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Sample records for genotype dependent expressed

  1. Genotype-dependent Burst of Transposable Element Expression in Crowns of Hexaploid Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. during Cold Acclimation

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    Debbie Laudencia-Chingcuanco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The expression of 1,613 transposable elements (TEs represented in the Affymetrix Wheat Genome Chip was examined during cold treatment in crowns of four hexaploid wheat genotypes that vary in tolerance to cold and in flowering time. The TE expression profiles showed a constant level of expression throughout the experiment in three of the genotypes. In winter Norstar, the most cold-hardy of the four genotypes, a subset of the TEs showed a burst of expression after vernalization saturation was achieved. About 47% of the TEs were expressed, and both Class I (retrotransposons and Class II (DNA transposons types were well represented. Gypsy and Copia were the most represented among the retrotransposons while CACTA and Mariner were the most represented DNA transposons. The data suggests that the Vrn-A1 region plays a role in the stage-specific induction of TE expression in this genotype.

  2. Tissue distribution, gender- and genotype-dependent expression of autophagy-related genes in avian species.

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    Alissa Piekarski

    Full Text Available As a result of the genetic selection of broiler (meat-type breeders chickens for enhanced growth rate and lower feed conversion ratio, it has become necessary to restrict feed intake. When broilers are fed ad libitum, they would become obese and suffer from several health-related problems. A vital adaptation to starvation is autophagy, a self-eating mechanism for recycling cellular constituents. The autophagy pathway has witnessed dramatic growth in the last few years and extensively studied in yeast and mammals however, there is a paucity of information in avian (non-mammalian species. Here we characterized several genes involved in autophagosome initiation and elongation in Red Jungle fowl (Gallus gallus and Japanese quail (coturnix coturnix Japonica. Both complexes are ubiquitously expressed in chicken and quail tissues (liver, leg and breast muscle, brain, gizzard, intestine, heart, lung, kidney, adipose tissue, ovary and testis. Alignment analysis showed high similarity (50.7 to 91.5% between chicken autophagy-related genes and their mammalian orthologs. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the evolutionary relationship between autophagy genes is consistent with the consensus view of vertebrate evolution. Interestingly, the expression of autophagy-related genes is tissue- and gender-dependent. Furthermore, using two experimental male quail lines divergently selected over 40 generations for low (resistant, R or high (sensitive, S stress response, we found that the expression of most studied genes are higher in R compared to S line. Together our results indicate that the autophagy pathway is a key molecular signature exhibited gender specific differences and likely plays an important role in response to stress in avian species.

  3. Unequal and genotype-dependent expression of mitochondrial genes in larvae of the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

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    Curole, Jason P; Meyer, Eli; Manahan, Donal T; Hedgecock, Dennis

    2010-04-01

    Mitochondria are essential for regulation of energy metabolism, but little is known about patterns of mitochondrial genome expression in invertebrates. To explore the association of mitochondrial expression with differential growth of Crassostrea gigas, the Pacific oyster, we crossed two inbred lines to produce inbred and hybrid larvae, which grew at different rates under the same environmental conditions. Using high-throughput cloning and sequencing methods, we identified 1.1 million expressed sequence tags from the mitochondrial genome, 96.7% of which were perfect matches to genes targeted by the method. Expression varied significantly among genes, ranging over nearly four orders of magnitude, from mt:lRNA, which constituted 21% of all transcripts, to mt:CoII, which constituted less than 0.02% of all transcripts. Variable expression of genes coding for subunits of macromolecular complexes (e.g., mt:CoI and mt:CoII) implies that stoichiometry in these complexes must be regulated post-transcriptionally. Surprisingly, the mitochondrial transcriptome contained non-coding transcripts, which may play a role in the regulation of mitochondrial function. Finally, mitochondrial expression depended strongly on maternal factors and nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions, which may explain previously observed growth differences between reciprocal hybrids. Differences in mitochondrial gene expression could provide a biochemical index for the metabolic basis of genetically determined differences in larval growth.

  4. Genotypic to expression profiling of bovine calcium channel, voltage-dependent, alpha-2/delta subunit 1 gene, and their association with bovine mastitis among Frieswal (HFX Sahiwal) crossbred cattle of Indian origin.

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    Deb, Rajib; Singh, Umesh; Kumar, Sushil; Kumar, Arun; Singh, Rani; Sengar, Gyanendra; Mann, Sandeep; Sharma, Arjava

    2014-04-01

    Calcium channel, voltage-dependent, alpha-2/delta subunit 1 (CACNA2D1) gene is considered to be an important noncytokine candidate gene influencing mastitis. Scanty of reports are available until today regarding the role play of CACNA2D1 gene on the susceptibility of bovine mastitis. We interrogated the CACNA2D1 G519663A [A>G] SNP by PCR-RFLP among two hundreds Frieswal (HF X Sahiwal) crossbred cattle of Indian origin. Genotypic frequency of AA (51.5, n=101) was comparatively higher than AG (35, n=70) and GG (14.5, n=29). Association of Somatic cell score (SCS) with genotypes revealed that, GG genotypes showing lesser count (less susceptible to mastitis) compare to AA and AG. Relative expression of CACNA2D1 transcript (in milk samples) was significantly higher among GG than AG and AA. Further we have also isolated blood sample from the all groups and PBMCs were cultured from each blood sample as per the standard protocol. They were treated with Calcium channel blocker and the expression level of the CACNA2D1 gene was evaluated by Real Time PCR. Results show that expression level decline in each genotypic group after treatment and expression level of GG are again significantly higher than AA and AG. Thus, it may be concluded that GG genotypic animals are favorable for selecting disease resistant breeds.

  5. Association between low-activity serotonin transporter genotype and heroin dependence: behavioral and personality correlates.

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    Gerra, G; Garofano, L; Santoro, G; Bosari, S; Pellegrini, C; Zaimovic, A; Moi, G; Bussandri, M; Moi, A; Brambilla, F; Donnini, C

    2004-04-01

    In previous studies, serotonin (5-HT) system disturbance was found involved in a variety of behavioral disorders, psychopathologies, and substance use disorders. A functional polymorphism in the promoter region of the human serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) was recently identified and the presence of the short (S) allele found to be associated with a lower level of expression of the gene, lower levels of 5-HT uptake, type 2 alcoholism, violence and suicidal behavior. In the present study, 101 heroin addicts (males, West European, Caucasians) and 101 healthy control subjects matched for race and gender, with no history of substance use disorder, have been genotyped. Aggressiveness levels were measured in both heroin addicts and controls utilizing Buss-Durkee-Hostility-Inventory (BDHI). Data about suicide attempt and violent criminal behavior in subject history have been collected. The short-short (SS) genotype frequency was significantly higher among heroin dependent individuals compared with control subjects (P = 0.025). The odds ratio for the SS genotype versus the long-long (LL) genotype frequency was 0.69, 95% Cl (0.49-0.97), when heroin addicts were compared with healthy controls. The SS genotype frequency was significantly higher among violent heroin dependent individuals compared with addicted individuals without aggressive behavior (P = 0.02). BDHI mean total scores and suspiciousness and negativism subscales scores were significantly higher in SS individuals, in comparison with LL subjects, among heroin addicts. No association was found between SS genotype and suicide history. Our data suggest that a decreased expression of the gene encoding the 5-HTT transporter, due to "S" promoter polymorphism, may be associated with an increased risk for substance use disorders, particularly in the subjects with more consistent aggressiveness and impulsiveness.

  6. The Association of Il28b Genotype with the Histological Features of Chronic Hepatitis C Is HCV Genotype Dependent

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    Roberta D'Ambrosio

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The interleukin 28B (IL28B rs12979860 polymorphism is associated with treatment outcome in hepatitis C virus (HCV genotype 1 and 4 patients. Its association with the histological features of chronic hepatitis C and disease severity needs further clarifications. To assess the correlation between IL28B genotype, HCV genotype and liver biopsy findings in untreated patients. Materials and Methods: Pre-treatment liver biopsies from 335 HCV Caucasian patients (59% males, age 50 years enrolled in the MIST study were staged for fibrosis and inflammation according to the METAVIR and the Ishak scoring systems; steatosis was dichotomized as <5% or ≥5%. IL28B was typed by Taqman Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP genotyping assay. HCV genotype was 1 in 151 (45%, 2 in 99 (30%, 3 in 50 (15% and 4 in 35 (10% patients. IL28B genotype was CC in 117 (34%, CT in 166 (49% and TT in 52 (15%. At univariate analysis, the IL28B CC genotype was associated with severe portal inflammation in HCV-1 patients (CC vs. CT/TT: 86% vs. 63%, p = 0.005, severe lobular inflammation in HCV-2 patients (CC vs. CT/TT: 44% vs. 23%, p = 0.03, and less fatty infiltration in HCV-1 patients (CC vs. CT/TT: 72% vs. 51%, p = 0.02. Despite the lack of any association between IL28B and fibrosis stage, in HCV-3 patients IL28B CC correlated with METAVIR F3-F4 (CC vs. CT/TT: 74% vs. 26%, p = 0.05. At multivariate analysis, the genotype CC remained associated with severe portal inflammation in HCV-1, only (Odds Ratio (OR: 95% Confidence Interval (CI: 3.24 (1.23–8.51. IL28B genotype is associated with the histological features of chronic hepatitis C in a HCV genotype dependent manner, with CC genotype being independently associated with severe portal inflammation.

  7. Coexistence of genotypic and temperature-dependent sex determination in pejerrey Odontesthes bonariensis.

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    Yoji Yamamoto

    Full Text Available In this study, we examined whether a homolog of the master sex-determining gene amhy of Odontesthes hatcheri is present and plays any role in testis determination of pejerrey O. bonariensis, a species otherwise known for its strong temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD. Screening of wild and laboratory-reared pejerrey for amhy revealed a high, although not complete linkage with phenotypic sex. The sex ratio in an amhy+/-/amhy-/- full sibling progeny reared during the thermolabile period of sex determination at an intermediate temperature of 25°C was 68.7% male:31.3% female; all amhy+/- fish developed as males whereas about 2/3 and 1/3 of the amhy-/- were female and male, respectively. Expression analyses revealed that amhy transcription began during embryo stage and decreased by the end of sex determination period. The autosomal amha was present in all individuals regardless of amhy genotype; its expression increased significantly from the end of the same period in the gonads of all amhy+/- but only in part of the amhy-/- animals. After histological gonadal differentiation, all gonads of amhy-/- animals with amha ISH signals were testes and those without it were ovaries. These results suggest that amhy is important for testicular differentiation in pejerrey, at least at intermediate temperatures. Thus, we hypothesize that amhy+/- animals differentiate as males by expression of either amhy alone or amhy and amha together whereas the amhy-/- probably rely solely on amha expression. These findings represent the first clear genomic evidence that genotypic and environmental sex determinants can coexist in species with marked TSD such as the pejerrey. The finding of amhy will make possible to monitor wild pejerrey populations for mismatches between genotypic and phenotypic sex and may prove instrumental for field studies addressing the effects of endocrine disruptors or abnormal temperatures on reproduction and the ecological relevance of TSD

  8. Differential expression of jasmonate biosynthesis genes in cacao genotypes contrasting for resistance against Moniliophthora perniciosa.

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    Litholdo, Celso G; Leal, Gildemberg A; Albuquerque, Paulo S B; Figueira, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    The resistance mechanism of cacao against M. perniciosa is likely to be mediated by JA/ET-signaling pathways due to the preferential TcAOS and TcSAM induction in a resistant genotype. The basidiomycete Moniliophthora perniciosa causes a serious disease in cacao (Theobroma cacao L.), and the use of resistant varieties is the only sustainable long-term solution. Cacao resistance against M. perniciosa is characterized by pathogen growth inhibition with reduced colonization and an attenuation of disease symptoms, suggesting a regulation by jasmonate (JA)/ethylene (ET) signaling pathways. The hypothesis that genes involved in JA biosynthesis would be active in the interaction of T. cacao and M. perniciosa was tested here. The cacao JA-related genes were evaluated for their relative quantitative expression in susceptible and resistant genotypes upon the exogenous application of ET, methyl-jasmonate (MJ), and salicylic acid (SA), or after M. perniciosa inoculation. MJ treatment triggered changes in the expression of genes involved in JA biosynthesis, indicating that the mechanism of positive regulation by exogenous MJ application occurs in cacao. However, a higher induction of these genes was observed in the susceptible genotype. Further, a contrast in JA-related transcriptional expression was detected between susceptible and resistant plants under M. perniciosa infection, with the induction of the allene oxide synthase gene (TcAOS), which encodes a key enzyme in the JA biosynthesis pathway in the resistant genotype. Altogether, this work provides additional evidences that the JA-dependent signaling pathway is modulating the defense response against M. perniciosa in a cacao-resistant genotype.

  9. Genotype-dependent participation of coat color gene loci in the behavioral traits of laboratory mice.

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    Yamamuro, Yutaka; Shiraishi, Aya

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate if loci responsible for coat color phenotypes contribute to behavioral characteristics, we specified novel gene loci associated with social exploratory behavior and examined the effects of the frequency of each allele at distinct loci on behavioral expression. We used the F2 generation, which arose from the mating of F1 mice obtained by interbreeding DBA/2 and ICR mice. Phenotypic analysis indicated that the agouti and albino loci affect behavioral traits. A genotype-based analysis revealed that novel exploratory activity was suppressed in a manner dependent on the frequency of the dominant wild-type allele at the agouti, but not albino, locus. The allele-dependent suppression was restricted to colored mice and was not seen in albino mice. The present results suggest that the agouti locus contributes to a particular behavioral trait in the presence of a wild-type allele at the albino locus, which encodes a structural gene for tyrosinase.

  10. Genotype-dependent variation of mitochondrial transcriptional profiles in interpopulation hybrids.

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    Ellison, Christopher K; Burton, Ronald S

    2008-10-14

    Hybridization between populations can disrupt gene expression, frequently resulting in deleterious hybrid phenotypes. Reduced fitness in interpopulation hybrids of the marine copepod Tigriopus californicus has been traced to interactions between the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Here, we determine transcript levels of four to six genes involved in the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation pathway for a series of parental and inbred hybrid lines using RT-qPCR. Both nuclear and mitochondrial-encoded genes are included in the analysis. Although all genes studied are up-regulated under salinity stress, only expression of genes located on the mtDNA differed among lines. Because mitochondrial genes are transcribed by a dedicated RNA polymerase encoded in the nuclear genome, we compare transcript levels among hybrid lines with different combinations of mitochondrial RNA polymerase and mtDNA genotypes. Lines bearing certain mtDNA-mitochondrial RNA polymerase genotypic combinations show a diminished capacity to up-regulate mitochondrial genes in response to hypoosmotic stress. Effects on the transcriptional profile depend on the specific interpopulation cross and are correlated with viability effects. We hypothesize that disruption of the mitochondrial transcriptional system in F(2) hybrids may play a central role in hybrid breakdown.

  11. Genotype-dependent regulation of drought-responsive genes in tolerant and sensitive sugarcane cultivars.

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    da Silva, Manassés Daniel; de Oliveira Silva, Roberta Lane; Ferreira Neto, José Ribamar Costa; Benko-Iseppon, Ana Maria; Kido, Ederson Akio

    2017-10-30

    Drought is the most damaging among the major abiotic stresses. Transcriptomic studies allow a global overview of expressed genes, providing the basis for molecular markers development. Here, the HT-SuperSAGE technique allowed the evaluation of four drought-tolerant cultivars and four-sensitive cultivars, after 24h of irrigation suppression. We identified 9831 induced unitags from roots of the tolerant cultivars with different regulations by the -sensitive cultivars after the applied stress. These unitags allowed a proposal of 15 genes, whose expressed profiles were validated by RT-qPCR, evaluating each cultivar independently. These genes covered broad metabolic processes: ethylene stress attenuation (ACCD); root growth (β-EXP8); protein degradation [ubiquitination pathway (E2, 20SPβ4); plant proteases (AP, C13)]; oxidative detoxification (TRX); fatty acid synthesis (ACC); amino acid transport (AAT), and carbohydrate metabolism [glycolysis (PFK, TPI, FBA); TCA cycle (LDP, MDH); pentose phosphate pathway (TKT)]. The expressed profiles showed a genotype-dependent regulation of the target genes. Two drought-tolerant cultivars (SP83-2847; CTC6) presented each one, nine of the induced genes. Among the -sensitive cultivars, CTC13 induced only one, while SP90-1636 induced two genes. These genes should help breeders to identify accessions managing drought stress tolerance responses, showing better ethylene stress attenuation, energy allocation, amino acid transport, and protein homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of blast resistance expression in rice genotypes using ...

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    USER

    2010-06-14

    Jun 14, 2010 ... genotypes were evaluated for resistance to blast disease under induced epiphytotic conditions obtained in the ..... desirable changes in the population through selection ..... that resistance sources are non-allelic for resistance.

  13. Personalized smoking cessation: interactions between nicotine dose, dependence and quit-success genotype score.

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    Rose, Jed E; Behm, Frédérique M; Drgon, Tomas; Johnson, Catherine; Uhl, George R

    2010-01-01

    Improving and targeting nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) are cost-effective strategies for reducing adverse health consequences for smokers. Treatment studies document the efficacy of precessation NRT and support important roles for level of nicotine dependence and precessation smoking reduction in successful quitting. However, prior work has not identified the optimal precessation dose or means for personalizing NRT. Genome-wide association has identified groups of genomic markers associated with successful quitting, allowing us to develop a v1.0 "quit-success" genotype score. We now report influences of v1.0 quit-success genotype score, level of dependence and precessation smoking reduction in a smoking cessation trial that examined effects of 21 versus 42 mg/24 h precessation NRT. Four hundred seventy-nine smokers were randomized to 21 or 42 mg NRT, initiated 2 wks prior to target quit dates. We monitored self-reported abstinence and end-expired air carbon monoxide (CO). Genotyping used Affymetrix arrays (Santa Clara, CA, USA). The primary outcome was 10-wk continuous smoking abstinence. NRT dose, level of nicotine dependence and genotype scores displayed significant interactive effects on successful quitting. Successful abstinence also was predicted by CO reductions during precessation NRT. These results document ways in which smoking cessation strategies can be personalized based on levels of nicotine dependence, genotype scores and CO monitoring. These assessments, taken together, can help match most smokers with optimal NRT doses and help rapidly identify some who may be better treated using other methods.

  14. Increasing the power to detect causal associations by combining genotypic and expression data in segregating populations.

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    Jun Zhu

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available To dissect common human diseases such as obesity and diabetes, a systematic approach is needed to study how genes interact with one another, and with genetic and environmental factors, to determine clinical end points or disease phenotypes. Bayesian networks provide a convenient framework for extracting relationships from noisy data and are frequently applied to large-scale data to derive causal relationships among variables of interest. Given the complexity of molecular networks underlying common human disease traits, and the fact that biological networks can change depending on environmental conditions and genetic factors, large datasets, generally involving multiple perturbations (experiments, are required to reconstruct and reliably extract information from these networks. With limited resources, the balance of coverage of multiple perturbations and multiple subjects in a single perturbation needs to be considered in the experimental design. Increasing the number of experiments, or the number of subjects in an experiment, is an expensive and time-consuming way to improve network reconstruction. Integrating multiple types of data from existing subjects might be more efficient. For example, it has recently been demonstrated that combining genotypic and gene expression data in a segregating population leads to improved network reconstruction, which in turn may lead to better predictions of the effects of experimental perturbations on any given gene. Here we simulate data based on networks reconstructed from biological data collected in a segregating mouse population and quantify the improvement in network reconstruction achieved using genotypic and gene expression data, compared with reconstruction using gene expression data alone. We demonstrate that networks reconstructed using the combined genotypic and gene expression data achieve a level of reconstruction accuracy that exceeds networks reconstructed from expression data alone, and that

  15. Variable salinity responses of 12 alfalfa genotypes and comparative expression analyses of salt-response genes

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    Sandhu, Devinder; Cornacchione, Monica V.; Ferreira, Jorge F. S.; Suarez, Donald L.

    2017-01-01

    Twelve alfalfa genotypes that were selected for biomass under salinity, differences in Na and Cl concentrations in shoots and K/Na ratio were evaluated in this long-term salinity experiment. The selected plants were cloned to reduce genetic variability within each genotype. Salt tolerance (ST) index of the genotypes ranged from 0.39 to 1. The most salt-tolerant genotypes SISA14-1 (G03) and AZ-90ST (G10), the top performers for biomass, exhibited the least effect on shoot number and height. SISA14-1 (G03) accumulated low Na and Cl under salinity. Most genotypes exhibited a net reduction in shoot Ca, Mg, P, Fe, and Cu, while Mn and Zn increased under salinity. Salinity reduced foliar area and stomatal conductance; while net photosynthetic rate and transpiration were not affected. Interestingly, salinity increased chlorophyll and antioxidant capacity in most genotypes; however neither parameter correlated well to ST index. Salt-tolerant genotypes showed upregulation of the SOS1, SOS2, SOS3, HKT1, AKT1, NHX1, P5CS1, HSP90.7, HSP81.2, HSP71.1, HSPC025, OTS1, SGF29 and SAL1 genes. Gene expression analyses allowed us to classify genotypes based on their ability to regulate different components of the salt tolerance mechanism. Pyramiding different components of the salt tolerance mechanism may lead to superior salt-tolerant alfalfa genotypes. PMID:28225027

  16. Viability of cytochrome c genotypes depends on cytoplasmic backgrounds in Tigriopus californicus.

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    Willett, C S; Burton, R S

    2001-08-01

    Because of their extensive functional interaction, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear genes may evolve to form coadapted complexes within reproductively isolated populations. As a consequence of coadaptation, the fitness of particular nuclear alleles may depend on mtDNA genotype. Among populations of the copepod Tigriopus californicus, there are high levels of amino acid substitutions in both the mtDNA genes encoding subunits of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) and the nuclear gene encoding cytochrome c (CYC), the substrate for COX. Because of the functional interaction between enzyme and substrate proteins, we hypothesized that the fitness of CYC genotypes would depend on mtDNA genotype. To test this hypothesis, segregation ratios for CYC and a second nuclear marker (histone H1) unrelated to mitochondrial function were scored in F2 progeny of several reciprocal interpopulation crosses. Genotypic ratios at the CYC locus (but not the H1 locus) differed between reciprocal crosses and differed from expected Mendelian ratios, suggesting that CYC genotypic fitnesses were strongly influenced by cytoplasmic (including mtDNA) background. However, in most cases the nature of the deviations from Mendelian ratios and differences between reciprocal crosses are not consistent with simple coevolution between CYC and mtDNA background. In a cross in which both newly hatched larvae and adults were sampled, only the adult sample showed deviations from Mendelian ratios, indicating that genotypic viabilities differed. In two of six crosses, large genotypic ratio differences for CYC were observed between the sexes. These results suggest that significant variation in nuclear-mtDNA coadaptation may exist between T. californicus populations and that the relative viability of specific cytonuclear allelic combinations is somehow affected by sex.

  17. Vector competence in West African Aedes aegypti Is Flavivirus species and genotype dependent.

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    Laura B Dickson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Vector competence of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes is a quantitative genetic trait that varies among geographic locations and among different flavivirus species and genotypes within species. The subspecies Ae. aegypti formosus, found mostly in sub-Saharan Africa, is considered to be refractory to both dengue (DENV and yellow fever viruses (YFV compared to the more globally distributed Ae. aegypti aegypti. Within Senegal, vector competence varies with collection site and DENV-2 viral isolate, but knowledge about the interaction of West African Ae. aegypti with different flaviviruses is lacking. The current study utilizes low passage isolates of dengue-2 (DENV-2-75505 sylvatic genotype and yellow fever (YFV BA-55 -West African Genotype I, or YFV DAK 1279-West African Genotype II from West Africa and field derived Ae. aegypti collected throughout Senegal to determine whether vector competence is flavivirus or virus genotype dependent.Eight collections of 20-30 mosquitoes from different sites were fed a bloodmeal containing either DENV-2 or either isolate of YFV. Midgut and disseminated infection phenotypes were determined 14 days post infection. Collections varied significantly in the rate and intensity of midgut and disseminated infection among the three viruses.Overall, vector competence was dependent upon both viral and vector strains. Importantly, contrary to previous studies, sylvatic collections of Ae. aegypti showed high levels of disseminated infection for local isolates of both DENV-2 and YFV.

  18. DLEC1 Expression Is Modulated by Epigenetic Modifications in Hepatocelluar Carcinoma Cells: Role of HBx Genotypes

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    Niu, Dandan; Feng, Huixing; Chen, Wei Ning, E-mail: WNChen@ntu.edu.sg [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2010-09-16

    Deleted in Lung and Esophageal Cancer 1 (DLEC1) is a functional tumor suppressor gene (TSG). It has been found to be silenced in a variety of human cancers including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The silencing of DLEC1 can be modulated by epigenetic modifications, such as DNA hypermethylation and histone hypoacetylation. In the case of HCC, hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) has been implicated in methylation of target promoters resulting in the down-regulation of tumor suppressor genes, which in turn contributes to the development of HCC. In the present study, we first established a cell system in which epigenetic modifications can be modulated using inhibitors of either DNA methylation or histone deacetylation. The cell system was used to reveal that the expression of DLEC1 was upregulated by HBx in a genotype-dependent manner. In particular, HBx genotype A was found to decrease DNA methylation of the DLEC1 promoter. Our results have provided new insights on the impact of HBx in HCC development by epigenetic modifications.

  19. HPV genotyping and p16 expression in Xingu Indigenous Park, Brazil.

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    Freitas, V G; Focchi, G R; Pereira, E R; Levi, J E; Speck, N M G; Ribalta, J C

    2016-09-16

    The association between high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes and p16 expression in indigenous women from the Xingu Indigenous Park, Brazil, was unknown. This study evaluated p16 expression in women with a histological diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 3 or higher and correlated this expression with HPV genotypes to determine possible discrepancies in the expression of this marker. We evaluated 37 previously collected samples with different HPV genotypes and high-grade lesions diagnosed based on cytology, histology, and colposcopy. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed using paraffin-embedded tissue sections and the CINtec® Histology Kit. p16 protein expression was investigated by immunostaining with an anti-p16 antibody. HPV genotyping was performed by reverse hybridization. The age of the study population ranged from 22-75 years (43.81 ± 15.89 years) and parity ranged from 1-11 (5.92 ± 2.58). Thirteen different HPV genotypes were found using the INNO-LiPA kit. Single and multiple infections by HPV were found with prevalence of single infections (P = 0.029). Comparison between HPV genotype and simple or multiple infections was highly significant; it was observed more HPV 52 followed by HPV 16 in single infections (P p16 expression was predominantly diffuse, which was observed in 91.7% of lesions, whereas 8.3% were focal (P p16 expression in high-grade CIN was not influenced by the viral genotype; however, more studies are necessary to further our understanding of this restricted group.

  20. Genotyping Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Copy Number Variability of the FCGRs Expressed on NK Cells.

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    Erbe, Amy K; Wang, Wei; Gallenberger, Mikayla; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Sondel, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are one of the main effector immune cells involved in antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Upon recognition of cell-bound IgG antibodies, which occurs through Fc gamma receptors (FCGRs) expressed on the cell surface of NK cells, NK cells become activated and lyse target tumor or infected cells. The FCGRs, FCGR3A and FCGR2C, expressed on the surface of NK cells have single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that result in differential activity of NK cells. In addition to SNP genetic variation within each of these genes, the FCGRs are subject to copy number variation (CNV), which leads to variable protein expression levels on the cell surface. Studies have found that FCGR genotype for FCGR3A and FCGR2C is associated with variation in the response to immunotherapy.Due to high sequence homology within FCGR3 and FCGR2 families, there are difficulties associated with genotyping these specific receptors related to cross-amplification of non-targeted FCGRs. To improve specificity for both FCGR3A and FCGR2C, Rnase-H (RH) primers were designed to amplify specifically FCGR3A (while not co-amplifying FCGR3B) and FCGR2C (while not co-amplifying FCGR2B). In addition, fluorescently labeled locked nucleic acid (LNA) probes provide additional precision for determination of the SNPs within both FCGR3A and FCGR2C. For CNV determination, separate fluorescently labeled probes for FCGR3A, and for FCGR2C, can be used with the same RH primers for each gene. These probes can be combined in the same well with control primers/probe for a known diploid gene and used to calculate the copy number of both FCGR3A and FCGR2C. Here we provide new detailed methodology that allows for the specific amplification of these FCGRs in a single PCR reaction, allowing for genotyping of both the SNPs and CNVs using real-time PCR.

  1. Genotype-dependent sulphite tolerance of Australian Dekkera (Brettanomyces) bruxellensis wine isolates.

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    Curtin, C; Kennedy, E; Henschke, P A

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine sulphite tolerance for a large number of Dekkera bruxellensis isolates and evaluate the relationship between this phenotype and previously assigned genotype markers. A published microplate-based method for evaluation of yeast growth in the presence of sulphite was benchmarked against culturability following sulphite treatment, for the D. bruxellensis type strain (CBS 74) and a reference wine isolate (AWRI 1499). This method was used to estimate maximal sulphite tolerance for 41 D. bruxellensis isolates, which was found to vary over a fivefold range. Significant differences in sulphite tolerance were observed when isolates were grouped according to previously assigned genotypes and ribotypes. Variable sulphite tolerance for the wine spoilage yeast D. bruxellensis can be linked to genotype markers. Strategies to minimize risk of wine spoilage by D. bruxellensis must take into account at least a threefold range in effective sulphite concentration that is dependent upon the genotype group(s) present. The isolates characterized in this study will be a useful resource for establishing the mechanisms conferring sulphite tolerance for this industrially important yeast species. © 2012 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Altered Gene Expression Profiles of Wheat Genotypes against Fusarium Head Blight

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    Ayumi Kosaka

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium graminearum is responsible for Fusarium head blight (FHB, which is a destructive disease of wheat that makes its quality unsuitable for end use. To understand the temporal molecular response against this pathogen, microarray gene expression analysis was carried out at two time points on three wheat genotypes, the spikes of which were infected by Fusarium graminearum. The greatest number of genes was upregulated in Nobeokabouzu-komugi followed by Sumai 3, whereas the minimum expression in Gamenya was at three days after inoculation (dai. In Nobeokabouzu-komugi, high expression of detoxification genes, such as multidrug-resistant protein, multidrug resistance-associated protein, UDP-glycosyltransferase and ABC transporters, in addition to systemic defense-related genes, were identified at the early stage of infection. This early response of the highly-resistant genotype implies a different resistance response from the other resistant genotype, Sumai 3, primarily containing local defense-related genes, such as cell wall defense genes. In Gamenya, the expression of all three functional groups was minimal. The differences in these molecular responses with respect to the time points confirmed the variation in the genotypes. For the first time, we report the nature of gene expression in the FHB-highly resistant cv. Nobeokabouzu-komugi during the disease establishment stage and the possible underlying molecular response.

  3. Influence of Atg5 mutation in SLE depends on functional IL-10 genotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia López

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence supports the involvement of autophagy in the etiopathology of autoimmune diseases. Despite the identification of autophagy-related protein (Atg-5 as one of the susceptibility loci in systemic Lupus erythematosus (SLE, the consequences of the carriage of these mutations for patients remain unclear. The present work analyzed the association of Atg5 rs573775 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP with SLE susceptibility, IFNα, TNFα and IL-10 serum levels, and clinical features, in 115 patients and 170 healthy individuals. Patients who where carriers of the rs573775 T* minor allele presented lower IFNα levels than those with the wild genotype, whereas the opposite result was detected for IL-10. Thus, since IL-10 production was regulated by rs1800896 polymorphisms, we evaluated the effect of this Atg5 mutation in genetically high and low IL-10 producers. Interestingly, we found that the rs573775 T* allele was a risk factor for SLE in carriers of the high IL-10 producer genotype, but not among genetically low producers. Moreover, IL-10 genotype influences SLE features in patients presenting the Atg5 mutated allele. Specifically, carriage of the rs573775 T* allele led to IL-10 upregulation, reduced IFNα and TNFα production and a low frequency of cytopenia in patients with the high IL-10 producer genotype, whereas patients with the same Atg5 allele that were low IL-10 producers presented reduced amounts of all these cytokines, had a lower prevalence of anti-dsDNA antibodies and the latest onset age. In conclusion, the Atg5 rs573775 T* allele seems to influence SLE susceptibility, cytokine production and disease features depending on other factors such as functional IL-10 genotype.

  4. Increased hepatic expression of miRNA-122 in patients infected with HCV genotype 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ketti G; Malta, Fernanda M; Nastri, Ana C S S; Widman, Azzo; Faria, Paola L; Santana, Rúbia A F; Alves, Venâncio A F; Carrilho, Flair J; Pinho, João R R

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects approximately 3 % of the world population. HCV targets hepatic tissue, and most infected patients develop a chronic infection. Currently, studies have demonstrated an association between HCV-RNA replication and miR-122, the most abundant microRNA in the liver. Our aim was to evaluate liver and serum expression of miR-122 in patients infected with HCV genotypes 1 and 3, and to identify possible associations between miR-122 expression and lipid profiles, HCV viral load, apolipoproteins and liver enzymes. MicroRNAs were isolated from blood and liver tissue, and miR-122 expression was quantified by real-time PCR. HCV viral load was quantified by real-time PCR and HCV genotype, and serum biomarkers were obtained from medical report. The levels of miR-122 were higher in liver than those in blood from individuals infected with HCV genotypes 1 and 3 (p HCV genotype 3 (6.22-fold, p HCV genotype 1 (r = 0.302, p = 0.026); in these patients, an inverse correlation was observed between serum apolipoprotein A-II (ApoA-II) levels and the blood (r = -0.330; p = 0.014) and hepatic (r = -0.311; p = 0.020) levels of miR-122. In patients infected with HCV genotype 3, there was a positive correlation between the hepatic miR-122 and the high-density lipoprotein-HDL (r = 0.412, p = 0.036) and insulin (r = 0.478, p = 0.044). Lipid metabolism proteins and miR-122 expression levels have different relations in HCV-3- and HCV-1-infected patients.

  5. Tumor response to radiotherapy is dependent on genotype-associated mechanisms in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Jerry R

    2010-08-01

    structure that predicts tumor response to radiotherapy based on coefficients that represent in vitro and in vivo responses. Both coefficients are dependent on tumor cell genotype and fraction-size. We identify a novel previously unreported mechanism that sensitizes tumors in vivo; this sensitization varies with tumor cell genotype and fraction size.

  6. Genotype and tumor locus determine expression profile of pseudohypoxic pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shankavaram, U.; Fliedner, S.M.; Elkahloun, A.G.; Barb, J.J.; Munson, P.J.; Huynh, T.T.; Matro, J.C.; Turkova, H.; Linehan, W.M.; Timmers, H.J.L.M.; Tischler, A.S.; Powers, J.F.; Krijger, R. de; Baysal, B.E.; Takacova, M.; Pastorekova, S.; Gius, D.; Lehnert, H.; Camphausen, K.; Pacak, K.

    2013-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas (PHEOs) and paragangliomas (PGLs) related to mutations in the mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) subunits A, B, C, and D, SDH complex assembly factor 2, and the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) genes share a pseudohypoxic expression profile. However, genotype-specific differences

  7. Phosphoglucose isomerase genotype affects running speed and heat shock protein expression after exposure to extreme temperatures in a montane willow beetle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rank, Nathan E; Bruce, Douglas A; McMillan, David M; Barclay, Colleen; Dahlhoff, Elizabeth P

    2007-03-01

    Eastern Sierra Nevada populations of the willow beetle Chrysomela aeneicollis commonly experience stressfully high and low environmental temperatures that may influence survival and reproduction. Allele frequencies at the enzyme locus phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI) vary across a climatic latitudinal gradient in these populations, with PGI allele 1 being most common in cooler regions and PGI allele 4 in warmer ones. PGI genotypes differ in heat and cold tolerance and in expression of a 70 kDa heat shock protein. Here we examine genetic, behavioral and environmental factors affecting a performance character, running speed, for willow beetles, and assess effects of consecutive cold and heat exposure on running speed and expression of Hsp70 in the laboratory. In nature, running speed depends on air temperature and is higher for males than females. Mating beetles ran faster than single beetles, and differences among PGI genotypes in male running speed depended on the presence of females. In the laboratory, exposure to cold reduced subsequent running speed, but the amount of this reduction depended on PGI genotype and previous thermal history. Effects of exposure to heat also depended on life history stage and PGI genotype. Adults possessing allele 1 ran fastest after a single exposure to stressful temperature, whereas those possessing allele 4 ran faster after repeated exposure. Larvae possessing allele 4 ran fastest after a single stressful exposure, but running speed generally declined after a second exposure to stressful temperature. The ranking of PGI genotypes after the second exposure depended on whether a larva had been exposed to cold or heat. Effects of temperature on Hsp70 expression also varied among PGI genotypes and depended on type of exposure, especially for adults (single heat exposure, two cold exposures: PGI 1-1>1-4>4-4; other multiple extreme exposures: 4-4>1-4>1-1). There was no consistent association between alleles at other polymorphic enzyme loci

  8. The tricks of the trait: neural implementation of personality varies with genotype-dependent serotonin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Tim; Heinzel, Sebastian; Notebaert, Karolien; Dresler, Thomas; Reif, Andreas; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Jakob, Peter M; Windmann, Sabine; Fallgatter, Andreas J

    2013-11-01

    Gray's Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST) has developed into one of the most prominent personality theories of the last decades. The RST postulates a Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS) modulating the reaction to stimuli indicating aversive events. A number of psychiatric disorders including depression, anxiety disorders, and psychosomatic illnesses have been associated with extreme BIS responsiveness. In recent years, neuroimaging studies have implicated the amygdala-septo-hippocampal circuit as an important neural substrate of the BIS. However, the neurogenetic basis of the regulation of this behaviorally and clinically essential system remains unclear. Investigating the effects of two functional genetic polymorphisms (tryptophan hydroxylase-2, G-703T, and serotonin transporter, serotonin transporter gene-linked polymorphic region) in 89 human participants, we find significantly different patterns of associations between BIS scores and amygdala-hippocampus connectivity during loss anticipation for genotype groups regarding both polymorphisms. Specifically, the correlation between amygdala-hippocampus connectivity and Gray's trait anxiety scores is positive in individuals homozygous for the TPH2 G-allele, while carriers of at least one T-allele show a negative association. Likewise, individuals homozygous for the 5-HTTLPR L(A) variant display a positive association while carriers of the S/L(G) allele show a trend towards a negative association. Thus, we show converging evidence of different neural implementation of the BIS depending on genotype-dependent levels of serotonin. We provide evidence suggesting that genotype-dependent serotonin levels and thus putative changes in the efficiency of serotonergic neurotransmission might not only alter brain activation levels directly, but also more fundamentally impact the neural implementation of personality traits. We outline the direct clinical implications arising from this finding and discuss the complex interplay

  9. CHRNA3 genotype, nicotine dependence, lung function and disease in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Bojesen, Stig E

    2012-01-01

    The CHRNA3 rs1051730 polymorphism has been associated to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lung cancer and nicotine dependence in case-control studies with high smoking exposure; however, its influence on lung function and COPD severity in the general population is largely unknown. We...... genotyped 57,657 adult individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study, of whom 34,592 were ever-smokers. Information on spirometry, hospital admissions, smoking behaviour and use of nicotinic replacement therapy was recorded. In homozygous (11%), heterozygous (44%) and noncarrier (45%) ever...

  10. Data on IL-6 c.-174 G>C genotype and allele frequencies in patients with coronary heart disease in dependence of cardiovascular outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Reichert

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this data article we present data on the distribution of alleles and genotypes of the interleukin (IL-6 c.-174 G>C polymorphism (rs 1800795 in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD in dependence of the incidence of new cardiovascular events (combined endpoint: myocardial infarction, stroke/TIA, cardiac death, death according to stroke within three years follow-up. Moreover, we investigated putative associations between individual expression of IL-6 genotypes and IL-6 serum level. This investigation is a subanalysis of the article entitled “The Interleukin 6 c.-174 CC genotype is a predictor for new cardiovascular events in patients with coronary heart disease within three years follow-up“ (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01045070 (Reichert et al., 2016 [1].

  11. Expression-dependent folding of interphase chromatin.

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    Hansjoerg Jerabek

    Full Text Available Multiple studies suggest that chromatin looping might play a crucial role in organizing eukaryotic genomes. To investigate the interplay between the conformation of interphase chromatin and its transcriptional activity, we include information from gene expression profiles into a polymer model for chromatin that incorporates genomic loops. By relating loop formation to transcriptional activity, we are able to generate chromosome conformations whose structural and topological properties are consistent with experimental data. The model particularly allows to reproduce the conformational variations that are known to occur between highly and lowly expressed chromatin regions. As previously observed in experiments, lowly expressed regions of the simulated polymers are much more compact. Due to the changes in loop formation, the distributions of chromatin loops are also expression-dependent and exhibit a steeper decay in highly active regions. As a results of entropic interaction between differently looped parts of the chromosome, we observe topological alterations leading to a preferential positioning of highly transcribed loci closer to the surface of the chromosome territory. Considering the diffusional behavior of the chromatin fibre, the simulations furthermore show that the higher the expression level of specific parts of the chromatin fibre is, the more dynamic they are. The results exhibit that variations of loop formation along the chromatin fibre, and the entropic changes that come along with it, do not only influence the structural parameters on the local scale, but also effect the global chromosome conformation and topology.

  12. Genotype-specific differences between mouse CNS stem cell lines expressing frontotemporal dementia mutant or wild type human tau.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda E Orr

    Full Text Available Stem cell (SC lines that capture the genetics of disease susceptibility provide new research tools. To assess the utility of mouse central nervous system (CNS SC-containing neurosphere cultures for studying heritable neurodegenerative disease, we compared neurosphere cultures from transgenic mice that express human tau with the P301L familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD mutation, rTg(tau(P301L4510, with those expressing comparable levels of wild type human tau, rTg(tau(wt21221. rTg(tau(P301L4510 mice express the human tau(P301L variant in their forebrains and display cellular, histological, biochemical and behavioral abnormalities similar to those in human FTD, including age-dependent differences in tau phosphorylation that distinguish them from rTg(tau(wt21221 mice. We compared FTD-hallmark tau phosphorylation in neurospheres from rTg(tau(P301L4510 mice and from rTg(tau(wt21221 mice. The tau genotype-specific phosphorylation patterns in neurospheres mimicked those seen in mice, validating use of neurosphere cultures as models for studying tau phosphorylation. Genotype-specific tau phosphorylation was observed in 35 independent cell lines from individual fetuses; tau in rTg(tau(P301L4510 cultures was hypophosphorylated in comparison with rTg(tau(wt21221 as was seen in young adult mice. In addition, there were fewer human tau-expressing cells in rTg(tau(P301L4510 than in rTg(tau(wt21221 cultures. Following differentiation, neuronal filopodia-spine density was slightly greater in rTg(tau(P301L4510 than rTg(tau(wt21221 and control cultures. Together with the recapitulation of genotype-specific phosphorylation patterns, the observation that neurosphere lines maintained their cell line-specific-differences and retained SC characteristics over several passages supports the utility of SC cultures as surrogates for analysis of cellular disease mechanisms.

  13. SOCS3 and IRS-1 gene expression differs between genotype 1 and genotype 2 hepatitis C virus-infected HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persico, Marcello; Russo, Roberta; Persico, Eliana; Svelto, Monica; Spano, Daniela; Andolfo, Immacolata; La Mura, Vincenzo; Capasso, Mario; Tiribelli, Claudio; Torella, Roberto; Iolascon, Achille

    2009-01-01

    The poor response to antiviral treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients with genotype 1b has been associated with a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome. However, the molecular link between these clinical entities is not clear. The goal of this study was to clarify the role of genotype 1b and 2 in the genetic expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) and insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1). We infected human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) cells with human HCV genotype 1b or 2 and measured the gene and protein expression of SOCS3 at various times. We also evaluated impairment in the insulin pathway by analysis of IRS-1 and phospho-AKT. For the control, we used HepG2 cell cultures treated with non-infectious serum. We also demonstrated the occurrence of HCV infection by the detection of both positive and negative strands in the cells and culture medium. To test infection of the HepG2 cells, we performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) of viral load at different time points. We analyzed the viral genotype in the pellet and supernatant. At each time point, we found positive and negative strands in the infected cells, while in the medium we found positive, but no negative strands. We also detected the presence of the correct genotype in the medium. Two weeks following infection when the viral load was higher, we tested genotype 1b and 2 infected cells. SOCS3 gene expression was significantly higher in genotype 1b-infected cells (median 2.56; mean 2.82+/-0.59) compared with genotype 2 (median 1.34; mean 1.46+/-0.31) (p=0.04) and control cells (median 1.09; mean 1.02+/-0.11, p=0.02). There was no difference between cells exposed to genotype 2 and control cells. Conversely, IRS-1 was significantly lower in genotype 1b-infected cells (median 15.97; mean 15.45+/-0.67) compared with genotype 2-infected cells (median 16.45; mean 16.44+/-0.01, p=0.04). Statistically significant differences were seen when

  14. Phenotype and Genotype in a Cohort of 312 Adult Patients with Nontransfusion-Dependent Thalassemia in Northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prayalaw, Patcharawadee; Teawtrakul, Nattiya; Jetsrisuparb, Arunee; Pongudom, Saranya; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Fucharoen, Supan

    2016-01-01

    Patients with nontransfusion-dependent thalassemia (NTDT) do not require regular blood transfusion for survival but may encounter several complications that contribute to morbidity and mortality. We report the molecular heterogeneity and hematological features of NTDT in 312 adult patients in northeast Thailand. Hemoglobin (Hb) and DNA analyses identified 177 subjects with Hb E-β-thalassemia, 1 with homozygous β0-thalassemia and 134 with Hb H, AEBart's and EEBart's diseases. For β-thalassemia, 12 different mutations including both β0- and β+-thalassemias were detected. Coinheritance of α-thalassemia as an ameliorating factor was observed in 18 of 178 cases (10.1%) with β-thalassemia. The α-globin gene triplicated haplotype (αααanti3.7) was observed in 1 case of Hb E-β0-thalassemia. The presence of the -158 (Cx2192;T) Gx03B3;-XmnI polymorphism (+/+) was found to be associated with increased Hb F expression, but its frequency in the studied subjects was low. Those with α-thalassemia included 17 with deletional and 51 nondeletional Hb H, and 63 with AEBart's and 3 with EEBart's diseases. The hematological parameters of these NTDT and genotype-phenotype relationships are presented. The diverse molecular heterogeneity of NTDT underlines the importance of complete genotyping of the patient. These results should prove useful for management planning, the prediction of clinical outcome and to improve genetic counseling for NTDT patients. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. The effect of inoculation with mycorrhizal arbuscular fungi on expression of limonene synthase in Mentha spicata L. genotypes

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    Leila Shabani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Spearmint (Mentha spicata L. is an important economical and medicinal plant from Lamiaceae family, which has gained research attraction as a model for biosynthesis of essential oils due to its high capability for synthesis of monoterpenes. Limonene is a simple monoterpene and its biosynthesis is catalyzed by limonene synthase a key regulatory enzyme in the biosynthesis pathway of monoterpenes in spearmint plant. This study was concerned with the effect of colonization of roots with Funneliformis mosseae and F. etunicatum fungi on spearmint plant growth indices, leaf essential oils and changes in the expression of limonene synthase (LS gene. This study also explained the application of GADPH gene as the internal standard for real-time quantitative PCR (RTqPCR analysis of LS in spearmints. Our results showed that essential oil content of leaf in spearmint genotype Meybod inoculated with F. etunicatum was higher than that of genotypes from populations Kashan and Bojnourd and was 130% higher than the control. According to the results of this study, increase in transcript accumulation of the LS gene in leaves of spearmint plants inoculated with F. etunicatum was concordant with the increased essential oil contents and was dependent on the plant genotype.

  16. Clonal expansion of the Pseudogymnoascus destructans genotype in North America is accompanied by significant variation in phenotypic expression.

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    Jordan Khankhet

    Full Text Available Pseudogymnoascus destructans is the causative agent of an emerging infectious disease that threatens populations of several North American bat species. The fungal disease was first observed in 2006 and has since caused the death of nearly six million bats. The disease, commonly known as white-nose syndrome, is characterized by a cutaneous infection with P. destructans causing erosions and ulcers in the skin of nose, ears and/or wings of bats. Previous studies based on sequences from eight loci have found that isolates of P. destructans from bats in the US all belong to one multilocus genotype. Using the same multilocus sequence typing method, we found that isolates from eastern and central Canada also had the same genotype as those from the US, consistent with the clonal expansion of P. destructans into Canada. However, our PCR fingerprinting revealed that among the 112 North American isolates we analyzed, three, all from Canada, showed minor genetic variation. Furthermore, we found significant variations among isolates in mycelial growth rate; the production of mycelial exudates; and pigment production and diffusion into agar media. These phenotypic differences were influenced by culture medium and incubation temperature, indicating significant variation in environmental condition--dependent phenotypic expression among isolates of the clonal P. destructans genotype in North America.

  17. Tetraploidization events by chromosome doubling of nucellar cells are frequent in apomictic citrus and are dependent on genotype and environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleza, Pablo; Froelicher, Yann; Schwarz, Sergio; Agustí, Manuel; Hernández, María; Juárez, José; Luro, François; Morillon, Raphael; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Polyploidy is a major component of plant evolution. The citrus gene pool is essentially diploid but tetraploid plants are frequently encountered in seedlings of diploid apomictic genotypes. The main objectives of the present study were to establish the origin of these tetraploid plants and to ascertain the importance of genotypic and environmental factors on tetraploid formation. Methods Tetraploid seedlings from 30 diploid apomictic genotypes were selected by flow cytometry and genotyped with 24 single sequence repeat (SSR) markers to analyse their genetic origin. Embryo rescue was used to grow all embryos contained in polyembryonic seeds of ‘Tardivo di Ciaculli’ mandarin, followed by characterization of the plantlets obtained by flow cytometry and SSR markers to accurately establish the rate of tetraploidization events and their potential tissue location. Inter-annual variations in tetraploid seedling rates were analysed for seven genotypes. Variation in tetraploid plantlet rates was analysed between different seedlings of the same genotype (‘Carrizo’ citrange; Citrus sinensis × Poncirus trifoliata) from seeds collected in different tropical, subtropical and Mediterranean countries. Key Results Tetraploid plants were obtained for all the studied diploid genotypes, except for four mandarins. All tetraploid plants were identical to their diploid maternal line for SSR markers and were not cytochimeric. Significant genotypic and environmental effects were observed, as well as negative correlation between mean temperature during the flowering period and tetraploidy seedling rates. The higher frequencies (20 %) of tetraploids were observed for citranges cultivated in the Mediterranean area. Conclusions Tetraploidization by chromosome doubling of nucellar cells are frequent events in apomictic citrus, and are affected by both genotypic and environmental factors. Colder conditions in marginal climatic areas appear to favour the expression of

  18. MSTN genotypes in Thoroughbred horses influence skeletal muscle gene expression and racetrack performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGivney, Beatrice A; Browne, John A; Fonseca, Rita G; Katz, Lisa M; Machugh, David E; Whiston, Ronan; Hill, Emmeline W

    2012-12-01

    Myostatin, encoded by the MSTN gene, is a member of the TGF-β superfamily that regulates skeletal muscle development. A MSTN SNP significantly associated with Thoroughbred horse racing phenotypes has recently been identified as well as significant reductions in Thoroughbred skeletal muscle gene expression for three transcripts 400-1500 base pairs downstream of the MSTN gene following a period of training. Together, these findings indicate that MSTN genotypes may influence MSTN gene expression. To investigate this, MSTN mRNA expression was measured in biopsies from the middle gluteal muscle from 60 untrained yearling Thoroughbreds (C/C, n = 15; C/T, n = 28; T/T, n = 17) using two independent real-time qRT-PCR assays. MSTN gene expression was also evaluated in a subset (N = 33) of these animals using samples collected after a ten-month period of training. A significant association was observed between genotype and mRNA abundance for the untrained horses (assay I, P = 0.0237; assay II, P = 0.003559), with the C/C cohort having the highest MSTN mRNA levels, the T/T group the lowest levels and the C/T group intermediate levels. Following training, there was a significant decrease in MSTN mRNA (-3.35-fold; P = 6.9 × 10(-7) ), which was most apparent for the C/C cohort (-5.88-fold, P = 0.001). These data demonstrate the tight relationship between phenotype, genotype and gene expression at the MSTN gene in Thoroughbred racehorses.

  19. Population structure of mixed Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is strain genotype and culture medium dependent.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanekom, M.; Streicher, E.M.; Berg, D. Van den; Cox, H.; McDermid, C.; Bosman, M.; Pittius, N.C. Gey van; Victor, T.C.; Kidd, M.; Soolingen, D. van; Helden, P.D. van; Warren, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Molecular genotyping methods have shown infection with more than one Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain genotype in a single sputum culture, indicating mixed infection. AIM: This study aimed to develop a PCR-based genotyping tool to determine the population structure of M. tuberculosis st

  20. Genotype-dependent activation or repression of HBV enhancer Ⅱ by transcription factor COUP-TF1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silke F Fischer; Katja Schmidt; Nicola Fiedler; Dieter Glebe; Christian Schüttler; Jianguang Sun; Wolfram H Gerlich; Reinald Repp; Stephan Schaefer

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the expression of HBV enhancer Ⅱ by transcription factor COUP-TF1.METHODS: In order to study the regulation of HBV variants in the vicinity of the NRRE we cloned luciferase constructs containing the HBV enhancer Ⅱ from variants and from HBV genotypes A and D and cotransfected them together with expression vectors for COUP-TF1 into HepG2 cells.RESULTS: Our findings show that enhancer Ⅱ of HBV genotype A is also repressed by COUP-TF1. In contrast,two different enhancer Ⅱ constructs of HBV genotype D were activated by COUP-TF1. The activation was independent of the NRRE because a natural variant with a deletion of nt 1763-1770 was still activated by COUP-TF1.CONCLUSION: Regulation of transcription of the HBV genome seems to differ among HBV genomes derived from different genotypes. These differences in transcriptional control among HBV genotypes may be the molecular basis for differences in the clinical course among HBV genotypes.

  1. Distribution of Human Papillomavirus 52 and 58 Genotypes, and Their Expression of p16 and p53 in Cervical Neoplasia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Tae Eun; Kim, Hwal Woong; Lee, Kyung Eun

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) 52 and 58 genotypes among women residing in Busan, and the expression of p16 and p53 proteins in cervical neoplasia with HPV 52 and 58 infections...

  2. Population structure of mixed Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is strain genotype and culture medium dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Hanekom

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular genotyping methods have shown infection with more than one Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain genotype in a single sputum culture, indicating mixed infection. AIM: This study aimed to develop a PCR-based genotyping tool to determine the population structure of M. tuberculosis strain genotypes in primary Mycobacterial Growth Indicator Tubes (MGIT and Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ cultures to identify mixed infections and to establish whether the growth media influenced the recovery of certain strain genotypes. METHOD: A convenience sample of 206 paired MGIT and LJ M. tuberculosis cultures from pulmonary tuberculosis patients resident in Khayelitsha, South Africa were genotyped using an in-house PCR-based method to detect defined M. tuberculosis strain genotypes. RESULTS: The sensitivity and specificity of the PCR-based method for detecting Beijing, Haarlem, S-family, and LAM genotypes was 100%, and 75% and 50% for detecting the Low Copy Clade, respectively. Thirty-one (15% of the 206 cases showed the presence of more than one M. tuberculosis strain genotype. Strains of the Beijing and Haarlem genotypes were significantly more associated with a mixed infection (on both media when compared to infections with a single strain (Beijing MGIT p = 0.02; LJ, p<0.01 and (Haarlem: MGIT p<0.01; LJ, p = 0.01. Strains with the Beijing genotype were less likely to be with "other genotype" strains (p<0.01 while LAM, Haarlem, S-family and LCC occurred independently with the Beijing genotype. CONCLUSION: The PCR-based method was able to identify mixed infection in at least 15% of the cases. LJ media was more sensitive in detecting mixed infections than MGIT media, implying that the growth characteristics of M. tuberculosis on different media may influence our ability to detect mixed infections. The Beijing and Haarlem genotypes were more likely to occur in a mixed infection than any of the other genotypes tested suggesting pathogen

  3. Analysis of gene expression and proteomic profiles of clonal genotypes from Theobroma cacao subjected to soil flooding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolde, Fabiana Z; Almeida, Alex-Alan F; Pirovani, Carlos P

    2014-01-01

    Soil flooding causes changes in gene transcription, synthesis and degradation of proteins and cell metabolism. The main objective of this study was to understand the biological events of Theobroma cacao during soil flooding-induced stress, using the analyses of gene expression and activity of key enzymes involved in fermentation, as well as the identification of differentially expressed proteins by mass spectrometry in two contrasting genotypes for flooding tolerance (tolerant - TSA-792 and susceptible - TSH-774). Soil anoxia caused by flooding has led to changes in the expression pattern of genes associated with the biosynthesis of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in leaves and roots of the two evaluated genotypes. Significant differences were observed between the enzyme activities of the two genotypes. Leaves and roots of the TSA-792 genotype showed higher ADH activity as compared to the TSH-774 genotype, whereas the activities of PDC and LDH have varied over the 96 h of soil flooding, being higher for TSA-792 genotype, at the initial stage, and TSH-774 genotype, at the final stage. Some of the identified proteins are those typical of the anaerobic metabolism-involved in glycolysis and alcoholic fermentation-and different proteins associated with photosynthesis, protein metabolism and oxidative stress. The ability to maintain glycolysis and induce fermentation was observed to play an important role in anoxia tolerance in cacao and may also serve to distinguish tolerant and susceptible genotypes in relation to this stressor.

  4. Complex nature of SNP genotype effects on gene expression in primary human leucocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesen Lotte C

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome wide association studies have been hugely successful in identifying disease risk variants, yet most variants do not lead to coding changes and how variants influence biological function is usually unknown. Methods We correlated gene expression and genetic variation in untouched primary leucocytes (n = 110 from individuals with celiac disease – a common condition with multiple risk variants identified. We compared our observations with an EBV-transformed HapMap B cell line dataset (n = 90, and performed a meta-analysis to increase power to detect non-tissue specific effects. Results In celiac peripheral blood, 2,315 SNP variants influenced gene expression at 765 different transcripts (cis expression quantitative trait loci, eQTLs. 135 of the detected SNP-probe effects (reflecting 51 unique probes were also detected in a HapMap B cell line published dataset, all with effects in the same allelic direction. Overall gene expression differences within the two datasets predominantly explain the limited overlap in observed cis-eQTLs. Celiac associated risk variants from two regions, containing genes IL18RAP and CCR3, showed significant cis genotype-expression correlations in the peripheral blood but not in the B cell line datasets. We identified 14 genes where a SNP affected the expression of different probes within the same gene, but in opposite allelic directions. By incorporating genetic variation in co-expression analyses, functional relationships between genes can be more significantly detected. Conclusion In conclusion, the complex nature of genotypic effects in human populations makes the use of a relevant tissue, large datasets, and analysis of different exons essential to enable the identification of the function for many genetic risk variants in common diseases.

  5. FGFR2 protein expression in breast cancer: nuclear localisation and correlation with patient genotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Alastair M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs in intron 2 of the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Type 2 (FGFR2 gene, including rs2981582, contribute to multifactorial breast cancer susceptibility. The high risk polymorphism haplotype in the FGFR2 gene has been associated with increased mRNA transcription and altered transcription factor binding but the effect on FGFR2 protein expression is unknown. 40 breast tumours were identified from individuals with known rs2981582 genotype. Tumour sections were stained for FGFR2 protein expression, and scored for nuclear and cytoplasmic staining in tumour and surrounding normal tissue. Findings FGFR2 immunohistochemistry demonstrated variable nuclear staining in normal tissue and tumour tissue, as well as consistent cytoplasmic staining. We did not find an association between nuclear staining for FGFR2 and genotype, and there was no association between FGFR2 staining and estrogen or progestogen receptor status. There was an association between presence of nuclear staining for FGFR2 in normal tissue and presence of nuclear staining in the adjacent tumour (Fishers exact test, p = 0.002. Conclusions Variable nuclear staining for FGFR2 in breast cancer, but an absence of correlation with rs2981582 genotype suggests that the mechanism of action of polymorphisms at the FGFR2 locus may be more complex than a direct effect on mRNA expression levels in the final cancer. The effect may relate to FGFR2 function or localisation during breast development or tumourigenesis. Nuclear localisation of FGFR2 suggests an important additional role for this protein in breast development and breast cancer, in addition to its function as a classical cell surface receptor.

  6. Cold sore susceptibility gene-1 genotypes affect the expression of herpes labialis in unrelated human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriesel, John D; Bhatia, Amiteshwar; Thomas, Alun

    2014-01-01

    Our group has recently described a gene on human chromosome 21, the Cold Sore Susceptibility Gene-1 (CSSG-1, also known as C21orf91), which may confer susceptibility to frequent cold sores in humans. We present here a genotype-phenotype analysis of CSSG-1 in a new, unrelated human population. Seven hundred fifty-eight human subjects were enrolled in a case/control Cold Sore Study. CSSG-1 genotyping, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) serotyping, demographic and phenotypic data was available from 622 analyzed subjects. Six major alleles (H1-H6) were tested for associations with each of the self-reported phenotypes. The statistical analysis was adjusted for age, sex and ethnicity. Genotype-phenotype associations were analyzed from 388 HSV1-seropositive subjects. There were significant CSSG-1 haplotype effects on annual cold sore outbreaks (P=0.006), lifetime cold sores (P=0.012) and perceived cold sore severity (P=0.012). There were relatively consistent trends toward protection from frequent and severe cold sores among those with the H3 or H5/6 haplotypes, whereas those with H1, H2, and H4 haplotypes tended to have more frequent and more severe episodes. Different alleles of the newly described gene CSSG-1 affect the expression of cold sore phenotypes in this new, unrelated human population, confirming the findings of the previous family-based study.

  7. Differential expression of carotenoid biosynthetic pathway genes in two contrasting tomato genotypes for lycopene content

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shilpa Pandurangaiah; Kundapura V Ravishankar; Kodthalu S Shivashankar; Avverahally T Sadashiva; Kavitha Pillakenchappa; Sunil Kumar Narayanan

    2016-06-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is one of the model plants to study the carotenoid biosynthesis. In the present study, the fruit carotenoid content were quantified at different developmental stages for two contrasting genotypes viz. IIHR-249-1and IIHR-2866 by UPLC. Lycopene content was high in IIHR-249-1(19.45 mg/100g fresh weight) compared to IIHR-2866 ((1.88 mg/100g fresh weight) at the ripe stage. qPCR was performed for genes that are involved in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway to study the difference in lycopene content in fruits of both the genotypes. The expression of Phytoene Synthase (PSY) increased by 36 fold and Phytoene desaturase (PDS) increased by 14fold from immature green stage to ripe stage in IIHR-249-1. The expression of Chloroplast lycopene β cyclase (LCY-B) and Chromoplast lycopene β cyclase (CYC-B) decreased gradually from the initial stage to the ripe stage in IIHR-249-1. IIHR 249-1 showed 3 and 1.8 fold decrease in gene expression for Chloroplast lycopene β cyclase ((LCY-B) and Chromoplast lycopene β cyclase (CYC-B) .The F2 hybrids derived from IIHR-249-1 and IIHR-2866 were analyzed at the ripe stage for lycopene content. The gene expression of Chloroplast lycopene β cyclase (LCY-B) and Chromoplast lycopene β cyclase (CYC-B) in high and low lycopene lines from F2 progenies also showed the decrease in transcript levels of both the genes in high lycopene F2 lines. We wish to suggest that the differential expression of Lycopene β -cyclases can be used in marker assisted breeding.

  8. Analysis of the ACTN3 heterozygous genotype suggests that α-actinin-3 controls sarcomeric composition and muscle function in a dose-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogarth, Marshall W; Garton, Fleur C; Houweling, Peter J; Tukiainen, Taru; Lek, Monkol; Macarthur, Daniel G; Seto, Jane T; Quinlan, Kate G R; Yang, Nan; Head, Stewart I; North, Kathryn N

    2016-03-01

    A common null polymorphism (R577X) in ACTN3 causes α-actinin-3 deficiency in ∼ 18% of the global population. There is no associated disease phenotype, but α-actinin-3 deficiency is detrimental to sprint and power performance in both elite athletes and the general population. However, despite considerable investigation to date, the functional consequences of heterozygosity for ACTN3 are unclear. A subset of studies have shown an intermediate phenotype in 577RX individuals, suggesting dose-dependency of α-actinin-3, while others have shown no difference between 577RR and RX genotypes. Here, we investigate the effects of α-actinin-3 expression level by comparing the muscle phenotypes of Actn3(+/-) (HET) mice to Actn3(+/+) [wild-type (WT)] and Actn3(-/-) [knockout (KO)] littermates. We show reduction in α-actinin-3 mRNA and protein in HET muscle compared with WT, which is associated with dose-dependent up-regulation of α-actinin-2, z-band alternatively spliced PDZ-motif and myotilin at the Z-line, and an incremental shift towards oxidative metabolism. While there is no difference in force generation, HET mice have an intermediate endurance capacity compared with WT and KO. The R577X polymorphism is associated with changes in ACTN3 expression consistent with an additive model in the human genotype-tissue expression cohort, but does not influence any other muscle transcripts, including ACTN2. Overall, ACTN3 influences sarcomeric composition in a dose-dependent fashion in mouse skeletal muscle, which translates directly to function. Variance in fibre type between biopsies likely masks this phenomenon in human skeletal muscle, but we suggest that an additive model is the most appropriate for use in testing ACTN3 genotype associations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Social environment influences the relationship between genotype and gene expression in wild baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runcie, Daniel E; Wiedmann, Ralph T; Archie, Elizabeth A; Altmann, Jeanne; Wray, Gregory A; Alberts, Susan C; Tung, Jenny

    2013-05-19

    Variation in the social environment can have profound effects on survival and reproduction in wild social mammals. However, we know little about the degree to which these effects are influenced by genetic differences among individuals, and conversely, the degree to which social environmental variation mediates genetic reaction norms. To better understand these relationships, we investigated the potential for dominance rank, social connectedness and group size to modify the effects of genetic variation on gene expression in the wild baboons of the Amboseli basin. We found evidence for a number of gene-environment interactions (GEIs) associated with variation in the social environment, encompassing social environments experienced in adulthood as well as persistent effects of early life social environment. Social connectedness, maternal dominance rank and group size all interacted with genotype to influence gene expression in at least one sex, and either in early life or in adulthood. These results suggest that social and behavioural variation, akin to other factors such as age and sex, can impact the genotype-phenotype relationship. We conclude that GEIs mediated by the social environment are important in the evolution and maintenance of individual differences in wild social mammals, including individual differences in responses to social stressors.

  10. Effects of hepatitis B virus precore and basal core promoter mutations on the expression of viral antigens: genotype B vs C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C-J; Cheng, H-R; Chen, C-L; Chen, T-C; Tseng, T-C; Wang, Z-L; Chen, P-J; Liu, C-H; Chen, D-S; Kao, J-H

    2011-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes/mutants are known to affect natural outcomes. The virologic differences among HBV genotype, precore and basal core promoter (BCP) mutations were investigated. HBV strains were isolated from 18 hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-positive patients (nine genotype B and nine genotype C). All had precore and BCP wild-type sequences. After cloning of full-length HBV genome, the effects of viral genotype, precore and BCP mutations singly or additively on the expression of viral DNA and antigens were investigated by mutagenesis and transfection assays in Huh7 cells. Significant findings included the following: (i) expression of intracellular core protein increased when precore or BCP mutation was introduced in genotype C strains; (ii) expression of intracellular surface protein was lower in genotype C precore wild-type strain compared with genotype B; (iii) precore mutation was associated with a lower extracellular expression level of HBV DNA; (iv) secretion of hepatitis B surface antigen in genotype C was lower than that in genotype B; and (v) secretion of HBeAg in genotype B was lower than that in genotype C. No additive effect was observed by combining precore and BCP mutations. Hence, HBV genotype and precore/BCP mutations correlate with intrahepatic expression of viral antigens in vitro.

  11. Bacterial histo-blood group antigens contributing to genotype-dependent removal of human noroviruses with a microfiltration membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasiri, Mohan; Hashiba, Satoshi; Miura, Takayuki; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Nakagomi, Osamu; Ishii, Satoshi; Okabe, Satoshi; Sano, Daisuke

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrated the genotype-dependent removal of human norovirus particles with a microfiltration (MF) membrane in the presence of bacteria bearing histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs). Three genotypes (GII.3, GII.4, and GII.6) of norovirus-like particles (NoVLPs) were mixed with three bacterial strains (Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, Escherichia coli O86:K61:B7, and Staphylococcus epidermidis), respectively, and the mixture was filtered with an MF membrane having a nominal pore size of 0.45 μm. All NoVLP genotypes were rejected by the MF membrane in the presence of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, which excreted HBGAs as extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). This MF membrane removal of NoVLPs was not significant when EPS was removed from cells of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6. GII.6 NoVLP was not rejected with the MF membrane in the presence of E. coli O86:K61:B7, but the removal of EPS of E. coli O86:K61:B7 increased the removal efficiency due to the interaction of NoVLPs with the exposed B-antigen in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of E. coli O86:K61:B7. No MF membrane removal of all three genotypes was observed when S. epidermidis, an HBGA-negative strain, was mixed with NoVLPs. These results demonstrate that the location of HBGAs on bacterial cells is an important factor in determining the genotype-dependent removal efficiency of norovirus particles with the MF membrane. The presence of HBGAs in mixed liquor suspended solids from a membrane bioreactor (MBR) pilot plant was confirmed by immune-transmission electron microscopy, which implies that bacterial HBGAs can contribute to the genotype-dependent removal of human noroviruses with MBR using MF membrane.

  12. T3SS-dependent differential modulations of the jasmonic acid pathway in susceptible and resistant genotypes of Malus spp. challenged with Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugé De Bernonville, Thomas; Gaucher, Matthieu; Flors, Victor; Gaillard, Sylvain; Paulin, Jean-Pierre; Dat, James F; Brisset, Marie-Noëlle

    2012-06-01

    Fire blight is a bacterial disease of Maloideae caused by Erwinia amylovora (Ea). This necrogenic enterobacterium uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject type III effectors into the plant cells to cause disease on its susceptible hosts, including economically important crops like apple and pear. The expressions of marker genes of the salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) defense regulation pathways were monitored by RT-qPCR in leaves of two apple genotypes, one susceptible and one resistant, challenged with a wild type strain, a T3SS-deficient strain or water. The transcriptional data taken together with hormone level measurements indicated that the SA pathway was similarly induced in both apple genotypes during infection by Ea. On the contrary, the data clearly showed a strong T3SS-dependent down-regulation of the JA pathway in leaves of the susceptible genotype but not in those of the resistant one. Accordingly, methyl-jasmonate treated susceptible plants displayed an increased resistance to Ea. Bacterial mutant analysis indicated that JA manipulation by Ea mainly relies on the type III effector DspA/E. Taken together, our data suggest that the T3SS-dependent down-regulation of the JA pathway is a critical step in the infection process of Malus spp. by Ea.

  13. Maternal environment influences cocaine intake in adulthood in a genotype-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rixt van der Veen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accumulating epidemiological evidence points to the role of genetic background as a modulator of the capacity of adverse early experiences to give rise to mental illness. However, direct evidence of such gene-environment interaction in the context of substance abuse is scarce. In the present study we investigated whether the impact of early life experiences on cocaine intake in adulthood depends on genetic background. In addition, we studied other behavioral dimensions associated with drug abuse, i.e. anxiety- and depression-related behaviors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For this purpose, we manipulated the maternal environment of two inbred mouse strains, the C57BL/6J and DBA/2J by fostering them with non-related mothers, i.e. the C3H/HeN and AKR strains. These mother strains show respectively high and low pup-oriented behavior. As adults, C57BL/6J and DBA/2J were tested either for cocaine intravenous self-administration or in the elevated plus-maze and forced swim test (FST. We found that the impact of maternal environment on cocaine use and a depression-related behavior depends upon genotype, as cocaine self-administration and behavior in the FST were influenced by maternal environment in DBA/2J, but not in C57BL/6J mice. Anxiety was not influenced by maternal environment in either strain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our experimental approach could contribute to the identification of the psychobiological factors determining the susceptibility or the resilience of certain individuals to develop psychopathologies.

  14. Genotyping, levels of expression and physical status of human papilloma virus in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma among Colombian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erira, Alveiro; Motta, Leidy Angélica; Chala, Andrés; Moreno, Andrey; Gamboa, Fredy; García, Dabeiba Adriana

    2015-10-23

    One of the risk factors for squamous cell oropharyngeal carcinoma is infection with the human papilloma virus (HPV), with prevalences that vary depending on the geographical region.  To identify the most frequent HPV viral types in oropharyngeal cancer, the levels of expression and the physical condition of the viral genome.  Forty-six patients were included in the study from among those attending head and neck surgical services in the cities of Bogotá, Manizales and Bucaramanga. In the histopathological report all study samples were characterized as oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. DNA extraction was subsequently performed for HPV genotyping and to determine the physical state of the viral genome, as well as RNA to determine viral transcripts using real-time PCR.  HPV prevalence in tumors was 21.74% (n=10) and the most common viral type was HPV-16 (nine cases). Viral expression for HPV-16 was low (one of 11 copies) and the predominant physical state of the virus was mixed (eight cases), with disruption observed at the E1 - E2 binding site (2525 - 3720 nucleotides).  The prevalence of HPV associated with oropharyngeal carcinoma among the Colombian study population was 21.7%, which is relatively low. The most frequent viral type was HPV-16, found in a mixed form and with low expression of E7, possibly indicating a poor prognosis for these patients.

  15. RBCS1 expression in coffee: Coffea orthologs, Coffea arabica homeologs, and expression variability between genotypes and under drought stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vieira Luiz GE

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In higher plants, the inhibition of photosynthetic capacity under drought is attributable to stomatal and non-stomatal (i.e., photochemical and biochemical effects. In particular, a disruption of photosynthetic metabolism and Rubisco regulation can be observed. Several studies reported reduced expression of the RBCS genes, which encode the Rubisco small subunit, under water stress. Results Expression of the RBCS1 gene was analysed in the allopolyploid context of C. arabica, which originates from a natural cross between the C. canephora and C. eugenioides species. Our study revealed the existence of two homeologous RBCS1 genes in C. arabica: one carried by the C. canephora sub-genome (called CaCc and the other carried by the C. eugenioides sub-genome (called CaCe. Using specific primer pairs for each homeolog, expression studies revealed that CaCe was expressed in C. eugenioides and C. arabica but was undetectable in C. canephora. On the other hand, CaCc was expressed in C. canephora but almost completely silenced in non-introgressed ("pure" genotypes of C. arabica. However, enhanced CaCc expression was observed in most C. arabica cultivars with introgressed C. canephora genome. In addition, total RBCS1 expression was higher for C. arabica cultivars that had recently introgressed C. canephora genome than for "pure" cultivars. For both species, water stress led to an important decrease in the abundance of RBCS1 transcripts. This was observed for plants grown in either greenhouse or field conditions under severe or moderate drought. However, this reduction of RBCS1 gene expression was not accompanied by a decrease in the corresponding protein in the leaves of C. canephora subjected to water withdrawal. In that case, the amount of RBCS1 was even higher under drought than under unstressed (irrigated conditions, which suggests great stability of RBCS1 under adverse water conditions. On the other hand, for C. arabica, high nocturnal

  16. Effect of p53 genotype on gene expression profiles in murine liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Suzanne M. [Division of Genetic and Reproductive Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, US Food and Drug Administration, 3900 NCTR Road, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)], E-mail: suzanne.morris@fda.hhs.gov; Akerman, Gregory S. [Toxicology Branch, Health Effects Division (7509P), US Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Desai, Varsha G. [Division of Systems Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, US Food and Drug Administration, 3900 NCTR Road, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Tsai, Chen-an [Biostatistics Center and Department of Public Health, China Medical University, Taichung, 40402, Taiwan (China); Tolleson, William H.; Melchior, William B. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, US Food and Drug Administration, 3900 NCTR Road, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Lin, Chien-Ju [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, National Center for Toxicological Research, US Food and Drug Administration, 3900 NCTR Road, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Fuscoe, James C. [Division of Systems Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, US Food and Drug Administration, 3900 NCTR Road, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Casciano, Daniel A. [Dan Casciano and Associates, 47 Marcella Drive, Little Rock, AR 72233 (United States); Chen, James J. [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, National Center for Toxicological Research, US Food and Drug Administration, 3900 NCTR Road, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)

    2008-04-02

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 is a key regulatory element in the cell and is regarded as the 'guardian of the genome'. Much of the present knowledge of p53 function has come from studies of transgenic mice in which the p53 gene has undergone a targeted deletion. In order to provide additional insight into the impact on the cellular regulatory networks associated with the loss of this gene, microarray technology was utilized to assess gene expression in tissues from both the p53{sup -/-} and p53{sup +/-} mice. Six male mice from each genotype (p53{sup +/+}, p53{sup +/-}, and p53{sup -/-}) were humanely killed and the tissues processed for microarray analysis. The initial studies have been performed in the liver for which the Dunnett test revealed 1406 genes to be differentially expressed between p53{sup +/+} and p53{sup +/-} or between p53{sup +/+} and p53{sup -/-} at the level of p {<=} 0.05. Both genes with increased expression and decreased expression were identified in p53{sup +/-} and in p53{sup -/-} mice. Most notable in the gene list derived from the p53{sup +/-} mice was the significant reduction in p53 mRNA. In the p53{sup -/-} mice, not only was there reduced expression of the p53 genes on the array, but genes associated with DNA repair, apoptosis, and cell proliferation were differentially expressed, as expected. However, altered expression was noted for many genes in the Cdc42-GTPase pathways that influence cell proliferation. This may indicate that alternate pathways are brought into play in the unperturbed liver when loss or reduction in p53 levels occurs.

  17. Expressão do potencial de rendimento de cultivares de soja Yield potential expression of soybean genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Motta Navarro Júnior

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available A soja possui alto potencial de rendimento de grãos, mas em virtude da interação genótipo vs. ambiente esse potencial não é verificado em sua totalidade. Utilizando-se seis genótipos de soja de diferentes ciclos, objetivou-se estudar a expressão do potencial de rendimento de grãos e quantificá-lo durante a ontogenia. O experimento foi conduzido no ano agrícola 1996/97 na Estação Experimental Agronômica da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Eldorado do Sul, RS. As avaliações foram realizadas em plantas individuais e se estenderam desde o estádio de floração até o de maturação. Os resultados obtidos indicam que alto potencial de rendimento não necessariamente identifica uma planta eficiente na retenção das estruturas reprodutivas. Os potenciais de rendimento estimados na floração e no início do enchimento de grãos não se mantêm até a maturação. Genótipos com alto potencial de rendimento de grãos em R8 não apresentam os maiores potenciais de rendimento de grãos em R2 e em R5, porém, são os que apresentam as menores diferenças entre o potencial estimado em R5 e o estimado em R2.Soybean has high yield potential, which is not totally expressed due to genotype vs. environment interaction. Six soybean genotypes of different maturity groups were used with the objective of studying their yield potential expression and quantifying it during ontogeny. The experiment was conducted during the 1996/97 growing season in the Agronomic Experimental Station of the Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Eldorado do Sul, RS, Brazil. Plants were evaluated individually from flowering until maturity. Results obtained indicate that high yield potential does not necessarily mean an efficient plant in reproductive structure retention. Yield potential estimated in the flowering and beginning of grain filling stages are not maintained until maturity. Genotypes with high yield potential in the R8 stage do not present the

  18. Integrated Microfluidic Devices for Automated Microarray-Based Gene Expression and Genotyping Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Robin H.; Lodes, Mike; Fuji, H. Sho; Danley, David; McShea, Andrew

    Microarray assays typically involve multistage sample processing and fluidic handling, which are generally labor-intensive and time-consuming. Automation of these processes would improve robustness, reduce run-to-run and operator-to-operator variation, and reduce costs. In this chapter, a fully integrated and self-contained microfluidic biochip device that has been developed to automate the fluidic handling steps for microarray-based gene expression or genotyping analysis is presented. The device consists of a semiconductor-based CustomArray® chip with 12,000 features and a microfluidic cartridge. The CustomArray was manufactured using a semiconductor-based in situ synthesis technology. The micro-fluidic cartridge consists of microfluidic pumps, mixers, valves, fluid channels, and reagent storage chambers. Microarray hybridization and subsequent fluidic handling and reactions (including a number of washing and labeling steps) were performed in this fully automated and miniature device before fluorescent image scanning of the microarray chip. Electrochemical micropumps were integrated in the cartridge to provide pumping of liquid solutions. A micromixing technique based on gas bubbling generated by electrochemical micropumps was developed. Low-cost check valves were implemented in the cartridge to prevent cross-talk of the stored reagents. Gene expression study of the human leukemia cell line (K562) and genotyping detection and sequencing of influenza A subtypes have been demonstrated using this integrated biochip platform. For gene expression assays, the microfluidic CustomArray device detected sample RNAs with a concentration as low as 0.375 pM. Detection was quantitative over more than three orders of magnitude. Experiment also showed that chip-to-chip variability was low indicating that the integrated microfluidic devices eliminate manual fluidic handling steps that can be a significant source of variability in genomic analysis. The genotyping results showed

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi: gene expression surveyed by proteomic analysis reveals interaction between different genotypes in mixed in vitro cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Machin

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the comportment in in vitro culture of 2 different genotypes of Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, pertaining to 2 major genetic subdivisions (near-clades of this parasite. One of the stocks was a fast-growing one, highly virulent in mice, while the other one was slow-growing, mildly virulent in mice. The working hypothesis was that mixtures of genotypes interact, a pattern that has been observed by us in empirical experimental studies. Genotype mixtures were followed every 7 days and characterized by the DIGE technology of proteomic analysis. Proteic spots of interest were characterized by the SAMESPOT software. Patterns were compared to those of pure genotypes that were also evaluated every 7 days. One hundred and three spots exhibited changes in time by comparison with T = 0. The major part of these spots (58% exhibited an under-expression pattern by comparison with the pure genotypes. 32% of the spots were over-expressed; 10% of spots were not different from those of pure genotypes. Interestingly, interaction started a few minutes after the mixtures were performed. We have retained 43 different proteins that clearly exhibited either under- or over-expression. Proteins showing interaction were characterized by mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF. Close to 50% of them were either tubulins or heat shock proteins. This study confirms that mixed genotypes of T. cruzi interact at the molecular level. This is of great interest because mixtures of genotypes are very frequent in Chagas natural cycles, both in insect vectors and in mammalian hosts, and may play an important role in the transmission and severity of Chagas disease. The methodology proposed here is potentially applicable to any micropathogen, including fungi, bacteria and viruses. It should be of great interest in the case of bacteria, for which the epidemiological and clinical consequences of mixed infections could be underestimated.

  20. Association between Gc genotype and susceptibility to TB is dependent on vitamin D status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martineau, A R; Leandro, A C C S; Anderson, S T; Newton, S M; Wilkinson, K A; Nicol, M P; Pienaar, S M; Skolimowska, K H; Rocha, M A; Rolla, V C; Levin, M; Davidson, R N; Bremner, S A; Griffiths, C J; Eley, B S; Bonecini-Almeida, M G; Wilkinson, R J

    2010-05-01

    Group-specific component (Gc) variants of vitamin D binding protein differ in their affinity for vitamin D metabolites that modulate antimycobacterial immunity. We conducted studies to determine whether Gc genotype associates with susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB). The following subjects were recruited into case-control studies: in the UK, 123 adult TB patients and 140 controls, all of Gujarati Asian ethnic origin; in Brazil, 130 adult TB patients and 78 controls; and in South Africa, 281 children with TB and 182 controls. Gc genotypes were determined and their frequency was compared between cases versus controls. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations were obtained retrospectively for 139 Gujarati Asians, and case-control analysis was stratified by vitamin D status. Interferon (IFN)-gamma release assays were also performed on 36 Gujarati Asian TB contacts. The Gc2/2 genotype was strongly associated with susceptibility to active TB in Gujarati Asians, compared with Gc1/1 genotype (OR 2.81, 95% CI 1.19-6.66; p = 0.009). This association was preserved if serum 25(OH)D was or =20 nmol.L(-1) (p = 0.36). Carriage of the Gc2 allele was associated with increased PPD of tuberculin-stimulated IFN-gamma release in Gujarati Asian TB contacts (p = 0.02). No association between Gc genotype and susceptibility to TB was observed in other ethnic groups studied.

  1. Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genotype diversity and interferon gamma expression in patients with chronic gastritis and patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Carrillo, D N; Atrisco-Morales, J; Hernández-Pando, R; Reyes-Navarrete, S; Betancourt-Linares, R; Cruz-del Carmen, I; Illades Aguiar, B; Román-Román, A; Fernández-Tilapa, G

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main risk factor for the development of chronic gastritis, gastric ulcer, and gastric cancer. In H. pylori-infected individuals, the clinical result is dependent on various factors, among which are bacterial components, the immune response, and environmental influence. To compare IFN-γ expression with the H. pylori vacA and cagA genotypes in patients with chronic gastritis and patients with gastric cancer. Ninety-five patients diagnosed with chronic gastritis and 20 with gastric cancer were included in the study. Three gastric biopsies were taken; one was used for the molecular detection and genotyping of H. pylori; another was fixed in absolute alcohol and histologic sections were made for determining IFN-γ expression through immunohistochemistry. No differences were found in the cells that expressed IFN-γ between the patients with chronic gastritis (median percentage of positive cells: 82.6% in patients without H. pylori and 82% in infected persons) and those with gastric cancer (70.5% in H. pylori-negative patients and 78.5% in infected persons). IFN-γ expression was 69% in chronic gastritis patients infected with H. pylori vacAs2m2/cagA⁻ it was 86.5% in patients infected with H. pylori vacAs1m2/cagA⁻, 86.5% in vacAs1m1/cagA⁻, and 82% in vacAs1m1/cagA⁺. Similar data were found in the patients with gastric cancer. IFN-γ expression varied depending on the H. pylori vacA and cagA genotype, but not in accordance with the presence of chronic gastritis or gastric cancer.

  2. Differentially expressed genes between drought-tolerant and drought-sensitive barley genotypes in response to drought stress during the reproductive stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peiguo; Baum, Michael; Grando, Stefania; Ceccarelli, Salvatore; Bai, Guihua; Li, Ronghua; von Korff, Maria; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Graner, Andreas; Valkoun, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Drought tolerance is a key trait for increasing and stabilizing barley productivity in dry areas worldwide. Identification of the genes responsible for drought tolerance in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) will facilitate understanding of the molecular mechanisms of drought tolerance, and also facilitate the genetic improvement of barley through marker-assisted selection or gene transformation. To monitor the changes in gene expression at the transcriptional level in barley leaves during the reproductive stage under drought conditions, the 22K Affymetrix Barley 1 microarray was used to screen two drought-tolerant barley genotypes, Martin and Hordeum spontaneum 41-1 (HS41-1), and one drought-sensitive genotype Moroc9-75. Seventeen genes were expressed exclusively in the two drought-tolerant genotypes under drought stress, and their encoded proteins may play significant roles in enhancing drought tolerance through controlling stomatal closure via carbon metabolism (NADP malic enzyme, NADP-ME, and pyruvate dehydrogenase, PDH), synthesizing the osmoprotectant glycine-betaine (C-4 sterol methyl oxidase, CSMO), generating protectants against reactive-oxygen-species scavenging (aldehyde dehydrogenase,ALDH, ascorbate-dependent oxidoreductase, ADOR), and stabilizing membranes and proteins (heat-shock protein 17.8, HSP17.8, and dehydrin 3, DHN3). Moreover, 17 genes were abundantly expressed in Martin and HS41-1 compared with Moroc9-75 under both drought and control conditions. These genes were possibly constitutively expressed in drought-tolerant genotypes. Among them, seven known annotated genes might enhance drought tolerance through signalling [such as calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) and membrane steroid binding protein (MSBP)], anti-senescence (G2 pea dark accumulated protein, GDA2), and detoxification (glutathione S-transferase, GST) pathways. In addition, 18 genes, including those encoding Δl-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS), protein phosphatase 2C

  3. Genotype-by-environment interactions underlie the expression of pre- and post-copulatory sexually selected traits in guppies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J P; Rahman, M M; Gasparini, C

    2015-04-01

    The role that genotype-by-environment interactions (GEIs) play in sexual selection has only recently attracted the attention of evolutionary biologists. Yet GEIs can have profound evolutionary implications by compromising the honesty of sexual signals, maintaining high levels of genetic variance underlying their expression and altering the patterns of genetic covariance among fitness traits. In this study, we test for GEIs in a highly sexually dimorphic freshwater fish, the guppy Poecilia reticulata. We conducted an experimental quantitative genetic study in which male offspring arising from a paternal half-sibling breeding design were assigned to differing nutritional 'environments' (either high or low feed levels). We then determined whether the manipulation of diet quantity influenced levels of additive genetic variance and covariance for several highly variable and condition-dependent pre- and post-copulatory sexual traits. In accordance with previous work, we found that dietary limitation had strong phenotypic effects on numerous pre- and post-copulatory sexual traits. We also report evidence for significant GEI for several of these traits, which in some cases (area of iridescence and sperm velocity) reflected a change in the rank order of genotypes across different nutritional environments (i.e. ecological crossover). Furthermore, we show that genetic correlations vary significantly between nutritional environments. Notably, a highly significant negative genetic correlation between iridescent coloration and sperm viability in the high food treatment broke down under dietary restriction. Taken together, these findings are likely to have important evolutionary implications for guppies; ecological crossover may influence sexual signal reliability in unstable (nutritional) environments and contribute towards the extreme levels of polymorphism in sexual traits typically reported for this species. Furthermore, the presence of environment-specific genetic covariance

  4. Expression of zinc and cadmium responsive genes in leaves of willow (Salix caprea L.) genotypes with different accumulation characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konlechner, Cornelia; Türktaş, Mine; Langer, Ingrid; Vaculík, Marek; Wenzel, Walter W; Puschenreiter, Markus; Hauser, Marie-Theres

    2013-07-01

    Salix caprea is well suited for phytoextraction strategies. In a previous survey we showed that genetically distinct S. caprea plants isolated from metal-polluted and unpolluted sites differed in their zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) tolerance and accumulation abilities. To determine the molecular basis of this difference we examined putative homologues of genes involved in heavy metal responses and identified over 200 new candidates with a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) screen. Quantitative expression analyses of 20 genes in leaves revealed that some metallothioneins and cell wall modifying genes were induced irrespective of the genotype's origin and metal uptake capacity while a cysteine biosynthesis gene was expressed constitutively higher in the metallicolous genotype. The third and largest group of genes was only induced in the metallicolous genotype. These data demonstrate that naturally adapted woody non-model species can help to discover potential novel molecular mechanisms for metal accumulation and tolerance.

  5. Expression patterns of Doppel in differential ovine PRNP genotypes: quantification using real-time RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Zhao, C-L; Liu, L; Wu, R; Zhang, X-L

    2015-10-09

    Doppel is a homologue of cellular prion protein (PrP)-like protein (PrPC). Different tissue samples were collected from the central nervous system plus four regions of lymphoid system, eleven regions of digestive tract and two reproductive organs from four ARR/ARQ and four ARH/ARQ sheep, genotypes of the PrP gene. Total RNA was isolated from these samples, and Doppel mRNA was quantified by real-time RT-PCR using SYBR Green. Doppel mRNA expression was higher in the ovary, hypothalamus and brain than in other tissues, and it significantly differed between the two genotypes in brain, ileum, cecum, rectum, colon, and uterus. This study demonstrated that Doppel mRNA expression in sheep with ARR/ARQ or ARH/ARQ genotypes was very different. These findings could be helpful in future studies of the relationship between PrP and Doppel.

  6. Dose-dependent cannabis use, depressive symptoms, and FAAH genotype predict sleep quality in emerging adults: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maple, Kristin E; McDaniel, Kymberly A; Shollenbarger, Skyler G; Lisdahl, Krista M

    2016-07-01

    Cannabis has been shown to affect sleep in humans. Findings from animal studies indicate that higher endocannabinoid levels promote sleep, suggesting that chronic use of cannabis, which downregulates endocannabinoid activity, may disrupt sleep. This study sought to determine if past-year cannabis use and genes that regulate endocannabinoid signaling, FAAH rs324420 and CNR1 rs2180619, predicted sleep quality. As depression has been previously associated with both cannabis and sleep, the secondary aim was to determine if depressive symptoms moderated or mediated these relationships. Data were collected from 41 emerging adult (ages 18-25) cannabis users. Exclusion criteria included Axis I disorders (besides SUD) and medical and neurologic disorders. Relationships were tested using multiple regressions, controlling for demographic variables, past-year substance use, and length of cannabis abstinence. Greater past-year cannabis use and FAAH C/C genotype were associated with poorer sleep quality. CNR1 genotype did not significantly predict sleep quality. Depressive symptoms moderated the relationship between cannabis use and sleep at a nonsignificant trend level, such that participants with the higher cannabis use and depressive symptoms reported the more impaired sleep. Depressive symptoms mediated the relationship between FAAH genotype and sleep quality. This study demonstrates a dose-dependent relationship between chronic cannabis use and reported sleep quality, independent of abstinence length. Furthermore, it provides novel evidence that depressive symptoms mediate the relationship between FAAH genotype and sleep quality in humans. These findings suggest potential targets to impact sleep disruptions in cannabis users.

  7. Temporal regulation of polygalacturonase gene expression in fruits of normal, mutant, and heterozygous tomato genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, M S; Handa, A K

    1989-01-01

    Molecular cloning of polygalacturonase (PG; EC 3.2. 1.15) from fruits of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill cv Rutgers) was accomplished by constructing a cDNA library from turning stage poly(A)(+) RNA in lambdagtll and immunoscreening with polyclonal antibodies raised against purified PG2. Both PG cDNA and antibody probes were used to quantify changes in PG gene expression in pericarp from normal, mutant, and heterozygous genotypes. Results show that PG mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity sequentially peak at the turning, ripe, and red ripe stages of Rutgers pericarp ripening, respectively. PG gene expression was attenuated greatly (0-15% of normal on a gram fresh weight basis) for PG mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity in five ripening-impaired mutants (rin, nor, Nr, Gr, and Long Keeper) tested. Maximum expression of the PG gene in heterozygotes of rin, nor, Nr, Gr, and Long Keeper (crosses with Rutgers) at the mRNA level was about 25, 13, 17, 5, and 62% of the Rutgers turning stage, at the protein level was about 166, 110, 15, 6, and 104% of the Rutgers ripe stage, and at the enzyme activity level was about 69, 37, 4, 1, and 50% of the Rutgers red ripe stage, respectively. No PG gene expression was found in preclimacteric fruits or vegetative tissues. PG mRNA was localized on both free and membrane-bound polyribosomes of ripening pericarp. In addition to transcriptional regulation, mechanisms contributing to mRNA stability, delayed protein accumulation, and posttranslational modifications may play important roles in the overall accumulation of PG activity during fruit ripening.

  8. SNPexp - A web tool for calculating and visualizing correlation between HapMap genotypes and gene expression levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franke Andre

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression levels for 47294 transcripts in lymphoblastoid cell lines from all 270 HapMap phase II individuals, and genotypes (both HapMap phase II and III of 3.96 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the same individuals are publicly available. We aimed to generate a user-friendly web based tool for visualization of the correlation between SNP genotypes within a specified genomic region and a gene of interest, which is also well-known as an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL analysis. Results SNPexp is implemented as a server-side script, and publicly available on this website: http://tinyurl.com/snpexp. Correlation between genotype and transcript expression levels are calculated by performing linear regression and the Wald test as implemented in PLINK and visualized using the UCSC Genome Browser. Validation of SNPexp using previously published eQTLs yielded comparable results. Conclusions SNPexp provides a convenient and platform-independent way to calculate and visualize the correlation between HapMap genotypes within a specified genetic region anywhere in the genome and gene expression levels. This allows for investigation of both cis and trans effects. The web interface and utilization of publicly available and widely used software resources makes it an attractive supplement to more advanced bioinformatic tools. For the advanced user the program can be used on a local computer on custom datasets.

  9. Interferon-γ activates expression of p15 and p16 regardless of 9p21.3 coronary artery disease risk genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almontashiri, Naif A M; Fan, Meng; Cheng, Brian L M; Chen, Hsiao-Huei; Roberts, Robert; Stewart, Alexandre F R

    2013-01-15

    Because post-transcriptional mechanisms modulate levels of p16 (encoded by CDKN2A) and p15 (encoded by CDKN2B), we tested whether interferon-γ regulates the expression of these proteins and the effect of the 9p21 genotype. The mechanism whereby the common variant at chromosome 9p21.3 confers risk for coronary artery disease (CAD) remains uncertain. A recent report proposed that 9p21.3 confers differential activation of adjacent genes in response to interferon-γ, and reported that mRNA levels of CDKN2B are reduced in response to interferon-γ. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), aortic smooth muscle cells, HeLa cells, HEK293 cells, and 16 human lymphoblastoid cell lines, all genotyped for the 9p21.3 locus, were treated with interferon-γ and analyzed by immunoblot. In all cells tested--except HUVECs where expression was not modulated by interferon-γ--regardless of 9p21.3 genotype, interferon-γ increased the expression of p16 and p15. Northern blot analysis confirmed that interferon-γ has little effect on mRNA levels of CDKN2A and CDKN2B. The 9p21.3 risk genotype does not affect the activation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p15 and p16 by interferon-γ. Thus, another mechanism is likely to account for the CAD risk associated with this locus. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Gender-dependent association of the functional catechol-O-methyltransferase Val158Met genotype with sensation seeking personality trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Undine E; Bajbouj, Malek; Bajbouj, Malck; Sander, Thomas; Gallinat, Juergen

    2007-09-01

    The gene encoding cathechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) contains a common functional missense polymorphism (Val158Met) that regulates dopamine in an allele-dependent manner. A pivotal role of dopamine neurotransmission in the prefrontal cortex has been implicated in drug-seeking behavior and related personality traits, such as sensation seeking, with some evidence for a gender-specific association. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the COMT Val158Met polymorphism modulates the personality dimension, sensation seeking, in a gender-dependent manner. Study sample included 214 male (age 38.1+/-12.6 years) and 218 female (age 36.1+/-13.6 years) healthy volunteers, who were assessed with Zuckerman's sensation-seeking scale and genotyped for the Val158Met polymorphism (dbSNP:rs4680). Univariate analysis of variance showed that the sensation seeking score was significantly affected by a COMT genotype x gender interaction (F=5.330, df=2, p=0.005). The Val158Met polymorphism was associated with the sensation seeking personality trait in women only. The highest scores in the sensation-seeking scale and in three of the four subscales were observed in female subjects with the Val/Val genotype relative to women carrying the Met allele. Our results suggest that high COMT enzyme activity associated with the Val allele predisposes to high sensation seeking scores in female subjects and add to increasing evidence for a gender specific role of COMT in normal and dysfunctional behavior.

  11. Colonic mucosal gene expression and genotype in irritable bowel syndrome patients with normal or elevated fecal bile acid excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Michael; Carlson, Paula; Acosta, Andres; Busciglio, Irene

    2015-07-01

    The mucosal gene expression in rectosigmoid mucosa (RSM) in irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) is unknown. Our objectives were, first, to study mRNA expression [by RT(2) PCR of 19 genes pertaining to tight junctions, immune activation, intestinal ion transport and bile acid (BA) homeostasis] in RSM in IBS-D patients (n = 47) and healthy controls (n = 17) and study expression of a selected protein (PDZD3) in 10 IBS-D patients and 4 healthy controls; second, to assess RSM mRNA expression according to genotype and fecal BA excretion (high ≥ 2,337 μmol/48 h); and third, to determine whether genotype or mucosal mRNA expression is associated with colonic transit or BA parameters. Fold changes were corrected for false detection rate for 19 genes studied (P colonic transit. We concluded that mucosal ion transport mRNA (for several genes and PDZD3 protein) is upregulated and barrier protein mRNA downregulated in IBS-D compared with healthy controls, independent of genotype. There are no differences in gene expression in IBS-D with high compared with normal fecal BA excretion.

  12. Physiological traits and Mn transporter genes expression in ryegrass genotypes under increasing Mn at short-term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Díaz, Marjorie; Inostroza-Blancheteau, Claudio; Berríos, Graciela; Deppe, Mariana; Demanet, Rolando; Alberdi, Miren

    2017-09-01

    We studied physiological traits and Mn transporter genes expression in ryegrass genotypes (One-50, Banquet-II, Halo-AR1 and Nui) under increasing Mn (2.4-750 μM) at short-term (8-24 h) in nutrient solution. An increment in Mn concentration occurred early in roots of all genotypes at increased Mn doses relative to control. Banquet-II and Nui roots showed the greatest Mn concentration at the highest Mn supply. Net photosynthesis (Pn) of Banquet-II and Halo-AR1 were not perturbed by Mn doses, whereas One-50 and Nui, decayed strongly at the highest Mn dose, concomitant with reduced total chlorophyll concentration. A high accumulation of Mn in roots together the maintained Pn under increased Mn doses in Banquet-II and Halo-AR1 suggest a higher Mn resistance of these genotypes. Stomatal conductance (gs) of all genotypes did not vary in presence of Mn. In roots of Banquet-II an augment of lipid peroxidation (LP) by Mn excess was observed earlier decreasing afterwards, being attenuated by the augment of the radical scavenging activity (RSA) and total phenols (TP) of this genotype. Mn concentration and LP in tissues of One-50 and Nui genotypes rose together, may be due to its Mn sensitivity. Differential expression of Mn transporter genes were found in the studied genotypes grown under increasing supplies of Mn, being MTP8.1 expressed in shoots and NRAMP2-like in roots. We concluded that Banquet-II showed greater Mn concentration associated to high roots NRAMP2-like gene expression, without changes in photosynthetic performance. Despite, this genotype showed an increase of LP at the first hours of Mn-excess, it was decreased by the RSA and TP. Halo-AR1 appears to be Mn-resistant in the short-term due to its photosynthetic performance was unchanged by Mn-toxicity, whilst One-50 and Nui were Mn-sensitive. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Osteoradionecrosis in Head-and-Neck Cancer Has a Distinct Genotype-Dependent Cause

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, Andrew J., E-mail: Andrew.Lyons@gstt.nhs.uk [Head and Neck Unit, Guy' s and St. Thomas' Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); West, Catharine M. [University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Risk, Janet M. [Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Slevin, Nick J.; Chan, Clara [Department of Clinical Oncology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Crichton, Siobhan [Division of Health and Social Care Research, King' s College, London (United Kingdom); Rinck, Gabrielle; Howell, Dawn [Laboratory 21, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Shaw, Richard J. [Liverpool CR-UK Centre, Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We performed a case-control study to establish whether the development of osteoradionecrosis (ORN) was related to a variant allele substituting T for C at -509 of the transforming growth factor-{beta}1 gene (TGF-{beta}1). Patients and Methods: A total of 140 patients, 39 with and 101 without ORN, who underwent radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer with a minimum of 2 years follow-up, were studied. None of the patients had clinical evidence of recurrence at this time. DNA extracted from blood was genotyped for the -509 C-T variant allele of the TGF-{beta}1 gene. Results: There were no significant differences in patient, cancer treatment, or tumor characteristics between the two groups. Of the 39 patients who developed ORN, 9 were homozygous for the common CC allele, 19 were heterozygous, and 11 were homozygous for the rare TT genotype. Of the 101 patients without ORN, the distribution was 56 (CC), 33 (CT), and 12 (TT). The difference in distribution was significant, giving an increased risk of ORN of 5.7 (95% CI, 1.7-19.2) for homozygote TT patients (p = 0.001) and 3.6 (95% CI, 1.3-10.0) for heterozygotes (p = 0.004) when compared with patients with the CC genotype. Postradiotherapy dentoalveolar surgery preceding the development of ORN was associated with the CC genotype (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Our findings support the postulate that the development of ORN is related to the presence of the T variant allele at -509 within the TGF-{beta}1 gene.

  14. Genetic ecotoxicology IV: survival and DNA strand breakage is dependent on genotype in radionuclide-exposed mosquitofish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodorakis, C.W. [Texas A and M University, Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, College Station, TX 77843-2258 (United States); Elbl, T. [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Philadelphia, PA 19102 (United States); Shugart, L.R. [L.R. Shugart and Associates, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    1999-05-01

    Western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) were caged in situ in a radioactively-contaminated pond in order to determine if survival and amount of DNA strand breakage were dependent on genotype. Genotypes of fish were determined using the randomly amplified polymorphic (RAPD) technique, and DNA strand breakage was determined using agarose gel electrophoresis. This study is a continuation of research undertaken at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which examined the effects of radionuclide contamination on the population genetic structure of mosquitofish. The previous research found 17 RAPD markers that were present at a higher frequency in contaminated than in reference populations ('contaminant-indicative bands'), and fish from contaminated sites which possessed these markers had higher fecundity and fewer strand breaks than fish which did not. One of the contaminated populations (Pond 3513) was colonized from one of the reference populations (Crystal Springs) in 1977. In the present study, fish were obtained from Crystal Springs and an additional reference site, and caged in Pond 3513. The percent survival and amount of DNA strand breakage were then determined for fish with and without the contaminant-indicative markers. When Crystal Springs fish were caged in Pond 3513, it was found that the genotypic distribution of the survivors was more similar to the native Pond 3513 population than to the Crystal Springs population. Furthermore, for nine of the contaminant-indicative markers, the percent survival was greater for fish which possessed these markers than for fish which did not. For five of these markers, fish which possessed them had higher DNA integrity (fewer strand breaks) than fish which did not. These data indicate that probability of survival and degree of DNA strand breakage in radionuclide-exposed mosquitofish are dependent on RAPD genotype, and are consistent with the hypothesis that the contaminant-indicative RAPD bands are markers of loci

  15. Differential survival of mosquitofish exposed to radionuclides is dependent on RAPD genotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodorakis, C.W. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN (United States); Shugart, L.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    In previous studies, it was found that certain RAPD (Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA) markers were present at higher frequencies in radionuclide-contaminated mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) populations than in reference populations. These markers will be referred to as contaminant specific markers. In the present study, fish with and without these markers were collected from non-contaminated populations and exposed in situ to radionuclides by caging them in one of the contaminated sites. Forty fish were exposed for 1--6 weeks, after which the survivors were collected and DNA was extracted for genotypic analysis. In one experiment, the frequencies of contaminant specific markers in the survivors were compared to the frequencies of these markers in the native contaminated and uncontaminated (the source of the caged fish) populations. It was found that the genotypic distributions were more similar to the native contaminated population. In another experiment, samples of caudal fin tissue were collected for DNA extraction before and after placing fish in the cages, in order to compare survival rates of different genotypes. It was found that fish with the contaminant indicative bands had higher percent survival than the other fish. Experiments are underway or are being planned in order to determine the molecular identity of these bands and the ecological significance of altered band frequencies in hopes of developing population-level biomarkers of contaminant exposure and ecological affects.

  16. Effects of Lactobacillus helveticus on murine behavior are dependent on diet and genotype and correlate with alterations in the gut microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohland, Christina L; Kish, Lisa; Bell, Haley; Thiesen, Aducio; Hotte, Naomi; Pankiv, Evelina; Madsen, Karen L

    2013-09-01

    Modulation of the gut microbiota with diet and probiotic bacteria can restore intestinal homeostasis in inflammatory conditions and alter behavior via the gut-brain axis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the modulatory effects of probiotics differ depending on diet and mouse genotype. At weaning, wild type (WT) and IL-10 deficient (IL-10(-/-)) 129/SvEv mice were placed on a standard mouse chow or a Western-style diet (fat 33%, refined carbohydrate 49%)±Lactobacillus helveticus ROO52 (10(9)cfu/d) for 21 days. Animal weight and food eaten were monitored weekly. Intestinal immune function was analysed for cytokine expression using the Meso Scale Discovery platform. Spatial memory and anxiety-like behavior was assessed in a Barnes maze. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) was used to analyze the fecal microbiota. Both WT and IL-10(-/-) mice on a Western diet had increased weight gain along with changes in gut microbiota and cytokine expression and altered anxiety-like behavior. The ability of L. helveticus to modulate these factors was genotype- and diet-dependent. Anxiety-like behavior and memory were negatively affected by Western-style diet depending on inflammatory state, but this change was prevented with L. helveticus administration. However, probiotics alone decreased anxiety-like behavior in WT mice on a chow diet. Mice on the Western diet had decreased inflammation and fecal corticosterone, but these markers did not correlate with changes in behavior. Analysis of bacterial phyla from WT and IL-10(-/-)mice showed discrete clustering of the groups to be associated with both diet and probiotic supplementation, with the diet-induced shift normalized to some degree by L. helveticus. These findings suggest that the type of diet consumed by the host and the presence or absence of active inflammation may significantly alter the ability of probiotics to modulate host physiological function.

  17. Variable salinity responses of 12 alfalfa genotypes and comparative expression analyses of salt-response genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twelve alfalfa genotypes that were selected for biomass under salinity, differences in Na and Cl concentrations in shoots and K/Na ratio were evaluated in this long-term salinity experiment. The selected plants were cloned to reduce genetic variability within each genotype. Salt tolerance (ST) index...

  18. Sex-specific genotype-by-environment interactions for cuticular hydrocarbon expression in decorated crickets, Gryllodes sigillatus: implications for the evolution of signal reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weddle, C B; Mitchell, C; Bay, S K; Sakaluk, S K; Hunt, J

    2012-10-01

    Phenotypic traits that convey information about individual identity or quality are important in animal social interactions, and the degree to which such traits are influenced by environmental variation can have profound effects on the reliability of these cues. Using inbred genetic lines of the decorated cricket, Gryllodes sigillatus, we manipulated diet quality to test how the cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) profiles of males and females respond across two different nutritional rearing environments. There were significant differences between lines in the CHC profiles of females, but the effect of diet was not quite statistically significant. There was no significant genotype-by-environment interaction (GEI), suggesting that environmental effects on phenotypic variation in female CHCs are independent of genotype. There was, however, a significant effect of GEI for males, with changes in both signal quantity and content, suggesting that environmental effects on phenotypic expression of male CHCs are dependent on genotype. The differential response of male and female CHC expression to variation in the nutritional environment suggests that these chemical cues may be under sex-specific selection for signal reliability. Female CHCs show the characteristics of reliable cues of identity: high genetic variability, low condition dependence and a high degree of genetic determination. This supports earlier work showing that female CHCs are used in self-recognition to identify previous mates and facilitate polyandry. In contrast, male CHCs show the characteristics of reliable cues of quality: condition dependence and a relatively higher degree of environmental determination. This suggests that male CHCs are likely to function as cues of underlying quality during mate choice and/or male dominance interactions.

  19. Studying the Complex Expression Dependences between Sets of Coexpressed Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Huerta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Organisms simplify the orchestration of gene expression by coregulating genes whose products function together in the cell. The use of clustering methods to obtain sets of coexpressed genes from expression arrays is very common; nevertheless there are no appropriate tools to study the expression networks among these sets of coexpressed genes. The aim of the developed tools is to allow studying the complex expression dependences that exist between sets of coexpressed genes. For this purpose, we start detecting the nonlinear expression relationships between pairs of genes, plus the coexpressed genes. Next, we form networks among sets of coexpressed genes that maintain nonlinear expression dependences between all of them. The expression relationship between the sets of coexpressed genes is defined by the expression relationship between the skeletons of these sets, where this skeleton represents the coexpressed genes with a well-defined nonlinear expression relationship with the skeleton of the other sets. As a result, we can study the nonlinear expression relationships between a target gene and other sets of coexpressed genes, or start the study from the skeleton of the sets, to study the complex relationships of activation and deactivation between the sets of coexpressed genes that carry out the different cellular processes present in the expression experiments.

  20. Cruciferous vegetable supplementation in a controlled diet study alters the serum peptidome in a GSTM1-genotype dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cruciferous vegetable intake is inversely associated with the risk of several cancers. Isothiocyanates (ITC are hypothesized to be the major bioactive constituents contributing to these cancer-preventive effects. The polymorphic glutathione-S-transferase (GST gene family encodes several enzymes which catalyze ITC degradation in vivo. Methods We utilized high throughput proteomics methods to examine how human serum peptides (the "peptidome" change in response to cruciferous vegetable feeding in individuals of different GSTM1 genotypes. In two randomized, crossover, controlled feeding studies (EAT and 2EAT participants consumed a fruit- and vegetable-free basal diet and the basal diet supplemented with cruciferous vegetables. Serum samples collected at the end of the feeding period were fractionated and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry spectra were obtained. Peak identification/alignment computer algorithms and mixed effects models were used to analyze the data. Results After analysis of spectra from EAT participants, 24 distinct peaks showed statistically significant differences associated with cruciferous vegetable intake. Twenty of these peaks were driven by their GSTM1 genotype (i.e., GSTM1+ or GSTM1- null. When data from EAT and 2EAT participants were compared by joint processing of spectra to align a common set, 6 peaks showed consistent changes in both studies in a genotype-dependent manner. The peaks at 6700 m/z and 9565 m/z were identified as an isoform of transthyretin (TTR and a fragment of zinc α2-glycoprotein (ZAG, respectively. Conclusions Cruciferous vegetable intake in GSTM1+ individuals led to changes in circulating levels of several peptides/proteins, including TTR and a fragment of ZAG. TTR is a known marker of nutritional status and ZAG is an adipokine that plays a role in lipid mobilization. The results of this study present evidence that the GSTM1

  1. Dose-Dependent Cannabis Use, Depressive Symptoms, and FAAH Genotype Predict Sleep Quality in Emerging Adults: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maple, Kristin E.; McDaniel, Kymberly A.; Shollenbarger, Skyler G.; Lisdahl, Krista M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Cannabis has been shown to affect sleep in humans. Findings from animal studies indicate that higher endocannabinoid levels promote sleep, suggesting that chronic use of cannabis, which downregulates endocannabinoid activity, may disrupt sleep. Objectives This study sought to determine if past year cannabis use and genes that regulate endocannabinoid signaling, FAAH rs324420 and CNR1 rs2180619, predicted sleep quality. As depression has been previously associated with both cannabis and sleep, the secondary aim was to determine if depressive symptoms moderated or mediated these relationships. Methods Data were collected from 41 emerging adult (ages 18–25) cannabis users. Exclusion criteria included Axis I disorders (besides SUD) and medical and neurologic disorders. Relationships were tested using multiple regressions, controlling for demographic variables, past year substance use, and length of cannabis abstinence. Results Greater past year cannabis use and FAAH C/C genotype were associated with poorer sleep quality. CNR1 genotype did not significantly predict sleep quality. Depressive symptoms moderated the relationship between cannabis use and sleep at a non-significant trend level, such that participants with the greatest cannabis use and most depressive symptoms reported the most impaired sleep. Depressive symptoms mediated the relationship between FAAH genotype and sleep quality. Conclusions This study demonstrates a dose-dependent relationship between chronic cannabis use and reported sleep quality, independent of abstinence length. Furthermore, it provides novel evidence that depressive symptoms mediate the relationship between FAAH genotype and sleep quality in humans. These findings suggest potential targets to impact sleep disruptions in cannabis users. PMID:27074158

  2. Salt-Induced Tissue-Specific Cytosine Methylation Downregulates Expression of HKT Genes in Contrasting Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suresh; Beena, Ananda Sankara; Awana, Monika; Singh, Archana

    2017-04-01

    Plants have evolved several strategies, including regulation of genes through epigenetic modifications, to cope with environmental stresses. DNA methylation is dynamically regulated through the methylation and demethylation of cytosine in response to environmental perturbations. High-affinity potassium transporters (HKTs) have accounted for the homeostasis of sodium and potassium ions in plants under salt stress. Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is sensitive to soil salinity, which impedes its growth and development, resulting in decreased productivity. The differential expression of HKTs has been reported to confer tolerance to salt stress in plants. In this study, we investigated variations in cytosine methylation and their effects on the expression of HKT genes in contrasting wheat genotypes under salt stress. We observed a genotype- and tissue-specific increase in cytosine methylation induced by NaCl stress that downregulated the expression of TaHKT2;1 and TaHKT2;3 in the shoot and root tissues of Kharchia-65, thereby contributing to its improved salt-tolerance ability. Although TaHKT1;4 was expressed only in roots and was downregulated under the stress in salt-tolerant genotypes, it was not regulated through variations in cytosine methylation. Thus, understanding epigenetic regulation and the function of HKTs would enable an improvement in salt tolerance and the development of salt-tolerant crops.

  3. The Control Level of Bronchial Asthma in Dependence of Genotype by BCL1 Polymorphism of Glucocorticoids Receptor Gene and Body Mass Index

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    Vladyslava V. Kmyta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of allelic genotypes by BclI polymorphism glucocorticoids receptor gene (GR had been studied in dependence of the control level of bronchial asthma (BA and body mass index (BMI, and also- connection between those indicators. 188 patient with BA and 95 almost healthy humans were investigated. Determination of single nucleotide BclI polymorphism GR gene performed by the method of polymerase chain reaction with following analyze of the length of restriction fragments. Our studies demonstrated connection between BA control, BclI polymorphism GR gene and BMI. Proved, that distribution C/C, C/G and G/G genotypes by BclI polymorphism in patients with BA showed reliable difference between patients with different BMI and connection G/G genotype with obesity. The reliable difference in distributing of genotype in dependence of BA control level has been proved: with controlled BA reliably often met C/C genotype, without control – G/G genotype. Therefore, proved, that frequency G/G genotype by BclI polymorphism GR gene in patients with BA with obesity and absence of control for the flowing of disease is reliably higher, that confirmed the role of this genotype, likewise, in obesity occurrence, so in absence of the control of disease.

  4. Trismus following radiotherapy to the head and neck is likely to have distinct genotype dependent cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Andrew J; Crichton, Siobhan; Pezier, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Trismus frequently occurs as a consequence of radiotherapy or chemo-radiotherapy to the head and neck, with a loss of function that can reduce the overall quality of life. Radiation can trigger an intense fibrosis within the masticatory muscles and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF β1) is involved in this process. As in other tissues the degree of fibrosis may be related to a single nucleotide polymorphism; C-T at position -509 in the TGF β1 gene. Trismus was measured in 62 patients before and after radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy, blood was taken for DNA extraction, and genotype analysis of the TGF β1 gene. Trismus was analysed against, patient age, sex, tumour site and stage, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. After radiotherapy or chemo-radiotherapy the reduction in mouth opening was shown to be significantly related to the presence of the T allele (ptrismus. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Salt stress induced variation in DNA methylation pattern and its influence on gene expression in contrasting rice genotypes.

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    Ratna Karan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Salinity is a major environmental factor limiting productivity of crop plants including rice in which wide range of natural variability exists. Although recent evidences implicate epigenetic mechanisms for modulating the gene expression in plants under environmental stresses, epigenetic changes and their functional consequences under salinity stress in rice are underexplored. DNA methylation is one of the epigenetic mechanisms regulating gene expression in plant's responses to environmental stresses. Better understanding of epigenetic regulation of plant growth and response to environmental stresses may create novel heritable variation for crop improvement. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Methylation sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP technique was used to assess the effect of salt stress on extent and patterns of DNA methylation in four genotypes of rice differing in the degree of salinity tolerance. Overall, the amount of DNA methylation was more in shoot compared to root and the contribution of fully methylated loci was always more than hemi-methylated loci. Sequencing of ten randomly selected MSAP fragments indicated gene-body specific DNA methylation of retrotransposons, stress responsive genes, and chromatin modification genes, distributed on different rice chromosomes. Bisulphite sequencing and quantitative RT-PCR analysis of selected MSAP loci showed that cytosine methylation changes under salinity as well as gene expression varied with genotypes and tissue types irrespective of the level of salinity tolerance of rice genotypes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The gene body methylation may have an important role in regulating gene expression in organ and genotype specific manner under salinity stress. Association between salt tolerance and methylation changes observed in some cases suggested that many methylation changes are not "directed". The natural genetic variation for salt tolerance observed in rice germplasm may be

  6. Sweet corn (Zea mays L.: Fresh ear yield in dependance of genotype and the environment

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    Srdić Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sweet corn is used as food in the milky stage of endosperm, when its kernel is tender, succulent and sweet. It is consumed in form of fresh ears, or it is industrially processed. Breeding of sweet corn has several equally important aims that are directed by the market demands and different modes of consumption. The ear yield, in sweet corn is the most important but not the only main goal of breeding. In the two year study (2013, 2014 we observed the effect of the genotype, year and their interactions on the yields of 8 sweet corn hybrids. Two of the hybrids were commercial and six were experimental hybrids. The field experiment was arranged according to the RCBD with four replications. Hybrids were harvested 23 days after pollination, i.e. silking. Average yield in 2013 was significantly higher (12.19 t ha-1 than in 2014 (11.49 t ha- 1. In 2013 it ranged from 10.21 t ha-1 for the experimental hybrid ZP 489/1su, up to 13.52 t ha-1 for the commercial hybrid ZP 355su. In 2014 the lowest yielding hybrid was ZP 485/1su (10.14 t ha-1 while the highest yielding was ZP 486/1su (13.41 t ha-1. On average those two were also the highest (13.19 t ha-1 and the lowest yielding (10.66 t ha-1 hybrids. Statistical analysis showed that the effect of genotype and the year, as well as their interactions had significant impact on the yield performances of sweet corn hybrids.

  7. The Change of Expression Configuration Affects Identity-Dependent Expression Aftereffect but Not Identity-Independent Expression Aftereffect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Miao; Shinomori, Keizo; Qian, Qian; Yin, Jun; Zeng, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of expression configuration on cross-identity expression aftereffect. The expression configuration refers to the spatial arrangement of facial features in a face for conveying an emotion, e.g., an open-mouth smile vs. a closed-mouth smile. In the first of two experiments, the expression aftereffect is measured using a cross-identity/cross-expression configuration factorial design. The facial identities of test faces were the same or different from the adaptor, while orthogonally, the expression configurations of those facial identities were also the same or different. The results show that the change of expression configuration impaired the expression aftereffect when the facial identities of adaptor and tests were the same; however, the impairment effect disappears when facial identities were different, indicating the identity-independent expression representation is more robust to the change of the expression configuration in comparison with the identity-dependent expression representation. In the second experiment, we used schematic line faces as adaptors and real faces as tests to minimize the similarity between the adaptor and tests, which is expected to exclude the contribution from the identity-dependent expression representation to expression aftereffect. The second experiment yields a similar result as the identity-independent expression aftereffect observed in Experiment 1. The findings indicate the different neural sensitivities to expression configuration for identity-dependent and identity-independent expression systems.

  8. Genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (ALDH7A1 deficiency)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mills, Philippa B; Footitt, Emma J; Mills, Kevin A

    2010-01-01

    Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy was recently shown to be due to mutations in the ALDH7A1 gene, which encodes antiquitin, an enzyme that catalyses the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent dehydrogenation of l-alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde/L-Delta1-piperideine 6-carboxylate. However, whilst...... with suspected or clinically proven pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy and to characterize further the phenotypic spectrum of antiquitin deficiency. Urinary L-alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde concentration was determined by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. When this was above the normal range, DNA......, through abnormal foetal movements and a multisystem neonatal disorder, to the onset of seizures and autistic features after the first year of life. Our relatively large series suggested that clinical diagnosis of pyridoxine dependent epilepsy can be challenging because: (i) there may be some response...

  9. Genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (ALDH7A1 deficiency)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mills, Philippa B; Footitt, Emma J; Mills, Kevin A

    2010-01-01

    Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy was recently shown to be due to mutations in the ALDH7A1 gene, which encodes antiquitin, an enzyme that catalyses the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent dehydrogenation of l-alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde/L-Delta1-piperideine 6-carboxylate. However, whilst t...... to pyridoxine. These findings support the use of biochemical and DNA tests for antiquitin deficiency and a clinical trial of pyridoxine in infants and children with epilepsy across a broad range of clinical scenarios.......Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy was recently shown to be due to mutations in the ALDH7A1 gene, which encodes antiquitin, an enzyme that catalyses the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent dehydrogenation of l-alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde/L-Delta1-piperideine 6-carboxylate. However, whilst...... with suspected or clinically proven pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy and to characterize further the phenotypic spectrum of antiquitin deficiency. Urinary L-alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde concentration was determined by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. When this was above the normal range, DNA...

  10. Nitrogen-Deficiency Stress Induces Protein Expression Differentially in Low-N Tolerant and Low-N Sensitive Maize Genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Muslima; Pandey, Renu; Siddiqi, Tariq O.; Ibrahim, Mohamed M.; Qureshi, Mohammad I.; Abraham, Gerard; Vengavasi, Krishnapriya; Ahmad, Altaf

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is essential for proper plant growth and its application has proven to be critical for agricultural produce. However, for unavoidable economic and environmental problems associated with excessive use of N-fertilizers, it is an urgent demand to manage application of fertilizers. Improving the N-use efficiency (NUE) of crop plants to sustain productivity even at low N levels is the possible solution. In the present investigation, contrasting low-N sensitive (HM-4) and low-N tolerant (PEHM-2) genotypes were identified and used for comparative proteome-profiling of leaves under optimum and low N as well as restoration of low N on 3rd (NR3) and 5th (NR5) days after re-supplying N. The analysis of differential expression pattern of proteins was performed by 2-D gel electrophoresis. Significant variations in the expression of proteins were observed under low N, which were genotype specific. In the leaf proteome, 25 spots were influenced by N treatment and four spots were different between the two genotypes. Most of the proteins that were differentially accumulated in response to N level and were involved in photosynthesis and metabolism, affirming the relationship between N and carbon metabolism. In addition to this, greater intensity of some defense proteins in the low N tolerant genotype was found that may have a possible role in imparting it tolerance under N starvation conditions. The new insights generated on maize proteome in response to N-starvation and restoration would be useful toward improvement of NUE in maize. PMID:27047497

  11. Assessing numerical dependence in gene expression summaries with the jackknife expression difference.

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    John R Stevens

    Full Text Available Statistical methods to test for differential expression traditionally assume that each gene's expression summaries are independent across arrays. When certain preprocessing methods are used to obtain those summaries, this assumption is not necessarily true. In general, the erroneous assumption of dependence results in a loss of statistical power. We introduce a diagnostic measure of numerical dependence for gene expression summaries from any preprocessing method and discuss the relative performance of several common preprocessing methods with respect to this measure. Some common preprocessing methods introduce non-trivial levels of numerical dependence. The issue of (between-array dependence has received little if any attention in the literature, and researchers working with gene expression data should not take such properties for granted, or they risk unnecessarily losing statistical power.

  12. Basal expression studies of cystatins during specific growth stages of wheat spikes for defining their possible role in differential and stage dependent immunity against Karnal bunt (Tilletia indica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwar, Shalini; Marla, Soma S; Singh, U S; Kumar, Anil

    2010-03-01

    Two genotypes showing differential immunity against Karnal bunt (Tilletia indica) were used to investigate the role of three members of cystatin gene family in growth stage dependent immunity in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Three members of cystatin gene family (WC1, WC2, and WC4) were cloned and sequenced. Analysis of sequenced data showed that there was 76-99% nucleotide and protein sequence identity between different genes of the wheat cystatin. In silico amino acid sequence analysis revealed the presence of a conserved signature pattern of residues and also the functional domains were presumed to be actively involved in imparting cysteine protease inhibition capability. The semi-quantitative and quantitative levels of these members were measured by means of RT-PCR, northern blotting, western blotting, and by ELISA techniques. The members of cystatin gene family were expressed in both resistant (HD 29) and susceptible genotypes (WH 542); however, the expression level was significantly (P 0.05) in contrary to WC1 family whose expression gradually increased from S(v) to S(2) stage. According to the intensity of the detected band in RT PCR, northern blot and western blot, WC1 family seems to be expressed more than the other gene families. The immunoassay results further showed that WC1 protein was abundantly expressed in resistant genotype and high expression was observed at the S2 stage as compared to susceptible genotype (P cystatin gene family in differential and stage dependent immunity against KB.

  13. Genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (ALDH7A1 deficiency).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Philippa B; Footitt, Emma J; Mills, Kevin A; Tuschl, Karin; Aylett, Sarah; Varadkar, Sophia; Hemingway, Cheryl; Marlow, Neil; Rennie, Janet; Baxter, Peter; Dulac, Olivier; Nabbout, Rima; Craigen, William J; Schmitt, Bernhard; Feillet, François; Christensen, Ernst; De Lonlay, Pascale; Pike, Mike G; Hughes, M Imelda; Struys, Eduard A; Jakobs, Cornelis; Zuberi, Sameer M; Clayton, Peter T

    2010-07-01

    Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy was recently shown to be due to mutations in the ALDH7A1 gene, which encodes antiquitin, an enzyme that catalyses the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent dehydrogenation of l-alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde/L-Delta1-piperideine 6-carboxylate. However, whilst this is a highly treatable disorder, there is general uncertainty about when to consider this diagnosis and how to test for it. This study aimed to evaluate the use of measurement of urine L-alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde/creatinine ratio and mutation analysis of ALDH7A1 (antiquitin) in investigation of patients with suspected or clinically proven pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy and to characterize further the phenotypic spectrum of antiquitin deficiency. Urinary L-alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde concentration was determined by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. When this was above the normal range, DNA sequencing of the ALDH7A1 gene was performed. Clinicians were asked to complete questionnaires on clinical, biochemical, magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography features of patients. The clinical spectrum of antiquitin deficiency extended from ventriculomegaly detected on foetal ultrasound, through abnormal foetal movements and a multisystem neonatal disorder, to the onset of seizures and autistic features after the first year of life. Our relatively large series suggested that clinical diagnosis of pyridoxine dependent epilepsy can be challenging because: (i) there may be some response to antiepileptic drugs; (ii) in infants with multisystem pathology, the response to pyridoxine may not be instant and obvious; and (iii) structural brain abnormalities may co-exist and be considered sufficient cause of epilepsy, whereas the fits may be a consequence of antiquitin deficiency and are then responsive to pyridoxine. These findings support the use of biochemical and DNA tests for antiquitin deficiency and a clinical trial of pyridoxine in infants and

  14. Genotype-Dependent Effect of Exogenous Nitric Oxide on Cd-induced Changes in Antioxidative Metabolism, Ultrastructure, and Photosynthetic Performance in Barley Seedlings (Hordeum vulgare)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fei; Wang, Fang; Sun, Hongyan

    2010-01-01

    10- and 15-day treatments. Furthermore, NO significantly increased stromal APX and Mn-SOD activities in both genotypes and upregulated Cd-induced decrease in cAPX activity and gene expression of root/leaf cAPX and leaf CAT1 in the Cd-sensitive genotype. These data suggest that under Cd stress, NO......A greenhouse hydroponic experiment was performed using Cd-sensitive (cv. Dong 17) and Cd-tolerant (Weisuobuzhi) barley seedlings to evaluate how different genotypes responded to cadmium (Cd) toxicity in the presence of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a nitric oxide (NO) donor. Results showed that 5 μ......M Cd increased the accumulation of O2•-, H2O2, and malondialdehyde (MDA) but reduced plant height, chlorophyll content, net photosynthetic rate (P n), and biomass, with a much more severe response in the Cd-sensitive genotype. Antioxidant enzyme activities increased significantly under Cd stress...

  15. Genotype-Associated Differential NKG2D Expression on CD56+CD3+ Lymphocytes Predicts Response to Pegylated-Interferon/Ribavirin Therapy in Chronic Hepatitis C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-sung Chu

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV genotype 1 infections are significantly more difficult to eradicate with PEG-IFN/ribavirin therapy, compared to HCV genotype 2. The aim of this work is to investigate the difference of immunological impairments underlying this phenomenon. Pre-treatment NKG2D expression on peripheral CD56+CD3+ lymphocytes and CD56+CD3- NK cells from cases of chronic hepatitis C were analyzed and assessed by treatment effect. Two strains of HCV were used to co-incubate with immune cells in vitro. NKG2D expression on peripheral CD56+CD3+ lymphocytes, but not NK cells, was significantly impaired in genotype 1 infection, compared to genotype 2. When peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors were co-incubated with TNS2J1, a genotype 1b/2a chimera strain, or with JFH1, a genotype 2a strain, genotype-specific decrease of NKG2D on CD56+CD3+ lymphocytes, but not NK cells, was observed. Pre-treatment NKG2D expression on peripheral CD56+CD3+ lymphocytes significantly correlated with reduction in serum HCV RNA levels from week 0 to week 4, and predicted treatment response. Ex vivo stimulation of peripheral CD56+CD3+ lymphocytes showed NKG2D expression-correlated IFN-γ production. In conclusion, Decreased NKG2D expression on CD56+CD3+ lymphocytes in chronic HCV genotype 1 infection predicts inferior treatment response to PEG-IFN/ribavirin therapy compared to genotype 2.

  16. Physiological characterisation of recombinant Aspergillus nidulans strains with different creA genotypes expressing A-oryzae alpha-amylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Teit; Petersen, J.B.; O'Connor, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    The physiology of three strains of Aspergillus nidulans was examined-a creA deletion strain, a wild type creA genotype and a strain containing extra copies of the creA gene, all producing Aspergillus oryzae alpha-amylase. The strains were cultured in batch and continuous cultivations and the biom......The physiology of three strains of Aspergillus nidulans was examined-a creA deletion strain, a wild type creA genotype and a strain containing extra copies of the creA gene, all producing Aspergillus oryzae alpha-amylase. The strains were cultured in batch and continuous cultivations...... and the biomass formation and alpha-amylase production was characterised. Overexpression of the creA gene resulted in a lower maximum specific growth rate and a slightly higher repression of the alpha-amylase production during conditions with high glucose concentration. No expression of creA also resulted...... in a decreased maximum specific growth rate, but also in drastic changes in morphology. Furthermore, the expression of alpha-amylase was completely derepressed and creA thus seems to be the only regulatory protein responsible for glucose repression of alpha-amylase expression. The effect of different carbon...

  17. The quantification of COMT mRNA in post mortem cerebellum tissue: diagnosis, genotype, methylation and expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Ian W

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The COMT gene is located on chromosome 22q11, a region strongly implicated in the aetiology of several psychiatric disorders, in particular schizophrenia. Previous research has suggested that activity and expression of COMT is altered in schizophrenia, and is mediated by one or more polymorphisms within the gene, including the functional Val158Met polymorphism. Method In this study we examined the expression levels of COMT mRNA using quantitative RT-PCR in 60 post mortem cerebellum samples derived from individuals with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, and no history of psychopathology. Furthermore, we have examined the methylation status of two CpG sites in the promoter region of the gene. Results We found no evidence of altered COMT expression or methylation in any of the psychiatric diagnoses examined. We did, however, find evidence to suggest that genotype is related to COMT gene expression, replicating the findings of two previous studies. Specifically, val158met (rs165688; Val allele rs737865 (G allele and rs165599 (G allele all showed reduced expression (P COMT expression, with females exhibiting significantly greater levels of COMT mRNA. Conclusion The expression of COMT does not appear to be altered in the cerebellum of individuals suffering from schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or depression, but does appear to be influenced by single nucleotide polymorphisms within the gene.

  18. Genome-wide gene expression regulation as a function of genotype and age in C. elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viñuela Rodriguez, A.; Snoek, L.B.; Riksen, J.A.G.; Kammenga, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression becomes more variable with age, and it is widely assumed that this is due to a decrease in expression regulation. But currently there is no understanding how gene expression regulatory patterns progress with age. Here we explored genome-wide gene expression variation and regulatory l

  19. The mitochondrial atpA/atp9 co-transcript in wheat and triticale: RNA processing depends on the nuclear genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser, B; Kück, U

    1995-12-01

    The gene region coding for subunits alpha and 9 of the mitochondrial ATP synthase exhibit an identical DNA sequence in wheat, rye, and the intergeneric hybrid triticale (xTriticosecale Wittmack). However, co-transcripts containing both genes show different sizes depending on the nuclear genotype. To investigate nuclear-mitochondrial interactions leading to this variation, we performed a comparative transcript analysis with various lines carrying defined nuclear and cytoplasmic genotypes. Northern analyses showed that all wheat lines investigated possess a single atpA/atp9 mRNA of 2.6kb, whereas in rye and five independent triticale lines an additional transcript of 2.35kb appeared. Primer-extension and RNase-protection analyses indicate that the co-transcripts of this gene have staggered 5' termini in some lines, whereas the 3' termini seem to be similar in wheat, rye, and triticale. Transcription is initiated at position -338/-339 upstream of the atpA gene in all lines investigated, giving rise to a 2.6-kb mRNA. In rye and triticale, staggered 5' termini were observed closer to the translational start. The DNA sequences upstream of these termini exhibit homology to plant mitochondrial-processing sites, therefore the proximal 5' ends are most probably generated by RNA processing. As the processing event occurs more frequently in triticale carrying the Triticum timopheevi cytoplasm, trans-acting factors from rye are likely to interact with other cytoplasmic factors resulting in the observed RNA modification. Most interestingly, the T. timopheevi cytoplasm inducing male sterility in alloplasmic wheat, fails to generate the CMS phenotype in triticale. The data support our hypothesis that nuclear factors affect mitochondrial gene expression and thus control sexual fertility in wheat and triticale.

  20. TonB-dependent transporters expressed by Neisseria gonorrhoeae

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    Cynthia N Cornelissen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Neisseria gonorrhoeae causes the common sexually transmitted infection, gonorrhea. This microorganism is an obligate human pathogen, existing nowhere in nature except in association with humans. For growth and proliferation, N. gonorrhoeae requires iron and must acquire this nutrient from within its host. The gonococcus is well-adapted for growth in diverse niches within the human body because it expresses efficient transport systems enabling use of a diverse array of iron sources. Iron transport systems facilitating the use of transferrin, lactoferrin and hemoglobin have two components: one TonB-dependent transporter and one lipoprotein. A single component TonB-dependent transporter also allows N. gonorrhoeae to avail itself of iron bound to heterologous siderophores produced by bacteria within the same ecological niche. Other TonB-dependent transporters are encoded by the gonococcus but have not been ascribed specific functions. The best characterized iron transport system expressed by N. gonorrhoeae enables the use of human transferrin as a sole iron source. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms involved in gonococcal iron acquisition from human transferrin and also reviews what is currently known about the other TonB-dependent transport systems. No vaccine is available to prevent gonococcal infections and our options for treating this disease are compromised by the emergence of antibiotic resistance. Because iron transport systems are critical for the survival of the gonococcus in vivo, the surface-exposed components of these systems are attractive candidates for vaccine development or therapeutic intervention.

  1. TonB-Dependent Transporters Expressed by Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Cynthia Nau; Hollander, Aimee

    2011-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae causes the common sexually transmitted infection, gonorrhea. This microorganism is an obligate human pathogen, existing nowhere in nature except in association with humans. For growth and proliferation, N. gonorrhoeae requires iron and must acquire this nutrient from within its host. The gonococcus is well-adapted for growth in diverse niches within the human body because it expresses efficient transport systems enabling use of a diverse array of iron sources. Iron transport systems facilitating the use of transferrin, lactoferrin, and hemoglobin have two components: one TonB-dependent transporter and one lipoprotein. A single component TonB-dependent transporter also allows N. gonorrhoeae to avail itself of iron bound to heterologous siderophores produced by bacteria within the same ecological niche. Other TonB-dependent transporters are encoded by the gonococcus but have not been ascribed specific functions. The best characterized iron transport system expressed by N. gonorrhoeae enables the use of human transferrin as a sole iron source. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms involved in gonococcal iron acquisition from human transferrin and also reviews what is currently known about the other TonB-dependent transport systems. No vaccine is available to prevent gonococcal infections and our options for treating this disease are compromised by the emergence of antibiotic resistance. Because iron transport systems are critical for the survival of the gonococcus in vivo, the surface-exposed components of these systems are attractive candidates for vaccine development or therapeutic intervention.

  2. Comparative analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs between drought-tolerant and -susceptible genotypes of chickpea under terminal drought stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raju N L

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. is an important grain-legume crop that is mainly grown in rainfed areas, where terminal drought is a major constraint to its productivity. We generated expressed sequence tags (ESTs by suppression subtraction hybridization (SSH to identify differentially expressed genes in drought-tolerant and -susceptible genotypes in chickpea. Results EST libraries were generated by SSH from root and shoot tissues of IC4958 (drought tolerant and ICC 1882 (drought resistant exposed to terminal drought conditions by the dry down method. SSH libraries were also constructed by using 2 sets of bulks prepared from the RNA of root tissues from selected recombinant inbred lines (RILs (10 each for the extreme high and low root biomass phenotype. A total of 3062 unigenes (638 contigs and 2424 singletons, 51.4% of which were novel in chickpea, were derived by cluster assembly and sequence alignment of 5949 ESTs. Only 2185 (71% unigenes showed significant BLASTX similarity ( Conclusion Our study compares not only genes that are up- and down-regulated in a drought-tolerant genotype under terminal drought stress and a drought susceptible genotype but also between the bulks of the selected RILs exhibiting extreme phenotypes. More than 50% of the genes identified have been shown to be associated with drought stress in chickpea for the first time. This study not only serves as resource for marker discovery, but can provide a better insight into the selection of candidate genes (both up- and downregulated associated with drought tolerance. These results can be used to identify suitable targets for manipulating the drought-tolerance trait in chickpea.

  3. Construction and immune efficacy of recombinant pseudorabies virus expressing PrM-E proteins of Japanese encephalitis virus genotype І.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ping; Zhi, Xianwei; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Huawei; Chen, Huanchun; Li, Xiangmin

    2015-12-10

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is an arboviral disease with high case fatality rates and neurologic or psychiatric sequelae among survivors in Asia, western Pacific countries and northern Australia. Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the cause of JE and the emergence of genotype І (GI) JEV has displaced genotype III (GIII) as the dominant strains circulating in some Asian regions. The currently available JE vaccines are safe and effective in preventing this disease, but they are developed based on the GIII JEV strains. The recombinant virus PRV TK(-)/gE(-)/PrM-E(+) which expressed the premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) proteins of JEV SX09S-01 strain (genotype I, GI) was constructed by homologous recombination between the genome of PRV TK(-)/gE(-)/LacZ(+) digested with EcoRI and plasmid pIE-CAG-PrM-E-BGH. Expression of JEV PrM and E proteins was analyzed by Western blot analysis. Immune efficacy of PRV TK(-)/gE(-)/PrM-E(+) was further evaluated in mouse model. A recombinant pseudorabies virus (PRV TK(-)/gE(-)/PrM-E(+)) was successfully constructed. Mice experiments showed that PRV TK(-)/gE(-)/PrM-E(+) could induce a high level of ELISA antibodies against PRV and JEV, as well as high titer of PRV neutralizing antibodies. After challenge with 1 × 10(7) PFU virulent JEV SX09S-01 strain, the time of death was delayed and the survival rate was improved in PRV TK(-)/gE(-)/PrM-E(+) vaccinated mice. PRV TK(-)/gE(-)/PrM-E(+) is a potential vaccine candidate against PRV and JEV GI infection in the future.

  4. Multiple cytokine expression profiles reveal immune-based differences in occult hepatitis B genotype H-infected Mexican Nahua patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Alma Fierro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A high prevalence of occult hepatitis B (OHB genotype H infections has been observed in the native Mexican Nahua population. In addition, a low incidence of hepatitis B virus (HBV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma has been described in Mexico. The immune response to infection among OHB-infected patients has been poorly evaluated in vivo. Therefore, we assessed the expression profiles of 23 cytokines in OHB genotype H-infected Nahua patients. A total of 41 sera samples from natives of the Nahua community were retrospectively analysed. Based on their HBV antibody profiles, patients were stratified into two groups: OHB patients (n = 21 and patients that had recovered from HBV infection (n = 20. Herein, we report distinctive cytokines profiles in OHB-infected individuals. Compared to healthy controls (n = 20 and patients who resolved HBV infection, OHB-infected patients displayed an increase in interleukin (IL-2 secretion in addition to a characteristic inflammation profile (decrease in IL-8 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels and increased levels of tumour growth factor-beta. IL-15 and interferon-gamma levels were reduced in OHB-infected individuals when compared to those patients who resolved HBV infection. In contrast, OHB patients showed an increase in monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1 and MCP-2 compared to healthy controls and patients who resolved HBV infection. These findings suggest that cytokine expression can influence the severity of OHB disease and could lead to new investigation into the treatment of liver and other infectious diseases.

  5. Diversity in the carotenoid profiles and the expression of genes related to carotenoid accumulation among citrus genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikoma, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hikaru; Kato, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are not only important to the plants themselves but also are beneficial to human health. Since citrus fruit is a good source of carotenoids for the human diet, it is important to study carotenoid profiles and the accumulation mechanism in citrus fruit. Thus, in the present paper, we describe the diversity in the carotenoid profiles of fruit among citrus genotypes. In regard to carotenoids, such as β-cryptoxanthin, violaxanthin, lycopene, and β-citraurin, the relationship between the carotenoid profile and the expression of carotenoid-biosynthetic genes is discussed. Finally, recent results of quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses of carotenoid contents and expression levels of carotenoid-biosynthetic genes in citrus fruit are shown.

  6. Identification of Echinococcus granulosus microRNAs and their expression in different life cycle stages and parasite genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucher, M; Prada, L; Mourglia-Ettlin, G; Dematteis, S; Camicia, F; Asurmendi, S; Rosenzvit, M

    2011-03-01

    The aetiological agent of cystic hydatid disease, the platyhelminth parasite Echinococcus granulosus, undergoes a series of metamorphic events during its complex life cycle. One of its developmental stages, the protoscolex, shows a remarkable degree of heterogeneous morphogenesis, being able to develop either into the vesicular or strobilar direction. Another level of complexity is added by the existence of genotypes or strains that differ in the range of intermediate hosts where they can develop and form fertile cysts. These features make E. granulosus an interesting model for developmental studies. Hence, we focused on the study of the regulation of gene expression by microRNAs (miRNAs), one of the key mechanisms that control development in metazoans and plants and which has not been analysed in E. granulosus yet. In this study, we cloned 38 distinct miRNAs, including four candidate new miRNAs that seem to be specific to Echinococcus spp. Thirty-four cloned sequences were orthologous to miRNAs already described in other organisms and were grouped in 16 metazoan miRNA families, some of them known for their role in the development of other organisms. The expression of some of the cloned miRNAs differs according to the parasite life cycle stage analysed, showing differential developmental expression. We did not detect differences in the expression of the analysed miRNAs between protoscoleces of two parasite genotypes. This work sets the scene for the study of gene regulation mediated by miRNAs in E. granulosus and provides a new approach to study the molecules involved in its developmental plasticity and intermediate host specificity. Understanding the developmental processes of E. granulosus may help to find new strategies for the control of cystic hydatid disease, caused by the metacestode stage of the parasite.

  7. A novel B(var) allele (547 G>A) demonstrates differential expression depending on the co-inherited ABO allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, D; Kim, S H; Ki, C S; Choi, K L; Cho, Y G; Song, J W; Shin, J H; Suh, S P; Yazer, M H; Ryang, D W

    2004-10-01

    Genetic analysis of group B donors in Korea was performed. Exons 6 and 7 were sequenced in 12 phenotypically B3 donors 6 B3, 6 A1B3. Consensus sequences all B3 and 2/6 A1B3 donors were present. Four A1B3 donors demonstrated a novel B allele, B(var), in the context of A101/ or A102/B(var) genotypes. Family studies based on an A1B3 donor with the B(var) allele and on another unrelated subject with identical genotype and phenotype revealed B(var)/O01 genotypes with full B-antigen expression. B(var) allele is subject to differential expression, depending on the co-inherited ABO allele.

  8. Androgen-Dependent Regulation of Human MUC1 Mucin Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Mitchell

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available MUC1 mucin is transcriptionally regulated by estrogen, progesterone, and glucocorticoids. Our objective was to determine whether androgen receptor. (20AR activation regulates expression of MUC1. The following breast and prostatic cell lines were phenotyped and grouped according to AR and MUC1protein expression: 1 AR+MUCi + [DAR17+19. (20AR transfectants of DU-145, ZR-75-1, MDA-MB-453, and T47D]; 2 AR-MUCi+ [DZeoi. (20AR- vector control, DU-145, BT20, MDA-MB231, and MCF7]; 3 AIR +MUCi -. (20LNCaP and LNCaP-r. Cell proliferation was determined using the MTT assay in the presence of synthetic androgen R1881, 0.1 pM to 1 µM. Cell surface MUC1expression was determined by flow cytometry in the presence or absence of oestradiol, medroxy progesterone acetate or R1881, with and without 4 hydroxy-flutamide. (204-OH, a nonsteroidal AR antagonist. The functional significance of MUC1expression was investigated with a cell-cell aggregation assay. Only AR+ MUC1 + cell lines showed a significant increase in MUC1expression with AR activation. (20P. (20range =.01 to .0001, reversed in the presence of 4-OHF. Cell proliferation was unaffected. Increased expression of MUC1was associated with a significant. (20P. (20range =.002 to .001 reduction in cell-cell adhesion. To our knowledge, this is the first description of androgen-dependent regulation of MUC1mucin. This is also functionally associated with decreased cell-cell adhesion, a recognised feature of progressive malignancy. These findings have important implications for physiological and pathological processes.

  9. A Sorghum bicolor expression atlas reveals dynamic genotype-specific expression profiles for vegetative tissues of grain, sweet and bioenergy sorghums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakoor, N; Nair, R; Crasta, O; Morris, G; Feltus, A; Kresovich, S

    2014-01-23

    Background: Effective improvement in sorghum crop development necessitates a genomics-based approach to identify functional genes and QTLs. Sequenced in 2009, a comprehensive annotation of the sorghum genome and the development of functional genomics resources is key to enable the discovery and deployment of regulatory and metabolic genes and gene networks for crop improvement. Results: This study utilizes the first commercially available whole-transcriptome sorghum microarray (Sorgh-WTa520972F) to identify tissue and genotype-specific expression patterns for all identified Sorghum bicolor exons and UTRs. The genechip contains 1,026,373 probes covering 149,182 exons (27,577 genes) across the Sorghum bicolor nuclear, chloroplast, and mitochondrial genomes. Specific probesets were also included for putative non-coding RNAs that may play a role in gene regulation (e. g., microRNAs), and confirmed functional small RNAs in related species (maize and sugarcane) were also included in our array design. We generated expression data for 78 samples with a combination of four different tissue types (shoot, root, leaf and stem), two dissected stem tissues (pith and rind) and six diverse genotypes, which included 6 public sorghum lines (R159, Atlas, Fremont, PI152611, AR2400 and PI455230) representing grain, sweet, forage, and high biomass ideotypes. Conclusions: Here we present a summary of the microarray dataset, including analysis of tissue-specific gene expression profiles and associated expression profiles of relevant metabolic pathways. With an aim to enable identification and functional characterization of genes in sorghum, this expression atlas presents a new and valuable resource to the research community.

  10. Genotypic diversity among rhizospheric bacteria of three legumes assessed by cultivation-dependent and cultivation-independent techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongsilp, Neelawan; Nimnoi, Pongrawee; Lumyong, Saisamorn

    2012-02-01

    The genotypic diversity of rhizospheric bacteria of 3 legumes including Vigna radiata, Arachis hypogaea and Acacia mangium was compared by using cultivation-dependent and cultivation-independent methods. For cultivation-dependent method, Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profiles revealed that the bacterial genetic diversity of V. radiata and A. mangium rhizospheres was higher than that of A. hypogaea rhizosphere. For cultivation-independent method, Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes revealed the difference in bacterial community and diversity of rhizospheres collected from 3 legumes. The ribotype richness which indicates species diversity, was highest in V. radiata rhizosphere, followed by A. hypogaea and A. mangium rhizospheres, respectively. Three kinds of media were used to cultivate different target groups of bacteria. The result indicates that the communities of cultivable bacteria in 3 rhizospheres recovered from nutrient agar (NA) medium were mostly different from each other, while Bradyrhizobium selective medium (BJSM) and nitrogen-free medium shaped the communities of cultivable bacteria. Nine isolates grown on BJSM were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. These isolates were very closely related (with 96% to 99% identities) to either one of the three groups including Cupriavidus-Ralstonia group, Bacillus group and Bradyrhizobium-Bosea-Afipia group. The rhizospheres were also examined for their enzymatic patterns. Of 19 enzymes tested, 3 rhizospheres were distinguishable by the presence or the absence of leucine acrylamidase and acid phosphatase. The selected cultivable bacteria recovered from NA varied in their abilities to produce indole-acetic acid and ammnonia. The resistance to 10 antibiotics was indistinguishable among bacteria isolated from different rhizospheres.

  11. Preliminary Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles in HepG2 Cell Line Induced by Different Genotype Core Proteins of HCV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Dou; Pengbo Liu; Jing Wang; Xinjian Zhang

    2006-01-01

    In present investigation, we constructed recombinants expressing the HCV genotypes 1b, 2a, and 4d core proteins,and established human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cell line that expressed various genotype core proteins.The gene expression profiles in the cells expressing different HCV genotype core proteins were compared with those in the control by microarray analysis. In data analysis, a threshold was set to eliminate all genes that were not increased or decreased by 2.5-fold change in a comparison between the transfected cells and control cells. The preliminary microarray analysis suggests that the gene expression profiles regulated by three kinds of genotype core proteins are mainly involved in transport, signal transduction, regulation of transcription, protease activity, etc.,and that some pathogenesis/oncogenesis gene expressions are up/down- regulated simultaneously in the HepG2 cell line. The data suggest that each core protein has its gene expressions profile and that the profiles are implicated in HCV replication and pathogenesis, which may open up a novel way to understand the function of the HCV variant core proteins biological and their pathogenic mechanism.

  12. Molecular Cloning, Expression Pattern and Genotypic Effects on Glucoraphanin Biosynthetic Related Genes in Chinese Kale (Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra Bailey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ling; Chen, Changming; Chen, Guoju; Cao, Bihao; Lei, Jianjun

    2015-11-11

    Glucoraphanin is a plant secondary metabolite that is involved in plant defense and imparts health-promoting properties to cruciferous vegetables. In this study, three genes involved in glucoraphanin metabolism, branched-chain aminotransferase 4 (BCAT4), methylthioalkylmalate synthase 1 (MAM1) and dihomomethionine N-hydroxylase (CYP79F1), were cloned from Chinese kale (Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra Bailey). Sequence homology and phylogenetic analysis identified these genes and confirmed the evolutionary status of Chinese kale. The transcript levels of BCAT4, MAM1 and CYP79F1 were higher in cotyledon, leaf and stem compared with flower and silique. BCAT4, MAM1 and CYP79F1 were expressed throughout leaf development with lower transcript levels during the younger stages. Glucoraphanin content varied extensively among different varieties, which ranged from 0.25 to 2.73 µmol·g(-1) DW (dry weight). Expression levels of BCAT4 and MAM1 were high at vegetative-reproductive transition phase, while CYP79F1 was expressed high at reproductive phase. BCAT4, MAM1 and CYP79F1 were expressed significantly high in genotypes with high glucoraphanin content. All the results provided a better understanding of the roles of BCAT4, MAM1 and CYP79F1 in the glucoraphanin biosynthesis of Chinese kale.

  13. In Vitro Studies Show that Sequence Variability Contributes to Marked Variation in Hepatitis B Virus Replication, Protein Expression, and Function Observed across Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozzi, Vitina; Walsh, Renae; Littlejohn, Margaret; Colledge, Danni; Jackson, Kathy; Warner, Nadia; Yuen, Lilly; Locarnini, Stephen A; Revill, Peter A

    2016-11-15

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) exists as 9 major genotypes (A to I), one minor strain (designated J) and multiple subtypes. Marked differences in HBV natural history, disease progression and treatment response are exhibited by many of these genotypes and subtypes. For example, HBV genotype C is associated with later hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) seroconversion and high rates of liver cancer compared to other HBV genotypes, whereas genotype A2 is rarely associated with HBeAg-negative disease or liver cancer. The reasons for these and other differences in HBV natural history are yet to be determined but could in part be due to sequence differences in the HBV genome that alter replicative capacity and/or gene expression. Direct comparative studies on HBV replication and protein expression have been limited to date due largely to the absence of infectious HBV cDNA clones for each of the HBV genotypes present in the same genetic arrangement. We have produced replication-competent infectious cDNA clones of the most common subtypes of genotypes A to D, namely, A2, B2, C2, D3, and the minor strain J, and compared their HBV replication phenotype using transient-transfection models. We identified striking differences in HBV replicative capacity as well as HBeAg and surface (HBsAg) protein expression across genotypes, which may in part be due to sequence variability in regulatory regions of the HBV genome. Functional analysis showed that sequence differences in the major upstream regulatory region across genotypes impacted promoter activity. There have been very few studies directly comparing the replication phenotype of different HBV genotypes, for which there are marked differences in natural history and disease progression worldwide. We have generated replication-competent 1.3-mer cDNA clones of the major genotypes A2, B2, C2, and D3, as well as a recently identified strain J, and identified striking differences in replicative capacity and protein expression that may

  14. Cobalt stimulates HIF-1-dependent but inhibits HIF-2-dependent gene expression in liver cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Befani, Christina; Mylonis, Ilias; Gkotinakou, Ioanna-Maria; Georgoulias, Panagiotis; Hu, Cheng-Jun; Simos, George; Liakos, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are transcriptional regulators that mediate the cellular response to low oxygen. Although HIF-1 is usually considered as the principal mediator of hypoxic adaptation, several tissues and different cell types express both HIF-1 and HIF-2 isoforms under hypoxia or when treated with hypoxia mimetic chemicals such as cobalt. However, the similarities or differences between HIF-1 and HIF-2, in terms of their tissue- and inducer-specific activation and function, are not adequately characterized. To address this issue, we investigated the effects of true hypoxia and hypoxia mimetics on HIF-1 and HIF-2 induction and specific gene transcriptional activity in two hepatic cancer cell lines, Huh7 and HepG2. Both hypoxia and cobalt caused rapid induction of both HIF-1α and HIF-2α proteins. Hypoxia induced erythropoietin (EPO) expression and secretion in a HIF-2-dependent way. Surprisingly, however, EPO expression was not induced when cells were treated with cobalt. In agreement, both HIF-1- and HIF-2-dependent promoters (of PGK and SOD2 genes, respectively) were activated by hypoxia while cobalt only activated the HIF-1-dependent PGK promoter. Unlike cobalt, other hypoxia mimetics such as DFO and DMOG activated both types of promoters. Furthermore, cobalt impaired the hypoxic stimulation of HIF-2, but not HIF-1, activity and cobalt-induced HIF-2α interacted poorly with USF-2, a HIF-2-specific co-activator. These data show that, despite similar induction of HIF-1α and HIF-2α protein expression, HIF-1 and HIF-2 specific gene activating functions respond differently to different stimuli and suggest the operation of oxygen-independent and gene- or tissue-specific regulatory mechanisms involving additional transcription factors or co-activators. PMID:23958427

  15. Expression of DNA-dependent protein kinase in human granulocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Annahita SALLMYR; Anna MILLER; Aida GABDOULKHAKOVA; Valentina SAFRONOVA; Gunnel HENRIKSSON; Anders BREDBERG

    2004-01-01

    Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) have been reported to completely lack of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) which is composed of Ku protein and the catalytic subunit DNA-PKcs, needed for nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) of DNA double-strand breaks. Promyelocytic HL-60 cells express a variant form of Ku resulting in enhanced radiation sensitivity. This raises the question if low efficiency of NHEJ, instrumental for the cellular repair of oxidative damage, is a normal characteristic of myeloid differentiation. Here we confirmed the complete lack of DNAPK in P MN protein extracts, and the expression of the truncated Ku86 variant form in HL-60. However, this degradation of DNA-PK was shown to be due to a DNA-PK-degrading protease in PMN and HL-60. In addition, by using a protease-resistant whole cell assay, both Ku86 and DNA-PKcs could be demonstrated in PMN, suggesting the previously reported absence in PMN of DNA-PK to be an artefact. The levels of Ku86 and DNA-PKcs were much reduced in PMN, as compared with that of the lymphocytes, whereas HL-60 displayed a markedly elevated DNA-PK concentration.In conclusion, our findings provide evidence of reduced, not depleted expression of DNA-PK during the mature stages of myeloid differentiation.

  16. Increased All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes and High-Expression Mannan-Binding Lectin Genotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Jakob A; Thiel, Steffen; Lajer, Maria

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is a complement-activating carbohydrate-recognizing molecule associated with diabetic nephropathy. MBL is associated with all-cause mortality in type 2 diabetes, but whether MBL is associated with mortality in type 1 diabetes remains unknown. We therefore...... are both associated with increased mortality rates in type 1 diabetes compared with low MBL expression genotypes and low MBL concentrations....... aimed to investigate this. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We studied an existing 12-year prospective cohort with type 1 diabetes with 198 patients with diabetic nephropathy (121 men, age 41 years [95% CI 40-42], estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] 67 mL/min/1.73 m(2) [95% CI 63-70]) and 174...

  17. Desmanthus GENOTYPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ HENRIQUE DE ALBUQUERQUE RANGEL

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Desmanthus is a genus of forage legumes with potential to improve pastures and livestock produc-tion on clay soils of dry tropical and subtropical regions such as the existing in Brazil and Australia. Despite this patterns of natural or enforced after-ripening of Desmanthus seeds have not been well established. Four year old seed banks of nine Desmanthus genotypes at James Cook University were accessed for their patterns of seed softe-ning in response to a range of temperatures. Persistent seed banks were found to exist under all of the studied ge-notypes. The largest seeds banks were found in the genotypes CPI 78373 and CPI 78382 and the smallest in the genotypes CPI’s 37143, 67643, and 83563. An increase in the percentage of softened seeds was correlated with higher temperatures, in two patterns of response: in some accessions seeds were not significantly affected by tempe-ratures below 80º C; and in others, seeds become soft when temperature rose to as little as 60 ºC. At 80 °C the heat started to depress germination. High seed production of Desmanthus associated with dependence of seeds on eleva-ted temperatures to softening can be a very important strategy for plants to survive in dry tropical regions.

  18. Stem carbohydrate dynamics and expression of genes involved in fructan accumulation and remobilization during grain growth in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genotypes with contrasting tolerance to water stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yáñez, Alejandra; Tapia, Gerardo; Guerra, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    The genetic and physiological mechanisms underlying the relationship between water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC) and water stress tolerance are scarcely known. This study aimed to evaluate the main WSC in stems, and the expression of genes involved in fructan metabolism in wheat genotypes growing in a glasshouse with water stress (WS; 50% field capacity from heading) and full irrigation (FI; 100% field capacity). Eight wheat genotypes (five tolerant and three susceptible to water stress) were evaluated initially (experiment 1) and the two most contrasting genotypes in terms of WSC accumulation were evaluated in a subsequent experiment (experiment 2). Maximum accumulation of WSC occurred 10–20 days after anthesis. Under WS, the stress-tolerant genotype exhibited higher concentrations of WSC, glucose, fructose and fructan in the stems, compared to FI. In addition, the stress-tolerant genotype exhibited higher up-regulation of the fructan 1-fructosyltransferase B (1-FFTB) and fructan 1-exohydrolase w2 (1-FEHw2) genes, whereas the susceptible cultivar presented an up-regulation of the fructan 6-fructosyltransferase (6-SFT) and fructan 1-exohydrolase w3 (1-FEHw3) genes. Our results indicated clear differences in the pattern of WSC accumulation and the expression of genes regulating fructan metabolism between the tolerant and susceptible genotypes under WS. PMID:28552955

  19. Towards systems genetic analyses in barley: Integration of phenotypic, expression and genotype data into GeneNetwork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Druka Arnis

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A typical genetical genomics experiment results in four separate data sets; genotype, gene expression, higher-order phenotypic data and metadata that describe the protocols, processing and the array platform. Used in concert, these data sets provide the opportunity to perform genetic analysis at a systems level. Their predictive power is largely determined by the gene expression dataset where tens of millions of data points can be generated using currently available mRNA profiling technologies. Such large, multidimensional data sets often have value beyond that extracted during their initial analysis and interpretation, particularly if conducted on widely distributed reference genetic materials. Besides quality and scale, access to the data is of primary importance as accessibility potentially allows the extraction of considerable added value from the same primary dataset by the wider research community. Although the number of genetical genomics experiments in different plant species is rapidly increasing, none to date has been presented in a form that allows quick and efficient on-line testing for possible associations between genes, loci and traits of interest by an entire research community. Description Using a reference population of 150 recombinant doubled haploid barley lines we generated novel phenotypic, mRNA abundance and SNP-based genotyping data sets, added them to a considerable volume of legacy trait data and entered them into the GeneNetwork http://www.genenetwork.org. GeneNetwork is a unified on-line analytical environment that enables the user to test genetic hypotheses about how component traits, such as mRNA abundance, may interact to condition more complex biological phenotypes (higher-order traits. Here we describe these barley data sets and demonstrate some of the functionalities GeneNetwork provides as an easily accessible and integrated analytical environment for exploring them. Conclusion By

  20. Expression patterns of prion protein gene in differential genotypes sheep: quantification using molecular beacon real-time RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuan; Wu, Run; Li, Fa-Di; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Zhao, Chun-Lin; Diao, Xiao-Long; Guan, Hong-Wei

    2011-06-01

    Determination of the transcription level of cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is essential for understanding its role in organisms and revealing mechanism of susceptibility and resistance to scrapie. However, the expression of prion protein (PrP) mRNA in sheep has not been quantified in great detail in digestive tract which is important during scrapie spread through oral route. Herein, we report on measurement of sheep PrP mRNA using absolute quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Total RNA was isolated from five different regions of the central nervous system (CNS), four regions of lymphoid system, eleven regions of digestive tract, and two reproductive organ tissues of eight sheep of two different genotypes (ARR/ARQ and ARH/ARQ) and PrP mRNA was quantified by real-time RT-PCR using molecular beacon. The results showed that highest levels of PrP mRNA were expressed in thalamus and cerebrum (P mRNA expression in sheep for further studies of pathogenesis of prion diseases.

  1. Genotypic Characterization of Egypt Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Isolates Expressing Coli Surface Antigen 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    n = 3) and none co-expressed CS4 [9]. The reason for variability in recovery of CS6 co-expressing isolates is not obvious, but it may be due to...Governorate, Egypt. The Abu Homos field site has been described previously [22]. Five individual lactose fermenting colonies with typical morphology of E...coli were isolated from MacConkey-lactose agar medium, cultured overnight in brain heart infusion broth [23], and frozen in 15% glycerol at -70ºC

  2. Complex nature of SNP genotype effects on gene expression in primary human leucocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heap, Graham A.; Trynka, Gosia; Jansen, Ritsert C.; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Swertz, Morris A.; Dinesen, Lotte C.; Hunt, Karen A.; Wijmenga, Cisca; vanHeel, David A.; Franke, Lude; Heel, David A van

    2009-01-01

    Background: Genome wide association studies have been hugely successful in identifying disease risk variants, yet most variants do not lead to coding changes and how variants influence biological function is usually unknown. Methods: We correlated gene expression and genetic variation in untouched

  3. Real-Time Determination of Photosynthesis, Transpiration, Water-Use Efficiency and Gene Expression of Two Sorghum bicolor (Moench Genotypes Subjected to Dry-Down

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Fracasso

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth and productivity are strongly affected by limited water availability in drought prone environments. The current climate change scenario, characterized by long periods without precipitations followed by short but intense rainfall, forces plants to implement different strategies to cope with drought stress. Understanding how plants use water during periods of limited water availability is of primary importance to identify and select the best adapted genotypes to a certain environment. Two sorghum genotypes IS22330 and IS20351, previously characterized as drought tolerant and drought sensitive genotypes, were subjected to progressive drought stress through a dry-down experiment. A whole-canopy multi-chamber system was used to determine the in vivo water use efficiency (WUE. This system records whole-canopy net photosynthetic and transpiration rate of 12 chambers five times per hour allowing the calculation of whole-canopy instantaneous WUE daily trends. Daily net photosynthesis and transpiration rates were coupled with gene expression dynamics of five drought related genes. Under drought stress, the tolerant genotype increased expression level for all the genes analyzed, whilst the opposite trend was highlighted by the drought sensitive genotype. Correlation between gene expression dynamics and gas exchange measurements allowed to identify three genes as valuable candidate to assess drought tolerance in sorghum.

  4. E2 GLYCOPROTEIN OF GENOTYPE Ⅲ CHINESE ISOLATES OF HEPATITIS C VIRUS EXPRESSED IN MAMMALIAN CELL AS ANTIGEN FOR ANTI-E2 ANTIBODY DETECTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴朝栋; 陶其敏

    1998-01-01

    Expression vector inserted with E2/NS1 gane derived from ganotype Ⅲ Chinese isolates of HCV was transfected into mammalian cells to express E2 glycoprotein. Expressed protein was used as antigen for anti-E2 antibody detection in 19 cases of hepatitis C patients by Western blot. It was first to express E2 glycoprotein of genotype Ⅲ Chinese hepatitis C virus isolates. For anti-E2 detection, 14 cases of patients were positive of antibodies against E2(73.7%). These results indicated that E2 glycoprotein expressed in mammalian cells had good immunoganicity and cross reactivity to serum infected with genotype Ⅱ Chinese hepatitis C virus isolates.

  5. Expression of core antigen of HCV genotype 3a and its evaluation as screening agent for HCV infection in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehman Irshad U

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pakistan is facing a threat from hepatitis C infection which is increasing at an alarming rate throughout the country. More specific and sensitive screening assays are needed to timely and correctly diagnose this infection. Methods After RNA extraction from specimen (HCV-3a, cDNA was synthesized that was used to amplify full length core gene of HCV 3a. After verification through PCR, DNA sequencing and BLAST, a properly oriented positive recombinant plasmid for core gene was digested with proper restriction enzymes to release the target gene which was then inserted downstream of GST encoding DNA in the same open reading frame at proper restriction sites in multiple cloning site of pGEX4t2 expression vector. Recombinant expression vector for each gene was transformed in E. coli BL21 (DE3 and induced with IPTG for recombinant fusion protein production that was then purified through affinity chromatography. Western blot and Enzyme Linked Immunosorbant Assay (ELISA were used to detect immuno-reactivity of the recombinant protein. Results The HCV core antigen produced in prokaryotic expression system was reactive and used to develop a screening assay. After validating the positivity (100% and negativity (100% of in-house anti-HCV screening assay through a standardized panel of 200 HCV positive and 200 HCV negative sera, a group of 120 serum specimens of suspected HCV infection were subjected to comparative analysis of our method with commercially available assay. The comparison confirmed that our method is more specific than the commercially available assays for HCV strains circulating in this specific geographical region of the world and could thus be used for HCV screening in Pakistan. Conclusion In this study, we devised a screening assay after successful PCR amplification, isolation, sequencing, expression and purification of core antigen of HCV genotype 3a. Our developed screening assay is more sensitive, specific and

  6. ATP-Binding Cassette Genes Genotype and Expression: A Potential Association with Pancreatic Cancer Development and Chemoresistance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Pang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic polymorphisms in ABC (ATP-binding cassette transporter genes are associated with differential responses to chemotherapy in various cancers including pancreatic cancer. In this study, four SNPs in the ABCB1, ABCC1, and ABCG2 genes were investigated in normal and pancreatic cancerous specimens. The expression of the three transporters was also analyzed. The TT genotypes of G2677T and C3435T in ABCB1 gene were associated with lower risk of developing pancreatic cancer (P=0.013, OR = 0.35 and P=0.015, OR = 0.29, resp.. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the common polymorphisms in the ABCB1 gene affecting the genetic risk of developing pancreatic cancer. Moreover, the expression of ABCB1 in 2677TT and 3435TT carriers was lower compared to the wild-type homozygotes and heterozygotes. A cell viability assay, using standard pancreatic cancer cell lines, revealed that the ABCB1 2677TT-3455TT haplotype was more sensitive than the other haplotypes to gemcitabine. Conclusion. Polymorphisms in ABCB1 G2677T and G3435T were associated with differential susceptibility to pancreatic cancer and may predict responses to chemotherapy.

  7. Comparative analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) between drought-tolerant and -susceptible genotypes of chickpea under terminal drought stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is an important grain-legume crop that is mainly grown in rainfed areas, where terminal drought is a major constraint to its productivity. We generated expressed sequence tags (ESTs) by suppression subtraction hybridization (SSH) to identify differentially expressed genes in drought-tolerant and -susceptible genotypes in chickpea. Results EST libraries were generated by SSH from root and shoot tissues of IC4958 (drought tolerant) and ICC 1882 (drought resistant) exposed to terminal drought conditions by the dry down method. SSH libraries were also constructed by using 2 sets of bulks prepared from the RNA of root tissues from selected recombinant inbred lines (RILs) (10 each) for the extreme high and low root biomass phenotype. A total of 3062 unigenes (638 contigs and 2424 singletons), 51.4% of which were novel in chickpea, were derived by cluster assembly and sequence alignment of 5949 ESTs. Only 2185 (71%) unigenes showed significant BLASTX similarity (chickpea for the first time. This study not only serves as resource for marker discovery, but can provide a better insight into the selection of candidate genes (both up- and downregulated) associated with drought tolerance. These results can be used to identify suitable targets for manipulating the drought-tolerance trait in chickpea. PMID:21513527

  8. Effect of Sucrose Concentration on Sucrose-Dependent Adhesion and Glucosyltransferase Expression of S. mutans in Children with Severe Early-Childhood Caries (S-ECC

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    Wei Zhao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sucrose, extracellular polysaccharide, and glucosyltransferases (GTFs are key factors in sucrose-dependent adhesion and play important roles in the process of severe early-childhood caries (S-ECC. However, whether sucrose concentration regulates gtf expression, extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, and sucrose-dependent adhesion is related to the different genotypes of S. mutans isolated from ECC in children and still needs to be investigated. In this study, 52 strains of S. mutans were isolated from children with S-ECC and caries-free (CF children. Water-insoluble glucan (WIG synthesis was detected by the anthrone method, adhesion capacity by the turbidimetric method, and expression of gtf by RT-PCR in an in vitro model containing 1%–20% sucrose. The genotypes of S. mutans were analyzed by AP-PCR. The results showed that WIG synthesis, adhesion capacity, and gtf expression increased significantly when the sucrose concentration was from 1% to 10%. WIG synthesis and gtfB as well as gtfC expression of the 1% and 5% groups were significantly lower than those of the 10% and 20% groups (p < 0.05. There were no significant differences between the 10% and 20% groups. The fingerprints of S. mutans detected from individuals in the S-ECC group exhibited a significant difference in diversity compared with those from CF individuals (p < 0.05. Further, the expression of gtfB and gtfC in the S-ECC group was significantly different among the 1- to 5-genotype groups (p < 0.05. It can be concluded that sucrose-dependent adhesion might be related to the diversity of genotypes of S. mutans, and the 10% sucrose level can be seen as a “turning point” and essential factor for the prevention of S-ECC.

  9. Ondansetron reduces naturalistic drinking in non-treatment seeking alcohol dependent individuals with the LL 5′-HTTLPR genotype: a laboratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, George A.; Zywiak, William H.; Swift, Robert M.; McGeary, John E.; Clifford, James S.; Shoaff, Jessica R.; Vuittonet, Cynthia; Fricchione, Samuel; Brickley, Michael; Beaucage, Kayla; Haass-Koffler, Carolina L.; Leggio, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Background One hypothesis suggests that the differential response to ondansetron and serotonin specific re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may be due to a functional polymorphism of the 5′-HTTLPR promoter region in SLC6A4, the gene that codes for the serotonin transporter (5-HTT). The LL 5′-HTTLPR genotype is postulated to be specifically sensitive to the effects of ondansetron with SS/SL 5′-HTTLPR genotypes sensitive to SSRIs. This study tests this hypothesis by matching non-treatment seeking alcohol dependent (AD) individuals with LL genotype to ondansetron and SS/SL genotypes to the SSRI sertraline, and mis-matching them assessing naturalistic and bar-laboratory alcohol drinking. Methods Seventy-seven AD individuals were randomized to one of two counterbalanced arms to receive sertraline 200mg/day or ondansetron 0.5 mg/day for three weeks followed by an alcohol self-administration experiment (ASAE), then received placebo for three weeks followed by a second ASAE. Individuals then received the alternate drug for three weeks followed by a third ASAE. Drinks per drinking day (DDD with drinks in SDUs) for 7 days prior to each ASAE and milliliters consumed during each ASAE were the primary outcomes. Results Fifty-five participants completed the study. The genotype x order interaction was significant [F(1,47) = 8.42, p = .006] for DDD. Three ANCOVAs were conducted for DDD during the week before each ASAE. Ondansetron compared to sertraline resulted in a significant reduction in DDD during the week before the first [F(1,47) = 7.64, p = .008] but not the third ASAE. There was no difference in milliliters consumed during each ASAE. Conclusion This study modestly supports the hypothesis that ondansetron may reduce DDD in AD individuals with the LL genotype as measured naturalistically. By contrast there was no support that ondansetron reduces drinking during the ASAEs or that sertraline reduces alcohol use in individuals who have SS/SL genotypes. We provide limited

  10. Construction of an infectious molecular clone of Japanese encephalitis virus genotype V and its derivative subgenomic replicon capable of expressing a foreign gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Tomohiro; Abe, Makoto; Masuda, Michiaki

    2015-01-02

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) genotype V was originally isolated in Malaysia in 1952 and has long been restricted to the area. In 2009, sudden emergence of the genotype V in China and Korea was reported, suggesting expansion of its geographical distribution. Although studies on the genotype V are becoming more important, they have been limited partly due to lack of its infectious molecular clone. In this study, a plasmid carrying cDNA corresponding to the entire genome of JEV Muar strain, which belongs to genotype V, in the downstream of T7 promoter was constructed. Electroporation of viral RNA transcribed by T7 RNA polymerase (T7RNAP) in vitro from the plasmid led to production of progeny viruses both in mammalian and mosquito cells. Also, transfection of the infectious clone plasmid into mammalian cells expressing T7RNAP transiently or stably was demonstrated to generate infectious progenies. When the viral structural protein genes were partially deleted from the full-length cDNA, the subgenomic RNA transcribed in vitro from the modified plasmid was shown to replicate itself in mammalian cells as a replicon. The replicon carrying the firefly luciferase gene in place of the deleted structural protein genes was also shown to efficiently replicate itself and express luciferase in mammalian cells. Compared with the replicon derived from JEV genotype III (Nakayama strain), the genotype V-derived replicon appeared to be more tolerant to introduction of a foreign gene. The infectious clone and the replicons constructed in this study may serve as useful tools for characterizing JEV genotype V.

  11. Identifying differentially expressed genes in trophozoites and cysts of Acanthamoeba T4 genotype: Implications for developing new treatments for Acanthamoeba keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedkhojasteh, Hoda; Niyyati, Maryam; Rezaei, Sasan; Mohebali, Mehdi; Farnia, Shohreh; Kazemi-Rad, Elham; Roozafzoon, Reza; Sianati, Hamed; Rezaeian, Mostafa; Heidari, Mansour

    2015-02-01

    Acanthamoeba T4 genotype is the most prevalent genotype associated with amoebic keratitis. Acanthamoeba keratitis therapy is difficult due to transformation of trophozoite to cyst stage, which hinders the treatment of the disease. Although encystation assists the organism to survive against the chemotherapeutic compounds, the precise mechanism of encystation remains poorly understood. The purpose of this work was to identify differentially expressed genes in Acanthamoeba T4 genotype which might be useful for understanding of the encystment process and may thus help develop more efficient treatment. The mRNA profile of trophozoite and cyst of Acanthamoeba T4 genotype isolated from a soft contact lens wearer were analyzed using a cDNA amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) technique. Subsequently, a real time reverse transcriptase-PCR was performed to validate the cDNA-AFLP results. Three genes, heat shock protein70 (hsp70), actin-I and elongation factor-1alpha (EF-1α) were differentially expressed during Acanthamoeba differentiation. An in silico result predicted that transformation of trophozoite to cyst could be mediated through their cooperation with the protein partners interaction. Taken together, our experimental and bioinformatics findings suggested potential functions of hsp70, EF-1α and actin-I in differentiation of Acanthamoeba T4 genotype which may be useful in the design of an efficient therapeutic strategy in AK.

  12. Distribution of genotypes C825T polymorphism G-protein β3-subunit gene in patients with hypertension depending on body mass index

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    Prystupa L.N.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the frequency of genotypes of C825T polymorphism G-protein β3-subunit gene (GNB3 in patients with arterial hypertension (AH, depending on body mass index (BMI. The study involved 155 patients with verified diagnosis of AH (study group and 50 healthy individuals (control group. The patients of the main group were divided into 3 groups according to BMI: I - 35 patients with normal body weight, II - 38 patients with overweight, III - 82 patients with obesity. We used general clinical, anthropometric, instrumental, molecular-genetic and statistical methods. Probability of differences in the frequency of alleles and genotypes was determined using χ² criteria. Pairwise comparison of groups was made using nonparametric Mann-Whitney test. The difference was considered statistically significant at p <0,05. Investigation of the distribution of genotypes C825T polymorphism GNB3 in patients with AH according to BMI showed statistically significant increase in the frequency of genotypes C / T and T / T and T allele in patients with overweight and obesity as compared with patients with normal body weight (χ² = 26 8; p <0.001. The risk of weight increase in AH patients with T allele carriers is 2,2 times higher than in C allele carriers. Association of C825T polymorphism of GNB3 with a tendency to obesity and overweight in patients with AH was proved.

  13. Exploring the functional role of the CHRM2 gene in human cognition: results from a dense genotyping and brain expression study

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    de Geus Eco JC

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CHRM2 gene, located on the long arm of chromosome 7 (7q31-35, is involved in neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity and feedback regulation of acetylcholine release, and has been implicated in higher cognitive processing. The aim of this study is the identification of functional (noncoding variants underlying cognitive phenotypic variation. Methods We previously reported an association between polymorphisms in the 5'UTR regions of the CHRM2 gene and intelligence.. However, no functional variants within this area have currently been identified. In order to identify the relevant functional variant(s, we conducted a denser coverage of SNPs, using two independent Dutch cohorts, consisting of a children's sample (N = 371 ss; mean age 12.4 and an adult sample (N= 391 ss; mean age 37.6. For all individuals standardized intelligence measures were available. Subsequently, we investigated genotype-dependent CHRM2 gene expression levels in the brain, to explore putative enhancer/inhibition activity exerted by variants within the muscarinic acetylcholinergic receptor. Results Using a test of within-family association two of the previously reported variants – rs2061174, and rs324650 – were again strongly associated with intelligence (P Conclusion Using a denser coverage of SNPs in the CHRM2 gene, we confirmed the 5'UTR regions to be most interesting in the context of intelligence, and ruled out other regions of this gene. Although no correlation between genomic variants and gene expression was found, it would be interesting to examine allele-specific effects on CHRM2 transcripts expression in much more detail, for example in relation to transcripts specific halve-life and their relation to LTP and memory.

  14. Improving the phenotypic expression of rice genotypes:Rethinking“intensification”for production systems and selection practices for rice breeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Norman Uphoff; Vasilia Fasoula; Anas Iswandi; Amir Kassam; Amod K. Thakure

    2015-01-01

    Intensification in rice crop production is generally understood as requiring increased use of material inputs: water, inorganic fertilizers, and agrochemicals. However, this is not the only kind of intensification available. More productive crop phenotypes, with traits such as more resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses and shorter crop cycles, are possible through modifications in the management of rice plants, soil, water, and nutrients, reducing rather than increasing material inputs. Greater factor productivity can be achieved through the application of new knowledge and more skill, and (initially) more labor, as seen from the System of Rice Intensification (SRI), whose practices are used in various combinations by as many as 10 million farmers on about 4 million hectares in over 50 countries. The highest yields achieved with these management methods have come from hybrids and improved rice varieties, confirming the importance of making genetic improvements. However, unimproved varieties are also responsive to these changes, which induce better growth and functioning of rice root systems and more abundance, diversity, and activity of beneficial soil organisms. Some of these organisms as symbiotic endophytes can affect and enhance the expression of rice plants' genetic potential as well as their phenotypic resilience to multiple stresses, including those of climate change. SRI experience and data suggest that decades of plant breeding have been selecting for the best crop genetic endowments under suboptimal growing conditions, with crowding of plants that impedes their photosynthesis and growth, flooding of rice paddies that causes roots to degenerate and forgoes benefits derived from aerobic soil organisms, and overuse of agrochemicals that adversely affect these organisms as well as soil and human health. This review paper reports evidence from research in India and Indonesia that changes in crop and water management can improve the expression of rice

  15. Improving the phenotypic expression of rice genotypes: Rethinking “intensification” for production systems and selection practices for rice breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Uphoff

    2015-06-01

    expression of rice plants' genetic potential, thereby creating more productive and robust phenotypes from given rice genotypes. Data indicate that increased plant density does not necessarily enhance crop yield potential, as classical breeding methods suggest. Developing cultivars that can achieve their higher productivity under a wide range of plant densities—breeding for density-neutral cultivars using alternative selection strategies—will enable more effective exploitation of available crop growth resources. Density-neutral cultivars that achieve high productivity under ample environmental growth resources can also achieve optimal productivity under limited resources, where lower densities can avert crop failure due to overcrowding. This will become more important to the extent that climatic and other factors become more adverse to crop production. Focusing more on which management practices can evoke the most productive and robust phenotypes from given genotypes is important for rice breeding and improvement programs since it is phenotypes that feed our human populations.

  16. Chilling-dependent release of seed and bud dormancy in peach associates to common changes in gene expression.

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    Carmen Leida

    Full Text Available Reproductive meristems and embryos display dormancy mechanisms in specialized structures named respectively buds and seeds that arrest the growth of perennial plants until environmental conditions are optimal for survival. Dormancy shows common physiological features in buds and seeds. A genotype-specific period of chilling is usually required to release dormancy by molecular mechanisms that are still poorly understood. In order to find common transcriptional pathways associated to dormancy release, we analyzed the chilling-dependent expression in embryos of certain genes that were previously found related to dormancy in flower buds of peach. We propose the presence of short and long-term dormancy events affecting respectively the germination rate and seedling development by independent mechanisms. Short periods of chilling seem to improve germination in an abscisic acid-dependent manner, whereas the positive effect of longer cold treatments on physiological dwarfing coincides with the accumulation of phenylpropanoids in the seed.

  17. The wine yeast strain-dependent expression of genes implicated in sulfide production in response to nitrogen availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes-Ferreira, Ana; Barbosa, Catarina; Jimenez-Marti, Elena; Del Olmo, Marcel Li; Mendes-Faia, Arlete

    2010-09-01

    Sulfur metabolism in S. cerevisiae is well established, but the mechanisms underlying the formation of sulfide remain obscure. Here we investigated by real time RT-PCR the dependence of expression levels of MET3, MET5/ECM17, MET10, MET16 and MET17 along with SSU1 on nitrogen availability in two wine yeast strains that produce divergent sulfide profiles. MET3 was the most highly expressed of the genes studied in strain PYCC4072, and SSU1 in strain UCD522. Strains behaved differently according to the sampling times, with UCD522 and PYCC4072 showing the highest expression levels at 120h and 72h, respectively. In the presence of 267mg assimilable N/l, the genes were more highly expressed in strain UCD522 than in PYCC4072. MET5/ECM17 and MET17 were only weakly expressed in both strains under any condition tested. MET10 and SSU1 in both strains, but MET16 only in PYCC4072, were consistently up-regulated when sulfide production was inhibited. This study illustrates that strain genotype could be important in determining enzyme activities and therefore the rate of sulfide liberation. This linkage, for some yeast strains, of sulfide production to expression levels of genes associated to sulfate assimilation and sulfur amino acid biosynthesis could be relevant for defining new strategies for genetic improvement of wine yeasts.

  18. Integrated genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling reveals BCL11B as a putative oncogene in acute myeloid leukemia with 14q32 aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Saman; Sanders, Mathijs A; Zeilemaker, Annelieke; Geertsma-Kleinekoort, Wendy M C; Koenders, Jasper E; Kavelaars, Francois G; Abbas, Zabiollah G; Mahamoud, Souad; Chu, Isabel W T; Hoogenboezem, Remco; Peeters, Justine K; van Drunen, Ellen; van Galen, Janneke; Beverloo, H Berna; Löwenberg, Bob; Valk, Peter J M

    2014-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a neoplasm characterized by recurrent molecular aberrations traditionally demonstrated by cytogenetic analyses. We used high density genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling to reveal acquired cryptic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia. By genome-wide genotyping of 137 cases of primary acute myeloid leukemia, we disclosed a recurrent focal amplification on chromosome 14q32, which included the genes BCL11B, CCNK, C14orf177 and SETD3, in two cases. In the affected cases, the BCL11B gene showed consistently high mRNA expression, whereas the expression of the other genes was unperturbed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on 40 cases of acute myeloid leukemia with high BCL11B mRNA expression [2.5-fold above median; 40 out of 530 cases (7.5%)] revealed 14q32 abnormalities in two additional cases. In the four BCL11B-rearranged cases the 14q32 locus was fused to different partner chromosomes. In fact, in two cases, we demonstrated that the focal 14q32 amplifications were integrated into transcriptionally active loci. The translocations involving BCL11B result in increased expression of full-length BCL11B protein. The BCL11B-rearranged acute myeloid leukemias expressed both myeloid and T-cell markers. These biphenotypic acute leukemias all carried FLT3 internal tandem duplications, a characteristic marker of acute myeloid leukemia. BCL11B mRNA expression in acute myeloid leukemia appeared to be strongly associated with expression of other T-cell-specific genes. Myeloid 32D(GCSF-R) cells ectopically expressing Bcl11b showed decreased proliferation rate and less maturation. In conclusion, by an integrated approach involving high-throughput genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling we identified BCL11B as a candidate oncogene in acute myeloid leukemia.

  19. Human papillomavirus genotyping and p16 expression as prognostic factors for patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer stages I to III carcinoma of the anal canal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup-Hansen, Eva; Linnemann, Dorte; Skovrider-Ruminski, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Carcinomas of the anal canal are strongly associated with the human papillomavirus (HPV). Expression of p16 is used as a surrogate marker of HPV infection. In a retrospective study, we evaluated HPV genotyping and p16 expression as prognostic markers of overall survival (OS) and disease......-specific survival (DSS) in patients diagnosed with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stages I to III carcinoma of the anal canal. PATIENTS AND METHODS: HPV genotyping polymerase chain reaction (high-risk subtypes 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58) and immunohistochemical expression of p16 were analyzed...... by using paraffin-embedded tumor biopsies from 143 anal carcinomas. The patients were treated with combined chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy alone. RESULTS: HPV16 was detected in 81.0% of the tumors, followed by HPV33 (5.1%), HPV18 (2.2%), and HPV58 (0.7%). p16 positivity was found in 92.9% of the tumors...

  20. Regulation of gene expression by 17β-estradiol in the arcuate nucleus of the mouse through ERE-dependent and ERE-independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jennifer A; Mamounis, Kyle J; Yasrebi, Ali; Roepke, Troy A

    2016-03-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) modulates gene expression in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) to control homeostatic functions. In the ARC, estrogen receptor (ER) α is highly expressed and is an important contributor to E2's actions, controlling gene expression through estrogen response element (ERE)-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The objective of this study was to determine if known E2-regulated genes are regulated through these mechanisms. The selected genes have been shown to regulate homeostasis and have been separated into three subsections: channels, receptors, and neuropeptides. To determine if ERE-dependent or ERE-independent mechanisms regulate gene expression, two transgenic mouse models, an ERα knock-out (ERKO) and an ERα knock-in/knock-out (KIKO), which lacks a functional ERE binding domain, were used in addition to their wild-type littermates. Females of all genotypes were ovariectomized and injected with oil or estradiol benzoate (E2B). Our results suggest that E2B regulates multiple genes through these mechanisms. Of note, Cacna1g and Kcnmb1 channel expression was increased by E2B in WT females only, suggesting an ERE-dependent regulation. Furthermore, the NKB receptor, Tac3r, was suppressed by E2B in WT and KIKO females but not ERKO females, suggesting that ERα-dependent, ERE-independent signaling is necessary for Tac3r regulation. The adrenergic receptor Adra1b was suppressed by E2B in all genotypes indicating that ERα is not the primary receptor for E2B's actions. The neuropeptide Tac2 was suppressed by E2B through ERE-dependent mechanisms. These results indicate that E2B activates both ERα-dependent and independent signaling in the ARC through ERE-dependent and ERE-independent mechanisms to control gene expression.

  1. Variation in salinity tolerance of four lowland genotypes of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) as assessed by growth, physiological traits, and sodium transporter gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Carrasco, Karina; Antognoni, Fabiana; Coulibaly, Amadou Konotie; Lizardi, Susana; Covarrubias, Adriana; Martínez, Enrique A; Molina-Montenegro, Marco A; Biondi, Stefania; Zurita-Silva, Andrés

    2011-11-01

    Chenopodium quinoa (Willd.) is an Andean plant showing a remarkable tolerance to abiotic stresses. In Chile, quinoa populations display a high degree of genetic distancing, and variable tolerance to salinity. To investigate which tolerance mechanisms might account for these differences, four genotypes from coastal central and southern regions were compared for their growth, physiological, and molecular responses to NaCl at seedling stage. Seeds were sown on agar plates supplemented with 0, 150 or 300mM NaCl. Germination was significantly reduced by NaCl only in accession BO78. Shoot length was reduced by 150mM NaCl in three out of four genotypes, and by over 60% at 300mM (except BO78 which remained more similar to controls). Root length was hardly affected or even enhanced at 150mM in all four genotypes, but inhibited, especially in BO78, by 300mM NaCl. Thus, the root/shoot ratio was differentially affected by salt, with the highest values in PRJ, and the lowest in BO78. Biomass was also less affected in PRJ than in the other accessions, the genotype with the highest increment in proline concentration upon salt treatment. Free putrescine declined dramatically in all genotypes under 300mM NaCl; however (spermidine+spermine)/putrescine ratios were higher in PRJ than BO78. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses of two sodium transporter genes, CqSOS1 and CqNHX, revealed that their expression was differentially induced at the shoot and root level, and between genotypes, by 300mM NaCl. Expression data are discussed in relation to the degree of salt tolerance in the different accessions.

  2. Human Platelet Antigen Genotyping and Expression of CD109 (Human Platelet Antigen 15 mRNA in Various Human Cell Types

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    Sang Mee Hwang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available CD109 gene encodes a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked glycoprotein found in a subset of platelets and endothelial cell, and human platelet antigen (HPA 15 is found on CD109. We evaluated the HPA genotype and/or the CD109 mRNA expression on two peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC, two peripheral bloods (PB, 12 granulocyte products, natural killer (NK-92, B-lymphocyte (CO88BV59-1, K-562 leukemia cell line, human embryonic stem cell (hESC, and human fibroblasts (HF. HPA genotyping was performed by SNaPshot assay and CD109 mRNA expression was evaluated by real-time PCR with SYBR green and melting curve analysis. Genotype HPA-15a/-15a was found in PBSC#1 and two granulocyte products, and HPA-15a/-15b was found in PBSC#2, eight granulocyte products, NK-92, K-562, hESC, and HF, and HPA-15b/-15b was found in two granulocyte products. CD109 mRNA expression was highly increased in HF and increased in CD34+ and CD34− PBSCs and some granulocyte products, compared to the PB. However, the increase of expression level varied among the PBSC and granulocyte products. The CD109 mRNA expression of NK-92, K-562, hESC, and CO 88BV59-1 was not detected. HPA genotype was evaluated in various cells and the expression of CD109, which contains HPA 15, was different among cell lines and high in HF and PBSCs.

  3. Intensity dependence in high-level facial expression adaptation aftereffect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sang Wook; Yoon, K Lira

    2017-06-14

    Perception of a facial expression can be altered or biased by a prolonged viewing of other facial expressions, known as the facial expression adaptation aftereffect (FEAA). Recent studies using antiexpressions have demonstrated a monotonic relation between the magnitude of the FEAA and adaptor extremity, suggesting that facial expressions are opponent coded and represented continuously from one expression to its antiexpression. However, it is unclear whether the opponent-coding scheme can account for the FEAA between two facial expressions. In the current study, we demonstrated that the magnitude of the FEAA between two facial expressions increased monotonically as a function of the intensity of adapting facial expressions, consistent with the predictions based on the opponent-coding model. Further, the monotonic increase in the FEAA occurred even when the intensity of an adapting face was too weak for its expression to be recognized. These results together suggest that multiple facial expressions are encoded and represented by balanced activity of neural populations tuned to different facial expressions.

  4. Hepatic expression levels of interferons and interferon-stimulated genes in patients with chronic hepatitis C: A phenotype-genotype correlation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noureddin, M; Rotman, Y; Zhang, F; Park, H; Rehermann, B; Thomas, E; Liang, T J

    2015-01-01

    IFNL4 is linked to hepatitis C virus treatment response and type III interferons (IFNs). We studied the functional associations among hepatic expressions of IFNs and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), and treatment response to peginterferon and ribavirin. Type I IFNs (IFNA1, IFNB1), type II (IFNG), type III (IFNL1, IFNL2/3), IFNL4 and ISG hepatic expressions were measured by qPCR from in 65 chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients whose IFNL4-associated rs368234815 and IFNL3-associated rs12989760 genotype were determined. There was a robust correlation of hepatic expression within type I and type III IFNs and between type III IFNs and IFNL4 but no correlation between other IFN types. Expression of ISGs correlated with type III IFNs and IFNL4 but not with type I IFNs. Levels of ISGs and IFNL2/3 mRNAs were lower in IFNL3 rs12979860 CC patients compared with non-CC patients, and in treatment responders, compared with nonresponders. IFNL4-ΔG genotype was associated with high ISG levels and nonresponse. Hepatic levels of ISGs in CHC are associated with IFNL2/3 and IFNL4 expression, suggesting that IFNLs, not other types of IFNs, drive ISG expression. Hepatic IFNL2/3 expression is functionally linked to IFNL4 and IFNL3 polymorphisms, potentially explaining the tight association among ISG expression and treatment response.

  5. Transmissibility of atypical scrapie in ovine transgenic mice: major effects of host prion protein expression and donor prion genotype.

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    Jean-Noël Arsac

    Full Text Available Atypical scrapie or Nor98 has been identified as a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE that is clearly distinguishable from classical scrapie and BSE, notably regarding the biochemical features of the protease-resistant prion protein PrP(res and the genetic factors involved in susceptibility to the disease. In this study we transmitted the disease from a series of 12 French atypical scrapie isolates in a transgenic mouse model (TgOvPrP4 overexpressing in the brain approximately 0.25, 1.5 or 6x the levels of the PrP(ARQ ovine prion protein under the control of the neuron-specific enolase promoter. We used an approach based on serum PrP(c measurements that appeared to reflect the different PrP(c expression levels in the central nervous system. We found that transmission of atypical scrapie, much more than in classical scrapie or BSE, was strongly influenced by the PrP(c expression levels of TgOvPrP4 inoculated mice. Whereas TgOvPrP4 mice overexpressing approximately 6x the normal PrP(c level died after a survival periods of 400 days, those with approximately 1.5x the normal PrP(c level died at around 700 days. The transmission of atypical scrapie in TgOvPrP4 mouse line was also strongly influenced by the prnp genotypes of the animal source of atypical scrapie. Isolates carrying the AF(141RQ or AHQ alleles, associated with increased disease susceptibility in the natural host, showed a higher transmissibility in TgOvPrP4 mice. The biochemical analysis of PrP(res in TgOvPrP4 mouse brains showed a fully conserved pattern, compared to that in the natural host, with three distinct PrP(res products. Our results throw light on the transmission features of atypical scrapie and suggest that the risk of transmission is intrinsically lower than that of classical scrapie or BSE, especially in relation to the expression level of the prion protein.

  6. Signaling Pathways Related to Protein Synthesis and Amino Acid Concentration in Pig Skeletal Muscles Depend on the Dietary Protein Level, Genotype and Developmental Stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingying; Li, Fengna; Kong, Xiangfeng; Tan, Bie; Li, Yinghui; Duan, Yehui; Blachier, François; Hu, Chien-An A; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    Muscle growth is regulated by the homeostatic balance of the biosynthesis and degradation of muscle proteins. To elucidate the molecular interactions among diet, pig genotype, and physiological stage, we examined the effect of dietary protein concentration, pig genotype, and physiological stages on amino acid (AA) pools, protein deposition, and related signaling pathways in different types of skeletal muscles. The study used 48 Landrace pigs and 48 pure-bred Bama mini-pigs assigned to each of 2 dietary treatments: lower/GB (Chinese conventional diet)- or higher/NRC (National Research Council)-protein diet. Diets were fed from 5 weeks of age to respective market weights of each genotype. Samples of biceps femoris muscle (BFM, type I) and longissimus dorsi muscle (LDM, type II) were collected at nursery, growing, and finishing phases according to the physiological stage of each genotype, to determine the AA concentrations, mRNA levels for growth-related genes in muscles, and protein abundances of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Our data showed that the concentrations of most AAs in LDM and BFM of pigs increased (Ppigs had generally higher (Ppigs. The mRNA levels for myogenic determining factor, myogenin, myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2 A, and myostatin of Bama mini-pigs were higher (Ppigs, while total and phosphorylated protein levels for protein kinase B, mTOR, and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinases (p70S6K), and ratios of p-mTOR/mTOR, p-AKT/AKT, and p-p70S6K/p70S6K were lower (Ppig genotype-dependent effect of dietary protein on the levels for mTOR and p70S6K. When compared with the higher protein-NRC diet, the lower protein-GB diet increased (Ppigs, but repressed (Ppigs. The higher protein-NRC diet increased ratio of p-mTOR/mTOR in Landrace pigs. These findings indicated that the dynamic consequences of AA profile and protein deposition in muscle tissues are the concerted effort of distinctive genotype, nutrient status, age, and

  7. Frequency of alpha- and beta-haemolysin in Staphylococcus aureus of bovine and human origin - A comparison between pheno- and genotype and variation in phenotypic expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Larsen, H.D.; Eriksen, N.H.R.;

    1999-01-01

    change in expression of haemolysins after subcultivation in human and bovine blood and milk was studied in selected isolates. alpha-haemolysin was expressed phenotypically in 39 (37%) of the bovine isolates, in 59 (59%) of the human carrier isolates, and in 40 (67%) of the isolates from septicaemia. beta......The phenotypic expression of haemolysins and the presence of genes encoding alpha and beta-haemolysin were determined in 105 Sraphylococcus aureus isolates from bovine mastitis, 100 isolates from the nostrils of healthy humans, and 60 isolates from septicaemia in humans. Furthermore, the possible......-haemolysin was expressed in 76 (72%) bovine, 11 (11%) carrier, and 8 (13%) septicaemia isolates. Significantly more bovine than human isolates expressed beta-haemolysin and significantly fewer expressed alpha-haemolysin. Genotypically, the gene encoding alpha-haemolysin was detected in all isolates. A significant...

  8. The Study of HFE Genotypes and Its Expression Effect on Iron Status of Iranian Haemochromatosis, Iron Deficiency Anemia Patients, Iron-Taker and Non Iron-Taker Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiranvand, Elham; Abediankenari, Saeid; Rostamian, Mosayeb; Beiranvand, Behnoush; Naazeri, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    The role of HFE gene mutations or its expression in regulation of iron metabolism of hereditary haemochromatosis (HH) patients is remained controversial. Therefore here the correlation between two common HFE genotype (p.C282Y, p.H63D) and HFE gene expression with iron status in HH, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and healthy Iranian participants was studied. For this purpose genotype determination was done by polymerase chain reaction--restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Real-Time PCR was applied for evaluation of HFE gene expression. Biochemical parameters and iron consumption were also assessed. Homozygote p.H63D mutation was seen in all HH patients and p.C282Y was not observed in any member of the population. A significant correlation was observed between serum ferritin (SF) level and gender or age of HH patients. p.H63D homozygote was seen to be able to significantly increase SF and transferrin saturation (TS) level without affecting on liver function. Our results also showed that iron consumption affects on TS level increasing. HFE gene expression level of IDA patients was significantly higher than other groups. Also the HFE gene expression was negatively correlated with TS. Finally, the main result of our study showed that loss of HFE function in HH is not derived from its gene expression inhibition and much higher HFE gene expression might lead to IDA. However we propose repeating of the study for more approval of our finding.

  9. Effect of the Arg389Gly β₁-adrenoceptor polymorphism on plasma renin activity and heart rate, and the genotype-dependent response to metoprolol treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Morten; Andersen, Jon T; Jimenez-Solem, Espen; Broedbaek, Kasper; Hjelvang, Brian R; Henriksen, Trine; Frandsen, Erik; Forman, Julie L; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Køber, Lars; Poulsen, Henrik E

    2012-09-01

    1. A gene-drug interaction has been indicated between β₁-adrenoceptor-selective beta-blockers and the Arg389Gly polymorphism (rs1801253) in the adrenergic beta-1 receptor gene (ADRB1). In the present study, we investigated the effect of the ADRB1 Arg389Gly polymorphism on plasma renin activity (PRA) and heart rate (HR), as well as genotype-dependent responses to metoprolol and exercise. 2. Twenty-nine healthy male subjects participated in two treatment periods (placebo and 200 mg/day metoprolol). A 15 min submaximal exercise test was performed after each treatment period and PRA and HR were measured before and after exercise. 3. Before exercise, median PRA was lower in Gly/Gly subjects than in Arg/Arg subjects after both placebo (P = 0.030) and metoprolol (P = 0.020) treatment. After placebo, the exercise-induced increase in PRA was greater in Gly/Gly than Arg/Gly and Arg/Arg subjects (P = 0.033). The linear association between log(PRA) and log(metoprolol concentration) varied significantly between genotypes (P = 0.024). In Gly/Gly subjects, PRA decreased significantly with metoprolol concentration before (P = 0.025) and after exercise (P concentration had no effect on PRA. The effect of metoprolol concentration on PRA in Gly/Gly subjects was enhanced by exercise (P = 0.044). No significant differences in HR were seen between genotype groups. 4. Resting PRA was lower in Gly/Gly than Arg/Arg subjects and the effect of exercise and metoprolol concentration on PRA was stronger in Gly/Gly subjects than with the other two genotypes. Thus, Gly/Gly heart failure patients may require lower doses of metoprolol than other patients to block neurohumoral hyperactivity.

  10. Thylakoid redox signals are integrated into organellar-gene-expression-dependent retrograde signalling in the prors1-1 mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca eTadini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Perturbations in organellar gene expression (OGE and the thylakoid redox state (TRS activate retrograde signalling pathways that adaptively modify nuclear gene expression (NGE, according to developmental and metabolic needs. The prors1-1 mutation in Arabidopsis down-regulates the expression of the nuclear gene Prolyl-tRNA Synthetase1 (PRORS1 which acts in both plastids and mitochondria, thereby impairing protein synthesis in both organelles and triggering OGE-dependent retrograde signalling. Because the mutation also affects thylakoid electron transport, TRS-dependent signals may likewise have an impact on the changes in NGE observed in this genotype. In this study, we have investigated whether signals related to TRS are actually integrated into the OGE-dependent retrograde signalling pathway. To this end, the chaos mutation (for chlorophyll a/b binding protein harvesting-organelle specific, which shows a partial loss of PSII antennae proteins and thus a reduction in PSII light absorption capability, was introduced into the prors1-1 mutant background. The resulting double mutant displayed a prors1-1-like reduction in plastid translation rate and a chaos-like decrease in PSII antenna size, whereas the hyper-reduction of the thylakoid electron transport chain, caused by the prors1-1 mutation, was alleviated, as determined by monitoring chlorophyll (Chl fluorescence and thylakoid phosphorylation. Interestingly, a substantial fraction of the nucleus-encoded photosynthesis genes down-regulated in the prors1-1 mutant are expressed at nearly wild-type rates in prors1-1 chaos leaves, and this recovery is reflected in the steady-state levels of their protein products in the chloroplast. We therefore conclude that signals related to photosynthetic electron transport and TRS, and indirectly to carbohydrate metabolism and energy balance, are indeed fed into the OGE-dependent retrograde pathway to modulate NGE and adjust the abundance of chloroplast proteins.

  11. Population effects of growth hormone transgenic coho salmon depend on food availability and genotype by environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Robert H; D'Andrade, Mark; Uh, Mitchell; Biagi, Carlo A

    2004-06-22

    Environmental risk assessment of genetically modified organisms requires determination of their fitness and invasiveness relative to conspecifics and other ecosystem members. Cultured growth hormone transgenic coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) have enhanced feeding capacity and growth, which can result in large enhancements in body size (>7-fold) relative to nontransgenic salmon, but in nature, the ability to compete for available food is a key factor determining survival fitness and invasiveness of a genotype. When transgenic and nontransgenic salmon were cohabitated and competed for different levels of food, transgenic salmon consistently outgrew nontransgenic fish and could affect the growth of nontransgenic cohorts except when food availability was high. When food abundance was low, dominant individuals emerged, invariably transgenic, that directed strong agonistic and cannibalistic behavior to cohorts and dominated the acquisition of limited food resources. When food availability was low, all groups containing transgenic salmon experienced population crashes or complete extinctions, whereas groups containing only nontransgenic salmon had good (72.0 +/- 4.3% SE) survival, and their population biomass continued to increase. Thus, effects of growth hormone transgenic salmon on experimental populations were primarily mediated by an interaction between food availability and population structure. These data, while indicative of forces which may act on natural populations, also underscore the importance of genotype by environment interactions in influencing risk assessment data for genetically modified organisms and suggest that, for species such as salmon which are derived from large complex ecosystems, considerable caution is warranted in applying data from individual studies.

  12. Regional and hormone-dependent effects of apolipoprotein E genotype on changes in bone mineral in perimenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Lars Ulrik; Vestergaard, P; Hermann, Pernille;

    2001-01-01

    , whereas serum levels of alkaline phosphatase and its bone isoenzyme were higher in women with APOE 2-2 and APOE 2-3 than in women with APOE 3-3 and APOE 3-4 and lower in women with APOE 4-4. Among women not receiving hormonal-replacement therapy (HRT; n = 262), those with APOE 2-2 and APOE 2-3 had 30......-40% lower rates of femoral neck and total hip bone mineral loss than women with APOE 3-3 and APOE 3-4, whereas the rates of mineral loss in other skeletal regions did not differ between these APOE genotypes. Women with APOE 4-4 appeared to have lower rates of bone mineral loss in all regions. Women treated...... with hormones throughout the follow-up period (n = 113) gained bone mineral, and women with APOE 3-4 and APOE 4-4 gained relatively more mineral than other women. A comparison of untreated and treated women with APOE 2-3, APOE 3-3, and APOE 3-4 suggests a possible modification of the effect of APOE genotype...

  13. Strength, power, fiber types, and mRNA expression in trained men and women with different ACTN3 R577X genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Barbara; Esbjörnsson, Mona; Rundqvist, Håkan; Osterlund, Ted; von Walden, Ferdinand; Tesch, Per A

    2009-03-01

    Alpha-actinins are structural proteins of the Z-line. Human skeletal muscle expresses two alpha-actinin isoforms, alpha-actinin-2 and alpha-actinin-3, encoded by their respective genes ACTN2 and ACTN3. ACTN2 is expressed in all muscle fiber types, while only type II fibers, and particularly the type IIb fibers, express ACTN3. ACTN3 (R577X) polymorphism results in loss of alpha-actinin-3 and has been suggested to influence skeletal muscle function. The X allele is less common in elite sprint and power athletes than in the general population and has been suggested to be detrimental for performance requiring high power. The present study investigated the association of ACTN3 genotype with muscle power during 30-s Wingate cycling in 120 moderately to well-trained men and women and with knee extensor strength and fatigability in a subset of 21 men performing isokinetic exercise. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle to determine fiber-type composition and ACTN2 and ACTN3 mRNA levels. Peak and mean power and the torque-velocity relationship and fatigability output showed no difference across ACTN3 genotypes. Thus this study suggests that R577X polymorphism in ACTN3 is not associated with differences in power output, fatigability, or force-velocity characteristics in moderately trained individuals. However, repeated exercise bouts prompted an increase in peak torque in RR but not in XX genotypes, suggesting that ACTN3 genotype may modulate responsiveness to training. Our data further suggest that alpha-actinins do not play a significant role in determining muscle fiber-type composition. Finally, we show that ACTN2 expression is affected by the content of alpha-actinin-3, which implies that alpha-actinin-2 may compensate for the lack of alpha-actinin-3 and hence counteract the phenotypic consequences of the deficiency.

  14. Validated context-dependent associations of coronary heart disease risk with genotype variation in the chromosome 9p21 region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lusk, Christine M; Dyson, Greg; Clark, Andrew G;

    2014-01-01

    Markers of the chromosome 9p21 region are regarded as the strongest and most reliably significant genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals for Coronary heart disease (CHD) risk; this was recently confirmed by the CARDIoGRAMplusC4D Consortium meta-analysis. However, while these associations...... genotypes in the 9p21 region were strongest in a sub-group of hypertensives. We subsequently validated the effect of the region in an independent sample from the Copenhagen City Heart Study. Our study suggests that marker SNPs identified as predictors of CHD risk in large population based GWAS may have...... their greatest utility in explaining risk of disease in particular sub-groups characterized by biological and environmental effects measured by the traditional CHD risk factors....

  15. Plasma homocysteine in adolescents depends on the interaction between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase genotype, lipids and folate: a seroepidemiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Ángel

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many publications link high homocysteine levels to cardiovascular disease. In Spain there is little information on the prevalence of hyperhomocysteinaemia and associated vitamin factors among the general population, and less still among children. Cardiovascular risk factors in the childhood population may be related to the appearance of cardiovascular disease at adult age. The aim of this study is to establish a definition of hyperhomocysteinaemia in adolescents and to analyze the influence of vitamin and metabolic factors in homocysteine levels in this population group. Methods Descriptive, cross-sectional epidemiological study to estimate serum homocysteine, vitamin B12 and folate levels, as well as plasma total, HDL- and LDL- cholesterol in a schoolgoing population aged 13 to 17 years in Madrid, Spain. Spearman correlation analysis was performed to ascertain quantitative comparison, Pearson's χ2 test (frequency Results Based on the classic values for definition of hyperhomocysteinaemia in adults, prevalence of hyperhomocysteinaemia in the study population was: 1.26% for 15 μmol/L; and 2.52% for 12 μmol/L. Deficits in HDL cholesterol and serum folate levels yielded adjusted Odds Ratios (OR for hyperhomocysteinemia of 2.786, 95% CI (1.089-7.126, and 5.140, 95% CI (2.347-11.256 respectively. Mutation of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T genotype also raises the risk of hyperhomocysteinaemia (CC→CT: OR = 2.362; 95% CI (1.107-5.042 CC→TT: OR = 6.124, 95% CI (2.301-16.303 Conclusion A good definition of hyperhomocysteinaemia in adolescents is the 90th percentile, equivalent to 8.23 μmol/L. Risk factors for hyperhomocysteinaemia are cHDL and folate deficiency, and the MTHFR C677T mutant genotype. No significant effect could be assessed for vitamin B12. Coexistence of all three factors increases the risk of suffering from hyperhomocysteinaemia 87-fold.

  16. Differential Space-Time Expression of StLTPb1 Gene Between Resistant and Susceptible Potato Genotypes in Response to Ralstonia solanacearum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Gang; JIN Li-ping; XIE Kai-yun; QU Dong-yu

    2008-01-01

    This study is to investigate the role of lipid transfer protein (LTP1) gene of potato (Solanum tuberosum) in bacterial wilt (Ralstonia solanacearum) resistance. A novel cDNA clone encoding nsLTP was isolated from cultivated potato (Solanum tuberosum) infected with R. solanacearum by 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The temporal and spatial expression of StLTPb1 was studied during the early stages of potato-R. solanacearum interaction by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and Northern blotting. The sequence analysis of the cloned cDNA, named StLTPb1, showed 691 bp which encoded a type 1 nsLTP of 91 amino acids. Construction of a phylogenic tree showed that StLTPb1 is well conserved in the coding region with high identity at the amino acid level with other Solanaceae nsLTPs. The temporal and spatial expression of StLTPb1 was studied during the early stages of potato-R, solanacearum interaction. StLTPb1 transcription is induced faster and transcripts accumulate to higher concentrations in resistant compared with susceptible genotypes by the pathogen. Dominant differences in the pathogen-induced gene expression pattern between the upper and lower leaves and stems were observed within the same genotypes. In situ hybridization results showed that the StLTPb1 mRNA was localized in phloem cells of vascular tissues in potato leaf and stem tissues after pathogen infection. Salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate and abscisic acid could induce StLTPb1 gene expression without significant difference between the upper and lower tissues. These abiotic elicitors could produce a long-lasting effect on the StLTPb1 during early stages of potato-R. solanacearum interaction. Differential expression of StLTPb1 gene between resistance and susceptible potato genotypes in response to R. solanacearum suggests that this gene plays a key role in plant defense mechanisms.

  17. Effect of sucrose concentration on sucrose-dependent adhesion and glucosyltransferase expression of S. mutans in children with severe early-childhood caries (S-ECC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Li, Wenqing; Lin, Jiacheng; Chen, Zhuoyu; Yu, Dongsheng

    2014-09-09

    Sucrose, extracellular polysaccharide, and glucosyltransferases (GTFs) are key factors in sucrose-dependent adhesion and play important roles in the process of severe early-childhood caries (S-ECC). However, whether sucrose concentration regulates gtf expression, extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, and sucrose-dependent adhesion is related to the different genotypes of S. mutans isolated from ECC in children and still needs to be investigated. In this study, 52 strains of S. mutans were isolated from children with S-ECC and caries-free (CF) children. Water-insoluble glucan (WIG) synthesis was detected by the anthrone method, adhesion capacity by the turbidimetric method, and expression of gtf by RT-PCR in an in vitro model containing 1%-20% sucrose. The genotypes of S. mutans were analyzed by AP-PCR. The results showed that WIG synthesis, adhesion capacity, and gtf expression increased significantly when the sucrose concentration was from 1% to 10%. WIG synthesis and gtfB as well as gtfC expression of the 1% and 5% groups were significantly lower than those of the 10% and 20% groups (p S. mutans detected from individuals in the S-ECC group exhibited a significant difference in diversity compared with those from CF individuals (p S. mutans, and the 10% sucrose level can be seen as a "turning point" and essential factor for the prevention of S-ECC.

  18. Maize response to elevated plant density combined with lowered N-fertilizer rate is genotype-dependent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmed; Medhat; M.Al-Naggar; Reda; A.Shabana; Mohamed; M.M.Atta; Tarek; H.Al-Khalil

    2015-01-01

    Increasing plant density and improving N fertilizer rate along with the use of high density-tolerant genotypes would lead to maximizing maize(Zea mays L.) grain productivity per unit land area. The objective of this investigation was to match the functions of optimum plant density and adequate nitrogen fertilizer application to produce the highest possible yields per unit area with the greatest maize genotype efficiency. Six maize inbred lines differing in tolerance to low N and high density(D) [three tolerant(T); L-17, L-18, L-53,and three sensitive(S); L-29, L-54, L-55] were chosen for diallel crosses. Parents and crosses were evaluated in the 2012 and 2013 seasons under three plant densities: low(47,600),medium(71,400), and high(95,200) plants ha-1and three N fertilization rates: low(no N addition), medium(285 kg N ha-1) and high(570 kg N ha-1). The T × T crosses were superior to the S × S and T × S crosses under the low N–high D environment in most studied traits across seasons. The relationships between the nine environments and grain yield per hectare(GYPH) showed near-linear regression functions for inbreds L54, L29, and L55 and hybrids L18 × L53 and L18 × L55 with the highest GYPH at a density of47,600 plants ha-1and N rate of 570 kg N ha-1and a curvilinear relationship for inbreds L17, L18, and L53 and the rest of the hybrids with the highest GYPH at a density of95,200 plants ha-1combined with an N rate of 570 kg N ha-1. Cross L17 × L54 gave the highest grain yield in this study under both high N–high-D(19.9 t ha-1) and medium N–high-D environments(17.6 t ha-1).

  19. Age Dependent Variability in Gene Expression in Fischer 344 ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent evidence suggests older adults may be a sensitive population with regard to environmental exposure to toxic compounds. One source of this sensitivity could be an enhanced variability in response. Studies on phenotypic differences have suggested that variation in response does increase with age. However, few reports address the question of variation in gene expression as an underlying cause for increased variability of phenotypic response in the aged. In this study, we utilized global analysis to compare variation in constitutive gene expression in the retinae of young (4 mos), middle-aged (11 mos) and aged (23 mos) Fischer 344 rats. Three hundred and forty transcripts were identified in which variance in expression increased from 4 to 23 mos of age, while only twelve transcripts were found for which it decreased. Functional roles for identified genes were clustered in basic biological categories including cell communication, function, metabolism and response to stimuli. Our data suggest that population stochastically-induced variability should be considered in assessing sensitivity due to old age. Recent evidence suggests older adults may be a sensitive population with regard to environmental exposure to toxic compounds. One source of this sensitivity could be an enhanced variability in response. Studies on phenotypic differences have suggested that variation in response does increase with age. However, few reports address the question of variation in

  20. Genotype-dependent molecular evolution of sheep bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prions in vitro affects their zoonotic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejciova, Zuzana; Barria, Marcelo A; Jones, Michael; Ironside, James W; Jeffrey, Martin; González, Lorenzo; Head, Mark W

    2014-09-19

    Prion diseases are rare fatal neurological conditions of humans and animals, one of which (variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease) is known to be a zoonotic form of the cattle disease bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). What makes one animal prion disease zoonotic and others not is poorly understood, but it appears to involve compatibility between the prion strain and the host prion protein sequence. Concerns have been raised that the United Kingdom sheep flock may have been exposed to BSE early in the cattle BSE epidemic and that serial BSE transmission in sheep might have resulted in adaptation of the agent, which may have come to phenotypically resemble scrapie while maintaining its pathogenicity for humans. We have modeled this scenario in vitro. Extrapolation from our results suggests that if BSE were to infect sheep in the field it may, with time and in some sheep genotypes, become scrapie-like at the molecular level. However, the results also suggest that if BSE in sheep were to come to resemble scrapie it would lose its ability to affect humans.

  1. Increased genetic risk or protection for canine autoimmune lymphocytic thyroiditis in Giant Schnauzers depends on DLA class II genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbe, M; Sundberg, K; Hansen, I R; Strandberg, E; Nachreiner, R F; Hedhammar, A; Kennedy, L J; Andersson, G; Björnerfeldt, S

    2010-06-01

    Dogs represent an excellent comparative model for autoimmune thyroiditis as several dog breeds develop canine lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLT), which is clinically similar to Hashimoto's thyroiditis in human. We obtained evidence that dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) class II genotype function as either genetic risk factor that predisposes for CLT or as protective factor against the disease. Genetic diversity at their DLA-DRB1, -DQA1, and -DQB1 loci were defined and potential association to major histocompatibility complex II haplotypes and alleles was analyzed. Giant Schnauzers carrying the DLA-DRB1*01201/DQA1*00101/DQB1*00201 haplotype showed an increased risk (odds ratio of 6.5) for developing CLT. The same risk haplotype has, to date, been observed in three different breeds affected by this disease, Giant Schnauzer, Dobermann, and Labrador Retriever, indicating that it is a common genetic risk factor in a variety of breeds affected by this disease. Importantly, protection for development of the disease was found in dogs carrying the DLA-DRB1*01301/DQA1*00301/DQB1*00501 haplotype (odds ratio of 0.3).

  2. Intrinsic androgen-dependent gene expression patterns revealed by comparison of genital fibroblasts from normal males and individuals with complete and partial androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schweikert Hans-Udo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To better understand the molecular programs of normal and abnormal genital development, clear-cut definition of androgen-dependent gene expression patterns, without the influence of genotype (46, XX vs. 46, XY, is warranted. Previously, we have identified global gene expression profiles in genital-derived fibroblasts that differ between 46, XY males and 46, XY females with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS due to inactivating mutations of the androgen receptor (AR. While these differences could be due to cell autonomous changes in gene expression induced by androgen programming, recent work suggests they could also be influenced by the location from which the fibroblasts were harvested (topology. To minimize the influence of topology, we compared gene expression patterns of fibroblasts derived from identical urogenital anlagen: the scrotum in normally virilized 46, XY males and the labia majora from completely feminized 46, XY individuals with CAIS. Results 612 transcripts representing 440 unique genes differed significantly in expression levels between scrotum and CAIS labia majora, suggesting the effects of androgen programming. While some genes coincided with those we had identified previously (TBX3, IGFBP5, EGFR, CSPG2, a significant number did not, implying that topology had influenced gene expression in our previous experiments. Supervised clustering of gene expression data derived from a large set of fibroblast cultures from individuals with partial AIS revealed that the new, topology controlled data set better classified the specimens. Conclusion Inactivating mutations of the AR, in themselves, appear to induce lasting changes in gene expression in cultured fibroblasts, independent of topology and genotype. Genes identified are likely to be relevant candidates to decipher androgen-dependent normal and abnormal genital development.

  3. Nitric Oxide Synthase Enzymes in the Airways of Mice Exposed to Ovalbumin: NOS2 Expression Is NOS3 Dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Bratt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives and Design. The function of the airway nitric oxide synthase (NOS isoforms and the lung cell types responsible for its production are not fully understood. We hypothesized that NO homeostasis in the airway is important to control inflammation, which requires upregulation, of NOS2 protein expression by an NOS3-dependent mechanism. Materials or Subjects. Mice from a C57BL/6 wild-type, NOS1−/−, NOS2−/−, and NOS3−/− genotypes were used. All mice strains were systemically sensitized and exposed to filtered air or ovalbumin (OVA aerosol for two weeks to create a subchronic model of allergen-induced airway inflammation. Methods. We measured lung function, lung lavage inflammatory and airway epithelial goblet cell count, exhaled NO, nitrate and nitrite concentration, and airway NOS1, NOS2, and NOS3 protein content. Results. Deletion of NOS1 or NOS3 increases NOS2 protein present in the airway epithelium and smooth muscle of air-exposed animals. Exposure to allergen significantly reduced the expression of NOS2 protein in the airway epithelium and smooth muscle of the NOS3−/− strain only. This reduction in NOS2 expression was not due to the replacement of epithelial cells with goblet cells as remaining epithelial cells did not express NOS2. NOS1−/− animals had significantly reduced goblet cell metaplasia compared to C57Bl/6 wt, NOS2−/−, and NOS3−/− allergen-exposed mice. Conclusion. The airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells maintain a stable airway NO concentration under noninflammatory conditions. This “homeostatic” mechanism is unable to distinguish between NOS derived from the different constitutive NOS isoforms. NOS3 is essential for the expression of NOS2 under inflammatory conditions, while NOS1 expression contributes to allergen-induced goblet cell metaplasia.

  4. Nitric oxide synthase enzymes in the airways of mice exposed to ovalbumin: NOS2 expression is NOS3 dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratt, Jennifer M; Williams, Keisha; Rabowsky, Michelle F; Last, Michael S; Franzi, Lisa M; Last, Jerold A; Kenyon, Nicholas J

    2010-01-01

    The function of the airway nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms and the lung cell types responsible for its production are not fully understood. We hypothesized that NO homeostasis in the airway is important to control inflammation, which requires upregulation, of NOS2 protein expression by an NOS3-dependent mechanism. Mice from a C57BL/6 wild-type, NOS1(-/-), NOS2(-/-), and NOS3(-/-) genotypes were used. All mice strains were systemically sensitized and exposed to filtered air or ovalbumin (OVA) aerosol for two weeks to create a subchronic model of allergen-induced airway inflammation. We measured lung function, lung lavage inflammatory and airway epithelial goblet cell count, exhaled NO, nitrate and nitrite concentration, and airway NOS1, NOS2, and NOS3 protein content. Deletion of NOS1 or NOS3 increases NOS2 protein present in the airway epithelium and smooth muscle of air-exposed animals. Exposure to allergen significantly reduced the expression of NOS2 protein in the airway epithelium and smooth muscle of the NOS3(-/-) strain only. This reduction in NOS2 expression was not due to the replacement of epithelial cells with goblet cells as remaining epithelial cells did not express NOS2. NOS1(-/-) animals had significantly reduced goblet cell metaplasia compared to C57Bl/6 wt, NOS2(-/-), and NOS3(-/-) allergen-exposed mice. The airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells maintain a stable airway NO concentration under noninflammatory conditions. This "homeostatic" mechanism is unable to distinguish between NOS derived from the different constitutive NOS isoforms. NOS3 is essential for the expression of NOS2 under inflammatory conditions, while NOS1 expression contributes to allergen-induced goblet cell metaplasia.

  5. Chamber-dependent circadian expression of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, Jens Peter; Georg, Birgitte; Jørgensen, Henrik L

    2010-01-01

    OFF. Eight animals (4 males and 4 females) were included at each time point. Another 48 animals were killed during the second cycle of dark/dark (designated Circadian Time or CT: CT 4, CT 8, CT 12, CT 16, CT 20, and CT 24). The cellular contents of the clock genes Per1 and Bmal1 as well as ANP, BNP......Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) have important local functions within the myocardium, where they protect against accelerated fibrosis. As circadian expression of cardiac natriuretic peptides could be of importance in local cardiac protection against disease, we...

  6. Choosing Between Yeast and Bacterial Expression Systems: Yield Dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Rebecca S.; Malone, Christine C.; Moore, Blake P.; Burk, Melissa; Crawford, Lisa; Karr, Laurel J.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a naturally occurring fluorescent protein isolated from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria. The intrinsic fluorescence of the protein is due to a chromophore located in the center of the molecule. Its usefulness has been established as a marker for gene expression and localization of gene products. GFP has recently been utilized as a model protein for crystallization studies at NASA/MSFC, both in earth-based and in microgravity experiments. Because large quantities of purified protein were needed, the cDNA of GFP was cloned into the Pichia pastoris pPICZ(alpha) C strain, with very little protein secreted into the media. Microscopic analysis prior to harvest showed gigantic green fluorescent yeast, but upon harvesting most protein was degraded. Trial fermentations of GFP cloned into pPICZ A for intracellular expression provided unsatisfactory yield. GFP cloned into E, coli was overexpressed at greater than 150 mg/liter, with purification yields at greater than 100mg/liter.

  7. Developmental and Genotypic Variation in Leaf Wax Content and Composition, and in Expression of Wax Biosynthetic Genes in Brassica oleracea var. capitata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laila, Rawnak; Robin, Arif Hasan Khan; Yang, Kiwoung; Park, Jong-In; Suh, Mi Chung; Kim, Juyoung; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2017-01-01

    Cuticular waxes act as a protective barrier against environmental stresses. In the present study, we investigated developmental and genotypic variation in wax formation of cabbage lines, with a view to understand the related morphology, genetics and biochemistry. Our studies revealed that the relative expression levels of wax biosynthetic genes in the first-formed leaf of the highest-wax line remained constantly higher but were decreased in other genotypes with leaf aging. Similarly, the expression of most of the tested genes exhibited decrease from the inner leaves to the outer leaves of 5-month-old cabbage heads in the low-wax lines in contrast to the highest-wax line. In 10-week-old plants, expression of wax biosynthetic genes followed a quadratic function and was generally increased in the early developing leaves but substantially decreased at the older leaves. The waxy compounds in all cabbage lines were predominately C29-alkane, -secondary alcohol, and -ketone. Its deposition was increased with leaf age in 5-month-old plants. The high-wax lines had dense, prominent and larger crystals on the leaf surface compared to low-wax lines under scanning electron microscopy. Principal component analysis revealed that the higher expression of LTP2 genes in the lowest-wax line and the higher expression of CER3 gene in the highest-wax line were probably associated with the comparatively lower and higher wax content in those two lines, respectively. This study furthers our understanding of the relationships between the expression of wax biosynthetic genes and the wax deposition in cabbage lines. Highlight: In cabbage, expression of wax-biosynthetic genes was generally decreased in older and senescing leaves, while wax deposition was increased with leaf aging, and C29-hydrocarbon was predominant in the wax crystals. PMID:28119701

  8. Signaling Pathways Related to Protein Synthesis and Amino Acid Concentration in Pig Skeletal Muscles Depend on the Dietary Protein Level, Genotype and Developmental Stages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Liu

    Full Text Available Muscle growth is regulated by the homeostatic balance of the biosynthesis and degradation of muscle proteins. To elucidate the molecular interactions among diet, pig genotype, and physiological stage, we examined the effect of dietary protein concentration, pig genotype, and physiological stages on amino acid (AA pools, protein deposition, and related signaling pathways in different types of skeletal muscles. The study used 48 Landrace pigs and 48 pure-bred Bama mini-pigs assigned to each of 2 dietary treatments: lower/GB (Chinese conventional diet- or higher/NRC (National Research Council-protein diet. Diets were fed from 5 weeks of age to respective market weights of each genotype. Samples of biceps femoris muscle (BFM, type I and longissimus dorsi muscle (LDM, type II were collected at nursery, growing, and finishing phases according to the physiological stage of each genotype, to determine the AA concentrations, mRNA levels for growth-related genes in muscles, and protein abundances of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway. Our data showed that the concentrations of most AAs in LDM and BFM of pigs increased (P<0.05 gradually with increasing age. Bama mini-pigs had generally higher (P<0.05 muscle concentrations of flavor-related AA, including Met, Phe, Tyr, Pro, and Ser, compared with Landrace pigs. The mRNA levels for myogenic determining factor, myogenin, myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2 A, and myostatin of Bama mini-pigs were higher (P<0.05 than those of Landrace pigs, while total and phosphorylated protein levels for protein kinase B, mTOR, and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinases (p70S6K, and ratios of p-mTOR/mTOR, p-AKT/AKT, and p-p70S6K/p70S6K were lower (P<0.05. There was a significant pig genotype-dependent effect of dietary protein on the levels for mTOR and p70S6K. When compared with the higher protein-NRC diet, the lower protein-GB diet increased (P<0.05 the levels for mTOR and p70S6K in Bama mini-pigs, but

  9. Dose-dependent expression of neuronopathy after experimental pyridoxine intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y; Sladky, J T; Brown, M J

    1989-08-01

    We examined the sequence of nervous system abnormalities that resulted when rats were given excess amounts of vitamin B6 (pyridoxine). High doses of pyridoxine (1,200 or 600 mg/kg/d) for 6 to 10 days caused a neuronopathy with necrosis of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons, accompanied by centrifugal axonal atrophy and breakdown of peripheral and central sensory axons. Large diameter neurons with long processes and large cytoplasmic volumes were especially affected. Smaller doses (300 to 150 mg/kg/d) for up to 12 weeks had minor effects on DRG neurons, but produced a neuropathy with axonal atrophy and degeneration. Guinea pigs given 1,800 mg/kg/d developed sensory neuronopathy, whereas mice given similar or higher doses did not have neuropathologic abnormalities. Multiple factors including rate of administration, differential neuronal vulnerability, and species susceptibility have bearing on the final expression of pyridoxine neurotoxicity.

  10. Diversity in the carotenoid profiles and the expression of genes related to carotenoid accumulation among citrus genotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Ikoma, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hikaru; Kato, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are not only important to the plants themselves but also are beneficial to human health. Since citrus fruit is a good source of carotenoids for the human diet, it is important to study carotenoid profiles and the accumulation mechanism in citrus fruit. Thus, in the present paper, we describe the diversity in the carotenoid profiles of fruit among citrus genotypes. In regard to carotenoids, such as β-cryptoxanthin, violaxanthin, lycopene, and β-citraurin, the relationship between t...

  11. miR-24 and miR-205 expression is dependent on HPV onco-protein expression in keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenna, Declan J., E-mail: dj.mckenna@ulster.ac.uk [Biomedical Sciences Research Institute, University of Ulster, Coleraine, Co. Derry BT52 1SA (United Kingdom); Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Science, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 7BL (United Kingdom); Patel, Daksha, E-mail: d.patel@qub.ac.uk [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Science, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 7BL (United Kingdom); McCance, Dennis J., E-mail: d.mccance@qub.ac.uk [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Science, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 7BL (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-05

    A screen of microRNA (miRNA) expression following differentiation in human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) identified changes in several miRNAs, including miR-24 and miR-205. We investigated how expression of Human Papilloma Virus Type-16 (HPV16) onco-proteins E6 and E7 affected expression of miR-24 and miR-205 during proliferation and differentiation of HFKs. We show that the induction of both miR-24 and miR-205 observed during differentiation of HFKs is lost in HFKs expressing E6 and E7. We demonstrate that the effect on miR-205 is due to E7 activity, as miR-205 expression is dependent on pRb expression. Finally, we provide evidence that miR-24 effects in the cell may be due to targeting of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p27. In summary, these results indicate that expression of both miR-24 and miR-205 are impacted by E6 and/or E7 expression, which may be one mechanism by which HPV onco-proteins can disrupt the balance between proliferation and differentiation in keratinocytes. - Highlights: • miR-24 and miR-205 are induced during keratinocyte differentiation. • This induction is lost in keratinocytes expressing HPV onco-proteins E6 and E7. • miR-205 is dependent upon pRb expression. • miR-24 targets p27 in cycling keratinocytes.

  12. Expression of RNA virus proteins by RNA polymerase II dependent expression plasmids is hindered at multiple steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Überla Klaus

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins of human and animal viruses are frequently expressed from RNA polymerase II dependent expression cassettes to study protein function and to develop gene-based vaccines. Initial attempts to express the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV and the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV by eukaryotic promoters revealed restrictions at several steps of gene expression. Results Insertion of an intron flanked by exonic sequences 5'-terminal to the open reading frames (ORF of VSV-G and RSV-F led to detectable cytoplasmic mRNA levels of both genes. While the exonic sequences were sufficient to stabilise the VSV-G mRNA, cytoplasmic mRNA levels of RSV-F were dependent on the presence of a functional intron. Cytoplasmic VSV-G mRNA levels led to readily detectable levels of VSV-G protein, whereas RSV-F protein expression remained undetectable. However, RSV-F expression was observed after mutating two of four consensus sites for polyadenylation present in the RSV-F ORF. Expression levels could be further enhanced by codon optimisation. Conclusion Insufficient cytoplasmic mRNA levels and premature polyadenylation prevent expression of RSV-F by RNA polymerase II dependent expression plasmids. Since RSV replicates in the cytoplasm, the presence of premature polyadenylation sites and elements leading to nuclear instability should not interfere with RSV-F expression during virus replication. The molecular mechanisms responsible for the destabilisation of the RSV-F and VSV-G mRNAs and the different requirements for their rescue by insertion of an intron remain to be defined.

  13. Apolipoprotein E Genotype-Dependent Paradoxical Short-Term Effects of {sup 56}Fe Irradiation on the Brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haley, Gwendolen E. [Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Division of Neuroscience, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Beaverton, OR (United States); Villasana, Laura; Dayger, Catherine; Davis, Matthew J. [Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Raber, Jacob, E-mail: raberj@ohsu.edu [Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Division of Neuroscience, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Beaverton, OR (United States); Department of Neurology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: In humans, apolipoprotein E (apoE) is encoded by three major alleles ({epsilon}2, {epsilon}3, and {epsilon}4) and, compared to apoE3, apoE4 increases the risk of developing Alzheimer disease and cognitive impairments following various environmental challenges. Exposure to irradiation, including that of {sup 56}Fe, during space missions poses a significant risk to the central nervous system, and apoE isoform might modulate this risk. Methods and Materials: We investigated whether apoE isoform modulates hippocampus-dependent cognitive performance starting 2 weeks after {sup 56}Fe irradiation. Changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) can affect cognition and are induced by irradiation. Therefore, after cognitive testing, we assessed hippocampal ROS levels in ex vivo brain slices, using the ROS-sensitive fluorescent probe, dihydroethidium (DHE). Brain levels of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), CuZn superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), extracellular SOD, and apoE were assessed using Western blotting analysis. Results: In the water maze, spatial memory retention was impaired by irradiation in apoE2 and apoE4 mice but enhanced by irradiation in apoE3 mice. Irradiation reduced DHE-oxidation levels in the enclosed blade of the dentate gyrus and levels of 3-NT and CuZnSOD in apoE2 but not apoE3 or apoE4 mice. Finally, irradiation increased apoE levels in apoE3 but not apoE2 or apoE4 mice. Conclusions: The short-term effects of {sup 56}Fe irradiation on hippocampal ROS levels and hippocampus-dependent spatial memory retention are apoE isoform-dependent.

  14. Network analysis reveals the relationship among wood properties, gene expression levels and genotypes of natural Populus trichocarpa accessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porth, Ilga; Klápště, Jaroslav; Skyba, Oleksandr; Friedmann, Michael C; Hannemann, Jan; Ehlting, Juergen; El-Kassaby, Yousry A; Mansfield, Shawn D; Douglas, Carl J

    2013-11-01

    High-throughput approaches have been widely applied to elucidate the genetic underpinnings of industrially important wood properties. Wood traits are polygenic in nature, but gene hierarchies can be assessed to identify the most important gene variants controlling specific traits within complex networks defining the overall wood phenotype. We tested a large set of genetic, genomic, and phenotypic information in an integrative approach to predict wood properties in Populus trichocarpa. Nine-yr-old natural P. trichocarpa trees including accessions with high contrasts in six traits related to wood chemistry and ultrastructure were profiled for gene expression on 49k Nimblegen (Roche NimbleGen Inc., Madison, WI, USA) array elements and for 28,831 polymorphic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Pre-selected transcripts and SNPs with high statistical dependence on phenotypic traits were used in Bayesian network learning procedures with a stepwise K2 algorithm to infer phenotype-centric networks. Transcripts were pre-selected at a much lower logarithm of Bayes factor (logBF) threshold than SNPs and were not accommodated in the networks. Using persistent variables, we constructed cross-validated networks for variability in wood attributes, which contained four to six variables with 94-100% predictive accuracy. Accommodated gene variants revealed the hierarchy in the genetic architecture that underpins substantial phenotypic variability, and represent new tools to support the maximization of response to selection.

  15. Transferring a Gene Expression Cassette Lacking the Vector Backbone Sequences of the 1Ax1 High Molecular Weight Glutenin Subunit into Two Chinese Hexaploid Wheat Genotypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Nong-nong; HE Guang-yuan; LI Ke-xiu; WANG Hui-zhong; CHEN Guan-ping; XU Ying

    2007-01-01

    1Ax1 high molecular weight glutenin subunit (HMW-GS) gene expression cassette (GEC) lacking vector backbone sequences together with selectable marker Bar GEC were co-transformed into Chinese hexaploid cultivars Een 1 and Emai 12 to test the feasibility and the efficiency of explant regeneration, transformation frequency and transgene expression comparing with whole vector transformation by the approaches of plasmid extraction and excision, immature embryo isolation, particle co-bombardment, tissue culture, DNA extraction, PCR amplification, southern hybridization, leaf-painting test and SDS-PAGE etc. No significant difference was shown in tissue culture response of the proportion of embryogenic calli, somatic embryogenesis and regeneration frequency between GEC and whole plasmid bombarded embryos, but both regenerated less well than non-bombarded control. Total 56 plantlets that survived PPT selection had insertion of at least the Bar gene, 18 were from the GEC treatment and 38 from the whole plasmid treatment, the escape ratio averaged 0.23. Six independent transplants f230 - f235 with GEC transformation from genotype Emai 12 presented clear PCR amplification bands of Bar and 1Ax1 gene. The transformation and co-transformation frequency were 3.51 and 100% respectively. PCR amplification using a primer-pair specific for ampicillin resistant gene indicated the existence of AmpR gene in whole vectors but the removal in GECs and transplants. Southern blot of total DNA and PCR products from transgenic plants of 1Ax1 GEC confirmed the integration of the transgene 1Ax1 and the absence of the EcoR Ⅰ recognition site at both ends of the 1Ax1 GEC when integrated. SDS-PAGE showed the expression of 1Ax1 GEC and un-expression of whole plasmid. The length of integrated fragment, the proportion of the gene of interest (GOI) and the selectable marker (MG), bombardment pressure and genotypes are vital for the expression of a transformed GEC.

  16. Interactive and Symbolic Data Dependence AnalysisBased on Ranges of Expressions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨博; 郑丰宙; 王鼎兴; 郑纬民

    2002-01-01

    Traditional data dependence testing algorithms have become very accurate and efficient for simple subscript expressions, but they cannot handle symbolic expressions because of the complexity of data-flow and lack of the semantic information of variables in programs. In this paper, a range-based testing and query approach, called DDTQ, is proposed to eliminate data dependence between array references with symbolic subscripts. DDTQ firstly extracts data dependence information from the symbolic subscripts, a testing algorithm is then used to disprove the dependence based on the ranges of expressions. The assumed dependence that cannot be handled by the disprover will be converted into simple questions by a question engine so that the compiler can solve them by user interaction in a friendly way. The experiment on perfect benchmarks indicates that DDTQ is effective in improving the parallelizing capability of the compiler.

  17. Patterns of expression of keratin 17 in human epithelia: dependency on cell position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyanovsky, S M; Guelstein, V I; Tchipysheva, T A; Krutovskikh, V A; Bannikov, G A

    1989-07-01

    By immunomorphology, using keratin 17-specific monoclonal antibody, it has been shown that this keratin is expressed only in the basal cells of a group of complex epithelia: glandular epithelium with myoepithelial component, transitional and pseudostratified epithelia. Immunolocalization of keratin 17 provides evidence that the expression of this keratin strongly depends on the cell position within epithelial structures. The topographical character of the keratin expression suggests that these proteins may be implicated in the generation of spatial organization of epithelial tissues.

  18. Trait specific expression profiling of salt stress responsive genes in diverse rice genotypes as determined by modified Significance Analysis of Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rashed Hossain

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Stress responsive gene expression is commonly profiled in a comparative manner involving different stress conditions or genotypes with contrasting reputation of tolerance/resistance. In contrast, this research exploited a wide natural variation in terms of taxonomy, origin and salt sensitivity in eight genotypes of rice to identify the trait specific patterns of gene expression under salt stress. Genome wide transcptomic responses were interrogated by the weighted continuous morpho-physiological trait responses using modified Significance Analysis of Microarrays. More number of genes was found to be differentially expressed under salt stressed compared to that of under unstressed conditions. Higher numbers of genes were observed to be differentially expressed for the traits shoot Na+/K+, shoot Na+, root K+, biomass and shoot Cl-, respectively. The results identified around sixty genes to be involved in Na+, K+ and anion homeostasis, transport and transmembrane activity under stressed conditions. Gene Ontology (GO enrichment analysis identified 1.36% (578 genes of the entire transcriptome to be involved in the major molecular functions such as signal transduction (>150 genes, transcription factor (81 genes and translation factor activity (62 genes etc. under salt stress. Chromosomal mapping of the genes suggests that majority of the genes are located on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 6 & 7. The gene network analysis showed that the transcription factors and translation initiation factors formed the major gene networks and are mostly active in nucleus, cytoplasm and mitochondria whereas the membrane and vesicle bound proteins formed a secondary network active in plasma membrane and vacuoles. The novel genes and the genes with unknown functions thus identified provide picture of a synergistic salinity response representing the potentially fundamental mechanisms that are active in the wide natural genetic background of rice and will be of greater use once

  19. TRPM2 SNP genotype previously associated with susceptibility to Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in Quarter Horse foals displays differential gene expression identified using RNA-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, Cole M; Whitfield-Cargile, Canaan M; Konganti, Kranti; Blodgett, Glenn P; Dindot, Scott V; Cohen, Noah D

    2016-12-05

    Rhodococcus equi (R. equi) is an intracellular bacterium that affects young foals and immuno-compromised individuals causing severe pneumonia. Currently, the genetic mechanisms that confer susceptibility and/or resistance to R. equi are not fully understood. Previously, using a SNP-based genome-wide association study, we identified a region on equine chromosome 26 associated with culture-confirmed clinical pneumonia. To better characterize this region and understand the function of the SNP located within TRPM2 that was associated with R. equi pneumonia, we performed RNA-Seq on 12 horses representing the 3 genotypic forms of this SNP. We identified differentially expressed genes in the innate immune response pathway when comparing homozygous A allele horses with the AB and BB horses. Isoform analyses of the RNA-Seq data predicted the existence of multiple transcripts and provided evidence of differential expression at the TRPM2 locus. This finding is consistent with previously demonstrated work in human cell lines in which isoform-specific expression of TRPM2 was critical for cell viability. This work demonstrates that SNPs in TRPM2 are associated with differences in gene expression, suggesting that modulation of expression of this innate immune gene contributes to susceptibility to R. equi pneumonia.

  20. Influences of gestational obesity on associations between genotypes and gene expression levels in offspring following maternal gastrointestinal bypass surgery for obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Guénard

    Full Text Available METHODS: Whole-genome genotyping and gene expression analyses in blood of 22 BMS and 23 AMS offspring from 19 mothers were conducted using Illumina HumanOmni-5-Quad and HumanHT-12 v4 Expression BeadChips, respectively. Using PLINK we analyzed interactions between offspring gene variations and maternal surgical status on offspring gene expression levels. Altered biological functions and pathways were identified and visualized using DAVID and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. RESULTS: Significant interactions (p ≤ 1.22 x 10(-12 were found for 525 among the 16,060 expressed transcripts: 1.9% of tested SNPs were involved. Gene function and pathway analysis demonstrated enrichment of transcription and of cellular metabolism functions and overrepresentation of cellular stress and signaling, immune response, inflammation, growth, proliferation and development pathways. CONCLUSION: We suggest that impaired maternal gestational metabolic fitness interacts with offspring gene variations modulating gene expression levels, providing potential mechanisms explaining improved cardiometabolic risk profiles of AMS offspring related to ameliorated maternal lipid and carbohydrate metabolism.

  1. Expression of Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg from genotypes A, D and F and influence of amino acid variations related or not to genotypes on HBsAg detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia M. Araujo

    Full Text Available The impact of hepatitis B virus (HBV genotypes on the sensitivity of surface antigen (HBsAg detection assays has been poorly investigated. Here, plasmids carrying consensus or variant coding sequences for HBV surface proteins from genotypes A, D and F, were constructed. HBsAg levels were evaluated in medium and extracts of transfected CHO cells by a commercial polyclonal-based assay. We show that HBsAg detection values of consensus forms from genotypes D and F were, respectively, 37% and 30% lower than those obtained by genotype A. However, the presence of two single variations, T143M in genotype A, and T125M in genotype D, produced a decrease of 44% and an increase of 34%, respectively, on HBsAg mean values in comparison with their consensus forms. In conclusion, HBsAg detection levels varied among HBV genotypes. However, unique amino acid substitutions not linked to genotypes, such as T125M and T143M described here, should have more implications in HBV immunological diagnostics than the set of variations characteristic of each HBV genotype.

  2. Expression of Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg from genotypes A, D and F and influence of amino acid variations related or not to genotypes on HBsAg detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia M. Araujo

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The impact of hepatitis B virus (HBV genotypes on the sensitivity of surface antigen (HBsAg detection assays has been poorly investigated. Here, plasmids carrying consensus or variant coding sequences for HBV surface proteins from genotypes A, D and F, were constructed. HBsAg levels were evaluated in medium and extracts of transfected CHO cells by a commercial polyclonal-based assay. We show that HBsAg detection values of consensus forms from genotypes D and F were, respectively, 37% and 30% lower than those obtained by genotype A. However, the presence of two single variations, T143M in genotype A, and T125M in genotype D, produced a decrease of 44% and an increase of 34%, respectively, on HBsAg mean values in comparison with their consensus forms. In conclusion, HBsAg detection levels varied among HBV genotypes. However, unique amino acid substitutions not linked to genotypes, such as T125M and T143M described here, should have more implications in HBV immunological diagnostics than the set of variations characteristic of each HBV genotype.

  3. Novel expression and regulation of voltage-dependent potassium channels in placentas from women with preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Hiten D; McCallum, Laura A; Kurlak, Lesia O; Greenwood, Iain A; Broughton Pipkin, Fiona; Tribe, Rachel M

    2011-09-01

    Preeclampsia is associated with structural/functional alterations in placental and maternal vasculature. Voltage-dependant potassium channels encoded by KCNQ1-5 genes have been detected in several types of blood vessels where they promote vascular relaxation. Voltage-dependant potassium channel function can be modulated by KCNE1-5-encoded accessory proteins. The aim of this study was to determine whether KCNQ and KCNE genes are differentially expressed in placentas from women with preeclampsia compared with normotensive controls and to examine any differences in those who delivered preterm (voltage-dependant potassium channels are expressed and markedly modulated in placentas from preeclamptic women. Differential expression of isoforms may lead to altered cell proliferation. The correlation between KCNQ3 and KCNE5 expression is indicative of a novel channel complex and warrants further investigation.

  4. De novo polymerase activity and oligomerization of hepatitis C virus RNA-dependent RNA-polymerases from genotypes 1 to 5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Clemente-Casares

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV shows a great geographical diversity reflected in the high number of circulating genotypes and subtypes. The response to HCV treatment is genotype specific, with the predominant genotype 1 showing the lowest rate of sustained virological response. Virally encoded enzymes are candidate targets for intervention. In particular, promising antiviral molecules are being developed to target the viral NS3/4A protease and NS5B polymerase. Most of the studies with the NS5B polymerase have been done with genotypes 1b and 2a, whilst information about other genotypes is scarce. Here, we have characterized the de novo activity of NS5B from genotypes 1 to 5, with emphasis on conditions for optimum activity and kinetic constants. Polymerase cooperativity was determined by calculating the Hill coefficient and oligomerization through a new FRET-based method. The V(max/K(m ratios were statistically different between genotype 1 and the other genotypes (p<0.001, mainly due to differences in V(max values, but differences in the Hill coefficient and NS5B oligomerization were noted. Analysis of sequence changes among the studied polymerases and crystal structures show the αF helix as a structural component probably involved in NS5B-NS5B interactions. The viability of the interaction of αF and αT helixes was confirmed by docking studies and calculation of electrostatic surface potentials for genotype 1 and point mutants corresponding to mutations from different genotypes. Results presented in this study reveal the existence of genotypic differences in NS5B de novo activity and oligomerization. Furthermore, these results allow us to define two regions, one consisting of residues Glu128, Asp129, and Glu248, and the other consisting of residues of αT helix possibly involved in NS5B-NS5B interactions.

  5. Calmodulin-like protein 3 is an estrogen receptor alpha coregulator for gene expression and drug response in a SNP, estrogen, and SERM-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Sisi; Ingle, James N; Liu, Mohan; Yu, Jia; Wickerham, D Lawrence; Kubo, Michiaki; Weinshilboum, Richard M; Wang, Liewei

    2017-08-18

    We previously performed a case-control genome-wide association study in women treated with selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) for breast cancer prevention and identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ZNF423 as potential biomarkers for response to SERM therapy. The ZNF423rs9940645 SNP, which is approximately 200 bp away from the estrogen response elements, resulted in the SNP, estrogen, and SERM-dependent regulation of ZNF423 expression and, "downstream", that of BRCA1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay-mass spectrometry was performed to identify proteins binding to the ZNF423 SNP and coordinating with estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). Clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 genome editing was applied to generate ZR75-1 breast cancer cells with different ZNF423 SNP genotypes. Both cultured cells and mouse xenograft models with different ZNF423 SNP genotypes were used to study the cellular responses to SERMs and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. We identified calmodulin-like protein 3 (CALML3) as a key sensor of this SNP and a coregulator of ERα, which contributes to differential gene transcription regulation in an estrogen and SERM-dependent fashion. Furthermore, using CRISPR/Cas9-engineered ZR75-1 breast cancer cells with different ZNF423 SNP genotypes, striking differences in cellular responses to SERMs and PARP inhibitors, alone or in combination, were observed not only in cells but also in a mouse xenograft model. Our results have demonstrated the mechanism by which the ZNF423 rs9940645 SNP might regulate gene expression and drug response as well as its potential role in achieving more highly individualized breast cancer therapy.

  6. Change of Cystine/Glutamate Antiporter Expression in Ethanol-Dependent Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Tiziana Peana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some drugs of abuse down regulate the expression of cystine/glutamate (xCT antiporter in the nucleus accumbens (Acb after extinction or withdrawal. The altered level of xCT exchanger in Acb, a structure involved in ethanol reinforcement, may contribute to the pathological glutamatergic signalling, linked to addiction. We hypothesised that the expression of xCT may be changed in Acb and whole brain also in non-dependent (occasional drinkers, ethanol-dependent rats, as well as, during ethanol withdrawal.Methods: Wistar rats were made ethanol-dependent by chronic exposure to an alcoholic milk beverage (from 2.4 to 7.2% v/v ethanol. Ethanol non-dependent rats were exposed to a similar, but non-alcoholic liquid diet and self-administered ethanol (10% twice a week. Withdrawal in ethanol-dependent rats was studied at 12 hours after the last ethanol-enriched diet exposure. Immediately after the measurement of somatic signs of withdrawal, Western blot analysis with a polyclonal antibody against xCT was carried out in a naïve control group, non-dependent and ethanol-dependent rats as well as withdrawal rats, in order to study the level of xCT expression in Acb and whole brain. Results. Non-dependent rats self-administered an average dose of 1.21±0.02 g/kg per session (30 min. Daily ethanol consumption during chronic exposure to the alcoholic beverage ranged from 6.30±0.16 to 13.99±0.66 g/kg. Ethanol dependent rats after suspension of the ethanol-enriched diet have shown significant somatic signs of withdrawal. Western blotting analysis of Acb lysates revealed that xCT was over expressed in ethanol-dependent rats whereas in whole brain preparations xCT was over expressed in both non-dependent and ethanol-dependent rats compared to control group. On the contrary, xCT expression during withdrawal was down regulated in Acb and restored to control level in whole brain preparations. Conclusions: The changes of xCT expression in both Acb and

  7. PVYNTN elicits a diverse gene expression response in different potato genotypes in the first 12 h after inoculation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baebler, S.; Krecic-Stres, H.; Rotter, A.; Kogovsek, P.; Cankar, K.; Kok, E.J.; Gruden, K.; Kovac, M.; Zel, J.; Pompe-Novak, M.; Ravnikar, M.

    2009-01-01

    Host gene expression changes in the early response to potato virus Y-NTN interaction were compared in two differently sensitive potato cultivars: the resistant cultivar SantE and the sensitive cultivar Igor. Hybridization of potato TIGR cDNA microarrays allowed us to monitor the expression of

  8. (Brassica napus L.) genotypes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... The genetic diversity and relationships among rapeseed genotypes were ... dent of environment and plant growth stage, unlimited ..... interactions that lead to the expression of particular traits .... thesis, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Novi Sad. ... in the U.S. hard red winter wheat cultivars as reveled by.

  9. CB1 and CB2 receptor expression and promoter methylation in patients with cannabis dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotter, Andrea; Bayerlein, Kristina; Hansbauer, Max; Weiland, Judith; Sperling, Wolfgang; Kornhuber, Johannes; Biermann, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    CB1 and CB2 receptors are influenced via exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids. To date, little is known regarding changes in receptor expression and methylation in THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) dependence. Therefore, the CB1 and CB2 receptor mRNA expression levels and promoter methylation status in the peripheral blood cells of 77 subjects (36 with THC dependence, 21 cigarette smokers and 20 nonsmokers) were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR and methylation-specific PCR. There was a significant difference in CB1 receptor expression levels between the three groups (ANOVA, p CB1 receptor mRNA expression levels (Spearman's rho: r = -0.37; p = 0.002). Using a mixed general linear model, it was demonstrated that the CB1 mRNA expression (as the dependent variable) was associated with the satisfaction with life scale (SWLS) (r = 0.101; T = 2.8; p = 0.007), craving (as measured with the VAS; r = -0.023; T = -2.3; p = 0.023) and the WHO-Assist Subscale for Cannabis consumption (r = -0.068; T = -2.4; p = 0.02). CB1 receptor expression levels and methylation status appear to be altered in subjects with THC dependence.

  10. High-Fat Diet Changes Hippocampal Apolipoprotein E (ApoE in a Genotype- and Carbohydrate-Dependent Manner in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney Lane-Donovan

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is a currently incurable neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Risk factors for Alzheimer's disease include genetic risk factors, such as possession of ε4 allele of apolipoprotein E (ApoE4 over the risk-neutral ApoE3 allele, and lifestyle risk factors, such as diet and exercise. The intersection of these two sources of disease risk is not well understood. We investigated the impact of diet on ApoE levels by feeding wildtype, ApoE3, and ApoE4 targeted replacement (TR mice with chow, high-fat, or ketogenic (high-fat, very-low-carbohydrate diets. We found that high-fat diet affected both plasma and hippocampal levels of ApoE in an isoform-dependent manner, with high-fat diet causing a surprising reduction of hippocampal ApoE levels in ApoE3 TR mice. Conversely, the ketogenic diet had no effect on hippocampal ApoE. Our findings suggest that the use of dietary interventions to slow the progression AD should take ApoE genotype into consideration.

  11. High-Fat Diet Changes Hippocampal Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) in a Genotype- and Carbohydrate-Dependent Manner in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane-Donovan, Courtney; Herz, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a currently incurable neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Risk factors for Alzheimer's disease include genetic risk factors, such as possession of ε4 allele of apolipoprotein E (ApoE4) over the risk-neutral ApoE3 allele, and lifestyle risk factors, such as diet and exercise. The intersection of these two sources of disease risk is not well understood. We investigated the impact of diet on ApoE levels by feeding wildtype, ApoE3, and ApoE4 targeted replacement (TR) mice with chow, high-fat, or ketogenic (high-fat, very-low-carbohydrate) diets. We found that high-fat diet affected both plasma and hippocampal levels of ApoE in an isoform-dependent manner, with high-fat diet causing a surprising reduction of hippocampal ApoE levels in ApoE3 TR mice. Conversely, the ketogenic diet had no effect on hippocampal ApoE. Our findings suggest that the use of dietary interventions to slow the progression AD should take ApoE genotype into consideration.

  12. Gene Expression-Genotype Analysis Implicates GSDMA, GSDMB, and LRRC3C as Contributors to Inflammatory Bowel Disease Susceptibility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Söderman, Jan; Berglind, Linda; Almer, Sven

    2015-01-01

    ... (inflamed and noninflamed mucosa) or from individuals without IBD (noninflamed mucosa). The susceptibility allele was consistently associated with reduced expression of GSDMB (P = 4.1 × 10(-3)-7.2 × 10(-10...

  13. Context-dependent expression of the foraging gene in field colonies of ants: the interacting roles of age, environment and task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Krista K; Gordon, Deborah M; Friedman, Daniel A; Greene, Michael; Kahler, John; Peteru, Swetha

    2016-08-31

    Task allocation among social insect workers is an ideal framework for studying the molecular mechanisms underlying behavioural plasticity because workers of similar genotype adopt different behavioural phenotypes. Elegant laboratory studies have pioneered this effort, but field studies involving the genetic regulation of task allocation are rare. Here, we investigate the expression of the foraging gene in harvester ant workers from five age- and task-related groups in a natural population, and we experimentally test how exposure to light affects foraging expression in brood workers and foragers. Results from our field study show that the regulation of the foraging gene in harvester ants occurs at two time scales: levels of foraging mRNA are associated with ontogenetic changes over weeks in worker age, location and task, and there are significant daily oscillations in foraging expression in foragers. The temporal dissection of foraging expression reveals that gene expression changes in foragers occur across a scale of hours and the level of expression is predicted by activity rhythms: foragers have high levels of foraging mRNA during daylight hours when they are most active outside the nests. In the experimental study, we find complex interactions in foraging expression between task behaviour and light exposure. Oscillations occur in foragers following experimental exposure to 13 L : 11 D (LD) conditions, but not in brood workers under similar conditions. No significant differences were seen in foraging expression over time in either task in 24 h dark (DD) conditions. Interestingly, the expression of foraging in both undisturbed field and experimentally treated foragers is also significantly correlated with the expression of the circadian clock gene, cycle Our results provide evidence that the regulation of this gene is context-dependent and associated with both ontogenetic and daily behavioural plasticity in field colonies of harvester ants. Our results underscore

  14. Gene Expression-Genotype Analysis Implicates GSDMA, GSDMB, and LRRC3C as Contributors to Inflammatory Bowel Disease Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Söderman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the biological foundation of the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, susceptibility locus rs2872507, we have investigated the expression of 13 genes using ileal and colonic biopsies from patients with IBD (inflamed and noninflamed mucosa or from individuals without IBD (noninflamed mucosa. The susceptibility allele was consistently associated with reduced expression of GSDMB (P = 4.1 × 10−3–7.2 × 10−10. The susceptibility allele was also associated with the increased expression of GSDMA (P = 1.6 × 10−4 and LRRC3C (P = 7.8 × 10−6 in colon tissue from individuals without IBD and with the reduced expression of PGAP3 (IBD; P = 2.0 × 10−3 and ZPBP2 (Crohn’s disease; P = 7.7 × 10−4 in noninflamed ileum. Inflammation resulted in the reduced colonic expression of ERBB2, GRB7, MIEN1, and PGAP3 (P = 1.0 × 10−4–1.0 × 10−9 and the increased colonic expression of IKZF3 and CSF3 (P = 2.4 × 10−7–3.5 × 10−8. Based on our results and published findings on GSDMA, GSDMB, LRRC3C, and related proteins, we propose that this locus in part affects IBD susceptibility via effects on apoptosis and cell proliferation and believe this hypothesis warrants further experimental investigation.

  15. A preliminary perusal of ACE I/D polymorphism with adiposity traits and blood pressure among the AO NAGAS: Does gender-dependent gene expression matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imkongtenla Pongen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the association of gender-dependent expression of angiotensin converting enzyme gene polymorphism (I/D with adiposity markers and blood pressure among AoNagas.57AoNagas[Males (n =26; Females (n = 31; Mean Age: 30.56±7.5 and 31.9 ±8.3 1]residing in Delhi were included in this cross sectionalstudy. Anthropometric measurements and blood pressure were taken using standardized techniques. Adiposity indices viz., BMI, WHR and WHtR were computed. Body fat percentage was assessed by bioelectricimpedance technique using Tanita Body composition analyzer (T-6360. Venous blood samples were withdrawn for DNA extraction and genotyping of ACE gene (I/D polymorphism was established by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. In female participants with DD homozygote, risk of both general and central obesity as depicted by BMI, body fat percentage, WC, WHR and WHtR were higher than ID heterozygote. Risk of hypertension was found to be greater among males with DD homozygote rather than females with DD homozygote. In males, obesity was not found to be associated with hypertension in either DD or ID genotypic variants of ACE. Whereas, in females obesity was significantly and positively correlated with hypertension in both DD and ID genotype. DD homozygous form of ACE is linked with both obesity and blood pressure in females and only with blood pressure in males. This genotype-by-gender interaction gives us a facet in understanding the complex genetic basis of adiposity and blood pressure phenotypes.

  16. Protein expression and genetic structure of the coral Porites lobata in an environmentally extreme Samoan back reef: Does host genotype limit phenotypic plasticity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barshis, D.J.; Stillman, J.H.; Gates, R.D.; Toonen, R.J.; Smith, L.W.; Birkeland, C.

    2010-01-01

    The degree to which coral reef ecosystems will be impacted by global climate change depends on regional and local differences in corals' susceptibility and resilience to environmental stressors. Here, we present data from a reciprocal transplant experiment using the common reef building coral Porites lobata between a highly fluctuating back reef environment that reaches stressful daily extremes, and a more stable, neighbouring forereef. Protein biomarker analyses assessing physiological contributions to stress resistance showed evidence for both fixed and environmental influence on biomarker response. Fixed influences were strongest for ubiquitin-conjugated proteins with consistently higher levels found in back reef source colonies both pre and post-transplant when compared with their forereef conspecifics. Additionally, genetic comparisons of back reef and forereef populations revealed significant population structure of both the nuclear ribosomal and mitochondrial genomes of the coral host (FST = 0.146 P < 0.0001, FST = 0.335 P < 0.0001 for rDNA and mtDNA, respectively), whereas algal endosymbiont populations were genetically indistinguishable between the two sites. We propose that the genotype of the coral host may drive limitations to the physiological responses of these corals when faced with new environmental conditions. This result is important in understanding genotypic and environmental interactions in the coral algal symbiosis and how corals may respond to future environmental changes. ?? 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Size-dependent foraging gene expression and behavioral caste differentiation in Bombus ignitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokoyama Jun

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eusocial hymenopteran insects, foraging genes, members of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase family, are considered to contribute to division of labor through behavioral caste differentiation. However, the relationship between foraging gene expression and behavioral caste in honeybees is opposite to that observed in ants and wasps. In the previously examined eusocial Hymenoptera, workers behave as foragers or nurses depending on age. We reasoned that examination of a different system of behavioral caste determination might provide new insights into the relationship between foraging genes and division of labor, and accordingly focused on bumblebees, which exhibit size-dependent behavioral caste differentiation. We characterized a foraging gene (Bifor in bumblebees (Bombus ignitus and examined the relationship between Bifor expression and size-dependent behavioral caste differentiation. Findings A putative open reading frame of the Bifor gene was 2004 bp in length. It encoded 668 aa residues and showed high identity to orthologous genes in other hymenopterans (85.3-99.0%. As in ants and wasps, Bifor expression levels were higher in nurses than in foragers. Bifor expression was negatively correlated with individual body size even within the same behavioral castes (regression coefficient = -0.376, P P = 0.018, within foragers. Conclusion These findings indicate that Bifor expression is size dependent and support the idea that Bifor expression levels are related to behavioral caste differentiation in B. ignitus. Thus, the relationship between foraging gene expression and behavioral caste differentiation found in ants and wasps was identified in a different system of labor determination.

  18. Extensive genome heterogeneity leads to preferential allele expression and copy number-dependent expression in cultivated potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Gina M; Newton, Linsey; Wiegert-Rininger, Krystle; Vaillancourt, Brieanne; Douches, David S; Buell, C Robin

    2017-09-04

    Relative to homozygous diploids, the presence of multiple homologs or homeologs in polyploids affords greater tolerance to mutations that can impact genome evolution. In this study, we describe sequence and structural variation in the genomes of six accessions of cultivated potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), a vegetatively propagated autotetraploid, and their impact on the transcriptome. Sequence diversity was high with a mean SNP rate of approximately 1 per 50 bases suggestive of high levels of allelic diversity. Additive gene expression was observed in leaves (3,605 genes) and tubers (6,156 genes) that contrasted the preferential allele expression of between 2,180 and 3,502 and 3,367 and 5,270 genes in the leaf and tuber transcriptome, respectively. Preferential allele expression was significantly associated with evolutionarily conserved genes suggesting selection of specific alleles of genes responsible for biological processes common to angiosperms during the breeding selection process. Copy number variation was rampant with between 16,098 and 18,921 genes in each cultivar exhibiting duplication or deletion. Copy number variable genes tended to be evolutionarily recent, lowly expressed, and enriched in genes that show increased expression in response to biotic and abiotic stress treatments suggestive of a role in adaptation. Gene copy number impacts on gene expression were detected with 528 genes having correlations between copy number and gene expression. Collectively, these data suggest that in addition to allelic variation of coding sequence, the heterogenous nature of the tetraploid potato genome contributes to a highly dynamic transcriptome impacted by allele preferential and copy number-dependent expression effects. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Matricaria chamomilla extract inhibits both development of morphine dependence and expression of abstinence syndrome in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaa, Adel; Hashem, Tahia; Mohamed, Mahmoud; Ashry, Esraa

    2003-05-01

    The effect of Matricaria chamomilla (M. chamomilla) on the development of morphine dependence and expression of abstinence was investigated in rats. The frequencies of withdrawal behavioral signs (paw tremor, rearing, teeth chattering, body shakes, ptosis, diarrhea, and urination) and weight loss induced by naloxone challenge were demonstrated in morphine-dependent rats receiving M. chamomilla extract or saline. The withdrawal behavioral manifestations and weight loss were inhibited significantly by chronic co-administration of M. chamomilla extract with morphine. Administration of a single dose of M. chamomilla before the naloxone challenge in morphine-dependent animals abolished the withdrawal behavioral manifestations. The dramatic increase of plasma cAMP induced by naloxone-precipitated abstinence was prevented by chronic co-administration of M. chamomilla extract with morphine. These results suggest that M. chamomilla extract inhibits the development of morphine dependence and expression of abstinence syndrome.

  20. Control of Neuropeptide Expression by Parallel Activity-dependent Pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo Romanos, Teresa; Petersen, Jakob Gramstrup; Pocock, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring of neuronal activity within circuits facilitates integrated responses and rapid changes in behavior. We have identified a system in Caenorhabditis elegans where neuropeptide expression is dependent on the ability of the BAG neurons to sense carbon dioxide. In C. elegans, CO2 sensing is predominantly coordinated by the BAG-expressed receptor-type guanylate cyclase GCY-9. GCY-9 binding to CO2 causes accumulation of cyclic GMP and opening of the cGMP-gated TAX-2/TAX-4 cation channels; provoking an integrated downstream cascade that enables C. elegans to avoid high CO2. Here we show that cGMP regulation by GCY-9 and the PDE-1 phosphodiesterase controls BAG expression of a FMRFamide-related neuropeptide FLP-19 reporter (flp-19::GFP). This regulation is specific for CO2-sensing function of the BAG neurons, as loss of oxygen sensing function does not affect flp-19::GFP expression. We also found that expression of flp-19::GFP is controlled in parallel to GCY-9 by the activity-dependent transcription factor CREB (CRH-1) and the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (KIN-2) signaling pathway. We therefore show that two parallel pathways regulate neuropeptide gene expression in the BAG sensory neurons: the ability to sense changes in carbon dioxide and CREB transcription factor. Such regulation may be required in particular environmental conditions to enable sophisticated behavioral decisions to be performed. PMID:28139692

  1. Test of IL28B polymorphisms in chronic hepatitis C patients treated with PegIFN and ribavirin depends on HCV genotypes: results from a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifang Jia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many studies have been published on the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP near the IL28B gene and response to the combined treatments of pegylated-interferon (PegIFN and ribavirin (RBV in chronic HCV-infected patients, but without identical conclusions. The aim of this study was to assess impact of the IL28B polymorphisms on the effect of HCV standard treatment using meta-analysis based method. METHODS: Association studies between polymorphisms of rs12979860 or rs8099917 and response to PegIFN/RBV treatment in chronic HCV patients were retrieved from PubMed. Data of qualified studies on sustained virological response (SVR in different genotypes were extracted and analyzed using meta-analysis method in Stata 10 software. RESULTS: Thirty-four papers, containing 46 independent studies, were included in the analysis. In the HCV G1/4 patients without treatment history, individuals carrying rs12979860 CC genotype were more likely to achieve SVR (OR 3.97, 95%CI 3.29-4.80 compared to those carrying CT/TT genotypes. Similar results were observed in the HCV G1/4 patients with unsuccessful or unknown treatment history (OR 3.76, 95%CI 2.67-5.28 or in the patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (OR 5.20, 95%CI 3.04-8.90. However, associations could not be observed in HCV G2/3 patients. For rs8099917, similar results were obtained for genotype TT compared to genotypes TG/GG, indicating that TT genotype was significantly associated with better treatment response in patients infected with genotype 1 or 4 HCV, but not genotype 2 or 3 HCV. CONCLUSION: Polymorphisms of rs12979860 and rs8099917 near IL28B only associate with the treatment response to PegIFN/RBV in patients infected with HCV genotype 1 or 4 but not with genotype 2 or 3, irrespective of the previous treatment history or HIV co-infected status. Therefore, identification of IL28B genotypes is necessary only in patients infected with relatively difficult

  2. Volatile emissions of scented Alstroemeria genotypes are dominated by terpenes, and a myrcene synthase gene is highly expressed in scented Alstroemeria flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aros, Danilo; Gonzalez, Veronica; Allemann, Rudolf K; Müller, Carsten T; Rosati, Carlo; Rogers, Hilary J

    2012-04-01

    Native to South America, Alstroemeria flowers are known for their colourful tepals, and Alstroemeria hybrids are an important cut flower. However, in common with many commercial cut flowers, virtually all the commercial Alstroemeria hybrids are not scented. The cultivar 'Sweet Laura' is one of very few scented commercial Alstroemeria hybrids. Characterization of the volatile emission profile of these cut flowers revealed three major terpene compounds: (E)-caryophyllene, humulene (also known as α-caryophyllene), an ocimene-like compound, and several minor peaks, one of which was identified as myrcene. The profile is completely different from that of the parental scented species A. caryophyllaea. Volatile emission peaked at anthesis in both scented genotypes, coincident in cv. 'Sweet Laura' with the maximal expression of a putative terpene synthase gene AlstroTPS. This gene was preferentially expressed in floral tissues of both cv. 'Sweet Laura' and A. caryophyllaea. Characterization of the AlstroTPS gene structure from cv. 'Sweet Laura' placed it as a member of the class III terpene synthases, and the predicted 567 amino acid sequence placed it into the subfamily TPS-b. The conserved sequences R(28)(R)X(8)W and D(321)DXXD are the putative Mg(2+)-binding sites, and in vitro assay of AlstroTPS expressed in Escherichia coli revealed that the encoded enzyme possesses myrcene synthase activity, consistent with a role for AlstroTPS in scent production in Alstroemeria cv. 'Sweet Laura' flowers.

  3. Analysis of SLC16A11 Variants in 12,811 American Indians: Genotype-Obesity Interaction for Type 2 Diabetes and an Association With RNASEK Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traurig, Michael; Hanson, Robert L; Marinelarena, Alejandra; Kobes, Sayuko; Piaggi, Paolo; Cole, Shelley; Curran, Joanne E; Blangero, John; Göring, Harald; Kumar, Satish; Nelson, Robert G; Howard, Barbara V; Knowler, William C; Baier, Leslie J; Bogardus, Clifton

    2016-02-01

    Genetic variants in SLC16A11 were recently reported to be associated with type 2 diabetes in Mexican and other Latin American populations. The diabetes risk haplotype had a frequency of 50% in Native Americans from Mexico but was rare in Europeans and Africans. In the current study, we analyzed SLC16A11 in 12,811 North American Indians and found that the diabetes risk haplotype, tagged by the rs75493593 A allele, was nominally associated with type 2 diabetes (P = 0.001, odds ratio 1.11). However, there was a strong interaction with BMI (P = 5.1 × 10(-7)) such that the diabetes association was stronger in leaner individuals. rs75493593 was also strongly associated with BMI in individuals with type 2 diabetes (P = 3.4 × 10(-15)) but not in individuals without diabetes (P = 0.77). Longitudinal analyses suggest that this is due, in part, to an association of the A allele with greater weight loss following diabetes onset (P = 0.02). Analyses of global gene expression data from adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and whole blood provide evidence that rs75493593 is associated with expression of the nearby RNASEK gene, suggesting that RNASEK expression may mediate the effect of genotype on diabetes.

  4. Exact expression for decoherence factor in the time-dependent generalized Cini model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianqi Shen(沈建其); Sanshui Xiao(肖三水); Qiang Wu(武强)

    2003-01-01

    The present letter finds the complete set of exact solutions of the time-dependent generalized Cini modelby making use of the Lewis-Riesenfeld invariant theory and the invariant-related unitary transformationformulation and, based on this, the general explicit expression for the decoherence factor is thereforeobtained. This study provides us with a useful method to consider the geometric phase and topologicalproperties in the time-dependent quantum decoherence process.

  5. Susceptibility of biallelic haplotype and genotype frequencies to genotyping error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskvina, Valentina; Schmidt, Karl Michael

    2006-12-01

    With the availability of fast genotyping methods and genomic databases, the search for statistical association of single nucleotide polymorphisms with a complex trait has become an important methodology in medical genetics. However, even fairly rare errors occurring during the genotyping process can lead to spurious association results and decrease in statistical power. We develop a systematic approach to study how genotyping errors change the genotype distribution in a sample. The general M-marker case is reduced to that of a single-marker locus by recognizing the underlying tensor-product structure of the error matrix. Both method and general conclusions apply to the general error model; we give detailed results for allele-based errors of size depending both on the marker locus and the allele present. Multiple errors are treated in terms of the associated diffusion process on the space of genotype distributions. We find that certain genotype and haplotype distributions remain unchanged under genotyping errors, and that genotyping errors generally render the distribution more similar to the stable one. In case-control association studies, this will lead to loss of statistical power for nondifferential genotyping errors and increase in type I error for differential genotyping errors. Moreover, we show that allele-based genotyping errors do not disturb Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the genotype distribution. In this setting we also identify maximally affected distributions. As they correspond to situations with rare alleles and marker loci in high linkage disequilibrium, careful checking for genotyping errors is advisable when significant association based on such alleles/haplotypes is observed in association studies.

  6. Effects of cell-cycle-dependent expression on random fluctuations in protein levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Mohammad; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-12-01

    Expression of many genes varies as a cell transitions through different cell-cycle stages. How coupling between stochastic expression and cell cycle impacts cell-to-cell variability (noise) in the level of protein is not well understood. We analyse a model where a stable protein is synthesized in random bursts, and the frequency with which bursts occur varies within the cell cycle. Formulae quantifying the extent of fluctuations in the protein copy number are derived and decomposed into components arising from the cell cycle and stochastic processes. The latter stochastic component represents contributions from bursty expression and errors incurred during partitioning of molecules between daughter cells. These formulae reveal an interesting trade-off: cell-cycle dependencies that amplify the noise contribution from bursty expression also attenuate the contribution from partitioning errors. We investigate the existence of optimum strategies for coupling expression to the cell cycle that minimize the stochastic component. Intriguingly, results show that a zero production rate throughout the cell cycle, with expression only occurring just before cell division, minimizes noise from bursty expression for a fixed mean protein level. By contrast, the optimal strategy in the case of partitioning errors is to make the protein just after cell division. We provide examples of regulatory proteins that are expressed only towards the end of the cell cycle, and argue that such strategies enhance robustness of cell-cycle decisions to the intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression.

  7. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression is dependent upon epidermal growth factor receptor expression or activation in androgen independent prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-Peng Jia; Lu-Wei Xu; Qi Su; Jian-Hua Zhao; Wen-Cheng Li; Feng Wang; Zheng Xu

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the possible mechanism in the development in androgen independent prostate cancer (AIPC). Methods: Immunohis- tochemistry was performed on paraffin-embedded sections with goat polyclonal against COX-2 and mouse mono- clonal antibody against EGFR in 30 AIPC and 18 androgen dependent prostate cancer (ADPC) specimens. The effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) treatments on the expression of COX-2 and signal pathway in PC-3 and DU-145 cells was studied using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. ELISA was used to measure prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels in the media of PC-3 and DU-145 incubated with EGF for 24 h. Results: COX-2 was positively expressed in AIPC and ADPC, which were predominantly in endochylema of prostate cancer (Pca) cells. Intense staining was seen in AIPC (80%) and in ADPC (55.5%), but there was no significant association between the two groups. EGFR expression was also positive in the two groups (61.8% in ADPC and 90% in AIPC, P < 0.01). A significant association was found between EGFR expression and a higher Gleason score (P < 0.05) or tumor stage (P < 0.05). The expression of PGE2 was increased in PC-3 and DU-145 cells after being incubated with EGF. Both p38MAPK and PI-3K pathway were involved in the PC-3 cell COX-2 upregulation course. In DU- 145, only p38MAPK pathway was associated with COX-2 upregulation. Conclusion: EGFR activation induces COX-2 expression through PI-3K and/or p38MAPK pathways. COX-2 and EGFR inhibitors might have a cooperative anti-tumor effect in Pca.

  8. Genotype × genotype interactions between the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis and its grazer, the waterflea Daphnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Veerle; Brusciotti, Silvia; van Gremberghe, Ineke; Vyverman, Wim; Vanoverbeke, Joost; De Meester, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Toxic algal blooms are an important problem worldwide. The literature on toxic cyanobacteria blooms in inland waters reports widely divergent results on whether zooplankton can control cyanobacteria blooms or cyanobacteria suppress zooplankton by their toxins. Here we test whether this may be due to genotype × genotype interactions, in which interactions between the large-bodied and efficient grazer Daphnia and the widespread cyanobacterium Microcystis are not only dependent on Microcystis strain or Daphnia genotype but are specific to genotype × genotype combinations. We show that genotype × genotype interactions are important in explaining mortality in short-time exposures of Daphnia to Microcystis. These genotype × genotype interactions may result in local coadaptation and a geographic mosaic of coevolution. Genotype × genotype interactions can explain why the literature on zooplankton–cyanobacteria interactions is seemingly inconsistent, and provide hope that zooplankton can contribute to the suppression of cyanobacteria blooms in restoration projects. PMID:25568039

  9. Condition-dependent expression of melanin-based coloration in the Eurasian kestrel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piault, Romain; van den Brink, Valentijn; Roulin, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Melanin is the most common pigment in animal integuments and is responsible for some of the most striking ornaments. A central tenet of sexual selection theory states that melanin-based traits can signal absolute individual quality in any environment only if their expression is condition-dependent.

  10. Condition-dependent expression of melanin-based coloration in the Eurasian kestrel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piault, Romain; van den Brink, Valentijn; Roulin, Alexandre

    Melanin is the most common pigment in animal integuments and is responsible for some of the most striking ornaments. A central tenet of sexual selection theory states that melanin-based traits can signal absolute individual quality in any environment only if their expression is condition-dependent.

  11. Insulin Increases Expression of TRPC6 Channels in Podocytes by a Calcineurin-Dependent Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, Shengqiang; Liu, Ying; Li, Xinming

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Insulin signaling to podocytes is relevant for the function of the glomerulus. Now, we tested the hypothesis that insulin increases the surface expression of canonical transient receptor potential canonical type 6 (TRPC6) channels in podocytes by a calcineurin-dependent pathway. ...

  12. APP-dependent glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression drives neuromuscular junction formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanga, Serena; Zanou, Nadège; Audouard, Emilie; Tasiaux, Bernadette; Contino, Sabrina; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; René, Frédérique; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Clotman, Frédéric; Gailly, Philippe; Dewachter, Ilse; Octave, Jean-Noël; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal

    2016-05-01

    Besides its crucial role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, the knowledge of amyloid precursor protein (APP) physiologic functions remains surprisingly scarce. Here, we show that APP regulates the transcription of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). APP-dependent regulation of GDNF expression affects muscle strength, muscular trophy, and both neuronal and muscular differentiation fundamental for neuromuscular junction (NMJ) maturation in vivo In a nerve-muscle coculture model set up to modelize NMJ formation in vitro, silencing of muscular APP induces a 30% decrease in secreted GDNF levels and a 40% decrease in the total number of NMJs together with a significant reduction in the density of acetylcholine vesicles at the presynaptic site and in neuronal maturation. These defects are rescued by GDNF expression in muscle cells in the conditions where muscular APP has been previously silenced. Expression of GDNF in muscles of amyloid precursor protein null mice corrected the aberrant synaptic morphology of NMJs. Our findings highlight for the first time that APP-dependent GDNF expression drives the process of NMJ formation, providing new insights into the link between APP gene regulatory network and physiologic functions.-Stanga, S., Zanou, N., Audouard, E., Tasiaux, B., Contino, S., Vandermeulen, G., René, F., Loeffler, J.-P., Clotman, F., Gailly, P., Dewachter, I., Octave, J.-N., Kienlen-Campard, P. APP-dependent glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression drives neuromuscular junction formation.

  13. HepG2 cells support viral replication and gene expression of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Awady, Mostafa K; Tabll, Ashraf A; El-Abd, Yasmine S; Bahgat, Mahmoud M; Shoeb, Hussein A; Youssef, Samar S; Din, Noha G Bader El; Redwan, El-Rashdy M; El-Demellawy, Maha; Omran, Moataza H; El-Garf, Wael T; Goueli, Said A

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To establish a cell culture system with long-term replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome and expression of viral antigens in vitro. METHODS: HepG2 cell line was tested for its susceptibility to HCV by incubation with a serum from a patient with chronic hepatitis C. Cells and supernatant were harvested at various time points during the culture. Culture supernatant was tested for its ability to infect naïve cells. The presence of minus (antisense) RNA strand, and the detection of core and E1 antigens in cells were examined by RT-PCR and immunological techniques (flow cytometry and Western blot) respectively. RESULTS: The intracellular HCV RNA was first detected on d 3 after infection and then could be consistently detected in both cells and supernatant over a period of at least three months. The fresh cells could be infected with supernatant from cultured infected cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed surface and intracellular HCV antigen expression using in house made polyclonal antibodies (anti-core, and anti-E1). Western blot analysis showed the expression of a cluster of immunogenic peptides at molecular weights extended between 31 and 45 kDa in an one month old culture of infected cells whereas this cluster was undetectable in uninfected HepG2 cells. CONCLUSION: HepG2 cell line is not only susceptible to HCV infection but also supports its replication in vitro. Expression of HCV structural proteins can be detected in infected HepG2 cells. These cells are also capable of shedding viral particles into culture media which in turn become infectious to uninfected cells. PMID:16937465

  14. HepG2 cells support viral replication and gene expression of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mostafa K El-Awady; Moataza H Omran; Wael T El-Garf; Said A Goueli; Ashraf A Tabll; Yasmine S El-Abd; Mahmoud M Bahgat; Hussein A Shoeb; Samar S Youssef; Noha G Bader El Din; El-Rashdy M Redwan; Maha El-Demellawy

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To establish a cell culture system with longterm replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome and expression of viral antigens in vitro. METHODS: HepG2 cell line was tested for its susceptibility to HCV by incubation with a serum from a patient with chronic hepatitis C. Cells and supernatant were harvested at various time points during the culture. Culture supernatant was tested for its ability to infect naive cells. The presence of minus (antisense) RNA strand, and the detection of core and E1 antigens in cells were examined by RT-PCR and immunological techniques (flow cytometry and Western blot) respectively. RESULTS: The intracellular HCV RNA was first detected on d 3 after infection and then could be consistently detected in both cells and supernatant over a period of at least three months. The fresh cells could be infected with supernatant from cultured infected cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed surface and intracellular HCV antigen expression using in house made polyclonal antibodies (anti-core, and anti-E1). Western blot analysis showed the expression of a cluster of immunogenic peptides at molecular weights extended between 31 and 45 kDa in an one month old culture of infected cells whereas this cluster was undetectable in uninfected HepG2 cells. CONCLUSION: HepG2 cell line is not only susceptible to HCV infection but also supports its replication in vitro. Expression of HCV structural proteins can be detected in infected HepG2 cells. These cells are also capable of shedding viral particles into culture media which in turn become infectious to uninfected cells.

  15. Bone marrow large B cell lymphoma bearing cyclin D3 expression: clinical, morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genotypic analyses of seven patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanuki, Jyuri; Hatakeyama, Kinta; Sonoki, Takashi; Tatetsu, Hiro; Yoshida, Katsuhiko; Fujii, Soichiro; Mizutani, Minoru; Abo, Toru; Kurimoto, Miwa; Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Matsuno, Fumihiko; Nakakuma, Hideki

    2009-09-01

    We report seven large B cell lymphoma patients showing the involvement of tumor cells with cyclin D3 (CCND3) expression in bone marrow (BM) at the initial diagnosis. All patients presented with B symptoms, splenomegaly, and anemia/thrombocytopenia lacking hemophagocytosis in the BM. Five of the seven patients had suffered from immunological diseases or cancers. The tumor cells were divided into those with a lymphoplasmacytoid or blastoid appearance. Six cases were confirmed to express CD5 antigen on tumor cells. Three cases presented a chromosomal translocation between CCND3 and the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) loci, t(6;14)(p21;q32). Three and two cases showed unmutated and mutated sequences of the variable region of IGH (VH), respectively, and one case showed deletion of an entire segment of VH. Two cases with t(6;14)(p21;q32) showed an unmutated VH sequence and chromosomal translocation within the switch region of IGH. Further studies are required to determine whether CCND3 expression is associated with a unique subset of diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

  16. RRE-dependent HIV-1 Env RNA effects on Gag protein expression, assembly and release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López, Claudia S., E-mail: lopezcl@ohsu.edu [Departments of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Oregon Health and Sciences University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Sloan, Rachel; Cylinder, Isabel [Departments of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Oregon Health and Sciences University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Kozak, Susan L.; Kabat, David [Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Oregon Health and Sciences University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Barklis, Eric, E-mail: barklis@ohsu.edu [Departments of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Oregon Health and Sciences University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR 97239 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    The HIV-1 Gag proteins are translated from the full-length HIV-1 viral RNA (vRNA), whereas the envelope (Env) protein is translated from incompletely spliced Env mRNAs. Nuclear export of vRNAs and Env mRNAs is mediated by the Rev accessory protein which binds to the rev-responsive element (RRE) present on these RNAs. Evidence has shown there is a direct or indirect interaction between the Gag protein, and the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein. Our current work shows that env gene expression impacts HIV-1 Gag expression and function in two ways. At the protein level, full-length Env expression altered Gag protein expression, while Env CT-deletion proteins did not. At the RNA level, RRE-containing Env mRNA expression reduced Gag expression, processing, and virus particle release from cells. Our results support models in which Gag is influenced by the Env CT, and Env mRNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export. - Highlights: • At the protein level, full-length HIV-1 Env alters Gag protein expression. • HIV-1 Env RNA expression reduces Gag levels and virus release. • Env RNA effects on Gag are dependent on the RRE. • RRE-containing Env RNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export.

  17. Hypothalamic expression of porcine leptin receptor (LEPR), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) genes is influenced by LEPR genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovilo, Cristina; Fernández, Almudena; Fernández, Ana I; Folch, Josep M; Varona, Luis; Benítez, Rita; Nuñez, Yolanda; Rodríguez, Carmen; Silió, Luis

    2010-12-01

    The leptin receptor (LEPR) is a key gene in the control of food intake and energy homeostasis. The sequence variant LEPR{NM_001024587.1}:c.1987C>T has been associated with growth, fatness, and body composition in several pig populations. The purpose of this work was to confirm the phenotypic effects of this SNP in two new experimental backcrosses involving Iberian, Landrace, and Duroc breeds, and to evaluate the quantitative effects of the SNP on the hypothalamic expression of LEPR and two other downstream genes. Results indicate significant additive effects of the SNP on body weight, back fat thickness, and hypothalamic LEPR gene expression in both populations. Allele T fixed in the Iberian breed is systematically associated with a higher growth and fat deposition and leads to an intense reduction of LEPR hypothalamic expression, providing new functional evidence that supports the causality of the analyzed SNP with respect to previously reported and newly observed phenotypic effects. Also, some effects of the LEPR genotype on neuropeptide Y (NPY) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) genes are detected, although they are conditioned by the breed. Finally, a change in mRNA structure and an increase in free energy is predicted for allele T, agreeing with a cis-acting functional effect on mRNA stability, which also supports the causality hypothesis. The lower expression of the LEPR gene in Iberian pigs fits with obesity by leptin resistance observed in this breed. A reduction in leptin signaling could thus be considered one of the determinants of the obese phenotype characteristic of Iberian breed.

  18. De novo transcriptome sequencing of Acer palmatum and comprehensive analysis of differentially expressed genes under salt stress in two contrasting genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Liping; Li, Qianzhong; Li, Shushun; Tang, Ling; Wen, Jing

    2016-04-01

    Maple (Acer palmatum) is an important species for landscape planting worldwide. Salt stress affects the normal growth of the Maple leaf directly, leading to loss of esthetic value. However, the limited availability of Maple genomic information has hindered research on the mechanisms underlying this tolerance. In this study, we performed comprehensive analyses of the salt tolerance in two genotypes of Maple using RNA-seq. Approximately 146.4 million paired-end reads, representing 181,769 unigenes, were obtained. The N50 length of the unigenes was 738 bp, and their total length over 102.66 Mb. 14,090 simple sequence repeats and over 500,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified, which represent useful resources for marker development. Importantly, 181,769 genes were detected in at least one library, and 303 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between salt-sensitive and salt-tolerant genotypes. Among these DEGs, 125 were upregulated and 178 were downregulated genes. Two MYB-related proteins and one LEA protein were detected among the first 10 most downregulated genes. Moreover, a methyltransferase-related gene was detected among the first 10 most upregulated genes. The three most significantly enriched pathways were plant hormone signal transduction, arginine and proline metabolism, and photosynthesis. The transcriptome analysis provided a rich genetic resource for gene discovery related to salt tolerance in Maple, and in closely related species. The data will serve as an important public information platform to further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in salt tolerance in Maple.

  19. An ERK-dependent pathway to Noxa expression regulates apoptosis by platinum-based chemotherapeutic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, C; Brumatti, G; Elgendy, M; Brunet, M; Martin, S J

    2010-12-09

    Cisplatin is a widely used cancer chemotherapeutic that promotes DNA damage-associated apoptosis. Although platinum compounds are known to form DNA adducts and provoke DNA damage, the molecular mechanism of cisplatin-induced cell death remains unclear. In this article, we show that the BH3-only protein Noxa is strongly transcriptionally upregulated in response to cisplatin and related platinum compounds. Cisplatin-induced Noxa expression was ERK dependent, but p53 independent, and inhibition of ERK activation markedly attenuated cisplatin-induced cell death, as well as Noxa expression. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated ablation of Noxa expression also inhibited cisplatin-induced cell death and permitted clonogenic survival. These observations reveal a novel ERK-regulated route to Noxa expression that is important for the cell killing activity of platinum-based chemotherapeutic drugs.

  20. Recombinant expression and purification of an ATP-dependent DNA ligase from Aliivibrio salmonicida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Adele; Pedersen, Hege

    2014-05-01

    The genome of the psychrophilic fish-pathogen Aliivibrio salmonicida encodes a putative ATP-dependent DNA ligase in addition to a housekeeping NAD-dependent enzyme. In order to study the structure and activity of the ATP dependent ligase in vitro we have undertaken its recombinant production and purification from an Escherichia coli based expression system. Expression and purification of this protein presented two significant challenges. First, the gene product was moderately toxic to E. coli cells, second it was necessary to remove the large amounts of E. coli DNA present in bacterial lysates without contamination of the protein preparation by nucleases which might interfere with future assaying. The toxicity problem was overcome by fusion of the putative ligase to large solubility tags such as maltose-binding protein (MBP) or Glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and DNA was removed by treatment with a nuclease which could be inhibited by reducing agents. As the A. salmonicida ATP-dependent DNA ligase gene encodes a predicted leader peptide, both the full-length and mature forms of the protein were produced. Both possessed ATP-dependent DNA ligase activity, but the truncated form was significantly more active. Here we detail the first reported production, purification and preliminary characterization of active A. salmonicida ATP-dependent DNA ligase.

  1. The architecture and ppGpp-dependent expression of the primary transcriptome of Salmonella Typhimurium during invasion gene expression

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    Ramachandran Vinoy K

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invasion of intestinal epithelial cells by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium requires expression of the extracellular virulence gene expression programme (STEX, activation of which is dependent on the signalling molecule guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp. Recently, next-generation transcriptomics (RNA-seq has revealed the unexpected complexity of bacterial transcriptomes and in this report we use differential RNA sequencing (dRNA-seq to define the high-resolution transcriptomic architecture of wild-type S. Typhimurium and a ppGpp null strain under growth conditions which model STEX. In doing so we show that ppGpp plays a much wider role in regulating the S. Typhimurium STEX primary transcriptome than previously recognised. Results Here we report the precise mapping of transcriptional start sites (TSSs for 78% of the S. Typhimurium open reading frames (ORFs. The TSS mapping enabled a genome-wide promoter analysis resulting in the prediction of 169 alternative sigma factor binding sites, and the prediction of the structure of 625 operons. We also report the discovery of 55 new candidate small RNAs (sRNAs and 302 candidate antisense RNAs (asRNAs. We discovered 32 ppGpp-dependent alternative TSSs and determined the extent and level of ppGpp-dependent coding and non-coding transcription. We found that 34% and 20% of coding and non-coding RNA transcription respectively was ppGpp-dependent under these growth conditions, adding a further dimension to the role of this remarkable small regulatory molecule in enabling rapid adaptation to the infective environment. Conclusions The transcriptional architecture of S. Typhimurium and finer definition of the key role ppGpp plays in regulating Salmonella coding and non-coding transcription should promote the understanding of gene regulation in this important food borne pathogen and act as a resource for future research.

  2. Regulation of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 and isochorismate synthase gene expression in Arabidopsis.

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    Lydia J R Hunter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs function in anti-viral silencing in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plants. Salicylic acid (SA, an important defensive signal, increases RDR1 gene expression, suggesting that RDR1 contributes to SA-induced virus resistance. In Nicotiana attenuata RDR1 also regulates plant-insect interactions and is induced by another important signal, jasmonic acid (JA. Despite its importance in defense RDR1 regulation has not been investigated in detail. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In Arabidopsis, SA-induced RDR1 expression was dependent on 'NON-EXPRESSER OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES 1', indicating regulation involves the same mechanism controlling many other SA- defense-related genes, including pathogenesis-related 1 (PR1. Isochorismate synthase 1 (ICS1 is required for SA biosynthesis. In defensive signal transduction RDR1 lies downstream of ICS1. However, supplying exogenous SA to ics1-mutant plants did not induce RDR1 or PR1 expression to the same extent as seen in wild type plants. Analysing ICS1 gene expression using transgenic plants expressing ICS1 promoter:reporter gene (β-glucuronidase constructs and by measuring steady-state ICS1 transcript levels showed that SA positively regulates ICS1. In contrast, ICS2, which is expressed at lower levels than ICS1, is unaffected by SA. The wound-response hormone JA affects expression of Arabidopsis RDR1 but jasmonate-induced expression is independent of CORONATINE-INSENSITIVE 1, which conditions expression of many other JA-responsive genes. Transiently increased RDR1 expression following tobacco mosaic virus inoculation was due to wounding and was not a direct effect of infection. RDR1 gene expression was induced by ethylene and by abscisic acid (an important regulator of drought resistance. However, rdr1-mutant plants showed normal responses to drought. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: RDR1 is regulated by a much broader range of phytohormones than previously thought

  3. GalNAc-T14 promotes metastasis through Wnt dependent HOXB9 expression in lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ok-Seon; Oh, Ensel; Park, Jeong-Rak; Lee, Ji-Seon; Bae, Gab-Yong; Koo, Jae-Hyung; Kim, Hyongbum; Choi, Yoon L; Choi, Young Soo; Kim, Jhingook; Cha, Hyuk-Jin

    2015-12-01

    While metastasis, the main cause of lung cancer-related death, has been extensively studied, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. A previous clinicogenomic study revealed that expression of N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (GalNAc-T14), is highly inversely correlated with recurrence-free survival in those with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) has not been determined. Here, we showed that GalNAc-T14 expression was positively associated with the invasive phenotype. Microarray and biochemical analyses revealed that HOXB9, the expression of which was increased in a GalNAc-T14-dependent manner, played an important role in metastasis. GalNAc-T14 increased the sensitivity of the WNT response and increased the stability of the β-catenin protein, leading to induced expression of HOXB9 and acquisition of an invasive phenotype. Pharmacological inhibition of β-catenin in GalNAc-T14-expressing cancer cells suppressed HOXB9 expression and invasion. A meta-analysis of clinical genomics data revealed that expression of GalNAc-T14 or HOXB9 was strongly correlated with reduced recurrence-free survival and increased hazard risk, suggesting that targeting β-catenin within the GalNAc-T14/WNT/HOXB9 axis may be a novel therapeutic approach to inhibit metastasis in NSCLC.

  4. Density-dependent expression of keratins in transformed rat liver cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyanovsky, S M; Bannikov, G A; Montesano, R; Vasiliev, J M

    1986-04-01

    Immunomorphological examination of the distribution of three keratins in cultured rat liver-derived epithelial cell lines of the IAR series was performed in order to find out the effects of neoplastic evolution on the expression of these epithelium-specific markers. Specific monoclonal antibodies were used to reveal various intermediate filament proteins: keratins with molecular masses of 55, 49 or 40 kD (K55, K49 or K40), and vimentin. The expression of keratins was negligible in sparse and dense cultures of non-transformed lines, which had typical epithelial morphology. The examined keratins were also absent in the sparse cultures of transformed lines, which have lost partially or completely the morphological features of epithelia. However, cells in dense cultures of most transformed lines contained numerous keratin filaments. It is suggested that the paradoxical increase of keratin expression after transformation is due to increased saturation density of transformed cultures; this high density favours the expression. As shown by the experiments with culture wounding, the effects of density are local and reversible. While K55 was present in all the cells of dense cultures, the expression of the other two keratins was dependent on the cell position within these cultures. It is suggested that the expression of the latter two keratins, besides high cell density, also requires the presence (K40) or the absence (K49) of cell-substratum contacts. Possible mechanisms of the effects of cell density on the expression of keratins are discussed.

  5. IL-4 dependent alternatively-activated macrophages have a distinctive in vivo gene expression phenotype

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    Guiliano David

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background "Alternatively-activated" macrophages are found in Th2-mediated inflammatory settings such as nematode infection and allergic pulmonary inflammation. Due in part to a lack of markers, these cells have not been well characterized in vivo and their function remains unknown. Results We have used murine macrophages elicited by nematode infection (NeMφ as a source of in vivo derived alternatively activated macrophages. Using three distinct yet complementary molecular approaches we have established a gene expression profile of alternatively activated macrophages and identified macrophage genes that are regulated in vivo by IL-4. First, genes abundantly expressed were identified by an expressed sequence tag strategy. Second, an array of 1176 known mouse genes was screened for differential expression between NeMφ from wild type or IL-4 deficient mice. Third, a subtractive library was screened to identify novel IL-4 dependent macrophage genes. Differential expression was confirmed by real time RT-PCR analysis. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that alternatively activated macrophages generated in vivo have a gene expression profile distinct from any macrophage population described to date. Several of the genes we identified, including those most abundantly expressed, have not previously been associated with macrophages and thus this study provides unique new information regarding the phenotype of macrophages found in Th2-mediated, chronic inflammatory settings. Our data also provide additional in vivo evidence for parallels between the inflammatory processes involved in nematode infection and allergy.

  6. Proteomic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum core metabolism: relative protein expression profiles and growth phase-dependent changes in protein expression

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    Rydzak Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium thermocellum produces H2 and ethanol, as well as CO2, acetate, formate, and lactate, directly from cellulosic biomass. It is therefore an attractive model for biofuel production via consolidated bioprocessing. Optimization of end-product yields and titres is crucial for making biofuel production economically feasible. Relative protein expression profiles may provide targets for metabolic engineering, while understanding changes in protein expression and metabolism in response to carbon limitation, pH, and growth phase may aid in reactor optimization. We performed shotgun 2D-HPLC-MS/MS on closed-batch cellobiose-grown exponential phase C. thermocellum cell-free extracts to determine relative protein expression profiles of core metabolic proteins involved carbohydrate utilization, energy conservation, and end-product synthesis. iTRAQ (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation based protein quantitation was used to determine changes in core metabolic proteins in response to growth phase. Results Relative abundance profiles revealed differential levels of putative enzymes capable of catalyzing parallel pathways. The majority of proteins involved in pyruvate catabolism and end-product synthesis were detected with high abundance, with the exception of aldehyde dehydrogenase, ferredoxin-dependent Ech-type [NiFe]-hydrogenase, and RNF-type NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductase. Using 4-plex 2D-HPLC-MS/MS, 24% of the 144 core metabolism proteins detected demonstrated moderate changes in expression during transition from exponential to stationary phase. Notably, proteins involved in pyruvate synthesis decreased in stationary phase, whereas proteins involved in glycogen metabolism, pyruvate catabolism, and end-product synthesis increased in stationary phase. Several proteins that may directly dictate end-product synthesis patterns, including pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductases, alcohol dehydrogenases, and a putative

  7. Functional expression of a heterologous nickel-dependent, ATP-independent urease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, N; Luttik, M A H; Cueto Rojas, H F; Wahl, A; van Maris, A J A; Pronk, J T; Daran, J M

    2015-07-01

    In microbial processes for production of proteins, biomass and nitrogen-containing commodity chemicals, ATP requirements for nitrogen assimilation affect product yields on the energy producing substrate. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a current host for heterologous protein production and potential platform for production of nitrogen-containing chemicals, uptake and assimilation of ammonium requires 1 ATP per incorporated NH3. Urea assimilation by this yeast is more energy efficient but still requires 0.5 ATP per NH3 produced. To decrease ATP costs for nitrogen assimilation, the S. cerevisiae gene encoding ATP-dependent urease (DUR1,2) was replaced by a Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene encoding ATP-independent urease (ure2), along with its accessory genes ureD, ureF and ureG. Since S. pombe ure2 is a Ni(2+)-dependent enzyme and Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not express native Ni(2+)-dependent enzymes, the S. pombe high-affinity nickel-transporter gene (nic1) was also expressed. Expression of the S. pombe genes into dur1,2Δ S. cerevisiae yielded an in vitro ATP-independent urease activity of 0.44±0.01 µmol min(-1) mg protein(-1) and restored growth on urea as sole nitrogen source. Functional expression of the Nic1 transporter was essential for growth on urea at low Ni(2+) concentrations. The maximum specific growth rates of the engineered strain on urea and ammonium were lower than those of a DUR1,2 reference strain. In glucose-limited chemostat cultures with urea as nitrogen source, the engineered strain exhibited an increased release of ammonia and reduced nitrogen content of the biomass. Our results indicate a new strategy for improving yeast-based production of nitrogen-containing chemicals and demonstrate that Ni(2+)-dependent enzymes can be functionally expressed in S. cerevisiae.

  8. Interaction of environment conditions and genotypes on expression of genetic background in micro-phenophases of strawberry mixed flower bud

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    Selamovska Ana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is differentiation or micro-phenophases of reproductive organs on two junebearing strawberry (Fragaria x anannassa varieties senga sengana and pocahontas, depending on climate conditions, rosettes ordering and cultivate manner (orchard mulched on black foil and orchard on bare soil. The beginning of differentiation of flower buds is genetic characteristic depending on climate conditions (insulations, day length, higher midday and night air temperatures from 1.05 till the beginning of differentiation, the sum of rainfalls from the beginning of May until the end of July, order of rosettes and cultivate manner The sum of effective temperatures over 10ºC from 1st of May till the beginning of differentiation has no influence on beginning of flower buds differentiation. First morphological changes of the apical meristem were started in the first decade of August that has coincided with the day length of 14 hours and day insulations of 9.3 hours. Micro-phenophases were undergoing almost at the same time in both varieties, only the beginning at pocahontas was 2-3 days earlier. Primary rosettes differ 10-15 days earlier than the secondary rosettes. Plants that grown on black foil had 7-10 days earlier flower bud differentiation compared to those grown on bare soil.

  9. The Effect of the Arg389Gly Beta-1 Adrenoceptor Polymorphism on Plasma Renin Activity and Heart Rate and the Genotype-Dependent Response to Metoprolol Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Morten; Andersen, Jon T; Jimenez-Solem, Espen

    2012-01-01

    A gene-drug interaction has been indicated between beta-1 selective beta-blockers and the Arg389Gly polymorphism (rs1801253) in the adrenergic beta-1 receptor gene (ADRB1). We studied the effect of the ADRB1 Arg389Gly polymorphism on plasma renin activity (PRA) and heart rate (HR) and the genotype......(metoprolol concentration) varied significantly between genotypes (P = 0.024). In Gly/Gly subjects, PRA decreased significantly with metoprolol concentration before (P = 0.025) and after exercise (P effect on PRA. The effect of metoprolol concentration...... on PRA in Gly/Gly subjects was enhanced by exercise (P = 0.044). No significant differences in HR were seen between genotype groups. Resting PRA was lower in Gly/Gly than in Arg/Arg subjects, and the effect of exercise and metoprolol concentration on PRA was stronger in Gly/Gly subjects than...

  10. Effects of Hepatitis C Mixture on RNA Expression of Different Genotypic HCV Replicons%丙肝合剂对不同基因型丙型肝炎病毒复制子基因表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李京涛; 魏海梁; 席奇; 刘亚珠; 闫曙光; 惠毅; 宋春荣; 李日向; 常占杰

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the inhibition mechanism of Hepatitis C Mixture for RNA expression of different genotypic HCV replicons in vitro.MethodsDifferent genotypic HCV replicon cell models were established. According to the disparity of genotypes, they were divided into three groups which named HCV 1b, HCV 2a and J6/JFH1. The Huh7.5.1 cell colonies which contain HCV replicon RNA were treated with various concentrations of Hepatitis C Mixture for 48 h. Then the luciferase activity and cytotoxicity of cell colonieswere detected. MTT method was used to detect cytotoxicity. IFN-2α and DMSO were selected as positive and negative control for eliminating the experiment errors.ResultsLuciferase activities of three groups showed a dose dependent decrease. Luciferase activities of three groups were significant different (P<0.05). Multiple comparisons were performed and showed the luciferase activity of HCV 2a group was lower than those in HCV 1b and J6/JFH1 groups (P<0.05). The results of MTT showed that when cells were treated with 0.2 g/mL of Hepatitis C Mixture, cellular survival rate was higher over 99%. ConclusionHepatitis C Mixture could partly inhibit the RNA expression of different genotypic HCV replicons in vitro, especially the HCV 2a replicon. The optimal inhibitory concentrations of Hepatitis C Mixture is 0.1 g/mL.%目的 通过体外实验探讨丙肝合剂抑制不同基因型丙型肝炎病毒(HCV)复制子基因表达的机制.方法建立不同基因型HCV复制子细胞模型,按基因型不同分为HCV 1b组、HCV 2a组和J6/JFH1组,不同浓度丙肝合剂干预负载复制子的Huh7.5.1细胞48 h后,收集细胞裂解液,进行荧光素酶活性测定,MTT法检测细胞毒性.选择IFN-2α和DMSO分别作为阳性对照和阴性对照以排除实验误差.结果 3组荧光素酶活性呈剂量依赖性下降,3组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).多重比较显示,HCV 2a组荧光素酶活性显著低于HCV 1b组和J6/JFH1组(P<0.05).MTT实验结

  11. Differentially Expressed Genes in Resistant and Susceptible Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. Genotypes in Response to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli.

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    Renfeng Xue

    Full Text Available Fusarium wilt of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., caused by Fusarium oxysporum Schlechtend.:Fr. f.sp. phaseoli (Fop, is one of the most important diseases of common beans worldwide. Few natural sources of resistance to Fop exist and provide only moderate or partial levels of protection. Despite the economic importance of the disease across multiple crops, only a few of Fop induced genes have been analyzed in legumes. Therefore, our goal was to identify transcriptionally regulated genes during an incompatible interaction between common bean and the Fop pathogen using the cDNA amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP technique. We generated a total of 8,730 transcript-derived fragments (TDFs with 768 primer pairs based on the comparison of a moderately resistant and a susceptible genotype. In total, 423 TDFs (4.9% displayed altered expression patterns after inoculation with Fop inoculum. We obtained full amplicon sequences for 122 selected TDFs, of which 98 were identified as annotated known genes in different functional categories based on their putative functions, 10 were predicted but non-annotated genes and 14 were not homologous to any known genes. The 98 TDFs encoding genes of known putative function were classified as related to metabolism (22, signal transduction (21, protein synthesis and processing (20, development and cytoskeletal organization (12, transport of proteins (7, gene expression and RNA metabolism (4, redox reactions (4, defense and stress responses (3, energy metabolism (3, and hormone responses (2. Based on the analyses of homology, 19 TDFs from different functional categories were chosen for expression analysis using quantitative RT-PCR. The genes found to be important here were implicated at various steps of pathogen infection and will allow a better understanding of the mechanisms of defense and resistance to Fop and similar pathogens. The differential response genes discovered here could also be used as

  12. Alteration of RH gene structure and expression in human dCCee and DCW-red blood cells: phenotypic homozygosity versus genotypic heterozygosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C H

    1996-09-15

    This report describes a comparative study on the dCCee and DCW-red blood cells devoid of RhD and CcEe antigens, respectively. Southern blots showed that the two variants carried opposite deletions in the D and non-D (CcEe) genes. Rh haplotyping and exon polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay indicated that the deletions did not extend beyond the 5' region upstream from exon 1 or the 3' region downstream from exon 10 of the respective genes. This was confirmed by finding intact promoters and 3' untranslated regions in both D and non-D genes in each variant. Reverse transcriptase-PCR and cDNA sequencing showed the expression of two transcripts in each cell type. In dCCee cells, one transcript was the regular Ce form and the other occurred as a D-Ce-D hybrid whose Ce sequence spanned exons 2 through 9. In DCW-cells, the two transcripts were derived from reversely arranged hybrid genes, ie, the CW-D gene was formed by fusion of CW exon 1 with D exons 2 through 10, whereas the reverse product was formed by fusion of D exons 1 through 9 with non-D exon 10. These results indicated that DNA deletion and recombination had occurred in either cis or trans configuration and involved both RH loci in the dCCee or DCW-genome. Identification of such compound alterations correlates the genotypes with phenotypes and explains the lost Rh antigenic expression. A reinvestigation of gene organization also led to the reassignment of several 5' and 3' splice sites. Together, this study not only shows the complexity of Rh phenotypic diversity, but also points to the importance of concurrent analysis of genomic structure and transcript expression in deciphering the underlying genetic mechanisms.

  13. Differentially Expressed Genes in Resistant and Susceptible Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Genotypes in Response to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Renfeng; Wu, Jing; Zhu, Zhendong; Wang, Lanfen; Wang, Xiaoming; Wang, Shumin; Blair, Matthew W

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium wilt of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), caused by Fusarium oxysporum Schlechtend.:Fr. f.sp. phaseoli (Fop), is one of the most important diseases of common beans worldwide. Few natural sources of resistance to Fop exist and provide only moderate or partial levels of protection. Despite the economic importance of the disease across multiple crops, only a few of Fop induced genes have been analyzed in legumes. Therefore, our goal was to identify transcriptionally regulated genes during an incompatible interaction between common bean and the Fop pathogen using the cDNA amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) technique. We generated a total of 8,730 transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) with 768 primer pairs based on the comparison of a moderately resistant and a susceptible genotype. In total, 423 TDFs (4.9%) displayed altered expression patterns after inoculation with Fop inoculum. We obtained full amplicon sequences for 122 selected TDFs, of which 98 were identified as annotated known genes in different functional categories based on their putative functions, 10 were predicted but non-annotated genes and 14 were not homologous to any known genes. The 98 TDFs encoding genes of known putative function were classified as related to metabolism (22), signal transduction (21), protein synthesis and processing (20), development and cytoskeletal organization (12), transport of proteins (7), gene expression and RNA metabolism (4), redox reactions (4), defense and stress responses (3), energy metabolism (3), and hormone responses (2). Based on the analyses of homology, 19 TDFs from different functional categories were chosen for expression analysis using quantitative RT-PCR. The genes found to be important here were implicated at various steps of pathogen infection and will allow a better understanding of the mechanisms of defense and resistance to Fop and similar pathogens. The differential response genes discovered here could also be used as molecular

  14. Transcriptomic responses to environmental temperature by turtles with temperature-dependent and genotypic sex determination assessed by RNAseq inform the genetic architecture of embryonic gonadal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Srihari; Literman, Robert; Neuwald, Jennifer; Severin, Andrew; Valenzuela, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    Vertebrate sexual fate is decided primarily by the individual's genotype (GSD), by the environmental temperature during development (TSD), or both. Turtles exhibit TSD and GSD, making them ideal to study the evolution of sex determination. Here we analyze temperature-specific gonadal transcriptomes (RNA-sequencing validated by qPCR) of painted turtles (Chrysemys picta TSD) before and during the thermosensitive period, and at equivalent stages in soft-shell turtles (Apalone spinifera-GSD), to test whether TSD's and GSD's transcriptional circuitry is identical but deployed differently between mechanisms. Our data show that most elements of the mammalian urogenital network are active during turtle gonadogenesis, but their transcription is generally more thermoresponsive in TSD than GSD, and concordant with their sex-specific function in mammals [e.g., upregulation of Amh, Ar, Esr1, Fog2, Gata4, Igf1r, Insr, and Lhx9 at male-producing temperature, and of β-catenin, Foxl2, Aromatase (Cyp19a1), Fst, Nf-kb, Crabp2 at female-producing temperature in Chrysemys]. Notably, antagonistic elements in gonadogenesis (e.g., β-catenin and Insr) were thermosensitive only in TSD early-embryos. Cirbp showed warm-temperature upregulation in both turtles disputing its purported key TSD role. Genes that may convert thermal inputs into sex-specific development (e.g., signaling and hormonal pathways, RNA-binding and heat-shock) were differentially regulated. Jak-Stat, Nf-κB, retinoic-acid, Wnt, and Mapk-signaling (not Akt and Ras-signaling) potentially mediate TSD thermosensitivity. Numerous species-specific ncRNAs (including Xist) were differentially-expressed, mostly upregulated at colder temperatures, as were unannotated loci that constitute novel TSD candidates. Cirbp showed warm-temperature upregulation in both turtles. Consistent transcription between turtles and alligator revealed putatively-critical reptilian TSD elements for male (Sf1, Amh, Amhr2) and female (Crabp2 and Hspb1

  15. Regulation of the type Mb sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporter expression in the intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin WANG; Yulong YIN

    2009-01-01

    Phosphate (Pi) plays important roles in growth, development, bone mineralization, energy metabolism, nucleic acid synthesis, cell signaling, and acid-base regulation. The rate of intestinal absorption of Pi is a major determinant of Pi homeostasis. The type lib sodium- dependent Pi cotransporter (NaPi-Iib) is responsible for intestinal Pi absorption. Many physiological factors regulate the rate of Pi absorption via modulating the expression of NaPi-Iib in the intestine. In this review, we summarize the role of these factors in the regulation of NaPi-Iib expression in the intestine.

  16. Improving the phenotypic expression of rice genotypes:Rethinking “intensification” for production systems and selection practices for rice breeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Norman; Uphoff; Vasilia; Fasoula; Anas; Iswandi; Amir; Kassam; Amod; K.Thakur

    2015-01-01

    Intensification in rice crop production is generally understood as requiring increased use of material inputs: water, inorganic fertilizers, and agrochemicals. However, this is not the only kind of intensification available. More productive crop phenotypes, with traits such as more resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses and shorter crop cycles, are possible through modifications in the management of rice plants, soil, water, and nutrients, reducing rather than increasing material inputs. Greater factor productivity can be achieved through the application of new knowledge and more skill, and(initially) more labor, as seen from the System of Rice Intensification(SRI), whose practices are used in various combinations by as many as 10 million farmers on about 4 million hectares in over 50 countries. The highest yields achieved with these management methods have come from hybrids and improved rice varieties, confirming the importance of making genetic improvements. However,unimproved varieties are also responsive to these changes, which induce better growth and functioning of rice root systems and more abundance, diversity, and activity of beneficial soil organisms. Some of these organisms as symbiotic endophytes can affect and enhance the expression of rice plants’ genetic potential as well as their phenotypic resilience to multiple stresses, including those of climate change. SRI experience and data suggest that decades of plant breeding have been selecting for the best crop genetic endowments under suboptimal growing conditions, with crowding of plants that impedes their photosynthesis and growth, flooding of rice paddies that causes roots to degenerate and forgoes benefits derived from aerobic soil organisms, and overuse of agrochemicals that adversely affect these organisms as well as soil and human health. This review paper reports evidence from research in India and Indonesia that changes in crop and water management can improve the expression of rice

  17. Light-Dependent Expression of Four Cryptic Archaeal Circadian Gene Homologs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eManiscalco

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are important biological signals that have been found in almost all major groups of life from bacteria to man, yet it remains unclear if any members of the second major prokaryotic domain of life, the Archaea, also possess a biological clock. To investigate this question, we examined the regulation of four cyanobacterial-like circadian gene homologs present in the genome of the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii. These genes, designated cirA, cirB, cirC, and cirD, display similarity to the KaiC-family of cyanobacterial clock proteins, which act to regulate rhythmic gene expression and to control the timing of cell division. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis was used to examine the expression of each of the four cir genes in response to 12 h light/12 h dark cycles (LD 12:12 during balanced growth in H. volcanii. Our data reveal that there is an approximately two to sixteen-fold increase in cir gene expression when cells are shifted from light to constant darkness and this pattern of gene expression oscillates with the light conditions in a rhythmic manner. Targeted single- and double-gene knockouts in the H. volcanii cir genes results in disruption of light-dependent, rhythmic gene expression, although it does not lead to any significant effect on growth under these conditions. Restoration of light-dependent, rhythmic gene expression was demonstrated by introducing, in trans, a wild-type copy of individual cir genes into knockout strains. These results are noteworthy as this is the first attempt to characterize the transcriptional expression and regulation of the ubiquitous kaiC homologs found among archaeal genomes.

  18. Prominin-2 expression increases protrusions, decreases caveolae and inhibits Cdc42 dependent fluid phase endocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Raman Deep, E-mail: Takhter.Ramandeep@mayo.edu; Schroeder, Andreas S.; Scheffer, Luana; Holicky, Eileen L.; Wheatley, Christine L.; Marks, David L., E-mail: Marks.david@mayo.edu; Pagano, Richard E.

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Prominin-2 expression induced protrusions that co-localized with lipid raft markers. •Prominin-2 expression decreased caveolae, caveolar endocytosis and increased pCav1. •Prominin-2 expression inhibited fluid phase endocytosis by inactivation of Cdc42. •These endocytic effects can be reversed by adding exogenous cholesterol. •Caveolin1 knockdown restored fluid phase endocytosis in Prominin2 expressing cells. -- Abstract: Background: Membrane protrusions play important roles in biological processes such as cell adhesion, wound healing, migration, and sensing of the external environment. Cell protrusions are a subtype of membrane microdomains composed of cholesterol and sphingolipids, and can be disrupted by cholesterol depletion. Prominins are pentaspan membrane proteins that bind cholesterol and localize to plasma membrane (PM) protrusions. Prominin-1 is of great interest as a marker for stem and cancer cells, while Prominin-2 (Prom2) is reportedly restricted to epithelial cells. Aim: To characterize the effects of Prom-2 expression on PM microdomain organization. Methods: Prom2-fluorescent protein was transfected in human skin fibroblasts (HSF) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells for PM raft and endocytic studies. Caveolae at PM were visualized using transmission electron microscopy. Cdc42 activation was measured and caveolin-1 knockdown was performed using siRNAs. Results: Prom2 expression in HSF and CHO cells caused extensive Prom2-positive protrusions that co-localized with lipid raft markers. Prom2 expression significantly decreased caveolae at the PM, reduced caveolar endocytosis and increased caveolin-1 phosphorylation. Prom2 expression also inhibited Cdc42-dependent fluid phase endocytosis via decreased Cdc42 activation. Effects on endocytosis were reversed by addition of cholesterol. Knockdown of caveolin-1 by siRNA restored Cdc42 dependent fluid phase endocytosis in Prom2-expressing cells. Conclusions: Prom2 protrusions primarily

  19. NLRC5 controls basal MHC class I gene expression in an MHC enhanceosome-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neerincx, Andreas; Rodriguez, Galaxia M; Steimle, Viktor; Kufer, Thomas A

    2012-05-15

    Nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins play important roles in innate immune responses as pattern-recognition receptors. Although most NLR proteins act in cell autonomous immune pathways, some do not function as classical pattern-recognition receptors. One such NLR protein is the MHC class II transactivator, the master regulator of MHC class II gene transcription. In this article, we report that human NLRC5, which we recently showed to be involved in viral-mediated type I IFN responses, shuttles to the nucleus and activates MHC class I gene expression. Knockdown of NLRC5 in different human cell lines and primary dermal fibroblasts leads to reduced MHC class I expression, whereas introduction of NLRC5 into cell types with very low expression of MHC class I augments MHC class I expression to levels comparable to those found in lymphocytes. Expression of NLRC5 positively correlates with MHC class I expression in human tissues. Functionally, we show that both the N-terminal effector domain of NLRC5 and its C-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain are needed for activation of MHC class I expression. Moreover, nuclear shuttling and function depend on a functional Walker A motif. Finally, we identified a promoter sequence in the MHC class I promoter, the X1 box, to be involved in NLRC5-mediated MHC class I gene activation. Taken together, this suggested that NLRC5 acts in a manner similar to class II transactivator to drive MHC expression and revealed NLRC5 as an important regulator of basal MHC class I expression.

  20. Genome-wide expression patterns of calcium-dependent protein kinases in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-Lei; Huang, Si-Yang; Zhang, Nian-Zhang; Chen, Jia; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-06-04

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are found in plants and some Apicomplexan parasites but not in animals or fungi. CDPKs have been shown to play important roles in various calcium-signaling pathways such as host cell invasion, egress and protein secretion in Toxoplasma gondii. The objectives of the present study were to examine the T. gondii CDPK genes expression patterns during different development stages and stress responses. We carried out a comprehensive expression analysis of CDPK genes based on previously published microarray datasets, and we also used real time quantitative RT-PCR to study ten T. gondii CDPK genes expression patterns under acid, alkali, high temperature and low temperature conditions. Microarrays analysis indicated that some TgCDPK genes exhibited different expression levels in IFN-γ stimuli conditions or at different developmental stages, suggesting that CDPK genes may play different roles in these processes. Expression profiles under low temperature, high temperature, acid and alkaline indicated that most CDPK may be involved in regulating high temperature, acid and alkaline signaling pathways. We present a genome-wide expression analysis of CDPK genes in T. gondii for the first time, and the mRNA levels change with abiotic and biotic stresses, suggesting their functional roles in these processes. These results will provide a solid basis for future functional studies of the CDPK gene family in T. gondii.

  1. Alginate-Dependent Gene Expression Mechanism in Sphingomonas sp. Strain A1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Chie; Takase, Ryuichi; Momma, Keiko; Maruyama, Yukie; Murata, Kousaku

    2014-01-01

    Sphingomonas sp. strain A1, a Gram-negative bacterium, directly incorporates alginate polysaccharide into the cytoplasm through a periplasmic alginate-binding protein-dependent ATP-binding cassette transporter. The polysaccharide is degraded to monosaccharides via the formation of oligosaccharides by endo- and exotype alginate lyases. The strain A1 proteins for alginate uptake and degradation are encoded in both strands of a genetic cluster in the bacterial genome and inducibly expressed in the presence of alginate. Here we show the function of the alginate-dependent transcription factor AlgO and its mode of action on the genetic cluster and alginate oligosaccharides. A putative gene within the genetic cluster seems to encode a transcription factor-like protein (AlgO). Mutant strain A1 (ΔAlgO mutant) cells with a disrupted algO gene constitutively produced alginate-related proteins. DNA microarray analysis indicated that wild-type cells inducibly transcribed the genetic cluster only in the presence of alginate, while ΔAlgO mutant cells constitutively expressed the genetic cluster. A gel mobility shift assay showed that AlgO binds to the specific intergenic region between algO and algS (algO-algS). Binding of AlgO to the algO-algS intergenic region diminished with increasing alginate oligosaccharides. These results demonstrated a novel alginate-dependent gene expression mechanism. In the absence of alginate, AlgO binds to the algO-algS intergenic region and represses the expression of both strands of the genetic cluster, while in the presence of alginate, AlgO dissociates from the algO-algS intergenic region via binding to alginate oligosaccharides produced through the lyase reaction and subsequently initiates transcription of the genetic cluster. This is the first report on the mechanism by which alginate regulates the expression of the gene cluster. PMID:24816607

  2. Direct evidence of fiber type-dependent GLUT-4 expression in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Poulsen, P; Handberg, A

    2000-01-01

    GLUT-4 expression in individual fibers of human skeletal muscles in younger and older adults was studied. Furthermore, the dependency of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake on fiber type distribution was investigated. Fiber type distribution was determined in cryosections of muscle biopsies from 8...... younger (29 yr) and 8 older (64 yr) healthy subjects, and estimates of GLUT-4 expression in individual fibers were obtained by combining immunohistochemistry and stereology. GLUT-4 was more abundantly expressed in slow compared with fast muscle fibers in both younger (P ...) subjects. A 25% reduction of GLUT-4 density in fast fibers (P GLUT-4 density in slow fibers were demonstrated in older compared with younger subjects. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake rates measured by hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp were not correlated with the fraction...

  3. Glucose-Dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide Stimulates Osteopontin Expression in the Vasculature via Endothelin-1 and CREB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berglund, Lisa M; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Ladenvall, Claes;

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is an incretin hormone with extrapancreatic effects beyond glycemic control. Here we demonstrate unexpected effects of GIP signaling in the vasculature. GIP induces the expression of the pro-atherogenic cytokine osteopontin (OPN) in mouse arteries......, via local release of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and activation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Infusion of GIP increases plasma OPN levels in healthy individuals. Plasma ET-1 and OPN levels are positively correlated in patients with critical limb ischemia. Fasting GIP levels are higher......; and expression associates to parameters characteristic of unstable and inflammatory plaques (increased lipid accumulation, macrophage infiltration and reduced smooth muscle cell content). While GIPR expression is predominantly endothelial in healthy arteries from human, mouse, rat and pig; remarkable up-regulation...

  4. Local Adaptation of Sun-Exposure-Dependent Gene Expression Regulation in Human Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Ryosuke; Fraser, Hunter B.

    2016-01-01

    Sun-exposure is a key environmental variable in the study of human evolution. Several skin-pigmentation genes serve as classical examples of positive selection, suggesting that sun-exposure has significantly shaped worldwide genomic variation. Here we investigate the interaction between genetic variation and sun-exposure, and how this impacts gene expression regulation. Using RNA-Seq data from 607 human skin samples, we identified thousands of transcripts that are differentially expressed between sun-exposed skin and non-sun-exposed skin. We then tested whether genetic variants may influence each individual’s gene expression response to sun-exposure. Our analysis revealed 10 sun-exposure-dependent gene expression quantitative trait loci (se-eQTLs), including genes involved in skin pigmentation (SLC45A2) and epidermal differentiation (RASSF9). The allele frequencies of the RASSF9 se-eQTL across diverse populations correlate with the magnitude of solar radiation experienced by these populations, suggesting local adaptation to varying levels of sunlight. These results provide the first examples of sun-exposure-dependent regulatory variation and suggest that this variation has contributed to recent human adaptation. PMID:27760139

  5. An atypical epigenetic mechanism affects uniparental expression of Pol IV-dependent siRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Mosher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Small RNAs generated by RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV are the most abundant class of small RNAs in flowering plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana Pol IV-dependent short interfering (p4-siRNAs are imprinted and accumulate specifically from maternal chromosomes in the developing seeds. Imprinted expression of protein-coding genes is controlled by differential DNA or histone methylation placed in gametes. To identify epigenetic factors required for maternal-specific expression of p4-siRNAs we analyzed the effect of a series of candidate mutations, including those required for genomic imprinting of protein-coding genes, on uniparental expression of a representative p4-siRNA locus. RESULTS: Paternal alleles of imprinted genes are marked by DNA or histone methylation placed by DNA METHYLTRANSFERASE 1 or the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2. Here we demonstrate that repression of paternal p4-siRNA expression at locus 08002 is not controlled by either of these mechanisms. Similarly, loss of several chromatin modification enzymes, including a histone acetyltransferase, a histone methyltransferase, and two nucleosome remodeling proteins, does not affect maternal expression of locus 08002. Maternal alleles of imprinted genes are hypomethylated by DEMETER DNA glycosylase, yet expression of p4-siRNAs occurs irrespective of demethylation by DEMETER or related glycosylases. CONCLUSIONS: Differential DNA methylation and other chromatin modifications associated with epigenetic silencing are not required for maternal-specific expression of p4-siRNAs at locus 08002. These data indicate that there is an as yet unknown epigenetic mechanism causing maternal-specific p4-siRNA expression that is distinct from the well-characterized mechanisms associated with DNA methylation or the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2.

  6. Differentiation-dependent expression of retinoid-binding proteins in BFC-1 beta adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zovich, D C; Orologa, A; Okuno, M; Kong, L W; Talmage, D A; Piantedosi, R; Goodman, D S; Blaner, W S

    1992-07-15

    Recently, we demonstrated that adipose tissue plays an important role in retinol storage and retinol-binding protein (RBP) synthesis. Our data suggested that RBP expression in adipose tissue is dependent on the state of adipocyte differentiation. To examine this possibility, we explored the differentiation-dependent expression of RBP using BFC-1 beta preadipocytes, which can be stimulated to undergo adipose differentiation. Total RNA was isolated from undifferentiated (preadipocytes) and differentiated (adipocytes) BFC-1 beta cells and analyzed by Northern blotting. RBP mRNA was not detected in the preadipocytes, but considerable RBP mRNA was present in differentiated BFC-1 beta cells. In BFC-1 beta cells, induced to differentiate with insulin and thyroid hormone, RBP mRNA was first detected after 4 days, reached a maximum level by day 10, and remained at this maximum level for at least 2 more days. Cellular retinol-binding protein was expressed at low levels in the BFC-1 beta preadipocytes and the level of expression increased for 6 days after induction to differentiate and slowly declined on later days. Neither the maximum level of RBP expression nor the day on which this level was reached was influenced by the level of retinol provided in the BFC-1 beta culture medium. BFC-1 beta cells secreted newly synthesized RBP into the culture medium at a rate of 43 +/- 14 ng RBP/24 h/10(6) adipocytes. When the BFC-1 beta adipocytes were provided 1.0 microM retinol in the medium, they accumulated the retinol and synthesized retinyl esters. These studies with BFC-1 beta cells confirm that RBP synthesis and secretion and retinol accumulation are intrinsic properties of differentiated adipocytes. Furthermore, they suggest that RBP and cellular retinol-binding protein gene expression are regulated as part of a package of genes which are modulated during adipocyte differentiation.

  7. Keratin-dependent regulation of Aire and gene expression in skin tumor keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Ryan P; DePianto, Daryle J; Jacob, Justin T; Han, Minerva C; Chung, Byung-Min; Batazzi, Adriana S; Poll, Brian G; Guo, Yajuan; Han, Jingnan; Ong, SuFey; Zheng, Wenxin; Taube, Janis M; Čiháková, Daniela; Wan, Fengyi; Coulombe, Pierre A

    2015-08-01

    Expression of the intermediate filament protein keratin 17 (K17) is robustly upregulated in inflammatory skin diseases and in many tumors originating in stratified and pseudostratified epithelia. We report that autoimmune regulator (Aire), a transcriptional regulator, is inducibly expressed in human and mouse tumor keratinocytes in a K17-dependent manner and is required for timely onset of Gli2-induced skin tumorigenesis in mice. The induction of Aire mRNA in keratinocytes depends on a functional interaction between K17 and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein hnRNP K. Further, K17 colocalizes with Aire protein in the nucleus of tumor-prone keratinocytes, and each factor is bound to a specific promoter region featuring an NF-κB consensus sequence in a relevant subset of K17- and Aire-dependent proinflammatory genes. These findings provide radically new insight into keratin intermediate filament and Aire function, along with a molecular basis for the K17-dependent amplification of inflammatory and immune responses in diseased epithelia.

  8. Dynamic expression of combinatorial replication-dependent histone variant genes during mouse spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rongfang; Qi, Huayu

    2014-01-01

    Nucleosomes are basic chromatin structural units that are formed by DNA sequences wrapping around histones. Global chromatin states in different cell types are specified by combinatorial effects of post-translational modifications of histones and the expression of histone variants. During mouse spermatogenesis, spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) self-renew while undergo differentiation, events that occur in the company of constant re-modeling of chromatin structures. Previous studies have shown that testes contain highly expressed or specific histone variants to facilitate these epigenetic modifications. However, mechanisms of regulating the epigenetic changes and the specific histone compositions of spermatogenic cells are not fully understood. Using real time quantitative RT-PCR, we examined the dynamic expression of replication-dependent histone genes in post-natal mouse testes. It was found that distinct sets of histone genes are expressed in various spermatogenic cells at different stages during spermatogenesis. While gonocyte-enriched testes from mice at 2-dpp (days post partum) express pre-dominantly thirteen histone variant genes, SSC-stage testes at 9-dpp highly express a different set of eight histone genes. During differentiation stage when testes are occupied mostly by spermatocytes and spermatids, another twenty-two histone genes are expressed much higher than the rest, including previously known testis-specific hist1h1t, hist1h2ba and hist1h4c. In addition, histone genes that are pre-dominantly expressed in gonocytes and SSCs are also highly expressed in embryonic stem cells. Several of them were changed when embryoid bodies were formed from ES cells, suggesting their roles in regulating pluripotency of the cells. Further more, differentially expressed histone genes are specifically localized in either SSCs or spermatocytes and spermatids, as demonstrated by in situ hybridization using gene specific probes. Taken together, results presented here

  9. Fighting experience alters brain androgen receptor expression dependent on testosterone status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-Yu; Earley, Ryan L.; Huang, Shu-Ping; Hsu, Yuying

    2014-01-01

    Contest decisions are influenced by the outcomes of recent fights (winner–loser effects). Steroid hormones and serotonin are closely associated with aggression and therefore probably also play important roles in mediating winner–loser effects. In mangrove rivulus fish, Kryptolebias marmoratus, individuals with higher testosterone (T), 11-ketotestosterone and cortisol levels are more capable of winning, but titres of these hormones do not directly mediate winner–loser effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of winning/losing experiences on brain expression levels of the receptor genes for androgen (AR), oestrogen α/β (ERα/β), glucocorticoid (GR) and serotonin (5-HT1AR). The effect of contest experience on AR gene expression depended on T levels: repeated losses decreased, whereas repeated wins increased AR gene expression in individuals with low T but not in individuals with medium or high T levels. These results lend strong support for AR being involved in mediating winner–loser effects, which, in previous studies, were more detectable in individuals with lower T. Furthermore, the expression levels of ERα/β, 5-HT1AR and GR genes were higher in individuals that initiated contests against larger opponents than in those that did not. Overall, contest experience, underlying endocrine state and hormone and serotonin receptor expression patterns interacted to modulate contest decisions jointly. PMID:25320171

  10. Abiotic surface sensing and biofilm-dependent regulation of gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigent-Combaret, C; Vidal, O; Dorel, C; Lejeune, P

    1999-10-01

    To get further information on bacterial surface sensing and biofilm-dependent regulation of gene expression in Escherichia coli K-12, random insertion mutagenesis with Mu dX, a mini-Mu carrying the promoterless lacZ gene, was performed with an ompR234 adherent strain, and a simple screen was developed to assess changes in gene expression in biofilm cells versus planktonic cells. This screen revealed that major changes in the pattern of gene expression occur during biofilm development: the transcription of 38% of the genes was affected within biofilms. Different cell functions were more expressed in sessile bacteria: the OmpC porin, the high-affinity transport system of glycine betaine (encoded by the proU operon), the colanic acid exopolysaccharide (wca locus, formerly called cps), tripeptidase T (pepT), and the nickel high-affinity transport system (nikA). On the other hand, the syntheses of flagellin (fliC) and of a putative protein of 92 amino acids (f92) were both reduced in biofilms. Such a genetic reprogramming of gene expression in biofilms seems to result from changes in multiple environmental physicochemical conditions. In this work, we show that bacteria within biofilms encounter higher-osmolarity conditions, greater oxygen limitation, and higher cell density than in the liquid phase.

  11. 4EBP-Dependent Signaling Supports West Nile Virus Growth and Protein Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine D. Shives

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is a (+ sense, single-stranded RNA virus in the Flavivirus genus. WNV RNA possesses an m7GpppNm 5′ cap with 2′-O-methylation that mimics host mRNAs preventing innate immune detection and allowing the virus to translate its RNA genome through the utilization of cap-dependent translation initiation effectors in a wide variety of host species. Our prior work established the requirement of the host mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 for optimal WNV growth and protein expression; yet, the roles of the downstream effectors of mTORC1 in WNV translation are unknown. In this study, we utilize gene deletion mutants in the ribosomal protein kinase called S6 kinase (S6K and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP pathways downstream of mTORC1 to define the role of mTOR-dependent translation initiation signals in WNV gene expression and growth. We now show that WNV growth and protein expression are dependent on mTORC1 mediated-regulation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein/eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP/eIF4E interaction and eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F complex formation to support viral growth and viral protein expression. We also show that the canonical signals of mTORC1 activation including ribosomal protein s6 (rpS6 and S6K phosphorylation are not required for WNV growth in these same conditions. Our data suggest that the mTORC1/4EBP/eIF4E signaling axis is activated to support the translation of the WNV genome.

  12. Metal accumulation in tobacco expressing Arabidopsis halleri metal hyperaccumulation gene depends on external supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabasz, Anna; Krämer, Ute; Hanikenne, Marc; Rudzka, Justyna; Antosiewicz, Danuta Maria

    2010-06-01

    Engineering enhanced transport of zinc to the aerial parts of plants is a major goal in bio-fortification. In Arabidopsis halleri, high constitutive expression of the AhHMA4 gene encoding a metal pump of the P(1B)-ATPase family is necessary for both Zn hyperaccumulation and the full extent of Zn and Cd hypertolerance that are characteristic of this species. In this study, an AhHMA4 cDNA was introduced into N. tabacum var. Xanthi for expression under the control of its endogenous A. halleri promoter known to confer high and cell-type specific expression levels in both A. halleri and the non-hyperaccumulator A. thaliana. The transgene was expressed at similar levels in both roots and shoots upon long-term exposure to low Zn, control, and increased Zn concentrations. A down-regulation of AhHMA4 transcript levels was detected with 10 muM Zn resupply to tobacco plants cultivated in low Zn concentrations. In general, a transcriptional regulation of AhHMA4 in tobacco contrasted with the constitutively high expression previously observed in A. halleri. Differences in root/shoot partitioning of Zn and Cd between transgenic lines and the wild type were strongly dependent on metal concentrations in the hydroponic medium. Under low Zn conditions, an increased Zn accumulation in the upper leaves in the AhHMA4-expressing lines was detected. Moreover, transgenic plants exposed to cadmium accumulated less metal than the wild type. Both modifications of zinc and cadmium accumulation are noteworthy outcomes from the biofortification perspective and healthy food production. Expression of AhHMA4 may be useful in crops grown on soils poor in Zn.

  13. Differential screening identifies transcripts with depot-dependent expression in white adipose tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Shengli

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The co-morbidities of obesity are tied to location of excess fat in the intra-abdominal as compared to subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT depot. Genes distinctly expressed in WAT depots may impart depot-dependent physiological functions. To identify such genes, we prepared subtractive cDNA libraries from murine subcutaneous (SC or intra-abdominal epididymal (EP white adipocytes. Results Differential screening and qPCR validation identified 7 transcripts with 2.5-fold or greater enrichment in EP vs. SC adipocytes. Boc, a component of the hedgehog signaling pathway demonstrated highest enrichment (~12-fold in EP adipocytes. We also identified a dramatic enrichment in SC adipocytes vs. EP adipocytes and in SC WAT vs. EP WAT for transcript(s for the major urinary proteins (Mups, small secreted proteins with pheromone functions that are members of the lipocalin family. Expression of Boc and Mup transcript was further assessed in murine tissues, adipogenesis models, and obesity. qPCR analysis reveals that EP WAT is a major site of expression of Boc transcript. Furthermore, Boc transcript expression decreased in obese EP WAT with a concomitant upregulation of Boc transcript in the obese SC WAT depot. Assessment of the Boc binding partner Cdon in adipose tissue and cell fractions thereof, revealed transcript expression similar to Boc; suggestive of a role for the Boc-Cdon axis in WAT depot function. Mup transcripts were predominantly expressed in liver and in the SC and RP WAT depots and increased several thousand-fold during differentiation of primary murine preadipocytes to adipocytes. Mup transcripts were also markedly reduced in SC WAT and liver of ob/ob genetically obese mice compared to wild type. Conclusion Further assessment of WAT depot-enriched transcripts may uncover distinctions in WAT depot gene expression that illuminate the physiological impact of regional adiposity.

  14. Differentiation-Dependent KLF4 Expression Promotes Lytic Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Epithelial Cells.

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    Dhananjay M Nawandar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is a human herpesvirus associated with B-cell and epithelial cell malignancies. EBV lytically infects normal differentiated oral epithelial cells, where it causes a tongue lesion known as oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL in immunosuppressed patients. However, the cellular mechanism(s that enable EBV to establish exclusively lytic infection in normal differentiated oral epithelial cells are not currently understood. Here we show that a cellular transcription factor known to promote epithelial cell differentiation, KLF4, induces differentiation-dependent lytic EBV infection by binding to and activating the two EBV immediate-early gene (BZLF1 and BRLF1 promoters. We demonstrate that latently EBV-infected, telomerase-immortalized normal oral keratinocyte (NOKs cells undergo lytic viral reactivation confined to the more differentiated cell layers in organotypic raft culture. Furthermore, we show that endogenous KLF4 expression is required for efficient lytic viral reactivation in response to phorbol ester and sodium butyrate treatment in several different EBV-infected epithelial cell lines, and that the combination of KLF4 and another differentiation-dependent cellular transcription factor, BLIMP1, is highly synergistic for inducing lytic EBV infection. We confirm that both KLF4 and BLIMP1 are expressed in differentiated, but not undifferentiated, epithelial cells in normal tongue tissue, and show that KLF4 and BLIMP1 are both expressed in a patient-derived OHL lesion. In contrast, KLF4 protein is not detectably expressed in B cells, where EBV normally enters latent infection, although KLF4 over-expression is sufficient to induce lytic EBV reactivation in Burkitt lymphoma cells. Thus, KLF4, together with BLIMP1, plays a critical role in mediating lytic EBV reactivation in epithelial cells.

  15. Epigenomics and bolting tolerance in sugar beet genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébrard, Claire; Peterson, Daniel G.; Willems, Glenda; Delaunay, Alain; Jesson, Béline; Lefèbvre, Marc; Barnes, Steve; Maury, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    In sugar beet (Beta vulgaris altissima), bolting tolerance is an essential agronomic trait reflecting the bolting response of genotypes after vernalization. Genes involved in induction of sugar beet bolting have now been identified, and evidence suggests that epigenetic factors are involved in their control. Indeed, the time course and amplitude of DNA methylation variations in the shoot apical meristem have been shown to be critical in inducing sugar beet bolting, and a few functional targets of DNA methylation during vernalization have been identified. However, molecular mechanisms controlling bolting tolerance levels among genotypes are still poorly understood. Here, gene expression and DNA methylation profiles were compared in shoot apical meristems of three bolting-resistant and three bolting-sensitive genotypes after vernalization. Using Cot fractionation followed by 454 sequencing of the isolated low-copy DNA, 6231 contigs were obtained that were used along with public sugar beet DNA sequences to design custom Agilent microarrays for expression (56k) and methylation (244k) analyses. A total of 169 differentially expressed genes and 111 differentially methylated regions were identified between resistant and sensitive vernalized genotypes. Fourteen sequences were both differentially expressed and differentially methylated, with a negative correlation between their methylation and expression levels. Genes involved in cold perception, phytohormone signalling, and flowering induction were over-represented and collectively represent an integrative gene network from environmental perception to bolting induction. Altogether, the data suggest that the genotype-dependent control of DNA methylation and expression of an integrative gene network participate in bolting tolerance in sugar beet, opening up perspectives for crop improvement. PMID:26463996

  16. Development and application of hepatitis C reporter viruses with genotype 1 to 7 core-nonstructural protein 2 (NS2) expressing fluorescent proteins or luciferase in modified JFH1 NS5A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith M; Jensen, Tanja B; Mathiesen, Christian K

    2011-01-01

    To facilitate genotype-specific high-throughput studies of hepatitis C virus (HCV), we have developed reporter viruses using JFH1-based recombinants expressing core-nonstructural protein 2 (NS2) of genotype 1 to 7 prototype isolates. We introduced enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) into NS5A...... domain III of the genotype 2a virus J6/JFH1 [2a(J6)]. During Huh7.5 cell culture adaptation, 2a(J6)-EGFP acquired a 40-amino-acid (aa) (¿40) or 25-aa (¿25) deletion in NS5A domain II, rescuing the impairment of viral assembly caused by the EGFP insertion. ¿40 conferred efficient growth characteristics...... deletions in EGFP, while 2a(J6)¿40 did not show an impaired viability. We further developed panels of JFH1-based genotype 1 to 7 core-NS2 recombinants expressing EGFP- or RLuc-NS5A¿40 fusion proteins. In cell culture, the different EGFP recombinants showed growth characteristics comparable to those...

  17. Cruciferous vegetable feeding alters UGT1A1 activity: diet- and genotype-dependent changes in serum bilirubin in a controlled feeding trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Sandi L; Peterson, Sabrina; Chen, Chu; Makar, Karen W; Schwarz, Yvonne; King, Irena B; Li, Shuying S; Li, Lin; Kestin, Mark; Lampe, Johanna W

    2009-04-01

    Chemoprevention by isothiocyanates from cruciferous vegetables occurs partly through up-regulation of phase II conjugating enzymes, such as UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT). UGT1A1 glucuronidates bilirubin, estrogens, and several dietary carcinogens. The UGT1A1*28 polymorphism reduces transcription compared with the wild-type, resulting in decreased enzyme activity. Isothiocyanates are metabolized by glutathione S-transferases (GST); variants may alter isothiocyanate clearance such that response to crucifers may vary by genotype. We evaluated, in a randomized, controlled, crossover feeding trial in humans (n = 70), three test diets (single- and double-"dose" cruciferous and cruciferous plus apiaceous) compared with a fruit and vegetable-free basal diet. We measured serum bilirubin concentrations on days 0, 7, 11, and 14 of each 2-week feeding period to monitor UGT1A1 activity and determined effects of UGT1A1*28 and GSTM1/GSTT1-null variants on response. Aggregate bilirubin response to all vegetable-containing diets was statistically significantly lower compared with the basal diet (P cruciferous diets compared with basal (P cruciferous and cruciferous plus apiaceous compared with basal, and cruciferous plus apiaceous compared with single-dose cruciferous (P vegetable-containing diets compared with basal (P < 0.02 for all). Evaluation of the effects of diet stratified by GST genotype revealed some statistically significant genotypic differences; however, the magnitude was similar and not statistically significant between genotypes. These results may have implications for altering carcinogen metabolism through dietary intervention, particularly among UGT1A1*28/*28 individuals.

  18. Topoisomerase 1 Regulates Gene Expression in Neurons through Cleavage Complex-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms.

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    Angela M Mabb

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase 1 (TOP1 inhibitors, including camptothecin and topotecan, covalently trap TOP1 on DNA, creating cleavage complexes (cc's that must be resolved before gene transcription and DNA replication can proceed. We previously found that topotecan reduces the expression of long (>100 kb genes and unsilences the paternal allele of Ube3a in neurons. Here, we sought to evaluate overlap between TOP1cc-dependent and -independent gene regulation in neurons. To do this, we utilized Top1 conditional knockout mice, Top1 knockdown, the CRISPR-Cas9 system to delete Top1, TOP1 catalytic inhibitors that do not generate TOP1cc's, and a TOP1 mutation (T718A that stabilizes TOP1cc's. We found that topotecan treatment significantly alters the expression of many more genes, including long neuronal genes, immediate early genes, and paternal Ube3a, when compared to Top1 deletion. Our data show that topotecan has a stronger effect on neuronal transcription than Top1 deletion, and identifies TOP1cc-dependent and -independent contributions to gene expression.

  19. Lestaurtinib inhibits histone phosphorylation and androgen-dependent gene expression in prostate cancer cells.

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    Jens Köhler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epigenetics is defined as heritable changes in gene expression that are not based on changes in the DNA sequence. Posttranslational modification of histone proteins is a major mechanism of epigenetic regulation. The kinase PRK1 (protein kinase C related kinase 1, also known as PKN1 phosphorylates histone H3 at threonine 11 and is involved in the regulation of androgen receptor signalling. Thus, it has been identified as a novel drug target but little is known about PRK1 inhibitors and consequences of its inhibition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Using a focused library screening approach, we identified the clinical candidate lestaurtinib (also known as CEP-701 as a new inhibitor of PRK1. Based on a generated 3D model of the PRK1 kinase using the homolog PKC-theta (protein kinase c theta protein as a template, the key interaction of lestaurtinib with PRK1 was analyzed by means of molecular docking studies. Furthermore, the effects on histone H3 threonine phosphorylation and androgen-dependent gene expression was evaluated in prostate cancer cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Lestaurtinib inhibits PRK1 very potently in vitro and in vivo. Applied to cell culture it inhibits histone H3 threonine phosphorylation and androgen-dependent gene expression, a feature that has not been known yet. Thus our findings have implication both for understanding of the clinical activity of lestaurtinib as well as for future PRK1 inhibitors.

  20. Temperature dependent expression of cdc2 and cyclin B1 in spermatogenic cells during spermatogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    p34cdc2 and Cyclin Bi are key components of cell cycle controlling machine and are believed to play a fundamental role in gametogenesis. It is also well known that, in scrotal mammals, spermatogenesis depends greatly on the maintenance of comparatively low temperature in the scrotum. To investigate whether the expression of cdc2 and cyclin B1 in spermatogenic cells during spermatogenesis is actually a temperature dependent event, in situ hybridization, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry analysis were used to study the expression of cdc2 and cyclin B1 in normal and cryptorchid testis. Results showed that the abdominal temperature had no significant influence on the transcription of cdc2 and cyclin B1 in the spermatogonia and pachytene/diplotene primary spermatocytes, but it blocked the translation of them. Due to the deficiency of p34cdc2 and Cyclin B1, the spermatogonia and pachytene/diplotene primary spermatocytes were unable to form MPF, hence, they couldn't undergo karyokinesis. The development of primary spermato cytes was arrested at the G2 to M phase transition. We also found that testosterone could regulate the Cyclin B1 expression in spermatogenic cells. Muscular injection of testosterone could recover spermatogenesis in the unilateral scrotal testis which was influenced by the contralateral cryptorchid testis, but it could not salvage the spermatogenesis block in the cryptorchid testis.

  1. TALE activators regulate gene expression in a position- and strand-dependent manner in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhde-Stone, Claudia; Cheung, Edna; Lu, Biao

    2014-01-24

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are a class of transcription factors that are readily programmable to regulate gene expression. Despite their growing popularity, little is known about binding site parameters that influence TALE-mediated gene activation in mammalian cells. We demonstrate that TALE activators modulate gene expression in mammalian cells in a position- and strand-dependent manner. To study the effects of binding site location, we engineered TALEs customized to recognize specific DNA sequences located in either the promoter or the transcribed region of reporter genes. We found that TALE activators robustly activated reporter genes when their binding sites were located within the promoter region. In contrast, TALE activators inhibited the expression of reporter genes when their binding sites were located on the sense strand of the transcribed region. Notably, this repression was independent of the effector domain utilized, suggesting a simple blockage mechanism. We conclude that TALE activators in mammalian cells regulate genes in a position- and strand-dependent manner that is substantially different from gene activation by native TALEs in plants. These findings have implications for optimizing the design of custom TALEs for genetic manipulation in mammalian cells.

  2. Learning-dependent gene expression of CREB1 isoforms in the molluscan brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisayo Sadamoto

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein1 (CREB1 has multiple functions in gene regulation. Various studies have reported that CREB1-dependent gene induction is necessary for memory formation and long-lasting behavioral changes in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In the present study, we characterized Lymnaea CREB1 (LymCREB1 mRNA isoforms of spliced variants in the central nervous system (CNS of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Among these spliced variants, the three isoforms that code a whole LymCREB1 protein are considered to be the activators for gene regulation. The other four isoforms, which code truncated LymCREB1 proteins with no kinase inducible domain, are the repressors. For a better understanding of the possible roles of different LymCREB1 isoforms, the expression level of these isoform mRNAs was investigated by a real-time quantitative RT-PCR method. Further, we examined the changes in gene expression for all the isoforms in the CNS after conditioned taste aversion (CTA learning or backward conditioning as a control. The results showed that CTA learning increased LymCREB1 gene expression, but it did not change the activator/repressor ratio. Our findings showed that the repressor isoforms, as well as the activator ones, are expressed in large amounts in the CNS, and the gene expression of CREB1 isoforms appeared to be specific for the given stimulus. This was the first quantitative analysis of the expression patterns of CREB1 isoforms at the mRNA level and their association with learning behavior.

  3. Identification, organ expression and ligand-dependent expression levels of peroxisome proliferator activated receptors in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shan; Liang, Xu-Fang; Qu, Chun-Mei; Huang, Wei; Shen, Dan; Zhang, Wen-Bing; Mai, Kang-Sen

    2012-03-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-dependent transcription factors belonging to the nuclear receptor family, and can regulate various genes involved in lipid metabolism. The aim of the present study was to investigate the tissue distribution patterns of PPARs and their ligand specificities in grass carp. We cloned three PPAR isotypes of the species and evaluated their organ distribution patterns using real-time PCR. Through analyzing the deduced amino acid sequences identities between the products cloned in grass carp and those described in other species, we concluded that the same type of PPAR amino acid sequences in different species were with high homology, and different subtypes of PPAR in the same species were with low homology. The mRNA constitutive expression level of PPARα predominated in the liver, but was weak in other tested tissues. PPARβ was present in all tested organs, and particularly abundant in heart, liver and muscle. PPARγ was only detected in the liver, and to a lesser extent in brain, muscle and visceral adipose tissue. Grass carp were intraperitoneally injected with 50 mg kg(-1) body mass (bw) dose of clofibrate, 42 mg kg(-1) bw dose of 2-bromo palmitate and 1 mg kg(-1) bw dose of 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14) prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2), respectively, and the relative changes of the mRNA abundance of PPARs in liver were analyzed by real-time PCR. Clofibrate was able to increase the expressions of both PPARα and β, but was not able to for PPARγ. 2-bromo palmitate could affect the expressions of both PPARβ and γ, but was not able to for PPARα. 15d-PGJ2 was able to induce PPARβ expression, but PPARα and γ were not enhanced. Consequently, these results indicate that clofibrate, 2-bromo palmitate and 15d-PGJ2 could be applied as the activators of grass carp PPARs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Maternal High Fat Diet Affects Offspring's Vitamin K-Dependent Proteins Expression Levels.

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    Stuart Lanham

    Full Text Available Studies suggest bone growth & development and susceptibility to vascular disease in later life are influenced by maternal nutrition, during intrauterine and early postnatal life. There is evidence for a role of vitamin K-dependent proteins (VKDPs including Osteocalcin, Matrix-gla protein, Periostin, and Gas6, in bone and vascular development. This study extends the analysis of VKDPs previously conducted in 6 week old offspring, into offspring of 30 weeks of age, to assess the longer term effects of a maternal and postnatal high fat (HF diet on VKDP expression. Overall a HF maternal diet and offspring diet exacerbated the bone changes observed. Sex specific and tissue specific differences were observed in VKDP expression for both aorta and femoral tissues. In addition, significant correlations were observed between femoral OCN, Periostin Gas6, and Vkor expression levels and measures of femoral bone structure. Furthermore, MGP, OCN, Ggcx and Vkor expression levels correlated to mass and fat volume, in both sexes. In summary the current study has highlighted the importance of the long-term effects of maternal nutrition on offspring bone development and the correlation of VKDPs to bone structure.

  5. Binding of upstream stimulatory factor 1 to the E-box regulates the 4G/5G polymorphism-dependent plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 expression in mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhongcai; Jhun, Bongsook; Jung, Sandy Y; Oh, Chad K

    2008-04-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 is a key regulator of the fibrinolytic system. PAI-1 levels are markedly elevated in the asthmatic airways. The 4G/5G polymorphism of the PAI-1 gene is associated with allergic asthma. To characterize the mechanisms of the 4G/5G-dependent PAI-1 expression in mast cells (MCs), a major source of PAI-1 and key effector cells in asthma. Transcription of PAI-1 was assessed by transiently transfecting human MC line (HMC-1) cells with the luciferase-tagged PAI-1 promoters containing the 4G or 5G allele (4G-PAI-1 or 5G-PAI-1 promoter). Upstream stimulatory factor (USF)-1 and the E-box interactions were studied by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and supershift assays. Expression of USF-1 was determined by Western blot analysis. The 4G-PAI-1 promoter has higher promoter activity than the 5G-PAI-1 promoter in stimulated HMC-1 cells, and the E-box adjacent to the 4G/5G site (E-4G/5G) regulates the genotype-specific PAI-1 transcription. USF-1 binds to the E-4G with greater affinity than to the E-5G. USF-1 level is increased in HMC-1 cells after stimulation, and elevated USF-1 enhances PAI-1 transcription. Overexpression of wild-type USF-1 or dominant-negative USF remedies the 4G/5G-dependent PAI-1 transcription. Binding of USF-1 to the E-4G/5G regulates the 4G/5G polymorphism-dependent PAI-1 expression in MCs.

  6. Sarcosine induces increase in HER2/neu expression in androgen-dependent prostate cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Malin; Bouchelouche, Pierre; Kramer-Marek, Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    epithelial cells. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of sarcosine on HER2/neu expression in prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP (androgen dependent), PC-3 and DU145 (both androgen independent). Relative amounts of HER2/neu and androgen receptor (AR) transcripts were determined using RT......Increasing evidence suggests that Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu) is involved in progression of prostate cancer. Recently, sarcosine was reported to be highly increased during prostate cancer progression, and exogenous sarcosine induces an invasive phenotype in benign prostate......-qPCR. Total expression of HER2/neu was confirmed by Western blot (WB). HER2/neu protein on the surface of living LNCaP cells was visualized by confocal microscopy using a HER2/neu-specific fluorescent probe. Exposure of LNCaP cells to 50 µM sarcosine for 24 h resulted in a 58% increase of the HER2/neu m...

  7. Sarcosine induces increase in HER2/neu expression in androgen-dependent prostate cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Malin; Bouchelouche, Pierre; Kramer-Marek, Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    epithelial cells. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of sarcosine on HER2/neu expression in prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP (androgen dependent), PC-3 and DU145 (both androgen independent). Relative amounts of HER2/neu and androgen receptor (AR) transcripts were determined using RT......Increasing evidence suggests that Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu) is involved in progression of prostate cancer. Recently, sarcosine was reported to be highly increased during prostate cancer progression, and exogenous sarcosine induces an invasive phenotype in benign prostate......-qPCR. Total expression of HER2/neu was confirmed by Western blot (WB). HER2/neu protein on the surface of living LNCaP cells was visualized by confocal microscopy using a HER2/neu-specific fluorescent probe. Exposure of LNCaP cells to 50 μM sarcosine for 24 h resulted in a 58% increase of the HER2/neu m...

  8. Growth condition-dependent Esp expression by Enterococcus faecium affects initial adherence and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wamel, Willem J B; Hendrickx, Antoni P A; Bonten, Marc J M; Top, Janetta; Posthuma, George; Willems, Rob J L

    2007-02-01

    A genetic subpopulation of Enterococcus faecium, called clonal complex 17 (CC-17), is strongly associated with hospital outbreaks and invasive infections. Most CC-17 strains contain a putative pathogenicity island encoding the E. faecium variant of enterococcal surface protein (Esp). Western blotting, flow cytometric analyses, and electron microscopy showed that Esp is expressed and exposed on the surface of E. faecium, though Esp expression and surface exposure are highly varied among different strains. Furthermore, Esp expression depends on growth conditions like temperature and anaerobioses. When grown at 37 degrees C, five of six esp-positive E. faecium strains showed significantly increased levels of surface-exposed Esp compared to bacteria grown at 21 degrees C, which was confirmed at the transcriptional level by real-time PCR. In addition, a significant increase in surface-exposed Esp was found in half of these strains when grown at 37 degrees C under anaerobic conditions compared to the level in bacteria grown under aerobic conditions. Finally, amounts of surface-exposed Esp correlated with initial adherence to polystyrene (R(2) = 0.7146) and biofilm formation (R(2) = 0.7535). Polystyrene adherence was competitively inhibited by soluble recombinant N-terminal Esp. This study demonstrates that Esp expression on the surface of E. faecium (i) varies consistently between strains, (ii) is growth condition dependent, and (iii) is quantitatively correlated with initial adherence and biofilm formation. These data indicate that E. faecium senses and responds to changing environmental conditions, which might play a role in the early stages of infection when bacteria transit from oxygen-rich conditions at room temperature to anaerobic conditions at body temperature. In addition, variation of surface exposure may explain the contrasting findings reported on the role of Esp in biofilm formation.

  9. Dose-dependent regulation of target gene expression and cell proliferation by c-Myc levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhmacher, Marino; Eick, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    The proto-oncogene c-myc encodes a basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factor (c-Myc). c-Myc plays a crucial role in cell growth and proliferation. Here, we examined how expression of c-Myc target genes and cell proliferation depend on variation of c-Myc protein levels. We show that proliferation rates, the number of cells in S-phase, and cell size increased in a dose-dependent manner in response to increasing c-Myc levels. Likewise, the mRNA levels of c-Myc responsive genes steadily increased with rising c-Myc levels. Strikingly, steady-state mRNA levels of c-Myc target genes did not saturate even at highest c-Myc concentrations. These characteristics predestine c-Myc levels as a cellular rheostat for the control and fine-tuning of cell proliferation and growth rates.

  10. Analysis of hepatitis C virus core/NS5A protein co-localization using novel cell culture systems expressing core-NS2 and NS5A of genotypes 1-7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Andrea; Scheel, Troels K H; Prentoe, Jannick C

    2013-01-01

    JFH1-based recombinants expressing core-NS2 and NS5A from genotypes 1-7, and analysed core and NS5A co-localization in infected cells. Huh7.5 cells were transfected with RNA of core-NS2/NS5A recombinants and putative adaptive mutations were analysed by reverse genetics. Adapted core-NS2/NS5A...

  11. Activity-Dependent Bidirectional Regulation of GAD Expression in a Homeostatic Fashion Is Mediated by BDNF-Dependent and Independent Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanno-Iijima, Yoko; Tanaka, Masami; Iijima, Takatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic synaptic plasticity, or synaptic scaling, is a mechanism that tunes neuronal transmission to compensate for prolonged, excessive changes in neuronal activity. Both excitatory and inhibitory neurons undergo homeostatic changes based on synaptic transmission strength, which could effectively contribute to a fine-tuning of circuit activity. However, gene regulation that underlies homeostatic synaptic plasticity in GABAergic (GABA, gamma aminobutyric) neurons is still poorly understood. The present study demonstrated activity-dependent dynamic scaling in which NMDA-R (N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor) activity regulated the expression of GABA synthetic enzymes: glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and 67 (GAD65 and GAD67). Results revealed that activity-regulated BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) release is necessary, but not sufficient, for activity-dependent up-scaling of these GAD isoforms. Bidirectional forms of activity-dependent GAD expression require both BDNF-dependent and BDNF-independent pathways, both triggered by NMDA-R activity. Additional results indicated that these two GAD genes differ in their responsiveness to chronic changes in neuronal activity, which could be partially caused by differential dependence on BDNF. In parallel to activity-dependent bidirectional scaling in GAD expression, the present study further observed that a chronic change in neuronal activity leads to an alteration in neurotransmitter release from GABAergic neurons in a homeostatic, bidirectional fashion. Therefore, the differential expression of GAD65 and 67 during prolonged changes in neuronal activity may be implicated in some aspects of bidirectional homeostatic plasticity within mature GABAergic presynapses.

  12. Profiling of REST-dependent microRNAs reveals dynamic modes of expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengliang eGao

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Multipotent neural stem cells (NSCs possess the ability to self-renew and differentiate into both neurons and glia. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying NSC fate decisions are not well understood. Recent work suggest that the interaction between cell-type specific transcription factors and microRNAs (miRNAs is important as resident neural stem/progenitor cells give rise to functionally mature neurons. Recently, we demonstrated that the transcriptional repressor REST (RE1-silencing transcription factor is essential to prevent precocious neuronal differentiation and maintain NSC self-renewal in the adult hippocampus. Here we show that REST is required for orchestrating the expression of distinct subsets of miRNAs in primary mouse NSC cultures, a physiologically relevant cell type. Using miRNA array profiling, we identified known REST-regulated miRNA genes, as well as previously uncharacterized REST-dependent miRNAs. Interestingly, REST-regulated miRNAs undergo dynamic expression changes under differentiation conditions over time, but not under proliferation conditions. These results suggest that REST functions in a context-dependent manner through its target miRNAs for mediating neuronal production.

  13. KCNE gene expression is dependent on the proliferation and mode of activation of leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé, Laura; Vallejo-Gracia, Albert; Roig, Sara R; Serrano-Albarrás, Antonio; Marruecos, Laura; Manils, Joan; Gómez, Diana; Soler, Concepció; Felipe, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-dependent K (+) (Kv) channels are tightly regulated during the immune system response. Leukocytes have a limited repertoire of Kv channels, whose physiological role is under intense investigation. A functional Kv channel is an oligomeric complex composed of pore-forming and ancillary subunits. The KCNE gene family is a novel group of modulatory Kv channel elements in leukocytes. Here, we characterized the gene expression of KCNEs (1-5) in leukocytes and investigated their regulation during leukocyte proliferation and mode of activation. Murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages, human Jurkat T-lymphocytes and human Raji B-cells were analyzed. KCNEs (1-5) are expressed in all leukocytes lineages. Most KCNE mRNAs show cell cycle-dependent regulation and are differentially regulated under specific insults. Our results further suggest a new and yet undefined physiological role for KCNE subunits in the immune system. Putative associations of these ancillary proteins with Kv channels would yield a wide variety of biophysically and pharmacologically distinct channels that fine-tune the immunological response.

  14. Differentiation-dependent expression of gelatinase B/matrix metalloproteinase-9 in trophoblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, T J; Albieri, A; Bevilacqua, E; Chapman, B M; Crane, L H; Hamlin, G P; Seiki, M; Soares, M J

    1999-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Rcho-1 trophoblast culture system as a model for studying trophoblast invasion and to examine stage-specific expression of enzyme(s) potentially participating in rat trophoblast giant cell invasive behavior. The invasive behavior of the differentiating Rcho-1 trophoblast cells was demonstrated using Matrigel invasion chambers. Gelatin zymography and Western blot analysis of conditioned medium from differentiating Rcho-1 trophoblast cell cultures and rat ectoplacental cone outgrowths revealed a differentiation-dependent increase in gelatinase B/matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9). Nothern blot and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses of Rcho-1 trophoblast or ectoplacental cone cells also showed increasing expression of MMP-9 accompanying cell differentiation. Rcho-1 trophoblast cells stably transfected with MMP-9 promoter/luciferase reporter constructs exhibited a differentiation-dependent increase in MMP-9 promoter activation. In conclusion, trophoblast giant cell differentiation is characterized by transcriptional activation of the MMP-9 gene and appearance of the invasive phenotype.

  15. Pathology-Dependent Effects Linked to Small Heat Shock Proteins Expression: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-P. Arrigo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Small heat shock proteins (small Hsps are stress-induced molecular chaperones that act as holdases towards polypeptides that have lost their folding in stress conditions or consequently of mutations in their coding sequence. A cellular protection against the deleterious effects mediated by damaged proteins is thus provided to cells. These chaperones are also highly expressed in response to protein conformational and inflammatory diseases and cancer pathologies. Through specific and reversible modifications in their phospho-oligomeric organization, small Hsps can chaperone appropriate client proteins in order to provide cells with resistance to different types of injuries or pathological conditions. By helping cells to better cope with their pathological status, their expression can be either beneficial, such as in diseases characterized by pathological cell degeneration, or deleterious when they are required for tumor cell survival. Moreover, small Hsps are actively released by cells and can act as immunogenic molecules that have dual effects depending on the pathology. The cellular consequences linked to their expression levels and relationships with other Hsps as well as therapeutic strategies are discussed in view of their dynamic structural organization required to interact with specific client polypeptides.

  16. Gender-dependent Expression of Murine Irf5 Gene: Implications for Sex Bias in Autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui; Panchanathan, Ravichandran; Rajavelu, Priya; Duan, Xin; Gould, Karen A.; Choubey, Divaker

    2010-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms that contribute to sex bias in the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease, remain unknown. We found that the expression levels of interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5), a lupus susceptibility factor, depend on gender of mice. We found that steady-state levels of the Irf5 mRNA were relatively higher in splenic cells from certain autoimmune-prone mice (for example, NZB and NZB/W F1) than in non-autoimmune C57BL/6 mice. Additionally, levels of Irf5 mRNA and protein were higher in females than in strain and age-matched males. Accordingly, splenic cells from estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα) knockout, when compared with the wild-type (ERα+/+), female mice expressed relatively lower levels of Irf5 mRNA and the treatment of splenic cells with 17β-estradiol increased the levels. Furthermore, splenic B cells from the female mice had relatively more IRF5 protein in the nucleus than the male mice. Collectively, our observations demonstrate a gender bias in the expression and sub-cellular localization of the murine IRF5. PMID:20802013

  17. Targeting Activation of Specific NF-κB Subunits Prevents Stress-Dependent Atherothrombotic Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuric, Zdenka; Kashif, Muhammed; Fleming, Thomas; Muhammad, Sajjad; Piel, David; von Bauer, Rüdiger; Bea, Florian; Herzig, Stephan; Zeier, Martin; Pizzi, Marina; Isermann, Berend; Hecker, Markus; Schwaninger, Markus; Bierhaus, Angelika; Nawroth, Peter P

    2012-01-01

    Psychosocial stress has been shown to be a contributing factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Although the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated entirely, it has been shown previously that the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is an important component of stress-activated signaling pathway. In this study, we aimed to decipher the mechanisms of stress-induced NF-κB-mediated gene expression, using an in vitro and in vivo model of psychosocial stress. Induction of stress led to NF-κB-dependent expression of proinflammatory (tissue factor, intracellular adhesive molecule 1 [ICAM-1]) and protective genes (manganese superoxide dismutase [MnSOD]) via p50, p65 or cRel. Selective inhibition of the different subunits and the respective kinases showed that inhibition of cRel leads to the reduction of atherosclerotic lesions in apolipoprotein−/− (ApoE−/−) mice via suppression of proinflammatory gene expression. This observation may therefore provide a possible explanation for ineffectiveness of antioxidant therapies and suggests that selective targeting of cRel activation may provide a novel approach for the treatment of stress-related inflammatory vascular disease. PMID:23114885

  18. The Impact of IL28B Genotype and Liver Fibrosis on the Hepatic Expression of IP10, IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 and Their Association with Treatment Outcomes in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagalski, Krzysztof; Pawłowska, Małgorzata; Kozielewicz, Dorota; Dybowska, Dorota; Tretyn, Andrzej; Halota, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    The strong impact of interleukin 28B (IL28B) polymorphisms on sustained virological response (SVR) after peginterferon and ribavirin treatment in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is well-known. We investigated IL28B variability and hepatic expression of IP10, IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 in CHC patients, the relation of each with their clinical characteristics, and how they associated with responses to combined therapy. Genotyping and gene expression analysis were conducted in a selected cohort of treatment-naïve patients who underwent interferon and ribavirin treatment. Differential expression of IP10, IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 genes was assessed from pretreatment liver biopsies using quantitative PCR. Histopathological evaluation of liver specimens was performed on the basis of the Scheuer's modified scale. We showed that hepatic IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 expression was lower in the IL28B CC 12979860 and TT rs8099917 groups than in the CT-TT rs12979860 and TG-GG rs8099917 groups (P 0.05); in contrast, IP10 expression was significantly affected by the progression of fibrosis (P = 0.007). We showed that the rs12979860 CC genotype was associated with successful treatment when compared to the rs12979860 CT-TT genotype (P = 0.004). Additionally, the expression levels of IP10, IFI27 and ISG15, but not MX1, were significantly higher in non-SVR patients than in SVR patients. The effect of variation in IL28B on the results of IFN-based treatment may be associated with changes in IFI27 and ISG15, but not with IP10. Silencing of IP10 is positive and independent from IL28B prediction of SVR, which is strongly associated with liver fibrosis in CHC patients.

  19. The Impact of IL28B Genotype and Liver Fibrosis on the Hepatic Expression of IP10, IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 and Their Association with Treatment Outcomes in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Domagalski

    Full Text Available The strong impact of interleukin 28B (IL28B polymorphisms on sustained virological response (SVR after peginterferon and ribavirin treatment in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC is well-known. We investigated IL28B variability and hepatic expression of IP10, IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 in CHC patients, the relation of each with their clinical characteristics, and how they associated with responses to combined therapy. Genotyping and gene expression analysis were conducted in a selected cohort of treatment-naïve patients who underwent interferon and ribavirin treatment. Differential expression of IP10, IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 genes was assessed from pretreatment liver biopsies using quantitative PCR. Histopathological evaluation of liver specimens was performed on the basis of the Scheuer's modified scale. We showed that hepatic IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 expression was lower in the IL28B CC 12979860 and TT rs8099917 groups than in the CT-TT rs12979860 and TG-GG rs8099917 groups (P 0.05; in contrast, IP10 expression was significantly affected by the progression of fibrosis (P = 0.007. We showed that the rs12979860 CC genotype was associated with successful treatment when compared to the rs12979860 CT-TT genotype (P = 0.004. Additionally, the expression levels of IP10, IFI27 and ISG15, but not MX1, were significantly higher in non-SVR patients than in SVR patients. The effect of variation in IL28B on the results of IFN-based treatment may be associated with changes in IFI27 and ISG15, but not with IP10. Silencing of IP10 is positive and independent from IL28B prediction of SVR, which is strongly associated with liver fibrosis in CHC patients.

  20. Expression profiling the temperature-dependent amphibian response to infection by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

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    Laia Ribas

    Full Text Available Amphibians are experiencing a panzootic of unprecedented proportions caused by the emergence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd. However, all species are not equally at risk of infection, and risk is further modified by environmental variables, specifically temperature. In order to understand how, and when, hosts mount a response to Bd we analysed infection dynamics and patterns of gene expression in the model amphibian species Silurana (Xenopus tropicalis. Mathematical modelling of infection dynamics demonstrate the existence of a temperature-dependent protective response that is largely independent of the intrinsic growth-rate of Bd. Using temporal expression-profiling by microarrays and qRT-PCR, we characterise this response in the main amphibian lymphoid tissue, the spleen. We demonstrate that clearance of Bd at the host-optimal temperature is not clearly associated with an adaptive immune response, but rather is correlated with the induction of components of host innate immunity including the expression of genes that are associated with the production of the antimicrobial skin peptide preprocareulein (PPCP as well as inflammatory responses. We find that adaptive immunity appears to be lacking at host-optimal temperatures. This suggests that either Bd does not stimulate, or suppresses, adaptive immunity, or that trade-offs exist between innate and adaptive limbs of the amphibian immune system. At cold temperatures, S. tropicalis loses the ability to mount a PPCP-based innate response, and instead manifests a more pronounced inflammatory reaction that is characterised by the production of proteases and higher pathogen burdens. This study demonstrates the temperature-dependency of the amphibian response to infection by Bd and indicates the influence that changing climates may exert on the ectothermic host response to pathogens.

  1. Multicenter collaborative study for standardization of Candida albicans genotyping using a polymorphic microsatellite marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Hermoso, Dea; MacCallum, Donna M; Lott, Timothy J; Sampaio, Paula; Serna, Maria-José Buitrago; Grenouillet, Fréderic; Klaassen, Corné H W; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2010-07-01

    Microsatellite-based genotyping for Candida albicans can give discrepant results between laboratories when expressed in fragment sizes, because their determination depends on electrophoretic conditions. The interlaboratory reproducibility was assessed in six laboratories provided with an allelic ladder. Despite variations in size determinations, alleles were correctly assigned, making data transportable between laboratories.

  2. Water Channels Aquaporin 4 and -1 Expression in Subependymoma Depends on the Localization of the Tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Noell

    Full Text Available We analyzed aquaporin 4 and -1 expression in subependymomas, benign and slow growing brain tumors WHO grade I. Ten subependymoma cases were investigated, five of the fossa inferior and five of the fossa superior.Using immunohistochemistry, we observed different aquaporin expression patterns depending on localization: aquaporin 4 and -1 were detected in infratentorial subependymomas in the entire tumor tissue. In contrast, supratentorial subependymomas revealed aquaporin 4 and -1 expression only in border areas of the tumor. PCR analyses however showed no difference in aquaporin 4 expression between all subependymomas independent of localization but at higher levels than in normal brain. In contrast, aquaporin 1 RNA levels were found to be higher only in infratentorial samples compared to supratentorial and normal brain samples. The reason for the different distribution pattern of aquaporin 4 in subependymomas still remains unclear. On the cellular level, aquaporin 4 was redistributed on the surface of the tumor cells, and in freeze fracture replicas no orthogonal arrays of particles were found. This was similar to our previous findings in malignant glioblastomas. From these studies, we know that extracellular matrix molecules within the tumor like agrin and its receptor alpha-dystroglycan are involved in forming orthogonal arrays of particles. In subependymomas neither agrin nor alpha-dystroglycan were detected around blood vessels.Taken together, we show in this study that in the benign subependymomas aquaporins 1 and 4 are dramatically redistributed and upregulated. We speculate that extracellular environments of infra- and supratentorial subependymomas are different and lead to different distribution patterns of aquaporin 4 and -1.

  3. Development and application of hepatitis C reporter viruses with genotype 1 to 7 core-nonstructural protein 2 (NS2) expressing fluorescent proteins or luciferase in modified JFH1 NS5A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottwein, Judith M; Jensen, Tanja B; Mathiesen, Christian K; Meuleman, Philip; Serre, Stephanie B N; Lademann, Jacob B; Ghanem, Lubna; Scheel, Troels K H; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Bukh, Jens

    2011-09-01

    To facilitate genotype-specific high-throughput studies of hepatitis C virus (HCV), we have developed reporter viruses using JFH1-based recombinants expressing core-nonstructural protein 2 (NS2) of genotype 1 to 7 prototype isolates. We introduced enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) into NS5A domain III of the genotype 2a virus J6/JFH1 [2a(J6)]. During Huh7.5 cell culture adaptation, 2a(J6)-EGFP acquired a 40-amino-acid (aa) (Δ40) or 25-aa (Δ25) deletion in NS5A domain II, rescuing the impairment of viral assembly caused by the EGFP insertion. Δ40 conferred efficient growth characteristics to 2a(J6) tagged with EGFP, DsRed-Express2, mCherry, or Renilla luciferase (RLuc), yielding peak supernatant infectivity titers of 4 to 5 log(10) focus-forming units (FFU)/ml. 2a(J6) with Δ40 or Δ25 was fully viable in Huh7.5 cells. In human liver chimeric mice, 2a(J6)-EGFPΔ40 acquired various deletions in EGFP, while 2a(J6)Δ40 did not show an impaired viability. We further developed panels of JFH1-based genotype 1 to 7 core-NS2 recombinants expressing EGFP- or RLuc-NS5AΔ40 fusion proteins. In cell culture, the different EGFP recombinants showed growth characteristics comparable to those of the nontagged recombinants, with peak infectivity titers of 4 to 5 log(10) FFU/ml. RLuc recombinants showed slightly less efficient growth characteristics, with peak infectivity titers up to 10-fold lower. Overall, the EGFP and RLuc recombinants were genetically stable after one viral passage. The usefulness of these reporter viruses for high-throughput fluorescence- and luminescence-based studies of HCV-receptor interactions and serum-neutralizing antibodies was demonstrated. Finally, using RLuc viruses, we showed that the genotype-specific core-NS2 sequence did not influence the response to alfa-2b interferon (IFN-alfa-2b) and that genotype 1 to 7 viruses all responded to treatment with p7 ion channel inhibitors.

  4. Below and beyond the recognition of emotional facial expressions in alcohol dependence: from basic perception to social cognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D'Hondt, Fabien; Campanella, Salvatore; Kornreich, Charles; Philippot, Pierre; Maurage, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Studies that have carried out experimental evaluation of emotional skills in alcohol-dependence have, up to now, been mainly focused on the exploration of emotional facial expressions (EFE) decoding...

  5. Over Expression of Voltage Dependent Anion Channel 2 (VDAC2 in Muscles of Electrically Stunned Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norshahida Abu Samah, Azura Amid, and Faridah Yusof

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Water bath stunning is a common practice in commercial slaughterhouses. Such treatment is economic and in line with animal welfare practice. However, the conditions applied for the stunning process may vary from a slaughterhouse to another slaughterhouse. Such a loose regulation on the stunning procedure has opened up doors for food adulteration such as over dose stunning. In this study, a simple and reliable approach using proteomics have been developed to study the effect of different currents and voltages in stunning on the protein expression of the chickens. Protein profiles of the chickens were constructed in order to detect any differences in protein expression and modifications. The different voltage studied were 10 V, 40 V and 70 V while the values for current studied were 0.25 A, 0.5 A, and 0.75 A. After the proteomics analyses using 2D Platinum ImageMaster 6.0 and Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization- time of flight (MALDI TOF spectrometry identification, Voltage dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2 was identified to be over expressed in the muscle sample of over stunned chicken. The over expression of VDAC2 was confirmed at the transcriptional level of RNA expression. Real Time PCR showed that all over stunned samples contained higher mRNA expression level for VDAC2 genes. The mRNA level of VDAC2 was up-regulated by 59.87 fold change when normalized with housekeeping gene. In conclusion, VDAC2 could serve as potential biomarkers for identification of electrically stimulated chickens. The existence of these biomarkers will help to monitor the slaughtering and stunning process in the future. It will revolutionize the food authentication field and give a new breathe to the meat industry.ABSTRAK: Kaedah "waterbath stunning" merupakan amalan biasa di pusat-pusat penyembelihan. Kaedah ini adalah ekonomik dan selari dengan amalan kebajikan haiwan. Walaubagaimanapun, syarat-syarat yang digunakan untuk proses kejutan tersebut mungkin

  6. Two mechanisms for putrescine-dependent transcriptional expression of the putrescine aminotransferase gene, ygjG, in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Sik; Shin, Hyun-Chul; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2014-09-01

    In this study, on evaluating the physiological function and mechanism of putrescine, we found that putrescine supplementation (1 mM) increases transcription of the putrescine aminotransferase gene, ygjG. Putrescine-dependent expression was confirmed by measuring β-galactosidase activity and with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. To understand the role of putrescine in ygjG expression, we genetically characterized and found that a knockout mutation in an alternative sigma factor, rpoS, abolished putrescine-dependent ygjG-lacZ expression. In the rpoS mutant, RpoS overexpression complemented the mutant phenotype. However, RpoS overexpression induced ygjG-lacZ expression with putrescine supplementation but not without supplementation. We also found that the loss of putrescine-dependent ygjG-lacZ expression induced by rpoS was completely restored under nitrogen-starvation conditions. The putrescine-dependent expression of ygjG-lacZ under this condition was clearly dependent on another alternative sigma factor, rpoN, and its cognate activator ntrC. These results show that rpoS is required for putrescine-dependent ygjG-lacZ expression, but the effect of putrescine on this expression is not caused by simple modulation of RpoS synthesis. Putrescine-dependent expression of ygjG-lacZ was controlled by at least two sigma factors: rpoS under excess nitrogen conditions and rpoN under nitrogen-starvation conditions. These results suggest that putrescine plays an important role in the nitrogen regulation system.

  7. Chloromethane-dependent expression of the cmu gene cluster of Hyphomicrobium chloromethanicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodina, Elena; McDonald, Ian R; Murrell, J Colin

    2004-07-01

    The methylotrophic bacterium Hyphomicrobium chloromethanicum CM2 can utilize chloromethane (CH(3)Cl) as the sole carbon and energy source. Previously genes cmuB, cmuC, cmuA, and folD were shown to be essential for the growth of Methylobacterium chloromethanicum on CH(3)Cl. These CH(3)Cl-specific genes were subsequently detected in H. chloromethanicum. Transposon and marker exchange mutagenesis studies were carried out to identify the genes essential for CH(3)Cl metabolism in H. chloromethanicum. New developments in genetic manipulation of Hyphomicrobium are presented in this study. An electroporation protocol has been optimized and successfully applied for transformation of mutagenesis plasmids into H. chloromethanicum to generate stable CH(3)Cl-negative mutants. Both transposon and marker exchange mutageneses were highly applicable for genetic analysis of Hyphomicrobium. A reliable and reproducible selection procedure for screening of CH(3)Cl utilization-negative mutants has also been developed. Mutational inactivation of cmuB, cmuC, or hutI resulted in strains that were unable to utilize CH(3)Cl or to express the CH(3)Cl-dependent polypeptide CmuA. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that cmuB, cmuC, cmuA, fmdB, paaE, hutI, and metF formed a single cmuBCA-metF operon and were coregulated and coexpressed in H. chloromethanicum. This finding led to the conclusion that, in cmuB and cmuC mutants, impaired expression of cmuA was likely to be due to a polar effect of the defective gene (cmuB or cmuC) located upstream (5') of cmuA. The detrimental effect of mutation in hutI on the upstream (5')-located cmuA is not clear but indicated that all the genes located within the cmuBCA-metF operon are coordinately expressed. Expression of the cmuBCA-metF transcript was also shown to be strictly CH(3)Cl inducible and was not repressed by the alternative C(1) substrate methanol. Sequence analysis of a transposon mutant (D20) led to the discovery of the previously

  8. Neural crest and mesoderm lineage-dependent gene expression in orofacial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacherjee, Vasker; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Singh, Saurabh; Johnson, Charles; Philipose, John T; Warner, Courtney P; Greene, Robert M; Pisano, M Michele

    2007-06-01

    profiles of neural crest- and mesoderm-derived mesenchymal cells from the first branchial arch revealed over 140 genes that exhibited statistically significant differential levels of expression. The gene products of many of these differentially expressed genes have previously been linked to the development of mesoderm- or neural crest-derived tissues in the embryo. Interestingly, however, hitherto uncharacterized coding sequences with highly significant differences in expression between the two embryonic progenitor cell types were also identified. These lineage-dependent mesenchymal cell molecular fingerprints offer the opportunity to elucidate additional mechanisms governing cellular growth, differentiation, and morphogenesis of the embryonic orofacial region. The chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1, (SDF-1), was found to exhibit greater expression in mesoderm-derived mesenchyme in the branchial arch when compared with neurectoderm, suggesting a possible chemotactic role for SDF-1 in guiding the migratory neural crest cells to their destination. The novel combination of genetic labeling of the neural crest cell population by EGFP coupled with isolation of cells by LCM for gene expression analysis has enabled, for the first time, the generation of gene expression profiles of distinct embryonic cell lineages.

  9. Aging, Alzheimer’s, and APOE genotype influence the expression and neuronal distribution patterns of microtubule motor protein dynactin-P50

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orwa eAboud

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Reports from neural cell cultures and experimental animal studies provide evidence of age- and disease-related changes in retrograde transport of spent or misfolded proteins destined for degradation or recycling. However, few studies address these issues in human brain from those who either age without dementia and overt neuropathology, or succumb to Alzheimer’s; especially as such propensity may be influenced by APOE genotype. We studied the expression and distribution of the dynein subunit dynactin-P50, the β amyloid precursor protein (βAPP, and hyperphosphorylated tau (P-tau in tissues and tissue sections of brains from non-demented, neuropathology-free patients and from Alzheimer patients, with either APOE ε3,3 or APOE ε4,4. We found that advanced age in patients without dementia or neuropathological change was associated with coordinated increases in dynactin-P50 and βAPP in neurons in pyramidal layers of the hippocampus. In contrast, in Alzheimer’s, βAPP and dynactin were significantly reduced. Furthermore, the dynactin-P50 and βAPP that was present was located primarily in dystrophic neurites in Aβ plaques. Tissues from Alzheimer patients with APOE ε3,3 had less P-tau, more βAPP, dynactin-P50, and synaptophysin than did tissues from Alzheimer patients carrying APOE ε4,4. It is logical to conclude, then, that as neurons age successfully, there is coordination between retrograde delivery and maintenance and repair, as well as between retrograde delivery and degradation and/or recycling of spent proteins. The buildup of proteins slated for repair, synaptic viability, transport, and re-cycling in neuron soma and dystrophic neurites suggest a loss of this coordination in Alzheimer neurons. Inheritance of APOE ε3,3 rather than APOE ε4,4, is associated with neuronal resilience, suggestive of better repair capabilities, more synapses, more efficient transport, and less hyperphosphorylation of tau. We conclude that even in disease

  10. Where is the extended phenotype in the wild? The community composition of arthropods on mature oak trees does not depend on the oak genotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin M Gossner

    Full Text Available Through a series of common garden experiments, it has been shown that heritable phenotypic differences between individual trees can affect arthropod communities. However, field studies under heterogeneous environmental conditions remain rare. In the present study, we investigated the genetic constitution of 121 mature oak host trees at different trophic levels from 10 sites across Bavaria, southern Germany and their associated insect communities. A total of 23,576 individuals representing 395 species of beetles and true bugs were evaluated. In particular, we determined whether the composition of arthropod communities is related to the oak genotype and whether the strength of the relationships decreases from lower to higher trophic levels, such as for phytophagous, xylophagous, zoophagous, and mycetophagous species. The genetic differentiation of oaks was assessed using eight microsatellite markers. We found no significant influence of the oak genotype on neither the full beetle and true bug community nor on any of the analyzed trophic guilds. In contrast, the community composition of the insects was highly related to the space and climate, such that the community similarity decreased with increases in spatial distance and climatic differences. The relationship with space and climate was much stronger in beetles than in true bugs, particularly in mycetophagous species. Our results suggest that spatial processes override the genetic effects of the host plant in structuring arthropod communities on oak trees. Because we used neutral markers, we cannot exclude the possibility that trait-specific markers may reveal a genetic imprint of the foundation tree species on the composition of the arthropod community. However, based on the strength of the spatial patterns in our data set, we assume that genetic differences among oaks are less important in the structuring of arthropod communities. Future whole-genome studies are required to draw a final

  11. Age-dependent brain gene expression and copy number anomalies in autism suggest distinct pathological processes at young versus mature ages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie L Chow

    Full Text Available Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, yet the genetic underpinnings of the disorder are largely unknown. Aberrant brain overgrowth is a well-replicated observation in the autism literature; but association, linkage, and expression studies have not identified genetic factors that explain this trajectory. Few studies have had sufficient statistical power to investigate whole-genome gene expression and genotypic variation in the autistic brain, especially in regions that display the greatest growth abnormality. Previous functional genomic studies have identified possible alterations in transcript levels of genes related to neurodevelopment and immune function. Thus, there is a need for genetic studies involving key brain regions to replicate these findings and solidify the role of particular functional pathways in autism pathogenesis. We therefore sought to identify abnormal brain gene expression patterns via whole-genome analysis of mRNA levels and copy number variations (CNVs in autistic and control postmortem brain samples. We focused on prefrontal cortex tissue where excess neuron numbers and cortical overgrowth are pronounced in the majority of autism cases. We found evidence for dysregulation in pathways governing cell number, cortical patterning, and differentiation in young autistic prefrontal cortex. In contrast, adult autistic prefrontal cortex showed dysregulation of signaling and repair pathways. Genes regulating cell cycle also exhibited autism-specific CNVs in DNA derived from prefrontal cortex, and these genes were significantly associated with autism in genome-wide association study datasets. Our results suggest that CNVs and age-dependent gene expression changes in autism may reflect distinct pathological processes in the developing versus the mature autistic prefrontal cortex. Our results raise the hypothesis that genetic dysregulation in the developing brain leads to abnormal regional patterning, excess

  12. Age-dependent brain gene expression and copy number anomalies in autism suggest distinct pathological processes at young versus mature ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Maggie L; Pramparo, Tiziano; Winn, Mary E; Barnes, Cynthia Carter; Li, Hai-Ri; Weiss, Lauren; Fan, Jian-Bing; Murray, Sarah; April, Craig; Belinson, Haim; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Schork, Nicholas J; Courchesne, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, yet the genetic underpinnings of the disorder are largely unknown. Aberrant brain overgrowth is a well-replicated observation in the autism literature; but association, linkage, and expression studies have not identified genetic factors that explain this trajectory. Few studies have had sufficient statistical power to investigate whole-genome gene expression and genotypic variation in the autistic brain, especially in regions that display the greatest growth abnormality. Previous functional genomic studies have identified possible alterations in transcript levels of genes related to neurodevelopment and immune function. Thus, there is a need for genetic studies involving key brain regions to replicate these findings and solidify the role of particular functional pathways in autism pathogenesis. We therefore sought to identify abnormal brain gene expression patterns via whole-genome analysis of mRNA levels and copy number variations (CNVs) in autistic and control postmortem brain samples. We focused on prefrontal cortex tissue where excess neuron numbers and cortical overgrowth are pronounced in the majority of autism cases. We found evidence for dysregulation in pathways governing cell number, cortical patterning, and differentiation in young autistic prefrontal cortex. In contrast, adult autistic prefrontal cortex showed dysregulation of signaling and repair pathways. Genes regulating cell cycle also exhibited autism-specific CNVs in DNA derived from prefrontal cortex, and these genes were significantly associated with autism in genome-wide association study datasets. Our results suggest that CNVs and age-dependent gene expression changes in autism may reflect distinct pathological processes in the developing versus the mature autistic prefrontal cortex. Our results raise the hypothesis that genetic dysregulation in the developing brain leads to abnormal regional patterning, excess prefrontal neurons

  13. Depth-dependent expression of obliquely incident wave induced radiation stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The vertically dependent expressions of obliquely incident waves induced radiation stress are derived by use of the second order Stokes wave theory within three regions of the water column, that is, above the mean water level, below the wave trough level, and between these two levels. Computations indicate that the wave-induced radiation stress below the wave trough level is from the water wave particle velocity only, whereas both the water wave particle velocity and the wave pressure contribute to the tensor above the wave trough level; the vertical variations of the wave-induced radiation stress are influenced substantially by the velocity component in the direction of wave propagation; the distributions of the wave-induced radiation stress tensor over depth are non-uniform and the proportion of the tensor below the wave trough level becomes considerable in the shallow water; from water surface to seabed, the reversed variations occur for the predominant tensor components.

  14. TAT-mediated intracellular protein delivery to primary brain cells is dependent on glycosaminoglycan expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Melissa J; Gao, Shan; Kang, Woo Hyeun; Banta, Scott; Morrison, Barclay

    2009-09-01

    Although some studies have shown that the cell penetrating peptide (CPP) TAT can enter a variety of cell lines with high efficiency, others have observed little or no transduction in vivo or in vitro under conditions mimicking the in vivo environment. The mechanisms underlying TAT-mediated transduction have been investigated in cell lines, but not in primary brain cells. In this study we demonstrate that transduction of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-TAT fusion protein is dependent on glycosaminoglycan (GAG) expression in both the PC12 cell line and primary astrocytes. GFP-TAT transduced PC12 cells and did so with even higher efficiency following NGF differentiation. In cultures of primary brain cells, TAT significantly enhanced GFP delivery into astrocytes grown under different conditions: (1) monocultures grown in serum-containing medium; (2) monocultures grown in serum-free medium; (3) cocultures with neurons in serum-free medium. The efficiency of GFP-TAT transduction was significantly higher in the monocultures than in the cocultures. The GFP-TAT construct did not significantly enter neurons. Experimental modulation of GAG content correlated with alterations in TAT transduction in PC12 cells and astrocyte monocultures grown in the presence of serum. In addition, this correlation was predictive of TAT-mediated transduction in astrocyte monocultures grown in serum free medium and in coculture. We conclude that culture conditions affect cellular GAG expression, which in turn dictates TAT-mediated transduction efficiency, extending previous results from cell lines to primary cells. These results highlight the cell-type and phenotype-dependence of TAT-mediated transduction, and underscore the necessity of controlling the phenotype of the target cell in future protein engineering efforts aimed at creating more efficacious CPPs.

  15. Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayhan Azadmanesh

    2005-09-01

    throughout the viral genome(9.Genomic Organization of HCVThis virus has a positive-sense single-stranded RNA genome of about 10 kb containing one long open reading frame (ORF. All its proteins are encoded in a single open reading frame that encodes a polyprotein of approximately 3010 amino acids(10 (Fig. 1, with genes coding for structural proteins situated towards the N-terminus of the genome and non-structural genes located near the C-terminus. The structural genes code for the capsid protein (C, or Core and the envelope glycoproteins (E1, E2. The first 27 amino acids of the E2 gene constitute the hypervariable region 1 (HVR1, which is the most variable region of the genome and appears to be involved in virus evasion of the immune system and disease progression. The non-structural genes code for a protease (NS2, NS3 and its cofactor (NS4A, a helicase (NS3, a protein of unknown function (NS4B, a phosphoprotein (NS5A, and an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5B. In addition, the HCV genome has 5'-UTR and 3'- UTR untranslated regions (UTRs that are involved in control of viral translation. Correspondence:Malek H. Ahmadipour, Department of Hepatitis and AIDS,Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, IranTel: +98 21 6696 92 91Fax: +98 21 6646 51 32E-mail: m_ahmadipour@yahoo.com It has a complicated secondary structure comprised of at least seven stem-loops important for ribosome entry and presumably, for viral RNA replication(11, 12. The translation of HCV RNA begins at the internal ribosome entry site (IRES and at the 40S ribosomal subunit in the absence of external factors, which makes the HCV translation efficient(13. Thus, the secondary structure of IRES plays an important role in HCV replication(14, and single nucleotide changes within this region could alter viral replication characteristics. HCV replication via RNA-dependent RNApolymerase is very error-prone and generates mutations at an estimated rate of 10-5 mutations per nucleotide per replication. This high mutation rate is

  16. Construction of Nef-positive doxycycline-dependent HIV-1 variants using bicistronic expression elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velden, Yme U. van der; Kleibeuker, Wendy; Harwig, Alex; Klaver, Bep; Siteur-van Rijnstra, Esther; Frankin, Esmay; Berkhout, Ben; Das, Atze T., E-mail: a.t.das@amc.uva.nl

    2016-01-15

    Conditionally replicating HIV-1 variants that can be switched on and off at will are attractive tools for HIV research. We previously developed a genetically modified HIV-1 variant that replicates exclusively when doxycycline (dox) is administered. The nef gene in this HIV-rtTA variant was replaced with the gene encoding the dox-dependent rtTA transcriptional activator. Because loss of Nef expression compromises virus replication in primary cells and precludes studies on Nef function, we tested different approaches to restore Nef production in HIV-rtTA. Strategies that involved translation via an EMCV or synthetic internal ribosome entry site (IRES) failed because these elements were incompatible with efficient virus replication. Fusion protein approaches with the FMDV 2A peptide and human ubiquitin were successful and resulted in genetically-stable Nef-expressing HIV-rtTA strains that replicate more efficiently in primary T-cells and human immune system (HIS) mice than Nef-deficient variants, thus confirming the positive effect of Nef on in vivo virus replication. - Highlights: • Different approaches to encode additional proteins in the HIV-1 genome were tested. • IRES translation elements are incompatible with efficient HIV-1 replication. • Ubiquitin and 2A fusion protein approaches allow efficient HIV-1 replication. • Doxycycline-controlled HIV-1 variants that encode all viral proteins were developed. • Nef stimulates HIV-rtTA replication in primary cells and human immune system mice.

  17. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide induces cytokine expression, lipolysis, and insulin resistance in human adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timper, Katharina; Grisouard, Jean; Sauter, Nadine S; Herzog-Radimerski, Tanja; Dembinski, Kaethi; Peterli, Ralph; Frey, Daniel M; Zulewski, Henryk; Keller, Ulrich; Müller, Beat; Christ-Crain, Mirjam

    2013-01-01

    Obesity-related insulin resistance is linked to a chronic state of systemic and adipose tissue-derived inflammation. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is an incretin hormone also acting on adipocytes. We investigated whether GIP affects inflammation, lipolysis, and insulin resistance in human adipocytes. Human subcutaneous preadipocyte-derived adipocytes, differentiated in vitro, were treated with human GIP to analyze mRNA expression and protein secretion of cytokines, glycerol, and free fatty acid release and insulin-induced glucose uptake. GIP induced mRNA expression of IL-6, IL-1β, and the IL-1 receptor antagonist IL-1Ra, whereas TNFα, IL-8, and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 remained unchanged. Cytokine induction involved PKA and the NF-κB pathway as well as an autocrine IL-1 effect. Furthermore, GIP potentiated IL-6 and IL-1Ra secretion in the presence of LPS, IL-1β, and TNFα. GIP induced lipolysis via activation of hormone-sensitive lipase and was linked to NF-κB activation. Finally, chronic GIP treatment impaired insulin-induced glucose uptake possibly due to the observed impaired translocation of glucose transporter GLUT4. In conclusion, GIP induces an inflammatory and prolipolytic response via the PKA -NF-κB-IL-1 pathway and impairs insulin sensitivity of glucose uptake in human adipocytes.

  18. Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase expression and signalling in skeletal muscle during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Adam John; Kiens, Bente; Richter, Erik

    2006-01-01

    Ca2+ signalling is proposed to play an important role in skeletal muscle function during exercise. Here, we examined the expression of multifunctional Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMK) in human skeletal muscle and show that CaMKII and CaMKK, but not CaMKI or CaMKIV, are expressed....... Furthermore, the effect of exercise duration and intensity on skeletal muscle CaMKII activity and phosphorylation of downstream targets was examined. Eight healthy men exercised at ~67% of peak pulmonary O2 uptake (VO2peak) with muscle samples taken at rest and after 1, 10, 30, 60 and 90 min of exercise. Ten...... other men exercised for three consecutive 10 min bouts at 35%, 60% and 85% VO2peak with muscle samples taken at rest, at the end of each interval and 30 min post-exercise. There was a rapid and transient increase in autonomous CaMKII activity and CaMKII phosphorylation at Thr287 in skeletal muscle...

  19. PPARgamma-Dependent Control of Renin Expression: Molecular Mechanisms and Pathophysiological Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir T. Todorov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last years accumulating evidence demonstrated that the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma regulates the expression of renin gene and thus the overall renin production. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the transcriptional control of the renin gene by PPARgamma received from variety of models ranging from cell culture to transgenic animals. The molecular mechanisms of the PPARgamma action on renin are particularly interesting because they are featured by two newly described characteristics: one of them is the recently identified PPARgamma target sequence Pal3 which is specific for the human renin gene and mediates exceptionally high sensitivity to transactivation; the other is the potentiating effect of PPARgamma on the cAMP signaling in the renin-producing cells. Furthermore, I discuss the need for generating of additional transgenic animal models which are more appropriate with regard to the role of the PPARgamma-dependent regulation of the renin gene expression in human diseases such as arterial hypertension and metabolic syndrome.

  20. PPARgamma-Dependent Control of Renin Expression: Molecular Mechanisms and Pathophysiological Relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Vladimir T

    2013-01-01

    During the last years accumulating evidence demonstrated that the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) regulates the expression of renin gene and thus the overall renin production. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the transcriptional control of the renin gene by PPARgamma received from variety of models ranging from cell culture to transgenic animals. The molecular mechanisms of the PPARgamma action on renin are particularly interesting because they are featured by two newly described characteristics: one of them is the recently identified PPARgamma target sequence Pal3 which is specific for the human renin gene and mediates exceptionally high sensitivity to transactivation; the other is the potentiating effect of PPARgamma on the cAMP signaling in the renin-producing cells. Furthermore, I discuss the need for generating of additional transgenic animal models which are more appropriate with regard to the role of the PPARgamma-dependent regulation of the renin gene expression in human diseases such as arterial hypertension and metabolic syndrome.

  1. ClpE from Lactococcus lactis promotes repression of CtsR-dependent gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varmanen, P.; Vogensen, F.K.; Hammer, Karin;

    2003-01-01

    The heat shock response in bacterial cells is characterized by rapid induction of heat shock protein expression, followed by an adaptation period during which heat shock protein synthesis decreases to a new steady-state level. In this study we found that after a shift to a high temperature the Clp...... ATPase (ClpE) in Lactococcus lactis is required for such a decrease in expression of a gene negatively regulated by the heat shock regulator (CtsR). Northern blot analysis showed that while a shift to a high temperature in wild-type cells resulted in a temporal increase followed by a decrease......E by Western blot analysis revealed that at a high temperature CIpE is subjected to ClpP-dependent processing and that disruption of the zinc finger domain renders GpE more susceptible. Interestingly, this domain resembles the N-terminal region of McsA, which was recently reported to interact with the Cts...

  2. Interfering with TGFβ-induced Smad3 nuclear accumulation differentially affects TGFβ-dependent gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dittmer Jürgen

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ plays an important role in late-stage carcinogenesis by stimulating invasive behavior of cancer cells, promoting neo-angiogenesis and by helping cancer cells to escape surveillance by the immune system. It also supports colonization of the bone by metastatic breast cancer cells by increasing expression of osteolytic parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP. Interfering with TGFβ signalling may thus weaken the malignant properties of cancer cells. We investigated to what extent two inhibitors, SB-202190 and SB-203580, interfere with TGFβ-signalling in invasive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. These compounds, formerly used as p38-MAPK-specific inhibitors, were recently also demonstrated to inhibit TGFβ type I receptor kinase. Results Our results show that these inhibitors delay the onset of TGFβ-induced nuclear accumulation of Smad3 and reduces its amplitude. This effect was accompanied by a strong reduction in TGFβ-responsivess of the slow-responder genes pthrp, pai-1 and upa, while the reactivity of the fast-responder gene smad7 to TGFβ remained almost unchanged. Neither was the TGFβ response of the fast-responder ese-1/esx gene, whose expression we found to be strongly downregulated by TGFβ, affected by the inhibitors. Conclusion The data show that SB-202190 and SB-203580 suppress TGFβ-dependent activation of genes that are important for the acquisition of invasive behavior, while having no effect on the expression of the natural TGFβ inhibitor Smad7. This suggests that these compounds are potent inhibitors of malignant behavior of cancer cells.

  3. Dynamic emotional and neural responses to music depend on performance expression and listener experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, Heather; Jantzen, Kelly; Kelso, J A Scott; Steinberg, Fred; Large, Edward

    2010-12-16

    Apart from its natural relevance to cognition, music provides a window into the intimate relationships between production, perception, experience, and emotion. Here, emotional responses and neural activity were observed as they evolved together with stimulus parameters over several minutes. Participants listened to a skilled music performance that included the natural fluctuations in timing and sound intensity that musicians use to evoke emotional responses. A mechanical performance of the same piece served as a control. Before and after fMRI scanning, participants reported real-time emotional responses on a 2-dimensional rating scale (arousal and valence) as they listened to each performance. During fMRI scanning, participants listened without reporting emotional responses. Limbic and paralimbic brain areas responded to the expressive dynamics of human music performance, and both emotion and reward related activations during music listening were dependent upon musical training. Moreover, dynamic changes in timing predicted ratings of emotional arousal, as well as real-time changes in neural activity. BOLD signal changes correlated with expressive timing fluctuations in cortical and subcortical motor areas consistent with pulse perception, and in a network consistent with the human mirror neuron system. These findings show that expressive music performance evokes emotion and reward related neural activations, and that music's affective impact on the brains of listeners is altered by musical training. Our observations are consistent with the idea that music performance evokes an emotional response through a form of empathy that is based, at least in part, on the perception of movement and on violations of pulse-based temporal expectancies.

  4. PKR-dependent mechanisms of gene expression from a subgenomic hepatitis C virus clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Estilla, Ana Maria; Svitkin, Yuri; Lopez Lastra, Marcelo; Hatzoglou, Maria; Sherker, Averell; Koromilas, Antonis E

    2002-11-01

    Studies on hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication have been greatly advanced by the development of cell culture models for HCV known as replicon systems. The prototype replicon consists of a subgenomic HCV RNA in which the HCV structural region is replaced by the neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPTII) gene, and translation of the HCV proteins NS3 to NS5 is directed by the encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES). The interferon (IFN)-inducible protein kinase PKR plays an important role in cell defense against virus infection by impairing protein synthesis as a result of eIF-2alpha phosphorylation. Here, we show that expression of the viral nonstructural (NS) and PKR proteins and eIF-2alpha phosphorylation are all variably regulated in proliferating replicon Huh7 cells. In proliferating cells, induction of PKR protein by IFN-alpha is inversely proportional to viral RNA replication and NS protein expression, whereas eIF-2alpha phosphorylation is induced by IFN-alpha in proliferating but not in serum-starved replicon cells. The role of PKR and eIF-2alpha phosphorylation was further addressed in transient-expression assays in Huh7 cells. These experiments demonstrated that activation of PKR results in the inhibition of EMCV IRES-driven NS protein synthesis from the subgenomic viral clone through mechanisms that are independent of eIF-2alpha phosphorylation. Unlike NS proteins, HCV IRES-driven NPTII protein synthesis from the subgenomic clone was resistant to PKR activation. Interestingly, activation of PKR could induce HCV IRES-dependent mRNA translation from dicistronic constructs, but this stimulatory effect was mitigated by the presence of the viral 3' untranslated region. Thus, PKR may assume multiple roles in modulating HCV replication and protein synthesis, and tight control of PKR activity may play an important role in maintaining virus replication and allowing infection to evade the host's IFN system.

  5. Dynamic emotional and neural responses to music depend on performance expression and listener experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Chapin

    Full Text Available Apart from its natural relevance to cognition, music provides a window into the intimate relationships between production, perception, experience, and emotion. Here, emotional responses and neural activity were observed as they evolved together with stimulus parameters over several minutes. Participants listened to a skilled music performance that included the natural fluctuations in timing and sound intensity that musicians use to evoke emotional responses. A mechanical performance of the same piece served as a control. Before and after fMRI scanning, participants reported real-time emotional responses on a 2-dimensional rating scale (arousal and valence as they listened to each performance. During fMRI scanning, participants listened without reporting emotional responses. Limbic and paralimbic brain areas responded to the expressive dynamics of human music performance, and both emotion and reward related activations during music listening were dependent upon musical training. Moreover, dynamic changes in timing predicted ratings of emotional arousal, as well as real-time changes in neural activity. BOLD signal changes correlated with expressive timing fluctuations in cortical and subcortical motor areas consistent with pulse perception, and in a network consistent with the human mirror neuron system. These findings show that expressive music performance evokes emotion and reward related neural activations, and that music's affective impact on the brains of listeners is altered by musical training. Our observations are consistent with the idea that music performance evokes an emotional response through a form of empathy that is based, at least in part, on the perception of movement and on violations of pulse-based temporal expectancies.

  6. [Cadmium induces p53-dependent apoptosis through the inhibition of Ube2d family gene expression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokumoto, Maki; Satoh, Masahiko

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd), a harmful metal, exerts severe toxic effects on various tissues such as those in the kidney, liver, lung, and bone. In particular, renal toxicity with damage to proximal tubule cells is caused by chronic exposure to Cd. However, the molecular mechanism underlying chronic Cd renal toxicity remains to be understood. In this review, we present our recent findings since we examined to search for the target molecules involved in the renal toxicity of Cd using toxicogenomics. In NRK-52E rat renal tubular epithelial cells, we found using DNA microarrays that Cd suppressed the expression of the gene encoding Ube2d4, a member of the Ube2d family. The Ube2d family consists of selective ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes associated with p53 degradation. Moreover, Cd suppressed the expressions of genes encoding all Ube2d family members (Ube2d1/2/3/4) prior to the appearance of cytotoxicity in NRK-52E cells. Cd markedly increased p53 protein level and induced p53 phosphorylation and apoptosis in the cells. In vivo studies showed that chronic Cd exposure also suppressed Ube2d family gene expression and induced p53 accumulation and apoptosis in the renal tubules of the mouse kidney. These findings suggest that Cd causes p53-dependent apoptosis due to the inhibition of p53 degradation through the down-regulation of Ube2d family genes in NRK-52E cells and mouse kidney. Thus, the Ube2d family genes may be one of the key targets of renal toxicity caused by Cd.

  7. Interleukin-1-induced activation of the small GTPase Rac1 depends on receptor internalization and regulates gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windheim, Mark; Hansen, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) triggers the internalization of its cognate receptor from the plasma membrane. We recently demonstrated that this internalization is of critical importance for the IL-1-induced gene expression. In this study we report that the IL-1-induced activation of the small GTPase Rac1 requires receptor endocytosis. We further show that the depletion of Rac1 reduces the IL-1-dependent gene expression without affecting signaling events that are initiated at the plasma membrane. Collectively, we provide evidence for a key role of Rac1 in a pathway that regulates IL-1-induced gene expression depending on receptor endocytosis.

  8. ERK Oscillation-Dependent Gene Expression Patterns and Deregulation by Stress-Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, Katrina M.; Cummings, Brian S.; Shankaran, Harish; Scholpa, Natalie E.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2014-09-15

    Studies were undertaken to determine whether ERK oscillations regulate a unique subset of genes in human keratinocytes and subsequently, whether the p38 stress response inhibits ERK oscillations. A DNA microarray identified many genes that were unique to ERK oscillations, and network reconstruction predicted an important role for the mediator complex subunit 1 (MED1) node in mediating ERK oscillation-dependent gene expression. Increased ERK-dependent phosphorylation of MED1 was observed in oscillating cells compared to non-oscillating counterparts as validation. Treatment of keratinocytes with a p38 inhibitor (SB203580) increased ERK oscillation amplitudes and MED1 and phospho-MED1 protein levels. Bromate is a probable human carcinogen that activates p38. Bromate inhibited ERK oscillations in human keratinocytes and JB6 cells and induced an increase in phospho-p38 and decrease in phospho-MED1 protein levels. Treatment of normal rat kidney cells and primary salivary gland epithelial cells with bromate decreased phospho-MED1 levels in a reversible fashion upon treatment with p38 inhibitors (SB202190; SB203580). Our results indicate that oscillatory behavior in the ERK pathway alters homeostatic gene regulation patterns and that the cellular response to perturbation may manifest differently in oscillating vs non-oscillating cells.

  9. Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide modification, Lewis antigen expression, and gastric colonization are cholesterol-dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGee David J

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori specifically takes up cholesterol and incorporates it into the bacterial membrane, yet little is currently known about cholesterol's physiological roles. We compared phenotypes and in vivo colonization ability of H. pylori grown in a defined, serum-free growth medium, F12 with 1 mg/ml albumin containing 0 to 50 μg/ml cholesterol. Results While doubling times were largely unaffected by cholesterol, other overt phenotypic changes were observed. H. pylori strain SS1 grown in defined medium with cholesterol successfully colonized the stomach of gerbils, whereas SS1 grown without cholesterol failed to colonize. H. pylori lipopolysaccharide often displays Lewis X and/or Y antigens. Expression of these antigens measured by whole-cell ELISA was markedly enhanced in response to growth of strain SS1, 26695, or G27 in cholesterol. In addition, electrophoretic analysis of lipopolysaccharide in wild type G27 and in mutants lacking the O-chain revealed structural changes within the oligosaccharide core/lipid A moieties. These responses in Lewis antigen levels and in lipopolysaccharide profiles to cholesterol availability were highly specific, because no changes took place when cholesterol was substituted by β-sitosterol or bile salts. Disruption of the genes encoding cholesterol α-glucosyltransferase or lipid A phosphoethanolamine transferase had no effect on Lewis expression, nor on lipopolysaccharide profiles, nor on the cholesterol responsiveness of these properties. Disruption of the lipid A 1-phosphatase gene eliminated the effect of cholesterol on lipopolysaccharide profiles but not its effect on Lewis expression. Conclusions Together these results suggest that cholesterol depletion leads to aberrant forms of LPS that are dependent upon dephosphorylation of lipid A at the 1-position. A tentative model for the observed effects of cholesterol is discussed in which sequential steps of lipopolysaccharide biogenesis

  10. Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide modification, Lewis antigen expression, and gastric colonization are cholesterol-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Ellen; McGee, David J

    2009-12-14

    Helicobacter pylori specifically takes up cholesterol and incorporates it into the bacterial membrane, yet little is currently known about cholesterol's physiological roles. We compared phenotypes and in vivo colonization ability of H. pylori grown in a defined, serum-free growth medium, F12 with 1 mg/ml albumin containing 0 to 50 mug/ml cholesterol. While doubling times were largely unaffected by cholesterol, other overt phenotypic changes were observed. H. pylori strain SS1 grown in defined medium with cholesterol successfully colonized the stomach of gerbils, whereas SS1 grown without cholesterol failed to colonize. H. pylori lipopolysaccharide often displays Lewis X and/or Y antigens. Expression of these antigens measured by whole-cell ELISA was markedly enhanced in response to growth of strain SS1, 26695, or G27 in cholesterol. In addition, electrophoretic analysis of lipopolysaccharide in wild type G27 and in mutants lacking the O-chain revealed structural changes within the oligosaccharide core/lipid A moieties. These responses in Lewis antigen levels and in lipopolysaccharide profiles to cholesterol availability were highly specific, because no changes took place when cholesterol was substituted by beta-sitosterol or bile salts. Disruption of the genes encoding cholesterol alpha-glucosyltransferase or lipid A phosphoethanolamine transferase had no effect on Lewis expression, nor on lipopolysaccharide profiles, nor on the cholesterol responsiveness of these properties. Disruption of the lipid A 1-phosphatase gene eliminated the effect of cholesterol on lipopolysaccharide profiles but not its effect on Lewis expression. Together these results suggest that cholesterol depletion leads to aberrant forms of LPS that are dependent upon dephosphorylation of lipid A at the 1-position. A tentative model for the observed effects of cholesterol is discussed in which sequential steps of lipopolysaccharide biogenesis and, independently, presentation of Lewis antigen at

  11. TGFβ-dependent gene expression shows that senescence correlates with abortive differentiation along several lineages in Myc-induced lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Judith; Samans, Birgit; van Riggelen, Jan; Fagà, Giovanni; Peh K N, Raquel; Wei, Chia-Lin; Müller, Heiko; Amati, Bruno; Felsher, Dean; Eilers, Martin

    2010-12-01

    Deregulated expression of Myc under the control of an immunoglobulin enhancer induces lymphoma formation in mice. The development of lymphomas is limited by TGFβ-dependent senescence and high levels of Myc expression are continuously required to antagonize senescence. The biological processes underlying senescence are not fully resolved. We report here a comprehensive analysis of TGFβ-dependent alterations in gene expression when the Myc transgene is switched off. Our data show that Myc-induced target genes are downregulated in a TGFβ-independent manner. In contrast, TGFβ is required to upregulate a broad spectrum of genes that are characteristic of different T-cell lineages when Myc is turned off. The analysis reveals a significant overlap between these Myc-repressed genes with genes that are targets of polycomb repressive complexes in embryonic stem cells. Therefore, TGFβ-dependent senescence is associated with gene expression patterns indicative of abortive cellular differentiation along several lineages.

  12. Up-regulation of nucleotide excision repair in mouse lung and liver following chronic exposure to aflatoxin B{sub 1} and its dependence on p53 genotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulder, Jeanne E. [Pharmacology and Toxicology Graduate Program, Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Queen' s University Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); Bondy, Genevieve S.; Mehta, Rekha [Toxicology Research Division, 2202D, Bureau of Chemical Safety, Food Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada); Massey, Thomas E., E-mail: masseyt@queensu.ca [Pharmacology and Toxicology Graduate Program, Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Queen' s University Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2014-03-01

    Aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) is biotransformed in vivo into an epoxide metabolite that forms DNA adducts that may induce cancer if not repaired. p53 is a tumor suppressor gene implicated in the regulation of global nucleotide excision repair (NER). Male heterozygous p53 knockout (B6.129-Trp53{sup tm1Brd}N5, Taconic) and wild-type mice were exposed to 0, 0.2 or 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} for 26 weeks. NER activity was assessed with an in vitro assay, using AFB{sub 1}-epoxide adducted plasmid DNA as a substrate. For wild-type mice, repair of AFB{sub 1}–N7-Gua adducts was 124% and 96% greater in lung extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm and 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} respectively, and 224% greater in liver extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm AFB{sub 1} (p < 0.05). In heterozygous p53 knockout mice, repair of AFB{sub 1}–N7-Gua was only 45% greater in lung extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm AFB{sub 1} (p < 0.05), and no effect was observed in lung extracts from mice treated with 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} or in liver extracts from mice treated with either AFB{sub 1} concentration. p53 genotype did not affect basal levels of repair. AFB{sub 1} exposure did not alter repair of AFB{sub 1}-derived formamidopyrimidine adducts in lung or liver extracts of either mouse genotype nor did it affect XPA or XPB protein levels. In summary, chronic exposure to AFB{sub 1} increased NER activity in wild-type mice, and this response was diminished in heterozygous p53 knockout mice, indicating that loss of one allele of p53 limits the ability of NER to be up-regulated in response to DNA damage. - Highlights: • Mice are chronically exposed to low doses of the mycotoxin aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}). • The effects of AFB{sub 1} and p53 status on nucleotide excision repair are investigated. • AFB{sub 1} increases nucleotide excision repair in wild type mouse lung and liver. • This increase is attenuated in p53 heterozygous mouse lung and liver. • Results portray the role of p53 in

  13. High-risk HPV genotypes and P16INK4a expression in a cohort of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Louise Soo Yee; Fredrik, Petersson; Ker, Liang; Yu, Feng Gang; Wang, De Yun; Goh, Boon Cher; Loh, Kwok Seng; Lim, Chwee Ming

    2016-12-27

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), especially HPV16 genotype, is associated with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). We aim to determine the prevalence and characterize the high-risk (HR)-HPV genotypes in head and neck SCC (HNSCC) in a South-East Asian multi-ethnic society in Singapore and examine its prognostic significance.159 HNSCC archival tissue samples were retrieved and tumour DNA was screened for 18 HR-HPV genotypes using a PCR-based assay (Qiagen, digene HPV genotyping RH test). P16 protein overexpression was identified using immunohistochemistry (IHC). Statistical correlation between clinical outcomes were performed between HPV-positive and negative HNSCC patients.Six HR-HPVs (HPV16, 18, 31, 45, 56, 68) were detected in 90.6% of HNSCC; and 79.9% had multiple HPV genotypes detected. HPV31 and HPV45 were the most prevalent (79.2% and 87.4%, respectively); and HPV16 was predominantly found in OPSCC (p HPV-DNA PCR assay yielded a high sensitivity (96%) but low specificity (11%) when compared to p16 immunohistochemistry as the reference standard.P16-positive HNSCC was predominantly observed in OPSCC (73.7%; p = 0.005); and p16-positive OPSCC exhibited improved overall survival compared to p16-negative OPSCC (p = 0.022). Similarly, smoking and alcohol consumption were poor prognostic factors of overall survival (p = 0.007; p = 0.01) in OPSCC patients.HR-HPVs were identified in 90.6% of HNSCC patients using the HPV-DNA PCR assay. This test had a poor specificity when compared to p16 IHC; making it an unreliable detection technique in selecting patients for radiation dose de-escalation treatment protocol. P16-positive tumor was predominantly found in the oropharynx these patients demonstrated better overall survival than those with p16-negative OPSCC.

  14. Potential antioxidant response to coffee — A matter of genotype?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ute Hassmann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In a human intervention study, coffee combining natural green coffee bean constituents and dark roast products was identified as a genotype-dependent inducer of the Nrf2/ARE pathway, significantly affecting Nrf2 gene expression and downstream GST1A1 and UGT1A1 gene transcription. The observed transcriptional changes correlated with the presence of specific Nrf2 genotypes suggesting their influence on both Nrf2 and subsequent ARE-dependent GST1A1 and UGT1A1 transcription. While the presence of the −653 SNP seems to be advantageous, resulting in higher Nrf2, GST1A1 and UGT1A1 gene transcription following coffee consumption, in contrast, the presence of the −651 SNP significantly down-regulated the response to the study coffee. Furthermore, the presence of the B/B genotype in GST1A1 along with the frequency of the [TA]6/6 and [TA]7/7 polymorphisms in UGT1A1 appeared to significantly increase sensitivity toward coffee-induced gene transcription. This data suggests that when examining the role of the Nrf2/ARE pathway in the regulation of antioxidative and chemopreventive phase II efficacy, individual genotypes should be included when considering the potency of bioactive food/food constituents and their therapeutic potential.

  15. RNA thermometer controls temperature-dependent virulence factor expression in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Gregor G; Kortmann, Jens; Narberhaus, Franz; Klose, Karl E

    2014-09-30

    Vibrio cholerae is the bacterium that causes the diarrheal disease cholera. The bacteria experience a temperature shift as V. cholerae transition from contaminated water at lower temperatures into the 37 °C human intestine. Within the intestine, V. cholerae express cholera toxin (CT) and toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP), two main virulence factors required for disease. CT and TCP expression is controlled by the transcriptional activator protein ToxT. We identified an RNA thermometer motif in the 5' UTR of toxT, with a fourU anti-Shine-Dalgarno (SD) element that base pairs with the SD sequence to regulate ribosome access to the mRNA. RNA probing experiments demonstrated that the fourU element allowed access to the SD sequence at 37 °C but not at 20 °C. Moreover, mutations within the fourU element (U5C, U7C) that strengthened base-pairing between the anti-SD and SD sequences prevented access to the SD sequence even at 37 °C. Translation of ToxT-FLAG from the native toxT UTR was enhanced at 37 °C, compared with 25 °C in both Escherichia coli and V. cholerae. In contrast, the U5C, U7C UTR prevented translation of ToxT-FLAG even at 37 °C. V. cholerae mutants containing the U5C, U7C UTR variant were unable to colonize the infant mouse small intestine. Our results reveal a previously unknown regulatory mechanism consisting of an RNA thermometer that controls temperature-dependent translation of toxT, facilitating V. cholerae virulence at a relevant environmental condition found in the human intestine.

  16. IL7Rα expression and upregulation by IFNβ in dendritic cell subsets is haplotype-dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona C McKay

    Full Text Available The IL7Rα gene is unequivocally associated with susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS. Haplotype 2 (Hap 2 confers protection from MS, and T cells and dendritic cells (DCs of Hap 2 exhibit reduced splicing of exon 6, resulting in production of relatively less soluble receptor, and potentially more response to ligand. We have previously shown in CD4 T cells that IL7Rα haplotypes 1 and 2, but not 4, respond to interferon beta (IFNβ, the most commonly used immunomodulatory drug in MS, and that haplotype 4 (Hap 4 homozygotes have the highest risk of developing MS. We now show that IL7R expression increases in myeloid cells in response to IFNβ, but that the response is haplotype-dependent, with cells from homozygotes for Hap 4 again showing no response. This was shown using freshly derived monocytes, in vitro cultured immature and mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and by comparing homozygotes for the common haplotypes, and relative expression of alleles in heterozygotes (Hap 4 vs not Hap 4. As for T cells, in all myeloid cell subsets examined, Hap 2 homozygotes showed a trend for reduced splicing of exon 6 compared to the other haplotypes, significantly so in most conditions. These data are consistent with increased signaling being protective from MS, constitutively and in response to IFNβ. We also demonstrate significant regulation of immune response, chemokine activity and cytokine biosynthesis pathways by IL7Rα signaling in IFNβ -treated myeloid subsets. IFNβ-responsive genes are over-represented amongst genes associated with MS susceptibility. IL7Rα haplotype may contribute to MS susceptibility through reduced capacity for IL7Rα signalling in myeloid cells, especially in the presence of IFNβ, and is currently under investigation as a predictor of therapeutic response.

  17. Expression, characterization and mutagenesis of an FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase from Aspergillus terreus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yufeng; Huang, Lei; Wang, Jufang; Xu, Zhinan

    2015-01-01

    An FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (FAD-GDH) from Aspergillus terreus NIH2624 was expressed in Escherichia coli with a yield of 228±16U/L of culture. Co-expression with chaperones DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE and osmotic stress induced by simple carbon sources enhanced productivity significantly, improving the yield to 23883±563U/L after optimization. FAD-GDH was purified in two steps with the specific activity of 604U/mg. Using d-glucose as substrate, the optimal pH and temperature for FAD-GDH were determined to be 7.5 and 50°C, respectively. Activity was stable across the pH range 3.5-9.0, and the half-life was 52min at 42°C. Km and Vmax were calculated as 86.7±5.3mM and 928±35U/mg, and the molecular weight was approximately 65.6kDa based on size exclusion chromatography, indicating a monomeric structure. The 3D structure of FAD-GDH was simulated by homology modelling using the structure of A. niger glucose oxidase (GOD) as template. From the model, His551, His508, Asn506 and Arg504 were identified as key residues, and their importance was verified by site-directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, three additional mutants (Arg84Ala, Tyr340Phe and Tyr406Phe) were generated and all exhibited a higher degree of substrate specificity than the native enzyme. These results extend our understanding of the structure and function of FAD-GDH, and could assist potential commercial applications.

  18. Ascaroside expression in Caenorhabditis elegans is strongly dependent on diet and developmental stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Kaplan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ascarosides form a family of small molecules that have been isolated from cultures of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. They are often referred to as "dauer pheromones" because most of them induce formation of long-lived and highly stress resistant dauer larvae. More recent studies have shown that ascarosides serve additional functions as social signals and mating pheromones. Thus, ascarosides have multiple functions. Until now, it has been generally assumed that ascarosides are constitutively expressed during nematode development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cultures of C. elegans were developmentally synchronized on controlled diets. Ascarosides released into the media, as well as stored internally, were quantified by LC/MS. We found that ascaroside biosynthesis and release were strongly dependent on developmental stage and diet. The male attracting pheromone was verified to be a blend of at least four ascarosides, and peak production of the two most potent mating pheromone components, ascr#3 and asc#8 immediately preceded or coincided with the temporal window for mating. The concentration of ascr#2 increased under starvation conditions and peaked during dauer formation, strongly supporting ascr#2 as the main population density signal (dauer pheromone. After dauer formation, ascaroside production largely ceased and dauer larvae did not release any ascarosides. These findings show that both total ascaroside production and the relative proportions of individual ascarosides strongly correlate with these compounds' stage-specific biological functions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Ascaroside expression changes with development and environmental conditions. This is consistent with multiple functions of these signaling molecules. Knowledge of such differential regulation will make it possible to associate ascaroside production to gene expression profiles (transcript, protein or enzyme activity and help to determine genetic

  19. Type-dependent differential expression of neuropeptide Y in chicken hypothalamus (Gallus domesticus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most important orexigenic agents in central regulation of feeding behavior, body weight and energy homeostasis in domestic chickens. To examine differences in the hypothalamic NPY between layer-type and meat-type of chickens, which are two divergent kinds of the domestic chickens in feeding behavior and body weight, we detected mRNA levels of NPY in hypothalamic infundibular nucleus (IN), paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and lateral hypothalamic area(LHA) of these two types of chickens using one-step real time RT-PCR. The meat-type chicken had more food daily (about 1.7 folds) and greater body weights (about 1.5 folds) and brain weights than the layer-type chicken at the age of 14 d. In the meat-type of chicken, NPY mRNA levels of the IN and PVN were significantly greater than those of the LHA, and were not significantly different between the IN and PVN. However, in the layer-type of chicken, NPY mRNA levels were significantly greater in the IN than those in the LHA and PVN, and were not significantly different between the PVN and LHA. In all these hypothalamic regions,the layer-type of chicken had significantly higher NPY mRNA levels than the meat-type chicken did. These results suggest the expression of NPY in the hypothalamus has a type-dependent pattern in domestic chickens.

  20. Calcium-dependent protein kinases in plants: evolution, expression and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valmonte, Gardette R; Arthur, Kieren; Higgins, Colleen M; MacDiarmid, Robin M

    2014-03-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CPKs) are plant proteins that directly bind calcium ions before phosphorylating substrates involved in metabolism, osmosis, hormone response and stress signaling pathways. CPKs are a large multigene family of proteins that are present in all plants studied to date, as well as in protists, oomycetes and green algae, but are not found in animals and fungi. Despite the increasing evidence of the importance of CPKs in developmental and stress responses from various plants, a comprehensive genome-wide analysis of CPKs from algae to higher plants has not been undertaken. This paper describes the evolution of CPKs from green algae to plants using a broadly sampled phylogenetic analysis and demonstrates the functional diversification of CPKs based on expression and functional studies in different plant species. Our findings reveal that CPK sequence diversification into four major groups occurred in parallel with the terrestrial transition of plants. Despite significant expansion of the CPK gene family during evolution from green algae to higher plants, there is a high level of sequence conservation among CPKs in all plant species. This sequence conservation results in very little correlation between CPK evolutionary groupings and functional diversity, making the search for CPK functional orthologs a challenge.

  1. HPV16E6-Dependent c-Fos Expression Contributes to AP-1 Complex Formation in SiHa Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feixin Liang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, the major role of HPV16E6 in cancer has been considered to be its ability to inhibit the p53 tumor-suppressor protein, thereby thwarting p53-mediated cytotoxic responses to cellular stress signals. Here, we show that HPV16E6-dependent c-fos oncogenic protein expression contributes to AP-1 complex formation under oxidative stress in SiHa cells (HPV16-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. In addition, we examined the role of HPV16E6 in TGF-α-induced c-fos expression and found that the c-fos protein expression induced by TGF-α is HPV16E6 dependent. Thus, our results provide the first evidence that HPV16E6 contributes to AP-1 complex formation after both ligand-dependent and independent EGFR activation, suggesting a new therapeutic approach to the treatment of HPV-associated tumors.

  2. Protein Kinase CK2 Expression Predicts Relapse Survival in ERα Dependent Breast Cancer, and Modulates ERα Expression in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlon D. Williams

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The heterotetrameric protein kinase CK2 has been associated with oncogenic transformation, and our previous studies have shown that it may affect estrogenic signaling. Here, we investigate the role of the protein kinase CK2 in regulating ERα (estrogen receptor α signaling in breast cancer. We determined the correlation of CK2α expression with relapse free breast cancer patient survival utilizing Kaplan Meier Plotter (kmplot.com/analysis/ to mine breast cancer microarrays repositories. Patients were stratified according to ERα status, histological grade, and hormonal therapy. Luciferase reporter assays and flow cytometry were implemented to determine the impact of CK2 inhibition on ERE-mediated gene expression and expression of ERα protein. CK2α expression is associated with shorter relapse free survival among ERα (+ patients with grade 1 or 2 tumors, as well as among those patients receiving hormonal therapy. Biochemical inhibition of CK2 activity results in increased ER-transactivation as well as increased expression among ERα (+ and ERα (− breast cancer cell lines. These findings suggest that CK2 may contribute to estrogen-independent cell proliferation and breast tumor progression, and may potentially serve as a biomarker and pharmacological target in breast cancer.

  3. Gene Expression Profile of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase IIα in Rat's Hippocampus during Morphine Withdrawal

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Amiri, Shahin; Rafieenia, Fatemeh; Rostamzadeh, Jalal

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) which is highly expressed in the hippocampus is known to play a pivotal role in reward-related memories and morphine dependence. Methods In the present study, repeated morphine injections once daily for 7 days was done to induce morphine tolerance in male Wistar rats, after which gene expression profile of α-isoform of CaMKII (CaMKIIα) in the hippocampus was evaluated upon discontinuation of morphine injection over 21 days o...

  4. Unraveling the regulatory mechanisms underlying tissue-dependent genetic variation of gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, Jingyuan; Wolfs, Marcel G M; Deelen, Patrick; Westra, Harm Jan; Fehrmann, Rudolf S N; te Meerman, Gerhardus; Buurman, Wim A; Rensen, Sander S M; Groen, Hendricus; Weersma, Rinse K; van den Berg, Leonard H; Veldink, Jan; Ophoff, Roel A; Snieder, Harold; van Heel, David; Jansen, Ritsert C; Hofker, Marten H; Wijmenga, Cisca; Franke, Lude

    2012-01-01

    It is known that genetic variants can affect gene expression, but it is not yet completely clear through what mechanisms genetic variation mediate this expression. We therefore compared the cis-effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on gene expression between blood samples from 1,240 human

  5. Evidence for a time-dependent association between FOLR1 expression and survival from ovarian carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köbel, M; Madore, J; Ramus, S J

    2014-01-01

    expression. We conducted a large study evaluating FOLR1 expression with survival in different histological types of OvCa. METHODS: Tissue microarrays composed of tumour samples from 2801 patients in the Ovarian Tumour Tissue Analysis (OTTA) consortium were assessed for FOLR1 expression by centralised...

  6. Expression of NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase in Enterobacter aerogenes and its involvement in anaerobic metabolism and H2 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuan; Zhao, Hongxin; Zhang, Chong; Lai, Qiheng; Wu, Xi; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2009-10-01

    An expression system for NAD(+)-dependent formate dehydrogenase gene (fdh1), from Candida boidinii, was constructed and cloned into Enterobacter aerogenes IAM1183. With the fdh1 expression, the total H(2) yield was attributed to a decrease in activity of the lactate pathway and an increase of the formate pathway flux due to the NADH regeneration. Analysis of the redox state balance and ethanol-to-acetate ratio in the fdhl-expressed strain showed that increased reducing power arose from the reconstruction of NADH regeneration pathway from formate thereby contributing to the improved H(2) production.

  7. Integrating mRNA and miRNA Weighted Gene Co-Expression Networks with eQTLs in the Nucleus Accumbens of Subjects with Alcohol Dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Mamdani

    Full Text Available Alcohol consumption is known to lead to gene expression changes in the brain. After performing weighted gene co-expression network analyses (WGCNA on genome-wide mRNA and microRNA (miRNA expression in Nucleus Accumbens (NAc of subjects with alcohol dependence (AD; N = 18 and of matched controls (N = 18, six mRNA and three miRNA modules significantly correlated with AD were identified (Bonferoni-adj. p≤ 0.05. Cell-type-specific transcriptome analyses revealed two of the mRNA modules to be enriched for neuronal specific marker genes and downregulated in AD, whereas the remaining four mRNA modules were enriched for astrocyte and microglial specific marker genes and upregulated in AD. Gene set enrichment analysis demonstrated that neuronal specific modules were enriched for genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial dysfunction and MAPK signaling. Glial-specific modules were predominantly enriched for genes involved in processes related to immune functions, i.e. cytokine signaling (all adj. p≤ 0.05. In mRNA and miRNA modules, 461 and 25 candidate hub genes were identified, respectively. In contrast to the expected biological functions of miRNAs, correlation analyses between mRNA and miRNA hub genes revealed a higher number of positive than negative correlations (χ2 test p≤ 0.0001. Integration of hub gene expression with genome-wide genotypic data resulted in 591 mRNA cis-eQTLs and 62 miRNA cis-eQTLs. mRNA cis-eQTLs were significantly enriched for AD diagnosis and AD symptom counts (adj. p = 0.014 and p = 0.024, respectively in AD GWAS signals in a large, independent genetic sample from the Collaborative Study on Genetics of Alcohol (COGA. In conclusion, our study identified putative gene network hubs coordinating mRNA and miRNA co-expression changes in the NAc of AD subjects, and our genetic (cis-eQTL analysis provides novel insights into the etiological mechanisms of AD.

  8. Experience-dependent expression of Nogo-A and Nogo receptor in the developing rat visual cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoying Wu; Yulin Luo; Shuangzhen Liu; Kuanshu Li

    2012-01-01

    Nogo-A and Nogo receptor (NgR) expression in the visual cortex following a critical developmental period (postnatal days 20-60) has been previously shown. However, little is known regarding Nogo-A and NgR expression between postnatal day 0 and initiation of the critical period. The present study analyzed Nogo-A and NgR expression at four different time points: postnatal day 0 (P0), before critical period (P14), during critical period (P28), and after critical period (P60). Results showed significantly increased Nogo-A mRNA and protein expression levels in the visual cortex following birth, and expression levels remained steady between P28 and P60. NgR mRNA or protein expression was dramatically upregulated with age and peaked at P14 or P28, respectively, and maintained high expression to P60. In addition, Nogo-A and NgR expression was analyzed in each visual cortex layer in normal developing rats and rats with monocular deprivation. Monocular deprivation decreased Nogo-A and NgR mRNA and protein expression in the rat visual cortex, in particular in layers II-III and IV in the visual cortex contralateral to the deprived eye. These findings suggested that Nogo-A and NgR regulated termination of the critical period in experience- dependent visual cortical plasticity.

  9. Age dependent nitro-oxidative load and melatonin receptor expression in the spleen and immunity of goat Capra hircus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amaresh Kumar; Haldar, Chandana

    2014-12-01

    The decline in the plasma level of melatonin has been associated with increased oxidative stress in the physiological system while aging. The increased levels of oxidants are known to augment the nitro-oxidative stress, which induces the apoptotic factors in lymphoid organs leading to age dependent immunosenescence. There are no reports to date that can suggest how the age dependent nitro-oxidative stress can influence the melatonin membrane MT1/MT2R expression and immune status of any small ruminant. In the present study, we noted the expression of melatonin receptors MT1R and MT2R and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) along with the apoptotic markers (viz. Bcl-2, Bax and Pro-caspase-3) in the spleen of young, middle-aged and old-aged Indian goat Capra hircus. The lymphocyte proliferation was also recorded along with the total nitrite and nitrate ion concentration (NOx) in the spleen and plasma. An age dependent decline in MT1R and MT2R expressions and lymphocyte proliferation with increased level of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and iNOS expression was noted. An increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and a decreased Pro-caspase-3 expression were observed in the spleen of goat with an age dependent decline in the peripheral melatonin level. This decline in melatonin along with reduced melatonin receptor (MT1/MT2) expression and elevated RNS level in the spleen with aging might have an important role in the regulation of immune function of goats. Our observations suggest that the age-associated immunosenescence observed in goats can be a consequence of declining melatonin and its receptor expression and induction of apoptotic factors influenced by the increased RNS level that deteriorates the proper functioning of the spleen.

  10. Runx-dependent expression of PKC is critical for cell survival in the sea urchin embryo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCarthy John J

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Runx transcription factors play critical roles in the developmental control of cell fate and contribute variously as oncoproteins and tumor suppressors to leukemia and other cancers. To discover fundamental Runx functions in the cell biology of animal development, we have employed morpholino antisense-mediated knockdown of the sea urchin Runx protein SpRunt-1. Previously we showed that embryos depleted of SpRunt-1 arrest development at early gastrula stage and underexpress the conventional protein kinase C SpPKC1. Results We report here that SpRunt-1 deficiency leads to ectopic cell proliferation and extensive apoptosis. Suppression of the apoptosis by pharmacological inhibition of caspase-3 prevents the ectopic proliferation and rescues gastrulation, indicating that many of the overt defects obtained by knockdown of SpRunt-1 are secondary to the apoptosis. Inhibition or knockdown of SpPKC1 also causes apoptosis, while cell survival is rescued in SpRunt-1 morphant embryos coinjected with SpPKC1 mRNA, suggesting that the apoptosis associated with SpRunt-1 deficiency is caused by the deficit in SpPKC1 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation indicates that SpRunt-1 interacts physically with SpPKC1 in vivo, and cis-regulatory analysis shows that this interaction activates SpPKC1 transcription. Conclusions Our results show that Runx-dependent activation of SpPKC1 is essential for maintaining protein kinase C activity at levels conducive to cell survival during embryogenesis.

  11. Protein Kinase CK2 Expression Predicts Relapse Survival in ERα Dependent Breast Cancer, and Modulates ERα Expression in Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The heterotetrameric protein kinase CK2 has been associated with oncogenic transformation, and our previous studies have shown that it may affect estrogenic signaling. Here, we investigate the role of the protein kinase CK2 in regulating ERα (estrogen receptor α) signaling in breast cancer. We determined the correlation of CK2α expression with relapse free breast cancer patient survival utilizing Kaplan Meier Plotter (kmplot.com/analysis/) to mine breast cancer microarrays repositories. Patie...

  12. Cloning of RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase (RdRp Gene from Genotype Dengue Type-2 (New Guinea-C Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samian, R.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus causes febrile disease in human. Dengue infection causes dengue fever that is not life threatening. However, a severe form of the disease called dengue hemorrhagic fever (DH or dengue shock syndrome (DSS, proven to be fatal. A positive single stranded RNA virus genome encodes for a single polyprotein precursor and is arranged in the order of NH2-C-prM-E-NS1-NS2A-NS2B-NS3-NS4A-NS4B-NS5-COOH. The purpose of this study was to clone NS5 gene that encodes for the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp. This enzyme plays an important role in viral RNA replication. The RdRp associated by cofactors produce minus-strand single stranded RNA, which in turn, serves as a template for the production of new plus-strand single stranded genome. The virus RNA was extracted from Aedes albopictus cell line C6/36 that was infected with dengue virus type 2. Then, the extracted virus RNA was used as the template for RT-PCR. A 2.7 kb DNA fragment, representing the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene, wassuccessfully amplified using specific primers. The PCR product was then cloned into cloning vector (pGEM-T and transformed into E. coli JM109.

  13. Effect of temperature on biomass allocation in seedlings of two contrasting genotypes of the oilseed crop Ricinus communis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Paulo R; Zanotti, Rafael F; Deflers, Carole; Fernandez, Luzimar G; Castro, Renato D de; Ligterink, Wilco; Hilhorst, Henk W M

    2015-08-01

    Ricinus communis is becoming an important crop for oil production, and studying the physiological and biochemical aspects of seedling development may aid in the improvement of crop quality and yield. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of temperature on biomass allocation in two R. communis genotypes. Biomass allocation was assessed by measuring dry weight of roots, stems, and cotyledons of seedlings grown at three different temperatures. Root length of each seedling was measured. Biomass allocation was strongly affected by temperature. Seedlings grown at 25°C and 35°C showed greater biomass than seedlings grown at 20°C. Cotyledon and stem dry weight increased for both genotypes with increasing temperature, whereas root biomass allocation showed a genotype-dependent behavior. Genotype MPA11 showed a continuous increase in root dry weight with increasing temperature, while genotype IAC80 was not able to sustain further root growth at higher temperatures. Based on metabolite and gene expression profiles, genotype MPA11 increases its level of osmoprotectant molecules and transcripts of genes encoding for antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins to a higher extent than genotype IAC80. This might be causal for the ability to maintain homeostasis and support root growth at elevated temperatures in genotype MPA11. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. c-Myc dependent expression of pro-apoptotic Bim renders HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells dependent on anti-apoptotic Mcl-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jézéquel Pascal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-apoptotic signals induced downstream of HER2 are known to contribute to the resistance to current treatments of breast cancer cells that overexpress this member of the EGFR family. Whether or not some of these signals are also involved in tumor maintenance by counteracting constitutive death signals is much less understood. To address this, we investigated what role anti- and pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members, key regulators of cancer cell survival, might play in the viability of HER2 overexpressing breast cancer cells. Methods We used cell lines as an in vitro model of HER2-overexpressing cells in order to evaluate how anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Mcl-1, and pro-apoptotic Puma and Bim impact on their survival, and to investigate how the constitutive expression of these proteins is regulated. Expression of the proteins of interest was confirmed using lysates from HER2-overexpressing tumors and through analysis of publicly available RNA expression data. Results We show that the depletion of Mcl-1 is sufficient to induce apoptosis in HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells. This Mcl-1 dependence is due to Bim expression and it directly results from oncogenic signaling, as depletion of the oncoprotein c-Myc, which occupies regions of the Bim promoter as evaluated in ChIP assays, decreases Bim levels and mitigates Mcl-1 dependence. Consistently, a reduction of c-Myc expression by inhibition of mTORC1 activity abrogates occupancy of the Bim promoter by c-Myc, decreases Bim expression and promotes tolerance to Mcl-1 depletion. Western blot analysis confirms that naïve HER2-overexpressing tumors constitutively express detectable levels of Mcl-1 and Bim, while expression data hint on enrichment for Mcl-1 transcripts in these tumors. Conclusions This work establishes that, in HER2-overexpressing tumors, it is necessary, and maybe sufficient, to therapeutically impact on the Mcl-1/Bim balance for efficient induction of

  15. TIME-DEPENDENT EFFECTS ON GENE EXPRESSION IN RAT SEMINAL VESICLE DEVELOPMENTALLY ALTERED BY IN UTERO EXPOSURE TO TCDD

    Science.gov (United States)

    TIME-DEPENDENT EFFECTS ON GENE EXPRESSION IN RAT SEMINAL VESICLE DEVELOPMENTALLY ALTERED BY IN UTERO EXPOSURE TO TCDD. V M Richardson', J T Hamm2, and L S Birnbaum1. 'USEPA, ORD/NHEERL/ETD, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA, 'Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, ...

  16. Hepatitis C virus depends on E-cadherin as an entry factor and regulates its expression in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qisheng; Sodroski, Catherine; Lowey, Brianna; Schweitzer, Cameron J; Cha, Helen; Zhang, Fang; Liang, T Jake

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) enters the host cell through interactions with a cascade of cellular factors. Although significant progress has been made in understanding HCV entry, the precise mechanisms by which HCV exploits the receptor complex and host machinery to enter the cell remain unclear. This intricate process of viral entry likely depends on additional yet-to-be-defined cellular molecules. Recently, by applying integrative functional genomics approaches, we identified and interrogated distinct sets of host dependencies in the complete HCV life cycle. Viral entry assays using HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpps) of various genotypes uncovered multiple previously unappreciated host factors, including E-cadherin, that mediate HCV entry. E-cadherin silencing significantly inhibited HCV infection in Huh7.5.1 cells, HepG2/miR122/CD81 cells, and primary human hepatocytes at a postbinding entry step. Knockdown of E-cadherin, however, had no effect on HCV RNA replication or internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-mediated translation. In addition, an E-cadherin monoclonal antibody effectively blocked HCV entry and infection in hepatocytes. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that E-cadherin is closely associated with claudin-1 (CLDN1) and occludin (OCLN) on the cell membrane. Depletion of E-cadherin drastically diminished the cell-surface distribution of these two tight junction proteins in various hepatic cell lines, indicating that E-cadherin plays an important regulatory role in CLDN1/OCLN localization on the cell surface. Furthermore, loss of E-cadherin expression in hepatocytes is associated with HCV-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), providing an important link between HCV infection and liver cancer. Our data indicate that a dynamic interplay among E-cadherin, tight junctions, and EMT exists and mediates an important function in HCV entry.

  17. A humanized UGT1 mouse model expressing the UGT1A1*28 allele for assessing drug clearance by UGT1A1-dependent glucuronidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hongliang; Nguyen, Nghia; Peterkin, Vincent; Yang, Young-Sun; Hotz, Kathy; La Placa, Deirdre Beaton; Chen, Shujuan; Tukey, Robert H; Stevens, Jeffrey C

    2010-05-01

    Humanized mice that express the human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1 locus have been developed in a Ugt1-null background as a model to improve predictions of human UGT1A-dependent drug clearance. Enzyme kinetic parameters (K(m) and V(max)) and pharmacokinetic properties of three probe drugs were compared using wild-type and humanized UGT1 mice that express the Gilbert's UGT1A1*28 allele [Tg(UGT1(A1*28)) Ugt1(-/-) mice]. The well characterized substrate for UGT1A1, 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin (SN-38), showed the greatest difference in parent drug exposure ( approximately 3-fold increase) and clearance ( approximately 3-fold decrease) in Tg(UGT1(A1*28)) Ugt1(-/-) mice after intravenous administration compared with wild-type and phenobarbital-treated animals. In contrast, the clearance of the UGT2B7 substrate (-)-17-allyl-4, 5alpha-epoxy-3, 14-dihydroxymorphinan-6-one (naloxone) was not altered in Tg(UGT1(A1*28)) Ugt1(-/-) mice. In addition, pharmacokinetic parameters with 1-(4-fluorophenyl)3(R)-[3-(4-fluorophenyl)-3(S)-hydroxypropyl]-4(S)-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-azetidinone (ezetimibe, Zetia; Merck & Co., Whitehouse Station, NJ), considered to be a major substrate for UGT1A1, showed small to no dependence on UGT1A1-directed glucuronidation. Enzyme kinetic parameters assessed for SN-38, ezetimibe, and naloxone using liver microsomes prepared from wild-type and Tg(UGT1(A1*28)) Ugt1(-/-) mice showed patterns consistent with the in vivo pharmacokinetic data. For SN-38 glucuronidation, V(max) decreased 5-fold in Tg(UGT1(A1*28)) Ugt1(-/-) mouse liver microsomes compared with microsomes prepared from wild-type mice, and decreased 10-fold compared with phenobarbital-treated Tg(UGT1(A1*28)) Ugt1(-/-) mice. These differences are consistent with SN-38 glucuronidation activities using HLMs isolated from individuals genotyped as UGT1A1*1 or UGT1A1*28. For ezetimibe and naloxone the differences in V(max) were minimal. Thus, Tg(UGT1(A1*28)) Ugt1(-/-) mice can serve as a

  18. Estrogen-dependent expression of sine oculis homeobox 1 in the mouse uterus during the estrous cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sijeong [Department of Biomedical Science, CHA University, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 13488 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hwang [Fertility Center of CHA Bundang Medical Center, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 13496 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Hyemin [Department of Biomedical Science, CHA University, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 13488 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Miseon [Fertility Center of CHA Gangnam Medical Center, Seoul 06135 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hye-Ryun; Song, Haengseok [Department of Biomedical Science, CHA University, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 13488 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Kwonho, E-mail: kwonho.hong@dankook.ac.kr [Department of Nanobiomedical Science & BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan-si, Chungcheongnam-do 31116 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Youngsok, E-mail: youngsokchoi@cha.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science, CHA University, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 13488 (Korea, Republic of); Fertility Center of CHA Gangnam Medical Center, Seoul 06135 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-08

    The sine oculis homeobox 1 (SIX1) is a member of the Six gene family. SIX1 is involved in tissue development by regulating proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. However, function of SIX1 in the uterus remains unknown. Here, we found that Six1 expression is regulated along the estrous cycle in mouse uterus. Six1 expression was significantly increased at estrus stage and decreased at the rest of stages. SIX1 is detected in the luminal and glandular epithelium of uterine endometrium at the estrus stage. Estrogen injection increased Six1 expression in the ovariectomized mouse uterus, whereas progesterone had no effect on its expression. Estrogen receptor antagonist inhibited estrogen-induced Six1 expression. Our findings imply that SIX1 may play a role as an important regulator to orchestrate the dynamic of uterine endometrium in response to estrogen level during the estrous cycle. These results will give us a better understanding of uterine biology. - Highlights: • Six1 expression is regulated during the estrous cycle in mouse uterus. • Six1 is highly expressed at the estrus stage of estrous cycle. • SIX1 is detected in luminal/glandular epithelium of the uterus at the estrus stage. • Estrogen stimulates Six1 expression in an estrogen receptor-dependent manner.

  19. Following the time course of face gender and expression processing: a task-dependent ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Conroy, Berenice; Aguado, Luis; Fernández-Cahill, María; Romero-Ferreiro, Verónica; Diéguez-Risco, Teresa

    2014-05-01

    The effects of task demands and the interaction between gender and expression in face perception were studied using event-related potentials (ERPs). Participants performed three different tasks with male and female faces that were emotionally inexpressive or that showed happy or angry expressions. In two of the tasks (gender and expression categorization) facial properties were task-relevant while in a third task (symbol discrimination) facial information was irrelevant. Effects of expression were observed on the visual P100 component under all task conditions, suggesting the operation of an automatic process that is not influenced by task demands. The earliest interaction between expression and gender was observed later in the face-sensitive N170 component. This component showed differential modulations by specific combinations of gender and expression (e.g., angry male vs. angry female faces). Main effects of expression and task were observed in a later occipito-temporal component peaking around 230 ms post-stimulus onset (EPN or early posterior negativity). Less positive amplitudes in the presence of angry faces and during performance of the gender and expression tasks were observed. Finally, task demands also modulated a positive component peaking around 400 ms (LPC, or late positive complex) that showed enhanced amplitude for the gender task. The pattern of results obtained here adds new evidence about the sequence of operations involved in face processing and the interaction of facial properties (gender and expression) in response to different task demands. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The Prognostic Impact of p53 Expression on Sporadic Colorectal Cancer Is Dependent on p21 Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruschewski, Martin, E-mail: martin.kruschewski@charite.de; Mueller, Kathrin; Lipka, Sybille [Department of Surgery, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité-University Medicine Berlin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12200 Berlin (Germany); Budczies, Jan; Noske, Aurelia [Institute of Pathology, Campus Mitte, Charité-University Medicine Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Buhr, Heinz Johannes [Department of Surgery, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité-University Medicine Berlin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12200 Berlin (Germany); Elezkurtaj, Sefer [Institute of Pathology, Campus Mitte, Charité-University Medicine Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-03-11

    The prognostic value of p53 and p21 expression in colorectal cancer is still under debate. We hypothesize that the prognostic impact of p53 expression is dependent on p21 status. The expression of p53 and p21 was immunohistochemically investigated in a prospective cohort of 116 patients with UICC stage II and III sporadic colorectal cancer. The results were correlated with overall and recurrence-free survival. The mean observation period was 51.8 ± 2.5 months. Expression of p53 was observed in 72 tumors (63%). Overall survival was significantly better in patients with p53-positive carcinomas than in those without p53 expression (p = 0.048). No differences were found in recurrence-free survival (p = 0.161). The p53+/p21− combination was seen in 68% (n = 49), the p53+/p21+ combination in 32% (n = 23). Patients with p53+/p21− carcinomas had significantly better overall and recurrence-free survival than those with p53+/p21+ (p < 0.0001 resp. p = 0.003). Our data suggest that the prognostic impact of p53 expression on sporadic colorectal cancer is dependent on p21 status.

  1. Genotype adaptability and stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Miodrag

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the primary concerns in breeding programs is a small genotype reaction to environmental factor variation for better usage of yield genetic potential. Particularly if one takes in consideration that yield could van greatly because of more and more variable meteorological conditions. Studies conducted to observe genotype and environmental relations relay on numerous mathematical models, but genotype behavior in various ecological conditions is not, still, precisely defined Major sources of variation influencing genotype behavior in different environments are genotype/environment interaction, genetic background and environmental conditions. These factors could play an important role in establishing growth regions for maximal realization of genotype genetic potential, as well as in selection of genotypes having better response to complex requirements of particular growth region. Stability, the genotype ability to perform high, uniform yield no meter of different environmental conditions, and adaptability, genotype ability to give uniform yield in a different environmental conditions, are two common terms used to define genotype reaction in a consequence of environmental changes. Most of the models dealing with stability and adaptability are based on variation sources appearing under the influence of treatment, multivariate effects and residue. No meter which statistical model is used for GE interaction estimation, there is an opinion that no solid proof for the existence of stable genotypes obtained in breeding programs, which make some space for further investigations. There are still questions to answer dealing with definitions, sources of variation, usage value of existent models and interpretation of the results. .

  2. Risperidone regulates Dopamine D2-like receptors expression in rat brain in a time-dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Peiyan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Antipsychotics can elicit dopamine super-sensitivity by up-regulation of D2-like receptors (DRD2, DRD3, and DRD4 expression. Nevertheless, the expression profile of dopamine D2-like receptors in different brain regions and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, and changes following risperidone administration were still unclear. In this study, we would investigate the expression of D2-like receptors mRNA in different brain regions and the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs in rats after 2, 6 weeks risperidone administration. Methods: The experimental rats were given risperidone (0.25mg/kg/day, i.p., and the control rats were given 0.9% NaCl. The rats were sacrificed at 0 week, 2 weeks and 6 weeks after the drug administration. Expression of the dopamine D2-like receptors was quantified by Real-time PCR method. Results: Dopamine D2-like receptors expressed in all the examined regions of rat brain. Their expression significantly increased 2weeks after risperidone administration in different brain regions. However, the changed expression of DRD2 and DRD3 turned back to the basal level 6weeks later, while the increased DRD4 expression remained in left parietal cortex. Meanwhile, DRD2 and DRD3 but not DRD4 expressed in PBMCs, however, the risperidone could not affect their expression. Conclusions: The risperidone could change the dopamine D2-like receptors expression in a time-dependent manner in different brain regions, which might guide the clinical use in the near future.

  3. MHC class I expression dependent on bacterial infection and parental factors in whitefish embryos (Salmonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Emily S; Wilkins, Laetitia G E; Wedekind, Claus

    2013-10-01

    Ecological conditions can influence not only the expression of a phenotype, but also the heritability of a trait. As such, heritable variation for a trait needs to be studied across environments. We have investigated how pathogen challenge affects the expression of MHC genes in embryos of the lake whitefish Coregonus palaea. In order to experimentally separate paternal (i.e. genetic) from maternal and environmental effects, and determine whether and how stress affects the heritable variation for MHC expression, embryos were produced in full-factorial in vitro fertilizations, reared singly, and exposed at 208 degree days (late-eyed stage) to either one of two strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens that differ in their virulence characteristics (one increased mortality, while both delayed hatching time). Gene expression was assessed 48 h postinoculation, and virulence effects of the bacterial infection were monitored until hatching. We found no evidence of MHC class II expression at this stage of development. MHC class I expression was markedly down-regulated in reaction to both pseudomonads. While MHC expression could not be linked to embryo survival, the less the gene was expressed, the earlier the embryos hatched within each treatment group, possibly due to trade-offs between immune function and developmental rate or further factors that affect both hatching timing and MHC expression. We found significant additive genetic variance for MHC class I expression in some treatments. That is, changes in pathogen pressures could induce rapid evolution in MHC class I expression. However, we found no additive genetic variance in reaction norms in our study population.

  4. In vivo CNS infection model of Acanthamoeba genotype T4: the early stages of infection lack presence of host inflammatory response and are a slow and contact-dependent process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omaña-Molina, Maritza; Hernandez-Martinez, Dolores; Sanchez-Rocha, Raquel; Cardenas-Lemus, Ulises; Salinas-Lara, Citlaltepetl; Mendez-Cruz, Adolfo Rene; Colin-Barenque, Laura; Aley-Medina, Patricia; Espinosa-Villanueva, Jesus; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2017-02-01

    This study was developed in order to describe the early morphological events observed during the invasion of two pathogenic strains of Acanthamoeba (genotype T4); A. castellanii and A. culbertsoni, at the olfactory meatus and cerebral, pulmonary, renal, hepatic and splenic tissues levels, an in vivo invasion study. Histological and immunohistochemical description of the events at 24, 48, 72, and 96 h postintranasal inoculations of BALB/c mice was performed. A. castellanii showed a higher invasion rate than A. culbertsoni, which was only able to reach lung and brain tissue in the in vivo model. The current study supports previous evidence of lack of inflammatory response during the early stages of infection. Acanthamoeba invasion of the CNS and other organs is a slow and contact-dependent process. The early morphological events during the invasion of amoebae include the penetration of trophozoites into different epithelia: olfactory, respiratory, alveolar space, and renal tubule, which resemble the process of amoebae invasion described in corneal tissue. The data suggest that after reaching the nasal epithelium, trophozoites continued invasion, separating and lifting the most superficial cells, then migrating and penetrating between the cell junctions without causing a cytolytic effect on adjacent cells. These results reaffirm the idea that contact-dependent mechanisms are relevant for amoebae of Acanthamoeba genus regardless of the invasion site.

  5. MICA Expression Is Regulated by Cell Adhesion and Contact in a FAK/Src-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncayo, Gerald; Lin, Da; McCarthy, Michael T.; Watson, Aleksandra A.; O’Callaghan, Christopher A.

    2017-01-01

    MICA is a major ligand for the NKG2D immune receptor, which plays a key role in activating natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T cells. We analyzed NKG2D ligand expression on a range of cell types and could demonstrate that MICA expression levels were closely linked to cellular growth mode. While the expression of other NKG2D ligands was largely independent of cell growth mode, MICA expression was mainly found on cells cultured as adherent cells. In addition, MICA surface expression was reduced through increase in cell–cell contact or loss of cell–matrix adherence. Furthermore, we found that the reduction in MICA expression was modulated by focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/Src signaling and associated with increased susceptibility to NK cell-mediated killing. While the mechanisms of tumor immune evasion are not fully understood, the reduction of MICA expression following loss of attachment poises a potential way by which metastasizing tumor cells avoid immune detection. The role of FAK/Src in this process indicates a potential therapeutic approach to modulate MICA expression and immune recognition of tumor cells during metastasis. PMID:28154561

  6. Expression of transgenes targeted to the Gt(ROSA26Sor locus is orientation dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Strathdee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Targeting transgenes to a chosen location in the genome has a number of advantages. A single copy of the DNA construct can be inserted by targeting into regions of chromatin that allow the desired developmental and tissue-specific expression of the transgene. METHODOLOGY: In order to develop a reliable system for reproducibly expressing transgenes it was decided to insert constructs at the Gt(ROSA26Sor locus. A cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter was used to drive expression of the Tetracycline (tet transcriptional activator, rtTA2(s-M2, and test the effectiveness of using the ROSA26 locus to allow transgene expression. The tet operator construct was inserted into one allele of ROSA26 and a tet responder construct controlling expression of EGFP was inserted into the other allele. CONCLUSIONS: Expression of the targeted transgenes was shown to be affected by both the presence of selectable marker cassettes and by the orientation of the transgenes with respect to the endogenous ROSA26 promoter. These results suggest that transcriptional interference from the endogenous gene promoter or from promoters in the selectable marker cassettes may be affecting transgene expression at the locus. Additionally we have been able to determine the optimal orientation for transgene expression at the ROSA26 locus.

  7. Inferring gene dependency network specific to phenotypic alteration based on gene expression data and clinical information of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xionghui Zhou

    Full Text Available Although many methods have been proposed to reconstruct gene regulatory network, most of them, when applied in the sample-based data, can not reveal the gene regulatory relations underlying the phenotypic change (e.g. normal versus cancer. In this paper, we adopt phenotype as a variable when constructing the gene regulatory network, while former researches either neglected it or only used it to select the differentially expressed genes as the inputs to construct the gene regulatory network. To be specific, we integrate phenotype information with gene expression data to identify the gene dependency pairs by using the method of conditional mutual information. A gene dependency pair (A,B means that the influence of gene A on the phenotype depends on gene B. All identified gene dependency pairs constitute a directed network underlying the phenotype, namely gene dependency network. By this way, we have constructed gene dependency network of breast cancer from gene expression data along with two different phenotype states (metastasis and non-metastasis. Moreover, we have found the network scale free, indicating that its hub genes with high out-degrees may play critical roles in the network. After functional investigation, these hub genes are found to be biologically significant and specially related to breast cancer, which suggests that our gene dependency network is meaningful. The validity has also been justified by literature investigation. From the network, we have selected 43 discriminative hubs as signature to build the classification model for distinguishing the distant metastasis risks of breast cancer patients, and the result outperforms those classification models with published signatures. In conclusion, we have proposed a promising way to construct the gene regulatory network by using sample-based data, which has been shown to be effective and accurate in uncovering the hidden mechanism of the biological process and identifying the gene

  8. Stable In Vivo Transgene Expression in Endothelial Cells with Helper-Dependent Adenovirus: Roles of Promoter and Interleukin-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dronadula, Nagadhara; Wacker, Bradley K; Van Der Kwast, Reginald; Zhang, Jingwan; Dichek, David A

    2017-03-01

    Our long-term goal is to prevent or reverse atherosclerosis by delivering gene therapy from stably transduced endothelial cells (EC). We previously reported that EC-directed gene therapy with a helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd) expressing apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I) retarded development of atherosclerosis in rabbit carotid arteries over a 1-month interval. However, a 70% decline in apo A-I expression during this time raised concerns about long-term efficacy of this approach. Here we report use of several approaches aimed either at preventing this decline or at increasing apo A-I expression from HDAd at all time points: codon optimization, deletion of 3' untranslated sequences, substitution of a synthetic mammalian-based promoter (4XETE) for the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter, and co-transduction with an HDAd expressing interleukin-10. We tested these approaches using plasmid transfection of cultured EC and in vivo transduction of rabbit carotid artery EC. Codon optimization did not increase apo A-I expression. Deletion of 3' untranslated sequences extinguished apo A-I expression. Both substitution of 4XETE for the CMV promoter and expression of interleukin-10 stabilized apo A-I expression in vivo, although at the cost of lower early (3-day) expression levels. Surprisingly, both interventions stabilized apo A-I expression without altering the rate at which HDAd genomes were lost. These data establish that transgene expression from HDAd in EC is inherently stable in vivo and suggest that the early decline of CMV promoter-driven expression from HDAd-transduced EC is due neither to active downregulation of transcription nor to loss of HDAd genomes. Instead, apparent loss of expression from the CMV promoter appears to be a consequence of early (3-day) upregulation of CMV promoter activity via inflammatory pathways. Our results yield new paradigms to explain the early loss of genomes and transgene expression after in vivo gene transfer. These new paradigms will

  9. Restriction of GAGE protein expression to subpopulations of cancer cells is independent of genotype and may limit the use of GAGE proteins as targets for cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, M F; Johansen, L E; Nielsen, O

    2006-01-01

    The GAGE cancer testis antigen gene family encodes products that can be recognized by autologous T cells, and GAGE proteins have been suggested as potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Analysis of GAGE expression in tumours has primarily been performed at the level of gene transcription......, whereas little is known about GAGE expression at the protein level. To evaluate the potential of GAGE proteins as targets for cancer-specific immunotherapy, we studied the expression of these proteins in normal and malignant cells/tissues using a novel panel of monoclonal antibodies. Immunohistochemical...... analysis of more than 250 cancer specimens demonstrated that GAGE proteins were frequently expressed in numerous cancer types and correlated with the expression of the cancer testis antigens MAGE-A1 and NY-ESO-1. Significant intercellular and subcellular differences in GAGE protein levels were observed...

  10. Dependence of Intracellular and Exosomal microRNAs on Viral E6/E7 Oncogene Expression in HPV-positive Tumor Cells: e1004712

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anja Honegger; Daniela Schilling; Sandra Bastian; Jasmin Sponagel; Vladimir Kuryshev; Holger Sültmann; Martin Scheffner; Karin Hoppe-Seyler; Felix Hoppe-Seyler

    2015-01-01

    ...) expression patterns. By genome-wide analyses, we investigate whether the intracellular and exosomal miRNA compositions of HPV-positive cancer cells are dependent on endogenous E6/E7 oncogene expression...

  11. Dependence of intracellular and exosomal microRNAs on viral E6/E7 oncogene expression in HPV-positive tumor cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Honegger, Anja; Schilling, Daniela; Bastian, Sandra; Sponagel, Jasmin; Kuryshev, Vladimir; Sültmann, Holger; Scheffner, Martin; Hoppe-Seyler, Karin; Hoppe-Seyler, Felix

    2015-01-01

    ...) expression patterns. By genome-wide analyses, we investigate whether the intracellular and exosomal miRNA compositions of HPV-positive cancer cells are dependent on endogenous E6/E7 oncogene expression...

  12. The Role of Sugar-related Regulation in the Light-dependent Alterations of Arabidopsis Glutamate Dehydrogenase Genes Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Yu. Garnik

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Expression of gdh1 and gdh2 genes of Arabidopsis thaliana increases in the dark and decreases in the light. The reason of such alteration seems to be a glucose rising in photosynthetic cell in the light, but this hypothesis needs to be confirmed. In this work we investigate the role of glucose and hexokinase 1 in the light-dependent regulation of the gdh1 and gdh2 expression. A comparison of expression profiles of apl3, gdh1, gdh2 genes in presenсe of exogenous sucrose in the dark and in the light has demonstrated that sugar-related repression of gdh1 and gdh2 genes is insufficient to provide the high decrease of their transcripts in the light. Using Arabidopsis mutant gin2-1 with a defect in hxk1 gene we demonstrated that such a decrease is not depended on the regulatory function of hexokinase 1. We presume that light- dependent alterations of gdh1 and gdh2 expression are mediated by some chloroplast-to-nucleus regulatory signals.

  13. PPARgamma-dependent regulation of adenylate cyclase 6 amplifies the stimulatory effect of cAMP on renin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desch, Michael; Schubert, Thomas; Schreiber, Andrea; Mayer, Sandra; Friedrich, Björn; Artunc, Ferruh; Todorov, Vladimir T

    2010-11-01

    The second messenger cAMP plays an important role in the regulation of renin gene expression. Nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is known to stimulate renin gene transcription acting through PPARγ-binding sequences in renin promoter. We show now that activation of PPARγ by unsaturated fatty acids or thiazolidinediones drastically augments the cAMP-dependent increase of renin mRNA in the human renin-producing cell line Calu-6. The underlying mechanism involves potentiation of agonist-induced cAMP increase and up-regulation of adenylate cyclase 6 (AC6) gene expression. We identified a palindromic element with a 3-bp spacer (Pal3) in AC6 intron 1 (AC6Pal3). AC6Pal3 bound PPARγ and mediated trans-activation by PPARγ agonist. AC6 knockdown decreased basal renin mRNA level and attenuated the maximal PPARγ-dependent stimulation of the cAMP-induced renin gene expression. AC6Pal3 decoy oligonucleotide abrogated the PPARγ-dependent potentiation of cAMP-induced renin gene expression. Treatment of mice with PPARγ agonist increased AC6 mRNA kidney levels. Our data suggest that in addition to its direct effect on renin gene transcription, PPARγ "sensitizes" renin gene to cAMP via trans-activation of AC6 gene. AC6 has been identified as PPARγ target gene with a functional Pal3 sequence.

  14. Small RNA-dependent expression of secondary metabolism is controlled by Krebs cycle function in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Kasumi; Kiefer, Patrick; Reimmann, Cornelia; Keel, Christoph; Dubuis, Christophe; Rolli, Joëlle; Vorholt, Julia A; Haas, Dieter

    2009-12-11

    Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0, an antagonist of phytopathogenic fungi in the rhizosphere of crop plants, elaborates and excretes several secondary metabolites with antibiotic properties. Their synthesis depends on three small RNAs (RsmX, RsmY, and RsmZ), whose expression is positively controlled by the GacS-GacA two-component system at high cell population densities. To find regulatory links between primary and secondary metabolism in P. fluorescens and in the related species Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we searched for null mutations that affected central carbon metabolism as well as the expression of rsmY-gfp and rsmZ-gfp reporter constructs but without slowing down the growth rate in rich media. Mutation in the pycAB genes (for pyruvate carboxylase) led to down-regulation of rsmXYZ and secondary metabolism, whereas mutation in fumA (for a fumarase isoenzyme) resulted in up-regulation of the three small RNAs and secondary metabolism in the absence of detectable nutrient limitation. These effects required the GacS sensor kinase but not the accessory sensors RetS and LadS. An analysis of intracellular metabolites in P. fluorescens revealed a strong positive correlation between small RNA expression and the pools of 2-oxoglutarate, succinate, and fumarate. We conclude that Krebs cycle intermediates (already known to control GacA-dependent virulence factors in P. aeruginosa) exert a critical trigger function in secondary metabolism via the expression of GacA-dependent small RNAs.

  15. Angiogenin levels and ANG genotypes: dysregulation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Lewis McLaughlin

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine whether 5 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associate with ALS in 3 different populations. We also assessed the contribution of genotype to angiogenin levels in plasma and CSF. METHODS: Allelic association statistics were calculated for polymorphisms in the ANG gene in 859 patients and 1047 controls from Sweden, Ireland and Poland. Plasma, serum and CSF angiogenin levels were quantified and stratified according to genotypes across the ANG gene. The contribution of SNP genotypes to variance in circulating angiogenin levels was estimated in patients and controls. RESULTS: All SNPs showed association with ALS in the Irish group. The SNP rs17114699 replicated in the Swedish cohort. No SNP associated in the Polish cohort. Age- and sex-corrected circulating angiogenin levels were significantly lower in patients than in controls (p<0.001. An allele dose-dependent regulation of angiogenin levels was observed in controls. This regulation was attenuated in the ALS cohort. A significant positive correlation between CSF plasma angiogenin levels was present in controls and abolished in ALS. CONCLUSIONS: ANG variants associate with ALS in the Irish and Swedish populations, but not in the Polish. There is evidence of dysregulation of angiogenin expression in plasma and CSF in sporadic ALS. Angiogenin expression is likely to be important in the pathogenesis of ALS.

  16. Age and sex dependent changes in liver gene expression during the life cycle of the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branham William S

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Age- and sex-related susceptibility to adverse drug reactions and disease is a key concern in understanding drug safety and disease progression. We hypothesize that the underlying suite of hepatic genes expressed at various life cycle stages will impact susceptibility to adverse drug reactions. Understanding the basal liver gene expression patterns is a necessary first step in addressing this hypothesis and will inform our assessments of adverse drug reactions as the liver plays a central role in drug metabolism and biotransformation. Untreated male and female F344 rats were sacrificed at 2, 5, 6, 8, 15, 21, 52, 78, and 104 weeks of age. Liver tissues were collected for histology and gene expression analysis. Whole-genome rat microarrays were used to query global expression profiles. Results An initial list of differentially expressed genes was selected using criteria based upon p-value (p Conclusions These results suggest an underlying role for genes in specific clusters in potentiating age- and sex-related differences in susceptibility to adverse health effects. Furthermore, such a comprehensive picture of life cycle changes in gene expression deepens our understanding and informs the utility of liver gene expression biomarkers.

  17. Electrical stimulation promotes BDNF expression in spinal cord neurons through Ca(2+)- and Erk-dependent signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenjin, Wang; Wenchao, Liu; Hao, Zhu; Feng, Li; Yan, Wo; Wodong, Shi; Xianqun, Fan; Wenlong, Ding

    2011-04-01

    Brief electrical stimulation has been shown to be effective in promoting neuronal regeneration following peripheral nerve injury. These effects are thought to be mediated largely by the upregulation of the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in spinal cord neurons. However, the molecular mechanisms by which electrical stimulation can promote BDNF expression are not known. The mechanism involved in BDNF expression after electrical stimulation was explored in this study. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting were used to test BDNF expression. Confocal microscopy was utilized to study intracellular Ca(2+) volume. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting confirmed that brief electrical stimulation increased BDNF expression in spinal cord neurons both in vivo and in vitro. Treatment of cultured neurons with nifedipine, an inhibitor of voltage-gated calcium channels, significantly reduced the BDNF increase produced by electrical stimulation, and an inhibitor of Erk completely abolished the effect of electrical stimulation. Levels of BDNF expression in the presence of the Erk inhibitor were lower that in unstimulated and untreated controls, indicating that Erk activation is required to maintain baseline levels of BDNF. Confocal microscopy using a Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorochrome revealed that electrical stimulation is accompanied by an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) levels; the increase was partly blocked by nifedipine. These findings argue that electrical stimulation increases BDNF expression in spinal cord neurons by activating a Ca(2+)- and Erk-dependent signaling pathways.

  18. Expression of thyrotropin receptor, thyroglobulin, sodium-iodide symporter, and thyroperoxidase by fibrocytes depends on AIRE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Roshini; Lu, Ying; Atkins, Stephen J; Mester, Tunde; Branham, Kari; Smith, Terry J

    2014-07-01

    CD34(+) fibrocytes, bone marrow-derived progenitor cells, infiltrate orbital connective tissue in thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy, a manifestation of Graves' disease. In the orbit, they become CD34(+) fibroblasts and coexist with native CD34(-) fibroblasts. Fibrocytes have been shown to express TSH receptor and thyroglobulin. The objective of the study was to determine whether a broader repertoire of thyroid protein expression can be detected in fibrocytes and whether a common factor is responsible. Fibrocytes and fibroblasts were collected and analyzed from healthy individuals and those with Graves' disease in an academic clinical practice. Real-time PCR, Western blot analysis, gene promoter analysis, cell transfections, and flow cytometric cell sorting were performed. We detect two additional thyroid proteins expressed by fibrocytes, namely sodium-iodide symporter and thyroperoxidase. The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) protein appears necessary for this expression. AIRE expression in fibrocytes results from an active AIRE gene promoter and stable AIRE mRNA. Knocking down AIRE with a targeting small interfering RNA reduces the expression of these thyroid proteins in fibrocytes as well as the transcription factors paired box-8 and thyroid transcription factor-1. When compared with an unaffected first-degree relative, levels of these proteins are substantially reduced in fibrocytes from an individual with an inactivating AIRE mutation. Levels of AIRE and the thyroid proteins are lower in orbital fibroblasts from patients with thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy than in fibrocytes. However, when mixed fibroblast populations are sorted into pure CD34(+) and CD34(-) subsets, the levels of these proteins are dramatically increased selectively in CD34(+) fibroblasts. Fibrocytes express four proteins, the aggregate expression of which was previously thought to be restricted to thyroid epithelium. These proteins represent the necessary molecular biosynthetic machinery

  19. Transcription profiling reveals stage- and function-dependent expression patterns in the filarial nematode Brugia malayi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ben-Wen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brugia malayi is a nematode parasite that causes lymphatic filariasis, a disfiguring and disabiling tropical disease. Although a first draft genome sequence was released in 2007, very little is understood about transcription programs that govern developmental changes required for the parasite’s development and survival in its mammalian and insect hosts. Results We used a microarray with probes that represent some 85% of predicted genes to generate gene expression profiles for seven parasite life cycle stages/sexes. Approximately 41% of transcripts with detectable expression signals were differentially expressed across lifecycle stages. Twenty-six percent of transcripts were exclusively expressed in a single parasite stage, and 27% were expressed in all stages studied. K-means clustering of differentially expressed transcripts revealed five major transcription patterns that were associated with parasite lifecycle stages or gender. Examination of known stage-associated transcripts validated these data sets and suggested that newly identified stage or gender-associated transcripts may exercise biological functions in development and reproduction. The results also indicate that genes with similar transcription patterns were often involved in similar functions or cellular processes. For example, nuclear receptor family gene transcripts were upregulated in gene expression pattern four (female-enriched while protein kinase gene family transcripts were upregulated in expression pattern five (male-enriched. We also used pair-wise comparisons to identify transcriptional changes between life cycle stages and sexes. Conclusions Analysis of gene expression patterns of lifecycle in B. malayi has provided novel insights into the biology of filarial parasites. Proteins encoded by stage-associated and/or stage-specific transcripts are likely to be critically important for key parasite functions such as establishment and maintenance of

  20. State-dependent mechanisms of LTP expression revealed by optical quantal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Bonnie; McGuinness, Lindsay; Akerman, Colin J; Fine, Alan; Bliss, Tim V P; Emptage, Nigel J

    2006-11-22

    The expression mechanism of long-term potentiation (LTP) remains controversial. Here we combine electrophysiology and Ca(2+) imaging to examine the role of silent synapses in LTP expression. Induction of LTP fails to change p(r) at these synapses but instead mediates an unmasking process that is sensitive to the inhibition of postsynaptic membrane fusion. Once unmasked, however, further potentiation of formerly silent synapses leads to an increase in p(r). The state of the synapse thus determines how LTP is expressed.

  1. Arecoline induced disruption of expression and localization of the tight junctional protein ZO-1 is dependent on the HER 2 expression in human endometrial Ishikawa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Sarbani; Poindexter, Kevin M; Sundar, Shyam N; Firestone, Gary L

    2010-07-06

    Approximately 600 million people chew Betel nut, making this practice the fourth most popular oral habit in the world. Arecoline, the major alkaloid present in betel nut is one of the causative agents for precancerous lesions and several cancers of mouth among those who chew betel nut. Arecoline can be detected in the human embryonic tissue and is correlated to low birth weight of newborns whose mothers chew betel nut during pregnancy, suggesting that arecoline can induce many systemic effects. However, few reports exist as to the effects of arecoline in human tissues other than oral cancer cell lines. Furthermore, in any system, virtually nothing is known about the cellular effects of arecoline treatment on membrane associated signaling components of human cancer cells. Using the human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell line, we investigated the effects of arecoline on expression, localization and functional connections between the ZO-1 tight junction protein and the HER2 EGF receptor family member. Treatment of Ishikawa cells with arecoline coordinately down-regulated expression of both ZO-1 and HER2 protein and transcripts in a dose dependent manner. Biochemical fractionation of cells as well as indirect immunofluorescence revealed that arecoline disrupted the localization of ZO-1 to the junctional complex at the cell periphery. Compared to control transfected cells, ectopic expression of exogenous HER2 prevented the arecoline mediated down-regulation of ZO-1 expression and restored the localization of ZO-1 to the cell periphery. Furthermore, treatment with dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid reported to up-regulate expression of HER2 in Ishikawa cells, precluded arecoline from down-regulating ZO-1 expression and disrupting ZO-1 localization. Arecoline is known to induce precancerous lesions and cancer in the oral cavity of betel nut users. The arecoline down-regulation of ZO-1 expression and subcellular distribution suggests that arecoline potentially

  2. Arecoline induced disruption of expression and localization of the tight junctional protein ZO-1 is dependent on the HER 2 expression in human endometrial Ishikawa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundar Shyam N

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately 600 million people chew Betel nut, making this practice the fourth most popular oral habit in the world. Arecoline, the major alkaloid present in betel nut is one of the causative agents for precancerous lesions and several cancers of mouth among those who chew betel nut. Arecoline can be detected in the human embryonic tissue and is correlated to low birth weight of newborns whose mothers chew betel nut during pregnancy, suggesting that arecoline can induce many systemic effects. However, few reports exist as to the effects of arecoline in human tissues other than oral cancer cell lines. Furthermore, in any system, virtually nothing is known about the cellular effects of arecoline treatment on membrane associated signaling components of human cancer cells. Results Using the human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell line, we investigated the effects of arecoline on expression, localization and functional connections between the ZO-1 tight junction protein and the HER2 EGF receptor family member. Treatment of Ishikawa cells with arecoline coordinately down-regulated expression of both ZO-1 and HER2 protein and transcripts in a dose dependent manner. Biochemical fractionation of cells as well as indirect immunofluorescence revealed that arecoline disrupted the localization of ZO-1 to the junctional complex at the cell periphery. Compared to control transfected cells, ectopic expression of exogenous HER2 prevented the arecoline mediated down-regulation of ZO-1 expression and restored the localization of ZO-1 to the cell periphery. Furthermore, treatment with dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid reported to up-regulate expression of HER2 in Ishikawa cells, precluded arecoline from down-regulating ZO-1 expression and disrupting ZO-1 localization. Conclusion Arecoline is known to induce precancerous lesions and cancer in the oral cavity of betel nut users. The arecoline down-regulation of ZO-1 expression and

  3. Expression of BDNF and TrkB Phosphorylation in the Rat Frontal Cortex During Morphine Withdrawal are NO Dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peregud, Danil I; Yakovlev, Alexander A; Stepanichev, Mikhail Yu; Onufriev, Mikhail V; Panchenko, Leonid F; Gulyaeva, Natalia V

    2016-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) mediates pharmacological effects of opiates including dependence and abstinence. Modulation of NO synthesis during the induction phase of morphine dependence affects manifestations of morphine withdrawal syndrome, though little is known about mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. Neurotrophic and growth factors are involved in neuronal adaptation during opiate dependence. NO-dependent modulation of morphine dependence may be mediated by changes in expression and activity of neurotrophic and/or growth factors in the brain. Here, we studied the effects of NO synthesis inhibition during the induction phase of morphine dependence on the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) as well as their receptors in rat brain regions after spontaneous morphine withdrawal in dependent animals. Morphine dependence in rats was induced within 6 days by 12 injections of morphine in increasing doses (10-100 mg/kg), and NO synthase inhibitor L-N(G)-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (10 mg/kg) was given 1 h before each morphine injection. The expression of the BDNF, GDNF, NGF, IGF1, and their receptors in the frontal cortex, striatum, hippocampus, and midbrain was assessed 40 h after morphine withdrawal. L-NAME treatment during morphine intoxication resulted in an aggravation of the spontaneous morphine withdrawal severity. Morphine withdrawal was accompanied by upregulation of BDNF, IGF1, and their receptors TrkB and IGF1R, respectively, on the mRNA level in the frontal cortex, and only BDNF in hippocampus and midbrain. L-NAME administration during morphine intoxication decreased abstinence-induced upregulation of these mRNAs in the frontal cortex, hippocampus and midbrain. L-NAME prevented from abstinence-induced elevation of mature but not pro-form of BDNF polypeptide in the frontal cortex. While morphine abstinence did not affect Trk

  4. Time-dependent expression profiles of microRNAs and mRNAs in rat milk whey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirohisa Izumi

    Full Text Available Functional RNAs, such as microRNA (miRNA and mRNA, are present in milk, but their roles are unknown. To clarify the roles of milk RNAs, further studies using experimental animals such as rats are needed. However, it is unclear whether rat milk also contains functional RNAs and what their time dependent expression profiles are. Thus, we prepared total RNA from whey isolated from rat milk collected on days 2, 9, and 16 postpartum and analyzed using microarrays and quantitative PCR. The concentration of RNA in colostrum whey (day 2 was markedly higher than that in mature milk whey (days 9 and 16. Microarray analysis detected 161 miRNAs and 10,948 mRNA transcripts. Most of the miRNAs and mRNA transcripts were common to all tested milks. Finally, we selected some immune- and development-related miRNAs and mRNAs, and analysed them by quantitative PCR (in equal sample volumes to determine their time-dependent changes in expression in detail. Some were significantly more highly expressed in colostrum whey than in mature milk whey, but some were expressed equally. And mRNA expression levels of some cytokines and hormones did not reflect the protein levels. It is still unknown whether RNAs in milk play biological roles in neonates. However, our data will help guide future in vivo studies using experimental animals such as rats.

  5. Serotonin transporter genotype linked to adolescent substance use treatment outcome through externalizing behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy eChung

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Meta-analyses suggest that the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR short (S allele, relative to the long (L allele, is associated with risk for alcohol dependence, particularly among individuals with early onset antisocial alcoholism. Youth in substance use treatment tend to show antisocial or externalizing behaviors, such as conduct problems, which predict worse treatment outcome. This study examined a pathway in which 5-HTTLPR genotype is associated with externalizing behavior, and the intermediate phenotype of externalizing behavior serves as a link between 5-HTTLPR genotype and substance use treatment outcome in youth. Adolescents (n=142 who were recruited from addictions treatment were genotyped for 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms (S and LG carriers vs. LALA, assessed for externalizing and internalizing behaviors shortly after starting treatment, and followed over 6-months. 5-HTTLPR genotype was not associated with internalizing behaviors, and was not directly associated with 6-month substance use outcomes. However, 5-HTTLPR genotype was associated with externalizing behaviors (S and LG > LALA, and externalizing behaviors predicted alcohol and marijuana problem severity at 6-month follow-up. Results indicated an indirect (p<.05 and non-specific (i.e., both alcohol and marijuana severity effect of 5-HTTLPR genotype on youth substance use treatment outcomes, with externalizing behaviors as an important linking factor. Adolescents in substance use treatment with low expressing (S and LG 5-HTTLPR alleles and externalizing behavior might benefit from intervention that addresses serotonergic functioning, externalizing behaviors, and substance use to improve outcomes.

  6. In Your Face: Startle to Emotional Facial Expressions Depends on Face Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalsen, Henriette; Øvervoll, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Although faces are often included in the broad category of emotional visual stimuli, the affective impact of different facial expressions is not well documented. The present experiment investigated startle electromyographic responses to pictures of neutral, happy, angry, and fearful facial expressions, with a frontal face direction (directed) and at a 45° angle to the left (averted). Results showed that emotional facial expressions interact with face direction to produce startle potentiation: Greater responses were found for angry expressions, compared with fear and neutrality, with directed faces. When faces were averted, fear and neutrality produced larger responses compared with anger and happiness. These results are in line with the notion that startle is potentiated to stimuli signaling threat. That is, a forward directed angry face may signal a threat toward the observer, and a fearful face directed to the side may signal a possible threat in the environment.

  7. Metagenomic Analysis of Streptomyces lividans Reveals Host-Dependent Functional Expression

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Most functional metagenomic studies have been limited by the poor expression of many genes derived from metagenomic DNA in Escherichia coli, which has been the predominant surrogate host to date. To expand the range of expressed genes, we developed tools for construction and functional screening of metagenomic libraries in Streptomyces lividans. We expanded on previously published protocols by constructing a system that enables retrieval and characterization of the metagenomic DNA from biolog...

  8. Age-dependent expression of osteochondrosis-related genes in equine leukocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Mendoza García, Luis; Piquemal, David; Lejeune, Jean-Philippe; Vander Heyden, Laurent; Noguier, F.; Bruno, R; Sandersen, Charlotte; Serteyn, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:  Osteochondrosis (OC) is a developmental disease in horses which has a significant impact on the horse's welfare and performance. The early disturbance in the process of endochondral ossification progresses to inflammatory and repair processes in older horses. Previously, differentially expressed genes in leukocytes of OC-affected horses have been identified. The aim of the present study is to detect age-related changes in these differentially expressed genes. Materials and Meth...

  9. Pbx-dependent regulation of lbx gene expression in developing zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukowski, Chris M; Drummond, Danna Lynne; Waskiewicz, Andrew J

    2011-12-01

    Ladybird (Lbx) homeodomain transcription factors function in neural and muscle development--roles conserved from Drosophila to vertebrates. Lbx expression in mice specifies neural cell types, including dorsally located interneurons and association neurons, within the neural tube. Little, however, is known about the regulation of vertebrate lbx family genes. Here we describe the expression pattern of three zebrafish ladybird genes via mRNA in situ hybridization. Zebrafish lbx genes are expressed in distinct but overlapping regions within the developing neural tube, with strong expression within the hindbrain and spinal cord. The Hox family of transcription factors, in cooperation with cofactors such as Pbx and Meis, regulate hindbrain segmentation during embryogenesis. We have identified a novel regulatory interaction in which lbx1 genes are strongly downregulated in Pbx-depleted embryos. Further, we have produced a transgenic zebrafish line expressing dTomato and EGFP under the control of an lbx1b enhancer--a useful tool to acertain neuron location, migration, and morphology. Using this transgenic strain, we have identified a minimal neural lbx1b enhancer that contains key regulatory elements for expression of this transcription factor.

  10. Uterine Micro-Environment and Estrogen-Dependent Regulation of Osteopontin Expression in Mouse Blastocyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Zhen Xie

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Embryo implantation is a highly synchronized bioprocess between an activated blastocyst and a receptive uterus. In mice, successful implantation relies on the dynamic interplay of estrogen and progesterone; however, the key mediators downstream of these hormones that act on blastocyst competency and endometrium receptivity acquisition are largely unknown. In this study, we showed that the expression of osteopontin (OPN in mouse blastocysts is regulated by ovarian estrogen and uterine micro-environment. OPN mRNA is up-regulated in mouse blastocyst on day 4 of pregnancy, which is associated with ovarian estrogen secretion peak. Hormone treatment in vivo demonstrated that OPN expression in a blastocyst is regulated by estrogen through an estrogen receptor (ER. Our results of the delayed and activated implantation model showed that OPN expression is induced after estrogen injection. While estrogen treatment during embryo culture in vitro showed less effect on OPN expression, the tubal ligation model on day 3 of pregnancy confirmed that the regulation of estrogen on OPN expression in blastocyst might, through some specific cytokines, have existed in a uterine micro-environment. Collectively, our study presents that estrogen regulates OPN expression and it may play an important role during embryo implantation by activating blastocyst competence and facilitating the endometrium acceptable for active blastocyst.

  11. Time-dependent matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases expression change in fusarium solani keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Gao, Xin-Rui; Cui, Hong-Ping; Lang, Li-Li; Xie, Xiu-Wen; Chen, Qun

    2016-01-01

    To investigate matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) expression during the progress of fusarium solani (F.solani) keratitis in a rat model. A rat model of F.solani keratitis was produced using corneal scarification and a hand-made contact lens. MMPs and TIMPs expressiond were explored in this rat model of F.solani keratitis using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DIF. GM6001 (400 µmol/mL) was used to treat infected corneas. The keratitis duration, amount and area of corneal neovascularization (CNV) were evaluated. MMP-3 expression was 66.3 times higher in infected corneas compared to normal corneas. MMP-8, -9, and -13 expressions were significantly upregulated in the mid-period of the infection, with infected-to-normal ratios of 4.03, 39.86, and 5.94, respectively. MMP-2 and -7 expressions increased in the late period, with the infected-to-normal ratios of 5.94 and 16.22, respectively. TIMP-1 expression was upregulated in the early period, and it was 43.17 times higher in infected compared to normal corneas, but TIMP-2, -3, and -4 expressions were mildly downregulated or unchanged. The results of DIF were consistent with the result of real-time PCR. GM6001, a MMPs inhibitor, decreased the duration of F.solani infection and the amount and area of CNV. MMPs and TIMPs contributed into the progress of F.solani keratitis.

  12. Lox-dependent gene expression in transgenic plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbak, N; Kishchenko, O; Sakhno, L; Komarnytsky, I; Kuchuk, M

    2013-01-01

    Lox sites of the Cre/lox recombination system from bacteriophage P1 were analyzed for their ability to affect on transgene expression when inserted upstream from a gene coding sequence adjacent to the right border (RB) of T-DNA. Wild and mutated types of lox sites were tested for their effect upon bar gene expression in plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated and biolistic transformation methods. Lox-mediated expression of bar gene, recognized by resistance of transgenic plants to PPT, occurred only in plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. RT-PCR analysis confirms that PPT-resistant phenotype of transgenic plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was caused by activation of bar gene. The plasmid with promoterless gus gene together with the lox site adjacent to the RB was constructed and transferred to Nicotiana tabacum as well. Transgenic plants exhibited GUS activity and expression of gus gene was detected in plant leaves. Expression of bar gene from the vectors containing lox site near RB allowed recovery of numerous PPT-resistant transformants of such important crops as Beta vulgaris, Brassica napus, Lactuca sativa and Solanum tuberosum. Our results demonstrate that the lox site sequence adjacent to the RB can be used to control bar gene expression in transgenic plants.

  13. Extracellular ATP activates NFAT-dependent gene expression in neuronal PC12 cells via P2X receptors

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    Becker Walter

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of neuronal PC12 cells with ATP induces depolarisation and increases intracellular calcium levels via purinergic receptors. In many cell types, sustained elevation of intracellular calcium levels cause changes in gene expression via activation of the transcription factor NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T cells. We have therefore characterised the signalling pathway by which ATP regulates NFAT-dependent gene expression in PC12 cells. Results The activation of NFAT transcriptional activity by extracellular ATP was characterised with the help of reporter gene assays. Treatment of PC12 cells with ATP elicited a dose-dependent increase in luciferase activity (EC50 = 78 μM. UTP, 4-benzoylbenzoyl ATP and α,β-methylene ATP did not mimic the effect of ATP, which was abolished by treatment with the P2X receptor antagonist pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonate (PPADS. This pharmacological characterisation provides evidence for a critical role of ionotropic P2X receptors. Blockade of L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels by nifedipine reduced the response of NFAT to ATP, indicating that a depolarisation-mediated calcium influx was required for maximal NFAT activation. Inhibition of store-operated calcium entry by the pyrazole derivative BTP2 also diminished ATP-dependent NFAT activation. Furthermore, ATP-induced NFAT activation was associated with the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK1/2. Finally, treatment with ATP increased the levels of the NFAT target transcripts, RCAN1-4 (regulator of calcineurin and BDNF (brain derived neurotrophic factor. Conclusion The present data show that ATP induces NFAT-dependent changes in gene expression in PC12 cells by acting on P2X receptors. Maximal NFAT activation depends on both depolarisation-induced calcium influx and store-operated calcium entry and requires the activity of the protein phosphatase calcineurin and the mitogen-activated protein

  14. Histone Acetylation Modifications Affect Tissue-Dependent Expression of Poplar Homologs of C4 Photosynthetic Enzyme Genes

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    Yuan Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Histone modifications play important roles in regulating the expression of C4 photosynthetic genes. Given that all enzymes required for the C4 photosynthesis pathway are present in C3 plants, it has been hypothesized that this expression regulatory mechanism has been conserved. However, the relationship between histone modification and the expression of homologs of C4 photosynthetic enzyme genes has not been well determined in C3 plants. In the present study, we cloned nine hybrid poplar (Populus simonii × Populus nigra homologs of maize (Zea mays C4 photosynthetic enzyme genes, carbonic anhydrase (CA, pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, and investigated the correlation between the expression levels of these genes and the levels of promoter histone acetylation modifications in four vegetative tissues. We found that poplar homologs of C4 homologous genes had tissue-dependent expression patterns that were mostly well-correlated with the level of histone acetylation modification (H3K9ac and H4K5ac determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A further confirmed the role of histone acetylation in the regulation of the nine target genes. Collectively, these results suggest that both H3K9ac and H4K5ac positively regulate the tissue-dependent expression pattern of the PsnCAs, PsnPPDKs, PsnPCKs, and PsnPEPCs genes and that this regulatory mechanism seems to be conserved among the C3 and C4 species. Our findings provide new insight that will aid efforts to modify the expression pattern of these homologs of C4 genes to engineer C4 plants from C3 plants.

  15. Reversal of MDR1 gene-dependent multidrug resistance using short hairpin RNA expression vectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAN Hui-zhu; ZHENG De-ming; ZHANG Gui-zhen; ZHAO Ji-sheng; ZHANG Feng-chun; BU Li-sha; YANG Shao-juan; PIAO Song-lan; DU Zhen-wu; GAO Shen

    2005-01-01

    Background RNA interference using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) can mediate sequence-specific inhibition of gene expression in mammalian cells. A vector-based approach for synthesizing shRNA has been developed recently. Overexpression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the MDR1 gene product, confers multidrug resistance (MDR) to cancer cells. In this study, we reversed MDR using shRNA expression vectors in a multidrug-resistant human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7/AdrR). Methods The two shRNA expression vectors were constructed and introduced into MCF-7/AdrR cells. Expression of MDR1 mRNA was assessed by RT-PCR, and P-gp expression was determined by Western Blot and immunocytochemistry. Apoptosis and sensitization of the breast cancer cells to doxorubicin were quantified by flow cytometry and methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assays, respectively. Cellular daunorubicin accumulation was assayed by laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM). Statistical significance of differences in mean values was evaluated by Student's t tests. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results In MCF-7/AdrA cells transfected with MDR1-A and MDR1-B shRNA expression vectors, RT-PCR showed that MDR1 mRNA expression was reduced by 40.9% (P<0.05), 30.1% (P<0.01) (transient transfection) and 37.6 % (P<0.05), 28.0% (P<0.01) (stable transfection), respectively. Western Blot and immunocytochemistry showed that P-gp expression was significantly and specifically inhibited. Resistance against doxorubicin was decreased from 162-fold to 109-fold (P<0.05), 54-fold (P<0.01) (transient transfection) and to 108-fold (P<0.05), 50-fold (P<0.01) (stable transfection). Furthermore, shRNA vectors significantly enhanced the cellular daunorubicin accumulation. The combination of shRNA vectors and doxorubicin significantly induced apoptosis in MCF-7/AdrR cells. Conclusions shRNA expression vectors effectively reduce MDR expression in a sustained fashion and can restore the sensitivity of drug-resistant cancer

  16. Nrf2-dependent repression of interleukin-12 expression in human dendritic cells exposed to inorganic arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie; Génard, Romain; Pallardy, Marc; Kerdine-Römer, Saadia; Fardel, Olivier; Vernhet, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Inorganic arsenic, a well-known Nrf2 inducer, exerts immunosuppressive properties. In this context, we recently reported that the differentiation of human blood monocytes into immature dendritic cells (DCs), in the presence of low and noncytotoxic concentrations of arsenic, represses the ability of DCs to release key cytokines in response to different stimulating agents. Particularly, arsenic inhibits the expression of human interleukin-12 (IL-12, also named IL-12p70), a major proinflammatory cytokine that controls the differentiation of Th1 lymphocytes. In the present study, we determined if Nrf2 could contribute to these arsenic immunotoxic effects. To this goal, human monocyte-derived DCs were first differentiated in the absence of metalloid and then pretreated with arsenic just before DC stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Under these experimental conditions, arsenic rapidly and stably activates Nrf2 and increases the expression of Nrf2 target genes. It also significantly inhibits IL-12 expression in activated DCs, at both mRNA and protein levels. Particularly, arsenic reduces mRNA levels of IL12A and IL12B genes which encodes the p35 and p40 subunits of IL-12p70, respectively. tert-Butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), a reference Nrf2 inducer, mimics arsenic effects and potently inhibits IL-12 expression. Genetic inhibition of Nrf2 expression markedly prevents the repression of both IL12 mRNA and IL-12 protein levels triggered by arsenic and tBHQ in human LPS-stimulated DCs. In addition, arsenic significantly reduces IL-12 mRNA levels in LPS-activated bone marrow-derived DCs from Nrf2+/+ mice but not in DCs from Nrf2-/- mice. Finally, we show that, besides IL-12, arsenic significantly reduces the expression of IL-23, another heterodimer containing the p40 subunit. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that arsenic represses IL-12 expression in human-activated DCs by specifically stimulating Nrf2 activity.

  17. Nidogen-1 regulates laminin-1-dependent mammary-specific gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujuguet, Philippe; Simian, Marina; Liaw, Jane; Timpl, Rupert; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J..

    2000-02-01

    Nidogen-1 (entactin) acts as a bridge between the extracellular matrix molecules laminin-1 and type IV collagen, and thus participates in the assembly of basement membranes. To investigate the role of nidogen-1 in regulating cell-type-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium, we designed a culture microecosystem in which each component, including epithelial cells, mesenchymal cells, lactogenic hormones and extracellular matrix, could be controlled. We found that primary and established mesenchymal and myoepithelial cells synthesized and secreted nidogen-1, whereas expression was absent in primary and established epithelial cells. In an epithelial cell line containing mesenchymal cells, nidogen-1 was produced by the mesenchymal cells but deposited between the epithelial cells. In this mixed culture, mammary epithelial cells express b-casein in the presence of lactogenic hormones. Addition of either laminin-1 plus nidogen-1, or laminin-1 alone to mammary epithelial cells induced b- casein production. We asked whether recombinant nidogen-1 alone could signal directly for b-casein. Nidogen-1 did not induce b-casein synthesis in epithelial cells, but it augmented the inductive capacity of laminin-1. These data suggest that nidogen-1 can cooperate with laminin-1 to regulate b-casein expression. Addition of full length nidogen-1 to the mixed cultures had no effect on b-casein gene expression; however, a nidogen-1 fragment containing the laminin-1 binding domain, but lacking the type IV collagen-binding domain, had a dominant negative effect on b-casein expression. These data point to a physiological role for nidogen-1 in the basement membrane-induced gene expression by epithelial cells.

  18. Interleukin-6 upregulates paraoxonase 1 gene expression via an AKT/NF-κB-dependent pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Chi-Chih [Department of Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Hsueh, Chi-Mei [Department of Life Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chiu-Yuan [Graduate Institute of Natural Healing Sciences, Nanhua University, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Chen, Tzu-Hsiu, E-mail: hsiu@mail.chna.edu.tw [Department of Health and Nutrition, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Shih-Lan, E-mail: h2326@vghtc.gov.tw [Department of Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Applied Chemistry, National Chi Nan University, Puli, Nantou, Taiwan (China)

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •IL-6 could induce PON1 gene expression. •IL-6 increased NF-κB protein expression and NF-κB-p50 and -p65 subunits nuclear translocation. •IL-6-induced PON1 up-regulation was through an AKT/NF-κB pathway. -- Abstract: The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between paraoxonase 1 (PON1) and atherosclerosis-related inflammation. In this study, human hepatoma HepG2 cell line was used as a hepatocyte model to examine the effects of the pro-inflammatory cytokines on PON1 expression. The results showed that IL-6, but not TNF-α and IL-1β, significantly increased both the function and protein level of PON1; data from real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that the IL-6-induced PON1 expression occurred at the transcriptional level. Increase of IκB kinase activity and IκB phosphorylation, and reduction of IκB protein level were also observed in IL-6-treated HepG2 cells compared with untreated culture. This event was accompanied by increase of NF-κB-p50 and -p65 nuclear translocation. Moreover, treatment with IL-6 augmented the DNA binding activity of NF-κB. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB activation by PDTC and BAY 11-7082, markedly suppressed the IL-6-mediated PON1 expression. In addition, IL-6 increased the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase B (PKB, AKT). An AKT inhibitor LY294002 effectively suppressed IKK/IκB/NF-κB signaling and PON1 gene expression induced by IL-6. Our findings demonstrate that IL-6 upregulates PON1 gene expression through an AKT/NF-κB signaling axis in human hepatocyte-derived HepG2 cell line.

  19. RB/PLK1-dependent induced pathway by SLAMF3 expression inhibits mitosis and control hepatocarcinoma cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhlal, Hicham; Singh, Amrathlal Rabbind; Ossart, Christèle; Reignier, Aline; Hocini, Hakim; Fouquet, Gregory; Baghami, Mohammed Al; Eugenio, Mélanie Simoes; Nguyen-Khac, Eric; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc; Marcq, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Polo-like kinase PLK1 is a cell cycle protein that plays multiple roles in promoting cell cycle progression. Among the many roles, the most prominent role of PLK1 is to regulate the mitotic spindle formation checkpoint at the M-phase. Recently we reported the expression of SLAMF3 in Hepatocytes and show that it is down regulated in tumor cells of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We also show that the forced high expression level of SLAMF3 in HCC cells controls proliferation by inhibiting the MAPK ERK/JNK and the mTOR pathways. In the present study, we provide evidence that the inhibitory effect of SLAMF3 on HCC proliferation occurs through Retinoblastoma (RB) factor and PLK1-dependent pathway. In addition to the inhibition of MAPK ERK/JNK and the mTOR pathways, expression of SLAMF3 in HCC retains RB factor in its hypophosphorylated active form, which in turn inactivates E2F transcription factor, thereby repressing the expression and activation of PLK1. A clear inverse correlation was also observed between SLAMF3 and PLK expression in patients with HCC. In conclusion, the results presented here suggest that the tumor suppressor potential of SLAMF3 occurs through activation of RB that represses PLK1. We propose that the induction of a high expression level of SLAMF3 in cancerous cells could control cellular mitosis and block tumor progression. PMID:26799423

  20. The mitochondria mediate the induction of NOX1 gene expression by aldosterone in an ATF-1-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yanping; Shi, Gang; Wu, Yong; Kawai, Yasuyuki; Tian, Qing; Yue, Linlin; Xia, Qinjie; Miyamori, Isamu; Fan, Chunyuan

    2011-06-01

    High aldosterone (Ald) levels can induce hypertrophy of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), which carries high risks of heart failure. A previous study showed that Ald induces hypertrophy of VSMCs by up-regulating NOX1, a catalytic subunit of NADPH oxidase that produces superoxides. However, the precise mechanism remains unknown. Diphenylene iodonium (DPI) is known as an inhibitor of complex I in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and it was also found to almost completely suppress the induction of NOX1 mRNA and the phosphorylation of activating transcription factor (ATF-1) by PGF2α or PDGF in a rat VSMC cell line. In this study, we found that the Ald-induced phosphorylation of ATF-1 and NOX1 expression was significantly suppressed by DPI. Silencing of ATF-1 gene expression attenuated the induction of NOX1 mRNA expression, and over-expression of ATF-1 restored Ald-induced NOX1 expression. On the basis of this data, we show that the mitochondria mediate aldosterone-induced NOX1 gene expression in an ATF-1-dependent manner.

  1. Sox17-dependent gene expression and early heart and gut development in Sox17-deficient mouse embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Sabine; Jones, Vanessa J; Power, Melinda; Truisi, Germaine L; Khoo, Poh-Lynn; Steiner, Kirsten A; Kanai-Azuma, Masami; Kanai, Yoshiakira; Tam, Patrick P L; Loebel, David A F

    2011-01-01

    Sox17 is a transcription factor that is required for maintenance of the definitive endoderm in mouse embryos. By expression profiling of wild-type and mutant embryos and Sox17-overexpressing hepatoma cells, we identified genes with Sox17-dependent expression. Among the genes that were up-regulated in Sox17-null embryos and down-regulated by Sox17 expressing HepG2 cells is a set of genes that are expressed in the developing liver, suggesting that one function of Sox17 is the repression of liver gene expression, which is compatible with a role for Sox17 in maintaining the definitive endoderm in a progenitor state. Consistent with these findings, Sox17(-/-) cells display a diminished capacity to contribute to the definitive endoderm when transplanted into wild-type hosts. Analysis of gene ontology further revealed that many genes related to heart development were downregulated in Sox17-null embryos. This is associated with the defective development of the heart in the mutant embryos, which is accompanied by localised loss of Myocd-expressing cardiogenic progenitors and the malformation of the anterior intestinal portal.

  2. Dynamic expression of Notch-dependent neurogenic markers in the chick embryonic nervous system

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    Leslie eRatié

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of a functional nervous system requires a highly orchestrated process of neural proliferation and differentiation. The evolutionary conserved Notch signalling pathway is a key regulator of this process, regulating bHLH transcriptional repressors and proneural genes. However little is known about downstream Notch targets and subsequently genes required for neuronal specification.In this report, the expression pattern of Tagln3, Chga and Cntn2 was described in detail during early chick embryogenesis. Expression of these genes was largely restricted to the nervous system including the early axon scaffold populations, cranial ganglia and spinal motor neurons. Their temporal and spatial expression were compared with the neuronal markers Nhlh1, Stmn2 and HuC/D. We show that Tagln3 is an early marker for postmitotic neurons whereas Chga and Cntn2 are expressed in mature neurons. We demonstrate that inhibition of Notch signalling during spinal cord neurogenesis enhances expression of these markers. This data demonstrates that Tagln3, Chga and Cntn2 represent strong new candidates to contribute to the sequential progression of vertebrate neurogenesis.

  3. Leptin induces CREB-dependent aromatase activation through COX-2 expression in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Gyun; Jin, Sun Woo; Kim, Yong An; Khanal, Tilak; Lee, Gi Ho; Kim, Se Jong; Rhee, Sang Dal; Chung, Young Chul; Hwang, Young Jung; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2017-08-01

    Leptin plays a key role in the control of adipocyte formation, as well as in the associated regulation of energy intake and expenditure. The goal of this study was to determine if leptin-induced aromatase enhances estrogen production and induces tumor cell growth stimulation. To this end, breast cancer cells were incubated with leptin in the absence or presence of inhibitor pretreatment, and changes in aromatase and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression were evaluated at the mRNA and protein levels. Transient transfection assays were performed to examine the aromatase and COX-2 gene promoter activities and immunoblot analysis was used to examine protein expression. Leptin induced aromatase expression, estradiol production, and promoter activity in breast cancer cells. Protein levels of phospho-STAT3, PKA, Akt, ERK, and JNK were increased by leptin. Leptin also significantly increased cAMP levels, cAMP response element (CRE) activation, and CREB phosphorylation. In addition, leptin induced COX-2 expression, promoter activity, and increased the production of prostaglandin E2. Finally, a COX-2 inhibitor and aromatase inhibitor suppressed leptin-induced cell proliferation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Together, our data show that leptin increased aromatase expression in breast cancer cells, which was correlated with COX-2 upregulation, mediated through CRE activation and cooperation among multiple signaling pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Immune- and wound-dependent differential gene expression in an ancient insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Paul R; Rolff, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Two of the main functions of the immune system are to control infections and to contribute to wound closure. Here we present the results of an RNAseq study of immune- and wound-response gene expression in the damselfly Coenagrion puella, a representative of the odonates, the oldest taxon of winged insects. De novo assembly of RNAseq data revealed a rich repertoire of canonical immune pathways, as known from model insects, including recognition, transduction and effector gene expression. A shared set of immune and wound repair genes were differentially expressed in both wounded and immune-challenged larvae. Moreover 3-fold more immune genes were induced only in the immune-challenged treatment. This is consistent with the notion that the immune-system reads a balance of signals related to wounding and infection and that the response is tailored accordingly.

  5. Energy balance-dependent regulation of ovine glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase protein isoform expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantaphyllopoulos, Kostas A; Laliotis, George P; Bizelis, Iosif A

    2014-01-01

    G6PDH is the rate-limiting enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway and one of the principal source of NADPH, a major cellular reductant. Importantly, in ruminant's metabolism the aforementioned NADPH provided, is utilized for de novo fatty acid synthesis. Previous work of cloning the ovine (Ovis aries) og6pdh gene has revealed the presence of two cDNA transcripts (og6pda and og6pdb), og6pdb being a product of alternative splicing not similar to any other previously reported.(1) In the current study the effect of energy balance in the ovine G6PDH protein expression was investigated, shedding light on the biochemical features and potential physiological role of the oG6PDB isoform. Changes in energy balance leads to protein expression changes in both transcripts, to the opposite direction and not in a proportional way. Negative energy balance was not in favor of the presence of any particular isoform, while both protein expression levels were not significantly different (P > 0.05). In contrast, at the transition point from negative to positive and on the positive energy balance, there is a significant increase of oG6PDA compared with oG6PDB protein expression (P < 0.001). Both oG6PDH protein isoforms changed significantly toward the positive energy balance. oG6PDA is escalating, while oG6PDB is falling, under the same stimulus (positive energy balance alteration). This change is also positively associated with increasing levels in enzyme activity, 4 weeks post-weaning in ewes' adipose tissue. Furthermore, regression analysis clearly demonstrated the linear correlation of both proteins in response to the WPW, while energy balance, enzyme activity, and oG6PDA relative protein expression follow the same escalating trend; in contrast, oG6PDB relative protein expression falls in time, similar to both transcripts accumulation pattern, as reported previously.(2.)

  6. Astrocytic expression of the Alzheimer's disease beta-secretase (BACE1) is stimulus-dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartlage-Rübsamen, Maike; Zeitschel, Ulrike; Apelt, Jenny

    2003-01-01

    The beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE1) is a prerequisite for the generation of beta-amyloid peptides, which give rise to cerebrovascular and parenchymal beta-amyloid deposits in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients. BACE1 is neuronally expressed in the brains of humans and experimental...... paradigms studied. In contrast, BACE1 expression by reactive astrocytes was evident in chronic but not in acute models of gliosis. Additionally, we observed BACE1-immunoreactive astrocytes in proximity to beta-amyloid plaques in the brains of aged Tg2576 mice and Alzheimer's disease patients....

  7. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

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    van Erk Marjan J

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an anti-oxidant and it can act as an anti-inflammatory agent. The aim of this study was to elucidate mechanisms and effect of curcumin in colon cancer cells using gene expression profiling. Methods Gene expression changes in response to curcumin exposure were studied in two human colon cancer cell lines, using cDNA microarrays with four thousand human genes. HT29 cells were exposed to two different concentrations of curcumin and gene expression changes were followed in time (3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours. Gene expression changes after short-term exposure (3 or 6 hours to curcumin were also studied in a second cell type, Caco-2 cells. Results Gene expression changes (>1.5-fold were found at all time points. HT29 cells were more sensitive to curcumin than Caco-2 cells. Early response genes were involved in cell cycle, signal transduction, DNA repair, gene transcription, cell adhesion and xenobiotic metabolism. In HT29 cells curcumin modulated a number of cell cycle genes of which several have a role in transition through the G2/M phase. This corresponded to a cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase as was observed by flow cytometry. Functional groups with a similar expression profile included genes involved in phase-II metabolism that were induced by curcumin after 12 and 24 hours. Expression of some cytochrome P450 genes was downregulated by curcumin in HT29 and Caco-2 cells. In addition, curcumin affected expression of metallothionein genes, tubulin genes, p53 and other genes involved in colon carcinogenesis. Conclusions This study has extended knowledge on pathways or processes already reported to be affected by curcumin (cell cycle arrest, phase

  8. Germ cell differentiation-dependent and stage-specific expression of LANCL1 in rodent testis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Hansen, Martin Asser; Jørgensen, Marianne;

    2003-01-01

    , the establishment of an impermeable blood-testis barrier occurs between day 10-16 post natal (pn). Differential display analysis showed that the expression level of LANCL1 mRNA in mouse testes was very low until day 16 pn, but increased gradually from day 16 pn to reach a maximum on days 22-24 pn followed...... 18 and 20 pn, verifying the expression profile determined by differential display. LANCL1 mRNA level remained high in the meiotic division phase and in early round spermatids, but was down regulated in elongating spermatids and it was undetectable in step 9 elongating spermatids in stage IX (as...

  9. Differential alterations in gene expression profiles contribute to time-dependent effects of nandrolone to prevent denervation atrophy

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    Bauman William A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anabolic steroids, such as nandrolone, slow muscle atrophy, but the mechanisms responsible for this effect are largely unknown. Their effects on muscle size and gene expression depend upon time, and the cause of muscle atrophy. Administration of nandrolone for 7 days beginning either concomitantly with sciatic nerve transection (7 days or 29 days later (35 days attenuated denervation atrophy at 35 but not 7 days. We reasoned that this model could be used to identify genes that are regulated by nandrolone and slow denervation atrophy, as well as genes that might explain the time-dependence of nandrolone effects on such atrophy. Affymetrix microarrays were used to profile gene expression changes due to nandrolone at 7 and 35 days and to identify major gene expression changes in denervated muscle between 7 and 35 days. Results Nandrolone selectively altered expression of 124 genes at 7 days and 122 genes at 35 days, with only 20 genes being regulated at both time points. Marked differences in biological function of genes regulated by nandrolone at 7 and 35 days were observed. At 35, but not 7 days, nandrolone reduced mRNA and protein levels for FOXO1, the mTOR inhibitor REDD2, and the calcineurin inhibitor RCAN2 and increased those for ApoD. At 35 days, correlations between mRNA levels and the size of denervated muscle were negative for RCAN2, and positive for ApoD. Nandrolone also regulated genes for Wnt signaling molecules. Comparison of gene expression at 7 and 35 days after denervation revealed marked alterations in the expression of 9 transcriptional coregulators, including Ankrd1 and 2, and many transcription factors and kinases. Conclusions Genes regulated in denervated muscle after 7 days administration of nandrolone are almost entirely different at 7 versus 35 days. Alterations in levels of FOXO1, and of genes involved in signaling through calcineurin, mTOR and Wnt may be linked to the favorable action of nandrolone on

  10. MicroRNA expression analysis and Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification in metastatic and non-metastatic uveal melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ann-Cathrine; Holst, Line; Kaczkowski, Bogumil

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the association of microRNA expression and chromosomal changes with metastasis and survival in uveal melanoma (UM). Methods: Thirty-six patients with UM were selected based on the metastatic status, and clinicopathological data were collected. Multiplex ligation......-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) was used to identify chromosomal changes. Chromosomal changes and clinicopathological data were correlated with survival and metastasis. The microRNA expression was analysed in 26 of the 36 archived UM samples. Unsupervised analysis, differential expression analysis and Cox...... regression analysis were performed to determine the association with metastasis and survival. Results: Metastasis and metastatic death occurred in 20 patients, two patients died of other causes and one patient of unknown causes. A significant association between increasing size category (p = 0.002, log...

  11. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase alpha is expressed by monocytic cells and regulates the activation profile.

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    Christopher B Guest

    Full Text Available Macrophages are capable of assuming numerous phenotypes in order to adapt to endogenous and exogenous challenges but many of the factors that regulate this process are still unknown. We report that Ca(2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase alpha (CaMKKalpha is expressed in human monocytic cells and demonstrate that its inhibition blocks type-II monocytic cell activation and promotes classical activation. Affinity chromatography with paramagnetic beads isolated an approximately 50 kDa protein from nuclear lysates of U937 human monocytic cells activated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA. This protein was identified as CaMKKalpha by mass spectrometry and Western analysis. The function of CaMKKalpha in monocyte activation was examined using the CaMKKalpha inhibitors (STO-609 and forskolin and siRNA knockdown. Inhibition of CaMKKalpha, enhanced PMA-dependent CD86 expression and reduced CD11b expression. In addition, inhibition was associated with decreased translocation of CaMKKalpha to the nucleus. Finally, to further examine monocyte activation profiles, TNFalpha and IL-10 secretion were studied. CaMKKalpha inhibition attenuated PMA-dependent IL-10 production and enhanced TNFalpha production indicating a shift from type-II to classical monocyte activation. Taken together, these findings indicate an important new role for CaMKKalpha in the differentiation of monocytic cells.

  12. Modulation of TLR 3, 7 and 8 Expressions in HCV Genotype 3 Infected Individuals: Potential Correlations of Pathogenesis and Spontaneous Clearance

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    Rushna Firdaus

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatitis C virus is the major cause of chronic hepatitis worldwide which finally leads to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. Toll like receptors (TLRs play an important role in the course of many viral infections, but the role of TLRs in HCV pathogenesis has not been well elucidated so far. Objective. The aim of this study was to analyse the mRNA expression of TLRs 3, 7, and 8 in different stages of HCV infection including chronic, cirrhosis, interferon treated resolved, and relapsed cases. Methodology. Total RNA from whole blood was extracted and mRNA expression of TLRs 3, 7, and 8 genes was analyzed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR using β-Actin gene as an internal control. Results. This study consisted of 100 HCV infected individuals and twenty healthy controls. TLR 3 expression was found to be significantly elevated in individuals who had spontaneously cleared the virus (p<0.001, whereas TLR 7 was found to be 3.26 times more elevated in patients with cirrhosis of liver. In IFN induced individuals, TLR 8 expression levels were found to be 2.28-fold elevated as compared to control population. Conclusion. TLRs 3, 7, and 8 are prime biomarker candidates for HCV infection mRNA expression analysis which might improve current therapeutic approaches.

  13. Effects of manipulating slowpoke calcium-dependent potassium channel expression on rhythmic locomotor activity in Drosophila larvae

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    Erin C. McKiernan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Rhythmic motor behaviors are generated by networks of neurons. The sequence and timing of muscle contractions depends on both synaptic connections between neurons and the neurons’ intrinsic properties. In particular, motor neuron ion currents may contribute significantly to motor output. Large conductance Ca2+-dependent K+ (BK currents play a role in action potential repolarization, interspike interval, repetitive and burst firing, burst termination and interburst interval in neurons. Mutations in slowpoke (slo genes encoding BK channels result in motor disturbances. This study examined the effects of manipulating slo channel expression on rhythmic motor activity using Drosophila larva as a model system. Dual intracellular recordings from adjacent body wall muscles were made during spontaneous crawling-related activity in larvae expressing a slo mutation or a slo RNA interference construct. The incidence and duration of rhythmic activity in slo mutants were similar to wild-type control animals, while the timing of the motor pattern was altered. slo mutants showed decreased burst durations, cycle durations, and quiescence intervals, and increased duty cycles, relative to wild-type. Expressing slo RNAi in identified motor neurons phenocopied many of the effects observed in the mutant, including decreases in quiescence interval and cycle duration. Overall, these results show that altering slo expression in the whole larva, and specifically in motor neurons, changes the frequency of crawling activity. These results suggest an important role for motor neuron intrinsic properties in shaping the timing of motor output.

  14. PU.1 Expression in T Follicular Helper Cells Limits CD40L-Dependent Germinal Center B Cell Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awe, Olufolakemi; Hufford, Matthew M; Wu, Hao; Pham, Duy; Chang, Hua-Chen; Jabeen, Rukhsana; Dent, Alexander L; Kaplan, Mark H

    2015-10-15

    PU.1 is an ETS family transcription factor that is important for the development of multiple hematopoietic cell lineages. Previous work demonstrated a critical role for PU.1 in promoting Th9 development and in limiting Th2 cytokine production. Whether PU.1 has functions in other Th lineages is not clear. In this study, we examined the effects of ectopic expression of PU.1 in CD4(+) T cells and observed decreased expression of genes involved with the function of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells, including Il21 and Tnfsf5 (encoding CD40L). T cells from conditional mutant mice that lack expression of PU.1 in T cells (Sfpi1(lck-/-)) demonstrated increased production of CD40L and IL-21 in vitro. Following adjuvant-dependent or adjuvant-independent immunization, we observed that Sfpi1(lck-/-) mice had increased numbers of Tfh cells, increased germinal center B cells (GCB cells), and increased Ab production in vivo. This correlated with increased expression of IL-21 and CD40L in Tfh cells from Sfpi1(lck-/-) mice compared with control mice. Finally, although blockade of IL-21 did not affect GCB cells in Sfpi1(lck-/-) mice, anti-CD40L treatment of immunized Sfpi1(lck-/-) mice decreased GCB cell numbers and Ag-specific Ig concentrations. Together, these data indicate an inhibitory role for PU.1 in the function of Tfh cells, germinal centers, and Tfh-dependent humoral immunity.

  15. In vivo functional expression of a screened P. aeruginosa chaperone-dependent lipase in E. coli

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    Wu Xiangping

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial lipases particularly Pseudomonas lipases are widely used for biotechnological applications. It is a meaningful work to design experiments to obtain high-level active lipase. There is a limiting factor for functional overexpression of the Pseudomonas lipase that a chaperone is necessary for effective folding. As previously reported, several methods had been used to resolve the problem. In this work, the lipase (LipA and its chaperone (LipB from a screened strain named AB which belongs to Pseudomonas aeruginosa were overexpressed in E. coli with two dual expression plasmid systems to enhance the production of the active lipase LipA without in vitro refolding process. Results In this work, we screened a lipase-produced strain named AB through the screening procedure, which was identified as P. aeruginosa on the basis of 16S rDNA. Genomic DNA obtained from the strain was used to isolate the gene lipA (936 bp and lipase specific foldase gene lipB (1023 bp. One single expression plasmid system E. coli BL21/pET28a-lipAB and two dual expression plasmid systems E. coli BL21/pETDuet-lipA-lipB and E. coli BL21/pACYCDuet-lipA-lipB were successfully constructed. The lipase activities of the three expression systems were compared to choose the optimal expression method. Under the same cultured condition, the activities of the lipases expressed by E. coli BL21/pET28a-lipAB and E. coli BL21/pETDuet-lipA-lipB were 1300 U/L and 3200 U/L, respectively, while the activity of the lipase expressed by E. coli BL21/pACYCDuet-lipA-lipB was up to 8500 U/L. The lipase LipA had an optimal temperature of 30°C and an optimal pH of 9 with a strong pH tolerance. The active LipA could catalyze the reaction between fatty alcohols and fatty acids to generate fatty acid alkyl esters, which meant that LipA was able to catalyze esterification reaction. The most suitable fatty acid and alcohol substrates for esterification were octylic acid and hexanol

  16. Ontogenesis of gonadal aromatase gene expression in atlantic silverside (Menidia menidia) populations with genetic and temperature-dependent sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Tara A; Picha, Matthew E; Won, Eugene T; Borski, Russell J; McElroy, Anne E; Conover, David O

    2010-08-01

    Cytochrome P450 aromatase (P450arom), an enzyme that converts testosterone to 17beta-estradiol, is an important mediator of sex determination in teleosts with genetic sex determination (GSD) and temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). We compared the ontogenetic expression of P450arom in two populations of Atlantic silversides, Menidia menidia, which exhibit TSD (South Carolina) or GSD (Nova Scotia, Canada) using quantitative, real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Embryos and newly hatched larvae were reared at an intermediate sex ratio-producing temperature (21 degrees C), and older larvae and juveniles were reared at temperatures that feminize (15 degrees C) and masculinize (28 degrees C) to assess the temperature response of P450arom during development. Before sex determination, embryos and newly-hatched larvae displayed negligible P450arom expression, indicating minimal upregulation of this gene before sex determination. Gene expression increased in both populations during sex differentiation. Nova Scotia fish with GSD exhibited presumptive male- and female-like expression levels during early sex differentiation that were not influenced by temperature. South Carolina fish displayed low levels of expression at 28 degrees C with significantly heightened expression in some individuals at 15 degrees C, indicating that P450arom is temperature sensitive in the population with TSD. Populations also differed in the timing and maximal levels of P450arom expression, with fish from Nova Scotia exhibiting both the highest and earliest increase in expression in presumptive females. Our results support the hypothesis that P450arom is involved in female sex differentiation in this species, but is only responsive to temperature in M. menidia populations that exhibit TSD.

  17. Sex-dependent changes in brain CB1R expression and functionality and immune CB2R expression as a consequence of maternal deprivation and adolescent cocaine exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorente-Berzal, Alvaro; Assis, María A; Rubino, Tiziana; Zamberletti, Erica; Marco, Eva M; Parolaro, Daniela; Ambrosio, Emilio; Viveros, María-Paz

    2013-08-01

    Early life stress has been associated with several psychiatric disorders, including drug addiction. Actually, maternal deprivation (MD) alters the endocannabinoid system, which participates in motivation and reward for drugs, including cocaine. At youth, the rate of cocaine abuse is alarmingly increasing. Herein, we have investigated the consequences of MD and/or adolescent cocaine exposure in brain CB1Rs and CB2Rs in immune tissues. Control and maternally deprived (24h on postnatal day, pnd, 9) male and female Wistar rats were administered cocaine (8mg/kg/day) or saline during adolescence (pnd 28-42). At adulthood, [(3)H]-CP-55,940 autoradiographic binding was employed for the analysis of CB1R density and CP-55,940-stimulated [(35)S]-GTPgammaS binding for CB1R functionality; CB2R expression was analyzed by Western blotting. Sex differences in CB1R expression and functionality were found, and MD induced important and enduring sex-dependent changes. In addition, the plastic changes induced by adolescent cocaine administration in brain CB1Rs were differentially influenced by early life events. MD increased spleen CB2R expression while adolescent cocaine administration attenuated this effect; cocaine exposure also diminished CB2R expression in bone marrow. Present findings provide evidence for changes in brain CB1R expression and functionality and immune CB2R expression as a consequence of early life stress and adolescent cocaine exposure, and indicate functional interactions between both treatments, which in many regions differ between males and females.

  18. Healthy sheep that differ in scrapie associated PRNP genotypes exhibit significant differences of expression pattern associated with immune response and cell-to-cell signalling in retropharyngeal lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komolka, Katrin; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Schwerin, Manfred

    2013-04-15

    The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis whether prion protein gene (PRNP) associated scrapie susceptibility is connected with physiological changes in tissue involved in pathogen uptake, migration and propagation. Jejunum, ileal Peyer's patches, retropharyngeal lymph nodes, brain stem and liver of healthy and non scrapie-infected sheep with PRNP genotypes representing the scrapie risk class R1 (scrapie-resistant) and R5 (scrapie-susceptible), respectively, were comparatively analysed by microarray technology and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT qPCR). Significantly higher expression levels of genes involved in immune response and cell communication pathways in retropharyngeal lymph nodes of R1 sheep in comparison with R5 animals strongly suggest PRNP associated physiological processes with impact as an early barrier in pathogen defence. Equal expression patterns in brain stem suggest no physiological differences in brain of healthy R1 and R5 animals. In addition, similar expression pattern in liver indicates that there are no transcriptional differences in genes of the hepatic energy metabolism between animals of scrapie classes R1 and R5.

  19. Real-time PCR expression profiling of genes encoding potential virulence factors in Candida albicans biofilms: identification of model-dependent and -independent gene expression

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    Řičicová Markéta

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candida albicans infections are often associated with biofilm formation. Previous work demonstrated that the expression of HWP1 (hyphal wall protein and of genes belonging to the ALS (agglutinin-like sequence, SAP (secreted aspartyl protease, PLB (phospholipase B and LIP (lipase gene families is associated with biofilm growth on mucosal surfaces. We investigated using real-time PCR whether genes encoding potential virulence factors are also highly expressed in biofilms associated with abiotic surfaces. For this, C. albicans biofilms were grown on silicone in microtiter plates (MTP or in the Centres for Disease Control (CDC reactor, on polyurethane in an in vivo subcutaneous catheter rat (SCR model, and on mucosal surfaces in the reconstituted human epithelium (RHE model. Results HWP1 and genes belonging to the ALS, SAP, PLB and LIP gene families were constitutively expressed in C. albicans biofilms. ALS1-5 were upregulated in all model systems, while ALS9 was mostly downregulated. ALS6 and HWP1 were overexpressed in all models except in the RHE and MTP, respectively. The expression levels of SAP1 were more pronounced in both in vitro models, while those of SAP2, SAP4 and SAP6 were higher in the in vivo model. Furthermore, SAP5 was highly upregulated in the in vivo and RHE models. For SAP9 and SAP10 similar gene expression levels were observed in all model systems. PLB genes were not considerably upregulated in biofilms, while LIP1-3, LIP5-7 and LIP9-10 were highly overexpressed in both in vitro models. Furthermore, an elevated lipase activity was detected in supernatans of biofilms grown in the MTP and RHE model. Conclusions Our findings show that HWP1 and most of the genes belonging to the ALS, SAP and LIP gene families are upregulated in C. albicans biofilms. Comparison of the fold expression between the various model systems revealed similar expression levels for some genes, while for others model-dependent expression

  20. Microbial expression profiles in the rhizosphere of willows depend on soil contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yergeau, Etienne; Sanschagrin, Sylvie; Maynard, Christine; St-Arnaud, Marc; Greer, Charles W

    2014-02-01

    The goal of phytoremediation is to use plants to immobilize, extract or degrade organic and inorganic pollutants. In the case of organic contaminants, plants essentially act indirectly through the stimulation of rhizosphere microorganisms. A detailed understanding of the effect plants have on the activities of rhizosphere microorganisms could help optimize phytoremediation systems and enhance their use. In this study, willows were planted in contaminated and non-contaminated soils in a greenhouse, and the active microbial communities and the expression of functional genes in the rhizosphere and bulk soil were compared. Ion Torrent sequencing of 16S rRNA and Illumina sequencing of mRNA were performed. Genes related to carbon and amino-acid uptake and utilization were upregulated in the willow rhizosphere, providing indirect evidence of the compositional content of the root exudates. Related to this increased nutrient input, several microbial taxa showed a significant increase in activity in the rhizosphere. The extent of the rhizosphere stimulation varied markedly with soil contamination levels. The combined selective pressure of contaminants and rhizosphere resulted in higher expression of genes related to competition (antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation) in the contaminated rhizosphere. Genes related to hydrocarbon degradation were generally more expressed in contaminated soils, but the exact complement of genes induced was different for bulk and rhizosphere soils. Together, these results provide an unprecedented view of microbial gene expression in the plant rhizosphere during phytoremediation.

  1. Adiposity dependent apelin gene expression: relationships with oxidative and inflammation markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Díaz, Diego; Campión, Javier; Milagro, Fermín I; Martínez, Jose A

    2007-11-01

    It has been reported that apelin functions as an adipokine, which has been associated to obesity and insulin resistance. The objective of this study was to analyze the apelin mRNA expression in white adipose tissue (WAT) from high-fat (Cafeteria) fed rats, in order to examine potential relationships with obesity markers and other related risk factors. Animals fed on the high-fat diet during 56 days increased their body weight, total body fat and WAT depots weights when compared to controls. Apelin subcutaneous mRNA expression was higher in the Cafeteria than in the Control fed group and this increase was partially reversed by dietary vitamin C supplementation. Statistically significant associations between subcutaneous apelin gene expression and almost all the studied variables were identified, being of special interest the correlations found with serum leptin (r=0.517), liver malondialdehyde (MDA) levels (r=0.477), and leptin, IRS-3 and IL-1ra retroperitoneal mRNA expression (r=0.701; r=0.692 and r=0.561, respectively). These associations evidence a possible role for apelin in the excessive weight gain induced by high-fat feeding and increased adiposity, insulin-resistance, liver oxidative stress and inflammation.

  2. Time Dependent Gene Expression Changes in the Liver of Mice Treated with Benzene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V.S. Rana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Benzene is used as a general purpose solvent. Benzene metabolism starts from phenol and ends with p-benzoquinone and o-benzoquinone. Liver injury inducted by benzene still remains a toxicologic problem. Tumor related genes and immune responsive genes have been studied in patients suffering from benzene exposure. However, gene expression profiles and pathways related to its hepatotoxicity are not known. This study reports the results obtained in the liver of BALB/C mice (SLC, Inc., Japan administered 0.05 ml/100 g body weight of 2% benzene for six days. Serum, ALT, AST and ALP were determined using automated analyzer (Fuji., Japan. Histopathological observations were made to support gene expression data. c-DNA microarray analyses were performed using Affymetrix Gene-chip system. After six days of benzene exposure, twenty five genes were down regulated whereas nineteen genes were up-regulated. These gene expression changes were found to be related to pathways of biotransformation, detoxification, apoptosis, oxidative stress and cell cycle. It has been shown for the first time that genes corresponding to circadian rhythms are affected by benzene. Results suggest that gene expression profile might serve as potential biomarkers of hepatotoxicity during benzene exposure.

  3. Sex-dependent gene expression in early brain development of chicken embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stigson Michael

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Differentiation of the brain during development leads to sexually dimorphic adult reproductive behavior and other neural sex dimorphisms. Genetic mechanisms independent of steroid hormones produced by the gonads have recently been suggested to partly explain these dimorphisms. Results Using cDNA microarrays and real-time PCR we found gene expression differences between the male and female embryonic brain (or whole head that may be independent of morphological differentiation of the gonads. Genes located on the sex chromosomes (ZZ in males and ZW in females were common among the differentially expressed genes, several of which (WPKCI-8, HINT, MHM non-coding RNA have previously been implicated in avian sex determination. A majority of the identified genes were more highly expressed in males. Three of these genes (CDK7, CCNH and BTF2-P44 encode subunits of the transcription factor IIH complex, indicating a role for this complex in neuronal differentiation. Conclusion In conclusion, this study provides novel insights into sexually dimorphic gene expression in the embryonic chicken brain and its possible involvement in sex differentiation of the nervous system in birds.

  4. Egg size-dependent expression of growth hormone receptor accompanies compensatory growth in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segers, F H I D; Berishvili, G; Taborsky, B

    2012-02-07

    Large egg size usually boosts offspring survival, but mothers have to trade off egg size against egg number. Therefore, females often produce smaller eggs when environmental conditions for offspring are favourable, which is subsequently compensated for by accelerated juvenile growth. How this rapid growth is modulated on a molecular level is still unclear. As the somatotropic axis is a key regulator of early growth in vertebrates, we investigated the effect of egg size on three key genes belonging to this axis, at different ontogenetic stages in a mouthbrooding cichlid (Simochromis pleurospilus). The expression levels of one of them, the growth hormone receptor (GHR), were significantly higher in large than in small eggs, but remarkably, this pattern was reversed after hatching: young originating from small eggs had significantly higher GHR expression levels as yolk sac larvae and as juveniles. GHR expression in yolk sac larvae was positively correlated with juvenile growth rate and correspondingly fish originating from small eggs grew faster. This enabled them to catch up fully in size within eight weeks with conspecifics from larger eggs. This is the first evidence for a potential link between egg size, an important maternal effect, and offspring gene expression, which mediates an adaptive adjustment in a relevant hormonal axis.

  5. The rice field cyanobacteria Anabaena azotica and Anabaena sp. CH1 express vanadium-dependent nitrogenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boison, G.; Steingen, C.; Stal, L.J.; Bothe, H.

    2006-01-01

    Anabaena azotica FACHB-118 and Anabaena sp. CH1, heterocystous cyanobacteria isolated from Chinese and Taiwanese rice fields, expressed vanadium-containing nitrogenase when under molybdenum deficiency. This is the second direct observation of an alternative nitrogenase in cyanobacteria. The vanadium

  6. Cell cycle-regulated expression of mammalian CDC6 is dependent on E2F

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hateboer, G; Wobst, A; Petersen, B O

    1998-01-01

    The E2F transcription factors are essential regulators of cell growth in multicellular organisms, controlling the expression of a number of genes whose products are involved in DNA replication and cell proliferation. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the MBF and SBF transcription complexes have functi...

  7. Developmental and Activity-Dependent miRNA Expression Profiling in Primary Hippocampal Neuron Cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Spronsen (Myrrhe); E.Y. van Battum (Eljo); M. Kuijpers (Marijn); V.R. Vangoor (Vamshidhar); M.L. Rietman (M. Liset); J. Pothof (Joris); L.F. Gumy (Laura); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); A.S. Akhmanova (Anna); R.J. Pasterkamp (Jeroen); C.C. Hoogenraad (Casper)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractMicroRNAs (miRNAs) are evolutionarily conserved non-coding RNAs of ∼22 nucleotides that regulate gene expression at the level of translation and play vital roles in hippocampal neuron development, function and plasticity. Here, we performed a systematic and in-depth analysis of miRNA exp

  8. Egg size-dependent expression of growth hormone receptor accompanies compensatory growth in fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segers, F. H. I. D.; Berishvili, G.; Taborsky, B.

    2012-01-01

    Large egg size usually boosts offspring survival, but mothers have to trade off egg size against egg number. Therefore, females often produce smaller eggs when environmental conditions for offspring are favourable, which is subsequently compensated for by accelerated juvenile growth. How this rapid growth is modulated on a molecular level is still unclear. As the somatotropic axis is a key regulator of early growth in vertebrates, we investigated the effect of egg size on three key genes belonging to this axis, at different ontogenetic stages in a mouthbrooding cichlid (Simochromis pleurospilus). The expression levels of one of them, the growth hormone receptor (GHR), were significantly higher in large than in small eggs, but remarkably, this pattern was reversed after hatching: young originating from small eggs had significantly higher GHR expression levels as yolk sac larvae and as juveniles. GHR expression in yolk sac larvae was positively correlated with juvenile growth rate and correspondingly fish originating from small eggs grew faster. This enabled them to catch up fully in size within eight weeks with conspecifics from larger eggs. This is the first evidence for a potential link between egg size, an important maternal effect, and offspring gene expression, which mediates an adaptive adjustment in a relevant hormonal axis. PMID:21752823

  9. Age-Dependent Changes in Human Hepatic CYP2C8 and 1A2 Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predicting age-specific metabolism of pyrethroids is important in evaluating age-related sensitivity. Our goal is to use an in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) approach to predict pyrethroid metabolism for different ages incorporating enzyme ontogeny and expressed enzyme ki...

  10. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 1-Alpha-Hydroxylase-Dependent Stimulation of Renal Klotho Expression by Spironolactone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Alesutan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Klotho, a transmembrane protein, protease and hormone mainly expressed in kidney, is required for the suppression of 1,25(OH2D3-generating 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 1-alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp27b1 by FGF23. Conversely, 1,25(OH2D3 stimulates, by activating the vitamin D3 receptor (Vdr, the expression of klotho, thus establishing a negative feedback loop. Klotho protects against renal and vascular injury. Klotho deficiency accelerates aging and early death, effects at least partially due to excessive formation of 1,25(OH2D3 and subsequent hyperphosphatemia. Klotho expression is inhibited by aldosterone. The present study explored the interaction of aldosterone and DOCA as well as the moderately selective mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist spironolactone on klotho expression. Methods: mRNA levels were determined utilizing quantitative RT-PCR in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293 or in renal tissues from mice without or with prior mineralocorticoid (aldosterone or DOCA and/or spironolactone treatment. In HEK293 cells, protein levels were determined by western blotting. The experiments in HEK293 cells were performed without or with silencing of CYP27B1, of vitamin D3 receptor (VDR or of mineralocorticoid receptor (NR3C2. Results: In HEK293 cells aldosterone and in mice DOCA significantly decreased KLOTHO gene expression, effects opposed by spironolactone treatment. Spironolactone treatment alone significantly increased KLOTHO and CYP27B1 transcript levels in HEK293 cells (24 hours and mice (8 hours or 5 days. Moreover, spironolactone significantly increased klotho and CYP27B1 protein levels in HEK293 cells (48 hours. Reduced NR3C2 expression following silencing did not significantly affect KLOTHO and CYP27B1 transcript levels in presence or absence of spironolactone. Silencing of CYP27B1 and VDR significantly blunted the stimulating effect of spironolactone on KLOTHO mRNA levels in HEK293 cells. Conclusion: Besides blocking the effects of

  11. Mesoderm-specific Stat3 deletion affects expression of Sox9 yielding Sox9-dependent phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michael D.; Murray, Caroline A.; Perantoni, Alan O.

    2017-01-01

    To date, mutations within the coding region and translocations around the SOX9 gene both constitute the majority of genetic lesions underpinning human campomelic dysplasia (CD). While pathological coding-region mutations typically result in a non-functional SOX9 protein, little is known about what mechanism(s) controls normal SOX9 expression, and subsequently, which signaling pathways may be interrupted by alterations occurring around the SOX9 gene. Here, we report the identification of Stat3 as a key modulator of Sox9 expression in nascent cartilage and developing chondrocytes. Stat3 expression is predominant in tissues of mesodermal origin, and its conditional ablation using mesoderm-specific TCre, in vivo, causes dwarfism and skeletal defects characteristic of CD. Specifically, Stat3 loss results in the expansion of growth plate hypertrophic chondrocytes and deregulation of normal endochondral ossification in all bones examined. Conditional deletion of Stat3 with a Sox9Cre driver produces palate and tracheal irregularities similar to those described in Sox9+/- mice. Furthermore, mesodermal deletion of Stat3 causes global embryonic down regulation of Sox9 expression and function in vivo. Mechanistic experiments ex vivo suggest Stat3 can directly activate the expression of Sox9 by binding to its proximal promoter following activation. These findings illuminate a novel role for Stat3 in chondrocytes during skeletal development through modulation of a critical factor, Sox9. Importantly, they further provide the first evidence for the modulation of a gene product other than Sox9 itself which is capable of modeling pathological aspects of CD and underscore a potentially valuable therapeutic target for patients with the disorder. PMID:28166224

  12. Ecotype dependent expression and alternative splicing of epithiospecifier protein (ESP) in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissen, R; Hyldbakk, E; Wang, C-W V; Sørmo, C G; Rossiter, J T; Bones, A M

    2012-03-01

    Epithiospecifier protein (ESP) is responsible for diverting glucosinolate hydrolysis from the generation of isothiocyanates to that of epithionitriles or nitriles, and thereby negatively affects the ability of the plant to defend itself against certain insects. Despite this important role of ESP, little is known about its expression in plant tissues and the regulation thereof. We therefore investigated ESP expression by qPCR and Western blot in different organs during the growth cycle of the two Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes Col-0 and Mt-0. Besides the fact that ESP transcript and protein levels were revealed to be much higher in Mt-0 than in Col-0 in all cases, our qPCR results also indicated that ESP expression is regulated differently in the two A. thaliana ecotypes. No ESP protein was detected by Western blot in any organ or developmental stage for Col-0. During the assays an alternative splice variant of ESP was identified in Col-0, but not Mt-0, leading to a mis-spliced transcript which could explain the low expression levels of ESP in the former ecotype. Analysis of genomic sequences containing the ESP splice sites, of ESP protein level and ESP activity from seven A. thaliana ecotypes showed a positive correlation between the presence of a non-canonical 5' splice site for ESP and the absence of detectable ESP protein levels and ESP activity. When analysing the expression of both transcript variants in Col-0 after treatment with methyl jasmonate, a condition known to "induce ESP", it was indeed the alternative splice variant that was preferentially induced.

  13. Below and beyond the recognition of emotional facial expressions in alcohol dependence: from basic perception to social cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Hondt, Fabien; Campanella, Salvatore; Kornreich, Charles; Philippot, Pierre; Maurage, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Studies that have carried out experimental evaluation of emotional skills in alcohol-dependence have, up to now, been mainly focused on the exploration of emotional facial expressions (EFE) decoding. In the present paper, we provide some complements to the recent systematic literature review published by Donadon and de Lima Osório on this crucial topic. We also suggest research avenues that must be, in our opinion, considered in the coming years. More precisely, we propose, first, that a battery integrating a set of emotional tasks relating to different processes should be developed to better systemize EFE decoding measures in alcohol-dependence. Second, we propose to go below EFE recognition deficits and to seek for the roots of those alterations, particularly by investigating the putative role played by early visual processing and vision-emotion interactions in the emotional impairment observed in alcohol-dependence. Third, we insist on the need to go beyond EFE recognition deficits by suggesting that they only constitute a part of wider emotional deficits in alcohol-dependence. Importantly, since the efficient decoding of emotions is a crucial ability for the development and maintenance of satisfactory interpersonal relationships, we suggest that disruption of this ability in alcohol-dependent individuals may have adverse consequences for their social integration. One way to achieve this research agenda would be to develop the field of affective and social neuroscience of alcohol-dependence, which could ultimately lead to major advances at both theoretical and therapeutic levels.

  14. High-frequency Oligonucleotides in Watermelon Expressed Sequenced Tag-unigenes Are Useful in Producing Polymorphic Polymerase Chain Reaction Markers among Watermelon Genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we report a simple procedure for developing gene targeted primers, named high-frequency gene sequence (HFGS) primers, based on oligonucleotides that exist in high frequency in watermelon expressed sequence tag (EST)-unigenes. These HFGS primers were constructed by first screening for...

  15. Dopamine and serotonin transporter genotypes moderate sensitivity to maternal expressed emotion: the case of conduct and emotional problems in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonuga-Barke, E.; Oades, R.D.; Psychogiou, L.; Chen, W.; Franke, B.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Banaschewski, T.; Ebstein, R.P.; Gil, M.; Anney, R.; Miranda, A.; Roeyers, H.; Rothenberger, A.; Sergeant, J.A.; Steinhausen, H.C.; Thompson, M.; Asherson, P.; Faraone, S.V.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mothers' positive emotions expressed about their children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are associated with a reduced likelihood of comorbid conduct problems (CP). We examined whether this association with CP, and one with emotional problems (EMO), is moderated by

  16. Dopamine and Serotonin Transporter Genotypes Moderate Sensitivity to Maternal Expressed Emotion: The Case of Conduct and Emotional Problems in Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J. S.; Oades, Robert D.; Psychogiou, Lamprini; Chen, Wai; Franke, Barbara; Buitelaar, Jan; Banaschewski, Tobias; Ebstein, Richard P.; Gil, Michael; Anney, Richard; Miranda, Ana; Roeyers, Herbert; Rothenberger, Aribert; Sergeant, Joseph; Steinhausen, Hans Christoph; Thompson, Margaret; Asherson, Philip; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Mothers' positive emotions expressed about their children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are associated with a reduced likelihood of comorbid conduct problems (CP). We examined whether this association with CP, and one with emotional problems (EMO), is moderated by variants within three genes, previously reported…

  17. Microarray-based method for the parallel analysis of genotypes and expression profiles of wood-forming tissues in Eucalyptus grandis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Barros, E

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available of Eucalyptus grandis planting stock that exhibit preferred wood qualities is thus a priority of the South African forestry industry. The researchers used microarray-based DNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis in combination with expression...

  18. Genotypic Variation under Fe Deficiency Results in Rapid Changes in Protein Expressions and Genes Involved in Fe Metabolism and Antioxidant Mechanisms in Tomato Seedlings (Solanum lycopersicum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muneer, Sowbiya; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2015-11-25

    To investigate Fe deficiency tolerance in tomato cultivars, quantification of proteins and genes involved in Fe metabolism and antioxidant mechanisms were performed in "Roggusanmaru" and "Super Doterang". Fe deficiency (Moderate, low and -Fe) significantly decreased the biomass, total, and apoplastic Fe concentration of "Roggusanmaru", while a slight variation was observed in "Super Doterang" cultivar. The quantity of important photosynthetic pigments such as total chlorophyll and carotenoid contents significantly decreased in "Roggusanmaru" than "Super Doterang" cultivar. The total protein profile in leaves and roots determines that "Super Doterang" exhibited an optimal tolerance to Fe deficiency compared to "Roggusanmaru" cultivar. A reduction in expression of PSI (photosystem I), PSII (photosystem II) super-complexes and related thylakoid protein contents were detected in "Roggusanmaru" than "Super Doterang" cultivar. Moreover, the relative gene expression of SlPSI and SlPSII were well maintained in "Super Doterang" than "Roggusanmaru" cultivar. The relative expression of genes involved in Fe-transport (SlIRT1 and SlIRT2) and Fe(III) chelates reductase oxidase (SlFRO1) were relatively reduced in "Roggusanmaru", while increased in "Super Doterang" cultivar under Fe deficient conditions. The H⁺-ATPase relative gene expression (SlAHA1) in roots were maintained in "Super Doterang" compared to "Roggusanmaru". Furthermore, the gene expressions involved in antioxidant defense mechanisms (SlSOD, SlAPX and SlCAT) in leaves and roots showed that these genes were highly increased in "Super Doterang", whereas decreased in "Roggusanmaru" cultivar under Fe deficiency. The present study suggested that "Super Doterang" is better tomato cultivar than "Roggusanmaru" for calcareous soils.

  19. The expression of different superoxide dismutase forms is cell-type dependent in olive (Olea europaea L.) leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corpas, Francisco J; Fernández-Ocaña, Ana; Carreras, Alfonso; Valderrama, Raquel; Luque, Francisco; Esteban, Francisco J; Rodríguez-Serrano, María; Chaki, Mounira; Pedrajas, José R; Sandalio, Luisa M; del Río, Luis A; Barroso, Juan B

    2006-07-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is a key antioxidant enzyme present in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells as a first line of defense against the accumulation of superoxide radicals. In olive leaves, the SOD enzymatic system was characterized and was found to be comprised of three isozymes, an Mn-SOD, an Fe-SOD and a CuZn-SOD. Transcript expression analysis of whole leaves showed that the three isozymes represented 82, 17 and 0.8% of the total SOD expressed, respectively. Using the combination of laser capture microdissection (LCM) and real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), the expression of these SOD isozymes was studied in different cell types of olive leaves, including spongy mesophyll, palisade mesophyll, xylem and phloem. In spongy mesophyll cells, the isozyme proportion was similar to that in whole leaves, but in the other cells the proportion of expressed SOD isozymes was different. In palisade mesophyll cells, Fe-SOD was the most abundant, followed by Mn-SOD and CuZn-SOD, but in phloem cells Mn-SOD was the most prominent isozyme, and Fe-SOD was present in trace amounts. In xylem cells, only the Mn-SOD was detected. On the other hand, the highest accumulation of superoxide radicals was localized in vascular tissue which was the tissue with the lowest level of SOD transcripts. These data show that in olive leaves, each SOD isozyme has a different gene expression depending on the cell type of the leaf.

  20. Reishi immuno-modulation protein induces interleukin-2 expression via protein kinase-dependent signaling pathways within human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsien-Yeh; Hua, Kuo-Feng; Wu, Wei-Chi; Hsu, Jason; Weng, Shih-Ting; Lin, Tsai-Leng; Liu, Chun-Yi; Hseu, Ruey-Shyang; Huang, Ching-Tsan

    2008-04-01

    Ganoderma lucidum, a medicinal fungus is thought to possess and enhance a variety of human immune functions. An immuno-modulatory protein, Ling Zhi-8 (LZ-8) isolated from G. lucidum exhibited potent mitogenic effects upon human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). However, LZ-8-mediated signal transduction in the regulation of interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene expression within human T cells is largely unknown. Here we cloned the LZ-8 gene of G. lucidum, and expressed the recombinant LZ-8 protein (rLZ-8) by means of a yeast Pichia pastoris protein expression system. We found that rLZ-8 induces IL-2 gene expression via the Src-family protein tyrosine kinase (PTK), via reactive oxygen species (ROS), and differential protein kinase-dependent pathways within human primary T cells and cultured Jurkat T cells. In essence, we have established the nature of the rLZ-8-mediated signal-transduction pathways, such as PTK/protein kinase C (PKC)/ROS, PTK/PLC/PKCalpha/ERK1/2, and PTK/PLC/PKCalpha/p38 pathways in the regulation of IL-2 gene expression within human T cells. Our current results of analyzing rLZ-8-mediated signal transduction in T cells might provide a potential application for rLZ-8 as a pharmacological immune-modulating agent.

  1. Expression of nitric oxide synthase in T-cell-dependent liver injury initiated by ConA in Kunming mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张修礼; 曲建慧; 万谟彬; 权启镇; 孙自勤; 王要军; 江学良; 李文波

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is expressed in T-cell-dependent liver injury initiated by concanavalin A (ConA) in Kunming mice and study the possible effect of nitric oxide(NO) on liver injury models. Methods: Liver injury in Kunming mice was induced by administration of ConA through tail vein. Expression of NOS in the liver was detected by NADPH diaphorase staining method. The possible effect of NO on liver injury models was obtained by L-NAME injection to suppress synthesis of NO. Results: NOS has a strong expression in hepatocytes after ConA injection, especially in those close to the central vein, while only a weak expression was found in the epithelial cells in control group. Liver injury became more serious when NO synthesis was inhibited by L-NAME, accompanied by great malondialdehyde(MDA) increase in serum and severe intrahepatic vascular thrombosis. Conclusion: NOS markedly expressed in ConAinduced liver injury, which may subsequently promote nitric oxide synthesis. Increasement of nitric oxide has a protective effect on ConA-induced liver injury.

  2. Varietal Dependence of GLVs Accumulation and LOX-HPL Pathway Gene Expression in Four Vitis vinifera Wine Grapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xu; Xu, Xiao-Qing; Yu, Ke-Ji; Zhu, Bao-Qing; Lan, Yi-Bin; Duan, Chang-Qing; Pan, Qiu-Hong

    2016-11-23

    Variety is one of the major factors influencing grape and wine aromatic characteristics. Green leaf volatiles (GLVs), derived from lipoxygenase-hydroperoxides lyase (LOX-HPL) pathway, are important components for the aromatic quality of grapes and wines. However, the varietal difference regarding GLVs accumulation and related gene expression are poorly studied. This work exhibited that the accumulation of various GLVs and the expression of LOX-HPL pathway genes in four Vitis vinifera wine grape cultivars: Syrah, Muscat Tchervine, Gewürztraminer and Chardonnay. The results showed a variety dependence of GLVs profile. Muscat Tchervine harvested grapes contained less C6 aldehydes and the most abundant esters, which corresponded to very low VvLOXA and VvHPL1 expression abundance as well as high VvAAT transcript in this variety. High expression level of both VvLOXA and VvHPL1 paralleled with higher level of C6 aldehydes together with higher alcohols in Syrah grape. Gewürztraminer and Chardonnay grapes had high aldehydes and alcohols as well as low esters, which were resulted from their higher expression level of VvLOXA or VvHPL1 and lower VvAAT. From these above corresponding relations, it is concluded that VvLOXA, VvHPL1 and VvAAT in the LOX-HPL pathway are targets for altering GLVs composition in the grape varieties.

  3. Comprehensive Analysis of PPARa-Dependent Regulation of Hepatic Lipid Metabolism by Expression Profiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rakhshandehroo, M.; Sanderson-Kjellberg, L.M.; Matilainen, M.; Stienstra, R.

    2007-01-01

    PPARa is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of nutrient metabolism and inflammation. Although much is already known about the function of PPARa in hepatic lipid metabolism, many PPARa-dependent pathways and genes have yet to be discovered. In order to obtain an overvi

  4. CLONING, SEQUENCING, AND EXPRESSION OF BACILLUS-SUBTILIS GENES INVOLVED IN ATP-DEPENDENT NUCLEASE SYNTHESIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOOISTRA, J; VENEMA, G

    1991-01-01

    The genes encoding the subunits of the Bacillus subtilis ATP-dependent nuclease (add genes) have been cloned. The genes were located on an 8.8-kb SalI-SmaI chromosomal DNA fragment. Transformants of a recBCD deletion mutant of Escherichia coli with plasmid pGV1 carrying this DNA fragment showed ATP-

  5. Vasopressin-dependent short-term regulation of aquaporin 4 expressed in Xenopus oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeller, H B; Fenton, R A; Zeuthen, T;

    2009-01-01

    following pathologies such as brain injuries, brain tumours, and cerebral ischemia. As vasopressin and its G-protein-coupled receptor (V1(a)R) have been shown to affect the outcome of brain edema, we have investigated the regulatory interaction between AQP4 and V1(a)R by heterologous expression in Xenopus......Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) is abundantly expressed in the perivascular glial endfeet in the central nervous system (CNS), where it is involved in the exchange of fluids between blood and brain. At this location, AQP4 contributes to the formation and/or the absorption of the brain edema that may arise......)R may prove to be a potential therapeutic target in the prevention and treatment of brain edema....

  6. Diet-dependent gene expression in honey bees: honey vs. sucrose or high fructose corn syrup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Marsha M; Robinson, Gene E

    2014-07-17

    Severe declines in honey bee populations have made it imperative to understand key factors impacting honey bee health. Of major concern is nutrition, as malnutrition in honey bees is associated with immune system impairment and increased pesticide susceptibility. Beekeepers often feed high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) or sucrose after harvesting honey or during periods of nectar dearth. We report that, relative to honey, chronic feeding of either of these two alternative carbohydrate sources elicited hundreds of differences in gene expression in the fat body, a peripheral nutrient-sensing tissue analogous to vertebrate liver and adipose tissues. These expression differences included genes involved in protein metabolism and oxidation-reduction, including some involved in tyrosine and phenylalanine metabolism. Differences between HFCS and sucrose diets were much more subtle and included a few genes involved in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Our results suggest that bees receive nutritional components from honey that are not provided by alternative food sources widely used in apiculture.

  7. Short-term striatal gene expression responses to brain-derived neurotrophic factor are dependent on MEK and ERK activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgun Gokce

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is believed to be an important regulator of striatal neuron survival, differentiation, and plasticity. Moreover, reduction of BDNF delivery to the striatum has been implicated in the pathophysiology of Huntington's disease. Nevertheless, many essential aspects of BDNF responses in striatal neurons remain to be elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we assessed the relative contributions of multipartite intracellular signaling pathways to the short-term induction of striatal gene expression by BDNF. To identify genes regulated by BDNF in these GABAergic cells, we first used DNA microarrays to quantify their transcriptomic responses following 3 h of BDNF exposure. The signal transduction pathways underlying gene induction were subsequently dissected using pharmacological agents and quantitative real-time PCR. Gene expression responses to BDNF were abolished by inhibitors of TrkB (K252a and calcium (chelator BAPTA-AM and transient receptor potential cation channel [TRPC] antagonist SKF-96365. Interestingly, inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases 1 and 2 (MEK1/2 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase ERK also blocked the BDNF-mediated induction of all tested BDNF-responsive genes. In contrast, inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS, phosphotidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K, and CAMK exhibited less prevalent, gene-specific effects on BDNF-induced RNA expression. At the nuclear level, the activation of both Elk-1 and CREB showed MEK dependence. Importantly, MEK-dependent activation of transcription was shown to be required for BDNF-induced striatal neurite outgrowth, providing evidence for its contribution to striatal neuron plasticity. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that the MEK/ERK pathway is a major mediator of neuronal plasticity and other important BDNF-dependent striatal functions that are fulfilled through the positive regulation of gene expression.

  8. Dose-dependent Differential Effects of Risedronate on Gene Expression in Osteoblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, J.; Stern, P H

    2011-01-01

    Bisphosphonates have multiple effects on bone. Their actions on osteoclasts lead to inhibition of bone resorption, at least partially through apoptosis. Effects on osteoblasts vary, with modifications in the molecule and concentration both resulting in qualitatively different responses. To understand the mechanism of the differential effects of high and low bisphosphonate concentrations on osteoblast activity, we compared the effects of 10−8M and 10−4M risedronate on gene expression in UMR-10...

  9. UCP2 mRNA expression is dependent on glucose metabolism in pancreatic islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Louise Torp

    2012-01-01

    Uncoupling Protein 2 (UCP2) is expressed in the pancreatic β-cell, where it partially uncouples the mitochondrial proton gradient, decreasing both ATP-production and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Increased glucose levels up-regulate UCP2 mRNA and protein levels, but the mechanism f...... down-regulation of UCP2 is involved in preserving the insulin secretory capacity of GK mutant mice and might also be implicated in limiting disease progression in MODY2 patients....

  10. Diet-dependent hypercalciuria in transgenic mice with reduced CLC5 chloride channel expression

    OpenAIRE

    Luyckx, Valerie A.; LeClercq, Baudouin; Dowland, Lara K.; Yu, Alan S. L.

    1999-01-01

    Dent’s disease is an X-linked inherited disorder characterized by hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, nephrolithiasis, low molecular weight proteinuria, Fanconi’s syndrome, and renal failure. It is caused by inactivating mutations in CLC5, a member of the CLC voltage-gated chloride channel family. CLC5 is known to be expressed in the endosomal compartment of the renal proximal tubule, where it may be required for endosomal acidification and trafficking. Although the Fanconi’s syndrome and low m...

  11. Chronic Cadmium Exposure Stimulates SDF-1 Expression in an ERα Dependent Manner

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium is an omnipotent environmental contaminant associated with the development of breast cancer. Studies suggest that cadmium functions as an endocrine disruptor, mimicking the actions of estrogen in breast cancer cells and activating the receptor to promote cell growth. Although acute cadmium exposure is known to promote estrogen receptor-mediated gene expression associated with growth, the consequence of chronic cadmium exposure is unclear. Since heavy metals are known to bioaccumulate,...

  12. Maturational changes in connexin 43 expression in the seminiferous tubules may depend on thyroid hormone action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchlewska, Katarzyna; Kula, Krzysztof; Walczak-Jedrzejowska, Renata; Kula, Wojciech; Oszukowska, Elzbieta; Filipiak, Eliza; Moszura, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Connexin 43 (Cx43) mediates the effect of thyroid hormone on Sertoli cell