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Sample records for genotoxic agent nalidixic

  1. PprA contributes to Deinococcus radiodurans resistance to nalidixic acid, genome maintenance after DNA damage and interacts with deinococcal topoisomerases.

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    Swathi Kota

    Full Text Available PprA is known to contribute to Deinococcus radiodurans' remarkable capacity to survive a variety of genotoxic assaults. The molecular bases for PprA's role(s in the maintenance of the damaged D. radiodurans genome are incompletely understood, but PprA is thought to promote D. radiodurans's capacity for DSB repair. PprA is found in a multiprotein DNA processing complex along with an ATP type DNA ligase, and the D. radiodurans toposiomerase IB (DraTopoIB as well as other proteins. Here, we show that PprA is a key contributor to D. radiodurans resistance to nalidixic acid (Nal, an inhibitor of topoisomerase II. Growth of wild type D. radiodurans and a pprA mutant were similar in the absence of exogenous genotoxic insults; however, the pprA mutant exhibited marked growth delay and a higher frequency of anucleate cells following treatment with DNA-damaging agents. We show that PprA interacts with both DraTopoIB and the Gyrase A subunit (DraGyrA in vivo and that purified PprA enhances DraTopoIB catalysed relaxation of supercoiled DNA. Thus, besides promoting DNA repair, our findings suggest that PprA also contributes to preserving the integrity of the D. radiodurans genome following DNA damage by interacting with DNA topoisomerases and by facilitating the actions of DraTopoIB.

  2. Genotoxicity studies on DNA-interactive telomerase inhibitors with application as anti-cancer agents.

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    Harrington, Dean J; Cemeli, Eduardo; Carder, Joanna; Fearnley, Jamie; Estdale, Sian; Perry, Philip J; Jenkins, Terence C; Anderson, Diana

    2003-01-01

    Telomerase-targeted strategies have aroused recent interest in anti-cancer chemotherapy, because DNA-binding drugs can interact with high-order tetraplex rather than double-stranded (duplex) DNA targets in tumour cells. However, the protracted cell-drug exposure times necessary for clinical application require that telomerase inhibitory efficacy must be accompanied by both low inherent cytotoxicity and the absence of mutagenicity/genotoxicity. For the first time, the genotoxicity of a number of structurally diverse DNA-interactive telomerase inhibitors is examined in the Ames test using six Salmonella typhimurium bacterial strains (TA1535, TA1537, TA1538, TA98, TA100, and TA102). DNA damage induced by each agent was also assessed using the Comet assay with human lymphocytes. The two assay procedures revealed markedly different genotoxicity profiles that are likely to reflect differences in metabolism and/or DNA repair between bacterial and mammalian cells. The mutational spectrum for a biologically active fluorenone derivative, shown to be mutagenic in the TA100 strain, was characterised using a novel and rapid assay method based upon PCR amplification of a fragment of the hisG46 allele, followed by RFLP analysis. Preliminary analysis indicates that the majority (84%) of mutations induced by this compound are C --> A transversions at position 2 of the missense proline codon of the hisG46 allele. However, despite its genotoxic bacterial profile, this fluorenone agent gave a negative response in the Comet assay, and demonstrates how unwanted systemic effects (e.g., cytotoxicity and genotoxicity) can be prevented or ameliorated through suitable molecular fine-tuning of a candidate drug in targeted human tumour cells. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Contributions of DNA repair and damage response pathways to the non-linear genotoxic responses of alkylating agents

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    Klapacz, Joanna; Pottenger, Lynn H.; Engelward, Bevin P.; Heinen, Christopher D.; Johnson, George E.; Clewell, Rebecca A.; Carmichael, Paul L.; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2016-01-01

    From a risk assessment perspective, DNA-reactive agents are conventionally assumed to have genotoxic risks at all exposure levels, thus applying a linear extrapolation for low-dose responses. New approaches discussed here, including more diverse and sensitive methods for assessing DNA damage and DNA repair, strongly support the existence of measurable regions where genotoxic responses with increasing doses are insignificant relative to control. Model monofunctional alkylating agents have in vitro and in vivo datasets amenable to determination of points of departure (PoDs) for genotoxic effects. A session at the 2013 Society of Toxicology meeting provided an opportunity to survey the progress in understanding the biological basis of empirically-observed PoDs for DNA alkylating agents. Together with the literature published since, this review discusses cellular pathways activated by endogenous and exogenous alkylation DNA damage. Cells have evolved conserved processes that monitor and counteract a spontaneous steady-state level of DNA damage. The ubiquitous network of DNA repair pathways serves as the first line of defense for clearing of the DNA damage and preventing mutation. Other biological pathways discussed here that are activated by genotoxic stress include post-translational activation of cell cycle networks and transcriptional networks for apoptosis/cell death. The interactions of various DNA repair and DNA damage response pathways provide biological bases for the observed PoD behaviors seen with genotoxic compounds. Thus, after formation of DNA adducts, the activation of cellular pathways can lead to the avoidance a mutagenic outcome. The understanding of the cellular mechanisms acting within the low-dose region will serve to better characterize risks from exposures to DNA-reactive agents at environmentally-relevant concentrations. PMID:27036068

  4. Emerging nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin resistance in non-typhoidal Salmonella isolated from patients having acute diarrhoeal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panhotra, B.R.; Saxena, A.K.; Al-Arabi, Ali M.

    2004-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella are one of the key etiological agents of diarrhoeal disease. The appearence of multiple drung resistance along with resistance to quinolones in this bacterium poses a serious therapeutic problem. We determined the prevalence of nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin resistance in non-typhodial Salmonella isolated from faecal samples of patients with acute diarroheal disease attending the outpatient and inpatient department of a hospital in Saudi Arabia during the years 1999 to 2002. Non-typhodial Salmonella were isolated from faecal samples. Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested by the disc diffusion test. MICs to nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacinwere determined by the agar dilution method. During the study period , 524 strains of non-typhoidal Salmonella were isolated. Strains belonging to serogroup C1were the commonest (41.4%) followed by serogroups B and D (15.6% and 14.5%, respectively). Resistance to ampicillin was observed in 22.9% and to trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole in 18.5%of the strains. Nalidixic acid resistance was encounterd in 9.9% and ciprofloxacin esistance in 2.3% of the strains. Resistance to nalidixic acid significantly increased from 0.1% in 1999 to 5.51% in 2002 ( p=0.0007)and ciprofloxacin resistance increased significantly from 0.1% in 1999 to 0.9% in 2002( p=0.0001). MICs to nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin were determined among 29 nalidixic acid-resistant strains of non-typhoidal salmonella isolated during 2002. The MIC was >256 ug /ml to nalidixic acid and 8 to 16 ug/ml to ciprofloxacin. The increasing rate of antimicrobial resistance encountered among non-tyophoidal Salmonella necessiate the judicious use of these drugs in humans. Moreover, these findings support the concern that the use of quinolones in animal feed may lead to an increasein resistance and should should be restricted. (author)

  5. Contributions of DNA repair and damage response pathways to the non-linear genotoxic responses of alkylating agents.

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    Klapacz, Joanna; Pottenger, Lynn H; Engelward, Bevin P; Heinen, Christopher D; Johnson, George E; Clewell, Rebecca A; Carmichael, Paul L; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Andersen, Melvin E

    2016-01-01

    From a risk assessment perspective, DNA-reactive agents are conventionally assumed to have genotoxic risks at all exposure levels, thus applying a linear extrapolation for low-dose responses. New approaches discussed here, including more diverse and sensitive methods for assessing DNA damage and DNA repair, strongly support the existence of measurable regions where genotoxic responses with increasing doses are insignificant relative to control. Model monofunctional alkylating agents have in vitro and in vivo datasets amenable to determination of points of departure (PoDs) for genotoxic effects. A session at the 2013 Society of Toxicology meeting provided an opportunity to survey the progress in understanding the biological basis of empirically-observed PoDs for DNA alkylating agents. Together with the literature published since, this review discusses cellular pathways activated by endogenous and exogenous alkylation DNA damage. Cells have evolved conserved processes that monitor and counteract a spontaneous steady-state level of DNA damage. The ubiquitous network of DNA repair pathways serves as the first line of defense for clearing of the DNA damage and preventing mutation. Other biological pathways discussed here that are activated by genotoxic stress include post-translational activation of cell cycle networks and transcriptional networks for apoptosis/cell death. The interactions of various DNA repair and DNA damage response pathways provide biological bases for the observed PoD behaviors seen with genotoxic compounds. Thus, after formation of DNA adducts, the activation of cellular pathways can lead to the avoidance of a mutagenic outcome. The understanding of the cellular mechanisms acting within the low-dose region will serve to better characterize risks from exposures to DNA-reactive agents at environmentally-relevant concentrations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Genomic phenotyping by barcode sequencing broadly distinguishes between alkylating agents, oxidizing agents, and non-genotoxic agents, and reveals a role for aromatic amino acids in cellular recovery after quinone exposure.

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    Svensson, J Peter; Quirós Pesudo, Laia; McRee, Siobhan K; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Carmichael, Paul; Samson, Leona D

    2013-01-01

    Toxicity screening of compounds provides a means to identify compounds harmful for human health and the environment. Here, we further develop the technique of genomic phenotyping to improve throughput while maintaining specificity. We exposed cells to eight different compounds that rely on different modes of action: four genotoxic alkylating (methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU), N,N'-bis(2-chloroethyl)-N-nitroso-urea (BCNU), N-ethylnitrosourea (ENU)), two oxidizing (2-methylnaphthalene-1,4-dione (menadione, MEN), benzene-1,4-diol (hydroquinone, HYQ)), and two non-genotoxic (methyl carbamate (MC) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)) compounds. A library of S. cerevisiae 4,852 deletion strains, each identifiable by a unique genetic 'barcode', were grown in competition; at different time points the ratio between the strains was assessed by quantitative high throughput 'barcode' sequencing. The method was validated by comparison to previous genomic phenotyping studies and 90% of the strains identified as MMS-sensitive here were also identified as MMS-sensitive in a much lower throughput solid agar screen. The data provide profiles of proteins and pathways needed for recovery after both genotoxic and non-genotoxic compounds. In addition, a novel role for aromatic amino acids in the recovery after treatment with oxidizing agents was suggested. The role of aromatic acids was further validated; the quinone subgroup of oxidizing agents were extremely toxic in cells where tryptophan biosynthesis was compromised.

  7. The role of natural indigo dye in alleviation of genotoxicity of sodium dithionite as a reducing agent.

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    Bektaş, İdris; Karaman, Şengül; Dıraz, Emel; Çelik, Mustafa

    2016-12-01

    Indigo blue is a natural dye used for thousands of years by civilizations to dye fabric blue and it is naturally obtained from Isatis tinctoria. I. tinctoria is not only used for extraction of indigo blue color but also used medicinally in Traditional Chinese Medicine because of its active compounds. Sodium dithionite (Na 2 S 2 O 4 ) is used in dye bath for indigo blue extraction, but this reducing agent and its derivatives are major pollutants of textile industry and subsequently have hazardous influences on public health. Herein, the present study was designed to obtain the high yield of natural indigo dye but with low possible toxic effect. In this context, genotoxic effects of particular combinations of natural dye solutions obtained from Isatis tinctoria subsp. tomentolla with Na 2 S 2 O 4 as reducing agent were investigated. Dye solutions were obtained using two different pH levels (pH 9 and 11) and three different concentrations of Na 2 S 2 O 4 (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/ml). In addition to the dye solutions and reducing agent, aqueous extracts of I. tinctoria were assessed for their genotoxicity on human lymphocytes. For in vitro testing of genotoxicity, chromosomal aberrations (CAs), sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and mitotic indexes (MI) assays were used. Accordingly, Na 2 S 2 O 4 caused significant increases in CA and SCE as well decrease in MI but the genotoxic effects of sodium dithionite were reduced with natural indigo dye. As a result, aqueous extracts of Isatis leaves removed the toxic effects of sodium dithionite and showed anti-genotoxic effect. For the optimal and desired quality but with less toxic effects of natural dye, 2.5 mg/ml (for wool yarn) and 5 mg/ml (for cotton yarn) of Na 2 S 2 O 4 doses were found to be the best doses for reduction in the dye bath at Ph 9.

  8. Genomic phenotyping by barcode sequencing broadly distinguishes between alkylating agents, oxidizing agents, and non-genotoxic agents, and reveals a role for aromatic amino acids in cellular recovery after quinone exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Peter Svensson

    Full Text Available Toxicity screening of compounds provides a means to identify compounds harmful for human health and the environment. Here, we further develop the technique of genomic phenotyping to improve throughput while maintaining specificity. We exposed cells to eight different compounds that rely on different modes of action: four genotoxic alkylating (methyl methanesulfonate (MMS, N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU, N,N'-bis(2-chloroethyl-N-nitroso-urea (BCNU, N-ethylnitrosourea (ENU, two oxidizing (2-methylnaphthalene-1,4-dione (menadione, MEN, benzene-1,4-diol (hydroquinone, HYQ, and two non-genotoxic (methyl carbamate (MC and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO compounds. A library of S. cerevisiae 4,852 deletion strains, each identifiable by a unique genetic 'barcode', were grown in competition; at different time points the ratio between the strains was assessed by quantitative high throughput 'barcode' sequencing. The method was validated by comparison to previous genomic phenotyping studies and 90% of the strains identified as MMS-sensitive here were also identified as MMS-sensitive in a much lower throughput solid agar screen. The data provide profiles of proteins and pathways needed for recovery after both genotoxic and non-genotoxic compounds. In addition, a novel role for aromatic amino acids in the recovery after treatment with oxidizing agents was suggested. The role of aromatic acids was further validated; the quinone subgroup of oxidizing agents were extremely toxic in cells where tryptophan biosynthesis was compromised.

  9. Genotoxic effects of environmental pollutants genotoxic monitoring and detection of antigenotoxic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simic, D.; Knezevic-Vukcevic, J.; Vukovi -Gacic, B.; Mitic, D.; Beric, T.; Nikolic, B.; Stanojevic, J.; Stankovic, S.

    2002-01-01

    The control of genotoxic agents mass release, which can adversely affect the ecosystem stability and human health is of the greatest importance. Therefore, it is necessary to seriously elaborate the strategy of genotoxic monitoring and relevant legislation. Additional approach is the study and dietary use of antigenotoxic plant substances for prevention of mutation-related diseases. (author)

  10. Genotoxic effects of environmental pollutants genotoxic monitoring and detection of antigenotoxic effects

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    Simic, D; Knezevic-Vukcevic, J; Vukovi -Gacic, B; Mitic, D; Beric, T; Nikolic, B; Stanojevic, J; Stankovic, S [Faculty of Biology, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    2002-05-01

    The control of genotoxic agents mass release, which can adversely affect the ecosystem stability and human health is of the greatest importance. Therefore, it is necessary to seriously elaborate the strategy of genotoxic monitoring and relevant legislation. Additional approach is the study and dietary use of antigenotoxic plant substances for prevention of mutation-related diseases. (author)

  11. Comparison of the effect of nalidixic acid and thymine deprivation on excision repair in Escherichia coli

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    Masek, F; Slezarikova, V; Sedliakova, M [Slovenska Akademia Vied, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia). Vyskumny Ustav Onkologicky

    1975-01-01

    A difference was found in the extent of inhibition of thymine dimers (TT) excision in ultraviolet (UV) irradiated cells of E. coli after preirradiation depression of protein and DNA syntheses induced by a simultaneous removal of essential amino acids (AA/sup -/) and thymine (T/sup -/) or by the removal of essential amino acids and the addition of nalidixic acid (NAL/sup +/). The difference was observed in both E. coli B/r Hcr/sup +/ and E. coli K12 SR20 uvr/sup +/ cells. The depression of DNA synthesis by nalidixic acid as an exogenous agent inhibited TT excision to a lower degree than the depression of DNA synthesis by thymine starvation. The extent of TT excision had no appreciable effect on the restoration of the sedimentation profile of a newly synthesized DNA nor on UV resistance of cells during dark repair. A DNA molecule having the size of a molecule of nonirradiated cells became synthesized while TT were still present in the DNA.

  12. Comparison of the effect of nalidixic acid and thymine deprivation on excision repair in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masek, F.; Slezarikova, V.; Sedliakova, M.

    1975-01-01

    A difference was found in the extent of inhibition of thymine dimers (TT) excision in ultraviolet (UV) irradiated cells of E. coli after preirradiation depression of protein and DNA syntheses induced by a simultaneous removal of essential amino acids (AA - ) and thymine (T - ) or by the removal of essential amino acids and the addition of nalidixic acid (NAL + ). The difference was observed in both E. coli B/r Hcr + and E. coli K12 SR20 uvr + cells. The depression of DNA synthesis by nalidixic acid as an exogenous agent inhibited TT excision to a lower degree than the depression of DNA synthesis by thymine starvation. The extent of TT excision had no appreciable effect on the restoration of the sedimentation profile of a newly synthesized DNA nor on UV resistance of cells during dark repair. A DNA molecule having the size of a molecule of nonirradiated cells became synthesized while TT were still present in the DNA. (author)

  13. GroEL and dnaK genes of Escherichia coli are induced by UV irradiation and nalidixic acid in an htpR+-dependent fashion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, J.H.; Walker, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    Two proteins with molecular weights of 61,000 and 73,000 were found to be induced by UV light in Escherichia coli mutants in which the SOS responses are constitutively expressed. The induction of these proteins by UV light and nalidixic acid was shown to be independent of the recA + lexA + regulatory system. Analysis of these proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and comparison with the heat-shock proteins of E. coli revealed that the M/sub r/ 61,000 protein comigrated with the groEL gene product, that the M/sub r/ 73,000 protein comigrated with the dnaK gene product, and that other heat-shock proteins were also induced. The induction of groEL and dnaK by UV light and nalidixic acid is controlled by the htpR locus. The results suggest that the regulatory response of E. coli to agents such as UV light and nalidixic acid is more complex than previously thought. 35 references, 6 figures, 1 table

  14. A predictive toxicogenomics signature to classify genotoxic versus non-genotoxic chemicals in human TK6 cells

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    Andrew Williams

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Genotoxicity testing is a critical component of chemical assessment. The use of integrated approaches in genetic toxicology, including the incorporation of gene expression data to determine the DNA damage response pathways involved in response, is becoming more common. In companion papers previously published in Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis, Li et al. (2015 [6] developed a dose optimization protocol that was based on evaluating expression changes in several well-characterized stress-response genes using quantitative real-time PCR in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells in culture. This optimization approach was applied to the analysis of TK6 cells exposed to one of 14 genotoxic or 14 non-genotoxic agents, with sampling 4 h post-exposure. Microarray-based transcriptomic analyses were then used to develop a classifier for genotoxicity using the nearest shrunken centroids method. A panel of 65 genes was identified that could accurately classify toxicants as genotoxic or non-genotoxic. In Buick et al. (2015 [1], the utility of the biomarker for chemicals that require metabolic activation was evaluated. In this study, TK6 cells were exposed to increasing doses of four chemicals (two genotoxic that require metabolic activation and two non-genotoxic chemicals in the presence of rat liver S9 to demonstrate that S9 does not impair the ability to classify genotoxicity using this genomic biomarker in TK6cells.

  15. Synthesis of Ethyl Nalidixate: A Medicinal Chemistry Experiment

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    Leslie, Ray; Leeb, Elaine; Smith, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    A series of laboratory experiments that complement a medicinal chemistry lecture course in drug design and development have been developed. The synthesis of ethyl nalidixate covers three separate experimental procedures, all of which can be completed in three, standard three-hour lab classes and incorporate aspects of green chemistry such as…

  16. Reliability of plant root comet assay in comparison with human leukocyte comet assay for assessment environmental genotoxic agents.

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    Reis, Gabriela Barreto Dos; Andrade-Vieira, Larissa Fonseca; Moraes, Isabella de Campos; César, Pedro Henrique Souza; Marcussi, Silvana; Davide, Lisete Chamma

    2017-08-01

    Comet assay is an efficient test to detect genotoxic compounds based on observation of DNA damage. The aim of this work was to compare the results obtained from the comet assay in two different type of cells extracted from the root tips from Lactuca sativa L. and human blood. For this, Spent Pot Liner (SPL), and its components (aluminum and fluoride) were applied as toxic agents. SPL is a solid waste generated in industry from the aluminum mining and processing with known toxicity. Three concentrations of all tested solutions were applied and the damages observed were compared to negative and positive controls. It was observed an increase in the frequency of DNA damage for human leukocytes and plant cells, in all treatments. On human leukocytes, SPL induced the highest percentage of damage, with an average of 87.68%. For root tips cells of L. sativa the highest percentage of damage was detected for aluminum (93.89%). Considering the arbitrary units (AU), the average of nuclei with high levels of DNA fragmentation was significant for both cells type evaluated. The tested cells demonstrated equal effectiveness for detection of the genotoxicity induced by the SPL and its chemical components, aluminum and fluoride. Further, using a unique method, the comet assay, we proved that cells from root tips of Lactuca sativa represent a reliable model to detect DNA damage induced by genotoxic pollutants is in agreement of those observed in human leukocytes as model. So far, plant cells may be suggested as important system to assess the toxicological risk of environmental agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Detection of genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens in Xpc−/−p53+/− mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melis, Joost P.M.; Speksnijder, Ewoud N.; Kuiper, Raoul V.; Salvatori, Daniela C.F.; Schaap, Mirjam M.; Maas, Saskia; Robinson, Joke; Verhoef, Aart; Benthem, Jan van; Luijten, Mirjam; Steeg, Harry van

    2013-01-01

    An accurate assessment of the carcinogenic potential of chemicals and pharmaceutical drugs is essential to protect humans and the environment. Therefore, substances are extensively tested before they are marketed to the public. Currently, the rodent two-year bioassay is still routinely used to assess the carcinogenic potential of substances. However, over time it has become clear that this assay yields false positive results and also has several economic and ethical drawbacks including the use of large numbers of animals, the long duration, and the high cost. The need for a suitable alternative assay is therefore high. Previously, we have proposed the Xpa*p53 mouse model as a very suitable alternative to the two-year bioassay. We now show that the Xpc*p53 mouse model preserves all the beneficial traits of the Xpa*p53 model for sub-chronic carcinogen identification and can identify both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Moreover, Xpc*p53 mice appear to be more responsive than Xpa*p53 mice towards several genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Furthermore, Xpc*p53 mice are far less sensitive than Xpa*p53 mice for the toxic activity of DNA damaging agents and as such clearly respond in a similar way as wild type mice do. These advantageous traits of the Xpc*p53 model make it a better alternative for in vivo carcinogen testing than Xpa*p53. This pilot study suggests that Xpc*p53 mice are suited for routine sub-chronic testing of both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens and as such represent a suitable alternative to possibly replace the murine life time cancer bioassay. Highlights: ► The Xpc*p53 mouse model is able to identify genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. ► Time, animals and cost can be significantly reduced compared to the 2-year bioassay. ► Xpc*p53 mice are more advantageous for carcinogen identification than Xpa*p53 mice. ► Xpc*p53 mice exhibit a wild type response upon exposure to genotoxicants.

  18. Effect of green juice and their bioactive compounds on genotoxicity induced by alkylating agents in mice.

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    Fagundes, Gabriela Elibio; Damiani, Adriani Paganini; Borges, Gabriela Daminelli; Teixeira, Karina Oliveira; Jesus, Maiellen Martins; Daumann, Francine; Ramlov, Fernanda; Carvalho, Tiago; Leffa, Daniela Dimer; Rohr, Paula; Moraes De Andrade, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    Kale juice (Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala D.C.) is a reliable source of dietary carotenoids and typically contains the highest concentrations of lutein (LT) and beta-carotene (BC) among green leafy vegetables. As a result of their antioxidant properties, dietary carotenoids are postulated to decrease the risk of disease occurrence, particularly certain cancers. The present study aimed to (1) examine the genotoxic and antigenotoxic activity of natural and commercially available juices derived from Brassica oleracea and (2) assess influence of LT or BC against DNA damage induced by alkylating agents such as methyl methanesulfonate (MS) or cyclophosphamide (CP) in vivo in mice. Male Swiss mice were divided into groups of 6 animals, which were treated with water, natural, or commercial Brassica oleraceae juices (kale), LT, BC, MMS, or CP. After treatment, DNA damage was determined in peripheral blood lymphocytes using the comet assay. Results demonstrated that none of the Brassica oleraceae juices or carotenoids produced genotoxic effects. In all examined cell types, kale juices or carotenoids inhibited DNA damage induced by MMS or CP administered either pre- or posttreatment by 50 and 20%, respectively. Under our experimental conditions, kale leaf juices alone exerted no marked genotoxic or clastogenic effects. However, a significant decrease in DNA damage induced by MMS or CP was noted. This effect was most pronounced in groups that received juices, rather than carotenoids, suggesting that the synergy among constituents present in the food matrix may be more beneficial than the action of single compounds. Data suggest that the antigenotoxic properties of kale juices may be of therapeutic importance.

  19. Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO to nalidixic acid and low levels of beta-lactam antibiotics: mapping of chromosomal genes.

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    Rella, M; Haas, D

    1982-01-01

    Resistance to high concentrations of nalidixic acid in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO was due to mutations in one locus designated nalA, which was mapped by transduction between hex-9001 and leu-10. The nalA mutants were cross-resistant to pipemidic acid, a nalidixic acid analog, at relatively low concentrations. Replicative DNA synthesis was resistant to both drugs in permeabilized cells of nalA mutants. A locus coding for low-level resistance to nalidixic acid, nalB, was cotransducible with pyrB, proC, and met-28. The nalB mutants were also resistant to low levels of pipemidic acid, novobiocin, and beta-lactam antibiotics (e.g., carbenicillin, azlocillin, and cefsulodin), but not to other drugs, such as gentamicin, rifampin, kanamycin, or tetracycline. In nalB mutants, DNA replication showed wild-type sensitivity to nalidixic acid, whereas carbenicillin-induced filamentation required higher drug levels than in the wild-type strain. Thus, nalB mutations appear to decrease cell permeability to some antibiotics. The sensitivity of replicative DNA synthesis to nalidixic acid and novobiocin was very similar in P. aeruginosa and Escherichia coli; by contrast, the concentrations of these drugs needed to inhibit growth of P. aeruginosa were higher than those reported for E. coli by one or two orders of magnitude. PMID:6821455

  20. Development of a Fish Cell Biosensor System for Genotoxicity Detection Based on DNA Damage-Induced Trans-Activation of p21 Gene Expression

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    Huarong Guo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available p21CIP1/WAF1 is a p53-target gene in response to cellular DNA damage. Here we report the development of a fish cell biosensor system for high throughput genotoxicity detection of new drugs, by stably integrating two reporter plasmids of pGL3-p21-luc (human p21 promoter linked to firefly luciferase and pRL-CMV-luc (CMV promoter linked to Renilla luciferase into marine flatfish flounder gill (FG cells, referred to as p21FGLuc. Initial validation of this genotoxicity biosensor system showed that p21FGLuc cells had a wild-type p53 signaling pathway and responded positively to the challenge of both directly acting genotoxic agents (bleomycin and mitomycin C and indirectly acting genotoxic agents (cyclophosphamide with metabolic activation, but negatively to cyclophosphamide without metabolic activation and the non-genotoxic agents ethanol and D-mannitol, thus confirming a high specificity and sensitivity, fast and stable response to genotoxic agents for this easily maintained fish cell biosensor system. This system was especially useful in the genotoxicity detection of Di(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP, a rodent carcinogen, but negatively reported in most non-mammalian in vitro mutation assays, by providing a strong indication of genotoxicity for DEHP. A limitation for this biosensor system was that it might give false positive results in response to sodium butyrate and any other agents, which can trans-activate the p21 gene in a p53-independent manner.

  1. In vitro evaluation of the cyto-genotoxic potential of Ruthenium(II) SCAR complexes: a promising class of antituberculosis agents.

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    De Grandis, Rone Aparecido; Resende, Flávia Aparecida; da Silva, Monize Martins; Pavan, Fernando Rogério; Batista, Alzir Azevedo; Varanda, Eliana Aparecida

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis is a top infectious disease killer worldwide, caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Increasing incidences of multiple drug-resistance (MDR) strains are emerging as one of the major public health threats. However, the drugs in use are still incapable of controlling the appalling upsurge of MDR. In recent years a marked number of research groups have devoted their attention toward the development of specific and cost-effective antimicrobial agents against targeted MDR-Tuberculosis. In previous studies, ruthenium(II) complexes (SCAR) have shown a promising activity against MDR-Tuberculosis although few studies have indeed considered ruthenium toxicity. Therefore, within the preclinical requirements, we have sought to determine the cyto-genotoxicity of three SCAR complexes in this present study. The treatment with the SCARs induced a concentration-dependent decrease in cell viability in CHO-K1 and HepG2 cells. Based on the clonogenic survival, SCAR 5 was found to be more cytotoxic while SCAR 6 exhibited selectivity action on tumor cells. Although SCAR 4 and 5 did not indicate any mutagenic activity as evidenced by the Ames and Cytokinesis block micronucleus cytome assays, the complex SCAR 6 was found to engender a frameshift mutation detected by Salmonella typhimurium in the presence of S9. Similarly, we observed a chromosomal damage in HepG2 cells with significant increases of micronuclei and nucleoplasmic bridges. These data indicate that SCAR 4 and 5 complexes did not show genotoxicity in our models while SCAR 6 was considered mutagenic. This study presented a comprehensive genotoxic evaluation of SCAR complexes were shown to be genotoxic in vitro. All in all, further studies are required to fully elucidate how the properties can affect human health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Damage and functional recovery of the mouse retina after exposure to genotoxic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradova, Yu.V.; Tronov, V.A.; Lyakhova, K.N.; Ostrovskij, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    As is known, the mature retina is characterized by high radiation resistance. We showed earlier that ionizing radiation at a dose of ≥25 Gy and the chemical genotoxic agent methylnitrosourea (MNU) in a concentration of ≥60 mg/kg induce acute retinal degeneration, combined with proapoptotic protein expression. The process has a high genotoxic threshold, below which no degeneration signs were traced. The aim of this work was to study the damaging effect of ionizing radiation and MNU on the functional activity of the retina and its ability to recover after exposure to these genotoxicants. The functional activity of the mouse retina was evaluated with electroretinograms (ERG). In parallel, morphological changes in the retina were controlled, and the TUNEL detection of the death of its cell elements was performed. It has been shown that gamma rays or accelerated proton irradiation below 15 Gy cause no structural or functional changes in the mouse retina, which confirms the mature retina's high radiation resistance. Irradiation with a higher dose of 25 Gy leads to photoreceptor layer destruction. This goes along with an increase in the number of the TUNEL-positive photoreceptors, among which are cells with fragmented nuclei, which are typical of apoptosis. MNU in a concentration of 70 mg/kg caused the irreversible loss of the retina's physiological activity, and the morphological degeneration of photoreceptors and their mass death. In a concentration of 35 mg/kg, however, MNU had no cytotoxic effect on the retina. Moreover, this dose caused a reversible ERG amplitude decrease. Also, adaptive response was observed in the retina, which became apparent after two consecutive MNU injections - first, at a dose of 17 mg/kg; then, at a cytotoxic dose of 70 mg/kg. These results point to the possibility of the neurohormesis effect, which was described concerning the retina's exposure to ionizing radiation and some chemicals.

  3. Sodium butyrate affects the cytotoxic and mutagenic response of V79 Chinese hamster cells to the genotoxic agents, daunorubicin and U.V. radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pani, B.; Babudri, N.; Giancotti, V.; Russo, E.

    1984-01-01

    It has been suggested that conditions which lead to modifications in the chromatin structure could be responsible for an increased accessibility of DNA to genotoxic agents in eukaryotic cells. With this in mind, the cytotoxic and mutagenic activity of the anthracycline antibiotic, daunorubicin, and of UV radiation was assayed on V79 Chinese hamster cells pretreated or not with 5 mM sodium butyrate, an agent known to induce modifications in the chromatin structure: this treatment in fact proved to induce the hyperacetylation of the core histones, and moreover to enhance the cytotoxic response of the cells to both daunorubicin and UV radiation and the mutagenic response to daunorubicin. (orig.)

  4. METABOLISM, GENOTOXICITY, AND CARCINOGENICITY OF COMFREY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Nan; Guo, Lei; Fu, Peter P.; Fuscoe, James C.; Luan, Yang; Chen, Tao

    2018-01-01

    Comfrey has been consumed by humans as a vegetable and a tea and used as an herbal medicine for more than 2000 years. Comfrey, however, produces hepatotoxicity in livestock and humans and carcinogenicity in experimental animals. Comfrey contains as many as 14 pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PA), including 7-acetylintermedine, 7-acetyllycopsamine, echimidine, intermedine, lasiocarpine, lycopsamine, myoscorpine, symlandine, symphytine, and symviridine. The mechanisms underlying comfrey-induced genotoxicity and carcinogenicity are still not fully understood. The available evidence suggests that the active metabolites of PA in comfrey interact with DNA in liver endothelial cells and hepatocytes, resulting in DNA damage, mutation induction, and cancer development. Genotoxicities attributed to comfrey and riddelliine (a representative genotoxic PA and a proven rodent mutagen and carcinogen) are discussed in this review. Both of these compounds induced similar profiles of 6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5H-pyrrolizine (DHP)-derived DNA adducts and similar mutation spectra. Further, the two agents share common mechanisms of drug metabolism and carcinogenesis. Overall, comfrey is mutagenic in liver, and PA contained in comfrey appear to be responsible for comfrey-induced toxicity and tumor induction. PMID:21170807

  5. Metabolism, genotoxicity, and carcinogenicity of comfrey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Nan; Guo, Lei; Fu, Peter P; Fuscoe, James C; Luan, Yang; Chen, Tao

    2010-10-01

    Comfrey has been consumed by humans as a vegetable and a tea and used as an herbal medicine for more than 2000 years. Comfrey, however, produces hepatotoxicity in livestock and humans and carcinogenicity in experimental animals. Comfrey contains as many as 14 pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PA), including 7-acetylintermedine, 7-acetyllycopsamine, echimidine, intermedine, lasiocarpine, lycopsamine, myoscorpine, symlandine, symphytine, and symviridine. The mechanisms underlying comfrey-induced genotoxicity and carcinogenicity are still not fully understood. The available evidence suggests that the active metabolites of PA in comfrey interact with DNA in liver endothelial cells and hepatocytes, resulting in DNA damage, mutation induction, and cancer development. Genotoxicities attributed to comfrey and riddelliine (a representative genotoxic PA and a proven rodent mutagen and carcinogen) are discussed in this review. Both of these compounds induced similar profiles of 6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5H-pyrrolizine (DHP)-derived DNA adducts and similar mutation spectra. Further, the two agents share common mechanisms of drug metabolism and carcinogenesis. Overall, comfrey is mutagenic in liver, and PA contained in comfrey appear to be responsible for comfrey-induced toxicity and tumor induction.

  6. DNA-synthesis inhibition and repair DNA-synthesis in CHO Ade- C cells: An alternative approach to genotoxicity testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slamenova, D.; Papsova, E.; Gabelova, A.; Dusinska, M.; Collins, A.; Wsolova, L.

    1997-01-01

    We describe an alternative assay to determine genotoxicity. Its main feature is that it combines two measures in a single experiment; the inhibition of replicative DNA synthesis together with the stimulation of DNA repair. We show that, in tests of four different genotoxic agents, the assay gives results that are entirely consistent with what is known about the mode of action of these agents. In addition, we have demonstrated that chemical carcinogens requiring metabolic activation can be examined using a standard procedure of incubation with a microsomal activating fraction. We consider the combined assay for DNA synthesis inhibition and repair synthesis to be a useful way for the rapid pre-screening of chemicals suspected of genotoxic activity on the level of mammalian cells. (author)

  7. Workshop. Assessment of Occupational and Environmental Exposure to Genotoxic Substances - a Methodological Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    During the workshop various works concerning radiobiology, environmental and occupational medicine were presented. Exposure to genotoxic and carcinogenic agents, like ionizing radiation, aromatic hydrocarbons, herbicides, pesticides was investigated

  8. Epigenetic alterations induced by genotoxic occupational and environmental human chemical carcinogens: A systematic literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Grace; Pogribny, Igor P.; Guyton, Kathryn Z.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that epigenetic alterations play an important role in chemically-induced carcinogenesis. Although the epigenome and genome may be equally important in carcinogenicity, the genotoxicity of chemical agents and exposure-related transcriptomic responses have been more thoroughly studied and characterized. To better understand the evidence for epigenetic alterations of human carcinogens, and the potential association with genotoxic endpoints, we conducted a systematic review of published studies of genotoxic carcinogens that reported epigenetic endpoints. Specifically, we searched for publications reporting epigenetic effects for the 28 agents and occupations included in Monograph Volume 100F of the International Agency for the Research on Cancer (IARC) that were classified as “carcinogenic to humans” (Group 1) with strong evidence of genotoxic mechanisms of carcinogenesis. We identified a total of 158 studies that evaluated epigenetic alterations for 12 of these 28 carcinogenic agents and occupations (1,3-butadiene, 4-aminobiphenyl, aflatoxins, benzene, benzidine, benzo[a]pyrene, coke production, formaldehyde, occupational exposure as a painter, sulfur mustard, and vinyl chloride). Aberrant DNA methylation was most commonly studied, followed by altered expression of non-coding RNAs and histone changes (totaling 85, 59 and 25 studies, respectively). For 3 carcinogens (aflatoxins, benzene and benzo[a]pyrene), 10 or more studies reported epigenetic effects. However, epigenetic studies were sparse for the remaining 9 carcinogens; for 4 agents, only 1 or 2 published reports were identified. While further research is needed to better identify carcinogenesis-associated epigenetic perturbations for many potential carcinogens, published reports on specific epigenetic endpoints can be systematically identified and increasingly incorporated in cancer hazard assessments. PMID:27234561

  9. Lack of genotoxicity in medical oncology nurses handling antineoplastic drugs: effect of work environment and protective equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulten, Tuna; Evke, Elif; Ercan, Ilker; Evrensel, Turkkan; Kurt, Ender; Manavoglu, Osman

    2011-01-01

    In this study we aimed to investigate the genotoxic effects of antineoplastic agents in occupationally exposed oncology nurses. Genotoxic effects mean the disruptive effects in the integrity of DNA and they are associated with cancer development. Biomonitoring of health care workers handling antineoplastic agents is helpful for the evaluation of exposure to cytostatics. The study included an exposed and two control groups. The exposed group (n=9) was comprised of oncology nurses. The first (n=9) and second (n=10) control groups were comprised of subjects who did not come into contact with antineoplastic drugs working respectively in the same department with oncology nurses and in different departments. Genotoxicity evaluation was performed using SCE analysis. After applying culture, harvest and chromosome staining procedures, a total of 25 metaphases were analyzed per person. Kruskal Wallis test was used to perform statistical analysis. A statistically significant difference of sister chromatid exchange frequencies was not observed between the exposed and control groups. Lack of genotoxicity in medical oncology nurses might be due to good working conditions with high standards of technical equipment and improved personal protection.

  10. In vitro susceptibility of Helicobacter pullorum strains to different antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceelen, Liesbeth; Decostere, Annemie; Devriese, Luc A; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2005-01-01

    The in vitro activity of 13 antimicrobial agents against 23 Helicobacter pullorum strains from poultry (21) and human (two) origin, and one human H. canadensis strain was tested by the agar dilution method. With the H. pullorum strains, monomodal distributions of Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) were seen with lincomycin, doxycycline, gentamicin, tobramycin, erythromycin, tylosin, metronidazole, and enrofloxacin in concentration ranges considered as indicating susceptibility in other bacteria. The normal susceptibility level for nalidixic acid was situated at or slightly above the MIC breakpoints proposed for Campylobacteriaceae. Ampicillin, ceftriaxone, and sulphamethoxazole-trimethoprim showed poor activity against H. pullorum. For the H. canadensis strain, a similar susceptibility pattern was seen, except for nalidixic acid and enrofloxacin, whose MIC of >512 and 8 microg/ml, respectively, indicated resistance of this agent. With spectinomycin, a bimodal distribution of the MICs was noted for the tested strains; eight H. pullorum isolates originating from one flock showed acquired resistance (MIC>512 microg/ml).

  11. Impacts of fullerene C60 and virgin olive oil on cadmium-induced genotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Fayza M; Kotb, Ahmed M; Haridy, Mohie A M; Hammad, Seddik

    2018-07-15

    Currently, cadmium is considered to be one of the major environmental pollutants. Environmentally, cadmium is released in various forms e.g. oxide, chloride and sulphide. The aim of the present study was to examine the genotoxic impact of fullerene nanoparticles C 60 (C 60 ) and virgin olive oil (VOO) on cadmium chloride (CdCl 2 )-induced genotoxicity in rats. To evaluate these effects on DNA damage and chromosomal frequency, 25 albino rats were randomly assigned to 5 groups (n=5 per group): Group 1 served as a control; Group 2 received a single intraperitoneal dose of CdCl 2 (3.5mg/kg); Group 3 animals were treated with C 60 (4mg/kg, orally) every other day for 20days; Group 4 received a single intraperitoneal dose of CdCl 2 (3.5mg/kg) and an oral dose of C 60 (4mg/kg); and Group 5 received a single intraperitoneal dose of CdCl 2 (3.5mg/kg) and oral doses of VOO every other day for 20 consecutive days. Genotoxic and anti-genotoxic effects of C 60 and VOO were evaluated in the liver, kidney and bone marrow using molecular and cytogenetic assays. As expected, CdCl 2 and C 60 administration was associated with band number alterations in both liver and kidney; however, C 60 pretreatment recovered to approximately basal number. Surprisingly, C 60 and VOO significantly attenuated the genotoxic effects caused by CdCl 2 in livers and kidneys. In bone marrow, in addition to a reduction in the chromosomal number, several chromosomal aberrations were caused by CdCl 2 . These chromosomal alterations were also reversed by C 60 and VOO. In conclusion, molecular and cytogenetic studies showed that C 60 and VOO exhibit anti-genotoxic agents against CdCl 2 -induced genotoxicity in rats. Further studies are needed to investigate the optimal conditions for potential biomedical applications of these anti-genotoxic agents. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Pre-and post-gamma irradiation fetal bovine serum genotoxic evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilili, J.P.; Molinari, G.; Gonzalez, N.V.; Soloneski, S.; Reigosa, M.L.; Larramendy, M.L.

    2008-01-01

    Fetal bovine serum (FBS) is an essential component to propagate cells in vitro. Different methods are used by the industry to eliminate xenobiotic agents before their use, among them the ionizing radiations application. The aim of the present work was to analyze the existence of xenobiotic agents in 18 FBS lots manufactured by Internegocios S.A., Mercedes, Pcia. Bs. As., assessed pre- and postirradiation. The analysis of the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and micronuclei (MNs) in CHO K1 cells were used as genotoxicity endpoints. The results showed SCEs increase in 44% of the lots (71% of non-irradiated sera and 29% of irradiated sera) and in MNs only in a sample non-irradiated (6.25%). These results would render evident the presence of agents with genotoxic capacity as much in lots of FBS irradiated as in non-irradiated. Thus, the irradiation not only grants sterility to FBS but eliminates or inhibits those xenobiotics with deleterious capacity present in them before irradiation. Finally, variations in the conditions during irradiation (temperature, time of exposure) could generate compound with clastogenic and/or aneugenic capacity that could affect the correct propagation of cells in culture. (authors)

  13. Dose-Response for Multiple Biomarkers of Exposure and Genotoxic Effect Following Repeated Treatment of Rats with the Alkylating Agents, MMS and MNU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhiying; LeBaron, Matthew J; Schisler, Melissa R; Zhang, Fagen; Bartels, Michael J; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar; Pottenger, Lynn H

    2016-05-01

    The nature of the dose-response relationship for various in vivo endpoints of exposure and effect were investigated using the alkylating agents, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and methylnitrosourea (MNU). Six male F344 rats/group were dosed orally with 0, 0.5, 1, 5, 25 or 50mg/kg bw/day (mkd) of MMS, or 0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 5, 10, 25 or 50 mkd of MNU, for 4 consecutive days and sacrificed 24h after the last dose. The dose-responses for multiple biomarkers of exposure and genotoxic effect were investigated. In MMS-treated rats, the hemoglobin adduct level, a systemic exposure biomarker, increased linearly with dose (r (2) = 0.9990, P agents. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Enhancement by Nalidixic Acid of the Thermal Susceptibility of the Ts-7 Mutant of Escherichia Coli TAU-Bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Mikio; Mishima, Yukio; Kawada, Jun; Yielding, K. Lemone

    1975-01-01

    Nadilidixic acid at 5 × 10−6 M produced a substantial increase in thermal susceptibility of Ts-7, suggesting either that the thermal and nalidixic acid targets are identical or closely interdependent. PMID:1101825

  15. Critical effective methods to detect genotoxic carcinogens and neoplasm-promoting agents.

    OpenAIRE

    Weisburger, J H; Williams, G M

    1991-01-01

    Neoplasia in fish can result from contamination of waters with carcinogens and promoters. Cancer in fish, therefore, is a possible indicator of cancer risk to man and serves as a guide to the need for preventive approaches involving improved means of waste disposal and environmental hygiene. Moreover, cancer in fish indicates that this important food source may be contaminated. Detection of genotoxic carcinogens to which fish are exposed can be achieved quickly and efficiently by carefully se...

  16. Reichardt's dye and its reactions with the alkylating agents 4-chloro-1-butanol, ethyl methanesulfonate, 1-bromobutane and Fast Red B - a potentially useful reagent for the detection of genotoxic impurities in pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Damion K; Whitcombe, Michael J; McCrossen, Sean; Piletsky, Sergey

    2009-04-01

    Alkylating agents are potentially genotoxic impurities that may be present in drug products. These impurities occur in pharmaceuticals as by-products from the synthetic steps involved in drug production, as impurities in starting materials or from in-situ reactions that take place in the final drug product. Currently, analysis for genotoxic impurities is typically carried out using either HPLC/MS or GC/MS. These techniques require specialist expertise, have long analysis times and often use sample clean-up procedures. Reichardt's dye is well known for its solvatochromic properties. In this paper the dye's ability to undergo alkylation is reported. The reaction between Reichardt's dye and alkylating agents such as 4-chloro-1-butanol and ethyl methanesulfonate was monitored spectrophotometrically at 618 nm in acetonitrile and 624 nm in N,N-dimethylformamide. Changes in absorption were observed using low levels of alkylating agent (5-10 parts per million). Alkylation of the dye with 4-chloro-1-butanol and ethyl methanesulfonate was confirmed. Reichardt's dye, and its changing UV absorption, was examined in the presence of paracetamol (10 and 100 mg/ml). Whilst the alkylation-induced changes in UV absorption were not as pronounced as with standard solutions, detection of alkylation was still possible. Using standard solutions and in the presence of a drug matrix, Reichardt's dye shows promise as a reagent for detection of low levels of industrially important alkylating agents.

  17. In vitro and in vivo genotoxicity assessment of HI-6 dimethanesulfonate/oxime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakab, Lauren; Bardot, Isabelle; Bardot, Sébastien; Simar, Sophie; Marzin, Daniel; Nesslany, Fabrice

    2014-03-01

    Organophosphate compounds, which induce organophosphate poisoning, were originally used as pesticides. But this type of product has also been used as warfare nerve agent like sarin, soman, Russian VX, or tabun. HI-6-dimethanesulfonate is a salt of the oxime HI-6 used in the treatment of nerve-agent poisoning. It is known to be the best re-activator component of inactivated acetyl cholinesterase. HI-6-dimethanesulfonate has shown a higher level of solubility with similar potency to reactivate acetyl cholinesterase and a similar pharmacokinetics profile compared with HI-6 dichloride. HI-6 dimethanesulfonate was tested for its mutagenic and genotoxic potential by use of the standard ICH S2R (1) battery for the evaluation of pharmaceuticals. HI-6-dimethanesulfonate was mutagenic in the Ames test only in the presence of metabolic activation. In the mutation assay at the Tk locus in L5178Y mouse-lymphoma cells, HI-6-dimethanesulfonate showed mutagenic activity both with and without metabolic activation, with a significant increase in small colonies. The effects were in favour of a clastogenic activity. It was concluded that the compound was mutagenic and possibly clastogenic in vitro. In contrast, the in vivo micronucleus test in rat bone-marrow did not demonstrate any genotoxic activity and the Comet assay performed in rat liver did not show any statistically or biologically significant increases in DNA strand-breaks. The results of both in vivo studies performed on two different organs with two endpoints are sufficient to conclude the absence of a genotoxic hazard in vivo and to consider that there is no genotoxic concern in humans for HI-6-dimethanesulfonate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Removal of nalidixic acid and its degradation products by an integrated MBR-ozonation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollice, A; Laera, G; Cassano, D; Diomede, S; Pinto, A; Lopez, A; Mascolo, G

    2012-02-15

    Chemical-biological degradation of a widely spread antibacterial (nalidixic acid) was successfully obtained by an integrated membrane bioreactor (MBR)-ozonation process. The composition of the treated solution simulated the wastewater from the production of the target pharmaceutical, featuring high salinity and a relevant concentration of sodium acetate. Aim of treatment integration was to exploit the synergistic effects of chemical oxidation and bioprocesses, by adopting the latter to remove most of the COD and the ozonation biodegradable products. Integration was achieved by placing ozonation in the recirculation stream of the bioreactor effluent. The recirculation flow rate was three-fold the MBR feed, and the performance of the integrated system was compared to the standard polishing configuration (single ozonation step after the MBR). Results showed that the introduction of the ozonation step did not cause relevant drawbacks to both biological and filtration processes. nalidixic acid passed undegraded through the MBR and was completely removed in the ozonation step. Complete degradation of most of the detected ozonation products was better achieved with the integrated MBR-ozonation process than using the sequential treatment configuration, i.e. ozone polishing after MBR, given the same ozone dosage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Genotoxic evaluation of two oral antidiabetic agents in the Drosophila wing spot test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürbüzel, Mehmet; Çapoğlu, Ilyas; Kızılet, Halit; Halıcı, Zekai; Özçiçek, Fatih; Demirtaş, Levent

    2014-05-01

    In this study, two sulfonylureas--glimepiride and glipizide--commonly used in type 2 diabetes mellitus were investigated for genotoxicity in the Drosophila wing spot test. For this purpose, three-day-old transheterozygous larvae were treated with three mutagenic compounds, and the results obtained were compared with the control group. Mutational or recombinogenic changes were recorded in two recessive genes--multiple wing hairs (mwh) and flare (flr (3)). Two recessive markers were located on the left arm of chromosome 3, mwh in map position 0.3, and flare-3 (flr3) at 38.8, while the centromere was located in position 47.7. Wing spot tests are targeted on the loss of heterozygosity, which may be grounded in different genetic mechanisms such as mutation, mitotic recombination, deletion, half-translocation, chromosome loss, or nondisjunction. Genetic changes formatting in somatic cells of the imaginal discs cause nascence different mutant cloning in different body parts of adult flies. Our in vivo experiments demonstrated that glimepiride and glipizide show the genotoxicity, which is especially dependent on homologous somatic recombination.

  20. Critical effective methods to detect genotoxic carcinogens and neoplasm-promoting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisburger, J H; Williams, G M

    1991-01-01

    Neoplasia in fish can result from contamination of waters with carcinogens and promoters. Cancer in fish, therefore, is a possible indicator of cancer risk to man and serves as a guide to the need for preventive approaches involving improved means of waste disposal and environmental hygiene. Moreover, cancer in fish indicates that this important food source may be contaminated. Detection of genotoxic carcinogens to which fish are exposed can be achieved quickly and efficiently by carefully selected batteries of complementary in vitro and in vivo bioassays. One such battery consists of the Ames test, a reverse mutation assay in prokaryotic Salmonella typhimurium, and the Williams test, involving DNA repair in freshly explanted metabolically highly competent liver cells from diverse species, including humans. Determination of DNA-carcinogen adducts by varied techniques, including 32P-postlabeling, as well as DNA breakage, mammalian cell mutagenicity, chromosome aberrations, sister chromatid exchange, or cell transformation represent additional approaches, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. More research is needed on systems to apprehend neoplasm promoters, but tests to determine interruption of intercellular communications through gap junctions appear promising. Other approaches rely on measurement of enzymes such as ornithine decarboxylase and protein kinase C. Approaches to the definition of risk to fish or humans require characterization of the genotoxic or nongenotoxic properties of a chemical, relative potency data obtained in select, limited rodent bioassays, and knowledge of prevailing environmental concentrations of specific carcinogens.

  1. Micronuclei as biomarkers of genotoxicity of gamma radiation in aquatic environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Luanna R.S.; Silva, Edvane B.; Melo, Ana M.M.A. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (GERAR/DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Grupo de Estudos em Radioprotecao e Radioecologia; Silva, Ronaldo C. da [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Genetica; Amancio, Francisco F. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Radiobiologia. Lab. de Radiobiologia

    2011-07-01

    Ionizing radiation is a genotoxic agent, inducing gene mutations and cellular death. Several efforts have been defendants in the development of techniques for measurement of radiation damage in biological systems. Among these techniques, micronuclei test has been showing as a great bio marker of DNA damage, being used in environmental monitoring to detect genotoxic agents in the environment. Additionally, organisms as Biomphalaria glabrata, freshwater molluscs, presents itself as an excellent model to assess damage caused by physical and chemical agents, due their biological and environmental characteristics. The snails were divided into groups of 5 individuals exposed to doses of 0 (control), 25, 35, 45 and 55 Gy of {sup 60}Co. After 48 hours of irradiation, the hemo lymph was collected and prepared the slides, which were stained with Giemsa and analyzed the cellular changes in haemocytes Statistical analysis was accomplished through chi-square test, ANOVA and Tukey test (p< 0,05). The results indicated that B. glabrata showed to be sensitive to gamma radiation. The snails irradiated with 35 Gy showed a decrease of haemocytes, while that of 55 Gy increased. Cellular and morphological changes were observed at doses of 35, 45 and 55 Gy and the dose of 55 Gy, the most radiotoxic. (author)

  2. Micronuclei as biomarkers of genotoxicity of gamma radiation in aquatic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Luanna R.S.; Silva, Edvane B.; Melo, Ana M.M.A.; Silva, Ronaldo C. da; Amancio, Francisco F.

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a genotoxic agent, inducing gene mutations and cellular death. Several efforts have been defendants in the development of techniques for measurement of radiation damage in biological systems. Among these techniques, micronuclei test has been showing as a great bio marker of DNA damage, being used in environmental monitoring to detect genotoxic agents in the environment. Additionally, organisms as Biomphalaria glabrata, freshwater molluscs, presents itself as an excellent model to assess damage caused by physical and chemical agents, due their biological and environmental characteristics. The snails were divided into groups of 5 individuals exposed to doses of 0 (control), 25, 35, 45 and 55 Gy of 60 Co. After 48 hours of irradiation, the hemo lymph was collected and prepared the slides, which were stained with Giemsa and analyzed the cellular changes in haemocytes Statistical analysis was accomplished through chi-square test, ANOVA and Tukey test (p< 0,05). The results indicated that B. glabrata showed to be sensitive to gamma radiation. The snails irradiated with 35 Gy showed a decrease of haemocytes, while that of 55 Gy increased. Cellular and morphological changes were observed at doses of 35, 45 and 55 Gy and the dose of 55 Gy, the most radiotoxic. (author)

  3. The influence of abiotic factors present in the Rio de la Plata over the chromium genotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, L.C.; Moretton, J.

    1997-01-01

    The alterations suffered by the well-known environmental genotoxic agent, Cr(V I), were studied. Cr(V I) salts were dissolved in water effluent river receptors waters such as from the Rio de la Plata. The influence of abiotic factors present in this kind of water was evaluated using the Rec. assay in Bacillus subtilis. The results detected a soluble fraction that potentiated Cr(V I) genotoxicity. This substance (or group of substances) is sensible to sterilization by heat and UV radiation, and its activity seems to decrease with particulate matter. Its genotoxicity was not affected by high concentrations of particulate matter in the Rio de la Plata water. In samples where chromium salts were added to raw river water, abiotic interference due to sterilization process occurred. A decrease in genotoxicity was found after filtration through inorganic filters (0.22 μ m) and an increase was noticed after exposure to UV radiation. (Author)

  4. Genotoxic evaluation of terbinafine in human lymphocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolomeotti, Danielle; de Castro-Prado, Marialba Avezum Alves; de Sant'Anna, Juliane Rocha; Martins, Ana Beatriz Tozzo; Della-Rosa, Valter Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Terbinafine is an antimycotic drug usually used against several superficial fungal infections and with a potential application in the treatment of human cancers. Since to date there are few data on the genotoxic effects of terbinafine in mammalian cells, current study evaluated the potential genotoxic of such antifungal agent in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Terbinafine was used at the peak plasma concentration (1.0 μg/ml) and in four additional concentrations higher than the human plasmatic peak (5.0 μg/ml, 25.0 μg/ml, 50.0 μg/ml and 100.0 μg/ml). Chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridges (NP) and nuclear buds (NB) were scored as genetic endpoints. In all analysis no significant differences (α = 0.05, Kruskal-Wallis test) were observed. Complementary criterion adopted to obtain the final response in cytogenetic agreed with statistical results. Therefore, results of this study showed that terbinafine neither induced CA, SCE, MN, NP and NB nor affected significantly mitotic, replication and cytokinesis-block proliferation indices in any of the tested concentrations. It may be assumed that terbinafine was not genotoxic or cytotoxic to cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes in our experimental conditions.

  5. Human biological monitoring of occupational genotoxic exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Sorsa, M

    1993-01-01

    Human biological monitoring is a valuable tool for exposure assessment in groups of persons occupationally exposed to genotoxic agents. If the monitoring activity covers genetic material the term genetic monitoring is used. The methods used for genetic monitoring are either substance specific, e......) occupational exposure limit value of styrene in ambient air. The consideration of ethical issues in human genetic monitoring is an important but often overlooked aspect. This includes the scientific and preventional relevance of performing a test on individuals, pre- and post study information of donors...

  6. Evidence that novobiocin and nalidixic acid do not inhibit excision repair in u.v.-irradiated human skin fibroblasts at a pre-incision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyse, S.M.; Tyrrell, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of novobiocin and nalidixic acid on the specific toxicity of aphidicolin towards u.v. irradiated arrested human skin fibroblasts have been determined. Contrary to the result expected if either drug were causing inhibition of excision repair at a pre-incision step the sector of toxicity due to a combined treatment of 300 μg ml -1 nalidixic acid and 1.0 μg ml -1 aphidicolin is unchanged when compared with that due to treatment with 1.0 μg ml -1 aphidicolin alone, while that for 150 μg ml -1 novobiocin + 1.0 μg ml -1 aphidicolin was slightly increased. In parallel measurements of the inhibition of u.v.-induced DNA repair synthesis in arrested fibroblasts by these drugs, 150 μg ml -1 novobiocin inhibited repair synthesis by approx.60% over the fluence range employed. Nalidixic acid (300 μg ml -1 ) caused no detectable inhibition of repair synthesis. It was concluded that the mode of action of novobiocin in the inhibition of DNA excision repair is not via the inhibition of a pre-incision step and the data do not support the hypothesis that a type II topoisomerase mediated change in DNA supercoiling is an essential early step in excision repair of u.v.-induced damage. (author)

  7. Altered expression of long non-coding RNAs during genotoxic stress-induced cell death in human glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Sun, Shanquan; Yu, Wei; Jiang, Jin; Zhuo, Fei; Qiu, Guoping; Xu, Shiye; Jiang, Xuli

    2015-04-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), a recently discovered class of non-coding genes, are transcribed throughout the genome. Emerging evidence suggests that lncRNAs may be involved in modulating various aspects of tumor biology, including regulating gene activity in response to external stimuli or DNA damage. No data are available regarding the expression of lncRNAs during genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis and/or necrosis in human glioma cells. In this study, we detected a change in the expression of specific candidate lncRNAs (neat1, GAS5, TUG1, BC200, Malat1, MEG3, MIR155HG, PAR5, and ST7OT1) during DNA damage-induced apoptosis in human glioma cell lines (U251 and U87) using doxorubicin (DOX) and resveratrol (RES). We also detected the expression pattern of these lncRNAs in human glioma cell lines under necrosis induced using an increased dose of DOX. Our results reveal that the lncRNA expression patterns are distinct between genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis and necrosis in human glioma cells. The sets of lncRNA expressed during genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis were DNA-damaging agent-specific. Generally, MEG3 and ST7OT1 are up-regulated in both cell lines under apoptosis induced using both agents. The induction of GAS5 is only clearly detected during DOX-induced apoptosis, whereas the up-regulation of neat1 and MIR155HG is only found during RES-induced apoptosis in both cell lines. However, TUG1, BC200 and MIR155HG are down regulated when necrosis is induced using a high dose of DOX in both cell lines. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the distinct regulation of lncRNAs may possibly involve in the process of cellular defense against genotoxic agents.

  8. [Genotoxic damage among artisanal and small-scale mining workers exposed to mercury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Rimache, Jaime A; Elizabeth Malca, Nancy; Alarcón, Jhonatan J; Chávez, Manuel; Gonzáles, Marco Antonio

    2013-01-01

    To determine the genotoxic damage among artisanal and small-scale mining workers exposed to mercury. Observational cross-sectional study which evaluated mercury-exposed workers (n=83), whose cells were collected by mouth swab for further staining, microscopic observance, micronuclei count, and other nuclear alterations. 24-hour urine was also collected for the determination of inorganic mercury. 68.7% of participants were male, the mean age being 43 ± 12,4 years (range: 16-76). The average time of occupational exposure to mercury was 12,1 ± 6,7 years, and the contact with mercury was 4,1 ± 3,6 kg per person per day. 93% of participants failed to wear personal protection gear while handling mercury. Results of biological monitoring showed that 17% of participants had concentrations of mercury in urine higher than 2,5 µg/L, this value being the detection limit of the measurement technique used. Results of the genotoxic evaluation evidenced that 15% of people with labor exposure to mercury presented micronuclei in mouth epithelial cells, and other indicators of nuclear alteration such as nucleoplasmic bridges, gemmation and binucleation were found, which are also considered genotoxic events associated to the exposure of physical or chemical risk agents. The finding of micronuclei in mouth epithelial cells reflects genotoxic damage associated to the labor exposure of mercury used in artisanal and small-scale mining activities.

  9. Genotoxic and apoptotic effects of Goeckerman therapy for psoriasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borska, L.; Andrys, C.; Krejsek, J.; Hamakova, K.; Kremlacek, J.; Palicka, V.; Ranna, D.; Fiala, Z. [Charles University Prague, Prague (Czech Republic). Faculty of Medicine

    2010-03-15

    Goeckerman therapy (GT) for psoriasis is based on cutaneous application of crude coal tar (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)) and exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR). PAH and UVR are mutagenic, carcinogenic and immunotoxic agents that promote apoptosis. We evaluated dermal absorption of PAH as well as the genotoxic and apoptotic effects of GT in 20 patients with psoriasis, by determining numbers of chromosomal abnormalities in peripheral lymphocytes, and levels of 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP), p53 protein and soluble FasL (sFasL) in urine and/or blood, before and after GT. Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) score was used to evaluate clinical efficacy of GT. Compared with pre-treatment levels, there was a significant increase in urine 1-OHP, indicating a high degree of dermal absorption of PAH (P <0.01). We also found a significant increase in the number of chromosomal abnormalities in peripheral blood lymphocytes (P <0.001), suggesting that GT is genotoxic; significantly increased p53 protein in plasma (P <0.05), an indicator of cell response to DNA damage; and significantly increased sFasL in serum (P <0.01), an indicator of apoptosis. The PASI score was significantly decreased after GT (P <0.001), confirming clinical benefit of this treatment. Our results demonstrate high dermal absorption of PAH during GT and provide evidence that GT promotes genotoxicity and apoptosis.

  10. The influence of nalidixic acid and nicotinamide of the radiation-induced cytogenetic injury to hexaploid wheat varities contrast by radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selezneva, E.M.; Sarapul'tsev, B.I.

    1990-01-01

    Nalidixic acid modifies the cytogenetic injury when only applied to seeds of a radiosensitive variety, Moskovskaya 35. The radioprotective effect of nicotinamide on both radiosensitive and radioresistant hexaploid wheat varities is observed being dependent on the extent which the genetic apparatus is impaired

  11. Use of scintillometric quantitation of unscheduled DNA synthesis in isolated rat hepatocytes for the screening of genotoxic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsia, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    The induction of unscheduled DNA synthesis has been considered as a suitable endpoint for the screening of genotoxic agents. Experimentally, unscheduled DNA synthesis is most frequently measured by autoradiography. The purpose of this report was to examine the usefulness of the liquid scintillation counting technique in measuring unscheduled DNA synthesis response in isolated rat hepatocytes. The various liquid scintillation counting-based unscheduled DNA synthesis assay procedures were examined according to the following groupings: (1) procedures based on the acid precipitation of cellular macromolecules, (2) procedures based on isopycnic gradient centrifugation of solubilized cells, (3) procedures based on nuclei isolation in conjunction with other DNA purification methods, and (4) procedures based on the selective retention of hepatocellular DNA. Limited cases in which test chemicals gave positive unscheduled DNA synthesis response in liquid scintillation counting-based assays and negative unscheduled DNA synthesis response in autoradiography-based assays are presented. It is concluded that liquid scintillation counting-based unscheduled DNA synthesis assays represent an appropriate system for inclusion in carcinogenicity and mutagenicity testing programs

  12. Evidence that novobiocin and nalidixic acid do not inhibit excision repair in u.v.-irradiated human skin fibroblasts at a pre-incision step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyse, S.M.; Tyrrell, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of novobiocin and nalidixic acid on the specific toxicity of aphidicolin towards u.v. irradiated arrested (nondividing) human skin fibroblasts have been determined. Contrary to the result expected if either drug were causing inhibition of excision repair at a pre-incision step the sector of toxicity due to a combined treatment of 300 micrograms ml -1 nalidixic acid and 1.0 micrograms ml -1 aphidicolin is unchanged when compared with that due to treatment with 1.0 micrograms ml -1 aphidicolin alone, while that for 150 micrograms ml -1 novobiocin + 1.0 micrograms ml -1 aphidicolin was slightly increased. In parallel measurements of the inhibition of u.v.-induced DNA repair synthesis in arrested fibroblasts by these drugs, 150 micrograms ml -1 novobiocin inhibited repair synthesis by approximately 60% over the fluence range employed. Nalidixic acid at a concentration of 300 micrograms ml -1 caused no detectable inhibition of repair synthesis. The authors conclude that the mode of action of novobiocin in the inhibition of DNA excision repair is not via the inhibition of a pre-incision step and the data do not support the hypothesis that a type II topoisomerase mediated change in DNA supercoiling is an essential early step in excision repair of u.v.-induced damage

  13. Comparative Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of Particulate and Soluble Hexavalent Chromium in Human and Sperm Whale (Physeter macrocephalus) Skin Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Chen, Tânia; LaCerte, Carolyne; Wise, Sandra S.; Holmes, Amie; Martino, Julieta; Wise, John Pierce; Thompson, W. Douglas; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) is a global marine pollutant, present in marine mammal tissues. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a known human carcinogen. In this study we compare the cytotoxic and clastogenic effects of Cr(VI) in human (Homo sapiens) and sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) skin fibroblasts. Our data show that increasing concentrations of both particulate and soluble Cr(VI) induce increasing amounts of cytotoxicity and clastogenicity in human and sperm whale skin cells. Furthermore, the data show that sperm whale cells are resistant to these effects exhibiting less cytotoxicity and genotoxicity than the human cells. Differences in Cr uptake accounted for some but not all of the differences in particulate and soluble Cr(VI) genotoxicity, although it did explain the differences in particulate Cr(VI) cytotoxicity. Altogether the data indicate that Cr(VI) is a genotoxic threat to whales, but also suggest that whales have evolved cellular mechanisms to protect them against the genotoxicity of environmental agents such as Cr(VI). PMID:21466859

  14. The SOS Chromotest applied for screening plant antigenotoxic agents against ultraviolet radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, J L; García Forero, A; Quintero Ruiz, N; Prada Medina, C A; Rey Castellanos, N; Franco Niño, D A; Contreras García, D A; Córdoba Campo, Y; Stashenko, E E

    2017-09-13

    In this work, we investigated the usefulness of the SOS Chromotest for screening plant antigenotoxic agents against ultraviolet radiation (UV). Fifty Colombian plant extracts obtained by supercritical fluid (CO 2 ) extraction, twelve plant extract constituents (apigenin, carvacrol, β-caryophyllene, 1,8-cineole, citral, p-cymene, geraniol, naringenin, pinocembrin, quercetin, squalene, and thymol) and five standard antioxidant and/or photoprotective agents (curcumin, epigallocatechin gallate, resveratrol, α-tocopherol, and Trolox®) were evaluated for their genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity against UV using the SOS Chromotest. None of the plant extracts, constituents or agents were genotoxic in the SOS Chromotest at tested concentrations. Based on the minimal extract concentration that significantly inhibited UV-genotoxicity (CIG), five plant extracts were antigenotoxic against UV as follows: Baccharis nítida (16 μg mL -1 ) = Solanum crotonifolium (16 μg mL -1 ) > Hyptis suaveolens (31 μg mL -1 ) = Persea caerulea (31 μg mL -1 ) > Lippia origanoides (62 μg mL -1 ). Based on CIG values, the flavonoid compounds showed the highest antigenotoxic potential as follows: apigenin (7 μM) > pinocembrin (15 μM) > quercetin (26 μM) > naringenin (38 μM) > epigallocatechin gallate (108 μM) > resveratrol (642 μM). UV-genotoxicity inhibition with epigallocatechin gallate, naringenin and resveratrol was related to its capability for inhibiting protein synthesis. A correlation analysis between compound antigenotoxicity estimates and antioxidant activity evaluated by the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay showed that these activities were not related. The usefulness of the SOS Chromotest for bioprospecting of plant antigenotoxic agents against UV was discussed.

  15. Correlation between the genotoxicity endpoints measured by two different genotoxicity assays: comet assay and CBMN assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Ladeira

    2015-06-01

    The results concerning of positive findings by micronuclei and non significant ones by comet assay, are corroborated by Deng et al. (2005 study performed in workers occupationally exposed to methotrexate, also a cytostatic drug. According to Cavallo et al. (2009, the comet assay seems to be more suitable for the prompt evaluation of the genotoxic effects, for instance, of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons mixtures containing volatile substances, whereas the micronucleus test seems more appropriate to evaluate the effects of exposure to antineoplastic agents. However, there are studies that observed an increase in both the comet assay and the micronucleus test in nurses handling antineoplastic drugs, although statistical significance was only seen in the comet assay, quite the opposite of our results (Maluf & Erdtmann, 2000; Laffon et al. 2005.

  16. Involvement of mismatch repair proteins in adaptive responses induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine against {gamma}-induced genotoxicity in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Ayumi; Sakamoto, Yasuteru; Masumura, Kenichi; Honma, Masamitsu [Division of Genetics and Mutagenesis, National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Nohmi, Takehiko, E-mail: nohmi@nihs.go.jp [Division of Genetics and Mutagenesis, National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan)

    2011-08-01

    Highlights: {yields} Health effects of radiation should be evaluated in combination with chemicals. {yields} Here, we show that MNNG suppresses radiation-induced genotoxicity in human cells. {yields} Mismatch repair proteins play critical roles in the apparent adaptive responses. {yields} Chemical exposure may modulate radiation-induced genotoxicity in humans. - Abstract: As humans are exposed to a variety of chemical agents as well as radiation, health effects of radiation should be evaluated in combination with chemicals. To explore combined genotoxic effects of radiation and chemicals, we examined modulating effects of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), a direct-acting methylating agent, against genotoxicity of {gamma}-radiation. Human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells and its mismatch-deficient derivative, i.e., MT1 cells, were treated with MNNG for 24 h before they were exposed to {gamma}-irradiation at a dose of 1.0 Gy, and the resulting genotoxicity was examined. In TK6 cells, the pretreatments with MNNG at low doses suppressed frequencies of the thymidine kinase (TK) gene mutation and micronucleus (MN) formation induced by {gamma}-irradiation and thus the dose responses of TK and MN assays were U-shaped along with the pretreatment doses of MNNG. In contrast, the genotoxic effects of MNNG and {gamma}-irradiation were additive in MT1 cells and the frequencies of TK mutations and MN induction increased along with the doses of MNNG. Apoptosis induced by {gamma}-radiation was suppressed by the pretreatments in TK6 cells, but not in MT1 cells. The expression of p53 was induced and cell cycle was delayed at G2/M phase in TK6, but not in MT1 cells, by the treatments with MNNG. These results suggest that pretreatments of MNNG at low doses suppress genotoxicity of {gamma}-radiation in human cells and also that mismatch repair proteins are involved in the apparent adaptive responses.

  17. Nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella enteric serotype typhi infection presenting with sub-intestinal obstruction and mesenteric adenitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Khuwaitir, Tarig S.; Al-Zuhair, Amin A.; Al-Ghamdi, Ali G.; Khan, A.

    2008-01-01

    Nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella typhi NARST infections increase minimal inhibitory concentrations of fluoroquinolones, due to chromosomal mutations in the gene encoding DNA gyrase, and can lead to a delayed treatment response. This in turn alters the course of the disease allowing for a protracted period of illness and the occurrence of complications. In this case report, we present a patient from the Indian sub-continent, who was diagnosed with NARST complicated by sub-intestinal obstruction, her diagnosis, treatment and subsequent recovery. (author)

  18. Tooth bleaching using peroxide-containing agents: current status of safety issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y

    1998-08-01

    During the last 10 years, at-home tooth bleaching using peroxide-containing agents has quickly become well accepted. It is one of the most popular cosmetic dental procedures for whitening teeth. Although there are few disputes regarding their efficacy, concerns and debates have continued regarding the safety of peroxide-containing tooth bleaching agents. Potential carcinogenicity and genotoxicity of the peroxides used in bleaching agents are the two most persistent and controversial issues. This article reviews and discusses available information on carcinogenicity and genotoxicity of hydrogen peroxide and the potential risks associated with the use of peroxide-containing bleaching agents. Clinical studies reported after the 1996 international symposium on responses of oral tissues to peroxide-containing bleaching agents are also reviewed. Overall evidence supports the conclusion that the proper use of peroxide-containing at-home tooth bleaching agents is safe. However, potential adverse effects may occur in inappropriate applications, abuses, or the use of inappropriate products. At-home tooth bleaching should be monitored by dental professionals to maximize the benefits while minimizing potential risks.

  19. Genotoxicity Expert Panel review: weight of evidence evaluation of the genotoxicity of glyphosate, glyphosate-based formulations, and aminomethylphosphonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusick, David; Aardema, Marilyn; Kier, Larry; Kirkland, David; Williams, Gary

    2016-09-01

    In 2015, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) published a monograph concluding there was strong evidence for genotoxicity of glyphosate and glyphosate formulations and moderate evidence for genotoxicity of the metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA). These conclusions contradicted earlier extensive reviews supporting the lack of genotoxicity of glyphosate and glyphosate formulations. The IARC Monograph concluded there was strong evidence of induction of oxidative stress by glyphosate, glyphosate formulations, and AMPA. The Expert Panel reviewed the genotoxicity and oxidative stress data considered in the IARC Monograph, together with other available data not considered by IARC. The Expert Panel defined and used a weight of evidence (WoE) approach that included ranking of studies and endpoints by the strength of their linkage to events associated with carcinogenic mechanisms. Importantly, the Expert Panel concluded that there was sufficient information available from a very large number of regulatory genotoxicity studies that should have been considered by IARC. The WoE approach, the inclusion of all relevant regulatory studies, and some differences in interpretation of individual studies led to significantly different conclusions by the Expert Panel compared with the IARC Monograph. The Expert Panel concluded that glyphosate, glyphosate formulations, and AMPA do not pose a genotoxic hazard and the data do not support the IARC Monograph genotoxicity evaluation. With respect to carcinogenicity classification and mechanism, the Expert Panel concluded that evidence relating to an oxidative stress mechanism of carcinogenicity was largely unconvincing and that the data profiles were not consistent with the characteristics of genotoxic carcinogens.

  20. E2F1 transcription is induced by genotoxic stress through ATM/ATR activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcagno, Abel L; Ogara, María F; Sonzogni, Silvina V; Marazita, Mariela C; Sirkin, Pablo F; Ceruti, Julieta M; Cánepa, Eduardo T

    2009-05-01

    E2F1, a member of the E2F family of transcription factors, plays a critical role in controlling both cell cycle progression and apoptotic cell death in response to DNA damage and oncogene activation. Following genotoxic stresses, E2F1 protein is stabilized by phosphorylation and acetylation driven to its accumulation. The aim of the present work was to examine whether the increase in E2F1 protein levels observed after DNA damage is only a reflection of an increase in E2F1 protein stability or is also the consequence of enhanced transcription of the E2F1 gene. The data presented here demonstrates that UV light and other genotoxics induce the transcription of E2F1 gene in an ATM/ATR dependent manner, which results in increasing E2F1 mRNA and protein levels. After genotoxic stress, transcription of cyclin E, an E2F1 target gene, was significantly induced. This induction was the result of two well-differentiated effects, one of them dependent on de novo protein synthesis and the other on the protein stabilization. Our results strongly support a transcriptional effect of DNA damaging agents on E2F1 expression. The results presented herein uncover a new mechanism involving E2F1 in response to genotoxic stress.

  1. Genotoxicity of swine effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techio, V H; Stolberg, J; Kunz, A; Zanin, E; Perdomo, C C

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of genotoxic effects of swine effluents from different stages of a treatment system for swine wastes through bioassay of stamen hairs and micronuclei in Tradescantia (clone BNL 4430). No significant differences (p≥0.05) regarding the genic mutations were found in the bioassay of stamen hairs, independently of the effluent analysed. For the genotoxicity test with micronuclei, the plants exposed to raw wastes, to sludge, and to effluent of the biodigester have presented higher rates of chromosomal damages (micronuclei), with significant differences in relation to the control group and other effluent of the waste treatment system (p≤0.05). The association between the chemical parameters and the genotoxicity data have shown that the variables COD and TKN have presented significant correlation (p≤0.05) with the number of mutagenic events in the tetrads.

  2. Genotoxic thresholds, DNA repair, and susceptibility in human populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, Gareth J.S.; Zair, Zoulikha; Johnson, George E.; Doak, Shareen H.

    2010-01-01

    It has been long assumed that DNA damage is induced in a linear manner with respect to the dose of a direct acting genotoxin. Thus, it is implied that direct acting genotoxic agents induce DNA damage at even the lowest of concentrations and that no 'safe' dose range exists. The linear (non-threshold) paradigm has led to the one-hit model being developed. This 'one hit' scenario can be interpreted such that a single DNA damaging event in a cell has the capability to induce a single point mutation in that cell which could (if positioned in a key growth controlling gene) lead to increased proliferation, leading ultimately to the formation of a tumour. There are many groups (including our own) who, for a decade or more, have argued, that low dose exposures to direct acting genotoxins may be tolerated by cells through homeostatic mechanisms such as DNA repair. This argument stems from the existence of evolutionary adaptive mechanisms that allow organisms to adapt to low levels of exogenous sources of genotoxins. We have been particularly interested in the genotoxic effects of known mutagens at low dose exposures in human cells and have identified for the first time, in vitro genotoxic thresholds for several mutagenic alkylating agents (Doak et al., 2007). Our working hypothesis is that DNA repair is primarily responsible for these thresholded effects at low doses by removing low levels of DNA damage but becoming saturated at higher doses. We are currently assessing the roles of base excision repair (BER) and methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) for roles in the identified thresholds (Doak et al., 2008). This research area is currently important as it assesses whether 'safe' exposure levels to mutagenic chemicals can exist and allows risk assessment using appropriate safety factors to define such exposure levels. Given human variation, the mechanistic basis for genotoxic thresholds (e.g. DNA repair) has to be well defined in order that susceptible individuals are

  3. Genotoxicity studies of organically grown broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) and its interactions with urethane, methyl methanesulfonate and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide genotoxicity in the wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heres-Pulido, María Eugenia; Dueñas-García, Irma; Castañeda-Partida, Laura; Santos-Cruz, Luis Felipe; Vega-Contreras, Viridiana; Rebollar-Vega, Rosa; Gómez-Luna, Juan Carlos; Durán-Díaz, Angel

    2010-01-01

    Broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) has been defined as a cancer preventive food. Nevertheless, broccoli contains potentially genotoxic compounds as well. We performed the wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster in treatments with organically grown broccoli (OGB) and co-treatments with the promutagen urethane (URE), the direct alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO) in the standard (ST) and high bioactivation (HB) crosses with inducible and high levels of cytochrome P450s (CYPs), respectively. Larvae of both crosses were chronically fed with OGB or fresh market broccoli (FMB) as a non-organically grown control, added with solvents or mutagens solutions. In both crosses, the OGB added with Tween-ethanol yielded the expected reduction in the genotoxicity spontaneous rate. OGB co-treatments did not affect the URE effect, MMS showed synergy and 4-NQO damage was modulated in both crosses. In contrast, FMB controls produced damage increase; co-treatments modulated URE genotoxicity, diminished MMS damage, and did not change the 4-NQO damage. The high dietary consumption of both types of broccoli and its protective effects in D. melanogaster are discussed. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cytotoxic, genotoxic and apoptotic effects of naringenin-oxime relative to naringenin on normal and cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurrahim Kocyigit

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: This study showed that both NG-Ox and NG possess cytotoxic, genotoxic and apoptotic activities through the production of ROS on cells, NG-Ox being the more effective one. Therefore, derived compound of NG might be used as antiproliferative agents for the treatment of cancer.

  5. Genotoxicity evaluation of alpha-linolenic acid-diacylglycerol oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Honda

    Full Text Available The alpha-linolenic acid (ALA-diacylglycerol (DAG oil is an edible oil enriched with DAG (>80% and ALA (>50%. Although DAG oil, which mainly consists of oleic and linoleic acids has no genotoxic concerns, the fatty acid composition could affect the chemical property of DAG. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of ALA-DAG oil using standard genotoxicity tests in accordance with the OECD guidelines. ALA-DAG oil showed negative results in the bacterial reverse mutation test (Ames test and in vitro micronucleus test in cultured Chinese hamster lung cells with and without metabolic activation, and in the in vivo bone marrow micronucleus test in mice. Our results did not show any genotoxicity, suggesting that the fatty acid composition had no deleterious effects. We conclude that ALA-DAG oil had no genotoxicity concerns under the testing conditions. Keywords: Alpha-linolenic acid-rich diacylglycerol, Diacylglycerol, Alpha-linolenic acid, Fatty acid composition, Genotoxicity

  6. Genotoxicity of metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hong; Mason, Michael M; Wise, John Pierce

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is currently used in industry, medicine, and military applications, as well as in more than 300 commercial products. Yet, the same properties that make these particles exciting for technology also make them daunting public health concerns because their toxicity is unknown and relatively unexplored. Increased attention is being placed on the study of metal particle genotoxicity; however, a lot of unknowns remain about their effects and the mechanisms. In this article, we highlight some metal and metal oxide nanoparticles of interest and discuss the current in vivo and in vitro studies of genotoxic effects. Many metal nanoparticles were found to cause chromosomal aberrations, DNA strand breaks, oxidative DNA damage, and mutations. Inconsistencies are found in the literature, however, thus drawing conclusions is difficult due to a variety of factors. Therefore, the areas requiring further attention are highlighted and recommendations to improve our understanding of the genotoxic potential are addressed.

  7. Biomarkers of environmental genotoxicity: comparison of genetic damage induced in Trad-SH cells and human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebulska-Wasilewska, A.

    1999-01-01

    The report presents some of the results of genotoxicity of the environmental agents studied in somatic cells of Tradescantia and show similarity between responses of the Tradescantia stamen hair cells (Trad-SH) and human blood cells to the physical and chemical mutagens. In the studies in vitro chromosome aberrations (CA) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) were applied to evaluate genotoxicity of pesticides. For comparison of genotoxic effectiveness of agrochemicals with other chemicals, there are also presented results of the genotoxicity of well-known mutagens (EMS, X-rays). The results confirm that in the environment a chemical pollution might cause higher genetic risk than radiation. Trad-SH assay was applied for in situ monitoring of the ambient air mutagenicity caused by benzene and petroleum associated compounds. The studies showed that gene mutation frequencies were slightly dependent on the distance from the petroleum work center. Results of measures of the cell cycle factor have shown also that the chemical pollutants in the air played also an important role in physiological cellular processes. The similarity of the Trad-SH and human blood cells responses to the physical and chemical mutagens showed that the gene mutations in Tradescantia present a simple and sensitive model, which can be very useful in biological monitoring

  8. Genotoxicity of 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol in the SOS chromotest and in the Ames test. Elucidation of the genotoxic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, H; Eder, E; Deininger, C

    1991-01-01

    1,3-Dichloro-2-propanol (1,3-DCP-OH, glycerol dichlorohydrin) is of great importance in many industrial processes and has been detected in foodstuffs, in particular in soup spices and instant soups. It has been shown to be carcinogenic, genotoxic and mutagenic. Its genotoxic mechanisms are, however, not yet entirely understood. We have investigated whether alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) catalysed activation to the highly mutagenic and carcinogenic 1,3-dichloroacetone or formation of epichlorohydrin or other genotoxic compounds play a role for mutagenicity and genotoxicity. In our studies, no indications of ADH catalysed formation of 1,3-dichloropropane could be found, although we could demonstrate a clear activation by ADH in the case of 2-chloropropenol. Formation of allyl chloride could also be excluded. We found, however, clear evidence that epichlorohydrin formed chemically in the buffer and medium used in the test is responsible for genotoxicity. No indication was found that enzymatic formation of epichlorohydrin plays a role. Additional mutagenicity and genotoxicity studies with epichlorohydrin also confirmed the hypothesis that genotoxic effects of 1,3-DCP-OH depend on the chemical formation of epichlorohydrin.

  9. Enthalpy-entropy compensation for the solubility of drugs in solvent mixtures: paracetamol, acetanilide, and nalidixic acid in dioxane-water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, P; Romero, S; Pena, A; Escalera, B; Reillo, A

    1998-12-01

    In earlier work, a nonlinear enthalpy-entropy compensation was observed for the solubility of phenacetin in dioxane-water mixtures. This effect had not been earlier reported for the solubility of drugs in solvent mixtures. To gain insight into the compensation effect, the behavior of the apparent thermodynamic magnitudes for the solubility of paracetamol, acetanilide, and nalidixic acid is studied in this work. The solubility of these drugs was measured at several temperatures in dioxane-water mixtures. DSC analysis was performed on the original powders and on the solid phases after equilibration with the solvent mixture. The thermal properties of the solid phases did not show significant changes. The three drugs display a solubility maximum against the cosolvent ratio. The solubility peaks of acetanilide and nalidixic acid shift to a more polar region at the higher temperatures. Nonlinear van't Hoff plots were observed for nalidixic acid whereas acetanilide and paracetamol show linear behavior at the temperature range studied. The apparent enthalpies of solution are endothermic going through a maximum at 50% dioxane. Two different mechanisms, entropy and enthalpy, are suggested to be the driving forces that increase the solubility of the three drugs. Solubility is entropy controlled at the water-rich region (0-50% dioxane) and enthalpy controlled at the dioxane-rich region (50-100% dioxane). The enthalpy-entropy compensation analysis also suggests that two different mechanisms, dependent on cosolvent ratio, are involved in the solubility enhancement of the three drugs. The plots of deltaH versus deltaG are nonlinear, and the slope changes from positive to negative above 50% dioxane. The compensation effect for the thermodynamic magnitudes of transfer from water to the aqueous mixtures can be described by a common empirical nonlinear relationship, with the exception of paracetamol, which follows a separate linear relationship at dioxane ratios above 50%. The

  10. Nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi presenting as a primary psoas abscess: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, William A; Davie, Daniel; Tonnerre, Claude; Rubin, Michael A; Strong, Michael; Petti, Cathy A

    2005-02-01

    We report an unusual case of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi presenting as a primary psoas abscess. The isolate tested susceptible to ciprofloxacin but resistant to nalidixic acid in vitro, a pattern associated with fluoroquinolone therapeutic failures. We review the literature for serovar Typhi psoas abscess in the absence of bacteremia and discuss the importance of identifying isolates with reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones.

  11. Kinetics of micronucleus induction and cytotoxicity caused by distinct antineoplastics and alkylating agents in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Ramírez, Pedro; Vallarino-Kelly, Teresita; Cruz-Vallejo, Virginia

    2014-01-30

    This mini-review aims to compare the differences in the kinetics of the induction of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MN-PCE) and cytotoxicity by distinct antineoplastic and genotoxic agents in murine peripheral blood in vivo and to correlate these kinetics with the underlying processes. Comparisons were carried out using our previously obtained data with nominal doses causing similar levels of cytotoxicity, as measured in terms reduction of PCE. The aneuploidogens caused the most rapid induction of MN-PCEs and had the highest rates of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. The promutagens cyclophosphamide and dimethylnitrosamine showed the most delayed responses and had the lowest genotoxic and cytotoxic efficiencies. DNA crosslinking agents had a similar delay of 4-5 h, greater than those of aneuploidogens, but differed in their cytotoxic and genotoxic efficiencies. Methylnitrosourea and 5-aza-cytidine caused greater delays than crosslinking agents. These delays can be due to the methylnitrosourea-mediated induction of formation of mono alkyl adducts which are interpreted as mismatches during DNA duplication, whereas 5-aza-cytidine requires incorporation into the DNA to induce breakage. This review allows us to conclude that the requirement for metabolic activation and the mechanisms of DNA breakage and of micronucleus induction are the main factors that affect the time of maximal MN-PCE induction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Combined effect of environmental radiation and other agents: Is there a synergism trap?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornhardt, S.; Jung, T.; Burkart, W.

    2002-01-01

    Most assessments of possible deleterious outcomes from environmental and occupational exposures concentrate on single agents and neglect the potential for combined effects, i.e. synergisms or antagonisms. Biomechanistic considerations based on multistep processes such as carcinogenesis indicate the potential for highly detrimental interactions, if two or more consecutive rate limiting steps are specifically effected by different agents. However, low specificity towards molecular structure or DNA-sequence - and therefore exchangeability - of many genotoxic agents indicate little functional specificity and therefore little vulnerability towards synergism at most occupational and environmental exposure situations. The low potential for significant combined effects for those common low exposure situations where non-genotoxic agents with highly non-linear dose effect relationships and apparent thresholds are involved, is also evident. Nevertheless, a quantitative assessment of the contribution of synergistic interactions to the total detriment from natural and man-made toxicants based on experimental data is far away. The existing database on combined effects is rudimentary, mainly descriptive and rarely covers exposure ranges large enough to make direct inferences to present day low dose exposure situations. In view of the multitude of possible interactions between the large number of potentially harmful agents in the human environment, descriptive approaches will have to be supplemented by the use of mechanistic models for critical health endpoints such as cancer. Finally an important question considering the shape of dose effect relationships for ionizing radiation arises from the unresolved question whether real or apparent thresholds may be used for any genotoxic agent separately or only one time for an exposed genome. (author)

  13. Treatment failure in a typhoid patient infected with nalidixic acid resistant S. enterica serovar Typhi with reduced susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin: a case report from Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asonganyi Etienne DN

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluoroquinolones or third generation cephalosporins are the drugs of choice for the treatment of typhoid fever. Treatment failure with fluoroquinolones has been reported in Asia and Europe. We report a case of ciprofloxacin treatment failure in typhoid fever in Cameroon. Case presentation A 29-year-old female patient with suspected typhoid fever from Kumba, Cameroon, yielded growth of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi in blood culture. The isolate was resistant to nalidixic acid but sensitive to ciprofloxacin by disc diffusion test. However, the patient did not respond to treatment with ciprofloxacin, although the isolate was apparently susceptible to ciprofloxacin. Conclusion Treatment failure with ciprofloxacin in our case indicates the presence of nalidixic acid resistant S. enterica serovar Typhi (NARST with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin in Cameroon (Central Africa.

  14. In silico prediction of genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichard, Jörg D

    2017-08-01

    The in silico prediction of genotoxicity has made considerable progress during the last years. The main driver for the pharmaceutical industry is the ICH M7 guideline about the assessment of DNA reactive impurities. An important component of this guideline is the use of in silico models as an alternative approach to experimental testing. The in silico prediction of genotoxicity provides an established and accepted method that defines the first step in the assessment of DNA reactive impurities. This was made possible by the growing amount of reliable Ames screening data, the attempts to understand the activity pathways and the subsequent development of computer-based prediction systems. This paper gives an overview of how the in silico prediction of genotoxicity is performed under the ICH M7 guideline. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Nalidixic Acid-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhi Presenting as a Primary Psoas Abscess: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, William A.; Davie, Daniel; Tonnerre, Claude; Rubin, Michael A.; Strong, Michael; Petti, Cathy A.

    2005-01-01

    We report an unusual case of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi presenting as a primary psoas abscess. The isolate tested susceptible to ciprofloxacin but resistant to nalidixic acid in vitro, a pattern associated with fluoroquinolone therapeutic failures. We review the literature for serovar Typhi psoas abscess in the absence of bacteremia and discuss the importance of identifying isolates with reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. PMID:15695728

  16. The Paracrine Induction of TRAIL by Genotoxic Agents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spalding, Aaron

    2002-01-01

    TNF related apoptosis inducing ligand, TRAIL, is a recently cloned cytokine that has been shown to induce apoptosis in a synergistic fashion with chemotherapeutic agents on several cancer cell lines...

  17. Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Studies of Beta-Sitosterol and Pteropodine in Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Paniagua-Pérez

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Beta-sitosterol (BS and pteropodine (PT are constituents of various plants with pharmacological activities potentially useful to man. The chemicals themselves possess biomedical properties related to the modulation of the immune and the nervous systems, as well as to the inflammatory process. Therefore, safety evaluation of the compounds is necessary in regard to their probable beneficial use in human health. The present study evaluates their genotoxic and cytotoxic potential by determining the capacity of the compounds to induce sister chromatid exchanges (SCE, or to alter cellular proliferation kinetics (CPK and the mitotic index (MI in mouse bone marrow cells. Besides, it also determines their capacity to increase the rate of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPE in peripheral mouse blood, and the relationship polychromatic erythrocytes/normochromatic erythrocytes (PE/NE as an index of cytotoxicity. For the first assay, four doses of each compound were tested: 200, 400, 600, and 1000 mg/kg in case of BS, and 100, 200, 300, and 600 mg/kg for PT. The results in regard to both agents showed no SCE increase induced by any of the tested doses, as well as no alteration in the CPK, or in the MI. With respect to the second assay, the results obtained with the two agents were also negative for both the MNPE and the PE/NE index along the daily evaluation made for four days. In the present study, the highest tested dose corresponded to 80% of the LD50 obtained for BS and to 78% in the case of PT. The results obtained establish that the studied agents have neither genotoxic nor cytotoxic effect on the model used, and therefore they encourage studies on their pharmacological properties.

  18. Vanillin as a modulator agent in SMART test: inhibition in the steps that precede N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-, ethylmethanesulphonate- and bleomycin-genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinigaglia, Marialva; Lehmann, Maurício; Baumgardt, Paula; do Amaral, Viviane Souza; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues; Reguly, Maria Luíza; de Andrade, Heloísa Helena Rodrigues

    2006-09-05

    Vanillin (VA), the world's major flavoring compound used in food industry and confectionery products - that has antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic activity against a variety of mutagenic/carcinogenic agents - was tested for the interval between the formation of premutational lesion and it is finalization as a DNA lesion. The overall findings using co-treatment protocols in SMART test suggest that VA can lead to a significant protection against the general genotoxicity of ethylmethanesulphonate (EMS), N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and bleomycin sulphate (BLEO). Considering MNU, ENU and EMS the desmutagenic activity observed could result from VA-stimulation of detoxification, via induction of glutathione S-transferase. However, the protector effect related to BLEO could be attributed to its powerful scavenger ability, which has the potential to prevent oxidative damage induced by BLEO.

  19. Evaluation of environmental genotoxicity by comet assay in Columba livia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Acevedo, Anahi; García-Salas, Juan A; Gosálvez, Jaime; Fernández, José Luis; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Méndez-López, Luis F; Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I

    2016-01-01

    The concentrations of recognized or suspected genotoxic and carcinogenic agents found in the air of large cities and, in particular, developing countries, have raised concerns about the potential for chronic health effects in the populations exposed to them. The biomonitoring of environmental genotoxicity requires the selection of representative organisms as "sentinels," as well as the development of suitable and sensitive assays, such as those aimed at assessing DNA damage. The aim of this study was to evaluate DNA damage levels in erythrocytes from Columba livia living in the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Mexico, compared with control animals via comet assay, and to confirm the results via Micronuclei test (MN) and DNA breakage detection-fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH). Our results showed a significant increase in DNA migration in animals from the area assayed compared with that observed in control animals sampled in non-contaminated areas. These results were confirmed by MN test and DBD-FISH. In conclusion, these observations confirm that the examination of erythrocytes from Columba livia via alkaline comet assay provides a sensitive and reliable end point for the detection of environmental genotoxicants.

  20. Dynamic response of plant genome to ultraviolet radiation and other genotoxic stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinier, Jean; Oakeley, Edward J.; Niederhauser, Olivier; Kovalchuk, Igor; Hohn, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarray technology was used to identify genes, which are responding after exposure to UV-C radiation and to other agents causing genotoxic stress. The effect of these conditions on recombinational DNA repair was monitored in parallel. Global changes in gene expression were investigated in Arabidopsis wild-type plants challenged with UV-C, bleomycin, another abiotic agent and xylanase, a biotic factor, all leading to elevated homologous recombination frequencies. The comparison of the expression profile of each treatment allowed defining genes specifically involved in the dynamic response to UV. In the future, the potential roles of such genes in the different forms of stress recognition, signal transduction, and their roles in DNA repair processes will be assessed by using reverse genetic tools available for Arabidopsis thaliana

  1. Quantitative genotoxicity assays for analysis of medicinal plants: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponchiado, Graziela; Adam, Mônica Lucia; Silva, Caroline Dadalt; Soley, Bruna Silva; de Mello-Sampayo, Cristina; Cabrini, Daniela Almeida; Correr, Cassyano Januário; Otuki, Michel Fleith

    2016-02-03

    Medicinal plants are known to contain numerous biologically active compounds, and although they have proven pharmacological properties, they can cause harm, including DNA damage. Review the literature to evaluate the genotoxicity risk of medicinal plants, explore the genotoxicity assays most used and compare these to the current legal requirements. A quantitative systematic review of the literature, using the keywords "medicinal plants", "genotoxicity" and "mutagenicity", was undertakenQ to identify the types of assays most used to assess genotoxicity, and to evaluate the genotoxicity potential of medicinal plant extracts. The database searches retrieved 2289 records, 458 of which met the inclusion criteria. Evaluation of the selected articles showed a total of 24 different assays used for an assessment of medicinal plant extract genotoxicity. More than a quarter of those studies (28.4%) reported positive results for genotoxicity. This review demonstrates that a range of genotoxicity assay methods are used to evaluate the genotoxicity potential of medicinal plant extracts. The most used methods are those recommended by regulatory agencies. However, based on the current findings, in order to conduct a thorough study concerning the possible genotoxic effects of a medicinal plant, we indicate that it is important always to include bacterial and mammalian tests, with at least one in vivo assay. Also, these tests should be capable of detecting outcomes that include mutation induction, clastogenic and aneugenic effects, and structural chromosome abnormalities. In addition, the considerable rate of positive results detected in this analysis further supports the relevance of assessing the genotoxicity potential of medicinal plants. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. "Aspartame: A review of genotoxicity data".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, David; Gatehouse, David

    2015-10-01

    Aspartame is a methyl ester of a dipeptide of aspartic acid and phenylalanine. It is 200× sweeter than sucrose and is approved for use in food products in more than 90 countries around the world. Aspartame has been evaluated for genotoxic effects in microbial, cell culture and animal models, and has been subjected to a number of carcinogenicity studies. The in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity data available on aspartame are considered sufficient for a thorough evaluation. There is no evidence of induction of gene mutations in a series of bacterial mutation tests. There is some evidence of induction of chromosomal damage in vitro, but this may be an indirect consequence of cytotoxicity. The weight of evidence from in vivo bone marrow micronucleus, chromosomal aberration and Comet assays is that aspartame is not genotoxic in somatic cells in vivo. The results of germ cell assays are difficult to evaluate considering limited data available and deviations from standard protocols. The available data therefore support the conclusions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) that aspartame is non-genotoxic. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. GENOTOXICITY OF TOBACCO SMOKE AND TOBACCO SMOKE CONDENSATE: A REVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genotoxicity of Tobacco Smoke and Tobacco Smoke Condensate: A ReviewAbstractThis report reviews the literature on the genotoxicity of main-stream tobacco smoke and cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) published since 1985. CSC is genotoxic in nearly all systems in which it h...

  4. Genotoxic effect of alkaloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. P. Henriques

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the increase use of alkaloids in general medical practice in recent years, it is of interest to determine genotoxic, mutagenic and recombinogenic response to different groups of alkaloids in prokaryotic and eucaryotic organisms. Reserpine, boldine and chelerythrine did not show genotoxicity response in the SOS-Chromotest whereas skimmianine showed genotixicity in the presence of a metabolic activation mixture. Voacristine isolated fromthe leaves of Ervatamia coronaria shows in vivo cytostatic and mutagenic effects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae hapioids cells. The Rauwolfia alkaloid (reserpine was not able to induce reverse mutation and recombinational mitotic events (crossing-over and gene conversion in yeast diploid strain XS2316.

  5. Chromosomal abnormalities in roots of aquatic plant Elodea canadensis as a tool for testing genotoxicity of bottom sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotina, Tatiana; Medvedeva, Marina; Trofimova, Elena; Alexandrova, Yuliyana; Dementyev, Dmitry; Bolsunovsky, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Submersed freshwater macrophytes are considered as relevant indicators for use in bulk bottom sediment contact tests. The purpose of this study was to estimate the validity of endpoints of aquatic plant Elodea canadensis for laboratory genotoxicity testing of natural bottom sediments. The inherent level of chromosome abnormalities (on artificial sediments) in roots of E. canadensis under laboratory conditions was lower than the percentage of abnormal cells in bulk sediments from the Yenisei River. The percentage of abnormal cells in roots of E. canadensis was more sensitive to the presence of genotoxic agents in laboratory contact tests than in the natural population of the plant. The spectra of chromosomal abnormalities that occur in roots of E. canadensis under natural conditions in the Yenisei River and in laboratory contact tests on the bulk bottom sediments from the Yenisei River were similar. Hence, chromosome abnormalities in roots of E. canadensis can be used as a relevant and sensitive genotoxicity endpoint in bottom sediment-contact tests. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Three-Dimensional, Transgenic Cell Models to Quantify Space Genotoxic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, S. R.; Sognier, M. A.; Wu, H.; Pingerelli, P. L.; Glickman, B. W.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The space environment contains radiation and chemical agents known to be mutagenic and carcinogenic to humans. Additionally, microgravity is a complicating factor that may modify or synergize induced genotoxic effects. Most in vitro models fail to use human cells (making risk extrapolation to humans more difficult), overlook the dynamic effect of tissue intercellular interactions on genotoxic damage, and lack the sensitivity required to measure low-dose effects. Currently a need exists for a model test system that simulates cellular interactions present in tissue, and can be used to quantify genotoxic damage induced by low levels of radiation and chemicals, and extrapolate assessed risk to humans. A state-of-the-art, three-dimensional, multicellular tissue equivalent cell culture model will be presented. It consists of mammalian cells genetically engineered to contain multiple copies of defined target genes for genotoxic assessment,. NASA-designed bioreactors were used to coculture mammalian cells into spheroids, The cells used were human mammary epithelial cells (H184135) and Stratagene's (Austin, Texas) Big Blue(TM) Rat 2 lambda fibroblasts. The fibroblasts were genetically engineered to contain -a high-density target gene for mutagenesis (60 copies of lacl/LacZ per cell). Tissue equivalent spheroids were routinely produced by inoculation of 2 to 7 X 10(exp 5) fibroblasts with Cytodex 3 beads (150 micrometers in diameter). at a 20:1 cell:bead ratio, into 50-ml HARV bioreactors (Synthecon, Inc.). Fibroblasts were cultured for 5 days, an equivalent number of epithelial cells added, and the fibroblast/epithelial cell coculture continued for 21 days. Three-dimensional spheroids with diameters ranging from 400 to 600 micrometers were obtained. Histological and immunohistochemical Characterization revealed i) both cell types present in the spheroids, with fibroblasts located primarily in the center, surrounded by epithelial cells; ii) synthesis of extracellular matrix

  7. Genotoxicity risk assessment of diversely substituted quinolines using the SOS chromotest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Leidy Tatiana Díaz; Rincón, Nathalia Olivar; Galvis, Carlos Eduardo Puerto; Kouznetsov, Vladimir V; Lorenzo, Jorge Luis Fuentes

    2015-03-01

    Quinolines are aromatic nitrogen compounds with wide therapeutic potential to treat parasitic and microbial diseases. In this study, the genotoxicity of quinoline, 4-methylquinoline, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO), and diversely functionalized quinoline derivatives and the influence of the substituents (functional groups and/or atoms) on their genotoxicity were tested using the SOS chromotest. Quinoline derivatives that induce genotoxicity by the formation of an enamine epoxide structure did not induce the SOS response in Escherichia coli PQ37 cells, with the exception of 4-methylquinoline that was weakly genotoxic. The chemical nature of the substitution (C-5 to C-8: hydroxyl, nitro, methyl, isopropyl, chlorine, fluorine, and iodine atoms; C-2: phenyl and 3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl rings) of quinoline skeleton did not significantly modify compound genotoxicities; however, C-2 substitution with α-, β-, or γ-pyridinyl groups removed 4-methylquinoline genotoxicity. On the other hand, 4-NQO derivatives whose genotoxic mechanism involves reduction of the C-4 nitro group were strong inducers of the SOS response. Methyl and nitrophenyl substituents at C-2 of 4-NQO core affected the genotoxic potency of this molecule. The relevance of these results is discussed in relation to the potential use of the substituted quinolines. The work showed the sensitivity of SOS chromotest for studying structure-genotoxicity relationships and bioassay-guided quinoline synthesis. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Lack of genotoxicity in vivo for food color additive Tartrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastaki, Maria; Farrell, Thomas; Bhusari, Sachin; Pant, Kamala; Kulkarni, Rohan

    2017-07-01

    Tartrazine is approved as a food color additive internationally with INS number 102, in the United States as food color subject to batch certification "Food, Drug, and Cosmetic" (FD&C) Yellow No. 5, and in Europe as food color additive with E number 102. In their evaluation of the color (2013), the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) expressed concerns of potential genotoxicity, based primarily on one genotoxicity study that was not conducted according to Guidelines. The present in vivo genotoxicity study was conducted according to OECD Guidelines in response to EFSA's request for additional data. The animal species and strain, and the tissues examined were selected specifically to address the previously reported findings. The results of this study show clear absence of genotoxic activity for Tartrazine, in the bone marrow micronucleus assay and the Comet assay in the liver, stomach, and colon. These data addressed EFSA's concerns for genotoxicity. The Joint WHO/FAO Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) (2016) also reviewed these data and concluded that there is no genotoxicity concern for Tartrazine. Negative findings in parallel genotoxicity studies on Allura Red AC and Ponceau 4R (published separately) are consistent with lack of genotoxicity for azo dyes used as food colors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of Antimicrobial Properties of Nano Quinolone with its Microscale Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbahani, G. Rezaie; Sadr, M. Hossaini; Nabipour, H.; Behbahani, H. Rezaei; Vahedpour, M.; Barzegar, L.

    2013-06-01

    Nano nalidixic acid was prepared by ultrasonic method in carbon tetrachloride. Nano nalidixic acid (quinolone antibiotic) was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The antibacterial activities of nano nalidixic acid were tested against microorganisms and compared with the microscale drug. The results show that nano nalidixic acid has good inhibitory properties against two Gram-positive species, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. Nano nalidixic acid also showed good antifungal activity against Candida albicans. Nano nalidixic acid can be injected into the human body as a decontaminating agent to prevent the growth of harmful microorganisms more effectively than the micro-sized drug.

  10. Determination of spectral markers of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity using in vitro Raman microspectroscopy: cellular responses to polyamidoamine dendrimer exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efeoglu, Esen; Casey, Alan; Byrne, Hugh J

    2017-10-09

    Although consumer exposure to nanomaterials is ever increasing, with potential increased applications in areas such as drug and/or gene delivery, contrast agents and diagnosis, the determination of the cyto- and geno-toxic effects of nanomaterials on human health and the environment still remains challenging. Although many techniques have been established and adapted to determine the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of nano-sized materials, these techniques remain limited by the number of assays required, total cost, and use of labels and they struggle to explain the underlying interaction mechanisms. In this study, Raman microspectroscopy is employed as an in vitro label-free, high content screening technique to observe toxicological changes within the cell in a multi-parametric fashion. The evolution of spectral markers as a function of time and applied dose has been used to elucidate the mechanism of action of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers associated with cytotoxicity and their impact on nuclear biochemistry. PAMAM dendrimers are chosen as a model nanomaterial due to their widely studied cytotoxic and genotoxic properties and commercial availability. Point spectra were acquired from the cytoplasm to monitor the cascade of toxic events occurring in the cytoplasm upon nanoparticle exposure, whereas the spectra acquired from the nucleus and the nucleolus were used to explore PAMAM-nuclear material interaction as well as genotoxic responses.

  11. Efficacy of ATR inhibitors as single agents in Ewing sarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieto-Soler, Maria; Morgado-Palacin, Isabel; Lafarga, Vanesa

    2016-01-01

    Ewing sarcomas (ES) are pediatric bone tumors that arise from a driver translocation, most frequently EWS/FLI1. Current ES treatment involves DNA damaging agents, yet the basis for the sensitivity to these therapies remains unknown. Oncogene-induced replication stress (RS) is a known source...... efficacy in ES xenografts as single agents. Expression of EWS/FLI1 or EWS/ERG oncogenic translocations sensitizes non-ES cells to ATR inhibitors. Our data shed light onto the sensitivity of ES to genotoxic agents, and identify ATR inhibitors as a potential therapy for Ewing Sarcomas....

  12. [Evaluation of cyto- and genotoxic action of ferronanomagnetic and constant magnetic field in in vivo system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekhun, V F; Lozovs'ka, Iu V; Luk'ianova, N Iu; Demash, D V; Todor, I M; Nalieskina, L A

    2013-01-01

    Cyto- and genotoxic effects of nanoparticles on the basis of FM, CMF or their combination have been studied in AKE cells, BM cells of erythroid line, and peripheral blood lymphocytes with the use of MN test and "DNA-comet" assay. It has been shown that expression of mentioned effects is related to FM concentration and duration of tested agent action. It has been also demonstrated that action of CMF alone in the studied cells did not cause any changes in cell architectonics or affect MN counts which are associated with DNA damage. When FM and CMF were used in combination there has been observed the phenomenon of induction of CMF action with FM nanoparticles. The obtained results allow recommend MN test and "DNA-comet" assay as the markers of genome stability in the tests of genotoxic effects of nanomaterials for development of vector nanosystems.

  13. SIGNALING TO THE P53 TUMOR SUPPRESSOR THROUGH PATHWAYS ACTIVATED BY GENOTOXIC AND NON-GENOTOXIC STRESSES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ANDERSON,C.W.APPELLA,E.

    2002-07-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a tetrameric transcription factor that is post-translational modified at {approx}18 different sites by phosphorylation, acetylation, or sumoylation in response to various cellular stress conditions. Specific posttranslational modifications, or groups of modifications, that result from the activation of different stress-induced signaling pathways are thought to modulate p53 activity to regulate cell fate by inducing cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or cellular senescence. Here we review the posttranslational modifications to p53 and the pathways that produce them in response to both genotoxic and non-genotoxic stresses.

  14. Dose-Response Assessment of Four Genotoxic Chemicals in a Combined Mouse and Rat Micronucleus and Comet Assay Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recio, Leslie; Hobbs, Cheryl; Caspary, William; Witt, Kristine L.

    2012-01-01

    The in vivo micronucleus (MN) assay has proven to be an effective measure of genotoxicity potential. However, sampling a single tissue (bone marrow) for a single indicator of genetic damage using the MN assay provides a limited genotoxicity profile. The in vivo alkaline (pH>13) Comet assay, which detects a broad spectrum of DNA damage, can be applied to a variety of rodent tissues following administration of test agents. To determine if the Comet assay is a useful supplement to the in vivo MN assay, a combined test protocol (MN/Comet assay) was conducted in male B6C3F1 mice and F344/N rats using four model genotoxicants: ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), acrylamide (ACM), cyclophosphamide (CP), and vincristine sulfate (VS). Test compounds were administered on 4 consecutive days at 24-hour intervals (VS was administered to rats for 3 days); animals were euthanized 4 hours after the last administration. All compounds induced significant increases in micronucleated reticulocytes (MN-RET) in the peripheral blood of mice, and all but ACM induced MN-RET in rats. EMS and ACM induced significant increases in DNA damage, measured by the Comet assay, in multiple tissues of mice and rats. CP-induced DNA damage was detected in leukocytes and duodenum cells. VS, a spindle fiber disrupting agent, was negative in the Comet assay. Based on these results, the MN/Comet assay holds promise for providing more comprehensive assessments of potential genotoxicants, and the National Toxicology Program is presently using this combined protocol in its overall evaluation of the genotoxicity of substances of public health concern. PMID:20371966

  15. The cyto- and genotoxicity of organotin compounds is dependent on the cellular uptake capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dopp, E.; Hartmann, L.M.; Recklinghausen, U. von; Florea, A.M.; Rabieh, S.; Shokouhi, B.; Hirner, A.V.; Obe, G.; Rettenmeier, A.W.

    2007-01-01

    Organotin compounds have been widely used as stabilizers and anti-fouling agents with the result that they are ubiquitously distributed in the environment. Organotins accumulate in the food chain and potential effects on human health are disquieting. It is not known as yet whether cell surface adsorption or accumulation within the cell, or indeed both is a prerequisite for the toxicity of organotin compounds. In this study, the alkylated tin derivatives monomethyltin trichloride (MMT), dimethyltin dichloride (DMT), trimethyltin chloride (TMT) and tetramethyltin (TetraMT) were investigated for cyto- and genotoxic effects in CHO-9 cells in relation to the cellular uptake. To identify genotoxic effects, induction of micronuclei (MN), chromosome aberrations (CA) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) were analyzed and the nuclear division index (NDI) was calculated. The cellular uptake was assessed using ICP-MS analysis. The toxicity of the tin compounds was also evaluated after forced uptake by electroporation. Our results show that uptake of the organotin compounds was generally low but dose-dependent. Only weak genotoxic effects were observed after exposure of cells to DMT and TMT. MMT and TetraMT were negative in the test systems. After forced uptake by electroporation MMT, DMT and TMT induced significant DNA damage at non-cytotoxic concentrations. The results presented here indicate a considerable toxicological potential of some organotin species but demonstrate clearly that the toxicity is modulated by the cellular uptake capability

  16. Genotoxicity of 2-bromo-3′-chloropropiophenone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Fanxue; Yan, Jian; Li, Yan [Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, 3900 NCTR Road, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Fu, Peter P. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, 3900 NCTR Road, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Fossom, Linda H.; Sood, Ramesh K.; Mans, Daniel J.; Chu, Pei-I [Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20993 (United States); Moore, Martha M. [Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, 3900 NCTR Road, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Chen, Tao, E-mail: tao.chen@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, 3900 NCTR Road, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Impurities are present in any drug substance or drug product. They can be process-related impurities that are not completely removed during purification or are formed due to the degradation of the drug substance over the product shelf-life. Unlike the drug substance, impurities generally do not have beneficial effects and may present a risk without associated benefit. Therefore, their amount should be minimized. 2-Bromo-3′-chloropropiophenone (BCP) is an impurity of bupropion, a second-generation antidepressant and a smoking cessation aid. The United States Pharmacopeia recommends an acceptable level for BCP that is not more than 0.1% of the bupropion. Because exposure to genotoxic impurities even at low levels is of significant concern, it is important to determine whether or not BCP is genotoxic. Therefore, in this study the Ames test and the in vitro micronucleus assay were conducted to evaluate the genotoxicity of BCP. BCP was mutagenic with S9 metabolic activation, increasing the mutant frequencies in a concentration-dependent manner, up to 22- and 145-fold induction over the controls in Salmonella strains TA100 and TA1535, respectively. BCP was also positive in the in vitro micronucleus assay, resulting in up to 3.3- and 5.1-fold increase of micronucleus frequency for treatments in the absence and presence of S9, respectively; and 9.9- and 7.4-fold increase of aneuploidies without and with S9, respectively. The addition of N-acetyl-L-cysteine, an antioxidant, reduced the genotoxicity of BCP in both assays. Further studies showed that BCP treatment resulted in induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the TK6 cells. The results suggest that BCP is mutagenic, clastogenic, and aneugenic, and that these activities are mediated via generation of reactive metabolites. - Highlights: • 2-Bromo-3′-chloropropiophenone is an impurity of bupropion. • BCP was positive in both the Ames test and the in vitro micronucleus assay. • It induced high frequencies of

  17. Genotoxicity of 2-bromo-3′-chloropropiophenone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Fanxue; Yan, Jian; Li, Yan; Fu, Peter P.; Fossom, Linda H.; Sood, Ramesh K.; Mans, Daniel J.; Chu, Pei-I; Moore, Martha M.; Chen, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Impurities are present in any drug substance or drug product. They can be process-related impurities that are not completely removed during purification or are formed due to the degradation of the drug substance over the product shelf-life. Unlike the drug substance, impurities generally do not have beneficial effects and may present a risk without associated benefit. Therefore, their amount should be minimized. 2-Bromo-3′-chloropropiophenone (BCP) is an impurity of bupropion, a second-generation antidepressant and a smoking cessation aid. The United States Pharmacopeia recommends an acceptable level for BCP that is not more than 0.1% of the bupropion. Because exposure to genotoxic impurities even at low levels is of significant concern, it is important to determine whether or not BCP is genotoxic. Therefore, in this study the Ames test and the in vitro micronucleus assay were conducted to evaluate the genotoxicity of BCP. BCP was mutagenic with S9 metabolic activation, increasing the mutant frequencies in a concentration-dependent manner, up to 22- and 145-fold induction over the controls in Salmonella strains TA100 and TA1535, respectively. BCP was also positive in the in vitro micronucleus assay, resulting in up to 3.3- and 5.1-fold increase of micronucleus frequency for treatments in the absence and presence of S9, respectively; and 9.9- and 7.4-fold increase of aneuploidies without and with S9, respectively. The addition of N-acetyl-L-cysteine, an antioxidant, reduced the genotoxicity of BCP in both assays. Further studies showed that BCP treatment resulted in induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the TK6 cells. The results suggest that BCP is mutagenic, clastogenic, and aneugenic, and that these activities are mediated via generation of reactive metabolites. - Highlights: • 2-Bromo-3′-chloropropiophenone is an impurity of bupropion. • BCP was positive in both the Ames test and the in vitro micronucleus assay. • It induced high frequencies of

  18. A three-dimensional in vitro HepG2 cells liver spheroid model for genotoxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ume-Kulsoom; Mallia, Jefferson de Oliveira; Singh, Neenu; Chapman, Katherine E; Doak, Shareen H; Jenkins, Gareth J S

    2018-01-01

    The liver's role in metabolism of chemicals makes it an appropriate tissue for toxicity testing. Current testing protocols, such as animal testing and two-dimensional liver cell systems, offer limited resemblance to in vivo liver cell behaviour, in terms of gene expression profiles and metabolic competence; thus, they do not always accurately predict human toxicology. In vitro three-dimensional liver cell models offer an attractive alternative. This study reports on the development of a 3D liver model, using HepG2 cells, by a hanging-drop technique, with a focus on evaluating spheroid growth characteristics and suitability for genotoxicity testing. The cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay protocol was adapted to enable micronucleus (MN) detection in the 3D spheroid models. This involved evaluating the difference between hanging vs non-hanging drop positions for dosing of the test agents and comparison of automated Metafer scoring with manual scoring for MN detection in HepG2 spheroids. The initial seeding density, used for all experiments, was 5000 cells/20 μl drop hanging spheroids, harvested on day 4, with >75% cell viability. Albumin secretion (7.8 g/l) and both CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 gene expression were highest in the 3D environment at day 4. Exposure to metabolically activated genotoxicants for 24 h resulted in a 6-fold increase in CYP1A1 enzyme activity (3 μM B[a]P) and a 30-fold increase in CYP1A2 enzyme activity (5 μM PhIP) in 3D hanging spheroids. MN inductions in response to B[a]P or PhIP were 2-fold and 3-fold, respectively, and were greater in 3D hanging spheroids than in 2D format, showing that hanging spheroids are more sensitive to genotoxic agents. HepG2 hanging-drop spheroids are an exciting new alternative system for genotoxicity studies, due to their improved structural and physiological properties, relative to 2D cultures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effect of the [166Dy]Dy/166Ho-EDTMP in vivo generator system in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedraza-Lopez, Martha; Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Arteaga de Murphy, Consuelo; Morales-Ramirez, Pedro; Piedras-Ross, Josefa; Murphy-Stack, Eduardo; Hernandez-Oviedo, Omar

    2004-01-01

    Multiple myeloma and other hematological malignancies have been treated by myeloablative radiotherapy/chemotherapy and subsequent stem cell transplantation. [ 166 Dy]Dy/ 166 Ho-ethylenediaminetetramethylene phosphonate (EDTMP) forms a stable in vivo generator system with selective skeletal uptake in mice; therefore, it could work as a potential and improved agent for marrow ablation. Induced bone marrow cytotoxicity and genotoxicity are determined by the reduction of reticulocytes (RET) and elevation of micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) in peripheral blood and ablation by bone marrow histological studies. The aim of this study was to determine the bone marrow cytotoxic and genotoxic effect of the [ 166 Dy]Dy/ 166 Ho-EDTMP in vivo generator system in mice and to evaluate by histopathology its myeloablative potential. Enriched 166 Dy 2 O 3 was irradiated and [ 166 Dy]DyCl 3 was added to EDTMP in phosphate buffer (pH 8.0) in a molar ratio of 1:1.75. QC was determined by TLC. Dy-EDTMP complex was prepared the same way with nonirradiated dysprosium oxide. A group of BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with the radiopharmaceutical and two groups of control animals were injected with the cold complex and with 0.9% sodium chloride, respectively. A blood sample was taken at the beginning of the experiments and every 48 h for 12 days postinjection. The animals were sacrificed, organs of interest taken out and the radioactivity determined. The femur was used for histological studies. Flow cytometry analysis was used to quantify the frequency of RET and MN-RET in the blood samples. The MCNP4B Monte Carlo computer code was used for dosimetry calculations. Radiochemical purity was 99% and the mean specific activity was 1.3 MBq/mg. The RET and MN-RET frequency were statistically different in the treatment at the end of the 12-day period demonstrating cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by the in vivo generator system. The histology studies show that there was

  20. Recent perspectives on the relations between faecal mutagenicity, genotoxicity and diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eGratz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage is an essential component of the genesis of colonic cancer. Gut microbial products and food components are thought to be principally responsible for the damage that initiates disease progression. Modified Ames tests and Comet assays have been developed for measuring mutagenicity and genotoxicity. Their relevance to oncogenesis remains to be confirmed, as does the relative importance of different mutagenic and genotoxic compounds present in faecal water and the bacteria involved in their metabolism. Dietary intervention studies provide clues to the likely risks of oncogenesis. High-protein diets lead to increases in N-nitroso compounds in faecal water and greater DNA damage as measured by the Comet assay, for example. Other dietary interventions, such as non-digestible carbohydrates and probiotics, may lead to lower faecal genotoxicity. In order to make recommendations to the general public, we must develop a better understanding of how genotoxic compounds are formed in the colon, how accurate the Ames and Comet assays are, and how diet affects genotoxicity.

  1. Occurrence of Salmonella spp. in broiler chicken carcasses and their susceptibility to antimicrobial agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Dalila Angélica Moliterno; Ribeiro, Aldemir Reginato; Vasconcelos, Ana Mércia Mendes; Santos, Sylnei Barros; Silva, Juliana Vital Domingos; de Andrade, Patrícia Lúcia Arruda; de Arruda Falcão, Lúcia Sadae Pereira da Costa

    2009-01-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the occurrence of Salmonellae in broiler chicken carcasses and to determine the antimicrobial resistance profile of the isolated strains. Twenty-five out of the 260 broiler chicken carcasses samples (9.6%) were positive for Salmonella. S. Enteritidis was the most frequent serovar. Nineteen Salmonella isolates were tested for antimicrobial resistance, and the results indicated that 94.7% were resistant to at least one antimicrobial agent. Resistance to streptomycin (73.7%), nitrofurantoin (52.3%), tetracycline (31.6%), and nalidixic acid (21%) were the prevalent amongst Salmonella strains tested. PMID:24031401

  2. The genotoxic contribution of wood smoke to indoor respirable suspended particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, P.M. (John B. Pierce Foundation Laboratory, New Haven, CT (USA)); Rossman, T.G. (New York Univ. Medical Center, New York (USA)); Daisey, J.M. (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The effect of wood burning stoves on the genotoxicity of indoor respirable organic matter was investigated for four homes during the winter and spring of 1986. Paired samples, one collected when the stove was not used and one when wood was burned, were extracted with dichloromethane and acetone. Aliquots of the dichloromethane extracts were analyzed with and without metabolic activation using the Microscreen bioassay. The Microscreen is a rapid, sensitive bioassay which measures a broad genotoxic endpoint, {lambda}-prophage induction. Per nanogram of organic material, wood smoke proved to be a major source of indirect (observed with metabolic activation) but not direct genotoxins in homes. The increase in indirect genotoxicity for extracts from aerosol containing wood smoke is probably due to higher concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the wood smoke aerosol as well as other unidentified classes. The direct genotoxicity observed for extracts of aerosol not containing wood smoke decreased with metabolic activation. This direct genotoxicity may be related to cooking activities in the homes. The trends in genotoxicity observed per nanogram of organic material are more pronounced when expressed per m{sup 3} of air due to the higher percentage of extractable material in aerosol containing wood smoke.

  3. Chronic toxicity, genotoxic assay, and phytochemical analysis of four traditional medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda Sortibrán, América; Téllez, María Guadalupe Ordaz; Ocotero, Verónica Muñoz; Carballo-Ontiveros, Marco Antonio; García, Angélica Méndez; Valdés, Rocio Jimena Jiménez; Gutiérrez, Elizabeth Romero; Rodríguez-Arnaiz, Rosario

    2011-09-01

    Four medicinal plants--Tecoma stans, Ligusticum porteri, Monarda austromontana, and Poliomintha longiflora, which are distributed in tropical and subtropical countries of the American continent--are widely used in folk medicine to treat diseases such as diarrhea and dysentery. In addition, T. stans and P. longiflora are extensively used as hypoglycemic agents, and M. austromontana and P. longiflora are used as condiments. The plants were collected, identified, dried, and pulverized. Solvent extraction was prepared by maceration of the plant samples, and the phytochemical composition of the extracts was determined by using standard analysis procedures. Phytochemical analysis showed the presence of triterpenoids/steroids, flavonoids, and phenols/tannins and, in L. porteri, traces of alkaloids. After the elimination of solvents in vacuo, the extracts were administrated to Drosophila larvae to test their toxicity and genotoxicity. Third instar larvae were chronically fed with the phytoextracts. The extract from L. porteri was toxic, whereas those from T. stans, P. longiflora, and M. austromontana were not. Genotoxic activities of the 4 plants were investigated by using the wing-spot assay of D. melanogaster. Mitomycin C was used as a positive control. No statistically significant increase was observed between treated sample series and a concurrent negative (water) or solvent control sample series.

  4. Hepatotoxicity and genotoxicity of gasoline fumes in albino rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folarin O. Owagboriaye

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Toxic effects of gasoline fumes have been reported, but evidence of its hepatotoxicity and genotoxicity are rare. Therefore, this study assesses hepatotoxicity and genotoxicity of gasoline fumes on forty Albino rats randomly assigned to five experimental treatments (T with eight rats per treatment (T1, T2, T3, T4 and T5. T1(Control was housed in a section of experimental animal house free from gasoline fumes while T2, T3, T4 and T5 were exposed to gasoline fumes in exposure chambers for one, three, five and nine hours daily respectively for twelve weeks. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alkaline phosphatase (ALP and histopathological examination of the liver tissues were used as diagnostic markers to assess liver dysfunction. Genotoxicity test was conducted on the lung tissues using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting polymerase chain reaction (RAPD PCR technique. Significant increase (p < 0.05 in the level of ALT, AST and ALP for T2, T3, T4 and T5 compared to T1 were recorded. Photomicrograph examination of the liver sections of T1 showed hepatic tissue with normal liver cell architecture while that of T2, T3, T4 and T5 revealed degenerative changes in the ultrastructural integrity of the hepatic cells. Genotoxicity test revealed DNA bands at a reducing intensity from T1 to T5. Dendrogram showed DNA damage in the lungs of T3, T4 and T5 were closely similar and the genotoxic impact was more in T3. Frequent exposure to gasoline fumes was observed to induce hepatoxicity and genotoxicity, hence impairing the normal liver function and gene structure.

  5. Current investigations into the genotoxicity of zinc oxide and silica nanoparticles in mammalian models in vitro and in vivo: carcinogenic/genotoxic potential, relevant mechanisms and biomarkers, artifacts, and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon JY

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jee Young Kwon,1,* Preeyaporn Koedrith,2,* Young Rok Seo1 1Department of Life Science, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Dongguk University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 2Faculty of Environment and Resource Studies, Mahidol University, Phuttamonthon District, NakhonPathom, Thailand *These authors contributed equally to this work and should be considered as co-first authors Abstract: Engineered nanoparticles (NPs are widely used in many sectors, such as food, medicine, military, and sport, but their unique characteristics may cause deleterious health effects. Close attention is being paid to metal NP genotoxicity; however, NP genotoxic/carcinogenic effects and the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In this review, we address some metal and metal oxide NPs of interest and current genotoxicity tests in vitro and in vivo. Metal NPs can cause DNA damage such as chromosomal aberrations, DNA strand breaks, oxidative DNA damage, and mutations. We also discuss several parameters that may affect genotoxic response, including physicochemical properties, widely used assays/end point tests, and experimental conditions. Although potential biomarkers of nanogenotoxicity or carcinogenicity are suggested, inconsistent findings in the literature render results inconclusive due to a variety of factors. Advantages and limitations related to different methods for investigating genotoxicity are described, and future directions and recommendations for better understanding genotoxic potential are addressed. Keywords: carcinogenicity, exposure assessment, genotoxicity, nanoparticles, risk evaluation

  6. Assessment of Genotoxicity of Ionizing radiation using Tradescantia-Comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Min; Ryu, Tae Ho; Hyun, Kyung Man; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Wilhelmova, Nad [Institute of Experimental Botany, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2010-05-15

    Over the last two decades, several new methodologies for the detection of DNA damage have been developed. The comet assay is currently used in different areas of biological sciences to detect DNA damage. The comet assay, also called the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) was first introduced by Ostling and Johanson as a microelectrophoretic technique for the direct visualization of DNA damage in individual cells. The comet assay, due to its simplicity, sensitivity and need of a few cells, is ideal as a short-term genotoxicity test. The comet assay can theoretically be applied to every type of eukaryotic cell, including plant cells. Plants are very useful as monitors of genetic effects caused by pollution in the atmosphere, water and soil. Although the genotoxic effects detected by Tradescantia tests cannot be associated with mutagenesis or even carcinogenesis in humans, these bioassays are very useful tools for screening the mutagenic potential in the environment. Experiments were conducted to study the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiations on the genome integrity, particularly of Tradescantia. The increasingly frequent use of Tradescantia as a sensitive environmental bioindicator of genotoxic effects. This study was designed to assess the genotoxicity of ionizing radiation using Tradescnatia-comet assay

  7. Genotoxic, radioprotective and radiosensitizing effect of curcumin and trans-resveratrol in vitro cultures of human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, V.A.; Tirsa Muñoz, B.; Sebastià, N.; Gómez-Cabrero, L.; La Parra, V.; Hervás, D.; Rodrigo, R.; Villaescusa, J.I.; Soriano, J.M.; Montoro, A.

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin and trans-resveratrol are natural polyphenol compounds. Curcumin is obtained from the rhizomes of the Curcumin plant (Curcuma longa), while trans-resveratrol is found in grapes, blackberries and other types of berry. These compounds have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunostimulant and anticarcinogenic properties among others. In addition, they are also known for their radiomodulating properties since they are capable of providing radioprotection or radiosensitization for normal or tumours cells depending on different factors. This dual action may be the result of their properties, such as free radicals scavenging, as well as their influence on cell cycle checkpoints or control mechanisms. These are activated in response to the genetic damage induced by radiation. Despite the many beneficial properties attributed to these polyphenol compounds, some studies suggest that they are able to be genotoxic agents for some cellular lines. The results obtained indicate that both compounds possess a radioprotective effect on the lymphocytes of peripheral blood in the quiescent phase of the cellular cycle (G0). Nevertheless, they are capable of induce radiosensitivity on these type of cells in the growth phase (G2), and in addition, a different genotoxic effect can be seen according to the concentration of each compound. This study suggests, therefore, that curcumin and trans-resveratrol are able to exert a triple effect, genotoxic, radioprotective and radiosensitizing on in vitro cultures of human lymphocytes depending on the study parameters. [es

  8. The use of ex vivo human skin tissue for genotoxicity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reus, Astrid A.; Usta, Mustafa [TNO Triskelion BV, Utrechtseweg 48, 3704 HE, Zeist (Netherlands); Krul, Cyrille A.M., E-mail: cyrille.krul@tno.nl [TNO, Utrechtseweg 48, 3704 HE Zeist (Netherlands)

    2012-06-01

    As a result of the chemical legislation concerning the registration, evaluation, authorization and restriction of chemicals (REACH), and the Seventh Amendment to the Cosmetics Directive, which prohibits animal testing in Europe for cosmetics, alternative methods for safety evaluation of chemicals are urgently needed. Current in vitro genotoxicity assays are not sufficiently predictive for the in vivo situation, resulting in an unacceptably high number of misleading positives. For many chemicals and ingredients of personal care products the skin is the first site of contact, but there are no in vitro genotoxicity assays available in the skin for additional evaluation of positive or equivocal responses observed in regulatory in vitro genotoxicity assays. In the present study ex vivo human skin tissue obtained from surgery was used for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals by using the comet assay. Fresh ex vivo human skin tissue was cultured in an air–liquid interface and topically exposed to 20 chemicals, including true positive, misleading positive and true negative genotoxins. Based on the results obtained in the present study, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the ex vivo skin comet assay to predict in vivo genotoxicity were 89%, 90% and 89%, respectively. Donor and experimental variability were mainly reflected in the magnitude of the response and not the difference between the presence and absence of a genotoxic response. The present study indicates that human skin obtained from surgery is a promising and robust model for safety evaluation of chemicals that are in direct contact with the skin. -- Highlights: ► We use human skin obtained from surgery for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals. ► We use the comet assay as parameter for genotoxicity in ex vivo human skin. ► Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to predict in vivo genotoxins are determined. ► Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy are 89%, 90% and 90%, respectively. ► The method

  9. The use of ex vivo human skin tissue for genotoxicity testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reus, Astrid A.; Usta, Mustafa; Krul, Cyrille A.M.

    2012-01-01

    As a result of the chemical legislation concerning the registration, evaluation, authorization and restriction of chemicals (REACH), and the Seventh Amendment to the Cosmetics Directive, which prohibits animal testing in Europe for cosmetics, alternative methods for safety evaluation of chemicals are urgently needed. Current in vitro genotoxicity assays are not sufficiently predictive for the in vivo situation, resulting in an unacceptably high number of misleading positives. For many chemicals and ingredients of personal care products the skin is the first site of contact, but there are no in vitro genotoxicity assays available in the skin for additional evaluation of positive or equivocal responses observed in regulatory in vitro genotoxicity assays. In the present study ex vivo human skin tissue obtained from surgery was used for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals by using the comet assay. Fresh ex vivo human skin tissue was cultured in an air–liquid interface and topically exposed to 20 chemicals, including true positive, misleading positive and true negative genotoxins. Based on the results obtained in the present study, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the ex vivo skin comet assay to predict in vivo genotoxicity were 89%, 90% and 89%, respectively. Donor and experimental variability were mainly reflected in the magnitude of the response and not the difference between the presence and absence of a genotoxic response. The present study indicates that human skin obtained from surgery is a promising and robust model for safety evaluation of chemicals that are in direct contact with the skin. -- Highlights: ► We use human skin obtained from surgery for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals. ► We use the comet assay as parameter for genotoxicity in ex vivo human skin. ► Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to predict in vivo genotoxins are determined. ► Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy are 89%, 90% and 90%, respectively. ► The method

  10. Genotoxicity and ELF-magnetic fields: a review through the micronucleus assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaraz, M.; Andreu-Galvez, M.; Sanchez-Villalobos, J. M.; Achel, D. G.; Olmos, E.; Martinez-Hernandez, C. M.

    2012-01-01

    Thirty for (34) published studies, conducted from 1994 to the present to evaluate the genotoxic effect of magnetic fields using ELF-EMF and diagnostic resonance on humans by the micronucleus assay have been reviewed. some characteristics of the assay methods, their significance to genotoxicity and basic interpretations of the results of these assays are discussed. of the studies analysed 70.5% implicated genotoxic effects induced by these magnetic fields: 52.9% were due to exposure to magnetic fields only and 17,6% by exposure to magnetic fields in combination with some treatment types, resulting in additive or synergistic effect. Evidence exist to support the notion that exposure of humans to magnetic fields stimulates genotoxic effects, although the actual mechanisms of action or even the true human health consequences resulting from these exposure still remain unclear. (Author) 80 refs.

  11. Soil genotoxicity assessment: a new stategy based on biomolecular tools and plant bioindicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citterio, Sandra; Aina, Roberta; Labra, Massimo; Ghiani, Alessandra; Fumagalli, Pietro; Sgorbati, Sergio; Santagostino, Angela

    2002-06-15

    The setting up of efficient early warning systems is a challenge to research for preventing environmental alteration and human disease. In this paper, we report the development and the field application of a new biomonitoring methodology for assessing soil genotoxicity. In the first part, the use of amplified fragment length polymorphism and flow cytometry techniques to detect DNA damage induced by soils artificially contaminated with heavy metals as potentially genotoxic compounds is explained. Results show that the combination of the two techniques leads to efficient detection of the sublethal genotoxic effect induced in the plant bioindicator by contaminated soil. By contrast, the classic mortality, root, and shoot growth vegetative endpoints prove inappropriate for assessing soil genotoxicity because, although they cause genotoxic damage, some heavy metals do not affect sentinel plant development negatively. The statistical elaboration of the data obtained led to the development of a statistical predictive model which differentiates four different levels of soil genotoxic pollution and can be used everywhere. The second part deals with the application of the biomonitoring protocol in the genotoxic assessment of two areas surrounding a steelworks in northern Italy and the effectiveness of this methodology. In this particular case, in these areas, the predictive model reveals a pollution level strictly correlated to the heavy metal concentrations revealed by traditional chemical analysis.

  12. Borax counteracts genotoxicity of aluminum in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkez, Hasan; Geyikoğlu, Fatime; Tatar, Abdulgani

    2013-10-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the protective role of borax (BX) on genotoxicity induced by aluminum (Al) in rat liver, using liver micronucleus assay as an indicator of genotoxicity. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly separated into six groups and each group had four animals. Aluminum chloride (AlCl₃; 5 mg/kg b.w.) and BX (3.25 and 13 mg/kg b.w.) were injected intraperitoneally to rats. Besides, animals were also treated with Al for 4 consecutive days followed by BX for 10 days. Rats were anesthetized after Al and BX injections and the hepatocytes were isolated for counting the number of micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs). AlCl₃ was found to significantly (p < 0.05) increase the number of MNHEPs. Rats treated with BX, however, showed no increase in MNHEPs. Moreover, simultaneous treatments with BX significantly modulated the genotoxic effects of AlCl₃ in rats. It can be concluded that BX has beneficial influences and has the ability to antagonize Al toxicity.

  13. Identification of new RECQL4 mutations in Caucasian Rothmund-Thomson patients and analysis of sensitivity to a wide range of genotoxic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caseira Cabral, Rosa Estela [Laboratoire ' Genomes et Cancers' , FRE2939 CNRS, Institut Gustave-Roussy, Universite Paris-Sud, PRII, 39 Rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France); Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Centro de Ciencias da Saude, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Queille, Sophie [Laboratoire ' Genomes et Cancers' , FRE2939 CNRS, Institut Gustave-Roussy, Universite Paris-Sud, PRII, 39 Rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France); Bodemer, Christine; Prost, Yves de [Service de Dermatologie, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Universite Decartes-Paris V, APHP, Cedex (France); Bispo Cabral Neto, Januario [Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Centro de Ciencias da Saude, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Sarasin, Alain [Laboratoire ' Genomes et Cancers' , FRE2939 CNRS, Institut Gustave-Roussy, Universite Paris-Sud, PRII, 39 Rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France); Daya-Grosjean, Leela [Laboratoire ' Genomes et Cancers' , FRE2939 CNRS, Institut Gustave-Roussy, Universite Paris-Sud, PRII, 39 Rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France)], E-mail: daya@igr.fr

    2008-08-25

    Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS), a rare recessive autosomal disorder, presents genome instability and clinical heterogeneity with growth deficiency, skin and bone defects, premature aging symptoms and cancer susceptibility. A subset of RTS patients presents mutations of the RECQL4 gene, member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases, including the RECQL2 (BLM) and RECQL3 (WRN) genes, defective in the cancer prone Bloom and Werner syndromes, respectively. Analysis of the RECQL4 gene in six clinically diagnosed RTS patients shows five patients, including two siblings, with eight mutations mainly located in the helicase domain, three patients presenting two mutations. The alterations include four missense mutations, one nonsense mutation and the same frameshift deletion, g.2881delG in exon 9 found in three patients. Seven RECQL4 polymorphisms, two being new, have also been identified. Primary RTS fibroblasts from these RTS patients show no sensitivity to a wide variety of genotoxic agents including ionizing or ultraviolet irradiation, nitrogen mustard, 4NQO, 8-MOP, Cis-Pt, MMC, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, HU, or UV plus caffeine which could be related to the RECQL4 alterations identified here. This is in contrast with the DNA damage sensitive Bloom and Werner cells and highlights the complexity of the numerous RecQ protein functions implicated in the different cellular pathways required for maintaining genomic integrity.

  14. Identification of new RECQL4 mutations in Caucasian Rothmund-Thomson patients and analysis of sensitivity to a wide range of genotoxic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caseira Cabral, Rosa Estela; Queille, Sophie; Bodemer, Christine; Prost, Yves de; Bispo Cabral Neto, Januario; Sarasin, Alain; Daya-Grosjean, Leela

    2008-01-01

    Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS), a rare recessive autosomal disorder, presents genome instability and clinical heterogeneity with growth deficiency, skin and bone defects, premature aging symptoms and cancer susceptibility. A subset of RTS patients presents mutations of the RECQL4 gene, member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases, including the RECQL2 (BLM) and RECQL3 (WRN) genes, defective in the cancer prone Bloom and Werner syndromes, respectively. Analysis of the RECQL4 gene in six clinically diagnosed RTS patients shows five patients, including two siblings, with eight mutations mainly located in the helicase domain, three patients presenting two mutations. The alterations include four missense mutations, one nonsense mutation and the same frameshift deletion, g.2881delG in exon 9 found in three patients. Seven RECQL4 polymorphisms, two being new, have also been identified. Primary RTS fibroblasts from these RTS patients show no sensitivity to a wide variety of genotoxic agents including ionizing or ultraviolet irradiation, nitrogen mustard, 4NQO, 8-MOP, Cis-Pt, MMC, H 2 O 2 , HU, or UV plus caffeine which could be related to the RECQL4 alterations identified here. This is in contrast with the DNA damage sensitive Bloom and Werner cells and highlights the complexity of the numerous RecQ protein functions implicated in the different cellular pathways required for maintaining genomic integrity

  15. Genotoxicity evaluation of the insecticide ethion in root of Allium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-07-05

    Jul 5, 2010 ... In this study, the genotoxic effects of ethion were investigated in the mitotic cell division of Allium ... The use of plant root tips, particularly those of A. cepa and Vicia faba, as a bioassay test system for the genotoxicity of pesticides has shown extremely ..... the long run, even below the recommended dose.

  16. Genotoxicity test of irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Noriho

    2004-01-01

    Safety tests of radiation irradiated foods started as early as from 1967 in Japan and genotoxicity tests in the Hatano Res. Inst., from 1977. The latter is unique in the world and is reviewed in this paper. Tests included those for the initial injury of DNA, mutagenicity, chromosomal aberration and transformation with use of bacteria, cultured mammalian cells and animals (for chromosomal aberration, micronucleus formation and dominant lethality). Foods tested hitherto were onion, rice, wheat and flour, Vienna sausage, fish sausage (kamaboko), mandarian orange, potato, black pepper and red capsicum, of which extract or powder was subjected to the test. Irradiation doses and its purposes were 0.15-6 kGy γ-ray ( 60 Co) or electron beam by the accelerator (only for the orange), and suppression of germination, pesticide action or sterilization, respectively. Genotoxicity of all foods under tested conditions is shown negative. (N.I.)

  17. Screening potential genotoxic effect of aquatic plant extracts using the mussel micronucleus test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Eck-Varanka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the genotoxic potential of selected aquatic macrophytes: Ceratophyllum demersum L. (hornwort, family Ceratophyllaceae, Typha angustifolia L. (narrowleaf cattail, family Typhaceae, Stratiotes aloides L. (water soldier, family Butomaceae, and Oenanthe aquatica (L. Poir. (water dropwort, family Umbelliferae. Methods: For genotoxicity assessment, the mussel micronucleus test was applied. Micronucleus frequency was determined from the haemolymph of Unio pictorum L. (painter’s mussel. In parallel, total and hydrolisable tannin contents were determined. Results: All plant extracts elucidated significant mutagenic effect. Significant correlation was determined between tannin content and mutagenic capacity. Conclusions: The significant correlation between genotoxicity as expressed by micronucleus frequency and tannin content (both total and hydrolisable tannins indicate that tannin is amongst the main compounds being responsible for the genotoxic potential. It might be suggested that genotoxic capacity of these plants elucidate a real ecological effect in the ecosystem.

  18. A whole-cell bioreporter assay for quantitative genotoxicity evaluation of environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo; Li, Guanghe; Xing, Yi; Zhang, Dayi; Jia, Jianli; Cui, Zhisong; Luan, Xiao; Tang, Hui

    2017-10-01

    Whole-cell bioreporters have emerged as promising tools for genotoxicity evaluation, due to their rapidity, cost-effectiveness, sensitivity and selectivity. In this study, a method for detecting genotoxicity in environmental samples was developed using the bioluminescent whole-cell bioreporter Escherichia coli recA::luxCDABE. To further test its performance in a real world scenario, the E. coli bioreporter was applied in two cases: i) soil samples collected from chromium(VI) contaminated sites; ii) crude oil contaminated seawater collected after the Jiaozhou Bay oil spill which occurred in 2013. The chromium(VI) contaminated soils were pretreated by water extraction, and directly exposed to the bioreporter in two phases: aqueous soil extraction (water phase) and soil supernatant (solid phase). The results indicated that both extractable and soil particle fixed chromium(VI) were bioavailable to the bioreporter, and the solid-phase contact bioreporter assay provided a more precise evaluation of soil genotoxicity. For crude oil contaminated seawater, the response of the bioreporter clearly illustrated the spatial and time change in genotoxicity surrounding the spill site, suggesting that the crude oil degradation process decreased the genotoxic risk to ecosystem. In addition, the performance of the bioreporter was simulated by a modified cross-regulation gene expression model, which quantitatively described the DNA damage response of the E. coli bioreporter. Accordingly, the bioluminescent response of the bioreporter was calculated as the mitomycin C equivalent, enabling quantitative comparison of genotoxicities between different environmental samples. This bioreporter assay provides a rapid and sensitive screening tool for direct genotoxicity assessment of environmental samples. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Mutagenicity and genotoxicity of coal fly ash water leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Rajarshi; Mukherjee, Anita

    2009-03-01

    Fly ash is a by-product of coal-fired electricity generation plants. The prevalent practice of disposal is as slurry of ash and water to storage or ash ponds located near power stations. This has lain to waste thousands of hectares of land all over the world. Since leaching is often the cause of off-site contamination and pathway of introduction into the human environment, a study on the genotoxic effects of fly ash leachate is essential. Leachate prepared from the fly ash sample was analyzed for metal content, and tested for mutagenicity and genotoxicity. Analyses of metals show predominance of the metals-sodium, silicon, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, manganese, zinc, and sulphate. The Ames Salmonella mutagenicity assay, a short-term bacterial reverse mutation assay, was conducted on two-tester strains of Salmonella typhimurium strains TA97a and TA102. For genotoxicity, the alkaline version of comet assay on fly ash leachate was carried in vitro on human blood cells and in vivo on Nicotiana plants. The leachate was directly mutagenic and induced significant (Ppercentage (%), tail length (mum), and olive tail moment (arbitrary units). Our results indicate that leachate from fly ash dumpsites has the genotoxic potential and may lead to adverse effects on vegetation and on the health of exposed human populations.

  20. Evaluation of Genotoxic Pressure along the Sava River.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoimir Kolarević

    Full Text Available In this study we have performed a comprehensive genotoxicological survey along the 900 rkm of the Sava River. In total, 12 sites were chosen in compliance with the goals of GLOBAQUA project dealing with the effects of multiple stressors on biodiversity and functioning of aquatic ecosystems. The genotoxic potential was assessed using a complex battery of bioassays performed in prokaryotes and aquatic eukaryotes (freshwater fish. Battery comprised evaluation of mutagenicity by SOS/umuC test in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002. The level of DNA damage as a biomarker of exposure (comet assay and biomarker of effect (micronucleus assay and the level of oxidative stress as well (Fpg-modified comet assay was studied in blood cells of bleak and spirlin (Alburnus alburnus/Alburnoides bipunctatus respectively. Result indicated differential sensitivity of applied bioassays in detection of genotoxic pressure. The standard and Fpg-modified comet assay showed higher potential in differentiation of the sites based on genotoxic potential in comparison with micronucleus assay and SOS/umuC test. Our data represent snapshot of the current status of the river which indicates the presence of genotoxic potential along the river which can be traced to the deterioration of quality of the Sava River by communal and industrial wastewaters. The major highlight of the study is that we have provided complex set of data obtained from a single source (homogeneity of analyses for all samples.

  1. Plant genotoxicity: a molecular cytogenetic approach in plant bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluszynska, Jolanta; Juchimiuk, Jolanta

    2005-06-01

    It is important for the prevention of DNA changes caused by environment to understand the biological consequences of DNA damages and their molecular modes of action that lead to repair or alterations of the genetic material. Numerous genotoxicity assay systems have been developed to identify DNA reactive compounds. The available data show that plant bioassays are important tests in the detection of genotoxic contamination in the environment and the establishment of controlling systems. Plant system can detect a wide range of genetic damage, including gene mutations and chromosome aberrations. Recently introduced molecular cytogenetic methods allow analysis of genotoxicity, both at the chromosomal and DNA level. FISH gives a new possibility of the detection and analysis of chromosomal rearrangements in a great detail. DNA fragmentation can be estimated using the TUNEL test and the single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay).

  2. Evaluation of Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of Acacia aroma Leaf Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Mattana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acacia aroma, native plant from San Luis, Argentina, is commonly used as antiseptic and for healing of wounds. The present study was conducted to investigate the in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of hot aqueous extract (HAE and ethanolic extract (EE of A. aroma. The cytotoxic activity was assayed by neutral red uptake assay on Vero cell. Cell treatment with a range from 100 to 5000 μg/mL of HAE and EE showed that 500 μg/mL and 100 μg/mL were the maximum noncytotoxic concentrations, respectively. The CC50 was 658 μg/mL for EE and 1020 μg/mL for HAE. The genotoxicity was tested by the single-cell gel electrophoresis comet assay. The results obtained in the evaluation of DNA cellular damage exposed to varied concentrations of the HAE showed no significant genotoxic effect at range of 1–20 mg/mL. The EE at 20 mg/mL showed moderate genotoxic effect related to the increase of the DNA percentage contained in tail of the comet; DNA was classified in category 2. At concentrations below 5 mg/mL, the results of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Acacia aroma guarantee the safety at cell and genomic level. However further studies are needed for longer periods including animal models to confirm the findings.

  3. Distinct Functional Domains of Ubc9 Dictate Cell Survival and Resistance to Genotoxic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Waardenburg, Robert C. A. M.; Duda, David M.; Lancaster, Cynthia S.; Schulman, Brenda A.; Bjornsti, Mary-Ann

    2006-01-01

    Covalent modification with SUMO alters protein function, intracellular localization, or protein-protein interactions. Target recognition is determined, in part, by the SUMO E2 enzyme, Ubc9, while Siz/Pias E3 ligases may facilitate select interactions by acting as substrate adaptors. A yeast conditional Ubc9P123L mutant was viable at 36°C yet exhibited enhanced sensitivity to DNA damage. To define functional domains in Ubc9 that dictate cellular responses to genotoxic stress versus those necessary for cell viability, a 1.75-Å structure of yeast Ubc9 that demonstrated considerable conservation of backbone architecture with human Ubc9 was solved. Nevertheless, differences in side chain geometry/charge guided the design of human/yeast chimeras, where swapping domains implicated in (i) binding residues within substrates that flank canonical SUMOylation sites, (ii) interactions with the RanBP2 E3 ligase, and (iii) binding of the heterodimeric E1 and SUMO had distinct effects on cell growth and resistance to DNA-damaging agents. Our findings establish a functional interaction between N-terminal and substrate-binding domains of Ubc9 and distinguish the activities of E3 ligases Siz1 and Siz2 in regulating cellular responses to genotoxic stress. PMID:16782883

  4. Genotoxicity of triiodothyronine: Effects on Salmonella typhimurium TA100 and human lymphocytes in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bošnjak-Neumüller Jasna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that substances which are normally present in human or animal bodies may, under the certain circumstances, exhibit deleterious effects on genetic material, therefore acting as endogenous mutagenic agents. Since hormones represent one of the best studied endogenous mutagens, some research focused on the possible role of thyroid hormone in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. Indeed, thyroid hormones accelerate aerobic metabolism and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and, therefore, may exhibit mutagenic effects in various test systems on mammalian cells. However, possible mutagenic effects on prokaryotic DNA has not been investigated so far. Hence, the aim of this research was to compare the sensitivity of TA 100 Salmonella typhimurium with and without metabolic activation with S9 fraction, and human lymphocytes to possible genotoxic effects of triiodothyronine (T3. Therefore, we used the reverse mutation assay on S. typhimurium (Ames test and in vitro Comet assay in isolated peripheral blood human lymphocytes. In both tests-systems a broad spectrum of T3 concentrations was applied. The obtained results showed absence of genotoxic effects of T3 in bacterial reverse mutation assay and very profound genotoxic effects in human lymphocytes at concentrations higher than 15 μM. We only observed cytotoxic effects in bacterial system at very high T3 concentrations (300 and 500 μM. In conclusion, T3 was unable to increase the level of reverse mutations in Ames test both with and without S9 mix. Therefore, it seems that ROS production in mitochondria may be the primary cause of DNA damage caused by T3 in mammalian cells. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. III46002

  5. The SOS chromotest: bacterial cells to detect and characterize genotoxic products and radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quillardet, P.; Hofnung, M.

    1994-01-01

    The advanced knowledge we have on the bacterium Escherichia coli has facilitated the development of the colorimetric and fast assay, the SOS chromotest, which involves a single tester strain and gives a qualitative and a quantitative assay of the action of a genotoxic agent. We discuss a number of possibilities opened by this test in order to make a genetic diagnosis of the chemical nature of the damages caused in the genetic material by means of a battery of strains which have been genetically modified for that purpose. In order to give an idea of the accuracy of the bacterial responses and of the way they can be used to characterize the DNA damage by a genetic approach, the case of alkylating agents is described in a relatively detailed fashion, and the case of oxidative agents is rapidly mentioned. The sensitivity to ionizing radiation is such that the test is able to detect doses of the order of 1 Gy. We discuss briefly how it could be possible to increase this sensitivity by genetically inactivating repair systems which process the injuries caused by these agents, and how the use of a battery of tester strains could also give information on the nature of injuries caused by various types of ionizing radiation. (authors). 39 refs. 4 figs. 1 tab

  6. Genotoxicity of a Low-Dose Nitrosamine Mixture as Drinking Water Disinfection Byproducts in NIH3T3 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Yan; Qin, Ming; Dong, Lei; Lv, Jia-Ying; Wang, Xia

    2017-01-01

    N - nitrosamines (NAms), which can arise as byproducts of disinfection agents, are reportedly found in drinking water, and their potential carcinogenicity is a concern; however, little research exists regarding the genotoxicity or carcinogenicity of NAms exposure as a low-dose mixture. The three most common NAms components in China's drinking water are N -nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N -nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) and N -nitrosomethylethylamine (NMEA). Thus, we measured the genotoxic and carcinogenic potential of these compounds and measured the cell cycle and gene expression. The data show that exposure to the NAms-mixture doubled the revertants in the TA98 and TA100 S. typhimurium strains and increased the DNA double-strand breaks and the micronuclear frequency in the NIH3T3 cells compared to a single exposure. After long-term NAms mixture exposure, a malignant transformation of NIH3T3 and a significantly increased G2/M distribution were observed. Furthermore, P53, CDK1, P38, CDC25A and CyclinB expressions were down-regulated in the NAms-mixture exposure group; however, P21 and GADD45A genes were up-regulated. Interestingly, the CHK1/CHK2 and CDC25A genes had two responses, depending on the NAms concentrations. Thus, we observed mutagenic, genotoxic and carcinogenic effects after a low-dose NAms-mixture exposure in drinking water, and DNA repair and apoptosis pathways may contribute to these adverse effects.

  7. Genotoxicity of drinking water treated with different disinfectants and effects of disinfection conditions detected by umu-test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xuebiao; Liu, Wenjun; Zhang, Liping; Liu, Qing

    2017-06-01

    The genotoxicity of drinking water treated with 6 disinfection methods and the effects of disinfection conditions were investigated using the umu-test. The pretreatment procedure of samples for the umu-test was optimized for drinking water analysis. The results of the umu-test were in good correlation with those of the Ames-test. The genotoxicity and production of haloacetic acids (HAAs) were the highest for chlorinated samples. UV+chloramination is the safest disinfection method from the aspects of genotoxicity, HAA production and inactivation effects. For chloramination, the effects of the mass ratio of Cl 2 to N of chloramine on genotoxicity were also studied. The changes of genotoxicity were different from those of HAA production, which implied that HAA production cannot represent the genotoxic potential of water. The genotoxicity per chlorine decay of chlorination and chloramination had similar trends, indicating that the reaction of organic matters and chlorine made a great contribution to the genotoxicity. The results of this study are of engineering significance for optimizing the operation of waterworks. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Somatic cell genotoxicity at the glycophorin A locus in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, R.H.; Grant, S.G.; Langlois, R.G.; Bigbee, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    We have developed an assay for detecting variant erythrocytes that occur as a result of in vivo allele loss at the glycophorin A (GPA) locus on chromosome 4 in humans. This gene codes for an erythroid- specific cell surface glycoprotein, and with our assay we are able to detect rare variant erythrocytes that have lost expression of one of the two GPA alleles. Two distinctly different variant cell types are detected with this assay. One variant cell type (called N OE) is hemizygous. Our assay also detects homozygous variant erythrocytes that have lost expression of the GPA(M) allele and express the GPA(N) allele at twice the heterozygous level. The results of this assay are an enumeration of the frequency of N OE and NN variant cell types for each individual analyzed. These variant cell frequencies provide a measure of the amount of somatic cell genotoxicity that has occurred at the GPA locus. Such genotoxicity could be the result of (1) reactions of toxic chemicals to which the individual has been exposed, or (2) high energy radiation effects on erythroid precursor cells, or (3) errors in DNA replication or repair in these cells of the bone marrow. Thus, the GPA-based variant cell frequency can serve as a biodosimeter that indicates the amount of genotoxic exposure each individual has received. Because two very different kinds of variant cells are enumerated, different kinds of genotoxicity should be distinguishable. Results of the GPA somatic genotoxicity assay may also provide valuable information for cancer-risk estimation on each individual. 16 refs

  9. Genistein genotoxicity: Critical considerations of in vitro exposure dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Catherine B.; King, Audrey A.

    2007-01-01

    The potential health benefits of soy-derived phytoestrogens include their reported utility as anticarcinogens, cardioprotectants and as hormone replacement alternatives in menopause. Although there is increasing popularity of dietary phytoestrogen supplementation and of vegetarian and vegan diets among adolescents and adults, concerns about potential detrimental or other genotoxic effects persist. While a variety of genotoxic effects of phytoestrogens have been reported in vitro, the concentrations at which such effects occurred were often much higher than the physiologically relevant doses achievable by dietary or pharmacologic intake of soy foods or supplements. This review focuses on in vitro studies of the most abundant soy phytoestrogen, genistein, critically examining dose as a crucial determinant of cellular effects. In consideration of levels of dietary genistein uptake and bioavailability we have defined in vitro concentrations of genistein > 5 μM as non-physiological, and thus 'high' doses, in contrast to much of the previous literature. In doing so, many of the often-cited genotoxic effects of genistein, including apoptosis, cell growth inhibition, topoisomerase inhibition and others become less obvious. Recent cellular, epigenetic and microarray studies are beginning to decipher genistein effects that occur at dietarily relevant low concentrations. In toxicology, the well accepted principle of 'the dose defines the poison' applies to many toxicants and can be invoked, as herein, to distinguish genotoxic versus potentially beneficial in vitro effects of natural dietary products such as genistein

  10. Genotoxicity of diuron and glyphosate in oyster spermatozoa and embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcha, F; Spagnol, C; Rouxel, J

    2012-01-15

    We investigated the effects of genotoxicant exposure in gametes and embryos to find a possible link between genotoxicity and reproduction/developmental impairment, and explore the impact of chemical genotoxicity on population dynamics. Our study focused on the genotoxic effects of two herbicides on oyster gametes and embryos: glyphosate (both as an active substance and in the Roundup formulation) and diuron. France is Europe's leading consumer of agrochemical substances and as such, contamination of France's coastal waters by pesticides is a major concern. Glyphosate and diuron are among the most frequently detected herbicides in oyster production areas; as oyster is a specie with external reproduction, its gametes and embryos are in direct contact with the surrounding waters and are hence particularly exposed to these potentially dangerous substances. In the course of this study, differences in genotoxic and embryotoxic responses were observed in the various experiments, possibly due to differences in pollutant sensitivity between the tested genitor lots. Glyphosate and Roundup had no effect on oyster development at the concentrations tested, whereas diuron significantly affected embryo-larval development from the lowest tested concentration of 0.05 μg L⁻¹, i.e. an environmentally realistic concentration. Diuron may therefore have a significant impact on oyster recruitment rates in the natural environment. Our spermiotoxicity study revealed none of the tested herbicides to be cytotoxic for oyster spermatozoa. However, the alkaline comet assay showed diuron to have a significant genotoxic effect on oyster spermatozoa at concentrations of 0.05 μg L⁻¹ upwards. Conversely, no effects due to diuron exposure were observed on sperm mitochondrial function or acrosomal membrane integrity. Although our initial results showed no negative effect on sperm function, the possible impact on fertilization rate and the consequences of the transmission of damaged DNA for

  11. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of biogenic silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, R; Feitosa, L O; Ballottin, D; Tasic, L; Durán, N; Marcato, P D

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic silver nanoparticles with 40.3 ± 3.5 nm size and negative surface charge (− 40 mV) were prepared with Fusarium oxysporum. The cytotoxicity of 3T3 cell and human lymphocyte were studied by a TaliTM image-based cytometer and the genotoxicity through Allium cepa and comet assay. The results of BioAg-w (washed) and BioAg-nw (unwashed) biogenic silver nanoparticles showed cytotoxicity exceeding 50 μg/mL with no significant differences of response in 5 and 10 μg/mL regarding viability. Results of genotoxicity at concentrations 5.0 and 10.0 ug/mL show some response, but at concentrations 0.5 and 1.0 μg/mL the washed and unwashed silver nanoparticles did not present any effect. This in an important result since in tests with different bacteria species and strains, including resistant, MIC (minimal inhibitory concentration) had good answers at concentrations less than 1.9 μg/mL. This work concludes that biogenic silver nanoparticles may be a promising option for antimicrobial use in the range where no cyto or genotoxic effect were observed. Furthermore, human cells were found to have a greater resistance to the toxic effects of silver nanoparticles in comparison with other cells.

  12. Genotoxic pressure of vineyard pesticides in fish: field and mesocosm surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bony, S; Gillet, C; Bouchez, A; Margoum, C; Devaux, A

    2008-09-17

    The present study deals with the genotoxicity assessment of vineyard pesticides in fish exposed in the field or in mesocosm conditions. Primary DNA damage was quantified as strand breaks using the single cell gel electrophoresis assay (Comet assay) applied to fish erythrocytes. In a first experiment, a significant genotoxic effect was observed following an upstream-downstream gradient in early life stages of brown trout (Salmo trutta fario) exposed in the Morcille River contaminated by a mixture of vineyard pesticides during three consecutive years. The pronounced response in terms of DNA damage reported in the present study could argue for a high sensitivity of fish early life stage and/or a high level of exposure to genotoxic compounds in the Morcille River. This stresses the interest in using trout larvae incubated in sediment bed to assess genotoxic compounds in the field. In a second experiment, adult European topminnow (Phoxinus phoxinus) were exposed in water running through artificial channels to a mixture of diuron and azoxystrobin, two of the main pesticides detected in the Morcille watershed. As compared with the unexposed channel, a 3-5-fold increase in the DNA damage was observed in fish exposed to chronic environmental pesticide concentrations (1-2 microg L(-1) for diuron and 0.5-1 microg L(-1) for axoxystrobin). A single 6h pulse of pesticide (14 microg L(-1) of diuron and 7 microg L(-1) of azoxystrobin) was applied to simulate transiently elevated chemical concentrations in the river following storm conditions. It did not increase genotoxicity. After a 1-month recovery period, DNA damage in exposed fish erythrocytes recovered to unexposed level, suggesting possible involvement of both repair mechanisms and cellular turnover in this transient response. This work highlights that vineyard treatment by pesticides and in particular diuron and azoxystrobin can represent a genotoxic threat to fish from contaminated watershed rivers.

  13. In vitro and in vivo genotoxic evaluation of Bothrops moojeni snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak Zobiole, Nathalia; Caon, Thiago; Wildgrube Bertol, Jéssica; Pereira, Cintia Alves de Souza; Okubo, Brunna Mary; Moreno, Susana Elisa; Cardozo, Francielle Tramontini Gomes de Sousa

    2015-06-01

    Bothrops moojeni Hoge (Viperidae) venom is a complex mixture of compounds with therapeutic potential that has been included in the research and development of new drugs. Along with the biological activity, the pharmaceutical applicability of this venom depends on its toxicological profile. This study evaluates the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of the Bothrops moojeni venom (BMV). The in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of a pooled sample of BMV was assessed by the MTT and Comet assay, respectively. Genotoxicity was also evaluated in vivo through the micronucleus assay. BMV displayed a 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50) on Vero cells of 4.09 µg/mL. Vero cells treated with 4 µg/mL for 90 min and 6 h presented significant (p < 0.05, ANOVA/Newman-Keuls test) higher DNA damage than the negative control in the Comet assay. The lower DNA damage found after 6 h compared with the 90 min treatment suggests a DNA repair effect. Mice intraperitoneally treated with BMV at 10, 30, or 80 µg/animal presented significant genotoxicity (p < 0.05, ANOVA/Newman-Keuls test) in relation to the negative control after 24 h of treatment. Contrary to the in vitro results, no DNA repair seemed to occur in vivo up to 96 h post-venom inoculation at a dose of 30 µg/animal. The results show that BMV presents cyto- and genotoxicity depending on the concentration/dose used. These findings emphasize the importance of toxicological studies, including assessment of genotoxicity, in the biological activity research of BMV and/or in the development of BMV-derived products.

  14. Genotoxicity of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Granulosa Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Pöttler

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles that are aimed at targeting cancer cells, but sparing healthy tissue provide an attractive platform of implementation for hyperthermia or as carriers of chemotherapeutics. According to the literature, diverse effects of nanoparticles relating to mammalian reproductive tissue are described. To address the impact of nanoparticles on cyto- and genotoxicity concerning the reproductive system, we examined the effect of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs on granulosa cells, which are very important for ovarian function and female fertility. Human granulosa cells (HLG-5 were treated with SPIONs, either coated with lauric acid (SEONLA only, or additionally with a protein corona of bovine serum albumin (BSA; SEONLA-BSA, or with dextran (SEONDEX. Both micronuclei testing and the detection of γH2A.X revealed no genotoxic effects of SEONLA-BSA, SEONDEX or SEONLA. Thus, it was demonstrated that different coatings of SPIONs improve biocompatibility, especially in terms of genotoxicity towards cells of the reproductive system.

  15. Comet Assay on Daphnia magna in eco-genotoxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegri, Valerio; Gorbi, Gessica; Buschini, Annamaria

    2014-10-01

    Detection of potentially hazardous compounds in water bodies is a priority in environmental risk assessment. For the evaluation and monitoring of water quality, a series of methodologies may be applied. Among them, the worldwide used toxicity tests with organisms of the genus Daphnia is one of the most powerful. In recent years, some attempts were made to utilize Daphnia magna in genotoxicity testing as many of the new environmental contaminants are described as DNA-damaging agents in aquatic organisms. The aim of this research was to develop a highly standardized protocol of the Comet Assay adapted for D. magna, especially regarding the isolation of cells derived from the same tissue (haemolymph) from newborn organisms exposed in vivo. Several methods for haemolymph extraction and different Comet Assay parameters were compared. Electrophoretic conditions were adapted in order to obtain minimum DNA migration in cells derived from untreated organisms and, at the same time, maximum sensitivity in specimens treated with known genotoxicants (CdCl2 and H2O2). Additional tests were performed to investigate if life-history traits of the cladoceran (such as the age of adult organisms that provide newborns, the clutch size of origin, the number of generations reared in standard conditions) and the water composition as well, might influence the response of the assay. This study confirms the potential application of the Comet Assay in D. magna for assessing genotoxic loads in aqueous solution. The newly developed protocol could integrate the acute toxicity bioassay, thus expanding the possibility of using this model species in freshwater monitoring (waters, sediment and soil elutriates) and is in line with the spirit of the EU Water Framework Directive in reducing the number of bioassays that involve medium-sized species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Considerations on photochemical genotoxicity. II: Report of the 2009 International Workshop on Genotoxicity Testing Working Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lynch, A.M.; Guzzie, P.J.; Bauer, D.; Gocke, E.; Itoh, S.; Jacobs, A.; Krul, C.A.M.; Schepky, A.; Tanaka, N.; Kasper, P.

    2011-01-01

    A workshop to reappraise the previous IWGT recommendations for photogenotoxicity testing [E. Gocke, L. Muller, P.J. Guzzie, S. Brendler-Schwaab, S. Bulera, C.F. Chignell, L.M. Henderson, A. Jacobs, H. Murli, R.D. Snyder, N. Tanaka, Considerations on photochemical genotoxicity: report of the

  17. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effect of the [{sup 166}Dy]Dy/{sup 166}Ho-EDTMP in vivo generator system in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedraza-Lopez, Martha [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion, Salvador Zubiran, Delegacion Tlalpan, Mexico DF 14000 (Mexico); Ferro-Flores, Guillermina [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico, CP 52045 (Mexico); Arteaga de Murphy, Consuelo [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion, Salvador Zubiran, Delegacion Tlalpan, Mexico DF 14000 (Mexico)]. E-mail: consuelo_murphy@yahoo.com.mx; Morales-Ramirez, Pedro [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico, CP 52045 (Mexico); Piedras-Ross, Josefa [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion, Salvador Zubiran, Delegacion Tlalpan, Mexico DF 14000 (Mexico); Murphy-Stack, Eduardo [Hospital Santaelena, Mexico DF (Mexico); Hernandez-Oviedo, Omar [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, IPN, Mexico DF (Mexico)

    2004-11-01

    Multiple myeloma and other hematological malignancies have been treated by myeloablative radiotherapy/chemotherapy and subsequent stem cell transplantation. [{sup 166}Dy]Dy/{sup 166}Ho-ethylenediaminetetramethylene phosphonate (EDTMP) forms a stable in vivo generator system with selective skeletal uptake in mice; therefore, it could work as a potential and improved agent for marrow ablation. Induced bone marrow cytotoxicity and genotoxicity are determined by the reduction of reticulocytes (RET) and elevation of micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) in peripheral blood and ablation by bone marrow histological studies. The aim of this study was to determine the bone marrow cytotoxic and genotoxic effect of the [{sup 166}Dy]Dy/{sup 166}Ho-EDTMP in vivo generator system in mice and to evaluate by histopathology its myeloablative potential. Enriched {sup 166}Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} was irradiated and [{sup 166}Dy]DyCl{sub 3} was added to EDTMP in phosphate buffer (pH 8.0) in a molar ratio of 1:1.75. QC was determined by TLC. Dy-EDTMP complex was prepared the same way with nonirradiated dysprosium oxide. A group of BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with the radiopharmaceutical and two groups of control animals were injected with the cold complex and with 0.9% sodium chloride, respectively. A blood sample was taken at the beginning of the experiments and every 48 h for 12 days postinjection. The animals were sacrificed, organs of interest taken out and the radioactivity determined. The femur was used for histological studies. Flow cytometry analysis was used to quantify the frequency of RET and MN-RET in the blood samples. The MCNP4B Monte Carlo computer code was used for dosimetry calculations. Radiochemical purity was 99% and the mean specific activity was 1.3 MBq/mg. The RET and MN-RET frequency were statistically different in the treatment at the end of the 12-day period demonstrating cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by the in vivo generator system. The

  18. AFFINITY BIOSENSOR BASED ON SCREEN-PRINTED ELECTRODE MODIFIED WITH DNA FOR GENOTOXIC COMPOUNDS DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Kuswandi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available An electrochemical method for the detection of the genotoxic compounds using a DNA-modified electrode was developed. This electrode was successfully used for the electrochemical detection of genotoxic compounds in water samples. The electrochemical results clearly demonstrated that, the development is related to the molecular interaction between the surface-linked DNA obtained from calf thymus and the target compounds, such as pollutants, in order to develop a simple device for rapid screening of genotoxic compounds in environmental samples. The detection of such compounds was measured by their effect on the oxidation signal of the guanine peak of the DNA immobilised on the surface of carbon based Screen-Printed Electrode (SPE in disposable mode, and monitored by square-wave voltametric analysis. The DNA biosensor is able to detect known intercalating and groove-binding genotoxic compounds such as Dioxin, Bisphenol A, PCBs, and Phtalates. Application to real water samples is discussed and reported.   Keywords: electrochemical, screen-printed electrode, DNA biosensor, genotoxic compounds

  19. Application of the micronucleus test and comet assay in Trachemys callirostris erythrocytes as a model for in situ genotoxic monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Lina M; Bock, Brian C; Orozco, Luz Yaneth; Palacio, Jaime A

    2016-05-01

    Trachemys callirostris is a turtle species endemic to northern South America. In northern Colombia it occurs in the middle and lower Magdalena River drainage and its principal tributaries (lower Cauca and San Jorge rivers) and in other minor drainages such as the lower Sinú River. In recent years, industrial, agricultural, and mining activities have altered natural habitats in Colombia where this species occurs, and many of the pollutants released there are known to induce genetic alterations in wildlife species. The micronucleus test and comet assay are two of the most widely used methods to characterize DNA damage induced by physical and chemical agents in wildlife species, but have not been employed previously for genotoxic evaluations in T. callirostris. The goal of this study was to optimize these genotoxic biomarkers for T. callirostris erythrocytes in order to establish levels of DNA damage in this species and thereby evaluate its potential as a sentinel species for monitoring genotoxic effects in freshwater environments in northern Colombia. Both genotoxic techniques were applied on peripheral blood erythrocytes from 20 captive-reared T. callirostris individuals as a negative control, as well as from samples obtained from 49 individuals collected in Magangué (Magdalena River drainage) and 24 individuals collected in Lorica (Sinú River drainage) in northern Colombia. Negative control individuals exhibited a baseline frequency of micronuclei of 0.78±0.58 and baseline values for comet tail length and tail moment of 3.34±0.24µm and 10.70±5.5, respectively. In contrast, samples from both field sites exhibited significantly greater evidence of genotoxic effects for both tests. The mean MN frequencies in the samples from Magangué and Lorica were 8.04±7.08 and 12.19±12.94, respectively. The mean tail length for samples from Magangué and Lorica were 5.78±3.18 and 15.46±7.39, respectively. Finally, the mean tail moment for samples from Magangué and

  20. Genotoxic Maillard byproducts in current phytopharmaceutical preparations of Echinodorus grandiflorus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELISANGELA C. LIMA-DELLAMORA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracts of Echinodorus grandiflorus obtained from dried leaves by three different techniques were evaluated by bacterial lysogenic induction assay (Inductest in relation to their genotoxic properties. Before being added to test cultures, extracts were sterilized either by steam sterilization or ultraviolet light. Only the extracts prepared by infusion and steam sterilized have shown genotoxic activity. The phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of the flavonoids isovitexin, isoorientin, swertisin and swertiajaponin, isolated from a genotoxic fraction. They were assayed separately and tested negative in the Inductest protocol. The development of browning color and sweet smell in extracts submitted to heat, prompted further chemical analysis in search for Maillard's reaction precursors. Several aminoacids and reducing sugars were cast in the extract. The presence of characteristic Maillard's melanoidins products was determined by spectrophotometry in the visible region and the inhibition of this reaction was observed when its characteristic inhibitor, sodium bisulfite, was added prior to heating. Remarkably, this is the first paper reporting on the appearance of such compounds in a phytomedicine preparation under a current phytopharmaceutical procedure. The genotoxic activity of such heat-prepared infusions imply in some risk of developing degenerative diseases for patients in long-term, uncontrolled use of such phytomedicines.

  1. Occurrence of Salmonella spp. in broiler chicken carcasses and their susceptibility to antimicrobial agents Ocorrência de Salmonella spp. em carcaças de frango e sua suscetibilidade a agentes antimicrobianos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalila Angélica Moliterno Duarte

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to evaluate the occurrence of Salmonellae in broiler chicken carcasses and to determine the antimicrobial resistance profile of the isolated strains. Twenty-five out of the 260 broiler chicken carcasses samples (9.6% were positive for Salmonella. S. Enteritidis was the most frequent serovar. Nineteen Salmonella isolates were tested for antimicrobial resistance, and the results indicated that 94.7% were resistant to at least one antimicrobial agent. Resistance to streptomycin (73.7%, nitrofurantoin (52.3%, tetracycline (31.6%, and nalidixic acid (21% were the prevalent amongst Salmonella strains tested.O presente estudo teve como objetivo verificar a ocorrência de Salmonellae em amostras de carcaças de frango e a suscetibilidade dos isolados a agentes antimicrobianos. Das 260 carcaças analisadas, 25 (9,6% foram positivas para Salmonella. Salmonella Enteritidis foi o sorovar predominante. Com relação à suscetibilidade a agentes antimicrobianos, 94,7% das cepas de Salmonella testadas, apresentaram resistência a um ou mais agentes antimicrobianos. Os perfís de resistência mais comumente observados entre os isolados foram a resistência à estreptomicina (73,7%, nitrofurantoína (52,3%, tetraciclina (31,6% e ácido nalidíxico (21%.

  2. Correlation between serum anyloid a low density lipoprotein and genotoxicity in smokers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamil, A.; Rashid, A.; Majeed, A.; Naveed, A.K.

    2018-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the relation between serum amyloid A-low density lipoprotein (SAA-LDL) and genotoxicity in smokers. Study Design:An experimental study. Place and Duration of Study:Army Medical College, Rawalpindi and National Institute of Health (NIH), Islamabad, from June 2014 to February 2015. Methodology:Seventy healthy Sprague Dawley rats were purchased from NIH and exposed to cigarette smoke in smoke chamber for three months. Blood samples were drawn from each rat at the end of the study period. SAA-LDL was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Genotoxicity was assessed by cytokinesis block micronucleus (CBMN) assay. Pearson correlation was used to find correlation between SAA-LDL and genotoxicity. Results:Strong positive correlation was found between SAA-LDL and micronuclei frequency in smoke-exposed rats (r=0.799, N=70, p <0.01). Conclusion:Statistically significant strong positive correlation between SAA-LDL and genotoxicity in smoke-exposed rats shows that changes in one is associated with changes in other and vice versa. (author)

  3. Evaluation of perfluorooctanoate for potential genotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. Butenhoff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA is a fully fluorinated eight-carbon fatty acid analog with exceptional stability toward degradation that has been used as an industrial surfactant and has been detected in environmental and biological matrices. Exposures to PFOA in the workplace and in the environment have continuously stimulated investigations into its potential human health hazards. In this article, the results of fifteen unpublished genotoxicity assays conducted with perfluorooctanoate (as either the linear or linear/branched ammonium salt (APFO or the linear/branched sodium salt are reported and include: seven mutation assays (three in vitro reverse mutation assays with histidine auxotrophic strains of Salmonella typhimurium, two in vitro reverse mutation assays with the tryptophan auxotrophic Escherichia coli WP2uvr strain, one in vitro mitotic recombination (gene conversion assay with Saccharomyces cerevisiae D4, and an in vitro Chinese hamster ovary (CHO HGPRT forward mutation assay; seven studies to assess potential for chromosomal damage (three in vitro CHO chromosomal aberration studies, an in vitro human whole blood lymphocyte chromosomal aberration study, and three in vivo mouse micronucleus assays; and an in vitro C3H 10T1/2 cell transformation assay. Although PFOA has not been demonstrated to be metabolized, all in vitro assays were conducted both in the presence and in the absence of a mammalian hepatic microsomal activation system. These assays were originally described in twelve contract laboratory reports which have been available via the United States Environmental Protection Agency public docket (Administrative Record 226 for over a decade; however, the details of these assays have not been published previously in the open scientific literature. With the exception of limited positive findings at high and cytotoxic concentrations in some assay trials which reflected the likely consequence of cytotoxic disruption of normal cellular

  4. Evaluation of genotoxicity of nitrile fragrance ingredients using in vitro and in vivo assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, S P; Politano, V T; Api, A M

    2013-09-01

    Genotoxicity studies were conducted on a group of 8 fragrance ingredients that belong to the nitrile family. These nitriles are widely used in consumer products however there is very limited data in the literature regarding the genotoxicity of these nitriles. The 8 nitriles were assessed for genotoxicity using an Ames test, in vitro chromosome aberration test or in vitro micronucleus test. The positive results observed in the in vitro tests were further investigated using an in vivo micronucleus test. The results from these different tests were compared and these 8 nitriles are not considered to be genotoxic. Dodecanitrile and 2,2,3-trimethylcyclopent-3-enylacetonitrile were negative in the in vitro chromosome aberration test and in vitro micronucleus test, respectively. While citronellyl nitrile, 3-methyl-5-phenylpentanenitrile, cinnamyl nitrile, and 3-methyl-5-phenylpent-2-enenitrile revealed positive results in the in vitro tests, but confirmatory in vivo tests determined these nitriles to be negative in the in vivo micronucleus assay. The remaining two nitriles (benzonitrile and α-cyclohexylidene benzeneacetonitrile) were negative in the in vivo micronucleus test. This study aims to evaluate the genotoxicity potential of these nitriles as well as enrich the literature with genotoxicity data on fragrance ingredients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of clothianidin in human lymphocytes with or without metabolic activation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlı Şekeroğlu, Zülal; Şekeroğlu, Vedat; Uçgun, Ebru; Kontaş Yedier, Seval; Aydın, Birsen

    2018-02-26

    Clothianidin (CHN) is a broad-spectrum neonicotinoid insecticide. Limited studies have been carried out on the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of both CHN using different genotoxicity tests in human cells with or without human metabolic activation system (S9 mix). Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of CHN and its metabolites on human lymphocyte cultures with or without S9 mix using chromosomal aberration (CA) and micronucleus (MN) tests. The cultures were treated with 25, 50, and 100 µg/ml of CHN in the presence (3 h treatment) and absence (48 h treatment) of S9 mix. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was used as a solvent control. CHN showed cytotoxic and genotoxic effects due to significant decreases in mitotic index (MI) and nuclear division index (NDI), and significant increases in the CAs, aberrant cells, and MN formation in the absence of S9 mix when compared with solvent control. However, CHN did not significantly induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in the presence of S9 mix. Our results indicated that CHN has cytotoxic, cytostatic, and genotoxic potential on human peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures, but not its metabolites under the experimental conditions.

  6. Molecular and cytogenetic assessment of Dipterygium glaucum genotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NADA H. ALTWATY

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of the present study is to assess the genotoxicity of Dipterygium glaucum grows widely in Saudi Arabia desert to produce safety herbal products. This work is considered the first and pioneer report so far due to the lack and poor evaluated reports of the plant species for their mutagensity, genotoxicity and cytogenetics effects. Cytogenetic effects of D. glaucum on mitotic in roots of Vicia faba showed reduction in mitotic activity using three extracts; water, ethanol and ethyl acetate. Chromosomal abnormalities were recorded that included stickiness of chromosomes, chromatin bridge, fragments, lagging chromosome and micronuclei. Protein bands and RAPD analyses of V. faba treated with three D. glaucum extracts revealed some newly induced proteins and DNA fragments and other disappeared. Chemical constitution of the plant species should be identified with their biological activities against human and animal cells like HeLa cancer cell line. We are recommending using additional genotoxicity tests and other toxicity tests on animal culture with different concentrations and also utilizing several drought and heat tolerant genes of the plant species in gene cloning to develop and improve other economical crop plants instead of using the species as oral herbal remedy

  7. A mixture of honey bee products ameliorates the genotoxic side effects of cyclophosphamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha Aly Fahmy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the protective role of a mixture of honey bee products (honey, royal jelly and pollen grains against the genotoxicity induced by the anticancer drug cyclophosphamide (CP. Methods: The study included chromosomal aberration analysis in mice bone marrow cells, induction of morphological sperm abnormalities, DNA fragmentation and histopathological changes induced in liver cells of mice. CP was injected intraperitoneally at the dose of 20 mg/ kg body weight. The mixture of honey bee products was administrated orally for different periods of time 5, 10 and 15 days with a dose exactly equivalent to the daily intake of human beings. Results: The results revealed that honey mixture ameliorated the genotoxic side effects of CP. For chromosomal aberrations the percentage reached 25.20 ± 1.30 for CP treated group, while it reached half of that value 12.30 ± 0.54 in CP-group pretreated with honey mixture for 15 days. Breaks, fragments and multiple aberrations were the most pronounced types of aberrations induced after CP treatment and honey mixture reduced these types of abnormalities. CP induced significant percentage of sperm abnormalities 8.52 ± 0.17 compared to control 3.10 ± 0.10. The percentage of sperm abnormalities reached nearly to the control value in CP- mice treated with honey mixture for 15 days. Honey also reduced the incidence of liver DNA damage induced by CP. The results also indicated that CP had a marked damaging effect on liver tissue including severe dilatation, congestion of main blood vessels and massive infiltration of inflammatory cells with irregular general pattern of the tissue. These effects were greatly ameliorated by using oral administration of honey mixture for different periods of time. Conclusions: The results concluded that honey bee mixture can be used as chemopreventive agent for minimizing the genotoxic side effects of the anticancer drug CP and open the field for its use in many applications.

  8. Genotoxicity of antiobesity drug orlistat and effect of caffeine intervention: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Manoswini; Ghosh, Ilika; Jana, Aditi; Ghosh, Manosij; Mukherjee, Anita

    2017-07-01

    Obesity is a major global health problem associated with various adverse effects. Pharmacological interventions are often necessary for the management of obesity. Orlistat is an FDA-approved antiobesity drug which is a potent inhibitor of intestinal lipases. In the current study, orlistat was evaluated for its genotoxic potential in human lymphocyte cells in vitro and was compared with that of another antiobesity drug sibutramine, presently withdrawn from market due its undesirable health effects. Caffeine intake may be an additional burden in people using anorectic drugs, therefore, further work is needed to be carried out to evaluate the possible effects of caffeine on orlistat-induced DNA damage. Human lymphocytes were exposed to orlistat (250, 500 and 1000 μg/ml), sibutramine (250, 500 and 1000 μg/ml) and caffeine (25, 50, 75, 100, 125 and 150 μg/ml) to assess their genotoxicity by comet assay in vitro. In addition, lymphocytes were co-incubated with caffeine (50, 75 and 100 μg/ml) and a single concentration of orlistat (250 μg/ml). Orlistat and sibutramine were genotoxic at all concentrations tested, sibutramine being more genotoxic. Caffeine was found to be genotoxic at concentrations 125 μg/ml and above. Co-treatment of orlistat with non-genotoxic concentrations (50, 75 and 100 μg/ml) of caffeine lead to a decrease in DNA damage. Orlistat can induce DNA damage in human lymphocytes in vitro and caffeine was found to reduce orlistat-induced genotoxicity.

  9. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate cobalt in human lung fibroblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Leah J.; Holmes, Amie L. [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Maine Center for Environmental Toxicology and Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Kandpal, Sanjeev Kumar; Mason, Michael D. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Zheng, Tongzhang [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT (United States); Wise, John Pierce, E-mail: John.Wise@usm.maine.edu [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Maine Center for Environmental Toxicology and Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Cobalt exposure is increasing as cobalt demand rises worldwide due to its use in enhancing rechargeable battery efficiency, super-alloys, and magnetic products. Cobalt is considered a possible human carcinogen with the lung being a primary target. However, few studies have considered cobalt-induced toxicity in human lung cells. Therefore, in this study, we sought to determine the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of particulate and soluble cobalt in human lung cells. Cobalt oxide and cobalt chloride were used as representative particulate and soluble cobalt compounds, respectively. Exposure to both particulate and soluble cobalt induced a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular cobalt ion levels. Based on intracellular cobalt ion levels, we found that soluble cobalt was more cytotoxic than particulate cobalt while particulate and soluble cobalt induced similar levels of genotoxicity. However, soluble cobalt induced cell cycle arrest indicated by the lack of metaphases at much lower intracellular cobalt concentrations compared to cobalt oxide. Accordingly, we investigated the role of particle internalization in cobalt oxide-induced toxicity and found that particle-cell contact was necessary to induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity after cobalt exposure. These data indicate that cobalt compounds are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung fibroblasts, and solubility plays a key role in cobalt-induced lung toxicity. - Highlights: • Particulate and soluble cobalt are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung cells. • Soluble cobalt induces more cytotoxicity compared to particulate cobalt. • Soluble and particulate cobalt induce similar levels of genotoxicity. • Particle-cell contact is required for particulate cobalt-induced toxicity.

  10. Genotoxicity and potential carcinogenicity of cyanobacterial toxins - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegura, Bojana; Straser, Alja; Filipič, Metka

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms has increased significantly in many regions of the world in the last century due to water eutrophication. These blooms are hazardous to humans, animals, and plants due to the production of cyanotoxins, which can be classified in five different groups: hepatotoxins, neurotoxins, cytotoxins, dermatotoxins, and irritant toxins (lipopolysaccharides). There is evidence that certain cyanobacterial toxins are genotoxic and carcinogenic; however, the mechanisms of their potential carcinogenicity are not well understood. The most frequently occurring and widespread cyanotoxins in brackish and freshwater blooms are the cyclic heptapeptides, i.e., microcystins (MCs), and the pentapeptides, i.e., nodularins (NODs). The main mechanism associated with potential carcinogenic activity of MCs and NOD is the inhibition of protein phosphatases, which leads to the hyperphosphorylation of cellular proteins, which is considered to be associated with their tumor-promoting activity. Apart from this, MCs and NOD induce increased formation of reactive oxygen species and, consequently, oxidative DNA damage. There is also evidence that MCs and NOD induce micronuclei, and NOD was shown to have aneugenic activity. Both cyanotoxins interfere with DNA damage repair pathways, which, along with DNA damage, is an important factor involved in the carcinogenicity of these agents. Furthermore, these toxins increase the expression of TNF-α and early-response genes, including proto-oncogenes, genes involved in the response to DNA damage, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Rodent studies indicate that MCs and NOD are tumor promotors, whereas NOD is thought to have also tumor-initiating activity. Another cyanobacterial toxin, cylindrospermopsin (CYN), which has been neglected for a long time, is lately being increasingly found in the freshwater environment. The principal mechanism of its toxicity is the irreversible inhibition of protein synthesis. It is pro-genotoxic

  11. Toxicity of nalidixic acid on candida albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobieski, R J; Brewer, A R

    1976-03-01

    The antibacterial drug nalidixic acid (Nal) can suppress the growth of Candida albicans at levels of the drug normally found in urine. Growth suppression increases as drug levels are increased, and Nal also causes a similar proportional inhibition of the synthesis of all cellular macromolecules. However, growth temperature (25 versus 37 C) and the divalent cations Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) can increase C. albicans resistance to Nal. Also, nitrogen depletion of Candida shows that Nal-treated and untreated cells exhibit no difference in leucine uptake during readaptation to nitrogen. In Nal-treated, nitrogen-starved cells, ribonucleic acid and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) biosynthesis are less affected than in unstarved Nal-treated cells, but of the two nucleic acids DNA synthesis is the most affected. Nal-resistant strains of C. albicans exhibit a slight toxicity for macromolecular synthesis. Nal treatment of a synchronized population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in an increase in the culture mean doubling time of, at most, 20%, but Nal causes the loss of synchronous cell division. With a synchronized population of Kluyveromyces lactis, Nal causes an increase in the mean doubling time of upwards of 300%, with synchrony of cell division being maintained. It is known that S. cerevisiae asynchronously synthesizes mitochondrial DNA during the cell cycle, whereas with K. lactis it is synchronous. Thus, with C. albicans Nal toxicity is dependent both on the dose and the physiological state of the cell. Furthermore, Nal inhibits growth of yeast with synchronous mitochondrial DNA synthesis more adversely than yeast with asynchronous mitochondrial DNA synthesis.

  12. Comparative Physicochemical and Genotoxicity Assessments of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    ABSTRACT: The textile industry has become indispensable in view of its basic and social importance to human life, but its environmental impact has continued to be a subject of concern. ... the economy of many countries. ... Textile and clothing production process ..... Genotoxicity screening of industrial effluents using.

  13. CHO cell cytotoxicity and genotoxicity analyses of disinfection by-products: An updated review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elizabeth D.Wagner; Michael J.Plewa

    2017-01-01

    The disinfection of drinking water is an important public health service that generates high quality,safe and palatable tap water.The disinfection of drinking water to reduce waterborne disease was an outstanding public health achievement of the 20th century.An unintended consequence is the reaction of disinfectants with natural organic matter,anthropogenic contaminants and bromide/iodide to form disinfection by-products (DBPs).A large number of DBPs are cytotoxic,neurotoxic,mutagenic,genotoxic,carcinogenic and teratogenic.Epidemiological studies demonstrated low but significant associations between disinfected drinking water and adverse health effects.The distribution of DBPs in disinfected waters has been well defined by advances in high precision analytical chemistry.Progress in the analytical biology and toxicology of DBPs has been forthcoming.The objective of this review was to provide a detailed presentation of the methodology for the quantitative,comparative analyses on the induction of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of 103 DBPs using an identical analytical biological platform and endpoints.A single Chinese hamster ovary cell line was employed in the assays.The data presented are derived from papers published in the literature as well as additional new data and represent the largest direct quantitative comparison on the toxic potency of both regulated and emerging DBPs.These data may form the foundation of novel research to define the major forcing agents of DBP-mediated toxicity in disinfected water and may play an important role in achieving the goal of making safe drinking water better.

  14. Genotoxicity of clays with potential use in biopolymers for food packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anoop Kumar; Mortensen, Alicja; Hadrup, Niels

    Genotoxicity of clays with potential use in biopolymers for food packaging Plastics produced from biopolymers are of commercial interest as they are manufactured from renewable resources such as agricultural crop wastes and have the potential to meet environmental and health requirements. Biopoly......Genotoxicity of clays with potential use in biopolymers for food packaging Plastics produced from biopolymers are of commercial interest as they are manufactured from renewable resources such as agricultural crop wastes and have the potential to meet environmental and health requirements...... in crude suspensions (suspended in cell culture medium) and crude suspensions filtrated through a 0.2 µm pore size filter in order to investigate the potential effect of “nanoparticles” only. The two clays showed noticeable differences in genotoxicity; both crude and filtered suspensions of Cloisite...

  15. Genotoxicity Revaluation of Three Commercial Nitroheterocyclic Drugs: Nifurtimox, Benznidazole, and Metronidazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Buschini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitroheterocyclic compounds are widely used as therapeutic agents against a variety of protozoan and bacterial infections. However, the literature on these compounds, suspected of being carcinogens, is widely controversial. In this study, cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of three drugs, Nifurtimox (NFX, Benznidazole (BNZ, and Metronidazole (MTZ was re-evaluated by different assays. Only NFX reduces survival rate in actively proliferating cells. The compounds are more active for base-pair substitution than frameshift induction in Salmonella; NFX and BNZ are more mutagenic than MTZ; they are widely dependent from nitroreduction whereas microsomal fraction S9 weakly affects the mutagenic potential. Comet assay detects BNZ- and NFX-induced DNA damage at doses in the range of therapeutically treated patient plasma concentration; BNZ seems to mainly act through ROS generation whereas a dose-dependent mechanism of DNA damaging is suggested for NFX. The lack of effects on mammalian cells for MTZ is confirmed also in MN assay whereas MN induction is observed for NFX and BNZ. The effects of MTZ, that shows comparatively low reduction potential, seem to be strictly dependent on anaerobic/hypoxic conditions. Both NFX and BNZ may not only lead to cellular damage of the infective agent but also interact with the DNA of mammalian cells.

  16. An assessment of the genotoxicity and human health risk of topical use of kojic acid [5-hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)-4H-pyran-4-one].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohynek, Gerhard J; Kirkland, David; Marzin, Daniel; Toutain, Herve; Leclerc-Ribaud, Christele; Jinnai, Hiroyuki

    2004-01-01

    Kojic acid (KA), a natural substance produced by fungi or bacteria, such as Aspergillus, Penicillium or Acetobacter spp, is contained in traditional Japanese fermented foods and is used as a dermatological skin-lightening agent. High concentrations of KA (>or=1000 microg/plate) were mutagenic in S. typhimurium strains TA 98, TA 100, TA 1535, TA102 and E. coli WP2uvrA, but not in TA 1537. An Ames test following the "treat and plate" protocol was negative. A chromosome aberration test in V79 cells following a robust protocol showed only a marginal increase in chromosome aberrations at cytotoxic concentrations after prolonged (>or=18 h) exposure. No genotoxic activity was observed for hprt mutations either in mouse lymphoma or V79 cells, or in in vitro micronucleus tests in human keratinocytes or hepatocytes. All in vivo genotoxicity studies on KA doses were negative, including mouse bone marrow micronucleus tests after single or multiple doses, an in vivo/in vitro unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) test, or a study in the liver of the transgenic Muta(TM) Mouse. On the basis of pharmacokinetic studies in rats and in vitro absorption studies in human skin, the systemic exposure of KA in man following its topical application is estimated to be in the range of 0.03-0.06 mg/kg/day. Comparing these values with the NOAEL in oral subchronic animal studies (250 mg/kg/day), the calculated margin of safety would be 4200- to 8900-fold. Comparing human exposure with the doses that were negative for micronuclei, UDS and gene mutations in vivo, the margins of safety are 16000 to 26000-fold. In conclusion, the topical use of KA as a skin lightening agent results in minimal exposure that poses no or negligible risk of genotoxicity or toxicity to the consumer.

  17. Effect of nalidixic acid on repair of single-strand breaks in DNA induced by ionizing irradiation in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francia, I [Debreceni Orvostudomanyi Egyetem (Hungary); Okos, A; Hernadi, F J [Institute of Pharmacology, Debrecen (Hungary)

    1978-09-30

    The incidence of DNA single-strand breaks induced by /sup 60/Co irradiation and their repair in E.coli K12 (AB 1157) rec/sup +/ cells were studied by the alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation method described by McGrath and Williams. For the quantitative analysis of sedimentation profiles we used the s 1/2 values described by Veatch and Okada. The s 1/2 value of non-irradiated controls was 22.4, and after 20 krads irradiation it was found to be 11.7. A postirradiation incubation at 37 /sup 0/C for 60 min increasedthe s 1/2 value from 11.7 to 22.1. Nalidixic acid at low concentration (20-50 ..mu..g/ml) did not block, but at 100 ..mu..g/ml extensively inhibited the above repair process, exhibiting an s 1/2 value of 14.4.

  18. Genotoxic effects of boric acid and borax in zebrafish, Danio rerio using alkaline comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülsoy, Nagihan; Yavas, Cüneyd; Mutlu, Özal

    2015-01-01

    The present study is conducted to determine the potential mechanisms of Boron compounds, boric acid (BA) and borax (BX), on genotoxicity of zebrafish Danio rerio for 24, 48, 72 and 96-hours acute exposure (level:1, 4, 16, 64 mg/l BA and BX) in semi-static bioassay experiment. For that purpose, peripheral erythrocytes were drawn from caudal vein and Comet assay was applied to assess genotoxicity. Acute (96 hours) exposure and high concentrations of boric acid and borax increases % tail DNA and Olive tail moment. Genotoxicity was found for BA as concentration-dependent and BX as concentration and time dependent manner. In general, significant effects (P borax-induced genotoxicity in fish.

  19. Genotoxic Effects of Exposure to Gasoline Fumes on Petrol Pump Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Amrin Shaikh; Darshana Barot; Divya Chandel

    2018-01-01

    Background: Petrol pump workers are occupationally exposed to gasoline and its fumes consisting of several mutagenic chemicals. Objective: To evaluate the genotoxic effects of exposure to gasoline fumes on petrol pump workers. Methods: The study groups included 70 petrol pump workers (exposed group) and 70 healthy age-matched individuals with no known exposure (comparison group). Buccal micronucleus cytome assay (BMCyt) was performed to check the genotoxicity caused due to inhalation ...

  20. Genotoxicity assessment of some cosmetic and food additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sotto, Antonella; Maffei, Francesca; Hrelia, Patrizia; Di Giacomo, Silvia; Pagano, Ester; Borrelli, Francesca; Mazzanti, Gabriela

    2014-02-01

    α-Hexylcinnamaldehyde (HCA) and p-tert-butyl-alpha-methylhydrocinnamic aldehyde (BMHCA) are synthetic aldehydes, characterized by a typical floral scent, which makes them suitable to be used as fragrances in personal care (perfumes, creams, shampoos, etc.) and household products, and as flavouring additives in food and pharmaceutical industry. The aldehydic structure suggests the need for a safety assessment for these compounds. Here, HCA and BMHCA were evaluated for their potential genotoxic risk, both at gene level (frameshift or base-substitution mutations) by the bacterial reverse mutation assay (Ames test), and at chromosomal level (clastogenicity and aneuploidy) by the micronucleus test. In order to evaluate a primary and repairable DNA damage, the comet assay has been also included. In spite of their potential hazardous chemical structure, a lack of mutagenicity was observed for both compounds in all bacterial strains tested, also in presence of the exogenous metabolic activator, showing that no genotoxic derivatives were produced by CYP450-mediated biotransformations. Neither genotoxicity at chromosomal level (i.e. clastogenicity or aneuploidy) nor single-strand breaks were observed. These findings will be useful in further assessing the safety of HCA and BMHCA as either flavour or fragrance chemicals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of the tickcide, genotoxic, and mutagenic effects of the Ruta graveolens L. (Rutaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Vargas de Carvalho

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Current analysis investigated the tickcide effects of the aqueous extract and chloroform fractions of Ruta graveolens L. (rue on engorged females of Rhipicephalus microplus, as well as their genotoxic and mutagenic effects on human leukocytes. The best tickcide activity (non-dependent dose and genotoxic / mutagenic effects (dependent-dose were observed on exposure to chloroform fractions. Results suggest that extract fractions of R. graveolens L are efficient against R. microplus, although the fraction and the tested concentrations show genotoxic and mutagenic potential for human leukocytes.

  2. Assessing the genotoxicity of urban air pollutants using two in situ plant bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarini, M.; Fatigoni, C.; Dominici, L.; Maestri, S. [Department of Medical-Surgical Specialties and Public Health, University of Perugia, I-06126 (Italy); Ederli, L.; Pasqualini, S. [Department of Applied Biology, University of Perugia, I-06121 (Italy); Monarca, S. [Department of Medical-Surgical Specialties and Public Health, University of Perugia, I-06126 (Italy); Moretti, M., E-mail: massimo.moretti@unipg.i [Department of Medical-Surgical Specialties and Public Health, University of Perugia, I-06126 (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    Genotoxicity of urban air has been analysed almost exclusively in airborne particulates. We monitored the genotoxic effects of airborne pollutants in the urban air of Perugia (Central Italy). Two plant bioindicators with different genetic endpoints were used: micronuclei in meiotic pollen mother cells using Tradescantia-micronucleus bioassay (Trad-MCN) and DNA damage in nuclei of Nicotiana tabacum leaves using comet assay (Nicotiana-comet). Buds of Tradescantia clone no. 4430 and young N. tabacum cv. Xanthi plants were exposed for 24 h at three sites with different pollution levels. One control site (indoor control) was also used. The two bioassays showed different sensitivities toward urban pollutants: Trad-MCN assay was the most sensitive, but DNA damage in N. tabacum showed a better correlation with the pollutant concentrations. In situ biomonitoring of airborne genotoxins using higher plants combined with chemical analysis is thus recommended for characterizing genotoxicity of urban air. - Plant bioassays used to explore in situ the correlation between air pollution and genotoxicity.

  3. Assessing the genotoxicity of urban air pollutants using two in situ plant bioassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villarini, M.; Fatigoni, C.; Dominici, L.; Maestri, S.; Ederli, L.; Pasqualini, S.; Monarca, S.; Moretti, M.

    2009-01-01

    Genotoxicity of urban air has been analysed almost exclusively in airborne particulates. We monitored the genotoxic effects of airborne pollutants in the urban air of Perugia (Central Italy). Two plant bioindicators with different genetic endpoints were used: micronuclei in meiotic pollen mother cells using Tradescantia-micronucleus bioassay (Trad-MCN) and DNA damage in nuclei of Nicotiana tabacum leaves using comet assay (Nicotiana-comet). Buds of Tradescantia clone no. 4430 and young N. tabacum cv. Xanthi plants were exposed for 24 h at three sites with different pollution levels. One control site (indoor control) was also used. The two bioassays showed different sensitivities toward urban pollutants: Trad-MCN assay was the most sensitive, but DNA damage in N. tabacum showed a better correlation with the pollutant concentrations. In situ biomonitoring of airborne genotoxins using higher plants combined with chemical analysis is thus recommended for characterizing genotoxicity of urban air. - Plant bioassays used to explore in situ the correlation between air pollution and genotoxicity.

  4. Genotoxicity Screening of Industrial Effluents using Onion bulbs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    ABSTRACT: The potential cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of three industrial wastewaters (brewery .... National recommended water quality criteria – correction; cWorld Health Organisation (1996). ..... Industrial Pollution Policy Management Study.

  5. Toward a Genotoxic Protection Factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesarini, J.P.; Demanneville, S.

    2000-01-01

    P53, a molecule normally expressed before mitosis, is considered as the 'guardian of the genome'. In the skin its level is normally very low (<3% of cells), detected by immunohistochemical methods. At least 50% of the keratinocytes express p53 protein, 24 h following a significant UV irradiation (2 SED). It is expected using sunscreens to reduce the expression of p53 in parallel with their ability to reduce the actinic erythema, the endpoint adopted to evaluate the Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of sunscreens. P53 detection on biopsies performed on the buttocks of human volunteers was used to evaluate the genotoxic protecting factor (GPF) of several sunscreens with either high UVB filtration or high UVA filtration, characterised by various SPF (COLIPA) from 10 to 40. The p53 count in parallel with sunburn cell count were the parameters studied. In general, the GPF of the sunscreens was found below the proprietary SPF. If a genotoxic effect is shown in an increased p53 expression, this effect is still observed at a dose lower than the dose inducing the faintest actinic erythema. (author)

  6. Toward a Genotoxic Protection Factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesarini, J.P.; Demanneville, S

    2000-07-01

    P53, a molecule normally expressed before mitosis, is considered as the 'guardian of the genome'. In the skin its level is normally very low (<3% of cells), detected by immunohistochemical methods. At least 50% of the keratinocytes express p53 protein, 24 h following a significant UV irradiation (2 SED). It is expected using sunscreens to reduce the expression of p53 in parallel with their ability to reduce the actinic erythema, the endpoint adopted to evaluate the Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of sunscreens. P53 detection on biopsies performed on the buttocks of human volunteers was used to evaluate the genotoxic protecting factor (GPF) of several sunscreens with either high UVB filtration or high UVA filtration, characterised by various SPF (COLIPA) from 10 to 40. The p53 count in parallel with sunburn cell count were the parameters studied. In general, the GPF of the sunscreens was found below the proprietary SPF. If a genotoxic effect is shown in an increased p53 expression, this effect is still observed at a dose lower than the dose inducing the faintest actinic erythema. (author)

  7. Genotoxicity tests on D-tagatose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, C L; Whittaker, M H; Frankos, V H

    1999-04-01

    D-tagatose is a low-calorie sweetener that tastes like sucrose. Its genotoxic potential was examined in five standard assays: the Ames Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay, the Escherichia coli/mammalian microsome assay, a chromosomal aberration assay in Chinese hamster ovary cells, a mouse lymphoma forward mutation assay, and an in vivo mouse micronucleus assay. D-tagatose was not found to increase the number of revertants per plate relative to vehicle controls in either the S. typhimurium tester strains or the WP2uvrA- tester strain with or without metabolic activation at doses up to 5000 microg/plate. No significant increase in Chinese hamster ovary cells with chromosomal aberrations was observed at concentrations up to 5000 microg/ml with or without metabolic activation. D-tagatose was not found to increase the mutant frequency in mouse lymphoma L5178Y cells with or without metabolic activation up to concentrations of 5000 microg/ml. D-tagatose caused no significant increase in micronuclei in bone marrow polychromatic erythrocytes at doses up to 5000 mg/kg. D-tagatose was not found to be genotoxic under the conditions of any of the assays described above. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  8. In vivo genotoxicity of nitramines, transformation products of amine-based carbon capture technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Coutris

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In times where we need to reduce our CO2 emissions to the atmosphere, it is important to get a clearer picture of the environmental impacts associated with potential mitigation technologies. Chemical absorption with amines is emerging as the most advanced mitigation technology for post-combustion capture of CO2 from fossil fuel power stations. Although the amine solvent used in this technology is recycled during the capture process, degradation products are formed and released into the environment. Among these degradation products, the aliphatic nitramine compounds dimethylnitramine and ethanolnitramine have been identified, whose environmental impact was unknown. In addition to conducting survival, growth and reproduction tests in a range of marine species, we looked into the in vivo genotoxic potential of these two compounds to experimentally exposed fish (Coutris et al. 2015. DNA damage was analyzed in blood samples collected from the caudal vein of juvenile turbot Scophthalmus maximus after 28 day exposure to nitramines, using the 12 mini-gels version of the comet assay, with and without digestion with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. Although whole organism bioassays indicated that nitramine toxicity through necrosis was low, the genotoxicity assessment revealed contrasting results, with ethanolnitramine found to be more genotoxic than dimethylnitramine by three orders of magnitude. At the lowest ethanolnitramine concentration (1 mg/L, 84 % DNA damage was observed, whereas 100 mg/L dimethylnitramine was required to cause 37 % DNA damage. The mechanisms of genotoxicity were also shown to differ between the two compounds, with oxidation of the DNA bases responsible for over 90 % of the genotoxicity of dimethylnitramine, whereas DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites were responsible for over 90 % of the genotoxicity of ethanolnitramine. Fish exposed to > 3 mg/L ethanolnitramine had virtually no DNA left in their red blood cells. The

  9. In Vitro and In Vivo Genotoxicity Assessment of Aristolochia manshuriensis Kom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youn-Hwan Hwang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arisolochiae species plants containing aristolochic acids I and II (AA I and AA II are well known to cause aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN. Recently, there are various approaches to use AAs-containing herbs after the removal of their toxic factors. However, there is little information about genotoxicity of Arisolochiae manshuriensis Kom. (AMK per se. To obtain safety information for AMK, its genotoxicity was evaluated in accordance with OECD guideline. To evaluate genotoxicity of AMK, we tested bacterial reverse mutation assay, chromosomal aberration test, and micronucleus test. Here, we also determined the amounts of AA I and II in AMK (2.85 ± 0.08 and 0.50 ± 0.02 mg/g extract, resp.. In bacterial reverse mutation assay, AMK dose-dependently increased revertant colony numbers in TA98, TA100 and TA1537 regardless of metabolic activation. AMK increased the incidence of chromosomal aberration in Chinese hamster ovary-K1 cells, but there was no statistically significant difference. The incidences of micronucleus in bone marrow erythrocyte were significantly increased in mice after oral administration of AMK (5000 mg/kg, comparing with those of vehicle group (P<0.05. The results of three standard tests suggest that the genotoxicity of AMK is directly related to the AAs contents in AMK.

  10. Genotoxicity of unmodified and organo-modified montmorillonite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anoop Kumar; Schmidt, Bjørn; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    2010-01-01

    absent in the filtered samples, which was independently confirmed by dynamic light-scattering measurements. Detection and identification of free quaternary ammonium modifier in the filtered sample was carried out by HPLC-Q-TOF/MS and revealed a total concentration of a mixture of quaternary ammonium...... assay, none of the clays produced ROS in a cell-free test system (the DCFH-DA assay). Inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to detect clay particles in the filtered samples using aluminium as a tracer element characteristic to clay. The results indicated that clay particles were...... analogues of 1.57 mu g/ml. These findings suggest that the genotoxicity of organo-modified montmorillonite was caused by the organo-modifier. The detected organo-modifier mixture was synthesized and comet-assay results showed that the genotoxic potency of this synthesized organo-modifier was in the same...

  11. Does Probiotic Yeast Act as Antigenotoxin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jekabs Raipulis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii on genotoxicity induced by the well-known mutagen 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide (4-NQO, as well as antibacterial (furazolidone and antibiotic (nalidixic acid drugs, has been studied using the short-term bacterial assay, SOS chromotest, with Escherichia coli PQ 37 as the test organism. It has been shown that S. boulardii possesses antigenotoxic activity, revealed by SOS chromotest, when coincubated with these genotoxins. A weaker antigenotoxic activity against the same compounds was observed with S. carlsbergensis, too.

  12. Genotoxicity Biomonitoring Along a Coastal Zone Under Influence of Offshore Petroleum Exploration (Southeastern Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Juan Manuel; da Conceição, Moisés Basilio; Molisani, Mauricio Mussi; Weber, Laura Isabel

    2018-03-01

    Offshore oil exploration creates threats to coastal ecosystems, including increasing urbanization and associated effluent releases. Genotoxicity biomarkers in mussels were determined across a gradient of coastal zone influences of offshore petroleum exploration in southeastern Brazil. Coastal ecosystems such as estuaries, beaches and islands were seasonally monitored for genotoxicity evaluation using the brown mussel Perna perna. The greatest DNA damage (5.2% ± 1.9% tail DNA and 1.5‰  ± 0.8‰ MN) were observed in urban estuaries, while Santana Archipelago showed levels of genotoxicity near zero and is considered a reference site. Mussels from urban and pristine beaches showed intermediate damage levels, but were also influenced by urbanization. Thus, mussel genotoxicity biomarkers greatly indicated the proposed oil exploration and urbanization scenarios that consequently are genetically affecting coastal organisms.

  13. Methodological considerations for using umu assay to assess photo-genotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cupi, Denisa; Baun, Anders

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated the feasibility of high-throughput (96-well plate) umu assay to test the genotoxic effect of TiO2 engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) under UV light (full spectrum) and visible light (455nm). Exposure of TiO2 ENPs to up to 60min of UV light induced a photocatalytic...... production of ROS. However, UV light itself caused cytotoxic damage to Salmonella typhimurium at exposures >15min and a genotoxic effect at exposures >0.5min; and use of UV filters did not lower this effect. No genotoxicity of TiO2 ENPs was observed under visible light conditions at concentrations up to 100...

  14. Primary genotoxicity in the liver following pulmonary exposure to carbon black nanoparticles in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modrzynska, Justyna; Berthing, Trine; Ravn-Haren, Gitte

    2018-01-01

    Background Little is known about the mechanism underlying the genotoxicity observed in the liver following pulmonary exposure to carbon black (CB) nanoparticles (NPs). The genotoxicity could be caused by the presence of translocated particles or by circulating inflammatory mediators released during...

  15. Proteome-wide Identification of Poly(ADP-Ribosyl)ation Targets in Different Genotoxic Stress Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungmichel, S.; Rosenthal, F.; Altmeyer, M.

    2013-01-01

    . Nuclear proteins encompassing nucleic acid binding properties are prominently PARylated upon genotoxic stress, consistent with the nuclear localization of ARTD1/PARP1 and ARTD2/PARP2. Distinct differences in proteins becoming PARylated upon various genotoxic insults are observed, exemplified...

  16. Subtle cytotoxicity and genotoxicity differences in superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with various functional groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong SC

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Seong Cheol Hong1,*, Jong Ho Lee1,*, Jaewook Lee1, Hyeon Yong Kim1, Jung Youn Park2, Johann Cho3, Jaebeom Lee1, Dong-Wook Han11Department of Nanomedical Engineering, BK21 Nano Fusion Technology Division, College of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Pusan National University, 2Department of Biotechnology Research, National Fisheries Research and Development Institute, Busan, 3Electronic Materials Lab, Samsung Corning Precision Materials Co, Ltd, Gumi City, Gyeongsangbukdo, Korea*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs have been widely utilized for the diagnosis and therapy of specific diseases, as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents and drug-delivery carriers, due to their easy transportation to targeted areas by an external magnetic field. For such biomedical applications, SPIONs must have multifunctional characteristics, including optimized size and modified surface. However, the biofunctionality and biocompatibility of SPIONs with various surface functional groups of different sizes have yet to be elucidated clearly. Therefore, it is important to carefully monitor the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of SPIONs that are surfaced-modified with various functional groups of different sizes. In this study, we evaluated SPIONs with diameters of approximately 10 nm and 100~150 nm, containing different surface functional groups. SPIONs were covered with –O-groups, so-called bare SPIONs. Following this, they were modified with three different functional groups – hydroxyl (–OH, carboxylic (–COOH, and amine (–NH2 groups – by coating their surfaces with tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS, (3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS, TEOS-APTMS, or citrate, which imparted different surface charges and sizes to the particles. The effects of SPIONs coated with these functional groups on mitochondrial activity, intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species, membrane integrity

  17. A novel mechanism of oxidative genotoxicity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The genotoxicity of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is well established. The underlying mechanism involves oxidation of DNA by ROS. However, we have recently shown that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), the major mediator of oxidative stress, can also cause genomic damage indirectly. Thus, H2O2 at pathologically relevant ...

  18. Bio-monitoring for the genotoxic assessment in road construction workers as determined by the buccal micronucleus cytome assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Ayla; Yildirim, Seda; Ekinci, Seda Yaprak; Taşdelen, Bahar

    2013-06-01

    Buccal micronucleus cytome (BMCyt) assay monitors genetic damage, cell proliferation and cell death in humans exposed to occupational and environmental agents. BMCyt is used as an indicator of genotoxic exposure, since it is associated with chromosomal instability. There is little research on the occupational exposure among road construction workers for genotoxicity testing. In the present study, we evaluated MN frequencies and other nuclear changes, karyorrhexis (KR), karyolysis (KL), broken egg (BE), binucleate (BN), condensed chromatin cell (CCC), and picnotic cell (PC) in buccal mucosa cells of 40 road construction workers (twenty smokers and twenty non-smokers) and 40 control groups consisting of healthy persons (twenty smokers and twenty non-smokers). Microscopic observation was performed of 2000 cells per individual in both road construction workers and control group. In control and worker groups, for each person repair index (RI) was calculated via formula KR+L/BE+MN. The results showed a statistically significant increase in the frequency of MN in buccal epithelial cells of exposed group compared with control group (proad construction workers, RI is lower than the control group. There is a significant difference between workers and control group (proad paving operations are absorbed by workers and that asphalt fume exposure is able to significantly induce cytogenetic damage in buccal mucosa cells of workers after controlling some possible confounding factors, such as age, sex and smoking habits. In addition to determination of nuclear changes and the micronucleus, the determination of RI value presents a new approach to genotoxic bio-monitoring assessment studies of occupationally exposed population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessing genotoxic effects in fish from a marine protected area influenced by former mining activities and other stressors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusso-Choueri, Paloma Kachel; Choueri, Rodrigo Brasil; Santos, Gustavo Souza; Seraphim de Araújo, Giuliana; Feitosa Cruz, Ana Carolina

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to evaluate different genotoxicity tools in order to assess a marine protected area (MPA) affected by former mining activities and urban settlements. A catfish (Cathorops spixii) was analyzed for genotoxic effects at the (i) molecular and at the (ii) chromosomal levels. Through factor analysis, genotoxicity was found to be linked to levels of metals bioaccumulated and PAH metabolites in the bile. Micronucleus and nuclear alteration were less vulnerable to the effects of confounding factors in mildly contaminated areas since they were more frequently associated with bioaccumulated metals than the DNA analysis. The different genotoxicity responses allowed for the identification of sources of pollution in the MPA. This approach was important for detecting environmental risks related to genotoxic contaminants in a mildly contaminated MPA. -- Highlights: •We assessed genotoxicity and bioaccumulation in catfish from a marine protected area. •The area is under the influence of past mining activities and urban settlements. •Cellular level responses were highly associated with body burdens of metals and As. •Responses at the molecular level were less associated with body burdens. •Genotoxicity in different organs helped identify pollution sources in MPA.

  20. Different mechanisms of modulation of gap junction communication by non-genotoxic carcinogens in rat liver in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowles, C.; Mally, A.; Chipman, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    This is a comparative study of the mechanisms by which three different rodent non-genotoxic carcinogens modulate connexin-mediated gap junction intercellular communication in male rat liver in vivo. In the case of the peroxisome proliferating agent Wy-14,643, a non-hepatotoxic dose of 50 mg/kg led to a marked loss of inter-hepatocyte dye transfer associated with a loss of both Cx32 and Cx26 protein expression. In contrast, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) at a non-hepatotoxic dose (25 mg/kg) was not found to alter Cx32 or Cx26 expression or to produce a measurable Cx32 serine phosphorylation but did give a small, significant reduction of cell communication. Carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ) did not affect cell communication (despite a small significant reduction of Cx32 content) at a non-hepatotoxic dose. Both loss of communication and Cx32 expression was observed only at a dose that caused hepatocyte toxicity as evidenced by increased serum alanine aminotransferase activity. Overall, the findings emphasise that loss of gap junctional communication in vivo can contribute to carcinogenesis by non-genotoxic carcinogens through different primary mechanism. In contrast to Wy-14,643 and DDT, the results with CCl 4 are consistent with a requirement for hepatotoxicity in its carcinogenic action

  1. Novel glyceryl glucoside is a low toxic alternative for cryopreservation agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Cathy; Allum, Allison J. [Department of Environmental & Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, 1618 Campus Delivery, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Aizawa, Yasushi [Research and Development Group, Toyo Sugar Refining Co. Ltd., Tokyo 103-0046 (Japan); Kato, Takamitsu A., E-mail: Takamitsu.Kato@Colostate.edu [Department of Environmental & Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, 1618 Campus Delivery, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States)

    2016-08-05

    . •Glyceryl Glucoside is better cyroprotective agent than glycerol. •Glycerol has higher genotoxicity than Glyceryl Glucoside. •DMSO has higher cytotoxicity than Glyceryl Glucoside.

  2. Protective Effect of Onion Extract on Bleomycin-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Human Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Hee Cho

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Following one of the world’s largest nuclear accidents, occured at Fukushima, Japan in 2011, a significant scientific effort has focused on minimizing the potential adverse health effects due to radiation exposure. The use of natural dietary antioxidants to reduce the risk of radiation-induced oxidative DNA damage is a simple strategy for minimizing radiation-related cancer rates and improving overall health. The onion is among the richest sources of dietary flavonoids and is an important food for increasing their overall intake. Therefore, we examined the effect of an onion extract on cyto- and geno-toxicity in human lymphocytes treated with bleomycin (BLM, a radiomimetic agent. In addition, we measured the frequency of micronuclei (MN and DNA damage following treatment with BLM using a cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay and a single cell gel electrophoresis assay. We observed a significant increase in cell viability in lymphocytes treated with onion extract then exposed to BLM compared to cells treated with BLM alone. The frequency of BLM induced MN and DNA damage increased in a dose-dependent manner; however, when lymphocytes were pretreated with onion extract (10 and 20 μL/mL, the frequency of BLM-induced MN was decreased at all doses of BLM and DNA damage was decreased at 3 μg/mL of BLM. These results suggest that onion extract may have protective effects against BLM-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in human lymphocytes.

  3. Tungsten carbide-cobalt as a nanoparticulate reference positive control in in vitro genotoxicity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moche, Hélène; Chevalier, Dany; Barois, Nicolas; Lorge, Elisabeth; Claude, Nancy; Nesslany, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing human exposure to nanoparticles (NP), the evaluation of their genotoxic potential is of significant importance. However, relevance for NP of the routinely used in vitro genotoxicity assays is often questioned, and a nanoparticulate reference positive control would therefore constitute an important step to a better testing of NP, ensuring that test systems are really appropriate. In this study, we investigated the possibility of using tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) NP as reference positive control in in vitro genotoxicity assays, including 2 regulatory assays, the mouse lymphoma assay and the micronucleus assay, and in the Comet assay, recommended for the toxicological evaluation of nanomedicines by the French Agency of Human Health Products (Afssaps). Through these assays, we were able to study different genetic endpoints in 2 cell types commonly used in regulatory genotoxicity assays: the L5178Y mouse lymphoma cell line and primary cultures of human lymphocytes. Our results showed that the use of WC-Co NP as positive control in in vitro genotoxicity assays was conceivable, but that different parameters have to be considered, such as cell type and treatment schedule. L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells did not provide satisfactory results in the 3 performed tests. However, human lymphocytes were more sensitive to genotoxic effects induced by WC-Co NP, particularly after a 24-h treatment in the in vitro micronucleus assay and after a 4-h treatment in the in vitro Comet assay. Under such conditions, WC-Co could be used as a nanoparticulate reference positive control in these assays.

  4. Comet assay evaluation of six chemicals of known genotoxic potential in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Cheryl A; Recio, Leslie; Streicker, Michael; Boyle, Molly H; Tanaka, Jin; Shiga, Atsushi; Witt, Kristine L

    2015-07-01

    As a part of an international validation of the in vivo rat alkaline comet assay (comet assay) initiated by the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM) we examined six chemicals for potential to induce DNA damage: 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF), N-nitrosodimethylamine (DMN), o-anisidine, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (1,2-DMH), sodium chloride, and sodium arsenite. DNA damage was evaluated in the liver and stomach of 7- to 9-week-old male Sprague Dawley rats. Of the five genotoxic carcinogens tested in our laboratory, DMN and 1,2-DMH were positive in the liver and negative in the stomach, 2-AAF and o-anisidine produced an equivocal result in liver and negative results in stomach, and sodium arsenite was negative in both liver and stomach. 1,2-DMH and DMN induced dose-related increases in hedgehogs in the same tissue (liver) that exhibited increased DNA migration. However, no cytotoxicity was indicated by the neutral diffusion assay (assessment of highly fragmented DNA) or histopathology in response to treatment with any of the tested chemicals. Therefore, the increased DNA damage resulting from exposure to DMN and 1,2-DMH was considered to represent a genotoxic response. Sodium chloride, a non-genotoxic non-carcinogen, was negative in both tissues as would be predicted. Although only two (1,2-DMH and DMN) out of five genotoxic carcinogens produced clearly positive results in the comet assay, the results obtained for o-anisidine and sodium arsenite in liver and stomach cells are consistent with the known mode of genotoxicity and tissue specificity exhibited by these carcinogens. In contrast, given the known genotoxic mode-of-action and target organ carcinogenicity of 2-AAF, it is unclear why this chemical failed to convincingly increase DNA migration in the liver. Thus, the results of the comet assay validation studies conducted in our laboratory were considered appropriate for five out of the six test chemicals. Copyright © 2015

  5. Genotoxic evaluation of an industrial effluent from an oil refinery using plant and animal bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Fernando Postalli; Angeli, José Pedro Friedmann; Mantovani, Mário Sérgio; Guedes, Carmen Luisa Barbosa; Jordão, Berenice Quinzani

    2010-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are genotoxic chemicals commonly found in effluents from oil refineries. Bioassays using plants and cells cultures can be employed for assessing environmental safety and potential genotoxicity. In this study, the genotoxic potential of an oil refinery effluent was analyzed by means of micronucleus (MN) testing of Alium cepa, which revealed no effect after 24 h of treatment. On the other hand, primary lesions in the DNA of rat (Rattus norvegicus) hepatoma cells (HTC) were observed through comet assaying after only 2 h of exposure. On considering the capacity to detect DNA damage of a different nature and of these cells to metabolize xenobiotics, we suggest the association of the two bioassays with these cell types, plant (Allium cepa) and mammal (HTC) cells, for more accurately assessing genotoxicity in environmental samples.

  6. Cells behaviors and genotoxicity on topological surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, N.; Yang, M.K.; Bi, S.X.; Chen, L.; Zhu, Z.Y.; Gao, Y.T.; Du, Z.

    2013-01-01

    To investigate different cells behaviors and genotoxicity, which were driven by specific microenvironments, three patterned surfaces (pillars, wide grooves and narrow grooves) and one smooth surface were prepared by template-based technique. Vinculin is a membrane-cytoskeletal protein in focal adhesion plaques and associates with cell–cell and cell–matrix junctions, which can promote cell adhesion and spreading. The immunofluorescence staining of vinculin revealed that the narrow grooves patterned substrate was favorable for L929 cell adhesion. For cell multiplication, the narrow grooves surface was fitted for the proliferation of L929, L02 and MSC cells, the pillars surface was only in favor of L929 cells to proliferate during 7 days of cell cultivation. Cell genetic toxicity was evaluated by cellular micronuclei test (MNT). The results indicated that topological surfaces were more suitable for L929 cells to proliferate and maintain the stability of genome. On the contrary, the narrow grooves surface induced higher micronuclei ratio of L02 and MSC cells than other surfaces. With the comprehensive results of cell multiplication and MNT, it was concluded that the wide grooves surface was best fitted for L02 cells to proliferate and have less DNA damages, and the smooth surface was optimum for the research of MSC cells in vitro. - Highlights: • Different cells behaviors on microstructure surfaces were discussed in this paper. • The expression of cell protein of Vinculin was studied in this research. • Cellular micronuclei test was applied to evaluate cells' genotoxicity. • Cell genotoxicity was first studied in the research field of topological surfaces

  7. Aporrectodea caliginosa, a suitable earthworm species for field based genotoxicity assessment?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klobucar, Goeran I.V.; Stambuk, Anamaria; Srut, Maja; Husnjak, Ivana; Merkas, Martina; Traven, Luka; Cvetkovic, Zelimira

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing interest for the application of biomakers to field-collected earthworms. Therefore we have evaluated the usability of native populations of endogeic, widely distributed earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa in the assessment of soil genotoxicity using the Comet assay. Validation of the Comet assay on earthworm coelomocytes has been established using commercially available Eisenia fetida exposed to copper, cadmium, and pentachlorophenol, along with A. caliginosa exposed to copper in a filter paper contact test. Neutral red retention time (NRRT) assay was conducted on copper exposed and field-collected earthworms. Significant DNA and lysosomal damage was measured using Comet and NRRT assays in native populations of A. caliginosa sampled from the polluted soils in the urban area in comparison to the earthworms from the reference site. The results of this study confirm the employment of A. caliginosa as a suitable species for the in situ soil toxicity and genotoxicity field surveys. - Research highlights: → Native A. caliginosa has shown significant biological effect measured by the Comet and NRRT assays. → The Comet assay on A. caliginosa and E. fetida has shown to be of similar sensitivity as the NRRT assay. → A. caliginosa is a suitable species for the in situ soil toxicity and genotoxicity field surveys. - Native populations of endogeic earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa can be successfully applied in the genotoxicity field surveys using Comet assay.

  8. Aporrectodea caliginosa, a suitable earthworm species for field based genotoxicity assessment?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klobucar, Goeran I.V., E-mail: gklobuca@zg.biol.pmf.hr [Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Rooseveltov trg 6, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Stambuk, Anamaria; Srut, Maja [Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Rooseveltov trg 6, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Husnjak, Ivana [Ministry of Environmental Protection, Physical Planning and Construction, Ulica Republike Austrije 14, Zagreb (Croatia); Merkas, Martina [Croatian Institute for Brain Research, School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, Salata 12, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Traven, Luka [Department of Environmental Medicine, Medical Faculty, University of Rijeka, Brace Branchetta 20a, 51000 Rijeka (Croatia); Teaching Institute of Public Health of the Primorsko-goranska County, Kresimirova 52a, 51000 Rijeka (Croatia); Cvetkovic, Zelimira [Department of Ecology, Institute of Public Health, Mirogojska c. 16, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2011-04-15

    There is a growing interest for the application of biomakers to field-collected earthworms. Therefore we have evaluated the usability of native populations of endogeic, widely distributed earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa in the assessment of soil genotoxicity using the Comet assay. Validation of the Comet assay on earthworm coelomocytes has been established using commercially available Eisenia fetida exposed to copper, cadmium, and pentachlorophenol, along with A. caliginosa exposed to copper in a filter paper contact test. Neutral red retention time (NRRT) assay was conducted on copper exposed and field-collected earthworms. Significant DNA and lysosomal damage was measured using Comet and NRRT assays in native populations of A. caliginosa sampled from the polluted soils in the urban area in comparison to the earthworms from the reference site. The results of this study confirm the employment of A. caliginosa as a suitable species for the in situ soil toxicity and genotoxicity field surveys. - Research highlights: > Native A. caliginosa has shown significant biological effect measured by the Comet and NRRT assays. > The Comet assay on A. caliginosa and E. fetida has shown to be of similar sensitivity as the NRRT assay. > A. caliginosa is a suitable species for the in situ soil toxicity and genotoxicity field surveys. - Native populations of endogeic earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa can be successfully applied in the genotoxicity field surveys using Comet assay.

  9. Synthesis and biological activity of imidazopyridine anticoccidial agents: part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribner, Andrew; Dennis, Richard; Hong, Jean; Lee, Shuliang; McIntyre, Donald; Perrey, David; Feng, Dennis; Fisher, Michael; Wyvratt, Matthew; Leavitt, Penny; Liberator, Paul; Gurnett, Anne; Brown, Chris; Mathew, John; Thompson, Donald; Schmatz, Dennis; Biftu, Tesfaye

    2007-01-01

    Coccidiosis is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in the poultry industry. Protozoan parasites of the genus Eimeria invade the intestinal lining of the avian host causing tissue pathology, poor weight gain, and in some cases mortality. Resistance to current anticoccidials has prompted the search for new therapeutic agents with potent in vitro and in vivo activity against Eimeria. Antiparasitic activity is due to inhibition of a parasite specific cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). In this study, we present the synthesis and biological activity of imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine anticoccidial agents. From this series, several compounds showed subnanomolar in vitro activity and commercial levels of in vivo activity. However, the potential genotoxicity of these compounds precludes them from further development.

  10. Genotoxicity studies in semiconductor industry. 1. In vitro mutagenicity and genotoxicity studies of waste samples resulting from plasma etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, R.; Huettner, E.M.; Merten, H.; Raabe, F. (Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, Gatersleben (Germany))

    1993-07-01

    Solid waste samples taken from the etching reactor, the turbo pump, and the waste air system of a plasma etching technology line in semiconductor production were studied as to their genotoxic properties in a bacterial repair test, in the Ames/Salmonella microsome assay, in the SOS chromotest, in primary mouse hepatocytes, and in Chinese hamster V79 cell cultures. All three waste samples were found to be active by inducing of unscheduled DNA-synthesis in mouse hepatocytes in vitro. In the bacterial rec-type repair test with Proteus mirabilis, waste samples taken from the turbo pump and the vacuum pipe system were not genotoxic. The waste sample taken from the chlorine-mediated plasma reactor was clearly positive in the bacterial repair assay and in the SOS chromotest with Escherichia coli. Mutagenic activity was demonstrated for all samples in the presence and absence of S9 mix made from mouse liver homogenate. Again, highest mutagenic activity was recorded for the waste sample taken from the plasma reactor, while samples collected from the turbo pump and from the waste air system before dilution and liberation of the air were less mutagenic. For all samples chromosomal damage in V79 cells was not detected, indicating absence of clastogenic activity in vitro. Altogether, these results indicate generation of genotoxic and mutagenic products as a consequence of chlorine-mediated plasma etching in the microelectronics industry and the presence of genotoxins even in places distant from the plasma reactor. Occupational exposure can be expected both from the precipitated wastes and from chemicals reaching the environment with the air stream.

  11. Cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of food-borne nitriles in a liver in vitro model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupke, Franziska; Herz, Corinna; Hanschen, Franziska S.; Platz, Stefanie; Odongo, Grace A.; Helmig, Simone; Bartolomé Rodríguez, María M.; Schreiner, Monika; Rohn, Sascha; Lamy, Evelyn

    2016-01-01

    Isothiocyanates are the most intensively studied breakdown products of glucosinolates from Brassica plants and well recognized for their pleiotropic effects against cancer but also for their genotoxic potential. However, knowledge about the bioactivity of glucosinolate-borne nitriles in foods is very poor. As determined by GC-MS, broccoli glucosinolates mainly degrade to nitriles as breakdown products. The cytotoxicity of nitriles in human HepG2 cells and primary murine hepatocytes was marginal as compared to isothiocyanates. Toxicity of nitriles was not enhanced in CYP2E1-overexpressing HepG2 cells. In contrast, the genotoxic potential of nitriles was found to be comparable to isothiocyanates. DNA damage was persistent over a certain time period and CYP2E1-overexpression further increased the genotoxic potential of the nitriles. Based on actual in vitro data, no indications are given that food-borne nitriles could be relevant for cancer prevention, but could pose a certain genotoxic risk under conditions relevant for food consumption. PMID:27883018

  12. Modulation of mitomycin C-induced genotoxicity by acetyl- and thio- analogues of salicylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Amol Ashok; Vikram, Ajit; Tripathi, Durga Nand; Padmanabhan, Shweta; Ramarao, Poduri; Jena, Gopabandhu

    2009-01-01

    Recent reports regarding acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and its metabolites suggest suppressive effects against mitomycin C (MMC)-induced genotoxicity in a mice chromosomal aberration assay. Keeping this in mind, the potential anti-genotoxic effect of the thio-analogue of salicylic acid namely thio-salicylic acid (TSA) was speculated upon. The present study investigated and compared the anti-genotoxic potential of ASA and TSA. The study was performed in male swiss mice (20+/-2 g) using single-cell gel electrophoresis and a peripheral blood micronucleus assay. ASA and TSA (5, 10 or 20 mg/kg) were administered 15 minutes after MMC (1 mg/kg) once daily for 3 or 7 days. Both ASA and TSA significantly decreased the DNA damage induced by MMC as indicated by a decrease in the comet parameters in bone marrow cells and decreased frequencies of micronucleated reticulocytes in peripheral blood. The results clearly demonstrate the anti-genotoxic potential of ASA and TSA.

  13. In Vitro Genotoxic Effects of Four Helichrysum Species in Human Lymphocytes Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Erolu, Erhan H; Hamzaolu, Ergin; Aksoy, Ahmet; Budak, Ümit; Özkul, Yusuf

    2010-01-01

    Helichrysum sanguineum, Helichrysum pamphylicum, Helichrysum orientale, Helichrysum noeanum (Asteraceae) are medicinal plants. For centuries, they have been used as tea in Turkey because of their medicinal properties. So far no scientifc evidence has been found in a literature survey regarding the genotoxic effects of these plants. This work evaluated the genotoxic effects on human lymphocyte cultures induced by methanol extracts of these plants, assayed in different concentrations (0.01, 0.0...

  14. Genotoxicity assessment data for exfoliated buccal cells exposed to mobile phone radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.M. de Oliveira

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Healthy mobile phone users aged 18–30 y.o. provided exfoliated buccal cells samples from the right and left inner cheeks. A total of 2000 cells per subject were screened for the presence of micronuclei as a sign of genotoxic damage, according to the mobile phone use profile of each user. Keywords: Electromagnetic fields, Mobile phones, Genotoxicity, Micronuclei, Exfoliated buccal cells, Feulgen stain

  15. Cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and mutagenicity of 1-chloro-2-hydroxy-3-butene and 1-chloro-3-buten-2-one, two alternative metabolites of 1,3-butadiene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xin-Jie; Zeng, Fang-Mao; An, Jing; Yu, Ying-Xin [Institute of Environmental Pollution and Health, School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Zhang, Xin-Yu, E-mail: xyzhang999@shu.edu.cn [Institute of Environmental Pollution and Health, School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Elfarra, Adnan A., E-mail: elfarra@svm.vetmed.wisc.edu [Department of Comparative Biosciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Molecular and Environmental Toxicology Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    The cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and mutagenicity of 1-chloro-2-hydroxy-3-butene (CHB), a known in vitro metabolite of the human carcinogen 1,3-butadiene, have not previously been investigated. Because CHB can be bioactivated by alcohol dehydrogenases to yield 1-chloro-3-buten-2-one (CBO), a bifunctional alkylating agent that caused globin-chain cross-links in erythrocytes, in the present study we investigated the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of CHB and CBO in human normal hepatocyte L02 cells using the MTT assay, the relative cloning efficiency assay and the comet assay. We also investigated the mutagenic potential of these compounds with the Ames test using Salmonella strains TA1535 and TA1537. The results provide clear evidence for CHB and CBO being both cytotoxic and genotoxic with CBO being approximately 100-fold more potent than CHB. Interestingly, CHB generated both single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites on DNA, whereas CBO produced only alkali-labile sites. CHB did not directly result in DNA breaks, whereas CBO was capable of directly generating breaks on DNA. Interestingly, both compounds did not induce DNA cross-links as examined by the comet assay. The Ames test results showed that CHB induced point mutation but not frameshift mutation, whereas the toxic effects of CBO made it difficult to reliably assess the mutagenic potential of CBO in the two strains. Collectively, the results suggest that CHB and CBO may play a role in the mutagenicity and carcinogenicity of 1,3-butadiene. - Highlights: • 1-Chloro-2-hydroxy-3-butene (CHB) is cytotoxic and genotoxic in human liver cells. • The CHB metabolite, 1-chloro-3-buten-2-one (CBO) is ∼ 100-fold more toxic than CHB. • CHB and CBO cause DNA alkali-labile sites, but only CBO directly causes DNA breaks. • CHB is mutagenic in the Ames test, but CBO is too toxic in the assay. • The results suggest a role for CHB in 1,3-butadiene genotoxicity and mutagenicity.

  16. Mutagenic and genotoxic activity of particulate matter MP2,5, in Pamplona, North Santander, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez Montañez, Mónica Liseth

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the mutagenic and genotoxic activities of particulate material (MP2,5 collected in Pamplona, Norte de Santander, Colombia.Materials and methods: MP2,5 was monitored by means of a Partisol 2025 sequential air sampler with Plus Palmflex quartz filters. The latter were subjected to two extraction procedures: Soxhlet extraction using dichloromethane-acetone; and ultrasonic extraction using dichloromethane, acetone and dichloromethane/ acetone mix. The mutagenic and genotoxic activities were determined for each extract.Results: This is the first study conducted in Colombia that reports the mutagenic and genotoxic activities associated with particulate matter (MP2,5 taken from vehicular emissions in Pamplona, Norte de Santander. The mutagenic assay determined by the Ames test using Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100 showed a high direct mutagenic activity in the analyzed extracts. On the other hand, the genotoxic activity, determined by means of the comet assay, was high too.Conclusion: Particulate material (MP2,5 present in air samples in Pamplona (northeastern Colombia is a risk factor for the exposed population because it can directly induce mutations and also cause genotoxic damage.

  17. Genotoxic effects of synthetic amorphous silica nanoparticles in the mouse lymphoma assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eşref Demir

    Full Text Available Synthetic amorphous silica nanoparticles (SAS NPs have been used in various industries, such as plastics, glass, paints, electronics, synthetic rubber, in pharmaceutical drug tablets, and a as food additive in many processed foods. There are few studies in the literature on NPs using gene mutation approaches in mammalian cells, which represents an important gap for genotoxic risk estimations. To fill this gap, the mouse lymphoma L5178Y/Tk+/− assay (MLA was used to evaluate the mutagenic effect for five different concentrations (from 0.01 to 150 μg/mL of two different sizes of SAS NPs (7.172 and 7.652 nm and a fine collodial form of silicon dioxide (SiO2. This assay detects a broad spectrum of mutational events, from point mutations to chromosome alterations. The results obtained indicate that the two selected SAS NPs are mutagenic in the MLA assay, showing a concentration-dependent effect. The relative mutagenic potencies according to the induced mutant frequency (IMF are as follows: SAS NPs (7.172 nm (IMF = 705.5 × 10−6, SAS NPs (7.652 nm (IMF = 575.5 × 10−6, and SiO2 (IMF = 57.5 × 10−6. These in vitro results, obtained from mouse lymphoma cells, support the genotoxic potential of NPs as well as focus the discussion of the benefits/risks associated with their use in different areas. Keywords: Synthetic amorphous silica nanoparticles, Mouse lymphoma assay, Mutagenic agents, Thymidine kinase (Tk gene, In vitro mutagenicity

  18. Genotoxic effect of radio marked lymphocytes using Tc-99m complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedraza L, M.; Ferro F, G.; Mendiola C, M.T.; Morales R, P.

    1997-01-01

    The genotoxic effect of radio marked lymphocytes was evaluated using 99m -Tc-HMPAO and 99m -Tc- gentisic acid complexes. With the results of this work it is pretended to contribute to the knowledge of genetic and structural damages that provokes the radiation in the marked lymphocytes. The d, 1-HMPAO was synthesized in laboratory with a yielding of 30 %. The radiochemical purity of the complexes was greater than 85%. Mouse lymphocytes obtained of sanguineous volumes 2 ml were used. The radio marked efficiency of cells was 19.6 ± 6.4% and 25.6 ± 5.8% for 99m Tc-HMPAO and 99m Tc gentisic acid respectively. The genotoxic effect was evaluated using the technique of Unicellular Electrophoresis in Micro gel (Comet assay). The results showed that both 99m Tc complexes produce genotoxicity due to their capacity to penetrate cells, therefore the Auger and M internal conversion electrons place all their energy obtaining doses of Gray order. (Author)

  19. Genotoxic evaluation of an industrial effluent from an oil refinery using plant and animal bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Postalli Rodrigues

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are genotoxic chemicals commonly found in effluents from oil refineries. Bioassays using plants and cells cultures can be employed for assessing environmental safety and potential genotoxicity. In this study, the genotoxic potential of an oil refinery effluent was analyzed by means of micronucleus (MN testing of Alium cepa, which revealed no effect after 24 h of treatment. On the other hand, primary lesions in the DNA of rat (Rattus norvegicus hepatoma cells (HTC were observed through comet assaying after only 2 h of exposure. On considering the capacity to detect DNA damage of a different nature and of these cells to metabolize xenobiotics, we suggest the association of the two bioassays with these cell types, plant (Allium cepa and mammal (HTC cells, for more accurately assessing genotoxicity in environmental samples.

  20. Conventional and whitening toothpastes: cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and effect on the enamel surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Samira Esteves Afonso; Jóias, Renata Pilli; Santana-Melo, Gabriela Fátima; Ferreira, Lara Tolentino; El Achkar, Vivian Narana Ribeiro; Rode, Sigmar de Mello

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of whitening and common toothpastes, and the surface roughness of tooth enamel submitted to brushing with both toothpastes. Samples of whitening toothpastes [Colgate Whitening (CW) and Oral-B Whitening (OBW)] and regular (non-whitening) toothpastes (Colgate and Oral-B) were extracted in culture medium. Gingival human fibroblasts (FMM-1) were placed in contact with different dilutions of culture media that had been previously exposed to such materials, and the cytotoxicity was evaluated using the MTT assay. The genotoxicity was assessed by the micronucleus formation assay in Chinese hamster fibroblasts (V79). The cell survival rate and micronuclei number were assessed before and after exposure to the toothpaste extracts. For the surface roughness evaluation, 20 bovine tooth specimens, divided into four groups according to toothpastes, were submitted to 10,000 brushing cycles. The results were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U and two-way ANOVA tests (P whitening toothpastes showed the highest numbers of micronuclei compared to the untreated control (UC) (P enamel surface (P whitening toothpastes and Oral-B were cytotoxic to the cells. The whitening toothpastes were more genotoxic to cells in vitro than the common toothpastes, and genotoxicity was more pronounced in the OBW toothpaste.

  1. Size- and coating-dependent cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of silver nanoparticles evaluated using in vitro standard assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Li, Yan; Yan, Jian; Ingle, Taylor; Jones, Margie Yvonne; Mei, Nan; Boudreau, Mary D; Cunningham, Candice K; Abbas, Mazhar; Paredes, Angel M; Zhou, Tong; Moore, Martha M; Howard, Paul C; Chen, Tao

    2016-11-01

    The physicochemical characteristics of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) may greatly alter their toxicological potential. To explore the effects of size and coating on the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of AgNPs, six different types of AgNPs, having three different sizes and two different coatings, were investigated using the Ames test, mouse lymphoma assay (MLA) and in vitro micronucleus assay. The genotoxicities of silver acetate and silver nitrate were evaluated to compare the genotoxicity of nanosilver to that of ionic silver. The Ames test produced inconclusive results for all types of the silver materials due to the high toxicity of silver to the test bacteria and the lack of entry of the nanoparticles into the cells. Treatment of L5718Y cells with AgNPs and ionic silver resulted in concentration-dependent cytotoxicity, mutagenicity in the Tk gene and the induction of micronuclei from exposure to nearly every type of the silver materials. Treatment of TK6 cells with these silver materials also resulted in concentration-dependent cytotoxicity and significantly increased micronucleus frequency. With both the MLA and micronucleus assays, the smaller the AgNPs, the greater the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. The coatings had less effect on the relative genotoxicity of AgNPs than the particle size. Loss of heterozygosity analysis of the induced Tk mutants indicated that the types of mutations induced by AgNPs were different from those of ionic silver. These results suggest that AgNPs induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in a size- and coating-dependent manner. Furthermore, while the MLA and in vitro micronucleus assay (in both types of cells) are useful to quantitatively measure the genotoxic potencies of AgNPs, the Ames test cannot.

  2. In vivo micronucleus test as a biomarker of genotoxicity in free-range goats from suspected contaminated environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afusat Jagun Jubril

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: The finding indicates the prevalence and frequency of micronucleus as a biomarker of genotoxicity and an indicator of exposure to environmental genotoxic subtances. Hence, this highlights the relevance of these goats as important sentinel animal model. These findings, therefore, serve as a preliminary data for further studies on the latent genotoxic environmental contaminants and their potential deleterious impact. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2017; 4(3.000: 281-287

  3. Genotoxic Effect of Atrazine, Arsenic, Cadmium and Nitrate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Atrazine has clastogenic effects and may also act as tumor promoter as it induces the aromatase enzyme. ... bladder cancer. This study ... in MCF-10A cells, suggesting that estrogen receptor modulated the genotoxicity of estrogen. Cd caused ...

  4. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of intravitreal adalimumab administration in rabbit retinal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álcio Coutinho de Paula

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of intravitreal adalimumab treatment in an animal experimental model using cytological and molecular techniques. Methods: Eighteen rabbits were randomly assigned to three groups: control, adalimumab treatment, and placebo. Cytotoxicity on retinal cells was evaluated using flow cytometry assays to determine the level of apoptosis and necrosis. Genotoxicity was evaluated by comet assays to assess DNA damage, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR was used to evaluate expression of apoptosis-inducing caspases (8 and 3. Results: No cytotoxicity or genotoxicity was observed in any of the two treatment groups (adalimumab and placebo following intravitreal administration compared with the control group. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that more than 90% of the cells were viable, and only a low proportion of retinal cells presented apoptotic (~10% or necrotic (<1% activity across all groups. Molecular damage was also low with a maximum of 6.4% DNA degradation observed in the comet assays. In addition, no increase in gene expression of apoptosis-inducing caspases was observed on retinal cells by qPCR in both the adalimumab and placebo groups compared with the control group. Conclusion: The use of adalimumab resulted in no detectable cytotoxicity or genotoxicity on retinal cells for up to 60 days upon administration. These results therefore indicate that adalimumab may be a safe option for intravitreal application to treat ocular inflammatory diseases in which TNF-α is involved.

  5. Genotoxicity evaluation of dental restoration nanocomposite using comet assay and chromosome aberration test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musa, Marahaini; Ponnuraj, Kannan Thirumulu; Mohamad, Dasmawati; Rahman, Ismail Ab

    2013-01-01

    Nanocomposite is used as a dental filling to restore the affected tooth, especially in dental caries. The dental nanocomposite (KelFil) for tooth restoration used in this study was produced by the School of Dental Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia and is incorporated with monodispersed, spherical nanosilica fillers. The aim of the study was to determine the genotoxic effect of KelFil using in vitro genotoxicity tests. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of KelFil was evaluated using MTT assay, comet assay and chromosome aberration tests with or without the addition of a metabolic activation system (S9 mix), using the human lung fibroblast cell line (MRC-5). Concurrent negative and positive controls were included. In the comet assay, no comet formation was found in the KelFil groups. There was a significant difference in tail moment between KelFil groups and positive control (p < 0.05). Similarly, no significant aberrations in chromosomes were noticed in KelFil groups. The mitotic indices of treatment groups and negative control were significantly different from positive controls. Hence, it can be concluded that the locally produced dental restoration nanocomposite (KelFil) is non-genotoxic under the present test conditions. (paper)

  6. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity induced by eluates from orthodontic glass ionomer cements in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Angelieri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of some orthodontic glass ionomer cements commercially available by means of the single cell gel (comet assay. For this purpose, five commercial orthodontic glass ionomer cements (Vidrion C®, Meron®, Optiband®, Multicure® and Ultra Band Lok® were tested in murine fibroblasts in vitro. For this purpose, eluates from each cement were prepared according manufactures instructions at 0, 2, 4, 8, 18, 32 and 64 days of immersion in artificial saliva at 37 °C. All orthodontic glass ionomer cements failed to induce cytotoxicity to murine fibroblasts for all periods evaluated in this study. However, Vidrion C® was able to induce genotoxicity after 64 days of exposure to eluates. Meron® also demonstrated genotoxicity as depicted by increasing DNA damage on 2nd day. Multicure® demonstrated genotoxicity on 32nd day and Ultra band Lok on 18th, 32nd days of exposure. Taken together, our results demonstrated that orthodontic cements derived from resin-modified glass ionomer composite (Multicure® and compomer (Ultra Band Lok® cause genetic damage in mammalian cells in vitro.

  7. Estimation of TiO₂ nanoparticle-induced genotoxicity persistence and possible chronic gastritis-induction in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Hanan Ramadan Hamad

    2015-09-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are widely used as a food additive and coloring agent in many consumer products however limited data is available on the nano-TiO2 induced genotoxicity persistence. Thus, this study investigated the persistence of nano-TiO2 induced genotoxicity and possible induction of chronic gastritis in mice. The mice were orally administered 5, 50 or 500 mg/kg body weight nano-TiO2 for five consecutive days, and then mice from each dosage group were sacrificed 24 h or one or two weeks after the last treatment. The administration of nano-TiO2 resulted in persistent apoptotic DNA fragmentation and mutations in p53 exons (5-8) as well as significant persistent elevations in malondialdehyde and nitric oxide levels and decreases in the reduced glutathione level and catalase activity compared with the control mice in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Necrosis and inflammation were evident upon histological examination. These findings could be attributed to the persistent accumulation of nano-TiO2 at the tested doses at all three time points. Based on these findings, we conclude that the administration of nano-TiO2, even at low doses, leads to persistent accumulation of nano-TiO2 in mice, resulting in persistent inflammation, apoptosis and oxidative stress, ultimately leading to the induction of chronic gastritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Induction of micronuclei by 2-hydroxypyridine in water and elimination of solution genotoxicity by UVC (254 nm) photolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoutelis, Charalambos G.; Vlastos, Dimitris; Kortsinidou, Marianna C.; Theodoridis, Ioannis T.; Papadaki, Maria I.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► 2-Hydroxypyridine (2-HPY) is the major metabolite of 2-halogenated pyridines photolysis. ► We examine the genotoxicity of 2-HPY in cultured human lymphocytes applying the micronucleus assay. ► 2-HPY was found to be genotoxic. ► Aqueous solutions of 2-HPY were irradiated by UV at 254 nm. ► Solution genotoxicity can be completely removed after prolonged phototreatment. - Abstract: 2-Hydroxypyridine (2-HPY) is a major first-stage product formed upon the photolytic destruction of 2-halogenated pyridines. Genotoxicity of 2-HPY in water was studied as a function of concentration. Aqueous solutions of 2-HPY were irradiated by ultraviolet (UV) at 254 nm. 2-HPY concentration, solution total organic carbon (TOC) concentration and solution genotoxicity were measured as a function of treatment time and their profile as a function of time is presented in this work. 2-HPY was found to be genotoxic at all concentrations in the range of 5–400 μg ml −1 . 2-HPY mineralises completely upon prolonged UV irradiation. All untreated and irradiated solution samples, taken at different photo-treatment times, were tested in cultured human lymphocytes applying the cytokinesis block micronucleus (CBMN) assay. The genotoxicity of the solution was reduced near to the control level after prolonged UV irradiation.

  9. Acute toxicity and genotoxic activity of avocado seed extract (Persea americana Mill., c.v. Hass).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Camberos, Eduardo; Martínez-Velázquez, Moisés; Flores-Fernández, José Miguel; Villanueva-Rodríguez, Socorro

    2013-01-01

    The use of vegetal extracts requires toxicological and genotoxic evaluations to establish and verify safety before being added to human cosmetic, pharmaceutical medicine, or alimentary products. Persea americana seeds have been used in traditional medicine as treatment for several diseases. In this work, the ethanolic seed extract of Persea americana was evaluated with respect to its genotoxic potential through micronucleus assay in rodents. The frequency of micronuclei in groups of animals treated with avocado seed extract showed no differences compared to the negative control (vehicle); therefore, it is considered that the avocado seed extract showed no genotoxic activity in the micronucleus test.

  10. Non-genotoxic carcinogens: early effects on gap junctions, cell proliferation and apoptosis in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mally, Angela; Chipman, James Kevin

    2002-01-01

    Non-genotoxic carcinogens are thought to induce tumour formation by disturbing the balance between cell growth and cell death. Gap junctions (GJ) contribute to the maintenance of tissue homeostasis by allowing the intercellular exchange of growth regulatory signals and potential inhibition of GJ intercellular communication through loss of connexin (Cx) plaques has been shown to be involved in the cancer process. We have investigated the time- and dose-dependent effects of the non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens Wy-14,643, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, methapyrilene and hexachlorobenzene and the male rat kidney carcinogens chloroform, p-dichlorobenzene and d-limonene on gap junction plaque expression in relation to proliferation and apoptosis. With the exception of limonene, all non-genotoxic carcinogens significantly reduced the expression of GJ plaques containing Cx32 in their respective target tissue. No dose-dependent, significant effects were seen in non-target organs. Although alteration of Cx32 expression did not appear to correlate with induction of cell proliferation, out data suggest that the interaction of both processes--interference of GJ coupled with a proliferative stimulus (at the carcinogenic dose)--may be important in non-genotoxic carcinogenesis and provide a potential alert for non-genotoxic carcinogens in short-term toxicity tests

  11. In vitro genotoxic effects of four Helichrysum species in human lymphocytes cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erolu, Erhan H; Hamzaolu, Ergin; Aksoy, Ahmet; Budak, Ümit; Özkul, Yusuf

    2010-01-01

    Helichrysum sanguineum, Helichrysum pamphylicum, Helichrysum orientale, Helichrysum noeanum (Asteraceae) are medicinal plants. For centuries, they have been used as tea in Turkey because of their medicinal properties. So far no scientific evidence has been found in a literature survey regarding the genotoxic effects of these plants. This work evaluated the genotoxic effects on human lymphocyte cultures induced by methanol extracts of these plants, assayed in different concentrations (0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5 and 1 mg/mL). According to the results, Helichrysum noeanum, Helichrysum pamphylicum and Helichrysum sanguineum induced the formation of micronuclei and decreased the mitotic and replication indexes. Helichrysum orientale did not affect these parameters, whereas Helichrysum noeanum, Helichrysum pamphylicum and Helichrysum sanguineum were clearly genotoxic. They should therefore not be used freely in alternative medicine, although their antiproliferative activity may suggest antimitotic and anticarcinogenic properties. Helichrysum orientale could be used in alternative medicine.

  12. Genotoxicity of gemfibrozil in the gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, A; Luis, L G; Soares, A M V M; Paíga, P; Santos, L H M L M; Delerue-Matos, C; Hylland, K; Loureiro, S; Oliveira, M

    2017-09-01

    Widespread use of pharmaceuticals and suboptimal wastewater treatment have led to increased levels of these substances in aquatic ecosystems. Lipid-lowering drugs such as gemfibrozil, which are among the most abundant human pharmaceuticals in the environment, may have deleterious effects on aquatic organisms. We examined the genotoxicity of gemfibrozil in a fish species, the gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata), which is commercially important in southern Europe. Following 96-h waterborne exposure, molecular (erythrocyte DNA strand breaks) and cytogenetic (micronuclei and other nuclear abnormalities in cells) endpoints were measured. Gemfibrozil was positive in both endpoints, at environmentally relevant concentrations, a result that raises concerns about the potential genotoxic effects of the drug in recipient waters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Aspect ratio has no effect on genotoxicity of multi-wall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Sik; Lee, Kyu; Lee, Young Hee; Cho, Hyun Sun; Kim, Ki Heon; Choi, Kyung Hee; Lee, Sang Hee; Song, Kyung Seuk; Kang, Chang Soo; Yu, Il Je

    2011-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have specific physico-chemical and electrical properties that are useful for telecommunications, medicine, materials, manufacturing processes and the environmental and energy sectors. Yet, despite their many advantages, it is also important to determine whether CNTs may represent a hazard to the environment and human health. Like asbestos, the aspect ratio (length:diameter) and metal components of CNTs are known to have an effect on the toxicity of carbon nanotubes. Thus, to evaluate the toxic potential of CNTs in relation to their aspect ratio and metal contamination, in vivo and in vitro genotoxicity tests were conducted using high-aspect-ratio (diameter: 10-15 nm, length: ~10 μm) and low-aspect-ratio multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, diameter: 10-15 nm, length: ~150 nm) according to OECD test guidelines 471 (bacterial reverse mutation test), 473 (in vitro chromosome aberration test), and 474 (in vivo micronuclei test) with a good laboratory practice system. To determine the treatment concentration for all the tests, a solubility and dispersive test was performed, and a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) solution found to be more suitable than distilled water. Neither the high- nor the low-aspect-ratio MWCNTs induced any genotoxicity in a bacterial reverse mutation test (~1,000 μg/plate), in vitro chromosome aberration test (without S9: ~6.25 μg/ml, with S9: ~50 μg/ml), or in vivo micronuclei test (~50 mg/kg). However, the high-aspect-ratio MWCNTs were found to be more toxic than the low-aspect-ratio MWCNTs. Thus, while high-aspect-ratio MWCNTs do not induce direct genotoxicity or metabolic activation-mediated genotoxicity, genotoxicity could still be induced indirectly through oxidative stress or inflammation.

  14. Mercury-induced genotoxicity in marine diatom (Chaetoceros tenuissimus)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarker, S.; Desai, S.R.; Verlecar, X.N.; Sarker, M.S.; Sarkar, A.

    In this paper, we present an evaluation of genotoxic responses in marine diatom, Chaetoceros tenuissimus, isolated from Kandla Creek (lat 23.03° N, long 70.22° E), Gujarat, India, in terms of impairment of DNA integrity as a function...

  15. Embryonic stem cells deficient for Brca2 or Blm exhibit divergent genotoxic profiles that support opposing activities during homologous recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marple, Teresa [Department of Molecular Medicine and Institute of Biotechnology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 15355 Lambda Drive San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Kim, Tae Moon [Department of Molecular Medicine and Institute of Biotechnology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 15355 Lambda Drive San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Hasty, Paul [Department of Molecular Medicine and Institute of Biotechnology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 15355 Lambda Drive San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States)]. E-mail: hastye@uthscsa.edu

    2006-12-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility protein, Brca2 and the RecQ helicase, Blm (Bloom syndrome mutated) are tumor suppressors that maintain genome integrity, at least in part, through homologous recombination (HR). Brca2 facilitates HR by interacting with Rad51 in multiple regions, the BRC motifs encoded by exon 11 and a single domain encoded by exon 27; however, the exact importance of these regions is not fully understood. Blm also interacts with Rad51 and appears to suppress HR in most circumstances; however, its yeast homologue Sgs1 facilitates HR in response to some genotoxins. To better understand the biological importance of these two proteins, we performed a genotoxic screen on mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells impaired for either Brca2 or Blm to establish their genotoxic profiles (a cellular dose-response to a wide range of agents). This is the first side-by-side comparison of these two proteins in an identical genetic background. We compared cells deleted for Brca2 exon 27 to cells reduced for Blm expression and find that the Brca2- and Blm-impaired cells exhibit genotoxic profiles that reflect opposing activities during HR. Cells deleted for Brca2 exon 27 are hypersensitive to {gamma}-radiation, streptonigrin, mitomycin C and camptothecin and mildly resistant to ICRF-193 which is similar to HR defective cells null for Rad54. By contrast, Blm-impaired cells are hypersensitive to ICRF-193, mildly resistant to camptothecin and mitomycin C and more strongly resistant to hydroxyurea. These divergent profiles support the notion that Brca2 and Blm perform opposing functions during HR in mouse ES cells.

  16. High Dose Ascorbate Causes Both Genotoxic and Metabolic Stress in Glioma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Maria Leticia; Carson, Georgia M.; McConnell, Melanie J.; Herst, Patries M.

    2017-01-01

    We have previously shown that exposure to high dose ascorbate causes double stranded breaks (DSBs) and a build-up in S-phase in glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines. Here we investigated whether or not this was due to genotoxic stress as well as metabolic stress generated by exposure to high dose ascorbate, radiation, ascorbate plus radiation and H2O2 in established and primary GBM cell lines. Genotoxic stress was measured as phosphorylation of the variant histone protein, H2AX, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8OH-dG) positive cells and cells with comet tails. Metabolic stress was measured as a decrease in NADH flux, mitochondrial membrane potential (by CMXRos), ATP levels (by ATP luminescence) and mitochondrial superoxide production (by mitoSOX). High dose ascorbate, ascorbate plus radiation, and H2O2 treatments induced both genotoxic and metabolic stress. Exposure to high dose ascorbate blocked DNA synthesis in both DNA damaged and undamaged cell of ascorbate sensitive GBM cell lines. H2O2 treatment blocked DNA synthesis in all cell lines with and without DNA damage. DNA synthesis arrest in cells with damaged DNA is likely due to both genotoxic and metabolic stress. However, arrest in DNA synthesis in cells with undamaged DNA is likely due to oxidative damage to components of the mitochondrial energy metabolism pathway. PMID:28737676

  17. Observations of the effect of atmospheric processes on the genotoxic potency of airborne particulate matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feilberg, Anders; Nielsen, Torben; Binderup, Mona-Lise

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the relationship between genotoxic potency and the occurrence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), including benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), and nitro-PAH in urban and semi-rural air masses has been investigated. The Salmonella/microsome assay has been used as a measure of genotoxic po...

  18. In vitro and in vivo genotoxicity of 1,3-butadiene and metabolites.

    OpenAIRE

    Arce, G T; Vincent, D R; Cunningham, M J; Choy, W N; Sarrif, A M

    1990-01-01

    1,3-Butadiene and two major genotoxic metabolites 3,4-epoxybutene (EB) and 1,2:3,4-diepoxybutane (DEB) were used as model compounds to determine if genetic toxicity findings in animal and human cells can aid in extrapolating animal toxicity data to man. Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and micronucleus induction results indicated 1,3-butadiene was genotoxic in the bone marrow of the mouse but not the rat. This paralleled the chronic bioassays which showed mice to be more susceptible than rats ...

  19. Evaluation of the genotoxic and antigenotoxic potential of Baccharis dracunculifolia extract on V79 cells by the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munari, Carla Carolina; Alves, Jacqueline Morais; Bastos, Jairo Kenupp; Tavares, Denise Crispim

    2010-01-01

    Baccharis dracunculifolia (Asteraceae), the main botanical source of green propolis, is a shrub of the Brazilian 'cerrado'. In folk medicine it is used as an anti-inflammatory agent, mainly for the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the genotoxic and antigenotoxic effects of B. dracunculifolia ethyl acetate extract (Bd-EAE) on Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts (V79 cells) by the comet assay. Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS; 200 microM) was used as an inducer of DNA damage. Genotoxicity was evaluated using four different concentrations of Bd-EAE: 12.5, 25.0, 50.0 and 100.0 microg ml(-1). Antigenotoxicity was assessed before, simultaneously, and after treatment with the mutagen. The results showed a significant increase in the frequency of DNA damage in cultures treated with 50.0 and 100.0 microg ml(-1) Bd-EAE. Regarding its antigenotoxic potential, Bd-EAE reduced the frequency of DNA damage induced by MMS. However, this chemopreventive activity depended on the concentrations and treatment regimens used. The antioxidant activity of phenolic components present in Bd-EAE may contribute to reduce the alkylation damage induced by MMS. In conclusion, our findings confirmed the chemopreventive activity of Bd-EAE and showed that this effect occurs under different mechanism.

  20. Genotoxicity of two heavy metal compounds: lead nitrate and cobalt chloride in Polychaete Perinereis cultrifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nisha; Bhagat, Jacky; Ingole, Baban S

    2017-07-01

    The present study explores the in vivo and in vitro genotoxic effects of lead nitrate, [Pb(NO 3 ) 2 ] a recognized environmental pollutant and cobalt chloride (CoCl 2 ), an emerging environmental pollutant in polychaete Perinereis cultrifera using comet assay. Despite widespread occurrence and extensive industrial applications, no previous published reports on genotoxicity of these compounds are available in polychaete as detected by comet assay. Polychaetes were exposed in vivo to Pb(NO 3 ) 2 (0, 100, 500, and 1000 μg/l) and CoCl 2 (0, 100, 300, and 500 μg/l) for 5 days. At 100 μg/l Pb(NO 3 ) 2 concentration, tail DNA (TDNA) values in coelomocytes were increase by 1.16, 1.43, and 1.55-fold after day 1, day 3, and day 5, whereas, OTM showed 1.12, 2.33, and 2.10-fold increase in in vivo. Pb(NO 3 ) 2 showed a concentration and time-dependent genotoxicity whereas CoCl 2 showed a concentration-dependent genotoxicity in in vivo. A concentration-dependent increase in DNA damage was observed in in vitro studies for Pb(NO 3 ) 2 and CoCl 2 . DNA damage at 500 μg/L showed almost threefold increase in TDNA and approximately fourfold increase in OTM as compared to control in in vitro. Our studies suggest that Pb(NO 3 ) 2 and CoCl 2 have potential to cause genotoxic damage, with Pb(NO 3 ) 2 being more genotoxic in polychaete and should be used more carefully in industrial and other activities. Graphical abstract.

  1. Genotoxicity of indium tin oxide by comet test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Hakkı Ciğerci

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Indium tin oxide (ITO is used for liquid crystal display (LCDs, electrochromic displays, flat panel displays, field emission displays, touch or laptop computer screens, cell phones, energy conserving architectural windows, defogging aircraft and automobile windows, heat-reflecting coatings to increase light bulb efficiency, gas sensors, antistatic window coatings, wear resistant layers on glass, nanowires and nanorods because of its unique properties of high electrical conductivity, transparency and mechanical resistance.Genotoxic effects of ITO were investigated on the root cells of Allium cepa by Comet assay. A. cepa roots were treated with the aqueous dispersions of ITO at 5 different concentrations (12.5, 25, 50, 75, and 100 ppm for 4 h. A significant increase in DNA damage was a observed at all concentrations of ITO by Comet assay. These result indicate that ITO exhibit genotoxic activity in A. cepa root meristematic cells.

  2. Metabolic profile and genotoxicity in obese rats exposed to cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasceno, Debora C; Sinzato, Yuri K; Bueno, Aline; Dallaqua, Bruna; Lima, Paula H; Calderon, Iracema M P; Rudge, Marilza V C; Campos, Kleber E

    2013-08-01

    Experimental studies have shown that exposure to cigarette smoke has negative effects on lipid metabolism and oxidative stress status. Cigarette smoke exposure in nonpregnant and pregnant rats causes significant genotoxicity (DNA damage). However, no previous studies have directly evaluated the effects of obesity or the association between obesity and cigarette smoke exposure on genotoxicity. Therefore, the aim of the present investigation was to evaluate DNA damage levels, oxidative stress status and lipid profiles in obese Wistar rats exposed to cigarette smoke. Female rats subcutaneously (s.c.) received a monosodium glutamate solution or vehicle (control) during the neonatal period to induce obesity. The rats were randomly distributed into three experimental groups: control, obese exposed to filtered air, and obese exposed to tobacco cigarette smoke. After a 2-month exposure period, the rats were anesthetized and killed to obtain blood samples for genotoxicity, lipid profile, and oxidative stress status analyses. The obese rats exposed to tobacco cigarette smoke presented higher DNA damage, triglycerides, total cholesterol, free fatty acids, VLDL-c, HDL-c, and LDL-c levels compared to control and obese rats exposed to filtered air. Both obese groups showed reduced SOD activity. These results showed that cigarette smoke enhanced the effects of obesity. In conclusion, the association between obesity and cigarette smoke exposure exacerbated the genotoxicity, negatively impacted the biochemical profile and antioxidant defenses and caused early glucose intolerance. Thus, the changes caused by cigarette smoke exposure can trigger the earlier onset of metabolic disorders associated with obesity, such as diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  3. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of coronaridine from Tabernaemontana catharinensis A.DC in a human laryngeal epithelial carcinoma cell line (Hep-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizo, Walace Fraga; Ferreira, Luis Eduardo; Colnaghi, Vanessa; Martins, Juliana Simões; Franchi, Leonardo Pereira; Takahashi, Catarina Satie; Beleboni, Rene Oliveira; Marins, Mozart; Pereira, Paulo Sérgio; Fachin, Ana Lúcia

    2013-01-01

    Cancer has become a major public health problem worldwide and the number of deaths due to this disease is increasing almost exponentially. In the constant search for new treatments, natural products of plant origin have provided a variety of new compounds to be explored as antitumor agents. Tabernaemontana catharinensis is a medicinal plant that produces alkaloids with expressive antitumor activity, such as heyneanine, coronaridine and voacangine. The aim of present study was firstly to screen the cytotoxic activity of the indole alkaloids heyneanine, coronaridine and voacangine against HeLa (human cervix tumor), 3T3 (normal mouse embryo fibroblasts), Hep-2 (human laryngeal epithelial carcinoma) and B-16 (murine skin) cell lines by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide); and secondly to analyze the apoptotic activity, cell membrane damage and genotoxicity of the compound that showed the best cytotoxic activity against the tumor cell lines tested. Coronaridine was the one that exhibited greater cytotoxic activity in the laryngeal carcinoma cell line Hep-2 (IC50 = 54.47 μg/mL) than the other alkaloids tested (voacangine IC50 = 159.33 g/mL, and heyneanine IC50 = 689.45 μg/mL). Coronaridine induced apoptosis in cell lines 3T3 and Hep-2, even at high concentrations. The evaluation of genotoxicity by comet assay showed further that coronaridine caused minimal DNA damage in the Hep-2 tumor cell line, and the LDH test showed that it did not affect the plasma membrane. These results suggest that further investigation of coronaridine as an antitumor agent has merit. PMID:23569415

  4. Evaluation of the genotoxicity of cellulose nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Renata; Oliveira Feitosa, Leandro; Rodrigues Maruyama, Cintia; Abreu Barga, Mariana; Yamawaki, Patrícia Cristina; Vieira, Isolda Jesus; Teixeira, Eliangela M; Corrêa, Ana Carolina; Caparelli Mattoso, Luiz Henrique; Fernandes Fraceto, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Agricultural products and by products provide the primary materials for a variety of technological applications in diverse industrial sectors. Agro-industrial wastes, such as cotton and curaua fibers, are used to prepare nanofibers for use in thermoplastic films, where they are combined with polymeric matrices, and in biomedical applications such as tissue engineering, amongst other applications. The development of products containing nanofibers offers a promising alternative for the use of agricultural products, adding value to the chains of production. However, the emergence of new nanotechnological products demands that their risks to human health and the environment be evaluated. This has resulted in the creation of the new area of nanotoxicology, which addresses the toxicological aspects of these materials. Contributing to these developments, the present work involved a genotoxicological study of different nanofibers, employing chromosomal aberration and comet assays, as well as cytogenetic and molecular analyses, to obtain preliminary information concerning nanofiber safety. The methodology consisted of exposure of Allium cepa roots, and animal cell cultures (lymphocytes and fibroblasts), to different types of nanofibers. Negative controls, without nanofibers present in the medium, were used for comparison. The nanofibers induced different responses according to the cell type used. In plant cells, the most genotoxic nanofibers were those derived from green, white, and brown cotton, and curaua, while genotoxicity in animal cells was observed using nanofibers from brown cotton and curaua. An important finding was that ruby cotton nanofibers did not cause any significant DNA breaks in the cell types employed. This work demonstrates the feasibility of determining the genotoxic potential of nanofibers derived from plant cellulose to obtain information vital both for the future usage of these materials in agribusiness and for an understanding of their environmental

  5. Tradescantia micronucleus test indicates genotoxic potential of traffic emissions in European cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klumpp, Andreas; Ansel, Wolfgang; Klumpp, Gabriele; Calatayud, Vicent; Garrec, Jean Pierre; He Shang; Penuelas, Josep; Ribas, Angela; Ro-Poulsen, Helge; Rasmussen, Stine; Sanz, Maria Jose; Vergne, Phillippe

    2006-01-01

    Urban atmospheres contain complex mixtures of air pollutants including mutagenic and carcinogenic substances such as benzene, diesel soot, heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In the frame of a European network for the assessment of air quality by the use of bioindicator plants, the Tradescantia micronucleus (Trad-MCN) test was applied to examine the genotoxicity of urban air pollution. Cuttings of Tradescantia clone no. 4430 were exposed to ambient air at 65 monitoring sites in 10 conurbations employing a standardised methodology. The tests revealed an elevated genotoxic potential mainly at those urban sites which were exposed to severe car traffic emissions. This bioassay proved to be a suitable tool to detect local 'hot spots' of mutagenic air pollution in urban areas. For its use in routine monitoring programmes, however, further standardisation of cultivation and exposure techniques is recommended in order to reduce the variability of results due to varying environmental conditions. - The Tradescantia micronucleus test can be used to assess genotoxic potential at urban sites

  6. Genotoxic effects of N-nitrosodimethylamine in somatic and generative cells of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna V. Lovinskaya

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA was shown to have genotoxic properties in acute and subacute studies on laboratory mice. The organ-specificity of the genotoxic effect of NDMA was revealed using the Comet assay. The most sensitive organs to the action of NDMA were kidneys and liver. DNA damage in liver cells of NDMA-treated animals at doses of 4.0 and 8.0 mg/kg, increased compared to control in 6.9 and 12.5 (р < 0.001, and in kidney cells – in 8.1 and 14.2 times (р < 0.001, respectively. NDMA also showed genotoxic activity in the reproductive cells of experimental animals, causing structural disorders of synaptonemal complexes in spermatocyte. In NDMA-treated animals at a dose of 2.0 mg/kg in acute and subacute studies, the level of spermatocytes with damaged synaptonemal complexes increased statistically significantly compared to control in 6.0 and 7.0 (р < 0.05 times, respectively.

  7. Tradescantia micronucleus test indicates genotoxic potential of traffic emissions in European cities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klumpp, Andreas [Institute for Landscape and Plant Ecology (320), University of Hohenheim, 70593 Stuttgart (Germany)]. E-mail: aklumpp@uni-hohenheim.de; Ansel, Wolfgang [Institute for Landscape and Plant Ecology (320), University of Hohenheim, 70593 Stuttgart (Germany); Klumpp, Gabriele [Institute for Landscape and Plant Ecology (320), University of Hohenheim, 70593 Stuttgart (Germany); Calatayud, Vicent [Fundacion CEAM, Parque Tecnologico, c/Charles Darwin 14, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Garrec, Jean Pierre [INRA Nancy, Laboratoire Pollution Atmospherique, 54280 Champenoux (France); He Shang [INRA Nancy, Laboratoire Pollution Atmospherique, 54280 Champenoux (France); Penuelas, Josep [Unitat Ecofisiologia CSIC-CEAB-CREAF, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Ed. C, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Ribas, Angela [Unitat Ecofisiologia CSIC-CEAB-CREAF, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Ed. C, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Ro-Poulsen, Helge [Botanical Institute, University of Copenhagen, Oster Farimagsgade 2D, 1353 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Rasmussen, Stine [Botanical Institute, University of Copenhagen, Oster Farimagsgade 2D, 1353 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Sanz, Maria Jose [Fundacion CEAM, Parque Tecnologico, c/Charles Darwin 14, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Vergne, Phillippe [ENS Lyon and Lyon Botanical Garden, 46 Allee d' Italie, 69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France)

    2006-02-15

    Urban atmospheres contain complex mixtures of air pollutants including mutagenic and carcinogenic substances such as benzene, diesel soot, heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In the frame of a European network for the assessment of air quality by the use of bioindicator plants, the Tradescantia micronucleus (Trad-MCN) test was applied to examine the genotoxicity of urban air pollution. Cuttings of Tradescantia clone no. 4430 were exposed to ambient air at 65 monitoring sites in 10 conurbations employing a standardised methodology. The tests revealed an elevated genotoxic potential mainly at those urban sites which were exposed to severe car traffic emissions. This bioassay proved to be a suitable tool to detect local 'hot spots' of mutagenic air pollution in urban areas. For its use in routine monitoring programmes, however, further standardisation of cultivation and exposure techniques is recommended in order to reduce the variability of results due to varying environmental conditions. - The Tradescantia micronucleus test can be used to assess genotoxic potential at urban sites.

  8. In Vitro Genotoxic Effects of Four Helichrysum Species in Human Lymphocytes Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan H Erolu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Helichrysum sanguineum, Helichrysum pamphylicum, Helichrysum orientale, Helichrysum noeanum (Asteraceae are medicinal plants. For centuries, they have been used as tea in Turkey because of their medicinal properties. So far no scientifc evidence has been found in a literature survey regarding the genotoxic effects of these plants. This work evaluated the genotoxic effects on human lymphocyte cultures induced by methanol extracts of these plants, assayed in different concentrations (0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5 and 1 mg/mL. According to the results, Helichrysum noeanum, Helichrysum pamphylicum and Helichrysum sanguineum induced the formation of micronuclei and decreased the mitotic and replication indexes. Helichrysum orientale did not affect these parameters, whereas Helichrysum noeanum, Helichrysum pamphylicum and Helichrysum sanguineum were clearly genotoxic. They should therefore not be used freely in alternative medicine, although their antiproliferative activity may suggest antimitotic and anticarcinogenic properties. Helichrysum orientale could be used in alternative medicine.

  9. Acute Toxicity and Genotoxic Activity of Avocado Seed Extract (Persea americana Mill., c.v. Hass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Padilla-Camberos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of vegetal extracts requires toxicological and genotoxic evaluations to establish and verify safety before being added to human cosmetic, pharmaceutical medicine, or alimentary products. Persea americana seeds have been used in traditional medicine as treatment for several diseases. In this work, the ethanolic seed extract of Persea americana was evaluated with respect to its genotoxic potential through micronucleus assay in rodents. The frequency of micronuclei in groups of animals treated with avocado seed extract showed no differences compared to the negative control (vehicle; therefore, it is considered that the avocado seed extract showed no genotoxic activity in the micronucleus test.

  10. Comparative potency approach based on H2AX assay for estimating the genotoxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, M; Zeman, F; Beaudoin, R; Péry, A; Cravedi, J-P

    2012-04-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) constitute a family of over one hundred compounds and can generally be found in complex mixtures. PAHs metabolites cause DNA damage which can lead to the development of carcinogenesis. Toxicity assessment of PAH complex mixtures is currently expressed in terms of toxic equivalents, based on Toxicity Equivalent Factors (TEFs). However, the definition of new TEFs for a large number of PAH could overcome some limitations of the current method and improve cancer risk assessment. The current investigation aimed at deriving the relative potency factors of PAHs, based on their genotoxic effect measured in vitro and analyzed with mathematical models. For this purpose, we used a new genotoxic assay (γH2AX) with two human cell lines (HepG2 and LS-174T) to analyze the genotoxic properties of 13 selected PAHs at low doses after 24h treatment. The dose-response for genotoxic effects was modeled with a Hill model; equivalency between PAHs at low dose was assessed by applying constraints to the model parameters. In the two cell lines tested, we observed a clear dose-response for genotoxic effects for 11 tested compounds. LS-174T was on average ten times more sensitive than HepG2 towards PAHs regarding genotoxicity. We developed new TEFs, which we named Genotoxic Equivalent Factor (GEF). Calculated GEF for the tested PAHs were generally higher than the TEF usually used. Our study proposed a new in vitro based method for the establishment of relevant TEFs for PAHs to improve cancer risk assessment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of genotoxic potential of neurotoxin anatoxin-a with the use of umuC test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieroslawska, Anna; Rymuszka, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate genotoxicity of anatoxin-a, cyanotoxin of neurotoxic activity. Additionally, other frequently detected cyanotoxin of previously described genotoxic potential, microcystin-LR, was used at the same concentrations, as well as the mixture of both toxins, anatoxin-a and microcystin-LR. Genotoxicity of the toxins was determined with the use of the umuC assay, in which the induction and expression of the umuC - lacZ reporter gene was assessed. The test was conducted on Salmonella typhimurium TA 1535/pSK1002 strain, with and without metabolic transformation. The toxin concentrations were 0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2 µg/ml. The exposure time was 2 h. The highest inefficient concentration of anatoxin-a without metabolic transformation was 0.25 µg/ml, of microcystin-LR was 0.5 µg/ml and in case of the toxin mixture all used concentrations induced the umuC gene. When S9 fraction was added to the samples, no effects were detected. To our knowledge, this is the first report on genotoxic effects of anatoxin-a. Although the study is preliminary and needs further research, however, indicates the new potential activity of the toxin, as well as the possible increase of genotoxicity of other cyanotoxins, more stable in the environment, e.g. microcystin-LR.

  12. Initial hazard screening for genotoxicity of photo-transformation products of ciprofloxacin by applying a combination of experimental and in-silico testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toolaram, Anju Priya; Haddad, Tarek; Leder, Christoph; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin (CIP) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic found within μg/L concentration range in the aquatic environment. It is a known contributor of umuC induction in hospital wastewater samples. CIP can undergo photolysis to result in many transformation products (TPs) of mostly unknown toxicity. The aims of this study were to determine the genotoxicity of the UV mixtures and to understand the possible genotoxic role of the stable TPs. As such, CIP and its UV-irradiated mixtures were investigated in a battery of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in vitro assays. The combination index (CI) analysis of residual CIP in the irradiated mixtures was performed for the umu assay. Further, Quantitative Structure–Activity Relationships (QSARs) predicted selected genotoxicity endpoints of the identified TPs. CIP achieved primary elimination after 128 min of irradiation but was not completely mineralized. Nine photo-TPs were identified. The irradiated mixtures were neither mutagenic in the Ames test nor genotoxic in the in vitro micronucleus (MN) test. Like CIP, the irradiated mixtures were umuC inducing. The CI analysis revealed that the irradiated mixtures and the corresponding CIP concentration in the mixtures shared similar umuC potentials. QSAR predictions suggested that the TPs may be capable of inducing chromosome aberration, MN in vivo, bacterial mutation and mammalian mutation. However, the experimental testing for a few genotoxic endpoints did not show significant genotoxic activity for the TPs present as a component of the whole mixture analysis and therefore, further genotoxic endpoints may need to be investigated to fully confirm this. - Highlights: • Identified photo-transformation products (TPs) retained the quinolone core. • Experimental and in silico tools assessed for genotoxicity of TPs in the mixtures. • Some of the TPs were predicted as genotoxic by QSAR analysis. • Irradiated mixtures were neither micronuclei inducing nor mutagenic in Ames test

  13. Evaluation of genotoxicity of liquid effluents from gas washing systems by means of bioassay Trad-MCN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, Alessandra Carla Fattori Ergesse; Alves, Edenise Segala

    2007-01-01

    In the gas washing systems the gaseous emissions from a facility are forced through an absorbing liquid preventing pollutants to be dispersed into the atmosphere. In the Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo/Centro Experimental Aramar (CEA), the gas washing are used to control the emissions from the uranium enrichment facilities. Uranium. fluoride, ammonia and hydrogen fluoride are the main contaminants, all heavily toxic. Biological assays, using plants or other living organisms, have been used to assess genotoxic agents in the environment. Among the bioassays using plants, the Trad-MCN has been used extensively, as it allows the evaluation of liquid or gaseous contaminants. The species Tradescantia pallida (Rose) was exposed in a dynamic system to liquid effluents from CEA. A positive control was the exposure to formaldehyde 10% in water, known as a very toxic solution, and the negative control was the exposure to filtered air. The protocol established by Ma (1983) for hybrid clones and validated for the T. pallida by Guimaraes (2003) was used to perform the Trad-MCN assays. Only preparations containing early tetrads were scored. In that context, the present study objectifies to evaluate, by the Trad-MCN bioassay, the genotoxicity of the solution from the gas washing and, also, evaluate the efficiency of that system. The results obtained show that the T. pallida is a sensitive bioindicator for the pollutants tested and can be useful for in vitro environmental monitoring under controlled conditions. (author)

  14. Evaluation of genotoxicity of liquid effluents from gas washing systems by means of bioassay Trad-MCN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Alessandra Carla Fattori Ergesse [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), SP (Brazil). Div. de Monitoracao Ambiental], E-mail: alessandra@ctmsp.mar.mil.br; Alves, Edenise Segala [Instituto de Botanica de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Secao de Anatomia], E-mail: ealves@ibot.sp.gov.br

    2007-07-01

    In the gas washing systems the gaseous emissions from a facility are forced through an absorbing liquid preventing pollutants to be dispersed into the atmosphere. In the Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo/Centro Experimental Aramar (CEA), the gas washing are used to control the emissions from the uranium enrichment facilities. Uranium. fluoride, ammonia and hydrogen fluoride are the main contaminants, all heavily toxic. Biological assays, using plants or other living organisms, have been used to assess genotoxic agents in the environment. Among the bioassays using plants, the Trad-MCN has been used extensively, as it allows the evaluation of liquid or gaseous contaminants. The species Tradescantia pallida (Rose) was exposed in a dynamic system to liquid effluents from CEA. A positive control was the exposure to formaldehyde 10% in water, known as a very toxic solution, and the negative control was the exposure to filtered air. The protocol established by Ma (1983) for hybrid clones and validated for the T. pallida by Guimaraes (2003) was used to perform the Trad-MCN assays. Only preparations containing early tetrads were scored. In that context, the present study objectifies to evaluate, by the Trad-MCN bioassay, the genotoxicity of the solution from the gas washing and, also, evaluate the efficiency of that system. The results obtained show that the T. pallida is a sensitive bioindicator for the pollutants tested and can be useful for in vitro environmental monitoring under controlled conditions. (author)

  15. Ecotoxicity and genotoxicity assessment of cytostatic pharmaceuticals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zounková, R.; Odráška, P.; Doležalová, L.; Hilscherová, Klára; Maršálek, Blahoslav; Bláha, Luděk

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 10 (2007), s. 2208-2214 ISSN 0730-7268 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 2B06171; ECODIS(XE) 518043-1 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : cytostatic pharmaceuticals * genotoxicity * antineoplastics Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.309, year: 2007

  16. Genoprotective and Genotoxic Effects of Thymoquinone on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comet assays and apoptotic cell studies were performed to evaluate the effect of TQ on the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity-induced by DXR. Results: TQ treatment, alone, (5.0, 10, or 20 µM) increased DNA damage index (DI) in a concentrationdependent manner (0.64 ± 0.09, 0.84 ± 0.07, and 0.93 ± 0.06, respectively).

  17. In vitro evaluation of mutagenicity and genotoxicity of sitagliptin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Sitagliptin, Artificial sweeteners, Comet assay, DNA damage, Ames assay, Genotoxicity,. Mutagenicity. Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research is indexed by Science Citation Index (SciSearch), Scopus,. International Pharmaceutical Abstract, Chemical Abstracts, Embase, Index Copernicus, EBSCO, African.

  18. In vivo genotoxicity evaluation of an artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) aqueous extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Meriele A; Ferraz, Alexandre B F; Richter, Marc F; Picada, Jaqueline N; de Andrade, Heloisa H R; Lehmann, Mauricio; Dihl, Rafael R; Nunes, Emilene; Semedo, Juliane; Da Silva, Juliana

    2013-02-01

    The Cynara scolymus (artichoke) is widely consumed as tea or food and shows important therapeutic properties. However, few studies have assessed the possible toxic effects of artichoke extracts. This study evaluates genotoxic and mutagenic activities of artichoke leaf aqueous extract in mice using the comet assay and the micronucleus test. Leaf extracts were given by gavage (500 mg/kg, 1000 mg/kg, and 2000 mg/kg) for 3 consecutive days. Extract composition was investigated using phytochemical screening and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In addition, antioxidant capacity was analyzed through the diphenyl-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and xanthine oxidase assay. Phytochemical screening detected the presence of phenolic compounds, flavonoids, and saponins. HPLC analyses indicated the presence of chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, isoquercetrin, and rutin. Extracts showed a dose-dependent free radical scavenging effect of DPPH and an inhibitory effect of xanthine oxidase. The genotoxic results showed that leaf extracts did not increase micronuclei in peripheral blood cells. Compared to the control group, a significant increase in comet assay values was observed only in bone marrow of group treated with 2000 mg/kg, the highest dose tested, indicating that artichoke tea should be consumed with moderation. This is the first report of in vivo mutagenic and genotoxic evaluation with C. scolymus. The present study revealed leaf aqueous extract from artichoke shows lack of mutagenicity in vivo, and low genotoxicity and antioxidant activity; indicating that artichoke tea should be consumed with moderation. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Oxcarbazepine-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human lymphocyte cultures with or without metabolic activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlı Şekeroğlu, Zülal; Kefelioğlu, Haluk; Kontaş Yedier, Seval; Şekeroğlu, Vedat; Delmecioğlu, Berrin

    2017-03-01

    There has been considerable debate about the relationship between epilepsy and cancer. Oxcarbazepine (OXC) is used for treating certain types of seizures in patients with epilepsy. There have been no detailed investigations about genotoxicity of OXC and its metabolites. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of OXC and its metabolites on cultured human lymphocytes. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of OXC on human peripheral blood lymphocytes were examined in vitro by sister chromatid exchange (SCE), chromosomal aberration (CA) and micronucleus (MN) tests. Cultures were treated with 125, 250 and 500 μg/ml of OXC in the presence (3 h treatment) and absence (24 h and 48 h treatment) of a metabolic activator (S9 mix). Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was used as a solvent control. OXC showed cytotoxic activities due to significant decreases in mitotic index (MI), proliferation index (PI) and nuclear division index (NDI) in the absence of S9 mix when compared with solvent control. Metabolites of OXC also significantly reduced MI and PI in cultures with S9 mix. OXC significantly increased the CAs, aberrant cells, SCE and MN values in the presence and absence of S9 mix. Our results indicated that both OXC and its metabolites have cytotoxic, cytostatic and genotoxic potential on human peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures under the experimental conditions. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the relationship between cytotoxic, cytostatic and genotoxic effects, and to make a possible risk assessment in patients receiving therapy with this drug.

  20. Genotoxicity assessment of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with different particle sizes and surface coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yanping; Xia, Qiyue; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Shuyang; Cheng, Feng; Wang, Li; Li, Hongxia; Xiao, Kai; Zhong, Zhihui

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been widely used for various biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging and drug delivery. However, their potential toxic effects, including genotoxicity, need to be thoroughly understood. In the present study, the genotoxicity of IONPs with different particle sizes (10, 30 nm) and surface coatings (PEG, PEI) were assessed using three standard genotoxicity assays, the Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay (Ames test), the in vitro mammalian chromosome aberration test, and the in vivo micronucleus assay. In the Ames test, SMG-10 (PEG coating, 10 nm) showed a positive mutagenic response in all the five test bacterial strains with and without metabolic activation, whereas SEI-10 (PEI coating, 10 nm) showed no mutagenesis in all tester strains regardless of metabolic activation. SMG-30 (PEG coating, 30 nm) was not mutagenic in the absence of metabolic activation, and became mutagenic in the presence of metabolic activation. In the chromosomal aberration test, no increase in the incidence of chromosomal aberrations was observed for all three IONPs. In the in vivo micronucleus test, there was no evidence of increased micronuclei frequencies for all three IONPs, indicating that they were not clastogenic in vivo. Taken together, our results demonstrated that IONPs with PEG coating exhibited mutagenic activity without chromosomal and clastogenic abnormalities, and smaller IONPs (SMG-10) had stronger mutagenic potential than larger ones (SMG-30); whereas, IONPs with SEI coating (SEI-10) were not genotoxic in all three standard genotoxicity assays. This suggests that the mutagenicity of IONPs depends on their particle size and surface coating. (paper)

  1. Histopathological and genotoxic effects of chlorpyrifos in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzi, Lobna; Belhadj Salah, Imen; Haouas, Zohra; Sakly, Amina; Grissa, Intissar; Chakroun, Sana; Kerkeni, Emna; Hassine, Mohsen; Mehdi, Meriem; Ben Cheikh, Hassen

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of chlorpyrifos's sub-acute exposure on male rats. Two groups with six animals each were orally treated, respectively, with 3.1 mg/kg b w and 6.2 mg/kg b w of chlorpyrifos during 4 weeks. The genotoxic effect of chlopyrifos was investigated using the comet assay and the micronucleus test. Some hematological and liver's histopathological changes were also evaluated. Results revealed that chlorpyrifos induced histopathological alterations in liver parenchyma. The lymphoid infiltration observed in liver sections and the increase in white blood cells parameter are signs of inflammation. A significant increase in the platelet' count and in polychromatic erythrocytes/normochromatic erythrocytes (PCE/NCE) ratio was observed in chlorpyrifos-treated groups which could be due to the stimulatory effect of chlorpyrifos on cell formation in the bone marrow at lower doses. In addition, the increase of bone marrow micronucleus percentage and the comet tail length revealed a genotoxic potential of chlorpyrifos in vivo.

  2. Biomonitoring of genotoxic exposure among stainless steel welders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Boisen, T; Christensen, J M

    1992-01-01

    A biosurvey in the Danish metal industry measured the genotoxic exposure from stainless steel welding. The study comprised measurements of chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister-chromatid exchanges (SCE), unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in peripheral lymphocytes and serum immunoglobulin G. Environm......A biosurvey in the Danish metal industry measured the genotoxic exposure from stainless steel welding. The study comprised measurements of chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister-chromatid exchanges (SCE), unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in peripheral lymphocytes and serum immunoglobulin G....... A higher frequency of chromosomal aberrations, classified as translocations, double minutes, exchanges and rings, was observed in stainless steel welders than in non-welders. SCE was lower in welders working with both MMA and TIG welding than in reference persons. N-Acetoxy-N-acetylaminofluorene (NA...... lymphocytes in exposed persons compared with non-exposed are suggested. MMA welding gave the highest exposure to chromium, an increased number of chromosomal aberrations and a decrease in SCE when compared with TIG welding. Consequently improvements in the occupational practice of stainless steel welding...

  3. Genotoxic and teratogenic potential of marine sediment extracts investigated with comet assay and zebrafish test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kammann, Ulrike; Biselli, Scarlett; Huehnerfuss, Heinrich; Reineke, Ninja; Theobald, Norbert; Vobach, Michael; Wosniok, Werner

    2004-01-01

    Organic extracts of marine sediments from the North Sea and the Baltic Sea were investigated with two toxicity assays. The comet assay based on the fish cell line Epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) was applied to determine the genotoxic potential; zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio) were used to quantify the teratogenic potential of the samples. EC 50 values were calculated from dose-response curves for both test systems. Highest teratogenic and genotoxic effects normalised to total organic carbon (TOC) content were detected in sediment samples of different origins. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are not likely to be the causes of the observed effects, as demonstrated by a two-step fractionation procedure of selected extracts. The toxic potential was more pronounced in fractions having polarity higher than those possessed by PAHs and PCBs. The suitability of the two in vitro test systems for assessing genotoxic and teratogenic effects of marine sediment extracts could be demonstrated. - Capsule: In vitro toxicity assays are used to assess genotoxic and teratogenic effects of environmental extracts

  4. Investigation of genotoxic potential of various sizes Fe2O3 nanoparticles with comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Hakkı Ciğerci

    2015-06-01

    In this study, genotoxic potential of <50 nm and <100 nm Fe2O3 nanoparticles were investigated by using Comet Assay. Allium cepa root meristems were exposed with five doses (0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 mM of <50 nm for 4 hour and three doses (2.5, 5 (EC50, 10 mM for <100 nm of Fe2O3 nanoparticle for 24 and 96 h. Methyl methanesulfonate -MMS (10 ppm was used as a positive control. The results were also analyzed statistically by using SPSS by Windows, 18.0. It was determined that different doses of <50 nm Fe2O3 nanoparticle have no genotoxic effect of DNA. Different doses of <100 nm Fe2O3 have no genotoxic but only 10 mM dose have genotoxic effect on DNA. When compared <50 nm with <100 nm of Fe2O3 nanoparticle; <50 nm have more effects than <100 nm of Fe2O3 on DNA damage.

  5. Cyto-genotoxicity and oxidative stress in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) exposed to a mixture of ibuprofen and diclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islas-Flores, Hariz; Manuel Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; Michelle Sánchez-Ocampo, Esmeralda; SanJuan-Reyes, Nely; Ortíz-Reynoso, Mariana; Dublán-García, Octavio

    2017-05-01

    Thirty million people worldwide consume each day nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), a heterogeneous group of pharmaceuticals used for its analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory properties. Recent studies report high NSAID concentrations in wastewater treatment plant effluents, in surface, ground, and drinking water, and in sediments. NSAIDs are also known to induce toxicity on aquatic organisms. However, toxicity in natural ecosystems is not usually the result of exposure to a single substance but to a mixture of toxic agents, yet only a few studies have evaluated the toxicity of mixtures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity induced by diclofenac (DCF), ibuprofen (IBP), and their mixture on a species of commercial interest, the common carp Cyprinus carpio. The median lethal concentration of IBP and DCF was determined, and oxidative stress was evaluated using the following biomarkers: lipid peroxidation and activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Cyto-genotoxicity was evaluated by micronucleus test, comet assay, and the specific activity of caspase-3. Results show that DCF, IBP, and a mixture of these pharmaceuticals induced free radical production, oxidative stress and cyto-genotoxicity in tissues of C. carpio. However, a greater effect was elicited by the mixture than by either pharmaceutical alone in some biomarkers evaluated, particularly in gill. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 1637-1650, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Follow-Up Genotoxic Study: Chromosome Damage Two and Six Years after Exposure to the Prestige Oil Spill.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Hildur

    Full Text Available The north-west coast of Spain was heavily contaminated by the Prestige oil spill, in 2002. Individuals who participated in the clean-up tasks showed increased chromosome damage two years after exposure. Long-term clinical implications of chromosome damage are still unknown.To realize a follow-up genotoxic study to detect whether the chromosome damage persisted six years after exposure to the oil.Follow-up study.Fishermen cooperatives in coastal villages.Local fishermen who were highly exposed (n = 52 and non-exposed (n = 23 to oil seven years after the spill.Chromosome damage in circulating lymphocytes.Chromosome damage in exposed individuals persists six years after oil exposure, with a similar incidence than those previously detected four years before. A surprising increase in chromosome damage in non-exposed individual was found six years after Prestige spill vs. those detected two years after the exposure.The sample size and the possibility of some kind of selection bias should be considered. Genotoxic results cannot be extrapolated to the approximately 300,000 individuals who participated occasionally in clean-up tasks.The persistence of chromosome damage detected in exposed individuals six years after oil exposure seems to indicate that the cells of the bone marrow are affected. A surprising increase in chromosome damage in non-exposed individuals detected in the follow-up study suggests an indirect exposition of these individuals to some oil compounds or to other toxic agents during the last four years. More long-term studies are needed to confirm the presence of chromosome damage in exposed and non-exposed fishermen due to the association between increased chromosomal damage and increased risk of cancer. Understanding and detecting chromosome damage is important for detecting cancer in its early stages. The present work is the first follow-up cytogenetic study carried out in lymphocytes to determine genotoxic damage evolution between two

  7. Follow-Up Genotoxic Study: Chromosome Damage Two and Six Years after Exposure to the Prestige Oil Spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildur, Kristin; Templado, Cristina; Zock, Jan-Paul; Giraldo, Jesús; Pozo-Rodríguez, Francisco; Frances, Alexandra; Monyarch, Gemma; Rodríguez-Trigo, Gema; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Emma; Souto, Ana; Gómez, Federico P.; Antó, Josep M.; Barberà, Joan Albert; Fuster, Carme

    2015-01-01

    Background The north-west coast of Spain was heavily contaminated by the Prestige oil spill, in 2002. Individuals who participated in the clean-up tasks showed increased chromosome damage two years after exposure. Long-term clinical implications of chromosome damage are still unknown. Objective To realize a follow-up genotoxic study to detect whether the chromosome damage persisted six years after exposure to the oil. Design Follow-up study. Setting Fishermen cooperatives in coastal villages. Participants Local fishermen who were highly exposed (n = 52) and non-exposed (n = 23) to oil seven years after the spill. Measurements Chromosome damage in circulating lymphocytes. Results Chromosome damage in exposed individuals persists six years after oil exposure, with a similar incidence than those previously detected four years before. A surprising increase in chromosome damage in non-exposed individual was found six years after Prestige spill vs. those detected two years after the exposure. Limitations The sample size and the possibility of some kind of selection bias should be considered. Genotoxic results cannot be extrapolated to the approximately 300,000 individuals who participated occasionally in clean-up tasks. Conclusion The persistence of chromosome damage detected in exposed individuals six years after oil exposure seems to indicate that the cells of the bone marrow are affected. A surprising increase in chromosome damage in non-exposed individuals detected in the follow-up study suggests an indirect exposition of these individuals to some oil compounds or to other toxic agents during the last four years. More long-term studies are needed to confirm the presence of chromosome damage in exposed and non-exposed fishermen due to the association between increased chromosomal damage and increased risk of cancer. Understanding and detecting chromosome damage is important for detecting cancer in its early stages. The present work is the first follow-up cytogenetic

  8. Moesin Is a Biomarker for the Assessment of Genotoxic Carcinogens in Mouse Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoen Jung; Choi, In-Kwon; Sheen, Yhun Yhong; Park, Sue Nie; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2012-01-01

    1,2-Dibromoethane and glycidol are well known genotoxic carcinogens, which have been widely used in industry. To identify a specific biomarker for these carcinogens in cells, the cellular proteome of L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells treated with these compounds was analyzed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS). Of 50 protein spots showing a greater than 1.5-fold increase or decrease in intensity compared to control cells on a 2-D gel, we focused on the candidate biomarker moesin. Western analysis using monoclonal rabbit anti-moesin confirmed the identity of the protein and its increased level of expression upon exposure to the carcinogenic compounds. Moesin expression also increased in cells treated with six additional genotoxic carcinogens, verifying that moesin could serve as a biomarker to monitor phenotypic change upon exposure to genotoxic carcinogens in L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells. PMID:22358511

  9. Use of the Microscreen phage-induction assay to assess the genotoxicity of 14 hazardous industrial wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houk, V.S.; DeMarini, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    The Microscreen phage-induction assay, which quantitatively measures the induction of prophage lambda in Escherichia coli WP2s lambda, was used to test 14 crude (unfractionated) hazardous industrial-waste samples for genotoxic activity in the presence and absence of metabolic activation. Eleven of the 14 wastes induced prophage, and induction was observed at concentrations as low as 0.4 picograms per ml. Comparisons between the mutagenicity of these waste samples in Salmonella and their ability to induce prophage lambda indicate that the Microscreen phage-induction assay detected genotoxic activity in all but one of the wastes that were mutagenic in Salmonella. Moreover, the Microscreen assay detected as genotoxic 5 additional wastes that were not detected in the Salmonella assay. The applicability of the Microscreen phage-induction assay for screening hazardous wastes for genotoxic activity is discussed along with some of the problems associated with screening highly toxic wastes containing toxic volatile compounds.

  10. Use of the microscreen phage-induction assay to assess the genotoxicity of 14 hazardous industrial wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houk, V.S.; DeMarini, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    The Microscreen phage-induction assay, which quantitatively measures the induction of prophage lambda in Escherichia coli WP2s(lambda), was used to test 14 crude (unfractionated) hazardous industrial waste samples for genotoxic activity in the presence and absence of metabolic activation. Eleven of the 14 wastes induced prophage, and induction was observed at concentrations as low as 0.4 pg per ml. Comparisons between the ability of these waste samples to induce prophage and their mutagenicity in the Salmonella reverse mutation assay indicate that the phage-induction assay detected genotoxic activity in all but one of the wastes that were mutagenic in Salmonella. Moreover, the Microscreen assay detected as genotoxic five additional wastes that were not detected in the Salmonella assay. The applicability of the Microscreen phage-induction assay for screening hazardous wastes for genotoxic activity is discussed, as are some of the problems associated with screening highly toxic wastes containing toxic volatile compounds.

  11. Assessment of the in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity of extracts and indole monoterpene alkaloid from the roots of Galianthe thalictroides (Rubiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, L M; Garcez, W S; Mantovani, M S; Figueiredo, P O; Fernandes, C A; Garcez, F R; Guterres, Z R

    2013-09-01

    Roots of Galianthe thalictroides K. Schum. (Rubiaceae) are used in folk medicine in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, for treating and preventing cancer. To gain information about the genotoxicity of extracts (aqueous and EtOH), the CHCl₃ phase resulting from partition of the EtOH extract and the indole monoterpene alkaloid 1 obtained from this plant. The genotoxicity of 1 and extracts was evaluated in vivo through the Drosophila melanogaster wing Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test - SMART, while in vitro cytotoxic (MTT) and Comet assays were performed only with alkaloid 1. The results obtained with the SMART test indicated that the aqueous extract had no genotoxic activity. The EtOH extract was not genotoxic to ST descendants but genotoxic to HB ones. The CHCl₃ phase was genotoxic and cytotoxic. Alkaloid 1 showed significant mutational events with SMART, in the cytotoxicity assay (MTT), it showed a high cytotoxicity for human hepatoma cells (HepG2), whereas for the Comet assay, not showing genotoxic activity. The ethanol extract was shown to be genotoxic to HB descendants in the SMART assay, while the results obtained in this test for the monoterpene indole alkaloid 1 isolated from this extract. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of the in vivo and in vitro genotoxicity of glyphosate isopropylamine salt in three different organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alvarez-Moya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable controversy with regard to the genotoxicity of glyphosate, with some reports stating that this compound is non-toxic for fish, birds and mammals. In this work, we used the comet assay to examine the genotoxicity of glyphosate isopropylamine (0.7, 7, 70 and 700 µM in human lymphocytes, erythrocytes of Oreochromis niloticus and staminal nuclei of Tradescantia (4430 in vitro and in vivo. Cells, nuclei and fish that had and had not been exposed to 5 mM N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. Significant (p 7 µM, whereas in vitro, glyphosphate was genotoxic in human lymphocytes and Tradescantia hairs at > 0.7 µM. These results indicate that glyphosate is genotoxic in the cells and organisms studied at concentrations of 0.7-7 µM.

  13. Assessment of mutagenic, antimutagenic and genotoxicity effects of Mimosa tenuiflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane A. Silva

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Genotoxic effects of Mimosa tenuiflora (Willd. Poir, Fabaceae, were investigated by using both micronucleus test and bacterial reverse mutation assay in Salmonella typhimurium TA97, TA98, TA100, TA102 respectively. In respect of Ames test results show that the extract does not induce mutations in any strains of Salmonella typhimurium tested since the mutagenicity index is less than 2. In the antimutagenic effect was observed that the extract at the concentrations tested significantly decreased the mutagenicity index of all strains tested which characterized the extract as antimutagenic in these conditions. In the micronucleus test in vivo, we observed that the concentrations used did not induce an increase in the frequency of micronucleus in normochromatic erythrocytes of mice. Therefore, we concluded that the extract of M. tenuiflora is not mutagenic in the absence of exogenous metabolizing system and does not induce an increase in the frequency of the micronucleus characterized as an agent not mutagenic in these conditions. Further studies of toxicity need to be made to the use of this plant in the treatment of diseases to be stimulated.

  14. Assessment of mutagenic, antimutagenic and genotoxicity effects of Mimosa tenuiflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane A. Silva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Genotoxic effects of Mimosa tenuiflora (Willd. Poir, Fabaceae, were investigated by using both micronucleus test and bacterial reverse mutation assay in Salmonella typhimurium TA97, TA98, TA100, TA102 respectively. In respect of Ames test results show that the extract does not induce mutations in any strains of Salmonella typhimurium tested since the mutagenicity index is less than 2. In the antimutagenic effect was observed that the extract at the concentrations tested significantly decreased the mutagenicity index of all strains tested which characterized the extract as antimutagenic in these conditions. In the micronucleus test in vivo, we observed that the concentrations used did not induce an increase in the frequency of micronucleus in normochromatic erythrocytes of mice. Therefore, we concluded that the extract of M. tenuiflora is not mutagenic in the absence of exogenous metabolizing system and does not induce an increase in the frequency of the micronucleus characterized as an agent not mutagenic in these conditions. Further studies of toxicity need to be made to the use of this plant in the treatment of diseases to be stimulated.

  15. Electrochemical Genotoxicity Assay Based on a SOS/umu Test Using Hydrodynamic Voltammetry in a Droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramitz, Hideki; Sazawa, Kazuto; Nanayama, Yasuaki; Hata, Noriko; Taguchi, Shigeru; Sugawara, Kazuharu; Fukushima, Masami

    2012-01-01

    The SOS/umu genotoxicity assay evaluates the primary DNA damage caused by chemicals from the β-galactosidase activity of S. typhimurium. One of the weaknesses of the common umu test system based on spectrophotometric detection is that it is unable to measure samples containing a high concentration of colored dissolved organic matters, sediment, and suspended solids. However, umu tests with electrochemical detection techniques prove to be a better strategy because it causes less interference, enables the analysis of turbid samples and allows detection even in small volumes without loss of sensitivity. Based on this understanding, we aim to develop a new umu test system with hydrodynamic chronoamperometry using a rotating disk electrode (RDE) in a microliter droplet. PAPG when used as a substrate is not electroactive at the potential at which PAP is oxidized to p-quinone imine (PQI), so the current response of chronoamperometry resulting from the oxidation of PAP to PQI is directly proportional to the enzymatic activity of S. typhimurium. This was achieved by performing genotoxicity tests for 2-(2-furyl)-3-(5-nitro-2-furyl)-acrylamide (AF-2) and 2-aminoanthracene (2-AA) as model genotoxic compounds. The results obtained in this study indicated that the signal detection in the genotoxicity assay based on hydrodynamic voltammetry was less influenced by the presence of colored components and sediment particles in the samples when compared to the usual colorimetric signal detection. The influence caused by the presence of humic acids (HAs) and artificial sediment on the genotoxic property of selected model compounds such as 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide (4-NQO), 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX), 1,8-dinitropyrene (1,8-DNP) and 1-nitropyrene (1-NP) were also investigated. The results showed that the genotoxicity of 1-NP and MX changed in the presence of 10 mg·L−1 HAs. The genotoxicity of tested chemicals with a high hydrophobicity such as 1,8-DNP

  16. New investigations into the genotoxicity of cobalt compounds and their impact on overall assessment of genotoxic risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, David; Brock, Tom; Haddouk, Hasnaà; Hargeaves, Victoria; Lloyd, Melvyn; Mc Garry, Sarah; Proudlock, Raymond; Sarlang, Séverine; Sewald, Katherina; Sire, Guillaume; Sokolowski, Andrea; Ziemann, Christina

    2015-10-01

    The genotoxicity of cobalt metal and cobalt compounds has been widely studied. Several publications show induction of chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei or DNA damage in mammalian cells in vitro in the absence of S9. Mixed results were seen in gene mutation studies in bacteria and mammalian cells in vitro, and in chromosomal aberration or micronucleus assays in vivo. To resolve these inconsistencies, new studies were performed with soluble and poorly soluble cobalt compounds according to OECD-recommended protocols. Induction of chromosomal damage was confirmed in vitro, but data suggest this may be due to oxidative stress. No biologically significant mutagenic responses were obtained in bacteria, Tk(+/-) or Hprt mutation tests. Negative results were also obtained for chromosomal aberrations (in bone marrow and spermatogonia) and micronuclei at maximum tolerated doses in vivo. Poorly soluble cobalt compounds do not appear to be genotoxic. Soluble compounds do induce some DNA and chromosomal damage in vitro, probably due to reactive oxygen. The absence of chromosome damage in robust GLP studies in vivo suggests that effective protective processes are sufficient to prevent oxidative DNA damage in whole mammals. Overall, there is no evidence of genetic toxicity with relevance for humans of cobalt substances and cobalt metal. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hypersensitivity of hypoxia grown Mycobacterium smegmatis to DNA damaging agents: implications of the DNA repair deficiencies in attenuation of mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rex, Kervin; Kurthkoti, Krishna; Varshney, Umesh

    2013-10-01

    Mycobacteria are an important group of pathogenic bacteria. We generated a series of DNA repair deficient strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis, a model organism, to understand the importance of various DNA repair proteins (UvrB, Ung, UdgB, MutY and Fpg) in survival of the pathogenic strains. Here, we compared tolerance of the M. smegmatis strains to genotoxic stress (ROS and RNI) under aerobic, hypoxic and recovery conditions of growth by monitoring their survival. We show an increased susceptibility of mycobacteria to genotoxic stress under hypoxia. UvrB deficiency led to high susceptibility of M. smegmatis to the DNA damaging agents. Ung was second in importance in strains with single deficiencies. Interestingly, we observed that while deficiency of UdgB had only a minor impact on the strain's susceptibility, its combination with Ung deficiency resulted in severe consequences on the strain's survival under genotoxic stress suggesting a strong interdependence of different DNA repair pathways in safeguarding genomic integrity. Our observations reinforce the possibility of targeting DNA repair processes in mycobacteria for therapeutic intervention during active growth and latency phase of the pathogen. High susceptibility of the UvrB, or the Ung/UdgB deficient strains to genotoxic stress may be exploited in generation of attenuated strains of mycobacteria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Approaches to the risk assessment of genotoxic carcinogens in food: a critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, J; Renwick, A G; Constable, A; Dybing, E; Müller, D J G; Schlatter, J; Slob, W; Tueting, W; van Benthem, J; Williams, G M; Wolfreys, A

    2006-10-01

    The present paper examines the particular difficulties presented by low levels of food-borne DNA-reactive genotoxic carcinogens, some of which may be difficult to eliminate completely from the diet, and proposes a structured approach for the evaluation of such compounds. While the ALARA approach is widely applicable to all substances in food that are both carcinogenic and genotoxic, it does not take carcinogenic potency into account and, therefore, does not permit prioritisation based on potential risk or concern. In the absence of carcinogenicity dose-response data, an assessment based on comparison with an appropriate threshold of toxicological concern may be possible. When carcinogenicity data from animal bioassays are available, a useful analysis is achieved by the calculation of margins of exposure (MOEs), which can be used to compare animal potency data with human exposure scenarios. Two reference points on the dose-response relationship that can be used for MOE calculation were examined; the T25 value, which is derived from linear extrapolation, and the BMDL10, which is derived from mathematical modelling of the dose-response data. The above approaches were applied to selected food-borne genotoxic carcinogens. The proposed approach is applicable to all substances in food that are DNA-reactive genotoxic carcinogens and enables the formulation of appropriate semi-quantitative advice to risk managers.

  19. Cytotoxic and genotoxic studies of essential oil from Rosa damascene Mill., Kashan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokrzadeh, Mohammad; Habibi, Emran; Modanloo, Mona

    2017-08-01

    Aim Rosa damascene Mill. belongs to the family of Roseaceae and its essential oil is produced in large amounts in Iran. The wide application of rose oil has raised questions about potential adverse health effects. We have investigated cytotoxic activity and genotoxic effects of Rosa oil from Kashan, Iran. Methods The cytotoxic effect and IC50 of the essential oil on the cell lines was studied followed by MTT assay. In this assay mitochondrial oxidoreductase enzymes with reducing the tetrazolium dye MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) reflect the number of viable cells. Genotoxic effect of the oil was evaluated by micronucleus assay by evaluating produced micronuclei due to cytogenetic damage in binucleated lymphocytes. Results The results showed that essential oil significantly had cytotoxic and genotoxic effects at doses over 10µg/mL (pessential oil of Rose showed lower IC50 in cancer cell line (A549) in comparison with the normal cell line (NIH3T3). Conclusion Cytotoxic and genotoxic properties of essential oil of Rose in Kashan, Iran, are safe at a dose of 10µg/mL. Also, a good cytotoxic effect was shown and could be introduced as an anticancer compound. Further studies are needed with regard to anti-cancer effects of Rose essential oil. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  20. Genotoxic damage in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Falaq Naz

    2012-06-29

    Jun 29, 2012 ... Genotoxic damage in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes of oral ... catechol estrogens and quinines, via redox reactions causes oxidative damage to .... volume was prepared for each donor. About, 0.8 ml of cell sus .... duce the adverse effects of OCs, such as the reduction in the estrogen content.

  1. Ground and surface water for drinking: a laboratory study on genotoxicity using plant tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Feretti

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface waters are increasingly utilized for drinking water because groundwater sources are often polluted. Several monitoring studies have detected the presence of mutagenicity in drinking water, especially from surface sources due to the reaction of natural organic matter with disinfectant. The study aimed to investigate the genotoxic potential of the products of reaction between humic substances, which are naturally present in surface water, and three disinfectants: chlorine dioxide, sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid. Commercial humic acids dissolved in distilled water at different total organic carbon (TOC concentrations were studied in order to simulate natural conditions of both ground water (TOC=2.5 mg/L and surface water (TOC=7.5 mg/L. These solutions were treated with the biocides at a 1:1 molar ratio of C:disinfectant and tested for genotoxicity using the anaphase chromosomal aberration and micronucleus tests in Allium cepa, and the Vicia faba and Tradescantia micronucleus tests. The tests were carried out after different times and with different modes of exposure, and at 1:1 and 1:10 dilutions of disinfected and undisinfected humic acid solutions. A genotoxic effect was found for sodium hypochlorite in all plant tests, at both TOCs considered, while chlorine dioxide gave positive results only with the A.cepa tests. Some positive effects were also detected for PAA (A.cepa and Tradescantia. No relevant differences were found in samples with different TOC values. The significant increase in all genotoxicity end-points induced by all tested disinfectants indicates that a genotoxic potential is exerted even in the presence of organic substances at similar concentrations to those frequently present in drinking water.

  2. Environmental genotoxicity and risk assessment in the Gulf of Riga (Baltic Sea) using fish, bivalves, and crustaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butrimavičienė, Laura; Baršienė, Janina; Greiciūnaitė, Janina; Stankevičiūtė, Milda; Valskienė, Roberta

    2018-06-21

    Environmental genotoxicity in the Gulf of Riga was assessed using different bioindicators (fish, clams, and isopods) collected from 14 study stations. Comparison of genotoxicity responses (micronuclei (MN) and nuclear buds (NB)) in blood erythrocytes of herring (Clupea harengus), eelpout (Zoarces viviparous), and flounder (Platichthys flesus) revealed the species- and site-specific differences. For the first time, the analysis of genotoxicity was carried out in gill cells of isopods Saduria entomon. The highest inductions of MN and NB in gill cells of investigated S. entomon and clams (Macoma balthica) were evaluated in specimens from station 111A (offshore zone). In fish, the highest incidences of MN were measured in eelpout and in herring collected in the southern part of Gulf of Riga (station GOR3/41S). Moreover, in the southern coastal area, the assessment of genotoxicity risk (according to micronuclei levels) indicated exceptionally high risk for flounder, eelpout, and clams.

  3. High throughput comet assay to study genotoxicity of nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naouale El Yamani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The unique physicochemical properties of engineered nanomaterials (NMs have accelerated their use in diverse industrial and domestic products. Although their presence in consumer products represents a major concern for public health safety, their potential impact on human health is poorly understood. There is therefore an urgent need to clarify the toxic effects of NMs and to elucidate the mechanisms involved. In view of the large number of NMs currently being used, high throughput (HTP screening technologies are clearly needed for efficient assessment of toxicity. The comet assay is the most used method in nanogenotoxicity studies and has great potential for increasing throughput as it is fast, versatile and robust; simple technical modifications of the assay make it possible to test many compounds (NMs in a single experiment. The standard gel of 70-100 μL contains thousands of cells, of which only a tiny fraction are actually scored. Reducing the gel to a volume of 5 μL, with just a few hundred cells, allows twelve gels to be set on a standard slide, or 96 as a standard 8x12 array. For the 12 gel format, standard slides precoated with agarose are placed on a metal template and gels are set on the positions marked on the template. The HTP comet assay, incorporating digestion of DNA with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG to detect oxidised purines, has recently been applied to study the potential induction of genotoxicity by NMs via reactive oxygen. In the NanoTEST project we investigated the genotoxic potential of several well-characterized metal and polymeric nanoparticles with the comet assay. All in vitro studies were harmonized; i.e. NMs were from the same batch, and identical dispersion protocols, exposure time, concentration range, culture conditions, and time-courses were used. As a kidney model, Cos-1 fibroblast-like kidney cells were treated with different concentrations of iron oxide NMs, and cells embedded in minigels (12

  4. Genotoxicity study of an experimental beverage made with quinua, kiwicha and kañiwa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francia D.P. Huaman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Genotoxic evaluation is an important step for a product that is aimed for human consumption. A beverage composed of pseudocereals with highly nutritious elements like quinua (Chenopodium quinoa Willd., kiwicha (Amaranthus caudatus L. and kañiwa (Chenopodium pallidicaule Aellen was prepared to reduce lipid contents in a group of volunteers. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the genotoxic potential of an experimental beverage using two in vitro tests that have been validated by international agencies. For the Ames test, two strains of Salmonella typhimurium (TA98 and TA100 with and without microsomal fraction (S9 were used. Four doses of the beverage were tested and also a possible protective effect (same four doses of beverage added to plates with mutagens. Cultures of binucleated lymphocytes and five doses of the beverage were used for the micronucleus test. Both Ames and the micronucleus tests showed the beverage has not genotoxic effect in all tested doses. However, in evaluating the possible protective effect of the beverage, it would be evident that on the contrary, the mutagenic effect of mutagens used for each strain is enhanced. These results suggest that additional tests should be performed to check the genotoxic potential of this beverage before consumption.

  5. Exposure to sorbitol during lactation causes metabolic alterations and genotoxic effects in rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Felipe S; Araujo-Lima, Carlos F; Aiub, Claudia A F; Felzenszwalb, Israel

    2016-10-17

    Sorbitol is a polyol used by the food industry as a sweetener. Women are consuming diet and light products containing sorbitol during pregnancy and in the postnatal period to prevent themselves from excessive weight gain and maintain a slim body. Although there is no evidence for the genotoxicity of sorbitol in the perinatal period, this study focused on evaluating the effects of the maternal intake of sorbitol on the biochemical and toxicological parameters of lactating Wistar rat offspring after 14days of mother-to-offspring exposure. A dose-dependent reduction of offspring length was observed. An increase in sorbitol levels determined in the milk was also observed. However, we detected an inverse relationship between the exposition dose in milk fructose and triacylglycerols concentrations. There was an increase in the plasmatic levels of ALT, AST and LDLc and a decrease in proteins, cholesterol and glucose levels in the offspring. Sorbitol exposure caused hepatocyte genotoxicity, including micronuclei induction. Maternal sorbitol intake induced myelotoxicity and myelosuppression in their offspring. The Comet assay of the blood cells detected a dose-dependent genotoxic response within the sorbitol-exposed offspring. According to our results, sorbitol is able to induce important metabolic alterations and genotoxic responses in the exposed offspring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Genotoxicity of styrene oligomers extracted from polystyrene intended for use in contact with food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Nakai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we conducted in vitro genotoxicity tests to evaluate the genotoxicity of styrene oligomers extracted from polystyrene intended for use in contact with food. Styrene oligomers were extracted with acetone and the extract was subjected to the Ames test (OECD test guideline No. 471 and the in vitro chromosomal aberration test (OECD test guideline No. 473 under good laboratory practice conditions. The concentrations of styrene dimers and trimers in the concentrated extract were 540 and 13,431 ppm, respectively. Extraction with acetone provided markedly higher concentrations of styrene oligomers compared with extraction with 50% ethanol aqueous solution, which is the food simulant currently recommended for use in safety assessments of polystyrene by both the United States Food and Drug Administration and the European Food Safety Authority. And these high concentrations of styrene dimers and trimers were utilized for the evaluation of genotoxicity in vitro. Ames tests using five bacterial tester strains were negative both in the presence or absence of metabolic activation. The in vitro chromosomal aberration test using Chinese hamster lung cells (CHL/IU was also negative. Together, these results suggest that the risk of the genotoxicity of styrene oligomers that migrate from polystyrene food packaging into food is very low.

  7. Genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity assessment of shiitake (Lentinula edodes (Berkeley Pegler using the Comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CK Miyaji

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The mushroom shiitake (Lentinula edodes (Berkeley Pegler is been widely consumed in many countries, including Brazil, because of its pleasant flavor and reports of its therapeutic properties, although there is little available information on the genotoxicity and/or antigenotoxicity of this mushroom. We used the Comet assay and HEp-2 cells to evaluate the in vitro genotoxic and antigenotoxic activity of aqueous extracts of shiitake prepared in three different concentrations (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mg/mL and three different temperatures (4, 22 and 60 °C, using methyl methanesulfonate (MMS as a positive control and untreated cells as a negative control. Two concentrations (1.0 and 1.5 mg/mL of extract prepared at 4 °C and all of the concentrations prepared at 22 ± 2 and 60 °C showed moderate genotoxic activity. To test the protective effect of the three concentrations of the extracts against the genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate, three protocols were used: pre-treatment, simultaneous-treatment and post-treatment. Treatments were repeated for all combinations of preparation temperature and concentration. Two extracts (22 ± 2 °C 1.0 mg/mL (simultaneous-treatment and 4 °C 0.5 mg/mL (post-treatment showed antigenotoxic activity.

  8. Benzene-induced genotoxicity in mice in vivo detected by the alkaline comet assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuo, J; Loft, S; Thomsen, M S

    1996-01-01

    was further increased to 5.4-fold and 6.6-fold of the control values, respectively (p propylene glycol (5 microliters/g b.wt., twice with a 60-min interval), a selective CYP2E1 inhibitor, reduced the increase in the tail length by about half at all doses in both cell types (p ...The myelotoxic and genotoxic effects of benzene have been related to oxidative DNA damage after metabolism by CYP2E1. Single cell gel electrophoresis (alkaline comet assay) detects DNA damage and may thus be a convenient method for the study of benzene genotoxicity. Benzene exposure to NMRI mice.......01). By comparing our data with those from genotoxicity studies on benzene using other methods, we conclude that the 'alkaline comet assay' is a sensitive method to detect DNA damage induced by benzene. We also infer that CYP2E1 contributes, at least partly, to the formation of the 'comet'-inducing metabolites...

  9. Eco- and genotoxicity profiling of a rapeseed biodiesel using a battery of bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck-Varanka, Bettina; Kováts, Nora; Horváth, Eszter; Ferincz, Árpád; Kakasi, Balázs; Nagy, Szabolcs Tamás; Imre, Kornélia; Paulovits, Gábor

    2018-04-30

    Biodiesel is considered an important renewable energy source but still there is some controversy about its environmental toxicity, especially to aquatic life. In our study, the toxicity of water soluble fraction of biodiesel was evaluated in relatively low concentrations using a battery of bioassays: Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence inhibition, Sinapis alba root growth inhibition, Daphnia magna immobilization, boar semen live/dead ratio and DNA fragmentation and Unio pictorum micronucleus test. While the S. alba test indicated nutritive (stimulating) effect of the sample, the biodiesel exerted toxic effect in the aquatic tests. D. magna was the most sensitive with EC 50 value of 0.0226%. For genotoxicity assessment, the mussel micronucleus test (MNT) was applied, detecting considerable genotoxic potential of the biodiesel sample: it elucidated micronuclei formation already at low concentration of 3.3%. Although this test has never been employed in biodiesel eco/genotoxicity assessments, it seems a promising tool, based on its appropriate sensitivity, and representativity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Antioxidant and antigenotoxic role of recombinant human erythropoeitin against alkylating agents: cisplatin and mitomycin C in cultured Vero cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rjiba-Touati, Karima; Ayed-Boussema, Imen; Soualeh, Nidhal; Achour, Abdellatif; Bacha, Hassen; Abid, Salwa

    2013-08-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) and mitomycin C (MMC), two alkylating agents used against various solid tumours, are a common source of acute kidney injury. Thus, strategies for minimizing CDDP and MMC toxicity are of a clinical interest. In this study, we aimed to investigate the protective role of recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) against oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by CDDP and MMC in cultured Vero cells. Three types of treatments were performed: (i) cells were treated with rhEPO 24 h before exposure to CDDP/MMC (pre-treatment), (ii) cells were treated with rhEPO and CDDP/MMC simultaneously (co-treatment), (iii) cells were treated with rhEPO 24 h after exposure to CDDP/MMC (post-treatment). Our results showed that rhEPO decreased the reactive oxygen species levels, the malondialdehyde levels and ameliorated glutathione (reduced and oxidized glutathione) modulation induced by CDDP and MMC in cultured Vero cells. Furthermore, rhEPO administration prevented alkylating agents-induced DNA damage accessed by comet test. Altogether, our results suggested a protective role of rhEPO, against CDDP- and MMC-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity, especially in pre-treatment condition.

  11. Effect of Boron Toxicity on Oxidative Stress and Genotoxicity in Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çatav, Şükrü Serter; Genç, Tuncer Okan; Kesik Oktay, Müjgan; Küçükakyüz, Köksal

    2018-04-01

    Boron (B) toxicity, which occurs in semi-arid and arid environments, can adversely affect the growth and yield of many plants. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of different concentrations of boric acid (3, 6, 9 and 12 mM) on growth, oxidative stress and genotoxicity parameters in root and shoot tissues of wheat seedlings. Our results indicate that B stress inhibits root and shoot growth of wheat in a concentration-dependent manner, and leads to increases in TBARS and H 2 O 2 contents in shoot tissue. Moreover, our findings suggest that high concentrations of B may exert a genotoxic effect on wheat. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to evaluate the effect of B stress on genotoxicity in both root and shoot tissues of wheat.

  12. Photochemical fate and eco-genotoxicity assessment of the drug etodolac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passananti, Monica [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Università di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia, 4, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand (ICCF) UMR 6296, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); Lavorgna, Margherita [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Ambientali, Biologiche e Farmaceutiche, Seconda Università di Napoli, Via Vivaldi 43, I-81100 Caserta (Italy); Iesce, Maria Rosaria, E-mail: iesce@unina.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Università di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia, 4, 80126 Napoli (Italy); DellaGreca, Marina [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Università di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia, 4, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Brigante, Marcello [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand (ICCF) UMR 6296, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); Criscuolo, Emma [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Ambientali, Biologiche e Farmaceutiche, Seconda Università di Napoli, Via Vivaldi 43, I-81100 Caserta (Italy); Cermola, Flavio [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Università di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia, 4, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Isidori, Marina, E-mail: marina.isidori@unina2.it [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Ambientali, Biologiche e Farmaceutiche, Seconda Università di Napoli, Via Vivaldi 43, I-81100 Caserta (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    The photochemical behavior of etodolac was investigated under various irradiation conditions. Kinetic data were obtained after irradiation of 10{sup −4} M aqueous solutions by UVB, UVA and direct exposure to sunlight. The Xenon lamp irradiation was used in order to determine the photodegradation quantum yield under sun-simulated condition (ϕ{sub sun}). The value was determined to be = 0.10 ± 0.01. In order to obtain photoproducts and for mechanistic purposes, experiments were carried out on more concentrated solutions by exposure to sunlight and to UVA and UVB lamps. The drug underwent photooxidative processes following an initial oxygen addition to the double bond of the five membered ring and was mainly converted into a spiro compound and a macrolactam. Ecotoxicity tests were performed on etodolac, its photostable spiro derivative and its sunlight irradiation mixture on two different aquatic trophic levels, plants (algae) and invertebrates (rotifers and crustaceans). Mutagenesis and genotoxicity were detected on bacterial strains. The results showed that only etodolac had long term effects on rotifers although at concentrations far from environmental detection values. A mutagenic and genotoxic potential was found for its derivative. - Highlights: • Photochemical transformation of etodolac occurs in the environment. • Etodolac was slightly toxic in the long term for some aquatic organisms. • A mutagenic and genotoxic potential was found for etodolac photostable derivative.

  13. Does Caesalpinia bonducella ameliorate genotoxicity? An in vitro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study is to investigate the antimutagenic and antigenotoxic potential of alcoholic extracts of C. bonducella against methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) induced genotoxicity. In this experiment we have used in vitro method i.e., human lymphocyte culture and in vivo method in bone marrow cells of albino mice, ...

  14. Genotoxicity and mutagenicity of solid waste leachates: A review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2013-07-03

    Jul 3, 2013 ... There is need for a shift from waste disposal to sustainable waste management. Awareness on possible health ... Key words: Solid waste leachate, genotoxicity, mutagenicity, environmental pollution. INTRODUCTION. Solid wastes .... landfills and incineration residues from Japan include persistent organic ...

  15. Genotoxicity of topoisomerase II inhibitors: An anti-infective perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    At present, an inevitable consequence of a chemical's inhibitory activity on key regulators of DNA topology in bacteria, the type II topoisomerases, is a less pronounced effect on their eukaryotic counterparts. In the context of anti-infectives drug development, this may pose a risk to patient safety as inhibition of eukaryotic type II topoisomerases (TOPO II) can result in the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), which have the potential to manifest as mutations, chromosome breakage or cell death. The biological effects of several TOPO II inhibitors in mammalian cells are described herein; their modulation of DSB damage response parameters is examined and evidence for the existence of a threshold concept for genotoxicity and its relevance in safety assessment is discussed. The potential utility of γH2AX, a promising and highly sensitive molecular marker for DSBs, in a novel genotoxicity 'pre-screen' to conventional assays is also highlighted

  16. Analysis of genotoxic activity of ketamine and rocuronium bromide using the somatic mutation and recombination test in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koksal, Pakize Muge; Gürbüzel, Mehmet

    2015-03-01

    The present study evaluated the mutagenic and recombinogenic effects of two commonly used anesthetic agents, ketamine and rocuronium bromide, in medicine using the wing somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in Drosophila. The standard (ST) cross and the high-bioactivation (HB) cross with high sensitivity to procarcinogens and promutagens were used. The SMART test is based on the loss of heterozygosity, which occurs via various mechanisms, such as chromosome loss and deletion, half-translocation, mitotic recombination, mutation, and non-disjunction. Genetic alterations occurring in the somatic cells of the wing's imaginal discs result in mutant clones in the wing blade. Three-day-old trans-heterozygous larvae with two recessive markers, multiple wing hairs (mwh) and flare (flr(3)), were treated with ketamine and rocuronium bromide. Analysis of the ST cross indicated that ketamine exhibited genotoxicity activity and that this activity was particularly dependent on homologous mitotic recombination at concentrations of 250 μg/ml and above. Rocuronium bromide did not exert mutagenic and/or recombinogenic effects. In the HB cross, ketamine at a concentration of 1000 μg/ml and rocuronium bromide at all concentrations, with the exception of 250 μg/ml (inconclusive), exerted genotoxic effects, which could also be associated with the increase in mitotic recombination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. New investigations into the genotoxicity of cobalt compounds and their impact on overall assessment of genotoxic risk

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkland, David; Brock, Tom; Haddouk, Hasnaà; Hargeaves, Victoria; Lloyd, Melvyn; Mc Garry, Sarah; Proudlock, Raymond; Sarlang, Séverine; Sewald, Katherina; Sire, Guillaume; Sokolowski, Andrea; Ziemann, Christina

    2015-01-01

    The genotoxicity of cobalt metal and cobalt compounds has been widely studied. Several publications show induction of chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei or DNA damage in mammalian cells in vitro in the absence of S9. Mixed results were seen in gene mutation studies in bacteria and mammalian cells in vitro, and in chromosomal aberration or micronucleus assays in vivo. To resolve these inconsistencies, new studies were performed with soluble and poorly soluble cobalt compounds according to OE...

  18. Genotoxicity detected in wild mice living in a highly polluted wetland area in south western Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mateos, Santiago; Daza, Paula; Dominguez, Inmaculada; Cardenas, Jose Antonio [University of Seville, Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Biology, Avenida de la Reina Mercedes no 6, E-41012 Seville (Spain); Cortes, Felipe [University of Seville, Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Biology, Avenida de la Reina Mercedes no 6, E-41012 Seville (Spain)], E-mail: cortes@us.es

    2008-06-15

    A field study was carried out in the south of the Iberian Peninsula in an industrial area in the neighbourhood of Huelva city, SW Spain, and in a natural area (Donana National Park) for comparison, to estimate the genetic risk induced by environmental pollution in wild mice. Genotoxic effects in a sentinel organism, the Algerian mice (Mus spretus) free living in the industrial area were compared with animals of the same species living in the natural protected area. The single cell gel electrophoresis, or Comet assay, was performed as a genotoxicity test in peripheral blood of mice. Our results clearly show that mice free living in the contaminated area bear a high burden of genetic damage as compared with control individuals. The results suggest that the assessing of genotoxicity levels by the Comet assay in wild mice can be used as a valuable test in pollution monitoring and environmental conservation. - We have found an increased genotoxic damage in wild mice in a highly polluted area from industry, mining and agriculture in SW Spain, as assessed by the Comet assay.

  19. Biodetection of potential genotoxic pollutants entering the human food chain through ashes used in livestock diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Vicente, Laura; Herraez, Elisa; Briz, Oscar; Nogales, Rogelio; Molina-Alcaide, Eduarda; Marin, Jose J G

    2016-08-15

    Ash derived from energy generation is used as a source of minerals in livestock feeds. The microbial biosensor recApr-Luc2 was built to detect genotoxic hazard in recycled ash. Escherichia coli SOS gene (recA, lexA, dinI and umuC) expression in response to cisplatin-induced DNA damage led to the selection of the recA promoter. The biosensor required functional RecA expression to respond to genotoxic heavy metals (Cr>Cd≈Pb), and polluted ash induced a strong recApr-Luc2 response. In human liver and intestinal cells, heavy metals induced acute toxicity (Cr>Cd>Pb) at concentrations sufficient to activate recApr-Luc2. Cytostatic effects, including genotoxicity, were cell- and metal-dependent, apart from Cr. In agreement with the recApr-Luc2 bioassay, Cr had the strongest effect in all cells. In conclusion, recApr-Luc2 could be useful for evaluating the genotoxic risk of pollutants present in ash that might be concentrated in animal products and, thus, entering the human food chain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Genotoxic effects of silver amalgam and composite restorations: Micronuclei-Based cohort and case–control study in oral exfoliated cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Jeslin Mary

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: A huge number of people carry dental fillings which contain either mercury-based amalgam and/or the recently introduced methacrylate-based resins. It has been shown that both these materials are known to be leached into the oral cavity and induce genotoxic alterations in the buccal mucosal cells. Because of its low cost and ease of manipulation, dental amalgam is still widely used as a restorative material in developing countries. The health risks associated with the components of this restorative material has always been a matter of concern. The present study was designed to assess the frequency of micronuclei (MN in oral mucosal cells as it is a promising tool for studying the genotoxic effect of clastogenic agents on them. Aims: The aim of this study is to evaluate the genotoxic effects of silver amalgam and composite restorations by measuring the mean number of MN in oral exfoliated cells. Materials and Methods: The present study was a prospective cohort study which includes a study group consisting of 110 participants. The study sample was equally divided into 55 participants requiring only amalgam restoration and 55 participants requiring only composite restoration in any permanent molar teeth. The same participants before the restoration formed the control group. Smears were obtained from each patient before and 10 days after restoration and were stained with DNA-specific Feulgen stain. The number of cells containing MN out of 500 cells were counted and recorded. After the evaluation of the slides, the results were compiled and subjected to statistical analysis. Results: There was a statistically significant (P < 0.01 variation in the mean number of MN after the restoration in both amalgam (5.41 ± 1.25 and composite (2.83 ± 0.85 restorations when compared to before the restoration. However, the mean number of MN in composite restoration was significantly less when compared to amalgam restoration. There was also a statistically

  1. An evaluation of the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of the anti-obesity drugs sibutramine and fenproporex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Cristiano José; dos Santos, José Ernesto; Satie Takahashi, Catarina

    2010-03-01

    Anti-obesity medications deserve special considerations at the present time due to an increasing number of overweight and obese people who require these therapeutic alternatives. Obesity is positively associated with several chronic illnesses, including cancer. In this work, we evaluated the possible genotoxic and/or cytotoxic actions of two drugs, sibutramine and fenproporex, in the doses of 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg body weight (bw), administered intraperitoneally in male Swiss mice. The genotoxic effect was analyzed by comet assay and micronucleus test. We found that both drugs increased the frequency of genotoxic damage in Swiss mice, but did not present cytotoxic activities towards the polychromatic erythrocytes of the bone marrow of these animals.

  2. Determination of heavy metals and genotoxicity of water from an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determination of heavy metals and genotoxicity of water from an artesian well ... do Amaral, Vanessa Marques de Oliveira Moraes, Luciana Pereira Silva ... environmental interest because it is the most important zinc producer district of Brazil.

  3. Applicability of in silico genotoxicity models on food and feed ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorinen, Anna; Bellion, Phillip; Beilstein, Paul

    2017-11-01

    Evaluation of the genotoxic potential of food and feed ingredients is required in the development of new substances and for their registration. In addition to in vitro and in vivo assays, in silico tools such as expert alert-based and statistical models can be used for data generation. These in silico models are commonly used among the pharmaceutical industry, whereas the food industry has not widely adopted them. In this study, the applicability of in silico tools for predicting genotoxicity was evaluated, with a focus on bacterial mutagenicity, in vitro and in vivo chromosome damage assays. For this purpose, a test set of 27 food and feed ingredients including vitamins, carotenoids, and nutraceuticals with experimental genotoxicity data was constructed from proprietary data. This dataset was run through multiple models and the model applicability was analyzed. The compounds were generally within the applicability domain of the models and the models predicted the compounds correctly in most of the cases. Although the regulatory acceptance of in silico tools as single data source is still limited, the models are applicable and can be used in the safety evaluation of food and feed ingredients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Can Genotoxic Effect be Model Dependent in Allium Test?-An Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Singh Rathore

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Genotoxicity of peracetic acid (PAA has been assessed in two models (protocols of Allium cepa conducting two sets of experiments to know whether the results would be model dependent. One experiment was set as per Fiskesjo's model in which Allium cepa bulbs were grown in five concentrations of peracetic acid (0.039, 0.078, 0.156, 0.312 and 0.625 ppm in tap water. Another experiment was set as per Rank and Nielson's model in which Allium cepa bulbs were first grown in tap water for 24 hours and were then further grown in the same concentrations of peracetic acid as in earlier model. Genotoxic effects of peracetic acid were assessed in both models using usual parameters i.e. shape, colour and length of root tips, mitotic index, chromosomal aberrations and cell death. Magnitude of effect differed significantly in both models. More severe genotoxic effects could be seen in Fiskesjo's model. It is suggested that root primordial cells were in G0 state in Fiskesjo's model, which presumably lacked their defense system, hence were more prone to peracetic acid toxicity. Mitotically dividing root cells in Rank and Nielsen's model were equipped with antioxidant system and were more resistant to peracetic acid

  5. Investigation of J-shaped dose-responses induced by exposure to the alkylating agent N-methyl-N-nitrosourea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Katherine E; Hoffmann, George R; Doak, Shareen H; Jenkins, Gareth J S

    2017-07-01

    Hormesis is defined as a biphasic dose-response where biological effects of low doses of a stressor demonstrate the opposite effect to high-dose effects of the same stressor. Hormetic, or J-shaped, dose-response relationships are relatively rarely observed in toxicology, resulting in a limited understanding and even some skepticism of the concept. Low dose-response studies for genotoxicity endpoints have been performed at Swansea University for over a decade. However, no statistically significant decreases below control genotoxicity levels have been detected until recently. A hormetic-style dose-response following a 24h exposure to the alkylating agent N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) was observed in a previous study for HPRT mutagenesis in the human lymphoblastoid cell line AHH-1. A second recent study demonstrated a J-shaped dose-response for the induction of micronuclei by MNU in a 24h treatment in a similar test system. Following mechanistic investigations, it was hypothesized that p53 may be responsible for the observed hormetic phenomenon. As genotoxic carcinogens are a major causative factor of many cancers, consideration of hormesis in carcinogenesis could be important in safety assessment. The data examined here offer possible insights into hormesis, including its estimated prevalence, underlying mechanisms and lack of generalizability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Investigation of potential genotoxic activity using the SOS Chromotest for real paracetamol wastewater and the wastewater treated by the Fenton process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocak, Emel

    2015-01-01

    The potential genotoxic activity associated with high strength real paracetamol (PCT) wastewater (COD = 40,000 mg/L, TOC = 12,000 mg/L, BOD5 = 19,320 mg/L) from a large-scale drug-producing plant in the Marmara Region, was investigated in pre- and post- treated wastewater by the Fenton process (COD = 2,920 mg/L, TOC = 880 mg/L; BOD5 = 870 mg/L). The SOS Chromotest, which is based on Escherichia coli PQ37 activities, was used for the assessment of genotoxicity. The corrected induction factors (CIF) values used as quantitative measurements of the genotoxic activity were obtained from a total of four different dilutions (100, 50, 6.25, and 0.078 % v/v.) for two samples, in triplicate, to detect potentially genotoxic activities with the SOS Chromotest. The results of the SOS Chromotest demonstrated CIFmax value of 1.24, indicating that the PCT effluent (non-treated) is genotoxic. The results of the SOS Chromotest showed an CIFmax value of 1.72, indicating that the wastewater treated by Fenton process is genotoxic. The findings of this study clearly reveal that the PCT wastewater (non-treated) samples have a potentially hazardous impact on the aquatic environment before treatment, and in the wastewater that was treated by the Fenton process, genotoxicity generally increased.

  7. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity property of hydroxyapatite-mullite eluates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmodia, Sushma; Sharma, Vyom; Pandey, Alok K; Dhawan, Alok; Basu, Bikramjit

    2011-02-01

    Long-term biomedical applications of implant materials may cause osteolysis, aseptic losing and toxicity. Therefore, we investigated the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of hydroxyapatite (HA) mullite eluates in L929 mouse fibroblast cells. The spark plasma sintered HA-20% mullite biocomposite (HA20M) were ground using mortar and pestle as well as ball milling. The cells were exposed for 6 h to varying concentrations (10, 25, 50, 75 and 100%) of the eluates of HA-20% mullite (87 nm), HA (171 nm) and mullite (154 nm). The scanning electron microscopy and MTT assay revealed the concentration dependent toxicity of H20M eluate at and above 50%. The analysis of the DNA damaging potential of HA, mullite and HA20M eluates using Comet assay demonstrated a significant DNA damage by HA20M which was largely related to the presence of mullite. The results collectively demonstrate the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of HA20M eluate in L929 cells is dependent on particle size, concentration and composition.

  8. Chemopreventive effect of cactus Opuntia ficus indica on oxidative stress and genotoxicity of aflatoxin B1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Mansour Hédi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 is potent hepatotoxic and hepatocarcinogenic agent. In aflatoxicosis, oxidative stress is a common mechanism contributing to initiation and progression of hepatic damage. The aim of this work was to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of cactus cladode extract (CCE on aflatoxin B1-induced liver damage in mice by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA level, the protein carbonyls generation and the heat shock proteins Hsp 70 and Hsp 27 expressions in liver. We also looked for an eventual protective effect against AFB1-induced genotoxicity as determined by chromosome aberrations test, SOS Chromotest and DNA fragmentation assay. We further evaluated the modulation of p53, bax and bcl2 protein expressions in liver. Methods Adult, healthy balbC (20-25 g male mice were pre-treated by intraperitonial administration of CCE (50 mg/Kg.b.w for 2 weeks. Control animals were treated 3 days a week for 4 weeks by intraperitonial administration of 250 μg/Kg.b.w AFB1. Animals treated by AFB1 and CCE were divided into two groups: the first group was administrated CCE 2 hours before each treatment with AFB1 3 days a week for 4 weeks. The second group was administrated without pre-treatment with CCE but this extract was administrated 24 hours after each treatment with AFB1 3 days a week for 4 weeks. Results Our results clearly showed that AFB1 induced significant alterations in oxidative stress markers. In addition, it has a genotoxic potential and it increased the expression of pro apoptotic proteins p53 and bax and decreased the expression of bcl2. The treatment of CCE before or after treatment with AFB1, showed (i a total reduction of AFB1 induced oxidative damage markers, (ii an anti-genotoxic effect resulting in an efficient prevention of chromosomal aberrations and DNA fragmentation compared to the group treated with AFB1 alone (iii restriction of the effect of AFB1 by differential modulation of the expression of p53 which

  9. THE GENOTOXICITY OF AMBIENT OUTDOOR AIR, A REVIEW: SALMONELLA MUTAGENICITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genotoxicity of ambient outdoor air, a review: Salmonella mutagenicityAbstractMutagens in urban air pollution come from anthropogenic sources (especially combustion sources) and are products of airborne chemical reactions. Bacterial mutation tests have been used ...

  10. Mutagenic and genotoxic activity of particulate matter MP2,5, in Pamplona, North Santander, Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Montañez, Mónica Liseth; Meléndez Gélvez, Iván; Quijano Parra, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the mutagenic and genotoxic activities of particulate material (MP2,5 collected in Pamplona, Norte de Santander, Colombia.Materials and methods: MP2,5 was monitored by means of a Partisol 2025 sequential air sampler with Plus Palmflex quartz filters. The latter were subjected to two extraction procedures: Soxhlet extraction using dichloromethane-acetone; and ultrasonic extraction using dichloromethane, acetone and dichloromethane/ acetone mix. The mutagenic and genotoxic a...

  11. Development of a Transgenic Model to Assess Bioavailable Genotoxicity in Sediments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    This technical note describes the rationale for using transgenic animal models to assess the potential genotoxicity of sediments, the benefits that can be obtained using such models versus currently...

  12. Genotoxic and chemopreventive assessment of Cynara scolymus L. aqueous extract in a human-derived liver cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Regiane Pereira; Jacociunas, Laura Vicedo; de Carli, Raíne Fogliati; de Abreu, Bianca Regina Ribas; Lehmann, Mauricio; da Silva, Juliana; Ferraz, Alexandre de Barros Falcão; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues

    2017-10-01

    Cynara scolymus L., popularly known as artichoke, is consumed as food and used as tea infusions for pharmacological purposes to treat liver dysfunctions and other conditions. Scientific data on the safety and protective effect of artichoke in human-derived liver cells is missing. This study investigated the genotoxic and modulatory effect of a liophilized extract suspended in water of C. scolymus L. leaves. Four extract concentrations (0.62, 1.25, 2.5 and 5.0 mg/mL) were evaluated using the comet assay on human hepatocyte cultures, HepG2 cells. Genotoxicity was assessed after two treatment periods, 1 and 24 h. Antigenotoxicity was evaluated against oxidative lesions induced by hydrogen peroxide in pre-, simultaneous and post-treatment protocols. Artichoke leaves aqueous extract induced genotoxic effects in HepG2 cells after 1- and 24-h treatments. In turn, extract concentrations of 0.62, 1.25 and 2.5 mg/mL, exhibited a protective effect in pretreatment, compared to hydrogen peroxide alone. However, in simultaneous and post-treatment protocols, only the lowest concentration reduced the frequency of DNA damage induced by hydrogen peroxide. In addition, in the simultaneous treatment protocol, the highest artichoke extract concentration increased hydrogen peroxide genotoxicity. It can be concluded that artichoke is genotoxic, in vitro, to HepG2 cells, but can also modulate hydrogen peroxide DNA damage.

  13. Genotoxic and immunotoxic potential effects of selected psychotropic drugs and antibiotics on blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) hemocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacaze, Emilie; Pédelucq, Julie; Fortier, Marlène; Brousseau, Pauline; Auffret, Michel; Budzinski, Hélène; Fournier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The potential toxicity of pharmaceuticals towards aquatic invertebrates is still poorly understood and sometimes controversial. This study aims to document the in vitro genotoxicity and immunotoxicity of psychotropic drugs and antibiotics on Mytilus edulis. Mussel hemocytes were exposed to fluoxetine, paroxetine, venlafaxine, carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim and erythromycin, at concentrations ranging from μg/L to mg/L. Paroxetine at 1.5 μg/L led to DNA damage while the same concentration of venlafaxine caused immunomodulation. Fluoxetine exposure resulted in genotoxicity, immunotoxicity and cytotoxicity. In the case of antibiotics, trimethoprim was genotoxic at 200 μg/L and immunotoxic at 20 mg/L whereas erythromycin elicited same detrimental effects at higher concentrations. DNA metabolism seems to be a highly sensitive target for psychotropic drugs and antibiotics. Furthermore, these compounds affect the immune system of bivalves, with varying intensity. This attests the relevance of these endpoints to assess the toxic mode of action of pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. - Highlights: • Psychotropic drugs and antibiotics affect the immune system of Mytilus edulis. • Genotoxic and immunotoxic endpoints were relevant to assess pharmaceuticals toxicity. • DNA metabolism is a highly sensitive target for pharmaceuticals. • Fluoxetine and paroxetine were the most toxic compounds on mussel hemocytes. - Psychotropic drugs and antibiotics have the potential to cause immune toxicity and genotoxicity on Mytilus edulis hemocytes

  14. Genotoxicity of the Musi River (Hyderabad, India) investigated with the VITOTOX test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayashree, B; Ahuja, Y R; Regniers, L; Rao, V; Verschaeve, L

    2005-01-01

    The bacterial VITOTOX genotoxicity test was used to screen water samples collected from three different stations along the banks of the river Musi, in Hyderabad, India. Water was collected at three stations that differed from each other in the nature of the surrounding industrial and other activities. A number of different pollutants were also measured in water, soil and air samples. The three stations were found highly polluted and different with regard to the genotoxicity and toxicity of their samples. These results demonstrate the need for further biological studies in this area to generate valuable data on genomic instability, risk assessment of cancer, and to provide avenues for risk management.

  15. Relationship between genotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by mercury on common carp (Cyprinus carpio) tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Medina, Sandra; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo Manuel; Ruiz-Lara, Karina; Islas-Flores, Hariz; Gasca-Pérez, Eloy

    2017-11-01

    Mercury is one of the most toxic metals in aquatic systems since it is able to induce neurobehavioral disorders as well as renal and gastrointestinal tract damage. The common carp Cyprinus carpio is an important species from both an ecological and economic viewpoint as it is consumed in many countries, the top producers being Mexico, China, India and Japan. The present study aimed to evaluate the relation between Hg-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in diverse tissues of C. carpio. Specimens were exposed to 0.01mgHg/L (the maximum permissible limit for aquatic life protection), and lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl content and the activity of antioxidant enzymes were evaluated at 96h. Micronuclei frequency and DNA damage by comet assay were determined at 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96h. Hg induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity on exposed fish, since inhibition of antioxidant enzymes activity and increases in lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and micronuclei frequency occurred. Blood, gill and liver were more susceptible to oxidative stress, while blood were more sensitive to genotoxicity. In conclusion, Hg at concentrations equal to the maximum permissible limit for aquatic life protection induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity on C. carpio, and these two effects prove to be correlated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Genotoxic Effects of Exposure to Gasoline Fumes on Petrol Pump Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Amrin; Barot, Darshana; Chandel, Divya

    2018-04-01

    Petrol pump workers are occupationally exposed to gasoline and its fumes consisting of several mutagenic chemicals. To evaluate the genotoxic effects of exposure to gasoline fumes on petrol pump workers. The study groups included 70 petrol pump workers (exposed group) and 70 healthy age-matched individuals with no known exposure (comparison group). Buccal micronucleus cytome assay (BMCyt) was performed to check the genotoxicity caused due to inhalation of gasoline fumes. The frequencies of micronucleated cells, nuclear bud, condensed chromatin cells, karyorrhectic cells, pyknotic cells, and karyolytic cells were significantly higher in the exposed workers compared to the comparison group. Exposure to gasoline fumes is associated with increased frequency of cell abnormalities. This may lead to various health consequences including cancer in those occupationally exposed to gasoline fumes.

  17. Potential genotoxicity of traditional chinese medicinal plants and phytochemicals: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jue; Ouedraogo, Moustapha; Qu, Fan; Duez, Pierre

    2013-12-01

    In the last decades, cases of poisoning due to herbal medicines have occurred in many countries; Chinese herbal medicines (CHMs) are occasionally involved. The experience gained from traditional use is efficient to detect immediate or near-immediate relationship between administration and toxic effects but is quite unlikely to detect medium- to long-term toxicities; thorough investigations of herbal medicines (toxicity assessments, active pharmacovigilance) appear then essential for their safe use. Genotoxicity is an especially insidious toxicity that may result in carcinoma development years after exposure; it can arise from multiple compounds, with or without metabolic activation. The present work reviews traditional CHMs and phytochemicals that have been shown to present a genotoxic hazard. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for toxicity and genotoxicity of halogenated aliphatic compounds: wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chroust, Karel; Pavlová, Martina; Prokop, Zbynek; Mendel, Jan; Bozková, Katerina; Kubát, Zdenek; Zajícková, Veronika; Damborský, Jiri

    2007-02-01

    Halogenated aliphatic compounds were evaluated for toxic and genotoxic effects in the somatic mutation and recombination test employing Drosophila melanogaster. The tested chemicals included chlorinated, brominated and iodinated; mono-, di- and tri-substituted; saturated and unsaturated alkanes: 1,2-dibromoethane, 1-bromo-2-chloroethane, 1-iodopropane, 2,3-dichloropropene, 3-bromo-1-propene, epibromohydrin, 2-iodobutane, 3-chloro-2-methylpropene, 1,2,3-trichloropropane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichlorobutane, 1-chloro-2-methylpropane, 1,3-dichloropropane, 1,2-dichloropropane, 2-chloroethymethylether, 1-bromo-2-methylpropane and 1-chloropentane. N-methyl-N-nitrosourea served as the positive and distilled water as the negative control. The set of chemicals for the toxicological testing was selected by the use of statistical experiment design. Group of unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons were generally more toxic than saturated analogues. The genotoxic effect was observed with 14 compounds in the wing spot test, while 3 substances did not show any genotoxicity by using the wing spot test at 50% lethal concentration. The highest number of wing spots was observed in genotoxicity assay with 1-bromo-2-chloroethane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dibromoethane and 1-iodopropane. Nucleophilic superdelocalizability calculated by quantum mechanics appears to be a good parameter for prediction of both toxicity and genotoxicity effects of halogenated aliphatic compounds.

  19. Effect of a base-catalyzed dechlorination process on the genotoxicity of PCB-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMarini, D.M.; Houk, V.S.; Kornel, A.; Rogers, C.J.

    1992-01-01

    We evaluated the genotoxicity of dichloromethane (DCM) extracts of PCB-contaminated soil before and after the soil had been treated by a base-catalyzed dechlorination process, which involved heating a mixture of the soil, polyethylene glycol, and sodium hydroxide to 250-350 C. This dechlorination process reduced by over 99% the PCB concentration in the soil, which was initially 2,200 ppm. The DCM extracts of both control and treated soils were not mutagenic in strain TA100 of Salmonella, but they were mutagenic in strain TA98. The base-catalyzed dechlorination process reduced the mutagenic potency of the soil by approximately one-half. The DCM extracts of the soils before and after treatment were equally genotoxic in a prophage-induction assay in E. coli, which detects some chlorinated organic carcinogens that were not detected by the Salmonella mutagenicity assay. These results show that treatment of PCB-contaminated soil by this base-catalyzed dechlorination process did not increase the genotoxicity of the soil.

  20. Acute toxicity and genotoxicity of fermented traditional medicine oyaksungi-san

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwayong Park

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: As a whole, no acute toxicity or genotoxicity were observed in all the assays examined. Therefore, fermented OY is considered to be a safe material that can be used for development of complementary and alternative medicine using bioconversion.

  1. Potential genotoxic effects of melted snow from an urban area revealed by the Allium cepa test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagojević, Jelena; Stamenković, Gorana; Vujosević, Mladen

    2009-09-01

    The presence of well-known atmospheric pollutants is regularly screened for in large towns but knowledge about the effects of mixtures of different pollutants and especially their genotoxic potential is largely missing. Since falling snow collects pollutants from the air, melted snow samples could be suitable for evaluating potential genotoxicity. For this purpose the Allium cepa anaphase-telophase test was used to analyse melted snow samples from Belgrade, the capital city of Serbia. Samples of snow were taken at two sites, characterized by differences in pollution intensity, in three successive years. At the more polluted site the analyses showed a very high degree of both toxicity and genotoxicity in the first year of the study corresponding to the effects of the known mutagen used as the positive control. At the other site the situation was much better but not without warning signals. The results showed that standard analyses for the presence of certain contaminants in the air do not give an accurate picture of the possible consequences of urban air pollution because the genotoxic potential remains hidden. The A. cepa test has been demonstrated to be very convenient for evaluation of air pollution through analyses of melted snow samples.

  2. In vivo genotoxicity assessment in rats exposed to Prestige-like oil by inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Kiliç, Gözde; Costa, Carla; Amor-Carro, Óscar; Mariñas-Pardo, Luis; Ramos-Barbón, David; Méndez, Josefina; Pásaro, Eduardo; Laffon, Blanca

    2012-01-01

    One of the largest oil spill disasters in recent times was the accident of the oil tanker Prestige in front of the Galician coast in 2002. Thousands of people participated in the cleanup of the contaminated areas, being exposed to a complex mixture of toxic substances. Acute and prolonged respiratory symptoms and genotoxic effects were reported, although environmental exposure measurements were restricted to current determinations, such that attribution of effects observed to oil exposure is difficult to establish. The aim of this study was to analyze peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) harvested from a rat model of subchronic exposure to a fuel oil with similar characteristics to that spilled by the Prestige tanker, in order to determine potential genotoxic effects under strictly controlled, in vivo exposure. Wistar Han and Brown Norway rats were exposed to the oil for 3 wk, and micronucleus test (MN) and comet assay, standard and modified with 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) enzyme, were employed to assess genotoxicity 72 h and 15 d after the last exposure. In addition, the potential effects of oil exposure on DNA repair capacity were determined by means of mutagen sensitivity assay. Results obtained from this study showed that inhalation oil exposure induced DNA damage in both Brown Norway and Wistar Han rats, especially in those animals evaluated 15 d after exposure. Although alterations in the DNA repair responses were noted, the sensitivity to oil substances varied depending on rat strain. Data support previous positive genotoxicity results reported in humans exposed to Prestige oil during cleanup tasks.

  3. Genotoxic effects of environmental endocrine disruptors on the aquatic insect Chironomus riparius evaluated using the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Paz, Pedro; Morales, Mónica; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis; Morcillo, Gloria

    2013-12-12

    Genotoxicity is one of the most important toxic endpoints in chemical toxicity testing and environmental risk assessment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic potential of various environmental pollutants frequently found in aquatic environments and characterized by their endocrine disrupting activity. Monitoring of DNA damage was undertaken after in vivo exposures of the aquatic larvae of the midge Chironomus riparius, a model organism that represents an abundant and ecologically relevant macroinvertebrate, widely used in freshwater toxicology. DNA-induced damage, resulting in DNA fragmentation, was quantified by the comet assay after short (24 h) and long (96 h) exposures to different concentrations of the selected toxicants: bisphenol A (BPA), nonylphenol (NP), pentachlorophenol (PCP), tributyltin (TBT) and triclosan (TCS). All five compounds were found to have genotoxic activity as demonstrated by significant increases in all the comet parameters (%DNA in tail, tail length, tail moment and Olive tail moment) at all tested concentrations. Persistent exposure did not increase the extent of DNA damage, except for TCS at the highest concentration, but generally there was a reduction in DNA damage thought to be associated with the induction of the detoxification processes and repairing mechanisms. Comparative analysis showed differences in the genotoxic potential between the chemicals, as well as significant time and concentration-dependent variations, which most likely reflect differences in the ability to repair DNA damage under the different treatments. The present report demonstrates the sensitivity of the benthic larvae of C. riparius to these environmental genotoxins suggesting its potential as biomonitor organism in freshwater ecosystems. The results obtained about the DNA-damaging potential of these environmental pollutants reinforce the need for additional studies on the genotoxicity of endocrine active substances that, by linking genotoxic

  4. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles cause genotoxicity in human lung epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of engineered nanoparticles in consumer products is steadily increasing. However, the health effects of exposure to these nanoparticles are not thoroughly understood. This study investigated the genotoxicity of six titanium dioxide and two cerium oxide nanoparticles of va...

  5. The yeast mitogen-activated protein kinase Slt2 is involved in the cellular response to genotoxic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soriano-Carot María

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The maintenance of genomic integrity is essential for cell viability. Complex signalling pathways (DNA integrity checkpoints mediate the response to genotoxic stresses. Identifying new functions involved in the cellular response to DNA-damage is crucial. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SLT2 gene encodes a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascade whose main function is the maintenance of the cell wall integrity. However, different observations suggest that SLT2 may also have a role related to DNA metabolism. Results This work consisted in a comprehensive study to connect the Slt2 protein to genome integrity maintenance in response to genotoxic stresses. The slt2 mutant strain was hypersensitive to a variety of genotoxic treatments, including incubation with hydroxyurea (HU, methylmetanosulfonate (MMS, phleomycin or UV irradiation. Furthermore, Slt2 was activated by all these treatments, which suggests that Slt2 plays a central role in the cellular response to genotoxic stresses. Activation of Slt2 was not dependent on the DNA integrity checkpoint. For MMS and UV, Slt2 activation required progression through the cell cycle. In contrast, HU also activated Slt2 in nocodazol-arrested cells, which suggests that Slt2 may respond to dNTP pools alterations. However, neither the protein level of the distinct ribonucleotide reductase subunits nor the dNTP pools were affected in a slt2 mutant strain. An analysis of the checkpoint function revealed that Slt2 was not required for either cell cycle arrest or the activation of the Rad53 checkpoint kinase in response to DNA damage. However, slt2 mutant cells showed an elongated bud and partially impaired Swe1 degradation after replicative stress, indicating that Slt2 could contribute, in parallel with Rad53, to bud morphogenesis control after genotoxic stresses. Conclusions Slt2 is activated by several genotoxic treatments and is required to properly cope with DNA damage. Slt

  6. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of calcium silicate-based cements on an osteoblast lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lívia GOMES-CORNÉLIO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several calcium silicate-based biomaterials have been developed in recent years, in addition to Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and apoptosis/necrosis in human osteoblast cells (SAOS-2 of pure calcium silicate-based cements (CSC and modified formulations: modified calcium silicate-based cements (CSCM and three resin-based calcium silicate cements (CSCR1 (CSCR 2 (CSCR3. The following tests were performed after 24 hours of cement extract exposure: methyl-thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT, apoptosis/necrosis assay and comet assay. The negative control (CT- was performed with untreated cells, and the positive control (CT+ used hydrogen peroxide. The data for MTT and apoptosis were submitted to analysis of variance and Bonferroni’s posttest (p < 0.05, and the data for the comet assay analysis, to the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (p < 0.05. The MTT test showed no significant difference among the materials in 2 mg/mL and 10 mg/mL concentrations. CSCR3 showed lower cell viability at 10 mg/mL. Only CSC showed lower cell viability at 50 mg/mL. CSCR1, CSCR2 and CSCR3 showed a higher percentage of initial apoptosis than the control in the apoptosis test, after 24 hours exposure. The same cements showed no genotoxicity in the concentration of 2 mg/mL, with the comet assay. CSC and CSCR2 were also not genotoxic at 10 mg/mL. All experimental materials showed viability with MTT. CSC and CSCR2 presented a better response to apoptosis and genotoxicity evaluation in the 10 mg/mL concentration, and demonstrated a considerable potential for use as reparative materials.

  7. Detection of genotoxic effects of drinking water disinfection by-products using Vicia faba bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yu; Tan, Li; Zhang, Shao-Hui; Zuo, Yu-Ting; Han, Xue; Liu, Na; Lu, Wen-Qing; Liu, Ai-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Plant-based bioassays have gained wide use among the toxicological and/or ecotoxicological assessment procedures because of their simplicity, sensitivity, low cost, and reliability. The present study describes the use of Vicia faba (V. faba) micronucleus (MN) test and V. faba comet assay in the evaluation of the genotoxic potential of disinfection by-products (DBPs) commonly found in chlorine-disinfected drinking water. Five haloacetic acids and three halogenated acetonitriles were chosen as representatives of DBPs in this study because they are of potentially great public health risk. Results of the MN test indicated that monochloroacetic acid (MCA), monobromoacetic acid (MBA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), dibromoacetic acid (DBA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and trichloroacetonitrile (TCAN) caused a statistically significant increase in MN frequency in V. faba root tip cells. However, no genotoxic response was observed for dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) and dibromoacetonitrile (DBAN). Results of the comet assay showed that all tested DBPs induced a statistically significant increase in genomic DNA damage to V. faba root tip cells. On considering the capacity to detect genomic damage of a different nature, we suggest that a combination of V. faba MN test and V. faba comet assay is a useful tool for the detection of genotoxic effects of DBPs. It is worthy of assessing the feasibility of using V. faba comet assay combined with V. faba MN test to screen for the genotoxic activity of chlorinated drinking water in future work.

  8. Indoor and outdoor genotoxic load detected by the Comet assay in leaves of Nicotiana tabacum cultivars Bel B and Bel W3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restivo, Francesco Maria; Laccone, Maria Concetta; Buschini, Annamaria; Rossi, Carlo; Poli, Paola

    2002-03-01

    Environmental pollution assessment and control are priority issues for both developed and developing countries of the world. The use of plant material for a more complete picture of environmental health appears to be particularly appealing. Here we validate a previous plant-adapted Comet assay on leaf tissues of Nicotiana tabacum cultivars Bel B and Bel W3. The effects of H(2)O(2) on DNA damage in Bel B and Bel W3 agree with the hypothesis that some component of the machinery that protects DNA integrity from oxidative stress may be impaired in cv. Bel W3. Exposure in the field on sunny summer days (peak ozone concentration >80 p.p.b.) showed significantly higher DNA damage in cv. Bel W3 if plants were collected and subjected to the Comet assay when the air ozone concentration was reaching its peak value, but not when plants were sampled early in the morning and hence after a period of low ozone concentration. The different results suggest that Bel W3 possesses a less efficient recovery apparatus that requires a longer period of activity to be effective and/or is less protected against reactive oxygen species production during exposure to ozone. However, it cannot be excluded that the increase in mean DNA damage is the result of the presence of a genotoxic agent(s) other than ozone. Interestingly, Bel W3 also appears to be more responsive, compared with Bel B, when exposed to ambient indoor pollutants. The use of cv. Bel W3 increases the sensitivity of the assay under both indoor and field conditions. However, different classes of mutagens should be tested to define the range of profitable utilization of this tobacco cultivar for environmental genotoxicity detection.

  9. Synthesis and biological activity of imidazopyridine anticoccidial agents: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribner, Andrew; Dennis, Richard; Lee, Shuliang; Ouvry, Gilles; Perrey, David; Fisher, Michael; Wyvratt, Matthew; Leavitt, Penny; Liberator, Paul; Gurnett, Anne; Brown, Chris; Mathew, John; Thompson, Donald; Schmatz, Dennis; Biftu, Tesfaye

    2008-06-01

    Coccidiosis is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in the poultry industry. Protozoan parasites of the genus Eimeria invade the intestinal lining of the avian host causing tissue pathology, poor weight gain, and in some cases mortality. Resistance to current anticoccidials has prompted the search for new therapeutic agents with potent in vitro and in vivo activity against Eimeria. Recently, we reported the synthesis and biological activity of potent imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine anticoccidial agents. Antiparasitic activity is due to inhibition of a parasite specific cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). In this study, we report the synthesis and anticoccidial activity of a second set of such compounds, focusing on derivatization of the amine side chain at the imidazopyridine 7-position. From this series, several compounds showed subnanomolar in vitro activity and commercial levels of in vivo activity. However, the potential genotoxicity of these compounds precludes them from further development.

  10. Genotoxicity of Nicotiana tabacum leaves on Helix aspersa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Fernanda R; Erdtmann, Bernardo; Dalpiaz, Tiago; Nunes, Emilene; Ferraz, Alexandre; Martins, Tales L C; Dias, Johny F; da Rosa, Darlan P; Porawskie, Marilene; Bona, Silvia; da Silva, Juliana

    2013-07-01

    Tobacco farmers are routinely exposed to complex mixtures of inorganic and organic chemicals present in tobacco leaves. In this study, we examined the genotoxicity of tobacco leaves in the snail Helix aspersa as a measure of the risk to human health. DNA damage was evaluated using the micronucleus test and the Comet assay and the concentration of cytochrome P450 enzymes was estimated. Two groups of snails were studied: one fed on tobacco leaves and one fed on lettuce (Lactuca sativa L) leaves (control group). All of the snails received leaves (tobacco and lettuce leaves were the only food provided) and water ad libitum. Hemolymph cells were collected after 0, 24, 48 and 72 h. The Comet assay and micronucleus test showed that exposure to tobacco leaves for different periods of time caused significant DNA damage. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 enzymes occurred only in the tobacco group. Chemical analysis indicated the presence of the alkaloid nicotine, coumarins, saponins, flavonoids and various metals. These results show that tobacco leaves are genotoxic in H. aspersa and inhibit cytochrome P450 activity, probably through the action of the complex chemical mixture present in the plant.

  11. Genotoxicity of Nicotiana tabacum leaves on Helix aspersa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda R. da Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco farmers are routinely exposed to complex mixtures of inorganic and organic chemicals present in tobacco leaves. In this study, we examined the genotoxicity of tobacco leaves in the snail Helix aspersa as a measure of the risk to human health. DNA damage was evaluated using the micronucleus test and the Comet assay and the concentration of cytochrome P450 enzymes was estimated. Two groups of snails were studied: one fed on tobacco leaves and one fed on lettuce (Lactuca sativa L leaves (control group. All of the snails received leaves (tobacco and lettuce leaves were the only food provided and water ad libitum. Hemolymph cells were collected after 0, 24, 48 and 72 h. The Comet assay and micronucleus test showed that exposure to tobacco leaves for different periods of time caused significant DNA damage. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 enzymes occurred only in the tobacco group. Chemical analysis indicated the presence of the alkaloid nicotine, coumarins, saponins, flavonoids and various metals. These results show that tobacco leaves are genotoxic in H. aspersa and inhibit cytochrome P450 activity, probably through the action of the complex chemical mixture present in the plant.

  12. Measurement of DNA strand breaks as a biomarker of genotoxic pollutants

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.; Patil, S.S.; Holkar, P.K.R.

    This paper deals with the development of a molecular biomarker technique by measurement of DNA integrity in marine organisms for biomonitoring of pollution due to genotoxic compounds. The marine environment is continuously being polluted...

  13. Genotoxic Effects of Exposure to Gasoline Fumes on Petrol Pump Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrin Shaikh

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Petrol pump workers are occupationally exposed to gasoline and its fumes consisting of several mutagenic chemicals. Objective: To evaluate the genotoxic effects of exposure to gasoline fumes on petrol pump workers. Methods: The study groups included 70 petrol pump workers (exposed group and 70 healthy age-matched individuals with no known exposure (comparison group. Buccal micronucleus cytome assay (BMCyt was performed to check the genotoxicity caused due to inhalation of gasoline fumes. Results: The frequencies of micronucleated cells, nuclear bud, condensed chromatin cells, karyorrhectic cells, pyknotic cells, and karyolytic cells were significantly higher in the exposed workers compared to the comparison group. Conclusion: Exposure to gasoline fumes is associated with increased frequency of cell abnormalities. This may lead to various health consequences including cancer in those occupationally exposed to gasoline fumes.

  14. Invitro genotoxicity, assessment of cytotoxicity and of Rely X luting cement on human lymphocyte cells before and after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shetty, Shilpa S.; Hegde, Mithra N.; Shabin; Hegde, Nidarsh D.; Suchetha Kumari; Sanjeev, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    In dentistry, a luting agent is a viscous material placed between tooth structure and a prosthesis that by polymerization firmly attach the prosthesis to the tooth structure. Luting agents contact a large area of dentin when used for crown cementation. There is little information on biocompatibility tests, especially on the effect of electron beam irradiation on cytotoxicity for luting resin cements. To determine the in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Rely X luting cement on human lymphocyte cells before and after irradiation. Rely X luting cement was obtained commercially. Samples were prepared as per the ISO standard size of 25x2x2 mm using polytetrafluoroethylene teflon mould and divided into two groups - non irradiated and irradiated groups. The samples in irradiated category were exposed to 200 Gy of electron beam irradiation at Microtron Centre, Mangalore University, Mangalore, India. For hemolysis the samples were immersed in phosphate buffer saline and incubated at 370℃ for 24 hrs, 7 days and 14 days. 200 μl of 24 hr material extract was mixed with human peripheral blood lymphocyte tested for comet assay by single cell DNA comet assay. Hemolytic activity of non irradiated Rely X luting cement after 24 hrs, 7 days and 14 days was 54.78±1.48, 69.91±2.41 and 43.21±0.92 respectively whereas hemolytic activity of irradiated Rely X luting cement after 24 hrs, 7 days and 14 days was 91.8±8.29, 56.95±19.7 and 41.34±12.30. The irradiation of Rely X luting cement with 200 Gy dose of electron beam irradiation caused an increase in the frequency of DNA damage when compared to that of the non-irradiated group. Based on the experimental condition, it is concluded that incomplete polymerization of the dental luting cements has resulted in the elution of the resin components which are responsible for the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Rely X luting cement on human lymphocyte cells. (author)

  15. ROS-mediated genotoxicity of asbestos-cement in mammalian lung cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rödelsperger Klaus

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Asbestos is a known carcinogen and co-carcinogen. It is a persisting risk in our daily life due to its use in building material as asbestos-cement powder. The present study done on V79-cells (Chinese hamster lung cells demonstrates the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of asbestos-cement powder (ACP in comparison with chrysotile asbestos. A co-exposure of chrysotile and ACP was tested using the cell viability test and the micronucleus assay. The kinetochore analysis had been used to analyse the pathway causing such genotoxic effects. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances were determined as evidence for the production of reactive oxygen species. Both, asbestos cement as well as chrysotile formed micronuclei and induced loss of cell viability in a concentration- and time- dependent way. Results of TBARS analysis and iron chelator experiments showed induction of free radicals in ACP- and chrysotile exposed cultures. CaSO4 appeared to be a negligible entity in enhancing the toxic potential of ACP. The co-exposure of both, ACP and chrysotile, showed an additive effect in enhancing the toxicity. The overall study suggests that asbestos-cement is cytotoxic as well as genotoxic in vitro. In comparison to chrysotile the magnitude of the toxicity was less, but co-exposure increased the toxicity of both.

  16. Genotoxicity and mutagenicity of Echinodorus macrophyllus (chapéu-de-couro extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo S. Vidal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Echinodorus macrophyllus, commonly known as chapéu-de-couro, is a medicinal plant used in folk medicine to treat inflammation and rheumatic diseases. In this work, we used short-term bacterial assays based on the induction of SOS functions to examine the genotoxicity and mutagenicity of an aqueous extract of E. macrophyllus leaves. Whole extract and an ethyl acetate fraction showed similar genotoxicity and caused an ~70-fold increase in lysogenic induction. The extract also gave a positive result in the SOS chromotest with an increase of 12-fold in β-Galactosidase enzymatic units. There was a strong trend towards base substitutions and frameshifts at purine sites in the mutations induced by the extract in Escherichia coli (CC103 and CC104 strains and Salmonella typhimurium test strains (22-fold increase in histidine revertants in TA98 strain. Since reactive oxygen species may be implicated in aging process and in degenerative diseases, we used antioxidant compounds as catalase, thiourea and dipyridyl in the lysogenic induction test. All this compounds were able to reduce the induction factor observed in the treatment with chapéu-de-couro, thus suggesting that the genotoxicity and mutagenicity were attributable to the production of reactive oxygen species that targeted DNA purines.

  17. Evaluation of river water genotoxicity using the piscine micronucleus test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergene, Serap; Cavaş, Tolga; Celik, Ayla; Köleli, Nurcan; Aymak, Cemil

    2007-07-01

    The Berdan River, which empties into the Mediterranean Sea on the east coast of Turkey, receives discharges of industrial and municipal waste. In the present study, the in vivo piscine micronucleus (MN) test was used to evaluate the genotoxicity of water samples collected from different locations along the Berdan River. Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) were exposed in the laboratory for 2, 4, and 6 days, and micronuclei were evaluated in peripheral blood erythrocytes, gill cells, and caudal fin epithelial cells. A single dose of 5 mg/L cyclophosphamide was used as a positive control. In addition to micronuclei, nuclear abnormalities (NAs), such as binucleated cells and blebbed, notched, and lobed nuclei, were assessed in the erythrocytes, and chemical analyses were carried out to determine the amount of heavy metals in the water samples. MN and NA frequencies were significantly elevated (up to 2- to 3-fold) in fish exposed to river water samples taken downstream of potential discharges, and the elevated responses in gill and fin cells were related to the concentration of heavy metals in the water. MN frequencies (expressed as micronucleated cells/1,000 cells), in both treated and untreated fish, were greatest in gill cells (range: 0.80-3.70), and generally lower in erythrocytes (range: 0.50-2.80), and fin cells (range: 0.45-1.70). The results of this study indicate that the Berdan River is contaminated with genotoxic pollutants and that the genotoxicity is related to the discharge of wastes into the river water.

  18. Acute dyskerin depletion triggers cellular senescence and renders osteosarcoma cells resistant to genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Ping; Mobasher, Maral E.; Alawi, Faizan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Dyskerin depletion triggers cellular senescence in U2OS osteosarcoma cells. • Dyskerin-depleted cells are resistant to apoptosis induced by genotoxic stress. • Chromatin relaxation sensitizes dyskerin-depleted cells to apoptosis. - Abstract: Dyskerin is a conserved, nucleolar RNA-binding protein implicated in an increasing array of fundamental cellular processes. Germline mutation in the dyskerin gene (DKC1) is the cause of X-linked dyskeratosis congenita (DC). Conversely, wild-type dyskerin is overexpressed in sporadic cancers, and high-levels may be associated with poor prognosis. It was previously reported that acute loss of dyskerin function via siRNA-mediated depletion slowed the proliferation of transformed cell lines. However, the mechanisms remained unclear. Using human U2OS osteosarcoma cells, we show that siRNA-mediated dyskerin depletion induced cellular senescence as evidenced by proliferative arrest, senescence-associated heterochromatinization and a senescence-associated molecular profile. Senescence can render cells resistant to apoptosis. Conversely, chromatin relaxation can reverse the repressive effects of senescence-associated heterochromatinization on apoptosis. To this end, genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis was suppressed in dyskerin-depleted cells. In contrast, agents that induce chromatin relaxation, including histone deacetylase inhibitors and the DNA intercalator chloroquine, sensitized dyskerin-depleted cells to apoptosis. Dyskerin is a core component of the telomerase complex and plays an important role in telomere homeostasis. Defective telomere maintenance resulting in premature senescence is thought to primarily underlie the pathogenesis of X-linked DC. Since U2OS cells are telomerase-negative, this leads us to conclude that loss of dyskerin function can also induce cellular senescence via mechanisms independent of telomere shortening

  19. Dietary modulation of the biotransformation and genotoxicity of aflatoxin B1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross-Steinmeyer, Kerstin; Eaton, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Diet and its various components are consistently identified as among the most important ‘risk factors’ for cancer worldwide, yet great uncertainty remains regarding the relative contribution of nutritive (e.g., vitamins, calories) vs. non-nutritive (e.g., phytochemicals, fiber, contaminants) factors in both cancer induction and cancer prevention. Among the most potent known human dietary carcinogens is the mycotoxin, aflatoxin B 1 (AFB). AFB and related aflatoxins are produced as secondary metabolites by the molds Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus that commonly infect poorly stored foods including peanuts, pistachios, corn, and rice. AFB is a potent hepatocarcinogenic agent in numerous animal species, and has been implicated in the etiology of human hepatocellular carcinoma. Recent research has shown that many diet-derived factors have great potential to influence AFB biotransformation, and some efficiently protect from AFB-induced genotoxicity. One key mode of action for reducing AFB-induced carcinogenesis in experimental animals was shown to be the induction of detoxification enzymes such as certain glutathione-S-transferases that are regulated through the Keap1–Nrf2–ARE signaling pathway. Although initial studies utilized the dithiolthione drug, oltipraz, as a prototypical inducer of antioxidant response, dietary components such as suforaphane (SFN) are also effective inducers of this pathway in rodent models. However, human GSTs in general do not appear to be extensively induced by SFN, and GSTM1 – the only human GST with measurable catalytic activity toward aflatoxin B 1 -8,9-epoxide (AFBO; the genotoxic metabolite of AFB), does not appear to be induced by SFN, at least in human hepatocytes, even though its expression in human liver cells does appear to offer considerable protection against AFB–DNA damage. Although induction of detoxification pathways has served as the primary mechanistic focus of chemoprevention studies, protective

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus saprophyticus and urethral staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrie, T J; Kwan, C

    1982-01-01

    The activity of eight antimicrobial agents was determined against 115 isolates of Staphylococcus saprophyticus. All were susceptible to ampicillin, cephalexin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and resistant to nalidixic acid and novobiocin. A bimodal pattern of susceptibility to erythromycin was observed: 80% were inhibited by 0.25 microgram/ml, whereas 13% required greater than or equal to 128 micrograms/ml. The following urethral staphylococci were susceptible to ampicillin, cephalexin, and nitrofurantoin but resistant to nalidixic acid: S. epidermidis, S. hominis, S. haemolyticus, S. warneri, S. simulans, and S. cohnii. PMID:6982679

  1. Protective effect of thymoquinone against diazinon-induced hematotoxicity, genotoxicity and immunotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danaei, Gholam Hassan; Karami, Mohammad

    2017-10-01

    Several studies have shown that oxidative stress and cell damage can occur in the very early stages of diazinon (DZN) exposure. The present study was designed to determine the beneficial effect of thymoquinone (Thy), the main component of Nigella sativa (black seed or black cumin) against DZN immunotoxicity, hematotoxicity and genotoxicity in rats. In the present experimental study, 48 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups, (eight per group) as follows: control (receiving corn oil as the DZN solvent), DZN (20mg/kg), Thy (10mg/kg), Thy (2.5mg/kg)+DZN, Thy (5mg/kg)+DZN and Thy (10mg/kg)+DZN. After four weeks of treatment, the hematological parameters of red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs), hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct) and platelets (PLTs) were evaluated. The evaluation of genotoxicity was carried out using the micronucleus assay. For measurement of cytokine production, interferon gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin 10 (IL10) and interleukin 4 (IL4) were chosen as immunotoxicity indicators of DZN toxicity. DZN was found to decrease RBCs, WBCs, Hb, Hct, PLTs, butyrl- and acetyl-cholinesterase activity and I FN-γ and increased the micronucleus indices of IL10 and IL4 as compared with the control group. Treatment with Thy reduced DZN hematotoxicity and immunotoxicity, but, significantly, did not prevent genotoxicity. This study showed that Thy (without the significant effect on genotoxicity) decreased the hematological toxicity, immunotoxicity and butyrl and acetyl cholinesterase activity induced by DZN. The success of Thy supplementation against DZN toxicity can be attributed to the antioxidant effects of its constituents. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. In vitro cytotoxic, genotoxic and antioxidant/oxidant effects of guaiazulene on human lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Başak Toğar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate for the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and antioxidant/oxidant activity of GYZ on human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs. Guaiazulene (GYZ was added into culture tubes at various concentrations (0-400 µg/mL-1. Cytotoxicity against the human lymphocytes cultures was examined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release assay. The proliferative response was estimated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Antioxidant/oxidant activity was evaluated by measuring the total oxidant status (TOS and total antioxidant capacity (TAC levels. Micronucleus (MN and chromosomal aberration (CA tests were used in genotoxicity studies. The results showed that GYZ caused cytotoxicity in the PBLs at high concentrations, but TOS level were not affected, while the level of TAC was significantly increased. GYZ also did not induce chromosomal aberrations when compared to that of the control group. Results this study clearly revealed that GYZ was not genotoxic and also increased the capacity of the antioxidant in the culture of human PBL cells. This report is first report on the impact of GYZ on human PBL cells.

  3. Evaluation of Hypoglycemic and Genotoxic Effect of Polyphenolic Bark Extract from Quercus sideroxyla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-García, Marcela; Rosales-Castro, Martha; Escalona-Cardoso, Gerardo N.

    2016-01-01

    Quercus sideroxyla is a wood species whose bark has phenolic compound and should be considered to be bioactive; the hypoglycemic and genotoxic properties of Q. sideroxyla bark were evaluated in this study. Total phenolic compound was determined in crude extract (CE) and organic extract (OE). The OE has the highest amount of phenols (724.1 ± 12.0 GAE/g). Besides, both CE and OE demonstrated effect over the inhibition of α-amylase in vitro. Hypoglycemic activity was assessed by glucose tolerance curve and the area under curve (UAC); OE showed the highest hypoglycemic activity. In addition, diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (65 mg/kg) and the extracts (50 mg/kg) were administered for 10 days; OE showed hypoglycemic effect compared with diabetic control and decreased hepatic lipid peroxidation. Acute toxicity and genotoxicity were evaluated in CE; results of acute toxicity did not show any mortality. Besides, the comet assay showed that CE at a dose of 100 mg/kg did not show any genotoxic effect when evaluated at 24 h, whereas it induced slight damage at 200 mg/kg, with the formation of type 1 comets. PMID:27867402

  4. In vitro evaluation of genotoxic effects under magnetic resonant coupling wireless power transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Kohei; Shinohara, Naoki; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2015-04-07

    Wireless power transfer (WPT) technology using the resonant coupling phenomenon has been widely studied, but there are very few studies concerning the possible relationship between WPT exposure and human health. In this study, we investigated whether exposure to magnetic resonant coupling WPT has genotoxic effects on WI38VA13 subcloned 2RA human fibroblast cells. WPT exposure was performed using a helical coil-based exposure system designed to transfer power with 85.4% efficiency at a 12.5-MHz resonant frequency. The magnetic field at the positions of the cell culture dishes is approximately twice the reference level for occupational exposure as stated in the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. The specific absorption rate at the positions of the cell culture dishes matches the respective reference levels stated in the ICNIRP guidelines. For assessment of genotoxicity, we studied cell growth, cell cycle distribution, DNA strand breaks using the comet assay, micronucleus formation, and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene mutation, and did not detect any significant effects between the WPT-exposed cells and control cells. Our results suggest that WPT exposure under the conditions of the ICNIRP guidelines does not cause detectable cellular genotoxicity.

  5. Evaluation of Hypoglycemic and Genotoxic Effect of Polyphenolic Bark Extract from Quercus sideroxyla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Soto-García

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quercus sideroxyla is a wood species whose bark has phenolic compound and should be considered to be bioactive; the hypoglycemic and genotoxic properties of Q. sideroxyla bark were evaluated in this study. Total phenolic compound was determined in crude extract (CE and organic extract (OE. The OE has the highest amount of phenols (724.1±12.0 GAE/g. Besides, both CE and OE demonstrated effect over the inhibition of α-amylase in vitro. Hypoglycemic activity was assessed by glucose tolerance curve and the area under curve (UAC; OE showed the highest hypoglycemic activity. In addition, diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (65 mg/kg and the extracts (50 mg/kg were administered for 10 days; OE showed hypoglycemic effect compared with diabetic control and decreased hepatic lipid peroxidation. Acute toxicity and genotoxicity were evaluated in CE; results of acute toxicity did not show any mortality. Besides, the comet assay showed that CE at a dose of 100 mg/kg did not show any genotoxic effect when evaluated at 24 h, whereas it induced slight damage at 200 mg/kg, with the formation of type 1 comets.

  6. Formation and removal of genotoxic activity during UV/H

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heringa, M.B.; Harmsen, D.J.H.; Beerendonk, E.F.; Reus, A.A.; Krul, C.A.M.; Metz, D.H.; Ijpelaar, G.F.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the genotoxic activity of water after UV/H2O2 oxidation and GAC filtration. Pre-treated surface water from three locations was treated with UV/H2O2 with medium pressure (MP) lamps and passed through granulated

  7. Genotoxic effects in wild rodents (Rattus rattus and Mus musculus) in an open coal mining area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Grethel; Pérez, Lyda Espitia; Linares, Juan Carlos; Hartmann, Andreas; Quintana, Milton

    2007-06-15

    Coal is a mixture of a variety of compounds containing mutagenic and carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Exposure to coal is considered as an important non-cellular and cellular source of reactive oxygen species that can induce DNA damage. In addition, spontaneous combustion can occur in coal mining areas, further releasing compounds with detrimental effects on the environment. In this study the comet assay was used to investigate potential genotoxic effects of coal mining activities in peripheral blood cells of the wild rodents Rattus rattus and Mus musculus. The study was conducted in a coal mining area of the Municipio de Puerto Libertador, South West of the Departamento de Cordoba, Colombia. Animals from two areas in the coal mining zone and a control area located in the Municipio de Lorica were investigated. The results showed evidence that exposure to coal results in elevated primary DNA lesions in blood cells of rodents. Three different parameters for DNA damage were assessed, namely, DNA damage index, migration length and percentage damaged cells. All parameters showed statistically significantly higher values in mice and rats from the coal mining area in comparison to the animals from the control area. The parameter "DNA Damage Index" was found to be most sensitive and to best indicate a genotoxic hazard. Both species investigated were shown to be sensitive indicators of environmental genotoxicity caused by coal mining activities. In summary, our study constitutes the first investigation of potential genotoxic effects of open coal mining carried out in Puerto Libertador. The investigations provide a guide for measures to evaluate genotoxic hazards, thereby contributing to the development of appropriate measures and regulations for more careful operations during coal mining.

  8. Synergistic effect of Gentiana lutea L. on methyl methanesulfonate genotoxicity in the Drosophila wing spot test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patenković, Aleksandra; Stamenković-Radak, Marina; Nikolić, Dragana; Marković, Tamara; Anđelković, Marko

    2013-03-27

    Gentiana lutea L., the yellow gentian, is herb known for its pharmacological properties, with a long tradition of use for the treatment of a variety of diseases including the use as a remedy for digestion, also in food products and in bitter beverages. The aim of the present study is to evaluate, for the first time, genotoxicity of gentian alone, and its antigenotoxicity against methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). The water infusion of the underground part of gentian were evaluated in vivo using the Drosophila wing spot test, at the dose commonly used in traditional medicine. For antigenotoxic study two types of treatment with gentian and MMS were performed: chronic co-treatment, as well as post-treatment with gentian after acute exposure with MMS. Water infusion of gentian alone did not exhibit genotoxicity. The results of co- and post-treatment experiments with gentian show that gentian enhanced the frequency of mutant clones over the values obtained with MMS alone, instead of reducing the genotoxicity of MMS, for 22.64% and 27.13% respectively. This result suggests a synergism of gentian with MMS, and indicates that water infusion of gentian used in traditional medicine may have particular effects with regard to genotoxicity indicating careful use. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparative Genotoxicity of Cadmium and Lead in Earthworm Coelomocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ptumporn Muangphra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine genotoxicity to coelomocytes, Pheretima peguana earthworms were exposed in filter paper studies to cadmium (Cd and lead (Pb for 48 h, at concentrations less than the LC10—Cd: 0.09, 0.19, 0.38, 0.75, and 1.50 μg cm−2; Pb: 1.65, 3.29, 6.58, 13.16, and 26.32 μg cm−2. For Cd at 0.75 μg cm−2, in the micronucleus test (detects chromosomal aberrations, significant increases (<.05 in micronuclei and binucleate cells were observed, and in the comet assay (detects DNA single-strand breaks, tail DNA% was significantly increased. Lead was less toxic with minimal effects on DNA, but the binucleates were significantly increased by Pb at 3.29 μg cm−2. This study shows that Cd is more acutely toxic and sublethally genotoxic than Pb to P. peguana. Cadmium caused chromosomal aberrations and DNA single-strand breaks at 45% of the LC10 concentration. Lead, in contrast, did not induce DNA damage but caused cytokinesis defects.

  10. A review of the genotoxicity of trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, David; Fowler, Paul

    2018-04-01

    Trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA) is a trifunctional acrylate monomer which polymerizes rapidly when exposed to sources of free radicals. It is widely used as a reactive diluent and polymer building block in the formulation of overprint varnishes, inks and a variety of wood, plastic and metal coatings. TMPTA has been tested in a range of in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity tests. There is no clear evidence of induction of gene mutations by TMPTA in bacteria or mammalian cells in vitro, but there is evidence of clastogenicity from induction of small colony tk mutants in the mouse lymphoma assay, and also induction of micronuclei and chromosomal aberrations. However, TMPTA was negative in bone marrow or blood micronucleus tests in vivo following oral or repeated dermal application, and did not induce comets in bone marrow or liver of mice following intravenous administration, which would have achieved plasma (and therefore tissue) concentrations estimated to exceed those inducing clastogenic effects in vitro. It is concluded that TMPTA is not genotoxic in vivo. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of genotoxic effect of silver nanoparticles (Ag-Nps) in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, Priscila; Balbinot, Fernanda; Martins de Oliveira, Hugo; Elibio Fagundes, Gabriela; Venâncio, Mireli; Vieira Ronconi, João Vitor; Merlini, Aline; Streck, Emílio L.; Marques da Silva, Paula; Moraes de Andrade, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) are the most prominent nanoproducts. Due to their antimicrobial activity, they have been incorporated in different materials, such as catheters, clothes, electric home appliance, and many others. The genotoxicity of Ag-NPs (5–45 nm), in different concentrations and times of exposure, was evaluated by the comet assay in in vitro and in vivo conditions, respectively, using human peripheral blood and Swiss mice. The results showed the genotoxic effect of Ag-NPs in vitro, in all the doses tested in the initial hour of exposure, possibly through the reactive oxygen species generation. Nevertheless, the values for this damage decrease with time, indicating that the DNA may have been restored by the repair system. In the in vivo conditions, we found no genotoxicity of Ag-NPs in any hour of exposure and any dose investigated, which can be attributed to the activation of a cellular antioxidant network and the hydrophobic nature of Ag-NPs. Now, it is absolutely necessary to investigate the role of Ag-NPs in different cell lines in vivo.

  12. Evaluation of genotoxic effect of silver nanoparticles (Ag-Nps) in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, Priscila; Balbinot, Fernanda; Martins de Oliveira, Hugo; Elibio Fagundes, Gabriela [PPGCS, Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Laboratorio de Biologia Celular e Molecular (Brazil); Venancio, Mireli; Vieira Ronconi, Joao Vitor; Merlini, Aline [Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Laboratorio de Sintese de Complexos Multifuncionais (Brazil); Streck, Emilio L. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias da Saude, Unidade Academica de Ciencias da Saude, Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Laboratorio de Fisiopatologia Experimental (Brazil); Marques da Silva, Paula [Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Laboratorio de Sintese de Complexos Multifuncionais (Brazil); Moraes de Andrade, Vanessa, E-mail: vmoraesdeandrade@yahoo.com.br [PPGCS, Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Laboratorio de Biologia Celular e Molecular (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) are the most prominent nanoproducts. Due to their antimicrobial activity, they have been incorporated in different materials, such as catheters, clothes, electric home appliance, and many others. The genotoxicity of Ag-NPs (5-45 nm), in different concentrations and times of exposure, was evaluated by the comet assay in in vitro and in vivo conditions, respectively, using human peripheral blood and Swiss mice. The results showed the genotoxic effect of Ag-NPs in vitro, in all the doses tested in the initial hour of exposure, possibly through the reactive oxygen species generation. Nevertheless, the values for this damage decrease with time, indicating that the DNA may have been restored by the repair system. In the in vivo conditions, we found no genotoxicity of Ag-NPs in any hour of exposure and any dose investigated, which can be attributed to the activation of a cellular antioxidant network and the hydrophobic nature of Ag-NPs. Now, it is absolutely necessary to investigate the role of Ag-NPs in different cell lines in vivo.

  13. Protective Effect of Melatonin Against Mitomycin C-Induced Genotoxic Damage in Peripheral Blood of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ortega-Gutiérrez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitomycin C (MMC generates free radicals when metabolized. We investigated the effect of melatonin against MMC-induced genotoxicity in polychromatic erythrocytes and MMC-induced lipid peroxidation in brain and liver homogenates. Rats (N = 36 were classified into 4 groups: control, melatonin, MMC, and MMC + melatonin. Melatonin and MMC doses of 10 mg/kg and 2 mg/kg, respectively, were injected intraperitoneally. Peripheral blood samples were collected at 0, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours posttreatment and homogenates were obtained at 96 hours posttreatment. The number of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MN-PCE per 1000 PCE was used as a genotoxic marker. Malondialdehyde (MDA plus 4-hydroxyalkenal (4-HDA levels were used as an index of lipid peroxidation. The MMC group showed a significant increase in MN-PCE at 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours that was significantly reduced with melatonin begin coadministrated. No significant differences were found in lipid peroxidation. Our results indicate that MMC-induced genotoxicity can be reduced by melatonin.

  14. The current limitations of in vitro genotoxicity testing and their relevance to the in vivo situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesslany, Fabrice

    2017-08-01

    The standard regulatory core battery of genotoxicity tests generally includes 2 or 3 validated tests with at least one in vitro test in bacteria and one in vitro test on cell cultures. However, limitations in in vitro genotoxicity testing may exist at many levels. The knowledge of the underlying mechanisms of genotoxicity is particularly useful to assess the level of relevance for the in vivo situation. In order to avoid wrong conclusions regarding the actual genotoxicity status of any test substance, it appears very important to be aware of the various origins of related bias leading to 'false positives and negatives' by using in vitro methods. Among these, mention may be made on the metabolic activation system, experimental (extreme) conditions, specificities of the test systems implemented, cell type used etc. The knowledge of the actual 'limits' of the in vitro test systems used is clearly an advantage and may contribute to avoid some pitfalls in order to better assess the level of relevance for the in vivo situation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Chemical fate and genotoxic risk associated with hypochlorite treatment of nicotine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarrelli, Armando, E-mail: zarrelli@unina.it [UdR Napoli 4 Consorzio INCA, IC-REACH, Department of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, University Federico II, Naples (Italy); DellaGreca, Marina; Parolisi, Alice; Iesce, Maria Rosaria; Cermola, Flavio; Temussi, Fabio [UdR Napoli 4 Consorzio INCA, IC-REACH, Department of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, University Federico II, Naples (Italy); Isidori, Marina; Lavorgna, Margherita [Department of Life Sciences, II University of Naples, Caserta (Italy); Passananti, Monica; Previtera, Lucio [UdR Napoli 4 Consorzio INCA, IC-REACH, Department of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, University Federico II, Naples (Italy)

    2012-06-01

    Nicotine, the main alkaloid of tobacco, is a non- prescription drug to which all members of a tobacco-smoking society are exposed either through direct smoke inhalation or through second-hand passive 'smoking'. Nicotine is also commercially available in some pharmaceutical products and is used worldwide as a botanical insecticide in agriculture. Nicotine dynamics in indoor and outdoor environments as well as the human excretions and the manufacturing process are responsible for its entry in the environment through municipal and industrial wastewater discharges. The presence of nicotine in surface and ground waters points out that it survives a conventional treatment process and persists in potable-water supplies. Complete removal of nicotine is instead reported when additional chlorination steps are used. In this paper a simulation of STP chlorination of nicotine and a genotoxic evaluation of its main degradation products are reported. Under laboratory conditions removal of nicotine seems not to be due to mineralization but to transformation in oxidized and chlorinated products. The by-products have been isolated after fractionation by diverse chromatographic procedures and their structures determined using mass spectrometry and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy. Preliminary genotoxic SOS Chromotests with Escherichia coli PQ37 evidence no toxicity of the products. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Processes of chlorination in the treatment of raw water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer STP chlorination of nicotine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Genotoxic evaluation of main degradation products of nicotine.

  16. Chemical fate and genotoxic risk associated with hypochlorite treatment of nicotine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarrelli, Armando; DellaGreca, Marina; Parolisi, Alice; Iesce, Maria Rosaria; Cermola, Flavio; Temussi, Fabio; Isidori, Marina; Lavorgna, Margherita; Passananti, Monica; Previtera, Lucio

    2012-01-01

    Nicotine, the main alkaloid of tobacco, is a non- prescription drug to which all members of a tobacco-smoking society are exposed either through direct smoke inhalation or through second-hand passive ‘smoking’. Nicotine is also commercially available in some pharmaceutical products and is used worldwide as a botanical insecticide in agriculture. Nicotine dynamics in indoor and outdoor environments as well as the human excretions and the manufacturing process are responsible for its entry in the environment through municipal and industrial wastewater discharges. The presence of nicotine in surface and ground waters points out that it survives a conventional treatment process and persists in potable-water supplies. Complete removal of nicotine is instead reported when additional chlorination steps are used. In this paper a simulation of STP chlorination of nicotine and a genotoxic evaluation of its main degradation products are reported. Under laboratory conditions removal of nicotine seems not to be due to mineralization but to transformation in oxidized and chlorinated products. The by-products have been isolated after fractionation by diverse chromatographic procedures and their structures determined using mass spectrometry and 1 H and 13 C NMR spectroscopy. Preliminary genotoxic SOS Chromotests with Escherichia coli PQ37 evidence no toxicity of the products. - Highlights: ► Processes of chlorination in the treatment of raw water. ► STP chlorination of nicotine. ► Genotoxic evaluation of main degradation products of nicotine.

  17. Hexavalent chromium is cytotoxic and genotoxic to American alligator cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sandra S; Wise, Catherine; Xie, Hong; Guillette, Louis J; Zhu, Cairong; Wise, John Pierce; Wise, John Pierce

    2016-02-01

    Metals are a common pollutant in the aquatic ecosystem. With global climate change, these levels are anticipated to rise as lower pH levels allow sediment bound metals to be released. The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is an apex predator in the aquatic ecosystem and is considered a keystone species; as such it serves as a suitable monitor for localized pollution. One metal of increasing concern is hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)). It is present in the aquatic environment and is a known human carcinogen and reproductive toxicant. We measured the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Cr(VI) in American alligator cells derived from scute tissue. We found that particulate and soluble Cr(VI) are both cytotoxic and genotoxic to alligator cells in a concentration-dependent manner. These data suggest that alligators may be used as a model for assessing the effects of environmental Cr(VI) contamination as well as for other metals of concern. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Genotoxic evaluation of infusions of Urera baccifera leaves and roots in Allium cepa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L. Gindri

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Context: The aqueous extracts of Urera baccifera Wedd. leaves and roots are used to inflammatory and infectious diseases in Brazilian folk medicine. Oxalic acid, a substance co-related with toxicity and stinging, was already quantified in this plant. Aims: To evaluate the action of leaves and roots infusions (1, 30, 75 g/L and the oxalic acid standard on mitosis as indicative of presumably antimitotic and genotoxic actions, using the Allium cepa test. Methods: Oxalic acid was quantified in the roots and leaves infusions by High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-DAD, with the mobile phase of 25 mM phosphate buffer (pH 2.5: acetonitrile at 95:5 (v/v. To the genotoxicity test, onion bulbs were used. After the rootlets germination, each bulb was submitted for 24 h of the individual treatments. Were analyzed 1000 cells per bulb, in a total of 5000 cells per treatment. Results: Results showed that all concentrations of roots infusions induced chromosomes abnormalities, except for the highest, that caused a substantial inhibition in the mitosis, precluding to be observed abnormalities. In the leaves infusions, only the two higher concentrations caused the highest values of damage in the cellular cycle. The oxalic acid also caused abnormalities in the mitosis, and may be considered responsible by part of the genotoxic action of U. baccifera. Conclusions: Oxalic acid can be responsible by part of the chromosomal abnormalities caused by U. baccifera, although, there must have more metabolites that evoke the same effect promoting the genotoxic effect of this nettle.

  19. Analyzing the Genotoxicity of Retroviral Vectors in Hematopoietic Cell Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Biasco

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Retroviral vectors, including those derived from gammaretroviruses and lentiviruses, have found their way into the clinical arena and demonstrated remarkable efficacy for the treatment of immunodeficiencies, leukodystrophies, and globinopathies. Despite these successes, gene therapy unfortunately also has had to face severe adverse events in the form of leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes, related to the semi-random vector integration into the host cell genome that caused deregulation of neighboring proto-oncogenes. Although improvements in vector design clearly lowered the risk of this insertional mutagenesis, analysis of potential genotoxicity and the consequences of vector integration remain important parameters for basic and translational research and most importantly for the clinic. Here, we review current assays to analyze biodistribution and genotoxicity in the pre-clinical setting and describe tools to monitor vector integration sites in vector-treated patients as a biosafety readout.

  20. Ecotoxicity and genotoxicity of cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, their metabolites/transformation products and their mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Česen, Marjeta; Eleršek, Tina; Novak, Matjaž; Žegura, Bojana; Kosjek, Tina; Filipič, Metka; Heath, Ester

    2016-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CP) and ifosfamide (IF) are commonly used cytostatic drugs that repress cell division by interaction with DNA. The present study investigates the ecotoxicity and genotoxicity of CP, IF, their human metabolites/transformation products (TPs) carboxy-cyclophosphamide (CPCOOH), keto-cyclophosphamide (ketoCP) and N-dechloroethyl-cyclophosphamide (NdCP) as individual compounds and as mixture. The two parent compounds (CP and IF), at concentrations up to 320 mg L −1 , were non-toxic towards the alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and cyanobacterium Synecococcus leopoliensis. Further ecotoxicity studies of metabolites/TPs and a mixture of parent compounds and metabolites/TPs performed in cyanobacteria S. leopoliensis, showed that only CPCOOH (EC 50  = 17.1 mg L −1 ) was toxic. The measured toxicity (EC 50  = 11.5 mg L −1 ) of the mixture was lower from the toxicity predicted by concentration addition model (EC 50  = 21.1 mg L −1 ) indicating potentiating effects of the CPCOOH toxicity. The SOS/umuC assay with Salmonella typhimurium revealed genotoxic activity of CP, CPCOOH and the mixture in the presence of S9 metabolic activation. Only CPCOOH was genotoxic also in the absence of metabolic activation indicating that this compound is a direct acting genotoxin. This finding is of particular importance as in the environment such compounds can directly affect DNA of non-target organisms and also explains toxicity of CPCOOH against cyanobacteria S. leopoliensis. The degradation study with UV irradiation of samples containing CP and IF showed efficient degradation of both compounds and remained non-toxic towards S. leopoliensis, suggesting that no stable TPs with adverse effects were formed. To our knowledge, this is the first study describing the ecotoxicity and genotoxicity of the commonly used cytostatics CP and IF, their known metabolites/TPs and their mixture. The results indicate the importance of toxicological evaluation and

  1. Cyto-genotoxic and DNA methylation changes induced by different crystal phases of TiO{sub 2}-np in bronchial epithelial (16-HBE) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Manosij, E-mail: gmanosij@gmail.com [K.U.Leuven, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Centre Environment & Health, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Öner, Deniz; Duca, Radu-Corneliu [K.U.Leuven, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Centre Environment & Health, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Cokic, Stevan M. [Department of Oral Health Sciences, KU Leuven BIOMAT, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Seys, Sven [K.U.Leuven, Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Leuven (Belgium); Kerkhofs, Stef [Centre for Surface Chemistry and Catalysis, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200f, Heverlee, Leuven (Belgium); Van Landuyt, Kirsten [Department of Oral Health Sciences, KU Leuven BIOMAT, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Hoet, Peter [K.U.Leuven, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Centre Environment & Health, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Godderis, Lode, E-mail: lode.godderis@med.kuleuven.be [K.U.Leuven, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Centre Environment & Health, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Idewe, External Service for Prevention and Protection at Work, B-3001, Heverlee (Belgium)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Comet and micronucleus (with and without CytB) assays revealed significant genotoxic effect of TiO{sub 2}-np. • TiO{sub 2}-np induces cell cycle arrest in the S-phase. • Anatase form induces more cyto-genotoxic effect compared to rutile and anatase-rutile mixture. • Significant hypomethylation were observed at for anatase, rutile and anatase: rutile mixture. - Abstract: With the increase in use of TiO{sub 2}-np, a better understanding of their safety is important. In the present study the effect of different crystal phases of TiO{sub 2}-np (anatase, rutile and anatase: rutile mixture; 20–26 nm) were studied for cyto-genotoxicity and global DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation. Cytotoxic response was observed at a concentration of 25 μg/ml for the particles tested. Results of comet and micronucleus (with and without CytB) assays revealed significant genotoxic effect of these particles. Flow cytometry revealed cell cycle arrest in the S-phase. Based on the results, toxicity of the particles could be correlated with their physico-chemical properties (i.e. smaller size and hydrodynamic diameter and larger surface area), anatase form being the most toxic. From the results of the cyto-genotoxicity assays, concentrations were determined for the epigenetic study. Effect on global DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation levels were studied at cyto-genotoxic (25 μg/ml), genotoxic (12.5 μg/ml) and sub cyto-genotoxic (3.25 μg/ml) concentrations using LC–MS/MS analysis. Though no significant changes were observed for 3 h treatment schedule; significant hypomethylation were observed at 24 h for anatase (significant at 3.25 and 25 μg/ml), rutile (significant at 3.25 and 25 μg/ml) and anatase: rutile mixture (significant at 25 μg/ml) forms. The results suggest that epigenetic changes could occur at sub cyto-genotoxic concentrations. And hence for complete characterization of nanoparticle toxicity, epigenetic studies should be performed along with

  2. Evaluation of genotoxic effects of surface waters using a battery of bioassays indicating different mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yingnan; Li, Na; Oda, Yoshimitsu; Ma, Mei; Rao, Kaifeng; Wang, Zijian; Jin, Wei; Hong, Gang; Li, Zhiguo; Luo, Yi

    2016-11-01

    With the burgeoning contamination of surface waters threatening human health, the genotoxic effects of surface waters have received much attention. Because mutagenic and carcinogenic compounds in water cause tumors by different mechanisms, a battery of bioassays that each indicate a different mode of action (MOA) is required to evaluate the genotoxic effects of contaminants in water samples. In this study, 15 water samples from two source water reservoirs and surrounding rivers in Shijiazhuang city of China were evaluated for genotoxic effects. Target chemical analyses of 14 genotoxic pollutants were performed according to the Environmental quality standards for surface water of China. Then, the in vitro cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay, based on a high-content screening technique, was used to detect the effect of chromosome damage. The SOS/umu test using strain TA1535/pSK1002 was used to detect effects on SOS repair of gene expression. Additionally, two other strains, NM2009 and NM3009, which are highly sensitive to aromatic amines and nitroarenes, respectively, were used in the SOS/umu test to avoid false negative results. In the water samples, only two of the genotoxic chemicals listed in the water standards were detected in a few samples, with concentrations that were below water quality standards. However, positive results for the CBMN assay were observed in two river samples, and positive results for the induction of umuC gene expression in TA1535/pSK1002 were observed in seven river samples. Moreover, positive results were observed for NM2009 with S9 and NM3009 without S9 in some samples that had negative results using the strain TA1535/pSK1002. Based on the results with NM2009 and NM3009, some unknown or undetected aromatic amines and nitroarenes were likely in the source water reservoirs and the surrounding rivers. Furthermore, these compounds were most likely the causative pollutants for the genotoxic effect of these water samples. Therefore

  3. Mixture Genotoxicity of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid, Acrylamide, and Maleic Hydrazide on Human Caco-2 Cells Assessed with Comet Assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syberg, Kristian; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Cedergreen, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of genotoxic properties of chemicals is mainly conducted only for single chemicals, without taking mixture genotoxic effects into consideration. The current study assessed mixture effects of the three known genotoxic chemicals, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), acrylamide (AA......), and maleic hydrazide (MH), in an experiment with a fixed ratio design setup. The genotoxic effects were assessed with the single-cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay) for both single chemicals and the ternary mixture. The concentration ranges used were 0-1.4, 0-20, and 0-37.7 mM for 2,4-D, AA, and MH......, respectively. Mixture toxicity was tested with a fixed ratio design at a 10:23:77% ratio for 2.4-D:AA:MH. Results indicated that the three chemicals yielded a synergistic mixture effect. It is not clear which mechanisms are responsible for this interaction. A few possible interactions are discussed...

  4. Genotoxicity of Swimming Pool Water and Carcinogenicity of Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Among the 11 disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water that are regulated by the U.S. EPA, (a) 2 DBPs (chloroaceticacid and chlorite) are not carcinogenic-in either of2 species; (b) chlorite is not carcinogenic in 3 rodent assays and has never been tested for genotoxicity...

  5. Genotoxicity of Swimming Pool Water and Carcinogenicity of Drinking Water**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Among the 11 disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water that are regulated by the U.S. EPA, (a) 2 DBPs (chloroaceticacid and chlorite) are not carcinogenic-in either of2 species; (b) chlorite is not carcinogenic in 3 rodent assays and has never been tested for genotoxicity...

  6. Induction of cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of Guandu River waters in the Allium cepa system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Vieira Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Guandu River is the main source of water supply for the metropolitan region of Rio de Janeiro and has been facing serious environmental problems due to increasing population and industrial pollution, as well as the presence of polluted tributaries. This study analyzed the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of the Guandu River’s waters, through the use of the Allium cepa test system. Collection points were chosen at the greatest confluences of pollutant sources. The sampling included two different seasons: the rainy season (January and February and the dry season (June and July. The analyses of 5000 cells per treatment showed that all the points studied had some degree of cytotoxicity and/or genotoxicity. Two sampling locations, which receive major influxes from the polluted waters of the Poços/Queimados and Cabuçu/Ipiranga Rivers, stood out for the strong presence of micronuclei, sticky chromosomes, mitotic spindle abnormalities, necrotic cells and nucleolar changes compared to the negative control. At least two locations also found changes in the mitotic index. The existence of variations in the number of cytotoxic and genotoxic changes between periods of rain and drought indicates that the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of the water pollutants varies according to time, depending on the discharges of the tributary rivers and the increase of contaminated effluents. The results highlight the importance of bio-monitoring to assist managers in the control of effluent discharge.

  7. Integrated analysis of the ecotoxicological and genotoxic effects of the antimicrobial peptide melittin on Daphnia magna and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galdiero, Emilia; Maselli, Valeria; Falanga, Annarita; Gesuele, Renato; Galdiero, Stefania; Fulgione, Domenico; Guida, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Melittin is a major constituent of the bee venom of Apis mellifera with a broad spectrum of activities. Melittin therapeutical potential is subject to its toxicity and the assessment of ecotoxicity and genotoxicity is of particular interest for therapeutic use. Here we analyzed the biological effects of melittin on two aquatic species, which are representative of two different levels of the aquatic trophic chain: the invertebrate Daphnia magna and the unicellular microalgae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. The attention was focused on the determination of: i) ecotoxicity; ii) genotoxicity; iii) antigenotoxicity. Our main finding is that melittin is detrimental to D. magna reproduction and its sub-lethal concentrations create an accumulation dependent on exposition times and a negative effect on DNA. We also observed that melittin significantly delayed time to first eggs. Moreover, results showed that melittin exerted its toxic and genotoxic effects in both species, being a bit more aggressive towards P. subcapitata. - Highlights: • We examine ecotoxicity to study how AMPs affect the environment. • We examine genotoxicity in order to analyze the damages to the DNA. • We examine the antigenotoxicity in order to verify DNA repair ability of the cells. • Possible therapeutical applications of AMPs depend on assessment of ecotoxicity. - Melittin exerts its dose dependent toxic and genotoxic effects on both indicators; no toxicity is found at concentrations that may typically reach the environment

  8. Potential genotoxic and cytotoxicity of emamectin benzoate in human normal liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhijie; Zhao, Xinyu; Qin, Xiaosong

    2017-10-10

    Pesticide residue inducing cancer-related health problems draw people more attention recently. Emamectin benzoate (EMB) has been widely used in agriculture around the world based on its specificity targets. Although potential risk and the molecular mechanism of EMB toxicity to human liver has not been well-characterized. Unlike well-reported toxicity upon central nervous system, potential genotoxic and cytotoxicity of EMB in human liver cell was ignored and very limited. In this study, we identify genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of EMB to human normal liver cells (QSG7701 cell line) in vitro . We demonstrate that EMB inhibited the viability of QSG7701 cells and induced the DNA damage. Established assays of cytotoxicity were performed to characterize the mechanism of EMB toxicity on QSG7701 cells. Typical chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation indicated the apoptosis of QSG7701 cells induced by EMB. And the intracellular biochemical results demonstrated that EMB-enhanced apoptosis of QSG7701 cells concurrent with generated ROS, a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, the cytochrome-c release, up regulate the Bax/Bcl-2 and the activation of caspase-9/-3. Our results of EMB induces the death of QSG7701 cells maybe via mitochondrial-mediated intrinsic apoptotic pathways would contribute to promote the awareness of EMB as an extensive used pesticide to human being effects and reveal the underlying mechanisms of potential genotoxic.

  9. Genotoxic Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids — Mechanisms Leading to DNA Adduct Formation and Tumorigenicity

    OpenAIRE

    Ming W. Chou; Ge Lin; Qingsu Xia; Peter P. Fu

    2002-01-01

    Abstract: Plants that contain pyrrolizidine alkaloids are widely distributed in the world. Although pyrrolizidine alkaloids have been shown to be genotoxic and tumorigenic in experimental animals, the mechanisms of actions have not been fully understood. The results of our recent mechanistic studies suggest that pyrrolizidine alkaloids induce tumors via a genotoxic mechanism mediated by 6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5Hpyrrolizine (DHP)-derived DNA adduct formation. This mechanism may ...

  10. Assessment of Genotoxic Potential of Hridayarnava Rasa (A Herbo-Mineralo-Metallic Ayurvedic Formulation) Using Chromosomal Aberration and Sperm Abnormality Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagtap, Chandrashekhar Y.; Chaudhari, Swapnil Y.; Thakkar, Jalaram H.; Galib, R.; Prajapati, P. K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Herbo-mineral formulations are being successfully used in therapeutics since centuries. But recently, they came under the scanner for their metallic contents especially the presence of heavy metals. Hence it is the need of the hour to assess and establish the safety of these formulations through toxicity studies. In line with the various toxicity studies that are being carried out, Government of India expressed the need for conducting genotoxicity studies of different metal- or mineral-based drugs. Till date very few Ayurvedic herbo-mineral formulations have been studied for their genotoxic potential. The present study is aimed to evaluate the genotoxic potential of Hridayarnava Rasa. Materials and Methods: It was prepared as per classical guidelines and administered to Swiss albino mice for 14 consecutive days. Chromosomal aberration and sperm abnormality assay were done to evaluate the genotoxic potential of the test drugs. Cyclophosphamide (CP) was taken as positive group and results were compared. Results: All treated groups exhibited significant body weight gain in comparison to CP group. Results revealed no structural deformity in the above parameters in comparison to the CP-treated group. Conclusion: Reported data showed that both tested samples of Hridayarnava Rasa does not possess genotoxic potential under the experimental conditions and can be safely used. PMID:25948961

  11. A re-assessment of the safety of silver in household water treatment: rapid systematic review of mammalian in vivo genotoxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fewtrell, Lorna; Majuru, Batsirai; Hunter, Paul R

    2017-06-20

    Despite poor evidence of their effectiveness, colloidal silver and silver nanoparticles are increasingly being promoted for treating potentially contaminated drinking water in low income countries. Recently, however, concerns have been raised about the possible genotoxicity of particulate silver. The goal of this paper was to review the published mammalian in vivo genotoxicity studies using silver micro and nanoparticles. SCOPUS and Medline were searched using the following search string: ("DNA damage" OR genotox* OR Cytotox* OR Embryotox*) AND (silver OR AgNP). Included papers were any mammalian in vivo experimental studies investigating genotoxicity of silver particles. Studies were quality assessed using the ToxRTool. 16 relevant papers were identified. There were substantial variations in study design including the size of silver particles, animal species, target organs, silver dose, route of administration and the method used to detect genotoxicity. Thus, it was not possible to produce a definitive pooled result. Nevertheless, most studies showed evidence of genotoxicity unless using very low doses. We also identified one human study reporting evidence of "severe DNA damage" in silver jewellery workers occupationally exposed to silver particles. With the available evidence it is not possible to be definitive about risks to human health from oral exposure to silver particulates. However, the balance of evidence suggests that there should be concerns especially when considering the evidence from jewellery workers. There is an urgent need to determine whether people exposed to particulate silver as part of drinking water treatment have evidence of DNA damage.

  12. Way forward in case of a false positive in vitro genotoxicity result for a cosmetic substance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doktorova, Tatyana Y; Ates, Gamze; Vinken, Mathieu; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera

    2014-02-01

    The currently used regulatory in vitro mutagenicity/genotoxicity test battery has a high sensitivity for detecting genotoxicants, but it suffers from a large number of irrelevant positive results (i.e. low specificity) thereby imposing the need for additional follow-up by in vitro and/or in vivo genotoxicity tests. This could have a major impact on the cosmetic industry in Europe, seen the imposed animal testing and marketing bans on cosmetics and their ingredients. Afflicted, but safe substances could therefore be lost. Using the example of triclosan, a cosmetic preservative, we describe here the potential applicability of a human toxicogenomics-based in vitro assay as a potential mechanistically based follow-up test for positive in vitro genotoxicity results. Triclosan shows a positive in vitro chromosomal aberration test, but is negative during in vivo follow-up tests. Toxicogenomics analysis unequivocally shows that triclosan is identified as a compound acting through non-DNA reactive mechanisms. This proof-of-principle study illustrates the potential of genome-wide transcriptomics data in combination with in vitro experimentation as a possible weight-of-evidence follow-up approach for de-risking a positive outcome in a standard mutagenicity/genotoxicity battery. As such a substantial number of cosmetic compounds wrongly identified as genotoxicants could be saved for the future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Physicochemical characteristics, mutagenicity and genotoxicity of airborne particles under industrial and rural influences in Northern Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melki, Pamela N; Ledoux, Frédéric; Aouad, Samer; Billet, Sylvain; El Khoury, Bilal; Landkocz, Yann; Abdel-Massih, Roula M; Courcot, Dominique

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the main objectives were to assess the mutagenic and genotoxic effects of fine particulate matter collected in an industrial influenced site in comparison with a non-industrial influenced one (rural site) and to relate the particulate matter (PM) composition to the observed genotoxic effects. At the industrial influenced site, higher concentrations of phosphates, trace metals, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in particles could be related to the contributions of quarries, fertilizer producer, cement plants, and tires burning. Gasoline and diesel combustion contributions were evidenced in particles collected at both sites. Particles collected under industrial influence showed a higher mutagenic potential on three tested strains of Salmonella typhimurium (TA98, YG1041, and TA102), and especially on the YG1041, compared to particles from the rural site. Furthermore, only particles collected in the vicinity of the industrial site showed a tendency to activate the SOS responses in Escherichia coli PQ37, which is indicative of DNA damage as a result of exposure of the bacteria cells to the action of mutagenic samples. The mutagenicity and genotoxicity of the industrial PM 2.5-0.3 particulates may be attributed to its composition especially in organic compounds. This study showed that proximity of industries can affect local PM composition as well as PM genotoxic and mutagenic potential.

  14. Antioxidant Activity and Genotoxic Assessment of Crabwood (Andiroba, Carapa guianensis Aublet Seed Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos F. Araujo-Lima

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The seed oil of Carapa guianensis (Aublet, a tree from the Meliaceae family commonly known as andiroba, is widely used in Brazilian traditional medicine because of its multiple curative properties against fever and rheumatism and as an anti-inflammatory agent, antibacterial agent, and insect repellant. Since there is no consensus on the best way to obtain the C. guianensis oil and due to its ethnomedicinal properties, the aim of the present research was to evaluate the chemical composition, free-radical scavenging activity, and mutagenic and genotoxicity properties of three C. guianensis oils obtained by different extraction methods. The phenolic contents were evaluated by spectrophotometry. Oil 1 was obtained by pressing the dried seeds at room temperature; oil 2 was obtained by autoclaving, drying, and pressing; oil 3 was obtained by Soxhlet extraction at 30–60°C using petroleum ether. The oil from each process presented differential yields, physicochemical properties, and phenolic contents. Oil 1 showed a higher scavenging activity against the DPPH radical when compared to oils 2 and 3, suggesting a significant antioxidant activity. All oils were shown to be cytotoxic to bacteria and to CHO-K1 and RAW264.7 cells. At noncytotoxic concentrations, oil 2 presented mutagenicity to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and induced micronuclei in both cell types. Under the same conditions, oil 3 also induced micronucleus formation. However, the present data demonstrated that oil 1, extracted without using high temperatures, was the safest for use as compared to the other two oils, not showing mutagenicity or micronucleus induction.

  15. Fipronil-induced genotoxicity and DNA damage in vivo: Protective effect of vitamin E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badgujar, P C; Selkar, N A; Chandratre, G A; Pawar, N N; Dighe, V D; Bhagat, S T; Telang, A G; Vanage, G R

    2017-05-01

    Fipronil, an insecticide of the phenylpyrazole class has been classified as a carcinogen by United States Environmental Protection Agency, yet very limited information is available about its genotoxic effects. Adult male and female animals were gavaged with various doses of fipronil (2.5, 12.5, and 25 mg/kg body weight (bw)) to evaluate micronucleus test (mice), chromosome aberration (CA), and comet assay (rats), respectively. Cyclophosphamide (40 mg/kg bw; intraperitoneal) was used as positive control. Another group of animals were pretreated with vitamin E orally (400 mg/kg bw) for 5 days prior to administration of fipronil (12.5 mg/kg). Fipronil exposure in both male and female mice caused significant increase in the frequency of micronuclei (MN) in polychromatic erythrocytes. Similarly, structural CAs in bone marrow cells and DNA damage in the lymphocytes was found to be significantly higher in the male and female rats exposed to fipronil as compared to their respective controls. The average degree of protection (male and female animals combined together) shown by pretreatment of vitamin E against fipronil-induced genotoxicity was 63.28%: CAs; 47.91%: MN formation; and 74.70%: DNA damage. Findings of this study demonstrate genotoxic nature of fipronil regardless of gender effect and documents protective role of vitamin E.

  16. In Vitro Evaluation of Genotoxic Effects under Magnetic Resonant Coupling Wireless Power Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Mizuno

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Wireless power transfer (WPT technology using the resonant coupling phenomenon has been widely studied, but there are very few studies concerning the possible relationship between WPT exposure and human health. In this study, we investigated whether exposure to magnetic resonant coupling WPT has genotoxic effects on WI38VA13 subcloned 2RA human fibroblast cells. WPT exposure was performed using a helical coil-based exposure system designed to transfer power with 85.4% efficiency at a 12.5-MHz resonant frequency. The magnetic field at the positions of the cell culture dishes is approximately twice the reference level for occupational exposure as stated in the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP guidelines. The specific absorption rate at the positions of the cell culture dishes matches the respective reference levels stated in the ICNIRP guidelines. For assessment of genotoxicity, we studied cell growth, cell cycle distribution, DNA strand breaks using the comet assay, micronucleus formation, and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT gene mutation, and did not detect any significant effects between the WPT-exposed cells and control cells. Our results suggest that WPT exposure under the conditions of the ICNIRP guidelines does not cause detectable cellular genotoxicity.

  17. The Cosmetics Europe strategy for animal-free genotoxicity testing: project status up-date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfuhler, S; Fautz, R; Ouedraogo, G; Latil, A; Kenny, J; Moore, C; Diembeck, W; Hewitt, N J; Reisinger, K; Barroso, J

    2014-02-01

    The Cosmetics Europe (formerly COLIPA) Genotoxicity Task Force has driven and funded three projects to help address the high rate of misleading positives in in vitro genotoxicity tests: The completed "False Positives" project optimized current mammalian cell assays and showed that the predictive capacity of the in vitro micronucleus assay was improved dramatically by selecting more relevant cells and more sensitive toxicity measures. The on-going "3D skin model" project has been developed and is now validating the use of human reconstructed skin (RS) models in combination with the micronucleus (MN) and Comet assays. These models better reflect the in use conditions of dermally applied products, such as cosmetics. Both assays have demonstrated good inter- and intra-laboratory reproducibility and are entering validation stages. The completed "Metabolism" project investigated enzyme capacities of human skin and RS models. The RS models were shown to have comparable metabolic capacity to native human skin, confirming their usefulness for testing of compounds with dermal exposure. The program has already helped to improve the initial test battery predictivity and the RS projects have provided sound support for their use as a follow-up test in the assessment of the genotoxic hazard of cosmetic ingredients in the absence of in vivo data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Measurement of DNA integrity in marine gastropods as biomarker of genotoxicity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.; Vashistha, D.; Gupta, N.; Malik, K.; Gaitonde, D.C.S.

    to identify the hot spot of pollution due to genotoxic compounds, the DNA damage was measured in terms of the loss of DNA integrity in marine gastropods due to the occurrence of DNA strand breaks following the technique of time dependent partially alkaline...

  19. Intermediate frequency magnetic field generated by a wireless power transmission device does not cause genotoxicity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Dejing; Zhu, Chunbo; Lu, Rengui; Mao, Shitong; Qi, Yanhua

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of intermediate frequency magnetic fields (IFMF) generated by a wireless power transmission (WPT) based on magnetic resonance from the perspective of cellular genotoxicity on cultured human lens epithelial cells (HLECs). We evaluated the effects of exposure to 90 kHz magnetic fields at 93.36 µT on cellular genotoxicity in vitro for 2 and 4 h. The magnetic flux density is approximately 3.5 times higher than the reference level recommended by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. For assessment of genotoxicity, we studied cellular proliferation, apoptosis and DNA damage by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, flow cytometry analysis, alkaline comet assay and phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX) foci formation test. We did not detect any effect of a 90 kHz IFMF generated by WPT based on magnetic resonance on cell proliferation, apoptosis, comet assay, and γH2AX foci formation test. Our results indicated that exposure to 90 kHz IFMF generated by WPT based on magnetic resonance at 93.36 µT for 2 and 4 h does not cause detectable cellular genotoxicity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Utilization of Photochemically Induced Fluorescence Detection for HPLC Determination of Genotoxic Impurities in the Vortioxetine Manufacturing Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douša, Michal; Doubský, Jan; Srbek, Jan

    2016-07-01

    An analytical reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for the detection and quantitative determination of two genotoxic impurities at ppm level present in the vortioxetine manufacturing process is described. Applying the concept of threshold of toxicological concern, a limit of 75 ppm each for both genotoxic impurities was calculated based on the maximum daily dose of active pharmaceutical ingredients. The novel reversed-phase HPLC method with photochemically induced fluorescence detection was developed on XSELECT Charged Surface Hybrid Phenyl-Hexyl column using the mobile phase consisted a mixture of 10 mM ammonium formate pH 3.0 and acetonitrile. The elution was performed using an isocratic composition of 48:52 (v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The photochemically induced fluorescence detection is based on the use of UV irradiation at 254 nm through measuring the fluorescence intensity at 300 nm and an excitation wavelength of 272 nm to produce fluorescent derivatives of both genotoxic impurities. The online photochemical conversion and detection is easily accomplished for two expected genotoxic impurities and provides a sufficiently low limit detection and quantification for the target analysis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. QSAR pre-screen of 70,983 substances for genotoxic carcinogenicity, mutagenicity and developmental toxicity in the EU FP7 project ChemScreen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedebye, Eva Bay; Dybdahl, Marianne; Nikolov, Nikolai Georgiev

    2014-01-01

    be performed in REACH on known genotoxic carcinogens or germ cell mutagens with appropriate risk management measures implemented, a QSAR pre-screen for genotoxic carcinogenicity, germ cell mutagenicity and (limited) developmental toxicity was included in the project. Predictions for estrogenic and anti...... algorithms were applied to combine the predictions from the individual models to reach overall predictions for genotoxic carcinogenicity, germ cell mutagenicity and developmental toxicity. Furthermore, the full list of REACH pre-registered substances (143,835) was searched for substances containing certain...

  2. Genotoxicity of water from the Songhua River, China, in 1994-1995 and 2002-2003: Potential risks for human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiaren; Dong Hongwei; Tang Xuanle; Sun Xiangrong; Han Xiaohui; Chen Bingqing; Sun Changhao; Yang Baofeng

    2009-01-01

    A previous study showed that the cancer mortalities are higher for residents who lived nearby the Songhua River heavily polluted by organic contamination. It is important to determine its risk of carcinogenic potential. Short-term genotoxic bio-assays using Salmonella, Sister Chromatid Exchange (SCE), and Micronuclei (MN) assays were employed to examine the genotoxic activity of ether extracts of water samples taken from the Songhua River. The results of the Salmonella bioassay indicated that there were indirect frame-shift mutagens in the water samples. A dose-response relationship for the SCE and MN assays was obtained. These results showed that organic extracts of water samples have genotoxic activity and the risk of carcinogenic potential to human health. The mutagenesis of water samples had changed compared to the results in 1994-1995. An increasing trend of risk of carcinogenic potential in the Songhua River after ten years should be noted and needs to be studied further. - Organic extracts of water samples taken from the Songhua River have genotoxic activity and the risk of carcinogenic potential to human health

  3. The Vitotox and ToxTracker assays: A two-test combination for quick and reliable assessment of genotoxic hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Gamze; Favyts, Dorien; Hendriks, Giel; Derr, Remco; Mertens, Birgit; Verschaeve, Luc; Rogiers, Vera; Y Doktorova, Tatyana

    2016-11-01

    To ensure safety for humans, it is essential to characterize the genotoxic potential of new chemical entities, such as pharmaceutical and cosmetic substances. In a first tier, a battery of in vitro tests is recommended by international regulatory agencies. However, these tests suffer from inadequate specificity: compounds may be wrongly categorized as genotoxic, resulting in unnecessary, time-consuming, and expensive in vivo follow-up testing. In the last decade, novel assays (notably, reporter-based assays) have been developed in an attempt to overcome these drawbacks. Here, we have investigated the performance of two in vitro reporter-based assays, Vitotox and ToxTracker. A set of reference compounds was selected to span a variety of mechanisms of genotoxic action and applicability domains (e.g., pharmaceutical and cosmetic ingredients). Combining the performance of the two assays, we achieved 93% sensitivity and 79% specificity for prediction of gentoxicity for this set of compounds. Both assays permit quick high-throughput analysis of drug candidates, while requiring only small quantities of the test substances. Our study shows that these two assays, when combined, can be a reliable method for assessment of genotoxicity hazard. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Genotoxicity induced by Taenia solium and its reduction by immunization with calreticulin in a hamster model of taeniosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Ana María; Mendlovic, Fela; Cruz-Rivera, Mayra; Chávez-Talavera, Oscar; Sordo, Monserrat; Avila, Guillermina; Flisser, Ana; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia

    2013-06-01

    Genotoxicity induced by neurocysticercosis has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo in humans. The adult stage of Taenia solium lodges in the small intestine and is the main risk factor to acquire neurocysticercosis, nevertheless its carcinogenic potential has not been evaluated. In this study, we determined the genotoxic effect of T. solium infection in the hamster model of taeniosis. In addition, we assessed the effect of oral immunization with recombinant T. solium calreticulin (rTsCRT) plus cholera toxin as adjuvant on micronuclei induction, as this protein has been shown to induce 33-44% protection in the hamster model of taeniosis. Blood samples were collected from the orbital venous plexus of noninfected and infected hamsters at different days postinfection, as well as from orally immunized animals, to evaluate the frequency of micronucleated reticulocytes as a measure of genotoxicity induced by parasite exposure and rTsCRT vaccination. Our results indicate that infection with T. solium caused time-dependent DNA damage in vivo and that rTsCRT immunization reduced the genotoxic damage induced by the presence of the tapeworms. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Air quality biomonitoring: assessment of air pollution genotoxicity in the Province of Novara (North Italy) by using Trifolium repens L. and molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piraino, F; Aina, R; Palin, L; Prato, N; Sgorbati, S; Santagostino, A; Citterio, S

    2006-12-15

    Mixed air pollutants are considered a major cause of DNA damage in living species. In this study Trifolium repens L. cv Regal was used as a bioindicator to assess the genotoxicity of air stressors in the Italian province of Novara. Two on-site biomonitoring experiments were performed during the spring and autumn of 2004. Test plants were exposed at 19 monitoring sites distributed homogeneously throughout the province, and each experiment lasted for a period of 6 weeks. Genotoxicity was evaluated with Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) molecular markers. The results show the predominantly rural central-west region of the Novara Province to have the worst air quality with regard to genotoxicity. Analyses of geomorphology, land use and climatic factors suggest that the compromised air quality in the region could be attributed to wind strength and direction, transporting pollution from vehicular traffic on the A4 highway and from the urban/industrialized centres of Novara and Vercelli. Plant growth, changes in plant photochemical efficiency and the presence of ozone related leaf injuries were also measured to better interpret the results of genotoxicity. Statistical analyses show that although climatic factors such as light intensity and temperature influence plant growth, they do not contribute to atmospheric stressor-induced DNA damage. Further analyses indicated that, as expected, a mixture of genotoxic and non-genotoxic pollutants coexist in the Novara Province troposphere, and that the elevated ozone concentrations experienced during the study may have contributed to the DNA damage in the tested plants by enhancing genotoxicity via interaction with other air stressors.

  6. Protective Effects of Quercetin against Dimethoate-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Allium sativum Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Waseem; Shaikh, Sibhghatulla; Nazam, Nazia; Lone, Mohammad Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was directed to study the possible protective activity of quercetin-a natural antioxidant against dimethoate-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in meristematic cells of Allium sativum. So far there is no report on the biological properties of quercetin in plant test systems. Chromosome breaks, multipolar anaphase, stick chromosome, and mitotic activity were undertaken in the current study as markers of cyto- and genotoxicity. Untreated control, quercetin controls (@ 5, 10 and 20 μg/mL for 3 h), and dimethoate exposed groups (@ 100 and 200 μg/mL for 3 h) were maintained. For protection against cytogenotoxicity, the root tip cells treated with dimethoate at 100 and 200 μg/mL for 3 h and quercetin treatment at 5, 10, and 20 μg/mL for 16 h, prior to dimethoate treatment, were undertaken. Quercetin was found to be neither cytotoxic nor genotoxic in Allium sativum control at these doses. A significant increase (P Allium. Pretreatment of Allium sativum with quercetin significantly (P Allium sativum that resides, at least in part, on its antioxidant effects.

  7. IWGT report on quantitative approaches to genotoxicity risk assessment II. Use of point-of-departure (PoD) metrics in defining acceptable exposure limits and assessing human risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, James T; Frötschl, Roland; White, Paul A; Crump, Kenny S; Eastmond, David A; Fukushima, Shoji; Guérard, Melanie; Hayashi, Makoto; Soeteman-Hernández, Lya G; Johnson, George E; Kasamatsu, Toshio; Levy, Dan D; Morita, Takeshi; Müller, Lutz; Schoeny, Rita; Schuler, Maik J; Thybaud, Véronique

    2015-05-01

    This is the second of two reports from the International Workshops on Genotoxicity Testing (IWGT) Working Group on Quantitative Approaches to Genetic Toxicology Risk Assessment (the QWG). The first report summarized the discussions and recommendations of the QWG related to the need for quantitative dose-response analysis of genetic toxicology data, the existence and appropriate evaluation of threshold responses, and methods to analyze exposure-response relationships and derive points of departure (PoDs) from which acceptable exposure levels could be determined. This report summarizes the QWG discussions and recommendations regarding appropriate approaches to evaluate exposure-related risks of genotoxic damage, including extrapolation below identified PoDs and across test systems and species. Recommendations include the selection of appropriate genetic endpoints and target tissues, uncertainty factors and extrapolation methods to be considered, the importance and use of information on mode of action, toxicokinetics, metabolism, and exposure biomarkers when using quantitative exposure-response data to determine acceptable exposure levels in human populations or to assess the risk associated with known or anticipated exposures. The empirical relationship between genetic damage (mutation and chromosomal aberration) and cancer in animal models was also examined. It was concluded that there is a general correlation between cancer induction and mutagenic and/or clastogenic damage for agents thought to act via a genotoxic mechanism, but that the correlation is limited due to an inadequate number of cases in which mutation and cancer can be compared at a sufficient number of doses in the same target tissues of the same species and strain exposed under directly comparable routes and experimental protocols. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects caused by 153 Sm-EDTMP, combined with BrdU a thymidine analog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales A, E.; Ferro F, G.; Morales R, P.

    2006-01-01

    The ablation of the bone marrow previous to the transplant by means of radiation and chemical antineoplastics its affect indiscriminately to the healthy tissues and in particular those that are in proliferation. The objective of this work is to determine the effect of the incorporation from the BrdU to the DNA on the genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of the cells of the bone marrow caused by the radiopharmaceutical 153 Sm-EDTMP. The genotoxicity was determined by the rate of erythrocytes polychromatic micro nucleates (EPC-MN) and the cytotoxicity by the frequency of EPC. Both parameters determined in peripheral blood after the BrdU administration and 153 Sm-EDTMP. The combination of the BrdU and r1 radiopharmaceutical produced a bigger cytotoxicity that the radiation and the BrdU alone; on the other hand it produced a reduction of the EPC-MN produced by the radiation, suggesting that the cytotoxicity didn't allow the expression of the genotoxicity. (Author)

  9. Randomly amplified polymorphic-DNA analysis for detecting genotoxic effects of Boron on maize (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakcali, M Serdal; Kekec, Guzin; Uzonur, Irem; Alpsoy, Lokman; Tombuloglu, Huseyin

    2015-08-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the genotoxic effect of boron (B) on maize using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method. Experimental design was conducted under 0, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, 125, and 150 ppm B exposures, and physiological changes have revealed a sharp decrease in root growth rates from 28% to 85%, starting from 25 ppm to 150 ppm, respectively. RAPD-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis shows that DNA alterations are clearly observed from beginning to 100 ppm. B-induced inhibition in root growth had a positive correlation with DNA alterations. Total soluble protein, root and stem lengths, and B content analysis in root and leaves encourage these results as a consequence. These preliminary findings reveal that B causes chromosomal aberration and genotoxic effects on maize. Meanwhile, usage of RAPD-PCR technique is a suitable biomarker to detect genotoxic effect of B on maize and other crops for the future. © The Author(s) 2013.

  10. Resistência antimicrobiana em Salmonella Enteritidis isoladas de amostras clínicas e ambientais de frangos de corte e matrizes pesadas Antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella Enteritidis isolated from clinical and environmental broiler chickens and breeders broiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Ribeiro

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella Enteritidis strains isolated from clinical and environmental poultry samples in the Southern Brazil during the years of 1999, 2000 and 2001 was evaluated. Among the 79 isolated samples, 64 (81% were resistant to at least one of the antimicrobial agents tested, showing 22 different resistance patterns. Tetracycline showed the highest percentage (64,5% of resistance among the antimicrobial agents used. Resistance to drugs at different levels was found as the following: ampicillin (1.2%, kanamycin (1.2%, ciprofloxacin (2.5%, enrofloxacin (8.8%, gentamicin (21.5%, streptomycin (20.2%, nitrofurantoin (26.6%, and nalidixic acid (30.4%. None of the S. Enteritidis strains were resistant to chloramphenicol, norfloxacin, and polimycin B. Among the 64 S. Enteritidis strains that showed resistance, 43 (67.2% were resistant to two or more antimicrobial agents. Twenty-one (32.8% strains were resistant to only one of the antimicrobial agents, 14 to tetracycline, three to nalidixic acid, three to nitrofurantoin, and one to gentamycin. These antimicrobial resistance levels suggest a high occurrence of tetracycline resistant S. Enteritidis strains and resistance to two or more antimicrobial agents.

  11. Evaluation of Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Exposed In Vitro to Neonicotinoid Insecticides News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Calderón-Segura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Calypso (thiacloprid, Poncho (clothianidin, Gaucho (imidacloprid, and Jade (imidacloprid are commercial neonicotinoid insecticides, a new class of agrochemicals in México. However, genotoxic and cytotoxic studies have not been performed. In the present study, human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL were exposed in vitro to different concentrations of the four insecticides. The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects were evaluated using the alkaline comet and trypan blue dye exclusion assays. DNA damage was evaluated using two genotoxicity parameters: tail length and comet frequency. Exposure to 9.5×10-6 to 5.7×10-5 M Jade; 2.8×10-4 to 1.7×10-3 M Gaucho; 0.6×10-1 to 1.4×10-1 M Calypso; 1.2×10-1 to 9.5×10-1 M Poncho for 2 h induced a significant increase DNA damage with a concentration-dependent relationship. Jade was the most genotoxic of the four insecticides studied. Cytotoxicity was observed in cells exposed to 18×10-3 M Jade, 2.0×10-3 M Gaucho, 2.0×10-1 M Calypso, 1.07 M Poncho, and cell death occurred at 30×10-3 M Jade, 3.3×10-3 M Gaucho, 2.8×10-1 M Calypso, and 1.42 M Poncho. This study provides the first report of genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in PBL following in vitro exposure to commercial neonicotinoid insecticides.

  12. Embryotoxicity and genotoxicity evaluation of sediments from Yangtze River estuary using zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Chen, Ling; Liu, Li; Wu, Lingling

    2016-03-01

    Sediments function both as a sink and a source of pollutants in aquatic ecosystems and may impose serious effects on benthic organisms and human health. As one of the largest estuaries in the world, the Yangtze River estuary suffers from abundant wastewater from the coastal cities. In this study, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were employed in the fish embryo test and a comet assay to evaluate the embryotoxicity and genotoxicity of the sediments from the Yangtze River estuary, respectively. Results showed that the sediments from the Yangtze River estuary significantly increased mortality, induced development abnormalities, and reduced hatching rate and heart rate of zebrafish embryos after 96 h of exposure. Significant genotoxicity was observed in the samples relative to the controls. Relatively low-level embryotoxicity and genotoxicity of sediments were found in the Yangtze River compared with other river systems. Toxic responses were also discussed in relation to the analyzed organic contaminants in sediments. More attention should be paid to non-priority pollutant monitoring in the Yangtze River estuary.

  13. Anti-Genotoxic Potential of Bilirubin In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallner, Marlies; Antl, Nadja; Rittmannsberger, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The bile pigment bilirubin is a known antioxidant and is associated with protection from cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD) when present in too strong concentrations. Unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) might also possess anti-genotoxic potential by preventing oxidative damage to DNA. Moderately...... elevated bilirubin levels are found in individuals with Gilbert syndrome and more severe in the hyperbilirubinemic Gunn rat model. This study was therefore aimed to assess the levels of oxidative damage to DNA in Gilbert syndrome subjects and Gunn rats compared to matched controls. Seventy-six individuals...

  14. Acute effects of a prooxidant herbicide on the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Screening cytotoxicity and genotoxicity endpoints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esperanza, Marta; Cid, Ángeles; Herrero, Concepción; Rioboo, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Mitochondrial membrane potential constituted the most sensitive parameter assayed. • Several genotoxicity methods were applied for first time in ecotoxicological studies. • Oxidative DNA base damage (8-OHdG) was induced by paraquat exposure. • Cells with DNA strand breakage and subG1-nuclei increased in treated cultures. • Typical apoptosis hallmarks were observed in microalgal cells exposed to paraquat. - Abstract: Since recent evidence has demonstrated that many types of chemicals exhibit oxidative and/or genotoxic potential on living organisms, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and DNA damage are currently the best accepted paradigms to assess the potential hazardous biological effects of a wide range of contaminants. The goal of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of different cytotoxicity and genotoxicity responses on the model microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exposed to the prooxidant herbicide paraquat. In addition to the growth endpoint, cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential and presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assayed as potential markers of cytotoxicity using flow cytometry (FCM). To study the effects of paraquat on C. reinhardtii DNA, several genotoxicity approaches were implemented for the first time in an ecotoxicological study on microalgae. Oxidative DNA base damage was analysed by measuring the oxidative DNA lesion 8-OHdG by FCM. DNA fragmentation was analysed by different methods: comet assay, and cell cycle analysis by FCM, with a particular focus on the presence of subG1-nuclei. Finally, effects on morphology of nuclei were monitored through DAPI staining. The evaluation of these endpoints showed that several physiological and biochemical parameters reacted to oxidative stress disturbances with greater sensitivity than integrative parameters such as growth rates or cell viability. The experiments revealed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity (ROS formation, depolarization of

  15. Acute effects of a prooxidant herbicide on the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Screening cytotoxicity and genotoxicity endpoints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esperanza, Marta; Cid, Ángeles; Herrero, Concepción; Rioboo, Carmen, E-mail: carmen.rioboo@udc.es

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Mitochondrial membrane potential constituted the most sensitive parameter assayed. • Several genotoxicity methods were applied for first time in ecotoxicological studies. • Oxidative DNA base damage (8-OHdG) was induced by paraquat exposure. • Cells with DNA strand breakage and subG1-nuclei increased in treated cultures. • Typical apoptosis hallmarks were observed in microalgal cells exposed to paraquat. - Abstract: Since recent evidence has demonstrated that many types of chemicals exhibit oxidative and/or genotoxic potential on living organisms, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and DNA damage are currently the best accepted paradigms to assess the potential hazardous biological effects of a wide range of contaminants. The goal of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of different cytotoxicity and genotoxicity responses on the model microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exposed to the prooxidant herbicide paraquat. In addition to the growth endpoint, cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential and presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assayed as potential markers of cytotoxicity using flow cytometry (FCM). To study the effects of paraquat on C. reinhardtii DNA, several genotoxicity approaches were implemented for the first time in an ecotoxicological study on microalgae. Oxidative DNA base damage was analysed by measuring the oxidative DNA lesion 8-OHdG by FCM. DNA fragmentation was analysed by different methods: comet assay, and cell cycle analysis by FCM, with a particular focus on the presence of subG1-nuclei. Finally, effects on morphology of nuclei were monitored through DAPI staining. The evaluation of these endpoints showed that several physiological and biochemical parameters reacted to oxidative stress disturbances with greater sensitivity than integrative parameters such as growth rates or cell viability. The experiments revealed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity (ROS formation, depolarization of

  16. Neuroblastoma Cell Lines Are Refractory to Genotoxic Drug-Mediated Induction of Ligands for NK Cell-Activating Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Veneziani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma (NB, the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood, causes death in almost 15% of children affected by cancer. Treatment of neuroblastoma is based on the combination of chemotherapy with other therapeutic interventions such as surgery, radiotherapy, use of differentiating agents, and immunotherapy. In particular, adoptive NK cell transfer is a new immune-therapeutic approach whose efficacy may be boosted by several anticancer agents able to induce the expression of ligands for NK cell-activating receptors, thus rendering cancer cells more susceptible to NK cell-mediated lysis. Here, we show that chemotherapeutic drugs commonly used for the treatment of NB such as cisplatin, topotecan, irinotecan, and etoposide are unable to induce the expression of activating ligands in a panel of NB cell lines. Consistently, cisplatin-treated NB cell lines were not more susceptible to NK cells than untreated cells. The refractoriness of NB cell lines to these drugs has been partially associated with the abnormal status of genes for ATM, ATR, Chk1, and Chk2, the major transducers of the DNA damage response (DDR, triggered by several anticancer agents and promoting different antitumor mechanisms including the expression of ligands for NK cell-activating receptors. Moreover, both the impaired production of reactive oxygen species (ROS in some NB cell lines and the transient p53 stabilization in response to our genotoxic drugs under our experimental conditions could contribute to inefficient induction of activating ligands. These data suggest that further investigations, exploiting molecular strategies aimed to potentiate the NK cell-mediated immunotherapy of NB, are warranted.

  17. Neuroblastoma Cell Lines Are Refractory to Genotoxic Drug-Mediated Induction of Ligands for NK Cell-Activating Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veneziani, Irene; Brandetti, Elisa; Ognibene, Marzia; Pezzolo, Annalisa; Pistoia, Vito

    2018-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB), the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood, causes death in almost 15% of children affected by cancer. Treatment of neuroblastoma is based on the combination of chemotherapy with other therapeutic interventions such as surgery, radiotherapy, use of differentiating agents, and immunotherapy. In particular, adoptive NK cell transfer is a new immune-therapeutic approach whose efficacy may be boosted by several anticancer agents able to induce the expression of ligands for NK cell-activating receptors, thus rendering cancer cells more susceptible to NK cell-mediated lysis. Here, we show that chemotherapeutic drugs commonly used for the treatment of NB such as cisplatin, topotecan, irinotecan, and etoposide are unable to induce the expression of activating ligands in a panel of NB cell lines. Consistently, cisplatin-treated NB cell lines were not more susceptible to NK cells than untreated cells. The refractoriness of NB cell lines to these drugs has been partially associated with the abnormal status of genes for ATM, ATR, Chk1, and Chk2, the major transducers of the DNA damage response (DDR), triggered by several anticancer agents and promoting different antitumor mechanisms including the expression of ligands for NK cell-activating receptors. Moreover, both the impaired production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in some NB cell lines and the transient p53 stabilization in response to our genotoxic drugs under our experimental conditions could contribute to inefficient induction of activating ligands. These data suggest that further investigations, exploiting molecular strategies aimed to potentiate the NK cell-mediated immunotherapy of NB, are warranted. PMID:29805983

  18. Xylo-Oligosaccharides and Inulin Affect Genotoxicity and Bacterial Populations Differently in a Human Colonic Simulator Challenged with Soy Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophersen, Claus T.; Petersen, Anne; Licht, Tine R.; Conlon, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    High dietary intakes of some protein sources, including soy protein, can increase colonic DNA damage in animals, whereas some carbohydrates attenuate this. We investigated whether inulin and xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS) could be protective against DNA strand breaks by adding them to a human colonic simulator consisting of a proximal vessel (PV) (pH 5.5) and a distal vessel (DV) (pH 6.8) inoculated with human faeces and media containing soy protein. Genotoxicity of the liquid phase and microbial population changes in the vessels were measured. Soy protein (3%) was fermented with 1% low amylose cornstarch for 10 day followed by soy protein with 1% XOS or 1% inulin for 10 day. Inulin did not alter genotoxicity but XOS significantly reduced PV genotoxicity and increased DV genotoxicity. Inulin and XOS significantly increased butyrate concentration in the DV but not PV. Numbers of the key butyrate-producing bacterium Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were significantly increased in the PV and DV by inulin but significantly decreased by XOS in both vessels. Other bacteria examined were also significantly impacted by the carbohydrate treatments or by the vessel (i.e., pH). There was a significant overall inverse correlation between levels of damage induced by the ferments and levels of sulphate-reducing bacteria, Bacteroides fragilis, and acetate. In conclusion, dietary XOS can potentially modulate the genotoxicity of the colonic environment and specific bacterial groups and short chain fatty acids may mediate this. PMID:24064573

  19. Amplification of arsenic genotoxicity by TiO2 nanoparticles in mammalian cells: new insights from physicochemical interactions and mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinan; Liu, Yun; Wang, Juan; Nie, Yaguang; Chen, Shaopeng; Hei, Tom K; Deng, Zhaoxiang; Wu, Lijun; Zhao, Guoping; Xu, An

    2017-10-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO 2 NPs) have shown great adsorption capacity for arsenic (As); however, the potential impact of TiO 2 NPs on the behavior and toxic responses of As remains largely unexplored. In the present study, we focused on the physicochemical interaction between TiO 2 NPs and As(III) to clarify the underlying mechanisms involved in their synergistic genotoxic effect on mammalian cells. Our data showed that As(III) mainly interacted with TiO 2 NPs by competitively occupying the sites of hydroxyl groups on the surface of TiO 2 NP aggregates, resulting in more aggregation of TiO 2 NPs. Although TiO 2 NPs at concentrations used here had no cytotoxic or genotoxic effects on cells, they efficiently increased the genotoxicity of As(III) in human-hamster hybrid (A L ) cells. The synergistic genotoxicity of TiO 2 NPs and As(III) was partially inhibited by various endocytosis pathway inhibitors while it was completely blocked by an As(III)-specific chelator. Using a mitochondrial membrane potential fluorescence probe, a reactive oxygen species (ROS) probe together with mitochondrial DNA-depleted ρ 0 A L cells, we discovered that mitochondria were essential for mediating the synergistic DNA-damaging effects of TiO 2 NPs and As(III). These data provide novel mechanistic proof that TiO 2 NPs enhanced the genotoxicity of As(III) via physicochemical interactions, which were mediated by mitochondria-dependent ROS.

  20. The cda GenoTox assay: A new and sensitive method for detection of environmental genotoxins, including nitroarenes and aromatic amines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Trine G.; Hansen, Lars Henrik; Binderup, Mona-Lise

    2007-01-01

    A new bacterial test system for detection of genotoxic compounds was developed, based on two new Sahnonella typhimurium tester strains, TGO1 and TGO2. Both strains contain a gene fusion between a strong SOS-promotor, P-cda, and the gfp gene, which allows detection of genotoxic compounds that indu...

  1. The use of dose-response data in a margin of exposure approach to carcinogenic risk assessment for genotoxic chemicals in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benford, Diane J

    2016-05-01

    Genotoxic substances are generally not permitted for deliberate use in food production. However, an appreciable number of known or suspected genotoxic substances occur unavoidably in food, e.g. from natural occurrence, environmental contamination and generation during cooking and processing. Over the past decade a margin of exposure (MOE) approach has increasingly been used in assessing the exposure to substances in food that are genotoxic and carcinogenic. The MOE is defined as a reference point on the dose-response curve (e.g. a benchmark dose lower confidences limit derived from a rodent carcinogenicity study) divided by the estimated human intake. A small MOE indicates a higher concern than a very large MOE. Whilst the MOE cannot be directly equated to risk, it supports prioritisation of substances for further research or for possible regulatory action, and provides a basis for communicating to the public. So far, the MOE approach has been confined to substances for which carcinogenicity data are available. In the absence of carcinogenicity data, evidence of genotoxicity is used only in hazard identification. The challenge to the genetic toxicology community is to develop approaches for characterising risk to human health based on data from genotoxicity studies. In order to achieve wide acceptance, it would be important to further address the issues that have been discussed in the context of dose-response modelling of carcinogenicity data in order to assign levels of concern to particular MOE values, and also whether it is possible to make generic conclusions on how potency in genotoxicity assays relates to carcinogenic potency. © Crown copyright 2015.

  2. QSAR ligand dataset for modelling mutagenicity, genotoxicity, and rodent carcinogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davy Guan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Five datasets were constructed from ligand and bioassay result data from the literature. These datasets include bioassay results from the Ames mutagenicity assay, Greenscreen GADD-45a-GFP assay, Syrian Hamster Embryo (SHE assay, and 2 year rat carcinogenicity assay results. These datasets provide information about chemical mutagenicity, genotoxicity and carcinogenicity.

  3. Genotoxicity evaluation of the insecticide ethion in root of Allium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the genotoxic effects of ethion were investigated in the mitotic cell division of Allium cepa. Primary roots of A. cepa were treated with various concentrations (25, 50, 75, and 100%) of ethion solutions for different duration of time. The result revealed that increase in the concentration and duration of treatment ...

  4. A tiered approach to the use of alternatives to animal testing for the safety assessment of cosmetics: genotoxicity. A COLIPA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfuhler, Stefan; Kirst, Annette; Aardema, Marilyn; Banduhn, Norbert; Goebel, Carsten; Araki, Daisuke; Costabel-Farkas, Margit; Dufour, Eric; Fautz, Rolf; Harvey, James; Hewitt, Nicola J; Hibatallah, Jalila; Carmichael, Paul; Macfarlane, Martin; Reisinger, Kerstin; Rowland, Joanna; Schellauf, Florian; Schepky, Andreas; Scheel, Julia

    2010-01-01

    For the assessment of genotoxic effects of cosmetic ingredients, a number of well-established and regulatory accepted in vitro assays are in place. A caveat to the use of these assays is their relatively low specificity and high rate of false or misleading positive results. Due to the 7th amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive ban on in vivo genotoxicity testing for cosmetics that was enacted March 2009, it is no longer possible to conduct follow-up in vivo genotoxicity tests for cosmetic ingredients positive in in vitro genotoxicity tests to further assess the relevance of the in vitro findings. COLIPA, the European Cosmetics Association, has initiated a research programme to improve existing and develop new in vitro methods. A COLIPA workshop was held in Brussels in April 2008 to analyse the best possible use of available methods and approaches to enable a sound assessment of the genotoxic hazard of cosmetic ingredients. Common approaches of cosmetic companies are described, with recommendations for evaluating in vitro genotoxins using non-animal approaches. A weight of evidence approach was employed to set up a decision-tree for the integration of alternative methods into tiered testing strategies. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Wild type p53 transcriptionally represses the SALL2 transcription factor under genotoxic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Farkas

    Full Text Available SALL2- a member of the Spalt gene family- is a poorly characterized transcription factor found deregulated in various cancers, which suggests it plays a role in the disease. We previously identified SALL2 as a novel interacting protein of neurotrophin receptors and showed that it plays a role in neuronal function, which does not necessarily explain why or how SALL2 is deregulated in cancer. Previous evidences indicate that SALL2 gene is regulated by the WT1 and AP4 transcription factors. Here, we identified SALL2 as a novel downstream target of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Bioinformatic analysis of the SALL2 gene revealed several putative p53 half sites along the promoter region. Either overexpression of wild-type p53 or induction of the endogenous p53 by the genotoxic agent doxorubicin repressed SALL2 promoter activity in various cell lines. However R175H, R249S, and R248W p53 mutants, frequently found in the tumors of cancer patients, were unable to repress SALL2 promoter activity, suggesting that p53 specific binding to DNA is important for the regulation of SALL2. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated binding of p53 to one of the identified p53 half sites in the Sall2 promoter, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed in vivo interaction of p53 with the promoter region of Sall2 containing this half site. Importantly, by using a p53ER (TAM knockin model expressing a variant of p53 that is completely dependent on 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen for its activity, we show that p53 activation diminished SALL2 RNA and protein levels during genotoxic cellular stress in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs and radiosensitive tissues in vivo. Thus, our finding indicates that p53 represses SALL2 expression in a context-specific manner, adding knowledge to the understanding of SALL2 gene regulation, and to a potential mechanism for its deregulation in cancer.

  6. Bioluminescence Detection of Cells Having Stabilized p53 in Response to a Genotoxic Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnawaz Rehemtulla

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Inactivation of p53 is one of the most frequent molecular events in neoplastic transformation. Approximately 60% of all human tumors have mutations in both p53 alleles. Wild-type p53 activity is regulated in large part by the proteosome-dependent degradation of p53, resulting in a short p53 half-life in unstressed and untransformed cells. Activation of p53 by a variety of stimuli, including DNA damage induced by genotoxic drugs or radiation, is accomplished by stabilization of wild-type p53. The stabilized and active p53 can result in either cell-cycle arrest or apoptosis. Surprisingly, the majority of tumor-associated, inactivating p53 mutations also result in p53 accumulation. Thus, constitutive elevation of p53 levels in cells is a reliable measure of p53 inactivation, whereas transiently increased p53 levels reflect a recent genotoxic stress. In order to facilitate noninvasive imaging of p53 accumulation, we here describe the construction of a p53-luciferase fusion protein. Induction of DNA damage in cells expressing the fusion protein resulted in a time-dependent accumulation of the fusion that was noninvasively detected using bioluminescence imaging and validated by Western blot analysis. The p53-Luc protein retains p53 function because its expression in HCT116 cells lacking functional p53 resulted in activation of p21 expression as well as induction of apoptosis in response to a DNA damaging event. Employed in a transgenic animal model, the proposed p53-reporter fusion protein will be useful for studying p53 activation in response to exposure to DNA-damaging carcinogenic agents. It could also be used to study p53 stabilization as a result of inactivating p53 mutations. Such studies will further our understanding of p53's role as the “guardian of the genome” and its function in tumorigenesis.

  7. Protective Effect of Curcumin against Ionizing Radiation (IR)-induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in HepG2 Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Dong Min; Nasir Uddin, S. M.; Ryu, Tae Ho; Kang, Mi Young; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Ionizing radiation (IR) has many practical applications such as medicine, foods, agricultures, industries, and research laboratories. However, the increasing use of radiation is associated with radiation accidents threatening human health. It is well known that exposure to IR gives rise to genomic alterations, mutagenesis, and cell death. IR is absorbed directly by DNA, leading to various DNA damages (single or double-strand breaks, base damage, and DNA-DNA or DNA-protein cross-linkages) in many living organisms. Therefore, the development of effective and nontoxic radioprotective agents is of considerable interest. Curcumin (C{sub 12}H{sub 20}O{sub 6}, structure is the major yellow component of Curcuma longa with biological activities (antioxidant, anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory properties). It has been widely used as food and medicine for a long time. The aim of our present study is to investigate the protective effects of curcumin against IR-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in cultured HepG2 cells.

  8. Protective Effect of Curcumin against Ionizing Radiation (IR)-induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in HepG2 Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Dong Min; Nasir Uddin, S. M.; Ryu, Tae Ho; Kang, Mi Young; Kim, Jin Kyu

    2013-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) has many practical applications such as medicine, foods, agricultures, industries, and research laboratories. However, the increasing use of radiation is associated with radiation accidents threatening human health. It is well known that exposure to IR gives rise to genomic alterations, mutagenesis, and cell death. IR is absorbed directly by DNA, leading to various DNA damages (single or double-strand breaks, base damage, and DNA-DNA or DNA-protein cross-linkages) in many living organisms. Therefore, the development of effective and nontoxic radioprotective agents is of considerable interest. Curcumin (C 12 H 20 O 6 , structure is the major yellow component of Curcuma longa with biological activities (antioxidant, anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory properties). It has been widely used as food and medicine for a long time. The aim of our present study is to investigate the protective effects of curcumin against IR-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in cultured HepG2 cells

  9. Genotoxic effects of vinclozolin on the aquatic insect Chironomus riparius (Diptera, Chironomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilino, Mónica; Sánchez-Argüello, Paloma; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2018-01-01

    Vinclozolin (Vz) is a pollutant found in aquatic environments whose antiandrogenic effects in reproduction are well known in mammals. Although its reproductive effects have been less studied in invertebrates, other effects, including genotoxicity, have been described. Therefore, in this work, we studied the genotoxic effects of Vz in the freshwater benthic invertebrate Chironomus riparius. DNA damage was evaluated with the comet assay (tail area, olive moment, tail moment and % DNA in tail), and the transcriptional levels of different genes involved in DNA repair (ATM, NLK and XRCC1) and apoptosis (DECAY) were measured by RT-PCR. Fourth instar larvae of C. riparius, were exposed to Vz for 24 h at 20 and 200 μg/L. The Vz exposures affected the DNA integrity in this organism, since a dose-response relationship occurred, with DNA strand breaks significantly increased with increased dose for tail area, olive moment and tail moment parameters. Additionally, the lower concentration of Vz produced a significant induction of the transcripts of three genes under study (ATM, NLK and XRCC1) showing the activation of the cellular repair mechanism. In contrast, the expression of these genes with the highest concentration were downregulated, indicating failure of the cellular repair mechanism, which would explain the higher DNA damage. These data report for the first time the alterations of Vz on gene transcription of an insect and confirm the potential genotoxicity of this compound on freshwater invertebrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Genotoxicity in earthworm after combined treatment of ionising radiation and mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Tae Ho; Kim, Jin Kyu; An, Kwang-Guk

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the acute genotoxic effects of mercury and radiation on earthworms (Eisenia fetida). The levels of DNA damage and the repair kinetics in the coelomocytes of E. fetida treated with mercuric chloride (HgCl 2 ) and ionising radiation (gamma rays) were analysed by means of the comet assay. For detection of DNA damage and repair, E. fetida was exposed to HgCl 2 (0-160 mg kg -1 ) and irradiated with gamma rays (0-50 Gy) in vivo. The increase in DNA damage depended on the concentration of mercury or dose of radiation. The results showed that the more the oxidative stress induced by mercury and radiation the longer the repair time that was required. When a combination of HgCl 2 and gamma rays was applied, the cell damage was much higher than those treated with HgCl 2 or radiation alone, which indicated that the genotoxic effects were increased after the combined treatment of mercury and radiation. (authors)

  11. Study of the Prevalence of Causative Bacterial&Protozoal Agents of in Stool Samples of 470 Gastroenteritis Patients Referring to the Nikoopour Clinic in Yazd,Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Sharifi

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Interoduction: Gasteroenteritis is one of the problems worth consideration all over the world. It is one of the important causes of mortality, especially in children < 5 years of age, in developing countries including Iran. The aim of this descriptive study was to determine the demographic conditions influencing the presence of causative bacteria and protozoa, followed by antibiograms of isolated bacteria from stool samples of patients with gasteroenteritis referring to Nikoopour Clinic in the city of Yazd, Iran from 1998 – 2001. Materials and method: A total of 470 samples were microbiologically examined by direct method, culture and then antibiogramed. In order to isolate the possible bacteria, differential and selected media were used. Also, wet – mount technique was applied for detection of protozoa. Results: Results revealed that 272 samples (57.9% were infected by pathogenic bacteria or protozoa. 138 (50.8% pathogenic specimens were from male patients and the remaining 134(49.3% were from female patients. Isolated species were: Enteropathogenic E.coli 117(43%, Shigella 51(18.8%, Salmonella.interetidis 25(9.2%, C.jejuni 16(5.9%, Giardia lambdia 51(18.8% and Amoebae spp 12(4.4%. The most commonly detected shigella species was dysenteriae, (74.5% while boydii with 2% was the least common type observed in the specimens. Except shigella, all the other bacteria were more common in males than female, but insignificant statistically. In order to determine the sensitivity and/or resistance of pathogenic bacteria, antibiogram test was performed using selected antibiotic disks such as Ampicillin, Nalidixic Acid, Ciprofloxacin, Gentamycin and Sulfamethaxazole. Conclusion: Results revealed that some patients were probably infected by pathogenic factors other than bacteria or protozoa. Since all viruses and parasites are almost resistant to antibiotics and on the other hand, administration of antibiotics may lead to resistance of bacterial agents

  12. Antibiotic-Mediated Inhibition of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV Infection: A Novel Quinolone Function Which Potentiates the Antiviral Cytokine Response in MARC-145 Cells and Pig Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. Cafruny

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV is an economically significant agent for which there currently are no effective treatments. Development of antiviral agents for PRRSV as well as many other viruses has been limited by toxicity of known antiviral compounds. In contrast, antibiotics for non-virus microbial infections have been widely useful, in part because of their acceptable toxicity in animals. We report here the discovery that the quinolonecontaining compound Plasmocin™, as well as the quinolones nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin, have potent anti-PRRSV activity in vitro. PRRSV replication was inhibited by these antibiotics in both cultured MARC-145 cells and cultured primary alveolar porcine macrophages (PAMs. Furthermore, sub-optimal concentrations of nalidixic acid synergized with antiviral cytokines (AK-2 or IFN-γ to quantitatively and qualitatively inhibit PRRSV replication in MARC-145 cells or PAMs. The antiviral activity of Plasmocin and nalidixic acid correlated with reduced actin expression in MARC-145 cells. Replication of the related lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV was also inhibited in primary mouse macrophages by Plasmocin. These results are significant to the development of antiviral strategies with potentially reduced toxicity, and provide a model system to better understand regulation of arterivirus replication.

  13. Genotoxic action of sunlight upon Bacillus subtilis spores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munakata, Nobuo

    1989-01-01

    Samples of Bacillus subtilis spores dried on membrane filter were exposed to natural sunlight from solar-noon time at Tokyo. The survival and mutation induction of wild-type (UVR) and repair-deficient (UVS) spores were determined on 66 occasions since 1979. Two of the values were considered to be useful in monitoring solar UV intensity; the inverse of the time (in minutes) of exposure to kill 63% of the UVS spores ('sporocidal index') and the induced mutation frequency at 60 minutes of exposure of the UVR spores ('mutagenic index'). Both values were varied greatly due to time of a year, weather and other conditions. Estimates of year-round changes under clear skies were obtained by connecting the maximum values attained in these years. In these curves, there are more than 7-fold differences in the genotoxicity between winter and summer months, with major increases observed in early spring and decreases through autumn. Using a series of UV cut-off filters, the wavelengths most effective for the sporocidal actions were estimated to be in the range of 308 - 325 nm, shorter wavelengths being effective when the genotoxicity was higher. Sunburn meter of Robertson-Berger type seems to respond to slightly longer wavelength components of the solar spectrum. However, a reasonable correlation was obtained between the reading of the meter and the sporocidal index. (author)

  14. Identification of early target genes of aflatoxin B1 in human hepatocytes, inter-individual variability and comparison with other genotoxic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josse, Rozenn; Dumont, Julie; Fautrel, Alain; Robin, Marie-Anne; Guillouzo, André

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression profiling has recently emerged as a promising approach to identify early target genes and discriminate genotoxic carcinogens from non-genotoxic carcinogens and non-carcinogens. However, early gene changes induced by genotoxic compounds in human liver remain largely unknown. Primary human hepatocytes and differentiated HepaRG cells were exposed to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) that induces DNA damage following enzyme-mediated bioactivation. Gene expression profile changes induced by a 24 h exposure of these hepatocyte models to 0.05 and 0.25 μM AFB1 were analyzed by using oligonucleotide pangenomic microarrays. The main altered signaling pathway was the p53 pathway and related functions such as cell cycle, apoptosis and DNA repair. Direct involvement of the p53 protein in response to AFB1 was verified by using siRNA directed against p53. Among the 83 well-annotated genes commonly modulated in two pools of three human hepatocyte populations and HepaRG cells, several genes were identified as altered by AFB1 for the first time. In addition, a subset of 10 AFB1-altered genes, selected upon basis of their function or tumor suppressor role, was tested in four human hepatocyte populations and in response to other chemicals. Although they exhibited large variable inter-donor fold-changes, several of these genes, particularly FHIT, BCAS3 and SMYD3, were found to be altered by various direct and other indirect genotoxic compounds and unaffected by non-genotoxic compounds. Overall, this comprehensive analysis of early gene expression changes induced by AFB1 in human hepatocytes identified a gene subset that included several genes representing potential biomarkers of genotoxic compounds. -- Highlights: ► Gene expression profile changes induced by aflatoxin B1 in human hepatocytes. ► AFB1 modulates various genes including tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes. ► Important inter-individual variations in the response to AFB1. ► Some genes also altered by other

  15. Diagnosis of Constitutional Mismatch Repair-Deficiency Syndrome Based on Microsatellite Instability and Lymphocyte Tolerance to Methylating Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodo, Sahra; Colas, Chrystelle; Buhard, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Patients with bi-allelic germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, or PMS2) develop a rare but severe variant of Lynch syndrome called constitutional MMR deficiency (CMMRD). This syndrome is characterized by early-onset colorectal cancers, lymphomas...... or leukemias, and brain tumors. There is no satisfactory method for diagnosis of CMMRD because screens for mutations in MMR genes are noninformative for 30% of patients. MMR-deficient cancer cells are resistant to genotoxic agents and have microsatellite instability (MSI), due to accumulation of errors...

  16. Decisions to regulate genotoxic substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengtsson, G

    1988-07-01

    Decisions to regulate genotoxic substances involve trade-offs between various incomparable factors such as risks to human health and other environmental risks, public perceptions, costs and uncertainties. Two different approaches towards these trade-offs are discussed. In one approach, all relevant factors are defined and trade-offs are considered using a general and very elaborate analysis. Cost-benefit analysis is an exponent of this approach. An illustration is given for the regulation of transboundary releases of radioactive materials. The other approach considers what is politically feasible for the time being and seeks a decision with much room for later corrections. Incrementalism is a philosophy in this vein. It is illustrated by reference to the regulation of transboundary air pollution. Weaknesses and strengths of the two approaches are discussed. (author)

  17. Decisions to regulate genotoxic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, G.

    1988-01-01

    Decisions to regulate genotoxic substances involve trade-offs between various incomparable factors such as risks to human health and other environmental risks, public perceptions, costs and uncertainties. Two different approaches towards these trade-offs are discussed. In one approach, all relevant factors are defined and trade-offs are considered using a general and very elaborate analysis. Cost-benefit analysis is an exponent of this approach. An illustration is given for the regulation of transboundary releases of radioactive materials. The other approach considers what is politically feasible for the time being and seeks a decision with much room for later corrections. Incrementalism is a philosophy in this vein. It is illustrated by reference to the regulation of transboundary air pollution. Weaknesses and strengths of the two approaches are discussed. (author)

  18. Genotoxic activities of the food contaminant 5-hydroxymethylfurfural using different in vitro bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, Isabelle; Dumont, Coralie; Jondeau-Cabaton, Adeline; Graillot, Vanessa; Chagnon, Marie-Christine

    2010-02-01

    5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) is known as an indicator of quality deterioration in a wide range of foods. 5-HMF is formed as an intermediate in the Maillard reaction and has been identified in a wide variety of heat-processed foods. In recent years, the presence of 5-HMF in foods has raised toxicological concerns: data have shown cytotoxic, genotoxic and tumoral effects but further studies suggest that 5-HMF does not pose a serious health risk. However the subject is still a matter of debate. We investigated the genotoxicity of the food-borne contaminant 5-HMF using the Ames test, the micronucleus (MN) and the single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assays in the human metabolically active HepG2 cell line. Cytotoxic effect of 5-HMF was first assessed using Alamar Blue as a sensitive sub-lethal assay. 5-HMF did not induce any genic mutation in bacteria whatever the concentration in the Ames test. Furthermore, it does not induce clastogenic or aneugenic effects in the HepG2 cells. In contrast, 5-HMF induced HepG2 DNA damage at concentrations from 7.87 to 25 mM in the comet assay suggesting a weak genotoxic effect of 5-HMF in the HepG2 cells probably repaired. 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. High-throughput in vivo genotoxicity testing: an automated readout system for the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Lombardot

    Full Text Available Genotoxicity testing is an important component of toxicity assessment. As illustrated by the European registration, evaluation, authorization, and restriction of chemicals (REACH directive, it concerns all the chemicals used in industry. The commonly used in vivo mammalian tests appear to be ill adapted to tackle the large compound sets involved, due to throughput, cost, and ethical issues. The somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART represents a more scalable alternative, since it uses Drosophila, which develops faster and requires less infrastructure. Despite these advantages, the manual scoring of the hairs on Drosophila wings required for the SMART limits its usage. To overcome this limitation, we have developed an automated SMART readout. It consists of automated imaging, followed by an image analysis pipeline that measures individual wing genotoxicity scores. Finally, we have developed a wing score-based dose-dependency approach that can provide genotoxicity profiles. We have validated our method using 6 compounds, obtaining profiles almost identical to those obtained from manual measures, even for low-genotoxicity compounds such as urethane. The automated SMART, with its faster and more reliable readout, fulfills the need for a high-throughput in vivo test. The flexible imaging strategy we describe and the analysis tools we provide should facilitate the optimization and dissemination of our methods.

  20. Evaluation of genotoxic effects caused by extracts of chlorinated drinking water using a combination of three different bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qiang; Zhang, Shao-Hui; Liao, Jing; Miao, Dong-Yue; Wang, Xin-Yi; Yang, Pan; Yun, Luo-Jia; Liu, Ai-Lin; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2015-10-15

    Potential genotoxic effects of chlorinated drinking water now are of a great concern. In this study, raw water, finished water, and tap water from a water plant in Wuhan, China were collected in two different sampling times of the year (January and July). Genotoxic effects of water extracts were evaluated using a combination of three different bioassays: SOS/umu test, HGPRT gene mutation assay, and micronucleus assay, which were separately used to detect DNA damage, gene mutation, and chromosome aberration. The results of three different bioassays showed that all water samples in January and July induced at least one types of genotoxic effects, of which the DNA-damage effects were all detectable. The levels of DNA-damage effects and gene-mutation effects of finished water and tap water in January were higher than those in July. Chlorination could increase the DNA-damage effects of drinking water in January and the gene-mutation effects of drinking water in both January and July, but did not increase the chromosome-aberration effects of drinking water in both January and July. Our results highlighted the importance of using a combination of different bioassays to evaluate the genotoxicity of water samples in different seasons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Significance and nature of bystander responses induced by various agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Neha; Tiku, Ashu Bhan

    2017-07-01

    Bystander effects in a biological system are the responses shown by non-targeted neighbouring cells/tissues/organisms. These responses are triggered by factors released from targeted cells when exposed to a stress inducing agent. The biological response to stress inducing agents is complex, owing to the diversity of mechanisms and pathways activated in directly targeted and bystander cells. These responses are highly variable and can be either beneficial or hazardous depending on the cell lines tested, dose of agent used, experimental end points and time course selected. Recently non-targeted cells have even been reported to rescue the directly exposed cells by releasing protective signals that might be induced by non-targeted bystander responses. The nature of bystander signal/s is not yet clear. However, there are evidences suggesting involvement of ROS, RNS, protein factors and even DNA molecules leading to the activation of a number of signaling pathways. These can act independently or in a cascade, to induce events leading to changes in gene expression patterns that could elicit detrimental or beneficial effects. Many review articles on radiation induced bystander responses have been published. However, to the best of our knowledge, a comprehensive review on bystander responses induced by other genotoxic chemicals and stress inducing agents has not been published so far. Therefore, the aim of the present review is to give an overview of the literature on different aspects of bystander responses: agents that induce these responses, factors that can modulate bystander responses and the mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Genotoxic effects and oxidative stress induced by organic extracts of particulate matter(PM 10)collected from a subway tunnel in Seoul, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Mi Hyun; Kim, Ha Ryong; Park, Yong Joo; Park, Duck Shin; Chung, Kyu Hyuck; Oh, Seung Min

    2012-12-12

    Particulate matter (PM) has become an important health risk factor in our society. PM can easily deposit in the bronchi and lungs, causing diverse diseases such as respiratory infections, lung cancers and cardiovascular diseases. In recent days, more and more toxicological studies have been dealing with air particles in distinctive areas including industrial areas, transportation sites, or indoors. Studies on subway PM in particular, have been recognizing PM as an important health risk factor because many people use subways as a major mode of public transportation (4 million people a day in Korea). The main aim of the present study was to evaluate the genotoxic effects of organic extract (OE) of subway PM10 and potential attribution of PAHs to these effects. Particles were collected in the subway tunnel at Kil-eum station(Line 4) for one month and then extracted with Dichloromethane (DCM). Chinese Hamster Ovary cells(CHO-K1) and human normal bronchial cells (BEAS-2B) were exposed to OE, and MN and Comet assays were conducted to analyze the genotoxicity. The results showed that OE increased DNA or chromosome damages in both cell lines. In the modified Comet assay and MN assay with free radical scavengers, we confirmed that the genotoxic effect of OE was partially due to the oxidative damage on DNA. DCFHD Aassay also indicated that OE induced ROS generation in BEAS-2B cells. PAHs [benzo(a)anthracene,benzo(k)fluoranthrene, etc.], the most well-known carcinogens in polluted air, were detected in Kil-eum PM10. In conclusion, our findings confirmed that OE of subway PM10 has genotoxic effects on normal human lung cells, and oxidative stress could be one of the major mechanisms of these genotoxic effects.In addition, some genotoxic and carcinogenic PAHs were detected in OE by GC/MS/MS, even though PAHs level was not enough to increase CYP1A1 gene. Therefore, we suggest that additive or synergistic effects by unidentified chemicals as well as PAHs contained in OE of subway

  3. The comet assay in testing the potential genotoxicity of nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaya Azqueta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last two decades the production and use of nanomaterials (NMs has impressively increased. Their small size, given a mass equal to that of the corresponding bulk material, implies an increase in the surface area and consequently in the number of atoms that can be reactive. They possess different physical, chemical and biological properties compared to bulk materials of the same composition, which makes them very interesting and valuable for many different applications in technology, energy, construction, electronics, agriculture, optics, paints, textiles, food, cosmetics, medicine... Toxicological assessment of NMs is crucial; the same properties that make them interesting also make them potentially harmful for health and the environment. However, the term NM covers many different kinds of particle , and so there is no simple, standard approach to assessing their toxicity. NMs can enter the cell, interact with cell components and even penetrate the nucleus and interfere with the genetic material. Among the different branches of toxicology, genotoxicity is a main area of concern since it is closely related with the carcinogenic potential of compounds. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD has published internationally agreed in vitro and in vivo validated test methods to evaluate different genotoxic endpoints of chemicals, including chromosome and gene mutations, and DNA breaks. However not all the assays are suitable to study the genotoxic potential of NMs as has been shown by the OECD Working Party on Manufactured Nanomaterials (WPMN. Moreover, alterations to DNA bases, which are precursors to mutations and of great importance in elucidating the mechanism of action of NMs, are not covered by the OECD guidelines. The in vivo standard comet assay (which measures DNA breaks and alkali-labile sites was included in the OECD assays battery in September 2014 while the in vitro standard comet assay is currently under

  4. Genotoxicity assessment of membrane concentrates of landfill leachate treated with Fenton reagent and UV-Fenton reagent using human hepatoma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guifang [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Lu, Gang [Key Laboratory of Water/Soil Toxic Pollutants Control and Bioremediation of Guangdong Higher Education Institutes, Department of Environmental Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Yin, Pinghe, E-mail: tyinph@jnu.edu.cn [Research Center of Analysis and Test, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Zhao, Ling, E-mail: zhaoling@jnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Water/Soil Toxic Pollutants Control and Bioremediation of Guangdong Higher Education Institutes, Department of Environmental Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Jimmy Yu, Qiming [Griffith School of Engineering, Griffith University, Nathan Campus, Brisbane, Queensland 4111 (Australia)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Membrane concentrates have a threat to human health and environment. • Untreated membrane concentrates induces cytotoxic and genotoxic to HepG2 cells. • Both methods were effective method for degradation of BPA and NP in concentrates. • Both methods were efficient in reducing genotoxic effects of concentrates. • UV-Fenton reagent had higher removal efficiency and provides toxicological safety. - Abstract: Membrane concentrates of landfill leachates contain organic and inorganic contaminants that could be highly toxic and carcinogenic. In this paper, the genotoxicity of membrane concentrates before and after Fenton and UV-Fenton reagent was assessed. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity was determined by using the methods of methyltetrazolium (MTT), cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) and comet assay in human hepatoma cells. MTT assay showed a cytotoxicity of 75% after 24 h of exposure to the highest tested concentration of untreated concentrates, and no cytotoxocity for UV-Fenton and Fenton treated concentrates. Both CBMN and comet assays showed increased levels of genotoxicity in cells exposed to untreated concentrates, compared to those occurred in cells exposed to UV-Fenton and Fenton reagent treated concentrates. There was no significant difference between negative control and UV-Fenton treated concentrates for micronucleus and comet assay parameters. UV-Fenton and Fenton treatment, especially the former, were effective methods for degradation of bisphenol A and nonylphenol in concentrates. These findings showed UV-Fenton and Fenton reaction were effective methods for treatment of such complex concentrates, UV-Fenton reagent provided toxicological safety of the treated effluent, and the genotoxicity assays were found to be feasible tools for assessment of toxicity risks of complex concentrates.

  5. Genotoxicity assessment of membrane concentrates of landfill leachate treated with Fenton reagent and UV-Fenton reagent using human hepatoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Guifang; Lu, Gang; Yin, Pinghe; Zhao, Ling; Jimmy Yu, Qiming

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Membrane concentrates have a threat to human health and environment. • Untreated membrane concentrates induces cytotoxic and genotoxic to HepG2 cells. • Both methods were effective method for degradation of BPA and NP in concentrates. • Both methods were efficient in reducing genotoxic effects of concentrates. • UV-Fenton reagent had higher removal efficiency and provides toxicological safety. - Abstract: Membrane concentrates of landfill leachates contain organic and inorganic contaminants that could be highly toxic and carcinogenic. In this paper, the genotoxicity of membrane concentrates before and after Fenton and UV-Fenton reagent was assessed. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity was determined by using the methods of methyltetrazolium (MTT), cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) and comet assay in human hepatoma cells. MTT assay showed a cytotoxicity of 75% after 24 h of exposure to the highest tested concentration of untreated concentrates, and no cytotoxocity for UV-Fenton and Fenton treated concentrates. Both CBMN and comet assays showed increased levels of genotoxicity in cells exposed to untreated concentrates, compared to those occurred in cells exposed to UV-Fenton and Fenton reagent treated concentrates. There was no significant difference between negative control and UV-Fenton treated concentrates for micronucleus and comet assay parameters. UV-Fenton and Fenton treatment, especially the former, were effective methods for degradation of bisphenol A and nonylphenol in concentrates. These findings showed UV-Fenton and Fenton reaction were effective methods for treatment of such complex concentrates, UV-Fenton reagent provided toxicological safety of the treated effluent, and the genotoxicity assays were found to be feasible tools for assessment of toxicity risks of complex concentrates.

  6. Hexavalent Chromium Is Cytotoxic and Genotoxic to Hawksbill Sea Turtle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sandra S.; Xie, Hong; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Thompson, W. Douglas; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-01-01

    Sea turtles are a charismatic and ancient ocean species and can serve as key indicators for ocean ecosystems, including coral reefs and sea grass beds as well as coastal beaches. Genotoxicity studies in the species are absent, limiting our understanding of the impact of environmental toxicants on sea turtles. Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a ubiquitous environmental problem worldwide, and recent studies show it is a global marine pollutant of concern. Thus, we evaluated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate Cr(VI) in hawksbill sea turtle cells. Particulate Cr(VI) was both cytotoxic and genotoxic to sea turtle cells. Concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm2 lead chromate induced 108, 79, 54, and 7 percent relative survival, respectively. Additionally, concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm2 lead chromate induced damage in 4, 10, 15, 26, and 36 percent of cells and caused 4, 11, 17, 30, and 56 chromosome aberrations in 100 metaphases, respectively. For soluble Cr, concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate induced 84, 69, 46, 25, and 3 percent relative survival, respectively. Sodium chromate induced 3, 9, 9, 14, 21, and 29 percent of metaphases with damage, and caused 3, 10, 10, 16, 26, and 39 damaged chromosomes in 100 metaphases at concentrations of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate, respectively. These data suggest that Cr(VI) may be a concern for hawksbill sea turtles and sea turtles in general. PMID:24952338

  7. Analysis of Aloe vera cytotoxicity and genotoxicity associated with endodontic medication and laser photobiomodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Nayane Chagas; Guedes, Simone Alves Garcez; Albuquerque-Júnior, Ricardo Luiz Cavalcanti; de Albuquerque, Diana Santana; de Souza Araújo, Adriano Antunes; Paranhos, Luiz Renato; Camargo, Samira Esteves Afonso; Ribeiro, Maria Amália Gonzaga

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate, in vitro, the effect of Aloe vera associated with endodontic medication, with or without laser photobiomodulation (FTL) irradiation in FP6 human pulp fibroblasts. The materials were divided into eight groups: CTR - control; CL - FTL alone; AA - Aloe vera with distilled water; AL - Aloe vera with distilled water and FTL; HA - calcium hydroxide P.A. with distilled water; HL - calcium hydroxide P.A. with distilled water and FTL; HAA - calcium hydroxide P.A. with Aloe vera and distilled water; HAL - calcium hydroxide P.A. with Aloe vera, distilled water, and FTL. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT assay at 24, 48, and 72h and the genotoxicity by micronucleus test assay. This study was performed in triplicate. Data obtained in both tests were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's tests (p≤0.05). Group AA presented high genotoxicity and low cytotoxicity. After 24, 48, and 72h, the group HAA significantly reduced the cell viability. Interaction with FTL showed slightly increase cell viability after 24 and 48h in groups CL and HL (pAloe vera allowed higher cell viability in human pulp fibroblasts in the presence of calcium hydroxide or with FTL separately, but genotoxicity increased in these associations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Cyto- and genotoxic profile of groundwater used as drinking water supply before and after disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellacani, C; Cassoni, F; Bocchi, C; Martino, A; Pinto, G; Fontana, F; Furlini, M; Buschini, A

    2016-12-01

    The assessment of the toxicological properties of raw groundwater may be useful to predict the type and quality of tap water. Contaminants in groundwater are known to be able to affect the disinfection process, resulting in the formation of substances that are cytotoxic and/or genotoxic. Though the European directive (98/83/EC, which establishes maximum levels for contaminants in raw water (RW)) provides threshold levels for acute exposure to toxic compounds, the law does not take into account chronic exposure at low doses of pollutants present in complex mixture. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cyto- and genotoxic load in the groundwater of two water treatment plants in Northern Italy. Water samples induced cytotoxic effects, mainly observed when human cells were treated with RW. Moreover, results indicated that the disinfection process reduced cell toxicity, independent of the biocidal used. The induction of genotoxic effects was found, in particular, when the micronucleus assay was carried out on raw groundwater. These results suggest that it is important to include bio-toxicological assays as additional parameters in water quality monitoring programs, as their use would allow the evaluation of the potential risk of groundwater for humans.

  9. The use of genotoxicity biomarkers in molecular epidemiology: applications in environmental, occupational and dietary studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Ladeira

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Molecular epidemiology is an approach increasingly used in the establishment of associations between exposure to hazardous substances and development of disease, including the possible modulation by genetic susceptibility factors. Environmental chemicals and contaminants from anthropogenic pollution of air, water and soil, but also originating specifically in occupational contexts, are potential sources of risk of development of disease. Also, diet presents an important role in this process, with some well characterized associations existing between nutrition and some types of cancer. Genotoxicity biomarkers allow the detection of early effects that result from the interaction between the individual and the environment; they are therefore important tools in cancer epidemiology and are extensively used in human biomonitoring studies. This work intends to give an overview of the potential for genotoxic effects assessment, specifically with the cytokinesis blocked micronucleus assay and comet assay in environmental and occupational scenarios, including diet. The plasticity of these techniques allows their inclusion in human biomonitoring studies, adding important information with the ultimate aim of disease prevention, in particular cancer, and so it is important that they be included as genotoxicity assays in molecular epidemiology.

  10. Sensitivity of Bidens laevis L. to mutagenic compounds. Use of chromosomal aberrations as biomarkers of genotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, D.J. [Laboratorio de Genetica, Estacion Experimental Agropecuaria Balcarce (INTA), Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias, UNMdP, CC 276, 7620 Balcarce (Argentina); Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Departamento de Ciencias Marinas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, UNMdP, Funes 3350, 7600 Mar del Plata (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Lukaszewicz, G. [Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Departamento de Ciencias Marinas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, UNMdP, Funes 3350, 7600 Mar del Plata (Argentina); Menone, M.L., E-mail: lujanm@mdp.edu.a [Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Departamento de Ciencias Marinas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, UNMdP, Funes 3350, 7600 Mar del Plata (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Camadro, E.L. [Laboratorio de Genetica, Estacion Experimental Agropecuaria Balcarce (INTA), Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias, UNMdP, CC 276, 7620 Balcarce (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-01-15

    The wetland macrophyte Bidens laevis possesses suitable cytological characteristics for genotoxicity testing. To test its sensitivity as compared to terrestrial plants species currently in use in standardized assays, Methyl Methanesulfonate (MMS), N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) and Maleic Hydrazide (HM) were used. On the other hand, the insecticide Endosulfan (ES) - an environmentally relevant contaminant - was assayed in seeds and two-month old plants. Mitotic Index (MI), frequency of Chromosome Aberrations in Anaphase-Telophase (CAAT) and frequency of Abnormal Metaphases (AM) were analyzed. MH, MMS and ENU caused a significant decrease of the MI. MMS was aneugenic whereas MH and ENU were both aneugenic and clastogenic. ES caused a significant concentration-dependent increase of total- and aneugenic-CAAT in roots and a significant high frequency of AM at high concentrations. Because of its sensitivity to mutagenic substances, B. laevis can be regarded as a reliable and convenient species for genotoxicity assays especially if aquatic contaminants are evaluated. - The wetland macrophyte Bidens laevis is sensitive to genotoxic compounds similarly to terrestrial standardized species.

  11. Sensitivity of Bidens laevis L. to mutagenic compounds. Use of chromosomal aberrations as biomarkers of genotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, D.J.; Lukaszewicz, G.; Menone, M.L.; Camadro, E.L.

    2011-01-01

    The wetland macrophyte Bidens laevis possesses suitable cytological characteristics for genotoxicity testing. To test its sensitivity as compared to terrestrial plants species currently in use in standardized assays, Methyl Methanesulfonate (MMS), N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) and Maleic Hydrazide (HM) were used. On the other hand, the insecticide Endosulfan (ES) - an environmentally relevant contaminant - was assayed in seeds and two-month old plants. Mitotic Index (MI), frequency of Chromosome Aberrations in Anaphase-Telophase (CAAT) and frequency of Abnormal Metaphases (AM) were analyzed. MH, MMS and ENU caused a significant decrease of the MI. MMS was aneugenic whereas MH and ENU were both aneugenic and clastogenic. ES caused a significant concentration-dependent increase of total- and aneugenic-CAAT in roots and a significant high frequency of AM at high concentrations. Because of its sensitivity to mutagenic substances, B. laevis can be regarded as a reliable and convenient species for genotoxicity assays especially if aquatic contaminants are evaluated. - The wetland macrophyte Bidens laevis is sensitive to genotoxic compounds similarly to terrestrial standardized species.

  12. Critical review of the current and future challenges associated with advanced in vitro systems towards the study of nanoparticle (secondary) genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Stephen J; Clift, Martin J D; Singh, Neenu; de Oliveira Mallia, Jefferson; Burgum, Michael; Wills, John W; Wilkinson, Thomas S; Jenkins, Gareth J S; Doak, Shareen H

    2017-01-01

    With the need to understand the potential biological impact of the plethora of nanoparticles (NPs) being manufactured for a wide range of potential human applications, due to their inevitable human exposure, research activities in the field of NP toxicology has grown exponentially over the last decade. Whilst such increased research efforts have elucidated an increasingly significant knowledge base pertaining to the potential human health hazard posed by NPs, understanding regarding the possibility for NPs to elicit genotoxicity is limited. In vivo models are unable to adequately discriminate between the specific modes of action associated with the onset of genotoxicity. Additionally, in line with the recent European directives, there is an inherent need to move away from invasive animal testing strategies. Thus, in vitro systems are an important tool for expanding our mechanistic insight into NP genotoxicity. Yet uncertainty remains concerning their validity and specificity for this purpose due to the unique challenges presented when correlating NP behaviour in vitro and in vivo This review therefore highlights the current state of the art in advanced in vitro systems and their specific advantages and disadvantages from a NP genotoxicity testing perspective. Key indicators will be given related to how these systems might be used or improved to enhance understanding of NP genotoxicity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society.

  13. Evaluation of genotoxicity after application of Listerine(R) on human lymphocytes by micronucleus and single cell gel electrophoresis assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkez, Hasan; Togar, Basak; Arabaci, Taner

    2012-04-01

    Listerine (LN) is one of the most commonly used mouth rinses worldwide although very limited information is available concerning its genotoxicity. In another view, the biological safety profile of oral care products is frequently assumed on the basis of simplistic test models. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the in vitro genotoxic potential of LN using micronucleus and single cell gel electrophoresis tests as genetic endpoints. Different concentrations of LN (0-100% of ml/culture, v/v) were applied to whole human blood cultures (n = 5). The result of the present study showed that there were no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05) between the control group and the groups treated with LN alone in both analysed endpoints. In conclusion, our result first demonstrated the absence of genotoxicity of LN on human lymphocytes.

  14. The genotoxic effect of oxcarbazepine on mice blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Huma; Khan, Ajmal; Mohammadzai, Imdadullah; Khisroon, Muhammad; Begum, Ilham

    2018-04-01

    This study was conducted to assess the amount of DNA damage caused by Oxcarbazepine (OXC) through single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) technique/comet assay. OXC derived from dibenzazepine series is an effective second generation antiepileptic drug (AED) for both children and adults. Side effects like genotoxic effects of AEDs are of prime importance resulting from toxic metabolites, free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Forty Eight adult male Bagg's albino mice (BALB/c) were randomly classified into eight groups, each comprising of six animals. Two of these groups were control and six were tested groups. Control groups were injected with 1% tween 80 while tested groups were injected with 10, 20, and 40 mg/kg-day OXC for seven days (acute therapy) and 28 days (subchronic therapy) in peritoneal cavity. Blood samples were collected by cardiac puncture and subjected to comet assay for the analysis of DNA damage. Per sample 100 cells were scored and classified according to comet tail length. The results showed that OXC in acute and long term therapies had significantly higher (p < 0.05) genotoxicity in treated groups as compared to control groups. Our study suggests that OXC may cause significant DNA damage in both acute as well as in subchronic therapies.

  15. In vivo genotoxicity assessment of acrylamide and glycidyl methacrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Pacheco-Martinez, M Monserrat; McDaniel, L Patrice; Pearce, Mason G; Ding, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Acrylamide (ACR) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) are structurally related compounds used for making polymers with various properties. Both chemicals can be present in food either as a byproduct of processing or a constituent of packaging. We performed a comprehensive evaluation of ACR and GMA genotoxicity in Fisher 344 rats using repeated gavage administrations. Clastogenicity was measured by scoring micronucleated (MN) erythrocytes from peripheral blood, DNA damage in liver, bone marrow and kidneys was measured using the Comet assay, and gene mutation was measured using the red blood cell (RBC) and reticulocyte Pig-a assay. A limited histopathology evaluation was performed in order to determine levels of cytotoxicity. Doses of up to 20 mg/kg/day of ACR and up to 250 mg/kg/day of GMA were used. ACR treatment resulted in DNA damage in the liver, but not in the bone marrow. While ACR was not a clastogen, it was a weak (equivocal) mutagen in the cells of bone marrow. GMA caused DNA damage in the cells of bone marrow, liver and kidney, and induced MN reticulocytes and Pig-a mutant RBCs in a dose-dependent manner. Collectively, our data suggest that both compounds are in vivo genotoxins, but the genotoxicity of ACR is tissue specific. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. In vivo genotoxic effects of dietary heme iron on rat colon mucosa and ex vivo effects on colon cells monitored by an optimized alkaline comet assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Océane, C Martin

    2015-04-01

    In conclusion, our results offer a suitable protocol to evaluate genotoxicity on in vivo cryopreserved colon mucosa and on in vitro murine colonic cells, with a middle throughput capacity. This protocol confirms the increase of genotoxicity in rat colon mucosa after an heme-iron diet. Moreover, this protocol enables the demonstration that aldehydes from heme-induced lipoperoxidation are responsible for this increase of genotoxicity.

  17. Genotoxic potential evaluation of a cosmetic insoluble substance by the micronuclei assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, N; Shah, V; Minko, T

    2011-01-01

    An optical brightener (OB) powder (INCI: sodium silicoaluminate (and) glycidoxypropyl trimethyloxysilane/PEI-250 cross fluorescent brightener 230 salt (and) polyvinylalcohol crosspolymer) that is used in cosmetic facial products was tested for its genotoxic potential using the micronuclei test (MNT). It is a solid dry powder with an average size of 5 microns that is insoluble but dispersible in water. This study describes the exposure of cell culture to positive controls with and without enzymatic activation and to the test compound in different concentrations. We evaluated three end points: microscopic observation and quantification of micronuclei formation, and cell viability and proliferation. Both positive controls induced significant changes that were observed under the microscope and quantified. Based on its chemical nature, it was not anticipated that the test substance will degrade under the conditions of the experiments. However, the test is required to make sure that when solublized, impurities that may be present, even at trace levels, will not induce a genotoxic effect. The test compound did not promote micronuclei formation or change the viability or proliferation rate of cells. During this study we faced challenges such as solubilization and correlating viability data to genotoxicity data. These are described in the body of the paper. We believe that with the emergence of the 7(th) European amendment that bans animal testing, sharing these data and the study protocol serves as a key in building the understanding of the utilization of in vitro studies in the safety assessment of cosmetic ingredients.

  18. GENOTOXICITY OF BIOREMEDIATED SOILS FROM THE REILLY TARSITE, ST. LOUIS PARK, MINNESOTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    An in vitro approach was used to measure the genotoxicity of creosote-contaminated soil before and after four bioremediation processes. The soil was taken from the Reilly Tar site, a closed Superfund site in Saint Louis Park, Minnesota. The creosote soil was bioremediated in bios...

  19. Genotoxic and Antigenotoxic Potential of Momordica charantia Linn (Cucurbitaceae) in the Wing Spot Test of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterres, Zaira Rosa; Zanetti, Thalita Alves; Sennes-Lopes, Tiago Felipe; da Silva, Ana Francisca Gomes

    2015-10-01

    Momordica charantia, popularly known as bitter melon, is a plant widely used in ethnobotanical medicine. It has antibacterial, antifungal, anthelmintic, antidiabetic, antiviral, and antimalarial activities, among others. The goal of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic and/or antigenotoxic activity of the aqueous extracts obtained from the aerial parts and fruit of this plant by means of the Drosophila melanogaster wing spot test. Third-stage larvae that obtained standard (ST) cross and high bioactivation (HB) cross were treated with aqueous extracts of the aerial parts (IQA) and fruit (IQF) of M. charantia, following two protocols (genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity). The aqueous extracts are not genotoxic in lower concentrations. The frequencies of mutant spots observed in the descendants of the ST and HB crosses treated with doxorubicin (DXR) alone were 8.65 and 9.25, respectively, whereas in those cotreated with IQA and DXR, the frequencies ranged from 15.90 to 29 in the ST cross and from 15.05 to 24.78 in the HB cross. In cotreatment with IQF, the frequencies ranged from 30.10 to 30.65 in the ST cross and from 13.60 to 14.50 in the HB cross, whereas the frequencies obtained with DXR were 32.50 in the ST cross and 26.00 in the HB cross. In conclusion, the IQA has a synergistic effect, enhancing the genotoxicity of DXR in the ST cross and the HB cross, whereas the IQF has antigenotoxic effects in the HB cross.

  20. COMPARATIVE GENOTOXIC RESPONSES TO ARSENITE IN GUINEA PIG, MOUSE, RAT AND HUMAN LYMPHOCYTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative genotoxic responses to arsenite in guinea pig, mouse, rat and human lymphocytes.Inorganic arsenic is a known human carcinogen causing skin, lung, and bladder cancer following chronic exposures. Yet, long-term laboratory animal carcinogenicity studies have ...

  1. Role of Proteus mirabilis MR/P fimbriae and flagella in adhesion, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induction in T24 and Vero cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavone, Paola; Villar, Silvia; Umpiérrez, Ana; Zunino, Pablo

    2015-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis is frequently associated with complicated urinary tract infections (UTI). It is proposed that several virulence factors are associated with P. mirabilis uropathogenicity. The aim of this work was to elucidate genotoxic and cytotoxic effects mediated by MR/P fimbriae and flagella in eukaryotic cells in vitro. Two cell lines (kidney- and bladder-derived) were infected with a clinical wild-type P. mirabilis strain and an MR/P and a flagellar mutant. We evaluated adhesion, genotoxicity and cytotoxicity by microscopy, comet assay and triple staining technique, respectively. Mutant strains displayed lower adhesion rates than the P. mirabilis wild-type strain and were significantly less effective to induce genotoxic and cytotoxic effects compared to the wild type. We report for the first time that P. mirabilis MR/P fimbriae and flagella mediate genotoxic and cytotoxic effects on eukaryotic cells, at least in in vitro conditions. These results could contribute to design new strategies for the control of UTI. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Comparative study of the mutagenic and genotoxic activity associated with inhalable particulate matter in Rio de Janeiro air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miguel, A.G.; Daisey, J.M.; Sousa, J.A. (Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil))

    1990-01-01

    We have determined the genotoxic and mutagenic activities associated with inhalable particulate matter (IPM) collected in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Camden, NJ, and Caldecott Tunnel, CA, and used these results to compare three different bioassays. Samples collected every 12 hr (Rio) or every 24 hr (Camden) were extracted sequentially with cyclohexane (CX), dichloromethane (DCM), and acetone (ACE), for a rough fractionation by polarity, and composites of the extracts were tested for mutagenicity using the Salmonella frame shift (TA98) and base substitution (TA100) tester strains, as well as for genotoxicity using the Rossman Microscreen bioassay based on the induction of lambda-prophage in a lysogenic Escherichia coli strain. All samples were tested without and with S9 metabolic activation. Maximum mutagenic and genotoxic activities were in the nonpolar (CX) and polar (ACE) fractions, respectively, indicating that these two assays detect different classes of compounds with different efficiencies. Oxidative aging of the Rio aerosol is indicated by a shift in activities in both tests from the less polar fractions in the day to the polar (ACE) fraction at night. The Rio TA98 mutagenic (18 rev/m3) and genotoxic (1.4 x 10(5) PFU/m3) activities were higher than those for Camden, an Eastern U.S. city, by factors of 1.4 and 2.8, respectively.

  3. No evidence of the genotoxic potential of gold, silver, zinc oxide and titanium dioxide nanoparticles in the SOS chromotest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Sun-Hwa; Kim, Shin Woong; An, Youn-Joo

    2013-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs), silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs), zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are widely used in cosmetic products such as preservatives, colorants and sunscreens. This study investigated the genotoxicity of Au NPs, Ag NPs, ZnO NPs and TiO2 NPs using the SOS chromotest with Escherichia coli PQ37. The maximum exposure concentrations for each nanoparticle were 3.23 mg l(-1) for Au NPs, 32.3 mg l(-1) for Ag NPs and 100 mg l(-1) for ZnO NPs and TiO2 NPs. Additionally, in order to compare the genotoxicity of nanoparticles and corresponding dissolved ions, the ions were assessed in the same way as nanoparticles. The genotoxicity of the titanium ion was not assessed because of the extremely low solubility of TiO2 NPs. Au NPs, Ag NPs, ZnO NPs, TiO2 NPs and ions of Au, Ag and Zn, in a range of tested concentrations, exerted no effects in the SOS chromotest, evidenced by maximum IF (IFmax) values of below 1.5 for all chemicals. Owing to the results, nanosized Au NPs, Ag NPs, ZnO NPs, TiO2 NPs and ions of Au, Ag and Zn are classified as non-genotoxic on the basis of the SOS chromotest used in this study. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the genotoxicity of Au NPs, Ag NPs, ZnO NPs and TiO2 NPs using the SOS chromotest. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Sex-related effects of imidacloprid modulated by piperonyl butoxide and menadione in rats. Part II: genotoxic and cytotoxic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Mehmet; Sevgiler, Yusuf; Buyukleyla, Mehmet; Yardimci, Mustafa; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Rencuzogullari, Eyyup

    2016-01-01

    Despite its intended use, imidacloprid causes genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in mammals, especially in the presence of metabolic activation systems. The aim of this study was to determine to which extent these effects are sex related and how its metabolism modulators piperonyl butoxide and menadione affect its toxicity. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with the intraperitoneal LD50 dose of imidacloprid alone (170 mg/kg) or pretreated with piperonyl butoxide (100 mg/kg) and menadione (25 mg/kg) for 12 and 24 h. Structural chromosome aberrations, abnormal cells and mitotic index were determined microscopically in bone marrow cells. Male rats showed susceptibility to the genotoxic effects of imidacloprid. Piperonyl butoxide was effective in countering this effect only at 24 h, whereas menadione exacerbated imidacloprid-induced genotoxicity. Piperonyl butoxide and menadione pretreatments increased the percentage of structural chromosome aberrations and abnormal cells in females. Imidacloprid decreased the mitotic index, whereas pretreatment with piperonyl butoxide and menadione showed improvement in both sexes. We believe that CYP450-mediated metabolism of imidacloprid is under the hormonal control and therefore that its genotoxicity is sex related. Piperonyl butoxide pretreatment also showed sex-related modulation. The hormonal effects on imidacloprid biotransformation require further investigation.

  5. Efficacy of Allium cepa test system for screening cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of industrial effluents originated from different industrial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathiratne, Asoka; Hemachandra, Chamini K; De Silva, Nimal

    2015-12-01

    Efficacy of Allium cepa test system for screening cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of treated effluents originated from four types of industrial activities (two textile industries, three rubber based industries, two common treatment plants of industrial zones, and two water treatment plants) was assessed. Physico-chemical parameters including the heavy metal/metalloid levels of the effluents varied depending on the industry profile, but most of the measured parameters in the effluents were within the specified tolerance limits of Sri Lankan environmental regulations for discharge of industrial effluents into inland surface waters. In the A. cepa test system, the undiluted effluents induced statistically significant root growth retardation, mitosis depression, and chromosomal aberrations in root meristematic cells in most cases in comparison to the dilution water and upstream water signifying effluent induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. Ethyl methane sulphonate (a mutagen, positive control) and all the effluents under 1:8 dilution significantly induced total chromosomal aberrations in root meristematic cells in comparison to the dilution water and upstream water indicating inadequacy of expected 1:8 dilutions in the receiving waters for curtailing genotoxic impacts. The results support the use of a practically feasible A. cepa test system for rapid screening of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of diverse industrial effluents discharging into inland surface waters.

  6. Silica nanoparticles and biological dispersants: genotoxic effects on A549 lung epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, David M.; Varet, Julia; Johnston, Helinor; Chrystie, Alison; Stone, Vicki

    2015-01-01

    Silica nanoparticle exposure could be intentional (e.g. medical application or food) or accidental (e.g. occupational inhalation). On entering the body, particles become coated with specific proteins depending on the route of entry. The ability of silica particles of different size and charge (non-functionalized 50 and 200 nm and aminated 50 and 200 nm) to cause genotoxic effects in A549 lung epithelial cells was investigated. Using the modified comet assay and the micronucleus assay, we examined the effect of suspending the particles in different dispersion media [RPMI or Hanks’ balanced salt solution (HBSS), supplemented with bovine serum albumin (BSA), lung lining fluid (LLF) or serum] to determine if this influenced the particle’s activity. Particle characterisation suggested that the particles were reasonably well dispersed in the different media, with the exception of aminated 50 nm particles which showed evidence of agglomeration. Plain 50, 200 nm and aminated 50 nm particles caused significant genotoxic effects in the presence of formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase when dispersed in HBSS or LLF. These effects were reduced when the particles were dispersed in BSA and serum. There was no significant micronucleus formation produced by any of the particles when suspended in any of the dispersants. The data suggest that silica particles can produce a significant genotoxic effect according to the comet assay in A549 cells, possibly driven by an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism which may be modified depending on the choice of dispersant employed

  7. Silica nanoparticles and biological dispersants: genotoxic effects on A549 lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, David M., E-mail: d.brown@hw.ac.uk [Heriot-Watt University, Nanosafety Research Group, School of Life Sciences (United Kingdom); Varet, Julia, E-mail: julia.varet@IOM-world.org [Institute of Occupational Medicine (United Kingdom); Johnston, Helinor, E-mail: h.johnston@hw.ac.uk; Chrystie, Alison; Stone, Vicki, E-mail: v.stone@hw.ac.uk [Heriot-Watt University, Nanosafety Research Group, School of Life Sciences (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Silica nanoparticle exposure could be intentional (e.g. medical application or food) or accidental (e.g. occupational inhalation). On entering the body, particles become coated with specific proteins depending on the route of entry. The ability of silica particles of different size and charge (non-functionalized 50 and 200 nm and aminated 50 and 200 nm) to cause genotoxic effects in A549 lung epithelial cells was investigated. Using the modified comet assay and the micronucleus assay, we examined the effect of suspending the particles in different dispersion media [RPMI or Hanks’ balanced salt solution (HBSS), supplemented with bovine serum albumin (BSA), lung lining fluid (LLF) or serum] to determine if this influenced the particle’s activity. Particle characterisation suggested that the particles were reasonably well dispersed in the different media, with the exception of aminated 50 nm particles which showed evidence of agglomeration. Plain 50, 200 nm and aminated 50 nm particles caused significant genotoxic effects in the presence of formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase when dispersed in HBSS or LLF. These effects were reduced when the particles were dispersed in BSA and serum. There was no significant micronucleus formation produced by any of the particles when suspended in any of the dispersants. The data suggest that silica particles can produce a significant genotoxic effect according to the comet assay in A549 cells, possibly driven by an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism which may be modified depending on the choice of dispersant employed.

  8. Silica nanoparticles and biological dispersants: genotoxic effects on A549 lung epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David M.; Varet, Julia; Johnston, Helinor; Chrystie, Alison; Stone, Vicki

    2015-10-01

    Silica nanoparticle exposure could be intentional (e.g. medical application or food) or accidental (e.g. occupational inhalation). On entering the body, particles become coated with specific proteins depending on the route of entry. The ability of silica particles of different size and charge (non-functionalized 50 and 200 nm and aminated 50 and 200 nm) to cause genotoxic effects in A549 lung epithelial cells was investigated. Using the modified comet assay and the micronucleus assay, we examined the effect of suspending the particles in different dispersion media [RPMI or Hanks' balanced salt solution (HBSS), supplemented with bovine serum albumin (BSA), lung lining fluid (LLF) or serum] to determine if this influenced the particle's activity. Particle characterisation suggested that the particles were reasonably well dispersed in the different media, with the exception of aminated 50 nm particles which showed evidence of agglomeration. Plain 50, 200 nm and aminated 50 nm particles caused significant genotoxic effects in the presence of formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase when dispersed in HBSS or LLF. These effects were reduced when the particles were dispersed in BSA and serum. There was no significant micronucleus formation produced by any of the particles when suspended in any of the dispersants. The data suggest that silica particles can produce a significant genotoxic effect according to the comet assay in A549 cells, possibly driven by an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism which may be modified depending on the choice of dispersant employed.

  9. Hexavalent chromium is cytotoxic and genotoxic to hawksbill sea turtle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, Sandra S., E-mail: sandra.wise@maine.edu [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Xie, Hong, E-mail: hongxie@usm.maine.edu [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Fukuda, Tomokazu, E-mail: tomofukuda009@gmail.com [Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Tohoku University, Laboratory of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Second Research Building, Rm 112, 1-1 Amamiyamachi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Douglas Thompson, W., E-mail: dougt@usm.maine.edu [Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); and others

    2014-09-01

    Sea turtles are a charismatic and ancient ocean species and can serve as key indicators for ocean ecosystems, including coral reefs and sea grass beds as well as coastal beaches. Genotoxicity studies in the species are absent, limiting our understanding of the impact of environmental toxicants on sea turtles. Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a ubiquitous environmental problem worldwide, and recent studies show it is a global marine pollutant of concern. Thus, we evaluated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate Cr(VI) in hawksbill sea turtle cells. Particulate Cr(VI) was both cytotoxic and genotoxic to sea turtle cells. Concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm{sup 2} lead chromate induced 108, 79, 54, and 7% relative survival, respectively. Additionally, concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm{sup 2} lead chromate induced damage in 4, 10, 15, 26, and 36% of cells and caused 4, 11, 17, 30, and 56 chromosome aberrations in 100 metaphases, respectively. For soluble Cr, concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate induced 84, 69, 46, 25, and 3% relative survival, respectively. Sodium chromate induced 3, 9, 9, 14, 21, and 29% of metaphases with damage, and caused 3, 10, 10, 16, 26, and 39 damaged chromosomes in 100 metaphases at concentrations of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate, respectively. These data suggest that Cr(VI) may be a concern for hawksbill sea turtles and sea turtles in general. - Highlights: • Particulate Cr(VI) is cytotoxic and clastogenic to hawksbill sea turtle cells. • Soluble Cr(VI) is cytotoxic and clastogenic to hawksbill sea turtle cells. • Cr(VI) may be a risk factor for hawksbill sea turtle health.

  10. Hexavalent chromium is cytotoxic and genotoxic to hawksbill sea turtle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, Sandra S.; Xie, Hong; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Douglas Thompson, W.

    2014-01-01

    Sea turtles are a charismatic and ancient ocean species and can serve as key indicators for ocean ecosystems, including coral reefs and sea grass beds as well as coastal beaches. Genotoxicity studies in the species are absent, limiting our understanding of the impact of environmental toxicants on sea turtles. Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a ubiquitous environmental problem worldwide, and recent studies show it is a global marine pollutant of concern. Thus, we evaluated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate Cr(VI) in hawksbill sea turtle cells. Particulate Cr(VI) was both cytotoxic and genotoxic to sea turtle cells. Concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm 2 lead chromate induced 108, 79, 54, and 7% relative survival, respectively. Additionally, concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm 2 lead chromate induced damage in 4, 10, 15, 26, and 36% of cells and caused 4, 11, 17, 30, and 56 chromosome aberrations in 100 metaphases, respectively. For soluble Cr, concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate induced 84, 69, 46, 25, and 3% relative survival, respectively. Sodium chromate induced 3, 9, 9, 14, 21, and 29% of metaphases with damage, and caused 3, 10, 10, 16, 26, and 39 damaged chromosomes in 100 metaphases at concentrations of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate, respectively. These data suggest that Cr(VI) may be a concern for hawksbill sea turtles and sea turtles in general. - Highlights: • Particulate Cr(VI) is cytotoxic and clastogenic to hawksbill sea turtle cells. • Soluble Cr(VI) is cytotoxic and clastogenic to hawksbill sea turtle cells. • Cr(VI) may be a risk factor for hawksbill sea turtle health

  11. Xylo-oligosaccharides and inulin affect genotoxicity and bacterial populations differently in a human colonic simulator challenged with soy protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, C. T.; Petersen, Anne; Licht, Tine Rask

    2013-01-01

    High dietary intakes of some protein sources, including soy protein, can increase colonic DNA damage in animals, whereas some carbohydrates attenuate this. We investigated whether inulin and xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS) could be protective against DNA strand breaks by adding them to a human colonic...... cornstarch for 10 day followed by soy protein with 1% XOS or 1% inulin for 10 day. Inulin did not alter genotoxicity but XOS significantly reduced PV genotoxicity and increased DV genotoxicity. Inulin and XOS significantly increased butyrate concentration in the DV but not PV. Numbers of the key butyrate......-producing bacterium Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were significantly increased in the PV and DV by inulin but significantly decreased by XOS in both vessels. Other bacteria examined were also significantly impacted by the carbohydrate treatments or by the vessel (i.e., pH). There was a significant overall inverse...

  12. Expression of the recA gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO is inducible by DNA-damaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.V.; Kokjohn, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    Western (immunoblot) analysis using Escherichia coli anti-RecA antiserum revealed that expression of the RecA protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO is induced upon exposure of the bacterium to UV irradiation or norfloxacin, a quinolone related to nalidixic acid

  13. Comparative cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of 13 drinking water disinfection by-products using a microplate-based cytotoxicity assay and a developed SOS/umu assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shao-Hui; Miao, Dong-Yue; Tan, Li; Liu, Ai-Lin; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The implications of disinfection by-products (DBPs) present in drinking water are of public health concern because of their potential mutagenic, carcinogenic and other toxic effects on humans. In this study, we selected 13 main DBPs found in drinking water to quantitatively analyse their cytotoxicity and genotoxicity using a microplate-based cytotoxicity assay and a developed SOS/umu assay in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002. With the developed SOS/umu test, eight DBPs: 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2[5H]-fura3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2-[5H]-furanone (MX), dibromoacetonitrile (DBN), iodoacetic acid (IA), bromochloroacetonitrile (BCN), bromoacetic acid (BA), trichloroacetonitrile (TCN), dibromoacetic acid (DBA) and dichloroacetic acid (DCA) were significantly genotoxic to S. typhimurium. Three DBPs: chloroacetic acid (CA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and dichloroacetonitrile (DCN) were weakly genotoxic, whereas the remaining DBPs: chloroacetonitrile (CN) and chloral hydrate (CH) were negative. The rank order in decreasing genotoxicity was as follows: MX > DBN > IA > BCN > BA > TCN > DBA > DCA > CA, TCA, DCN > CN, CH. MX was approximately 370 000 times more genotoxic than DCA. In the microplate-based cytotoxicity assay, cytotoxic potencies of the 13 DBPs were compared and ranked in decreasing order as follows: MX > IA > DBN > BCN > BA > TCN > DCN > CA > DCA > DBA > CN > TCA > CH. MX was approximately 19 200 times more cytotoxic than CH. A statistically significant correlation was found between cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of the 13 DBPs in S. typhimurium. Results suggest that microplate-based cytotoxicity assay and the developed SOS/umu assay are feasible tools for analysing the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of DBPs, particularly for comparing their toxic intensities quantitatively. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e

  14. Does the recommended lymphocyte cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay for human biomonitoring actually detect DNA damage induced by occupational and environmental exposure to genotoxic chemicals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speit, Günter

    2013-07-01

    This commentary challenges the paradigm that the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMN assay) with cultured human lymphocytes, as it is performed currently, is a sensitive and useful tool for detecting genotoxic effects in populations exposed occupationally or environmentally to genotoxic chemicals. Based on the principle of the assay and the available data, increased micronucleus (MN) frequencies in binucleated cells (BNC) are mainly due to MN produced in vitro during the cultivation period (i.e. MN produced in vivo do not substantially contribute to the MN frequency measured in BNC). The sensitivity of the assay for the detection of induced MN in BNC after an in vivo exposure to a genotoxic chemical is limited because cytochalasin B (Cyt-B) is added relatively late during the culture period and, therefore, the BNC that are scored do not always represent cells that have completed one cell cycle only. Furthermore, this delay means that damaged cells can be eliminated by apoptosis and/or that DNA damage induced in vivo can be repaired prior to the production of a MN in the presence of Cyt-B. A comparison with the in vitro CBMN assay used for genotoxicity testing leads to the conclusion that it is highly unlikely that DNA damage induced in vivo is the cause for increased MN frequencies in BNC after occupational or environmental exposure to genotoxic chemicals. This commentary casts doubt on the usefulness of the CBMN assay as an indicator of genotoxicity in human biomonitoring and questions the relevance of many published data for hazard identification and risk assessment. Thus, it seems worthwhile to reconsider the use of the CBMN assay as presently conducted for the detection of genotoxic exposure in human biomonitoring.

  15. Genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity study of aqueous and hydro-methanol extracts of Spondias mombin L., Nymphaea lotus L. and Luffa cylindrical L. using animal bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyeyemi, Ifeoluwa Temitayo; Yekeen, Olaide Maruf; Odusina, Paul Olayinka; Ologun, Taiwo Mary; Ogbaide, Orezimena Michelle; Olaleye, Olayinka Israel; Bakare, Adekunle A

    2015-12-01

    Spondias mombin (Linn), Nymphaea lotus (Linn) and Luffa cylindrica (Linn) (syn Luffa aegyptiaca Mill) are plants traditionally used as food ingredients and in the management of diseases, including cancer, in Nigeria. Despite the therapeutic potentials attributed to these plants, reports on their genotoxicity are scanty. In this study, the genotoxicity of the aqueous and hydro-methanol extract of these plants was evaluated using mouse bone marrow micronucleus and sperm morphology assays. Antigenotoxicity was assessed by the bone marrow micronucleus test. The highest attainable dose of 5 000 mg/kg according to OECD guidelines was first used to assess acute toxicity of the aqueous and hydro-methanol extracts in Swiss albino mice. For each extract, there were five groups of mice (n=4/group) treated with different concentrations of the extract as against the negative and positive control group for the genotoxicity study. In the antigenotoxicity study, five groups of mice were exposed to five different concentrations of the extracts along with 60 mg/kg of methyl methane sulfonate (MMS), which was used to induce genotoxicity. The mice were administered 0.2 mL of extract per day for 10 days in the genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity groups. Administration of each of the extracts at the concentration of 5 000 mg/kg did not induce acute toxicity in mice. At the concentrations tested, all the extracts, except aqueous S. mombin, increased micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes. The aqueous and hydro-methanol extracts of N. lotus increased the frequency of aberrant sperm cells. All the extracts were also able to ameliorate MMS induced genotoxicity in bone marrow cells of the exposed mice. The results showed the potential of the extracts to induce somatic and germ cell mutation in male mice. The extracts also ameliorated the genotoxic effect of MMS.

  16. Genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity study of aqueous and hydro-methanol extracts of Spondias mombin L., Nymphaea lotus L. and Luffa cylindrical L. using animal bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyeyemi Ifeoluwa Temitayo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Spondias mombin (Linn, Nymphaea lotus (Linn and Luffa cylindrica (Linn (syn Luffa aegyptiaca Mill are plants traditionally used as food ingredients and in the management of diseases, including cancer, in Nigeria. Despite the therapeutic potentials attributed to these plants, reports on their genotoxicity are scanty. In this study, the genotoxicity of the aqueous and hydro-methanol extract of these plants was evaluated using mouse bone marrow micronucleus and sperm morphology assays. Antigenotoxicity was assessed by the bone marrow micronucleus test. The highest attainable dose of 5 000 mg/kg according to OECD guidelines was first used to assess acute toxicity of the aqueous and hydro-methanol extracts in Swiss albino mice. For each extract, there were five groups of mice (n=4/group treated with different concentrations of the extract as against the negative and positive control group for the genotoxicity study. In the antigenotoxicity study, five groups of mice were exposed to five different concentrations of the extracts along with 60 mg/kg of methyl methane sulfonate (MMS, which was used to induce genotoxicity. The mice were administered 0.2 mL of extract per day for 10 days in the genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity groups. Administration of each of the extracts at the concentration of 5 000 mg/kg did not induce acute toxicity in mice. At the concentrations tested, all the extracts, except aqueous S. mombin, increased micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes. The aqueous and hydro-methanol extracts of N. lotus increased the frequency of aberrant sperm cells. All the extracts were also able to ameliorate MMS induced genotoxicity in bone marrow cells of the exposed mice. The results showed the potential of the extracts to induce somatic and germ cell mutation in male mice. The extracts also ameliorated the genotoxic effect of MMS.

  17. Prophylactic role of some plants and phytochemicals against radio-genotoxicity in human lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Cheki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Genotoxicity in lymphocytes of cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy can lead to lymphocytopenia. Lymphocytopenia induced by radiotherapy is one of the most unfavorable prognostic biological markers in cancer patients, since it has been accepted to be associated with poor prognosis in terms of both survival time and response to cancer therapy. Therefore, reduction in lymphocytopenia may increase treatment efficiency. Research endeavors with synthetic radioprotectors in the past have met with little success primarily due to toxicity-related problems. These disadvantages have led to interest on the use of some plants and phytochemicals as radioprotector. The aim of this paper is to review protective role of some plants and phytochemicals against genotoxicity-induced by ionizing radiation in human blood lymphocytes. Therefore, current review may help the future researches to decrease lymphocytopenia in radiotherapeutic clinical trials.

  18. In vivo assessment of genotoxic, antigenotoxic and anticarcinogenic activities of Solanum lycocarpum fruits glycoalkaloidic extract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Carolina Munari

    Full Text Available The fruits of Solanum lycocarpum, known as wolf-fruit, are used in folk medicine, and because of that we have evaluated both the genotoxic potential of its glycoalkaloidic extract (SL and its influence on the genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate. Furthermore, the potential blocking effect of SL intake in the initial stage of colon carcinogenesis in Wistar rats was investigated in a short-term (4-week bioassay using aberrant crypt foci (ACF as biomarker. The genotoxic potential was evaluated using the Swiss mice peripheral blood micronucleus test. The animals were treated with different doses of SL (15, 30 and 60 mg/kg b.w. for 14 days, and the peripheral blood samples were collected at 48 h, 7 days and 14 days after starting the treatment. For antigenotoxicity assessment, MMS was administered on the 14th day, and after 24 h the harvesting of bone marrow and liver cells was performed, for the micronucleus and comet assays, respectively. In the ACF assay, male Wistar rats were given four subcutaneous injections of the carcinogen 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH, 40 mg/kg b.w., twice a week, during two weeks to induce ACF. The treatment with SL (15, 30 and 60 mg/kg b.w. was given for four weeks during and after carcinogen treatment to investigate the potential beneficial effects of SL on DMH-induced ACF. The results demonstrated that SL was not genotoxic in the mouse micronucleus test. In animals treated with SL and MMS, the frequencies of micronucleus and extensions of DNA damage were significantly reduced in comparison with the animals receiving only MMS. Regarding the ACF assay, SL significantly reduced the frequency of ACF induced by DMH.

  19. Assessment of global and gene-specific DNA methylation in rat liver and kidney in response to non-genotoxic carcinogen exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozden, Sibel, E-mail: stopuz@istanbul.edu.tr [Department of Pharmaceutical Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Turgut Kara, Neslihan [Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Faculty of Science, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Sezerman, Osman Ugur [Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, Acibadem University, Istanbul (Turkey); Durasi, İlknur Melis [Biological Sciences and Bioengineering, Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabancı University, Istanbul (Turkey); Chen, Tao [Department of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Demirel, Goksun; Alpertunga, Buket [Department of Pharmaceutical Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Chipman, J. Kevin [School of Biosciences, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Mally, Angela [Department of Toxicology, University of Würzburg, Würzburg (Germany)

    2015-12-01

    Altered expression of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes, which is regulated in part at the level of DNA methylation, is an important event involved in non-genotoxic carcinogenesis. This may serve as a marker for early detection of non-genotoxic carcinogens. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), methapyrilene (MPY) and male rat kidney carcinogens, d-limonene, p-dichlorobenzene (DCB), chloroform and ochratoxin A (OTA) on global and CpG island promoter methylation in their respective target tissues in rats. No significant dose-related effects on global DNA hypomethylation were observed in tissues of rats compared to vehicle controls using LC–MS/MS in response to short-term non-genotoxic carcinogen exposure. Initial experiments investigating gene-specific methylation using methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing, revealed partial methylation of p16 in the liver of rats treated with HCB and TCDD. However, no treatment related effects on the methylation status of Cx32, e-cadherin, VHL, c-myc, Igfbp2, and p15 were observed. We therefore applied genome-wide DNA methylation analysis using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation combined with microarrays to identify alterations in gene-specific methylation. Under the conditions of our study, some genes were differentially methylated in response to MPY and TCDD, whereas d-limonene, DCB and chloroform did not induce any methylation changes. 90-day OTA treatment revealed enrichment of several categories of genes important in protein kinase activity and mTOR cell signaling process which are related to OTA nephrocarcinogenicity. - Highlights: • Studied non-genotoxic carcinogens caused no change on global DNA hypomethylation. • d-Limonene, DCB and chloroform did not show any genome-wide methylation changes. • Some genes were differentially methylated in response to MPY, TCDD and OTA. • Protein kinase activity

  20. Assessment of global and gene-specific DNA methylation in rat liver and kidney in response to non-genotoxic carcinogen exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozden, Sibel; Turgut Kara, Neslihan; Sezerman, Osman Ugur; Durasi, İlknur Melis; Chen, Tao; Demirel, Goksun; Alpertunga, Buket; Chipman, J. Kevin; Mally, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Altered expression of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes, which is regulated in part at the level of DNA methylation, is an important event involved in non-genotoxic carcinogenesis. This may serve as a marker for early detection of non-genotoxic carcinogens. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), methapyrilene (MPY) and male rat kidney carcinogens, d-limonene, p-dichlorobenzene (DCB), chloroform and ochratoxin A (OTA) on global and CpG island promoter methylation in their respective target tissues in rats. No significant dose-related effects on global DNA hypomethylation were observed in tissues of rats compared to vehicle controls using LC–MS/MS in response to short-term non-genotoxic carcinogen exposure. Initial experiments investigating gene-specific methylation using methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing, revealed partial methylation of p16 in the liver of rats treated with HCB and TCDD. However, no treatment related effects on the methylation status of Cx32, e-cadherin, VHL, c-myc, Igfbp2, and p15 were observed. We therefore applied genome-wide DNA methylation analysis using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation combined with microarrays to identify alterations in gene-specific methylation. Under the conditions of our study, some genes were differentially methylated in response to MPY and TCDD, whereas d-limonene, DCB and chloroform did not induce any methylation changes. 90-day OTA treatment revealed enrichment of several categories of genes important in protein kinase activity and mTOR cell signaling process which are related to OTA nephrocarcinogenicity. - Highlights: • Studied non-genotoxic carcinogens caused no change on global DNA hypomethylation. • d-Limonene, DCB and chloroform did not show any genome-wide methylation changes. • Some genes were differentially methylated in response to MPY, TCDD and OTA. • Protein kinase activity

  1. The application of structure-based assessment to support safety and chemistry diligence to manage genotoxic impurities in active pharmaceutical ingredients during drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobo, Krista L; Greene, Nigel; Cyr, Michelle O; Caron, Stéphane; Ku, Warren W

    2006-04-01

    Starting materials and intermediates used to synthesize pharmaceuticals are reactive in nature and may be present as impurities in the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) used for preclinical safety studies and clinical trials. Furthermore, starting materials and intermediates may be known or suspected mutagens and/or carcinogens. Therefore, during drug development due diligence need be applied from two perspectives (1) to understand potential mutagenic and carcinogenic risks associated with compounds used for synthesis and (2) to understand the capability of synthetic processes to control genotoxic impurities in the API. Recently, a task force comprised of experts from pharmaceutical industry proposed guidance, with recommendations for classification, testing, qualification and assessing risk of genotoxic impurities. In our experience the proposed structure-based classification, has differentiated 75% of starting materials and intermediates as mutagenic and non-mutagenic with high concordance (92%) when compared with Ames results. Structure-based assessment has been used to identify genotoxic hazards, and prompted evaluation of fate of genotoxic impurities in API. These two assessments (safety and chemistry) culminate in identification of genotoxic impurities known or suspected to exceed acceptable levels in API, thereby triggering actions needed to assure appropriate control and measurement methods are in place. Hypothetical case studies are presented demonstrating this multi-disciplinary approach.

  2. Investigating the embryo/larval toxic and genotoxic effects of {gamma} irradiation on zebrafish eggs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, O., E-mail: olivier.simon@irsn.fr [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et d' Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat 186, BP3, 13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Massarin, S. [Laboratoire de Modelisation Environnementale, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat 159, BP3, 13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Coppin, F. [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et d' Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat 186, BP3, 13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Hinton, T.G. [Service d' Etude du Comportement des Radionucleides dans les Ecosystemes, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat 159, BP3, 13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Gilbin, R. [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et d' Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat 186, BP3, 13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2011-11-15

    Eggs/larval of freshwater fish (Danio rerio) were exposed to low dose rates of external gamma radiation (from 1 to 1000 mGy d{sup -1}) over a 20-day period, with the objective of testing the appropriateness of the 10 mGy d{sup -1} guideline suggested by the IAEA. The present study examines different endpoints, mortality and hatching time and success of embryos as well as the genotoxicity of {gamma}-irradiations (after 48 h). The 20-day embryo-larval bioassay showed an enhanced larval resistance to starvation after chronic exposure to {gamma} irradiation (from low 1 mGy d{sup -1} to high dose rate 1000 mGy d{sup -1}) and an acceleration in hatching time. Gamma irradiation led to increased genotoxic damage Ito zebrafish egg (40-50% DNA in tail in Comet assay) from the lowest dose rate (1 mGy d{sup -1}). Possible mechanisms of {gamma} radiotoxicity and implications for radioprotection are discussed. - Highlights: > Relevant information on the {gamma} radiation impact on early life stage biota is scarce. > The eggs of zebrafish Danio rerio were selected as biological model. > We test the appropriateness of the 10 mGy d{sup -1} guideline (IAEA). > We observed effects measured at individual levels (starvation, hatching time). > Chronic gamma irradiation led to increased genotoxic damage to zebrafish egg. > {gamma} radiotoxicity mechanisms and implications for radioprotection are discussed.

  3. Absence of genotoxic activity from milk and water boiled in microwave oven in somatic cells from Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Cristina das Dores.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports an experiment for evaluation of the possible genotoxic effects of food prepared in a microwave oven, through the mutation test and somatic recombination, in wings of Drosophila melanogaster. Two crossing have been performed: a standard cross-ST and a high bioactivation cross - HB resulting in marked trans -heterozygote descendents (MH) and balanced heterozygotes (BH). The 72 hours larvas were fed with water and milk boiled both in the microwave oven and in the traditional way. The MH individual wings were analyzed, where the spots can be induced either by mutation or mitotic recombination. The experiment presented negative results related to the genotoxic effects of the water and milk boiled using the microwave oven, in MH descendents of both crossing. Therefore, under these experimental conditions, genotoxic activity were not presented by milk and water boiled in the microwave oven. However, an extensive study using different techniques is necessary to investigate the action of the food prepared in the microwave oven on the genetic material

  4. Genotoxicity of extracts of Japanese traditional herbal medicines (Kampo)

    OpenAIRE

    Makoto, Katami; Haruo, Kuboniwa; Shunichi, Maemura; Toshihiko, Yanagisawa; New Drug Discovery Laboratory, R & D Division, TSUMURA & Co.; New Drug Discovery Laboratory, R & D Division, TSUMURA & Co.; New Drug Discovery Laboratory, R & D Division, TSUMURA & Co.; New Drug Discovery Laboratory, R & D Division, TSUMURA & Co.

    2002-01-01

    The possible genotoxicity potential of 128 Japanese traditional herbal medicines (Kampo) was investigated using a bacterial reverse mutation test (the Ames test), an in vivo micronucleus test (MN test) in mouse bone marrow cells and an unscheduled DNA synthesis test (UDS test) in rat hepatocytes. Of 128 Kampo extracts examined, 98 did not induce mutations in bacteria while 30 induced mutations weakly in Salmonella typhimurium TA1537. Extracts of Scutellariae Radix, a common herbal drug, and i...

  5. Evaluation of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of water samples from the Sinos River Basin, southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Bianchi

    Full Text Available Some water bodies in the Sinos River Basin (SRB have been suffering the effects of pollution by residential, industrial and agroindustrial wastewater. The presence of cytotoxic and genotoxic compounds could compromise the water quality and the balance of these ecosystems. In this context, the research aimed to evaluate the genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of the water at four sites along the SRB (in the cities of Santo Antônio da Patrulha, Parobé, Campo Bom and Esteio, using bioassays in fish and cell culture. Samples of surface water were collected and evaluated in vitro using the Astyanax jacuhiensis fish species (micronucleus test and comet assay and the Vero lineage of cells (comet assay and cytotoxicity tests, neutral red - NR and tetrazolium MTT. The micronucleus test in fish showed no significant differences between the sampling sites, and neither did the comet assay and the MTT and NR tests in Vero cells. The comet assay showed an increase in genetic damage in the fish exposed to water samples collected in the middle and lower sections of the basin (Parobé, Campo Bom and Esteio when compared to the upper section of the basin (Santo Antônio da Patrulha. The results indicate contamination by genotoxic substances starting in the middle section of the SRB.

  6. Bacterial Composition, Genotoxicity, and Cytotoxicity of Fecal Samples from Individuals Consuming Omnivorous or Vegetarian Diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Ermanno; Prete, Roberta; Lazzi, Camilla; Pellegrini, Nicoletta; Moretti, Massimo; Corsetti, Aldo; Cenci, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    This study analyzes the composition of viable fecal bacteria and gut toxicology biomarkers of 29 healthy volunteers, who followed omnivorous, lacto-ovo-vegetarian, or vegan diets. In particular, the research was focused on the prevalence of some representative viable bacteria from the four dominant phyla (Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria) commonly present in human feces, in order to evaluate the relationship between microorganisms selected by the habitual dietary patterns and the potential risk due to fecal water (FW) genotoxicity and cytotoxicity, considered as biomarkers for cancer risk and protective food activity. The relative differences of viable bacteria among dietary groups were generally not statistically significant. However, compared to omnivores, lacto-ovo-vegetarians showed low levels of total anaerobes. Otherwise, vegans showed total anaerobes counts similar to those of omnivores, but with lower number of bifidobacteria and the highest levels of bacteria from the Bacteroides–Prevotella genera. FW genotoxicity of lacto-ovo-vegetarians resulted significantly lower either in relation to that of omnivores and vegans. Lacto-ovo-vegetarians also showed the lowest levels of cytotoxicity, while the highest were found for vegans. These results highlighted that lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet was particularly effective in a favorable modulation of microbial activity, thus contributing to a significant reduction of the genotoxic and cytotoxic risk in the gut. PMID:28293225

  7. Bacterial Composition, Genotoxicity, and Cytotoxicity of Fecal Samples from Individuals Consuming Omnivorous or Vegetarian Diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Ermanno; Prete, Roberta; Lazzi, Camilla; Pellegrini, Nicoletta; Moretti, Massimo; Corsetti, Aldo; Cenci, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    This study analyzes the composition of viable fecal bacteria and gut toxicology biomarkers of 29 healthy volunteers, who followed omnivorous, lacto-ovo-vegetarian, or vegan diets. In particular, the research was focused on the prevalence of some representative viable bacteria from the four dominant phyla (Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria) commonly present in human feces, in order to evaluate the relationship between microorganisms selected by the habitual dietary patterns and the potential risk due to fecal water (FW) genotoxicity and cytotoxicity, considered as biomarkers for cancer risk and protective food activity. The relative differences of viable bacteria among dietary groups were generally not statistically significant. However, compared to omnivores, lacto-ovo-vegetarians showed low levels of total anaerobes. Otherwise, vegans showed total anaerobes counts similar to those of omnivores, but with lower number of bifidobacteria and the highest levels of bacteria from the Bacteroides-Prevotella genera. FW genotoxicity of lacto-ovo-vegetarians resulted significantly lower either in relation to that of omnivores and vegans. Lacto-ovo-vegetarians also showed the lowest levels of cytotoxicity, while the highest were found for vegans. These results highlighted that lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet was particularly effective in a favorable modulation of microbial activity, thus contributing to a significant reduction of the genotoxic and cytotoxic risk in the gut.

  8. Genotoxic effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Julia; Felder, Eva; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Kaltbeitzel, Anke; Heinrich, Ulf Ruediger; Brochhausen, Christoph; Mailänder, Volker; Tremel, Wolfgang; Brieger, Juergen

    2015-05-01

    The potential toxicity of nanoparticles has currently provoked public and scientific discussions, and attempts to develop generally accepted handling procedures for nanoparticles are under way. The investigation of the impact of nanoparticles on human health is overdue and reliable test systems accounting for the special properties of nanomaterials must be developed. Nanoparticular zinc oxide (ZnO) may be internalised through ambient air or the topical application of cosmetics, only to name a few, with unpredictable health effects. Therefore, we analysed the determinants of ZnO nanoparticle (NP) genotoxicity. ZnO NPs (15-18 nm in diameter) were investigated at concentrations of 0.1, 10 and 100 μg mL-1 using the cell line A549. Internalised NPs were only infrequently detectable by TEM, but strongly increased Zn2+ levels in the cytoplasm and even more in the nuclear fraction, as measured by atom absorption spectroscopy, indicative of an internalised zinc and nuclear accumulation. We observed a time and dosage dependent reduction of cellular viability after ZnO NP exposure. ZnCl2 exposure to cells induced similar impairments of cellular viability. Complexation of Zn2+ with diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) resulted in the loss of toxicity of NPs, indicating the relevant role of Zn2+ for ZnO NP toxicity. Foci analyses showed the induction of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) by ZnO NPs and increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Treatment of the cells with the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) resulted in strongly decreased intracellular ROS levels and reduced DNA damage. However, a slow increase of ROS after ZnO NP exposure and reduced but not quashed DSBs after NAC-treatment suggest that Zn2+ may exert genotoxic activities without the necessity of preceding ROS-induction. Our data indicate that ZnO NP toxicity is a result of cellular Zn2+ intake. Subsequently increased ROS-levels cause DNA damage. However, we found evidence for

  9. [Study on the chemical components of edible oil fume in kitchen and its genotoxity on Drosophila].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S; Wang, Y; Zhang, J; Zhao, X

    1999-01-30

    To study the chemical components of the condensate of edible oil fume in kitchen and its genotoxicity on Drosophila. Analysis for the chemical components was carried out by gas chromatography and mass spectra (GC/MS) and its genotoxicity was studied by sex linked recessive lethal (SLRL) test in Drosophila. A total of 74 organic compounds were found in samples of condensed oil from the fume in kitchen. It included hydroxylic acids, hydrocarbons, alcohols, esters, aldehydes, ketones, aromatic compounds, and steroids, etc. The total mutagenicity rates in SLRL test induced by the samples at concentrations of 110,320 and 960 mg/L were 0.1732%, 0.4306% and 0.1707% respectively. The sterility rates of the first broods were 2.564%, 2.056% and 2.845% at above 3 concentrations respectively(P < 0.05, as compared with the control). The mutagenicity rate of the second brood at 320 mg/L was 0.530% and that of the third brood at 110 mg/L 0.540%(P < 0.001). Some of the compounds in the condensate of edible oil fume were proved to have high recessive lethal effect and genotoxic effect on the reproductive system of Drosophila.

  10. A comparative genotoxicity study of a supraphysiological dose of triiodothyronine (T₃) in obese rats subjected to either calorie-restricted diet or hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sibio, Maria Teresa; Luvizotto, Renata Azevedo Melo; Olimpio, Regiane Marques Castro; Corrêa, Camila Renata; Marino, Juliana; de Oliveira, Miriane; Conde, Sandro José; Ferreira, Ana Lúcia dos Anjos; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Nogueira, Célia Regina

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the genotoxicity of a supraphysiological dose of triiodothyronine (T3) in both obese and calorie-restricted obese animals. Fifty male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to one of the two following groups: control (C; n = 10) and obese (OB; n = 40). The C group received standard food, whereas the OB group was fed a hypercaloric diet for 20 weeks. After this period, half of the OB animals (n = 20) were subjected to a 25%-calorie restriction of standard diet for 8 weeks forming thus a new group (OR), whereas the remaining OB animals were kept on the initial hypercaloric diet. During the following two weeks, 10 OR animals continued on the calorie restriction diet, whereas the remaining 10 rats of this group formed a new group (ORS) given a supraphysiological dose of T3 (25 µg/100 g body weight) along with the calorie restriction diet. Similarly, the remaining OB animals were divided into two groups, one that continued on the hypercaloric diet (OB, n = 10), and one that received the supraphysiological dose of T3 (25 µg/100 g body weight) along with the hypercaloric diet (OS, n = 10) for two weeks. The OB group showed weight gain, increased adiposity, insulin resistance, increased leptin levels and genotoxicity; T3 administration in OS animals led to an increase in genotoxicity and oxidative stress when compared with the OB group. The OR group showed weight loss and normalized levels of adiposity, insulin resistance, serum leptin and genotoxicity, thus having features similar to those of the C group. On the other hand, the ORS group, compared to OR animals, showed higher genotoxicity. Our results indicate that regardless of diet, a supraphysiological dose of T3 causes genotoxicity and potentiates oxidative stress.

  11. Evaluation of the genotoxic and cytotoxic potential of mainstream whole smoke and smoke condensate from a cigarette containing a novel carbon filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombick, D W; Bombick, B R; Ayres, P H; Putnam, K; Avalos, J; Borgerding, M F; Doolittle, D J

    1997-09-01

    A novel carbon filter has been developed which primarily reduces the amount of certain vapor phase constituents of tobacco smoke with greater efficiency than the charcoal filters of cigarettes currently in the market. In vitro indicators of genotoxic and cytotoxic potential were used to compare the cigarette smoke condensate (particulate phase) or whole cigarette smoke (vapor phase and particulate phase) from cigarettes containing the novel carbon filter with smoke condensate or whole smoke from commercial or prototype cigarettes not containing the novel carbon filter. Ames bacterial mutagenicity, sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, and neutral red cytotoxicity assays in CHO cells were utilized to assess the genotoxic and cytotoxic potential of the cigarette smoke condensates. SCE and neutral red cytotoxicity assays were utilized to assess the genotoxic and cytotoxic potential of the whole smoke. As expected, the novel carbon filter did not significantly affect the genotoxic or cytotoxic activity of the smoke condensate, although we did observe that the use of low-nitrogen tobacco reduced the mutagenicity of the condensate in Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98. However, the whole smoke from cigarettes containing the novel carbon filter demonstrated significant reductions in genotoxic and cytotoxic potential compared to cigarettes without the novel carbon filter. The toxicity of the smoke was correlated (r = 0.7662 for cytotoxicity and r = 0.7562 for SCE induction) to the aggregate mass of several vapor phase components (acetone, acetaldehyde, acrolein, acrylonitrile, 1,3-butadiene, ammonia, NOx, HCN, benzene, isoprene, and formaldehyde) in the smoke of the cigarettes utilized in this study. In conclusion, this novel carbon filter, which significantly reduced the amount of carbonyls and other volatiles in mainstream cigarette smoke, resulted in significant reductions in the genotoxic and cytotoxic activity of the smoke as measured

  12. A comparative genotoxicity study of a supraphysiological dose of triiodothyronine (T₃ in obese rats subjected to either calorie-restricted diet or hyperthyroidism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa De Sibio

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine the genotoxicity of a supraphysiological dose of triiodothyronine (T3 in both obese and calorie-restricted obese animals. Fifty male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to one of the two following groups: control (C; n = 10 and obese (OB; n = 40. The C group received standard food, whereas the OB group was fed a hypercaloric diet for 20 weeks. After this period, half of the OB animals (n = 20 were subjected to a 25%-calorie restriction of standard diet for 8 weeks forming thus a new group (OR, whereas the remaining OB animals were kept on the initial hypercaloric diet. During the following two weeks, 10 OR animals continued on the calorie restriction diet, whereas the remaining 10 rats of this group formed a new group (ORS given a supraphysiological dose of T3 (25 µg/100 g body weight along with the calorie restriction diet. Similarly, the remaining OB animals were divided into two groups, one that continued on the hypercaloric diet (OB, n = 10, and one that received the supraphysiological dose of T3 (25 µg/100 g body weight along with the hypercaloric diet (OS, n = 10 for two weeks. The OB group showed weight gain, increased adiposity, insulin resistance, increased leptin levels and genotoxicity; T3 administration in OS animals led to an increase in genotoxicity and oxidative stress when compared with the OB group. The OR group showed weight loss and normalized levels of adiposity, insulin resistance, serum leptin and genotoxicity, thus having features similar to those of the C group. On the other hand, the ORS group, compared to OR animals, showed higher genotoxicity. Our results indicate that regardless of diet, a supraphysiological dose of T3 causes genotoxicity and potentiates oxidative stress.

  13. Evaluation of Genotoxicity and 28-day Oral Dose Toxicity on Freeze-dried Powder of Tenebrio molitor Larvae (Yellow Mealworm)

    OpenAIRE

    Han, So-Ri; Yun, Eun-Young; Kim, Ji-Young; Hwang, Jae Sam; Jeong, Eun Ju; Moon, Kyoung-Sik

    2014-01-01

    The larval form of Tenebrio molitor (T. molitor) has been eaten in many countries and provides benefits as a new food source of protein for humans. However, no information exists regarding its safety for humans. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the genotoxicity and repeated dose oral toxicity of the freeze-dried powder of T. molitor larvae. The genotoxic potential was evaluated by a standard battery testing: bacterial reverse mutation test, in vitro chromosome aberration tes...

  14. ORIGINAL ARTICLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    synthetic antimicrobial agents which have greater activity against Gram positive and Gram- negative bacteria than the older quinolone analogue, nalidixic acid and oxolinic acid which are used for urinary infection and occasionally enteric infections (1, 2). In veterinary medicine, fluoroquinolones are used for treatment and.

  15. Genotoxicity evaluation of HMG CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berber, Ahmet Ali; Celik, Mustafa; Aksoy, Hüseyin

    2014-07-01

    The genotoxic potential of rosuvastatin as one of the statin drugs was assessed by chromosomal aberrations (CAs), micronucleus (MN) and DNA damage by comet assay in the human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Rosuvastatin was used at concentrations of 0.0625, 0.125, 0.25, 0.5 and 1 µg/mL for these in vitro assays. In all assays, a negative and positive control were also included. CA frequencies were significantly increased in all concentrations at 24 hours and significantly increased in all concentrations except 0.0625 µg/mL at 48 hours, compared to the negative control. Rosuvastatin has a decreased mitotic index (MI) at 0.5- and 1-µg/mL concentrations at 24 hours and at 0.25, 0.5 and 1 µg/mL at 48 hours. A significant increase was observed for induction of MN in all treatments, compared to the negative control. Cytokinesis-block proliferation indices were not affected by treatments with rosuvastatin. In the comet assay, significant increases in comet tail length and tail moment were observed at 0.0625-, 0.5- and 1-µg/mL concentrations. Comet intensity was significantly increased in all concentrations except 0.0625 µg/mL. According to these results, rosuvastatin is cytotoxic and clastogenic/aneugenic in human peripheral lymphocytes. Further studies should be conducted in other test systems to evaluate the full genotoxic potential of rosuvastatin.

  16. Characterization of TCHQ-induced genotoxicity and mutagenesis using the pSP189 shuttle vector in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jing, E-mail: avaecn@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Yu Shouyi [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Jiao Shouhai [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Shandong Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan 250062 (China); Lv Xiaowen [Feed Safety Reference Laboratory of Ministry of Agriculture, Feed Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100081 (China); Ma Min [Laboratory of Environmental Biotechnology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhu Benzhan; Du Yuguo [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2012-01-03

    Tetrachlorohydroquinone (TCHQ) is a major toxic metabolite of the widely used wood preservative, pentachlorophenol (PCP), and it has also been implicated in PCP genotoxicity. However, the underlying mechanisms of genotoxicity and mutagenesis induced by TCHQ remain unclear. In this study, we examined the genotoxicity of TCHQ by using comet assays to detect DNA breakage and formation of TCHQ-DNA adducts. Then, we further verified the levels of mutagenesis by using the pSP189 shuttle vector in A549 human lung carcinoma cells. We demonstrated that TCHQ causes significant genotoxicity by inducing DNA breakage and forming DNA adducts. Additionally, DNA sequence analysis of the TCHQ-induced mutations revealed that 85.36% were single base substitutions, 9.76% were single base insertions, and 4.88% were large fragment deletions. More than 80% of the base substitutions occurred at G:C base pairs, and the mutations were G:C to C:G, G:C to T:A or G:C to A:T transversions and transitions. The most common types of mutations in A549 cells were G:C to A:T (37.14%) and A:T to C:G transitions (14.29%) and G:C to C:G (34.29%) and G:C to T:A (11.43%) transversions. We identified hotspots at nucleotides 129, 141, and 155 in the supF gene of plasmid pSP189. These mutation hotspots accounted for 63% of all single base substitutions. We conclude that TCHQ induces sequence-specific DNA mutations at high frequencies. Therefore, the safety of using this product would be carefully examined.

  17. Oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by ketorolac on the common carp Cyprinus carpio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galar-Martínez, M; García-Medina, S; Gómez-Olivan, L M; Pérez-Coyotl, I; Mendoza-Monroy, D J; Arrazola-Morgain, R E

    2016-09-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ketorolac is extensively used in the treatment of acute postoperative pain. This pharmaceutical has been found at concentrations of 0.2-60 µg/L in diverse water bodies around the world; however, its effects on aquatic organisms remain unknown. The present study, evaluated the oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by sublethal concentrations of ketorolac (1 and 60 µg/L) on liver, brain, and blood of the common carp Cyprinus carpio. This toxicant induced oxidative damage (increased lipid peroxidation, hydroperoxide content, and protein carbonyl content) as well as changes in antioxidant status (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activity) in liver and brain of carp. In blood, ketorolac increased the frequency of micronuclei and is therefore genotoxic for the test species. The effects observed were time and concentration dependent. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1035-1043, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Toxicity and genotoxicity of the quaternary ammonium compound benzalkonium chloride (BAC) using Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia as model systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavorgna, Margherita; Russo, Chiara; D'Abrosca, Brigida; Parrella, Alfredo; Isidori, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity and genotoxicity of the cationic surfactant benzalkonium chloride (BAC) were studied using Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia as model systems. Acute and chronic toxicity testing were performed according to the international standard guidelines and the genotoxicity was detected through the comet assay on cells from whole organisms in vivo exposed. Acute effects occurred at concentrations in the order of tens of μg/L in D. magna and hundreds of μg/L in C. dubia. Chronic effects were found at one order of magnitude less than short-term effects maintaining the same difference in sensitivity between D. magna and C. dubia. BAC induced relevant DNA damage, in both cladocerans; the lowest adverse effect levels were 0.4 and 4 ng/L for D. magna and C. dubia, respectively. As these effective concentrations are far lower than BAC occurrence in surface waters (units of μg/L) a concerning environmental risk cannot be excluded. The findings of this study showed that D. magna and C. dubia, could be used as model organisms to detect acute and chronic toxicity as well as genotoxicity at the whole organism level. - Highlights: • Benzalkonium chloride chronic effect in C. dubia was found at dozens of μg/L. • The LOAEC detected by comet assay in D. magna is in the order of hundreds of pg/L. • D. magna and C. dubia are useful model organisms to detect toxicity and genotoxicity. - Benzalkonium chloride showed chronic toxicity and genotoxicity in Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia at concentrations of environmental concern. Daphnids are useful model organisms.

  19. Evaluation of Genotoxicity and 28-day Oral Dose Toxicity on Freeze-dried Powder of Tenebrio molitor Larvae (Yellow Mealworm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, So-Ri; Yun, Eun-Young; Kim, Ji-Young; Hwang, Jae Sam; Jeong, Eun Ju; Moon, Kyoung-Sik

    2014-06-01

    The larval form of Tenebrio molitor (T. molitor) has been eaten in many countries and provides benefits as a new food source of protein for humans. However, no information exists regarding its safety for humans. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the genotoxicity and repeated dose oral toxicity of the freeze-dried powder of T. molitor larvae. The genotoxic potential was evaluated by a standard battery testing: bacterial reverse mutation test, in vitro chromosome aberration test, and in vivo micronucleus test. To assess the repeated dose toxicity, the powder was administered once daily by oral gavage to Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats at dose levels of 0, 300, 1000 and 3000 mg/kg/day for 28 days. The parameters which were applied to the study were mortality, clinical signs, body and organ weights, food consumption, ophthalmology, urinalysis, hematology, serum chemistry, gross findings and histopathologic examination. The freezedried powder of T. molitor larvae was not mutagenic or clastogenic based on results of in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity assays. Furthermore, no treatment-related changes or findings were observed in any parameters in rats after 28 days oral administration. In conclusion, the freeze-dried powder of T. molitor larvae was considered to be non-genotoxic and the NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level) was determined to be 3000 mg/kg/day in both sexes of SD rats under our experimental conditions.

  20. Evaluation of genotoxic activity of maleic hydrazide, ethyl methane sulfonate, and N-nitroso diethylamine in Tradescantia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Moya, C; Santerre-Lucas, A; Zúñiga-González, G; Torres-Bugarín, O; Padilla-Camberos, E; Feria-Velasco, A

    2001-01-01

    To assess the genotoxic activity of N-nitroso diethylamine (NDEA), maleic hydrazide (MH), and ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) using two systems: the comet assay on nuclei from Tradescantia, and the pink mutation test on Tradescantia staminal hairs (clone 4430). Tradescantia cups was obtained from Laboratorio de Citogenética y Mutagénesis del Centro de Ciencias de la Atmósfera de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and treated with: N-nitroso diethylamine (NDEA) at 1, 5, 10 mM, maleic hydrazide (MH) at 1, 5, 10 mM and ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) at 15, 30 and 45 mM; and used in both pink mutation assay and comet assay using cellular nuclei from Tradescantia staminal hairs. The observation of staminal hair was realized along eight days (6-14) after treatment), flowers produced day 14 after treatment were utilized done according to Underbrink. In previous reports on plants, were comet assay was used, breaking cellular wall and separating by centrifugation gradient are necessary. Here, nuclei from staminal hairs were obtained by squashing the cells (is not necessary to utilize to break special procedure cellular wall), collected using a nylon mesh of 80 Mm and next the comet assay was applied. Student's T test was the statistical test used for analyzing the comet assay data. Both assays showed a great sensitivity to the studied mutagens. A relationship between the dose-pink event and the dose-tail length was evident. Even though the Tradescantia mutation assay is a sensitive test with MH and EMS, low doses of NDEA were not able to induce a significant increase in the pink event frequencies; however, the comet assay was able to detect the mutagenic effect of NDEA at the same dose. Thus, it is clear that the comet assay is highly sensitive to the lowest dose of chemical mutagens. The comet assay on nuclei from Tradescantia staminal hairs is a useful tool to monitor genotoxic agents; it is simple, highly sensitive, and faster than the pink mutation test.

  1. Time-Dependent Toxic and Genotoxic Effects of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles after Long-Term and Repetitive Exposure to Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Ickrath

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NP are widely spread in consumer products. Data about the toxicological characteristics of ZnO-NP is still under controversial discussion. The human skin is the most important organ concerning ZnO-NP exposure. Intact skin was demonstrated to be a sufficient barrier against NPs; however, defect skin may allow NP contact to proliferating cells. Within these cells, stem cells are the most important toxicological target for NPs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of ZnO-NP at low-dose concentrations after long-term and repetitive exposure to human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC. Cytotoxic effects of ZnO-NP were measured by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Furthermore, genotoxicity was evaluated by the comet assay. For long-term observation over 6 weeks, transmission electron microscopy (TEM was applied. The results of the study indicated cytotoxic effects of ZnO-NP beginning at high concentrations of 50 μg/mL and genotoxic effects in hMSC exposed to 1 and 10 μg/mL ZnO-NP. Repetitive exposure enhanced cyto- but not genotoxicity. Intracellular NP accumulation was observed up to 6 weeks. The results suggest cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of ZnO-NP. Even low doses of ZnO-NP may induce toxic effects as a result of repetitive exposure and long-term cellular accumulation. This data should be considered before using ZnO-NP on damaged skin.

  2. Assessment of the genotoxic impact of pesticides on farming communities in the countryside of Santa Catarina State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueli Salvagni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the use of pesticides on farms located in the Lambedor River watershed in Guatambu, State of Santa Catarina, as well as to determine, by micronucleus testing, the risk of genotoxic impact. Samples from locally collected Cyprinus carpio, Hypostomus punctatus, Rhamdia quelen and Oreochromis niloticus gave evidence of a mean increase in micronuclei frequency from 6.21 to 13.78 in 1,000 erythrocytes, a clear indication of the genotoxic potenciality of pesticide residues in regional dams, and their significant contribution to local environmental contamination.

  3. APPLICATION OF KATG::LUX GENE CONSTRUCT FOR CYTOTOXICITY AND GENOTOXICITY MONITORING OF METOPROLOL IN ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza Hawrylik

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was the evaluation of usefulness of Escherichia coli K-12 RFM 443 katG::lux for cytotoxicity and genotoxicity monitoring of metoprolol in the environment. Metoprolol is one of the most popular cardiac drug which belongs to the group of β – blockers. The drug was applied at concentrations ranging from 10-1 mg/cm3 to 10-5 mg/cm3. Obtained data indicated the influence of metoprolol on lux gene expression and katG promotor activity in E.coli K-12. The results indicato the possibility of using of Escherichia coli K-12 RFM 443 strain with katG::lux gene construct in the monitoring of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity cardiac drug residues in the environment.

  4. Comparative cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate hexavalent chromium in human and hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricate) skin cells

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Jamie L.; Wise, Sandra S.; Xie, Hong; Zhu, Cairong; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Wise, John Pierce

    2015-01-01

    Chromium is both a global marine pollutant and a known human health hazard. In this study, we compare the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of both soluble and particulate chromate in human and hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) skin fibroblasts. Our data show that both soluble and particulate Cr(VI) induce concentration-dependent increases in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular Cr ion concentrations in both human and hawksbill sea turtle fibroblasts. Based on administered co...

  5. Sea urchin coelomocytes are resistant to a variety of DNA damaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loram, Jeannette; Raudonis, Renee; Chapman, Jecar; Lortie, Mae; Bodnar, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Increasing anthropogenic activities are creating environmental pressures that threaten marine ecosystems. Effective environmental health assessment requires the development of rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective tools to predict negative impacts at the individual and ecosystem levels. To this end, a number of biological assays using a variety of cells and organisms measuring different end points have been developed for biomonitoring programs. The sea urchin fertilization/development test has been useful for evaluating environmental toxicology and it has been proposed that sea urchin coelomocytes represent a novel cellular biosensor of environmental stress. In this study we investigated the sensitivity of coelomocytes from the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus to a variety of DNA-damaging agents including ultraviolet (UV) radiation, hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), methylmethane sulfonate (MMS) and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). LD 50 values determined for coelomocytes after 24 h of exposure to these DNA damaging agents indicated a high level of resistance to all treatments. Significant increases in the formation of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP or abasic) sites in DNA were only detected using high doses of H 2 O 2 , MMS and UV radiation. Comparison of sea urchin coelomocytes with hemocytes from the gastropod mollusk Aplysia dactylomela and the decapod crustacean Panulirus argus indicated that sensitivity to different DNA damaging agents varies between species. The high level of resistance to genotoxic agents suggests that DNA damage may not be an informative end point for environmental health assessment using sea urchin coelomocytes however, natural resistance to DNA damaging agents may have implications for the occurrence of neoplastic disease in these animals.

  6. DNA repair and cyclin D1 polymorphisms and styrene-induced genotoxicity and immunotoxicity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuricová, Miroslava; Naccarati, Alessio; Kumar, R.; Koskinen, M.; Sanyal, S.; Dušinská, M.; Tulinská, J.; Vodičková, Ludmila; Lisková, A.; Jahnová, E.; Fuortes, L.; Haufroid, V.; Hemminki, K.; Vodička, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 207, - (2005), S302-S309 ISSN 0041-008X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/03/0437 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : styrene genotoxicity * immunotoxicity Subject RIV: FM - Hygiene Impact factor: 3.148, year: 2005

  7. A diet high in fat and meat but low in dietary fibre increases the genotoxic potential of 'faecal water'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieger, Martin A.; Parlesak, Alexandr; Pool-Zobel, Beatrice

    1999-01-01

    To determine the effects of different diets on the genotoxicity of human faecal water, a diet rich in fat, meat and sugar but poor in vegetables and free of wholemeal products (diet 1) was consumed by seven healthy volunteers over a period of 12 days. One week after the end of this period......, the volunteers started to consume a diet enriched with vegetables and wholemeal products but poor in fat and meat (diet 2) over a second period of 12 days. The genotoxic effect of faecal waters obtained after both diets was assessed with the single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay) using the human colon...... and purine bases revealed no differences after pretreatment with both types of faecal water. The results indicate that diets high in fat and meat but low in dietary fibre increase the genotoxicity of faecal water to colonic cells and may contribute to an enhanced risk of colorectal cancer....

  8. Logical network of genotoxic stress-induced NF-kappaB signal transduction predicts putative target structures for therapeutic intervention strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Poltz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Rainer Poltz1, Raimo Franke1,#, Katrin Schweitzer1, Steffen Klamt2, Ernst-Dieter Gilles2, Michael Naumann11Institute of Experimental Internal Medicine, Otto von Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany; 2Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems, Magdeburg, Germany; #Present address: Department of Chemical Biology, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, GermanyAbstract: Genotoxic stress is induced by a broad range of DNA-damaging agents and could lead to a variety of human diseases including cancer. DNA damage is also therapeutically induced for cancer treatment with the aim to eliminate tumor cells. However, the effectiveness of radio- and chemotherapy is strongly hampered by tumor cell resistance. A major reason for radio- and chemotherapeutic resistances is the simultaneous activation of cell survival pathways resulting in the activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB. Here, we present a Boolean network model of the NF-κB signal transduction induced by genotoxic stress in epithelial cells. For the representation and analysis of the model, we used the formalism of logical interaction hypergraphs. Model reconstruction was based on a careful meta-analysis of published data. By calculating minimal intervention sets, we identified p53-induced protein with a death domain (PIDD, receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1, and protein inhibitor of activated STAT y (PIASy as putative therapeutic targets to abrogate NF-κB activation resulting in apoptosis. Targeting these structures therapeutically may potentiate the effectiveness of radio- and chemotherapy. Thus, the presented model allows a better understanding of the signal transduction in tumor cells and provides candidates as new therapeutic target structures.Keywords: apoptosis, Boolean network, cancer therapy, DNA-damage response, NF-κB

  9. Assessment of genotoxic effects of pesticide and vermicompost treated soil with Allium cepa test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivika Datta

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil forms a huge reservoir of nutrients that sustains life on earth. Anthropogenic and natural impacts have led to degradation of land which declines the overall quality of soil, water or vegetation. The present study involves comparison of genotoxicity of soil procured from two different agricultural sites, pesticide treated soil (PTS and vermicompost treated soil (VTS. The soil was physico-chemically characterized and showed significant differences in terms of cytotoxicity (root length; mitotic index and genotoxicity (chromosomal aberrations in Allium cepa test. The mitotic index of the control after 24 and 48 h was found to be 26.1 ± 1.6 and 26.1 ± 1.3 respectively. Mitotic index was reduced to 10.3 ± 0.9 and 9.7 ± 0.6 in 100% PTS and 24.4 ± 1.7 and 25.4 ± 0.8 in 100% VTS after 24 and 48 h of exposure, respectively. Clastogenic aberrations were found to be highest (54.5% in 100% PTS which was significantly different from VTS extract. The PTS extracts incurred significantly more cytotoxic and genotoxic effects on A. cepa in comparison to VTS. The result indicates that addition of vermicompost in agriculture field acts as soil ameliorator and plays an important role in promotion of cell division and proliferation, hence good for the plant health and crop productivity.

  10. Genotoxic Effects of Titanium Dioxide and Cerium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Respiratory Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nanomaterial industry has recently seen rapid growth, therefore, the risk assessment of human exposure to nanomaterials in consumer products is of paramount importance. The genotoxicity of nanomaterials is a fundamental aspect of hazard identification and regulatory guidance....

  11. Co-binding of pharmaceutical compounds at mineral surfaces: Molecular investigations of dimer formation at goethite/water interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Xu , Jing; Marsac , Rémi; Costa , Dominique; Cheng , Wei; Wu , Feng; Boily , Jean-François; Hanna , Khalil