriele; Kemp, Katharina; Klüter, Harald

    2012-06-01

    BACKGROUND: The ABO blood groups result from DNA sequence variations, predominantly single nucleotide and insertion/deletion polymorphisms (SNPs and indels), in the ABO gene encoding a glycosyltransferase. The ABO blood groups A(1), A(2), B and O predominantly result from the wild type allele A1 and the major gene variants that are characterized by four diallelic markers (261G>del, 802G>A, 803G>C, 1061C>del). Here, we were interested to evaluate the impact of ABO genotyping compared to ABO phenotyping in paternity testing. METHODS: The major ABO alleles were determined by PCR amplification with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) in a representative sample of 1,335 blood donors. The genotypes were compared to the ABO blood groups registered in the blood donor files. Then, the ABO phenotypes and genotypes were determined in 95 paternity trio cases that have been investigated by 12 short tandem repeat (STR) markers before. We compared statistical parameters (PL, paternity likelihood; PE, power of exclusion) of both blood grouping approaches. RESULTS: The prevalence of the major ABO alleles and genotypes corresponded to the expected occurrence of ABO blood groups in a Caucasian population. The low resolution genotyping of 4 diallelic markers revealed a correct genotype-phenotype correlation in 1,331 of 1,335 samples (99.7%). In 60 paternity trios with confirmed paternity of the alleged father based on STR analysis both PL and PE of the ABO genotype was significantly higher than of the ABO phenotype. In 12 of 35 exclusion cases (34.3%) the ABO genotype also excluded the alleged father, whereas the ABO phenotype excluded the alleged father only in 7 cases (20%). CONCLUSION: In paternity testing ABO genotyping is superior to ABO phenotyping with regard to PL and PE, however, ABO genotyping is not sufficient for valid paternity testing. Due to the much lower mutation rate compared to STR markers, blood group SNPs in addition to anonymous SNPs could be considered for

  7. Blood Group ABO Genotyping in Paternity Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugert, Peter; Rink, Gabriele; Kemp, Katharina; Klüter, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Background The ABO blood groups result from DNA sequence variations, predominantly single nucleotide and insertion/deletion polymorphisms (SNPs and indels), in the ABO gene encoding a glycosyltransferase. The ABO blood groups A1, A2, B and O predominantly result from the wild type allele A1 and the major gene variants that are characterized by four diallelic markers (261G>del, 802G>A, 803G>C, 1061C>del). Here, we were interested to evaluate the impact of ABO genotyping compared to ABO phenotyping in paternity testing. Methods The major ABO alleles were determined by PCR amplification with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) in a representative sample of 1,335 blood donors. The genotypes were compared to the ABO blood groups registered in the blood donor files. Then, the ABO phenotypes and genotypes were determined in 95 paternity trio cases that have been investigated by 12 short tandem repeat (STR) markers before. We compared statistical parameters (PL, paternity likelihood; PE, power of exclusion) of both blood grouping approaches. Results The prevalence of the major ABO alleles and genotypes corresponded to the expected occurrence of ABO blood groups in a Caucasian population. The low resolution genotyping of 4 diallelic markers revealed a correct genotype-phenotype correlation in 1,331 of 1,335 samples (99.7%). In 60 paternity trios with confirmed paternity of the alleged father based on STR analysis both PL and PE of the ABO genotype was significantly higher than of the ABO phenotype. In 12 of 35 exclusion cases (34.3%) the ABO genotype also excluded the alleged father, whereas the ABO phenotype excluded the alleged father only in 7 cases (20%). Conclusion In paternity testing ABO genotyping is superior to ABO phenotyping with regard to PL and PE, however, ABO genotyping is not sufficient for valid paternity testing. Due to the much lower mutation rate compared to STR markers, blood group SNPs in addition to anonymous SNPs could be considered for future

  8. Genomic and genotoxic responses to controlled weathered-oil exposures confirm and extend field studies on impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on native killifish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitney Pilcher

    Full Text Available To understand the ecotoxicological impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, field studies provide a context for ecological realism but laboratory-based studies offer power for connecting biological effects with specific causes. As a complement to field studies, we characterized genome-wide gene expression responses of Gulf killifish (Fundulus grandis to oil-contaminated waters in controlled laboratory exposures. Transcriptional responses to the highest concentrations of oiled water in the laboratory were predictive of field-observed responses that coincided with the timing and location of major oiling. The transcriptional response to the low concentration (∼ 10-fold lower than the high concentration was distinct from the high concentration and was not predictive of major oiling in the field. The high concentration response was characterized by activation of the molecular signaling pathway that facilitates oil metabolism and oil toxicity. The high concentration also induced DNA damage. The low concentration invoked expression of genes that may support a compensatory response, including genes associated with regulation of transcription, cell cycle progression, RNA processing, DNA damage, and apoptosis. We conclude that the gene expression response detected in the field was a robust indicator of exposure to the toxic components of contaminating oil, that animals in the field were exposed to relatively high concentrations that are especially damaging to early life stages, and that such exposures can damage DNA.

  9. Does Immigration Crowd Natives into or out of Higher Education? Working Papers. No. 15-18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Osborne

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of immigration on the college enrollment of U.S. natives. Many studies have focused on the effect of increased demand for schooling by immigrants on the enrollment of natives. However, changes in immigrant labor supply may also affect native enrollment by changing local market prices. Using U.S. Census data from…

  10. Impact of obesity on the predictive accuracy of prostate-specific antigen density and prostate-specific antigen in native Korean men undergoing prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Heon; Doo, Seung Whan; Yang, Won Jae; Lee, Kwang Woo; Lee, Chang Ho; Song, Yun Seob; Jeon, Yoon Su; Kim, Min Eui; Kwon, Soon-Sun

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the impact of obesity on the biopsy detection of prostate cancer. We retrospectively reviewed data of 1182 consecutive Korean patients (≥50 years) with serum prostate-specific antigen levels of 3-10 ng/mL who underwent initial extended 12-cores biopsy from September 2009 to March 2013. Patients who took medications that were likely to influence the prostate-specific antigen level were excluded. Receiver operating characteristic curves were plotted for prostate-specific antigen and prostate-specific antigen density predicting cancer status among non-obese and obese men. A total of 1062 patients (mean age 67.1 years) were enrolled in the analysis. A total of 230 men (21.7%) had a positive biopsy. In the overall study sample, the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve of serum prostate-specific antigen for predicting prostate cancer on biopsy were 0.584 and 0.633 for non-obese and obese men, respectively (P = 0.234). However, the area under the curve for prostate-specific antigen density in predicting cancer status showed a significant difference (non-obese 0.696, obese 0.784; P = 0.017). There seems to be a significant difference in the ability of prostate-specific antigen density to predict biopsy results between non-obese and obese men. Obesity positively influenced the overall ability of prostate-specific antigen density to predict prostate cancer. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  11. Axiom turkey genotyping array

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Axiom®Turkey Genotyping Array interrogates 643,845 probesets on the array, covering 643,845 SNPs. The array development was led by Dr. Julie Long of the USDA-ARS Beltsville Agricultural Research Center under a public-private partnership with Hendrix Genetics, Aviagen, and Affymetrix. The Turk...

  12. (Brassica napus L.) genotypes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... The genetic diversity and relationships among rapeseed genotypes were ... dent of environment and plant growth stage, unlimited ..... interactions that lead to the expression of particular traits .... thesis, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Novi Sad. ... in the U.S. hard red winter wheat cultivars as reveled by.

  13. Intelligibility of native and non-native Dutch Speech

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, S.J. van

    2001-01-01

    The intelligibility of speech is known to be lower if the speaker is non-native instead of native for the given language. This study is aimed at quantifying the overall degradation due to limitations of non-native speakers of Dutch, specifically of Dutch-speaking Americans who have lived in the Neth

  14. Speech intelligibility of native and non-native speech

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, S.J. van

    1999-01-01

    The intelligibility of speech is known to be lower if the talker is non-native instead of native for the given language. This study is aimed at quantifying the overall degradation due to acoustic-phonetic limitations of non-native talkers of Dutch, specifically of Dutch-speaking Americans who have l

  15. Impact of two common polymorphisms in the PPARgamma gene on glucose tolerance and plasma insulin profiles in monozygotic and dizygotic twins: thrifty genotype, thrifty phenotype, or both?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Pernille; Andersen, Gitte; Fenger, Mogens;

    2003-01-01

    The Pro12Ala polymorphism in the PPARgamma2 gene has been associated with reduced risk of type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. Recently, an association between dizygotic twinning and PPARgamma gene polymorphisms has been proposed. We investigated the phenotypic appearance of the two polymorphi......The Pro12Ala polymorphism in the PPARgamma2 gene has been associated with reduced risk of type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. Recently, an association between dizygotic twinning and PPARgamma gene polymorphisms has been proposed. We investigated the phenotypic appearance of the two...... polymorphism on glucose tolerance, diabetic status, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, and plasma insulin profiles in twins. No impact of the silent exon 6 polymorphism on glucose homeostasis or plasma insulin profiles was found. Independent of the polymorphisms, we observed a significant...... an association between the Ala allele and reduced risk of diabetes and insulin resistance in twins. However, the differences in metabolic profiles among MZ and DZ twins were not explained by differences in frequencies of the genetic variants and may be due to intrauterine environmental factors operating in twins...

  16. Native Americans' Interest in Horticulture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Mary Hockenberry

    1999-01-01

    Focus groups arranged by local Native American Master Gardeners on two Minnesota reservations determined community interest in extension-horticulture programs. Topics of interest included food preservation and historical Native-American uses of plants. (SK)

  17. Native Prairie Adaptive Management (NPAM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — NPAM is a framework for guiding annual decisions about the management of Service‐owned native prairie parcels that are prone to invasions by non‐native grasses,...

  18. Trophic Strategies of a Non-Native and a Native Amphibian Species in Shared Ponds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olatz San Sebastián

    Full Text Available One of the critical factors for understanding the establishment, success and potential impact on native species of an introduced species is a thorough knowledge of how these species manage trophic resources. Two main trophic strategies for resource acquisition have been described: competition and opportunism. In the present study our objective was to identify the main trophic strategies of the non-native amphibian Discoglossus pictus and its potential trophic impact on the native amphibian Bufo calamita. We determine whether D. pictus exploits similar trophic resources to those exploited by the native B. calamita (competition hypothesis or alternative resources (opportunistic hypothesis. To this end, we analyzed the stable isotope values of nitrogen and carbon in larvae of both species, in natural ponds and in controlled laboratory conditions. The similarity of the δ15N and δ13C values in the two species coupled with isotopic signal variation according to pond conditions and niche partitioning when they co-occurred indicated dietary competition. Additionally, the non-native species was located at higher levels of trophic niches than the native species and B. calamita suffered an increase in its standard ellipse area when it shared ponds with D. pictus. These results suggest niche displacement of B. calamita to non-preferred resources and greater competitive capacity of D. pictus in field conditions. Moreover, D. pictus showed a broader niche than the native species in all conditions, indicating increased capacity to exploit the diversity of resources; this may indirectly favor its invasiveness. Despite the limitations of this study (derived from potential variability in pond isotopic signals, the results support previous experimental studies. All the studies indicate that D. pictus competes with B. calamita for trophic resources with potential negative effects on the fitness of the latter.

  19. Who Stole Native American Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Lynn, Elizabeth

    1997-01-01

    Native American Studies has failed to develop into an academic discipline because of the continued influence of postcolonial theories, attempts to discredit Native American scholars, politically determined research agendas, and the ideology of the "New Historicism." Native American Studies must seek autonomy from other opportunistic…

  20. Who Stole Native American Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Lynn, Elizabeth

    1997-01-01

    Native American Studies has failed to develop into an academic discipline because of the continued influence of postcolonial theories, attempts to discredit Native American scholars, politically determined research agendas, and the ideology of the "New Historicism." Native American Studies must seek autonomy from other opportunistic…

  1. Digital Natives or Digital Tribes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Ian Robert

    2013-01-01

    This research builds upon the discourse surrounding digital natives. A literature review into the digital native phenomena was undertaken and found that researchers are beginning to identify the digital native as not one cohesive group but of individuals influenced by other factors. Primary research by means of questionnaire survey of technologies…

  2. Food sources of dominant macrozoobenthos between native and non-native mangrove forests: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luzhen; Yan, Ting; Xiong, Yiyi; Zhang, Yihui; Lin, Guanghui

    2017-03-01

    The macrozoobenthos is an important link of the food web in coastal wetlands. Diet-habitat relationships may significantly depend on qualitative differences and seasonal availability of food sources. Increasing interest has been shown in food web structure altered by non-native plants. In particular, however, a non-native mangrove species from Bangladesh, Sonneratia apetala, has been widely planted in China, but little is known about its possible impact on food sources of macrozoobenthos living in these non-native mangrove forests. Therefore, in this study, we used fatty acid analysis to compare the food sources of one littorinid snail and two grapsid crab species between two native mangrove forests and one non-native S. apetala plantation in the Zhanjiang Mangrove National Nature Reserve of China. We found that the sediment of all three forests had high diatom and bacteria signals, but low mangrove leaf signals, while the opposite patterns were detected in the three macrozoobenthos. Specifically, the gastropod Littoraria melanostoma relied mainly on mangrove leaves and brown algae as food sources, with significant differences among the three mangrove forests, and showed significant seasonal variation in its diet. The grapsidae species (Perisesarma bidens and Parasesarma plicatum) mainly grazed on mangrove litter, brown and green algae, and occasionally consumed diatoms and bacteria, also showing significant seasonal variation in their diet. Overall, Principle Components Analysis (PCA) of the fatty acid profiles showed a significant overlapping in food sources among the macrozoobenthos living in the non-native and native mangrove forests, but significant seasonal variations in their food sources. This suggests that the planting of non-native S. apetala near original mangrove forests has had little effect on the feeding behavior of macrozoobenthos some 10 years after planting.

  3. Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayhan Azadmanesh

    2005-09-01

    the ultimate source of the virus's genetic diversity. HCV circulates as a heterogeneous population of genetically different but closely related genomes known as the quasispecies(15.As only 30-35% of nucleotides actually differ, there is obviously considerable heterogeneity in evolutionary rates among nucleotide sites in the genome. This heterogeneity is the result of variable evolutionary constraints. The 5'-UTR contains extensive secondary RNA structure and is correspondingly the slowest evolving genomic region(16. The next slowest region is the C (Core gene, which evolves three times faster than the 5'- UTR. The envelope genes E1 and E2 constitute the most diverse genome region and evolve about nine times faster than the 5'-UTR(16, probably as a result of their presumed role in evading the host immune response. Genomic Heterogeneity and ClassificationSystemsShortly after its discovery in 1989, it became clear that HCV had substantial nucleotide sequence diversity, with only 66 to 80% overall sequencesimilarity among strains belonging to different genotypes or subtypes(17. HCV isolates show four levels of genomic variations: types, subtypes, isolates, andquasispecies. The overall sequence similarities over complete genomic sequences are at least 91% within quasispecies, approximately 79% (range, 77 to 80% between subtypes, and about 68% (range, 66 to 69% between different types. This quasispecies is composed of a group of heterogeneous RNA sequences centered around a dominant nucleotide sequence that changes, throughout the course of the infection, under the selective pressure of the host immune system(18. More than one genotype can be found in the circulations of some HCV-infected patients, particularly in individuals who have received multiple transfusions and intravenous drug users. These are referred to as mixed-genotype infections(19, 20.The lack of a routinely available cell culture system and an easily available animal model has rendered classification of HCV

  4. Changing genotypes of cholera toxin (CT) of Vibrio cholerae O139 in Bangladesh and description of three new CT genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, Nurul A; Nusrin, Suraia; Alam, Munirul; Morita, Masatomo; Watanabe, Haruo; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Cravioto, Alejandro; Nair, Gopinath Balakrish

    2009-11-01

    We determined the genotype of cholera toxin by amplifying and sequencing the B-subunit in a sequential collection of 90 strains of Vibrio cholerae O139 isolated over the past 13 years since its first description in 1992. Representative strains isolated during 1993-1997 harboured ctxB of El Tor type (genotype 3). Twenty-six strains isolated during 1999, 2001, 2005 and three strains isolated in 1998, 2000 and 2002 were identified to belong to new ctxB genotypes 4 and 5, respectively. Genotype 5 was similar to genotype 1 except at position 28 (D-->A). The genotype 6 was similar to genotype 4 except at position 34 (H-->P). The implication of switch in terms of function of the toxin and its impact on human disease is unclear. How this change has influenced their prevalence relative to that of V. cholerae O1 in human infection is also not clear. The other common virulence gene clusters including the Vibrio pathogenicity island-1, Vibrio seventh pandemic island (VSP)-I and VSP-II of V. cholerae O139 did not show any remarkable difference from that of the O1 El Tor strains. Overall, the majority of the O139 strains tested in this study were similar to the El Tor strains but had altered ctxB genotype. This change and the impact that it causes to the epidemiology of cholera caused by O139 should be closely monitored.

  5. SNP genotyping technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Studer, Bruno; Kölliker, Roland

    2013-01-01

    for this is the availability of high-throughput platforms for multiplexed SNP genotyping. Advancements in these technologies have enabled increased flexibility and throughput, allowing for the generation of adequate SNP marker data at very competitive cost per data point.......In the recent years, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers have emerged as the marker technology of choice for plant genetics and breeding applications. Besides the efficient technologies available for SNP discovery even in complex genomes, one of the main reasons...

  6. SNP genotyping technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Studer, Bruno; Kölliker, Roland

    2013-01-01

    In the recent years, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers have emerged as the marker technology of choice for plant genetics and breeding applications. Besides the efficient technologies available for SNP discovery even in complex genomes, one of the main reasons...... for this is the availability of high-throughput platforms for multiplexed SNP genotyping. Advancements in these technologies have enabled increased flexibility and throughput, allowing for the generation of adequate SNP marker data at very competitive cost per data point....

  7. Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > American Indian/Alaska Native > Asthma Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives In 2014, 218, ... Native American adults reported that they currently have asthma. American Indian/Alaska Native children are 30% more ...

  8. Stroke and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Population Profiles > Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Stroke Stroke and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders Native Hawaiians/Pacific ... non-Hispanic white adults to die from a stroke in 2010. In general, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander ...

  9. Dispersal and selection mediate hybridization between a native and invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Ryan P; Muhlfeld, Clint C; Boyer, Matthew C; Lowe, Winsor H; Allendorf, Fred W; Luikart, Gordon

    2015-01-22

    Hybridization between native and non-native species has serious biological consequences, but our understanding of how dispersal and selection interact to influence invasive hybridization is limited. Here, we document the spread of genetic introgression between a native (Oncorhynchus clarkii) and invasive (Oncorhynchus mykiss) trout, and identify the mechanisms influencing genetic admixture. In two populations inhabiting contrasting environments, non-native admixture increased rapidly from 1984 to 2007 and was driven by surprisingly consistent processes. Individual admixture was related to two phenotypic traits associated with fitness: size at spawning and age of juvenile emigration. Fish with higher non-native admixture were larger and tended to emigrate at a younger age--relationships that are expected to confer fitness advantages to hybrid individuals. However, strong selection against non-native admixture was evident across streams and cohorts (mean selection coefficient against genotypes with non-native alleles (s) = 0.60; s.e. = 0.10). Nevertheless, hybridization was promoted in both streams by the continuous immigration of individuals with high levels of non-native admixture from other hybrid source populations. Thus, antagonistic relationships between dispersal and selection are mediating invasive hybridization between these fish, emphasizing that data on dispersal and natural selection are needed to fully understand the dynamics of introgression between native and non-native species. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  10. New native South American Y chromosome lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jota, Marilza S; Lacerda, Daniela R; Sandoval, José R; Vieira, Pedro Paulo R; Ohasi, Dominique; Santos-Júnior, José E; Acosta, Oscar; Cuellar, Cinthia; Revollo, Susana; Paz-Y-Miño, Cesar; Fujita, Ricardo; Vallejo, Gustavo A; Schurr, Theodore G; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo M; Pena, Sergio Dj; Ayub, Qasim; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Santos, Fabrício R

    2016-07-01

    Many single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the non-recombining region of the human Y chromosome have been described in the last decade. High-coverage sequencing has helped to characterize new SNPs, which has in turn increased the level of detail in paternal phylogenies. However, these paternal lineages still provide insufficient information on population history and demography, especially for Native Americans. The present study aimed to identify informative paternal sublineages derived from the main founder lineage of the Americas-haplogroup Q-L54-in a sample of 1841 native South Americans. For this purpose, we used a Y-chromosomal genotyping multiplex platform and conventional genotyping methods to validate 34 new SNPs that were identified in the present study by sequencing, together with many Y-SNPs previously described in the literature. We updated the haplogroup Q phylogeny and identified two new Q-M3 and three new Q-L54*(xM3) sublineages defined by five informative SNPs, designated SA04, SA05, SA02, SA03 and SA29. Within the Q-M3, sublineage Q-SA04 was mostly found in individuals from ethnic groups belonging to the Tukanoan linguistic family in the northwest Amazon, whereas sublineage Q-SA05 was found in Peruvian and Bolivian Amazon ethnic groups. Within Q-L54*, the derived sublineages Q-SA03 and Q-SA02 were exclusively found among Coyaima individuals (Cariban linguistic family) from Colombia, while Q-SA29 was found only in Maxacali individuals (Jean linguistic family) from southeast Brazil. Furthermore, we validated the usefulness of several published SNPs among indigenous South Americans. This new Y chromosome haplogroup Q phylogeny offers an informative paternal genealogy to investigate the pre-Columbian history of South America.Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 31 March 2016; doi:10.1038/jhg.2016.26.

  11. Susceptibility of biallelic haplotype and genotype frequencies to genotyping error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskvina, Valentina; Schmidt, Karl Michael

    2006-12-01

    With the availability of fast genotyping methods and genomic databases, the search for statistical association of single nucleotide polymorphisms with a complex trait has become an important methodology in medical genetics. However, even fairly rare errors occurring during the genotyping process can lead to spurious association results and decrease in statistical power. We develop a systematic approach to study how genotyping errors change the genotype distribution in a sample. The general M-marker case is reduced to that of a single-marker locus by recognizing the underlying tensor-product structure of the error matrix. Both method and general conclusions apply to the general error model; we give detailed results for allele-based errors of size depending both on the marker locus and the allele present. Multiple errors are treated in terms of the associated diffusion process on the space of genotype distributions. We find that certain genotype and haplotype distributions remain unchanged under genotyping errors, and that genotyping errors generally render the distribution more similar to the stable one. In case-control association studies, this will lead to loss of statistical power for nondifferential genotyping errors and increase in type I error for differential genotyping errors. Moreover, we show that allele-based genotyping errors do not disturb Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the genotype distribution. In this setting we also identify maximally affected distributions. As they correspond to situations with rare alleles and marker loci in high linkage disequilibrium, careful checking for genotyping errors is advisable when significant association based on such alleles/haplotypes is observed in association studies.

  12. 立足本土提升科技期刊国际影响力%Enhancement of international impact of scientific journals in Chinese based on native language

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏秀菊; 王柳; 刘丽英; 赵爱琴; 朱明

    2014-01-01

    In order to inherit and disseminate Chinese culture, and enhance international collaboration in science and technology, international impact of scientific journals in Chinese should be enhanced. Transactions of the Chinese Society of Agricultural Engineering (Transactions of CSAE) was coved by authority indexes such as EI Compendex, CAB Abstracts and ACSESS Digital Library. Transactions of CSAE was ranked No.10 in journals in Chinese by Google scholar for its high citation in 2014. Transactions of CSAE was given the honor of the 2013 most influential Chinese academic journals in the world (Top 5). All of these honors should mainly owe to a series of measure carried by of Transactions of CSAE to enhance international impact of scientific journals in Chinese based on native language. Practice demonstrate that scientific journals in Chinese could enhance their international impact by in-creasing the amount of English information in papers and improving the quality of English, by hiring editors who have studied abroad and hiring associate editors who were in abroad, by developing English website, by exhibiting journals on more international digital platform, The experience is a reference for journals in Chinese enhancing international impact.%为了传承和传播中华文化,加强对外的科技交流,增强中国的软实力,除了扶持中国英文科技期刊外,还需立足本土,提升中文科技期刊的国际影响力。《农业工程学报》在被国际工程权威数据库EI(美国工程索引)、国际农业权威数据库CAB Abstracts等收录的基础上被美国农学、环境、土壤学会联合会数字图书馆(ACSESS Digital Library)收录;2014年位列国际学术搜索引擎Google学术搜索高被引中文期刊第10名;2013年入选(Top 5)“2013中国最具国际影响力学术期刊”,这些都得益于采取的一系列的立足本土提升中文科技期刊影响力的措施。实践证明中文科技期刊

  13. Super-genotype: global monoclonality defies the odds of nature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes J Le Roux

    Full Text Available The ability to respond to natural selection under novel conditions is critical for the establishment and persistence of introduced alien species and their ability to become invasive. Here we correlated neutral and quantitative genetic diversity of the weed Pennisetum setaceum Forsk. Chiov. (Poaceae with differing global (North American and African patterns of invasiveness and compared this diversity to native range populations. Numerous molecular markers indicate complete monoclonality within and among all of these areas (F(ST = 0.0 and is supported by extreme low quantitative trait variance (Q(ST = 0.00065-0.00952. The results support the general-purpose-genotype hypothesis that can tolerate all environmental variation. However, a single global genotype and widespread invasiveness under numerous environmental conditions suggests a super-genotype. The super-genotype described here likely evolved high levels of plasticity in response to fluctuating environmental conditions during the Early to Mid Holocene. During the Late Holocene, when environmental conditions were predominantly constant but extremely inclement, strong selection resulted in only a few surviving genotypes.

  14. Super-genotype: global monoclonality defies the odds of nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Johannes J; Wieczorek, Ania M; Wright, Mark G; Tran, Carol T

    2007-07-04

    The ability to respond to natural selection under novel conditions is critical for the establishment and persistence of introduced alien species and their ability to become invasive. Here we correlated neutral and quantitative genetic diversity of the weed Pennisetum setaceum Forsk. Chiov. (Poaceae) with differing global (North American and African) patterns of invasiveness and compared this diversity to native range populations. Numerous molecular markers indicate complete monoclonality within and among all of these areas (F(ST) = 0.0) and is supported by extreme low quantitative trait variance (Q(ST) = 0.00065-0.00952). The results support the general-purpose-genotype hypothesis that can tolerate all environmental variation. However, a single global genotype and widespread invasiveness under numerous environmental conditions suggests a super-genotype. The super-genotype described here likely evolved high levels of plasticity in response to fluctuating environmental conditions during the Early to Mid Holocene. During the Late Holocene, when environmental conditions were predominantly constant but extremely inclement, strong selection resulted in only a few surviving genotypes.

  15. Invasive knotweed affects native plants through allelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrell, Craig; Gerber, Esther; Krebs, Christine; Parepa, Madalin; Schaffner, Urs; Bossdorf, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that many plant invaders interfere with native plants through allelopathy. This allelopathic interference may be a key mechanism of plant invasiveness. One of the most aggressive current plant invaders is the clonal knotweed hybrid Fallopia × bohemica, which often forms monocultures in its introduced range. Preliminary results from laboratory studies suggest that allelopathy could play a role in this invasion. We grew experimental communities of European plants together with F. × bohemica. We used activated carbon to test for allelopathic effects, and we combined this with single or repeated removal of Fallopia shoots to examine how mechanical control can reduce the species' impact. Addition of activated carbon to the soil significantly reduced the suppressive effect of undamaged F. × bohemica on native forbs. The magnitude of this effect was similar to that of regular cutting of Fallopia shoots. Regular cutting of Fallopia shoots efficiently inhibited the growth of rhizomes, together with their apparent allelopathic effects. The ecological impact of F. × bohemica on native forbs is not just a result of competition for shared resources, but it also appears to have a large allelopathic component. Still, regular mechnical control successfully eliminated allelopathic effects. Therefore, allelopathy will create an additional challenge to knotweed management and ecological restoration only if the allelochemicals are found to persist in the soil. More research is needed to examine the mechanisms underlying Fallopia allelopathy, and the long-term effects of soil residues.

  16. Traditional West Coast Native Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Deagle, George

    1988-01-01

    An important part of the complex culture of the Native people of Canada's Pacific coast is the traditional system of medicine each culture has developed. Population loss from epidemics and the influence of dominant European cultures has resulted in loss of many aspects of traditional medicine. Although some Native practices are potentially hazardous, continuation of traditional approaches to illness remains an important part of health care for many Native people. The use of “devil's club” pla...

  17. Impacts of Native and Exotic Vegetation Types on a Cambisols Properties in the Mid-Yunnan Plateau%滇中本地和外来植物群落对紫色土理化性质的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国盛; 李中杰; 艾锐; 金玲慧

    2011-01-01

    The long term impacts of native and exotic vegetation were investigated on soil physico-chemical properties(1.5 m depth of soil profiles).The experiment site,established in a degraded Aci Pup Udic Cambisols of the mid-Yunnan plateau of China(25°24′09″N,101°28′18″E),contained five vegetation types,including one exotic,Eucalyptus smithii forest(EF),and four native vegetation: shrub land(SL),Pinus yunnanensis forest(PF),semi-natural Keteleeria evelyniana and Pinus yunnanensis forest(SNF),natural secondary forest of Keteleeria evelyniana and Cyclobalanopsis glaucoides(NSF).With the vegetation succession from shrub land to natural secondary forest,soil bulk density,pH,soluble salt content decreased,but the contents of clay,total acidity,active aluminum,organic carbon and total nitrogen increased significantly.The highest soil organic carbon(SOC) and total nitrogen(TN) measured under NSF were 121 and 2.96 mg C hm^-2,respectively,whereas under SL,those were 86 mg C hm^-2 and 1.76 mg C hm^-2 respectively.Therefore,there is evidence suggesting that pedogenic processes of allitication,humification and argilication of the Cambisols were intensified following the forest succession.Soil pH,SOC and TN of EF were 4.49,93.04 Mmg C hm^-2 and 2.45 mg C hm^-2 respectively,and were not significantly different from those of the SNF soil.However,higher content of soil total acidity and active aluminum of EF soil indicated that the plantation of Eucalyptus smithii might have accelerated soil acidification.%在同一"气候-母质"条件下,本文研究了滇中飒马场流域4种处于不同演替阶段的本地植被群落和1种外来植被群落对酸性紫色土理化性质的影响。结果表明:随着灌草丛、云南松、针阔混交林到次生常绿阔叶林的本地植物群落演替过程,土壤的容重、pH、水溶性盐阳离子含量明显降低,而土壤粘粒、水解性酸、活性铝、有机碳、全氮含量

  18. Evolutionary significance of the invasion of introduced populations into the native range of Meconopsis cambrica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtueña, Francisco J; Preston, Chris D; Kadereit, Joachim W

    2011-10-01

    The long history of the deliberate or accidental and human-mediated dispersal of flowering plants has led to the introduction of foreign genotypes of many species into areas of Europe hitherto occupied by potentially distinct native populations. Studies of the genetic and evolutionary consequences of such changes are handicapped by the difficulty of identifying the surviving native populations of many species in the absence of clear morphological differences. We investigated the relationship between putative native and introduced populations of the herbaceous perennial Meconopsis cambrica (Papaveraceae), as the isolated native populations of this species can be identified by historical and ecological evidence. In Britain, the species is scarce and declining as a native, but has become increasingly frequent in recent decades as a garden escape. Native populations from Spain and France were compared with native and introduced British populations using internal transcribed spacer and cpDNA sequences and amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). Ten of the twelve British populations could be unambiguously assigned to native or introduced groups using cpDNA and AFLPs. The introduced plants appear to originate from the central and eastern Pyrenees rather than from native British sites. Two populations (including one previously considered native) cannot be classified unambiguously. There is unequivocal evidence for unidirectional gene flow from native plants into two of the introduced populations and possible evidence for hybridization in three other sites (two native). The absence of biological barriers to hybridization suggests that the native and introduced gene pools of M. cambrica in Britain might eventually merge.

  19. Visible Genotype Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Imai

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A visible sensor array system for simultaneous multiple SNP genotyping has been developed using a new plastic base with specific surface chemistry. Discrimination of SNP alleles is carried out by an allele-specific extension reaction using immobilized oligonucleotide primers. The 3’-ends of oligonucleotide primers are modified with a locked nucleic acid to enhance their efficiency in allelic discrimination. Biotin-dUTPs included in the reaction mixture are selectively incorporated into extending primer sequences and are utilized as tags for alkaline phosphatase-mediated precipitation of colored chemical substrates onto the surface of the plastic base. The visible precipitates allow immediate inspection of typing results by the naked eye and easy recording by a digital camera equipped on a commercial mobile phone. Up to four individuals can be analyzed on a single sensor array and multiple sensor arrays can be handled in a single operation. All of the reactions can be performed within one hour using conventional laboratory instruments. This visible genotype sensor array is suitable for “focused genomics” that follows “comprehensive genomics”.

  20. Low temperature impact on photosynthetic parameters of coffee genotypes Impacto de baixas temperaturas em parâmetros fotossintéticos de genótipos de cafeeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Luiz Partelli

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate photoprotective mechanisms related to low positive temperatures in Coffea canephora (Conilon clones 02 and 153 and C. arabica ('Catucaí' IPR 102 genotypes, involved in cold temperature tolerance. To accomplish this, one-year-old plants were successively submitted to: temperature decrease of 0.5ºC day-1, from 25/20ºC to 13/8ºC; a three-day chilling cycle at 13/4ºC; and a recovery period of 14 days (25/20ºC. During the experiment, leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll a fluorescence and leaf photosynthetic pigment content were evaluated. Total activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco and ribulose-5-phosphate kinase (Ru5PK were quantified to measure the activity of photosynthesis key enzymes. All genotypes showed low temperature sensitivity, but displayed diverse cold impact and recovery capabilities regarding the photosynthetic-related parameters studied. Catucaí IPR 102 cultivar showed better ability to cope with cold stress than the Conilon clones, especially Conilon 02, and had full recovery of leaf gas exchange, fluorescence parameters, enzymatic activity, and higher contents of the photoprotective pigments zeaxanthin and lutein.O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar mecanismos de fotoproteção relacionados a temperaturas baixas positivas em genótipos de Coffea canephora (clones Conilon 02 e 153 e C. arabica ('Catucaí' IPR 102, envolvidos na tolerância a baixas temperaturas. Para tal, plantas com um ano de idade foram expostas sucessivamente a: decréscimo da temperatura (0,5ºC dia-1, de 25/20ºC até 13/8ºC; um ciclo de três dias a 13/4ºC; e a 14 dias de recuperação (25/20ºC. Durante o experimento, foram avaliadas as trocas gasosas, a fluorescência da clorofila a e os teores de pigmentos fotossintéticos foliares. Foram quantificadas a atividade total da ribulose-1,5-bisfosfato carboxilase/oxigenase (Rubisco e da ribulose-5-fosfato quinase (Ru5PK, para medir a

  1. Propagating native Salicaceae for afforestation and restoration in New York City's five boroughs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald S. Zalesny; Richard A. Hallett; Nancy Falxa-Raymond; Adam H. Wiese; Bruce A. Birr

    2014-01-01

    Identifying superior Salicaceae genotypes for afforestation and restoration activities in urban areas can greatly increase the provision of ecosystem services for long-term ecological sustainability. To address this opportunity, we collected native Populus L. (Salicaceae) and Salix L. (Salicaceae) scions from 3 sites on Staten...

  2. Native Speakers' Perception of Non-Native English Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Maysa; Hussein, Riyad F.

    2011-01-01

    This study is aimed at investigating the rating and intelligibility of different non-native varieties of English, namely French English, Japanese English and Jordanian English by native English speakers and their attitudes towards these foreign accents. To achieve the goals of this study, the researchers used a web-based questionnaire which…

  3. STR MARKERS. GENOTYPING APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Sirbu

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available STR (short tandem repeats loci consist of short, repetitive sequence elements of 2-8 bp in length. These abundant repeats are well distributed throughout the human genome and are rich source of highly polymorphic markers. There are literally hundreds of STR systems which have been mapped throughout the human genome. Several dozen have been investigated for application to human identity testing. These STR loci are found on almost every chromosome in the genome. They may be amplified using a variety of PCR primers. Tetranucleotide repeats have been most popular among forensic scientists due to their fidelity in PCR amplification although some tri- and pentanucleotide repeats are also in use. In this paper we intend (far from being exhaustive to present a synthesis of the characteristics of these genetic markers and their applications in genotyping, giving as an example the use of the STRs in a paternity testing case.

  4. Native American youth and justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.Sc. Laurence A. French

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Youth and delinquency issues have long been problematic among Native Americans groups both on- and off-reservation. This phenomenon is further complicated by the cultural diversity among American Indians and Alaska Natives scattered across the United States. In address these issues, the paper begins with a historical overview of Native American youth. This history presents the long tradition of federal policies that, how well intended, have resulted in discriminatory practices with the most damages attacks being those directed toward the destruction of viable cultural attributes – the same attributes that make Native Americans unique within United States society. Following the historical material, the authors contrast the pervasive Native American aboriginal ethos of harmony with that of Protestant Ethic that dominates the ethos of the larger United States society. In addition to providing general information on Native American crime and delinquency, the paper also provides a case study of Native American justice within the Navajo Nation, the largest tribe, in both size and population, in the United States. The paper concludes with a discussion of issues specific to Native American youth and efforts to address these problems.

  5. Native American Foods and Cookery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Tom; Potter, Eloise F.

    Native Americans had a well-developed agriculture long before the arrival of the Europeans. Three staples--corn, beans, and squash--were supplemented with other gathered plants or cultivated crops such as white potatoes, sweet potatoes, pumpkins, and peanuts. Native Americans had no cows, pigs, or domesticated chickens; they depended almost…

  6. Ohiyesa's Path: Reclaiming Native Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Adrienne Brant; Renville, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    As Natives have assumed increasing authority and responsibility for tribal and federally funded and administered schools, a more balanced and enlightened view is emerging. Notable among these events is the recognition of the critical need to shift emphasis to the untapped heritage of more recently recognized and acknowledged Native American…

  7. Coyote's Eyes: Native Cognition Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafoya, Terry

    1982-01-01

    Using a Native American parable, compares the Standard Average European (SAE) world view with the Standard Native American (SNA) world view and the effects they have on education. Points out possible areas of interethnic confusion as a result of these two world views in communication dealing with cognitive schemes. (LC)

  8. Native American Foods and Cookery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Tom; Potter, Eloise F.

    Native Americans had a well-developed agriculture long before the arrival of the Europeans. Three staples--corn, beans, and squash--were supplemented with other gathered plants or cultivated crops such as white potatoes, sweet potatoes, pumpkins, and peanuts. Native Americans had no cows, pigs, or domesticated chickens; they depended almost…

  9. Invasive plant suppresses the growth of native tree seedlings by disrupting belowground mutualisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina A Stinson

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The impact of exotic species on native organisms is widely acknowledged, but poorly understood. Very few studies have empirically investigated how invading plants may alter delicate ecological interactions among resident species in the invaded range. We present novel evidence that antifungal phytochemistry of the invasive plant, Alliaria petiolata, a European invader of North American forests, suppresses native plant growth by disrupting mutualistic associations between native canopy tree seedlings and belowground arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Our results elucidate an indirect mechanism by which invasive plants can impact native flora, and may help explain how this plant successfully invades relatively undisturbed forest habitat.

  10. Plant-soil biota interactions and spatial distribution of black cherry in its native and invasive ranges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhart, K.O.; Packer, A.; Van der Putten, W.H.; Clay, K.A.

    2003-01-01

    One explanation for the higher abundance of invasive species in their non-native than native ranges is the escape from natural enemies. But there are few experimental studies comparing the parallel impact of enemies (or competitors and mutualists) on a plant species in its native and invaded ranges,

  11. Impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohse, Detlef; Bergmann, Raymond; Mikkelsen, Rene; Zeilstra, Christiaan; Meer, van der Devaraj; Versluis, Michel

    2004-01-01

    A lot of information on impacts of solid bodies on planets has been extracted from remote observations of impact craters on planetary surfaces; experiments however with large enough impact energies as compared to the energy stored in the ground are difficult. We approach this problem by downscaled e

  12. Native American Language Education as Policy-in-Practice: An Interpretative Policy Analysis of the Native American Languages Act of 1990/1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warhol, Larisa

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on findings from an interpretive policy analysis of the development and impacts of landmark federal legislation in support of Native American languages: the 1990/1992 Native American Languages Act (NALA). Overturning more than two centuries of federal Indian policy, NALA established the federal role in preserving and protecting…

  13. Community-based research as a mechanism to reduce environmental health disparities in american Indian and alaska native communities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McOliver, Cynthia Agumanu; Camper, Anne K; Doyle, John T; Eggers, Margaret J; Ford, Tim E; Lila, Mary Ann; Berner, James; Campbell, Larry; Donatuto, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    .... Climate change is adding to these impacts on Native American communities, variably causing drought, increased flooding and forced relocation affecting tribal water resources, traditional foods...

  14. An invasive plant alters pollinator-mediated phenotypic selection on a native congener.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beans, Carolyn M; Roach, Deborah A

    2015-01-01

    • Recent studies suggest that invasive plants compete reproductively with native plants by reducing the quantity or quality of pollinator visits. Although these studies have revealed ecological consequences of pollinator-mediated competition between invasive and native plants, the evolutionary outcomes of these interactions remain largely unexplored.• We studied the ecological and evolutionary impact of pollinator-mediated competition with an invasive jewelweed, Impatiens glandulifera, on a co-occurring native congener, I. capensis. Using a pollinator choice experiment, a hand pollination experiment, and a selection analysis, we addressed the following questions: (1) Do native pollinators show preference for the invasive or native jewelweed, and do they move between the two species? (2) Does invasive jewelweed pollen inhibit seed production in the native plant? (3) Does the invasive jewelweed alter phenotypic selection on the native plant's floral traits?• The pollinator choice experiment showed that pollinators strongly preferred the invasive jewelweed. The hand pollination experiment demonstrated that invasive pollen inhibited seed production in the native plant. The selection analysis showed that the presence of the invasive jewelweed altered phenotypic selection on corolla height in the native plant.• Invasive plants have the potential to alter phenotypic selection on floral traits in native plant populations. If native plants can evolve in response to this altered selection pressure, the evolution of floral traits may play an important role in permitting long-term coexistence of native and invasive plants. © 2015 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  15. HBV genotypic variability in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Carmen L; Aguilar, Julio C; Aguiar, Jorge; Muzio, Verena; Pentón, Eduardo; Garcia, Daymir; Guillen, Gerardo; Pujol, Flor H

    2015-01-01

    The genetic diversity of HBV in human population is often a reflection of its genetic admixture. The aim of this study was to explore the genotypic diversity of HBV in Cuba. The S genomic region of Cuban HBV isolates was sequenced and for selected isolates the complete genome or precore-core sequence was analyzed. The most frequent genotype was A (167/250, 67%), mainly A2 (149, 60%) but also A1 and one A4. A total of 77 isolates were classified as genotype D (31%), with co-circulation of several subgenotypes (56 D4, 2 D1, 5 D2, 7 D3/6 and 7 D7). Three isolates belonged to genotype E, two to H and one to B3. Complete genome sequence analysis of selected isolates confirmed the phylogenetic analysis performed with the S region. Mutations or polymorphisms in precore region were more common among genotype D compared to genotype A isolates. The HBV genotypic distribution in this Caribbean island correlates with the Y lineage genetic background of the population, where a European and African origin prevails. HBV genotypes E, B3 and H isolates might represent more recent introductions.

  16. HBV Genotypic Variability in Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Carmen L.; Aguilar, Julio C.; Aguiar, Jorge; Muzio, Verena; Pentón, Eduardo; Garcia, Daymir; Guillen, Gerardo; Pujol, Flor H.

    2015-01-01

    The genetic diversity of HBV in human population is often a reflection of its genetic admixture. The aim of this study was to explore the genotypic diversity of HBV in Cuba. The S genomic region of Cuban HBV isolates was sequenced and for selected isolates the complete genome or precore-core sequence was analyzed. The most frequent genotype was A (167/250, 67%), mainly A2 (149, 60%) but also A1 and one A4. A total of 77 isolates were classified as genotype D (31%), with co-circulation of several subgenotypes (56 D4, 2 D1, 5 D2, 7 D3/6 and 7 D7). Three isolates belonged to genotype E, two to H and one to B3. Complete genome sequence analysis of selected isolates confirmed the phylogenetic analysis performed with the S region. Mutations or polymorphisms in precore region were more common among genotype D compared to genotype A isolates. The HBV genotypic distribution in this Caribbean island correlates with the Y lineage genetic background of the population, where a European and African origin prevails. HBV genotypes E, B3 and H isolates might represent more recent introductions. PMID:25742179

  17. Admixture between native and invasive populations may increase invasiveness of Mimulus guttatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kleunen, Mark; Röckle, Michael; Stift, Marc

    2015-09-22

    Self-fertilization and admixture of genotypes from different populations can have major fitness consequences in native species. However, few studies have addressed their potential roles in invasive species. Here, we used plants of Mimulus guttatus from seven native North American, three invasive Scottish and four invasive New Zealand populations to address this. We created seeds from self-fertilization, within-population outcrossing, between-population outcrossing within the same range, and outcrossing between the native and invasive ranges. A greenhouse experiment showed that native and invasive plants of M. guttatus suffered to similar degrees from inbreeding depression, in terms of asexual reproduction and biomass production. After outcrossing with plants from other populations, M. guttatus benefited from heterosis, in terms of asexual and sexual reproduction, and biomass production, particularly when plants from native and invasive populations were crossed. This suggests that, when novel genotypes of M. guttatus from the native North American range will be introduced to the invasive ranges, subsequent outcrossing with M. guttatus plants that are already there might further boost invasiveness of this species.

  18. Security Awareness of the Digital Natives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios Gkioulos

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Young generations make extensive use of mobile devices, such as smartphones, tablets and laptops, while a plethora of security risks associated with such devices are induced by vulnerabilities related to user behavior. Furthermore, the number of security breaches on or via portable devices increases exponentially. Thus, deploying suitable risk treatments requires the investigation of how the digital natives (young people, born and bred in the digital era use their mobile devices and their level of security awareness, in order to identify common usage patterns with negative security impact. In this article, we present the results of a survey performed across a multinational sample of digital natives with distinct backgrounds and levels of competence in terms of security, to identify divergences in user behavior due to regional, educational and other factors. Our results highlight significant influences on the behavior of digital natives, arising from user confidence, educational background, and parameters related to usability and accessibility. The outcomes of this study justify the need for further analysis of the topic, in order to identify the influence of fine-grained semantics, but also the consolidation of wide and robust user-models.

  19. Comparison of two PCR-based human papillomavirus genotyping methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Philip E; Porras, Carolina; Quint, Wim G; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Schiffman, Mark; Gravitt, Patti E; González, Paula; Katki, Hormuzd A; Silva, Sandra; Freer, Enrique; Van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Jiménez, Silvia; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan

    2008-10-01

    (10) methods. The LA method detected more carcinogenic-HPV-genotype infections per specimen than the SPF(10) method (P HPV16 and HPV18 genotype-specific detection among ungenotyped HPV-positive specimens were comparable for detection of HPV16 and HPV18, the two HPV genotypes targeted by current prophylactic HPV vaccines. Both approaches are suitable for monitoring the impact of HPV16/18 vaccines in clinical trials.

  20. Asthma and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Population Profiles > Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Asthma Asthma and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders are 70 percent more likely to have asthma as non-Hispanic whites. National data for this ...

  1. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders among Native Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ISORDERS A MONG N ATIVE A MERICANS Native American cultures, which encompass American Indian, Alaska Native and Native ... among American Indians: The mythical and real properties. American Indian Culture and Research Journal 18(2):121-143. www. ...

  2. Mineral content of sorghum genotypes and the influence of water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Caroline Liboreiro; Queiroz, Valéria Aparecida Vieira; Simeone, Maria Lúcia Ferreira; Schaffert, Robert Eugene; de Oliveira, Antônio Carlos; da Silva, Camila Santana

    2017-01-01

    Sorghum is a source of several minerals whose content may vary depending on the genotype and the production environment. The objective of this study was to screen sorghum genotypes for mineral content and to investigate the effect of water stress on it. A large variability was observed in the mineral content of 100 sorghum genotypes grown in environments without (WoWS) and with water stress (WthWS). The water stress decreased Mn, P, Mg and S contents in 100, 96, 93 and 56% of genotypes, respectively. The genotypes and other factors seemed to have more impact than water stress on K, Ca, Cu, Fe and Zn levels. In 100 sorghum genotypes, 2 were classified as excellent sources of Fe and 25 of Zn, in both environments. The best two genotypes to Fe content were SC21 and SC655 and to Zn were SC320 and SHAN-QUI-RED which showed great potential for use in biofortification.

  3. The Relationship between Native American Ancestry, Body Mass Index and Diabetes Risk among Mexican-Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao; Huff, Chad D; Yamamura, Yuko; Wu, Xifeng; Strom, Sara S

    2015-01-01

    Higher body mass index (BMI) is a well-established risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes are substantially higher among Mexican-Americans relative to non-Hispanic European Americans. Mexican-Americans are genetically diverse, with a highly variable distribution of Native American, European, and African ancestries. Here, we evaluate the role of Native American ancestry on BMI and diabetes risk in a well-defined Mexican-American population. Participants were randomly selected among individuals residing in the Houston area who are enrolled in the Mexican-American Cohort study. Using a custom Illumina GoldenGate Panel, we genotyped DNA from 4,662 cohort participants for 87 Ancestry-Informative Markers. On average, the participants were of 50.2% Native American ancestry, 42.7% European ancestry and 7.1% African ancestry. Using multivariate linear regression, we found BMI and Native American ancestry were inversely correlated; individuals with 80% Native American ancestry. Furthermore, we demonstrated an interaction between BMI and Native American ancestry in diabetes risk among women; Native American ancestry was a strong risk factor for diabetes only among overweight and obese women (OR = 1.190 for each 10% increase in Native American ancestry). This study offers new insight into the complex relationship between obesity, genetic ancestry, and their respective effects on diabetes risk. Findings from this study may improve the diabetes risk prediction among Mexican-American individuals thereby facilitating targeted prevention strategies.

  4. Native Speakers in Linguistic Imperialism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillipson, Robert

    2016-01-01

    is recognised as desirable by some British experts, the native speakers in question seldom have this key qualification. This is even the case when the host country (Brunei) aims at bilingual education. It is unlikely that the host countries are getting value for money. Whether the UK and other ‘English...... the linguicism of British pedagogical expertise are generally involved in native speaker export businesses. They underpin a hierarchy with under-qualified native speakers projected as superior to local teachers who are seen as in need of foreign ‘aid’. In view of the British bodies involved openly declaring...

  5. The Rise of native advertising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius MANIC

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Native advertising is described both as a new way for promoters to engage audiences and as a new, clever, source of revenue for publishers and media agencies. The debates around its morality and the need for a wide accepted framework are often viewed as calls for creativity. Aside from the various forms, strategies and the need for clarification, the fact that native advertising works and its revenue estimates increase annually transforms the new type of ad into a clear objective for companies, marketers and publishers. Native advertising stopped being a buzzword and started being a marketing reality.

  6. Complements or Substitutes? Task Specialization by Gender and Nativity in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina; de la Rica, Sara

    2009-01-01

    Learning about the impact of immigration on the labor market outcomes of natives is a topic of major concern for immigrant-receiving countries. There exists an extensive literature evaluating the impact of immigration on the employment and wages of natives in the U.S. Yet, despite the significant degree of occupational segregation by gender regardless of workers' origin, the literature has traditionally treated male and female immigrants as a homogenous group when examining the impact of immi...

  7. Short-Term Response of Native Flora to the Removal of Non-Native Shrubs in Mixed-Hardwood Forests of Indiana, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M. Shields

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available While negative impacts of invasive species on native communities are well documented, less is known about how these communities respond to the removal of established populations of invasive species. With regard to invasive shrubs, studies examining native community response to removal at scales greater than experimental plots are lacking. We examined short-term effects of removing Lonicera maackii (Amur honeysuckle and other non-native shrubs on native plant taxa in six mixed-hardwood forests. Each study site contained two 0.64 ha sample areas—an area where all non-native shrubs were removed and a reference area where no treatment was implemented. We sampled vegetation in the spring and summer before and after non-native shrubs were removed. Cover and diversity of native species, and densities of native woody seedlings, increased after shrub removal. However, we also observed significant increases in L. maackii seedling densities and Alliaria petiolata (garlic mustard cover in removal areas. Changes in reference areas were less pronounced and mostly non-significant. Our results suggest that removing non-native shrubs allows short-term recovery of native communities across a range of invasion intensities. However, successful restoration will likely depend on renewed competition with invasive species that re-colonize treatment areas, the influence of herbivores, and subsequent control efforts.

  8. Physical and functional evaluation of extruded flours obtained from different rice genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Salamoni Becker

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of broken grains into native flours modified by extrusion is an alternative to add value to these co-products from the paddy rice processing. This study aimed to analyze the process of extrusion cooking on the physical and functional characteristics of extruded flours obtained from different rice genotypes (IRGA-417, BRS-Primavera and CNA-8502. The experimental design was completely randomized (3x2 factorial with four original replicates and analysis of variance to assess particle size, instrumental color parameters (L*, a* and b*, water absorption index (WAI, milk absorption index (MAI, oil absorption index (OAI, water solubility index (WSI and milk solubility index (MSI of rice flour. The extrusion process promoted changes in all physical and functional properties of rice flour, but only WSI and color parameters were influenced by genotype and by the industrial processing. Rice flours become darker, tending to a more reddish and yellow coloration after extrusion. Native and extruded rice flours of genotypes IRGA-417, BRS-Primavera and extruded rice flour of genotype CNA-8502 showed finer particles, while native flour of genotype CNA-8502 showed coarser particles. The extruded flours of IRGA-417 genotype obtained higher expansion and luminosity, and lower values of chroma a*, chroma b* and water solubility, while the BRS-Primavera higher values of chroma a* and b*, and lower luminosity and expansion, and CAN-8502 higher water solubility and lower expansion and value of chroma a*. The extrusion process led to flours with high water and milk absorption and solubility, low oil absorption and with potential for application in instant products, regardless of genotype.

  9. Genotype transposer: automated genotype manipulation for linkage disequilibrium analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, D G; Canzian, F

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this work is to provide the modern molecular geneticist with tools to perform more efficient and more accurate analysis of the genotype data they produce. By using Microsoft Excel macros written in Visual Basic, we can translate genotype data into a form readable by the versatile software 'Arlequin', read the Arlequin output, calculate statistics of linkage disequilibrium, and put the results in a format for viewing with the software 'GOLD'. The software is available by FTP at: ftp://xcsg.iarc.fr/cox/Genotype_Transposer/. Detailed instruction and examples are available at: ftp://xcsg.iarc.fr/cox/Genotype&_Transposer/. Arlequin is available at: http://lgb.unige.ch/arlequin/. GOLD is available at: http://www.well.ox.ac.uk/asthma/GOLD/.

  10. Native Terrestrial Animal Species Richness

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These data represent predicted current distributions of all native mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and butterflies in the Middle-Atlantic region. The data are...

  11. Native grassland inventory and monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Benton Lake refuge has nearly 6,000 acres of native western wheatgrass-green needlegrass prairie uplands. This pilot study was designed to assess the condition of...

  12. Charting Transnational Native American Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsinya Huang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction to the Special Forum entitled "Charting Transnational Native American Studies: Aesthetics, Politics, Identity," edited by Hsinya Huang, Philip J. Deloria, Laura M. Furlan, and John Gamber

  13. Characteristics of carcass and non-carcass components in feedlot native goats in the Brazilian semiarid region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Souza da Silva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of carcass and non-carcass components in Brazilian semi-arid native goats of different genotypes in feedlot system. It was used 30 non-castrated Azul, Graúna and Moxotó goats with average initial weight of 15.93 ± 2.4, distributed in a completely randomized design with 3 genotypes and 10 replicates. The experimental diet used had a roughage:concentrate ratio of 47:53. There was a significant effect for weight gain and subcutaneous fat thickness according to genotype. Retail cut yields did not differ among the studied breeds. The percentage of non-carcass components in relation to live weight and empty body weight were not different among genotypes. Graúna and Azul genotypes showed daily gain greater than Moxotó genotype. The subcutaneous fat thickness presented by Azul and Moxotó genotypes was greater than that of Graúna genotype. All genotypes have good quantitative and morphometric carcass traits in addition to satisfactory yields of cut and non-carcass components, but for subcutaneous fat thickness (carcass finishing, Azul and Moxotó genotypes stand out.

  14. The potential of different lime tree (Tilia spp genotypes for phytoextraction of heavy metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šijačić-Nikolić Mirjana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The research of heavy metals contents (Pb, Mn, Zn, Ni, Fe in soil in the area of the National Park „Fruška gora”, along the highway M21 shows lower values for manganese, zinc and iron than the maximum allowed quantity prescribed by law. For nickel and lead it shows higher values than maximum allowed quantity. The heavy metals contents in leaves of lime tree in 12 analyzed genotypes are far below average values in accordance with ECCE with all genotypes except genotype 7 for lead and genotypes 7 and 8 for iron. The results of analysis of variance components show that out of four components (locality, genotype, locality x genotype and error only the interaction between locality and genotype does not contribute to variance. The contents of Pb, Mn, Fe and Zn in leaves is primarily influenced by genotype while Ni contents may be considered a consequence of locality. The selection of genotypes which is able to uptake greater quantities of heavy metals than other genotypes may serve as a solid basis for phytoextraction of heavy metals as a technology by which heavy metals, metalloids and radionuclides are extracted from environment through usage of suitable species and plant genotypes able to uptake and accumulate the given pollutants in parts of plant tissue. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 43007: Studying climate change and its influence on the environment: Impacts, adaptation and mitigation

  15. Discovering unique tobacco use patterns among Alaska Native people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A. Dilley

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background . Alaska Native people are disproportionately impacted by tobacco-related diseases in comparison to non-Native Alaskans. Design. We used Alaska's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS to describe tobacco use among more than 4,100 Alaska Native adults, stratified by geographic region and demographic groups. Results . Overall tobacco use was high: approximately 2 out of every 5 Alaska Native adults reported smoking cigarettes (41.2% and 1 in 10 reported using smokeless tobacco (SLT, 12.3%. A small percentage overall (4.8% reported using iq'mik, an SLT variant unique to Alaska Native people. When examined by geographic region, cigarette smoking was highest in remote geographic regions; SLT use was highest in the southwest region of the state. Use of iq'mik was primarily confined to a specific area of the state; further analysis showed that 1 in 3 women currently used iq'mik in this region. Conclusion . Our results suggest that different types of tobacco use are epidemic among diverse Alaska Native communities. Our results also illustrate that detailed analysis within racial/ethnic groups can be useful for public health programme planning to reduce health disparities.

  16. One-Time Herbicide use Causes Local Extinction of Native Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invasive species are depleting the World’s native biota. When ecosystems become invaded, ecosystem managers face a difficult dilemma. They can use aggressive practices to reduce invader abundances, thereby reducing invaders’ competitive impacts on native species. But it is usually difficult or im...

  17. The Digital Native Debate in Higher Education: A Comparative Analysis of Recent Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Erika E.

    2012-01-01

    More than a decade after Prensky's influential articulation of digital natives and immigrants, disagreement exists around these characterizations of students and the impact of such notions within higher education. Perceptions of today's undergraduate learners as tech-savvy "digital natives" (Prensky, 2001a), who both want and need the latest…

  18. Native species that can replace exotic species in landscaping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Regina Tempel Stumpf

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Beyond aesthetics, the contemporary landscaping intends to provide other benefits for humans and environment, especially related to the environmental quality of urban spaces and conservation of the species. A trend in this direction is the reduction in the use of exotic plants in their designs, since, over time, they can become agents of replacement of native flora, as it has occurred in Rio Grande do Sul with many species introduced by settlers. However, the use of exotic species is unjustifiable, because the flora diversity of the Bioma Pampa offers many native species with appropriate features to the ornamental use. The commercial cultivation and the implantation of native species in landscaped areas constitute innovations for plant nurseries and landscapers and can provide a positive reduction in extractivism, contributing to dissemination, exploitation and preservation of native flora, and also decrease the impact of chemical products on environment. So, this work intends to identify native species of Bioma Pampa with features and uses similar to the most used exotic species at Brazilian landscaping. The species were selected from consulting books about native plants of Bioma Pampa and plants used at Brazilian landscaping, considering the similarity on habit and architecture, as well as characteristics of leafs, flowers and/or fruits and environmental conditions of occurrence and cultivation. There were identified 34 native species able to properly replace exotic species commonly used. The results show that many native species of Bioma Pampa have interesting ornamental features to landscape gardening, allowing them to replace exotic species that are traditionally cultivated.

  19. The Power of Protection: A Population-Based Comparison of Native and Non-Native Youth Suicide Attempters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackin, Juliette; Perkins, Tamara; Furrer, Carrie

    2012-01-01

    This study provides actionable information about intervening with American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth to prevent suicide. Statewide school survey data were used to model the impact of risk and protective factors on self-reported suicide attempts (both AI/AN and non-AI/AN). The cumulative risk and protective model worked similarly for both…

  20. Reproductive Performance of Native Pulawska and High Productivity Polish Landrace Sows in the Context of Stress During the Period of Early Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babicz, M; Szyndler-Nędza, M; Skrzypczak, E; Kasprzyk, A

    2016-02-01

    Experiments revealed that it is necessary to get rid of genotypes RYR1C/T and RYR1T/T because of problems with meat quality and reproduction of gilts and sows. This phenomenon, however, is of individual nature and is characterized by high variability. The aim of the study was to analyse the influence of stressogenic factors in native Puławska and high productivity Polish Landrace breed sows during the period of low pregnancy on reproductive performance and maternal behaviour. Sows in the 2nd reproduction cycle were assigned into groups of five animals as follows: control (C) of RYR1 C/C genotype and experimental (E) of RYR1 C/T genotype. In all, 30 Puławska breed sows and 30 PL breed sows were analysed. During the early stage of pregnancy (days 42-84), experimental groups were subjected to the action of stressogenic factors: elevated temperature, noisy and rough treatment of sows by service personnel and immobilization stress. The effect of stressogenic factors was referred to the reproductive performance of sows. Puławska and PL breed sows from the experimental groups were subjected to the evaluation of maternal traits on the basis of perinatal behaviour determined with the help of an ethogram. Analysis of the results of reproduction and the behaviour of the sows confirmed the higher resistance to stressogenic factors of the Puławska breed. The performed analysis of reproduction and behaviour confirmed that heterozygotic genotypes in the RYR1 locus exhibited less advantageous reproduction, which corroborates the hypothesis about a negative impact of the T allele on swine productivity. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Transforming microbial genotyping: a robotic pipeline for genotyping bacterial strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian O'Farrell

    Full Text Available Microbial genotyping increasingly deals with large numbers of samples, and data are commonly evaluated by unstructured approaches, such as spread-sheets. The efficiency, reliability and throughput of genotyping would benefit from the automation of manual manipulations within the context of sophisticated data storage. We developed a medium- throughput genotyping pipeline for MultiLocus Sequence Typing (MLST of bacterial pathogens. This pipeline was implemented through a combination of four automated liquid handling systems, a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS consisting of a variety of dedicated commercial operating systems and programs, including a Sample Management System, plus numerous Python scripts. All tubes and microwell racks were bar-coded and their locations and status were recorded in the LIMS. We also created a hierarchical set of items that could be used to represent bacterial species, their products and experiments. The LIMS allowed reliable, semi-automated, traceable bacterial genotyping from initial single colony isolation and sub-cultivation through DNA extraction and normalization to PCRs, sequencing and MLST sequence trace evaluation. We also describe robotic sequencing to facilitate cherrypicking of sequence dropouts. This pipeline is user-friendly, with a throughput of 96 strains within 10 working days at a total cost of 200,000 items were processed by two to three people. Our sophisticated automated pipeline can be implemented by a small microbiology group without extensive external support, and provides a general framework for semi-automated bacterial genotyping of large numbers of samples at low cost.

  2. Prion protein gene polymorphism and genetic risk evaluation for scrapie in all Turkish native sheep breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meydan, H; Yüceer, B; Degirmenci, R; Özkan, M M; Yildiz, M A

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the prion protein (PrP) gene polymorphism in a total of 1,110 healthy sheep from 18 Turkish native sheep breeds. There were nine alleles and 22 genotypes observed based on codons 136, 154, and 171 of the PrP gene. The ARQ allele was predominant for all breeds. The most resistant allele to scrapie, ARR, was present in all breeds. The VRQ allele, associated with the highest susceptibility to scrapie, was detected at low frequencies in İvesi (0.06), Kıvırcık (0.021), Sakız (0.010), Karayaka (0.011), Çine Çaparı (0.012), and Güneykaraman (0.017). In general, the ARQ/ARQ genotype was predominant in all breeds. The most resistant genotype to scrapie, ARR/ARR, was found with the frequency lower than 0.180. The most susceptible genotype, VRQ/VRQ, was found in only Kıvırcık. The TRR and TRH alleles and the genotypes of ARR/TRR, ARR/ARK, and ARH/TRH have been found for the first time in Turkish native sheep breeds. According to these results, all breeds belong to risk group R3 followed by R2. It is propounded that the susceptibility to scrapie increased from eastern to western part of Turkey. Our findings of Turkish native sheep breeds with PrP gene polymorphisms will assist the sheep breeding program for selection of scrapie resistance genotypes to reduce the risk of scrapie.

  3. Identification of polymorphic inversions from genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cáceres Alejandro

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphic inversions are a source of genetic variability with a direct impact on recombination frequencies. Given the difficulty of their experimental study, computational methods have been developed to infer their existence in a large number of individuals using genome-wide data of nucleotide variation. Methods based on haplotype tagging of known inversions attempt to classify individuals as having a normal or inverted allele. Other methods that measure differences between linkage disequilibrium attempt to identify regions with inversions but unable to classify subjects accurately, an essential requirement for association studies. Results We present a novel method to both identify polymorphic inversions from genome-wide genotype data and classify individuals as containing a normal or inverted allele. Our method, a generalization of a published method for haplotype data 1, utilizes linkage between groups of SNPs to partition a set of individuals into normal and inverted subpopulations. We employ a sliding window scan to identify regions likely to have an inversion, and accumulation of evidence from neighboring SNPs is used to accurately determine the inversion status of each subject. Further, our approach detects inversions directly from genotype data, thus increasing its usability to current genome-wide association studies (GWAS. Conclusions We demonstrate the accuracy of our method to detect inversions and classify individuals on principled-simulated genotypes, produced by the evolution of an inversion event within a coalescent model 2. We applied our method to real genotype data from HapMap Phase III to characterize the inversion status of two known inversions within the regions 17q21 and 8p23 across 1184 individuals. Finally, we scan the full genomes of the European Origin (CEU and Yoruba (YRI HapMap samples. We find population-based evidence for 9 out of 15 well-established autosomic inversions, and for 52 regions

  4. 78 FR 70956 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Assessment of Native American, Alaska Native...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Assessment of Native American... Title of Information Collection: Assessment of Native American, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian... American and Alaskan Native populations, most notably through the Indian Housing Block Grant. The level...

  5. Literacy Skill Differences between Adult Native English and Native Spanish Speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Julia; Cote, Nicole Gilbert; Reilly, Lenore; Binder, Katherine S.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the literacy skills of adult native English and native Spanish ABE speakers. Participants were 169 native English speakers and 124 native Spanish speakers recruited from five prior research projects. The results showed that the native Spanish speakers were less skilled on morphology and passage comprehension…

  6. Literacy Skill Differences between Adult Native English and Native Spanish Speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Julia; Cote, Nicole Gilbert; Reilly, Lenore; Binder, Katherine S.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the literacy skills of adult native English and native Spanish ABE speakers. Participants were 169 native English speakers and 124 native Spanish speakers recruited from five prior research projects. The results showed that the native Spanish speakers were less skilled on morphology and passage comprehension…

  7. Apparent competition and native consumers exacerbate the strong competitive effect of an exotic plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrock, John L; Dutra, Humberto P; Marquis, Robert J; Barber, Nicholas

    2015-04-01

    Direct and indirect effects can play a key role in invasions, but experiments evaluating both are rare. We examined the roles of direct competition and apparent competition by exotic Amur honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii) by manipulating (1) L. maackii vegetation, (2) presence of L. maackii fruits, and (3) access to plants by small mammals and deer. Direct competition with L. maackii reduced the abundance and richness of native and exotic species, and native consumers significantly reduced the abundance and richness of native species. Although effects of direct competition and consumption were more pervasive, richness of native plants was also reduced through apparent competition, as small-mammal consumers reduced richness only when L. maackii fruits were present. Our experiment reveals the multiple, interactive pathways that affect the success and impact of an invasive exotic plant: exotic plants may directly benefit from reduced attack by native consumers, may directly exert strong competitive effects on native plants, and may also benefit from apparent competition.

  8. Managing conflicts arising from fisheries enhancements based on non-native fishes in southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellender, B R; Woodford, D J; Weyl, O L F; Cowx, I G

    2014-12-01

    Southern Africa has a long history of non-native fish introductions for the enhancement of recreational and commercial fisheries, due to a perceived lack of suitable native species. This has resulted in some important inland fisheries being based on non-native fishes. Regionally, these introductions are predominantly not benign, and non-native fishes are considered one of the main threats to aquatic biodiversity because they affect native biota through predation, competition, habitat alteration, disease transfer and hybridization. To achieve national policy objectives of economic development, food security and poverty eradication, countries are increasingly looking towards inland fisheries as vehicles for development. As a result, conflicts have developed between economic and conservation objectives. In South Africa, as is the case for other invasive biota, the control and management of non-native fishes is included in the National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act. Implementation measures include import and movement controls and, more recently, non-native fish eradication in conservation priority areas. Management actions are, however, complicated because many non-native fishes are important components in recreational and subsistence fisheries that contribute towards regional economies and food security. In other southern African countries, little attention has focussed on issues and management of non-native fishes, and this is cause for concern. This paper provides an overview of introductions, impacts and fisheries in southern Africa with emphasis on existing and evolving legislation, conflicts, implementation strategies and the sometimes innovative approaches that have been used to prioritize conservation areas and manage non-native fishes.

  9. Haplotypes versus genotypes on pedigrees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirkpatrick Bonnie B

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome sequencing will soon produce haplotype data for individuals. For pedigrees of related individuals, sequencing appears to be an attractive alternative to genotyping. However, methods for pedigree analysis with haplotype data have not yet been developed, and the computational complexity of such problems has been an open question. Furthermore, it is not clear in which scenarios haplotype data would provide better estimates than genotype data for quantities such as recombination rates. Results To answer these questions, a reduction is given from genotype problem instances to haplotype problem instances, and it is shown that solving the haplotype problem yields the solution to the genotype problem, up to constant factors or coefficients. The pedigree analysis problems we will consider are the likelihood, maximum probability haplotype, and minimum recombination haplotype problems. Conclusions Two algorithms are introduced: an exponential-time hidden Markov model (HMM for haplotype data where some individuals are untyped, and a linear-time algorithm for pedigrees having haplotype data for all individuals. Recombination estimates from the general haplotype HMM algorithm are compared to recombination estimates produced by a genotype HMM. Having haplotype data on all individuals produces better estimates. However, having several untyped individuals can drastically reduce the utility of haplotype data.

  10. Impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellmuth, M.; Kabat, P.

    2003-01-01

    Even without the impacts of climate change, water managers face prodigious challenges in meeting sustainable development goals. Growing populations need affordable food, water and energy. Industrial development demands a growing share of water resources and contaminates those same resources with its

  11. Impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellmuth, M.; Kabat, P.

    2003-01-01

    Even without the impacts of climate change, water managers face prodigious challenges in meeting sustainable development goals. Growing populations need affordable food, water and energy. Industrial development demands a growing share of water resources and contaminates those same resources with its

  12. Native Colombia: Contact, Conquest and Colonial Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villamarín, Juan

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Studies done on Colombia’s population history during the last three decades have been influenced by the ideas, methods and approaches of Woodrow Borah. We will discuss three issues that he and Sherburne Cook considered in the course of their work on Latin American demography – probable size of native populations on the eve of European contact; the effects of climate and elevation on the intensity of different groups’ decline; and the impact on native populations of diseases brought from the Old World to the New. We examine the information available on Colombia’s diverse highland and lowland regions, and in that context explore questions that have arisen recently regarding nutrition and health levels of native people prior to European conquest.

    Los estudios que se han realizado sobre la historia demográfica de Colombia durante las tres últimas décadas se han visto influidos por las ideas, métodos y planteamientos de Woodrow Borah. Discutiremos tres aspectos que él y Sherburne Cook han tenido en cuenta a lo largo de sus trabajos sobre la demografía latinoamericana: el volumen de la población nativa en vísperas del contacto con los europeos; los efectos del clima y de la altitud en el declive de la intensidad demográfica de los diferentes grupos; y el impacto en la población nativa de las enfermedades procedentes del Viejo Mundo. Examinamos la información disponible en el altiplano y en la zona costera de Colombia y, en dicho contexto, valoramos cuestiones que han surgido recientemente con relación a los niveles de nutrición y salud de la población nativa antes de la conquista europea.

  13. Genetic variation and population structure in native Americans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijia Wang

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available We examined genetic diversity and population structure in the American landmass using 678 autosomal microsatellite markers genotyped in 422 individuals representing 24 Native American populations sampled from North, Central, and South America. These data were analyzed jointly with similar data available in 54 other indigenous populations worldwide, including an additional five Native American groups. The Native American populations have lower genetic diversity and greater differentiation than populations from other continental regions. We observe gradients both of decreasing genetic diversity as a function of geographic distance from the Bering Strait and of decreasing genetic similarity to Siberians--signals of the southward dispersal of human populations from the northwestern tip of the Americas. We also observe evidence of: (1 a higher level of diversity and lower level of population structure in western South America compared to eastern South America, (2 a relative lack of differentiation between Mesoamerican and Andean populations, (3 a scenario in which coastal routes were easier for migrating peoples to traverse in comparison with inland routes, and (4 a partial agreement on a local scale between genetic similarity and the linguistic classification of populations. These findings offer new insights into the process of population dispersal and differentiation during the peopling of the Americas.

  14. Kalispel Non-Native Fish Suppression Project 2007 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wingert, Michele; Andersen, Todd [Kalispel Natural Resource Department

    2008-11-18

    Non-native salmonids are impacting native salmonid populations throughout the Pend Oreille Subbasin. Competition, hybridization, and predation by non-native fish have been identified as primary factors in the decline of some native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) populations. In 2007, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) initiated the Kalispel Nonnative Fish Suppression Project. The goal of this project is to implement actions to suppress or eradicate non-native fish in areas where native populations are declining or have been extirpated. These projects have previously been identified as critical to recovering native bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout (WCT). Lower Graham Creek was invaded by non-native rainbow (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) after a small dam failed in 1991. By 2003, no genetically pure WCT remained in the lower 700 m of Graham Creek. Further invasion upstream is currently precluded by a relatively short section of steep, cascade-pool stepped channel section that will likely be breached in the near future. In 2008, a fish management structure (barrier) was constructed at the mouth of Graham Creek to preclude further invasion of non-native fish into Graham Creek. The construction of the barrier was preceded by intensive electrofishing in the lower 700 m to remove and relocate all captured fish. Westslope cutthroat trout have recently been extirpated in Cee Cee Ah Creek due to displacement by brook trout. We propose treating Cee Cee Ah Creek with a piscicide to eradicate brook trout. Once eradication is complete, cutthroat trout will be translocated from nearby watersheds. In 2004, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) proposed an antimycin treatment within the subbasin; the project encountered significant public opposition and was eventually abandoned. However, over the course of planning this 2004 project, little public

  15. Population samples and genotyping technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, S J; Sanchez-Mazas, A; Single, R M; Meyer, D; Hill, J; Dron, H A; Jani, A J; Thomson, G; Erlich, H A

    2007-04-01

    The 14th International HLA (human leukocyte antigen) Immunogenetics Workshop (14th-IHIWS) Biostatistics and Anthropology/Human Genetic Diversity project continues the population sampling, genotype data generation, and biostatistic analyses of the 13th International Histocompatibility Workshop Anthropology/Human Genetic Diversity Component, with the overall goal of further characterizing global HLA allele and haplotype diversity and better describing the relationships between major histocompatibility complex diversity, geography, linguistics, and population history. Since the 13th Workshop, new investigators have and continue to be recruited to the project and new high-resolution class I and class II genotype data are being generated for 112 population samples from around the world.

  16. IMPACTS !

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    (Photo courtesy of Don Davis / NASA)The University of Geneva (UNIGE) and the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale of Lausanne (EPFL) are organising the 4th series of public lectures on astronomy, on the theme of "Impacts". The schedule is as follows: Il y a 100 ans : une explosion dans la Tunguska – Dr. Frédéric COURBIN, EPFL Les impacts sur Terre – Prof. Didier Queloz, UNIGE La fin des dinosaures – Dr. Stéphane Paltani, UNIGE Wednesday 7 May 2008, from 7.00 p.m. to 9.00 p.m. Auditoire CO1, EPFL, Ecublens Thursday 08 May 2008, from 7.00 p.m. to 9.00 p.m. Auditoire Rouiller, Uni-Dufour, Genève All 3 lectures will be givent each evening! Admission free Information: 022 379 22 00

  17. Feedback in online course for non-native English-speaking students

    CERN Document Server

    Olesova, Larisa

    2013-01-01

    Feedback in Online Course for Non-Native English-Speaking Students is an investigation of the effectiveness of audio and text feedback provided in English in an online course for non-native English-speaking students. The study presents results showing how audio and text feedback can impact on non-native English-speaking students' higher-order learning as they participate in an asynchronous online course. It also discusses the results of how students perceive both types of the feedback provided. In addition, the study examines how the impact and perceptions differ when the instructor giving the

  18. Speech Recognition of Non-Native Speech Using Native and Non-Native Acoustic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    NATIVE AND NON-NATIVE ACOUSTIC MODELS David A. van Leeuwen and Rosemary Orr vanLeeuwentm .tno. nl R. 0rr~kno. azn. nl TNO Human Factors Research...a] is pronounced closer to the [c] by the vowels . Journal of Phonetics, 25:437-470, 1997. 32 [2] D. B. Paul and J. M. Baker. The design for [9] R. H...J. Kershaw, [12] Tony Robinson. Private Communication. L. Lamel, D. A. van Leeuwen , D. Pye, A. J. Robinson, H. J. M. Steeneken, and P. C. Wood- [13

  19. Native herbaceous perennials as ornamentals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bjarne; Ørgaard, Marian

    2013-01-01

    Gardening with native perennials is a way to bring nature closer to urban citizens and bring up reflections on nature in a busy world. During three seasons of trialing Salvia pratensis, Dianthus deltoides, Campanula trachelium, Vincetoxicum hirundinaria, Saxifraga granulata, Plantago media and P...

  20. Native American College Student Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosholder, Richard; Goslin, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Native American students are the most likely racial/ethnic group tracked in post-secondary American education to be affected by poverty and limited access to educational opportunities. In addition, they are the most likely to be required to take remedial course work and are the least likely to graduate from college. A review of the literature was…

  1. Native Art of the Southwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langham, Barbara A.

    1997-01-01

    Provides historical information on native Southwest peoples and their arts to encourage appreciation and understanding of this cultural heritage. Provides instructions and supply lists for age-appropriate craft projects including woven baskets and rugs, clay pots, clay and paper beads, silver bracelets, kachina dolls, sand paintings, dream…

  2. 汉语学习者常见偏误分析和母语对第二语言习得的影响--以英语为母语者的作文为例%Common Errors in Chinese learners and the Impact Analysis of Native Speakers to Second Language Acquisition--Take Native speakers of English's Composition for example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何雅沁

    2015-01-01

    汉语对于大部分留学生来说,并不是一门容易掌握的语言,本文旨在从偏误分析的角度出发,以英语为母语的汉语学习者作文中出现的问题为例,着重探讨偏误类型以及偏误产生的原因和母语对于第二语言习得的影响以及在第二语言教学过程中,教师需要注意和改进的方法和策略。%Chinese for most foreign students, it is not an easy grasp of the language, this paper aims to analyze the perspec-tive of Errors in English-speaking learners of Chinese writing problems arising, for example, focuses on the type of bias caus-es and native errors generated effects for the second language acquisition and second language teaching process, teachers need to pay attention and improve methods and strategies.

  3. Pooled DNA genotyping on Affymetrix SNP genotyping arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen Michael J

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genotyping technology has advanced such that genome-wide association studies of complex diseases based upon dense marker maps are now technically feasible. However, the cost of such projects remains high. Pooled DNA genotyping offers the possibility of applying the same technologies at a fraction of the cost, and there is some evidence that certain ultra-high throughput platforms also perform with an acceptable accuracy. However, thus far, this conclusion is based upon published data concerning only a small number of SNPs. Results In the current study we prepared DNA pools from the parents and from the offspring of 30 parent-child trios that have been extensively genotyped by the HapMap project. We analysed the two pools with Affymetrix 10 K Xba 142 2.0 Arrays. The availability of the HapMap data allowed us to validate the performance of 6843 SNPs for which we had both complete individual and pooled genotyping data. Pooled analyses averaged over 5–6 microarrays resulted in highly reproducible results. Moreover, the accuracy of estimating differences in allele frequency between pools using this ultra-high throughput system was comparable with previous reports of pooling based upon lower throughput platforms, with an average error for the predicted allelic frequencies differences between the two pools of 1.37% and with 95% of SNPs showing an error of Conclusion Genotyping thousands of SNPs with DNA pooling using Affymetrix microarrays produces highly accurate results and can be used for genome-wide association studies.

  4. 77 FR 72832 - Applications for New Awards; Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    ..., traditional languages spoken by Native Americans, consistent with section 103 of the Native American Languages... methods of evaluation will provide performance feedback and permit periodic assessment of progress...

  5. National Conference on High Blood Pressure Control in Native American Communities (2nd, Tulsa, Oklahoma, November 6-7, 1980). Summary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Heart and Lung Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD. National High Blood Pressure Education Program.

    As part of the National High Blood Pressure Education Program effort, the conference explored the impact of high blood pressure (hypertension) on Native Americans. Participants, including health professionals, health service consumers, and volunteers providing health services to Native Americans, discussed these issues: traditional Native American…

  6. Is a University an Appropriate Venue to Motivate, Teach and Explore Cross-disciplinary Concepts that Impact Native American and other World-views, by Means of Applied Physics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Roger

    2006-10-01

    Students easily comprehend that pairs of eye muscles, operating in opposition, can be stimulated excessively by educational visual stresses. Then, physiological equivalents of Hooke's law apply, and the visual system is usually significantly impaired. Awareness of Native Americans, and other cultures, likely capabilities can be used to gain possible insight into natural phenomena, if it is verifiable that such cultures may have been using awareness of natural phenomena that enable them to do things like predicting earthquakes, tornados and hurricanes, among other events. This is usually described in ways that can mask the actual applied physics import of what is actually being accomplished. Much of the information is masked so successfully that the majority culture is unaware that science may be going on, hidden by a mask of cultural veneer.

  7. Native and Non-Native Perceptions on a Non-Native Oral Discourse in an Academic Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Dikilitaş

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study investigates discourse-level patterns typically employed by a Turkish lecturer based on the syntactic patterns found in the collected data. More specifically, the study aims to reveal how different native and non-native speakers of English perceive discourse patterns used by a non-native lecturer teaching in English. The data gathered from a Turkish lecturer teaching finance, and the interviews both with the lecturer and the students. The lecturer and the students were videotaped and the data was evaluated by content analysis. The results revealed a difference between the way non-native and native speakers evaluate an oral discourse of a non-native lecturer teaching in English. Native speakers of English found the oral performance moderately comprehensible, while non-native speakers found it relatively comprehensible.

  8. Impact of "Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor /Ligand" Genotypes on Outcome following Surgery among Patients with Colorectal Cancer: Activating KIRs Are Associated with Long-Term Disease Free Survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Beksac

    Full Text Available Approximately 30% of patients with stage II/III colorectal cancer develop recurrence following surgery. How individual regulation of host mediated anti-tumor cytotoxicity is modified by the killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIRs genotype is essential for prediction of outcome. We analyzed the frequency of KIR and KIR ligand Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I genotypes, and their effects on recurrence and disease-free survival (DFS. Out of randomly selected 87 colorectal cancer patients who underwent R0 resection operations between 2005 and 2008, 29 patients whose cancers progressed within a median five-year follow-up period were compared with 58 patients with no recurrence within the same time period. Recurrent cases shared similar tumor stages with non-recurrent cases, but had different localizations. We used DNA isolated from pathological archival lymphoid and tumor tissues for KIR and KIR ligand (HLA-C, group C1, group C2, and HLA-A-Bw4 genotyping. Among cases with recurrence, KIR2DL1 (inhibitory KIR and A-Bw4 (ligand for inhibitory KIR3DL1 were observed more frequently (p=0.017 and p=0.024; and KIR2DS2 and KIR2DS3 (both activating KIRs were observed less frequently (p=0.005 and p=0.043. Similarly, in the non-recurrent group, inhibitory KIR-ligand combinations 2DL1-C2 and 2DL3-C1 were less frequent, while the activating combination 2DS2-C1 was more frequent. The lack of KIR2DL1, 2DL1-C2, and 2DL3-C1 improved disease-free survival (DFS (100% vs. 62.3%, p=0.05; 93.8% vs. 60.0%, p=0.035; 73.6% vs. 55.9%, p=0.07. The presence of KIR2DS2, 2DS3, and 2DS2-C1 improved DFS (77.8% vs. 48.5%, p=0.01; 79.4% vs. 58.5%, p=0.003; 76.9% vs. 51.4%, p=0.023. KIR2DS3 reduced the risk of recurrence (HR=0.263, 95% CI = 0.080-0.863, p=0.028. The number of activating KIRs are correlated strongly with DFS, none/ one/ two KIR : 54/77/98 months (p=0.004. In conclusion the inheritance of increasing numbers of activating KIRs and lack of inhibitory KIRs

  9. Impact of "Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor /Ligand" Genotypes on Outcome following Surgery among Patients with Colorectal Cancer: Activating KIRs Are Associated with Long-Term Disease Free Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beksac, Kemal; Beksac, Meral; Dalva, Klara; Karaagaoglu, Ergun; Tirnaksiz, M Bulent

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 30% of patients with stage II/III colorectal cancer develop recurrence following surgery. How individual regulation of host mediated anti-tumor cytotoxicity is modified by the killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIRs) genotype is essential for prediction of outcome. We analyzed the frequency of KIR and KIR ligand Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I genotypes, and their effects on recurrence and disease-free survival (DFS). Out of randomly selected 87 colorectal cancer patients who underwent R0 resection operations between 2005 and 2008, 29 patients whose cancers progressed within a median five-year follow-up period were compared with 58 patients with no recurrence within the same time period. Recurrent cases shared similar tumor stages with non-recurrent cases, but had different localizations. We used DNA isolated from pathological archival lymphoid and tumor tissues for KIR and KIR ligand (HLA-C, group C1, group C2, and HLA-A-Bw4) genotyping. Among cases with recurrence, KIR2DL1 (inhibitory KIR) and A-Bw4 (ligand for inhibitory KIR3DL1) were observed more frequently (p=0.017 and p=0.024); and KIR2DS2 and KIR2DS3 (both activating KIRs) were observed less frequently (p=0.005 and p=0.043). Similarly, in the non-recurrent group, inhibitory KIR-ligand combinations 2DL1-C2 and 2DL3-C1 were less frequent, while the activating combination 2DS2-C1 was more frequent. The lack of KIR2DL1, 2DL1-C2, and 2DL3-C1 improved disease-free survival (DFS) (100% vs. 62.3%, p=0.05; 93.8% vs. 60.0%, p=0.035; 73.6% vs. 55.9%, p=0.07). The presence of KIR2DS2, 2DS3, and 2DS2-C1 improved DFS (77.8% vs. 48.5%, p=0.01; 79.4% vs. 58.5%, p=0.003; 76.9% vs. 51.4%, p=0.023). KIR2DS3 reduced the risk of recurrence (HR=0.263, 95% CI = 0.080-0.863, p=0.028). The number of activating KIRs are correlated strongly with DFS, none/ one/ two KIR : 54/77/98 months (p=0.004). In conclusion the inheritance of increasing numbers of activating KIRs and lack of inhibitory KIRs, independent of

  10. Physiological responses of genotypes soybean to simulated drought stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonóra Krivosudská

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to investigate possible genetic variation in the sensitivity of soybean cultivars for nitrogen fixation rates in response to soil drying. The work confirmed that the selected physiological characteristics (RWC, osmotic potential, stress index and created nodules on roots are good evaluating parameters for the determination of water stress in plant. In the floricultural year 2014 an experiment with four genetic resources of soybean was launched. Sowing of Maverick (USA, Drina (HRV, Nigra (SVK and Polanka (CZK genotypes was carried out in the containers of 15 l capacity. This stress had a negative impact on the physiological parameters. By comparing the RWC values, the decrease was more significant at the end of dehydration, which was monitored in Maverick and Drina genotypes using the Nitrazon inoculants and water stress effect. Inoculated stressed Nigra and Polanka genotypes have kept higher water content till the end of dehydration period. Also the proline accumulation was monitored during the water stress, whilst higher content of free proline reached of Maverick. More remarkable decrease of osmotic potential was again registered in a foreign Drina and Maverick genotypes in the inoculated variations. Nigra and Polanka genotypes responses not so significant in the given conditions.

  11. FTO genotype and weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livingstone, Katherine M; Celis-Morales, Carlos; Papandonatos, George D

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of the FTO genotype on weight loss after dietary, physical activity, or drug based interventions in randomised controlled trials. DESIGN: Systematic review and random effects meta-analysis of individual participant data from randomised controlled trials. DATA SOURC...

  12. FTO genotype and weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livingstone, Katherine M; Celis-Morales, Carlos; Papandonatos, George D;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of the FTO genotype on weight loss after dietary, physical activity, or drug based interventions in randomised controlled trials. DESIGN: Systematic review and random effects meta-analysis of individual participant data from randomised controlled trials. DATA SOURC...

  13. Microsatellite genotyping of carnation varieties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, M.J.M.; Noordijk, Y.; Rus-Kortekaas, W.; Bredemeijer, G.M.M.; Vosman, B.

    2003-01-01

    A set of 11 sequence-tagged microsatellite markers for carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus) was developed using a DNA library enriched for microsatellites. Supplemented with three markers derived from sequence database entries, these were used to genotype carnation varieties using a semi-automated fluo

  14. Genotyping with TaqMAMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baohui; Kadura, Ibrahim; Fu, Dong-Jing; Watson, David E

    2004-02-01

    TaqMAMA combines the quantitative strengths of TaqMan with the allele-specific PCR of MAMA. In this article we develop TaqMAMA as a technique for screening human DNA samples for known genetic polymorphisms. In the first set of experiments, plasmids that model all types of genetic polymorphisms were used to understand the relationship between TaqMAMA primer/template mismatches and their strength of allelic discrimination. These data can be used to improve allelic discrimination of other primer extension genotyping methodologies through directed use of nucleotide mismatches. We used the data to derive a guide for TaqMAMA primer design and DNA strand selection for TaqMAMA genotyping assays. The guide was then used to develop assays for 11 known and novel human genetic polymorphisms. Genotypes were assigned quickly and accurately in all cases. TaqMAMA genotyping assays require minimal development time, have a high probability of success, produce reliable data that are straightforward to analyze, and are very cost-competitive.

  15. High-throughput genotyping: practical considerations concerning the day-to-day application

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIndoe, Richard A.; Bumgarner, R. E.; Welti, Russ; Hood, Leroy

    1996-04-01

    Advances in high throughput genotyping protocols over the past few years have been remarkable. Most protocols developed to increase the throughput of genotyping rely on fluorescent based technologies for data acquisition and capture. In general, the number of genotypes per day quoted for these protocols are the result of extrapolations based on ideal situations. Here we present our experience with respect to the day to day problems of high throughput genotyping. Our laboratory is currently working on several genetic mapping projects in both mouse and man. For example, we are looking at the genetic basis for susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis in a local native American tribe as well as a mouse animal model for the same disease. The machines used to collect gel image data are two Li- Cor infrared DNA sequencers adapted for genotyping. During the evolution of these projects, we have addressed issues concerning the tracking and flow of information from the initial extraction of DNA to the calling of the genotypes. In particular, we have focused on designing methods that are efficient, cost effective and can be easily taught to the technical staff. Computer programs have been written that record gel specific information (e.g. ID information), archive data and capture genotypes in a simple point and click environment. Instrumentation was purchased to ease the repetitive nature of sample allocation, reagent disbursement and gel loading. Using this system, we can produce genotype data on 96 individuals for 20 loci (1920 genotypes) in one day. Solutions to the overall flow of information at each of these junctions are discussed.

  16. Native Americans Make Progress Against Diabetes Complication

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_162979.html Native Americans Make Progress Against Diabetes Complication Kidney failure down by 54 percent over 2 ... Failure Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Diabetes Complications Kidney Failure Native American Health About MedlinePlus Site ...

  17. Native Communities and the Peruvian Constitutional Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Indian Journal, 1978

    1978-01-01

    A loosely knit coalition of over 25 native groups, the Peruvian Amazon Peoples has prepared a statement directed at the Peruvian Constitutional Assembly for purposes of Native input into the preparation of a revised national constitution. (JC)

  18. Genotype × genotype interactions between the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis and its grazer, the waterflea Daphnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Veerle; Brusciotti, Silvia; van Gremberghe, Ineke; Vyverman, Wim; Vanoverbeke, Joost; De Meester, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Toxic algal blooms are an important problem worldwide. The literature on toxic cyanobacteria blooms in inland waters reports widely divergent results on whether zooplankton can control cyanobacteria blooms or cyanobacteria suppress zooplankton by their toxins. Here we test whether this may be due to genotype × genotype interactions, in which interactions between the large-bodied and efficient grazer Daphnia and the widespread cyanobacterium Microcystis are not only dependent on Microcystis strain or Daphnia genotype but are specific to genotype × genotype combinations. We show that genotype × genotype interactions are important in explaining mortality in short-time exposures of Daphnia to Microcystis. These genotype × genotype interactions may result in local coadaptation and a geographic mosaic of coevolution. Genotype × genotype interactions can explain why the literature on zooplankton–cyanobacteria interactions is seemingly inconsistent, and provide hope that zooplankton can contribute to the suppression of cyanobacteria blooms in restoration projects. PMID:25568039

  19. Changes in soil physical and chemical properties in long term improved natural and traditional agroforestry management systems of cacao genotypes in Peruvian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arévalo-Gardini, Enrique; Canto, Manuel; Alegre, Julio; Loli, Oscar; Julca, Alberto; Baligar, Virupax

    2015-01-01

    Growing cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) in an agroforestry system generates a productive use of the land, preserves the best conditions for physical, chemical and biological properties of tropical soils, and plays an important role in improving cacao production and fertility of degraded tropical soils. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of two long term agroforestry systems of cacao management on soil physical and chemical properties in an area originally inhabited by 30 years old native secondary forest (SF). The two agroforestry systems adapted were: improved natural agroforestry system (INAS) where trees without economic value were selectively removed to provide 50% shade and improved traditional agroforestry system (ITAS) where all native trees were cut and burnt in the location. For evaluation of the changes of soil physical and chemical properties with time due to the imposed cacao management systems, plots of 10 cacao genotypes (ICS95, UF613, CCN51, ICT1112, ICT1026, ICT2162, ICT2171, ICT2142, H35, U30) and one plot with a spontaneous hybrid were selected. Soil samples were taken at 0-20, 20-40 and 40-60 cm depths before the installation of the management systems (2004), and then followed at two years intervals. Bulk density, porosity, field capacity and wilting point varied significantly during the years of assessment in the different soil depths and under the systems assessed. Soil pH, CEC, exchangeable Mg and sum of the bases were higher in the INAS than the ITAS. In both systems, SOM, Ext. P, K and Fe, exch. K, Mg and Al+H decreased with years of cultivation; these changes were more evident in the 0-20 cm soil depth. Overall improvement of SOM and soil nutrient status was much higher in the ITAS than INAS. The levels of physical and chemical properties of soil under cacao genotypes showed a marked difference in both systems.

  20. Movement of genotypes of Ceratocystis fimbriata within and among Eucalyptus plantations in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maria A; Harrington, Thomas C; Alfenas, Acelino C; Mizubuti, Eduardo S G

    2011-08-01

    Ceratocystis wilt on eucalyptus, caused by Ceratocystis fimbriata, was first recognized in 1997 in the state of Bahia, Brazil, but is now known in five other states and in four other countries. C. fimbriata is a native, soilborne pathogen in some parts of Brazil but we hypothesized that genotypes of the pathogen have been moved among plantations in rooted cuttings collected from diseased trees and within plantations on cutting tools. We used six microsatellite markers to identify 78 genotypes of C. fimbriata among 177 isolates from individual trees in 20 eucalyptus plantations. The highest gene and genotypic diversity values were found in plantations on formerly wild Cerrado forest in Minas Gerais, suggesting that the fungus was in the soil prior to planting eucalyptus. In contrast, one or only a few genotypes were found in plantations on previous pastureland (with no woody hosts) in Bahia and São Paulo, and most of these genotypes were found in a Bahian nursery or in one of two Bahian plantations that were sources for rooted cuttings. Sources of cuttings tended to be dominated by one or a few genotypes that may have been spread within the plantation on cutting tools.

  1. Allelopathic interference of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) genotypes to annual ryegrass (Lolium rigidum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubair, Hasan Muhammad; Pratley, James E; Sandral, G A; Humphries, A

    2017-07-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) genotypes at varying densities were investigated for allelopathic impact using annual ryegrass (Lolium rigidum) as the target species in a laboratory bioassay. Three densities (15, 30, and 50 seedlings/beaker) and 40 alfalfa genotypes were evaluated by the equal compartment agar method (ECAM). Alfalfa genotypes displayed a range of allelopathic interference in ryegrass seedlings, reducing root length from 5 to 65%. The growth of ryegrass decreased in response to increasing density of alfalfa seedlings. At the lowest density, Q75 and Titan9 were the least allelopathic genotypes. An overall inhibition index was calculated to rank each alfalfa genotype. Reduction in seed germination of annual ryegrass occurred in the presence of several alfalfa genotypes including Force 10, Haymaster7 and SARDI Five. A comprehensive metabolomic analysis using Quadruple Time of Flight (Q-TOF), was conducted to compare six alfalfa genotypes. Variation in chemical compounds was found between alfalfa root extracts and exudates and also between genotypes. Further individual compound assessments and quantitative study at greater chemical concentrations are needed to clarify the allelopathic activity. Considerable genetic variation exists among alfalfa genotypes for allelopathic activity creating the opportunity for its use in weed suppression through selection.

  2. Mineral composition of organically grown wheat genotypes: contribution to daily minerals intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Abrar; Larsson, Hans; Kuktaite, Ramune; Johansson, Eva

    2010-09-01

    In this study, 321 winter and spring wheat genotypes were analysed for twelve nutritionally important minerals (B, Cu, Fe, Se, Mg, Zn, Ca, Mn, Mo, P, S and K). Some of the genotypes used were from multiple locations and years, resulting in a total number of 493 samples. Investigated genotypes were divided into six genotype groups i.e., selections, old landraces, primitive wheat, spelt, old cultivars and cultivars. For some of the investigated minerals higher concentrations were observed in selections, primitive wheat, and old cultivars as compared to more modern wheat material, e.g., cultivars and spelt wheat. Location was found to have a significant effect on mineral concentration for all genotype groups, although for primitive wheat, genotype had a higher impact than location. Spring wheat was observed to have significantly higher values for B, Cu, Fe, Zn, Ca, S and K as compared to winter wheat. Higher levels of several minerals were observed in the present study, as compared to previous studies carried out in inorganic systems, indicating that organic conditions with suitable genotypes may enhance mineral concentration in wheat grain. This study also showed that a very high mineral concentration, close to daily requirements, can be produced by growing specific primitive wheat genotypes in an organic farming system. Thus, by selecting genotypes for further breeding, nutritional value of the wheat flour for human consumption can be improved.

  3. 34 CFR 300.29 - Native language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Native language. 300.29 Section 300.29 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.29 Native language. (a) Native language, when used with respect to an individual who is limited English proficient, means the following: (1) The...

  4. Native American Children in Michigan. [Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. K. Kellogg Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Native American Children in Michigan," provides a historical context for the tenuous relationship between Michigan's 12 federally recognized tribes and the state government, paying particular attention to the erosion of Native American education programs and the disproportionate number of Native children who find themselves in both the child…

  5. Genetic dissimilarity among jabuticaba trees native to southwestern Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moeses Andrigo Danner

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge on the genetic diversity within and between genotype groups is of great importance for breeding programs. The purpose of this study was to estimate the genetic dissimilarity among 36 native jabuticaba trees (Plinia cauliflora from five sites in the southwestern region of Paraná, Brazil. Sixteen fruit traits were analyzed, based on multivariate techniques (canonical variables, Tocher and UPGMA, using Mahalanobis' distance as dissimilarity measure. By the techniques of clustering and graphic dispersion, together with the comparison of means, the genetic diversity among native jabuticaba trees was efficiently identified, indicating a high potential of these genotypes for breeding programs. The traits of greatest importance for dissimilarity were percentage of pulp and of skin, which are easily measured. The clustering structure is related to the collection sites and for breeding programs, genotypes from different sites should be crossed to generate progenies to be tested. Genotypes 'CV5' and 'VT3' should be conserved in genebanks, due to its important agronomic traits.

  6. ADH and ALDH polymorphisms among Alaska Natives entering treatment for alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, B

    1999-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHs) and aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) involved in alcohol metabolism are polymorphic. Different alleles encode subunits of the enzymes that are related to differences in alcohol metabolism with different ethnic groups. This study examined the allele frequencies at the ADH1, ADH2, ADH3 and ALDH2 loci in Alaska Natives entering treatment for alcoholism to determine if allele frequencies at these loci differ among five distinct Alaska Native groups: Yupik and Inupiat Eskimos, Athabascan, Tlingit and Aleut. It was found that all persons were homozygous for the ADH1*1, ADH2*1 and ALDH2*1 alleles. Variations, however, were found for the allele distribution of the ADH3 genotype. Comparison with a general population sample found no differences in allele distributions for ADHs and ALDH2*1, but differences were found when comparisons were made with four Asian Groups. The study's findings suggest that the Alaska Natives are not protected from the risk of alcoholism in the same way that Asians who possess the ALDH2*2 genotype are considered to have a negative risk factor. Nor, does there appear to be any generalized differences between Alaska Native alcoholics and members of the general population with respect to the ALDH and ADH polymorphisms studied herein.

  7. Native herbaceous perennials as ornamentals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bjarne; Ørgaard, Marian

    2013-01-01

    Gardening with native perennials is a way to bring nature closer to urban citizens and bring up reflections on nature in a busy world. During three seasons of trialing Salvia pratensis, Dianthus deltoides, Campanula trachelium, Vincetoxicum hirundinaria, Saxifraga granulata, Plantago media and P....... as a realistic plant community with an attractive, low habit and beautiful colors. Phyteuma spicatum is an attractive, novel species for a shady garden site.......Gardening with native perennials is a way to bring nature closer to urban citizens and bring up reflections on nature in a busy world. During three seasons of trialing Salvia pratensis, Dianthus deltoides, Campanula trachelium, Vincetoxicum hirundinaria, Saxifraga granulata, Plantago media and P....... maritima were found suitable for cultivation in wholesale-containers and applicable for dry, sunny conditions in gardens. On the other hand, Narthecium ossifragum, Pulsatilla palustris, Drosera rotundifolia, Vaccinium oxycoccos, Eriophorum angustifolium and Sphagnum sp. were cultivated and planted...

  8. Native Speakers in Linguistic Imperialism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillipson, Robert

    2016-01-01

    An investigation of Native English Speaking Teachers’ performance in schemes in six Asian contexts, commissioned by the British Council, and undertaken by three British academics, is subjected to critical evaluation. Key issues for exploration are the issue of a monolingual approach to English...... learning and teaching, and the inappropriate qualifications of those sent to education systems when they are unfamiliar with the learners’ languages, cultures, and pedagogical traditions. Whether the schemes involved constitute linguistic imperialismis analysed. Whereas the need for multilingual competence...... is recognised as desirable by some British experts, the native speakers in question seldom have this key qualification. This is even the case when the host country (Brunei) aims at bilingual education. It is unlikely that the host countries are getting value for money. Whether the UK and other ‘English...

  9. Native Terrestrial Animal Species Richness

    Science.gov (United States)

    These data represent predicted current distributions of all native mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and butterflies in the Middle-Atlantic region. The data are available for both 8-digit HUCs and EMAP hexagons and represent total species counts for each spatial unit. More information about these resources, including the variables used in this study, may be found here: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip.

  10. Genetic characterization of Hawaiian isolates of Plasmodium relictum reveals mixed-genotype infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkinson Carter T

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relatively recent introduction of a highly efficient mosquito vector and an avian pathogen (Plasmodium relictum to an isolated island ecosystem with naïve, highly susceptible avian hosts provides a unique opportunity to investigate evolution of virulence in a natural system. Mixed infections can significantly contribute to the uncertainty in host-pathogen dynamics with direct impacts on virulence. Toward further understanding of how host-parasite and parasite-parasite relationships may impact virulence, this study characterizes within-host diversity of malaria parasite populations based on genetic analysis of the trap (thrombospondin-related anonymous protein gene in isolates originating from Hawaii, Maui and Kauai Islands. Methods A total of 397 clones were produced by nested PCR amplification and cloning of a 1664 bp fragment of the trap gene from two malarial isolates, K1 (Kauai and KV115 (Hawaii that have been used for experimental studies, and from additional isolates from wild birds on Kauai, Maui and Hawaii Islands. Diversity of clones was evaluated initially by RFLP-based screening, followed by complete sequencing of 33 selected clones. Results RFLP analysis of trap revealed a minimum of 28 distinct RFLP haplotypes among the 397 clones from 18 birds. Multiple trap haplotypes were detected in every bird evaluated, with an average of 5.9 haplotypes per bird. Overall diversity did not differ between the experimental isolates, however, a greater number of unique haplotypes were detected in K1 than in KV115. We detected high levels of clonal diversity with clear delineation between isolates K1 and KV115 in a haplotype network. The patterns of within-host haplotype clustering are consistent with the possibility of a clonal genetic structure and rapid within-host mutation after infection. Conclusion Avian malaria (P. relictum and Avipoxvirus are the significant infectious diseases currently affecting the native Hawaiian

  11. Genetic characterization of Hawaiian isolates of Plasmodium relictum reveals mixed-genotype infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvi, S.I.; Farias, M.E.M.; Atkinson, C.T.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The relatively recent introduction of a highly efficient mosquito vector and an avian pathogen (Plasmodium relictum) to an isolated island ecosystem with nai??ve, highly susceptible avian hosts provides a unique opportunity to investigate evolution of virulence in a natural system. Mixed infections can significantly contribute to the uncertainty in host-pathogen dynamics with direct impacts on virulence. Toward further understanding of how host-parasite and parasite-parasite relationships may impact virulence, this study characterizes within-host diversity of malaria parasite populations based on genetic analysis of the trap (thrombospondin-related anonymous protein) gene in isolates originating from Hawaii, Maui and Kauai Islands. Methods: A total of 397 clones were produced by nested PCR amplification and cloning of a 1664 bp fragment of the trap gene from two malarial isolates, K1 (Kauai) and KV115 (Hawaii) that have been used for experimental studies, and from additional isolates from wild birds on Kauai, Maui and Hawaii Islands. Diversity of clones was evaluated initially by RFLP-based screening, followed by complete sequencing of 33 selected clones. Results: RFLP analysis of trap revealed a minimum of 28 distinct RFLP haplotypes among the 397 clones from 18 birds. Multiple trap haplotypes were detected in every bird evaluated, with an average of 5.9 haplotypes per bird. Overall diversity did not differ between the experimental isolates, however, a greater number of unique haplotypes were detected in K1 than in KV115. We detected high levels of clonal diversity with clear delineation between isolates K1 and KV115 in a haplotype network. The patterns of within-host haplotype clustering are consistent with the possibility of a clonal genetic structure and rapid within-host mutation after infection. Conclusion: Avian malaria (P. relictum) and Avipoxvirus are the significant infectious diseases currently affecting the native Hawaiian avifauna. This

  12. Determinants of success in native and non-native listening comprehension: an individual differences approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Andringa; N. Olsthoorn; C. van Beuningen; R. Schoonen; J. Hulstijn

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explain individual differences in both native and non-native listening comprehension; 121 native and 113 non-native speakers of Dutch were tested on various linguistic and nonlinguistic cognitive skills thought to underlie listening comprehension. Structural equation mo

  13. Delayed Next Turn Repair Initiation in Native/Non-native Speaker English Conversation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jean

    2000-01-01

    Examines a form of other-initiated conversational repair that is delayed within next turn position, a form that is produced by non-native speakers of English whose native language is Mandarin. Using the framework of conversational analysis, shows that in native/non-native conversation, other-initiated repair is not always done as early as possible…

  14. Genotype and local environment dynamically influence growth, disturbance response and survivorship in the threatened coral, Acropora cervicornis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Crawford; Manzello, Derek; Lirman, Diego

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between the coral genotype and the environment is an important area of research in degraded coral reef ecosystems. We used a reciprocal outplanting experiment with 930 corals representing ten genotypes on each of eight reefs to investigate the influence of genotype and the environment on growth and survivorship in the threatened Caribbean staghorn coral, Acropora cervicornis. Coral genotype and site were strong drivers of coral growth and individual genotypes exhibited flexible, non-conserved reaction norms, complemented by ten-fold differences in growth between specific G-E combinations. Growth plasticity may diminish the influence of local adaptation, where foreign corals grew faster than native corals at their home sites. Novel combinations of environment and genotype also significantly affected disturbance response during and after the 2015 bleaching event, where these factors acted synergistically to drive variation in bleaching and recovery. Importantly, small differences in temperature stress elicit variable patterns of survivorship based on genotype and illustrate the importance of novel combinations of coral genetics and small differences between sites representing habitat refugia. In this context, acclimatization and flexibility is especially important given the long lifespan of corals coping with complex environmental change. The combined influence of site and genotype creates short-term differences in growth and survivorship, contributing to the standing genetic variation needed for adaptation to occur over longer timescales and the recovery of degraded reefs through natural mechanisms. PMID:28319134

  15. Genotype and local environment dynamically influence growth, disturbance response and survivorship in the threatened coral, Acropora cervicornis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Crawford; Manzello, Derek; Lirman, Diego

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between the coral genotype and the environment is an important area of research in degraded coral reef ecosystems. We used a reciprocal outplanting experiment with 930 corals representing ten genotypes on each of eight reefs to investigate the influence of genotype and the environment on growth and survivorship in the threatened Caribbean staghorn coral, Acropora cervicornis. Coral genotype and site were strong drivers of coral growth and individual genotypes exhibited flexible, non-conserved reaction norms, complemented by ten-fold differences in growth between specific G-E combinations. Growth plasticity may diminish the influence of local adaptation, where foreign corals grew faster than native corals at their home sites. Novel combinations of environment and genotype also significantly affected disturbance response during and after the 2015 bleaching event, where these factors acted synergistically to drive variation in bleaching and recovery. Importantly, small differences in temperature stress elicit variable patterns of survivorship based on genotype and illustrate the importance of novel combinations of coral genetics and small differences between sites representing habitat refugia. In this context, acclimatization and flexibility is especially important given the long lifespan of corals coping with complex environmental change. The combined influence of site and genotype creates short-term differences in growth and survivorship, contributing to the standing genetic variation needed for adaptation to occur over longer timescales and the recovery of degraded reefs through natural mechanisms.

  16. Invasive Buddleja davidii allocates more nitrogen to its photosynthetic machinery than five native woody species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yu-Long; Auge, Harald; Ebeling, Susan K

    2007-09-01

    The general-purpose genotype hypothesis and the hypothesis of the evolution of invasiveness predict that invasive species are characterized by particular traits that confer invasiveness. However, these traits are still not well-defined. In this study, ecophysiological traits of eight populations of the invasive shrub Buddleja davidii from a wide range of European locations and five co-occurring native woody species in Germany were compared in a common garden experiment. We hypothesized that the invader has higher resource capture ability and utilization efficiency than the natives. No differences were detected among the eight populations of B. davidii in any of the traits evaluated, indicating that the invader did not evolve during range expansion, thus providing support to the general-purpose genotype hypothesis. The invader showed significantly higher maximum electron transport rate, maximum carboxylation rate, carboxylation efficiency, light-saturated photosynthetic rate (P(max)) and photosynthetic nitrogen utilization efficiency (PNUE) than the five natives. Leaf nitrogen content was not significantly different between the invader and the natives, but the invader allocated more nitrogen to the photosynthetic machinery than the natives. The increased nitrogen content in the photosynthetic machinery resulted in a higher resource capture ability and utilization efficiency in the invader. At the same intercellular CO(2) concentration, P (max) was significantly higher in the invader than in the natives, again confirming the importance of the higher nitrogen allocation to photosynthesis. The invader reduced metabolic cost by increasing the ratio of P (max) to dark respiration rate (R (d)), but it did not reduce carbon cost by increasing the specific leaf area and decreasing leaf construction cost. The higher nitrogen allocation to the photosynthetic machinery, P(max), PNUE and P(max)/R(d) may facilitate B. davidii invasion, although studies involving a wide range of

  17. Free classification of American English dialects by native and non-native listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clopper, Cynthia G; Bradlow, Ann R

    2009-10-01

    Most second language acquisition research focuses on linguistic structures, and less research has examined the acquisition of sociolinguistic patterns. The current study explored the perceptual classification of regional dialects of American English by native and non-native listeners using a free classification task. Results revealed similar classification strategies for the native and non-native listeners. However, the native listeners were more accurate overall than the non-native listeners. In addition, the non-native listeners were less able to make use of constellations of cues to accurately classify the talkers by dialect. However, the non-native listeners were able to attend to cues that were either phonologically or sociolinguistically relevant in their native language. These results suggest that non-native listeners can use information in the speech signal to classify talkers by regional dialect, but that their lack of signal-independent cultural knowledge about variation in the second language leads to less accurate classification performance.

  18. Positive Transfer of Native Language in English Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹强珍

    2015-01-01

    The role of speakers’ native language (NL) in the process of second language learning has been a controversial focus among researchers.For decades researchers generally considered speakers’ NL as a kind of interference, or negative transfer in second language acquisition (SLA).Recent studies, however, have proved the positive effect of NL.In this paper the writer attempts to explores the positive impact of Chinese on English learning.

  19. FTO genotype and weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livingstone, Katherine M; Celis-Morales, Carlos; Papandonatos, George D;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of the FTO genotype on weight loss after dietary, physical activity, or drug based interventions in randomised controlled trials. DESIGN: Systematic review and random effects meta-analysis of individual participant data from randomised controlled trials. DATA SOURCES...... well to dietary, physical activity, or drug based weight loss interventions and thus genetic predisposition to obesity associated with the FTO minor allele can be at least partly counteracted through such interventions. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42015015969.......: Ovid Medline, Scopus, Embase, and Cochrane from inception to November 2015. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA FOR STUDY SELECTION: Randomised controlled trials in overweight or obese adults reporting reduction in body mass index, body weight, or waist circumference by FTO genotype (rs9939609 or a proxy) after...

  20. Two-mode clustering of genotype by trait and genotype by environment data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, J.A.; Malosetti, M.; Eeuwijk, van F.A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the use of two-mode clustering for genotype by trait and genotype by environment data. In contrast to two separate (one mode) clusterings on genotypes or traits/environments, two-mode clustering simultaneously produces homogeneous groups of genotypes and traits/environm

  1. Non-native plant invasions in managed and protected ponderosa pine/Douglas-fir forests of the Colorado Front Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornwalt, P.J.; Kaufmann, M.R.; Huckaby, L.S.; Stoker, J.M.; Stohlgren, T.J.

    2003-01-01

    We examined patterns of non-native plant diversity in protected and managed ponderosa pine/Douglas-fir forests of the Colorado Front Range. Cheesman Lake, a protected landscape, and Turkey Creek, a managed landscape, appear to have had similar natural disturbance histories prior to European settlement and fire protection during the last century. However, Turkey Creek has experienced logging, grazing, prescribed burning, and recreation since the late 1800s, while Cheesman Lake has not. Using the modified-Whittaker plot design to sample understory species richness and cover, we collected data for 30 0.1 ha plots in each landscape. Topographic position greatly influenced results, while management history did not. At both Cheesman Lake and Turkey Creek, low/riparian plots had highest native and non-native species richness and cover; upland plots (especially east/west-facing, south-facing and flat, high plots) had the lowest. However, there were no significant differences between Cheesman Lake and Turkey Creek for native species richness, native species cover, non-native species richness, or non-native species cover for any topographic category. In general, non-native species richness and cover were highly positively correlated with native species richness and/or cover (among other variables). In total, 16 non-native species were recorded at Cheesman Lake and Turkey Creek; none of the 16 non-native species were more common at one site than another. These findings suggest that: (1) areas that are high in native species diversity also contain more non-native species; (2) both protected and managed areas can be invaded by non-native plant species, and at similar intensities; and (3) logging, grazing, and other similar disturbances may have less of an impact on non-native species establishment and growth than topographic position (i.e., in lowland and riparian zones versus upland zones).

  2. Selection of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes using a genotype plus genotype x environment interaction biplot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, A M; Teodoro, P E; Gonçalves, M C; Santos, A; Torres, F E

    2016-08-05

    Recently, the genotype plus genotype x environment interaction (GGE) biplot methodology has been used to investigate genotype x environment interactions in several crop species, but has not been applied to the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) crop in Brazil. The aim of this study was to identify common bean genotypes that exhibit high grain yield and stability in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. We conducted 12 trials from 2000 to 2006 in the municipalities of Aquidauana and Dourados, and evaluated 13 genotypes in a randomized block design with three replications. Grain yield data were subjected to individual and joint analyses of variance. After analyzing the GE interaction, the adaptability and phenotypic stability of the common bean genotypes were analyzed using GGE biplot methodology. The genotypes EMGOPA-201, Xamego, and Aporé are recommended for growing in Mato Grosso do Sul, because they exhibited high grain yield and phenotypic stability.

  3. Cellular biomarkers for monitoring estuarine environments: transplanted versus native mussels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, M; Falleni, A; Barga, I Del; Scarcelli, V; Lucchesi, P; Regoli, F; Frenzilli, G

    2006-05-25

    In developed countries, estuarine environments are often subjected to chemical pollution, whose biological impact is profitably evaluated by the use of multi-biomarker approaches on sentinel species. In this paper, we investigate genotoxicity and lysosomal alterations in the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis), from the estuary of the River Cecina (Tuscany, Italy), selected as "pilot basin" within the Water Frame Directive (2000/60 European Community). Both native and 1 month transplanted mussels were used in order to compare these two approaches in terms of sensitiveness of specific biomarker responses. Genotoxic effects were evaluated as strand breaks, by single cell gel electrophoresis (or Comet assay), and as chromosomal alterations, by the micronucleus test in gill cells. Lysosomal alterations were assessed by the neutral red retention time (in haemocytes), lipofuscin accumulation and ultrastructure (in digestive cells). Heavy metal bioaccumulation was also analysed. Mussels from the River Cecina showed a general alteration of all the biomarkers investigated, accompanied by an elevation of tissue metal levels. However, some differences in specific responses occurred between transplanted and native mussels. Early biomarkers, such as those based on DNA and lysosomal membrane integrity, were induced at similar degree in native and transplanted mussels; while alterations resulting from cumulative events, as the increase of micronuclei frequency were much more elevated in native specimens (23.1+/-7.6) than in transplanted (9.3+/-4.7) and reference ones (5.8+/-5.2). Similarly, the comparison between lipofuscin accumulation and mean lysosomal diameter in impacted and control sites, gave significant differences exclusively with transplanted mussels. These results suggest that the parallel use of caged and native mussels in environmental biomonitoring can improve the characterization of the study area.

  4. Differentiation in quinolone resistance by virulence genotype in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Agnello

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading pathogen that has become increasingly resistant to the fluoroquinolone antibiotics due to widespread prescribing. Adverse outcomes have been shown for patients infected with fluoroquinolone-resistant strains. The type III secretion system (TTSS is a major virulence determinant during acute infections through the injection of effector toxins into host cells. Most strains exhibit a unique TTSS virulence genotype defined by the presence of either exoS or exoU gene encoding two of the effector toxins, ExoS and ExoU, respectively. Specific TTSS effector genotype has been shown previously to differentially impact virulence in pneumonia. In this study, we examined the relationship between TTSS effector genotype and fluoroquinolone resistance mechanisms in a collection of 270 respiratory isolates. We found that a higher proportion of exoU+ strains were fluoroquinolone-resistant compared to exoS+ strains (63% vs 49%, p = 0.03 despite its lower overall prevalence (38% exoU+ vs 56% exoS+. Results from sequencing the quinolone resistance determining regions (QRDRs of the 4 target genes (gyrA, gyrB, parC, parE indicated that strains containing the exoU gene were more likely to acquire ≥ 2 mutations than exoS+ strains at MICs ≤ 8 µg/ml (13% vs none and twice as likely to have mutations in both gyrA and parC than exoS+ strains (48% vs 24% p = 0.0439. Our findings indicate that P. aeruginosa strains differentially develop resistance-conferring mutations that correlate with TTSS effector genotype and the more virulent exoU+ subpopulation. Differences in mutational processes by virulence genotype that were observed suggest co-evolution of resistance and virulence traits favoring a more virulent genotype in the quinolone-rich clinical environment.

  5. Genetic diversity of rhizobia nodulating native Vicia spp. in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampomah, Osei Yaw; Huss-Danell, Kerstin

    2016-05-01

    Despite the recognition that Rhizobium leguminosarum sv. viciae is the most common symbiont of Vicia species worldwide, there is no available information on rhizobia nodulating native Vicia species in Sweden. We have therefore studied the genetic diversity and phylogeny of root nodule bacteria isolated from V. cracca, V. hirsuta, V. sepium, V. tetrasperma and V. sylvatica growing in different locations in Sweden as well as an isolate each from V. cracca in Tromsø, Norway, and V. multicaulis in Siberia, Russia. Out of 25 isolates sampled from the six Vicia species in 12 different locations, there were 14 different genotypes based on the atpD, recA and nodA gene phylogenies. All isolates were classified into Rhizobium leguminosarum sv. viciae group based on the concatenated atpD and recA phylogeny and the nodA phylogeny.

  6. Simultaneous estimation of QTL effects and positions when using genotype data with errors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Liang Tong; Weijun Ma; Haidong Liu; Chaofeng Yuan; Ying Zhou

    2015-03-01

    Accurate genetic data are important prerequisite of performing genetic linkage test or association test. Currently, most analytical methods assume that the observed genotypes are correct. However, due to the constraint at the technical level, most of the genetic data that people used so far contain errors. In this paper, we considered the problem of QTL mapping based on biological data with genotyping errors. By analysing all possible genotypes of each individual in framework of multiple-interval mapping, we proposed an algorithm of inferring all model parameters through the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm and discussed the hypothesis testing of the existence of QTL. We carried out extensive simulation studies to assess the proposed method. Simulation results showed that the new method outperforms the method that does not take the genotyping errors into account, and therefore it can decrease the impact of genotyping errors on QTL mapping. The proposed method was also applied to analyse a real barley dataset.

  7. Effects of Using Personal Genotype Data on Student Learning and Attitudes in a Pharmacogenomics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Caitrin W.; Elsey, Amanda R.; Burkley, Benjamin; Cavallari, Larisa H.; Johnson, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the impact of personal genotyping and a novel educational approach on student attitudes, knowledge, and beliefs regarding pharmacogenomics and genomic medicine. Methods. Two online elective courses (pharmacogenomics and genomic medicine) were offered to student pharmacists at the University of Florida using a flipped-classroom, patient-centered teaching approach. In the pharmacogenomics course, students could be genotyped and apply results to patient cases. Results. Thirty-four and 19 student pharmacists completed the pharmacogenomics and genomic medicine courses, respectively, and 100% of eligible students (n=34) underwent genotyping. Student knowledge improved after the courses. Seventy-four percent (n=25) of students reported better understanding of pharmacogenomics based on having undergone genotyping. Conclusions. Completion of a novel pharmacogenomics elective course sequence that incorporated personal genotyping and genomic medicine was associated with increased student pharmacist knowledge and improved clinical confidence with pharmacogenomics. PMID:27756930

  8. Genotypic variation in a foundation tree (Populus tremula L.) explains community structure of associated epiphytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Chantel; Ellis, Christopher J; Iason, Glenn R; Ennos, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Community genetics hypothesizes that within a foundation species, the genotype of an individual significantly influences the assemblage of dependent organisms. To assess whether these intra-specific genetic effects are ecologically important, it is required to compare their impact on dependent organisms with that attributable to environmental variation experienced over relevant spatial scales. We assessed bark epiphytes on 27 aspen (Populus tremula L.) genotypes grown in a randomized experimental array at two contrasting sites spanning the environmental conditions from which the aspen genotypes were collected. We found that variation in aspen genotype significantly influenced bark epiphyte community composition, and to the same degree as environmental variation between the test sites. We conclude that maintaining genotypic diversity of foundation species may be crucial for conservation of associated biodiversity.

  9. Native plasma-derived FVIII/VWF complex has lower sensitivity to FVIII inhibitors than the combination of isolated FVIII and VWF proteins. Impact on Bethesda assay titration of FVIII inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, M I; Da Rocha-Souto, B; Grancha, S; Jorquera, J I

    2014-11-01

    Sensitivity to FVIII inhibitors of the native plasma-derived (pd) FVIII/VWF complex vs. the complexes formed after exogenous FVIII infusion in the haemophilic patient has not been thoroughly studied. The role of VWF in the interaction of FVIII with inhibitors was studied in vitro using different combinations of VWF and FVIII concentrates. Normal plasma, pdFVIII/VWF and isolated FVIII (recombinant FVIII, B-domain deleted and pdFVIII) were used. Titre (BU) was kinetically determined (up to 2 h) in serial dilutions of inhibitor IgG (purified from a pool of plasmas with inhibitors) mixed with VWF and then incubated with the different FVIII. Inhibitor was also added to previously mixed VWF+FVIII. Residual FVIII:C was determined. TGA assays were performed with FVIII-deficient plasma spiked with the FVIII-VWF mixtures with/without an ESH-8 antibody. Inhibitor titres for plasma and pdFVIII/VWF were comparable at all time points. Titres for all concentrates of isolated FVIII were significantly higher than those for plasma or pdFVIII/VWF (1.4-1.9 fold) even after preincubation with VWF. At t = 0 h, titres for plasma or pdFVIII/VWF were unquantifiable, but were detectable for isolated FVIII (0.6-1.6 BU). In contrast to pdFVIII/VWF, the decrease in thrombin generation parameters by isolated FVIII in the presence of ESH-8 was significant (P isolated proteins. Bethesda assay titration using different FVIII concentrates would be advisable to guide the treatment of inhibitor patients.

  10. Prevailing HCV genotypes and subtypes among hiv infected patients in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karchava, M; Sharvadze, L; Gatserelia, L; Badridze, N; Tsertsvadze, T

    2009-12-01

    Recent analysis of antiretroviral treatment (ART) program data in Georgia showed that end-stage liver disease was a leading cause of death among HIV/HCV co infected patients in 2005. The objective of this retrospective study was to study prevailing genotypes and subtypes of HCV virus in a cohort of HIV infected patients. The investigation revealed that of 1490 patients, 879 (59%) were hepatitis C antibody positive. Detectable HCV RNA was found among 91% of patients. Median liver HCV RNA level was higher than among mono-infected patients. The most prevalent genotypes were genotype 1 (41.6%), followed by genotype 3 (34.7%) and genotype 2 (17.6%), inter (mix) genotype recombinants were found among 5.8 % of patients. The genotype distribution in our study is slightly different from what was seen in Georgia in 2000. The differences of prevailing HCV genotypes among general population and HIV co infected group was probably attributed to the different methods for sample selection used within our study or possible influence of diverse transmission networks among HIV infected group. Another explanation can be the possible shift from predominance of genotype 1 to non 1 genotypes. The higher number intergenotype recombinant forms might be the result of continues parenteral exposure to different HCV genotypes during drug injection paraphernalia. Our study demonstrated high prevalence of HCV infection among HIV-infected patients and revealed 1b as predominant genotype. IDUs were less likely to spontaneously clear the virus than homosexual man and heterosexually infected woman. A greater HCV RNA levels were associated with a greater chance to be infected with HCV genotypes 1. Possible shift from predominance of genotype 1 to non 1 genotypes can be of option. This shift may have a major and beneficial impact on treatment schedules and costs. The higher number intergenotype recombinant forms might be the results of continues parenteral exposure to different HCV genotypes during

  11. Bioengineering Human Myocardium on Native Extracellular Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyette, Jacques P.; Charest, Jonathan M; Mills, Robert W; Jank, Bernhard J.; Moser, Philipp T.; Gilpin, Sarah E.; Gershlak, Joshua R.; Okamoto, Tatsuya; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Milan, David J.; Gaudette, Glenn R.; Ott, Harald C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale More than 25 million individuals suffer from heart failure worldwide, with nearly 4,000 patients currently awaiting heart transplantation in the United States. Donor organ shortage and allograft rejection remain major limitations with only about 2,500 hearts transplanted each year. As a theoretical alternative to allotransplantation, patient-derived bioartificial myocardium could provide functional support and ultimately impact the treatment of heart failure. Objective The objective of this study is to translate previous work to human scale and clinically relevant cells, for the bioengineering of functional myocardial tissue based on the combination of human cardiac matrix and human iPS-derived cardiac myocytes. Methods and Results To provide a clinically relevant tissue scaffold, we translated perfusion-decellularization to human scale and obtained biocompatible human acellular cardiac scaffolds with preserved extracellular matrix composition, architecture, and perfusable coronary vasculature. We then repopulated this native human cardiac matrix with cardiac myocytes derived from non-transgenic human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and generated tissues of increasing three-dimensional complexity. We maintained such cardiac tissue constructs in culture for 120 days to demonstrate definitive sarcomeric structure, cell and matrix deformation, contractile force, and electrical conduction. To show that functional myocardial tissue of human scale can be built on this platform, we then partially recellularized human whole heart scaffolds with human iPSC-derived cardiac myocytes. Under biomimetic culture, the seeded constructs developed force-generating human myocardial tissue, showed electrical conductivity, left ventricular pressure development, and metabolic function. Conclusions Native cardiac extracellular matrix scaffolds maintain matrix components and structure to support the seeding and engraftment of human iPS-derived cardiac myocytes, and enable

  12. Progress in genotyping of Chlamydia trachomatis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Yong; Xiong Likuan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the common genotyping techniques of Chlamydia trachomatis in terms of their principles,characteristics,applications and limitations.Data sources Data used in this review were mainly from English literatures of PubMed database.The search terms were "Chlamydia trachomatis" and "genotyping".Meanwhile,data from World Health Organization were also cited.Study selection Original articles and reviews relevant to present review's theme were selected.Results Different genotyping techniques were applied on different occasions according to their characteristics,especially in epidemiological studies worldwide,which pushed the study of Chlamydia trachomatis forward greatly.In addition,summaries of some epidemiological studies by genotyping were also included in this work for reference and comparison.Conclusions A clear understanding of common genotyping techniques could be helpful to genotype C.trachomatis more appropriately and effectively.Furthermore,more studies on the association of genotypes of Ch/amydia trachomatis with clinical manifestations should be performed.

  13. Native and Non-Native English Language Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Walkinshaw

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The English language teaching industry in East and Southeast Asia subscribes to an assumption that native English-speaking teachers (NESTs are the gold standard of spoken and written language, whereas non-native English-speaking teachers (non-NESTs are inferior educators because they lack this innate linguistic skill. But does this premise correspond with the views of second language learners? This article reports on research carried out with university students in Vietnam and Japan exploring the advantages and disadvantages of learning English from NESTs and non-NESTs. Contrary to the above notion, our research illuminated a number of perceived advantages—and disadvantages—in both types of teachers. Students viewed NESTs as models of pronunciation and correct language use, as well as being repositories of cultural knowledge, but they also found NESTs poor at explaining grammar, and their different cultures created tension. Non-NESTs were perceived as good teachers of grammar, and had the ability to resort to the students’ first language when necessary. Students found classroom interaction with non-NESTs easier because of their shared culture. Non-NESTs’ pronunciation was often deemed inferior to that of NESTs, but also easier to comprehend. Some respondents advocated learning from both types of teachers, depending on learners’ proficiency and the skill being taught.

  14. Justification for setting the individual animal genotype call rate threshold at eighty-five percent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purfield, D C; McClure, M; Berry, D P

    2016-11-01

    Data quality of SNP arrays impacts the accuracy and precision of downstream data analyses. One such quality control measure often imposed is a threshold on individual animal call rate. Different call rate thresholds have been applied across studies; little is known, however, about the impact of these thresholds on the quality of the genotype data. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of different call rate thresholds on the integrity of the genotypes but also to quantify the contribution of different factors to the variability in animal call rate. Data included 142,342 samples genotyped on a custom Illumina genotype panel from 141,591 dairy and beef cattle; the number of Illumina SNP on the panel was 14,371. The mean animal call rate across all samples was 99.09%; 487 animals had both a low call rate (call rate (≥99%) after resampling and regenotyping. Several factors were associated ( call rate including animal sex, the sampling herd, the date of genotyping, the genotyping plate, and the plate well. The genotype and allele concordance between the genotypes of the 487 low- and high-call rate individuals improved at a diminishing rate as mean animal call rate increased. Mean genotype and allele concordance rates of 0.987 and 0.997, respectively, existed when animal call rate was between 85 and 90%, increasing to 0.998 and 0.999, respectively, when animal call rate was between 95 and call rate animals increased when animal call rate improved; an allele concordance rate of 1.00 was achieved when animal call rate was between 85 and call rate animals improved as animal call rate increased; the mean genotype concordance rate of the imputed nonobserved SNP was 0.41 when animal call rate was call rate was between 95 and call rate was call rate threshold of 85%.

  15. Predicting the impact of adverse events and treatment duration on medical resource utilization-related costs in hepatitis C genotype 1 treatment-naïve patients receiving antiviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpo, Essè Ifèbi Hervé; Cerri, Karin; Kleintjens, Joris

    2015-04-01

    Studies on medical resource utilization (MRU) and related costs are important for evaluating the potential patient management and cost-effectiveness implications of antiviral treatments for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The objectives of this study were (i) to compare the MRU and related costs for two treatment approaches; (ii) to identify the main drivers of resource use and costs; and (iii) to assess the effects of various treatment regimen attributes on MRU-related costs in a UK clinical setting. The analysis used data collected alongside the simeprevir (SMV) phase III trials for treatment-naïve genotype 1 HCV-infected patients; these data covered outpatient consultations with specialists, emergency room visits and hospital admissions. Logistic regressions were constructed to estimate the predictors of resource utilization, and a two-part multivariable analysis model was used to determine the total costs of treatment in the UK. Data on 731 patients receiving SMV plus pegylated interferon and ribavirin (SMV/PegIFN/R) or PegIFN/R were included in the analysis. While MRU was similar between the SMV and PegIFN/R groups, MRU-related costs were significantly lower in the SMV group than in the PegIFN/R group (P MRU-related costs for HCV patients following antiviral therapy. The shortened treatment duration and reduction in rash due to treatment with SMV triple therapy lead to substantial non-drug cost savings, compared with PegIFN/R treatment. This suggests that there are potential patient management and cost-effectiveness implications associated with the choice of specific antiviral treatments.

  16. Chinese Native Speakers Counterfactuals Revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    1.IntroductionI have found,in my teaching experience,that English counterfactuals are among the most diffi-cult problems for Chinese native speaker EFL learners. A recent survey of EFL teachers in Guilin,China also supports these findings. In response to the question“What do you think is the most diffi-cult for your students to learn in English”,5 6out of 71 ,or 79% said the English subjunctive verbsare. To the question“Do you think the English subjunctives are difficultfor your students”,1 0 0 % ofthe EFL ...

  17. Local ecological knowledge is not a useful source of information concerning impacts caused by non-native Nile tilapia on fishery stocks - doi 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v35i3.18418

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José da Silva Mourão

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Exotic freshwater fish can have deleterious effects on local biodiversity, although these impacts often only become apparent many years after the introduction. Local Ecological Knowledge (LEK may be a useful source of information in situations where formal technical studies are insufficient, but few works have examined the reliability of information generated through this approach. We examined the reliability of LEK by investigating the impacts of Nile tilapia on fishery stocks in an artificial reservoir in northeastern Brazil. We gathered LEK from 29 experienced fishermen and then confronted this information with official fishery statistics from the same site. Twenty-two fishermen stated that total catch in the Gargalheiras Reservoir had declined over the years, 68% (N=15 of them began fishing before 1976 (the year Nile tilapia was introduced into reservoir. Of those 15 fishermen, 87% (N=13 stated that tilapia has not negatively affected other species, which ran counter to analyses of fishery statistics. Our study suggests that the LEK of fishermen is not a useful source of information concerning the impacts caused by exotic tilapia. However, the LEK added an overfishing hypothesis of the decline in fishery stocks in the Gargalheiras reservoir.   

  18. Native Chicken Production in Indonesia: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hidayat

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is a country rich in native chicken genetic resources. There are 31 native chicken breed in Indonesia. Native chicken farming was developed for decades. In early period of 1907’s, mostly farmers reared their native chicken by traditional system (about 80%. In 1980s until now, the number of native chicken farmers which rear native chicken by semi intensive and intensive system have been increasing. These rearing system changing have significantly increased the native chicken productivity. The major constraints for the development of native chicken i.e. low growth rate, risks of high mortality, low egg production. Many research results stated that improving in breeding, feeding and management aspect will increase native chicken production. The information and data contained in this paper is the result of study literature for scientific papers, either in the form of journals, books, or proceedings, and livestock statistics books. This paper is made to support the development of native chickens in Indonesia.

  19. Disability through a Native American lens: examining influences of culture and colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Hilary N

    2015-01-01

    Disability is a socially constructed identity. What constitutes a disability and what it means to be a person with a disability can vary across cultures. This article explores meanings of disability within Native American cultures, including how ideas about wellness, balance, roles, and responsibilities influence perceptions of disabilities. This is followed by a review of disability prevalence, discussion of services, and explorations of possible reasons for the disproportionate impact of disabilities in Native American populations. The article concludes with an examination of how the colonial context frames both attitudes about and services for Native Americans with disabilities.

  20. Integrating spiritual and Western treatment modalities in a Native American substance user center: provider perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Jacquelene F; Momper, Sandra L

    2011-01-01

    Few studies examine how traditional Native American and Western healing practices are being integrated in Native American substance user treatment centers. Data are presented from a 2008 study of providers of integrated substance user treatment for Native Americans at an urban Western US center. Nineteen semistructured interviews were conducted to examine 10 providers' views of the integration of traditional and Western healing and the impact on recovery for clients. We used a grounded theory approach to data analysis with manual and NVivo codes and themes developed. Limitations and implications for practice are discussed.

  1. American Indian and Alaska Native Substance Abuse: Co-Morbidity and Cultural Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Norma; Nye, Patricia S.

    2001-01-01

    The devastating impact of substance abuse on American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) is reviewed with an emphasis on psychological and physical effects. Co-morbidity of substance abuse, trans-generational trauma, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and depression among AI/ANs is also discussed since each condition may cause, impact, and/or…

  2. Contrasting feeding patterns of native red deer and two exotic ungulates in a Mediterranean ecosystem

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda, María; Sicilia, Marisa; Bartolomé, Jordi; Molina Alcaide, Eduarda; Gálvez Bravo, Lucía; Cassinello, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    [Context]: Ungulates have been widely introduced in multiple ecosystems throughout the world due to their value as food and for sport hunting.The identification of for aging preferences of exotic and native ungulates livingin sympatry is, therefore, becoming increasingly important in order to assess potential impacts of introduced animals on the host ecosystem. [Aims]: To describe species-specific for aging strategies and infer resource selection overlap between native and exotic ungulates. [...

  3. STUDY OF THE VARIABILITY OF SOME FRUIT PARAMETERS IN ROSA CANINA L. GENOTYPES FROM SEVERAL LOCAL POPULATIONS IN BACĂU, NEAMŢ AND VRANCEA COUNTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogu Gheorghita

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available There were studied 36 genotypes of Rosa canina L. belonging to 25 native populations from the counties ofBacău, Neamţ and Vrancea. The analyzed genotypes displayed a high variability of fruit density/individual (shrub, andalso of the shape, size, colour and biomass, and of the content of vitamin C in fruits. There were identified genotypes ofgreat perspective in this species’ amelioration as it concerns the fruit density/plant, a lower density of stem prickles, thefresh biomass/hip, and the content of vitamin C in the ripe fruits.

  4. Competitive advantage and higher fitness in native populations of genetically structured planktonic diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sildever, Sirje; Sefbom, Josefin; Lips, Inga; Godhe, Anna

    2016-12-01

    It has been shown that the planktonic diatom Skeletonema from neighbouring areas are genetically differentiated despite absence of physical dispersal barriers. We revisited two sites, Mariager Fjord and Kattegat, NE Atlantic, and isolated new strains. Microsatellite genotyping and F-statistics revealed that the populations were genetically differentiated. An experiment was designed to investigate if populations are locally adapted and have a native competitive advantage. Ten strains from each location were grown individually in native and foreign water to investigate differences in produced biomass. Additionally, we mixed six pairs, one strain from each site, and let them grow together in native and foreign water. Strains from Mariager Fjord and Kattegat produced higher biomass in native water. In the competition experiment, strains from both sites displayed higher relative abundance and demonstrated competitive advantage in their native water. The cause of the differentiated growth is unknown, but could possibly be attributed to differences in silica concentration or viruses in the two water types. Our data show that dispersal potential does not influence the genetic structure of the populations. We conclude that genetic adaptation has not been overruled by gene flow, but instead the responses to different selection conditions are enforcing the observed genetic structure. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Encrusted pyelitis of native kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertig, A; Duvic, C; Chretien, Y; Jungers, P; Grünfeld, J P; Rieu, P

    2000-06-01

    This study reports the first four cases of encrusted pyelitis involving native kidneys. The clinical features, management, and outcome of these patients were analyzed. Predisposing factors were underlying urologic disease and/or urologic manipulations, debilitating diseases, hospitalization, and prolonged antibiotic therapies. Presenting symptoms were renal failure in three patients with ureteroileal urinary diversion and manifestations of cystitis in one patient. Computed tomography scan of the urinary tract was critical for diagnosis. Presence of struvite was demonstrated by crystalluria and infrared spectrophotometry analysis of the encrusted material. Corynebacterium urealyticum urinary infection was identified in one case. Surgery (one patient) and palliative ureteral diversion (one patient), respectively, led to death and end-stage renal failure. Successful dissolution of encrusted pyelitis was obtained in two patients treated with intravenous vancomycin and local acidification of the renal collecting system. Clinical observation shows that encrusted pyelitis is a threatening disorder that destroys the native kidneys and may lead to end-stage renal failure. Successful treatment of the disease by chemolysis and antibiotics depends on correct and early diagnosis. Diagnosis required recognition of the predisposing factors, computed tomography imaging of the urinary tract, crystalluria, and identification of urea-splitting bacteria with prolonged culture on selective medium.

  6. Antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 replication in HepG2 cells

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Hepatitis C (HCV) viral infection is a serious medical problem in Egypt and it has a devastating impact on the Egyptian economy. It is estimated that over 15% of Egyptians are infected by the virus and thus finding a cure for this disease is of utmost importance. Current therapies for hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 4 with interferon/ribavirin have not been successful and thus the development of alternative therapy for this genotype is disparately needed. Results Although...

  7. Assessment of beef production from Brahman x Thai native and Charolais x Thai native crossbred bulls slaughtered at different weights. I: growth performance and carcass quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waritthitham, A; Lambertz, C; Langholz, H-J; Wicke, M; Gauly, M

    2010-05-01

    Effects of genotype and slaughter weight on growth performance and carcass quality of Brahman x Thai native (BRA) and Charolais x Thai native (CHA) crossbred bulls were studied. Thirty-four BRA and 34 CHA bulls raised under practical fattening beef farm conditions were randomly selected and slaughtered at 500, 550 and 600 kg live weight, respectively. Parameters of growth performance, carcass quality and commercial prime cuts were determined. Results showed that growth performance and carcass quality of CHA was better, since they showed higher weight gain, better body muscle score, higher carcass weight high dressing percentage, higher carcass muscle, less carcass fat and bone plus connective tissue proportions, better carcass classifications, greater loin eye area and higher commercial prime cut percentage. Slaughter weights up to 600 kg resulted in increased carcass weight, loin eye area and percentage of commercial prime cuts and can therefore be recommended.

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains of the Beijing genotype are rarely observed in tuberculosis patients in South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Ritacco

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of the Beijing genotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a cause of tuberculosis (TB in South America was determined by analyzing genotypes of strains isolated from patients that had been diagnosed with the disease between 1997 and 2003 in seven countries of the subcontinent. In total, 19 of the 1,202 (1.6% TB cases carried Beijing isolates, including 11 of the 185 patients from Peru (5.9%, five of the 512 patients from Argentina (1.0%, two of the 252 Brazilian cases (0.8%, one of the 166 patients from Paraguay (0.6% and none of the samples obtained from Chile (35, Colombia (36 and Ecuador (16. Except for two patients that were East Asian immigrants, all cases with Beijing strains were native South Americans. No association was found between carrying a strain with the Beijing genotype and having drug or multi-drug resistant disease. Our data show that presently transmission of M. tuberculosis strains of the Beijing genotype is not frequent in Latin America. In addition, the lack of association of drug resistant TB and infection with M. tuberculosis of the Beijing genotype observed presently demands efforts to define better the contribution of the virulence and lack of response to treatment to the growing spread of Beijing strains observed in other parts of the world.

  9. PHENOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF GENOTYPES FROM CATTLEY GUAVA AND GUAVA TREES SUBMITTED TO FRUCTIFICATION PRUNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CINTIA APARECIDA BREMENKAMP

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Psidium cattleianum Sabine is a species from the Myrtaceae family that serves as an option for the native fruits cultivation, besides being considered a source of resistance to the Meloidogyne enterolobii nematode. Although cattley guava trees from this species produce flower buds in young branches, there are no reports of response to fructification pruning or phenological synchronism with the guava tree. The objective of this paper was the comparative evaluation of the genotype response of strawberry guava trees and guava cultivars to fructification pruning, thus, describing the phenology of both species under the same cultivation conditions. The experiment was conducted under an entirely randomized outline, in 7x2 factorial scheme, being evaluated seven genotypes (three from strawberry guava and four from guava trees, and with pruning performed in two seasons (May 2012 and March 2013, with three repetitions. Fructification pruning was executed by a lopping on all mature branches, from the last growth flow in the woody branch region. Were evaluated budding characteristics and fruit harvesting, as well as number of days from pruning to the observation of the phenological event. Cattley guava tree pruning stimulated fructification of all three genotypes after pruning done on May and two genotypes after the March’s pruning. There has been a sync between the guava cultivars’ flowering and both strawberry guava trees genotypes, when those were pruned on May.

  10. NativeView: A Geospatial Curriculum for Native Nation Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattling Leaf, J.

    2007-12-01

    In the spirit of collaboration and reciprocity, James Rattling Leaf of Sinte Gleska University on the Rosebud Reservation of South Dakota will present recent developments, experiences, insights and a vision for education in Indian Country. As a thirty-year young institution, Sinte Gleska University is founded by a strong vision of ancestral leadership and the values of the Lakota Way of Life. Sinte Gleska University (SGU) has initiated the development of a Geospatial Education Curriculum project. NativeView: A Geospatial Curriculum for Native Nation Building is a two-year project that entails a disciplined approach towards the development of a relevant Geospatial academic curriculum. This project is designed to meet the educational and land management needs of the Rosebud Lakota Tribe through the utilization of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Remote Sensing (RS) and Global Positioning Systems (GPS). In conjunction with the strategy and progress of this academic project, a formal presentation and demonstration of the SGU based Geospatial software RezMapper software will exemplify an innovative example of state of the art information technology. RezMapper is an interactive CD software package focused toward the 21 Lakota communities on the Rosebud Reservation that utilizes an ingenious concept of multimedia mapping and state of the art data compression and presentation. This ongoing development utilizes geographic data, imagery from space, historical aerial photography and cultural features such as historic Lakota documents, language, song, video and historical photographs in a multimedia fashion. As a tangible product, RezMapper will be a project deliverable tool for use in the classroom and to a broad range of learners.

  11. Native plants for erosion control in urban river slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Alvarado

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical and structural erosion of soils is produced by the loss of the vegetal cover and the action of rain on unprotected surfaces. Raindrop impact, transport and sediment deposition leads to landslides and slope instability and soil loss. In Costa Rica, water bodies have been negatively impacted by urban development and both water resources and soils have become more vulnerable. This is the case of the Pirro river micro watershed where riverbed vegetation has been replaced by constructions producing erosion problems in its slopes. In order to evaluate how native plants favor sediment control and prevent this sediment from been deposited in the river, eight experimental plots were installed. Four treatments were established: A (Costus pulverulentus Presl, B (Heliconia tortuosa (Griggs Standl., C (Vetiveria zizanioides (L. Nash and D (control. Sediments were collected weekly during the rainy and transitional seasons. A clear relation between rainfall intensity and sediment production was determined, particularly for intensities higher than 50 mm h-1. Significant differences were also determined between the treatments and the efficiency order was B >A > C >D, with the native plants being the most efficient in terms of sediment control. The use of native plants is recommended for the management and rehabilitation of slopes near urban rivers due to their ecological value and their capability for sediment control.

  12. Successful Strategies for Earth Science Research in Native Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redsteer, M. H.; Anderson, D.; Ben, N.; Bitsuie, R.; Blackhorse, A.; Breit, G.; Clifford, A.; Salabye, J.; Semken, S.; Weaver, K.; Yazzie, N.

    2004-12-01

    A small U.S. Geological Survey pilot project utilizes strategies that are successful at involving the Native community in earth science research. This work has ignited the interest of Native students in interdisciplinary geoscience studies, and gained the recognition of tribal community leaders from the conterminous United States, Alaska, and Canada. This study seeks to examine land use, climatic variability, and their related impacts on land-surface conditions in the ecologically sensitive Tsezhin Bii' region of the Navajo Nation. Work conducted by predominantly Native American researchers, includes studies of bedrock geology, surficial processes, soil and water quality, and plant ecology, as well as the history of human habitation. Community involvement that began during the proposal process, has helped to guide research, and has provided tribal members with information that they can use for land use planning and natural resource management. Work by Navajo tribal members who have become involved in research as it has progressed, includes K-12 science curriculum development, community outreach and education on environmental and geologic hazards, drought mitigation, grazing management, and impacts of climate change and land use on medicinal plants.

  13. Effects of Different Nitrogen Fertilizer Levels and Native Soil Properties on Rice Grain Fe, Zn and Protein Contents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. CHANDEL; S. BANERJEE; S. SEE; R. MEENA; D. J. SHARMA; S. B. VERULKAR

    2010-01-01

    Deposition of protein and metal ions (Fe, Zn) in rice grains is a complex polygenic trait showing considerable environmental effect. To analyze the effect of nitrogen application levels and native soil properties on rice grain protein, iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) contents, 32 rice genotypes were grown at three different locations each under 80 and 120 kg/hm2 nitrogen fertilizer applications. In treatments with nitrogen fertilizer application, the brown rice grain protein content (GPC) increased significantly (1.1% to 7.0%) under higher nitrogen fertilizer application (120 kg/hm2) whereas grain Fe/Zn contents showed non-significant effect of nitrogen application level, thus suggesting that the rate of uptake and translocation of macro-elements does not influence the uptake and translocation of micro-elements. The pH, organic matter content and inherent Fe/Zn levels of native soil showed significant effects on grain Fe and Zn contents of all the rice genotypes. Grain Zn content of almost all the tested rice genotypes was found to increase at Location III having loamy soil texture, neutral pH value (pH 6.83) and higher organic matter content than the other two locations (Locations I and II), indicating significant influence of native soil properties on brown rice grain Zn content while grain Fe content showed significant genotype × environment interaction effect. Genotypic difference was found to be the most significant factor to affect grain Fe/Zn contents in all the tested rice genotypes, indicating that although native soil properties influence phyto-availability of micronutrients and consequently influencing absorption, translocation and grain deposition of Fe/Zn ions, yet genetic makeup of a plant determines its response to varied soil conditions and other external factors. Two indica rice genotypes R-RF-31 (27.62 μg/g grain Zn content and 7.80% GPC) and R1033-968-2-1 (30.05 μg/g grain Zn content and 8.47% GPC) were identified as high grain Zn and moderate GPC

  14. Immigration, education and native wage inequality

    OpenAIRE

    Lumpe, Christian; Weigert, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the effect of immigration on the labour market prospects for different skill groups among natives. We develop a model of endogenous labour supply in which immigration affects educational decisions of natives. We argue that the distributional consequences of immigration with respect to native between-skill-group inequality are ambiguous in general and crucially depend on the host country's level of educational attainment. We show that this result is robust irrespective...

  15. Word Durations in Non-Native English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Rachel E.; Baese-Berk, Melissa; Bonnasse-Gahot, Laurent; Kim, Midam; Van Engen, Kristin J.; Bradlow, Ann R.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we compare the effects of English lexical features on word duration for native and non-native English speakers and for non-native speakers with different L1s and a range of L2 experience. We also examine whether non-native word durations lead to judgments of a stronger foreign accent. We measured word durations in English paragraphs read by 12 American English (AE), 20 Korean, and 20 Chinese speakers. We also had AE listeners rate the `accentedness' of these non-native speakers. AE speech had shorter durations, greater within-speaker word duration variance, greater reduction of function words, and less between-speaker variance than non-native speech. However, both AE and non-native speakers showed sensitivity to lexical predictability by reducing second mentions and high frequency words. Non-native speakers with more native-like word durations, greater within-speaker word duration variance, and greater function word reduction were perceived as less accented. Overall, these findings identify word duration as an important and complex feature of foreign-accented English. PMID:21516172

  16. Rotavirus genotypes in Belarus, 2008-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeiko, Galina V; Yermalovich, Marina A; Poliakova, Nadezhda; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Kerin, Tara K; Wasley, Annemarie; Videbaek, Dovile; Gentsch, Jon R; Bowen, Michael D; Samoilovich, Elena O

    2014-12-01

    This study describes group A rotavirus (RVA) genotype prevalence in Belarus from 2008 to 2012. In 2008, data from 3 sites in Belarus (Brest, Mogilev, Minsk) indicated that G4P[8] was the predominant genotype. Data from Minsk (2008-2012) showed that G4P[8] was the predominant RVA genotype in all years except in 2011 when G3P[8] was most frequently detected. Other RVA genotypes common in Europe (G1P[8], G2P[4]) were detected each year of the study. This study reveals the dominance of genotype G4P[8] in Belarus and helps to establish the baseline genotype prevalence prior to RVA vaccine introduction in the country.

  17. Grain yield stability of early maize genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitra Bahadur Kunwar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to estimate grain yield stability of early maize genotypes. Five early maize genotypes namely Pool-17, Arun1EV, Arun-4, Arun-2 and Farmer’s variety were evaluated using Randomized Complete Block Design along with three replications at four different locations namely Rampur, Rajahar, Pakhribas and Kabre districts of Nepal during summer seasons of three consecutive years from 2010 to 2012 under farmer’s fields. Genotype and genotype × environment (GGE biplot was used to identify superior genotype for grain yield and stability pattern. The genotypes Arun-1 EV and Arun-4 were better adapted for Kabre and Pakhribas where as pool-17 for Rajahar environments. The overall findings showed that Arun-1EV was more stable followed by Arun-2 therefore these two varieties can be recommended to farmers for cultivation in both environments.

  18. Sleep and native language interference affect non-native speech sound learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earle, F Sayako; Myers, Emily B

    2015-12-01

    Adults learning a new language are faced with a significant challenge: non-native speech sounds that are perceptually similar to sounds in one's native language can be very difficult to acquire. Sleep and native language interference, 2 factors that may help to explain this difficulty in acquisition, are addressed in 3 studies. Results of Experiment 1 showed that participants trained on a non-native contrast at night improved in discrimination 24 hr after training, while those trained in the morning showed no such improvement. Experiments 2 and 3 addressed the possibility that incidental exposure to perceptually similar native language speech sounds during the day interfered with maintenance in the morning group. Taken together, results show that the ultimate success of non-native speech sound learning depends not only on the similarity of learned sounds to the native language repertoire, but also to interference from native language sounds before sleep.

  19. Contrasting xylem vessel constraints on hydraulic conductivity between native and non-native woody understory species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria S Smith

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We examined the hydraulic properties of 82 native and non-native woody species common to forests of Eastern North America, including several congeneric groups, representing a range of anatomical wood types. We observed smaller conduit diameters with greater frequency in non-native species, corresponding to lower calculated potential vulnerability to cavitation index. Non-native species exhibited higher vessel-grouping in metaxylem compared with native species, however, solitary vessels were more prevalent in secondary xylem. Higher frequency of solitary vessels in secondary xylem was related to a lower potential vulnerability index. We found no relationship between anatomical characteristics of xylem, origin of species and hydraulic conductivity, indicating that non-native species did not exhibit advantageous hydraulic efficiency over native species. Our results confer anatomical advantages for non-native species under the potential for cavitation due to freezing, perhaps permitting extended growing seasons.

  20. Polymorphism of Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I gene and their effect on growth traits in Indonesia native chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A Mu'in

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The research was aimed is to detect Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I gene polymorphism and their effect on growth traits in Indonesia natives chicken. Seventy two Indonesian native chicken are going to be used in this research. The polymorphism of IGF-I gene was detected by PCR-RFLP/Pst-I. Four growth traits (body weight at 1, 2, 3, and 4 months were recorded for analyzing the association between IGF-I gene polymorphism and growth performance.The results showed that allele A (621 bp and allele B (364 and 257 bp were found in this research. It was found that Indonesian native chicken carried high frequencies of allele A (0.82, and frequencies of IGF-I genotypes (AA, AB, BB were 68.0, 27.8, and 4,2%, respectively. When compared to the IGF-I genotypes, the BB genotype had the highest body weight at 1, 2, 3, and 4 month (P<0.05. The results showed that the B allele was positive of associated to a higher growth rate. Therefore, these results suggest that there is a possibility of IGF-I genotypes acting as a molecular marker for growth rate of Indonesia native.

  1. Aerococcus viridans Native Valve Endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenwan Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerococcus viridans is an infrequent human pathogen and few cases of infective endocarditis have been reported. A case involving a 69-year-old man with colon cancer and hemicolectomy 14 years previously, without recurrence, is reported. A diagnosis of native mitral valve endocarditis was established on the basis of clinical presentation, characteristic echocardiographic findings and pathological specimen examination after urgent valve replacement. A viridans endocarditis appears to be particularly virulent, requiring a surgical approach in four of 10 cases reported and death in one of nine. Given the aggressive nature of A viridans endocarditis and the variable time to diagnosis (a few days to seven months, prompt recognition of symptoms and echocardiography, in addition to blood cultures, should be performed when symptoms persist.

  2. Speaking C++ as a native

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroustrup, Bjarne

    2001-08-01

    C++ supports several styles ("multiple paradigms") of programming. This allows great flexibility, notational convenience, maintainability, and close-to-optimal performance. Programmers who don't know the basic native C++ styles and techniques "speak" C++ with a thick accent, limiting themselves to relatively restrictive pidgin dialects. Here, I present language features such as classes, class hierarchies, abstract classes, and templates, together with the fundamental programming styles they support. In particular, I show how to provide generic algorithms, function objects, access objects, and delayed evaluation as needed to build and use flexible and efficient libraries. The aim is to give an idea of what's possible to provide, and some understanding of the fundamental techniques of modern C++ libraries.

  3. Hepatitis C virus genotypes in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Nan Nwe; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu; Shirasawa, Hiroshi

    2016-07-21

    Myanmar is adjacent to India, Bangladesh, Thailand, Laos and China. In Myanmar, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is 2%, and HCV infection accounts for 25% of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we reviewed the prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar. HCV genotypes 1, 3 and 6 were observed in volunteer blood donors in and around the Myanmar city of Yangon. Although there are several reports of HCV genotype 6 and its variants in Myanmar, the distribution of the HCV genotypes has not been well documented in areas other than Yangon. Previous studies showed that treatment with peginterferon and a weight-based dose of ribavirin for 24 or 48 wk could lead to an 80%-100% sustained virological response (SVR) rates in Myanmar. Current interferon-free treatments could lead to higher SVR rates (90%-95%) in patients infected with almost all HCV genotypes other than HCV genotype 3. In an era of heavy reliance on direct-acting antivirals against HCV, there is an increasing need to measure HCV genotypes, and this need will also increase specifically in Myanmar. Current available information of HCV genotypes were mostly from Yangon and other countries than Myanmar. The prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar should be determined.

  4. Turkish Students' Perspectives on Speaking Anxiety in Native and Non-Native English Speaker Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozavli, Ebubekir; Gulmez, Recep

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to reveal the effect of FLA (foreign language anxiety) in native/non-native speaker of English classrooms. In this study, two groups of students (90 in total) of whom 38 were in NS (native speaker) class and 52 in NNS (non-native speaker) class taking English as a second language course for 22 hours a week at Erzincan…

  5. Antipredator responses by native mosquitofish to non-native cichlids: An examination of the role of prey naiveté

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehage, Jennifer S.; Dunlop, Katherine L.; Loftus, William F.

    2009-01-01

    The strong impact of non-native predators in aquatic systems is thought to relate to the evolutionary naiveté of prey. Due to isolation and limited dispersal, this naiveté may be relatively high in freshwater systems. In this study, we tested this notion by examining the antipredator response of native mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki, to two non-native predators found in the Everglades, the African jewelfish,Hemichromis letourneuxi, and the Mayan cichlid, Cichlasoma urophthalmus. We manipulated prey naiveté by using two mosquitofish populations that varied in their experience with the recent invader, the African jewelfish, but had similar levels of experience with the longer-established Mayan cichlid. Specifically, we tested these predictions: (1) predator hunting modes differed between the two predators, (2) predation rates would be higher by the novel jewelfish predator, (3) particularly on the naive population living where jewelfish have not invaded yet, (4) antipredator responses would be stronger to Mayan cichlids due to greater experience and weaker and/or ineffective to jewelfish, and (5) especially weakest by the naive population. We assayed prey and predator behavior, and prey mortality in lab aquaria where both predators and prey were free-ranging. Predator hunting modes and habitat domains differed, with jewelfish being more active search predators that used slightly higher parts of the water column and less of the habitat structure relative to Mayan cichlids. In disagreement with our predictions, predation rates were similar between the two predators, antipredator responses were stronger to African jewelfish (except for predator inspections), and there was no difference in response between jewelfish-savvy and jewelfish-naive populations. These results suggest that despite the novelty of introduced predators, prey may be able to respond appropriately if non-native predator archetypes are similar enough to those of native predators, if prey rely

  6. Rapid high-throughput genotyping of HBV DNA using a modified hybridization-extension technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Han; Zhao, Wenliang; Ruan, Banjun; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Jinrong; Lei, Xiaoying; Wang, Weihua; Liu, Yonglan; Sun, Jianbing; Xiang, An; Guo, Yanhai; Yan, Zhen

    2013-11-07

    China has the highest incidence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection worldwide. HBV genotypes have variable impacts on disease pathogenesis and drug tolerance. We have developed a technically simple and accurate method for HBV genotyping that will be applicable to pre-treatment diagnosis and individualized treatment. Multiple sequence alignments of HBV genomes from GenBank were used to design primers and probes for genotyping of HBV A through H. The hybridization was carried out on nitrocellulose (NC) membranes with probes fixed in an array format, which was followed by hybrid amplification by an extension step with DNA polymerase to reinforce the double-stranded DNA hybrids on the NC membrane and subsequent visualization using an avidin-biotin system. Genotyping results were confirmed by DNA sequencing and bioinformatics analysis using the National Center for Biotechnology Information genotyping database, and compared with results from the line probe assay. The data show that multiple sequence alignment defined a 630 bp region in the HBV PreS and S regions that was suitable for genotyping. All genotyping significant single nucleotides in the region were defined. Two-hundred-and-ninety-one HBV-positive serum samples from Northwest Chinese patients were genotyped, and the genotyping rate from the new modified hybridization-extension method was 100% compared with direct sequencing. Compared with line probe assay, the newly developed method is superior, featuring reduced reaction time, lower risk of contamination, and increased accuracy for detecting single nucleotide mutation. In conclusion, a novel hybridization-extension method for HBV genotyping was established, which represents a new tool for accurate and rapid SNP detection that will benefit clinical testing.

  7. Native and alien squirrels in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Bertolino

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In Italy there are four species of squirrels: the native red squirrel and other three species recently introduced. The red squirrel is present in the Italian peninsula with three subspecies, and is missing only in Salento, and Italian islands. This species is common on Alps and Apennines, while in the plains it is declining because of the habitat loss. Competition with the grey squirrel and habitat fragmentation are considered the major threats to the survival of the red squirrel. The grey squirrel is present in Piedmont and Liguria. A study on the Piedmontese colony showed that the red squirrel is disappearing from the area colonised by the grey squirrel and the damage due to bark-stripping and feeding is considerable. Free-ranging populations of the Siberian chipmunk live in Belluno, Verona, and Rome, but records of single animals were reported for other areas. The Finlayson's squirrel is present with a small nucleus in an urban area of Piedmont. Here, the impact of this species on the vegetation appears dramatic. The eradication of the grey squirrel is a priority for the conservation of the red squirrel, but control plans for the other introduced species are also needed.

  8. Thermomagnetic evidence of native iron in sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechersky, D. M.; Sharonova, Z. V.

    2012-04-01

    The paper summarizes the results of thermomagnetic analysis concerning the distribution of metallic iron in the sediments ranging in age from Miocene to Early Cretaceous sampled from the following sections: Gams (Austria); Verkhorech'e and Sel'bukhra (the Crimea); Kvirinaki and Tetritskaro (Georgia); Aimaki, Dzhengutai, Madzhalis, and Gergebil (Ciscaucasia, Russia); Klyuchi and Teplovka (Volga region, Russia); Koshak (Kazakhstan); and Khalats and Kara-Kala (Turkmenia). Small amounts of native iron (from 10-5% to 0.05%) are identified in 521 samples of 921 studied; i.e., iron particles are almost pervasive. This fact traces the origin of these particles to cosmic dust. Some established features point to the heterogeneous character of the cosmic dust: (a) the samples clearly fall into two groups. One group comprises the rocks that contain iron particles; the rocks of the other group are iron-free. In the first group, four intervals are distinguished where the sediments are globally enriched with iron with constant nickel content (5-6%); (b) in terms of composition, the iron particles are divided into three groups. The first group contains pure iron; the particles pertaining to the second group contain iron with a minor amount of nickel typical for kamacite; and the third group comprises the particles of Fe-Ni alloy with more than 20% nickel. The first and the second groups are ubiquitous; the particles of the third group are spread locally. They bear no relation to cosmic dust and are probably associated with the meteoritic impacts.

  9. Influence of native and non-native multitalker babble on speech recognition in noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandni Jain

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess speech recognition in noise using multitalker babble of native and non-native language at two different signal to noise ratios. The speech recognition in noise was assessed on 60 participants (18 to 30 years with normal hearing sensitivity, having Malayalam and Kannada as their native language. For this purpose, 6 and 10 multitalker babble were generated in Kannada and Malayalam language. Speech recognition was assessed for native listeners of both the languages in the presence of native and nonnative multitalker babble. Results showed that the speech recognition in noise was significantly higher for 0 dB signal to noise ratio (SNR compared to -3 dB SNR for both the languages. Performance of Kannada Listeners was significantly higher in the presence of native (Kannada babble compared to non-native babble (Malayalam. However, this was not same with the Malayalam listeners wherein they performed equally well with native (Malayalam as well as non-native babble (Kannada. The results of the present study highlight the importance of using native multitalker babble for Kannada listeners in lieu of non-native babble and, considering the importance of each SNR for estimating speech recognition in noise scores. Further research is needed to assess speech recognition in Malayalam listeners in the presence of other non-native backgrounds of various types.

  10. Comparison of native and non-native phone imitation by English and Spanish speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Anne J; Viswanathan, Navin; Aivar, M Pilar; Manuel, Sarath

    2013-01-01

    Experiments investigating phonetic convergence in conversation often focus on interlocutors with similar phonetic inventories. Extending these experiments to those with dissimilar inventories requires understanding the capacity of speakers to imitate native and non-native phones. In the present study, we tested native Spanish and native English speakers to determine whether imitation of non-native tokens differs qualitatively from imitation of native tokens. Participants imitated a [ba]-[pa] continuum that varied in VOT from -60 ms (prevoiced, Spanish [b]) to +60 ms (long lag, English [p]) such that the continuum consisted of some tokens that were native to Spanish speakers and some that were native to English speakers. Analysis of the imitations showed two critical results. First, both groups of speakers demonstrated sensitivity to VOT differences in tokens that fell within their native regions of the VOT continuum (prevoiced region for Spanish and long lag region for English). Secondly, neither group of speakers demonstrated such sensitivity to VOT differences among tokens that fell in their non-native regions of the continuum. These results show that, even in an intentional imitation task, speakers cannot accurately imitate non-native tokens, but are clearly flexible in producing native tokens. Implications of these findings are discussed with reference to the constraints on convergence in interlocutors from different linguistic backgrounds.

  11. Vowel perception: Effects of non-native language versus non-native dialect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, A.; Smits, R.; Cooper, N.

    2005-01-01

    Three groups of listeners identified the vowel in CV and VC syllables produced by an American English talker. The listeners were (a) native speakers of American English, (b) native speakers of Australian English (different dialect), and (c) native speakers of Dutch (different language). The syllable

  12. Native- and Non-Native Speaking English Teachers in Vietnam: Weighing the Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkinshaw, Ian; Duong, Oanh Thi Hoang

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines a common belief that learners of English as a foreign language prefer to learn English from native-speaker teachers rather than non-native speakers of English. 50 Vietnamese learners of English evaluated the importance of native-speakerness compared with seven qualities valued in an English language teacher: teaching…

  13. Risk to native Uroleucon aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) from non-native lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aphids in the genus Uroleucon Mordvilko (Hemiptera: Aphididae) are native herbivores that feed on goldenrod (Solidago spp.) and other Asteraceae in North America. The aphids are potential prey for a wide variety of natural enemies, including native and non-native species of lady beetles (Coleoptera...

  14. Native American History in a Box: A New Approach to Teaching Native American Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Emory C.; Hitt, Austin M.; Schipper, Jason A.; Jones, Adam M.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the Native American History in a Box curriculum which is designed to introduce elementary and middle-level students to Native American cultures. The curriculum consists of a five day unit addressing the following concepts pertaining to Native American Nations: settlements, tools, sustenance, pottery, and contact with…

  15. Vowel perception: Effects of non-native language versus non-native dialect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, A.; Smits, R.; Cooper, N.

    2005-01-01

    Three groups of listeners identified the vowel in CV and VC syllables produced by an American English talker. The listeners were (a) native speakers of American English, (b) native speakers of Australian English (different dialect), and (c) native speakers of Dutch (different language). The

  16. Comparison of native and non-native phone imitation by English and Spanish speakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie J Olmstead

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Experiments investigating phonetic convergence in conversation often focus on interlocutors with similar phonetic inventories. Extending these experiments to those with dissimilar inventories requires understanding the capacity of speakers to imitate native and non-native phones. In the present study, we tested native Spanish and native English speakers to determine whether imitation of non-native tokens differs qualitatively from imitation of native tokens. Participants imitated a [ba] -[pa] continuum that varied in VOT from -60 ms (prevoiced, Spanish [b] to +60 ms (long lag, English [p] such that the continuum consisted of some tokens that were native to Spanish speakers and some that were native to English speakers. Analysis of the imitations showed two critical results. First, both groups of speakers demonstrated sensitivity to VOT differences in tokens that fell within their native regions of the VOT continuum (prevoiced region for Spanish and long lag region for English. Secondly, neither group of speakers demonstrated such sensitivity to VOT differences among tokens that fell in their non-native regions of the continuum. These results show that, even in an intentional imitation task, speakers cannot accurately imitate non-native tokens, but are clearly flexible in producing native tokens. Implications of these findings are discussed with reference to the constraints on convergence in interlocutors from different linguistic backgrounds.

  17. Differential survival of mosquitofish exposed to radionuclides is dependent on RAPD genotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodorakis, C.W. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN (United States); Shugart, L.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    In previous studies, it was found that certain RAPD (Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA) markers were present at higher frequencies in radionuclide-contaminated mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) populations than in reference populations. These markers will be referred to as contaminant specific markers. In the present study, fish with and without these markers were collected from non-contaminated populations and exposed in situ to radionuclides by caging them in one of the contaminated sites. Forty fish were exposed for 1--6 weeks, after which the survivors were collected and DNA was extracted for genotypic analysis. In one experiment, the frequencies of contaminant specific markers in the survivors were compared to the frequencies of these markers in the native contaminated and uncontaminated (the source of the caged fish) populations. It was found that the genotypic distributions were more similar to the native contaminated population. In another experiment, samples of caudal fin tissue were collected for DNA extraction before and after placing fish in the cages, in order to compare survival rates of different genotypes. It was found that fish with the contaminant indicative bands had higher percent survival than the other fish. Experiments are underway or are being planned in order to determine the molecular identity of these bands and the ecological significance of altered band frequencies in hopes of developing population-level biomarkers of contaminant exposure and ecological affects.

  18. The Impacts of Complex Allele Structure on Genotyping Accuracy of Microsatellite: a Lesson from Bear Microsatellites UamD116 and UamB1%微卫星复杂结构对分型的影响:以熊UamD116和UamB1为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小芳; 杨淑慧; 马跃; 徐艳春; 宋伟杰

    2012-01-01

    群体遗传学结论.%Objective: Microsatellite refers to a kind of polymorphic. DNA fragments on the genome which contains variable number of tandem repeats of a short specific sequence of nucleotides (motif). The polymorphism of micorsatellite is reflected by variation of repeating number of motifs resulting in variation of fragment length among alleles. Therefore, routine genotyping approach is based on the fragment length of amplified alleles using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Tetra-nucleotide microsatellites are preferable than di-nucleotide ones because of the influence of stutters on genotyping of the later. However, tetra-nucleotide microsatellites often contain complex motif structure potentially impacting genotyping and such problem is-usually ignored in studies. To address the impacts of complex allele structure on the genotyping, we genotyped two tetra-nucleotide loci of the Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus), UamDl 16 and UamBl, using fragment length based approach and sequence based approach, and compared the results. Methods: A total of 96 samples including muscle, blood and hair were used in the experiments. PCR using fluorescently labeled upper primers were performed for each sample. PCR products were isolated using capillary electrophoresis on an automated DNA sequencer. Results: UamDl 16 contained multiple types of motifs, and mono-, di- tri-nucloetide insertions between motifs. Meanwhile, a 1-bp deletion occurred in the downstream flanking region of some alleles. Fragment length based genotyping was not able to discriminate the differences and sorted different alleles with similar length as a single one. UamBl contained 2 types of alleles, one type contained a 3-bp insertion resulting in the shifts of size difference between the two types of alleles from 4 bp to 1 bp. In addition, alleles with different motifs had similar size. Fragment length based genotyping identified 8 alleles, while sequence based approach identified 12 ones. Conclusion: For complex tetra

  19. Reading Native American Literature: A Teacher's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Bruce A.

    2004-01-01

    High school and college teachers interested in offering units or courses on Native American literature have often had to carve out new teaching strategies because ready resources and guides are scarce. In "Reading Native American Literature: A Teacher's Guide," Bruce A. Goebel offers innovative and practical suggestions about how to introduce…

  20. Support for Native Americans with Developmental Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Wylie; Rife, Christine

    This report addresses the high incidence of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and fetal alcohol effects (FAE) among Native Americans and suggests that there is a lack of comprehensive effort to provide outreach services to the Native American population in Illinois. The report begins with an overview of American Indian history and the migration of…

  1. Native grasses for rehabilitating Hunter Valley minesites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huxtable, C. [NSW Department of Land and Water Conservation, NSW (Australia)

    1998-04-01

    Introduced plant species, particularly grasses, have long been used to rehabilitate mined land in Australia. Interest in using native species spawned a research project in the Hunter Valley which has demonstrated the suitability of certain native species for rehabilitation and put forward guidelines to enhance the chance of their successful establishment. 4 photos., 1 tab.

  2. The Native Speaker: Membership Has Its Privileges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siskin, H. Jay

    This paper responds to Claire Kramsch's essay on the demise of the notion of the idealized native speaker as the model for second language learning and implications for second languages and cultures education. In her essay, Kramsch forcefully argues against the native speaker construct and exhorts teachers and learners not to abandon their unique…

  3. Stennis Space Center celebrates Native American culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Famie Willis (left), 2009-2010 Choctaw Indian Princess, displays artifacts during Native American Heritage Month activities at Stennis Space Center on Nov. 24. The celebration featured various Native American cultural displays for Stennis employees to view. Shown above are (l to r): Willis, Elaine Couchman of NASA Shared Services Center, John Cecconi of NSSC and Lakeisha Robertson of the Environmental Protection Agency.

  4. How Digital Native Learners Describe Themselves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Penny

    2015-01-01

    Eight university students from the "digital native" generation were interviewed about the connections they saw between technology use and learning, and also their reactions to the popular press claims about their generation. Themes that emerged from the interviews were coded to show patterns in how digital natives describe themselves.…

  5. Can We Teach Digital Natives Digital Literacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wan

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there has been much debate about the concept of digital natives, in particular the differences between the digital natives' knowledge and adoption of digital technologies in informal versus formal educational contexts. This paper investigates the knowledge about educational technologies of a group of undergraduate students…

  6. Theoretical Perspectives of How Digital Natives Learn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivunja, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Marck Prensky, an authority on teaching and learning especially with the aid of Information and Communication Technologies, has referred to 21st century children born after 1980 as "Digital Natives". This paper reviews literature of leaders in the field to shed some light on theoretical perspectives of how Digital Natives learn and how…

  7. Brain Hemispheric Functions and the Native American.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Allen Chuck

    1982-01-01

    Uses brain research conducted by Dr. Roger Sperry to show that traditional Native Americans are more dominant in right hemisphere thinking, setting them apart from a modern left hemisphere-oriented society (especially emphasized in schools). Describes some characteristics of Native American thinking that illustrate a right hemisphere orientation…

  8. Substance Abuse among Native-American Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncher, Michael S.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Reviews social epidemiological data on substance abuse among Native American youth and discusses culturally relevant etiological factors. Highlights strategies for identification of high-risk youth, concentrating on theoretical and methodological aspects appropriate for Native American populations. Issues of sensitive technology transfer and…

  9. Staphylococcus saprophyticus causing native valve endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garduño, Eugenio; Márquez, Irene; Beteta, Alicia; Said, Ibrahim; Blanco, Javier; Pineda, Tomás

    2005-01-01

    Coagulase negative staphylococci are a rare cause of native valve endocarditis. Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus infrequently reported as a human pathogen, and most of the cases reported are urinary tract infections. We describe a case of native valve endocarditis attributed to this organism. The patient needed valve replacement due to heart failure.

  10. Investigating Native and Non-Native English-Speaking Teacher Raters' Judgements of Oral Proficiency in the College English Test-Spoken English Test (CET-SET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Elder, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of raters' language background on their judgements of the speaking performance in the College English Test-Spoken English Test (CET-SET) of China, by comparing the rating patterns of non-native English-speaking (NNES) teacher raters, who are currently employed to assess performance on the CET-SET, with those of…

  11. Spatial arrangement overrules environmental factors to structure native and non-native assemblages of synanthropic harvestmen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Muster

    Full Text Available Understanding how space affects the occurrence of native and non-native species is essential for inferring processes that shape communities. However, studies considering spatial and environmental variables for the entire community - as well as for the native and non-native assemblages in a single study - are scarce for animals. Harvestmen communities in central Europe have undergone drastic turnovers during the past decades, with several newly immigrated species, and thus provide a unique system to study such questions. We studied the wall-dwelling harvestmen communities from 52 human settlements in Luxembourg and found the assemblages to be largely dominated by non-native species (64% of specimens. Community structure was analysed using Moran's eigenvector maps as spatial variables, and landcover variables at different radii (500 m, 1000 m, 2000 m in combination with climatic parameters as environmental variables. A surprisingly high portion of pure spatial variation (15.7% of total variance exceeded the environmental (10.6% and shared (4% components of variation, but we found only minor differences between native and non-native assemblages. This could result from the ecological flexibility of both, native and non-native harvestmen that are not restricted to urban habitats but also inhabit surrounding semi-natural landscapes. Nevertheless, urban landcover variables explained more variation in the non-native community, whereas coverage of semi-natural habitats (forests, rivers at broader radii better explained the native assemblage. This indicates that some urban characteristics apparently facilitate the establishment of non-native species. We found no evidence for competitive replacement of native by invasive species, but a community with novel combination of native and non-native species.

  12. An Analysis of Student Evaluations of Native and Non Native Korean Foreign Language Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Damron

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of native and non-native teaching assistants and part-time teachers (both referred to as TAs in this article, students completed 632 evaluations of Ko-rean Language TAs from 2005 to 2008, and these evaluations were compiled for an analysis of variants (ANOVA. The evaluations were categorized into three groups of TAs: native Korean-speaking female, native Korean-speaking male, and non-native male; non-native females would have been included in the study, but there were not enough non-native female teachers to have a reliable sample. In an effort to encourage more self-examined teaching practices, this study addresses the greatest strengths and weaknesses of each group. Results revealed several significant differences between the ratings of the groups: native female TAs rated lowest overall, and non-native male TAs rated highest overall. The most prominent differences be-tween groups occurred in ratings of amount students learned, TAs’ preparedness, TAs’ active involvement in students’ learning, TAs’ enthusiasm, and TAs’ tardiness. This study reviews students’ written comments on the evaluations and proposes possible causes of these findings, concluding that differences in ratings are based on both teaching patterns associated with each group of TAs and student re-sponse bias that favors non-native male speakers. Teaching patterns include a tendency for native (Korean female TAs to teach using a lecture format and non-native male TAs to teach using a discussion format; for native TAs to have difficulty adapting to the language level of the students; and for a more visible enthusiasm for Korean culture held by non-native TAs. Causes for bias may include “other-ing” females and natives, TA selection procedures, and trends in evaluating TAs based on language level.

  13. Native and Non-native English Teachers' Perceptions of their Professional Identity: Convergent or Divergent?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zia Tajeddin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available There is still a preference for native speaker teachers in the language teaching profession, which is supposed to influence the self-perceptions of native and nonnative teachers. However, the status of English as a globalized language is changing the legitimacy of native/nonnative teacher dichotomy. This study sought to investigate native and nonnative English-speaking teachers’ perceptions about native and nonnative teachers’ status and the advantages and disadvantages of being a native or nonnative teacher. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire and a semi-structured interview. A total of 200 native and nonnative teachers of English from the UK and the US, i.e. the inner circle, and Turkey and Iran, the expanding circle, participated in this study. A significant majority of nonnative teachers believed that native speaker teachers have better speaking proficiency, better pronunciation, and greater self-confidence. The findings also showed nonnative teachers’ lack of self-confidence and awareness of their role and status compared with native-speaker teachers, which could be the result of existing inequities between native and nonnative English-speaking teachers in ELT. The findings also revealed that native teachers disagreed more strongly with the concept of native teachers’ superiority over nonnative teachers. Native teachers argued that nonnative teachers have a good understanding of teaching methodology whereas native teachers are more competent in correct language. It can be concluded that teacher education programs in the expanding-circle countries should include materials for teachers to raise their awareness of their own professional status and role and to remove their misconception about native speaker fallacy.

  14. Nativization processes in L1 Esperanto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, B K

    2001-10-01

    The artificial language Esperanto is spoken not only as a second language, by its proponents, but also as a native language by children of some of those proponents. The present study is a preliminary description of some characteristics of the Native Esperanto (NE) of eight speakers, ranging in age from six to fourteen years. As such, it is the first of its kind--previous works on NE are either theoretical treatises or individual case studies. We find, at least for the eight subjects studied, both bilingualism and nativization effects, differentiating native from non-native Esperanto speech. Among these effects are loss or modification of the accusative case, phonological reduction, attrition of the tense/aspect system, and pronominal cliticization. The theoretical ramifications are discussed, particularly with regard to universals of language acquisition and the effects of expressive requirements of language.

  15. The new digital natives cutting the chord

    CERN Document Server

    Dingli, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    The first generation of Digital Natives (DNs) is now growing up.  However, these digital natives were rather late starters since; their exposure to computers started when they could master the mouse and the penetration of computers in educational institutions was still very low. Today, a new breed of digital natives is emerging.  This new breed includes those individuals who are being introduced from their first instances to the world of wireless devices. One year olds manage to master the intuitive touch interfaces of their tablets whilst sitting comfortably in their baby bouncers. The controller-less interfaces allow these children to interact with a machine in a way which was unconceivable below. Thus, our research investigated the paradigm shift between the different generations of digital natives. We analysed the way in which these two generations differ from each other and we explored how the world needs to change in order to harness the potential of these new digital natives.

  16. An invasive plant alters phenotypic selection on the vegetative growth of a native congener.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beans, Carolyn M; Roach, Deborah A

    2015-02-01

    The ecological consequences of plant competition have frequently been tested, but the evolutionary outcomes of these interactions have gone largely unexplored. The study of species invasions can make an important contribution to this field of research by allowing us to watch ecological and evolutionary processes unfold as a novel species is integrated into a plant community. We explored the ecological and evolutionary impact of an invasive jewelweed, Impatiens glandulifera, on a closely related native congener, I. capensis and asked: (1) Does the presence of the invasive jewelweed alter the fitness of native jewelweed populations? (2) Does the invasive jewelweed affect the vegetative growth of the native congener? and (3) Does the invasive jewelweed alter phenotypic selection on the vegetative traits of the native congener? We used a greenhouse competition experiment, an invasive species removal field experiment, and a survey of natural populations. We show that when the invasive jewelweed is present, phenotypic selection favors native jewelweed individuals investing less in rapid upward growth and more in branching and fruiting potential through the production of nodes. This research demonstrates that invasive plants have the potential to greatly alter natural selection on native competitors. Studies investigating altered selection in invaded communities can reveal the potential evolutionary impact of invasive competitors, while deepening our understanding of the more general role of competition in driving plant evolution and permitting species coexistence. © 2015 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  17. Native Generations: A campaign addressing infant mortality among American Indians and Alaska Natives in urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutman, Shira; Loughran, Julie; Tanner, Leah; Randall, Leslie L

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the development and evaluation of Native Generations, a campaign addressing high rates of infant mortality (IM) among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) in urban areas. Campaign development included reviews of literature and previous campaigns, an advisory council, and focus groups. Campaign messages are strength-based, encouraging AI/AN caregivers to utilize available Native-specific resources, including health care, support services, and programming as IM protective factors. The primary campaign material is an 11-minute video. Pilot survey data indicate the video may help increase awareness of IM and Native-specific resources, and increase connection to Native identity, culture, and community.

  18. Genotypic diversity effects on the performance of Taraxacum officinale populations increase with time and environmental favorability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily B M Drummond

    Full Text Available Within-population genetic diversity influences many ecological processes, but few studies have examined how environmental conditions may impact these short-term diversity effects. Over four growing seasons, we followed experimental populations of a clonal, ubiquitous weed, Taraxacum officinale, with different numbers of genotypes in relatively favorable fallow field and unfavorable mowed lawn environmental treatments. Population performance (measured as total leaf area, seed production or biomass clearly and consistently increased with diversity, and this effect became stronger over the course of the experiment. Diversity effects were stronger, and with different underlying mechanisms, in the fallow field versus the mowed lawn. Large genotypes dominated in the fallow field driving overyielding (via positive selection effects, whereas in the mowed lawn, where performance was limited by regular disturbance, there was evidence for complementarity among genotypes (with one compact genotype in particular performing better in mixture than monoculture. Hence, we predict stronger genotypic diversity effects in environments where intense intraspecific competition enhances genotypic differences. Our four-year field experiment plus seedling establishment trials indicate that genotypic diversity effects have far-reaching and context-dependent consequences across generations.

  19. Genotypic diversity effects on the performance of Taraxacum officinale populations increase with time and environmental favorability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Emily B M; Vellend, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Within-population genetic diversity influences many ecological processes, but few studies have examined how environmental conditions may impact these short-term diversity effects. Over four growing seasons, we followed experimental populations of a clonal, ubiquitous weed, Taraxacum officinale, with different numbers of genotypes in relatively favorable fallow field and unfavorable mowed lawn environmental treatments. Population performance (measured as total leaf area, seed production or biomass) clearly and consistently increased with diversity, and this effect became stronger over the course of the experiment. Diversity effects were stronger, and with different underlying mechanisms, in the fallow field versus the mowed lawn. Large genotypes dominated in the fallow field driving overyielding (via positive selection effects), whereas in the mowed lawn, where performance was limited by regular disturbance, there was evidence for complementarity among genotypes (with one compact genotype in particular performing better in mixture than monoculture). Hence, we predict stronger genotypic diversity effects in environments where intense intraspecific competition enhances genotypic differences. Our four-year field experiment plus seedling establishment trials indicate that genotypic diversity effects have far-reaching and context-dependent consequences across generations.

  20. When does an alien become a native species? A vulnerable native mammal recognizes and responds to its long-term alien predator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra J R Carthey

    Full Text Available The impact of alien predators on native prey populations is often attributed to prey naiveté towards a novel threat. Yet evolutionary theory predicts that alien predators cannot remain eternally novel; prey species must either become extinct or learn and adapt to the new threat. As local enemies lose their naiveté and coexistence becomes possible, an introduced species must eventually become 'native'. But when exactly does an alien become a native species? The dingo (Canis lupus dingo was introduced to Australia about 4000 years ago, yet its native status remains disputed. To determine whether a vulnerable native mammal (Perameles nasuta recognizes the close relative of the dingo, the domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris, we surveyed local residents to determine levels of bandicoot visitation to yards with and without resident dogs. Bandicoots in this area regularly emerge from bushland to forage in residential yards at night, leaving behind tell-tale deep, conical diggings in lawns and garden beds. These diggings were less likely to appear at all, and appeared less frequently and in smaller quantities in yards with dogs than in yards with either resident cats (Felis catus or no pets. Most dogs were kept indoors at night, meaning that bandicoots were not simply chased out of the yards or killed before they could leave diggings, but rather they recognized the threat posed by dogs and avoided those yards. Native Australian mammals have had thousands of years experience with wild dingoes, which are very closely related to domestic dogs. Our study suggests that these bandicoots may no longer be naïve towards dogs. We argue that the logical criterion for determining native status of a long-term alien species must be once its native enemies are no longer naïve.

  1. When does an alien become a native species? A vulnerable native mammal recognizes and responds to its long-term alien predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carthey, Alexandra J R; Banks, Peter B

    2012-01-01

    The impact of alien predators on native prey populations is often attributed to prey naiveté towards a novel threat. Yet evolutionary theory predicts that alien predators cannot remain eternally novel; prey species must either become extinct or learn and adapt to the new threat. As local enemies lose their naiveté and coexistence becomes possible, an introduced species must eventually become 'native'. But when exactly does an alien become a native species? The dingo (Canis lupus dingo) was introduced to Australia about 4000 years ago, yet its native status remains disputed. To determine whether a vulnerable native mammal (Perameles nasuta) recognizes the close relative of the dingo, the domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris), we surveyed local residents to determine levels of bandicoot visitation to yards with and without resident dogs. Bandicoots in this area regularly emerge from bushland to forage in residential yards at night, leaving behind tell-tale deep, conical diggings in lawns and garden beds. These diggings were less likely to appear at all, and appeared less frequently and in smaller quantities in yards with dogs than in yards with either resident cats (Felis catus) or no pets. Most dogs were kept indoors at night, meaning that bandicoots were not simply chased out of the yards or killed before they could leave diggings, but rather they recognized the threat posed by dogs and avoided those yards. Native Australian mammals have had thousands of years experience with wild dingoes, which are very closely related to domestic dogs. Our study suggests that these bandicoots may no longer be naïve towards dogs. We argue that the logical criterion for determining native status of a long-term alien species must be once its native enemies are no longer naïve.

  2. Estimating the single nucleotide polymorphism genotype misclassification from routine double measurements in a large epidemiologic sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heid, Iris M; Lamina, Claudia; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Fischer, Guido; Klopp, Norman; Kolz, Melanie; Grallert, Harald; Vollmert, Caren; Wagner, Stefanie; Huth, Cornelia; Müller, Julia; Müller, Martina; Hunt, Steven C; Peters, Annette; Paulweber, Bernhard; Wichmann, H-Erich; Kronenberg, Florian; Illig, Thomas

    2008-10-15

    Previously, estimation of genotype misclassification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as encountered in epidemiologic practice and involving thousands of subjects was lacking. The authors collected representative data on approximately 14,000 subjects from 8 studies and 646,558 genotypes assessed in 2005 by means of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Overall discordance among 57,805 double genotypes from routine quality control was 0.36%. Fitting different misclassification models by maximum likelihood assuming identical misclassification for all SNPs, the estimated misclassification probabilities ranged from 0.0000 to 0.0035. When applying the misclassification simulation and extrapolation (MC-SIMEX) method for the first time to genetic data to account for the misclassification in a reanalysis of adiponectin-encoding (APM1) gene SNP associations with plasma adiponectin in 1,770 subjects, the authors found no impact of this small error on association estimates but increased estimates for a more substantial error. This study is the first to provide large-scale epidemiologic data on SNP genotype misclassification. The estimated misclassification in this example was small and negligible for association estimates, which is reassuring and essential for detecting SNP associations. In situations with more substantial error, the presented approach using duplicate genotyping and the MC-SIMEX method is practical and helpful for quantifying the genotyping error and its impact.

  3. Genotypic variation in foundation species generates network structure that may drive community dynamics and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Matthew K; Keith, Arthur R; Borrett, Stuart R; Shuster, Stephen M; Whitham, Thomas G

    2016-03-01

    Although genetics in a single species is known to impact whole communities, little is known about how genetic variation influences species interaction networks in complex ecosystems. Here, we examine the interactions in a community of arthropod species on replicated genotypes (clones) of a foundation tree species, Populus angustifolia James (narrowleaf cottonwood), in a long-term, common garden experiment using a bipartite "genotype-species" network perspective. We combine this empirical work with a simulation experiment designed to further investigate how variation among individual tree genotypes can impact network structure. Three findings emerged: (1) the empirical "genotype-species network" exhibited significant network structure with modularity being greater than the highly conservative null model; (2) as would be expected given a modular network structure, the empirical network displayed significant positive arthropod co-occurrence patterns; and (3) furthermore, the simulations of "genotype-species" networks displayed variation in network structure, with modularity in particular clearly increasing, as genotypic variation increased. These results support the conclusion that genetic variation in a single species contributes to the structure of ecological interaction networks, which could influence eco-ogical dynamics (e.g., assembly and stability) and evolution in a community context.

  4. Hepatitis B virus genotypes:an overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mamun-Al Mahtab; Salimur Rahman; Mobin Khan; Fazal Karim

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major cause of mortality and morbidity globally. The quest continues to identify viral factors that inlfuence disease progression and severity as well as responses to treatment of HBV infection. Based on variations in HBV, the virus has been divided into a number of genotypes. DATA SOURCES: Review of published literature on HBV genotypes. RESULTS: HBV genotypes are likely to be important in determining the severity and progression of HBV-induced liver disease as well as responses to different anti-viral agents. CONCLUSION: Although HBV genotyping is not yet recommended for routine use in treating HBV infection, available data suggest that, as in hepatitis C virus infection, HBV genotyping is also likely to become a routine investigation for HBV treatment, perhaps in the not too distant future.

  5. Toward fully automated genotyping: Genotyping microsatellite markers by deconvolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlin, M.W.; Lancia, G.; See-Kiong, Ng [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Dense genetic linkage maps have been constructed for the human and mouse genomes, with average densities of 2.9 cM and 0.35 cM, respectively. These genetic maps are crucial for mapping both Mendelian and complex traits and are useful in clinical genetic diagnosis. Current maps are largely comprised of abundant, easily assayed, and highly polymorphic PCR-based microsatellite markers, primarily dinucleotide (CA){sub n} repeats. One key limitation of these length polymorphisms is the PCR stutter (or slippage) artifact that introduces additional stutter bands. With two (or more) closely spaced alleles, the stutter bands overlap, and it is difficult to accurately determine the correct alleles; this stutter phenomenon has all but precluded full automation, since a human must visually inspect the allele data. We describe here novel deconvolution methods for accurate genotyping that mathematically remove PCR stutter artifact from microsatellite markers. These methods overcome the manual interpretation bottleneck and thereby enable full automation of genetic map construction and use. New functionalities, including the pooling of DNAs and the pooling of markers, are described that may greatly reduce the associated experimentation requirements. 32 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Expression of Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg from genotypes A, D and F and influence of amino acid variations related or not to genotypes on HBsAg detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia M. Araujo

    Full Text Available The impact of hepatitis B virus (HBV genotypes on the sensitivity of surface antigen (HBsAg detection assays has been poorly investigated. Here, plasmids carrying consensus or variant coding sequences for HBV surface proteins from genotypes A, D and F, were constructed. HBsAg levels were evaluated in medium and extracts of transfected CHO cells by a commercial polyclonal-based assay. We show that HBsAg detection values of consensus forms from genotypes D and F were, respectively, 37% and 30% lower than those obtained by genotype A. However, the presence of two single variations, T143M in genotype A, and T125M in genotype D, produced a decrease of 44% and an increase of 34%, respectively, on HBsAg mean values in comparison with their consensus forms. In conclusion, HBsAg detection levels varied among HBV genotypes. However, unique amino acid substitutions not linked to genotypes, such as T125M and T143M described here, should have more implications in HBV immunological diagnostics than the set of variations characteristic of each HBV genotype.

  7. Expression of Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg from genotypes A, D and F and influence of amino acid variations related or not to genotypes on HBsAg detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia M. Araujo

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The impact of hepatitis B virus (HBV genotypes on the sensitivity of surface antigen (HBsAg detection assays has been poorly investigated. Here, plasmids carrying consensus or variant coding sequences for HBV surface proteins from genotypes A, D and F, were constructed. HBsAg levels were evaluated in medium and extracts of transfected CHO cells by a commercial polyclonal-based assay. We show that HBsAg detection values of consensus forms from genotypes D and F were, respectively, 37% and 30% lower than those obtained by genotype A. However, the presence of two single variations, T143M in genotype A, and T125M in genotype D, produced a decrease of 44% and an increase of 34%, respectively, on HBsAg mean values in comparison with their consensus forms. In conclusion, HBsAg detection levels varied among HBV genotypes. However, unique amino acid substitutions not linked to genotypes, such as T125M and T143M described here, should have more implications in HBV immunological diagnostics than the set of variations characteristic of each HBV genotype.

  8. Simultaneous circulation of genotypes I and III of dengue virus 3 in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo Cristina

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue is a major health problem in tropical and subtropical regions. In Colombia, dengue viruses (DENV cause about 50,000 cases annually, 10% of which involve Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever/Dengue Shock Syndrome. The picture is similar in other surrounding countries in the Americas, with recent outbreaks of severe disease, mostly associated with DENV serotype 3, strains of the Indian genotype, introduced into the Americas in 1994. Results The analysis of the 3'end (224 bp of the envelope gene from 32 DENV-3 strains recently recovered in Colombia confirms the circulation of the Indian genotype, and surprisingly the co-circulation of an Asian-Pacific genotype only recently described in the Americas. Conclusion These results have important implications for epidemiology and surveillance of DENV infection in Central and South America. Molecular surveillance of the DENV genotypes infecting humans could be a very valuable tool for controlling/mitigating the impact of the DENV infection.

  9. Native bees and plant pollination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, H.S.

    2004-01-01

    Bees are important pollinators, but evidence suggests that numbers of some species are declining. Decreases have been documented in the honey bee, Apis mellifera (which was introduced to North America), but there are no monitoring programs for the vast majority of native species, so we cannot be sure about the extent of this problem. Recent efforts to develop standardized protocols for bee sampling will help us collect the data needed to assess trends in bee populations. Unfortunately, diversity of bee life cycles and phenologies, and the large number of rare species, make it difficult to assess trends in bee faunas. Changes in bee populations can affect plant reproduction, which can influence plant population density and cover, thus potentially modifying horizontal and vertical structure of a community, microclimate near the ground, patterns of nitrogen deposition, etc. These potential effects of changes in pollination patterns have not been assessed in natural communities. Effects of management actions on bees and other pollinators should be considered in conservation planning.

  10. Identification of Mislabeled Samples and Sample Mix-ups in Genotype Data using Barcode Genotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Christian Theil; Appel, Emil Vincent Rosenbaum; Grarup, Niels

    2014-01-01

    barcode genotypes. To detect mislabeled samples we calculate the probability that the discordance between genotypes in the data and in the independent genotypes can be attributed to random (non-mislabeling) genotyping errors. To identify mix-ups we calculate the probability of identifying the set...... of identical genotypes between sample x and sample y by chance. Based on this we calculate a mix-up confidence score with penalization for introducing mismatches in the proposed new label and adjustment for independency among the genotypes. This confidence score is used to identify probable mix-ups.......Abstract—Undetected mislabeled samples may affect the results of genotype studies, particular when rare genetic variants are investigated. Mislabeled samples are often not detected during quality control and if they are detected, they are normally discarded due to a lack of a reliable method...

  11. Invaders interfere with native parasite-host interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thieltges, David W.; Reise, Karsten; Prinz, Katrin

    2009-01-01

    edulis). In laboratory mesocosm experiments, the presence of Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) and American slipper limpets (Crepidula fornicata) reduced the parasite load in mussels by 65-77% and 89% in single and mixed species treatments, respectively. Both introduced species acted as decoys...... infections have detrimental effects on the mussel hosts, the presence of the two invaders may elicit a beneficial effect on mussels. Our experiments indicate that introduced species alter native parasite-hosts systems thus extending the potential impacts of invaders beyond the usually perceived mechanisms....

  12. Reciprocal transplants demonstrate strong adaptive differentiation of the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana in its native range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agren, Jon; Schemske, Douglas W

    2012-06-01

    To quantify adaptive differentiation in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, we conducted reciprocal transplant experiments for five years between two European populations, one near the northern edge of the native range (Sweden) and one near the southern edge (Italy). We planted seeds (years 1-3) and seedlings (years 4-5), and estimated fitness as the number of fruits produced per seed or seedling planted. In eight of the 10 possible site × year comparisons, the fitness of the local population was significantly higher than that of the nonlocal population (3.1-22.2 times higher at the southern site, and 1.7-3.6 times higher at the northern site); in the remaining two comparisons no significant difference was recorded. At both sites, the local genotype had higher survival than the nonlocal genotype, and at the Italian site, the local genotype also had higher fecundity. Across years, the relative survival of the Italian genotype at the northern site decreased with decreasing winter soil temperature. The results provide evidence of strong adaptive differentiation between natural populations of A. thaliana and indicate that differences in tolerance to freezing contributed to fitness variation at the northern site. In ongoing work, we explore the functional and genetic basis of this adaptive differentiation.

  13. Confirmed field hybridization of native and introduced Phragmites australis (Poaceae) in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltonstall, Kristin; Castillo, Hilda E; Blossey, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Intraspecific hybridization between native and introduced lineages of a species can increase invasiveness and may lead to the decline of native lineages. The introduction of Eurasian Phragmites australis has caused profound changes to wetland habitats across North America, yet evidence for hybridization between native and introduced Phragmites australis in North America is lacking and has puzzled researchers for over a decade. Here we present the first confirmed field hybridization event between the two lineages. Hybrid plants were initially recognized during field surveys by their intermediate morphology and distinct herbivore community. We verified hybrid status using chloroplast DNA haplotypes and microsatellite markers. Confirmed hybrid stems were restricted to one site and displayed morphological characteristics of both native and introduced P. australis. Based on their microsatellite profiles, all samples likely represent a single clone of a first generation hybrid. Sequencing of cpDNA indicates that the maternal parent is from the introduced lineage. Identification of hybrid P. australis in the field is complex and requires multiple characters. All suspected hybrids should be verified using genetic techniques. Preventing the spread of introduced genes and genotypes through North America will require recognition and rapid management response to hybrid plants.

  14. An ancient DNA test of a founder effect in Native American ABO blood group frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, Melissa S; Bolnick, Deborah A

    2008-11-01

    Anthropologists have assumed that reduced genetic diversity in extant Native Americans is due to a founder effect that occurred during the initial peopling of the Americas. However, low diversity could also be the result of subsequent historical events, such as the population decline following European contact. In this study, we show that autosomal DNA from ancient Native American skeletal remains can be used to investigate the low level of ABO blood group diversity in the Americas. Extant Native Americans exhibit a high frequency of blood type O, which may reflect a founder effect, genetic drift associated with the historical population decline, or natural selection in response to the smallpox epidemics that occurred following European contact. To help distinguish between these possibilities, we determined the ABO genotypes of 15 precontact individuals from eastern North America. The precontact ABO frequencies were not significantly different from those observed in extant Native Americans from the same region, but they did differ significantly from the ABO frequencies in extant Siberian populations. Studies of other precontact populations are needed to better test the three hypotheses for low ABO blood group diversity in the Americas, but our findings are most consistent with the hypothesis of a founder effect during the initial settlement of this continent.

  15. Genomic evaluations with many more genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiggans George R

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic evaluations in Holstein dairy cattle have quickly become more reliable over the last two years in many countries as more animals have been genotyped for 50,000 markers. Evaluations can also include animals genotyped with more or fewer markers using new tools such as the 777,000 or 2,900 marker chips recently introduced for cattle. Gains from more markers can be predicted using simulation, whereas strategies to use fewer markers have been compared using subsets of actual genotypes. The overall cost of selection is reduced by genotyping most animals at less than the highest density and imputing their missing genotypes using haplotypes. Algorithms to combine different densities need to be efficient because numbers of genotyped animals and markers may continue to grow quickly. Methods Genotypes for 500,000 markers were simulated for the 33,414 Holsteins that had 50,000 marker genotypes in the North American database. Another 86,465 non-genotyped ancestors were included in the pedigree file, and linkage disequilibrium was generated directly in the base population. Mixed density datasets were created by keeping 50,000 (every tenth of the markers for most animals. Missing genotypes were imputed using a combination of population haplotyping and pedigree haplotyping. Reliabilities of genomic evaluations using linear and nonlinear methods were compared. Results Differing marker sets for a large population were combined with just a few hours of computation. About 95% of paternal alleles were determined correctly, and > 95% of missing genotypes were called correctly. Reliability of breeding values was already high (84.4% with 50,000 simulated markers. The gain in reliability from increasing the number of markers to 500,000 was only 1.6%, but more than half of that gain resulted from genotyping just 1,406 young bulls at higher density. Linear genomic evaluations had reliabilities 1.5% lower than the nonlinear evaluations with 50

  16. Projecting invasion risk of non-native watersnakes (Nerodia fasciata and Nerodia sipedon) in the western United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jonathan P; Todd, Brian D

    2014-01-01

    Species distribution models (SDMs) are increasingly used to project the potential distribution of introduced species outside their native range. Such studies rarely explicitly evaluate potential conflicts with native species should the range of introduced species expand. Two snake species native to eastern North America, Nerodia fasciata and Nerodia sipedon, have been introduced to California where they represent a new stressor to declining native amphibians, fish, and reptiles. To project the potential distributions of these non-native watersnakes in western North America, we built ensemble SDMs using MaxEnt, Boosted Regression Trees, and Random Forests and habitat and climatic variables. We then compared the overlap between the projected distribution of invasive watersnakes and the distributions of imperiled native amphibians, fish, and reptiles that can serve as prey or competitors for the invaders, to estimate the risk to native species posed by non-native watersnakes. Large areas of western North America were projected to be climatically suitable for both species of Nerodia according to our ensemble SDMs, including much of central California. The potential distributions of both N. fasciata and N. sipedon overlap extensively with the federally threatened Giant Gartersnake, Thamnophis gigas, which inhabits a similar ecological niche. N. fasciata also poses risk to the federally threatened California Tiger Salamander, Ambystoma californiense, whereas N. sipedon poses risk to some amphibians of conservation concern, including the Foothill Yellow-legged Frog, Rana boylii. We conclude that non-native watersnakes in California can likely inhabit ranges of several native species of conservation concern that are expected to suffer as prey or competing species for these invaders. Action should be taken now to eradicate or control these invasions before detrimental impacts on native species are widespread. Our methods can be applied broadly to quantify the risk posed by

  17. Projecting invasion risk of non-native watersnakes (Nerodia fasciata and Nerodia sipedon in the western United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan P Rose

    Full Text Available Species distribution models (SDMs are increasingly used to project the potential distribution of introduced species outside their native range. Such studies rarely explicitly evaluate potential conflicts with native species should the range of introduced species expand. Two snake species native to eastern North America, Nerodia fasciata and Nerodia sipedon, have been introduced to California where they represent a new stressor to declining native amphibians, fish, and reptiles. To project the potential distributions of these non-native watersnakes in western North America, we built ensemble SDMs using MaxEnt, Boosted Regression Trees, and Random Forests and habitat and climatic variables. We then compared the overlap between the projected distribution of invasive watersnakes and the distributions of imperiled native amphibians, fish, and reptiles that can serve as prey or competitors for the invaders, to estimate the risk to native species posed by non-native watersnakes. Large areas of western North America were projected to be climatically suitable for both species of Nerodia according to our ensemble SDMs, including much of central California. The potential distributions of both N. fasciata and N. sipedon overlap extensively with the federally threatened Giant Gartersnake, Thamnophis gigas, which inhabits a similar ecological niche. N. fasciata also poses risk to the federally threatened California Tiger Salamander, Ambystoma californiense, whereas N. sipedon poses risk to some amphibians of conservation concern, including the Foothill Yellow-legged Frog, Rana boylii. We conclude that non-native watersnakes in California can likely inhabit ranges of several native species of conservation concern that are expected to suffer as prey or competing species for these invaders. Action should be taken now to eradicate or control these invasions before detrimental impacts on native species are widespread. Our methods can be applied broadly to quantify

  18. Context matters — the complex interplay between resistome genotypes and resistance phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantas, Gautam; Sommer, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Application of metagenomic functional selections to study antibiotic resistance genes is revealing a highly diverse and complex network of genetic exchange between bacterial pathogens and environmental reservoirs, which likely contributes significantly to increasing resistance levels in pathogens....... In some cases, clinically relevant resistance genes have been acquired from organisms where their native function is not antibiotic resistance, and which may not even confer a resistance phenotype in their native context. In this review, we attempt to distinguish the resistance phenotype from...... the resistome genotype, and we highlight examples of genes and their hosts where this distinction becomes important in order to understand the relevance of environmental niches that contribute most to clinical problems associated with antibiotic resistance....

  19. Assessment of the association between GSTM1 null genotype and risk of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ran; Liu, Bin; Dong, Qi

    2013-06-01

    Many studies have investigated the association between Glutathione S-Transferase M1 (GSTM1) null genotype and risk of diabetes mellitus, but the impact of GSTM1 null genotype on diabetes mellitus is unclear owing to the obvious inconsistence among those studies. This study aimed to quantify the strength of association between GSTM1 null genotype and risk of diabetes mellitus. We searched the PubMed, Embase and Wangfang databases for studies relating the association between GSTM1 null genotype and risk of diabetes mellitus. We estimated summary odds ratio (OR) with their 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) to assess the association. Subgroup analyses were performed by type of diabetes and ethnicity. 10 case-control studies with 7, 054 subjects were included into this meta-analysis. Meta-analysis of total 10 studies showed GSTM1 null genotype was associated increased risk of diabetes mellitus (OR = 1.59, 95 % CI 1.14-2.22, P = 0.007). Subgroup analyses by type of diabetes mellitus suggested GSTM1 null genotype was associated increased risk of type 2 diabetes (OR = 1.90, 95 % CI 1.37-2.64, P null genotype and increased risk of type 2 diabetes. The cumulative meta-analyses showed a trend of obvious association between GSTM1 null genotype and risk of type 2 diabetes as information accumulated. No evidence of publication bias was observed. Thus, evidence from current meta-analysis suggests an association between GSTM1 null genotype and risk of type 2 diabetes.

  20. Diet of the American mink Mustela vison and its potential impact on the native fauna of Navarino Island, Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve, Chile Dieta del visón norteamericano Mustela vison y su impacto potencial sobre la fauna nativa de Isla Navarino, Reserva de Biosfera Cabo de Hornos, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELKE SCHÜTTLER

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Invasive exotic species of mammalian predators represent a major cause of vertebrate animal extinctions on islands, particularly those that lack native mammalian carnivores. In 2001, the American mink (Mustela vison was recorded for the first time on Navarino Island, in the Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve (55° S in Chile, representing the southernmost population of mink worldwide. In order to assess its potential impact on native fauna, we studied its diet on Navarino Island, as part of an integrative management program on invasive species. Over a three-year period (2005-2007 we collected 512 scats in semi-aquatic habitats: marine coasts, riparian and lake shores. Overall, the main prey was mammals (37 % biomass, and birds (36 %, followed by fish (24 %. Over the spring and summer, mink consumed significantly more birds, whereas mammals constituted the main prey over the autumn and winter when migratory birds had left the area. Among birds, the mink preyed mainly on adult Passeriformes, followed by Anseriformes and Pelecaniformes, caught as chicks. Among mammals, the exotic muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus was the most important prey, and together with the native rodent Abrothrix xanthorhinus it accounted for 78 % of the biomass intake. For an integrated management of invasive exotic mammal species on Navarino Island and in the Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve it is important to further research interactions established here among the various introduced mammals, and to initiate immediate control of the mink population in its initial stage of invasion.Las especies exóticas de mamíferos carnívoros invasores constituyen una de las principales causas de extinciones de vertebrados en islas, particularmente en aquellas que carecen de predadores mamíferos nativos. En 2001, el visón norteamericano (Mustela vison fue registrado por primera vez en Isla Navarino en la Reserva de Biosfera Cabo de Hornos (55° S en Chile, representando la población de visones m

  1. Population Structure, Diversity and Reproductive Mode of the Grape Phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae) across Its Native Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, M. Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Grape Phylloxera, Daktulosphaira vitifoliae, is a gall-forming insect that feeds on the leaves and roots of many Vitis species. The roots of the cultivated V. vinifera cultivars and hybrids are highly susceptible to grape phylloxera feeding damage. The native range of this insect covers most of North America, and it is particularly abundant in the eastern and central United States. Phylloxera was introduced from North America to almost all grape-growing regions across five of the temperate zone continents. It devastated vineyards in each of these regions causing large-scale disruptions to grape growers, wine makers and national economies. In order to understand the population diversity of grape phylloxera in its native range, more than 500 samples from 19 States and 34 samples from the introduced range (northern California, Europe and South America) were genotyped with 32 simple sequence repeat markers. STRUCTURE, a model based clustering method identified five populations within these samples. The five populations were confirmed by a neighbor-joining tree and principal coordinate analysis (PCoA). These populations were distinguished by their Vitis species hosts and their geographic locations. Samples collected from California, Europe and South America traced back to phylloxera sampled in the northeastern United States on V. riparia, with some influence from phylloxera collected along the Atlantic Coast and Central Plains on V. vulpina. Reproductive statistics conclusively confirmed that sexual reproduction is common in the native range and is combined with cyclical parthenogenesis. Native grape phylloxera populations were identified to be under Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The identification of admixed samples between many of these populations indicates that shared environments facilitate sexual reproduction between different host associated populations to create new genotypes of phylloxera. This study also found that assortative mating might occur across the

  2. Fluency in native and nonnative English speech

    CERN Document Server

    Götz, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    This book takes a new and holistic approach to fluency in English speech and differentiates between productive, perceptive, and nonverbal fluency. The in-depth corpus-based description of productive fluency points out major differences of how fluency is established in native and nonnative speech. It also reveals areas in which even highly advanced learners of English still deviate strongly from the native target norm and in which they have already approximated to it. Based on these findings, selected learners are subjected to native speakers' ratings of seven perceptive fluency variables in or

  3. Asian genotypes of dengue virus 4 in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, A C O; Sardi, S I; Paula, F L; Peixoto, I B; Brandão, C J; Fernandez, F M C; Campos, G S

    2015-10-01

    Dengue virus, commonly transmitted by mosquitoes, causes a human disease of significant social impact and presents a serious public health problem in Brazil. This report describes the unusual emergence of DENV-4 in northern Brazil after a nearly 30-year-long absence. DENV-4 genotype I is of Asian origin and was identified in the serum of patients receiving treatment at a hospital serving the Salvador area (Brazilian state of Bahia). The identification of dengue virus serotypes through molecular and phylogenetic analysis is essential for predicting disease severity or fatal illness, principally in endemic countries such as Brazil.

  4. Elucidating Native and Non-Native Plant-Fog Interactions Across Microclimatic Zones in San Cristobal Island, Galapagos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, S.; Riveros-Iregui, D. A.; Hu, J.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in land use, such as the clear cutting of forests and the abandonment of land once used for agriculture, pose an incredible threat to the fragile ecosystems in the tropics. One such consequence of land use change in the tropics is the propagation of invasive plant species. The Galapagos Islands, an ecosystem subject to significant anthropogenic pressure by both increasing tourism and a growing native population, are especially threatened by invasive plant species. More than 800 plant species have been introduced in Galapagos, comprising over 60% of the total flora. San Cristobal Island in particular has been impacted by the introduction of non-native species; the combined pressures of invasive species and land use change have fundamentally altered 70% of the landscape of the island. We performed stable isotope analysis of fog water, surface water and plant xylem water to examine water use by both native and invasive plant species across different microclimatic zones. We conducted these measurements starting at the end of the rainy season and through the middle of the dry season. Our results represent an initial effort to characterize the effects of a changing vegetative cover on the water cycling of tropical islands and provide insight into the interactions between plants, surface water and groundwater at various spatial and temporal scales.

  5. An introduced and a native vertebrate hybridize to form a genetic bridge to a second native species

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, D.B.; Parchman, T.L.; Bower, M.R.; Hubert, W.A.; Rahel, F.J.

    2008-01-01

    The genetic impacts of hybridization between native and introduced species are of considerable conservation concern, while the possibility of reticulate evolution affects our basic understanding of how species arise and shapes how we use genetic data to understand evolutionary diversification. By using mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (ND2) sequences and 467 amplified fragment-length polymorphism nuclear DNA markers, we show that the introduced white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) has hybridized with two species native to the Colorado River Basin - the flannelmouth sucker (Catostomus latipinnis) and the bluehead sucker (Catostomus discobolus). Hybrids between the flannelmouth sucker and white sucker have facilitated introgression between the two native species, previously isolated by reproductive barriers, such that individuals exist with contributions from all three genomes. Most hybrids had the mitochondrial haplotype of the introduced white sucker, emphasizing its pivotal role in this three-way hybridization. Our findings highlight how introduced species can threaten the genetic integrity of not only one species but also multiple previously reproductively isolated species. Furthermore, this complex three-way reticulate (as opposed to strictly bifurcating) evolution suggests that seeking examples in other vertebrate systems might be productive. Although the present study involved an introduced species, similar patterns of hybridization could result from natural processes, including stream capture or geological formations (e.g., the Bering land bridge). ?? 2008 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  6. Flavonoid profile of green asparagus genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Alventosa, J M; Jaramillo, S; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, G; Cermeño, P; Espejo, J A; Jiménez-Araujo, A; Guillén-Bejarano, R; Fernández-Bolaños, J; Rodríguez-Arcos, R

    2008-08-27

    The determination of flavonoid profiles from different genotypes of triguero asparagus and their comparison to those from green asparagus commercial hybrids was the main goal of this study. The samples consisted of 32 commercial hybrids and 65 genotypes from the Huetor-Tajar population variety (triguero). The analysis of individual flavonoids by HPLC-DAD-MS has allowed the determination of eight naturally occurring flavonol derivatives in several genotypes of triguero asparagus. Those compounds included mono-, di-, and triglycosides of three flavonols, that is, quercetin, isorhamnetin, and kaempferol. The detailed analysis of the flavonoid profiles revealed significant differences among the distinct genotypes. These have been classified in three distinct groups as the result of a k-means clustering analysis, two of them containing both commercial hybrids and triguero asparagus and another cluster constituted by 21 genotypes of triguero asparagus, which contain several key flavonol derivatives able to differentiate them. Hence, the triglycosides tentatively identified as quercetin-3-rhamnosyl-rutinoside, isorhamnetin-3-rhamnosyl-rutinoside, and isorhamnetin-3-O-glucoside have been detected only in the genotypes grouped in the above-mentioned cluster. On the other hand, the compound tentatively identified as isorhamnetin-3-glucosyl-rutinoside was present in most genotypes of triguero asparagus, whereas it has not been detected in any of the commercial hybrids.

  7. HPV Genotyping 9G Membrane Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danishmalik Rafiq Sayyed

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The results of the genital human papillomavirus (HPV detection in 439 cervical samples by cervical cytology were compared with sequencing analysis and a newly developed HPV genotyping 9G membrane test. The excellent sensitivity and specificity of the HPV genotyping 9G membrane test was assured by a signal to noise ratio of more than 300 and a target hybridization to non-target hybridization ratio of 300 ~ 400 at 25 °C. The final results can be obtained in 29 min by simple loading of the hybridization and washing solutions and scanning the membranes without any drying steps or special handling. The 100% identical results of the HPV genotyping 9G membrane test with sequencing results in 439 clinical samples demonstrate significant clinical application for this test. HPV genotyping 9G membrane tests can identify and discriminate five HR-HPV genotypes which are prevalent in almost 87% of cervical cancer cases. Its simple handling makes the HPV genotyping 9G membrane test a very convenient platform for accurate HPV genotyping.

  8. Host preference, population growth and injuries assessment of Polyphagotarsonemus latus (banks) (ACARI: Tarsonemidae) on Capsicum annuum L. Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breda, M O; de Oliveira, J V; Esteves Filho, A B; Barbosa, D R S; de Santana, M F

    2016-10-01

    Despite the continued efforts on the search for different genotypes, Capsicum annuum (L.) is quite susceptible to attack by pest arthropods, especially the broad mite Polyphagotarsonemus latus Banks. Thus, the host preference, population growth and the injuries assessment of P. latus was studied on six C. annuum genotypes used in Brazil (Atlantis, California Wonder, Impact, Palloma, Rubia and Tendence). Host preference was accessed in choice tests, pairing the several genotypes, and the population growth was observed through non-choice tests in laboratory. The injuries assessments were evaluated in the greenhouse, comparing the injury level among the six genotypes. The results indicate that California Wonder and Palloma genotypes were more preferred by P. latus, and Impact and Tendence were less preferred. P. latus presented positive population growth rates (ri) on all the genotypes, however, Palloma and California Wonder showed the highest values of population growth rate (ri = 0.344 and ri = 0.340, respectively), while Impact had the lowest value (ri = 0.281). All the evaluated C. annuum genotypes showed low tolerance to P. latus and exhibited several injuries, but there was no statistical difference between them. California Wonder had the highest average number of mites/leaf (57.15), while Impact and Tendence obtained the lowest values (36.67 and 35.12, respectively) at the end of the evaluation period. The total average of injuries notes at the end of the bioassay did not differ between the genotypes. The number of mites/leaf was growing for the injury scale to the note 3.0, but when the injury scale approached the note 4.0, there was observed a decrease in the number of mites/leaf for all the genotypes.

  9. HCV genotype-specific correlation with serum markers: Higher predictability for genotype 4a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asad Sultan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several factors have been proposed to assess the clinical outcome of HCV infection. The correlation of HCV genotypes to possible serum markers in clinical prediction is still controversial. The main objective of this study was to determine the existence of any correlation between HCV genotypes to viral load and different clinical serum markers. Methods We performed a prospective cross-sectional and observational study. About 3160 serum HCV RNA positive patients were chosen from 4020 randomly selected anti-HCV positive patients. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS 16 software package. ROC (receiver operating characteristics curves were used to compare diagnostic values of serum markers to predict genotypes. Results The most prevalent genotype was 3a (73.9% followed by 1a (10.7%, 4a (6.4% and 3b (6.1% in Pakistani population. No correlation was found between viral load and serum markers for genotype 3a in a large no. of sample (n = 2336. While significant correlation was observed between viral load and AST in genotype 3b, ALP with viral load and ALT for genotype 1a. Patients with genotype 4a showed a significant inverse correlation with viral load and Hb level and AST with ALP. For genotype 4a, AUC (area under the curve of ALT, ALP, AST, bilirubin, Hb level and viral load was 0.790, 0.763, 0.454, 0.664, 0.458 and 0.872 respectively. Conclusions In conclusion, there was a significant variable response of HCV genotypes with serum markers. Severity of disease is independent of serum marker level in genotype 3a, while the liver damage in genotype 4a may associate with viral cytopathic effect as well as the immune-mediated process. An index using six serum markers may correctly predict genotype 4a in patients with ≥75% accuracy.

  10. Nonverbal Communications in Native North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Allan Ross

    1975-01-01

    This article describes several types of native American nonspeech communications systems, including the Plains sign language, distance signaling of various kinds, picture writing and whistle speech. See FL 508 188 for availability. (CLK)

  11. Native Freshwater Fish and Mussel Species Richness

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These data represent predicted current distributions of all native freshwater fish and freshwater mussels in the Middle-Atlantic region. The data are available for...

  12. Management Recommendations: Native Adaptive Management Program (NPAM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Management recommendations are a product of the decision support tool for the Native Adaptive Management Program (NPAM). The provides tall and mixed grass management...

  13. Advancing Efforts to Energize Native Alaska (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-04-01

    This brochure describes key programs and initiatives of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs to advance energy efficiency, renewable energy, and energy infrastructure projects in Alaska Native villages.

  14. 75 FR 8105 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... Native Claims Settlement Act will be issued to NANA Regional Corporation, Inc., Successor in Interest to... these lands will also be conveyed to NANA Regional Corporation, Inc. when the surface estate is...

  15. Nonverbal Communications in Native North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Allan Ross

    1975-01-01

    This article describes several types of native American nonspeech communications systems, including the Plains sign language, distance signaling of various kinds, picture writing and whistle speech. See FL 508 188 for availability. (CLK)

  16. Decision Policy: Native Prairie Adaptive Management (NPAM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A decision support for the Native Adaptive Management Program (NPAM). The documents provide tall and mixed grass decision policies in relation to the management...

  17. Epistemologies in the Text of Children's Books: Native- and non-Native-authored books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Morteza; Bang, Megan; Medin, Douglas; Marin, Ananda; Leddon, Erin; Waxman, Sandra

    2013-09-01

    An examination of artifacts provides insights into the goals, practices, and orientations of the persons and cultures who created them. Here, we analyze storybook texts, artifacts that are a part of many children's lives. We examine the stories in books targeted for 4-8-year-old children, contrasting the texts generated by Native American authors versus popular non-Native authors. We focus specifically on the implicit and explicit 'epistemological orientations' associated with relations between human beings and the rest of nature. Native authors were significantly more likely than non-Native authors to describe humans and the rest of nature as psychologically close and embedded in relationships. This pattern converges well with evidence from a behavioral task in which we probed Native (from urban inter-tribal and rural communities) and non-Native children's and adults' attention to ecological relations. We discuss the implications of these differences for environmental cognition and science learning.

  18. Intraguild predation and native lady beetle decline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary M Gardiner

    Full Text Available Coccinellid communities across North America have experienced significant changes in recent decades, with declines in several native species reported. One potential mechanism for these declines is interference competition via intraguild predation; specifically, increased predation of native coccinellid eggs and larvae following the introduction of exotic coccinellids. Our previous studies have shown that agricultural fields in Michigan support a higher diversity and abundance of exotic coccinellids than similar fields in Iowa, and that the landscape surrounding agricultural fields across the north central U.S. influences the abundance and activity of coccinellid species. The goal of this study was to quantify the amount of egg predation experienced by a native coccinellid within Michigan and Iowa soybean fields and explore the influence of local and large-scale landscape structure. Using the native lady beetle Coleomegilla maculata as a model, we found that sentinel egg masses were subject to intense predation within both Michigan and Iowa soybean fields, with 60.7% of egg masses attacked and 43.0% of available eggs consumed within 48 h. In Michigan, the exotic coccinellids Coccinella septempunctata and Harmonia axyridis were the most abundant predators found in soybean fields whereas in Iowa, native species including C. maculata, Hippodamia parenthesis and the soft-winged flower beetle Collops nigriceps dominated the predator community. Predator abundance was greater in soybean fields within diverse landscapes, yet variation in predator numbers did not influence the intensity of egg predation observed. In contrast, the strongest predictor of native coccinellid egg predation was the composition of edge habitats bordering specific fields. Field sites surrounded by semi-natural habitats including forests, restored prairies, old fields, and pasturelands experienced greater egg predation than fields surrounded by other croplands. This study shows

  19. Multiple conformations of proteins in native state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Examples of protein sequences that can adopt multiple native states are recently accumulated. Characterization of the protein multiple conformations will have important implications for our understanding of the relationship between structure and function, and their folding kinetics. In present review, the experimental evidence for the existence of multiple conformations in the native state of proteins, the molecular basis and the biological significance of multiple conformations of proteins are focused.

  20. Should Australia Export its Native Birds?

    OpenAIRE

    Kingwell, Ross S.

    1994-01-01

    Commercial export from Australia of native birds, wild or captive bred, is prohibited. This paper firstly describes the current legislation and regulations that restrict the export of native birds and discusses why governments have adopted such a regulatory approach to bird species preservation. Secondly, the paper reviews the debate concerning the export ban, pointing out strengths and weaknesses in arguments and indicating the important role of CITES. Lastly, the paper outlines a new case f...