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Sample records for genotoxic effects caused

  1. Red mud a byproduct of aluminum production contains soluble vanadium that causes genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in higher plants

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    Mišík, Miroslav [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Burke, Ian T. [Earth Surface Science Institute, School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Reismüller, Matthias; Pichler, Clemens; Rainer, Bernhard [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Mišíková, Katarina [Department of Botany, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Bratislava (Slovakia); Mayes, William M. [Centre for Environmental and Marine Sciences, University of Hull, Scarborough YO11 3AZ (United Kingdom); Knasmueller, Siegfried, E-mail: siegfried.knasmueller@meduniwien.ac.at [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    Red mud (RM) is a byproduct of aluminum production; worldwide between 70 and 120 million tons is produced annually. We analyzed RM which was released in the course of the Kolontar disaster in Hungary into the environment in acute and genotoxicity experiments with plants which are widely used for environmental monitoring. We detected induction of micronuclei which reflect chromosomal damage in tetrads of Tradescantia and in root cells of Allium as well as retardation of root growth with contaminated soils and leachates. Chemical analyses showed that RM contains metals, in particular high concentrations of vanadium. Follow-up experiments indicated that vanadate causes the effects in the plants. This compound causes also in humans DNA damage and positive results were obtained in carcinogenicity studies. Since it was found also in RM from other production sites our findings indicate that its release in the environment is a global problem which should be studied in more detail. Capsule abstract: Our findings indicate that the red mud causes genotoxic effect in plants probably due to the presence of vanadate which is contained at high concentrations in the residue. - Highlights: • Red mud, a by-product of aluminum production, causes DNA-damage in higher plants. • We showed that this effect is caused by vanadate a known carcinogenic genotoxin. • Vanadate is contained in high concentrations in the residue. • Release of red mud may cause adverse effects in ecosystems and affect human health.

  2. Genotoxic effect of alkaloids

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    J. A. P. Henriques

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the increase use of alkaloids in general medical practice in recent years, it is of interest to determine genotoxic, mutagenic and recombinogenic response to different groups of alkaloids in prokaryotic and eucaryotic organisms. Reserpine, boldine and chelerythrine did not show genotoxicity response in the SOS-Chromotest whereas skimmianine showed genotixicity in the presence of a metabolic activation mixture. Voacristine isolated fromthe leaves of Ervatamia coronaria shows in vivo cytostatic and mutagenic effects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae hapioids cells. The Rauwolfia alkaloid (reserpine was not able to induce reverse mutation and recombinational mitotic events (crossing-over and gene conversion in yeast diploid strain XS2316.

  3. Red mud a byproduct of aluminum production contains soluble vanadium that causes genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mišík, Miroslav; Burke, Ian T; Reismüller, Matthias; Pichler, Clemens; Rainer, Bernhard; Mišíková, Katarina; Mayes, William M; Knasmueller, Siegfried

    2014-09-15

    Red mud (RM) is a byproduct of aluminum production; worldwide between 70 and 120 million tons is produced annually. We analyzed RM which was released in the course of the Kolontar disaster in Hungary into the environment in acute and genotoxicity experiments with plants which are widely used for environmental monitoring. We detected induction of micronuclei which reflect chromosomal damage in tetrads of Tradescantia and in root cells of Allium as well as retardation of root growth with contaminated soils and leachates. Chemical analyses showed that RM contains metals, in particular high concentrations of vanadium. Follow-up experiments indicated that vanadate causes the effects in the plants. This compound causes also in humans DNA damage and positive results were obtained in carcinogenicity studies. Since it was found also in RM from other production sites our findings indicate that its release in the environment is a global problem which should be studied in more detail. Our findings indicate that the red mud causes genotoxic effect in plants probably due to the presence of vanadate which is contained at high concentrations in the residue. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Benzalkonium chloride (BAC) and dimethyldioctadecyl-ammonium bromide (DDAB), two common quaternary ammonium compounds, cause genotoxic effects in mammalian and plant cells at environmentally relevant concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferk, F; Misík, M; Hoelzl, C; Uhl, M; Fuerhacker, M; Grillitsch, B; Parzefall, W; Nersesyan, A; Micieta, K; Grummt, T; Ehrlich, V; Knasmüller, S

    2007-11-01

    Quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) are cationic surfactants that are widely used as disinfectants. In the present study, we tested two important representatives, namely, benzalkonium chloride (BAC) and dimethyldioctadecyl-ammonium bromide (DDAB) in four genotoxicity tests, namely, in the Salmonella/microsome assay with strains TA 98, TA 100 and TA 102, in the single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay with primary rat hepatocytes and in micronucleus (MN) assays with peripheral human lymphocytes and with root tip cells of Vicia faba. In the bacterial experiments, consistently negative results were obtained in the dose range between 0.001 and 110 microg per plate in the presence and absence of metabolic activation while significant induction of DNA migration was detected in the liver cells. With BAC, a moderate but significant effect was found with an exposure concentration of 1.0 mg/l while DDAB caused damage at lower doses (0.3 mg/l). The effects were not altered when the nuclei were treated with formamidopyridine glycosylase, indicating that they are not due to formation of oxidized purines. The MN assays with blood cells were carried out under identical conditions to the SCGE experiments and a significant increase was seen at the highest dose levels (BAC: 1.0 and 3.0 mg/l; DDAB: 1 mg/l). Both compounds also caused significant induction of MN as well as inhibition of cell division in plant cells, the lowest effective levels were 1.0 and 10 mg/l for DDAB and BAC, respectively. Our findings show that both chemicals induce moderate but significant genotoxic effects in eukaryotic cells at concentrations which are found in wastewaters and indicate that their release into the environment may cause genetic damage in exposed organisms. Furthermore, the direct contact of humans to QAC-containing detergents and pharmaceuticals that contain substantially higher concentrations than those which were required to cause effects in eukaryotic cells in the present study should

  5. The effect of royal sun agaricus, agaricus brasiliensis S. Wasser et al., Extract on methyl Methanesulfonate caused genotoxicity in Drosophila melanogaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savic, T.; Patenkovic, A.; Sokovic, M.; Glamoclija, J.; Andjelkovic, M.; Griensven, van L.J.L.D.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of culinary-medicinal Royal Sun Agaricus (Agaricus brasiliensis) hot water extract on methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) induced mutagenicity/genotoxity in Drosophila melanogaster was studied using a quick and broadly applicable in vivo assay, i.e., the wing somatic mutation and recombination

  6. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects caused by {sup 153} Sm-EDTMP, combined with BrdU a thymidine analog; Efecto citotoxico y genotoxico causado por {sup 153} Sm-EDTMP, combinado con BrdU un analogo de timidina

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    Morales A, E.; Ferro F, G.; Morales R, P. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    The ablation of the bone marrow previous to the transplant by means of radiation and chemical antineoplastics its affect indiscriminately to the healthy tissues and in particular those that are in proliferation. The objective of this work is to determine the effect of the incorporation from the BrdU to the DNA on the genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of the cells of the bone marrow caused by the radiopharmaceutical {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP. The genotoxicity was determined by the rate of erythrocytes polychromatic micro nucleates (EPC-MN) and the cytotoxicity by the frequency of EPC. Both parameters determined in peripheral blood after the BrdU administration and {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP. The combination of the BrdU and r1 radiopharmaceutical produced a bigger cytotoxicity that the radiation and the BrdU alone; on the other hand it produced a reduction of the EPC-MN produced by the radiation, suggesting that the cytotoxicity didn't allow the expression of the genotoxicity. (Author)

  7. [Bacterial pigment prodigiosin and its genotoxic effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur'ianov, I D; Karamova, N S; Iusupova, D V; Gnezdilov, O I; Koshkarova, L A

    2013-01-01

    The prodigiosin preparation was isolated and purified from Serratia marcescens ATCC 9986, using chromatographic methods. The analysis of the preparation by TLC, NMR-spectrometry and mass-spectrometry allowed to confirm the red pigment fraction as the prodigiosin and detect its purity. Originally, the specific features of the toxic and genotoxic effects of prodigiosin and the possibility of induction of mutations by pigment in the cells of Salmonella typhimurium TA 100 (Ames test) and chromosome damage of mammalian erythroblasts have been determined.

  8. Mechanisms of genotoxic effects of hormones

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    Đelić Ninoslav J.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A concept that compounds commonly present in biological systems lack genotoxic and mutagenic activities is generally in use, hence a low number of endogenous substances have ever been tested to mutagenicity. Epidemiological and experimental analyses indicated, however, that sexual steroids could contribute to initiation and/or continuation of malign diseases. Detailed studies using methods of biochemistry, molecular biology, cytogenetics and other branches, showed that not only epigenetic mechanisms, such as a stimulation of cell proliferation, but also certain hormones, that can express genotoxic effects, such as covalent DNA modification, then chromosomal lesions and chromosomal aberrations, are in the background of malign transformation under activities of hormones. In the case of oestrogens, it was shown that excessive hormonal stimulation led to a metabolic conversion of these hormones to reactive intermediates with formation of reactive oxygenic derivates, so that cells were virtually under conditions of oxidative stress. Individual and tissue susceptibility to occurrence of deterioration of DNA and other cell components generally results from the differences in efficiency of enzymic and non-enzymic mechanisms of resistance against oxidative stress. Besides, steroid thyeroid hormones and catecholamine (dopamine, noradrenaline/norepinephrine and adrenaline can express genotoxic effects in some test-systems. It is interesting that all above mentioned hormones have a phenolic group. Data on possible genotoxic effects of peptide and protein hormones are very scarce, but based on the available literature it is considered that this group of hormones probably lacks mutagenic activities. The possibility that hormones, as endogenous substances, express mutagenic activities results from the fact that DNA is, regardless of chemical and metabolic stability susceptible, to a certain extent, to changeability compatible with the processes of the

  9. Genotoxic effects of copper sulfate in rabbits

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    Georgieva S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the genotoxic effects of oral application of CuSO4 in rabbits by the chromosome aberration (CA and sister chromatid exchange (SCE tests. Ten male New Zealand rabbits (5 months old, weighing 3.5-4.0 kg were allocated into two groups. The first group received CuSO4 (5H2O in drinking water for 6 consecutive days. The second group was used as a control. On the 7th day, blood samples were taken from the ear marginal vein and the SCE and CA tests in peripheral lymphocytes were used as genotoxicity and mutagenicity endpoints, respectively. Results showed a significant increase in the frequencies of the aberrant cells (7.4±0.24, P<0.001 and CA (chromatid fragments 3.2±0.37, chromosome fragments 4.2±0.37, P<0.001, and total aberrations (7.4±0.24, P<0.001 after the treatment with CuSO4 when compared with the control group. The level of SCE per cell in the CuSO4-treated rabbits (9.66±0.062 was significantly higher than in rabbits from the control group. These findings show that copper exhibits a genotoxic and mutagenic potential in rabbits.

  10. Magnetic fields generated by an induction heating (IH) cook top do not cause genotoxicity in vitro.

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    Miyakoshi, Junji; Horiuchi, Emi; Nakahara, Takehisa; Sakurai, Tomonori

    2007-10-01

    The use of induction heater (IH) cook tops in homes has become widespread, especially in Japan, but there are concerns about the safety of intermediate frequency (IF) electromagnetic fields associated with these cooking appliances. Since the cellular genotoxicity of IF magnetic fields has not been examined in cultured cells, we examined the effects of these fields at a magnetic flux density of 532 +/- 20 microT at 23 kHz, using an exposure unit with a built-in CO2 incubator. Exposure to the IF magnetic field at 532 microT for 2 h did not affect the growth of CHO-K1 cells and caused no mutagenic effects in bacterial mutation assays. Exposure to the IF magnetic field for 2 h induced neither single nor double DNA strand breaks in comet assays, and caused no significant change in the mutation frequency at the HPRT locus compared to sham exposure. The magnetic field used in this study is more than 80 times higher than the level recommended as safe in the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. From these results, we suggest that exposure to an IF magnetic field for 2 h does not cause cellular genotoxicity in bacteria and in Chinese hamster cells. However, the possibility of effects on other cellular functions remains, and further studies on the cellular effects of IF magnetic fields are required.

  11. Fusarium infection causes genotoxic disorders and antioxidant-based damages in Orobanche spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aybeke, Mehmet

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the toxic effects of Fusarium oxysporum on root parasitic weed, Orobanche spp. Comparative genetic and gene expression studies were conducted on uninfected and fungus-infected orobanches. In genetic studies, isolated total DNA was amplified by RAPD PCR. Fragment properties were analysed by GTS test. According to the results, the fragment properties of control and Fusarium infected (experimental) groups varied widely; and it has been observed that Fusarium has genotoxic effects on the DNA of orobanches. In gene expression studies, the expression levels of genes encoding enzymes or proteins were associated with ROS damage and toxic effects, therefore, gene expressions of Mn-superoxide dismutase (SOD), Zn-superoxide dismutase (=SOD2, mitochondrial), glutamine synthetase (GS), heat shock protein gene (HSP70), BAX, Caspase-3 and BCL2 were significantly higher in the experimental group. In the light of obtained data, it was concluded that F. oxysporum (1) caused heavy ROS damage in Orobanche (2) induced significant irrevocable genotoxic effects on the DNA of Orobanche, (3) degraded protein metabolism and synthesis, and finally (4) triggered apoptosis. The results of this study can be a ground for further research on reducing the toxic effects of Fusarium on agricultural products, so that advancements in bio-herbicide technology may provide a sustainable agricultural production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. The in vitro genotoxic effect of Tucuma (Astrocaryum aculeatum), an Amazonian fruit rich in carotenoids.

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    de Souza Filho, Olmiro Cezimbra; Sagrillo, Michele Rorato; Garcia, Luiz Filipe Machado; Machado, Alencar Kolinski; Cadoná, Francine; Ribeiro, Euler Esteves; Duarte, Marta Maria Medeiros Frescura; Morel, Ademir Farias; da Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica

    2013-11-01

    Tucuma (Astrocaryum aculeatum) is an Amazonian fruit that presents high levels of carotenoids and other bioactive compounds such as quercetin. The extracts of tucuma peel and pulp present strong antioxidant activity which illustrate an elevated concentration that causes cytotoxic effects in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). This study performed additional investigations to analyze the potential genotoxic effects of the tucuma extracts on PBMCs. The genotoxicity was evaluated by DNA fragmentation, Comet assay, and chromosomal instability G-band assays. The acute tucuma extract treatment showed genoprotective effects against DNA denaturation when compared with untreated PBMC cells. However, in the experiments with 24 and 72 h treatments to tucuma treatments, we observed low genotoxicity through a concentration of 100 μg/mL, some genotoxic effects related to intermediary concentrations (100-500 μg/mL), and more pronounced genotoxic effects on higher tucuma extract concentrations. After 24 h of treatment, the reactive oxygen species were similar among treatments and PBMC control groups. However, the caspase-1 activity related to the apoptosis and pyroptosis process increased significantly in higher tucuma concentrations. In summary, tucuma extracts, despite their higher antioxidant content and antioxidant activity, would present PBMCs genotoxic effects that are dependent on concentration and time exposition. These results need to be considered in future in vitro and in vivo studies of tucuma effects.

  13. Nanoceria have no genotoxic effect on human lens epithelial cells

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    Pierscionek, Barbara K; Yasseen, Akeel A [School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine, BT52 1SA (United Kingdom); Li, Yuebin; Schachar, Ronald A; Chen, Wei [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Colhoun, Liza M, E-mail: b.pierscionek@ulster.ac.uk, E-mail: weichen@uta.edu [Centre for Vision and Vascular Sciences, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Grosvenor Road, Belfast, BT12 6BA (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-22

    There are no treatments for reversing or halting cataract, a disease of the structural proteins in the eye lens, that has associations with other age-related degenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. The incidence of cataract and associated conditions is increasing as the average age of the population rises. Protein folding diseases are difficult to assess in vivo as proteins and their age-related changes are assessed after extraction. Nanotechnology can be used to investigate protein changes in the intact lens as well as for a potential means of drug delivery. Nanoparticles, such as cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) which have antioxidant properties, may even be used as a means of treating cataract directly. Prior to use in treatments, nanoparticle genotoxicity must be tested to assess the extent of any DNA or chromosomal damage. Sister chromatid exchanges were measured and DNA damage investigated using the alkaline COMET assay on cultured human lens epithelial cells, exposed to 5 and 10 {mu}g ml{sup -1} of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles (nanoceria). Nanoceria at these dosages did not cause any DNA damage or significant increases in the number of sister chromatid exchanges. The absence of genotoxic effects on lens cells suggests that nanoceria, in the doses and exposures tested in this study, are not deleterious to the eye lens and have the potential for use in studying structural alterations, in developing non-surgical cataract treatments and in investigating other protein folding diseases.

  14. Genotoxic effect of Phenanthrene on Chironomus sancticaroli (Diptera: Chironomidae

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    Gisele dos Santos Morais

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Phenanthrene, a Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon, remains adsorbed to sedimentary particles in aquatic environments. It affects mainly benthic organisms, and is considered potentially genotoxic. In ecotoxicology, species of Chironomus Meigen, 1803 are widely known as bioindicators of the effects of chemicals on aquatic organisms. This study investigates the effects of phenanthrene on the size of the head capsule of Chironomus sancticaroli Strixino & Strixino, 1981 larvae after chronic (eight days exposure, and DNA damage after acute (96 hours and chronic exposure (eight days, under laboratory conditions. DNA damage, evaluated using the alkaline comet assay, detected effects for both exposure periods, indicating that phenanthrene is toxic for C. sancticaroli. For the acute exposure, we analyzed five concentrations of phenanthrene, between 0.16 mg.l-1 and 1.60 mg.l-1, detecting significant differences (Kruskall-Wallis test with p < 0.05 in the degree of DNA damage in all groups. These effects were not dose-dependent. For the chronic exposure, two concentrations (0.16 mg.l-1, 0.83 mg.l-1 were analyzed, and DNA damage was observed in both. Again, the effects were not dose-dependent. This indicates that phenanthrene is genotoxic to larvae of C. sancticaroli even at low concentrations. The size of the head capsule was evaluated after chronic exposure to concentrations of 0.16 mg.l-1 and 0.83 mg.l-1. Significant differences (ANOVA test with p < 0.05 were detected in the two concentrations, and a reduction in the size of the larval head capsule was observed. This suggests that phenanthrene causes delay in larval development. These results indicate that phenanthrene affects the development of and causes DNA damage in C. sancticaroli larvae. Therefore, we suggest that C. sancticaroli can be used as a biological indicator for environmental contamination with phenanthrene.

  15. Silicon Dioxide Impedes Antiviral Response and Causes Genotoxic Insult During Calicivirus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihothram, Sudhakar S; Vermudez, Sheryl Anne; Mullis, Lisa; Townsend, Todd A; Manjanatha, Mugimane G; Azevedo, Marli P

    2016-07-01

    Noroviruses (NoV) are the leading cause of nonbacterial gastroenteritis in humans, and replicate extensively in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Silica (also known as silicon dioxide, SiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) used in processed foods, dairy products, and beverages also accumulate in the GI tract. We investigated the effect of silica NPs on NoV replication and host cell response during virus infection, using murine norovirus (MNV-1) infection of RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. Pretreatment with 10 μg/ml silica significantly reduced the viability of macrophages, but no cumulative effects on viability of macrophages were observed with MNV-1 infection. No difference was observed between exposure to control or silica NPs on either the quantity of viral genome copies or the production of infectious virus in macrophages infected with MNV-1. Silica NPs reduced the ability of macrophages to upregulate genes encoding bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs), chemokine ligands and cytokines for which expression levels were otherwise found to be upregulated in response to MNV-1 infection. Furthermore, silica NPs reduced the levels of proinflammatory cytokines secreted by macrophages in response to MNV infection. Finally, silica NPs with MNV-1 infection produced a genotoxic insult to macrophages. Strikingly, this genotoxic insult was also found to occur as a synergistic effect of silica NPs and feline calicivirus infection in feline kidney epithelial cells. Taken together, our study suggests important safety considerations related to reducing exposure to silica NPs affecting the GI tract in individuals infected with NoVs and possibly other foodborne viruses.

  16. Assessment of genotoxic effects of flumorph by the comet assay in mice organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T; Zhao, Q; Zhang, Y; Ning, J

    2014-03-01

    The present study investigated the genotoxic effects of flumorph in various organs (brain, liver, spleen, kidney and sperm) of mice. The DNA damage, measured as comet tail length (µm), was determined using the alkaline comet assay. The comet assay is a sensitive assay for the detection of genotoxicity caused by flumorph using mice as a model. Statistically significant increases in comet assay for both dose-dependent and duration-dependent DNA damage were observed in all the organs assessed. The organs exhibited the maximum DNA damage in 96 h at 54 mg/kg body weight. Brain showed maximum DNA damage followed by spleen > kidney > liver > sperm. Our data demonstrated that flumorph had induced systemic genotoxicity in mammals as it caused DNA damage in all tested vital organs, especially in brain and spleen.

  17. Effects of wood dust:Inflammation, Genotoxicity and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Jette Bornholdt

    cell line A549 measuring inflammatory and DNA damaging effects. The second part consists of a molecular analysis of the K-ras gene for mutations in the hotspots codons in human sinonasal cancers. Design, calibration and validation of the assays were performed. Cancer at the sinonasal cavities is rare......-malignant symptoms are still poorly understood. Particulate induced inflammation as well as extractives are suggested to be involved in the carcinogenesis. In this thesis wood dust potential to induce DNA damage and inflammation was investigated exposing the human lung epithelial cell line A549 to various species...... of wood dust and endpoints for inflammation and genotoxicity was evaluated. The experiments showed that the different species of wood dust vary in their ability to cause DNA strand breaks and inflammation. There was no apparent correlation between the species potential to initiate inflammation...

  18. Genotoxic effects of sodium nitrate in onion roots

    OpenAIRE

    Maria-Mihaela ANTOFIE; Doroftei, Elena

    2013-01-01

    The scope of this paper is to assess cyto- and genotoxic effects of sodium nitrate on Allium cepa root tips by using different concentrations (i.e. 0,1%; 1% and 5%) for treating uniform healthy onion bulbs for three different periods of time: 6, 24 and 72 hours. In the end of the experiment the harvested root tips were prepared according to Feulgen’s squash technique using Schiff reagent and the investigations were realized according to Allium test. The cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of nitr...

  19. [Research Progress in Genotoxic Effects of Degradation Products, Cobalt, Chromium Ions and Nanoparticles from Metal-on-metal Prostheses on Cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hao; Han, Qinglin; Liu, Fan

    2015-04-01

    Cobalt or chromium alloys are the most common clinical materials of prosthesis and there have been some investigators at home and abroad have done related researches about the genotoxic effects of cobalt and chromium ions and nanoparticles. People have certain understanding about the mechanism of production of ions as well as their influence on cells. However, chromium or cobalt nanoparticles genotoxicity related research is still in its preliminary stage. In each stage, the mechanisms, from creating of the particles, through entering cells, until finally causing genotoxic, are still contained many problems to be solved. This article reviews the research progress in mechanisms of production and genotoxic effects of cobalt, chromium ions and nanoparticles.

  20. Cytostatic and genotoxic effect of temephos in human lymphocytes and HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez-Trinidad, A B; Herrera-Moreno, J F; Vázquez-Estrada, G; Verdín-Betancourt, F A; Sordo, M; Ostrosky-Wegman, P; Bernal-Hernández, Y Y; Medina-Díaz, I M; Barrón-Vivanco, B S; Robledo-Marenco, M L; Salazar, A M; Rojas-García, A E

    2015-06-01

    Temephos is an organophosphorus pesticide that is used in control campaigns against Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, which transmit dengue. In spite of the widespread use of temephos, few studies have examined its genotoxic potential. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic, cytostatic and genotoxic effects of temephos in human lymphocytes and hepatoma cells (HepG2). The cytotoxicity was evaluated with simultaneous staining (FDA/EtBr). The cytostatic and genotoxic effects were evaluated using comet assays and the micronucleus technique. We found that temephos was not cytotoxic in either lymphocytes or HepG2 cells. Regarding the cytostatic effect in human lymphocytes, temephos (10 μM) caused a significant decrease in the percentage of binucleated cells and in the nuclear division index as well as an increase in the apoptotic cell frequency, which was not the case for HepG2 cells. The comet assay showed that temephos increased the DNA damage levels in human lymphocytes, but it did not increase the MN frequency. In contrast, in HepG2 cells, temephos increased the tail length, tail moment and MN frequency in HepG2 cells compared to control cells. In conclusion, temephos causes stable DNA damage in HepG2 cells but not in human lymphocytes. These findings suggest the importance of temephos biotransformation in its genotoxic effect.

  1. Evaluation of the Bronchorelaxant, Genotoxic, and Antigenotoxic Effects of Cassia alata L.

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    M. Ouédraogo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous-ethanolic extract of Cassia alata (AECal and its derived fractions obtained through liquid-liquid fractionation were evaluated for their bronchorelaxant, genotoxic, and antigenotoxic effects. Contractile activity of rats’ tracheas in the presence of tested materials, as well as its modifications with different inhibitors and blockers, was isometrically recorded. The antigenotoxic potential of AECal was evaluated on cyclophosphamide- (CP- induced genotoxicity in the rat. Animals were pretreated with the extract, then liver comet assay was performed. AECal and its chloroformic fractions (CF-AECal relaxed the contraction induced by Ach, but both were significantly less potent in inhibiting contraction induced by KCl (30 mM; 80 mM. Propranolol, indomethacin, L-NAME, methylene blue, and glibenclamide did not modify the relaxant effect of CF-AECal. TEA altered the response of trachea to CF-AECal. CF-AECal caused a rightward shift without affecting the Emax in cumulative concentration-response curves of Ach only at low concentrations. In animals pretreated with the extract, the percentage of CP-induced DNA damage decreased. Our results suggest that (1 muscarinic receptors contribute at least in part to the relaxant effects of CF-AECal; (2 CF-AECal interferes with membrane polarization; and (3 AECal is not genotoxic in vivo and contains chemopreventive phytoconstituents offering protection against CP-induced genotoxicity.

  2. Protective effect of boric acid on lead- and cadmium-induced genotoxicity in V79 cells.

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    Ustündağ, Aylin; Behm, Claudia; Föllmann, Wolfram; Duydu, Yalçin; Degen, Gisela H

    2014-06-01

    The toxic heavy metals cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) are important environmental pollutants which can cause serious damage to human health. As the metal ions (Cd(2+) and Pb(2+)) accumulate in the organism, there is special concern regarding chronic toxicity and damage to the genetic material. Metal-induced genotoxicity has been attributed to indirect mechanisms, such as induction of oxidative stress and interference with DNA repair. Boron is a naturally occurring element and considered to be an essential micronutrient, although the cellular activities of boron compounds remain largely unexplored. The present study has been conducted to evaluate potential protective effects of boric acid (BA) against genotoxicity induced by cadmium chloride (CdCl2) and lead chloride (PbCl2) in V79 cell cultures. Cytotoxicity assays (neutral red uptake and cell titer blue assay) served to determine suitable concentrations for subsequent genotoxicity assays. Chromosomal damage and DNA strand breaks were assessed by micronucleus tests and comet assays. Both PbCl2 and CdCl2 (at 3, 5 and 10 µM) were shown to induce concentration-dependent increases in micronucleus frequencies and DNA strand breaks in V79 cells. BA itself was not cytotoxic (up to 300 µM) and showed no genotoxic effects. Pretreatment of cells with low levels of BA (2.5 and 10 µM) was found to strongly reduce the genotoxic effects of the tested metals. Based on the findings of this in vitro study, it can be suggested that boron provides an efficient protection against the induction of DNA strand breaks and micronuclei by lead and cadmium. Further studies on the underlying mechanisms for the protective effect of boron are needed.

  3. Genotoxicity biomarkers in the assessment of heavy metal effects in mussels: experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognesi, C; Landini, E; Roggieri, P; Fabbri, R; Viarengo, A

    1999-01-01

    Heavy metals are stable and persistent environmental contaminants. The range of metal concentrations is generally below acute thresholds in coastal areas, where recognition of chronic sublethal effects is more relevant. Evidence of long-term adverse effects, such as cancer, due to heavy metals in marine animals comes from a number of field and experimental studies. The mechanism of metal carcinogenicity remains largely unknown, although several lines of experimental evidence suggest that a genotoxic effect may be involved. The aim of our study was to evaluate the sensitivity of genotoxicity tests, alkaline elution and micronucleus test, as biomarkers for the detection of heavy metals in mussels as the sentinel species. Experimental studies were carried out on Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed in aquarium (5 days) to different concentrations of three selected metal salts, CuCl2 (5, 10, 20, 40, 80 micrograms/l/a), CdCl2 (1.84, 18.4, 184 micrograms/l/a), and HgCl2 (32 micrograms/l/a), and to a mixture of equimolar doses of the three metals to study the results of their joint action. Metallothionein quantitation was used as a marker of metal exposure. Lysosomal membrane stability was applied to evaluate the influence of physiological status on genotoxic damage. The ranking of genotoxic potential was in decreasing order: Hg > Cu > Cd. Cu and Hg caused an increase of DNA single-strand breaks and micronuclei frequency. Cd induced a statistical increase of DNA damage, but gave negative results with the micronucleus test. A relationship between genotoxic effects and metallothionein content was observed. Reduction in lysosomal membrane stability with the increasing concentration of heavy metals was also evident. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Genotoxic effects of sodium nitrate in onion roots

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    Maria-Mihaela ANTOFIE

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this paper is to assess cyto- and genotoxic effects of sodium nitrate on Allium cepa root tips by using different concentrations (i.e. 0,1%; 1% and 5% for treating uniform healthy onion bulbs for three different periods of time: 6, 24 and 72 hours. In the end of the experiment the harvested root tips were prepared according to Feulgen’s squash technique using Schiff reagent and the investigations were realized according to Allium test. The cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of nitrate were investigated by calculating the mitotic index and observing all chromosomes’ complement alterations during the mitosis. The phase rate of cells undergoing mitosis is also studied. For microscopy investigations a Novex Holland B microscope with digital camera included was used. The cytogenetic analysis of nitrate effects revealed a strong decrease in the mitotic index which is more intense with the concentration and time of exposure. Moreover, this effect is associated in case of the variant treated with 5% sodium nitrate acting for more than 24 hours, with the appearance of genotoxic effects such as chromosomal alterations, highly condensed chromatin expression easily identified during mitosis stages, sticky chromosomes and chromosomal bridges and laggards.

  5. Detection of genotoxic effects of drinking water disinfection by-products using Vicia faba bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yu; Tan, Li; Zhang, Shao-Hui; Zuo, Yu-Ting; Han, Xue; Liu, Na; Lu, Wen-Qing; Liu, Ai-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Plant-based bioassays have gained wide use among the toxicological and/or ecotoxicological assessment procedures because of their simplicity, sensitivity, low cost, and reliability. The present study describes the use of Vicia faba (V. faba) micronucleus (MN) test and V. faba comet assay in the evaluation of the genotoxic potential of disinfection by-products (DBPs) commonly found in chlorine-disinfected drinking water. Five haloacetic acids and three halogenated acetonitriles were chosen as representatives of DBPs in this study because they are of potentially great public health risk. Results of the MN test indicated that monochloroacetic acid (MCA), monobromoacetic acid (MBA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), dibromoacetic acid (DBA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and trichloroacetonitrile (TCAN) caused a statistically significant increase in MN frequency in V. faba root tip cells. However, no genotoxic response was observed for dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) and dibromoacetonitrile (DBAN). Results of the comet assay showed that all tested DBPs induced a statistically significant increase in genomic DNA damage to V. faba root tip cells. On considering the capacity to detect genomic damage of a different nature, we suggest that a combination of V. faba MN test and V. faba comet assay is a useful tool for the detection of genotoxic effects of DBPs. It is worthy of assessing the feasibility of using V. faba comet assay combined with V. faba MN test to screen for the genotoxic activity of chlorinated drinking water in future work.

  6. Genotoxic effects in wild rodents (Rattus rattus and Mus musculus) in an open coal mining area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Grethel; Pérez, Lyda Espitia; Linares, Juan Carlos; Hartmann, Andreas; Quintana, Milton

    2007-06-15

    Coal is a mixture of a variety of compounds containing mutagenic and carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Exposure to coal is considered as an important non-cellular and cellular source of reactive oxygen species that can induce DNA damage. In addition, spontaneous combustion can occur in coal mining areas, further releasing compounds with detrimental effects on the environment. In this study the comet assay was used to investigate potential genotoxic effects of coal mining activities in peripheral blood cells of the wild rodents Rattus rattus and Mus musculus. The study was conducted in a coal mining area of the Municipio de Puerto Libertador, South West of the Departamento de Cordoba, Colombia. Animals from two areas in the coal mining zone and a control area located in the Municipio de Lorica were investigated. The results showed evidence that exposure to coal results in elevated primary DNA lesions in blood cells of rodents. Three different parameters for DNA damage were assessed, namely, DNA damage index, migration length and percentage damaged cells. All parameters showed statistically significantly higher values in mice and rats from the coal mining area in comparison to the animals from the control area. The parameter "DNA Damage Index" was found to be most sensitive and to best indicate a genotoxic hazard. Both species investigated were shown to be sensitive indicators of environmental genotoxicity caused by coal mining activities. In summary, our study constitutes the first investigation of potential genotoxic effects of open coal mining carried out in Puerto Libertador. The investigations provide a guide for measures to evaluate genotoxic hazards, thereby contributing to the development of appropriate measures and regulations for more careful operations during coal mining.

  7. From nanotechnology to nanogenotoxicology: genotoxic effect of cobalt-chromium nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zülal Atlı Şekeroğlu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology is a multi-disciplinary technology that processes the materials that can be measured with nanometer-level and combines many research field or discipline. Nanomaterials (NMs are widely used in the fields of science, technology, communication, electronics, industry, pharmacy, medicine, environment, consumer products and military. Until recently little has been known about whether or not nanomaterials have the toxic or hazardous effects on human health and the environment. However, several studies have indicated that exposure to some nanomaterials, e.g. nanoparticles, can cause some adverse effects in humans and animals. Over the last years the number of publications focusing on nanotoxicology has gained momentum, but, there is still a gap about the genotoxicity of nanomaterials.Metal nanoparticles and their alloys with excellent mechanical properties are the materials which can be easily adapted to the mechanical conditions of the musculoskeletal system. Cobalt-chromium alloys are widely used in orthopedic applications as joint prosthesis and bone regeneration material, fillings and dental implants in jaw surgery, and in cardiovascular surgery, especially stent applications. Studies about cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of metal nanoparticles on human indicate that some metal nanoparticles have cytotoxic and genotoxic effects and they may be hazardous for humans. However, a few studies have been reported concerning the genotoxic effects of cobalt-chromium nanoparticles. The data from these studies indicate that cobalt-chromium nanoparticles have cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. It has been stated that the wear debris from implants cause DNA and chromosome damage in patients with cobalt-chromium replacements. It was also found that the risk of urinary cancers such as bladder, ureter, kidney and prostate in patients after hip replacement than among the wider population.Because there are very little biocompatibility and toxicity tests on

  8. Genotoxic effect of formocresol pulp therapy of deciduous teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas Leite, Ana Catarina Gaioso; Rosenblatt, Aronita; da Silva Calixto, Merilane; da Silva, Cirlene Maria; Santos, Neide

    2012-08-30

    To investigate whether formocresol, in Buckley's original formulation, used for pulp therapy of deciduous teeth, can have a genotoxic effect. Genotoxicity was tested in lymphocyte cultures from the peripheral blood of children aged 5-10y, in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. This was a case-control study. The sample comprised 40 children who had primary teeth with non-vital pulps. Two venous blood samples (6-8ml) were collected from each child, the first prior to pulp therapy (control group) and the second 24h after pulp therapy (experimental group). Lymphocyte cultures were grown in 78% RPMI 1640 medium, 20% fetal bovine serum, 2% phytohemagglutinin. The lymphocytes were assessed for chromosomal aberrations; each sample involved analysis of 100 metaphases. There was a statistically significant difference between the control and treated groups for the isochromatid gap (pformocresol in pediatric dentistry is recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Dragon's blood Croton palanostigma induces genotoxic effects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maistro, Edson Luis; Ganthous, Giulia; Machado, Marina da Silva; Zermiani, Tailyn; Andrade, Sérgio Faloni de; Rosa, Paulo Cesar Pires; Perazzo, Fabio Ferreira

    2013-05-20

    Dragon's blood is a dark-red sap produced by species from the genus Croton (Euphorbiaceae), which has been used as a famous traditional medicine since ancient times in many countries, with scarce data about its safe use in humans. In this research, we studied genotoxicity and clastogenicity of Croton palanostigma sap using the comet assay and micronucleus test in cells of mice submitted to acute treatment. HPLC analysis was performed to identify the main components of the sap. The sap was administered by oral gavage at doses of 300 mg/kg, 1,000 mg/kg and 2,000 mg/kg. For the analysis, the comet assay was performed on the leukocytes and liver cells collected 24h after treatment, and the micronucleus test (MN) on bone marrow cells. Cytotoxicity was assessed by scoring 200 consecutive polychromatic (PCE) and normochromatic (NCE) erythrocytes (PCE/NCE ratio). The alkaloid taspine was the main compound indentified in the crude sap of Croton palanostigma. The results of the genotoxicity assessment show that all sap doses tested produced genotoxic effects in leukocytes and liver cells and also produced clastogenic/aneugenic effects in bone marrow cells of mice at the two higher doses tested. The PCE/NCE ratio indicated no cytotoxicity. The data obtained suggest caution in the use of Croton palanostigma sap by humans considering its risk of carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Genotoxic and apoptotic effects of Goeckerman therapy for psoriasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borska, L.; Andrys, C.; Krejsek, J.; Hamakova, K.; Kremlacek, J.; Palicka, V.; Ranna, D.; Fiala, Z. [Charles University Prague, Prague (Czech Republic). Faculty of Medicine

    2010-03-15

    Goeckerman therapy (GT) for psoriasis is based on cutaneous application of crude coal tar (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)) and exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR). PAH and UVR are mutagenic, carcinogenic and immunotoxic agents that promote apoptosis. We evaluated dermal absorption of PAH as well as the genotoxic and apoptotic effects of GT in 20 patients with psoriasis, by determining numbers of chromosomal abnormalities in peripheral lymphocytes, and levels of 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP), p53 protein and soluble FasL (sFasL) in urine and/or blood, before and after GT. Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) score was used to evaluate clinical efficacy of GT. Compared with pre-treatment levels, there was a significant increase in urine 1-OHP, indicating a high degree of dermal absorption of PAH (P <0.01). We also found a significant increase in the number of chromosomal abnormalities in peripheral blood lymphocytes (P <0.001), suggesting that GT is genotoxic; significantly increased p53 protein in plasma (P <0.05), an indicator of cell response to DNA damage; and significantly increased sFasL in serum (P <0.01), an indicator of apoptosis. The PASI score was significantly decreased after GT (P <0.001), confirming clinical benefit of this treatment. Our results demonstrate high dermal absorption of PAH during GT and provide evidence that GT promotes genotoxicity and apoptosis.

  11. Genotoxic effect of ethacrynic acid and impact of antioxidants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, William M.; Hoffman, Jared D.; Loo, George, E-mail: g_loo@uncg.edu

    2015-07-01

    It is known that ethacrynic acid (EA) decreases the intracellular levels of glutathione. Whether the anticipated oxidative stress affects the structural integrity of DNA is unknown. Therefore, DNA damage was assessed in EA-treated HCT116 cells, and the impact of several antioxidants was also determined. EA caused both concentration-dependent and time-dependent DNA damage that eventually resulted in cell death. Unexpectedly, the DNA damage caused by EA was intensified by either ascorbic acid or trolox. In contrast, EA-induced DNA damage was reduced by N-acetylcysteine and by the iron chelator, deferoxamine. In elucidating the DNA damage, it was determined that EA increased the production of reactive oxygen species, which was inhibited by N-acetylcysteine and deferoxamine but not by ascorbic acid and trolox. Also, EA decreased glutathione levels, which were inhibited by N-acetylcysteine. But, ascorbic acid, trolox, and deferoxamine neither inhibited nor enhanced the capacity of EA to decrease glutathione. Interestingly, the glutathione synthesis inhibitor, buthionine sulfoxime, lowered glutathione to a similar degree as EA, but no noticeable DNA damage was found. Nevertheless, buthionine sulfoxime potentiated the glutathione-lowering effect of EA and intensified the DNA damage caused by EA. Additionally, in examining redox-sensitive stress gene expression, it was found that EA increased HO-1, GADD153, and p21mRNA expression, in association with increased nuclear localization of Nrf-2 and p53 proteins. In contrast to ascorbic acid, trolox, and deferoxamine, N-acetylcysteine suppressed the EA-induced upregulation of GADD153, although not of HO-1. Overall, it is concluded that EA has genotoxic properties that can be amplified by certain antioxidants. - Highlights: • Ethacrynic acid (EA) caused cellular DNA damage. • EA-induced DNA damage was potentiated by ascorbic acid or trolox. • EA increased ROS production, not inhibited by ascorbic acid or trolox. • EA

  12. Genotoxic Effects of PAH Containing Sludge Extracts in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Objective Many studies have been conducted in order to evaluate the genotoxicity of chemicals and waste materials, which utilized in vivo test protocols. The use of animals for routine toxicity testing is now questioned by a growing segment of society[1]. Methods Keeping the above fact in mind, we have conducted in the present study the genotoxicity evaluation of oily sludge samples generated from a petroleum refinery and petrochemical industry and ETP sludge from petroleum refinery using DNA damage, chromosomal aberration, p53 protein induction and apoptosis in short term in vitro mammalian Chinese Hamster Ovary cell cultures. Results It is evident from the results that the oily sludge compounds derived from petroleum refinery and petrochemical industry could cause DNA damage, chromosomal aberration, p53 protein accumulation and apoptotic cell death on exposure to oily sludge extracts in the presence of metabolic activation system (S-9 mix), however, ETP sludge extract could not cause significant genotoxicity in comparison to oily sludge extract and negative control. Conclusion The effect may be attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present in the samples as evidenced from GC-MS.

  13. Early Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects of the Toxic Dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima in the Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prego-Faraldo, María Verónica; Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Laffon, Blanca; Mendez, Josefina; Eirin-Lopez, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and dinophysistoxins (DTXs) are the main toxins responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) intoxications during harmful algal blooms (HABs). Although the genotoxic and cytotoxic responses to OA have been evaluated in vitro, the in vivo effects of these toxins have not yet been fully explored. The present work fills this gap by evaluating the in vivo effects of the exposure to the DSP-toxin-producing dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima during the simulation of an early HAB episode in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The obtained results revealed that in vivo exposure to this toxic microalgae induced early genotoxicity in hemocytes, as a consequence of oxidative DNA damage. In addition, the DNA damage observed in gill cells seems to be mainly influenced by exposure time and P. lima concentration, similarly to the case of the oxidative damage found in hemocytes exposed in vitro to OA. In both cell types, the absence of DNA damage at low toxin concentrations is consistent with the notion suggesting that this level of toxicity does not disturb the antioxidant balance. Lastly, in vivo exposure to growing P. lima cell densities increased apoptosis but not necrosis, probably due to the presence of a high number of protein apoptosis inhibitors in molluscs. Overall, this work sheds light into the in vivo genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of P. lima. In doing so, it also demonstrates for the first time the potential of the modified (OGG1) comet assay for assessing oxidative DNA damage caused by marine toxins in marine invertebrates. PMID:27231936

  14. Early Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects of the Toxic Dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima in the Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Verónica Prego-Faraldo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Okadaic acid (OA and dinophysistoxins (DTXs are the main toxins responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP intoxications during harmful algal blooms (HABs. Although the genotoxic and cytotoxic responses to OA have been evaluated in vitro, the in vivo effects of these toxins have not yet been fully explored. The present work fills this gap by evaluating the in vivo effects of the exposure to the DSP-toxin-producing dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima during the simulation of an early HAB episode in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The obtained results revealed that in vivo exposure to this toxic microalgae induced early genotoxicity in hemocytes, as a consequence of oxidative DNA damage. In addition, the DNA damage observed in gill cells seems to be mainly influenced by exposure time and P. lima concentration, similarly to the case of the oxidative damage found in hemocytes exposed in vitro to OA. In both cell types, the absence of DNA damage at low toxin concentrations is consistent with the notion suggesting that this level of toxicity does not disturb the antioxidant balance. Lastly, in vivo exposure to growing P. lima cell densities increased apoptosis but not necrosis, probably due to the presence of a high number of protein apoptosis inhibitors in molluscs. Overall, this work sheds light into the in vivo genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of P. lima. In doing so, it also demonstrates for the first time the potential of the modified (OGG1 comet assay for assessing oxidative DNA damage caused by marine toxins in marine invertebrates.

  15. Genotoxic effect of substituted phenoxyacetic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkov, P; Topashka-Ancheva, M; Georgieva, M; Alexieva, V; Karanov, E

    2000-11-01

    The potential toxic and mutagenic action of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid has been studied in different test systems, and the obtained results range from increased chromosomal damage to no effect at all. We reexamined the effect of this herbicide by simultaneous using three tests based on yeast, transformed hematopoietic, and mouse bone marrow cells. The results obtained demonstrated that 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid has cytotoxic and mutagenic effects. The positive response of yeast and transformed hematopoietic cells was verified in kinetics and dose-response experiments. The analysis of metaphase chromosomes indicated a statistically proved induction of breaks, deletions, and exchanges after the intraperitoneal administration of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in mice. The study of phenoxyacetic acid and its differently chlorinated derivatives showed that cytotoxicity and mutagenicity are induced by chlorine atoms at position 2 and/or 4 in the benzene ring. The mutagenic effect was abolished by introduction of a third chlorine atom at position 5. Thus 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid was found to have very weak, if any mutagenic effect; however, the herbicide preserved its toxic effect.

  16. Fipronil-induced genotoxicity and DNA damage in vivo: Protective effect of vitamin E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badgujar, P C; Selkar, N A; Chandratre, G A; Pawar, N N; Dighe, V D; Bhagat, S T; Telang, A G; Vanage, G R

    2017-05-01

    Fipronil, an insecticide of the phenylpyrazole class has been classified as a carcinogen by United States Environmental Protection Agency, yet very limited information is available about its genotoxic effects. Adult male and female animals were gavaged with various doses of fipronil (2.5, 12.5, and 25 mg/kg body weight (bw)) to evaluate micronucleus test (mice), chromosome aberration (CA), and comet assay (rats), respectively. Cyclophosphamide (40 mg/kg bw; intraperitoneal) was used as positive control. Another group of animals were pretreated with vitamin E orally (400 mg/kg bw) for 5 days prior to administration of fipronil (12.5 mg/kg). Fipronil exposure in both male and female mice caused significant increase in the frequency of micronuclei (MN) in polychromatic erythrocytes. Similarly, structural CAs in bone marrow cells and DNA damage in the lymphocytes was found to be significantly higher in the male and female rats exposed to fipronil as compared to their respective controls. The average degree of protection (male and female animals combined together) shown by pretreatment of vitamin E against fipronil-induced genotoxicity was 63.28%: CAs; 47.91%: MN formation; and 74.70%: DNA damage. Findings of this study demonstrate genotoxic nature of fipronil regardless of gender effect and documents protective role of vitamin E.

  17. In vitro evaluation of genotoxic effects under magnetic resonant coupling wireless power transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Kohei; Shinohara, Naoki; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2015-04-07

    Wireless power transfer (WPT) technology using the resonant coupling phenomenon has been widely studied, but there are very few studies concerning the possible relationship between WPT exposure and human health. In this study, we investigated whether exposure to magnetic resonant coupling WPT has genotoxic effects on WI38VA13 subcloned 2RA human fibroblast cells. WPT exposure was performed using a helical coil-based exposure system designed to transfer power with 85.4% efficiency at a 12.5-MHz resonant frequency. The magnetic field at the positions of the cell culture dishes is approximately twice the reference level for occupational exposure as stated in the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. The specific absorption rate at the positions of the cell culture dishes matches the respective reference levels stated in the ICNIRP guidelines. For assessment of genotoxicity, we studied cell growth, cell cycle distribution, DNA strand breaks using the comet assay, micronucleus formation, and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene mutation, and did not detect any significant effects between the WPT-exposed cells and control cells. Our results suggest that WPT exposure under the conditions of the ICNIRP guidelines does not cause detectable cellular genotoxicity.

  18. Argentine folk medicine: genotoxic effects of Chenopodiaceae family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadano, A B; Gurni, A A; Carballo, M A

    2006-01-16

    Chenopodium ambrosioides L. and Chenopodium multifidum L. (Chenopodiaceae), common name: Paico, are medicinal plants. They are aromatic shrubs growing in South America. For centuries, they have been used due to its medicinal properties. However, there are few reports in literature about the genotoxic effects of these plants. There for, the aim of these work is the evaluation of genetic damage induced by decoction and infusion of this plants which were assayed in different concentrations (1, 10, 100, 1,000 microL extract/mL culture), by addition of the extract to human lymphocyte cell cultures, negative controls were included. The endpoints evaluated were chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), cell proliferation kinetics (CPK) and mitotic index (MI). The repeated measure analysis of variance was used for statistic evaluation of the results. The results showed: (a) statistical increase in the percentage of cells with CA and in the frequency of SCE when cultures were exposed to both aromatic plants, (b) a decrease in MI of both Paicos assayed, although no modification in the CPK values was observed, (c) no effect was noticed in the analysis of Chenopodium album L., which was used as negative control of the essential oil. These results suggest a cyto and genotoxic effect of Chenopodium ambrosioides and Chenopodium multifidum aqueous extracts related to the essential oil of the plant (as Chenopodium album did not perform).

  19. Genotoxicity of phthalates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkekoglu, Pınar; Kocer-Gumusel, Belma

    2014-12-01

    Many of the environmental, occupational and industrial chemicals are able to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cause oxidative stress. ROS may lead to genotoxicity, which is suggested to contribute to the pathophysiology of many human diseases, including inflammatory diseases and cancer. Phthalates are ubiquitous environmental chemicals and are well-known peroxisome proliferators (PPs) and endocrine disruptors. Several in vivo and in vitro studies have been conducted concerning the carcinogenic and mutagenic effects of phthalates. Di(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP) and several other phthalates are shown to be hepatocarcinogenic in rodents. The underlying factor in the hepatocarcinogenesis is suggested to be their ability to generate ROS and cause genotoxicity. Several methods, including chromosomal aberration test, Ames test, micronucleus assay and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) mutation test and Comet assay, have been used to determine genotoxic properties of phthalates. Comet assay has been an important tool in the measurement of the genotoxic potential of many chemicals, including phthalates. In this review, we will mainly focus on the studies, which were conducted on the DNA damage caused by different phthalate esters and protection studies against the genotoxicity of these chemicals.

  20. Evaluation of genotoxic effect of amalgam restorations in oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chennoju Sai Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mercury a popular heavy metal used in dentistry in the form of amalgam is a known clastogen. The assessment of micronuclei in cells is a promising tool for studying the genotoxic effect of mercury on them. Hence, a study was conducted to evaluate the frequency of micronuclei in exfoliated buccal cells of subjects with amalgam restorations. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 subjects (age and gender-matched sample of 30 study group and 30 control group were included in this study. Smears were obtained with moistened wooden spatula from buccal mucosa in close contact with amalgam restoration and fixed with 100% ethyl alcohol. After staining with Papanicolaou stain, all the slides were examined under ×40 and 1,000 cells were counted for the presence of micronuclei. The data were entered into a spread sheet and subjected to statistical analysis. Results: A statistically significant increase in the number of micronuclei containing cells was observed in the study group when compared to control group (P < 0.05. A positive correlation was observed between the duration of restoration and frequency of micronuclei (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The results showed a definite genotoxic effect of amalgam restorations on the oral cavity which can be attributed to the clastogenic action of mercury in amalgam restorations.

  1. Genotoxic effects of bismuth (III oxide nanoparticles by comet assay

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    Reecep Liman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth oxide is one of the important transition metal oxides and it has been intensively studied due to their peculiar characteristics (semiconductor band gap, high refractive index, high dielectric permittivity, high oxygen conductivity, resistivity, photoconductivity and photoluminescence etc.. Therefore, it is used such as microelectronics, sensor technology, optical coatings, transparent ceramic glass manufacturing, nanoenergetic gas generator, biosensor for DNA hybridization, potential immobilizing platforms for glucose oxidase and polyphenol oxidase, fuel cells, a additive in paints, an astringent in a variety of medical creams and topical ointments, and for the determination of heavy metal ions in drinking water, mineral water and urine. In addition this, Bismuth (III oxide nanoparticles (BONPs are favorable for the biomolecules adsorption than regular sized particles because of their greater advantages and novel characteristics (much higher specific surface, greater surface free energy, and good electrochemical stability etc.. Genotoxic effects of BONPs were investigated on the root cells of Allium cepa by Comet assay. A. cepa roots were treated with the aqueous dispersions of BONPs at 5 different concentrations (12.5, 25, 50, 75, and 100 ppm for 4 h. A significant increase in DNA damage was also observed at all concentrations of BONPs except 12.5 ppm by Comet assay. The results were also analyzed statistically by using SPSS for Windows; Duncan’s multiple range test was performed. These result indicate that BONPs exhibit genotoxic activity in A. cepa root meristematic cells.

  2. Effects of soil pH on the Vicia-micronucleus genotoxicity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhyèvre, Adrien; Foltête, Anne Sophie; Aran, Delphine; Muller, Serge; Cotelle, Sylvie

    2014-11-01

    In the field of contaminated sites and soil management, chemical analyses only bring typological data about pollution. As far as bioavailability and effects on organisms are concerned, we need ecotoxicology tools. In this domain, among many existing tests, we chose to study genotoxicity because it is a short-term endpoint with long-term consequences. The aim of this study is to assess the effects of soil pH on the results of the Vicia faba root tip micronucleus test for the two following reasons: (i) to define the pH range within which the test can be performed without modifying the soil to be tested, within the framework of the ISO standard of the test and (ii) to provides information about the effects of the pH on the genotoxic potential of soils. In this context, we modified the pH of a standard soil with HCl or NaOH and we spiked the matrix with copper (2, 4 and 8 mmol kg(-1) dry soil) or with maleic hydrazide, an antigerminative chemical (5, 10 and 20 μmol kg(-1) dry soil). We concluded that the pH had no effect on the mitotic index or micronucleus frequency in the root cells of the negative controls: extreme pH values did not induce micronucleus formation in root cells. Moreover, according to our results, the Vicia-micronucleus test can be performed with pH values ranging between 3.2 and 9.0, but in the ISO 29200 "Soil quality--assessment of genotoxic effects on higher plants--V. faba micronucleus test" we recommended to use a control soil with a pH value ranging between 5 and 8 for a more accurate assessment of chemical genotoxicity. We also found that acid pH could increase the genotoxic potential of pollutants, especially heavy metals. With hydrazide maleic spiked soil, plants were placed in a situation of double stress, i.e. toxicity caused by extreme pH values and toxicity induced by the pollutant.

  3. Screening potential genotoxic effect of aquatic plant extracts using the mussel micronucleus test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Eck-Varanka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the genotoxic potential of selected aquatic macrophytes: Ceratophyllum demersum L. (hornwort, family Ceratophyllaceae, Typha angustifolia L. (narrowleaf cattail, family Typhaceae, Stratiotes aloides L. (water soldier, family Butomaceae, and Oenanthe aquatica (L. Poir. (water dropwort, family Umbelliferae. Methods: For genotoxicity assessment, the mussel micronucleus test was applied. Micronucleus frequency was determined from the haemolymph of Unio pictorum L. (painter’s mussel. In parallel, total and hydrolisable tannin contents were determined. Results: All plant extracts elucidated significant mutagenic effect. Significant correlation was determined between tannin content and mutagenic capacity. Conclusions: The significant correlation between genotoxicity as expressed by micronucleus frequency and tannin content (both total and hydrolisable tannins indicate that tannin is amongst the main compounds being responsible for the genotoxic potential. It might be suggested that genotoxic capacity of these plants elucidate a real ecological effect in the ecosystem.

  4. Screening potential genotoxic effect of aquatic plant extracts using the mussel micronucleus test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bettina Eck-Varanka; Nora Kovts; Katalin Hubai; Gbor Paulovits; rpd Ferincz; Eszter Horvth

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To assess the genotoxic potential of selected aquatic macrophytes:Ceratophyllum demersum L. (hornwort, family Ceratophyllaceae),Typha angustifolia L. (narrowleaf cattail, family Typhaceae),Stratiotes aloides L. (water soldier, family Butomaceae), andOenanthe aquatica (L.) Poir. (water dropwort, family Umbelliferae). Methods: For genotoxicity assessment, the mussel micronucleus test was applied. Micronucleus frequency was determined from the haemolymph ofUnio pictorum L. (painter’s mussel). In parallel, total and hydrolisable tannin contents were determined. Results:All plant extracts elucidated significant mutagenic effect. Significant correlation was determined between tannin content and mutagenic capacity. Conclusions:The significant correlation between genotoxicity as expressed by micronucleus frequency and tannin content (both total and hydrolisable tannins) indicate that tannin is amongst the main compounds being responsible for the genotoxic potential. It might be suggested that genotoxic capacity of these plants elucidate a real ecological effect in the ecosystem.

  5. Genotoxic damage in Solea senegalensis exposed to sediments from the Sado Estuary (Portugal): effects of metallic and organic contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Pedro M; Lobo, Jorge; Caeiro, Sandra; Martins, Marta; Ferreira, Ana M; Caetano, Miguel; Vale, Carlos; Delvalls, T Angel; Costa, Maria H

    2008-06-30

    Juvenile Solea senegalensis (Senegalese sole) were exposed to freshly collected sediments from three sites of the Sado Estuary (West-Portuguese coast) in 28-day laboratory assays in order to assess the ecological risk from sediment contaminants, by measuring two genotoxicity biomarkers in peripheral blood: the percentage of Erythrocyte Nuclear Abnormalities (ENA) by use of an adaptation of the micronucleus test, and the percentage of DNA strand-breakage (DNA-SB) with the Comet assay. Sediments were surveyed for metallic (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd and Pb) and organic (PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) and DDTs (dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane)) contaminants. Sediments from site A (farthest from hotspots of contamination) were found to be the least contaminated and weaker inducers of genotoxic damage, whereas sediments from sites B (urban influence) and C (affected by industrial effluents and agricultural runoffs) were responsible for a very significant increase in both ENA and DNA-SB, site B being most contaminated with metals and site C mainly with organic pollutants, especially PAHs and PCBs . Analysis of genotoxic effects showed a strong correlation between the concentrations of PAHs and PCBs and both biomarkers at sampling times T(14) and T(28), while the amounts of Cu, As, Cd and Pb were less strongly correlated, and at T(28) only, with ENA and DNA-SB. These results show that organic contaminants in sediment are stronger and faster acting genotoxic stressors. The results also suggest that metals may have an inhibitory effect on genotoxicity when interacting with organic contaminants, at least during early exposure. ENA and DNA-SB do not show a linear relationship, but a strong correlation exists between the overall increase in genotoxicity caused by exposure to sediment, confirming that they are different, and possibly non-linked effects that respond similarly to exposure. Although the Comet assay showed enhanced

  6. Silica nanoparticles and biological dispersants: genotoxic effects on A549 lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, David M., E-mail: d.brown@hw.ac.uk [Heriot-Watt University, Nanosafety Research Group, School of Life Sciences (United Kingdom); Varet, Julia, E-mail: julia.varet@IOM-world.org [Institute of Occupational Medicine (United Kingdom); Johnston, Helinor, E-mail: h.johnston@hw.ac.uk; Chrystie, Alison; Stone, Vicki, E-mail: v.stone@hw.ac.uk [Heriot-Watt University, Nanosafety Research Group, School of Life Sciences (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Silica nanoparticle exposure could be intentional (e.g. medical application or food) or accidental (e.g. occupational inhalation). On entering the body, particles become coated with specific proteins depending on the route of entry. The ability of silica particles of different size and charge (non-functionalized 50 and 200 nm and aminated 50 and 200 nm) to cause genotoxic effects in A549 lung epithelial cells was investigated. Using the modified comet assay and the micronucleus assay, we examined the effect of suspending the particles in different dispersion media [RPMI or Hanks’ balanced salt solution (HBSS), supplemented with bovine serum albumin (BSA), lung lining fluid (LLF) or serum] to determine if this influenced the particle’s activity. Particle characterisation suggested that the particles were reasonably well dispersed in the different media, with the exception of aminated 50 nm particles which showed evidence of agglomeration. Plain 50, 200 nm and aminated 50 nm particles caused significant genotoxic effects in the presence of formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase when dispersed in HBSS or LLF. These effects were reduced when the particles were dispersed in BSA and serum. There was no significant micronucleus formation produced by any of the particles when suspended in any of the dispersants. The data suggest that silica particles can produce a significant genotoxic effect according to the comet assay in A549 cells, possibly driven by an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism which may be modified depending on the choice of dispersant employed.

  7. Acute effects of a prooxidant herbicide on the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Screening cytotoxicity and genotoxicity endpoints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esperanza, Marta; Cid, Ángeles; Herrero, Concepción; Rioboo, Carmen, E-mail: carmen.rioboo@udc.es

    2015-08-15

    mitochondrial membrane), genotoxicity (oxidative DNA damage, DNA strand breakage, alterations in nuclear morphology), and cell cycle disturbances (subG1-nuclei, decrease of 4N population) in paraquat-treated cells. Overall, the genotoxicity results indicate that the production of ROS caused by exposure to paraquat induces oxidative DNA damage followed by DNA single- and double-strand breaks and cell cycle alterations, possibly leading to apoptosis in C. reinhardtii cells. This is supported by the observation of typical hallmarks of apoptosis, such as mitochondrial membrane depolarization, alterations in nuclear morphology and subG1 nuclei in cells exposed to the highest assayed concentrations. To our knowledge, this is the first study that provides a comprehensive analysis of oxidative DNA base damage in unicellular algal cells exposed to a prooxidant pollutant, as well as of its possible relation with other physiological effects. These results reinforce the need for additional studies on the genotoxicity of environmental pollutants on ecologically relevant organisms such as microalgae that can provide a promising basis for the characterization of potential pollutant hazards in the aquatic environment.

  8. Evaluation of the tickcide, genotoxic, and mutagenic effects of the Ruta graveolens L. (Rutaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Vargas de Carvalho

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Current analysis investigated the tickcide effects of the aqueous extract and chloroform fractions of Ruta graveolens L. (rue on engorged females of Rhipicephalus microplus, as well as their genotoxic and mutagenic effects on human leukocytes. The best tickcide activity (non-dependent dose and genotoxic / mutagenic effects (dependent-dose were observed on exposure to chloroform fractions. Results suggest that extract fractions of R. graveolens L are efficient against R. microplus, although the fraction and the tested concentrations show genotoxic and mutagenic potential for human leukocytes.

  9. Protective effects of boron on cyclophosphamide induced lipid peroxidation and genotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, Sinan; Kucukkurt, Ismail; Demirel, Hasan Huseyin; Acaroz, Damla Arslan; Akbel, Erten; Cigerci, Ibrahim Hakki

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible protective effect of boron (B) on cyclophosphamide (CYC) induced oxidative stress in rats. Totally, thirty Wistar albino male rats were fed standard rodent diet and divided into 5 equal groups: physiological saline was given intraperitoneally (i.p.) to the control group (vehicle treated), to the second group only 75 mg kg(-1) CYC was given i.p. on the 14th d, and boron was administered (5, 10, and 20 mg kg(-1), i.p.) to the other groups for 14 d and CYC (75 mg kg(-1), i.p.) on the 14th d. CYC caused increase of malondialdehyde and decrease of glutathione levels, decrease of superoxide dismutase activities in erythrocyte and tissues, decrease of erythrocyte, heart, lung, and brain catalase, and plasma antioxidant activities. Also, CYC treatment caused to DNA damage in mononuclear leukocytes. Moreover, B exhibited protective action against the CYC-induced histopathological changes in tissues. However, treatment of B decreased severity of CYC-induced lipid peroxidation and genotoxicity on tissues. In conclusion, B has ameliorative effects against CYC-induced lipid peroxidation and genotoxicity by enhancing antioxidant defence mechanism in rat.

  10. Genotoxic and anti-genotoxic effects of esculin and its oligomer fractions against mitomycin C-induced DNA damages in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokdad Bzeouich, Imen; Mustapha, Nadia; Maatouk, Mouna; Ghedira, Kamel; Ghoul, Mohamed; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2016-12-01

    Mitomycin C is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic drugs against various solid tumors. However, despite its wide spectrum of clinical benefits, this agent is capable of inducing various types of genotoxicity. In this study, we investigated the effect of esculin and its oligomer fractions (E1, E2 and E3) against mitomycin C induced genotoxicity in liver and kidney cells isolated from Balb/C mice using the comet assay. Esculin and its oligomer fractions were not genotoxic at the tested doses (20 mg/kg and 40 mg/kg b.w). A significant decrease in DNA damages was observed, suggesting a protective role of esculin and its oligomer fractions against the genotoxicity induced by mitomycin C on liver and kidney cells. Moreover, esculin and its oligomer fractions did not induce an increase of malondialdehyde levels.

  11. Genotoxic potential of nonsteroidal hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topalović Dijana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormones are cellular products involved in the regulation of a large number of processes in living systems, and which by their actions affect the growth, function and metabolism of cells. Considering that hormones are compounds normally present in the organism, it is important to determine if they can, under certain circumstances, lead to genetic changes in the hereditary material. Numerous experimental studies in vitro and in vivo in different systems, from bacteria to mammals, dealt with the mutagenic and genotoxic effects of hormones. This work presents an overview of the research on genotoxic effects of non­steroidal hormones, although possible changes of genetic material under their influence have not still been known enough, and moreover, investigations on their genotoxic influence have given conflicting results. The study results show that mechanisms of genotoxic effect of nonsteroidal hormones are manifested through the increase of oxidative stress by arising reactive oxygen species. A common mechanism of ROS occurence in thyroid hormones and catecholamines is through metabolic oxidation of their phenolic groups. Manifestation of insulin genotoxic effect is based on production of ROS by activation of NADPH isophorms, while testing oxytocin showed absence of genotoxic effect. Considering that the investigations on genotoxicity of nonsteroidal hormones demonstrated both positive and negative results, the explanation of this discordance involve limitations of test systems themselves, different cell types or biological species used in the experiments, different level of reactivity in vitro and in vivo, as well as possible variations in a tissue-specific expression. Integrated, the provided data contribute to better understanding of genotoxic effect of nonsteroidal hormones and point out to the role and mode of action of these hormones in the process of occurring of effects caused by oxidative stress. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike

  12. Assessment of mutagenic, antimutagenic and genotoxicity effects of Mimosa tenuiflora

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    Viviane A. Silva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Genotoxic effects of Mimosa tenuiflora (Willd. Poir, Fabaceae, were investigated by using both micronucleus test and bacterial reverse mutation assay in Salmonella typhimurium TA97, TA98, TA100, TA102 respectively. In respect of Ames test results show that the extract does not induce mutations in any strains of Salmonella typhimurium tested since the mutagenicity index is less than 2. In the antimutagenic effect was observed that the extract at the concentrations tested significantly decreased the mutagenicity index of all strains tested which characterized the extract as antimutagenic in these conditions. In the micronucleus test in vivo, we observed that the concentrations used did not induce an increase in the frequency of micronucleus in normochromatic erythrocytes of mice. Therefore, we concluded that the extract of M. tenuiflora is not mutagenic in the absence of exogenous metabolizing system and does not induce an increase in the frequency of the micronucleus characterized as an agent not mutagenic in these conditions. Further studies of toxicity need to be made to the use of this plant in the treatment of diseases to be stimulated.

  13. Cadmium: cellular effects, modifications of biomolecules, modulation of DNA repair and genotoxic consequences (a review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, G; Averbeck, D

    2006-11-01

    Cadmium is an important toxic environmental heavy metal. Occupational and environmental pollution with cadmium results mainly from mining, metallurgy industry and manufactures of nickel-cadmium batteries, pigments and plastic stabilizers. Important sources of human intoxication are cigarette smoke as well as food, water and air contaminations. In humans, cadmium exposures have been associated with cancers of the prostate, lungs and testes. Acute exposures are responsible for damage to these organs. Chronic intoxication is associated with obstructive airway disease, emphysema, irreversible renal failure, bone disorders and immuno-suppression. At the cellular level, cadmium affects proliferation, differentiation and causes apoptosis. It has been classified as a carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). However, it is weakly genotoxic. Indirect effects of cadmium provoke generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage. Cadmium modulates also gene expression and signal transduction, reduces activities of proteins involved in antioxidant defenses. Several studies have shown that it interferes with DNA repair. The present review focuses on the effects of cadmium in mammalian cells with special emphasis on the induction of damage to DNA, membranes and proteins, the inhibition of different types of DNA repair and the induction of apoptosis. Current data and hypotheses on the mechanisms involved in cadmium genotoxicity and carcinogenesis are outlined.

  14. Mutagenic and genotoxic effects of Guelma's urban wastewater, Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabet, Mouna; Abda, Ahlem; Benouareth, Djamel E; Liman, Recep; Konuk, Muhsin; Khallef, Messaouda; Taher, Ali

    2015-02-01

    Assessment of water pollution and its effect upon river biotic communities and human health is indispensable to develop control and management strategies. In this study, the mutagenicity and genotoxicity of urban wastewater of the city of Guelma in Algeria were examined between April 2012 and April 2013. For this, two biological tests, namely Amesand chromosomal aberrations (CA) test in Allium cepa root tips were employed on the samples collected from five different sampling stages (S1-S5). In Ames test, two strains of Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 with or without metabolic activation (S9-mix) were used. All water samples were found to be mutagenic to S. typhimurium TA98 with or without S9-mix. A significant decrease in mitotic index (MI) was observed with a decrease in the percentage of cells in the prophase and an increase in the telophase. Main aberrations observed were anaphase bridges, disturbed anaphase-telophase cells, vagrants and stickiness in anaphase-telophase cells. All treatments of wastewater in April 2012, at S5 in July 2012, at S1 and S5 in November 2012, at S5 in February 2013, and at S1 in April 2013 induced CA when compared to the negative control. Some physicochemical parameters and heavy metals (Cd, Pb, and Cu) were also recorded in the samples examined.

  15. Kerosene soot genotoxicity: enhanced effect upon co-exposure with chrysotile asbestos in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohani, M; Dopp, E; Weiss, D G; Schiffmann, D; Rahman, Q

    2000-04-03

    Epidemiological and experimental studies have suggested an enhancement of asbestos-induced bronchogenic carcinoma by cigarette smoke. Further, our recent experimental and epidemiological studies have indicated that besides smoking, several other compounds including kerosene soot may accelerate disease processes in asbestos-exposed animals as well as in the humans. Incomplete combustion of kerosene oil generates large volumes of soot, which contains various polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and aliphatic compounds. As reported earlier, exposure to kerosene soot is known to cause biochemical and pathological changes in the pulmonary tissue, which may cause cardiopulmonary disorders. In this study we investigated genotoxic effects caused by kerosene soot and chrysotile asbestos as well as co-exposure of kerosene soot and chrysotile using Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts (SHE). The micronucleus assay revealed a significant increase of induced micronuclei (MN), (Pkerosene soot (0.5-1.0 microg/cm(2)) for 66 h (36 MN/1000 cells). Combined treatment with chrysotile and soot induced up to 110 MN/1000 cells (chrysotile alone: 80 MN/1000 cells; concentrations: 1 microg/cm(2), exposure times: 66 h). Kinetochore staining revealed mainly clastogenic effects in all cases (soot: 21.3% CRMN(+); chrysotile: 27%; soot+chrysotile: 27.6%; control: 20.8%). This is the first study showing that kerosene soot is not only genotoxic but it can also elevate the genotoxic potential of chrysotile asbestos. This information may be of importance for workers occupationally exposed to asbestos and domestically exposed to kerosene soot.

  16. Unravelling mechanisms of dietary flavonoid-mediated health effects: effects on lipid metabolism and genotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek-van den Hil, E.F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Consumption of foods containing flavonoids is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), possibly by lipid-lowering effects. On the other hand, for one of these flavonoids, quercetin, also genotoxicity was shown especially in in vitro bioassays.

  17. Unravelling mechanisms of dietary flavonoid-mediated health effects: effects on lipid metabolism and genotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek-van den Hil, E.F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Consumption of foods containing flavonoids is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), possibly by lipid-lowering effects. On the other hand, for one of these flavonoids, quercetin, also genotoxicity was shown especially in in vitro bioassays. Therefo

  18. Cytotoxic, Genotoxic, and Neurotoxic Effects of Mg, Pb, and Fe on Pheochromocytoma (PC-12) Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Talia; Liu, Yi-Ming; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Metals such as lead (Pb), magnesium (Mg), and iron (Fe) are ubiquitous in the environment as a result of natural occurrence and anthropogenic activities. Although Mg, Fe and others are considered essential elements, high level of exposure has been associated with severe adverse health effects including cardiovascular, hematological, nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic, and neurologic abnormalities in humans. In the present study we hypothesized that Mg, Pb, and Fe are cytotoxic, genotoxic and neurotoxic, and their toxicity is mediated through oxidative stress and alteration in protein expression. To test the hypothesis, we used the pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cell line as a neuro cell model and performed the LDH assay for cell viability, Comet assay for DNA damage, Western blot for oxidative stress, and HPLC-MS to assess the concentration levels of neurological biomarkers such as glutamate, dopamine (DA), and 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT). The results of this study clearly show that Mg, Pb, and Fe, respectively in the form of MgSO4, Pb(NO3)2, FeCl2, and FeCl3 induce cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and genotoxicity in PC-12 cells. In addition, exposure to these metallic compounds caused significant changes in the concentration levels of glutamate, dopamine, and 3-MT in PC-12 cells. Taken together the findings suggest that MgSO4, Pb(NO3)2, FeCl2, and FeCl3 have the potential to induce substantial toxicity to PC-12 cells. PMID:24942330

  19. The effect of temperature on the efficiency of industrial wastewater nitrification and its (genotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gnida Anna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the problem of the determination of the effects of temperature on the efficiency of the nitrification process of industrial wastewater, as well as its toxicity to the test organisms. The study on nitrification efficiency was performed using wastewater from one of Polish chemical factories. The chemical factory produces nitrogen fertilizers and various chemicals. The investigated wastewater was taken from the influent to the industrial mechanical-biological wastewater treatment plant (WWTP. The WWTP guaranteed high removal efficiency of organic compounds defined as chemical oxygen demand (COD but periodical failure of nitrification performance was noted in last years of the WWTP operation. The research aim was to establish the cause of recurring failures of nitrification process in the above mentioned WWTP. The tested wastewater was not acutely toxic to activated sludge microorganisms. However, the wastewater was genotoxic to activated sludge microorganisms and the genotoxicity was greater in winter than in spring time. Analysis of almost 3 years’ period of the WWTP operation data and laboratory batch tests showed that activated sludge from the WWTP under study is very sensitive to temperature changes and the nitrification efficiency collapses rapidly under 16°C. Additionally, it was calculated that in order to provide the stable nitrification, in winter period the sludge age (SRT in the WWTP should be higher than 35 days.

  20. Effects of chemical agent injections on genotoxicity of wastewater in a microfiltration-reverse osmosis membrane process for wastewater reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fang; Hu, Hong-Ying; Wu, Qian-Yuan; Tang, Xin; Sun, Ying-Xue; Shi, Xiao-Lei; Huang, Jing-Jing

    2013-09-15

    With combined microfiltration (MF)/ultrafiltration (UF) and reverse osmosis (RO) process being widely used in municipal wastewater reclamation, RO concentrate with high level genotoxicity is becoming a potential risk to water environment. In this study, wastewater genotoxicity in a MF-RO process for municipal wastewater reclamation and also the effects of chemical agent injections were evaluated by SOS/umu genotoxicity test. The genotoxicity of RO concentrate ranged 500-559 μg 4-NQO (4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide)/L and 12-22 μg 4-NQO/mg DOC, was much higher than that of RO influent. Further research suggested that Kathon biocide was a key chemical agent associated with the genotoxicity increase. Kathon biocide used in RO system was highly genotoxic in vitro and Kathon biocide retained in RO system could contribute to a higher genotoxicity of RO concentrate. Hence, treatments for biocides before discharging are necessary. Chlorination of secondary effluent could significantly decrease the genotoxicity and increasing chlorine dosage could be an efficacious method to decrease the genotoxicity of RO concentrate. According to the result of the experiment, the dosage of chlorine in dual-membrane process could be set to about 2.5 mg Cl₂/L. The effect of antiscalant (2-phosphomobutane-1,2,4-tricarboxylic acid) was also investigated; it turned out to have no effect on genotoxicity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Cytotoxic, genotoxic/antigenotoxic and mutagenic/antimutagenic effects of the venom of the wasp Polybia paulista.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshina, Márcia M; Santos, Lucilene D; Palma, Mario S; Marin-Morales, Maria A

    2013-09-01

    Hymenoptera venoms are constituted by a complex mixture of chemically or pharmacologically bioactive agents, such as phospholipases, hyaluronidases and mastoparans. Venoms can also contain substances that are able to inhibit and/or diminish the genotoxic or mutagenic action of other compounds that are capable of promoting damages in the genetic material. Thus, the present study aimed to assess the effect of the venom of Polybia paulista, a neotropical wasp, by assays with HepG2 cells maintained in culture. The cytotoxic potential of the wasp venom, assessed by the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay (MTT assay), was tested for the concentrations of 10 μg/mL, 5 μg/mL and 1 μg/mL. As these concentrations were not cytotoxic, they were used to evaluate the genotoxic (comet assay) and mutagenic potential (micronucleus test) of the venom. In this study, it was verified that these concentrations induced damages in the DNA of the exposed cells, and it was necessary to test lower concentrations until it was found those that were not considered genotoxic and mutagenic. The concentrations of 1 ng/mL, 100 pg/mL and 10 pg/mL, which did not induce genotoxicity and mutagenicity, were used in four different treatments (post-treatment, pre-treatment, simultaneous treatment with and without incubation), in order to evaluate if these concentrations were able to inhibit or decrease the genotoxic and mutagenic action of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). None of the concentrations was able to inhibit and/or decrease the MMS activity. The genotoxic and mutagenic activity of the venom of P. paulista could be caused by the action of phospholipase, mastoparan and hyaluronidase, which are able to disrupt the cell membrane and thereby interact with the genetic material of the cells or even facilitate the entrance of other compounds of the venom that can act on the DNA. Another possible explanation for the genotoxicity and mutagenicity of the venom can be the presence of substances able

  2. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of water and sediment samples from gypsum mining area in channel catfish ovary (CCO) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternjej, Ivančica; Gaurina Srček, Višnja; Mihaljević, Zlatko; Kopjar, Nevenka

    2013-12-01

    Man-made activities such as mining generate certain amounts of metal contaminated wastes which can reach aquatic environment and cause the serious effects on different organisms and ecosystem. Chemical analysis of the environmental samples is the most direct approach to reveal their pollution status but it cannot always provide information on biological effects to different organisms, including fish. This study was aimed to investigate the in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of water and sediment samples from gypsum mining area using the channel catfish ovary (CCO) cell line. Results obtained by the WST-1 assay and alkaline comet assay revealed that exposure of CCO cells to the same concentrations of contaminated water and sediment samples caused significant decrease in cell viability and increased DNA damages. Chemical analysis of water and sediment samples showed that increased concentrations of strontium, aluminum and iron were mainly responsible for the observed cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in CCO cells. The study suggested that fish CCO cells could be useful biological test-system for water and sediment cytotoxicity and genotoxicity assessments. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic Evidence for Genotoxic Effect of Entecavir, an Anti-Hepatitis B Virus Nucleotide Analog.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jiang

    Full Text Available Nucleoside analogues (NAs have been the most frequently used treatment option for chronic hepatitis B patients. However, they may have genotoxic potentials due to their interference with nucleic acid metabolism. Entecavir, a deoxyguanosine analog, is one of the most widely used oral antiviral NAs against hepatitis B virus. It has reported that entecavir gave positive responses in both genotoxicity and carcinogenicity assays. However the genotoxic mechanism of entecavir remains elusive. To evaluate the genotoxic mechanisms, we analyzed the effect of entecavir on a panel of chicken DT40 B-lymphocyte isogenic mutant cell line deficient in DNA repair and damage tolerance pathways. Our results showed that Parp1-/- mutant cells defective in single-strand break (SSB repair were the most sensitive to entecavir. Brca1-/-, Ubc13-/- and translesion-DNA-synthesis deficient cells including Rad18-/- and Rev3-/- were hypersensitive to entecavir. XPA-/- mutant deficient in nucleotide excision repair was also slightly sensitive to entecavir. γ-H2AX foci forming assay confirmed the existence of DNA damage by entecavir in Parp1-/-, Rad18-/- and Brca1-/- mutants. Karyotype assay further showed entecavir-induced chromosomal aberrations, especially the chromosome gaps in Parp1-/-, Brca1-/-, Rad18-/- and Rev3-/- cells when compared with wild-type cells. These genetic comprehensive studies clearly identified the genotoxic potentials of entecavir and suggested that SSB and postreplication repair pathways may suppress entecavir-induced genotoxicity.

  4. Disperse Red 1 (textile dye) induces cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in mouse germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Fábio Henrique; Bustos-Obregon, Eduardo; Salvadori, Daisy Maria Fávero

    2015-06-01

    Disperse Red 1 (DR1), which is widely used in the textile industry, is an azo dye that contributes to the toxicity and pollution of wastewater. To assess the toxic effects of DR1 on reproduction, sexually mature male mice (Mus musculus, strain CF-1) were orally (gavage) treated with single doses of the compound at 20, 100 and 500 mg/kg body weight. Testicular features and sperm parameters were evaluated 8.3, 16.6 and 24.9 days after treatments. In addition to testicular toxicity caused by the dye, the data clearly showed an increased frequency of sperm with abnormal morphology and decreased fertility. An increased amount of DNA damage was also detected in testis cells 16.6 and 24.9 days after treatments with 100 and 500 mg/kg. This study demonstrated the toxic and genotoxic effects of DR1, indicating the harmful activity of this dye on reproductive health.

  5. Genotoxic, Cytotoxic, Antigenotoxic, and Anticytotoxic Effects of Sulfonamide Chalcone Using the Ames Test and the Mouse Bone Marrow Micronucleus Test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Ribeiro E Silva

    Full Text Available Chalcones present several biological activities and sulfonamide chalcone derivatives have shown important biological applications, including antitumor activity. In this study, genotoxic, cytotoxic, antigenotoxic, and anticytotoxic activities of the sulfonamide chalcone N-{4-[3-(4-nitrophenylprop-2-enoyl]phenyl} benzenesulfonamide (CPN were assessed using the Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation test (Ames test and the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test. The results showed that CPN caused a small increase in the number of histidine revertant colonies in S. typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100, but not statistically significant (p > 0.05. The antimutagenicity test showed that CPN significantly decreased the number of His+ revertants in strain TA98 at all doses tested (p 0.05. Additionally, CPN co-administered with MMC significantly increased PCE/NCE ratio at all doses tested, demonstrating its anticytotoxic effect. In summary, CPN presented genotoxic, cytotoxic, antigenotoxic, and anticytotoxic properties.

  6. Genotoxicity of antiobesity drug orlistat and effect of caffeine intervention: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Manoswini; Ghosh, Ilika; Jana, Aditi; Ghosh, Manosij; Mukherjee, Anita

    2017-07-01

    Obesity is a major global health problem associated with various adverse effects. Pharmacological interventions are often necessary for the management of obesity. Orlistat is an FDA-approved antiobesity drug which is a potent inhibitor of intestinal lipases. In the current study, orlistat was evaluated for its genotoxic potential in human lymphocyte cells in vitro and was compared with that of another antiobesity drug sibutramine, presently withdrawn from market due its undesirable health effects. Caffeine intake may be an additional burden in people using anorectic drugs, therefore, further work is needed to be carried out to evaluate the possible effects of caffeine on orlistat-induced DNA damage. Human lymphocytes were exposed to orlistat (250, 500 and 1000 μg/ml), sibutramine (250, 500 and 1000 μg/ml) and caffeine (25, 50, 75, 100, 125 and 150 μg/ml) to assess their genotoxicity by comet assay in vitro. In addition, lymphocytes were co-incubated with caffeine (50, 75 and 100 μg/ml) and a single concentration of orlistat (250 μg/ml). Orlistat and sibutramine were genotoxic at all concentrations tested, sibutramine being more genotoxic. Caffeine was found to be genotoxic at concentrations 125 μg/ml and above. Co-treatment of orlistat with non-genotoxic concentrations (50, 75 and 100 μg/ml) of caffeine lead to a decrease in DNA damage. Orlistat can induce DNA damage in human lymphocytes in vitro and caffeine was found to reduce orlistat-induced genotoxicity.

  7. Fruit extract of the medicinal plant Crataegus oxyacantha exerts genotoxic and mutagenic effects in cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quadros, Ana Paula Oliveira; Mazzeo, Dania Elisa Christofoletti; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida; Perazzo, Fábio Ferreira; Rosa, Paulo Cesar Pires; Maistro, Edson Luis

    2017-01-01

    Crataegus oxyacantha, a plant of the Rosaceae family also known "English hawthorn, haw, maybush, or whitethorn," has long been used for medicinal purposes such as digestive disorders, hyperlipidemia, dyspnea, inducing diuresis, and preventing kidney stones. However, the predominant use of this plant has been to treat cardiovascular disorders. Due to a lack of studies on the genotoxicity of C. oxyacantha, this investigation was undertaken to determine whether its fruit extract exerts cytotoxic, genotoxic, or clastogenic/aneugenic effects in leukocytes and HepG2 (liver hepatocellular carcinoma) cultured human cells, or mutagenic effects in TA100 and TA98 strains of Salmonella typhimurium bacterium. Genotoxicity analysis showed that the extract produced no marked genotoxic effects at concentrations of 2.5 or 5 µg/ml in either cell type; however, at concentrations of 10 µg/ml or higher significant DNA damage was detected. The micronucleus test also demonstrated that concentrations of 10 µg/ml or higher produced clastogenic/aneugenic responses. In the Ames test, the extract induced mutagenic effects in TA98 strain of S. typhimurium with metabolic activation at all tested concentrations (2.5 to 500 µg/ml). Data indicate that, under certain experimental conditions, the fruit extract of C. oxyacantha exerts genotoxic and clastogenic/aneugenic effects in cultured human cells, and with metabolism mutagenicity occurs in bacteria cells.

  8. Assessment of genotoxicity and acute toxic effect of the imatinib mesylate in plant bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, Clemens; Filipič, Metka; Kundi, Michael; Rainer, Bernhard; Knasmueller, Siegfried; Mišík, Miroslav

    2014-11-01

    Imatinib mesylate (IM) is at present one of the most widely used cytostatic drugs in developed countries but information on its ecotoxicological activities is scarce. This article describes the results of the first investigation in which genotoxic and acute toxic properties of the drug were studied in higher plants. IM was tested in two widely used plant bioassays namely in micronucleus (MN) assays with meiotic tetrad cells of Tradescantia (clone #4430) and in mitotic root tip cells of Allium cepa. Additionally, acute toxic effects (inhibition of cell division and growth of roots) were monitored in the onions. Furthermore, we studied the impact of the drug on the fertility of higher plants in pollen abortion experiments with three wildlife species (Chelidonium majus, Tradescantia palludosa and Arabidopsis thaliana). In MN assays with Tradesacantia a significant effect was seen with doses ⩾10μM; the Allium MN assay was even more sensitive (LOEL⩾1.0μM). A significant decrease of the mitotic indices was detected at levels ⩾10μM in the onions and reduction of root growth with ⩾100μM. In the pollen fertility assays clear effects were observed at doses ⩾147.3mgkg(-1). Data concerning the annual use of the drug in European countries (France, Germany, Slovenia) enable the calculation of the predicted environmental concentration (PEC) values which are in the range between 3.3 and 5.0ngL(-1). Although comparisons with the genotoxic potencies of other commonly used cytostatic drugs and with highly active heavy metal compounds show that IM is an extremely potent genotoxin in higher plants, it is evident that the environmental concentrations are ⩾5 orders of magnitude lower as the levels which are required to cause adverse effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Genotoxic effects of the insecticide cypermethrin on the root meristem cells of sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inceer, Huseyin; Hayirlioglu-Ayaz, Sema; Ozcan, Melahat

    2009-11-01

    In this study, the genotoxic effects of the insecticide cypermethrin on the root meristem cells of sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L.) were investigated. The roots were treated with 10- 25- 50- and 100-ppm concentrations of cypermethrin for 6, 12 and 24 h. The mitotic index and mitotic abnormalities were determined in both control and test groups. The cypermethrin showed a marked mitodepressive action on mitosis. The types of mitotic abnormalities included disturbed metaphase, c-mitosis, stickiness, laggards and chromatid bridges. A pronounced toxic effect was observed at the 50-ppm concentration. Cypermethrin may have genotoxic effects on sunflowers.

  10. Assessment of genotoxic effects in nurses handling cytostatic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladeira, C; Viegas, S; Pádua, M; Gomes, M; Carolino, E; Gomes, M C; Brito, M

    2014-01-01

    Several antineoplastic drugs have been classified as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) on the basis of epidemiological findings, animal carcinogenicity data, and outcomes of in vitro genotoxicity studies. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), which is easily absorbed through the skin, is the most frequently used antineoplastic agent in Portuguese hospitals and therefore may be used as an indicator of surface contamination. The aims of the present investigation were to (1) examine surface contamination by 5-FU and (2) assess the genotoxic risk using cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in nurses from two Portuguese hospitals. The study consisted of 2 groups: 27 nurses occupationally exposed to cytostatic agents (cases) and 111 unexposed individuals (controls). Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were collected in order to measure micronuclei (MN) in both groups. Hospital B showed a higher numerical level of contamination but not significantly different from Hospital A. However; Hospital A presented the highest value of contamination and also a higher proportion of contaminated samples. The mean frequency of MN was significantly higher in exposed workers compared with controls. No significant differences were found among MN levels between the two hospitals. The analysis of confounding factors showed that age is a significant variable in MN frequency occurrence. Data suggest that there is a potential genotoxic damage related to occupational exposure to cytostatic drugs in oncology nurses.

  11. Protective Effects of Quercetin against Dimethoate-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Allium sativum Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Waseem; Shaikh, Sibhghatulla; Nazam, Nazia; Lone, Mohammad Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was directed to study the possible protective activity of quercetin-a natural antioxidant against dimethoate-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in meristematic cells of Allium sativum. So far there is no report on the biological properties of quercetin in plant test systems. Chromosome breaks, multipolar anaphase, stick chromosome, and mitotic activity were undertaken in the current study as markers of cyto- and genotoxicity. Untreated control, quercetin controls (@ 5, 10 and 20 μg/mL for 3 h), and dimethoate exposed groups (@ 100 and 200 μg/mL for 3 h) were maintained. For protection against cytogenotoxicity, the root tip cells treated with dimethoate at 100 and 200 μg/mL for 3 h and quercetin treatment at 5, 10, and 20 μg/mL for 16 h, prior to dimethoate treatment, were undertaken. Quercetin was found to be neither cytotoxic nor genotoxic in Allium sativum control at these doses. A significant increase (P < 0.05) in chromosomal aberrations was noted in dimethoate treated Allium. Pretreatment of Allium sativum with quercetin significantly (P < 0.05) reduced dimethoate-induced genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in meristematic cells, and these effects were dose dependent. In conclusion, quercetin has a protective role in the abatement of dimethoate-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in the meristematic cells of Allium sativum that resides, at least in part, on its antioxidant effects.

  12. Genotoxic, Cytotoxic, Antigenotoxic, and Anticytotoxic Effects of Sulfonamide Chalcone Using the Ames Test and the Mouse Bone Marrow Micronucleus Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Carolina Ribeiro E; Borges, Flávio Fernandes Veloso; Bernardes, Aline; Perez, Caridad Noda; Silva, Daniela de Melo E; Chen-Chen, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Chalcones present several biological activities and sulfonamide chalcone derivatives have shown important biological applications, including antitumor activity. In this study, genotoxic, cytotoxic, antigenotoxic, and anticytotoxic activities of the sulfonamide chalcone N-{4-[3-(4-nitrophenyl)prop-2-enoyl]phenyl} benzenesulfonamide (CPN) were assessed using the Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation test (Ames test) and the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test. The results showed that CPN caused a small increase in the number of histidine revertant colonies in S. typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100, but not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The antimutagenicity test showed that CPN significantly decreased the number of His+ revertants in strain TA98 at all doses tested (p micronucleus test indicated that CPN significantly increased the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCE) at 24 h and 48 h, revealing a genotoxic effect of this compound. Also, a significant decrease in polychromatic/normochromatic erythrocyte ratio (PCE/NCE) was observed at the higher doses of CPN at 24 h and 48 h (p tested at 24 h (p 0.05). Additionally, CPN co-administered with MMC significantly increased PCE/NCE ratio at all doses tested, demonstrating its anticytotoxic effect. In summary, CPN presented genotoxic, cytotoxic, antigenotoxic, and anticytotoxic properties.

  13. Genotoxic effect of Lythrum salicaria extract determined by the mussel micronucleus test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck-Varanka, Bettina; Kováts, Nóra; Hubai, Katalin; Paulovits, Gábor; Ferincz, Árpád; Horváth, Eszter

    2015-12-01

    A wide range of aquatic plants have been proven to release allelochemicals, of them phenolics and tannin are considered rather widely distributed. Tannins, however, have been demonstrated to have genotoxic capacity. In our study genotoxic potential of Lythrum salicaria L. (Purple Loosestrife, family Lythraceae) was assessed by the mussel micronucleus test, using Unio pictorum. In parallel, total and hydrolysable tannin contents were determined. Results clearly show that the extract had a high hydrolysable tannin content and significant mutagenic effect. As L. salicaria has been long used in traditional medicine for chronic diarrhoea, dysentery, leucorrhoea and blood-spitting, genotoxic potential of the plant should be evaluated not only with regard to potential effects in the aquatic ecosystem, but also assessing its safe use as a medicinal herb.

  14. Genotoxicity of drinking water treated with different disinfectants and effects of disinfection conditions detected by umu-test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xuebiao; Liu, Wenjun; Zhang, Liping; Liu, Qing

    2017-06-01

    The genotoxicity of drinking water treated with 6 disinfection methods and the effects of disinfection conditions were investigated using the umu-test. The pretreatment procedure of samples for the umu-test was optimized for drinking water analysis. The results of the umu-test were in good correlation with those of the Ames-test. The genotoxicity and production of haloacetic acids (HAAs) were the highest for chlorinated samples. UV+chloramination is the safest disinfection method from the aspects of genotoxicity, HAA production and inactivation effects. For chloramination, the effects of the mass ratio of Cl2 to N of chloramine on genotoxicity were also studied. The changes of genotoxicity were different from those of HAA production, which implied that HAA production cannot represent the genotoxic potential of water. The genotoxicity per chlorine decay of chlorination and chloramination had similar trends, indicating that the reaction of organic matters and chlorine made a great contribution to the genotoxicity. The results of this study are of engineering significance for optimizing the operation of waterworks. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. The cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of metalaxy-M on earthworms (Eisenia fetida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong; Zhu, Lusheng; Han, Yingnan; Wang, Jinhua; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Yan

    2014-10-01

    As the main optical isomer of metalaxyl, metalaxyl-M has been widely used worldwide in recent years because of its notable effect on the prevention and control of crop diseases. Together with the toxicity and degradation of metalaxyl-M, the chemical has attracted the attention of researchers. The present study examined the toxic effects of metalaxyl-M on earthworms at 0 mg kg(-1) , 0.1 mg kg(-1) , 1 mg kg(-1) , and 3 mg kg(-1) on days 7, 14, 21 and 28 after exposure. The results showed that metalaxyl-M could cause an obvious increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) when the concentration was higher than 0.1 mg kg(-1) , which led to lipid peroxidation in earthworms. Metalaxyl-M can induce DNA damage in earthworms, and the level of DNA damage markedly increased with increasing the concentration of metalaxyl-M. Metalaxyl-M also has a serious influence on the activities of antioxidant enzymes, which results in irreversible oxidative damage in cells. The changes of these indicators all indicated that metalaxyl-M may cause cytotoxic and genotoxic effects on earthworms. © 2014 SETAC.

  16. Analysis of the interaction of polycyclic aromatic compounds in a model organism: integration of genotoxic and histopathological effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Pereira

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to their toxicity, especially their carcinogenic potential, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are considered priority in biomonitoring programmes. Many of these compounds are listed through the European Water Framework Directive as priority pollutants. Benzo(bfluoranthene (B[b]F, considered potentially carcinogenic, and phenanthrene (Phe, non-carcinogenic, are two common PAHs in coastal waters and own distinct proprieties that are reflected in their mechanisms of toxicity. Still, their interaction effects onto the aquatic biota remain largely unknown. This work aimed to analyze the genotoxic effects caused by the interaction of B[b]F and Phe and their relation to histopathological alterations in the liver. The model organism was the seabass Dicentrarchus labrax, an important coastal species for fisheries and aquaculture. For the purpose, fish were injected with the two compounds (5 µg/g fish ww, isolated or in mixture, and incubated for 24h. The results only revealed minor clastogenic and aneugenic alterations, determined through erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities. On the other hand, the Comet assay showed significant DNA strand breakage in the individuals injected with B[b]F and the combination of the two compounds. On the contrary, Phe failed to cause significant genotoxic effects. Significant hepatic histopathological alterations were also found in animals injected with B[b]F, relating especially to inflammation-related responses. Overall, the results indicate no significant additive effect between B[b]F and Phe, under the current experimental conditions. Nonetheless, the seabass revealed to be sensitive to exposure to B[b]F (a higher molecular weight PAH, likely due to more efficient bioactivation of the pollutant (yielded genotoxic metabolites and reactive oxygen species, when compared to Phe. It is of paramount importance to understand the long-term interaction effects between PAHs under ecologically-relevant scenarios, since

  17. Genotoxic exposure and biological effects in the rubber manufacturing industry. Relevance of the dermal route

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, R.

    2001-01-01

    This thesis describes an industry wide survey on genotoxic exposure and biological effects in the rubber manifacturing industry. Chapters are devoted to long-term trends in inhalable and dermal contamination levels, identification of dermal exposure pathways and the assessment of mutagenic

  18. Use of RAPD “Fingerprinting” Technique to Detect Genotoxic Effects of Heavy Metals in Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Gjorgieva, Darinka; Kadifkova-Panovska, Tatjana; Baceva, Katerina; Stafilov, Trajče

    2012-01-01

    Detection of genotoxic effect using RAPD involves the comparison of profiles generated from control (unexposed) and treated (exposed) DNA. Events observed following the metal exposure were a variation in the disappearance and appearance of new bands. These unique bands clearly differentiated the samples exposed to heavy metal stress, and would be act as marker for assessment of environmental exposition of these metals.

  19. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of two hair dyes used in the formulation of black color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafurt-Cardona, Yaliana; Suares-Rocha, Paula; Fernandes, Thaís Cristina Casimiro; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2015-12-01

    According to the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), some hair dyes are considered mutagenic and carcinogenic in in vitro assays and exposed human populations. Epidemiological studies indicate that hairdressers occupationally exposed to hair dyes have a higher risk of developing bladder cancer. In Brazil, 26% of the adults use hair dye. In this study, we investigated the toxic effects of two hair dyes, Basic Red 51 (BR51) and Basic Brown 17 (BB17), which are temporary dyes of the azo group (R-N=N-R'), used in the composition of the black hair dye. To this end, MTT and trypan blue assays (cytotoxicity), comet and micronucleus assay (genotoxicity) were applied, with HepG2 cells. For cytotoxic assessment, dyes were tested in serial dilutions, being the highest concentrations those used in the commercial formula for hair dyes. For genotoxic assessment concentrations were selected according to cell viability. Results showed that both dyes induced significant cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in the cells, in concentrations much lower than those used in the commercial formula. Genotoxic effects could be related to the azo structure present in the composition of the dyes, which is known as mutagenic and carcinogenic. These results point to the hazard of the hair dye exposure to human health.

  20. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of abamectin, chlorfenapyr, and imidacloprid on CHOK1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sarar, Ali S; Abobakr, Yasser; Bayoumi, Alaa E; Hussein, Hamdy I

    2015-11-01

    The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of abamectin, chlorfenapyr, and imidacloprid have been evaluated on the Chinese hamster ovary (CHOK1) cells. Neutral red incorporation (NRI), total cellular protein content (TCP), and methyl tetrazolium (MTT) assays were followed to estimate the mid-point cytotoxicity values, NRI50, TCP50, and MTT50, respectively. The effects of the sublethal concentration (NRI25) on glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GRD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and total glutathione content have been evaluated in the presence and absence of reduced glutathione (GSH), vitamin C, and vitamin E. The genotoxicity was evaluated using chromosomal aberrations (CA), micronucleus (MN) formation, and DNA fragmentation techniques in the presence and absence of the metabolic activation system, S9 mix. Abamectin was the most cytotoxic pesticide followed by chlorfenapyr, while imidacloprid was the least cytotoxic one. The glutathione redox cycle components were altered by the tested pesticides in the absence and presence of the tested antioxidants. The results of genotoxicity indicate that abamectin, chlorfenapyr, and imidacloprid have potential genotoxic effects on CHOK1 cells under the experimental conditions.

  1. Genotoxic and histopathological biomarkers for assessing the effects of magnetic exfoliated vermiculite and exfoliated vermiculite in Danio rerio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cáceres-Vélez, Paolin Rocio; Fascineli, Maria Luiza; Koppe Grisolia, Cesar [Department of Genetics and Morphology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Brasília University, Brasília (Brazil); Oliveira Lima, Emília Celma de [Chemistry Institute, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia (Brazil); Sousa, Marcelo Henrique [Green Nanotechnology Group, Faculty of Ceilândia, Brasília University, Brasília (Brazil); Morais, Paulo César de [Physics Institute, Brasília University, Brasília (Brazil); Huazhong University of Science and Technology, School of Automation, Wuhan 430074 (China); Bentes de Azevedo, Ricardo, E-mail: razevedo@unb.br [Department of Genetics and Morphology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Brasília University, Brasília (Brazil)

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic exfoliated vermiculite is a synthetic nanocomposite that quickly and efficiently absorbs organic compounds such as oil from water bodies. It was developed primarily to mitigate pollution, but the possible adverse impacts of its application have not yet been evaluated. In this context, the acute toxicity of magnetic exfoliated vermiculite and exfoliated vermiculite was herein assessed by genotoxic and histopathological biomarkers in zebrafish (Danio rerio). DNA fragmentation was statistically significant for all groups exposed to the magnetic exfoliated vermiculite and for fish exposed to the highest concentration (200 mg/L) of exfoliated vermiculite, whereas the micronucleus frequency, nuclear abnormalities and histopathological alterations were not statistically significant for the fish exposed to these materials. In the intestinal lumen, epithelial cells and goblet cells, we found the presence of magnetic exfoliated vermiculite and exfoliated vermiculite, but no alterations or presence of the materials-test in the gills or liver were observed. Our findings suggest that the use of magnetic exfoliated vermiculite and exfoliated vermiculite during standard ecotoxicological assays caused DNA damage in D. rerio, whose alterations may be likely to be repaired, indicating that the magnetic nanoparticles have the ability to promote genotoxic damage, such as DNA fragmentation, but not mutagenic effects. - Highlights: • MEV is a synthetic nanocomposite that quickly and efficiently absorbs organic compounds such as oil from water bodies. • The use of MEV and EV during standard ecotoxicological assays caused DNA fragmentation in zebrafish. • The magnetic nanoparticles showed ability to promote genotoxic damage, but did not induce micronucleus in peripheral erythrocytes at 96 h of exposure. • The tested concentrations of MEV and EV do not cause significant histopathological alterations in the gills, liver and intestine of zebrafish.

  2. The effects of seasonal weather on the genotoxicity, cytokinetic properties, cytotoxicity and organochemical content of extracts of airborne particulates in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Segura, Ma Elena; Gómez-Arroyo, Sandra; Villalobos-Pietrini, Rafael; Butterworth, Frank M; Amador-Muñoz, Omar

    2004-03-14

    Extracted organic material (EOM) from PM10 airborne particles collected during three distinct seasons in Mexico City was assayed for genotoxicity, cytokinetic effects and cytotoxicity. Using sister chromatid exchange (SCE) for genotoxicity, replication index (RI) and mitotic index (MI) for cytokinetics, and microscopic evaluation (cell death) for cytotoxicity on human lymphocytes exposed to increasing concentrations of EOM, this study showed that the extent of genotoxic, cytokinetic, and cytotoxic change caused by pollutants depended at least in part on the seasonal weather. Bioactivated extracts of samplings in April (warm and dry), August (warm and rainy) and November (cool and dry) produced the highest rate of genotoxicity (SCE) in November and the lowest rate in April. Without bioactivation the rates were still highest in November but equally low in April and August. Thus, almost all of the genotoxic responses in the bioactivation experiments during these latter months were from promutagens. However, in November equally large amounts of mutagens and promutagens were present. Cytokinetics (RI and MI) showed steady decreases as the concentration of EOM was increased, independent of bioactivation and weather. Cytotoxicity (cell death) occurred when higher concentrations of EOM were used. EOM was the least cytotoxic in April and most cytotoxic in November. Bioactivation was not required for cytokinetic change and cytotoxicity, suggesting that the agents involved may be different from the genotoxic agents. Using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) it could be shown that the type of pollutant chemicals in the EOM also depended on the weather. In particular, all 15 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) studied were present in November EOM whereas four different PAH were absent in the other 2 months. Generally the amounts were less in the EOM collected in April and August. Conversely, nitro-PAH compounds were greater in number in April EOM but higher in

  3. Genotoxic effects in occupational exposure to formaldehyde: A study in anatomy and pathology laboratories and formaldehyde-resins production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viegas Susana

    2010-08-01

    cause of the observed genotoxic endpoint effects. The association of these cytogenetic effects with formaldehyde exposure gives important information to risk assessment process and may also be used to assess health risks for exposed workers.

  4. Safrole-2',3'-oxide induces cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in HepG2 cells and in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Su-yin; Lee, Pei-yi; Lai, Ming-tsung; Shen, Li-ching; Chung, Wen-sheng; Huang, Hui-fen; Wu, Kuen-yuh; Wu, Hsiu-ching

    2011-12-24

    Safrole-2',3'-oxide (SAFO) is a reactive electrophilic metabolite of the hepatocarcinogen safrole, the main component of sassafras oil. Safrole occurs naturally in a variety of spices and herbs, including the commonly used Chinese medicine Xi xin (Asari Radix et Rhizoma) and Dong quai (Angelica sinensis). SAFO is the most mutagenic metabolite of safrole tested in the Ames test. However, little or no data are available on the genotoxicity of SAFO in mammalian systems. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of SAFO in human HepG2 cells and male FVB mice. Using MTT assay, SAFO exhibited a dose- and time-dependent cytotoxic effect in HepG2 cells with TC(50) values of 361.9μM and 193.2μM after 24 and 48h exposure, respectively. In addition, treatment with SAFO at doses of 125μM and higher for 24h in HepG2 cells resulted in a 5.1-79.6-fold increase in mean Comet tail moment by the alkaline Comet assay and a 2.6-7.8-fold increase in the frequency of micronucleated binucleated cells by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. Furthermore, repeated intraperitoneal administration of SAFO (15, 30, 45, and 60mg/kg) to mice every other day for a total of twelve doses caused a significant dose-dependent increase in mean Comet tail moment in peripheral blood leukocytes (13.3-43.4-fold) and in the frequency of micronucleated reticulocytes (1.5-5.8-fold). Repeated administration of SAFO (60mg/kg) to mice caused liver lesions manifested as a rim of ballooning degeneration of hepatocytes immediately surrounding the central vein. Our data clearly demonstrate that SAFO significantly induced cytotoxicity, DNA strand breaks, micronuclei formation both in human cells in vitro and in mice. More studies are needed to explore the role SAFO plays in safrole-induced genotoxicity.

  5. Toxicopathic changes and genotoxic effects in liver of rat following exposure to diazinon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzi, Lobna; Haouas, Zohra; Salah, Imen Belhadj; Sakly, Amina; Grissa, Intissar; Chakroun, Sana; Kerkeni, Emna; Hassine, Mohsen; Mehdi, Meriem; Cheikh, Hassen Ben

    2016-06-01

    In general, people may come in contact with mixtures of insecticides through domestic use, consumption of contaminated food or drinks, and/or living close to treated areas. We analyzed the toxic effects of diazinon on histological structure of liver and hematological parameters in male rats. DNA-damaging potential of diazinon was also investigated using the comet assay in blood cells and the micronucleus test in bone marrow. Two groups of six male rats orally received different amounts of diazinon: 1/50 and 1/25 LD 50 for 4 weeks (5 day/week). The present study showed that diazinon caused hypertrophy of sinusoids, central vein, and portal triad, in addition to the formation of oedema, vacuoles, hemorrhage, necrosis, and lymphoid infiltration in rats' liver. A significant decrease in red blood cells, hemoglobin, hematocrite levels, and platelet counts was observed in the treated groups. However, the white blood cell count increased. Micronucleus test results revealed aneugenic effects of diazinon. Furthermore, we noticed an increase in comet tail length in treated groups. So, the comet assay confirmed the genotoxic potential of diazinon in vivo. On the assumption that all alterations observed in rats could be observed in human, it is necessary to raise the awareness about the health risk posed by this insecticide.

  6. Examination of genotoxic effects of fumagillin in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulić Milan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Fumagillin is an antibiotic derived from the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. It has been used successfully for the treatment of intestinal microsporidiosis in HIV-positive humans, as well as in those suffering from intestinal amebiasis and microsporidial keratoconjunctivitis. In veterinary medicine it is approved for the treatment of microsporidiosis in bees and fish. In this research fumagillin was tested for the ability to provoke chromosomal aberrations in mouse bone marrow cells. BALB/c mice were administered fumagillin by gastric probe in doses of 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg b.w. Water-sugary syrup was the negative and cyclophosphamide (15 mg/kg b.w. the positive control. Significantly increased frequencies (p<0.01 or p<0.001 of numerical chromosomal aberrations (aneuploidies and poliploidies was observed both in the medium (10 mg/kg b.w. and the highest (20 mg/kg b.w. dose of fumagillin. Structural chromosomal aberrations (gaps, breaks and insertions were noticeably more frequent in comparison to negative control only in the highest experimental dose of dycikloheksilamine. These results clearly showed that fumagillin in concetrations 10 and 20 mg/kg b.w. had a genotoxic potential in vivo.

  7. Genotoxic Effects of Culture Media on Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash Bangalore, Megha; Adhikarla, Syama; Mukherjee, Odity; Panicker, Mitradas M.

    2017-01-01

    Culture conditions play an important role in regulating the genomic integrity of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells (HPSCs). We report that HPSCs cultured in Essential 8 (E8) and mTeSR, two widely used media for feeder-free culturing of HPSCs, had many fold higher levels of ROS and higher mitochondrial potential than cells cultured in Knockout Serum Replacement containing media (KSR). HPSCs also exhibited increased levels of 8-hydroxyguanosine, phospho-histone-H2a.X and p53, as well as increased sensitivity to γ-irradiation in these two media. HPSCs in E8 and mTeSR had increased incidence of changes in their DNA sequence, indicating genotoxic stress, in addition to changes in nucleolar morphology and number. Addition of antioxidants to E8 and mTeSR provided only partial rescue. Our results suggest that it is essential to determine cellular ROS levels in addition to currently used criteria i.e. pluripotency markers, differentiation into all three germ layers and normal karyotype through multiple passages, in designing culture media. PMID:28176872

  8. Cytotoxic and Genotoxic effects of Arsenic and Lead on Human Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (AMSCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakoori, Ar; Ahmad, A

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic and lead, known to have genotoxic and mutagenic effects, are ubiquitously distributed in the environment. The presence of arsenic in drinking water has been a serious health problem in many countries. Human exposure to these metals has also increased due to rapid industrialization and their use in formulation of many products. Liposuction material is a rich source of stem cells. In the present study cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of these metals were tested on adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs). Cells were exposed to 1-10 μg/ml and 10-100 μg/ml concentration of arsenic and lead, respectively, for 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. The cytotoxic effects were measured by neutral red uptake assay, while the genotoxic effects were tested by comet assay. The growth of cells decreased with increasing concentration and the duration of exposure to arsenic. Even the morphology of cells was changed; they became round at 10 μg /ml of arsenic. The cell growth was also decreased after exposure to lead, though it proved to be less toxic when cells were exposed for longer duration. The cell morphology remained unchanged. DNA damage was observed in the metal treated cells. Different parameters of comet assay were investigated for control and treated cells which indicated more DNA damage in arsenic treated cells compared to that of lead. Intact nuclei were observed in control cells. Present study clearly demonstrates that both arsenic and lead have cytotoxic and genotoxic effects on AMSCs, though arsenic compared to lead has more deleterious effects on AMSCs.

  9. Cytotoxic and Genotoxic Effects of Arsenic and Lead on Human Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (AMSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakoori A

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic and lead, known to have genotoxic and mutagenic effects, are ubiquitously distributed in the environment. The presence of arsenic in drinking water has been a serious health problem in many countries. Human exposure to these metals has also increased due to rapid industrialization and their use in formulation of many products. Liposuction material is a rich source of stem cells. In the present study cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of these metals were tested on adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs. Cells were exposed to 1-10 µg/ml and 10-100 µg/ml concentration of arsenic and lead, respectively, for 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. The cytotoxic effects were measured by neutral red uptake assay, while the genotoxic effects were tested by comet assay. The growth of cells decreased with increasing concentration and the duration of exposure to arsenic. Even the morphology of cells was changed; they became round at 10 µg /ml of arsenic. The cell growth was also decreased after exposure to lead, though it proved to be less toxic when cells were exposed for longer duration. The cell morphology remained unchanged. DNA damage was observed in the metal treated cells. Different parameters of comet assay were investigated for control and treated cells which indicated more DNA damage in arsenic treated cells compared to that of lead. Intact nuclei were observed in control cells. Present study clearly demonstrates that both arsenic and lead have cytotoxic and genotoxic effects on AMSCs, though arsenic compared to lead has more deleterious effects on AMSCs.

  10. Genotoxic Effects of Superconducting Static Magnetic Fields (SMFs) on Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Pollen Mother Cells (PMCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pingping; Yin, Ruochun; Chen, Zhiyou; Wu, Lifang; Yu, Zengliang

    2007-04-01

    The effects of superconducting static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the pollen mother cells (PMCs) of wheat were investigated in order to evaluate the possible genotoxic effect of such non-ionizing radiation. The seeds of wheat were exposed to static magnetic fields with either different magnetic flux densities (0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 Tesla) for 5 h or different durations (1, 3 and 5 h) at a magnetic flux density of 7 Tesla. The seeds were germinated at 23oC after exposure and the seedlings were transplanted into the field. The PMCs from young wheat ears were taken and slides were made following the conventional method. The genotoxic effect was evaluated in terms of micronucleus (MN), chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome and fragments in PMCs. Although the exposed groups of a low field intensity (below 5 Tesla) showed no statistically significant difference in the aberration frequency compared with the unexposed control groups and sham exposed groups, a significant increase in the chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome, triple-polar segregation or micronucleus was observed at a field strength of 5 Tesla or 7 Tesla, respectively. The analysis of dose-effect relationships indicated that the increased frequency of meiotic abnormal cells correlated with the flux density of the magnetic field and duration, but no linear relationship was observed. Such statistically significant differences indicated a potential genotoxic effect of high static magnetic fields above 5 T.

  11. Oxidative and genotoxic effects of 900 MHz electromagnetic fields in the earthworm Eisenia fetida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkalec, Mirta; Stambuk, Anamaria; Srut, Maja; Malarić, Krešimir; Klobučar, Göran I V

    2013-04-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) can have various biological effects. In this study the oxidative and genotoxic effects were investigated in earthworms Eisenia fetida exposed in vivo to RF-EMF at the mobile phone frequency (900 MHz). Earthworms were exposed to the homogeneous RF-EMF at field levels of 10, 23, 41 and 120 V m(-1) for a period of 2h using a Gigahertz Transversal Electromagnetic (GTEM) cell. At the field level of 23 V m(-1) the effect of longer exposure (4h) and field modulation (80% AM 1 kHz sinusoidal) was investigated as well. All exposure treatments induced significant genotoxic effect in earthworms coelomocytes detected by the Comet assay, demonstrating DNA damaging capacity of 900 MHz electromagnetic radiation. Field modulation additionally increased the genotoxic effect. Moreover, our results indicated the induction of antioxidant stress response in terms of enhanced catalase and glutathione reductase activity as a result of the RF-EMF exposure, and demonstrated the generation of lipid and protein oxidative damage. Antioxidant responses and the potential of RF-EMF to induce damage to lipids, proteins and DNA differed depending on the field level applied, modulation of the field and duration of E. fetida exposure to 900 MHz electromagnetic radiation. Nature of detected DNA lesions and oxidative stress as the mechanism of action for the induction of DNA damage are discussed.

  12. Genotoxic Effects of Superconducting Static Magnetic Fields (SMFs) on Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Pollen Mother Cells (PMCs)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Pingping; YIN Ruochun; CHEN Zhiyou; WU Lifang; YU Zengliang

    2007-01-01

    The effects of superconducting static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the pollen mother cells (PMCs) of wheat were investigated in order to evaluate the possible genotoxic effect of such non-ionizing radiation.The seeds of wheat were exposed to static magnetic fields with either different magnetic flux densities (0,1,3,5 and 7 Tesla) for 5 h or different durations (1,3 and 5 h) at a magnetic flux density of 7 Tesla.The seeds were germinated at 23℃ after exposure and the seedlings were transplanted into the field.The PMCs from young wheat ears were taken and slides were made following the conventional method.The genotoxic effect was evaluated in terms of micronucleus (MN),chromosomal bridge,lagging chromosome and fragments in PMCs.Although the exposed groups of a low field intensity (below 5 Tesla) showed no statistically significant difference in the aberration frequency compared with the unexposed control groups and sham exposed groups,a significant increase in the chromosomal bridge,lagging chromosome,triple-polar segregation or micronucleus was observed at a field strength of 5 Tesla or 7 Tesla,respectively.The analysis of dose-effect relationships indicated that the increased frequency of meiotic abnormal cells correlated with the flux density of the magnetic field and duration,but no linear relationship was observed.Such statistically significant differences indicated a potential genotoxic effect of high static magnetic fields above 5 T.

  13. In vitro cytotoxic, genotoxic and antioxidant/oxidant effects of guaiazulene on human lymphocytes

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    Başak Toğar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate for the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and antioxidant/oxidant activity of GYZ on human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs. Guaiazulene (GYZ was added into culture tubes at various concentrations (0-400 µg/mL-1. Cytotoxicity against the human lymphocytes cultures was examined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release assay. The proliferative response was estimated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Antioxidant/oxidant activity was evaluated by measuring the total oxidant status (TOS and total antioxidant capacity (TAC levels. Micronucleus (MN and chromosomal aberration (CA tests were used in genotoxicity studies. The results showed that GYZ caused cytotoxicity in the PBLs at high concentrations, but TOS level were not affected, while the level of TAC was significantly increased. GYZ also did not induce chromosomal aberrations when compared to that of the control group. Results this study clearly revealed that GYZ was not genotoxic and also increased the capacity of the antioxidant in the culture of human PBL cells. This report is first report on the impact of GYZ on human PBL cells.

  14. The Combined Toxic and Genotoxic Effects of Cd and As to Plant Bioindicator Trifolium repens L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiani, Alessandra; Fumagalli, Pietro; Nguyen Van, Tho; Gentili, Rodolfo; Citterio, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate combined toxic and genotoxic effects of cadmium (Cd) and arsenic (As) on white clover, a pollutant sensitive plant frequently used as environmental bioindicator. Plants were exposed to soil spiked with increasing concentrations of cadmium sulfate (20, 40 and 60 mg Kg−1) or sodium arsenite (5, 10 and 20 mg Kg−1) as well as with their combinations. Metal(loid) bioavailability was assessed after soil contamination, whereas plant growth, metal(loid) concentration in plant organs and DNA damage were measured at the end of plant exposition. Results showed that individual and joint toxicity and genotoxicity were related to the concentration of Cd and As measured in plant organs, and that As concentration was the most relevant variable. Joint effects on plant growth were additive or synergistic, whereas joint genotoxic effects were additive or antagonistic. The interaction between Cd and As occurred at both soil and plant level. In soil the presence of As limited the bioavailability of Cd, whereas the presence of Cd increased the bioavailability of As. Nevertheless only As biovailability determined the amount of As absorbed by plants. The amount of Cd absorbed by plant was not linearly correlated with the fraction of bioavailable Cd in soil suggesting the involvement of additional factors, such as plant uptake mechanisms. These results reveal that the simultaneous presence in soil of Cd and As, although producing an additive or synergistic toxic effect on Trifolium repens L. growth, generates a lower DNA damage. PMID:24914541

  15. The combined toxic and genotoxic effects of Cd and As to plant bioindicator Trifolium repens L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ghiani

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to investigate combined toxic and genotoxic effects of cadmium (Cd and arsenic (As on white clover, a pollutant sensitive plant frequently used as environmental bioindicator. Plants were exposed to soil spiked with increasing concentrations of cadmium sulfate (20, 40 and 60 mg Kg-1 or sodium arsenite (5, 10 and 20 mg Kg-1 as well as with their combinations. Metal(loid bioavailability was assessed after soil contamination, whereas plant growth, metal(loid concentration in plant organs and DNA damage were measured at the end of plant exposition. Results showed that individual and joint toxicity and genotoxicity were related to the concentration of Cd and As measured in plant organs, and that As concentration was the most relevant variable. Joint effects on plant growth were additive or synergistic, whereas joint genotoxic effects were additive or antagonistic. The interaction between Cd and As occurred at both soil and plant level. In soil the presence of As limited the bioavailability of Cd, whereas the presence of Cd increased the bioavailability of As. Nevertheless only As biovailability determined the amount of As absorbed by plants. The amount of Cd absorbed by plant was not linearly correlated with the fraction of bioavailable Cd in soil suggesting the involvement of additional factors, such as plant uptake mechanisms. These results reveal that the simultaneous presence in soil of Cd and As, although producing an additive or synergistic toxic effect on Trifolium repens L. growth, generates a lower DNA damage.

  16. Determining oxidative and non-oxidative genotoxic effects driven by estuarine sediment contaminants on a human hepatoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, M; Costa, P M; Louro, H; Costa, M H; Lavinha, J; Caeiro, S; Silva, M J

    2014-04-15

    Estuarine sediments may be reservoirs of hydrophilic and hydrophobic pollutants, many of which are acknowledged genotoxicants, pro-mutagens and even potential carcinogens for humans. Still, studies aiming at narrowing the gap between ecological and human health risk of sediment-bound contaminant mixtures are scarce. Taking an impacted estuary as a case study (the Sado, SW Portugal), HepG2 (human hepatoma) cells were exposed in vitro for 48 h to extracts of sediments collected from two areas (urban/industrial and Triverine/agricultural), both contaminated by distinct mixtures of organic and inorganic toxicants, among which are found priority mutagens such as benzo[a]pyrene. Comparatively to a control test, extracts of sediments from both impacted areas produced deleterious effects in a dose-response manner. However, sediment extracts from the industrial area caused lower replication index plus higher cytotoxicity and genotoxicity (concerning total DNA strand breakage and clastogenesis), with emphasis on micronucleus induction. On the other hand, extracts from the rural area induced the highest oxidative damage to DNA, as revealed by the FPG (formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase) enzyme in the Comet assay. Although the estuary, on its whole, has been classified as moderately contaminated, the results suggest that the sediments from the industrial area are significantly genotoxic and, furthermore, elicit permanent chromosome damage, thus potentially being more mutagenic than those from the rural area. The results are consistent with contamination by pro-mutagens like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), potentiated by metals. The sediments from the agriculture-influenced area likely owe their genotoxic effects to metals and other toxicants, probably pesticides and fertilizers, and able to induce reactive oxygen species without the formation of DNA strand breakage. The findings suggest that the mixtures of contaminants present in the assayed sediments are genotoxic

  17. Role of Zucchini and Its Distinctive Components in the Modulation of Degenerative Processes: Genotoxicity, Anti-Genotoxicity, Cytotoxicity and Apoptotic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Valdivieso, Damián; Font, Rafael; Fernández-Bedmar, Zahira; Merinas-Amo, Tania; Gómez, Pedro; Alonso-Moraga, Ángeles; Del Río-Celestino, Mercedes

    2017-07-14

    Zucchini (Cucurbita pepo subsp. pepo) is a seasonal vegetable with high nutritional and medical values. Many useful properties of this fruit are attributed to bioactive compounds. Zucchini fruits ("Yellow" and "Light Green" varieties) and four distinctive components (lutein, β-carotene, zeaxanthin and dehydroascorbic acid) were selected. Firstly, the lutein, β-carotene, zeaxanthin and dehydroascorbic acid contents were determined in these fruits. Then, in order to evaluate the safety and suitability of their use, different assays were carried out: (i) genotoxicity and anti-genotoxicity tests to determine the safety and DNA-protection against hydrogen peroxide; (ii) cytotoxicity; and (iii) DNA fragmentation and Annexin V/PI (Propidium Iodide) assays to evaluate the pro-apoptotic effect. Results showed that: (i) all the substances were non-genotoxic; (ii) all the substances were anti-genotoxic except the highest concentration of lutein; (iii) "Yellow" zucchini epicarp and mesocarp exhibited the highest cytotoxic activity (IC50 > 0.1 mg/mL and 0.2 mg/mL, respectively); and (iv) "Light Green" zucchini skin induced internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, β-carotene being the possible molecule responsible for its pro-apoptotic activity. To sum up, zucchini fruit could play a positive role in human health and nutrition due to this fruit and its components were safe, able to inhibit significantly the H₂O₂-induced damage and exhibit anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities toward HL60 (human promyelocytic leukemia cells) tumor cells. The information generated from this research should be considered when selecting potential accessions for breeding program purposes.

  18. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity caused by yttrium oxide nanoparticles in HEK293 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj V

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Vellaisamy Selvaraj,1 Sravanthi Bodapati,1 Elizabeth Murray,2 Kevin M Rice,1 Nicole Winston,1,3 Tolou Shokuhfar,4 Yu Zhao,4 Eric Blough1,3,5 1Center for Diagnostic Nanosystems, 2Department of Integrated Science and Technology, 3Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Research, School of Pharmacy, Marshall University, Huntington, WV, USA; 4Department of Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI, USA; 5Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Toxicology, School of Medicine, Marshall University, Huntington, WV, USA Background: The increased use of engineered nanoparticles (NPs has caused new concerns about the potential exposure to biological systems and the potential risk that these materials may pose on human health. Here, we examined the effects of exposure to different concentrations (0–50 µg/mL and incubation times (10 hours, 24 hours, or 48 hours of yttrium oxide (Y2O3 NPs on human embryonic kidney (HEK293 cells. Changes in cellular morphology, cell viability, cell membrane integrity, reactive oxygen species levels, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell death (apoptosis and necrosis, and the DNA damage after NP exposure were compared to the effects seen following incubation with paraquat, a known toxicant. Results: The 24-hour inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50 of Y2O3 NPs (41±5 nm in size in the HEK293 cells was found to be 108 µg/mL. Incubation with Y2O3 NPs (12.25–50 µg/mL increased the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, caspase-3 expression and promoted apoptotic- and necrotic-mediated cell death in both a concentration and a time-dependent manner. Decreases in cell survivability were associated with elevations in cellular reactive oxygen species levels, increased mitochondrial membrane permeability, and evidence of DNA damage, which were consistent with the possibility that mitochondria impairment may play an important role in the cytotoxic response. Conclusion: These data demonstrate

  19. Can Genotoxic Effect be Model Dependent in Allium Test?-An Evidence

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    Hemant Singh Rathore

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Genotoxicity of peracetic acid (PAA has been assessed in two models (protocols of Allium cepa conducting two sets of experiments to know whether the results would be model dependent. One experiment was set as per Fiskesjo's model in which Allium cepa bulbs were grown in five concentrations of peracetic acid (0.039, 0.078, 0.156, 0.312 and 0.625 ppm in tap water. Another experiment was set as per Rank and Nielson's model in which Allium cepa bulbs were first grown in tap water for 24 hours and were then further grown in the same concentrations of peracetic acid as in earlier model. Genotoxic effects of peracetic acid were assessed in both models using usual parameters i.e. shape, colour and length of root tips, mitotic index, chromosomal aberrations and cell death. Magnitude of effect differed significantly in both models. More severe genotoxic effects could be seen in Fiskesjo's model. It is suggested that root primordial cells were in G0 state in Fiskesjo's model, which presumably lacked their defense system, hence were more prone to peracetic acid toxicity. Mitotically dividing root cells in Rank and Nielsen's model were equipped with antioxidant system and were more resistant to peracetic acid

  20. Evaluation of Hypoglycemic and Genotoxic Effect of Polyphenolic Bark Extract from Quercus sideroxyla

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    Marcela Soto-García

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quercus sideroxyla is a wood species whose bark has phenolic compound and should be considered to be bioactive; the hypoglycemic and genotoxic properties of Q. sideroxyla bark were evaluated in this study. Total phenolic compound was determined in crude extract (CE and organic extract (OE. The OE has the highest amount of phenols (724.1±12.0 GAE/g. Besides, both CE and OE demonstrated effect over the inhibition of α-amylase in vitro. Hypoglycemic activity was assessed by glucose tolerance curve and the area under curve (UAC; OE showed the highest hypoglycemic activity. In addition, diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (65 mg/kg and the extracts (50 mg/kg were administered for 10 days; OE showed hypoglycemic effect compared with diabetic control and decreased hepatic lipid peroxidation. Acute toxicity and genotoxicity were evaluated in CE; results of acute toxicity did not show any mortality. Besides, the comet assay showed that CE at a dose of 100 mg/kg did not show any genotoxic effect when evaluated at 24 h, whereas it induced slight damage at 200 mg/kg, with the formation of type 1 comets.

  1. Effect of recombinant human erythropoietin on mitomycin C-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in rat kidney and heart tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rjiba-Touati, K; Ayed-Boussema, I; Guedri, Y; Achour, A; Bacha, H; Abid-Essefi, S

    2016-01-01

    Mitomycin C (MMC) is an antineoplastic agent used for the treatment of several human malignancies. Nevertheless, the prolonged use of the drug may result in a serious heart and kidney injuries. Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) has recently been shown to exert an important cytoprotective effect in experimental brain injury and ischemic acute renal failure. The aim of the present work is to investigate the cardioprotective and renoprotective effects of rhEPO against MMC-induced oxidative damage and genotoxicity. Our results showed that MMC induced oxidative stress and DNA damage. rhEPO administration in any treatment conditions decreased oxidative damage induced by MMC. It reduced malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels. rhEPO ameliorated reduced glutathione plus oxidized glutathione modulation and the increased catalase activity after MMC treatment. Furthermore, rhEPO restored DNA damage caused by MMC. We concluded that rhEPO administration especially in pretreatment condition protected rats against MMC-induced heart and renal oxidative stress and genotoxicity.

  2. Natural Antioxidants Against Arsenic-Induced Genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Munesh; Lalit, Minakshi; Thakur, Rajesh

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic is present in water, soil, and air in organic as well as in inorganic forms. However, inorganic arsenic is more toxic than organic and can cause many diseases including cancers in humans. Its genotoxic effect is considered as one of its carcinogenic actions. Arsenic can cause DNA strand breaks, deletion mutations, micronuclei formation, DNA-protein cross-linking, sister chromatid exchange, and DNA repair inhibition. Evidences indicate that arsenic causes DNA damage by generation of reactive free radicals. Nutritional supplementation of antioxidants has been proven highly beneficial against arsenic genotoxicity in experimental animals. Recent studies suggest that antioxidants protect mainly by reducing excess free radicals via restoring the activities of cellular enzymatic as well as non-enzymatic antioxidants and decreasing the oxidation processes such as lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent literature on arsenic-induced genotoxicity and its mitigation by naturally derived antioxidants in various biological systems.

  3. Genotoxic effects of linear alkyl benzene sulfonate, sodium pentachlorophenate and dichromate on Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y; Shen, Y

    1992-01-01

    DNA in macro- and micronuclei of Tetrahymena pyriformis treated with linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) and sodium pentachlorophenate (PCP-Na) were determined by microspectrophotometry. The effects on rate of formation of macronuclear DNA extrusion bodies were also studied. We found DNA content of micronuclei in 0.14 ppm LAS and 0.9 ppb PCP-Na was lower than in that of the control, and LAS was able to increase the formation rate of macronuclear DNA extrusion bodies (the formation rate was 54% in 11.3 ppm LAS and 25.6% in 16.7 ppm dichromate). We concluded that 0.14 ppm LAS (below the maximum acceptable toxicant concentration) was genotoxic, whereas 0.014 ppm LAS was not. Dichromate 0.05 ppm and 0.9 ppb PCP-Na, equal to and below the maximum acceptable toxicant concentration, respectively, were potentially genotoxic.

  4. Genotoxicity Induced by Foetal and Infant Exposure to Magnetic Fields and Modulation of Ionising Radiation Effects.

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    Ion Udroiu

    Full Text Available Few studies have investigated the toxicity and genotoxicity of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF during prenatal and neonatal development. These phases of life are characterized by cell proliferation and differentiation, which might make them sensitive to environmental stressors. Although in vitro evidences suggest that ELF-MF may modify the effects of ionizing radiation, no research has been conducted so far in vivo on the genotoxic effects of ELF-MF combined with X-rays.Aim of this study was to investigate in somatic and germ cells the effects of chronic ELF-MF exposure from mid gestation until weaning, and any possible modulation produced by ELF-MF exposure on ionizing radiation-induced damage. Mice were exposed to 50 Hz, 65 μT magnetic field, 24 hours/day, for a total of 30 days, starting from 12 days post-conception. Another group was irradiated with 1 Gy X-rays immediately before ELF-MF exposure, other groups were only X-irradiated or sham-exposed. Micronucleus test on blood erythrocytes was performed at multiple times from 1 to 140 days after birth. Additionally, 42 days after birth, genotoxic and cytotoxic effects on male germ cells were assessed by comet assay and flow cytometric analysis.ELF-MF exposure had no teratogenic effect and did not affect survival, growth and development. The micronucleus test indicated that ELF-MF induced a slight genotoxic damage only after the maximum exposure time and that this effect faded away in the months following the end of exposure. ELF-MF had no effects on ionizing radiation (IR-induced genotoxicity in erythrocytes. Differently, ELF-MF appeared to modulate the response of male germ cells to X-rays with an impact on proliferation/differentiation processes. These results point to the importance of tissue specificity and development on the impact of ELF-MF on the early stages of life and indicate the need of further research on the molecular mechanisms underlying ELF-MF biological

  5. Genotoxic and mutagenic effects of lipid-coated CdSe/ZnS quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Mélanie; Di Giorgio, Carole; Berque-Bestel, Isabelle; Aime, Ahissan; Pichon, Benoit P; Jammes, Yves; Barthélémy, Philippe; De Méo, Michel

    2013-01-20

    We proposed to evaluate the genotoxicity and mutagenicity of a new quantum dots (QDs) nanoplatform (QDsN), consisting of CdSe/ZnS core-shell QDs encapsulated by a natural fusogenic lipid (1,2-di-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC)) and functionalized by a nucleolipid N-[5'-(2',3'-di-oleoyl) uridine]-N',N',N'-trimethylammoniumtosylate (DOTAU). This QDs nanoplatform may represent a new therapeutic tool for the diagnosis and treatment of human cancers. The genotoxic, mutagenic and clastogenic effects of QDsN were compared to those of cadmium chloride (CdCl(2)). Three assays were used: (1) the Salmonella/microsome assay with four tester strains, (2) the comet assay and (3) the micronucleus test on CHO cells. The contribution of simulated sunlight was studied in the three assays while oxidative events were only explored in the comet assay in aliquots pretreated with the antioxidant l-ergothioneine. We found that QDsN could enter CHO-K1 cells and accumulate in cytoplasmic vesicles. It was not mutagenic in the Salmonella/mutagenicity test whereas CdCl(2) was weakly positive. In the dark, both the QDsN and CdCl(2) similarly induced dose-dependent increases in single-strand breaks and micronuclei. Exposure to simulated sunlight significantly potentiated the genotoxic activities of both QDsN and CdCl(2), but did not significantly increase micronucleus frequencies. l-Ergothioneine significantly reduced but did not completely suppress the DNA-damaging activity of QDsN and CdCl(2). The present results clearly point to the genotoxic properties and the risk of long-term adverse effects of such a nanoplatform if used for human anticancer therapy and diagnosis in the future.

  6. Genotoxic Effects of Tobacco on Buccal Epithelium: Cell Nuclear Anomalies as Biomarker

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    Sohini Das Biswas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tobacco use has toxic effects on different organs. This study was carried out to assess the effect of indigenous tobacco both in smoking (bidi and smokeless (gutkha, zarda and khaini forms on buccal cells at chromosomal level, through assessment of different nuclear anomalies as biomarker. Methods:This study was done on people living in Durgapur and its adjacent areas, West Bengal, India during January to July 2011. The samples were collected from 50 smokers (case group, 50 smokeless tobacco consumers or chewers (case group and 50 non-tobacco consumers (control group. Micronucleus assay was used to assess buccal cell nuclear changes. Buccal smears collected from study subjects were prepared on a grease free slide. Prepared slides were observed under light microscope and 2 to 5 fields were observed randomly for counting the different anomalies. In each field, the frequency of each anomaly was assessed in 100 cells and reported with percentage. Results:Chewers had significantly the highest frequency of all nuclear anomalies compared to smokers and healthy controls (HCs. Smokers also had significantly more anomalies compared to HCs. Condensed chromatin (CC, karyolysis (KL and bi-nucleation (BN in chewers and CC, pyknosis and BN in smokers were the most frequent anomalies. KL was significantly more frequent in chewers compared to smokers (59.8 ± 6.4 vs. 24.2 ± 12.4%, P < 0.001, however, the frequency of other nuclear anomalies were not significantly different in these two study groups. Presence of each nuclear anomaly was significantly greater in older ages in all study groups. Conclusion:Tobacco can cause and increase the rate of nuclear anomalies in both smoking and smokeless forms compared to HCs. The genotoxic effects of tobacco on buccal cells are partly age-related. Cell nuclear anomalies in buccal tissue can be used as biomarker indicating the detrimental effects of tobacco.

  7. Genotoxic Effect in Autoimmune Diseases Evaluated by the Micronucleus Test Assay: Our Experience and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Bugarín, Olivia; Macriz Romero, Nicole; Ramos Ibarra, María Luisa; Flores-García, Aurelio; Valdez Aburto, Penélope; Zavala-Cerna, María Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AD) are classified into organ-specific, systemic, and mixed; all forms of AD share a high risk for cancer development. In AD a destructive immune response induced by autoreactive lymphocytes is started and continues with the production of autoantibodies against different targets; furthermore apoptosis failure and loss of balance in oxidative stress as a consequence of local or systemic inflammation are common features seen in AD as well. Micronucleus (MN) assay can be performed in order to evaluate loss of genetic material in a clear, accurate, fast, simple, and minimally invasive test. The MN formation in the cytoplasm of cells that have undergone proliferation is a consequence of DNA fragmentation during mitosis and the appearance of small additional nuclei during interphase. The MN test, widely accepted for in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity research, provides a sensitive marker of genomic damage associated to diverse conditions. In here, we present a review of our work and other published papers concerning genotoxic effect in AD, identified by means of the MN assay, with the aim of proposing this tool as a possible early biomarker for genotoxic damage, which is a consequence of disease progression. Additionally this biomarker could be used for follow-up, to asses genome damage associated to therapies. PMID:26339592

  8. Genotoxic Effect in Autoimmune Diseases Evaluated by the Micronucleus Test Assay: Our Experience and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Torres-Bugarín

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (AD are classified into organ-specific, systemic, and mixed; all forms of AD share a high risk for cancer development. In AD a destructive immune response induced by autoreactive lymphocytes is started and continues with the production of autoantibodies against different targets; furthermore apoptosis failure and loss of balance in oxidative stress as a consequence of local or systemic inflammation are common features seen in AD as well. Micronucleus (MN assay can be performed in order to evaluate loss of genetic material in a clear, accurate, fast, simple, and minimally invasive test. The MN formation in the cytoplasm of cells that have undergone proliferation is a consequence of DNA fragmentation during mitosis and the appearance of small additional nuclei during interphase. The MN test, widely accepted for in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity research, provides a sensitive marker of genomic damage associated to diverse conditions. In here, we present a review of our work and other published papers concerning genotoxic effect in AD, identified by means of the MN assay, with the aim of proposing this tool as a possible early biomarker for genotoxic damage, which is a consequence of disease progression. Additionally this biomarker could be used for follow-up, to asses genome damage associated to therapies.

  9. Genotoxic Effect in Autoimmune Diseases Evaluated by the Micronucleus Test Assay: Our Experience and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Bugarín, Olivia; Macriz Romero, Nicole; Ramos Ibarra, María Luisa; Flores-García, Aurelio; Valdez Aburto, Penélope; Zavala-Cerna, María Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AD) are classified into organ-specific, systemic, and mixed; all forms of AD share a high risk for cancer development. In AD a destructive immune response induced by autoreactive lymphocytes is started and continues with the production of autoantibodies against different targets; furthermore apoptosis failure and loss of balance in oxidative stress as a consequence of local or systemic inflammation are common features seen in AD as well. Micronucleus (MN) assay can be performed in order to evaluate loss of genetic material in a clear, accurate, fast, simple, and minimally invasive test. The MN formation in the cytoplasm of cells that have undergone proliferation is a consequence of DNA fragmentation during mitosis and the appearance of small additional nuclei during interphase. The MN test, widely accepted for in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity research, provides a sensitive marker of genomic damage associated to diverse conditions. In here, we present a review of our work and other published papers concerning genotoxic effect in AD, identified by means of the MN assay, with the aim of proposing this tool as a possible early biomarker for genotoxic damage, which is a consequence of disease progression. Additionally this biomarker could be used for follow-up, to asses genome damage associated to therapies.

  10. Investigating the embryo/larval toxic and genotoxic effects of {gamma} irradiation on zebrafish eggs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, O., E-mail: olivier.simon@irsn.fr [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et d' Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat 186, BP3, 13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Massarin, S. [Laboratoire de Modelisation Environnementale, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat 159, BP3, 13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Coppin, F. [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et d' Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat 186, BP3, 13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Hinton, T.G. [Service d' Etude du Comportement des Radionucleides dans les Ecosystemes, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat 159, BP3, 13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Gilbin, R. [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et d' Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat 186, BP3, 13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2011-11-15

    Eggs/larval of freshwater fish (Danio rerio) were exposed to low dose rates of external gamma radiation (from 1 to 1000 mGy d{sup -1}) over a 20-day period, with the objective of testing the appropriateness of the 10 mGy d{sup -1} guideline suggested by the IAEA. The present study examines different endpoints, mortality and hatching time and success of embryos as well as the genotoxicity of {gamma}-irradiations (after 48 h). The 20-day embryo-larval bioassay showed an enhanced larval resistance to starvation after chronic exposure to {gamma} irradiation (from low 1 mGy d{sup -1} to high dose rate 1000 mGy d{sup -1}) and an acceleration in hatching time. Gamma irradiation led to increased genotoxic damage Ito zebrafish egg (40-50% DNA in tail in Comet assay) from the lowest dose rate (1 mGy d{sup -1}). Possible mechanisms of {gamma} radiotoxicity and implications for radioprotection are discussed. - Highlights: > Relevant information on the {gamma} radiation impact on early life stage biota is scarce. > The eggs of zebrafish Danio rerio were selected as biological model. > We test the appropriateness of the 10 mGy d{sup -1} guideline (IAEA). > We observed effects measured at individual levels (starvation, hatching time). > Chronic gamma irradiation led to increased genotoxic damage to zebrafish egg. > {gamma} radiotoxicity mechanisms and implications for radioprotection are discussed.

  11. Investigation of co-genotoxic effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschaeve, L; Heikkinen, P; Verheyen, G; Van Gorp, U; Boonen, F; Vander Plaetse, F; Maes, A; Kumlin, T; Mäki-Paakkanen, J; Puranen, L; Juutilainen, J

    2006-05-01

    We investigated the possible combined genotoxic effects of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (900 MHz, amplitude modulated at 217 Hz, mobile phone signal) with the drinking water mutagen and carcinogen 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX). Female rats were exposed to RF fields for a period of 2 years for 2 h per day, 5 days per week at average whole-body specific absorption rates of 0.3 or 0.9 W/kg. MX was given in the drinking water at a concentration of 19 microg/ml. Blood samples were taken at 3, 6 and 24 months of exposure and brain and liver samples were taken at the end of the study (24 months). DNA damage was assessed in all samples using the alkaline comet assay, and micronuclei were determined in erythrocytes. We did not find significant genotoxic activity of MX in blood and liver cells. However, MX induced DNA damage in rat brain. Co-exposures to MX and RF radiation did not significantly increase the response of blood, liver and brain cells compared to MX exposure only. In conclusion, this 2-year animal study involving long-term exposures to RF radiation and MX did not provide any evidence for enhanced genotoxicity in rats exposed to RF radiation.

  12. Evaluation of genotoxic effect of silver nanoparticles (Ag-Nps) in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, Priscila; Balbinot, Fernanda; Martins de Oliveira, Hugo; Elibio Fagundes, Gabriela [PPGCS, Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Laboratorio de Biologia Celular e Molecular (Brazil); Venancio, Mireli; Vieira Ronconi, Joao Vitor; Merlini, Aline [Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Laboratorio de Sintese de Complexos Multifuncionais (Brazil); Streck, Emilio L. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias da Saude, Unidade Academica de Ciencias da Saude, Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Laboratorio de Fisiopatologia Experimental (Brazil); Marques da Silva, Paula [Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Laboratorio de Sintese de Complexos Multifuncionais (Brazil); Moraes de Andrade, Vanessa, E-mail: vmoraesdeandrade@yahoo.com.br [PPGCS, Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Laboratorio de Biologia Celular e Molecular (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) are the most prominent nanoproducts. Due to their antimicrobial activity, they have been incorporated in different materials, such as catheters, clothes, electric home appliance, and many others. The genotoxicity of Ag-NPs (5-45 nm), in different concentrations and times of exposure, was evaluated by the comet assay in in vitro and in vivo conditions, respectively, using human peripheral blood and Swiss mice. The results showed the genotoxic effect of Ag-NPs in vitro, in all the doses tested in the initial hour of exposure, possibly through the reactive oxygen species generation. Nevertheless, the values for this damage decrease with time, indicating that the DNA may have been restored by the repair system. In the in vivo conditions, we found no genotoxicity of Ag-NPs in any hour of exposure and any dose investigated, which can be attributed to the activation of a cellular antioxidant network and the hydrophobic nature of Ag-NPs. Now, it is absolutely necessary to investigate the role of Ag-NPs in different cell lines in vivo.

  13. Genotoxic and enzymatic effects of fluoranthene in microsomes and freshly isolated hepatocytes from sole (Solea solea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, N; Ménard, D; Pichavant-Rafini, K; Ollivier, H; Le Goff, J; Burgeot, T; Akcha, F

    2012-02-01

    The fluoranthene (Fluo) is one of the most abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in human food and in marine compartments. However, the existing data on its genotoxicity is poor and controversial. The aim of this study was to assess in vitro the potential genotoxicity of Fluo in sole and its possible effect on CYP450 modulation. Freshly isolated hepatocytes were exposed for 24 h to a range of Fluo concentrations from 0.5 to 50 μM in both culture flasks and microplate wells. The ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity was measured as an indicator of the activity of the cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1). The genotoxic effects were evaluated by measuring both DNA strand breaks and DNA adducts by the alkaline comet assay and the postlabeling technique respectively. Calf thymus DNA was also exposed to Fluo in the presence of sole liver microsomes in order to check for Fluo DNA adduct formation. In sole hepatocytes, Fluo was shown to induce a decrease in the EROD activity in a concentration-dependent manner. A significant genotoxic effect was observed in terms of DNA strand breakage from an exposure concentration of 5 μM: despite a concentration-dependent effect was observed, it did not follow a linear dose-response. The response was similar whatever the way of exposure in flasks or in wells. One reproducible adduct was detected in the hepatocytes exposed to the highest concentrations of Fluo. The formation of Fluo adducts was confirmed by the detection of one reproducible adduct following in vitro exposure of calf thymus DNA to 100 and 200 μM of Fluo in the presence of sole microsomes. These results demonstrate the potential of sole hepatocytes to metabolize Fluo in 24 h into reactive species, able to induce genotoxicity by DNA strand breakage and DNA adduct formation. Moreover, a miniaturized cell exposure system was validated for further experiments using fewer amounts of hepatocytes and contaminants, and allowing exposure to PAH metabolites. Copyright

  14. Genotoxic Effect of Atrazine, Arsenic, Cadmium and Nitrate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 655 W. Baltimore Street, ... Estrogen caused whole cell damage but not flow karyotype damage in. MCF-7. ...... evaluation of arsenic trioxide toxicity in Sprague.

  15. The modulating effect of melatonin against the genotoxicity of lead acetate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia Demerdash Abd El-Monem

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Lead represents a significant ecological and public health concern due to its toxicity and its ability to accumulate in living organisms. The present investigation was designated to assess the modulating effect of melatonin (MLT against lead acetate (LA genotoxicity. Three cytogenetic end points were considered: the frequencies of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocyte cells (MnPCEs in the bone marrow, the chromosomal aberration in the primary spermatocytes and the frequency of sperm abnormalities. Male mice were used in this experiment; animals were divided into 8 groups of 6 animals each. First group received an oral gavage of solvent (4% ethanol and served as control and the other groups received an oral gavage of MLT (10 mg/kg and/or 10, 50, 100 mg/kg body weight of lead acetate for 11 days. Mice were scarified 24 h after the last treatment. Examination and analysis of MnPCEs and meiotic metaphases showed no mutagenic effect of melatonin. Meanwhile LA induced a significant (P < 0.01 increase in the three end points used in this investigation. Results showed that melatonin caused a significant reduction in MnPCEs and chromosomal aberrations in meiotic cells. PCE/NCE ratios in bone marrow also increased in relation to melatonin and LA treatments. Moreover, melatonin decreased the % of sperm abnormality by 28.3%. The data obtained in this study suggest that melatonin administration confers protection against damage inflicted by LA, and support the contention that melatonin protection is achieved by its ability as a scavenger for free radicals generated by LA.

  16. [Genotoxic effects of heavy metals and their salts in an experiment on Drosophila and mammals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopikashvili, L V; Bobyleva, L A; Zolotareva, G N

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of data on the influence of different metals (cadmium, cobalt, molybdenum) on the Drosophila melanogaster cells has revealed a considerable genotoxic effect of cadmium salts which manifests in the high percentage of cells elimination at the early stages of spermatogenesis--the premeiotic cells. The modifying effect of molybdenum in the combination with cadmium and molybdenum decreasing the percentage of the progeny fall may be induced by activation of the reparation systems. In the bone marrow cells of mice Cd ions modify cytogenetic effects of the AB preparation, intensifying its mutagenic activity in some cases.

  17. Detection of genotoxic effects of heavy metal contaminated soils with plant bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knasmüller, S; Gottmann, E; Steinkellner, H; Fomin, A; Pickl, C; Paschke, A; Göd, R; Kundi, M

    1998-12-03

    Aim of the present study was the development of a bioassay which enables the detection of genotoxic effects of heavy metal contaminated soils. In the first part of the present study, the data base on metal effects in plant bioassays was extended. Four metal salts, namely Cr(VI)O3, Cr(III)Cl3, Ni(II)Cl2 and Sb(III)Cl3 were tested comparatively in MN tests with pollen tetrad cells of Tradescantia clone #4430 and in meristematic root tip cells of Vicia faba. With Cr6+ and Ni2+, clear-cut dose-effects were observed in a range between 0.75 and 10.0 mM, whereas this was not the case with Cr3+ (range tested 1.25-10 mM) and Sb3+ (range 0.30-5.25 mM). In Vicia, negative results were obtained with the four metal salts under all conditions of test. To compare the mutagenic potencies of the metals, the increases of the regression curves (k-values) were calculated, they indicate the number of MN induced per mM in 100 tetrad cells. The corresponding values for Cr6+ and Ni2+ are 0.87 and 1.05, respectively. It appears that the Tradescantia system is in particular sensitive towards those metal species which cause DNA damage in animals and man such as Cr6+, Cd2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+, whereas no clear positive results were obtained with less harmful metal ions such as Cu2+, Cr3+ or Sb3+. In the second part of the study, the mutagenic effects of four metal contaminated soils and two types of standardized leachates (pH 4.0 and pH 7.0) of these soils were tested in Tradescantia and in Vicia. In addition, chemical analyses were carried out to determine the metal concentrations in the soils and in the extracts. Two of the samples contained highly elevated levels of a number of metals (Zn, Pb, Cu, Cd, Sb, As), one soil came from the Central Austrian Alps and contained high As levels only. Direct exposure of the Tradescantia plants in the soils resulted in a drastic increase of the MN frequencies over the background. The lowest effect was seen with the Slovakian soil which contained in

  18. Cytotoxic, genotoxic and apoptotic effects of naringenin-oxime relative to naringenin on normal and cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdurrahim Kocyigit; Ismail Koyuncu; Murat Dikilitas; Fatemeh Bahadori; Baki Turkkan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess and compare the cytotoxic, genotoxic, apoptotic and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating effects of naringenin (NG) and its new derived compound naringenin-oxime (NG-Ox) on MCF-7, HT-29, PC-12 cancer and L-929 normal cell lines. Methods: The cells were incubated with different doses of NG-Ox and NG (50–1 000 mmol/L) for 24 h. The cell viability was assessed based on ATP cell viability assay. Intracellular accumulation of ROS was determined using the fluorescent probes 2070-dichlorodihydrofluorescin diacetate. Genotoxic effects were evaluated by alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay) and, the apoptotic effect was evaluated by acridine orange staining at below the IC50 levels. Results: Both NG-Ox and NG exhibited cytotoxic, genotoxic and apoptotic effects and resulted in increased ROS values in a dose-dependent manner. The effects were more pronounced on cancer cell lines. The cytotoxic, genotoxic and apoptotic effects of NG-Ox were higher than that of NG in all cell lines. Significant correlations were observed be-tween cell viability, DNA damage, apoptosis and ROS, in all cell lines exposed to either NG-Ox or NG. Conclusions: This study showed that both NG-Ox and NG possess cytotoxic, genotoxic and apoptotic activities through the production of ROS on cells, NG-Ox being the more effective one. Therefore, derived compound of NG might be used as antiproliferative agents for the treatment of cancer.

  19. In vivo genotoxic effect of potassium dichromate in mice leukocytes using comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana Devi, K; Rozati, R; Saleha Banu, B; Jamil, K; Grover, P

    2001-08-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a well-known mutagen and carcinogen. In the present investigation, single-/double-stranded DNA breaks by potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7) in mice, a sensitive model for genotoxic effects, have been studied in vivo using alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE)/comet assay. Mice were administered orally with a range of doses starting from 0.59 to 76.0 mg/kg body weight of K2Cr2O7 and samples of whole blood were collected at 24, 48, 72, 96 h, week 1 and week 2 post-treatment for alkaline SCGE assay to study DNA damage. The rationale for using leukocytes was to reflect biomarker analysis in humans. Significant increase in mean comet tail length (5.7-24.25 microM) indicating DNA damage was observed at all the doses with K2Cr2O7 when compared with controls (3.26 microM). Maximum increase in mean comet tail length was observed at 9.5 mg/kg body weight at 48 h post-treatment (24.25 microM). The mean comet tail length showed a clear dose-dependent increase from 0.59 to 9.5 mg/kg body weight and a dose-dependent decrease in higher doses (19.0-76.0 mg/kg body weight). A gradual decrease in the tail lengths from 72 h post-treatment was observed by the second week, and values had returned to control levels at all doses, indicating repair of the damaged DNA and/or loss of heavily damaged cells. The study also reveals that comet assay is a sensitive and rapid method for detecting DNA damage caused by heavy metals such as chromium (Cr).

  20. Up-regulation of ROS by mitochondria-dependent bystander signaling contributes to genotoxicity of bystander effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Shaopeng [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Zhao Ye; Zhao Guoping [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Han Wei [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Bao Lingzhi [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Wu Lijun, E-mail: ljw@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2009-06-18

    Genomic instability can be observed in bystander cells. However, the underlying mechanism(s) is still relatively unclear. In a previous study, we found that irradiated cells released mitochondria-dependent intracellular factor(s) which could lead to bystander {gamma}-H2AX induction. In this paper, we used normal ({rho}{sup +}) and mtDNA-depleted ({rho}{sup 0}) human-hamster hybrid cells to investigate mitochondrial effects on the genotoxicity in bystander effect through medium transfer experiments. Through the detection of DNA double-strand breaks with {gamma}-H2AX, we found that the fraction of {gamma}-H2AX positive cells changed with time when irradiation conditioned cell medium (ICCM) were harvested. ICCM harvested from irradiated {rho}{sup +} cells at 10 min post-irradiation ({rho}{sup +} ICCM{sub 10min}) caused larger increases of bystander {gamma}-H2AX induction comparing to {rho}{sup 0} ICCM{sub 10min}, which only caused a slight increase of bystander {gamma}-H2AX induction. The {rho}{sup +} ICCM{sub 10min} could also result in the up-regulation of ROS production (increased by 35% at 10 min), while there was no significant increase in cells treated with {rho}{sup 0} ICCM{sub 10min}. We treated cells with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), the scavenger of ROS, and quenched {gamma}-H2AX induction by {rho}{sup +} ICCM. Furthermore, after the medium had been transferred and the cells were continuously cultured for 7 days, we found significantly increased CD59{sup -} gene loci mutation (increased by 45.9%) and delayed cell death in the progeny of {rho}{sup +} ICCM-treated bystander cells. In conclusion, the work presented here suggested that up-regulation of the mitochondria-dependent ROS might be very important in mediating genotoxicity of bystander effects.

  1. Effect of physicochemical character differences on the genotoxic potency of kaolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Tatsuya; Toyooka, Tatsushi; Ibuki, Yuko; Masuda, Shuichi; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Totsuka, Yukari

    2017-01-01

    Kaolin is white clay mineral with the chemical composition Al2Si2O5(OH)4, and many varieties of kaolins having different crystal structures are utilized in industrial, cosmetic and medical fields. To evaluate the effect of physicochemical character differences on the genotoxicity of kaolin, two types of kaolin, kaolin-S with smooth, sphere-shaped crystals, and kaolin-P with clusters of thin pseudohexagonal plates, were used in the study. ICR mice were intratracheally instilled with the kaolins (0.05 and 0.2 mg/mouse), and comet assay was performed on their lungs. Both kaolins showed DNA damage in the lungs of the mice, however the DNA damaging potency was much higher with kaolin-P than that with kaolin-S. In order to clarify the mechanisms for the different genotoxic potency, we examined the incorporation rate and ROS generation of these two types of kaolin in alveolar epithelial A549 and macrophage-like RAW264 cells, using flow cytometric (FCM) analysis. Kaolin-P showed a higher incorporation rate into the mammalian cells and ROS generation than that of kaolin-S. Especially, RAW264 cells aggressively incorporated kaolins, and generated ROS, whereas almost no ROS generation was observed in A549 cells. In addition, inflammatory cytokines were quantified, using the ELISA method, to understand further genotoxic potency differences of kaolins. Concentrations of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the media were increased by exposure to both kaolins, but in the case of kaolin-P, these inflammatory cytokines were significantly elevated. Based on these findings, differences of genotoxic potency may contribute to incorporation rates into immune cells. Furthermore, it is likely that immune cells and epithelial cells might closely interact with each other for the appearance of genotoxocity in vivo. In order to clarify the interaction between epithelial and immune cells, A549 and RAW264 were co-cultured and RAW264 cells only were exposed to

  2. The cyto- and genotoxic effects induced by sulphates in Allium cepa L.

    OpenAIRE

    Doroftei, Elena; Maria-Mihaela ANTOFIE

    2013-01-01

    The scope of this paper is to assess the cyto- and genotoxic effects of sulphate on Allium cepa mitosis for root meristem. Three different concentrations of sodium sulphate (i.e. 0,1%; 1% and 5%) have been used, in which the onion bulbs were immersed for different periods of time such as 6, 24 and 72 hours. In the end of the experiment the harvested root tips were prepared according to Feulgen’s squash technique and using Schiff reagent. The cytotoxic effects of sulphate were investigated by ...

  3. The cyto- and genotoxic effects induced by sulphates in Allium cepa L.

    OpenAIRE

    Elena DOROFTEI; Maria-Mihaela ANTOFIE

    2013-01-01

    The scope of this paper is to assess the cyto- and genotoxic effects of sulphate on Allium cepa mitosis for root meristem. Three different concentrations of sodium sulphate (i.e. 0,1%; 1% and 5%) have been used, in which the onion bulbs were immersed for different periods of time such as 6, 24 and 72 hours. In the end of the experiment the harvested root tips were prepared according to Feulgen’s squash technique and using Schiff reagent. The cytotoxic effects of sulphate were investigated by ...

  4. Genotoxic effects of bistratene A on human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, E; Valverde, M; Vega, L; Salvador, A; Ramirez, P; Herrera, L A; Watters, D; Lavin, M F; Ostrosky-Wegman, P

    1996-03-01

    Bistratene A, a toxin isolated from the colonial ascidian Lissoclinum bistratum causes a decrease in mitotic index and retardation of lymphocyte proliferation kinetics when it is added at 48 h to 72-h human lymphocyte cultures. In the same cultures, the incidence of sister chromatid exchanges was not altered by this compound. We also observed an increase in the number of polyploid cells in the cultures, and alterations of the beta-tubulin organization by immunocytochemistry with an antibody against beta-tubulin. Bistratene A induces DNA damage in a dose-dependent fashion in leukocytes, as measured by the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis assay. These results show that bistratene A interferes with microtubule assembly, is cytotoxic and cytostatic, and that it causes DNA damage.

  5. Comparison of microbial tests for the detection of heavy metal genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codina, J C; Pérez-Torrente, C; Pérez-García, A; Cazorla, F M; de Vicente, A

    1995-08-01

    Heavy metal genotoxicity was evaluated by using different microbial tests. Four genotoxicity assays were employed: the Ames test, the E. coli WP2 test, the Mutatox test detecting mutagenicity, and the SOS assay with E. coli-detecting enzyme induction. All the metals tested (cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, nickel, and zinc) were detected as genotoxic by the Mutatox and the SOS tests. The Ames test and the E. coli WP2 assay only detected chromium as genotoxic, causing a mutagenic effect. The sensitivity to metals of all the assays used was maintained when they were dissolved in sewage, although there was a slight increase in the sensitivity thresholds.

  6. Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects of Antiretroviral Combinations in Mice Bone Marrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Commonly used guidelines for the management of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (highly active antiretroviral therapy, HAART) include drug combinations such as tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) + lamivudine (3TC) and combivir [zidovudine (AZT) + 3TC] + efavirenz (EFV). These combinations may enhance the genotoxic effects induced by such drugs individually, since the therapy requires lifelong adherence and the drugs have unknown effects during treatment. Thus, the evaluation of the benefits and risks of HAART is of great importance. In order to assess the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of three concentrations of each of the antiretroviral combinations TDF + 3TC (800 + 400, 1600 + 800, and 3200 + 1600 mg/kg body weight, BW) and combivir + EFV (200 + 100 + 400, 400 + 200 + 800, and 800 + 400 + 1600 mg/kg BW) after two exposure periods (24 h and 48 h), in the present study the in vivo comet assay (single-cell gel electrophoresis) and the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test were used. Neither TDF + 3TC nor combivir + EFV induced DNA damage at any concentrations tested after 24 h or 48 h using the comet assay. After 24 h, both combinations increased the micronucleus frequency at all concentrations tested. After 48 h, combivir + EFV increased the micronucleated polychromatic erythrocyte (MNPCE) frequency at the two highest concentrations tested. Polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE)/normochromatic erythrocytes (NCE) ratio was high for both combinations, suggesting that they can be mitogenic. Since genotoxicity may be related to carcinogenesis, it is necessary to conduct further studies to verify the long-term mutagenic effects of these drugs. PMID:27806085

  7. Cytogenetic and genotoxic effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles on root cells of Allium cepa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Mamta; Khan, S Sudheer; Pakrashi, Sunandan; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2011-06-15

    Increasing use of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NP) in consumer products may enhance its release into the environment. Phytotoxicity study is important to understand its possible environmental impact. Allium cepa (Onion bulb) is the best model organism to study genetic toxicology of nanoparticles. Here we have reported cytogenetic and genotoxic effects of ZnO NPs on the root cells of A. cepa. The effects of ZnO NPs on the mitotic index (MI), micronuclei index (MN index), chromosomal aberration index, and lipid peroxidation were determined through the hydroponic culturing of A. cepa. A. cepa roots were treated with the dispersions of ZnO NPs at four different concentrations (25, 50, 75, and 100 μg ml(-1)). With the increasing concentrations of ZnO NPs MI decreased with the increase of pycnotic cells, on the other hand MN and chromosomal aberration index increased. The frequency of micronucleated cells was higher in ZnO NPs treated cells as compared to control (deionized distilled water). The number of cells in each mitotic phase changed upon ZnO NPs treatment. The effect of ZnO NPs on lipid peroxidation as examined by measuring TBARS concentration was evident at all the concentrations compared to bulk ZnO. The TEM image showed internalization of ZnO NPs like particles. SEM image of treated A. cepa demonstrated that the internalized nanoparticles agglomerated depending on the physico-chemical environment inside the cell. Our results demonstrated that ZnO NPs can be a clastogenic/genotoxic and cytotoxic agent. In conclusion, the A. cepa cytogenetic test can be used for the genotoxicity monitoring of novel nanomaterials like ZnO NPs, which is used in many consumer products.

  8. Biomonitoring of the genotoxic effects and oxidative potentials of commercial edible dung beetles (Onitis sp.), grasshopper (Caelifera sp.) and mole crickets (Gryllotalpa sp.) in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Kubra; Incekara, Umit; Turkez, Hasan

    2014-09-01

    In this investigation, the genotoxic and oxidative effects of water soluble extracts of dung beetles, flying grasshopper and mole crickets have been assessed on cultured human blood cells. The extracts were added to the culture tubes at 12 different concentrations (0-2000 ppm). Micronucleus test was used to monitor the DNA and the chromosomal damage produced by aqueous extracts in vitro. In addition, to assess the oxidative effects, total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidant status (TOS) levels were also measured. Our results indicated that these extracts did not show genotoxic effects at the tested concentrations. However, the extracts caused dose-dependent alterations in both TAC and TOS levels. Based on the findings, it was concluded that the studied insects can be consumed safely, but it is necessary to consider the cellular damages which are likely to appear depending on oxidative stress at higher concentrations. It has also been suggested that this in vitro approach for oxidative and genotoxicity assessments may be useful to evaluate the potential health risks of edible insects.

  9. Comparative study of the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of titanium oxide and aluminium oxide nanoparticles in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Virgilio, A L; Reigosa, M; Arnal, P M; Fernández Lorenzo de Mele, M

    2010-05-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of titanium oxide (TiO(2)) and aluminium oxide (Al(2)O(3)) nanoparticles (NPs) on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells using neutral red (NR), mitochondrial activity (by MTT assay), sister chromatid exchange (SCE), micronucleus (MN) formation, and cell cycle kinetics techniques. Results showed a dose-related cytotoxic effect evidenced after 24h by changes in lysosomal and mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity. Interestingly, transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) showed the formation of perinuclear vesicles in CHO-K1 cells after treatment with both NPs during 24h but no NP was detected in the nuclei. Genotoxic effects were shown by MN frequencies which significantly increased at 0.5 and 1 microg/mL TiO(2) and 0.5-10 microg/mL Al(2)O(3). SCE frequencies were higher for cells treated with 1-5 microg/mL TiO(2). The absence of metaphases evidenced cytotoxicity for higher concentrations of TiO(2). No SCE induction was achieved after treatment with 1-25 microg/mL Al(2)O(3). In conclusion, findings showed cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of TiO(2) and Al(2)O(3) NPs on CHO-K1 cells. Possible causes of controversial reports are discussed further on.

  10. Oxidative stress and genotoxic effect of zinc oxide nanoparticles in freshwater snail Lymnaea luteola L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Daoud; Alarifi, Saud; Kumar, Sudhir; Ahamed, Maqusood; Siddiqui, Maqsood A

    2012-11-15

    Understanding the toxic effects of nanoparticles on aquatic organism is the biggest obstacle to the safe development of nanotechnology. However, little is known about the toxic mechanisms of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) in freshwater snail Lymnaea luteola (L. luteola). This study was designed to investigate the possible mechanisms of genotoxicity induced by ZnONPs in freshwater snail L. luteola. ZnONPs (32 μg/ml) elicited a significant (psnail L. luteola may be used as suitable test model for nanoecotoxicological studies in future.

  11. Genotoxic effects of the o-phenylphenol metabolites phenylhydroquinone and phenylbenzoquinone in V79 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, A C; Eastmond, D A

    1994-10-01

    o-Phenylphenol (OPP) and its sodium salt, sodium o-phenylphenate are broad spectrum fungicides and disinfectants with widespread usage. Both chemicals have been reported to induce cancer in the kidney and urinary bladder of Fischer 344 rats. Recently it has been proposed that the metabolic activation of OPP occurs via a two-step process involving the cytochrome P450-mediated formation of phenylhydroquinone (PHQ) in the liver and a prostaglandin H synthase-mediated oxidation of PHQ to phenylbenzoquinone (PBQ) in the urinary tract. In order to further investigate the metabolic activation and genotoxic effects of OPP, we have investigated the ability of PHQ and PBQ to induce micronuclei and mutations at the HGPRT locus in a prostaglandin H synthase-containing V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line. In arachidonic acid-supplemented V79 cells, PHQ induced a significant increase in micronuclei whereas no increase was observed in cells in the absence of arachidonic acid supplementation. Immunofluorescent labeling of centromeric proteins with the CREST antibody indicated that the arachidonic acid-dependent induction of micronuclei by PHQ was due almost entirely to micronuclei containing whole chromosomes which had failed to segregate properly during mitosis. The induction of micronuclei by PHQ was significantly inhibited by treatment of the cells with indomethacin, aspirin, ascorbic acid, dithiothreitol and reduced glutathione supporting a role for prostaglandin H synthase in the genotoxic effects of PHQ. No increase in 6-thioguanine-resistant cells was observed in cells treated with PHQ or PBQ. This arachidonic acid-dependent conversion of PHQ to a genotoxic species is consistent with the hypothesis that a prostaglandin H synthase-mediated activation of PHQ may be involved in OPP- and SOPP-induced urinary tract carcinogenesis and also suggests that the induction of aneuploidy may play an important role in OPP-induced tumorigenesis.

  12. Genotoxic effect of N-hydroxy-4-acetylaminobiphenyl on human DNA: implications in bladder cancer.

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    Uzma Shahab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The interaction of environmental chemicals and their metabolites with biological macromolecules can result in cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. 4-Aminobiphenyl (4-ABP and several other related arylamines have been shown to be causally involved in the induction of human urinary bladder cancers. The genotoxic and the carcinogenic effects of 4-ABP are exhibited only when it is metabolically converted to a reactive electrophile, the aryl nitrenium ions, which subsequently binds to DNA and induce lesions. Although several studies have reported the formation of 4-ABP-DNA adducts, no extensive work has been done to investigate the immunogenicity of 4-ABP-modified DNA and its possible involvement in the generation of antibodies in bladder cancer patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human DNA was modified by N-hydroxy-4-acetylaminobiphenyl (N-OH-AABP, a reactive metabolite of 4-ABP. Structural perturbations in the N-OH-AABP modified DNA were assessed by ultraviolet, fluorescence, and circular dichroic spectroscopy as well as by agarose gel electrophoresis. Genotoxicity of N-OH-AABP modified DNA was ascertained by comet assay. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC analysis of native and modified DNA samples confirmed the formation of N-(deoxyguanosine-8-yl-4-aminobiphenyl (dG-C8-4ABP in the N-OH-AABP damaged DNA. The experimentally induced antibodies against N-OH-AABP-modified DNA exhibited much better recognition of the DNA isolated from bladder cancer patients as compared to the DNA obtained from healthy individuals in competitive binding ELISA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work shows epitope sharing between the DNA isolated from bladder cancer patients and the N-OH-AABP-modified DNA implicating the role of 4-ABP metabolites in the DNA damage and neo-antigenic epitope generation that could lead to the induction of antibodies in bladder cancer patients.

  13. Beryllium metal I. experimental results on acute oral toxicity, local skin and eye effects, and genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strupp, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The toxicity of soluble metal compounds is often different from that of the parent metal. Since no reliable data on acute toxicity, local effects, and mutagenicity of beryllium metal have ever been generated, beryllium metal powder was tested according to the respective Organisation for Economical Co-Operation and Development (OECD) guidelines. Acute oral toxicity of beryllium metal was investigated in rats and local effects on skin and eye in rabbits. Skin-sensitizing properties were investigated in guinea pigs (maximization method). Basic knowledge about systemic bioavailability is important for the design of genotoxicity tests on poorly soluble substances. Therefore, it was necessary to experimentally compare the capacities of beryllium chloride and beryllium metal to form ions under simulated human lung conditions. Solubility of beryllium metal in artificial lung fluid was low, while solubility in artificial lysosomal fluid was moderate. Beryllium chloride dissolution kinetics were largely different, and thus, metal extracts were used in the in vitro genotoxicity tests. Genotoxicity was investigated in vitro in a bacterial reverse mutagenicity assay, a mammalian cell gene mutation assay, a mammalian cell chromosome aberration assay, and an unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay. In addition, cell transformation was tested in a Syrian hamster embryo cell assay, and potential inhibition of DNA repair was tested by modification of the UDS assay. Beryllium metal was found not to be mutagenic or clastogenic based on the experimental in vitro results. Furthermore, treatment with beryllium metal extracts did not induce DNA repair synthesis, indicative of no DNA-damaging potential of beryllium metal. A cell-transforming potential and a tendency to inhibit DNA repair when the cell is severely damaged by an external stimulus were observed. Beryllium metal was also found not to be a skin or eye irritant, not to be a skin sensitizer, and not to have relevant acute oral

  14. Genotoxic effects and induction of phytochelatins in the presence of cadmium in Vicia faba roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béraud, Eric; Cotelle, Sylvie; Leroy, Pierre; Férard, Jean-François

    2007-10-01

    This study investigates different effects in roots of Vicia faba (broad bean) after exposure to cadmium. Genotoxic effects were assessed by use of the well-known Vicia root tip micronucleus assay. Cytotoxic effects were evaluated by determining the mitotic index in root tip cells. Finally, molecular induction mechanisms were evaluated by measuring phytochelatins with HPLC. After hydroponical exposure of V. faba roots to a range of cadmium concentrations and during different exposure times, the results of this approach showed large variations, according to the endpoint measured: after 48 h of exposure, genotoxic effects were found between 7.5 x 10(-8) and 5 x 10(-7)M CdCl(2), and cytotoxic effects were observed between 2.5 x 10(-7) and 5 x 10(-7)M CdCl(2). Statistically significant phytochelatin (PC) concentrations were measured at >or=10(-6)M CdCl(2) for PC(2), and at >or=10(-5)M CdCl(2) for PC3 and PC4.

  15. Genotoxic and inflammatory effects of depleted uranium particles inhaled by rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monleau, Marjorie; De Méo, Michel; Paquet, François; Chazel, Valérie; Duménil, Gérard; Donnadieu-Claraz, Marie

    2006-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is a radioactive heavy metal coming from the nuclear industry and used in numerous military applications. Uranium inhalation can lead to the development of fibrosis and neoplasia in the lungs. As little is known concerning the molecular processes leading to these pathological effects, some of the events in terms of genotoxicity and inflammation were investigated in rats exposed to DU by inhalation. Our results show that exposure to DU by inhalation resulted in DNA strand breaks in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) cells and in increase of inflammatory cytokine expression and production of hydroperoxides in lung tissue suggesting that the DNA damage was in part a consequence of the inflammatory processes and oxidative stress. The effects seemed to be linked to the doses, were independent of the solubility of uranium compounds and correlating with the type of inhalation. Repeated inhalations seemed to induce an effect of potentiation in BAL cells and also in kidney cells. Comet assay in neutral conditions revealed that DNA damage in BAL cells was composed partly by double strands breaks suggesting that radiation could contribute to DU genotoxic effects in vivo. All these in vivo results contribute to a better understanding of the pathological effect of DU inhalation.

  16. Determination of genotoxic effects of boron and zinc on Zea mays using protein and random amplification of polymorphic DNA analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erturk, Filiz Aygun; Nardemir, Gokce; Hilal, A Y; Arslan, Esra; Agar, Guleray

    2015-11-01

    In this research, we aimed to determine genotoxic effects of boron (B) and zinc (Zn) on Zea mays by using total soluble protein content and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses. For the RAPD analysis, 16 RAPD primers were found to produce unique polymorphic band profiles on treated maize seedlings. With increased Zn and B concentrations, increased polymorphism rate was observed, while genomic template stability and total soluble protein content decreased. The treatment with Zn was more effective than that of B groups on the levels of total proteins. The obtained results from this study revealed that the total soluble protein levels and RAPD profiles were performed as endpoints of genotoxicity and these analyses can offer useful biomarker assays for the evaluation of genotoxic effects on Zn and B polluted plants. © The Author(s) 2013.

  17. Genotoxic effect of ethephon on the root meristems of Allium cepa L.

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    Joyce Sudandara Priya

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Genotoxic effect of ethephon [(2-chloroethyl phosphonic acid], a PGR that has replaced calcium carbide as an agent for fruit ripening, was studied by using a root chromosome assay. Onion root meristems were cultured and analyzed after exposure with ethephon at concentrations of 200 ppm and 500 ppm for 2, 24, and 48 h. There was a time dependent decrease and an immediate toxic effect on dividing cells in mitotic index when compared to control (the mitotic indices of root meristems treated with 200 ppm ethephon for 2, 24, and 48 h were 11.1%, 10.7%, and 8.9%, respectively; and with 500 ppm ethephon for 2, 24, and 48 h the mitotic indices were 10.8%, 10.2%, and 9.0% respectively. The total chromosomal aberrations increased with prolonged exposures indicating duration dependent effect compared to control (the chromosomal aberrations of root meristems treated with 200 ppm ethephon for 2, 24, and 48 h were 14.5%, 15.6%, and 34.0% respectively; and with 500 ppm ethephon for 2, 24, and 48 h the chromosomal aberrations were 20.6%, 26.1%, and 39.8%, respectively. Chromosomal anomalies such as clumps and breaks were of frequent occurrence. This study proves the genotoxic effect of ethephon and emphasizes the judicial use of this compound as a PGR on edible plants and plant parts.

  18. Assessing the genotoxic effects of two lipid peroxidation products (4-oxo-2-nonenal and 4-hydroxy-hexenal) in haemocytes and midgut cells of Drosophila melanogaster larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Eşref; Marcos, Ricard

    2017-07-01

    Lipid peroxidation products can induce tissue damage and are implicated in diverse pathological conditions, including aging, atherosclerosis, brain disorders, cancer, lung and various liver disorders. Since in vivo studies produce relevant information, we have selected Drosophila melanogaster as a suitable in vivo model to characterise the potential risks associated to two lipid peroxidation products namely 4-oxo-2-nonenal (4-ONE) and 4-hydroxy-hexenal (4-HHE). Toxicity, intracellular reactive oxygen species production, and genotoxicity were the end-points evaluated. Haemocytes and midgut cells were the evaluated targets. Results showed that both compounds penetrate the intestine of the larvae, affecting midgut cells, and reaching haemocytes. Significant genotoxic effects, as determined by the comet assay, were observed in both selected cell targets in a concentration/time dependent manner. This study highlights the importance of D. melanogaster as a model organism in the study of the different biological effects caused by lipid peroxidation products entering via ingestion. This is the first study reporting genotoxicity data in haemocytes and midgut cells of D. melanogaster larvae for the two selected compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Lack of genotoxic effect in workers exposed to very low doses of 1,3-butadiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovreglio, Piero; Bukvic, Nenad; Fustinoni, Silvia; Ballini, Andrea; Drago, Ignazio; Foà, Vito; Guanti, Ginevra; Soleo, Leonardo

    2006-06-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD), a probable carcinogen to humans, has been shown to have an ill-defined genotoxicity in occupationally exposed workers. In the present study, the influence of exposure to very low doses of BD and to cigarette smoking was investigated on some cytogenetic endpoints, namely, sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), chromosomal aberrations (CA) and cells with a high frequency of SCE (HFC), in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Twenty-seven male workers employed in a petrochemical plant and 26 matched controls were included in the study. As regards the airborne BD values, there was a significant difference between exposed (median BD value 1.5, min-max 0.2-69.0 microg/m3) and non-exposed workers (median BD value 0.4, min-max <0.1-3.8 microg/m3). Genotoxic biomarkers were not able to distinguish between the two groups. The frequency of SCE was higher in smokers than in non-smokers (p=0.001), with a positive correlation between the number of cigarettes smoked per day and both SCE (r=0.4; p=0.004) and HFC frequency (r=0.3; p=0.04). Multiple regression analysis confirmed the influence of cigarette smoking on the level of SCE and HFC, while these parameters were not affected by personal exposure to BD. Overall, the biomarkers of genotoxic effect investigated in our study were not able to discriminate between workers with a very low exposure to BD and controls, while it was possible to distinguish between smokers and non-smokers on the basis of SCE.

  20. Protective Effect of Onion Extract on Bleomycin-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Human Lymphocytes

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    Yoon Hee Cho

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Following one of the world’s largest nuclear accidents, occured at Fukushima, Japan in 2011, a significant scientific effort has focused on minimizing the potential adverse health effects due to radiation exposure. The use of natural dietary antioxidants to reduce the risk of radiation-induced oxidative DNA damage is a simple strategy for minimizing radiation-related cancer rates and improving overall health. The onion is among the richest sources of dietary flavonoids and is an important food for increasing their overall intake. Therefore, we examined the effect of an onion extract on cyto- and geno-toxicity in human lymphocytes treated with bleomycin (BLM, a radiomimetic agent. In addition, we measured the frequency of micronuclei (MN and DNA damage following treatment with BLM using a cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay and a single cell gel electrophoresis assay. We observed a significant increase in cell viability in lymphocytes treated with onion extract then exposed to BLM compared to cells treated with BLM alone. The frequency of BLM induced MN and DNA damage increased in a dose-dependent manner; however, when lymphocytes were pretreated with onion extract (10 and 20 μL/mL, the frequency of BLM-induced MN was decreased at all doses of BLM and DNA damage was decreased at 3 μg/mL of BLM. These results suggest that onion extract may have protective effects against BLM-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in human lymphocytes.

  1. Benzophenone guttiferone A from Garcinia achachairu Rusby (Clusiaceae) presents genotoxic effects in different cells of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrazas, Peterson Menezes; de Souza Marques, Eduardo; Mariano, Luisa Nathália Bolda; Cechinel-Filho, Valdir; Niero, Rivaldo; Andrade, Sergio Faloni; Maistro, Edson Luis

    2013-01-01

    Benzophenones from natural sources and those of synthetic analogues present several reports of potent biological properties, and Guttiferone A represents a promising medicinal natural compound with analgesic and gastroprotective profiles. Considering that there are no reports that assess the genetic toxicity of Guttiferone A, the present study was undertaken to investigate the genotoxic potential of this benzophenone isolated from seeds of Garcinia achachairu in terms of DNA damage in different cells of Swiss albino mice using the comet assay, and its clastogenic/aneugenic effects in bone marrow cells in vivo by the micronucleus test. Cytotoxicity was assessed by scoring polychromatic (PCE) and normochromatic (NCE) erythrocytes ratio. Guttiferone A was administered by oral gavage at doses of 15, 30 and 60 mg/kg. The results showed that Guttiferone A produced genotoxic effects in leukocytes, liver, bone marrow, brain and testicle cells and clastogenic/aneugenic effects in bone marrow erythrocytes of mice. The PCE/NCE ratio indicated no cytotoxicity. Since guttiferone A is harmful to the genetic material we suggest caution in its use by humans.

  2. Biomonitoring of genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of gingival epithelial cells exposed to digital panoramic radiography

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    Anuradha Pai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of low level ionizing radiation used in digital panoramic radiography on gingival epithelial cells. Materials and Methods: We included 50 healthy individuals advised for digital panoramic radiography for diagnostic purpose were included in this study. Demographic data and personal history of all subjects were recorded in a proforma before the examination. Gingival epithelial cells were obtained by gentle scraping with a modified cytobrush immediately before X-ray exposure and 10 ± 2 days later. Cytological preparations were stained according to the Feulgen/fast green method and analyzed under a light microscope. Micronuclei and degenerative nuclear alterations (pyknosis, karyolysis, karyorrhexis and condensed chromatin were scored. Results: The frequency of formation of micronuclei was not significant with regard to age, gender and after exposure to digital panoramic radiography ( P = 0.276. However this study showed significant increase in the frequencies of nuclear alterations like karyorrhexis, pyknosis, condensed chromatin, karyolysis and indicative of cell death ( P < 0.001. Conclusion: Panoramic radiographic examination does not induce genotoxic effect like micronuclei, but it does induce cytotoxic effects leading to cell death.

  3. Benzophenone guttiferone A from Garcinia achachairu Rusby (Clusiaceae presents genotoxic effects in different cells of mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Menezes Terrazas

    Full Text Available Benzophenones from natural sources and those of synthetic analogues present several reports of potent biological properties, and Guttiferone A represents a promising medicinal natural compound with analgesic and gastroprotective profiles. Considering that there are no reports that assess the genetic toxicity of Guttiferone A, the present study was undertaken to investigate the genotoxic potential of this benzophenone isolated from seeds of Garcinia achachairu in terms of DNA damage in different cells of Swiss albino mice using the comet assay, and its clastogenic/aneugenic effects in bone marrow cells in vivo by the micronucleus test. Cytotoxicity was assessed by scoring polychromatic (PCE and normochromatic (NCE erythrocytes ratio. Guttiferone A was administered by oral gavage at doses of 15, 30 and 60 mg/kg. The results showed that Guttiferone A produced genotoxic effects in leukocytes, liver, bone marrow, brain and testicle cells and clastogenic/aneugenic effects in bone marrow erythrocytes of mice. The PCE/NCE ratio indicated no cytotoxicity. Since guttiferone A is harmful to the genetic material we suggest caution in its use by humans.

  4. Genotoxic effects of starvation and dimethoate in haemocytes and midgut gland cells of wolf spider Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczek, Grażyna; Mędrzak, Monika; Augustyniak, Maria; Wilczek, Piotr; Stalmach, Monika

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxic effects of starvation and dimethoate (organophosphate insecticide) in female and male wolf spiders Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae) exposed to the stressors under laboratory conditions. DNA damage was measured in haemocytes and midgut gland cells using the comet assay. In response to the two stressing factors, both cell types showed %TDNA, tail length (TL) and OTM values higher in males than in females. Level of DNA damage in haemocytes was greater than in midgut gland cells. In both sexes, the strongest genotoxicity was recorded at single application of dimethoate. After five-time exposure to the pesticide, genotoxic effects of a single dose were sustained in males and reduced to the control level in females. Starvation stress was well tolerated by the females, in which neither cell type was affected by DNA damage. However, in male haemocytes food deprivation induced severe DNA damage, what suggests suppression of the defence potential at prolonged starvation periods.

  5. Genotoxic effects of fumes from asphalt modified with waste plastic and tall oil pitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Hanna K; Väänänen, Virpi; Järventaus, Hilkka; Suhonen, Satu; Nygren, Jonas; Hämeilä, Mervi; Valtonen, Jarkko; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Norppa, Hannu

    2008-05-31

    As the use of recycled materials and industrial by-products in asphalt mixtures is increasing, we investigated if recycled additives modify the genotoxicity of fumes emitted from asphalt. Fumes were generated in the laboratory at paving temperature from stone-mastic asphalt (SMA) and from SMA modified with waste plastic (90% polyethylene, 10% polypropylene) and tall oil pitch (SMA-WPT). In addition, fumes from SMA, SMA-WPT, asphalt concrete (AC), and AC modified with waste plastic and tall oil pitch (AC-WPT) were collected at paving sites. The genotoxicity of the fumes was studied by analysis of DNA damage (measured in the comet assay) and micronucleus formation in human bronchial epithelial BEAS 2B cells in vitro and by counting mutations in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and YG1024. DNA damage was also assessed in buccal leukocytes from road pavers before and after working with SMA, SMA-WPT, AC, and AC-WPT. The chemical composition of the emissions was analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The SMA-WPT fume generated in the laboratory induced a clear increase in DNA damage in BEAS 2B cells without metabolic activation. The laboratory-generated SMA fume increased the frequency of micronucleated BEAS 2B cells without metabolic activation. None of the asphalt fumes collected at the paving sites produced DNA damage with or without metabolic activation. Fumes from SMA and SMA-WPT from the paving sites increased micronucleus frequency without metabolic activation. None of the asphalt fumes studied showed mutagenic activity in Salmonella. No statistically significant differences in DNA damage in buccal leukocytes were detected between the pre- and post-shift samples collected from the road pavers. However, a positive correlation was found between DNA damage and the urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) after work shift, which suggested an association between occupational exposures during road paving and genotoxic effects. Our

  6. Genotoxic effects of 2-dodecyl cyclobutanone; Genotoxizitaet von 2-Dodecylcyclobutanon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delincee, H.; Pool-Zobel, B.L.; Rechkemmer, G. [Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Ernaehrung, Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Ernaehrungsphysiologie

    1999-07-01

    The paper reports in vivo experiments with rats who received two different doses of 2-dodecyl cyclobutane administered orally. 16 hours after administration, colon cells were isolated and examined for DNA damage by means of the comet assay. No cytotoxic effects were found with the trypan blue exclusion test. When the '% tail intensity' or the 'tail moment' were used for quantitative analysis with the comet assay, it was found that similar results are obtained for the test group which received a lower dose of 2-dodecyl cyclobutane (1.12 mg/kg of body weight) and the control group which received 2% dimethyl sulfoxide. Administration of higher concentrations of the 2-dodecyl cyclobutane (14.9 mg/kg of body weight) was found to induce minor, but significant DNA damage in the test group. Further experiments will be needed in order to assess the relevance of these results for assessment of health risks due to consumption of irradiated food. (orig./CB) [German] In dieser Arbeit wurden in vivo-Versuche an Ratten, die zwei Dosierungen an 2-Dodecylcyclobutanon per Schlundsonde erhielten, durchgefuehrt. Nach 16-stuendiger Einwirkung wurden Kolonzellen aus den Ratten isoliert und mit Hilfe des Comet Assay auf DNA-Schaeden analysiert. Zytotoxische Effekte wurden bei der Anwendung des Trypanblau-Ausschlusstests nicht festgestellt. Wenn im Comet Assay zur quantitativen Auswertung das '% tail intensity' oder das 'tail moment' eingesetzt wurde, wurde bei der Versuchsgruppe, die eine niedrigere Konzentration des 2-Dodecylcyclobutanons (1,12 mg/kg Koerpergewicht) erhielt, aehnliche Werte wie bei der Kontrollgruppe, die 2% Dimethylsulfoxid verabreicht bekamen, beobachtet. Bei der hoeheren Konzentration des 2-Dodecylcyclobutanons (14,9 mg/kg Koerpergewicht) wurde in der Versuchsgruppe eine geringe, aber signifikante DNA-Schaedigung festgestellt. Weiterfuehrende Untersuchungen sind erforderlich, um die Relevanz dieser Ergebnisse fuer eine

  7. [Genotoxicity effect of organic pollutants in Meiliang Bay of Taihu Lake on microalga Euglena gracilis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang-Yu; Cui, Yi-Bin; Hu, Chang-Wei; Qian, Xin; Kong, Zhi-Ming; Li, Mei

    2009-11-01

    Organic pollutant ingredients and content of water samples from Taihu Lake were analyzed by GC-MS. Results showed that Taihu Lake was already contaminated by the organic pollutant, and 15 kinds of targeted organic pollutants were detected. At lower concentrations (1 time), organic pollutants could not have notable effect on the growth of Euglena gracilis, but could increase the content of photosynthetic pigment. At higher concentrations (5, 10 times), organic pollutants restrained the growth of E. gracilis remarkably, and decreased the content of photosynthetic pigment. Activities of SOD and POD increased with the content of organic pollutants. It is indicated that organic pollution could induce activities of antioxidation enzymes in E. gracilis. TOM and TM for the genotoxicity assay increased and DNA damage was found. In higher concentration groups, DNA damage was serious and had an obvious dose-effect relationship. It is indicated that Meiliang bay water may have potential mutagenicity. Comet assay combined with SOD analysis was of value to genotoxic monitoring of polluted water and was a suitable biomarker for organic pollutants in water.

  8. The cyto- and genotoxic effects induced by sulphates in Allium cepa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena DOROFTEI

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this paper is to assess the cyto- and genotoxic effects of sulphate on Allium cepa mitosis for root meristem. Three different concentrations of sodium sulphate (i.e. 0,1%; 1% and 5% have been used, in which the onion bulbs were immersed for different periods of time such as 6, 24 and 72 hours. In the end of the experiment the harvested root tips were prepared according to Feulgen’s squash technique and using Schiff reagent. The cytotoxic effects of sulphate were investigated by calculating the mitotic index and also through the analysis of chromosomes alterations during the mitosis. The phase ratio of cells undergoing mitosis in all the phases is estimated for all variants. For microscopy investigations it was used a Novex Holland B microscope with digital camera included. The cytological analysis realized on Allium cepa revealed a strong decrease in the mitotic index due to sulphate treatments which is more intense with the time of exposure. Moreover this phenomenon is associated with the appearance of different chromosomal complement alterations including the appearance of highly condensed chromatin. The mitotic index and genotoxic observations over the chromosomes can also be correlated with phase ratio of cells undergoing mitosis.

  9. [Genotoxic and ecotoxic effects of urban waste water disinfected with sodium hypochlorite or peracetic acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crebelli, R; Conti, L; Marchini, S; Monarca, S; Feretti, D; Zerbini, I; Zani, C; Veschetti, E; Cutilli, D; Ottaviani, M

    2003-01-01

    Genotoxic and ecotoxicologic effects of urban wastewater disinfected with sodium hypochlorite or peracetic acid were analyzed. The formation of genotoxic species was studied by determining clastogenic and mutagenic activity of aqueous samples and their extracts with in vivo and in vitro tests, respectively. In particular, we have applied citogenetic tests to Allium cepa roots and Tradescantia inflorescence (Allium cepa test and Tradescantia/micronuclei test) and reversion test to Salmonella typhimurium according to the microsuspension procedure (Kado test). The latter is the method of choice for the analysis of complex matrices due to its high sensitivity and specificity. The mutagenic activity of disinfected effluents was similar to the corresponding untreated wastewater both sampled in four different periods. Therefore, the disinfection process did not seem to contribute to aquatic mutagenicity in the examined range of biocide concentration. The potential toxicity of disinfected wastewater for aquatic organisms was evaluated using Daphnia magna. The acute toxicity of peracetic acid in sewage was 0.4 mg/L (24 h E(L)C50). By comparing this value with peracetic acid concentrations detected in effluents from a pilot plant it is expected that treated wastewater would show acute toxic effects on aquatic organisms. Dissociation compounds (hydrogen peroxide and acetic acid) and possible by-products of peracetic acid did not seem to contribute significantly to the toxicity of sewage treated with peracetic acid.

  10. Protective effect of hawthorn extract against genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal; Azadbakht, Mohammad; Tanha, Mohammad; Mahmodzadeh, Aziz; Mohammadifar, Sohila

    2011-05-01

    The preventive effect of hawthorn (Crataegus microphylla) fruit extract against genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) has been investigated in human cultured blood lymphocytes. Peripheral blood samples were collected from human volunteers at 0 (10 minutes before), and at 1 and 2 hours after a single oral ingestion of 1 g hawthorn powder extract. At each time point, the whole blood was treated in vitro with MMS (200 µmol) at 24 hours after cell culture, and then the lymphocytes were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked binucleated cells. The lymphocytes treated with hawthorn and MMS to exhibit a significant decreasing in the incidence of micronucleated binucleated cells, as compared with similarly MMS-treated lymphocytes from blood samples collected at 0 hour. The maximum protection and decreasing in frequency of micronuclei (36%) was observed at 1 hour after ingestion of hawthorn extract. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that hawthorn contained chlorogenic acid, epicatechin and hyperoside. It is obvious that hawthorn, particularly flavonoids constituents with antioxidative activity, reduced the oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by toxic compounds. This set of data may have an important application for the protection of human lymphocyte from the genetic damage and side effects induced by chemicals hazardous in people.

  11. Genotoxic effects of Tabebuia impetiginosa (Mart. Ex DC. Standl. (Lamiales, Bignoniaceae extract in Wistar rats

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    Odilon A. Lemos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tabebuia sp. is native to tropical rain forests throughout Central and South America. Although the biological and pharmacological effects of bark extracts have been intensely studied, little is known on the extract obtained from the flower. Herein, the genotoxic potential of a flower extract from T. impetiginosa ("ipê roxo" on the blood and liver cells of Wistar rats was evaluated. Experimental procedures involved only male animals. Graduated concentrations of the extract, viz., 100, 300 and 500 mg kg-1 of body weight, were gavage-administered and 24 h latter cells were collected and processed for analysis. With the exception of the 100 mg kg-1 dose, a significant increase in DNA damage was noted, when compared with a negative control group. Although the genotoxic potential of this extract was higher in liver cells, the response in both tissues was related to dose-dependency. Even though DNA damage can be corrected before conversion into mutations, further study is recommended to arrive at a better understanding of incurred biological effects.

  12. Genotoxic effects of Tabebuia impetiginosa (Mart. Ex DC.) Standl. (Lamiales, Bignoniaceae) extract in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Odilon A; Sanches, Júlio C M; Silva, Icaro E F; Silva, Márcio L A; Vinhólis, Adriana H C; Felix, Mireille A P; Santos, Raquel A; Cecchi, Andréa O

    2012-04-01

    Tabebuia sp. is native to tropical rain forests throughout Central and South America. Although the biological and pharmacological effects of bark extracts have been intensely studied, little is known on the extract obtained from the flower. Herein, the genotoxic potential of a flower extract from T. impetiginosa ("ipê roxo") on the blood and liver cells of Wistar rats was evaluated. Experimental procedures involved only male animals. Graduated concentrations of the extract, viz., 100, 300 and 500 mg kg(-1) of body weight, were gavage-administered and 24 h latter cells were collected and processed for analysis. With the exception of the 100 mg kg(-1) dose, a significant increase in DNA damage was noted, when compared with a negative control group. Although the genotoxic potential of this extract was higher in liver cells, the response in both tissues was related to dose-dependency. Even though DNA damage can be corrected before conversion into mutations, further study is recommended to arrive at a better understanding of incurred biological effects.

  13. Effects of konjac glucomannan, inulin and cellulose on acute colonic responses to genotoxic azoxymethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen-Tzu; Yang, Lien-Chuan; Chen, Hsiao-Ling

    2014-07-15

    Mice were fed low-fibre, or that supplemented with soluble fibre (konjac glucomannan, KGM; inulin), or insoluble fibre (cellulose) to determine how these three fibres modulated the acute colonic responses to an azoxymethane (AOM) treatment. Results indicated that KGM and inulin exerted greater anti-genotoxic effects compared to cellulose and up-regulated the gene expressions of glutathione S-transferase and antioxidant enzymes. The apoptotic index in the distal colon was the greatest and the expression of Bcl-2 was the lowest in the KGM group 24h after the AOM treatment. On the other hand, the proliferative index and expression of Cyclin D1 were lower in all fibre groups. Furthermore, KGM increased cecal short-chain fatty acid contents, and both KGM and inulin increased fecal probiotic concentrations. This study suggested that soluble fibres were more effective than cellulose on ameliorating AOM-induced genotoxicity by up-regulating antioxidant enzyme genes, and enhancing epithelium apoptosis by down-regulating Bcl-2.

  14. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of Br-containing oxaphosphole on Allium cepa L. root tip cells and mouse bone marrow cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanya P. Kalcheva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous production and release of chemicals into the environment has led to the need to assess their genotoxicity. Numerous organophosphorus compounds with different structures have been synthesized in recent years, and several oxaphosphole derivatives are known to possess biological activity. Such chemical compounds may influence proliferating cells and cause disturbances of the genetic material. In this study, we examined the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of 4-bromo-N,N-diethyl-5,5-dimethyl-2,5-dihydro-1,2-oxaphosphol-2-amine 2-oxide (Br-oxph. In A. cepa cells, Br-oxph (10-9 M, 10-6 M and 10-3 M reduced the mitotic index 48 h after treatment with the two highest concentrations, with no significant effect at earlier intervals. Mitotic cells showed abnormalities 24 h and 48 h after treatment with the two lowest concentrations but there were no consistent changes in interphase cells. Bone marrow cells from mice treated with Br-oxph (2.82 x 10-3 µg/kg also showed a reduced mitotic index after 48 h and a greater percentage of cells with aberrations (principally chromatid and isochromatid breaks. These findings indicate the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Br-oxph in the two systems studied.

  15. Effects of cerium dioxide nanoparticles in Oncorhynchus mykiss liver after an acute exposure: assessment of oxidative stress, genotoxicity and histological alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Nunes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available At present cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NP have numerous applications ranging from industry to the household, leading to its wide distribution namely in the aquatic environment. The hereby study aimed to assess the toxic effects of CeO2 NPs in Oncorhynchus mykiss liver following an acute exposure (96h to three different concentrations (0.25, 2.5 and 25 mg/L in terms of the genotoxicity (comet assay, oxidative stress response (Catalase CAT; Glutathione S-Transferases GSTs; Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances TBARS and histopathology. CeO2 NP exposure resulted in genotoxic damage in all exposure treatments, inhibition of CAT in the highest concentration and histopathological changes in all exposure concentrations with predominance of progressive and circulatory alterations. However TBARS and GSTs showed no significant differences comparatively to the control (unexposed group. The results suggest that CeO2 NP are able to cause genotoxicity, biochemical impairment and histological alterations in the liver of rainbow trout.

  16. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of Br-containing oxaphosphole on Allium cepa L. root tip cells and mouse bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalcheva, Vanya P; Dragoeva, Asya P; Kalchev, Karamfil N; Enchev, Dobromir D

    2009-04-01

    The continuous production and release of chemicals into the environment has led to the need to assess their genotoxicity. Numerous organophosphorus compounds with different structures have been synthesized in recent years, and several oxaphosphole derivatives are known to possess biological activity. Such chemical compounds may influence proliferating cells and cause disturbances of the genetic material. In this study, we examined the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of 4-bromo-N,N-diethyl-5,5-dimethyl-2,5-dihydro-1,2-oxaphosphol-2-amine 2-oxide (Br-oxph). In A. cepa cells, Br-oxph (10(-9) M, 10 (-6) M and 10 (-3) M) reduced the mitotic index 48 h after treatment with the two highest concentrations, with no significant effect at earlier intervals. Mitotic cells showed abnormalities 24 h and 48 h after treatment with the two lowest concentrations but there were no consistent changes in interphase cells. Bone marrow cells from mice treated with Br-oxph (2.82 x 10 (-3) μg/kg) also showed a reduced mitotic index after 48 h and a greater percentage of cells with aberrations (principally chromatid and isochromatid breaks). These findings indicate the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Br-oxph in the two systems studied.

  17. Genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of Sunset Yellow and Brilliant Blue, colorant food additives, on human blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kus, Esra; Eroglu, Halil Erhan

    2015-01-01

    The synthetic dyes over fifty are used in many areas including the food industry around the world. Sunset Yellow FCF and Brilliant Blue FCF are used as colorant food additives in many food products. The present study investigated the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of Sunset Yellow and Brilliant Blue. Genotoxic and cytotoxic activities of the food additives were evaluated in lymphocyte cell cultures using mitotic index, replication index and micronucleus assay. Mitotic index frequencies and replication index values were decreased and micronucleus frequency was increased with increasing concentrations of Sunset Yellow and Brilliant Blue. The changes in mitotic index and micronucleus are statistically significant (pBlue can have cytotoxic and genotoxic potential. It care must be taken when using these materials as a food additive.

  18. Protective effects of acerola juice on genotoxicity induced by iron in vivo

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    Roberta Nunes Horta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metal ions such as iron can induce DNA damage by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS and oxidative stress. Vitamin C is one of the most widely consumed antioxidants worldwide, present in many fruits and vegetables, especially inMalpighia glabra L., popularly known as acerola, native to Brazil. Acerola is considered a functional fruit due to its high antioxidant properties and phenolic contents, and therefore is consumed to prevent diseases or as adjuvant in treatment strategies. Here, the influence of ripe and unripe acerola juices on iron genotoxicity was analyzed in vivo using the comet assay and micronucleus test. The comet assay results showed that acerola juice exerted no genotoxic or antigenotoxic activity. Neither ripe nor unripe acerola juices were mutagenic to animals treated with juices, in micronucleus test. However, when compared to iron group, the pre-treatment with acerola juices exerted antimutagenic activity, decreasing significantly micronucleus mean values in bone marrow. Stage of ripeness did not influence the interaction of acerola compounds with DNA, and both ripe and unripe acerola juices exerted protective effect over DNA damage generated by iron.

  19. Textile effluent induced genotoxic effects and oxidative stress in Clarias gariepinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoola, S O; Bassey, B O; Alimba, C G; Ajani, E K

    2012-09-01

    Human and ecological disorder experienced in industrial settlements as a result of improper disposal of chemicals such as textile effluent calls for careful surveillance on the state of the environment. This study investigated the toxicity of textile effluent discharge using biochemical and cytogenetic responses to ascertain the acute and sub lethal effects on Clarias gariepinus. The 96 h LC50 of C. gariepinus exposed to the textile effluent was 8.203 ml L(-1). Fourteen day exposures to 1, 2, 4 and 6 ml L(-1) doses were conducted and several toxicological endpoints were evaluated. Sub lethal genotoxicity and biochemical study was also carried out for fourteen days. The genotoxicity studies utilized micronucleus test while the biochemical studies quantified serum anti-oxidant status Total Protein (TP), Catalase (CAT), Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) and Malondialdehyde (MDA) of the exposed fish. Toxicity factor indicates that the 96 h LC50 was significantly more toxic than the 24 h LC50 (p 0.05). The results obtained from this study showed that textile effluent increase cytogenetic damage and altered anti-oxidant status in C. gariepinus. Chemicals in the effluent can be bioaccumulated and biomagnified in the aquatic organism hence affecting man.

  20. In vitro evaluation of selenium genotoxic, cytotoxic, and protective effects: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdiglesias, Vanessa [University of A Coruna, Toxicology Unit, Department of Psychobiology, A Coruna (Spain); University of A Coruna, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Sciences, A Coruna (Spain); Pasaro, Eduardo; Laffon, Blanca [University of A Coruna, Toxicology Unit, Department of Psychobiology, A Coruna (Spain); Mendez, Josefina [University of A Coruna, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Sciences, A Coruna (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    Selenium is an oligoelement with essential biological functions. Diet is the most important selenium source, and intake of this element depends on its concentration in food and amount of food consumed. Among the essential human micronutrients, selenium is peculiar due to its beneficial physiological activity and toxicity. It may have anticarcinogenic effects at low concentrations, whereas at concentrations higher than those necessary for nutrition, it can be genotoxic and carcinogenic. Because of that, selenium is probably the most widely investigated of all the oligonutrients. In the last decades, there has been increasing interest in several nutritional Se compounds because of their environmental, biological, and toxicological properties, particularly for their cancer- and disease-preventing activities. This article gives an overview of the results of in vitro studies on mutagenicity, genotoxicity, cytotoxicity, and DNA repair conducted within the last decades with different organic and inorganic selenium compounds. Results from these studies provide a better knowledge on the selenium activity and help to elucidate the reasons underlying its duality in order to regulate its correct use in nutrition and clinic. (orig.)

  1. Genotoxic effects of panoramic radiation by assessing the frequency of micronuclei formation in exfoliated buccal epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya KB

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Panoramic radiography is one of the most commonly used radiographic methods to complement clinical examination. Ionizing radiation is a well-known mutagen and carcinogen in the human population. So this study was undertaken to evaluate the possible genotoxic effects of panoramic radiation by assessing the frequency of micronuclei formation in the exfoliated buccal epithelium. Methods: 50 patients of either sex in the age range of 15 to 75 years with apparently normal oral mucosa with no adverse habits and without any oral lesions were included in the present study after their consent. Buccal epithelial cells were obtained from the buccal mucosa by scraping with the toothbrush immediately before and after 10 +/- 2 days of exposure to panoramic radiography. Cytological preparations were stained and observed under microscope. Student's paired and lsquo;t' test was used for the comparison between mean frequency of micronuclei in buccal epithelial cells in patients before and after panoramic radiography. Results: Significant increase (P <0.0001 in the frequency of cells with micronuclei and total number of micronuclei after panoramic radiography was detected. Conclusion: The X-radiation emitted during panoramic radiography does induce some genotoxic changes in the form of increased frequency of micronuclei in target buccal epithelial cells. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(2.000: 541-544

  2. Effect of buprenorphine on genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals by the rat liver micronucleus test with partial hepatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Satoru; Nagata, Mayumi; Hattori, Chiharu; Takasaki, Wataru

    2015-02-01

    In the view of animal welfare considerations, we investigated the suitability of modifying the rat liver micronucleus test with partial hepatectomy to include administration of an analgesic drug to minimize pain and distress as much as possible. The effects of the analgesic, buprenorphine, on the genotoxicity evaluation of structural chromosome aberration inducers (cyclophosphamide, diethylnitrosamine and 1,2-dimethylhydrazine) and numerical chromosome aberration inducers (colchicine and carbendazim) were examined. The genotoxicants were given orally to 8-week-old male F344 rats a day before or after partial hepatectomy and hepatocytes were isolated 4 days after the partial hepatectomy. Buprenorphine was injected subcutaneously twice a day with at least a 6-hr interval for 2 days from just after partial hepatectomy. As results, buprenorphine caused neither change in clinical signs (except for one animal death) nor increase in the incidence of micronucleated hepatocytes of vehicle treated animals. In the case of concomitant treatment of buprenorphine and a genotoxicant, one out of 8 animals died in each group given buprenorphine with cyclophosphamide, carbendazim or colchicine (lower dose level only). Slight changes in clinical signs were noted in the group given buprenorphine with cyclophosphamide or carbendazim. A statistically significant increase in the incidence of micronucleated hepatocytes was obtained in concomitant treatment of buprenorphine and genotoxicant compared with genotoxicant alone for 1,2-dimethylhydrazine, colchicine and carbendazim. It is concluded that use of buprenorphine as an analgesic drug to minimize pain and distress for rats that are given partial hepatectomy is not appropriate under the present experimental conditions, because it could enhance the general toxicity and genotoxicity of the test chemical.

  3. Protective Effect of Distillate and Redistillate of Cow's Urine in Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes Challenged With Established Genotoxic Chemicals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. KRISHNAMURTHI; DIPANWITA DUTTA; S. D. SIVANESAN; T. CHAKRABARTI

    2004-01-01

    From the ancient period cow's urine has been used as a medicine. In Veda, cow's urine was compared to the nectar. In Susrut, several medicinal properties of cow's urine have been mentioned and are known to cause weight loss, reversal of certain cardiac and kidney problems, indigestion, stomach ache, edema, etc. However, the literature and scripture did not mention the antigenotoxic properties of cow's urine. Methods In the present investigation, the antigenotoxic/ antioxidant properties of cow's urine distillate and redistillate were studied in vitro. The antioxidant status and volatile fatty acid levels were determined. Actinomycin-D (0.1 μmol/L) and hydrogen peroxide (150 μmol/L) were used for inducing DNA strand break with 0.1% DMSO as negative control. Dose for the antigenotoxic effect of cow's urine was chosen from the dose response study carried out earlier. Results Both actinomycin-D and H2O2 caused statistically significant DNA unwinding of 80% & 75% respectively (P<0.001) as revealed by fluorimetric analysis of DNA unwinding (FADU), and the damage could be protected with the redistilled cow's urine distillate (1, 50 & 100 μL) in simultaneous treatment with genotoxic chemicals. Conclusion The redistillate of cow's urine was found to possess total antioxidant status of around 2.6 mmol, contributed mainly by volatile fatty acids (1500 mg/L) as revealed by the GC-MS studies. These fatty acids and other antioxidants might cause the observed protective effects.

  4. Potential pulmonary effects of engineered carbon nanotubes: in vitro genotoxic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Linda M; Reynolds, Steven H; Castranova, Vincent

    2010-12-01

    The development of novel engineered nano-sized materials is a rapidly emerging technology with many applications in medicine and industry. In vitro and in vivo studies have suggested many deleterious effects of carbon nanotube exposure including granulomatous inflammation, release of cytosolic enzymes, pulmonary fibrosis, reactive oxygen damage, cellular atypia, DNA fragmentation, mutation and errors in chromosome number as well as mitotic spindle disruption. The physical properties of the carbon nanotubes make respiratory exposure to workers likely during the production or use of commercial products. Many of the investigations of the genotoxicity of carbon nanotubes have focused on reactive oxygen mediated DNA damage; however, the long thin tubular-shaped carbon nanotubes have a striking similarity to cellular microtubules. The similarity of carbon nanotubes to microtubules suggests a potential to interact with cellular biomolecules, such as the mitotic spindle, as well as the motor proteins that separate the chromosomes during cell division. Disruption of centrosomes and mitotic spindles would result in monopolar, tripolar, and quadrapolar divisions of chromosomes. The resulting aneuploidy is a key mechanism in the potential carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes.

  5. Genotoxicity investigations on nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oesch, Franz; Landsiedel, Robert

    2012-07-01

    This review is based on the lecture presented at the April 2010 nanomaterials safety assessment Postsatellite to the 2009 EUROTOX Meeting and summarizes genotoxicity investigations on nanomaterials published in the open scientific literature (up to 2008). Special attention is paid to the relationship between particle size and positive versus negative outcome, as well as the dependence of the outcome on the test used. Salient conclusions and outstanding recommendations emerging from the information summarized in this review are as follows: recognize that nanomaterials are not all the same; therefore know and document what nanomaterial has been tested and in what form; take nanomaterials specific properties into account; in order to make your results comparable with those of others and on other nanomaterials: use or at least include in your studies standardized methods; use in vivo studies to put in vitro results into perspective; take uptake and distribution of the nanomaterial into account; and in order to become able to make extrapolations to risk for human: learn about the mechanism of nanomaterials genotoxic effects. Past experience with standard non-nanosubstances already had shown that mechanisms of genotoxic effects can be complex and their elucidation can be demanding, while there often is an immediate need to assess the genotoxic hazard. Thus, a practical and pragmatic approach to genotoxicity investigations of novel nanomaterials is the use of a battery of standard genotoxicity testing methods covering a wide range of mechanisms. Application of these standard methods to nanomaterials demands, however, adaptations, and the interpretation of results from the genotoxicity testing of nanomaterials needs additional considerations exceeding those used for standard size materials.

  6. Protective effect of pumpkin seed oil against genotoxicity induced by azathioprine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Elfiky

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Pumpkin is a leafy green vegetable; it belongs to the Cucurbitaceae family. Pumpkin seed oil supplementation can prevent changes in plasma lipids and blood pressure. The present study was conducted to evaluate the protective effect of pumpkin seed oil against cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of azathioprine. Oral administration of pumpkin seed oil either before or after treatment of azathioprine was effective in the reduction of the frequencies of Mn-PCEs, decreased the DNA fragmentation, total sperm abnormalities and significantly increased sperm count, percentage of PCEs, and enhanced the ratio of PCEs to NCEs. However, random amplified polymorphism of DNA (RAPD showed distinct differences in animal groups intoxicated with azathioprine before and after pumpkin seed oil treatment, which reflected a DNA protective effect of pumpkin seed oil. Depletion of glutathione content in the testis was also observed in azathioprine treated mice, which was improved by an oral administration of pumpkin seed oil either before or after treatment with azathioprine.

  7. Chemopreventive effect of cactus Opuntia ficus indica on oxidative stress and genotoxicity of aflatoxin B1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is potent hepatotoxic and hepatocarcinogenic agent. In aflatoxicosis, oxidative stress is a common mechanism contributing to initiation and progression of hepatic damage. The aim of this work was to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of cactus cladode extract (CCE) on aflatoxin B1-induced liver damage in mice by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA) level, the protein carbonyls generation and the heat shock proteins Hsp 70 and Hsp 27 expressions in liver. We also looked for an eventual protective effect against AFB1-induced genotoxicity as determined by chromosome aberrations test, SOS Chromotest and DNA fragmentation assay. We further evaluated the modulation of p53, bax and bcl2 protein expressions in liver. Methods Adult, healthy balbC (20-25 g) male mice were pre-treated by intraperitonial administration of CCE (50 mg/Kg.b.w) for 2 weeks. Control animals were treated 3 days a week for 4 weeks by intraperitonial administration of 250 μg/Kg.b.w AFB1. Animals treated by AFB1 and CCE were divided into two groups: the first group was administrated CCE 2 hours before each treatment with AFB1 3 days a week for 4 weeks. The second group was administrated without pre-treatment with CCE but this extract was administrated 24 hours after each treatment with AFB1 3 days a week for 4 weeks. Results Our results clearly showed that AFB1 induced significant alterations in oxidative stress markers. In addition, it has a genotoxic potential and it increased the expression of pro apoptotic proteins p53 and bax and decreased the expression of bcl2. The treatment of CCE before or after treatment with AFB1, showed (i) a total reduction of AFB1 induced oxidative damage markers, (ii) an anti-genotoxic effect resulting in an efficient prevention of chromosomal aberrations and DNA fragmentation compared to the group treated with AFB1 alone (iii) restriction of the effect of AFB1 by differential modulation of the expression of p53 which decreased as well as its

  8. Chemopreventive effect of cactus Opuntia ficus indica on oxidative stress and genotoxicity of aflatoxin B1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Mansour Hédi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 is potent hepatotoxic and hepatocarcinogenic agent. In aflatoxicosis, oxidative stress is a common mechanism contributing to initiation and progression of hepatic damage. The aim of this work was to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of cactus cladode extract (CCE on aflatoxin B1-induced liver damage in mice by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA level, the protein carbonyls generation and the heat shock proteins Hsp 70 and Hsp 27 expressions in liver. We also looked for an eventual protective effect against AFB1-induced genotoxicity as determined by chromosome aberrations test, SOS Chromotest and DNA fragmentation assay. We further evaluated the modulation of p53, bax and bcl2 protein expressions in liver. Methods Adult, healthy balbC (20-25 g male mice were pre-treated by intraperitonial administration of CCE (50 mg/Kg.b.w for 2 weeks. Control animals were treated 3 days a week for 4 weeks by intraperitonial administration of 250 μg/Kg.b.w AFB1. Animals treated by AFB1 and CCE were divided into two groups: the first group was administrated CCE 2 hours before each treatment with AFB1 3 days a week for 4 weeks. The second group was administrated without pre-treatment with CCE but this extract was administrated 24 hours after each treatment with AFB1 3 days a week for 4 weeks. Results Our results clearly showed that AFB1 induced significant alterations in oxidative stress markers. In addition, it has a genotoxic potential and it increased the expression of pro apoptotic proteins p53 and bax and decreased the expression of bcl2. The treatment of CCE before or after treatment with AFB1, showed (i a total reduction of AFB1 induced oxidative damage markers, (ii an anti-genotoxic effect resulting in an efficient prevention of chromosomal aberrations and DNA fragmentation compared to the group treated with AFB1 alone (iii restriction of the effect of AFB1 by differential modulation of the expression of p53 which

  9. Molecular and genotoxic effects in Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to tritiated water at an elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallas, L.; Jha, A. [School of Biological Sciences, Plymouth University (United Kingdom); Bean, T.; Lyons, B. [Cefas Weymouth Laboratory (United Kingdom); Turner, A. [School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Plymouth University (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    h. These stress-induced genes are known to have protective roles as molecular chaperones, as radical scavengers, in control of cell cycle checkpoints and in DNA repair. As such, the temporal shift in HTO-induced genotoxicity may be as a result of compromised defence mechanisms. The {sup 3}H concentration in tissues was highest in byssus for all time points at both temperatures. The order in which other tissues accumulated {sup 3}H varied with time and temperature, but in general digestive gland, gill and foot showed higher concentrations than other tissues. Corresponding whole organism dose rates, as calculated using the ERICA tool, ranged from 10.94 ± 0.08 to 18.72 ± 0.10 μGy h{sup -1} (with total doses of 0.13 ± 0.01 to 2.75 ± 0.03 mGy) and were temperature- and time-dependent. This study is the first to investigate temperature effects on radiation-induced genotoxicity in the ecologically representative marine invertebrate, Mytilus galloprovincialis, which is especially pertinent in the context of rising sea temperatures and thermal pollution from nuclear institutions. From an ecological perspective, this research suggests that mussels (or similar marine species) exposed to increased temperature and HTO may have a compromised ability to defend against genotoxic insult. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  10. Cytotoxic, genotoxic and apoptotic effects of naringenin-oxime relative to naringenin on normal and cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurrahim Kocyigit

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: This study showed that both NG-Ox and NG possess cytotoxic, genotoxic and apoptotic activities through the production of ROS on cells, NG-Ox being the more effective one. Therefore, derived compound of NG might be used as antiproliferative agents for the treatment of cancer.

  11. The genotoxic effects of DNA lesions induced by artificial UV-radiation and sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuch, André Passaglia; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins

    2010-06-01

    Solar radiation sustains and affects all life forms on Earth. The increase in solar UV-radiation at environmental levels, due to depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer, highlights serious issues of social concern. This becomes still more dramatic in tropical and subtropical regions where radiation-intensity is still higher. Thus, there is the need to evaluate the harmful effects of solar UV-radiation on the DNA molecule as a basis for assessing the risks involved for human health, biological productivity and ecosystems. In order to evaluate the profile of DNA damage induced by this form of radiation and its genotoxic effects, plasmid DNA samples were exposed to artificial-UV lamps and directly to sunlight. The induction of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photoproducts (CPDs) and oxidative DNA damage in these molecules were evaluated by means of specific DNA repair enzymes. On the other hand, the biological effects of such lesions were determined through the analysis of the DNA inactivation rate and mutation frequency, after replication of the damaged pCMUT vector in an Escherichia coliMBL50 strain. The results indicated the induction of a significant number of CPDs after exposure to increasing doses of UVC, UVB, UVA radiation and sunlight. Interestingly, these photoproducts are those lesions that better correlate with plasmid inactivation as well as mutagenesis, and the oxidative DNA damages induced present very low correlation with these effects. The results indicated that DNA photoproducts play the main role in the induction of genotoxic effects by artificial UV-radiation sources and sunlight.

  12. Acute and chronic effects of erythromycin exposure on oxidative stress and genotoxicity parameters of Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, S., E-mail: up201208875@fc.up.pt [Departamento de Biologia da Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto (FCUP), Rua do Campo Alegre s/n, 4169–007 Porto (Portugal); Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigação Marinha e Ambiental (CIIMAR/CIMAR), Rua dos Bragas 289, 4050–123 Porto (Portugal); Antunes, S.C. [Departamento de Biologia da Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto (FCUP), Rua do Campo Alegre s/n, 4169–007 Porto (Portugal); Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigação Marinha e Ambiental (CIIMAR/CIMAR), Rua dos Bragas 289, 4050–123 Porto (Portugal); Correia, A.T. [Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigação Marinha e Ambiental (CIIMAR/CIMAR), Rua dos Bragas 289, 4050–123 Porto (Portugal); Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde da Universidade Fernando Pessoa (FCS-UFP), Rua Carlos da Maia, 296, 4200–150, Porto (Portugal); Nunes, B. [Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar (CESAM), Campus de Santiago, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810–193 Aveiro (Portugal); Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810–193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2016-03-01

    Erythromycin (ERY) is a macrolide antibiotic used in human and veterinary medicine, and has been detected in various aquatic compartments. Recent studies have indicated that this compound can exert biological activity on non-target organisms environmentally exposed. The present study aimed to assess the toxic effects of ERY in Oncorhynchus mykiss after acute and chronic exposures. The here adopted strategy involved exposure to three levels of ERY, the first being similar to concentrations reported to occur in the wild, thus ecologically relevant. Catalase (CAT), total glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GRed) activities and lipid peroxidation (TBARS levels) were quantified as oxidative stress biomarkers in gills and liver. Genotoxic endpoints, reflecting different types of genetic damage in blood cells, were also determined, by performing analysis of genetic damage (determination of the genetic damage index, GDI, measured by comet assay) and of erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities (ENAs). The results suggest the occurrence of a mild, but significant, oxidative stress scenario in gills. For acutely exposed organisms, significant alterations were observed in CAT and GRed activities, and also in TBARS levels, which however are modifications with uncertain biological interpretation, despite indicating involvement of an oxidative effect and response. After chronic exposure, a significant decrease of CAT activity, increase of GPx activity and TBARS levels in gills was noticed. In liver, significant decrease in TBARS levels were observed in both exposures. Comet and ENAs assays indicated significant increases on genotoxic damage of O. mykiss, after erythromycin exposures. This set of data (acute and chronic) suggests that erythromycin has the potential to induce DNA strand breaks in blood cells, and demonstrate the induction of chromosome breakage and/or segregational abnormalities. Overall results indicate that both DNA damaging effects induced by

  13. Human mesenchymal stem cells are resistant to cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of cisplatin in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Corrêa Bellagamba

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are known for their important properties involving multilineage differentiation potential., trophic factor secretion and localization along various organs and tissues. On the dark side, MSCs play a distinguished role in tumor microenvironments by differentiating into tumor-associated fibroblasts or supporting tumor growth via distinct mechanisms. Cisplatin (CIS is a drug widely applied in the treatment of a large number of cancers and is known for its cytotoxic and genotoxic effects, both in vitro and in vivo. Here we assessed the effects of CIS on MSCs and the ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR-3, by MTT and comet assays. Our results demonstrated the resistance of MSCs to cell death and DNA damage induction by CIS, which was not observed when OVCAR-3 cells were exposed to this drug.

  14. Causes and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, Carol L; Feldman, Mark A; DaSilva, Alison T

    2003-07-01

    Most companies make charitable donations, but few approach their contributions with an eye toward enhancing their brands. Those that do take such an approach commit talent and know-how, not just dollars, to a pressing but carefully chosen social need and then tell the world about the cause and their service to it. Through the association, both the business and the cause benefit in ways they could not otherwise. Organizations such as Avon, ConAgra Foods, and Chevrolet have recognized that a sustained cause-branding program can improve their reputations, boost their employees' morale, strengthen relations with business partners, and drive sales. And the targeted causes receive far more money than they could have from direct corporate gifts alone. The authors examine these best practices and offer four principles for building successful cause-branding programs. First, they say, a company should select a cause that advances its corporate goals. That is, unless the competitive logic for supporting the cause is clear, a company shouldn't even consider putting its finite resources behind it. Second, a business should commit to a cause before picking its charitable partners. Otherwise, a cause-branding program may become too dependent on its partners. Third, a company should put all its assets to work, especially its employees. It should leverage the professional skills of its workers as well as its other assets such as distribution networks. And fourth, a company should promote its philanthropic initiatives through every possible channel. In addition to using the media, it should communicate its efforts through the Web, annual reports, direct mail, and so on. Cause branding is a way to turn the obligations of corporate citizenship into a valuable asset. When the cause is well chosen, the commitment genuine, and the program well executed, the cause helps the company, and the company helps the cause.

  15. Genotoxic Effects in Swimmers Exposed to Disinfection By-products in Indoor Swimming Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogevinas, Manolis; Villanueva, Cristina M.; Font-Ribera, Laia; Liviac, Danae; Bustamante, Mariona; Espinoza, Felicidad; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.; Espinosa, Aina; Fernandez, Pilar; DeMarini, David M.; Grimalt, Joan O.; Grummt, Tamara; Marcos, Ricard

    2010-01-01

    Background Exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water has been associated with cancer risk. A recent study (Villanueva et al. 2007; Am J Epidemiol 165:148–156) found an increased bladder cancer risk among subjects attending swimming pools relative to those not attending. Objectives We evaluated adults who swam in chlorinated pools to determine whether exposure to DBPs in pool water is associated with biomarkers of genotoxicity. Methods We collected blood, urine, and exhaled air samples from 49 nonsmoking adult volunteers before and after they swam for 40 min in an indoor chlorinated pool. We estimated associations between the concentrations of four trihalomethanes (THMs) in exhaled breath and changes in micronuclei (MN) and DNA damage (comet assay) in peripheral blood lymphocytes before and 1 hr after swimming; urine mutagenicity (Ames assay) before and 2 hr after swimming; and MN in exfoliated urothelial cells before and 2 weeks after swimming. We also estimated associations and interactions with polymorphisms in genes related to DNA repair or to DBP metabolism. Results After swimming, the total concentration of the four THMs in exhaled breath was seven times higher than before swimming. The change in the frequency of micronucleated lymphocytes after swimming increased in association with higher exhaled concentrations of the brominated THMs (p = 0.03 for bromodichloromethane, p = 0.05 for chlorodibromomethane, p = 0.01 for bromoform) but not chloroform. Swimming was not associated with DNA damage detectable by the comet assay. Urine mutagenicity increased significantly after swimming, in association with the higher concentration of exhaled bromoform (p = 0.004). We found no significant associations with changes in micronucleated urothelial cells. Conclusions Our findings support potential genotoxic effects of exposure to DBPs from swimming pools. The positive health effects gained by swimming could be increased by reducing the potential health

  16. Genotoxicity of swine effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techio, V H; Stolberg, J; Kunz, A; Zanin, E; Perdomo, C C

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of genotoxic effects of swine effluents from different stages of a treatment system for swine wastes through bioassay of stamen hairs and micronuclei in Tradescantia (clone BNL 4430). No significant differences (p≥0.05) regarding the genic mutations were found in the bioassay of stamen hairs, independently of the effluent analysed. For the genotoxicity test with micronuclei, the plants exposed to raw wastes, to sludge, and to effluent of the biodigester have presented higher rates of chromosomal damages (micronuclei), with significant differences in relation to the control group and other effluent of the waste treatment system (p≤0.05). The association between the chemical parameters and the genotoxicity data have shown that the variables COD and TKN have presented significant correlation (p≤0.05) with the number of mutagenic events in the tetrads.

  17. Arsenic-induced biochemical and genotoxic effects and distribution in tissues of Sprague-Dawley rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patlolla, Anita K.; Todorov, Todor; Tchounwou, Paul B.; van der Voet, Gijsbert; Centeno, Jose A.

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a well documented human carcinogen. However, its mechanisms of toxic action and carcinogenic potential in animals have not been conclusive. In this research, we investigated the biochemical and genotoxic effects of As and studied its distribution in selected tissues of Sprague–Dawley rats. Four groups of six male rats, each weighing approximately 60 ± 2 g, were injected intraperitoneally, once a day for 5 days with doses of 5, 10, 15, 20 mg/kg BW of arsenic trioxide. A control group was also made of 6 animals injected with distilled water. Following anaesthetization, blood was collected and enzyme analysis was performed by spectrophotometry following standard protocols. At the end of experimentation, the animals were sacrificed, and the lung, liver, brain and kidney were collected 24 h after the fifth day treatment. Chromosome and micronuclei preparation was obtained from bone marrow cells. Arsenic exposure significantly increased (p < 0.05) the activities of plasma alanine aminotransferase–glutamate pyruvate transaminase (ALT/GPT), and aspartate aminotransferase–glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (AST/GOT), as well as the number of structural chromosomal aberrations (SCA) and frequency of micronuclei (MN) in the bone marrow cells. In contrast, the mitotic index in these cells was significantly reduced (p < 0.05). These findings indicate that aminotransferases are candidate biomarkers for arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity. Our results also demonstrate that As has a strong genotoxic potential, as measured by the bone marrow SCA and MN tests in Sprague–Dawley rats. Total arsenic concentrations in tissues were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A dynamic reaction cell (DRC) with hydrogen gas was used to eliminate the ArCl interference at mass 75, in the measurement of total As. Total As doses in tissues tended to correlate with specific exposure levels.

  18. Evaluation of Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Exposed In Vitro to Neonicotinoid Insecticides News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Calderón-Segura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Calypso (thiacloprid, Poncho (clothianidin, Gaucho (imidacloprid, and Jade (imidacloprid are commercial neonicotinoid insecticides, a new class of agrochemicals in México. However, genotoxic and cytotoxic studies have not been performed. In the present study, human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL were exposed in vitro to different concentrations of the four insecticides. The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects were evaluated using the alkaline comet and trypan blue dye exclusion assays. DNA damage was evaluated using two genotoxicity parameters: tail length and comet frequency. Exposure to 9.5×10-6 to 5.7×10-5 M Jade; 2.8×10-4 to 1.7×10-3 M Gaucho; 0.6×10-1 to 1.4×10-1 M Calypso; 1.2×10-1 to 9.5×10-1 M Poncho for 2 h induced a significant increase DNA damage with a concentration-dependent relationship. Jade was the most genotoxic of the four insecticides studied. Cytotoxicity was observed in cells exposed to 18×10-3 M Jade, 2.0×10-3 M Gaucho, 2.0×10-1 M Calypso, 1.07 M Poncho, and cell death occurred at 30×10-3 M Jade, 3.3×10-3 M Gaucho, 2.8×10-1 M Calypso, and 1.42 M Poncho. This study provides the first report of genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in PBL following in vitro exposure to commercial neonicotinoid insecticides.

  19. Evaluation of Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Exposed In Vitro to Neonicotinoid Insecticides News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Segura, María Elena; Gómez-Arroyo, Sandra; Villalobos-Pietrini, Rafael; Martínez-Valenzuela, Carmen; Carbajal-López, Yolanda; Calderón-Ezquerro, María del Carmen; Cortés-Eslava, Josefina; García-Martínez, Rocío; Flores-Ramírez, Diana; Rodríguez-Romero, María Isabel; Méndez-Pérez, Patricia; Bañuelos-Ruíz, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Calypso (thiacloprid), Poncho (clothianidin), Gaucho (imidacloprid), and Jade (imidacloprid) are commercial neonicotinoid insecticides, a new class of agrochemicals in México. However, genotoxic and cytotoxic studies have not been performed. In the present study, human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were exposed in vitro to different concentrations of the four insecticides. The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects were evaluated using the alkaline comet and trypan blue dye exclusion assays. DNA damage was evaluated using two genotoxicity parameters: tail length and comet frequency. Exposure to 9.5 × 10−6 to 5.7 × 10−5 M Jade; 2.8 × 10−4 to 1.7 × 10−3 M Gaucho; 0.6 × 10−1 to 1.4 × 10−1 M Calypso; 1.2 × 10−1 to 9.5 × 10−1 M Poncho for 2 h induced a significant increase DNA damage with a concentration-dependent relationship. Jade was the most genotoxic of the four insecticides studied. Cytotoxicity was observed in cells exposed to 18 × 10−3 M Jade, 2.0 × 10−3 M Gaucho, 2.0 × 10−1 M Calypso, 1.07 M Poncho, and cell death occurred at 30 × 10−3 M Jade, 3.3 × 10−3 M Gaucho, 2.8 × 10−1 M Calypso, and 1.42 M Poncho. This study provides the first report of genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in PBL following in vitro exposure to commercial neonicotinoid insecticides. PMID:22545045

  20. Comparative study of the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of titanium oxide and aluminium oxide nanoparticles in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Virgilio, A.L. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), Diag. 113 y 64, Correo 16, Suc. 4, La Plata (1900) (Argentina); Reigosa, M. [Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biologia Celular (IMBICE), Calle 526 y Camino Gral. Belgrano (entre 10 y 11), La Plata 1900 (Argentina); Arnal, P.M. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), Diag. 113 y 64, Correo 16, Suc. 4, La Plata 1900 (Argentina); Fernandez Lorenzo de Mele, M., E-mail: mmele@inifta.unlp.edu.ar [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), Diag. 113 y 64, Correo 16, Suc. 4, La Plata 1900 (Argentina)

    2010-05-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) and aluminium oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanoparticles (NPs) on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells using neutral red (NR), mitochondrial activity (by MTT assay), sister chromatid exchange (SCE), micronucleus (MN) formation, and cell cycle kinetics techniques. Results showed a dose-related cytotoxic effect evidenced after 24 h by changes in lysosomal and mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity. Interestingly, transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) showed the formation of perinuclear vesicles in CHO-K1 cells after treatment with both NPs during 24 h but no NP was detected in the nuclei. Genotoxic effects were shown by MN frequencies which significantly increased at 0.5 and 1 {mu}g/mL TiO{sub 2} and 0.5-10 {mu}g/mL Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. SCE frequencies were higher for cells treated with 1-5 {mu}g/mL TiO{sub 2}. The absence of metaphases evidenced cytotoxicity for higher concentrations of TiO{sub 2}. No SCE induction was achieved after treatment with 1-25 {mu}g/mL Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In conclusion, findings showed cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs on CHO-K1 cells. Possible causes of controversial reports are discussed further on.

  1. METABOLISM, MICROFLORA EFFECTS, AND GENOTOXICITY IN HALOACETIC ACID-TREATED CULTURES OF RAT CECAL MICROBIOTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haloacetic acids are by-products of drinking water disinfection. Several compounds in this class are genotoxic and have been identified as rodent hepatocarcinogens. Enzymes produced by the normal intestinal bacteria can transform some promutagens and procarcinogens to their bio...

  2. Genotoxic Effects of Titanium Dioxide and Cerium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Respiratory Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nanomaterial industry has recently seen rapid growth, therefore, the risk assessment of human exposure to nanomaterials in consumer products is of paramount importance. The genotoxicity of nanomaterials is a fundamental aspect of hazard identification and regulatory guidance....

  3. METABOLISM, MICROFLORA EFFECTS, AND GENOTOXICITY IN HALOACETIC ACID-TREATED CULTURES OF RAT CECAL MICROBIOTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haloacetic acids are by-products of drinking water disinfection. Several compounds in this class are genotoxic and have been identified as rodent hepatocarcinogens. Enzymes produced by the normal intestinal bacteria can transform some promutagens and procarcinogens to their bio...

  4. Zinc-Induced Genotoxic Effects in Root Meristems of Barley Seedlings

    OpenAIRE

    TRUTA, Elena; Daniela GHERGHEL; Iulia Csilla I. BARA; Gabriela V. VOCHITA

    2013-01-01

    The pollution increase, as a result of the release into environment of genotoxic chemicals, including heavy metals, largely affects the ecosystems and the health of living organisms. Although zinc is not considered highly phytotoxic, its excess becomes noxious. In literature, the reports on zinc genotoxicity are equivocal. Therefore, the objective of this work was to evaluate the amplitude of cytogenetic damage induced in Hordeum vulgare L. cv. ‘Madalin’ after seed treatment with different co...

  5. Protective effect of sodium selenite on genotoxicity to human whole blood cultures induced by aflatoxin B1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatime Geyikoglu

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of selenium and aflatoxin on human whole blood cultures (WBC in relation to induction of sister-chromatid exchange (SCE. Results showed that the frequency of SCEs in peripheral lymphocytes was significantly increased by the direct-acting mutagen AFB1 (at doses 5 and 10 µM except for 1µM compared with controls. When sodium selenite (Na2SeO3 was added at a molar ratio of 5x10-7 and 1x10-6, cells did not show significant increase in SCE frequency. Whereas, SCE rates induced by the various AFB1 concentrations could be significantly reduced by the presence of Na2SeO3 in a clear dose-related manner. These results indicated that selenite and AFB1 mutually antagonized their ability to cause DNA damage leading to the formation of SCEs. However, selenium didn't completely inhibit induction of SCEs by AFB1 compared with controls. AFB1 induced oxidative damage contributed to its genotoxicity in human WBC.

  6. Genotoxic effects of the herbicide Roundup Transorb and its active ingredient glyphosate on the fish Prochilodus lineatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Natália Cestari; Sofia, Silvia Helena; Martinez, Claudia B R

    2014-01-01

    Roundup Transorb (RT) is a glyphosate-based herbicide and despite its wide use around the world there are few studies comparing the effects of the active ingredient with the formulated product. In this context the purpose of this study was to compare the genotoxicity of the active ingredient glyphosate with the formulated product RT in order to clarify whether the active ingredient and the surfactant of the RT formula may exert toxic effects on the DNA molecule in juveniles of fish Prochilodus lineatus. Erythrocytes and gill cells of fish exposed to glyphosate and to RT showed DNA damage scores significantly higher than control animals. These results revealed that both glyphosate itself and RT were genotoxic to gill cells and erythrocytes of P. lineatus, suggesting that their use should be carefully monitored considering their potential impact on tropical aquatic biota. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of cerium dioxide nanoparticles in Oncorhynchus mykiss gills after an acute exposure: assessment of oxidative stress, genotoxicity and histological alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Teodorico Correia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Data about the toxicological effects of cerium dioxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NP in fish are scarce. This work aimed to assess the CeO2 NP possible deleterious effects on the gills of Oncorhynchus mykiss. A semi-continuous acute test was conducted to expose the rainbow trout to a freshwater control, 0.25, 2.50 and 25.00 mg/L CeO2 NPs for up to 96 hours. Gills pathological index showed a dose-effect relationship for the individuals exposed to CeO2. Gills showed aneurisms, epithelial lifting and hyperplasia. Furthermore exposure to CeO2 NPs caused statistical differences in some biomarkers determinations, namely a significant increase in the catalase activity and genotoxicity the higher concentrations. No significant changes were however observed in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances content, Na+-K+ ATPase and glutathione s-transferase activities. This study suggests that CeO2 nanoparticles are toxic compounds that can lead to histological, biochemical and genotoxic alterations.

  8. In Vitro Analysis of Early Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects of Okadaic Acid in Different Cell Types of the Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prego-Faraldo, María Verónica; Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Laffon, Blanca; Eirín-López, José M; Méndez, Josefina

    2015-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) is the predominant biotoxin responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) syndrome in humans. While its harmful effects have been extensively studied in mammalian cell lines, the impact on marine organisms routinely exposed to OA is still not fully known. Few investigations available on bivalve molluscs suggest less genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of OA at high concentrations during long exposure times. In contrast, no apparent information is available on how sublethal concentrations of OA affect these organisms over short exposure times. In order to fill this gap, this study addressed for the first time in vitro analysis of early genotoxic and cytotoxic effects attributed to OA in two cell types of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. Accordingly, hemocytes and gill cells were exposed to low OA concentrations (10, 50, 100, 200, or 500 nM) for short periods of time (1 or 2 h). The resulting DNA damage, as apoptosis and necrosis, was subsequently quantified using the comet assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Data demonstrated that (1) mussel hemocytes seem to display a resistance mechanism against early genotoxic and cytotoxic OA-induced effects, (2) mussel gill cells display higher sensitivity to early OA-mediated genotoxicity than hemocytes, and (3) mussel gill cells constitute more suitable systems to evaluate the genotoxic effect of low OA concentrations in short exposure studies. Taken together, this investigation provides evidence supporting the more reliable suitability of mussel gill cells compared to hemocytes to evaluate the genotoxic effect of low short-duration exposure to OA.

  9. Anti-oxidative and anti-genotoxic effects of methanolic extract of Mentha pulegium on human lymphocyte culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpsoy, Lokman; Sahin, Hilal; Karaman, Seyda

    2011-08-01

    In the present work, methanolic extract of Mentha pulegium from Erzurum, Turkey, was used in order to report the results of anti-oxidant capacity, anti-oxidant activity and anti-genotoxic effects. The total antioxidant capacity and total phenolic content were measured by using CUPRAC, ABTS and Folin-Ciocalteu colorimetric methods. The total phenolic content was higher than the total antioxidant capacity (for the results of both the CUPRAC and ABTS methods) of methanolic extract of M pulegium (ME). Also, we evaluated the anti-oxidant enzyme activity such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutation peroxidase, total glutation (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in human lymphocyte culture. In CCl₄-treated group, the activity of SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and GSH decreased significantly and the level of MDA increased significantly. A significant increase in the activity of SOD, GPx and the level of GSH were seen when supplemented with ME to CCl₄-treated group. Furthermore, a significant decrease in the level of MDA was observed when compared with CCl₄ alone treated group. In addition, anti-genotoxic effect of ME was studied by using sister chromatid exchange (SCE) method. As a result, ME has shown anti-genotoxic effect depend on anti-oxidative effect on human lymphocyte culture.

  10. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity evaluation of oenothein B and its protective effect against mitomycin C-induced mutagenic action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cinthia Aparecida; Silva, Carolina Ribeiro; Véras, Jefferson Hollanda; Chen-Chen, Lee; Ferri, Pedro Henrique; Santos, Suzana da Costa

    2014-06-01

    The natural product oenothein B (OeB), a dimeric macrocyclic ellagitannin, has a wide range of biological activities, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, antifungal, and antitumor. However, investigations concerning its genotoxicity have not been carried out. This study assessed the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and protective effects of oenothein B using in vitro SOS-Inductest and in vivo mouse bone marrow micronucleus (MN) assay through oral and intraperitonial routes. In both assays oenothein B did not produce genotoxic effects in any of doses tested; in contrast, cytotoxic effect in cells was detected only in mice groups treated by both routes and exposed for 24 and 48h. Antigenotoxic and anticytotoxic activities of oenothein B were evaluated using both assays in combination with mitomycin C (MMC), a bioreductive alkylating agent. In the MN assay, a significant reduction was observed in MN frequency in all groups co-treated with MMC and OeB compared to those which received only MMC. Anticytotoxicity was observed in mice groups exposed to OeB and MMC for 24 and 48h. In the SOS-Inductest, oenothein B failed to show antigenotoxic and anticytotoxic effects; thus, it undoubtedly showed an in vivo protective activity against primary DNA damage induced by mitomycin C.

  11. Genotoxic effect of Pb and Cd on in vitro cultures of Sphagnum palustre: An evaluation by ISSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Maria Cristina; Capozzi, Fiore; Giordano, Simonetta; Spagnuolo, Valeria

    2017-08-01

    In the present work, the genotoxic effect of cadmium and lead supplied in a laboratory trial, was investigated for the first time in the moss Sphagnum palustre, by ISSR molecular markers. A total of 169 reproducible bands were obtained with 12 primers, ten of which gave polymorphisms (i.e., appearance/disappearance of bands), indicating a clear genotoxic effect induced by the metals. Both metals induced a decrease of the genome template stability in a dose dependent manner. At concentration >10(-5) Cd also induced a general toxic effect in S. palustre, leading to chlorophyll degradation and moss death. Moreover, we followed the fate of supplied heavy metals into the moss tissue by SEM-EDX to see if they entered the cells. SEM-EDX observations on moss cultures treated with equimolar concentrations of the two metals showed that most Pb precipitated in form of particles on moss surface, while Cd did not aggregate in particles and was not found on moss surface. In light of these findings, we concluded that probably Pb induced a genotoxic effect at lower intracellular concentrations than Cd. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of genotoxicity and DNA protective effects of mangiferin, a glucosylxanthone isolated from Mangifera indica L. stem bark extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodeiro, I; Hernandez, S; Morffi, J; Herrera, J A; Gómez-Lechón, M J; Delgado, R; Espinosa-Aguirre, J J

    2012-09-01

    Mangiferin is a glucosylxantone isolated from Mangifera indica L. stem bark. Several studies have shown its pharmacological properties which make it a promising candidate for putative therapeutic use. This study was focused to investigate the in vitro genotoxic effects of mangiferin in the Ames test, SOS Chromotest and Comet assay. The genotoxic effects in bone marrow erythrocytes from NMRI mice orally treated with mangiferin (2000 mg/kg) were also evaluated. Additionally, its potential antimutagenic activity against several mutagens in the Ames test and its effects on CYP1A1 activity were assessed. Mangiferin (50-5000 μg/plate) did not increased the frequency of reverse mutations in the Ames test, nor induced primary DNA damage (5-1000 μg/mL) to Escherichia coli PQ37 cells under the SOS Chromotest. It was observed neither single strand breaks nor alkali-labile sites in blood peripheral lymphocytes or hepatocytes after 1h exposition to 10-500 μg/mL of mangiferin under the Comet assay. Furthermore, micronucleus studies showed mangiferin neither induced cytotoxic activity nor increased the frequency of micronucleated/binucleated cells in mice bone marrow. In short, mangiferin did not induce cytotoxic or genotoxic effects but it protect against DNA damage which would be associated with its antioxidant properties and its capacity to inhibit CYP enzymes.

  13. Effect of PCB153 on BaP-induced genotoxicity in HepG2 cells via modulation of metabolic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Ai-Lin; Xie, Shao-Hua; Chen, Xue-Min; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2009-04-30

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is a representative environmental carcinogen and is metabolically activated by several cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes to become the ultimate carcinogen. Numerous studies have indicated that 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) could effectively alter the activity of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs). Therefore, we propose that PCB153 may affect BaP-induced genotoxicity mediated by XMEs. In the present study, we treated HepG2 cells with BaP (50 microM) or PCB153 (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 microM), or pretreated the cells with PCB153 for 48 h followed by treatment with a combination of both BaP and PCB153. CYP1A1 activity was dramatically increased in cells treated with either BaP or PCB153. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity was increased in BaP-treated cells, but decreased in PCB153-treated cells. In parallel to studies on enzyme activity, the micronuclei (MN) assay was used to assess the genotoxic damage caused by BaP and PCB153. BaP and PCB153 at 100 microM enhanced MN formation. In contrast to BaP treatment alone, treatment with both BaP and PCB153 significantly enhanced the activity of CYP1A1 and the formation of MN, but reduced the activity of GST. alpha-Naphthoflavone (ANF), an inhibitor of CYP1A1, inhibited MN formation in the presence of both BaP and PCB153. In addition, there was a positive correlation between CYP1A activity and MN formation (r(2)=0.794, PBaP and PCB153 may increase BaP-induced genotoxicity, possibly through the induction of CYP1A1 and inhibition of GST.

  14. Potential genotoxic effects of GSM-1800 exposure on human cutaneous and nerve cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, S.; Poulletier De Gannes, F.; Haro, E.; Ruffie, G.; Lagroye, I.; Billaudel, B.; Veyret, B. [PIOM laboratory, UMR 5501 CNRS, ENSCPB, 33 -Pessac (France)

    2006-07-01

    Introduction The GSM-1800 signal has been in use for several years in Europe and questions raised about its potential biological effects, in view of the fact that, with respect to GSM-900, the increase in the carrier frequency corresponds to a more superficial absorption in the tissues. Consequently, the skin becomes an even more important target for the absorption of the radiofrequency radiation (R.F.R.) emitted by mobile phones. Nevertheless, brain tissues remain a critical target. Cells In order to determine whether R.F.R. at 1800 MHz could behave as a genotoxic agent, skin and brain cells were exposed to a 217-Hz-modulated GSM-1800 signal and assayed using the comet assay: (1) normal human epidermal keratinocytes (N.H.E.K.) and dermal fibroblasts (N.H.D.F.) which are cutaneous cells from epidermis and dermis respectively, and (2) the S.H. -S.Y.5.Y. and C.H.M.E.-5 human cell lines, which are neuroblastoma and micro-glial cells, respectively. Exposure The R.F.R. exposure system that was used in these experiments was manufactured by I.T. I.S. (Zurich, Switzerland). It consists in two shorted waveguides allowing to run exposed and sham conditions at the same time in the same culture incubator, at 37 Celsius degrees, 5% CO{sub 2}. It is controlled by a software, which provides blind conditions until completion of data analysis. The specific absorption rate (S.A.R.) used was 2 W/kg, corresponding to the public exposure limit recommended by I.C.N.I.R.P. and the exposure duration was 48 hours. Comet assay At the end of the exposure, cells were removed from their Petri dish by trypsin/EDTA treatment, counted and 5 x 10{sup 4} cells were used to detect DNA damage including single DNA breaks. Positive controls were performed using hydrogen peroxidase (1%, 1 hour). The genotoxic effects were detected using the alkaline comet assay kit (Trevigen slides) following the supplier procedure. Under these conditions, 6 independent experiments were performed for each cell type (2

  15. Effects of chronic exposure to benzalkonium chloride in Oncorhynchus mykiss: cholinergic neurotoxicity, oxidative stress, peroxidative damage and genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, S C; Nunes, B; Rodrigues, S; Nunes, R; Fernandes, J; Correia, A T

    2016-07-01

    Benzalkonium chloride (BAC) is one of the most used conservatives in pharmaceutical preparations. However, its use is limited to a small set of external use formulations, due to its high toxicity. Benzalkonium chloride effects are related to the potential exertion of deleterious effects, mediated via oxidative stress and through interaction with membrane enzymes, leading to cellular damage. To address the ecotoxicity of this specific compound rainbow trouts were chronically exposed to BAC at environmental relevant concentrations (ranging from 0.100 to 1.050mg/L), and the biological response of cholinergic neurotoxicity, modulation of the antioxidant defense, phase II metabolism, lipid peroxidation and genotoxicity was studied. The obtained results showed a dual pattern of antioxidant response, with significant alterations in catalase activity (starting at 0.180mg/L), and lipid peroxidation, for intermediate (0.180 and 0.324mg/L) concentrations. No significant alterations occurred for glutathione-S-transferases activity. An unexpected increased of the acetylcholinesterase activity was also recorded for the individuals exposed to higher concentrations of BAC (starting at 0.180mg/L). Furthermore, exposure to BAC resulted in the establishment of genotoxic alterations, observable (for the specific case of the comet assay results) for all tested BAC concentrations. However, and considering that the oxidative response was not devisable, other mechanisms may be involved in the genotoxic effects reported here.

  16. Antigenotoxic effects of a polyherbal drug septilin against the genotoxicity of cyclophosphamide in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shruthi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Septilin (Spt is a polyherbal drug formulation from Himalaya Drug Company, consisting of extracts from different medicinal plants and minerals. In the traditional system of medicine, septilin is being used as immunomodulatory, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. In the present study, the protective effects of septilin against the genotoxicity of cyclophosphamide (CP a widely used alkylating anticancer drug was evaluated by using in vivo micronucleus (MN and sperm shape abnormality assays in Swiss albino mice. CP administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 50 mg/kg b.w. was used as positive mutagen. Different doses of septilin viz., 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg b.w. was orally administered for 5 consecutive days. CP was administered intraperitoneally on 5th day. MN and sperm preparations were made after 24 h and 35 days respectively. CP induced significant MN in both bone marrow and peripheral blood cells and also a high frequency of abnormal sperms. In septilin supplemented animals, no significant induction of MN and abnormal sperms was recorded. In septilin supplemented groups, a dose dependent significant decrease in CP induced clastogenicity was observed. Thus the current in vivo study revealed the antigenotoxic effects of septilin against CP induced damage, in both somatic and germ cells of Swiss albino mice.

  17. Nickel oxide nanoparticles induce inflammation and genotoxic effect in lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capasso, Laura; Camatini, Marina; Gualtieri, Maurizio

    2014-04-07

    Nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiONPs) toxicity has been evaluated in the human pulmonary epithelial cell lines: BEAS-2B and A549. The nanoparticles, used at the doses of 20, 40, 60, 80, 100 μg/ml, induced a significant reduction of cell viability and an increase of apoptotic and necrotic cells at 24h. A significant release of interleukin-6 and -8 was assessed after 24h of treatment, even intracellular ROS increased already at 45 min after exposure. The results obtained evidenced that the cytokines release was dependent on mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) cascade through the induction of NF-kB pathway. NiONPs induced cell cycle alteration in both the cell lines even in different phases and these modifications may be induced by the NPs genotoxic effect, suggested by the nuclear translocation of phospho-ATM and phospho-ATR. Our results confirm the cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory potential of NiONPs. Moreover their ability in inducing DNA damage responses has been demonstrated. Such effects were present in A549 cells which internalize the NPs and BEAS-2B cells in which endocytosis has not been observed.

  18. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of aqueous extracts of five medicinal plants on Allium cepa Linn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinboro, A; Bakare, A A

    2007-07-25

    The cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of aqueous extracts of five medicinal plants: Azadirachta indica (A. Juss), Morinda lucida (Benth.), Cymbopogon citratus (DC Stapf.), Mangifera indica (Linn.) and Carica papaya (Linn.) was evaluated using the Allium cepa assay. The extracts were prepared with tap water as practised locally. Onion bulbs were exposed to 1, 5, 10, 25 and 50%; and 1, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20% concentrations (v/v) of each of the extracts for macroscopic and microscopic analyses, respectively. There was concentration-dependent and statistically significant (Pinhibition of root growth by the extracts when compared with the control. The EC(50) obtained for decoctions of Azadirachta indica. Cymbopogon citratus, Mangifera indica and Carica papaya were 0.6, 3.0, 1.4 and 0.8%, respectively. It was 2.6 and 0.8% for the squeezed extracts of Azadirachta indica and Morinda lucida, respectively. All the tested extracts were observed to have mitodepressive effects on cell division and induced mitotic spindle disturbance in Allium cepa. These results suggest an inhibitory, mitodepressive and turbagenic activities of the aqueous extracts on Allium cepa.

  19. Tartrazine induces structural and functional aberrations and genotoxic effects in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayyat, Latifa; Essawy, Amina; Sorour, Jehan; Soffar, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Tartrazine is a synthetic organic azo dye widely used in food and pharmaceutical products. The current study aimed to evaluate the possible adverse effect of this coloring food additive on renal and hepatic structures and functions. Also, the genotoxic potential of tartrazine on white blood cells was investigated using comet assay. Twenty adult male Wistar rats were grouped into two groups of 10 each, control- and tartrazine-treated groups. The control group was administered orally with water alone. The experimental group was administered orally with tartrazine (7.5 mg/kg, b.wt.). Our results showed a marked increase in the levels of ALT, AST, ALP, urea, uric acid, creatinine, MDA and NO, and a decreased level of total antioxidants in the serum of rats dosed with tartrazine compared to controls. On the other hand, administration of tartrazine was associated with severe histopathological and cellular alterations of rat liver and kidney tissues and induced DNA damage in leucocytes as detected by comet assay. Taken together, the results showed that tartrazine intake may lead to adverse health effects.

  20. Tartrazine induces structural and functional aberrations and genotoxic effects in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latifa Khayyat

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tartrazine is a synthetic organic azo dye widely used in food and pharmaceutical products. The current study aimed to evaluate the possible adverse effect of this coloring food additive on renal and hepatic structures and functions. Also, the genotoxic potential of tartrazine on white blood cells was investigated using comet assay. Twenty adult male Wistar rats were grouped into two groups of 10 each, control- and tartrazine-treated groups. The control group was administered orally with water alone. The experimental group was administered orally with tartrazine (7.5 mg/kg, b.wt.. Our results showed a marked increase in the levels of ALT, AST, ALP, urea, uric acid, creatinine, MDA and NO, and a decreased level of total antioxidants in the serum of rats dosed with tartrazine compared to controls. On the other hand, administration of tartrazine was associated with severe histopathological and cellular alterations of rat liver and kidney tissues and induced DNA damage in leucocytes as detected by comet assay. Taken together, the results showed that tartrazine intake may lead to adverse health effects.

  1. DNA adductomics to study the genotoxic effects of red meat consumption with and without added animal fat in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemeryck, Lieselot Y; Van Hecke, Thomas; Vossen, Els; De Smet, Stefaan; Vanhaecke, Lynn

    2017-09-01

    Digestion of red and processed meat has been linked to the formation of genotoxic N-nitroso compounds (NOCs) and lipid peroxidation products (LPOs) in the gut. In this study, rats were fed a meat based diet to compare the possible genotoxic effects of red vs. white meat, and the interfering role of dietary fat. To this purpose, liver, duodenum and colon DNA adductomes were analyzed with UHPLC-HRMS. The results demonstrate that the consumed meat type alters the DNA adductome; the levels of 22 different DNA adduct types significantly increased upon the consumption of beef (compared to chicken) and/or lard supplemented beef or chicken. Furthermore, the chemical constitution of the retrieved DNA adducts hint at a direct link with an increase in NOCs and LPOs upon red (and processed) meat digestion, supporting the current hypotheses on the causal link between red and processed meat consumption and the development of colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect ofBuchanania lanzan Spreng. bark extract on cyclophosphamide induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ritesh Jain; Sanmati Kumar Jain

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To elucidate the effect of ethanolic extract ofBuchanania lanzan Spreng. (B. lanan) bark against cyclophosphamide induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress in mice.Methods:The prevalence of micronuclei in bone marrow, the extent of lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione and the status of the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase in liver of mice were used as intermediate biomarkers for chemoprotection. Lipid peroxidation and associated compromised antioxidant defenses in cyclophosphamide treated mice were observed in the liver.Results: Pre-treatment withB. lanzan250, 500 and1 000mg/ kg,p.o., daily for7 days significantly reduced the chromosomal damage and lipid peroxidation with concomitant changes in antioxidants and detoxification systems.Conclusions: These results point out the presence of chemopreventive phytoconstituents in the crude extract offering protection against cyclophosphamide induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress in mice.

  3. Investigation of the cytotoxic, genotoxic, and apoptosis-inducing effects of estragole isolated from fennel (Foeniculum vulgare).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarini, Milena; Pagiotti, Rita; Dominici, Luca; Fatigoni, Cristina; Vannini, Samuele; Levorato, Sara; Moretti, Massimo

    2014-04-25

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate, in the HepG2 human hepatoma cell line, the in vitro cytotoxic, genotoxic, and apoptotic activities of estragole (1), contained in the essential oil of Foeniculum vulgare (fennel) and suspected to induce hepatic tumors in susceptible strains of mice. Toward this end, an MTT cytotoxicity assay, a trypan blue dye exclusion test, a double-staining (acridine orange and DAPI) fluorescence viability assay, a single-cell microgel-electrophoresis (comet) assay, a mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) assay, and a DNA fragmentation analysis were conducted. In terms of potential genotoxic effects, the comet assay indicated that estragole (1) was not able to induce DNA damage nor apoptosis under the experimental conditions used.

  4. Exploring cancer development in adulthood: cholinesterase depression and genotoxic effect from chronic exposure to organophosphate pesticides among rural farm children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    How, Vivien; Hashim, Zailina; Ismail, Patimah; Md Said, Salmiah; Omar, Dzolkhifli; Bahri Mohd Tamrin, Shamsul

    2014-01-01

    Children are the vulnerable group in the agricultural community due to their early exposure to pesticides through the dynamic interplay between genetic predisposition, environment, and host-related factors. This study aims to identify the possible association between the depression in blood cholinesterase level and genotoxic effect among farm children. The results of micronuclei assay and comet assay showed that the reduced blood cholinesterase level from organophosphate pesticide exposure is significantly associated with an increase in chromosome breakage and DNA strand breaks. These genotoxicity end points suggest that farm children's cells experience early DNA damage that may lead to uncontrolled cell proliferation during their adulthood. Thus, farm children who grow up near pesticide-treated farmland have a higher probability of developing cancer than children with minimal or zero exposure to pesticides.

  5. Effects of prenatal exposure to diesel exhaust particles on postnatal development, behavior, genotoxicity and inflammation in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, K. S.; Jensen, K. A.; Nordly, P.

    2008-01-01

    to 240 nm) on gestational days 9-19, for 1 h/day. Results: Gestational parameters were similar in control and diesel groups. Shortly after birth, body weights of DEP offspring were slightly lower than in controls. This difference increased during lactation, so by weaning the DEP exposed offspring weighed...... significantly less than the control progeny. Only slight effects of exposure were observed on cognitive function in female DEP offspring and on biomarkers of exposure to particles or genotoxic substances. Conclusion: In utero exposure to DEP decreased weight gain during lactation. Cognitive function and levels...... of biomarkers of exposure to particles or to genotoxic substances were generally similar in exposed and control offspring. The particle size and chemical composition of the DEP and differences in exposure methods (fresh, whole exhaust versus aged, resuspended DEP) may play a significant role on the biological...

  6. Analytical in vitro approach for studying cyto- and genotoxic effects of particulate airborne material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aufderheide, Michaela; Scheffler, Stefanie; Möhle, Niklas; Halter, Beat; Hochrainer, Dieter

    2011-12-01

    In the field of inhalation toxicology, progress in the development of in vitro methods and efficient exposure strategies now offers the implementation of cellular-based systems. These can be used to analyze the hazardous potency of airborne substances like gases, particles, and complex mixtures (combustion products). In addition, the regulatory authorities require the integration of such approaches to reduce or replace animal experiments. Although the animal experiment currently still has to provide the last proof of the toxicological potency and classification of a certain compound, in vitro testing is gaining more and more importance in toxicological considerations. This paper gives a brief characterization of the CULTEX® Radial Flow System exposure device, which allows the exposure of cultivated cells as well as bacteria under reproducible and stable conditions for studying cellular and genotoxic effects after the exposure at the air-liquid or air-agar interface, respectively. A commercial bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14o-) as well as Salmonella typhimurium tester strains were exposed to smoke of different research and commercial available cigarettes. A dose-dependent reduction of cell viability was found in the case of 16HBE14o- cells; S. typhimurium responded with a dose-dependent induction of revertants. The promising results recommend the integration of cellular studies in the field of inhalation toxicology and their regulatory acceptance by advancing appropriate validation studies.

  7. Cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic effects of sewage sludge on Allium cepa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa Martins, Maria Nilza; de Souza, Victor Ventura; da Silva Souza, Tatiana

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to ascertain the cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic potential of sewage sludge using Allium cepa bioassay. Solubilized and crude sludge from two sewage treatment stations (STSs), herein named JM and M, were tested. In addition, sanitized, crude and solubilized sludge were also analyzed from STS M. The treatments showed positive response to phytotoxicity, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and/or mutagenicity. Despite negative results for MN F1 (micronuclei counted in F1 root cells, derived from meristematic cells), the monitoring of genotoxic and mutagenic activities of sewage sludge are recommended because in agricultural areas this residue is applied in large scale and continuously. Based on our results we advise caution in the use of sewage sludge in agricultural soils.

  8. Genotoxic effects of boric acid and borax in zebrafish, Danio rerio using alkaline comet assay

    OpenAIRE

    Gülsoy, Nagihan; Yavaş, Cüneyd; Mutlu, Özal

    2015-01-01

    The present study is conducted to determine the potential mechanisms of Boron compounds, boric acid (BA) and borax (BX), on genotoxicity of zebrafish Danio rerio for 24, 48, 72 and 96-hours acute exposure (level:1, 4, 16, 64 mg/l BA and BX) in semi-static bioassay experiment. For that purpose, peripheral erythrocytes were drawn from caudal vein and Comet assay was applied to assess genotoxicity. Acute (96 hours) exposure and high concentrations of boric acid and borax increases % tail DNA and...

  9. Observations of the effect of atmospheric processes on the genotoxic potency of airborne particulate matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feilberg, Anders; Nielsen, Torben; Binderup, Mona-Lise

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the relationship between genotoxic potency and the occurrence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), including benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), and nitro-PAH in urban and semi-rural air masses has been investigated. The Salmonella/microsome assay has been used as a measure of genotoxic...... potency. We find that the ratios of BaP/ mutagenicity and PAH/mutagenicity are highly variable. The processes responsible for the variation are formation and degradation of mutagens and transport of polluted air masses from heavily industrialized regions, Air masses from Central Europe are shown...

  10. Nanoparticles containing allotropes of carbon have genotoxic effects on glioblastomamultiforme cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinzmann M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mateusz Hinzmann,1 Slawomir Jaworski,1 Marta Kutwin,1 Joanna Jagiello,2 Rafal Kozinski,2 Mateusz Wierzbicki,1 Marta Grodzik,1 Ludwika Lipinska,2 Ewa Sawosz,1 Andrè Chwalibog31Division of Nanobiotechnology, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, 2Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Warsaw, Poland; 3Department of Veterinary Clinical and Animal Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, DenmarkAbstract: The carbon-based nanomaterial family consists of nanoparticles containing allotropes of carbon, which may have a number of interactions with biological systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of nanoparticles comprised of pristine graphene, reduced graphene oxide, graphene oxide, graphite, and ultradispersed detonation diamond in a U87 cell line. The scope of the work consisted of structural analysis of the nanoparticles using transmission electron microscopy, evaluation of cell morphology, and assessment of cell viability by Trypan blue assay and level of DNA fragmentation of U87 cells after 24 hours of incubation with 50 µg/mL carbon nanoparticles. DNA fragmentation was studied using single-cell gel electrophoresis. Incubation with nanoparticles containing the allotropes of carbon did not alter the morphology of the U87 cancer cells. However, incubation with pristine graphene and reduced graphene oxide led to a significant decrease in cell viability, whereas incubation with graphene oxide, graphite, and ultradispersed detonation diamond led to a smaller decrease in cell viability. The results of a comet assay demonstrated that pristine graphene, reduced graphene oxide, graphite, and ultradispersed detonation diamond caused DNA damage and were therefore genotoxic in U87 cells, whereas graphene oxide was not.Keywords: nanostructures, graphene, graphite, diamond, glioblastoma multiforme, geno toxicity

  11. No effects of chlorophyllin on IQ (2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]-quinoline)-genotoxicity and -DNA adduct formation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Tomoe; Shinoda, Aki; Ishizaki, Nao; Hayatsu, Hikoya; Sugiyama, Chitose

    2004-02-01

    Previously we demonstrated that chlorophyllin suppressed the genotoxicities of many carcinogens. However, the genotoxicity of IQ (2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline), a carcinogenic heterocyclic amine, was not suppressed in Drosophila. On the contrary, it has been reported that chrolophyllin suppressed the genotoxicity of IQ in rodents, rainbow trout and Salmonella. We demonstrated that the chlorophyllin-induced suppression of MeIQx (2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline)-genotoxicity was associated with a decrease in MeIQx-DNA adduct formation in Drosophila larval DNA. MeIQx represents another type of heterocyclic amine and is similar to IQ in structure. In this study we utilized (32)P-postlabeling to examine whether chlorophyllin reduced IQ-DNA adduct formation in Drosophila DNA in the same way as MeIQx. The results revealed that the formation of IQ-DNA adducts was unaffected by treatment with chlorophyllin. This was consistent with the absence of any inhibitory effect on genotoxicity as observed in the Drosophila repair test. These results suggest that IQ-behavior in Drosophila is not affected by chlorophyllin, indicating that the process of IQ-DNA adduct formation followed by expression of genotoxicity in Drosophila may be different from that in other organisms.

  12. Induction of cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of Guandu River waters in the Allium cepa system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Vieira Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Guandu River is the main source of water supply for the metropolitan region of Rio de Janeiro and has been facing serious environmental problems due to increasing population and industrial pollution, as well as the presence of polluted tributaries. This study analyzed the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of the Guandu River’s waters, through the use of the Allium cepa test system. Collection points were chosen at the greatest confluences of pollutant sources. The sampling included two different seasons: the rainy season (January and February and the dry season (June and July. The analyses of 5000 cells per treatment showed that all the points studied had some degree of cytotoxicity and/or genotoxicity. Two sampling locations, which receive major influxes from the polluted waters of the Poços/Queimados and Cabuçu/Ipiranga Rivers, stood out for the strong presence of micronuclei, sticky chromosomes, mitotic spindle abnormalities, necrotic cells and nucleolar changes compared to the negative control. At least two locations also found changes in the mitotic index. The existence of variations in the number of cytotoxic and genotoxic changes between periods of rain and drought indicates that the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of the water pollutants varies according to time, depending on the discharges of the tributary rivers and the increase of contaminated effluents. The results highlight the importance of bio-monitoring to assist managers in the control of effluent discharge.

  13. Effect of nickel on regeneration in Jatropha curcas L. and assessment of genotoxicity using RAPD markers

    KAUST Repository

    Sarkar, Tanmoy

    2010-07-08

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of nickel on shoot regeneration in tissue culture as well as to identify polymorphisms induced in leaf explants exposed to nickel through random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). In vitro leaf explants of Jatropha curcas were grown in nickel amended Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium at four different concentrations (0, 0.01, 0.1, 1 mM) for 3 weeks. Percent regeneration, number of shoots produced and genotoxic effects were evaluated by RAPD using leaf explants obtained from the first three treatments following 5 weeks of their subsequent subculture in metal free MS medium. Percent regeneration decreased with increase in addition of nickel to the medium up to 14 days from 42.31% in control to zero in 1.0 mM. The number of shoot buds scored after 5 weeks was higher in control as compared to all other treatments except in one of the metal free subculture medium wherein the shoot number was higher in 0.01 mM treatment (mean = 7.80) than control (mean = 7.60). RAPD analysis produced only 5 polymorphic bands (3.225%) out of a total of 155 bands from 18 selected primers. Only three primers OPK-19, OPP-2, OPN-08 produced polymorphic bands. The dendrogram showed three groups A, B, and C. Group A samples showed 100% genetic similarity within them. Samples between groups B and C were more genetically distant from each other as compared to samples between groups A and B as well as groups A and C. Cluster analysis based on RAPD data correlated with treatments. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  14. Cholinesterase-inhibiting and genotoxic effects of acute carbofuran intoxication in man: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeljezic, Davor; Vrdoljak, Ana Lucic; Kopjar, Nevenka; Radic, Bozica; Milkovic Kraus, Sanja

    2008-10-01

    Carbofuran belongs to the group of N-methylcarbamate insecticides used for the control of soil-dwelling and foliar-feeding insects in various crops; its consumption totals approximately 20,000 tonnes per year. Although the neurological effects on human beings have been well documented, little is known on its impact on the genome. A 38-year-old, healthy male worker employed in a carbofuran production facility accidentally inhaled the dust of the active ingredient carbofuran. Thirty minutes later, he experienced weakness, fatigue, perspiration, breathing difficulties, cephalalgia, disorientation, abdominal pain and vomiting. Blood samples were taken to measure cholinesterase activity, and to perform the alkaline comet assay and micronucleus assay combined with pancentromeric probes. Analyses were repeated 72 hr after intoxication and compared with the results obtained from regular monitoring conducted 10 days prior to the accident. Cholinesterase activity showed the highest correlation with the number of apoptotic cells, comet assay tail length, and number of long-tailed nuclei, suggesting that these are the genomic end-points primarily affected by carbofuran intake. Only a weak correlation was detected for the total number of micronuclei, centromere-containing micronuclei and nuclear buds. Since those end-points increased significantly 72 hr after the accident, they could be considered as late biomarkers of the effects of carbofuran intoxication. The results of this report suggest that, in the interests of higher standards in risk assessment and health hazard protection, periodical medical examination of carbamate-exposed populations should include genotoxicity testing in addition to the assessment of cholinesterase activity.

  15. Effect of Green Tea Extract in Reducing Genotoxic Injuries of Cell Phone Microwaves on Bone Marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Zahedifar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Green tea (Camellia sinensis extract is rich source of natural antioxidants specially catechin that is quickly absorbed into the body and it has cancer protective, anti microbial and anti inflammation effects. In this study has been studied role of green tea extract against genotoxic damage induced by cell phone microwaves on bone marrow polychromatic erythrocytes of adult male Balb/C mouse.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study 40 mouse were divided into five groups, control animals were located under natural condition, sham -exposed animals were prepared by experimental condition without cell phone waves radiation. Experimental 1 group that irradiated at cell phones for 4 days (3 hours/day and experimental 2 groups were injected intraperitoneal 100 mg/kg green tea extract for 5 days and experimental 3 group that irradiated at active mobile phones for 4 days (3 hours/day and were injected intraperitoneal 100 mg/kg green tea extract for 5 days. After treatment period micronucleus test was evaluated in polychromatic erythrocytes on bone marrow. The quantitative data was analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test with using of SPSS-13 software at the level of p<0.05.Results: Based on this study, treatment with extracts of green tea decreased micronucleus frequency in bone marrow polychromatic erythrocytes of Balb/C mouse that irradiated at cell phone microwave (0.92±0.129, (p<0.001.Conclusion: Cell phone microwaves (940 MHz increased micronucleus on bone marrow polychromatic erythrocytes of male Balb/C mouse, but green tea had inhibitory effect and it decreased the average number of micronucleus.

  16. A bioassessment of soil nickel genotoxic effect in orchard planted on rehabilitated coalmine overburden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ličina, Vlado; Akšić, Milica Fotirić; Colić, Slavica; Zec, Gordan

    2013-12-01

    Environmental problems of non-rehabilitated overburden material are present in surrounding of open coal mines worldwide. Ecological restoration of this soil material usually deals with the improvement of its bad physico-chemical properties and its poor nutrient status, sometimes associated with heavy metal problems. Applied overburden restoration by planting orchard (1990) is assumed to be the first of its kind at opencast mines globally, so that present work was aimed at acquiring information about its efficiency of the applied measures concerning their possible use in agriculture. Various physical and chemical properties, together with the pseudo total and DTPA extractable metals (Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Co, Ni, Pb, Cr, Cd) as well as sequential Ni extraction analyses, was measured, in order to evaluate the impact of soil's Ni level (76.3-111.7 mg kg⁻¹) on decreasing yields of apples, pears and plums. As a general pattern, reclaimed soil was significantly enriched with organic matter (>2.5 percent) and nutrients compared to the initial (2 m depth) and non-reclaimed adjacent soil, approving this method for overburden restoration. Despite low Ni concentration in organs, Ni accumulation in a fruits' trees qualified these species as suitable for phytostabilization of present heavy metals, with a woody biomass as a large and important sink for Ni, especially in the roots. Applied cytogenetic studies evaluate the lack of genotoxic effect of nickel (Ni) on the gametic cells of investigated species, having no significant effect on meiosis and pollen germination. Most of the found anomalies were in apples, as a kind of aberrations with sticky figures and chromosome lagging, should be ascribed to the environmental and genetic interaction over the aging of trees. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Application of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) to detect the genotoxic effect of heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enan, Mohamed R

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on the influence of lead, copper, manganese and cadmium on DNA integrity in plant cells. Plants, as biological indicators, can measure the potential effects of pollutants when they are used to measure effects of heavy metals. The genotoxicity of heavy metals in kidney-bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seedlings was subjected to RAPD (random amplified polymorphic DNA) analysis. An RAPD 'fingerprinting' technique was used to detect DNA damage in the kidney-bean seedlings treated with two selected heavy metals at concentrations of 150 and 350 mg x l(-1). Polymorphisms became evident as the presence and/or absence of DNA fragments in treated samples compared with the untreated one. At 350 mg x l(-1), a high number of both missing bands and new amplified fragment were observed. Results suggested that a qualitative measure reflecting changes in RAPD profiles were significantly affected at higher concentrations (350 mg x l(-1)) of the tested heavy metals. A total of 467 RAPD fragments in RAPD profiles were detected by using six random primers (decamers) and 224 of these fragments showed polymorphism. There was a distinct distance between the band patterns of treated plants and the control samples when the cluster method was applied. In addition, the result derived from numerical analysis revealed a considerable distance between the band pattern of the plant samples treated with 350 mg x l(-1) heavy metals and the control sample. Finally, a comparison between untreated and treated genomes shows that RAPD analysis can be used to evaluate how the environmental pollutants modify the structure of DNA in living organisms.

  18. Soil genotoxicity assessment: a new stategy based on biomolecular tools and plant bioindicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citterio, Sandra; Aina, Roberta; Labra, Massimo; Ghiani, Alessandra; Fumagalli, Pietro; Sgorbati, Sergio; Santagostino, Angela

    2002-06-15

    The setting up of efficient early warning systems is a challenge to research for preventing environmental alteration and human disease. In this paper, we report the development and the field application of a new biomonitoring methodology for assessing soil genotoxicity. In the first part, the use of amplified fragment length polymorphism and flow cytometry techniques to detect DNA damage induced by soils artificially contaminated with heavy metals as potentially genotoxic compounds is explained. Results show that the combination of the two techniques leads to efficient detection of the sublethal genotoxic effect induced in the plant bioindicator by contaminated soil. By contrast, the classic mortality, root, and shoot growth vegetative endpoints prove inappropriate for assessing soil genotoxicity because, although they cause genotoxic damage, some heavy metals do not affect sentinel plant development negatively. The statistical elaboration of the data obtained led to the development of a statistical predictive model which differentiates four different levels of soil genotoxic pollution and can be used everywhere. The second part deals with the application of the biomonitoring protocol in the genotoxic assessment of two areas surrounding a steelworks in northern Italy and the effectiveness of this methodology. In this particular case, in these areas, the predictive model reveals a pollution level strictly correlated to the heavy metal concentrations revealed by traditional chemical analysis.

  19. Genotoxicity of diuron and glyphosate in oyster spermatozoa and embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcha, F; Spagnol, C; Rouxel, J

    2012-01-15

    oyster development and physiological performances, requires further investigation. A likely hypothesis to explain the embryotoxic and genotoxic effects of diuron is that it may act via causing oxidative stress.

  20. Signs of deferasirox genotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Ila, Hasan Basri; Topaktas, Mehmet; Arslan, Mehmet; Büyükleyla, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Iron overload is a major health problem for patients who have to have continuous blood transfusions. It brings some metabolic problems together. Various iron chelating agents are being used for treatment of hemochromatosis which arises from excess iron accumulation. This study was conducted with the aim of determining whether deferasirox used as an iron chelator in patients with hemochromatosis has genotoxic effects. Commercial form of deferasirox, Exjade was used as test material. Test mater...

  1. Biomonitoring of genotoxic effects and elemental accumulation derived from air pollution in community urban gardens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato-Lourenco, Luís Fernando; Lobo, Debora Jã A; Guimarães, Eliane T; Moreira, Tiana Carla Lopes; Carvalho-Oliveira, Regiani; Saiki, Mitiko; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Mauad, Thais

    2017-01-01

    Urban gardening is a growing global phenomenon with a positive impact on society. Despite several associated benefits, growing vegetables in urban gardens that are localized in highly polluted areas poses questions about the safety of the produced food. Therefore, the identification of risk factors that result in possible deleterious effects to human health is important for realizing all of the benefits to society. We evaluated the use of two biomonitoring methods in ten urban gardens of Sao Paulo city and one control site: the micronuclei frequencies for early tetrads of Tradescantia pallida (Rose) Hunt. cv. "Purpurea" Boom (hereafter, Trad-MCN) as a short-term indicator of genotoxic response and tree barks to quantify the accumulation of traffic-related chemical elements as a long-term biomarker of air pollution in urban gardens. Mature plants of Tradescantia pallida were exposed in each garden, and their inflorescences were sampled over three months. A random set of 300 early tetrads in 13 to 21 slides per garden were evaluated for micronuclei frequencies. Elemental concentrations in 428 tree barks samples from 107 different trees in the areas surrounding urban gardens were quantified using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. The frequency of Trad-MCN has a significant correlation with traffic variables and chemical elements related to road dust and tailpipe emissions deposited in tree barks. Negative associations between Trad-MCN and both the distance through traffic and the presence of vertical obstacles were observed in the community gardens. The Mn/Zn concentrations in tree barks were associated with increased Trad-MCN.

  2. Analysis of Delphinidin and Luteolin Genotoxicity in Human Lymphocyte Culture

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    Jasmin Ezić

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bioflavonoids delphinidin (2-(3,4,5-Trihydroxyphenylchromenylium-3,5,7-triol and luteolin (2-(3,4-Dihydroxyphenyl-5,7-dihydroxy-4-chromenone have been recognized as promising antioxidants and anticancer substances. Due to their extensive use, the goal of the research was to determine whether they have any genotoxic potential in vitro.Methods: Analysis of genotoxic potential was performed applying chromosome aberrations test in human lymphocyte culture, as this kind of research was not conducted abundantly for these two bioflavonoids. Delphinidin and luteolin were dissolved in DMSO and added to cultures in final concentrations of 25, 50 and 100 μM.Results: In human lymphocytes cultures Delphinidin induced PCDs in all treatments, potentially affecting the cell cycle and topoisomerase II activity. In concentration of 50 μM luteolin showed strong genotoxic effects and caused significant reduction of cell proliferation.Conclusion: Luteolin exhibited certain genotoxic and cytostatic potential. Delphinidin was not considered genotoxic, however its impact on mitosis, especially topoisomerase II activity, was revealed.

  3. Combined genotoxic effects of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (B(aP and an heterocyclic amine (PhIP in relation to colorectal carcinogenesis.

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    Emilien L Jamin

    Full Text Available Colorectal neoplasia is the third most common cancer worldwide. Environmental factors such as diet are known to be involved in the etiology of this cancer. Several epidemiological studies have suggested that specific neo-formed mutagenic compounds related to meat consumption are an underlying factor involved in the association between diet and colorectal cancer. Heterocyclic amines (HCAs and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are known mutagens and possible human carcinogens formed at the same time in meat during cooking processes. We studied the genotoxicity of the model PAH benzo(apyrene (B(aP and HCA 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP, alone or in mixture, using the mouse intestinal cell line Apc(Min/+, mimicking the early step of colorectal carcinogenesis, and control Apc(+/+ cells. The genotoxicity of B(aP and PhIP was investigated using both cell lines, through the quantification of B(aP and PhIP derived DNA adducts, as well as the use of a genotoxic assay based on histone H2AX phosphorylation quantification. Our results demonstrate that heterozygous Apc mutated cells are more effective to metabolize B(aP. We also established in different experiments that PhIP and B(aP were more genotoxic on Apc (Min/+ cells compared to Apc (+/+ . Moreover when tested in mixture, we observed a combined genotoxicity of B(aP and PhIP on the two cell lines, with an increase of PhIP derived DNA adducts in the presence of B(aP. Because of their genotoxic effects observed on heterozygous Apc mutated cells and their possible combined genotoxic effects, both B(aP and PhIP, taken together, could be implicated in the observed association between meat consumption and colorectal cancer.

  4. Evaluation of genotoxic and antigenotoxic effects of boron by the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) on Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarıkaya, Rabia; Erciyas, Kamile; Kara, Muhammed Isa; Sezer, Ufuk; Erciyas, Ali Fuat; Ay, Sinan

    2016-10-01

    In this study, different concentrations of boron have been evaluated for genotoxic and antigenotoxic properties by using the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) on Drosophila melanogaster. The treatment concentrations were chosen to a pretest. Third-instar larvae trans-heterozygous for two genetic markers, multiple wing hair (mwh) and flare (flr3), were treated at different concentrations (0.1, 5, 10, 20, and 40 mg/mL) of boron. In addition to investigating antigenotoxic effects, the same boron concentrations were co-administered with 0.1 mM Ethyl Methane Sulfonate (EMS). Distilled water was used as a negative control; 0.1 mM of EMS was used as a positive control. For the chronic feeding study, small plastic vials were prepared with 1.5 g of dry Drosophila Instant Medium and 5 mL of the respective test solution. Hundreds of trans-heterozygous larvae were embedded into this medium. Feeding ended with pupation of the surviving larvae. After metamorphosis, all surviving flies were collected and stored in a 70% ethanol solution. Preparation and microscopic analyses of wing were made after the treatment. Then the observed mutations were classified according to size and type of mutation per wing. Results indicated that there is no significant genotoxic effect with all of the boron concentrations. In addition, the antigenotoxic activities of boron against EMS were tested. Results indicated that all boron concentrations (0.1, 5, 10, 20 and 40 mg/mL) were able to abolish the genotoxic effects induced by the EMS. It is suggested that the observed effects can be linked to the antioxidant properties of boron. Moreover, these in vivo results will contribute to the antigenotoxicity database of boron.

  5. Genotoxic and cytostatic effects of 6-pentadecyl salicylic anacardic acid in transformed cell lines and peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam-Escamilla, David; Estrada-Muñiz, Elizabet; Solís-Villegas, Erik; Elizondo, Guillermo; Vega, Libia

    2015-01-01

    In Mexico, as in many other countries, traditional medicine is used for the treatment of several diseases. In particular, Amphipterygium adstringens infusion is used for gastritis, gastric ulcers, and gastric cancer. Extracts from this tree have microbicidal effects against Helicobacter pylori, an important risk factor for gastric cancer development. Anacardic acids are constituents of A. adstringens, and 6-pentadecyl salicylic acid (6-PSA) is the most abundant. However, there is a lack of information regarding the effects of 6-PSA on cancer cells. Therefore, we investigated whether 6-PSA has differential effects on the induction of genotoxicity, cytostaticity, and apoptosis in normal human peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMCs), bone marrow polychromatic erythrocytes of Balb/c mice, and human transformed cell lines derived from both gastric cancer (AGS cells) and leukaemia (K562 cells). Treatment with 6-PSA (30-150 μM) reduced the viability of AGS and K562 cells together with a moderate, but significant, increase in the frequency of micronucleated cells and the induction of DNA breakage (Comet Assay). Moreover, 6-PSA increased the apoptosis rate in both the AGS and K562 cell lines in a caspase 8-dependent manner. In contrast, neither cytotoxicity nor genotoxicity were observed in PBMCs or bone marrow polychromatic erythrocytes of Balb/c mice after treatment with low doses of 6-PSA (0.2-2.0 mg/Kg). Instead, 6-PSA treatment resulted in the inhibition of PBMC proliferation, which was reversible after the compound was removed. Additionally, 6-PSA treatments (2-20 mg/Kg) increased the frequency of mature polychromatic erythrocytes in the bone marrow, suggesting a possible effect on the differentiation process of immune cells. The present results indicate that 6-PSA induces cytotoxicity and moderate genotoxicity, together with an increase in the apoptosis rate, in a caspase 8-dependent manner in gastric cancer cells. In contrast, a low toxicity was observed when

  6. Flow-cytometric determination of genotoxic effects of exposure to petroleum in mink and sea otters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickham, J.W.; Mazet, J.A.; Blake, J.; Smolen, M.J.; Lou, Y.; Ballachey, B.E.

    1998-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to investigate the genotoxic effects of crude oil on mink and sea otters, In the first experiment, the effects on mink of chronic exposure to weathered Prudhoe Bay crude oil were studied, Female mink were fed a diet that included weathered crude oil for a period of 3 weeks prior to mating, during pregnancy and until weaning. Kits were exposed through lactation and by diet after weaning until 4 months of age. Kidney and liver tissues of the kits were examined using flow cytometry (FCM) and it was found that the genome size was increased in kidney samples from the experimental group compared to the control group. This effect was probably due to some type of DNA amplification and it could have been inherited from the exposed mothers or have been a somatic response to oil exposure in the pups, No evidence of clastogenic effects, as measured by the coefficient of variation (CV) of the G(1) peak, was found in kidney or liver tissue. In the second experiment, yearling female mink were exposed either by diet or externally to crude oil or bunker C fuel oil. Evidence for clastogenic damage was found in spleen tissue for the exposure groups, but not in kidney tissue. No evidence of increased genome size was observed. In the third experiment, blood was obtained from wild-caught sea otters in Prince William Sound. The sea otters represented two populations: one from western Prince William Sound that was potentially exposed to oil from the Exxon Valdez oil spill and a reference population from eastern Prince William Sound that did not receive oil from the spill. The spill had occurred 1.5 years prior to obtaining the blood samples. Although the mean CVs did not differ between the populations, the exposed population had a significantly higher variance of CV measurements and five out of 15 animals from the exposed population had CVs higher than the 95% confidence limits of the reference population, It is concluded that FCM is a sensitive indicator

  7. Genotoxic effects of deoxynivalenol in broiler chickens fed low-protein feeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, W A; Ghareeb, K; Dadak, A; Gille, L; Staniek, K; Hess, M; Böhm, J

    2012-03-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is one of the most abundant and important trichothecenes in food and feed, and it is a significant contaminant due to its frequent occurrence at toxicologically relevant concentrations worldwide. Deoxynivalenol has negative influences on the health and performance of chicks. However, there is little information available regarding the effect of DON on DNA fragmentation in blood lymphocytes. In addition, the effects of Mycofix select (Biomin GmbH, Herzogenburg, Austria) supplementation to DON-contaminated broiler diets on lymphocyte DNA have not yet been demonstrated. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to establish the effect of DON on lipid peroxidation and lymphocyte DNA fragmentation in broilers and to evaluate the potential of Mycofix select in the prevention of toxin-mediated changes. Thirty-two 1-d-old (Ross 308 male) broiler chicks were randomly divided into 4 groups. The control group was fed a noncontaminated diet, and a second group was fed the same diet but supplemented with Mycofix select (0.25%). A third group of broilers was fed a diet artificially contaminated with 10 mg of feed-grade DON/kg of diet, and a fourth group was fed a DON-contaminated diet supplemented with Mycofix select. At the end of the feeding trial, blood was collected and the degree of lymphocyte DNA damage was measured in the plasma by comet assay. Deoxynivalenol increased (P = 0.016) the amount of DNA damage in chicken lymphocytes by 46.8%. Mycofix select protected lymphocyte DNA from the DON effects. To our knowledge, these are the first data on genotoxic effects of a moderate dose of DON on chicken lymphocytes. However, the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances level in liver and liver enzyme activity did not differ among the groups. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the diets contaminated with the mycotoxin DON at moderate levels in combination with low-protein feed are able to induce lymphocyte DNA damage in chickens

  8. Evolution of genotoxicity test methods in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofuni, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of methods to assess genotoxicity of test compounds is thought to be one of the important subjects in The Japanese Environmental and Mutagen Society (JEMS). In 1970, the Ministry of Education of Japan (at that time) organized a research group (Organizer: Y. Tazima, National Institute of Genetics), and started a systematic research on the genotoxic effects induced by chemical substances. Considering the importance of this issue through the outcomes of the research group, JEMS was established in 1972, and President Tazima organized the 1st annual meeting in the August in Tokyo with the participation of experts in this field working in national institutes, universities and others in Japan. The discovery that food additives possessed genotoxic potential triggered various scientific activities in the field of genotoxicity. Another important point was the correlation between genotoxicity and carcinogenicity, in which the establishment of the reverse mutation assay played an important role. Other critical factors, such as side effects of drugs, occupational cancer, and environmental pollution due to genotoxic chemicals, emphasized the importance of genotoxicity tests for human safety. The tests performed to assess genotoxicity from 1960s to 1980s will be described to understand that many different genotoxic methodologies were discussed in these periods.

  9. Genotoxic and hematological effects in children exposed to a chemical mixture in a petrochemical area in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelallo-Martínez, Nadia Azenet; Batres-Esquivel, Lilia; Carrizales-Yáñez, Leticia; Díaz-Barriga, Fernando Martínez

    2014-07-01

    Children living in Coatzacoalcos, Veracruz, and in nearby surrounding areas are exposed to a mixture of pollutants from different sources. Previous studies in the area have reported genotoxic and haematotoxic compounds, such as lead (Pb), benzene, toluene, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), in environmental and biological samples. The final toxic effects of these compounds are unknown because the toxic behaviour of each compound is modified when in a complex mixture. This is the first study on the exposure and effect of chemical mixtures on children who live near a petrochemical area. The aim of this study was to evaluate genotoxicity and haematological effects in children environmentally exposed to such mixtures and to determine whether the final effect was modified by the composition of the mixture composition. Biomarkers of exposure to Pb, benzene, toluene, and PAHs were quantified in urine and blood samples of 102 children. DNA damage was evaluated using comet assay, and haematological parameters were determined. Our results show that Pb and toluene did not surpass the exposure guidelines; the exposure was similar in all three localities (Allenede, Mundo Nuevo, and López Mateos). In contrast, exposure to PAHs was observed at three levels of exposure: low, medium, and high. The most severe effects of these mixtures were strictly related to coexposure to high levels of PAHs.

  10. POTENTIAL APPLICATIONS OF SOS-GFP BIOSENSOR TO IN VITRO RAPID SCREENING OF CYTOTOXIC AND GENOTOXIC EFFECT OF ANTICANCER AND ANTIDIABETIC PHARMACIST RESIDUES IN SURFACE WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Matejczyk

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli K-12 GFP-based bacterial biosensors allowed the detection of cytotoxic and genotoxic effect of anticancer drug– cyclophosphamide and antidiabetic drug – metformin in PBS buffer and surface water. Experimental data indicated that recA::gfpmut2 genetic system was sensitive to drugs and drugs mixture applied in experiment. RecA promoter was a good bioindicator in cytotoxic and genotoxic effect screening of cyclophosphamide, metformin and the mixture of the both drugs in PBS buffer and surface water. The results indicated that E. coli K-12 recA::gfp mut2 strain could be potentially useful for first-step screening of cytotoxic and genotoxic effect of anticancer and antidiabetic pharmacist residues in water. Next steps in research will include more experimental analysis to validate recA::gfpmut2 genetic system in E. coli K-12 on different anticancer drugs.

  11. Genotoxic effects of eugenol, isoeugenol and safrole in the wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munerato, Maria Cristina; Sinigaglia, Marialva; Reguly, Maria Luíza; de Andrade, Heloísa Helena Rodrigues

    2005-04-01

    In the present study, the phenolic compounds eugenol, isoeugenol and safrole were investigated for genotoxicity in the wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster. The Drosophila wing somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) provides a rapid means to evaluate agents able to induce gene mutations and chromosome aberrations, as well as rearrangements related to mitotic recombination. We applied the SMART in its standard version with normal bioactivation and in its variant with increased cytochrome P450-dependent biotransformation capacity. Eugenol and safrole produced a positive recombinagenic response only in the improved assay, which was related to a high CYP450-dependent activation capacity. This suggests, as previously reported, the involvement of this family of enzymes in the activation of eugenol and safrole rather than in its detoxification. On the contrary, isoeugenol was clearly non-genotoxic at the same millimolar concentrations as used for eugenol in both the crosses. The responsiveness of SMART assays to recombinagenic compounds, as well as the reactive metabolites from eugenol and safrole were considered responsible for the genotoxicity observed.

  12. In vivo genotoxic effects of industrial waste leachates in mice following oral exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Saurabh; Chauhan, Lalit K S; Dhawan, Alok; Murthy, Ramesh C; Gupta, Shrawan K

    2006-06-01

    Contamination of ground water by industrial waste poses potential health hazards for man and his environment. The improper disposal of toxic wastes could allow genotoxic chemicals to percolate into ground waters, and these contaminated ground waters may produce toxicity, including mutation and eventually cancer, in exposed individuals. In the present study, we evaluated the in vivo genotoxic potential of leachates made from three different kinds of industrial waste (tannery waste, metal-based waste, and waste containing dyes and pigments) that are disposed of in areas adjoining human habitation. Three different doses of test leachates were administered by oral gavage for 15 consecutive days to Swiss albino mice; their bone marrow cells were examined for chromosome aberrations (CAs), micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCEs), and DNA damage using the alkaline Comet assay. Exposure to the leachates resulted in significant (P dye-waste leachate produced weaker genotoxic responses. The cytogenetic abnormalities and DNA damage produced by the leachates indicate that humans consuming water contaminated with these materials are at increased risk of developing adverse health consequences.

  13. Protective effects of hesperidin against genotoxicity induced by {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI in human cultured lymphocyte cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal [Department of Radiopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy and Traditional and Complementary Medicine Research Center, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: sjhosseinim@yahoo.com; Ahmadi, Amirhossein [Department of Radiopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy and Traditional and Complementary Medicine Research Center, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Beiki, Davood [Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Habibi, Emran [Department of Radiopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy and Traditional and Complementary Medicine Research Center, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahmoudzadeh, Aziz [Laboratory of Cytogenetics, Novin Radiation Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    Introduction: Radiopharmaceuticals have been widely used as nuclear tracers for myocardial perfusion imaging. The purpose of this study was to investigate the radioprotective effects of hesperidin as a flavonoid which protects against the genotoxic effects of {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI in human cultured lymphocytes. Methods: Whole blood samples from human volunteers were incubated with hesperidin at doses of 10, 50 and 100 {mu}mol. After 1 h of incubation, the lymphocytes were incubated with {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI (200 {mu}Ci/2 ml) for 3 h. The lymphocyte cultures were then mitogenically stimulated to allow for evaluation of the number of micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked binucleated cells. Results: Incubation of lymphocytes with {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI at this high dose induces additional genotoxicity and shown by increases in micronuclei frequency in human lymphocytes. Hesperidin at these doses significantly reduced the micronuclei frequency in cultured lymphocytes. The maximum protective effect and greatest decrease in micronuclei frequency occurred when cultures were incubated with a 100-{mu}mol dose of 65% hesperidin. Conclusion: This study has important implications for patients undergoing nuclear medicine procedures. The results indicate a protective role for hesperidin against the genetic damage and side effects induced by radiopharmaceutical administration.

  14. Effects of coal combustion residues on survival, antioxidant potential, and genotoxicity resulting from full-lifecycle exposure of grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio Holthius)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmick, Danika M.; Mitchelmore, Carys L.; Rowe, Christopher L. [University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, 1, Williams Street, PO Box 38, Solomons, MD, 20688 (United States); Hopkins, William A. [Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 100 Cheatham Hall, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2007-02-01

    Coal combustion residues (CCRs), largely derived from coal-fired electrical generation, are rich in numerous trace elements that have the potential to induce sublethal effects including oxidative stress, alterations in antioxidant status and DNA single strand breaks (SSB). CCRs are frequently discharged into natural and man-made aquatic systems. As the effects of CCRs have received relatively little attention in estuarine systems, the estuarine grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, was chosen for this study. Grass shrimp were exposed in the laboratory to CCR-enriched sediments and food over a full life cycle. Survival to metamorphosis was significantly reduced in CCR-exposed larvae (17 {+-} 4 versus 70 {+-} 13% in the controls) but not in the juveniles or adults. The COMET assay, a general but sensitive assay for genotoxicity, was used to quantify DNA SSB in the adults. Total antioxidant potential was examined to assess the overall antioxidant scavenging capacity of CCR-exposed and non-exposed adult grass shrimp. Grass shrimp exposed to CCR significantly accumulated selenium and cadmium compared to unexposed shrimp, although an inverse relationship was seen for mercury accumulation. Chronic CCR exposure caused DNA SSB in hepatopancreas cells, as evidenced by the significantly increased percent tail DNA, tail moment, and tail length as compared to reference shrimp. However, no significant difference was observed in total antioxidant potential. Our findings suggest that genotoxicity may be an important mode of toxicity of CCR, and that DNA SSB may serve as a useful biomarker of exposure and effect of this very common, complex waste stream. (author)

  15. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of butyl cyclohexyl phthalate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köksal, Çinel; Nalbantsoy, Ayse; Karabay Yavaşoğlu, N Ülkü

    2016-03-01

    Butyl cyclohexyl phthalate (BCP) is frequently used in personal care products, medical and household applications. The aim of this study is therefore to evaluate possible cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of BCP using in vitro and in vivo assays. The in vitro cytotoxic effect of BCP was investigated on mouse fibroblastic cell line (L929 cells) by MTT assay. The result showed that BCP inhibits cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 value = 0.29 µg/mL). For genotoxicity assessment, tested concentrations of BCP demonstrated mutagenic activity in the presence of S9 mix with the Salmonella strain TA100 in the Ames test. Results showed that BCP is a secondary mutagenic substance even in low concentrations. The data obtained from 28-days repeated toxicity tests on mice revealed that BCP caused abnormalities of chromosome number, in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, DNA damage, particularly DNA strand breaks, was assessed by Comet assay. The test result shows that BCP seemed to have genotoxic potential at a high level of exposure.

  16. Current investigations into the genotoxicity of zinc oxide and silica nanoparticles in mammalian models in vitro and in vivo: carcinogenic/genotoxic potential, relevant mechanisms and biomarkers, artifacts, and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon JY

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jee Young Kwon,1,* Preeyaporn Koedrith,2,* Young Rok Seo1 1Department of Life Science, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Dongguk University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 2Faculty of Environment and Resource Studies, Mahidol University, Phuttamonthon District, NakhonPathom, Thailand *These authors contributed equally to this work and should be considered as co-first authors Abstract: Engineered nanoparticles (NPs are widely used in many sectors, such as food, medicine, military, and sport, but their unique characteristics may cause deleterious health effects. Close attention is being paid to metal NP genotoxicity; however, NP genotoxic/carcinogenic effects and the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In this review, we address some metal and metal oxide NPs of interest and current genotoxicity tests in vitro and in vivo. Metal NPs can cause DNA damage such as chromosomal aberrations, DNA strand breaks, oxidative DNA damage, and mutations. We also discuss several parameters that may affect genotoxic response, including physicochemical properties, widely used assays/end point tests, and experimental conditions. Although potential biomarkers of nanogenotoxicity or carcinogenicity are suggested, inconsistent findings in the literature render results inconclusive due to a variety of factors. Advantages and limitations related to different methods for investigating genotoxicity are described, and future directions and recommendations for better understanding genotoxic potential are addressed. Keywords: carcinogenicity, exposure assessment, genotoxicity, nanoparticles, risk evaluation

  17. Study of the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of the α-, β-, and γ- Hexachlorocyclohexane isomers in human lymphocyte cells using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennaceur, Soukaina

    2017-01-01

    The genotoxic potential of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers (α-, β-, and γ-) which are organochlorine pesticides was tested in peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures from two donors by using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. Micronucleus (MN) frequency, binucleated cells with micronucleus (BNMN), and cytokinesis-blocked proliferation index (CBPI) were determined as genotoxic and cytotoxic endpoints. At the concentration ranges tested (12.5-100 μg.L (-1)), all HCH isomers induced dose-dependent cytotoxic effects, γ-HCH being the most toxic. This isomer was also able to induce significant increase in MN frequency and BNMN cells indicating a genotoxic potential at 50 and 100 μg.L (-1). The genotoxic test of β-HCH showed a positive induction of MN and BNMN cells at the highest concentration of 100 μg.L (-1) and a significant cytotoxicity at 50 μg.L (-1). Under the experimental condition used, α-HCH was unable to induce any significant increase in MN frequency confirming that α-HCH is a non-genotoxic agent.

  18. The genotoxic effects of benzo[a]pyrene and methamidophos on black porgy evaluated by comet assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In this study, two common pollutants (benzo[a]pyrene and methamidophos) in marine environment were tested by comet assay for their inducement of in vivo genotoxic effect to the blood cells of black porgy (Acanthopagrus schlegeli). The fish was exposed to 2 μg/L of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and methamidophos, and their mixture. The assay was performed on whole blood at 2 h, 5 h, 24 h and 96 h exposure intervals. A significant increase in DNA damage was observed in each treatment with the pollutants. Additive effect of BaP and methamidophos was also found in the experiment. However, the decrease ratios of DNA damage for 5 h and 96 h exposure interals compared with 2 h and 24 h exposure ones, respectively, were noticed. This phenomenon may be explained by the function of repairing process via enzyme cytochrome P450 in the animal. Evidence of the genotoxicity of organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on marine fish are discussed in this paper.

  19. The genotoxic effects of benzo[a]pyrene and methamidophos on black porgy evaluated by comet assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rixian; Hong, Huasheng; Wang, Xinhong; Wang, Kejian; Wang, Chunguang

    2005-12-01

    In this study, two common pollutants (benzo[a]pyrene and methamidophos) in marine environment were tested by comet assay for their inducement of in vivo genotoxic effect to the blood cells of black porgy ( Acanthopagrus schlegeli). The fish was exposed to 2 μg/L of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and methamidophos, and their mixture. The assay was performed on whole blood at 2 h, 5 h, 24 h and 96 h exposure intervals. A significant increase in DNA damage was observed in each treatment with the pollutants. Additive effect of BaP and methamidophos was also found in the experiment. However, the decrease ratios of DNA damage for 5 h and 96 h exposure interals compared with 2 h and 24 h exposure ones, respectively, were noticed. This phenomenon may be explained by the function of repairing process via enzyme cytochrome P450 in the animal. Evidence of the genotoxicity of organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on marine fish are discussed in this paper.

  20. Genotoxic and antigenotoxic effects of Fucus vesiculosus extract on cultured human lymphocytes using the chromosome aberration and Comet assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleide Leite-Silva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fucales, Fucaceae was screened for its protective activity using doxorubicin-induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes. In this study, we assessed the genotoxic and antigenotoxic potential of three different concentrations (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg mL-1 of F. vesiculosus aqueous extract using the chromosome aberration and Comet assays. Treatment of human lymphocyte cultures with 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg mL-1 F. vesiculosus aqueous extract had no effect on the chromosome aberration frequency or on the extent of DNA damage detected by the Comet assay. The antigenotoxic effects of the extract were tested in human lymphocyte cultures treated with 15 µg mL-1 of doxorubicin, either alone or combined with the different concentrations of the extract, which was added to the cultures before, simultaneously with or after the doxorubicin. Only when lymphocytes were pre-treated with extract there was a reduction in doxorubicin-induced chromosome aberrations and DNA damage as detected by the Comet assay. These results demonstrate that F. vesiculosus aqueous extract is not genotoxic in cultured human lymphocytes and indicate that when added to lymphocyte cultures before doxorubicin it has antigenotoxic activity against doxorubicin-induced DNA damage.

  1. Effectiveness of activated carbon and Egyptian montmorillonite in the protection against deoxynivalenol-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Wahhab, Mosaad A; El-Kady, Ahmed A; Hassan, Aziza M; Abd El-Moneim, Omaima M; Abdel-Aziem, Sekena H

    2015-09-01

    This study was conducted to prepare and characterize activated carbon (AC) and to evaluate its protective effect against deoxynivalenol (DON) toxicity in rats compared to Egyptian montmorillonite (EM). AC was prepared using a single-step chemical activation with phosphoric acid (H3PO4). The resulted AC has a high surface area and a high total pore volume. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 6 groups (n = 10) and treated for 3 weeks as follow: the control group, the groups fed AC or EM-supplemented diet (0.5% w/w), the group treated orally with DON (5 mg/kg b.w.) and the groups fed AC or EM-supplemented diet and treated with DON. Blood and liver samples were collected for different analyses. Treatment with DON increased liver function enzymes, lipid peroxidation, tumor necrosis factor α, DNA fragmentation, decreased hepatic glutathione content, up regulating mRNA Fas and TNF-α genes expression and increased micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes and normochromatic erythrocytes in bone marrow. Co-treatment of DON plus AC or EM succeeded to normalize the levels of the biochemical parameters, reduced the cytotoxicity of bone marrow and ameliorated the hepatic genotoxicity. Moreover, AC was more effective than EM and has a high affinity to adsorb DON and to reduce its cytotoxicity and genotoxicity.

  2. In vitro assessment of genotoxic effects of electric arc furnace dust on human lymphocytes using the alkaline comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera; Orescanin, Visnja; Ruk, Damir; Gajski, Goran

    2009-02-15

    In vitro genotoxic effects of leachates of electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) on human peripheral lymphocytes, assessed prior and following the treatment with a strong alkaline solution were investigated using the alkaline comet assay. Prior and following the treatment, lymphocytes were incubated with leachate of EAFD for 6 and 24 hours at 37 degrees C. Negative controls were also included. Mean values of the tail lengths established in the samples treated with the leachate stemming from the original dust for 6 and 24 hours, were 15.70 microm and 16.78 microm, respectively, as compared to 12.33 microm found in the control sample. Slight, but significant increase in the tail length was also found with the dust treated with a strong alkaline solution (13.37 microm and 13.60 microm). In case of high heavy metal concentrations (the extract of the original furnace dust), the incubation period was revealed to be of significance as well. The obtained results lead to the conclusion that alkaline comet assay could be used as a rapid, sensitive and low-cost tool when assessing genotoxicity of various waste materials, such as leachates of the electric arc furnace dust.

  3. Protective effect of probiotic bacteria against cadmium-induced genotoxicity in rat hepatocytes in vivo and in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurašević Siniša F.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The protective effect of probiotic bacteria against cadmium (Cd-induced genotoxicity was studied in rat hepatocytes in vivo and in vitro. Male Wistar rats, Rattus norvegicus, were treated for five weeks with (i CdCl2 (70 ppm in the drinking water, (ii a mixture of lyophilized probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus rhamnosus, L. acidophilus and Bifido-bacterium longum (5×108 cfu/g of food, or (iii CdCl2 and probiotic bacteria. In addition, single cells obtained from the untreated rat liver were exposed to CdCl2 (70 ppm, probiotic bacteria (1.28 mg/ml, or CdCl2 and probiotic bacteria, for 15 min at 22°C in the dark. The level of Cd-induced DNA damage in hepatocytes was determined by the comet assay. The obtained results show that probiotic bacteria significantly reduced Cd-induced genotoxicity, both in vivo and in vitro (20% and 48%, respectively. Moreover, the toxicity of Cd to lactobacilli in the gastrointestinal tracts of rats was significantly decreased in the probiotic-treated animals. The binding of Cd2+ to probiotic bacteria was proposed as the most probable protection mechanism. [Acknowledgments. This research was financially supported by the Ministry of Education and Science of the Government of Serbia, projects No 172058 and 173023

  4. Genotoxic effect of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the metropolitan area of Porto Alegre, Brazil, evaluated by Helix aspersa (Mueller, 1774)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ianistcki, M. [Laboratorio de Genetica Toxicologica, Department of Biology, ULBRA, Av. Farroupilha 8001, Pr. 14/Sala 218, Bairro Sao Jose, CEP 92425-900 Canoas, RS (Brazil); Dallarosa, J. [Laboratorio de Ecologia, UFRGS (Brazil); Sauer, C.; Teixeira, C.E. [Fundacao Estadual de Protecao Ambiental Henrique Luis Roessler, FEPAM, RS (Brazil); Silva, J. da, E-mail: juliana.silva@ulbra.b [Laboratorio de Genetica Toxicologica, Department of Biology, ULBRA, Av. Farroupilha 8001, Pr. 14/Sala 218, Bairro Sao Jose, CEP 92425-900 Canoas, RS (Brazil)

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to biomonitor metropolitan areas of Porto Alegre (Brazil) for PAHs associated with atmospheric particles and check their effects on the DNA of the land mollusk Helix aspersa. The sampling sites are located in an urban area with heavy traffic: (i) Canoas, (ii) Sapucaia do Sul, and (iii) FIERGS/Porto Alegre. The samples were collected during a continuous period of 24 hours during 15 days using Stacked Filter Units (SFU) on polycarbonate filters (two separated size fractions: PM{sub 10-2.5} and PM{sub <2.5}). The concentrations of 16 major PAHs were determined according to EPA. Comet assay on H. aspersa hemolymph cells was chosen for genotoxicity evaluation. This evaluation shows that, in general, the smaller PM-size fractions (PM{sub <2.5}) have the highest genotoxicity and contain higher concentrations of extractable organic matter. In addition, associations between chemical characteristics and PM carcinogenicity tend to be stronger for the smaller PM-size fractions. - DNA damage in H. aspersa exposed to atmospheric particulate in Metropolitan Area of Porto Alegre demonstrated association with PAHs in the fine filter (PM{sub <2.5}).

  5. Treatment effects and genotoxicity relevance of the toxic organic pollutants in semi-coking wastewater by combined treatment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongjun; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Aining; Liu, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    The removal effects of main toxic organic pollutants in semi-coking wastewater by combined treatment process were investigated, while the genotoxicity relevance of wastewater from different treatment units were monitored by using Vicia faba bioassays. Results showed that 37 kinds of toxic organic pollutants were detected in the crude sewage, most of them were removed by physicochemical pretreatment, and the total concentration of organic pollutants decreased from 4826 mg L(-1) to 546 mg L(-1). After pretreatment, benzenes, phenols, quinolines and indoles in the wastewater were mainly removed by anaerobic/aerobic biodegradation, but the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were removed mainly by advanced treatment, total concentration of toxic organic pollutants was lower than 0.5 mg L(-1) in the effluent. Genotoxicity evaluation results showed that the wastewater from coagulating sedimentation unit or foregoing had significant mutagenic properties. However, the micronuclei (MN) frequency (‰, which was calculated by observing 1000 cells) induced by wastewater after adsorption with modified coke was only 8.06‰, it was no significant difference compared with negative control (7.43‰). It could be concluded that the adsorption treatment was required for the safety of effluent, and the physicochemical-biochemical combined process in this study was suitable for high concentration semi-coking wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Determination of genotoxic effects of Imazethapyr herbicide in Allium cepa root cells by mitotic activity, chromosome aberration, and comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liman, Recep; Ciğerci, İbrahim Hakkı; Öztürk, Nur Serap

    2015-02-01

    Imazethapyr (IM) is an imidazolinone herbicide that is currently used for broad-spectrum weed control in soybean and other legume crops. In this study, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of IM were investigated by using mitotic index (MI), mitotic phases, chromosomal abnormalities (CAs) and DNA damage on the root meristem cells of Allium cepa. In Allium root growth inhibition test, EC50 value was determined as 20 ppm, and 0.5xEC50, EC50 and 2xEC50 concentrations of IM herbicide were introduced to onion tuber roots. Distilled water and methyl methane sulfonate (MMS, 10 mg/L) were used as a negative and positive control, respectively. As A. cepa cell cycle is 24 hours, so, application process was carried out for 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours. All the applied doses decreased MIs compared to control group and these declines were found to be statistically meaningful. Analysis of the chromosomes showed that 10 ppm IM except for 48 h induced CAs but 40 ppm IM except for 72 h decreased CAs. DNA damage was found significantly higher in 20 and 40 ppm of IM compared to the control in comet assay. These results indicated that IM herbicide exhibits cytotoxic activity but not genotoxic activity (except 10 ppm) and induced DNA damage in a dose dependent manner in A. cepa root meristematic cells.

  7. Genotoxic and mutagenic effects of polluted surface water in the midwestern region of Brazil using animal and plant bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Leocádia Rosa Dourado

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to evaluate DNA damage in animal and plant cells exposed to water from the Água Boa stream (Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil by using bioassays, and to identify the chemical compounds in the water to determine the water quality in the area. Through the cytotoxicity bioassay with Allium cepa, using micronucleus test, and comet assay, using Astyanax altiparanae fish, the results indicated that biological samples were genetically altered. Micronuclei were observed in erythrocytes of A. altiparanae after exposure to water from locations close to industrial waste discharge. The highest DNA damage observed with the comet assay in fish occurred with the exposure to water from locations where the presence of metals (Cu, Pb, Cd, Ni was high, indicating the possibility of genotoxic effects of these compounds. Thus, these results reinforce the importance of conducting genotoxicity tests for developing management plans to improve water quality, and indicate the need for waste management before domestic and industrial effluents are released into the rivers and streams.

  8. Genotoxicity of perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) to the green mussel (Perna viridis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changhui; Chang, Victor W C; Gin, Karina Y H; Nguyen, Viet Tung

    2014-07-15

    Concerns regarding perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) have grown significantly in recent years. However, regulations and guidelines regarding the emission and treatment of PFCs are still missing in most parts of the world, mostly due to the lack of PFC toxicity data. In the current study, the genotoxic effects of four common PFCs, named perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), perfluoroocanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) were investigated on marine mussels. The effects of exposure time and concentration on the toxic behavior of the compounds were also examined. Genotoxicity of PFCs was assessed in biomarker assays, showing that exposure to the target compounds could damage the organism's genetic material to varying extents, including DNA strand breaks and fragmentation, chromosomal breaks and apoptosis. The adverse effects increased with both exposure concentration and time and were related with the organism burden of PFCs. The integrated biomarker response analysis demonstrated that PFOS exhibited a higher genotoxicity than the other tested compounds. The EC50 values and confidence intervals based on integrative genotoxicity were 33 (29-37), 594 (341-1036), 195 (144-265) and 78 (73-84) μg/L for PFOS, PFOA, PFNA and PFDA respectively, classifying PFOS as a highly genotoxic compound. Although primary DNA damage was shown to be recoverable after exposure ceased, permanent genetic damage caused by elevated PFC concentrations was not restored. This is the first ecotoxicity study of PFCs that focuses on the genotoxic effects of the compounds, clearly indicating the genotoxicity of the tested PFCs and demonstrating that functional groups have a major impact on the compounds' genotoxic behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Genotoxicity of industrial wastes and effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton, L D; Houk, V S; Hughes, T J

    1998-06-01

    In excess of several million pounds of genotoxic and/or carcinogenic industrial wastes are released into the U.S. environment each year. Chemical characterization of these waste materials can rarely provide an adequate assessment of their genotoxicity and potential hazard. Bioassays do not require prior information about chemical composition and can effectively assess the genotoxicity of complex waste materials. The most commonly used genotoxicity assay has been the Salmonella mutagenicity assay. Results with this system have shown that the genotoxic potency of industrial wastes can vary over 10 orders of magnitude, from virtually nondetectable to highly potent. Industries employing similar industrial processes generally release wastes of similar potency. Extremely high potency wastes include those from furazolidone and nitrofurfural production. Pulp and paper mills, steel foundries, and organic chemical manufacturing facilities also discharge wastes of noteworthy potency. Treatment and remediation of some wastes, such as pulp and paper mill effluents, have been shown to reduce or eliminate genotoxicity. However, in other cases, treatment and remediation have been shown to enhance genotoxicity, such as for fungal treatment of oils. Analyses of samples collected from areas known to receive industrial wastes and effluents have shown that genotoxins can accumulate in the receiving environment and have adverse effects on indigenous biota. The evaluation of hazardous wastes and effluents by genotoxicity assays may provide data useful not only for hazard identification but for comparative risk assessment.

  10. Alarm Fatigue: Causes and Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilken, Marc; Hüske-Kraus, Dirk; Klausen, Andreas; Koch, Christian; Schlauch, Wolfgang; Röhrig, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    The term "Alarm fatigue" is commonly used to describe the effect which a high number of alarms can have on caregivers: Frequent alarms, many of which are avoidable, can lead to inadequate responses, severely impacting patient safety. In the first step of a long-term effort to address this problem, both the direct and indirect impact of alarms, as well as possible causes of unnecessary alarms were focused. Models of these causes and impacts were developed using a scoping review which included guided interviews with experts from medical informatics, clinicians and medical device manufacturers. These models can provide the methodical grounds for the definition of targeted interventions and the assessment of their effects.

  11. Genotoxic and reprotoxic effects of tritium and external gamma irradiation on aquatic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam-Guillermin, Christelle; Pereira, Sandrine; Della-Vedova, Claire; Hinton, Tom; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are chronically exposed to natural radioactivity or to artificial radionuclides released by human activities (e.g., nuclear medicine and biology,nuclear industry, military applications). Should the nuclear industry expand in the future, radioactive environmental releases, under normal operating conditions or accidental ones, are expected to increase, which raises public concerns about possible consequences on the environment and human health. Radionuclide exposures may drive macromolecule alterations, and among macromolecules DNA is the major target for ionizing radiations. DNA damage, if not correctly repaired, may induce mutations, teratogenesis, and reproductive effects. As such, damage at the molecular level may have consequences at the population level. In this review, we present an overview of the literature dealing with the effects of radionuclides on DNA, development, and reproduction of aquatic organisms. The review focuses on the main radionuclides that are released by nuclear power plants under normal operating conditions, γ emitters and tritium. Additionally, we fitted nonlinear curves to the dose-response data provided in the reviewed publications and manuscripts, and thus obtained endpoints commonly associated with ecotoxicological studies, such as the EDR(10). These were then used as a common metric for comparing the values and data published in the literature.The effects of tritium on aquatic organisms were reviewed for dose rates that ranged from 29 nGy/day to 29 Gy/day. Although beta emission from tritium decay presents a rather special risk of damage to DNA, genotoxicity-induced by tritium has been scarcely studied. Most of the effects studied have related to reproduction and development. Species sensitivity and the form of tritium present are important factors that drive the ecotoxicity of tritium. We have concluded from this review that invertebrates are more sensitive to the effects of tritium than are vertebrates

  12. Antiproliferative and genotoxic effects of nature identical and artificial synthetic food additives of aroma and flavor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. M. Nunes

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to analyze the antiproliferative and genotoxic potential of synthetic food flavorings, nature identical passion fruit and artificial vanilla. This assessment used root meristem cells of Allium cepa L., in exposure times of 24 and 48 hours and using doses of 0.2; 0.4 and 0.6 mL. Roots were fixed in Carnoy’s solution, hydrolyzed in hydrochloric acid, stained with acetic orcein and analyzed with optical microscope at 400× magnification, 5,000 cells for each treatment. For data analysis, it was used Chi-square test at 5%. Doses of 0.2 mL at ET 48 h; 0.4 and 0.6 mL at ET 24 and 48 h of passion fruit flavor, and the three doses of the vanilla flavor at ET 24 and 48 h significantly reduced the cell division rate in the meristems of roots, proving to be cytotoxic. Doses of 0.2; 0.4 and 0.6 mL of the passion fruit additive, and the three doses of vanilla tested, in the two exposure times, induced mitotic spindle changes and micronuclei formation in the cells of the test organism used, proving to be genotoxic. Therefore, under the studied conditions, flavoring solutions of vanilla and passion fruit, marketed nationally and internationally, significantly altered the functioning of the cell cycle in root meristem cells of A. cepa.

  13. Antiproliferative and genotoxic effects of nature identical and artificial synthetic food additives of aroma and flavor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, R D M; Sales, I M S; Silva, S I O; Sousa, J M C; Peron, A P

    2016-07-25

    This study aimed to analyze the antiproliferative and genotoxic potential of synthetic food flavorings, nature identical passion fruit and artificial vanilla. This assessment used root meristem cells of Allium cepa L., in exposure times of 24 and 48 hours and using doses of 0.2; 0.4 and 0.6 mL. Roots were fixed in Carnoy's solution, hydrolyzed in hydrochloric acid, stained with acetic orcein and analyzed with optical microscope at 400× magnification, 5,000 cells for each treatment. For data analysis, it was used Chi-square test at 5%. Doses of 0.2 mL at ET 48 h; 0.4 and 0.6 mL at ET 24 and 48 h of passion fruit flavor, and the three doses of the vanilla flavor at ET 24 and 48 h significantly reduced the cell division rate in the meristems of roots, proving to be cytotoxic. Doses of 0.2; 0.4 and 0.6 mL of the passion fruit additive, and the three doses of vanilla tested, in the two exposure times, induced mitotic spindle changes and micronuclei formation in the cells of the test organism used, proving to be genotoxic. Therefore, under the studied conditions, flavoring solutions of vanilla and passion fruit, marketed nationally and internationally, significantly altered the functioning of the cell cycle in root meristem cells of A. cepa.

  14. The urinary bladder carcinogen propoxur does not produce genotoxic effects in the urinary bladder of Wistar male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatropoulos, M J; Duan, J-D; Schmuck, G; Williams, G M

    2015-09-01

    Propoxur (PPX) is a carbamate insecticide which induced urinary bladder cancer in Wistar rats when fed at 5000ppm in Altromin 1321 diet (1321). In the present investigation, PPX was studied for induction of several key events related to modes of action (MOA) of carcinogenicity in urinary bladders (UBs). Wistar rats were administered the compound for 28 days at 8000ppm in Provini Liba SA 3883 diet, which is similar to the 1321 diet. o-Anisidine HCl (AH) was used as a genotoxic UB carcinogenic comparator, and trisodium nitrilotriacetate (NTA) as an epigenetic UB carcinogen comparator. Along with the non-dosed control and three test substance groups (PPX, AH, NTA), four more groups were additionally fed 2% ammonium chloride (AC) in the diet to acidify the urine, since 1321 was reported to increase urinary pH. AC did acidify the urine, as expected, although the 3883 diet itself did not increase pH values above 8. In the alkaline comet assay, AH produced DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) in the UB urothelium (UBU) irrespective of AC administration, whereas PPX and NTA did not. In the nucleotide (32)P-postlabeling assay (NPL), AH produced DNA adducts irrespective of AC administration, whereas PPX and NTA did not. Routine (H&E) histopathology evaluation of the UBU did not reveal any hyperplasia or evidence of luminal microprecipitates or calculi in any of the groups. Assessment of UBU proliferation as measured by immunohistochemistry of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, revealed that NTA and NTA plus AC increased the replicating fraction (RF). Also AH plus AC, but not AH alone, increased the RF of UBU, whereas PPX groups were not significantly different from controls. Thus, the results reveal no evidence for DNA SSBs, binding, or alteration of DNA synthesis in the UBU by PPX, while demonstrating UBU DNA damage by AH and showing that NTA does not damage DNA, but causes increased UBU proliferation. The findings are in accord with a genotoxic MOA for AH, and an epigenetic

  15. Genotoxicity of refinery waste assessed by some DNA damage tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amit Kumar; Ahmad, Irshad; Ahmad, Masood

    2015-04-01

    Refinery waste effluent is well known to contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols and heavy metals as potentially genotoxic substances. The aim of the present study was to assess the genotoxic potential of Mathura refinery wastewater (MRWW) by various in vitro tests including the single cell gel electrophoresis, plasmid nicking assay and S1 nuclease assay. Treatment of human lymphocytes to different MRWW concentrations (0.15×, 0.3×, 0.5× and 0.78×) caused the formation of comets of which the mean tail lengths increased proportionately and differed significantly from those of unexposed controls. The toxic effect of MRWW on DNA was also studied by plasmid nicking assay and S1 nuclease assay. Strand breaks formation in the MRWW treated pBR322 plasmid confirmed its genotoxic effect. Moreover, a dose dependent increase in cleavage of calf thymus DNA in S1 nuclease assay was also suggestive of the DNA damaging potential of MRWW. A higher level of ROS generation in the test water sample was recorded which might be contributing to its genotoxicity. Interaction between the constituents of MRWW and calf thymus DNA was also ascertained by UV-visible spectroscopy.

  16. Mutagenicity and genotoxicity of coal fly ash water leachate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, R.; Mukherjee, A. [University of Calcutta, Calcutta (India). Dept. of Botany

    2009-03-15

    Fly ash is a by-product of coal-fired electricity generation plants. The prevalent practice of disposal is as slurry of ash and water to storage or ash ponds located near power stations. This has lain to waste thousands of hectares of land all over the world. Since leaching is often the cause of off-site contamination and pathway of introduction into the human environment, a study on the genotoxic effects of fly ash leachate is essential. Leachate prepared from the fly ash sample was analyzed for metal content, and tested for mutagenicity and genotoxicity. Analyses of metals show predominance of the metals - sodium, silicon, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, manganese, zinc, and sulphate. The Ames Salmonella mutagenicity assay, a short-term bacterial reverse mutation assay, was conducted on two-tester strains of Salmonella typhimurium strains TA97a and TA102. For genotoxicity, the alkaline version of comet assay on fly ash leachate was carried in vitro on human blood cells and in vivo on Nicotiana plants. The leachate was directly mutagenic and induced significantconcentration-dependent increases in DNA damage in whole blood cells, lymphocytes, and in Nicotiana plants. The comet parameters show increases in tail DNA percentage (%), tail length (mu m), and olive tail moment (arbitrary units). Our results indicate that leachate from fly ash dumpsites has the genotoxic potential and may lead to adverse effects on vegetation and on the health of exposed human populations.

  17. The in vitro genotoxic effects of a commercial formulation of alpha-cypermethrin in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaman, Ayşe Yavuz; Topaktaş, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    alpha-Cypermethrin, a highly active pyrethroid insecticide, is effective against a wide range of insects encountered in agriculture and animal husbandry. The potential genotoxicity of a commercial formulation of alpha-cypermethrin (Fastac 100 EC, containing 10% alpha-cypermethrin as the active ingredient) on human peripheral lymphocytes was examined in vitro by sister chromatid exchange (SCE), chromosomal aberrations (CAs), and micronucleus (MN) tests. The human lymphocytes were treated with 5, 10, 15, and 20 microg/ml of alpha-cypermethrin for 24- and 48-hr. alpha-Cypermethrin induced SCEs and CAs significantly at all concentrations and treatment times and MN formation was significantly induced at 5 and 10 microg/ml of alpha-cypermethrin when compared with both the control and solvent control. Binuclear cells could not be detected sufficiently in the highest two concentration of alpha-cypermethrin (15 and 20 microg/ml) for both the 24- and 48-hr treatment times. alpha-Cypermethrin decreased the proliferation index (PI) at three high concentrations (10, 15, and 20 microg/ml) for both treatment periods as compared with the control groups. In addition, alpha-cypermethrin reduced both the mitotic index (MI) and nuclear division index (NDI) significantly at all concentrations for two treatment periods. The PI and MI were reduced by alpha-cypermethrin in a concentration-dependent manner during both treatment times. In general, alpha-cypermethrin showed higher cytotoxic and cytostatic effects than positive control (MMC) at the two highest concentrations for the 24- and 48-hr treatment periods. The present study is the first to report the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of commercial formulation of alpha-cypermethrin in peripheral blood lymphocytes.

  18. Pesticide genotoxic effect of fipronil in alevins "Gamitana" Colossoma macropomum under laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto López

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the genotoxic injury in the species Colossoma macropomum (“Gamitana" when exposed to the pesticide Fipronil, for which we used the micronucleus test (MN. We workwed with juveniles in the third stage, placed in glass tanks, which were exposed to 3 different concentrations of fipronil (C1: 0.075 mg /L, C2: 0.15 mg /L and C3: 0.30 mg /L, evaluated at 24 and 48 h. Peripheral blood was used which made the spread. The counting of micronuclei and abnormalities was made on the basis of 1000 cells. The average rate of micronuclei indicates that 0.075 mg / L the average frequency is twice the control. With regard to abnormalities of the core, was found more frequently at 48 h of exposure.

  19. Catalase can protect cells against the genotoxic effects of monomethylarsonous acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although it is widely known that arsenic-contaminated drinking water causes cancer and other health effects, its exact mode of action (MOA) is not fully understood. Induction of oxidative stress has been proposed as a key event in the MOA of arsenic. Our studies are centered on i...

  20. Nicotine derived genotoxic effects in human primary parotid gland cells as assessed in vitro by comet assay, cytokinesis-block micronucleus test and chromosome aberrations test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzkey, Christian; Steussloff, Gudrun; Koehler, Christian; Burghartz, Marc; Scherzed, Agmal; Hackenberg, Stephan; Hagen, Rudolf; Kleinsasser, Norbert H

    2014-08-01

    Genotoxic effects of nicotine were described in different human cells including salivary gland cells. Based on the high nicotine concentration in saliva of smokers or patients using therapeutic nicotine patches, the current study was performed to evaluate the genotoxic potential of nicotine in human salivary gland cells. Therefore, primary salivary gland cells from 10 patients undergoing parotid gland surgery were exposed to nicotine concentrations between 1 μM and 1000 μM for 1 h in the absence of exogenous metabolic activation. The acinar phenotype was proven by immunofluorescent staining of alpha-amylase. Genotoxic effects were evaluated using the Comet assay, the micronucleus test and the chromosome aberration test. Cytotoxicity and apoptosis were determined by trypan blue exclusion test and Caspase-3 assay. Nicotine was able to induce genotoxic effects in all three assays. The chromosome aberration test was the most sensitive and increases in numerical and structural (chromatid-type and chromosome-type) aberrations were seen at ≥1 μM, whereas increases in micronuclei frequency were detected at 10 μM and DNA damage as measured in the Comet assay was noted at >100 μM. No cytotoxic damage or influence of apoptosis could be demonstrated. Nicotine as a possible risk factor for tumor initiation in salivary glands is still discussed controversially. Our results demonstrated the potential of nicotine to induce genotoxic effects in salivary gland cells. These results were observed at saliva nicotine levels similar to those found after oral or transdermal exposure to nicotine and suggest the necessity of careful monitoring of the use of nicotine in humans.

  1. Neoplastic transformation of breast epithelial cells by genotoxic stress

    OpenAIRE

    Raman Venu; Winnard Paul T; Botlagunta Mahendran

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Exposure to genotoxic stresses such as radiation and tobacco smoke can cause increased cancer incidence rate as reflected in an in depth meta-analysis of data for women and breast cancer incidence. Published reports have indicated that exposures to low dose radiation and tobacco smoke are factors that contribute to the development of breast cancer. However, there is a scarcity of information on the combinatorial effects of low dose radiation and tobacco smoke on formation ...

  2. Genotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs, <100 nm are increasingly being used in pharmaceuticals and cosmetics due to the unique properties derived from their small sizes. However, their large surface-area to mass ratio and high redox potential may negatively impact human health and the environment. TiO2-NPs can cause inflammation, pulmonary damage, fibrosis, and lung tumors and they are possibly carcinogenic to humans. Because cancer is a disease involving mutation, there are a large number of studies on the genotoxicity of TiO2-NPs. In this article, we review the results that have been reported in the literature, with a focus on data generated from the standard genotoxicity assays. The data include genotoxicity results from the Ames test, in vitro and in vivo Comet assay, in vitro and in vivo micronucleus assay, sister chromatid exchange assay, mammalian cell hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase gene assay, the wing somatic mutation and recombination assay, and the mouse phosphatidylinositol glycan, class A gene assay. Inconsistent results have been found in these assays, with both positive and negative responses being reported. The in vitro systems for assessing the genotoxicity of TiO2-NPs have generated a greater number of positive results than the in vivo systems, and tests for DNA and chromosome damage have produced more positive results than the assays measuring gene mutation. Nearly all tests for measuring the mutagenicity of TiO2-NPs were negative. The current data indicate that the genotoxicity of TiO2-NPs is mediated mainly through the generation of oxidative stress in cells.

  3. In vivo and in vitro exposures for the evaluation of the genotoxic effects of lead on the Neotropical freshwater fish Prochilodus lineatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, V.; Cavalcante, D.G.S.M.; Vilela, M.B.F.A. [Laboratory of Animal Ecophysiology, Department of Physiological Sciences, Londrina State University, PB 6001, 86051-990 Londrina, PR (Brazil); Sofia, S.H. [Laboratory of Genetics and Animal Ecology, Department of General Biology, Londrina State University, PB 6001, 86051-990 Londrina, PR (Brazil); Martinez, C.B.R., E-mail: cbueno@uel.br [Laboratory of Animal Ecophysiology, Department of Physiological Sciences, Londrina State University, PB 6001, 86051-990 Londrina, PR (Brazil)

    2011-08-15

    In the present study, in vivo and in vitro exposures were used to assess the genotoxicity of lead (Pb) to the freshwater fish Prochilodus lineatus. The comet assay using blood, liver and gill cells, and the occurrence of micronuclei (MN) and other erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities (ENA) were used to assess the genotoxic potential of lead in vivo. Metallothionein content (MT) was measured in fish liver in order to evaluate the protection of fish against Pb toxicity. Fish erythrocytes were exposed to Pb in vitro (1, 3 and 6 h) and the number of viable cells, DNA integrity, using the comet assay, and lysosomal membrane stability, measured by the neutral red retention assay (NRRA) were analyzed. The results of the comet assay after in vivo toxicity tests (6, 24 and 96 h) showed that Pb was genotoxic for all the three tissues analyzed after 96 h exposure. A significant increase in liver MT content was observed after 6 and 24 h of Pb exposure. MN frequency did not increase after Pb exposures, but the frequency of the other ENA, such as kidney-shaped nuclei, segmented nuclei and lobed nuclei, showed a significant increase after 24 and 96 h, indicating that ENA is a better biomarker for Pb exposure than MN alone after short-term exposures. The results of the comet assay performed with erythrocytes in vitro exposed to lead confirmed its genotoxic effect and showed that DNA damage increased with increasing exposure time. Moreover, the NRRA clearly indicated that Pb induces a destabilization of the lysosomal membrane. These results demonstrate the potential genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of lead after acute exposures.

  4. In vivo and in vitro exposures for the evaluation of the genotoxic effects of lead on the Neotropical freshwater fish Prochilodus lineatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, V; Cavalcante, D G S M; Viléla, M B F A; Sofia, S H; Martinez, C B R

    2011-08-01

    In the present study, in vivo and in vitro exposures were used to assess the genotoxicity of lead (Pb) to the freshwater fish Prochilodus lineatus. The comet assay using blood, liver and gill cells, and the occurrence of micronuclei (MN) and other erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities (ENA) were used to assess the genotoxic potential of lead in vivo. Metallothionein content (MT) was measured in fish liver in order to evaluate the protection of fish against Pb toxicity. Fish erythrocytes were exposed to Pb in vitro (1, 3 and 6 h) and the number of viable cells, DNA integrity, using the comet assay, and lysosomal membrane stability, measured by the neutral red retention assay (NRRA) were analyzed. The results of the comet assay after in vivo toxicity tests (6, 24 and 96 h) showed that Pb was genotoxic for all the three tissues analyzed after 96 h exposure. A significant increase in liver MT content was observed after 6 and 24 h of Pb exposure. MN frequency did not increase after Pb exposures, but the frequency of the other ENA, such as kidney-shaped nuclei, segmented nuclei and lobed nuclei, showed a significant increase after 24 and 96 h, indicating that ENA is a better biomarker for Pb exposure than MN alone after short-term exposures. The results of the comet assay performed with erythrocytes in vitro exposed to lead confirmed its genotoxic effect and showed that DNA damage increased with increasing exposure time. Moreover, the NRRA clearly indicated that Pb induces a destabilization of the lysosomal membrane. These results demonstrate the potential genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of lead after acute exposures.

  5. Comparative genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of the oral antidiabetic drugs sitagliptin, rosiglitazone, and pioglitazone in patients with type-2 diabetes: a cross-sectional, observational pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz Gul, Ozen; Cinkilic, Nilufer; Gul, Cuma Bulent; Cander, Soner; Vatan, Ozgur; Ersoy, Canan; Yılmaz, Dilek; Tuncel, Ercan

    2013-09-18

    This cross-sectional, observational pilot study was designed to investigate the frequency of different endpoints of genotoxicity (sister-chromatid exchange, total chromosome aberrations, and micronucleus formation) and cytotoxicity (mitotic index, replication index, and nuclear division index) in the peripheral lymphocytes of patients with type-2 diabetes treated with different oral anti-diabetic agents for 6 months. A total of 104 patients who met the American Diabetes Association criteria for type-2 diabetes were enrolled in the study. Of the 104 patients, 33 were being treated with sitagliptin (100mg/day), 25 with pioglitazone (30mg/day), 22 with rosiglitazone (4mg/day), and 24 with medical nutrition therapy (control group). The results for all the genotoxicity endpoints were significantly different across the four study groups. Post hoc analysis revealed that the genotoxicity observed in the sitagliptin group was significantly higher than that observed in the medical nutrition therapy group, but lower than that occurring in subjects who received thiazolidinediones. All of the three cytotoxicity endpoints were significantly lower in patients treated by oral anti-diabetic agents compared with those who received medical nutrition therapy. However, the three indexes did not differ significantly in the sitagliptin, rosiglitazone, and pioglitazone groups. Taken together, these pilot data indicate that sitagliptin and thiazolidinediones may exert genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in patients with type-2 diabetes. Further investigations are necessary to clarify the possible long-term differences between oral anti-diabetic drugs in terms of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity, and how these can modulate the risk of developing diabetic complications in general and cancer in particular.

  6. Protective effects of steroidal alkaloids isolated from Solanum paniculatum L. against mitomycin cytotoxic and genotoxic actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PABLINE M. VIEIRA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Solanum paniculatum L. is a plant species widespread throughout tropical America, especially in the Brazilian Cerrado region. It is used in Brazil for culinary purposes and in folk medicine to treat liver and gastric dysfunctions, as well as hangovers. Previous studies with S. paniculatum ethanolic leaf extract or ethanolic fruit extract demonstrated that they have no genotoxic activity neither in mice nor in bacterial strains, although their cytotoxicity and antigenotoxicity were demonstrated in higher doses. In order to assess the possible compounds responsible for the activities observed, we fractionated the ethanolic fruit extract of S. paniculatum, characterized by 1H and 13C NMR spectra, and evaluated two fractions containing steroidal alkaloids against mitomycin C (MMC using the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test. Swiss mice were orally treated with different concentrations (25, 50, or 100 mg.kg−1 of each fraction simultaneously with a single intraperitonial dose of MMC (4 mg.kg−1. Antigenotoxicity was evaluated by using the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCE, whereas anticytotoxicity was assessed by the polychromatic and normochromatic erythrocytes ratio (PCE/NCE. Our results demonstrated that steroidal alkaloids isolated from S. paniculatum strongly protected cells against MMC aneugenic and/or clastogenic activities as well as modulated MMC cytotoxic action.

  7. Genotoxic Effect of Chronic Exposure to DDT on Lymphocytes, Oral Mucosa and Breast Cells of Female Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ruth De Celis; Ulises Gómez-Pinedo; Hugo Salado-Ponce; Alfredo Feria-Velasco; Alejandro Canales-Aguirre; Eduardo Padilla-Camberos

    2011-01-01

    The genotoxicity of some environmental contaminants may affect human health directly by damaging genetic material and thus plays an important role in cancer development. Xenoestrogens are one kind of environmental pollutants that may alter hormonal routes or directly affect DNA. The number of available biomarkers used to assess genetic risk and cancer is very extensive. The present study evaluated genotoxicity produced by the pesticide DDT on systemic and mammary gland cells obtained from adu...

  8. Genotoxicity in native fish associated with agricultural runoff events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, A.; Kuivila, K.M.; Orlando, J.L.; Kotelevtsev, S.; Anderson, S.L.

    2004-01-01

    The primary objective of the present study was to test whether agricultural chemical runoff was associated with in-stream genotoxicity in native fish. Using Sacramento sucker (Catostomus occidentalis), we combined field-caging experiments in an agriculturally dominated watershed with controlled laboratory exposures to field-collected water samples, and we coupled genotoxicity biomarker measurements in fish with bacterial mutagenicity analysis of water samples. We selected DNA strand breakage as a genotoxicity biomarker and Ames Salmonella mutagenicity tests as a second, supporting indicator of genotoxicity. Data from experiments conducted during rainfall runoff events following winter application of pesticides in 2000 and 2001 indicated that DNA strand breaks were significantly elevated in fish exposed to San Joaquin River (CA, USA) water (38.8, 28.4, and 53.6% DNA strand breakage in year 2000 field, year 2000 lab, and year 2001 field exposures, respectively) compared with a nearby reference site (15.4, 8.7, and 12.6% DNA strand breakage in year 2000 field, year 2000 lab, and year 2001 field exposures, respectively). Time-course measurements in field experiments supported a linkage between induction of DNA strand breakage and the timing of agricultural runoff. San Joaquin River water also caused significant reversion mutation in two Ames Salmonella tester strains. Salmonella mutagenicity corroborated in-stream effects, further strengthening a causal relationship between runoff events and genotoxicity. Potentially responsible agents are discussed in the context of timing of runoff events in the field, concordance between laboratory and field exposures, pesticide application patterns in the drainage, and analytical chemistry data.

  9. Effects of light on the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of benzo(a)pyrene and an oil refinery effluent in the newt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, M.; l`Haridon, J. [Universite Paul-Sabatier, Toulouse (France)

    1994-12-31

    The genotoxicity and/or toxicity of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) were evaluated under different lighting conditions in larvae and embryos of the newt Pleurodeles waltl. Visible light alone, UVA alone, or BaP alone had no toxic effects on the larvae. Conversely, toxic effects were observed in animals exposed to BaP + daylight, or BaP + UVA. The genotoxicity of BaP (50 ppb) was halved by its previous exposure to UVA, and was abolished at the lowest concentration (12.5 ppb). In other experiments, the larvae were exposed alternatively to BaP or Irr BaP (18 hours in dark) and UVA (6 hr in water), every day for 8 days. All animals that had accumulated non-irradiated BaP (50 ppb) showed signs of severe toxicity, and 90% died before the end of the test. On the other hand, irradiated BaP (50 ppb) was a 4-fold less toxic and half as genotoxic as non-irradiated BaP. In addition, exposure of the animals to UVA alone for 4 days prior to treatment with BaP did not affect the genotoxicity or toxicity of this hydrocarbon. In the dark, the embryotoxicity of BaP was markedly attenuated by the presence of the jelly coats. Although UVA alone did not affect growth of the embryos, the toxicity of BaP was enhanced by the combined action of the two agents together or in succession (BaP + UVA or BaP then UVA). Larvae were treated with an oil refinery effluent (EF). At 125 ml/l, EF was not found to be genotoxic in the dark. However, in animals exposed to both EF and UVA, there was a progressive increase in level of micronucleated erythrocytes with increasing duration of daily exposure to UVA. Moreover, the genotoxic potential of irradiated EF + UVA was systematically below that of non-irradiated EF + UVA for all durations of exposure to ultraviolet light. Irradiation of this type of effluent might help reduce its harmful effects on aquatic species. Our results also suggest that metabolic activation is not necessary for hydrocarbons to induce toxic effects. 51 refs., 5 tabs., 3 figs.

  10. Exposure of Vicia faba and Pisum sativum to copper-induced genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souguir, D; Ferjani, E; Ledoigt, G; Goupil, P

    2008-11-01

    The potential genotoxicity of Cu(2+) was investigated in Vicia faba and Pisum sativum seedlings in hydroponic culture conditions. Cu(2+) caused a dose-dependent increase in micronuclei frequencies in both plant models. Cytological analysis of root tips cells showed clastogenic and aneugenic effects of this heavy metal on V. faba root meristems. Cu(2+) induced chromosomal alterations at the lowest concentration used (2.5 mM) when incubated for 42 h, indicating the potent mutagenic effect of this ion. A spectrum of chromosomal abnormalities was observed in V. faba root meristems, illustrating the genotoxic events leading to micronuclei formation.

  11. Forskolin: genotoxicity assessment in Allium cepa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Khalid Pasha; Aarey, Archana; Tamkeen, Shayesta; Jahan, Parveen

    2015-01-01

    Forskolin, a diterpene, 7β-acetoxy-8,13-epoxy-1α,6β,9α-trihydroxy-labd-14-en-11-one (C22H34O7) isolated from Coleus forskohlii, exerts multiple physiological effects by stimulating the enzyme adenylate cyclase and increasing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) concentrations. Forskolin is used in the treatment of hypertension, congestive heart failure, eczema, and other diseases. A cytogenetic assay was performed in Allium cepa to assess possible genotoxic effects of forskolin. Forskolin was tested at concentrations 5-100 μM for exposure periods of 24 or 48 h. Treated samples showed significant reductions in mitotic index (p < 0.05) and increases in the frequency of chromosome aberrations (p < 0.01) at both exposure times. The treated meristems showed chromosome aberrations including sticky metaphases, sticky anaphases, laggard, anaphase bridges, micronuclei, polyploidy, fragments, breaks, and C-mitosis. Forskolin may cause genotoxic effects and further toxicological evaluations should be conducted to ensure its safety.

  12. Absence of genotoxic effects of the chalcone (E)-1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-3-(4-methylphenyl)-prop-2-en-1-one) and its potential chemoprevention against DNA damage using in vitro and in vivo assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The chalcone (E)-1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-3-(4-methylphenyl)-prop-2-en-1-one), or 2HMC, displays antileishmanial, antimalarial, and antioxidant activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, and protective effects of 2HMC using the Ames mutagenicity test, the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test, and the comet assay in mice. In the assessment using the Ames test, 2HMC did not increase the number of His+ revertants in Salmonella typhimurium strains, demonstrating lack of mutagenicity. 2HMC showed no significant increase in micronucleated polychromatic erythrocyte frequency (MNPCE) in the micronucleus test, or in DNA strand breaks using the comet assay, evidencing absence of genotoxicity. Regarding cytotoxicity, 2HMC exhibited moderate cytotoxicity in mouse bone marrow cells by micronucleus test. 2HMC showed antimutagenic action in co-administration with the positive controls, sodium azide (SA) and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO), in the Ames test. Co-administered and mainly pre-administered with cyclophosphamide (CPA), 2HMC caused a decrease in the frequency of MNPCE using the micronucleus test and in DNA strand breaks using the comet assay. Thus, 2HMC exhibited antimutagenic and antigenotoxic effects, displaying a DNA-protective effect against CPA, SA, and 4NQO carcinogens. In conclusion, 2HMC presented antimutagenic, antigenotoxic and moderate cytotoxic effects; therefore it is a promising molecule for cancer prevention. PMID:28207781

  13. Assessment of Genotoxicity of Ionizing radiation using Tradescantia-Comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Min; Ryu, Tae Ho; Hyun, Kyung Man; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Wilhelmova, Nad [Institute of Experimental Botany, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2010-05-15

    Over the last two decades, several new methodologies for the detection of DNA damage have been developed. The comet assay is currently used in different areas of biological sciences to detect DNA damage. The comet assay, also called the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) was first introduced by Ostling and Johanson as a microelectrophoretic technique for the direct visualization of DNA damage in individual cells. The comet assay, due to its simplicity, sensitivity and need of a few cells, is ideal as a short-term genotoxicity test. The comet assay can theoretically be applied to every type of eukaryotic cell, including plant cells. Plants are very useful as monitors of genetic effects caused by pollution in the atmosphere, water and soil. Although the genotoxic effects detected by Tradescantia tests cannot be associated with mutagenesis or even carcinogenesis in humans, these bioassays are very useful tools for screening the mutagenic potential in the environment. Experiments were conducted to study the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiations on the genome integrity, particularly of Tradescantia. The increasingly frequent use of Tradescantia as a sensitive environmental bioindicator of genotoxic effects. This study was designed to assess the genotoxicity of ionizing radiation using Tradescnatia-comet assay

  14. Cellular detection of 50 Hz magnetic fields and weak blue light: effects on superoxide levels and genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höytö, Anne; Herrala, Mikko; Luukkonen, Jukka; Juutilainen, Jukka; Naarala, Jonne

    2017-06-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields (MFs) on superoxide levels and genotoxicity depend on the presence of blue light. Human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were exposed to a 50 Hz, 100 μT MF with or without non-phototoxic level of blue light for 24 h. We also studied whether these treatments alter responses to menadione, an agent that induces mitochondrial superoxide (O2(• -)) production and DNA damage. Micronuclei, proliferation, viability, cytosolic and mitochondrial O2(• -) levels were assessed. MF (without blue light) increased cytosolic O2(• -) production and blue light suppressed this effect. Mitochondrial O2(• -) production was reduced by both MF and blue light, but these effects were not additive. Micronucleus frequency was not affected by blue light or MF alone, but blue light (significantly when combined with MF) enhanced menadione-induced micronuclei. The original simple hypothesis (blue light is needed for MF effects) was not supported, but interaction of MF and blue light was nevertheless observed. The results are consistent with MF effects on light-independent radical reactions.

  15. In Vivo and In Vitro Genotoxic and Epigenetic Effects of Two Types of Cola Beverages and Caffeine: A Multiassay Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo-Fernández, Marcos; Merinas-Amo, Tania; Moreno-Millán, Miguel; Alonso-Moraga, Ángeles; Demyda-Peyrás, Sebastián

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the biological and food safety of two different beverages: Classic Coca Cola™ (CCC) and Caffeine-Free Coca Cola (CFCC). To this end, we determined the genotoxicological and biological effects of different doses of lyophilised CCC and CFCC and Caffeine (CAF), the main distinctive constituent. Their toxic/antitoxic, genotoxic/antigenotoxic, and chronic toxicity (lifespan assay) effects were determined in vivo using the Drosophila model. Their cytotoxic activities were determined using the HL-60 in vitro cancer model. In addition, clastogenic DNA toxicity was measured using internucleosomal fragmentation and SCGE assays. Their epigenetic effects were assessed on the HL-60 methylation status using some repetitive elements. The experimental results showed a slight chemopreventive effect of the two cola beverages against HL-60 leukaemia cells, probably mediated by nonapoptotic mechanisms. Finally, CCC and CAF induced a global genome hypomethylation evaluated in LINE-1 and Alu M1 repetitive elements. Overall, we demonstrated for the first time the safety of this famous beverage in in vivo and in vitro models.

  16. In vivo systemic chlorogenic acid therapy under diabetic conditions: Wound healing effects and cytotoxicity/genotoxicity profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagdas, Deniz; Etoz, Betul Cam; Gul, Zulfiye; Ziyanok, Sedef; Inan, Sevda; Turacozen, Ozge; Gul, Nihal Yasar; Topal, Ayse; Cinkilic, Nilufer; Tas, Sibel; Ozyigit, Musa Ozgur; Gurun, Mine Sibel

    2015-07-01

    Oxidative stress occurs following the impairment of pro-oxidant/antioxidant balance in chronic wounds and leads to harmful delays in healing progress. A fine balance between oxidative stress and endogenous antioxidant defense system may be beneficial for wound healing under redox control. This study tested the hypothesis that oxidative stress in wound area can be controlled with systemic antioxidant therapy and therefore wound healing can be accelerated. We used chlorogenic acid (CGA), a dietary antioxidant, in experimental diabetic wounds that are characterized by delayed healing. Additionally, we aimed to understand possible side effects of CGA on pivotal organs and bone marrow during therapy. Wounds were created on backs of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. CGA (50 mg/kg/day) was injected intraperitoneally. Animals were sacrificed on different days. Biochemical and histopathological examinations were performed. Side effects of chronic antioxidant treatment were tested. CGA accelerated wound healing, enhanced hydroxyproline content, decreased malondialdehyde/nitric oxide levels, elevated reduced-glutathione, and did not affect superoxide dismutase/catalase levels in wound bed. While CGA induced side effects such as cyto/genotoxicity, 15 days of treatment attenuated blood glucose levels. CGA decreased lipid peroxidation levels of main organs. This study provides a better understanding for antioxidant intake on diabetic wound repair and possible pro-oxidative effects.

  17. In Vivo and In Vitro Genotoxic and Epigenetic Effects of Two Types of Cola Beverages and Caffeine: A Multiassay Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Mateo-Fernández

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to assess the biological and food safety of two different beverages: Classic Coca Cola™ (CCC and Caffeine-Free Coca Cola (CFCC. To this end, we determined the genotoxicological and biological effects of different doses of lyophilised CCC and CFCC and Caffeine (CAF, the main distinctive constituent. Their toxic/antitoxic, genotoxic/antigenotoxic, and chronic toxicity (lifespan assay effects were determined in vivo using the Drosophila model. Their cytotoxic activities were determined using the HL-60 in vitro cancer model. In addition, clastogenic DNA toxicity was measured using internucleosomal fragmentation and SCGE assays. Their epigenetic effects were assessed on the HL-60 methylation status using some repetitive elements. The experimental results showed a slight chemopreventive effect of the two cola beverages against HL-60 leukaemia cells, probably mediated by nonapoptotic mechanisms. Finally, CCC and CAF induced a global genome hypomethylation evaluated in LINE-1 and Alu M1 repetitive elements. Overall, we demonstrated for the first time the safety of this famous beverage in in vivo and in vitro models.

  18. Differential effect of manool--a diterpene from Salvia officinalis, on genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate in V79 and HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolella, Heloiza Diniz; de Oliveira, Pollyanna Francielli; Munari, Carla Carolina; Costa, Gizela Faleiros Dias; Moreira, Monique Rodrigues; Veneziani, Rodrigo Cassio Sola; Tavares, Denise Crispim

    2014-10-01

    Salvia officinalis (sage) is a perennial woody subshrub native to the Mediterranean region that is commonly used as a condiment and as an anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antimicrobial agent due to its biological activities. Manool is the most abundant micro-metabolite found in Salvia officinalis essential oils and extracts. We therefore decided to evaluate the cytotoxic, genotoxic and antigenotoxic potential of manool in Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts (V79) and human hepatoma cells (HepG2). Cytotoxicity was assessed by the colony-forming assay in V79 cells and toxic effects were observed at concentrations of up to 8.0 μg/mL. The micronucleus test was used to evaluate the genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity of manool in V79 and HepG2 cells at concentrations of 0.5-6.0 μg/mL and 0.5-8.0 μg/mL, respectively. For evaluation of antigenotoxicity, the concentrations of manool were combined with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS, 44 μg/mL). The results showed a significant increase in the frequency of micronuclei in cultures of both cell lines treated with the highest concentration tested, demonstrating a genotoxic effect. On the other hand, manool exhibited a protective effect against chromosome damage induced by MMS in HepG2 cells, but not in V79 cells. These data suggest that some manool metabolite may be responsible for the antigenotoxic effect observed in HepG2 cells.

  19. Potential anti-genotoxic effect of sodium butyrate to modulate induction of DNA damage by tamoxifen citrate in rat bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shorbagy, Haidan M

    2017-02-01

    Sodium butyrate (SB) is one of the histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi's) that is recently evidenced to have a prooxidant activity and an ability to reduce hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage. Since the majority of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer patients are treated with tamoxifen citrate (TC), which exerts well established oxidative and genotoxic effects, thus the basic objective of this study is to determine whether SB could ameliorate or curate tamoxifen citrate-induced oxidative DNA damage and genotoxic effect in vivo through up-regulation of some antioxidant enzymes. The individual and combined effects of SB and TC have been examined on rat bone marrow cells, using Micronucleus assays (MN), Comet assay, DNA fragmentation, expression of some antioxidant genes using Real time-PCR and finally, oxidative stress analysis. SB significantly increased the mitotic activity (P TC induced marked micronuclei and oxidative DNA damage, in the SB post-treatment group, the combination of SB (300 mg/kg) and TC (40 mg/kg) was able to decrease the induction of MN and oxidative DNA damage through up-regulation of Cat, Sod and Gpx1 genes significantly at (P TC treatment to modulate TC genotoxic effect by reducing its oxidative stress, and thus being an appropriate agonist agent to combine with TC than each compound alone.

  20. Evaluation of the in vivo genotoxic effects of gamma radiation on the peripheral blood leukocytes of head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, Samit B; Shyama, Soorambail K; Almeida, Valentine G

    2013-04-15

    The present study aimed to evaluate the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation on non-target cells of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) patients exposed to various cumulative doses of gamma rays during radiotherapy. The ten patients (P1-P10) were treated with cobalt 60 gamma radiation (External Beam Radiotherapy) for a period of five to six weeks with a daily fraction of 2Gy for 5 days each week. The genotoxic effects of radiation (single strand breaks - SSBs) in these patients were analyzed using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) technique, with the Olive Tail Moment (OTM) as the critical parameter. A sample of each patient's peripheral blood before starting with radiotherapy (pre-therapy) served as the control, and blood collected at weekly time intervals during the course of the radiotherapy served as treated (10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60Gy) samples. In vivo radiosensitivity of these patients, as indicated by SSB's after the cumulative radiation doses at the various times, was assessed using Student's t-test. Significant DNA damage relative to the individual patient's pre-therapy baseline data was observed in all patients. Inter-individual variation of the genotoxic effects was analyzed using two-way ANOVA. The correlation between doses for the means of smoker and non-smoker patients was calculated using the Pearson test. The results of this study may indicate the need to reduce the daily radiotherapy dose further to prevent genotoxic effects on non-target cells, thus improving safety. Furthermore, these results may indicate that the estimation of DNA damage following exposure to a gamma radiation, as measured by the comet assay in whole blood leukocytes, can be used to screen human populations for radiation-induced genetic damage at the molecular level.

  1. Investigation of the genotoxic effects of chlorine bleach and dishwashing detergent on Guppy (Poecillia reticulata Peters, 1859) by using the micronucleus test

    OpenAIRE

    ARSLAN, Pınar; DALGIÇ, Mehmet Ali; SARIÇAKMAK, Sedanur; SARIGİL, Necla; ÜLKER, Şeyma; MEMMİ, Burcu KOÇAK

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the potential genotoxic effects of dishwashing detergent and chlorine bleach, which pollute aquatic ecosystems due to domestic, industrial and general uses were investigated on the standard test organism Guppy (Poecillia reticulata Peters, 1859) by using the fish erythrocyte micronucleus test. The fish were exposed to dishwashing detergent and chlorine bleach at 15 μl/L concentration for 96 hours and blood samples were taken after 96 hours from Poecillia reticulata. M...

  2. Genotoxic activity of praziquantel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, R; Ostrosky, P

    1997-12-01

    Praziquantel is a synthetic drug with a remarkable activity against parasites, particularly treamatodes and cestodes. Initial genotoxicity tests used a spectrum of endpoints including tests in bacteria, yeasts, mammalian cells and Drosophila and each one gave negative results. Effects on reproductive cells of mice were negative as well. However, host mediated studies in mice and humans were contradictory and a comutagenic effect with several mutagens and carcinogens was found. Later studies, including monitoring in humans and pigs have shown that Praziquantel induces a greater frequency of hyperploid lymphocytes as well as structural chromosomal aberrations, but not in all the individuals treated. In vitro studies have demonstrated that Praziquantel can induce micronuclei in syrian hamster embryonic (SHE) cells and in lymphocytes of some individuals. The same was found about structural chromosomal aberrations. Fetal death and fetal resorption were found when Praziquantel was administered in high doses to pregnant rats between the 6th and 10th day of gestation. Due to its efficiency as a parasiticide, Praziquantel is in use in Latin-American, Asiatic, African and East-European countries where infections by trematodes and cestodes are frequent. However, the extensive use of Praziquantel in multiple reinfections, in non-infected and non-diagnosed individuals for prevention, in higher doses or repeated doses for cysticercosis treatment and in individuals exposed to environmental mutagens, in conjunction with new findings about its metabolism and genotoxic properties, make it necessary to further evaluate the potential of this drug not only to be mutagenic per se, but to contribute in the development of neoplasm.

  3. Comparative Study on Genotoxicity in Vitro Caused by Nano- and Micro-Scale ZnO%纳米与微米尺度氧化锌体外遗传毒作用特征的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁春柳; 朱江波; 朱玉平; 姚朗; 张天宝

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the characteristics of genotoxicity of nano-ZnO and so as to provide a scientific basis for safety assessment of nanomaterials,the comparison of genotoxicity between nano- and micro-scale ZnO was conducted using cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome test and alkaline comet assays in vitro.Results were as follows: ? Micro-ZnO could not significantly influence the indexes such as micronucleus,nu-cleoplasmic bridge,nuclear bud and nuclear divided index (NDI) at the dosage of 0.02-2.5 |xg·mL-1(P>0.05).However,nano-ZnO at the dosage higher than 0.5 μg·mL-1 led to an increase in the numbers of total micro-nucleus,type I micronucleus and nuclear bud in a dose-dependent manner (P0.05).However,the numbers of total micronucleus,type I micronucleus and nucleoplasmic bridge exhibited a time-effect relationship in nano-ZnO group.(3) Nano-ZnO caused DNA damage at 0.5 μg·mL-1.but DNA damage was not observed in micro-ZnO group until the dosage of 2.5 μg·mL-1.The study demonstrated that the properties and strength of genotoxicity were significantly different between nano-ZnO and micro-ZnO.Nano-ZnO could induce the generation of type I micronucleus,type II micronucleus,nuclear bud and nucleoplasmic bridge and cause DNA damage,whereas only DNA damage was caused by micro-ZnO at relatively high doses.%为揭示纳米氧化锌(ZnO)遗传毒作用特征,以便为纳米材料的安全性评价提供科学依据,利用胞质分裂阻滞微核细胞组学实验和碱性彗星实验比较了纳米和微米尺度ZnO的遗传毒性.结果显示:①微米尺度ZnO在0.02~2.5 μg·mL-1剂量下对微核、核质桥、核芽和核分裂指数(nucleus divided index,NDI)均无显著诱导作用(P>0 05);而纳米尺度ZnO在>0.5 μg·mL-1剂量时可显著诱导细胞产生总微核、Ⅰ型微核和核芽(P<0.05),且均存在一定的剂量-效应关系,剂量为2.5 μg· mL-1时,细胞的Ⅱ型微核数、核质桥数和NDI与对照组相

  4. Genotoxic effect of lead nitrate on mice using SCGE (comet assay).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, K D; Banu, B S; Grover, P; Jamil, K

    2000-04-14

    Single stranded DNA breakage induced by lead nitrate in mice has been studied in vivo using alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). Mice were administered orally 0.7, 1.4, 2.8, 5.6, 11. 2, 22.4, 44.8 and 89.6 mg/kg body weight of lead nitrate and the assay was performed on whole blood at 24, 48, 72 h, 1st and 2nd week. Significant increase in mean tail-length of DNA was observed at all time intervals after treatment with lead nitrate when compared to controls. The mean tail-length did not show a dose-related increase and the elevation in the mean tail-length was of a fluctuating type. Increase in mean tail-lengths clearly gives evidence that lead nitrate causes DNA damage effectively. The study indicates that the alkaline comet assay is a sensitive and rapid method to detect DNA damage caused by heavy metals.

  5. Effects of individual and combined toxicity of bisphenol A, dibutyl phthalate and cadmium on oxidative stress and genotoxicity in HepG 2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohui; Yin, Pinghe; Zhao, Ling

    2017-07-01

    Bisphenol A, dibutyl phthalate and cadmium can be found in environment simultaneously. Several studies suggested that they had genotoxic effect. In this study, mono-exposure and co-exposure treatments, designed by 3 × 3 full factorial, were established to determine the individual toxicity and binary mixtures' combined effects on the oxidative stress and genotoxicity in HepG 2 cells. The highest oxidative damage was observed in the Cd treatments groups. Compared with control groups, the maximum level of reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde were ∼1.4 fold and ∼2.22 fold respectively. And a minimum level of superoxide dismutase activity was found with the decrease of 43%. The mechanism that excessive oxidative stress led to the DNA damage was inferred. However, cells treated with BPA showed the worst DNA damage rather than Cd, which may because Cd mainly damages DNA repairing mechanism. For the joint effect, different interactions can be found in different biological endpoints for different combinations since different mechanisms have been clarified in mixture toxicity studies. It is sure that the co-exposure groups enhanced cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and genotoxicity compared to the mono-exposures. Synergistic and additive interactions were considered, which means greater threat to organisms when exposed to multiple estrogenic endocrine disruptors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Protective Effect of Curcumin against Ionizing Radiation (IR)-induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in HepG2 Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Dong Min; Nasir Uddin, S. M.; Ryu, Tae Ho; Kang, Mi Young; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Ionizing radiation (IR) has many practical applications such as medicine, foods, agricultures, industries, and research laboratories. However, the increasing use of radiation is associated with radiation accidents threatening human health. It is well known that exposure to IR gives rise to genomic alterations, mutagenesis, and cell death. IR is absorbed directly by DNA, leading to various DNA damages (single or double-strand breaks, base damage, and DNA-DNA or DNA-protein cross-linkages) in many living organisms. Therefore, the development of effective and nontoxic radioprotective agents is of considerable interest. Curcumin (C{sub 12}H{sub 20}O{sub 6}, structure is the major yellow component of Curcuma longa with biological activities (antioxidant, anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory properties). It has been widely used as food and medicine for a long time. The aim of our present study is to investigate the protective effects of curcumin against IR-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in cultured HepG2 cells.

  7. Acetaminophen metabolism, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity in rat primary hepatocyte cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milam, K.M.; Byard, J.L.

    1985-06-30

    Acetaminophen (APAP) metabolism, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity were measured in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. Although 3 mM APAP caused a slight increase in cellular release of lactate dehydrogenase into the culture medium, cellular glutathione concentration (an index of APAP metabolism) was reduced by 50%. APAP at 7 mM was significantly more toxic to these hepatocytes and had a similar but more marked effect on glutathione concentrations. In spite of its cytotoxicity, neither dose of APAP stimulated DNA repair synthesis when monitored by the rate of incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA following exposure to APAP. Thus, although APAP has been shown to be both hepato- and nephrotoxic in several in vivo and in vitro systems, the reactive toxic metabolite of APAP is not genotoxic in rat primary hepatocyte cultures.

  8. Cyberbullying: Causes, Effects, and Remedies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Dianne L.; Mitchell, Sidney N.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present research exploring the pervasiveness and causes of cyberbullying, the psychological impact on students, and the responses to cyberbullying from students and administrators. The goal is to give school leaders a greater understanding of this phenomenon and suggest steps to deal with this challenging…

  9. Cyberbullying: Causes, Effects, and Remedies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Dianne L.; Mitchell, Sidney N.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present research exploring the pervasiveness and causes of cyberbullying, the psychological impact on students, and the responses to cyberbullying from students and administrators. The goal is to give school leaders a greater understanding of this phenomenon and suggest steps to deal with this challenging…

  10. Comparison of the genotoxic effects induced by 50 Hz extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields and 1800 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic fields in GC-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Weixia; Liu, Chuan; Zhang, Lei; He, Mindi; Xu, Shangcheng; Chen, Chunhai; Pi, Huifeng; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Yanwen; Zhong, Min; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2015-03-01

    Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) and radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) have been considered to be possibly carcinogenic to humans. However, their genotoxic effects remain controversial. To make experiments controllable and results comparable, we standardized exposure conditions and explored the potential genotoxicity of 50 Hz ELF-EMF and 1800 MHz RF-EMF. A mouse spermatocyte-derived GC-2 cell line was intermittently (5 min on and 10 min off) exposed to 50 Hz ELF-EMF at an intensity of 1, 2 or 3 mT or to RF-EMF in GSM-Talk mode at the specific absorption rates (SAR) of 1, 2 or 4 W/kg. After exposure for 24 h, we found that neither ELF-EMF nor RF-EMF affected cell viability using Cell Counting Kit-8. Through the use of an alkaline comet assay and immunofluorescence against γ-H2AX foci, we found that ELF-EMF exposure resulted in a significant increase of DNA strand breaks at 3 mT, whereas RF-EMF exposure had insufficient energy to induce such effects. Using a formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG)-modified alkaline comet assay, we observed that RF-EMF exposure significantly induced oxidative DNA base damage at a SAR value of 4 W/kg, whereas ELF-EMF exposure did not. Our results suggest that both ELF-EMF and RF-EMF under the same experimental conditions may produce genotoxicity at relative high intensities, but they create different patterns of DNA damage. Therefore, the potential mechanisms underlying the genotoxicity of different frequency electromagnetic fields may be different.

  11. Lack of genotoxic effect of food dyes amaranth, sunset yellow and tartrazine and their metabolites in the gut micronucleus assay in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poul, Martine; Jarry, Gérard; Elhkim, Mostafa Ould; Poul, Jean-Michel

    2009-02-01

    The food dyes amaranth, sunset yellow and tartrazine were administered twice, at 24h intervals, by oral gavage to mice and assessed in the in vivo gut micronucleus test for genotoxic effects (frequency of micronucleated cells) and toxicity (apoptotic and mitotic cells). The concentrations of each compound and their main metabolites (sulfanilic acid and naphthionic acid) were measured in faeces during a 24-h period after single oral administrations of the food dyes to mice. Parent dye compounds and their main aromatic amine metabolites were detected in significant amounts in the environment of colonic cells. Acute oral exposure to food dye additives amaranth, sunset yellow and tartrazine did not induce genotoxic effect in the micronucleus gut assay in mice at doses up to 2000 mg/kg b.w. Food dyes administration increased the mitotic cells at all dose levels when compared to controls. These results suggest that the transient DNA damages previously observed in the colon of mice treated by amaranth and tartrazine by the in vivo comet assay [Sasaki, Y.F., Kawaguchi, S., Kamaya, A., Ohshita, M., Kabasawa, K., Iwama, K., Taniguchi, K., Tsuda, S., 2002. The comet assay with 8 mouse organs: results with 39 currently used food additives. Mutat. Res. 519, 103-119] are unable to be fixed in stable genotoxic lesions and might be partly explained by local cytotoxicity of the dyes.

  12. Genotoxic effect of radio marked lymphocytes using Tc-99m complexes; Efecto genotoxico del radiomarcado de linfocitos empleando complejos de Tc-99m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedraza L, M.; Ferro F, G.; Mendiola C, M.T.; Morales R, P. [Instituto nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    The genotoxic effect of radio marked lymphocytes was evaluated using {sup 99m}-Tc-HMPAO and {sup 99m}-Tc- gentisic acid complexes. With the results of this work it is pretended to contribute to the knowledge of genetic and structural damages that provokes the radiation in the marked lymphocytes. The d, 1-HMPAO was synthesized in laboratory with a yielding of 30 %. The radiochemical purity of the complexes was greater than 85%. Mouse lymphocytes obtained of sanguineous volumes 2 ml were used. The radio marked efficiency of cells was 19.6 {+-} 6.4% and 25.6 {+-} 5.8% for {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO and {sup 99m} Tc gentisic acid respectively. The genotoxic effect was evaluated using the technique of Unicellular Electrophoresis in Micro gel (Comet assay). The results showed that both {sup 99m} Tc complexes produce genotoxicity due to their capacity to penetrate cells, therefore the Auger and M internal conversion electrons place all their energy obtaining doses of Gray order. (Author)

  13. Ameliorative effects of gallic acid, quercetin and limonene on urethane-induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Isha; Abraham, Suresh K

    2017-05-01

    The main objective of our present work was to ascertain the efficacy of Drosophila melanogaster model for assessing antigenotoxic and antioxidant effects of dietary phytochemicals gallic acid (GA), quercetin (QC) and limonene (Lim) against urethane (URE), a genotoxic environmental carcinogen. Oregon-K (ORK) adult male flies were fed GA, QC and Lim in combination with URE (20 mM) in 10% sucrose for 72 h. Third instar larvae were fed instant medium containing the above phytochemicals and URE for 24 h. Sex-linked recessive lethal (SLRL) test and assays for estimating glutathione content (GSH), glutathione S-transferase (GST), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and lipid peroxidation (MDA content) were performed. Adult feeding experiments demonstrated that co-treatment of flies with URE and the test phytochemicals has significantly decreased the frequencies of SLRL mutations in all the germ cell stages when compared to that with URE alone. Larval feeding experiments also showed a similar pattern. The above results correlate well with antioxidative potentials of the test agents where we observed the elevated enzymatic levels with a significant reduction in MDA level in Drosophila larvae. The results further suggest that the dietary phytochemicals have an antioxidant and antimutagenic property which can be assessed using D. melanogaster.

  14. Genotoxic and cell-transformation effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) following in vitro sub-chronic exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vales, Gerard; Rubio, Laura; Marcos, Ricard

    2016-04-05

    BEAS-2B cells were sub-chronically exposed (up to 4 weeks) to low doses of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT, NM403). Genotoxic effects were evaluated using the comet and the micronucleus (MN) assays at three different time-points. The expression of different interleukins (IL) such as IL-1B, IL-6 and IL-8, as well as HO-1 as stress marker, was assessed after 3 weeks treatments. As a hallmark biomarker of cell-transforming ability we used the soft-agar assay, which detects anchorage-independent cell growth. Our results show high levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated to MWCNT exposure. Nevertheless, an important proportion of these ROS levels seems to be associated to solubilized metals contaminants present in NM403, more than to the internalized MWCNT. No primary DNA damage was obtained in the Comet assay although significant levels of chromosome damage were detected using the micronucleus assay. A significant decrease in the expression of the studied cytokines was observed and significant increases in the number of induced colonies were obtained when the ability of induce anchorage-independent growth was determined. These results show that chromosome damage and reducing inflammatory signalling correlated with an increase in attachment-independent growth associated with sub-chronic MWCNT exposure.

  15. Effect of probiotic fermented milk and chlorophyllin on gene expressions and genotoxicity during AFB₁-induced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Verma, Vinod; Nagpal, Ravinder; Kumar, Ashok; Gautam, Sanjeev K; Behare, Pradip V; Grover, Chand R; Aggarwal, Praveen K

    2011-12-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the chemopreventive effect of probiotic fermented milk and chlorophyllin on aflatoxin B₁ (AFB₁) induced hepatocellular carcinoma. In vivo trials were conducted on 200 Wistar rats allocated to eight groups. Rats in the positive control group were given intraperitoneal injection of aflatoxin B₁ at 450 μg/kg body weight twice a week for 6 weeks. The rats were sacrificed and dissected at 25th week of the experiment, and comet assay was carried out in hepatic cells to assess the genotoxicity or DNA damage. The tumour incidence was decreased by approximately one-third than AFB₁ control group. The expression of c-myc bax, bcl-2, cyclin D1, p53 and rasp-21 genes was also studied. A significant (Pchlorophyllin group as compared to aflatoxin B₁ control group. The c-myc, bcl-2, cyclin D1 and rasp-21 level was found to be highest in AFB₁ control group as compared to the treatment group. The results advocate the enhanced protective potential of probiotic fermented milk and chlorophyllin against AFB₁-induced molecular alterations in hepatic cells during carcinogenesis.

  16. Lack of genotoxic effects (micronucleus induction) in human lymphocytes exposed in vitro to 900 MHz electromagnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeni, O; Chiavoni, A S; Sannino, A; Antolini, A; Forigo, D; Bersani, F; Scarfì, M R

    2003-08-01

    In the present study, we investigated the induction of genotoxic effects in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after exposure to electromagnetic fields used in mobile communication systems (frequency 900 MHz). For this purpose, the incidence of micronuclei was evaluated by applying the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. Cytotoxicity was also investigated using the cytokinesis-block proliferation index. The experiments were performed on peripheral blood from 20 healthy donors, and several conditions were tested by varying the duration of exposure, the specific absorption rate (SAR), and the signal [continuous-wave (CW) or GSM (Global System of Mobile Communication) modulated signal]. The following exposures were carried out: (1) CW intermittent exposure (SAR = 1.6 W/kg) for 6 min followed by a 3-h pause (14 on/off cycles); (2) GSM signal, intermittent exposure as described in (1); (3) GSM signal, intermittent exposure as described in (1) 24 h before stimulation with phytohemagglutinin (8 on/off cycles); (4) GSM signal, intermittent exposure (SAR = 0.2 W/kg) 1 h per day for 3 days. The SARs were estimated numerically. No statistically significant differences were detected in any case in terms of either micronucleus frequency or cell cycle kinetics.

  17. Oxidative stress and genotoxic effects in gill and kidney of Anguilla anguilla L. exposed to chromium with or without pre-exposure to beta-naphthoflavone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Iqbal; Maria, V L; Oliveira, M; Pacheco, M; Santos, M A

    2006-09-19

    Fish in the aquatic environment can be subjected to a multipollution state and the occurrence of sequential exposures is an important aspect of eco-toxicological research. In this context, a preceding exposure can affect a toxic response to a subsequent exposure. Therefore, the current study was based on sequential exposures, viz. to a PAH-like compound (beta-naphthoflavone, BNF) followed by a heavy metal (chromium, Cr), focusing on the assessment of oxidative stress responses and their role in induction of genotoxicity. Oxidative stress responses in gill and kidney were investigated in European eel (Anguilla anguilla L.), and measured as lipid peroxidation (LPO), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), catalase (CAT) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity, and reduced glutathione (GSH) concentration, whereas genotoxicity was measured as DNA strand breakage. Fish were exposed for 24 h to two Cr concentrations (100 microM, 1 mM), with or without pre-exposure to BNF (2.7 microM, 24 h). In gill, a GSH decrease was observed along with loss of DNA integrity at all exposure conditions except at the lowest Cr concentration, showing a crucial role of GSH over genotoxicity. Moreover, sporadic induction of antioxidant enzymes was not effective in the protection against genotoxicity. However, a different mechanism seems to occur in kidney, since the loss of DNA integrity detected for all exposed groups was not accompanied by alterations in antioxidant levels. With regards to peroxidative damage, both organs showed an LPO increase after sequential exposure to BNF and 100 microM Cr. However, no association between LPO induction and antioxidant responses could be established, showing that LPO is not predictable solely on the basis of antioxidant depletion. The interference of BNF pre-exposure with the response of organs to Cr showed a marked dependence on the Cr concentration. Gill showed synergistic effects on LPO and GPX increase, as well as on CAT and GSH decrease for the lowest

  18. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of the epoxy resin-based root canal sealer AH plus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyhausen, G; Heil, J; Reifferscheid, G; Waldmann, P; Geurtsen, W

    1999-02-01

    Previous studies with four rapid in vitro and in vivo test systems have shown that the epoxy resin-based root canal sealer AH26 may be genotoxic and cytotoxic (9). The purpose of this study was to determine the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of the new resinous root canal sealer AH Plus by means of the growth inhibition test with primary human periodontal ligament fibroblasts and permanent 3T3 monolayers, the procaryotic umu test, the eucaryotic DNA synthesis inhibition test, and the in vivo alkaline filter elution test. In addition, Ames tests were performed with extracts from AH Plus. AH Plus caused only slight or no cellular injuries. Furthermore, no genotoxicity and mutagenicity were revealed by AH Plus. These data should be taken into consideration when deciding about a root canal sealer.

  19. In situ biomonitoring of the genotoxic effects of mixed industrial emissions using the Tradescantia micronucleus and pollen abortion tests with wild life plants: demonstration of the efficacy of emission controls in an eastern European city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misík, Miroslav; Micieta, Karol; Solenská, Martina; Misíková, Katarína; Pisarcíková, Helena; Knasmüller, Siegfried

    2007-01-01

    Aim of the study was to monitor changes of genotoxic activity of urban air caused by an incinerator and a petrochemical plant in Tradescantia micronucleus (Trad-MCN) and pollen fertility assays with wild plants (Chelidonium majus, Clematis vitalba, Cichorium intybus, Linaria vulgaris, Robinia pseudoacacia). While in the first sampling period (1997-2000) significantly (on average 80%) more MN were found at the polluted site in comparison to controls from a rural area, no significant effects were observed during a later period (between 2003 and 2005). A similar pattern was observed in the pollen abortion assays in which the most pronounced effects were found in chicory and false acacia. The differences of the results obtained in the two periods can be explained by a substantial reduction of air pollution by use of new technologies. In particular the decrease of SO(2) emissions may account for the effects seen in the present study.

  20. Genotoxic Effect of Chronic Exposure to DDT on Lymphocytes, Oral Mucosa and Breast Cells of Female Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth De Celis

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The genotoxicity of some environmental contaminants may affect human health directly by damaging genetic material and thus plays an important role in cancer development. Xenoestrogens are one kind of environmental pollutants that may alter hormonal routes or directly affect DNA. The number of available biomarkers used to assess genetic risk and cancer is very extensive. The present study evaluated genotoxicity produced by the pesticide DDT on systemic and mammary gland cells obtained from adult female Wistar rats. Oral mucosa cells micronuclei were assessed; the comet assay in peripheral blood-isolated lymphocytes and mammary epithelial cells was also carried out. Additionally, oxidative stress was studied in mammary tissue through a lipid peroxidation assay. Our data showed an increase in lipid peroxidation, product of an increase in free oxygen radical levels, which leads to an oxidative stress status. Our results suggest that DDT is genotoxic, not only for lymphocytes but also to mammary epithelial cells.

  1. Genotoxic effect of chronic exposure to DDT on lymphocytes, oral mucosa and breast cells of female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales-Aguirre, Alejandro; Padilla-Camberos, Eduardo; Gómez-Pinedo, Ulises; Salado-Ponce, Hugo; Feria-Velasco, Alfredo; De Celis, Ruth

    2011-02-01

    The genotoxicity of some environmental contaminants may affect human health directly by damaging genetic material and thus plays an important role in cancer development. Xenoestrogens are one kind of environmental pollutants that may alter hormonal routes or directly affect DNA. The number of available biomarkers used to assess genetic risk and cancer is very extensive. The present study evaluated genotoxicity produced by the pesticide DDT on systemic and mammary gland cells obtained from adult female Wistar rats. Oral mucosa cells micronuclei were assessed; the comet assay in peripheral blood-isolated lymphocytes and mammary epithelial cells was also carried out. Additionally, oxidative stress was studied in mammary tissue through a lipid peroxidation assay. Our data showed an increase in lipid peroxidation, product of an increase in free oxygen radical levels, which leads to an oxidative stress status. Our results suggest that DDT is genotoxic, not only for lymphocytes but also to mammary epithelial cells.

  2. [Studies on the genotoxic effects of crude liver oils from 3 species of Mediterranean sharks by means of in vitro micronucleus test using human lymphocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartfai, E; Orsière, T; Duffaud, F; Villani, P; Pompili, J; Botta, A

    2000-01-01

    Lymphoid system tumours have been identified in two subjects who used to handle for several years mediterranean shark liver oil and squalen extracted from this oil. Moreover, scientific data, reported in 1959 by Kröning, show the induction of lymphoid tumours in C57 B1 mice after exposure of their skin to squalen. These observations rose the question of a possible mutagenic power of shark liver oil. In order to determine the genotoxicity of these oils, in vitro assays have been performed on crude hepatic oil of three species of mediterranean sharks: two benthic sharks, Centrophorus granulosus and Galeus melastomus, and one pelagic specie, Prionace glauca. Genotoxicity of oils have been assayed using a micronucleus test which can detected simultaneously clastogen and aneugen effects. The incubation of human cells with the hepatic crude oils of Centrophorus granulosus increases the rate of the binucleated micronucleated cell in a dose dependent manner. The mean micronucleated cell rate was 9.0%. +/- 1.1 in controls and increased up to 27,1%. +/- 4,0 for the highest concentrations of oil extracts. Similar results have been obtained with crude hepatic oils of Galeus melastomus and Prionace glauca. The results of this experimental study show that the crude liver oils of three species of sharks are genotoxic and confirm a high carcinogenic risk.

  3. Genotoxicity and Cytotoxicity Evaluation of the Neolignan Analogue 2-(4-Nitrophenoxy-1Phenylethanone and its Protective Effect Against DNA Damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Lucas Hanusch

    Full Text Available Neolignans are secondary metabolites found in various groups of Angiosperms. They belong to a class of natural compounds with great diversity of chemical structures and pharmacological activities. These compounds are formed by linking two phenylpropanoid units. Several compounds that have ability to prevent genetic damage have been isolated from plants, and can be used to prevent or delay the development of tumor cells. Genetic toxicology evaluation is widely used in risk assessment of new drugs in preclinical screening tests. In this study, we evaluated the genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of the neolignan analogue 2-(4-nitrophenoxy-1-phenylethanone (4NF and its protective effect against DNA damage using the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test and the comet assay in mouse peripheral blood. Our results showed that this neolignan analogue had no genotoxic activity and was able to reduce induced damage both in mouse bone marrow and peripheral blood. Although the neolignan analogue 4NF was cytotoxic, it reduced cyclophosphamide-induced cytotoxicity. In conclusion, it showed no genotoxic action, but exhibited cytotoxic, antigenotoxic, and anticytotoxic activities.

  4. Lead- induced genotoxicity in wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Truta

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The changes induced in cytogenetic parameters from root meristems of Triticum aestivum cv. Maruca seedlings have been studied after treatment with lead acetate and lead nitrate solutions, at four concentrations (10, 25, 50, 100 μM containing 2.07, 5.18, 10.36, respectively 20.72 μg ml-1 Pb2+. Lead induced mitosis disturbances in root meristematic cells of wheat seedlings, expressed mainly in decrease of mitotic index and changes in preponderance of division phases. This heavy metal has genotoxic effects, expressed in the occurrence of many chromosomal aberrations in all Pb2+ treated variants. Pb2+ nitrate shows a more pronounced genotoxic potential than lead acetate trihydrate.

  5. In vivo genotoxic effects of dietary heme iron on rat colon mucosa and ex vivo effects on colon cells monitored by an optimized alkaline comet assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Océane, C Martin

    2015-04-01

    In conclusion, our results offer a suitable protocol to evaluate genotoxicity on in vivo cryopreserved colon mucosa and on in vitro murine colonic cells, with a middle throughput capacity. This protocol confirms the increase of genotoxicity in rat colon mucosa after an heme-iron diet. Moreover, this protocol enables the demonstration that aldehydes from heme-induced lipoperoxidation are responsible for this increase of genotoxicity.

  6. Evaluation of genotoxicity and pro-oxidant effect of the azo dyes: acids yellow 17, violet 7 and orange 52, and of their degradation products by Pseudomonas putida mt-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Mansour, Hedi; Corroler, David; Barillier, Daniel; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir, Leila; Mosrati, Ridha

    2007-09-01

    Acids yellow 17, violet 7 and orange 52, very important commercial azo dyes used in the textile, food, paper and cosmetic industries, were degraded by Pseudomonas putida mt-2 at concentrations up to 100mg/l. The culture media was completely decolorized under static incubation for 60 h, this faster than under continuous shaking incubation. SOS chromotest using Escherichia coli PQ37, with and without metabolic activation (S-9 preparations), was used to assess genotoxicity potential of these dyes before and after biodegradation. None of these dyes or their metabolites was found to be genotoxic in the absence of "Araclor-Induced rat liver microsome" preparations (S-9). However, in presence of the preparation S-9, the genotoxicity of the biodegradation products was highlighted. Metabolites resulting from static cultures were more genotoxic than those obtained in shaken conditions. In addition to genotoxic effects, metabolites have shown a significant ability to induce the formation of superoxide free radical anion (O(2)(*-)). The toxicities generated by the pure azo dyes and the pure azo-reduction products (sulfanilic acid, N,N'-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine and 4'-aminoacetanilid) were compared. These results suggest that P. putida mt-2 degrades the studied azo dyes in two steps: an azo-reduction followed by an oxygen-dependent metabolization. Some of the derived metabolites would be responsible of genotoxicity and metabolic toxicity.

  7. Genotoxic effects of fly ash in bacteria, mammalian cells and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, D L; Connor, T H; Harper, J B; Ward, J B; Legator, M S

    1989-01-01

    The increasing use of fossil fuels has raised concerns about possible deleterious health effects of the final combustion product, fly ash. Seven ash samples from coal sources obtained from Battelle Columbus Laboratories were evaluated in the Salmonella/mammalian microsome mutagenicity assay to determine their mutagenic potential. While dimethyl sulfoxide extracts of five samples showed no mutagenicity, sample 102 caused an increase in the number of revertants per plate over controls in TA100 and TA98 with activation by liver homogenate (2-fold and 2.4-fold, respectively), and without (2-fold and 6-fold). This ash was thus evaluated in whole animal studies. Animals treated by inhalation or oral gavage were assayed for the presence of mutagens in the urine, micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes, and chromosomal aberrations in metaphase bone marrow cells. Those animals treated by inhalation were also examined for local damage in the lung. The assay for mutagens in the urine was negative as shown by the Ames assay with TA100 and TA98 and there was no increase in micronuclei or in metaphase aberrations. Histological sections from the animals treated by inhalation did not show the presence of particles, macrophage infiltrations and generalized lung damage. We tested the same fly ash with an in vitro cell transformation assay with the cell line Balb/c 3T3 subclone A31-1-13. Although there was not an increase in Type III foci, there was a dose-dependent increase of Type II foci in the treated cells over the controls. In one assay, there was approximately a 14-fold increase in Type II foci in the highest dose (2 mg/ml) compared to the solvent control. One other ash sample induced cell transformation without being markedly cytotoxic, while a third sample was highly toxic but did not induce transformation.

  8. Cell-Based Genotoxicity Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifferscheid, Georg; Buchinger, Sebastian

    Genotoxicity test systems that are based on bacteria display an important role in the detection and assessment of DNA damaging chemicals. They belong to the basic line of test systems due to their easy realization, rapidness, broad applicability, high sensitivity and good reproducibility. Since the development of the Salmonella microsomal mutagenicity assay by Ames and coworkers in the early 1970s, significant development in bacterial genotoxicity assays was achieved and is still a subject matter of research. The basic principle of the mutagenicity assay is a reversion of a growth inhibited bacterial strain, e.g., due to auxotrophy, back to a fast growing phenotype (regain of prototrophy). Deeper knowledge of the ­mutation events allows a mechanistic understanding of the induced DNA-damage by the utilization of base specific tester strains. Collections of such specific tester strains were extended by genetic engineering. Beside the reversion assays, test systems utilizing the bacterial SOS-response were invented. These methods are based on the fusion of various SOS-responsive promoters with a broad variety of reporter genes facilitating numerous methods of signal detection. A very important aspect of genotoxicity testing is the bioactivation of ­xenobiotics to DNA-damaging compounds. Most widely used is the extracellular metabolic activation by making use of rodent liver homogenates. Again, genetic engineering allows the construction of highly sophisticated bacterial tester strains with significantly enhanced sensitivity due to overexpression of enzymes that are involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics. This provides mechanistic insights into the toxification and detoxification pathways of xenobiotics and helps explaining the chemical nature of hazardous substances in unknown mixtures. In summary, beginning with "natural" tester strains the rational design of bacteria led to highly specific and sensitive tools for a rapid, reliable and cost effective ­genotoxicity

  9. Genotoxic and cytotoxic effects and gene expression changes induced by fixed orthodontic appliances in oral mucosa cells of patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Cameán, Ana; Jos, Angeles; Cameán, Ana M; Solano, Enrique; Iglesias-Linares, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of chronic or severe acute DNA and cellular damage in oral mucosa cells is one of the main factors that help initiate a wide range of malignant lesions in the oral cavity. There has been considerable controversy in the literature about the effect of such sustained genotoxic and cytotoxic damage to oral mucosa cells. The aim of this systematic review, reported in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, is to investigate the effects of such interventions. Electronic and manual searches were performed (15 May 2015) for Randomized Clinical Trials/quasi-Randomized Clinical Trials that analyzed the genotoxic/cytotoxic effects of these types of oral appliances in humans. A primary outcome (cell/DNA damage) and a number of secondary outcomes were examined. Two reviewers carried out the study selection and performed a "risk of bias" assessment [Cochrane Collaboration's tool]. Wherever possible the meta-analysis was conducted on homogenous groups. From the electronic search (2797), 6 studies met the eligibility criteria. Most studies (5/6) observed significant differences in most comparisons at the short-term (1-3 months) and long-term (24-48 months) evaluations, with respect to critically acute genotoxic/cytotoxic effects. Some of the studies (2/3) concluded that the post-removable effects at DNA/cellular levels were not significant (p > 0.05) with respect to the controls. Acute DNA/cellular damage in oral mucosa cells is induced by orthodontic appliances. Nevertheless, even though these effects were no longer detected after removing the appliances, more rigorous RCTs are needed to explore the extent to which acquired damage can be observed in the oral mucosa.

  10. Exposing native cyprinid (Barbus plebejus) juveniles to river sediments leads to gonadal alterations, genotoxic effects and thyroid disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viganò, Luigi; De Flora, Silvio; Gobbi, Marco; Guiso, Giovanna; Izzotti, Alberto; Mandich, Alberta; Mascolo, Giuseppe; Roscioli, Claudio

    2015-12-01

    Juveniles (50 days post hatch) of a native cyprinid fish (Barbus plebejus) were exposed for 7 months to sediments from the River Lambro, a polluted tributary impairing the quality of the River Po for tens of kilometers from their confluence. Sediments were collected upstream of the city of Milan and downstream at the closure of the drainage basin of the River Lambro. Chemical analyses revealed the presence of a complex mixture of bioavailable endocrine-active chemicals, with higher exposure levels in the downstream section of the tributary. Mainly characterized by brominated flame retardants, alkylphenols, polychlorinated biphenyls, and minor co-occurring personal care products and natural hormones, the sediment contamination induced reproductive disorders, as well as other forms of endocrine disruption and toxicity. In particular, exposed male barbel exhibited higher biliary PAH-like metabolites, overexpression of the cyp1a gene, vitellogenin production in all specimens, the presence of oocytes (up to 22% intersex), degenerative alterations in their testis, liver fat vacuolization, a marked depression of total thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) plasma levels, and genotoxic damages determined as hepatic DNA adducts. These results clearly demonstrate that Lambro sediments alone are responsible for recognizable changes in the structure and function of the reproductive and, in general, the endocrine system of a native fish species. In the real environment, exposure to waterborne and food-web sources of chemicals are responsible for additional toxic loads, and the present findings thus provide evidence for a causal role of this tributary in the severe decline observed in barbel in recent decades and raise concern that the fish community of the River Po is exposed to endocrine-mediated health effects along tens of kilometres of its course.

  11. Gene expression profiles for genotoxic effects of silica-free and silica-coated cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Do Won; Lee, Dong Soo; Kim, Soonhag

    2012-01-01

    Nanomaterials have been widely evaluated for potential use as efficient delivery carriers for cancer diagnosis and therapy. To translate these nanomaterials to the clinic, their safety needs to be verified, particularly in terms of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity. We investigated changes in gene expression profiles influenced by silica-coated cobalt ferrite magnetic-fluorescence nanoparticles and silica-free cobalt ferrite magnetic-core nanoparticles in vivo and in vitro. (68)Ga-labeled cobalt ferrite nanoparticles produced by synthesis of 2-(p-isothio-cyanatobenzyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclonane-1,4,7-triacetic acid chelator were established after labeling efficiency had been validated through a thin-layer chromatography method. The expression of genes associated with the stress and toxicity pathways was verified by a commercially available polymerase chain reaction array kit. In comparison with magnetic-fluorescence nanoparticles, magnetic-core nanoparticles revealed severe cytotoxic effects at various doses and treatment times as determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Whole-body small-animal PET and biodistribution studies, including transmission electron microscope analysis, showed that tail-vein injection of magnetic-core or magnetic-fluorescence nanoparticles exhibited substantial liver accumulation. Real-time polymerase chain reaction array using 52 genes related to cellular toxicity demonstrated that 17 genes from the magnetic-core-treated liver samples were significantly affected, mostly in relation to DNA damage or repair and to oxidative or metabolic stress. The magnetic-fluorescence-treated liver samples showed gene expression approximately 90% similar to that of untreated liver samples. We compared a variety of gene expression profiles in mice injected with magnetic-fluorescence or magnetic-core nanoparticles. This study of gene expression profiles affected by nanotoxicity provides critical information for the

  12. Genotoxicity of unmodified and organo-modified montmorillonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anoop Kumar; Schmidt, Bjørn; Frandsen, Henrik; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Larsen, Erik Husfeldt; Binderup, Mona-Lise

    2010-07-19

    The natural clay mineral montmorillonite (Cloisite) Na+) and an organo-modified montmorillonite (Cloisite 30B) were investigated for genotoxic potential as crude suspensions and as suspensions filtrated through a 0.2-microm pore-size filter to remove particles above the nanometre range. Filtered and unfiltered water suspensions of both clays did not induce mutations in the Salmonella/microsome assay at concentrations up to 141microg/ml of the crude clay, using the tester strains TA98 and TA100. Filtered and unfiltered Cloisite) Na+ suspensions in culture medium did not induce DNA strand-breaks in Caco-2 cells after 24h of exposure, as tested in the alkaline comet assay. However, both the filtered and the unfiltered samples of Cloisite 30B induced DNA strand-breaks in a concentration-dependent manner and the two highest test concentrations produced statistically significantly different results from those seen with control samples (porgano-modified montmorillonite was caused by the organo-modifier. The detected organo-modifier mixture was synthesized and comet-assay results showed that the genotoxic potency of this synthesized organo-modifier was in the same order of magnitude at equimolar concentrations of organo-modifier in filtrated Cloisite) 30B suspensions, and could therefore at least partly explain the genotoxic effect of Cloisite) 30B.

  13. Safety pharmacology and genotoxicity evaluation of AVI-4658.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazani, Peter; Weller, Doreen L; Shrewsbury, Stephen B

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by dystrophin gene mutations. Restoration of dystrophin by exon skipping was demonstrated with the phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMO) class of splice-switching oligomers, in both mouse and dog disease models. The authors report the results of Good Laboratory Practice-compliant safety pharmacology and genotoxicity evaluations of AVI-4658, a PMO under clinical evaluation for DMD. In cynomolgus monkeys, no test article-related effects were seen on cardiovascular, respiratory, global neurological, renal, or liver parameters at the maximum feasible dose (320 mg/kg). Genotoxicity battery showed that AVI-4658 has no genotoxic potential at up to 5000 microg/mL in an in vitro mammalian chromosome aberration test and a bacterial reverse mutation assay. In the mouse bone marrow erythrocyte micronucleus test, a single intravenous injection up to 2000 mg/kg was generally well tolerated and resulted in no mutagenic potential. These results allowed initiation of systemic clinical trials in DMD patients in the United Kingdom.

  14. DNA damage and oxidative stress induced by CeO2 nanoparticles in human dermal fibroblasts: Evidence of a clastogenic effect as a mechanism of genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benameur, Laila; Auffan, Mélanie; Cassien, Mathieu; Liu, Wei; Culcasi, Marcel; Rahmouni, Hidayat; Stocker, Pierre; Tassistro, Virginie; Bottero, Jean-Yves; Rose, Jérôme; Botta, Alain; Pietri, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    The broad range of applications of cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles (nano-CeO2) has attracted industrial interest, resulting in greater exposures to humans and environmental systems in the coming years. Their health effects and potential biological impacts need to be determined for risk assessment. The aims of this study were to gain insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the genotoxic effects of nano-CeO2 in relation with their physicochemical properties. Primary human dermal fibroblasts were exposed to environmentally relevant doses of nano-CeO2 (mean diameter, 7 nm; dose range, 6 × 10(-5)-6 × 10(-3) g/l corresponding to a concentration range of 0.22-22 µM) and DNA damages at the chromosome level were evaluated by genetic toxicology tests and compared to that induced in cells exposed to micro-CeO2 particles (mean diameter, 320 nm) under the same conditions. For this purpose, cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay in association with immunofluorescence staining of centromere protein A in micronuclei were used to distinguish between induction of structural or numerical chromosome changes (i.e. clastogenicity or aneuploidy). The results provide the first evidence of a genotoxic effect of nano-CeO2, (while not significant with micro-CeO2) by a clastogenic mechanism. The implication of oxidative mechanisms in this genotoxic effect was investigated by (i) assessing the impact of catalase, a hydrogen peroxide inhibitor, and (ii) by measuring lipid peroxidation and glutathione status and their reversal by application of N-acetylcysteine, a precusor of glutathione synthesis in cells. The data are consistent with the implication of free radical-related mechanisms in the nano-CeO2-induced clastogenic effect, that can be modulated by inhibition of cellular hydrogen peroxide release.

  15. In Vivo Effects of Vanadium Pentoxide and Antioxidants (Ascorbic Acid and Alpha-Tocopherol) on Apoptotic, Cytotoxic, and Genotoxic Damage in Peripheral Blood of Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rodríguez, María del Carmen; Hernández-Cortés, Lourdes Montserrat; Altamirano-Lozano, Mario Agustín

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of vanadium pentoxide (V2O5), ascorbic acid (AA), and alpha-tocopherol (α-TOH) on apoptotic, cytotoxic, and genotoxic activity. Groups of five Hsd:ICR mice were treated with the following: (a) vehicle, distilled water; (b) vehicle, corn oil; (c) AA, 100 mg/kg intraperitoneally (ip); (d) α-TOH, 20 mg/kg by gavage; (e) V2O5, 40 mg/kg by ip injection; (f) AA + V2O5; and (g) α-TOH + V2O5. Genotoxic damage was evaluated by examining micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MN-PCE) obtained from the caudal vein at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h after treatments. Induction of apoptosis and cell viability were assessed at 48 h after treatment in nucleated cells of peripheral blood. Treatment with AA alone reduced basal MN-PCE, while V2O5 treatment marginally increased MN-PCE at all times after injection. Antioxidants treatments prior to V2O5 administration decreased MN-PCE compared to the V2O5 group, with the most significant effect in the AA + V2O5 group. The apoptotic cells increased with all treatments, suggesting that this process may contribute to the elimination of the cells with V2O5-induced DNA damage (MN-PCE). The necrotic cells only increased in the V2O5 group. Therefore, antioxidants such as AA and α-TOH can be used effectively to protect or reduce the genotoxic effects induced by vanadium compounds like V2O5. PMID:27413422

  16. A pre-validation trial - testing genotoxicity of several chemicals using standard, medium- and high-throughput comet formats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Bjerve Gutzkow

    2015-06-01

    Results obtained with the three systems (standard, medium- and high-throughput were essentially the same. The 96-minigel format was analysed with the fully automated scoring system IMSTAR and comparable results were achieved with the semi-automated scoring system from Perceptives. The known genotoxic chemicals MNU, B(aP, 4-NQO and cyclophosphamide showed little consistent sign of genotoxicity at concentrations causing limited cytotoxicity. D-mannitol and Triton X-100 were, as expected, non-genotoxic (though Triton X-100, at high concentrations, caused DNA breaks as an apparent secondary effect of cytotoxicity. Etoposide and bleomycin gave significant increase in DNA strand break at borderline cytotoxic concentrations. The limitation of the assay to detect damaged bases by known genotoxins may be overcome by incorporating a DNA repair enzyme, such as formamidopyrimidine-DNA-glycosylase (FPG, to convert damaged bases into breaks as shown by Azqueta A et al., Mutagenesis vol. 28 no. 3 pp. 271–277, 2013 .

  17. Genotoxic effects of the carbamate insecticide Pirimor-50® in Vicia faba root tip meristems and human lymphocyte culture after direct application and treatment with its metabolic extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia-Quintana, Rafael; Gómez-Arroyo, Sandra; Sánchez-Alarcón, Juana; Milić, Mirta; Olivares, José Luis Gómez; Waliszewski, Stefan M; Cortés-Eslava, Josefina; Villalobos-Pietrini, Rafael; Calderón-Segura, María Elena

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate genotoxic effects of Pirimor-50®, a pirimicarb-based formulation (50 % active ingredient), in human lymphocyte cultures and Vicia faba root meristems. Furthermore, the objective was to examine a combined influence of insecticide treatment with mammalian microsomal S9 and vegetal S10 metabolic fractions or S10 mix metabolic transformation extracts (after Vicia faba primary roots treatment with Pirimor-50®). We used sister chromatid exchange assay-SCE and measured cell cycle progression and proliferation (proportion of M1-M3 metaphases and replication index ratio-RI). Two processes were used for plant promutagen activation: in vivo activation-Pirimor-50® was applied for 4 h to the plant and then S10 mix was added to lymphocytes; and, in vitro activation-lymphocytes were treated with Pirimor-50® and S10 or S9 for 2 h. Direct treatment induced significantly higher SCE frequencies in meristems at 0.01 mg mL-1. In lymphocytes, significantly higher SCE was at 1 mg mL-1 with decrease in RI and M1-M3 metaphase proportions at 0.5 mg mL-1 and cell division stop at 2.5 mg mL1. S10 mix lymphocyte treatment showed significantly elevated SCE values at 2-2.5 mg mL-1, with cell death at 3 mg mL-1. Lymphocyte treatment with Pirimor-50® together with S9 or S10 showed slightly elevated SCE frequency but had a significant influence on RI decrease, with lowest values in S9 treatment. Since no data are available on the genotoxicity of Pirimor-50®, this study is one of the first to evaluate and compare its direct effect in two bioassays, animal and vegetal, and also the effect of plant and animal metabolism on its genotoxic potential.

  18. Genotoxicity studies on green tea catechin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, R; Ikeda, N; Yuki, K; Morita, O; Saigo, K; Blackstock, C; Nishiyama, N; Kasamatsu, T

    2008-06-01

    The beneficial effects of tea catechins are well documented. We evaluated the genotoxic potential of a green tea catechin preparation using established genotoxicity assays, including a bacterial reverse mutation assay (Ames test), a chromosomal aberration assay in cultured Chinese hamster lung cells (CHL/IU), a mouse lymphoma L5178Y/tk assay, and a bone marrow micronucleus (MN) assay in ICR CD mice and SD rats. No significant increases in the number of revertant colonies were observed in the Ames test, but positive responses were observed in two in vitro assays: the chromosomal aberration assay and mouse lymphoma L5178/tk assay. However, the in vivo study demonstrated no significant increase in micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCE) in the bone marrow of both ICR CD mice and SD rats administered a high dose of the green tea catechin preparation up to 2000mg/kg. Combined with favorable epidemiological information suggesting a chemopreventive effect of tea catechins on carcinogenesis, we conclude that green tea catechin presents no significant genotoxic concern under the anticipated conditions of use. These results are consistent with other genotoxicity studies of tea catechins, which show minimal, if any, genotoxic potential.

  19. Beryllium: genotoxicity and carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Terry; Bowser, Darlene

    2003-12-10

    Beryllium (Be) has physical-chemical properties, including low density and high tensile strength, which make it useful in the manufacture of products ranging from space shuttles to golf clubs. Despite its utility, a number of standard setting agencies have determined that beryllium is a carcinogen. Only a limited number of studies, however, have addressed the underlying mechanisms of the carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of beryllium. Importantly, mutation and chromosomal aberration assays have yielded somewhat contradictory results for beryllium compounds and whereas bacterial tests were largely negative, mammalian test systems showed evidence of beryllium-induced mutations, chromosomal aberrations, and cell transformation. Although inter-laboratory differences may play a role in the variability observed in genotoxicity assays, it is more likely that the different chemical forms of beryllium have a significant effect on mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. Because workers are predominantly exposed to airborne particles which are generated during the machining of beryllium metal, ceramics, or alloys, testing of the mechanisms of the mutagenic and carcinogenic activity of beryllium should be performed with relevant chemical forms of beryllium.

  20. More on the Cause-Effect Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janik, Jerzy A.

    2007-06-01

    Does every event have a cause? An answer is not simple. The notion of cause contains a particular being y acting on being x plus everything that may be called the boundary conditions. These may form necessary and suffcient conditions giving rise to a strong cause, or only necessary conditions, giving rise to a weak cause. These matters are discussed in this article with particular attention being paid to the argumentation of Thomas Aquinas known as prima via. Prima via is the analysis of a cause-effect sequence which leads (according to Thomas) to a First Cause (First Mover). It seems that the extrapolation of the cause-effect sequence to infinity is permissible from the logical point of view. But the possibility of weak causes seems to destroy the cause-effect "line". Here it is perhaps useful to "escape" to the metaphysical abstraction which looks at things sub ratione entitatis. If we ignore space and time (which is characteristic of this abstraction) we are led to believe that the IS of cause is finally unavoidable, which means that from the vantage point of this abstraction, i.e. from the point of view of IS, all causes are strong.

  1. Prevalence of at-risk genotypes for genotoxic effects decreases with age in a randomly selected population in Flanders: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Delft Joost HM

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We hypothesized that in Flanders (Belgium, the prevalence of at-risk genotypes for genotoxic effects decreases with age due to morbidity and mortality resulting from chronic diseases. Rather than polymorphisms in single genes, the interaction of multiple genetic polymorphisms in low penetrance genes involved in genotoxic effects might be of relevance. Methods Genotyping was performed on 399 randomly selected adults (aged 50-65 and on 442 randomly selected adolescents. Based on their involvement in processes relevant to genotoxicity, 28 low penetrance polymorphisms affecting the phenotype in 19 genes were selected (xenobiotic metabolism, oxidative stress defense and DNA repair, respectively 13, 6 and 9 polymorphisms. Polymorphisms which, based on available literature, could not clearly be categorized a priori as leading to an 'increased risk' or a 'protective effect' were excluded. Results The mean number of risk alleles for all investigated polymorphisms was found to be lower in the 'elderly' (17.0 ± 2.9 than the 'adolescent' (17.6 ± 3.1 subpopulation (P = 0.002. These results were not affected by gender nor smoking. The prevalence of a high (> 17 = median number of risk alleles was less frequent in the 'elderly' (40.6% than the 'adolescent' (51.4% subpopulation (P = 0.002. In particular for phase II enzymes, the mean number of risk alleles was lower in the 'elderly' (4.3 ± 1.6 than the 'adolescent' age group (4.8 ± 1.9 P 4 = median number of risk alleles was less frequent in the 'elderly' (41.3% than the adolescent subpopulation (56.3%, P 8 = median number of risk alleles for DNA repair enzyme-coding genes was lower in the 'elderly' (37,3% than the 'adolescent' subpopulation (45.6%, P = 0.017. Conclusions These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that, in Flanders, the prevalence of at-risk alleles in genes involved in genotoxic effects decreases with age, suggesting that persons carrying a higher number of

  2. Determination of genotoxic effects of methidathion alkaline hydrolysis in human lymphocytes using the micronucleus assay and square-wave voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stivaktakis, Polychronis D; Giannakopoulos, Evangelos; Vlastos, Dimitris; Matthopoulos, Demetrios P

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of pesticides with environmental factors, such as pH, may result in alterations of their physicochemical properties and should be taken into consideration in regard to their classification. This study investigates the genotoxicity of methidathion and its alkaline hydrolysis by-products in cultured human lymphocytes, using the square-wave voltammetry (square wave-adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (SW-AdCSV) technique) and the cytokinesis block micronucleus assay (CBMN assay). According to the SW-AdCSV data the alkaline hydrolysis of methidathion results in two new molecules, one non-electro-active and a second electro-active which is more genotoxic than methidathion itself in cultured human lymphocytes, inducing higher micronuclei frequencies. The present study confirms the SW-AdCSV technique as a voltammetric method which can successfully simulates the electrodynamics of the cellular membrane.

  3. The genotoxic effects of the imidacloprid-based insecticide formulation Glacoxan Imida on Montevideo tree frog Hypsiboas pulchellus tadpoles (Anura, Hylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Iglesias, J M; Ruiz de Arcaute, C; Nikoloff, N; Dury, L; Soloneski, S; Natale, G S; Larramendy, M L

    2014-06-01

    The neonicotinoid insecticide imidacloprid (IMI) affects the insect central nervous system and is successfully applied to control pests for a variety of agricultural crops. In the current study, acute toxicity and genotoxicity of the IMI-containing commercial formulation insecticide Glacoxan Imida (35 percent IMI) was evaluated on Hypsiboas pulchellus (Anura: Hylidae) tadpoles exposed under laboratory conditions. A lethal effect was evaluated as the end point for lethality, whereas micronucleus (MN) frequency and DNA single-strand breaks evaluated by the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay were employed as end points for genotoxicity. Sublethal end points were assayed within the 12.5-37.5mg/L IMI concentration range. Experiments were performed on tadpoles at stage 36 (range, 35-37) according to the classification proposed by Gosner. Lethality studies revealed an LC50 96h value of 52.622mg/L IMI. Increased frequency of MNs was only observed when 25.0mg/L was assayed for 96h, whereas no other nuclear abnormalities were induced. Increase of the genetic damage index was observed at 48h of treatment within the 12.5-37.5mg/L concentration range, whereas an increased frequency of DNA damage was observed only in tadpoles treated with 37.5mg/L IMI for 96h. This study represents the first evidence of the acute lethal and genotoxic effects exerted by IMI on tadpoles of an amphibian species native to Argentina under laboratory conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Lymphocyte Oxidative Stress/Genotoxic Effects Are Related to Serum IgG and IgA Levels in Coke Oven Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meili Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated oxidative stress/genotoxic effects levels, immunoglobulin levels, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs levels exposed in 126 coke oven workers and in 78 control subjects, and evaluated the association between oxidative stress/genotoxic effects levels and immunoglobulin levels. Significant differences were observed in biomarkers, including 1-hydroxypyrene levels, employment time, percentages of alcohol drinkers, MDA, 8-OHdG levels, CTL levels and CTM, MN, CA frequency, and IgG, IgA levels between the control and exposed groups. Slightly higher 1-OHP levels in smoking users were observed. For the dose-response relationship of IgG, IgA, IgM, and IgE by 1-OHP, each one percentage increase in urinary 1-OHP generates a 0.109%, 0.472%, 0.051%, and 0.067% decrease in control group and generates a 0.312%, 0.538%, 0.062%, and 0.071% decrease in exposed group, respectively. Except for age, alcohol and smoking status, IgM, and IgE, a significant correlation in urinary 1-OHP and other biomarkers in the total population was observed. Additionally, a significant negative correlation in genotoxic/oxidative damage biomarkers of MDA, 8-OH-dG, CTL levels, and immunoglobins of IgG and IgA levels, especially in coke oven workers, was found. These data suggest that oxidative stress/DNA damage induced by PAHs may play a role in toxic responses for PAHs in immunological functions.

  5. Lagos lagoon sediment organic extracts and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons induce embryotoxic, teratogenic and genotoxic effects in Danio rerio (zebrafish) embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Sogbanmu, Temitope; Nagy, Eszter; Phillips, David Hunter; Arlt, Volker Manfred; Otitoloju, Adebayo; Bury, Nicolas Richard

    2016-01-01

    An expansion of anthropogenic activity around Lagos lagoon, Nigeria has raised concerns over increasing contaminants entering the lagoon’s ecosystem. The embryotoxicity, teratogenicity and genotoxicity of sediment organic extracts from four sampling zones around Lagos lagoon, Ilaje, Iddo, Atlas Cove and Apapa, as well as the dominant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) identified in water measured during the wet season (naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene, benzo[a]pyrene and a mixture of th...

  6. Protective effects of niacin against methylmercury-induced genotoxicity and alterations in antioxidant status in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva de Paula, Eloisa; Carneiro, Maria Fernanda Hornos; Grotto, Denise; Hernandes, Lívia Cristina; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi; Barbosa, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the potential beneficial effects of niacin (NA; vitamin B3) supplementation in rats chronically exposed to methylmercury (MeHg). Animals were randomly assigned to one of 4 groups (n = 6): Group I, control, received distilled water by gavage; Group II, received MeHg (100 µg/kg/d) by gavage; Group III, received NA (50 mg/kg/d) in drinking water; Group IV, received MeHg (100 µg/kg/d) by gavage + NA (50 mg/kg/d) in drinking water. Biochemical parameters levels of glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol and fractions, and enzyme activities aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) were determined. Further, oxidative stress markers activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase (CAT) activity, as well as levels of reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and nitric oxide, were examined, and the comet assay was performed, using blood/plasma. Hg levels were measured in blood, brain, and kidneys of animals. Our results demonstrated that NA reduced adverse effects produced by MeHg. The mechanism underlying these effects appears to be related to the intrinsic antioxidant potential of NA. Considering the beneficial effects attributed to NA following MeHg exposure and that fish are the main source of both NA and MeHg, future studies need to evaluate the potential counteractive effect of NA against the adverse consequences of MeHg exposure in fish-eating populations.

  7. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of metal(oid)s bioactivated in rocket leaves (Eruca vesicaria subsp. sativa Miller).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villatoro-Pulido, Myriam; Font, Rafael; Obregón-Cano, Sara; Moreno-Rojas, Rafael; Amaro-López, Manuel Ángel; Anter, Jauoad; Muñoz-Serrano, Andrés; De Haro Bailón, Antonio; Alonso-Moraga, Angeles; Del Río-Celestino, Mercedes

    2013-11-01

    Rocket is an important source of essential elements. However, it may also accumulate toxic elements such as metal(oids). The objectives of the present work were (i) to study the uptake of arsenic, lead, cadmium and zinc in rocket grown in contaminated soils, (ii) to establish the genotoxic and cytotoxic activities of this vegetable material, and (iii) to study the modulator role of the glucosinolate and metal contents in the genotoxic/cytotoxic activities. Lead, cadmium and zinc leaf concentrations in our study were over the concentrations allowed by the statutory limit set for metal(oid) contents in vegetables. The accessions were non genotoxic at the different concentrations studied, although one of the accessions showed the highest mutation rates doubling those of negative control. The cytotoxicity assays with HL60 human leukaemia cells showed that the tumouricide activities of rocket leaves decreased with the increasing of metal(oid) concentrations and also with the decreasing of glucosinolate concentrations in their tissues. An interaction between metal(oid)s and glucosinolate degradation products contained in rocket leaves is suggested as the main modulator agents of the biological activity of the plants grown in metal-contaminated soils.

  8. Cytogenetic analyses of Azadirachtin reveal absence of genotoxicity but marked antiproliferative effects in human lymphocytes and CHO cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosesso, Pasquale; Bohm, Lothar; Pepe, Gaetano; Fiore, Mario; Carpinelli, Alice; Gäde, Gerd; Nagini, Siddavaram; Ottavianelli, Alessandro; Degrassi, Francesca

    2012-09-18

    In this work we have examined the genotoxic potential of the bioinsecticide Azadirachtin A (AZA) and its influence on cell proliferation on human lymphocytes and Chinese Hamster ovary (CHO) cells. AZA genotoxicity was assessed by the analysis of chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in the absence and presence of rat liver S9 metabolism. Primary DNA damage was also investigated by means of the comet assay. The results obtained clearly indicate that AZA is not genotoxic in mammalian cells. On the other hand, AZA proved to interfere with cell cycle progression as shown by modulation of frequencies of first (M1) and second division (M2) metaphases detected by 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine labeling. Accumulation of M1 metaphases were more pronounced in human lymphocytes. In the transformed CHO cell line, however, significant increases of multinucleated interphases and polyploid cells were observed at long treatment time. At higher dose-levels, the incidence of polyploidy was close to 100%. Identification of spindle structure and number of centrosomes by fluorescent immunostaining with α- and γ-tubulin antibodies revealed aberrant mitoses exhibiting multipolar spindles with several centrosomal signals. These findings suggest that AZA can act either through a stabilizing activity of microtubules or by inhibition of Aurora A, since both mechanisms are able to generate genetically unstable polyploid cells with multipolar spindles and multinucleated interphases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Toxic and genotoxic effects of hexavalent chromium in environment and its bioremediation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sandhya; Bharagava, Ram Naresh

    2016-01-01

    Chromium is one of the major inorganic environmental pollutants, which is added in the environment through various natural and anthropogenic activities and exists mainly in two forms: Cr(III) and Cr(VI). Cr(VI) is considered to be more toxic than Cr(III) due to its high solubility and mobility. It is a well-reported occupational carcinogen associated with lung, nasal, and sinus cancers. Thus, this review article provides the detailed information on the occurrence, sources of chromium contamination in the environment and their toxicological effects in human, animal, plants as well as in microorganisms, and bioremediation strategies to minimize the toxic effects.

  10. Impact of acid mine drainage on haematological, histopathological and genotoxic effects in golden mahaseer, Tor putitora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Neetu; Sarma, Debaji; Pandey, Jyoti; Das, Partha; Sarma, Dandadhar; Mallik, Sumanta Kumar

    2016-07-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate sub-lethal mechanism of acid mine drainage toxicity in fingerlings (9.5 ± 2.4 cm) of golden mahseer, Tor putitora. Exposed fingerlings showed significant reduction (P < 0.01) in blood erythrocytes, neutrophils, thrombocytes, lymphocytes and leukocytes in contrast to increase in number of immature circulating cells. Hyperplasia, degeneration of glomeruli, presence of inflammatory cells and increased number of melanomacrophage aggregates, vacuolization of cell cytoplasm, hepatocyte swelling were marked in kidney and liver of fish. Ladder in, an increment of 180-200 bp of hepatic and kidney DNA, by electrophoresis were consistent with DNA damage. 10 day exposure to acid mine drainage resulted in reduction of double stranded DNA to 46.0 and 48.0 in hepatocytes and kidney cells respectively. Significant increase (P < 0.01) in tail length and percent tail DNA was evident by comet assay. The results suggest that exposure to acid mine drainage might cause irreversible damage to immune cells, tissue and DNA of fish, and this model of DNA damage may contribute in identifying novel molecular mechanism of interest for bioremediation application.

  11. Genotoxic effects of the herbicide Roundup(®) in the fish Corydoras paleatus (Jenyns 1842) after short-term, environmentally low concentration exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castilhos Ghisi, Nédia; Cestari, Marta Margarete

    2013-04-01

    The glyphosate-based herbicide, Roundup(®), is one of the most used pesticides worldwide. In concert with the advent of transgenic crops resistant to glyphosate, the use of this pesticide has led to an increase in agricultural yields. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic effect that the herbicide Roundup(®) (at a concentration of 6.67 μg/L, corresponding to 3.20 μg/L glyphosate) can have on the fish Corydoras paleatus. Treatment groups were exposed for 3, 6, and 9 days, and effects were analyzed using the piscine micronucleus test (PMT) and comet assay. A group subjected to filtered water only was used as a negative control. The PMT did not show differences between the control and exposed groups for any of the treatment times. In contrast, the comet assay showed a high rate of DNA damage in group exposed to Roundup(®) for all treatment times, both for blood and hepatic cells. We conclude that for the low concentration used in this research, the herbicide shows potential genotoxic effects. Future research will be important in evaluating the effects of this substance, whose presence in the environment is ever-increasing.

  12. Effect of eugenol on the genotoxicity of established mutagens in the liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rompelberg, C.J.M.; Evertz, S.J.C.J.; Bruijntjes-Rozier, G.C.D.M.; Heuvel, P.D. van den; Verhagen, H.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of in vivo treatment with eugenol on established mutagens was studied to determine whether eugenol has antigenotoxic potential. The effects of eugenol in rats was investigated in the unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay with established mutagens and the Salmonella typhimurium mutageni

  13. Glutathione-S-transferase A3 knockout mice are sensitive to acute cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of aflatoxin B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Zoran; Crawford, Dana; Vakharia, Dilip; Egner, Patricia A; Sell, Stewart

    2010-02-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a major risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in humans. However, mice, a major animal model for the study of AFB1 carcinogenesis, are resistant, due to high constitutive expression, in the mouse liver, of glutathione S-transferase A3 subunit (mGSTA3) that is lacking in humans. Our objective was to establish that a mouse model for AFB1 toxicity could be used to study mechanisms of toxicity that are relevant for human disease, i.e., an mGSTA3 knockout (KO) mouse that responds to toxicants such as AFB1 in a manner similar to humans. Exons 3-6 of the mGSTA3 were replaced with a neomycin cassette by homologous recombination. Southern blotting, RT-PCR, Western blotting, and measurement of AFB1-N(7)-DNA adduct formation were used to evaluate the mGSTA3 KO mice. The KO mice have deletion of exons 3-6 of the mGSTA3 gene, as expected, as well as a lack of mGSTA3 expression at the mRNA and protein levels. Three hours after injection of 5 mg/kg AFB1, mGSTA3 KO mice have more than 100-fold more AFB1-N(7)-DNA adducts in their livers than do similarly treated wild-type (WT) mice. In addition, the mGSTA3 KO mice die of massive hepatic necrosis, at AFB1 doses that have minimal toxic effects in WT mice. We conclude that mGSTA3 KO mice are sensitive to the acute cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of AFB1, confirming the crucial role of GSTA3 subunit in protection of normal mice against AFB1 toxicity. We propose the mGSTA3 KO mouse as a useful model with which to study the interplay of risk factors leading to HCC development in humans, as well as for testing of additional possible functions of mGSTA3.

  14. Evaluating the possible genotoxic, mutagenic and tumor cell proliferation-inhibition effects of a non-anticoagulant, but antithrombotic algal heterofucan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Lima, Jailma; Costa, Leandro Silva; Silva, Naisandra Bezerra; Melo-Silveira, Raniere Fagundes; Silva, Fábio Vasconcelos; Felipe, Maria Beatriz Mesquita Cansanção; Medeiros, Silvia Regina Batistuzzo; Leite, Edda Lisboa; Rocha, Hugo Alexandre Oliveira

    2010-10-01

    Fucan is a term used to denominate a family of sulfated polysaccharides rich in L-fucose. They are extracted mainly from brown seaweeds and echinoderms. The brown seaweed Spatoglossum schröederi (Dictyotaceae) synthesizes three heterofucans named A, B and C. Our research group purified a non-anticoagulant heterofucan (fucan A) which displays antithrombotic activity in vivo. However, its in vitro toxicity has yet to be determined. This work presents the evaluation of the potential cytotoxicity, mutagenicity and genotoxicity of this fucan. After 48 h incubation fucan A cytotoxicity was determinate using MTT assay. Tumor-cell (HeLa, PC3, PANC, HL60) proliferation was inhibited 2.0-43.7%; at 0.05-1 mg ml⁻¹ of the heterofucan, the 3T3 non-tumor cell line proliferation was also inhibited (3.3-22.0%). On the other hand, the CHO tumorigenic and RAW non-tumor cell lines proliferation were not affected by this molecule (0.05-1 mg ml⁻¹). We observed no mutagenic activity in Salmonella reversion assay when bacterial strains TA97a, TA98, TA100 and TA102 (with and without S9) were used.Comet assay showed that fucan A had no genotoxic effect (from 20 to 1000 mg ml⁻¹) on CHO cells. In conclusion, this study indicates that the S. schröederi fucan A was not found to be genotoxic or mutagenic compound; thus it could be used in new antithrombotic drug development.

  15. Studies on the genotoxic effect of beryllium chloride and the possible protective role of selenium/vitamins A, C and E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmy, Maha A; Hassan, Nagwa H A; Farghaly, Ayman A; Hassan, Entesar E S

    2008-04-30

    The genotoxic potential of beryllium chloride (BeCl2) was evaluated in vivo in mice using different endpoints. Chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells and in spermatocytes as well as sperm abnormalities were determined in the tested mice. The protective role of an orally administered drug consisting of selenium and vitamins A, C and E (selenium-ACE) was also studied. For analysis of chromosomal aberrations, both single and repeated oral treatments for a period of 3 weeks were performed. The doses used were 93.75, 187.50, 375, and 750 mg BeCl2/kg bw, which corresponds to 1/16, 1/8, 1/4, and 1/2 of the experimental LD50. BeCl2 induced a statistically significant increase in the percentage of chromosomal aberrations in both somatic and germ cells, with a dose- and time-response. The percentage of induced chromosomal aberrations was significantly reduced in all BeCl2-treated groups after oral administration of selenium-ACE. Beryllium chloride also induced a significant increase in the percentage of abnormal sperm. This percentage reached values of 9.62 +/- 0.32 and 5.56 +/- 0.31 in mice treated with the highest test dose of BeCl2 and with BeCl2+selenium-ACE, respectively, compared with 1.96 +/- 0.14 for the control. In conclusion, the results demonstrate the genotoxic effect of beryllium chloride and confirm the protective role of selenium-ACE against the genotoxicity of beryllium chloride.

  16. Genotoxicity effects of Flusilazole on the somatic cells of Allium cepa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozakca, Dilek Unal; Silah, Hulya

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the fungicide flusilazole on somatic cells of Allium cepa. For evaluation of cytogenetic effects, root meristem cells of A. cepa were treated with 10, 20, 30 and 45 ppm (EC50 concentration) for 24, 48 and 72 h. The mitotic index and different types of chromosomal abnormalities such as bridges, stickiness and laggards were determined in both control and test groups. Acridine orange/Ethidium bromide double staining and fluorescence microscope was used to determine the stability of chromosome structure. Data obtained from staining process indicated that ratio of necrotic cells significantly increased by the flusilazole presoaking. The RAPD-PCR method was used and the higher doses treated-group (45 ppm) was more distant to the control group compare with others.

  17. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells affect the cell cycle arrest effect of genotoxic agents on acute lymphocytic leukemia cells via p21 down-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiran; Hu, Kaimin; Hu, Yongxian; Liu, Lizhen; Wang, Binsheng; Huang, He

    2014-09-01

    The effect of bone marrow microenvironment on the cell cycle of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. In this study, we found that in normal condition, bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) had no significant effect on the cell cycle and apoptosis of ALL; in the condition when the cell cycle of ALL was blocked by genotoxic agents, BM-MSCs could increase the S-phase cell ratio and decrease the G2/M phase ratio of ALL. Besides, BM-MSCs could protect ALL cells from drug-induced apoptosis. Then, we proved that BM-MSCs affect the cell cycle arrest effect of genotoxic agents on ALL cells via p21 down-regulation. Moreover, our results indicated that activation of Wnt/β-catenin and Erk pathways might be involved in the BM-MSC-induced down-regulation of p21 in ALL cells. Targeting microenvironment-related signaling pathway may therefore be a potential novel approach for ALL therapy.

  18. Comparison of cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of plutonium-239 alpha particles and mobile phone GSM 900 radiation in the Allium cepa test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesnya, Dmitry S; Romanovsky, Anton V

    2013-01-20

    The goal of this study was to compare the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of plutonium-239 alpha particles and GSM 900 modulated mobile phone (model Sony Ericsson K550i) radiation in the Allium cepa test. Three groups of bulbs were exposed to mobile phone radiation during 0 (sham), 3 and 9h. A positive control group was treated during 20min with plutonium-239 alpha-radiation. Mitotic abnormalities, chromosome aberrations, micronuclei and mitotic index were analyzed. Exposure to alpha-radiation from plutonium-239 and exposure to modulated radiation from mobile phone during 3 and 9h significantly increased the mitotic index. GSM 900 mobile phone radiation as well as alpha-radiation from plutonium-239 induced both clastogenic and aneugenic effects. However, the aneugenic activity of mobile phone radiation was more pronounced. After 9h of exposure to mobile phone radiation, polyploid cells, three-groups metaphases, amitoses and some unspecified abnormalities were detected, which were not registered in the other experimental groups. Importantly, GSM 900 mobile phone radiation increased the mitotic index, the frequency of mitotic and chromosome abnormalities, and the micronucleus frequency in a time-dependent manner. Due to its sensitivity, the A. cepa test can be recommended as a useful cytogenetic assay to assess cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Environmental genotoxicity: Probing the underlying mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shugart, L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Theodorakis, C. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Environmental pollution is a complex issue because of the diversity of anthropogenic agents, both chemical and physical, that have been detected and catalogued. The consequences to biota from exposure to genotoxic agents present an additional problem because of the potential for these agents to produce adverse change at the cellular and organismal levels. Past studies in genetic toxicology at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have focused on structural damage to the DNA of environmental species that may occur after exposure to genotoxic agents and the use of this information to document exposure and to monitor remediation. In an effort to predict effects at the population, community and ecosystem levels, current studies in genetic ecotoxicology are attempting to characterize the biological mechanisms at the gene level that regulate and limit the response of an individual organism to genotoxic factors in their environment.

  20. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effect of the [{sup 166}Dy]Dy/{sup 166}Ho-EDTMP in vivo generator system in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedraza-Lopez, Martha [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion, Salvador Zubiran, Delegacion Tlalpan, Mexico DF 14000 (Mexico); Ferro-Flores, Guillermina [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico, CP 52045 (Mexico); Arteaga de Murphy, Consuelo [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion, Salvador Zubiran, Delegacion Tlalpan, Mexico DF 14000 (Mexico)]. E-mail: consuelo_murphy@yahoo.com.mx; Morales-Ramirez, Pedro [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico, CP 52045 (Mexico); Piedras-Ross, Josefa [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion, Salvador Zubiran, Delegacion Tlalpan, Mexico DF 14000 (Mexico); Murphy-Stack, Eduardo [Hospital Santaelena, Mexico DF (Mexico); Hernandez-Oviedo, Omar [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, IPN, Mexico DF (Mexico)

    2004-11-01

    Multiple myeloma and other hematological malignancies have been treated by myeloablative radiotherapy/chemotherapy and subsequent stem cell transplantation. [{sup 166}Dy]Dy/{sup 166}Ho-ethylenediaminetetramethylene phosphonate (EDTMP) forms a stable in vivo generator system with selective skeletal uptake in mice; therefore, it could work as a potential and improved agent for marrow ablation. Induced bone marrow cytotoxicity and genotoxicity are determined by the reduction of reticulocytes (RET) and elevation of micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) in peripheral blood and ablation by bone marrow histological studies. The aim of this study was to determine the bone marrow cytotoxic and genotoxic effect of the [{sup 166}Dy]Dy/{sup 166}Ho-EDTMP in vivo generator system in mice and to evaluate by histopathology its myeloablative potential. Enriched {sup 166}Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} was irradiated and [{sup 166}Dy]DyCl{sub 3} was added to EDTMP in phosphate buffer (pH 8.0) in a molar ratio of 1:1.75. QC was determined by TLC. Dy-EDTMP complex was prepared the same way with nonirradiated dysprosium oxide. A group of BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with the radiopharmaceutical and two groups of control animals were injected with the cold complex and with 0.9% sodium chloride, respectively. A blood sample was taken at the beginning of the experiments and every 48 h for 12 days postinjection. The animals were sacrificed, organs of interest taken out and the radioactivity determined. The femur was used for histological studies. Flow cytometry analysis was used to quantify the frequency of RET and MN-RET in the blood samples. The MCNP4B Monte Carlo computer code was used for dosimetry calculations. Radiochemical purity was 99% and the mean specific activity was 1.3 MBq/mg. The RET and MN-RET frequency were statistically different in the treatment at the end of the 12-day period demonstrating cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by the in vivo generator system. The

  1. Genotoxicity evaluation of alpha-linolenic acid-diacylglycerol oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Honda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The alpha-linolenic acid (ALA-diacylglycerol (DAG oil is an edible oil enriched with DAG (>80% and ALA (>50%. Although DAG oil, which mainly consists of oleic and linoleic acids has no genotoxic concerns, the fatty acid composition could affect the chemical property of DAG. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of ALA-DAG oil using standard genotoxicity tests in accordance with the OECD guidelines. ALA-DAG oil showed negative results in the bacterial reverse mutation test (Ames test and in vitro micronucleus test in cultured Chinese hamster lung cells with and without metabolic activation, and in the in vivo bone marrow micronucleus test in mice. Our results did not show any genotoxicity, suggesting that the fatty acid composition had no deleterious effects. We conclude that ALA-DAG oil had no genotoxicity concerns under the testing conditions.

  2. Genotoxic effects of cadmium chloride on human amniotic fluid cells cultured in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogu, G. [Sassari Univ., Sassari (Italy). Dept. of Physiological, Biochemical and Cellular sciences; Sassari Univ., Sassari (Italy). Centre of Clinical Genetics; Congiu, A. M.; Sini, M. C.; Ladu, R. [Sassari Univ., Sassari (Italy). Dept. of Physiological, Biochemical and Cellular sciences; Campus, P. M.; Sanna, R.; Soro, G. [Sassari Univ., Sassari (Italy). Centre of Clinical Genetics

    2000-12-01

    In this study it has been reported the results of cytogenetic tests, namely a search for chromosome aberrations (CA) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), performed on human amniotic fluid cells cultured and treated with Cadmium chloride. The cells from primary cultures were exposed to CdCl{sub 2} at 1 {mu}M and 10 {mu}M for 24 h. At the higher dose, no metaphases were scored and at the lower dose (1 {mu}M) no effects were evident on cell proliferation, and no chromosome aberrations were found. In the subsequent experiments were used cells from subcultures exposed to 1 {mu}M and 5 {mu}M CdCl{sub 2}. At the 5 {mu}M dose was evident the induction of chromatid breaks, while the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges shows a small increase, not statistically significant at the dose of 1 {mu}M. In this study it was positively demonstrated that amniotic fluid cells grown in vitro are reliable for testing various mutagenic or teratogenic substances. With regard to cadmium treatment results, it is evident a clastogenic effect of cadmium chloride but not a significant induction of SCEs. [Italian] In questo studio abbiamo riportato i risultati dei tests citogenici di valutazione degli scambi fra cromatidi fratelli (SCEs) e di induzione di aberrazioni cromosomiche (CA) condotti su colture cellulari di liquido amniotico umano, trattate con cloruro di cadmio. Le cellule delle colture primarie venivano esposte al CdCl{sub 2} a concentrazioni di 1 {mu}M 10 {mu}M per 24 h. Alla dose piu' alta (10 {mu}M) non sono state osservate metafasi, mentre alla dose piu' bassa (1 {mu}M) non sono stati evidenziati ne' effetti sulla proliferazione cellulare ne' CA. Nei successivi esperimenti il CdC{sub 2} e' stato testato su subcolture cellulari alle dosi di 1 {mu}M e 5 {mu}M. Alla dose di 5 {mu}M sono state evidenziate rotture cromatidiche, mentre la frequenza di SCE alla dose di 1 {mu}M ha mostrato un piccolo incremento, statisticamente non significativo. In questo

  3. Study on genotoxicity effect of domestic sewage on cell of broad bean root tip%生活污水对蚕豆根尖细胞致畸效应的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亚青; 李屹

    2013-01-01

    以蚕豆根尖为材料,采用蚕豆根尖细胞的微核试验和染色体畸变试验方法,研究不同取样点生活污水对蚕豆根尖细胞的致畸效应.结果表明:生活污水能诱发微核率升高,而且在一定范围内,其微核率随污染物浓度升高而增加,但高于一定浓度后有下降趋势;不同取样点的污水均使蚕豆根尖细胞有丝分裂指数下降;生活污水还能诱导蚕豆根尖细胞产生较高频率的染色体畸变.所以生活污水蚕豆根尖细胞具有明显的致畸效应.%The paper investigated the genotoxicity effect of domestic sewage from different treatment processes on the cell of broad bean root tip.The micronucleus and chromosome aberration assay were conducted to determine the micronucleus rate and chromosome aberration rate of broad bean root tip cells induced by domestic sewage.The result indicated that domestic sewage could increase the micronucleus rate of the sells of broad bean root tip.Within certain concentration range of pollutant,the micronucleus rate increased with the increase of the concentration of pollutants,but beyond certain range,the micronucleus rate decreased with further increase of the concentration of pollutants.Domestic sewage could decrease the cell mitosis index.Furthermore,it also caused the increase of chromosome aberration rate.The conclusion is that domestic sewage has obvious genotoxicity effect on the cell of broad bean root tip.

  4. Embryotoxic and genotoxic effects of sewage effluents in zebrafish embryo using multiple endpoint testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, Sanja; Barišić, Josip; Višić, Hrvoje; Sauerborn Klobučar, Roberta; Topić Popović, Natalija; Strunjak-Perović, Ivančica; Čož-Rakovac, Rozelindra; Klobučar, Göran

    2017-05-15

    Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents are often complex mixtures of various organic and inorganic substances. Quality control of wastewaters and sludges has been regulated with measuring several physico-chemical parameters and sometimes using biological methods with non-specific responses, while synergistic action mechanisms of contaminants in such complex mixtures is still unknown. Toxic effects of wastewaters within and downstream of the WWTP in City of Virovitica, Croatia, were tested on zebrafish Danio rerio using a set of biomarkers that enabled an insight in wastewaters toxic potential on embryos at the cellular, tissue and the whole organism level during an early ontogenesis (24 and 48 hpf). Exposure of embryos to the wastewater samples from WWTP Virovitica increased mortality and abnormality rate. Heart rate, spontaneous movements and pigmentation formation were also markedly affected. Biochemical markers confirmed the presence of MXR inhibitors in all tested wastewater samples, indicating the increase of pollutant accumulation in the cell/organism. Also, a tendency of DNA damage decrease measured with Comet assay was evident in wastewater samples downstream from WWTP although control levels were not reached in any environmental sample. Histopathological analysis showed that exposure to tested samples resulted in impaired muscle organization, notochord malformation and retardation in eye and brain development at embryos 48 hpf. Furthermore, semi-quantitative histopathology assessment indicated increased percentage of embryo defects in river water sampled several kilometers downstream from the WWTP, confirming toxic potential of WWTP effluents. Extension of the zebrafish embryotoxicity test (ZET) with biochemical and histopathological biomarkers could serve as a guiding principle in biomonitoring of wastewater contamination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ameliorative effects of thyme and calendula extracts alone or in combination against aflatoxins-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aziem, Sekena H; Hassan, Aziza M; El-Denshary, Ezzeldein S; Hamzawy, Mohamed A; Mannaa, Fathia A; Abdel-Wahhab, Mosaad A

    2014-05-01

    The aims of the current work were to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of calendula flowers and/or thyme leave extracts on aflatoxins (AFs)-induced oxidative stress, genotoxicity and alteration of p53 bax and bcl2 gene expressions. Eighty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into eight equal groups including: the control group, the group fed AFs-contaminated diet (2.5 mg/kg diet) for 5 weeks, the groups treated orally with thyme and/or calendula extract (0.5 g/kg b.w) for 6 weeks and the groups pretreated orally with thyme and/or calendula extract 1 week before and during AFs treatment for further 5 weeks. Blood, liver and bone marrow samples were collected for biochemical analysis, gene expression, DNA fragmentation and micronucleus assay. The results showed that AFs induced significant alterations in oxidative stress markers, increased serum AFP and inflammatory cytokine, percentage of DNA fragmentation, the expression of pro-apoptotic gene p53 and bax accompanied with a decrease in the expression of bcl2. Animals treated with the extracts 1 week before AFs treatment showed a significant decrease in oxidative damage markers, micronucleated cells, DNA fragmentation and modulation of the expression of pro-apoptotic genes. These results suggested that both calendula and thyme extracts had anti-genotoxic effects due to their higher content of total phenolic compounds.

  6. Genotoxicity--threshold or not? Introduction of cases of industrial chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolt, Hermann M

    2003-04-11

    Many industrially and environmentally important industrial carcinogens display effects that lead them to be viewed and regulated as 'genotoxic compounds'. Some of these chemicals cause experimental tumours only at high or toxic doses. The current view is that non-threshold principles should be applied for risk assessments and to define permissible exposure values. The toxicological impact of underlying mechanisms is frequently not well investigated and understood. The classification of carcinogens is now in a state of discussion. In Germany, the 'MAK-Commission' has issued new recommendations to distinguish between 5 groups of proven and suspected carcinogens. This proposal includes a category of 'substances with carcinogenic potential for which genotoxicity plays no or at most a minor role'. Another category comprises 'substances with carcinogenic and genotoxic potential, the potency of which is considered so low that, provided that the MAK-value is observed, no significant contribution to human cancer risk is to be expected'. There is also a number of apparently genotoxic carcinogens where the existence of 'practical thresholds' is at least debated. One outstanding example is vinyl acetate, which must be viewed against the background of discussions on other industrial high-volume chemicals like formaldehyde, acrylonitrile, acrylamide and trichloroethylene. Main arguments in favour or against thresholds of carcinogenicity of these individual compounds are summarised. Current instruments of regulation should be adjusted to allow adequate consideration of carcinogenic effects of chemicals that are practically relevant at high doses only. Also, research into this field is encouraged.

  7. Potentially harmful elements in house dust from Estarreja, Portugal: characterization and genotoxicity of the bioaccessible fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumejeaud, Sophie; Reis, Amelia Paula; Tassistro, Virginie; Patinha, Carla; Noack, Yves; Orsière, Thierry

    2016-10-22

    Due to their behavioral characteristics, young children are vulnerable to the ingestion of indoor dust, often contaminated with chemicals that are potentially harmful. Exposure to potentially harmful elements (PHEs) is currently exacerbated by their widespread use in several industrial, agricultural, domestic and technological applications. PHEs cause adverse health effects on immune and nervous systems and can lead to cancer development via genotoxic mechanisms. The present study is an integrated approach that aims at assessing the genotoxicity of bioaccessible PHEs following ingestion of contaminated house dust. A multidisciplinary methodology associating chemical characterization of five house dust samples, extraction of the bioaccessible PHEs in gastric extracts by the unified BARGE method, determination of the bioaccessible fraction and in vitro genotoxicity of gastric extracts in adenocarcinoma gastric human (AGS) cells was developed. The five gastric extracts induced dose-dependent genotoxicity in AGS cells. Copper (bioaccessible concentration up to 111 mg/kg) was probably the prevalent PHE inducing primary DNA damage (up to 5.1-fold increase in tail DNA at 0.53 g/l of gastric extract). Lead (bioaccessible concentration up to 245 mg/kg) was the most prevalent PHE inducing chromosome-damaging effects (r = 0.55; p health risks.

  8. Cobalt and antimony: genotoxicity and carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boeck, Marlies; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Lison, Dominique

    2003-12-10

    The purpose of this review is to summarise the data concerning genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of Co and Sb. Both metals have multiple industrial and/or therapeutical applications, depending on the considered species. Cobalt is used for the production of alloys and hard metal (cemented carbide), diamond polishing, drying agents, pigments and catalysts. Occupational exposure to cobalt may result in adverse health effects in different organs or tissues. Antimony trioxide is primarily used as a flame retardant in rubber, plastics, pigments, adhesives, textiles, and paper. Antimony potassium tartrate has been used worldwide as an anti-shistosomal drug. Pentavalent antimony compounds have been used for the treatment of leishmaniasis. Co(II) ions are genotoxic in vitro and in vivo, and carcinogenic in rodents. Co metal is genotoxic in vitro. Hard metal dust, of which occupational exposure is linked to an increased lung cancer risk, is proven to be genotoxic in vitro and in vivo. Possibly, production of active oxygen species and/or DNA repair inhibition are mechanisms involved. Given the recently provided proof for in vitro and in vivo genotoxic potential of hard metal dust, the mechanistic evidence of elevated production of active oxygen species and the epidemiological data on increased cancer risk, it may be advisable to consider the possibility of a new evaluation by IARC. Both trivalent and pentavalent antimony compounds are generally negative in non-mammalian genotoxicity tests, while mammalian test systems usually give positive results for Sb(III) and negative results for Sb(V) compounds. Assessment of the in vivo potential of Sb2O3 to induce chromosome aberrations (CA) gave conflicting results. Animal carcinogenicity data were concluded sufficient for Sb2O3 by IARC. Human carcinogenicity data is difficult to evaluate given the frequent co-exposure to arsenic. Possible mechanisms of action, including potential to produce active oxygen species and to interfere with

  9. Assessment of the cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic effects of the commercial black dye in Allium cepa cells before and after bacterial biodegradation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura-Camargo, Bruna de Campos; de Angelis, Dejanira de Franceschi; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2016-10-01

    The present study evaluated the cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic actions of different concentrations (50 and 200 μg/L) of BDCP (Black Dye Commercial Product) used by textile industries, before and after bacterial biodegradation, by the conventional staining cytogenetic technique and NOR-banding in Allium cepa cells. Differences in the chromosomal and nuclear aberrations and alterations in the number of nucleoli were observed in cells exposed to BDCP with and without the microbial treatment. The significant frequencies of chromosome and nuclear aberrations noted in the tests with bacterially biodegraded BDCP indicate that the metabolites generated by degradation are more genotoxic than the chemical itself. Losses of genetic material characterize a type of alteration that was mainly associated with the action of the original BDCP, whereas chromosome stickiness, nuclear buds and binucleated cells were the aberrations that were preferentially induced by BDCP metabolites after biodegradation. The significant frequencies of cell death observed in the tests with biodegraded BDCP also show the cytotoxic effects of the BDCP metabolites. The reduction in the total frequency of altered cells after the recovery treatments showed that the test organism A. cepa has the ability to recover from damage induced by BDCP and its metabolites after the exposure conditions are normalized.

  10. Genotoxicity of citrus wastewater in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and efficiency of heterogeneous photocatalysis by TiO(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saverini, Marghereth; Catanzaro, Irene; Sciandrello, Giulia; Avellone, Giuseppe; Indelicato, Sergio; Marcì, Giuseppe; Palmisano, Leonardo

    2012-03-01

    The presence of (±)α-pinene, (+)β-pinene, (+)3-carene, and R-(+)limonene terpenes in wastewater of a citrus transformation factory was detected and analyzed, in a previous study, by using Solid Phase Micro-extraction (SPME) followed by GC analyses. Purpose of that research was to compare the genotoxic responses of mixtures of terpenes with the genotoxicity of the individual compounds, and the biological effects of actual wastewater. Genotoxicity was evaluated in the Salmonella reversion assay (Ames test) and in V79 cells by Comet assay. Ames tests indicated that the four single terpenes did not induce an increase of revertants frequency. On the contrary, the mixtures of terpenes caused, in the presence of metabolic activation, a highly significant increase of the revertants in TA100 strain in comparison to the control. The Comet assay showed a significant increase in DNA damage in V79 cells treated for 1h with single or mixed terpenes. Moreover, the actual wastewater was found highly genotoxic in bacterial and mammalian cells. Photocatalytic tests completely photodegraded the pollutants present in aqueous wastewater and the initial high genotoxicity of samples of wastewater collected during the photocatalytic run, was completely lose in 3h of irradiation.

  11. Carbon black nanoparticle instillation induces sustained inflammation and genotoxicity in mouse lung and liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourdon Julie A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Widespread occupational exposure to carbon black nanoparticles (CBNPs raises concerns over their safety. CBNPs are genotoxic in vitro but less is known about their genotoxicity in various organs in vivo. Methods We investigated inflammatory and acute phase responses, DNA strand breaks (SB and oxidatively damaged DNA in C57BL/6 mice 1, 3 and 28 days after a single instillation of 0.018, 0.054 or 0.162 mg Printex 90 CBNPs, alongside sham controls. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid was analyzed for cellular composition. SB in BAL cells, whole lung and liver were assessed using the alkaline comet assay. Formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG sensitive sites were assessed as an indicator of oxidatively damaged DNA. Pulmonary and hepatic acute phase response was evaluated by Saa3 mRNA real-time quantitative PCR. Results Inflammation was strongest 1 and 3 days post-exposure, and remained elevated for the two highest doses (i.e., 0.054 and 0.162 mg 28 days post-exposure (P Saa3 mRNA in lung tissue on day 1 (all doses, 3 (all doses and 28 (0.054 and 0.162 mg, but not in liver. Conclusions Deposition of CBNPs in lung induces inflammatory and genotoxic effects in mouse lung that persist considerably after the initial exposure. Our results demonstrate that CBNPs may cause genotoxicity both in the primary exposed tissue, lung and BAL cells, and in a secondary tissue, the liver.

  12. International current of the genotoxicity testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HayaM

    2002-01-01

    One of the goals of the genetic toxicology is to assess the risk to humans that derives from genotoxic agents.The risk involves both somatic and germ cells,with damage to the former resulting in cancer and damage to the latter in adverse effects that could be transmitted through generations.It is necessary to consider not only direct effects,but also effects that are the result of analtered environment.To perform an accurate risk assessment.it is necessary to evaluate genotoxic hazards in ways that are appropriate both methodologically and strategically.In establishing a genotoxicity assay system,international cooperation is important because it enables us to incorporate the thoughts of specialists everywhere and to learn of specific regional concerns.Here I will introduce the “Guidance on a Strategy for Testing of Chemicals for Mutagenicity” recently reported by the UK Committee on Mutagenicity (COM) and also I will briefly summarize the activities of the International Workshop on Genotoxicity Test Procedures(IWGTP).The first and the second workshops focused on methodology.we started to include the strategic issues as well as procedures in the third workshop.Starting with the 3rd IWGT,the workshop will become an activity of the International Association of EMSs.

  13. Differential genotoxicity mechanisms of silver nanoparticles and silver ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Qin, Taichun; Ingle, Taylor; Yan, Jian; He, Weiwei; Yin, Jun-Jie; Chen, Tao

    2017-01-01

    In spite of many reports on the toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), the mechanisms underlying the toxicity are far from clear. A key question is whether the observed toxicity comes from the silver ions (Ag(+)) released from the AgNPs or from the nanoparticles themselves. In this study, we explored the genotoxicity and the genotoxicity mechanisms of Ag(+) and AgNPs. Human TK6 cells were treated with 5 nM AgNPs or silver nitrate (AgNO3) to evaluate their genotoxicity and induction of oxidative stress. AgNPs and AgNO3 induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in a similar range of concentrations (1.00-1.75 µg/ml) when evaluated using the micronucleus assay, and both induced oxidative stress by measuring the gene expression and reactive oxygen species in the treated cells. Addition of N-acetylcysteine (NAC, an Ag(+) chelator) to the treatments significantly decreased genotoxicity of Ag(+), but not AgNPs, while addition of Trolox (a free radical scavenger) to the treatment efficiently decreased the genotoxicity of both agents. In addition, the Ag(+) released from the highest concentration of AgNPs used for the treatment was measured. Only 0.5 % of the AgNPs were ionized in the culture medium and the released silver ions were neither cytotoxic nor genotoxic at this concentration. Further analysis using electron spin resonance demonstrated that AgNPs produced hydroxyl radicals directly, while AgNO3 did not. These results indicated that although both AgNPs and Ag(+) can cause genotoxicity via oxidative stress, the mechanisms are different, and the nanoparticles, but not the released ions, mainly contribute to the genotoxicity of AgNPs.

  14. Chronic ecotoxic effects to Pseudomonas putida and Vibrio fischeri, and cytostatic and genotoxic effects to the hepatoma cell line (HepG2) of ofloxacin photo(cata)lytically treated solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasquez, M.I. [University of Cyprus, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Cyprus, 75 Kallipoleos Street, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Nireas International Water Research Center, University of Cyprus (Cyprus); Garcia-Käufer, M. [University Medical Centre Freiburg, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, 115 B, Breisacher Straße, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Hapeshi, E. [University of Cyprus, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Cyprus, 75 Kallipoleos Street, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Nireas International Water Research Center, University of Cyprus (Cyprus); Menz, J. [Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Leuphana University Lüneburg, Scharnhorststraße 1/C13, 21335 Lüneburg (Germany); Kostarelos, K.; Fatta-Kassinos, D. [University of Cyprus, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Cyprus, 75 Kallipoleos Street, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Nireas International Water Research Center, University of Cyprus (Cyprus); Kümmerer, K., E-mail: Klaus.Kuemmerer@uni.leuphana.de [Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Leuphana University Lüneburg, Scharnhorststraße 1/C13, 21335 Lüneburg (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    Ofloxacin (OFL), a broad-spectrum and widespread-used photolabile fluoroquinolone, is frequently found in treated wastewaters, aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems leading to increasing concern during the past decades regarding its effects to the environment and human health. The elimination of OFL and other xenobiotics by the application of advanced oxidation processes using photolytic (PL) and photocatalytic (PC) treatments seems promising. However, an integrated assessment scheme is needed, in which, not only the removal of the parent compound, but also the effects of the photo-transformation products (PTPs) are investigated. For this purpose, in the present study, a chronic ecotoxic assessment using representative bacteria of marine and terrestrial ecosystems and a cytostatic and genotoxic evaluation using hepatoma cell line were performed. PL and PC treatments of OFL were applied using UV radiation. The photo-transformation of OFL during the treatments was monitored by DOC measurements and UPLC–MS/MS analysis. The chronic ecotoxicity of OFL and treated samples was evaluated using Pseudomonas putida and Vibrio fischeri; whereas the cytostasis and genotoxicity were estimated by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMN). The main results suggest that photo-transformation of OFL took place during these treatments since the concentration of OFL decreased when the irradiation time increased, as quantified by UPLC–MS/MS analysis, and this was not coupled with an analogous DOC removal. Furthermore, nine compounds were identified as probable PTPs formed through piperazinyl dealkylation and decarboxylation. The ecotoxicity of treated solutions to the bacteria studied decreased while the cytostasis to the hepatoma cell line remained at low levels during both treatments. However, the genotoxicity to the hepatoma cell line demonstrated a different pattern in which treated samples induced a greater number of MNi for the 4–16 min of irradiation (p < 0.05) during

  15. Differential genotoxicity of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe2 and diphenyl ditelluride (PhTe2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane Francine Meinerz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Organoselenium compounds have been pointed out as therapeutic agents. In contrast, the potential therapeutic aspects of tellurides have not yet been demonstrated. The present study evaluated the comparative toxicological effects of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe2 and diphenyl ditelluride (PhTe2 in mice after in vivo administration. Genotoxicity (as determined by comet assay and mutagenicicity were used as end-points of toxicity. Subcutaneous administration of high doses of (PhSe2 or (PhTe2 (500 µmol/kg caused distinct genotoxicity in mice. (PhSe2 significantly decreased the DNA damage index after 48 and 96 h of its injection (p < 0.05. In contrast, (PhTe caused a significant increase in DNA damage (p < 0.05 after 48 and 96 h of intoxication. (PhSe2 did not cause mutagenicity but (PhTe2 increased the micronuclei frequency, indicating its mutagenic potential. The present study demonstrated that acute in vivo exposure to ditelluride caused genotoxicity in mice, which may be associated with pro-oxidant effects of diphenyl ditelluride. In addition, the use of this compound and possibly other related tellurides must be carefully controlled.

  16. In situ biomonitoring of the genotoxic effects of mixed industrial emissions using the Tradescantia micronucleus and pollen abortion tests with wild life plants: Demonstration of the efficacy of emission controls in an eastern European city

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misik, Miroslav [Department of Botany, Comenius University in Bratislava, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Revova 39, SK 811 02 Bratislava 1 (Slovakia); Micieta, Karol [Department of Botany, Comenius University in Bratislava, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Revova 39, SK 811 02 Bratislava 1 (Slovakia); Solenska, Martina [Department of Botany, Comenius University in Bratislava, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Revova 39, SK 811 02 Bratislava 1 (Slovakia); Misikova, Katarina [Department of Botany, Comenius University in Bratislava, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Revova 39, SK 811 02 Bratislava 1 (Slovakia); Pisarcikova, Helena [Department of Botany, Comenius University in Bratislava, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Revova 39, SK 811 02 Bratislava 1 (Slovakia); Knasmueller, Siegfried [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Inner Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: siegfried.knasmueller@meduniwien.ac.at

    2007-01-15

    Aim of the study was to monitor changes of genotoxic activity of urban air caused by an incinerator and a petrochemical plant in Tradescantia micronucleus (Trad-MCN) and pollen fertility assays with wild plants (Chelidonium majus, Clematis vitalba, Cichorium intybus, Linaria vulgaris, Robinia pseudoacacia). While in the first sampling period (1997-2000) significantly (on average 80%) more MN were found at the polluted site in comparison to controls from a rural area, no significant effects were observed during a later period (between 2003 and 2005). A similar pattern was observed in the pollen abortion assays in which the most pronounced effects were found in chicory and false acacia. The differences of the results obtained in the two periods can be explained by a substantial reduction of air pollution by use of new technologies. In particular the decrease of SO{sub 2} emissions may account for the effects seen in the present study. - Air pollution caused by industrial emissions induced micronuclei in Tradescantia and increased pollen abortion in wild plant species.

  17. Genotoxic effect induced by a magnetic field of 200 micro tesla: experimental model in vivo; Efecto genotoxico inducido por un campo magnetico de 200 microteslas: modelo experimental in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoya Navarro, I.; Alcaraz Saura, M.; Alcaraz Fernandez, M. D.; Olmos Ortiz, E.; Montalban Leon, F.; Sanchez Villalobos, J. M.; Alcaraz Banos, M.

    2011-07-01

    This study aims to determine the existence of a possible genotoxic (mutagenic) induced by continuous exposure to a magnetic field of 200 {+-} 20 {+-} Teslas and evaluate a possible protective effect of different antioxidants considered protective against chromosomal damage induced by ionizing radiation.

  18. Genotoxic effects of a particular mixture of acetamiprid and alpha-cypermethrin on chromosome aberration, sister chromatid exchange, and micronucleus formation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaman, Ayşe Yavuz; Topaktaş, Mehmet

    2010-04-01

    The genotoxic effects of a particular mixture of acetamiprid (Acm, neonicotinoid insecticide) and alpha-cypermethrin (alpha-cyp, pyrethroid insecticide) on human peripheral lymphocytes were examined in vitro by chromosomal aberrations (CAs), sister chromatid exchange (SCE), and micronucleus (MN) tests. The human peripheral lymphocytes were treated with 12.5 + 2.5, 15 + 5, 17.5 + 7.5, and 20 + 10 microg/mL of Acm+alpha-cyp, respectively, for 24 and 48 h. The mixture of Acm+alpha-cyp induced the CAs and SCEs at all concentrations and treatment times when compared with both the control and solvent control and these increases were concentration-dependent in both treatment times. MN formation was significantly induced at 12.5 + 2.5, 15 + 5, 17.5 + 7.5, microg/mL of Acm+alpha-cyp when compared with both controls although these increases were not concentration-dependent. Binuclear cells could not be detected sufficiently in the highest concentration of the mixture (20 + 10 microg/mL) for both the 24- and 48-h treatment times. Mitotic index (MI), proliferation index (PI) and nuclear division index (NDI) significantly decreased because of the cytotoxic and cytostatic effects of the mixture, at all concentrations for two treatment periods. Significant decreases in MI and PI were concentration dependent at both treatment times. The decrease in NDI was also concentration-dependent at 48-h treatment period. In general, Acm+alpha-cyp inhibited nuclear division more than positive control, mitomycin C (MMC) and showed a higher cytostatic effect than MMC. Furthermore, in this article, the results of combined effects of Acm+alpha-cyp were compared with the results of single effects of Acm or alpha-cyp (Kocaman and Topaktas,2007,2009, respectively). In conclusion, the particular mixture of Acm+alpha-cyp synergistically induced the genotoxicity/cytotoxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

  19. Genotoxicity of formaldehyde: Molecular basis of DNA damage and mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanobu eKawanishi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde is commonly used in the chemical industry and is present in the environment, such as vehicle emissions, some building materials, food and tobacco smoke. It also occurs as a natural product in most organisms, the sources of which include a number of metabolic processes. It causes various acute and chronic adverse effects in humans if they inhale its fumes. Among the chronic effects on human health, we summarize data on genotoxicity and carcinogenicity in this review, and we particularly focus on the molecular mechanisms involved in the formaldehyde mutagenesis. Formaldehyde mainly induces N-hydroxymethyl mono-adducts on guanine, adenine and cytosine, and N-methylene crosslinks between adjacent purines in DNA. These crosslinks are types of DNA damage potentially fatal for cell survival if they are not removed by the nucleotide excision repair pathway. In the previous studies, we showed evidence that formaldehyde causes intra-strand crosslinks between purines in DNA using a unique method (Matsuda et al. Nucleic Acids Res. 26, 1769-1774,1998. Using shuttle vector plasmids, we also showed that formaldehyde as well as acetaldehyde induces tandem base substitutions, mainly at 5’-GG and 5’-GA sequences, which would arise from the intra-strand crosslinks. These mutation features are different from those of other aldehydes such as crotonaldehyde, acrolein, glyoxal and methylglyoxal. These findings provide molecular clues to improve our understanding of the genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of formaldehyde.

  20. Effects of Long-Term Exposure to 60 GHz Millimeter-Wavelength Radiation on the Genotoxicity and Heat Shock Protein (Hsp Expression of Cells Derived from Human Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Koyama

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Human corneal epithelial (HCE-T and human lens epithelial (SRA01/04 cells derived from the human eye were exposed to 60 gigahertz (GHz millimeter-wavelength radiation for 24 h. There was no statistically significant increase in the micronucleus (MN frequency in cells exposed to 60 GHz millimeter-wavelength radiation at 1 mW/cm2 compared with sham-exposed controls and incubator controls. The MN frequency of cells treated with bleomycin for 1 h provided positive controls. The comet assay, used to detect DNA strand breaks, and heat shock protein (Hsp expression also showed no statistically significant effects of exposure. These results indicate that exposure to millimeter-wavelength radiation has no effect on genotoxicity in human eye cells.

  1. Differential genotoxic effects of subchronic exposure to ethyl tertiary butyl ether in the livers of Aldh2 knockout and wild-type mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Zuquan; Suda, Megumi; Ohtani, Katsumi; Mei, Nan; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Nakajima, Tamie; Wang, Rui-Sheng

    2012-04-01

    Ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE) is used as an additive to gasoline to reduce carbon monoxide emissions in some developed countries. So far, ETBE was not found with positive results in many genotoxic assays. This study is undertaken to investigate the modifying effects of deficiency of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) on the toxicity of ETBE in the livers of mice. Eight-week-old wild-type (WT) and Aldh2 knockout (KO) C57BL/6 mice of both sexes were exposed to 0, 500, 1,750, and 5,000 ppm ETBE for 6 h/day with 5 days per weeks for 13 weeks. Histopathology assessments and measurements of genetic effects in the livers were performed. Significantly increased accidences of centrilobular hypertrophy were observed in the livers of WT and KO mice of both sexes in 5,000 ppm group; there was a sex difference in centrilobular hypertrophy between male and female KO mice, with more severe damage in the males. In addition, DNA strand breaks, 8-hydroxyguanine DNA-glycosylase (hOGG1)-modified oxidative base modification, and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine as genetic damage endpoints were significantly increased in three exposure groups in KO male mice, while these genotoxic effects were only found in 5,000 ppm group of KO female mice. In WT mice, significant DNA damage was seen in 5,000 ppm group of male mice, but not in females. Thus, sex differences in DNA damage were found not only in KO mice, but also in WT mice. These results suggest that ALDH2 polymorphisms and sex should be taken into considerations in predicting human health effects of ETBE exposure.

  2. Early genotoxic response and accumulation induced by waterborne copper, lead, and arsenic in European seabass, Dicentrarchus labrax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canalejo, Antonio; Diaz-de-Alba, Margarita; Granado-Castro, M Dolores; Cordoba, Francisco; Espada-Bellido, Estrella; Galindo-Riaño, M Dolores; Torronteras, Rafael

    2016-02-01

    Cu, Pb, and As, which are among the most abundant metals in the aquatic environment, are also among the most health-threatened by causing diverse cellular injuries. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the potential early induction of genotoxic effects after waterborne Cu, Pb, and As exposure in European seabass, Dicentrarchus labrax, a commercial widely cultured fish, using the micronucleus (MN) assay in peripheral blood erythrocytes. Fish were exposed under laboratory conditions to nominal solutions ranging 0-10 mg/L for 24 and 96 h. Furthermore, actual metal ion concentrations were measured by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) or differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) in water and four fish tissues differentially related to environmental exposition and metal accumulation, i.e. the gills, liver, muscle, and brain. Dose-dependent increases of micronuclei (MNi) frequency were observed after these very short exposures; based on measured metal concentrations in water, the genotoxic effect ordered as Cu > As > Pb. Significant genotoxic effect at 0.009 mg/L Cu, 0.57 mg/L Pb, and 0.01 mg/L As was seen. For Cu and Pb these are only slightly higher, but for As it is notably lower than the USEPA criteria of maximum concentration to prevent acute toxicity in aquatic organisms. Furthermore, genotoxicity was differentially related to metal accumulation. MNi frequency correlated positively with the content of Pb in all the organs, with the content of As in liver and gills and only with the content of Cu in the brain. In conclusion, our findings raised environmental concerns because these depicted a genotoxic potential of Cu, Pb, and As after a very short exposure to low but environmentally relevant concentrations, too close to regulatory thresholds. In addition, the MN test in D. labrax could be considered an early biomarker of genotoxicity induced by these metals in fish.

  3. Characterisation of acute toxicity, genotoxicity and oxidative stress posed by textile effluent on zebrafish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenjuan Zhang; Wei Liu; Jing Zhang; Huimin Zhao; Yaobin Zhang; Xie Quan; Yihe Jin

    2012-01-01

    Textile industries are important sources of toxic discharges and contribute enormously to water deterioration,while little attention has been paid to the toxicity of textile effluents in discharge regulation.Bioassays with zebrafish were employed to evaluate the toxicity of wastewater samples collected from different stages at a textile factory and sewage treatment plants (STPs).Physico-chemical parameters,acute toxicity,genotoxicity and oxidative stress biomarkers were analyzed.The wastewater samples from bleaching,rinsing and soaping of the textile factory exhibited high acute toxicity and genotoxicity.The coexisting components of dye compounds,as assistants and oxidants,seemed to cause some effect on the toxic response.After treatment employing the anoxic-oxic (A/O) process in STPs,the color and the chemical oxygen demand (COD) were reduced by 40% and 84%,respectively,falling within the criteria of the Chinese Sewage Discharge Standard.In contrast,increases in acute toxicity and genotoxicity were observed in the anaerobic tank,indicating the formation of toxic intermediates.The genotoxicity of the effluent of the STP was not significantly different from that of the influent,suggesting the wastewater treatment processes were not effective in removing the genotoxicity of the dye wastewater.Results indicated that the effluent contains pro-oxidants since the activities of glutathione (GSH),malondialdehyde (MDA),and total anti-oxidation capacity (T-AOC) were all elevated.In addition,decreases in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione-S transferase (GST) activities observed can be interpreted as a cytotoxicity sign due to an over-production of reactive oxygen species (ROS).The results of the present study suggest that the STPs were not capable of reducing the toxicity of wastewater sufficiently.Further treatment is needed to remove the potential risks posed by textile effluent to ecosystems and human health,and employing a toxicity index is necessary for

  4. Effect of CYP2E1 induction by ethanol on the immunotoxicity and genotoxicity of extended low-level benzene exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiker, D H; Shipp, B K; Schoenfeld, H A; Klimpel, G R; Witz, G; Moslen, M T; Ward, J B

    2000-02-11

    Potential additive effects of ethanol consumption, a common life-style factor, and low-level benzene exposure, a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, were investigated. Ethanol is a potent inducer of the cytochrome P-450 2E1 (CYP2E1) enzyme, which bioactivates benzene to metabolites with known genotoxicity and immunotoxicity. A liquid diet containing 4.1% ethanol was used to induce hepatic CYP2E1 activity by 4-fold in female CD-1 mice. Groups of ethanol-treated or pair-fed control mice were exposed to benzene or filtered air in inhalation chambers for 7 h/d, 5 d/wk for 6 or 11 wk. The initial experiment focused on immunotoxicity endpoints based on literature reports that ethanol enhances high-dose benzene effects on spleen, thymus, and bone marrow cellularity and on peripheral red blood cell (RBC) and white blood cell (WBC) counts. No statistically significant alterations were found in spleen lymphocyte cellularity, subtype profile, or function (mitogen-induced proliferation, cytokine production, or natural killer cell lytic activity) after 6 wk of ethanol diet, 0.44 ppm benzene exposure, or both. This observed absence of immunomodulation by ethanol alone, a potential confounding factor, further validates our previously established murine model of sustained CYP2E1 induction by dietary ethanol. Subsequent experiments involved a 10-fold higher benzene level for a longer time of 11 wk and focused on genotoxic endpoints in known target tissues. Bone marrow and spleen cells were evaluated for DNA-protein cross-links, a sensitive transient index of genetic damage, and spleen lymphocytes were monitored for hprt-mutant frequency, a biomarker of cumulative genetic insult. No treatment-associated changes in either genotoxic endpoint were detected in animals exposed to 4.4 ppm benzene for 6 or 11 wk with or without coexposure to ethanol. Thus, our observations suggest an absence of genetic toxicity in CD-1 mice exposed to environmentally relevant levels of benzene with or

  5. Quantitative comparisons of genotoxic effects of atomic energy and fossil-fuelled energy. Rad-equivalences for ethylene, ethylene oxide and formaldehyde - consequences for decisions at Government level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latarjet, R.; Averbeck, D.; Levy, S.; Poirier, V. (Section de Biologie, Institut Curie, Paris, France)

    1982-01-01

    Rad-equivalences have been determined on the basis of data on the genotoxic effects of low linear energy transfer ionizing radiation and of three chemical pollutants - ethylene, ethylene oxide and formaldehyde - emitted from energy-producing power plants. In the case of ethylene and its metabolite, ethylene oxide, the conditions were particularly favourable because the equivalences could be based on the induction of total mutations in the mouse, which is the same genetic end-point used for the assessment of radiation risks. Once established, the rad-equivalences were used (a) to extrapolate the rules adopted for radiation to each of these two compounds and (b) to make recommendations for exposed workers at 'hot spots' and for the general population. Measurements of ethylene in power plants and in the atmosphere of Paris have indicated that in most cases the measured values fall within the recommended values. However, pollution by ethylene oxide in cold sterilization units should be reduced. Rad-equivalences obtained for lethal effects, and for the induction of chromosome aberrations by formaldehyde in human cells in vitro, suggest that the maximum admissible concentrations are far too high in most countries and must be reconsidered. In France, the Ministry of Health is taking the rad-equivalences into consideration for the preparation of a law regulating pollution by ethylene and ethylene oxide - as a first step. These results show that rad-equivalences can be used for risk assessments of genotoxic effects from power plants and that decisions can be made by extrapolating the rules adopted for radiation protection to some chemical mutagens, when certain strict conditions are fulfilled.

  6. Ameliorative effects of dimetylthiourea and N-acetylcysteine on nanoparticles induced cyto-genotoxicity in human lung cancer cells-A549.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Kumar Srivastava

    Full Text Available We study the ameliorative potential of dimetylthiourea (DMTU, an OH• radical trapper and N-acetylcysteine (NAC, a glutathione precursor/H₂O₂ scavenger against titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO₂-NPs and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs induced cyto-genotoxicity in cultured human lung cancer cells-A549. Cytogenotoxicity was induced by exposing the cells to selected concentrations (10 and 50 µg/ml of either of TiO₂-NPs or MWCNTs for 24 h. Anti-cytogenotoxicity effects of DMTU and NAC were studied in two groups, i.e., treatment of 30 minutes prior to toxic insult (short term exposure, while the other group received DMTU and NAC treatment during nanoparticles exposure, i.e., 24 h (long term exposure. Investigations were carried out for cell viability, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, micronuclei (MN, and expression of markers of oxidative stress (HSP27, CYP2E1, genotoxicity (P⁵³ and CYP2E1 dependent n- nitrosodimethylamine-demethylase (NDMA-d activity. In general, the treatment of both DMTU and NAC was found to be effective significantly against TiO₂-NPs and MWCNTs induced cytogenotoxicity in A549 cells. Long-term treatment of DMTU and NAC during toxic insults has shown better prevention than short-term pretreatment. Although, cells responded significantly to both DMTU and NAC, but responses were chemical specific. In part, TiO₂-NPs induced toxic responses were mediated through OH• radicals generation and reduction in the antioxidant defense system. While in the case of MWCNTs, adverse effects were primarily due to altering/hampering the enzymatic antioxidant system. Data indicate the applicability of human lung cancer cells-A549 as a pre-screening tool to identify the target specific prophylactic and therapeutic potential of drugs candidate molecules against nanoparticles induced cellular damages.

  7. "Aspartame: A review of genotoxicity data".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, David; Gatehouse, David

    2015-10-01

    Aspartame is a methyl ester of a dipeptide of aspartic acid and phenylalanine. It is 200× sweeter than sucrose and is approved for use in food products in more than 90 countries around the world. Aspartame has been evaluated for genotoxic effects in microbial, cell culture and animal models, and has been subjected to a number of carcinogenicity studies. The in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity data available on aspartame are considered sufficient for a thorough evaluation. There is no evidence of induction of gene mutations in a series of bacterial mutation tests. There is some evidence of induction of chromosomal damage in vitro, but this may be an indirect consequence of cytotoxicity. The weight of evidence from in vivo bone marrow micronucleus, chromosomal aberration and Comet assays is that aspartame is not genotoxic in somatic cells in vivo. The results of germ cell assays are difficult to evaluate considering limited data available and deviations from standard protocols. The available data therefore support the conclusions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) that aspartame is non-genotoxic.

  8. Genotoxic evaluation of infusions of Urera baccifera leaves and roots in Allium cepa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L. Gindri

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Context: The aqueous extracts of Urera baccifera Wedd. leaves and roots are used to inflammatory and infectious diseases in Brazilian folk medicine. Oxalic acid, a substance co-related with toxicity and stinging, was already quantified in this plant. Aims: To evaluate the action of leaves and roots infusions (1, 30, 75 g/L and the oxalic acid standard on mitosis as indicative of presumably antimitotic and genotoxic actions, using the Allium cepa test. Methods: Oxalic acid was quantified in the roots and leaves infusions by High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-DAD, with the mobile phase of 25 mM phosphate buffer (pH 2.5: acetonitrile at 95:5 (v/v. To the genotoxicity test, onion bulbs were used. After the rootlets germination, each bulb was submitted for 24 h of the individual treatments. Were analyzed 1000 cells per bulb, in a total of 5000 cells per treatment. Results: Results showed that all concentrations of roots infusions induced chromosomes abnormalities, except for the highest, that caused a substantial inhibition in the mitosis, precluding to be observed abnormalities. In the leaves infusions, only the two higher concentrations caused the highest values of damage in the cellular cycle. The oxalic acid also caused abnormalities in the mitosis, and may be considered responsible by part of the genotoxic action of U. baccifera. Conclusions: Oxalic acid can be responsible by part of the chromosomal abnormalities caused by U. baccifera, although, there must have more metabolites that evoke the same effect promoting the genotoxic effect of this nettle.

  9. Assessment of isorhamnetin 3-O-neohesperidoside from Acacia salicina: protective effects toward oxidation damage and genotoxicity induced by aflatoxin B1 and nifuroxazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhlel, Ines; Limem, Ilef; Skandrani, Ines; Nefatti, Aicha; Ghedira, Kamel; Dijoux-Franca, Marie-Genevieve; Leila, Chekir-Ghedira

    2010-08-01

    Antioxidant activity of isorhamnetin 3-O-neohesperidoside, isolated from the leaves of Acacia salicina, was determined by the ability of this compound to inhibit xanthine oxidase activity and to scavenge the free radical 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS(.-)) diammonium salt. Antigenotoxic activity was assessed using the SOS chromotest assay. This compound has the ability to scavenge the ABTS(.+) radical by a hydrogen donating mechanism. We also envisaged the study of the antioxidant effect of this compound by the enzymatic xanthine/xanthine oxidase (X/XOD) assay. Results indicated that isorhamnetin 3-O-neohesperidoside was a potent inhibitor of xanthine oxidase and superoxide anion scavengers. Moreover, this compound induced an inhibitory activity against nifuroxazide and aflatoxine B1 (AFB1) induced genotoxicity. Taken together, these observations provide evidence that isorhamnetin 3-O-neohesperidoside isolated from the leaves of A. salicina is able to protect cells against the consequences of oxidative stress.

  10. Effect of training data size and noise level on support vector machines virtual screening of genotoxic compounds from large compound libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Ma, Xiaohua; Liu, Xianghui; Jia, Jia; Bucong, Han; Xue, Ying; Li, Ze Rong; Yang, Sheng Yong; Wei, Yu Quan; Chen, Yu Zong

    2011-05-01

    Various in vitro and in-silico methods have been used for drug genotoxicity tests, which show limited genotoxicity (GT+) and non-genotoxicity (GT-) identification rates. New methods and combinatorial approaches have been explored for enhanced collective identification capability. The rates of in-silco methods may be further improved by significantly diversified training data enriched by the large number of recently reported GT+ and GT- compounds, but a major concern is the increased noise levels arising from high false-positive rates of in vitro data. In this work, we evaluated the effect of training data size and noise level on the performance of support vector machines (SVM) method known to tolerate high noise levels in training data. Two SVMs of different diversity/noise levels were developed and tested. H-SVM trained by higher diversity higher noise data (GT+ in any in vivo or in vitro test) outperforms L-SVM trained by lower noise lower diversity data (GT+ in in vivo or Ames test only). H-SVM trained by 4,763 GT+ compounds reported before 2008 and 8,232 GT- compounds excluding clinical trial drugs correctly identified 81.6% of the 38 GT+ compounds reported since 2008, predicted 83.1% of the 2,008 clinical trial drugs as GT-, and 23.96% of 168 K MDDR and 27.23% of 17.86M PubChem compounds as GT+. These are comparable to the 43.1-51.9% GT+ and 75-93% GT- rates of existing in-silico methods, 58.8% GT+ and 79% GT- rates of Ames method, and the estimated percentages of 23% in vivo and 31-33% in vitro GT+ compounds in the "universe of chemicals". There is a substantial level of agreement between H-SVM and L-SVM predicted GT+ and GT- MDDR compounds and the prediction from TOPKAT. SVM showed good potential in identifying GT+ compounds from large compound libraries based on higher diversity and higher noise training data.

  11. Molecular and cytogenetic assessment of Dipterygium glaucum genotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    ALTWATY,NADA H.; EL-SAYED,OSAMA E.; ALY,NARIMAN A.H.; Baeshen, Mohamed N.; BAESHEN,NABIH A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of the present study is to assess the genotoxicity of Dipterygium glaucum grows widely in Saudi Arabia desert to produce safety herbal products. This work is considered the first and pioneer report so far due to the lack and poor evaluated reports of the plant species for their mutagensity, genotoxicity and cytogenetics effects. Cytogenetic effects of D. glaucum on mitotic in roots of Vicia faba showed reduction in mitotic activity using three extracts; water, ethanol and eth...

  12. Comparative Genotoxicity of Cadmium and Lead in Earthworm Coelomocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ptumporn Muangphra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine genotoxicity to coelomocytes, Pheretima peguana earthworms were exposed in filter paper studies to cadmium (Cd and lead (Pb for 48 h, at concentrations less than the LC10—Cd: 0.09, 0.19, 0.38, 0.75, and 1.50 μg cm−2; Pb: 1.65, 3.29, 6.58, 13.16, and 26.32 μg cm−2. For Cd at 0.75 μg cm−2, in the micronucleus test (detects chromosomal aberrations, significant increases (<.05 in micronuclei and binucleate cells were observed, and in the comet assay (detects DNA single-strand breaks, tail DNA% was significantly increased. Lead was less toxic with minimal effects on DNA, but the binucleates were significantly increased by Pb at 3.29 μg cm−2. This study shows that Cd is more acutely toxic and sublethally genotoxic than Pb to P. peguana. Cadmium caused chromosomal aberrations and DNA single-strand breaks at 45% of the LC10 concentration. Lead, in contrast, did not induce DNA damage but caused cytokinesis defects.

  13. Genotoxic activity of a technical toxaphene mixture and its photodegradation products in SOS genotoxicity tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartos, Tomás; Skarek, Michal; Cupr, Pavel; Kosubová, Petra; Holoubek, Ivan

    2005-01-03

    Toxaphene (CAS No. 800-35-2) is a complex mixture of several hundred components that was used worldwide primarily as an agricultural pesticide with insecticide effects in the second half of the 20th century. In vitro investigations of the genotoxicity and mutagenicity of toxaphene were generally described in the literature, but they provided somewhat equivocal results. We re-evaluated the genotoxicity of technical toxaphene in two prokaryotic systems. The SOS Chromotest showed high sensitivity to toxaphene: three concentrations (40, 20 and 10 mg/l) were clearly positive and the dose-response effect was evident. In the umuC assay, a dose-dependent increase in genotoxic activity was observed at toxaphene concentrations from 2.5 to 40.0 mg/l, but these results were found to be not significant. The genotoxicity of toxaphene and its photodegradation products after UV-irradiation (3-6-9 h) at concentrations ranging from 7.5 to 60.0 mg/l was also examined in this study. An irradiated solution of technical toxaphene after 3 h showed no significant evidence of bacterial growth inhibition. However, exposure of Salmonella to 6 h UV-irradiated toxaphene showed a toxic effect compared with the negative control. After 9 h irradiation, a decrease of bacterial growth was observed. Activity of beta-galactosidase in the presence of a toxaphene solution was significantly increased after 6 and 9 h irradiation, reaching values that were 2.4- and 3.1-fold higher, respectively, than the control, which exceeded the criteria of significant genotoxicity. These results show that while technical toxaphene is a weak, direct-acting mutagen in some bacterial tests, a dose-dependent toxicity and genotoxicity of its photoproducts could be conclusively demonstrated by the umuC test.

  14. Modulation of genotoxic effects in asbestos-exposed primary human mesothelial cells by radical scavengers, metal chelators and a glutathione precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poser, Ina; Rahman, Qamar; Lohani, Mohtashim; Yadav, Santosh; Becker, Hans-Henner; Weiss, Dieter G; Schiffmann, Dietmar; Dopp, Elke

    2004-04-11

    The genotoxicity of asbestos fibers is generally mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and by insufficient antioxidant protection. To further elucidate which radicals are involved in asbestos-mediated genotoxicity and to which extent, we have carried out experiments with the metal chelators deferoxamine (DEF) and phytic acid (PA), and with the radical scavengers superoxide dismutase (SOD), dimethylthiourea (DMTU) and the glutathione precursor Nacystelyn trade mark (NAL). We investigated the influence of these compounds on the potency of crocidolite, an amphibole asbestos fiber with a high iron content (27%), and chrysotile, a serpentine asbestos fiber with a low iron content (2%), to induce micronuclei (MN) in human mesothelial cells (HMC) after an exposure time of 24-72 h. Our results show that the number of crocidolite-induced MN is significantly reduced after pretreatment of fibers with PA and DEF. This effect was not observed with chrysotile. In contrast, simultaneous treatment of cells with asbestos and the OH*scavenging DMTU or the O2- -scavenging SOD significantly decreased the number of MN induced by chrysotile and crocidolite. In particular, DMTU almost completely suppressed micronucleus induction by both fiber types. A similar effect was observed in the presence of the H(2)O(2)-scavenging NAL after chrysotile treatment of HMC. By means of kinetochore analysis, it could be shown that the number of clastogenic events is decreased after PA and DEF pretreatment of fibers as well as after application of the above-mentioned scavengers. Our results show that chrysotile asbestos induces an increased release of H(2)O(2) in contrast to crocidolite. Also, the iron content of the fiber plays an important role in radical formation, but nevertheless, chrysotile produces oxy radicals to a similar extent as crocidolite, probably by phagocytosis-mediated oxidative bursting.

  15. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of cisplatin treatment combined with anaesthetics on EAT cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozovic, Gordana; Orsolic, Nada; Knezevic, Fabijan; Horvat Knezevic, Anica; Benkovic, Vesna; Sakic, Katarina; Hrgovic, Zlatko; Bendelja, Kreso; Fassbender, Walter J

    2009-06-01

    In this study, DNA damage in tumour cells, as well as irreversible cell damage leading to apoptosis induced in vivo by the combined application of cisplatin and inhalation anaesthetics, was investigated. The genotoxicity of anaesthetics on Ehrlich ascites tumour (EAT) cells of mice, alone or in combined application with cisplatin, was estimated by using the alkaline comet assay. The percentage of EAT cell apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry. Groups of EAT-bearing mice were (i) treated intraperitoneally with cisplatin, (ii) exposed to repeated anaesthesia with inhalation anaesthetic, and (iii) subjected to combined treatment of exposure to anaesthetics after cisplatin for 3 days. Sevoflurane, halothane and isoflurane caused strong genotoxic effects on tumour cells in vivo. The tested anaesthetics alone showed no direct effect on programmed cell death although sevoflurane and especially halothane decreased the number of living EAT cells in peritoneal cavity lavage. Repeated anaesthesia with isoflurane had stimulatory effects on EAT cell proliferation and inhibited tumour cell apoptosis (6.11%), compared to the control group (10.26%). Cisplatin caused massive apoptosis of EAT cells (41.14%) and decreased the number of living EAT cells in the peritoneal cavity. Combined cisplatin and isoflurane treatment additionally increased EAT cell apoptosis to 51.32%. Combined treatment of mice with cisplatin and all anaesthetics increased the number of living tumour cells in the peritoneal cavity compared to cisplatin treatment of mice alone. These results suggest that the inhalation of anaesthetics may protect tumour cells from the cisplatin-induced genotoxic and cytotoxic effects.

  16. Human genotoxic study carried out two years after oil exposure during the clean-up activities using two different biomarkers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biern, G.; Giraldo, J.; Zock, J.P.; Monyarch, G.; Espinosa, A.; Rodríguez-Trigo, G.; Gomez, F.; Pozo-Rodríguez, F.; Barberà, J.A.; Fuster, C.

    2015-01-01

    Micronuclei, comet and chromosome alterations assays are the most widely used biomarkers for determining the genotoxic damage in a population exposed to genotoxic chemicals. While chromosome alterations are an excellent biomarker to detect short- and long-term genotoxic effects, the comet assay only

  17. Genotoxicity assessment of 4-methylimidazole: regulatory perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Takeshi; Uneyama, Chikako

    2016-01-01

    4-Methylimidazole (4-MI) is formed as a result of the Maillard reaction process, and therefore is found in many foods and beverages. It is also found in soft drinks (i.e., cola) as a by-product in the production of some caramel colors. NTP bioassays revealed clear evidence of lung carcinogenicity of 4-MI in male and female mice, but not in rats and then IARC classified 4-MI as group 2B carcinogen. Genotoxicity studies with 4-MI were negative in the Ames tests and in the erythrocyte micronucleus tests with mice or rats. US California EPA (CEPA) evaluated the testing has not been adequately comprehensive to rule out a genotoxic mode of action; as target tissue of the carcinogenicity of 4-MI was lung, the lung should be used as a source tissue for in vitro metabolic activation system. Thus, CEPA defined the No Significant Risk Level (NSRL) for 10(-5) lifetime risk level of cancer by 4-MI as 29 μg/day based on the non-threshold approach. As higher levels of 4-MI than the NSRL were identified in some kinds of cola, health concerns of 4-MI were drawn the attention. On the other hand, other regulatory bodies (e.g., European Food Safety Authority, EFSA) showed no concerns of 4-MI from the use of caramel colors in food. EFSA evaluated 4-MI is not genotoxic, so, non-observed adverse effect level of 4-MI was considered to be 80 mg/kg/day. In this paper, genotoxic assessments of 4-MI in different regulatory bodies are presented and the risk evaluation of 4-MI is discussed based on new genotoxicity data.

  18. Genotoxic Effects of Low- and High-LET Radiation on Human Epithelial Cells Grown in 2-D Versus 3-D Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Z. S.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Huff, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Risk estimation for radiation-induced cancer relies heavily on human epidemiology data obtained from terrestrial irradiation incidents from sources such as medical and occupational exposures as well as from the atomic bomb survivors. No such data exists for exposures to the types and doses of high-LET radiation that will be encountered during space travel; therefore, risk assessment for space radiation requires the use of data derived from cell culture and animal models. The use of experimental models that most accurately replicate the response of human tissues is critical for precision in risk projections. This work compares the genotoxic effects of radiation on normal human epithelial cells grown in standard 2-D monolayer culture compared to 3-D organotypic co-culture conditions. These 3-D organotypic models mimic the morphological features, differentiation markers, and growth characteristics of fully-differentiated normal human tissue and are reproducible using defined components. Cultures were irradiated with 2 Gy low-LET gamma rays or varying doses of high-LET particle radiation and genotoxic damage was measured using a modified cytokinesis block micronucleus assay. Our results revealed a 2-fold increase in residual damage in 2 Gy gamma irradiated cells grown under organotypic culture conditions compared to monolayer culture. Irradiation with high-LET particle radiation gave similar results, while background levels of damage were comparable under both scenarios. These observations may be related to the phenomenon of "multicellular resistance" where cancer cells grown as 3-D spheroids or in vivo exhibit an increased resistance to killing by chemotherapeutic agents compared to the same cells grown in 2-D culture. A variety of factors are likely involved in mediating this process, including increased cell-cell communication, microenvironment influences, and changes in cell cycle kinetics that may promote survival of damaged cells in 3-D culture that would

  19. Effects of SO/sub 2/ or NOx on toxic and genotoxic properties of chemical carcinogens. II. Short term in vivo studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pool, B.L.; Brendler, S.; Klein, R.G.; Monarca, S.; Pasquini, R.; Schmezer, P.; Zeller, W.J.

    1988-07-01

    Short term in vivo studies were performed to study biological effects of the common air pollutants SO2 or NOx and their influence on the genotoxic activities of nitrosamines. Hepatocytes and lung cells were isolated from Sprague-Dawley rats which had inhaled 50 p.p.m. of SO2 or NOx for 2 weeks. After incubating the cells for 1 h, genotoxicity was determined in hepatocytes by measuring DNA single-strand breaks induced by N-nitroso-acetoxymethylmethylamine, N-nitrosodimethylamine and N-nitrosomethylbenzylamine. Parameters of toxicity (trypan blue exclusion and leakage of serum enzymes) were determined in both liver and lung cells also following 1 h incubation. The activities of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH), nitrosodimethylamine demethylase (NDMA-D) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) were determined in subcellular microsomal fractions isolated from lung and liver tissues. Finally, as a measure of overall toxicity, the activities of various serum enzymes were determined in the blood serum of the rats. It was found that the induction of DNA single-strand breaks by three nitrosamines was decreased in hepatocytes from SO2-treated animals. The viability of rat hepatocytes and of rat lung cells, as determined by trypan blue exclusion, was similar in all three treatment groups immediately after isolation, as well as after 1 h incubation with DMSO or with the nitrosamines. In contrast, the leakage of enzymes was different in hepatocytes of SO2-treated rats, since lactate dehydrogenase activity was decreased. Leakage of enzymes from the lung cells did not differ from group to group, but was lower than from hepatocytes. Foreign compound metabolizing enzymes were mainly decreased in NOx-treated animals, namely AHH, NDMA-D and GST in liver and GST in the lung. For SO2-treated animals NDMA-D was increased in liver and GST was decreased in lung.

  20. Non—Genotoxic Carcinogens.Approaches to Their Rish Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.A.CASTRO; M.I.DiazGomez; 等

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiological studies support the idea that most human cancers are related to chemicals present in the human environment.In turn,chemicals are believed to cause cancer via either genotoxic or non-genotoxic mechanisms.There were described in literature several simple rapid and inexpensive short term ests to reasonably predict the genotoxic nature of chemicals but in contrast,there is no reliable test or battery of tests available to predict the carcinogenicity of non-genotoxic compounds and this poses a major problem to their rish assessment.In addition,there are conflictive opinions about rish assessment needs for both classes of carcinogens.Some workers elieve that for non-genotoxic carcinogens,thresholds for exposure can be drawn while others do not.In this review,the reasons behind both of these opinions and the present hypotheses about the mechanism of action of non-genotoxic carcinogens are described and analyzed in relation to future needs.

  1. Evaluation of the genotoxic and mutagenic potentials of phytotherapic and homeopathic solutions of Euphorbia tirucalli Lineu (Aveloz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Holandino

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Euphorbia tirucalli Lineu, commonly known as Aveloz, is a very common plant found in tropical regions [1]. The ingestion or contact with its latex causes symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea, pallor, skin irritation, hepatotoxicity as well as carcinogenesis [2]. Moreover, the Aveloz latex is also responsible for a few important activities against some infectious and neoplastic diseases. Aveloz latex phytochemical composition may vary according to seasonal aspects and geographic location [3], and it is used either orally or topically in traditional medicine. Popularly known as an antitumoral agent (breast, prostate, lung, kidney, it is used not only in Brazil, but in several other countries. According to the literature, the latex could have a dual behaviour, activating or inhibiting tumoral events [3-6]. However, there are few reports discussing these mechanisms. Besides, the mutagenic and genotoxic potentials of phytochemical and homeopathic Aveloz have not yet been described. Several experimental methods have been used to evaluate the mutagenic and genotoxic effects, such as Inductest, the Ames test and the chromotest. Objective: This study aims to evaluate the genotoxic and mutagenic potentials of Aveloz latex and Aveloz phytotherapic and homeopathic solutions. Methodology: In this study, Aveloz 5 and 30cH are prepared according to Brazilian Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia [7], from Aveloz latex collected in the Center for Natural Products Research (NPPN at the Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro [8]. The Aveloz phytochemical solution was prepared following the doses used in folk medicine: 2 drops diluted in 250ml of water and 2 drops diluted in 25 ml of water. All test solutions were submitted to the following methodologies: (a Inductest: assesses the ability of physical or chemical agents to promote lysogenic induction as a response to DNA damage in lysogenic bacteria; (b The Ames test: uses indicator strains of Salmonella

  2. Genotoxicity of metal based engineered nanoparticles in aquatic organisms: A review

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mahaye, Ntombikayise

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available on how these challenges might be addressed. We review the application of eight different genotoxicity assays, where the Comet Assay is generally preferred due to its capacity to detect low levels of DNA damage. Most ENPs have been shown to cause genotoxic...

  3. Sublethal propoxur toxicity to juvenile common carp (Cyprinus carpio L., 1758): biochemical, hematological, histopathological, and genotoxicity effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gül, Ali; Benli, A Çağlan Karasu; Ayhan, Ayşen; Memmi, Burcu Koçak; Selvi, Mahmut; Sepici-Dinçel, Aylin; Cakiroğullari, Gül Çelik; Erkoç, Figen

    2012-09-01

    The sublethal toxicological and genotoxic potential of propoxur, a widely used carbamate insecticide against household pests, in veterinary medicine, and in public health, was evaluated on carp as a model species (Cyprinus carpio L., 1758) using the erythrocyte micronucleus test. Based on the 96-h lethal concentration, 50% (LC50) data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ECOTOX Database (10 mg/L), a sublethal exposure concentration of 5 mg/L was used under static bioassay laboratory conditions. Histopathological evaluation showed no significant changes in spleen, intestine, muscle, or skin tissues. However, the following conditions were recorded: hyperemia, branchitis in primary lamella, and telangiectasis, hyperplasia, fusion, epithelial lifting, and epithelial desquamation in secondary lamella of gill tissues; hemorrhage, destruction, prenephritis, and inflammation and desquamation in the tubules; edema in the kidney; passive hyperemia, albumin, and hydropic degeneration in the liver; and hyperemia, chromatolysis, and glial proliferation in brain tissues. No statistically significant increases in micronuclei frequencies were found. Hematological parameters showed decreased hematocrit values and mean corpuscular volume values, as well as increased erythrocyte and leukocyte counts compared with the control group (p Propoxur has an ecotoxicological potential on fish, a nontarget organism.

  4. Space storms and radiation causes and effects

    CERN Document Server

    Schrijver, Carolus J

    2010-01-01

    Heliophysics is a fast-developing scientific discipline that integrates studies of the Sun's variability, the surrounding heliosphere, and the environment and climate of planets. The Sun is a magnetically variable star and for planets with intrinsic magnetic fields, planets with atmospheres, or planets like Earth with both, there are profound consequences. This 2010 volume, the second in this series of three heliophysics texts, integrates the many aspects of space storms and the energetic radiation associated with them - from causes on the Sun to effects in planetary environments. It reviews t

  5. BUSINESS PROCESS REENGINEERING: CONCEPTS CAUSES AND EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Nugroho Yahya

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Some people made a wrong concept about Business Process Reengineering (BPR. Some were misunderstanding about the BPR term. In other way, so many researches were introduced to describe a better definition about BPR. The thinking about concepts, causes, and effect of BPR will make a new perception about the term of BPR itself as a better methodology instead of the other Quality Management Methodology such as Total Quality Management (TQM, Just In Time (JIT, etc. This paper will mention the context of BPR in some of case study's journal.

  6. CAUSE AND EFFECT IN PROMOTING A PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEVERIAN-VLĂDUȚ IACOB

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available For a project to be considered successful it is necessary, besides a proper coordination, to be also done a good and wide promotion. In view of communication, promotion and maintenance ensures the organization's image. Disturbances occurring in any type of project, as a result of poor promotion, affect the image of the team and highlight the weaknesses in its management. Therefore, the promotion should be permanently monitored and evaluated. Cause-effect analysis is one of the ways we can identify some of nonconformities of the promotion process within a project.

  7. Effects of genotoxicity and its consequences at the population level in sexual and asexual Artemia assessed by analysis of inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumaran, Sandhya; Grant, Alastair

    2013-09-18

    There is considerable evidence that genetic damage in organisms occurs in the environment as a result of exposure to genotoxins and ionising radiation, but we have limited understanding of the extent to which this results in adverse consequences at a population level. We used inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers to quantify genotoxic effects of the mutagen ethylmethane sulfonate (EMS) on a sexual (Artemia franciscana) and an asexual (Artemia parthenogenetica) species of brine shrimp. The method provides information similar to that obtained with assessment of RAPD (random amplification of polymorphic DNA) but is more robust. Genetic damage was transmitted to the F1 generation in both Artemia species, but the sexual species showed a greater degree of recovery, as shown by higher values of genomic template stability. There was a strong correlation between DNA damage and effects on individual fitness parameters: size, survival, reproduction and population growth. These effects persisted into the F2 generation in A. parthenogenetica, but in the sexual A. franciscana only effects on fecundity continued beyond the exposed generation, even though there were substantial alterations in ISSR patterns in the F1 generation. Genetic biomarkers can thus be indicative of effects at the population level, but sexually reproducing species have a considerable assimilative capacity for the effects of genotoxins.

  8. Genotoxicity effects of nano bioactive glass and Novabone bioglass on gingival fibroblasts using single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Tavakoli

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: The findings of this study have demonstrated that novel nano bioactive glass had no genotoxicity in concentrations lower than 4 mg/ml. Nanoparticles have a higher surface area in comparison to microparticles and thus, the amount and rate of ion release for nanoparticles are extremely higher. This difference is the main reason for the different genotoxicity of nano bioactive glass and micro Novabone bioglass in the concentrations higher than 4 mg/ml.

  9. Investigating the relationship between embryotoxic and genotoxic effects of benzo[alpha]pyrene, 17 alpha-ethinylestradiol and endosulfan on Crassostrea gigas embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Wessel, Nathalie; Rousseau, Sabrina; Caisey, Xavier; Quiniou, Francoise; Akcha, Farida

    2007-01-01

    Genotoxicity biomarkers are widely measured in ecotoxicology as molecular toxic endpoints of major environmental pollutants. However, the long-term consequences of such damage still have to be elucidated. Some authors have suggested that the accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions could explain the embryotoxicity of certain chemical pollutants. As embryotoxicity exerts a direct impact on the recruitment rate, genotoxicity could be closely related to disturbances of ecological concern and produ...

  10. Studies on Potential Mutagenic and Genotoxic Activity of Setarud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Farzamfar

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Setarud (IMODTM is a new herbal drug that has demonstrated immune modulating activity in preliminary investigations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of mutagenicity and genotoxic properties of Setarud following the guidelines of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD for the Testing of Chemicals. Methods: Ames Salmonella/mammalian microsome mutagenesis assay was used to evaluate the ability of the drug and its metabolites to induce mutation in Salmonella tester strains. Setarud was applied in concentrations of 0.1-1000 µg/dish. The effect of the drug metabolites which were formed in the presence of rat liver microsomal fraction S9 was investigated using complete and incomplete microsomal activation mixtures, separately. Induction of dominant lethal mutations in spermatogenic stem cells of male mice was also assessed. Results: In the Ames test, the drug preparation did not cause a significant increase in the number of revertant bacterial colonies as compared with negative control meaning that Setarud within the tested range did not exhibit mutagenic activity. The level of post-implantation losses and as a result the number of lethal mutations in germ cells at different stages of spermatogenesis in mice treated with Setarud was not statistically higher than that of control. Conclusion: Under experimental conditions which were employed, the drug was not mutagenic or genotoxic.

  11. Methodological considerations for using umu assay to assess photo-genotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cupi, Denisa; Baun, Anders

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated the feasibility of high-throughput (96-well plate) umu assay to test the genotoxic effect of TiO2 engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) under UV light (full spectrum) and visible light (455nm). Exposure of TiO2 ENPs to up to 60min of UV light induced a photocatalytic...... production of ROS. However, UV light itself caused cytotoxic damage to Salmonella typhimurium at exposures >15min and a genotoxic effect at exposures >0.5min; and use of UV filters did not lower this effect. No genotoxicity of TiO2 ENPs was observed under visible light conditions at concentrations up to 100......μgmL(-1); or under dark conditions at concentrations up to 667μgmL(-1), though cytotoxicity was seen at the higher concentrations. Additionally, the growth factor calculation was influenced by a shading effect due to ENPs, and was corrected by considering the pre-incubation OD readings of Plate B...

  12. Qualitative and quantitative approaches in the dose-response assessment of genotoxic carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Shoji; Gi, Min; Kakehashi, Anna; Wanibuchi, Hideki; Matsumoto, Michiharu

    2016-05-01

    Qualitative and quantitative approaches are important issues in field of carcinogenic risk assessment of the genotoxic carcinogens. Herein, we provide quantitative data on low-dose hepatocarcinogenicity studies for three genotoxic hepatocarcinogens: 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) and N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN). Hepatocarcinogenicity was examined by quantitative analysis of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) positive foci, which are the preneoplastic lesions in rat hepatocarcinogenesis and the endpoint carcinogenic marker in the rat liver medium-term carcinogenicity bioassay. We also examined DNA damage and gene mutations which occurred through the initiation stage of carcinogenesis. For the establishment of points of departure (PoD) from which the cancer-related risk can be estimated, we analyzed the above events by quantitative no-observed-effect level and benchmark dose approaches. MeIQx at low doses induced formation of DNA-MeIQx adducts; somewhat higher doses caused elevation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyquanosine levels; at still higher doses gene mutations occurred; and the highest dose induced formation of GST-P positive foci. These data indicate that early genotoxic events in the pathway to carcinogenesis showed the expected trend of lower PoDs for earlier events in the carcinogenic process. Similarly, only the highest dose of IQ caused an increase in the number of GST-P positive foci in the liver, while IQ-DNA adduct formation was observed with low doses. Moreover, treatment with DEN at low doses had no effect on development of GST-P positive foci in the liver. These data on PoDs for the markers contribute to understand whether genotoxic carcinogens have a threshold for their carcinogenicity. The most appropriate approach to use in low dose-response assessment must be approved on the basis of scientific judgment.

  13. Evaluation of genotoxic effects of five flavour enhancers (glutamates) on the root meristem cells of Allium cepa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkoğlu, Şifa

    2015-09-01

    The effects of different treatments with flavour enhancers monosodium glutamate, monopotassium glutamate, calcium diglutamate, monoammonium glutamate, and magnesium diglutamate on the cytology, DNA content, and interphase nuclear volume (INV) of A. cepa were investigated. Three concentrations of these additives - 20, 40, and 60 ppm - were applied for 6, 12, and 24 h. All the concentrations of these chemicals showed an inhibitory effect on cell division in root tips of A. cepa and caused a decrease in mitotic index values. Additionally, all the treatments changed the frequency of mitotic phases when compared with the control groups. These compounds increased chromosome abnormalities, among them are micronuclei, c-mitosis, anaphase bridges, stickiness, binucleus, laggards, and breaks. The nuclear DNA content and INV decreased when compared with control groups.

  14. Evaluation of genotoxic effects of sodium propionate, calcium propionate and potassium propionate on the root meristem cells of Allium cepa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkoğlu, Sifa

    2008-06-01

    The effects of different treatments with food preservatives, sodium propionate (SP), calcium propionate (CP) and potassium propionate (PP), on the cytology and DNA content of Allium cepa were investigated. Five concentrations of these additives - 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3000ppm - were applied for 24, 48, and 72h. All concentrations of these chemicals showed an inhibitory effect on cell division in root-tips of A. cepa and caused a decrease in mitotic index values. Additionally, all treatments changed the frequency of mitotic phases when compared with the control groups. These compounds increased chromosome abnormalities in test material. Among these abnormalities were C-mitosis, anaphase bridges, micronuclei, binucleated cells, stickiness, laggards, and chromosome breaks. The nuclear DNA contents decreased when compared with control groups.

  15. The development of improved and new in vitro assays for detecting the genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogenic potential of chemicals in the discovery phase of drug development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, W.M.A.

    2011-01-01

    In drug development, toxicity is an important factor for attrition, resulting in a failure rate of 30%-40%. Hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, cardiovascular safety, reproduction toxicity, developmental toxicity (teratogenicity), genotoxicity and carcinogenicity are the main causes for attrition in saf

  16. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of biogenic silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, R.; Feitosa, L. O.; Ballottin, D.; Marcato, P. D.; Tasic, L.; Durán, N.

    2013-04-01

    Biogenic silver nanoparticles with 40.3 ± 3.5 nm size and negative surface charge (- 40 mV) were prepared with Fusarium oxysporum. The cytotoxicity of 3T3 cell and human lymphocyte were studied by a TaliTM image-based cytometer and the genotoxicity through Allium cepa and comet assay. The results of BioAg-w (washed) and BioAg-nw (unwashed) biogenic silver nanoparticles showed cytotoxicity exceeding 50 μg/mL with no significant differences of response in 5 and 10 μg/mL regarding viability. Results of genotoxicity at concentrations 5.0 and 10.0 ug/mL show some response, but at concentrations 0.5 and 1.0 μg/mL the washed and unwashed silver nanoparticles did not present any effect. This in an important result since in tests with different bacteria species and strains, including resistant, MIC (minimal inhibitory concentration) had good answers at concentrations less than 1.9 μg/mL. This work concludes that biogenic silver nanoparticles may be a promising option for antimicrobial use in the range where no cyto or genotoxic effect were observed. Furthermore, human cells were found to have a greater resistance to the toxic effects of silver nanoparticles in comparison with other cells.

  17. An alternative approach to studying the effects of ZnO nanoparticles in cultured human lymphocytes: combining electrochemistry and genotoxicity tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branica, Gina; Mladinić, Marin; Omanović, Dario; Želježić, Davor

    2016-12-01

    Nanoparticle use has increased radically raising concern about possible adverse effects in humans. Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are among the most common nanomaterials in consumer and medical products. Several studies indicate problems with their safe use. The aim of our study was to see at which levels ZnO NPs start to produce adverse cytogenetic effects in human lymphocytes as an early attempt toward establishing safety limits for ZnO NP exposure in humans. We assessed the genotoxic effects of low ZnO NP concentrations (1.0, 2.5, 5, and 7.5 μg mL-1) in lymphocyte cultures over 14 days of exposure. We also tested whether low and high-density lymphocytes differed in their ability to accumulate ZnO NPs in these experimental conditions. Primary DNA damage (measured with the alkaline comet assay) increased with nanoparticle concentration in unseparated and high density lymphocytes. The same happened with the fragmentation of TP53 (measured with the comet-FISH). Nanoparticle accumulation was significant only with the two highest concentrations, regardless of lymphocyte density. High-density lymphocytes had significantly more intracellular Zn2+ than light-density ones. Our results suggest that exposure to ZnO NPs in concentrations above 5 μg mL-1 increases cytogenetic damage and intracellular Zn2+ levels in lymphocytes.

  18. BUDGET AMENDMENT – CAUSE AND EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROXANA ISPAS

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes both the causes and effects of budget amendment in Romania, taking into account the Fiscal Budget Responsibility Law. Reduction by 5% of the CSI payable by the employer from the 1st of October 2014 should be necessarily accompanied by a reform of the social security system, starting from the principle of equal treatment of taxpayers irrespective of their type of income and the elaboration and implementation of a medium-term strategy for financially rebalancing the social security budgets, especially the pensions' budget. Such a strategy should aim to increase the number of taxpayers, in particular by reducing "black" labor, and ensure a total transparency of budget expenditures as a whole in order to stimulate the growth of voluntary compliance to payment of taxes.

  19. Protective Effects of the Flavonoid Chrysin against Methylmercury-Induced Genotoxicity and Alterations of Antioxidant Status, In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Scandinari Manzolli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of phytochemicals has been widely used as inexpensive approach for prevention of diseases related to oxidative damage due to its antioxidant properties. One of dietary flavonoids is chrysin (CR, found mainly in passion fruit, honey, and propolis. Methylmercury (MeHg is a toxic metal whose main toxic mechanism is oxidative damage. Thus, the study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant effects of CR against oxidative damage induced by MeHg in Wistar rats. Animals were treated with MeHg (30 µg/kg/bw in presence and absence of CR (0.10, 1.0, and 10 mg/kg/bw by gavage for 45 days. Glutathione (GSH in blood was quantified spectrophotometrically and for monitoring of DNA damage, comet assay was used in leukocytes and hepatocytes. MeHg led to a significant increase in the formation of comets; when the animals were exposed to the metal in the presence of CR, higher concentrations of CR showed protective effects. Moreover, exposure to MeHg decreased the levels of GSH and GSH levels were restored in the animals that received CR plus MeHg. Taken together the findings of the present work indicate that consumption of flavonoids such as CR may protect humans against the adverse health effects caused by MeHg.

  20. [Evaluation of genotoxicity induced by repetitive administration of local anaesthetics: an experimental study in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nai, Gisele Alborghetti; de Oliveira, Mariliza Casanova; de Oliveira Tavares, Graziela; Pereira, Laís Fabrício Fonseca; Soares, Nádia Derli Salvador Lemes; Silva, Patrícia Gatti

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies regarding the effects of some local anaesthetics have suggested that these agents can cause genetic damage. However, they have not been tested for genotoxicity related to repetitive administration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic potential of local anaesthetics upon repetitive administration. 80 male Wistar rats were divided into: group A - 16 rats intraperitoneally injected with lidocaine hydrochloride 2%; group B - 16 rats IP injected with mepivacaine 2%; group C - 16 rats intraperitoneally injected with articaine 4%; group D - 16 rats IP injected with prilocaine 3% (6.0mg/kg); group E - 8 rats subcutaneously injected with a single dose of cyclophosphamide; and group F - 8 rats intraperitoneally injected with saline. Eight rats from groups A to D received a single dose of anaesthetic on Day 1 of the experiment; the remaining rats were dosed once a day for 5 days. The median number of micronuclei in the local anaesthetics groups exposed for 1 or 5 days ranged from 0.00 to 1.00, in the cyclophosphamide-exposed group was 10.00, and the negative control group for 1 and 5 days was 1.00 and 0.00, respectively (plocal anaesthetic groups (p=0.0001), but not between the negative control group and the local anaesthetic groups (p>0.05). No genotoxicity effect was observed upon repetitive exposure to any of the local anaesthetics evaluated. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Genotoxicity assessment of Garcinia achachairu Rusby (Clusiaceae) extract in mammalian cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Eduardo de Souza; Silva, Suellen; Niero, Rivaldo; de Andrade, Sérgio Faloni; Rosa, Paulo Cesar Pires; Perazzo, Fabio Ferreira; Maistro, Edson Luis

    2012-07-13

    Garcinia achachairu Rusby (Clusiaceae) is popularly known as "achachairu", and is used in Bolivian folk medicine for its healing, digestive, and laxative properties, and in the treatment of gastritis, rheumatism and inflammation. Despite its widespread therapeutic use, there is a lack of data regarding its in vivo genotoxic effects. Therefore, in this study, we used the comet assay and the micronucleus test, respectively, to evaluate the possible genotoxic and clastogenic effects of Garcinia achachairu seed extract (GAE) on different cells of mice. The GAE was administered by oral gavage at doses of 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg. For the analysis, the comet assay was performed on the leukocytes (collected 4 and 24 h after treatment), liver, bone marrow and testicular cells (collected 24 h after treatment), and the micronucleus test (MN) on bone marrow cells. Cytotoxicity was assessed by scoring 200 consecutive polychromatic (PCE) and normochromatic (NCE) erythrocytes (PCE/NCE ratio). The results showed that GAE did not induce significant DNA damage in leukocytes (4 h and 24 h samples), liver, bone marrow and testicular cells (24 h samples). GAE also did not show any significant increase in micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCEs) at the three tested doses. The PCE/NCE ratio indicated no cytotoxicity. Under our experimental conditions, the data obtained suggest that a single oral administration of G. achachairu extract does not cause genotoxicity and clastogenicity in different cells of mice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mutagenic and genotoxic activity of chosen dyes and surface active compounds used in the textile industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybojewska, B; Barański, B; Spiechowicz, E; Szymczak, W

    1989-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the mutagenic and genotoxic properties of ten dyes and four surface active compounds using Salmonella/microsome assay and the micronucleus test. Five of the investigated dyes (Acid Blue 7, Acid Green 16, Direct Black 19:1, Basic Red 22, Basic Orange 28) possessed mutagenic activity with regard to test strains of Salmonella. In addition, all of them increased the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes in the bone marrow of mice. Three other compounds (Acid Blue 62, Direct Yellow 12, Direct Red 81), which were not mutagenic in the Salmonella/microsome assay, were genotoxic in the micronucleus test. The other two dyes (Reactive Blue 13, Acid Red 213), as well as tested surface active compounds, did not exert mutagenic and genotoxic effects, and therefore, it is most probable that they do not have carcinogenic properties. Besides, it was noted that Acid Blue 62, Direct Black 19:1, Direct Red 81 and Basic Orange 28 cause a significant decrease in the ratio polychromatic to normochromatic erythrocytes in the bone marrow of mice, which means that, at the doses used in the experiment, they are toxic to the erythrocyte series cells of bone marrow. The other compounds under consideration have no such effect.

  3. ROS-mediated genotoxicity of asbestos-cement in mammalian lung cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rödelsperger Klaus

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Asbestos is a known carcinogen and co-carcinogen. It is a persisting risk in our daily life due to its use in building material as asbestos-cement powder. The present study done on V79-cells (Chinese hamster lung cells demonstrates the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of asbestos-cement powder (ACP in comparison with chrysotile asbestos. A co-exposure of chrysotile and ACP was tested using the cell viability test and the micronucleus assay. The kinetochore analysis had been used to analyse the pathway causing such genotoxic effects. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances were determined as evidence for the production of reactive oxygen species. Both, asbestos cement as well as chrysotile formed micronuclei and induced loss of cell viability in a concentration- and time- dependent way. Results of TBARS analysis and iron chelator experiments showed induction of free radicals in ACP- and chrysotile exposed cultures. CaSO4 appeared to be a negligible entity in enhancing the toxic potential of ACP. The co-exposure of both, ACP and chrysotile, showed an additive effect in enhancing the toxicity. The overall study suggests that asbestos-cement is cytotoxic as well as genotoxic in vitro. In comparison to chrysotile the magnitude of the toxicity was less, but co-exposure increased the toxicity of both.

  4. Genotoxicity of Microcystin-LR in In Vitro and In Vivo Experimental Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Dias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcystin-LR (MCLR is a cyanobacterial toxin known for its acute hepatotoxicity. Despite being recognized as tumour promoter, its genotoxicity is far from being completely clarified, particularly in organs other than liver. In this work, we used the comet and/or the micronucleus (MN assays to study the genotoxicity of MCLR in kidney- (Vero-E6 and liver-derived (HepG2 cell lines and in blood cells from MCLR-exposed mice. MCLR treatment (5 and 20 μM caused a significant induction in the MN frequency in both cell lines and, interestingly, a similar positive effect was observed in mouse reticulocytes (37.5 μg MCLR/kg, i.p. route. Moreover, the FISH-based analysis of the MN content (HepG2 cells suggested that MCLR induces both chromosome breaks and loss. On the other hand, the comet assay results were negative in Vero-E6 cells and in mouse leukocytes, with the exception of a transient increase in the level of DNA damage 30 minutes after mice exposure. Overall, the present findings contributed to increase the weight of evidence in favour of MCLR genotoxicity, based on its capacity to induce permanent genetic damage either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, they suggest a clastogenic and aneugenic mode of action that might underlie a carcinogenic effect.

  5. Assessment of genotoxic potential of two mycotoxins in the wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürbüzel, Mehmet; Uysal, Handan; Kızılet, Halit

    2015-03-01

    Mycotoxins, the toxic products of molds, exposure causes serious adverse health problems in human, animals, and crops. Determining the potential genotoxic effects of these substances is, therefore, of great importance. We have evaluated the genotoxic toxicity of two trichothecenes--diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS) and T-2 toxin--using the wing somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster. The SMART is based on the principle that the loss of heterozygosis of recessive markers located on the left arm of chromosome 3--multiple wing hairs (mwh) at the map position 0.3 and flare-3 (flr3) at the map position 38.8--may occur through various mechanisms such as mitotic recombination, mutation, deletion, half-translocation, chromosome loss, and nondisjunction. Both the mycotoxins were administered to third instar larvae (72 ± 4 h old) at concentrations ranging from 5 to 40 μM. Based on our results, DAS and T-2 toxins does not exert genotoxic effects up to a concentration of 40 μM.

  6. Evaluation of genotoxicity induced by repetitive administration of local anaesthetics: an experimental study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Alborghetti Nai

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Previous studies regarding the effects of some local anaesthetics have suggested that these agents can cause genetic damage. However, they have not been tested for genotoxicity related to repetitive administration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic potential of local anaesthetics upon repetitive administration. METHODS: 80 male Wistar rats were divided into: group A - 16 rats intraperitoneally injected with lidocaine hydrochloride 2%; group B - 16 rats IP injected with mepivacaine 2%; group C - 16 rats intraperitoneally injected with articaine 4%; group D - 16 rats IP injected with prilocaine 3% (6.0 mg/kg; group E - 8 rats subcutaneously injected with a single dose of cyclophosphamide; and group F - 8 rats intraperitoneally injected with saline. Eight rats from groups A to D received a single dose of anaesthetic on Day 1 of the experiment; the remaining rats were dosed once a day for 5 days. RESULTS: The median number of micronuclei in the local anaesthetics groups exposed for 1 or 5 days ranged from 0.00 to 1.00, in the cyclophosphamide-exposed group was 10.00, and the negative control group for 1 and 5 days was 1.00 and 0.00, respectively (p 0.05. CONCLUSION: No genotoxicity effect was observed upon repetitive exposure to any of the local anaesthetics evaluated.

  7. In vitro genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of ivermectin and its formulation ivomec on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO{sub K1}) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molinari, G.; Soloneski, S.; Reigosa, M.A. [Catedra de Citologia, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Museo, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata (Argentina); Larramendy, M.L., E-mail: m_larramendy@hotmail.com [Catedra de Citologia, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Museo, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata (Argentina)

    2009-06-15

    The effects of ivermectin (IVM) and its commercial formulation ivomec (IVM 1.0%) were studied on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO{sub K1}) cells by several genotoxicity [sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE)] and cytotoxicity [cell-cycle progression (CCP), mitotic index (MI), proliferative replication index (PRI), 3(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), and neutral red (NR)] bioassays within the 1.0-250 {mu}g/ml concentration-range. While IVM and ivomec did not modified SCE frequencies, they induced DNA-strand breaks revealed by SCGE. An enhancement of slightly damaged cells and a decrease in undamaged cells were observed in IVM-treated cultures with 5.0-50.0 {mu}g/ml. In ivomec-treated cells, while an increase in slightly damaged cells was induced with 5.0-50.0 {mu}g/ml, the damaged and undamaged cells increased and decreased only with 50.0 {mu}g/ml. Both compounds exerted a delay in CCP and a reduction in PRI when 25.0 {mu}g/ml was employed whereas cytotoxicity was observed at higher concentration than 50.0 {mu}g/ml. No MI alteration was observed with 1.0-10.0 and 1.0-5.0 {mu}g/ml of IVM and ivomec, respectively. A concentration-related trend to an increase in MI was achieved within 1.0-10.0 {mu}g/ml. An increase in the MI was induced in 10.0 {mu}g/ml ivomec-treated cultures. A marked reduction of about 89% and 62% in regard to controls was observed with 25.0 {mu}g/ml of IVM and ivomec, respectively. NR and MTT assays revealed a cell growth inhibition when 0.25-250.0 {mu}g/ml of both compounds was employed. The results highlighted that IVM and ivomec exert both genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in mammalian cells in vitro, at least in CHO{sub K1} cells.

  8. Neurobehavioral and genotoxic parameters of antipsychotic agent aripiprazole in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaqueline Nascimento PICADA; Viviane Minuzzo PONTES; Patrícia PEREIRA; Bruna de Jesus Neto DOS SANTOS; Franciele CELSO; Jéssica Dias MONTEIRO; Kelly Morais DA ROSA; Leandro Rosa CAMACHO; Luciana Rodrigues VIEIRA; Taís Madelon FREITAS; Tatiana Grasiela DASILVA

    2011-01-01

    Aim:Aripiprazole is an antipsychotic agent to treat schizophrenia,which acts through dopamine D2 partial agonism,serotonin 5-HT1A partial agonism and 5-HT2A antagonism.This study was designed to evaluate the neurobehavioral effects and genotoxic/mutagenic activities of the agent,as well as its effects on lipoperoxidation.Methods:Open field and inhibitory avoidance tasks were used.Thirty min before performing the behavioral tasks,adult male CF-1 mice were administered aripiprazole (1,3 or 10 mg/kg,ip) once for the acute treatment,or the same doses for 5 d for the subchronic treatment.Genotoxic effects were assessed using comet assay in the blood and brain tissues.Mutagenic effects were evaluated using bone marrow micronucleus test.Lipoperoxidation was assessed with thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS).Results:Acute and subchronic treatments significantly decreased the number of crossing and rearing in the open field task.Acute treatment significantly increased the step-down latency for both the short- and long-term memory in the inhibitory avoidance task.Subchronic treatments with aripiprazole (3 and 10 mg/kg) caused significant DNA strain-break damage in peripheral blood but not in the brain.Mutagenic effect was not detected in the acute and subchronic treatments.Nor TBARS levels in the liver were affected.Conclusion:Aripiprazole improved memory,but could impair motor activities in mice.The drug increased DNA damage in blood,but did not show mutagenic effects,suggesting that it might affect long-term genomic stability.

  9. Genotoxic effects of old landfill leachate on HepG2 cells after nitration/ultrafiltration/reverse osmosis membrane treatment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Rong; Zhao, Ling; Yin, Pinghe

    2017-06-06

    Toxicity assessment of nitration/ultrafiltration/reverse osmosis (nitration/UF/RO) project, which has recently been widely used as an efficient process with applications in practical leachate treatment, was very limited. In the present study, DNA damage of leachates was investigated before and after the nitration/UF/RO process by a battery of assays with human hepatoma cells. Methyletrazolium assay showed a high cytotoxicity of 97.1% after being exposed to the highest concentration of raw leachate for 24 h, and a cytotoxicity of 26% in effluent at a concentration of 30% (v/v). Both comet assay (24 h) and γH2AX flow cytometer assay (3 h) showed increased levels of DNA damage in cells exposed to raw leachate and after nitration/UF-treated leachate followed by a significant increase of 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity. However, the effluent after nitration/UF/RO treatment showed no significant difference compared to negative control for γH2AX flow cytometer assay but slight DNA damage at concentrations of 20% and 30% (v/v) as well as increase of 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase. Analysis showed that nitration/UF/RO process exhibited high removal of physicochemical indexes and significant reduction of toxic and genotoxic effects of leachate, but still demands an improvement to reduce all possible negative risks to the environment and humans. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Toxic effect and genotoxicity of the semisynthetic derivatives dillapiole ethyl ether and dillapiole n-butyl ether for control of Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca Meireles, Sabrina; Domingos, Pedro Rauel Cândido; da Silva Pinto, Ana Cristina; Rafael, Míriam Silva

    2016-09-01

    Two derivatives of dillapiole, dillapiole ethyl ether (1KL39-B) and butyl ether-n dillapiole (1KL43-C), were studied for their toxicity and genotoxicity against Aedes albopictus, to help develop new strategies for the control of this potential vector of dengue and other arboviruses, because it is resistant to synthetic insecticides. Eggs and larvae exposed to different concentrations of 1KL39-B (25, 30, 50, 70, and 80μg/mL) and of 1KL43-C (12.5, 20, 25, 30 and 40μg/mL) exhibited toxicity and susceptibility, with 100% mortality. The LC50 was 55.86±1.57μg/mL for 1KL39-B and 25.60±1.24μg/mL for 1KL43-C, while the LC90 was 70.12μg/mL for 1KL39-B and 41.51μg/mL for 1KL43-C. The gradual decrease in oviposition of the females of the G1 to G4 generations was proportional to the increase in concentrations of these compounds, which could be related to the cumulative effect of cell anomalies in neuroblasts and oocytes (P<0.05), including micronuclei, budding, multinucleated cells and nuclear bridges. These findings showed that both 1KL39-B and 1KL43-C can serve as potential alternatives in the control of A. albopictus.

  11. Genotoxicity test of propolis extract, mineral trioksida aggregat, and calcium hydroxide on fibroblast BHK-21 cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceples Dian Kartika W.P

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health industry has always used natural products as an alternative. Propolis, a natural antibiotic, is a resinous yellow brown or dark brown substance derived from honey bees (Apis mellifera. The main chemical compounds contained in propolis are flavonoids, phenolics and other various aromatic compounds. Flavonoids are well known plant compounds that have antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory proprieties. Propolis is expected to be an alternative used for root canal treatment with lower toxicity compared to calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH2 . Over the last decade, a new material, mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA was developed, and has been used as the gold standard. All materials used in mouth should be biocompatible. The initial level of material biocompatibility evaluation involves toxicity and genotoxicity tests. Purpose: This research is aimed to conduct comparison test of genotoxicity effect of propolis extract, MTA and Ca(OH2 on fibroblast BHK-21 cell culture. Methods: This research was conducted with single-cell gel electrophoresis method. Results: The results indicate that propolis extract cannot cause DNA damage, while MTA can cause apoptosis and Ca(OH2 can cause neucrosis. Conclusion: It can be concluded that propolis extract has genotoxicity effect lower than MTA and Ca(OH2 , but MTA has lower effect on fibroblast BHK-21 cell culture.

  12. Fatigue in traffic : causes and effects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2006-01-01

    The role of fatigue must not be underestimated when studying the causes of crashes. Crashes in which driver fatigue plays a role are not only a matter of having spent too long behind the wheel; fatigue can also be caused by too little sleep, stress, or the time of the day. According to a conservativ

  13. Genotoxicity of unmodified and organo-modified montmorillonite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anoop Kumar; Schmidt, Bjørn; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    2010-01-01

    The natural clay mineral montmorillonite (Cloisite (R) Na+) and an organo-modified montmorillonite (Cloisite (R) 30B) were investigated for genotoxic potential as crude suspensions and as suspensions filtrated through a 0.2-mu m pore-size filter to remove particles above the nanometre range...... absent in the filtered samples, which was independently confirmed by dynamic light-scattering measurements. Detection and identification of free quaternary ammonium modifier in the filtered sample was carried out by HPLC-Q-TOF/MS and revealed a total concentration of a mixture of quaternary ammonium...... analogues of 1.57 mu g/ml. These findings suggest that the genotoxicity of organo-modified montmorillonite was caused by the organo-modifier. The detected organo-modifier mixture was synthesized and comet-assay results showed that the genotoxic potency of this synthesized organo-modifier was in the same...

  14. Evaluation of Genotoxic and Mutagenic Activity of Organic Extracts from Drinking Water Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ying; Wang, Xiaodong; Wong, Minghung; Sun, Guoping; An, Taicheng; Guo, Jun; Zhang, Guoxia

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of industrial, agricultural and commercial chemicals in the aquatic environment lead to various deleterious effects on organisms, which is becoming a serious global health concern. In this study, the Ames test and SOS/umu test were conducted to investigate the potential genotoxicity and mutagenicity caused by organic extracts from drinking water sources. Organic content of source water was extracted with XAD-2 resin column and organic solvents. Four doses of the extract equivalent to 0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2L of source water were tested for toxicity. All the water samples were collected from six different locations in Guangdong province. The results of the Ames test and SOS/umu test showed that all the organic extracts from the water samples could induce different levels of DNA damage and mutagenic potentials at the dose of 2 L in the absence of S9 mix, which demonstrated the existence of genotoxicity and mutagenicity. Additionally, we found that Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98 was more sensitive for the mutagen. Correlation analysis between genotoxicity, Organochlorine Pesticides (OCPs) and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) showed that most individual OCPs were frame shift toxicants in drinking water sources, and there was no correlation with total OCPs and PAHs.

  15. Macrophages detoxify the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of surgical cobalt chrome alloy particles but not quartz particles on human cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, I; Shadrick, V; Davis, S; Hails, L; Schins, R; Newson, R; Fisher, J; Ingham, E; Case, C P

    2008-08-25

    Particles of surgical cobalt chrome alloy are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human fibroblasts in vitro. In vivo orthopaedic patients are exposed to cobalt chrome particles as a result of wear of a joint replacement. Many of the wear debris particles that are produced are phagocytosed by macrophages that accumulate at the site of the worn implant and are disseminated to local and distant lymph nodes the liver and the spleen. In this study we have tested whether this process of phagocytosis could have altered the cytotoxic and genotoxic properties of the cobalt chrome particles. Quartz particles have been investigated as a control. Micron-sized particles of cobalt chrome alloy were internalised by either white cells of peripheral blood or by THP-1 monocytes for 1 week and 1 day, respectively. The particles were then extracted and presented at different doses to fibroblasts for 1 day. There was a reduction of the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of the cobalt chrome particles after phagocytosis by white cells or THP-1 cells. Cobalt chrome particles that were internalised by fibroblasts also showed a reduction of their cytotoxicity but not their genotoxicity. In contrast the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of quartz particles was increased after internalisation by THP-1 cells. The surface morphology of the cobalt chrome particles but not the quartz particles was changed after phagocytosis by THP-1 cells. This study suggests that the genotoxic and cytotoxic properties of particles that fall within the size range for phagocytosis may be highly complex in vivo and depend on the combination of material type and previous phagocytosis. These results may have relevance for particle exposure from orthopaedic implants and from environmental or industrial pollution.

  16. Genotoxicity of pyrrolizidine alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Mei, Nan; Fu, Peter P

    2010-04-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are common constituents of many plant species around the world. PA-containing plants are probably the most common poisonous plants affecting livestock and wildlife. They can inflict harm to humans through contaminated food sources, herbal medicines and dietary supplements. Half of the identified PAs are genotoxic and many of them are tumorigenic. The mutagenicity of PAs has been extensively studied in different biological systems. Upon metabolic activation, PAs produce DNA adducts, DNA cross-linking, DNA breaks, sister chromatid exchange, micronuclei, chromosomal aberrations, gene mutations and chromosome mutations in vivo and in vitro. PAs induced mutations in the cII gene of rat liver and in the p53 and K-ras genes of mouse liver tumors. It has been suggested that all PAs produce a set of (+/-)-6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5H-pyrrolizine-derived DNA adducts and similar types of gene mutations. The signature types of mutations are G : C --> T : A transversion and tandem base substitutions. Overall, PAs are mutagenic in vivo and in vitro and their mutagenicity appears to be responsible for the carcinogenesis of PAs.

  17. Genotoxicity and anti-genotoxicity of some traditional medicinal herbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Jiménez, Magdalena; Campos-Sánchez, Juan; Analla, Mohamed; Muñoz-Serrano, Andrés; Alonso-Moraga, Angeles

    2005-08-01

    Six herbal infusions used worldwide (Matricaria chamomilla, Tilia cordata, Mentha piperita, Mentha pulegium, Uncaria tomentosa and Valeriana officinalis) were assayed for anti-genotoxicity using the Somatic Mutation And Recombination Test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster. All these infusions are traditionally used for various medical purposes, including anti-inflammatory processes. Hydrogen peroxide was used as an oxidative genotoxicant to test the anti-genotoxic potency of the medicinal infusions. None of these infusions showed a significant genotoxicity, quite the reverse they were able to behave as desmutagens, detoxifying the mutagen hydrogen peroxide. The phenolic content of such herbal infusions is argued to be the possible scavenger of reactive oxygen radicals produced by the hydrogen peroxide.

  18. COMPARATIVE GENOTOXIC RESPONSES TO ARSENITE IN GUINEA PIG, MOUSE, RAT AND HUMAN LYMPHOCYTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative genotoxic responses to arsenite in guinea pig, mouse, rat and human lymphocytes.Inorganic arsenic is a known human carcinogen causing skin, lung, and bladder cancer following chronic exposures. Yet, long-term laboratory animal carcinogenicity studies have ...

  19. Genotoxicity of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Granulosa Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Pöttler

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles that are aimed at targeting cancer cells, but sparing healthy tissue provide an attractive platform of implementation for hyperthermia or as carriers of chemotherapeutics. According to the literature, diverse effects of nanoparticles relating to mammalian reproductive tissue are described. To address the impact of nanoparticles on cyto- and genotoxicity concerning the reproductive system, we examined the effect of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs on granulosa cells, which are very important for ovarian function and female fertility. Human granulosa cells (HLG-5 were treated with SPIONs, either coated with lauric acid (SEONLA only, or additionally with a protein corona of bovine serum albumin (BSA; SEONLA-BSA, or with dextran (SEONDEX. Both micronuclei testing and the detection of γH2A.X revealed no genotoxic effects of SEONLA-BSA, SEONDEX or SEONLA. Thus, it was demonstrated that different coatings of SPIONs improve biocompatibility, especially in terms of genotoxicity towards cells of the reproductive system.

  20. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study Auxiliary Findings on 2007-Compliant Diesel Engines: A Comparison With Diesel Exhaust Genotoxicity Effects Prior to 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lance M Hallberg

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Since its beginning, more than 117 years ago, the compression-ignition engine, or diesel engine, has grown to become a critically important part of industry and transportation. Public concerns over the health effects from diesel emissions have driven the growth of regulatory development, implementation, and technological advances in emission controls. In 2001, the United States Environmental Protection Agency and California Air Resources Board issued new diesel fuel and emission standards for heavy-duty engines. To meet these stringent standards, manufacturers used new emission after-treatment technology, and modified fuel formulations, to bring about reductions in particulate matter and nitrogen oxides within the exhaust. To illustrate the impact of that technological transition, a brief overview of pre-2007 diesel engine exhaust biomarkers of genotoxicity and health-related concerns is provided, to set the context for the results of our research findings, as part of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES, in which the effects of a 2007-compliant diesel engine were examined. In agreement with ACES findings reported in other tissues, we observed a lack of measurable 2007-compliant diesel treatment–associated DNA damage, in lung tissue (comet assay, blood serum (8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine [8-OHdG] assay, and hippocampus (lipid peroxidation assay, across diesel exhaust exposure levels. A time-dependent assessment of 8-OHdG and lipid peroxidation also suggested no differences in responses across diesel exhaust exposure levels more than 24 months of exposure. These results indicated that the 2007-compliant diesel engine reduced measurable reactive oxygen species–associated tissue derangements and suggested that the 2007 standards–based mitigation approaches were effective.

  1. Evaluation of Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of Acacia aroma Leaf Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Mattana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acacia aroma, native plant from San Luis, Argentina, is commonly used as antiseptic and for healing of wounds. The present study was conducted to investigate the in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of hot aqueous extract (HAE and ethanolic extract (EE of A. aroma. The cytotoxic activity was assayed by neutral red uptake assay on Vero cell. Cell treatment with a range from 100 to 5000 μg/mL of HAE and EE showed that 500 μg/mL and 100 μg/mL were the maximum noncytotoxic concentrations, respectively. The CC50 was 658 μg/mL for EE and 1020 μg/mL for HAE. The genotoxicity was tested by the single-cell gel electrophoresis comet assay. The results obtained in the evaluation of DNA cellular damage exposed to varied concentrations of the HAE showed no significant genotoxic effect at range of 1–20 mg/mL. The EE at 20 mg/mL showed moderate genotoxic effect related to the increase of the DNA percentage contained in tail of the comet; DNA was classified in category 2. At concentrations below 5 mg/mL, the results of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Acacia aroma guarantee the safety at cell and genomic level. However further studies are needed for longer periods including animal models to confirm the findings.

  2. Evaluation of Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of Acacia aroma Leaf Extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattana, C. M.; Cangiano, M. A.; Alcaráz, L. E.; Sosa, A.; Escobar, F.; Sabini, C.; Sabini, L.; Laciar, A. L.

    2014-01-01

    Acacia aroma, native plant from San Luis, Argentina, is commonly used as antiseptic and for healing of wounds. The present study was conducted to investigate the in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of hot aqueous extract (HAE) and ethanolic extract (EE) of A. aroma. The cytotoxic activity was assayed by neutral red uptake assay on Vero cell. Cell treatment with a range from 100 to 5000 μg/mL of HAE and EE showed that 500 μg/mL and 100 μg/mL were the maximum noncytotoxic concentrations, respectively. The CC50 was 658 μg/mL for EE and 1020 μg/mL for HAE. The genotoxicity was tested by the single-cell gel electrophoresis comet assay. The results obtained in the evaluation of DNA cellular damage exposed to varied concentrations of the HAE showed no significant genotoxic effect at range of 1–20 mg/mL. The EE at 20 mg/mL showed moderate genotoxic effect related to the increase of the DNA percentage contained in tail of the comet; DNA was classified in category 2. At concentrations below 5 mg/mL, the results of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Acacia aroma guarantee the safety at cell and genomic level. However further studies are needed for longer periods including animal models to confirm the findings. PMID:25530999

  3. Prevalence of genotoxic chemicals among animal and human carcinogens evaluated in the IARC Monograph Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, H; Malaveille, C

    1989-06-01

    To determine whether genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens contribute similarly to the cancer burden in humans, an analysis was performed on agents that were evaluated in Supplements 6 and 7 to the IARC Monographs for their carcinogenic effects in humans and animals and for the activity in short-term genotoxicity tests. The prevalence of genotoxic carcinogens on four groups of agents, consisting of established human carcinogens (group 1, n = 30), probable human carcinogens (group 2A, n = 37), possible human carcinogens (group 2B, n = 113) and on agents with limited evidence of carcinogenicity in animals (a subset of group 3, n = 149) was determined. A high prevalence in the order of 80 to 90% of genotoxic carcinogens was found in each of the groups 1, 2A and 2B, which were also shown to be multi-species/multi-tissues carcinogens. The distribution of carcinogenic potency in rodents did not reveal any specific characteristic of the human carcinogens in group 1 that would differentiate them from agents in groups 2A, 2B and 3. The results of this analysis indicate that (a) an agent with unknown carcinogenic potential showing sufficient evidence of activity in in vitro/in vivo genotoxicity assays (involving as endpoints DNA damage and chromosomal/mutational damage) may represent a hazard to humans; and b) an agent showing lack of activity in this spectrum of genotoxicity assays should undergo evaluation for carcinogenicity by rodent bioassay, in view of the present lack of validated short-term tests for non-genotoxic carcinogens. Overall, this analysis implies that genotoxic carcinogens add more to the cancer burden in man than non-genotoxic carcinogens. Thus, identification of such genotoxic carcinogens and subsequent lowering of exposure will remain the main goal for primary cancer prevention in man.

  4. Assessment of genotoxicity of Lannate-90® and its plant and animal metabolites in human lymphocyte cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia-Quintana, Rafael; Gómez-Arroyo, Sandra; Sánchez-Alarcón, Juana; Milić, Mirta; Olivares, José Luis Gómez; Waliszewski, Stefan M; Cortés-Eslava, Josefina; Villalobos-Pietrini, Rafael; Calderón-Segura, María Elena

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated direct and metabolic genotoxic effects caused by Lannate-90®, a methomyl-based formulation (90 % active ingredient), in human lymphocyte cultures using sister chromatid exchange assay (SCE). Two processes were used for the plant promutagens evaluation: in vivo activation, applying the insecticide systemically in plants for 4 h and subsequently adding plant metabolites containing extracts to lymphocyte cultures; and in vitro activation, where the insecticide was incubated with Vicia faba S10 mix plus human lymphocyte culture. Direct treatment with the insecticide significantly increased SCE frequency in human lymphocytes (250-750 mgL-1), with cellular death observed at 1000 mgL-1 concentration. Using the extracts of Vicia faba treated with Lannate-90® to treat human lymphocytes, a dose-response relationship was observed. In lymphocyte cultures treated directly with the insecticide for 2 h, a negative response was obtained. When S10 mix was added, SCE frequency did not change significantly. Meanwhile, a mixture of S9 mammalian metabolic mix and Lannate-90® increased the SCE frequency, with an observed concentration-dependent response. Although Lannate-90® induced cellular death at the highest concentrations, it did not cause a delay in cell proliferation in any of the treatments, confirming its genotoxic action. This study is one of the first to evaluate and compare the direct effect of Lannate-90® in two bioassays, animal and vegetal, and the effect of plant and animal metabolism on its genotoxic potential.

  5. Genotoxicity of Anesthetics Evaluated In Vivo (Animals)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz, Mariana G.; Karahalil, Bensu

    2015-01-01

    The anesthesia has been improved all over the years. However, it can have impact on health, in both patients and animals anesthetized, as well as professionals exposed to inhaled anesthetics. There is continuing effort to understand the possible effects of anesthetics at molecular levels. Knowing the effects of anesthetic agents on genetic material could be a valuable basic support to better understand the possible mechanisms of these agents. Thus, the purpose of this review is to provide an overview on the genotoxic potential, evaluated in animal models, of many anesthetics that have already been used and those currently used in anesthesia. PMID:26199936

  6. The Young Drinking Driver: Cause or Effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Patricia F.; Waller, Marcus B.

    Drunk driving is a major public health problem and young people suffer disproportionately high rates of morbidity and mortality as a result of drinking and driving. Motor vehicle injuries are the leading cause of death for persons aged 15-24 in this country, and alcohol is implicated in many of these deaths. Countermeasures to drinking and driving…

  7. Commodity Price Volatility: Causes, Effects and Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Mugera, Harriet Kasidi

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural commodities experienced substantial increases in prices over the most recent decade with major surges in both 2007-08 and again in 2010-11. These price movements coincided with sharp rises in energy prices, in particular crude oil. Sharp increases in agricultural prices were not uncommon, but it is the short period between the recent two price surges that has drawn concerns and raised questions. What were the causes of the increase in world agricultural prices and what are the pr...

  8. Toxic and genotoxic effects of the imazethapyr-based herbicide formulation Pivot H® on montevideo tree frog Hypsiboas pulchellus tadpoles (Anura, Hylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Iglesias, J M; Soloneski, S; Nikoloff, N; Natale, G S; Larramendy, M L

    2015-09-01

    Acute lethal and sublethal toxicity of the imidazolinone imazethapyr (IMZT)-based commercial formulation herbicide Pivot H® (10.59% IMZT) was evaluated on Hypsiboas pulchellus tadpoles. Whereas mortality was used as the end point for lethality, frequency of micronuclei (MNs) and other nuclear abnormalities as well as DNA single-strand breaks evaluated by the single cell gel electrophoresis assay were employed to test genotoxicity. Behavioral, growth, developmental, and morphological abnormalities were also employed as sublethal end points. Mortality studies revealed equivalent LC50 (96h) values of 1.49mg/L (confidence limit, 1.09-1.63) and 1.55mg/L (confidence limit, 1.51-1.60) IMZT for Gosner stage (GS) 25 and GS36, respectively. Behavioral changes, i.e., irregular swimming and immobility, as well as a decreased frequency of keratodonts were observed. The herbicide increased the frequency of MNs in circulating erythrocytes of tadpoles exposed for 48h to the highest concentration assayed (1.17mg/L). However, regardless of the concentration of the herbicide assayed, an enhanced frequency of MNs was observed in tadpoles exposed for 96h. The herbicide was able to induce other nuclear abnormalities, i.e., blebbed and notched nuclei, only when tadpoles were exposed for 96h. In addition, we observed that exposure to IMZT within the 0.39-1.17mg/L range increased the genetic damage index in treatments lasting for both 48 and 96h. This study represents the first evidence of acute lethal and sublethal effects exerted by IMZT on amphibians. Finally, our findings highlight the properties of this herbicide that jeopardize nontarget living species exposed to IMZT.

  9. Genotoxicity of Pesticide Waste Contaminated Soil and Its Leachate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. D. SIVANESAN; K. KRISHNAMURTHI; S. D. WACHASUNDER; T. CHAKRABARTI

    2004-01-01

    Improper land disposal of hazardous waste can result in leaching of hazardous constituents which may contaminate ground and surface water leading to adverse impact on human health and environment consequences. The present study utilized mammalian cell culture for the genotoxicity assessment of waste and its leachate. Methods Genotoxic potential and chemical analysis of pesticide derived tarry waste contaminated soil extract and its leachate was assessed using in vitro human lymphocyte cultures and GC-MS. Results The investigation revealed that the soil extract could cause significant to highly significant genotoxicity in the form of DNA strand break at 25 μL (P<0.01), 50 μL, 100 μL and 200 μL (P<0.001) and chromosomal aberration at 25 μL (P<0.01) and 50 μL and 100 μL (P<0.001). The leachate could cause significant DNA strand break and chromosomal aberration only at 100 μL and 200 μL (P<0.01) dose levels. Conclusion The genotoxicity observed is attributed to carbaril and tetra methyl naphthyl carbamate, the major ingredients of the extracts, as revealed by GC-MS.

  10. [Haematological adverse effects caused by psychiatric drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaira, Silvina

    2008-01-01

    Almost all clases of psychiatric drugs (typical and atypical antipsychotics, antidepressants, mood stabilizers, benzodiazepines) have been reported as possible causes of haematological toxicity. This is a review of the literature in which different clinical situations involving red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets and impaired coagulation are detailed and the drugs more frequently involved are listed. The haematological adverse reactions detailed here include: aplastic anemia, haemolitic anemia, leukopenia, agranulocytosis, leukocytosis, eosinophilia, thrombocytosis, thrombocytopenia, disordered platelet function and impaired coagulation. The haematologic toxicity profile of the drugs more frequently involved: lithium, clozapine, carbamazepine, valproic acid and SSRI antidepressants is mentioned.

  11. Genotoxic potential of glyphosate formulations: mode-of-action investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydens, William F; Healy, Charles E; Hotz, Kathy J; Kier, Larry D; Martens, Mark A; Wilson, Alan G E; Farmer, Donna R

    2008-02-27

    A broad array of in vitro and in vivo assays has consistently demonstrated that glyphosate and glyphosate-containing herbicide formulations (GCHF) are not genotoxic. Occasionally, however, related and contradictory data are reported, including findings of mouse liver and kidney DNA adducts and damage following intraperitoneal (ip) injection. Mode-of-action investigations were therefore undertaken to determine the significance of these contradictory data while concurrently comparing results from ip and oral exposures. Exposure by ip injection indeed produced marked hepatic and renal toxicity, but oral administration did not. The results suggest that ip injection of GCHF may induce secondary effects mediated by local toxicity rather than genotoxicity. Furthermore, these results continue to support the conclusion that glyphosate and GCHF are not genotoxic under exposure conditions that are relevant to animals and humans.

  12. Use of a standardized JaCVAM in vivo rat comet assay protocol to assess the genotoxicity of three coded test compounds; ampicillin trihydrate, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride, and N-nitrosodimethylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, J P; Bellier, P V

    2015-07-01

    As part of the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM)-initiative international validation study of the in vivo rat alkaline comet assay (comet assay), our laboratory examined ampicillin trihydrate (AMP), 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH), and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDA) using a standard comet assay validation protocol (v14.2) developed by the JaCVAM validation management team (VMT). Coded samples were received by our laboratory along with basic MSDS information. Solubility analysis and range-finding experiments of the coded test compounds were conducted for dose selection. Animal dosing schedules, the comet assay processing and analysis, and statistical analysis were conducted in accordance with the standard protocol. Based upon our blinded evaluation, AMP was not found to exhibit evidence of genotoxicity in either the rat liver or stomach. However, both NDA and DMH were observed to cause a significant increase in % tail DNA in the rat liver at all dose levels tested. While acute hepatoxicity was observed for these compounds in the high dose group, in the investigators opinion there were a sufficient number of consistently damaged/measurable cells at the medium and low dose groups to judge these compounds as genotoxic. There was no evidence of genotoxicity from either NDA or DMH in the rat stomach. In conclusion, our laboratory observed increased DNA damage from two blinded test compounds in rat liver (later identified as genotoxic carcinogens), while no evidence of genotoxicity was observed for the third blinded test compound (later identified as a non-genotoxic, non-carcinogen). This data supports the use of a standardized protocol of the in vivo comet assay as a cost-effective alternative genotoxicity assay for regulatory testing purposes.

  13. Is the Comet Assay a Sensitive Procedure for Detecting Genotoxicity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satomi Kawaguchi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the Comet assay, a procedure for quantitating DNA damage in mammalian cells, is considered sensitive, it has never been ascertained that its sensitivity is higher than the sensitivity of other genotoxicity assays in mammalian cells. To determine whether the power of the Comet assay to detect a low level of genotoxic potential is superior to those of other genotoxicity assays in mammalian cells, we compared the results of Comet assay with those of micronucleus test (MN test. WTK1 human lymphoblastoid cells were exposed to methyl nitrosourea (MNU, ethyl nitrosourea (ENU, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS, ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS, bleomycin (BLM, or UVC. In Comet assay, cells were exposed to each mutagen with (Comet assay/araC and without (Comet assay DNA repair inhibitors (araC and hydroxyurea. Furthermore, acellular Comet assay (acellular assay was performed to determine how single-strand breaks (SSBs as the initial damage contributes to DNA migration and/or to micronucleus formation. The lowest genotoxic dose (LGD, which is defined as the lowest dose at which each mutagen causes a positive response on each genotoxicity assay, was used to compare the power of the Comet assay to detect a low level of genotoxic potential and that of MN test; that is, a low LGD indicates a high power. Results are summarized as follows: (1 for all mutagens studied, LGDs were MN test ≦ Comet assay; (2 except for BLM, LGDs were Comet assay/araC ≦ MN test; (3 except for UVC and MNU, LGDs were acellular assay ≦ Comet assay/araC ≦ MN test ≦ Comet assay. The following is suggested by the present findings: (1 LGD in the Comet assay is higher than that in MN test, which suggests that the power of the MN test to detect a low level of genotoxic potential is superior to that of the Comet assay; (2 for the studied mutagens, all assays were able to detect all mutagens correctly, which suggests that the sensitivity of the Comet assay and that of the MN test were

  14. Is tetrachloroethylene genotoxic or not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, David

    2010-09-01

    A recent study published in Mutagenesis, in which the ability of tetrachloroethylene to induce DNA damage, detected by the alkaline comet assay, in mouse tissues (liver and kidney) was examined, has resulted in different interpretations of the data for liver as either positive or negative for genotoxicity. Here, I discuss the statistical approaches used and comment on the different conclusions reached.

  15. Investigations of potential susceptibility toward formaldehyde-induced genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Jasmin; Högel, Josef; Linsenmeyer, Regina; Teller, Christopher; Speit, Günter

    2012-09-01

    Blood samples were taken from three groups of volunteers (30 male smokers, 30 female non-smokers, and 30 school children) and tested for ex vivo susceptibility toward formaldehyde (FA)-induced genotoxicity. Blood samples were exposed to 150 μM FA for 2 h, and the induction of DNA-protein crosslinks (DPX) in leukocytes was measured by a modification of the alkaline comet assay (i.e., reduction of γ-irradiation induced DNA migration). Removal of DPX was determined by the abolition of FA-induced reduction in DNA migration within 4 h after the end of the exposure. Induction and persistence of FA-induced DNA lesions was also measured by the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) test with cultured lymphocytes after treatment of whole blood cultures with FA (150 μM). Furthermore, the expression (mRNA level) of the GSH-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FDH, identical to alcohol dehydrogenase 5; ADH5) was measured in leukocytes by quantitative real-time RT-PCR with TaqMan probes. The subjects were also analyzed for the GSTM1 and GSTT1 metabolic gene polymorphisms and a correlation analysis with the investigated genetic endpoints for FA-induced genotoxicity was performed. The results indicate that there are no biologically relevant differences between the three study groups with regard to the various indicators of cellular sensitivity toward FA-induced genotoxic effects and the expression of FDH. The induced genotoxic effects were not associated with polymorphisms in GSTM1 and GSTT1. None of the study groups showed particular mutagen sensitivity toward FA-induced genotoxicity. These results suggest that a low scaling factor to address possible human inter-individual differences in FA-induced genotoxicity could be reasonable.

  16. Genistein genotoxicity: critical considerations of in vitro exposure dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Catherine B; King, Audrey A

    2007-10-01

    The potential health benefits of soy-derived phytoestrogens include their reported utility as anticarcinogens, cardioprotectants and as hormone replacement alternatives in menopause. Although there is increasing popularity of dietary phytoestrogen supplementation and of vegetarian and vegan diets among adolescents and adults, concerns about potential detrimental or other genotoxic effects persist. While a variety of genotoxic effects of phytoestrogens have been reported in vitro, the concentrations at which such effects occurred were often much higher than the physiologically relevant doses achievable by dietary or pharmacologic intake of soy foods or supplements. This review focuses on in vitro studies of the most abundant soy phytoestrogen, genistein, critically examining dose as a crucial determinant of cellular effects. In consideration of levels of dietary genistein uptake and bioavailability we have defined in vitro concentrations of genistein >5 microM as non-physiological, and thus "high" doses, in contrast to much of the previous literature. In doing so, many of the often-cited genotoxic effects of genistein, including apoptosis, cell growth inhibition, topoisomerase inhibition and others become less obvious. Recent cellular, epigenetic and microarray studies are beginning to decipher genistein effects that occur at dietarily relevant low concentrations. In toxicology, the well accepted principle of "the dose defines the poison" applies to many toxicants and can be invoked, as herein, to distinguish genotoxic versus potentially beneficial in vitro effects of natural dietary products such as genistein.

  17. Genotoxicity Studies Performed in the Ecuadorian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Paz-y-Miño

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genotoxicity studies in Ecuador have been carried out during the past two decades. The focuses of the research were mainly the area of environmental issues, where the populations have been accidentally exposed to contaminants and the area of occupational exposure of individuals at the workplace. This paper includes studies carried out in the population of the Amazon region, a zone known for its rich biodiversity as well as for the ecological damage caused by oil spills and chemical sprayings whose consequences continue to be controversial. Additionally, we show the results of studies comprised of individuals occupationally exposed to toxic agents in two very different settings: flower plantation workers exposed to pesticide mixtures and X-ray exposure of hospital workers. The results from these studies confirm that genotoxicity studies can help evaluate current conditions and prevent further damage in the populations exposed to contaminants. As such, they are evidence of the need for biomonitoring employers at risk, stricter law enforcement regarding the use of pesticides, and increasingly conscientious oil extraction activities.

  18. Genotoxicity studies performed in the ecuadorian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Y-Miño, César; Cumbal, Nadia; Sánchez, María Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    Genotoxicity studies in Ecuador have been carried out during the past two decades. The focuses of the research were mainly the area of environmental issues, where the populations have been accidentally exposed to contaminants and the area of occupational exposure of individuals at the workplace. This paper includes studies carried out in the population of the Amazon region, a zone known for its rich biodiversity as well as for the ecological damage caused by oil spills and chemical sprayings whose consequences continue to be controversial. Additionally, we show the results of studies comprised of individuals occupationally exposed to toxic agents in two very different settings: flower plantation workers exposed to pesticide mixtures and X-ray exposure of hospital workers. The results from these studies confirm that genotoxicity studies can help evaluate current conditions and prevent further damage in the populations exposed to contaminants. As such, they are evidence of the need for biomonitoring employers at risk, stricter law enforcement regarding the use of pesticides, and increasingly conscientious oil extraction activities.

  19. Genotoxicity evaluation of sesamin and episesamin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Hisako; Takayanagi, Tomomi; Kamada, Yoko; Shimoyoshi, Satomi; Ono, Yoshiko; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Shibata, Hiroshi; Nagao, Minako; Fujii, Wataru; Sakakibara, Yutaka

    2011-02-03

    Sesamin is a major lignan that is present in sesame seeds and oil. Sesamin is partially converted to its stereoisomer, episesamin, during the refining process of non-roasted sesame seed oil. We evaluated the genotoxicity of these substances through the following tests: a bacterial reverse mutation assay (Ames test), a chromosomal aberration test in cultured Chinese hamster lung cells (CHL/IU), a bone marrow micronucleus (MN) test in Crlj:CD1 (ICR) mice, and a comet assay using the liver of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Episesamin showed negative results in the Ames test with and without S9 mix, in the in vitro chromosomal aberration test with and without S9 mix, and in the in vivo comet assay. Sesamin showed negative results in the Ames test with and without S9 mix. In the in vitro chromosomal aberration test, sesamin did not induce chromosomal aberrations in the absence of S9 mix, but induced structural abnormalities at cytotoxic concentrations in the presence of S9 mix. Oral administration of sesamin at doses up to 2.0g/kg did not cause a significant increase in either the percentage of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes in the in vivo bone marrow MN test or in the % DNA in the comet tails in the in vivo comet assay of liver cells. These findings indicate that sesamin does not damage DNA in vivo and that sesamin and episesamin have no genotoxic activity.

  20. Genotoxicity and toxicity assay of water sampled from a radium production industry storage cell territory by means of Allium-test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evseeva, Tatiana I; Geras'kin, Stanislav A; Shuktomova, Ida I

    2003-01-01

    Water from natural reservoirs located near the radium production industry storage cell were analyzed using the anaphase-telophase chromosome aberration assay that was carried out on Allium schoenoprasum L. meristematic root tip cells. (262)Ra, (228)U, (232)Th, (210)Pb and (210)Po concentrations in all samples were found not to exceed the radioactivity concentration guides. The concentrations of 10 heavy metal ions were measured in water samples, but only Zn and Mn levels exceeded the maximum permissible concentration for the natural reservoirs. All water samples caused a significant increase of the chromosome aberration frequency as compared to control. The chromosome aberration spectrum analysis shows that the genotoxic effect was a result of chemical toxicity mainly. Two samples from the brook springhead were found to be toxic. The regression analysis results show that the mitotic index increased in parallel to Zn ion levels, and decreased with higher (238)U concentrations. The water samples genotoxicity positively correlated with the Zn concentration. The present work demonstrates that in order to achieve pollutant screening, it is not sufficient to determine the pollutants concentration only. Adequate conclusions on the risk due to environment contamination need to be based on the additional simultaneous use of toxicity and genotoxicity tests. When bioassays indicate some genotoxic and toxic effects, the determination of the chemical composition of the samples is then required. A combination of these two methods allows the identification of the elements that require constant biological monitoring. In the study reported here, those elements are Zn and (238)U.

  1. Toxicity and genotoxicity in Astyanax bimaculatus (Characidae) induced by microcystins from a bloom of Microcystis spp

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Studies of genotoxicity in fish caused by cyanobacterial microcystins can be useful both in determining the sensitivity of native species, as well as comparing exposure routes. The genotoxicity caused by the microcystins LR and LA from a bloom collected in a eutrophic lake, was revealed in the fish Astyanaxbimaculatus, a native species from South America. LC50 (72 h) was determined as 242.81 μg L -1 and LD50 (72 h) as 49.19 μg kg -1 bw. There was a significant increase of DNA damage in peripheral erythrocytes, following intraperitoneal injection (ip) with tested concentrations of 24.58 μg kg -1 bw and 36.88 μg kg -1 bw, as well as through body exposure to a concentration of 103.72 μg L -1 . Micronucleus (MN) induction was observed after ip injections of 24.58 μg kg -1 bw and 36.88 μg kg -1 bw for 72 h, as well as following body exposure for 72 at 103.72 μg L -1 . Thus, both exposure routes resulted in MN induction and DNA damage. Apoptosis-necrosis testing was carried out only by ip injection with concentrations of 24.58 μg kg -1 bw and 36.88 μg kg- 1 bw. Exposure to microcystins at lower concentrations induced more apoptosis than necrosis in peripheral erythrocytes, whereas exposure at higher concentrations gave rise to both conditions. Thus, Astyanax bimaculatus can be considered as a species sensitive to the genotoxic effects caused by microcystins. PMID:21637586

  2. Toxicity and genotoxicity in Astyanax bimaculatus (Characidae induced by microcystins from a bloom of Microcystis spp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Rocha Pavan da Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies of genotoxicity in fish caused by cyanobacterial microcystins can be useful both in determining the sensitivity of native species, as well as comparing exposure routes. The genotoxicity caused by the microcystins LR and LA from a bloom collected in a eutrophic lake, was revealed in the fish Astyanax bimaculatus, a native species from South America. LC50 (72 h was determined as 242.81 µg L-1 and LD50 (72 h as 49.19 µg kg-1 bw. There was a significant increase of DNA damage in peripheral erythrocytes, following intraperitoneal injection (ip with tested concentrations of 24.58 µg kg-1 bw and 36.88 µg kg-1 bw, as well as through body exposure to a concentration of 103.72 µg L-1. Micronucleus (MN induction was observed after ip injections of 24.58 µg kg-1 bw and 36.88 µg kg-1 bw for 72 h, as well as following body exposure for 72 at 103.72 µg L-1. Thus, both exposure routes resulted in MN induction and DNA damage. Apoptosis-necrosis testing was carried out only by ip injection with concentrations of 24.58 µg -1 bw and 36.88 µg kg-1 bw. Exposure to microcystins at lower concentrations induced more apoptosis than necrosis in peripheral erythrocytes, whereas exposure at higher concentrations gave rise to both conditions. Thus, Astyanax bimaculatus can be considered as a species sensitive to the genotoxic effects caused by microcystins.

  3. Linking embryo toxicity with genotoxic responses in the freshwater snail Physa acuta: single exposure to benzo(a)pyrene, fluoxetine, bisphenol A, vinclozolin and exposure to binary mixtures with benzo(a)pyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Argüello, Paloma; Aparicio, Natalia; Fernández, Carlos

    2012-06-01

    Genotoxic effects on fauna after waterborne pollutant exposure have been demonstrated by numerous research programmes. Less effort has been focused on establishing relationship between genotoxicity and long-term responses at higher levels of biological organization. Taking into account that embryos may be more sensitive indicators of reproductive impairment than alterations in fertility, we have developed two assays in multiwell plates to address correlations between embryo toxicity and genotoxicity. The potential teratogenicity was assessed by analyzing abnormal development and mortality of Physa acuta at embryonic stage. Genotoxicity was measured by the micronucleus (MN) test using embryonic cells. Our results showed that linkage between genotoxicity and embryo toxicity depends on mechanisms of action of compounds under study. Embryo toxic responses showed a clear dose-related tendency whereas no clear dose-dependent effect was observed in micronucleus induction. The higher embryo toxicity was produced by benzo(a)pyrene exposure followed by fluoxetine and bisphenol A. Vinclozolin was the lower embryo toxic compound. Binary mixtures with BaP always resulted in higher embryo toxicity than single exposures but antagonistic effects were observed for MN induction. Benzo(a)pyrene produced the higher MN induction at 0.04 mg/L, which also produced clear embryo toxic effects. Fluoxetine did not induce cytogenetic effects but 0.25mg/L altered embryonic development. Bisphenol A significantly reduced hatchability at 0.5mg/L while MN induction appeared with higher treatments than those that start causing teratogenicity. Much higher concentration of vinclozolin (5mg/L) reduced hatchability and induced maximum MN formation. In conclusion, while validating one biomarker of genotoxicity and employing one ecologically relevant effect, we have evaluated the relative sensitivity of a freshwater mollusc for a range of chemicals. The embryo toxicity test is a starting point for the

  4. Technostress in Libraries: Causes, Effects and Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichteler, Julie

    1987-01-01

    Examines some of the fears, frustrations, and misconceptions of library staff and patrons that hamper the effective use of computers in libraries. Strategies that library administrators could use to alleviate stress are outlined, including staff participation in the automation process, well-designed workstations, and adequate training for staff…

  5. Mycotoxins’ Activity at Toxic and Sub-Toxic Concentrations: Differential Cytotoxic and Genotoxic Effects of Single and Combined Administration of Sterigmatocystin, Ochratoxin A and Citrinin on the Hepatocellular Cancer Cell Line Hep3B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolia Αnninou

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Food safety organizations indicate the likelihood of constant human and animal exposure to mycotoxin mixtures as a possible negative public health impact. Risk assessment demonstrates that certain mycotoxins of Aspergillus and Penicillium spp. are toxic and hold a significant genotoxic efficacy at nanomolar concentrations. The aim of the current study was to investigate the potential cytogenetic effects of sterigmatocystin (STER, ochratoxin A (OTA and citrinin (CTN alone or in combination, at pM to μΜ concentrations, on the human hepatocellular cancer cell line Hep3B. MTT reduction, mitotic divisions, cell cycle delays and sister chromatid exchange rates (SCE were determined as endpoints of metabolic activity, cytotoxicity, cytostaticity, and genotoxicity, respectively. All mycotoxin treatments induce SCE rates from 10−12 M, while their cytotoxic and cytostatic potential varies. In PRI and MI assays, but not at MTT, STER alone or in combination with OTA + CTN appeared cytostatic and cytotoxic, even at 10−12 M, while CTN alone and all other combinations displayed substantial cellular survival inhibition in doses ≥ 10−8 M. Co-administration of STER + OTA or STER + CTN in concentrations ≤ 10−1 M, increased the MI and MTT activity, while it did not affect the PRI. Mycotoxin co-treatments revealed in general similar-to-additive or antagonistic genotoxic and cytotoxic effects. Our results for the first time describe that STER alone or in combination with OTA and/or CTN share a cytotoxic and cytogenetic potential even at picoMolar concentrations on human hepatoma cells in vitro.

  6. Effects of perivitelline fluid obtained from Horseshoe crab on the proliferation and genotoxicity of dental pulp stem cells

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Musa, M.; Ali, K.M.; Kannan, T.P.; Azlina, A.; Omar, N.S.; Chatterji, A.; Mokhtar, K.I.

    Perivitelline fluid (PVF) of the horseshoe crab embryo has been reported to possess an important role during embryogenesis by promoting cell proliferation. This study aims to evaluate the effect of PVF on the proliferation, chromosome aberration (CA...

  7. Efeitos da cisplatina em cobaias: histologia coclear e genotoxidade Cisplatin effects on guinea pigs: cochlear histology and genotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cacineli Marion de Franceschi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Conhecer as respostas do DNA aos agentes externos como a cisplatina pode ser relevante para o diagnóstico e tratamento das alterações auditivas causadas pela administração deste fármaco. OBJETIVOS: Verificar a influência da cisplatina sobre a cóclea e o DNA de cobaias. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo experimental executado com 12 cobaias (Cavia porcellus. O critério de inclusão de cobaias na amostra foi a presença de reflexo de Preyer e emissões otoacústicas produto de distorção (EOAPDs. As cobaias foram dividas em dois grupos: Grupo controle (GC - composto de seis cobaias, às quais foi administrada solução fisiológica por seis dias consecutivos, via intraperitoneal; Grupo estudo (GE - composto por seis cobaias, às quais foi administrada cisplatina em seis doses consecutivas de 3mg/kg/dia via intraperitoneal. Vinte e quatro horas após a última aplicação de cisplatina as cobaias foram sacrificadas, foi coletada amostra sanguínea e as cócleas foram removidas. RESULTADOS: Administração de cisplatina não provocou alterações genotóxicas. A análise histológica mostrou alterações no órgão de Corti e gânglio espiral. CONCLUSÃO: A cisplatina provoca alterações na histologia coclear como perda da microcitoarquitetura normal do órgão de Corti e redução dos neurônios do gânglio espiral com alterações celulares. No entanto, não foram detectados danos genotóxicos.To understand how the DNA answers to external agents such as cisplatin may be relevant to the diagnosis and treatment of hearing disorders caused by the administration of such drug. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the cisplatin influence on the cochlea and DNA of guinea pigs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Experimental study carried out with 12 guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus. The inclusion criterion was the presence of Preyer's reflex and distortion-product otoacoustic emissions. Guinea pigs were divided into two groups: Control Group (CG - made up of six guinea pigs

  8. Contextual dissonance effects: nature and causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M

    1977-08-01

    Contextual consonance or dissonance refers to the concordance of, or the discrepancy between, the individual's social characteristics and those of the population by which he is surrounded. Although a number of advantageous consequences have been shown to issue from contextual dissonance, self-esteem is not one of them. This article seeks to account for the deleterious effect of contextual dissonance on self-esteem by examining the nature of dissonant communications environments, dissonant cultural environments, and dissonant comparison reference groups.

  9. Effect of dietary cadmium on fitness, growth, genotoxicity and accumulation in the Yellow-spotted River Turtle, Podocnemis unifilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frossard, Alexandra; Ferreira, Paulo D. [Universidade Vila Velha, Vila Velha, ES (Brazil); Carneiro, Maria T.W.D. [Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Heringer, Otávio A. [Universidade Vila Velha, Vila Velha, ES (Brazil); Tommasi Analítica, Vila Velha, ES (Brazil); Endringer, Denise C. [Universidade Vila Velha, Vila Velha, ES (Brazil); Gomes, Levy C., E-mail: levy.gomes@uvv.br [Universidade Vila Velha, Vila Velha, ES (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    The aim of this study was to expose the Yellow-spotted River Turtle, Podocnemis unifilis, to dietary cadmium (Cd) contamination. The P. unifilis were fed with a Cd contaminated diet (590 µg g{sup −1}) or a control diet for 30 and 60 days. After the Cd feeding period, the locomotor performance and specific growth rate were assessed. Blood samples were drawn for micronuclei analysis and tissues were collected to analyze the Cd concentration. Dietary Cd influenced the fitness of turtles at 30 days (righting time 752 s), but not after 60 days (righting time 43.67 s). Micronuclei in erythrocytes (12 ± 5‰) were significantly greater in contaminated turtle at 60 days. Cd accumulation is found in gut, intestine, kidney, fat, liver and blood of animals from contaminated diet group and the Cd concentration of almost all the tissues had increased following the 30–60-day feeding period. Cd does not impair animal the fitness after sixty days of dietary treatment, but it does can cause an accumulation on P. unifilis.

  10. Evaluation of perfluorooctanoate for potential genotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. Butenhoff

    2014-01-01

    processes and not a specific genotoxic effect, the results of the studies presented in this paper and other published results clearly demonstrate the absence of direct mutagenic or genotoxic risk associated with PFOA. This finding is consistent with the physical/chemical characteristics of PFOA and is supported by other published genotoxicity studies.

  11. INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN (HSP70-1) PROTECTS MCF-7 CELLS FROM THE CYTOTOXIC AND GENOTOXIC EFFECTS OF ARSENITE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) belong to the highly conserved family of stress proteins and are induced following exposure to arsenic. Elevated HSPs protect against cellular damage from heat but it is unclear wether HSP induction alters the damaging effects of environmental chemical ...

  12. INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN (HSP70-1) PROTECTS MCF-7 CELLS FROM THE CYTOTOXIC AND GENOTOXIC EFFECTS OF ARSENITE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) belong to the highly conserved family of stress proteins and are induced following exposure to arsenic. Elevated HSPs protect against cellular damage from heat but it is unclear wether HSP induction alters the damaging effects of environmental chemical ...

  13. Exposure to Crystal Violet, Its Toxic, Genotoxic and Carcinogenic Effects on Environment and Its Degradation and Detoxification for Environmental Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Sujata; Bharagava, Ram Naresh

    2016-01-01

    Crystal Violet (CV), a triphenylmethane dye, has been extensively used in human and veterinary medicine as a biological stain, as a textile dye in textile processing industries and also used to provide a deep violet color to paints and printing ink. CV is also used as a mutagenic and bacteriostatic agent in medical solutions and antimicrobial agent to prevent the fungal growth in poultry feed. Inspite of its many uses, CV has been reported as a recalcitrant dye molecule that persists in environment for a long period and pose toxic effects in environment. It acts as a mitotic poison, potent carcinogen and a potent clastogene promoting tumor growth in some species of fish. Thus, CV is regarded as a biohazard substance. Although, there are several physico-chemical methods such as adsorption, coagulation and ion-pair extraction reported for the removal of CV, but these methods are insufficient for the complete removal of CV from industrial wastewaters and also produce large quantity of sludge containing secondary pollutants. However, biological methods are regarded as cost-effective and eco-friendly for the treatment of industrial wastewaters, but these methods also have certain limitations. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop such eco-friendly and cost-effective biological treatment methods, which can effectively remove the dye from industrial wastewaters for the safety of environment, as well as human and animal health.

  14. Genotoxicity of Chlorpyrifos, Alpha-thrin, Efekto virikop and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-03

    Dec 3, 2008 ... tion to their intended effects, are sometimes found to affect non-target organisms, ... been given to the use of alternatives to mammals in testing, research and ... impact connected with the introduction and heavy use of pesti- ..... sativum in anaphase-telophase test screening metal genotoxicity. Biologia 57: ...

  15. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of cis-tetraammine(oxalato)ruthenium(III) dithionate on the root meristem cells of Allium cepa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Flávia de Castro; Vilanova-Costa, Cesar Augusto Sam Tiago; de Lima, Aliny Pereira; Ribeiro, Alessandra de Santana Braga Barbosa; da Silva, Hugo Delleon; Pavanin, Luiz Alfredo; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela de Paula

    2009-06-01

    Ruthenium complexes have attracted much attention as possible building blocks for new transition-metal-based antitumor agents. The present study examines the mitotoxic and clastogenic effects induced in the root tips of Allium cepa by cis-tetraammine(oxalato)ruthenium(III) dithionate {cis-[Ru(C(2)O(2))(NH(3))(4)](2)(S(2)O(6))} at different exposure durations and concentrations. Correlation tests were performed to determine the effects of the time of exposure and concentration of ruthenium complex on mitotic index (MI) and mitotic aberration index. A comparison of MI results of cis-[Ru(C(2)O(2))(NH(3))(4)](2)(S(2)O(6)) to those of lead nitrate reveals that the ruthenium complex demonstrates an average mitotic inhibition eightfold higher than lead, with the frequency of cellular abnormalities almost fourfold lower and mitotic aberration threefold lower. A. cepa root cells exposed to a range of ruthenium complex concentrations did not display significant clastogenic effects. Cis-tetraammine(oxalato)ruthenium(III) dithionate therefore exhibits a remarkable capacity to inhibit mitosis, perhaps by inhibiting DNA synthesis or blocking the cell cycle in the G2 phase. Further investigation of the mechanisms of action of this ruthenium complex will be important to define its clinical potential and to contribute to a novel and rational approach to developing a new metal-based drug with antitumor properties complementary to those exhibited by the drugs already in clinical use.

  16. Modulatory effects of the antioxidant ascorbic acid on the direct genotoxicity of doxorubicin in somatic cells of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson José Fragiorge

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study two different crosses involving the wing cell markers mwh and flr³ (standard (ST cross and high bioactivation (HB cross, the latter being characterized by a high constitutive level of cytochrome P450 which leads to an increased sensitivity to a number of promutagens and procarcinogens were used to investigate the modulatory effects of ascorbic acid (AA combined with the antitumor agent doxorubicin (DXR in Drosophila melanogaster. We observed that the two different concentrations of AA (50 or 100 mM had no effect on spots frequencies, while DXR treatments (0.2 or 0.4 mM gave positive results for all types of spots, when compared to negative control. For marker-heterozygous (MH flies, a protective effect was observed with the lower concentration of AA (50 mM that was able to statistically decrease the frequency of spots induced by DXR (0.2 mM, while an enhanced frequency of spots induced by DXR was observed with the higher concentration of AA (100 mM, when compared to DXR treatment (p < 0.05. These results suggest that AA may interfere with free radicals generated by DXR and with other possible reactive metabolites. The efficiency of AA in protecting the somatic cells of D. melanogaster against mutation and recombination induced by DXR is dependent on the dose used and the protection is directly related to the activity of cytochrome P450 enzymes.

  17. The Mitigating Effect of Citrullus colocynthis (L. Fruit Extract against Genotoxicity Induced by Cyclophosphamide in Mice Bone Marrow Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shokrzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Possible genoprotective effect of Citrullus colocynthis (L. (CCT fruits extract against cyclophosphamide- (CP-induced DNA damage in mice bone marrow cells was evaluated using micronucleus assay, as an index of induced chromosomal damage. Mice were preadministered with different doses of CCT via intraperitoneal injection for 7 consecutive days followed by injection with CP (70 mg/kg b.w. 1 hr after the last injection of CCT. After 24 hr, mice were scarified to evaluate the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MnPCEs. In addition, the number of polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs among 1000 normochromatic erythrocytes (NCEs per animal was recorded to evaluate bone marrow. Pretreatment with CCT significantly reduced the number of MnPCEs induced by CP in bone marrow cells (P<0.0001. At 200 mg/kg, CCT had a maximum chemoprotective effect and reduced the number of MnPCEs by 6.37-fold and completely normalized the mitotic activity. CCT also led to marked proliferation and hypercellularity of immature myeloid elements after mice were treated with CP and mitigated the bone marrow suppression. Our study revealed that CCT has an antigenotoxic effect against CP-induced oxidative DNA damage in mice. Therefore, it could be used concomitantly as a supplement to protect people undergoing chemotherapy.

  18. Amelioration of Cadmium-Produced Teratogenicity and Genotoxicity in Mice Given Arthrospira maxima (Spirulina) Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüelles-Velázquez, Nancy; Alvarez-González, Isela; Madrigal-Bujaidar, Eduardo; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of the effects of Arthrospira maxima (AM) was made, otherwise known as Spirulina, on the teratogenicity, genotoxicity, and DNA oxidation processes induced by cadmium (Cd). Pregnant ICR mice were divided into groups and administered water, Cd only, AM only, or AM plus Cd. AM was administered orally at doses of 200, 400, and 800 mg/kg from gestational day 0 (GD0) to GD17, and at GD7 there was an intraperitoneal challenge of Cd (1.5 mg/kg). Cd only caused fetal malformations, including exencephaly, micrognathia, ablephary, microphthalmia, and clubfoot, as well as a significant increase in the quantity of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPE) and of micronucleated normochromatic erythrocytes (MNNE) in blood cells of both the mothers and their fetuses. An increased level of oxidation was also found, measured by a rise in the levels of the adduct 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine. In a dose-dependent manner, AM significantly reduced the number of external, visceral, and skeletal malformations, the quantity of MNPE and MNNE, and the level of DNA oxidation. The results suggest that AM may reduce the genotoxic effects and rates of congenital malformations caused by exposure to Cd in utero and that the antioxidant activity of this cyanobacterium could be responsible, at least in part, for producing this effect. PMID:24369479

  19. Short-term effects on antioxidant enzymes and long-term genotoxic and carcinogenic potential of CuO nanoparticles compared to bulk CuO and ionic copper in mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Pamela; Katsumiti, Alberto; Nieto, Jose A; Bori, Jaume; Jimeno-Romero, Alba; Reip, Paul; Arostegui, Inmacul