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Sample records for genotoxicity

  1. Genotoxicity investigations on nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oesch, Franz; Landsiedel, Robert

    2012-07-01

    This review is based on the lecture presented at the April 2010 nanomaterials safety assessment Postsatellite to the 2009 EUROTOX Meeting and summarizes genotoxicity investigations on nanomaterials published in the open scientific literature (up to 2008). Special attention is paid to the relationship between particle size and positive versus negative outcome, as well as the dependence of the outcome on the test used. Salient conclusions and outstanding recommendations emerging from the information summarized in this review are as follows: recognize that nanomaterials are not all the same; therefore know and document what nanomaterial has been tested and in what form; take nanomaterials specific properties into account; in order to make your results comparable with those of others and on other nanomaterials: use or at least include in your studies standardized methods; use in vivo studies to put in vitro results into perspective; take uptake and distribution of the nanomaterial into account; and in order to become able to make extrapolations to risk for human: learn about the mechanism of nanomaterials genotoxic effects. Past experience with standard non-nanosubstances already had shown that mechanisms of genotoxic effects can be complex and their elucidation can be demanding, while there often is an immediate need to assess the genotoxic hazard. Thus, a practical and pragmatic approach to genotoxicity investigations of novel nanomaterials is the use of a battery of standard genotoxicity testing methods covering a wide range of mechanisms. Application of these standard methods to nanomaterials demands, however, adaptations, and the interpretation of results from the genotoxicity testing of nanomaterials needs additional considerations exceeding those used for standard size materials.

  2. Genotoxicity of phthalates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkekoglu, Pınar; Kocer-Gumusel, Belma

    2014-12-01

    Many of the environmental, occupational and industrial chemicals are able to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cause oxidative stress. ROS may lead to genotoxicity, which is suggested to contribute to the pathophysiology of many human diseases, including inflammatory diseases and cancer. Phthalates are ubiquitous environmental chemicals and are well-known peroxisome proliferators (PPs) and endocrine disruptors. Several in vivo and in vitro studies have been conducted concerning the carcinogenic and mutagenic effects of phthalates. Di(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP) and several other phthalates are shown to be hepatocarcinogenic in rodents. The underlying factor in the hepatocarcinogenesis is suggested to be their ability to generate ROS and cause genotoxicity. Several methods, including chromosomal aberration test, Ames test, micronucleus assay and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) mutation test and Comet assay, have been used to determine genotoxic properties of phthalates. Comet assay has been an important tool in the measurement of the genotoxic potential of many chemicals, including phthalates. In this review, we will mainly focus on the studies, which were conducted on the DNA damage caused by different phthalate esters and protection studies against the genotoxicity of these chemicals.

  3. Genotoxicity of swine effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techio, V H; Stolberg, J; Kunz, A; Zanin, E; Perdomo, C C

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of genotoxic effects of swine effluents from different stages of a treatment system for swine wastes through bioassay of stamen hairs and micronuclei in Tradescantia (clone BNL 4430). No significant differences (p≥0.05) regarding the genic mutations were found in the bioassay of stamen hairs, independently of the effluent analysed. For the genotoxicity test with micronuclei, the plants exposed to raw wastes, to sludge, and to effluent of the biodigester have presented higher rates of chromosomal damages (micronuclei), with significant differences in relation to the control group and other effluent of the waste treatment system (p≤0.05). The association between the chemical parameters and the genotoxicity data have shown that the variables COD and TKN have presented significant correlation (p≤0.05) with the number of mutagenic events in the tetrads.

  4. Genotoxic effect of alkaloids

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    J. A. P. Henriques

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the increase use of alkaloids in general medical practice in recent years, it is of interest to determine genotoxic, mutagenic and recombinogenic response to different groups of alkaloids in prokaryotic and eucaryotic organisms. Reserpine, boldine and chelerythrine did not show genotoxicity response in the SOS-Chromotest whereas skimmianine showed genotixicity in the presence of a metabolic activation mixture. Voacristine isolated fromthe leaves of Ervatamia coronaria shows in vivo cytostatic and mutagenic effects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae hapioids cells. The Rauwolfia alkaloid (reserpine was not able to induce reverse mutation and recombinational mitotic events (crossing-over and gene conversion in yeast diploid strain XS2316.

  5. Signs of deferasirox genotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Ila, Hasan Basri; Topaktas, Mehmet; Arslan, Mehmet; Büyükleyla, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Iron overload is a major health problem for patients who have to have continuous blood transfusions. It brings some metabolic problems together. Various iron chelating agents are being used for treatment of hemochromatosis which arises from excess iron accumulation. This study was conducted with the aim of determining whether deferasirox used as an iron chelator in patients with hemochromatosis has genotoxic effects. Commercial form of deferasirox, Exjade was used as test material. Test mater...

  6. Genotoxic activity of praziquantel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, R; Ostrosky, P

    1997-12-01

    Praziquantel is a synthetic drug with a remarkable activity against parasites, particularly treamatodes and cestodes. Initial genotoxicity tests used a spectrum of endpoints including tests in bacteria, yeasts, mammalian cells and Drosophila and each one gave negative results. Effects on reproductive cells of mice were negative as well. However, host mediated studies in mice and humans were contradictory and a comutagenic effect with several mutagens and carcinogens was found. Later studies, including monitoring in humans and pigs have shown that Praziquantel induces a greater frequency of hyperploid lymphocytes as well as structural chromosomal aberrations, but not in all the individuals treated. In vitro studies have demonstrated that Praziquantel can induce micronuclei in syrian hamster embryonic (SHE) cells and in lymphocytes of some individuals. The same was found about structural chromosomal aberrations. Fetal death and fetal resorption were found when Praziquantel was administered in high doses to pregnant rats between the 6th and 10th day of gestation. Due to its efficiency as a parasiticide, Praziquantel is in use in Latin-American, Asiatic, African and East-European countries where infections by trematodes and cestodes are frequent. However, the extensive use of Praziquantel in multiple reinfections, in non-infected and non-diagnosed individuals for prevention, in higher doses or repeated doses for cysticercosis treatment and in individuals exposed to environmental mutagens, in conjunction with new findings about its metabolism and genotoxic properties, make it necessary to further evaluate the potential of this drug not only to be mutagenic per se, but to contribute in the development of neoplasm.

  7. Genotoxic potential of nonsteroidal hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topalović Dijana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormones are cellular products involved in the regulation of a large number of processes in living systems, and which by their actions affect the growth, function and metabolism of cells. Considering that hormones are compounds normally present in the organism, it is important to determine if they can, under certain circumstances, lead to genetic changes in the hereditary material. Numerous experimental studies in vitro and in vivo in different systems, from bacteria to mammals, dealt with the mutagenic and genotoxic effects of hormones. This work presents an overview of the research on genotoxic effects of non­steroidal hormones, although possible changes of genetic material under their influence have not still been known enough, and moreover, investigations on their genotoxic influence have given conflicting results. The study results show that mechanisms of genotoxic effect of nonsteroidal hormones are manifested through the increase of oxidative stress by arising reactive oxygen species. A common mechanism of ROS occurence in thyroid hormones and catecholamines is through metabolic oxidation of their phenolic groups. Manifestation of insulin genotoxic effect is based on production of ROS by activation of NADPH isophorms, while testing oxytocin showed absence of genotoxic effect. Considering that the investigations on genotoxicity of nonsteroidal hormones demonstrated both positive and negative results, the explanation of this discordance involve limitations of test systems themselves, different cell types or biological species used in the experiments, different level of reactivity in vitro and in vivo, as well as possible variations in a tissue-specific expression. Integrated, the provided data contribute to better understanding of genotoxic effect of nonsteroidal hormones and point out to the role and mode of action of these hormones in the process of occurring of effects caused by oxidative stress. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike

  8. Genotoxicity of pyrrolizidine alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Mei, Nan; Fu, Peter P

    2010-04-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are common constituents of many plant species around the world. PA-containing plants are probably the most common poisonous plants affecting livestock and wildlife. They can inflict harm to humans through contaminated food sources, herbal medicines and dietary supplements. Half of the identified PAs are genotoxic and many of them are tumorigenic. The mutagenicity of PAs has been extensively studied in different biological systems. Upon metabolic activation, PAs produce DNA adducts, DNA cross-linking, DNA breaks, sister chromatid exchange, micronuclei, chromosomal aberrations, gene mutations and chromosome mutations in vivo and in vitro. PAs induced mutations in the cII gene of rat liver and in the p53 and K-ras genes of mouse liver tumors. It has been suggested that all PAs produce a set of (+/-)-6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5H-pyrrolizine-derived DNA adducts and similar types of gene mutations. The signature types of mutations are G : C --> T : A transversion and tandem base substitutions. Overall, PAs are mutagenic in vivo and in vitro and their mutagenicity appears to be responsible for the carcinogenesis of PAs.

  9. Beryllium: genotoxicity and carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Terry; Bowser, Darlene

    2003-12-10

    Beryllium (Be) has physical-chemical properties, including low density and high tensile strength, which make it useful in the manufacture of products ranging from space shuttles to golf clubs. Despite its utility, a number of standard setting agencies have determined that beryllium is a carcinogen. Only a limited number of studies, however, have addressed the underlying mechanisms of the carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of beryllium. Importantly, mutation and chromosomal aberration assays have yielded somewhat contradictory results for beryllium compounds and whereas bacterial tests were largely negative, mammalian test systems showed evidence of beryllium-induced mutations, chromosomal aberrations, and cell transformation. Although inter-laboratory differences may play a role in the variability observed in genotoxicity assays, it is more likely that the different chemical forms of beryllium have a significant effect on mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. Because workers are predominantly exposed to airborne particles which are generated during the machining of beryllium metal, ceramics, or alloys, testing of the mechanisms of the mutagenic and carcinogenic activity of beryllium should be performed with relevant chemical forms of beryllium.

  10. Genotoxicity and anti-genotoxicity of some traditional medicinal herbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Jiménez, Magdalena; Campos-Sánchez, Juan; Analla, Mohamed; Muñoz-Serrano, Andrés; Alonso-Moraga, Angeles

    2005-08-01

    Six herbal infusions used worldwide (Matricaria chamomilla, Tilia cordata, Mentha piperita, Mentha pulegium, Uncaria tomentosa and Valeriana officinalis) were assayed for anti-genotoxicity using the Somatic Mutation And Recombination Test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster. All these infusions are traditionally used for various medical purposes, including anti-inflammatory processes. Hydrogen peroxide was used as an oxidative genotoxicant to test the anti-genotoxic potency of the medicinal infusions. None of these infusions showed a significant genotoxicity, quite the reverse they were able to behave as desmutagens, detoxifying the mutagen hydrogen peroxide. The phenolic content of such herbal infusions is argued to be the possible scavenger of reactive oxygen radicals produced by the hydrogen peroxide.

  11. Is tetrachloroethylene genotoxic or not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, David

    2010-09-01

    A recent study published in Mutagenesis, in which the ability of tetrachloroethylene to induce DNA damage, detected by the alkaline comet assay, in mouse tissues (liver and kidney) was examined, has resulted in different interpretations of the data for liver as either positive or negative for genotoxicity. Here, I discuss the statistical approaches used and comment on the different conclusions reached.

  12. Genotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs, <100 nm are increasingly being used in pharmaceuticals and cosmetics due to the unique properties derived from their small sizes. However, their large surface-area to mass ratio and high redox potential may negatively impact human health and the environment. TiO2-NPs can cause inflammation, pulmonary damage, fibrosis, and lung tumors and they are possibly carcinogenic to humans. Because cancer is a disease involving mutation, there are a large number of studies on the genotoxicity of TiO2-NPs. In this article, we review the results that have been reported in the literature, with a focus on data generated from the standard genotoxicity assays. The data include genotoxicity results from the Ames test, in vitro and in vivo Comet assay, in vitro and in vivo micronucleus assay, sister chromatid exchange assay, mammalian cell hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase gene assay, the wing somatic mutation and recombination assay, and the mouse phosphatidylinositol glycan, class A gene assay. Inconsistent results have been found in these assays, with both positive and negative responses being reported. The in vitro systems for assessing the genotoxicity of TiO2-NPs have generated a greater number of positive results than the in vivo systems, and tests for DNA and chromosome damage have produced more positive results than the assays measuring gene mutation. Nearly all tests for measuring the mutagenicity of TiO2-NPs were negative. The current data indicate that the genotoxicity of TiO2-NPs is mediated mainly through the generation of oxidative stress in cells.

  13. Overview of genotoxic impurities in pharmaceutical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercu, Joel P; Dobo, Krista L; Gocke, Elmar; McGovern, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    This symposium focuses on the management of genotoxic impurities in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals. Recent developments in both Europe and United States require sponsors of new drug applications to develop processes to control the risks of potential genotoxic impurities. Genotoxic impurities represent a special case relative to the International Conference on Harmonisation Q3A/Q3B guidances, because genotoxicity tests used to qualify the drug substance may not be sufficient to demonstrate safety of a potentially genotoxic impurity. The default risk management approach for a genotoxic impurity is the threshold of toxicological concern unless a more specific risk characterization is appropriate. The symposium includes descriptions of industry examples where impurities are introduced and managed in the synthesis of a pharmaceutical. It includes recent regulatory developments such as the "staged threshold of toxicological concern" when administration is of short duration (eg, during clinical trials).

  14. Lead- induced genotoxicity in wheat

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    Elena Truta

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The changes induced in cytogenetic parameters from root meristems of Triticum aestivum cv. Maruca seedlings have been studied after treatment with lead acetate and lead nitrate solutions, at four concentrations (10, 25, 50, 100 μM containing 2.07, 5.18, 10.36, respectively 20.72 μg ml-1 Pb2+. Lead induced mitosis disturbances in root meristematic cells of wheat seedlings, expressed mainly in decrease of mitotic index and changes in preponderance of division phases. This heavy metal has genotoxic effects, expressed in the occurrence of many chromosomal aberrations in all Pb2+ treated variants. Pb2+ nitrate shows a more pronounced genotoxic potential than lead acetate trihydrate.

  15. Cell-Based Genotoxicity Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifferscheid, Georg; Buchinger, Sebastian

    Genotoxicity test systems that are based on bacteria display an important role in the detection and assessment of DNA damaging chemicals. They belong to the basic line of test systems due to their easy realization, rapidness, broad applicability, high sensitivity and good reproducibility. Since the development of the Salmonella microsomal mutagenicity assay by Ames and coworkers in the early 1970s, significant development in bacterial genotoxicity assays was achieved and is still a subject matter of research. The basic principle of the mutagenicity assay is a reversion of a growth inhibited bacterial strain, e.g., due to auxotrophy, back to a fast growing phenotype (regain of prototrophy). Deeper knowledge of the ­mutation events allows a mechanistic understanding of the induced DNA-damage by the utilization of base specific tester strains. Collections of such specific tester strains were extended by genetic engineering. Beside the reversion assays, test systems utilizing the bacterial SOS-response were invented. These methods are based on the fusion of various SOS-responsive promoters with a broad variety of reporter genes facilitating numerous methods of signal detection. A very important aspect of genotoxicity testing is the bioactivation of ­xenobiotics to DNA-damaging compounds. Most widely used is the extracellular metabolic activation by making use of rodent liver homogenates. Again, genetic engineering allows the construction of highly sophisticated bacterial tester strains with significantly enhanced sensitivity due to overexpression of enzymes that are involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics. This provides mechanistic insights into the toxification and detoxification pathways of xenobiotics and helps explaining the chemical nature of hazardous substances in unknown mixtures. In summary, beginning with "natural" tester strains the rational design of bacteria led to highly specific and sensitive tools for a rapid, reliable and cost effective ­genotoxicity

  16. Evolution of genotoxicity test methods in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofuni, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of methods to assess genotoxicity of test compounds is thought to be one of the important subjects in The Japanese Environmental and Mutagen Society (JEMS). In 1970, the Ministry of Education of Japan (at that time) organized a research group (Organizer: Y. Tazima, National Institute of Genetics), and started a systematic research on the genotoxic effects induced by chemical substances. Considering the importance of this issue through the outcomes of the research group, JEMS was established in 1972, and President Tazima organized the 1st annual meeting in the August in Tokyo with the participation of experts in this field working in national institutes, universities and others in Japan. The discovery that food additives possessed genotoxic potential triggered various scientific activities in the field of genotoxicity. Another important point was the correlation between genotoxicity and carcinogenicity, in which the establishment of the reverse mutation assay played an important role. Other critical factors, such as side effects of drugs, occupational cancer, and environmental pollution due to genotoxic chemicals, emphasized the importance of genotoxicity tests for human safety. The tests performed to assess genotoxicity from 1960s to 1980s will be described to understand that many different genotoxic methodologies were discussed in these periods.

  17. Genotoxicity of industrial wastes and effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton, L D; Houk, V S; Hughes, T J

    1998-06-01

    In excess of several million pounds of genotoxic and/or carcinogenic industrial wastes are released into the U.S. environment each year. Chemical characterization of these waste materials can rarely provide an adequate assessment of their genotoxicity and potential hazard. Bioassays do not require prior information about chemical composition and can effectively assess the genotoxicity of complex waste materials. The most commonly used genotoxicity assay has been the Salmonella mutagenicity assay. Results with this system have shown that the genotoxic potency of industrial wastes can vary over 10 orders of magnitude, from virtually nondetectable to highly potent. Industries employing similar industrial processes generally release wastes of similar potency. Extremely high potency wastes include those from furazolidone and nitrofurfural production. Pulp and paper mills, steel foundries, and organic chemical manufacturing facilities also discharge wastes of noteworthy potency. Treatment and remediation of some wastes, such as pulp and paper mill effluents, have been shown to reduce or eliminate genotoxicity. However, in other cases, treatment and remediation have been shown to enhance genotoxicity, such as for fungal treatment of oils. Analyses of samples collected from areas known to receive industrial wastes and effluents have shown that genotoxins can accumulate in the receiving environment and have adverse effects on indigenous biota. The evaluation of hazardous wastes and effluents by genotoxicity assays may provide data useful not only for hazard identification but for comparative risk assessment.

  18. Genotoxic Klebsiella pneumoniae in Taiwan.

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    Yi-Chyi Lai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colibactin is a nonribosomal peptide-polyketide synthesized by multi-enzyme complexes encoded by the pks gene cluster. Colibactin-producing Escherichia coli have been demonstrated to induce host DNA damage and promote colorectal cancer (CRC development. In Taiwan, the occurrence of pyogenic liver abscess (PLA has been suggested to correlate with an increasing risk of CRC, and Klebsiella pneumoniae is the predominant PLA pathogen in Taiwan. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: At the asn tRNA loci of the newly sequenced K. pneumoniae 1084 genome, we identified a 208-kb genomic island, KPHPI208, of which a module identical to the E. coli pks colibactin gene cluster was recognized. KPHPI208 consists of eight modules, including the colibactin module and the modules predicted to be involved in integration, conjugation, yersiniabactin production, microcin production, and unknown functions. Transient infection of BALB/c normal liver cells with K. pneumoniae 1084 increased the phosphorylation of histone H2AX, indicating the induction of host DNA damage. Colibactin was required for the genotoxicity of K. pneumoniae 1084, as it was diminished by deletion of clbA gene and restored to the wild type level by trans-complementation with a clbA coding plasmid. Besides, BALB/c mice infected with K. pneumoniae 1084 exhibited enhanced DNA damage in the liver parenchymal cells when compared to the isogenic clbA deletion mutant. By PCR detection, the prevalence of pks-positive K. pneumoniae in Taiwan is 25.6%, which is higher than that reported in Europe (3.5%, and is significantly correlated with K1 type, which predominantly accounted for PLA in Taiwan. CONCLUSIONS: Our knowledge regarding how bacteria contribute to carcinogenesis has just begun. The identification of genotoxic K. pneumoniae and its genetic components will facilitate future studies to elucidate the molecular basis underlying the link between K. pneumoniae, PLA, and CRC.

  19. Development of an in vitro genotoxicity screening assay: combining different genotoxic endpoints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahabir, A.G.

    2010-01-01

    Genotoxic agents are a major threat to the integritiy of chromosomes and viability of cells, specially if the damage is not repaired, because it can lead to chromosome instability, cell cycle arrest, cell dysfunction, induction of apoptosis or carcinogenesis. For genotoxicity, two main endpoints are

  20. Genotoxicity studies on green tea catechin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, R; Ikeda, N; Yuki, K; Morita, O; Saigo, K; Blackstock, C; Nishiyama, N; Kasamatsu, T

    2008-06-01

    The beneficial effects of tea catechins are well documented. We evaluated the genotoxic potential of a green tea catechin preparation using established genotoxicity assays, including a bacterial reverse mutation assay (Ames test), a chromosomal aberration assay in cultured Chinese hamster lung cells (CHL/IU), a mouse lymphoma L5178Y/tk assay, and a bone marrow micronucleus (MN) assay in ICR CD mice and SD rats. No significant increases in the number of revertant colonies were observed in the Ames test, but positive responses were observed in two in vitro assays: the chromosomal aberration assay and mouse lymphoma L5178/tk assay. However, the in vivo study demonstrated no significant increase in micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCE) in the bone marrow of both ICR CD mice and SD rats administered a high dose of the green tea catechin preparation up to 2000mg/kg. Combined with favorable epidemiological information suggesting a chemopreventive effect of tea catechins on carcinogenesis, we conclude that green tea catechin presents no significant genotoxic concern under the anticipated conditions of use. These results are consistent with other genotoxicity studies of tea catechins, which show minimal, if any, genotoxic potential.

  1. GENOTOXICITY OF TOBACCO SMOKE AND TOBACCO SMOKE CONDENSATE: A REVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genotoxicity of Tobacco Smoke and Tobacco Smoke Condensate: A ReviewAbstractThis report reviews the literature on the genotoxicity of main-stream tobacco smoke and cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) published since 1985. CSC is genotoxic in nearly all systems in which it h...

  2. Environmental genotoxicity: Probing the underlying mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shugart, L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Theodorakis, C. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Environmental pollution is a complex issue because of the diversity of anthropogenic agents, both chemical and physical, that have been detected and catalogued. The consequences to biota from exposure to genotoxic agents present an additional problem because of the potential for these agents to produce adverse change at the cellular and organismal levels. Past studies in genetic toxicology at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have focused on structural damage to the DNA of environmental species that may occur after exposure to genotoxic agents and the use of this information to document exposure and to monitor remediation. In an effort to predict effects at the population, community and ecosystem levels, current studies in genetic ecotoxicology are attempting to characterize the biological mechanisms at the gene level that regulate and limit the response of an individual organism to genotoxic factors in their environment.

  3. Natural Antioxidants Against Arsenic-Induced Genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Munesh; Lalit, Minakshi; Thakur, Rajesh

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic is present in water, soil, and air in organic as well as in inorganic forms. However, inorganic arsenic is more toxic than organic and can cause many diseases including cancers in humans. Its genotoxic effect is considered as one of its carcinogenic actions. Arsenic can cause DNA strand breaks, deletion mutations, micronuclei formation, DNA-protein cross-linking, sister chromatid exchange, and DNA repair inhibition. Evidences indicate that arsenic causes DNA damage by generation of reactive free radicals. Nutritional supplementation of antioxidants has been proven highly beneficial against arsenic genotoxicity in experimental animals. Recent studies suggest that antioxidants protect mainly by reducing excess free radicals via restoring the activities of cellular enzymatic as well as non-enzymatic antioxidants and decreasing the oxidation processes such as lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent literature on arsenic-induced genotoxicity and its mitigation by naturally derived antioxidants in various biological systems.

  4. Genotoxic evaluation of polymeric nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Iglesias Alonso

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available An important strategy for optimizing the therapeutic efficacy of many conventional drugs is the development of polymeric nanoparticles (NPs, as it may expand their activities, reduce their toxicity, increase their bioactivity and improve biodistribution. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of 8 different poly (anhydride NPs designed for the oral administration of therapeutic compounds by using the comet assay in combination with the enzyme formamidopypiridine DNA-glycosylase (FPG. Furthermore, the mitogen capacity of the NPs was evaluated by the proliferation assay. All NPs were tested at four concentrations (0, 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/mL in Caco-2 cells after 3 hours of treatment while selected NPs were also tested after 24 h. The comet assay was performed immediately after the treatment and cell proliferation was assessed by counting the treated cells after their incubation at 37 °C for 48h. Cells treated with 1 µM of the photosensitizer Ro 19-8022 plus 5 min of light, as well as cells treated with 100 µM H2O2 were included as positive controls in all the experiments. All NPs studied did not result in any increase in the frequency of strand breaks or alkali-labile sites in Caco-2 cells but they induced a slight concentration-dependent increase in net FPG sensitive sites (oxidized and/or alkylated bases. Furthermore, treated cells did not show changes in levels of proliferation in comparison with the negative control.

  5. Cobalt and antimony: genotoxicity and carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boeck, Marlies; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Lison, Dominique

    2003-12-10

    The purpose of this review is to summarise the data concerning genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of Co and Sb. Both metals have multiple industrial and/or therapeutical applications, depending on the considered species. Cobalt is used for the production of alloys and hard metal (cemented carbide), diamond polishing, drying agents, pigments and catalysts. Occupational exposure to cobalt may result in adverse health effects in different organs or tissues. Antimony trioxide is primarily used as a flame retardant in rubber, plastics, pigments, adhesives, textiles, and paper. Antimony potassium tartrate has been used worldwide as an anti-shistosomal drug. Pentavalent antimony compounds have been used for the treatment of leishmaniasis. Co(II) ions are genotoxic in vitro and in vivo, and carcinogenic in rodents. Co metal is genotoxic in vitro. Hard metal dust, of which occupational exposure is linked to an increased lung cancer risk, is proven to be genotoxic in vitro and in vivo. Possibly, production of active oxygen species and/or DNA repair inhibition are mechanisms involved. Given the recently provided proof for in vitro and in vivo genotoxic potential of hard metal dust, the mechanistic evidence of elevated production of active oxygen species and the epidemiological data on increased cancer risk, it may be advisable to consider the possibility of a new evaluation by IARC. Both trivalent and pentavalent antimony compounds are generally negative in non-mammalian genotoxicity tests, while mammalian test systems usually give positive results for Sb(III) and negative results for Sb(V) compounds. Assessment of the in vivo potential of Sb2O3 to induce chromosome aberrations (CA) gave conflicting results. Animal carcinogenicity data were concluded sufficient for Sb2O3 by IARC. Human carcinogenicity data is difficult to evaluate given the frequent co-exposure to arsenic. Possible mechanisms of action, including potential to produce active oxygen species and to interfere with

  6. "Aspartame: A review of genotoxicity data".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, David; Gatehouse, David

    2015-10-01

    Aspartame is a methyl ester of a dipeptide of aspartic acid and phenylalanine. It is 200× sweeter than sucrose and is approved for use in food products in more than 90 countries around the world. Aspartame has been evaluated for genotoxic effects in microbial, cell culture and animal models, and has been subjected to a number of carcinogenicity studies. The in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity data available on aspartame are considered sufficient for a thorough evaluation. There is no evidence of induction of gene mutations in a series of bacterial mutation tests. There is some evidence of induction of chromosomal damage in vitro, but this may be an indirect consequence of cytotoxicity. The weight of evidence from in vivo bone marrow micronucleus, chromosomal aberration and Comet assays is that aspartame is not genotoxic in somatic cells in vivo. The results of germ cell assays are difficult to evaluate considering limited data available and deviations from standard protocols. The available data therefore support the conclusions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) that aspartame is non-genotoxic.

  7. International current of the genotoxicity testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HayaM

    2002-01-01

    One of the goals of the genetic toxicology is to assess the risk to humans that derives from genotoxic agents.The risk involves both somatic and germ cells,with damage to the former resulting in cancer and damage to the latter in adverse effects that could be transmitted through generations.It is necessary to consider not only direct effects,but also effects that are the result of analtered environment.To perform an accurate risk assessment.it is necessary to evaluate genotoxic hazards in ways that are appropriate both methodologically and strategically.In establishing a genotoxicity assay system,international cooperation is important because it enables us to incorporate the thoughts of specialists everywhere and to learn of specific regional concerns.Here I will introduce the “Guidance on a Strategy for Testing of Chemicals for Mutagenicity” recently reported by the UK Committee on Mutagenicity (COM) and also I will briefly summarize the activities of the International Workshop on Genotoxicity Test Procedures(IWGTP).The first and the second workshops focused on methodology.we started to include the strategic issues as well as procedures in the third workshop.Starting with the 3rd IWGT,the workshop will become an activity of the International Association of EMSs.

  8. Genotoxicity assessment of 4-methylimidazole: regulatory perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Takeshi; Uneyama, Chikako

    2016-01-01

    4-Methylimidazole (4-MI) is formed as a result of the Maillard reaction process, and therefore is found in many foods and beverages. It is also found in soft drinks (i.e., cola) as a by-product in the production of some caramel colors. NTP bioassays revealed clear evidence of lung carcinogenicity of 4-MI in male and female mice, but not in rats and then IARC classified 4-MI as group 2B carcinogen. Genotoxicity studies with 4-MI were negative in the Ames tests and in the erythrocyte micronucleus tests with mice or rats. US California EPA (CEPA) evaluated the testing has not been adequately comprehensive to rule out a genotoxic mode of action; as target tissue of the carcinogenicity of 4-MI was lung, the lung should be used as a source tissue for in vitro metabolic activation system. Thus, CEPA defined the No Significant Risk Level (NSRL) for 10(-5) lifetime risk level of cancer by 4-MI as 29 μg/day based on the non-threshold approach. As higher levels of 4-MI than the NSRL were identified in some kinds of cola, health concerns of 4-MI were drawn the attention. On the other hand, other regulatory bodies (e.g., European Food Safety Authority, EFSA) showed no concerns of 4-MI from the use of caramel colors in food. EFSA evaluated 4-MI is not genotoxic, so, non-observed adverse effect level of 4-MI was considered to be 80 mg/kg/day. In this paper, genotoxic assessments of 4-MI in different regulatory bodies are presented and the risk evaluation of 4-MI is discussed based on new genotoxicity data.

  9. [Bacterial pigment prodigiosin and its genotoxic effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur'ianov, I D; Karamova, N S; Iusupova, D V; Gnezdilov, O I; Koshkarova, L A

    2013-01-01

    The prodigiosin preparation was isolated and purified from Serratia marcescens ATCC 9986, using chromatographic methods. The analysis of the preparation by TLC, NMR-spectrometry and mass-spectrometry allowed to confirm the red pigment fraction as the prodigiosin and detect its purity. Originally, the specific features of the toxic and genotoxic effects of prodigiosin and the possibility of induction of mutations by pigment in the cells of Salmonella typhimurium TA 100 (Ames test) and chromosome damage of mammalian erythroblasts have been determined.

  10. Mechanisms of genotoxic effects of hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đelić Ninoslav J.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A concept that compounds commonly present in biological systems lack genotoxic and mutagenic activities is generally in use, hence a low number of endogenous substances have ever been tested to mutagenicity. Epidemiological and experimental analyses indicated, however, that sexual steroids could contribute to initiation and/or continuation of malign diseases. Detailed studies using methods of biochemistry, molecular biology, cytogenetics and other branches, showed that not only epigenetic mechanisms, such as a stimulation of cell proliferation, but also certain hormones, that can express genotoxic effects, such as covalent DNA modification, then chromosomal lesions and chromosomal aberrations, are in the background of malign transformation under activities of hormones. In the case of oestrogens, it was shown that excessive hormonal stimulation led to a metabolic conversion of these hormones to reactive intermediates with formation of reactive oxygenic derivates, so that cells were virtually under conditions of oxidative stress. Individual and tissue susceptibility to occurrence of deterioration of DNA and other cell components generally results from the differences in efficiency of enzymic and non-enzymic mechanisms of resistance against oxidative stress. Besides, steroid thyeroid hormones and catecholamine (dopamine, noradrenaline/norepinephrine and adrenaline can express genotoxic effects in some test-systems. It is interesting that all above mentioned hormones have a phenolic group. Data on possible genotoxic effects of peptide and protein hormones are very scarce, but based on the available literature it is considered that this group of hormones probably lacks mutagenic activities. The possibility that hormones, as endogenous substances, express mutagenic activities results from the fact that DNA is, regardless of chemical and metabolic stability susceptible, to a certain extent, to changeability compatible with the processes of the

  11. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of butyl cyclohexyl phthalate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köksal, Çinel; Nalbantsoy, Ayse; Karabay Yavaşoğlu, N Ülkü

    2016-03-01

    Butyl cyclohexyl phthalate (BCP) is frequently used in personal care products, medical and household applications. The aim of this study is therefore to evaluate possible cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of BCP using in vitro and in vivo assays. The in vitro cytotoxic effect of BCP was investigated on mouse fibroblastic cell line (L929 cells) by MTT assay. The result showed that BCP inhibits cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 value = 0.29 µg/mL). For genotoxicity assessment, tested concentrations of BCP demonstrated mutagenic activity in the presence of S9 mix with the Salmonella strain TA100 in the Ames test. Results showed that BCP is a secondary mutagenic substance even in low concentrations. The data obtained from 28-days repeated toxicity tests on mice revealed that BCP caused abnormalities of chromosome number, in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, DNA damage, particularly DNA strand breaks, was assessed by Comet assay. The test result shows that BCP seemed to have genotoxic potential at a high level of exposure.

  12. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of biogenic silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, R.; Feitosa, L. O.; Ballottin, D.; Marcato, P. D.; Tasic, L.; Durán, N.

    2013-04-01

    Biogenic silver nanoparticles with 40.3 ± 3.5 nm size and negative surface charge (- 40 mV) were prepared with Fusarium oxysporum. The cytotoxicity of 3T3 cell and human lymphocyte were studied by a TaliTM image-based cytometer and the genotoxicity through Allium cepa and comet assay. The results of BioAg-w (washed) and BioAg-nw (unwashed) biogenic silver nanoparticles showed cytotoxicity exceeding 50 μg/mL with no significant differences of response in 5 and 10 μg/mL regarding viability. Results of genotoxicity at concentrations 5.0 and 10.0 ug/mL show some response, but at concentrations 0.5 and 1.0 μg/mL the washed and unwashed silver nanoparticles did not present any effect. This in an important result since in tests with different bacteria species and strains, including resistant, MIC (minimal inhibitory concentration) had good answers at concentrations less than 1.9 μg/mL. This work concludes that biogenic silver nanoparticles may be a promising option for antimicrobial use in the range where no cyto or genotoxic effect were observed. Furthermore, human cells were found to have a greater resistance to the toxic effects of silver nanoparticles in comparison with other cells.

  13. Genotoxic effects of copper sulfate in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgieva S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the genotoxic effects of oral application of CuSO4 in rabbits by the chromosome aberration (CA and sister chromatid exchange (SCE tests. Ten male New Zealand rabbits (5 months old, weighing 3.5-4.0 kg were allocated into two groups. The first group received CuSO4 (5H2O in drinking water for 6 consecutive days. The second group was used as a control. On the 7th day, blood samples were taken from the ear marginal vein and the SCE and CA tests in peripheral lymphocytes were used as genotoxicity and mutagenicity endpoints, respectively. Results showed a significant increase in the frequencies of the aberrant cells (7.4±0.24, P<0.001 and CA (chromatid fragments 3.2±0.37, chromosome fragments 4.2±0.37, P<0.001, and total aberrations (7.4±0.24, P<0.001 after the treatment with CuSO4 when compared with the control group. The level of SCE per cell in the CuSO4-treated rabbits (9.66±0.062 was significantly higher than in rabbits from the control group. These findings show that copper exhibits a genotoxic and mutagenic potential in rabbits.

  14. Genotoxic activity of a technical toxaphene mixture and its photodegradation products in SOS genotoxicity tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartos, Tomás; Skarek, Michal; Cupr, Pavel; Kosubová, Petra; Holoubek, Ivan

    2005-01-03

    Toxaphene (CAS No. 800-35-2) is a complex mixture of several hundred components that was used worldwide primarily as an agricultural pesticide with insecticide effects in the second half of the 20th century. In vitro investigations of the genotoxicity and mutagenicity of toxaphene were generally described in the literature, but they provided somewhat equivocal results. We re-evaluated the genotoxicity of technical toxaphene in two prokaryotic systems. The SOS Chromotest showed high sensitivity to toxaphene: three concentrations (40, 20 and 10 mg/l) were clearly positive and the dose-response effect was evident. In the umuC assay, a dose-dependent increase in genotoxic activity was observed at toxaphene concentrations from 2.5 to 40.0 mg/l, but these results were found to be not significant. The genotoxicity of toxaphene and its photodegradation products after UV-irradiation (3-6-9 h) at concentrations ranging from 7.5 to 60.0 mg/l was also examined in this study. An irradiated solution of technical toxaphene after 3 h showed no significant evidence of bacterial growth inhibition. However, exposure of Salmonella to 6 h UV-irradiated toxaphene showed a toxic effect compared with the negative control. After 9 h irradiation, a decrease of bacterial growth was observed. Activity of beta-galactosidase in the presence of a toxaphene solution was significantly increased after 6 and 9 h irradiation, reaching values that were 2.4- and 3.1-fold higher, respectively, than the control, which exceeded the criteria of significant genotoxicity. These results show that while technical toxaphene is a weak, direct-acting mutagen in some bacterial tests, a dose-dependent toxicity and genotoxicity of its photoproducts could be conclusively demonstrated by the umuC test.

  15. A predictive toxicogenomics signature to classify genotoxic versus non-genotoxic chemicals in human TK6 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Williams

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Genotoxicity testing is a critical component of chemical assessment. The use of integrated approaches in genetic toxicology, including the incorporation of gene expression data to determine the DNA damage response pathways involved in response, is becoming more common. In companion papers previously published in Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis, Li et al. (2015 [6] developed a dose optimization protocol that was based on evaluating expression changes in several well-characterized stress-response genes using quantitative real-time PCR in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells in culture. This optimization approach was applied to the analysis of TK6 cells exposed to one of 14 genotoxic or 14 non-genotoxic agents, with sampling 4 h post-exposure. Microarray-based transcriptomic analyses were then used to develop a classifier for genotoxicity using the nearest shrunken centroids method. A panel of 65 genes was identified that could accurately classify toxicants as genotoxic or non-genotoxic. In Buick et al. (2015 [1], the utility of the biomarker for chemicals that require metabolic activation was evaluated. In this study, TK6 cells were exposed to increasing doses of four chemicals (two genotoxic that require metabolic activation and two non-genotoxic chemicals in the presence of rat liver S9 to demonstrate that S9 does not impair the ability to classify genotoxicity using this genomic biomarker in TK6cells.

  16. Considerations on photochemical genotoxicity. II: Report of the 2009 International Workshop on Genotoxicity Testing Working Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lynch, A.M.; Guzzie, P.J.; Bauer, D.; Gocke, E.; Itoh, S.; Jacobs, A.; Krul, C.A.M.; Schepky, A.; Tanaka, N.; Kasper, P.

    2011-01-01

    A workshop to reappraise the previous IWGT recommendations for photogenotoxicity testing [E. Gocke, L. Muller, P.J. Guzzie, S. Brendler-Schwaab, S. Bulera, C.F. Chignell, L.M. Henderson, A. Jacobs, H. Murli, R.D. Snyder, N. Tanaka, Considerations on photochemical genotoxicity: report of the

  17. Genotoxicity evaluation of alpha-linolenic acid-diacylglycerol oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Honda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The alpha-linolenic acid (ALA-diacylglycerol (DAG oil is an edible oil enriched with DAG (>80% and ALA (>50%. Although DAG oil, which mainly consists of oleic and linoleic acids has no genotoxic concerns, the fatty acid composition could affect the chemical property of DAG. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of ALA-DAG oil using standard genotoxicity tests in accordance with the OECD guidelines. ALA-DAG oil showed negative results in the bacterial reverse mutation test (Ames test and in vitro micronucleus test in cultured Chinese hamster lung cells with and without metabolic activation, and in the in vivo bone marrow micronucleus test in mice. Our results did not show any genotoxicity, suggesting that the fatty acid composition had no deleterious effects. We conclude that ALA-DAG oil had no genotoxicity concerns under the testing conditions.

  18. Evaluation of perfluorooctanoate for potential genotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. Butenhoff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA is a fully fluorinated eight-carbon fatty acid analog with exceptional stability toward degradation that has been used as an industrial surfactant and has been detected in environmental and biological matrices. Exposures to PFOA in the workplace and in the environment have continuously stimulated investigations into its potential human health hazards. In this article, the results of fifteen unpublished genotoxicity assays conducted with perfluorooctanoate (as either the linear or linear/branched ammonium salt (APFO or the linear/branched sodium salt are reported and include: seven mutation assays (three in vitro reverse mutation assays with histidine auxotrophic strains of Salmonella typhimurium, two in vitro reverse mutation assays with the tryptophan auxotrophic Escherichia coli WP2uvr strain, one in vitro mitotic recombination (gene conversion assay with Saccharomyces cerevisiae D4, and an in vitro Chinese hamster ovary (CHO HGPRT forward mutation assay; seven studies to assess potential for chromosomal damage (three in vitro CHO chromosomal aberration studies, an in vitro human whole blood lymphocyte chromosomal aberration study, and three in vivo mouse micronucleus assays; and an in vitro C3H 10T1/2 cell transformation assay. Although PFOA has not been demonstrated to be metabolized, all in vitro assays were conducted both in the presence and in the absence of a mammalian hepatic microsomal activation system. These assays were originally described in twelve contract laboratory reports which have been available via the United States Environmental Protection Agency public docket (Administrative Record 226 for over a decade; however, the details of these assays have not been published previously in the open scientific literature. With the exception of limited positive findings at high and cytotoxic concentrations in some assay trials which reflected the likely consequence of cytotoxic disruption of normal cellular

  19. Genotoxicity of Anesthetics Evaluated In Vivo (Animals)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz, Mariana G.; Karahalil, Bensu

    2015-01-01

    The anesthesia has been improved all over the years. However, it can have impact on health, in both patients and animals anesthetized, as well as professionals exposed to inhaled anesthetics. There is continuing effort to understand the possible effects of anesthetics at molecular levels. Knowing the effects of anesthetic agents on genetic material could be a valuable basic support to better understand the possible mechanisms of these agents. Thus, the purpose of this review is to provide an overview on the genotoxic potential, evaluated in animal models, of many anesthetics that have already been used and those currently used in anesthesia. PMID:26199936

  20. Genotoxicity assessment of 4-methylimidazole: regulatory perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Morita, Takeshi; Uneyama, Chikako

    2016-01-01

    4-Methylimidazole (4-MI) is formed as a result of the Maillard reaction process, and therefore is found in many foods and beverages. It is also found in soft drinks (i.e., cola) as a by-product in the production of some caramel colors. NTP bioassays revealed clear evidence of lung carcinogenicity of 4-MI in male and female mice, but not in rats and then IARC classified 4-MI as group 2B carcinogen. Genotoxicity studies with 4-MI were negative in the Ames tests and in the erythrocyte micronucle...

  1. Genotoxicity Expert Panel review: weight of evidence evaluation of the genotoxicity of glyphosate, glyphosate-based formulations, and aminomethylphosphonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusick, David; Aardema, Marilyn; Kier, Larry; Kirkland, David; Williams, Gary

    2016-09-01

    In 2015, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) published a monograph concluding there was strong evidence for genotoxicity of glyphosate and glyphosate formulations and moderate evidence for genotoxicity of the metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA). These conclusions contradicted earlier extensive reviews supporting the lack of genotoxicity of glyphosate and glyphosate formulations. The IARC Monograph concluded there was strong evidence of induction of oxidative stress by glyphosate, glyphosate formulations, and AMPA. The Expert Panel reviewed the genotoxicity and oxidative stress data considered in the IARC Monograph, together with other available data not considered by IARC. The Expert Panel defined and used a weight of evidence (WoE) approach that included ranking of studies and endpoints by the strength of their linkage to events associated with carcinogenic mechanisms. Importantly, the Expert Panel concluded that there was sufficient information available from a very large number of regulatory genotoxicity studies that should have been considered by IARC. The WoE approach, the inclusion of all relevant regulatory studies, and some differences in interpretation of individual studies led to significantly different conclusions by the Expert Panel compared with the IARC Monograph. The Expert Panel concluded that glyphosate, glyphosate formulations, and AMPA do not pose a genotoxic hazard and the data do not support the IARC Monograph genotoxicity evaluation. With respect to carcinogenicity classification and mechanism, the Expert Panel concluded that evidence relating to an oxidative stress mechanism of carcinogenicity was largely unconvincing and that the data profiles were not consistent with the characteristics of genotoxic carcinogens.

  2. Carbon black nanoparticle instillation induces sustained inflammation and genotoxicity in mouse lung and liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourdon, Julie A; Saber, Anne T; Jacobsen, Nicklas R;

    2012-01-01

    Widespread occupational exposure to carbon black nanoparticles (CBNPs) raises concerns over their safety. CBNPs are genotoxic in vitro but less is known about their genotoxicity in various organs in vivo.......Widespread occupational exposure to carbon black nanoparticles (CBNPs) raises concerns over their safety. CBNPs are genotoxic in vitro but less is known about their genotoxicity in various organs in vivo....

  3. Genotoxicity Studies Performed in the Ecuadorian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Paz-y-Miño

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genotoxicity studies in Ecuador have been carried out during the past two decades. The focuses of the research were mainly the area of environmental issues, where the populations have been accidentally exposed to contaminants and the area of occupational exposure of individuals at the workplace. This paper includes studies carried out in the population of the Amazon region, a zone known for its rich biodiversity as well as for the ecological damage caused by oil spills and chemical sprayings whose consequences continue to be controversial. Additionally, we show the results of studies comprised of individuals occupationally exposed to toxic agents in two very different settings: flower plantation workers exposed to pesticide mixtures and X-ray exposure of hospital workers. The results from these studies confirm that genotoxicity studies can help evaluate current conditions and prevent further damage in the populations exposed to contaminants. As such, they are evidence of the need for biomonitoring employers at risk, stricter law enforcement regarding the use of pesticides, and increasingly conscientious oil extraction activities.

  4. Genotoxicity studies performed in the ecuadorian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Y-Miño, César; Cumbal, Nadia; Sánchez, María Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    Genotoxicity studies in Ecuador have been carried out during the past two decades. The focuses of the research were mainly the area of environmental issues, where the populations have been accidentally exposed to contaminants and the area of occupational exposure of individuals at the workplace. This paper includes studies carried out in the population of the Amazon region, a zone known for its rich biodiversity as well as for the ecological damage caused by oil spills and chemical sprayings whose consequences continue to be controversial. Additionally, we show the results of studies comprised of individuals occupationally exposed to toxic agents in two very different settings: flower plantation workers exposed to pesticide mixtures and X-ray exposure of hospital workers. The results from these studies confirm that genotoxicity studies can help evaluate current conditions and prevent further damage in the populations exposed to contaminants. As such, they are evidence of the need for biomonitoring employers at risk, stricter law enforcement regarding the use of pesticides, and increasingly conscientious oil extraction activities.

  5. Genotoxicity evaluation of sesamin and episesamin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Hisako; Takayanagi, Tomomi; Kamada, Yoko; Shimoyoshi, Satomi; Ono, Yoshiko; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Shibata, Hiroshi; Nagao, Minako; Fujii, Wataru; Sakakibara, Yutaka

    2011-02-03

    Sesamin is a major lignan that is present in sesame seeds and oil. Sesamin is partially converted to its stereoisomer, episesamin, during the refining process of non-roasted sesame seed oil. We evaluated the genotoxicity of these substances through the following tests: a bacterial reverse mutation assay (Ames test), a chromosomal aberration test in cultured Chinese hamster lung cells (CHL/IU), a bone marrow micronucleus (MN) test in Crlj:CD1 (ICR) mice, and a comet assay using the liver of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Episesamin showed negative results in the Ames test with and without S9 mix, in the in vitro chromosomal aberration test with and without S9 mix, and in the in vivo comet assay. Sesamin showed negative results in the Ames test with and without S9 mix. In the in vitro chromosomal aberration test, sesamin did not induce chromosomal aberrations in the absence of S9 mix, but induced structural abnormalities at cytotoxic concentrations in the presence of S9 mix. Oral administration of sesamin at doses up to 2.0g/kg did not cause a significant increase in either the percentage of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes in the in vivo bone marrow MN test or in the % DNA in the comet tails in the in vivo comet assay of liver cells. These findings indicate that sesamin does not damage DNA in vivo and that sesamin and episesamin have no genotoxic activity.

  6. Forskolin: genotoxicity assessment in Allium cepa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Khalid Pasha; Aarey, Archana; Tamkeen, Shayesta; Jahan, Parveen

    2015-01-01

    Forskolin, a diterpene, 7β-acetoxy-8,13-epoxy-1α,6β,9α-trihydroxy-labd-14-en-11-one (C22H34O7) isolated from Coleus forskohlii, exerts multiple physiological effects by stimulating the enzyme adenylate cyclase and increasing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) concentrations. Forskolin is used in the treatment of hypertension, congestive heart failure, eczema, and other diseases. A cytogenetic assay was performed in Allium cepa to assess possible genotoxic effects of forskolin. Forskolin was tested at concentrations 5-100 μM for exposure periods of 24 or 48 h. Treated samples showed significant reductions in mitotic index (p < 0.05) and increases in the frequency of chromosome aberrations (p < 0.01) at both exposure times. The treated meristems showed chromosome aberrations including sticky metaphases, sticky anaphases, laggard, anaphase bridges, micronuclei, polyploidy, fragments, breaks, and C-mitosis. Forskolin may cause genotoxic effects and further toxicological evaluations should be conducted to ensure its safety.

  7. Steviol glycoside safety: is the genotoxicity database sufficient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, J D; Carakostas, M C; Brusick, D J

    2013-01-01

    The safety of steviol glycoside sweeteners has been extensively reviewed in the literature. National and international food safety agencies and approximately 20 expert panels have concluded that steviol glycosides, including the widely used sweeteners stevioside and rebaudioside A, are not genotoxic. However, concern has been expressed in recent publications that steviol glycosides may be mutagenic based on select studies representing a small fraction of the overall database, and it has been suggested that further in vivo genotoxicity studies are required to complete their safety profiles. To address the utility of conducting additional in vivo genotoxicity studies, this review evaluates the specific genotoxicity studies that are the sources of concern, and evaluates the adequacy of the database including more recent genotoxicity data not mentioned in those publications. The current database of in vitro and in vivo studies for steviol glycosides is robust and does not indicate that either stevioside or rebaudioside A are genotoxic. This, combined with a lack of evidence for neoplasm development in rat bioassays, establish the safety of all steviol glycosides with respect to their genotoxic/carcinogenic potential.

  8. Differential genotoxicity mechanisms of silver nanoparticles and silver ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Qin, Taichun; Ingle, Taylor; Yan, Jian; He, Weiwei; Yin, Jun-Jie; Chen, Tao

    2017-01-01

    In spite of many reports on the toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), the mechanisms underlying the toxicity are far from clear. A key question is whether the observed toxicity comes from the silver ions (Ag(+)) released from the AgNPs or from the nanoparticles themselves. In this study, we explored the genotoxicity and the genotoxicity mechanisms of Ag(+) and AgNPs. Human TK6 cells were treated with 5 nM AgNPs or silver nitrate (AgNO3) to evaluate their genotoxicity and induction of oxidative stress. AgNPs and AgNO3 induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in a similar range of concentrations (1.00-1.75 µg/ml) when evaluated using the micronucleus assay, and both induced oxidative stress by measuring the gene expression and reactive oxygen species in the treated cells. Addition of N-acetylcysteine (NAC, an Ag(+) chelator) to the treatments significantly decreased genotoxicity of Ag(+), but not AgNPs, while addition of Trolox (a free radical scavenger) to the treatment efficiently decreased the genotoxicity of both agents. In addition, the Ag(+) released from the highest concentration of AgNPs used for the treatment was measured. Only 0.5 % of the AgNPs were ionized in the culture medium and the released silver ions were neither cytotoxic nor genotoxic at this concentration. Further analysis using electron spin resonance demonstrated that AgNPs produced hydroxyl radicals directly, while AgNO3 did not. These results indicated that although both AgNPs and Ag(+) can cause genotoxicity via oxidative stress, the mechanisms are different, and the nanoparticles, but not the released ions, mainly contribute to the genotoxicity of AgNPs.

  9. Evaluation of the genotoxicity of cellulose nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Lima R

    2012-07-01

    plant cells, the most genotoxic nanofibers were those derived from green, white, and brown cotton, and curaua, while genotoxicity in animal cells was observed using nanofibers from brown cotton and curaua. An important finding was that ruby cotton nanofibers did not cause any significant DNA breaks in the cell types employed.Conclusion: This work demonstrates the feasibility of determining the genotoxic potential of nanofibers derived from plant cellulose to obtain information vital both for the future usage of these materials in agribusiness and for an understanding of their environmental impacts.Keywords: cotton, curaua, nanotoxicology, environmental nanotechnology

  10. Monitoring genotoxic exposure in uranium mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sram, R.J.; Vesela, D.; Vesely, D. [Institute of Experimental Medicine, Prague (Czech Republic)] [and others

    1993-10-01

    Recent data from deep uranium mines in Czechoslovakia indicated that miners are exposed to other mutagenic factors in addition to radon daughter products. Mycotoxins were identified as a possible source of mutagens in these mines. Mycotoxins were examined in 38 samples from mines and in throat swabs taken from 116 miners and 78 controls. The following mycotoxins were identified from mines samples: aflatoxins B{sub 1} and G1, citrinin, citreoviridin, mycophenolic acid, and sterigmatocystin. Some mold strains isolated from mines and throat swabs were investigated for mutagenic activity by the SOS chromotest and Salmonella assay with strains TA100 and TA98. Mutagenicity was observed, especially with metabolic activation in citro. These data suggest that mycotoxins produced by molds in uranium mines are a new genotoxic factor im uranium miners. 17 refs., 4 tabs.

  11. Human biological monitoring of occupational genotoxic exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Sorsa, M

    1993-01-01

    ) occupational exposure limit value of styrene in ambient air. The consideration of ethical issues in human genetic monitoring is an important but often overlooked aspect. This includes the scientific and preventional relevance of performing a test on individuals, pre- and post study information of donors......Human biological monitoring is a valuable tool for exposure assessment in groups of persons occupationally exposed to genotoxic agents. If the monitoring activity covers genetic material the term genetic monitoring is used. The methods used for genetic monitoring are either substance specific, e...... for and the biomonitoring results should preferentially be linked with accurate ambient air monitoring. In persons occupationally exposed to styrene the endpoints of DNA-damage and DNA-repair in genetic monitoring are methods of choice in exposure situations above the current Danish (25 ppm) or Finnish (20 ppm...

  12. Assessment of Occupational Genotoxic Risk among Brazilian Hairdressers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Galiotte, Maíra Precivalle; Kohler, Priscila; Mussi, Gisele; Figaro Gattás, Gilka J

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the genotoxic risk to hairdressers exposed daily to chemical substances such as hair dyes, waving and straightening preparations and manicurists' products by the Comet assay test...

  13. Molecular and cytogenetic assessment of Dipterygium glaucum genotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    ALTWATY,NADA H.; EL-SAYED,OSAMA E.; ALY,NARIMAN A.H.; Baeshen, Mohamed N.; BAESHEN,NABIH A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of the present study is to assess the genotoxicity of Dipterygium glaucum grows widely in Saudi Arabia desert to produce safety herbal products. This work is considered the first and pioneer report so far due to the lack and poor evaluated reports of the plant species for their mutagensity, genotoxicity and cytogenetics effects. Cytogenetic effects of D. glaucum on mitotic in roots of Vicia faba showed reduction in mitotic activity using three extracts; water, ethanol and eth...

  14. In vitro genotoxicity of pyridine in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelnsia, Aida D; Rather, Irfan A

    2016-05-01

    This work was carried out to study the genotoxicity of pyridine in vitro on human leucocyte culture. Cyclophosphamide, a well-known carcinogen was used as positive control. The four different concentrations of pyridine and cyclophosphamide showed breaks and pulverization of chromosomes in dose dependent manner. Higher number of pulverization was observed with higher concentration of pyridine (3.25μg/mL). Based on this data, our results confirm that both pyridine and its precursor showed genotoxicity against human lymphocytes.

  15. Non—Genotoxic Carcinogens.Approaches to Their Rish Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.A.CASTRO; M.I.DiazGomez; 等

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiological studies support the idea that most human cancers are related to chemicals present in the human environment.In turn,chemicals are believed to cause cancer via either genotoxic or non-genotoxic mechanisms.There were described in literature several simple rapid and inexpensive short term ests to reasonably predict the genotoxic nature of chemicals but in contrast,there is no reliable test or battery of tests available to predict the carcinogenicity of non-genotoxic compounds and this poses a major problem to their rish assessment.In addition,there are conflictive opinions about rish assessment needs for both classes of carcinogens.Some workers elieve that for non-genotoxic carcinogens,thresholds for exposure can be drawn while others do not.In this review,the reasons behind both of these opinions and the present hypotheses about the mechanism of action of non-genotoxic carcinogens are described and analyzed in relation to future needs.

  16. Genotoxicity and carcinogenicity risk of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyokuni, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    Novel materials are often commercialized without a complete assessment of the risks they pose to human health because such assessments are costly and time-consuming; additionally, sometimes the methodology needed for such an assessment does not exist. Carbon nanotubes have the potential for widespread application in engineering, materials science and medicine. However, due to the needle-like shape and high durability of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), concerns have been raised that they may induce asbestos-like pathogenicity when inhaled. Indeed, experiments in rodents supported this hypothesis. Notably, the genetic alterations in MWCNT-induced rat malignant mesothelioma were similar to those induced by asbestos. Single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) cause mitotic disturbances in cultured cells, but thus far, there has been no report that SWCNTs are carcinogenic. This review summarizes the recent noteworthy publications on the genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of CNTs and explains the possible molecular mechanisms responsible for this carcinogenicity. The nanoscale size and needle-like rigid structure of CNTs appear to be associated with their pathogenicity in mammalian cells, where carbon atoms are major components in the backbone of many biomolecules. Publishing adverse events associated with novel materials is critically important for alerting people exposed to such materials. CNTs still have a bright future with superb economic and medical merits. However, appropriate regulation of the production, distribution and secondary manufacturing processes is required, at least to protect the workers.

  17. DNA dosimetry assessment for sunscreen genotoxic photoprotection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Passaglia Schuch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Due to the increase of solar ultraviolet radiation (UV incidence over the last few decades, the use of sunscreen has been widely adopted for skin protection. However, considering the high efficiency of sunlight-induced DNA lesions, it is critical to improve upon the current approaches that are used to evaluate protection factors. An alternative approach to evaluate the photoprotection provided by sunscreens against daily UV radiation-induced DNA damage is provided by the systematic use of a DNA dosimeter. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The Sun Protection Factor for DNA (DNA-SPF is calculated by using specific DNA repair enzymes, and it is defined as the capacity for inhibiting the generation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD and oxidised DNA bases compared with unprotected control samples. Five different commercial brands of sunscreen were initially evaluated, and further studies extended the analysis to include 17 other products representing various formulations and Sun Protection Factors (SPF. Overall, all of the commercial brands of SPF 30 sunscreens provided sufficient protection against simulated sunlight genotoxicity. In addition, this DNA biosensor was useful for rapidly screening the biological protection properties of the various sunscreen formulations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The application of the DNA dosimeter is demonstrated as an alternative, complementary, and reliable method for the quantification of sunscreen photoprotection at the level of DNA damage.

  18. Revision of OECD Guidelines for Genotoxicity Testing: Current Status and Next Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over the past 30 years, assays have been developed to evaluate chemical genotoxicity. OECD Genotoxicity Test Guidelines (TG) describe assay procedures for regulatory safety testing. Since the last OECD TG revision (1997), there has been tremendous scientific and technological pro...

  19. Analysis of Delphinidin and Luteolin Genotoxicity in Human Lymphocyte Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Ezić

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bioflavonoids delphinidin (2-(3,4,5-Trihydroxyphenylchromenylium-3,5,7-triol and luteolin (2-(3,4-Dihydroxyphenyl-5,7-dihydroxy-4-chromenone have been recognized as promising antioxidants and anticancer substances. Due to their extensive use, the goal of the research was to determine whether they have any genotoxic potential in vitro.Methods: Analysis of genotoxic potential was performed applying chromosome aberrations test in human lymphocyte culture, as this kind of research was not conducted abundantly for these two bioflavonoids. Delphinidin and luteolin were dissolved in DMSO and added to cultures in final concentrations of 25, 50 and 100 μM.Results: In human lymphocytes cultures Delphinidin induced PCDs in all treatments, potentially affecting the cell cycle and topoisomerase II activity. In concentration of 50 μM luteolin showed strong genotoxic effects and caused significant reduction of cell proliferation.Conclusion: Luteolin exhibited certain genotoxic and cytostatic potential. Delphinidin was not considered genotoxic, however its impact on mitosis, especially topoisomerase II activity, was revealed.

  20. Evaluation of Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of Acacia aroma Leaf Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Mattana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acacia aroma, native plant from San Luis, Argentina, is commonly used as antiseptic and for healing of wounds. The present study was conducted to investigate the in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of hot aqueous extract (HAE and ethanolic extract (EE of A. aroma. The cytotoxic activity was assayed by neutral red uptake assay on Vero cell. Cell treatment with a range from 100 to 5000 μg/mL of HAE and EE showed that 500 μg/mL and 100 μg/mL were the maximum noncytotoxic concentrations, respectively. The CC50 was 658 μg/mL for EE and 1020 μg/mL for HAE. The genotoxicity was tested by the single-cell gel electrophoresis comet assay. The results obtained in the evaluation of DNA cellular damage exposed to varied concentrations of the HAE showed no significant genotoxic effect at range of 1–20 mg/mL. The EE at 20 mg/mL showed moderate genotoxic effect related to the increase of the DNA percentage contained in tail of the comet; DNA was classified in category 2. At concentrations below 5 mg/mL, the results of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Acacia aroma guarantee the safety at cell and genomic level. However further studies are needed for longer periods including animal models to confirm the findings.

  1. Evaluation of Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of Acacia aroma Leaf Extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattana, C. M.; Cangiano, M. A.; Alcaráz, L. E.; Sosa, A.; Escobar, F.; Sabini, C.; Sabini, L.; Laciar, A. L.

    2014-01-01

    Acacia aroma, native plant from San Luis, Argentina, is commonly used as antiseptic and for healing of wounds. The present study was conducted to investigate the in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of hot aqueous extract (HAE) and ethanolic extract (EE) of A. aroma. The cytotoxic activity was assayed by neutral red uptake assay on Vero cell. Cell treatment with a range from 100 to 5000 μg/mL of HAE and EE showed that 500 μg/mL and 100 μg/mL were the maximum noncytotoxic concentrations, respectively. The CC50 was 658 μg/mL for EE and 1020 μg/mL for HAE. The genotoxicity was tested by the single-cell gel electrophoresis comet assay. The results obtained in the evaluation of DNA cellular damage exposed to varied concentrations of the HAE showed no significant genotoxic effect at range of 1–20 mg/mL. The EE at 20 mg/mL showed moderate genotoxic effect related to the increase of the DNA percentage contained in tail of the comet; DNA was classified in category 2. At concentrations below 5 mg/mL, the results of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Acacia aroma guarantee the safety at cell and genomic level. However further studies are needed for longer periods including animal models to confirm the findings. PMID:25530999

  2. Genotoxic risk in rubber manufacturing industry: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognesi, Claudia; Moretto, Angelo

    2014-10-15

    A large body of evidence from epidemiological studies among workers employed in the rubber manufacturing industry has indicated a significant excess cancer risk in a variety of sites. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has recently classified the "Occupational exposures in the rubber-manufacturing industry" as carcinogenic to humans (Group 1). A genotoxic mechanism for the increased cancer risk was suggested on the basis of the evidence from the scientific literature. Exposure assessment studies have shown that workers in the rubber manufacturing industry may be exposed to different airborne carcinogenic and/or genotoxic chemicals, such as certain aromatic amines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, N-nitrosamines, although the available information does not allow to establish a causal association of cancer or genotoxic risk with particular substances/classes of chemicals or specific jobs. The aim of this paper is to critically evaluate, by conducting a systematic review, the available biomonitoring studies using genotoxicity biomarkers in rubber manufacturing industry. This systematic review suggests that a genotoxic hazard may still be present in certain rubber manufacturing industries. A quantitative risk assessment needs further studies addressing the different, processes and chemicals in the rubber manufacturing industries.

  3. Evaluation of genotoxicity testing of FDA approved large molecule therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Satin G; Fielden, Mark R; Black, Kurt A

    2014-10-01

    Large molecule therapeutics (MW>1000daltons) are not expected to enter the cell and thus have reduced potential to interact directly with DNA or related physiological processes. Genotoxicity studies are therefore not relevant and typically not required for large molecule therapeutic candidates. Regulatory guidance supports this approach; however there are examples of marketed large molecule therapeutics where sponsors have conducted genotoxicity studies. A retrospective analysis was performed on genotoxicity studies of United States FDA approved large molecule therapeutics since 1998 identified through the Drugs@FDA website. This information was used to provide a data-driven rationale for genotoxicity evaluations of large molecule therapeutics. Fifty-three of the 99 therapeutics identified were tested for genotoxic potential. None of the therapeutics tested showed a positive outcome in any study except the peptide glucagon (GlucaGen®) showing equivocal in vitro results, as stated in the product labeling. Scientific rationale and data from this review indicate that testing of a majority of large molecule modalities do not add value to risk assessment and support current regulatory guidance. Similarly, the data do not support testing of peptides containing only natural amino acids. Peptides containing non-natural amino acids and small molecules in conjugated products may need to be tested.

  4. Genotoxicity of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Granulosa Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Pöttler

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles that are aimed at targeting cancer cells, but sparing healthy tissue provide an attractive platform of implementation for hyperthermia or as carriers of chemotherapeutics. According to the literature, diverse effects of nanoparticles relating to mammalian reproductive tissue are described. To address the impact of nanoparticles on cyto- and genotoxicity concerning the reproductive system, we examined the effect of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs on granulosa cells, which are very important for ovarian function and female fertility. Human granulosa cells (HLG-5 were treated with SPIONs, either coated with lauric acid (SEONLA only, or additionally with a protein corona of bovine serum albumin (BSA; SEONLA-BSA, or with dextran (SEONDEX. Both micronuclei testing and the detection of γH2A.X revealed no genotoxic effects of SEONLA-BSA, SEONDEX or SEONLA. Thus, it was demonstrated that different coatings of SPIONs improve biocompatibility, especially in terms of genotoxicity towards cells of the reproductive system.

  5. Genotoxic potential of glyphosate formulations: mode-of-action investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydens, William F; Healy, Charles E; Hotz, Kathy J; Kier, Larry D; Martens, Mark A; Wilson, Alan G E; Farmer, Donna R

    2008-02-27

    A broad array of in vitro and in vivo assays has consistently demonstrated that glyphosate and glyphosate-containing herbicide formulations (GCHF) are not genotoxic. Occasionally, however, related and contradictory data are reported, including findings of mouse liver and kidney DNA adducts and damage following intraperitoneal (ip) injection. Mode-of-action investigations were therefore undertaken to determine the significance of these contradictory data while concurrently comparing results from ip and oral exposures. Exposure by ip injection indeed produced marked hepatic and renal toxicity, but oral administration did not. The results suggest that ip injection of GCHF may induce secondary effects mediated by local toxicity rather than genotoxicity. Furthermore, these results continue to support the conclusion that glyphosate and GCHF are not genotoxic under exposure conditions that are relevant to animals and humans.

  6. Genotoxicity of unmodified and organo-modified montmorillonite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anoop Kumar; Schmidt, Bjørn; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    2010-01-01

    The natural clay mineral montmorillonite (Cloisite (R) Na+) and an organo-modified montmorillonite (Cloisite (R) 30B) were investigated for genotoxic potential as crude suspensions and as suspensions filtrated through a 0.2-mu m pore-size filter to remove particles above the nanometre range...... absent in the filtered samples, which was independently confirmed by dynamic light-scattering measurements. Detection and identification of free quaternary ammonium modifier in the filtered sample was carried out by HPLC-Q-TOF/MS and revealed a total concentration of a mixture of quaternary ammonium...... analogues of 1.57 mu g/ml. These findings suggest that the genotoxicity of organo-modified montmorillonite was caused by the organo-modifier. The detected organo-modifier mixture was synthesized and comet-assay results showed that the genotoxic potency of this synthesized organo-modifier was in the same...

  7. Investigations of potential susceptibility toward formaldehyde-induced genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Jasmin; Högel, Josef; Linsenmeyer, Regina; Teller, Christopher; Speit, Günter

    2012-09-01

    Blood samples were taken from three groups of volunteers (30 male smokers, 30 female non-smokers, and 30 school children) and tested for ex vivo susceptibility toward formaldehyde (FA)-induced genotoxicity. Blood samples were exposed to 150 μM FA for 2 h, and the induction of DNA-protein crosslinks (DPX) in leukocytes was measured by a modification of the alkaline comet assay (i.e., reduction of γ-irradiation induced DNA migration). Removal of DPX was determined by the abolition of FA-induced reduction in DNA migration within 4 h after the end of the exposure. Induction and persistence of FA-induced DNA lesions was also measured by the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) test with cultured lymphocytes after treatment of whole blood cultures with FA (150 μM). Furthermore, the expression (mRNA level) of the GSH-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FDH, identical to alcohol dehydrogenase 5; ADH5) was measured in leukocytes by quantitative real-time RT-PCR with TaqMan probes. The subjects were also analyzed for the GSTM1 and GSTT1 metabolic gene polymorphisms and a correlation analysis with the investigated genetic endpoints for FA-induced genotoxicity was performed. The results indicate that there are no biologically relevant differences between the three study groups with regard to the various indicators of cellular sensitivity toward FA-induced genotoxic effects and the expression of FDH. The induced genotoxic effects were not associated with polymorphisms in GSTM1 and GSTT1. None of the study groups showed particular mutagen sensitivity toward FA-induced genotoxicity. These results suggest that a low scaling factor to address possible human inter-individual differences in FA-induced genotoxicity could be reasonable.

  8. Genotoxicity of diuron and glyphosate in oyster spermatozoa and embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcha, F; Spagnol, C; Rouxel, J

    2012-01-15

    We investigated the effects of genotoxicant exposure in gametes and embryos to find a possible link between genotoxicity and reproduction/developmental impairment, and explore the impact of chemical genotoxicity on population dynamics. Our study focused on the genotoxic effects of two herbicides on oyster gametes and embryos: glyphosate (both as an active substance and in the Roundup formulation) and diuron. France is Europe's leading consumer of agrochemical substances and as such, contamination of France's coastal waters by pesticides is a major concern. Glyphosate and diuron are among the most frequently detected herbicides in oyster production areas; as oyster is a specie with external reproduction, its gametes and embryos are in direct contact with the surrounding waters and are hence particularly exposed to these potentially dangerous substances. In the course of this study, differences in genotoxic and embryotoxic responses were observed in the various experiments, possibly due to differences in pollutant sensitivity between the tested genitor lots. Glyphosate and Roundup had no effect on oyster development at the concentrations tested, whereas diuron significantly affected embryo-larval development from the lowest tested concentration of 0.05 μg L⁻¹, i.e. an environmentally realistic concentration. Diuron may therefore have a significant impact on oyster recruitment rates in the natural environment. Our spermiotoxicity study revealed none of the tested herbicides to be cytotoxic for oyster spermatozoa. However, the alkaline comet assay showed diuron to have a significant genotoxic effect on oyster spermatozoa at concentrations of 0.05 μg L⁻¹ upwards. Conversely, no effects due to diuron exposure were observed on sperm mitochondrial function or acrosomal membrane integrity. Although our initial results showed no negative effect on sperm function, the possible impact on fertilization rate and the consequences of the transmission of damaged DNA for

  9. Is the Comet Assay a Sensitive Procedure for Detecting Genotoxicity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satomi Kawaguchi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the Comet assay, a procedure for quantitating DNA damage in mammalian cells, is considered sensitive, it has never been ascertained that its sensitivity is higher than the sensitivity of other genotoxicity assays in mammalian cells. To determine whether the power of the Comet assay to detect a low level of genotoxic potential is superior to those of other genotoxicity assays in mammalian cells, we compared the results of Comet assay with those of micronucleus test (MN test. WTK1 human lymphoblastoid cells were exposed to methyl nitrosourea (MNU, ethyl nitrosourea (ENU, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS, ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS, bleomycin (BLM, or UVC. In Comet assay, cells were exposed to each mutagen with (Comet assay/araC and without (Comet assay DNA repair inhibitors (araC and hydroxyurea. Furthermore, acellular Comet assay (acellular assay was performed to determine how single-strand breaks (SSBs as the initial damage contributes to DNA migration and/or to micronucleus formation. The lowest genotoxic dose (LGD, which is defined as the lowest dose at which each mutagen causes a positive response on each genotoxicity assay, was used to compare the power of the Comet assay to detect a low level of genotoxic potential and that of MN test; that is, a low LGD indicates a high power. Results are summarized as follows: (1 for all mutagens studied, LGDs were MN test ≦ Comet assay; (2 except for BLM, LGDs were Comet assay/araC ≦ MN test; (3 except for UVC and MNU, LGDs were acellular assay ≦ Comet assay/araC ≦ MN test ≦ Comet assay. The following is suggested by the present findings: (1 LGD in the Comet assay is higher than that in MN test, which suggests that the power of the MN test to detect a low level of genotoxic potential is superior to that of the Comet assay; (2 for the studied mutagens, all assays were able to detect all mutagens correctly, which suggests that the sensitivity of the Comet assay and that of the MN test were

  10. Genotoxic effects of sodium nitrate in onion roots

    OpenAIRE

    Maria-Mihaela ANTOFIE; Doroftei, Elena

    2013-01-01

    The scope of this paper is to assess cyto- and genotoxic effects of sodium nitrate on Allium cepa root tips by using different concentrations (i.e. 0,1%; 1% and 5%) for treating uniform healthy onion bulbs for three different periods of time: 6, 24 and 72 hours. In the end of the experiment the harvested root tips were prepared according to Feulgen’s squash technique using Schiff reagent and the investigations were realized according to Allium test. The cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of nitr...

  11. Genotoxic and tumorigenic pyrrolizidine alkaloids in Chinese herbal plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.P. Fu; Q. Xia; M.W. Chou; G. Lin

    2005-01-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids are a class of hepatotoxic and tumorigenic compounds detected in Chinese herbal plants,contaminated foods, and dietary supplements. In this review, the sources, toxicity, genotoxicity, tumorigenicity, and the metabolic pathways,particular the activation pathways leading to hepatotoxicity and tumorigenicity, of pyrrolizidine alkaloids are briefly discussed, with a focus on the most recent important findings concerning the genotoxic mechanism by which riddelliine liver tumors. This mechanism involves the formation of 6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5H-pyrrolizine (DHP)-derived DNA adducts and may be general to most carcinogenic pyrrolizidine alkaloids.

  12. Correlation between the genotoxicity endpoints measured by two different genotoxicity assays: comet assay and CBMN assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Ladeira

    2015-06-01

    The results concerning of positive findings by micronuclei and non significant ones by comet assay, are corroborated by Deng et al. (2005 study performed in workers occupationally exposed to methotrexate, also a cytostatic drug. According to Cavallo et al. (2009, the comet assay seems to be more suitable for the prompt evaluation of the genotoxic effects, for instance, of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons mixtures containing volatile substances, whereas the micronucleus test seems more appropriate to evaluate the effects of exposure to antineoplastic agents. However, there are studies that observed an increase in both the comet assay and the micronucleus test in nurses handling antineoplastic drugs, although statistical significance was only seen in the comet assay, quite the opposite of our results (Maluf & Erdtmann, 2000; Laffon et al. 2005.

  13. Detection of genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens in Xpc{sup −/−}p53{sup +/−} mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melis, Joost P.M. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands); Speksnijder, Ewoud N. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands); Kuiper, Raoul V. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Dutch Molecular Pathology Center, Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Salvatori, Daniela C.F. [Leiden University Medical Center, Central Animal Facility, Leiden (Netherlands); Schaap, Mirjam M. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands); Maas, Saskia [Leiden University Medical Center, Central Animal Facility, Leiden (Netherlands); Robinson, Joke; Verhoef, Aart; Benthem, Jan van; Luijten, Mirjam [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Steeg, Harry van, E-mail: Harry.van.Steeg@rivm.nl [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-01-15

    An accurate assessment of the carcinogenic potential of chemicals and pharmaceutical drugs is essential to protect humans and the environment. Therefore, substances are extensively tested before they are marketed to the public. Currently, the rodent two-year bioassay is still routinely used to assess the carcinogenic potential of substances. However, over time it has become clear that this assay yields false positive results and also has several economic and ethical drawbacks including the use of large numbers of animals, the long duration, and the high cost. The need for a suitable alternative assay is therefore high. Previously, we have proposed the Xpa*p53 mouse model as a very suitable alternative to the two-year bioassay. We now show that the Xpc*p53 mouse model preserves all the beneficial traits of the Xpa*p53 model for sub-chronic carcinogen identification and can identify both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Moreover, Xpc*p53 mice appear to be more responsive than Xpa*p53 mice towards several genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Furthermore, Xpc*p53 mice are far less sensitive than Xpa*p53 mice for the toxic activity of DNA damaging agents and as such clearly respond in a similar way as wild type mice do. These advantageous traits of the Xpc*p53 model make it a better alternative for in vivo carcinogen testing than Xpa*p53. This pilot study suggests that Xpc*p53 mice are suited for routine sub-chronic testing of both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens and as such represent a suitable alternative to possibly replace the murine life time cancer bioassay. Highlights: ► The Xpc*p53 mouse model is able to identify genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. ► Time, animals and cost can be significantly reduced compared to the 2-year bioassay. ► Xpc*p53 mice are more advantageous for carcinogen identification than Xpa*p53 mice. ► Xpc*p53 mice exhibit a wild type response upon exposure to genotoxicants.

  14. SIGNALING TO THE P53 TUMOR SUPPRESSOR THROUGH PATHWAYS ACTIVATED BY GENOTOXIC AND NON-GENOTOXIC STRESSES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ANDERSON,C.W.APPELLA,E.

    2002-07-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a tetrameric transcription factor that is post-translational modified at {approx}18 different sites by phosphorylation, acetylation, or sumoylation in response to various cellular stress conditions. Specific posttranslational modifications, or groups of modifications, that result from the activation of different stress-induced signaling pathways are thought to modulate p53 activity to regulate cell fate by inducing cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or cellular senescence. Here we review the posttranslational modifications to p53 and the pathways that produce them in response to both genotoxic and non-genotoxic stresses.

  15. Genotoxicity of refinery waste assessed by some DNA damage tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amit Kumar; Ahmad, Irshad; Ahmad, Masood

    2015-04-01

    Refinery waste effluent is well known to contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols and heavy metals as potentially genotoxic substances. The aim of the present study was to assess the genotoxic potential of Mathura refinery wastewater (MRWW) by various in vitro tests including the single cell gel electrophoresis, plasmid nicking assay and S1 nuclease assay. Treatment of human lymphocytes to different MRWW concentrations (0.15×, 0.3×, 0.5× and 0.78×) caused the formation of comets of which the mean tail lengths increased proportionately and differed significantly from those of unexposed controls. The toxic effect of MRWW on DNA was also studied by plasmid nicking assay and S1 nuclease assay. Strand breaks formation in the MRWW treated pBR322 plasmid confirmed its genotoxic effect. Moreover, a dose dependent increase in cleavage of calf thymus DNA in S1 nuclease assay was also suggestive of the DNA damaging potential of MRWW. A higher level of ROS generation in the test water sample was recorded which might be contributing to its genotoxicity. Interaction between the constituents of MRWW and calf thymus DNA was also ascertained by UV-visible spectroscopy.

  16. Mutagenicity and genotoxicity of coal fly ash water leachate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, R.; Mukherjee, A. [University of Calcutta, Calcutta (India). Dept. of Botany

    2009-03-15

    Fly ash is a by-product of coal-fired electricity generation plants. The prevalent practice of disposal is as slurry of ash and water to storage or ash ponds located near power stations. This has lain to waste thousands of hectares of land all over the world. Since leaching is often the cause of off-site contamination and pathway of introduction into the human environment, a study on the genotoxic effects of fly ash leachate is essential. Leachate prepared from the fly ash sample was analyzed for metal content, and tested for mutagenicity and genotoxicity. Analyses of metals show predominance of the metals - sodium, silicon, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, manganese, zinc, and sulphate. The Ames Salmonella mutagenicity assay, a short-term bacterial reverse mutation assay, was conducted on two-tester strains of Salmonella typhimurium strains TA97a and TA102. For genotoxicity, the alkaline version of comet assay on fly ash leachate was carried in vitro on human blood cells and in vivo on Nicotiana plants. The leachate was directly mutagenic and induced significantconcentration-dependent increases in DNA damage in whole blood cells, lymphocytes, and in Nicotiana plants. The comet parameters show increases in tail DNA percentage (%), tail length (mu m), and olive tail moment (arbitrary units). Our results indicate that leachate from fly ash dumpsites has the genotoxic potential and may lead to adverse effects on vegetation and on the health of exposed human populations.

  17. Genotoxicity of complex mixtures: CHO cell mutagenicity assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazier, M.E.; Samuel, J.E.

    1985-02-01

    A Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mammalian cell assay was used to evaluate the genotoxicity of complex mixtures (synthetic fuels). The genotoxicity (mutagenic potency) of the mixtures increased as the temperature of their boiling range increased. Most of the genotoxicity in the 750/sup 0/F+ boiling-range materials was associated with the neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) fractions. Chemical analysis data indicate that the PAH fractions of high-boiling coal liquids contain a number of known chemical carcinogens, including five- and six-ring polyaromatics (e.g., benzo(a)pyrene) as well as four- and five-ring alkyl-substituted PAH (e.g., methylchrysene and dimethylbenzanthracenes); concentrations are a function of boiling point (bp). In vitro genotoxicity was also detected in fractions of nitrogen-containing polyaromatic compounds, as well as in those with aliphatics of hydroxy-containing PAH. Mutagenic activity of some fractions was detectable in the CHO assay in the absence of an exogenous metabolic activation system; in some instances, addition of exogenous enzymes and cofactors inhibited expression of the direct-acting mutagenic potential of the fraction. These data indicate that the organic matrix of the chemical fraction determines whether, and to what degree, various mutagens are expressed in the CHO assay. Therefore, the results of biological assays of these mixtures must be correlated with chemical analyses for proper interpretation of these data. 29 references, 16 figures, 4 tables.

  18. Genotoxicity studies on a high-purity rebaudioside A preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lonnie D; Burdock, George A

    2009-08-01

    Rebaudioside A (Reb A) is a steviol glycoside isolated from the leaves of the Stevia rebaudiana plant. This non-nutritive, natural sweetener is reported to be 250-450 times sweeter than sucrose and has potential for wide use in the US diet, and is used in Japan and South America today. The safety of Reb A has been investigated in several recently published studies and information on genotoxicity is described herein. Reb A was investigated for its potential to induce genotoxicity in three in vitro and two in vivo assays (conducted according to OECD guidelines). Reb A was non-mutagenic in an Ames test using Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli, in a chromosomal aberration test using Chinese Hamster V79 cells and in a mouse lymphoma assay using L5178Y+/- cells, all studies were conducted at concentrations up to 5000 microg/ml, with and without metabolic activation. Also, Reb A was non-genotoxic in a bone marrow micronucleus test in mice at doses up 750 mg/kg bw and in an unscheduled DNA synthesis test in rats at 2000 mg/kg bw. These studies provide additional evidence that Reb A is not genotoxic at the doses tested and further support the generally recognized as safe determination of Reb A.

  19. Genistein genotoxicity: critical considerations of in vitro exposure dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Catherine B; King, Audrey A

    2007-10-01

    The potential health benefits of soy-derived phytoestrogens include their reported utility as anticarcinogens, cardioprotectants and as hormone replacement alternatives in menopause. Although there is increasing popularity of dietary phytoestrogen supplementation and of vegetarian and vegan diets among adolescents and adults, concerns about potential detrimental or other genotoxic effects persist. While a variety of genotoxic effects of phytoestrogens have been reported in vitro, the concentrations at which such effects occurred were often much higher than the physiologically relevant doses achievable by dietary or pharmacologic intake of soy foods or supplements. This review focuses on in vitro studies of the most abundant soy phytoestrogen, genistein, critically examining dose as a crucial determinant of cellular effects. In consideration of levels of dietary genistein uptake and bioavailability we have defined in vitro concentrations of genistein >5 microM as non-physiological, and thus "high" doses, in contrast to much of the previous literature. In doing so, many of the often-cited genotoxic effects of genistein, including apoptosis, cell growth inhibition, topoisomerase inhibition and others become less obvious. Recent cellular, epigenetic and microarray studies are beginning to decipher genistein effects that occur at dietarily relevant low concentrations. In toxicology, the well accepted principle of "the dose defines the poison" applies to many toxicants and can be invoked, as herein, to distinguish genotoxic versus potentially beneficial in vitro effects of natural dietary products such as genistein.

  20. Evaluation of Genotoxic Pressure along the Sava River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kračun-Kolarević, Margareta; Kostić, Jovana; Simonović, Predrag; Simić, Vladica; Milošković, Aleksandra; Reischer, Georg; Farnleitner, Andreas; Gačić, Zoran; Milačič, Radmila; Zuliani, Tea; Vidmar, Janja; Pergal, Marija; Piria, Marina; Paunović, Momir; Vuković-Gačić, Branka

    2016-01-01

    In this study we have performed a comprehensive genotoxicological survey along the 900 rkm of the Sava River. In total, 12 sites were chosen in compliance with the goals of GLOBAQUA project dealing with the effects of multiple stressors on biodiversity and functioning of aquatic ecosystems. The genotoxic potential was assessed using a complex battery of bioassays performed in prokaryotes and aquatic eukaryotes (freshwater fish). Battery comprised evaluation of mutagenicity by SOS/umuC test in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002. The level of DNA damage as a biomarker of exposure (comet assay) and biomarker of effect (micronucleus assay) and the level of oxidative stress as well (Fpg—modified comet assay) was studied in blood cells of bleak and spirlin (Alburnus alburnus/Alburnoides bipunctatus respectively). Result indicated differential sensitivity of applied bioassays in detection of genotoxic pressure. The standard and Fpg—modified comet assay showed higher potential in differentiation of the sites based on genotoxic potential in comparison with micronucleus assay and SOS/umuC test. Our data represent snapshot of the current status of the river which indicates the presence of genotoxic potential along the river which can be traced to the deterioration of quality of the Sava River by communal and industrial wastewaters. The major highlight of the study is that we have provided complex set of data obtained from a single source (homogeneity of analyses for all samples). PMID:27631093

  1. Genotoxic Maillard byproducts in current phytopharmaceutical preparations of Echinodorus grandiflorus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELISANGELA C. LIMA-DELLAMORA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracts of Echinodorus grandiflorus obtained from dried leaves by three different techniques were evaluated by bacterial lysogenic induction assay (Inductest in relation to their genotoxic properties. Before being added to test cultures, extracts were sterilized either by steam sterilization or ultraviolet light. Only the extracts prepared by infusion and steam sterilized have shown genotoxic activity. The phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of the flavonoids isovitexin, isoorientin, swertisin and swertiajaponin, isolated from a genotoxic fraction. They were assayed separately and tested negative in the Inductest protocol. The development of browning color and sweet smell in extracts submitted to heat, prompted further chemical analysis in search for Maillard's reaction precursors. Several aminoacids and reducing sugars were cast in the extract. The presence of characteristic Maillard's melanoidins products was determined by spectrophotometry in the visible region and the inhibition of this reaction was observed when its characteristic inhibitor, sodium bisulfite, was added prior to heating. Remarkably, this is the first paper reporting on the appearance of such compounds in a phytomedicine preparation under a current phytopharmaceutical procedure. The genotoxic activity of such heat-prepared infusions imply in some risk of developing degenerative diseases for patients in long-term, uncontrolled use of such phytomedicines.

  2. Genotoxicity of Chlorpyrifos, Alpha-thrin, Efekto virikop and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-03

    Dec 3, 2008 ... tion to their intended effects, are sometimes found to affect non-target organisms, ... been given to the use of alternatives to mammals in testing, research and ... impact connected with the introduction and heavy use of pesti- ..... sativum in anaphase-telophase test screening metal genotoxicity. Biologia 57: ...

  3. Genotoxicity of Pesticide Waste Contaminated Soil and Its Leachate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. D. SIVANESAN; K. KRISHNAMURTHI; S. D. WACHASUNDER; T. CHAKRABARTI

    2004-01-01

    Improper land disposal of hazardous waste can result in leaching of hazardous constituents which may contaminate ground and surface water leading to adverse impact on human health and environment consequences. The present study utilized mammalian cell culture for the genotoxicity assessment of waste and its leachate. Methods Genotoxic potential and chemical analysis of pesticide derived tarry waste contaminated soil extract and its leachate was assessed using in vitro human lymphocyte cultures and GC-MS. Results The investigation revealed that the soil extract could cause significant to highly significant genotoxicity in the form of DNA strand break at 25 μL (P<0.01), 50 μL, 100 μL and 200 μL (P<0.001) and chromosomal aberration at 25 μL (P<0.01) and 50 μL and 100 μL (P<0.001). The leachate could cause significant DNA strand break and chromosomal aberration only at 100 μL and 200 μL (P<0.01) dose levels. Conclusion The genotoxicity observed is attributed to carbaril and tetra methyl naphthyl carbamate, the major ingredients of the extracts, as revealed by GC-MS.

  4. Formation and removal of genotoxic activity during UV/H

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heringa, M.B.; Harmsen, D.J.H.; Beerendonk, E.F.; Reus, A.A.; Krul, C.A.M.; Metz, D.H.; Ijpelaar, G.F.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the genotoxic activity of water after UV/H2O2 oxidation and GAC filtration. Pre-treated surface water from three locations was treated with UV/H2O2 with medium pressure (MP) lamps and passed through granulated

  5. Mercury-induced genotoxicity in marine diatom (Chaetoceros tenuissimus)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarker, S.; Desai, S.R.; Verlecar, X.N.; Sarker, M.S.; Sarkar, A.

    In this paper, we present an evaluation of genotoxic responses in marine diatom, Chaetoceros tenuissimus, isolated from Kandla Creek (lat 23.03° N, long 70.22° E), Gujarat, India, in terms of impairment of DNA integrity as a function...

  6. Genotoxicity in native fish associated with agricultural runoff events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, A.; Kuivila, K.M.; Orlando, J.L.; Kotelevtsev, S.; Anderson, S.L.

    2004-01-01

    The primary objective of the present study was to test whether agricultural chemical runoff was associated with in-stream genotoxicity in native fish. Using Sacramento sucker (Catostomus occidentalis), we combined field-caging experiments in an agriculturally dominated watershed with controlled laboratory exposures to field-collected water samples, and we coupled genotoxicity biomarker measurements in fish with bacterial mutagenicity analysis of water samples. We selected DNA strand breakage as a genotoxicity biomarker and Ames Salmonella mutagenicity tests as a second, supporting indicator of genotoxicity. Data from experiments conducted during rainfall runoff events following winter application of pesticides in 2000 and 2001 indicated that DNA strand breaks were significantly elevated in fish exposed to San Joaquin River (CA, USA) water (38.8, 28.4, and 53.6% DNA strand breakage in year 2000 field, year 2000 lab, and year 2001 field exposures, respectively) compared with a nearby reference site (15.4, 8.7, and 12.6% DNA strand breakage in year 2000 field, year 2000 lab, and year 2001 field exposures, respectively). Time-course measurements in field experiments supported a linkage between induction of DNA strand breakage and the timing of agricultural runoff. San Joaquin River water also caused significant reversion mutation in two Ames Salmonella tester strains. Salmonella mutagenicity corroborated in-stream effects, further strengthening a causal relationship between runoff events and genotoxicity. Potentially responsible agents are discussed in the context of timing of runoff events in the field, concordance between laboratory and field exposures, pesticide application patterns in the drainage, and analytical chemistry data.

  7. Genotoxicity of 2-bromo-3′-chloropropiophenone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Fanxue; Yan, Jian; Li, Yan [Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, 3900 NCTR Road, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Fu, Peter P. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, 3900 NCTR Road, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Fossom, Linda H.; Sood, Ramesh K.; Mans, Daniel J.; Chu, Pei-I [Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20993 (United States); Moore, Martha M. [Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, 3900 NCTR Road, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Chen, Tao, E-mail: tao.chen@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, 3900 NCTR Road, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Impurities are present in any drug substance or drug product. They can be process-related impurities that are not completely removed during purification or are formed due to the degradation of the drug substance over the product shelf-life. Unlike the drug substance, impurities generally do not have beneficial effects and may present a risk without associated benefit. Therefore, their amount should be minimized. 2-Bromo-3′-chloropropiophenone (BCP) is an impurity of bupropion, a second-generation antidepressant and a smoking cessation aid. The United States Pharmacopeia recommends an acceptable level for BCP that is not more than 0.1% of the bupropion. Because exposure to genotoxic impurities even at low levels is of significant concern, it is important to determine whether or not BCP is genotoxic. Therefore, in this study the Ames test and the in vitro micronucleus assay were conducted to evaluate the genotoxicity of BCP. BCP was mutagenic with S9 metabolic activation, increasing the mutant frequencies in a concentration-dependent manner, up to 22- and 145-fold induction over the controls in Salmonella strains TA100 and TA1535, respectively. BCP was also positive in the in vitro micronucleus assay, resulting in up to 3.3- and 5.1-fold increase of micronucleus frequency for treatments in the absence and presence of S9, respectively; and 9.9- and 7.4-fold increase of aneuploidies without and with S9, respectively. The addition of N-acetyl-L-cysteine, an antioxidant, reduced the genotoxicity of BCP in both assays. Further studies showed that BCP treatment resulted in induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the TK6 cells. The results suggest that BCP is mutagenic, clastogenic, and aneugenic, and that these activities are mediated via generation of reactive metabolites. - Highlights: • 2-Bromo-3′-chloropropiophenone is an impurity of bupropion. • BCP was positive in both the Ames test and the in vitro micronucleus assay. • It induced high frequencies of

  8. A review of the genotoxicity of marketed pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, R D; Green, J W

    2001-05-01

    Information in the 1999 Physician's Desk Reference as well as from the peer-reviewed published literature was used to evaluate the genotoxicity of marketed pharmaceuticals. This survey is a compendium of genotoxicity information and a means to gain perspective on the inherent genotoxicity of structurally diverse pharmaceuticals. Data from 467 marketed drugs were collected. Excluded from analysis were anti-cancer drugs and nucleosides, which are expected to be genotoxic, steroids, biologicals and peptide-based drugs. Of the 467 drugs, 115 had no published gene-tox data. This group was comprised largely of acutely administered drugs such as antibiotics, antifungals, antihistamines decongestants and anesthetics. The remaining 352 had at least one standard gene-tox assay result. Of these, 101 compounds (28.7%) had at least one positive assay result in the pre-ICH/OECD standard four-test battery (bacterial mutagenesis, in vitro cytogenetics, mouse lymphoma assay (MLA), in vivo cytogenetics). Per assay type, the percentage of positive compounds was: bacterial mutagenesis test, 27/323 (8.3%); in vitro cytogenetics 55/222 (24.8%); MLA 24/96 (25%); in vivo cytogenetics 29/252 (11.5%). Of the supplemental genetic toxicology test findings reported, the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assay had the largest percentage of positives 17/39 (43.5%) and mammalian mutagenesis assays (excluding MLA) had the lowest percentage of positives 2/91 (2.2%). The predictive value of genetic toxicology findings for 2-year bioassay outcomes is difficult to assess since carcinogenicity can occur via non-genotoxic mechanisms. Nevertheless, the following survey findings were made: 201 drugs had both gene-tox data and rodent carcinogenicity data. Of these, 124 were negative and 77 were equivocal or positive for carcinogenicity in at least 1 gender/1 species. Of the 124 non-carcinogens, 100 had no positive gene-tox findings. Of the remaining 24, 19 were positive in in vitro cytogenetics assays. Among

  9. Nuclear PTEN controls DNA repair and sensitivity to genotoxic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, C; Ho, J; Srikumar, T; Dowling, RJO; Gorrini, C; Miller, SJ; Mak, TW; Neel, BG; Raught, B; Stambolic, V

    2016-01-01

    Loss of function of the Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) tumor suppressor gene is associated with many human cancers. In the cytoplasm, PTEN antagonizes the Phosphatidylinositol 3′ kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway. PTEN also accumulates in the nucleus, where its function remains poorly understood. We demonstrate that SUMOylation (SUMO) of PTEN controls its nuclear localization. In cells exposed to genotoxic stress, SUMO-PTEN was rapidly excluded from the nucleus dependent on the protein kinase Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). Cells lacking nuclear PTEN were hypersensitive to DNA damage, while PTEN-deficient cells were susceptible to killing by a combination of genotoxic stress and a small molecule PI3K inhibitor both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings may have implications for individualized therapy for patients with PTEN-deficient tumors. PMID:23888040

  10. Assessment of genotoxic potential of Tamra Bhasma (incinerated copper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnil Y Chaudhari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The presence of metallic content in Ayurvedic drugs became an important burning issue in present days. The usefulness of Bhasmas (incinerated metals/minerals in therapeutics, their safety or toxicity is frequently being raised on different platforms. Considering this, there is a need to develop toxicity profiles of different metals/minerals. Tamra Bhasma (incinerated copper one such metallic formulation is widely used in cardiac and lipid disorders by Ayurvedic Physicians. The present study is aimed to evaluate the genotoxic potential of Tamra Bhasma. Materials and Methods: It was prepared as per classical guidelines and administered to Swiss albino mice for 14 consecutive days. Chromosomal aberration and sperm abnormality assay were studied. Results: All treated groups exhibited significant body weight gain in comparison to cyclophosphamide (CP group. Results revealed no structural deformity in above parameters in comparison to CP group. Conclusion: Reported data showed that both tested samples of Tamra Bhasma were not genotoxic and can be used safely.

  11. Genotoxicity of Euphorbia hirta: an Allium cepa assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuet Ping, Kwan; Darah, Ibrahim; Yusuf, Umi Kalsom; Yeng, Chen; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan

    2012-06-26

    The potential genotoxic effects of methanolic extracts of Euphorbia hirta which is commonly used in traditional medicine to treat a variety of diseased conditions including asthma, coughs, diarrhea and dysentery was investigated using Allium cepa assay. The extracts of 125, 250, 500 and 1,000 µg/mL were tested on root meristems of A. cepa. Ethylmethanesulfonate was used as positive control and distilled water was used as negative control. The result showed that mitotic index decreased as the concentrations of E. hirta extract increased. A dose-dependent increase of chromosome aberrations was also observed. Abnormalities scored were stickiness, c-mitosis, bridges and vagrant chromosomes. Micronucleated cells were also observed at interphase. Result of this study confirmed that the methanol extracts of E. hirta exerted significant genotoxic and mitodepressive effects at 1,000 µg/mL.

  12. Acetaminophen metabolism, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity in rat primary hepatocyte cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milam, K.M.; Byard, J.L.

    1985-06-30

    Acetaminophen (APAP) metabolism, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity were measured in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. Although 3 mM APAP caused a slight increase in cellular release of lactate dehydrogenase into the culture medium, cellular glutathione concentration (an index of APAP metabolism) was reduced by 50%. APAP at 7 mM was significantly more toxic to these hepatocytes and had a similar but more marked effect on glutathione concentrations. In spite of its cytotoxicity, neither dose of APAP stimulated DNA repair synthesis when monitored by the rate of incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA following exposure to APAP. Thus, although APAP has been shown to be both hepato- and nephrotoxic in several in vivo and in vitro systems, the reactive toxic metabolite of APAP is not genotoxic in rat primary hepatocyte cultures.

  13. Genotoxic effect of formocresol pulp therapy of deciduous teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas Leite, Ana Catarina Gaioso; Rosenblatt, Aronita; da Silva Calixto, Merilane; da Silva, Cirlene Maria; Santos, Neide

    2012-08-30

    To investigate whether formocresol, in Buckley's original formulation, used for pulp therapy of deciduous teeth, can have a genotoxic effect. Genotoxicity was tested in lymphocyte cultures from the peripheral blood of children aged 5-10y, in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. This was a case-control study. The sample comprised 40 children who had primary teeth with non-vital pulps. Two venous blood samples (6-8ml) were collected from each child, the first prior to pulp therapy (control group) and the second 24h after pulp therapy (experimental group). Lymphocyte cultures were grown in 78% RPMI 1640 medium, 20% fetal bovine serum, 2% phytohemagglutinin. The lymphocytes were assessed for chromosomal aberrations; each sample involved analysis of 100 metaphases. There was a statistically significant difference between the control and treated groups for the isochromatid gap (pformocresol in pediatric dentistry is recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Tradescantia micronucleus test indicates genotoxic potential of traffic emissions in European cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klumpp, A.; Ansel, W.; Klumpp, G.

    2006-01-01

    , the Tradescantia micronucleus (Trad-MCN) test was applied to examine the genotoxicity of urban air pollution. Cuttings of Tradescantia clone #4430 were exposed to ambient air at 65 monitoring sites in 10 conurbations employing a standardised methodology. The tests revealed an elevated genotoxic potential mainly...... is recommended in order to reduce the variability of results due to varying environmental conditions. The Tradescantia micronucleus test can be used to assess genotoxic potential at urban sites....

  15. In vivo genotoxicity of estragole in male F344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wei; Levy, Dan D; Bishop, Michelle E; Pearce, Mason G; Davis, Kelly J; Jeffrey, Alan M; Duan, Jian-Dong; Williams, Gary M; White, Gene A; Lyn-Cook, Lascelles E; Manjanatha, Mugimane G

    2015-05-01

    Estragole, a naturally occurring constituent of various herbs and spices, is a rodent liver carcinogen which requires bio-activation. To further understand the mechanisms underlying its carcinogenicity, genotoxicity was assessed in F344 rats using the comet, micronucleus (MN), and DNA adduct assays together with histopathological analysis. Oxidative damage was measured using human 8-oxoguanine-DNA-N-glycosylase (hOGG1) and EndonucleaseIII (EndoIII)-modified comet assays. Results with estragole were compared with the structurally related genotoxic carcinogen, safrole. Groups of seven-week-old male F344 rats received corn oil or corn oil containing 300, 600, or 1,000 mg/kg bw estragole and 125, 250, or 450 mg/kg bw safrole by gavage at 0, 24, and 45 hr and terminated at 48 hr. Estragole-induced dose-dependent increases in DNA damage following EndoIII or hOGG1 digestion and without enzyme treatment in liver, the cancer target organ. No DNA damage was detected in stomach, the non-target tissue for cancer. No elevation of MN was observed in reticulocytes sampled from peripheral blood. Comet assays, both without digestion or with either EndoIII or hOGG1 digestion, also detected DNA damage in the liver of safrole-dosed rats. No DNA damage was detected in stomach, nor was MN elevated in peripheral blood following dosing with safrole suggesting that, as far both safrole and estragole, oxidative damage may contribute to genotoxicity. Taken together, these results implicate multiple mechanisms of estragole genotoxicity. DNA damage arises from chemical-specific interaction and is also mediated by oxidative species.

  16. Neoplastic transformation of breast epithelial cells by genotoxic stress

    OpenAIRE

    Raman Venu; Winnard Paul T; Botlagunta Mahendran

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Exposure to genotoxic stresses such as radiation and tobacco smoke can cause increased cancer incidence rate as reflected in an in depth meta-analysis of data for women and breast cancer incidence. Published reports have indicated that exposures to low dose radiation and tobacco smoke are factors that contribute to the development of breast cancer. However, there is a scarcity of information on the combinatorial effects of low dose radiation and tobacco smoke on formation ...

  17. Genotoxicity of Euphorbia hirta: An Allium cepa Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Kwan Yuet Ping; Ibrahim Darah; Umi Kalsom Yusuf; Chen Yeng; Sreenivasan Sasidharan

    2012-01-01

    The potential genotoxic effects of methanolic extracts of Euphorbia hirta which is commonly used in traditional medicine to treat a variety of diseased conditions including asthma, coughs, diarrhea and dysentery was investigated using Allium cepa assay. The extracts of 125, 250, 500 and 1,000 µg/mL were tested on root meristems of A. cepa. Ethylmethanesulfonate was used as positive control and distilled water was used as negative ...

  18. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of phenazine in two human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuigan, Claire F; Li, Xing-Fang

    2014-06-01

    Phenazine was recently identified as a drinking water disinfection byproduct (DBP), but little is known of its toxic effects. We examined in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of phenazine (1.9-123 μM) in HepG2 and T24 cell lines. Cytotoxicity was determined by an impedance-based real-time cell analysis instrument. The BrdU (5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine) proliferation and MTT ((3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) viability assays were used to examine mechanisms of cytotoxicity. Genotoxicity was determined using the alkaline comet assay. Concentration-dependent cytotoxicity was observed in HepG2 cells, primarily due to an antiproliferative effect (BrdU 24 h IC50: 11 μM; 48 h IC50: 7.8 μM) observed as low as 1.9 μM. T24 cells experienced a minor antiproliferative effect (BrdU 24 h IC50: 47 μM; 48 h IC50: 17 μM). IC50 values for HepG2 proliferation and viability were 54-77% lower compared to T24 cells. In both cell lines, IC50 values for proliferation were 66-90% lower than those for viability. At phenazine concentrations producing equivalent cytotoxicity, HepG2 cells (1.9-30.8 μM) experienced no significant genotoxic effects, while T24 cells (7.7-123 μM) experienced significant genotoxicity at ⩾61.5 μM. While these effects were seen at phenazine concentrations above those found in disinfected water, the persistence of the antiproliferative effect and the differential toxicity in each cell line deserves further study.

  19. Genotoxicity of organic extracts of house dust from Shanxi, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naufal, Z.; Zhou, G.D.; McDonald, T.; Li, Z.W.; Li, Z.; Donnelly, K.C. [Texas A& amp; M Health Science Center, College Station, TX (USA). School for Rural Public Health

    2007-07-01

    Indoor combustion of solid fuel such as coal may generate respirable particles containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) that may adhere to settled dust. Dust might therefore present a major source of PAH exposure in humans. This study evaluated the in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity of PAH mixtures extracted from house dust samples. Four dust samples (E1-4) were collected from houses in Shanxi, China, where coal is heavily used for heating and cooking. For comparison, a coal sample was also collected from one of the houses and included in the analyses. The samples were extracted with methylene chloride: acetone (95:5 v/v), dried, and redissolved in appropriate solvents for assessment in genotoxicity assays. Samples were evaluated for their ability to induce point mutations in bacteria and DNA adducts in vivo. DNA adduct levels were analyzed by nuclease P1-enhanced P-32-postlabeling. PAH were quantified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Based on chemical analysis, sample E1 had the highest concentration by sampling area of benzo(a) pyrene (BaP) (181 {mu} g/m{sup 2}) and total PAH (10100 {mu} g/m{sup 2}). However, based on the microbial genotoxicity assay, sample E3, with the highest carcinogenic PAH/total PAH ratio (26%), produced the greatest number of revertants. In mice, administration of the extract of coal induced more adducts (9.81 adducts per 109 nucleotides) than dust extracts. The results of this study confirm the presence of genotoxic chemicals in residential dust. Inhalation of respirable particles containing similar mixtures of PAH represents a cancer risk for humans.

  20. Genotoxicity of Dyes Present in Colored Smoke Munitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-07

    bdd f-or !4- I . I I GENOTOXICITY OF DYES PRESENT IN COLORED SMOKE MUNITIONS FINAL REPORT I Rogene F. Henderson, Principal Investigdtor Antone L...the impurity was done using HPLC run with a more polar solvent, water:acetonitrile (1:1). Figure 2 shows the results of this experiment and indicates...conducted additional studies using the more polar solvent with 1,4-diaminoanthraquinone run as a positive control. The I HPLC tracings indicated that 1,4

  1. Assessment of genotoxic effects in nurses handling cytostatic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladeira, C; Viegas, S; Pádua, M; Gomes, M; Carolino, E; Gomes, M C; Brito, M

    2014-01-01

    Several antineoplastic drugs have been classified as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) on the basis of epidemiological findings, animal carcinogenicity data, and outcomes of in vitro genotoxicity studies. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), which is easily absorbed through the skin, is the most frequently used antineoplastic agent in Portuguese hospitals and therefore may be used as an indicator of surface contamination. The aims of the present investigation were to (1) examine surface contamination by 5-FU and (2) assess the genotoxic risk using cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in nurses from two Portuguese hospitals. The study consisted of 2 groups: 27 nurses occupationally exposed to cytostatic agents (cases) and 111 unexposed individuals (controls). Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were collected in order to measure micronuclei (MN) in both groups. Hospital B showed a higher numerical level of contamination but not significantly different from Hospital A. However; Hospital A presented the highest value of contamination and also a higher proportion of contaminated samples. The mean frequency of MN was significantly higher in exposed workers compared with controls. No significant differences were found among MN levels between the two hospitals. The analysis of confounding factors showed that age is a significant variable in MN frequency occurrence. Data suggest that there is a potential genotoxic damage related to occupational exposure to cytostatic drugs in oncology nurses.

  2. Genotoxic effects of sodium nitrate in onion roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Mihaela ANTOFIE

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this paper is to assess cyto- and genotoxic effects of sodium nitrate on Allium cepa root tips by using different concentrations (i.e. 0,1%; 1% and 5% for treating uniform healthy onion bulbs for three different periods of time: 6, 24 and 72 hours. In the end of the experiment the harvested root tips were prepared according to Feulgen’s squash technique using Schiff reagent and the investigations were realized according to Allium test. The cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of nitrate were investigated by calculating the mitotic index and observing all chromosomes’ complement alterations during the mitosis. The phase rate of cells undergoing mitosis is also studied. For microscopy investigations a Novex Holland B microscope with digital camera included was used. The cytogenetic analysis of nitrate effects revealed a strong decrease in the mitotic index which is more intense with the concentration and time of exposure. Moreover, this effect is associated in case of the variant treated with 5% sodium nitrate acting for more than 24 hours, with the appearance of genotoxic effects such as chromosomal alterations, highly condensed chromatin expression easily identified during mitosis stages, sticky chromosomes and chromosomal bridges and laggards.

  3. In vivo and in vitro genotoxicity studies of Semelil (ANGIPARSTM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khorram Khorshid HR

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Semelil is a novel herbal-based compound formulated for treatment of bed sore and diabetic foot ulcer. The objective of the present preclinical study was to assess the mutagenicity and genotoxicity of Semelil in full compliance with the standard guidelines for testing chemicals. "nThe potential genotoxicity of Semelil, as part of the safety evaluation process was assessed in three different in vitro and in vivo tests, including bacterial reverse mutation (Ames test, mammalian bone marrow chromosomal aberration, and rodent dominant lethal assays. "nEffects of Semelil was clearly negative at different doses in the Ames test. No statistically significant differences were observed between the levels of chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells of mice from the experimental and control groups. The rate of post-implantation losses and thus, the number of lethal mutations in germ cells at different stages of spermatogenesis in male mice treated with a single dose of Semelil did not statistically exceed the control rate. While on the basis of these observations, Semelil can be considered genotoxically safe, further investigations using other bio-assays for mutagenicity studies are warranted.

  4. Genotoxicity of unmodified and organo-modified montmorillonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anoop Kumar; Schmidt, Bjørn; Frandsen, Henrik; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Larsen, Erik Husfeldt; Binderup, Mona-Lise

    2010-07-19

    The natural clay mineral montmorillonite (Cloisite) Na+) and an organo-modified montmorillonite (Cloisite 30B) were investigated for genotoxic potential as crude suspensions and as suspensions filtrated through a 0.2-microm pore-size filter to remove particles above the nanometre range. Filtered and unfiltered water suspensions of both clays did not induce mutations in the Salmonella/microsome assay at concentrations up to 141microg/ml of the crude clay, using the tester strains TA98 and TA100. Filtered and unfiltered Cloisite) Na+ suspensions in culture medium did not induce DNA strand-breaks in Caco-2 cells after 24h of exposure, as tested in the alkaline comet assay. However, both the filtered and the unfiltered samples of Cloisite 30B induced DNA strand-breaks in a concentration-dependent manner and the two highest test concentrations produced statistically significantly different results from those seen with control samples (porgano-modified montmorillonite was caused by the organo-modifier. The detected organo-modifier mixture was synthesized and comet-assay results showed that the genotoxic potency of this synthesized organo-modifier was in the same order of magnitude at equimolar concentrations of organo-modifier in filtrated Cloisite) 30B suspensions, and could therefore at least partly explain the genotoxic effect of Cloisite) 30B.

  5. Genotoxic and apoptotic effects of Goeckerman therapy for psoriasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borska, L.; Andrys, C.; Krejsek, J.; Hamakova, K.; Kremlacek, J.; Palicka, V.; Ranna, D.; Fiala, Z. [Charles University Prague, Prague (Czech Republic). Faculty of Medicine

    2010-03-15

    Goeckerman therapy (GT) for psoriasis is based on cutaneous application of crude coal tar (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)) and exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR). PAH and UVR are mutagenic, carcinogenic and immunotoxic agents that promote apoptosis. We evaluated dermal absorption of PAH as well as the genotoxic and apoptotic effects of GT in 20 patients with psoriasis, by determining numbers of chromosomal abnormalities in peripheral lymphocytes, and levels of 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP), p53 protein and soluble FasL (sFasL) in urine and/or blood, before and after GT. Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) score was used to evaluate clinical efficacy of GT. Compared with pre-treatment levels, there was a significant increase in urine 1-OHP, indicating a high degree of dermal absorption of PAH (P <0.01). We also found a significant increase in the number of chromosomal abnormalities in peripheral blood lymphocytes (P <0.001), suggesting that GT is genotoxic; significantly increased p53 protein in plasma (P <0.05), an indicator of cell response to DNA damage; and significantly increased sFasL in serum (P <0.01), an indicator of apoptosis. The PASI score was significantly decreased after GT (P <0.001), confirming clinical benefit of this treatment. Our results demonstrate high dermal absorption of PAH during GT and provide evidence that GT promotes genotoxicity and apoptosis.

  6. Genotoxicity assessment of amaranth and allura red using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabeen, Hafiza Sumara; ur Rahman, Sajjad; Mahmood, Shahid; Anwer, Sadaf

    2013-01-01

    Amaranth (E123) and Allura red (E129), very important food azo dyes used in food, drug, paper, cosmetic and textile industries, were assessed for their genotoxic potential through comet assay in yeast cells. Comet assay was standardized by with different concentration of H(2)O(2). Concentrations of Amaranth and Allura red were maintained in sorbitol buffer starting from 9.76 to 5,000 μg/mL and 1 × 10(4) cells were incubated at two different incubation temperatures 28 and 37°C. Amaranth (E123) and Allura red (E129) were found to exhibit their genotoxic effect directly in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. No significant genotoxic activity was observed for Amaranth and Allura red at 28°C but at 37°C direct relation of Amaranth concentration with comet tail was significant and no positive relation was seen with time exposure factor. At 37°C the minimum concentration of Amaranth and Allura red at which significant DNA damage observed through comet assay was 1,250 μg/mL in 2nd h post exposure time. The results indicated that food colors should be carefully used in baking products as heavy concentration of food colors could affect the fermentation process of baking.

  7. Dragon's blood Croton palanostigma induces genotoxic effects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maistro, Edson Luis; Ganthous, Giulia; Machado, Marina da Silva; Zermiani, Tailyn; Andrade, Sérgio Faloni de; Rosa, Paulo Cesar Pires; Perazzo, Fabio Ferreira

    2013-05-20

    Dragon's blood is a dark-red sap produced by species from the genus Croton (Euphorbiaceae), which has been used as a famous traditional medicine since ancient times in many countries, with scarce data about its safe use in humans. In this research, we studied genotoxicity and clastogenicity of Croton palanostigma sap using the comet assay and micronucleus test in cells of mice submitted to acute treatment. HPLC analysis was performed to identify the main components of the sap. The sap was administered by oral gavage at doses of 300 mg/kg, 1,000 mg/kg and 2,000 mg/kg. For the analysis, the comet assay was performed on the leukocytes and liver cells collected 24h after treatment, and the micronucleus test (MN) on bone marrow cells. Cytotoxicity was assessed by scoring 200 consecutive polychromatic (PCE) and normochromatic (NCE) erythrocytes (PCE/NCE ratio). The alkaloid taspine was the main compound indentified in the crude sap of Croton palanostigma. The results of the genotoxicity assessment show that all sap doses tested produced genotoxic effects in leukocytes and liver cells and also produced clastogenic/aneugenic effects in bone marrow cells of mice at the two higher doses tested. The PCE/NCE ratio indicated no cytotoxicity. The data obtained suggest caution in the use of Croton palanostigma sap by humans considering its risk of carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular and cytogenetic assessment of Dipterygium glaucum genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altwaty, Nada H; El-Sayed, Osama E; Aly, Nariman A H; Baeshen, Mohamed N; Baeshen, Nabih A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to assess the genotoxicity of Dipterygium glaucum grows widely in Saudi Arabia desert to produce safety herbal products. This work is considered the first and pioneer report so far due to the lack and poor evaluated reports of the plant species for their mutagensity, genotoxicity and cytogenetics effects. Cytogenetic effects of D. glaucum on mitotic in roots of Vicia faba showed reduction in mitotic activity using three extracts; water, ethanol and ethyl acetate. Chromosomal abnormalities were recorded that included stickiness of chromosomes, chromatin bridge, fragments, lagging chromosome and micronuclei. Protein bands and RAPD analyses of V. faba treated with three D. glaucum extracts revealed some newly induced proteins and DNA fragments and other disappeared. Chemical constitution of the plant species should be identified with their biological activities against human and animal cells like HeLa cancer cell line. We are recommending using additional genotoxicity tests and other toxicity tests on animal culture with different concentrations and also utilizing several drought and heat tolerant genes of the plant species in gene cloning to develop and improve other economical crop plants instead of using the species as oral herbal remedy.

  9. Safety pharmacology and genotoxicity evaluation of AVI-4658.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazani, Peter; Weller, Doreen L; Shrewsbury, Stephen B

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by dystrophin gene mutations. Restoration of dystrophin by exon skipping was demonstrated with the phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMO) class of splice-switching oligomers, in both mouse and dog disease models. The authors report the results of Good Laboratory Practice-compliant safety pharmacology and genotoxicity evaluations of AVI-4658, a PMO under clinical evaluation for DMD. In cynomolgus monkeys, no test article-related effects were seen on cardiovascular, respiratory, global neurological, renal, or liver parameters at the maximum feasible dose (320 mg/kg). Genotoxicity battery showed that AVI-4658 has no genotoxic potential at up to 5000 microg/mL in an in vitro mammalian chromosome aberration test and a bacterial reverse mutation assay. In the mouse bone marrow erythrocyte micronucleus test, a single intravenous injection up to 2000 mg/kg was generally well tolerated and resulted in no mutagenic potential. These results allowed initiation of systemic clinical trials in DMD patients in the United Kingdom.

  10. Molecular and cytogenetic assessment of Dipterygium glaucum genotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NADA H. ALTWATY

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of the present study is to assess the genotoxicity of Dipterygium glaucum grows widely in Saudi Arabia desert to produce safety herbal products. This work is considered the first and pioneer report so far due to the lack and poor evaluated reports of the plant species for their mutagensity, genotoxicity and cytogenetics effects. Cytogenetic effects of D. glaucum on mitotic in roots of Vicia faba showed reduction in mitotic activity using three extracts; water, ethanol and ethyl acetate. Chromosomal abnormalities were recorded that included stickiness of chromosomes, chromatin bridge, fragments, lagging chromosome and micronuclei. Protein bands and RAPD analyses of V. faba treated with three D. glaucum extracts revealed some newly induced proteins and DNA fragments and other disappeared. Chemical constitution of the plant species should be identified with their biological activities against human and animal cells like HeLa cancer cell line. We are recommending using additional genotoxicity tests and other toxicity tests on animal culture with different concentrations and also utilizing several drought and heat tolerant genes of the plant species in gene cloning to develop and improve other economical crop plants instead of using the species as oral herbal remedy

  11. Genotoxicity risk assessment of diversely substituted quinolines using the SOS chromotest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Leidy Tatiana Díaz; Rincón, Nathalia Olivar; Galvis, Carlos Eduardo Puerto; Kouznetsov, Vladimir V; Lorenzo, Jorge Luis Fuentes

    2015-03-01

    Quinolines are aromatic nitrogen compounds with wide therapeutic potential to treat parasitic and microbial diseases. In this study, the genotoxicity of quinoline, 4-methylquinoline, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO), and diversely functionalized quinoline derivatives and the influence of the substituents (functional groups and/or atoms) on their genotoxicity were tested using the SOS chromotest. Quinoline derivatives that induce genotoxicity by the formation of an enamine epoxide structure did not induce the SOS response in Escherichia coli PQ37 cells, with the exception of 4-methylquinoline that was weakly genotoxic. The chemical nature of the substitution (C-5 to C-8: hydroxyl, nitro, methyl, isopropyl, chlorine, fluorine, and iodine atoms; C-2: phenyl and 3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl rings) of quinoline skeleton did not significantly modify compound genotoxicities; however, C-2 substitution with α-, β-, or γ-pyridinyl groups removed 4-methylquinoline genotoxicity. On the other hand, 4-NQO derivatives whose genotoxic mechanism involves reduction of the C-4 nitro group were strong inducers of the SOS response. Methyl and nitrophenyl substituents at C-2 of 4-NQO core affected the genotoxic potency of this molecule. The relevance of these results is discussed in relation to the potential use of the substituted quinolines. The work showed the sensitivity of SOS chromotest for studying structure-genotoxicity relationships and bioassay-guided quinoline synthesis.

  12. Comparison of microbial tests for the detection of heavy metal genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codina, J C; Pérez-Torrente, C; Pérez-García, A; Cazorla, F M; de Vicente, A

    1995-08-01

    Heavy metal genotoxicity was evaluated by using different microbial tests. Four genotoxicity assays were employed: the Ames test, the E. coli WP2 test, the Mutatox test detecting mutagenicity, and the SOS assay with E. coli-detecting enzyme induction. All the metals tested (cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, nickel, and zinc) were detected as genotoxic by the Mutatox and the SOS tests. The Ames test and the E. coli WP2 assay only detected chromium as genotoxic, causing a mutagenic effect. The sensitivity to metals of all the assays used was maintained when they were dissolved in sewage, although there was a slight increase in the sensitivity thresholds.

  13. High throughput comet assay to study genotoxicity of nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naouale El Yamani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The unique physicochemical properties of engineered nanomaterials (NMs have accelerated their use in diverse industrial and domestic products. Although their presence in consumer products represents a major concern for public health safety, their potential impact on human health is poorly understood. There is therefore an urgent need to clarify the toxic effects of NMs and to elucidate the mechanisms involved. In view of the large number of NMs currently being used, high throughput (HTP screening technologies are clearly needed for efficient assessment of toxicity. The comet assay is the most used method in nanogenotoxicity studies and has great potential for increasing throughput as it is fast, versatile and robust; simple technical modifications of the assay make it possible to test many compounds (NMs in a single experiment. The standard gel of 70-100 μL contains thousands of cells, of which only a tiny fraction are actually scored. Reducing the gel to a volume of 5 μL, with just a few hundred cells, allows twelve gels to be set on a standard slide, or 96 as a standard 8x12 array. For the 12 gel format, standard slides precoated with agarose are placed on a metal template and gels are set on the positions marked on the template. The HTP comet assay, incorporating digestion of DNA with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG to detect oxidised purines, has recently been applied to study the potential induction of genotoxicity by NMs via reactive oxygen. In the NanoTEST project we investigated the genotoxic potential of several well-characterized metal and polymeric nanoparticles with the comet assay. All in vitro studies were harmonized; i.e. NMs were from the same batch, and identical dispersion protocols, exposure time, concentration range, culture conditions, and time-courses were used. As a kidney model, Cos-1 fibroblast-like kidney cells were treated with different concentrations of iron oxide NMs, and cells embedded in minigels (12

  14. Prevalence of genotoxic chemicals among animal and human carcinogens evaluated in the IARC Monograph Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, H; Malaveille, C

    1989-06-01

    To determine whether genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens contribute similarly to the cancer burden in humans, an analysis was performed on agents that were evaluated in Supplements 6 and 7 to the IARC Monographs for their carcinogenic effects in humans and animals and for the activity in short-term genotoxicity tests. The prevalence of genotoxic carcinogens on four groups of agents, consisting of established human carcinogens (group 1, n = 30), probable human carcinogens (group 2A, n = 37), possible human carcinogens (group 2B, n = 113) and on agents with limited evidence of carcinogenicity in animals (a subset of group 3, n = 149) was determined. A high prevalence in the order of 80 to 90% of genotoxic carcinogens was found in each of the groups 1, 2A and 2B, which were also shown to be multi-species/multi-tissues carcinogens. The distribution of carcinogenic potency in rodents did not reveal any specific characteristic of the human carcinogens in group 1 that would differentiate them from agents in groups 2A, 2B and 3. The results of this analysis indicate that (a) an agent with unknown carcinogenic potential showing sufficient evidence of activity in in vitro/in vivo genotoxicity assays (involving as endpoints DNA damage and chromosomal/mutational damage) may represent a hazard to humans; and b) an agent showing lack of activity in this spectrum of genotoxicity assays should undergo evaluation for carcinogenicity by rodent bioassay, in view of the present lack of validated short-term tests for non-genotoxic carcinogens. Overall, this analysis implies that genotoxic carcinogens add more to the cancer burden in man than non-genotoxic carcinogens. Thus, identification of such genotoxic carcinogens and subsequent lowering of exposure will remain the main goal for primary cancer prevention in man.

  15. Bioactivation and genotoxicity of the herbal constituents safrole, estragole and methyleugenol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, S.M.F.

    2007-01-01

    The herbal constituents safrole, estragole, and methyleugenol, belonging to the chemical class of the alkenylbenzenes, are genotoxic and carcinogenic compounds. The genotoxicity of these alkenylbenzenes proceeds via electrophilic metabolites generated bycytochromeP450 enzym

  16. GENOTOXICITY OF TEN CIGARETTE SMOKE CONDENSATES IN FOUR TEST SYSTEMS: COMPARISONS AMONG ASSAYS AND CONDENSATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The particulate fraction of cigarette smoke, cigarette smoke condensate (CSC), is genotoxic in many short-term in vitro tests and carcinogenic in rodents. However, no study has evaluatedd a set of CSCs prepared from a diverse set of cigarettes in a variety of short-term genotoxic...

  17. Genotoxicity of metal based engineered nanoparticles in aquatic organisms: A review

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mahaye, Ntombikayise

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available on how these challenges might be addressed. We review the application of eight different genotoxicity assays, where the Comet Assay is generally preferred due to its capacity to detect low levels of DNA damage. Most ENPs have been shown to cause genotoxic...

  18. Genotoxicity testing using the Mutatox assay: evaluation of benzo[a]pyrene as a positive control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klamer, H.J.C.; Villerius, L.A.; Roelsma, J.; Maagd, de P.G.J.; Opperhuizen, A.

    1997-01-01

    In a study on bioassay-directed chemical factionation of sediment extracts, problems were encountered using benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) as a positive control in the Mutatox™ bacterial genotoxicity assay. Genotoxic responses of tests with this compound, prescribed by the Mutatox supplier, could only be meas

  19. Human genotoxic study carried out two years after oil exposure during the clean-up activities using two different biomarkers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biern, G.; Giraldo, J.; Zock, J.P.; Monyarch, G.; Espinosa, A.; Rodríguez-Trigo, G.; Gomez, F.; Pozo-Rodríguez, F.; Barberà, J.A.; Fuster, C.

    2015-01-01

    Micronuclei, comet and chromosome alterations assays are the most widely used biomarkers for determining the genotoxic damage in a population exposed to genotoxic chemicals. While chromosome alterations are an excellent biomarker to detect short- and long-term genotoxic effects, the comet assay only

  20. The development of improved and new in vitro assays for detecting the genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogenic potential of chemicals in the discovery phase of drug development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, W.M.A.

    2011-01-01

    In drug development, toxicity is an important factor for attrition, resulting in a failure rate of 30%-40%. Hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, cardiovascular safety, reproduction toxicity, developmental toxicity (teratogenicity), genotoxicity and carcinogenicity are the main causes for attrition in saf

  1. Genotoxic and anti-genotoxic effects of esculin and its oligomer fractions against mitomycin C-induced DNA damages in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokdad Bzeouich, Imen; Mustapha, Nadia; Maatouk, Mouna; Ghedira, Kamel; Ghoul, Mohamed; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2016-12-01

    Mitomycin C is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic drugs against various solid tumors. However, despite its wide spectrum of clinical benefits, this agent is capable of inducing various types of genotoxicity. In this study, we investigated the effect of esculin and its oligomer fractions (E1, E2 and E3) against mitomycin C induced genotoxicity in liver and kidney cells isolated from Balb/C mice using the comet assay. Esculin and its oligomer fractions were not genotoxic at the tested doses (20 mg/kg and 40 mg/kg b.w). A significant decrease in DNA damages was observed, suggesting a protective role of esculin and its oligomer fractions against the genotoxicity induced by mitomycin C on liver and kidney cells. Moreover, esculin and its oligomer fractions did not induce an increase of malondialdehyde levels.

  2. Screening potential genotoxic effect of aquatic plant extracts using the mussel micronucleus test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Eck-Varanka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the genotoxic potential of selected aquatic macrophytes: Ceratophyllum demersum L. (hornwort, family Ceratophyllaceae, Typha angustifolia L. (narrowleaf cattail, family Typhaceae, Stratiotes aloides L. (water soldier, family Butomaceae, and Oenanthe aquatica (L. Poir. (water dropwort, family Umbelliferae. Methods: For genotoxicity assessment, the mussel micronucleus test was applied. Micronucleus frequency was determined from the haemolymph of Unio pictorum L. (painter’s mussel. In parallel, total and hydrolisable tannin contents were determined. Results: All plant extracts elucidated significant mutagenic effect. Significant correlation was determined between tannin content and mutagenic capacity. Conclusions: The significant correlation between genotoxicity as expressed by micronucleus frequency and tannin content (both total and hydrolisable tannins indicate that tannin is amongst the main compounds being responsible for the genotoxic potential. It might be suggested that genotoxic capacity of these plants elucidate a real ecological effect in the ecosystem.

  3. Reduction of acute toxicity and genotoxicity of dye effluent using Fenton-coagulation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Chen, Shuo; Zhang, Ying; Quan, Xie; Zhao, Huimin; Zhang, Yaobin

    2014-06-15

    Dye wastewater exhibits significant ecotoxicity even though its physico-chemical parameters meet the discharge standards. In this work, the acute toxicity and genotoxicity of dye effluent were tested, and the Fenton-coagulation process was carried out to detoxify this dye effluent. The acute toxicity was evaluated according to the mortality rate of zebrafish, and genotoxicity was evaluated by micronucleus (MN) and comet assays. Removal of color and chemical oxygen demand (COD) was also investigated. The results indicated that the dye effluent showed strong acute toxicity and genotoxicity to zebrafish. After 4h of treatment by Fenton-coagulation process, the dye effluent exhibited no significant acute toxicity and genotoxicity to zebrafish. In addition, its COD was less than 50mg/L, which met the discharge standard. It demonstrates that Fenton-coagulation process can comprehensively reduce the acute toxicity and genotoxicity as well as the COD of the dye effluent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Comet Assay for the Evaluation of Genotoxic Potential of Landfill Leachate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Widziewicz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genotoxic assessment of landfill leachate before and after biological treatment was conducted with two human cell lines (Me45 and NHDF and Daphnia magna somatic cells. The alkali version of comet assay was used to examine genotoxicity of leachate by DNA strand breaks analysis and its repair dynamics. The leachate samples were collected from Zabrze landfill, situated in the Upper Silesian Industrial District, Poland. Statistically significant differences (Kruskal-Wallice ANOVA rank model were observed between DNA strand breaks in cells incubated with leachate before and after treatment (P<0.001. Nonparametric Friedman ANOVA confirmed time-reliable and concentration-reliable cells response to leachate concentration. Examinations of chemical properties showed a marked decrease in leachate parameters after treatment which correlate to reduced genotoxicity towards tested cells. Obtained results demonstrate that biological cotreatment of leachate together with municipal wastewater is an efficient method for its genotoxic potential reduction; however, treated leachate still possessed genotoxic character.

  5. Screening potential genotoxic effect of aquatic plant extracts using the mussel micronucleus test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bettina Eck-Varanka; Nora Kovts; Katalin Hubai; Gbor Paulovits; rpd Ferincz; Eszter Horvth

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To assess the genotoxic potential of selected aquatic macrophytes:Ceratophyllum demersum L. (hornwort, family Ceratophyllaceae),Typha angustifolia L. (narrowleaf cattail, family Typhaceae),Stratiotes aloides L. (water soldier, family Butomaceae), andOenanthe aquatica (L.) Poir. (water dropwort, family Umbelliferae). Methods: For genotoxicity assessment, the mussel micronucleus test was applied. Micronucleus frequency was determined from the haemolymph ofUnio pictorum L. (painter’s mussel). In parallel, total and hydrolisable tannin contents were determined. Results:All plant extracts elucidated significant mutagenic effect. Significant correlation was determined between tannin content and mutagenic capacity. Conclusions:The significant correlation between genotoxicity as expressed by micronucleus frequency and tannin content (both total and hydrolisable tannins) indicate that tannin is amongst the main compounds being responsible for the genotoxic potential. It might be suggested that genotoxic capacity of these plants elucidate a real ecological effect in the ecosystem.

  6. The Food Contaminant Deoxynivalenol Exacerbates the Genotoxicity of Gut Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Payros

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of human beings from developed countries are colonized by Escherichia coli strains producing colibactin, a genotoxin suspected to be associated with the development of colorectal cancers. Deoxynivalenol (DON is the most prevalent mycotoxin that contaminates staple food—especially cereal products—in Europe and North America. This study investigates the effect of the food contaminant DON on the genotoxicity of the E. coli strains producing colibactin. In vitro, intestinal epithelial cells were coexposed to DON and E. coli producing colibactin. In vivo, newborn rats colonized at birth with E. coli producing colibactin were fed a DON-contaminated diet. Intestinal DNA damage was estimated by the phosphorylation of histone H2AX. DON exacerbates the genotoxicity of the E. coli producing colibactin in a time- and dose-dependent manner in vitro. Although DON had no effect on the composition of the gut microbiota, and especially on the number of E. coli, a significant increase in DNA damage was observed in intestinal epithelial cells of animals colonized by E. coli strains producing colibactin and coexposed to DON compared to animals colonized with E. coli strains unable to produce colibactin or animals exposed only to DON. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that the genotoxicity of E. coli strains producing colibactin, increasingly present in the microbiota of asymptomatic human beings, is modulated by the presence of DON in the diet. This raises questions about the synergism between food contaminants and gut microbiota with regard to intestinal carcinogenesis.

  7. Assessment of methyl methacrylate genotoxicity by the micronucleus test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Amarildo Mariano de; Alves, Guilherme Rodrigues; Avanço, Guilherme Trevisan; Parizi, José Luiz Santos; Nai, Gisele Alborghetti

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic potential of methyl methacrylate (MMA) vapor by simulating standard occupational exposure of 8 hours per day and using the micronucleus test. We used 32 adult male Wistar rats divided into three groups: A - 16 rats exposed to MMA for 8 hours a day, B - Eight rats receiving single subcutaneous doses of cyclophosphamide on the first day of the experiment (positive control), C - Eight rats receiving only water and food ad libitum (negative control). Eight rats from group A and all of the rats from groups B and C were sacrificed 24 hours after beginning the experiment (acute exposure in group A). The remaining animals in group A were sacrificed 5 days after the experiment began (repeated exposure assessment in group A, simulating occupational exposure 40 hours/week). Femoral bone marrow was collected from each rat at the time of sacrifice for use in the micronucleus test. Two slides were completed per animal and were stained with Giemsa staining. Two thousand polychromatic erythrocytes were counted per animal. The Kruskal-Wallis test followed by a multiple comparisons test (Dunn test) was used for statistical analysis. The median number of micronuclei was 7.00 in the group exposed to MMA for 1 day, 2.00 in the group exposed to MMA for 5 days, 9.00 in the group exposed to cyclophosphamide (positive control) and 0.756 in the negative control group (p < 0.0001). MMA was genotoxic when measured after 1 day of exposure but was not evidently genotoxic after 5 days.

  8. The Food Contaminant Deoxynivalenol Exacerbates the Genotoxicity of Gut Microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payros, Delphine; Martin, Patricia; Secher, Thomas; Bracarense, Ana Paula F. L.; Boury, Michèle; Laffitte, Joelle; Pinton, Philippe; Oswald, Eric

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT An increasing number of human beings from developed countries are colonized by Escherichia coli strains producing colibactin, a genotoxin suspected to be associated with the development of colorectal cancers. Deoxynivalenol (DON) is the most prevalent mycotoxin that contaminates staple food—especially cereal products—in Europe and North America. This study investigates the effect of the food contaminant DON on the genotoxicity of the E. coli strains producing colibactin. In vitro, intestinal epithelial cells were coexposed to DON and E. coli producing colibactin. In vivo, newborn rats colonized at birth with E. coli producing colibactin were fed a DON-contaminated diet. Intestinal DNA damage was estimated by the phosphorylation of histone H2AX. DON exacerbates the genotoxicity of the E. coli producing colibactin in a time- and dose-dependent manner in vitro. Although DON had no effect on the composition of the gut microbiota, and especially on the number of E. coli, a significant increase in DNA damage was observed in intestinal epithelial cells of animals colonized by E. coli strains producing colibactin and coexposed to DON compared to animals colonized with E. coli strains unable to produce colibactin or animals exposed only to DON. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that the genotoxicity of E. coli strains producing colibactin, increasingly present in the microbiota of asymptomatic human beings, is modulated by the presence of DON in the diet. This raises questions about the synergism between food contaminants and gut microbiota with regard to intestinal carcinogenesis. PMID:28292979

  9. Genotoxicity of uranium contamination in embryonic zebrafish cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Sandrine, E-mail: sandrine.pereira@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), DEI, SECRE, LRE, Cadarache (France); Camilleri, Virginie; Floriani, Magali; Cavalie, Isabelle; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), DEI, SECRE, LRE, Cadarache (France)

    2012-03-15

    Uranium is a metal used in the nuclear industry and for military applications. Studies on mammals have shown that uranium is genotoxic. However the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for the genotoxicity of uranium are poorly known for other types of vertebrates such as fish. Since unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are considered to be key lesions in cell lethality, the activity of one of the major DSB-repair pathways, i.e. non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), has been evaluated in embryonic zebrafish cells (ZF4) exposed to uranium. Genotoxicity of uranium in ZF4 cells was further assessed by comet and micronucleus assays. Exposure to uranium results in the production of DSBs a few hours after incubation. These breaks trigger the phosphorylation of H2AX proteins. We showed that the DNA-PK kinase activity, essential for NHEJ, is altered by the presence of uranium. The presence of uranium in cells disturbs but does not inhibit the repair rate of DSBs. Such a result suggests an impact of uranium upon the reparability of DSBs and the potential activation of alternative DSBs repair pathway leading to the propagation of possible misrepaired DSBs. In parallel, we performed a transmission electron microscopy analysis of cells exposed to uranium and were able to localize internalized uranium using an Energy Dispersive X-ray microanalyser. We observed the formation of precipitates in lysosome-like vesicles for 250 {mu}M of uranium in the medium. The appearance of these precipitates is concomitant with the decrease of the number of DSBs per cell. This process might be a part of a defence system whose role in counteracting cytotoxicity calls for further dedicated research.

  10. Genotoxic and antimicrobial studies of the leaves of Psidium guajava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nwannemka Lauretta Ofodile

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The guava, Psidium guajava is one of the most gregarious of fruit trees, of the Myrtaceae family. The leaf of P. guajava is a common herb used in the treatment of diarrhea in Nigeria and this has generated special interest in the probable antimicrobial and genotoxic effects of the leaf. However the mode of action of the leaf extracts has not been reported, hence the genotoxicity study. Materials and Methods: Antimicrobial activity of the aqueous and ethanolic extracts of the leaves of Psidium guajava on Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans, Salmonella spp., and Staphylococcus aureus were investigated using agar-well method and also subjected to phytochemical screening and Gas chromatography-Mass spectroscopy analysis. General toxicity and genotoxic effects of the aqueous leaf extracts (0.01 g/mL, 0.03 g/mL, 0.06 g/mL and 0.08 g/mL of P. guajava on Allium cepa root tips were also investigated using aceto-orcein squash technique. Results: Results showed that both aqueous and ethanolic extracts of guava leaf inhibited the growth of the bacteria and fungi tested. The ethanolic extract showed stronger inhibition than the aqueous extract against the organisms. A total of forty one compounds were identified in guava leaves using GC-MS analysis and these substances were found to be essential oils. The cytological effects at low concentration included mainly c-mitosis, vagrant chromosomes, chromosome bridges, and binucleate cells with EC50 of 0.02 g/mL. Conclusion: The antimicrobial activity of the essential oils from the extracts of leaves of P. guajava could be partly due to alterations associated with the cell division as deduced from the results.

  11. Anti-genotoxic potential of bilirubin in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallner, Marlies; Antl, Nadja; Rittmannsberger, Barbara;

    2013-01-01

    The bile pigment bilirubin is a known antioxidant and is associated with protection from cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD) when present in too strong concentrations. Unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) might also possess anti-genotoxic potential by preventing oxidative damage to DNA. Moderately...... elevated bilirubin levels are found in individuals with Gilbert syndrome and more severe in the hyperbilirubinemic Gunn rat model. This study was therefore aimed to assess the levels of oxidative damage to DNA in Gilbert syndrome subjects and Gunn rats compared to matched controls. Seventy-six individuals...

  12. The comet assay in testing the potential genotoxicity of nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaya Azqueta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last two decades the production and use of nanomaterials (NMs has impressively increased. Their small size, given a mass equal to that of the corresponding bulk material, implies an increase in the surface area and consequently in the number of atoms that can be reactive. They possess different physical, chemical and biological properties compared to bulk materials of the same composition, which makes them very interesting and valuable for many different applications in technology, energy, construction, electronics, agriculture, optics, paints, textiles, food, cosmetics, medicine... Toxicological assessment of NMs is crucial; the same properties that make them interesting also make them potentially harmful for health and the environment. However, the term NM covers many different kinds of particle , and so there is no simple, standard approach to assessing their toxicity. NMs can enter the cell, interact with cell components and even penetrate the nucleus and interfere with the genetic material. Among the different branches of toxicology, genotoxicity is a main area of concern since it is closely related with the carcinogenic potential of compounds. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD has published internationally agreed in vitro and in vivo validated test methods to evaluate different genotoxic endpoints of chemicals, including chromosome and gene mutations, and DNA breaks. However not all the assays are suitable to study the genotoxic potential of NMs as has been shown by the OECD Working Party on Manufactured Nanomaterials (WPMN. Moreover, alterations to DNA bases, which are precursors to mutations and of great importance in elucidating the mechanism of action of NMs, are not covered by the OECD guidelines. The in vivo standard comet assay (which measures DNA breaks and alkali-labile sites was included in the OECD assays battery in September 2014 while the in vitro standard comet assay is currently under

  13. Genotoxicity biomarkers for monitoring occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs

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    Hilda M. Rodríguez-Montero

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Context: The Institute of Oncology and Radiobiology (INOR is the leading institution for the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of cancer in Cuba. The main methods used in cancer treatment are surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The last one involves the handling of hazardous substances, such as cytostatics, which implies a health risk to persons occupationally exposed to it. There are two sites where a considerable among of cytostatic is handled (Ambulatory Chemotherapy Room (ACR and the Central Unit of Cytostatic Mixture Preparation (CUCM. Genotoxicity biomarkers of exposure and effects have been widely used to detect occupational environment hazards. Aims: To evaluate genotoxicity biomarkers indicative of exposure and effects to cytostatics. Methods: In this study were tested samples taken from the surfaces of biological safety cabinets located in the Central Unit of Cytostatic Mixture using SOS – Chromotest. We also evaluated samples of oral mucosa exfoliated cells from exposed and control subjects, by micronucleus test. Results: All subjects were exposed and subjects who administered the mixes in the institution had an increased of DNA damage in comparison with the pharmaceutical staff that prepared it and wear the primary protection barriers properly. Conclusions: These results underline the efficiency of genotoxicological biomarkers in detecting the exposure levels and the deleterious effect of cytostatics on occupationally exposed personal.

  14. Comparative Genotoxicity of Cadmium and Lead in Earthworm Coelomocytes

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    Ptumporn Muangphra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine genotoxicity to coelomocytes, Pheretima peguana earthworms were exposed in filter paper studies to cadmium (Cd and lead (Pb for 48 h, at concentrations less than the LC10—Cd: 0.09, 0.19, 0.38, 0.75, and 1.50 μg cm−2; Pb: 1.65, 3.29, 6.58, 13.16, and 26.32 μg cm−2. For Cd at 0.75 μg cm−2, in the micronucleus test (detects chromosomal aberrations, significant increases (<.05 in micronuclei and binucleate cells were observed, and in the comet assay (detects DNA single-strand breaks, tail DNA% was significantly increased. Lead was less toxic with minimal effects on DNA, but the binucleates were significantly increased by Pb at 3.29 μg cm−2. This study shows that Cd is more acutely toxic and sublethally genotoxic than Pb to P. peguana. Cadmium caused chromosomal aberrations and DNA single-strand breaks at 45% of the LC10 concentration. Lead, in contrast, did not induce DNA damage but caused cytokinesis defects.

  15. Genotoxic effects of bismuth (III oxide nanoparticles by comet assay

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    Reecep Liman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth oxide is one of the important transition metal oxides and it has been intensively studied due to their peculiar characteristics (semiconductor band gap, high refractive index, high dielectric permittivity, high oxygen conductivity, resistivity, photoconductivity and photoluminescence etc.. Therefore, it is used such as microelectronics, sensor technology, optical coatings, transparent ceramic glass manufacturing, nanoenergetic gas generator, biosensor for DNA hybridization, potential immobilizing platforms for glucose oxidase and polyphenol oxidase, fuel cells, a additive in paints, an astringent in a variety of medical creams and topical ointments, and for the determination of heavy metal ions in drinking water, mineral water and urine. In addition this, Bismuth (III oxide nanoparticles (BONPs are favorable for the biomolecules adsorption than regular sized particles because of their greater advantages and novel characteristics (much higher specific surface, greater surface free energy, and good electrochemical stability etc.. Genotoxic effects of BONPs were investigated on the root cells of Allium cepa by Comet assay. A. cepa roots were treated with the aqueous dispersions of BONPs at 5 different concentrations (12.5, 25, 50, 75, and 100 ppm for 4 h. A significant increase in DNA damage was also observed at all concentrations of BONPs except 12.5 ppm by Comet assay. The results were also analyzed statistically by using SPSS for Windows; Duncan’s multiple range test was performed. These result indicate that BONPs exhibit genotoxic activity in A. cepa root meristematic cells.

  16. Pb low doses induced genotoxicity in Lactuca sativa plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, S; Silva, P; Oliveira, H; Gaivão, I; Matos, M; Pinto-Carnide, O; Santos, C

    2017-03-01

    Soil and water contamination by lead (Pb) remains a topic of great concern, particularly regarding crop production. The admissible Pb values in irrigation water in several countries range from ≈0.1 to ≈5 mg L(-1). In order to evaluate putative effects of Pb within legal doses on crops growth, we exposed Lactuca sativa seeds and seedlings to increasing doses of Pb(NO3)2 up to 20 mg L(-1). The OECD parameter seed germination and seedling/plant growth were not affected by any of the Pb-concentrations used. However, for doses higher than 5 mg L(-1) significant DNA damage was detected: Comet assay detected DNA fragmentation at ≥ 5 mg L(-1) and presence of micronuclei (MN) were detected for 20 mg L(-1). Also, cell cycle impairment was observed for doses as low as 0.05 mg L(-1) and 0.5 mg L(-1) (mostly G2 arrest). Our data show that for the low doses of Pb used, the OECD endpoints were not able to detect toxicity, while more sensitive endpoints (related with DNA damage and mitotic/interphase disorders) identified genotoxic and cytostatic effects. Furthermore, the nature of the genotoxic effect was dependent on the concentration. Finally, we recommend that MN test and the comet assay should be included as sensitive endpoints in (eco)toxicological assays.

  17. Studies on Potential Mutagenic and Genotoxic Activity of Setarud

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    B Farzamfar

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Setarud (IMODTM is a new herbal drug that has demonstrated immune modulating activity in preliminary investigations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of mutagenicity and genotoxic properties of Setarud following the guidelines of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD for the Testing of Chemicals. Methods: Ames Salmonella/mammalian microsome mutagenesis assay was used to evaluate the ability of the drug and its metabolites to induce mutation in Salmonella tester strains. Setarud was applied in concentrations of 0.1-1000 µg/dish. The effect of the drug metabolites which were formed in the presence of rat liver microsomal fraction S9 was investigated using complete and incomplete microsomal activation mixtures, separately. Induction of dominant lethal mutations in spermatogenic stem cells of male mice was also assessed. Results: In the Ames test, the drug preparation did not cause a significant increase in the number of revertant bacterial colonies as compared with negative control meaning that Setarud within the tested range did not exhibit mutagenic activity. The level of post-implantation losses and as a result the number of lethal mutations in germ cells at different stages of spermatogenesis in mice treated with Setarud was not statistically higher than that of control. Conclusion: Under experimental conditions which were employed, the drug was not mutagenic or genotoxic.

  18. Evaluation of environmental genotoxicity by comet assay in Columba livia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Acevedo, Anahi; García-Salas, Juan A; Gosálvez, Jaime; Fernández, José Luis; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Méndez-López, Luis F; Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I

    2016-01-01

    The concentrations of recognized or suspected genotoxic and carcinogenic agents found in the air of large cities and, in particular, developing countries, have raised concerns about the potential for chronic health effects in the populations exposed to them. The biomonitoring of environmental genotoxicity requires the selection of representative organisms as "sentinels," as well as the development of suitable and sensitive assays, such as those aimed at assessing DNA damage. The aim of this study was to evaluate DNA damage levels in erythrocytes from Columba livia living in the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Mexico, compared with control animals via comet assay, and to confirm the results via Micronuclei test (MN) and DNA breakage detection-fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH). Our results showed a significant increase in DNA migration in animals from the area assayed compared with that observed in control animals sampled in non-contaminated areas. These results were confirmed by MN test and DBD-FISH. In conclusion, these observations confirm that the examination of erythrocytes from Columba livia via alkaline comet assay provides a sensitive and reliable end point for the detection of environmental genotoxicants.

  19. Nanoceria have no genotoxic effect on human lens epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierscionek, Barbara K; Yasseen, Akeel A [School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine, BT52 1SA (United Kingdom); Li, Yuebin; Schachar, Ronald A; Chen, Wei [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Colhoun, Liza M, E-mail: b.pierscionek@ulster.ac.uk, E-mail: weichen@uta.edu [Centre for Vision and Vascular Sciences, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Grosvenor Road, Belfast, BT12 6BA (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-22

    There are no treatments for reversing or halting cataract, a disease of the structural proteins in the eye lens, that has associations with other age-related degenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. The incidence of cataract and associated conditions is increasing as the average age of the population rises. Protein folding diseases are difficult to assess in vivo as proteins and their age-related changes are assessed after extraction. Nanotechnology can be used to investigate protein changes in the intact lens as well as for a potential means of drug delivery. Nanoparticles, such as cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) which have antioxidant properties, may even be used as a means of treating cataract directly. Prior to use in treatments, nanoparticle genotoxicity must be tested to assess the extent of any DNA or chromosomal damage. Sister chromatid exchanges were measured and DNA damage investigated using the alkaline COMET assay on cultured human lens epithelial cells, exposed to 5 and 10 {mu}g ml{sup -1} of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles (nanoceria). Nanoceria at these dosages did not cause any DNA damage or significant increases in the number of sister chromatid exchanges. The absence of genotoxic effects on lens cells suggests that nanoceria, in the doses and exposures tested in this study, are not deleterious to the eye lens and have the potential for use in studying structural alterations, in developing non-surgical cataract treatments and in investigating other protein folding diseases.

  20. A possible role for chromium(III) in genotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, E.T. (New York Univ. Medical Center, Tuxedo (United States))

    1991-05-01

    Chromium is found in the environment in two major forms: reduced Cr{sup III} and Cr{sup VI}, or chromate. Chromate, the most biologically active species, is readily taken up by living cells and reduced intracellularly, via reactive intermediates, to stable Cr{sup III} species. Cr{sup III}, the most abundant form of chromium in the environment, does not readily cross cell membranes and is relatively inactive in vivo. However, intracellular Cr{sup III} can react slowly with both nucleic acids and proteins and can be genotoxic. The authors have investigated the genotoxicity of Cr{sup III} in vitro using a DNA replication assay and in vivo by CaCl{sub 2}-mediated transfection of chromium-treated DNA into Escherichia coli. These results suggest that Cr{sup III} alters the interaction between the DNA template and the polymerase such that the binding strength of the DNA polymerase is increased and the fidelity of DNA replication is decreased. These interactions may contribute to the mutagenicity of chromium ions in vivo and suggest that Cr{sup III} can contribute to chromium-mediated carcinogenesis.

  1. Genotoxicity of formaldehyde: Molecular basis of DNA damage and mutation

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    Masanobu eKawanishi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde is commonly used in the chemical industry and is present in the environment, such as vehicle emissions, some building materials, food and tobacco smoke. It also occurs as a natural product in most organisms, the sources of which include a number of metabolic processes. It causes various acute and chronic adverse effects in humans if they inhale its fumes. Among the chronic effects on human health, we summarize data on genotoxicity and carcinogenicity in this review, and we particularly focus on the molecular mechanisms involved in the formaldehyde mutagenesis. Formaldehyde mainly induces N-hydroxymethyl mono-adducts on guanine, adenine and cytosine, and N-methylene crosslinks between adjacent purines in DNA. These crosslinks are types of DNA damage potentially fatal for cell survival if they are not removed by the nucleotide excision repair pathway. In the previous studies, we showed evidence that formaldehyde causes intra-strand crosslinks between purines in DNA using a unique method (Matsuda et al. Nucleic Acids Res. 26, 1769-1774,1998. Using shuttle vector plasmids, we also showed that formaldehyde as well as acetaldehyde induces tandem base substitutions, mainly at 5’-GG and 5’-GA sequences, which would arise from the intra-strand crosslinks. These mutation features are different from those of other aldehydes such as crotonaldehyde, acrolein, glyoxal and methylglyoxal. These findings provide molecular clues to improve our understanding of the genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of formaldehyde.

  2. Evaluation of genotoxic effect of amalgam restorations in oral cavity

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    Chennoju Sai Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mercury a popular heavy metal used in dentistry in the form of amalgam is a known clastogen. The assessment of micronuclei in cells is a promising tool for studying the genotoxic effect of mercury on them. Hence, a study was conducted to evaluate the frequency of micronuclei in exfoliated buccal cells of subjects with amalgam restorations. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 subjects (age and gender-matched sample of 30 study group and 30 control group were included in this study. Smears were obtained with moistened wooden spatula from buccal mucosa in close contact with amalgam restoration and fixed with 100% ethyl alcohol. After staining with Papanicolaou stain, all the slides were examined under ×40 and 1,000 cells were counted for the presence of micronuclei. The data were entered into a spread sheet and subjected to statistical analysis. Results: A statistically significant increase in the number of micronuclei containing cells was observed in the study group when compared to control group (P < 0.05. A positive correlation was observed between the duration of restoration and frequency of micronuclei (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The results showed a definite genotoxic effect of amalgam restorations on the oral cavity which can be attributed to the clastogenic action of mercury in amalgam restorations.

  3. In vivo genotoxicity assessment of acrylamide and glycidyl methacrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Pacheco-Martinez, M Monserrat; McDaniel, L Patrice; Pearce, Mason G; Ding, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Acrylamide (ACR) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) are structurally related compounds used for making polymers with various properties. Both chemicals can be present in food either as a byproduct of processing or a constituent of packaging. We performed a comprehensive evaluation of ACR and GMA genotoxicity in Fisher 344 rats using repeated gavage administrations. Clastogenicity was measured by scoring micronucleated (MN) erythrocytes from peripheral blood, DNA damage in liver, bone marrow and kidneys was measured using the Comet assay, and gene mutation was measured using the red blood cell (RBC) and reticulocyte Pig-a assay. A limited histopathology evaluation was performed in order to determine levels of cytotoxicity. Doses of up to 20 mg/kg/day of ACR and up to 250 mg/kg/day of GMA were used. ACR treatment resulted in DNA damage in the liver, but not in the bone marrow. While ACR was not a clastogen, it was a weak (equivocal) mutagen in the cells of bone marrow. GMA caused DNA damage in the cells of bone marrow, liver and kidney, and induced MN reticulocytes and Pig-a mutant RBCs in a dose-dependent manner. Collectively, our data suggest that both compounds are in vivo genotoxins, but the genotoxicity of ACR is tissue specific.

  4. Environmental Nanoparticles Interactions with Plants: Morphological, Physiological, and Genotoxic Aspects

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    C. Remédios

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles (NPs are characterized by their small size (less than 100 nm and large surface area, which confer specific physicochemical properties as strength, electrical, and optical features. NPs can be derived from natural or anthropic sources, such as engineered or unwanted/incidental NPs. The composition, dimension, and morphology of engineered NPs enable their use in a variety of areas, such as electronic, biomedical, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, energy, environmental, catalysis, and materials science. As nanotechnology is an innovative and scientific growth area with an exponential production, more information is needed concerning the impacts of these nanomaterials (NMs in the environment and, particularly, in animals/humans health and in plants performance. So, research on NPs as emerging contaminants is therefore a new field in environmental health. This minireview describes, briefly, the NPs characterization and their occurrence in the environment stating air, water, and soil. Finally, particular emphasis is given to the interaction of NPs with plants at different levels: morphology, physiology, and genotoxicity. By analyzing this compiled information, it is evident that research on NPs phytotoxicity is in the beginning, and more comprehensive studies are needed not only on NPs cytotoxicity and genotoxicity but also on the best and the most reliable methods of assessing NPs toxicity.

  5. Argentine folk medicine: genotoxic effects of Chenopodiaceae family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadano, A B; Gurni, A A; Carballo, M A

    2006-01-16

    Chenopodium ambrosioides L. and Chenopodium multifidum L. (Chenopodiaceae), common name: Paico, are medicinal plants. They are aromatic shrubs growing in South America. For centuries, they have been used due to its medicinal properties. However, there are few reports in literature about the genotoxic effects of these plants. There for, the aim of these work is the evaluation of genetic damage induced by decoction and infusion of this plants which were assayed in different concentrations (1, 10, 100, 1,000 microL extract/mL culture), by addition of the extract to human lymphocyte cell cultures, negative controls were included. The endpoints evaluated were chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), cell proliferation kinetics (CPK) and mitotic index (MI). The repeated measure analysis of variance was used for statistic evaluation of the results. The results showed: (a) statistical increase in the percentage of cells with CA and in the frequency of SCE when cultures were exposed to both aromatic plants, (b) a decrease in MI of both Paicos assayed, although no modification in the CPK values was observed, (c) no effect was noticed in the analysis of Chenopodium album L., which was used as negative control of the essential oil. These results suggest a cyto and genotoxic effect of Chenopodium ambrosioides and Chenopodium multifidum aqueous extracts related to the essential oil of the plant (as Chenopodium album did not perform).

  6. Antioxidant, genotoxic and antigenotoxic activities of daphne gnidium leaf extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaabane Fadwa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plants play a significant role in maintaining human health and improving the quality of human life. They serve humans well as valuable components of food, as well as in cosmetics, dyes, and medicines. In fact, many plant extracts prepared from plants have been shown to exert biological activity in vitro and in vivo. The present study explored antioxidant and antigenotoxic effects of Daphne gnidium leaf extracts. Methods The genotoxic potential of petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate, methanol and total oligomer flavonoid (TOF enriched extracts from leaves of Daphne gnidium, was assessed using Escherichia coli PQ37. Likewise, the antigenotoxicity of the same extracts was tested using the “SOS chromotest test”. Antioxidant activities were studied using non enzymatic and enzymatic method: NBT/Riboflavine and xantine oxidase. Results None of the different extracts produced a genotoxic effect, except TOF extract at the lowest tested dose. Our results showed that D. gnidium leaf extracts possess an antigenotoxic effect against the nitrofurantoin a mutagen of reference. Ethyl acetate and TOF extracts were the most effective in inhibiting xanthine oxidase activity. While, methanol extract was the most potent superoxide scavenger when tested with the NBT/Riboflavine assay. Conclusions The present study has demonstrated that D. gnidium leaf extract possess antioxidant and antigenotoxic effects. These activities could be ascribed to compounds like polyphenols and flavonoid. Further studies are required to isolate the active molecules.

  7. DNA damage in caged Gammarus fossarum amphipods: A tool for freshwater genotoxicity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacaze, Emilie [Universite de Lyon, INRA-ENTPE, Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Environnement, rue Maurice Audin, Vaulx en Velin F-69518 (France); Cemagref, Unite de Recherche des Milieux Aquatiques, (UR MALY), 3 bis quai Chauveau, 69336 Lyon, Cedex 9 (France); Devaux, Alain [Universite de Lyon, INRA-ENTPE, Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Environnement, rue Maurice Audin, Vaulx en Velin F-69518 (France); Mons, Raphael [Cemagref, Unite de Recherche des Milieux Aquatiques, (UR MALY), 3 bis quai Chauveau, 69336 Lyon, Cedex 9 (France); Bony, Sylvie [Universite de Lyon, INRA-ENTPE, Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Environnement, rue Maurice Audin, Vaulx en Velin F-69518 (France); Garric, Jeanne [Cemagref, Unite de Recherche des Milieux Aquatiques, (UR MALY), 3 bis quai Chauveau, 69336 Lyon, Cedex 9 (France); Geffard, Alain [EA 2069 URVVC-SE, Laboratoire d' Eco-Toxicologie, UFR Sciences, Moulin de la Housse, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Geffard, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.geffard@cemagref.fr [Cemagref, Unite de Recherche des Milieux Aquatiques, (UR MALY), 3 bis quai Chauveau, 69336 Lyon, Cedex 9 (France)

    2011-06-15

    The aim of this study was to propose a tool for freshwater environmental genotoxicity assessment using Gammarus fossarum, a high ecologically relevant species. In a first part, gammarids were caged upstream and downstream wastewater treatment plant effluent output. The sensitivity of genotoxic responses of haemocytes, oocytes and spermatozoa was compared using the Comet assay. Spermatozoa appeared to be the most sensitive, suitable and relevant cell type for genotoxicity risk assessment. In a second part, a watershed-scale study was conducted over 2 years to evaluate the applicability of our caging procedure. The genotoxic impact of a contamination was followed, taking into account seasonal variability. DNA damage in spermatozoa exhibited low basal level and low variability in control upstream sites, providing a reliable discrimination of polluted sites. Finally, DNA damage in caged G. fossarum has been proved to be a sensitive and reproducible tool for freshwater genotoxicity assessment. - Highlights: > Two different contamination contexts: WWTP effluents and polymetallic contamination. > DNA damage in caged Gammarus fossarum is a sensitive tool for freshwater quality assessment. > Spermatozoa is the most relevant cell type for biomonitoring freshwater genotoxicity. > Combining biomarker responses with analytical chemistry provides rich ecotoxicological information. - We propose an approach to assess freshwater genotoxicity in the field based on caged Gammarus fossarum (Crustacea, amphipoda).

  8. Soil genotoxicity assessment: a new stategy based on biomolecular tools and plant bioindicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citterio, Sandra; Aina, Roberta; Labra, Massimo; Ghiani, Alessandra; Fumagalli, Pietro; Sgorbati, Sergio; Santagostino, Angela

    2002-06-15

    The setting up of efficient early warning systems is a challenge to research for preventing environmental alteration and human disease. In this paper, we report the development and the field application of a new biomonitoring methodology for assessing soil genotoxicity. In the first part, the use of amplified fragment length polymorphism and flow cytometry techniques to detect DNA damage induced by soils artificially contaminated with heavy metals as potentially genotoxic compounds is explained. Results show that the combination of the two techniques leads to efficient detection of the sublethal genotoxic effect induced in the plant bioindicator by contaminated soil. By contrast, the classic mortality, root, and shoot growth vegetative endpoints prove inappropriate for assessing soil genotoxicity because, although they cause genotoxic damage, some heavy metals do not affect sentinel plant development negatively. The statistical elaboration of the data obtained led to the development of a statistical predictive model which differentiates four different levels of soil genotoxic pollution and can be used everywhere. The second part deals with the application of the biomonitoring protocol in the genotoxic assessment of two areas surrounding a steelworks in northern Italy and the effectiveness of this methodology. In this particular case, in these areas, the predictive model reveals a pollution level strictly correlated to the heavy metal concentrations revealed by traditional chemical analysis.

  9. Genotoxic hazards of azo pigments and other colorants related to 1-phenylazo-2-hydroxynaphthalene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, P; Wallin, H

    2000-01-01

    Azo pigments are used extensively as coloring agents in inks, paints and cosmetics. We have surveyed the literature for genotoxic and cancer data on nine colorants, which are structurally related to 1-phenylazo-2-hydroxynaphthalene (C.I. Solvent yellow 14). C.I. Solvent yellow 14 is metabolized by oxidative and peroxidative enzymes. Metabolically activated C.I. Solvent yellow 14 forms both RNA and DNA adducts. It induces liver nodules in rats upon oral administration. Although there is a mixture of negative and positive findings in short-term tests and in animal cancer studies, C.I. Solvent yellow 14 should be considered genotoxic. C.I. Pigment red 3 should be considered carcinogenic but is only weakly genotoxic. C.I. Solvent yellow 7, C.I. Pigment orange 5, C.I. Pigment red 4, and C.I. Pigment red 23 should be considered genotoxic. C.I. Pigment red 53:1 is not genotoxic, and observations of spleen tumors in male rats but not in female rats or mice seem to be related to toxic effects of high doses of C.I. Pigment red 53:1 in this organ. The data in the literature indicate that Pigment red 57:1 is not genotoxic or carcinogenic. We did not find sufficient data for a relevant evaluation of C.I. Pigment red 2 and C.I. Pigment red 64:1. Some of the colorants have in common the 2-amino-1-naphthol structure. This compound is not genotoxic. On the other hand, reductive cleavage of the azo bonds or hydrolysis of anilido bonds would produce aromatic amines, most of which have been under suspicion for genotoxicity or carcinogenicity. For C.I. Pigment red 53:1 and 57:1, sulphonated aromatic amines would be formed that are not genotoxic.

  10. Acute Toxicity and Genotoxic Activity of Avocado Seed Extract (Persea americana Mill., c.v. Hass

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    Eduardo Padilla-Camberos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of vegetal extracts requires toxicological and genotoxic evaluations to establish and verify safety before being added to human cosmetic, pharmaceutical medicine, or alimentary products. Persea americana seeds have been used in traditional medicine as treatment for several diseases. In this work, the ethanolic seed extract of Persea americana was evaluated with respect to its genotoxic potential through micronucleus assay in rodents. The frequency of micronuclei in groups of animals treated with avocado seed extract showed no differences compared to the negative control (vehicle; therefore, it is considered that the avocado seed extract showed no genotoxic activity in the micronucleus test.

  11. Acute toxicity and genotoxic activity of avocado seed extract (Persea americana Mill., c.v. Hass).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Camberos, Eduardo; Martínez-Velázquez, Moisés; Flores-Fernández, José Miguel; Villanueva-Rodríguez, Socorro

    2013-01-01

    The use of vegetal extracts requires toxicological and genotoxic evaluations to establish and verify safety before being added to human cosmetic, pharmaceutical medicine, or alimentary products. Persea americana seeds have been used in traditional medicine as treatment for several diseases. In this work, the ethanolic seed extract of Persea americana was evaluated with respect to its genotoxic potential through micronucleus assay in rodents. The frequency of micronuclei in groups of animals treated with avocado seed extract showed no differences compared to the negative control (vehicle); therefore, it is considered that the avocado seed extract showed no genotoxic activity in the micronucleus test.

  12. Evaluation of the tickcide, genotoxic, and mutagenic effects of the Ruta graveolens L. (Rutaceae

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    Alessandra Vargas de Carvalho

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Current analysis investigated the tickcide effects of the aqueous extract and chloroform fractions of Ruta graveolens L. (rue on engorged females of Rhipicephalus microplus, as well as their genotoxic and mutagenic effects on human leukocytes. The best tickcide activity (non-dependent dose and genotoxic / mutagenic effects (dependent-dose were observed on exposure to chloroform fractions. Results suggest that extract fractions of R. graveolens L are efficient against R. microplus, although the fraction and the tested concentrations show genotoxic and mutagenic potential for human leukocytes.

  13. Additional survey on genotoxicity of natural anthraquinones in the hepatocyte primary culture/DNA repair assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, H; Yoshimi, N; Iwata, H; Tanaka, T; Kawai, K; Sankawa, U

    1988-08-01

    Genotoxicity of fungal anthraquinones of islandicin, iridoskyrin and (-) rubroskyrin, and a colorant of insect origin, cochineal and its component, carminic acid, an anthraquinone, was examined in the hepatocyte primary culture/DNA repair test. The results were compared with that of versicolorin A, an anthraquinone with bisfuran ring, which had been proved to be genotoxic on this assay. All of these anthraquinones, differently from versicolorin A did not show clear response of DNA repair. The results suggest that these agents are not genotoxic carcinogens.

  14. Genotoxic damage in pathology anatomy laboratory workers exposed to formaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Solange; Coelho, Patrícia; Costa, Carla; Silva, Susana; Mayan, Olga; Santos, Luís Silva; Gaspar, Jorge; Teixeira, João Paulo

    2008-10-30

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a chemical traditionally used in pathology and anatomy laboratories as a tissue preservative. Several epidemiological studies of occupational exposure to FA have indicated an increased risk of nasopharyngeal cancers in industrial workers, embalmers and pathology anatomists. There is also a clear evidence of nasal squamous cell carcinomas from inhalation studies in the rat. The postulated mode of action for nasal tumours in rats was considered biologically plausible and considered likely to be relevant to humans. Based on the available data IARC, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, has recently classified FA as a human carcinogen. Although the in vitro genotoxic as well as the in vivo carcinogenic potentials of FA are well documented in mammalian cells and in rodents, evidence for genotoxic effects and carcinogenic properties in humans is insufficient and conflicting thus remains to be more documented. To evaluate the genetic effects of long-term occupational exposure to FA a group of 30 Pathological Anatomy laboratory workers was tested for a variety of biological endpoints, cytogenetic tests (micronuclei, MN; sister chromatid exchange, SCE) and comet assay. The level of exposure to FA was evaluated near the breathing zone of workers, time weighted average of exposure was calculated for each subject. The association between the biomarkers and polymorphic genes of xenobiotic metabolising and DNA repair enzymes was also assessed. The mean level of exposure was 0.44+/-0.08ppm (0.04-1.58ppm). MN frequency was significantly higher (p=0.003) in the exposed subjects (5.47+/-0.76) when compared with controls (3.27+/-0.69). SCE mean value was significantly higher (p<0.05) among the exposed group (6.13+/-0.29) compared with control group (4.49+/-0.16). Comet assay data showed a significant increase (p<0.05) of TL in FA-exposed workers (60.00+/-2.31) with respect to the control group (41.85+/-1.97). A positive correlation was found between FA

  15. Effects of wood dust:Inflammation, Genotoxicity and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Jette Bornholdt

    cell line A549 measuring inflammatory and DNA damaging effects. The second part consists of a molecular analysis of the K-ras gene for mutations in the hotspots codons in human sinonasal cancers. Design, calibration and validation of the assays were performed. Cancer at the sinonasal cavities is rare......-malignant symptoms are still poorly understood. Particulate induced inflammation as well as extractives are suggested to be involved in the carcinogenesis. In this thesis wood dust potential to induce DNA damage and inflammation was investigated exposing the human lung epithelial cell line A549 to various species...... of wood dust and endpoints for inflammation and genotoxicity was evaluated. The experiments showed that the different species of wood dust vary in their ability to cause DNA strand breaks and inflammation. There was no apparent correlation between the species potential to initiate inflammation...

  16. Genotoxicity of fumes from heated cooking oils produced in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, P F; Chiang, T A; Ko, Y C; Lee, H

    1999-02-01

    Epidemiologic investigations of lung cancer among Taiwanese nonsmoking women have found that exposure to fumes from cooking oils may be an important risk factor. Fume samples from three different commercial cooking oils (lard, soybean, and peanut oils) often used in Taiwan for preparing Chinese meals were collected for genotoxicity analysis in SOS chromotest and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assays. The induction factors of the SOS chromotest in Escherichia coli PQ 37 were dependent on the concentrations of lard and soybean cooking oil extracts without S9 mix. In addition, when CHO-K1 cells were exposed to condensates of cooking oil fumes for 12 h, SCEs showed a dose-related increase in extracts of lard and soybean oil fumes. This result provides experimental evidence and is in accordance with the findings of epidemiologic studies that women exposed to the emitted fumes of cooking oils are at an increase risk of contracting lung cancer. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  17. Cytotoxic and genotoxic activity of some Helleborus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čakar, Jasmina; Haverić, Anja; Haverić, Sanin; Maksimović, Milka; Parić, Adisa

    2014-01-01

    Despite their known toxic properties, various Helleborus species are used as medicaments in folk medicine to treat some diseases and health conditions. As the main mechanism of many cytostatic drugs is based on their cytotoxic activity, there is potential for the toxicity of hellebore to be used in anticancer therapy. This study tested the geno- and cytotoxic effects of extracts of three hellebore taxa (Helleborus odorus, Helleborus multifidus and Helleborus hercegovinus) on meristemic onion (Alliumcepa L.) cells and human lymphocytes. Treatments with Helleborus extracts induced cytotoxic and cytostatic effects in meristemic onion cells as well as in cultivated cytokinesis-blocked human lymphocytes. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay indicated that treatments with hellebore extracts induce genotoxic effects in human lymphocytes, and that the significant mechanism of their antiproliferative activity is apoptosis induction.

  18. The potential for new methods to assess human reproductive genotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1987-09-01

    The immediate prospects are not good for practical methods for measuring the human heritable mutation rate. The methods discussed here range from speculative to impractical, and at best are sensitive enough only for large numbers of subjects. Given the rapid development of DNA methods and the current status of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, there is some hope that the intermediate prospects may be better. In contrast, the prospects for useful cellular-based male germinal methods seem more promising and immediate. Effective specific locus methods for sperm are already conceivable and may be practical in a few years. Obviously such methods will not predict heritable effects definitively, but they will provide direct information on reproductive genotoxicity and should contribute significantly to many current medical and environmental situations where genetic damage is suspected. 22 refs.

  19. Effects of chemical agent injections on genotoxicity of wastewater in a microfiltration-reverse osmosis membrane process for wastewater reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fang; Hu, Hong-Ying; Wu, Qian-Yuan; Tang, Xin; Sun, Ying-Xue; Shi, Xiao-Lei; Huang, Jing-Jing

    2013-09-15

    With combined microfiltration (MF)/ultrafiltration (UF) and reverse osmosis (RO) process being widely used in municipal wastewater reclamation, RO concentrate with high level genotoxicity is becoming a potential risk to water environment. In this study, wastewater genotoxicity in a MF-RO process for municipal wastewater reclamation and also the effects of chemical agent injections were evaluated by SOS/umu genotoxicity test. The genotoxicity of RO concentrate ranged 500-559 μg 4-NQO (4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide)/L and 12-22 μg 4-NQO/mg DOC, was much higher than that of RO influent. Further research suggested that Kathon biocide was a key chemical agent associated with the genotoxicity increase. Kathon biocide used in RO system was highly genotoxic in vitro and Kathon biocide retained in RO system could contribute to a higher genotoxicity of RO concentrate. Hence, treatments for biocides before discharging are necessary. Chlorination of secondary effluent could significantly decrease the genotoxicity and increasing chlorine dosage could be an efficacious method to decrease the genotoxicity of RO concentrate. According to the result of the experiment, the dosage of chlorine in dual-membrane process could be set to about 2.5 mg Cl₂/L. The effect of antiscalant (2-phosphomobutane-1,2,4-tricarboxylic acid) was also investigated; it turned out to have no effect on genotoxicity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Comet Assay on Daphnia magna in eco-genotoxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegri, Valerio; Gorbi, Gessica; Buschini, Annamaria

    2014-10-01

    Detection of potentially hazardous compounds in water bodies is a priority in environmental risk assessment. For the evaluation and monitoring of water quality, a series of methodologies may be applied. Among them, the worldwide used toxicity tests with organisms of the genus Daphnia is one of the most powerful. In recent years, some attempts were made to utilize Daphnia magna in genotoxicity testing as many of the new environmental contaminants are described as DNA-damaging agents in aquatic organisms. The aim of this research was to develop a highly standardized protocol of the Comet Assay adapted for D. magna, especially regarding the isolation of cells derived from the same tissue (haemolymph) from newborn organisms exposed in vivo. Several methods for haemolymph extraction and different Comet Assay parameters were compared. Electrophoretic conditions were adapted in order to obtain minimum DNA migration in cells derived from untreated organisms and, at the same time, maximum sensitivity in specimens treated with known genotoxicants (CdCl2 and H2O2). Additional tests were performed to investigate if life-history traits of the cladoceran (such as the age of adult organisms that provide newborns, the clutch size of origin, the number of generations reared in standard conditions) and the water composition as well, might influence the response of the assay. This study confirms the potential application of the Comet Assay in D. magna for assessing genotoxic loads in aqueous solution. The newly developed protocol could integrate the acute toxicity bioassay, thus expanding the possibility of using this model species in freshwater monitoring (waters, sediment and soil elutriates) and is in line with the spirit of the EU Water Framework Directive in reducing the number of bioassays that involve medium-sized species.

  1. Genotoxic effect of Phenanthrene on Chironomus sancticaroli (Diptera: Chironomidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele dos Santos Morais

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Phenanthrene, a Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon, remains adsorbed to sedimentary particles in aquatic environments. It affects mainly benthic organisms, and is considered potentially genotoxic. In ecotoxicology, species of Chironomus Meigen, 1803 are widely known as bioindicators of the effects of chemicals on aquatic organisms. This study investigates the effects of phenanthrene on the size of the head capsule of Chironomus sancticaroli Strixino & Strixino, 1981 larvae after chronic (eight days exposure, and DNA damage after acute (96 hours and chronic exposure (eight days, under laboratory conditions. DNA damage, evaluated using the alkaline comet assay, detected effects for both exposure periods, indicating that phenanthrene is toxic for C. sancticaroli. For the acute exposure, we analyzed five concentrations of phenanthrene, between 0.16 mg.l-1 and 1.60 mg.l-1, detecting significant differences (Kruskall-Wallis test with p < 0.05 in the degree of DNA damage in all groups. These effects were not dose-dependent. For the chronic exposure, two concentrations (0.16 mg.l-1, 0.83 mg.l-1 were analyzed, and DNA damage was observed in both. Again, the effects were not dose-dependent. This indicates that phenanthrene is genotoxic to larvae of C. sancticaroli even at low concentrations. The size of the head capsule was evaluated after chronic exposure to concentrations of 0.16 mg.l-1 and 0.83 mg.l-1. Significant differences (ANOVA test with p < 0.05 were detected in the two concentrations, and a reduction in the size of the larval head capsule was observed. This suggests that phenanthrene causes delay in larval development. These results indicate that phenanthrene affects the development of and causes DNA damage in C. sancticaroli larvae. Therefore, we suggest that C. sancticaroli can be used as a biological indicator for environmental contamination with phenanthrene.

  2. Neurobehavioral and genotoxic parameters of antipsychotic agent aripiprazole in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaqueline Nascimento PICADA; Viviane Minuzzo PONTES; Patrícia PEREIRA; Bruna de Jesus Neto DOS SANTOS; Franciele CELSO; Jéssica Dias MONTEIRO; Kelly Morais DA ROSA; Leandro Rosa CAMACHO; Luciana Rodrigues VIEIRA; Taís Madelon FREITAS; Tatiana Grasiela DASILVA

    2011-01-01

    Aim:Aripiprazole is an antipsychotic agent to treat schizophrenia,which acts through dopamine D2 partial agonism,serotonin 5-HT1A partial agonism and 5-HT2A antagonism.This study was designed to evaluate the neurobehavioral effects and genotoxic/mutagenic activities of the agent,as well as its effects on lipoperoxidation.Methods:Open field and inhibitory avoidance tasks were used.Thirty min before performing the behavioral tasks,adult male CF-1 mice were administered aripiprazole (1,3 or 10 mg/kg,ip) once for the acute treatment,or the same doses for 5 d for the subchronic treatment.Genotoxic effects were assessed using comet assay in the blood and brain tissues.Mutagenic effects were evaluated using bone marrow micronucleus test.Lipoperoxidation was assessed with thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS).Results:Acute and subchronic treatments significantly decreased the number of crossing and rearing in the open field task.Acute treatment significantly increased the step-down latency for both the short- and long-term memory in the inhibitory avoidance task.Subchronic treatments with aripiprazole (3 and 10 mg/kg) caused significant DNA strain-break damage in peripheral blood but not in the brain.Mutagenic effect was not detected in the acute and subchronic treatments.Nor TBARS levels in the liver were affected.Conclusion:Aripiprazole improved memory,but could impair motor activities in mice.The drug increased DNA damage in blood,but did not show mutagenic effects,suggesting that it might affect long-term genomic stability.

  3. METABOLISM, MICROFLORA EFFECTS, AND GENOTOXICITY IN HALOACETIC ACID-TREATED CULTURES OF RAT CECAL MICROBIOTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haloacetic acids are by-products of drinking water disinfection. Several compounds in this class are genotoxic and have been identified as rodent hepatocarcinogens. Enzymes produced by the normal intestinal bacteria can transform some promutagens and procarcinogens to their bio...

  4. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate cobalt in human lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hong; Smith, Leah J; Holmes, Amie L; Zheng, Tongzhang; Pierce Wise, John

    2016-05-01

    Cobalt is a toxic metal used in various industrial applications leading to adverse lung effects by inhalation. Cobalt is considered a possible human carcinogen with the lung being a primary target. However, few studies have considered cobalt-induced toxicity in human lung cells, especially normal lung epithelial cells. Therefore, in this study, we sought to determine the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of particulate and soluble cobalt in normal primary human lung epithelial cells. Cobalt oxide and cobalt chloride were used as representative particulate and soluble cobalt compounds, respectively. Exposure to both particulate and soluble cobalt induced a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular cobalt ion levels. Based on intracellular cobalt ion levels, we found that soluble and particulate cobalt induced similar cytotoxicity while soluble cobalt was more genotoxic than particulate cobalt. These data indicate that cobalt compounds are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung epithelial cells.

  5. Genotoxic evaluation of an industrial effluent from an oil refinery using plant and animal bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Postalli Rodrigues

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are genotoxic chemicals commonly found in effluents from oil refineries. Bioassays using plants and cells cultures can be employed for assessing environmental safety and potential genotoxicity. In this study, the genotoxic potential of an oil refinery effluent was analyzed by means of micronucleus (MN testing of Alium cepa, which revealed no effect after 24 h of treatment. On the other hand, primary lesions in the DNA of rat (Rattus norvegicus hepatoma cells (HTC were observed through comet assaying after only 2 h of exposure. On considering the capacity to detect DNA damage of a different nature and of these cells to metabolize xenobiotics, we suggest the association of the two bioassays with these cell types, plant (Allium cepa and mammal (HTC cells, for more accurately assessing genotoxicity in environmental samples.

  6. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity assessment of Euphorbia hirta in MCF-7 cell line model using comet assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwan Yuet Ping; Ibrahim Darah; Yeng Chen; Sreenivasan Sasidharan

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity activity of Euphorbia hirta (E. hirta) in MCF-7 cell line model using comet assay. Methods: The cytotoxicity of E. hirta extract was investigated by employing brine shrimp lethality assay and the genotoxicity of E. hirta was assessed by using Comet assay. Results: Both toxicity tests exhibited significant toxicity result. In the comet assay, the E. hirta extract exhibited genotoxicity effects against MCF-7 DNA in a time-dependent manner by increasing mean percentage of DNA damage. The extract of E. hirta showed significant toxicity against brine shrimp with an LC50 value of 620.382 μg/mL (24 h). Comparison with positive control potassium dichromate signifies that cytotoxicity exhibited by the methanol extract might have moderate activity. Conclusion:The present work confirmed the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of E. hirta. However, the observed toxicity of E. hirta extracts needs to be confirmed in additional studies.

  7. The Genotoxicity of Titanium Dioxide and Cerium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Respiratory Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to the exponential growth of the nanomaterial industry, risk assessment of human exposure to nanomaterials in consumer products is of paramount importance. The genotoxicity of nanomaterials is an important aspect of hazard identification and regulatory guidance. However, this...

  8. Genotoxic Effects of Titanium Dioxide and Cerium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Respiratory Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nanomaterial industry has recently seen rapid growth, therefore, the risk assessment of human exposure to nanomaterials in consumer products is of paramount importance. The genotoxicity of nanomaterials is a fundamental aspect of hazard identification and regulatory guidance....

  9. A compilation of genotoxicity and carcinogenicity data on aromatic aminosulphonic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, R; Steinle, D; Anliker, R

    1992-07-01

    A review is presented to evaluate existing information on genotoxicity and carcinogenicity testing of various aromatic aminosulphonic acids (AASAs). A great variety of water-soluble azo dyes can form aromatic phenyl- or naphthyl-aminosulphonic acids by chemical and enzymatic reduction. AASAs are also used as intermediates in the synthesis of azo dyes and azo pigments and can arise as contaminants in the final products. Comparisons have been made with the data available on the corresponding unsulphonated analogues, some of which are known to be genotoxic and/or carcinogenic. The vast majority of the AASAs were conclusively non-mutagenic in the Ames test. In most cases the absence of genotoxicity was also demonstrated with a variety of other test systems in vitro and in vivo. It is concluded that AASAs, in contrast with some of their unsulphonated analogues, generally have no or very low genotoxic and tumorigenic potential.

  10. Detection of genotoxic, cytotoxic, and protective activities of Eugenia dysenterica DC. (Myrtaceae) in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Pabline Marinho; Veronezi, Eduardo; Silva, Carolina R; Chen-Chen, Lee

    2012-06-01

    Eugenia dysenterica DC. (Myrtaceae), popularly known in Brazil as cagaiteira, is a widespread plant species in the Brazilian Cerrado. In folk medicine, the leaves of this plant are used to treat diarrhea and dysentery. The fruits are used for fresh consumption and industrial purposes. Because of the use of this plant as a therapeutic resource and food, the present study evaluated the genotoxic, cytotoxic, antigenotoxic, and anticytotoxic effects of the lyophilized ethanolic leaf extract of E. dysenterica using the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test. The genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity of this extract were evaluated using the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes, and the cytotoxicity and anticytotoxicity were assessed by the polychromatic and normochromatic erythrocyte ratio. According to our results, the lyophilized ethanolic leaf extract of E. dysenterica exhibited genotoxic and cytotoxic effects at the higher doses and protection against cyclophosphamide-induced genotoxic and cytotoxic actions at all doses tested.

  11. COMPARATIVE GENOTOXIC RESPONSES TO ARSENITE IN GUINEA PIG, MOUSE, RAT AND HUMAN LYMPHOCYTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative genotoxic responses to arsenite in guinea pig, mouse, rat and human lymphocytes.Inorganic arsenic is a known human carcinogen causing skin, lung, and bladder cancer following chronic exposures. Yet, long-term laboratory animal carcinogenicity studies have ...

  12. METABOLISM, MICROFLORA EFFECTS, AND GENOTOXICITY IN HALOACETIC ACID-TREATED CULTURES OF RAT CECAL MICROBIOTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haloacetic acids are by-products of drinking water disinfection. Several compounds in this class are genotoxic and have been identified as rodent hepatocarcinogens. Enzymes produced by the normal intestinal bacteria can transform some promutagens and procarcinogens to their bio...

  13. The use of ex vivo human skin tissue for genotoxicity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reus, Astrid A.; Usta, Mustafa [TNO Triskelion BV, Utrechtseweg 48, 3704 HE, Zeist (Netherlands); Krul, Cyrille A.M., E-mail: cyrille.krul@tno.nl [TNO, Utrechtseweg 48, 3704 HE Zeist (Netherlands)

    2012-06-01

    As a result of the chemical legislation concerning the registration, evaluation, authorization and restriction of chemicals (REACH), and the Seventh Amendment to the Cosmetics Directive, which prohibits animal testing in Europe for cosmetics, alternative methods for safety evaluation of chemicals are urgently needed. Current in vitro genotoxicity assays are not sufficiently predictive for the in vivo situation, resulting in an unacceptably high number of misleading positives. For many chemicals and ingredients of personal care products the skin is the first site of contact, but there are no in vitro genotoxicity assays available in the skin for additional evaluation of positive or equivocal responses observed in regulatory in vitro genotoxicity assays. In the present study ex vivo human skin tissue obtained from surgery was used for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals by using the comet assay. Fresh ex vivo human skin tissue was cultured in an air–liquid interface and topically exposed to 20 chemicals, including true positive, misleading positive and true negative genotoxins. Based on the results obtained in the present study, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the ex vivo skin comet assay to predict in vivo genotoxicity were 89%, 90% and 89%, respectively. Donor and experimental variability were mainly reflected in the magnitude of the response and not the difference between the presence and absence of a genotoxic response. The present study indicates that human skin obtained from surgery is a promising and robust model for safety evaluation of chemicals that are in direct contact with the skin. -- Highlights: ► We use human skin obtained from surgery for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals. ► We use the comet assay as parameter for genotoxicity in ex vivo human skin. ► Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to predict in vivo genotoxins are determined. ► Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy are 89%, 90% and 90%, respectively. ► The method

  14. KEYNOTE LECTURES-KL1 New development in risk assessment of genotoxic carcinogens in foods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jun-Shi

    2006-01-01

    @@ The no-observed-effect level (NOEL) in a study of carcinogenicity for compounds that are both genotoxic and carcinogenic represents the limit of detection in that bioassay, rather than an estimate of a possible threshold. Therefore, for those genotoxic and carcinogenic contaminants (e.g. acrylamides, PAHs, etc.) in foods it is not possible to develop health-based guidance values (e.g. ADI or PTWI) using the traditional NOEL and safety/uncertainty factors.

  15. Genotoxic Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids — Mechanisms Leading to DNA Adduct Formation and Tumorigenicity

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Abstract: Plants that contain pyrrolizidine alkaloids are widely distributed in the world. Although pyrrolizidine alkaloids have been shown to be genotoxic and tumorigenic in experimental animals, the mechanisms of actions have not been fully understood. The results of our recent mechanistic studies suggest that pyrrolizidine alkaloids induce tumors via a genotoxic mechanism mediated by 6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5Hpyrrolizine (DHP)-derived DNA adduct formation. This mechanism may ...

  16. Genotoxicity of perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) to the green mussel (Perna viridis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changhui; Chang, Victor W C; Gin, Karina Y H; Nguyen, Viet Tung

    2014-07-15

    Concerns regarding perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) have grown significantly in recent years. However, regulations and guidelines regarding the emission and treatment of PFCs are still missing in most parts of the world, mostly due to the lack of PFC toxicity data. In the current study, the genotoxic effects of four common PFCs, named perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), perfluoroocanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) were investigated on marine mussels. The effects of exposure time and concentration on the toxic behavior of the compounds were also examined. Genotoxicity of PFCs was assessed in biomarker assays, showing that exposure to the target compounds could damage the organism's genetic material to varying extents, including DNA strand breaks and fragmentation, chromosomal breaks and apoptosis. The adverse effects increased with both exposure concentration and time and were related with the organism burden of PFCs. The integrated biomarker response analysis demonstrated that PFOS exhibited a higher genotoxicity than the other tested compounds. The EC50 values and confidence intervals based on integrative genotoxicity were 33 (29-37), 594 (341-1036), 195 (144-265) and 78 (73-84) μg/L for PFOS, PFOA, PFNA and PFDA respectively, classifying PFOS as a highly genotoxic compound. Although primary DNA damage was shown to be recoverable after exposure ceased, permanent genetic damage caused by elevated PFC concentrations was not restored. This is the first ecotoxicity study of PFCs that focuses on the genotoxic effects of the compounds, clearly indicating the genotoxicity of the tested PFCs and demonstrating that functional groups have a major impact on the compounds' genotoxic behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Vitamin C conjugates of genotoxic lipid peroxidation products: Structural characterization and detection in human plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Sowell, John; Frei, Balz; Stevens, Jan F.

    2004-01-01

    α,β-Unsaturated aldehydes such as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and other electrophilic lipid peroxidation (LPO) products may contribute to the pathogenesis of cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and other age-related diseases by cytotoxic, genotoxic, and proinflammatory mechanisms. The notion that vitamin C (ascorbic acid) acts as a biological antioxidant has been challenged recently by an in vitro study showing that ascorbic acid promotes, rather than inhibits, the formation of genotoxic LPO produ...

  18. Characterization of Cr(V)-induced genotoxicity using CdTe nanocrystals as fluorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Hao; Sui, Chao-Xia; Wang, Xie; Yin, Gong-Ju; Liu, Ying-Fan; Zhang, Ding

    2014-12-21

    CdTe nanocrystals capped by cysteamine were synthesized to study Cr(V)-induced genotoxicity. On the surface of TiO2 thin films, the stepwise process of DNA breakage induced by Cr(V)-GSH complexes was vividly observed by using CdTe-DNA self-assembled fluorescent probes; in acetate buffer solution, an analytical method was developed to detect Cr(V)-induced genotoxicity with CdTe fluorescent probes.

  19. Genotoxic activity and toxicity of Baccharis trimera Less. regarding the bioaccumulation of heavy metals

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Regildo Márcio Gonçalves da [UNESP; Oliveira, Vanessa Marques de [UNESP; Valadares, Fillipi; Mecina, Gustavo Franciscatti [UNESP; Silva, Luciana Pereira [UNESP

    2012-01-01

    Baccharis trimera Less. (“carqueja”) is a native plant from Brazil, used in folk medicine preparations such as infusions and/or decoctions. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity and genotoxicity of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of B. trimera and quantify heavy metals bioaccumulated in this specie. The extracts were prepared with ultra pure water. The Allium cepa test was conducted to examine the genotoxic activity of the extracts. The toxicological activity was used as bio...

  20. Zinc-Induced Genotoxic Effects in Root Meristems of Barley Seedlings

    OpenAIRE

    TRUTA, Elena; Daniela GHERGHEL; Iulia Csilla I. BARA; Gabriela V. VOCHITA

    2013-01-01

    The pollution increase, as a result of the release into environment of genotoxic chemicals, including heavy metals, largely affects the ecosystems and the health of living organisms. Although zinc is not considered highly phytotoxic, its excess becomes noxious. In literature, the reports on zinc genotoxicity are equivocal. Therefore, the objective of this work was to evaluate the amplitude of cytogenetic damage induced in Hordeum vulgare L. cv. ‘Madalin’ after seed treatment with different co...

  1. Genetic Evidence for Genotoxic Effect of Entecavir, an Anti-Hepatitis B Virus Nucleotide Analog.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jiang

    Full Text Available Nucleoside analogues (NAs have been the most frequently used treatment option for chronic hepatitis B patients. However, they may have genotoxic potentials due to their interference with nucleic acid metabolism. Entecavir, a deoxyguanosine analog, is one of the most widely used oral antiviral NAs against hepatitis B virus. It has reported that entecavir gave positive responses in both genotoxicity and carcinogenicity assays. However the genotoxic mechanism of entecavir remains elusive. To evaluate the genotoxic mechanisms, we analyzed the effect of entecavir on a panel of chicken DT40 B-lymphocyte isogenic mutant cell line deficient in DNA repair and damage tolerance pathways. Our results showed that Parp1-/- mutant cells defective in single-strand break (SSB repair were the most sensitive to entecavir. Brca1-/-, Ubc13-/- and translesion-DNA-synthesis deficient cells including Rad18-/- and Rev3-/- were hypersensitive to entecavir. XPA-/- mutant deficient in nucleotide excision repair was also slightly sensitive to entecavir. γ-H2AX foci forming assay confirmed the existence of DNA damage by entecavir in Parp1-/-, Rad18-/- and Brca1-/- mutants. Karyotype assay further showed entecavir-induced chromosomal aberrations, especially the chromosome gaps in Parp1-/-, Brca1-/-, Rad18-/- and Rev3-/- cells when compared with wild-type cells. These genetic comprehensive studies clearly identified the genotoxic potentials of entecavir and suggested that SSB and postreplication repair pathways may suppress entecavir-induced genotoxicity.

  2. Evaluation of genotoxicity of nitrile fragrance ingredients using in vitro and in vivo assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, S P; Politano, V T; Api, A M

    2013-09-01

    Genotoxicity studies were conducted on a group of 8 fragrance ingredients that belong to the nitrile family. These nitriles are widely used in consumer products however there is very limited data in the literature regarding the genotoxicity of these nitriles. The 8 nitriles were assessed for genotoxicity using an Ames test, in vitro chromosome aberration test or in vitro micronucleus test. The positive results observed in the in vitro tests were further investigated using an in vivo micronucleus test. The results from these different tests were compared and these 8 nitriles are not considered to be genotoxic. Dodecanitrile and 2,2,3-trimethylcyclopent-3-enylacetonitrile were negative in the in vitro chromosome aberration test and in vitro micronucleus test, respectively. While citronellyl nitrile, 3-methyl-5-phenylpentanenitrile, cinnamyl nitrile, and 3-methyl-5-phenylpent-2-enenitrile revealed positive results in the in vitro tests, but confirmatory in vivo tests determined these nitriles to be negative in the in vivo micronucleus assay. The remaining two nitriles (benzonitrile and α-cyclohexylidene benzeneacetonitrile) were negative in the in vivo micronucleus test. This study aims to evaluate the genotoxicity potential of these nitriles as well as enrich the literature with genotoxicity data on fragrance ingredients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparative investigations of genotoxic activity of five nitriles in the comet assay and the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jong-C; Hseu, You C; Chen, Chin-H; Wang, Shu-H; Chen, Ssu C

    2009-09-30

    Two short-term assays, the modified Ames test and the comet assay, were carried out to evaluate the genotoxicity of five nitriles (acetonitrile, propionitrile, methacrylonitrile, butyronitrile, and benzonitrile). With the comet assay, all the nitriles studied were found to induce the genotoxicity in human lymphocytes and Hep G2 cells. Except for butyronitrile, the genotoxic potency in lymphocytes was more pronounced than that in Hep G2 cells, and the rank order of genotoxicity induced by these five nitriles in lymphocytes was different from that in Hep G2 cells, indicating that the pathways leading to genotoxicity in both types of cells were different. In the modified Ames test, no tested nitriles showed mutagenic activity on Salmonella typhimurium strain TA 98 and TA 100 with and without metabolic activation. Comparing the results obtained from both tests in this study, the comet assay seems to be more sensitive than the modified Ames test. Thus, the comet assay can be used to detect the genotoxicity of all nitriles.

  4. The in vitro genotoxic effect of Tucuma (Astrocaryum aculeatum), an Amazonian fruit rich in carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Filho, Olmiro Cezimbra; Sagrillo, Michele Rorato; Garcia, Luiz Filipe Machado; Machado, Alencar Kolinski; Cadoná, Francine; Ribeiro, Euler Esteves; Duarte, Marta Maria Medeiros Frescura; Morel, Ademir Farias; da Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica

    2013-11-01

    Tucuma (Astrocaryum aculeatum) is an Amazonian fruit that presents high levels of carotenoids and other bioactive compounds such as quercetin. The extracts of tucuma peel and pulp present strong antioxidant activity which illustrate an elevated concentration that causes cytotoxic effects in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). This study performed additional investigations to analyze the potential genotoxic effects of the tucuma extracts on PBMCs. The genotoxicity was evaluated by DNA fragmentation, Comet assay, and chromosomal instability G-band assays. The acute tucuma extract treatment showed genoprotective effects against DNA denaturation when compared with untreated PBMC cells. However, in the experiments with 24 and 72 h treatments to tucuma treatments, we observed low genotoxicity through a concentration of 100 μg/mL, some genotoxic effects related to intermediary concentrations (100-500 μg/mL), and more pronounced genotoxic effects on higher tucuma extract concentrations. After 24 h of treatment, the reactive oxygen species were similar among treatments and PBMC control groups. However, the caspase-1 activity related to the apoptosis and pyroptosis process increased significantly in higher tucuma concentrations. In summary, tucuma extracts, despite their higher antioxidant content and antioxidant activity, would present PBMCs genotoxic effects that are dependent on concentration and time exposition. These results need to be considered in future in vitro and in vivo studies of tucuma effects.

  5. Further investigations into the genotoxicity of quinoxaline-di-N-oxides and their primary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qianying; Zhang, Jianwu; Luo, Xun; Ihsan, Awais; Liu, Xianglian; Dai, Menghong; Cheng, Guyue; Hao, Haihong; Wang, Xu; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-07-01

    Quinoxaline-di-N-oxides (QdNOs) are potential antibacterial agents with a wide range of biological properties. Quinocetone (QCT), carbadox (CBX), olaquindox (OLA), mequindox (MEQ) and cyadox (CYA) are classical QdNOs. Though the genotoxicity of parent drugs has been evaluated, the genotoxicity of their primary N → O reduced metabolites remains unclear. In the present study, a battery of four different short-term tests, mouse lymphoma assay (MLA), Ames test, chromosomal aberration assay in vitro and bone marrow erythrocyte micronucleus assay in vivo was carried out to investigate the genotoxicity of the six primary N → O reduced metabolites. Additionally, the genotoxicity of five parent drugs was evaluated by the MLA. Strong genotoxicity of N1-MEQ, B-MEQ and B-CBX was found in three of the assays but not in the Ames assay, and the rank order was N1-MEQ>B-MEQ>B-CBX that is consistent with prototype QdNOs. Negative results for the five QdNOs were noted in the MLA. We present for the first time a comparison of the genotoxicity of primary N → O reduced metabolites, and evaluate the ability of five QdNOs to cause mutations in the MLA. The present study demonstrates that metabolites are involved in genetic toxicity mediated by QdNOs, and improve the prudent use of QdNOs for public health.

  6. Genotoxicity of quinolones: substituents contribution and transformation products QSAR evaluation using 2D and 3D models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Wei, Dongbin; Zhao, Huimin; Du, Yuguo

    2014-01-01

    The genotoxicity of 21 quinolones antibiotics was determined using SOS/umu assay. Some quinolones exhibited high genotoxicity, and the chemical substituent on quinolone ring significantly affected genotoxicity. To establish the relationship between genotoxicity and substituent, a 2D-QSAR model based on quantum chemical parameters was developed. Calculation suggested that both steric and electrostatic properties were correlated well with genotoxicity. Furthermore, the specific effect on three key active sites (1-, 7- and 8-positions) of quinolone ring was investigated using a 3D-QSAR (comparative molecular field analysis, CoMFA) method. From our modeling, the genotoxicity increased when substituents had: (1) big volume and/or positive charge at 1-position; (2) negative charge at 7-position; and (3) small volume and/or negative charge at 8-position. The developed QSAR models were applicable to estimate genotoxicity of quinolones antibiotics and their transformation products. It is noted that some of the transformation products exhibited higher genotoxicity comparing to their precursor (e.g., ciprofloxacin). This study provided an alternative way to understand the molecule genotoxicity of quinolones derivatives, as well as to evaluate their potential environmental risks.

  7. Neoplastic transformation of breast epithelial cells by genotoxic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman Venu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to genotoxic stresses such as radiation and tobacco smoke can cause increased cancer incidence rate as reflected in an in depth meta-analysis of data for women and breast cancer incidence. Published reports have indicated that exposures to low dose radiation and tobacco smoke are factors that contribute to the development of breast cancer. However, there is a scarcity of information on the combinatorial effects of low dose radiation and tobacco smoke on formation and progression of breast cancer. The combination of these two genotoxic insults can induce significant damage to the genetic material of the cells resulting in neoplastic transformation. Methods To study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation and tobacco smoke on breast cells, MCF 10A cells were treated either with radiation (Rad - 0.1 Gray or cigarette smoke condensate (Csc - 10 microgram/ml of medium or a combination of Rad + Csc. Following treatments, cells were analyzed for cell cycle distribution patterns and the ability to extrude the Hoechst 33342 dye. In addition, in vitro invasion and migration as well as mammosphere formation assays were performed. Finally, differential gene expression profiles were generated from the individual and combination treatment. Results Exposure of MCF 10A cells to the combination of radiation plus cigarette smoke condensate generated a neoplastic phenotype. The transformed phenotype promoted increased mammosphere numbers, altered cell cycle phases with a doubling of the population in S phase, and increased invasion and motility. Also, exclusion of Hoechst 33342 dye, a surrogate marker for increased ABC transporters, was observed, which indicates a possible increase in drug resistance. In addition, changes in gene expression include the up regulation of genes encoding proteins involved in metabolic pathways and inflammation. Conclusions The results indicate that when normal breast cells are exposed to low dose

  8. Evaluation of the genotoxicity of process stream extracts from a coal gasification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, R W; Benson, J M; Li, A P; Henderson, R F; Brooks, A L

    1984-01-01

    Extracts of three complex organic environmental mixtures, two from an experimental coal gasifier (a raw gas and a clean gas sample) and one from a coke oven main, were examined for genotoxicity. Three short-term genotoxicity assay systems were used: Ames Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay, Chinese hamster ovary cell/hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (CHO/HGPRT) gene locus mutation assay, and the Chinese hamster lung primary culture/sister chromatid exchange (CHL/SCE) assay. Aroclor-1254-induced rat liver homogenate fraction (S-9) was required to observe genotoxicity in both gene locus mutation assays (CHO/HGPRT and Ames). The relative survival of CHO cells exposed to extracts was highest in cells exposed to clean gas samples, with the raw gas sample being the most cytotoxic either with or without the addition of S-9. All three complex mixtures induced sister chromatid exchanges in primary lung cell cultures without the addition of S-9. The relative genotoxicity ranking of the samples varied between the mammalian and prokaryotic assay systems. Coke oven main extract produced fewer revertants in bacteria than the raw gas sample. However, the coke oven main extract was more genotoxic in the two eukaryotic systems (CHL/SCE and CHO/HGPRT) than was the raw gas sample. The results of all three assays indicate that the cleanup process used in the experimental gasifier was effective in decreasing the genotoxic materials in the process stream. These data also reemphasize the necessity of evaluating genotoxicity of complex mixtures in a variety of short-term systems.

  9. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate cobalt in human lung fibroblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Leah J.; Holmes, Amie L. [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Maine Center for Environmental Toxicology and Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Kandpal, Sanjeev Kumar; Mason, Michael D. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Zheng, Tongzhang [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT (United States); Wise, John Pierce, E-mail: John.Wise@usm.maine.edu [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Maine Center for Environmental Toxicology and Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Cobalt exposure is increasing as cobalt demand rises worldwide due to its use in enhancing rechargeable battery efficiency, super-alloys, and magnetic products. Cobalt is considered a possible human carcinogen with the lung being a primary target. However, few studies have considered cobalt-induced toxicity in human lung cells. Therefore, in this study, we sought to determine the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of particulate and soluble cobalt in human lung cells. Cobalt oxide and cobalt chloride were used as representative particulate and soluble cobalt compounds, respectively. Exposure to both particulate and soluble cobalt induced a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular cobalt ion levels. Based on intracellular cobalt ion levels, we found that soluble cobalt was more cytotoxic than particulate cobalt while particulate and soluble cobalt induced similar levels of genotoxicity. However, soluble cobalt induced cell cycle arrest indicated by the lack of metaphases at much lower intracellular cobalt concentrations compared to cobalt oxide. Accordingly, we investigated the role of particle internalization in cobalt oxide-induced toxicity and found that particle-cell contact was necessary to induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity after cobalt exposure. These data indicate that cobalt compounds are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung fibroblasts, and solubility plays a key role in cobalt-induced lung toxicity. - Highlights: • Particulate and soluble cobalt are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung cells. • Soluble cobalt induces more cytotoxicity compared to particulate cobalt. • Soluble and particulate cobalt induce similar levels of genotoxicity. • Particle-cell contact is required for particulate cobalt-induced toxicity.

  10. Genotoxicity of antiobesity drug orlistat and effect of caffeine intervention: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Manoswini; Ghosh, Ilika; Jana, Aditi; Ghosh, Manosij; Mukherjee, Anita

    2017-07-01

    Obesity is a major global health problem associated with various adverse effects. Pharmacological interventions are often necessary for the management of obesity. Orlistat is an FDA-approved antiobesity drug which is a potent inhibitor of intestinal lipases. In the current study, orlistat was evaluated for its genotoxic potential in human lymphocyte cells in vitro and was compared with that of another antiobesity drug sibutramine, presently withdrawn from market due its undesirable health effects. Caffeine intake may be an additional burden in people using anorectic drugs, therefore, further work is needed to be carried out to evaluate the possible effects of caffeine on orlistat-induced DNA damage. Human lymphocytes were exposed to orlistat (250, 500 and 1000 μg/ml), sibutramine (250, 500 and 1000 μg/ml) and caffeine (25, 50, 75, 100, 125 and 150 μg/ml) to assess their genotoxicity by comet assay in vitro. In addition, lymphocytes were co-incubated with caffeine (50, 75 and 100 μg/ml) and a single concentration of orlistat (250 μg/ml). Orlistat and sibutramine were genotoxic at all concentrations tested, sibutramine being more genotoxic. Caffeine was found to be genotoxic at concentrations 125 μg/ml and above. Co-treatment of orlistat with non-genotoxic concentrations (50, 75 and 100 μg/ml) of caffeine lead to a decrease in DNA damage. Orlistat can induce DNA damage in human lymphocytes in vitro and caffeine was found to reduce orlistat-induced genotoxicity.

  11. Genotoxicity of 2-alkylcyclobutanones, markers for an irradiation treatment in fat-containing food - Part I : cyto- and genotoxic potential of 2-tetradecylcyclobutanone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delincee, H; Soika, C; Horvatovich, P; Rechkemmer, G; Marchioni, E

    2002-01-01

    Previous experiments had indicated a slight genotoxic potential both in rat and in human colon cells of a sample of 2-dodecylcyclobutanone, a compound formed by irradiation of food containing palmitic acid in its triglycerides. Up to date, there is no evidence that 2-alkylcyclobutanones occur in non

  12. The combined bacterial Lux-Fluoro test for the detection and quantification of genotoxic and cytotoxic agents in surface water: results from the "Technical Workshop on Genotoxicity Biosensing".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Horneck, Gerda

    2007-12-15

    The bioassay Lux-Fluoro test was developed for the rapid detection and quantification of environmental pollutants with genotoxic and/or cytotoxic potential. This bacterial test system uses two different reporter genes whose gene products and their reactions, respectively, can be measured easily and simultaneously by optical methods. Genotoxicity is measured by the increase of bioluminescence in genetically modified bacteria which carry a plasmid with a complete lux operon for the enzyme luciferase from the marine photobacterium P. leiognathi under the control of a DNA-damage dependent so-called SOS promoter. If the deoxyribonucleic acid in these bacteria is damaged by a genotoxic chemical, the SOS promoter is turned on and the lux operon is expressed. The newly synthesized luciferase reacts immediately with its substrate thereby producing bioluminescence in a damage-proportional manner. In the second part of the system, genetically modified bacteria carry the gene for the green fluorescent protein (gfp) from the jellyfish Aequora victoria downstream from a constitutively expressed promoter. These bacteria are fluorescent under common growth conditions. If their cellular metabolism is disturbed by the action of cytotoxic chemicals, the fluorescence decreases in a dose-proportional manner. The combined Lux-Fluoro test is shown to be well suited for the biological assessment of the geno- and cytotoxicity of a series of model agents and environmental samples at the Technical Workshop on Genotoxicity Biosensing (TECHNOTOX).

  13. Genotoxicity of 2-alkylcyclobutanones, markers for an irradiation treatment in fat-containing food - Part I : cyto- and genotoxic potential of 2-tetradecylcyclobutanone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delincee, H; Soika, C; Horvatovich, P; Rechkemmer, G; Marchioni, E

    2002-01-01

    Previous experiments had indicated a slight genotoxic potential both in rat and in human colon cells of a sample of 2-dodecylcyclobutanone, a compound formed by irradiation of food containing palmitic acid in its triglycerides. Up to date, there is no evidence that 2-alkylcyclobutanones occur in non

  14. A Study on Genotoxicity of Cooking Fume from Rapessed Oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENHUA; YANGMINGDING; 等

    1992-01-01

    The present article reports the genotoxic potential of rapeseed oil cooking fume investigated by a battery of short-term tests(Ames test,SCE/V79 in vitor and mice micronucleus in vivo test).The results showed that the cooking fume contained mutagenic activity.In the presence of S9 mix,an increase in the number of the Salmonella TA98 was observed at doses ranging from 1.0 to 5.0mg/plate,and the SCE frequencies of V79 cell were markedly raised at doses ranging from 0.05 to 0.5mg·m-1.The positive result was also obtained in mice micronucleus assay,the mice had inhaled the cooking fume a week earlier.The requency of mice bone marrow MN-PCR ws increased and it showed a remarkable time-dose-response relationship during the 4 weeks exposure.The results suggested that this cooking fume exposure may be a risk factor of lung cancer in Chinese women.

  15. Examination of genotoxic effects of fumagillin in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulić Milan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Fumagillin is an antibiotic derived from the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. It has been used successfully for the treatment of intestinal microsporidiosis in HIV-positive humans, as well as in those suffering from intestinal amebiasis and microsporidial keratoconjunctivitis. In veterinary medicine it is approved for the treatment of microsporidiosis in bees and fish. In this research fumagillin was tested for the ability to provoke chromosomal aberrations in mouse bone marrow cells. BALB/c mice were administered fumagillin by gastric probe in doses of 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg b.w. Water-sugary syrup was the negative and cyclophosphamide (15 mg/kg b.w. the positive control. Significantly increased frequencies (p<0.01 or p<0.001 of numerical chromosomal aberrations (aneuploidies and poliploidies was observed both in the medium (10 mg/kg b.w. and the highest (20 mg/kg b.w. dose of fumagillin. Structural chromosomal aberrations (gaps, breaks and insertions were noticeably more frequent in comparison to negative control only in the highest experimental dose of dycikloheksilamine. These results clearly showed that fumagillin in concetrations 10 and 20 mg/kg b.w. had a genotoxic potential in vivo.

  16. Anodically Grown Titania Nanotube Induced Cytotoxicity has Genotoxic Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, M. Sheikh; Torabi, Aida; Paulose, Maggie; Kumar, D. Sakthi; Varghese, Oomman K.

    2017-02-01

    Nanoarchitectures of titania (TiO2) have been widely investigated for a number of medical applications including implants and drug delivery. Although titania is extensively used in the food, drug and cosmetic industries, biocompatibility of nanoscale titania is still under careful scrutiny due to the conflicting reports on its interaction with cellular matter. For an accurate insight, we performed in vitro studies on the response of human dermal fibroblast cells toward pristine titania nanotubes fabricated by anodic oxidation. The nanotubes at low concentrations were seen to induce toxicity to the cells, whereas at higher concentrations the cell vitality remained on par with controls. Further investigations revealed an increase in the G0 phase cell population depicting that majority of cells were in the resting rather than active phase. Though the mitochondrial set-up did not exhibit any signs of stress, significantly enhanced reactive oxygen species production in the nuclear compartment was noted. The TiO2 nanotubes were believed to have gained access to the nuclear machinery and caused increased stress leading to genotoxicity. This interesting property of the nanotubes could be utilized to kill cancer cells, especially if the nanotubes are functionalized for a specific target, thus eliminating the need for any chemotherapeutic agents.

  17. Radio frequency electromagnetic fields: cancer, mutagenesis, and genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heynick, Louis N; Johnston, Sheila A; Mason, Patrick A

    2003-01-01

    We present critiques of epidemiologic studies and experimental investigations, published mostly in peer-reviewed journals, on cancer and related effects from exposure to nonionizing electromagnetic fields in the nominal frequency range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz of interest to Subcommittee 4 (SC4) of the International Committee on Electromagnetic Safety (ICES). The major topics discussed are presented under the headings Epidemiologic and Other Findings on Human Exposure, Mammals Exposed In Vivo, Mammalian Live Tissues and Cell Preparations Exposed In Vitro, and Mutagenesis and Genotoxicity in Microorganisms and Fruit Flies. Under each major topic, we present minireviews of papers on various specific endpoints investigated. The section on Epidemiologic and Other Findings on Human Exposure is divided into two subsections, the first on possible carcinogenic effects of exposure from emitters not in physical contact with the populations studied, for example, transmitting antennas and other devices. Discussed in the second subsection are studies of postulated carcinogenic effects from use of mobile phones, with prominence given to brain tumors from use of cellular and cordless telephones in direct physical contact with an ear of each subject. In both subsections, some investigations yielded positive findings, others had negative findings, including papers directed toward experimentally verifying positive findings, and both were reported in a few instances. Further research on various important aspects may resolve such differences. Overall, however, the preponderance of published epidemiologic and experimental findings do not support the supposition that in vivo or in vitro exposures to such fields are carcinogenic.

  18. Genotoxicity induced by saponified coconut oil surfactant in prokaryote systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petta, Tirzah Braz; de Medeiros, Sílvia Regina Batistuzzo; do Egito, Eryvaldo Sócrates Tabosa; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara Fassarella

    2004-11-01

    Surfactants are amphiphilic substances with special properties and chemical structures that allow a reduction in interfacial tension, which permits an increase in molecule solubilization. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) is an important characteristic of surfactants that determines their aggregate state, which is generally related to its functional mechanism. In this work the genotoxic potential of saponified coconut oil (SCO), a surfactant obtained from Cocos nucifera, was analyzed using prokaryote systems. DNA strand breaks were not observed after treatment of a plasmid with SCO. Negative results were also obtained in the SOS Chromotest using Escherichia coli strains PQ35 and PQ37. A moderate toxicity of SCO was observed after treatment of strain CC104 with a concentration above its CMC, in which micelles were found. Nevertheless, this treatment was not cytotoxic to a CC104mutMmutY strain. Furthermore, in this DNA repair-deficient strain treatment with a SCO dose below its CMC, in which only monomers were found, demonstrated the possibility of an antioxidant effect, since a reduction in spontaneous mutagenesis frequency was observed. Finally, in an Ames test without metabolic activation mutagenicity induction was observed in strains TA100 and TA104 with treatment doses below the CMC. The cytotoxic, antioxidant and mutagenic effects of SCO can be influenced by the aggregational state.

  19. Assessment of mutagenic, antimutagenic and genotoxicity effects of Mimosa tenuiflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane A. Silva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Genotoxic effects of Mimosa tenuiflora (Willd. Poir, Fabaceae, were investigated by using both micronucleus test and bacterial reverse mutation assay in Salmonella typhimurium TA97, TA98, TA100, TA102 respectively. In respect of Ames test results show that the extract does not induce mutations in any strains of Salmonella typhimurium tested since the mutagenicity index is less than 2. In the antimutagenic effect was observed that the extract at the concentrations tested significantly decreased the mutagenicity index of all strains tested which characterized the extract as antimutagenic in these conditions. In the micronucleus test in vivo, we observed that the concentrations used did not induce an increase in the frequency of micronucleus in normochromatic erythrocytes of mice. Therefore, we concluded that the extract of M. tenuiflora is not mutagenic in the absence of exogenous metabolizing system and does not induce an increase in the frequency of the micronucleus characterized as an agent not mutagenic in these conditions. Further studies of toxicity need to be made to the use of this plant in the treatment of diseases to be stimulated.

  20. Identification of consensus biomarkers for predicting non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shan-Han; Tung, Chun-Wei

    2017-01-01

    The assessment of non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens (NGHCs) is currently relying on two-year rodent bioassays. Toxicogenomics biomarkers provide a potential alternative method for the prioritization of NGHCs that could be useful for risk assessment. However, previous studies using inconsistently classified chemicals as the training set and a single microarray dataset concluded no consensus biomarkers. In this study, 4 consensus biomarkers of A2m, Ca3, Cxcl1, and Cyp8b1 were identified from four large-scale microarray datasets of the one-day single maximum tolerated dose and a large set of chemicals without inconsistent classifications. Machine learning techniques were subsequently applied to develop prediction models for NGHCs. The final bagging decision tree models were constructed with an average AUC performance of 0.803 for an independent test. A set of 16 chemicals with controversial classifications were reclassified according to the consensus biomarkers. The developed prediction models and identified consensus biomarkers are expected to be potential alternative methods for prioritization of NGHCs for further experimental validation.

  1. Mutagenic and genotoxic effects of Guelma's urban wastewater, Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabet, Mouna; Abda, Ahlem; Benouareth, Djamel E; Liman, Recep; Konuk, Muhsin; Khallef, Messaouda; Taher, Ali

    2015-02-01

    Assessment of water pollution and its effect upon river biotic communities and human health is indispensable to develop control and management strategies. In this study, the mutagenicity and genotoxicity of urban wastewater of the city of Guelma in Algeria were examined between April 2012 and April 2013. For this, two biological tests, namely Amesand chromosomal aberrations (CA) test in Allium cepa root tips were employed on the samples collected from five different sampling stages (S1-S5). In Ames test, two strains of Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 with or without metabolic activation (S9-mix) were used. All water samples were found to be mutagenic to S. typhimurium TA98 with or without S9-mix. A significant decrease in mitotic index (MI) was observed with a decrease in the percentage of cells in the prophase and an increase in the telophase. Main aberrations observed were anaphase bridges, disturbed anaphase-telophase cells, vagrants and stickiness in anaphase-telophase cells. All treatments of wastewater in April 2012, at S5 in July 2012, at S1 and S5 in November 2012, at S5 in February 2013, and at S1 in April 2013 induced CA when compared to the negative control. Some physicochemical parameters and heavy metals (Cd, Pb, and Cu) were also recorded in the samples examined.

  2. Genotoxic Effects of Culture Media on Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash Bangalore, Megha; Adhikarla, Syama; Mukherjee, Odity; Panicker, Mitradas M.

    2017-01-01

    Culture conditions play an important role in regulating the genomic integrity of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells (HPSCs). We report that HPSCs cultured in Essential 8 (E8) and mTeSR, two widely used media for feeder-free culturing of HPSCs, had many fold higher levels of ROS and higher mitochondrial potential than cells cultured in Knockout Serum Replacement containing media (KSR). HPSCs also exhibited increased levels of 8-hydroxyguanosine, phospho-histone-H2a.X and p53, as well as increased sensitivity to γ-irradiation in these two media. HPSCs in E8 and mTeSR had increased incidence of changes in their DNA sequence, indicating genotoxic stress, in addition to changes in nucleolar morphology and number. Addition of antioxidants to E8 and mTeSR provided only partial rescue. Our results suggest that it is essential to determine cellular ROS levels in addition to currently used criteria i.e. pluripotency markers, differentiation into all three germ layers and normal karyotype through multiple passages, in designing culture media. PMID:28176872

  3. Sewage sludge does not induce genotoxicity and carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Paula Regina Pereira; Barbisan, Luis Fernando; Dagli, Maria Lúcia Zaidan; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento

    2012-01-01

    Through a series of experiments, the genotoxic/mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of sewage sludge was assessed. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Group 1 - negative control; Group 2 - liver carcinogenesis initiated by diethylnitrosamine (DEN; 200 mg/kg i.p.); Group 3 and G4-liver carcinogenesis initiated by DEN and fed 10,000 ppm or 50,000 ppm of sewage sludge. The animals were submitted to a 70% partial hepatectomy at the 3rd week. Livers were processed for routine histological analysis and immunohistochemistry, in order to detect glutathione S-transferase positive altered hepatocyte foci (GST-P+ AHF). Peripheral blood samples for the comet assay were obtained from the periorbital plexus immediately prior to sacrificing. Polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) were analyzed in femoral bone-marrow smears, and the frequencies of those micronucleated (MNPCEs) registered. There was no sewage-sludge-induced increase in frequency of either DNA damage in peripheral blood leucocytes, or MNPCEs in the femoral bone marrow. Also, there was no increase in the levels of DNA damage, in the frequency of MNPCEs, and in the development of GST-P AHF when compared with the respective control group. PMID:23055806

  4. Transgenic Plants as Sensors of Environmental Pollution Genotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Igor; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2008-01-01

    Rapid technological development is inevitably associated with many environmental problems which primarily include pollution of soil, water and air. In many cases, the presence of contamination is difficult to assess. It is even more difficult to evaluate its potential danger to the environment and humans. Despite the existence of several whole organism-based and cell-based models of sensing pollution and evaluation of toxicity and mutagenicity, there is no ideal system that allows one to make a quick and cheap assessment. In this respect, transgenic organisms that can be intentionally altered to be more sensitive to particular pollutants are especially promising. Transgenic plants represent an ideal system, since they can be grown at the site of pollution or potentially dangerous sites. Plants are ethically more acceptable and esthetically more appealing than animals as sensors of environmental pollution. In this review, we will discuss various transgenic plant-based models that have been successfully used for biomonitoring genotoxic pollutants. We will also discuss the benefits and potential drawbacks of these systems and describe some novel ideas for the future generation of efficient transgenic phytosensors.

  5. From the Cover: An Investigation of the Genotoxicity and Interference of Gold Nanoparticles in Commonly Used In Vitro Mutagenicity and Genotoxicity Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jiya M; Magogotya, Millicent; Vetten, Melissa A; Buys, Antoinette V; Gulumian, Mary

    2017-03-01

    The suitability of 4 in vitro assays, commonly used for mutagenicity and genotoxicity assessment, was investigated in relation to treatment with 14 nm citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Specifically, the Ames test was conducted without metabolic activation, where no mutagenic effects were observed. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and Cytoviva dark-field image analysis showed that AuNPs did not enter the bacterial cells, thus confirming the unreliability of the Ames test for nanoparticle mutagenicity studies. In addition, the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line was used for Comet, Chromosome aberration and Micronucleus assays. CHO cells were treated with AuNPs for 20 h at 37 °C. Cytotoxicity was not detected by cell impedance studies even though AuNP uptake was confirmed using Cytoviva image analysis. The DNA damage was statistically significant in treated cells when assessed by the Comet assay. However, minimal and nonstatistically significant chromosomal DNA damage was observed using the chromosome aberration and micronucleus assays. In this study, we showed that false positive results obtained with Comet assay may have been due to the possibility of direct contact between the residual, intracellular AuNPs and DNA during the assay procedure. Therefore, the chromosome aberration and micronucleus assays are better suited to assess the genotoxic effects of nanoparticles due to low probability of such direct contact occurring. Genotoxic effect of 14 and 20 nm citrate-stabilized, as well as, 14 nm PCOOH AuNPs were also investigated using chromosome aberration and micronucleus assays. Based on our acceptance criteria for a positive genotoxic response, none of the AuNPs were found to be genotoxic in either of these assays. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Ogg1 genetic background determines the genotoxic potential of environmentally relevant arsenic exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Jordi; Sampayo-Reyes, Adriana; Marcos, Ricard; Hernández, Alba

    2014-03-01

    Inorganic arsenic (i-As) is a well-established human carcinogen to which millions of people are exposed worldwide. It is generally accepted that the genotoxic effects of i-As after an acute exposure are partially linked to the i-As-induced production of reactive oxygen species, but it is necessary to better determine whether chronic sub-toxic i-As doses are able to induce biologically significant levels of oxidative DNA damage (ODD). To fill in this gap, we have tested the genotoxic and oxidative effects of environmentally relevant arsenic exposures using mouse embryonic fibroblast MEF mutant Ogg1 cells and their wild-type counterparts. Effects were examined by using the comet assay complemented with the use of FPG enzyme. Our findings indicate that MEF Ogg1-/- cells are more sensitive to arsenite-induced acute toxicity, genotoxicity and ODD. Long-term exposure to sub-toxic doses of arsenite generates a detectable increase in ODD and genotoxic DNA damage only in MEF Ogg1-deficient cells. Altogether, the data presented here point out the relevance of ODD and Ogg1 genetic background on the genotoxic risk of i-As at environmentally plausible doses. The persistent accumulation of DNA 8-OH-dG lesions in Ogg1-/- cells during the complete course of the exposure suggests a relevant role in arsenic-associated carcinogenic risk in turn.

  7. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate cobalt in human lung fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Leah J; Holmes, Amie L; Kandpal, Sanjeev Kumar; Mason, Michael D; Zheng, Tongzhang; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-08-01

    Cobalt exposure is increasing as cobalt demand rises worldwide due to its use in enhancing rechargeable battery efficiency, super-alloys, and magnetic products. Cobalt is considered a possible human carcinogen with the lung being a primary target. However, few studies have considered cobalt-induced toxicity in human lung cells. Therefore, in this study, we sought to determine the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of particulate and soluble cobalt in human lung cells. Cobalt oxide and cobalt chloride were used as representative particulate and soluble cobalt compounds, respectively. Exposure to both particulate and soluble cobalt induced a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular cobalt ion levels. Based on intracellular cobalt ion levels, we found that soluble cobalt was more cytotoxic than particulate cobalt while particulate and soluble cobalt induced similar levels of genotoxicity. However, soluble cobalt induced cell cycle arrest indicated by the lack of metaphases at much lower intracellular cobalt concentrations compared to cobalt oxide. Accordingly, we investigated the role of particle internalization in cobalt oxide-induced toxicity and found that particle-cell contact was necessary to induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity after cobalt exposure. These data indicate that cobalt compounds are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung fibroblasts, and solubility plays a key role in cobalt-induced lung toxicity.

  8. Fruit extract of the medicinal plant Crataegus oxyacantha exerts genotoxic and mutagenic effects in cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quadros, Ana Paula Oliveira; Mazzeo, Dania Elisa Christofoletti; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida; Perazzo, Fábio Ferreira; Rosa, Paulo Cesar Pires; Maistro, Edson Luis

    2017-01-01

    Crataegus oxyacantha, a plant of the Rosaceae family also known "English hawthorn, haw, maybush, or whitethorn," has long been used for medicinal purposes such as digestive disorders, hyperlipidemia, dyspnea, inducing diuresis, and preventing kidney stones. However, the predominant use of this plant has been to treat cardiovascular disorders. Due to a lack of studies on the genotoxicity of C. oxyacantha, this investigation was undertaken to determine whether its fruit extract exerts cytotoxic, genotoxic, or clastogenic/aneugenic effects in leukocytes and HepG2 (liver hepatocellular carcinoma) cultured human cells, or mutagenic effects in TA100 and TA98 strains of Salmonella typhimurium bacterium. Genotoxicity analysis showed that the extract produced no marked genotoxic effects at concentrations of 2.5 or 5 µg/ml in either cell type; however, at concentrations of 10 µg/ml or higher significant DNA damage was detected. The micronucleus test also demonstrated that concentrations of 10 µg/ml or higher produced clastogenic/aneugenic responses. In the Ames test, the extract induced mutagenic effects in TA98 strain of S. typhimurium with metabolic activation at all tested concentrations (2.5 to 500 µg/ml). Data indicate that, under certain experimental conditions, the fruit extract of C. oxyacantha exerts genotoxic and clastogenic/aneugenic effects in cultured human cells, and with metabolism mutagenicity occurs in bacteria cells.

  9. Assessment of Genotoxicity of Ionizing radiation using Tradescantia-Comet assay

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    Han, Min; Ryu, Tae Ho; Hyun, Kyung Man; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Wilhelmova, Nad [Institute of Experimental Botany, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2010-05-15

    Over the last two decades, several new methodologies for the detection of DNA damage have been developed. The comet assay is currently used in different areas of biological sciences to detect DNA damage. The comet assay, also called the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) was first introduced by Ostling and Johanson as a microelectrophoretic technique for the direct visualization of DNA damage in individual cells. The comet assay, due to its simplicity, sensitivity and need of a few cells, is ideal as a short-term genotoxicity test. The comet assay can theoretically be applied to every type of eukaryotic cell, including plant cells. Plants are very useful as monitors of genetic effects caused by pollution in the atmosphere, water and soil. Although the genotoxic effects detected by Tradescantia tests cannot be associated with mutagenesis or even carcinogenesis in humans, these bioassays are very useful tools for screening the mutagenic potential in the environment. Experiments were conducted to study the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiations on the genome integrity, particularly of Tradescantia. The increasingly frequent use of Tradescantia as a sensitive environmental bioindicator of genotoxic effects. This study was designed to assess the genotoxicity of ionizing radiation using Tradescnatia-comet assay

  10. Mutagenic and genotoxic activity of particulate matter MP2,5, in Pamplona, North Santander, Colombia

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    Martínez Montañez, Mónica Liseth

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the mutagenic and genotoxic activities of particulate material (MP2,5 collected in Pamplona, Norte de Santander, Colombia.Materials and methods: MP2,5 was monitored by means of a Partisol 2025 sequential air sampler with Plus Palmflex quartz filters. The latter were subjected to two extraction procedures: Soxhlet extraction using dichloromethane-acetone; and ultrasonic extraction using dichloromethane, acetone and dichloromethane/ acetone mix. The mutagenic and genotoxic activities were determined for each extract.Results: This is the first study conducted in Colombia that reports the mutagenic and genotoxic activities associated with particulate matter (MP2,5 taken from vehicular emissions in Pamplona, Norte de Santander. The mutagenic assay determined by the Ames test using Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100 showed a high direct mutagenic activity in the analyzed extracts. On the other hand, the genotoxic activity, determined by means of the comet assay, was high too.Conclusion: Particulate material (MP2,5 present in air samples in Pamplona (northeastern Colombia is a risk factor for the exposed population because it can directly induce mutations and also cause genotoxic damage.

  11. Ecotoxicological and Genotoxic Evaluation of Buenos Aires City (Argentina Hospital Wastewater

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    Anahí Magdaleno

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hospital wastewater (HWW constitutes a potential risk to the ecosystems and human health due to the presence of toxic and genotoxic chemical compounds. In the present work we investigated toxicity and genotoxicity of wastewaters from the public hospital of Buenos Aires (Argentina. The effluent from the sewage treatment plant (STP serving around 10 million inhabitants was also evaluated. The study was carried out between April and September 2012. Toxicity and genotoxicity assessment was performed using the green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and the Allium cepa test, respectively. Toxicity assay showed that 55% of the samples were toxic to the algae (%I of growth between 23.9 and 54.8. The A. cepa test showed that 40% of the samples were genotoxic. The analysis of chromosome aberrations (CA and micronucleus (MN showed no significant differences between days and significant differences between months. The sample from the STP was not genotoxic to A. cepa but toxic to the algae (%I = 41%, showing that sewage treatment was not totally effective. This study highlights the need for environmental control programs and the establishment of advanced and effective effluent treatment plants in the hospitals, which are merely dumping the wastewaters in the municipal sewerage system.

  12. Genotoxicity of copper oxide and silver nanoparticles in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Tânia; Araújo, Olinda; Pereira, Rita; Almeida, Ana C; Cravo, Alexandra; Bebianno, Maria João

    2013-03-01

    Though there is some information on cytotoxicity of copper nanoparticles and silver nanoparticles on human cell lines, there is no information on their genotoxic and cytotoxic behaviour in bivalve molluscs. The aim of this study was to investigate the genotoxic impact of copper oxide and silver nanoparticles using mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis. Mussels were exposed to 10 μg L⁻¹ of CuO nanoparticles and Cu²⁺ and Ag nanoparticles and Ag⁺ for 15 days to assess genotoxic effects in hemocytes using the comet assay. The results obtained indicated that copper and silver forms (nanoparticles and ionic) induced DNA damage in hemolymph cells and a time-response effect was evident when compared to unexposed mussels. Ionic forms presented higher genotoxicity than nanoparticles, suggesting different mechanisms of action that may be mediated through oxidative stress. DNA strand breaks proved to be a useful biomarker of exposure to genotoxic effects of CuO and Ag nanoparticles in marine molluscs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. AFFINITY BIOSENSOR BASED ON SCREEN-PRINTED ELECTRODE MODIFIED WITH DNA FOR GENOTOXIC COMPOUNDS DETECTION

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    Bambang Kuswandi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available An electrochemical method for the detection of the genotoxic compounds using a DNA-modified electrode was developed. This electrode was successfully used for the electrochemical detection of genotoxic compounds in water samples. The electrochemical results clearly demonstrated that, the development is related to the molecular interaction between the surface-linked DNA obtained from calf thymus and the target compounds, such as pollutants, in order to develop a simple device for rapid screening of genotoxic compounds in environmental samples. The detection of such compounds was measured by their effect on the oxidation signal of the guanine peak of the DNA immobilised on the surface of carbon based Screen-Printed Electrode (SPE in disposable mode, and monitored by square-wave voltametric analysis. The DNA biosensor is able to detect known intercalating and groove-binding genotoxic compounds such as Dioxin, Bisphenol A, PCBs, and Phtalates. Application to real water samples is discussed and reported.   Keywords: electrochemical, screen-printed electrode, DNA biosensor, genotoxic compounds

  14. Protective Effects of Quercetin against Dimethoate-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Allium sativum Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Waseem; Shaikh, Sibhghatulla; Nazam, Nazia; Lone, Mohammad Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was directed to study the possible protective activity of quercetin-a natural antioxidant against dimethoate-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in meristematic cells of Allium sativum. So far there is no report on the biological properties of quercetin in plant test systems. Chromosome breaks, multipolar anaphase, stick chromosome, and mitotic activity were undertaken in the current study as markers of cyto- and genotoxicity. Untreated control, quercetin controls (@ 5, 10 and 20 μg/mL for 3 h), and dimethoate exposed groups (@ 100 and 200 μg/mL for 3 h) were maintained. For protection against cytogenotoxicity, the root tip cells treated with dimethoate at 100 and 200 μg/mL for 3 h and quercetin treatment at 5, 10, and 20 μg/mL for 16 h, prior to dimethoate treatment, were undertaken. Quercetin was found to be neither cytotoxic nor genotoxic in Allium sativum control at these doses. A significant increase (P < 0.05) in chromosomal aberrations was noted in dimethoate treated Allium. Pretreatment of Allium sativum with quercetin significantly (P < 0.05) reduced dimethoate-induced genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in meristematic cells, and these effects were dose dependent. In conclusion, quercetin has a protective role in the abatement of dimethoate-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in the meristematic cells of Allium sativum that resides, at least in part, on its antioxidant effects.

  15. Genotoxicity of intraperitoneal injection of lipoamphiphile CdSe/ZnS quantum dots in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Mélanie; Di Giorgio, Carole; Mekaouche, Mourad; Steinberg, Jean-Guillaume; Brerro-Saby, Christelle; Barthélémy, Philippe; De Méo, Michel; Jammes, Yves

    2013-12-12

    The main objective of the present in vivo rat study was to determine the genotoxicity of lipoamphiphile-coated CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots (QDs), in several organs (brain, liver, kidneys, lungs and testicles). The second objective was to establish the correlations between the QDs genotoxic activity and the oxidative stress, the production of a proinflammatory cytokine (TNF-α), a stress-induced chaperone protein, the phosphorylated heat shock protein 70 (pHsp70), and an increase in the caspase-3 apoptosis factor. Four QDs doses were injected into the peritoneal cavity (5, 5×10(-1), 5×10(-2) and 5×10(-3)μg/kg). DNA lesions in the different organs were measured by the comet assay, and chromosome abnormalities were evaluated by the micronucleus assay on blood reticulocytes (MNRET). Twenty-four hours after the QDs injection, genotoxic effects were observed in the brain and liver and, only for the highest QDs concentration, in testicles. No genotoxic effect was seen in the kidney and lung. The MNRET test revealed a dose-response induction of micronuclei. In parallel, we did neither reveal oxidative stress nor significant variations of TNF-α, pHsp70, and caspase-3. In conclusion, the QDs exerted significant genotoxic effects in the brain and liver, even in the absence of any associated oxidative stress and inflammatory processes.

  16. Recent perspectives on the relations between faecal mutagenicity, genotoxicity and diet

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    Silvia eGratz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage is an essential component of the genesis of colonic cancer. Gut microbial products and food components are thought to be principally responsible for the damage that initiates disease progression. Modified Ames tests and Comet assays have been developed for measuring mutagenicity and genotoxicity. Their relevance to oncogenesis remains to be confirmed, as does the relative importance of different mutagenic and genotoxic compounds present in faecal water and the bacteria involved in their metabolism. Dietary intervention studies provide clues to the likely risks of oncogenesis. High-protein diets lead to increases in N-nitroso compounds in faecal water and greater DNA damage as measured by the Comet assay, for example. Other dietary interventions, such as non-digestible carbohydrates and probiotics, may lead to lower faecal genotoxicity. In order to make recommendations to the general public, we must develop a better understanding of how genotoxic compounds are formed in the colon, how accurate the Ames and Comet assays are, and how diet affects genotoxicity.

  17. Genotoxicity of drinking water treated with different disinfectants and effects of disinfection conditions detected by umu-test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xuebiao; Liu, Wenjun; Zhang, Liping; Liu, Qing

    2017-06-01

    The genotoxicity of drinking water treated with 6 disinfection methods and the effects of disinfection conditions were investigated using the umu-test. The pretreatment procedure of samples for the umu-test was optimized for drinking water analysis. The results of the umu-test were in good correlation with those of the Ames-test. The genotoxicity and production of haloacetic acids (HAAs) were the highest for chlorinated samples. UV+chloramination is the safest disinfection method from the aspects of genotoxicity, HAA production and inactivation effects. For chloramination, the effects of the mass ratio of Cl2 to N of chloramine on genotoxicity were also studied. The changes of genotoxicity were different from those of HAA production, which implied that HAA production cannot represent the genotoxic potential of water. The genotoxicity per chlorine decay of chlorination and chloramination had similar trends, indicating that the reaction of organic matters and chlorine made a great contribution to the genotoxicity. The results of this study are of engineering significance for optimizing the operation of waterworks. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Anti-genotoxic ability of α-tocopherol and Anthocyanin to counteract fish DNA damage induced by musk xylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Lucia; Mottola, Filomena; Santonastaso, Marianna; Saputo, Valentina; Cusano, Elena; Costagliola, Domenico; Suero, Teresa; Pacifico, Severina; Stingo, Vincenzo

    2015-11-01

    Many compounds released into the environment are able to interact with genetic material. The main purpose of genetic toxicology is to investigate the adverse effects of genotoxic molecules such as reduced fitness, changes in gene frequencies and their impact on genetic diversity in populations following genotoxic exposure. However, the ecological effects of many genotoxic compounds remain poorly understood. The aim of this research was to evaluate the genotoxic activity of an artificial musk (musk xylene, MX) and the potential anti-genotoxicity against this chemical compound of two antioxidant substances (α-tocopherol and an anthocyanins enriched extract). The studies were performed both in vivo and in vitro, using the teleost Danio rerio and the DLEC (Dicentrarchus labrax embryonic cells) cell line. We carried out the exposure to these substances at different times. DNA and cell damage and their possible repair were detected by various experimental approaches: DNA strand breaks (Comet Assay), degree of apoptosis (Diffusion Assay) and molecular alterations at the genomic level (RAPD-PCR technique). Data were collected and analyzed for statistical significance using the Student's t test. The results of this study showed that MX exhibited a genotoxic activity even after short exposure times. The anti-genotoxicity experiments evidenced that both α-tocopherol and Anthocyanin were able to contrast the genotoxic effects induced by MX, both in vivo and in vitro.

  19. Assessment of genotoxic effects of flumorph by the comet assay in mice organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T; Zhao, Q; Zhang, Y; Ning, J

    2014-03-01

    The present study investigated the genotoxic effects of flumorph in various organs (brain, liver, spleen, kidney and sperm) of mice. The DNA damage, measured as comet tail length (µm), was determined using the alkaline comet assay. The comet assay is a sensitive assay for the detection of genotoxicity caused by flumorph using mice as a model. Statistically significant increases in comet assay for both dose-dependent and duration-dependent DNA damage were observed in all the organs assessed. The organs exhibited the maximum DNA damage in 96 h at 54 mg/kg body weight. Brain showed maximum DNA damage followed by spleen > kidney > liver > sperm. Our data demonstrated that flumorph had induced systemic genotoxicity in mammals as it caused DNA damage in all tested vital organs, especially in brain and spleen.

  20. Assessing the genotoxicity of urban air pollutants using two in situ plant bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarini, M; Fatigoni, C; Dominici, L; Maestri, S; Ederli, L; Pasqualini, S; Monarca, S; Moretti, M

    2009-12-01

    Genotoxicity of urban air has been analysed almost exclusively in airborne particulates. We monitored the genotoxic effects of airborne pollutants in the urban air of Perugia (Central Italy). Two plant bioindicators with different genetic endpoints were used: micronuclei in meiotic pollen mother cells using Tradescantia-micronucleus bioassay (Trad-MCN) and DNA damage in nuclei of Nicotiana tabacum leaves using comet assay (Nicotiana-comet). Buds of Tradescantia clone # 4430 and young N. tabacum cv. Xanthi plants were exposed for 24 h at three sites with different pollution levels. One control site (indoor control) was also used. The two bioassays showed different sensitivities toward urban pollutants: Trad-MCN assay was the most sensitive, but DNA damage in N. tabacum showed a better correlation with the pollutant concentrations. In situ biomonitoring of airborne genotoxins using higher plants combined with chemical analysis is thus recommended for characterizing genotoxicity of urban air.

  1. Lanthanum nitrate genotoxicity evaluation: Ames test, mouse micronucleus assay, and chromosome aberration test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Liu, Haibo; Cui, Wenming; Zhang, Qiannan; Li, Yongning; Yu, Zhou; Jia, Xudong

    2016-11-01

    The increasing use of rare-earth elements (REE) and their compounds has led to their accumulation in the environment and has raised concern about their safety. The toxic effects of REE such as lanthanum are largely unknown; genotoxicity studies have been limited and results are controversial. We evaluated the genotoxicity of lanthanum nitrate (La(NO3)3) in several in vitro and in vivo tests, including bacterial reverse mutation assay (Ames test), mouse bone marrow micronucleus assay, and chromosome aberration assay. La(NO3)3 was not mutagenic in the Ames test. La(NO3)3 did not increase the frequencies of bone marrow micronuclei or chromosome aberration in the mouse after repeated treatments at oral doses up to 735 (females) and 855mg/kg (males). The compound did not increase the frequency of chromosome aberrations in CHO cells in vitro. These results indicate that lanthanum is not a genotoxic hazard.

  2. The micronucleus test-most widely used in vivo genotoxicity test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Genotoxicity is commonly evaluated during the chemical safety assessment together with other toxicological endpoints. The micronucleus test is always included in many genotoxic test guidelines for long time in many classes of chemicals, e.g., pharmaceutical chemicals, agricultural chemicals, food additives. Although the trend of the safety assessment of chemicals faces to animal welfare and in vitro systems are more welcome than the in vivo systems, the in vivo test systems are paid more attention in the field of genotoxicity because of its weight of evidence. In this review, I will summarize the following points: 1) historical consideration of the test development, 2) characteristics of the test including advantages and limitations, 3) new approaches considering to the animal welfare.

  3. Genotoxic effect of Lythrum salicaria extract determined by the mussel micronucleus test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck-Varanka, Bettina; Kováts, Nóra; Hubai, Katalin; Paulovits, Gábor; Ferincz, Árpád; Horváth, Eszter

    2015-12-01

    A wide range of aquatic plants have been proven to release allelochemicals, of them phenolics and tannin are considered rather widely distributed. Tannins, however, have been demonstrated to have genotoxic capacity. In our study genotoxic potential of Lythrum salicaria L. (Purple Loosestrife, family Lythraceae) was assessed by the mussel micronucleus test, using Unio pictorum. In parallel, total and hydrolysable tannin contents were determined. Results clearly show that the extract had a high hydrolysable tannin content and significant mutagenic effect. As L. salicaria has been long used in traditional medicine for chronic diarrhoea, dysentery, leucorrhoea and blood-spitting, genotoxic potential of the plant should be evaluated not only with regard to potential effects in the aquatic ecosystem, but also assessing its safe use as a medicinal herb.

  4. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of the epoxy resin-based root canal sealer AH plus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyhausen, G; Heil, J; Reifferscheid, G; Waldmann, P; Geurtsen, W

    1999-02-01

    Previous studies with four rapid in vitro and in vivo test systems have shown that the epoxy resin-based root canal sealer AH26 may be genotoxic and cytotoxic (9). The purpose of this study was to determine the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of the new resinous root canal sealer AH Plus by means of the growth inhibition test with primary human periodontal ligament fibroblasts and permanent 3T3 monolayers, the procaryotic umu test, the eucaryotic DNA synthesis inhibition test, and the in vivo alkaline filter elution test. In addition, Ames tests were performed with extracts from AH Plus. AH Plus caused only slight or no cellular injuries. Furthermore, no genotoxicity and mutagenicity were revealed by AH Plus. These data should be taken into consideration when deciding about a root canal sealer.

  5. Cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic effects of sewage sludge on Allium cepa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa Martins, Maria Nilza; de Souza, Victor Ventura; da Silva Souza, Tatiana

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to ascertain the cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic potential of sewage sludge using Allium cepa bioassay. Solubilized and crude sludge from two sewage treatment stations (STSs), herein named JM and M, were tested. In addition, sanitized, crude and solubilized sludge were also analyzed from STS M. The treatments showed positive response to phytotoxicity, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and/or mutagenicity. Despite negative results for MN F1 (micronuclei counted in F1 root cells, derived from meristematic cells), the monitoring of genotoxic and mutagenic activities of sewage sludge are recommended because in agricultural areas this residue is applied in large scale and continuously. Based on our results we advise caution in the use of sewage sludge in agricultural soils.

  6. Genotoxicity assessment of fipronil (frontline plus® in Canis familiaris

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    Liane Ziliotto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Fipronil is a pesticide widely used for controlling fleas and ticks in domestic animals, and its short-term exposure can lead to serious effects on animals. However, the possible genotoxic effect of this compound has not been investigated in target animals. Based on the hypothesis that fipronil can induce genotoxicity, this study evaluated the effect of fipronil on DNA damage in peripheral blood cells. For that purpose, ten dogs of both sexes were used in the study. The product (6.7mg/kg was applied on the dorsal neck region of each animal. Peripheral blood samples were collected immediately prior to application of the product, and at 3, 8 and 24 hours after the application. Samples were processed for comet assay. No statistically significant differences were found among the four time points. The current study suggests for the first time that a single exposure to this pesticide does not induce systemic genotoxic effect in dogs.

  7. Genotoxicity evaluation of dimethoate to experimental mice by micronucleus, chromosome aberration tests, and comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayed-Boussema, Imen; Rjiba, Karima; Mnasri, Nourhène; Moussa, Amal; Bacha, Hassen

    2012-01-01

    Dimethoate (DM) is an organophosphate insecticide with numerous uses on field and agricultural crops and ornamentals. Data concerning DM-acute genotoxicity are controversial and knowledge on its delayed effect is limited. For this reason, we aimed to further explore DM genotoxicity resulting from subchronic intoxication of experimental mice. Thus, DM was administered to mice at doses ranging from 1 to 30 mg/kg body weight for a period of 30 consecutive days. There was a significant increase (P < .05) in the frequency of micronucleated bone marrow cells following DM administration. Furthermore, the chromosome aberration assay revealed a significant increase in the percentage of chromosome abnormalities in a dose-dependent manner. Dimethoate was also found to induce significant DNA damage in mouse bone marrow cells as assessed by the comet assay. Altogether, our results showed that, after a subchronic exposure, DM was a genotoxic compound in experimental mice.

  8. Evaluation of genotoxicity of combined soil pollution by cadmium and imidacloprid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN; Aijun; ZHU; Yongguan; TONG; Yiping

    2005-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is one of the important pollutants of soil and the genotoxicity of Cd-contaminated soil was studied in combination with imidacloprid. The single cell gel electrophoresis or comet assay was used to quantify DNA strand breaks as a measure of DNA damage induced by Cd and imidacloprid contamination in soil. The soil was artificially contaminated by Cd 2 h at 25℃ and were used in the comet assay. DNA damage was measured as the values of percentage of nuclei with tails, tail length, tail DNA, tail moment (TM), and Olive tail moment (OTM). DNA damages of root tips of Vicia faba increased after Cd treatment and there were dose-related increases in DNA damage measured as these parameters. However, the addition of imidacloprid further increased the DNA damage. These data confirmed the genotoxic effect of Cd to plants, and that the combined pollution with imidacloprid can enhance the genotoxicity of Cd.

  9. Lack of genotoxicity of formocresol, paramonochlorophenol, and calcium hydroxide on mammalian cells by comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Marques, Mariângela Esther Alencar; Salvadori, Daisy Maria Fávero

    2004-08-01

    Formocresol, paramonochlorophenol, and calcium hydroxide are widely used in dentistry because of their antibacterial activities in root canal disinfection. However, the results of genotoxicity studies using these materials are inconsistent in literature. The goal of this study was to examine the genotoxic potential of formocresol, paramonochlorophenol, and calcium hydroxide using mouse lymphoma cells and human fibroblasts cells in vitro by the comet assay. Data were assessed by Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test. The results showed that all compounds tested did not cause DNA damage for the tail moment or tail intensity parameters. These findings suggest that formocresol, paramonochlorophenol, and calcium hydroxide do not promote DNA damage in mammalian cells and that the comet assay is a suitable tool to investigate genotoxicity.

  10. Genotoxicity Evaluation of Irrigative Wastewater from Shijiazhuang City in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuehui Liu

    Full Text Available In the present study, the wastewater sample collected from the Dongming discharging river in Shijiazhuang city was analysed using both chemical analysis and biological assays including the Salmonella mutagenicity test, micronucleus test and single-cell gel electrophoresis. Chemical analysis of the sample was performed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The Salmonella mutagenicity test was performed on Salmonella typhimurium TA97, TA98, TA100 and TA102 strains with and without S9 mixture. The mice received the wastewater in natura through drinking water at concentrations of 25%, 50%, and 100%. One group of mice was exposed for 2 consecutive days, and the other group of mice was exposed for 15 consecutive days. To establish the levels of primary DNA damage, single-cell gel electrophoresis was performed on treated mouse liver cell. The concentrations of chromium and lead in the sample exceeded the national standard (GB20922-2007 by 0.78 and 0.43-fold, respectively. More than 30 organic compounds were detected, and some of the detected compounds were mutagens, carcinogens and environmental endocrine disrupters. A positive response for Salmonella typhimurium TA98 strain was observed. Mouse exposure via drinking water containing 50% and 100% of wastewater for 15 consecutive days caused a significant increase of MN frequencies in a dose-response manner. Mouse exposure via drinking water containing 50% and 100% of wastewater for 15 consecutive days caused a significant increase of the Olive tail moments in a dose-response manner. All the results indicated that the sample from the Dongming discharging river in Shijiazhuang city exhibited genotoxicity and might pose harmful effects on the local residents.

  11. Genotoxicity of agricultural soils in the vicinity of industrial area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Mohd Ikram; Malik, Abdul

    2009-03-17

    Soil samples from agricultural fields (cultivated) in the vicinity of industrial area of Ghaziabad City (India) were collected. In this city, wastewater coming from both industrial and domestic sources and without any treatment is used to irrigate the food crops. This practice has been polluting the soil and pollutants might reach the food chain. Gas chromatographic analysis show the presence of certain organochlorine (DDE, DDT, dieldrin, aldrin and endosulfan) and organophosphorus (dimethoate, malathion, methylparathion and chlorpyrifos) pesticides in soil samples. Samples were extracted using different solvents, i.e. methanol, chloroform, acetonitrile, hexane and acetone (all were HPLC-grade, SRL, India), and the extracts were assayed for genotoxic potential using Ames Salmonella/microsome test, DNA repair defective mutants and bacteriophage lambda systems. TA98 and TA100 were found to be the most sensitive strains to all the soil extracts tested. Methanol extracts exhibited a maximum mutagenicity with TA98 strain {540 (-S9) and 638 (+S9) revertants/g of soil} and 938 (-S9) and 1008 (+S9) revertants/g of soil with TA100 strain. The damage in the DNA repair defective mutants was found maximum with methanolic extract followed by acetonitrile, chloroform, hexane and acetone at the dose level of 40 microl/ml culture after 6h of treatment. The survival was 25, 30, 32, 33 and 35% in polA strain after 6h of treatment when tested with wastewater irrigated soil extracts of methanol, acetonitrile, chloroform, hexane and acetone, respectively. A significant decrease in the plaque forming units of bacteriophage lambda was also observed when treated with 40 microl of test samples. Present results showed that methanolic extracts of soil were more toxic than other soil extracts. The soil is accumulating a large number of pollutants due to wastewater irrigation and this practice of accumulation has an impact on soil health.

  12. Chlorination of tramadol: Reaction kinetics, mechanism and genotoxicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hanyang; Song, Dean; Chang, Yangyang; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-12-01

    Tramadol (TRA) is one of the most detected analgesics in environmental matrices, and it is of high significance to study the reactivity of TRA during chlorination considering its potential toxicity to the environment. The chlorine/TRA reaction is first order with respect to the TRA concentration, and a combination of first-order and second-order with respect to chlorine concentration. The pH dependence of the observed rate constants (kobs) showed that the TRA oxidation reactivity increased with increasing pH. kobs can be quantitatively described by considering all active species including Cl2, Cl2O and HOCl, and the individual rate constants of HOCl/TRA(0), HOCl/TRAH(+), Cl2/TRA and Cl2O/TRA reactions were calculated to be (2.61±0.29)×10(3)M(-1)s(-1), 14.73±4.17M(-1)s(-1), (3.93±0.34)×10(5)M(-1)s(-1) and (5.66±1.83)×10(6)M(-1)s(-1), respectively. Eleven degradation products were detected with UPLC-Q-TOF-MS, and the corresponding structures of eight products found under various pH conditions were proposed. The amine group was proposed to be the initial attack site under alkaline pH conditions, where reaction of the deprotonated amine group with HOCl is favorable. Under acidic and neutral pH conditions, however, two possible reaction pathways were proposed. One is an electrophilic substitution on the aromatic ring, and another is an electrophilic substitution on the nitrogen, leading to an N-chlorinated intermediate, which can be further oxidized. Finally, the SOS/umu test showed that the genotoxicity of TRA chlorination products increased with increasing dosage of chlorine, which was mostly attributed to the formation of some chlorine substitution products.

  13. Vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) genotoxicity profile: relevance for carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, Richard J

    2013-09-01

    Vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) is a site-of-contact carcinogen in rodents. It is also DNA reactive and mutagenic, but only after its carboxylesterase mediated conversion to acetaldehyde (AA), a metabolic reaction that also produces acetic acid and protons. As VAM's mutagenic metabolite, AA is normally produced endogenously; detoxification by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) is required to maintain intra-cellular AA homeostasis. This review examines VAM's overall genotoxicity, which is due to and limited by AA, and the processes leading to mutation induction. VAM and AA have both been universally negative in mutation studies in bacteria but both have tested positive in several in vitro studies in higher organisms that usually employed high concentrations of test agents. Recently however, in vitro studies evaluating submillimolar concentrations of VAM or AA have shown threshold dose-responses for mutagenicity in human cultured cells. Neither VAM nor AA induced systemic mutagenicity in in vivo studies in metabolically competent mice when tested at non-lethal doses while treatments of animals deficient in aldehyde dehydrogenase (Aldh in animals) did induce both gene and chromosome level mutations. The results of several studies have reinforced the critical role for aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2 in humans) in limiting AA's (and therefore VAM's) mutagenicity. The overall aim of this review of VAM's mutagenic potential through its AA metabolite is to propose a mode of action (MOA) for VAM's site-of-contact carcinogenesis that incorporates the overall process of mutation induction that includes both background mutations due to endogenous AA and those resulting from exogenous exposures.

  14. Rat Pig-a mutation assay responds to the genotoxic carcinogen ethyl carbamate but not the non-genotoxic carcinogen methyl carbamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemis, Jeffrey C; Labash, Carson; Avlasevich, Svetlana L; Carlson, Kristine; Berg, Ariel; Torous, Dorothea K; Barragato, Matthew; MacGregor, James T; Dertinger, Stephen D

    2015-05-01

    Determination of the mode of action of carcinogenic agents is an important factor in risk assessment and regulatory practice. To assess the ability of the erythrocyte-based Pig-a mutation assay to discriminate between genotoxic and non-genotoxic modes of action, the mutagenic response of Sprague Dawley rats exposed to methyl carbamate (MC) or ethyl carbamate (EC) was investigated. EC, a potent carcinogen, is believed to induce DNA damage through the formation of a DNA-reactive epoxide group, whereas the closely structurally related compound, MC, cannot form this epoxide and its weaker carcinogenic activity is thought to be secondary to inflammation and promotion of cell proliferation. The frequency of Pig-a mutant phenotype cells was monitored before, during, and after 28 consecutive days of oral gavage exposure to either MC (doses ranging from 125 to 500 mg/kg/day) or EC (250 mg/kg/day). Significant increases in the frequency of mutant reticulocytes were observed from Days 15 through 43, with a peak mean frequency of 19.9×10(-6) on Day 29 (i.e. 24.9-fold increase relative to mean vehicle control across all four sampling times). As expected, mutant erythrocyte responses lagged behind mutant reticulocyte responses, with a maximal mean frequency of 8.2×10(-6) on Day 43 (i.e. 16.4-fold increase). No mutagenic effects were observed with MC. A second indicator of in vivo genotoxicity, peripheral blood micronucleated reticulocytes, was also studied. This endpoint was responsive to EC (3.3-fold mean increase), but not to MC. These results support the hypothesis that genotoxicity contributes to the carcinogenicity of EC but not of MC, and illustrates the value of the Pig-a assay for discriminating between genotoxic and non-genotoxic modes of action. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Comparative assessment of genotoxicity of mineral water packed in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and glass bottles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceretti, Elisabetta; Zani, Claudia; Zerbini, Ilaria; Guzzella, Licia; Scaglia, Mauro; Berna, Vanda; Donato, Francesco; Monarca, Silvano; Feretti, Donatella

    2010-03-01

    The potential migration of genotoxic compounds into mineral water stored in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles was evaluated by an integrated chemical/biological approach using short-term toxicity/genotoxicity tests and chemical analysis. Six commercial brands of still and carbonated mineral water bottled in PET and in glass were stored at 40 degrees C for 10 days in a stove according to the standard EEC total migration test (82/711/EEC), or at room temperature in the dark. After treatment, the samples were analysed using gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to detect volatile and non-volatile compounds, the Microtox test to evaluate potential toxicity of the samples, and three mutagenicity tests -Tradescantia and Allium cepa micronucleus tests and the Comet assay on human leukocytes - to detect their genotoxic activity. GC/MS analysis did not detect phthalates or acetaldehyde in the water samples. The Microtox test found no toxic effects. Mutagenicity tests detected genotoxic properties of some samples in both PET and glass bottles. Statistical analyses showed a positive association between mineral content and mutagenicity (micronuclei in A. cepa and DNA damage in human leukocytes). No clear effect of treatment and PET bottle was found. These results suggest the absence of toxic compounds migrating from PET regardless of time and conditions of storage. In conclusion, bottle material and stove treatment were not associated with the genotoxic properties of the water; the genotoxic effects detected in bottled water may be related to the characteristics of the water (minerals and CO(2) content).

  16. Genotoxicity of metal oxide nanomaterials: review of recent data and discussion of possible mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbamaki, Nazanin; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Cassano, Antonio; Marchese Robinson, Richard L.; Benfenati, Emilio; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Cronin, Mark T. D.

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology has rapidly entered into human society, revolutionized many areas, including technology, medicine and cosmetics. This progress is due to the many valuable and unique properties that nanomaterials possess. In turn, these properties might become an issue of concern when considering potentially uncontrolled release to the environment. The rapid development of new nanomaterials thus raises questions about their impact on the environment and human health. This review focuses on the potential of nanomaterials to cause genotoxicity and summarizes recent genotoxicity studies on metal oxide/silica nanomaterials. Though the number of genotoxicity studies on metal oxide/silica nanomaterials is still limited, this endpoint has recently received more attention for nanomaterials, and the number of related publications has increased. An analysis of these peer reviewed publications over nearly two decades shows that the test most employed to evaluate the genotoxicity of these nanomaterials is the comet assay, followed by micronucleus, Ames and chromosome aberration tests. Based on the data studied, we concluded that in the majority of the publications analysed in this review, the metal oxide (or silica) nanoparticles of the same core chemical composition did not show different genotoxicity study calls (i.e. positive or negative) in the same test, although some results are inconsistent and need to be confirmed by additional experiments. Where the results are conflicting, it may be due to the following reasons: (1) variation in size of the nanoparticles; (2) variations in size distribution; (3) various purities of nanomaterials; (4) variation in surface areas for nanomaterials with the same average size; (5) differences in coatings; (6) differences in crystal structures of the same types of nanomaterials; (7) differences in size of aggregates in solution/media; (8) differences in assays; (9) different concentrations of nanomaterials in assay tests. Indeed, due to the

  17. Modulation of the genotoxicity of pesticides reacted with redox-modified smectite clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Kara C; Stucki, Joseph W; Warner, Richard E; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J

    2005-10-01

    Pesticides are toxic agents intentionally released into the environment; their use raises public health and environmental concerns. In recent years there has been much attention to the biotic degradation of pesticides. Abiotic mechanisms in the soil can contribute to pesticide degradation yet the toxicological impact of such degradation is unclear. This study combines for the first time an investigation into abiotic mechanisms of degradation coupled with toxicological endpoints in mammalian cells. The genotoxicity of three commonly used agricultural pesticides was assessed before and after exposure to redox-modified clay minerals. The objectives of the study were to determine the genotoxicity of 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D), dicamba, and oxamyl, using single cell gel electrophoresis with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, and to determine the effect of the iron oxidation state in clay minerals (ferruginous smectite SWa-1) on the genotoxic potency of the pesticides. 2,4-D alone or following reaction with redox-modified clays did not induce DNA damage in CHO cells. Oxamyl alone induced a concentration-dependent increase in genomic DNA damage; however, its genotoxicity declined after reaction with reduced clay minerals. Dicamba was not genotoxic when directly analyzed. When dicamba was reacted with reduced clay, a concentration-dependent increase in genomic DNA damage was observed. This is the first reported case of a pesticide being converted into a genotoxin after exposure to redox-modified smectites. These data introduce a new paradigm on the interaction between redox-modified clays and pesticide-related environmental genotoxicity.

  18. [Genotoxicity of drinking water during chlorine and chloramine disinfection and the influence of disinfection conditions using the umu-test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Zhang, Li-Ping; Liu, Wen-Jun; Nie, Xue-Biao; Zhang, Su-Xia; Zhang, Shun

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the effects of disinfectant dosage, reaction time and the ratio of Cl2 to N of disinfectant on genotoxicity of effluent of ozone-biological activated carbon (O3-BAC) during chlorine or chloramine disinfection were investigated using umu-test. It was found that, the genotoxicity of effluent of O3-BAC before disinfection ranged from 20-70 ng/L, and it increased after disinfection by chlorine or chloramines. With the same reaction time(24 h), genotoxicity after chlorination (40-95 ng/L) was higher than that after chloramination (20-40 ng/L) under same initial dosage. For chlorination, with initial dosage increasing from 0 mg/L to 10 mg/L, genotoxicity increased firstly, and got the maximum value at about 0.5-1 mg/L dosage, then decreased and got the minimum value at about 3-5 mg/L dosage, and finally increased again. For chloramination, genotoxicity didn't change that much. With the dosage of 3 mg/L and reaction time increasing from 0 h to 72 h, no matter for chlorine or chloramines disinfection, genotoxicity of effluent of O3-BAC both increased firstly, and got the maximum value at about 2 h, then decreased and got the minimum value at about 18 h, and finally increased again, and genotoxicity after chlorine disinfection (83-120 ng/L) was higher than that after chloramines disinfection (20-62 ng/L) under same reaction time. Further more, effects of the different ratios of Cl2 to N of disinfectant on genotoxicity of effluent of O3-BAC were also studied. Results of this study demonstrate that under test conditions, chloramine disinfection is safer than chlorine disinfection in the aspect of genotoxicity for drinking water, and the changes of genotoxicity are different from those of total HAAs.

  19. Genotoxic effects of boric acid and borax in zebrafish, Danio rerio using alkaline comet assay

    OpenAIRE

    Gülsoy, Nagihan; Yavaş, Cüneyd; Mutlu, Özal

    2015-01-01

    The present study is conducted to determine the potential mechanisms of Boron compounds, boric acid (BA) and borax (BX), on genotoxicity of zebrafish Danio rerio for 24, 48, 72 and 96-hours acute exposure (level:1, 4, 16, 64 mg/l BA and BX) in semi-static bioassay experiment. For that purpose, peripheral erythrocytes were drawn from caudal vein and Comet assay was applied to assess genotoxicity. Acute (96 hours) exposure and high concentrations of boric acid and borax increases % tail DNA and...

  20. Observations of the effect of atmospheric processes on the genotoxic potency of airborne particulate matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feilberg, Anders; Nielsen, Torben; Binderup, Mona-Lise

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the relationship between genotoxic potency and the occurrence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), including benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), and nitro-PAH in urban and semi-rural air masses has been investigated. The Salmonella/microsome assay has been used as a measure of genotoxic...... potency. We find that the ratios of BaP/ mutagenicity and PAH/mutagenicity are highly variable. The processes responsible for the variation are formation and degradation of mutagens and transport of polluted air masses from heavily industrialized regions, Air masses from Central Europe are shown...

  1. Genotoxicity of the boldine aporphine alkaloid in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, P R; Vargas, V M; Andrade, H H; Henriques, A T; Henriques, J A

    1991-06-01

    The aporphine alkaloid boldine, present in Peumus boldus (boldo-do-Chile) widely used all over the world, was tested for the presence of genotoxic, mutagenic and recombinogenic activities in microorganisms. This alkaloid did not show genotoxic activity with or without metabolic activation in the SOS chromotest and Ames tester strains TA100, TA98 and TA102. It was not able to induce point and frameshift mutations in haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. However, mitotic recombinational events such as crossing-over and gene conversion were weakly induced in diploid yeast cells by this alkaloid. Also, boldine was able to induce weakly cytoplasmic 'petite' mutation in haploid yeast cells.

  2. Genotoxicity of clays with potential use in biopolymers for food packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anoop Kumar; Mortensen, Alicja; Hadrup, Niels

    Genotoxicity of clays with potential use in biopolymers for food packaging Plastics produced from biopolymers are of commercial interest as they are manufactured from renewable resources such as agricultural crop wastes and have the potential to meet environmental and health requirements. Biopoly......®30B and Cloisite®Na+ by oral gavage and the comet assay will be performed on cells from different organs including the liver, colon and kidney. A fully automated comet assay scoring system (Imstar) will be used to evaluate the genotoxic potential....

  3. Genotoxicity assessment of fipronil (frontline plus®) in Canis familiaris

    OpenAIRE

    Liane Ziliotto; Stelio P. L. Luna; Daniel A. A.Filho; Resende,Ludimila O.; Aline G. Aun; Braz, Mariana G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Fipronil is a pesticide widely used for controlling fleas and ticks in domestic animals, and its short-term exposure can lead to serious effects on animals. However, the possible genotoxic effect of this compound has not been investigated in target animals. Based on the hypothesis that fipronil can induce genotoxicity, this study evaluated the effect of fipronil on DNA damage in peripheral blood cells. For that purpose, ten dogs of both sexes were used in the study. The product (6.7...

  4. Exposure of Vicia faba and Pisum sativum to copper-induced genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souguir, D; Ferjani, E; Ledoigt, G; Goupil, P

    2008-11-01

    The potential genotoxicity of Cu(2+) was investigated in Vicia faba and Pisum sativum seedlings in hydroponic culture conditions. Cu(2+) caused a dose-dependent increase in micronuclei frequencies in both plant models. Cytological analysis of root tips cells showed clastogenic and aneugenic effects of this heavy metal on V. faba root meristems. Cu(2+) induced chromosomal alterations at the lowest concentration used (2.5 mM) when incubated for 42 h, indicating the potent mutagenic effect of this ion. A spectrum of chromosomal abnormalities was observed in V. faba root meristems, illustrating the genotoxic events leading to micronuclei formation.

  5. Genotoxic activity in vivo of the naturally occurring glucoside, cycasin, in the Drosophila wing spot test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, K; Furukawa, H; Hirono, I

    1995-03-01

    Cycasin, methylazoxymethanol-beta-glucoside, is a naturally occurring carcinogenic compound. The genotoxicity of cycasin was assayed in the Drosophila wing spot test. Cycasin induced small single and large single spots on feeding at 10 mumol/g medium. The presence of these spots indicates that cycasin is genotoxic in Drosophila melanogaster. Microorganisms which showed beta-glucosidase activity for cleaving cycasin to toxic aglycon were isolated from gut flora of the Drosophila larvae. Consequently, the Drosophila wing spot test would be useful for mutagenicity screening of other naturally occurring glucosides.

  6. Genotoxic effects of the insecticide cypermethrin on the root meristem cells of sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inceer, Huseyin; Hayirlioglu-Ayaz, Sema; Ozcan, Melahat

    2009-11-01

    In this study, the genotoxic effects of the insecticide cypermethrin on the root meristem cells of sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L.) were investigated. The roots were treated with 10- 25- 50- and 100-ppm concentrations of cypermethrin for 6, 12 and 24 h. The mitotic index and mitotic abnormalities were determined in both control and test groups. The cypermethrin showed a marked mitodepressive action on mitosis. The types of mitotic abnormalities included disturbed metaphase, c-mitosis, stickiness, laggards and chromatid bridges. A pronounced toxic effect was observed at the 50-ppm concentration. Cypermethrin may have genotoxic effects on sunflowers.

  7. Role of Zucchini and Its Distinctive Components in the Modulation of Degenerative Processes: Genotoxicity, Anti-Genotoxicity, Cytotoxicity and Apoptotic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Valdivieso, Damián; Font, Rafael; Fernández-Bedmar, Zahira; Merinas-Amo, Tania; Gómez, Pedro; Alonso-Moraga, Ángeles; Del Río-Celestino, Mercedes

    2017-07-14

    Zucchini (Cucurbita pepo subsp. pepo) is a seasonal vegetable with high nutritional and medical values. Many useful properties of this fruit are attributed to bioactive compounds. Zucchini fruits ("Yellow" and "Light Green" varieties) and four distinctive components (lutein, β-carotene, zeaxanthin and dehydroascorbic acid) were selected. Firstly, the lutein, β-carotene, zeaxanthin and dehydroascorbic acid contents were determined in these fruits. Then, in order to evaluate the safety and suitability of their use, different assays were carried out: (i) genotoxicity and anti-genotoxicity tests to determine the safety and DNA-protection against hydrogen peroxide; (ii) cytotoxicity; and (iii) DNA fragmentation and Annexin V/PI (Propidium Iodide) assays to evaluate the pro-apoptotic effect. Results showed that: (i) all the substances were non-genotoxic; (ii) all the substances were anti-genotoxic except the highest concentration of lutein; (iii) "Yellow" zucchini epicarp and mesocarp exhibited the highest cytotoxic activity (IC50 > 0.1 mg/mL and 0.2 mg/mL, respectively); and (iv) "Light Green" zucchini skin induced internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, β-carotene being the possible molecule responsible for its pro-apoptotic activity. To sum up, zucchini fruit could play a positive role in human health and nutrition due to this fruit and its components were safe, able to inhibit significantly the H₂O₂-induced damage and exhibit anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities toward HL60 (human promyelocytic leukemia cells) tumor cells. The information generated from this research should be considered when selecting potential accessions for breeding program purposes.

  8. Current investigations into the genotoxicity of zinc oxide and silica nanoparticles in mammalian models in vitro and in vivo: carcinogenic/genotoxic potential, relevant mechanisms and biomarkers, artifacts, and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon JY

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jee Young Kwon,1,* Preeyaporn Koedrith,2,* Young Rok Seo1 1Department of Life Science, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Dongguk University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 2Faculty of Environment and Resource Studies, Mahidol University, Phuttamonthon District, NakhonPathom, Thailand *These authors contributed equally to this work and should be considered as co-first authors Abstract: Engineered nanoparticles (NPs are widely used in many sectors, such as food, medicine, military, and sport, but their unique characteristics may cause deleterious health effects. Close attention is being paid to metal NP genotoxicity; however, NP genotoxic/carcinogenic effects and the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In this review, we address some metal and metal oxide NPs of interest and current genotoxicity tests in vitro and in vivo. Metal NPs can cause DNA damage such as chromosomal aberrations, DNA strand breaks, oxidative DNA damage, and mutations. We also discuss several parameters that may affect genotoxic response, including physicochemical properties, widely used assays/end point tests, and experimental conditions. Although potential biomarkers of nanogenotoxicity or carcinogenicity are suggested, inconsistent findings in the literature render results inconclusive due to a variety of factors. Advantages and limitations related to different methods for investigating genotoxicity are described, and future directions and recommendations for better understanding genotoxic potential are addressed. Keywords: carcinogenicity, exposure assessment, genotoxicity, nanoparticles, risk evaluation

  9. Evaluation of occupational genotoxic risk in a Brazilian hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharbel Weidner Maluf

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Many therapeutic, diagnostic and prophylactic procedures used in hospitals are of potential genetic risk. An evaluation was made of genotoxic occupational risk in 42 workers from the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil, who had been occupationally exposed to lead (solder, ethylene oxide (sterilization area, antineoplastic drugs (nurses and pharmacists or ionizing radiation. They were compared with 42 unexposed individuals. There was an increase in the frequency of binucleated cytochalasin-blocked lymphocytes with micronuclei, though it was not significant (P = 0.058. The groups exposed to antineoplastic drugs and radiation had a significant increase in micronuclei frequency (P = 0.038 and P = 0.022, respectively. The high frequencies of dicentric bridges suggest the action of clastogenics in these two groups. These results suggest that the safety procedures adopted were very important to protect workers from exposure to mutagenic agents and should be improved in the radiological and chemotherapeutical areas.Vários procedimentos terapêuticos, diagnósticos e profiláticos usados em hospitais apresentam um risco genético. Para avaliar o risco genotóxico ocupacional, 42 trabalhadores do Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil, ocupacionalmente expostos a chumbo (uso de soldas, óxido de etileno (área de esterilização, drogas antineoplásicas (enfermeiros e farmacêuticos e radiação ionizante foram comparados com 42 indivíduos não expostos. A análise de linfócitos binucleados apresentou um aumento estatisticamente não significativo (P = 0.058 na freqüência de micronúcleos. Quando analisados separadamente, os grupos expostos a drogas antineoplásicas e radiação ionizante apresentaram um aumento estatisticamente significativo (P = 0.038 e P = 0.0217, respectivamente na freqüência de micronúcleos. As freqüências de pontes dicêntricas e anomalias de fuso sugerem a ação de clastogênicos nestes dois

  10. Genotoxic effect of ethacrynic acid and impact of antioxidants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, William M.; Hoffman, Jared D.; Loo, George, E-mail: g_loo@uncg.edu

    2015-07-01

    It is known that ethacrynic acid (EA) decreases the intracellular levels of glutathione. Whether the anticipated oxidative stress affects the structural integrity of DNA is unknown. Therefore, DNA damage was assessed in EA-treated HCT116 cells, and the impact of several antioxidants was also determined. EA caused both concentration-dependent and time-dependent DNA damage that eventually resulted in cell death. Unexpectedly, the DNA damage caused by EA was intensified by either ascorbic acid or trolox. In contrast, EA-induced DNA damage was reduced by N-acetylcysteine and by the iron chelator, deferoxamine. In elucidating the DNA damage, it was determined that EA increased the production of reactive oxygen species, which was inhibited by N-acetylcysteine and deferoxamine but not by ascorbic acid and trolox. Also, EA decreased glutathione levels, which were inhibited by N-acetylcysteine. But, ascorbic acid, trolox, and deferoxamine neither inhibited nor enhanced the capacity of EA to decrease glutathione. Interestingly, the glutathione synthesis inhibitor, buthionine sulfoxime, lowered glutathione to a similar degree as EA, but no noticeable DNA damage was found. Nevertheless, buthionine sulfoxime potentiated the glutathione-lowering effect of EA and intensified the DNA damage caused by EA. Additionally, in examining redox-sensitive stress gene expression, it was found that EA increased HO-1, GADD153, and p21mRNA expression, in association with increased nuclear localization of Nrf-2 and p53 proteins. In contrast to ascorbic acid, trolox, and deferoxamine, N-acetylcysteine suppressed the EA-induced upregulation of GADD153, although not of HO-1. Overall, it is concluded that EA has genotoxic properties that can be amplified by certain antioxidants. - Highlights: • Ethacrynic acid (EA) caused cellular DNA damage. • EA-induced DNA damage was potentiated by ascorbic acid or trolox. • EA increased ROS production, not inhibited by ascorbic acid or trolox. • EA

  11. Analysis of positions and substituents on genotoxicity of fluoroquinolones with quantitative structure-activity relationship and 3D Pharmacophore model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fengxian, Chen; Reti, Hai

    2017-02-01

    The genotoxicity values of 21 quinolones were studied to establish a quantitative structure-activity relationship model and 3D Pharmacophore model separately for screening essential positions and substituents that contribute to genotoxicity of fluoroquinolones (FQs). A full factor experimental design was performed to analyze the specific main effect and second-order interaction effect of different positions and substituents on genotoxicity, forming a reasonable modification scheme which was validated on typical FQ with genotoxicity and efficacy data. Four positions (1, 5, 7, 8) were screened finally to form the full factorial experimental design which contained 72 congeners in total, illustrating that: the dominant effect of 5 and 7-positions on genotoxicity of FQs is main effect; meanwhile the effect of 1 and 8-positions is a second-order interaction effect; two adjacent positions always have stronger second-order interaction effect and lower genotoxicity; the obtained modification scheme had been validated on typical FQ congeners with the modified compound has a lower genotoxicity, higher synthesis feasibilities and efficacy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of genotoxicity using automated detection of γH2AX in metabolically competent HepaRG cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesnot, Nicolas; Rondel, Karine; Audebert, Marc; Martinais, Sophie; Glaise, Denise; Morel, Fabrice; Loyer, Pascal; Robin, Marie-Anne

    2016-01-01

    The in situ detection of γH2AX was recently reported to be a promising biomarker of genotoxicity. In addition, the human HepaRG hepatoma cells appear to be relevant for investigating hepatic genotoxicity since they express most of drug metabolizing enzymes and a wild type p53. The aim of this study was to determine whether the automated in situ detection of γH2AX positive HepaRG cells could be relevant for evaluation of genotoxicity after single or long-term repeated in vitro exposure compared to micronucleus assay. Metabolically competent HepaRG cells were treated daily with environmental contaminants and genotoxicity was evaluated after 1, 7 and 14 days. Using these cells, we confirmed the genotoxicity of aflatoxin B1 and benzo(a)pyrene and demonstrated that dimethylbenzanthracene, fipronil and endosulfan previously found genotoxic with comet or micronucleus assays also induced γH2AX phosphorylation. Furthermore, we showed that fluoranthene and bisphenol A induced γH2AX while no effect had been previously reported in HepG2 cells. In addition, induction of γH2AX was observed with some compounds only after 7 days, highlighting the importance of studying long-term effects of low doses of contaminants. Together, our data demonstrate that automated γH2AX detection in metabolically competent HepaRG cells is a suitable high-through put genotoxicity screening assay.

  13. Change in genotoxicity of wastewater during chlorine dioxide and chlorine disinfections and the influence of ammonia nitrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lisha; HU Hongying; WANG Chao; Koichi Fujie

    2007-01-01

    The effects of chlorine dioxide and chlorine disinfections on the genotoxicity of different biologically treated sewage wastewater samples were studied by umu-test.The experiment results showed that when chlorine dioxide dosage was increased from 0 to 30 mg/L,the genotoxicity of wastewater first decreased rapidly and then tended to be stable,while when the chlorine dosage was increased from 0 to 30 mg/L,the genotoxicity of wastewater changed diversely for different samples.It was then found that ammonia nitrogen did not affect the change of genotoxicity during chlorine dioxide disinfection of wastewater,while it greatly affected the change of genotoxicity during chlorine disinfection of wastewater.When the concentration of ammonia nitrogen was low(<10-20mg/L),the genotoxicity of wastewater decreased after chlorine disinfection,and when the concentration of ammonia nitrogen was high(>10-20 mg/L),the genotoxicity of wastewater increased after chlorine disinfection.

  14. Genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity assessment of shiitake (Lentinula edodes (Berkeley Pegler using the Comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CK Miyaji

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The mushroom shiitake (Lentinula edodes (Berkeley Pegler is been widely consumed in many countries, including Brazil, because of its pleasant flavor and reports of its therapeutic properties, although there is little available information on the genotoxicity and/or antigenotoxicity of this mushroom. We used the Comet assay and HEp-2 cells to evaluate the in vitro genotoxic and antigenotoxic activity of aqueous extracts of shiitake prepared in three different concentrations (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mg/mL and three different temperatures (4, 22 and 60 °C, using methyl methanesulfonate (MMS as a positive control and untreated cells as a negative control. Two concentrations (1.0 and 1.5 mg/mL of extract prepared at 4 °C and all of the concentrations prepared at 22 ± 2 and 60 °C showed moderate genotoxic activity. To test the protective effect of the three concentrations of the extracts against the genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate, three protocols were used: pre-treatment, simultaneous-treatment and post-treatment. Treatments were repeated for all combinations of preparation temperature and concentration. Two extracts (22 ± 2 °C 1.0 mg/mL (simultaneous-treatment and 4 °C 0.5 mg/mL (post-treatment showed antigenotoxic activity.

  15. Genotoxic exposure and biological effects in the rubber manufacturing industry. Relevance of the dermal route

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, R.

    2001-01-01

    This thesis describes an industry wide survey on genotoxic exposure and biological effects in the rubber manifacturing industry. Chapters are devoted to long-term trends in inhalable and dermal contamination levels, identification of dermal exposure pathways and the assessment of mutagenic

  16. Evaluation of the Bronchorelaxant, Genotoxic, and Antigenotoxic Effects of Cassia alata L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ouédraogo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous-ethanolic extract of Cassia alata (AECal and its derived fractions obtained through liquid-liquid fractionation were evaluated for their bronchorelaxant, genotoxic, and antigenotoxic effects. Contractile activity of rats’ tracheas in the presence of tested materials, as well as its modifications with different inhibitors and blockers, was isometrically recorded. The antigenotoxic potential of AECal was evaluated on cyclophosphamide- (CP- induced genotoxicity in the rat. Animals were pretreated with the extract, then liver comet assay was performed. AECal and its chloroformic fractions (CF-AECal relaxed the contraction induced by Ach, but both were significantly less potent in inhibiting contraction induced by KCl (30 mM; 80 mM. Propranolol, indomethacin, L-NAME, methylene blue, and glibenclamide did not modify the relaxant effect of CF-AECal. TEA altered the response of trachea to CF-AECal. CF-AECal caused a rightward shift without affecting the Emax in cumulative concentration-response curves of Ach only at low concentrations. In animals pretreated with the extract, the percentage of CP-induced DNA damage decreased. Our results suggest that (1 muscarinic receptors contribute at least in part to the relaxant effects of CF-AECal; (2 CF-AECal interferes with membrane polarization; and (3 AECal is not genotoxic in vivo and contains chemopreventive phytoconstituents offering protection against CP-induced genotoxicity.

  17. Levels of Genotoxic and Carcinogenic Compounds in Plant food Supplements and Associated Risk Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den S.J.P.L.; Restani, P.; Boersma, M.G.; Delmulle, L.; Rietjens, I.

    2011-01-01

    The present study describes the selection, analysis and risk assessment of genotoxic and carcinogenic compounds of botanicals and botanical preparations which can be found in plant food supplements (PFS). First an inventory was made of botanical compounds that are of possible concern for human healt

  18. In Vitro and In Vivo Genotoxicity Assessment of Aristolochia manshuriensis Kom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youn-Hwan Hwang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arisolochiae species plants containing aristolochic acids I and II (AA I and AA II are well known to cause aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN. Recently, there are various approaches to use AAs-containing herbs after the removal of their toxic factors. However, there is little information about genotoxicity of Arisolochiae manshuriensis Kom. (AMK per se. To obtain safety information for AMK, its genotoxicity was evaluated in accordance with OECD guideline. To evaluate genotoxicity of AMK, we tested bacterial reverse mutation assay, chromosomal aberration test, and micronucleus test. Here, we also determined the amounts of AA I and II in AMK (2.85 ± 0.08 and 0.50 ± 0.02 mg/g extract, resp.. In bacterial reverse mutation assay, AMK dose-dependently increased revertant colony numbers in TA98, TA100 and TA1537 regardless of metabolic activation. AMK increased the incidence of chromosomal aberration in Chinese hamster ovary-K1 cells, but there was no statistically significant difference. The incidences of micronucleus in bone marrow erythrocyte were significantly increased in mice after oral administration of AMK (5000 mg/kg, comparing with those of vehicle group (P<0.05. The results of three standard tests suggest that the genotoxicity of AMK is directly related to the AAs contents in AMK.

  19. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of abamectin, chlorfenapyr, and imidacloprid on CHOK1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sarar, Ali S; Abobakr, Yasser; Bayoumi, Alaa E; Hussein, Hamdy I

    2015-11-01

    The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of abamectin, chlorfenapyr, and imidacloprid have been evaluated on the Chinese hamster ovary (CHOK1) cells. Neutral red incorporation (NRI), total cellular protein content (TCP), and methyl tetrazolium (MTT) assays were followed to estimate the mid-point cytotoxicity values, NRI50, TCP50, and MTT50, respectively. The effects of the sublethal concentration (NRI25) on glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GRD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and total glutathione content have been evaluated in the presence and absence of reduced glutathione (GSH), vitamin C, and vitamin E. The genotoxicity was evaluated using chromosomal aberrations (CA), micronucleus (MN) formation, and DNA fragmentation techniques in the presence and absence of the metabolic activation system, S9 mix. Abamectin was the most cytotoxic pesticide followed by chlorfenapyr, while imidacloprid was the least cytotoxic one. The glutathione redox cycle components were altered by the tested pesticides in the absence and presence of the tested antioxidants. The results of genotoxicity indicate that abamectin, chlorfenapyr, and imidacloprid have potential genotoxic effects on CHOK1 cells under the experimental conditions.

  20. The Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of Particulate and Soluble Cobalt in Human Urothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, Rachel M; The, Therry; Xie, Hong; Liou, Louis; Adam, Rosalyn M; Wise, John Pierce

    2017-03-21

    Cobalt use is increasing particularly due to its use as one of the primary metals in cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CoCrMo) metal-on-metal prosthetics. CoCrMo is a high-strength, wear-resistant alloy with reduced risk for prosthetic loosening and device fracture. More than 500,000 people receive hip implants each year in the USA which puts them at potential risk for exposure to metal ions and particles released by the prosthetic implants. Data show cobalt ions released from prosthetics reach the bloodstream and accumulate in the bladder. As patients with failed hip implants show increased urinary and blood cobalt levels, no studies have considered the effects of cobalt on human urothelial cells. Accordingly, we investigated the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of particulate and soluble cobalt in urothelial cells. Exposure to both particulate and soluble cobalt resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular cobalt ions. Based on intracellular cobalt ion levels, we found, when compared to particulate cobalt, soluble cobalt was more cytotoxic, but induced similar levels of genotoxicity. Interestingly, at similar intracellular cobalt ion concentrations, soluble cobalt induced cell cycle arrest indicated by a lack of metaphases not observed after particulate cobalt treatment. These data indicate that cobalt compounds are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human urothelial cells and solubility may play a key role in cobalt-induced toxicity.

  1. Assessment of the cytotoxic, genotoxic, and antigenotoxic activities of Celtis iguanaea (Jacq. in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FLAVIO F.V. BORGES

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ethnobotanical surveys of Cerrado native plants show that leaves of Celtis iguanaea (Jacq. Sargent (Cannabaceae, popularly known in Brazil as “esporão de galo”, are used in folk medicine for body pain, asthma, cramps, poor digestion, urinary infection, kidney dysfunctions, as well as a stimulant and diuretic. This work aimed at evaluating possible C. iguanaea aqueous leaf extract (CALE cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and antigenotoxicity using the mouse bone marrow micronucleous test. To assess CALE genotoxicity, Swiss mice were orally treated with three different extract concentrations (100, 300, and 500 mgkg−1. To evaluate its antigenotoxicity, the same doses were used simultaneously with a single i.p. dose of mitomycin C (MMC, 4mg.kg−1. The frequencies of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCE were evaluated 24 h and 48 h after administration except for the negative control (24 h. Genotoxicity was evaluated using the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCE, whereas cytotoxicity was assessed by the polychromatic and normochromatic erythrocytes ratio (PCE/NCE. The results showed that CALE did not exhibit a significant reduction in the PCE/NCE ratio, neither a considerable increase in the frequency of MNPCE. Nonetheless, CALE reduced bone marrow toxicity (increased PCE/NCE ratio and decreased the micronuclei frequency induced by MMC. We can conclude that CALE presented no cytotoxic and genotoxic effects, but showed antigenotoxic and anticytotoxic actions under the experimental conditions applied in this study.

  2. Assessing the genotoxicity of urban air pollutants using two in situ plant bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarini, M.; Fatigoni, C.; Dominici, L.; Maestri, S. [Department of Medical-Surgical Specialties and Public Health, University of Perugia, I-06126 (Italy); Ederli, L.; Pasqualini, S. [Department of Applied Biology, University of Perugia, I-06121 (Italy); Monarca, S. [Department of Medical-Surgical Specialties and Public Health, University of Perugia, I-06126 (Italy); Moretti, M., E-mail: massimo.moretti@unipg.i [Department of Medical-Surgical Specialties and Public Health, University of Perugia, I-06126 (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    Genotoxicity of urban air has been analysed almost exclusively in airborne particulates. We monitored the genotoxic effects of airborne pollutants in the urban air of Perugia (Central Italy). Two plant bioindicators with different genetic endpoints were used: micronuclei in meiotic pollen mother cells using Tradescantia-micronucleus bioassay (Trad-MCN) and DNA damage in nuclei of Nicotiana tabacum leaves using comet assay (Nicotiana-comet). Buds of Tradescantia clone no. 4430 and young N. tabacum cv. Xanthi plants were exposed for 24 h at three sites with different pollution levels. One control site (indoor control) was also used. The two bioassays showed different sensitivities toward urban pollutants: Trad-MCN assay was the most sensitive, but DNA damage in N. tabacum showed a better correlation with the pollutant concentrations. In situ biomonitoring of airborne genotoxins using higher plants combined with chemical analysis is thus recommended for characterizing genotoxicity of urban air. - Plant bioassays used to explore in situ the correlation between air pollution and genotoxicity.

  3. Unravelling mechanisms of dietary flavonoid-mediated health effects: effects on lipid metabolism and genotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek-van den Hil, E.F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Consumption of foods containing flavonoids is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), possibly by lipid-lowering effects. On the other hand, for one of these flavonoids, quercetin, also genotoxicity was shown especially in in vitro bioassays.

  4. Lab-on-a-chip-based high-throughput screening of the genotoxicity of engineered nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchio, Giuseppe; Fenech, Michael; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2014-07-09

    The continuous increasing of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in our environment, their combinatorial diversity, and the associated genotoxic risks, highlight the urgent need to better define the possible toxicological effects of ENMs. In this context, we present a new high-throughput screening (HTS) platform based on the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay, lab-on-chip cell sorting, and automated image analysis. This HTS platform has been successfully applied to the evaluation of the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and silica nanoparticles (SiO2NPs). In particular, our results demonstrate the high cyto- and genotoxicity induced by AgNPs and the biocompatibility of SiO2NPs, in primary human lymphocytes. Moreover, our data reveal that the toxic effects are also dependent on size, surface coating, and surface charge. Most importantly, our HTS platform shows that AgNP-induced genotoxicity is lymphocyte sub-type dependent and is particularly pronounced in CD2+ and CD4+ cells.

  5. GENOTOXICITY OF TEN CIGARETTE SMOKE CONDENSATES IN FOUR TEST SYSTEMS: COMPARISONS BETWEEN ASSAYS AND CONDENSATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    What is the study? This the first assessment of a set of cigarette smoke condensates from a range of cigarette types in a variety (4) of short-term genotoxicity assays. Why was it done? No such comparative study of cigarette smoke condensates has been reported. H...

  6. Gamma radiation at a human relevant low dose rate is genotoxic in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graupner, Anne; Eide, Dag M.; Instanes, Christine; Andersen, Jill M.; Brede, Dag A.; Dertinger, Stephen D.; Lind, Ole C.; Brandt-Kjelsen, Anicke; Bjerke, Hans; Salbu, Brit; Oughton, Deborah; Brunborg, Gunnar; Olsen, Ann K.

    2016-09-01

    Even today, 70 years after Hiroshima and accidents like in Chernobyl and Fukushima, we still have limited knowledge about the health effects of low dose rate (LDR) radiation. Despite their human relevance after occupational and accidental exposure, only few animal studies on the genotoxic effects of chronic LDR radiation have been performed. Selenium (Se) is involved in oxidative stress defence, protecting DNA and other biomolecules from reactive oxygen species (ROS). It is hypothesised that Se deficiency, as it occurs in several parts of the world, may aggravate harmful effects of ROS-inducing stressors such as ionising radiation. We performed a study in the newly established LDR-facility Figaro on the combined effects of Se deprivation and LDR γ exposure in DNA repair knockout mice (Ogg1-/-) and control animals (Ogg1+/-). Genotoxic effects were seen after continuous radiation (1.4 mGy/h) for 45 days. Chromosomal damage (micronucleus), phenotypic mutations (Pig-a gene mutation of RBCCD24-) and DNA lesions (single strand breaks/alkali labile sites) were significantly increased in blood cells of irradiated animals, covering three types of genotoxic activity. This study demonstrates that chronic LDR γ radiation is genotoxic in an exposure scenario realistic for humans, supporting the hypothesis that even LDR γ radiation may induce cancer.

  7. Genotoxicity evaluation of wood-derived and vegetable oil-derived stanol esters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turnbull, D.; Frankos, V.H.; Delft, J.H.M. van; Vogel, N. de

    1999-01-01

    Plant stanol esters from wood and vegetable oil sources were tested for genotoxicity in bacterial (Salmonella typhimurium) and mammalian cell (L5178Y) gene mutation assays and in a mammalian cell chromosome aberration assay (CHO cells). The two stanol ester formulations were tested separately at dos

  8. Genotoxicity--threshold or not? Introduction of cases of industrial chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolt, Hermann M

    2003-04-11

    Many industrially and environmentally important industrial carcinogens display effects that lead them to be viewed and regulated as 'genotoxic compounds'. Some of these chemicals cause experimental tumours only at high or toxic doses. The current view is that non-threshold principles should be applied for risk assessments and to define permissible exposure values. The toxicological impact of underlying mechanisms is frequently not well investigated and understood. The classification of carcinogens is now in a state of discussion. In Germany, the 'MAK-Commission' has issued new recommendations to distinguish between 5 groups of proven and suspected carcinogens. This proposal includes a category of 'substances with carcinogenic potential for which genotoxicity plays no or at most a minor role'. Another category comprises 'substances with carcinogenic and genotoxic potential, the potency of which is considered so low that, provided that the MAK-value is observed, no significant contribution to human cancer risk is to be expected'. There is also a number of apparently genotoxic carcinogens where the existence of 'practical thresholds' is at least debated. One outstanding example is vinyl acetate, which must be viewed against the background of discussions on other industrial high-volume chemicals like formaldehyde, acrylonitrile, acrylamide and trichloroethylene. Main arguments in favour or against thresholds of carcinogenicity of these individual compounds are summarised. Current instruments of regulation should be adjusted to allow adequate consideration of carcinogenic effects of chemicals that are practically relevant at high doses only. Also, research into this field is encouraged.

  9. Genotoxicity evaluation of dental restoration nanocomposite using comet assay and chromosome aberration test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, Marahaini; Thirumulu Ponnuraj, Kannan; Mohamad, Dasmawati; Rahman, Ismail Ab

    2013-01-01

    Nanocomposite is used as a dental filling to restore the affected tooth, especially in dental caries. The dental nanocomposite (KelFil) for tooth restoration used in this study was produced by the School of Dental Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia and is incorporated with monodispersed, spherical nanosilica fillers. The aim of the study was to determine the genotoxic effect of KelFil using in vitro genotoxicity tests. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of KelFil was evaluated using MTT assay, comet assay and chromosome aberration tests with or without the addition of a metabolic activation system (S9 mix), using the human lung fibroblast cell line (MRC-5). Concurrent negative and positive controls were included. In the comet assay, no comet formation was found in the KelFil groups. There was a significant difference in tail moment between KelFil groups and positive control (p < 0.05). Similarly, no significant aberrations in chromosomes were noticed in KelFil groups. The mitotic indices of treatment groups and negative control were significantly different from positive controls. Hence, it can be concluded that the locally produced dental restoration nanocomposite (KelFil) is non-genotoxic under the present test conditions.

  10. What is Comet assay not telling us: AFLP reveals wider aspects of genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šrut, Maja; Štambuk, Anamaria; Klobučar, Göran I V

    2013-06-01

    DNA damage detected by genotoxicity biomarkers such as the Comet assay is not always a reliable indicator of the consequences that genotoxic agents can have on the genome integrity of the exposed organisms. Therefore, to reveal the existence of more permanent alterations of DNA structure after genotoxic stress, the RTG-2 rainbow trout cell line was exposed for 3 days to benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P, 0.1-10 μM) and ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS, 0.1-1mM) followed by 3 days of recovery period. Primary DNA damage was evaluated by the Comet assay and DNA alterations were assessed using AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism). Qualitative and quantitative modifications in AFLP profiles were analyzed in order to detect genetic alterations arising from mutation events and/or DNA damage. Significant induction in DNA damage measured by the Comet assay was noticed after B[a]P treatment at all concentrations but values returned to the control level after recovery. Exposure to EMS induced significant DNA damage only at the highest concentration and damage persisted after the recovery period. AFLP profiles detected DNA alterations even when Comet assay indicated complete DNA repair, revealing more persistent damage. Since such DNA damage can impair its structure and function, Comet assay results should preferably be supplemented with other methods in order to predict the consequences of genotoxic insult more accurately.

  11. Aporrectodea caliginosa, a suitable earthworm species for field based genotoxicity assessment?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klobucar, Goeran I.V., E-mail: gklobuca@zg.biol.pmf.hr [Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Rooseveltov trg 6, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Stambuk, Anamaria; Srut, Maja [Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Rooseveltov trg 6, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Husnjak, Ivana [Ministry of Environmental Protection, Physical Planning and Construction, Ulica Republike Austrije 14, Zagreb (Croatia); Merkas, Martina [Croatian Institute for Brain Research, School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, Salata 12, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Traven, Luka [Department of Environmental Medicine, Medical Faculty, University of Rijeka, Brace Branchetta 20a, 51000 Rijeka (Croatia); Teaching Institute of Public Health of the Primorsko-goranska County, Kresimirova 52a, 51000 Rijeka (Croatia); Cvetkovic, Zelimira [Department of Ecology, Institute of Public Health, Mirogojska c. 16, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2011-04-15

    There is a growing interest for the application of biomakers to field-collected earthworms. Therefore we have evaluated the usability of native populations of endogeic, widely distributed earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa in the assessment of soil genotoxicity using the Comet assay. Validation of the Comet assay on earthworm coelomocytes has been established using commercially available Eisenia fetida exposed to copper, cadmium, and pentachlorophenol, along with A. caliginosa exposed to copper in a filter paper contact test. Neutral red retention time (NRRT) assay was conducted on copper exposed and field-collected earthworms. Significant DNA and lysosomal damage was measured using Comet and NRRT assays in native populations of A. caliginosa sampled from the polluted soils in the urban area in comparison to the earthworms from the reference site. The results of this study confirm the employment of A. caliginosa as a suitable species for the in situ soil toxicity and genotoxicity field surveys. - Research highlights: > Native A. caliginosa has shown significant biological effect measured by the Comet and NRRT assays. > The Comet assay on A. caliginosa and E. fetida has shown to be of similar sensitivity as the NRRT assay. > A. caliginosa is a suitable species for the in situ soil toxicity and genotoxicity field surveys. - Native populations of endogeic earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa can be successfully applied in the genotoxicity field surveys using Comet assay.

  12. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of two hair dyes used in the formulation of black color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafurt-Cardona, Yaliana; Suares-Rocha, Paula; Fernandes, Thaís Cristina Casimiro; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2015-12-01

    According to the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), some hair dyes are considered mutagenic and carcinogenic in in vitro assays and exposed human populations. Epidemiological studies indicate that hairdressers occupationally exposed to hair dyes have a higher risk of developing bladder cancer. In Brazil, 26% of the adults use hair dye. In this study, we investigated the toxic effects of two hair dyes, Basic Red 51 (BR51) and Basic Brown 17 (BB17), which are temporary dyes of the azo group (R-N=N-R'), used in the composition of the black hair dye. To this end, MTT and trypan blue assays (cytotoxicity), comet and micronucleus assay (genotoxicity) were applied, with HepG2 cells. For cytotoxic assessment, dyes were tested in serial dilutions, being the highest concentrations those used in the commercial formula for hair dyes. For genotoxic assessment concentrations were selected according to cell viability. Results showed that both dyes induced significant cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in the cells, in concentrations much lower than those used in the commercial formula. Genotoxic effects could be related to the azo structure present in the composition of the dyes, which is known as mutagenic and carcinogenic. These results point to the hazard of the hair dye exposure to human health.

  13. Carbon black nanoparticle instillation induces sustained inflammation and genotoxicity in mouse lung and liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourdon Julie A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Widespread occupational exposure to carbon black nanoparticles (CBNPs raises concerns over their safety. CBNPs are genotoxic in vitro but less is known about their genotoxicity in various organs in vivo. Methods We investigated inflammatory and acute phase responses, DNA strand breaks (SB and oxidatively damaged DNA in C57BL/6 mice 1, 3 and 28 days after a single instillation of 0.018, 0.054 or 0.162 mg Printex 90 CBNPs, alongside sham controls. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid was analyzed for cellular composition. SB in BAL cells, whole lung and liver were assessed using the alkaline comet assay. Formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG sensitive sites were assessed as an indicator of oxidatively damaged DNA. Pulmonary and hepatic acute phase response was evaluated by Saa3 mRNA real-time quantitative PCR. Results Inflammation was strongest 1 and 3 days post-exposure, and remained elevated for the two highest doses (i.e., 0.054 and 0.162 mg 28 days post-exposure (P Saa3 mRNA in lung tissue on day 1 (all doses, 3 (all doses and 28 (0.054 and 0.162 mg, but not in liver. Conclusions Deposition of CBNPs in lung induces inflammatory and genotoxic effects in mouse lung that persist considerably after the initial exposure. Our results demonstrate that CBNPs may cause genotoxicity both in the primary exposed tissue, lung and BAL cells, and in a secondary tissue, the liver.

  14. Comprehensive DNA Adduct Analysis Reveals Pulmonary Inflammatory Response Contributes to Genotoxic Action of Magnetite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kousuke Ishino

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanosized-magnetite (MGT is widely utilized in medicinal and industrial fields; however, its toxicological properties are not well documented. In our previous report, MGT showed genotoxicity in both in vitro and in vivo assay systems, and it was suggested that inflammatory responses exist behind the genotoxicity. To further clarify mechanisms underlying the genotoxicity, a comprehensive DNA adduct (DNA adductome analysis was conducted using DNA samples derived from the lungs of mice exposed to MGT. In total, 30 and 42 types of DNA adducts were detected in the vehicle control and MGT-treated groups, respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA against a subset of DNA adducts was applied and several adducts, which are deduced to be formed by inflammation or oxidative stress, as the case of etheno-deoxycytidine (εdC, revealed higher contributions to MGT exposure. By quantitative-LC-MS/MS analysis, εdC levels were significantly higher in MGT-treated mice than those of the vehicle control. Taken together with our previous data, it is suggested that inflammatory responses might be involved in the genotoxicity induced by MGT in the lungs of mice.

  15. Genotoxicity of copper oxide nanoparticles with different surface chemistry on rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Jiang, Pengfei; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The surface chemistry of nanoparticles (NPs) is one of the critical factors determining their cellular responses. In this study, the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of copper oxide (CuO) NPs with a similar size but different surface chemistry to rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were...

  16. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of intravitreal adalimumab administration in rabbit retinal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álcio Coutinho de Paula

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of intravitreal adalimumab treatment in an animal experimental model using cytological and molecular techniques. Methods: Eighteen rabbits were randomly assigned to three groups: control, adalimumab treatment, and placebo. Cytotoxicity on retinal cells was evaluated using flow cytometry assays to determine the level of apoptosis and necrosis. Genotoxicity was evaluated by comet assays to assess DNA damage, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR was used to evaluate expression of apoptosis-inducing caspases (8 and 3. Results: No cytotoxicity or genotoxicity was observed in any of the two treatment groups (adalimumab and placebo following intravitreal administration compared with the control group. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that more than 90% of the cells were viable, and only a low proportion of retinal cells presented apoptotic (~10% or necrotic (<1% activity across all groups. Molecular damage was also low with a maximum of 6.4% DNA degradation observed in the comet assays. In addition, no increase in gene expression of apoptosis-inducing caspases was observed on retinal cells by qPCR in both the adalimumab and placebo groups compared with the control group. Conclusion: The use of adalimumab resulted in no detectable cytotoxicity or genotoxicity on retinal cells for up to 60 days upon administration. These results therefore indicate that adalimumab may be a safe option for intravitreal application to treat ocular inflammatory diseases in which TNF-α is involved.

  17. Cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of food-borne nitriles in a liver in vitro model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupke, Franziska; Herz, Corinna; Hanschen, Franziska S.; Platz, Stefanie; Odongo, Grace A.; Helmig, Simone; Bartolomé Rodríguez, María M.; Schreiner, Monika; Rohn, Sascha; Lamy, Evelyn

    2016-01-01

    Isothiocyanates are the most intensively studied breakdown products of glucosinolates from Brassica plants and well recognized for their pleiotropic effects against cancer but also for their genotoxic potential. However, knowledge about the bioactivity of glucosinolate-borne nitriles in foods is very poor. As determined by GC-MS, broccoli glucosinolates mainly degrade to nitriles as breakdown products. The cytotoxicity of nitriles in human HepG2 cells and primary murine hepatocytes was marginal as compared to isothiocyanates. Toxicity of nitriles was not enhanced in CYP2E1-overexpressing HepG2 cells. In contrast, the genotoxic potential of nitriles was found to be comparable to isothiocyanates. DNA damage was persistent over a certain time period and CYP2E1-overexpression further increased the genotoxic potential of the nitriles. Based on actual in vitro data, no indications are given that food-borne nitriles could be relevant for cancer prevention, but could pose a certain genotoxic risk under conditions relevant for food consumption. PMID:27883018

  18. Cytostatic and genotoxic effect of temephos in human lymphocytes and HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez-Trinidad, A B; Herrera-Moreno, J F; Vázquez-Estrada, G; Verdín-Betancourt, F A; Sordo, M; Ostrosky-Wegman, P; Bernal-Hernández, Y Y; Medina-Díaz, I M; Barrón-Vivanco, B S; Robledo-Marenco, M L; Salazar, A M; Rojas-García, A E

    2015-06-01

    Temephos is an organophosphorus pesticide that is used in control campaigns against Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, which transmit dengue. In spite of the widespread use of temephos, few studies have examined its genotoxic potential. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic, cytostatic and genotoxic effects of temephos in human lymphocytes and hepatoma cells (HepG2). The cytotoxicity was evaluated with simultaneous staining (FDA/EtBr). The cytostatic and genotoxic effects were evaluated using comet assays and the micronucleus technique. We found that temephos was not cytotoxic in either lymphocytes or HepG2 cells. Regarding the cytostatic effect in human lymphocytes, temephos (10 μM) caused a significant decrease in the percentage of binucleated cells and in the nuclear division index as well as an increase in the apoptotic cell frequency, which was not the case for HepG2 cells. The comet assay showed that temephos increased the DNA damage levels in human lymphocytes, but it did not increase the MN frequency. In contrast, in HepG2 cells, temephos increased the tail length, tail moment and MN frequency in HepG2 cells compared to control cells. In conclusion, temephos causes stable DNA damage in HepG2 cells but not in human lymphocytes. These findings suggest the importance of temephos biotransformation in its genotoxic effect.

  19. Comparative Metabolism, Cytotoxicity, and Genotoxicity of Chemical Carcinogens in Primary Cultures of Hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-01

    metabolism was assessed 30-36 hours after the addition of TCDD. 244 A suspected hepatocarcinogen, senecionine, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid isolated from...and J. L. Byard (1981), Metabolism, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of the pyrrolizidine alkaloid sene- cionine in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes

  20. Detection of genotoxic effects of drinking water disinfection by-products using Vicia faba bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yu; Tan, Li; Zhang, Shao-Hui; Zuo, Yu-Ting; Han, Xue; Liu, Na; Lu, Wen-Qing; Liu, Ai-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Plant-based bioassays have gained wide use among the toxicological and/or ecotoxicological assessment procedures because of their simplicity, sensitivity, low cost, and reliability. The present study describes the use of Vicia faba (V. faba) micronucleus (MN) test and V. faba comet assay in the evaluation of the genotoxic potential of disinfection by-products (DBPs) commonly found in chlorine-disinfected drinking water. Five haloacetic acids and three halogenated acetonitriles were chosen as representatives of DBPs in this study because they are of potentially great public health risk. Results of the MN test indicated that monochloroacetic acid (MCA), monobromoacetic acid (MBA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), dibromoacetic acid (DBA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and trichloroacetonitrile (TCAN) caused a statistically significant increase in MN frequency in V. faba root tip cells. However, no genotoxic response was observed for dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) and dibromoacetonitrile (DBAN). Results of the comet assay showed that all tested DBPs induced a statistically significant increase in genomic DNA damage to V. faba root tip cells. On considering the capacity to detect genomic damage of a different nature, we suggest that a combination of V. faba MN test and V. faba comet assay is a useful tool for the detection of genotoxic effects of DBPs. It is worthy of assessing the feasibility of using V. faba comet assay combined with V. faba MN test to screen for the genotoxic activity of chlorinated drinking water in future work.

  1. Snakehead-fish cell line, SSN-1 (Ophicephalus striatus) as a model for cadmium genotoxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramphongphan, A; Laovitthayanggoon, S; Himakoun, L

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential of snakehead-fish cell line (SSN-1 cells) derived from a striped snakehead (Ophicephalus striatus) as a model in the genotoxic assessment of cadmium (Cd). The first approach employed was to determine the contaminated Cd levels in commercial snakehead fish by the Graphite Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. In the second approach, the sensitivity of SSN-1 cells to cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Cd was assessed by Trypan blue and micronucleus assays following 24, 48, and 72 h of incubation period. Exposure of SSN-1 cells to four increasing Cd concentrations ranging from 0.005 to 5 ppm for 72 h did not affect their survival as compared to the control cells. The Cd uptake by SSN-1 cells showed a concentration-dependent increase in intracellular Cd levels. Three non-cytotoxic Cd concentrations (0.05, 0.5, and 5 ppm) showed a concentration-dependent genotoxic effect, compared to relevant control cells. Both micronucleus frequencies and cadmium uptake levels by SSN-1 cells depended on exposure concentrations. These results showed that the SSN-1 cells are suitable for use as a model for in vitro Cd genotoxicity testing.

  2. Potentially harmful elements in house dust from Estarreja, Portugal: characterization and genotoxicity of the bioaccessible fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumejeaud, Sophie; Reis, Amelia Paula; Tassistro, Virginie; Patinha, Carla; Noack, Yves; Orsière, Thierry

    2016-10-22

    Due to their behavioral characteristics, young children are vulnerable to the ingestion of indoor dust, often contaminated with chemicals that are potentially harmful. Exposure to potentially harmful elements (PHEs) is currently exacerbated by their widespread use in several industrial, agricultural, domestic and technological applications. PHEs cause adverse health effects on immune and nervous systems and can lead to cancer development via genotoxic mechanisms. The present study is an integrated approach that aims at assessing the genotoxicity of bioaccessible PHEs following ingestion of contaminated house dust. A multidisciplinary methodology associating chemical characterization of five house dust samples, extraction of the bioaccessible PHEs in gastric extracts by the unified BARGE method, determination of the bioaccessible fraction and in vitro genotoxicity of gastric extracts in adenocarcinoma gastric human (AGS) cells was developed. The five gastric extracts induced dose-dependent genotoxicity in AGS cells. Copper (bioaccessible concentration up to 111 mg/kg) was probably the prevalent PHE inducing primary DNA damage (up to 5.1-fold increase in tail DNA at 0.53 g/l of gastric extract). Lead (bioaccessible concentration up to 245 mg/kg) was the most prevalent PHE inducing chromosome-damaging effects (r = 0.55; p health risks.

  3. In vitro analysis of the phytotoxic and genotoxic potential of Aligarh wastewater and Mathura refinery wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Ahmad Fazili

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Present report deals with the phytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Mathura refinery wastewater and Aligarh wastewater of Northern India. The IC50 value in Allium cepa root growth inhibition test was recorded to be 0.14X and 0.10X for Mathura refinery and Aligarh industrial wastewaters, respectively. Significant decline in the survival of various Escherichia coli K12 DNA repair defective mutants was observed when the tester strains were exposed to the aforementioned samples. The order of sensitivity was invariably as: AB1157 (wild type < AB2494 (lexA mutant < AB2463 (recA mutant < AB2480 (uvrA recA double mutant. These results suggested a significant amount of DNA damage within the bacterial cells exposed to test wastewaters. A. cepa genotoxicity test also demonstrated a considerable amount of chromosomal damage of A. cepa brought about by the test samples. The aberration index (A.I. for Aligarh wastewater and refinery wastewater was recorded to be 11.2% and 14.7%, respectively, whereas the aquaguard mineral water serving as negative control displayed the A.I. value to be 2.6%. Interestingly, genotoxicity of both industrial wastewaters was reduced to a remarkable extent in presence of mannitol, the hydroxyl radical scavenger. Present study clearly indicated a distinct pattern of the chromosomal aberrations showing predominantly stickiness and stray chromosomes in case of AWW while clumping and stickiness in case of RWW, thereby affirming the genotoxicity of both test waters.

  4. Formation of genotoxic compounds by medium pressure ultra violet treatment of nitrate rich water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martijn, A.J.; Boersma, M.G.; Vervoort, Jacques; Rietjens, I.; Kruithof, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Genotoxic compounds were produced by full-scale medium pressure (MP) ultraviolet hydrogen peroxide (UV/H2O2) treatment of nitrate-rich pretreated surface water. It was hypothesized that this formation was caused by the reaction of nitrate photolysis intermediates with natural organic matter (NOM). A

  5. Genotoxicity evaluation of drinking water sources in human peripheral blood lymphocytes using the comet assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yulin; CHEN Haigang; LI Zhaoli; SUN Liwei; QU Mengmeng; LI Mei; KONG Zhiming

    2008-01-01

    The potential harm of organic pollutants in drinking water to human health is widely focused on in the world; more and more pollutants with genotoxic substances are released into the aquatic environment. Water source samples were collected from 7 different localities of Nanjing City. The potential genotoxicity of organic extracts from drinking water sources were investigated by means of the comet assay in human peripheral lymphocytes. The results showed that all the organic extracts from all the water source samples could induce DNA damages of human peripheral blood lymphocytes at different levels. A significant difference (P < 0.01) was observed when compared with the solvent control. The DNA damage increased with the increase of the dosage of the original water source. Significant differences of DNA damage were observed in different drinking water sources, as shown by the multiple comparisons analysis at the dosage of 100×; the degree of DNA damage treated by Hushu waterworks (at town level) was the most serious, the arbitrary units (AU) was 141.62±6.96, however, that of Shangyuanmen waterworks (at city level) was only 109.64±2.97. The analysis also revealed that the genotoxicity of town's water sources was higher than that of the city. The results demonstrated that the comet assay can be successfully applied to the genotoxicity monitoring programs of drinking water sources.

  6. Amethod for genotoxicity detection using random amplified polymorphism DNA with Danio rerio

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RongZY; YinHW

    2002-01-01

    The increasing presence of genotoxic pollutants in the equatic environment has led to the development of quick monitoring methods.We have applied the random amplified polymorphism DNA(RKAPD) method to evaluate the toxic effects of genotoxic chemicals.In all 22 of normal wild type Danio rerio(zebrafish),78 amplified bands were obtained after PCR using primers set,in which the frequency of emergency above 60 percent is 21.There do exist 4 stable bands in the amplifed product,which appear in all normal test samples.The zebrafish RAPD fingerprinting database is set up on this base.The RAPD pattern from zebrafishes exposed to genotoxic chemicals such as cyclophosphamide 0.1-10mg·L-1 and dimethoate 10-100mg·L-1 displayed some changes in polymorphism of band pattern including the lost of stable bands.There also exists distinct distance between the band pattern of exposed zebrafishes and the control samples via the cluster method.In addition,the result derived from numeric analysis is more sensitive than the result obtained from stable band analysis because it can reveal the distance between the band pattern of 0.05mg·L-1 cyclophosphamide exposed zebrafish and the control sample.These results showed the accuracy and the sensitivity of the two analyses of genotoxicity based on the RAPD fingerprinting research.

  7. Unravelling mechanisms of dietary flavonoid-mediated health effects: effects on lipid metabolism and genotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek-van den Hil, E.F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Consumption of foods containing flavonoids is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), possibly by lipid-lowering effects. On the other hand, for one of these flavonoids, quercetin, also genotoxicity was shown especially in in vitro bioassays. Therefo

  8. Formation potentials of typical DBPs and changes of genotoxicity for chlorinated tertiary effluent pretreated by ozone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Nan; MIAO Tingting; LI Kuixiao; ZHANG Yu; YANG Min

    2009-01-01

    The effects of ozonation on the formation potential of typical disinfection byproducts (DBPs) and the changes of genotoxicity during post chlorination of tertiary effluent from a sewage treatment plant were investigated. Ozonation enhanced the yields of all detected chlorine DBPs except CHCl3. At a chlorine dose of 5 mg/L, the three brominated THMs and five HAAs increased, while chloroform decreased with the increase of ozone dose from 0 to 10 mg/L (ozone dose in consumption base). At a chlorine dose of 10 mg/L, the two mixed bromochloro species THMs and two dominant HAAs (DCAA and TCAA) firstly increased and then decreased with the increase of ozone dose, with the turning point approximately occurring at an ozone dose of 5 mg/L. The genotoxicity detected using umu test, on the other hand, was removed from 7 μg 4-NQO/L to a negligible level by ozonation under an ozone dose of 5 mg/L. Chlorination could further remove the genotoxicity to some extent. It was found that SUVA (UV absorbance divided by DOC concentration) might be used as an indicative parameter for monitoring the removal of genotoxicity during the oxidation.

  9. Genotoxicity study of an experimental beverage made with quinua, kiwicha and kañiwa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francia D.P. Huaman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Genotoxic evaluation is an important step for a product that is aimed for human consumption. A beverage composed of pseudocereals with highly nutritious elements like quinua (Chenopodium quinoa Willd., kiwicha (Amaranthus caudatus L. and kañiwa (Chenopodium pallidicaule Aellen was prepared to reduce lipid contents in a group of volunteers. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the genotoxic potential of an experimental beverage using two in vitro tests that have been validated by international agencies. For the Ames test, two strains of Salmonella typhimurium (TA98 and TA100 with and without microsomal fraction (S9 were used. Four doses of the beverage were tested and also a possible protective effect (same four doses of beverage added to plates with mutagens. Cultures of binucleated lymphocytes and five doses of the beverage were used for the micronucleus test. Both Ames and the micronucleus tests showed the beverage has not genotoxic effect in all tested doses. However, in evaluating the possible protective effect of the beverage, it would be evident that on the contrary, the mutagenic effect of mutagens used for each strain is enhanced. These results suggest that additional tests should be performed to check the genotoxic potential of this beverage before consumption.

  10. Genotoxic potential of Cotinus coggygria Scop. (Anacardiaceae stem extract in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Matic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The intention was to evaluate the possible in vivo genotoxic potential in different cell-types, of a methanol extract obtained from the plant stem of Cotinus coggygria Scop., using the sex-linked recessive lethal (or SLRL test and alkaline comet assay. The SLRL test, revealed the genotoxic effect of this extract in postmeiotic and premeiotic germ-cell lines. The comet assay was carried out on rat liver and bone marrow at 24 and 72 h after intraperitoneal administration. For genotoxic evaluation, three concentrations of the extract were tested, viz., 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg body weight (bw, based on the solubility limit of the extract in saline. Comet tail moment and total scores in the group treated with 500 mg/kg bw, 24 and 72 h after treatment, were not significantly different from the control group, whereas in the groups of animals, under the same conditions, but with 1000 and 2000 mg/kg bw of the extract, scores were statistically so. A slight decrease in the comet score and tail moment observed in all the doses in the 72 h treatment, gave to understand that DNA damage induced by Cotinus coggygria extract decreased with time. The results of both tests revealed the genotoxic effect of Cotinus coggygria under our experimental conditions.

  11. Genotoxicity of quinolone antibiotics in chlorination disinfection treatment: formation and QSAR simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Wei, Dongbin; Du, Yuguo

    2016-10-01

    Lots of unexpected disinfection by-products were formed during the chlorination disinfection of contaminated water bodies, leading to a potential threat to human health and ecological safety. In this study, SOS/umu assay was used to trace the genotoxicity variation of 20 quinolone compounds during the chlorination disinfection. Furthermore, two- and three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship models were developed based on the electronic and hydrophobic properties of the quinolones, which were used to quantify the impact of the different structural features of the compounds on their genotoxicity variation. The results revealed that quinolones bearing hydrophilic substituents with less H-bond donors and negative charge at the 1-position of the quinolone ring exhibited a positive correlation with genotoxicity elevation. More notably, the chlorination of quinolones in both ultrapure water and secondary effluent matrices provided comparable levels of genotoxicity, indicating that our research could potentially be used to evaluate the environmental risk of quinolone antibiotics in chlorination disinfection treatment.

  12. Investigation of genotoxic potential of various sizes Fe2O3 nanoparticles with comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Hakkı Ciğerci

    2015-06-01

    In this study, genotoxic potential of <50 nm and <100 nm Fe2O3 nanoparticles were investigated by using Comet Assay. Allium cepa root meristems were exposed with five doses (0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 mM of <50 nm for 4 hour and three doses (2.5, 5 (EC50, 10 mM for <100 nm of Fe2O3 nanoparticle for 24 and 96 h. Methyl methanesulfonate -MMS (10 ppm was used as a positive control. The results were also analyzed statistically by using SPSS by Windows, 18.0. It was determined that different doses of <50 nm Fe2O3 nanoparticle have no genotoxic effect of DNA. Different doses of <100 nm Fe2O3 have no genotoxic but only 10 mM dose have genotoxic effect on DNA. When compared <50 nm with <100 nm of Fe2O3 nanoparticle; <50 nm have more effects than <100 nm of Fe2O3 on DNA damage.

  13. Specific plant DNA adducts as molecular biomarkers of genotoxic atmospheric environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber-Lotfi, F; Obrecht-Pflumio, S; Guillemaut, P; Kleinpeter, J; Dietrich, A

    2005-03-01

    The general purpose of this study was to determine whether the formation of DNA addition products ('adducts') in plants could be a valuable biomarker of genotoxic air pollution. Plants from several species were exposed to ambient atmosphere at urban and suburban sites representative of different environmental conditions. The levels of NO2 and of the quantitatively major genotoxic air pollutants benzene, toluene, and xylene were monitored in parallel with plant exposure. DNA adducts were measured in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), rye-grass (Lolium perenne), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) seedlings by means of the [32P]-postlabeling method. Whereas, no correlation was found between the levels of the major genotoxic air pollutants and the total amounts of DNA adducts, individual analyses revealed site-specific and plant species-specific adduct responses, both at the qualitative and quantitative level. Among these, the amount of a specific rye-grass DNA adduct (rgs1) correlated with benzene/toluene/xylene levels above a threshold. For further characterization, rye-grass seedlings were treated in controlled conditions with benzene, toluene, xylene or their derivatives. On the other hand, in vitro DNA adduct formation assays were developed involving benzene, toluene, xylene, or their derivatives, and plant microsomes or purified peroxidase. Although in some cases, these approaches produced specific adduct responses, they failed to generate the rgs1 DNA adduct, which appeared to be characteristic for on-site test-plant exposure. Our studies have thus identified an interesting candidate for further analysis of environmental biomarkers of genotoxicity.

  14. Genotoxicity detected in wild mice living in a highly polluted wetland area in south western Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mateos, Santiago; Daza, Paula; Dominguez, Inmaculada; Cardenas, Jose Antonio [University of Seville, Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Biology, Avenida de la Reina Mercedes no 6, E-41012 Seville (Spain); Cortes, Felipe [University of Seville, Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Biology, Avenida de la Reina Mercedes no 6, E-41012 Seville (Spain)], E-mail: cortes@us.es

    2008-06-15

    A field study was carried out in the south of the Iberian Peninsula in an industrial area in the neighbourhood of Huelva city, SW Spain, and in a natural area (Donana National Park) for comparison, to estimate the genetic risk induced by environmental pollution in wild mice. Genotoxic effects in a sentinel organism, the Algerian mice (Mus spretus) free living in the industrial area were compared with animals of the same species living in the natural protected area. The single cell gel electrophoresis, or Comet assay, was performed as a genotoxicity test in peripheral blood of mice. Our results clearly show that mice free living in the contaminated area bear a high burden of genetic damage as compared with control individuals. The results suggest that the assessing of genotoxicity levels by the Comet assay in wild mice can be used as a valuable test in pollution monitoring and environmental conservation. - We have found an increased genotoxic damage in wild mice in a highly polluted area from industry, mining and agriculture in SW Spain, as assessed by the Comet assay.

  15. Immunocytotoxicity, cytogenotoxicity and genotoxicity of cadmium-based quantum dots in the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Thiago Lopes; Gomes, Tânia; Cardoso, Cátia; Letendre, Julie; Pinheiro, José Paulo; Sousa, Vânia Serrão; Teixeira, Margarida Ribau; Bebianno, Maria João

    2014-10-01

    There is an increased use of Quantum Dot (QDs) in biological and biomedical applications, but little is known about their marine ecotoxicology. So, the aim of this study was to investigate the possible immunocytotoxic, cytogenotoxic and genotoxic effects of cadmium telluride QDs (CdTe QDs) on the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. Mussels were exposed to 10 μg L(-1) of CdTe QDs or to soluble Cd [Cd(NO3)2] for 14 days and Cd accumulation, immunocytotoxicity [hemocyte density, cell viability, lysosomal membrane stability (LMS), differential cell counts (DCC)], cytogenotoxicity (micronucleus test and nuclear abnormalities assay) and genotoxicity (comet assay) were analyzed. Results show that in vivo exposure to QDs, Cd is accumulated in mussel soft tissues and hemolymph and induce immunotoxic effects mediated by a decrease in LMS, changes in DCC, as well as genotoxicity (DNA damage). However, QDs do not induce significant changes in hemocytes density, cell viability and cytogenetic parameters in opposition to Cd(2+). Soluble Cd is the most cytotoxic and cytogenotoxic form on Mytilus hemocytes due to a higher accumulation of Cd in tissues. Results indicate that immunotoxicity and genotoxicity of CdTe QDs and Cd(2+) are mediated by different modes of action and show that Mytilus hemocytes are important targets for in vivo QDs toxicity.

  16. Genotoxicity of rice bran oil extracted by supercritical CO2 extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Suk; Cheon, Eun Jin; Kim, Tae-Uk; Moon, Woi-Sook; Kim, Joo-Wan; Kim, Mi-Ryung

    2014-01-01

    Rice bran oil extracted by supercritical CO2 extraction (RB-SCE) reportedly exhibits pharmacological activities such as antioxidant and in vivo hair growth-inducing effects. Such activities raise the possibility of the development of novel hair growth-inducing agents using RB-SCE. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential genotoxic effects of RB-SCE in three short-term mutagenicity assays (bacterial reverse mutation assay, in vitro mammalian chromosomal aberration test, and in vivo micronucleus assay). RB-SCE showed no genotoxicity in the bacterial reverse mutation assay up to 5000 mg/plate and in the in vivo micronucleus test up to 600 mg/kg body weight. However, at 120 µg/mL with S9 mix and 200 µg/mL without S9 mix RB-SCE showed significantly different genotoxicity than the negative control in the in vitro chromosome aberration test. The induction of chromosomal aberrations under the present conditions may have no biological significance. We have herein demonstrated that RB-SCE can be regarded as a non-genotoxic material based on the available in vivo and in vitro results.

  17. The role of intracellular redox imbalance in nanomaterial induced cellular damage and genotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermanizadeh, Ali; Chauché, Caroline; Brown, David M;

    2015-01-01

    as one of the main contributors to nanomaterial (NM) induced adverse effects. One of the most important and widely investigated of these effects is genotoxicity. In general, systems that defend an organism against oxidative damage to DNA are very complex and include prevention of reactive oxygen species...

  18. Induction of cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of Guandu River waters in the Allium cepa system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Vieira Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Guandu River is the main source of water supply for the metropolitan region of Rio de Janeiro and has been facing serious environmental problems due to increasing population and industrial pollution, as well as the presence of polluted tributaries. This study analyzed the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of the Guandu River’s waters, through the use of the Allium cepa test system. Collection points were chosen at the greatest confluences of pollutant sources. The sampling included two different seasons: the rainy season (January and February and the dry season (June and July. The analyses of 5000 cells per treatment showed that all the points studied had some degree of cytotoxicity and/or genotoxicity. Two sampling locations, which receive major influxes from the polluted waters of the Poços/Queimados and Cabuçu/Ipiranga Rivers, stood out for the strong presence of micronuclei, sticky chromosomes, mitotic spindle abnormalities, necrotic cells and nucleolar changes compared to the negative control. At least two locations also found changes in the mitotic index. The existence of variations in the number of cytotoxic and genotoxic changes between periods of rain and drought indicates that the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of the water pollutants varies according to time, depending on the discharges of the tributary rivers and the increase of contaminated effluents. The results highlight the importance of bio-monitoring to assist managers in the control of effluent discharge.

  19. Screening of potentially genotoxic impurities in pharmaceuticals by LC-MS and CE-MS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijk, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Every day we are at risk for exposure to toxic components present in the environment and in food. Also medicines may contain traces of potentially genotoxic impurities (PGI), resulting from residues of process impurities or degradation.The presence of well-defined functional groups in impurities is

  20. Genotoxic and antibutyrylcholinesterasic activities of acid violet 7 and its biodegradation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Hedi Ben; Mosrati, Ridha; Limem, Ilef; Corroler, David; Ghedira, Kamel; Barillier, Daniel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2009-01-01

    Acid violet 7, a sulfonated azo dye was degraded by Pseudomonas putida mt-2 in mineral medium at concentrations up to 200 mg/L. The genotoxicity of AV7 and its biodegradation extracts was evaluated by using the DNA-strand scission assay. No genotoxicity was observed, even with or without exposition to UV irradiation, for biodegradation under shaking conditions, but increased significantly after biodegradation under static conditions. In addition, the ability of tested compounds to reduce human plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) activity was evaluated in vitro. Genotoxicity and anti-BuChE activity generated by the azoreduction products [4'-aminoacetanilid (4'-AA) and 5-acetamido-2-amino-1-hydroxy-3,6-naphtalene disulfonic acid (5-ANDS)] were assessed and compared with that of the parent unsubstituted amines. 4'-AA exhibited a strong genotoxicity, which was imputed to the presence of the acetoxy (COCH3) substituent on the aromatic amine; however, the presence of sulphonic groups in 5-ANDS seems to be responsible for its BuChE inhibition activity. The present study demonstrates that P. putida mt-2, incubated under aerobic conditions, has a catabolism that enables it to degrade AV7 and, especially, to detoxify the dye mixtures.

  1. Biodetection of potential genotoxic pollutants entering the human food chain through ashes used in livestock diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Vicente, Laura; Herraez, Elisa; Briz, Oscar; Nogales, Rogelio; Molina-Alcaide, Eduarda; Marin, Jose J G

    2016-08-15

    Ash derived from energy generation is used as a source of minerals in livestock feeds. The microbial biosensor recApr-Luc2 was built to detect genotoxic hazard in recycled ash. Escherichia coli SOS gene (recA, lexA, dinI and umuC) expression in response to cisplatin-induced DNA damage led to the selection of the recA promoter. The biosensor required functional RecA expression to respond to genotoxic heavy metals (Cr>Cd≈Pb), and polluted ash induced a strong recApr-Luc2 response. In human liver and intestinal cells, heavy metals induced acute toxicity (Cr>Cd>Pb) at concentrations sufficient to activate recApr-Luc2. Cytostatic effects, including genotoxicity, were cell- and metal-dependent, apart from Cr. In agreement with the recApr-Luc2 bioassay, Cr had the strongest effect in all cells. In conclusion, recApr-Luc2 could be useful for evaluating the genotoxic risk of pollutants present in ash that might be concentrated in animal products and, thus, entering the human food chain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Use of RAPD “Fingerprinting” Technique to Detect Genotoxic Effects of Heavy Metals in Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Gjorgieva, Darinka; Kadifkova-Panovska, Tatjana; Baceva, Katerina; Stafilov, Trajče

    2012-01-01

    Detection of genotoxic effect using RAPD involves the comparison of profiles generated from control (unexposed) and treated (exposed) DNA. Events observed following the metal exposure were a variation in the disappearance and appearance of new bands. These unique bands clearly differentiated the samples exposed to heavy metal stress, and would be act as marker for assessment of environmental exposition of these metals.

  3. Utilization of isolated marine mussel cells as an in vitro model to assess xenobiotics induced genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y F; Chen, S Y; Qu, M J; Adeleye, A O; Di, Y N

    2017-10-01

    Freshly isolated cells are used as an ideal experimental model in in vitro toxicology analysis, especially the detection of diverse xenobiotics induced genotoxic effects. In present study, heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Cd, Pb) and PCBs were selected as representative xenobiotics to verify the ability of in vitro model in assessing genotoxic effects in cells of marine mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis). DNA damage and chromosome aberration were assessed in freshly isolated cells from haemolymph, gill and digestive gland by single cell gel electrophoresis and micronucleus assay respectively. Gill cells showed more sensitive to Zn exposure among three types of cells, indicating tissue-specific genotoxicity. Significantly higher DNA aberrations were induced by Cu in haemocytes compared to Cd and Pb, indicating chemical-specific genotoxicity. An additive effect was detected after combined heavy metals and PCBs exposure, suggesting the interaction of selected xenobiotics. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to study the complex effects of organic and/or inorganic contaminants using freshly isolated cells from marine mussels. Genetic responses are proved to occur and maintained in vitro in relation to short-term xenobiotics induced stresses. The utilization of the in vitro model could provide a rapid tool to investigate the comprehensive toxic effects in marine invertebrates and monitor environmental health. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Genotoxicity of water concentrates from recreational pools after various disinfection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liviac, Danae; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Mitch, William A; Altonji, Matthew J; Plewa, Michael J

    2010-05-01

    Swimming and hot tub bathing are popular exercises and diversions. Disinfection of recreational pools is essential to prevent outbreaks of infectious disease. Recent research demonstrated an association between the application of disinfectants to recreational pools and adverse health outcomes. These pool waters represent extreme cases of disinfection that differ from disinfecting drinking waters. Pool waters are continuously exposed to disinfectants over average residence times extending to months. Disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursors include natural humic substances plus inputs from bathers through urine, sweat, hair, skin, and consumer products including cosmetics and sunscreens. This study presents a systematic mammalian cell genotoxicity analysis to evaluate different recreational waters derived from a common tap water source. The data demonstrated that all disinfected recreational pool water samples induced more genomic DNA damage than the source tap water. The type of disinfectant and illumination conditions altered the genotoxicity of the water. Accordingly, care should be taken in the disinfectant employed to treat recreational pool waters. The genotoxicity data suggest that brominating agents should be avoided. Combining chlorine with UV may be beneficial as compared to chlorination alone. During the recycling of pool water the organic carbon could be removed prior to disinfection. Behavior modification by swimmers may be critical in reducing the genotoxicity of pool water. Actions such as showering before entering the water and informing patrons about the potential harm from urinating in a pool could reduce the precursors of toxic DBPs.

  5. Genotoxicity of styrene oligomers extracted from polystyrene intended for use in contact with food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Nakai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we conducted in vitro genotoxicity tests to evaluate the genotoxicity of styrene oligomers extracted from polystyrene intended for use in contact with food. Styrene oligomers were extracted with acetone and the extract was subjected to the Ames test (OECD test guideline No. 471 and the in vitro chromosomal aberration test (OECD test guideline No. 473 under good laboratory practice conditions. The concentrations of styrene dimers and trimers in the concentrated extract were 540 and 13,431 ppm, respectively. Extraction with acetone provided markedly higher concentrations of styrene oligomers compared with extraction with 50% ethanol aqueous solution, which is the food simulant currently recommended for use in safety assessments of polystyrene by both the United States Food and Drug Administration and the European Food Safety Authority. And these high concentrations of styrene dimers and trimers were utilized for the evaluation of genotoxicity in vitro. Ames tests using five bacterial tester strains were negative both in the presence or absence of metabolic activation. The in vitro chromosomal aberration test using Chinese hamster lung cells (CHL/IU was also negative. Together, these results suggest that the risk of the genotoxicity of styrene oligomers that migrate from polystyrene food packaging into food is very low.

  6. Chlorination of oxybenzone: Kinetics, transformation, disinfection byproducts formation, and genotoxicity changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shujuan; Wang, Xiaomao; Yang, Hongwei; Xie, Yuefeng F

    2016-07-01

    UV filters are a kind of emerging contaminant, and their transformation behavior in water treatment processes has aroused great concern. In particular, toxic products might be produced during reaction with disinfectants during the disinfection process. As one of the most widely used UV filters, oxybenzone has received significant attention, because its transformation and toxicity changes during chlorine oxidation are a concern. In our study, the reaction between oxybenzone and chlorine followed pseudo-first-order and second-order kinetics. Three transformation products were detected by LC-MS/MS, and the stability of products followed the order of tri-chloro-methoxyphenoyl > di-chlorinated oxybenzone > mono-chlorinated oxybenzone. Disinfection byproducts (DBPs) including chloroform, trichloroacetic acid, dichloroacetic acid and chloral hydrate were quickly formed, and increased at a slower rate until their concentrations remained constant. The maximum DBP/oxybenzone molar yields for the four compounds were 12.02%, 6.28%, 0.90% and 0.23%, respectively. SOS/umu genotoxicity test indicated that genotoxicity was highly elevated after chlorination, and genotoxicity showed a significantly positive correlation with the response of tri-chloro-methoxyphenoyl. Our results indicated that more genotoxic transformation products were produced in spite of the elimination of oxybenzone, posing potential threats to drinking water safety. This study shed light on the formation of DBPs and toxicity changes during the chlorination process of oxybenzone.

  7. High-throughput genotoxicity assay identifies antioxidants as inducers of DNA damage response and cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human ATAD5 is an excellent biomarker for identifying genotoxic compounds because ATADS protein levels increase post-transcriptionally following exposure to a variety of DNA damaging agents. Here we report a novel quantitative high-throughput ATAD5-Iuciferase assay that can moni...

  8. Evaluation of the Genotoxicity and Cytotoxicity of Semipurified Fractions from the Mediterranean Brown Algae, Dictyopteris membranacea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akremi, Najoua; Cappoen, Davie; Anthonissen, Roel; Bouraoui, Abderrahman; Verschaeve, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Dictyopteris membranacea, a species of Mediterranean brown algae, is believed to have potential pharmacological and nutritional applications. However, such potentials only make sense when devoid of any adverse health consequences. The present study should be seen in this context. It aimed at evaluating the genotoxicity and cytoxicity of its organic extract (F0) and semi purified fractions (F4, F5, and F6). Extracts were tested using the bacterial Vitotox® test and micronucleus assay in different concentrations (from 1.25 μg/mL up to 100 μg/mL, depending on the test and the extract). Applied concentrations were based on a preliminary dose-finding test with the neutral red uptake assay. The results show that all extracts were not genotoxic in the presence or absence of a rat metabolic enzyme fraction (S9). This is encouraging and justifies further investigations on the therapeutic and other values of this algae. SUMMARY Dictyopteris membranacea extracts and some of their semi purified fractions have important antibacterial properties.The organic extract (F0) and semi purified fractions (F4, F5, and F6) were not genotoxic according to the bacterial Vitotox test.They were also not genotoxic according to the micronucleus test in human C3A cells.Applied concentrations were based on the in-vitro neutral red uptake (NRU) test. PMID:27761065

  9. Way forward in case of a false positive in vitro genotoxicity result for a cosmetic substance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doktorova, Tatyana Y; Ates, Gamze; Vinken, Mathieu; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera

    2014-02-01

    The currently used regulatory in vitro mutagenicity/genotoxicity test battery has a high sensitivity for detecting genotoxicants, but it suffers from a large number of irrelevant positive results (i.e. low specificity) thereby imposing the need for additional follow-up by in vitro and/or in vivo genotoxicity tests. This could have a major impact on the cosmetic industry in Europe, seen the imposed animal testing and marketing bans on cosmetics and their ingredients. Afflicted, but safe substances could therefore be lost. Using the example of triclosan, a cosmetic preservative, we describe here the potential applicability of a human toxicogenomics-based in vitro assay as a potential mechanistically based follow-up test for positive in vitro genotoxicity results. Triclosan shows a positive in vitro chromosomal aberration test, but is negative during in vivo follow-up tests. Toxicogenomics analysis unequivocally shows that triclosan is identified as a compound acting through non-DNA reactive mechanisms. This proof-of-principle study illustrates the potential of genome-wide transcriptomics data in combination with in vitro experimentation as a possible weight-of-evidence follow-up approach for de-risking a positive outcome in a standard mutagenicity/genotoxicity battery. As such a substantial number of cosmetic compounds wrongly identified as genotoxicants could be saved for the future.

  10. Study on the genotoxicity of HA/ZrO{sub 2} composite particles in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quan, Renfu, E-mail: quanrenfu8@yahoo.com [Xiaoshan Traditional Chinese Medical Hospital, ZhengJiang Province 311200 (China); Tang, Yanghua; Huang, Zhongming; Xu, Jinwei [Xiaoshan Traditional Chinese Medical Hospital, ZhengJiang Province 311200 (China); Wu, Xiaochen [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai (China); Yang, Disheng [Department of Orthopedics, the second Affiliated Hospital, Medical College of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009 (China)

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the genotoxicity of the HA/ZrO{sub 2} composite particles by using the micronucleus test (MNT) in vitro. HA/ZrO{sub 2} composite particles prepared by sintering at high temperature and pressure, that used powder of HA and ZrO{sub 2} of different proportions, were compared with pure HA particles and pure ZrO{sub 2} particles. The effect of the composite particles on cell proliferation of rabbit mesenchymal stem cells, and its the genotoxicity to rabbit mesenchymal stem cells were detected by MNT method. The MTT test showed that both pure HA particles and composite particles which contained HA promoted cell proliferation of rabbit mesenchymal stem cells, while pure ZrO{sub 2} particles did not, and there was a significant difference (P < 0.05). The MNT test showed no significant difference between the HA group and the negative control group (P > 0.05), but a significant difference between the HA group and the positive control group (P < 0.05). The difference between the ZrO{sub 2} group and the negative control group was significant (P < 0.01), while the difference between the ZrO{sub 2} group and the positive control group was insignificant (P > 0.05). The genotoxicity of the HA/ZrO{sub 2} composite particle increased with a higher proportion of ZrO{sub 2} and an increase in the concentration of the composite, and the 30 wt.% HA/70% ZrO{sub 2} composite with 200 μg/mL concentration showed significant genotoxicity (P < 0.01). - Highlights: ► HA/ZrO{sub 2} composite particles were prepared by sintering used powder of HA and ZrO{sub 2} of different proportions. ► Evaluate the genotoxicity of the HA/ZrO{sub 2} composite particle in vitro micronucleus test (MNT). ► The genotoxicity of the HA/ZrO{sub 2} composite particle increased with an increase in the proportion of ZrO{sub 2}. ► The 30%wtHA/70% ZrO{sub 2} composite with 200 μg/mL concentration showed significant genotoxicity.

  11. In vivo genotoxicity of nitramines, transformation products of amine-based carbon capture technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Coutris

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In times where we need to reduce our CO2 emissions to the atmosphere, it is important to get a clearer picture of the environmental impacts associated with potential mitigation technologies. Chemical absorption with amines is emerging as the most advanced mitigation technology for post-combustion capture of CO2 from fossil fuel power stations. Although the amine solvent used in this technology is recycled during the capture process, degradation products are formed and released into the environment. Among these degradation products, the aliphatic nitramine compounds dimethylnitramine and ethanolnitramine have been identified, whose environmental impact was unknown. In addition to conducting survival, growth and reproduction tests in a range of marine species, we looked into the in vivo genotoxic potential of these two compounds to experimentally exposed fish (Coutris et al. 2015. DNA damage was analyzed in blood samples collected from the caudal vein of juvenile turbot Scophthalmus maximus after 28 day exposure to nitramines, using the 12 mini-gels version of the comet assay, with and without digestion with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. Although whole organism bioassays indicated that nitramine toxicity through necrosis was low, the genotoxicity assessment revealed contrasting results, with ethanolnitramine found to be more genotoxic than dimethylnitramine by three orders of magnitude. At the lowest ethanolnitramine concentration (1 mg/L, 84 % DNA damage was observed, whereas 100 mg/L dimethylnitramine was required to cause 37 % DNA damage. The mechanisms of genotoxicity were also shown to differ between the two compounds, with oxidation of the DNA bases responsible for over 90 % of the genotoxicity of dimethylnitramine, whereas DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites were responsible for over 90 % of the genotoxicity of ethanolnitramine. Fish exposed to > 3 mg/L ethanolnitramine had virtually no DNA left in their red blood cells. The

  12. A rationale for determining, testing, and controlling specific impurities in pharmaceuticals that possess potential for genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Lutz; Mauthe, Robert J; Riley, Christopher M; Andino, Marta M; Antonis, David De; Beels, Chris; DeGeorge, Joseph; De Knaep, Alfons G M; Ellison, Dean; Fagerland, Jane A; Frank, Rebecca; Fritschel, Betsy; Galloway, Sheila; Harpur, Ernie; Humfrey, Charles D N; Jacks, Alexander S; Jagota, Nirdosh; Mackinnon, John; Mohan, Ganapathy; Ness, Daniel K; O'Donovan, Michael R; Smith, Mark D; Vudathala, Gopi; Yotti, Larry

    2006-04-01

    The synthesis of pharmaceutical products frequently involves the use of reactive reagents and the formation of intermediates and by-products. Low levels of some of these may be present in the final drug substance and drug product as impurities. Such chemically reactive impurities may have at the same time the potential for unwanted toxicities including genotoxicity and carcinogenicity and hence can have an impact on product risk assessment. This paper outlines a procedure for testing, classification, qualification, toxicological risk assessment, and control of impurities possessing genotoxic potential in pharmaceutical products. Referencing accepted principles of cancer risk assessment, this document proposes a staged threshold of toxicological concern (TTC) approach for the intake of genotoxic impurities over various periods of exposure. This staged TTC is based on knowledge about tumorigenic potency of a wide range of genotoxic carcinogens and can be used for genotoxic compounds, for which cancer data are limited or not available. The delineated acceptable daily intake values of between approximately 1.5 microg/day for approximately lifetime intake and approximately 120 microg/day for < or = 1 month are virtually safe doses. Based on sound scientific reasoning, these virtually safe intake values do not pose an unacceptable risk to either human volunteers or patients at any stage of clinical development and marketing of a pharmaceutical product. The intake levels are estimated to give an excess cancer risk of 1 in 100,000 to 1 in a million over a lifetime, and are extremely conservative given the current lifetime cancer risk in the population of over 1 in 4 (http://seer.cancer.gov/statfacts/html.all.html). The proposals in this document apply to all clinical routes of administration and to compounds at all stages of clinical development. It is important to note that certain types of products, such as those for life-threatening indications for which there are no

  13. Ground and surface water for drinking: a laboratory study on genotoxicity using plant tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Feretti

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface waters are increasingly utilized for drinking water because groundwater sources are often polluted. Several monitoring studies have detected the presence of mutagenicity in drinking water, especially from surface sources due to the reaction of natural organic matter with disinfectant. The study aimed to investigate the genotoxic potential of the products of reaction between humic substances, which are naturally present in surface water, and three disinfectants: chlorine dioxide, sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid. Commercial humic acids dissolved in distilled water at different total organic carbon (TOC concentrations were studied in order to simulate natural conditions of both ground water (TOC=2.5 mg/L and surface water (TOC=7.5 mg/L. These solutions were treated with the biocides at a 1:1 molar ratio of C:disinfectant and tested for genotoxicity using the anaphase chromosomal aberration and micronucleus tests in Allium cepa, and the Vicia faba and Tradescantia micronucleus tests. The tests were carried out after different times and with different modes of exposure, and at 1:1 and 1:10 dilutions of disinfected and undisinfected humic acid solutions. A genotoxic effect was found for sodium hypochlorite in all plant tests, at both TOCs considered, while chlorine dioxide gave positive results only with the A.cepa tests. Some positive effects were also detected for PAA (A.cepa and Tradescantia. No relevant differences were found in samples with different TOC values. The significant increase in all genotoxicity end-points induced by all tested disinfectants indicates that a genotoxic potential is exerted even in the presence of organic substances at similar concentrations to those frequently present in drinking water.

  14. Genotoxicity assessment of intravenously injected titanium dioxide nanoparticles in gpt delta transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tetsuya; Miura, Nobuhiko; Hojo, Rieko; Yanagiba, Yukie; Suda, Megumi; Hasegawa, Tatsuya; Miyagawa, Muneyuki; Wang, Rui-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are increasingly manufactured in large amounts for use in industrial applications such as cosmetics, pigments, foods, and as photo-catalysts. Many in vitro studies have examined the genotoxicity of TiO2 nanomaterials; some of these studies suggest that TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) are genotoxic. Several in vivo studies have also been reported recently, but the results are inconsistent. In this study, we investigated, using several genotoxicity endpoints, the effects of dispersed TiO2 suspensions following multiple intravenous injections in mice. Male gpt Delta C57BL/6J mice were administered TiO2 NPs at doses of 2, 10 or 50mg/kg body weight per week for 4 consecutive weeks. Genotoxic effects were then analyzed by the Pig-a gene mutation assay and the micronucleus assay on peripheral blood, and by the alkaline comet, gpt mutation, and Spi(-) mutation assays on the liver. We also assessed the localization of TiO2 NPs in the liver, by transmission electron microscopy. Administration of TiO2 NPs did not significantly increase any of the following endpoints: frequency of Pig-a mutants (erythrocytes); frequency of micronuclei (reticulocytes); level of DNA damage (liver); frequencies of gpt and Spi(-) mutants (liver). Most TiO2 NPs in the liver were found in the sinuses and inside Kupffer cells, although some were occasionally observed in liver parenchymal cells. These results indicate that TiO2 NPs do not have genotoxic effects on mouse liver or bone marrow.

  15. Genotoxicity of silver nanoparticles evaluated using the Ames test and in vitro micronucleus assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Chen, David H; Yan, Jian; Chen, Ying; Mittelstaedt, Roberta A; Zhang, Yongbin; Biris, Alexandru S; Heflich, Robert H; Chen, Tao

    2012-06-14

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have antimicrobial properties, which have contributed to their widespread use in consumer products. A current issue regarding nanomaterials is the extent to which existing genotoxicity assays are useful for evaluating the risks associated with their use. In this study, the genotoxicity of 5 nm AgNPs was assessed using two standard genotoxicity assays, the Salmonella reverse mutation assay (Ames test) and the in vitro micronucleus assay. Using the preincubation version of the Ames assay, Salmonella strains TA102, TA100, TA1537, TA98, and TA1535 were treated with 0.15-76.8 μg/plate of the AgNPs. Toxicity limited the doses that could be assayed to 2.4-38.4 μg/plate; no increases in mutant frequency over the vehicle control were found for the concentrations that could be assayed. Human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells were treated with 10-30 μg/ml AgNPs, and additional cells were treated with water and 0.73 gy X-rays as vehicle and positive controls. Micronucleus frequency was increased by the AgNP treatment in a dose-dependent manner. At a concentration of 30 μg/ml (with 45.4% relative population doubling), AgNPs induced a significant, 3.17-fold increase with a net increase of 1.60% in micronucleus frequency over the vehicle control, a weak positive response by our criteria. These results demonstrate that the 5 nm AgNP are genotoxic in TK6 cells. Also, the data suggest that the in vitro micronucleus assay may be more appropriate than the Ames test for evaluating the genotoxicity of the AgNPs.

  16. Characterisation of acute toxicity, genotoxicity and oxidative stress posed by textile effluent on zebrafish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenjuan Zhang; Wei Liu; Jing Zhang; Huimin Zhao; Yaobin Zhang; Xie Quan; Yihe Jin

    2012-01-01

    Textile industries are important sources of toxic discharges and contribute enormously to water deterioration,while little attention has been paid to the toxicity of textile effluents in discharge regulation.Bioassays with zebrafish were employed to evaluate the toxicity of wastewater samples collected from different stages at a textile factory and sewage treatment plants (STPs).Physico-chemical parameters,acute toxicity,genotoxicity and oxidative stress biomarkers were analyzed.The wastewater samples from bleaching,rinsing and soaping of the textile factory exhibited high acute toxicity and genotoxicity.The coexisting components of dye compounds,as assistants and oxidants,seemed to cause some effect on the toxic response.After treatment employing the anoxic-oxic (A/O) process in STPs,the color and the chemical oxygen demand (COD) were reduced by 40% and 84%,respectively,falling within the criteria of the Chinese Sewage Discharge Standard.In contrast,increases in acute toxicity and genotoxicity were observed in the anaerobic tank,indicating the formation of toxic intermediates.The genotoxicity of the effluent of the STP was not significantly different from that of the influent,suggesting the wastewater treatment processes were not effective in removing the genotoxicity of the dye wastewater.Results indicated that the effluent contains pro-oxidants since the activities of glutathione (GSH),malondialdehyde (MDA),and total anti-oxidation capacity (T-AOC) were all elevated.In addition,decreases in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione-S transferase (GST) activities observed can be interpreted as a cytotoxicity sign due to an over-production of reactive oxygen species (ROS).The results of the present study suggest that the STPs were not capable of reducing the toxicity of wastewater sufficiently.Further treatment is needed to remove the potential risks posed by textile effluent to ecosystems and human health,and employing a toxicity index is necessary for

  17. Ecotoxicity and genotoxicity assessment of cytotoxic antineoplastic drugs and their metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zounkova, Radka; Kovalova, Lubomira; Blaha, Ludek; Dott, Wolfgang

    2010-09-01

    In spite of growing scientific concern about pharmaceuticals in the environment, there is still a lack of information especially with regard to their metabolites. The present study investigated ecotoxicity and genotoxicity of three widely used cytostatic agents 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), cytarabine (CYT) and gemcitabine (GemC) and their major human metabolites, i.e. alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine (FBAL), uracil-1-beta-D-arabinofuranoside (AraU) and 2',2'-difluorodeoxyuridine (dFdU), respectively. Effects were studied in acute immobilization and reproduction assays with crustacean Daphnia magna and growth inhibition tests with alga Desmodesmus subspicatus and bacteria Pseudomonas putida. Genotoxicity was tested with umu-test employing Salmonella choleraesius subsp. chol. Toxicity was relatively high at parent compounds with EC(50) values ranging from 44 microg L(-1) (5-fluorouracil in the P. putida test) to 200 mg L(-1) (cytarabine in D. magna acute test). In general, the most toxic compound was 5-FU. Studied metabolites showed low or no toxicity; only FBAL (metabolite of 5-FU) showed low toxicity to D. subspicatus and P. putida with EC(50) values 80 and 140 mg L(-1), respectively. All parent cytostatics showed genotoxicity with minimum genotoxic concentrations (MGC) ranging from 40 to 330 mg L(-1). From metabolites, only FBAL was genotoxic in high concentrations. To our knowledge, the present study provides some of the first ecotoxicity data for both cytostatics and their metabolites, which might further serve for serious evaluation of ecological risks. The observed EC(50) values within the microg L(-1) range were fairly close to concentrations reported in hospital sewage water, which indicates further research needs, especially studies of chronic toxicity.

  18. Genotoxicity assessment of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with different particle sizes and surface coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanping; Xia, Qiyue; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Shuyang; Cheng, Feng; Zhong, Zhihui; Wang, Li; Li, Hongxia; Xiao, Kai

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been widely used for various biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging and drug delivery. However, their potential toxic effects, including genotoxicity, need to be thoroughly understood. In the present study, the genotoxicity of IONPs with different particle sizes (10, 30 nm) and surface coatings (PEG, PEI) were assessed using three standard genotoxicity assays, the Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay (Ames test), the in vitro mammalian chromosome aberration test, and the in vivo micronucleus assay. In the Ames test, SMG-10 (PEG coating, 10 nm) showed a positive mutagenic response in all the five test bacterial strains with and without metabolic activation, whereas SEI-10 (PEI coating, 10 nm) showed no mutagenesis in all tester strains regardless of metabolic activation. SMG-30 (PEG coating, 30 nm) was not mutagenic in the absence of metabolic activation, and became mutagenic in the presence of metabolic activation. In the chromosomal aberration test, no increase in the incidence of chromosomal aberrations was observed for all three IONPs. In the in vivo micronucleus test, there was no evidence of increased micronuclei frequencies for all three IONPs, indicating that they were not clastogenic in vivo. Taken together, our results demonstrated that IONPs with PEG coating exhibited mutagenic activity without chromosomal and clastogenic abnormalities, and smaller IONPs (SMG-10) had stronger mutagenic potential than larger ones (SMG-30); whereas, IONPs with SEI coating (SEI-10) were not genotoxic in all three standard genotoxicity assays. This suggests that the mutagenicity of IONPs depends on their particle size and surface coating.

  19. Protective effect of boric acid on lead- and cadmium-induced genotoxicity in V79 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustündağ, Aylin; Behm, Claudia; Föllmann, Wolfram; Duydu, Yalçin; Degen, Gisela H

    2014-06-01

    The toxic heavy metals cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) are important environmental pollutants which can cause serious damage to human health. As the metal ions (Cd(2+) and Pb(2+)) accumulate in the organism, there is special concern regarding chronic toxicity and damage to the genetic material. Metal-induced genotoxicity has been attributed to indirect mechanisms, such as induction of oxidative stress and interference with DNA repair. Boron is a naturally occurring element and considered to be an essential micronutrient, although the cellular activities of boron compounds remain largely unexplored. The present study has been conducted to evaluate potential protective effects of boric acid (BA) against genotoxicity induced by cadmium chloride (CdCl2) and lead chloride (PbCl2) in V79 cell cultures. Cytotoxicity assays (neutral red uptake and cell titer blue assay) served to determine suitable concentrations for subsequent genotoxicity assays. Chromosomal damage and DNA strand breaks were assessed by micronucleus tests and comet assays. Both PbCl2 and CdCl2 (at 3, 5 and 10 µM) were shown to induce concentration-dependent increases in micronucleus frequencies and DNA strand breaks in V79 cells. BA itself was not cytotoxic (up to 300 µM) and showed no genotoxic effects. Pretreatment of cells with low levels of BA (2.5 and 10 µM) was found to strongly reduce the genotoxic effects of the tested metals. Based on the findings of this in vitro study, it can be suggested that boron provides an efficient protection against the induction of DNA strand breaks and micronuclei by lead and cadmium. Further studies on the underlying mechanisms for the protective effect of boron are needed.

  20. Genotoxicity biomarkers in the assessment of heavy metal effects in mussels: experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognesi, C; Landini, E; Roggieri, P; Fabbri, R; Viarengo, A

    1999-01-01

    Heavy metals are stable and persistent environmental contaminants. The range of metal concentrations is generally below acute thresholds in coastal areas, where recognition of chronic sublethal effects is more relevant. Evidence of long-term adverse effects, such as cancer, due to heavy metals in marine animals comes from a number of field and experimental studies. The mechanism of metal carcinogenicity remains largely unknown, although several lines of experimental evidence suggest that a genotoxic effect may be involved. The aim of our study was to evaluate the sensitivity of genotoxicity tests, alkaline elution and micronucleus test, as biomarkers for the detection of heavy metals in mussels as the sentinel species. Experimental studies were carried out on Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed in aquarium (5 days) to different concentrations of three selected metal salts, CuCl2 (5, 10, 20, 40, 80 micrograms/l/a), CdCl2 (1.84, 18.4, 184 micrograms/l/a), and HgCl2 (32 micrograms/l/a), and to a mixture of equimolar doses of the three metals to study the results of their joint action. Metallothionein quantitation was used as a marker of metal exposure. Lysosomal membrane stability was applied to evaluate the influence of physiological status on genotoxic damage. The ranking of genotoxic potential was in decreasing order: Hg > Cu > Cd. Cu and Hg caused an increase of DNA single-strand breaks and micronuclei frequency. Cd induced a statistical increase of DNA damage, but gave negative results with the micronucleus test. A relationship between genotoxic effects and metallothionein content was observed. Reduction in lysosomal membrane stability with the increasing concentration of heavy metals was also evident. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Screening of genotoxicity and mutagenicity in extractable organics from oil sands process-affected water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetouni, Nikolas C; Siraki, Arno G; Weinfeld, Michael; Pereira, Alberto Dos Santos; Martin, Jonathan W

    2016-11-01

    Large volumes of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) are produced by the oil sands surface mining industry during alkaline hot-water extraction of bitumen. It is well documented that the acid extractable organics (AEOs) in OSPW, a highly complex mixture of acidic and polar neutral substances, are acutely toxic; but few studies have examined the genotoxicity or mutagenicity of this mixture. In the present study, the in vitro SOS Chromotest and the Ames test (TA98 and TA100 strains) were used to evaluate genotoxicity and mutagenicity for whole OSPW AEOs in the presence and absence of biotransformation by rat S9 liver enzymes. Two subfractions were also examined in the same assays: neutral extractable fraction (F1-NE), and the subsequent acid extractable fraction (F2-AE). In the SOS assay, whole AEO was cytotoxic when concentrated 2× (i.e., twice as concentrated as the environmental sample) and showed increasing genotoxic response above 6×. Co-exposure with S9 had a protective effect on the cell SOS-inducing factor and survival but did not eliminate genotoxicity above 6× concentrations. Most of the cytotoxicity was attributable to F2-AE, but both F1-NE and F2-AE had similar genotoxic dose-responses above 6×. In the Ames test without S9, whole AEO was mutagenic in both strains above 10× concentrations. Co-incubation with S9 had little effect on the TA100 strain but with TA98 resulted in bioactivation at midlevel doses (1.5-6.3×) and protection at higher doses (10-25×). The 2 subfractions were mutagenic in both strains but with different dose-responses. Further research in vivo or in more relevant cells is warranted to investigate the carcinogenic risks of OSPW. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;9999:1-8. © 2016 SETAC.

  2. Ground and surface water for drinking: a laboratory study on genotoxicity using plant tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feretti, Donatella; Ceretti, Elisabetta; Gustavino, Bianca; Zerbini, Llaria; Zani, Claudia; Monarca, Silvano; Rizzoni, Marco

    2012-02-17

    Surface waters are increasingly utilized for drinking water because groundwater sources are often polluted. Several monitoring studies have detected the presence of mutagenicity in drinking water, especially from surface sources due to the reaction of natural organic matter with disinfectant. The study aimed to investigate the genotoxic potential of the products of reaction between humic substances, which are naturally present in surface water, and three disinfectants: chlorine dioxide, sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid. Commercial humic acids dissolved in distilled water at different total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations were studied in order to simulate natural conditions of both ground water (TOC=2.5 mg/L) and surface water (TOC=7.5 mg/L). These solutions were treated with the biocides at a 1:1 molar ratio of C:disinfectant and tested for genotoxicity using the anaphase chromosomal aberration and micronucleus tests in Allium cepa, and the Vicia faba and Tradescantia micronucleus tests. The tests were carried out after different times and with different modes of exposure, and at 1:1 and 1:10 dilutions of disinfected and undisinfected humic acid solutions. A genotoxic effect was found for sodium hypochlorite in all plant tests, at both TOCs considered, while chlorine dioxide gave positive results only with the A.cepa tests. Some positive effects were also detected for PAA (A.cepa and Tradescantia). No relevant differences were found in samples with different TOC values. The significant increase in all genotoxicity end-points induced by all tested disinfectants indicates that a genotoxic potential is exerted even in the presence of organic substances at similar concentrations to those frequently present in drinking water.

  3. Genotoxic effects in wild rodents (Rattus rattus and Mus musculus) in an open coal mining area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Grethel; Pérez, Lyda Espitia; Linares, Juan Carlos; Hartmann, Andreas; Quintana, Milton

    2007-06-15

    Coal is a mixture of a variety of compounds containing mutagenic and carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Exposure to coal is considered as an important non-cellular and cellular source of reactive oxygen species that can induce DNA damage. In addition, spontaneous combustion can occur in coal mining areas, further releasing compounds with detrimental effects on the environment. In this study the comet assay was used to investigate potential genotoxic effects of coal mining activities in peripheral blood cells of the wild rodents Rattus rattus and Mus musculus. The study was conducted in a coal mining area of the Municipio de Puerto Libertador, South West of the Departamento de Cordoba, Colombia. Animals from two areas in the coal mining zone and a control area located in the Municipio de Lorica were investigated. The results showed evidence that exposure to coal results in elevated primary DNA lesions in blood cells of rodents. Three different parameters for DNA damage were assessed, namely, DNA damage index, migration length and percentage damaged cells. All parameters showed statistically significantly higher values in mice and rats from the coal mining area in comparison to the animals from the control area. The parameter "DNA Damage Index" was found to be most sensitive and to best indicate a genotoxic hazard. Both species investigated were shown to be sensitive indicators of environmental genotoxicity caused by coal mining activities. In summary, our study constitutes the first investigation of potential genotoxic effects of open coal mining carried out in Puerto Libertador. The investigations provide a guide for measures to evaluate genotoxic hazards, thereby contributing to the development of appropriate measures and regulations for more careful operations during coal mining.

  4. In vivo genotoxicity assessment of titanium, zirconium and aluminium nanoparticles, and their microparticulated forms, in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Eşref; Turna, Fatma; Vales, Gerard; Kaya, Bülent; Creus, Amadeu; Marcos, Ricard

    2013-11-01

    As in vivo system, we propose Drosophila melanogaster as a useful model for study the genotoxic risks associated with nanoparticle exposure. In this study we have carried out a genotoxic evaluation of titanium dioxide (TiO2), zirconium oxide (ZrO2) and aluminium oxide (Al2O3) nanoparticles and their microparticulated forms in D. melanogaster by using the wing somatic mutation and recombination assay. This assay is based on the principle that loss of heterozygosis and the corresponding expression of the suitable recessive markers, multiple wing hairs and flare-3, can lead to the formation of mutant clones in treated larvae, which are expressed as mutant spots on the wings of adult flies. Third instar larvae were feed with TiO2, ZrO2 and Al2O3 nanoparticles, and their microparticulated forms, at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 10mM. Although a certain level of aggregation/agglomeration was observed in solution, it must be noted than the constant digging activity of larvae ensures that treated medium pass constantly through the digestive tract ensuring exposure. The results showed that no significant increases in the frequency of all spots (e.g. small single, large single, twin, total mwh and total spots) were observed, indicating that these nanoparticles were not able to induce genotoxic activity in the wing spot assay of D. melanogaster. Negative data were also obtained with the microparticulated forms. This indicates that the nanoparticulated form of the selected nanomaterials does not modify the potential genotoxicity of their microparticulated versions. These in vivo results contribute to increase the genotoxicity database on the TiO2, ZrO2 and Al2O3 nanoparticles.

  5. Genotoxicity assessment of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with different particle sizes and surface coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanping; Xia, Qiyue; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Shuyang; Cheng, Feng; Zhong, Zhihui; Wang, Li; Li, Hongxia; Xiao, Kai

    2014-10-24

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been widely used for various biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging and drug delivery. However, their potential toxic effects, including genotoxicity, need to be thoroughly understood. In the present study, the genotoxicity of IONPs with different particle sizes (10, 30 nm) and surface coatings (PEG, PEI) were assessed using three standard genotoxicity assays, the Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay (Ames test), the in vitro mammalian chromosome aberration test, and the in vivo micronucleus assay. In the Ames test, SMG-10 (PEG coating, 10 nm) showed a positive mutagenic response in all the five test bacterial strains with and without metabolic activation, whereas SEI-10 (PEI coating, 10 nm) showed no mutagenesis in all tester strains regardless of metabolic activation. SMG-30 (PEG coating, 30 nm) was not mutagenic in the absence of metabolic activation, and became mutagenic in the presence of metabolic activation. In the chromosomal aberration test, no increase in the incidence of chromosomal aberrations was observed for all three IONPs. In the in vivo micronucleus test, there was no evidence of increased micronuclei frequencies for all three IONPs, indicating that they were not clastogenic in vivo. Taken together, our results demonstrated that IONPs with PEG coating exhibited mutagenic activity without chromosomal and clastogenic abnormalities, and smaller IONPs (SMG-10) had stronger mutagenic potential than larger ones (SMG-30); whereas, IONPs with SEI coating (SEI-10) were not genotoxic in all three standard genotoxicity assays. This suggests that the mutagenicity of IONPs depends on their particle size and surface coating.

  6. Comparison of the in vivo and in vitro genotoxicity of glyphosate isopropylamine salt in three different organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alvarez-Moya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable controversy with regard to the genotoxicity of glyphosate, with some reports stating that this compound is non-toxic for fish, birds and mammals. In this work, we used the comet assay to examine the genotoxicity of glyphosate isopropylamine (0.7, 7, 70 and 700 µM in human lymphocytes, erythrocytes of Oreochromis niloticus and staminal nuclei of Tradescantia (4430 in vitro and in vivo. Cells, nuclei and fish that had and had not been exposed to 5 mM N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. Significant (p 7 µM, whereas in vitro, glyphosphate was genotoxic in human lymphocytes and Tradescantia hairs at > 0.7 µM. These results indicate that glyphosate is genotoxic in the cells and organisms studied at concentrations of 0.7-7 µM.

  7. State of the Art High-Throughput Approaches to Genotoxicity: Flow Micronucleus, Ames II, GreenScreen and Comet

    Science.gov (United States)

    State of the Art High-Throughput Approaches to Genotoxicity: Flow Micronucleus, Ames II, GreenScreen and Comet (Presented by Dr. Marilyn J. Aardema, Chief Scientific Advisor, Toxicology, Dr. Leon Stankowski, et. al. (6/28/2012)

  8. The bacterial genotoxicity test:issues to be considered in the performance of the test and their recent advances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HakuA

    2002-01-01

    The bacterial genotoxicity test is widely used as an initial screening to determing the genotoxic potential of chemicals for hazard identification.Firstly,I will state about technical issues in the performance of the test,which may largely affect the results of the mutagenicity of test compounds of lead to low concordance with the results between inter-and intra-laboratories.The second issue of my speech will be a brief review on bacterial tester strains that are highly sensitive to the mutagenicity of particular classes of mutagens.These strains are often used to efficiently explore environmental mutagens and to study the mechanisms of mutagenesis.Finally,I will present our recent study on the use of human S9 fractions in the genotoxicity tests to comprehensively evaluate the genotoxic effect to humans.In addition,genetically-engineered tester strains expressing human drug-metabolizing enzymes will be introduced.

  9. Therapeutic efficacies of Coriandrum sativum aqueous extract against metronidazole-induced genotoxicity in Channa punctatus peripheral erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talapatra, Soumendra Nath; Dasgupta, Subham; Guha, Gunjan; Auddy, Moumita; Mukhopadhyay, Aniruddha

    2010-12-01

    Metronidazole (MTZ), a nitroimidazole drug, is primarily used as an anti-protozoan or an anti-bacterial agent in humans, although its genotoxic and carcinogenic effects have been widely reported, particularly in aquatic organisms. MTZ may induce DNA damages through single-strand breaks, modification of bases, DNA-DNA and DNA-protein cross-links, ultimately leading to apoptosis or necrosis. Here, we have assessed the genotoxicity of MTZ in the peripheral erythrocytes of Channa punctatus, using micronucleation (MN) and binucleation (BN) as genotoxicity markers. The therapeutic potential of aqueous extract of Coriandrum sativum against MTZ-induced genotoxicity has also been examined. The results show significant (Psativum leaf extract. Hence, we establish that MTZ can produce considerable degrees of micronucleus and binucleus formation in peripheral erythrocytes of C. punctatus, and such deleterious effect of MTZ treatment can be mitigated by aqueous extract of C. sativum leaves.

  10. Genotoxic Effect of Chronic Exposure to DDT on Lymphocytes, Oral Mucosa and Breast Cells of Female Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ruth De Celis; Ulises Gómez-Pinedo; Hugo Salado-Ponce; Alfredo Feria-Velasco; Alejandro Canales-Aguirre; Eduardo Padilla-Camberos

    2011-01-01

    The genotoxicity of some environmental contaminants may affect human health directly by damaging genetic material and thus plays an important role in cancer development. Xenoestrogens are one kind of environmental pollutants that may alter hormonal routes or directly affect DNA. The number of available biomarkers used to assess genetic risk and cancer is very extensive. The present study evaluated genotoxicity produced by the pesticide DDT on systemic and mammary gland cells obtained from adu...

  11. Comparison of in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of MMA-based polymeric materials and various metallic materials

    OpenAIRE

    İZ, Sultan GÜLÇE; GÜRHAN, Saime İsmet DELİLOĞLU; ŞEN, Bilge Hakan

    2010-01-01

    To determine the in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of some polymeric and metallic implant materials used as base materials in dentistry, based on ISO (International Organization for Standardization) and OECD (Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development) test protocols. Materials and methods: Three different acrylate-based polymeric materials were tested for their in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity (polymethylmethacrylate microspheres [PMMA], a solid cement prepared by mi...

  12. The use of protein biomarkers in ecotoxicology : Studies of oxidative and genotoxic stress in the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis)

    OpenAIRE

    Prevodnik, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Many environmental pollutants, heavy metals and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) among them, are toxic by oxidative stress. Oxidative stress may be defined as a state in an organism when its inherent capacity to handle oxyradicals is surpassed, and it may result in peroxidation of lipids, and damage to proteins and DNA. Thus, genotoxic stress may follow oxidative stress. Little is known about the effects of genotoxic stress in invertebrates, although the occurrence of tumors has been known fo...

  13. Comet assay evaluation of six chemicals of known genotoxic potential in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Cheryl A; Recio, Leslie; Streicker, Michael; Boyle, Molly H; Tanaka, Jin; Shiga, Atsushi; Witt, Kristine L

    2015-07-01

    As a part of an international validation of the in vivo rat alkaline comet assay (comet assay) initiated by the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM) we examined six chemicals for potential to induce DNA damage: 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF), N-nitrosodimethylamine (DMN), o-anisidine, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (1,2-DMH), sodium chloride, and sodium arsenite. DNA damage was evaluated in the liver and stomach of 7- to 9-week-old male Sprague Dawley rats. Of the five genotoxic carcinogens tested in our laboratory, DMN and 1,2-DMH were positive in the liver and negative in the stomach, 2-AAF and o-anisidine produced an equivocal result in liver and negative results in stomach, and sodium arsenite was negative in both liver and stomach. 1,2-DMH and DMN induced dose-related increases in hedgehogs in the same tissue (liver) that exhibited increased DNA migration. However, no cytotoxicity was indicated by the neutral diffusion assay (assessment of highly fragmented DNA) or histopathology in response to treatment with any of the tested chemicals. Therefore, the increased DNA damage resulting from exposure to DMN and 1,2-DMH was considered to represent a genotoxic response. Sodium chloride, a non-genotoxic non-carcinogen, was negative in both tissues as would be predicted. Although only two (1,2-DMH and DMN) out of five genotoxic carcinogens produced clearly positive results in the comet assay, the results obtained for o-anisidine and sodium arsenite in liver and stomach cells are consistent with the known mode of genotoxicity and tissue specificity exhibited by these carcinogens. In contrast, given the known genotoxic mode-of-action and target organ carcinogenicity of 2-AAF, it is unclear why this chemical failed to convincingly increase DNA migration in the liver. Thus, the results of the comet assay validation studies conducted in our laboratory were considered appropriate for five out of the six test chemicals.

  14. From nanotechnology to nanogenotoxicology: genotoxic effect of cobalt-chromium nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zülal Atlı Şekeroğlu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology is a multi-disciplinary technology that processes the materials that can be measured with nanometer-level and combines many research field or discipline. Nanomaterials (NMs are widely used in the fields of science, technology, communication, electronics, industry, pharmacy, medicine, environment, consumer products and military. Until recently little has been known about whether or not nanomaterials have the toxic or hazardous effects on human health and the environment. However, several studies have indicated that exposure to some nanomaterials, e.g. nanoparticles, can cause some adverse effects in humans and animals. Over the last years the number of publications focusing on nanotoxicology has gained momentum, but, there is still a gap about the genotoxicity of nanomaterials.Metal nanoparticles and their alloys with excellent mechanical properties are the materials which can be easily adapted to the mechanical conditions of the musculoskeletal system. Cobalt-chromium alloys are widely used in orthopedic applications as joint prosthesis and bone regeneration material, fillings and dental implants in jaw surgery, and in cardiovascular surgery, especially stent applications. Studies about cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of metal nanoparticles on human indicate that some metal nanoparticles have cytotoxic and genotoxic effects and they may be hazardous for humans. However, a few studies have been reported concerning the genotoxic effects of cobalt-chromium nanoparticles. The data from these studies indicate that cobalt-chromium nanoparticles have cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. It has been stated that the wear debris from implants cause DNA and chromosome damage in patients with cobalt-chromium replacements. It was also found that the risk of urinary cancers such as bladder, ureter, kidney and prostate in patients after hip replacement than among the wider population.Because there are very little biocompatibility and toxicity tests on

  15. Analysis of 75 marketed pharmaceuticals using the GADD45a-GFP 'GreenScreen HC' genotoxicity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastwell, Paul W; Webster, Thomas W; Tate, Matthew; Billinton, Nicholas; Lynch, Anthony M; Harvey, James S; Rees, Robert W; Walmsley, Richard M

    2009-09-01

    The GADD45a-GFP (GreenScreen HC) reporter assay detects genotoxic damage in the human lymphoblastoid TK6 cell line and gives positive results for all classes of genotoxin, including mutagens, aneugens and clastogens. In this study, a collection of 75 marketed pharmaceuticals were tested in the assay. Compounds in the collection represent a broad range of chemical structures, pharmacologies and therapeutic indications, including neoplasia and viral infection where positive genotoxicity results are often associated with the pharmacological activity. Based on the results of this study, two main conclusions can be drawn: (i) the GreenScreen HC is more predictive of in vivo genotoxicity (88%) and genotoxic carcinogenicity (93%) data than the any of the other regulatory in vitro genotoxicity assay and (ii) no compounds were uniquely positive in the GADD45a-GFP assay. This analysis therefore provides additional evidence to support the use of the GADD45a-GFP assay as an effective tool either in early genotoxic liability identification or non-clinical safety assessment of candidate pharmaceuticals during development.

  16. Lead-induced genotoxicity to Vicia faba L. roots in relation with metal cell uptake and initial speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, M; Pinelli, E; Pourrut, B; Silvestre, J; Dumat, C

    2011-01-01

    Formation of organometallic complexes in soil solution strongly influence metals phytoavailability. However, only few studies deal with the influence of metal speciation both on plant uptake and genotoxicity. In the present study, Vicia faba seedlings were exposed for 6h in controlled hydroponic conditions to 5 μM of lead nitrate alone and chelated to varying degrees by different organic ligands. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and citric acid were, respectively, chosen as models of humic substances and low weight organic acids present in natural soil solutions. Visual Minteq software was used to estimate free lead cations concentration and ultimately to design the experimental layout. For all experimental conditions, both micronucleus test and measure of lead uptake by plants were finally performed. Chelation of Pb by EDTA, a strong chelator, dose-dependently increased the uptake in V. faba roots while its genotoxicity was significantly reduced, suggesting a protective role of EDTA. A weak correlation was observed between total lead concentration absorbed by roots and genotoxicity (r(2)=0.65). In contrast, a strong relationship (r(2)=0.93) exists between Pb(2+) concentration in exposure media and genotoxicity in the experiment performed with EDTA. Citric acid induced labile organometallic complexes did not demonstrate any significant changes in lead genotoxicity or uptake. These results demonstrate that metal speciation knowledge could improve the interpretation of V. faba genotoxicity test performed to test soil quality.

  17. The in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity of benzocaine: a brief communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, William J; Bell, Thomas A

    2012-06-01

    Benzocaine has a long history of use in human medicine. However, benzocaine also has been used in aquaculture with finfish for more than 40 years for sedating fish for marking, transport, surgery, and so on, although benzocaine does not have a current Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for this application in the United States. As part of a FDA approval for use as an animal drug, the genotoxicity of benzocaine was evaluated in the in vitro bacterial reverse mutation assay and the forward mutation assay and in vivo in the mouse micronucleus assay. These studies were conducted in compliance with Good Laboratory Practice regulations and according to Veterinary International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines. Based on the results of these studies, benzocaine was determined not to be genotoxic.

  18. Lack of genotoxic potential of acetylated monoglyceride: An alternative plasticiser to phthalates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Alicja; Wedebye, Eva Bay; Niemelä, Jay Russell

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: With a yearly polymer production of more than 400 million tons, phthalates based on non sustainable petrochemical materials are the most used group of plasticisers. Their low biodegradability and endocrine activity suspected to affect reproductive ability of animals and humans caused...... an interest in alternatives. Biodegradable plasticisers produced from sustainable materials, of low toxicity and no endocrine activity offer desirable alternatives to phthalates. The aim of the project was to screen an alternative plasticiser acetoxylated monoglyceride for genotoxic potential. Methods...... substance and the substances in the training set of the model. The (Q)SAR's prediction was followed by in vitro testing using Salmonella/microsome assay (Ames test) with strains TA 98 and TA 100, with and without metabolic activation. Results: There were no warnings for genotoxic fragments (Ashby...

  19. Cytotoxic, mutagenic and genotoxic evaluation of crude extracts and fractions from Piper jericoense with trypanocidal action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedt, A L; Ortiz, I C; García-Huertas, P A; Sáenz, J; de Araujo, A Caldeira; De Mattos, J C P; Rodríguez-Gazquez, M A; Triana-Chávez, O

    2014-03-01

    The current Chagas disease treatment is based on two drugs, nifurtimox and benznidazole, which is considered unsatisfactory, not only because of the narrow therapeutic range but also because of the associated toxicity. Natural products are considered an important source of biologically active compounds against various infectious organisms. Numerous Piper species are used in traditional medicine to treat parasitic diseases. In this paper, we study the activity of extracts and fractions obtained from Piper jericoense plant against epimastigote, trypomastigote and amastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. In addition, we evaluated the cytotoxic, mutagenic and genotoxic activities of the F4 fraction obtained from one of the more promising extracts. We obtained four extracts, one of which presented low toxicity and high trypanocidal activity. This extract was separated into eight fractions, and the F4 fraction presented better results than the other extracts and had a higher selectivity index than the reference drug, benznidazole. This fraction was not cytotoxic, mutagenic or genotoxic.

  20. Genotoxicity of clays with potential use in biopolymers for food packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anoop Kumar; Mortensen, Alicja; Hadrup, Niels

    Genotoxicity of clays with potential use in biopolymers for food packaging Plastics produced from biopolymers are of commercial interest as they are manufactured from renewable resources such as agricultural crop wastes and have the potential to meet environmental and health requirements....... Biopolymers that are strengthened using reinforcing nano-scale fillers may improve the packaging quality by increasing barrier function and heat-resistance. Toxicological data on clays containing a nano-fraction and organo-modified clays remain very limited. The aim of this study is to investigate...... the genotoxic potential of clays that can be used in biopolymers for food contact materials. Two clays were tested in the comet assay using Caco-2 cells (a human colon cancer cell line); a natural montmorillonite (Cloisite®Na+) and an organo-modified montmorillonite (Cloisite®30B). Both clays were tested...

  1. Subcellular Distribution and Genotoxicity of Silica Nanoparticles 
in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangqiang ZHAO

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Silicon nanoparticles are widely used in daily life. Therefore, they attract increased attention because of their potential biotoxicity to the lungs when inhaled. The aims of this study are to explore the organism distribution and genotoxicity of silica nanoparticles in human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B. Methods The biodistribution of silica with different particle sizes in human bronchial epithelial cells was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. DNA damage was detected by single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay. Results TEM revealed that SiO2 nanoparticles with different sizes can be uptaken by cells and be localized in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Compared with micro-silica, nano-silica in BEAS-2B cells can inflict more severe DNA damage (P<0.05. Conclusion The particle size of silica nanoparticles can be used to determine their distribution in biological cells. Compared with micro-silica, nano-silica has higher genotoxicity.

  2. Genotoxicity of SPL (spent pot lining) as measured by Tradescantia bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Vieira, L F; Davide, L C; Gedraite, L S; Campos, J M S; Azevedo, H

    2011-10-01

    Spent Pot Liner (SPL) is a solid waste product generated in the process of aluminum production. Tradescantia micronuclei (Trad-MN) and stamen hair mutation (Trad-SHM) bioassays are very useful tests to assess genotoxicity of environmental pollutants. In the present study, we intended to investigate the genotoxicity of this waste with Tradescantia bioassays using leachates of SPL simulating the natural leachability of SPL in soil. The formation of micronuclei (MN) was found to be concentration dependent. MN frequency enhanced significantly with SPL treatment. In addition, SPL also appeared to increase the percentage of dyads and triads. Trad-SHM assay showed that SPL increases pink mutation events as SPL concentration increases. These results demonstrated that SPL is a cytogenotoxic agent that affects different genetic end-points (induction of micronuclei and point mutations) even at low concentration (2% and 3%).

  3. Genotoxicity of tetrodotoxin from puffer fish tested in root meristem cells of Allium cepa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khora, S S; Panda, K K; Panda, B B

    1997-07-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) extracted and purified from puffer fish Arothron nigropunctatus was tested for genotoxicity employing the root meristem cells of Allium cepa as the assay system. The genotoxicity endpoints investigated were mitotic index (MI), meta-anaphases with spindle aberrations, interphases with micronuclei (MNC) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in metaphase chromosomes. The results demonstrated that TTX inhibited mitosis at concentrations of > or = 30 microM as evident by the fall of MI, but failed to induce MNC at significant levels at any of the concentrations tested (10-100 microM). TTX was thus proved to be neither clastogenic nor aneugenic in the present study. It was, however, noteworthy that TTX at far lower concentrations, 0.1-5.0 microM, significantly enhanced the frequencies of SCE which indicated possible interference of the toxin in DNA replication and repair.

  4. Municipal sludge leachate-induced genotoxicity in mice--a subacute study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Anamika; Chauhan, L K S; Kumar, Dinesh; Gupta, S K

    2005-11-10

    Inappropriate disposal of municipal sludge (MS) results in the leaching of toxic metals and organic chemicals, which can contaminate the surface and ground water leading to the serious health hazards. In this study, the genotoxic potential of the leachate prepared from MS sample was examined in mouse bone marrow cells through chromosomal aberrations (CA), micronucleus test (MT) and comet assay. Analysis of metals and physicochemical parameters of the leachate was also carried out to correlate the genotoxic results. The dried sludge showed high concentrations of heavy metals, viz. Cr, Cu, Pb and Ni. However, in 10% leachate, concentrations of these metals were manifold lower than that of obtained in dried sludge. Male mice orally gavaged to leachates (0.1-0.4 ml/mouse/day) for 15 days revealed significant (Peffect was observed to be dose-dependent. Treatment of mice with leachates also induced significant (Pgenotoxic effects in mammals and suggest risks in human population.

  5. Genotoxicity studies in vitro and in vivo on carminic acid (natural red 4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprieno, G; Boncristiani, G; Loprieno, N

    1992-09-01

    The potential genotoxic activity of carminic acid (CAS no. 1260-17-9; EINECS no. 215-023-3; C.I. no. 75410), a component of natural red colouring products (cochineal: CAS no. 1343-78-8; EINECS no. 215-680-6; C.I. no. 75470), used in food, cosmetics and drugs, has been evaluated by means of a series of short-term tests in vitro and in vivo, namely Salmonella reverse mutation, chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges in vitro on Chinese hamster ovary cells, and the mouse micronucleus test. All studies have produced negative results. The data obtained strongly support the non-mutagenic/non-carcinogenic activity of this compound. Genotoxicity data previously obtained for carminic acid, concerning the induction of a series of other genetic endpoints in different test systems, have also been considered, as have recent findings that indicate lack of carcinogenic activity in the cochineal preparation containing 29.8% carminic acid.

  6. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of copper oxychloride in cultured human lymphocytes using cytogenetic and molecular tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Suleyman; Genc, Ahmet; Buyukleyla, Mehmet; Rencuzogullari, Eyyup

    2016-10-01

    The genotoxicity of copper oxychloride was investigated in human lymphocytes using chromosome aberration (CA) and micronucleus (MN) tests and the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction technique. The lymphocytes were treated with 3, 6, and 12 µg/mL of copper oxychloride for 24 and 48 h. Copper oxychloride increased CA and abnormal cells in a dose-dependent manner. The frequency of MN and micronucleated binuclear cells also increased at all concentrations and treatment periods. However, copper oxychloride cytotoxicity, observed through lower mitotic and nuclear division index, was significantly lower only at the higher concentrations (6 and 12 µg/mL). Copper oxychloride increased the polymorphic bands and decreased genomic template stability. In conclusion, in this study it was confirmed that copper oxychloride has genotoxic potential for human lymphocytes in vitro. Additionally, caution is advised for its use as a fungicide, because it may increase the risk of exposure through the food chain.

  7. Genotoxic effects of linear alkyl benzene sulfonate, sodium pentachlorophenate and dichromate on Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y; Shen, Y

    1992-01-01

    DNA in macro- and micronuclei of Tetrahymena pyriformis treated with linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) and sodium pentachlorophenate (PCP-Na) were determined by microspectrophotometry. The effects on rate of formation of macronuclear DNA extrusion bodies were also studied. We found DNA content of micronuclei in 0.14 ppm LAS and 0.9 ppb PCP-Na was lower than in that of the control, and LAS was able to increase the formation rate of macronuclear DNA extrusion bodies (the formation rate was 54% in 11.3 ppm LAS and 25.6% in 16.7 ppm dichromate). We concluded that 0.14 ppm LAS (below the maximum acceptable toxicant concentration) was genotoxic, whereas 0.014 ppm LAS was not. Dichromate 0.05 ppm and 0.9 ppb PCP-Na, equal to and below the maximum acceptable toxicant concentration, respectively, were potentially genotoxic.

  8. In vitro genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of polydopamine-coated magnetic nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak, Anna; Walawender, Magdalena; Tempka, Dominika; Coy, Emerson; Załęski, Karol; Grześkowiak, Bartosz F; Mrówczyński, Radosław

    2017-10-01

    Synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles and magnetic nanoclusters was performed by the co-precipitation method or solvothermal synthesis, respectively, followed by oxidative polymerization of dopamine, resulting in a polydopamine (PDA) shell. The nanomaterials obtained were described using TEM, FTIR and magnetic measurements. For the first time, cyto- and genotoxicity studies of polydopamine-coated nanostructures were performed on cancer and normal cell lines, providing in-depth insight into the toxicity of such materials. The tests conducted, e.g. ROS, apoptosis and DNA double-break of the nanomaterials obtained revealed the low toxicity of these structures. Thus, these results prove the biocompatibility and low genotoxicity of these materials and provide new data on the toxicity of PDA-coated materials, which is of great importance for their biomedical application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of the genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of semipurified fractions from the Mediterranean brown algae, Dictyopteris membranacea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najoua Akremi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dictyopteris membranacea, a species of Mediterranean brown algae,is believed to have potential pharmacological and nutritional applications. However, such potentials only make sense when devoid of any adverse health consequences. The present study should be seen in this context. It aimed at evaluating the genotoxicity and cytoxicity of its organic extract (F0 and semi purified fractions (F 4, F 5, and F 6.Extracts were tested using the bacterial Vitotox® test and micronucleus assay in different concentrations (from 1.25 μg/mL up to 100 μg/mL, depending on the test and the extract. Applied concentrations were based on a preliminary dose-finding test with the neutral red uptake assay. The results show that all extracts were not genotoxic in the presence or absence of a rat metabolic enzyme fraction (S9. This is encouraging and justifies further investigations on the therapeutic and other values of this algae.

  10. In vivo genotoxic effects of dietary heme iron on rat colon mucosa and ex vivo effects on colon cells monitored by an optimized alkaline comet assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Océane, C Martin

    2015-04-01

    In conclusion, our results offer a suitable protocol to evaluate genotoxicity on in vivo cryopreserved colon mucosa and on in vitro murine colonic cells, with a middle throughput capacity. This protocol confirms the increase of genotoxicity in rat colon mucosa after an heme-iron diet. Moreover, this protocol enables the demonstration that aldehydes from heme-induced lipoperoxidation are responsible for this increase of genotoxicity.

  11. Evaluation of cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and apoptosis of wastewater before and after disinfection with performic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragazzo, Patrizia; Feretti, Donatella; Monarca, Silvano; Dominici, Luca; Ceretti, Elisabetta; Viola, Gaia; Piccolo, Valentina; Chiucchini, Nicoletta; Villarini, Milena

    2017-06-01

    Disinfection with performic acid (PFA) represents an emerging technology in wastewater treatment. Many recent studies indicate its effectiveness and suitability as a disinfectant for different applications; several have demonstrated its reliability as an alternative to chlorine for disinfecting secondary effluents from urban wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Some disinfection technologies, in relation to their oxidative power, lead to the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs), some of which are of concern for their toxic and carcinogenic potential. The aim of this study was to investigate potential genotoxic, cytotoxic, and mutagenic effects of this disinfection agent on treated secondary effluent coming from a municipal WWTP. A strategy with multiple short-term tests and different target cells (bacterial, plant, and mammalian) was adopted to explore a relatively wide range of potential genotoxic events. The Ames test (point mutation in Salmonella), the micronucleus (chromosomal damage) and Comet tests (primary DNA damage) on human hepatic cells (HepG2) were conducted to detect mutagenicity and chromosomal DNA alterations. DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial potential assays were conducted to evaluate apoptosis in the same kinds of cells. Mutagenic and clastogenic effect potentials were evaluated by examining micronucleus formation in Allium cepa root cells. In all the in vitro tests, carried out on both disinfected and non-disinfected effluents, negative results were always obtained for mutagenic and genotoxic effects. In the Allium cepa tests, however, some non-concentrated wastewater samples after PFA treatment induced a slight increase in micronucleus frequencies in root cells, but not in a dose-related manner. In conclusion, PFA applied for disinfection to a secondary effluent from a municipal wastewater treatment plant did not contribute to the release of genotoxic or mutagenic compounds. Further studies are required to establish to which extent

  12. Modulation of genotoxicity of oxidative mutagens by glycyrrhizic acid from Glycyrrhiza glabra L.

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    Prabhjit Kaur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The chemopreventive effects of certain phytoconstituents can be exploited for their use as functional foods, dietary supplements and even as drugs. The natural compounds, acting as anti-genotoxic and free radical scavenging compounds, may serve as potent chemopreventive agents. These can inhibit DNA modulatory activities of mutagens and help preventing pathological processes. Objectives: Present study on Glycyrrhiza glabra L., a promising medicinal plant, widely used in traditional medicine, focused on the bioassay-guided fractionation of its extracts for the isolation of certain phytochemicals with anti-genotoxic potential against oxidative mutagens. Materials and Methods: The methanol extract of Glycyrrhiza glabra rhizomes was subjected to column chromatography, and isolated fraction was evaluated for its anti-genotoxic and antioxidant potential using SOS chromotest, Comet assay, and DPPH radical scavenging assay. Results: GLG fraction, which was characterized as Glycyrrhizic acid, inhibited the genotoxicity of oxidative mutagens viz., H 2 O 2 and 4NQOquite efficiently. In SOS chromotest, using E.coli PQ37 tester strain, it inhibited induction factor induced by H 2 O 2 and 4NQO by 75.54% and 71.69% at the concentration of 121.46 μM,respectively. In Comet assay, it reduced the tail moment induced by H 2 O 2 and 4NQO by 70.21% and 69.04%, respectively, at the same concentration in human blood lymphocytes. The isolated fraction also exhibited DPPH free radical scavenging activity and was able to scavenge 85.95% radicals at a concentration of 120 μM. Conclusion: Glycyrrhizic acid is a potential modulator of genotoxins as well as efficient scavenger of free radicals.

  13. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of calcium silicate-based cements on an osteoblast lineage

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    Ana Lívia GOMES-CORNÉLIO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several calcium silicate-based biomaterials have been developed in recent years, in addition to Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and apoptosis/necrosis in human osteoblast cells (SAOS-2 of pure calcium silicate-based cements (CSC and modified formulations: modified calcium silicate-based cements (CSCM and three resin-based calcium silicate cements (CSCR1 (CSCR 2 (CSCR3. The following tests were performed after 24 hours of cement extract exposure: methyl-thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT, apoptosis/necrosis assay and comet assay. The negative control (CT- was performed with untreated cells, and the positive control (CT+ used hydrogen peroxide. The data for MTT and apoptosis were submitted to analysis of variance and Bonferroni’s posttest (p < 0.05, and the data for the comet assay analysis, to the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (p < 0.05. The MTT test showed no significant difference among the materials in 2 mg/mL and 10 mg/mL concentrations. CSCR3 showed lower cell viability at 10 mg/mL. Only CSC showed lower cell viability at 50 mg/mL. CSCR1, CSCR2 and CSCR3 showed a higher percentage of initial apoptosis than the control in the apoptosis test, after 24 hours exposure. The same cements showed no genotoxicity in the concentration of 2 mg/mL, with the comet assay. CSC and CSCR2 were also not genotoxic at 10 mg/mL. All experimental materials showed viability with MTT. CSC and CSCR2 presented a better response to apoptosis and genotoxicity evaluation in the 10 mg/mL concentration, and demonstrated a considerable potential for use as reparative materials.

  14. Genotoxicity and Mutagenicity of Suspended Particulate Matter of River Water and Waste Water Samples

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    Georg Reifferscheid

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Suspended particulate matter of samples of river water and waste water treatment plants was tested for genotoxicity and mutagenicity using the standardized umu assay and two versions of the Ames microsuspension assay. The study tries to determine the entire DNA-damaging potential of the water samples and the distribution of DNA-damaging substances among the liquid phase and solid phase. Responsiveness and sensitivity of the bioassays are compared.

  15. Qualitative and quantitative approaches in the dose-response assessment of genotoxic carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Shoji; Gi, Min; Kakehashi, Anna; Wanibuchi, Hideki; Matsumoto, Michiharu

    2016-05-01

    Qualitative and quantitative approaches are important issues in field of carcinogenic risk assessment of the genotoxic carcinogens. Herein, we provide quantitative data on low-dose hepatocarcinogenicity studies for three genotoxic hepatocarcinogens: 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) and N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN). Hepatocarcinogenicity was examined by quantitative analysis of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) positive foci, which are the preneoplastic lesions in rat hepatocarcinogenesis and the endpoint carcinogenic marker in the rat liver medium-term carcinogenicity bioassay. We also examined DNA damage and gene mutations which occurred through the initiation stage of carcinogenesis. For the establishment of points of departure (PoD) from which the cancer-related risk can be estimated, we analyzed the above events by quantitative no-observed-effect level and benchmark dose approaches. MeIQx at low doses induced formation of DNA-MeIQx adducts; somewhat higher doses caused elevation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyquanosine levels; at still higher doses gene mutations occurred; and the highest dose induced formation of GST-P positive foci. These data indicate that early genotoxic events in the pathway to carcinogenesis showed the expected trend of lower PoDs for earlier events in the carcinogenic process. Similarly, only the highest dose of IQ caused an increase in the number of GST-P positive foci in the liver, while IQ-DNA adduct formation was observed with low doses. Moreover, treatment with DEN at low doses had no effect on development of GST-P positive foci in the liver. These data on PoDs for the markers contribute to understand whether genotoxic carcinogens have a threshold for their carcinogenicity. The most appropriate approach to use in low dose-response assessment must be approved on the basis of scientific judgment.

  16. Cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of surface water from the Pitimbu river, northeastern/RN Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Lucila Carmem Monte Egito; Maria das Graças Medeiros; Silvia Regina Batistuzzo de Medeiros; Lucymara Fassarella Agnez-Lima

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the onion (Allium cepa) root test was used to evaluate the genotoxicity of the Pitimbu River (Natal city, Brazil) surface water. The water was collected at five sampling sites along the river and one sample was obtained after the treatment (flocculation, chlorination and pH correction) of the river water for human consumption. All raw river water samples increased the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities and/or micronuclei and two of the water samples produced alterations in ...

  17. Epigenetic alterations induced by genotoxic occupational and environmental human chemical carcinogens: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Grace; Pogribny, Igor P; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Rusyn, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that epigenetic alterations play an important role in chemically-induced carcinogenesis. Although the epigenome and genome may be equally important in carcinogenicity, the genotoxicity of chemical agents and exposure-related transcriptomic responses have been more thoroughly studied and characterized. To better understand the evidence for epigenetic alterations of human carcinogens, and the potential association with genotoxic endpoints, we conducted a systematic review of published studies of genotoxic carcinogens that reported epigenetic endpoints. Specifically, we searched for publications reporting epigenetic effects for the 28 agents and occupations included in Monograph Volume 100F of the International Agency for the Research on Cancer (IARC) that were classified as "carcinogenic to humans" (Group 1) with strong evidence of genotoxic mechanisms of carcinogenesis. We identified a total of 158 studies that evaluated epigenetic alterations for 12 of these 28 carcinogenic agents and occupations (1,3-butadiene, 4-aminobiphenyl, aflatoxins, benzene, benzidine, benzo[a]pyrene, coke production, formaldehyde, occupational exposure as a painter, sulfur mustard, and vinyl chloride). Aberrant DNA methylation was most commonly studied, followed by altered expression of non-coding RNAs and histone changes (totaling 85, 59 and 25 studies, respectively). For 3 carcinogens (aflatoxins, benzene and benzo[a]pyrene), 10 or more studies reported epigenetic effects. However, epigenetic studies were sparse for the remaining 9 carcinogens; for 4 agents, only 1 or 2 published reports were identified. While further research is needed to better identify carcinogenesis-associated epigenetic perturbations for many potential carcinogens, published reports on specific epigenetic endpoints can be systematically identified and increasingly incorporated in cancer hazard assessments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessment of the Genotoxicity of olive mill waste water (OMWW) with the Vicia faba Micronucleus test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Hajjouji, H.; Pinelli, E.; Revel, J. C.; Hafidi, M.

    2009-07-01

    Olive mill waste water (OMW) can cause serious environmental hazards in olive producing countries, especially around the Mediterranean basin. In Morocco, olive mills are noe of the foremost polluters: the volume of OMW produced annually is estimated at 250 000 m{sup 3} during the season of production. the present study concerns the genotoxicity of OMW generated in mills producing olive oil in Morocco. (Author)

  19. Cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of food-borne nitriles in a liver in vitro model

    OpenAIRE

    Franziska Kupke; Corinna Herz; Hanschen, Franziska S.; Stefanie Platz; Grace A. Odongo; Simone Helmig; Bartolomé Rodríguez, María M.; Monika Schreiner; Sascha Rohn; Evelyn Lamy

    2016-01-01

    Isothiocyanates are the most intensively studied breakdown products of glucosinolates from Brassica plants and well recognized for their pleiotropic effects against cancer but also for their genotoxic potential. However, knowledge about the bioactivity of glucosinolate-borne nitriles in foods is very poor. As determined by GC-MS, broccoli glucosinolates mainly degrade to nitriles as breakdown products. The cytotoxicity of nitriles in human HepG2 cells and primary murine hepatocytes was margin...

  20. Corchorus olitorius (jute) extract induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity on human multiple myeloma cells (ARH-77).

    Science.gov (United States)

    İşeri, Özlem Darcansoy; Yurtcu, Erkan; Sahin, Feride Iffet; Haberal, Mehmet

    2013-06-01

    Corchorus olitorius L. (Malvaceae) has industrial importance in world jute production and is a widely cultivated and consumed crop in Cyprus and in some Arabic countries. The present study investigated cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of leaf extracts (LE) and seed extracts (SE) of the C. olitorius on the multiple myeloma-derived ARH-77 cells. The extracts were also evaluated for their total phenol content (TPC) and free radical scavenging activity (FRSA). C. olitorius was collected from Nicosia, Cyprus. TPC and FRSA were measured by Folin-Ciocalteu and DPPH free radical methods, respectively. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by the MTT assay (4-2048 µg/mL range), and DNA damage (at IC50 and ½IC50) was measured by the comet assay. The LE had significantly higher total phenol (78 mg GAE/g extract) than the SE (2 mg GAE/g extract) with significantly higher FRSA (IC50 LE: 23 µg/mL and IC50 SE: 10 401 µg/mL). Both LE and SE exerted cytotoxic effects on cells after 48 h. The IC50 of SE (17 µg/mL) was lower than LE (151 µg/mL), which demonstrates its higher cytotoxicity on cells. The extracts were applied at 150 and 75 µg/mL for LE and at 17 and 8.5 µg/mL for SE, and the results of the comet assay revealed that the extracts induced genotoxic damage on ARH-77 cells. In both 48 h leaf and seed extract treatments, genotoxic damage significantly increased with increasing concentrations at relevant cytotoxic concentrations. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the high cytotoxic potential of C. olitorius SE and the genotoxic potential of LE and SE.

  1. Electrochemical Genotoxicity Assay Based on a SOS/umu Test Using Hydrodynamic Voltammetry in a Droplet

    OpenAIRE

    Kazuharu Sugawara; Masami Fukushima; Shigeru Taguchi; Noriko Hata; Kazuto Sazawa; Yasuaki Nanayama; Hideki Kuramitz

    2012-01-01

    The SOS/umu genotoxicity assay evaluates the primary DNA damage caused by chemicals from the β-galactosidase activity of S. typhimurium. One of the weaknesses of the common umu test system based on spectrophotometric detection is that it is unable to measure samples containing a high concentration of colored dissolved organic matters, sediment, and suspended solids. However, umu tests with electrochemical detection techniques prove to be a better strategy because it causes less inter...

  2. Aroclor 1254 increases the genotoxicity of several carcinogens to liver primary cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza-Figueroa, T.; Lopez-Revilla, R.; Villa-Trevino, S.

    1985-01-01

    The genotoxicity of both direct-acting and precarcinogenic chemicals was evaluated in liver primary cell cultures (LPCC) from untreated and Aroclor 1254 (Ar) pretreated rats. Hepatocytes were isolated from partially hepatectomized rats and their DNA was labeled in vitro with (/sup 3/H) dThd; the molecular weight of single-stranded DNA was determined by alkaline sucrose sedimentation. Two parameters of DNA damage were defined: 1) the mean effective dose (ED50), i.e., the carcinogen concentration that decreased the DNA molecular weight to half the original, and 2) the DNA breaking potency (DBP), i.e., the number of breaks per DNA molecule produced by 2 h exposure to 1mM concentration of the chemical. Two hours exposure of LPCC from untreated rats to the direct-acting alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) (6.8-340..mu..M) and to the precarcinogens benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) (0.05-0.33 mM) and dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) (0.45-16 mM) produced a concentration-dependent decrease in the molecular weight of DNA. Pretreatment of rats with Ar decreased significantly the sedimentation velocity of DNA and increased five, three, and two times the DBP of MNNG, BaP, and DMN, respectively. These results show that Ar-pretreatment of rats increases the genotoxicity of both direct-acting and precarcinogenic chemicals and suggest that Ar might increase the genotoxicity of chemical carcinogens perhaps by enhancing their metabolic activation, by producing direct genotoxic effects, or both. Our results also emphasize the carcinogenic risk that the environmental pollution by polychlorinated biphenyls might represent to humans.

  3. Aroclor 1254 increases the genotoxicity of several carcinogens to liver primary cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Figueroa, T; López-Revilla, R; Villa-Treviño, S

    1985-01-01

    The genotoxicity of both direct-acting and precarcinogenic chemicals was evaluated in liver primary cell cultures (LPCC) from untreated and Aroclor 1254 (Ar) pretreated rats. Hepatocytes were isolated from partially hepatectomized rats and their DNA was labeled in vitro with [3H] dThd; the molecular weight of single-stranded DNA was determined by alkaline sucrose sedimentation. Two parameters of DNA damage were defined: the mean effective dose (ED50), i.e., the carcinogen concentration that decreased the DNA molecular weight to half the original, and the DNA breaking potency (DBP), i.e., the number of breaks per DNA molecule produced by 2 h exposure to 1 mM concentration of the chemical. Two hours exposure of LPCC from untreated rats to the direct-acting alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) (6.8-340 microM) and to the precarcinogens benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) (0.05-0.33 mM) and dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) (0.45-16 mM) produced a concentration-dependent decrease in the molecular weight of DNA. Pretreatment of rats with Ar decreased significantly the sedimentation velocity of DNA and increased five, three, and two times the DBP of MNNG, BaP, and DMN, respectively. These results show that Ar-pretreatment of rats increases the genotoxicity of both direct-acting and precarcinogenic chemicals and suggest that Ar might increase the genotoxicity of chemical carcinogens perhaps by enhancing their metabolic activation, by producing direct genotoxic effects, or both. Our results also emphasize the carcinogenic risk that the environmental pollution by polychlorinated biphenyls might represent to humans.

  4. Dimethylnitrosamine genotoxicity in rat liver primary cell cultures with low cytochrome P-450 levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Figueroa, T

    1984-12-01

    Liver primary cell cultures (LPCC) with decreasing concentrations of cytochrome P-450 were used to investigate the genotoxicity of the hepatic carcinogen dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) and the correlation between DMN genotoxicity and cytochrome P-450 levels. Hepatocytes were isolated from partially hepatectomized rats and incubated with [3H]thymidine; single-strand DNA molecular weight was determined by alkaline sucrose sedimentation. The molecular weight of DNA decreased 50% in LPCC plated either 2 or 24 h before being treated for 24 h with 70 micron DMN. Cytochrome P-450 content was 188 pmol per mg protein in freshly isolated hepatocytes, whereas it was 70 and 32 pmol per mg protein in hepatocytes that had been cultured 24 and 48 h, respectively. Incorporation of 14C into acid-insoluble material was the same in LPCC exposed 24 h to [14C]DMN starting either 2 or 24 h after cell plating. At non-toxic concentrations (0.01-1 microM), SKF 525-A, an inhibitor of mixed-function oxidase enzymes, inhibited approximately 20% of the binding of 14C from [14C]DMN to acid-insoluble material in LPCC plated either 2 or 24 h before they were exposed to DMN for 24 h. Hepatocyte cultures exposed to the direct-acting alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (at concentrations ranging between 6.8 X 10(-8) and 6.8 X 10(-5) M) starting 2 and 24 h after plating, exhibited significant unscheduled DNA synthesis. These results indicate that DMN genotoxicity was similar in LPCC differing considerably in cytochrome P-450 levels, and they suggest that DMN genotoxicity in these cultures is due mainly to similar DMN activation than to decreased DNA repair.

  5. Genotoxic evaluation of infusions of Urera baccifera leaves and roots in Allium cepa cells

    OpenAIRE

    Amanda L. Gindri; Ana Paula D. Coelho; Solange B. Tedesco; Athayde, Margareth L.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The aqueous extracts of Urera baccifera Wedd. leaves and roots are used to inflammatory and infectious diseases in Brazilian folk medicine. Oxalic acid, a substance co-related with toxicity and stinging, was already quantified in this plant. Aims: To evaluate the action of leaves and roots infusions (1, 30, 75 g/L) and the oxalic acid standard on mitosis as indicative of presumably antimitotic and genotoxic actions, using the Allium cepa test. Methods: Oxalic acid was quanti...

  6. Genotoxic evaluation of infusions of Urera baccifera leaves and roots in Allium cepa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L. Gindri

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Context: The aqueous extracts of Urera baccifera Wedd. leaves and roots are used to inflammatory and infectious diseases in Brazilian folk medicine. Oxalic acid, a substance co-related with toxicity and stinging, was already quantified in this plant. Aims: To evaluate the action of leaves and roots infusions (1, 30, 75 g/L and the oxalic acid standard on mitosis as indicative of presumably antimitotic and genotoxic actions, using the Allium cepa test. Methods: Oxalic acid was quantified in the roots and leaves infusions by High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-DAD, with the mobile phase of 25 mM phosphate buffer (pH 2.5: acetonitrile at 95:5 (v/v. To the genotoxicity test, onion bulbs were used. After the rootlets germination, each bulb was submitted for 24 h of the individual treatments. Were analyzed 1000 cells per bulb, in a total of 5000 cells per treatment. Results: Results showed that all concentrations of roots infusions induced chromosomes abnormalities, except for the highest, that caused a substantial inhibition in the mitosis, precluding to be observed abnormalities. In the leaves infusions, only the two higher concentrations caused the highest values of damage in the cellular cycle. The oxalic acid also caused abnormalities in the mitosis, and may be considered responsible by part of the genotoxic action of U. baccifera. Conclusions: Oxalic acid can be responsible by part of the chromosomal abnormalities caused by U. baccifera, although, there must have more metabolites that evoke the same effect promoting the genotoxic effect of this nettle.

  7. Protective role of taurine against genotoxic damage in mice treated with methotrexate and tamoxfine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Sally S; Hafiz, Nagla A; Abd El-Rahim, Abeer H

    2011-01-01

    The genotoxic actions of anti-neoplastic drugs can lead to the development of secondary cancers in patients in extended remission. One of the most attractive approaches to disease prevention involves the use of natural antioxidants to protect tissue against toxic injury. We investigated the modulatory effects of exogenously administered taurine, on the genotoxicity of two well known anti-neoplastic drugs methotrexate (MTX) and tamoxifen (TAM) in Swiss albino mice. The animals were randomly divided into six groups consisting of ten mice each. Two groups were received single intraperitoneal injection of MTX (10 mg/kgb.wt.) and TAM (50 mg/kgb.wt.) to induce genotoxicity. Two other groups were treated orally with taurine (100 mg/kgb.wt.) for nine days prior to MTX and TAM administration. A vehicle treated control group and taurine control groups were also included. The protective effects of taurine were monitored by apoptosis assays and level of reduced glutathione (GSH), a key antioxidant, in liver, chromosomal aberrations in somatic and germ cells as well as sperm count, motility and morphology. The results indicated that taurine pre-treatment showed significant increment in the levels of GSH content, reduction in DNA fragmentation and ladder formation in hepatic tissue, suggesting the antioxidant activity of taurine may reduce the toxic effects of MTX and TAM. Treatment with taurine showed also significant reduction in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in both somatic and germ cells. Moreover, it increases sperm count and motility, and decreases the incidence of sperm abnormalities. In conclusion, it appears that taurine protects against anti-neoplastic drugs-induced genotoxicity in somatic and germ tissues and may be of therapeutic potential in alleviating the risk of secondary tumors in chemotherapy.

  8. Analyses of Cytotoxic and Genotoxic Potentials of Loranthus micranthus using the Allium cepa Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.A. Iwalokun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Loranthus micranthus (LM is one of the Nigerian folk medicinal plants used chronically for the management of immuno-depressive illnesses such as diabetes mellitus, cancer and hypertension. There has not been report on the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of the plant. This study was conducted to investigate the cytotoxic, mitodepressive and genotoxic effects of LM against Allium cepa root cells. The roots of Allium cepa (onion bulb were exposed to different concentrations (2.5-40 mg/mL of L. micranthus aqueous leaf extract (LMAE using NaN3 (100 ug/mL and distilled water as positive and negative controls and examined macroscopically and microscopically for toxic effects. Phytochemical screening of the plant was also carried out using conventional methods. LMEA was found to significantly (p0.05 at 5 mg/mL compared to the control and did not display significant variation in activity between 20 and 40 mg/mL concentrations respectively (p>0.05. Furthermore, LMAE at 10 mg/mL was found to produce the highest number of aberrant cells but failed to elicit c-mitosis found only at 40 mg/mL. LMAE at 5 mg/mL produced the least number of aberrant cells and also failed to induce micronucleus and binucleated cell formation found mostly at 40 mg/mL. Chromosomal aberrations including stickiness, multipolar anaphase and lagging chromosomes, breaks and bridges were induced by all the extract concentrations tested but not dose-dependently. Tannins, alkaloids, saponins and flavonoids were also present in the extract. Our findings indicate that LM is cytotoxic, mitodepressive and genotoxic to Allium cepa especially at doses beyond pharmacological range in vitro and suggest for safety reasons, the continuous use of this plant at lower concentrations for human phytomedicine coupled with a need to conduct further in vivo genotoxic tests.

  9. Cytotoxic and Genotoxic effects of Arsenic and Lead on Human Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (AMSCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakoori, Ar; Ahmad, A

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic and lead, known to have genotoxic and mutagenic effects, are ubiquitously distributed in the environment. The presence of arsenic in drinking water has been a serious health problem in many countries. Human exposure to these metals has also increased due to rapid industrialization and their use in formulation of many products. Liposuction material is a rich source of stem cells. In the present study cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of these metals were tested on adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs). Cells were exposed to 1-10 μg/ml and 10-100 μg/ml concentration of arsenic and lead, respectively, for 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. The cytotoxic effects were measured by neutral red uptake assay, while the genotoxic effects were tested by comet assay. The growth of cells decreased with increasing concentration and the duration of exposure to arsenic. Even the morphology of cells was changed; they became round at 10 μg /ml of arsenic. The cell growth was also decreased after exposure to lead, though it proved to be less toxic when cells were exposed for longer duration. The cell morphology remained unchanged. DNA damage was observed in the metal treated cells. Different parameters of comet assay were investigated for control and treated cells which indicated more DNA damage in arsenic treated cells compared to that of lead. Intact nuclei were observed in control cells. Present study clearly demonstrates that both arsenic and lead have cytotoxic and genotoxic effects on AMSCs, though arsenic compared to lead has more deleterious effects on AMSCs.

  10. Cytotoxic and Genotoxic Effects of Arsenic and Lead on Human Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (AMSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakoori A

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic and lead, known to have genotoxic and mutagenic effects, are ubiquitously distributed in the environment. The presence of arsenic in drinking water has been a serious health problem in many countries. Human exposure to these metals has also increased due to rapid industrialization and their use in formulation of many products. Liposuction material is a rich source of stem cells. In the present study cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of these metals were tested on adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs. Cells were exposed to 1-10 µg/ml and 10-100 µg/ml concentration of arsenic and lead, respectively, for 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. The cytotoxic effects were measured by neutral red uptake assay, while the genotoxic effects were tested by comet assay. The growth of cells decreased with increasing concentration and the duration of exposure to arsenic. Even the morphology of cells was changed; they became round at 10 µg /ml of arsenic. The cell growth was also decreased after exposure to lead, though it proved to be less toxic when cells were exposed for longer duration. The cell morphology remained unchanged. DNA damage was observed in the metal treated cells. Different parameters of comet assay were investigated for control and treated cells which indicated more DNA damage in arsenic treated cells compared to that of lead. Intact nuclei were observed in control cells. Present study clearly demonstrates that both arsenic and lead have cytotoxic and genotoxic effects on AMSCs, though arsenic compared to lead has more deleterious effects on AMSCs.

  11. Genotoxic and mutagenic effects of lipid-coated CdSe/ZnS quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Mélanie; Di Giorgio, Carole; Berque-Bestel, Isabelle; Aime, Ahissan; Pichon, Benoit P; Jammes, Yves; Barthélémy, Philippe; De Méo, Michel

    2013-01-20

    We proposed to evaluate the genotoxicity and mutagenicity of a new quantum dots (QDs) nanoplatform (QDsN), consisting of CdSe/ZnS core-shell QDs encapsulated by a natural fusogenic lipid (1,2-di-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC)) and functionalized by a nucleolipid N-[5'-(2',3'-di-oleoyl) uridine]-N',N',N'-trimethylammoniumtosylate (DOTAU). This QDs nanoplatform may represent a new therapeutic tool for the diagnosis and treatment of human cancers. The genotoxic, mutagenic and clastogenic effects of QDsN were compared to those of cadmium chloride (CdCl(2)). Three assays were used: (1) the Salmonella/microsome assay with four tester strains, (2) the comet assay and (3) the micronucleus test on CHO cells. The contribution of simulated sunlight was studied in the three assays while oxidative events were only explored in the comet assay in aliquots pretreated with the antioxidant l-ergothioneine. We found that QDsN could enter CHO-K1 cells and accumulate in cytoplasmic vesicles. It was not mutagenic in the Salmonella/mutagenicity test whereas CdCl(2) was weakly positive. In the dark, both the QDsN and CdCl(2) similarly induced dose-dependent increases in single-strand breaks and micronuclei. Exposure to simulated sunlight significantly potentiated the genotoxic activities of both QDsN and CdCl(2), but did not significantly increase micronucleus frequencies. l-Ergothioneine significantly reduced but did not completely suppress the DNA-damaging activity of QDsN and CdCl(2). The present results clearly point to the genotoxic properties and the risk of long-term adverse effects of such a nanoplatform if used for human anticancer therapy and diagnosis in the future.

  12. Evaluation of genotoxic activity of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate in human peripheral lymphocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Kubra Kurt; Lale Donbak; Ahmet Kayraldiz

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Antiretroviral drugs used in the treatment of HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) iinfection, treat by preventing the proliferation of HIV in human body. People with HIV have to use this drugs for lifelong because of inability of the drugs to eradicate the viruses. In this study, we investigated the in vitro genotoxic activity of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate one of the antiretroviral drugs, in human peripheral lymphocytes. Material and Methods: The cells were treated with four d...

  13. Evaluation of the Genotoxicity and Cytotoxicity of Semipurified Fractions from the Mediterranean Brown Algae, Dictyopteris membranacea

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Dictyopteris membranacea, a species of Mediterranean brown algae, is believed to have potential pharmacological and nutritional applications. However, such potentials only make sense when devoid of any adverse health consequences. The present study should be seen in this context. It aimed at evaluating the genotoxicity and cytoxicity of its organic extract (F0) and semi purified fractions (F4, F5, and F6). Extracts were tested using the bacterial Vitotox® test and micronucleus assay in differ...

  14. Sucrose, glucose and fructose have similar genotoxicity in the rat colon and affect the metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Max; Baunsgaard, D.; Autrup, H.

    2008-01-01

    . The metabonomic studies indicated disturbed amino acid metabolism and decrease in plasma and urinary acetate as a common feature for all sugars and confirmed triglyceridemic effects of fructose. In conclusion, the genotoxicity may be related to the altered chemical environment in the caecum and thereby also...... in the colon but we found no related changes in insulin resistance or oxidative stress. (C) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  15. Protein serine/threonine phosphatase PPEF-1 suppresses genotoxic stress response via dephosphorylation of PDCD5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Yeon; Seo, Jaesung; Choi, Hyo-Kyoung; Oh, Hye-Jeong; Guk, Garam; Lee, Yoo-Hyun; Lee, Jeongmin; Jun, Woo Jin; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Yoon, Ho-Geun

    2017-01-01

    Programmed cell death 5 (PDCD5) is believed to play a crucial role in p53 activation; however, the underlying mechanism of how PDCD5 function is regulated during apoptosis remains obscure. Here, we report that the serine/threonine phosphatase PPEF-1 interacts with and dephosphorylates PDCD5 at Ser-119, which leads to PDCD5 destabilization. Overexpression of wild-type PPEF-1, but not inactive PPEF-1D172N, efficiently suppressed CK2α-mediated stabilization of PDCD5 and p53-mediated apoptosis in response to etoposide (ET). Conversely, PPEF-1 knockdown further enhanced genotoxic stress responses. Notably, PPEF-1 suppressed p53-mediated genotoxic stress response via negative regulation of PDCD5. We also determined that overexpression of wild-type PPEF-1, but not inactive PPEF-1D172N, significantly increased tumorigenic growth and chemoresistance of A549 human lung carcinoma cells. Collectively, these data demonstrate that PPEF-1 plays a pivotal role in tumorigenesis of lung cancer cells by reducing PDCD5-mediated genotoxic stress responses. PMID:28051100

  16. Evaluation of the genotoxic potential of standardized extract of Glycyrrhiza glabra (GutGard™).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, C V; Sundarajan, K; Gupta, Anumita; Srikanth, H S; Edwin, Jothie; Agarwal, Amit

    2011-12-01

    Glycyrrhiza glabra Linn. (licorice) is widespread throughout the Mediterranean region and certain areas of Asia. Historically, the dried rhizome and root of the plant were used by the Chinese, Egyptian, Greek, Indian, and Roman civilizations as expectorant and carminative. In the modern medicinal system, licorice is used to treat liver ailments, dyspepsia, bronchitis, rheumatoid arthritis etc. Despite the extensive pharmacological applications, the genotoxic potential of G. glabra extract (GutGard™) has not been evaluated. Hence, this study was conducted to investigate the genotoxic potential of GutGard™ using battery of in vitro test systems: bacterial reverse mutation test (Ames II™), chromosome aberration (CA) and micronucleus (MN) tests. GutGard™ did not show significant increase in number of revertant colonies in Salmonella typhimurium strains (TA98 and TAMix) with/without S9 fraction. In CA and MN studies, GutGard™ did not show clastogenic effect at 4 and 18 h treatments with and without S9 fraction. Results indicated that GutGard™ is not mutagenic in a battery of genotoxicity tests.

  17. The anticancer homeopathic composite "Canova Method" is not genotoxic for human lymphocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Igor C; Lima, Patrícia D L; Cardoso, Plínio C S; Khayat, André S; Bahia, Marcelo O; Buchi, Dorli de Freitas; Cabral, Isabel R; Burbano, Rommel R

    2003-06-30

    The Canova Method (CM) is a homeopathic medicine indicated for the treatment of patients with cancer and for pathologies that involve a depressed immune system, such as AIDS. This product is composed of homeopathic dilutions of Aconitum napellus, Arsenicum album (arsenic trioxide), Bryonia alba, Lachesis muta venom and Thuya occidentalis. It stimulates the immune system by activating macrophages. Activated macrophages stimulate the lymphocytes so that they increase their cytotoxic action in response to tumoral growth or infection. Given that the CM stimulates and accelerates the activity of macrophages and lymphocytes, we evaluated genotoxic effects induced in human lymphocytes treated with this homeopathic medication in vitro. Structural and numerical chromosomal aberrations were scored for the assessment of induced genotoxic effects, while the variation in mitotic index was considered as a monitor for induced cellular toxicity. The lymphocytes were cultivated for 24, 48 or 72 h in the following final concentrations of the medicinal composite CM: 4, 8 and 12%. Treatments with the CM did not affect mitotic indexes, nor did they provoke chromosomal aberrations, when compared with untreated controls. There was no cytotoxicity or genotoxicity at the chromosomal level.

  18. Genotoxicity studies of glycidol fatty acid ester (glycidol linoleate) and glycidol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Naohiro; Fujii, Kenkichi; Sarada, Miko; Saito, Hitoshi; Kawabata, Masayoshi; Naruse, Kiyoko; Yuki, Katsuyuki; Nakagiri, Hideaki; Honda, Hiroshi; Tamaki, Yasushi; Nishiyama, Naohiro; Kasamatsu, Toshio

    2012-11-01

    Glycidol fatty acid esters (GEs) are found in refined edible oils. Safety concerns have been alleged due to the possible release of glycidol (G), an animal carcinogen. We evaluated the genotoxic potential of glycidol linoleate (GL), a primary GE found in an edible oil (diacylglycerol oil), and G, using three established genotoxicity tests (a bacterial reverse mutation test, an in vitro chromosomal aberration test, and an in vivo bone marrow micronucleus test) under GLP conditions complying with all OECD guidelines. In the bacterial reverse mutation test, GL and G showed positive responses. The positive responses of GL were less than those of G and observed only in strains detecting point mutations where G showed remarkably positive responses. G was involved in the positive response of GL. In the chromosomal aberration test, GL did not induce chromosome aberrations whereas G induced structural chromosome aberrations in the presence and absence of metabolic activation. In the bone marrow micronucleus test, neither GL nor G induced significant increases of micronucleated immature (polychromatic) erythrocytes in bone marrow of test animals. Based on the above results as well as pertinent information on toxicokinetics, GL itself does not play a key role in genotoxic action.

  19. [Evaluation of genotoxicity induced by repetitive administration of local anaesthetics: an experimental study in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nai, Gisele Alborghetti; de Oliveira, Mariliza Casanova; de Oliveira Tavares, Graziela; Pereira, Laís Fabrício Fonseca; Soares, Nádia Derli Salvador Lemes; Silva, Patrícia Gatti

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies regarding the effects of some local anaesthetics have suggested that these agents can cause genetic damage. However, they have not been tested for genotoxicity related to repetitive administration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic potential of local anaesthetics upon repetitive administration. 80 male Wistar rats were divided into: group A - 16 rats intraperitoneally injected with lidocaine hydrochloride 2%; group B - 16 rats IP injected with mepivacaine 2%; group C - 16 rats intraperitoneally injected with articaine 4%; group D - 16 rats IP injected with prilocaine 3% (6.0mg/kg); group E - 8 rats subcutaneously injected with a single dose of cyclophosphamide; and group F - 8 rats intraperitoneally injected with saline. Eight rats from groups A to D received a single dose of anaesthetic on Day 1 of the experiment; the remaining rats were dosed once a day for 5 days. The median number of micronuclei in the local anaesthetics groups exposed for 1 or 5 days ranged from 0.00 to 1.00, in the cyclophosphamide-exposed group was 10.00, and the negative control group for 1 and 5 days was 1.00 and 0.00, respectively (plocal anaesthetic groups (p=0.0001), but not between the negative control group and the local anaesthetic groups (p>0.05). No genotoxicity effect was observed upon repetitive exposure to any of the local anaesthetics evaluated. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Genotoxic Effects of Superconducting Static Magnetic Fields (SMFs) on Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Pollen Mother Cells (PMCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pingping; Yin, Ruochun; Chen, Zhiyou; Wu, Lifang; Yu, Zengliang

    2007-04-01

    The effects of superconducting static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the pollen mother cells (PMCs) of wheat were investigated in order to evaluate the possible genotoxic effect of such non-ionizing radiation. The seeds of wheat were exposed to static magnetic fields with either different magnetic flux densities (0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 Tesla) for 5 h or different durations (1, 3 and 5 h) at a magnetic flux density of 7 Tesla. The seeds were germinated at 23oC after exposure and the seedlings were transplanted into the field. The PMCs from young wheat ears were taken and slides were made following the conventional method. The genotoxic effect was evaluated in terms of micronucleus (MN), chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome and fragments in PMCs. Although the exposed groups of a low field intensity (below 5 Tesla) showed no statistically significant difference in the aberration frequency compared with the unexposed control groups and sham exposed groups, a significant increase in the chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome, triple-polar segregation or micronucleus was observed at a field strength of 5 Tesla or 7 Tesla, respectively. The analysis of dose-effect relationships indicated that the increased frequency of meiotic abnormal cells correlated with the flux density of the magnetic field and duration, but no linear relationship was observed. Such statistically significant differences indicated a potential genotoxic effect of high static magnetic fields above 5 T.

  1. Genotoxic effects of eugenol, isoeugenol and safrole in the wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munerato, Maria Cristina; Sinigaglia, Marialva; Reguly, Maria Luíza; de Andrade, Heloísa Helena Rodrigues

    2005-04-01

    In the present study, the phenolic compounds eugenol, isoeugenol and safrole were investigated for genotoxicity in the wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster. The Drosophila wing somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) provides a rapid means to evaluate agents able to induce gene mutations and chromosome aberrations, as well as rearrangements related to mitotic recombination. We applied the SMART in its standard version with normal bioactivation and in its variant with increased cytochrome P450-dependent biotransformation capacity. Eugenol and safrole produced a positive recombinagenic response only in the improved assay, which was related to a high CYP450-dependent activation capacity. This suggests, as previously reported, the involvement of this family of enzymes in the activation of eugenol and safrole rather than in its detoxification. On the contrary, isoeugenol was clearly non-genotoxic at the same millimolar concentrations as used for eugenol in both the crosses. The responsiveness of SMART assays to recombinagenic compounds, as well as the reactive metabolites from eugenol and safrole were considered responsible for the genotoxicity observed.

  2. Microalga Euglena as a bioindicator for testing genotoxic potentials of organic pollutants in Taihu Lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei; Gao, Xiangyu; Wu, Bing; Qian, Xin; Giesy, John P; Cui, Yibin

    2014-05-01

    The microalga Euglena was selected as a bioindicator for determining genotoxicity potencies of organic pollutants in Meiliang Bay of Taihu Lake, Jiangsu, China among seasons in 2008. Several methods, including the comet assay to determine breaks in DNA and quantification of antioxidant enzymes were applied to characterize genotoxic effects of organic extracts of water from Taihu Lake on the flagellated, microalga Euglena gracilis. Contents of photosynthetic pigments, including Chl a, Chl b and carotenoid pigments were inversely proportion to concentrations of organic extracts to which E. gracilis was exposed. Organic extracts of Taihu Lake water also affected activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) of E. gracilis. There were no statistically significant differences in SOD activities among seasons except in June but significant differences in POD activities were observed among all seasons. The metrics of DNA fragmentation in the alkaline unwinding assay (Comet assay), olive tail moment (OTM) and tail moment (TM), used as measurement endpoints during the genotoxicity assay were both greater when E. gracilis was exposed to organic of water collected from Taihu Lake among four seasons. It is indicated that the comet assay was useful for determining effects of constituents of organic extracts of water on E. gracilis and this assay was effective as an early warning to organic pollutants.

  3. Identification and characterization of enhancer-blocking insulators to reduce retroviral vector genotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy C Groth

    Full Text Available The chromatin insulator cHS4 can reduce silencing chromosomal position effects and genotoxicity associated with integrating viral vectors. However, the fully active version of this element can also reduce vector titers and is only partially effective. In order to identify alternatives to cHS4, we developed a functional lentiviral vector-based reporter screen for enhancer-blocking insulators. Using this system, we screened candidate sequences that were initially identified by chromatin profiling for binding by CTCF and for DNase hypersensitivity. All 12 analyzed candidates blocked enhancer-promoter activity. The enhancer-blocking activity of the top two candidates was confirmed in two complementary plasmid-based assays. Studies in a gammaretroviral reporter vector indicated these two candidates have little to no effect on vector titers, and do not diminish vector expression in primary mouse bone marrow cultures. Subsequent assessment in a mouse in vivo tumor formation model demonstrated that both candidates reduced the rate of gammaretroviral vector-mediated genotoxicity as effectively as the cHS4 insulator. In summary, we have developed a novel lentiviral vector-based method of screening candidate elements for insulator activity, and have used this method to identify two new insulator elements capable of improving the safety of retroviral vectors without diminishing vector titers or expression. These findings expand the limited arsenal of insulators functionally validated to reduce the rate of retroviral vector-mediated genotoxicity.

  4. Cyto- and genotoxic profile of groundwater used as drinking water supply before and after disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellacani, C; Cassoni, F; Bocchi, C; Martino, A; Pinto, G; Fontana, F; Furlini, M; Buschini, A

    2016-12-01

    The assessment of the toxicological properties of raw groundwater may be useful to predict the type and quality of tap water. Contaminants in groundwater are known to be able to affect the disinfection process, resulting in the formation of substances that are cytotoxic and/or genotoxic. Though the European directive (98/83/EC, which establishes maximum levels for contaminants in raw water (RW)) provides threshold levels for acute exposure to toxic compounds, the law does not take into account chronic exposure at low doses of pollutants present in complex mixture. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cyto- and genotoxic load in the groundwater of two water treatment plants in Northern Italy. Water samples induced cytotoxic effects, mainly observed when human cells were treated with RW. Moreover, results indicated that the disinfection process reduced cell toxicity, independent of the biocidal used. The induction of genotoxic effects was found, in particular, when the micronucleus assay was carried out on raw groundwater. These results suggest that it is important to include bio-toxicological assays as additional parameters in water quality monitoring programs, as their use would allow the evaluation of the potential risk of groundwater for humans.

  5. Can Genotoxic Effect be Model Dependent in Allium Test?-An Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Singh Rathore

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Genotoxicity of peracetic acid (PAA has been assessed in two models (protocols of Allium cepa conducting two sets of experiments to know whether the results would be model dependent. One experiment was set as per Fiskesjo's model in which Allium cepa bulbs were grown in five concentrations of peracetic acid (0.039, 0.078, 0.156, 0.312 and 0.625 ppm in tap water. Another experiment was set as per Rank and Nielson's model in which Allium cepa bulbs were first grown in tap water for 24 hours and were then further grown in the same concentrations of peracetic acid as in earlier model. Genotoxic effects of peracetic acid were assessed in both models using usual parameters i.e. shape, colour and length of root tips, mitotic index, chromosomal aberrations and cell death. Magnitude of effect differed significantly in both models. More severe genotoxic effects could be seen in Fiskesjo's model. It is suggested that root primordial cells were in G0 state in Fiskesjo's model, which presumably lacked their defense system, hence were more prone to peracetic acid toxicity. Mitotically dividing root cells in Rank and Nielsen's model were equipped with antioxidant system and were more resistant to peracetic acid

  6. Analysis of in vitro chemoprevention of genotoxic damage by phytochemicals, as single agents or as combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Suresh K; Eckhardt, Alexander; Oli, Rajaraman G; Stopper, Helga

    2012-05-15

    Cancer chemoprevention with low-dose combinations of bioactive phytochemicals instead of single agents has been suggested to induce less toxicity and improve efficacy. In this study, we selected four plant food-based phytochemicals, viz. chlorogenic acid (CLA), pelargonidin (PEL), resveratrol (RES) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) to evaluate the in vitro chemoprevention of genotoxic damage in HL-60 cells. These agents were tested either individually or as a combination at two concentrations (with a 10-fold difference) against the genotoxins mitomycin C (MMC), diepoxybutane (DEB) and patulin (PAT). Our preliminary ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay demonstrated additive effects when PEL, CLA, RES and EGCG were combined. Results of the cytokinesis-block micronucleus test showed significant protection against genotoxic damage induced by PAT, DEB and MMC when CLA, PEL, RES and EGCG were tested individually. This protective effect of the phytochemicals was not concentration-related. Both low- and high-concentration combinations of CLA, PEL, RES and EGCG showed significant reducing effects on the frequencies of micronuclei induced by PAT, DEB and MMC. However, the micronucleus test did not provide indications of additive or synergistic effects with this combination of phytochemicals. In conclusion, the chemo-preventive effects of PEL, CLA, RES and EGCG against genotoxic damage induced by MMC, DEB and PAT are indicative of a 'saturation effect' when higher concentrations and combinations of these phytochemicals are used.

  7. Zebrafish as an in vivo high-throughput model for genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, Sridhara; Sadagopan, Sathish; Nair, Ayyappan; Sukumaran, Sunil Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Compounds routinely used to increase the quality of life and combat disease undergo stringent potency and biosafety tests before approval. However, based on the outcome of ongoing research, new norms need to be effected to ensure that the compounds conform to biosafety at all target levels of activity. Whereas in vitro tests used to assess biosafety lack the potency and the translational attribute of a whole animal, mammalian preclinical models are expensive and time exhaustive. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) has emerged as an attractive alternative for biosafety studies due to its small size, genetics, breeding capabilities, and most importantly, similarity at the molecular and physiological levels with humans. It has been used extensively for testing various forms of toxicity, including developmental toxicity, cardiotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and hepatotoxicity. We review here the utility of zebrafish as a powerful, sensitive, quantitative, noninvasive, and high-throughput whole-animal assay to screen for toxicity. Different forms of toxicity will be discussed briefly before we highlight the present state of genotoxicity study in zebrafish. This review, a first in this research area, will serve as a comprehensive introduction to the field of genotoxicity assay using zebrafish, a nascent but promising field that assays compounds for DNA damage. We also discuss possible approaches that could potentially be pursued to overcome some of the shortcomings in current genotoxic studies.

  8. Carboxylated nanodiamonds are neither cytotoxic nor genotoxic on liver, kidney, intestine and lung human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paget, V; Sergent, J A; Grall, R; Altmeyer-Morel, S; Girard, H A; Petit, T; Gesset, C; Mermoux, M; Bergonzo, P; Arnault, J C; Chevillard, S

    2014-08-01

    Although nanodiamonds (NDs) appear as one of the most promising nanocarbon materials available so far for biomedical applications, their risk for human health remains unknown. Our work was aimed at defining the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of two sets of commercial carboxylated NDs with diameters below 20 and 100 nm, on six human cell lines chosen as representative of potential target organs: HepG2 and Hep3B (liver), Caki-1 and Hek-293 (kidney), HT29 (intestine) and A549 (lung). Cytotoxicity of NDs was assessed by measuring cell impedance (xCELLigence® system) and cell survival/death by flow cytometry while genotoxicity was assessed by γ-H2Ax foci detection, which is considered the most sensitive technique for studying DNA double-strand breaks. To validate and check the sensitivity of the techniques, aminated polystyrene nanobeads were used as positive control in all assays. Cell incorporation of NDs was also studied by flow cytometry and luminescent N-V center photoluminescence (confirmed by Raman microscopy), to ensure that nanoparticles entered the cells. Overall, we show that NDs effectively entered the cells but NDs do not induce any significant cytotoxic or genotoxic effects on the six cell lines up to an exposure dose of 250 µg/mL. Taken together these results strongly support the huge potential of NDs for human nanomedicine but also their potential as negative control in nanotoxicology studies.

  9. Genotoxicity assessment of Garcinia achachairu Rusby (Clusiaceae) extract in mammalian cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Eduardo de Souza; Silva, Suellen; Niero, Rivaldo; de Andrade, Sérgio Faloni; Rosa, Paulo Cesar Pires; Perazzo, Fabio Ferreira; Maistro, Edson Luis

    2012-07-13

    Garcinia achachairu Rusby (Clusiaceae) is popularly known as "achachairu", and is used in Bolivian folk medicine for its healing, digestive, and laxative properties, and in the treatment of gastritis, rheumatism and inflammation. Despite its widespread therapeutic use, there is a lack of data regarding its in vivo genotoxic effects. Therefore, in this study, we used the comet assay and the micronucleus test, respectively, to evaluate the possible genotoxic and clastogenic effects of Garcinia achachairu seed extract (GAE) on different cells of mice. The GAE was administered by oral gavage at doses of 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg. For the analysis, the comet assay was performed on the leukocytes (collected 4 and 24 h after treatment), liver, bone marrow and testicular cells (collected 24 h after treatment), and the micronucleus test (MN) on bone marrow cells. Cytotoxicity was assessed by scoring 200 consecutive polychromatic (PCE) and normochromatic (NCE) erythrocytes (PCE/NCE ratio). The results showed that GAE did not induce significant DNA damage in leukocytes (4 h and 24 h samples), liver, bone marrow and testicular cells (24 h samples). GAE also did not show any significant increase in micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCEs) at the three tested doses. The PCE/NCE ratio indicated no cytotoxicity. Under our experimental conditions, the data obtained suggest that a single oral administration of G. achachairu extract does not cause genotoxicity and clastogenicity in different cells of mice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cytogenetic genotoxic investigation in peripheral blood lymphocytes of subjects with dental composite restorative filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettini, F; Savino, M; Corsalini, M; Cantore, S; Ballini, A

    2015-01-01

    Dental composite resins are biomaterials commonly used to aesthetically restore the structure and function of teeth impaired by caries, erosion, or fracture. Residual monomers released from resin restorations as a result of incomplete polymerization processes interact with living oral tissues. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of a common dental composite material (Enamel Plus-HFO), in subjects with average 13 filled teeth with the same material, compared to a control group (subjects having neither amalgam nor composite resin fillings). Genotoxicity assessment of composite materials was carried out in vitro in human peripheral blood leukocytes using sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) and chromosomal aberrations (CA) cytogenetic tests. The results of correlation and multiple regression analyses confirmed the absence of a relationship between SCE/cell, high frequency of SCE(HFC) or CA frequencies and exposure to dental composite materials. These results indicate that composite resins used for dental restorations differ extensively in vivo in their cytotoxic and genotoxic potential and in their ability to affect chromosomal integrity, cell-cycle progression, DNA replication and repair.

  11. Dichlorophen and Dichlorovos mediated genotoxic and cytotoxic assessment on root meristem cells of Allium cepa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibhghatulla Shaikh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Plants are direct recipients of agro – toxics and therefore important materials for assessing environmental chemicals for genotoxicity. The meristematic mitotic cell of Allium cepa is an efficient cytogenetic material for chromosome aberration assay on environmental pollutants. Onion root tips were grown on moistened filter paper in petri dish at room temperature. Germinated root tips were then exposed to three concentrations of each pesticide for 24 h. About 1 – 2 mm length of root tip was cut, fixed in cornoy’s fixative, hydrolyzed in warm 1 N HCL, stained with acetocarmine and squashed on glass slide. About 3000 cells were scored and classified into interphase and normal or aberrant division stage. Cytotoxicity was determined by comparing the mitotic index (MI of treated cells with that of the negative control. The MI of cells treated with Dichlorophen and Dichlorovos at one or more concentration was half or less than that of control are said to be cytotoxic. Genotoxicity was measured by comparing the number of cells/1000 in aberrant division stages at each dose with the negative control using Mann – Whitney U test. Both Dichlorophen and Dichlorovos are genotoxic at higher concentrations i.e. 0.001%, 0.002% and 0.028%, 0.056% inducing chromosome fragment, chromosome lagging and bridges, stick chromosome and multipolar anaphase.

  12. Bacterial Composition, Genotoxicity, and Cytotoxicity of Fecal Samples from Individuals Consuming Omnivorous or Vegetarian Diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Ermanno; Prete, Roberta; Lazzi, Camilla; Pellegrini, Nicoletta; Moretti, Massimo; Corsetti, Aldo; Cenci, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    This study analyzes the composition of viable fecal bacteria and gut toxicology biomarkers of 29 healthy volunteers, who followed omnivorous, lacto-ovo-vegetarian, or vegan diets. In particular, the research was focused on the prevalence of some representative viable bacteria from the four dominant phyla (Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria) commonly present in human feces, in order to evaluate the relationship between microorganisms selected by the habitual dietary patterns and the potential risk due to fecal water (FW) genotoxicity and cytotoxicity, considered as biomarkers for cancer risk and protective food activity. The relative differences of viable bacteria among dietary groups were generally not statistically significant. However, compared to omnivores, lacto-ovo-vegetarians showed low levels of total anaerobes. Otherwise, vegans showed total anaerobes counts similar to those of omnivores, but with lower number of bifidobacteria and the highest levels of bacteria from the Bacteroides-Prevotella genera. FW genotoxicity of lacto-ovo-vegetarians resulted significantly lower either in relation to that of omnivores and vegans. Lacto-ovo-vegetarians also showed the lowest levels of cytotoxicity, while the highest were found for vegans. These results highlighted that lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet was particularly effective in a favorable modulation of microbial activity, thus contributing to a significant reduction of the genotoxic and cytotoxic risk in the gut.

  13. In vivo genotoxic effects of industrial waste leachates in mice following oral exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Saurabh; Chauhan, Lalit K S; Dhawan, Alok; Murthy, Ramesh C; Gupta, Shrawan K

    2006-06-01

    Contamination of ground water by industrial waste poses potential health hazards for man and his environment. The improper disposal of toxic wastes could allow genotoxic chemicals to percolate into ground waters, and these contaminated ground waters may produce toxicity, including mutation and eventually cancer, in exposed individuals. In the present study, we evaluated the in vivo genotoxic potential of leachates made from three different kinds of industrial waste (tannery waste, metal-based waste, and waste containing dyes and pigments) that are disposed of in areas adjoining human habitation. Three different doses of test leachates were administered by oral gavage for 15 consecutive days to Swiss albino mice; their bone marrow cells were examined for chromosome aberrations (CAs), micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCEs), and DNA damage using the alkaline Comet assay. Exposure to the leachates resulted in significant (P dye-waste leachate produced weaker genotoxic responses. The cytogenetic abnormalities and DNA damage produced by the leachates indicate that humans consuming water contaminated with these materials are at increased risk of developing adverse health consequences.

  14. Mutagenic and genotoxic activity of chosen dyes and surface active compounds used in the textile industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybojewska, B; Barański, B; Spiechowicz, E; Szymczak, W

    1989-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the mutagenic and genotoxic properties of ten dyes and four surface active compounds using Salmonella/microsome assay and the micronucleus test. Five of the investigated dyes (Acid Blue 7, Acid Green 16, Direct Black 19:1, Basic Red 22, Basic Orange 28) possessed mutagenic activity with regard to test strains of Salmonella. In addition, all of them increased the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes in the bone marrow of mice. Three other compounds (Acid Blue 62, Direct Yellow 12, Direct Red 81), which were not mutagenic in the Salmonella/microsome assay, were genotoxic in the micronucleus test. The other two dyes (Reactive Blue 13, Acid Red 213), as well as tested surface active compounds, did not exert mutagenic and genotoxic effects, and therefore, it is most probable that they do not have carcinogenic properties. Besides, it was noted that Acid Blue 62, Direct Black 19:1, Direct Red 81 and Basic Orange 28 cause a significant decrease in the ratio polychromatic to normochromatic erythrocytes in the bone marrow of mice, which means that, at the doses used in the experiment, they are toxic to the erythrocyte series cells of bone marrow. The other compounds under consideration have no such effect.

  15. Genotoxic Effect in Autoimmune Diseases Evaluated by the Micronucleus Test Assay: Our Experience and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Bugarín, Olivia; Macriz Romero, Nicole; Ramos Ibarra, María Luisa; Flores-García, Aurelio; Valdez Aburto, Penélope; Zavala-Cerna, María Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AD) are classified into organ-specific, systemic, and mixed; all forms of AD share a high risk for cancer development. In AD a destructive immune response induced by autoreactive lymphocytes is started and continues with the production of autoantibodies against different targets; furthermore apoptosis failure and loss of balance in oxidative stress as a consequence of local or systemic inflammation are common features seen in AD as well. Micronucleus (MN) assay can be performed in order to evaluate loss of genetic material in a clear, accurate, fast, simple, and minimally invasive test. The MN formation in the cytoplasm of cells that have undergone proliferation is a consequence of DNA fragmentation during mitosis and the appearance of small additional nuclei during interphase. The MN test, widely accepted for in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity research, provides a sensitive marker of genomic damage associated to diverse conditions. In here, we present a review of our work and other published papers concerning genotoxic effect in AD, identified by means of the MN assay, with the aim of proposing this tool as a possible early biomarker for genotoxic damage, which is a consequence of disease progression. Additionally this biomarker could be used for follow-up, to asses genome damage associated to therapies. PMID:26339592

  16. Chemical fate and genotoxic risk associated with hypochlorite treatment of nicotine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarrelli, Armando, E-mail: zarrelli@unina.it [UdR Napoli 4 Consorzio INCA, IC-REACH, Department of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, University Federico II, Naples (Italy); DellaGreca, Marina; Parolisi, Alice; Iesce, Maria Rosaria; Cermola, Flavio; Temussi, Fabio [UdR Napoli 4 Consorzio INCA, IC-REACH, Department of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, University Federico II, Naples (Italy); Isidori, Marina; Lavorgna, Margherita [Department of Life Sciences, II University of Naples, Caserta (Italy); Passananti, Monica; Previtera, Lucio [UdR Napoli 4 Consorzio INCA, IC-REACH, Department of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, University Federico II, Naples (Italy)

    2012-06-01

    Nicotine, the main alkaloid of tobacco, is a non- prescription drug to which all members of a tobacco-smoking society are exposed either through direct smoke inhalation or through second-hand passive 'smoking'. Nicotine is also commercially available in some pharmaceutical products and is used worldwide as a botanical insecticide in agriculture. Nicotine dynamics in indoor and outdoor environments as well as the human excretions and the manufacturing process are responsible for its entry in the environment through municipal and industrial wastewater discharges. The presence of nicotine in surface and ground waters points out that it survives a conventional treatment process and persists in potable-water supplies. Complete removal of nicotine is instead reported when additional chlorination steps are used. In this paper a simulation of STP chlorination of nicotine and a genotoxic evaluation of its main degradation products are reported. Under laboratory conditions removal of nicotine seems not to be due to mineralization but to transformation in oxidized and chlorinated products. The by-products have been isolated after fractionation by diverse chromatographic procedures and their structures determined using mass spectrometry and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy. Preliminary genotoxic SOS Chromotests with Escherichia coli PQ37 evidence no toxicity of the products. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Processes of chlorination in the treatment of raw water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer STP chlorination of nicotine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Genotoxic evaluation of main degradation products of nicotine.

  17. Genotoxic Effect in Autoimmune Diseases Evaluated by the Micronucleus Test Assay: Our Experience and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Torres-Bugarín

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (AD are classified into organ-specific, systemic, and mixed; all forms of AD share a high risk for cancer development. In AD a destructive immune response induced by autoreactive lymphocytes is started and continues with the production of autoantibodies against different targets; furthermore apoptosis failure and loss of balance in oxidative stress as a consequence of local or systemic inflammation are common features seen in AD as well. Micronucleus (MN assay can be performed in order to evaluate loss of genetic material in a clear, accurate, fast, simple, and minimally invasive test. The MN formation in the cytoplasm of cells that have undergone proliferation is a consequence of DNA fragmentation during mitosis and the appearance of small additional nuclei during interphase. The MN test, widely accepted for in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity research, provides a sensitive marker of genomic damage associated to diverse conditions. In here, we present a review of our work and other published papers concerning genotoxic effect in AD, identified by means of the MN assay, with the aim of proposing this tool as a possible early biomarker for genotoxic damage, which is a consequence of disease progression. Additionally this biomarker could be used for follow-up, to asses genome damage associated to therapies.

  18. Genotoxic Effect in Autoimmune Diseases Evaluated by the Micronucleus Test Assay: Our Experience and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Bugarín, Olivia; Macriz Romero, Nicole; Ramos Ibarra, María Luisa; Flores-García, Aurelio; Valdez Aburto, Penélope; Zavala-Cerna, María Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AD) are classified into organ-specific, systemic, and mixed; all forms of AD share a high risk for cancer development. In AD a destructive immune response induced by autoreactive lymphocytes is started and continues with the production of autoantibodies against different targets; furthermore apoptosis failure and loss of balance in oxidative stress as a consequence of local or systemic inflammation are common features seen in AD as well. Micronucleus (MN) assay can be performed in order to evaluate loss of genetic material in a clear, accurate, fast, simple, and minimally invasive test. The MN formation in the cytoplasm of cells that have undergone proliferation is a consequence of DNA fragmentation during mitosis and the appearance of small additional nuclei during interphase. The MN test, widely accepted for in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity research, provides a sensitive marker of genomic damage associated to diverse conditions. In here, we present a review of our work and other published papers concerning genotoxic effect in AD, identified by means of the MN assay, with the aim of proposing this tool as a possible early biomarker for genotoxic damage, which is a consequence of disease progression. Additionally this biomarker could be used for follow-up, to asses genome damage associated to therapies.

  19. Evaluation of the Genotoxicity of Bangpungtongsung-San, a Traditional Herbal Prescription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Sik Shin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bangpungtongsung-san (BPS is a traditional Korean herbal formula used as an anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, antiobesity, and choleretic agent, which consists of 18 herbs. As part of a safety evaluation of BPS, the present study evaluated the potential genotoxicity of an aqueous BPS extract using a standard battery of tests, including, the Ames test, chromosomal aberration test, and mouse micronucleus test. The BPS extract was not found to be genotoxic under the conditions of the Ames test. In micronucleus test, oral administration of BPS at doses up to 2,000 mg/kg did not increases the incidence of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocyte. The chromosomal aberration test showed that the BPS extract induced an increase in the number of structural and numerical chromosomal aberrations in the group treated with BPS at high dose levels (2,500 and 4,000 μg/mL for 6 h, in the presence of the metabolic activation system (S-9 mix, compared with the vehicle control. In conclusion, these results indicate that BPS extract may act as a genotoxic agent.

  20. Genotoxic evaluation of Halfenprox using the human peripheral lymphocyte micronucleus assay and the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyıl, Dilek; Eren, Yasin; Konuk, Muhsin; Dere, Hatice; Serteser, Ahmet

    2017-04-01

    The genotoxicity and mutagenicity of Halfenprox, a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide and acaricide, was assessed using two standard genotoxicity assays of the Salmonella typhimurium mutagenicity assay (Ames test) and in vitro micronucleus (MN) assay in human peripheral lymphocytes. In the Ames test, Salmonella strains TA98 and TA100 were treated with or without S9 fraction. The doses of Halfenprox were 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 μg/plate and test materials were dissolved in DMSO. The concentrations of Halfenprox did not show mutagenic activity on both strains with and without S9 fraction. The MN assay was used to investigate the genotoxic effects of Halfenprox in human peripheral lymphocytes treated with 250, 500, 750, and 1000 μg/ml concentrations of Halfenprox for 24 and 48 h, and at 1000 μg/ml the concentration was significantly increased and the MN formation was compared with the negative control for both treatment periods. In addition, a significant decrease of the nuclear devision index (NDI) values at the higher concentrations of Halfenprox and at both treatment periods was observed.

  1. ROS-mediated genotoxicity of asbestos-cement in mammalian lung cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rödelsperger Klaus

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Asbestos is a known carcinogen and co-carcinogen. It is a persisting risk in our daily life due to its use in building material as asbestos-cement powder. The present study done on V79-cells (Chinese hamster lung cells demonstrates the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of asbestos-cement powder (ACP in comparison with chrysotile asbestos. A co-exposure of chrysotile and ACP was tested using the cell viability test and the micronucleus assay. The kinetochore analysis had been used to analyse the pathway causing such genotoxic effects. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances were determined as evidence for the production of reactive oxygen species. Both, asbestos cement as well as chrysotile formed micronuclei and induced loss of cell viability in a concentration- and time- dependent way. Results of TBARS analysis and iron chelator experiments showed induction of free radicals in ACP- and chrysotile exposed cultures. CaSO4 appeared to be a negligible entity in enhancing the toxic potential of ACP. The co-exposure of both, ACP and chrysotile, showed an additive effect in enhancing the toxicity. The overall study suggests that asbestos-cement is cytotoxic as well as genotoxic in vitro. In comparison to chrysotile the magnitude of the toxicity was less, but co-exposure increased the toxicity of both.

  2. The Combined Toxic and Genotoxic Effects of Cd and As to Plant Bioindicator Trifolium repens L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiani, Alessandra; Fumagalli, Pietro; Nguyen Van, Tho; Gentili, Rodolfo; Citterio, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate combined toxic and genotoxic effects of cadmium (Cd) and arsenic (As) on white clover, a pollutant sensitive plant frequently used as environmental bioindicator. Plants were exposed to soil spiked with increasing concentrations of cadmium sulfate (20, 40 and 60 mg Kg−1) or sodium arsenite (5, 10 and 20 mg Kg−1) as well as with their combinations. Metal(loid) bioavailability was assessed after soil contamination, whereas plant growth, metal(loid) concentration in plant organs and DNA damage were measured at the end of plant exposition. Results showed that individual and joint toxicity and genotoxicity were related to the concentration of Cd and As measured in plant organs, and that As concentration was the most relevant variable. Joint effects on plant growth were additive or synergistic, whereas joint genotoxic effects were additive or antagonistic. The interaction between Cd and As occurred at both soil and plant level. In soil the presence of As limited the bioavailability of Cd, whereas the presence of Cd increased the bioavailability of As. Nevertheless only As biovailability determined the amount of As absorbed by plants. The amount of Cd absorbed by plant was not linearly correlated with the fraction of bioavailable Cd in soil suggesting the involvement of additional factors, such as plant uptake mechanisms. These results reveal that the simultaneous presence in soil of Cd and As, although producing an additive or synergistic toxic effect on Trifolium repens L. growth, generates a lower DNA damage. PMID:24914541

  3. Genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of cobalt-, nickel- and copper-based nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    MAGAYE, RUTH; ZHAO, JINSHUN; BOWMAN, LINDA; DING, MIN

    2012-01-01

    The nanotechnology industry has matured and expanded at a rapid pace in the last decade, leading to the research and development of nanomaterials with enormous potential. The largest source of these nanomaterials is the transitional metals. It has been revealed that numerous properties of these nano-sized elements are not present in their bulk states. The nano size of these particles means they are easily transported into biological systems, thus, raising the question of their effects on the susceptible systems. Although advances have been made and insights have been gained on the effect of transitional metals on susceptible biological systems, there still is much ground to be covered, particularly with respect to our knowledge on the genotoxic and carcinogenic effects. Therefore, this review intends to summarize the current knowledge on the genotoxic and carcinogenic potential of cobalt-, nickel- and copper-based nanoparticles indicated in in vitro and in vivo mammalian studies. In the present review, we briefly state the sources, use and exposure routes of these nanoparticles and summarize the current literature findings on their in vivo and in vitro genotoxic and carcinogenic effects. Due to the increasing evidence of their role in carcinogenicity, we have also included studies that have reported epigenetic factors, such as abnormal apoptosis, enhanced oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory effects involving these nanoparticles. PMID:23170105

  4. Genotoxic Effects of PAH Containing Sludge Extracts in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Objective Many studies have been conducted in order to evaluate the genotoxicity of chemicals and waste materials, which utilized in vivo test protocols. The use of animals for routine toxicity testing is now questioned by a growing segment of society[1]. Methods Keeping the above fact in mind, we have conducted in the present study the genotoxicity evaluation of oily sludge samples generated from a petroleum refinery and petrochemical industry and ETP sludge from petroleum refinery using DNA damage, chromosomal aberration, p53 protein induction and apoptosis in short term in vitro mammalian Chinese Hamster Ovary cell cultures. Results It is evident from the results that the oily sludge compounds derived from petroleum refinery and petrochemical industry could cause DNA damage, chromosomal aberration, p53 protein accumulation and apoptotic cell death on exposure to oily sludge extracts in the presence of metabolic activation system (S-9 mix), however, ETP sludge extract could not cause significant genotoxicity in comparison to oily sludge extract and negative control. Conclusion The effect may be attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present in the samples as evidenced from GC-MS.

  5. Bacterial Composition, Genotoxicity, and Cytotoxicity of Fecal Samples from Individuals Consuming Omnivorous or Vegetarian Diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Ermanno; Prete, Roberta; Lazzi, Camilla; Pellegrini, Nicoletta; Moretti, Massimo; Corsetti, Aldo; Cenci, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    This study analyzes the composition of viable fecal bacteria and gut toxicology biomarkers of 29 healthy volunteers, who followed omnivorous, lacto-ovo-vegetarian, or vegan diets. In particular, the research was focused on the prevalence of some representative viable bacteria from the four dominant phyla (Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria) commonly present in human feces, in order to evaluate the relationship between microorganisms selected by the habitual dietary patterns and the potential risk due to fecal water (FW) genotoxicity and cytotoxicity, considered as biomarkers for cancer risk and protective food activity. The relative differences of viable bacteria among dietary groups were generally not statistically significant. However, compared to omnivores, lacto-ovo-vegetarians showed low levels of total anaerobes. Otherwise, vegans showed total anaerobes counts similar to those of omnivores, but with lower number of bifidobacteria and the highest levels of bacteria from the Bacteroides–Prevotella genera. FW genotoxicity of lacto-ovo-vegetarians resulted significantly lower either in relation to that of omnivores and vegans. Lacto-ovo-vegetarians also showed the lowest levels of cytotoxicity, while the highest were found for vegans. These results highlighted that lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet was particularly effective in a favorable modulation of microbial activity, thus contributing to a significant reduction of the genotoxic and cytotoxic risk in the gut. PMID:28293225

  6. Sensitivity of Bidens laevis L. to mutagenic compounds. Use of chromosomal aberrations as biomarkers of genotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, D.J. [Laboratorio de Genetica, Estacion Experimental Agropecuaria Balcarce (INTA), Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias, UNMdP, CC 276, 7620 Balcarce (Argentina); Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Departamento de Ciencias Marinas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, UNMdP, Funes 3350, 7600 Mar del Plata (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Lukaszewicz, G. [Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Departamento de Ciencias Marinas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, UNMdP, Funes 3350, 7600 Mar del Plata (Argentina); Menone, M.L., E-mail: lujanm@mdp.edu.a [Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Departamento de Ciencias Marinas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, UNMdP, Funes 3350, 7600 Mar del Plata (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Camadro, E.L. [Laboratorio de Genetica, Estacion Experimental Agropecuaria Balcarce (INTA), Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias, UNMdP, CC 276, 7620 Balcarce (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-01-15

    The wetland macrophyte Bidens laevis possesses suitable cytological characteristics for genotoxicity testing. To test its sensitivity as compared to terrestrial plants species currently in use in standardized assays, Methyl Methanesulfonate (MMS), N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) and Maleic Hydrazide (HM) were used. On the other hand, the insecticide Endosulfan (ES) - an environmentally relevant contaminant - was assayed in seeds and two-month old plants. Mitotic Index (MI), frequency of Chromosome Aberrations in Anaphase-Telophase (CAAT) and frequency of Abnormal Metaphases (AM) were analyzed. MH, MMS and ENU caused a significant decrease of the MI. MMS was aneugenic whereas MH and ENU were both aneugenic and clastogenic. ES caused a significant concentration-dependent increase of total- and aneugenic-CAAT in roots and a significant high frequency of AM at high concentrations. Because of its sensitivity to mutagenic substances, B. laevis can be regarded as a reliable and convenient species for genotoxicity assays especially if aquatic contaminants are evaluated. - The wetland macrophyte Bidens laevis is sensitive to genotoxic compounds similarly to terrestrial standardized species.

  7. Genotoxicity and mutagenicity of Echinodorus macrophyllus (chapéu-de-couro extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo S. Vidal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Echinodorus macrophyllus, commonly known as chapéu-de-couro, is a medicinal plant used in folk medicine to treat inflammation and rheumatic diseases. In this work, we used short-term bacterial assays based on the induction of SOS functions to examine the genotoxicity and mutagenicity of an aqueous extract of E. macrophyllus leaves. Whole extract and an ethyl acetate fraction showed similar genotoxicity and caused an ~70-fold increase in lysogenic induction. The extract also gave a positive result in the SOS chromotest with an increase of 12-fold in β-Galactosidase enzymatic units. There was a strong trend towards base substitutions and frameshifts at purine sites in the mutations induced by the extract in Escherichia coli (CC103 and CC104 strains and Salmonella typhimurium test strains (22-fold increase in histidine revertants in TA98 strain. Since reactive oxygen species may be implicated in aging process and in degenerative diseases, we used antioxidant compounds as catalase, thiourea and dipyridyl in the lysogenic induction test. All this compounds were able to reduce the induction factor observed in the treatment with chapéu-de-couro, thus suggesting that the genotoxicity and mutagenicity were attributable to the production of reactive oxygen species that targeted DNA purines.

  8. Evaluation of Genotoxic and Mutagenic Activity of Organic Extracts from Drinking Water Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ying; Wang, Xiaodong; Wong, Minghung; Sun, Guoping; An, Taicheng; Guo, Jun; Zhang, Guoxia

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of industrial, agricultural and commercial chemicals in the aquatic environment lead to various deleterious effects on organisms, which is becoming a serious global health concern. In this study, the Ames test and SOS/umu test were conducted to investigate the potential genotoxicity and mutagenicity caused by organic extracts from drinking water sources. Organic content of source water was extracted with XAD-2 resin column and organic solvents. Four doses of the extract equivalent to 0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2L of source water were tested for toxicity. All the water samples were collected from six different locations in Guangdong province. The results of the Ames test and SOS/umu test showed that all the organic extracts from the water samples could induce different levels of DNA damage and mutagenic potentials at the dose of 2 L in the absence of S9 mix, which demonstrated the existence of genotoxicity and mutagenicity. Additionally, we found that Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98 was more sensitive for the mutagen. Correlation analysis between genotoxicity, Organochlorine Pesticides (OCPs) and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) showed that most individual OCPs were frame shift toxicants in drinking water sources, and there was no correlation with total OCPs and PAHs.

  9. Investigating the embryo/larval toxic and genotoxic effects of {gamma} irradiation on zebrafish eggs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, O., E-mail: olivier.simon@irsn.fr [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et d' Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat 186, BP3, 13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Massarin, S. [Laboratoire de Modelisation Environnementale, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat 159, BP3, 13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Coppin, F. [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et d' Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat 186, BP3, 13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Hinton, T.G. [Service d' Etude du Comportement des Radionucleides dans les Ecosystemes, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat 159, BP3, 13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Gilbin, R. [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et d' Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat 186, BP3, 13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2011-11-15

    Eggs/larval of freshwater fish (Danio rerio) were exposed to low dose rates of external gamma radiation (from 1 to 1000 mGy d{sup -1}) over a 20-day period, with the objective of testing the appropriateness of the 10 mGy d{sup -1} guideline suggested by the IAEA. The present study examines different endpoints, mortality and hatching time and success of embryos as well as the genotoxicity of {gamma}-irradiations (after 48 h). The 20-day embryo-larval bioassay showed an enhanced larval resistance to starvation after chronic exposure to {gamma} irradiation (from low 1 mGy d{sup -1} to high dose rate 1000 mGy d{sup -1}) and an acceleration in hatching time. Gamma irradiation led to increased genotoxic damage Ito zebrafish egg (40-50% DNA in tail in Comet assay) from the lowest dose rate (1 mGy d{sup -1}). Possible mechanisms of {gamma} radiotoxicity and implications for radioprotection are discussed. - Highlights: > Relevant information on the {gamma} radiation impact on early life stage biota is scarce. > The eggs of zebrafish Danio rerio were selected as biological model. > We test the appropriateness of the 10 mGy d{sup -1} guideline (IAEA). > We observed effects measured at individual levels (starvation, hatching time). > Chronic gamma irradiation led to increased genotoxic damage to zebrafish egg. > {gamma} radiotoxicity mechanisms and implications for radioprotection are discussed.

  10. Evaluation of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Hancornia speciosa latex in Allium cepa root model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, T P; Sousa, T R; Arruda, A S; Peixoto, N; Gonçalves, P J; Almeida, L M

    2016-02-01

    The latex obtained from Hancornia speciosa Gomes (Mangabeira tree) is widely used in traditional medicine to treat a variety of diseases, including diarrhea, ulcer, gastritis, tuberculosis, acne and warts. In this study, the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity effects of H. speciosa latex on the root meristem cells of Allium cepa were examined. Onion bulbs were exposed to different concentrations of latex and then submitted to microscopic analysis using Giemsa stain. Water was used as a negative control and sodium azide as a positive control. The results showed that, under the testing conditions, the mitotic index (MI) of the onion roots submitted to latex treatment did not differ significantly from the negative control, which suggests that the latex is not cytotoxic. Low incidence of chromosome aberrations in the cells treated with H. speciosa latex was also observed, indicating that the latex does not have genotoxic effect either. The MI and the chromosome aberration frequency responded to the latex concentration, requiring more studies to evaluate the dosage effect on genotoxicity. The results indicate that in tested concentrations H. speciosa latex is probably not harmful to human health and may be potentially used in medicine.

  11. Fipronil-induced genotoxicity and DNA damage in vivo: Protective effect of vitamin E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badgujar, P C; Selkar, N A; Chandratre, G A; Pawar, N N; Dighe, V D; Bhagat, S T; Telang, A G; Vanage, G R

    2017-05-01

    Fipronil, an insecticide of the phenylpyrazole class has been classified as a carcinogen by United States Environmental Protection Agency, yet very limited information is available about its genotoxic effects. Adult male and female animals were gavaged with various doses of fipronil (2.5, 12.5, and 25 mg/kg body weight (bw)) to evaluate micronucleus test (mice), chromosome aberration (CA), and comet assay (rats), respectively. Cyclophosphamide (40 mg/kg bw; intraperitoneal) was used as positive control. Another group of animals were pretreated with vitamin E orally (400 mg/kg bw) for 5 days prior to administration of fipronil (12.5 mg/kg). Fipronil exposure in both male and female mice caused significant increase in the frequency of micronuclei (MN) in polychromatic erythrocytes. Similarly, structural CAs in bone marrow cells and DNA damage in the lymphocytes was found to be significantly higher in the male and female rats exposed to fipronil as compared to their respective controls. The average degree of protection (male and female animals combined together) shown by pretreatment of vitamin E against fipronil-induced genotoxicity was 63.28%: CAs; 47.91%: MN formation; and 74.70%: DNA damage. Findings of this study demonstrate genotoxic nature of fipronil regardless of gender effect and documents protective role of vitamin E.

  12. Evaluation of Hypoglycemic and Genotoxic Effect of Polyphenolic Bark Extract from Quercus sideroxyla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Soto-García

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quercus sideroxyla is a wood species whose bark has phenolic compound and should be considered to be bioactive; the hypoglycemic and genotoxic properties of Q. sideroxyla bark were evaluated in this study. Total phenolic compound was determined in crude extract (CE and organic extract (OE. The OE has the highest amount of phenols (724.1±12.0 GAE/g. Besides, both CE and OE demonstrated effect over the inhibition of α-amylase in vitro. Hypoglycemic activity was assessed by glucose tolerance curve and the area under curve (UAC; OE showed the highest hypoglycemic activity. In addition, diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (65 mg/kg and the extracts (50 mg/kg were administered for 10 days; OE showed hypoglycemic effect compared with diabetic control and decreased hepatic lipid peroxidation. Acute toxicity and genotoxicity were evaluated in CE; results of acute toxicity did not show any mortality. Besides, the comet assay showed that CE at a dose of 100 mg/kg did not show any genotoxic effect when evaluated at 24 h, whereas it induced slight damage at 200 mg/kg, with the formation of type 1 comets.

  13. In vitro cytotoxic, genotoxic and antioxidant/oxidant effects of guaiazulene on human lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Başak Toğar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate for the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and antioxidant/oxidant activity of GYZ on human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs. Guaiazulene (GYZ was added into culture tubes at various concentrations (0-400 µg/mL-1. Cytotoxicity against the human lymphocytes cultures was examined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release assay. The proliferative response was estimated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Antioxidant/oxidant activity was evaluated by measuring the total oxidant status (TOS and total antioxidant capacity (TAC levels. Micronucleus (MN and chromosomal aberration (CA tests were used in genotoxicity studies. The results showed that GYZ caused cytotoxicity in the PBLs at high concentrations, but TOS level were not affected, while the level of TAC was significantly increased. GYZ also did not induce chromosomal aberrations when compared to that of the control group. Results this study clearly revealed that GYZ was not genotoxic and also increased the capacity of the antioxidant in the culture of human PBL cells. This report is first report on the impact of GYZ on human PBL cells.

  14. Evaluation of the genotoxicity of alpha-amanitin in mice bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, B; Łopaczyńska, D; Ferenc, T

    2017-10-01

    Alpha-amanitin is a known cytotoxic substance found in some mushroom species including Amanita phalloides. Its main mechanism of action is to block the transcription, which can lead to cell death. Lack of reports on the genotoxicity of this toxin was an inspiration for undertaking this experiment. Genotoxic effect of α-amanitin on balb/c mice bone marrow cells was tested using: comet assay and chromosomal aberration test. The tested substance was given once by intraperitoneal administration to animals at doses: 0.1 mg/kg, 0.15 mg/kg and 0.25 mg/kg (LD50) body weight with 48 h exposure. The comet assay demonstrated a statistically significant increase in DNA damage for all the investigated α-amanitin doses compared to the negative control (p < 0.0001). The exposure to 0.15 and 0.25 mg/kg doses of α-amanitin also generated a statistically significant increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells of mice compared to the negative control (p < 0.05). The genotoxic effect induced by α-amanitin in mammalian cells can result in genome instability and its functional consequences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Acute genotoxicity analysis in vivo of the aqueous extract of Maytenus guyanensis Amazonian chichuá

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionatas Ulises de Oliveira Meneguetti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The species Maytenus guyanensis Klotzsch ex Reissek, Celastraceae, present a wide variety of possible pharmacological activities and its roots and stems are used by popular medicine in the western Amazon rainforest. Few studies have demonstrated the genotoxic safety of the popular use of this species, and owing to this, the present study aimed to perform an analysis of the acute genotoxicity in vivo of the aqueous extract of M. guyanensis. Male and female mice from Mus musculus species, of weights ranging from 20 to 40 g, organized in eight groups with different treatments were used. The aqueous extracts of the bark of M. guyanensis were administered orally by gavage with 0.1 ml of the test substance per 10 g of the animal, followed by performance of comet assay in peripheral blood, PCE/NCE correlation and occurrence of micronuclei in the bone marrow. It was found that the aqueous extract of M. guyanensis, with ten times higher concentration than those used in ethnopharmacology, did not present genotoxic effect and, moreover, it has antigenotoxic action in mice treated acutely. Further studies regarding bioaccumulation and chronic effects of this species are suggested, in order to improve the understanding of its mechanism of action, ensuring the efficacy and safety of its utilization and developing phytotherapics and drugs.

  16. Investigation of co-genotoxic effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschaeve, L; Heikkinen, P; Verheyen, G; Van Gorp, U; Boonen, F; Vander Plaetse, F; Maes, A; Kumlin, T; Mäki-Paakkanen, J; Puranen, L; Juutilainen, J

    2006-05-01

    We investigated the possible combined genotoxic effects of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (900 MHz, amplitude modulated at 217 Hz, mobile phone signal) with the drinking water mutagen and carcinogen 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX). Female rats were exposed to RF fields for a period of 2 years for 2 h per day, 5 days per week at average whole-body specific absorption rates of 0.3 or 0.9 W/kg. MX was given in the drinking water at a concentration of 19 microg/ml. Blood samples were taken at 3, 6 and 24 months of exposure and brain and liver samples were taken at the end of the study (24 months). DNA damage was assessed in all samples using the alkaline comet assay, and micronuclei were determined in erythrocytes. We did not find significant genotoxic activity of MX in blood and liver cells. However, MX induced DNA damage in rat brain. Co-exposures to MX and RF radiation did not significantly increase the response of blood, liver and brain cells compared to MX exposure only. In conclusion, this 2-year animal study involving long-term exposures to RF radiation and MX did not provide any evidence for enhanced genotoxicity in rats exposed to RF radiation.

  17. Genotoxic potential evaluation of a cosmetic insoluble substance by the micronuclei assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, N; Shah, V; Minko, T

    2011-01-01

    An optical brightener (OB) powder (INCI: sodium silicoaluminate (and) glycidoxypropyl trimethyloxysilane/PEI-250 cross fluorescent brightener 230 salt (and) polyvinylalcohol crosspolymer) that is used in cosmetic facial products was tested for its genotoxic potential using the micronuclei test (MNT). It is a solid dry powder with an average size of 5 microns that is insoluble but dispersible in water. This study describes the exposure of cell culture to positive controls with and without enzymatic activation and to the test compound in different concentrations. We evaluated three end points: microscopic observation and quantification of micronuclei formation, and cell viability and proliferation. Both positive controls induced significant changes that were observed under the microscope and quantified. Based on its chemical nature, it was not anticipated that the test substance will degrade under the conditions of the experiments. However, the test is required to make sure that when solublized, impurities that may be present, even at trace levels, will not induce a genotoxic effect. The test compound did not promote micronuclei formation or change the viability or proliferation rate of cells. During this study we faced challenges such as solubilization and correlating viability data to genotoxicity data. These are described in the body of the paper. We believe that with the emergence of the 7(th) European amendment that bans animal testing, sharing these data and the study protocol serves as a key in building the understanding of the utilization of in vitro studies in the safety assessment of cosmetic ingredients.

  18. Genotoxic potential of the latex from cotton-leaf physicnut (Jatropha gossypiifolia L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Marcos de Almeida

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha gossypiifolia L. (Euphorbiaceae, popularly known as cotton-leaf physicnut, is a milky shrub notable for its medicinal properties. The present study aimed to evaluate the toxic, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of the latex of J. gossypiifolia, using Allium cepa L. as test system. Seeds of A. cepa were exposed to five concentrations of the latex (1.25; 2.5; 5; 10 and 20 mL/L in order to evaluate parameters of toxicity (evaluation of root growth, cytotoxicity (mitotic index frequency and genotoxicity (frequency of chromosome alterations. The latex showed a significant decrease in root mean growth value as well as mitotic index for the tested concentrations, except for 1.25 mL/L, when compared to results from the negative control. The 1.25, 2.5 and 5 mL/L concentrations induced significant chromo-some adherences, C-metaphases and/or chromosome bridges, as genotoxic effects. The significant frequency of chromosome bridges also indicated mutagenic potential for chromosomes of J. gossypiifolia as discussed in the paper. Considering that the latex is used in popular therapies, and that the test system A. cepa presents good correlation with tests carried out in mammals, it can be pointed out that its use for medicinal purposes may be harmful to human health especially if ingested.

  19. Differential genotoxicity of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe2 and diphenyl ditelluride (PhTe2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane Francine Meinerz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Organoselenium compounds have been pointed out as therapeutic agents. In contrast, the potential therapeutic aspects of tellurides have not yet been demonstrated. The present study evaluated the comparative toxicological effects of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe2 and diphenyl ditelluride (PhTe2 in mice after in vivo administration. Genotoxicity (as determined by comet assay and mutagenicicity were used as end-points of toxicity. Subcutaneous administration of high doses of (PhSe2 or (PhTe2 (500 µmol/kg caused distinct genotoxicity in mice. (PhSe2 significantly decreased the DNA damage index after 48 and 96 h of its injection (p < 0.05. In contrast, (PhTe caused a significant increase in DNA damage (p < 0.05 after 48 and 96 h of intoxication. (PhSe2 did not cause mutagenicity but (PhTe2 increased the micronuclei frequency, indicating its mutagenic potential. The present study demonstrated that acute in vivo exposure to ditelluride caused genotoxicity in mice, which may be associated with pro-oxidant effects of diphenyl ditelluride. In addition, the use of this compound and possibly other related tellurides must be carefully controlled.

  20. Genotoxicity of Microcystin-LR in In Vitro and In Vivo Experimental Models

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    Elsa Dias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcystin-LR (MCLR is a cyanobacterial toxin known for its acute hepatotoxicity. Despite being recognized as tumour promoter, its genotoxicity is far from being completely clarified, particularly in organs other than liver. In this work, we used the comet and/or the micronucleus (MN assays to study the genotoxicity of MCLR in kidney- (Vero-E6 and liver-derived (HepG2 cell lines and in blood cells from MCLR-exposed mice. MCLR treatment (5 and 20 μM caused a significant induction in the MN frequency in both cell lines and, interestingly, a similar positive effect was observed in mouse reticulocytes (37.5 μg MCLR/kg, i.p. route. Moreover, the FISH-based analysis of the MN content (HepG2 cells suggested that MCLR induces both chromosome breaks and loss. On the other hand, the comet assay results were negative in Vero-E6 cells and in mouse leukocytes, with the exception of a transient increase in the level of DNA damage 30 minutes after mice exposure. Overall, the present findings contributed to increase the weight of evidence in favour of MCLR genotoxicity, based on its capacity to induce permanent genetic damage either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, they suggest a clastogenic and aneugenic mode of action that might underlie a carcinogenic effect.

  1. Methodological considerations for using umu assay to assess photo-genotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cupi, Denisa; Baun, Anders

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated the feasibility of high-throughput (96-well plate) umu assay to test the genotoxic effect of TiO2 engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) under UV light (full spectrum) and visible light (455nm). Exposure of TiO2 ENPs to up to 60min of UV light induced a photocatalytic...... production of ROS. However, UV light itself caused cytotoxic damage to Salmonella typhimurium at exposures >15min and a genotoxic effect at exposures >0.5min; and use of UV filters did not lower this effect. No genotoxicity of TiO2 ENPs was observed under visible light conditions at concentrations up to 100......μgmL(-1); or under dark conditions at concentrations up to 667μgmL(-1), though cytotoxicity was seen at the higher concentrations. Additionally, the growth factor calculation was influenced by a shading effect due to ENPs, and was corrected by considering the pre-incubation OD readings of Plate B...

  2. Early Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects of the Toxic Dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima in the Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prego-Faraldo, María Verónica; Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Laffon, Blanca; Mendez, Josefina; Eirin-Lopez, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and dinophysistoxins (DTXs) are the main toxins responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) intoxications during harmful algal blooms (HABs). Although the genotoxic and cytotoxic responses to OA have been evaluated in vitro, the in vivo effects of these toxins have not yet been fully explored. The present work fills this gap by evaluating the in vivo effects of the exposure to the DSP-toxin-producing dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima during the simulation of an early HAB episode in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The obtained results revealed that in vivo exposure to this toxic microalgae induced early genotoxicity in hemocytes, as a consequence of oxidative DNA damage. In addition, the DNA damage observed in gill cells seems to be mainly influenced by exposure time and P. lima concentration, similarly to the case of the oxidative damage found in hemocytes exposed in vitro to OA. In both cell types, the absence of DNA damage at low toxin concentrations is consistent with the notion suggesting that this level of toxicity does not disturb the antioxidant balance. Lastly, in vivo exposure to growing P. lima cell densities increased apoptosis but not necrosis, probably due to the presence of a high number of protein apoptosis inhibitors in molluscs. Overall, this work sheds light into the in vivo genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of P. lima. In doing so, it also demonstrates for the first time the potential of the modified (OGG1) comet assay for assessing oxidative DNA damage caused by marine toxins in marine invertebrates. PMID:27231936

  3. Early Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects of the Toxic Dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima in the Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Verónica Prego-Faraldo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Okadaic acid (OA and dinophysistoxins (DTXs are the main toxins responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP intoxications during harmful algal blooms (HABs. Although the genotoxic and cytotoxic responses to OA have been evaluated in vitro, the in vivo effects of these toxins have not yet been fully explored. The present work fills this gap by evaluating the in vivo effects of the exposure to the DSP-toxin-producing dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima during the simulation of an early HAB episode in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The obtained results revealed that in vivo exposure to this toxic microalgae induced early genotoxicity in hemocytes, as a consequence of oxidative DNA damage. In addition, the DNA damage observed in gill cells seems to be mainly influenced by exposure time and P. lima concentration, similarly to the case of the oxidative damage found in hemocytes exposed in vitro to OA. In both cell types, the absence of DNA damage at low toxin concentrations is consistent with the notion suggesting that this level of toxicity does not disturb the antioxidant balance. Lastly, in vivo exposure to growing P. lima cell densities increased apoptosis but not necrosis, probably due to the presence of a high number of protein apoptosis inhibitors in molluscs. Overall, this work sheds light into the in vivo genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of P. lima. In doing so, it also demonstrates for the first time the potential of the modified (OGG1 comet assay for assessing oxidative DNA damage caused by marine toxins in marine invertebrates.

  4. In vitro evaluation of genotoxic effects under magnetic resonant coupling wireless power transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Kohei; Shinohara, Naoki; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2015-04-07

    Wireless power transfer (WPT) technology using the resonant coupling phenomenon has been widely studied, but there are very few studies concerning the possible relationship between WPT exposure and human health. In this study, we investigated whether exposure to magnetic resonant coupling WPT has genotoxic effects on WI38VA13 subcloned 2RA human fibroblast cells. WPT exposure was performed using a helical coil-based exposure system designed to transfer power with 85.4% efficiency at a 12.5-MHz resonant frequency. The magnetic field at the positions of the cell culture dishes is approximately twice the reference level for occupational exposure as stated in the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. The specific absorption rate at the positions of the cell culture dishes matches the respective reference levels stated in the ICNIRP guidelines. For assessment of genotoxicity, we studied cell growth, cell cycle distribution, DNA strand breaks using the comet assay, micronucleus formation, and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene mutation, and did not detect any significant effects between the WPT-exposed cells and control cells. Our results suggest that WPT exposure under the conditions of the ICNIRP guidelines does not cause detectable cellular genotoxicity.

  5. Grape seed extract prevents gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity and genotoxicity in bone marrow cells of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ashmawy, Ibrahim M; El-Nahas, Abeer F; Salama, Osama M

    2006-09-01

    The protection conferred by grape seed extract against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity and bone marrow chromosomal aberrations have been evaluated in adult Swiss albino mice. The activity of reduced glutathione peroxidase (GSH peroxidase), the levels of glutathione (GSH) and lipid peroxidation as malondialdehyde (MDA) in the kidneys homogenates, serum urea and creatinine were measured, and in addition the changes in kidney histology and bone marrow chromosomes were investigated. Gentamicin (80 mg/kg b.wt. intraperitoneally for 2 weeks) induced kidney damage as indicated from a pronounced changes in kidney histology, a significant increase in serum urea and creatinine and MDA content in the kidney homogenate. While the activity of the antioxidant enzyme GSH peroxidase and the level of GSH were significantly decreased. Gentamicin induced genotoxicity indicated by increased the number of aberrant cells and different types of structural chromosomal aberrations (fragment, deletion and ring chromosome) and showed no effect on mitotic activity of the cell. Pretreatment with grape seed extract (7 days) and simultaneously (14 days) with gentamicin significantly protected the kidney tissue by ameliorating its antioxidant activity. Moreover, grape seed extract significantly protected bone marrow chromosomes from gentamicin induced genotoxicity by reducing the total number of aberrant cells, and different types of structural chromosomal aberrations. It could be concluded that grape seed extract acts as a potent antioxidant prevented kidney damage and genotoxicity of bone marrow cells.

  6. Influence Of Acacia nilotica On Arsenic Induced Genotoxicity In Male and Female Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    INAS S. Ghaly AND ZEINAB E. HANAFY

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available For centuries, plants have been used in traditional medicine and there has been recent interest in the chemopreventive properties of compounds derived from plants. In the present study, we investigated the effects of extracts of Acacia nilotica leaves on the genotoxicity of arsinic . Arsenic contamination in groundwater a global human health hazard .There is no effective remedial action of chronic arsenicsis. However, a well-nourished diet can modulate the onset of adverse health effects and delayed the effect of arsenic in drinking water. In the present work, genotoxic effects were induced by sodium arsenate through oral administration,and the protective effect of Acacia nilotica was studied. Chromosomal aberrations were more pronounced in sodium arsenate treated mice, while supplementation of Acacia nilotica with sodium arsenate reduced the incidence of the aberrations. The mean of DNA fragmentation induced by sodium arsenate was highly significant increase. However, the administration of Acacia nilotica significantly decreased DNA fragmentation induced by sodium arsenate. The mean number of sperms, were decreased significantly after treatment with sodium arsenate, while administration of Acacia nilotica increased the number of sperm in mice treated with sodium arsenate, and also decreased the percentage of sperm abnormalities induced by sodium arsenate. The outcome of study showed that Acacia nilotica has the efficiency to encounter the genotoxic effects induced by arsenic.

  7. Assessment of genotoxic potential of two mycotoxins in the wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürbüzel, Mehmet; Uysal, Handan; Kızılet, Halit

    2015-03-01

    Mycotoxins, the toxic products of molds, exposure causes serious adverse health problems in human, animals, and crops. Determining the potential genotoxic effects of these substances is, therefore, of great importance. We have evaluated the genotoxic toxicity of two trichothecenes--diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS) and T-2 toxin--using the wing somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster. The SMART is based on the principle that the loss of heterozygosis of recessive markers located on the left arm of chromosome 3--multiple wing hairs (mwh) at the map position 0.3 and flare-3 (flr3) at the map position 38.8--may occur through various mechanisms such as mitotic recombination, mutation, deletion, half-translocation, chromosome loss, and nondisjunction. Both the mycotoxins were administered to third instar larvae (72 ± 4 h old) at concentrations ranging from 5 to 40 μM. Based on our results, DAS and T-2 toxins does not exert genotoxic effects up to a concentration of 40 μM.

  8. Measures of genotoxicity in Gulf war I veterans exposed to depleted uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDiarmid, Melissa A; Albertini, Richard J; Tucker, James D; Vacek, Pamela M; Carter, Elizabeth W; Bakhmutsky, Marina V; Oliver, Marc S; Engelhardt, Susan M; Squibb, Katherine S

    2011-08-01

    Exposure to depleted uranium (DU), an alpha-emitting heavy metal, has prompted the inclusion of markers of genotoxicity in the long-term medical surveillance of a cohort of DU-exposed Gulf War veterans followed since 1994. Using urine U (uU) concentration as the measure of U body burden, the cohort has been stratified into low-u (genotoxicity [micronuclei (MN), chromosome aberrations, and MFs of HPRT and PIGA] were examined. There were no statistically significant differences in any outcome measure when results were compared between the low- vs. high-U groups. However, modeling of the HPRT MF results suggests a possible threshold effect for MFs occurring in the highest U exposed cohort members. Mutational spectral analysis of HPRT mutations is underway to clarify a potential clonal vs. a threshold uU effect to explain this observation. This study provides a comprehensive evaluation of a human population chronically exposed to DU and demonstrates a relatively weak genotoxic effect of the DU exposure. These results may explain the lack of clear epidemiologic evidence for U carcinogenicity in humans. Environ. Mol. Mutagen., 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. A review of the genotoxicity of 1,2-dichloroethane (EDC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwinn, Maureen R; Johns, Douglas O; Bateson, Thomas F; Guyton, Kathryn Z

    2011-01-01

    1,2-Dichloroethane (EDC, CAS#107-06-2) is a high production volume halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbon that is used mainly in the manufacture of vinyl chloride. EDC has been found in ambient and residential air samples, as well as in groundwater, surface water and drinking water. EDC has been well-studied in a variety of genotoxicity assays, and appears to involve the metabolic activation of the parent compound. We critically evaluated the genotoxicity data of EDC and its metabolites as part of an evaluation of carcinogenic mechanisms of action of EDC. EDC is genotoxic in multiple test systems via multiple routes of exposure. EDC has been shown to induce DNA adduct formation, gene mutations and chromosomal aberrations in the presence of key activation enzymes (including CYP450s and/or GSTs) in laboratory animal and in vitro studies. EDC was negative for clastogenesis as measured by the micronucleus assay in mice. In general, an increased level of DNA damage is observed related to the GSH-dependent bioactivation of EDC. Increased chromosomal aberrations with increased CYP450 expression were suggestive of a role for the oxidative metabolites of EDC in inducing chromosomal damage. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that EDC exposure, in the presence of key enzymes (including CYP450s and/or GSTs), leads to DNA adduct formation, gene mutations and chromosomal aberrations.

  10. Quercetin protects human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from OTA-induced oxidative stress, genotoxicity, and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, Ramyaa; Kalal, Iravathy Goud; Krishnaswamy, Rajashree; Viswanadha, VijayaPadma

    2016-07-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is one of the most abundant food-contaminating mycotoxins world wide, and is detrimental to human and animal health. This study evaluated the protective effect of quercetin against OTA-induced cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and inflammatory response in lymphocytes. Cytotoxicity determined by MTT assay revealed IC20 value of OTA to be 20 µM, which was restored to near control values by pretreatment with quercetin. Oxidative stress parameters such as antioxidant enzymes, LPO and PCC levels indicated that quercetin exerted a protective effect on OTA-induced oxidative stress. Quercetin exerted an antigenotoxic effect on OTA-induced genotoxicity, by significantly reducing the number of structural aberrations in chromosomes and comet parameters like, % olive tail moment from 2.76 ± 0.02 to 0.56 ± 0.02 and % tail DNA from 56.23 ± 2.56 to 12.36 ± 0.56 as determined by comet assay. OTA-induced NO, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 were significantly reduced in the quercetin pretreated samples indicating its anti-inflammatory role. Our results demonstrate for the first time that quercetin exerts a cytoprotective effect against OTA-induced oxidative stress, genotoxicity, and inflammation in lymphocytes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 855-865, 2016.

  11. The Cosmetics Europe strategy for animal-free genotoxicity testing: project status up-date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfuhler, S; Fautz, R; Ouedraogo, G; Latil, A; Kenny, J; Moore, C; Diembeck, W; Hewitt, N J; Reisinger, K; Barroso, J

    2014-02-01

    The Cosmetics Europe (formerly COLIPA) Genotoxicity Task Force has driven and funded three projects to help address the high rate of misleading positives in in vitro genotoxicity tests: The completed "False Positives" project optimized current mammalian cell assays and showed that the predictive capacity of the in vitro micronucleus assay was improved dramatically by selecting more relevant cells and more sensitive toxicity measures. The on-going "3D skin model" project has been developed and is now validating the use of human reconstructed skin (RS) models in combination with the micronucleus (MN) and Comet assays. These models better reflect the in use conditions of dermally applied products, such as cosmetics. Both assays have demonstrated good inter- and intra-laboratory reproducibility and are entering validation stages. The completed "Metabolism" project investigated enzyme capacities of human skin and RS models. The RS models were shown to have comparable metabolic capacity to native human skin, confirming their usefulness for testing of compounds with dermal exposure. The program has already helped to improve the initial test battery predictivity and the RS projects have provided sound support for their use as a follow-up test in the assessment of the genotoxic hazard of cosmetic ingredients in the absence of in vivo data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tradescantia micronucleus test indicates genotoxic potential of traffic emissions in European cities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klumpp, Andreas [Institute for Landscape and Plant Ecology (320), University of Hohenheim, 70593 Stuttgart (Germany)]. E-mail: aklumpp@uni-hohenheim.de; Ansel, Wolfgang [Institute for Landscape and Plant Ecology (320), University of Hohenheim, 70593 Stuttgart (Germany); Klumpp, Gabriele [Institute for Landscape and Plant Ecology (320), University of Hohenheim, 70593 Stuttgart (Germany); Calatayud, Vicent [Fundacion CEAM, Parque Tecnologico, c/Charles Darwin 14, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Garrec, Jean Pierre [INRA Nancy, Laboratoire Pollution Atmospherique, 54280 Champenoux (France); He Shang [INRA Nancy, Laboratoire Pollution Atmospherique, 54280 Champenoux (France); Penuelas, Josep [Unitat Ecofisiologia CSIC-CEAB-CREAF, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Ed. C, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Ribas, Angela [Unitat Ecofisiologia CSIC-CEAB-CREAF, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Ed. C, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Ro-Poulsen, Helge [Botanical Institute, University of Copenhagen, Oster Farimagsgade 2D, 1353 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Rasmussen, Stine [Botanical Institute, University of Copenhagen, Oster Farimagsgade 2D, 1353 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Sanz, Maria Jose [Fundacion CEAM, Parque Tecnologico, c/Charles Darwin 14, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Vergne, Phillippe [ENS Lyon and Lyon Botanical Garden, 46 Allee d' Italie, 69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France)

    2006-02-15

    Urban atmospheres contain complex mixtures of air pollutants including mutagenic and carcinogenic substances such as benzene, diesel soot, heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In the frame of a European network for the assessment of air quality by the use of bioindicator plants, the Tradescantia micronucleus (Trad-MCN) test was applied to examine the genotoxicity of urban air pollution. Cuttings of Tradescantia clone no. 4430 were exposed to ambient air at 65 monitoring sites in 10 conurbations employing a standardised methodology. The tests revealed an elevated genotoxic potential mainly at those urban sites which were exposed to severe car traffic emissions. This bioassay proved to be a suitable tool to detect local 'hot spots' of mutagenic air pollution in urban areas. For its use in routine monitoring programmes, however, further standardisation of cultivation and exposure techniques is recommended in order to reduce the variability of results due to varying environmental conditions. - The Tradescantia micronucleus test can be used to assess genotoxic potential at urban sites.

  13. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of cisplatin treatment combined with anaesthetics on EAT cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozovic, Gordana; Orsolic, Nada; Knezevic, Fabijan; Horvat Knezevic, Anica; Benkovic, Vesna; Sakic, Katarina; Hrgovic, Zlatko; Bendelja, Kreso; Fassbender, Walter J

    2009-06-01

    In this study, DNA damage in tumour cells, as well as irreversible cell damage leading to apoptosis induced in vivo by the combined application of cisplatin and inhalation anaesthetics, was investigated. The genotoxicity of anaesthetics on Ehrlich ascites tumour (EAT) cells of mice, alone or in combined application with cisplatin, was estimated by using the alkaline comet assay. The percentage of EAT cell apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry. Groups of EAT-bearing mice were (i) treated intraperitoneally with cisplatin, (ii) exposed to repeated anaesthesia with inhalation anaesthetic, and (iii) subjected to combined treatment of exposure to anaesthetics after cisplatin for 3 days. Sevoflurane, halothane and isoflurane caused strong genotoxic effects on tumour cells in vivo. The tested anaesthetics alone showed no direct effect on programmed cell death although sevoflurane and especially halothane decreased the number of living EAT cells in peritoneal cavity lavage. Repeated anaesthesia with isoflurane had stimulatory effects on EAT cell proliferation and inhibited tumour cell apoptosis (6.11%), compared to the control group (10.26%). Cisplatin caused massive apoptosis of EAT cells (41.14%) and decreased the number of living EAT cells in the peritoneal cavity. Combined cisplatin and isoflurane treatment additionally increased EAT cell apoptosis to 51.32%. Combined treatment of mice with cisplatin and all anaesthetics increased the number of living tumour cells in the peritoneal cavity compared to cisplatin treatment of mice alone. These results suggest that the inhalation of anaesthetics may protect tumour cells from the cisplatin-induced genotoxic and cytotoxic effects.

  14. Embryotoxicity and genotoxicity evaluation of sediments from Yangtze River estuary using zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Chen, Ling; Liu, Li; Wu, Lingling

    2016-03-01

    Sediments function both as a sink and a source of pollutants in aquatic ecosystems and may impose serious effects on benthic organisms and human health. As one of the largest estuaries in the world, the Yangtze River estuary suffers from abundant wastewater from the coastal cities. In this study, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were employed in the fish embryo test and a comet assay to evaluate the embryotoxicity and genotoxicity of the sediments from the Yangtze River estuary, respectively. Results showed that the sediments from the Yangtze River estuary significantly increased mortality, induced development abnormalities, and reduced hatching rate and heart rate of zebrafish embryos after 96 h of exposure. Significant genotoxicity was observed in the samples relative to the controls. Relatively low-level embryotoxicity and genotoxicity of sediments were found in the Yangtze River compared with other river systems. Toxic responses were also discussed in relation to the analyzed organic contaminants in sediments. More attention should be paid to non-priority pollutant monitoring in the Yangtze River estuary.

  15. Oxidative and genotoxic effects of 900 MHz electromagnetic fields in the earthworm Eisenia fetida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkalec, Mirta; Stambuk, Anamaria; Srut, Maja; Malarić, Krešimir; Klobučar, Göran I V

    2013-04-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) can have various biological effects. In this study the oxidative and genotoxic effects were investigated in earthworms Eisenia fetida exposed in vivo to RF-EMF at the mobile phone frequency (900 MHz). Earthworms were exposed to the homogeneous RF-EMF at field levels of 10, 23, 41 and 120 V m(-1) for a period of 2h using a Gigahertz Transversal Electromagnetic (GTEM) cell. At the field level of 23 V m(-1) the effect of longer exposure (4h) and field modulation (80% AM 1 kHz sinusoidal) was investigated as well. All exposure treatments induced significant genotoxic effect in earthworms coelomocytes detected by the Comet assay, demonstrating DNA damaging capacity of 900 MHz electromagnetic radiation. Field modulation additionally increased the genotoxic effect. Moreover, our results indicated the induction of antioxidant stress response in terms of enhanced catalase and glutathione reductase activity as a result of the RF-EMF exposure, and demonstrated the generation of lipid and protein oxidative damage. Antioxidant responses and the potential of RF-EMF to induce damage to lipids, proteins and DNA differed depending on the field level applied, modulation of the field and duration of E. fetida exposure to 900 MHz electromagnetic radiation. Nature of detected DNA lesions and oxidative stress as the mechanism of action for the induction of DNA damage are discussed.

  16. Photochemical fate and eco-genotoxicity assessment of the drug etodolac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passananti, Monica [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Università di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia, 4, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand (ICCF) UMR 6296, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); Lavorgna, Margherita [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Ambientali, Biologiche e Farmaceutiche, Seconda Università di Napoli, Via Vivaldi 43, I-81100 Caserta (Italy); Iesce, Maria Rosaria, E-mail: iesce@unina.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Università di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia, 4, 80126 Napoli (Italy); DellaGreca, Marina [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Università di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia, 4, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Brigante, Marcello [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand (ICCF) UMR 6296, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); Criscuolo, Emma [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Ambientali, Biologiche e Farmaceutiche, Seconda Università di Napoli, Via Vivaldi 43, I-81100 Caserta (Italy); Cermola, Flavio [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Università di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia, 4, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Isidori, Marina, E-mail: marina.isidori@unina2.it [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Ambientali, Biologiche e Farmaceutiche, Seconda Università di Napoli, Via Vivaldi 43, I-81100 Caserta (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    The photochemical behavior of etodolac was investigated under various irradiation conditions. Kinetic data were obtained after irradiation of 10{sup −4} M aqueous solutions by UVB, UVA and direct exposure to sunlight. The Xenon lamp irradiation was used in order to determine the photodegradation quantum yield under sun-simulated condition (ϕ{sub sun}). The value was determined to be = 0.10 ± 0.01. In order to obtain photoproducts and for mechanistic purposes, experiments were carried out on more concentrated solutions by exposure to sunlight and to UVA and UVB lamps. The drug underwent photooxidative processes following an initial oxygen addition to the double bond of the five membered ring and was mainly converted into a spiro compound and a macrolactam. Ecotoxicity tests were performed on etodolac, its photostable spiro derivative and its sunlight irradiation mixture on two different aquatic trophic levels, plants (algae) and invertebrates (rotifers and crustaceans). Mutagenesis and genotoxicity were detected on bacterial strains. The results showed that only etodolac had long term effects on rotifers although at concentrations far from environmental detection values. A mutagenic and genotoxic potential was found for its derivative. - Highlights: • Photochemical transformation of etodolac occurs in the environment. • Etodolac was slightly toxic in the long term for some aquatic organisms. • A mutagenic and genotoxic potential was found for etodolac photostable derivative.

  17. Evaluation of genotoxic effect of silver nanoparticles (Ag-Nps) in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, Priscila; Balbinot, Fernanda; Martins de Oliveira, Hugo; Elibio Fagundes, Gabriela [PPGCS, Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Laboratorio de Biologia Celular e Molecular (Brazil); Venancio, Mireli; Vieira Ronconi, Joao Vitor; Merlini, Aline [Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Laboratorio de Sintese de Complexos Multifuncionais (Brazil); Streck, Emilio L. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias da Saude, Unidade Academica de Ciencias da Saude, Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Laboratorio de Fisiopatologia Experimental (Brazil); Marques da Silva, Paula [Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Laboratorio de Sintese de Complexos Multifuncionais (Brazil); Moraes de Andrade, Vanessa, E-mail: vmoraesdeandrade@yahoo.com.br [PPGCS, Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Laboratorio de Biologia Celular e Molecular (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) are the most prominent nanoproducts. Due to their antimicrobial activity, they have been incorporated in different materials, such as catheters, clothes, electric home appliance, and many others. The genotoxicity of Ag-NPs (5-45 nm), in different concentrations and times of exposure, was evaluated by the comet assay in in vitro and in vivo conditions, respectively, using human peripheral blood and Swiss mice. The results showed the genotoxic effect of Ag-NPs in vitro, in all the doses tested in the initial hour of exposure, possibly through the reactive oxygen species generation. Nevertheless, the values for this damage decrease with time, indicating that the DNA may have been restored by the repair system. In the in vivo conditions, we found no genotoxicity of Ag-NPs in any hour of exposure and any dose investigated, which can be attributed to the activation of a cellular antioxidant network and the hydrophobic nature of Ag-NPs. Now, it is absolutely necessary to investigate the role of Ag-NPs in different cell lines in vivo.

  18. Anti-genotoxic and free-radical scavenging activities of extracts from (Tunisian) Myrtus communis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayder, N; Abdelwahed, A; Kilani, S; Ammar, R Ben; Mahmoud, A; Ghedira, K; Chekir-Ghedira, L

    2004-11-14

    The effect of extracts from leaves of Myrtus communis on the SOS reponse induced by Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and Nifuroxazide was investigated in a bacterial assay system, i.e. the SOS chromotest with Escherichia coli PQ37. Aqueous extract, the total flavonoids oligomer fraction (TOF), hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts and essential oil obtained from M. communis significantly decreased the SOS response induced by AFB1 (10 microg/assay) and Nifuroxazide (20 microg/assay). Ethyl acetate and methanol extracts showed the strongest inhibition of the induction of the SOS response by the indirectly genotoxic AFB1. The methanol and aqueous extracts exhibited the highest level of protection towards the SOS-induced response by the directly genotoxic Nifuroxazide. In addition to anti-genotoxic activity, the aqueous extract, the TOF, and the ethyl acetate and methanol extracts showed an important free-radical scavenging activity towards the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical. These results suggest the future utilization of these extracts as additives in chemoprevention studies.

  19. Black pepper constituent piperine: genotoxicity studies in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Anette; Buskens, Carin; Woehrle, Tina; Etheve, Stéphane; Schoenmakers, Ankie; Fehr, Markus; Beilstein, Paul

    2014-04-01

    Piperine is responsible for the hot taste of black pepper. Publications on genotoxicity of piperine are reported: negative Ames Tests and one in vitro micronucleus test (MNT). In vivo tests were mainly negative. In the majority of the data the administered dose levels did not follow the dose selection requirements of regulatory guidelines of having dose levels up to the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). The only oral high dose studies were a positive in vivo MNT in mice in contrast to a negative in vivo chromosome aberration test in rats. Thus, conflicting results in genotoxicity testing are published. To investigate this further, we administered piperine to mice up to the MTD and determined micronuclei-frequency. Piperine reduces core body temperature and interferes with blood cells both being known to result in irrelevant positive in vivo MNTs. Therefore we added mechanistic endpoints: core body temperature, haematology, erythropoietin level, and organ weights. Additionally an in vitro MNT in Chinese hamster ovary cells was performed. Piperine was negative in the in vitro MNT. It caused significant reduction of core body temperature, decrease of white blood cells and spleen weights but no increase in the micronucleus-frequency. Thus, in our studies piperine was not genotoxic.

  20. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles exhibit genotoxicity and impair DNA repair activity in A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jugan, Mary-Line; Barillet, Sabrina; Simon-Deckers, Angelique; Herlin-Boime, Nathalie; Sauvaigo, Sylvie; Douki, Thierry; Carriere, Marie

    2012-08-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO(2)-NPs) are produced in large quantities, raising concerns about their impact for human health. The aim of this study was to deeply characterize TiO(2)-NPs genotoxic potential to lung cells, and to link genotoxicity to physicochemical characteristics, e.g., size, specific surface area, crystalline phase. A549 cells were exposed to a panel of TiO(2)-NPs with diameters ranging from 12 to 140 nm, either anatase or rutile. A set of complementary techniques (comet and micronucleus assays, gamma-H2AX immunostaining, 8-oxoGuanine analysis, H2-DCFDA, glutathione content, antioxidant enzymes activities) allowed us to demonstrate that small and spherical TiO(2)-NPs, both anatase and rutile, induce single-strand breaks and oxidative lesions to DNA, together with a general oxidative stress. Additionally we show that these NPs impair cell ability to repair DNA, by inactivation of both NER and BER pathways. This study thus confirms the genotoxic potential of TiO(2)-NPs, which may preclude their mutagenicity and carcinogenicity.

  1. Evaluation of genotoxic activity of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate in human peripheral lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubra Kurt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Antiretroviral drugs used in the treatment of HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus iinfection, treat by preventing the proliferation of HIV in human body. People with HIV have to use this drugs for lifelong because of inability of the drugs to eradicate the viruses. In this study, we investigated the in vitro genotoxic activity of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate one of the antiretroviral drugs, in human peripheral lymphocytes. Material and Methods: The cells were treated with four different concentrations of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate for 24 and 48 hours. The levels of sister chromatid exchanges, chromosomal aberrations, and micronucleus in the cells were examined for the genotoxic activity of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate. Mitotic index, proliferation index, and nucleer division index of treated cells were also determined for the cytotoxic effect of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate. Results: There was no significant differences in the level of sister chromatid exchanges, chromosomal aberrations, and micronucleus in human lyphocytes treated with all concetrations of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate for all treatment period as compared to control group. Similarly, it was observed that treatment of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate did not affect the mitotic index, proliferation index, and nucleer division index values. Conclusion: As a result, in this study, it is demonstrated that tenofovir disoproxil fumarate did not have genotoxic or cytotoxic effect in the human peripheral lymphocytes. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(2.000: 229-235

  2. INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON HARMONISATION GUIDELINES ON THE LIMITS OF GENOTOXIC IMPURITIES IN DRUG PRODUCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Ajay

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available An impurity in a drug substance as defined by the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH guidelines is any component of the drug substance that is not the chemical entity defined as the drug substance. Similarly, an impurity in a drug product is any component of the drug product that is not the chemical entity defined as the drug substance or an excipient in the drug product. Genotoxic compounds have the potential to damage DNA at any level of exposure and that such damage may lead/contribute to tumour development. Thus for genotoxic carcinogens it is prudent to assume that there is no discernible threshold and that any level of exposure carries a risk. A threshold of toxicological concern (TTC value of 1.5μg/day intake of a genotoxic impurity is considered to be associated with an acceptable risk (excess cancer risk of <1 in 100,000 over a lifetime for most pharmaceuticals. From this threshold value, a permitted level in the active substance can be calculated based on the expected daily dose. Higher limits may be justified under certain conditions such as short-term exposure periods.

  3. Evaluation of genotoxicity induced by repetitive administration of local anaesthetics: an experimental study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Alborghetti Nai

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Previous studies regarding the effects of some local anaesthetics have suggested that these agents can cause genetic damage. However, they have not been tested for genotoxicity related to repetitive administration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic potential of local anaesthetics upon repetitive administration. METHODS: 80 male Wistar rats were divided into: group A - 16 rats intraperitoneally injected with lidocaine hydrochloride 2%; group B - 16 rats IP injected with mepivacaine 2%; group C - 16 rats intraperitoneally injected with articaine 4%; group D - 16 rats IP injected with prilocaine 3% (6.0 mg/kg; group E - 8 rats subcutaneously injected with a single dose of cyclophosphamide; and group F - 8 rats intraperitoneally injected with saline. Eight rats from groups A to D received a single dose of anaesthetic on Day 1 of the experiment; the remaining rats were dosed once a day for 5 days. RESULTS: The median number of micronuclei in the local anaesthetics groups exposed for 1 or 5 days ranged from 0.00 to 1.00, in the cyclophosphamide-exposed group was 10.00, and the negative control group for 1 and 5 days was 1.00 and 0.00, respectively (p 0.05. CONCLUSION: No genotoxicity effect was observed upon repetitive exposure to any of the local anaesthetics evaluated.

  4. The combined toxic and genotoxic effects of Cd and As to plant bioindicator Trifolium repens L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ghiani

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to investigate combined toxic and genotoxic effects of cadmium (Cd and arsenic (As on white clover, a pollutant sensitive plant frequently used as environmental bioindicator. Plants were exposed to soil spiked with increasing concentrations of cadmium sulfate (20, 40 and 60 mg Kg-1 or sodium arsenite (5, 10 and 20 mg Kg-1 as well as with their combinations. Metal(loid bioavailability was assessed after soil contamination, whereas plant growth, metal(loid concentration in plant organs and DNA damage were measured at the end of plant exposition. Results showed that individual and joint toxicity and genotoxicity were related to the concentration of Cd and As measured in plant organs, and that As concentration was the most relevant variable. Joint effects on plant growth were additive or synergistic, whereas joint genotoxic effects were additive or antagonistic. The interaction between Cd and As occurred at both soil and plant level. In soil the presence of As limited the bioavailability of Cd, whereas the presence of Cd increased the bioavailability of As. Nevertheless only As biovailability determined the amount of As absorbed by plants. The amount of Cd absorbed by plant was not linearly correlated with the fraction of bioavailable Cd in soil suggesting the involvement of additional factors, such as plant uptake mechanisms. These results reveal that the simultaneous presence in soil of Cd and As, although producing an additive or synergistic toxic effect on Trifolium repens L. growth, generates a lower DNA damage.

  5. Genotoxic Effects of Superconducting Static Magnetic Fields (SMFs) on Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Pollen Mother Cells (PMCs)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Pingping; YIN Ruochun; CHEN Zhiyou; WU Lifang; YU Zengliang

    2007-01-01

    The effects of superconducting static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the pollen mother cells (PMCs) of wheat were investigated in order to evaluate the possible genotoxic effect of such non-ionizing radiation.The seeds of wheat were exposed to static magnetic fields with either different magnetic flux densities (0,1,3,5 and 7 Tesla) for 5 h or different durations (1,3 and 5 h) at a magnetic flux density of 7 Tesla.The seeds were germinated at 23℃ after exposure and the seedlings were transplanted into the field.The PMCs from young wheat ears were taken and slides were made following the conventional method.The genotoxic effect was evaluated in terms of micronucleus (MN),chromosomal bridge,lagging chromosome and fragments in PMCs.Although the exposed groups of a low field intensity (below 5 Tesla) showed no statistically significant difference in the aberration frequency compared with the unexposed control groups and sham exposed groups,a significant increase in the chromosomal bridge,lagging chromosome,triple-polar segregation or micronucleus was observed at a field strength of 5 Tesla or 7 Tesla,respectively.The analysis of dose-effect relationships indicated that the increased frequency of meiotic abnormal cells correlated with the flux density of the magnetic field and duration,but no linear relationship was observed.Such statistically significant differences indicated a potential genotoxic effect of high static magnetic fields above 5 T.

  6. [Research Progress in Genotoxic Effects of Degradation Products, Cobalt, Chromium Ions and Nanoparticles from Metal-on-metal Prostheses on Cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hao; Han, Qinglin; Liu, Fan

    2015-04-01

    Cobalt or chromium alloys are the most common clinical materials of prosthesis and there have been some investigators at home and abroad have done related researches about the genotoxic effects of cobalt and chromium ions and nanoparticles. People have certain understanding about the mechanism of production of ions as well as their influence on cells. However, chromium or cobalt nanoparticles genotoxicity related research is still in its preliminary stage. In each stage, the mechanisms, from creating of the particles, through entering cells, until finally causing genotoxic, are still contained many problems to be solved. This article reviews the research progress in mechanisms of production and genotoxic effects of cobalt, chromium ions and nanoparticles.

  7. Human Genotoxic Study Carried Out Two Years after Oil Exposure during the Clean-up Activities Using Two Different Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Biern

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Micronuclei, comet and chromosome alterations assays are the most widely used biomarkers for determining the genotoxic damage in a population exposed to genotoxic chemicals. While chromosome alterations are an excellent biomarker to detect short- and long-term genotoxic effects, the comet assay only measures early biological effects, and furthermore it is unknown whether nuclear abnormalies, such as those measured in the micronucleus test, remain detectable long-term after an acute exposure. In our previous study, an increase in structural chromosome alterations in fishermen involved in the clean-up of the Prestige oil spill, two years after acute exposure, was detected. The aim of this study is to investigate whether, in lymphocytes from peripheral blood, the nuclear abnormalies (micronucleus, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds have a similar sensitivity to the chromosome damage analysis for genotoxic detection two years after oil exposure in the same non-smoker individuals and in the same peripheral blood extraction. No significant differences in nuclear abnormalies frequencies between exposed and non-exposed individuals were found (p > 0.05. However, chromosome damage, in the same individuals, was higher in exposed vs. non-exposed individuals, especially for chromosome lesions (p < 0.05. These findings, despite the small sample size, suggest that nuclear abnormalities are probably less-successful biomarkers than are chromosome alterations to evaluate genotoxic effects two or more years after an exposure to oil. Due to the great advantage of micronucleus automatic determination, which allows for a rapid study of hundreds of individuals exposed to genotoxic chemical exposure, further studies are needed to confirm whether this assay is or is not useful in long-term genotoxic studies after the toxic agent is no longer present.

  8. Genotoxicity assessment of reactive and disperse textile dyes using human dermal equivalent (3D cell culture system).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leme, Daniela Morais; Primo, Fernando Lucas; Gobo, Graciely Gomides; da Costa, Cleber Rafael Vieira; Tedesco, Antonio Claudio; de Oliveira, Danielle Palma

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of dyes are marketed daily for different purposes, including textile dyeing. However, there are several studies reporting attributing to dyes deleterious human effects such as DNA damage. Humans may be exposed to toxic dyes through either ingestion of contaminated waters or dermal contact with colored garments. With respect to dermal exposure, human skin equivalents are promising tools to assess in vitro genotoxicity of dermally applied chemicals using a three-dimensional (3D) model to mimic tissue behavior. This study investigated the sensitivity of an in-house human dermal equivalent (DE) for detecting genotoxicity of textile dyes. Two azo (reactive green 19 [RG19] and disperse red 1[DR1]) dyes and one anthraquinone (reactive blue 2 [RB2]) dye were analyzed. RG19 was genotoxic for DE in a dose-responsive manner, whereas RB2 and DR1 were nongenotoxic under the conditions tested. These findings are not in agreement with previous genotoxicological assessment of these dyes carried out using two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures, which showed that DR1 was genotoxic in human hepatoma cells (HepG2) and RG19 was nongenotoxic for normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF). These discrepant results probably may be due to differences between metabolic activities of each cell type (organ-specific genotoxicity, HepG2 and fibroblasts) and the test setup systems used in each study (fibroblasts cultured at 2D and three-dimensional [3D] culture systems). Genotoxicological assessment of textile dyes in context of organ-specific genotoxicity and using in vitro models that more closely resemble in vivo tissue architecture and physiology may provide more reliable estimates of genotoxic potential of these chemicals.

  9. Size- and coating-dependent cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of silver nanoparticles evaluated using in vitro standard assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Li, Yan; Yan, Jian; Ingle, Taylor; Jones, Margie Yvonne; Mei, Nan; Boudreau, Mary D; Cunningham, Candice K; Abbas, Mazhar; Paredes, Angel M; Zhou, Tong; Moore, Martha M; Howard, Paul C; Chen, Tao

    2016-11-01

    The physicochemical characteristics of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) may greatly alter their toxicological potential. To explore the effects of size and coating on the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of AgNPs, six different types of AgNPs, having three different sizes and two different coatings, were investigated using the Ames test, mouse lymphoma assay (MLA) and in vitro micronucleus assay. The genotoxicities of silver acetate and silver nitrate were evaluated to compare the genotoxicity of nanosilver to that of ionic silver. The Ames test produced inconclusive results for all types of the silver materials due to the high toxicity of silver to the test bacteria and the lack of entry of the nanoparticles into the cells. Treatment of L5718Y cells with AgNPs and ionic silver resulted in concentration-dependent cytotoxicity, mutagenicity in the Tk gene and the induction of micronuclei from exposure to nearly every type of the silver materials. Treatment of TK6 cells with these silver materials also resulted in concentration-dependent cytotoxicity and significantly increased micronucleus frequency. With both the MLA and micronucleus assays, the smaller the AgNPs, the greater the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. The coatings had less effect on the relative genotoxicity of AgNPs than the particle size. Loss of heterozygosity analysis of the induced Tk mutants indicated that the types of mutations induced by AgNPs were different from those of ionic silver. These results suggest that AgNPs induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in a size- and coating-dependent manner. Furthermore, while the MLA and in vitro micronucleus assay (in both types of cells) are useful to quantitatively measure the genotoxic potencies of AgNPs, the Ames test cannot.

  10. Genotoxic potentials and related mechanisms of bisphenol A and other bisphenol compounds: a comparison study employing chicken DT40 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangwoo; Liu, Xiaoshan; Takeda, Shunichi; Choi, Kyungho

    2013-09-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has been found in plastic food containers, paper currencies and toys. BPA has been reported for various adverse health concerns including reproduction, development and carcinogenesis. These potential health implications have led to increasing use of alternative bisphenols such as bisphenol F and bisphenol S among many. However, little is known about the toxicity of alternative bisphenols and most of the toxicological information is limited to endocrine disrupting potentials. In this study, we evaluated cytotoxicity and the genotoxic potentials of several bisphenol compounds, and identified the mechanism of genotoxicity using a panel of mutant chicken DT40 cell lines deficient in DNA repair pathways. Several bisphenols including bisphenol AP, bisphenol M, or bisphenol P exerted genotoxic potentials that are greater than that of BPA. Generally RAD54(-/-) mutant cells were the most sensitive to all bisphenols except for bisphenol F, suggesting the induction of DNA double-strand breaks that could be rescued by homologous recombination. Genotoxic potential of bisphenols was confirmed by chromosomal aberration assay and γ-H2AX foci forming assay between wild-type and RAD54(-/-) mutant. Among the tested bisphenols, BPP at 12.5μM showed the greatest genotoxic potency, inducing chromosomal aberration and γ-H2AX foci in RAD54(-/-) mutant by 2.6 and 4.8 folds greater than those in wild-type, respectively. Our results clearly show several alternative bisphenols can cause genotoxicity that could be rescued by homologous recombination pathway, and some bisphenols induced even greater genotoxic potentials than that of BPA.

  11. Genotoxic and enzymatic effects of fluoranthene in microsomes and freshly isolated hepatocytes from sole (Solea solea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, N; Ménard, D; Pichavant-Rafini, K; Ollivier, H; Le Goff, J; Burgeot, T; Akcha, F

    2012-02-01

    The fluoranthene (Fluo) is one of the most abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in human food and in marine compartments. However, the existing data on its genotoxicity is poor and controversial. The aim of this study was to assess in vitro the potential genotoxicity of Fluo in sole and its possible effect on CYP450 modulation. Freshly isolated hepatocytes were exposed for 24 h to a range of Fluo concentrations from 0.5 to 50 μM in both culture flasks and microplate wells. The ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity was measured as an indicator of the activity of the cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1). The genotoxic effects were evaluated by measuring both DNA strand breaks and DNA adducts by the alkaline comet assay and the postlabeling technique respectively. Calf thymus DNA was also exposed to Fluo in the presence of sole liver microsomes in order to check for Fluo DNA adduct formation. In sole hepatocytes, Fluo was shown to induce a decrease in the EROD activity in a concentration-dependent manner. A significant genotoxic effect was observed in terms of DNA strand breakage from an exposure concentration of 5 μM: despite a concentration-dependent effect was observed, it did not follow a linear dose-response. The response was similar whatever the way of exposure in flasks or in wells. One reproducible adduct was detected in the hepatocytes exposed to the highest concentrations of Fluo. The formation of Fluo adducts was confirmed by the detection of one reproducible adduct following in vitro exposure of calf thymus DNA to 100 and 200 μM of Fluo in the presence of sole microsomes. These results demonstrate the potential of sole hepatocytes to metabolize Fluo in 24 h into reactive species, able to induce genotoxicity by DNA strand breakage and DNA adduct formation. Moreover, a miniaturized cell exposure system was validated for further experiments using fewer amounts of hepatocytes and contaminants, and allowing exposure to PAH metabolites. Copyright

  12. Effects of soil pH on the Vicia-micronucleus genotoxicity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhyèvre, Adrien; Foltête, Anne Sophie; Aran, Delphine; Muller, Serge; Cotelle, Sylvie

    2014-11-01

    In the field of contaminated sites and soil management, chemical analyses only bring typological data about pollution. As far as bioavailability and effects on organisms are concerned, we need ecotoxicology tools. In this domain, among many existing tests, we chose to study genotoxicity because it is a short-term endpoint with long-term consequences. The aim of this study is to assess the effects of soil pH on the results of the Vicia faba root tip micronucleus test for the two following reasons: (i) to define the pH range within which the test can be performed without modifying the soil to be tested, within the framework of the ISO standard of the test and (ii) to provides information about the effects of the pH on the genotoxic potential of soils. In this context, we modified the pH of a standard soil with HCl or NaOH and we spiked the matrix with copper (2, 4 and 8 mmol kg(-1) dry soil) or with maleic hydrazide, an antigerminative chemical (5, 10 and 20 μmol kg(-1) dry soil). We concluded that the pH had no effect on the mitotic index or micronucleus frequency in the root cells of the negative controls: extreme pH values did not induce micronucleus formation in root cells. Moreover, according to our results, the Vicia-micronucleus test can be performed with pH values ranging between 3.2 and 9.0, but in the ISO 29200 "Soil quality--assessment of genotoxic effects on higher plants--V. faba micronucleus test" we recommended to use a control soil with a pH value ranging between 5 and 8 for a more accurate assessment of chemical genotoxicity. We also found that acid pH could increase the genotoxic potential of pollutants, especially heavy metals. With hydrazide maleic spiked soil, plants were placed in a situation of double stress, i.e. toxicity caused by extreme pH values and toxicity induced by the pollutant.

  13. Genotoxicity Induced by Foetal and Infant Exposure to Magnetic Fields and Modulation of Ionising Radiation Effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Udroiu

    Full Text Available Few studies have investigated the toxicity and genotoxicity of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF during prenatal and neonatal development. These phases of life are characterized by cell proliferation and differentiation, which might make them sensitive to environmental stressors. Although in vitro evidences suggest that ELF-MF may modify the effects of ionizing radiation, no research has been conducted so far in vivo on the genotoxic effects of ELF-MF combined with X-rays.Aim of this study was to investigate in somatic and germ cells the effects of chronic ELF-MF exposure from mid gestation until weaning, and any possible modulation produced by ELF-MF exposure on ionizing radiation-induced damage. Mice were exposed to 50 Hz, 65 μT magnetic field, 24 hours/day, for a total of 30 days, starting from 12 days post-conception. Another group was irradiated with 1 Gy X-rays immediately before ELF-MF exposure, other groups were only X-irradiated or sham-exposed. Micronucleus test on blood erythrocytes was performed at multiple times from 1 to 140 days after birth. Additionally, 42 days after birth, genotoxic and cytotoxic effects on male germ cells were assessed by comet assay and flow cytometric analysis.ELF-MF exposure had no teratogenic effect and did not affect survival, growth and development. The micronucleus test indicated that ELF-MF induced a slight genotoxic damage only after the maximum exposure time and that this effect faded away in the months following the end of exposure. ELF-MF had no effects on ionizing radiation (IR-induced genotoxicity in erythrocytes. Differently, ELF-MF appeared to modulate the response of male germ cells to X-rays with an impact on proliferation/differentiation processes. These results point to the importance of tissue specificity and development on the impact of ELF-MF on the early stages of life and indicate the need of further research on the molecular mechanisms underlying ELF-MF biological

  14. Influence of GSM signals on human peripheral lymphocytes: study of genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Petra; Bohnenberger, Susanne; Greinert, Rüdiger; Hermann-Then, Beate; Heselich, Anja; Klug, Stefanie J; Koenig, Jochem; Kuhr, Kathrin; Kuster, Niels; Merker, Mandy; Murbach, Manuel; Pollet, Dieter; Schadenboeck, Walter; Scheidemann-Wesp, Ulrike; Schwab, Britt; Volkmer, Beate; Weyer, Veronika; Blettner, Maria

    2013-02-01

    Exposure to radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) is continuously increasing worldwide. Yet, conflicting results of a possible genotoxic effect of RF EMF continue to be discussed. In the present study, a possible genotoxic effect of RF EMF (GSM, 1,800 MHz) in human lymphocytes was investigated by a collaboration of six independent institutes (institutes a, b, c, d, e, h). Peripheral blood of 20 healthy, nonsmoking volunteers of two age groups (10 volunteers 16-20 years old and 10 volunteers 50-65 years old) was taken, stimulated and intermittently exposed to three specific absorption rates (SARs) of RF EMF (0.2 W/kg, 2 W/kg, 10 W/kg) and sham for 28 h (institute a). The exposures were performed in a setup with strictly controlled conditions of temperature and dose, and randomly and automatically determined waveguide SARs, which were designed and periodically maintained by ITIS (institute h). Four genotoxicity tests with different end points were conducted (institute a): chromosome aberration test (five types of structural aberrations), micronucleus test, sister chromatid exchange test and the alkaline comet assay (Olive tail moment and % DNA). To demonstrate the validity of the study, positive controls were implemented. The genotoxicity end points were evaluated independently by three laboratories blind to SAR information (institute c = laboratory 1; institute d = laboratory 2; institute e = laboratory 3). Statistical analysis was carried out by institute b. Methods of primary statistical analysis and rules to adjust for multiple testing were specified in a statistical analysis plan based on a data review before unblinding. A linear trend test based on a linear mixed model was used for outcomes of comet assay and exact permutation test for linear trend for all other outcomes. It was ascertained that only outcomes with a significant SAR trend found by at least two of three analyzing laboratories indicated a substantiated suspicion of an exposure effect

  15. Multigenerational demographic responses of sexual and asexual Artemia to chronic genotoxicity by a reference mutagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumaran, Sandhya; Grant, Alastair

    2013-11-15

    Genotoxins are capable of multigenerational impacts on natural populations via DNA damage and mutations. Sexual reproduction is assumed to reduce the long term consequences of genotoxicity for individual fitness and should therefore reduce population level effects. However, rather few empirical studies have quantified the magnitude of this effect. We tried to analyse the multigenerational demographic responses of sexual Artemia franciscana and asexual Artemia parthenogenetica due to chronic genotoxicity by a reference mutagen, ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS). A prospective (elasticity analysis) and retrospective (differences and contributions) perturbation analysis was carried out to understand the interactions of life history traits with population growth rate λ by comparing elasticities, differences and contributions of vital rates to λ. None of the previous studies have compared the effects of chronic genotoxicity using prospective and retrospective perturbation analyses in a sexual and asexual species over generations. The behaviour of a population with lower growth rate in the presence of genotoxicants in the field was studied by simulating reduced fertilities in the LTRE design. The results of prospective and retrospective perturbation analyses of effects on λ showed that population growth rate was proportionally more sensitive to juvenile survival whereas the effect of EMS on juvenile fertility contributed more to the variations in population growth rate in both the species and this effect was due to the high growth rate of Artemia. Simulations of lower population growth rate in the model showed that adult fertility and survival are also of importance. Sexual reproduction substantially mitigated the long term consequences of genetic damage, although these would be greater if population growth rate were lower. So multigenerational population level consequences of genotoxicity were much greater in an asexual species. So asexual species, and those with a

  16. Efflux Transporters Regulate Arsenite Induced Genotoxicity in Double Negative and Double Positive T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huan; Medina, Sebastian; Lauer, Fredine T; Douillet, Christelle; Jian Liu, Ke; Hudson, Laurie G; Stýblo, Miroslav; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Burchiel, Scott W

    2017-04-29

    Arsenite (As+3) exposure is known to cause immunotoxicity in human and animal models. Our previous studies demonstrated that As+3 at 50 to 500 nM concentrations induced both genotoxicity and non-genotoxicity in mouse thymus cells. Developing T cells at CD4-CD8- double negative (DN) stage, the first stage after early T cells are transported from bone marrow to thymus, were found to be more sensitive to As+3 toxicity than the T cells at CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP) stage in vitro. Induction of Mdr1 (Abcb1) and Mrp1 (Abcc1), two multidrug resistance transporters and exporters of As+3, was associated with the reversal of As+3-induced double strand breaks and DNA damage. In order to confirm that the thymus cell populations have different sensitivity to As+3in vivo, male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 0, 100 and 500 ppb As+3 in drinking water for 30 d. A significant decrease in DN cell percentage was observed with exposure to 500 ppb As+3. Low to moderate concentrations of As+3 were shown to induce higher genotoxicity in sorted DN cells than DP cells in vitro. Calcein AM uptake and Mdr1/Mrp1 mRNA quantification results revealed that DN cells not only had limited As+3 exporter activity, but also lacked the ability to activate these exporters with As+3 treatments, resulting in a higher accumulation of intracellular As+3. Knockdown study of As+3 exporters in the DN thymic cell line, D1 using siRNA, demonstrated that Mdr1 and Mrp1 regulate intracellular As+3 accumulation and genotoxicity. Taken together, the results indicate that transporter regulation is an important mechanism for differential genotoxicity induced by As+3 in thymocytes at different developmental stages. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Evidence of the in vitro genotoxicity of methyl-pyrazole pesticides in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graillot, Vanessa; Tomasetig, Florence; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Audebert, Marc

    2012-10-09

    Consumers are exposed daily to several pesticide residues in food, which can be of potential concern for human health. Based on a previous study dealing with exposure of the French population to pesticide residues via the food, we selected 14 pesticides frequently found in foodstuffs, on the basis of their persistence in the environment or their bioaccumulation in the food chain. In a first step, the objective of this study was to investigate if the 14 selected pesticides were potentially cytotoxic and genotoxic. For this purpose, we used a new and sensitive genotoxicity assay (the γH2AX test, involving phosphorylation of histone H2AX) with four human cell lines (ACHN, SH-SY5Y, LS-174T and HepG2), each originating from a potential target tissue of food contaminants (kidney, nervous system, colon, and liver, respectively). Tebufenpyrad was the only compound identified as genotoxic and the effect was only observed in the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell-line. A time-course study showed that DNA damage appeared early after treatment (1h), suggesting that oxidative stress could be responsible for the induction of γH2AX. In a second step, three other pesticides were studied, i.e. bixafen, fenpyroximate and tolfenpyrad, which - like tebufenpad - also had a methyl-pyrazole structure. All these compounds demonstrated genotoxic activity in SH-SY5Y cells at low concentration (nanomolar range). Complementary experiments demonstrated that the same compounds show genotoxicity in a human T-cell leukemia cell line (Jurkat). Moreover, we observed an increased production of reactive oxygen species in Jurkat cells in the presence of the four methyl-pyrazoles. These results demonstrate that tebufenpyrad, bixafen, fenpyroximat and tolfenpyrad induce DNA damage in human cell lines, very likely by a mode of action that involves oxidative stress. Nonetheless, additional in vivo data are required before a definitive conclusion can be drawn regarding hazard prediction to humans. © 2012

  18. Acute effects of a prooxidant herbicide on the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Screening cytotoxicity and genotoxicity endpoints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esperanza, Marta; Cid, Ángeles; Herrero, Concepción; Rioboo, Carmen, E-mail: carmen.rioboo@udc.es

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Mitochondrial membrane potential constituted the most sensitive parameter assayed. • Several genotoxicity methods were applied for first time in ecotoxicological studies. • Oxidative DNA base damage (8-OHdG) was induced by paraquat exposure. • Cells with DNA strand breakage and subG1-nuclei increased in treated cultures. • Typical apoptosis hallmarks were observed in microalgal cells exposed to paraquat. - Abstract: Since recent evidence has demonstrated that many types of chemicals exhibit oxidative and/or genotoxic potential on living organisms, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and DNA damage are currently the best accepted paradigms to assess the potential hazardous biological effects of a wide range of contaminants. The goal of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of different cytotoxicity and genotoxicity responses on the model microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exposed to the prooxidant herbicide paraquat. In addition to the growth endpoint, cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential and presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assayed as potential markers of cytotoxicity using flow cytometry (FCM). To study the effects of paraquat on C. reinhardtii DNA, several genotoxicity approaches were implemented for the first time in an ecotoxicological study on microalgae. Oxidative DNA base damage was analysed by measuring the oxidative DNA lesion 8-OHdG by FCM. DNA fragmentation was analysed by different methods: comet assay, and cell cycle analysis by FCM, with a particular focus on the presence of subG1-nuclei. Finally, effects on morphology of nuclei were monitored through DAPI staining. The evaluation of these endpoints showed that several physiological and biochemical parameters reacted to oxidative stress disturbances with greater sensitivity than integrative parameters such as growth rates or cell viability. The experiments revealed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity (ROS formation, depolarization of

  19. Effect of physicochemical character differences on the genotoxic potency of kaolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Tatsuya; Toyooka, Tatsushi; Ibuki, Yuko; Masuda, Shuichi; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Totsuka, Yukari

    2017-01-01

    Kaolin is white clay mineral with the chemical composition Al2Si2O5(OH)4, and many varieties of kaolins having different crystal structures are utilized in industrial, cosmetic and medical fields. To evaluate the effect of physicochemical character differences on the genotoxicity of kaolin, two types of kaolin, kaolin-S with smooth, sphere-shaped crystals, and kaolin-P with clusters of thin pseudohexagonal plates, were used in the study. ICR mice were intratracheally instilled with the kaolins (0.05 and 0.2 mg/mouse), and comet assay was performed on their lungs. Both kaolins showed DNA damage in the lungs of the mice, however the DNA damaging potency was much higher with kaolin-P than that with kaolin-S. In order to clarify the mechanisms for the different genotoxic potency, we examined the incorporation rate and ROS generation of these two types of kaolin in alveolar epithelial A549 and macrophage-like RAW264 cells, using flow cytometric (FCM) analysis. Kaolin-P showed a higher incorporation rate into the mammalian cells and ROS generation than that of kaolin-S. Especially, RAW264 cells aggressively incorporated kaolins, and generated ROS, whereas almost no ROS generation was observed in A549 cells. In addition, inflammatory cytokines were quantified, using the ELISA method, to understand further genotoxic potency differences of kaolins. Concentrations of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the media were increased by exposure to both kaolins, but in the case of kaolin-P, these inflammatory cytokines were significantly elevated. Based on these findings, differences of genotoxic potency may contribute to incorporation rates into immune cells. Furthermore, it is likely that immune cells and epithelial cells might closely interact with each other for the appearance of genotoxocity in vivo. In order to clarify the interaction between epithelial and immune cells, A549 and RAW264 were co-cultured and RAW264 cells only were exposed to

  20. Cytotoxic, genotoxic and apoptotic effects of naringenin-oxime relative to naringenin on normal and cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdurrahim Kocyigit; Ismail Koyuncu; Murat Dikilitas; Fatemeh Bahadori; Baki Turkkan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess and compare the cytotoxic, genotoxic, apoptotic and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating effects of naringenin (NG) and its new derived compound naringenin-oxime (NG-Ox) on MCF-7, HT-29, PC-12 cancer and L-929 normal cell lines. Methods: The cells were incubated with different doses of NG-Ox and NG (50–1 000 mmol/L) for 24 h. The cell viability was assessed based on ATP cell viability assay. Intracellular accumulation of ROS was determined using the fluorescent probes 2070-dichlorodihydrofluorescin diacetate. Genotoxic effects were evaluated by alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay) and, the apoptotic effect was evaluated by acridine orange staining at below the IC50 levels. Results: Both NG-Ox and NG exhibited cytotoxic, genotoxic and apoptotic effects and resulted in increased ROS values in a dose-dependent manner. The effects were more pronounced on cancer cell lines. The cytotoxic, genotoxic and apoptotic effects of NG-Ox were higher than that of NG in all cell lines. Significant correlations were observed be-tween cell viability, DNA damage, apoptosis and ROS, in all cell lines exposed to either NG-Ox or NG. Conclusions: This study showed that both NG-Ox and NG possess cytotoxic, genotoxic and apoptotic activities through the production of ROS on cells, NG-Ox being the more effective one. Therefore, derived compound of NG might be used as antiproliferative agents for the treatment of cancer.

  1. Baccharis trimera (Less.) DC as genotoxicity indicator of exposure to coal and emissions from a thermal power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Ana Paula Simões; Da Silva, Juliana; Roloff, Joice; Reyes, Juliana; Debastiani, Rafaela; Dias, Johnny F; Rohr, Paula; de Barros Falcão Ferraz, Alexandre

    2013-10-01

    During coal combustion, hazardous elements are discharged that impair environmental quality. Plant cover is the first available surface for the atmospheric pollutants in terrestrial ecosystems. The aim of this study was to evaluate genotoxicity in the aqueous extract of the native plant, Baccharis trimera, exposed to coal and emissions from a thermal power plant (coal-fired power plant in Candiota, Brazil), correlating seasonality, wind tunnel predominance, and presence of inorganic elements. The presence of inorganic elements in the aerial parts of B. trimera was analyzed by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) spectrometry, and genotoxicity was evaluated by ex vivo comet assay. The genotoxic effects of aqueous extracts of B. trimera from four sites located in the area around power plant were analyzed by comet assay in peripheral human lymphocytes. Winter samples showed greater levels of metals than summer samples. Genotoxicity was detected in B. trimera extracts collected from the region exposed to extraction and burning coal. Extracts from the site impacted by the dominant wind induced more damage to DNA than those from other sites. Based on our data, we can suggest that in winter the inorganic elements from extraction and burning of coal and carried through the wind tunnel were responsible for the genotoxicity observed in aqueous extract of B. trimera.

  2. Evaluation of genotoxicity of captan, maneb and zineb in the wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster: role of nitrosation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaba, Lourdes; Rey, María Jesús; Aguirre, Ana; Alonso, Angeles; Graf, Ulrich

    2002-06-27

    The wing spot test in Drosophila melanogaster is a suitable system for the analysis of genotoxic activity of compounds that need metabolic transformation to render them active. We have analysed the genotoxicity of three fungicides for which it was reported that the metabolic processes taking place in vivo may determine their activity. The compounds analysed are captan, maneb, zineb and ethylenethiourea (ETU) (a metabolic derivative of ethylenebisdithiocarbamates like maneb and zineb). We have also evaluated the ability of ETU to form genotoxic derivatives in vivo analysing this compound in combined treatments with sodium nitrite. Both standard and high bioactivation NORR strains have been used. Captan, usually considered a mutagen in vitro but a non-mutagen in vivo, gave negative results in the wing spot test with both crosses. Positive results were obtained for maneb in the standard cross and for ETU in both the standard and the high bioactivation cross. The genotoxicities of maneb and ETU were higher when treatments were made on media in which nitrosation is favoured. A low absorption of the fungicide and an inefficient availability of the compound in the target may explain negative results obtained with zineb in both crosses. The results obtained in this study with the wing spot test demonstrate once again the suitability of this in vivo assay, in which absorption, distribution and metabolism processes take place, for the evaluation of genotoxicity of compounds to which humans are exposed.

  3. Genotoxicity of citrus wastewater in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and efficiency of heterogeneous photocatalysis by TiO(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saverini, Marghereth; Catanzaro, Irene; Sciandrello, Giulia; Avellone, Giuseppe; Indelicato, Sergio; Marcì, Giuseppe; Palmisano, Leonardo

    2012-03-01

    The presence of (±)α-pinene, (+)β-pinene, (+)3-carene, and R-(+)limonene terpenes in wastewater of a citrus transformation factory was detected and analyzed, in a previous study, by using Solid Phase Micro-extraction (SPME) followed by GC analyses. Purpose of that research was to compare the genotoxic responses of mixtures of terpenes with the genotoxicity of the individual compounds, and the biological effects of actual wastewater. Genotoxicity was evaluated in the Salmonella reversion assay (Ames test) and in V79 cells by Comet assay. Ames tests indicated that the four single terpenes did not induce an increase of revertants frequency. On the contrary, the mixtures of terpenes caused, in the presence of metabolic activation, a highly significant increase of the revertants in TA100 strain in comparison to the control. The Comet assay showed a significant increase in DNA damage in V79 cells treated for 1h with single or mixed terpenes. Moreover, the actual wastewater was found highly genotoxic in bacterial and mammalian cells. Photocatalytic tests completely photodegraded the pollutants present in aqueous wastewater and the initial high genotoxicity of samples of wastewater collected during the photocatalytic run, was completely lose in 3h of irradiation.

  4. Examination of the potential genotoxicity of pure capsaicin in bacterial mutation, chromosome aberration, and rodent micronucleus tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proudlock, Raymond; Thompson, Crista; Longstaff, Eric

    2004-01-01

    There is widespread dietary exposure to capsaicin in the form of chili peppers, while capsaicin's analgesic qualities have led to increased use of a topical herbal remedy in various impure forms. Most recently, injection of pure capsaicin has been proposed as a means of relieving a variety of debilitating diseases, in which case tissues would receive relatively high and direct exposure. The purpose of the present study, where a series of standard assays were performed in accordance with the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development guidance, was to clarify earlier conflicting reports concerning potential genotoxicity of capsaicin prior to administering it to patients in an injectable form. The results confirm the absence of genotoxic activity of high-purity capsaicin in the bacterial mutation and chromosome aberration tests. In addition, no evidence of cytotoxicity or genotoxicity was seen in the rat bone marrow micronucleus test, where systemic exposure to pure capsaicin was achieved using the subcutaneous route and a rising dose toleration protocol. It is concluded that pure capsaicin is not active in the standard battery of genotoxicity assays recommended by the International Conference on Harmonisation for evaluation of new medicines; earlier reported in vitro genotoxic activity is probably associated with mutagenic impurities in commercial grades of the material.

  5. The cda GenoTox assay: A new and sensitive method for detection of environmental genotoxins, including nitroarenes and aromatic amines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Trine G.; Hansen, Lars Henrik; Binderup, Mona-Lise;

    2007-01-01

    A new bacterial test system for detection of genotoxic compounds was developed, based on two new Sahnonella typhimurium tester strains, TGO1 and TGO2. Both strains contain a gene fusion between a strong SOS-promotor, P-cda, and the gfp gene, which allows detection of genotoxic compounds that indu...

  6. Development of a Fish Cell Biosensor System for Genotoxicity Detection Based on DNA Damage-Induced Trans-Activation of p21 Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huarong Guo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available p21CIP1/WAF1 is a p53-target gene in response to cellular DNA damage. Here we report the development of a fish cell biosensor system for high throughput genotoxicity detection of new drugs, by stably integrating two reporter plasmids of pGL3-p21-luc (human p21 promoter linked to firefly luciferase and pRL-CMV-luc (CMV promoter linked to Renilla luciferase into marine flatfish flounder gill (FG cells, referred to as p21FGLuc. Initial validation of this genotoxicity biosensor system showed that p21FGLuc cells had a wild-type p53 signaling pathway and responded positively to the challenge of both directly acting genotoxic agents (bleomycin and mitomycin C and indirectly acting genotoxic agents (cyclophosphamide with metabolic activation, but negatively to cyclophosphamide without metabolic activation and the non-genotoxic agents ethanol and D-mannitol, thus confirming a high specificity and sensitivity, fast and stable response to genotoxic agents for this easily maintained fish cell biosensor system. This system was especially useful in the genotoxicity detection of Di(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP, a rodent carcinogen, but negatively reported in most non-mammalian in vitro mutation assays, by providing a strong indication of genotoxicity for DEHP. A limitation for this biosensor system was that it might give false positive results in response to sodium butyrate and any other agents, which can trans-activate the p21 gene in a p53-independent manner.

  7. Determination of genotoxic effects of boron and zinc on Zea mays using protein and random amplification of polymorphic DNA analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erturk, Filiz Aygun; Nardemir, Gokce; Hilal, A Y; Arslan, Esra; Agar, Guleray

    2015-11-01

    In this research, we aimed to determine genotoxic effects of boron (B) and zinc (Zn) on Zea mays by using total soluble protein content and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses. For the RAPD analysis, 16 RAPD primers were found to produce unique polymorphic band profiles on treated maize seedlings. With increased Zn and B concentrations, increased polymorphism rate was observed, while genomic template stability and total soluble protein content decreased. The treatment with Zn was more effective than that of B groups on the levels of total proteins. The obtained results from this study revealed that the total soluble protein levels and RAPD profiles were performed as endpoints of genotoxicity and these analyses can offer useful biomarker assays for the evaluation of genotoxic effects on Zn and B polluted plants. © The Author(s) 2013.

  8. Genotoxic Effect of Chronic Exposure to DDT on Lymphocytes, Oral Mucosa and Breast Cells of Female Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth De Celis

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The genotoxicity of some environmental contaminants may affect human health directly by damaging genetic material and thus plays an important role in cancer development. Xenoestrogens are one kind of environmental pollutants that may alter hormonal routes or directly affect DNA. The number of available biomarkers used to assess genetic risk and cancer is very extensive. The present study evaluated genotoxicity produced by the pesticide DDT on systemic and mammary gland cells obtained from adult female Wistar rats. Oral mucosa cells micronuclei were assessed; the comet assay in peripheral blood-isolated lymphocytes and mammary epithelial cells was also carried out. Additionally, oxidative stress was studied in mammary tissue through a lipid peroxidation assay. Our data showed an increase in lipid peroxidation, product of an increase in free oxygen radical levels, which leads to an oxidative stress status. Our results suggest that DDT is genotoxic, not only for lymphocytes but also to mammary epithelial cells.

  9. Genotoxic effect of chronic exposure to DDT on lymphocytes, oral mucosa and breast cells of female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales-Aguirre, Alejandro; Padilla-Camberos, Eduardo; Gómez-Pinedo, Ulises; Salado-Ponce, Hugo; Feria-Velasco, Alfredo; De Celis, Ruth

    2011-02-01

    The genotoxicity of some environmental contaminants may affect human health directly by damaging genetic material and thus plays an important role in cancer development. Xenoestrogens are one kind of environmental pollutants that may alter hormonal routes or directly affect DNA. The number of available biomarkers used to assess genetic risk and cancer is very extensive. The present study evaluated genotoxicity produced by the pesticide DDT on systemic and mammary gland cells obtained from adult female Wistar rats. Oral mucosa cells micronuclei were assessed; the comet assay in peripheral blood-isolated lymphocytes and mammary epithelial cells was also carried out. Additionally, oxidative stress was studied in mammary tissue through a lipid peroxidation assay. Our data showed an increase in lipid peroxidation, product of an increase in free oxygen radical levels, which leads to an oxidative stress status. Our results suggest that DDT is genotoxic, not only for lymphocytes but also to mammary epithelial cells.

  10. Xylo-oligosaccharides and inulin affect genotoxicity and bacterial populations differently in a human colonic simulator challenged with soy protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, C. T.; Petersen, Anne; Licht, Tine Rask

    2013-01-01

    High dietary intakes of some protein sources, including soy protein, can increase colonic DNA damage in animals, whereas some carbohydrates attenuate this. We investigated whether inulin and xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS) could be protective against DNA strand breaks by adding them to a human colonic...... cornstarch for 10 day followed by soy protein with 1% XOS or 1% inulin for 10 day. Inulin did not alter genotoxicity but XOS significantly reduced PV genotoxicity and increased DV genotoxicity. Inulin and XOS significantly increased butyrate concentration in the DV but not PV. Numbers of the key butyrate......-producing bacterium Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were significantly increased in the PV and DV by inulin but significantly decreased by XOS in both vessels. Other bacteria examined were also significantly impacted by the carbohydrate treatments or by the vessel (i.e., pH). There was a significant overall inverse...

  11. p53 Promoter-based Reporter Gene in vitro Assays for Quick Assessment of Agents with Genotoxic Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huaixing LI; Ke SHI; Ruiwen CHEN; Yan HE; Dan WU; Shuhan SUN

    2007-01-01

    The p53 promoter-based green fluorescent protein (GFP) and luciferase reporter gene assays have been established for detecting DNA damage induced by genotoxic agents.To evaluate the system,NIH3T3 cells transfected with either pHP53-GFP or pMP53-GFP construct were treated with mitomycin or 5-fluorouracil.Expression of the GFP reporter gene was significantly and specifically induced in the cells exposed to mitomycin or 5-fluorouracil.Then we treated NIH3T3 cells harboring pHP53-Luc or pMP53-Luc vector with mitomycin,5-fluorouracil or cisplatin at various concentrations.Similarly,exposure of the cells to these agents with genotoxic potentials resulted in a dose-dependent induction in luciferase reporter gene expression.Thus,these in vitro reporter gene assays could provide an ideal system for quick assessment or screening of agents with genotoxic potential.

  12. Genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of Sunset Yellow and Brilliant Blue, colorant food additives, on human blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kus, Esra; Eroglu, Halil Erhan

    2015-01-01

    The synthetic dyes over fifty are used in many areas including the food industry around the world. Sunset Yellow FCF and Brilliant Blue FCF are used as colorant food additives in many food products. The present study investigated the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of Sunset Yellow and Brilliant Blue. Genotoxic and cytotoxic activities of the food additives were evaluated in lymphocyte cell cultures using mitotic index, replication index and micronucleus assay. Mitotic index frequencies and replication index values were decreased and micronucleus frequency was increased with increasing concentrations of Sunset Yellow and Brilliant Blue. The changes in mitotic index and micronucleus are statistically significant (pBlue can have cytotoxic and genotoxic potential. It care must be taken when using these materials as a food additive.

  13. Genotoxic effects of starvation and dimethoate in haemocytes and midgut gland cells of wolf spider Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczek, Grażyna; Mędrzak, Monika; Augustyniak, Maria; Wilczek, Piotr; Stalmach, Monika

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxic effects of starvation and dimethoate (organophosphate insecticide) in female and male wolf spiders Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae) exposed to the stressors under laboratory conditions. DNA damage was measured in haemocytes and midgut gland cells using the comet assay. In response to the two stressing factors, both cell types showed %TDNA, tail length (TL) and OTM values higher in males than in females. Level of DNA damage in haemocytes was greater than in midgut gland cells. In both sexes, the strongest genotoxicity was recorded at single application of dimethoate. After five-time exposure to the pesticide, genotoxic effects of a single dose were sustained in males and reduced to the control level in females. Starvation stress was well tolerated by the females, in which neither cell type was affected by DNA damage. However, in male haemocytes food deprivation induced severe DNA damage, what suggests suppression of the defence potential at prolonged starvation periods.

  14. Chromosomal abnormalities in roots of aquatic plant Elodea canadensis as a tool for testing genotoxicity of bottom sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotina, Tatiana; Medvedeva, Marina; Trofimova, Elena; Alexandrova, Yuliyana; Dementyev, Dmitry; Bolsunovsky, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Submersed freshwater macrophytes are considered as relevant indicators for use in bulk bottom sediment contact tests. The purpose of this study was to estimate the validity of endpoints of aquatic plant Elodea canadensis for laboratory genotoxicity testing of natural bottom sediments. The inherent level of chromosome abnormalities (on artificial sediments) in roots of E. canadensis under laboratory conditions was lower than the percentage of abnormal cells in bulk sediments from the Yenisei River. The percentage of abnormal cells in roots of E. canadensis was more sensitive to the presence of genotoxic agents in laboratory contact tests than in the natural population of the plant. The spectra of chromosomal abnormalities that occur in roots of E. canadensis under natural conditions in the Yenisei River and in laboratory contact tests on the bulk bottom sediments from the Yenisei River were similar. Hence, chromosome abnormalities in roots of E. canadensis can be used as a relevant and sensitive genotoxicity endpoint in bottom sediment-contact tests.

  15. A pre-validation trial - testing genotoxicity of several chemicals using standard, medium- and high-throughput comet formats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Bjerve Gutzkow

    2015-06-01

    Results obtained with the three systems (standard, medium- and high-throughput were essentially the same. The 96-minigel format was analysed with the fully automated scoring system IMSTAR and comparable results were achieved with the semi-automated scoring system from Perceptives. The known genotoxic chemicals MNU, B(aP, 4-NQO and cyclophosphamide showed little consistent sign of genotoxicity at concentrations causing limited cytotoxicity. D-mannitol and Triton X-100 were, as expected, non-genotoxic (though Triton X-100, at high concentrations, caused DNA breaks as an apparent secondary effect of cytotoxicity. Etoposide and bleomycin gave significant increase in DNA strand break at borderline cytotoxic concentrations. The limitation of the assay to detect damaged bases by known genotoxins may be overcome by incorporating a DNA repair enzyme, such as formamidopyrimidine-DNA-glycosylase (FPG, to convert damaged bases into breaks as shown by Azqueta A et al., Mutagenesis vol. 28 no. 3 pp. 271–277, 2013 .

  16. Silica nanoparticles and biological dispersants: genotoxic effects on A549 lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, David M., E-mail: d.brown@hw.ac.uk [Heriot-Watt University, Nanosafety Research Group, School of Life Sciences (United Kingdom); Varet, Julia, E-mail: julia.varet@IOM-world.org [Institute of Occupational Medicine (United Kingdom); Johnston, Helinor, E-mail: h.johnston@hw.ac.uk; Chrystie, Alison; Stone, Vicki, E-mail: v.stone@hw.ac.uk [Heriot-Watt University, Nanosafety Research Group, School of Life Sciences (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Silica nanoparticle exposure could be intentional (e.g. medical application or food) or accidental (e.g. occupational inhalation). On entering the body, particles become coated with specific proteins depending on the route of entry. The ability of silica particles of different size and charge (non-functionalized 50 and 200 nm and aminated 50 and 200 nm) to cause genotoxic effects in A549 lung epithelial cells was investigated. Using the modified comet assay and the micronucleus assay, we examined the effect of suspending the particles in different dispersion media [RPMI or Hanks’ balanced salt solution (HBSS), supplemented with bovine serum albumin (BSA), lung lining fluid (LLF) or serum] to determine if this influenced the particle’s activity. Particle characterisation suggested that the particles were reasonably well dispersed in the different media, with the exception of aminated 50 nm particles which showed evidence of agglomeration. Plain 50, 200 nm and aminated 50 nm particles caused significant genotoxic effects in the presence of formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase when dispersed in HBSS or LLF. These effects were reduced when the particles were dispersed in BSA and serum. There was no significant micronucleus formation produced by any of the particles when suspended in any of the dispersants. The data suggest that silica particles can produce a significant genotoxic effect according to the comet assay in A549 cells, possibly driven by an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism which may be modified depending on the choice of dispersant employed.

  17. Wildlife toxicology: biomarkers of genotoxic exposures at a hazardous waste site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Cole W.; Gillespie, Annika M.; McCarthy, Chris; McDonald, Thomas J.; Bickham, John W.; Sullivan, Robert; Donnelly, K.C.

    2013-01-01

    A large number of hazardous waste sites in the United States have undergone the initial stages of remediation or containment. At many of the remaining sites, the potential for exposure to ecological receptors is a primary concern. This manuscript reports on studies to investigate the impact on ecological receptors exposed to complex mixtures at a former creosote facility. Currently there are isolated areas on-site that were not addressed in the initial removal action that appear to be releasing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to the surrounding environment. The U.S. EPA collected environmental samples and performed ex situ sediment bioassays to measure chronic toxicity; whereas, this study describes an in situ study to measure biomarkers of effect in two ecological receptors. Mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) and cricket frogs (Acris crepitans) were collected from a small intermittent creek adjacent to the site, and reference stations. A weight-of-evidence ecological risk assessment was completed for the amphibian and fish communities. The ecological risk assessment was developed using analysis of media chemistry, body burden of specific PAHs, bioassay results, community surveys, and cellular genome size variation as a biomarker of genotoxicity. Flow cytometric estimates of chromosomal damage were significantly elevated for both mosquitofish and cricket frogs inhabiting the contaminated site, relative to at least one reference site. Surface water screening values for fish and amphibians exceeded screening values for PAHs by more than one order of magnitude in the on-site creek, and sediment PAH concentrations were extremely high (up to 1,549 μg/dry g). Tissue concentrations of PAHs were below screening values. Media chemistry, bioassay and genotoxicity data all support the same conclusion that on-site PAHs continue to impact aquatic receptors. The genotoxicity findings are consistent with and contribute to results of the weight-of-evidence ecological risk

  18. Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects of Antiretroviral Combinations in Mice Bone Marrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Commonly used guidelines for the management of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (highly active antiretroviral therapy, HAART) include drug combinations such as tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) + lamivudine (3TC) and combivir [zidovudine (AZT) + 3TC] + efavirenz (EFV). These combinations may enhance the genotoxic effects induced by such drugs individually, since the therapy requires lifelong adherence and the drugs have unknown effects during treatment. Thus, the evaluation of the benefits and risks of HAART is of great importance. In order to assess the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of three concentrations of each of the antiretroviral combinations TDF + 3TC (800 + 400, 1600 + 800, and 3200 + 1600 mg/kg body weight, BW) and combivir + EFV (200 + 100 + 400, 400 + 200 + 800, and 800 + 400 + 1600 mg/kg BW) after two exposure periods (24 h and 48 h), in the present study the in vivo comet assay (single-cell gel electrophoresis) and the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test were used. Neither TDF + 3TC nor combivir + EFV induced DNA damage at any concentrations tested after 24 h or 48 h using the comet assay. After 24 h, both combinations increased the micronucleus frequency at all concentrations tested. After 48 h, combivir + EFV increased the micronucleated polychromatic erythrocyte (MNPCE) frequency at the two highest concentrations tested. Polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE)/normochromatic erythrocytes (NCE) ratio was high for both combinations, suggesting that they can be mitogenic. Since genotoxicity may be related to carcinogenesis, it is necessary to conduct further studies to verify the long-term mutagenic effects of these drugs. PMID:27806085

  19. Genotoxicity of nano/microparticles in in vitro micronuclei, in vivo comet and mutation assay systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukumori Nobutaka

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, manufactured nano/microparticles such as fullerenes (C60, carbon black (CB and ceramic fiber are being widely used because of their desirable properties in industrial, medical and cosmetic fields. However, there are few data on these particles in mammalian mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. To examine genotoxic effects by C60, CB and kaolin, an in vitro micronuclei (MN test was conducted with human lung cancer cell line, A549 cells. In addition, DNA damage and mutations were analyzed by in vivo assay systems using male C57BL/6J or gpt delta transgenic mice which were intratracheally instilled with single or multiple doses of 0.2 mg per animal of particles. Results In in vitro genotoxic analysis, increased MN frequencies were observed in A549 cells treated with C60, CB and kaolin in a dose-dependent manner. These three nano/microparticles also induced DNA damage in the lungs of C57BL/6J mice measured by comet assay. Moreover, single or multiple instillations of C60 and kaolin, increased either or both of gpt and Spi- mutant frequencies in the lungs of gpt delta transgenic mice. Mutation spectra analysis showed transversions were predominant, and more than 60% of the base substitutions occurred at G:C base pairs in the gpt genes. The G:C to C:G transversion was commonly increased by these particle instillations. Conclusion Manufactured nano/microparticles, CB, C60 and kaolin, were shown to be genotoxic in in vitro and in vivo assay systems.

  20. Prediction of Non-Genotoxic Carcinogenicity Based on Genetic Profiles of Short Term Exposure Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Luis Orlando; González-José, Rolando; García, Pilar Peral

    2016-01-01

    Non-genotoxic carcinogens are substances that induce tumorigenesis by non-mutagenic mechanisms and long term rodent bioassays are required to identify them. Recent studies have shown that transcription profiling can be applied to develop early identifiers for long term phenotypes. In this study, we used rat liver expression profiles from the NTP (National Toxicology Program, Research Triangle Park, USA) DrugMatrix Database to construct a gene classifier that can distinguish between non-genotoxic carcinogens and other chemicals. The model was based on short term exposure assays (3 days) and the training was limited to oxidative stressors, peroxisome proliferators and hormone modulators. Validation of the predictor was performed on independent toxicogenomic data (TG-GATEs, Toxicogenomics Project-Genomics Assisted Toxicity Evaluation System, Osaka, Japan). To build our model we performed Random Forests together with a recursive elimination algorithm (VarSelRF). Gene set enrichment analysis was employed for functional interpretation. A total of 770 microarrays comprising 96 different compounds were analyzed and a predictor of 54 genes was built. Prediction accuracy was 0.85 in the training set, 0.87 in the test set and increased with increasing concentration in the validation set: 0.6 at low dose, 0.7 at medium doses and 0.81 at high doses. Pathway analysis revealed gene prominence of cellular respiration, energy production and lipoprotein metabolism. The biggest target of toxicogenomics is accurately predict the toxicity of unknown drugs. In this analysis, we presented a classifier that can predict non-genotoxic carcinogenicity by using short term exposure assays. In this approach, dose level is critical when evaluating chemicals at early time points. PMID:27818731

  1. Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of Ceria Nanoparticles on Different Cell Lines in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Santucci

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their radical scavenging and UV-filtering properties, ceria nanoparticles (CeO2-NPs are currently used for various applications, including as catalysts in diesel particulate filters. Because of their ability to filter UV light, CeO2-NPs have garnered significant interest in the medical field and, consequently, are poised for use in various applications. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of short-term (24 h and long-term (10 days CeO2-NP exposure to A549, CaCo2 and HepG2 cell lines. Cytotoxicity assays tested CeO2-NPs over a concentration range of 0.5 μg/mL to 5000 μg/mL, whereas genotoxicity assays tested CeO2-NPs over a concentration range of 0.5 μg/mL to 5000 μg/mL. In vitro assays showed almost no short-term exposure toxicity on any of the tested cell lines. Conversely, long-term CeO2-NP exposure proved toxic for all tested cell lines. NP genotoxicity was detectable even at 24-h exposure. HepG2 was the most sensitive cell line overall; however, the A549 line was most sensitive to the lowest concentration tested. Moreover, the results confirmed the ceria nanoparticles’ capacity to protect cells when they are exposed to well-known oxidants such as H2O2. A Comet assay was performed in the presence of both H2O2 and CeO2-NPs. When hydrogen peroxide was maintained at 25 μM, NPs at 0.5 μg/mL, 50 μg/mL, and 500 μg/mL protected the cells from oxidative damage. Thus, the NPs prevented H2O2-induced genotoxic damage.

  2. Cytogenetic and genotoxic effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles on root cells of Allium cepa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Mamta; Khan, S Sudheer; Pakrashi, Sunandan; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2011-06-15

    Increasing use of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NP) in consumer products may enhance its release into the environment. Phytotoxicity study is important to understand its possible environmental impact. Allium cepa (Onion bulb) is the best model organism to study genetic toxicology of nanoparticles. Here we have reported cytogenetic and genotoxic effects of ZnO NPs on the root cells of A. cepa. The effects of ZnO NPs on the mitotic index (MI), micronuclei index (MN index), chromosomal aberration index, and lipid peroxidation were determined through the hydroponic culturing of A. cepa. A. cepa roots were treated with the dispersions of ZnO NPs at four different concentrations (25, 50, 75, and 100 μg ml(-1)). With the increasing concentrations of ZnO NPs MI decreased with the increase of pycnotic cells, on the other hand MN and chromosomal aberration index increased. The frequency of micronucleated cells was higher in ZnO NPs treated cells as compared to control (deionized distilled water). The number of cells in each mitotic phase changed upon ZnO NPs treatment. The effect of ZnO NPs on lipid peroxidation as examined by measuring TBARS concentration was evident at all the concentrations compared to bulk ZnO. The TEM image showed internalization of ZnO NPs like particles. SEM image of treated A. cepa demonstrated that the internalized nanoparticles agglomerated depending on the physico-chemical environment inside the cell. Our results demonstrated that ZnO NPs can be a clastogenic/genotoxic and cytotoxic agent. In conclusion, the A. cepa cytogenetic test can be used for the genotoxicity monitoring of novel nanomaterials like ZnO NPs, which is used in many consumer products.

  3. Genotoxic effects of the o-phenylphenol metabolites phenylhydroquinone and phenylbenzoquinone in V79 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, A C; Eastmond, D A

    1994-10-01

    o-Phenylphenol (OPP) and its sodium salt, sodium o-phenylphenate are broad spectrum fungicides and disinfectants with widespread usage. Both chemicals have been reported to induce cancer in the kidney and urinary bladder of Fischer 344 rats. Recently it has been proposed that the metabolic activation of OPP occurs via a two-step process involving the cytochrome P450-mediated formation of phenylhydroquinone (PHQ) in the liver and a prostaglandin H synthase-mediated oxidation of PHQ to phenylbenzoquinone (PBQ) in the urinary tract. In order to further investigate the metabolic activation and genotoxic effects of OPP, we have investigated the ability of PHQ and PBQ to induce micronuclei and mutations at the HGPRT locus in a prostaglandin H synthase-containing V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line. In arachidonic acid-supplemented V79 cells, PHQ induced a significant increase in micronuclei whereas no increase was observed in cells in the absence of arachidonic acid supplementation. Immunofluorescent labeling of centromeric proteins with the CREST antibody indicated that the arachidonic acid-dependent induction of micronuclei by PHQ was due almost entirely to micronuclei containing whole chromosomes which had failed to segregate properly during mitosis. The induction of micronuclei by PHQ was significantly inhibited by treatment of the cells with indomethacin, aspirin, ascorbic acid, dithiothreitol and reduced glutathione supporting a role for prostaglandin H synthase in the genotoxic effects of PHQ. No increase in 6-thioguanine-resistant cells was observed in cells treated with PHQ or PBQ. This arachidonic acid-dependent conversion of PHQ to a genotoxic species is consistent with the hypothesis that a prostaglandin H synthase-mediated activation of PHQ may be involved in OPP- and SOPP-induced urinary tract carcinogenesis and also suggests that the induction of aneuploidy may play an important role in OPP-induced tumorigenesis.

  4. Immunotoxicity and genotoxicity testing of PLGA-PEO nanoparticles in human blood cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulinska, Jana; Kazimirova, Alena; Kuricova, Miroslava; Barancokova, Magdalena; Liskova, Aurelia; Neubauerova, Eva; Drlickova, Martina; Ciampor, Fedor; Vavra, Ivo; Bilanicova, Dagmar; Pojana, Giulio; Staruchova, Marta; Horvathova, Mira; Jahnova, Eva; Volkovova, Katarina; Bartusova, Maria; Cagalinec, Michal; Dusinska, Maria

    2015-05-01

    A human blood cell model for immunotoxicity and genotoxicity testing was used to measure the response to polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA-PEO) nanoparticle (NP) (0.12, 3, 15 and 75 μg/cm(2) exposure in fresh peripheral whole blood cultures/isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures from human volunteers (n = 9-13). PLGA-PEO NPs were not toxic up to dose 3 μg/cm(2); dose of 75 μg/cm(2) displays significant decrease in [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA of proliferating cells after 4 h (70% of control) and 48 h (84%) exposure to NPs. In non-cytotoxic concentrations, in vitro assessment of the immunotoxic effects displayed moderate but significant suppression of proliferative activity of T-lymphocytes and T-dependent B-cell response in cultures stimulated with PWM > CON A, and no changes in PHA cultures. Decrease in proliferative function was the most significant in T-cells stimulated with CD3 antigen (up to 84%). Cytotoxicity of natural killer cells was suppressed moderately (92%) but significantly in middle-dosed cultures (4 h exposure). On the other hand, in low PLGA-PEO NPs dosed cultures, significant stimulation of phagocytic activity of granulocytes (119%) > monocytes (117%) and respiratory burst of phagocytes (122%) was recorded. Genotoxicity assessment revealed no increase in the number of micronucleated binucleated cells and no induction of SBs or oxidised DNA bases in PLGA-PEO-treated cells. To conclude on immuno- and genotoxicity of PLGA-PEO NPs, more experiments with various particle size, charge and composition need to be done.

  5. Toxicity and genotoxicity in Astyanax bimaculatus (Characidae) induced by microcystins from a bloom of Microcystis spp

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Studies of genotoxicity in fish caused by cyanobacterial microcystins can be useful both in determining the sensitivity of native species, as well as comparing exposure routes. The genotoxicity caused by the microcystins LR and LA from a bloom collected in a eutrophic lake, was revealed in the fish Astyanaxbimaculatus, a native species from South America. LC50 (72 h) was determined as 242.81 μg L -1 and LD50 (72 h) as 49.19 μg kg -1 bw. There was a significant increase of DNA damage in peripheral erythrocytes, following intraperitoneal injection (ip) with tested concentrations of 24.58 μg kg -1 bw and 36.88 μg kg -1 bw, as well as through body exposure to a concentration of 103.72 μg L -1 . Micronucleus (MN) induction was observed after ip injections of 24.58 μg kg -1 bw and 36.88 μg kg -1 bw for 72 h, as well as following body exposure for 72 at 103.72 μg L -1 . Thus, both exposure routes resulted in MN induction and DNA damage. Apoptosis-necrosis testing was carried out only by ip injection with concentrations of 24.58 μg kg -1 bw and 36.88 μg kg- 1 bw. Exposure to microcystins at lower concentrations induced more apoptosis than necrosis in peripheral erythrocytes, whereas exposure at higher concentrations gave rise to both conditions. Thus, Astyanax bimaculatus can be considered as a species sensitive to the genotoxic effects caused by microcystins. PMID:21637586

  6. Hexavalent chromium is cytotoxic and genotoxic to hawksbill sea turtle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, Sandra S., E-mail: sandra.wise@maine.edu [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Xie, Hong, E-mail: hongxie@usm.maine.edu [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Fukuda, Tomokazu, E-mail: tomofukuda009@gmail.com [Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Tohoku University, Laboratory of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Second Research Building, Rm 112, 1-1 Amamiyamachi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Douglas Thompson, W., E-mail: dougt@usm.maine.edu [Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); and others

    2014-09-01

    Sea turtles are a charismatic and ancient ocean species and can serve as key indicators for ocean ecosystems, including coral reefs and sea grass beds as well as coastal beaches. Genotoxicity studies in the species are absent, limiting our understanding of the impact of environmental toxicants on sea turtles. Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a ubiquitous environmental problem worldwide, and recent studies show it is a global marine pollutant of concern. Thus, we evaluated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate Cr(VI) in hawksbill sea turtle cells. Particulate Cr(VI) was both cytotoxic and genotoxic to sea turtle cells. Concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm{sup 2} lead chromate induced 108, 79, 54, and 7% relative survival, respectively. Additionally, concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm{sup 2} lead chromate induced damage in 4, 10, 15, 26, and 36% of cells and caused 4, 11, 17, 30, and 56 chromosome aberrations in 100 metaphases, respectively. For soluble Cr, concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate induced 84, 69, 46, 25, and 3% relative survival, respectively. Sodium chromate induced 3, 9, 9, 14, 21, and 29% of metaphases with damage, and caused 3, 10, 10, 16, 26, and 39 damaged chromosomes in 100 metaphases at concentrations of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate, respectively. These data suggest that Cr(VI) may be a concern for hawksbill sea turtles and sea turtles in general. - Highlights: • Particulate Cr(VI) is cytotoxic and clastogenic to hawksbill sea turtle cells. • Soluble Cr(VI) is cytotoxic and clastogenic to hawksbill sea turtle cells. • Cr(VI) may be a risk factor for hawksbill sea turtle health.

  7. Lack of genotoxic effect in workers exposed to very low doses of 1,3-butadiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovreglio, Piero; Bukvic, Nenad; Fustinoni, Silvia; Ballini, Andrea; Drago, Ignazio; Foà, Vito; Guanti, Ginevra; Soleo, Leonardo

    2006-06-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD), a probable carcinogen to humans, has been shown to have an ill-defined genotoxicity in occupationally exposed workers. In the present study, the influence of exposure to very low doses of BD and to cigarette smoking was investigated on some cytogenetic endpoints, namely, sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), chromosomal aberrations (CA) and cells with a high frequency of SCE (HFC), in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Twenty-seven male workers employed in a petrochemical plant and 26 matched controls were included in the study. As regards the airborne BD values, there was a significant difference between exposed (median BD value 1.5, min-max 0.2-69.0 microg/m3) and non-exposed workers (median BD value 0.4, min-max <0.1-3.8 microg/m3). Genotoxic biomarkers were not able to distinguish between the two groups. The frequency of SCE was higher in smokers than in non-smokers (p=0.001), with a positive correlation between the number of cigarettes smoked per day and both SCE (r=0.4; p=0.004) and HFC frequency (r=0.3; p=0.04). Multiple regression analysis confirmed the influence of cigarette smoking on the level of SCE and HFC, while these parameters were not affected by personal exposure to BD. Overall, the biomarkers of genotoxic effect investigated in our study were not able to discriminate between workers with a very low exposure to BD and controls, while it was possible to distinguish between smokers and non-smokers on the basis of SCE.