WorldWideScience

Sample records for genomics transcriptional profiling

  1. Transcription profile of Escherichia coli: genomic SELEX search for regulatory targets of transcription factors

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    Ishihama, Akira; Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial genomes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), which achieves gene selectivity through interaction with sigma factors that recognize promoters, and transcription factors (TFs) that control the activity and specificity of RNAP holoenzyme. To understand the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, the identification of regulatory targets is needed for all these factors. We then performed genomic SELEX screenings of targets under the control of each sigma factor and each TF. Here we describe the assembly of 156 SELEX patterns of a total of 116 TFs performed in the presence and absence of effector ligands. The results reveal several novel concepts: (i) each TF regulates more targets than hitherto recognized; (ii) each promoter is regulated by more TFs than hitherto recognized; and (iii) the binding sites of some TFs are located within operons and even inside open reading frames. The binding sites of a set of global regulators, including cAMP receptor protein, LeuO and Lrp, overlap with those of the silencer H-NS, suggesting that certain global regulators play an anti-silencing role. To facilitate sharing of these accumulated SELEX datasets with the research community, we compiled a database, ‘Transcription Profile of Escherichia coli’ (www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/tec/). PMID:26843427

  2. Transcription profile of Escherichia coli: genomic SELEX search for regulatory targets of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihama, Akira; Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2016-03-18

    Bacterial genomes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), which achieves gene selectivity through interaction with sigma factors that recognize promoters, and transcription factors (TFs) that control the activity and specificity of RNAP holoenzyme. To understand the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, the identification of regulatory targets is needed for all these factors. We then performed genomic SELEX screenings of targets under the control of each sigma factor and each TF. Here we describe the assembly of 156 SELEX patterns of a total of 116 TFs performed in the presence and absence of effector ligands. The results reveal several novel concepts: (i) each TF regulates more targets than hitherto recognized; (ii) each promoter is regulated by more TFs than hitherto recognized; and (iii) the binding sites of some TFs are located within operons and even inside open reading frames. The binding sites of a set of global regulators, including cAMP receptor protein, LeuO and Lrp, overlap with those of the silencer H-NS, suggesting that certain global regulators play an anti-silencing role. To facilitate sharing of these accumulated SELEX datasets with the research community, we compiled a database, 'Transcription Profile of Escherichia coli' (www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/tec/). © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Genome-wide dynamic transcriptional profiling in clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 using single-nucleotide resolution RNA-Seq

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    Wang Yi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium beijerinckii is a prominent solvent-producing microbe that has great potential for biofuel and chemical industries. Although transcriptional analysis is essential to understand gene functions and regulation and thus elucidate proper strategies for further strain improvement, limited information is available on the genome-wide transcriptional analysis for C. beijerinckii. Results The genome-wide transcriptional dynamics of C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 over a batch fermentation process was investigated using high-throughput RNA-Seq technology. The gene expression profiles indicated that the glycolysis genes were highly expressed throughout the fermentation, with comparatively more active expression during acidogenesis phase. The expression of acid formation genes was down-regulated at the onset of solvent formation, in accordance with the metabolic pathway shift from acidogenesis to solventogenesis. The acetone formation gene (adc, as a part of the sol operon, exhibited highly-coordinated expression with the other sol genes. Out of the > 20 genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase in C. beijerinckii, Cbei_1722 and Cbei_2181 were highly up-regulated at the onset of solventogenesis, corresponding to their key roles in primary alcohol production. Most sporulation genes in C. beijerinckii 8052 demonstrated similar temporal expression patterns to those observed in B. subtilis and C. acetobutylicum, while sporulation sigma factor genes sigE and sigG exhibited accelerated and stronger expression in C. beijerinckii 8052, which is consistent with the more rapid forespore and endspore development in this strain. Global expression patterns for specific gene functional classes were examined using self-organizing map analysis. The genes associated with specific functional classes demonstrated global expression profiles corresponding to the cell physiological variation and metabolic pathway switch. Conclusions The results from this

  4. Comparative analysis of regulatory elements between Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae by genome-wide transcription start site profiling.

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    Donghyuk Kim

    Full Text Available Genome-wide transcription start site (TSS profiles of the enterobacteria Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were experimentally determined through modified 5' RACE followed by deep sequencing of intact primary mRNA. This identified 3,746 and 3,143 TSSs for E. coli and K. pneumoniae, respectively. Experimentally determined TSSs were then used to define promoter regions and 5' UTRs upstream of coding genes. Comparative analysis of these regulatory elements revealed the use of multiple TSSs, identical sequence motifs of promoter and Shine-Dalgarno sequence, reflecting conserved gene expression apparatuses between the two species. In both species, over 70% of primary transcripts were expressed from operons having orthologous genes during exponential growth. However, expressed orthologous genes in E. coli and K. pneumoniae showed a strikingly different organization of upstream regulatory regions with only 20% identical promoters with TSSs in both species. Over 40% of promoters had TSSs identified in only one species, despite conserved promoter sequences existing in the other species. 662 conserved promoters having TSSs in both species resulted in the same number of comparable 5' UTR pairs, and that regulatory element was found to be the most variant region in sequence among promoter, 5' UTR, and ORF. In K. pneumoniae, 48 sRNAs were predicted and 36 of them were expressed during exponential growth. Among them, 34 orthologous sRNAs between two species were analyzed in depth, and the analysis showed that many sRNAs of K. pneumoniae, including pleiotropic sRNAs such as rprA, arcZ, and sgrS, may work in the same way as in E. coli. These results reveal a new dimension of comparative genomics such that a comparison of two genomes needs to be comprehensive over all levels of genome organization.

  5. Whole genome transcript profiling from fingerstick blood samples: a comparison and feasibility study

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    Williams Adam R

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole genome gene expression profiling has revolutionized research in the past decade especially with the advent of microarrays. Recently, there have been significant improvements in whole blood RNA isolation techniques which, through stabilization of RNA at the time of sample collection, avoid bias and artifacts introduced during sample handling. Despite these improvements, current human whole blood RNA stabilization/isolation kits are limited by the requirement of a venous blood sample of at least 2.5 mL. While fingerstick blood collection has been used for many different assays, there has yet to be a kit developed to isolate high quality RNA for use in gene expression studies from such small human samples. The clinical and field testing advantages of obtaining reliable and reproducible gene expression data from a fingerstick are many; it is less invasive, time saving, more mobile, and eliminates the need of a trained phlebotomist. Furthermore, this method could also be employed in small animal studies, i.e. mice, where larger sample collections often require sacrificing the animal. In this study, we offer a rapid and simple method to extract sufficient amounts of high quality total RNA from approximately 70 μl of whole blood collected via a fingerstick using a modified protocol of the commercially available Qiagen PAXgene RNA Blood Kit. Results From two sets of fingerstick collections, about 70 uL whole blood collected via finger lancet and capillary tube, we recovered an average of 252.6 ng total RNA with an average RIN of 9.3. The post-amplification yields for 50 ng of total RNA averaged at 7.0 ug cDNA. The cDNA hybridized to Affymetrix HG-U133 Plus 2.0 GeneChips had an average % Present call of 52.5%. Both fingerstick collections were highly correlated with r2 values ranging from 0.94 to 0.97. Similarly both fingerstick collections were highly correlated to the venous collection with r2 values ranging from 0.88 to 0

  6. Mathematical Modeling of Avidity Distribution and Estimating General Binding Properties of Transcription Factors from Genome-Wide Binding Profiles.

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    Kuznetsov, Vladimir A

    2017-01-01

    The shape of the experimental frequency distributions (EFD) of diverse molecular interaction events quantifying genome-wide binding is often skewed to the rare but abundant quantities. Such distributions are systematically deviated from standard power-law functions proposed by scale-free network models suggesting that more explanatory and predictive probabilistic model(s) are needed. Identification of the mechanism-based data-driven statistical distributions that provide an estimation and prediction of binding properties of transcription factors from genome-wide binding profiles is the goal of this analytical survey. Here, we review and develop an analytical framework for modeling, analysis, and prediction of transcription factor (TF) DNA binding properties detected at the genome scale. We introduce a mixture probabilistic model of binding avidity function that includes nonspecific and specific binding events. A method for decomposition of specific and nonspecific TF-DNA binding events is proposed. We show that the Kolmogorov-Waring (KW) probability function (PF), modeling the steady state TF binding-dissociation stochastic process, fits well with the EFD for diverse TF-DNA binding datasets. Furthermore, this distribution predicts total number of TF-DNA binding sites (BSs), estimating specificity and sensitivity as well as other basic statistical features of DNA-TF binding when the experimental datasets are noise-rich and essentially incomplete. The KW distribution fits equally well to TF-DNA binding activity for different TFs including ERE, CREB, STAT1, Nanog, and Oct4. Our analysis reveals that the KW distribution and its generalized form provides the family of power-law-like distributions given in terms of hypergeometric series functions, including standard and generalized Pareto and Waring distributions, providing flexible and common skewed forms of the transcription factor binding site (TFBS) avidity distribution function. We suggest that the skewed binding

  7. Genome wide transcriptional profiling of acclimation to photoperiod in high-latitude accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Lewandowska-Sabat, Anna Monika; Winge, Per; Fjellheim, Siri; Dørum, Guro; Bones, Atle Magnar; Rognli, Odd Arne

    2012-04-01

    Three Arabidopsis thaliana accessions originating from the northernmost boundary of the species distribution in Norway (59-68°N) were used to study global wide transcriptional responses to 16 and 24 h photoperiods during flower initiation. Significant analysis of microarrays (SAM), analyses of statistically overrepresented gene ontologies (GOstat) and gene set enrichment analyses (GSEA) were used to identify candidate genes and genetic pathways underlying phenotypic adaptations of accessions to different photoperiods. Statistical analyses identified 732 and 258 differentially expressed genes between accessions in 16 and 24 h photoperiod, respectively. Among significantly expressed genes, ethylene mediated signaling pathway was significantly overrepresented in 16 h photoperiod, while genes involved in response to auxin stimulus were found to be significantly overrepresented in 24 h photoperiod. Several gene sets were found to be differentially expressed among accessions, e.g. cold acclimation, dehydration response, phytochrome signaling, vernalization response and circadian clock regulated flowering time genes. These results revealed several candidate genes and pathways likely involved in transcriptional control of photoperiodic response. In particular, ethylene and auxin signaling pathway may represent candidate genes contributing to local adaptation of high-latitude accessions of A. thaliana. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Genomic-wide transcriptional profiling in primary myoblasts reveals Runx1-regulated genes in muscle regeneration

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    Kfir Baruch Umansky

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In response to muscle damage the muscle adult stem cells are activated and differentiate into myoblasts that regenerate the damaged tissue. We have recently showed that following myopathic damage the level of the Runx1 transcription factor (TF is elevated and that during muscle regeneration this TF regulates the balance between myoblast proliferation and differentiation (Umansky et al.. We employed Runx1-dependent gene expression, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq, Assay for Transposase-Accessible Chromatin with high-throughput sequencing (ATAC-seq and histone H3K4me1/H3K27ac modification analyses to identify a subset of Runx1-regulated genes that are co-occupied by the TFs MyoD and c-Jun and are involved in muscle regeneration (Umansky et al.. The data is available at the GEO database under the superseries accession number GSE56131.

  9. Genome-wide profiling of transcription factor binding and epigenetic marks in adipocytes by ChIP-seq

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ronni; Mandrup, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    The recent advances in high-throughput sequencing combined with various other technologies have allowed detailed and genome-wide insight into the transcriptional networks that control adipogenesis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) combined with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) is one...... of the most widely used of these technologies. Using these methods, association of transcription factors, cofactors, and epigenetic marks can be mapped to DNA in a genome-wide manner. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for performing ChIP-seq analyses in preadipocytes and adipocytes. We have focused mainly...... on critical points, limitations of the assay, and quality controls required in order to obtain reproducible ChIP-seq data....

  10. Genome-wide expression profiling shows transcriptional reprogramming in Fusarium graminearum by Fusarium graminearum virus 1-DK21 infection

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    Cho Won

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fusarium graminearum virus 1 strain-DK21 (FgV1-DK21 is a mycovirus that confers hypovirulence to F. graminearum, which is the primary phytopathogenic fungus that causes Fusarium head blight (FHB disease in many cereals. Understanding the interaction between mycoviruses and plant pathogenic fungi is necessary for preventing damage caused by F. graminearum. Therefore, we investigated important cellular regulatory processes in a host containing FgV1-DK21 as compared to an uninfected parent using a transcriptional approach. Results Using a 3′-tiling microarray covering all known F. graminearum genes, we carried out genome-wide expression analyses of F. graminearum at two different time points. At the early point of growth of an infected strain as compared to an uninfected strain, genes associated with protein synthesis, including ribosome assembly, nucleolus, and ribosomal RNA processing, were significantly up-regulated. In addition, genes required for transcription and signal transduction, including fungal-specific transcription factors and cAMP signaling, respectively, were actively up-regulated. In contrast, genes involved in various metabolic pathways, particularly in producing carboxylic acids, aromatic amino acids, nitrogen compounds, and polyamines, showed dramatic down-regulation at the early time point. Moreover, genes associated with transport systems localizing to transmembranes were down-regulated at both time points. Conclusion This is the first report of global change in the prominent cellular pathways in the Fusarium host containing FgV1-DK21. The significant increase in transcripts for transcription and translation machinery in fungal host cells seems to be related to virus replication. In addition, significant down-regulation of genes required for metabolism and transporting systems in a fungal host containing the virus appears to be related to the host defense mechanism and fungal virulence. Taken together

  11. A cysteine protease (cathepsin Z) from disk abalone, Haliotis discus discus: Genomic characterization and transcriptional profiling during bacterial infections.

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    Godahewa, G I; Perera, N C N; Lee, Sukkyoung; Kim, Myoung-Jin; Lee, Jehee

    2017-09-05

    Cathepsin Z (CTSZ) is lysosomal cysteine protease of the papain superfamily. It participates in the host immune defense via phagocytosis, signal transduction, cell-cell communication, proliferation, and migration of immune cells such as monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. Hence, CTSZ is also acknowledged as an acute-phase protein in host immunity. In this study, we sought to identify the CTSZ homolog from disk abalone (AbCTSZ) and characterize it at the molecular, genomic, and transcriptional levels. AbCTSZ encodes a protein with 318 amino acids and a molecular mass of 36kDa. The structure of AbCTSZ reveals amino acid sequences that are characteristic of the signal sequence, pro-peptide, peptidase-C1 papain family cysteine protease domain, mini-loop, HIP motif, N-linked glycosylation sites, active sites, and conserved Cys residues. A pairwise comparison revealed that AbCTSZ shared the highest amino acid homology with its molluscan counterpart from Crassostrea gigas. A multiple alignment analysis revealed the conservation of functionally crucial elements of AbCTSZ, and a phylogenetic study further confirmed a proximal evolutionary relationship with its invertebrate counterparts. Further, an analysis of AbCTSZ genomic structure revealed seven exons separated by six introns, which differs from that of its vertebrate counterparts. Quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) detected the transcripts of AbCTSZ in early developmental stages and in eight different tissues. Higher levels of AbCTSZ transcripts were found in trochophore, gill, and hemocytes, highlighting its importance in the early development and immunity of disk abalone. In addition, we found that viable bacteria (Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Listeria monocytogenes) and bacterial lipopolysaccharides significantly modulated AbCTSZ transcription. Collectively, these lines of evidences suggest that AbCTSZ plays an indispensable role in the innate immunity of disk abalone. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier

  12. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Profile of Dof Transcription Factor Gene Family in Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

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    Wu, Zhiming; Cheng, Jiaowen; Cui, Junjie; Xu, Xiaowan; Liang, Guansheng; Luo, Xirong; Chen, Xiaocui; Tang, Xiangqun; Hu, Kailin; Qin, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Dof (DNA-binding One Zinc Finger) transcription factor family is unique to plants and has diverse roles associated with plant-specific phenomena, such as light, phytohormone and defense responses as well as seed development and germination. Although, genome-wide analysis of this family has been performed in many species, information regarding Dof genes in the pepper, Capsicum annuum L., is extremely limited. In this study, exhaustive searches of pepper genome revealed 33 potential CaDofs that were phylogenetically clustered into four subgroups. Twenty-nine of the 33 Dof genes could be mapped on 11 chromosomes, except for chromosome 7. The intron/exon organizations and conserved motif compositions of these genes were also analyzed. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis and classification of the Dof transcription factor family in eight plant species revealed that S. lycopersicum and C. annuum as well as O. sativa and S. bicolor Dof proteins may have evolved conservatively. Moreover, comprehensive expression analysis of CaDofs using a RNA-seq atlas and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) revealed that these genes exhibit a variety of expression patterns. Most of the CaDofs were expressed in at least one of the tissues tested, whereas several genes were identified as being highly responsive to heat and salt stresses. Overall, this study describes the first genome-wide analysis of the pepper Dof family, whose genes exhibited different expression patterns in all primary fruit developmental stages and tissue types, as in response to abiotic stress. In particular, some Dof genes might be used as biomarkers for heat and salt stress. The results could expand our understanding of the roles of Dof genes in pepper.

  13. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of peripheral blood leukocytes from cattle infected with Mycobacterium bovis reveals suppression of host immune genes

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    Killick Kate E

    2011-12-01

    study demonstrates that genome-wide transcriptional profiling of PBL can distinguish active M. bovis-infected animals from control non-infected animals. Furthermore, the results obtained support previous investigations demonstrating that mycobacterial infection is associated with host transcriptional suppression. These data support the use of transcriptomic technologies to enable the identification of robust, reliable transcriptional markers of active M. bovis infection.

  14. MYB Transcription Factors in Chinese Pear (Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd.: Genome-Wide Identification, Classification and Expression Profiling during Fruit Development

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    Yun Peng eCao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The MYB family is one of the largest families of transcription factors in plants. Although some MYBs have been reported to play roles in secondary metabolism, no comprehensive study of the MYB family in Chinese pear (Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd. has been reported. In the present study, we performed genome-wide analysis of MYB genes in Chinese pear, designated as PbMYBs, including analyses of their phylogenic relationships, structures, chromosomal locations, promoter regions, GO annotations and collinearity. A total of 129 PbMYB genes were identified in the pear genome and were divided into 31 subgroups based on phylogenetic analysis. These PbMYBs were unevenly distributed among 16 chromosomes (total of 17 chromosomes. The occurrence of gene duplication events indicated that whole-genome duplication and segmental duplication likely played key roles in expansion of the PbMYB gene family. Ka/Ks analysis suggested that the duplicated PbMYBs mainly experienced purifying selection with restrictive functional divergence after the duplication events. Interspecies microsynteny analysis revealed maximum orthology between pear and peach, followed by plum and strawberry. Subsequently, the expression patterns of 20 PbMYB genes that may be involved in lignin biosynthesis according to their phylogenetic relationships were examined throughout fruit development. Among the twenty genes examined, PbMYB25 and PbMYB52 exhibited expression patterns consistent with the typical variations in the lignin content previously reported. Moreover, sub-cellular localization analysis revealed that two proteins PbMYB25 and PbMYB52 were localized to the nucleus. All together, PbMYB25 and PbMYB52 were inferred to be candidate genes involved in the regulation of lignin biosynthesis during the development of pear fruit. This study provides useful information for further functional analysis of the MYB gene family in pear.

  15. The ModERN Resource: Genome-Wide Binding Profiles for Hundreds ofDrosophilaandCaenorhabditis elegansTranscription Factors.

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    Kudron, Michelle M; Victorsen, Alec; Gevirtzman, Louis; Hillier, LaDeana W; Fisher, William W; Vafeados, Dionne; Kirkey, Matt; Hammonds, Ann S; Gersch, Jeffery; Ammouri, Haneen; Wall, Martha L; Moran, Jennifer; Steffen, David; Szynkarek, Matt; Seabrook-Sturgis, Samantha; Jameel, Nader; Kadaba, Madhura; Patton, Jaeda; Terrell, Robert; Corson, Mitch; Durham, Timothy J; Park, Soo; Samanta, Swapna; Han, Mei; Xu, Jinrui; Yan, Koon-Kiu; Celniker, Susan E; White, Kevin P; Ma, Lijia; Gerstein, Mark; Reinke, Valerie; Waterston, Robert H

    2018-03-01

    To develop a catalog of regulatory sites in two major model organisms, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans , the modERN (model organism Encyclopedia of Regulatory Networks) consortium has systematically assayed the binding sites of transcription factors (TFs). Combined with data produced by our predecessor, modENCODE (Model Organism ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements), we now have data for 262 TFs identifying 1.23 M sites in the fly genome and 217 TFs identifying 0.67 M sites in the worm genome. Because sites from different TFs are often overlapping and tightly clustered, they fall into 91,011 and 59,150 regions in the fly and worm, respectively, and these binding sites span as little as 8.7 and 5.8 Mb in the two organisms. Clusters with large numbers of sites (so-called high occupancy target, or HOT regions) predominantly associate with broadly expressed genes, whereas clusters containing sites from just a few factors are associated with genes expressed in tissue-specific patterns. All of the strains expressing GFP-tagged TFs are available at the stock centers, and the chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing data are available through the ENCODE Data Coordinating Center and also through a simple interface (http://epic.gs.washington.edu/modERN/) that facilitates rapid accessibility of processed data sets. These data will facilitate a vast number of scientific inquiries into the function of individual TFs in key developmental, metabolic, and defense and homeostatic regulatory pathways, as well as provide a broader perspective on how individual TFs work together in local networks and globally across the life spans of these two key model organisms. Copyright © 2018 by the Genetics Society of America.

  16. Genome-wide transcript profiling of endosperm without paternal contribution identifies parent-of-origin-dependent regulation of AGAMOUS-LIKE36.

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    Reza Shirzadi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Seed development in angiosperms is dependent on the interplay among different transcriptional programs operating in the embryo, the endosperm, and the maternally-derived seed coat. In angiosperms, the embryo and the endosperm are products of double fertilization during which the two pollen sperm cells fuse with the egg cell and the central cell of the female gametophyte. In Arabidopsis, analyses of mutants in the cell-cycle regulator CYCLIN DEPENDENT KINASE A;1 (CKDA;1 have revealed the importance of a paternal genome for the effective development of the endosperm and ultimately the seed. Here we have exploited cdka;1 fertilization as a novel tool for the identification of seed regulators and factors involved in parent-of-origin-specific regulation during seed development. We have generated genome-wide transcription profiles of cdka;1 fertilized seeds and identified approximately 600 genes that are downregulated in the absence of a paternal genome. Among those, AGAMOUS-LIKE (AGL genes encoding Type-I MADS-box transcription factors were significantly overrepresented. Here, AGL36 was chosen for an in-depth study and shown to be imprinted. We demonstrate that AGL36 parent-of-origin-dependent expression is controlled by the activity of METHYLTRANSFERASE1 (MET1 maintenance DNA methyltransferase and DEMETER (DME DNA glycosylase. Interestingly, our data also show that the active maternal allele of AGL36 is regulated throughout endosperm development by components of the FIS Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2, revealing a new type of dual epigenetic regulation in seeds.

  17. Genome-wide analysis and expression profiling of DNA-binding with one zinc finger (Dof) transcription factor family in potato.

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    Venkatesh, Jelli; Park, Se Won

    2015-09-01

    DNA-binding with one finger (Dof) domain proteins are a multigene family of plant-specific transcription factors involved in numerous aspects of plant growth and development. Here, we report a genome-wide search for Solanum tuberosum Dof (StDof) genes and their expression profiles at various developmental stages and in response to various abiotic stresses. In addition, a complete overview of Dof gene family in potato is presented, including the gene structures, chromosomal locations, cis-regulatory elements, conserved protein domains, and phylogenetic inferences. Based on the genome-wide analysis, we identified 35 full-length protein-coding StDof genes, unevenly distributed on 10 chromosomes. Phylogenetic analysis with Dof members from diverse plant species showed that StDof genes can be classified into four subgroups (StDofI, II, III, and IV). qPCR expression analysis of StDof gene transcripts showed the distinct expression patterns of StDof genes in various potato organs, and tuber developmental stages analyzed. Many StDof genes were upregulated in response to drought, salinity, and ABA treatments. Overall, the StDof gene expression pattern and the number of over-represented cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of the StDof genes indicate that most of the StDof genes have redundant functions. The detailed genomic information and expression profiles of the StDof gene homologs in the present study provide opportunities for functional analyses to unravel the genes' exact role in plant growth and development as well as in abiotic stress tolerance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Transcript profiling of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. using the GeneChip® Soybean Genome Array: optimizing analysis by masking biased probes

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    Gronwald John W

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. and soybean (Glycine max both belong to the Phaseoleae tribe and share significant coding sequence homology. This suggests that the GeneChip® Soybean Genome Array (soybean GeneChip may be used for gene expression studies using common bean. Results To evaluate the utility of the soybean GeneChip for transcript profiling of common bean, we hybridized cRNAs purified from nodule, leaf, and root of common bean and soybean in triplicate to the soybean GeneChip. Initial data analysis showed a decreased sensitivity and accuracy of measuring differential gene expression in common bean cross-species hybridization (CSH GeneChip data compared to that of soybean. We employed a method that masked putative probes targeting inter-species variable (ISV regions between common bean and soybean. A masking signal intensity threshold was selected that optimized both sensitivity and accuracy of measuring differential gene expression. After masking for ISV regions, the number of differentially-expressed genes identified in common bean was increased by 2.8-fold reflecting increased sensitivity. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR analysis of 20 randomly selected genes and purine-ureide pathway genes demonstrated an increased accuracy of measuring differential gene expression after masking for ISV regions. We also evaluated masked probe frequency per probe set to gain insight into the sequence divergence pattern between common bean and soybean. The sequence divergence pattern analysis suggested that the genes for basic cellular functions and metabolism were highly conserved between soybean and common bean. Additionally, our results show that some classes of genes, particularly those associated with environmental adaptation, are highly divergent. Conclusions The soybean GeneChip is a suitable cross-species platform for transcript profiling in common bean when used in combination with the masking protocol described. In

  19. Evaluation of genome damage and transcription profile of DNA damage/repair response genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soren, D.C.; Saini, Divyalakshmi; Das, Birajalaxmi

    2016-01-01

    Humans are exposed to various physical and chemical mutagens in their life time. Physical mutagens, like ionizing radiation (IR), may induce adverse effect at high acute dose exposures in human cells. However, there are inconsistent results on the effect of low dose radiation exposure in human cells. There are a variety of DNA damage endpoints to evaluate the effect of low dose radiation in human cells. DNA damage response (DDR) may lead to changes in expression profile of many genes. In the present study, an attempt has been made to evaluate genome damage at low dose IR exposure in human blood lymphocytes. Cytochalasin blocked micronuclei (CBMN) assay has been used to determine the frequency of micronuclei in binucleated cells in PBMCs exposed to IR. Transcription profile of ATM, P53, GADD45A, CDKN1A, TRF1 and TRF2 genes was studied using real time quantitative PCR. Venous blood samples collected from 10 random healthy donors were irradiated with different doses of γ-radiation ( 137 Cs) along with sham irradiated control. Whole blood culture was set up using microculture technique. Blood samples were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin, and CBMN assay was performed. An average of 2,500 binucleated cells was scored for each dose point. For gene expression analysis, total RNA was isolated, cDNA was prepared, and gene expression analysis for ATM, P53, CDKN1A, GADD45A, TRF1 and TRF2 was done using real time PCR. Our results revealed no significant increase in the frequency of MN up to 100 mGy as compared to control. However, no significant alteration in gene expression profile was observed. In conclusion, no significant dose response was observed at the frequency of MN as well as the expression profile of DDR/repair genes, suggesting low dose radiation did not induce significant DNA damage at these acute dose exposures. (author)

  20. Enriching Genomic Resources and Transcriptional Profile Analysis of Miscanthus sinensis under Drought Stress Based on RNA Sequencing

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    Gang Nie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Miscanthus × giganteus is wildly cultivated as a potential biofuel feedstock around the world; however, the narrow genetic basis and sterile characteristics have become a limitation for its utilization. As a progenitor of M. × giganteus, M. sinensis is widely distributed around East Asia providing well abiotic stress tolerance. To enrich the M. sinensis genomic databases and resources, we sequenced and annotated the transcriptome of M. sinensis by using an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Approximately 316 million high-quality trimmed reads were generated from 349 million raw reads, and a total of 114,747 unigenes were obtained after de novo assembly. Furthermore, 95,897 (83.57% unigenes were annotated to at least one database including NR, Swiss-Prot, KEGG, COG, GO, and NT, supporting that the sequences obtained were annotated properly. Differentially expressed gene analysis indicates that drought stress 15 days could be a critical period for M. sinensis response to drought stress. The high-throughput transcriptome sequencing of M. sinensis under drought stress has greatly enriched the current genomic available resources. The comparison of DEGs under different periods of drought stress identified a wealth of candidate genes involved in drought tolerance regulatory networks, which will facilitate further genetic improvement and molecular studies of the M. sinensis.

  1. Genome-wide identification and transcriptional profiling analysis of auxin response-related gene families in cucumber.

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    Wu, Jian; Liu, Songyu; Guan, Xiaoyan; Chen, Lifei; He, Yanjun; Wang, Jie; Lu, Gang

    2014-04-08

    Auxin signaling has a vital function in the regulation of plant growth and development, both which are known to be mediated by auxin-responsive genes. So far, significant progress has been made toward the identification and characterization of auxin-response genes in several model plants, while no systematic analysis for these families was reported in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), a reference species for Cucurbitaceae crops. The comprehensive analyses will help design experiments for functional validation of their precise roles in plant development and stress responses. A genome-wide search for auxin-response gene homologues identified 16 auxin-response factors (ARFs), 27 auxin/indole acetic acids (Aux/IAAs), 10 Gretchen Hagen 3 (GH3s), 61 small auxin-up mRNAs (SAURs), and 39 lateral organ boundaries (LBDs) in cucumber. Sequence analysis together with the organization of putative motifs indicated the potential diverse functions of these five auxin-related family members. The distribution and density of auxin response-related genes on chromosomes were not uniform. Evolutionary analysis showed that the chromosomal segment duplications mainly contributed to the expansion of the CsARF, CsIAA, CsGH3, and CsLBD gene families. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that many ARFs, AUX/IAAs, GH3s, SAURs, and LBD genes were expressed in diverse patterns within different organs/tissues and during different development stages. They were also implicated in IAA, methyl jasmonic acid, or salicylic acid response, which is consistent with the finding that a great number of diverse cis-elements are present in their promoter regions involving a variety of signaling transduction pathways. Genome-wide comparative analysis of auxin response-related family genes and their expression analysis provide new evidence for the potential role of auxin in development and hormone response of plants. Our data imply that the auxin response genes may be involved in various vegetative

  2. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of Botrytis cinerea genes targeting plant cell walls during infections of different hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eBlanco-Ulate

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cell walls are barriers that impair colonization of host tissues, but also are important reservoirs of energy-rich sugars. Growing hyphae of necrotrophic fungal pathogens, such as Botrytis cinerea (Botrytis, henceforth, secrete enzymes that disassemble cell wall polysaccharides. In this work we describe the annotation of 275 putative secreted Carbohydrate-Active enZymes (CAZymes identified in the Botrytis B05.10 genome. Using RNAseq we determined which Botrytis CAZymes were expressed during infections of lettuce leaves, ripe tomato fruit, and grape berries. On the three hosts, Botrytis expressed a common group of 229 potentially secreted CAZymes, including 28 pectin backbone-modifying enzymes, 21 hemicellulose-modifying proteins, 18 enzymes that might target pectin and hemicellulose side-branches, and 16 enzymes predicted to degrade cellulose. The diversity of the Botrytis CAZymes may be partly responsible for its wide host range. Thirty-six candidate CAZymes with secretion signals were found exclusively when Botrytis interacted with ripe tomato fruit and grape berries. Pectin polysaccharides are notably abundant in grape and tomato cell walls, but lettuce leaf walls have less pectin and are richer in hemicelluloses and cellulose. The results of this study not only suggest that Botrytis targets similar wall polysaccharide networks on fruit and leaves, but also that it may selectively attack host wall polysaccharide substrates depending on the host tissue.

  3. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of Botrytis cinerea genes targeting plant cell walls during infections of different hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Ulate, Barbara; Morales-Cruz, Abraham; Amrine, Katherine C. H.; Labavitch, John M.; Powell, Ann L. T.; Cantu, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Cell walls are barriers that impair colonization of host tissues, but also are important reservoirs of energy-rich sugars. Growing hyphae of necrotrophic fungal pathogens, such as Botrytis cinerea (Botrytis, henceforth), secrete enzymes that disassemble cell wall polysaccharides. In this work we describe the annotation of 275 putative secreted Carbohydrate-Active enZymes (CAZymes) identified in the Botrytis B05.10 genome. Using RNAseq we determined which Botrytis CAZymes were expressed during infections of lettuce leaves, ripe tomato fruit, and grape berries. On the three hosts, Botrytis expressed a common group of 229 potentially secreted CAZymes, including 28 pectin backbone-modifying enzymes, 21 hemicellulose-modifying proteins, 18 enzymes that might target pectin and hemicellulose side-branches, and 16 enzymes predicted to degrade cellulose. The diversity of the Botrytis CAZymes may be partly responsible for its wide host range. Thirty-six candidate CAZymes with secretion signals were found exclusively when Botrytis interacted with ripe tomato fruit and grape berries. Pectin polysaccharides are notably abundant in grape and tomato cell walls, but lettuce leaf walls have less pectin and are richer in hemicelluloses and cellulose. The results of this study not only suggest that Botrytis targets similar wall polysaccharide networks on fruit and leaves, but also that it may selectively attack host wall polysaccharide substrates depending on the host tissue. PMID:25232357

  4. Whole genome transcript profiling of drug induced steatosis in rats reveals a gene signature predictive of outcome.

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    Nishika Sahini

    Full Text Available Drug induced steatosis (DIS is characterised by excess triglyceride accumulation in the form of lipid droplets (LD in liver cells. To explore mechanisms underlying DIS we interrogated the publically available microarray data from the Japanese Toxicogenomics Project (TGP to study comprehensively whole genome gene expression changes in the liver of treated rats. For this purpose a total of 17 and 12 drugs which are diverse in molecular structure and mode of action were considered based on their ability to cause either steatosis or phospholipidosis, respectively, while 7 drugs served as negative controls. In our efforts we focused on 200 genes which are considered to be mechanistically relevant in the process of lipid droplet biogenesis in hepatocytes as recently published (Sahini and Borlak, 2014. Based on mechanistic considerations we identified 19 genes which displayed dose dependent responses while 10 genes showed time dependency. Importantly, the present study defined 9 genes (ANGPTL4, FABP7, FADS1, FGF21, GOT1, LDLR, GK, STAT3, and PKLR as signature genes to predict DIS. Moreover, cross tabulation revealed 9 genes to be regulated ≥10 times amongst the various conditions and included genes linked to glucose metabolism, lipid transport and lipogenesis as well as signalling events. Additionally, a comparison between drugs causing phospholipidosis and/or steatosis revealed 26 genes to be regulated in common including 4 signature genes to predict DIS (PKLR, GK, FABP7 and FADS1. Furthermore, a comparison between in vivo single dose (3, 6, 9 and 24 h and findings from rat hepatocyte studies (2 h, 8 h, 24 h identified 10 genes which are regulated in common and contained 2 DIS signature genes (FABP7, FGF21. Altogether, our studies provide comprehensive information on mechanistically linked gene expression changes of a range of drugs causing steatosis and phospholipidosis and encourage the screening of DIS signature genes at the preclinical stage.

  5. Salmonella Typhimurium transcription profiles in space flight

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Salmonella transcription profiles were obtained from samples flown on space shuttle mission STS-115 and compared to profiles from Salmonella grown under identical...

  6. Genome Trees from Conservation Profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the genome tree depends on the potential evolutionary significance in the clustering of species according to similarities in the gene content of their genomes. In this respect, genome trees have often been identified with species trees. With the rapid expansion of genome sequence data it becomes of increasing importance to develop accurate methods for grasping global trends for the phylogenetic signals that mutually link the various genomes. We therefore derive here the methodological concept of genome trees based on protein conservation profiles in multiple species. The basic idea in this derivation is that the multi-component "presence-absence" protein conservation profiles permit tracking of common evolutionary histories of genes across multiple genomes. We show that a significant reduction in informational redundancy is achieved by considering only the subset of distinct conservation profiles. Beyond these basic ideas, we point out various pitfalls and limitations associated with the data handling, paving the way for further improvements. As an illustration for the methods, we analyze a genome tree based on the above principles, along with a series of other trees derived from the same data and based on pair-wise comparisons (ancestral duplication-conservation and shared orthologs. In all trees we observe a sharp discrimination between the three primary domains of life: Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. The new genome tree, based on conservation profiles, displays a significant correspondence with classically recognized taxonomical groupings, along with a series of departures from such conventional clusterings.

  7. Genomic data on breast cancer transcript profile modulation by 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 and 17-beta-estradiol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette A. Aka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The data presented here are related to the research article entitled “Estradiol-independent modulation of breast cancer transcript profile by 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1” (J.A. Aka, E.L. Calvo, S.X. Lin, 2016 [1]. We evaluated the effect of the steroidal enzyme 17β-HSD1 and its product, the estrogenic hormone 17-beta-estradiol (E2, on gene transcription profile of breast cancer cells. RNA interference technique was used to knock down the 17β-HSD1 gene (HSD17B1 in the hormone-dependent breast cancer cell line T47D in steroid-deprived medium. Transfected cells were subsequently treated with E2, and microarray analyses (with three contrasts were used to investigate (i the effect of 17β-HSD1 expression on breast cancer cell transcript profile in steroid-deprived condition, (ii the effect of E2 on breast cancer gene expression and (iii if E2 affects gene regulation by 17β-HSD1. Functional enrichments of the differentially expressed genes were assessed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA. Here, we showed data on 140 genes that are induced or repressed 1.5 time or higher (p < 0.05 in the HSD17B1-silenced and E2-treated T47D cells revealed by microarray analysis, and presented the 14 functional terms found in the cancer and in the cell death and survival categories revealed by the IPA biological function analysis. Data on IPA Canonical Pathway and network analyses is also presented. Further discussion on gene regulation by 17β-HSD1 and E2 is provided in the accompanying publication [1].

  8. Combined genome-wide expression profiling and targeted RNA interference in primary mouse macrophages reveals perturbation of transcriptional networks associated with interferon signalling

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    Craigon Marie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferons (IFNs are potent antiviral cytokines capable of reprogramming the macrophage phenotype through the induction of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs. Here we have used targeted RNA interference to suppress the expression of a number of key genes associated with IFN signalling in murine macrophages prior to stimulation with interferon-gamma. Genome-wide changes in transcript abundance caused by siRNA activity were measured using exon-level microarrays in the presence or absence of IFNγ. Results Transfection of murine bone-marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs with a non-targeting (control siRNA and 11 sequence-specific siRNAs was performed using a cationic lipid transfection reagent (Lipofectamine2000 prior to stimulation with IFNγ. Total RNA was harvested from cells and gene expression measured on Affymetrix GeneChip Mouse Exon 1.0 ST Arrays. Network-based analysis of these data revealed six siRNAs to cause a marked shift in the macrophage transcriptome in the presence or absence IFNγ. These six siRNAs targeted the Ifnb1, Irf3, Irf5, Stat1, Stat2 and Nfkb2 transcripts. The perturbation of the transcriptome by the six siRNAs was highly similar in each case and affected the expression of over 600 downstream transcripts. Regulated transcripts were clustered based on co-expression into five major groups corresponding to transcriptional networks associated with the type I and II IFN response, cell cycle regulation, and NF-KB signalling. In addition we have observed a significant non-specific immune stimulation of cells transfected with siRNA using Lipofectamine2000, suggesting use of this reagent in BMDMs, even at low concentrations, is enough to induce a type I IFN response. Conclusion Our results provide evidence that the type I IFN response in murine BMDMs is dependent on Ifnb1, Irf3, Irf5, Stat1, Stat2 and Nfkb2, and that siRNAs targeted to these genes results in perturbation of key transcriptional networks associated

  9. Transcriptional features of genomic regulatory blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akalin, Altuna; Fredman, David; Arner, Erik; Dong, Xianjun; Bryne, Jan Christian; Suzuki, Harukazu; Daub, Carsten O; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Lenhard, Boris

    2009-01-01

    Genomic regulatory blocks (GRBs) are chromosomal regions spanned by highly conserved non-coding elements (HCNEs), most of which serve as regulatory inputs of one target gene in the region. The target genes are most often transcription factors involved in embryonic development and differentiation. GRBs often contain extensive gene deserts, as well as additional 'bystander' genes intertwined with HCNEs but whose expression and function are unrelated to those of the target gene. The tight regulation of target genes, complex arrangement of regulatory inputs, and the differential responsiveness of genes in the region call for the examination of fundamental rules governing transcriptional activity in GRBs. Here we use extensive CAGE tag mapping of transcription start sites across different human tissues and differentiation stages combined with expression data and a number of sequence and epigenetic features to discover these rules and patterns. We show evidence that GRB target genes have properties that set them apart from their bystanders as well as other genes in the genome: longer CpG islands, a higher number and wider spacing of alternative transcription start sites, and a distinct composition of transcription factor binding sites in their core/proximal promoters. Target gene expression correlates with the acetylation state of HCNEs in the region. Additionally, target gene promoters have a distinct combination of activating and repressing histone modifications in mouse embryonic stem cell lines. GRB targets are genes with a number of unique features that are the likely cause of their ability to respond to regulatory inputs from very long distances.

  10. Genome-wide identification of MAPKK and MAPKKK gene families in tomato and transcriptional profiling analysis during development and stress response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wu

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades have important functions in plant growth, development, and response to various stresses. The MAPKK and MAPKKK gene families in tomato have never been systematically analyzed. In this study, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the MAPKK and MAPKKK gene families in tomato and identified 5 MAPKK genes and 89 MAPKKK genes. Phylogenetic analyses of the MAPKK and MAPKKK gene families showed that all the MAPKK genes formed four groups (groups A, B, C, and D, whereas all the MAPKKK genes were classified into three subfamilies, namely, MEKK, RAF, and ZIK. Evolutionary analysis showed that whole genome or chromosomal segment duplications were the main factors responsible for the expansion of the MAPKK and MAPKKK gene families in tomato. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that the majority of MAPKK and MAPKKK genes were expressed in all tested organs with considerable differences in transcript levels indicating that they might be constitutively expressed. However, the expression level of most of these genes changed significantly under heat, cold, drought, salt, and Pseudomonas syringae treatment. Furthermore, their expression levels exhibited significant changes in response to salicylic acid and indole-3-acetic acid treatment, implying that these genes might have important roles in the plant hormone network. Our comparative analysis of the MAPKK and MAPKKK families would improve our understanding of the evolution and functional characterization of MAPK cascades in tomato.

  11. Transcriptional profiling of Aspergillus niger

    OpenAIRE

    Veen, van der, D.

    2009-01-01

    The industrially important fungus Aspergillus niger feeds naturally on decomposing plant material, of which a significant proportion is lipid. Examination of the A. niger genome sequence suggested that all proteins required for metabolic conversion of lipids are present, including 63 predicted lipases. In contrast to polysaccharide-degrading enzyme networks, not much is known about the signaling and regulatory processes that control lipase expression and activity in fungi. This project was ai...

  12. Var transcription profiling of Plasmodium falciparum 3D7: assignment of cytoadherent phenotypes to dominant transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wunderlich Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytoadherence of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells is mediated by var gene-encoded P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein-1 and host receptor preference depends in most cases on which of the 50–60 var genes per genome is expressed. Enrichment of phenotypically homogenous parasites by panning on receptor expressing cells is fundamental for the identification of the corresponding var transcript. Methods P. falciparum 3D7 parasites were panned on several transfected CHO-cell lines and their var transcripts analysed by i reverse transcription/PCR/cloning/sequencing using a universal DBLα specific oligonucleotide pair and ii by reverse transcription followed by quantitative PCR using 57 different oligonucleotide pairs. Results Each cytoadherence selected parasite line also adhered to untransfected CHO-745 cells and upregulation of the var gene PFD995/PFD1000c was consistently associated with cytoadherence to all but one CHO cell line. In addition, parasites panned on different CHO cell lines revealed candidate var genes which reproducibly associated to the respective cytoadherent phenotype. The transcription profile obtained by RT-PCR/cloning/sequencing differed significantly from that of RT-quantitative PCR. Conclusion Transfected CHO cell lines are of limited use for the creation of monophenotypic cytoadherent parasite lines. Nevertheless, 3D7 parasites can be reproducibly selected for the transcription of different determined var genes without genetic manipulation. Most importantly, var transcription analysis by RT-PCR/cloning/sequencing may lead to erroneous interpretation of var transcription profiles.

  13. Annotation of microsporidian genomes using transcriptional signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyretaillade, Eric; Parisot, Nicolas; Polonais, Valérie; Terrat, Sébastien; Denonfoux, Jérémie; Dugat-Bony, Eric; Wawrzyniak, Ivan; Biderre-Petit, Corinne; Mahul, Antoine; Rimour, Sébastien; Gonçalves, Olivier; Bornes, Stéphanie; Delbac, Frédéric; Chebance, Brigitte; Duprat, Simone; Samson, Gaëlle; Katinka, Michael; Weissenbach, Jean; Wincker, Patrick; Peyret, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    High-quality annotation of microsporidian genomes is essential for understanding the biological processes that govern the development of these parasites. Here we present an improved structural annotation method using transcriptional DNA signals. We apply this method to re-annotate four previously annotated genomes, which allow us to detect annotation errors and identify a significant number of unpredicted genes. We then annotate the newly sequenced genome of Anncaliia algerae. A comparative genomic analysis of A. algerae permits the identification of not only microsporidian core genes, but also potentially highly expressed genes encoding membrane-associated proteins, which represent good candidates involved in the spore architecture, the invasion process and the microsporidian-host relationships. Furthermore, we find that the ten-fold variation in microsporidian genome sizes is not due to gene number, size or complexity, but instead stems from the presence of transposable elements. Such elements, along with kinase regulatory pathways and specific transporters, appear to be key factors in microsporidian adaptive processes.

  14. Transcription profiling of sparkling wine second fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penacho, Vanessa; Valero, Eva; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2012-02-01

    There is a specific set of stress factors that yeast cells must overcome under second fermentation conditions, during the production of sparkling wines by the traditional (Champenoise) method. Some of them are the same as those of the primary fermentation of still wines, although perhaps with a different intensity (high ethanol concentration, low pH, nitrogen starvation) while others are more specific to second fermentation (low temperature, CO(2) overpressure). The transcription profile of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during primary wine fermentation has been studied by several research groups, but this is the first report on yeast transcriptome under second fermentation conditions. Our results indicate that the main pathways affected by these particular conditions are related to aerobic respiration, but genes related to vacuolar and peroxisomal functions were also highlighted in this study. A parallelism between the transcription profile of wine yeast during primary and second fermentation is appreciated, with ethanol appearing as the main factor driving gene transcription during second fermentation. Low temperature seems to also influence yeast transcription profile under these particular winemaking conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Simultaneous Profiling of 194 Distinct Receptor Transcripts in Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Byong H.; Jensen, Karin J.; Hatch, Jaime A.; Janes, Kevin A.

    2013-01-01

    Many signal transduction cascades are initiated by transmembrane receptors with the presence or absence and abundance of receptors dictating cellular responsiveness. Here, we provide a validated array of quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) reagents for high-throughput profiling of the presence and relative abundance of transcripts for 194 transmembrane receptors in the human genome. We found that the qRT-PCR array had greater sensitivity and specificity for the detected receptor transcript profiles compared to conventional oligonucleotide microarrays or exon microarrays. The qRT-PCR array also distinguished functional receptor presence versus absence more accurately than deep sequencing of adenylated RNA species, RNA-seq. By applying qRT-PCR-based receptor transcript profiling to 40 human cell lines representing four main tissues (pancreas, skin, breast, and colon), we identified clusters of cell lines with enhanced signaling capabilities and revealed a role for receptor silencing in defining tissue lineage. Ectopic expression of the interleukin 10 (IL-10) receptor encoding gene IL10RA in melanoma cells engaged an IL-10 autocrine loop not otherwise present in this cell type, which altered signaling, gene expression, and cellular responses to proinflammatory stimuli. Our array provides a rapid, inexpensive, and convenient means for assigning a receptor signature to any human cell or tissue type. PMID:23921087

  16. A bifunctional invertebrate-type lysozyme from the disk abalone, Haliotis discus discus: genome organization, transcriptional profiling and biological activities of recombinant protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathige, S D N K; Umasuthan, Navaneethaiyer; Kasthuri, Saranya Revathy; Whang, Ilson; Lim, Bong-Soo; Nam, Bo-Hye; Lee, Jehee

    2013-10-01

    Lysozyme is an important enzyme in the innate immune system that plays a vital role in fighting microbial infections. In the current study, we identified, cloned, and characterized a gene that encodes an invertebrate-type lysozyme from the disk abalone, Haliotis discus discus (abLysI). The full-length cDNA of abLysI consisted of 545 bp with an open reading frame of 393 bp that encodes 131 amino acids. The theoretical molecular mass of mature abLysI was 12.3 kDa with an isoelectric point of 8.03. Conserved features in other homologs, such as catalytic sites for lytic activity (Glu(30) and Asp(41)), isopeptidase activity (His(107)), and ten cysteine residues were identified in abLysI. Genomic sequence analysis with respect to its cDNA showed that abLysI was organized into four exons interrupted by three introns. Several immune-related transcription factor binding sites were discovered in the putative promoter region. Homology and phylogeny analysis of abLysI depicted high identity and closer proximity, respectively, with an annelid i-type lysozyme from Hirudo medicinalis, and indicated that abLysI is a novel molluscan i-type lysozyme. Tissue-specific expressional studies revealed that abLysI is mainly transcribed in hepatopancreas followed by mantle. In addition, abLysI mRNA expression was induced following bacterial (Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Listeria monocytogenes) and viral (viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus) challenges. Recombinantly expressed abLysI [(r)abLysI] demonstrated strong lytic activity against Micrococcus lysodeikticus, isopeptidase activity, and antibacterial activity against several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, (r)abLysI showed optimum lytic activity at pH 4.0 and 60 °C, while exhibiting optimum isopeptidase activity at pH 7.0. Taken together, these results indicate that abLysI is potentially involved in immune responses of the disk abalone to protect it from invaders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. What can digital transcript profiling reveal about human cancers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Cerutti

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Important biological and clinical features of malignancy are reflected in its transcript pattern. Recent advances in gene expression technology and informatics have provided a powerful new means to obtain and interpret these expression patterns. A comprehensive approach to expression profiling is serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE, which provides digital information on transcript levels. SAGE works by counting transcripts and storing these digital values electronically, providing absolute gene expression levels that make historical comparisons possible. SAGE produces a comprehensive profile of gene expression and can be used to search for candidate tumor markers or antigens in a limited number of samples. The Cancer Genome Anatomy Project has created a SAGE database of human gene expression levels for many different tumors and normal reference tissues and provides online tools for viewing, comparing, and downloading expression profiles. Digital expression profiling using SAGE and informatics have been useful for identifying genes that have a role in tumor invasion and other aspects of tumor progression.

  18. Transcriptional Profiling Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Patient Sputa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildner, Leticia Muraro; Gould, Katherine A; Waddell, Simon J

    2018-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistance threatens to destroy tuberculosis control programs worldwide, with resistance to all first-line drugs and most second-line drugs detected. Drug tolerance (or phenotypic drug resistance) is also likely to be clinically relevant over the 6-month long standard treatment for drug-sensitive tuberculosis. Transcriptional profiling the response of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to antimicrobial drugs offers a novel interpretation of drug efficacy and mycobacterial drug-susceptibility that likely varies in dynamic microenvironments, such as the lung. This chapter describes the noninvasive sampling of tuberculous sputa and techniques for mRNA profiling M. tb bacilli during patient therapy to characterize real-world drug actions.

  19. Transcription profiling of sparkling wine second fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Penacho, Vanessa; Valero, Eva; González García, Ramón

    2012-01-01

    There is a specific set of stress factors that yeast cells must overcome under second fermentation conditions, during the production of sparkling wines by the traditional (Champenoise) method. Some of them are the same as those of the primary fermentation of still wines, although perhaps with a different intensity (high ethanol concentration, low pH, nitrogen starvation) while others are more specific to second fermentation (low temperature, CO 2 overpressure). The transcription profile of Sa...

  20. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and metabolic analysis uncover multiple molecular responses of the grass species Lolium perenne under low-intensity xenobiotic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Antonella eSerra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Lolium perenne, which is a major component of pastures, lawns, and grass strips, can be exposed to xenobiotic stresses due to diffuse and residual contaminations of soil. L. perenne was recently shown to undergo metabolic adjustments in response to sub-toxic levels of xenobiotics. To gain insight in such chemical stress responses, a de novo transcriptome analysis was carried out on leaves from plants subjected at the root level to low levels of xenobiotics, glyphosate, tebuconazole, and a combination of the two, leading to no adverse physiological effect. Chemical treatments influenced significantly the relative proportions of functional categories and of transcripts related to carbohydrate processes, to signalling, to protein-kinase cascades, as Serine/Threonine-protein kinases, to transcriptional regulations, to responses to abiotic or biotic stimuli and to responses to phytohormones. Transcriptomics-based expressions of genes encoding different types of SNF1 (sucrose non-fermenting 1-related kinases involved in sugar and stress signalling or encoding key metabolic enzymes were in line with specific qRT-PCR analysis or with the important metabolic and regulatory changes revealed by metabolomic analysis. The effects of pesticide treatments on metabolites and gene expression strongly suggest that pesticides at low levels, as single molecule or as mixture, affect cell signalling and functioning even in the absence of major physiological impact. This global analysis of L. perenne therefore highlighted the interactions between molecular regulation of responses to xenobiotics, and also carbohydrate dynamics, energy dysfunction, phytohormones and calcium signalling.

  1. Global identification and characterization of transcriptionally active regions in the rice genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Li

    Full Text Available Genome tiling microarray studies have consistently documented rich transcriptional activity beyond the annotated genes. However, systematic characterization and transcriptional profiling of the putative novel transcripts on the genome scale are still lacking. We report here the identification of 25,352 and 27,744 transcriptionally active regions (TARs not encoded by annotated exons in the rice (Oryza. sativa subspecies japonica and indica, respectively. The non-exonic TARs account for approximately two thirds of the total TARs detected by tiling arrays and represent transcripts likely conserved between japonica and indica. Transcription of 21,018 (83% japonica non-exonic TARs was verified through expression profiling in 10 tissue types using a re-array in which annotated genes and TARs were each represented by five independent probes. Subsequent analyses indicate that about 80% of the japonica TARs that were not assigned to annotated exons can be assigned to various putatively functional or structural elements of the rice genome, including splice variants, uncharacterized portions of incompletely annotated genes, antisense transcripts, duplicated gene fragments, and potential non-coding RNAs. These results provide a systematic characterization of non-exonic transcripts in rice and thus expand the current view of the complexity and dynamics of the rice transcriptome.

  2. Single molecule transcription profiling with AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Jason; Mishra, Bud; Pittenger, Bede; Magonov, Sergei; Troke, Joshua; Teitell, Michael A.; Gimzewski, James K.

    2007-01-01

    Established techniques for global gene expression profiling, such as microarrays, face fundamental sensitivity constraints. Due to greatly increasing interest in examining minute samples from micro-dissected tissues, including single cells, unorthodox approaches, including molecular nanotechnologies, are being explored in this application. Here, we examine the use of single molecule, ordered restriction mapping, combined with AFM, to measure gene transcription levels from very low abundance samples. We frame the problem mathematically, using coding theory, and present an analysis of the critical error sources that may serve as a guide to designing future studies. We follow with experiments detailing the construction of high density, single molecule, ordered restriction maps from plasmids and from cDNA molecules, using two different enzymes, a result not previously reported. We discuss these results in the context of our calculations. Based on invited talk at the International Conference on Nanoscience and Technology 2006.

  3. Single molecule transcription profiling with AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Jason; Mishra, Bud; Pittenger, Bede; Magonov, Sergei; Troke, Joshua; Teitell, Michael A; Gimzewski, James K

    2007-01-01

    Established techniques for global gene expression profiling, such as microarrays, face fundamental sensitivity constraints. Due to greatly increasing interest in examining minute samples from micro-dissected tissues, including single cells, unorthodox approaches, including molecular nanotechnologies, are being explored in this application. Here, we examine the use of single molecule, ordered restriction mapping, combined with AFM, to measure gene transcription levels from very low abundance samples. We frame the problem mathematically, using coding theory, and present an analysis of the critical error sources that may serve as a guide to designing future studies. We follow with experiments detailing the construction of high density, single molecule, ordered restriction maps from plasmids and from cDNA molecules, using two different enzymes, a result not previously reported. We discuss these results in the context of our calculations

  4. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Profiles of the Berry Skin of Two Red Grape Cultivars (Vitis vinifera) in Which Anthocyanin Synthesis Is Sunlight-Dependent or -Independent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Le; Xin, Hai-Ping; Li, Ji-Hu; Li, Shao-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Global gene expression was analyzed in the berry skin of two red grape cultivars, which can (‘Jingyan’) or cannot (‘Jingxiu’) synthesize anthocyanins after sunlight exclusion from fruit set until maturity. Gene transcripts responding to sunlight exclusion in ‘Jingyan’ were less complex than in ‘Jingxiu’; 528 genes were induced and 383 repressed in the former, whereas 2655 genes were induced and 205 suppressed in ‘Jingxiu’. They were regulated either in the same or opposing manner in the two cultivars, or in only one cultivar. In addition to VvUFGT and VvMYBA1, some candidate genes (e.g. AOMT, GST, and ANP) were identified which are probably involved in the differential responses of ‘Jingxiu’ and ‘Jingyan’ to sunlight exclusion. In addition, 26 MYB, 14 bHLH and 23 WD40 genes responded differently to sunlight exclusion in the two cultivars. Interestingly, all of the 189 genes classified as being relevant to ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation were down-regulated by sunlight exclusion in ‘Jingxiu’, but the majority (162) remained unchanged in ‘Jingyan’ berry skin. It would be of interest to determine the precise role of the ubiquitin pathway following sunlight exclusion, particularly the role of COP9 signalosome, cullins, RING-Box 1, and COP1-interacting proteins. Only a few genes in the light signal system were found to be regulated by sunlight exclusion in either or both cultivars. This study provides a valuable overview of the transcriptome changes and gives insight into the genetic background that may be responsible for sunlight-dependent versus -independent anthocyanin biosynthesis in berry skin. PMID:25158067

  5. eRNAs promote transcription by establishing chromatin accessibility at defined genomic loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousavi, Kambiz; Zare, Hossein; Dell'orso, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors and DNA regulatory binding motifs are fundamental components of the gene regulatory network. Here, by using genome-wide binding profiling, we show extensive occupancy of transcription factors of myogenesis (MyoD and Myogenin) at extragenic enhancer regions coinciding with RNA...... synthesis (i.e., eRNA). In particular, multiple regions were transcribed to eRNA within the regulatory region of MYOD1, including previously characterized distal regulatory regions (DRR) and core enhancer (CE). While (CE)RNA enhanced RNA polymerase II (Pol II) occupancy and transcription at MYOD1, (DRR)RNA...... acted to activate the downstream myogenic genes. The deployment of transcriptional machinery to appropriate loci is contingent on chromatin accessibility, a rate-limiting step preceding Pol II assembly. By nuclease sensitivity assay, we found that eRNAs regulate genomic access of the transcriptional...

  6. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Changes and Lipid Profile Modifications Induced by Medicago truncatula N5 Overexpression at an Early Stage of the Symbiotic Interaction with Sinorhizobium meliloti

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    Chiara Santi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs are small basic secreted proteins, which are characterized by lipid-binding capacity and are putatively involved in lipid trafficking. LTPs play a role in several biological processes, including the root nodule symbiosis. In this regard, the Medicago truncatula nodulin 5 (MtN5 LTP has been proved to positively regulate the nodulation capacity, controlling rhizobial infection and nodule primordia invasion. To better define the lipid transfer protein MtN5 function during the symbiosis, we produced MtN5-downregulated and -overexpressing plants, and we analysed the transcriptomic changes occurring in the roots at an early stage of Sinorhizobium meliloti infection. We also carried out the lipid profile analysis of wild type (WT and MtN5-overexpressing roots after rhizobia infection. The downregulation of MtN5 increased the root hair curling, an early event of rhizobia infection, and concomitantly induced changes in the expression of defence-related genes. On the other hand, MtN5 overexpression favoured the invasion of the nodules by rhizobia and determined in the roots the modulation of genes that are involved in lipid transport and metabolism as well as an increased content of lipids, especially galactolipids that characterize the symbiosome membranes. Our findings suggest the potential participation of LTPs in the synthesis and rearrangement of membranes occurring during the formation of the infection threads and the symbiosome membrane.

  7. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Changes and Lipid Profile Modifications Induced by Medicago truncatula N5 Overexpression at an Early Stage of the Symbiotic Interaction with Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Chiara; Molesini, Barbara; Guzzo, Flavia; Pii, Youry; Vitulo, Nicola; Pandolfini, Tiziana

    2017-12-19

    Plant lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs) are small basic secreted proteins, which are characterized by lipid-binding capacity and are putatively involved in lipid trafficking. LTPs play a role in several biological processes, including the root nodule symbiosis. In this regard, the Medicago truncatula nodulin 5 (MtN5) LTP has been proved to positively regulate the nodulation capacity, controlling rhizobial infection and nodule primordia invasion. To better define the lipid transfer protein MtN5 function during the symbiosis, we produced MtN5-downregulated and -overexpressing plants, and we analysed the transcriptomic changes occurring in the roots at an early stage of Sinorhizobium meliloti infection. We also carried out the lipid profile analysis of wild type (WT) and MtN5-overexpressing roots after rhizobia infection. The downregulation of MtN5 increased the root hair curling, an early event of rhizobia infection, and concomitantly induced changes in the expression of defence-related genes. On the other hand, MtN5 overexpression favoured the invasion of the nodules by rhizobia and determined in the roots the modulation of genes that are involved in lipid transport and metabolism as well as an increased content of lipids, especially galactolipids that characterize the symbiosome membranes. Our findings suggest the potential participation of LTPs in the synthesis and rearrangement of membranes occurring during the formation of the infection threads and the symbiosome membrane.

  8. Genome Binding and Gene Regulation by Stem Cell Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Brandsma (Johan)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractNearly all cells of an individual organism contain the same genome. However, each cell type transcribes a different set of genes due to the presence of different sets of cell type-specific transcription factors. Such transcription factors bind to regulatory regions such as promoters

  9. The transcriptionally active regions in the genome of Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Jarmer, Hanne Østergaard

    2009-01-01

    The majority of all genes have so far been identified and annotated systematically through in silico gene finding. Here we report the finding of 3662 strand-specific transcriptionally active regions (TARs) in the genome of Bacillus subtilis by the use of tiling arrays. We have measured the genome...

  10. Genome-wide transcription analyses in rice using tiling microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Lei; Wang, Xiangfeng; Stolc, Viktor

    2006-01-01

    . We report here a full-genome transcription analysis of the indica rice subspecies using high-density oligonucleotide tiling microarrays. Our results provided expression data support for the existence of 35,970 (81.9%) annotated gene models and identified 5,464 unique transcribed intergenic regions......Sequencing and computational annotation revealed several features, including high gene numbers, unusual composition of the predicted genes and a large number of genes lacking homology to known genes, that distinguish the rice (Oryza sativa) genome from that of other fully sequenced model species...... activity between duplicated segments of the genome. Collectively, our results provide the first whole-genome transcription map useful for further understanding the rice genome. Udgivelsesdato: 2006-Jan...

  11. High-density transcriptional initiation signals underline genomic islands in bacteria.

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    Qianli Huang

    Full Text Available Genomic islands (GIs, frequently associated with the pathogenicity of bacteria and having a substantial influence on bacterial evolution, are groups of "alien" elements which probably undergo special temporal-spatial regulation in the host genome. Are there particular hallmark transcriptional signals for these "exotic" regions? We here explore the potential transcriptional signals that underline the GIs beyond the conventional views on basic sequence composition, such as codon usage and GC property bias. It showed that there is a significant enrichment of the transcription start positions (TSPs in the GI regions compared to the whole genome of Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli. There was up to a four-fold increase for the 70% GIs, implying high-density TSPs profile can potentially differentiate the GI regions. Based on this feature, we developed a new sliding window method GIST, Genomic-island Identification by Signals of Transcription, to identify these regions. Subsequently, we compared the known GI-associated features of the GIs detected by GIST and by the existing method Islandviewer to those of the whole genome. Our method demonstrates high sensitivity in detecting GIs harboring genes with biased GI-like function, preferred subcellular localization, skewed GC property, shorter gene length and biased "non-optimal" codon usage. The special transcriptional signals discovered here may contribute to the coordinate expression regulation of foreign genes. Finally, by using GIST, we detected many interesting GIs in the 2011 German E. coli O104:H4 outbreak strain TY-2482, including the microcin H47 system and gene cluster ycgXEFZ-ymgABC that activates the production of biofilm matrix. The aforesaid findings highlight the power of GIST to predict GIs with distinct intrinsic features to the genome. The heterogeneity of cumulative TSPs profiles may not only be a better identity for "alien" regions, but also provide hints to the special

  12. Profiling genome-wide DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Wai-Shin; Hsu, Fei-Man; Chen, Pao-Yang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that plays an important role in regulating gene expression and therefore a broad range of biological processes and diseases. DNA methylation is tissue-specific, dynamic, sequence-context-dependent and trans-generationally heritable, and these complex patterns of methylation highlight the significance of profiling DNA methylation to answer biological questions. In this review, we surveyed major methylation assays, along with comparisons and biological examples, to provide an overview of DNA methylation profiling techniques. The advances in microarray and sequencing technologies make genome-wide profiling possible at a single-nucleotide or even a single-cell resolution. These profiling approaches vary in many aspects, such as DNA input, resolution, genomic region coverage, and bioinformatics analysis, and selecting a feasible method requires knowledge of these methods. We first introduce the biological background of DNA methylation and its pattern in plants, animals and fungi. We present an overview of major experimental approaches to profiling genome-wide DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation and then extend to the single-cell methylome. To evaluate these methods, we outline their strengths and weaknesses and perform comparisons across the different platforms. Due to the increasing need to compute high-throughput epigenomic data, we interrogate the computational pipeline for bisulfite sequencing data and also discuss the concept of identifying differentially methylated regions (DMRs). This review summarizes the experimental and computational concepts for profiling genome-wide DNA methylation, followed by biological examples. Overall, this review provides researchers useful guidance for the selection of a profiling method suited to specific research questions.

  13. Genomic Profiling of Hormone-Naïve Lymph Node Metastases in Patients with Prostate Cancer

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    Pamela L. Paris

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The progression of organ-confined prostate cancer to metastatic cancer is inevitably fatal. Consequently, identification of structural changes in the genome and associated transcriptional responses that drive this progression is critical to understanding the disease process and the development of biomarkers and therapeutic targets. In this study, whole genome copy number changes in genomes of hormone-naïve lymph node metastases were profiled using array comparative genomic hybridization, and matched primaries were included for a subset. Matched primaries and lymph node metastases showed very similar copy number profiles that are distinct from primary tumors that fail to metastasize.

  14. Transcriptional profiling of the dose response: a more powerful approach for characterizing drug activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Ru Ji

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The dose response curve is the gold standard for measuring the effect of a drug treatment, but is rarely used in genomic scale transcriptional profiling due to perceived obstacles of cost and analysis. One barrier to examining transcriptional dose responses is that existing methods for microarray data analysis can identify patterns, but provide no quantitative pharmacological information. We developed analytical methods that identify transcripts responsive to dose, calculate classical pharmacological parameters such as the EC50, and enable an in-depth analysis of coordinated dose-dependent treatment effects. The approach was applied to a transcriptional profiling study that evaluated four kinase inhibitors (imatinib, nilotinib, dasatinib and PD0325901 across a six-logarithm dose range, using 12 arrays per compound. The transcript responses proved a powerful means to characterize and compare the compounds: the distribution of EC50 values for the transcriptome was linked to specific targets, dose-dependent effects on cellular processes were identified using automated pathway analysis, and a connection was seen between EC50s in standard cellular assays and transcriptional EC50s. Our approach greatly enriches the information that can be obtained from standard transcriptional profiling technology. Moreover, these methods are automated, robust to non-optimized assays, and could be applied to other sources of quantitative data.

  15. Genome-wide conserved consensus transcription factor binding motifs are hyper-methylated

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    Down Thomas A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA methylation can regulate gene expression by modulating the interaction between DNA and proteins or protein complexes. Conserved consensus motifs exist across the human genome ("predicted transcription factor binding sites": "predicted TFBS" but the large majority of these are proven by chromatin immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq not to be biological transcription factor binding sites ("empirical TFBS". We hypothesize that DNA methylation at conserved consensus motifs prevents promiscuous or disorderly transcription factor binding. Results Using genome-wide methylation maps of the human heart and sperm, we found that all conserved consensus motifs as well as the subset of those that reside outside CpG islands have an aggregate profile of hyper-methylation. In contrast, empirical TFBS with conserved consensus motifs have a profile of hypo-methylation. 40% of empirical TFBS with conserved consensus motifs resided in CpG islands whereas only 7% of all conserved consensus motifs were in CpG islands. Finally we further identified a minority subset of TF whose profiles are either hypo-methylated or neutral at their respective conserved consensus motifs implicating that these TF may be responsible for establishing or maintaining an un-methylated DNA state, or whose binding is not regulated by DNA methylation. Conclusions Our analysis supports the hypothesis that at least for a subset of TF, empirical binding to conserved consensus motifs genome-wide may be controlled by DNA methylation.

  16. Comparative Transcriptional Profiling of Three Super-Hybrid Rice Combinations

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    Yonggang Peng

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Utilization of heterosis has significantly increased rice yields. However, its mechanism remains unclear. In this study, comparative transcriptional profiles of three super-hybrid rice combinations, LY2163, LY2186 and LYP9, at the flowering and filling stages, were created using rice whole-genome oligonucleotide microarray. The LY2163, LY2186 and LYP9 hybrids yielded 1193, 1630 and 1046 differentially expressed genes (DGs, accounting for 3.2%, 4.4% and 2.8% of the total number of genes (36,926, respectively, after using the z-test (p < 0.01. Functional category analysis showed that the DGs in each hybrid combination were mainly classified into the carbohydrate metabolism and energy metabolism categories. Further analysis of the metabolic pathways showed that DGs were significantly enriched in the carbon fixation pathway (p < 0.01 for all three combinations. Over 80% of the DGs were located in rice quantitative trait loci (QTLs of the Gramene database, of which more than 90% were located in the yield related QTLs in all three combinations, which suggested that there was a correlation between DGs and rice heterosis. Pathway Studio analysis showed the presence of DGs in the circadian regulatory network of all three hybrid combinations, which suggested that the circadian clock had a role in rice heterosis. Our results provide information that can help to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying rice heterosis.

  17. Simultaneous transcriptional profiling of bacteria and their host cells.

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    Michael S Humphrys

    Full Text Available We developed an RNA-Seq-based method to simultaneously capture prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression profiles of cells infected with intracellular bacteria. As proof of principle, this method was applied to Chlamydia trachomatis-infected epithelial cell monolayers in vitro, successfully obtaining transcriptomes of both C. trachomatis and the host cells at 1 and 24 hours post-infection. Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens that cause a range of mammalian diseases. In humans chlamydiae are responsible for the most common sexually transmitted bacterial infections and trachoma (infectious blindness. Disease arises by adverse host inflammatory reactions that induce tissue damage & scarring. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying these outcomes. Chlamydia are genetically intractable as replication outside of the host cell is not yet possible and there are no practical tools for routine genetic manipulation, making genome-scale approaches critical. The early timeframe of infection is poorly understood and the host transcriptional response to chlamydial infection is not well defined. Our simultaneous RNA-Seq method was applied to a simplified in vitro model of chlamydial infection. We discovered a possible chlamydial strategy for early iron acquisition, putative immune dampening effects of chlamydial infection on the host cell, and present a hypothesis for Chlamydia-induced fibrotic scarring through runaway positive feedback loops. In general, simultaneous RNA-Seq helps to reveal the complex interplay between invading bacterial pathogens and their host mammalian cells and is immediately applicable to any bacteria/host cell interaction.

  18. Targeted genome regulation via synthetic programmable transcriptional regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatek, Agnieszka; Mahfouz, Magdy M

    2017-06-01

    Regulation of gene transcription controls cellular functions and coordinates responses to developmental, physiological and environmental cues. Precise and efficient molecular tools are needed to characterize the functions of single and multiple genes in linear and interacting pathways in a native context. Modular DNA-binding domains from zinc fingers (ZFs) and transcriptional activator-like proteins (TALE) are amenable to bioengineering to bind DNA target sequences of interest. As a result, ZF and TALE proteins were used to develop synthetic programmable transcription factors. However, these systems are limited by the requirement to re-engineer proteins for each new target sequence. The clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR associated 9 (Cas9) genome editing tool was recently repurposed for targeted transcriptional regulation by inactivation of the nuclease activity of Cas9. Due to the facile engineering, simplicity, precision and amenability to library construction, the CRISPR/Cas9 system is poised to revolutionize the functional genomics field across diverse eukaryotic species. In this review, we discuss the development of synthetic customizable transcriptional regulators and provide insights into their current and potential applications, with special emphasis on plant systems, in characterization of gene functions, elucidation of molecular mechanisms and their biotechnological applications.

  19. Targeted genome regulation via synthetic programmable transcriptional regulators

    KAUST Repository

    Piatek, Agnieszka Anna

    2016-04-19

    Regulation of gene transcription controls cellular functions and coordinates responses to developmental, physiological and environmental cues. Precise and efficient molecular tools are needed to characterize the functions of single and multiple genes in linear and interacting pathways in a native context. Modular DNA-binding domains from zinc fingers (ZFs) and transcriptional activator-like proteins (TALE) are amenable to bioengineering to bind DNA target sequences of interest. As a result, ZF and TALE proteins were used to develop synthetic programmable transcription factors. However, these systems are limited by the requirement to re-engineer proteins for each new target sequence. The clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR associated 9 (Cas9) genome editing tool was recently repurposed for targeted transcriptional regulation by inactivation of the nuclease activity of Cas9. Due to the facile engineering, simplicity, precision and amenability to library construction, the CRISPR/Cas9 system is poised to revolutionize the functional genomics field across diverse eukaryotic species. In this review, we discuss the development of synthetic customizable transcriptional regulators and provide insights into their current and potential applications, with special emphasis on plant systems, in characterization of gene functions, elucidation of molecular mechanisms and their biotechnological applications. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

  20. Genome-wide transcriptional effects of the anti-cancer agent camptothecin.

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    Artur Veloso

    Full Text Available The anti-cancer drug camptothecin inhibits replication and transcription by trapping DNA topoisomerase I (Top1 covalently to DNA in a "cleavable complex". To examine the effects of camptothecin on RNA synthesis genome-wide we used Bru-Seq and show that camptothecin treatment primarily affected transcription elongation. We also observed that camptothecin increased RNA reads past transcription termination sites as well as at enhancer elements. Following removal of camptothecin, transcription spread as a wave from the 5'-end of genes with no recovery of transcription apparent from RNA polymerases stalled in the body of genes. As a result, camptothecin preferentially inhibited the expression of large genes such as proto-oncogenes, and anti-apoptotic genes while smaller ribosomal protein genes, pro-apoptotic genes and p53 target genes showed relative higher expression. Cockayne syndrome group B fibroblasts (CS-B, which are defective in transcription-coupled repair (TCR, showed an RNA synthesis recovery profile similar to normal fibroblasts suggesting that TCR is not involved in the repair of or RNA synthesis recovery from transcription-blocking Top1 lesions. These findings of the effects of camptothecin on transcription have important implications for its anti-cancer activities and may aid in the design of improved combinatorial treatments involving Top1 poisons.

  1. Genome-wide identification of transcription factors and transcription-factor binding sites in oleaginous microalgae Nannochloropsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianqiang; Wang, Dongmei; Li, Jing; Jing, Gongchao; Ning, Kang; Xu, Jian

    2014-06-26

    Nannochloropsis spp. are a group of oleaginous microalgae that harbor an expanded array of lipid-synthesis related genes, yet how they are transcriptionally regulated remains unknown. Here a phylogenomic approach was employed to identify and functionally annotate the transcriptional factors (TFs) and TF binding-sites (TFBSs) in N. oceanica IMET1. Among 36 microalgae and higher plants genomes, a two-fold reduction in the number of TF families plus a seven-fold decrease of average family-size in Nannochloropsis, Rhodophyta and Chlorophyta were observed. The degree of similarity in TF-family profiles is indicative of the phylogenetic relationship among the species, suggesting co-evolution of TF-family profiles and species. Furthermore, comparative analysis of six Nannochloropsis genomes revealed 68 "most-conserved" TFBS motifs, with 11 of which predicted to be related to lipid accumulation or photosynthesis. Mapping the IMET1 TFs and TFBS motifs to the reference plant TF-"TFBS motif" relationships in TRANSFAC enabled the prediction of 78 TF-"TFBS motif" interaction pairs, which consisted of 34 TFs (with 11 TFs potentially involved in the TAG biosynthesis pathway), 30 TFBS motifs and 2,368 regulatory connections between TFs and target genes. Our results form the basis of further experiments to validate and engineer the regulatory network of Nannochloropsis spp. for enhanced biofuel production.

  2. Genome-wide identification of the regulatory targets of a transcription factor using biochemical characterization and computational genomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolly Emmitt R

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major challenge in computational genomics is the development of methodologies that allow accurate genome-wide prediction of the regulatory targets of a transcription factor. We present a method for target identification that combines experimental characterization of binding requirements with computational genomic analysis. Results Our method identified potential target genes of the transcription factor Ndt80, a key transcriptional regulator involved in yeast sporulation, using the combined information of binding affinity, positional distribution, and conservation of the binding sites across multiple species. We have also developed a mathematical approach to compute the false positive rate and the total number of targets in the genome based on the multiple selection criteria. Conclusion We have shown that combining biochemical characterization and computational genomic analysis leads to accurate identification of the genome-wide targets of a transcription factor. The method can be extended to other transcription factors and can complement other genomic approaches to transcriptional regulation.

  3. A compendium of antibiotic-induced transcription profiles reveals broad regulation of Pasteurella multocida virulence genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikow, E; Schoenfeld, C; Spehr, V; Warrass, R; Gunkel, N; Duszenko, M; Selzer, P M; Ullrich, H J

    2008-10-15

    The transcriptional responses of Pasteurella multocida to eight antibiotics with known mode of actions (MoAs) and one novel antibiotic compound with an unknown MoA were collected to create a compendium of transcriptional profiles for MoA studies. At minimal inhibitory concentration the three bactericidal compounds enrofloxacin, cefquinome and the novel compound had a minor impact on gene regulation with approximately 1% of the P. multocida genome affected, whilst the bacteriostatic compounds florfenicol, tilmicosin, rifampin, trimethoprim and brodimoprim regulated 20% of the genome. Novobiocin was special in that it regulated 40% of all P. multocida genes. Regulation of target genes was observed for novobiocin, rifampin, florfenicol and tilmicosin and signature genes were identified for most antibiotics. The transcriptional profile induced by the novel compound was unrelated to the compendium profiles suggesting a new MoA. The transcription of many P. multocida virulence factors, particularly genes involved in capsule synthesis and export, LPS synthesis, competence, adherence and iron transport were altered in the presence of antibiotics. Virulence gene transcription was mainly negatively affected, however the opposite effect was also observed in the case of rifampin where the up-regulation of the tad locus involved in tight adherence was seen. Novobiocin and trimethoprim caused a marked reduction in the transcription of capsule genes, which correlated with a concomitant reduction of the capsular layer on the surface of P. multocida. The broad negative impact on virulence gene transcription supports the notion that the therapeutic effect of some antibiotics could be a combination of growth and virulence inhibition.

  4. Transcriptional and chromatin regulation during fasting – The genomic era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Ido; Hager, Gordon L.

    2015-01-01

    An elaborate metabolic response to fasting is orchestrated by the liver and is heavily reliant upon transcriptional regulation. In response to hormones (glucagon, glucocorticoids) many transcription factors (TFs) are activated and regulate various genes involved in metabolic pathways aimed at restoring homeostasis: gluconeogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, ketogenesis and amino acid shuttling. We summarize the recent discoveries regarding fasting-related TFs with an emphasis on genome-wide binding patterns. Collectively, the summarized findings reveal a large degree of co-operation between TFs during fasting which occurs at motif-rich DNA sites bound by a combination of TFs. These new findings implicate transcriptional and chromatin regulation as major determinants of the response to fasting and unravels the complex, multi-TF nature of this response. PMID:26520657

  5. Transcription of densovirus endogenous sequences in the Myzus persicae genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavijo, Gabriel; van Munster, Manuella; Monsion, Baptiste; Bochet, Nicole; Brault, Véronique

    2016-04-01

    Integration of non-retroviral sequences in the genome of different organisms has been observed and, in some cases, a relationship of these integrations with immunity has been established. The genome of the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (clone G006), was screened for densovirus-like sequence (DLS) integrations. A total of 21 DLSs localized on 10 scaffolds were retrieved that mostly shared sequence identity with two aphid-infecting viruses, Myzus persicae densovirus (MpDNV) and Dysaphis plantaginea densovirus (DplDNV). In some cases, uninterrupted potential ORFs corresponding to non-structural viral proteins or capsid proteins were found within DLSs identified in the aphid genome. In particular, one scaffold harboured a complete virus-like genome, while another scaffold contained two virus-like genomes in reverse orientation. Remarkably, transcription of some of these ORFs was observed in M. persicae, suggesting a biological effect of these viral integrations. In contrast to most of the other densoviruses identified so far that induce acute host infection, it has been reported previously that MpDNV has only a minor effect on M. persicae fitness, while DplDNV can even have a beneficial effect on its aphid host. This suggests that DLS integration in the M. persicae genome may be responsible for the latency of MpDNV infection in the aphid host.

  6. Regional regulation of transcription in the chicken genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megens Hendrik-Jan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past years, the relationship between gene transcription and chromosomal location has been studied in a number of different vertebrate genomes. Regional differences in gene expression have been found in several different species. The chicken genome, as the closest sequenced genome relative to mammals, is an important resource for investigating regional effects on transcription in birds and studying the regional dynamics of chromosome evolution by comparative analysis. Results We used gene expression data to survey eight chicken tissues and create transcriptome maps for all chicken chromosomes. The results reveal the presence of two distinct types of chromosomal regions characterized by clusters of highly or lowly expressed genes. Furthermore, these regions correlate highly with a number of genome characteristics. Regions with clusters of highly expressed genes have higher gene densities, shorter genes, shorter average intron and higher GC content compared to regions with clusters of lowly expressed genes. A comparative analysis between the chicken and human transcriptome maps constructed using similar panels of tissues suggests that the regions with clusters of highly expressed genes are relatively conserved between the two genomes. Conclusions Our results revealed the presence of a higher order organization of the chicken genome that affects gene expression, confirming similar observations in other species. These results will aid in the further understanding of the regional dynamics of chromosome evolution. The microarray data used in this analysis have been submitted to NCBI GEO database under accession number GSE17108. The reviewer access link is: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?token=tjwjpscyceqawjk&acc=GSE17108

  7. Transcriptional profiling of UlaR-regulated genes in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulman Shafeeq

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The transcriptional regulator UlaR belongs to the family of PRD-containing transcriptional regulators, which are mostly involved in the regulation of carbohydrate metabolism. The role of the transcriptional regulator UlaR in Streptococcus pneumoniae has recently been described [1]. Here, we report detailed genome-wide transcriptional profiling of UlaR-regulated genes in S. pneumoniae D39 and its ∆ulaR derivative, either in the presence of 10 mM ascorbic acid in M17 medium using microarray analysis. 10 mM concentration of ascorbic acid was supplemented to the M17 medium because our lacZ-fusion studies indicated that UlaR acts as a transcriptional activator of its targets in the presence of ascorbic acid and the expression of the ula operon was maximal at a 10 mM ascorbic acid concentration [1]. All transcriptional profiling data of UlaR-regulated genes was deposited to Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database under accession number GSE61649.

  8. Analysis of genomic sequence motifs for deciphering transcription factor binding and transcriptional regulation in eukaryotic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina eBoeva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic genomes contain a variety of structured patterns: repetitive elements, binding sites of DNA and RNA associated proteins, splice sites and so on. Often, these structured patterns can be formalized as motifs and described using a proper mathematical model such as position weight matrix and IUPAC consensus. Two key tasks are typically carried out for motifs in the context of the analysis of genomic sequences. These are: identification in a set of DNA regions of over-represented motifs from a particular motif database, and de novo discovery of over-represented motifs. Here we describe existing methodology to perform these two tasks for motifs characterizing transcription factor binding. When applied to the output of ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments, or to promoter regions of co-modulated genes, motif analysis techniques allow for the prediction of transcription factor binding events and enable identification of transcriptional regulators and co-regulators. The usefulness of motif analysis is further exemplified in this review by how motif discovery improves peak calling in ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments and, when coupled with information on gene expression, allows insights into physical mechanisms of transcriptional modulation.

  9. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Transcription Unit Organization: Genome Survey and Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Schrank, Augusto; Schrank, Irene Silveira

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is associated with swine respiratory diseases. Although gene organization and regulation are well known in many prokaryotic organisms, knowledge on mycoplasma is limited. This study performed a comparative analysis of three strains of M. hyopneumoniae (7448, J and 232), with a focus on genome organization and gene comparison for open read frame (ORF) cluster (OC) identification. An in silico analysis of gene organization demonstrated 117 OCs and 34 single ORFs in M. hyopneumoniae 7448 and J, while 116 OCs and 36 single ORFs were identified in M. hyopneumoniae 232. Genomic comparison revealed high synteny and conservation of gene order between the OCs defined for 7448 and J strains as well as for 7448 and 232 strains. Twenty-one OCs were chosen and experimentally confirmed by reverse transcription–PCR from M. hyopneumoniae 7448 genome, validating our prediction. A subset of the ORFs within an OC could be independently transcribed due to the presence of internal promoters. Our results suggest that transcription occurs in ‘run-on’ from an upstream promoter in M. hyopneumoniae, thus forming large ORF clusters (from 2 to 29 ORFs in the same orientation) and indicating a complex transcriptional organization. PMID:22086999

  10. Tailoring high-density oligonucleotide arrays for transcript profiling of different Arabidopsis thaliana accessions using a sequence-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudichevskaia, Anastassia; Cao, Hieu Xuan; Schmidt, Renate

    2017-08-01

    Excluding polymorphic probes from GeneChip ® transcript profiling experiments via a sequence-based approach results in improved detection of differentially expressed genes in developing seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana accessions Col-0 and C24. GeneChip ® arrays represent a powerful tool for transcript profiling experiments. The ATH1 GeneChip ® has been designed based on the sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana reference genome Col-0, hence the features on the array exactly match the sequences of Col-0 transcripts. In contrast, transcripts of other A. thaliana accessions or related species may show nucleotide differences and/or insertions/deletions when compared to the corresponding Col-0 transcripts, therefore, comparisons of transcript abundance involving different A. thaliana accessions or related species may be compromised for a certain number of transcripts. To tackle this limitation, a sequence-based strategy was developed. Only features on the array that were identical in sequence for the specimen to be compared were considered for transcript profiling. The impact of the proposed strategy was evaluated for transcript profiles that were established for developing seeds of A. thaliana accessions Col-0 and C24.

  11. DNA methylation-based chromatin compartments and ChIP-seq profiles reveal transcriptional drivers of prostate carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Poppy; Loomis, Erick; Curry, Edward

    2017-06-07

    Profiles of DNA methylation of many tissues relevant in human disease have been obtained from microarrays and are publicly available. These can be used to generate maps of chromatin compartmentalization, demarcating open and closed chromatin across the genome. Additionally, large sets of genome-wide transcription factor binding profiles have been made available thanks to ChIP-seq technology. We have identified genomic regions with altered chromatin compartmentalization in prostate adenocarcinoma tissue relative to normal prostate tissue, using DNA methylation microarray data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. DNA binding profiles from the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) ChIP-seq studies have been systematically screened to find transcription factors with inferred DNA binding sites located in discordantly open/closed chromatin in malignant tissue (compared with non-cancer control tissue). We have combined this with tests for corresponding up-/downregulation of the transcription factors' putative target genes to obtain an integrated measure of cancer-specific regulatory activity to identify likely transcriptional drivers of prostate cancer. Generally, we find that the degree to which transcription factors preferentially bind regions of chromatin that become more accessible during prostate carcinogenesis is significantly associated to the level of systematic upregulation of their targets, at the level of gene expression. Our approach has yielded 11 transcription factors that show strong cancer-specific transcriptional activation of targets, including the novel candidates KAT2A and TRIM28, alongside established drivers of prostate cancer MYC, ETS1, GABP and YY1. This approach to integrated epigenetic and transcriptional profiling using publicly available data represents a cheap and powerful technique for identifying potential drivers of human disease. In our application to prostate adenocarcinoma data, the fact that well-known drivers are amongst the top candidates

  12. Genome-wide expression profiling of complex regional pain syndrome.

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    Eun-Heui Jin

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a chronic, progressive, and devastating pain syndrome characterized by spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia, allodynia, altered skin temperature, and motor dysfunction. Although previous gene expression profiling studies have been conducted in animal pain models, there genome-wide expression profiling in the whole blood of CRPS patients has not been reported yet. Here, we successfully identified certain pain-related genes through genome-wide expression profiling in the blood from CRPS patients. We found that 80 genes were differentially expressed between 4 CRPS patients (2 CRPS I and 2 CRPS II and 5 controls (cut-off value: 1.5-fold change and p<0.05. Most of those genes were associated with signal transduction, developmental processes, cell structure and motility, and immunity and defense. The expression levels of major histocompatibility complex class I A subtype (HLA-A29.1, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9, alanine aminopeptidase N (ANPEP, l-histidine decarboxylase (HDC, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor 3 receptor (G-CSF3R, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 genes selected from the microarray were confirmed in 24 CRPS patients and 18 controls by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. We focused on the MMP9 gene that, by qRT-PCR, showed a statistically significant difference in expression in CRPS patients compared to controls with the highest relative fold change (4.0±1.23 times and p = 1.4×10(-4. The up-regulation of MMP9 gene in the blood may be related to the pain progression in CRPS patients. Our findings, which offer a valuable contribution to the understanding of the differential gene expression in CRPS may help in the understanding of the pathophysiology of CRPS pain progression.

  13. Broad genomic and transcriptional analysis reveals a highly derived genome in dinoflagellate mitochondria

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    Keeling Patrick J

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dinoflagellates comprise an ecologically significant and diverse eukaryotic phylum that is sister to the phylum containing apicomplexan endoparasites. The mitochondrial genome of apicomplexans is uniquely reduced in gene content and size, encoding only three proteins and two ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs within a highly compacted 6 kb DNA. Dinoflagellate mitochondrial genomes have been comparatively poorly studied: limited available data suggest some similarities with apicomplexan mitochondrial genomes but an even more radical type of genomic organization. Here, we investigate structure, content and expression of dinoflagellate mitochondrial genomes. Results From two dinoflagellates, Crypthecodinium cohnii and Karlodinium micrum, we generated over 42 kb of mitochondrial genomic data that indicate a reduced gene content paralleling that of mitochondrial genomes in apicomplexans, i.e., only three protein-encoding genes and at least eight conserved components of the highly fragmented large and small subunit rRNAs. Unlike in apicomplexans, dinoflagellate mitochondrial genes occur in multiple copies, often as gene fragments, and in numerous genomic contexts. Analysis of cDNAs suggests several novel aspects of dinoflagellate mitochondrial gene expression. Polycistronic transcripts were found, standard start codons are absent, and oligoadenylation occurs upstream of stop codons, resulting in the absence of termination codons. Transcripts of at least one gene, cox3, are apparently trans-spliced to generate full-length mRNAs. RNA substitutional editing, a process previously identified for mRNAs in dinoflagellate mitochondria, is also implicated in rRNA expression. Conclusion The dinoflagellate mitochondrial genome shares the same gene complement and fragmentation of rRNA genes with its apicomplexan counterpart. However, it also exhibits several unique characteristics. Most notable are the expansion of gene copy numbers and their arrangements

  14. In silico comparative genomic analysis of GABAA receptor transcriptional regulation

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    Joyce Christopher J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subtypes of the GABAA receptor subunit exhibit diverse temporal and spatial expression patterns. In silico comparative analysis was used to predict transcriptional regulatory features in individual mammalian GABAA receptor subunit genes, and to identify potential transcriptional regulatory components involved in the coordinate regulation of the GABAA receptor gene clusters. Results Previously unreported putative promoters were identified for the β2, γ1, γ3, ε, θ and π subunit genes. Putative core elements and proximal transcriptional factors were identified within these predicted promoters, and within the experimentally determined promoters of other subunit genes. Conserved intergenic regions of sequence in the mammalian GABAA receptor gene cluster comprising the α1, β2, γ2 and α6 subunits were identified as potential long range transcriptional regulatory components involved in the coordinate regulation of these genes. A region of predicted DNase I hypersensitive sites within the cluster may contain transcriptional regulatory features coordinating gene expression. A novel model is proposed for the coordinate control of the gene cluster and parallel expression of the α1 and β2 subunits, based upon the selective action of putative Scaffold/Matrix Attachment Regions (S/MARs. Conclusion The putative regulatory features identified by genomic analysis of GABAA receptor genes were substantiated by cross-species comparative analysis and now require experimental verification. The proposed model for the coordinate regulation of genes in the cluster accounts for the head-to-head orientation and parallel expression of the α1 and β2 subunit genes, and for the disruption of transcription caused by insertion of a neomycin gene in the close vicinity of the α6 gene, which is proximal to a putative critical S/MAR.

  15. Genome-wide transcriptional reprogramming under drought stress

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Hao

    2012-01-01

    Soil water deficit is one of the major factors limiting plant productivity. Plants cope with this adverse environmental condition by coordinating the up- or downregulation of an array of stress responsive genes. Reprogramming the expression of these genes leads to rebalanced development and growth that are in concert with the reduced water availability and that ultimately confer enhanced stress tolerance. Currently, several techniques have been employed to monitor genome-wide transcriptional reprogramming under drought stress. The results from these high throughput studies indicate that drought stress-induced transcriptional reprogramming is dynamic, has temporal and spatial specificity, and is coupled with the circadian clock and phytohormone signaling pathways. © 2012 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. All rights are reserved.

  16. Genomic dissection of conserved transcriptional regulation in intestinal epithelial cells.

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    Colin R Lickwar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium serves critical physiologic functions that are shared among all vertebrates. However, it is unknown how the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms underlying these functions have changed over the course of vertebrate evolution. We generated genome-wide mRNA and accessible chromatin data from adult intestinal epithelial cells (IECs in zebrafish, stickleback, mouse, and human species to determine if conserved IEC functions are achieved through common transcriptional regulation. We found evidence for substantial common regulation and conservation of gene expression regionally along the length of the intestine from fish to mammals and identified a core set of genes comprising a vertebrate IEC signature. We also identified transcriptional start sites and other putative regulatory regions that are differentially accessible in IECs in all 4 species. Although these sites rarely showed sequence conservation from fish to mammals, surprisingly, they drove highly conserved IEC expression in a zebrafish reporter assay. Common putative transcription factor binding sites (TFBS found at these sites in multiple species indicate that sequence conservation alone is insufficient to identify much of the functionally conserved IEC regulatory information. Among the rare, highly sequence-conserved, IEC-specific regulatory regions, we discovered an ancient enhancer upstream from her6/HES1 that is active in a distinct population of Notch-positive cells in the intestinal epithelium. Together, these results show how combining accessible chromatin and mRNA datasets with TFBS prediction and in vivo reporter assays can reveal tissue-specific regulatory information conserved across 420 million years of vertebrate evolution. We define an IEC transcriptional regulatory network that is shared between fish and mammals and establish an experimental platform for studying how evolutionarily distilled regulatory information commonly controls IEC development

  17. Ab initio identification of putative human transcription factor binding sites by comparative genomics

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    Provero P

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding transcriptional regulation of gene expression is one of the greatest challenges of modern molecular biology. A central role in this mechanism is played by transcription factors, which typically bind to specific, short DNA sequence motifs usually located in the upstream region of the regulated genes. We discuss here a simple and powerful approach for the ab initio identification of these cis-regulatory motifs. The method we present integrates several elements: human-mouse comparison, statistical analysis of genomic sequences and the concept of coregulation. We apply it to a complete scan of the human genome. Results By using the catalogue of conserved upstream sequences collected in the CORG database we construct sets of genes sharing the same overrepresented motif (short DNA sequence in their upstream regions both in human and in mouse. We perform this construction for all possible motifs from 5 to 8 nucleotides in length and then filter the resulting sets looking for two types of evidence of coregulation: first, we analyze the Gene Ontology annotation of the genes in the set, searching for statistically significant common annotations; second, we analyze the expression profiles of the genes in the set as measured by microarray experiments, searching for evidence of coexpression. The sets which pass one or both filters are conjectured to contain a significant fraction of coregulated genes, and the upstream motifs characterizing the sets are thus good candidates to be the binding sites of the TF's involved in such regulation. In this way we find various known motifs and also some new candidate binding sites. Conclusion We have discussed a new integrated algorithm for the "ab initio" identification of transcription factor binding sites in the human genome. The method is based on three ingredients: comparative genomics, overrepresentation, different types of coregulation. The method is applied to a full-scan of the

  18. Transcriptional profiling of putative human epithelial stem cells.

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    Koçer, Salih S; Djurić, Petar M; Bugallo, Mónica F; Simon, Sanford R; Matic, Maja

    2008-07-30

    Human interfollicular epidermis is sustained by the proliferation of stem cells and their progeny, transient amplifying cells. Molecular characterization of these two cell populations is essential for better understanding of self renewal, differentiation and mechanisms of skin pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to obtain gene expression profiles of alpha 6+/MHCI+, transient amplifying cells and alpha 6+/MHCI-, putative stem cells, and to compare them with existing data bases of gene expression profiles of hair follicle stem cells. The expression of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I, previously shown to be absent in stem cells in several tissues, and alpha 6 integrin were used to isolate MHCI positive basal cells, and MHCI low/negative basal cells. Transcriptional profiles of the two cell populations were determined and comparisons made with published data for hair follicle stem cell gene expression profiles. We demonstrate that presumptive interfollicular stem cells, alpha 6+/MHCI- cells, are enriched in messenger RNAs encoding surface receptors, cell adhesion molecules, extracellular matrix proteins, transcripts encoding members of IFN-alpha family proteins and components of IFN signaling, but contain lower levels of transcripts encoding proteins which take part in energy metabolism, cell cycle, ribosome biosynthesis, splicing, protein translation, degradation, DNA replication, repair, and chromosome remodeling. Furthermore, our data indicate that the cell signaling pathways Notch1 and NF-kappaB are downregulated/inhibited in MHC negative basal cells. This study demonstrates that alpha 6+/MHCI- cells have additional characteristics attributed to stem cells. Moreover, the transcription profile of alpha 6+/MHCI- cells shows similarities to transcription profiles of mouse hair follicle bulge cells known to be enriched for stem cells. Collectively, our data suggests that alpha 6+/MHCI- cells may be enriched for stem cells. This study is the first

  19. Transcriptional profiling of putative human epithelial stem cells

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    Koçer Salih S

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human interfollicular epidermis is sustained by the proliferation of stem cells and their progeny, transient amplifying cells. Molecular characterization of these two cell populations is essential for better understanding of self renewal, differentiation and mechanisms of skin pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to obtain gene expression profiles of alpha 6+/MHCI+, transient amplifying cells and alpha 6+/MHCI-, putative stem cells, and to compare them with existing data bases of gene expression profiles of hair follicle stem cells. The expression of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I, previously shown to be absent in stem cells in several tissues, and alpha 6 integrin were used to isolate MHCI positive basal cells, and MHCI low/negative basal cells. Results Transcriptional profiles of the two cell populations were determined and comparisons made with published data for hair follicle stem cell gene expression profiles. We demonstrate that presumptive interfollicular stem cells, alpha 6+/MHCI- cells, are enriched in messenger RNAs encoding surface receptors, cell adhesion molecules, extracellular matrix proteins, transcripts encoding members of IFN-alpha family proteins and components of IFN signaling, but contain lower levels of transcripts encoding proteins which take part in energy metabolism, cell cycle, ribosome biosynthesis, splicing, protein translation, degradation, DNA replication, repair, and chromosome remodeling. Furthermore, our data indicate that the cell signaling pathways Notch1 and NF-κB are downregulated/inhibited in MHC negative basal cells. Conclusion This study demonstrates that alpha 6+/MHCI- cells have additional characteristics attributed to stem cells. Moreover, the transcription profile of alpha 6+/MHCI- cells shows similarities to transcription profiles of mouse hair follicle bulge cells known to be enriched for stem cells. Collectively, our data suggests that alpha 6+/MHCI- cells

  20. Comparative transcriptional and genomic analysis of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates.

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    Margaret J Mackinnon

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms for differential regulation of gene expression may underlie much of the phenotypic variation and adaptability of malaria parasites. Here we describe transcriptional variation among culture-adapted field isolates of Plasmodium falciparum, the species responsible for most malarial disease. It was found that genes coding for parasite protein export into the red cell cytosol and onto its surface, and genes coding for sexual stage proteins involved in parasite transmission are up-regulated in field isolates compared with long-term laboratory isolates. Much of this variability was associated with the loss of small or large chromosomal segments, or other forms of gene copy number variation that are prevalent in the P. falciparum genome (copy number variants, CNVs. Expression levels of genes inside these segments were correlated to that of genes outside and adjacent to the segment boundaries, and this association declined with distance from the CNV boundary. This observation could not be explained by copy number variation in these adjacent genes. This suggests a local-acting regulatory role for CNVs in transcription of neighboring genes and helps explain the chromosomal clustering that we observed here. Transcriptional co-regulation of physical clusters of adaptive genes may provide a way for the parasite to readily adapt to its highly heterogeneous and strongly selective environment.

  1. TIPR: transcription initiation pattern recognition on a genome scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Taj; Wong, Weng-Keen; Megraw, Molly

    2015-12-01

    The computational identification of gene transcription start sites (TSSs) can provide insights into the regulation and function of genes without performing expensive experiments, particularly in organisms with incomplete annotations. High-resolution general-purpose TSS prediction remains a challenging problem, with little recent progress on the identification and differentiation of TSSs which are arranged in different spatial patterns along the chromosome. In this work, we present the Transcription Initiation Pattern Recognizer (TIPR), a sequence-based machine learning model that identifies TSSs with high accuracy and resolution for multiple spatial distribution patterns along the genome, including broadly distributed TSS patterns that have previously been difficult to characterize. TIPR predicts not only the locations of TSSs but also the expected spatial initiation pattern each TSS will form along the chromosome-a novel capability for TSS prediction algorithms. As spatial initiation patterns are associated with spatiotemporal expression patterns and gene function, this capability has the potential to improve gene annotations and our understanding of the regulation of transcription initiation. The high nucleotide resolution of this model locates TSSs within 10 nucleotides or less on average. Model source code is made available online at http://megraw.cgrb.oregonstate.edu/software/TIPR/. megrawm@science.oregonstate.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Transcription start site profiling uncovers divergent transcription and enhancer-associated RNAs in Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Meers, Michael P; Adelman, Karen; Duronio, Robert J; Strahl, Brian D; McKay, Daniel J; Matera, A Gregory

    2018-02-21

    High-resolution transcription start site (TSS) mapping in D. melanogaster embryos and cell lines has revealed a rich and detailed landscape of both cis- and trans-regulatory elements and factors. However, TSS profiling has not been investigated in an orthogonal in vivo setting. Here, we present a comprehensive dataset that links TSS dynamics with nucleosome occupancy and gene expression in the wandering third instar larva, a developmental stage characterized by large-scale shifts in transcriptional programs in preparation for metamorphosis. The data recapitulate major regulatory classes of TSSs, based on peak width, promoter-proximal polymerase pausing, and cis-regulatory element density. We confirm the paucity of divergent transcription units in D. melanogaster, but also identify notable exceptions. Furthermore, we identify thousands of novel initiation events occurring at unannotated TSSs that can be classified into functional categories by their local density of histone modifications. Interestingly, a sub-class of these unannotated TSSs overlaps with functionally validated enhancer elements, consistent with a regulatory role for "enhancer RNAs" (eRNAs) in defining developmental transcription programs. High-depth TSS mapping is a powerful strategy for identifying and characterizing low-abundance and/or low-stability RNAs. Global analysis of transcription initiation patterns in a developing organism reveals a vast number of novel initiation events that identify potential eRNAs as well as other non-coding transcripts critical for animal development.

  3. Comprehensive transcriptional profiling of NaCl-stressed Arabidopsis roots reveals novel classes of responsive genes

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    Deyholos Michael K

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Roots are an attractive system for genomic and post-genomic studies of NaCl responses, due to their primary importance to agriculture, and because of their relative structural and biochemical simplicity. Excellent genomic resources have been established for the study of Arabidopsis roots, however, a comprehensive microarray analysis of the root transcriptome following NaCl exposure is required to further understand plant responses to abiotic stress and facilitate future, systems-based analyses of the underlying regulatory networks. Results We used microarrays of 70-mer oligonucleotide probes representing 23,686 Arabidopsis genes to identify root transcripts that changed in relative abundance following 6 h, 24 h, or 48 h of hydroponic exposure to 150 mM NaCl. Enrichment analysis identified groups of structurally or functionally related genes whose members were statistically over-represented among up- or down-regulated transcripts. Our results are consistent with generally observed stress response themes, and highlight potentially important roles for underappreciated gene families, including: several groups of transporters (e.g. MATE, LeOPT1-like; signalling molecules (e.g. PERK kinases, MLO-like receptors, carbohydrate active enzymes (e.g. XTH18, transcription factors (e.g. members of ZIM, WRKY, NAC, and other proteins (e.g. 4CL-like, COMT-like, LOB-Class 1. We verified the NaCl-inducible expression of selected transcription factors and other genes by qRT-PCR. Conclusion Micorarray profiling of NaCl-treated Arabidopsis roots revealed dynamic changes in transcript abundance for at least 20% of the genome, including hundreds of transcription factors, kinases/phosphatases, hormone-related genes, and effectors of homeostasis, all of which highlight the complexity of this stress response. Our identification of these transcriptional responses, and groups of evolutionarily related genes with either similar or divergent

  4. Two modified RNA extraction methods compatible with transcript profiling and gene expression analysis for cotton roots.

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    Xie, Chengjian; Wang, Chunyan; Wang, Xiaokun; Yang, Xingyong

    2013-01-01

    Efficient isolation of high-quality RNA is of prime importance for optimal transcript profiling results and further gene expression analysis. However, it is difficult for cotton roots because of lower-than-average RNA content and high content of polysaccharides, polyphenols, and other secondary metabolites. To develop simple and reliable protocols for high-quality RNA extraction from cotton roots for transcript profiling and gene expression analysis, some modifications were introduced to a reported plant RNA isolation protocol and a reagent kit method. Using method A, we successfully extracted high-quality RNA for transcript profiling from cotton roots. Gel electrophoresis analysis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay indicated that RNA had good integrity without protein and genomic DNA contamination. Furthermore, the A260/280 (1.9) and A260/230 (1.6) ratios indicated that the isolated RNA was of high purity. Using method B, about 7 µg total RNA of high quality could be obtained from 0.1 g samples from cotton roots, which can be used for reverse-transcription (RT)-PCR and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. The two RNA extraction methods were used to investigate different gene expression of cotton roots (Gossypium hirsutum) infected by weak pathogenic Verticillium dahliae and the results showed they can satisfy the transcript profiling and quantitative real-time RT-PCR requirements for RNA. Supplemental materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Preparative Biochemistry and Biotechnology to view the supplemental file.

  5. RNA-Seq for gene identification and transcript profiling of three Stevia rebaudiana genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junwen; Hou, Kai; Qin, Peng; Liu, Hongchang; Yi, Bin; Yang, Wenting; Wu, Wei

    2014-07-07

    Stevia (Stevia rebaudiana) is an important medicinal plant that yields diterpenoid steviol glycosides (SGs). SGs are currently used in the preparation of medicines, food products and neutraceuticals because of its sweetening property (zero calories and about 300 times sweeter than sugar). Recently, some progress has been made in understanding the biosynthesis of SGs in Stevia, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying this process. Additionally, the genomics of Stevia, a non-model species, remains uncharacterized. The recent advent of RNA-Seq, a next generation sequencing technology, provides an opportunity to expand the identification of Stevia genes through in-depth transcript profiling. We present a comprehensive landscape of the transcriptome profiles of three genotypes of Stevia with divergent SG compositions characterized using RNA-seq. 191,590,282 high-quality reads were generated and then assembled into 171,837 transcripts with an average sequence length of 969 base pairs. A total of 80,160 unigenes were annotated, and 14,211 of the unique sequences were assigned to specific metabolic pathways by the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. Gene sequences of all enzymes known to be involved in SG synthesis were examined. A total of 143 UDP-glucosyltransferase (UGT) unigenes were identified, some of which might be involved in SG biosynthesis. The expression patterns of eight of these genes were further confirmed by RT-QPCR. RNA-seq analysis identified candidate genes encoding enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of SGs in Stevia, a non-model plant without a reference genome. The transcriptome data from this study yielded new insights into the process of SG accumulation in Stevia. Our results demonstrate that RNA-Seq can be successfully used for gene identification and transcript profiling in a non-model species.

  6. The Absence of the Transcription Factor Yrr1p, Identified from Comparative Genome Profiling, Increased Vanillin Tolerance Due to Enhancements of ABC Transporters Expressing, rRNA Processing and Ribosome Biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinning; Liang, Zhenzhen; Hou, Jin; Shen, Yu; Bao, Xiaoming

    2017-01-01

    Enhancing the tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to inhibitors derived from lignocellulose is conducive to producing biofuel and chemicals using abundant lignocellulosic materials. Vanillin is a major type of phenolic inhibitor in lignocellulose hydrolysates for S. cerevisiae . In the present work, the factors beneficial to vanillin resistance in yeast were identified from the vanillin-resistant strain EMV-8, which was derived from strain NAN-27 by adaptive evolution. We found 450 SNPs and 44 genes with InDels in the vanillin-tolerant strain EMV-8 by comparing the genome sequences of EMV-8 and NAN-27. To investigate the effects of InDels, InDels were deleted in BY4741, respectively. We demonstrated that the deletion of YRR1 improved vanillin tolerance of strain. In the presence of 6 mM vanillin, deleting YRR1 increase the maximum specific growth rate and the vanillin consumption rate by 142 and 51%, respectively. The subsequent transcriptome analysis revealed that deleting YRR1 resulted in changed expression of over 200 genes in the presence of 5 mM vanillin. The most marked changes were the significant up-regulation of the dehydrogenase ADH7 , several ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, and dozens of genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and rRNA processing. Coincidently, the crude enzyme solution of BY4741( yrr1 Δ) exhibited higher NADPH-dependent vanillin reduction activity than control. In addition, overexpressing the ABC transporter genes PDR5, YOR1 , and SNQ2 , as well as the RNA helicase gene DBP2 , increased the vanillin tolerance of strain. Interestingly, unlike the marked changes we mentioned above, under vanillin-free conditions, there are only limited transcriptional differences between wildtype and yrr1 Δ. This indicated that vanillin might act as an effector in Yrr1p-related regulatory processes. The new findings of the relationship between YRR1 and vanillin tolerance, as well as the contribution of rRNA processing and ribosome biogenesis to

  7. Understanding variation in transcription factor binding by modeling transcription factor genome-epigenome interactions.

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    Chieh-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available Despite explosive growth in genomic datasets, the methods for studying epigenomic mechanisms of gene regulation remain primitive. Here we present a model-based approach to systematically analyze the epigenomic functions in modulating transcription factor-DNA binding. Based on the first principles of statistical mechanics, this model considers the interactions between epigenomic modifications and a cis-regulatory module, which contains multiple binding sites arranged in any configurations. We compiled a comprehensive epigenomic dataset in mouse embryonic stem (mES cells, including DNA methylation (MeDIP-seq and MRE-seq, DNA hydroxymethylation (5-hmC-seq, and histone modifications (ChIP-seq. We discovered correlations of transcription factors (TFs for specific combinations of epigenomic modifications, which we term epigenomic motifs. Epigenomic motifs explained why some TFs appeared to have different DNA binding motifs derived from in vivo (ChIP-seq and in vitro experiments. Theoretical analyses suggested that the epigenome can modulate transcriptional noise and boost the cooperativity of weak TF binding sites. ChIP-seq data suggested that epigenomic boost of binding affinities in weak TF binding sites can function in mES cells. We showed in theory that the epigenome should suppress the TF binding differences on SNP-containing binding sites in two people. Using personal data, we identified strong associations between H3K4me2/H3K9ac and the degree of personal differences in NFκB binding in SNP-containing binding sites, which may explain why some SNPs introduce much smaller personal variations on TF binding than other SNPs. In summary, this model presents a powerful approach to analyze the functions of epigenomic modifications. This model was implemented into an open source program APEG (Affinity Prediction by Epigenome and Genome, http://systemsbio.ucsd.edu/apeg.

  8. RNAseq Transcriptional Profiling following Whip Development in Sugarcane Smut Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguti, Lucas M.; Peters, Leila P.; Creste, Silvana; Aitken, Karen S.; Van Sluys, Marie-Anne; Kitajima, João P.; Vieira, Maria L. C.; Monteiro-Vitorello, Claudia B.

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane smut disease is caused by the biotrophic fungus Sporisorium scitamineum. The disease is characterized by the development of a whip-like structure from the primary meristems, where billions of teliospores are produced. Sugarcane smut also causes tillering and low sucrose and high fiber contents, reducing cane productivity. We investigated the biological events contributing to disease symptoms in a smut intermediate-resistant sugarcane genotype by examining the transcriptional profiles (RNAseq) shortly after inoculating the plants and immediately after whip emission. The overall picture of disease progression suggests that premature transcriptional reprogramming of the shoot meristem functions continues until the emergence of the whip. The guidance of this altered pattern is potentially primarily related to auxin mobilization in addition to the involvement of other hormonal imbalances. The consequences associated with whip emission are the modulation of typical meristematic functions toward reproductive organ differentiation, requiring strong changes in carbon partitioning and energy production. These changes include the overexpression of genes coding for invertases and trehalose-6P synthase, as well as other enzymes from key metabolic pathways, such as from lignin biosynthesis. This is the first report describing changes in the transcriptional profiles following whip development, providing a hypothetical model and candidate genes to further study sugarcane smut disease progression. PMID:27583836

  9. RNAseq Transcriptional Profiling following Whip Development in Sugarcane Smut Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia D C Schaker

    Full Text Available Sugarcane smut disease is caused by the biotrophic fungus Sporisorium scitamineum. The disease is characterized by the development of a whip-like structure from the primary meristems, where billions of teliospores are produced. Sugarcane smut also causes tillering and low sucrose and high fiber contents, reducing cane productivity. We investigated the biological events contributing to disease symptoms in a smut intermediate-resistant sugarcane genotype by examining the transcriptional profiles (RNAseq shortly after inoculating the plants and immediately after whip emission. The overall picture of disease progression suggests that premature transcriptional reprogramming of the shoot meristem functions continues until the emergence of the whip. The guidance of this altered pattern is potentially primarily related to auxin mobilization in addition to the involvement of other hormonal imbalances. The consequences associated with whip emission are the modulation of typical meristematic functions toward reproductive organ differentiation, requiring strong changes in carbon partitioning and energy production. These changes include the overexpression of genes coding for invertases and trehalose-6P synthase, as well as other enzymes from key metabolic pathways, such as from lignin biosynthesis. This is the first report describing changes in the transcriptional profiles following whip development, providing a hypothetical model and candidate genes to further study sugarcane smut disease progression.

  10. Differential genomic targeting of the transcription factor TAL1 in alternate haematopoietic lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palii, Carmen G; Perez-Iratxeta, Carolina; Yao, Zizhen; Cao, Yi; Dai, Fengtao; Davison, Jerry; Atkins, Harold; Allan, David; Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Gentleman, Robert; Tapscott, Stephen J; Brand, Marjorie

    2011-02-02

    TAL1/SCL is a master regulator of haematopoiesis whose expression promotes opposite outcomes depending on the cell type: differentiation in the erythroid lineage or oncogenesis in the T-cell lineage. Here, we used a combination of ChIP sequencing and gene expression profiling to compare the function of TAL1 in normal erythroid and leukaemic T cells. Analysis of the genome-wide binding properties of TAL1 in these two haematopoietic lineages revealed new insight into the mechanism by which transcription factors select their binding sites in alternate lineages. Our study shows limited overlap in the TAL1-binding profile between the two cell types with an unexpected preference for ETS and RUNX motifs adjacent to E-boxes in the T-cell lineage. Furthermore, we show that TAL1 interacts with RUNX1 and ETS1, and that these transcription factors are critically required for TAL1 binding to genes that modulate T-cell differentiation. Thus, our findings highlight a critical role of the cellular environment in modulating transcription factor binding, and provide insight into the mechanism by which TAL1 inhibits differentiation leading to oncogenesis in the T-cell lineage.

  11. Relationships between genetic polymorphisms and transcriptional profiles for outcome prediction in anticancer agent treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Hyojung; Lee, Eunjung; Lee, Doheon

    2010-12-01

    In the era of personal genomics, predicting the individual response to drug-treatment is a challenge of biomedical research. The aim of this study was to validate whether interaction information between genetic and transcriptional signatures are promising features to predict a drug response. Because drug resistance/susceptibilities result from the complex associations of genetic and transcriptional activities, we predicted the inter-relationships between genetic and transcriptional signatures. With this concept, captured genetic polymorphisms and transcriptional profiles were prepared in cancer samples. By splitting ninety-nine samples into a trial set (n = 30) and a test set (n = 69), the outperformance of relationship-focused model (0.84 of area under the curve in trial set, P = 2.90 x 10⁻⁴) was presented in the trial set and validated in the test set, respectively. The prediction results of modeling show that considering the relationships between genetic and transcriptional features is an effective approach to determine outcome predictions of drug-treatment.

  12. The Role of Genome Accessibility in Transcription Factor Binding in Bacteria.

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    Antonio L C Gomes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ChIP-seq enables genome-scale identification of regulatory regions that govern gene expression. However, the biological insights generated from ChIP-seq analysis have been limited to predictions of binding sites and cooperative interactions. Furthermore, ChIP-seq data often poorly correlate with in vitro measurements or predicted motifs, highlighting that binding affinity alone is insufficient to explain transcription factor (TF-binding in vivo. One possibility is that binding sites are not equally accessible across the genome. A more comprehensive biophysical representation of TF-binding is required to improve our ability to understand, predict, and alter gene expression. Here, we show that genome accessibility is a key parameter that impacts TF-binding in bacteria. We developed a thermodynamic model that parameterizes ChIP-seq coverage in terms of genome accessibility and binding affinity. The role of genome accessibility is validated using a large-scale ChIP-seq dataset of the M. tuberculosis regulatory network. We find that accounting for genome accessibility led to a model that explains 63% of the ChIP-seq profile variance, while a model based in motif score alone explains only 35% of the variance. Moreover, our framework enables de novo ChIP-seq peak prediction and is useful for inferring TF-binding peaks in new experimental conditions by reducing the need for additional experiments. We observe that the genome is more accessible in intergenic regions, and that increased accessibility is positively correlated with gene expression and anti-correlated with distance to the origin of replication. Our biophysically motivated model provides a more comprehensive description of TF-binding in vivo from first principles towards a better representation of gene regulation in silico, with promising applications in systems biology.

  13. Transcript expression profiling for adventitious roots of Panax ginseng Meyer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniyam, Sathiyamoorthy; Mathiyalagan, Ramya; Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Kim, Yu-Jin; Jang, Moon-Gi; Park, Jun-Hyung; Yang, Deok Chun

    2014-08-01

    Panax ginseng Meyer is one of the major medicinal plants in oriental countries belonging to the Araliaceae family which are the primary source for ginsenosides. However, very few genes were characterized for ginsenoside pathway, due to the limited genome information. Through this study, we obtained a comprehensive transcriptome from adventitious roots, which were treated with methyl jasmonic acids for different time points (control, 2h, 6h, 12h, and 24h) and sequenced by RNA 454 pyrosequencing technology. Reference transcriptome 39,304,529 (0.04GB) was obtained from 5,724,987,880 bases (5.7GB) of 22 libraries by de novo assembly and 35,266 (58.5%) transcripts were annotated with biological schemas (GO and KEGG). The digital gene expression patterns were obtained from in vitro grown adventitious root sequences which mapped to reference, from that, 3813 (6.3%) unique transcripts were involved in ≥2 fold up and downregulations. Finally, candidates for ginsenoside pathway genes were predicted from observed expression patterns. Among them, 30 transcription factors, 20 cytochromes, and 11 glycosyl transferases were predicted as ginsenoside candidates. These data can remarkably expand the existing transcriptome resources of Panax, especially to predict existence of gene networks in P. ginseng. The entity of the data provides a valuable platform to reveal more on secondary metabolism and abiotic stresses from P. ginseng in vitro grown adventitious roots. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Olive phenolic compounds: metabolic and transcriptional profiling during fruit development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alagna Fiammetta

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Olive (Olea europaea L. fruits contain numerous secondary metabolites, primarily phenolics, terpenes and sterols, some of which are particularly interesting for their nutraceutical properties. This study will attempt to provide further insight into the profile of olive phenolic compounds during fruit development and to identify the major genetic determinants of phenolic metabolism. Results The concentration of the major phenolic compounds, such as oleuropein, demethyloleuropein, 3–4 DHPEA-EDA, ligstroside, tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, verbascoside and lignans, were measured in the developing fruits of 12 olive cultivars. The content of these compounds varied significantly among the cultivars and decreased during fruit development and maturation, with some compounds showing specificity for certain cultivars. Thirty-five olive transcripts homologous to genes involved in the pathways of the main secondary metabolites were identified from the massive sequencing data of the olive fruit transcriptome or from cDNA-AFLP analysis. Their mRNA levels were determined using RT-qPCR analysis on fruits of high- and low-phenolic varieties (Coratina and Dolce d’Andria, respectively during three different fruit developmental stages. A strong correlation was observed between phenolic compound concentrations and transcripts putatively involved in their biosynthesis, suggesting a transcriptional regulation of the corresponding pathways. OeDXS, OeGES, OeGE10H and OeADH, encoding putative 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-P synthase, geraniol synthase, geraniol 10-hydroxylase and arogenate dehydrogenase, respectively, were almost exclusively present at 45 days after flowering (DAF, suggesting that these compounds might play a key role in regulating secoiridoid accumulation during fruit development. Conclusions Metabolic and transcriptional profiling led to the identification of some major players putatively involved in biosynthesis of secondary compounds in the

  15. Olive phenolic compounds: metabolic and transcriptional profiling during fruit development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Olive (Olea europaea L.) fruits contain numerous secondary metabolites, primarily phenolics, terpenes and sterols, some of which are particularly interesting for their nutraceutical properties. This study will attempt to provide further insight into the profile of olive phenolic compounds during fruit development and to identify the major genetic determinants of phenolic metabolism. Results The concentration of the major phenolic compounds, such as oleuropein, demethyloleuropein, 3–4 DHPEA-EDA, ligstroside, tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, verbascoside and lignans, were measured in the developing fruits of 12 olive cultivars. The content of these compounds varied significantly among the cultivars and decreased during fruit development and maturation, with some compounds showing specificity for certain cultivars. Thirty-five olive transcripts homologous to genes involved in the pathways of the main secondary metabolites were identified from the massive sequencing data of the olive fruit transcriptome or from cDNA-AFLP analysis. Their mRNA levels were determined using RT-qPCR analysis on fruits of high- and low-phenolic varieties (Coratina and Dolce d’Andria, respectively) during three different fruit developmental stages. A strong correlation was observed between phenolic compound concentrations and transcripts putatively involved in their biosynthesis, suggesting a transcriptional regulation of the corresponding pathways. OeDXS, OeGES, OeGE10H and OeADH, encoding putative 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-P synthase, geraniol synthase, geraniol 10-hydroxylase and arogenate dehydrogenase, respectively, were almost exclusively present at 45 days after flowering (DAF), suggesting that these compounds might play a key role in regulating secoiridoid accumulation during fruit development. Conclusions Metabolic and transcriptional profiling led to the identification of some major players putatively involved in biosynthesis of secondary compounds in the olive tree. Our data

  16. Transcriptional Profiling of Egg Allergy and Relationship to Disease Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Kosoy

    Full Text Available Egg allergy is one of the most common food allergies of childhood. There is a lack of information on the immunologic basis of egg allergy beyond the role of IgE.To use transcriptional profiling as a novel approach to uncover immunologic processes associated with different phenotypes of egg allergy.Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were obtained from egg-allergic children who were defined as reactive (BER or tolerant (BET to baked egg, and from food allergic controls (AC who were egg non-allergic. PBMCs were stimulated with egg white protein. Gene transcription was measured by microarray after 24 h, and cytokine secretion by multiplex assay after 5 days.The transcriptional response of PBMCs to egg protein differed between BER and BET versus AC subjects. Compared to the AC group, the BER group displayed increased expression of genes associated with allergic inflammation as well as corresponding increased secretion of IL-5, IL-9 and TNF-α. A similar pattern was observed for the BET group. Further similarities in gene expression patterns between BER and BET groups, as well as some important differences, were revealed using a novel Immune Annotation resource developed for this project. This approach identified several novel processes not previously associated with egg allergy, including positive associations with TLR4-stimulated myeloid cells and activated NK cells, and negative associations with an induced Treg signature. Further pathway analysis of differentially expressed genes comparing BER to BET subjects showed significant enrichment of IFN-α and IFN-γ response genes, as well as genes associated with virally-infected DCs.Transcriptional profiling identified several novel pathways and processes that differed when comparing the response to egg allergen in BET, BER, and AC groups. We conclude that this approach is a useful hypothesis-generating mechanism to identify novel immune processes associated with allergy and tolerance to forms

  17. Novel transcriptional profile in wrist muscles from cerebral palsy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramaniam Shankar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral palsy (CP is an upper motor neuron disease that results in a progressive movement disorder. Secondary to the neurological insult, muscles from CP patients often become spastic. Spastic muscle is characterized by an increased resistance to stretch, but often develops the further complication of contracture which represents a prominent disability in children with CP. This study's purpose is to characterize alterations of spastic muscle on the transcriptional level. Increased knowledge of spastic muscle may lead to novel therapies to improve the quality of life for children with CP. Method The transcriptional profile of spastic muscles were defined in children with cerebral palsy and compared to control patients using Affymetrix U133A chips. Expression data were verified using quantitative-PCR (QPCR and validated with SDS-PAGE for select genes. Significant genes were determined using a 2 × 2 ANOVA and results required congruence between 3 preprocessing algorithms. Results CP patients clustered independently and 205 genes were significantly altered, covering a range of cellular processes. Placing gene expression in the context of physiological pathways, the results demonstrated that spastic muscle in CP adapts transcriptionally by altering extracellular matrix, fiber type, and myogenic potential. Extracellular matrix adaptations occur primarily in the basal lamina although there is increase in fibrillar collagen components. Fiber type is predominately fast compared to normal muscle as evidenced by contractile gene isoforms and decrease in oxidative metabolic gene transcription, despite a paradoxical increased transcription of slow fiber pathway genes. We also found competing pathways of fiber hypertrophy with an increase in the anabolic IGF1 gene in parallel with a paradoxical increase in myostatin, a gene responsible for stopping muscle growth. We found evidence that excitation-contraction coupling genes are altered in

  18. Convergent transcriptional profiles induced by endogenous estrogen and distinct xenoestrogens in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buterin, Tonko; Koch, Caroline; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2006-08-01

    Estrogen receptors display high levels of promiscuity in accommodating a wide range of ligand structures, but the functional consequence of changing receptor conformations in complex with distinct agonists is highly controversial. To determine variations in the transactivation capacity induced by different estrogenic agonists, we assessed global transcriptional profiles elicited by natural or synthetic xenoestrogens in comparison with the endogenous hormone 17beta-estradiol. Human MCF7 and T47D carcinoma cells, representing the most frequently used model systems for tumorigenic responses in the mammary gland, were synchronized by hormone starvation during 48 h. Subsequently, a 24 h exposure was carried out with equipotent concentrations of the selected xenoestrogens or 17beta-estradiol. Analysis of messenger RNA was performed on high-density oligonucleotide microarrays that display the sequences of 33,000 human transcripts, yielding a total of 181 gene products that are regulated upon estrogenic stimulation. Surprisingly, genistein (a phytoestrogen), bisphenol-A and polychlorinated biphenyl congener 54 (two synthetic xenoestrogens) produced highly congruent genomic fingerprints by regulating the same range of human genes. Also, the monotonous genomic signature observed in response to xenoestrogens is identical to the transcriptional effects induced by physiological concentrations of 17beta-estradiol. This striking functional convergence indicates that the transcription machinery is largely insensitive to the particular structure of estrogen receptor agonists. The occurrence of such converging transcriptional programs reinforces the hypothesis that multiple xenoestrogenic contaminants, of natural or anthropogenic origin, may act in conjunction with the endogenous hormone to induce additive effects in target tissues.

  19. Statistical modelling of transcript profiles of differentially regulated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergeant Martin J

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vast quantities of gene expression profiling data produced in microarray studies, and the more precise quantitative PCR, are often not statistically analysed to their full potential. Previous studies have summarised gene expression profiles using simple descriptive statistics, basic analysis of variance (ANOVA and the clustering of genes based on simple models fitted to their expression profiles over time. We report the novel application of statistical non-linear regression modelling techniques to describe the shapes of expression profiles for the fungus Agaricus bisporus, quantified by PCR, and for E. coli and Rattus norvegicus, using microarray technology. The use of parametric non-linear regression models provides a more precise description of expression profiles, reducing the "noise" of the raw data to produce a clear "signal" given by the fitted curve, and describing each profile with a small number of biologically interpretable parameters. This approach then allows the direct comparison and clustering of the shapes of response patterns between genes and potentially enables a greater exploration and interpretation of the biological processes driving gene expression. Results Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR-derived time-course data of genes were modelled. "Split-line" or "broken-stick" regression identified the initial time of gene up-regulation, enabling the classification of genes into those with primary and secondary responses. Five-day profiles were modelled using the biologically-oriented, critical exponential curve, y(t = A + (B + CtRt + ε. This non-linear regression approach allowed the expression patterns for different genes to be compared in terms of curve shape, time of maximal transcript level and the decline and asymptotic response levels. Three distinct regulatory patterns were identified for the five genes studied. Applying the regression modelling approach to microarray-derived time course data

  20. Identification of human-specific transcript variants induced by DNA insertions in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Seon; Hahn, Yoonsoo

    2011-01-01

    Many genes in the human genome produce a wide variety of transcript variants resulting from alternative exon splicing, differential promoter usage, or altered polyadenylation site utilization that may function differently in human cells. Here, we present a bioinformatics method for the systematic identification of human-specific novel transcript variants that might have arisen after the human-chimpanzee divergence. The procedure involved collecting genomic insertions that are unique to the human genome when compared with orthologous chimpanzee and rhesus macaque genomic regions, and that are expressed in the transcriptome as exons evidenced by mRNAs and/or expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Using this procedure, we identified 112 transcript variants that are specific to humans; 74 were associated with known genes and the remaining transcripts were located in unannotated genomic loci. The original source of inserts was mostly transposable elements including L1, Alu, SVA, and human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs). Interestingly, some non-repetitive genomic segments were also involved in the generation of novel transcript variants. Insert contributions to the transcripts included promoters, terminal exons and insertions in exons, splice donors and acceptors and complete exon cassettes. Comparison of personal genomes revealed that at least seven loci were polymorphic in humans. The exaptation of human-specific genomic inserts as novel transcript variants may have increased human gene versatility or affected gene regulation.

  1. Comparison of susceptibility and transcription profile of the new antifungal hassallidin A with caspofungin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhof, Torsten; Seibold, Michael; Thewes, Sascha; Laue, Michael; Han, Chang-Ok; Hube, Bernhard; Doehren, Hans von

    2006-01-01

    This is First report on the antifungal effects of the new glycolipopeptide hassallidin A. Due to related molecular structure moieties between hassallidin A and the established antifungal drug caspofungin we assumed parallels in the effects on cell viability. Therefore we compared hassallidin A with caspofungin by antifungal susceptibility testing and by analysing the genome-wide transcriptional profile of Candida albicans. Furthermore, we examined modifications in ultracellular structure due to hassallidin A treatment by electron microscopy. Hassallidin A was found to be fungicidal against all tested Candida species and Cryptococcus neoformans isolates. MICs ranged from 4 to 8 μg/ml, independently from the species. Electron microscopy revealed noticeable ultrastructural changes in C. albicans cells exposed to hassallidin A. Comparing the transcriptional profile of C. albicans cells treated with hassallidin A to that of cells exposed to caspofungin, only 20 genes were found to be similarly up- or down-regulated in both assays, while 227 genes were up- or down-regulated induced by hassallidin A specifically. Genes up-regulated in cells exposed to hassallidin A included metabolic and mitotic genes, while genes involved in DNA repair, vesicle docking, and membrane fusion were down-regulated. In summary, our data suggest that, although hassallidin A and caspofungin have similar structures, however, the effects on susceptibility and transcriptional response to yeasts seem to be different

  2. Functional profiling of cyanobacterial genomes and its role in ecological adaptations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Prabha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available With the availability of complete genome sequences of many cyanobacterial species, it is becoming feasible to study the broad prospective of the environmental adaptation and the overall changes at transcriptional and translational level in these organisms. In the evolutionary phase, niche-specific competitive forces have resulted in specific features of the cyanobacterial genomes. In this study, functional composition of the 84 different cyanobacterial genomes and their adaptations to different environments was examined by identifying the genomic composition for specific cellular processes, which reflect their genomic functional profile and ecological adaptation. It was identified that among cyanobacterial genomes, metabolic genes have major share over other categories and differentiation of genomic functional profile was observed for the species inhabiting different habitats. The cyanobacteria of freshwater and other habitats accumulate large number of poorly characterized genes. Strain specific functions were also reported in many cyanobacterial members, of which an important feature was the occurrence of phage-related sequences. From this study, it can be speculated that habitat is one of the major factors in giving the shape of functional composition of cyanobacterial genomes towards their ecological adaptations.

  3. Computational Profiling of Microbial Genomes using Short Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, Dale; Tsukuda, Toyoko

    2001-03-01

    The genomes of a number of microbial species have now been completely sequenced. We have developed a program for the statistical analysis of the appearance frequency and location of short DNA segments within an entire microbial genome. Using this program, the genomes of Methanococcus jannischii (1.66 Mbase; 68radiodurans (3.28 Mbase; 66and compared to a randomly generated genomic pattern. The random sequence shows the expected statistical frequency distribution about the average that equals the genome size divided by the total number of N size short segments (4N). In contrast, the microbial genomes are radically skewed with a large number of segments that rarely occur and a few that are highly represented in the genome. The specific distribution profile of the segments is strongly dependent on the overall bias in the organism. The biased appearance frequency allows us to develop a genome signature of each microbial species.

  4. Genome-wide transcriptional and physiological responses of Bradyrhizobium japonicum to paraquat-mediated oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Andrew J; Jeon, Jeong-Min; Sangurdekar, Dipen; So, Jae-Seong; Chang, Woo-Suk

    2011-06-01

    The rhizobial bacterium Bradyrhizobium japonicum functions as a nitrogen-fixing symbiont of the soybean plant (Glycine max). Plants are capable of producing an oxidative burst, a rapid proliferation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as a defense mechanism against pathogenic and symbiotic bacteria. Therefore, B. japonicum must be able to resist such a defense mechanism to initiate nodulation. In this study, paraquat, a known superoxide radical-inducing agent, was used to investigate this response. Genome-wide transcriptional profiles were created for both prolonged exposure (PE) and fulminant shock (FS) conditions. These profiles revealed that 190 and 86 genes were up- and downregulated for the former condition, and that 299 and 105 genes were up- and downregulated for the latter condition, respectively (>2.0-fold; P < 0.05). Many genes within putative operons for F(0)F(1)-ATP synthase, chemotaxis, transport, and ribosomal proteins were upregulated during PE. The transcriptional profile for the FS condition strangely resembled that of a bacteroid condition, including the FixK(2) transcription factor and most of its response elements. However, genes encoding canonical ROS scavenging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase and catalase, were not detected, suggesting constitutive expression of those genes by endogenous ROS. Various physiological tests, including exopolysaccharide (EPS), cellular protein, and motility characterization, were performed to corroborate the gene expression data. The results suggest that B. japonicum responds to tolerable oxidative stress during PE through enhanced motility, increased translational activity, and EPS production, in addition to the expression of genes involved in global stress responses, such as chaperones and sigma factors.

  5. Genome-wide transcription responses to synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprung, Carl N; Yang, Yuqing; Forrester, Helen B; Li, Jason; Zaitseva, Marina; Cann, Leonie; Restall, Tina; Anderson, Robin L; Crosbie, Jeffrey C; Rogers, Peter A W

    2012-10-01

    The majority of cancer patients achieve benefit from radiotherapy. A significant limitation of radiotherapy is its relatively low therapeutic index, defined as the maximum radiation dose that causes acceptable normal tissue damage to the minimum dose required to achieve tumor control. Recently, a new radiotherapy modality using synchrotron-generated X-ray microbeam radiotherapy has been demonstrated in animal models to ablate tumors with concurrent sparing of normal tissue. Very little work has been undertaken into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that differentiate microbeam radiotherapy from broad beam. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the whole genome transcriptional response of in vivo microbeam radiotherapy versus broad beam irradiated tumors. We hypothesized that gene expression changes after microbeam radiotherapy are different from those seen after broad beam. We found that in EMT6.5 tumors at 4-48 h postirradiation, microbeam radiotherapy differentially regulates a number of genes, including major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen gene family members, and other immunity-related genes including Ciita, Ifng, Cxcl1, Cxcl9, Indo and Ubd when compared to broad beam. Our findings demonstrate molecular differences in the tumor response to microbeam versus broad beam irradiation and these differences provide insight into the underlying mechanisms of microbeam radiotherapy and broad beam.

  6. Genome-wide identification, classification and analysis of heat shock transcription factor family in maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Su-Wen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heat shock response in eukaryotes is transcriptionally regulated by conserved heat shock transcription factors (Hsfs. Hsf genes are represented by a large multigene family in plants and investigation of the Hsf gene family will serve to elucidate the mechanisms by which plants respond to stress. In recent years, reports of genome-wide structural and evolutionary analysis of the entire Hsf gene family have been generated in two model plant systems, Arabidopsis and rice. Maize, an important cereal crop, has represented a model plant for genetics and evolutionary research. Although some Hsf genes have been characterized in maize, analysis of the entire Hsf gene family were not completed following Maize (B73 Genome Sequencing Project. Results A genome-wide analysis was carried out in the present study to identify all Hsfs maize genes. Due to the availability of complete maize genome sequences, 25 nonredundant Hsf genes, named ZmHsfs were identified. Chromosomal location, protein domain and motif organization of ZmHsfs were analyzed in maize genome. The phylogenetic relationships, gene duplications and expression profiles of ZmHsf genes were also presented in this study. Twenty-five ZmHsfs were classified into three major classes (class A, B, and C according to their structural characteristics and phylogenetic comparisons, and class A was further subdivided into 10 subclasses. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis indicated that the orthologs from the three species (maize, Arabidopsis and rice were distributed in all three classes, it also revealed diverse Hsf gene family expression patterns in classes and subclasses. Chromosomal/segmental duplications played a key role in Hsf gene family expansion in maize by investigation of gene duplication events. Furthermore, the transcripts of 25 ZmHsf genes were detected in the leaves by heat shock using quantitative real-time PCR. The result demonstrated that ZmHsf genes exhibit different

  7. Novel transcripts discovered by mining genomic DNA from defined regions of bovine chromosome 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eberlein Annett

    2009-04-01

    distinctive tissue-specific expression profile. However, their definite regulatory function has to be analyzed in further studies. The novel transcripts will add new sequence information to annotate a complete bovine genome sequence assembly, contribute to establish a detailed transcription map for targeted BTA6 regions and will also be helpful to dissect of the molecular and regulatory background of the QTL detected on BTA6.

  8. Changes in the transcriptional profile of cardiac myocytes following green fluorescent protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrian, Bahareh; Bogoyevitch, Marie A

    2007-10-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its multiple forms, such as enhanced GFP (EGFP), have been widely used as marker proteins and for tracking purposes in many biological systems, including the heart and cardiac cell systems. Despite some concerns on its toxicity under certain circumstances, GFP remains amongst the most reliable and easy-to-use markers available. Using rat full genome DNA microarrays, we have investigated the broader consequences of adenoviral-driven GFP expression in cardiac myocytes. In our transcriptional profiling analysis, we set a threshold of a twofold change. We removed possible changes resulting from adenoviral infection by comparison with transcriptional profiles of cardiac myocytes with adenoviral-driven expression of an unrelated protein, the kinase MEK. Our analysis revealed changes in the expression of 212 genes. Of these genes, 174 were upregulated and 38 were downregulated following GFP expression. Many of these genes remain unannotated, but an evaluation of those with described functions for their resulting proteins indicated that many were involved in processes, including responses to stimuli/stress and signal transduction. Our analysis thus indicates the broader consequences of GFP expression in altering gene expression profiles in cardiac cells. Care should therefore be taken when using GFP expression as a control in gene expression studies.

  9. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of TCP transcription factors in Gossypium raimondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Wang, Qinglian; Sun, Runrun; Xie, Fuliang; Jones, Don C; Zhang, Baohong

    2014-10-16

    Plant-specific TEOSINTE-BRANCHED1/CYCLOIDEA/PCF (TCP) transcription factors play versatile functions in multiple aspects of plant growth and development. However, no systematical study has been performed in cotton. In this study, we performed for the first time the genome-wide identification and expression analysis of the TCP transcription factor family in Gossypium raimondii. A total of 38 non-redundant cotton TCP encoding genes were identified. The TCP transcription factors were divided into eleven subgroups based on phylogenetic analysis. Most TCP genes within the same subfamily demonstrated similar exon and intron organization and the motif structures were highly conserved among the subfamilies. Additionally, the chromosomal distribution pattern revealed that TCP genes were unevenly distributed across 11 out of the 13 chromosomes; segmental duplication is a predominant duplication event for TCP genes and the major contributor to the expansion of TCP gene family in G. raimondii. Moreover, the expression profiles of TCP genes shed light on their functional divergence.

  10. REPARATION : ribosome profiling assisted (re-)annotation of bacterial genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Ndah, Elvis; Jonckheere, Veronique; Giess, Adam; Valen, Eivind; Menschaert, Gerben; Van Damme, Petra

    2017-01-01

    Prokaryotic genome annotation is highly dependent on automated methods, as manual curation cannot keep up with the exponential growth of sequenced genomes. Current automated methods depend heavily on sequence composition and often underestimate the complexity of the proteome. We developed RibosomeE Profiling Assisted (re-)AnnotaTION (REPARATION), a de novo machine learning algorithm that takes advantage of experimental protein synthesis evidence from ribosome profiling (Ribo-seq) to delineate...

  11. REPARATION: ribosome profiling assisted (re-)annotation of bacterial genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Ndah, Elvis; Jonckheere, Veronique; Giess, Adam; Valen, Eivind; Menschaert, Gerben; Van Damme, Petra

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Prokaryotic genome annotation is highly dependent on automated methods, as manual curation cannot keep up with the exponential growth of sequenced genomes. Current automated methods depend heavily on sequence composition and often underestimate the complexity of the proteome. We developed RibosomeE Profiling Assisted (re-)AnnotaTION (REPARATION), a de novo machine learning algorithm that takes advantage of experimental protein synthesis evidence from ribosome profiling (Ribo-seq) to ...

  12. Molecular characterization of BZR transcription factor family and abiotic stress induced expression profiling in Brassica rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Gopal; Park, Jong-In; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Ahmed, Nasar Uddin; Kayum, Md Abdul; Kang, Jong-Goo; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2015-07-01

    BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT (BZR) transcription factors (TFs) are primarily well known as positive regulators of Brassinosteroid (BR) signal transduction in different plants. BR is a plant specific steroid hormone, which has multiple stress resistance functions besides various growth regulatory roles. Being an important regulator of the BR synthesis, BZR TFs might have stress resistance related activities. However, no stress resistance related functional study of BZR TFs has been reported in any crop plants so far. Therefore, this study identified 15 BZR TFs of Brassica rapa (BrBZR) from a genome-wide survey and characterized them through sequence analysis and expression profiling against several abiotic stresses. Various systematic in silico analysis of these TFs validated the fundamental properties of BZRs, where a high degree of similarity also observed with recognized BZRs of other plant species from the comparison studies. In the organ specific expression analyses, 6 BrBZR TFs constitutively expressed in flower developmental stages indicating their flower specific functions. Subsequently, from the stress resistance related expression profiles differential transcript abundance levels were observed by 6 and 11 BrBZRs against salt and drought stresses, respectively. All BrBZRs showed several folds up-regulation against exogenous ABA treatment. All BrBZRs also showed differential expression against low temperature stress treatments and these TFs were proposed as transcriptional activators of CBF cold response pathway of B. rapa. Notably, three BrBZRs gave co-responsive expression against all the stresses tested here, suggesting their multiple stress resistance related functions. Thus, the findings would be helpful in resolving the complex regulatory mechanism of BZRs in stress resistance and further functional genomics study of these potential TFs in different Brassica crops. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Study of genomic fingerprints profile of Magnaporthe grisea from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Study of genomic fingerprints profile of Magnaporthe grisea from finger millet ( Eleusine Coracona ) by random amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain ... This study was done to generate genomic finger prints using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers as well as to find out genetic diversity in M.

  14. Cross-talk between non-genomic and genomic signalling pathways - Distinct effect profiles of environmental estrogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Elisabete; Kabil, Alena; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) transcriptional cross-talk after activation by 17β-estradiol (E2) has been studied in considerable detail, but comparatively little is known about the ways in which synthetic estrogen-like chemicals, so-called xenoestrogens, interfere with these signalling pathways. E2 can stimulate rapid, non-genomic signalling events, such as activation of the Src/Ras/Erk signalling pathway. We investigated how activation of this pathway by E2, the estrogenic environmental contaminants o,p'-DDT, β-HCH and p,p'-DDE, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) influences the expression of ER target genes, such as TFF1, ER, PR, BRCA1 and CCND1, and the proliferation of breast cancer cells. Despite commonalities in their estrogenicity as judged by cell proliferation assays, the environmental contaminants exhibited striking differences in their non-genomic and genomic signalling. The gene expression profiles of o,p'-DDT and β-HCH resembled the effects observed with E2. In the case of β-HCH this is surprising, considering its reported lack of affinity to the 'classical' ER. The expression profiles seen with p,p'-DDE showed some similarities with E2, but overall, p,p'-DDE was a fairly weak transcriptional inducer of TFF1, ER, PR, BRCA1 and CCND1. We observed distinct differences in the non-genomic signalling of the tested compounds. p,p'-DDE was unable to stimulate Src and Erk1/Erk2 activations. The effects of E2 on Src and Erk1/Erk2 phosphorylation were transient and weak when compared to EGF, but β-HCH induced strong and sustained activation of all tested kinases. Transcription of TFF1, ER, PR and BRCA1 by E2, o,p'-DDT and β-HCH could be suppressed partially by inhibiting the Src/Ras/Erk pathway with PD 98059. However, this was not seen with p,p'-DDE. Our investigations show that the cellular activities of estrogens and xenoestrogens are the result of a combination of extranuclear (non-genomic) and nuclear (genomic) events and highlight the need to take non-genomic

  15. Dof transcription factors in carrot: genome-wide analysis and their response to abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Huang, Ying; Li, Meng-yao; Wang, Feng; Xu, Zhi-sheng; Xiong, Ai-sheng

    2016-01-01

    The DNA-binding one zinc finger (Dof) family transcription factors (TF) are involved in stress response. Dof TFs in carrot were identified and the responses of DcDof genes to abiotic stresses were analyzed. 46 DcDofs in carrot were identified from carrot genome database. Based on the conserved domain in Dof TF family of Arabidopsis thaliana, the DcDof TFs were divided into four classes, named class A, B, C and D. Carrot and Arabidopsis shared most motifs in the same subgroup. Real-time quantification PCR analysis showed tissue-specific expression patterns in DcDofs. DcDofs from eight subgroups responded to four abiotic stress treatments. The expression profiles were different with the abiotic stresses changed, indicating complicated regulatory mechanisms in Dof TF family in higher plant, and the response mechanisms of Dof genes may be influenced by different plant species.

  16. Transcript profiling of a novel plant meristem, the monocot cambium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinkgraf, Matthew; Gerttula, Suzanne; Groover, Andrew

    2017-06-01

    While monocots lack the ability to produce a vascular cambium or woody growth, some monocot lineages evolved a novel lateral meristem, the monocot cambium, which supports secondary radial growth of stems. In contrast to the vascular cambium found in woody angiosperm and gymnosperm species, the monocot cambium produces secondary vascular bundles, which have an amphivasal organization of tracheids encircling a central strand of phloem. Currently there is no information concerning the molecular genetic basis of the development or evolution of the monocot cambium. Here we report high-quality transcriptomes for monocot cambium and early derivative tissues in two monocot genera, Yucca and Cordyline. Monocot cambium transcript profiles were compared to those of vascular cambia and secondary xylem tissues of two forest tree species, Populus trichocarpa and Eucalyptus grandis. Monocot cambium transcript levels showed that there are extensive overlaps between the regulation of monocot cambia and vascular cambia. Candidate regulatory genes that vary between the monocot and vascular cambia were also identified, and included members of the KANADI and CLE families involved in polarity and cell-cell signaling, respectively. We suggest that the monocot cambium may have evolved in part through reactivation of genetic mechanisms involved in vascular cambium regulation. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  17. Babelomics: advanced functional profiling of transcriptomics, proteomics and genomics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shahrour, Fátima; Carbonell, José; Minguez, Pablo; Goetz, Stefan; Conesa, Ana; Tárraga, Joaquín; Medina, Ignacio; Alloza, Eva; Montaner, David; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2008-01-01

    We present a new version of Babelomics, a complete suite of web tools for the functional profiling of genome scale experiments, with new and improved methods as well as more types of functional definitions. Babelomics includes different flavours of conventional functional enrichment methods as well as more advanced gene set analysis methods that makes it a unique tool among the similar resources available. In addition to the well-known functional definitions (GO, KEGG), Babelomics includes new ones such as Biocarta pathways or text mining-derived functional terms. Regulatory modules implemented include transcriptional control (Transfac, CisRed) and other levels of regulation such as miRNA-mediated interference. Moreover, Babelomics allows for sub-selection of terms in order to test more focused hypothesis. Also gene annotation correspondence tables can be imported, which allows testing with user-defined functional modules. Finally, a tool for the ‘de novo’ functional annotation of sequences has been included in the system. This allows using yet unannotated organisms in the program. Babelomics has been extensively re-engineered and now it includes the use of web services and Web 2.0 technology features, a new user interface with persistent sessions and a new extended database of gene identifiers. Babelomics is available at http://www.babelomics.org PMID:18515841

  18. Genome-wide analysis of coordinated transcript abundance during seed development in different Brassica rapa morphotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basnet, Ram Kumar; Moreno-Pachon, Natalia; Lin, Ke; Bucher, Johan; Visser, Richard G F; Maliepaard, Chris; Bonnema, Guusje

    2013-12-01

    Brassica seeds are important as basic units of plant growth and sources of vegetable oil. Seed development is regulated by many dynamic metabolic processes controlled by complex networks of spatially and temporally expressed genes. We conducted a global microarray gene co-expression analysis by measuring transcript abundance of developing seeds from two diverse B. rapa morphotypes: a pak choi (leafy-type) and a yellow sarson (oil-type), and two of their doubled haploid (DH) progenies, (1) to study the timing of metabolic processes in developing seeds, (2) to explore the major transcriptional differences in developing seeds of the two morphotypes, and (3) to identify the optimum stage for a genetical genomics study in B. rapa seed. Seed developmental stages were similar in developing seeds of pak choi and yellow sarson of B. rapa; however, the colour of embryo and seed coat differed among these two morphotypes. In this study, most transcriptional changes occurred between 25 and 35 DAP, which shows that the timing of seed developmental processes in B. rapa is at later developmental stages than in the related species B. napus. Using a Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA), we identified 47 "gene modules", of which 27 showed a significant association with temporal and/or genotypic variation. An additional hierarchical cluster analysis identified broad spectra of gene expression patterns during seed development. The predominant variation in gene expression was according to developmental stages rather than morphotype differences. Since lipids are the major storage compounds of Brassica seeds, we investigated in more detail the regulation of lipid metabolism. Four co-regulated gene clusters were identified with 17 putative cis-regulatory elements predicted in their 1000 bp upstream region, either specific or common to different lipid metabolic pathways. This is the first study of genome-wide profiling of transcript abundance during seed development in B

  19. Transcriptional profiling of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae during the acute phase of a natural infection in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harel Josée

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the etiological agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, a respiratory disease which causes great economic losses worldwide. Many virulence factors are involved in the pathogenesis, namely capsular polysaccharides, RTX toxins, LPS and many iron acquisition systems. In order to identify genes that are expressed in vivo during a natural infection, we undertook transcript profiling experiments with an A. pleuropneumoniae DNA microarray, after recovery of bacterial mRNAs from serotype 5b-infected porcine lungs. AppChip2 contains 2033 PCR amplicons based on the genomic sequence of App serotype 5b strain L20, representing more than 95% of ORFs greater than 160 bp in length. Results Transcriptional profiling of A. pleuropneumoniae recovered from the lung of a pig suffering from a natural infection or following growth of the bacterial isolate in BHI medium was performed. An RNA extraction protocol combining beadbeating and hot-acid-phenol was developed in order to maximize bacterial mRNA yields and quality following total RNA extraction from lung lesions. Nearly all A. pleuropneumoniae transcripts could be detected on our microarrays, and 150 genes were deemed differentially expressed in vivo during the acute phase of the infection. Our results indicate that, for example, gene apxIVA from an operon coding for RTX toxin ApxIV is highly up-regulated in vivo, and that two genes from the operon coding for type IV fimbriae (APL_0878 and APL_0879 were also up-regulated. These transcriptional profiling data, combined with previous comparative genomic hybridizations performed by our group, revealed that 66 out of the 72 up-regulated genes are conserved amongst all serotypes and that 3 of them code for products that are predicted outer membrane proteins (genes irp and APL_0959, predicted to code for a TonB-dependent receptor and a filamentous hemagglutinin/adhesin respectively or lipoproteins (gene APL_0920. Only 4

  20. Functional transcription factor target discovery via compendia of binding and expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Christopher J; Joshi, Anagha; Michoel, Tom

    2016-02-09

    Genome-wide experiments to map the DNA-binding locations of transcription-associated factors (TFs) have shown that the number of genes bound by a TF far exceeds the number of possible direct target genes. Distinguishing functional from non-functional binding is therefore a major challenge in the study of transcriptional regulation. We hypothesized that functional targets can be discovered by correlating binding and expression profiles across multiple experimental conditions. To test this hypothesis, we obtained ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data from matching cell types from the human ENCODE resource, considered promoter-proximal and distal cumulative regulatory models to map binding sites to genes, and used a combination of linear and non-linear measures to correlate binding and expression data. We found that a high degree of correlation between a gene's TF-binding and expression profiles was significantly more predictive of the gene being differentially expressed upon knockdown of that TF, compared to using binding sites in the cell type of interest only. Remarkably, TF targets predicted from correlation across a compendium of cell types were also predictive of functional targets in other cell types. Finally, correlation across a time course of ChIP-seq and RNA-seq experiments was also predictive of functional TF targets in that tissue.

  1. Genome transcription/translation of segmented, negative-strand RNA viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts-Dimitriadou, C.

    2011-01-01

    The requirements for alignment of capped RNA leader sequences along the viral genome during influenza transcription initiation (“cap-snatching”) have long been an enigma. Previous work on Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) transcription initiation has revealed that this virus displays a

  2. Rapid Genome-wide Recruitment of RNA Polymerase II Drives Transcription, Splicing, and Translation Events during T Cell Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Davari

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Activation of immune cells results in rapid functional changes, but how such fast changes are accomplished remains enigmatic. By combining time courses of 4sU-seq, RNA-seq, ribosome profiling (RP, and RNA polymerase II (RNA Pol II ChIP-seq during T cell activation, we illustrate genome-wide temporal dynamics for ∼10,000 genes. This approach reveals not only immediate-early and posttranscriptionally regulated genes but also coupled changes in transcription and translation for >90% of genes. Recruitment, rather than release of paused RNA Pol II, primarily mediates transcriptional changes. This coincides with a genome-wide temporary slowdown in cotranscriptional splicing, even for polyadenylated mRNAs that are localized at the chromatin. Subsequent splicing optimization correlates with increasing Ser-2 phosphorylation of the RNA Pol II carboxy-terminal domain (CTD and activation of the positive transcription elongation factor (pTEFb. Thus, rapid de novo recruitment of RNA Pol II dictates the course of events during T cell activation, particularly transcription, splicing, and consequently translation. : Davari et al. visualize global changes in RNA Pol II binding, transcription, splicing, and translation. T cells change their functional program by rapid de novo recruitment of RNA Pol II and coupled changes in transcription and translation. This coincides with fluctuations in RNA Pol II phosphorylation and a temporary reduction in cotranscriptional splicing. Keywords: RNA Pol II, cotranscriptional splicing, T cell activation, ribosome profiling, 4sU, H3K36, Ser-5 RNA Pol II, Ser-2 RNA Pol II, immune response, immediate-early genes

  3. From the Beauty of Genomic Landscapes to the Strength of Transcriptional Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natoli, Gioacchino

    2016-03-24

    Genomic analyses are commonly used to infer trends and broad rules underlying transcriptional control. The innovative approach by Tong et al. to interrogate genomic datasets allows extracting mechanistic information on the specific regulation of individual genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Genome-wide analysis of the Mediator transcription complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peppel, H.J. van de

    2006-01-01

    Transcription regulation is an essential process that enables living organisms to develop, to respond to extra-cellular signals and to environmental changes. In S. cerevisiae more than 300 proteins are required for accurate transcription regulation. This thesis focuses on one of the more central

  5. Genomic and chromatin signals underlying transcription start-site selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valen, Eivind; Sandelin, Albin Gustav

    2011-01-01

    A central question in cellular biology is how the cell regulates transcription and discerns when and where to initiate it. Locating transcription start sites (TSSs), the signals that specify them, and ultimately elucidating the mechanisms of regulated initiation has therefore been a recurrent the...

  6. Genome wide transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to stress-induced perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilal eTaymaz-Nikerel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cells respond to environmental and/or genetic perturbations in order to survive and proliferate. Characterization of the changes after various stimuli at different -omics levels is crucial to comprehend the adaptation of cells to changing conditions. Genome wide quantification and analysis of transcript levels, the genes affected by perturbations, extends our understanding of cellular metabolism by pointing out the mechanisms that play role in sensing the stress caused by those perturbations and related signaling pathways, and in this way guides us to achieve endeavors such as rational engineering of cells or interpretation of disease mechanisms. Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system has been studied in response to different perturbations and corresponding transcriptional profiles were followed either statically or/and dynamically, short- and long- term. This review focuses on response of yeast cells to diverse stress inducing perturbations including nutritional changes, ionic stress, salt stress, oxidative stress, osmotic shock, as well as to genetic interventions such as deletion and over-expression of genes. It is aimed to conclude on common regulatory phenomena that allow yeast to organize its transcriptomic response after any perturbation under different external conditions.

  7. PRISM offers a comprehensive genomic approach to transcription factor function prediction

    KAUST Repository

    Wenger, A. M.

    2013-02-04

    The human genome encodes 1500-2000 different transcription factors (TFs). ChIP-seq is revealing the global binding profiles of a fraction of TFs in a fraction of their biological contexts. These data show that the majority of TFs bind directly next to a large number of context-relevant target genes, that most binding is distal, and that binding is context specific. Because of the effort and cost involved, ChIP-seq is seldom used in search of novel TF function. Such exploration is instead done using expression perturbation and genetic screens. Here we propose a comprehensive computational framework for transcription factor function prediction. We curate 332 high-quality nonredundant TF binding motifs that represent all major DNA binding domains, and improve cross-species conserved binding site prediction to obtain 3.3 million conserved, mostly distal, binding site predictions. We combine these with 2.4 million facts about all human and mouse gene functions, in a novel statistical framework, in search of enrichments of particular motifs next to groups of target genes of particular functions. Rigorous parameter tuning and a harsh null are used to minimize false positives. Our novel PRISM (predicting regulatory information from single motifs) approach obtains 2543 TF function predictions in a large variety of contexts, at a false discovery rate of 16%. The predictions are highly enriched for validated TF roles, and 45 of 67 (67%) tested binding site regions in five different contexts act as enhancers in functionally matched cells.

  8. Robust analysis of 5′-transcript ends (5′-RATE): a novel technique for transcriptome analysis and genome annotation

    OpenAIRE

    Gowda, Malali; Li, Haumeng; Alessi, Joe; Chen, Feng; Pratt, Richard; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2006-01-01

    Complicated cloning procedures and the high cost of sequencing have inhibited the wide application of serial analysis of gene expression and massively parallel signature sequencing for genome-wide transcriptome profiling of complex genomes. Here we describe a new method called robust analysis of 5′-transcript ends (5′-RATE) for rapid and cost-effective isolation of long 5′ transcript ends (∼80 bp). It consists of three major steps including 5′-oligocapping of mRNA, NlaIII tag and ditag genera...

  9. Transcriptional profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae upon exposure to saxitoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusick, Kathleen D; Boyer, Gregory L; Wilhelm, Steven W; Sayler, Gary S

    2009-08-01

    Saxitoxin is a potent neurotoxin produced by several species of dinoflagellates and cyanobacteria. The molecular target of saxitoxin in higher eukaryotes is the voltage-gated sodium channel; however, its target in lower eukaryotic organisms remains unknown. The goal of this study was to obtain the transcriptional fingerprint of the model lower eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae upon exposure to saxitoxin to identify potential genes suitable for biomarker development. Microarray analyses identified multiple genes associated with copper and iron homeostasis and sulfur metabolism as significantly differentially expressed upon exposure to saxitoxin; these results were verified with quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR). Additionally, the qRT-PCR assays were used to generate expression profiles in a subset of the differentially regulated genes across multiple exposure times and concentrations, the results of which demonstrated that overall, genes tended to respond in a consistent manner to the toxin. In general, the genes encoding the metallothioneins CUP1 and CRS5 were induced following exposure to saxitoxin, while those encoding the ferric/ cupric reductase FRE1 and the copper uptake transporter CTR1 were repressed. The gene encoding the multicopper ferroxidase FET3, part of the high-affinity iron uptake system, was also induced in all treatments, along with the STR3 gene, which codes for the cystathionine beta-lyase found in the methionine biosynthetic pathway.

  10. Does selection against transcriptional interference shape retroelement-free regions in mammalian genomes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourier, Tobias; Willerslev, Eske

    2008-01-01

    in generating and maintaining retroelement-free regions in the human genome. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on the known transcriptional properties of retroelements, we expect long interspersed elements (LINEs) to be able to display a high degree of transcriptional interference. In contrast, we expect...... short interspersed elements (SINEs) to display very low levels of transcriptional interference. We find that genomic regions devoid of long interspersed elements (LINEs) are enriched for protein-coding genes, but that this is not the case for regions devoid of short interspersed elements (SINEs......). This is expected if genes are subject to selection against transcriptional interference. We do not find microRNAs to be associated with genomic regions devoid of either SINEs or LINEs. We further observe an increased relative activity of genes overlapping LINE-free regions during early embryogenesis, where...

  11. A code for transcription initiation in mammalian genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frith, Martin C.; Valen, Eivind Dale; Krogh, Anders

    2007-01-01

    that initiation events are clustered on the chromosomes at multiple scales - clusters within clusters - indicating multiple regulatory processes. Within the smallest of such clusters, which can be interpreted as core promoters, the local DNA sequence predicts the relative transcription start usage of each...... of large- and small-scale effects: the selection of transcription start sites is largely governed by the local DNA sequence, whereas the transcriptional activity of a locus is regulated at a different level; it is affected by distal features or events such as enhancers and chromatin remodeling....

  12. Global transcriptional profiling of longitudinal clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis exhibiting rapid accumulation of drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Anirvan; Saranath, Dhananjaya; Bhatter, Purva; Mistry, Nerges

    2013-01-01

    The identification of multidrug resistant (MDR), extensively and totally drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), in vulnerable sites such as Mumbai, is a grave threat to the control of tuberculosis. The current study aimed at explaining the rapid expression of MDR in Directly Observed Treatment Short Course (DOTS) compliant patients, represents the first study comparing global transcriptional profiles of 3 pairs of clinical Mtb isolates, collected longitudinally at initiation and completion of DOTS. While the isolates were drug susceptible (DS) at onset and MDR at completion of DOTS, they exhibited identical DNA fingerprints at both points of collection. The whole genome transcriptional analysis was performed using total RNA from H37Rv and 3 locally predominant spoligotypes viz. MANU1, CAS and Beijing, hybridized on MTBv3 (BuG@S) microarray, and yielded 36, 98 and 45 differentially expressed genes respectively. Genes encoding transcription factors (sig, rpoB), cell wall biosynthesis (emb genes), protein synthesis (rpl) and additional central metabolic pathways (ppdK, pknH, pfkB) were found to be down regulated in the MDR isolates as compared to the DS isolate of the same genotype. Up regulation of drug efflux pumps, ABC transporters, trans-membrane proteins and stress response transcriptional factors (whiB) in the MDR isolates was observed. The data indicated that Mtb, without specific mutations in drug target genes may persist in the host due to additional mechanisms like drug efflux pumps and lowered rate of metabolism. Furthermore this population of Mtb, which also showed reduced DNA repair activity, would result in selection and stabilization of spontaneous mutations in drug target genes, causing selection of a MDR strain in the presence of drug pressures. Efflux pump such as drrA may play a significant role in increasing fitness of low level drug resistant cells and assist in survival of Mtb till acquisition of drug resistant mutations with least

  13. Global transcriptional profiling of longitudinal clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis exhibiting rapid accumulation of drug resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirvan Chatterjee

    Full Text Available The identification of multidrug resistant (MDR, extensively and totally drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, in vulnerable sites such as Mumbai, is a grave threat to the control of tuberculosis. The current study aimed at explaining the rapid expression of MDR in Directly Observed Treatment Short Course (DOTS compliant patients, represents the first study comparing global transcriptional profiles of 3 pairs of clinical Mtb isolates, collected longitudinally at initiation and completion of DOTS. While the isolates were drug susceptible (DS at onset and MDR at completion of DOTS, they exhibited identical DNA fingerprints at both points of collection. The whole genome transcriptional analysis was performed using total RNA from H37Rv and 3 locally predominant spoligotypes viz. MANU1, CAS and Beijing, hybridized on MTBv3 (BuG@S microarray, and yielded 36, 98 and 45 differentially expressed genes respectively. Genes encoding transcription factors (sig, rpoB, cell wall biosynthesis (emb genes, protein synthesis (rpl and additional central metabolic pathways (ppdK, pknH, pfkB were found to be down regulated in the MDR isolates as compared to the DS isolate of the same genotype. Up regulation of drug efflux pumps, ABC transporters, trans-membrane proteins and stress response transcriptional factors (whiB in the MDR isolates was observed. The data indicated that Mtb, without specific mutations in drug target genes may persist in the host due to additional mechanisms like drug efflux pumps and lowered rate of metabolism. Furthermore this population of Mtb, which also showed reduced DNA repair activity, would result in selection and stabilization of spontaneous mutations in drug target genes, causing selection of a MDR strain in the presence of drug pressures. Efflux pump such as drrA may play a significant role in increasing fitness of low level drug resistant cells and assist in survival of Mtb till acquisition of drug resistant mutations with

  14. Comparative genomic reconstruction of transcriptional networks controlling central metabolism in the Shewanella genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovaleva Galina

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-scale prediction of gene regulation and reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria is one of the critical tasks of modern genomics. The Shewanella genus is comprised of metabolically versatile gamma-proteobacteria, whose lifestyles and natural environments are substantially different from Escherichia coli and other model bacterial species. The comparative genomics approaches and computational identification of regulatory sites are useful for the in silico reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria. Results To explore conservation and variations in the Shewanella transcriptional networks we analyzed the repertoire of transcription factors and performed genomics-based reconstruction and comparative analysis of regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The inferred regulatory network includes 82 transcription factors and their DNA binding sites, 8 riboswitches and 6 translational attenuators. Forty five regulons were newly inferred from the genome context analysis, whereas others were propagated from previously characterized regulons in the Enterobacteria and Pseudomonas spp.. Multiple variations in regulatory strategies between the Shewanella spp. and E. coli include regulon contraction and expansion (as in the case of PdhR, HexR, FadR, numerous cases of recruiting non-orthologous regulators to control equivalent pathways (e.g. PsrA for fatty acid degradation and, conversely, orthologous regulators to control distinct pathways (e.g. TyrR, ArgR, Crp. Conclusions We tentatively defined the first reference collection of ~100 transcriptional regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The resulting regulatory network contains ~600 regulated genes per genome that are mostly involved in metabolism of carbohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, vitamins, metals, and stress responses. Several reconstructed regulons including NagR for N-acetylglucosamine catabolism were experimentally validated in S

  15. The use of MPSS for whole-genome transcriptional analysis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Blake C; Tej, Shivakundan Singh; Vu, Tam H; Haudenschild, Christian D; Agrawal, Vikas; Edberg, Steve B; Ghazal, Hassan; Decola, Shannon

    2004-08-01

    We have generated 36,991,173 17-base sequence "signatures" representing transcripts from the model plant Arabidopsis. These data were derived by massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) from 14 libraries and comprised 268,132 distinct sequences. Comparable data were also obtained with 20-base signatures. We developed a method for handling these data and for comparing these signatures to the annotated Arabidopsis genome. As part of this procedure, 858,019 potential or "genomic" signatures were extracted from the Arabidopsis genome and classified based on the position and orientation of the signatures relative to annotated genes. A comparison of genomic and expressed signatures matched 67,735 signatures predicted to be derived from distinct transcripts and expressed at significant levels. Expressed signatures were derived from the sense strand of at least 19,088 of 29,084 annotated genes. A comparison of the genomic and expression signatures demonstrated that approximately 7.7% of genomic signatures were underrepresented in the expression data. These genomic signatures contained one of 20 four-base words that were consistently associated with reduced MPSS abundances. More than 89% of the sum of the expressed signature abundances matched the Arabidopsis genome, and many of the unmatched signatures found in high abundances were predicted to match to previously uncharacterized transcripts. Copyright 2004 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press ISSN

  16. Transcript Profiling of Hevea brasiliensis during Latex Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Jinquan; Yang, Shuguang; Chen, Yueyi; Tian, Wei-Min

    2017-01-01

    Latex exploitation enhances latex regeneration in rubber trees. The latex exploitation-caused latex flow lasts from 10 min to a few hours, which is convenient for exploring the transcript profiling of latex metabolism-related genes at the different stages of latex flow. In the present study, the expression pattern of 62 latex metabolism-related genes involved in water transportation, carbohydrate metabolism, natural rubber biosynthesis, hormone signaling, ROS generation and scavenging, and latex coagulum across three stages of latex flow between rubber tree clones CATAS7-33-97 and CATAS8-79 were comparatively analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. The two clones show differences in latex regeneration and have a different duration of latex flow. The results showed that the expression levels of 38 genes were significantly higher in CATAS8-79 latex than in CATAS7-33-97 during latex regeneration, while 45 genes had a notably higher expression level in CATAS8-79 latex during latex flow. Together with the activation of the MEP pathway and jasmonate pathway in CATAS8-79 latex, HbPIP1;3, HbPIP1;4, HbSUT3, HbSus3, HbHMGS1-2, HbMK should contribute to the high latex regeneration ability. The up-regulation of ethylene signaling and Hb44KD and the down-regulation of latex coagulation-related genes in CATAS8-79 latex might contribute to its longer latex flow duration. This study provides some cues for revealing the regulation of latex metabolism in rubber trees. PMID:29163621

  17. Transcript Profiling of Hevea brasiliensis during Latex Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinquan Chao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Latex exploitation enhances latex regeneration in rubber trees. The latex exploitation-caused latex flow lasts from 10 min to a few hours, which is convenient for exploring the transcript profiling of latex metabolism-related genes at the different stages of latex flow. In the present study, the expression pattern of 62 latex metabolism-related genes involved in water transportation, carbohydrate metabolism, natural rubber biosynthesis, hormone signaling, ROS generation and scavenging, and latex coagulum across three stages of latex flow between rubber tree clones CATAS7-33-97 and CATAS8-79 were comparatively analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. The two clones show differences in latex regeneration and have a different duration of latex flow. The results showed that the expression levels of 38 genes were significantly higher in CATAS8-79 latex than in CATAS7-33-97 during latex regeneration, while 45 genes had a notably higher expression level in CATAS8-79 latex during latex flow. Together with the activation of the MEP pathway and jasmonate pathway in CATAS8-79 latex, HbPIP1;3, HbPIP1;4, HbSUT3, HbSus3, HbHMGS1-2, HbMK should contribute to the high latex regeneration ability. The up-regulation of ethylene signaling and Hb44KD and the down-regulation of latex coagulation-related genes in CATAS8-79 latex might contribute to its longer latex flow duration. This study provides some cues for revealing the regulation of latex metabolism in rubber trees.

  18. TIGER: Toolbox for integrating genome-scale metabolic models, expression data, and transcriptional regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Paul A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several methods have been developed for analyzing genome-scale models of metabolism and transcriptional regulation. Many of these methods, such as Flux Balance Analysis, use constrained optimization to predict relationships between metabolic flux and the genes that encode and regulate enzyme activity. Recently, mixed integer programming has been used to encode these gene-protein-reaction (GPR relationships into a single optimization problem, but these techniques are often of limited generality and lack a tool for automating the conversion of rules to a coupled regulatory/metabolic model. Results We present TIGER, a Toolbox for Integrating Genome-scale Metabolism, Expression, and Regulation. TIGER converts a series of generalized, Boolean or multilevel rules into a set of mixed integer inequalities. The package also includes implementations of existing algorithms to integrate high-throughput expression data with genome-scale models of metabolism and transcriptional regulation. We demonstrate how TIGER automates the coupling of a genome-scale metabolic model with GPR logic and models of transcriptional regulation, thereby serving as a platform for algorithm development and large-scale metabolic analysis. Additionally, we demonstrate how TIGER's algorithms can be used to identify inconsistencies and improve existing models of transcriptional regulation with examples from the reconstructed transcriptional regulatory network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conclusion The TIGER package provides a consistent platform for algorithm development and extending existing genome-scale metabolic models with regulatory networks and high-throughput data.

  19. Phenotypic characterization of retinoic acid differentiated SH-SY5Y cells by transcriptional profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna A Korecka

    Full Text Available Multiple genetic and environmental factors play a role in the development and progression of Parkinson's disease (PD. The main neuropathological hallmark of PD is the degeneration of dopaminergic (DAergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. To study genetic and molecular contributors to the disease process, there is a great need for readily accessible cells with prominent DAergic features that can be used for reproducible in vitro cellular screening. Here, we investigated the molecular phenotype of retinoic acid (RA differentiated SH-SY5Y cells using genome wide transcriptional profiling combined with gene ontology, transcription factor and molecular pathway analysis. We demonstrated that RA induces a general neuronal differentiation program in SH-SY5Y cells and that these cells develop a predominantly mature DAergic-like neurotransmitter phenotype. This phenotype is characterized by increased dopamine levels together with a substantial suppression of other neurotransmitter phenotypes, such as those for noradrenaline, acetylcholine, glutamate, serotonin and histamine. In addition, we show that RA differentiated SH-SY5Y cells express the dopamine and noradrenalin neurotransmitter transporters that are responsible for uptake of MPP(+, a well known DAergic cell toxicant. MPP(+ treatment alters mitochondrial activity according to its proposed cytotoxic effect in DAergic neurons. Taken together, RA differentiated SH-SY5Y cells have a DAergic-like phenotype, and provide a good cellular screening tool to find novel genes or compounds that affect cytotoxic processes that are associated with PD.

  20. Profiling of transcription factor binding events by chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Liang; Koga, Yusuke; Ecker, Joseph R

    2016-01-01

    In multi-cellular organisms, gene expression is orchestrated by thousands of transcription factors (TF). Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) is a robust tool to investigate gene expression because this technique profiles in vivo protein-DNA interaction at a genome-wide scale. Eight years after the first ChIP-seq paper, there are limited reports of ChIP-seq experiments in plants, especially for sequence-specific DNA binding TFs This lag greatly prevents our understanding of transcriptional regulation in an entire kingdom. In order to bridge the technical gap, we describe a ChIP-seq procedure that we have successfully applied to dozens of sequence-specific DNA binding TFs. The basic protocol includes procedures to isolate nuclei, sonicate chromatin, immunoprecipitate TF-DNA complex, and recover ChIP-enriched DNA fragments. The support protocol also describes practices to optimize library preparation by a gel-free DNA size selection. Lastly, examples are given to optimize library amplification using real-time PCR.

  1. cisMEP: an integrated repository of genomic epigenetic profiles and cis-regulatory modules in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tzu-Hsien; Wang, Chung-Ching; Hung, Po-Cheng; Wu, Wei-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Cis-regulatory modules (CRMs), or the DNA sequences required for regulating gene expression, play the central role in biological researches on transcriptional regulation in metazoan species. Nowadays, the systematic understanding of CRMs still mainly resorts to computational methods due to the time-consuming and small-scale nature of experimental methods. But the accuracy and reliability of different CRM prediction tools are still unclear. Without comparative cross-analysis of the results and combinatorial consideration with extra experimental information, there is no easy way to assess the confidence of the predicted CRMs. This limits the genome-wide understanding of CRMs. It is known that transcription factor binding and epigenetic profiles tend to determine functions of CRMs in gene transcriptional regulation. Thus integration of the genome-wide epigenetic profiles with systematically predicted CRMs can greatly help researchers evaluate and decipher the prediction confidence and possible transcriptional regulatory functions of these potential CRMs. However, these data are still fragmentary in the literatures. Here we performed the computational genome-wide screening for potential CRMs using different prediction tools and constructed the pioneer database, cisMEP (cis-regulatory module epigenetic profile database), to integrate these computationally identified CRMs with genomic epigenetic profile data. cisMEP collects the literature-curated TFBS location data and nine genres of epigenetic data for assessing the confidence of these potential CRMs and deciphering the possible CRM functionality. cisMEP aims to provide a user-friendly interface for researchers to assess the confidence of different potential CRMs and to understand the functions of CRMs through experimentally-identified epigenetic profiles. The deposited potential CRMs and experimental epigenetic profiles for confidence assessment provide experimentally testable hypotheses for the molecular mechanisms

  2. The Use of MPSS for Whole-Genome Transcriptional Analysis in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Blake C.; Tej, Shivakundan Singh; Vu, Tam H.; Haudenschild, Christian D.; Agrawal, Vikas; Edberg, Steve B.; Ghazal, Hassan; Decola, Shannon

    2004-01-01

    We have generated 36,991,173 17-base sequence “signatures” representing transcripts from the model plant Arabidopsis. These data were derived by massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) from 14 libraries and comprised 268,132 distinct sequences. Comparable data were also obtained with 20-base signatures. We developed a method for handling these data and for comparing these signatures to the annotated Arabidopsis genome. As part of this procedure, 858,019 potential or “genomic” signatures were extracted from the Arabidopsis genome and classified based on the position and orientation of the signatures relative to annotated genes. A comparison of genomic and expressed signatures matched 67,735 signatures predicted to be derived from distinct transcripts and expressed at significant levels. Expressed signatures were derived from the sense strand of at least 19,088 of 29,084 annotated genes. A comparison of the genomic and expression signatures demonstrated that ∼7.7% of genomic signatures were underrepresented in the expression data. These genomic signatures contained one of 20 four-base words that were consistently associated with reduced MPSS abundances. More than 89% of the sum of the expressed signature abundances matched the Arabidopsis genome, and many of the unmatched signatures found in high abundances were predicted to match to previously uncharacterized transcripts. PMID:15289482

  3. Predicting combinatorial binding of transcription factors to regulatory elements in the human genome by association rule mining

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Xochitl C; Ni, Shulin; Miranker, Daniel P; Iyer, Vishwanath R

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Cis-acting transcriptional regulatory elements in mammalian genomes typically contain specific combinations of binding sites for various transcription factors. Although some cis-regulatory elements have been well studied, the combinations of transcription factors that regulate normal expression levels for the vast majority of the 20,000 genes in the human genome are unknown. We hypothesized that it should be possible to discover transcription factor combinations that regul...

  4. Isolation of Blastomyces dermatitidis yeast from lung tissue during murine infection for in vivo transcriptional profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Amber J; Wüthrich, Marcel; Carmen, John C; Sullivan, Thomas D; Klein, Bruce S; Cuomo, Christina A; Gauthier, Gregory M

    2013-07-01

    Blastomyces dermatitidis belongs to a group of thermally dimorphic fungi that grow as sporulating mold in the soil and convert to pathogenic yeast in the lung following inhalation of spores. Knowledge about the molecular events important for fungal adaptation and survival in the host remains limited. The development of high-throughput analytic tools such as RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) has potential to provide novel insight on fungal pathogenesis especially if applied in vivo during infection. However, in vivo transcriptional profiling is hindered by the low abundance of fungal cells relative to mammalian tissue and difficulty in isolating fungal cells from the tissues they infect. For the purpose of obtaining B. dermatitidis RNA for in vivo transcriptional analysis by RNA-Seq, we developed a simple technique for isolating yeast from murine lung tissue. Using a two-step approach of filtration and centrifugation following lysis of murine lung cells, 91% of yeast cells causing infection were isolated from lung tissue. B. dermatitidis recovered from the lung yielded high-quality RNA with minimal murine contamination and was suitable for RNA-Seq. Approximately 87% of the sequencing reads obtained from the recovered yeast aligned with the B. dermatitidis genome. This was similar to 93% alignment for yeast grown in vitro. The use of near-freezing temperature along with short ex vivo time minimized transcriptional changes that would have otherwise occurred with higher temperature or longer processing time. In conclusion, we have developed a technique that recovers the majority of yeast causing pulmonary infection and yields high-quality fungal RNA with minimal contamination by mammalian RNA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dynamic Transcript Profiling of Candida albicans Infection in Zebrafish: A Pathogen-Host Interaction Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fu-Chen; Hsu, Po-Chen; Chen, Hsueh-Fen; Peng, Shih-Chi; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Lan, Chung-Yu; Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Wong, David Shan Hill

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is responsible for a number of life-threatening infections and causes considerable morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Previous studies of C. albicans pathogenesis have suggested several steps must occur before virulent infection, including early adhesion, invasion, and late tissue damage. However, the mechanism that triggers C. albicans transformation from yeast to hyphae form during infection has yet to be fully elucidated. This study used a systems biology approach to investigate C. albicans infection in zebrafish. The surviving fish were sampled at different post-infection time points to obtain time-lapsed, genome-wide transcriptomic data from both organisms, which were accompanied with in sync histological analyses. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to analyze the dynamic gene expression profiles of significant variations in both C. albicans and zebrafish. The results categorized C. albicans infection into three progressing phases: adhesion, invasion, and damage. Such findings were highly supported by the corresponding histological analysis. Furthermore, the dynamic interspecies transcript profiling revealed that C. albicans activated its filamentous formation during invasion and the iron scavenging functions during the damage phases, whereas zebrafish ceased its iron homeostasis function following massive hemorrhage during the later stages of infection. Most of the immune related genes were expressed as the infection progressed from invasion to the damage phase. Such global, inter-species evidence of virulence-immune and iron competition dynamics during C. albicans infection could be crucial in understanding control fungal pathogenesis. PMID:24019870

  6. A strong anti-inflammatory signature revealed by liver transcription profiling of Tmprss6-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Riba

    Full Text Available Control of systemic iron homeostasis is interconnected with the inflammatory response through the key iron regulator, the antimicrobial peptide hepcidin. We have previously shown that mice with iron deficiency anemia (IDA-low hepcidin show a pro-inflammatory response that is blunted in iron deficient-high hepcidin Tmprss6 KO mice. The transcriptional response associated with chronic hepcidin overexpression due to genetic inactivation of Tmprss6 is unknown. By using whole genome transcription profiling of the liver and analysis of spleen immune-related genes we identified several functional pathways differentially expressed in Tmprss6 KO mice, compared to IDA animals and thus irrespective of the iron status. In the effort of defining genes potentially targets of Tmprss6 we analyzed liver gene expression changes according to the genotype and independently of treatment. Tmprss6 inactivation causes down-regulation of liver pathways connected to immune and inflammatory response as well as spleen genes related to macrophage activation and inflammatory cytokines production. The anti-inflammatory status of Tmprss6 KO animals was confirmed by the down-regulation of pathways related to immunity, stress response and intracellular signaling in both liver and spleen after LPS treatment. Opposite to Tmprss6 KO mice, Hfe(-/- mice are characterized by iron overload with inappropriately low hepcidin levels. Liver expression profiling of Hfe(-/- deficient versus iron loaded mice show the opposite expression of some of the genes modulated by the loss of Tmprss6. Altogether our results confirm the anti-inflammatory status of Tmprss6 KO mice and identify new potential target pathways/genes of Tmprss6.

  7. Datgan, a reusable software system for facile interrogation and visualization of complex transcription profiling data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Benjamin L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We introduce Glaucoma Discovery Platform (GDP, an online environment for facile visualization and interrogation of complex transcription profiling datasets for glaucoma. We also report the availability of Datgan, the suite of scripts that was developed to construct GDP. This reusable software system complements existing repositories such as NCBI GEO or EBI ArrayExpress as it allows the construction of searchable databases to maximize understanding of user-selected transcription profiling datasets. Description Datgan scripts were used to construct both the underlying data tables and the web interface that form GDP. GDP is populated using data from a mouse model of glaucoma. The data was generated using the DBA/2J strain, a widely used mouse model of glaucoma. The DBA/2J-Gpnmb+ strain provided a genetically matched control strain that does not develop glaucoma. We separately assessed both the retina and the optic nerve head, important tissues in glaucoma. We used hierarchical clustering to identify early molecular stages of glaucoma that could not be identified using morphological assessment of disease. GDP has two components. First, an interactive search and retrieve component provides the ability to assess gene(s of interest in all identified stages of disease in both the retina and optic nerve head. The output is returned in graphical and tabular format with statistically significant differences highlighted for easy visual analysis. Second, a bulk download component allows lists of differentially expressed genes to be retrieved as a series of files compatible with Excel. To facilitate access to additional information available for genes of interest, GDP is linked to selected external resources including Mouse Genome Informatics and Online Medelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM. Conclusion Datgan-constructed databases allow user-friendly access to datasets that involve temporally ordered stages of disease or developmental stages

  8. Oviductal transcriptional profiling of a bovine fertility model by next-generation sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Maria Gonella-Diaza

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In cattle, the oviduct plays a fundamental role in the reproductive process. Oviductal functions are controlled by the ovarian sex steroids: estradiol and progesterone. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the exposure to contrasting sex steroid milieus differentially impacts the oviductal transcriptional profile. We manipulated growth of the pre-ovulatory follicle to obtain cows that ovulated a larger (LF group or a smaller (SF group follicle. The LF group presented greater proestrus/estrus concentrations of estradiol and metaestrus concentrations of progesterone (Gonella-Diaza et al. 2015 [1], Mesquita et al. 2014 [2]. Also, the LF group was associated with greater fertility in timed-artificial insemination programs (Pugliesi et al. 2016 [3]. Cows were slaughtered on day 4 of the estrous cycle and total RNA was extracted from ampulla and isthmus fragments and analyzed by RNAseq. The resulting reads were mapped to the bovine genome (Bos taurus UMD 3.1, NCBI. The differential expression analyses revealed that 325 and 367 genes in ampulla and 274 and 316 genes in the isthmus were up-regulated and down-regulated in LF samples, respectively. To validate the RNAseq results, transcript abundance of 23 genes was assessed by qPCR and expression patterns were consistent between the two techniques. A functional enrichment analysis was performed using Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID software. Processes enriched in the LF group included tissue morphology changes (extracellular matrix remodeling, cellular changes (proliferation, and secretion changes (growth factors, ions and metal transporters. An overview of the gene expression data was deposited in the NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO and is accessible through the accession number GSE65681. In conclusion, differences in the peri-ovulatory sex steroid milieu modify the oviductal gene expression profiles. Such differences may be associated with the greater fertility

  9. A Quantitative Profiling Tool for Diverse Genomic Data Types Reveals Potential Associations between Chromatin and Pre-mRNA Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremsky, Isaac; Bellora, Nicolás; Eyras, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing, and genome-based datasets in general, are often represented as profiles centered at reference points to study the association of protein binding and other signals to particular regulatory mechanisms. Although these profiles often provide compelling evidence of these associations, they do not provide a quantitative assessment of the enrichment, which makes the comparison between signals and conditions difficult. In addition, a number of biases can confound profiles, but are rarely accounted for in the tools currently available. We present a novel computational method, ProfileSeq, for the quantitative assessment of biological profiles to provide an exact, nonparametric test that specific regions of the test profile have higher or lower signal densities than a control set. The method is applicable to high-throughput sequencing data (ChIP-Seq, GRO-Seq, CLIP-Seq, etc.) and to genome-based datasets (motifs, etc.). We validate ProfileSeq by recovering and providing a quantitative assessment of several results reported before in the literature using independent datasets. We show that input signal and mappability have confounding effects on the profile results, but that normalizing the signal by input reads can eliminate these biases while preserving the biological signal. Moreover, we apply ProfileSeq to ChIP-Seq data for transcription factors, as well as for motif and CLIP-Seq data for splicing factors. In all examples considered, the profiles were robust to biases in mappability of sequencing reads. Furthermore, analyses performed with ProfileSeq reveal a number of putative relationships between transcription factor binding to DNA and splicing factor binding to pre-mRNA, adding to the growing body of evidence relating chromatin and pre-mRNA processing. ProfileSeq provides a robust way to quantify genome-wide coordinate-based signal. Software and documentation are freely available for academic use at https://bitbucket.org/regulatorygenomicsupf/profileseq/.

  10. A Quantitative Profiling Tool for Diverse Genomic Data Types Reveals Potential Associations between Chromatin and Pre-mRNA Processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Kremsky

    Full Text Available High-throughput sequencing, and genome-based datasets in general, are often represented as profiles centered at reference points to study the association of protein binding and other signals to particular regulatory mechanisms. Although these profiles often provide compelling evidence of these associations, they do not provide a quantitative assessment of the enrichment, which makes the comparison between signals and conditions difficult. In addition, a number of biases can confound profiles, but are rarely accounted for in the tools currently available. We present a novel computational method, ProfileSeq, for the quantitative assessment of biological profiles to provide an exact, nonparametric test that specific regions of the test profile have higher or lower signal densities than a control set. The method is applicable to high-throughput sequencing data (ChIP-Seq, GRO-Seq, CLIP-Seq, etc. and to genome-based datasets (motifs, etc.. We validate ProfileSeq by recovering and providing a quantitative assessment of several results reported before in the literature using independent datasets. We show that input signal and mappability have confounding effects on the profile results, but that normalizing the signal by input reads can eliminate these biases while preserving the biological signal. Moreover, we apply ProfileSeq to ChIP-Seq data for transcription factors, as well as for motif and CLIP-Seq data for splicing factors. In all examples considered, the profiles were robust to biases in mappability of sequencing reads. Furthermore, analyses performed with ProfileSeq reveal a number of putative relationships between transcription factor binding to DNA and splicing factor binding to pre-mRNA, adding to the growing body of evidence relating chromatin and pre-mRNA processing. ProfileSeq provides a robust way to quantify genome-wide coordinate-based signal. Software and documentation are freely available for academic use at https://bitbucket.org/regulatorygenomicsupf/profileseq/.

  11. Probabilistic Inference on Multiple Normalized Signal Profiles from Next Generation Sequencing: Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2015-04-20

    With the prevalence of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with sequencing (ChIP-Seq) technology, massive ChIP-Seq data has been accumulated. The ChIP-Seq technology measures the genome-wide occupancy of DNA-binding proteins in vivo. It is well-known that different DNA-binding protein occupancies may result in a gene being regulated in different conditions (e.g. different cell types). To fully understand a gene\\'s function, it is essential to develop probabilistic models on multiple ChIP-Seq profiles for deciphering the gene transcription causalities. In this work, we propose and describe two probabilistic models. Assuming the conditional independence of different DNA-binding proteins\\' occupancies, the first method (SignalRanker) is developed as an intuitive method for ChIP-Seq genome-wide signal profile inference. Unfortunately, such an assumption may not always hold in some gene regulation cases. Thus, we propose and describe another method (FullSignalRanker) which does not make the conditional independence assumption. The proposed methods are compared with other existing methods on ENCODE ChIP-Seq datasets, demonstrating its regression and classification ability. The results suggest that FullSignalRanker is the best-performing method for recovering the signal ranks on the promoter and enhancer regions. In addition, FullSignalRanker is also the best-performing method for peak sequence classification. We envision that SignalRanker and FullSignalRanker will become important in the era of next generation sequencing. FullSignalRanker program is available on the following website: http://www.cs.toronto.edu/∼wkc/FullSignalRanker/ © 2015 IEEE.

  12. A hyperactive transcriptional state marks genome reactivation at the mitosis–G1 transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiung, Chris C.-S.; Bartman, Caroline R.; Huang, Peng; Ginart, Paul; Stonestrom, Aaron J.; Keller, Cheryl A.; Face, Carolyne; Jahn, Kristen S.; Evans, Perry; Sankaranarayanan, Laavanya; Giardine, Belinda; Hardison, Ross C.; Raj, Arjun; Blobel, Gerd A.

    2016-01-01

    During mitosis, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and many transcription factors dissociate from chromatin, and transcription ceases globally. Transcription is known to restart in bulk by telophase, but whether de novo transcription at the mitosis–G1 transition is in any way distinct from later in interphase remains unknown. We tracked Pol II occupancy genome-wide in mammalian cells progressing from mitosis through late G1. Unexpectedly, during the earliest rounds of transcription at the mitosis–G1 transition, ∼50% of active genes and distal enhancers exhibit a spike in transcription, exceeding levels observed later in G1 phase. Enhancer–promoter chromatin contacts are depleted during mitosis and restored rapidly upon G1 entry but do not spike. Of the chromatin-associated features examined, histone H3 Lys27 acetylation levels at individual loci in mitosis best predict the mitosis–G1 transcriptional spike. Single-molecule RNA imaging supports that the mitosis–G1 transcriptional spike can constitute the maximum transcriptional activity per DNA copy throughout the cell division cycle. The transcriptional spike occurs heterogeneously and propagates to cell-to-cell differences in mature mRNA expression. Our results raise the possibility that passage through the mitosis–G1 transition might predispose cells to diverge in gene expression states. PMID:27340175

  13. A hyperactive transcriptional state marks genome reactivation at the mitosis-G1 transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiung, Chris C-S; Bartman, Caroline R; Huang, Peng; Ginart, Paul; Stonestrom, Aaron J; Keller, Cheryl A; Face, Carolyne; Jahn, Kristen S; Evans, Perry; Sankaranarayanan, Laavanya; Giardine, Belinda; Hardison, Ross C; Raj, Arjun; Blobel, Gerd A

    2016-06-15

    During mitosis, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and many transcription factors dissociate from chromatin, and transcription ceases globally. Transcription is known to restart in bulk by telophase, but whether de novo transcription at the mitosis-G1 transition is in any way distinct from later in interphase remains unknown. We tracked Pol II occupancy genome-wide in mammalian cells progressing from mitosis through late G1. Unexpectedly, during the earliest rounds of transcription at the mitosis-G1 transition, ∼50% of active genes and distal enhancers exhibit a spike in transcription, exceeding levels observed later in G1 phase. Enhancer-promoter chromatin contacts are depleted during mitosis and restored rapidly upon G1 entry but do not spike. Of the chromatin-associated features examined, histone H3 Lys27 acetylation levels at individual loci in mitosis best predict the mitosis-G1 transcriptional spike. Single-molecule RNA imaging supports that the mitosis-G1 transcriptional spike can constitute the maximum transcriptional activity per DNA copy throughout the cell division cycle. The transcriptional spike occurs heterogeneously and propagates to cell-to-cell differences in mature mRNA expression. Our results raise the possibility that passage through the mitosis-G1 transition might predispose cells to diverge in gene expression states. © 2016 Hsiung et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  14. OCTAMER-BINDING TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS: GENOMICS AND FUNCTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Feng-Qi

    2013-01-01

    The Octamer-binding proteins (Oct) are a group of highly conserved transcription factors that specifically bind to the octamer motif (ATGCAAAT) and closely related sequences that are found in promoters and enhancers of a wide variety of both ubiquitously expressed and cell type-specific genes. Oct factors belong to the larger family of POU domain factors that are characterized by the presence of a highly conserved bipartite DNA binding domain, consisting of an amino-terminal specific subdomai...

  15. Transcriptional profiling of bovine milk using RNA sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wickramasinghe Saumya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cow milk is a complex bioactive fluid consumed by humans beyond infancy. Even though the chemical and physical properties of cow milk are well characterized, very limited research has been done on characterizing the milk transcriptome. This study performs a comprehensive expression profiling of genes expressed in milk somatic cells of transition (day 15, peak (day 90 and late (day 250 lactation Holstein cows by RNA sequencing. Milk samples were collected from Holstein cows at 15, 90 and 250 days of lactation, and RNA was extracted from the pelleted milk cells. Gene expression analysis was conducted by Illumina RNA sequencing. Sequence reads were assembled and analyzed in CLC Genomics Workbench. Gene Ontology (GO and pathway analysis were performed using the Blast2GO program and GeneGo application of MetaCore program. Results A total of 16,892 genes were expressed in transition lactation, 19,094 genes were expressed in peak lactation and 18,070 genes were expressed in late lactation. Regardless of the lactation stage approximately 9,000 genes showed ubiquitous expression. Genes encoding caseins, whey proteins and enzymes in lactose synthesis pathway showed higher expression in early lactation. The majority of genes in the fat metabolism pathway had high expression in transition and peak lactation milk. Most of the genes encoding for endogenous proteases and enzymes in ubiquitin-proteasome pathway showed higher expression along the course of lactation. Conclusions This is the first study to describe the comprehensive bovine milk transcriptome in Holstein cows. The results revealed that 69% of NCBI Btau 4.0 annotated genes are expressed in bovine milk somatic cells. Most of the genes were ubiquitously expressed in all three stages of lactation. However, a fraction of the milk transcriptome has genes devoted to specific functions unique to the lactation stage. This indicates the ability of milk somatic cells to adapt to different

  16. Integrated transcriptional and metabolic profiling in human endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisoglu, Kubra; Calvano, Steve E; Coyle, Susette M; Corbett, Siobhan A; Androulakis, Ioannis P

    2014-12-01

    In this meta-study, we aimed to integrate biological insights gained from two levels of -omics analyses on the response to systemic inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide in humans. We characterized the interplay between plasma metabolite compositions and transcriptional response of leukocytes through integration of transcriptomics with plasma metabonomics. We hypothesized that the drastic changes in the immediate environment of the leukocytes might have an adaptive effect on shaping their transcriptional response in conjunction with the initial inflammatory stimuli. Indeed, we observed that leukocytes, most notably, tune the activity of lipid- and protein-associated processes at the transcriptional level in accordance with the fluctuations in metabolite compositions of surrounding plasma. A closer look into the transcriptional control of only metabolic pathways uncovered alterations in bioenergetics and defenses against oxidative stress closely associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and shifts in energy production observed during inflammatory processes.

  17. Integration of maternal genome into the neonate genome through breast milk mRNA transcripts and reverse transcriptase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmak M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human milk samples contain microvesicles similar to the retroviruses. These microvesicles contain mRNA transcripts and possess reverse transcriptase activity. They contain about 14,000 transcripts representing the milk transcriptome. Microvesicles are also enriched with proteins related to “caveolar-mediated endocytosis signaling” pathway. It has recently been reported that microvesicles could be transferred to other cells by endocytosis and their RNA content can be translated and be functional in their new location. A significant percentage of the mammalian genome appears to be the product of reverse transcription, containing sequences whose characteristics point to RNA as a template precursor. These are mobile elements that move by way of transposition and are called retrotransposons. We thought that retrotransposons may stem from about 14,000 transcriptome of breast milk microvesicles, and reviewed the literature. The enhanced acceptance of maternal allografts in children who were breast-fed and tolerance to the maternal MHC antigens after breastfeeding may stem from RNAs of the breast milk microvesicles that can be taken up by the breastfed infant and receiving maternal genomic information. We conclude that milk microvesicles may transfer genetic signals from mother to neonate during breastfeeding. Moreover, transfer of wild type RNA from a healthy wet-nurse to the suckling neonate through the milk microvesicles and its subsequent reverse transcription and integration into the neonate genome could result in permanent correction of the clinical manifestations in genetic diseases.

  18. Genome-Wide Identification and Structural Analysis of bZIP Transcription Factor Genes in Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The basic region/leucine zipper motif (bZIP transcription factor family is one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators in plants. bZIP genes have been systematically characterized in some plants, but not in rapeseed (Brassica napus. In this study, we identified 247 BnbZIP genes in the rapeseed genome, which we classified into 10 subfamilies based on phylogenetic analysis of their deduced protein sequences. The BnbZIP genes were grouped into functional clades with Arabidopsis genes with similar putative functions, indicating functional conservation. Genome mapping analysis revealed that the BnbZIPs are distributed unevenly across all 19 chromosomes, and that some of these genes arose through whole-genome duplication and dispersed duplication events. All expression profiles of 247 bZIP genes were extracted from RNA-sequencing data obtained from 17 different B. napus ZS11 tissues with 42 various developmental stages. These genes exhibited different expression patterns in various tissues, revealing that these genes are differentially regulated. Our results provide a valuable foundation for functional dissection of the different BnbZIP homologs in B. napus and its parental lines and for molecular breeding studies of bZIP genes in B. napus.

  19. Genome-Wide Identification and Structural Analysis of bZIP Transcription Factor Genes in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Xu, Daixiang; Jia, Ledong; Huang, Xiaohu; Ma, Guoqiang; Wang, Shuxian; Zhu, Meichen; Zhang, Aoxiang; Guan, Mingwei; Lu, Kun; Xu, Xinfu; Wang, Rui; Li, Jiana; Qu, Cunmin

    2017-10-24

    The basic region/leucine zipper motif (bZIP) transcription factor family is one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators in plants. bZIP genes have been systematically characterized in some plants, but not in rapeseed ( Brassica napus ). In this study, we identified 247 BnbZIP genes in the rapeseed genome, which we classified into 10 subfamilies based on phylogenetic analysis of their deduced protein sequences. The BnbZIP genes were grouped into functional clades with Arabidopsis genes with similar putative functions, indicating functional conservation. Genome mapping analysis revealed that the BnbZIPs are distributed unevenly across all 19 chromosomes, and that some of these genes arose through whole-genome duplication and dispersed duplication events. All expression profiles of 247 bZIP genes were extracted from RNA-sequencing data obtained from 17 different B . napus ZS11 tissues with 42 various developmental stages. These genes exhibited different expression patterns in various tissues, revealing that these genes are differentially regulated. Our results provide a valuable foundation for functional dissection of the different BnbZIP homologs in B . napus and its parental lines and for molecular breeding studies of bZIP genes in B . napus .

  20. Sputum is a surrogate for bronchoalveolar lavage for monitoring Mycobacterium tuberculosis transcriptional profiles in TB patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Benjamin J; Loxton, Andre G; Dolganov, Gregory M; Van, Tran T; Davis, J Lucian; de Jong, Bouke C; Voskuil, Martin I; Leach, Sonia M; Schoolnik, Gary K; Walzl, Gerhard; Strong, Michael; Walter, Nicholas D

    2016-09-01

    Pathogen-targeted transcriptional profiling in human sputum may elucidate the physiologic state of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) during infection and treatment. However, whether M. tuberculosis transcription in sputum recapitulates transcription in the lung is uncertain. We therefore compared M. tuberculosis transcription in human sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from 11 HIV-negative South African patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. We additionally compared these clinical samples with in vitro log phase aerobic growth and hypoxic non-replicating persistence (NRP-2). Of 2179 M. tuberculosis transcripts assayed in sputum and BAL via multiplex RT-PCR, 194 (8.9%) had a p-value <0.05, but none were significant after correction for multiple testing. Categorical enrichment analysis indicated that expression of the hypoxia-responsive DosR regulon was higher in BAL than in sputum. M. tuberculosis transcription in BAL and sputum was distinct from both aerobic growth and NRP-2, with a range of 396-1020 transcripts significantly differentially expressed after multiple testing correction. Collectively, our results indicate that M. tuberculosis transcription in sputum approximates M. tuberculosis transcription in the lung. Minor differences between M. tuberculosis transcription in BAL and sputum suggested lower oxygen concentrations or higher nitric oxide concentrations in BAL. M. tuberculosis-targeted transcriptional profiling of sputa may be a powerful tool for understanding M. tuberculosis pathogenesis and monitoring treatment responses in vivo. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. EXPRESSION PROFILING OF FIVE RAT STRAINS REVEAL TRANSCRIPTIONAL MODES IN THE ANTIGEN PROCESSING PATHWAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative gene expression profiling of rat strains with genetic predisposition to diverse cardiovascular diseases can help decode the transcriptional program that governs cellular behavior. We hypothesized that co-transcribed, intra-pathway, functionally coherent genes can be r...

  2. A Genome-Scale Resource for the Functional Characterization of Arabidopsis Transcription Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L. Pruneda-Paz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Extensive transcriptional networks play major roles in cellular and organismal functions. Transcript levels are in part determined by the combinatorial and overlapping functions of multiple transcription factors (TFs bound to gene promoters. Thus, TF-promoter interactions provide the basic molecular wiring of transcriptional regulatory networks. In plants, discovery of the functional roles of TFs is limited by an increased complexity of network circuitry due to a significant expansion of TF families. Here, we present the construction of a comprehensive collection of Arabidopsis TFs clones created to provide a versatile resource for uncovering TF biological functions. We leveraged this collection by implementing a high-throughput DNA binding assay and identified direct regulators of a key clock gene (CCA1 that provide molecular links between different signaling modules and the circadian clock. The resources introduced in this work will significantly contribute to a better understanding of the transcriptional regulatory landscape of plant genomes.

  3. TIMP-1 expression in human colorectal cancer is associated with TGF-B1, LOXL2, INHBA1, TNF-AIP6 and TIMP-2 transcript profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offenberg, Hanne Kjær; Brunner, Nils; Mansilla, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    -regulated in CRC samples compared with normal tissue, while TIMP-2 was down-regulated. Eight MMPs were up-regulated in CRC compared with normal tissue. Correlating up-regulated genes with the TIMP-1 transcript, we identified 13 that were also up-regulated in cancerous tissue. Among these were genes associated...... it is regulated. To further elucidate potential mechanisms of regulation of this protein, we did a number of experiments to look at associations between the transcript profile of TIMP-1 with known matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) as well as with expression profiles of other genes differentially regulated in human...... colorectal cancer (CRC) and the other TIMPs 2-4, which have also been associated with the progression of colorectal cancer. Genome-wide expression profiling of 172 CRC and normal mucosa samples was used to identify transcript changes for the genes under investigation. We found that TIMP-1 was up...

  4. Transcriptional profiling of swine lung tissue after experimental infection with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Zhicai; Cui, Hengmin; Li, Mingzhou; Peng, Xi; Zhu, Ling; Zhang, Ming; Ma, Jideng; Xu, Zhiwen; Gan, Meng; Deng, Junliang; Li, Xuewei; Fang, Jing

    2013-05-21

    Porcine pleuropneumonia is a highly contagious respiratory disease that causes great economic losses worldwide. In this study, we aimed to explore the underlying relationship between infection and injury by investigation of the whole porcine genome expression profiles of swine lung tissues post-inoculated with experimentally Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Expression profiling experiments of the control group and the treatment group were conducted using a commercially available Agilent Porcine Genechip including 43,603 probe sets. Microarray analysis was conducted on profiles of lung from challenged versus non-challenged swine. We found 11,929 transcripts, identified as differentially expressed at the p ≤0.01 level. There were 1188 genes annotated as swine genes in the GenBank Data Base. GO term analysis identified a total of 89 biological process categories, 82 cellular components and 182 molecular functions that were significantly affected, and at least 27 biological process categories that were related to the host immune response. Gene set enrichment analysis identified 13 pathways that were significantly associated with host response. Many proinflammatory-inflammatory cytokines were activated and involved in the regulation of the host defense response at the site of inflammation; while the cytokines involved in regulation of the host immune response were suppressed. All changes of genes and pathways of induced or repressed expression not only led to a decrease in antigenic peptides presented to T lymphocytes by APCs via the MHC and alleviated immune response injury induced by infection, but also stimulated stem cells to produce granulocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils) and monocyte, and promote neutrophils and macrophages to phagocytose bacterial and foreign antigen at the site of inflammation. The defense function of swine infection with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae was improved, while its immune function was decreased.

  5. Genetic networks of liver metabolism revealed by integration of metabolic and transcriptional profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine T Ferrara

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Although numerous quantitative trait loci (QTL influencing disease-related phenotypes have been detected through gene mapping and positional cloning, identification of the individual gene(s and molecular pathways leading to those phenotypes is often elusive. One way to improve understanding of genetic architecture is to classify phenotypes in greater depth by including transcriptional and metabolic profiling. In the current study, we have generated and analyzed mRNA expression and metabolic profiles in liver samples obtained in an F2 intercross between the diabetes-resistant C57BL/6 leptin(ob/ob and the diabetes-susceptible BTBR leptin(ob/ob mouse strains. This cross, which segregates for genotype and physiological traits, was previously used to identify several diabetes-related QTL. Our current investigation includes microarray analysis of over 40,000 probe sets, plus quantitative mass spectrometry-based measurements of sixty-seven intermediary metabolites in three different classes (amino acids, organic acids, and acyl-carnitines. We show that liver metabolites map to distinct genetic regions, thereby indicating that tissue metabolites are heritable. We also demonstrate that genomic analysis can be integrated with liver mRNA expression and metabolite profiling data to construct causal networks for control of specific metabolic processes in liver. As a proof of principle of the practical significance of this integrative approach, we illustrate the construction of a specific causal network that links gene expression and metabolic changes in the context of glutamate metabolism, and demonstrate its validity by showing that genes in the network respond to changes in glutamine and glutamate availability. Thus, the methods described here have the potential to reveal regulatory networks that contribute to chronic, complex, and highly prevalent diseases and conditions such as obesity and diabetes.

  6. Comprehensive Genomic Profiling of Esthesioneuroblastoma Reveals Additional Treatment Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Laurie M; Kim, Sungeun; Fedorchak, Kyle; Kundranda, Madappa; Odia, Yazmin; Nangia, Chaitali; Battiste, James; Colon-Otero, Gerardo; Powell, Steven; Russell, Jeffery; Elvin, Julia A; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Suh, James; Ali, Siraj M; Stephens, Philip J; Miller, Vincent A; Ross, Jeffrey S

    2017-07-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB), also known as olfactory neuroblastoma, is a rare malignant neoplasm of the olfactory mucosa. Despite surgical resection combined with radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy, ENB often relapses with rapid progression. Current multimodality, nontargeted therapy for relapsed ENB is of limited clinical benefit. We queried whether comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) of relapsed or refractory ENB can uncover genomic alterations (GA) that could identify potential targeted therapies for these patients. CGP was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections from 41 consecutive clinical cases of ENBs using a hybrid-capture, adaptor ligation based next-generation sequencing assay to a mean coverage depth of 593X. The results were analyzed for base substitutions, insertions and deletions, select rearrangements, and copy number changes (amplifications and homozygous deletions). Clinically relevant GA (CRGA) were defined as GA linked to drugs on the market or under evaluation in clinical trials. A total of 28 ENBs harbored GA, with a mean of 1.5 GA per sample. Approximately half of the ENBs (21, 51%) featured at least one CRGA, with an average of 1 CRGA per sample. The most commonly altered gene was TP53 (17%), with GA in PIK3CA , NF1 , CDKN2A , and CDKN2C occurring in 7% of samples. We report comprehensive genomic profiles for 41 ENB tumors. CGP revealed potential new therapeutic targets, including targetable GA in the mTOR, CDK and growth factor signaling pathways, highlighting the clinical value of genomic profiling in ENB. Comprehensive genomic profiling of 41 relapsed or refractory ENBs reveals recurrent alterations or classes of mutation, including amplification of tyrosine kinases encoded on chromosome 5q and mutations affecting genes in the mTOR/PI3K pathway. Approximately half of the ENBs (21, 51%) featured at least one clinically relevant genomic alteration (CRGA), with an average of 1 CRGA per sample. The most commonly altered

  7. Expression profile of urothelial transcription factors in bladder biopsies with interstitial cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaga, Kanya; Inoue, Ken-Ichi; Kaga, Mayuko; Ichikawa, Tomohiko; Yamanishi, Tomonori

    2017-08-01

    To characterize interstitial cystitis pathology based on the expression profile of urothelial tissue-specific master transcription factors. Bladder carcinoma cell lines derived from the urothelial stem cells (epithelial or mesenchymal) were used to identify candidate urothelial master transcription factors. Gene expression was measured with quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. From the initial screening of 170 transcription factors (human homologs of Drosophila segmentation genes and known master transcription factors from a database), 28 transcription factors were selected. Subsequently, messenger ribonucleic acid from bladder biopsies of interstitial cystitis patients was purified, and gene expression levels of known urothelial marker genes and candidate master transcription factors were measured. Multivariate expression data were analyzed with spss software. Factor analysis decomposed the expression profile into four axes: principal axis 1 included retinoic acid receptors and 17 candidate master transcription factors. Principal axis 2 included KRT5 and five candidates. Principal axis 3 included transcription factor TP63 and two candidates. Principal axis 4 included SHH and two candidates. Principal component analysis segregated biopsies from Hunner's lesion in the principal component 1 (retinoic acid)/principal component 2 (SOX13)/principal component 3 (TP63) space. Urothelial master transcription factors could serve as novel diagnostic markers and potentially explain the molecular pathology of interstitial cystitis. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  8. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Transcription Start Sites and Promoter Motifs of Phytoplasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijo, Takamichi; Neriya, Yutaro; Koinuma, Hiroaki; Iwabuchi, Nozomu; Kitazawa, Yugo; Tanno, Kazuyuki; Okano, Yukari; Maejima, Kensaku; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Oshima, Kenro; Namba, Shigetou

    2017-12-01

    Phytoplasmas are obligate intracellular parasitic bacteria that infect both plants and insects. We previously identified the sigma factor RpoD-dependent consensus promoter sequence of phytoplasma. However, the genome-wide landscape of RNA transcripts, including non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and RpoD-independent promoter elements, was still unknown. In this study, we performed an improved RNA sequencing analysis for genome-wide identification of the transcription start sites (TSSs) and the consensus promoter sequences. We constructed cDNA libraries using a random adenine/thymine hexamer primer, in addition to a conventional random hexamer primer, for efficient sequencing of 5'-termini of AT-rich phytoplasma RNAs. We identified 231 TSSs, which were classified into four categories: mRNA TSSs, internal sense TSSs, antisense TSSs (asTSSs), and orphan TSSs (oTSSs). The presence of asTSSs and oTSSs indicated the genome-wide transcription of ncRNAs, which might act as regulatory ncRNAs in phytoplasmas. This is the first description of genome-wide phytoplasma ncRNAs. Using a de novo motif discovery program, we identified two consensus motif sequences located upstream of the TSSs. While one was almost identical to the RpoD-dependent consensus promoter sequence, the other was an unidentified novel motif, which might be recognized by another transcription initiation factor. These findings are valuable for understanding the regulatory mechanism of phytoplasma gene expression.

  9. Mapping 3 ' transcript ends in the bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus) mitochondrial genome with RNA-Seq

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marková, Silvia; Filipi, Karolína; Searle, J. B.; Kotlík, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 870 (2015) ISSN 1471-2164 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP506/11/1872 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : bicistronic transcript * mitochondrial genome * Myodes glareolus * transcriptome * polyadenylation * stop codon Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 3.867, year: 2015

  10. Hierarchical role for transcription factors and chromatin structure in genome organization along adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarusi Portuguez, Avital; Schwartz, Michal; Siersbaek, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    and the role of this organization in regulating the transcription program in adipocytes are not clear. Analysis of genome-wide chromosomal associations revealed cell type-specific spatial clustering of adipogenic genes in 3T3-L1 cells. Time course analysis demonstrated that the adipogenic 'hub', sampled...

  11. Transcription profiling of human peripheral blood to development gene expression signatures for practical radiation biodosimetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To further development of our gene expression approach to biodosimetry we have employed whole genome microarray expression profiling as a discovery platform to...

  12. Genome-wide prediction and identification of cis-natural antisense transcripts in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiu-Jie; Gaasterland, Terry; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2005-01-01

    Natural antisense transcripts (NAT) are a class of endogenous coding or non-protein-coding RNAs with sequence complementarity to other transcripts. Several lines of evidence have shown that cis- and trans-NATs may participate in a broad range of gene regulatory events. Genome-wide identification of cis-NATs in human, mouse and rice has revealed their widespread occurrence in eukaryotes. However, little is known about cis-NATs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We developed a new computational method to predict and identify cis-encoded NATs in Arabidopsis and found 1,340 potential NAT pairs. The expression of both sense and antisense transcripts of 957 NAT pairs was confirmed using Arabidopsis full-length cDNAs and public massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) data. Three known or putative Arabidopsis imprinted genes have cis-antisense transcripts. Sequences and the genomic arrangement of two Arabidopsis NAT pairs are conserved in rice. We combined information from full-length cDNAs and Arabidopsis genome annotation in our NAT prediction work and reported cis-NAT pairs that could not otherwise be identified by using one of the two datasets only. Analysis of MPSS data suggested that for most Arabidopsis cis-NAT pairs, there is predominant expression of one of the two transcripts in a tissue-specific manner.

  13. Transcriptional profile of Taxus chinensis cells in response to methyl jasmonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shu-tao

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methyl jasmonate (MeJA has been successfully used as an effective elicitor to enhance production of taxol and other taxanes in cultured Taxus cells. However the mechanism of MeJA-mediated taxane biosynthesis remains unclear. Genomic information for species in the genus Taxus is currently unavailable. Therefore, information about the transcriptome of Taxus cells and specifically, description of changes in gene expression in response to MeJA, is needed for the better exploration of the biological mechanisms of MeJA-mediated taxane biosynthesis. Results In this research, the transcriptome profiles of T. chinensis cells at 16 hours (T16 after MeJA treatment and of mock-treated cells (T0 were analyzed by “RNA-seq” to investigate the transcriptional alterations of Taxus cell in response to MeJA elicitation. More than 58 million reads (200 bp in length of cDNA from both samples were generated, and 46,581 unigenes were found. There were 13,469 genes found to be expressed differentially between the two timepoints, including all of the known jasmonate (JA biosynthesis/JA signaling pathway genes and taxol-related genes. The qRT-PCR results showed that the expression profiles of 12 randomly selected DEGs and 10 taxol biosynthesis genes were found to be consistent with the RNA-Seq data. MeJA appeared to stimulate a large number of genes involved in several relevant functional categories, such as plant hormone biosynthesis and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. Additionally, many genes encoding transcription factors were shown to respond to MeJA elicitation. Conclusions The results of a transcriptome analysis suggest that exogenous application of MeJA could induce JA biosynthesis/JA signaling pathway/defence responses, activate a series of transcription factors, as well as increase expression of genes in the terpenoid biosynthesis pathway responsible for taxol synthesis. This comprehensive description of gene expression information could

  14. Increasing the efficiency of bacterial transcription simulations: When to exclude the genome without loss of accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMillen David R

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simulating the major molecular events inside an Escherichia coli cell can lead to a very large number of reactions that compose its overall behaviour. Not only should the model be accurate, but it is imperative for the experimenter to create an efficient model to obtain the results in a timely fashion. Here, we show that for many parameter regimes, the effect of the host cell genome on the transcription of a gene from a plasmid-borne promoter is negligible, allowing one to simulate the system more efficiently by removing the computational load associated with representing the presence of the rest of the genome. The key parameter is the on-rate of RNAP binding to the promoter (k_on, and we compare the total number of transcripts produced from a plasmid vector generated as a function of this rate constant, for two versions of our gene expression model, one incorporating the host cell genome and one excluding it. By sweeping parameters, we identify the k_on range for which the difference between the genome and no-genome models drops below 5%, over a wide range of doubling times, mRNA degradation rates, plasmid copy numbers, and gene lengths. Results We assess the effect of the simulating the presence of the genome over a four-dimensional parameter space, considering: 24 min Conclusion Exclusion of the genome is shown to yield less than 5% difference in transcript numbers over wide ranges of values, and computational speed is improved by two to 24 times by excluding explicit representation of the genome.

  15. Transcriptional profiling of mechanically and genetically sink-limited soybeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    The absence of a reproductive sink causes physiological and morphological changes in soybean plants. These include increased accumulation of nitrogen and starch in the leaves and delayed leaf senescence. To identify transcriptional changes that occur in leaves of these sink-limited plants, we used R...

  16. TFIIS-Dependent Non-coding Transcription Regulates Developmental Genome Rearrangements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Maliszewska-Olejniczak

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Because of their nuclear dimorphism, ciliates provide a unique opportunity to study the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs in the communication between germline and somatic lineages. In these unicellular eukaryotes, a new somatic nucleus develops at each sexual cycle from a copy of the zygotic (germline nucleus, while the old somatic nucleus degenerates. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, the genome is massively rearranged during this process through the reproducible elimination of repeated sequences and the precise excision of over 45,000 short, single-copy Internal Eliminated Sequences (IESs. Different types of ncRNAs resulting from genome-wide transcription were shown to be involved in the epigenetic regulation of genome rearrangements. To understand how ncRNAs are produced from the entire genome, we have focused on a homolog of the TFIIS elongation factor, which regulates RNA polymerase II transcriptional pausing. Six TFIIS-paralogs, representing four distinct families, can be found in P. tetraurelia genome. Using RNA interference, we showed that TFIIS4, which encodes a development-specific TFIIS protein, is essential for the formation of a functional somatic genome. Molecular analyses and high-throughput DNA sequencing upon TFIIS4 RNAi demonstrated that TFIIS4 is involved in all kinds of genome rearrangements, including excision of ~48% of IESs. Localization of a GFP-TFIIS4 fusion revealed that TFIIS4 appears specifically in the new somatic nucleus at an early developmental stage, before IES excision. RT-PCR experiments showed that TFIIS4 is necessary for the synthesis of IES-containing non-coding transcripts. We propose that these IES+ transcripts originate from the developing somatic nucleus and serve as pairing substrates for germline-specific short RNAs that target elimination of their homologous sequences. Our study, therefore, connects the onset of zygotic non coding transcription to the control of genome plasticity in Paramecium

  17. Genomic profiling in Down syndrome acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies histone gene deletions associated with altered methylation profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudin, Michael G.; Wang, Jinhua; Leung, Hon-Chiu Eastwood; Gurusiddappa, Sivashankarappa; Meyer, Julia; Condos, Gregory; Morrison, Debra; Tsimelzon, Anna; Devidas, Meenakshi; Heerema, Nyla A.; Carroll, Andrew J.; Plon, Sharon E.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Basso, Giuseppe; Pession, Andrea; Bhojwani, Deepa; Carroll, William L.; Rabin, Karen R.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Down syndrome (DS) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have distinct clinical and biological features. Whereas most DS-ALL cases lack the sentinel cytogenetic lesions that guide risk assignment in childhood ALL, JAK2 mutations and CRLF2 overexpression are highly enriched. To further characterize the unique biology of DS-ALL, we performed genome-wide profiling of 58 DS-ALL and 68 non-Down syndrome (NDS) ALL cases by DNA copy number, loss of heterozygosity, gene expression, and methylation analyses. We report a novel deletion within the 6p22 histone gene cluster as significantly more frequent in DS-ALL, occurring in 11 DS (22%) and only two NDS cases (3.1%) (Fisher’s exact p = 0.002). Homozygous deletions yielded significantly lower histone expression levels, and were associated with higher methylation levels, distinct spatial localization of methylated promoters, and enrichment of highly methylated genes for specific pathways and transcription factor binding motifs. Gene expression profiling demonstrated heterogeneity of DS-ALL cases overall, with supervised analysis defining a 45-transcript signature associated with CRLF2 overexpression. Further characterization of pathways associated with histone deletions may identify opportunities for novel targeted interventions. PMID:21647151

  18. Genomic profiling of oral squamous cell carcinoma by array-based comparative genomic hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunichi Yoshioka

    Full Text Available We designed a study to investigate genetic relationships between primary tumors of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC and their lymph node metastases, and to identify genomic copy number aberrations (CNAs related to lymph node metastasis. For this purpose, we collected a total of 42 tumor samples from 25 patients and analyzed their genomic profiles by array-based comparative genomic hybridization. We then compared the genetic profiles of metastatic primary tumors (MPTs with their paired lymph node metastases (LNMs, and also those of LNMs with non-metastatic primary tumors (NMPTs. Firstly, we found that although there were some distinctive differences in the patterns of genomic profiles between MPTs and their paired LNMs, the paired samples shared similar genomic aberration patterns in each case. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis grouped together 12 of the 15 MPT-LNM pairs. Furthermore, similarity scores between paired samples were significantly higher than those between non-paired samples. These results suggested that MPTs and their paired LNMs are composed predominantly of genetically clonal tumor cells, while minor populations with different CNAs may also exist in metastatic OSCCs. Secondly, to identify CNAs related to lymph node metastasis, we compared CNAs between grouped samples of MPTs and LNMs, but were unable to find any CNAs that were more common in LNMs. Finally, we hypothesized that subpopulations carrying metastasis-related CNAs might be present in both the MPT and LNM. Accordingly, we compared CNAs between NMPTs and LNMs, and found that gains of 7p, 8q and 17q were more common in the latter than in the former, suggesting that these CNAs may be involved in lymph node metastasis of OSCC. In conclusion, our data suggest that in OSCCs showing metastasis, the primary and metastatic tumors share similar genomic profiles, and that cells in the primary tumor may tend to metastasize after acquiring metastasis-associated CNAs.

  19. Genomic profiling of oral squamous cell carcinoma by array-based comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Shunichi; Tsukamoto, Yoshiyuki; Hijiya, Naoki; Nakada, Chisato; Uchida, Tomohisa; Matsuura, Keiko; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Seto, Masao; Kawano, Kenji; Moriyama, Masatsugu

    2013-01-01

    We designed a study to investigate genetic relationships between primary tumors of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and their lymph node metastases, and to identify genomic copy number aberrations (CNAs) related to lymph node metastasis. For this purpose, we collected a total of 42 tumor samples from 25 patients and analyzed their genomic profiles by array-based comparative genomic hybridization. We then compared the genetic profiles of metastatic primary tumors (MPTs) with their paired lymph node metastases (LNMs), and also those of LNMs with non-metastatic primary tumors (NMPTs). Firstly, we found that although there were some distinctive differences in the patterns of genomic profiles between MPTs and their paired LNMs, the paired samples shared similar genomic aberration patterns in each case. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis grouped together 12 of the 15 MPT-LNM pairs. Furthermore, similarity scores between paired samples were significantly higher than those between non-paired samples. These results suggested that MPTs and their paired LNMs are composed predominantly of genetically clonal tumor cells, while minor populations with different CNAs may also exist in metastatic OSCCs. Secondly, to identify CNAs related to lymph node metastasis, we compared CNAs between grouped samples of MPTs and LNMs, but were unable to find any CNAs that were more common in LNMs. Finally, we hypothesized that subpopulations carrying metastasis-related CNAs might be present in both the MPT and LNM. Accordingly, we compared CNAs between NMPTs and LNMs, and found that gains of 7p, 8q and 17q were more common in the latter than in the former, suggesting that these CNAs may be involved in lymph node metastasis of OSCC. In conclusion, our data suggest that in OSCCs showing metastasis, the primary and metastatic tumors share similar genomic profiles, and that cells in the primary tumor may tend to metastasize after acquiring metastasis-associated CNAs.

  20. Detection of Pol IV/RDR2-dependent transcripts at the genomic scale in Arabidopsis reveals features and regulation of siRNA biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaofang; Vandivier, Lee E.; Tu, Bin; Gao, Lei; Won, So Youn; Li, Shengben; Zheng, Binglian; Gregory, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-four-nucleotide small interfering (si)RNAs are central players in RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM), a process that establishes and maintains DNA methylation at transposable elements to ensure genome stability in plants. The plant-specific RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV) is required for siRNA biogenesis and is believed to transcribe RdDM loci to produce primary transcripts that are converted to double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) by RDR2 to serve as siRNA precursors. Yet, no such siRNA precursor transcripts have ever been reported. Here, through genome-wide profiling of RNAs in genotypes that compromise the processing of siRNA precursors, we were able to identify Pol IV/RDR2-dependent transcripts from tens of thousands of loci. We show that Pol IV/RDR2-dependent transcripts correspond to both DNA strands, whereas the RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-dependent transcripts produced upon derepression of the loci are derived primarily from one strand. We also show that Pol IV/RDR2-dependent transcripts have a 5′ monophosphate, lack a poly(A) tail at the 3′ end, and contain no introns; these features distinguish them from Pol II-dependent transcripts. Like Pol II-transcribed genic regions, Pol IV-transcribed regions are flanked by A/T-rich sequences depleted in nucleosomes, which highlights similarities in Pol II- and Pol IV-mediated transcription. Computational analysis of siRNA abundance from various mutants reveals differences in the regulation of siRNA biogenesis at two types of loci that undergo CHH methylation via two different DNA methyltransferases. These findings begin to reveal features of Pol IV/RDR2-mediated transcription at the heart of genome stability in plants. PMID:25414514

  1. Mapping of genotype-phenotype diversity among clinical isolates of mycobacterium tuberculosis by sequence-based transcriptional profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Graham; Cortes, Teresa; Comas, Iñaki; Coscolla, Mireia; Gagneux, Sebastien; Young, Douglas B

    2013-01-01

    Genome sequencing has identified an extensive repertoire of single nucleotide polymorphisms among clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but the extent to which these differences influence phenotypic properties of the bacteria remains to be elucidated. To determine whether these polymorphisms give rise to phenotypic diversity, we have integrated genome data sets with RNA sequencing to assess their impact on the comparative transcriptome profiles of strains belonging to M. tuberculosis Lineages 1 and 2. We observed clear correlations between genotype and transcriptional phenotype. These arose by three mechanisms. First, lineage-specific changes in amino acid sequence of transcriptional regulators were associated with alterations in their ability to control gene expression. Second, changes in nucleotide sequence were associated with alteration of promoter activity and generation of novel transcriptional start sites in intergenic regions and within coding sequences. We show that in some cases this mechanism is expected to generate functionally active truncated proteins involved in innate immune recognition. Finally, genes showing lineage-specific patterns of differential expression not linked directly to primary mutations were characterized by a striking overrepresentation of toxin-antitoxin pairs. Taken together, these findings advance our understanding of mycobacterial evolution, contribute to a systems level understanding of this important human pathogen, and more broadly demonstrate the application of state-of-the-art techniques to provide novel insight into mechanisms by which intergenic and silent mutations contribute to diversity.

  2. RNA profiles of porcine embryos during genome activation reveal complex metabolic switch sensitive to in vitro conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Østrup

    Full Text Available Fertilization is followed by complex changes in cytoplasmic composition and extensive chromatin reprogramming which results in the abundant activation of totipotent embryonic genome at embryonic genome activation (EGA. While chromatin reprogramming has been widely studied in several species, only a handful of reports characterize changing transcriptome profiles and resulting metabolic changes in cleavage stage embryos. The aims of the current study were to investigate RNA profiles of in vivo developed (ivv and in vitro produced (ivt porcine embryos before (2-cell stage and after (late 4-cell stage EGA and determine major metabolic changes that regulate totipotency. The period before EGA was dominated by transcripts responsible for cell cycle regulation, mitosis, RNA translation and processing (including ribosomal machinery, protein catabolism, and chromatin remodelling. Following EGA an increase in the abundance of transcripts involved in transcription, translation, DNA metabolism, histone and chromatin modification, as well as protein catabolism was detected. The further analysis of members of overlapping GO terms revealed that despite that comparable cellular processes are taking place before and after EGA (RNA splicing, protein catabolism, different metabolic pathways are involved. This strongly suggests that a complex metabolic switch accompanies EGA. In vitro conditions significantly altered RNA profiles before EGA, and the character of these changes indicates that they originate from oocyte and are imposed either before oocyte aspiration or during in vitro maturation. IVT embryos have altered content of apoptotic factors, cell cycle regulation factors and spindle components, and transcription factors, which all may contribute to reduced developmental competence of embryos produced in vitro. Overall, our data are in good accordance with previously published, genome-wide profiling data in other species. Moreover, comparison with mouse and

  3. Transcription factor profiling unveils the oncogenes involved in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-03

    Jun 3, 2009 ... The first strategy to detect genes that are involved in cancerogenesis was the construction of subtraction libraries. The basic principle was that the total m-RNA of one cell type was ... already been used for DNA binding proteins of bacteria. ..... (2008). .A genomic and expression study of AP-1 in primary.

  4. Development of a tissue-specific ribosome profiling approach in Drosophila enables genome-wide evaluation of translational adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xun; Dickman, Dion

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances in next-generation sequencing approaches have revolutionized our understanding of transcriptional expression in diverse systems. However, measurements of transcription do not necessarily reflect gene translation, the process of ultimate importance in understanding cellular function. To circumvent this limitation, biochemical tagging of ribosome subunits to isolate ribosome-associated mRNA has been developed. However, this approach, called TRAP, lacks quantitative resolution compared to a superior technology, ribosome profiling. Here, we report the development of an optimized ribosome profiling approach in Drosophila. We first demonstrate successful ribosome profiling from a specific tissue, larval muscle, with enhanced resolution compared to conventional TRAP approaches. We next validate the ability of this technology to define genome-wide translational regulation. This technology is leveraged to test the relative contributions of transcriptional and translational mechanisms in the postsynaptic muscle that orchestrate the retrograde control of presynaptic function at the neuromuscular junction. Surprisingly, we find no evidence that significant changes in the transcription or translation of specific genes are necessary to enable retrograde homeostatic signaling, implying that post-translational mechanisms ultimately gate instructive retrograde communication. Finally, we show that a global increase in translation induces adaptive responses in both transcription and translation of protein chaperones and degradation factors to promote cellular proteostasis. Together, this development and validation of tissue-specific ribosome profiling enables sensitive and specific analysis of translation in Drosophila.

  5. Evaluative Profiling of Arsenic Sensing and Regulatory Systems in the Human Microbiome Project Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael D. Isokpehi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of environmental chemicals including arsenic, a type 1 carcinogen, on the composition and function of the human-associated microbiota is of significance in human health and disease. We have developed a suite of bioinformatics and visual analytics methods to evaluate the availability (presence or absence and abundance of functional annotations in a microbial genome for seven Pfam protein families: As(III-responsive transcriptional repressor (ArsR, anion-transporting ATPase (ArsA, arsenical pump membrane protein (ArsB, arsenate reductase (ArsC, arsenical resistance operon transacting repressor (ArsD, water/glycerol transport protein (aquaporins, and universal stress protein (USP. These genes encode function for sensing and/or regulating arsenic content in the bacterial cell. The evaluative profiling strategy was applied to 3,274 genomes from which 62 genomes from 18 genera were identified to contain genes for the seven protein families. Our list included 12 genomes in the Human Microbiome Project (HMP from the following genera: Citrobacter, Escherichia, Lactobacillus, Providencia, Rhodococcus , and Staphylococcus. Gene neighborhood analysis of the arsenic resistance operon in the genome of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron VPI-5482, a human gut symbiont, revealed the adjacent arrangement of genes for arsenite binding/transfer (ArsD and cytochrome c biosynthesis (DsbD_2. Visual analytics facilitated evaluation of protein annotations in 367 genomes in the phylum Bacteroidetes identified multiple genomes in which genes for ArsD and DsbD_2 were adjacently arranged. Cytochrome c , produced by a posttranslational process, consists of heme-containing proteins important for cellular energy production and signaling. Further research is desired to elucidate arsenic resistance and arsenic-mediated cellular energy production in the Bacteroidetes.

  6. RNA-seq transcriptional profiling of peripheral blood leukocytes from cattle infected with Mycobacterium bovis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten E McLoughlin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Bovine tuberculosis (BTB, caused by infection with Mycobacterium bovis, is a major endemic disease affecting cattle populations worldwide, despite the implementation of stringent surveillance and control programs in many countries. The development of high-throughput functional genomics technologies, including gene expression microarrays and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq, has enabled detailed analysis of the host transcriptome to M. bovis infection, particularly at the macrophage and peripheral blood level. In the present study, we have analyzed the peripheral blood leukocyte (PBL transcriptome of eight natural M. bovis-infected and eight age- and sex-matched non-infected control Holstein-Friesian animals using RNA-seq. In addition, we compared gene expression profiles generated using RNA-seq with those previously generated using the high-density Affymetrix® GeneChip® Bovine Genome Array platform from the same PBL-extracted RNA. A total of 3,250 differentially expressed (DE annotated genes were detected in the M. bovis-infected samples relative to the controls (adjusted P-value ≤ 0.05, with the number of genes displaying decreased relative expression (1,671 exceeding those with increased relative expression (1,579. Ingenuity® Systems Pathway Analysis (IPA of all DE genes revealed enrichment for genes with immune function. Notably, transcriptional suppression was observed among several of the top ranking canonical pathways including Leukocyte Extravasation Signaling. Comparative platform analysis demonstrated that RNA-seq detected a larger number of annotated DE genes (3,250 relative to the microarray (1,398, of which 917 genes were common to both technologies and displayed the same direction of expression. Finally, we show that RNA-seq had an increased dynamic range compared to the microarray for estimating differential gene expression.

  7. Human Metapneumovirus Induces Formation of Inclusion Bodies for Efficient Genome Replication and Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes-Muñoz, Nicolás; Branttie, Jean; Slaughter, Kerri Beth; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2017-12-15

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) causes significant upper and lower respiratory disease in all age groups worldwide. The virus possesses a negative-sense single-stranded RNA genome of approximately 13.3 kb encapsidated by multiple copies of the nucleoprotein (N), giving rise to helical nucleocapsids. In addition, copies of the phosphoprotein (P) and the large RNA polymerase (L) decorate the viral nucleocapsids. After viral attachment, endocytosis, and fusion mediated by the viral glycoproteins, HMPV nucleocapsids are released into the cell cytoplasm. To visualize the subsequent steps of genome transcription and replication, a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) protocol was established to detect different viral RNA subpopulations in infected cells. The FISH probes were specific for detection of HMPV positive-sense RNA (+RNA) and viral genomic RNA (vRNA). Time course analysis of human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells infected with HMPV revealed the formation of inclusion bodies (IBs) from early times postinfection. HMPV IBs were shown to be cytoplasmic sites of active transcription and replication, with the translation of viral proteins being closely associated. Inclusion body formation was consistent with an actin-dependent coalescence of multiple early replicative sites. Time course quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis suggested that the coalescence of inclusion bodies is a strategy to efficiently replicate and transcribe the viral genome. These results provide a better understanding of the steps following HMPV entry and have important clinical implications. IMPORTANCE Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a recently discovered pathogen that affects human populations of all ages worldwide. Reinfections are common throughout life, but no vaccines or antiviral treatments are currently available. In this work, a spatiotemporal analysis of HMPV replication and transcription in bronchial epithelial cell-derived immortal cells was performed. HMPV was shown to

  8. Transcriptional Profiling of Caudal Fin Regeneration in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schebesta

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Regeneration of severed limbs in adult animals is restricted to urodele amphibians. Mammals, including humans, have very limited regenerative capabilities and even with proper treatment, only the tips of our digits can grow back. Teleost fish can regenerate amputated fins, the evolutionary ancestors of limbs. To elucidate the principles of limb-fin regeneration, we performed an Affymetrix microarray screen on regenerating caudal fins 12, 24, 48, and 72 h post amputation. Approximately 15,000 zebrafish transcripts were analyzed, identifying 829 transcripts as differentially expressed during regeneration. Of those, 563 were up-regulated and 266 were down-regulated. We constructed a comprehensive database containing expression data, functional assignment, and background information from the literature for each differentially expressed transcript. In order to validate our findings, we employed three approaches: (1 microarray expression analysis of genes previously implicated in fin regeneration, (2 RT-PCR analysis of genes newly identified as differentially expressed during regeneration, and (3 in situ hybridization of the up-regulated genes bambi, dlx5A, and her6. Moreover, we show that Smad 1/5/8 proteins, effector molecules of Bmp signaling, are phosphorylated during fin regeneration. Taken together, we provide a comprehensive database of fin regeneration that will serve as an important tool for understanding the molecular mechanisms of regeneration.

  9. Transcription start site profiling of 15 anatomical regions of the Macaca mulatta central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francescatto, Margherita; Lizio, Marina; Philippens, Ingrid; Bontrop, Ronald; Sakai, Mizuho; Watanabe, Shoko; Itoh, Masayoshi; Hasegawa, Akira; Lassmann, Timo; Severin, Jessica; Harshbarger, Jayson; Abugessaisa, Imad; Kasukawa, Takeya; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Forrest, Alistair R R; Kawaji, Hideya; Rizzu, Patrizia; Heutink, Peter

    2017-10-31

    Rhesus macaque was the second non-human primate whose genome has been fully sequenced and is one of the most used model organisms to study human biology and disease, thanks to the close evolutionary relationship between the two species. But compared to human, where several previously unknown RNAs have been uncovered, the macaque transcriptome is less studied. Publicly available RNA expression resources for macaque are limited, even for brain, which is highly relevant to study human cognitive abilities. In an effort to complement those resources, FANTOM5 profiled 15 distinct anatomical regions of the aged macaque central nervous system using Cap Analysis of Gene Expression, a high-resolution, annotation-independent technology that allows monitoring of transcription initiation events with high accuracy. We identified 25,869 CAGE peaks, representing bona fide promoters. For each peak we provide detailed annotation, expanding the landscape of 'known' macaque genes, and we show concrete examples on how to use the resulting data. We believe this data represents a useful resource to understand the central nervous system in macaque.

  10. SINCERITIES: Inferring gene regulatory networks from time-stamped single cell transcriptional expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papili Gao, Nan; Ud-Dean, S M Minhaz; Gandrillon, Olivier; Gunawan, Rudiyanto

    2017-09-14

    Single cell transcriptional profiling opens up a new avenue in studying the functional role of cell-to-cell variability in physiological processes. The analysis of single cell expression profiles creates new challenges due to the distributive nature of the data and the stochastic dynamics of gene transcription process. The reconstruction of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) using single cell transcriptional profiles is particularly challenging, especially when directed gene-gene relationships are desired. We developed SINCERITIES (SINgle CEll Regularized Inference using TIme-stamped Expression profileS) for the inference of GRNs from single cell transcriptional profiles. We focused on time-stamped cross-sectional expression data, commonly generated from transcriptional profiling of single cells collected at multiple time points after cell stimulation. SINCERITIES recovers directed regulatory relationships among genes by employing regularized linear regression (ridge regression), using temporal changes in the distributions of gene expressions. Meanwhile, the modes of the gene regulations (activation and repression) come from partial correlation analyses between pairs of genes. We demonstrated the efficacy of SINCERITIES in inferring GRNs using in silico time-stamped single cell expression data and single cell transcriptional profiles of THP-1 monocytic human leukemia cells. The case studies showed that SINCERITIES could provide accurate GRN predictions, significantly better than other GRN inference algorithms such as TSNI, GENIE3 and JUMP3. Moreover, SINCERITIES has a low computational complexity and is amenable to problems of extremely large dimensionality. Finally, an application of SINCERITIES to single cell expression data of T2EC chicken erythrocytes pointed to BATF as a candidate novel regulator of erythroid development. The MATLAB and R version of SINCERITIES is freely available from the following websites: http://www.cabsel.ethz.ch/tools/sincerities.html and

  11. A functional genomics strategy reveals clockwork orange as a transcriptional regulator in the Drosophila circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Akira; Ukai-Tadenuma, Maki; Yamada, Rikuhiro G; Houl, Jerry; Uno, Kenichiro D; Kasukawa, Takeya; Dauwalder, Brigitte; Itoh, Taichi Q; Takahashi, Kuniaki; Ueda, Ryu; Hardin, Paul E; Tanimura, Teiichi; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2007-07-01

    The Drosophila circadian clock consists of integrated autoregulatory feedback loops, making the clock difficult to elucidate without comprehensively identifying the network components in vivo. Previous studies have adopted genome-wide screening for clock-controlled genes using high-density oligonucleotide arrays that identified hundreds of clock-controlled genes. In an attempt to identify the core clock genes among these candidates, we applied genome-wide functional screening using an RNA interference (RNAi) system in vivo. Here we report the identification of novel clock gene candidates including clockwork orange (cwo), a transcriptional repressor belonging to the basic helix-loop-helix ORANGE family. cwo is rhythmically expressed and directly regulated by CLK-CYC through canonical E-box sequences. A genome-wide search for its target genes using the Drosophila genome tiling array revealed that cwo forms its own negative feedback loop and directly suppresses the expression of other clock genes through the E-box sequence. Furthermore, this negative transcriptional feedback loop contributes to sustaining a high-amplitude circadian oscillation in vivo. Based on these results, we propose that the competition between cyclic CLK-CYC activity and the adjustable threshold imposed by CWO keeps E-box-mediated transcription within the controllable range of its activity, thereby rendering a Drosophila circadian clock capable of generating high-amplitude oscillation.

  12. Elucidating the role of transcription in shaping the 3D structure of the bacterial genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandao, Hugo B.; Wang, Xindan; Rudner, David Z.; Mirny, Leonid

    Active transcription has been linked to several genome conformation changes in bacteria, including the recruitment of chromosomal DNA to the cell membrane and formation of nucleoid clusters. Using genomic and imaging data as input into mathematical models and polymer simulations, we sought to explore the extent to which bacterial 3D genome structure could be explained by 1D transcription tracks. Using B. subtilis as a model organism, we investigated via polymer simulations the role of loop extrusion and DNA super-coiling on the formation of interaction domains and other fine-scale features that are visible in chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) data. We then explored the role of the condensin structural maintenance of chromosome complex on the alignment of chromosomal arms. A parameter-free transcription traffic model demonstrated that mean chromosomal arm alignment can be quantitatively explained, and the effects on arm alignment in genomically rearranged strains of B. subtilis were accurately predicted. H.B. acknowledges support from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada for a PGS-D fellowship.

  13. Water and salinity stress in grapevines: early and late changes in transcript and metabolite profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Grant R; Ergül, Ali; Grimplet, Jerome; Tillett, Richard L; Tattersall, Elizabeth A R; Bohlman, Marlene C; Vincent, Delphine; Sonderegger, Justin; Evans, Jason; Osborne, Craig; Quilici, David; Schlauch, Karen A; Schooley, David A; Cushman, John C

    2007-04-01

    Grapes are grown in semiarid environments, where drought and salinity are common problems. Microarray transcript profiling, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, and metabolite profiling were used to define genes and metabolic pathways in Vitis vinifera cv. Cabernet Sauvignon with shared and divergent responses to a gradually applied and long-term (16 days) water-deficit stress and equivalent salinity stress. In this first-of-a-kind study, distinct differences between water deficit and salinity were revealed. Water deficit caused more rapid and greater inhibition of shoot growth than did salinity at equivalent stem water potentials. One of the earliest responses to water deficit was an increase in the transcript abundance of RuBisCo activase (day 4), but this increase occurred much later in salt-stressed plants (day 12). As water deficit progressed, a greater number of affected transcripts were involved in metabolism, transport, and the biogenesis of cellular components than did salinity. Salinity affected a higher percentage of transcripts involved in transcription, protein synthesis, and protein fate than did water deficit. Metabolite profiling revealed that there were higher concentrations of glucose, malate, and proline in water-deficit-treated plants as compared to salinized plants. The metabolite differences were linked to differences in transcript abundance of many genes involved in energy metabolism and nitrogen assimilation, particularly photosynthesis, gluconeogenesis, and photorespiration. Water-deficit-treated plants appear to have a higher demand than salinized plants to adjust osmotically, detoxify free radicals (reactive oxygen species), and cope with photoinhibition.

  14. Genome-wide transcriptional responses of Alteromonas naphthalenivorans SN2 to contaminated seawater and marine tidal flat sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hyun Mi; Jeong, Hye Im; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Madsen, Eugene L; Jeon, Che Ok

    2016-02-18

    A genome-wide transcriptional analysis of Alteromonas naphthalenivorans SN2 was performed to investigate its ecophysiological behavior in contaminated tidal flats and seawater. The experimental design mimicked these habitats that either added naphthalene or pyruvate; tidal flat-naphthalene (TF-N), tidal flat-pyruvate (TF-P), seawater-naphthalene (SW-N), and seawater-pyruvate (SW-P). The transcriptional profiles clustered by habitat (TF-N/TF-P and SW-N/SW-P), rather than carbon source, suggesting that the former may exert a greater influence on genome-wide expression in strain SN2 than the latter. Metabolic mapping of cDNA reads from strain SN2 based on KEGG pathway showed that metabolic and regulatory genes associated with energy metabolism, translation, and cell motility were highly expressed in all four test conditions, probably highlighting the copiotrophic properties of strain SN2 as an opportunistic marine r-strategist. Differential gene expression analysis revealed that strain SN2 displayed specific cellular responses to environmental variables (tidal flat, seawater, naphthalene, and pyruvate) and exhibited certain ecological fitness traits -- its notable PAH degradation capability in seasonally cold tidal flat might be reflected in elevated expression of stress response and chaperone proteins, while fast growth in nitrogen-deficient and aerobic seawater probably correlated with high expression of glutamine synthetase, enzymes utilizing nitrite/nitrate, and those involved in the removal of reactive oxygen species.

  15. Nitrogen fixation and molecular oxygen: comparative genomic reconstruction of transcription regulation in Alphaproteobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V Tsoy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Biological nitrogen fixation plays a crucial role in the nitrogen cycle. An ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen, reducing it to ammonium, was described for multiple species of Bacteria and Archaea. Being a complex and sensitive process, nitrogen fixation requires a complicated regulatory system, also, on the level of transcription. The transcriptional regulatory network for nitrogen fixation was extensively studied in several representatives of the class Alphaproteobacteria. This regulatory network includes the activator of nitrogen fixation NifA, working in tandem with the alternative sigma-factor RpoN as well as oxygen-responsive regulatory systems, one-component regulators FnrN/FixK and two-component system FixLJ. Here we used a comparative genomics analysis for in silico study of the transcriptional regulatory network in 50 genomes of Alphaproteobacteria. We extended the known regulons and proposed the scenario for the evolution of the nitrogen fixation transcriptional network. The reconstructed network substantially expands the existing knowledge of transcriptional regulation in nitrogen-fixing microorganisms and can be used for genetic experiments, metabolic reconstruction, and evolutionary analysis.

  16. Modifiers of notch transcriptional activity identified by genome-wide RNAi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firnhaber Christopher B

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Notch signaling pathway regulates a diverse array of developmental processes, and aberrant Notch signaling can lead to diseases, including cancer. To obtain a more comprehensive understanding of the genetic network that integrates into Notch signaling, we performed a genome-wide RNAi screen in Drosophila cell culture to identify genes that modify Notch-dependent transcription. Results Employing complementary data analyses, we found 399 putative modifiers: 189 promoting and 210 antagonizing Notch activated transcription. These modifiers included several known Notch interactors, validating the robustness of the assay. Many novel modifiers were also identified, covering a range of cellular localizations from the extracellular matrix to the nucleus, as well as a large number of proteins with unknown function. Chromatin-modifying proteins represent a major class of genes identified, including histone deacetylase and demethylase complex components and other chromatin modifying, remodeling and replacement factors. A protein-protein interaction map of the Notch-dependent transcription modifiers revealed that a large number of the identified proteins interact physically with these core chromatin components. Conclusions The genome-wide RNAi screen identified many genes that can modulate Notch transcriptional output. A protein interaction map of the identified genes highlighted a network of chromatin-modifying enzymes and remodelers that regulate Notch transcription. Our results open new avenues to explore the mechanisms of Notch signal regulation and the integration of this pathway into diverse cellular processes.

  17. Genome-Wide Transcriptional and Physiological Responses of Bradyrhizobium japonicum to Paraquat-Mediated Oxidative Stress▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Andrew J.; Jeon, Jeong-Min; Sangurdekar, Dipen; So, Jae-Seong; Chang, Woo-Suk

    2011-01-01

    The rhizobial bacterium Bradyrhizobium japonicum functions as a nitrogen-fixing symbiont of the soybean plant (Glycine max). Plants are capable of producing an oxidative burst, a rapid proliferation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as a defense mechanism against pathogenic and symbiotic bacteria. Therefore, B. japonicum must be able to resist such a defense mechanism to initiate nodulation. In this study, paraquat, a known superoxide radical-inducing agent, was used to investigate this response. Genome-wide transcriptional profiles were created for both prolonged exposure (PE) and fulminant shock (FS) conditions. These profiles revealed that 190 and 86 genes were up- and downregulated for the former condition, and that 299 and 105 genes were up- and downregulated for the latter condition, respectively (>2.0-fold; P < 0.05). Many genes within putative operons for F0F1-ATP synthase, chemotaxis, transport, and ribosomal proteins were upregulated during PE. The transcriptional profile for the FS condition strangely resembled that of a bacteroid condition, including the FixK2 transcription factor and most of its response elements. However, genes encoding canonical ROS scavenging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase and catalase, were not detected, suggesting constitutive expression of those genes by endogenous ROS. Various physiological tests, including exopolysaccharide (EPS), cellular protein, and motility characterization, were performed to corroborate the gene expression data. The results suggest that B. japonicum responds to tolerable oxidative stress during PE through enhanced motility, increased translational activity, and EPS production, in addition to the expression of genes involved in global stress responses, such as chaperones and sigma factors. PMID:21498770

  18. Genome-wide transcriptional response of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with an altered redox metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro, Christoffer; Regenberg, Birgitte; Nielsen, Jens

    2004-01-01

    The genome-wide transcriptional response of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain deleted in GDH1 that encodes a NADP(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase was compared to a wild-type strain under anaerobic steady-state conditions. The GDH1-deleted strain has a significantly reduced NADPH requirement...... the only one with a direct link to redox metabolism was GND1, encoding phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. To extract additional information we analyzed the transcription data for a gene subset consisting of all known genes encoding metabolic enzymes that use NAD(+) or NADP(+). The subset was analyzed...

  19. Comparative transcriptional profiling of Bacillus cereus sensu lato strains during growth in CO2-bicarbonate and aerobic atmospheres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla D Passalacqua

    Full Text Available Bacillus species are spore-forming bacteria that are ubiquitous in the environment and display a range of virulent and avirulent phenotypes. This range is particularly evident in the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group; where closely related strains cause anthrax, food-borne illnesses, and pneumonia, but can also be non-pathogenic. Although much of this phenotypic range can be attributed to the presence or absence of a few key virulence factors, there are other virulence-associated loci that are conserved throughout the B. cereus group, and we hypothesized that these genes may be regulated differently in pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains.Here we report transcriptional profiles of three closely related but phenotypically unique members of the Bacillus cereus group--a pneumonia-causing B. cereus strain (G9241, an attenuated strain of B. anthracis (Sterne 34F(2, and an avirulent B. cereus strain (10987--during exponential growth in two distinct atmospheric environments: 14% CO(2/bicarbonate and ambient air. We show that the disease-causing Bacillus strains undergo more distinctive transcriptional changes between the two environments, and that the expression of plasmid-encoded virulence genes was increased exclusively in the CO(2 environment. We observed a core of conserved metabolic genes that were differentially expressed in all three strains in both conditions. Additionally, the expression profiles of putative virulence genes in G9241 suggest that this strain, unlike Bacillus anthracis, may regulate gene expression with both PlcR and AtxA transcriptional regulators, each acting in a different environment.We have shown that homologous and even identical genes within the genomes of three closely related members of the B. cereus sensu lato group are in some instances regulated very differently, and that these differences can have important implications for virulence. This study provides insights into the evolution of the B. cereus group, and

  20. Comparative Analysis of Transcriptional Profiles of Adult Schistosoma japonicum from Different Laboratory Animals and the Natural Host, Water Buffalo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuai; Zhou, Xiaosu; Piao, Xianyu; Wu, Chuang; Hou, Nan; Chen, Qijun

    2015-08-01

    Schistosomiasis is one of the most widely distributed parasitic diseases in the world. Schistosoma japonicum, a zoonotic parasite with a wide range of mammalian hosts, is one of the major pathogens of this disease. Although numerous studies on schistosomiasis japonica have been performed using laboratory animal models, systematic comparative analysis of whole-genome expression profiles in parasites from different laboratory animals and nature mammalian hosts is lacking to date. Adult schistosomes were obtained from laboratory animals BALB/c mice, C57BL/6 mice, New Zealand white rabbits and the natural host, water buffaloes. The gene expression profiles of schistosomes from these animals were obtained and compared by genome-wide oligonucleotide microarray analysis. The results revealed that the gene expression profiles of schistosomes from different laboratory animals and buffaloes were highly consistent (r>0.98) genome-wide. Meanwhile, a total of 450 genes were identified to be differentially expressed in schistosomes which can be clustered into six groups. Pathway analysis revealed that these genes were mainly involved in multiple signal transduction pathways, amino acid, energy, nucleotide and lipid metabolism. We also identified a group of 1,540 abundantly and stably expressed gene products in adult worms, including a panel of 179 Schistosoma- or Platyhelminthes-specific genes that may be essential for parasitism and may be regarded as novel potential anti-parasite intervention targets for future research. This study provides a comprehensive database of gene expression profiles of schistosomes derived from different laboratory animals and water buffaloes. An expanded number of genes potentially affecting the development of schistosomes in different animals were identified. These findings lay the foundation for schistosomiasis research in different laboratory animals and natural hosts at the transcriptional level and provide a valuable resource for screening anti

  1. 3' tag digital gene expression profiling of human brain and universal reference RNA using Illumina Genome Analyzer

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    Poland Gregory A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Massive parallel sequencing has the potential to replace microarrays as the method for transcriptome profiling. Currently there are two protocols: full-length RNA sequencing (RNA-SEQ and 3'-tag digital gene expression (DGE. In this preliminary effort, we evaluated the 3' DGE approach using two reference RNA samples from the MicroArray Quality Control Consortium (MAQC. Results Using Brain RNA sample from multiple runs, we demonstrated that the transcript profiles from 3' DGE were highly reproducible between technical and biological replicates from libraries constructed by the same lab and even by different labs, and between two generations of Illumina's Genome Analyzers. Approximately 65% of all sequence reads mapped to mitochondrial genes, ribosomal RNAs, and canonical transcripts. The expression profiles of brain RNA and universal human reference RNA were compared which demonstrated that DGE was also highly quantitative with excellent correlation of differential expression with quantitative real-time PCR. Furthermore, one lane of 3' DGE sequencing, using the current sequencing chemistry and image processing software, had wider dynamic range for transcriptome profiling and was able to detect lower expressed genes which are normally below the detection threshold of microarrays. Conclusion 3' tag DGE profiling with massive parallel sequencing achieved high sensitivity and reproducibility for transcriptome profiling. Although it lacks the ability of detecting alternative splicing events compared to RNA-SEQ, it is much more affordable and clearly out-performed microarrays (Affymetrix in detecting lower abundant transcripts.

  2. Transcriptional Slippage and RNA Editing Increase the Diversity of Transcripts in Chloroplasts: Insight from Deep Sequencing of Vigna radiata Genome and Transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Ping Lin

    Full Text Available We performed deep sequencing of the nuclear and organellar genomes of three mungbean genotypes: Vigna radiata ssp. sublobata TC1966, V. radiata var. radiata NM92 and the recombinant inbred line RIL59 derived from a cross between TC1966 and NM92. Moreover, we performed deep sequencing of the RIL59 transcriptome to investigate transcript variability. The mungbean chloroplast genome has a quadripartite structure including a pair of inverted repeats separated by two single copy regions. A total of 213 simple sequence repeats were identified in the chloroplast genomes of NM92 and RIL59; 78 single nucleotide variants and nine indels were discovered in comparing the chloroplast genomes of TC1966 and NM92. Analysis of the mungbean chloroplast transcriptome revealed mRNAs that were affected by transcriptional slippage and RNA editing. Transcriptional slippage frequency was positively correlated with the length of simple sequence repeats of the mungbean chloroplast genome (R2=0.9911. In total, 41 C-to-U editing sites were found in 23 chloroplast genes and in one intergenic spacer. No editing site that swapped U to C was found. A combination of bioinformatics and experimental methods revealed that the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase-transcribed genes psbF and ndhA are affected by transcriptional slippage in mungbean and in main lineages of land plants, including three dicots (Glycine max, Brassica rapa, and Nicotiana tabacum, two monocots (Oryza sativa and Zea mays, two gymnosperms (Pinus taeda and Ginkgo biloba and one moss (Physcomitrella patens. Transcript analysis of the rps2 gene showed that transcriptional slippage could affect transcripts at single sequence repeat regions with poly-A runs. It showed that transcriptional slippage together with incomplete RNA editing may cause sequence diversity of transcripts in chloroplasts of land plants.

  3. Genome-Wide Epigenetic Regulation of Gene Transcription in Maize Seeds.

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    Xiaoduo Lu

    Full Text Available Epigenetic regulation is well recognized for its importance in gene expression in organisms. DNA methylation, an important epigenetic mark, has received enormous attention in recent years as it's a key player in many biological processes. It remains unclear how DNA methylation contributes to gene transcription regulation in maize seeds. Here, we take advantage of recent technologies to examine the genome-wide association of DNA methylation with transcription of four types of DNA sequences, including protein-coding genes, pseudogenes, transposable elements, and repeats in maize embryo and endosperm, respectively.The methylation in CG, CHG and CHH contexts plays different roles in the control of gene expression. Methylation around the transcription start sites and transcription stop regions of protein-coding genes is negatively correlated, but in gene bodies positively correlated, to gene expression level. The upstream regions of protein-coding genes are enriched with 24-nt siRNAs and contain high levels of CHH methylation, which is correlated to gene expression level. The analysis of sequence content within CG, CHG, or CHH contexts reveals that only CHH methylation is affected by its local sequences, which is different from Arabidopsis.In summary, we conclude that methylation-regulated transcription varies with the types of DNA sequences, sequence contexts or parts of a specific gene in maize seeds and differs from that in other plant species. Our study helps people better understand from a genome-wide viewpoint that how transcriptional expression is controlled by DNA methylation, one of the important factors influencing transcription, and how the methylation is associated with small RNAs.

  4. Genome-Wide Epigenetic Regulation of Gene Transcription in Maize Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Zhenguang; Guo, Wenzhu; Chen, Rumei; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Jun; Lang, Zhihong; Fan, Yunliu; Zhao, Jiuran; Zhang, Chunyi

    2015-01-01

    Background Epigenetic regulation is well recognized for its importance in gene expression in organisms. DNA methylation, an important epigenetic mark, has received enormous attention in recent years as it’s a key player in many biological processes. It remains unclear how DNA methylation contributes to gene transcription regulation in maize seeds. Here, we take advantage of recent technologies to examine the genome-wide association of DNA methylation with transcription of four types of DNA sequences, including protein-coding genes, pseudogenes, transposable elements, and repeats in maize embryo and endosperm, respectively. Results The methylation in CG, CHG and CHH contexts plays different roles in the control of gene expression. Methylation around the transcription start sites and transcription stop regions of protein-coding genes is negatively correlated, but in gene bodies positively correlated, to gene expression level. The upstream regions of protein-coding genes are enriched with 24-nt siRNAs and contain high levels of CHH methylation, which is correlated to gene expression level. The analysis of sequence content within CG, CHG, or CHH contexts reveals that only CHH methylation is affected by its local sequences, which is different from Arabidopsis. Conclusions In summary, we conclude that methylation-regulated transcription varies with the types of DNA sequences, sequence contexts or parts of a specific gene in maize seeds and differs from that in other plant species. Our study helps people better understand from a genome-wide viewpoint that how transcriptional expression is controlled by DNA methylation, one of the important factors influencing transcription, and how the methylation is associated with small RNAs. PMID:26469520

  5. Genome-wide transcriptional response of the archaeon Thermococcus gammatolerans to cadmium.

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    Arnaud Lagorce

    Full Text Available Thermococcus gammatolerans, the most radioresistant archaeon known to date, is an anaerobic and hyperthermophilic sulfur-reducing organism living in deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Knowledge of mechanisms underlying archaeal metal tolerance in such metal-rich ecosystem is still poorly documented. We showed that T. gammatolerans exhibits high resistance to cadmium (Cd, cobalt (Co and zinc (Zn, a weaker tolerance to nickel (Ni, copper (Cu and arsenate (AsO(4 and that cells exposed to 1 mM Cd exhibit a cellular Cd concentration of 67 µM. A time-dependent transcriptomic analysis using microarrays was performed at a non-toxic (100 µM and a toxic (1 mM Cd dose. The reliability of microarray data was strengthened by real time RT-PCR validations. Altogether, 114 Cd responsive genes were revealed and a substantial subset of genes is related to metal homeostasis, drug detoxification, re-oxidization of cofactors and ATP production. This first genome-wide expression profiling study of archaeal cells challenged with Cd showed that T. gammatolerans withstands induced stress through pathways observed in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes but also through new and original strategies. T. gammatolerans cells challenged with 1 mM Cd basically promote: 1 the induction of several transporter/permease encoding genes, probably to detoxify the cell; 2 the upregulation of Fe transporters encoding genes to likely compensate Cd damages in iron-containing proteins; 3 the induction of membrane-bound hydrogenase (Mbh and membrane-bound hydrogenlyase (Mhy2 subunits encoding genes involved in recycling reduced cofactors and/or in proton translocation for energy production. By contrast to other organisms, redox homeostasis genes appear constitutively expressed and only a few genes encoding DNA repair proteins are regulated. We compared the expression of 27 Cd responsive genes in other stress conditions (Zn, Ni, heat shock, γ-rays, and showed that the Cd transcriptional pattern is

  6. Genome-wide analysis of Dof family transcription factors and their responses to abiotic stresses in Chinese cabbage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Li, Meng-Yao; Wang, Feng; Tang, Jun; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2015-01-31

    Chinese cabbage is an important leaf vegetable that experienced long-term cultivation and artificial selection. Dof (DNA-binding One Zinc Finger) transcription factors, with a highly conserved Dof domain, are members of a major plant-specific transcription factor family that play important roles in many plant biological processes. The Dof family transcription factors, one of the most important families of transcriptional regulators in higher plants, are involved in massive aspects of plant growth, development, and response to abiotic stresses. Our study will supply resources for understanding how Dof transcription factors respond to abiotic stress and the interaction network of these genes in tolerance mechanism. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of Dof family factors in Chinese cabbage. In total, 76 genes encoding BraDof family transcription factor were identified from Chinese cabbage, and those BraDof factors were divided into nine classes. Fifteen motifs were found based on Dof amino acid sequence alignments. Chromosome locations and gene duplications of BraDof family genes were also analyzed. Ten duplicate events of BraDof genes were discovered in Chinese cabbage chromosomes. The uneven distribution of BraDof genes in Brassica chromosomes may cause the expansion of BraDof genes. In the Dof family, 37 and 7 orthologous genes were identified between Chinese cabbage and Arabidopsis and between Chinese cabbage and Oryza sativa, respectively. The interaction networks of Dof factors in Chinese cabbage were also constructed. Expression profiles of nine selected genes from different nine classes subjected to four abiotic stresses (cold, heat, salt and drought) were further investigated by quantitative real-time PCR to obtain a better understanding of the functions and regulation mechanisms of BraDof family transcription factors in two Chinese cabbage varieties, 'Lubaisanhao' and 'Qingdao 87-114'. Dof-family transcription factors were analyzed in

  7. Clinical implication of genome-wide profiling in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and other subtypes of B-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iqbal, Javeed; Joshi, Shantaram; Patel, Kavita N

    2007-01-01

    of Lymphoid Neoplasms (REAL) and World Health Organization (WHO) classifications. These classification methods were based on histological, immunophenotypic and cytogenetic markers and widely accepted by pathologists and oncologists worldwide. During last several decades, great progress has been made...... technology. The genome-wide transcriptional measurement, also called gene expression profile (GEP) can accurately define the biological phenotype of the tumor. In this review, important discoveries made by genome-wide GEP in understanding the biology of lymphoma and additionally the diagnostic and prognostic...

  8. Hippocampal CA1 transcriptional profile of sleep deprivation: relation to aging and stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada M Porter

    Full Text Available Many aging changes seem similar to those elicited by sleep-deprivation and psychosocial stress. Further, sleep architecture changes with age suggest an age-related loss of sleep. Here, we hypothesized that sleep deprivation in young subjects would elicit both stress and aging-like transcriptional responses.F344 rats were divided into control and sleep deprivation groups. Body weight, adrenal weight, corticosterone level and hippocampal CA1 transcriptional profiles were measured. A second group of animals was exposed to novel environment stress (NES, and their hippocampal transcriptional profiles measured. A third cohort exposed to control or SD was used to validate transcriptional results with Western blots. Microarray results were statistically contrasted with prior transcriptional studies. Microarray results pointed to sleep pressure signaling and macromolecular synthesis disruptions in the hippocampal CA1 region. Animals exposed to NES recapitulated nearly one third of the SD transcriptional profile. However, the SD-aging relationship was more complex. Compared to aging, SD profiles influenced a significant subset of genes. mRNA associated with neurogenesis and energy pathways showed agreement between aging and SD, while immune, glial, and macromolecular synthesis pathways showed SD profiles that opposed those seen in aging.We conclude that although NES and SD exert similar transcriptional changes, selective presynaptic release machinery and Homer1 expression changes are seen in SD. Among other changes, the marked decrease in Homer1 expression with age may represent an important divergence between young and aged brain response to SD. Based on this, it seems reasonable to conclude that therapeutic strategies designed to promote sleep in young subjects may have off-target effects in the aged. Finally, this work identifies presynaptic vesicular release and intercellular adhesion molecular signatures as novel therapeutic targets to counter

  9. Genome-wide analysis of the DNA-binding with one zinc finger (Dof) transcription factor family in bananas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chen; Hu, Huigang; Xie, Jianghui

    2016-12-01

    DNA-binding with one finger (Dof) domain proteins are a multigene family of plant-specific transcription factors involved in numerous aspects of plant growth and development. In this study, we report a genome-wide search for Musa acuminata Dof (MaDof) genes and their expression profiles at different developmental stages and in response to various abiotic stresses. In addition, a complete overview of the Dof gene family in bananas is presented, including the gene structures, chromosomal locations, cis-regulatory elements, conserved protein domains, and phylogenetic inferences. Based on the genome-wide analysis, we identified 74 full-length protein-coding MaDof genes unevenly distributed on 11 chromosomes. Phylogenetic analysis with Dof members from diverse plant species showed that MaDof genes can be classified into four subgroups (StDof I, II, III, and IV). The detailed genomic information of the MaDof gene homologs in the present study provides opportunities for functional analyses to unravel the exact role of the genes in plant growth and development.

  10. Genomic and transcriptomic characterization of the transcription factor family R2R3-MYB in soybean and its involvement in the resistance responses to Phakopsora pachyrhizi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Luciano N; Lopes-Caitar, Valéria S; de Carvalho, Mayra C C G; Darben, Luana M; Polizel-Podanosqui, Adriana; Kuwahara, Marcia K; Nepomuceno, Alexandre L; Abdelnoor, Ricardo V; Marcelino-Guimarães, Francismar C

    2014-12-01

    Myb genes constitute one of the largest transcription factor families in the plant kingdom. Soybean MYB transcription factors have been related to the plant response to biotic stresses. Their involvement in response to Phakopsora pachyrhizi infection has been reported by several transcriptional studies. Due to their apparently highly diverse functions, these genes are promising targets for developing crop varieties resistant to diseases. In the present study, the identification and phylogenetic analysis of the soybean R2R3-MYB (GmMYB) transcription factor family was performed and the expression profiles of these genes under biotic stress were determined. GmMYBs were identified from the soybean genome using bioinformatic tools, and their putative functions were determined based on the phylogenetic tree and classified into subfamilies using guides AtMYBs describing known functions. The transcriptional profiles of GmMYBs upon infection with different pathogen were revealed by in vivo and in silico analyses. Selected target genes potentially involved in disease responses were assessed by RT-qPCR after different times of inoculation with P. pachyrhizi using different genetic backgrounds related to resistance genes (Rpp2 and Rpp5). R2R3-MYB transcription factors related to lignin synthesis and genes responsive to chitin were significantly induced in the resistant genotypes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Transcript profiling of transcription factor genes during silique development in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folter, S. de; Busscher, J.; Colombo, L.; Losa, A.; Angenent, G.C.

    2004-01-01

    Flower development is a key process for all angiosperms and is essential for sexual reproduction. The last phase in flower development is fertilization of the ovules and formation of the fruits, which are both biologically and economically of importance. Here, we report the expression profiles of

  12. Control of VEGF-A transcriptional programs by pausing and genomic compartmentalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaikkonen, Minna U; Niskanen, Henri; Romanoski, Casey E; Kansanen, Emilia; Kivelä, Annukka M; Laitalainen, Jarkko; Heinz, Sven; Benner, Christopher; Glass, Christopher K; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2014-11-10

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is a master regulator of angiogenesis, vascular development and function. In this study we investigated the transcriptional regulation of VEGF-A-responsive genes in primary human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) using genome-wide global run-on sequencing (GRO-Seq). We demonstrate that half of VEGF-A-regulated gene promoters are characterized by a transcriptionally competent paused RNA polymerase II (Pol II). We show that transition into productive elongation is a major mechanism of gene activation of virtually all VEGF-regulated genes, whereas only ∼40% of the genes are induced at the level of initiation. In addition, we report a comprehensive chromatin interaction map generated in HUVECs using tethered conformation capture (TCC) and characterize chromatin interactions in relation to transcriptional activity. We demonstrate that sites of active transcription are more likely to engage in chromatin looping and cell type-specific transcriptional activity reflects the boundaries of chromatin interactions. Furthermore, we identify large chromatin compartments with a tendency to be coordinately transcribed upon VEGF-A stimulation. We provide evidence that these compartments are enriched for clusters of regulatory regions such as super-enhancers and for disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Collectively, these findings provide new insights into mechanisms behind VEGF-A-regulated transcriptional programs in endothelial cells. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Isolation of genomic DNA encoding transcription factor TFIID from Acanthamoeba castellanii: characterization of the promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, J M; Liu, F; Bateman, E

    1992-01-01

    We have isolated a genomic clone encoding Acanthamoeba castellanii TFIID. The clone contains the entire TFIID gene, 300 bp of 5' promoter sequences and several hundred base pairs of 3' non-coding sequence. The coding region is interrupted by two short introns, but is otherwise identical to Acanthamoeba TFIID cDNA. Comparisons between forty four Acanthamoeba intron 5' and 3' boundaries suggest a 5' splice site consensus of GTACG(T/C) and a 3' consensus of CAG. We determined the position of the transcription initiation site used in vivo, and show that the same site is used in vitro by homologous nuclear extracts. Deletion analysis of the promoter region shows that the minimal promoter required for efficient expression in vitro is located between -97 and +4 relative to the transcription start site. Three regions within the promoter are important for transcription in vitro; sequences between -97 and -35, the TATAAA box and the initiation region. The initiation region is dispensable but appears to position the transcription start site relative to the TATAAA box. The TATAAA box is absolutely required for transcription initiation whereas the upstream region stimulates transcription approximately five-fold. Images PMID:1408796

  14. Chromosome scale genome assembly and transcriptome profiling of Nannochloropsis gaditana in nitrogen depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corteggiani Carpinelli, Elisa; Telatin, Andrea; Vitulo, Nicola; Forcato, Claudio; D'Angelo, Michela; Schiavon, Riccardo; Vezzi, Alessandro; Giacometti, Giorgio Mario; Morosinotto, Tomas; Valle, Giorgio

    2014-02-01

    Nannochloropsis is rapidly emerging as a model organism for the study of biofuel production in microalgae. Here, we report a high-quality genomic assembly of Nannochloropsis gaditana, consisting of large contigs, up to 500 kbp long, and scaffolds that in most cases span the entire length of the chromosomes. We identified 10646 complete genes and characterized possible alternative transcripts. The annotation of the predicted genes and the analysis of cellular processes revealed traits relevant for the genetic improvement of this organism such as genes involved in DNA recombination, RNA silencing, and cell wall synthesis. We also analyzed the modification of the transcriptional profile in nitrogen deficiency-a condition known to stimulate lipid accumulation. While the content of lipids increased, we did not detect major changes in expression of the genes involved in their biosynthesis. At the same time, we observed a very significant down-regulation of mitochondrial gene expression, suggesting that part of the Acetyl-CoA and NAD(P)H, normally oxidized through the mitochondrial respiration, would be made available for fatty acids synthesis, increasing the flux through the lipid biosynthetic pathway. Finally, we released an information resource of the genomic data of N. gaditana, available online at www.nannochloropsis.org.

  15. Genome-Wide Dynamics of Nascent Noncoding RNA Transcription in Porcine Heart After Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaikkonen, Minna U; Halonen, Paavo; Liu, Oscar Hsin-Fu; Turunen, Tiia A; Pajula, Juho; Moreau, Pierre; Selvarajan, Ilakya; Tuomainen, Tomi; Aavik, Einari; Tavi, Pasi; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2017-06-01

    Microarrays and RNA sequencing are widely used to profile transcriptome remodeling during myocardial ischemia. However, the steady-state RNA analysis lacks in sensitivity to detect all noncoding RNA species and does not provide separation between transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations. Here, we provide the first comprehensive analysis of nascent RNA profiles of mRNAs, primary micro-RNAs, long noncoding RNAs, and enhancer RNAs in a large animal model of acute infarction. Acute infarction was induced by cardiac catheterization of domestic swine. Nuclei isolated from healthy, border zone, and ischemic regions of the affected heart were subjected to global run-on sequencing. Global run-on sequencing analysis indicated that half of affected genes are regulated at the level of transcriptional pausing. A gradient of induction of inflammatory mediators and repression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling and oxidative phosphorylation was detected when moving from healthy toward infarcted area. In addition, we interrogated the transcriptional regulation of primary micro-RNAs and provide evidence that several arrhythmia-related target genes exhibit repression at post-transcriptional level. We identified 450 long noncoding RNAs differently regulated by ischemia, including novel conserved long noncoding RNAs expressed in antisense orientation to myocardial transcription factors GATA-binding protein 4, GATA-binding protein 6, and Krüppel-like factor 6. Finally, characterization of enhancers exhibiting differential expression of enhancer RNAs pointed a central role for Krüppel-like factor, MEF2C, ETS, NFY, ATF, E2F2, and NRF1 transcription factors in determining transcriptional responses to ischemia. Global run-on sequencing allowed us to follow the gradient of gene expression occurring in the ischemic heart and identify novel noncoding RNAs regulated by oxygen deprivation. These findings highlight potential new targets for diagnosis and

  16. Transcription profile of aging and cognition-related genes in the medial prefrontal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara eIanov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive function depends on transcription; however, there is little information linking altered gene expression to impaired prefrontal cortex function during aging. Young and aged F344 rats were characterized on attentional set shift and spatial memory tasks. Transcriptional differences associated with age and cognition were examined using RNA sequencing to construct transcriptomic profiles for the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC, white matter, and region CA1 of the hippocampus. The results indicate regional differences in vulnerability to aging. Age-related gene expression in the mPFC was similar to, though less robust than, that in the dorsolateral PFC of aging humans suggesting that aging processes may be similar. Importantly, the pattern of transcription associated with aging did not predict cognitive decline. Rather, increased mPFC expression of genes involved in regulation of transcription, including transcription factors that regulate the strength of excitatory and inhibitory inputs, and neural activity-related immediate-early genes was observed in aged animals that exhibit delayed set shift behavior. The specificity of impairment on a mPFC-dependent task, associated with a particular mPFC transcriptional profile indicates that impaired executive function involves altered transcriptional regulation and neural activity/plasticity processes that are distinct from that described for impaired hippocampal function.

  17. Transcriptional Profiling of the Immune Response to Marburg Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, John H; Yen, Judy; Caballero, Ignacio S; Garamszegi, Sara; Malhotra, Shikha; Lin, Kenny; Hensley, Lisa; Goff, Arthur J

    2015-10-01

    Marburg virus is a genetically simple RNA virus that causes a severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. The mechanism of pathogenesis of the infection is not well understood, but it is well accepted that pathogenesis is appreciably driven by a hyperactive immune response. To better understand the overall response to Marburg virus challenge, we undertook a transcriptomic analysis of immune cells circulating in the blood following aerosol exposure of rhesus macaques to a lethal dose of Marburg virus. Using two-color microarrays, we analyzed the transcriptomes of peripheral blood mononuclear cells that were collected throughout the course of infection from 1 to 9 days postexposure, representing the full course of the infection. The response followed a 3-stage induction (early infection, 1 to 3 days postexposure; midinfection, 5 days postexposure; late infection, 7 to 9 days postexposure) that was led by a robust innate immune response. The host response to aerosolized Marburg virus was evident at 1 day postexposure. Analysis of cytokine transcripts that were overexpressed during infection indicated that previously unanalyzed cytokines are likely induced in response to exposure to Marburg virus and further suggested that the early immune response is skewed toward a Th2 response that would hamper the development of an effective antiviral immune response early in disease. Late infection events included the upregulation of coagulation-associated factors. These findings demonstrate very early host responses to Marburg virus infection and provide a rich data set for identification of factors expressed throughout the course of infection that can be investigated as markers of infection and targets for therapy. Marburg virus causes a severe infection that is associated with high mortality and hemorrhage. The disease is associated with an immune response that contributes to the lethality of the disease. In this study, we investigated how the immune cells

  18. Production and processing of siRNA precursor transcripts from the highly repetitive maize genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Hale

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Mutations affecting the maintenance of heritable epigenetic states in maize identify multiple RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM factors including RMR1, a novel member of a plant-specific clade of Snf2-related proteins. Here we show that RMR1 is necessary for the accumulation of a majority of 24 nt small RNAs, including those derived from Long-Terminal Repeat (LTR retrotransposons, the most common repetitive feature in the maize genome. A genetic analysis of DNA transposon repression indicates that RMR1 acts upstream of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, RDR2 (MOP1. Surprisingly, we show that non-polyadenylated transcripts from a sampling of LTR retrotransposons are lost in both rmr1 and rdr2 mutants. In contrast, plants deficient for RNA Polymerase IV (Pol IV function show an increase in polyadenylated LTR RNA transcripts. These findings support a model in which Pol IV functions independently of the small RNA accumulation facilitated by RMR1 and RDR2 and support that a loss of Pol IV leads to RNA Polymerase II-based transcription. Additionally, the lack of changes in general genome homeostasis in rmr1 mutants, despite the global loss of 24 nt small RNAs, challenges the perceived roles of siRNAs in maintaining functional heterochromatin in the genomes of outcrossing grass species.

  19. Genome-wide analysis of the Dof transcription factor gene family reveals soybean-specific duplicable and functional characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Guo

    Full Text Available The Dof domain protein family is a classic plant-specific zinc-finger transcription factor family involved in a variety of biological processes. There is great diversity in the number of Dof genes in different plants. However, there are only very limited reports on the characterization of Dof transcription factors in soybean (Glycine max. In the present study, 78 putative Dof genes were identified from the whole-genome sequence of soybean. The predicted GmDof genes were non-randomly distributed within and across 19 out of 20 chromosomes and 97.4% (38 pairs were preferentially retained duplicate paralogous genes located in duplicated regions of the genome. Soybean-specific segmental duplications contributed significantly to the expansion of the soybean Dof gene family. These Dof proteins were phylogenetically clustered into nine distinct subgroups among which the gene structure and motif compositions were considerably conserved. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of these Dof proteins revealed four major groups, similar to those reported for Arabidopsis and rice. Most of the GmDofs showed specific expression patterns based on RNA-seq data analyses. The expression patterns of some duplicate genes were partially redundant while others showed functional diversity, suggesting the occurrence of sub-functionalization during subsequent evolution. Comprehensive expression profile analysis also provided insights into the soybean-specific functional divergence among members of the Dof gene family. Cis-regulatory element analysis of these GmDof genes suggested diverse functions associated with different processes. Taken together, our results provide useful information for the functional characterization of soybean Dof genes by combining phylogenetic analysis with global gene-expression profiling.

  20. Genome-wide analysis of the Dof transcription factor gene family reveals soybean-specific duplicable and functional characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yong; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2013-01-01

    The Dof domain protein family is a classic plant-specific zinc-finger transcription factor family involved in a variety of biological processes. There is great diversity in the number of Dof genes in different plants. However, there are only very limited reports on the characterization of Dof transcription factors in soybean (Glycine max). In the present study, 78 putative Dof genes were identified from the whole-genome sequence of soybean. The predicted GmDof genes were non-randomly distributed within and across 19 out of 20 chromosomes and 97.4% (38 pairs) were preferentially retained duplicate paralogous genes located in duplicated regions of the genome. Soybean-specific segmental duplications contributed significantly to the expansion of the soybean Dof gene family. These Dof proteins were phylogenetically clustered into nine distinct subgroups among which the gene structure and motif compositions were considerably conserved. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of these Dof proteins revealed four major groups, similar to those reported for Arabidopsis and rice. Most of the GmDofs showed specific expression patterns based on RNA-seq data analyses. The expression patterns of some duplicate genes were partially redundant while others showed functional diversity, suggesting the occurrence of sub-functionalization during subsequent evolution. Comprehensive expression profile analysis also provided insights into the soybean-specific functional divergence among members of the Dof gene family. Cis-regulatory element analysis of these GmDof genes suggested diverse functions associated with different processes. Taken together, our results provide useful information for the functional characterization of soybean Dof genes by combining phylogenetic analysis with global gene-expression profiling.

  1. Lingering Questions about Enhancer RNA and Enhancer Transcription-Coupled Genomic Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Gerson; Basu, Uttiya

    2017-01-01

    Intergenic and intragenic enhancers found inside topologically associated regulatory domains (TADs) express noncoding RNAs, known as enhancer RNAs (eRNAs). Recent studies have indicated these eRNAs play a role in gene regulatory networks by controlling promoter and enhancer interactions and topology of higher-order chromatin structure. Misregulation of enhancer and promoter associated noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) could stabilize deleterious secondary DNA structures, noncoding RNA associated DNA/RNA hybrid formation, and promote collisions of transcription complexes with replisomes. It is revealing that many chromosomal aberrations, some associated with malignancies, are present inside enhancer and/or promoter sequences. Here, we expand on current concepts to discuss enhancer RNAs and enhancer transcription, and how enhancer transcription influences genomic organization and integrity. PMID:28087167

  2. Lingering Questions about Enhancer RNA and Enhancer Transcription-Coupled Genomic Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Gerson; Basu, Uttiya

    2017-02-01

    Intergenic and intragenic enhancers found inside topologically associated regulatory domains (TADs) express noncoding RNAs, known as enhancer RNAs (eRNAs). Recent studies have indicated these eRNAs play a role in gene regulatory networks by controlling promoter and enhancer interactions and topology of higher-order chromatin structure. Misregulation of enhancer and promoter associated noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) could stabilize deleterious secondary DNA structures, noncoding RNA associated DNA/RNA hybrid formation, and promote collisions of transcription complexes with replisomes. It is revealing that many chromosomal aberrations, some associated with malignancies, are present inside enhancer and/or promoter sequences. Here, we expand on current concepts to discuss enhancer RNAs and enhancer transcription, and how enhancer transcription influences genomic organization and integrity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Transcriptional profiling reveals the expression of novel genes in response to various stimuli in the human dermatophyte Trichophyton rubrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aquino-Ferreira Roseli

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cutaneous mycoses are common human infections among healthy and immunocompromised hosts, and the anthropophilic fungus Trichophyton rubrum is the most prevalent microorganism isolated from such clinical cases worldwide. The aim of this study was to determine the transcriptional profile of T. rubrum exposed to various stimuli in order to obtain insights into the responses of this pathogen to different environmental challenges. Therefore, we generated an expressed sequence tag (EST collection by constructing one cDNA library and nine suppression subtractive hybridization libraries. Results The 1388 unigenes identified in this study were functionally classified based on the Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences (MIPS categories. The identified proteins were involved in transcriptional regulation, cellular defense and stress, protein degradation, signaling, transport, and secretion, among other functions. Analysis of these unigenes revealed 575 T. rubrum sequences that had not been previously deposited in public databases. Conclusion In this study, we identified novel T. rubrum genes that will be useful for ORF prediction in genome sequencing and facilitating functional genome analysis. Annotation of these expressed genes revealed metabolic adaptations of T. rubrum to carbon sources, ambient pH shifts, and various antifungal drugs used in medical practice. Furthermore, challenging T. rubrum with cytotoxic drugs and ambient pH shifts extended our understanding of the molecular events possibly involved in the infectious process and resistance to antifungal drugs.

  4. Predicting combinatorial binding of transcription factors to regulatory elements in the human genome by association rule mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyer Vishwanath R

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cis-acting transcriptional regulatory elements in mammalian genomes typically contain specific combinations of binding sites for various transcription factors. Although some cis-regulatory elements have been well studied, the combinations of transcription factors that regulate normal expression levels for the vast majority of the 20,000 genes in the human genome are unknown. We hypothesized that it should be possible to discover transcription factor combinations that regulate gene expression in concert by identifying over-represented combinations of sequence motifs that occur together in the genome. In order to detect combinations of transcription factor binding motifs, we developed a data mining approach based on the use of association rules, which are typically used in market basket analysis. We scored each segment of the genome for the presence or absence of each of 83 transcription factor binding motifs, then used association rule mining algorithms to mine this dataset, thus identifying frequently occurring pairs of distinct motifs within a segment. Results Support for most pairs of transcription factor binding motifs was highly correlated across different chromosomes although pair significance varied. Known true positive motif pairs showed higher association rule support, confidence, and significance than background. Our subsets of high-confidence, high-significance mined pairs of transcription factors showed enrichment for co-citation in PubMed abstracts relative to all pairs, and the predicted associations were often readily verifiable in the literature. Conclusion Functional elements in the genome where transcription factors bind to regulate expression in a combinatorial manner are more likely to be predicted by identifying statistically and biologically significant combinations of transcription factor binding motifs than by simply scanning the genome for the occurrence of binding sites for a single transcription

  5. A CRISPR/Cas9 Toolbox for Multiplexed Plant Genome Editing and Transcriptional Regulation1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowder, Levi G.; Zhang, Dengwei; Baltes, Nicholas J.; Paul, Joseph W.; Tang, Xu; Zheng, Xuelian; Voytas, Daniel F.; Hsieh, Tzung-Fu; Zhang, Yong; Qi, Yiping

    2015-01-01

    The relative ease, speed, and biological scope of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated Protein9 (Cas9)-based reagents for genomic manipulations are revolutionizing virtually all areas of molecular biosciences, including functional genomics, genetics, applied biomedical research, and agricultural biotechnology. In plant systems, however, a number of hurdles currently exist that limit this technology from reaching its full potential. For example, significant plant molecular biology expertise and effort is still required to generate functional expression constructs that allow simultaneous editing, and especially transcriptional regulation, of multiple different genomic loci or multiplexing, which is a significant advantage of CRISPR/Cas9 versus other genome-editing systems. To streamline and facilitate rapid and wide-scale use of CRISPR/Cas9-based technologies for plant research, we developed and implemented a comprehensive molecular toolbox for multifaceted CRISPR/Cas9 applications in plants. This toolbox provides researchers with a protocol and reagents to quickly and efficiently assemble functional CRISPR/Cas9 transfer DNA constructs for monocots and dicots using Golden Gate and Gateway cloning methods. It comes with a full suite of capabilities, including multiplexed gene editing and transcriptional activation or repression of plant endogenous genes. We report the functionality and effectiveness of this toolbox in model plants such as tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana), Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and rice (Oryza sativa), demonstrating its utility for basic and applied plant research. PMID:26297141

  6. Enhancement of single guide RNA transcription for efficient CRISPR/Cas-based genomic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ui-Tei, Kumiko; Maruyama, Shohei; Nakano, Yuko

    2017-06-01

    Genomic engineering using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) protein is a promising approach for targeting the genomic DNA of virtually any organism in a sequence-specific manner. Recent remarkable advances in CRISPR/Cas technology have made it a feasible system for use in therapeutic applications and biotechnology. In the CRISPR/Cas system, a guide RNA (gRNA), interacting with the Cas protein, recognizes a genomic region with sequence complementarity, and the double-stranded DNA at the target site is cleaved by the Cas protein. A widely used gRNA is an RNA polymerase III (pol III)-driven single gRNA (sgRNA), which is produced by artificial fusion of CRISPR RNA (crRNA) and trans-activation crRNA (tracrRNA). However, we identified a TTTT stretch, known as a termination signal of RNA pol III, in the scaffold region of the sgRNA. Here, we revealed that sgRNA carrying a TTTT stretch reduces the efficiency of sgRNA transcription due to premature transcriptional termination, and decreases the efficiency of genome editing. Unexpectedly, it was also shown that the premature terminated sgRNA may have an adverse effect of inducing RNA interference. Such disadvantageous effects were avoided by substituting one base in the TTTT stretch.

  7. A CRISPR/Cas9 Toolbox for Multiplexed Plant Genome Editing and Transcriptional Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowder, Levi G; Zhang, Dengwei; Baltes, Nicholas J; Paul, Joseph W; Tang, Xu; Zheng, Xuelian; Voytas, Daniel F; Hsieh, Tzung-Fu; Zhang, Yong; Qi, Yiping

    2015-10-01

    The relative ease, speed, and biological scope of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated Protein9 (Cas9)-based reagents for genomic manipulations are revolutionizing virtually all areas of molecular biosciences, including functional genomics, genetics, applied biomedical research, and agricultural biotechnology. In plant systems, however, a number of hurdles currently exist that limit this technology from reaching its full potential. For example, significant plant molecular biology expertise and effort is still required to generate functional expression constructs that allow simultaneous editing, and especially transcriptional regulation, of multiple different genomic loci or multiplexing, which is a significant advantage of CRISPR/Cas9 versus other genome-editing systems. To streamline and facilitate rapid and wide-scale use of CRISPR/Cas9-based technologies for plant research, we developed and implemented a comprehensive molecular toolbox for multifaceted CRISPR/Cas9 applications in plants. This toolbox provides researchers with a protocol and reagents to quickly and efficiently assemble functional CRISPR/Cas9 transfer DNA constructs for monocots and dicots using Golden Gate and Gateway cloning methods. It comes with a full suite of capabilities, including multiplexed gene editing and transcriptional activation or repression of plant endogenous genes. We report the functionality and effectiveness of this toolbox in model plants such as tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana), Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and rice (Oryza sativa), demonstrating its utility for basic and applied plant research. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Integrated genomic and gene expression profiling identifies two major genomic circuits in urothelial carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lindgren

    Full Text Available Similar to other malignancies, urothelial carcinoma (UC is characterized by specific recurrent chromosomal aberrations and gene mutations. However, the interconnection between specific genomic alterations, and how patterns of chromosomal alterations adhere to different molecular subgroups of UC, is less clear. We applied tiling resolution array CGH to 146 cases of UC and identified a number of regions harboring recurrent focal genomic amplifications and deletions. Several potential oncogenes were included in the amplified regions, including known oncogenes like E2F3, CCND1, and CCNE1, as well as new candidate genes, such as SETDB1 (1q21, and BCL2L1 (20q11. We next combined genome profiling with global gene expression, gene mutation, and protein expression data and identified two major genomic circuits operating in urothelial carcinoma. The first circuit was characterized by FGFR3 alterations, overexpression of CCND1, and 9q and CDKN2A deletions. The second circuit was defined by E3F3 amplifications and RB1 deletions, as well as gains of 5p, deletions at PTEN and 2q36, 16q, 20q, and elevated CDKN2A levels. TP53/MDM2 alterations were common for advanced tumors within the two circuits. Our data also suggest a possible RAS/RAF circuit. The tumors with worst prognosis showed a gene expression profile that indicated a keratinized phenotype. Taken together, our integrative approach revealed at least two separate networks of genomic alterations linked to the molecular diversity seen in UC, and that these circuits may reflect distinct pathways of tumor development.

  9. RSEM: accurate transcript quantification from RNA-Seq data with or without a reference genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewey Colin N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA-Seq is revolutionizing the way transcript abundances are measured. A key challenge in transcript quantification from RNA-Seq data is the handling of reads that map to multiple genes or isoforms. This issue is particularly important for quantification with de novo transcriptome assemblies in the absence of sequenced genomes, as it is difficult to determine which transcripts are isoforms of the same gene. A second significant issue is the design of RNA-Seq experiments, in terms of the number of reads, read length, and whether reads come from one or both ends of cDNA fragments. Results We present RSEM, an user-friendly software package for quantifying gene and isoform abundances from single-end or paired-end RNA-Seq data. RSEM outputs abundance estimates, 95% credibility intervals, and visualization files and can also simulate RNA-Seq data. In contrast to other existing tools, the software does not require a reference genome. Thus, in combination with a de novo transcriptome assembler, RSEM enables accurate transcript quantification for species without sequenced genomes. On simulated and real data sets, RSEM has superior or comparable performance to quantification methods that rely on a reference genome. Taking advantage of RSEM's ability to effectively use ambiguously-mapping reads, we show that accurate gene-level abundance estimates are best obtained with large numbers of short single-end reads. On the other hand, estimates of the relative frequencies of isoforms within single genes may be improved through the use of paired-end reads, depending on the number of possible splice forms for each gene. Conclusions RSEM is an accurate and user-friendly software tool for quantifying transcript abundances from RNA-Seq data. As it does not rely on the existence of a reference genome, it is particularly useful for quantification with de novo transcriptome assemblies. In addition, RSEM has enabled valuable guidance for cost

  10. Inference of transcriptional regulation using gene expression data from the bovine and human genomes

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    McEwan John C

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression is in part regulated by sequences in promoters that bind transcription factors. Thus, co-expressed genes may have shared sequence motifs representing putative transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs. However, for agriculturally important animals the genomic sequence is often incomplete. The more complete human genome may be able to be used for this prediction by taking advantage of the expected evolutionary conservation in TFBSs between the species. Results A method of de novo TFBS prediction based on MEME was implemented, tested, and validated on a muscle-specific dataset. Muscle specific expression data from EST library analysis from cattle was used to predict sets of genes whose expression was enriched in muscle and cardiac tissues. The upstream 1500 bases from calculated orthologous genes were extracted from the human reference set. A set of common motifs were discovered in these promoters. Slightly over one third of these motifs were identified as known TFBSs including known muscle specific binding sites. This analysis also predicted several highly statistically significantly overrepresented sites that may be novel TFBS. An independent analysis of the equivalent bovine genomic sequences was also done, this gave less detailed results than the human analysis due to both the quality of orthologue prediction and assembly in promoter regions. However, the most common motifs could be detected in both sets. Conclusion Using promoter sequences from human genes is a useful approach when studying gene expression in species with limited or non-existing genomic sequence. As the bovine genome becomes better annotated it can in turn serve as the reference genome for other agriculturally important ruminants, such as sheep, goat and deer.

  11. Extending CRISPR-Cas9 Technology from Genome Editing to Transcriptional Engineering in the Genus Clostridium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder, Mark R; Pyne, Michael E; Moo-Young, Murray; Chung, Duane A; Chou, C Perry

    2016-10-15

    The discovery and exploitation of the prokaryotic adaptive immunity system based on clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins have revolutionized genetic engineering. CRISPR-Cas tools have enabled extensive genome editing as well as efficient modulation of the transcriptional program in a multitude of organisms. Progress in the development of genetic engineering tools for the genus Clostridium has lagged behind that of many other prokaryotes, presenting the CRISPR-Cas technology an opportunity to resolve a long-existing issue. Here, we applied the Streptococcus pyogenes type II CRISPR-Cas9 (SpCRISPR-Cas9) system for genome editing in Clostridium acetobutylicum DSM792. We further explored the utility of the SpCRISPR-Cas9 machinery for gene-specific transcriptional repression. For proof-of-concept demonstration, a plasmid-encoded fluorescent protein gene was used for transcriptional repression in C. acetobutylicum Subsequently, we targeted the carbon catabolite repression (CCR) system of C. acetobutylicum through transcriptional repression of the hprK gene encoding HPr kinase/phosphorylase, leading to the coutilization of glucose and xylose, which are two abundant carbon sources from lignocellulosic feedstocks. Similar approaches based on SpCRISPR-Cas9 for genome editing and transcriptional repression were also demonstrated in Clostridium pasteurianum ATCC 6013. As such, this work lays a foundation for the derivation of clostridial strains for industrial purposes. After recognizing the industrial potential of Clostridium for decades, methods for the genetic manipulation of these anaerobic bacteria are still underdeveloped. This study reports the implementation of CRISPR-Cas technology for genome editing and transcriptional regulation in Clostridium acetobutylicum, which is arguably the most common industrial clostridial strain. The developed genetic tools enable simpler, more reliable, and more extensive

  12. Transcriptional profiling of MEF2-regulated genes in human neural progenitor cells derived from embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shing Fai Chan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2 family of transcription factors is highly expressed in the brain and constitutes a key determinant of neuronal survival, differentiation, and synaptic plasticity. However, genome-wide transcriptional profiling of MEF2-regulated genes has not yet been fully elucidated, particularly at the neural stem cell stage. Here we report the results of microarray analysis comparing mRNAs isolated from human neural progenitor/stem cells (hNPCs derived from embryonic stem cells expressing a control vector versus progenitors expressing a constitutively-active form of MEF2 (MEF2CA, which increases MEF2 activity. Microarray experiments were performed using the Illumina Human HT-12 V4.0 expression beadchip (GEO#: GSE57184. By comparing vector-control cells to MEF2CA cells, microarray analysis identified 1880 unique genes that were differentially expressed. Among these genes, 1121 genes were up-regulated and 759 genes were down-regulated. Our results provide a valuable resource for identifying transcriptional targets of MEF2 in hNPCs.

  13. Sequential use of transcriptional profiling, expression quantitative trait mapping, and gene association implicates MMP20 in human kidney aging.

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    Heather E Wheeler

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Kidneys age at different rates, such that some people show little or no effects of aging whereas others show rapid functional decline. We sequentially used transcriptional profiling and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL mapping to narrow down which genes to test for association with kidney aging. We first performed whole-genome transcriptional profiling to find 630 genes that change expression with age in the kidney. Using two methods to detect eQTLs, we found 101 of these age-regulated genes contain expression-associated SNPs. We tested the eQTLs for association with kidney aging, measured by glomerular filtration rate (GFR using combined data from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA and the InCHIANTI study. We found a SNP association (rs1711437 in MMP20 with kidney aging (uncorrected p = 3.6 x 10(-5, empirical p = 0.01 that explains 1%-2% of the variance in GFR among individuals. The results of this sequential analysis may provide the first evidence for a gene association with kidney aging in humans.

  14. Analysis of temporal transcription expression profiles reveal links between protein function and developmental stages of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Cen; Lees, Jonathan G; Minneci, Federico; Orengo, Christine A; Jones, David T

    2017-10-01

    Accurate gene or protein function prediction is a key challenge in the post-genome era. Most current methods perform well on molecular function prediction, but struggle to provide useful annotations relating to biological process functions due to the limited power of sequence-based features in that functional domain. In this work, we systematically evaluate the predictive power of temporal transcription expression profiles for protein function prediction in Drosophila melanogaster. Our results show significantly better performance on predicting protein function when transcription expression profile-based features are integrated with sequence-derived features, compared with the sequence-derived features alone. We also observe that the combination of expression-based and sequence-based features leads to further improvement of accuracy on predicting all three domains of gene function. Based on the optimal feature combinations, we then propose a novel multi-classifier-based function prediction method for Drosophila melanogaster proteins, FFPred-fly+. Interpreting our machine learning models also allows us to identify some of the underlying links between biological processes and developmental stages of Drosophila melanogaster.

  15. Analysis of temporal transcription expression profiles reveal links between protein function and developmental stages of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cen Wan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Accurate gene or protein function prediction is a key challenge in the post-genome era. Most current methods perform well on molecular function prediction, but struggle to provide useful annotations relating to biological process functions due to the limited power of sequence-based features in that functional domain. In this work, we systematically evaluate the predictive power of temporal transcription expression profiles for protein function prediction in Drosophila melanogaster. Our results show significantly better performance on predicting protein function when transcription expression profile-based features are integrated with sequence-derived features, compared with the sequence-derived features alone. We also observe that the combination of expression-based and sequence-based features leads to further improvement of accuracy on predicting all three domains of gene function. Based on the optimal feature combinations, we then propose a novel multi-classifier-based function prediction method for Drosophila melanogaster proteins, FFPred-fly+. Interpreting our machine learning models also allows us to identify some of the underlying links between biological processes and developmental stages of Drosophila melanogaster.

  16. Transcriptional profiles of the response of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to pentacyclic triterpenoids.

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    Pooi Yin Chung

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen in both hospital and the community that has demonstrated resistance to all currently available antibiotics over the last two decades. Multidrug-resistant isolates of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA exhibiting decreased susceptibilities to glycopeptides has also emerged, representing a crucial challenge for antimicrobial therapy and infection control. The availability of complete whole-genome nucleotide sequence data of various strains of S. aureus presents an opportunity to explore novel compounds and their targets to address the challenges presented by antimicrobial drug resistance in this organism. Study compounds α-amyrin [3β-hydroxy-urs-12-en-3-ol (AM], betulinic acid [3β-hydroxy-20(29-lupaene-28-oic acid (BA] and betulinaldehyde [3β-hydroxy-20(29-lupen-28-al (BE] belong to pentacyclic triterpenoids and were reported to exhibit antimicrobial activities against bacteria and fungi, including S. aureus. The MIC values of these compounds against a reference strain of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA (ATCC 43300 ranged from 64 µg/ml to 512 µg/ml. However, the response mechanisms of S. aureus to these compounds are still poorly understood. The transcription profile of reference strain of MRSA treated with sub-inhibitory concentrations of the three compounds was determined using Affymetrix GeneChips. The findings showed that these compounds regulate multiple desirable targets in cell division, two-component system, ABC transporters, fatty acid biosynthesis, peptidoglycan biosynthesis, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase, ribosome and β-lactam resistance pathways which could be further explored in the development of therapeutic agents for the treatment of S. aureus infections.

  17. Genome-wide modulation of gene transcription in ovarian carcinoma cells by a new mithramycin analogue.

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    Carolina Vizcaíno

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer has a poor prognosis due to intrinsic or acquired resistance to some cytotoxic drugs, raising the interest in new DNA-binding agents such as mithramycin analogues as potential chemotherapeutic agents in gynecological cancer. Using a genome-wide approach, we have analyzed gene expression in A2780 human ovarian carcinoma cells treated with the novel mithramycin analogue DIG-MSK (demycarosyl-3D-β-D-digitoxosyl-mithramycin SK that binds to C+G-rich DNA sequences. Nanomolar concentrations of DIG-MSK abrogated the expression of genes involved in a variety of cell processes including transcription regulation and tumor development, which resulted in cell death. Some of those genes have been associated with cell proliferation and poor prognosis in ovarian cancer. Sp1 transcription factor regulated most of the genes that were down-regulated by the drug, as well as the up-regulation of other genes mainly involved in response to cell stress. The effect of DIG-MSK in the control of gene expression by other transcription factors was also explored. Some of them, such as CREB, E2F and EGR1, also recognize C/G-rich regions in gene promoters, which encompass potential DIG-MSK binding sites. DIG-MSK affected several biological processes and molecular functions related to transcription and its cellular regulation in A2780 cells, including transcription factor activity. This new compound might be a promising drug for the treatment of ovarian cancer.

  18. cisMEP: an integrated repository of genomic epigenetic profiles and cis-regulatory modules in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Cis-regulatory modules (CRMs), or the DNA sequences required for regulating gene expression, play the central role in biological researches on transcriptional regulation in metazoan species. Nowadays, the systematic understanding of CRMs still mainly resorts to computational methods due to the time-consuming and small-scale nature of experimental methods. But the accuracy and reliability of different CRM prediction tools are still unclear. Without comparative cross-analysis of the results and combinatorial consideration with extra experimental information, there is no easy way to assess the confidence of the predicted CRMs. This limits the genome-wide understanding of CRMs. Description It is known that transcription factor binding and epigenetic profiles tend to determine functions of CRMs in gene transcriptional regulation. Thus integration of the genome-wide epigenetic profiles with systematically predicted CRMs can greatly help researchers evaluate and decipher the prediction confidence and possible transcriptional regulatory functions of these potential CRMs. However, these data are still fragmentary in the literatures. Here we performed the computational genome-wide screening for potential CRMs using different prediction tools and constructed the pioneer database, cisMEP (cis-regulatory module epigenetic profile database), to integrate these computationally identified CRMs with genomic epigenetic profile data. cisMEP collects the literature-curated TFBS location data and nine genres of epigenetic data for assessing the confidence of these potential CRMs and deciphering the possible CRM functionality. Conclusions cisMEP aims to provide a user-friendly interface for researchers to assess the confidence of different potential CRMs and to understand the functions of CRMs through experimentally-identified epigenetic profiles. The deposited potential CRMs and experimental epigenetic profiles for confidence assessment provide experimentally testable

  19. Prediction of hybrid performance in maize with a ridge regression model employed to DNA markers and mRNA transcription profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenke-Philippi, Carola; Thiemann, Alexander; Seifert, Felix; Schrag, Tobias; Melchinger, Albrecht E; Scholten, Stefan; Frisch, Matthias

    2016-03-29

    Ridge regression models can be used for predicting heterosis and hybrid performance. Their application to mRNA transcription profiles has not yet been investigated. Our objective was to compare the prediction accuracy of models employing mRNA transcription profiles with that of models employing genome-wide markers using a data set of 98 maize hybrids from a breeding program. We predicted hybrid performance and mid-parent heterosis for grain yield and grain dry matter content and employed cross validation to assess the prediction accuracy. Prediction with a ridge regression model using random effects for mRNA transcription profiles resulted in similar prediction accuracies than employing the model to DNA markers. For hybrids, of which none of the parental inbred lines was part of the training set, the ridge regression model did not reach the prediction accuracy that was obtained with a model using transcriptome-based distances. We conclude that mRNA transcription profiles are a promising alternative to DNA markers for hybrid prediction, but further studies with larger data sets are required to investigate the superiority of alternative prediction models.

  20. Comparative transcriptional profiling and preliminary study on heterosis mechanism of super-hybrid rice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, G.S.; Zhai, H.L.; Peng, Y.G.; Zhang, L.; Wei, G.; Chen, X.Y.; Xiao, Y.G.; Wang, L.; Chen, Y.J.; Wu, B.; Chen, B.; Zhang, Y.; Chen, H.; Feng, X.J.; Gong, W.K.; Liu, Y.; Yin, Z.J.; Wang, F.; Liu, G.Z.; Xu, H.L.; Wei, X.L.; Zhao, X.L.; Ouwerkerk, P.B.F.; Hankemeier, T.; Reijmers, T.; Heijden, R. van der; Lu, C.M.; Wang, M.; Greef, J. van der; Zhu, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Heterosis is a biological phenomenon whereby the offspring from two parents show improved and superior performance than either inbred parental lines. Hybrid rice is one of the most successful apotheoses in crops utilizing heterosis. Transcriptional profiling of F1 super-hybrid rice Liangyou-2186 and

  1. Transcriptional profiling identifies physicochemical properties of nanomaterials that are determinants of the in vivo pulmonary response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halappanavar, Sabina; Saber, Anne Thoustrup; Decan, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    We applied transcriptional profiling to elucidate the mechanisms associated with pulmonary responses to titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) of different sizes and surface coatings, and to determine if these responses are modified by NP size, surface area, surface modification, and embeddi...

  2. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of WRKY Transcription Factors under Multiple Stresses in Brassica napus.

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    Yajun He

    Full Text Available WRKY transcription factors play important roles in responses to environmental stress stimuli. Using a genome-wide domain analysis, we identified 287 WRKY genes with 343 WRKY domains in the sequenced genome of Brassica napus, 139 in the A sub-genome and 148 in the C sub-genome. These genes were classified into eight groups based on phylogenetic analysis. In the 343 WRKY domains, a total of 26 members showed divergence in the WRKY domain, and 21 belonged to group I. This finding suggested that WRKY genes in group I are more active and variable compared with genes in other groups. Using genome-wide identification and analysis of the WRKY gene family in Brassica napus, we observed genome duplication, chromosomal/segmental duplications and tandem duplication. All of these duplications contributed to the expansion of the WRKY gene family. The duplicate segments that were detected indicated that genome duplication events occurred in the two diploid progenitors B. rapa and B. olearecea before they combined to form B. napus. Analysis of the public microarray database and EST database for B. napus indicated that 74 WRKY genes were induced or preferentially expressed under stress conditions. According to the public QTL data, we identified 77 WRKY genes in 31 QTL regions related to various stress tolerance. We further evaluated the expression of 26 BnaWRKY genes under multiple stresses by qRT-PCR. Most of the genes were induced by low temperature, salinity and drought stress, indicating that the WRKYs play important roles in B. napus stress responses. Further, three BnaWRKY genes were strongly responsive to the three multiple stresses simultaneously, which suggests that these 3 WRKY may have multi-functional roles in stress tolerance and can potentially be used in breeding new rapeseed cultivars. We also found six tandem repeat pairs exhibiting similar expression profiles under the various stress conditions, and three pairs were mapped in the stress related

  3. Overview Article: Identifying transcriptional cis-regulatory modules in animal genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryamohan, Kushal; Halfon, Marc S.

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated through the activity of transcription factors and chromatin modifying proteins acting on specific DNA sequences, referred to as cis-regulatory elements. These include promoters, located at the transcription initiation sites of genes, and a variety of distal cis-regulatory modules (CRMs), the most common of which are transcriptional enhancers. Because regulated gene expression is fundamental to cell differentiation and acquisition of new cell fates, identifying, characterizing, and understanding the mechanisms of action of CRMs is critical for understanding development. CRM discovery has historically been challenging, as CRMs can be located far from the genes they regulate, have few readily-identifiable sequence characteristics, and for many years were not amenable to high-throughput discovery methods. However, the recent availability of complete genome sequences and the development of next-generation sequencing methods has led to an explosion of both computational and empirical methods for CRM discovery in model and non-model organisms alike. Experimentally, CRMs can be identified through chromatin immunoprecipitation directed against transcription factors or histone post-translational modifications, identification of nucleosome-depleted “open” chromatin regions, or sequencing-based high-throughput functional screening. Computational methods include comparative genomics, clustering of known or predicted transcription factor binding sites, and supervised machine-learning approaches trained on known CRMs. All of these methods have proven effective for CRM discovery, but each has its own considerations and limitations, and each is subject to a greater or lesser number of false-positive identifications. Experimental confirmation of predictions is essential, although shortcomings in current methods suggest that additional means of validation need to be developed. PMID:25704908

  4. Targeted deficiency of the transcriptional activator Hnf1alpha alters subnuclear positioning of its genomic targets.

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    Reini F Luco

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA binding transcriptional activators play a central role in gene-selective regulation. In part, this is mediated by targeting local covalent modifications of histone tails. Transcriptional regulation has also been associated with the positioning of genes within the nucleus. We have now examined the role of a transcriptional activator in regulating the positioning of target genes. This was carried out with primary beta-cells and hepatocytes freshly isolated from mice lacking Hnf1alpha, an activator encoded by the most frequently mutated gene in human monogenic diabetes (MODY3. We show that in Hnf1a-/- cells inactive endogenous Hnf1alpha-target genes exhibit increased trimethylated histone H3-Lys27 and reduced methylated H3-Lys4. Inactive Hnf1alpha-targets in Hnf1a-/- cells are also preferentially located in peripheral subnuclear domains enriched in trimethylated H3-Lys27, whereas active targets in wild-type cells are positioned in more central domains enriched in methylated H3-Lys4 and RNA polymerase II. We demonstrate that this differential positioning involves the decondensation of target chromatin, and show that it is spatially restricted rather than a reflection of non-specific changes in the nuclear organization of Hnf1a-deficient cells. This study, therefore, provides genetic evidence that a single transcriptional activator can influence the subnuclear location of its endogenous genomic targets in primary cells, and links activator-dependent changes in local chromatin structure to the spatial organization of the genome. We have also revealed a defect in subnuclear gene positioning in a model of a human transcription factor disease.

  5. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Regulation Mediated by Biochemically Distinct SWI/SNF Complexes.

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    Jesse R Raab

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple positions within the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex can be filled by mutually exclusive subunits. Inclusion or exclusion of these proteins defines many unique forms of SWI/SNF and has profound functional consequences. Often this complex is studied as a single entity within a particular cell type and we understand little about the functional relationship between these biochemically distinct forms of the remodeling complex. Here we examine the functional relationships among three complex-specific ARID (AT-Rich Interacting Domain subunits using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation, transcriptome analysis, and transcription factor binding maps. We find widespread overlap in transcriptional regulation and the genomic binding of distinct SWI/SNF complexes. ARID1B and ARID2 participate in wide-spread cooperation to repress hundreds of genes. Additionally, we find numerous examples of competition between ARID1A and another ARID, and validate that gene expression changes following loss of one ARID are dependent on the function of an alternative ARID. These distinct regulatory modalities are correlated with differential occupancy by transcription factors. Together, these data suggest that distinct SWI/SNF complexes dictate gene-specific transcription through functional interactions between the different forms of the SWI/SNF complex and associated co-factors. Most genes regulated by SWI/SNF are controlled by multiple biochemically distinct forms of the complex, and the overall expression of a gene is the product of the interaction between these different SWI/SNF complexes. The three mutually exclusive ARID family members are among the most frequently mutated chromatin regulators in cancer, and understanding the functional interactions and their role in transcriptional regulation provides an important foundation to understand their role in cancer.

  6. Integrated modeling and experimental approach for determining transcription factor profiles from fluorescent reporter data

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    Jayaraman Arul

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of quantitative models of signal transduction, as well as parameter estimation to improve existing models, depends on the ability to obtain quantitative information about various proteins that are part of the signaling pathway. However, commonly-used measurement techniques such as Western blots and mobility shift assays provide only qualitative or semi-quantitative data which cannot be used for estimating parameters. Thus there is a clear need for techniques that enable quantitative determination of signal transduction intermediates. Results This paper presents an integrated modeling and experimental approach for quantitatively determining transcription factor profiles from green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter data. The technique consists of three steps: (1 creating data sets for green fluorescent reporter systems upon stimulation, (2 analyzing the fluorescence images to determine fluorescence intensity profiles using principal component analysis (PCA and K-means clustering, and (3 computing the transcription factor concentration from the fluorescence intensity profiles by inverting a model describing transcription, translation, and activation of green fluorescent proteins. We have used this technique to quantitatively characterize activation of the transcription factor NF-κB by the cytokine TNF-α. In addition, we have applied the quantitative NF-κB profiles obtained from our technique to develop a model for TNF-α signal transduction where the parameters were estimated from the obtained data. Conclusion The technique presented here for computing transcription factor profiles from fluorescence microscopy images of reporter cells generated quantitative data on the magnitude and dynamics of NF-κB activation by TNF-α. The obtained results are in good agreement with qualitative descriptions of NF-κB activation as well as semi-quantitative experimental data from the literature. The profiles computed from

  7. Genome wide analysis of stress responsive WRKY transcription factors in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Shaiq Sultan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available WRKY transcription factors are a class of DNA-binding proteins that bind with a specific sequence C/TTGACT/C known as W-Box found in promoters of genes which are regulated by these WRKYs. From previous studies, 43 different stress responsive WRKY transcription factors in Arabidopsis thaliana, identified and then categorized in three groups viz., abiotic, biotic and both of these stresses. A comprehensive genome wide analysis including chromosomal localization, gene structure analysis, multiple sequence alignment, phylogenetic analysis and promoter analysis of these WRKY genes was carried out in this study to determine the functional homology in Arabidopsis. This analysis led to the classification of these WRKY family members into 3 major groups and subgroups and showed evolutionary relationship among these groups on the base of their functional WRKY domain, chromosomal localization and intron/exon structure. The proposed groups of these stress responsive WRKY genes and annotation based on their position on chromosomes can also be explored to determine their functional homology in other plant species in relation to different stresses. The result of the present study provides indispensable genomic information for the stress responsive WRKY transcription factors in Arabidopsis and will pave the way to explain the precise role of various AtWRKYs in plant growth and development under stressed conditions.

  8. Do Non-Genomically Encoded Fusion Transcripts Cause Recurrent Chromosomal Translocations?

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    Theo Dingermann

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We among others have recently demonstrated that normal cells produce “fusion mRNAs”. These fusion mRNAs do not derive from rearranged genomic loci, but rather they are derived from “early-terminated transcripts” (ETTs. Premature transcriptional termination takes place in intronic sequences that belong to “breakpoint cluster regions”. One important property of ETTs is that they exhibit an unsaturated splice donor site. This results in: (1 splicing to “cryptic exons” present in the final intron; (2 Splicing to another transcript of the same gene (intragenic trans-splicing, resulting in “exon repetitions”; (3 splicing to a transcript of another gene (intergenic trans-splicing, leading to “non-genomically encoded fusion transcripts” (NGEFTs. These NGEFTs bear the potential risk to influence DNA repair processes, since they share identical nucleotides with their DNA of origin, and thus, could be used as “guidance RNA” for DNA repair processes. Here, we present experimental data about four other genes. Three of them are associated with hemato-malignancies (ETV6, NUP98 and RUNX1, while one is associated with solid tumors (EWSR1. Our results demonstrate that all genes investigated so far (MLL, AF4, AF9, ENL, ELL, ETV6, NUP98, RUNX1 and EWSR1 display ETTs and produce transpliced mRNA species, indicating that this is a genuine property of translocating genes.

  9. Do Non-Genomically Encoded Fusion Transcripts Cause Recurrent Chromosomal Translocations?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowarz, Eric; Dingermann, Theo; Marschalek, Rolf, E-mail: Rolf.Marschalek@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Institute of Pharmaceutical Biology/ZAFES/DCAL, Goethe-University of Frankfurt, Biocenter, Max-von-Laue-Str. 9, D-60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2012-10-18

    We among others have recently demonstrated that normal cells produce “fusion mRNAs”. These fusion mRNAs do not derive from rearranged genomic loci, but rather they are derived from “early-terminated transcripts” (ETTs). Premature transcriptional termination takes place in intronic sequences that belong to “breakpoint cluster regions”. One important property of ETTs is that they exhibit an unsaturated splice donor site. This results in: (1) splicing to “cryptic exons” present in the final intron; (2) Splicing to another transcript of the same gene (intragenic trans-splicing), resulting in “exon repetitions”; (3) splicing to a transcript of another gene (intergenic trans-splicing), leading to “non-genomically encoded fusion transcripts” (NGEFTs). These NGEFTs bear the potential risk to influence DNA repair processes, since they share identical nucleotides with their DNA of origin, and thus, could be used as “guidance RNA” for DNA repair processes. Here, we present experimental data about four other genes. Three of them are associated with hemato-malignancies (ETV6, NUP98 and RUNX1), while one is associated with solid tumors (EWSR1). Our results demonstrate that all genes investigated so far (MLL, AF4, AF9, ENL, ELL, ETV6, NUP98, RUNX1 and EWSR1) display ETTs and produce transpliced mRNA species, indicating that this is a genuine property of translocating genes.

  10. Enriching Genomic Resources and Marker Development from Transcript Sequences of Jatropha curcas for Microgravity Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wenlan; Paudel, Dev

    2017-01-01

    Jatropha (Jatropha curcas L.) is an economically important species with a great potential for biodiesel production. To enrich the jatropha genomic databases and resources for microgravity studies, we sequenced and annotated the transcriptome of jatropha and developed SSR and SNP markers from the transcriptome sequences. In total 1,714,433 raw reads with an average length of 441.2 nucleotides were generated. De novo assembling and clustering resulted in 115,611 uniquely assembled sequences (UASs) including 21,418 full-length cDNAs and 23,264 new jatropha transcript sequences. The whole set of UASs were fully annotated, out of which 59,903 (51.81%) were assigned with gene ontology (GO) term, 12,584 (10.88%) had orthologs in Eukaryotic Orthologous Groups (KOG), and 8,822 (7.63%) were mapped to 317 pathways in six different categories in Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genome (KEGG) database, and it contained 3,588 putative transcription factors. From the UASs, 9,798 SSRs were discovered with AG/CT as the most frequent (45.8%) SSR motif type. Further 38,693 SNPs were detected and 7,584 remained after filtering. This UAS set has enriched the current jatropha genomic databases and provided a large number of genetic markers, which can facilitate jatropha genetic improvement and many other genetic and biological studies. PMID:28154822

  11. The CHR site: definition and genome-wide identification of a cell cycle transcriptional element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Gerd A.; Wintsche, Axel; Stangner, Konstanze; Prohaska, Sonja J.; Stadler, Peter F.; Engeland, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    The cell cycle genes homology region (CHR) has been identified as a DNA element with an important role in transcriptional regulation of late cell cycle genes. It has been shown that such genes are controlled by DREAM, MMB and FOXM1-MuvB and that these protein complexes can contact DNA via CHR sites. However, it has not been elucidated which sequence variations of the canonical CHR are functional and how frequent CHR-based regulation is utilized in mammalian genomes. Here, we define the spectrum of functional CHR elements. As the basis for a computational meta-analysis, we identify new CHR sequences and compile phylogenetic motif conservation as well as genome-wide protein-DNA binding and gene expression data. We identify CHR elements in most late cell cycle genes binding DREAM, MMB, or FOXM1-MuvB. In contrast, Myb- and forkhead-binding sites are underrepresented in both early and late cell cycle genes. Our findings support a general mechanism: sequential binding of DREAM, MMB and FOXM1-MuvB complexes to late cell cycle genes requires CHR elements. Taken together, we define the group of CHR-regulated genes in mammalian genomes and provide evidence that the CHR is the central promoter element in transcriptional regulation of late cell cycle genes by DREAM, MMB and FOXM1-MuvB. PMID:25106871

  12. Transcriptional profiling of Bacillus anthracis Sterne (34F2 during iron starvation.

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    Paul E Carlson

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Lack of available iron is one of many environmental challenges that a bacterium encounters during infection and adaptation to iron starvation is important for the pathogen to efficiently replicate within the host. Here we define the transcriptional response of B. anthracis Sterne (34F(2 to iron depleted conditions. Genome-wide transcript analysis showed that B. anthracis undergoes considerable changes in gene expression during growth in iron-depleted media, including the regulation of known and candidate virulence factors. Two genes encoding putative internalin proteins were chosen for further study. Deletion of either gene (GBAA0552 or GBAA1340 resulted in attenuation in a murine model of infection. This attenuation was amplified in a double mutant strain. These data define the transcriptional changes induced during growth in low iron conditions and illustrate the potential of this dataset in the identification of putative virulence determinants for future study.

  13. BarleyBase—an expression profiling database for plant genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lishuang; Gong, Jian; Caldo, Rico A.; Nettleton, Dan; Cook, Dianne; Wise, Roger P.; Dickerson, Julie A.

    2005-01-01

    BarleyBase (BB) (www.barleybase.org) is an online database for plant microarrays with integrated tools for data visualization and statistical analysis. BB houses raw and normalized expression data from the two publicly available Affymetrix genome arrays, Barley1 and Arabidopsis ATH1 with plans to include the new Affymetrix 61K wheat, maize, soybean and rice arrays, as they become available. BB contains a broad set of query and display options at all data levels, ranging from experiments to individual hybridizations to probe sets down to individual probes. Users can perform cross-experiment queries on probe sets based on observed expression profiles and/or based on known biological information. Probe set queries are integrated with visualization and analysis tools such as the R statistical toolbox, data filters and a large variety of plot types. Controlled vocabularies for gene and plant ontologies, as well as interconnecting links to physical or genetic map and other genomic data in PlantGDB, Gramene and GrainGenes, allow users to perform EST alignments and gene function prediction using Barley1 exemplar sequences, thus, enhancing cross-species comparison. PMID:15608273

  14. Transcriptome sequencing and whole genome expression profiling of chrysanthemum under dehydration stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanjie; Gao, Shan; Yang, Yingjie; Huang, Mingyun; Cheng, Lina; Wei, Qian; Fei, Zhangjun; Gao, Junping; Hong, Bo

    2013-09-28

    Chrysanthemum is one of the most important ornamental crops in the world and drought stress seriously limits its production and distribution. In order to generate a functional genomics resource and obtain a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms regarding chrysanthemum responses to dehydration stress, we performed large-scale transcriptome sequencing of chrysanthemum plants under dehydration stress using the Illumina sequencing technology. Two cDNA libraries constructed from mRNAs of control and dehydration-treated seedlings were sequenced by Illumina technology. A total of more than 100 million reads were generated and de novo assembled into 98,180 unique transcripts which were further extensively annotated by comparing their sequencing to different protein databases. Biochemical pathways were predicted from these transcript sequences. Furthermore, we performed gene expression profiling analysis upon dehydration treatment in chrysanthemum and identified 8,558 dehydration-responsive unique transcripts, including 307 transcription factors and 229 protein kinases and many well-known stress responsive genes. Gene ontology (GO) term enrichment and biochemical pathway analyses showed that dehydration stress caused changes in hormone response, secondary and amino acid metabolism, and light and photoperiod response. These findings suggest that drought tolerance of chrysanthemum plants may be related to the regulation of hormone biosynthesis and signaling, reduction of oxidative damage, stabilization of cell proteins and structures, and maintenance of energy and carbon supply. Our transcriptome sequences can provide a valuable resource for chrysanthemum breeding and research and novel insights into chrysanthemum responses to dehydration stress and offer candidate genes or markers that can be used to guide future studies attempting to breed drought tolerant chrysanthemum cultivars.

  15. Transcriptome sequencing and whole genome expression profiling of chrysanthemum under dehydration stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Chrysanthemum is one of the most important ornamental crops in the world and drought stress seriously limits its production and distribution. In order to generate a functional genomics resource and obtain a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms regarding chrysanthemum responses to dehydration stress, we performed large-scale transcriptome sequencing of chrysanthemum plants under dehydration stress using the Illumina sequencing technology. Results Two cDNA libraries constructed from mRNAs of control and dehydration-treated seedlings were sequenced by Illumina technology. A total of more than 100 million reads were generated and de novo assembled into 98,180 unique transcripts which were further extensively annotated by comparing their sequencing to different protein databases. Biochemical pathways were predicted from these transcript sequences. Furthermore, we performed gene expression profiling analysis upon dehydration treatment in chrysanthemum and identified 8,558 dehydration-responsive unique transcripts, including 307 transcription factors and 229 protein kinases and many well-known stress responsive genes. Gene ontology (GO) term enrichment and biochemical pathway analyses showed that dehydration stress caused changes in hormone response, secondary and amino acid metabolism, and light and photoperiod response. These findings suggest that drought tolerance of chrysanthemum plants may be related to the regulation of hormone biosynthesis and signaling, reduction of oxidative damage, stabilization of cell proteins and structures, and maintenance of energy and carbon supply. Conclusions Our transcriptome sequences can provide a valuable resource for chrysanthemum breeding and research and novel insights into chrysanthemum responses to dehydration stress and offer candidate genes or markers that can be used to guide future studies attempting to breed drought tolerant chrysanthemum cultivars. PMID:24074255

  16. Genome-Wide Expression Profiling of Five Mouse Models Identifies Similarities and Differences with Human Psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindell, William R.; Johnston, Andrew; Carbajal, Steve; Han, Gangwen; Wohn, Christian; Lu, Jun; Xing, Xianying; Nair, Rajan P.; Voorhees, John J.; Elder, James T.; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Sano, Shigetoshi; Prens, Errol P.; DiGiovanni, John; Pittelkow, Mark R.; Ward, Nicole L.; Gudjonsson, Johann E.

    2011-01-01

    Development of a suitable mouse model would facilitate the investigation of pathomechanisms underlying human psoriasis and would also assist in development of therapeutic treatments. However, while many psoriasis mouse models have been proposed, no single model recapitulates all features of the human disease, and standardized validation criteria for psoriasis mouse models have not been widely applied. In this study, whole-genome transcriptional profiling is used to compare gene expression patterns manifested by human psoriatic skin lesions with those that occur in five psoriasis mouse models (K5-Tie2, imiquimod, K14-AREG, K5-Stat3C and K5-TGFbeta1). While the cutaneous gene expression profiles associated with each mouse phenotype exhibited statistically significant similarity to the expression profile of psoriasis in humans, each model displayed distinctive sets of similarities and differences in comparison to human psoriasis. For all five models, correspondence to the human disease was strong with respect to genes involved in epidermal development and keratinization. Immune and inflammation-associated gene expression, in contrast, was more variable between models as compared to the human disease. These findings support the value of all five models as research tools, each with identifiable areas of convergence to and divergence from the human disease. Additionally, the approach used in this paper provides an objective and quantitative method for evaluation of proposed mouse models of psoriasis, which can be strategically applied in future studies to score strengths of mouse phenotypes relative to specific aspects of human psoriasis. PMID:21483750

  17. Genome-wide identification, classification, and analysis of heat shock transcription factor family in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa pekinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X Y; Tao, P; Li, B Y; Wang, W H; Yue, Z C; Lei, J L; Zhong, X M

    2015-03-27

    Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis) is one of the most important vegetable crops grown worldwide, and various methods exist for selection, propagation, and cultivation. The entire Chinese cabbage genome has been sequenced, and the heat shock transcription factor family (Hsfs) has been found to play a central role in plant growth and development and in the response to biotic and abiotic stress conditions, particularly in acquired thermotolerance. We analyzed heat tolerance mechanisms in Chinese cabbage. In this study, 30 Hsfs were identified from the Chinese cabbage genome database. The classification, phylogenetic reconstruction, chromosome distribution, conserved motifs, expression analysis, and interaction networks of the Hsfs were predicted and analyzed. Thirty BrHsfs were classified into 3 major classes (class A, B, and C) according to their structural characteristics and phylogenetic comparisons, and class A was further subdivided into 8 subclasses. Distribution mapping results showed that Hsf genes were located on 10 Chinese cabbage chromosomes. The expression profile indicated that Hsfs play differential roles in 5 organs in Chinese cabbage, and likely participate in the development of underground parts and regulation of reproductive growth. An orthologous gene interaction network was constructed, and included MBF1C, ROF1, TBP2, CDC2, and HSP70 5 genes, which are closely related to heat stress. Our results contribute to the understanding of the complexity of Hsfs in Chinese cabbage and provide a basis for further functional gene research.

  18. Genomic profiling reveals extensive heterogeneity in somatic DNA copy number aberrations of canine hemangiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Rachael; Borst, Luke; Rotroff, Daniel; Motsinger-Reif, Alison; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Modiano, Jaime F; Breen, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    Canine hemangiosarcoma is a highly aggressive vascular neoplasm associated with extensive clinical and anatomical heterogeneity and a grave prognosis. Comprehensive molecular characterization of hemangiosarcoma may identify novel therapeutic targets and advanced clinical management strategies, but there are no published reports of tumor-associated genome instability and disrupted gene dosage in this cancer. We performed genome-wide microarray-based somatic DNA copy number profiling of 75 primary intra-abdominal hemangiosarcomas from five popular dog breeds that are highly predisposed to this disease. The cohort exhibited limited global genomic instability, compared to other canine sarcomas studied to date, and DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs) were predominantly of low amplitude. Recurrent imbalances of several key cancer-associated genes were evident; however, the global penetrance of any single CNA was low and no distinct hallmark aberrations were evident. Copy number gains of dog chromosomes 13, 24, and 31, and loss of chromosome 16, were the most recurrent CNAs involving large chromosome regions, but their relative distribution within and between cases suggests they most likely represent passenger aberrations. CNAs involving CDKN2A, VEGFA, and the SKI oncogene were identified as potential driver aberrations of hemangiosarcoma development, highlighting potential targets for therapeutic modulation. CNA profiles were broadly conserved between the five breeds, although subregional variation was evident, including a near twofold lower incidence of VEGFA gain in Golden Retrievers versus other breeds (22 versus 40 %). These observations support prior transcriptional studies suggesting that the clinical heterogeneity of this cancer may reflect the existence of multiple, molecularly distinct subtypes of canine hemangiosarcoma.

  19. p53 Maintains Genomic Stability by Preventing Interference between Transcription and Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance Qiao Xin Yeo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available p53 tumor suppressor maintains genomic stability, typically acting through cell-cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. We discovered a function of p53 in preventing conflicts between transcription and replication, independent of its canonical roles. p53 deficiency sensitizes cells to Topoisomerase (Topo II inhibitors, resulting in DNA damage arising spontaneously during replication. Topoisomerase IIα (TOP2A-DNA complexes preferentially accumulate in isogenic p53 mutant or knockout cells, reflecting an increased recruitment of TOP2A to regulate DNA topology. We propose that p53 acts to prevent DNA topological stress originating from transcription during the S phase and, therefore, promotes normal replication fork progression. Consequently, replication fork progression is impaired in the absence of p53, which is reversed by transcription inhibition. Pharmacologic inhibition of transcription also attenuates DNA damage and decreases Topo-II-DNA complexes, restoring cell viability in p53-deficient cells. Together, our results demonstrate a function of p53 that may underlie its role in tumor suppression.

  20. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Reorganization Associated with Senescence-to-Immortality Switch during Human Hepatocellular Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konu, Ozlen; Yuzugullu, Haluk; Gursoy-Yuzugullu, Ozge; Ozturk, Nuri; Ozen, Cigdem; Ozdag, Hilal; Erdal, Esra; Karademir, Sedat; Sagol, Ozgul; Mizrak, Dilsa; Bozkaya, Hakan; Ilk, Hakki Gokhan; Ilk, Ozlem; Bilen, Biter; Cetin-Atalay, Rengul; Akar, Nejat; Ozturk, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Senescence is a permanent proliferation arrest in response to cell stress such as DNA damage. It contributes strongly to tissue aging and serves as a major barrier against tumor development. Most tumor cells are believed to bypass the senescence barrier (become “immortal”) by inactivating growth control genes such as TP53 and CDKN2A. They also reactivate telomerase reverse transcriptase. Senescence-to-immortality transition is accompanied by major phenotypic and biochemical changes mediated by genome-wide transcriptional modifications. This appears to happen during hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development in patients with liver cirrhosis, however, the accompanying transcriptional changes are virtually unknown. We investigated genome-wide transcriptional changes related to the senescence-to-immortality switch during hepatocellular carcinogenesis. Initially, we performed transcriptome analysis of senescent and immortal clones of Huh7 HCC cell line, and identified genes with significant differential expression to establish a senescence-related gene list. Through the analysis of senescence-related gene expression in different liver tissues we showed that cirrhosis and HCC display expression patterns compatible with senescent and immortal phenotypes, respectively; dysplasia being a transitional state. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that cirrhosis/senescence-associated genes were preferentially expressed in non-tumor tissues, less malignant tumors, and differentiated or senescent cells. In contrast, HCC/immortality genes were up-regulated in tumor tissues, or more malignant tumors and progenitor cells. In HCC tumors and immortal cells genes involved in DNA repair, cell cycle, telomere extension and branched chain amino acid metabolism were up-regulated, whereas genes involved in cell signaling, as well as in drug, lipid, retinoid and glycolytic metabolism were down-regulated. Based on these distinctive gene expression features we developed a 15-gene

  1. Berry flesh and skin ripening features in Vitis vinifera as assessed by transcriptional profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Lijavetzky

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ripening of fleshy fruit is a complex developmental process involving the differentiation of tissues with separate functions. During grapevine berry ripening important processes contributing to table and wine grape quality take place, some of them flesh- or skin-specific. In this study, transcriptional profiles throughout flesh and skin ripening were followed during two different seasons in a table grape cultivar 'Muscat Hamburg' to determine tissue-specific as well as common developmental programs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using an updated GrapeGen Affymetrix GeneChip® annotation based on grapevine 12×v1 gene predictions, 2188 differentially accumulated transcripts between flesh and skin and 2839 transcripts differentially accumulated throughout ripening in the same manner in both tissues were identified. Transcriptional profiles were dominated by changes at the beginning of veraison which affect both pericarp tissues, although frequently delayed or with lower intensity in the skin than in the flesh. Functional enrichment analysis identified the decay on biosynthetic processes, photosynthesis and transport as a major part of the program delayed in the skin. In addition, a higher number of functional categories, including several related to macromolecule transport and phenylpropanoid and lipid biosynthesis, were over-represented in transcripts accumulated to higher levels in the skin. Functional enrichment also indicated auxin, gibberellins and bHLH transcription factors to take part in the regulation of pre-veraison processes in the pericarp, whereas WRKY and C2H2 family transcription factors seems to more specifically participate in the regulation of skin and flesh ripening, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A transcriptomic analysis indicates that a large part of the ripening program is shared by both pericarp tissues despite some components are delayed in the skin. In addition, important tissue differences are

  2. Ketamine and Imipramine Reverse Transcriptional Signatures of Susceptibility and Induce Resilience-Specific Gene Expression Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagot, Rosemary C; Cates, Hannah M; Purushothaman, Immanuel; Vialou, Vincent; Heller, Elizabeth A; Yieh, Lynn; LaBonté, Benoit; Peña, Catherine J; Shen, Li; Wittenberg, Gayle M; Nestler, Eric J

    2017-02-15

    Examining transcriptional regulation by antidepressants in key neural circuits implicated in depression and understanding the relation to transcriptional mechanisms of susceptibility and natural resilience may help in the search for new therapeutic agents. Given the heterogeneity of treatment response in human populations, examining both treatment response and nonresponse is critical. We compared the effects of a conventional monoamine-based tricyclic antidepressant, imipramine, and a rapidly acting, non-monoamine-based antidepressant, ketamine, in mice subjected to chronic social defeat stress, a validated depression model, and used RNA sequencing to analyze transcriptional profiles associated with susceptibility, resilience, and antidepressant response and nonresponse in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), nucleus accumbens, hippocampus, and amygdala. We identified similar numbers of responders and nonresponders after ketamine or imipramine treatment. Ketamine induced more expression changes in the hippocampus; imipramine induced more expression changes in the nucleus accumbens and amygdala. Transcriptional profiles in treatment responders were most similar in the PFC. Nonresponse reflected both the lack of response-associated gene expression changes and unique gene regulation. In responders, both drugs reversed susceptibility-associated transcriptional changes and induced resilience-associated transcription in the PFC. We generated a uniquely large resource of gene expression data in four interconnected limbic brain regions implicated in depression and its treatment with imipramine or ketamine. Our analyses highlight the PFC as a key site of common transcriptional regulation by antidepressant drugs and in both reversing susceptibility- and inducing resilience-associated molecular adaptations. In addition, we found region-specific effects of each drug, suggesting both common and unique effects of imipramine versus ketamine. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological

  3. Global profiling of prolactin-modulated transcripts in breast cancer in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Prolactin (PRL) is essential for normal mammary gland development. PRL promotes mammary tumor formation in rodents and elevated serum prolactin is associated with increased risk of estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer in women. On the other hand, PRL may also exert pro-differentiation effects and act to suppress invasive features of established breast cancer. Previously published limited global transcript profiling analyses of prolactin-regulated gene expression in human breast cancer cells have exclusively been performed in vitro. The present study aimed to shed new light on how PRL modulates estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer through global transcript profiling of a human breast cancer xenograft model in vivo. Methods The prolactin-responsive human T47D breast cancer cell line was xenotransplanted into nude mice and global transcript profiling was carried out following treatment with or without human PRL for 48 h. A subset of PRL-modulated transcripts was further validated using qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results The in vivo analyses identified 130 PRL-modulated transcripts, 75 upregulated and 55 downregulated, based on fold change >1.6 and P-value breast cancer-relevance were selected and validated by qRT-PCR. Some but not all of the transcripts were also PRL-modulated in vitro. The selected PRL-modulated transcripts were tested for dependence on Stat5, Jak1 or Jak2 activation, and for co-regulation by 17β-estradiol (E2). The protein encoded by one of the PRL-regulated transcripts, PTHrP, was examined in a panel of 92 human breast cancers and found by in situ quantitative immunofluorescence analysis to be highly positively correlated with nuclear localized and tyrosine phosphorylated Stat5. Gene Ontology analysis revealed that PRL-upregulated genes were enriched in pathways involved in differentiation. Finally, a gene signature based on PRL-upregulated genes was associated with prolonged relapse-free and metastasis

  4. Semantic Assembly and Annotation of Draft RNAseq Transcripts without a Reference Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptitsyn, Andrey; Temanni, Ramzi; Bouchard, Christelle; Anderson, Peter A V

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptomes are one of the first sources of high-throughput genomic data that have benefitted from the introduction of Next-Gen Sequencing. As sequencing technology becomes more accessible, transcriptome sequencing is applicable to multiple organisms for which genome sequences are unavailable. Currently all methods for de novo assembly are based on the concept of matching the nucleotide context overlapping between short fragments-reads. However, even short reads may still contain biologically relevant information which can be used as hints in guiding the assembly process. We propose a computational workflow for the reconstruction and functional annotation of expressed gene transcripts that does not require a reference genome sequence and can be tolerant to low coverage, high error rates and other issues that often lead to poor results of de novo assembly in studies of non-model organisms. We start with either raw sequences or the output of a context-based de novo transcriptome assembly. Instead of mapping reads to a reference genome or creating a completely unsupervised clustering of reads, we assemble the unknown transcriptome using nearest homologs from a public database as seeds. We consider even distant relations, indirectly linking protein-coding fragments to entire gene families in multiple distantly related genomes. The intended application of the proposed method is an additional step of semantic (based on relations between protein-coding fragments) scaffolding following traditional (i.e. based on sequence overlap) de novo assembly. The method we developed was effective in analysis of the jellyfish Cyanea capillata transcriptome and may be applicable in other studies of gene expression in species lacking a high quality reference genome sequence. Our algorithms are implemented in C and designed for parallel computation using a high-performance computer. The software is available free of charge via an open source license.

  5. Rapid and highly efficient construction of TALE-based transcriptional regulators and nucleases for genome modification

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Lixin

    2012-01-22

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) can be used as DNA-targeting modules by engineering their repeat domains to dictate user-selected sequence specificity. TALEs have been shown to function as site-specific transcriptional activators in a variety of cell types and organisms. TALE nucleases (TALENs), generated by fusing the FokI cleavage domain to TALE, have been used to create genomic double-strand breaks. The identity of the TALE repeat variable di-residues, their number, and their order dictate the DNA sequence specificity. Because TALE repeats are nearly identical, their assembly by cloning or even by synthesis is challenging and time consuming. Here, we report the development and use of a rapid and straightforward approach for the construction of designer TALE (dTALE) activators and nucleases with user-selected DNA target specificity. Using our plasmid set of 100 repeat modules, researchers can assemble repeat domains for any 14-nucleotide target sequence in one sequential restriction-ligation cloning step and in only 24 h. We generated several custom dTALEs and dTALENs with new target sequence specificities and validated their function by transient expression in tobacco leaves and in vitro DNA cleavage assays, respectively. Moreover, we developed a web tool, called idTALE, to facilitate the design of dTALENs and the identification of their genomic targets and potential off-targets in the genomes of several model species. Our dTALE repeat assembly approach along with the web tool idTALE will expedite genome-engineering applications in a variety of cell types and organisms including plants. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  6. Prediction of transcriptional regulatory sites in the complete genome sequence of Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieffry, D; Salgado, H; Huerta, A M; Collado-Vides, J

    1998-06-01

    As one of the best-characterized free-living organisms, Escherichia coli and its recently completed genomic sequence offer a special opportunity to exploit systematically the variety of regulatory data available in the literature in order to make a comprehensive set of regulatory predictions in the whole genome. The complete genome sequence of E.coli was analyzed for the binding of transcriptional regulators upstream of coding sequences. The biological information contained in RegulonDB (Huerta, A.M. et al., Nucleic Acids Res.,26,55-60, 1998) for 56 different transcriptional proteins was the support to implement a stringent strategy combining string search and weight matrices. We estimate that our search included representatives of 15-25% of the total number of regulatory binding proteins in E.coli. This search was performed on the set of 4288 putative regulatory regions, each 450 bp long. Within the regions with predicted sites, 89% are regulated by one protein and 81% involve only one site. These numbers are reasonably consistent with the distribution of experimental regulatory sites. Regulatory sites are found in 603 regions corresponding to 16% of operon regions and 10% of intra-operonic regions. Additional evidence gives stronger support to some of these predictions, including the position of the site, biological consistency with the function of the downstream gene, as well as genetic evidence for the regulatory interaction. The predictions described here were incorporated into the map presented in the paper describing the complete E.coli genome (Blattner,F.R. et al., Science, 277, 1453-1461, 1997). The complete set of predictions in GenBank format is available at the url: http://www. cifn.unam.mx/Computational_Biology/E.coli-predictions ecoli-reg@cifn.unam.mx, collado@cifn.unam.mx

  7. Human disease-drug network based on genomic expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guanghui; Agarwal, Pankaj

    2009-08-06

    Drug repositioning offers the possibility of faster development times and reduced risks in drug discovery. With the rapid development of high-throughput technologies and ever-increasing accumulation of whole genome-level datasets, an increasing number of diseases and drugs can be comprehensively characterized by the changes they induce in gene expression, protein, metabolites and phenotypes. We performed a systematic, large-scale analysis of genomic expression profiles of human diseases and drugs to create a disease-drug network. A network of 170,027 significant interactions was extracted from the approximately 24.5 million comparisons between approximately 7,000 publicly available transcriptomic profiles. The network includes 645 disease-disease, 5,008 disease-drug, and 164,374 drug-drug relationships. At least 60% of the disease-disease pairs were in the same disease area as determined by the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) disease classification tree. The remaining can drive a molecular level nosology by discovering relationships between seemingly unrelated diseases, such as a connection between bipolar disorder and hereditary spastic paraplegia, and a connection between actinic keratosis and cancer. Among the 5,008 disease-drug links, connections with negative scores suggest new indications for existing drugs, such as the use of some antimalaria drugs for Crohn's disease, and a variety of existing drugs for Huntington's disease; while the positive scoring connections can aid in drug side effect identification, such as tamoxifen's undesired carcinogenic property. From the approximately 37K drug-drug relationships, we discover relationships that aid in target and pathway deconvolution, such as 1) KCNMA1 as a potential molecular target of lobeline, and 2) both apoptotic DNA fragmentation and G2/M DNA damage checkpoint regulation as potential pathway targets of daunorubicin. We have automatically generated thousands of disease and drug expression profiles using GEO

  8. Genome editing and transcriptional repression in Pseudomonas putida KT2440 via the type II CRISPR system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun; Wang, Qingzhuo; Jiang, Yu; Wen, Zhiqiang; Yang, Lirong; Wu, Jianping; Yang, Sheng

    2018-03-13

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is a "generally recognized as safe"-certified strain with robust property and versatile metabolism. Thus, it is an ideal candidate for synthetic biology, biodegradation, and other biotechnology applications. The known genome editing approaches of Pseudomonas are suboptimal; thus, it is necessary to develop a high efficiency genome editing tool. In this study, we established a fast and convenient CRISPR-Cas9 method in P. putida KT2440. Gene deletion, gene insertion and gene replacement could be achieved within 5 days, and the mutation efficiency reached > 70%. Single nucleotide replacement could be realized, overcoming the limitations of protospacer adjacent motif sequences. We also applied nuclease-deficient Cas9 binding at three locations upstream of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) for transcriptional inhibition, and the expression intensity of eGFP reduced to 28.5, 29.4, and 72.1% of the control level, respectively. Furthermore, based on this CRISPR-Cas9 system, we also constructed a CRISPR-Cpf1 system, which we validated for genome editing in P. putida KT2440. In this research, we established CRISPR based genome editing and regulation control systems in P. putida KT2440. These fast and efficient approaches will greatly facilitate the application of P. putida KT2440.

  9. Brain perihematoma genomic profile following spontaneous human intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rosell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH represents about 15% of all strokes and is associated with high mortality rates. Our aim was to identify the gene expression changes and biological pathways altered in the brain following ICH. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Twelve brain samples were obtained from four deceased patients who suffered an ICH including perihematomal tissue (PH and the corresponding contralateral white (CW and grey (CG matter. Affymetrix GeneChip platform for analysis of over 47,000 transcripts was conducted. Microarray Analysis Suite 5.0 was used to process array images and the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis System was used to analyze biological mechanisms and functions of the genes. We identified 468 genes in the PH areas displaying a different expression pattern with a fold change between -3.74 and +5.16 when compared to the contralateral areas (291 overexpressed and 177 underexpressed. The top genes which appeared most significantly overexpressed in the PH areas codify for cytokines, chemokines, coagulation factors, cell growth and proliferation factors while the underexpressed codify for proteins involved in cell cycle or neurotrophins. Validation and replication studies at gene and protein level in brain samples confirmed microarray results. CONCLUSIONS: The genomic responses identified in this study provide valuable information about potential biomarkers and target molecules altered in the perihematomal regions.

  10. Transcript profiling reveals auxin and cytokinin signaling pathways and transcription regulation during in vitro organogenesis of Ramie (Boehmeria nivea L. Gaud.

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    Xing Huang

    Full Text Available In vitro organogenesis, one of the most common pathways leading to in vitro plant regeneration, is widely used in biotechnology and the fundamental study of plant biology. Although previous studies have constructed a complex regulatory network model for Arabidopsis in vitro organogenesis, no related study has been reported in ramie. To generate more complete observations of transcriptome content and dynamics during ramie in vitro organogenesis, we constructed a reference transcriptome library and ten digital gene expression (DGE libraries for illumina sequencing. Approximately 111.34 million clean reads were obtained for transcriptome and the DGE libraries generated between 13.5 and 18.8 million clean reads. De novo assembly produced 43,222 unigenes and a total of 5,760 differentially expressed genes (DEGs were filtered. Searching against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database, 26 auxin related and 11 cytokinin related DEGs were selected for qRT-PCR validation of two ramie cultivars, which had high (Huazhu No. 5 or extremely low (Dazhuhuangbaima shoot regeneration abilities. The results revealed differing regulation patterns of auxin and cytokinin in different genotypes. Here we report the first genome-wide gene expression profiling of in vitro organogenesis in ramie and provide an overview of transcription and phytohormone regulation during the process. Furthermore, the auxin and cytokinin related genes have distinct expression patterns in two ramie cultivars with high or extremely low shoot regeneration ability, which has given us a better understanding of the in vitro organogenesis mechanism. This result will provide a foundation for future phytohormone research and lead to improvements of the ramie regeneration system.

  11. Large-scale analysis of antisense transcription in wheat using the Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array

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    Settles Matthew L

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural antisense transcripts (NATs are transcripts of the opposite DNA strand to the sense-strand either at the same locus (cis-encoded or a different locus (trans-encoded. They can affect gene expression at multiple stages including transcription, RNA processing and transport, and translation. NATs give rise to sense-antisense transcript pairs and the number of these identified has escalated greatly with the availability of DNA sequencing resources and public databases. Traditionally, NATs were identified by the alignment of full-length cDNAs or expressed sequence tags to genome sequences, but an alternative method for large-scale detection of sense-antisense transcript pairs involves the use of microarrays. In this study we developed a novel protocol to assay sense- and antisense-strand transcription on the 55 K Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array, which is a 3' in vitro transcription (3'IVT expression array. We selected five different tissue types for assay to enable maximum discovery, and used the 'Chinese Spring' wheat genotype because most of the wheat GeneChip probe sequences were based on its genomic sequence. This study is the first report of using a 3'IVT expression array to discover the expression of natural sense-antisense transcript pairs, and may be considered as proof-of-concept. Results By using alternative target preparation schemes, both the sense- and antisense-strand derived transcripts were labeled and hybridized to the Wheat GeneChip. Quality assurance verified that successful hybridization did occur in the antisense-strand assay. A stringent threshold for positive hybridization was applied, which resulted in the identification of 110 sense-antisense transcript pairs, as well as 80 potentially antisense-specific transcripts. Strand-specific RT-PCR validated the microarray observations, and showed that antisense transcription is likely to be tissue specific. For the annotated sense

  12. Large-scale mapping and validation of Escherichia coli transcriptional regulation from a compendium of expression profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah J Faith

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Machine learning approaches offer the potential to systematically identify transcriptional regulatory interactions from a compendium of microarray expression profiles. However, experimental validation of the performance of these methods at the genome scale has remained elusive. Here we assess the global performance of four existing classes of inference algorithms using 445 Escherichia coli Affymetrix arrays and 3,216 known E. coli regulatory interactions from RegulonDB. We also developed and applied the context likelihood of relatedness (CLR algorithm, a novel extension of the relevance networks class of algorithms. CLR demonstrates an average precision gain of 36% relative to the next-best performing algorithm. At a 60% true positive rate, CLR identifies 1,079 regulatory interactions, of which 338 were in the previously known network and 741 were novel predictions. We tested the predicted interactions for three transcription factors with chromatin immunoprecipitation, confirming 21 novel interactions and verifying our RegulonDB-based performance estimates. CLR also identified a regulatory link providing central metabolic control of iron transport, which we confirmed with real-time quantitative PCR. The compendium of expression data compiled in this study, coupled with RegulonDB, provides a valuable model system for further improvement of network inference algorithms using experimental data.

  13. Transcriptional profiling of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA regulated genes in mineralizing dental pulp cells at early and late time points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry F. Duncan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Dental pulp tissue can be damaged by a range of irritants, however, if the irritation is removed and/or the tooth is adequately restored, pulp regeneration is possible (Mjör and Tronstad, 1974 [1]. At present, dental restorative materials limit healing by impairing mineralization and repair processes and as a result new biologically-based materials are being developed (Ferracane et al., 2010 [2]. Previous studies have highlighted the benefit of epigenetic modification by histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi application to dental pulp cells (DPCs, which induces changes to chromatin architecture, promoting gene expression and cellular-reparative events (Duncan et al., 2013 [3]; Paino et al., 2014 [4]. In this study a genome-wide transcription profiling in epigenetically-modified mineralizing primary DPC cultures was performed, at relatively early and late time-points, to identify differentially regulated transcripts that may provide novel therapeutic targets for use in restorative dentistry. Here we provide detailed methods and analysis on these microarray data which has been deposited in Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO: GSE67175.

  14. Distinct Contributions of Replication and Transcription to Mutation Rate Variation of Human Genomes

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng

    2012-03-23

    Here, we evaluate the contribution of two major biological processes—DNA replication and transcription—to mutation rate variation in human genomes. Based on analysis of the public human tissue transcriptomics data, high-resolution replicating map of Hela cells and dbSNP data, we present significant correlations between expression breadth, replication time in local regions and SNP density. SNP density of tissue-specific (TS) genes is significantly higher than that of housekeeping (HK) genes. TS genes tend to locate in late-replicating genomic regions and genes in such regions have a higher SNP density compared to those in early-replication regions. In addition, SNP density is found to be positively correlated with expression level among HK genes. We conclude that the process of DNA replication generates stronger mutational pressure than transcription-associated biological processes do, resulting in an increase of mutation rate in TS genes while having weaker effects on HK genes. In contrast, transcription-associated processes are mainly responsible for the accumulation of mutations in highly-expressed HK genes.

  15. Whole-genome transcriptional analysis of heavy metal stresses inCaulobacter crescentus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Ping; Brodie, Eoin L.; Suzuki, Yohey; McAdams, Harley H.; Andersen, Gary L.

    2005-09-21

    The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus and related stalkbacterial species are known for their distinctive ability to live in lownutrient environments, a characteristic of most heavy metal contaminatedsites. Caulobacter crescentus is a model organism for studying cell cycleregulation with well developed genetics. We have identified the pathwaysresponding to heavy metal toxicity in C. crescentus to provide insightsfor possible application of Caulobacter to environmental restoration. Weexposed C. crescentus cells to four heavy metals (chromium, cadmium,selenium and uranium) and analyzed genome wide transcriptional activitiespost exposure using a Affymetrix GeneChip microarray. C. crescentusshowed surprisingly high tolerance to uranium, a possible mechanism forwhich may be formation of extracellular calcium-uranium-phosphateprecipitates. The principal response to these metals was protectionagainst oxidative stress (up-regulation of manganese-dependent superoxidedismutase, sodA). Glutathione S-transferase, thioredoxin, glutaredoxinsand DNA repair enzymes responded most strongly to cadmium and chromate.The cadmium and chromium stress response also focused on reducing theintracellular metal concentration, with multiple efflux pumps employed toremove cadmium while a sulfate transporter was down-regulated to reducenon-specific uptake of chromium. Membrane proteins were also up-regulatedin response to most of the metals tested. A two-component signaltransduction system involved in the uranium response was identified.Several differentially regulated transcripts from regions previously notknown to encode proteins were identified, demonstrating the advantage ofevaluating the transcriptome using whole genome microarrays.

  16. DNA replication factor C1 mediates genomic stability and transcriptional gene silencing in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Qian

    2010-07-01

    Genetic screening identified a suppressor of ros1-1, a mutant of REPRESSOR OF SILENCING1 (ROS1; encoding a DNA demethylation protein). The suppressor is a mutation in the gene encoding the largest subunit of replication factor C (RFC1). This mutation of RFC1 reactivates the unlinked 35S-NPTII transgene, which is silenced in ros1 and also increases expression of the pericentromeric Athila retrotransposons named transcriptional silent information in a DNA methylationindependent manner. rfc1 is more sensitive than the wild type to the DNA-damaging agent methylmethane sulphonate and to the DNA inter- and intra- cross-linking agent cisplatin. The rfc1 mutant constitutively expresses the G2/M-specific cyclin CycB1;1 and other DNA repair-related genes. Treatment with DNA-damaging agents mimics the rfc1 mutation in releasing the silenced 35S-NPTII, suggesting that spontaneously induced genomic instability caused by the rfc1 mutation might partially contribute to the released transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). The frequency of somatic homologous recombination is significantly increased in the rfc1 mutant. Interestingly, ros1 mutants show increased telomere length, but rfc1 mutants show decreased telomere length and reduced expression of telomerase. Our results suggest that RFC1 helps mediate genomic stability and TGS in Arabidopsis thaliana. © 2010 American Society of Plant Biologists.

  17. AIRE recruits multiple transcriptional components to specific genomic regions through tethering to nuclear matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yunxia; Kupfer, Rene; Stewart, Benjamin J; Williams-Skipp, Cheryll; Crowell, Christopher K; Patel, Dhavalkumar D; Sain, Steven; Scheinman, Robert I

    2006-02-01

    Thymic selection requires that diverse self antigens be presented to developing thymocytes by stromal cells. Consistent with this function, medullary thymic epithelial cells have been shown to express a large number of genes, many of which are tissue restricted. Autoimmune regulator (AIRE) is a nuclear protein, which has recently been identified as a regulator of this process, however, the mechanism by which AIRE functions is not well understood. Here we use a transrepression assay to demonstrate that AIRE interacts with multiple components of the transcription complex including a novel interaction with the UBA domain protein, GBDR1. When AIRE is expressed in cultured human thymic epithelial cells, it tightly associates with nuclear matrix, suggesting that AIRE responsive genes may be localized to specific regions. Using a mathematical approach we have re-analyzed an Affymetrix dataset identifying AIRE responsive genes and show that they tend to localize to specific regions of the genome. Together, these data suggest that AIRE regulates gene expression by recruiting components of the transcription complex to specific regions of the genome via interactions with nuclear matrix.

  18. Comprehensive analysis of the transcriptional profile of the Mediator complex across human cancer types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syring, Isabella; Klümper, Niklas; Offermann, Anne; Braun, Martin; Deng, Mario; Boehm, Diana; Queisser, Angela; von Mässenhausen, Anne; Brägelmann, Johannes; Vogel, Wenzel; Schmidt, Doris; Majores, Michael; Schindler, Anne; Kristiansen, Glen; Müller, Stefan C; Ellinger, Jörg; Shaikhibrahim, Zaki; Perner, Sven

    2016-04-26

    The Mediator complex is a key regulator of gene transcription and several studies demonstrated altered expressions of particular subunits in diverse human diseases, especially cancer. However a systematic study deciphering the transcriptional expression of the Mediator across different cancer entities is still lacking.We therefore performed a comprehensive in silico cancer vs. benign analysis of the Mediator complex subunits (MEDs) for 20 tumor entities using Oncomine datasets. The transcriptional expression profiles across almost all cancer entities showed differentially expressed MEDs as compared to benign tissue. Differential expression of MED8 in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and MED12 in lung cancer (LCa) were validated and further investigated by immunohistochemical staining on tissue microarrays containing large numbers of specimen. MED8 in clear cell RCC (ccRCC) associated with shorter survival and advanced TNM stage and showed higher expression in metastatic than primary tumors. In vitro, siRNA mediated MED8 knockdown significantly impaired proliferation and motility in ccRCC cell lines, hinting at a role for MED8 to serve as a novel therapeutic target in ccRCC. Taken together, our Mediator complex transcriptome proved to be a valid tool for identifying cancer-related shifts in Mediator complex composition, revealing that MEDs do exhibit cancer specific transcriptional expression profiles.

  19. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-04-26

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation.

  20. Nanosilver pathophysiology in earthworms: Transcriptional profiling of secretory proteins and the implication for the protein corona

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, Yuya; Miclaus, Teodora; Engelmann, Péter

    2016-01-01

    the corona composition, the extent to which nanoparticles influence the cells’ protein secretion profile is of remarkable interest that has rarely acquired attention. Here, we have probed transcriptional responses of E. fetida coelomocytes to the representative nanosilver NM-300K (15 nm) in a time......-like receptor (TLR) signaling. This offers an intriguing perspective of the nanosilver pathophysiology in earthworms, in which the conserved pattern recognition receptor TLRs may play an effector role....

  1. Discovery of non-directional and directional pioneer transcription factors by modeling DNase profile magnitude and shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Sophia; Barkal, Amira A; van Hoff, John Peter; Karun, Vivek; Jaakkola, Tommi; Gifford, David K

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe Protein Interaction Quantitation (PIQ), a computational method that models the magnitude and shape of genome-wide DNase profiles to facilitate the identification of transcription factor (TF) binding sites. Through the use of machine learning techniques, PIQ identified binding sites for >700 TFs from one DNase-seq experiment with accuracy comparable to ChIP-seq for motif-associated TFs (median AUC=0.93 across 303 TFs). We applied PIQ to analyze DNase-seq data from mouse embryonic stem cells differentiating into pre-pancreatic and intestinal endoderm. We identified (n=120) and experimentally validated eight ‘pioneer’ TF families that dynamically open chromatin, enabling other TFs to bind to adjacent DNA. Four pioneer TF families only open chromatin in one direction from their motifs. Furthermore, we identified a class of ‘settler’ TFs whose genomic binding is principally governed by proximity to open chromatin. Our results support a model of hierarchical TF binding in which directional and non-directional pioneer activity shapes the chromatin landscape for population by settler TFs. PMID:24441470

  2. Improved methods and resources for paramecium genomics: transcription units, gene annotation and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaiz, Olivier; Van Dijk, Erwin; Bétermier, Mireille; Lhuillier-Akakpo, Maoussi; de Vanssay, Augustin; Duharcourt, Sandra; Sallet, Erika; Gouzy, Jérôme; Sperling, Linda

    2017-06-26

    The 15 sibling species of the Paramecium aurelia cryptic species complex emerged after a whole genome duplication that occurred tens of millions of years ago. Given extensive knowledge of the genetics and epigenetics of Paramecium acquired over the last century, this species complex offers a uniquely powerful system to investigate the consequences of whole genome duplication in a unicellular eukaryote as well as the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that drive speciation. High quality Paramecium gene models are important for research using this system. The major aim of the work reported here was to build an improved gene annotation pipeline for the Paramecium lineage. We generated oriented RNA-Seq transcriptome data across the sexual process of autogamy for the model species Paramecium tetraurelia. We determined, for the first time in a ciliate, candidate P. tetraurelia transcription start sites using an adapted Cap-Seq protocol. We developed TrUC, multi-threaded Perl software that in conjunction with TopHat mapping of RNA-Seq data to a reference genome, predicts transcription units for the annotation pipeline. We used EuGene software to combine annotation evidence. The high quality gene structural annotations obtained for P. tetraurelia were used as evidence to improve published annotations for 3 other Paramecium species. The RNA-Seq data were also used for differential gene expression analysis, providing a gene expression atlas that is more sensitive than the previously established microarray resource. We have developed a gene annotation pipeline tailored for the compact genomes and tiny introns of Paramecium species. A novel component of this pipeline, TrUC, predicts transcription units using Cap-Seq and oriented RNA-Seq data. TrUC could prove useful beyond Paramecium, especially in the case of high gene density. Accurate predictions of 3' and 5' UTR will be particularly valuable for studies of gene expression (e.g. nucleosome positioning, identification of cis

  3. Transcriptional profiling uncovers a network of cholesterol-responsive atherosclerosis target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefin Skogsberg

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the well-documented effects of plasma lipid lowering regimes halting atherosclerosis lesion development and reducing morbidity and mortality of coronary artery disease and stroke, the transcriptional response in the atherosclerotic lesion mediating these beneficial effects has not yet been carefully investigated. We performed transcriptional profiling at 10-week intervals in atherosclerosis-prone mice with human-like hypercholesterolemia and a genetic switch to lower plasma lipoproteins (Ldlr(-/-Apo(100/100Mttp(flox/flox Mx1-Cre. Atherosclerotic lesions progressed slowly at first, then expanded rapidly, and plateaued after advanced lesions formed. Analysis of lesion expression profiles indicated that accumulation of lipid-poor macrophages reached a point that led to the rapid expansion phase with accelerated foam-cell formation and inflammation, an interpretation supported by lesion histology. Genetic lowering of plasma cholesterol (e.g., lipoproteins at this point all together prevented the formation of advanced plaques and parallel transcriptional profiling of the atherosclerotic arterial wall identified 37 cholesterol-responsive genes mediating this effect. Validation by siRNA-inhibition in macrophages incubated with acetylated-LDL revealed a network of eight cholesterol-responsive atherosclerosis genes regulating cholesterol-ester accumulation. Taken together, we have identified a network of atherosclerosis genes that in response to plasma cholesterol-lowering prevents the formation of advanced plaques. This network should be of interest for the development of novel atherosclerosis therapies.

  4. An MSC2 Promoter-lacZ Fusion Gene Reveals Zinc-Responsive Changes in Sites of Transcription Initiation That Occur across the Yeast Genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsuan Wu

    Full Text Available The Msc2 and Zrg17 proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae form a complex to transport zinc into the endoplasmic reticulum. ZRG17 is transcriptionally induced in zinc-limited cells by the Zap1 transcription factor. In this report, we show that MSC2 mRNA also increases (~1.5 fold in zinc-limited cells. The MSC2 gene has two in-frame ATG codons at its 5' end, ATG1 and ATG2; ATG2 is the predicted initiation codon. When the MSC2 promoter was fused at ATG2 to the lacZ gene, we found that unlike the chromosomal gene this reporter showed a 4-fold decrease in lacZ mRNA in zinc-limited cells. Surprisingly, β-galactosidase activity generated by this fusion gene increased ~7 fold during zinc deficiency suggesting the influence of post-transcriptional factors. Transcription of MSC2ATG2-lacZ was found to start upstream of ATG1 in zinc-replete cells. In zinc-limited cells, transcription initiation shifted to sites just upstream of ATG2. From the results of mutational and polysome profile analyses, we propose the following explanation for these effects. In zinc-replete cells, MSC2ATG2-lacZ mRNA with long 5' UTRs fold into secondary structures that inhibit translation. In zinc-limited cells, transcripts with shorter unstructured 5' UTRs are generated that are more efficiently translated. Surprisingly, chromosomal MSC2 did not show start site shifts in response to zinc status and only shorter 5' UTRs were observed. However, the shifts that occur in the MSC2ATG2-lacZ construct led us to identify significant transcription start site changes affecting the expression of ~3% of all genes. Therefore, zinc status can profoundly alter transcription initiation across the yeast genome.

  5. Genome-wide analysis of plant-specific Dof transcription factor family in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Yuyang; Zhang, Chanjuan; Zhang, Tingyan; Hu, Tixu; Ye, Jie; Zhang, Junhong; Wang, Taotao; Li, Hanxia; Ye, Zhibiao

    2013-06-01

    The Dof (DNA binding with One Finger) family encoding single zinc finger proteins has been known as a family of plant-specific transcription factors. These transcription factors are involved in a variety of functions of importance for different biological processes in plants. In the current study, we identified 34 Dof family genes in tomato, distributed on 11 chromosomes. A complete overview of SlDof genes in tomato is presented, including the gene structures, chromosome locations, phylogeny, protein motifs and evolution pattern. Phylogenetic analysis of 34 SlDof proteins resulted in four classes constituting six clusters. In addition, a comparative analysis between these genes in tomato, Arabidopsis and rice was also performed. The tomato Dof family expansion has been dated to recent duplication events, and segmental duplication is predominant for the SlDof genes. Furthermore, the SlDof genes displayed differential expression either in their transcript abundance or in their expression patterns under normal growth conditions. This is the first step towards genome-wide analyses of the Dof genes in tomato. Our study provides a very useful reference for cloning and functional analysis of the members of this gene family in tomato and other species. © 2013 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  6. Genome conformation capture reveals that the Escherichia coli chromosome is organized by replication and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliero, Cedric; Grand, Ralph S; Jones, M Beatrix; Jin, Ding J; O'Sullivan, Justin M

    2013-07-01

    To fit within the confines of the cell, bacterial chromosomes are highly condensed into a structure called the nucleoid. Despite the high degree of compaction in the nucleoid, the genome remains accessible to essential biological processes, such as replication and transcription. Here, we present the first high-resolution chromosome conformation capture-based molecular analysis of the spatial organization of the Escherichia coli nucleoid during rapid growth in rich medium and following an induced amino acid starvation that promotes the stringent response. Our analyses identify the presence of origin and terminus domains in exponentially growing cells. Moreover, we observe an increased number of interactions within the origin domain and significant clustering of SeqA-binding sequences, suggesting a role for SeqA in clustering of newly replicated chromosomes. By contrast, 'histone-like' protein (i.e. Fis, IHF and H-NS) -binding sites did not cluster, and their role in global nucleoid organization does not manifest through the mediation of chromosomal contacts. Finally, genes that were downregulated after induction of the stringent response were spatially clustered, indicating that transcription in E. coli occurs at transcription foci.

  7. Exploring Genome-Wide Expression Profiles Using Machine Learning Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebschull, Moritz; Papapanou, Panos N

    2017-01-01

    Although contemporary high-throughput -omics methods produce high-dimensional data, the resulting wealth of information is difficult to assess using traditional statistical procedures. Machine learning methods facilitate the detection of additional patterns, beyond the mere identification of lists of features that differ between groups.Here, we demonstrate the utility of (1) supervised classification algorithms in class validation, and (2) unsupervised clustering in class discovery. We use data from our previous work that described the transcriptional profiles of gingival tissue samples obtained from subjects suffering from chronic or aggressive periodontitis (1) to test whether the two diagnostic entities were also characterized by differences on the molecular level, and (2) to search for a novel, alternative classification of periodontitis based on the tissue transcriptomes.Using machine learning technology, we provide evidence for diagnostic imprecision in the currently accepted classification of periodontitis, and demonstrate that a novel, alternative classification based on differences in gingival tissue transcriptomes is feasible. The outlined procedures allow for the unbiased interrogation of high-dimensional datasets for characteristic underlying classes, and are applicable to a broad range of -omics data.

  8. The Maize TFome--development of a transcription factor open reading frame collection for functional genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdo, Brett; Gray, John; Goetting-Minesky, Mary P; Wittler, Bettina; Hunt, Matthew; Li, Tai; Velliquette, David; Thomas, Julie; Gentzel, Irene; dos Santos Brito, Michael; Mejía-Guerra, Maria Katherine; Connolly, Layne N; Qaisi, Dalya; Li, Wei; Casas, Maria I; Doseff, Andrea I; Grotewold, Erich

    2014-10-01

    Establishing the architecture of the gene regulatory networks (GRNs) responsible for controlling the transcription of all genes in an organism is a natural development that follows elucidation of the genome sequence. Reconstruction of the GRN requires the availability of a series of molecular tools and resources that so far have been limited to a few model organisms. One such resource consists of collections of transcription factor (TF) open reading frames (ORFs) cloned into vectors that facilitate easy expression in plants or microorganisms. In this study, we describe the development of a publicly available maize TF ORF collection (TFome) of 2034 clones corresponding to 2017 unique gene models in recombination-ready vectors that make possible the facile mobilization of the TF sequences into a number of different expression vectors. The collection also includes several hundred co-regulators (CoREGs), which we classified into well-defined families, and for which we propose here a standard nomenclature, as we have previously done for TFs. We describe the strategies employed to overcome the limitations associated with cloning ORFs from a genome that remains incompletely annotated, with a partial full-length cDNA set available, and with many TF/CoREG genes lacking experimental support. In many instances this required the combination of genome-wide expression data with gene synthesis approaches. The strategies developed will be valuable for developing similar resources for other agriculturally important plants. Information on all the clones generated is available through the GRASSIUS knowledgebase (http://grassius.org/). © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The Maize TFome – development of a transcription factor open reading frame collection for functional genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdo, Brett; Gray, John; Goetting-Minesky, Mary P; Wittler, Bettina; Hunt, Matthew; Li, Tai; Velliquette, David; Thomas, Julie; Gentzel, Irene; Brito, Michael dos Santos; Mejía-Guerra, Maria Katherine; Connolly, Layne N; Qaisi, Dalya; Li, Wei; Casas, Maria I; Doseff, Andrea I; Grotewold, Erich

    2014-01-01

    Establishing the architecture of the gene regulatory networks (GRNs) responsible for controlling the transcription of all genes in an organism is a natural development that follows elucidation of the genome sequence. Reconstruction of the GRN requires the availability of a series of molecular tools and resources that so far have been limited to a few model organisms. One such resource consists of collections of transcription factor (TF) open reading frames (ORFs) cloned into vectors that facilitate easy expression in plants or microorganisms. In this study, we describe the development of a publicly available maize TF ORF collection (TFome) of 2034 clones corresponding to 2017 unique gene models in recombination-ready vectors that make possible the facile mobilization of the TF sequences into a number of different expression vectors. The collection also includes several hundred co-regulators (CoREGs), which we classified into well-defined families, and for which we propose here a standard nomenclature, as we have previously done for TFs. We describe the strategies employed to overcome the limitations associated with cloning ORFs from a genome that remains incompletely annotated, with a partial full-length cDNA set available, and with many TF/CoREG genes lacking experimental support. In many instances this required the combination of genome-wide expression data with gene synthesis approaches. The strategies developed will be valuable for developing similar resources for other agriculturally important plants. Information on all the clones generated is available through the GRASSIUS knowledgebase (http://grassius.org/). PMID:25053252

  10. Genome-wide prediction of transcriptional regulatory elements of human promoters using gene expression and promoter analysis data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Seon-Young

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A complete understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of gene expression is the next important issue of genomics. Many bioinformaticians have developed methods and algorithms for predicting transcriptional regulatory mechanisms from sequence, gene expression, and binding data. However, most of these studies involved the use of yeast which has much simpler regulatory networks than human and has many genome wide binding data and gene expression data under diverse conditions. Studies of genome wide transcriptional networks of human genomes currently lag behind those of yeast. Results We report herein a new method that combines gene expression data analysis with promoter analysis to infer transcriptional regulatory elements of human genes. The Z scores from the application of gene set analysis with gene sets of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs were successfully used to represent the activity of TFBSs in a given microarray data set. A significant correlation between the Z scores of gene sets of TFBSs and individual genes across multiple conditions permitted successful identification of many known human transcriptional regulatory elements of genes as well as the prediction of numerous putative TFBSs of many genes which will constitute a good starting point for further experiments. Using Z scores of gene sets of TFBSs produced better predictions than the use of mRNA levels of a transcription factor itself, suggesting that the Z scores of gene sets of TFBSs better represent diverse mechanisms for changing the activity of transcription factors in the cell. In addition, cis-regulatory modules, combinations of co-acting TFBSs, were readily identified by our analysis. Conclusion By a strategic combination of gene set level analysis of gene expression data sets and promoter analysis, we were able to identify and predict many transcriptional regulatory elements of human genes. We conclude that this approach will aid in decoding

  11. Transcript profiling of Elf5+/- mammary glands during pregnancy identifies novel targets of Elf5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renee L Rogers

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elf5, an epithelial specific Ets transcription factor, plays a crucial role in the pregnancy-associated development of the mouse mammary gland. Elf5(-/- embryos do not survive, however the Elf5(+/- mammary gland displays a severe pregnancy-associated developmental defect. While it is known that Elf5 is crucial for correct mammary development and lactation, the molecular mechanisms employed by Elf5 to exert its effects on the mammary gland are largely unknown. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Transcript profiling was used to investigate the transcriptional changes that occur as a result of Elf5 haploinsufficiency in the Elf5(+/- mouse model. We show that the development of the mouse Elf5(+/- mammary gland is delayed at a transcriptional and morphological level, due to the delayed increase in Elf5 protein in these glands. We also identify a number of potential Elf5 target genes, including Mucin 4, whose expression, is directly regulated by the binding of Elf5 to an Ets binding site within its promoter. CONCLUSION: We identify novel transcriptional targets of Elf5 and show that Muc4 is a direct target of Elf5, further elucidating the mechanisms through which Elf5 regulates proliferation and differentiation in the mammary gland.

  12. Genome-scale analysis and comparison of gene expression profiles in developing and germinated pollen in Oryza sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Li Q; Xu, Wen Y; Deng, Zhu Y; Su, Zhen; Xue, Yongbiao; Wang, Tai

    2010-05-28

    Pollen development from the microspore involves a series of coordinated cellular events, and the resulting mature pollen has a specialized function to quickly germinate, produce a polar-growth pollen tube derived from the vegetative cell, and deliver two sperm cells into the embryo sac for double fertilization. The gene expression profiles of developing and germinated pollen have been characterised by use of the eudicot model plant Arabidopsis. Rice, one of the most important cereal crops, has been used as an excellent monocot model. A comprehensive analysis of transcriptome profiles of developing and germinated pollen in rice is important to understand the conserved and diverse mechanism underlying pollen development and germination in eudicots and monocots. We used Affymetrix GeneChip Rice Genome Array to comprehensively analyzed the dynamic changes in the transcriptomes of rice pollen at five sequential developmental stages from microspores to germinated pollen. Among the 51,279 transcripts on the array, we found 25,062 pollen-preferential transcripts, among which 2,203 were development stage-enriched. The diversity of transcripts decreased greatly from microspores to mature and germinated pollen, whereas the number of stage-enriched transcripts displayed a "U-type" change, with the lowest at the bicellular pollen stage; and a transition of overrepresented stage-enriched transcript groups associated with different functional categories, which indicates a shift in gene expression program at the bicellular pollen stage. About 54% of the now-annotated rice F-box protein genes were expressed preferentially in pollen. The transcriptome profile of germinated pollen was significantly and positively correlated with that of mature pollen. Analysis of expression profiles and coexpressed features of the pollen-preferential transcripts related to cell cycle, transcription, the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system, phytohormone signalling, the kinase system and defense

  13. Genome-scale analysis and comparison of gene expression profiles in developing and germinated pollen in Oryza sativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Yongbiao

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pollen development from the microspore involves a series of coordinated cellular events, and the resulting mature pollen has a specialized function to quickly germinate, produce a polar-growth pollen tube derived from the vegetative cell, and deliver two sperm cells into the embryo sac for double fertilization. The gene expression profiles of developing and germinated pollen have been characterised by use of the eudicot model plant Arabidopsis. Rice, one of the most important cereal crops, has been used as an excellent monocot model. A comprehensive analysis of transcriptome profiles of developing and germinated pollen in rice is important to understand the conserved and diverse mechanism underlying pollen development and germination in eudicots and monocots. Results We used Affymetrix GeneChip® Rice Genome Array to comprehensively analyzed the dynamic changes in the transcriptomes of rice pollen at five sequential developmental stages from microspores to germinated pollen. Among the 51,279 transcripts on the array, we found 25,062 pollen-preferential transcripts, among which 2,203 were development stage-enriched. The diversity of transcripts decreased greatly from microspores to mature and germinated pollen, whereas the number of stage-enriched transcripts displayed a "U-type" change, with the lowest at the bicellular pollen stage; and a transition of overrepresented stage-enriched transcript groups associated with different functional categories, which indicates a shift in gene expression program at the bicellular pollen stage. About 54% of the now-annotated rice F-box protein genes were expressed preferentially in pollen. The transcriptome profile of germinated pollen was significantly and positively correlated with that of mature pollen. Analysis of expression profiles and coexpressed features of the pollen-preferential transcripts related to cell cycle, transcription, the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system, phytohormone

  14. Transcription Activator-Like Effectors (TALEs) Hybrid Nucleases for Genome Engineering Application

    KAUST Repository

    Wibowo, Anjar

    2011-06-06

    Gene targeting is a powerful genome engineering tool that can be used for a variety of biotechnological applications. Genomic double-strand DNA breaks generated by engineered site-specific nucleases can stimulate gene targeting. Hybrid nucleases are composed of DNA binding module and DNA cleavage module. Zinc Finger Nucleases were used to generate double-strand DNA breaks but it suffers from failures and lack of reproducibility. The transcription activator–like effectors (TALEs) from plant pathogenic Xanthomonas contain a unique type of DNA-binding domain that bind specific DNA targets. The purpose of this study is to generate novel sequence specific nucleases by fusing a de novo engineered Hax3 TALE-based DNA binding domain to a FokI cleavage domain. Our data show that the de novo engineered TALE nuclease can bind to its target sequence and create double-strand DNA breaks in vitro. We also show that the de novo engineered TALE nuclease is capable of generating double-strand DNA breaks in its target sequence in vivo, when transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that TALE-based hybrid nucleases can be tailored to bind a user-selected DNA sequence and generate site-specific genomic double-strand DNA breaks. TALE-based hybrid nucleases hold much promise as powerful molecular tools for gene targeting applications.

  15. Genome-wide DNA Methylation Profiling by Modified Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing in Brassica rapa Suggests that Epigenetic Modifications Play a Key Role in Polyploid Genome Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun eChen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Brassica rapa includes some of the most important vegetables worldwide as well as oilseed crops. The complete annotated genome sequence confirmed its paleohexaploid origins and provides opportunities for exploring the detailed process of polyploid genome evolution. We generated a genome-wide DNA methylation profile for B. rapa using a modified reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS method. This sampling represented 2.24% of all CG loci (2.5 x 105, 2.16% CHG (2.7 x 105 and 1.68% CHH loci (1.05 x 105 (where H = A, T or C. Our sampling of DNA methylation in B. rapa indicated that 52.4% of CG sites were present as 5mCG, with 31.8% of CHG and 8.3% of CHH. It was found that genic regions of single copy genes had significantly higher methylation compared to those of two or three copy genes. Differences in degree of genic DNA methylation were observed in a hierarchical relationship corresponding to the relative age of the three ancestral subgenomes, primarily accounted by single-copy genes. RNA-seq analysis revealed that overall the level of transcription was negatively correlated with mean gene methylation content and depended on copy number or associated with the different subgenomes. These results provide new insights into the role epigenetic variation plays in polyploid genome evolution, and suggest an alternative mechanism for duplicate gene loss.

  16. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling by modified reduced representation bisulfite sequencing in Brassica rapa suggests that epigenetic modifications play a key role in polyploid genome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xun; Ge, Xianhong; Wang, Jing; Tan, Chen; King, Graham J; Liu, Kede

    2015-01-01

    Brassica rapa includes some of the most important vegetables worldwide as well as oilseed crops. The complete annotated genome sequence confirmed its paleohexaploid origins and provides opportunities for exploring the detailed process of polyploid genome evolution. We generated a genome-wide DNA methylation profile for B. rapa using a modified reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) method. This sampling represented 2.24% of all CG loci (2.5 × 10(5)), 2.16% CHG (2.7 × 10(5)), and 1.68% CHH loci (1.05 × 10(5)) (where H = A, T, or C). Our sampling of DNA methylation in B. rapa indicated that 52.4% of CG sites were present as (5m)CG, with 31.8% of CHG and 8.3% of CHH. It was found that genic regions of single copy genes had significantly higher methylation compared to those of two or three copy genes. Differences in degree of genic DNA methylation were observed in a hierarchical relationship corresponding to the relative age of the three ancestral subgenomes, primarily accounted by single-copy genes. RNA-seq analysis revealed that overall the level of transcription was negatively correlated with mean gene methylation content and depended on copy number or was associated with the different subgenomes. These results provide new insights into the role epigenetic variation plays in polyploid genome evolution, and suggest an alternative mechanism for duplicate gene loss.

  17. Development of a fluorescent microsphere-based multiplexed high-throughput assay system for profiling of transcription factor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaoi, Takuro; Jiang, Xin; Li, Xianqiang

    2006-06-01

    Transcription factors (TFs), which play crucial roles in the regulation of gene expression in the human genome, are highly regulated by a variety of mechanisms. A single extracellular stimulus can trigger multiple signaling pathways, and these in turn can activate multiple TFs to mediate the inducible expression of target genes. Alterations in the activities of TFs are often associated with human diseases, such as altered activating factor 1, estrogen receptor, and p53 function in cancer, nuclear factor kappaB in inflammatory diseases, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in obesity. A systematic assay for profiling the activation of TFs will aid in elucidating the mechanisms of TF activation, reveal altered TFs associated with human diseases, and aid in developing assays for drug discovery. Here, we developed a 24-plex fluorescent microsphere-based TF activation assay system with a 96-well plate format. The assay system enabled high-throughput profiling of the DNA binding activity of TFs in multiple samples with high sensitivity.

  18. The colitis-associated transcriptional profile of commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron enhances adaptive immune responses to a bacterial antigen.

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    Jonathan J Hansen

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD may be caused in part by aberrant immune responses to commensal intestinal microbes including the well-characterized anaerobic gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B. theta. Healthy, germ-free HLA-B27 transgenic (Tg rats develop chronic colitis when colonized with complex gut commensal bacteria whereas non-transgenic (nTg rats remain disease-free. However, the role of B. theta in causing disease in Tg rats is unknown nor is much known about how gut microbes respond to host inflammation.Tg and nTg rats were monoassociated with a human isolate of B. theta. Colonic inflammation was assessed by histologic scoring and tissue pro-inflammatory cytokine measurement. Whole genome transcriptional profiling of B. theta recovered from ceca was performed using custom GeneChips and data analyzed using dChip, Significance Analysis of Microarrays, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA software. Western Blots were used to determine adaptive immune responses to a differentially expressed B. theta gene.B. theta monoassociated Tg rats, but not nTg or germ-free controls, developed chronic colitis. Transcriptional profiles of cecal B. theta were significantly different in Tg vs. nTg rats. GSEA revealed that genes in KEGG canonical pathways involved in bacterial growth and metabolism were downregulated in B. theta from Tg rats with colitis though luminal bacterial concentrations were unaffected. Bacterial genes in the Gene Ontology molecular function "receptor activity", most of which encode nutrient binding proteins, were significantly upregulated in B. theta from Tg rats and include a SusC homolog that induces adaptive immune responses in Tg rats.B. theta induces colitis in HLA-B27 Tg rats, which is associated with regulation of bacterial genes in metabolic and nutrient binding pathways that may affect host immune responses. These studies of the host-microbial dialogue may lead to the identification of novel microbial targets

  19. RegPrecise 3.0--a resource for genome-scale exploration of transcriptional regulation in bacteria.

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    Novichkov, Pavel S; Kazakov, Alexey E; Ravcheev, Dmitry A; Leyn, Semen A; Kovaleva, Galina Y; Sutormin, Roman A; Kazanov, Marat D; Riehl, William; Arkin, Adam P; Dubchak, Inna; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2013-11-01

    Genome-scale prediction of gene regulation and reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in prokaryotes is one of the critical tasks of modern genomics. Bacteria from different taxonomic groups, whose lifestyles and natural environments are substantially different, possess highly diverged transcriptional regulatory networks. The comparative genomics approaches are useful for in silico reconstruction of bacterial regulons and networks operated by both transcription factors (TFs) and RNA regulatory elements (riboswitches). RegPrecise (http://regprecise.lbl.gov) is a web resource for collection, visualization and analysis of transcriptional regulons reconstructed by comparative genomics. We significantly expanded a reference collection of manually curated regulons we introduced earlier. RegPrecise 3.0 provides access to inferred regulatory interactions organized by phylogenetic, structural and functional properties. Taxonomy-specific collections include 781 TF regulogs inferred in more than 160 genomes representing 14 taxonomic groups of Bacteria. TF-specific collections include regulogs for a selected subset of 40 TFs reconstructed across more than 30 taxonomic lineages. Novel collections of regulons operated by RNA regulatory elements (riboswitches) include near 400 regulogs inferred in 24 bacterial lineages. RegPrecise 3.0 provides four classifications of the reference regulons implemented as controlled vocabularies: 55 TF protein families; 43 RNA motif families; ~150 biological processes or metabolic pathways; and ~200 effectors or environmental signals. Genome-wide visualization of regulatory networks and metabolic pathways covered by the reference regulons are available for all studied genomes. A separate section of RegPrecise 3.0 contains draft regulatory networks in 640 genomes obtained by an conservative propagation of the reference regulons to closely related genomes. RegPrecise 3.0 gives access to the transcriptional regulons reconstructed in

  20. Whole-genome gene expression profiling of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples.

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    Craig April

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a gene expression assay (Whole-Genome DASL, capable of generating whole-genome gene expression profiles from degraded samples such as formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE specimens.We demonstrated a similar level of sensitivity in gene detection between matched fresh-frozen (FF and FFPE samples, with the number and overlap of probes detected in the FFPE samples being approximately 88% and 95% of that in the corresponding FF samples, respectively; 74% of the differentially expressed probes overlapped between the FF and FFPE pairs. The WG-DASL assay is also able to detect 1.3-1.5 and 1.5-2 -fold changes in intact and FFPE samples, respectively. The dynamic range for the assay is approximately 3 logs. Comparing the WG-DASL assay with an in vitro transcription-based labeling method yielded fold-change correlations of R(2 approximately 0.83, while fold-change comparisons with quantitative RT-PCR assays yielded R(2 approximately 0.86 and R(2 approximately 0.55 for intact and FFPE samples, respectively. Additionally, the WG-DASL assay yielded high self-correlations (R(2>0.98 with low intact RNA inputs ranging from 1 ng to 100 ng; reproducible expression profiles were also obtained with 250 pg total RNA (R(2 approximately 0.92, with approximately 71% of the probes detected in 100 ng total RNA also detected at the 250 pg level. When FFPE samples were assayed, 1 ng total RNA yielded self-correlations of R(2 approximately 0.80, while still maintaining a correlation of R(2 approximately 0.75 with standard FFPE inputs (200 ng.Taken together, these results show that WG-DASL assay provides a reliable platform for genome-wide expression profiling in archived materials. It also possesses utility within clinical settings where only limited quantities of samples may be available (e.g. microdissected material or when minimally invasive procedures are performed (e.g. biopsied specimens.

  1. Transcriptional profiling identifies physicochemical properties of nanomaterials that are determinants of the in vivo pulmonary response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halappanavar, Sabina; Saber, Anne Thoustrup; Decan, Nathalie; Jensen, Keld Alstrup; Wu, Dongmei; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Guo, Charles; Rogowski, Jacob; Koponen, Ismo K; Levin, Marcus; Madsen, Anne Mette; Atluri, Rambabu; Snitka, Valentinas; Birkedal, Renie K; Rickerby, David; Williams, Andrew; Wallin, Håkan; Yauk, Carole L; Vogel, Ulla

    2015-03-01

    We applied transcriptional profiling to elucidate the mechanisms associated with pulmonary responses to titanium dioxide (TiO2 ) nanoparticles (NPs) of different sizes and surface coatings, and to determine if these responses are modified by NP size, surface area, surface modification, and embedding in paint matrices. Adult C57BL/6 mice were exposed via single intratracheal instillations to free forms of TiO2 NPs (10, 20.6, or 38 nm in diameter) with different surface coatings, or TiO2 NPs embedded in paint matrices. Controls were exposed to dispersion medium devoid of NPs. TiO2 NPs were characterized for size, surface area, chemical impurities, and agglomeration state in the exposure medium. Pulmonary transcriptional profiles were generated using microarrays from tissues collected one and 28 d postexposure. Property-specific pathway effects were identified. Pulmonary protein levels of specific inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were confirmed by ELISA. The data were collapsed to 659 differentially expressed genes (P ≤ 0.05; fold change ≥ 1.5). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of these genes revealed that TiO2 NPs clustered mainly by postexposure timepoint followed by particle type. A pathway-based meta-analysis showed that the combination of smaller size, large deposited surface area, and surface amidation contributes to TiO2 NP gene expression response. Embedding of TiO2 NP in paint dampens the overall transcriptional effects. The magnitude of the expression changes associated with pulmonary inflammation differed across all particles; however, the underlying pathway perturbations leading to inflammation were similar, suggesting a generalized mechanism-of-action for all TiO2 NPs. Thus, transcriptional profiling is an effective tool to determine the property-specific biological/toxicity responses induced by nanomaterials. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. PvTFDB: a Phaseolus vulgaris transcription factors database for expediting functional genomics in legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhawna; Bonthala, V S; Gajula, Mnv Prasad

    2016-01-01

    The common bean [Phaseolus vulgaris (L.)] is one of the essential proteinaceous vegetables grown in developing countries. However, its production is challenged by low yields caused by numerous biotic and abiotic stress conditions. Regulatory transcription factors (TFs) symbolize a key component of the genome and are the most significant targets for producing stress tolerant crop and hence functional genomic studies of these TFs are important. Therefore, here we have constructed a web-accessible TFs database for P. vulgaris, called PvTFDB, which contains 2370 putative TF gene models in 49 TF families. This database provides a comprehensive information for each of the identified TF that includes sequence data, functional annotation, SSRs with their primer sets, protein physical properties, chromosomal location, phylogeny, tissue-specific gene expression data, orthologues, cis-regulatory elements and gene ontology (GO) assignment. Altogether, this information would be used in expediting the functional genomic studies of a specific TF(s) of interest. The objectives of this database are to understand functional genomics study of common bean TFs and recognize the regulatory mechanisms underlying various stress responses to ease breeding strategy for variety production through a couple of search interfaces including gene ID, functional annotation and browsing interfaces including by family and by chromosome. This database will also serve as a promising central repository for researchers as well as breeders who are working towards crop improvement of legume crops. In addition, this database provide the user unrestricted public access and the user can download entire data present in the database freely.Database URL: http://www.multiomics.in/PvTFDB/. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  3. Genome-wide effects of selenium and translational uncoupling on transcription in the termite gut symbiont Treponema primitia.

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    Matson, Eric G; Rosenthal, Adam Z; Zhang, Xinning; Leadbetter, Jared R

    2013-11-12

    When prokaryotic cells acquire mutations, encounter translation-inhibiting substances, or experience adverse environmental conditions that limit their ability to synthesize proteins, transcription can become uncoupled from translation. Such uncoupling is known to suppress transcription of protein-encoding genes in bacteria. Here we show that the trace element selenium controls transcription of the gene for the selenocysteine-utilizing enzyme formate dehydrogenase (fdhFSec) through a translation-coupled mechanism in the termite gut symbiont Treponema primitia, a member of the bacterial phylum Spirochaetes. We also evaluated changes in genome-wide transcriptional patterns caused by selenium limitation and by generally uncoupling translation from transcription via antibiotic-mediated inhibition of protein synthesis. We observed that inhibiting protein synthesis in T. primitia influences transcriptional patterns in unexpected ways. In addition to suppressing transcription of certain genes, the expected consequence of inhibiting protein synthesis, we found numerous examples in which transcription of genes and operons is truncated far downstream from putative promoters, is unchanged, or is even stimulated overall. These results indicate that gene regulation in bacteria allows for specific post-initiation transcriptional responses during periods of limited protein synthesis, which may depend both on translational coupling and on unclassified intrinsic elements of protein-encoding genes. A large body of literature demonstrates that the coupling of transcription and translation is a general and essential method by which bacteria regulate gene expression levels. However, the potential role of noncanonical amino acids in regulating transcriptional output via translational control remains, for the most part, undefined. Furthermore, the genome-wide transcriptional state in response to translational decoupling is not well quantified. The results presented here suggest that the

  4. The contribution of co-transcriptional RNA:DNA hybrid structures to DNA damage and genome instability.

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    Hamperl, Stephan; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2014-07-01

    Accurate DNA replication and DNA repair are crucial for the maintenance of genome stability, and it is generally accepted that failure of these processes is a major source of DNA damage in cells. Intriguingly, recent evidence suggests that DNA damage is more likely to occur at genomic loci with high transcriptional activity. Furthermore, loss of certain RNA processing factors in eukaryotic cells is associated with increased formation of co-transcriptional RNA:DNA hybrid structures known as R-loops, resulting in double-strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA damage. However, the molecular mechanisms by which R-loop structures ultimately lead to DNA breaks and genome instability is not well understood. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the formation, recognition and processing of RNA:DNA hybrids, and discuss possible mechanisms by which these structures contribute to DNA damage and genome instability in the cell. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The family of DOF transcription factors in Brachypodium distachyon: phylogenetic comparison with rice and barley DOFs and expression profiling

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    Hernando-Amado Sara

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors (TFs are proteins that have played a central role both in evolution and in domestication, and are major regulators of development in living organisms. Plant genome sequences reveal that approximately 7% of all genes encode putative TFs. The DOF (DNA binding with One Finger TF family has been associated with vital processes exclusive to higher plants and to their close ancestors (algae, mosses and ferns. These are seed maturation and germination, light-mediated regulation, phytohormone and plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses, etc. In Hordeum vulgare and Oryza sativa, 26 and 30 different Dof genes, respectively, have been annotated. Brachypodium distachyon has been the first Pooideae grass to be sequenced and, due to its genomic, morphological and physiological characteristics, has emerged as the model system for temperate cereals, such as wheat and barley. Results Through searches in the B. distachyon genome, 27 Dof genes have been identified and a phylogenetic comparison with the Oryza sativa and the Hordeum vulgare DOFs has been performed. To explore the evolutionary relationship among these DOF proteins, a combined phylogenetic tree has been constructed with the Brachypodium DOFs and those from rice and barley. This phylogenetic analysis has classified the DOF proteins into four Major Cluster of Orthologous Groups (MCOGs. Using RT-qPCR analysis the expression profiles of the annotated BdDof genes across four organs (leaves, roots, spikes and seeds has been investigated. These results have led to a classification of the BdDof genes into two groups, according to their expression levels. The genes highly or preferentially expressed in seeds have been subjected to a more detailed expression analysis (maturation, dry stage and germination. Conclusions Comparison of the expression profiles of the Brachypodium Dof genes with the published functions of closely related DOF sequences from the cereal

  6. The family of DOF transcription factors in Brachypodium distachyon: phylogenetic comparison with rice and barley DOFs and expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando-Amado, Sara; González-Calle, Virginia; Carbonero, Pilar; Barrero-Sicilia, Cristina

    2012-11-05

    Transcription factors (TFs) are proteins that have played a central role both in evolution and in domestication, and are major regulators of development in living organisms. Plant genome sequences reveal that approximately 7% of all genes encode putative TFs. The DOF (DNA binding with One Finger) TF family has been associated with vital processes exclusive to higher plants and to their close ancestors (algae, mosses and ferns). These are seed maturation and germination, light-mediated regulation, phytohormone and plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses, etc. In Hordeum vulgare and Oryza sativa, 26 and 30 different Dof genes, respectively, have been annotated. Brachypodium distachyon has been the first Pooideae grass to be sequenced and, due to its genomic, morphological and physiological characteristics, has emerged as the model system for temperate cereals, such as wheat and barley. Through searches in the B. distachyon genome, 27 Dof genes have been identified and a phylogenetic comparison with the Oryza sativa and the Hordeum vulgare DOFs has been performed. To explore the evolutionary relationship among these DOF proteins, a combined phylogenetic tree has been constructed with the Brachypodium DOFs and those from rice and barley. This phylogenetic analysis has classified the DOF proteins into four Major Cluster of Orthologous Groups (MCOGs). Using RT-qPCR analysis the expression profiles of the annotated BdDof genes across four organs (leaves, roots, spikes and seeds) has been investigated. These results have led to a classification of the BdDof genes into two groups, according to their expression levels. The genes highly or preferentially expressed in seeds have been subjected to a more detailed expression analysis (maturation, dry stage and germination). Comparison of the expression profiles of the Brachypodium Dof genes with the published functions of closely related DOF sequences from the cereal species considered here, deduced from the phylogenetic

  7. Genome-wide characterization and expression profiling of the AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR (ARF gene family in Eucalyptus grandis.

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    Hong Yu

    Full Text Available Auxin is a central hormone involved in a wide range of developmental processes including the specification of vascular stem cells. Auxin Response Factors (ARF are important actors of the auxin signalling pathway, regulating the transcription of auxin-responsive genes through direct binding to their promoters. The recent availability of the Eucalyptus grandis genome sequence allowed us to examine the characteristics and evolutionary history of this gene family in a woody plant of high economic importance. With 17 members, the E. grandis ARF gene family is slightly contracted, as compared to those of most angiosperms studied hitherto, lacking traces of duplication events. In silico analysis of alternative transcripts and gene truncation suggested that these two mechanisms were preeminent in shaping the functional diversity of the ARF family in Eucalyptus. Comparative phylogenetic analyses with genomes of other taxonomic lineages revealed the presence of a new ARF clade found preferentially in woody and/or perennial plants. High-throughput expression profiling among different organs and tissues and in response to environmental cues highlighted genes expressed in vascular cambium and/or developing xylem, responding dynamically to various environmental stimuli. Finally, this study allowed identification of three ARF candidates potentially involved in the auxin-regulated transcriptional program underlying wood formation.

  8. Breeding response of transcript profiling in developing seeds of Brassica napus

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    Li Xiaodan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The upgrading of rapeseed cultivars has resulted in a substantial improvement in yield and quality in China over the past 30 years. With the selective pressure against fatty acid composition and oil content, high erucic acid- and low oil-content cultivars have been replaced by low erucic acid- and high oil-content cultivars. The high erucic acid cultivar Zhongyou 821 and its descendent, low erucic acid cultivar Zhongshuang 9, are representatives of two generations of the most outstanding Chinese rapeseed cultivars (B. napus developed the past 2 decades. This paper compares the transcriptional profiles of Zhongshuang 9 and Zhongyou 821 for 32 genes that are principally involved in lipid biosynthesis during seed development in order to elucidate how the transcriptional profiles of these genes responded to quality improvement over the past 20 years. Results Comparison of the cultivar Zhongyou 821 with its descendent, Zhongshuang 9, shows that the transcriptional levels of seven of the 32 genes were upregulated by 30% to 109%, including FAD3, ACCase, FAE1, GKTP, Caleosin, GAPDH, and PEPC. Of the 32 genes, 10 (KAS3, β-CT, BcRK6, P450, FatA, Oleosin, FAD6, FatB, α-CT and SUC1 were downregulated by at least 20% and most by 50%. The Napin gene alone accounted for over 75% of total transcription from all 32 genes assessed in both cultivars. Most of the genes showed significant correlation with fatty acid accumulation, but the correlation in ZS9 was significantly different from that in ZY821. Higher KCR2 activity is associated with higher C16:0, C18:0, and C18:2 in both cultivars, lower C22:1 and total fatty acid content in ZY821, and lower 18:1 in ZS9. Conclusion This paper illustrates the response of the transcription levels of 32 genes to breeding in developing rapeseed seeds. Both cultivars showed similar transcription profiles, with the Napin gene predominantly transcribed. Selective pressure for zero erucic acid, low

  9. Transcriptional Profiles of the Response to Ketoconazole and Amphotericin B in Trichophyton rubrum▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lu; Zhang, Wenliang; Wang, Lingling; Yang, Jian; Liu, Tao; Peng, Junping; Leng, Wenchuan; Chen, Lihong; Li, Ruoyu; Jin, Qi

    2007-01-01

    Trichophyton rubrum is a pathogenic filamentous fungus of increasing medical concern. Two antifungal agents, ketoconazole (KTC) and amphotericin B (AMB), have specific activity against dermatophytes. To identify the mechanisms of action of KTC and AMB against T. rubrum, a cDNA microarray was constructed from the expressed sequence tags of the cDNA library from different developmental stages, and transcriptional profiles of the responses to KTC and AMB were determined. T. rubrum was exposed to subinhibitory concentrations of KTC and AMB for 12 h, and microarray analysis was used to examine gene transcription. KTC exposure induced transcription of genes involved in lipid, fatty acid, and sterol metabolism, including ERG11, ERG3, ERG25, ERG6, ERG26, ERG24, ERG4, CPO, INO1, DW700960, CPR, DW696584, DW406350, and ATG15. KTC also increased transcription of the multidrug resistance gene ABC1. AMB exposure increased transcription of genes involved in lipid, fatty acid, and sterol metabolism (DW696584, EB801458, IVD, DW694010, DW688343, DW684992), membrane transport (Git1, DW706156, DW684040, DMT, DW406136, CCH1, DW710650), and stress-related responses (HSP70, HSP104, GSS, AOX, EB801455, EB801702, TDH1, UBI4) but reduced transcription of genes involved in maintenance of cell wall integrity and signal transduction pathways (FKS1, SUN4, DW699324, GAS1, DW681613, SPS1, DW703091, STE7, DW703091, DW695308) and some ribosomal proteins. This is the first report of the use of microarray analysis to determine the effects of drug action in T. rubrum. PMID:17060531

  10. Rewiring the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) transcription circuit: Engineering a recombination-resistant genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yount, Boyd; Roberts, Rhonda S.; Lindesmith, Lisa; Baric, Ralph S.

    2006-08-01

    Live virus vaccines provide significant protection against many detrimental human and animal diseases, but reversion to virulence by mutation and recombination has reduced appeal. Using severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus as a model, we engineered a different transcription regulatory circuit and isolated recombinant viruses. The transcription network allowed for efficient expression of the viral transcripts and proteins, and the recombinant viruses replicated to WT levels. Recombinant genomes were then constructed that contained mixtures of the WT and mutant regulatory circuits, reflecting recombinant viruses that might occur in nature. Although viable viruses could readily be isolated from WT and recombinant genomes containing homogeneous transcription circuits, chimeras that contained mixed regulatory networks were invariantly lethal, because viable chimeric viruses were not isolated. Mechanistically, mixed regulatory circuits promoted inefficient subgenomic transcription from inappropriate start sites, resulting in truncated ORFs and effectively minimize viral structural protein expression. Engineering regulatory transcription circuits of intercommunicating alleles successfully introduces genetic traps into a viral genome that are lethal in RNA recombinant progeny viruses. regulation | systems biology | vaccine design

  11. Linking the transcriptional profiles and the physiological states of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during an extended intracellular infection.

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    Kyle H Rohde

    Full Text Available Intracellular pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis have evolved strategies for coping with the pressures encountered inside host cells. The ability to coordinate global gene expression in response to environmental and internal cues is one key to their success. Prolonged survival and replication within macrophages, a key virulence trait of M. tuberculosis, requires dynamic adaptation to diverse and changing conditions within its phagosomal niche. However, the physiological adaptations during the different phases of this infection process remain poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, we have developed a multi-tiered approach to define the temporal patterns of gene expression in M. tuberculosis in a macrophage infection model that extends from infection, through intracellular adaptation, to the establishment of a productive infection. Using a clock plasmid to measure intracellular replication and death rates over a 14-day infection and electron microscopy to define bacterial integrity, we observed an initial period of rapid replication coupled with a high death rate. This was followed by period of slowed growth and enhanced intracellular survival, leading finally to an extended period of net growth. The transcriptional profiles of M. tuberculosis reflect these physiological transitions as the bacterium adapts to conditions within its host cell. Finally, analysis with a Transcriptional Regulatory Network model revealed linked genetic networks whereby M. tuberculosis coordinates global gene expression during intracellular survival. The integration of molecular and cellular biology together with transcriptional profiling and systems analysis offers unique insights into the host-driven responses of intracellular pathogens such as M. tuberculosis.

  12. Transcription profiling provides insights into gene pathways involved in horn and scurs development in cattle

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    Lehnert Sigrid A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two types of horns are evident in cattle - fixed horns attached to the skull and a variation called scurs, which refers to small loosely attached horns. Cattle lacking horns are referred to as polled. Although both the Poll and Scurs loci have been mapped to BTA1 and 19 respectively, the underlying genetic basis of these phenotypes is unknown, and so far, no candidate genes regulating these developmental processes have been described. This study is the first reported attempt at transcript profiling to identify genes and pathways contributing to horn and scurs development in Brahman cattle, relative to polled counterparts. Results Expression patterns in polled, horned and scurs tissues were obtained using the Agilent 44 k bovine array. The most notable feature when comparing transcriptional profiles of developing horn tissues against polled was the down regulation of genes coding for elements of the cadherin junction as well as those involved in epidermal development. We hypothesize this as a key event involved in keratinocyte migration and subsequent horn development. In the polled-scurs comparison, the most prevalent differentially expressed transcripts code for genes involved in extracellular matrix remodelling, which were up regulated in scurs tissues relative to polled. Conclusion For this first time we describe networks of genes involved in horn and scurs development. Interestingly, we did not observe differential expression in any of the genes present on the fine mapped region of BTA1 known to contain the Poll locus.

  13. T Cell Aging: A Review of the Transcriptional Changes Determined from Genome-Wide Analysis

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    Chen, Guobing; Lustig, Ana; Weng, Nan-ping

    2013-01-01

    Age carries a detrimental impact on T cell function. In the past decade, analyses of the genome-scale transcriptional changes of T cells during aging have yielded a large amount of data and provided a global view of gene expression changes in T cells from aged hosts as well as subsets of T cells accumulated with age. Here, we aim to review the changes of gene expression in thymocytes and peripheral mature T cells, as well as the subsets of T cells accumulated with age, and discuss the gene networks and signaling pathways that are altered with aging in T cells. We also discuss future direction for furthering the understanding of the molecular basis of gene expression alterations in aged T cells, which could potentially provide opportunities for gene-based clinical interventions. PMID:23730304

  14. Galactinol synthase transcriptional profile in two genotypes of Coffea canephora with contrasting tolerance to drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Tiago Benedito Dos; de Lima, Rogério Barbosa; Nagashima, Getúlio Takashi; Petkowicz, Carmen Lucia de Oliveira; Carpentieri-Pípolo, Valéria; Pereira, Luiz Filipe Protasio; Domingues, Douglas Silva; Vieira, Luiz Gonzaga Esteves

    2015-05-01

    Increased synthesis of galactinol and raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs) has been reported in vegetative tissues in response to a range of abiotic stresses. In this work, we evaluated the transcriptional profile of a Coffea canephora galactinol synthase gene (CcGolS1) in two clones that differed in tolerance to water deficit in order to assess the contribution of this gene to drought tolerance. The expression of CcGolS1 in leaves was differentially regulated by water deficit, depending on the intensity of stress and the genotype. In clone 109A (drought-susceptible), the abundance of CcGolS1 transcripts decreased upon exposure to drought, reaching minimum values during recovery from severe water deficit and stress. In contrast, CcGolS1 gene expression in clone 14 (drought-tolerant) was stimulated by water deficit. Changes in galactinol and RFO content did not correlate with variation in the steady-state transcript level. However, the magnitude of increase in RFO accumulation was higher in the tolerant cultivar, mainly under severe water deficit. The finding that the drought-tolerant coffee clone showed enhanced accumulation of CcGolS1 transcripts and RFOs under water deficit suggests the possibility of using this gene to improve drought tolerance in this important crop.

  15. Galactinol synthase transcriptional profile in two genotypes of Coffea canephora with contrasting tolerance to drought

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    Tiago Benedito Dos Santos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Increased synthesis of galactinol and raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs has been reported in vegetative tissues in response to a range of abiotic stresses. In this work, we evaluated the transcriptional profile of a Coffea canephora galactinol synthase gene (CcGolS1 in two clones that differed in tolerance to water deficit in order to assess the contribution of this gene to drought tolerance. The expression of CcGolS1 in leaves was differentially regulated by water deficit, depending on the intensity of stress and the genotype. In clone 109A (drought-susceptible, the abundance of CcGolS1 transcripts decreased upon exposure to drought, reaching minimum values during recovery from severe water deficit and stress. In contrast, CcGolS1 gene expression in clone 14 (drought-tolerant was stimulated by water deficit. Changes in galactinol and RFO content did not correlate with variation in the steady-state transcript level. However, the magnitude of increase in RFO accumulation was higher in the tolerant cultivar, mainly under severe water deficit. The finding that the drought-tolerant coffee clone showed enhanced accumulation of CcGolS1 transcripts and RFOs under water deficit suggests the possibility of using this gene to improve drought tolerance in this important crop.

  16. Dynamic Metabolite Profiling in an Archaeon Connects Transcriptional Regulation to Metabolic Consequences.

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    Horia Todor

    Full Text Available Previous work demonstrated that the TrmB transcription factor is responsible for regulating the expression of many enzyme-coding genes in the hypersaline-adapted archaeon Halobacterium salinarum via a direct interaction with a cis-regulatory sequence in their promoters. This interaction is abolished in the presence of glucose. Although much is known about the effects of TrmB at the transcriptional level, it remains unclear whether and to what extent changes in mRNA levels directly affect metabolite levels. In order to address this question, here we performed a high-resolution metabolite profiling time course during a change in nutrients using a combination of targeted and untargeted methods in wild-type and ΔtrmB strain backgrounds. We found that TrmB-mediated transcriptional changes resulted in widespread and significant changes to metabolite levels across the metabolic network. Additionally, the pattern of growth complementation using various purines suggests that the mis-regulation of gluconeogenesis in the ΔtrmB mutant strain in the absence of glucose results in low phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP levels. We confirmed these low PRPP levels using a quantitative mass spectrometric technique and found that they are associated with a metabolic block in de novo purine synthesis, which is partially responsible for the growth defect of the ΔtrmB mutant strain in the absence of glucose. In conclusion, we show how transcriptional regulation of metabolism affects metabolite levels and ultimately, phenotypes.

  17. Genome-Wide Identification and Characterization of BrrTCP Transcription Factors in Brassica rapa ssp. rapa

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    Jiancan Du

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The teosinte branched1/cycloidea/proliferating cell factor (TCP gene family is a plant-specific transcription factor that participates in the control of plant development by regulating cell proliferation. However, no report is currently available about this gene family in turnips (Brassica rapa ssp. rapa. In this study, a genome-wide analysis of TCP genes was performed in turnips. Thirty-nine TCP genes in turnip genome were identified and distributed on 10 chromosomes. Phylogenetic analysis clearly showed that the family was classified as two clades: class I and class II. Gene structure and conserved motif analysis showed that the same clade genes have similar gene structures and conserved motifs. The expression profiles of 39 TCP genes were determined through quantitative real-time PCR. Most CIN-type BrrTCP genes were highly expressed in leaf. The members of CYC/TB1 subclade are highly expressed in flower bud and weakly expressed in root. By contrast, class I clade showed more widespread but less tissue-specific expression patterns. Yeast two-hybrid data show that BrrTCP proteins preferentially formed heterodimers. The function of BrrTCP2 was confirmed through ectopic expression of BrrTCP2 in wild-type and loss-of-function ortholog mutant of Arabidopsis. Overexpression of BrrTCP2 in wild-type Arabidopsis resulted in the diminished leaf size. Overexpression of BrrTCP2 in triple mutants of tcp2/4/10 restored the leaf phenotype of tcp2/4/10 to the phenotype of wild type. The comprehensive analysis of turnip TCP gene family provided the foundation to further study the roles of TCP genes in turnips.

  18. Biology of breast cancer during pregnancy using genomic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azim, Hatem A; Brohée, Sylvain; Peccatori, Fedro A; Desmedt, Christine; Loi, Sherene; Lambrechts, Diether; Dell'Orto, Patrizia; Majjaj, Samira; Jose, Vinu; Rotmensz, Nicole; Ignatiadis, Michail; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Piccart, Martine; Viale, Giuseppe; Sotiriou, Christos

    2014-08-01

    Breast cancer during pregnancy is rare and is associated with relatively poor prognosis. No information is available on its biological features at the genomic level. Using a dataset of 54 pregnant and 113 non-pregnant breast cancer patients, we evaluated the pattern of hot spot somatic mutations and did transcriptomic profiling using Sequenom and Affymetrix respectively. We performed gene set enrichment analysis to evaluate the pathways associated with diagnosis during pregnancy. We also evaluated the expression of selected cancer-related genes in pregnant and non-pregnant patients and correlated the results with changes occurring in the normal breast using a pregnant murine model. We finally investigated aberrations associated with disease-free survival (DFS). No significant differences in mutations were observed. Of the total number of patients, 18.6% of pregnant and 23% of non-pregnant patients had a PIK3CA mutation. Around 30% of tumors were basal, with no differences in the distribution of breast cancer molecular subtypes between pregnant and non-pregnant patients. Two pathways were enriched in tumors diagnosed during pregnancy: the G protein-coupled receptor pathway and the serotonin receptor pathway (FDR pregnancy had higher expression of PD1 (PDCD1; P=0.015), PDL1 (CD274; P=0.014), and gene sets related to SRC (P=0.004), IGF1 (P=0.032), and β-catenin (P=0.019). Their expression increased almost linearly throughout gestation when evaluated on the normal breast using a pregnant mouse model underscoring the potential effect of the breast microenvironment on tumor phenotype. No genes were associated with DFS in a multivariate model, which could be due to low statistical power. Diagnosis during pregnancy impacts the breast cancer transcriptome including potential cancer targets. © 2014 Society for Endocrinology.

  19. Genome-Wide Identification and Analysis of TCP Transcription Factors Involved in the Formation of Leafy Head in Chinese Cabbage

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    Yan Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis is a widely cultivated and economically important vegetable crop with typical leaf curvature. The TCP (Teosinte branched1, Cycloidea, Proliferating cell factor family proteins are plant-specific transcription factors (TFs and play important roles in many plant biological processes, especially in the regulation of leaf curvature. In this study, 39 genes encoding TCP TFs are detected on the whole genome of B. rapa. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of TCPs between Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa, TCP genes of Chinese cabbage are named from BrTCP1a to BrTCP24b. Moreover, the chromosomal location; phylogenetic relationships among B. rapa, A. thaliana, and rice; gene structures and protein conserved sequence alignment; and conserved domains are analyzed. The expression profiles of BrTCPs are analyzed in different tissues. To understand the role of Chinese cabbage TCP members in regulating the curvature of leaves, the expression patterns of all BrTCP genes are detected at three development stages essential for leafy head formation. Our results provide information on the classification and details of BrTCPs and allow us to better understand the function of TCPs involved in leaf curvature of Chinese cabbage.

  20. Identification of ovule transcripts from the Apospory-Specific Genomic Region (ASGR-carrier chromosome

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    Ozias-Akins Peggy

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apomixis, asexual seed production in plants, holds great potential for agriculture as a means to fix hybrid vigor. Apospory is a form of apomixis where the embryo develops from an unreduced egg that is derived from a somatic nucellar cell, the aposporous initial, via mitosis. Understanding the molecular mechanism regulating aposporous initial specification will be a critical step toward elucidation of apomixis and also provide insight into developmental regulation and downstream signaling that results in apomixis. To discover candidate transcripts for regulating aposporous initial specification in P. squamulatum, we compared two transcriptomes derived from microdissected ovules at the stage of aposporous initial formation between the apomictic donor parent, P. squamulatum (accession PS26, and an apomictic derived backcross 8 (BC8 line containing only the Apospory-Specific Genomic Region (ASGR-carrier chromosome from P. squamulatum. Toward this end, two transcriptomes derived from ovules of an apomictic donor parent and its apomictic backcross derivative at the stage of apospory initiation, were sequenced using 454-FLX technology. Results Using 454-FLX technology, we generated 332,567 reads with an average read length of 147 base pairs (bp for the PS26 ovule transcriptome library and 363,637 reads with an average read length of 142 bp for the BC8 ovule transcriptome library. A total of 33,977 contigs from the PS26 ovule transcriptome library and 26,576 contigs from the BC8 ovule transcriptome library were assembled using the Multifunctional Inertial Reference Assembly program. Using stringent in silico parameters, 61 transcripts were predicted to map to the ASGR-carrier chromosome, of which 49 transcripts were verified as ASGR-carrier chromosome specific. One of the alien expressed genes could be assigned as tightly linked to the ASGR by screening of apomictic and sexual F1s. Only one transcript, which did not map to the ASGR

  1. Microarray-Based Transcriptional Profiling of Renieramycin M and Jorunnamycin C, Isolated from Thai Marine Organisms

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    Takatoshi Kawai

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Renieramycin M and jorunnamycin C, two isoquinolinequinone compounds differing only at the C-22 ester side chain, were evaluated for their cytotoxic effects on human colon (HCT116 and breast (MDA-MB-435 cancer cell lines. These two compounds displayed potent cancer cell growth inhibition, their IC50 values reaching nanomolar order. To examine their effects on transcription, we carried out oligonucleotide microarray analysis with focus on the similarities and differences between the two compounds in terms of transcriptional profiles. We found that the down-regulation of PTPRK (protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type K can be considered as a biomarker responsive to the cytotoxic effects of this class of antitumor marine natural products.

  2. Gene transcription profiling of Fusarium graminearum treated with an azole fungicide tebuconazole.

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    Liu, Xin; Jiang, Jinhua; Shao, Jiaofang; Yin, Yanni; Ma, Zhonghua

    2010-01-01

    Using a deep serial analysis of gene expression (DeepSAGE) sequencing approach, we profiled the transcriptional response of Fusarium graminearum to tebuconazole, a most widely used azole fungicide. By comparing the expression of genes in F. graminearum treated and untreated with tebuconazole, we identified 324 and 155 genes showing more than a 5-fold increase and decrease, respectively, in expression upon tebuconazole treatment. These genes are involved in a variety of cell functions including egrosterol biosynthesis, transcription, and cellular metabolism. The validity of DeepSAGE results were confirmed by real-time PCR analysis of expression of 20 genes with different expression levels in the DeepSAGE analysis. The results from this study provide useful information in understanding the mechanisms for the responses of F. graminearum to azole fungicides.

  3. Transcriptional Profiling of Biofilm Regulators Identified by an Overexpression Screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Cromie, Gareth A.; Tan, Zhihao; Hays, Michelle; Sirr, Amy; Jeffery, Eric W.; Dudley, Aimée M.

    2017-01-01

    Biofilm formation by microorganisms is a major cause of recurring infections and removal of biofilms has proven to be extremely difficult given their inherent drug resistance . Understanding the biological processes that underlie biofilm formation is thus extremely important and could lead to the development of more effective drug therapies, resulting in better infection outcomes. Using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a biofilm model, overexpression screens identified DIG1, SFL1, HEK2, TOS8, SAN1, and ROF1/YHR177W as regulators of biofilm formation. Subsequent RNA-seq analysis of biofilm and nonbiofilm-forming strains revealed that all of the overexpression strains, other than DIG1 and TOS8, were adopting a single differential expression profile, although induced to varying degrees. TOS8 adopted a separate profile, while the expression profile of DIG1 reflected the common pattern seen in most of the strains, plus substantial DIG1-specific expression changes. We interpret the existence of the common transcriptional pattern seen across multiple, unrelated overexpression strains as reflecting a transcriptional state, that the yeast cell can access through regulatory signaling mechanisms, allowing an adaptive morphological change between biofilm-forming and nonbiofilm states. PMID:28673928

  4. RNAseq versus genome-predicted transcriptomes: a large population of novel transcripts identified in an Illumina-454 Hydra transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Yvan; Galliot, Brigitte

    2013-03-25

    Evolutionary studies benefit from deep sequencing technologies that generate genomic and transcriptomic sequences from a variety of organisms. Genome sequencing and RNAseq have complementary strengths. In this study, we present the assembly of the most complete Hydra transcriptome to date along with a comparative analysis of the specific features of RNAseq and genome-predicted transcriptomes currently available in the freshwater hydrozoan Hydra vulgaris. To produce an accurate and extensive Hydra transcriptome, we combined Illumina and 454 Titanium reads, giving the primacy to Illumina over 454 reads to correct homopolymer errors. This strategy yielded an RNAseq transcriptome that contains 48'909 unique sequences including splice variants, representing approximately 24'450 distinct genes. Comparative analysis to the available genome-predicted transcriptomes identified 10'597 novel Hydra transcripts that encode 529 evolutionarily-conserved proteins. The annotation of 170 human orthologs points to critical functions in protein biosynthesis, FGF and TOR signaling, vesicle transport, immunity, cell cycle regulation, cell death, mitochondrial metabolism, transcription and chromatin regulation. However, a majority of these novel transcripts encodes short ORFs, at least 767 of them corresponding to pseudogenes. This RNAseq transcriptome also lacks 11'270 predicted transcripts that correspond either to silent genes or to genes expressed below the detection level of this study. We established a simple and powerful strategy to combine Illumina and 454 reads and we produced, with genome assistance, an extensive and accurate Hydra transcriptome. The comparative analysis of the RNAseq transcriptome with genome-predicted transcriptomes lead to the identification of large populations of novel as well as missing transcripts that might reflect Hydra-specific evolutionary events.

  5. A Brassica exon array for whole-transcript gene expression profiling.

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    Christopher G Love

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Affymetrix GeneChip® arrays are used widely to study transcriptional changes in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. GeneChip® arrays comprise multiple 25-mer oligonucleotide probes per gene and retain certain advantages over direct sequencing. For plants, there are several public GeneChip® arrays whose probes are localised primarily in 3' exons. Plant whole-transcript (WT GeneChip® arrays are not yet publicly available, although WT resolution is needed to study complex crop genomes such as Brassica, which are typified by segmental duplications containing paralogous genes and/or allopolyploidy. Available sequence data were sampled from the Brassica A and C genomes, and 142,997 gene models identified. The assembled gene models were then used to establish a comprehensive public WT exon array for transcriptomics studies. The Affymetrix GeneChip® Brassica Exon 1.0 ST Array is a 5 µM feature size array, containing 2.4 million 25-base oligonucleotide probes representing 135,201 gene models, with 15 probes per gene distributed among exons. Discrimination of the gene models was based on an E-value cut-off of 1E(-5, with ≤98% sequence identity. The 135 k Brassica Exon Array was validated by quantifying transcriptome differences between leaf and root tissue from a reference Brassica rapa line (R-o-18, and categorisation by Gene Ontologies (GO based on gene orthology with Arabidopsis thaliana. Technical validation involved comparison of the exon array with a 60-mer array platform using the same starting RNA samples. The 135 k Brassica Exon Array is a robust platform. All data relating to the array design and probe identities are available in the public domain and are curated within the BrassEnsembl genome viewer at http://www.brassica.info/BrassEnsembl/index.html.

  6. Genome-wide identification and characterization of TCP transcription factor genes in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Li, Deng-Di; Han, Li-Hong; Tao, Miao; Hu, Qian-Qian; Wu, Wen-Ying; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Li, Xue-Bao; Huang, Geng-Qing

    2017-08-31

    TCP proteins are plant-specific transcription factors (TFs), and perform a variety of physiological functions in plant growth and development. In this study, 74 non-redundant TCP genes were identified in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) genome. Cotton TCP family can be classified into two classes (class I and class II) that can be further divided into 11 types (groups) based on their motif composition. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated that GhTCPs display different expression patterns in cotton tissues. The majority of these genes are preferentially or specifically expressed in cotton leaves, while some GhTCP genes are highly expressed in initiating fibers and/or elongating fibers of cotton. Yeast two-hybrid results indicated that GhTCPs can interact with each other to form homodimers or heterodimers. In addition, GhTCP14a and GhTCP22 can interact with some transcription factors which are involved in fiber development. These results lay solid foundation for further study on the functions of TCP genes during cotton fiber development.

  7. Integrated genome-scale prediction of detrimental mutations in transcription networks.

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    Mirko Francesconi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A central challenge in genetics is to understand when and why mutations alter the phenotype of an organism. The consequences of gene inhibition have been systematically studied and can be predicted reasonably well across a genome. However, many sequence variants important for disease and evolution may alter gene regulation rather than gene function. The consequences of altering a regulatory interaction (or "edge" rather than a gene (or "node" in a network have not been as extensively studied. Here we use an integrative analysis and evolutionary conservation to identify features that predict when the loss of a regulatory interaction is detrimental in the extensively mapped transcription network of budding yeast. Properties such as the strength of an interaction, location and context in a promoter, regulator and target gene importance, and the potential for compensation (redundancy associate to some extent with interaction importance. Combined, however, these features predict quite well whether the loss of a regulatory interaction is detrimental across many promoters and for many different transcription factors. Thus, despite the potential for regulatory diversity, common principles can be used to understand and predict when changes in regulation are most harmful to an organism.

  8. Natural Guided Genome Engineering Reveals Transcriptional Regulators Controlling Quorum-Sensing Signal Degradation.

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    Abbas El Sahili

    Full Text Available Quorum-quenching (QQ are natural or engineered processes disrupting the quorum-sensing (QS signalling which controls virulence and persistence (e.g. biofilm in numerous bacteria. QQ involves different enzymes including lactonases, amidases, oxidases and reductases which degrade the QS molecules such as N-acylhomoserine lactones (NAHL. Rhodococcus erythropolis known to efficiently degrade NAHL is proposed as a biocontrol agent and a reservoir of QQ-enzymes for biotechnology. In R. erythropolis, regulation of QQ-enzymes remains unclear. In this work, we performed genome engineering on R. erythropolis, which is recalcitrant to reverse genetics, in order to investigate regulation of QQ-enzymes at a molecular and structural level with the aim to improve the QQ activity. Deep-sequencing of the R. erythropolis enhanced variants allowed identification of a punctual mutation in a key-transcriptional factor QsdR (Quorum sensing degradation Regulation which regulates the sole QQ-lactonase QsdA identified so far. Using biophysical and structural studies on QsdR, we demonstrate that QQ activity can be improved by modifying the regulation of QQ-enzymes degrading QS signal. This modification requiring the change of only one amino-acid in a transcriptional factor leads to an enhanced R. erythropolis in which the QS-signal degradation pathway is strongly activated.

  9. Genomic survey of bZIP transcription factor genes related to tanshinone biosynthesis in Salvia miltiorrhiza

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    Yu Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Tanshinones are a class of bioactive components in the traditional Chinese medicine Salvia miltiorrhiza, and their biosynthesis and regulation have been widely studied. Current studies show that basic leucine zipper (bZIP proteins regulate plant secondary metabolism, growth and developmental processes. However, the bZIP transcription factors involved in tanshinone biosynthesis are unknown. Here, we conducted the first genome-wide survey of the bZIP gene family and analyzed the phylogeny, gene structure, additional conserved motifs and alternative splicing events in S. miltiorrhiza. A total of 70 SmbZIP transcription factors were identified and categorized into 11 subgroups based on their phylogenetic relationships with those in Arabidopsis. Moreover, seventeen SmbZIP genes underwent alternative splicing events. According to the transcriptomic data, the SmbZIP genes that were highly expressed in the Danshen root and periderm were selected. Based on the prediction of bZIP binding sites in the promoters and the co-expression analysis and co-induction patterns in response to Ag+ treatment via quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, we concluded that SmbZIP7 and SmbZIP20 potentially participate in the regulation of tanshinone biosynthesis. These results provide a foundation for further functional characterization of the candidate SmbZIP genes, which have the potential to increase tanshinone production. KEY WORDS: bZIP genes, Salvia miltiorrhiza, Phylogenetic analysis, Expression pattern analysis, Tanshinone biosynthesis

  10. Bisphenol A and Bisphenol S Induce Distinct Transcriptional Profiles in Differentiating Human Primary Preadipocytes.

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    Jonathan G Boucher

    Full Text Available Bisphenol S (BPS is increasingly used as a replacement plasticizer for bisphenol A (BPA but its effects on human health have not been thoroughly examined. Recent evidence indicates that both BPA and BPS induce adipogenesis, although the mechanisms leading to this effect are unclear. In an effort to identify common and distinct mechanisms of action in inducing adipogenesis, transcriptional profiles of differentiating human preadipocytes exposed to BPA or BPS were compared. Human subcutaneous primary preadipocytes were differentiated in the presence of either 25 μM BPA or BPS for 2 and 4 days. Poly-A RNA-sequencing was used to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs. Functional analysis of DEGs was undertaken in Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. BPA-treatment resulted in 472 and 176 DEGs on days 2 and 4, respectively, affecting pathways such as liver X receptor (LXR/retinoid X receptor (RXR activation, hepatic fibrosis and cholestasis. BPS-treatment resulted in 195 and 51 DEGs on days 2 and 4, respectively, revealing enrichment of genes associated with adipogenesis and lipid metabolism including the adipogenesis pathway and cholesterol biosynthesis. Interestingly, the transcription repressor N-CoR was identified as a negative upstream regulator in both BPA- and BPS-treated cells. This study presents the first comparison of BPA- and BPS-induced transcriptional profiles in human differentiating preadipocytes. While we previously showed that BPA and BPS both induce adipogenesis, the results from this study show that BPS affects adipose specific transcriptional changes earlier than BPA, and alters the expression of genes specifically related to adipogenesis and lipid metabolism. The findings provide insight into potential BPS and BPA-mediated mechanisms of action in inducing adipogenesis in human primary preadipocytes.

  11. Comparative transcriptional profiling-based identification of raphanusanin-inducible genes

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    Hasegawa Koji

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Raphanusanin (Ra is a light-induced growth inhibitor involved in the inhibition of hypocotyl growth in response to unilateral blue-light illumination in radish seedlings. Knowledge of the roles of Ra still remains elusive. To understand the roles of Ra and its functional coupling to light signalling, we constructed the Ra-induced gene library using the Suppression Subtractive Hybridisation (SSH technique and present a comparative investigation of gene regulation in radish seedlings in response to short-term Ra and blue-light exposure. Results The predicted gene ontology (GO term revealed that 55% of the clones in the Ra-induced gene library were associated with genes involved in common defence mechanisms, including thirty four genes homologous to Arabidopsis genes implicated in R-gene-triggered resistance in the programmed cell death (PCD pathway. Overall, the library was enriched with transporters, hydrolases, protein kinases, and signal transducers. The transcriptome analysis revealed that, among the fifty genes from various functional categories selected from 88 independent genes of the Ra-induced library, 44 genes were up-regulated and 4 were down-regulated. The comparative analysis showed that, among the transcriptional profiles of 33 highly Ra-inducible genes, 25 ESTs were commonly regulated by different intensities and duration of blue-light irradiation. The transcriptional profiles, coupled with the transcriptional regulation of early blue light, have provided the functional roles of many genes expected to be involved in the light-mediated defence mechanism. Conclusions This study is the first comprehensive survey of transcriptional regulation in response to Ra. The results described herein suggest a link between Ra and cellular defence and light signalling, and thereby contribute to further our understanding of how Ra is involved in light-mediated mechanisms of plant defence.

  12. Transcriptional control in embryonic Drosophila midline guidance assessed through a whole genome approach

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    Tomancak Pavel

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the development of the Drosophila central nervous system the process of midline crossing is orchestrated by a number of guidance receptors and ligands. Many key axon guidance molecules have been identified in both invertebrates and vertebrates, but the transcriptional regulation of growth cone guidance remains largely unknown. It is established that translational regulation plays a role in midline crossing, and there are indications that transcriptional regulation is also involved. To investigate this issue, we conducted a genome-wide study of transcription in Drosophila embryos using wild type and a number of well-characterized Drosophila guidance mutants and transgenics. We also analyzed a previously published microarray time course of Drosophila embryonic development with an axon guidance focus. Results Using hopach, a novel clustering method which is well suited to microarray data analysis, we identified groups of genes with similar expression patterns across guidance mutants and transgenics. We then systematically characterized the resulting clusters with respect to their relevance to axon guidance using two complementary controlled vocabularies: the Gene Ontology (GO and anatomical annotations of the Atlas of Pattern of Gene Expression (APoGE in situ hybridization database. The analysis indicates that regulation of gene expression does play a role in the process of axon guidance in Drosophila. We also find a strong link between axon guidance and hemocyte migration, a result that agrees with mounting evidence that axon guidance molecules are co-opted in vertebrate vascularization. Cell cyclin activity in the context of axon guidance is also suggested from our array data. RNA and protein expression patterns of cell cyclins in axon guidance mutants and transgenics support this possible link. Conclusion This study provides important insights into the regulation of axon guidance in vivo.

  13. Draft genome sequence and transcriptional analysis of Rosellinia necatrix infected with a virulent mycovirus.

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    Shimizu, Takeo; Kanematsu, Satoko; Yaegashi, Hajime

    2018-04-24

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis is useful in developing effective control methods for fungal diseases. The white root rot fungus Rosellinia necatrix is a soil-borne pathogen that causes serious economic losses in various crops, including fruit trees, worldwide. Here, using next-generation sequencing techniques, we first produced a 44-Mb draft genome sequence of R. necatrix strain W97, an isolate from Japan, in which 12,444 protein-coding genes were predicted. To survey differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated with the pathogenesis of the fungus, the hypovirulent W97 strain infected with Rosellinia necatrix megabirnavirus 1 (RnMBV1) was used for a comprehensive transcriptome analysis. In total, 545 and 615 genes are up- and down-regulated, respectively, in R. necatrix infected with RnMBV1. Gene ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analyses of the DEGs suggested that primary and secondary metabolism would be greatly disturbed in R. necatrix infected with RnMBV1. The genes encoding transcriptional regulators, plant cell wall-degrading enzymes, and toxin production, such as cytochalasin E, were also found in the DEGs. The genetic resources provided in this study will accelerate the discovery of genes associated with pathogenesis and other biological characteristics of R. necatrix, thus contributing to disease control.

  14. The prophages of Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533: comparative genomics and transcription analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, Marco; Canchaya, Carlos; Pridmore, R. David; Bruessow, Harald

    2004-01-01

    Two non-inducible, but apparently complete prophages were identified in the genome of the sequenced Lactobacillus johnsonii strain NCC 533. The 38- and 40-kb-long prophages Lj928 and Lj965 represent distinct lineages of Sfi11-like pac-site Siphoviridae unrelated at the DNA sequence level. The deduced structural proteins from Lj928 demonstrated aa sequence identity with Lactococcus lactis phage TP901-1, while Lj965 shared sequence links with Streptococcus thermophilus phage O1205. With the exception of tRNA genes, inserted between DNA replication and DNA packaging genes, the transcription of the prophage was restricted to the genome segments near both attachment sites. Transcribed genes unrelated to phage functions were inserted between the phage repressor and integrase genes; one group of genes shared sequence relatedness with a mobile DNA element in Staphylococcus aureus. A short, but highly transcribed region was located between the phage lysin and right attachment site; it lacked a protein-encoding function in one prophage

  15. Comparative Genomic and Transcriptional Analyses of CRISPR Systems Across the Genus Pyrobaculum

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    David L Bernick

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Within the domain Archaea, the CRISPR immune system appears to be nearly ubiquitous based on computational genome analyses. Initial studies in bacteria demonstrated that the CRISPR system targets invading plasmid and viral DNA. Recent experiments in the model archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus uncovered a novel RNA-targeting variant of the CRISPR system potentially unique to archaea. Because our understanding of CRISPR system evolution in other archaea is limited, we have taken a comparative genomic and transcriptomic view of the CRISPR arrays across six diverse species within the crenarchaeal genus Pyrobaculum. We present transcriptional data from each of four species in the genus (P. aerophilum, P. islandicum, P. calidifontis, P. arsenaticum, analyzing mature CRISPR-associated small RNA abundance from over 20 arrays. Within the genus, there is remarkable conservation of CRISPR array structure, as well as unique features that are have not been studied in other archaeal systems. These unique features include: a nearly invariant CRISPR promoter, conservation of direct repeat families, the 5' polarity of CRISPR-associated small RNA abundance, and a novel CRISPR-specific association with homologues of nurA and herA. These analyses provide a genus-level evolutionary perspective on archaeal CRISPR systems, broadening our understanding beyond existing non-comparative model systems.

  16. Identification and characterisation of Dof transcription factors in the cucumber genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Chang-Long; Cheng, Qing; Zhao, Liqun; Mao, Aijun; Yang, Jingjing; Yu, Shuancang; Weng, Yiqun; Xu, Yong

    2016-03-16

    Cucumber is vulnerable to many foliage diseases. Recent studies reported cloning of candidate genes for several diseases in cucumber; however, the exact defence mechanisms remain unclear. Dof genes have been shown to play significant roles in plant growth, development, and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Dof genes coding for plant-specific transcription factors can promote large-scale expression of defence-related genes at whole genome level. The genes in the family have been identified and characterized in several plant species, but not in cucumber. In the present study, we identified 36 CsDof members from the cucumber draft genomes which could be classified into eight groups. The proportions of the CsDof family genes, duplication events, chromosomal locations, cis-elements and miRNA target sites were comprehensively investigated. Consequently, we analysed the expression patterns of CsDof genes in specific tissues and their response to two biotic stresses (watermelon mosaic virus and downy mildew). These results indicated that CsDof may be involved in resistance to biotic stresses in cucumber.

  17. A genomic approach to identify regulatory nodes in the transcriptional network of systemic acquired resistance in plants.

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    Dong Wang

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Many biological processes are controlled by intricate networks of transcriptional regulators. With the development of microarray technology, transcriptional changes can be examined at the whole-genome level. However, such analysis often lacks information on the hierarchical relationship between components of a given system. Systemic acquired resistance (SAR is an inducible plant defense response involving a cascade of transcriptional events induced by salicylic acid through the transcription cofactor NPR1. To identify additional regulatory nodes in the SAR network, we performed microarray analysis on Arabidopsis plants expressing the NPR1-GR (glucocorticoid receptor fusion protein. Since nuclear translocation of NPR1-GR requires dexamethasone, we were able to control NPR1-dependent transcription and identify direct transcriptional targets of NPR1. We show that NPR1 directly upregulates the expression of eight WRKY transcription factor genes. This large family of 74 transcription factors has been implicated in various defense responses, but no specific WRKY factor has been placed in the SAR network. Identification of NPR1-regulated WRKY factors allowed us to perform in-depth genetic analysis on a small number of WRKY factors and test well-defined phenotypes of single and double mutants associated with NPR1. Among these WRKY factors we found both positive and negative regulators of SAR. This genomics-directed approach unambiguously positioned five WRKY factors in the complex transcriptional regulatory network of SAR. Our work not only discovered new transcription regulatory components in the signaling network of SAR but also demonstrated that functional studies of large gene families have to take into consideration sequence similarity as well as the expression patterns of the candidates.

  18. Differential expression profiles of conserved Snail transcription factors in the mouse testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micati, D J; Hime, G R; McLaughlin, E A; Abud, H E; Loveland, K L

    2018-01-30

    Snail transcription factors are key regulators of cellular transitions during embryonic development and tumorigenesis. The closely related SNAI1 and SNAI2 proteins induce epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMTs), acting predominantly as transcriptional repressors, while the functions of SNAI3 are unknown. An initial examination of Snai2-deficient mice provided evidence of deficient spermatogenesis. To address the hypothesis that Snail proteins are important for male fertility, this study provides the first comprehensive cellular expression profiles of all three mammalian Snail genes in the post-natal mouse testis. To evaluate Snail transcript expression profiles, droplet digital (dd) PCR and in situ hybridization were employed. Snai1, 2 and 3 transcripts are readily detected at 7, 14, 28 days post-partum (dpp) and 7 weeks (adult). Unique cellular expression was demonstrated for each by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry using Western blot-validated antibodies. SNAI1 and SNAI2 are in the nucleus of the most mature germ cell types at post-natal ages 10, 15 and 26. SNAI3 is only detected from 15 dpp onwards and is localized in the Sertoli cell cytoplasm. In the adult testis, Snai1 and Snai2 transcripts are detected in spermatogonia and spermatocytes, while Snai3 is in both germ and Sertoli cells. SNAI1 protein is evident in nuclei of spermatogonia, spermatocytes, round spermatids and elongated spermatids (Stages IX-XII). SNAI2 is present in the nuclei of spermatogonia and spermatocytes, with a faint signal detected in round spermatids. SNAI3 was detected only in Sertoli cell cytoplasm, as in juvenile testes. Additionally, colocalization of SNAI1 and SNAI2 with previously identified key binding partners, LSD1 and PRC2 complex components, provides strong evidence that these important functional interactions are conserved during spermatogenesis to control gene activity. These distinct expression profiles suggest that each Snail family member has unique

  19. Whole-genome sequencing and comprehensive molecular profiling identify new driver mutations in gastric cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Kai; Yuen, Siu Tsan; Xu, Jiangchun; Lee, Siu Po; Yan, Helen H N; Shi, Stephanie T; Siu, Hoi Cheong; Deng, Shibing; Chu, Kent Man; Law, Simon; Chan, Kok Hoe; Chan, Annie S Y; Tsui, Wai Yin; Ho, Siu Lun; Chan, Anthony K W; Man, Jonathan L K; Foglizzo, Valentina; Ng, Man Kin; Chan, April S; Ching, Yick Pang; Cheng, Grace H W; Xie, Tao; Fernandez, Julio; Li, Vivian S W; Clevers, Hans; Rejto, Paul A; Mao, Mao; Leung, Suet Yi

    Gastric cancer is a heterogeneous disease with diverse molecular and histological subtypes. We performed whole-genome sequencing in 100 tumor-normal pairs, along with DNA copy number, gene expression and methylation profiling, for integrative genomic analysis. We found subtype-specific genetic and

  20. Epigenetic hereditary transcription profiles III, evidence for an epigenetic network resulting in gender, tissue and age-specific variation in overall transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simons Johannes WIM

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously shown that deviations from the average transcription profile of a group of functionally related genes are not only heritable, but also demonstrate specific patterns associated with age, gender and differentiation, thereby implicating genome-wide nuclear programming as the cause. To determine whether these results could be reproduced, a different micro-array database (obtained from two types of muscle tissue, derived from 81 human donors aged between 16 to 89 years was studied. Results This new database also revealed the existence of age, gender and tissue-specific features in a small group of functionally related genes. In order to further analyze this phenomenon, a method was developed for quantifying the contribution of different factors to the variability in gene expression, and for generating a database limited to residual values reflecting constitutional differences between individuals. These constitutional differences, presumably epigenetic in origin, contribute to about 50% of the observed residual variance which is connected with a network of interrelated changes in gene expression with some genes displaying a decrease or increase in residual variation with age. Conclusion Epigenetic variation in gene expression without a clear concomitant relation to gene function appears to be a widespread phenomenon. This variation is connected with interactions between genes, is gender and tissue specific and is related to cellular aging. This finding, together with the method developed for analysis, might contribute to the elucidation of the role of nuclear programming in differentiation, aging and carcinogenesis Reviewers This article was reviewed by Thiago M. Venancio (nominated by Aravind Iyer, Hua Li (nominated by Arcady Mushegian and Arcady Mushegian and J.P.de Magelhaes (nominated by G. Church.

  1. JASPAR 2010: the greatly expanded open-access database of transcription factor binding profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Thongjuea, Supat; Kwon, Andrew T

    2009-01-01

    JASPAR (http://jaspar.genereg.net) is the leading open-access database of matrix profiles describing the DNA-binding patterns of transcription factors (TFs) and other proteins interacting with DNA in a sequence-specific manner. Its fourth major release is the largest expansion of the core database...... to an active research community. As binding models are refined by newer data, the JASPAR database now uses versioning of matrices: in this release, 12% of the older models were updated to improved versions. Classification of TF families has been improved by adopting a new DNA-binding domain nomenclature...

  2. Effect of chronic uremia on the transcriptional profile of the calcified aorta analyzed by RNA sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rukov, Jakob Lewin; Gravesen, Eva; Mace, Maria L.

    2016-01-01

    The development of vascular calcification (VC) in chronic uremia (CU) is a tightly regulated process controlled by factors promoting and inhibiting mineralization. Next-generation high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is a powerful and sensitive tool for quantitative gene expression profiling...... with an expression level of >1 reads/kilobase transcript/million mapped reads, 2,663 genes were differentially expressed with 47% upregulated genes and 53% downregulated genes in uremic rats. Significantly deregulated genes were enriched for ontologies related to the extracellular matrix, response to wounding...

  3. Meloidogyne javanica Chorismate Mutase Transcript Expression Profile Using Real-Time Quantitative RT-PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Painter, Janet E.; Lambert, Kris N.

    2003-01-01

    A developmental expression profile of the Meloidodgyne javanica esophageal gland gene chorismate mutase-1 (Mj-cm-1) could suggest when in the lifecycle of the nematode the Mj-cm-1 product is functional. This study used real-time quantitative RT-PCR to examine the variation in Mj-cm-1 transcript levels over six timepoints in the nematode lifecycle: egg, infective second-stage juveniles (Inf-J2), 2-day post-inoculation (pi), 7-day pi, 14-day pi, and adult. The Mj-cm-1 mRNA levels peaked at 2-da...

  4. Genome-wide classification and expression analysis of MYB transcription factor families in rice and Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The MYB gene family comprises one of the richest groups of transcription factors in plants. Plant MYB proteins are characterized by a highly conserved MYB DNA-binding domain. MYB proteins are classified into four major groups namely, 1R-MYB, 2R-MYB, 3R-MYB and 4R-MYB based on the number and position of MYB repeats. MYB transcription factors are involved in plant development, secondary metabolism, hormone signal transduction, disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance. A comparative analysis of MYB family genes in rice and Arabidopsis will help reveal the evolution and function of MYB genes in plants. Results A genome-wide analysis identified at least 155 and 197 MYB genes in rice and Arabidopsis, respectively. Gene structure analysis revealed that MYB family genes possess relatively more number of introns in the middle as compared with C- and N-terminal regions of the predicted genes. Intronless MYB-genes are highly conserved both in rice and Arabidopsis. MYB genes encoding R2R3 repeat MYB proteins retained conserved gene structure with three exons and two introns, whereas genes encoding R1R2R3 repeat containing proteins consist of six exons and five introns. The splicing pattern is similar among R1R2R3 MYB genes in Arabidopsis. In contrast, variation in splicing pattern was observed among R1R2R3 MYB members of rice. Consensus motif analysis of 1kb upstream region (5′ to translation initiation codon) of MYB gene ORFs led to the identification of conserved and over-represented cis-motifs in both rice and Arabidopsis. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that several members of MYBs are up-regulated by various abiotic stresses both in rice and Arabidopsis. Conclusion A comprehensive genome-wide analysis of chromosomal distribution, tandem repeats and phylogenetic relationship of MYB family genes in rice and Arabidopsis suggested their evolution via duplication. Genome-wide comparative analysis of MYB genes and their expression analysis

  5. Stabilization of the U5-leader stem in the HIV-1 RNA genome affects initiation and elongation of reverse transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerens, N.; Groot, F.; Berkhout, B.

    2000-01-01

    Reverse transcription of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type I (HIV-1) RNA genome is primed by a cellular tRNA-lys3 molecule that binds to the primer binding site (PBS). The PBS is predicted to be part of an extended RNA structure, consisting of a small U5-PBS hairpin and a large U5-leader stem.

  6. Mutations in EBF3 Disturb Transcriptional Profiles and Cause Intellectual Disability, Ataxia, and Facial Dysmorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Frederike Leonie; Girisha, Katta M; Hardigan, Andrew A; Kortüm, Fanny; Shukla, Anju; Alawi, Malik; Dalal, Ashwin; Brady, Lauren; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Bird, Lynne M; Ceulemans, Sophia; Bebin, Martina; Bowling, Kevin M; Hiatt, Susan M; Lose, Edward J; Primiano, Michelle; Chung, Wendy K; Juusola, Jane; Akdemir, Zeynep C; Bainbridge, Matthew; Charng, Wu-Lin; Drummond-Borg, Margaret; Eldomery, Mohammad K; El-Hattab, Ayman W; Saleh, Mohammed A M; Bézieau, Stéphane; Cogné, Benjamin; Isidor, Bertrand; Küry, Sébastien; Lupski, James R; Myers, Richard M; Cooper, Gregory M; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2017-01-05

    From a GeneMatcher-enabled international collaboration, we identified ten individuals affected by intellectual disability, speech delay, ataxia, and facial dysmorphism and carrying a deleterious EBF3 variant detected by whole-exome sequencing. One 9-bp duplication and one splice-site, five missense, and two nonsense variants in EBF3 were found; the mutations occurred de novo in eight individuals, and the missense variant c.625C>T (p.Arg209Trp) was inherited by two affected siblings from their healthy mother, who is mosaic. EBF3 belongs to the early B cell factor family (also known as Olf, COE, or O/E) and is a transcription factor involved in neuronal differentiation and maturation. Structural assessment predicted that the five amino acid substitutions have damaging effects on DNA binding of EBF3. Transient expression of EBF3 mutant proteins in HEK293T cells revealed mislocalization of all but one mutant in the cytoplasm, as well as nuclear localization. By transactivation assays, all EBF3 mutants showed significantly reduced or no ability to activate transcription of the reporter gene CDKN1A, and in situ subcellular fractionation experiments demonstrated that EBF3 mutant proteins were less tightly associated with chromatin. Finally, in RNA-seq and ChIP-seq experiments, EBF3 acted as a transcriptional regulator, and mutant EBF3 had reduced genome-wide DNA binding and gene-regulatory activity. Our findings demonstrate that variants disrupting EBF3-mediated transcriptional regulation cause intellectual disability and developmental delay and are present in ∼0.1% of individuals with unexplained neurodevelopmental disorders. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Genome-wide analysis of EgEVE_1, a transcriptionally active endogenous viral element associated to small RNAs in Eucalyptus genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Sanches Marcon

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Endogenous viral elements (EVEs are the result of heritable horizontal gene transfer from viruses to hosts. In the last years, several EVE integration events were reported in plants by the exponential availability of sequenced genomes. Eucalyptus grandis is a forest tree species with a sequenced genome that is poorly studied in terms of evolution and mobile genetic elements composition. Here we report the characterization of E. grandis endogenous viral element 1 (EgEVE_1, a transcriptionally active EVE with a size of 5,664 bp. Phylogenetic analysis and genomic distribution demonstrated that EgEVE_1 is a newly described member of the Caulimoviridae family, distinct from the recently characterized plant Florendoviruses. Genomic distribution of EgEVE_1 and Florendovirus is also distinct. EgEVE_1 qPCR quantification in Eucalyptus urophylla suggests that this genome has more EgEVE_1 copies than E. grandis. EgEVE_1 transcriptional activity was demonstrated by RT-qPCR in five Eucalyptus species and one intrageneric hybrid. We also identified that Eucalyptus EVEs can generate small RNAs (sRNAs,that might be involved in de novo DNA methylation and virus resistance. Our data suggest that EVE families in Eucalyptus have distinct properties, and we provide the first comparative analysis of EVEs in Eucalyptus genomes.

  8. Genome-wide analysis of EgEVE_1, a transcriptionally active endogenous viral element associated to small RNAs in Eucalyptus genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Helena Sanches; Costa-Silva, Juliana; Lorenzetti, Alan Péricles Rodrigues; Marino, Celso Luis; Domingues, Douglas Silva

    2017-01-01

    Endogenous viral elements (EVEs) are the result of heritable horizontal gene transfer from viruses to hosts. In the last years, several EVE integration events were reported in plants by the exponential availability of sequenced genomes. Eucalyptus grandis is a forest tree species with a sequenced genome that is poorly studied in terms of evolution and mobile genetic elements composition. Here we report the characterization of E. grandis endogenous viral element 1 (EgEVE_1), a transcriptionally active EVE with a size of 5,664 bp. Phylogenetic analysis and genomic distribution demonstrated that EgEVE_1 is a newly described member of the Caulimoviridae family, distinct from the recently characterized plant Florendoviruses. Genomic distribution of EgEVE_1 and Florendovirus is also distinct. EgEVE_1 qPCR quantification in Eucalyptus urophylla suggests that this genome has more EgEVE_1 copies than E. grandis. EgEVE_1 transcriptional activity was demonstrated by RT-qPCR in five Eucalyptus species and one intrageneric hybrid. We also identified that Eucalyptus EVEs can generate small RNAs (sRNAs),that might be involved in de novo DNA methylation and virus resistance. Our data suggest that EVE families in Eucalyptus have distinct properties, and we provide the first comparative analysis of EVEs in Eucalyptus genomes.

  9. Transcriptional profiling of endocrine cerebro-osteodysplasia using microarray and next-generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piya Lahiry

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcriptome profiling of patterns of RNA expression is a powerful approach to identify networks of genes that play a role in disease. To date, most mRNA profiling of tissues has been accomplished using microarrays, but next-generation sequencing can offer a richer and more comprehensive picture. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ECO is a rare multi-system developmental disorder caused by a homozygous mutation in ICK encoding intestinal cell kinase. We performed gene expression profiling using both cDNA microarrays and next-generation mRNA sequencing (mRNA-seq of skin fibroblasts from ECO-affected subjects. We then validated a subset of differentially expressed transcripts identified by each method using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Finally, we used gene ontology (GO to identify critical pathways and processes that were abnormal according to each technical platform. Methodologically, mRNA-seq identifies a much larger number of differentially expressed genes with much better correlation to qRT-PCR results than the microarray (r² = 0.794 and 0.137, respectively. Biologically, cDNA microarray identified functional pathways focused on anatomical structure and development, while the mRNA-seq platform identified a higher proportion of genes involved in cell division and DNA replication pathways. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Transcriptome profiling with mRNA-seq had greater sensitivity, range and accuracy than the microarray. The two platforms generated different but complementary hypotheses for further evaluation.

  10. Transcriptional profiles of supragranular-enriched genes associate with corticocortical network architecture in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krienen, Fenna M; Yeo, B T Thomas; Ge, Tian; Buckner, Randy L; Sherwood, Chet C

    2016-01-26

    The human brain is patterned with disproportionately large, distributed cerebral networks that connect multiple association zones in the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes. The expansion of the cortical surface, along with the emergence of long-range connectivity networks, may be reflected in changes to the underlying molecular architecture. Using the Allen Institute's human brain transcriptional atlas, we demonstrate that genes particularly enriched in supragranular layers of the human cerebral cortex relative to mouse distinguish major cortical classes. The topography of transcriptional expression reflects large-scale brain network organization consistent with estimates from functional connectivity MRI and anatomical tracing in nonhuman primates. Microarray expression data for genes preferentially expressed in human upper layers (II/III), but enriched only in lower layers (V/VI) of mouse, were cross-correlated to identify molecular profiles across the cerebral cortex of postmortem human brains (n = 6). Unimodal sensory and motor zones have similar molecular profiles, despite being distributed across the cortical mantle. Sensory/motor profiles were anticorrelated with paralimbic and certain distributed association network profiles. Tests of alternative gene sets did not consistently distinguish sensory and motor regions from paralimbic and association regions: (i) genes enriched in supragranular layers in both humans and mice, (ii) genes cortically enriched in humans relative to nonhuman primates, (iii) genes related to connectivity in rodents, (iv) genes associated with human and mouse connectivity, and (v) 1,454 gene sets curated from known gene ontologies. Molecular innovations of upper cortical layers may be an important component in the evolution of long-range corticocortical projections.

  11. [Characterization of the copy number of RIRE10 retrotransposon and transcriptional activity of its LTR in rice genome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Hong, Guo-Fan; Han, Bin

    2003-08-01

    A full-length Ty3-like retrotransposon, named RIRE10, was identified on the long arm of chromosome 4 in rice genome. The internal region between two LTRs had another open reading frame in the region upstream of gag-pol sequence. The transcripts from LTR region were detected by Northern blot hybridization and RT-PCR. To assess the activity of RIRE10 in rice genome, the copy number of its internal region and long terminal repeat (LTR) domain were determined by dot blot analyses. Nearly 900 solo-LTR of the RIRE10 retrotransposon exist in rice genome, apart from those LTRs that flank 65 intact RIRE retrotransposons. Based on the experimental results, the retrotransposition of RIRE10 was speculated to be influenced by two factors: transcriptional activity of LTR region and homologous recombination resulting in solo-LTR.

  12. Global transcriptional profiling of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense using Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdner, Deana L; Anderson, Donald M

    2006-04-25

    Dinoflagellates are one of the most important classes of marine and freshwater algae, notable both for their functional diversity and ecological significance. They occur naturally as free-living cells, as endosymbionts of marine invertebrates and are well known for their involvement in "red tides". Dinoflagellates are also notable for their unusual genome content and structure, which suggests that the organization and regulation of dinoflagellate genes may be very different from that of most eukaryotes. To investigate the content and regulation of the dinoflagellate genome, we performed a global analysis of the transcriptome of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense under nitrate- and phosphate-limited conditions using Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS). Data from the two MPSS libraries showed that the number of unique signatures found in A. fundyense cells is similar to that of humans and Arabidopsis thaliana, two eukaryotes that have been extensively analyzed using this method. The general distribution, abundance and expression patterns of the A. fundyense signatures were also quite similar to other eukaryotes, and at least 10% of the A. fundyense signatures were differentially expressed between the two conditions. RACE amplification and sequencing of a subset of signatures showed that multiple signatures arose from sequence variants of a single gene. Single signatures also mapped to different sequence variants of the same gene. The MPSS data presented here provide a quantitative view of the transcriptome and its regulation in these unusual single-celled eukaryotes. The observed signature abundance and distribution in Alexandrium is similar to that of other eukaryotes that have been analyzed using MPSS. Results of signature mapping via RACE indicate that many signatures result from sequence variants of individual genes. These data add to the growing body of evidence for widespread gene duplication in dinoflagellates, which would contribute to

  13. Global transcriptional profiling of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense using Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Donald M

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dinoflagellates are one of the most important classes of marine and freshwater algae, notable both for their functional diversity and ecological significance. They occur naturally as free-living cells, as endosymbionts of marine invertebrates and are well known for their involvement in "red tides". Dinoflagellates are also notable for their unusual genome content and structure, which suggests that the organization and regulation of dinoflagellate genes may be very different from that of most eukaryotes. To investigate the content and regulation of the dinoflagellate genome, we performed a global analysis of the transcriptome of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense under nitrate- and phosphate-limited conditions using Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS. Results Data from the two MPSS libraries showed that the number of unique signatures found in A. fundyense cells is similar to that of humans and Arabidopsis thaliana, two eukaryotes that have been extensively analyzed using this method. The general distribution, abundance and expression patterns of the A. fundyense signatures were also quite similar to other eukaryotes, and at least 10% of the A. fundyense signatures were differentially expressed between the two conditions. RACE amplification and sequencing of a subset of signatures showed that multiple signatures arose from sequence variants of a single gene. Single signatures also mapped to different sequence variants of the same gene. Conclusion The MPSS data presented here provide a quantitative view of the transcriptome and its regulation in these unusual single-celled eukaryotes. The observed signature abundance and distribution in Alexandrium is similar to that of other eukaryotes that have been analyzed using MPSS. Results of signature mapping via RACE indicate that many signatures result from sequence variants of individual genes. These data add to the growing body of evidence for widespread gene

  14. Genome expression profiling predicts the molecular mechanism of peripheral myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoming

    2018-03-01

    The present study aimed to explore the molecular mechanism of myelination in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) based on genome expression profiles. Microarray data (GSE60345) was acquired from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were integrated and subsequently subjected to pathway and term enrichment analysis. A protein‑protein interaction network was constructed and the top 200 DEGs according to their degree value were further subjected to pathway enrichment analysis. A microRNA (miR)‑target gene regulatory network was constructed to explore the role of miRs associated with PNS myelination. A total of 783 upregulated genes and 307 downregulated genes were identified. The upregulated DEGs were significantly enriched in the biological function of complement and coagulation cascades, cytokine‑cytokine receptor interactions and cell adhesion molecules. Pathways significantly enriched by the downregulated DEGs included the cell cycle, oocyte meiosis and the p53 signaling pathway. In addition, the upregulated DEGs among the top 200 DEGs were significantly enriched in natural killer (NK) cell mediated cytotoxicity and the B cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathway, in which Fc γ receptor (FCGR), ras‑related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 2 (RAC2) and 1‑phosphatidylinositol‑4,5‑bisphosphate phosphodiesterase γ‑2 (PLCG2) were involved. miR‑339‑5p, miR‑10a‑5p and miR‑10b‑5p were identified as having a high degree value and may regulate the target genes TOX high mobility group box family member 4 (Tox4), DNA repair protein XRCC2 (Xrcc2) and C5a anaphylatoxin chemotactic receptor C5a2 (C5ar2). NK cell mediated cytotoxicity and the BCR pathway may be involved in peripheral myelination by targeting FCGR, RAC2 and PLCG2. The downregulation of oocyte meiosis, the cell cycle and the cellular tumor antigen p53 signaling pathway suggests decreasing schwann cell proliferation following the initiation of

  15. PanCoreGen - Profiling, detecting, annotating protein-coding genes in microbial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sandip; Bhardwaj, Archana; Bag, Sumit K; Sokurenko, Evgeni V; Chattopadhyay, Sujay

    2015-12-01

    A large amount of genomic data, especially from multiple isolates of a single species, has opened new vistas for microbial genomics analysis. Analyzing the pan-genome (i.e. the sum of genetic repertoire) of microbial species is crucial in understanding the dynamics of molecular evolution, where virulence evolution is of major interest. Here we present PanCoreGen - a standalone application for pan- and core-genomic profiling of microbial protein-coding genes. PanCoreGen overcomes key limitations of the existing pan-genomic analysis tools, and develops an integrated annotation-structure for a species-specific pan-genomic profile. It provides important new features for annotating draft genomes/contigs and detecting unidentified genes in annotated genomes. It also generates user-defined group-specific datasets within the pan-genome. Interestingly, analyzing an example-set of Salmonella genomes, we detect potential footprints of adaptive convergence of horizontally transferred genes in two human-restricted pathogenic serovars - Typhi and Paratyphi A. Overall, PanCoreGen represents a state-of-the-art tool for microbial phylogenomics and pathogenomics study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. PanCoreGen – profiling, detecting, annotating protein-coding genes in microbial genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Archana; Bag, Sumit K; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.

    2015-01-01

    A large amount of genomic data, especially from multiple isolates of a single species, has opened new vistas for microbial genomics analysis. Analyzing pan-genome (i.e. the sum of genetic repertoire) of microbial species is crucial in understanding the dynamics of molecular evolution, where virulence evolution is of major interest. Here we present PanCoreGen – a standalone application for pan- and core-genomic profiling of microbial protein-coding genes. PanCoreGen overcomes key limitations of the existing pan-genomic analysis tools, and develops an integrated annotation-structure for species-specific pan-genomic profile. It provides important new features for annotating draft genomes/contigs and detecting unidentified genes in annotated genomes. It also generates user-defined group-specific datasets within the pan-genome. Interestingly, analyzing an example-set of Salmonella genomes, we detect potential footprints of adaptive convergence of horizontally transferred genes in two human-restricted pathogenic serovars – Typhi and Paratyphi A. Overall, PanCoreGen represents a state-of-the-art tool for microbial phylogenomics and pathogenomics study. PMID:26456591

  17. Transcript profiling reveals rewiring of iron assimilation gene expression in Candida albicans and C. dubliniensis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Gary P

    2012-12-01

    Hyphal growth is repressed in Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis by the transcription factor Nrg1. Transcript profiling of a C. dubliniensis NRG1 mutant identified a common group of 28 NRG1-repressed genes in both species, including the hypha-specific genes HWP1, ECE1 and the regulator of cell elongation UME6. Unexpectedly, C. dubliniensis NRG1 was required for wild-type levels of expression of 10 genes required for iron uptake including seven ferric reductases, SIT1, FTR1 and RBT5. However, at alkaline pH and during filamentous growth in 10% serum, most of these genes were highly induced in C. dubliniensis. Conversely, RBT5, PGA10, FRE10 and FRP1 did not exhibit induction during hyphal growth when NRG1 is downregulated, indicating that in C. dubliniensis NRG1 is also required for optimal expression of these genes in alkaline environments. In iron-depleted medium at pH 4.5, reduced growth of the NRG1 mutant relative to wild type was observed; however, growth was restored to wild-type levels or greater at pH 6.5, indicating that alkaline induction of iron assimilation gene expression could rescue this phenotype. These data indicate that transcriptional control of iron assimilation and pseudohypha formation has been separated in C. albicans, perhaps promoting growth in a wider range of niches.

  18. Dynamic transcriptional profiling provides insights into tuberous root development in Rehmannia glutinosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng eSun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Rehmannia glutinosa, a herb of the Scrophulariaceae family, is widely cultivated in the Northern part of China. The tuberous root has well known medicinal properties; however, yield and quality are threatened by abiotic and biotic stresses. Understanding the molecular process of tuberous root development may help identify novel targets for its control. In the present study, we used Illumina sequencing and de novo assembly strategies to obtain a reference transcriptome that is relevant to tuberous root development. We then conducted RNA-seq quantification analysis to determine gene expression profiles of the adventitious root (AR, thickening adventitious root (TAR, and the developing tuberous root (DTR. Expression profiling identified a total of 6,974 differentially expressed unigenes during root developmental. Bioinformatics analysis and gene expression profiling revealed changes in phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, starch and sucrose metabolism, and plant hormone biosynthesis during root development. Moreover, we identified and allocated putative functions to the genes involved in tuberous root development, including genes related to major carbohydrate metabolism, hormone metabolism, and transcription regulation. The present study provides the initial description of gene expression profiles of AR, TAR, and DTR, which facilitates identification of genes of interest. Moreover, our work provides insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying tuberous root development and may assist in the design and development of improved breeding schemes for different R. glutinosa varieties through genetic manipulation.

  19. Soybean (Glycine max) SWEET gene family: insights through comparative genomics, transcriptome profiling and whole genome re-sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Gunvant; Valliyodan, Babu; Deshmukh, Rupesh; Prince, Silvas; Nicander, Bjorn; Zhao, Mingzhe; Sonah, Humira; Song, Li; Lin, Li; Chaudhary, Juhi; Liu, Yang; Joshi, Trupti; Xu, Dong; Nguyen, Henry T

    2015-07-11

    SWEET (MtN3_saliva) domain proteins, a recently identified group of efflux transporters, play an indispensable role in sugar efflux, phloem loading, plant-pathogen interaction and reproductive tissue development. The SWEET gene family is predominantly studied in Arabidopsis and members of the family are being investigated in rice. To date, no transcriptome or genomics analysis of soybean SWEET genes has been reported. In the present investigation, we explored the evolutionary aspect of the SWEET gene family in diverse plant species including primitive single cell algae to angiosperms with a major emphasis on Glycine max. Evolutionary features showed expansion and duplication of the SWEET gene family in land plants. Homology searches with BLAST tools and Hidden Markov Model-directed sequence alignments identified 52 SWEET genes that were mapped to 15 chromosomes in the soybean genome as tandem duplication events. Soybean SWEET (GmSWEET) genes showed a wide range of expression profiles in different tissues and developmental stages. Analysis of public transcriptome data and expression profiling using quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed that a majority of the GmSWEET genes were confined to reproductive tissue development. Several natural genetic variants (non-synonymous SNPs, premature stop codons and haplotype) were identified in the GmSWEET genes using whole genome re-sequencing data analysis of 106 soybean genotypes. A significant association was observed between SNP-haplogroup and seed sucrose content in three gene clusters on chromosome 6. Present investigation utilized comparative genomics, transcriptome profiling and whole genome re-sequencing approaches and provided a systematic description of soybean SWEET genes and identified putative candidates with probable roles in the reproductive tissue development. Gene expression profiling at different developmental stages and genomic variation data will aid as an important resource for the soybean research

  20. Transcriptional Profiling and Identification of Heat-Responsive Genes in Perennial Ryegrass by RNA-Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kehua Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne is one of the most widely used forage and turf grasses in the world due to its desirable agronomic qualities. However, as a cool-season perennial grass species, high temperature is a major factor limiting its performance in warmer and transition regions. In this study, a de novo transcriptome was generated using a cDNA library constructed from perennial ryegrass leaves subjected to short-term heat stress treatment. Then the expression profiling and identification of perennial ryegrass heat response genes by digital gene expression analyses was performed. The goal of this work was to produce expression profiles of high temperature stress responsive genes in perennial ryegrass leaves and further identify the potentially important candidate genes with altered levels of transcript, such as those genes involved in transcriptional regulation, antioxidant responses, plant hormones and signal transduction, and cellular metabolism. The de novo assembly of perennial ryegrass transcriptome in this study obtained more total and annotated unigenes compared to previously published ones. Many DEGs identified were genes that are known to respond to heat stress in plants, including HSFs, HSPs, and antioxidant related genes. In the meanwhile, we also identified four gene candidates mainly involved in C4 carbon fixation, and one TOR gene. Their exact roles in plant heat stress response need to dissect further. This study would be important by providing the gene resources for improving heat stress tolerance in both perennial ryegrass and other cool-season perennial grass plants.

  1. Transcriptional profiling at whole population and single cell levels reveals somatosensory neuron molecular diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Isaac M; Barrett, Lee B; Williams, Erika K; Strochlic, David E; Lee, Seungkyu; Weyer, Andy D; Lou, Shan; Bryman, Gregory S; Roberson, David P; Ghasemlou, Nader; Piccoli, Cara; Ahat, Ezgi; Wang, Victor; Cobos, Enrique J; Stucky, Cheryl L; Ma, Qiufu; Liberles, Stephen D; Woolf, Clifford J

    2014-01-01

    The somatosensory nervous system is critical for the organism's ability to respond to mechanical, thermal, and nociceptive stimuli. Somatosensory neurons are functionally and anatomically diverse but their molecular profiles are not well-defined. Here, we used transcriptional profiling to analyze the detailed molecular signatures of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons. We used two mouse reporter lines and surface IB4 labeling to purify three major non-overlapping classes of neurons: 1) IB4+SNS-Cre/TdTomato+, 2) IB4−SNS-Cre/TdTomato+, and 3) Parv-Cre/TdTomato+ cells, encompassing the majority of nociceptive, pruriceptive, and proprioceptive neurons. These neurons displayed distinct expression patterns of ion channels, transcription factors, and GPCRs. Highly parallel qRT-PCR analysis of 334 single neurons selected by membership of the three populations demonstrated further diversity, with unbiased clustering analysis identifying six distinct subgroups. These data significantly increase our knowledge of the molecular identities of known DRG populations and uncover potentially novel subsets, revealing the complexity and diversity of those neurons underlying somatosensation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04660.001 PMID:25525749

  2. Transcriptional profiling of protein expression related genes of Pichia pastoris under simulated microgravity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Qi

    Full Text Available The physiological responses and transcription profiling of Pichia pastoris GS115 to simulated microgravity (SMG were substantially changed compared with normal gravity (NG control. We previously reported that the recombinant P. pastoris grew faster under SMG than NG during methanol induction phase and the efficiencies of recombinant enzyme production and secretion were enhanced under SMG, which was considered as the consequence of changed transcriptional levels of some key genes. In this work, transcriptiome profiling of P. pastoris cultured under SMG and NG conditions at exponential and stationary phases were determined using next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies. Four categories of 141 genes function as methanol utilization, protein chaperone, RNA polymerase and protein transportation or secretion classified according to Gene Ontology (GO were chosen to be analyzed on the basis of NGS results. And 80 significantly changed genes were weighted and estimated by Cluster 3.0. It was found that most genes of methanol metabolism (85% of 20 genes and protein transportation or secretion (82.2% of 45 genes were significantly up-regulated under SMG. Furthermore the quantity and fold change of up-regulated genes in exponential phase of each category were higher than those of stationary phase. The results indicate that the up-regulated genes of methanol metabolism and protein transportation or secretion mainly contribute to enhanced production and secretion of the recombinant protein under SMG.

  3. Kinome-wide transcriptional profiling of uveal melanoma reveals new vulnerabilities to targeted therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Fiona P; Clarke, Kim; Kalirai, Helen; Kenyani, Jenna; Shahidipour, Haleh; Falciani, Francesco; Coulson, Judy M; Sacco, Joseph J; Coupland, Sarah E; Eyers, Patrick A

    2018-03-01

    Metastatic uveal melanoma (UM) is invariably fatal, usually within a year of diagnosis. There are currently no effective therapies, and clinical studies employing kinase inhibitors have so far demonstrated limited success. This is despite common activating mutations in GNAQ/11 genes, which trigger signalling pathways that might predispose tumours to a variety of targeted drugs. In this study, we have profiled kinome expression network dynamics in various human ocular melanomas. We uncovered a shared transcriptional profile in human primary UM samples and across a variety of experimental cell-based models. The poor overall response of UM cells to FDA-approved kinase inhibitors contrasted with much higher sensitivity to the bromodomain inhibitor JQ1, a broad transcriptional repressor. Mechanistically, we identified a repressed FOXM1-dependent kinase subnetwork in JQ1-exposed cells that contained multiple cell cycle-regulated protein kinases. Consistently, we demonstrated vulnerability of UM cells to inhibitors of mitotic protein kinases within this network, including the investigational PLK1 inhibitor BI6727. We conclude that analysis of kinome-wide signalling network dynamics has the potential to reveal actionable drug targets and inhibitors of potential therapeutic benefit for UM patients. © 2017 The Authors. Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research Published by John Wiley & Sons.

  4. Transcriptional and Cytokine Profiles Identify CXCL9 as a Biomarker of Disease Activity in Morphea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Jack C; Rainwater, Yevgeniya Byekova; Malviya, Neeta; Cyrus, Nika; Auer-Hackenberg, Lorenz; Hynan, Linda S; Hosler, Gregory A; Jacobe, Heidi T

    2017-08-01

    IFN-related pathways have not been studied in morphea, and biomarkers are needed. We sought to characterize morphea serum cytokine imbalance and IFN-related gene expression in blood and skin to address this gap by performing a case-control study of 87 participants with morphea and 26 healthy control subjects. We used multiplexed immunoassays to determine serum cytokine concentrations, performed transcriptional profiling of whole blood and lesional morphea skin, and used double-staining immunohistochemistry to determine the cutaneous cellular source of CXCL9. We found that CXCL9 was present at increased concentrations in morphea serum (P morphea skin (fold change = 30.6, P = 0.006), and preliminary transcriptional profiling showed little evidence for IFN signature in whole blood. Double-staining immunohistochemistry showed CXCL9 co-localized with CD68 + dermal macrophages. In summary, inflammatory morphea is characterized by T helper type 1 cytokine imbalance in serum, particularly CXCL9, which is associated with disease activity. CXCL9 expression in lesional macrophages implicates the skin as the source of circulating cytokines. CXCL9 is a promising biomarker of disease activity in morphea. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Revealing genome-scale transcriptional regulatory landscape of OmpR highlights its expanded regulatory roles under osmotic stress in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seo, Sang Woo; Gao, Ye; Kim, Donghyuk

    2017-01-01

    A transcription factor (TF), OmpR, plays a critical role in transcriptional regulation of the osmotic stress response in bacteria. Here, we reveal a genome-scale OmpR regulon in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. Integrative data analysis reveals that a total of 37 genes in 24 transcription units (TUs...

  6. A resource for characterizing genome-wide binding and putative target genes of transcription factors expressed during secondary growth and wood formation in Populus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijun Liu; Trevor Ramsay; Matthew S. Zinkgraf; David Sundell; Nathaniel Robert Street; Vladimir Filkov; Andrew Groover

    2015-01-01

    Identifying transcription factor target genes is essential for modeling the transcriptional networks underlying developmental processes. Here we report a chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) resource consisting of genome-wide binding regions and associated putative target genes for four Populus homeodomain transcription factors...

  7. UFO: a web server for ultra-fast functional profiling of whole genome protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinicke, Peter

    2009-09-02

    Functional profiling is a key technique to characterize and compare the functional potential of entire genomes. The estimation of profiles according to an assignment of sequences to functional categories is a computationally expensive task because it requires the comparison of all protein sequences from a genome with a usually large database of annotated sequences or sequence families. Based on machine learning techniques for Pfam domain detection, the UFO web server for ultra-fast functional profiling allows researchers to process large protein sequence collections instantaneously. Besides the frequencies of Pfam and GO categories, the user also obtains the sequence specific assignments to Pfam domain families. In addition, a comparison with existing genomes provides dissimilarity scores with respect to 821 reference proteomes. Considering the underlying UFO domain detection, the results on 206 test genomes indicate a high sensitivity of the approach. In comparison with current state-of-the-art HMMs, the runtime measurements show a considerable speed up in the range of four orders of magnitude. For an average size prokaryotic genome, the computation of a functional profile together with its comparison typically requires about 10 seconds of processing time. For the first time the UFO web server makes it possible to get a quick overview on the functional inventory of newly sequenced organisms. The genome scale comparison with a large number of precomputed profiles allows a first guess about functionally related organisms. The service is freely available and does not require user registration or specification of a valid email address.

  8. Complex MHC class I gene transcription profiles and their functional impact in orangutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Natasja G.; Heijmans, Corrine M.C.; van der Wiel, Marit K.H.; Blokhuis, Jeroen H.; Mulder, Arend; Guethlein, Lisbeth A.; Doxiadis, Gaby G.M.; Claas, Frans H.J.; Parham, Peter; Bontrop, Ronald E.

    2015-01-01

    MHC haplotypes of humans and the African great ape species have one copy of the MHC-A, -B, and -C genes. In contrast, MHC haplotypes of orangutans, the Asian great ape species, exhibit variation in the number of gene copies. An in-depth analysis of the MHC class I gene repertoire in the two orangutan species, Pongo abelii and Pongo pygmaeus, is presented here. This analysis involved Sanger and next-generation sequencing methodologies, revealing diverse and complicated transcription profiles for orangutan MHC-A, -B, and -C. Thirty-five previously unreported MHC class I alleles are described. The data demonstrate that each orangutan MHC haplotype has one copy of the MHC-A gene, and that the MHC-B region has been subject to duplication, giving rise to at least three MHC-B genes. The MHC-B*03 and -B*08 lineages of alleles each account for a separate MHC-B gene. All MHC-B*08 allotypes have the C1-epitope motif recognized by KIR. At least one other MHC-B gene is present, pointing to MHC-B alleles that are not B*03 or B*08. The MHC-C gene is present only on some haplotypes, and each MHC-C allotype has the C1-epitope. The transcription profiles demonstrate that MHC-A alleles are highly transcribed, whereas MHC-C alleles, when present, are transcribed at very low levels. The MHC-B alleles are transcribed to a variable extent and over a wide range. For those orangutan MHC class I allotypes that are detected by human monoclonal anti-HLA class I antibodies, the level of cell-surface expression of proteins correlates with the level of transcription of the allele. PMID:26685209

  9. Genome-wide DNA methylation profile analysis identifies differentially methylated loci associated with ankylosis spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jiangcan; Liu, Yang; Xu, Jiawen; Wang, Wenyu; Wen, Yan; He, Awen; Fan, Qianrui; Guo, Xiong; Zhang, Feng

    2017-07-25

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic rheumatic and autoimmune disease. Little is known about the potential role of DNA methylation in the pathogenesis of AS. This study was undertaken to explore the potential role of DNA methylation in the genetic mechanism of AS. In this study, we compared the genome-wide DNA methylation profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) between five AS patients and five healthy subjects, using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was performed to validate the relevance of the identified differentially methylated genes for AS, using another independent sample of five AS patients and five healthy subjects. Compared with healthy controls, we detected 1915 differentially methylated CpG sites mapped to 1214 genes. The HLA-DQB1 gene achieved the most significant signal (cg14323910, adjusted P = 1.84 × 10 -6 , β difference = 0.5634) for AS. Additionally, the CpG site cg04777551 of HLA-DQB1 presented a suggestive association with AS (adjusted P = 1.46 × 10 -3 , β difference = 0.3594). qRT-PCR observed that the mRNA expression level of HLA-DQB1 in AS PBMCs was significantly lower than that in healthy control PBMCs (ratio = 0.48 ± 0.10, P pathway enrichment analysis of differentially methylated genes identified four GO terms and 10 pathways for AS, functionally related to antigen dynamics and function. Our results demonstrated the altered DNA methylation profile of AS and implicated HLA-DQB1 in the development of AS.

  10. Real-time transcriptional profiling of cellular and viral gene expression during lytic cytomegalovirus infection.

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    Lisa Marcinowski

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available During viral infections cellular gene expression is subject to rapid alterations induced by both viral and antiviral mechanisms. In this study, we applied metabolic labeling of newly transcribed RNA with 4-thiouridine (4sU-tagging to dissect the real-time kinetics of cellular and viral transcriptional activity during lytic murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV infection. Microarray profiling on newly transcribed RNA obtained at different times during the first six hours of MCMV infection revealed discrete functional clusters of cellular genes regulated with distinct kinetics at surprising temporal resolution. Immediately upon virus entry, a cluster of NF-κB- and interferon-regulated genes was induced. Rapid viral counter-regulation of this coincided with a very transient DNA-damage response, followed by a delayed ER-stress response. Rapid counter-regulation of all three clusters indicated the involvement of novel viral regulators targeting these pathways. In addition, down-regulation of two clusters involved in cell-differentiation (rapid repression and cell-cycle (delayed repression was observed. Promoter analysis revealed all five clusters to be associated with distinct transcription factors, of which NF-κB and c-Myc were validated to precisely match the respective transcriptional changes observed in newly transcribed RNA. 4sU-tagging also allowed us to study the real-time kinetics of viral gene expression in the absence of any interfering virion-associated-RNA. Both qRT-PCR and next-generation sequencing demonstrated a sharp peak of viral gene expression during the first two hours of infection including transcription of immediate-early, early and even well characterized late genes. Interestingly, this was subject to rapid gene silencing by 5-6 hours post infection. Despite the rapid increase in viral DNA load during viral DNA replication, transcriptional activity of some viral genes remained remarkably constant until late-stage infection, or was

  11. Genome-wide transcriptional response of Silurana (Xenopus tropicalis to infection with the deadly chytrid fungus.

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    Erica Bree Rosenblum

    Full Text Available Emerging infectious diseases are of great concern for both wildlife and humans. Several highly virulent fungal pathogens have recently been discovered in natural populations, highlighting the need for a better understanding of fungal-vertebrate host-pathogen interactions. Because most fungal pathogens are not fatal in the absence of other predisposing conditions, host-pathogen dynamics for deadly fungal pathogens are of particular interest. The chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (hereafter Bd infects hundreds of species of frogs in the wild. It is found worldwide and is a significant contributor to the current global amphibian decline. However, the mechanism by which Bd causes death in amphibians, and the response of the host to Bd infection, remain largely unknown. Here we use whole-genome microarrays to monitor the transcriptional responses to Bd infection in the model frog species, Silurana (Xenopus tropicalis, which is susceptible to chytridiomycosis. To elucidate the immune response to Bd and evaluate the physiological effects of chytridiomycosis, we measured gene expression changes in several tissues (liver, skin, spleen following exposure to Bd. We detected a strong transcriptional response for genes involved in physiological processes that can help explain some clinical symptoms of chytridiomycosis at the organismal level. However, we detected surprisingly little evidence of an immune response to Bd exposure, suggesting that this susceptible species may not be mounting efficient innate and adaptive immune responses against Bd. The weak immune response may be partially explained by the thermal conditions of the experiment, which were optimal for Bd growth. However, many immune genes exhibited decreased expression in Bd-exposed frogs compared to control frogs, suggesting a more complex effect of Bd on the immune system than simple temperature-mediated immune suppression. This study generates important baseline data for ongoing

  12. Occupying chromatin: Polycomb mechanisms for getting to genomic targets, stopping transcriptional traffic, and staying put

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Jeffrey A.; Kingston, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Polycomb repressive complexes are conserved chromatin regulators with key roles in multicellular development, stem cell biology, and cancer. New findings advance molecular understanding of how they target to sites of action, interact with and alter local chromatin to silence genes, and maintain silencing in successive generations of proliferating cells. Chromatin modification by Polycomb proteins provides an essential strategy for gene silencing in higher eukaryotes. Polycomb repressive complexes (PRCs) silence many key developmental regulators and are centrally integrated in the transcriptional circuitry of embryonic and adult stem cells. PRC2 trimethylates histone H3 on lysine-27 (H3-K27me3) and PRC1-type complexes ubiquitylate histone H2A and compact polynucleosomes. How PRCs and these signature activities are deployed to select and silence genomic targets is the subject of intense current investigation. We review recent advances on targeting, modulation, and functions of PRC1 and PRC2, and we consider progress on defining transcriptional steps impacted in Polycomb silencing. Key recent findings demonstrate PRC1 targeting independent of H3-K27me3 and emphasize nonenzymatic PRC1-mediated compaction. We also evaluate expanding connections between Polycomb machinery and non-coding RNAs. Exciting new studies supply the first systematic analyses of what happens to Polycomb complexes, and associated histone modifications, during the wholesale chromatin reorganizations that accompany DNA replication and mitosis. The stage is now set to reveal fundamental epigenetic mechanisms that determine how Polycomb target genes are silenced and how Polycomb silence is preserved through cell cycle progression. PMID:23473600

  13. Transcriptional profiling of rat skeletal muscle hypertrophy under restriction of blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shouyu; Liu, Xueyun; Chen, Zhenhuang; Li, Gaoquan; Chen, Qin; Zhou, Guoqing; Ma, Ruijie; Yao, Xinmiao; Huang, Xiao

    2016-12-15

    Blood flow restriction (BFR) under low-intensity resistance training (LIRT) can produce similar effects upon muscles to that of high-intensity resistance training (HIRT) while overcoming many of the restrictions to HIRT that occurs in a clinical setting. However, the potential molecular mechanisms of BFR induced muscle hypertrophy remain largely unknown. Here, using a BFR rat model, we aim to better elucidate the mechanisms regulating muscle hypertrophy as induced by BFR and reveal possible clinical therapeutic targets for atrophy cases. We performed genome wide screening with microarray analysis to identify unique differentially expressed genes during rat muscle hypertrophy. We then successfully separated the differentially expressed genes from BRF treated soleus samples by comparing the Affymetrix rat Genome U34 2.0 array with the control. Using qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC) we also analyzed other related differentially expressed genes. Results suggested that muscle hypertrophy induced by BFR is essentially regulated by the rate of protein turnover. Specifically, PI3K/AKT and MAPK pathways act as positive regulators in controlling protein synthesis where ubiquitin-proteasome acts as a negative regulator. This represents the first general genome wide level investigation of the gene expression profile in the rat soleus after BFR treatment. This may aid our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating and controlling muscle hypertrophy and provide support to the BFR strategies aiming to prevent muscle atrophy in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Soybean Roots Grown under Heat Stress Show Global Changes in Their Transcriptional and Proteomic Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdés-López, Oswaldo; Batek, Josef; Gomez-Hernandez, Nicolas; Nguyen, Cuong T.; Isidra-Arellano, Mariel C.; Zhang, Ning; Joshi, Trupti; Xu, Dong; Hixson, Kim K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Stacey, Gary

    2016-04-25

    Heat stress is likely to be a key factor in the negative impact of climate change on crop production. Roots provide support, water and nutrients to other plant organs. Likewise, roots play an important role in the establishment of symbiotic associations with different microorganisms. Despite the physiological relevance of roots, few studies have examined the response of these plant organs to heat stress. In this study, we performed genome-wide transcriptomic and proteomic analyses on isolated root hairs, which are a single, epidermal cell type, and compared their response to whole roots. We identified 2,013 genes differentially regulated in root hairs in response to heat stress. Our gene regulatory module analysis identified ten, key modules that controlled the majority of the transcriptional response to heat stress. We also conducted proteomic analysis on membrane fractions isolated from roots and root hairs. These experiments identified a variety of proteins whose expression changed within 3 hours of application of heat stress. Most of these proteins were predicted to play a role in thermotolerance, as well as in chromatin remodeling and post-transcriptional regulation. The data presented represent an in-depth analysis of the heat stress response of a single cell type in soybean.

  15. Expanded roles of leucine-responsive regulatory protein in transcription regulation of the Escherichia coli genome: Genomic SELEX screening of the regulation targets

    OpenAIRE

    Shimada, Tomohiro; Saito, Natsumi; Maeda, Michihisa; Tanaka, Kan; Ishihama, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) is a transcriptional regulator for the genes involved in transport, biosynthesis and catabolism of amino acids in Escherichia coli. In order to identify the whole set of genes under the direct control of Lrp, we performed Genomic SELEX screening and identified a total of 314 Lrp-binding sites on the E. coli genome. As a result, the regulation target of Lrp was predicted to expand from the hitherto identified genes for amino acid metabolism to a set ...

  16. Sexual Polyploidization in Medicago sativa L.: Impact on the Phenotype, Gene Transcription, and Genome Methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosellini, Daniele; Ferradini, Nicoletta; Allegrucci, Stefano; Capomaccio, Stefano; Zago, Elisa Debora; Leonetti, Paola; Balech, Bachir; Aversano, Riccardo; Carputo, Domenico; Reale, Lara; Veronesi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Polyploidization as the consequence of 2n gamete formation is a prominent mechanism in plant evolution. Studying its effects on the genome, and on genome expression, has both basic and applied interest. We crossed two diploid (2n = 2x = 16) Medicago sativa plants, a subsp. falcata seed parent, and a coerulea × falcata pollen parent that form a mixture of n and 2n eggs and pollen, respectively. Such a cross produced full-sib diploid and tetraploid (2n = 4x = 32) hybrids, the latter being the result of bilateral sexual polyploidization (BSP). These unique materials allowed us to investigate the effects of BSP, and to separate the effect of intraspecific hybridization from those of polyploidization by comparing 2x with 4x full sib progeny plants. Simple sequence repeat marker segregation demonstrated tetrasomic inheritance for all chromosomes but one, demonstrating that these neotetraploids are true autotetraploids. BSP brought about increased biomass, earlier flowering, higher seed set and weight, and larger leaves with larger cells. Microarray analyses with M. truncatula gene chips showed that several hundred genes, related to diverse metabolic functions, changed their expression level as a consequence of polyploidization. In addition, cytosine methylation increased in 2x, but not in 4x, hybrids. Our results indicate that sexual polyploidization induces significant transcriptional novelty, possibly mediated in part by DNA methylation, and phenotypic novelty that could underpin improved adaptation and reproductive success of tetraploid M. sativa with respect to its diploid progenitor. These polyploidy-induced changes may have promoted the adoption of tetraploid alfalfa in agriculture. PMID:26858330

  17. Genetic and molecular analyses of PEG10 reveal new aspects of genomic organization, transcription and translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Lux

    Full Text Available The paternally expressed gene PEG10 is a retrotransposon derived gene adapted through mammalian evolution located on human chromosome 7q21. PEG10 codes for at least two proteins, PEG10-RF1 and PEG10-RF1/2, by -1 frameshift translation. Overexpression or reinduced PEG10 expression was seen in malignancies, like hepatocellular carcinoma or B-cell acute and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PEG10 was also shown to promote adipocyte differentiation. Experimental evidence suggests that the PEG10-RF1 protein is an inhibitor of apoptosis and mediates cell proliferation. Here we present new data on the genomic organization of PEG10 by identifying the major transcription start site, a new splice variant and report the cloning and analysis of 1.9 kb of the PEG10 promoter. Furthermore, we show for the first time that PEG10 translation is initiated at a non-AUG start codon upstream of the previously predicted AUG codon as well as at the AUG codon. The finding that PEG10 translation is initiated at different sides adds a new aspect to the already interesting feature of PEG10's -1 frameshift translation mechanism. It is now important to unravel the cellular functions of the PEG10 protein variants and how they are related to normal or pathological conditions. The generated promoter-reporter constructs can be used for future studies to investigate how PEG10 expression is regulated. In summary, our study provides new data on the genomic organization as well as expression and translation of PEG10, a prerequisite in order to study and understand the role of PEG10 in cancer, embryonic development and normal cell homeostasis.

  18. Transcriptional profiling of nitrogen fixation and the role of NifA in the diazotrophic endophyte Azoarcus sp. strain BH72.

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    Abhijit Sarkar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The model endophyte Azoarcus sp. strain BH72 is known to contribute fixed nitrogen to its host Kallar grass and also expresses nitrogenase genes endophytically in rice seedlings. Availability of nitrogen is a signal regulating the transcription of nitrogenase genes. Therefore, we analysed global transcription in response to differences in the nitrogen source. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A DNA microarray, comprising 70-mer oligonucleotides representing 3989 open reading frames of the genome of strain BH72, was used for transcriptome studies. Transcription profiles of cells grown microaerobically on N2 versus ammonium were compared. Expression of 7.2% of the genes was significantly up-regulated, and 5.8% down-regulated upon N2 fixation, respectively. A parallel genome-wide prediction of σ(54-type promoter elements mapped to the upstream region of 38 sequences of which 36 were modulated under the N2 response. In addition to modulation of genes related to N2 fixation, the expressions of gene clusters that might be related to plant-microbe interaction and of several transcription factors were significantly enhanced. While comparing under N2-fixation conditions the transcriptome of wild type with a nifLA(- insertion mutant, NifA being the essential transcriptional activator for nif genes, 24.5% of the genome was found to be affected in expression. A genome-wide prediction of 29 NifA binding sequences matched to 25 of the target genes whose expression was differential during microarray analysis, some of which were putatively negatively regulated by NifA. For selected genes, differential expression was corroborated by real time RT-PCR studies. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that life under conditions of nitrogen fixation is an important part of the lifestyle of strain BH72 in roots, as a wide range of genes far beyond the nif regulon is modulated. Moreover, the NifA regulon in strain BH72 appears to encompass a wider range of

  19. Profiling of histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation levels predicts transcription factor activity and survival in acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Hascher, Antje

    2010-01-01

    . The altered genomic regions showed an overrepresentation of cis-binding sites for ets and c-AMP response elements (CREs) for transcription factors of the CREB/CREM/ATF1 family. The decrease in H3K9me3 levels at CREs was associated with increased CRE-driven promoter activity in AML blasts in vivo. AML...

  20. Whole genome amplification and its impact on CGH array profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meldrum Cliff

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some array comparative genomic hybridisation (array CGH platforms require a minimum of micrograms of DNA for the generation of reliable and reproducible data. For studies where there are limited amounts of genetic material, whole genome amplification (WGA is an attractive method for generating sufficient quantities of genomic material from miniscule amounts of starting material. A range of WGA methods are available and the multiple displacement amplification (MDA approach has been shown to be highly accurate, although amplification bias has been reported. In the current study, WGA was used to amplify DNA extracted from whole blood. In total, six array CGH experiments were performed to investigate whether the use of whole genome amplified DNA (wgaDNA produces reliable and reproducible results. Four experiments were conducted on amplified DNA compared to unamplified DNA and two experiments on unamplified DNA compared to unamplified DNA. Findings All the experiments involving wgaDNA resulted in a high proportion of losses and gains of genomic material. Previously, amplification bias has been overcome by using amplified DNA in both the test and reference DNA. Our data suggests that this approach may not be effective, as the gains and losses introduced by WGA appears to be random and are not reproducible between different experiments using the same DNA. Conclusion In light of these findings, the use of both amplified test and reference DNA on CGH arrays may not provide an accurate representation of copy number variation in the DNA.

  1. RNA-seq transcriptional profiling of Leishmania amazonensis reveals an arginase-dependent gene expression regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Ide Aoki

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania is a protozoan parasite that alternates its life cycle between the sand-fly vector and the mammalian host. This alternation involves environmental changes and leads the parasite to dynamic modifications in morphology, metabolism, cellular signaling and regulation of gene expression to allow for a rapid adaptation to new conditions. The L-arginine pathway in L. amazonensis is important during the parasite life cycle and interferes in the establishment and maintenance of the infection in mammalian macrophages. Host arginase is an immune-regulatory enzyme that can reduce the production of nitric oxide by activated macrophages, directing the availability of L-arginine to the polyamine pathway, resulting in parasite replication. In this work, we performed transcriptional profiling to identify differentially expressed genes in L. amazonensis wild-type (La-WT versus L. amazonensis arginase knockout (La-arg- promastigotes and axenic amastigotes.A total of 8253 transcripts were identified in La-WT and La-arg- promastigotes and axenic amastigotes, about 60% of them codifying hypothetical proteins and 443 novel transcripts, which did not match any previously annotated genes. Our RNA-seq data revealed that 85% of genes were constitutively expressed. The comparison of transcriptome and metabolome data showed lower levels of arginase and higher levels of glutamate-5-kinase in La-WT axenic amastigotes compared to promastigotes. The absence of arginase activity in promastigotes increased the levels of pyrroline 5-carboxylate reductase, but decreased the levels of arginosuccinate synthase, pyrroline 5-carboxylate dehydrogenase, acetylornithine deacetylase and spermidine synthase transcripts levels. These observations can explain previous metabolomic data pointing to the increase of L-arginine, citrulline and L-glutamate and reduction of aspartate, proline, ornithine and putrescine. Altogether, these results indicate that arginase activity is important

  2. Transcriptional profiling in human HaCaT keratinocytes in response to kaempferol and identification of potential transcription factors for regulating differential gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Byung Young; Lee, Ki-Hwan; Lee, Yong Sung; Hong, Il; Lee, Mi-Ock; Min, Daejin; Chang, Ihseop; Hwang, Jae Sung; Park, Jun Seong; Kim, Duck Hee

    2008-01-01

    Kaempferol is the major flavonol in green tea and exhibits many biomedically useful properties such as antioxidative, cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic activities. To elucidate its effects on the skin, we investigated the transcriptional profiles of kaempferol-treated HaCaT cells using cDNA microarray analysis and identified 147 transcripts that exhibited significant changes in expression. Of these, 18 were up-regulated and 129 were down-regulated. These transcripts were then classified into 12 categories according to their functional roles: cell adhesion/cytoskeleton, cell cycle, redox homeostasis, immune/defense responses, metabolism, protein biosynthesis/modification, intracellular transport, RNA processing, DNA modification/ replication, regulation of transcription, signal transduction and transport. We then analyzed the promoter sequences of differentially-regulated genes and identified over-represented regulatory sites and candidate transcription factors (TFs) for gene regulation by kaempferol. These included c-REL, SAP-1, Ahr-ARNT, Nrf-2, Elk-1, SPI-B, NF-κB and p65. In addition, we validated the microarray results and promoter analyses using conventional methods such as real-time PCR and ELISA-based transcription factor assay. Our microarray analysis has provided useful information for determining the genetic regulatory network affected by kaempferol, and this approach will be useful for elucidating gene-phytochemical interactions. PMID:18446059

  3. RNA:DNA hybrids in the human genome have distinctive nucleotide characteristics, chromatin composition, and transcriptional relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadel, Julie; Athanasiadou, Rodoniki; Lemetre, Christophe; Wijetunga, N Ari; Ó Broin, Pilib; Sato, Hanae; Zhang, Zhengdong; Jeddeloh, Jeffrey; Montagna, Cristina; Golden, Aaron; Seoighe, Cathal; Greally, John M

    2015-01-01

    RNA:DNA hybrids represent a non-canonical nucleic acid structure that has been associated with a range of human diseases and potential transcriptional regulatory functions. Mapping of RNA:DNA hybrids in human cells reveals them to have a number of characteristics that give insights into their functions. We find RNA:DNA hybrids to occupy millions of base pairs in the human genome. A directional sequencing approach shows the RNA component of the RNA:DNA hybrid to be purine-rich, indicating a thermodynamic contribution to their in vivo stability. The RNA:DNA hybrids are enriched at loci with decreased DNA methylation and increased DNase hypersensitivity, and within larger domains with characteristics of heterochromatin formation, indicating potential transcriptional regulatory properties. Mass spectrometry studies of chromatin at RNA:DNA hybrids shows the presence of the ILF2 and ILF3 transcription factors, supporting a model of certain transcription factors binding preferentially to the RNA:DNA conformation. Overall, there is little to indicate a dependence for RNA:DNA hybrids forming co-transcriptionally, with results from the ribosomal DNA repeat unit instead supporting the intriguing model of RNA generating these structures in trans. The results of the study indicate heterogeneous functions of these genomic elements and new insights into their formation and stability in vivo.

  4. Genome-wide mapping of boundary element-associated factor (BEAF) binding sites in Drosophila melanogaster links BEAF to transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Emberly, Eldon; Cuvier, Olivier; Hart, Craig M

    2009-07-01

    Insulator elements play a role in gene regulation that is potentially linked to nuclear organization. Boundary element-associated factors (BEAFs) 32A and 32B associate with hundreds of sites on Drosophila polytene chromosomes. We hybridized DNA isolated by chromatin immunoprecipitation to genome tiling microarrays to construct a genome-wide map of BEAF binding locations. A distinct difference in the association of 32A and 32B with chromatin was noted. We identified 1,820 BEAF peaks and found that more than 85% were less than 300 bp from transcription start sites. Half are between head-to-head gene pairs. BEAF-associated genes are transcriptionally active as judged by the presence of RNA polymerase II, dimethylated histone H3 K4, and the alternative histone H3.3. Forty percent of these genes are also associated with the polymerase negative elongation factor NELF. Like NELF-associated genes, most BEAF-associated genes are highly expressed. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, we found that the expression levels of most BEAF-associated genes decrease in embryos and cultured cells lacking BEAF. These results provide an unexpected link between BEAF and transcription, suggesting that BEAF plays a role in maintaining most associated promoter regions in an environment that facilitates high transcription levels.

  5. Papillomavirus genomes in human cervical carcinoma: Analysis of their integration and transcriptional activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matulic, M.; Soric, J.

    1994-01-01

    Eighty-four biopsies derived from cervical tissues were analyzed for the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA types 6, 16 and 18 using Southern blot hybridization. HPV 6 was found in none of the cervical biopsies, and HPV types 16 and 18 were found in 44% of them. The rate of HPV 16/18 positive samples increased proportionally to the severity of the lesion. In normal tissue there were no positive samples, in mild and moderate dysplasia HPV 16/18 was present in 20% and in severe dysplasia and invasive carcinomas in 37 and 50%, respectively. In biopsies from 13 cases with squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix and CIN III lesions HPV 16 was integrated within the host genome. It was concluded that the virus could be integrated at variable, presumably randomly selected chromosomal loci and with different number of copies. Transcription of HPV 16 and 18 was detected in one cervical cancer in HeLa cells, respectively. These results imply that HPV types 16 and 18 play an etiological role in the carcinogenesis of human cervical epithelial cells. (author)

  6. Genome-wide identification and characterization of Dof transcription factors in eggplant (Solanum melongena L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingzhen Wei

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Eggplant (Solanum melongena L. is an important vegetable cultivated in Asia, Africa and southern Europe and, following tomato and pepper, ranks as the third most important solanaceous vegetable crop. The Dof (DNA-binding with one finger family is a group of plant-specific transcription factors that play important roles in plant growth, development, and response to biotic and abiotic stresses. The genes in the Dof family have been identified and analysed in many plant species, but the information remains lacking for eggplant. In the present study, we identified 29 SmeDof members from the eggplant genome database, which were classifed into nine subgroups. The phylogeny, gene structure, conserved motifs and homologous genes of SmeDof genes were comprehensively investigated. Subsequently, we analysed the expression patterns of SmeDof genes in six different eggplant subspecies. The results provide novel insights into the family of SmeDof genes and will promote the understanding of the structure and function of Dof genes in eggplant, and the role of Dof expression during stress.

  7. Genome-wide identification and characterization of Dof transcription factors in eggplant (Solanum melongenaL.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qingzhen; Wang, Wuhong; Hu, Tianhua; Hu, Haijiao; Mao, Weihai; Zhu, Qinmei; Bao, Chonglai

    2018-01-01

    Eggplant ( Solanum melongena L.) is an important vegetable cultivated in Asia, Africa and southern Europe and, following tomato and pepper, ranks as the third most important solanaceous vegetable crop. The Dof (DNA-binding with one finger) family is a group of plant-specific transcription factors that play important roles in plant growth, development, and response to biotic and abiotic stresses. The genes in the Dof family have been identified and analysed in many plant species, but the information remains lacking for eggplant. In the present study, we identified 29 SmeDof members from the eggplant genome database, which were classifed into nine subgroups. The phylogeny, gene structure, conserved motifs and homologous genes of SmeDof genes were comprehensively investigated. Subsequently, we analysed the expression patterns of SmeDof genes in six different eggplant subspecies. The results provide novel insights into the family of SmeDof genes and will promote the understanding of the structure and function of Dof genes in eggplant, and the role of Dof expression during stress.

  8. Interconversion between active and inactive TATA-binding protein transcription complexes in the mouse genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choukrallah, Mohamed-Amin; Kobi, Dominique; Martianov, Igor; Pijnappel, W W M Pim; Mischerikow, Nikolai; Ye, Tao; Heck, Albert J R; Timmers, H Th Marc; Davidson, Irwin

    2012-02-01

    The TATA binding protein (TBP) plays a pivotal role in RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription through incorporation into the TFIID and B-TFIID complexes. The role of mammalian B-TFIID composed of TBP and B-TAF1 is poorly understood. Using a complementation system in genetically modified mouse cells where endogenous TBP can be conditionally inactivated and replaced by exogenous mutant TBP coupled to tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identify two TBP mutations, R188E and K243E, that disrupt the TBP-BTAF1 interaction and B-TFIID complex formation. Transcriptome and ChIP-seq analyses show that loss of B-TFIID does not generally alter gene expression or genomic distribution of TBP, but positively or negatively affects TBP and/or Pol II recruitment to a subset of promoters. We identify promoters where wild-type TBP assembles a partial inactive preinitiation complex comprising B-TFIID, TFIIB and Mediator complex, but lacking TFIID, TFIIE and Pol II. Exchange of B-TFIID in wild-type cells for TFIID in R188E and K243E mutant cells at these primed promoters completes preinitiation complex formation and recruits Pol II to activate their expression. We propose a novel regulatory mechanism involving formation of a partial preinitiation complex comprising B-TFIID that primes the promoter for productive preinitiation complex formation in mammalian cells.

  9. Large-scale transcriptional profiling of lignified tissues in Tectona grandis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Esteban; Vasconcelos, Tarcísio Sales; Vidal, Mabel; Mejia-Guerra, Maria Katherine; Carrer, Helaine

    2015-09-15

    Currently, Tectona grandis is one of the most valuable trees in the world and no transcript dataset related to secondary xylem is available. Considering how important the secondary xylem and sapwood transition from young to mature trees is, little is known about the expression differences between those successional processes and which transcription factors could regulate lignin biosynthesis in this tropical tree. Although MYB transcription factors are one of the largest superfamilies in plants related to secondary metabolism, it has not yet been characterized in teak. These results will open new perspectives for studies of diversity, ecology, breeding and genomic programs aiming to understand deeply the biology of this species. We present a widely expressed gene catalog for T. grandis using Illumina technology and the de novo assembly. A total of 462,260 transcripts were obtained, with 1,502 and 931 genes differentially expressed for stem and branch secondary xylem, respectively, during age transition. Analysis of stem and branch secondary xylem indicates substantial similarity in gene ontologies including carbohydrate enzymes, response to stress, protein binding, and allowed us to find transcription factors and heat-shock proteins differentially expressed. TgMYB1 displays a MYB domain and a predicted coiled-coil (CC) domain, while TgMYB2, TgMYB3 and TgMYB4 showed R2R3-MYB domain and grouped with MYBs from several gymnosperms and flowering plants. TgMYB1, TgMYB4 and TgCES presented higher expression in mature secondary xylem, in contrast with TgMYB2, TgHsp1, TgHsp2, TgHsp3, and TgBi whose expression is higher in young lignified tissues. TgMYB3 is expressed at lower level in secondary xylem. Expression patterns of MYB transcription factors and heat-shock proteins in lignified tissues are dissimilar when tree development was evaluated, obtaining more expression of TgMYB1 and TgMYB4 in lignified tissues of 60-year-old trees, and more expression in TgHsp1, TgHsp2, Tg

  10. Generation of a large catalog of unique transcripts for whole-genome expression analysis in nonmodel species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellin, Diana; Ferrarini, Alberto; Delledonne, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have allowed new tools to be developed for transcriptome characterization. We describe here the methods for the preparation of a library from pooled RNAs for 454 sequencing of 3'-cDNA fragments. We also describe how the read sequences obtained can be used to generate, through de novo reads assembly, a large catalog of unique transcripts in organisms for which a comprehensive collection of transcripts or the complete genome sequence is not available. Finally, this catalog can be used efficiently to design oligonucleotide probes for setting up a comprehensive microarray for global analysis of gene expression.

  11. Transcript Profiling Distinguishes Complete Treatment Responders With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Retana, Jorge; Lasa-Gonsebatt, Federico; Lopez-Urrutia, Eduardo; Coronel-Martínez, Jaime; Cantu De Leon, David; Jacobo-Herrera, Nadia; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Perez-Montiel, Delia; Reynoso-Noveron, Nancy; Vazquez-Romo, Rafael; Perez-Plasencia, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) mortality is a major public health concern since it is the second cause of cancer-related deaths among women. Patients diagnosed with locally advanced CC (LACC) have an important rate of recurrence and treatment failure. Conventional treatment for LACC is based on chemotherapy and radiotherapy; however, up to 40% of patients will not respond to conventional treatment; hence, we searched for a prognostic gene signature able to discriminate patients who do not respond to the conventional treatment employed to treat LACC. Tumor biopsies were profiled with genome-wide high-density expression microarrays. Class prediction was performed in tumor tissues and the resultant gene signature was validated by quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. A 27-predictive gene profile was identified through its association with pathologic response. The 27-gene profile was validated in an independent set of patients and was able to distinguish between patients diagnosed as no response versus complete response. Gene expression analysis revealed two distinct groups of tumors diagnosed as LACC. Our findings could provide a strategy to select patients who would benefit from neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy-based treatment. PMID:25926073

  12. Transcript Profiling Distinguishes Complete Treatment Responders With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Fernandez-Retana

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer (CC mortality is a major public health concern since it is the second cause of cancer-related deaths among women. Patients diagnosed with locally advanced CC (LACC have an important rate of recurrence and treatment failure. Conventional treatment for LACC is based on chemotherapy and radiotherapy; however, up to 40% of patients will not respond to conventional treatment; hence, we searched for a prognostic gene signature able to discriminate patients who do not respond to the conventional treatment employed to treat LACC. Tumor biopsies were profiled with genome-wide high-density expression microarrays. Class prediction was performed in tumor tissues and the resultant gene signature was validated by quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. A 27-predictive gene profile was identified through its association with pathologic response. The 27-gene profile was validated in an independent set of patients and was able to distinguish between patients diagnosed as no response versus complete response. Gene expression analysis revealed two distinct groups of tumors diagnosed as LACC. Our findings could provide a strategy to select patients who would benefit from neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy-based treatment.

  13. The CREB Coactivator CRTC2 Is a Lymphoma Tumor Suppressor that Preserves Genome Integrity through Transcription of DNA Mismatch Repair Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Minggang; Pak, Magnolia L; Chamberlain, Lynn; Xing, Wei; Yu, Hongbo; Green, Michael R

    2015-06-09

    The CREB-regulated transcription coactivator CRTC2 stimulates CREB target gene expression and has a well-established role in modulating glucose and lipid metabolism. Here, we find, unexpectedly, that loss of CRTC2, as well as CREB1 and its coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP), results in a deficiency in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) and a resultant increased mutation frequency. We show that CRTC2, CREB1, and CBP are transcriptional activators of well-established MMR genes, including EXO1, MSH6, PMS1, and POLD2. Mining of expression profiling databases and analysis of patient samples reveal that CRTC2 and its target MMR genes are downregulated in specific T cell lymphoma subtypes, which are microsatellite unstable. The levels of acetylated histone H3 on the CRTC2 promoter are significantly reduced in lymphoma in comparison to normal tissue, explaining the decreased CRTC2 expression. Our results establish a role for CRTC2 as a lymphoma tumor suppressor gene that preserves genome integrity by stimulating transcription of MMR genes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Survey of the Applications of NGS to Whole-Genome Sequencing and Expression Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Sung Lim

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the technologies of DNA sequence variation and gene expression profiling have been used widely as approaches in the expertise of genome biology and genetics. The application to genome study has been particularly developed with the introduction of the next-generation DNA sequencer (NGS Roche/454 and Illumina/Solexa systems, along with bioinformation analysis technologies of whole-genome de novo assembly, expression profiling, DNA variation discovery, and genotyping. Both massive whole-genome shotgun paired-end sequencing and mate paired-end sequencing data are important steps for constructing de novo assembly of novel genome sequencing data. It is necessary to have DNA sequence information from a multiplatform NGS with at least 2× and 30× depth sequence of genome coverage using Roche/454 and Illumina/Solexa, respectively, for effective an way of de novo assembly. Massive short-length reading data from the Illumina/Solexa system is enough to discover DNA variation, resulting in reducing the cost of DNA sequencing. Whole-genome expression profile data are useful to approach genome system biology with quantification of expressed RNAs from a whole-genome transcriptome, depending on the tissue samples. The hybrid mRNA sequences from Rohce/454 and Illumina/Solexa are more powerful to find novel genes through de novo assembly in any whole-genome sequenced species. The 20× and 50× coverage of the estimated transcriptome sequences using Roche/454 and Illumina/Solexa, respectively, is effective to create novel expressed reference sequences. However, only an average 30× coverage of a transcriptome with short read sequences of Illumina/Solexa is enough to check expression quantification, compared to the reference expressed sequence tag sequence.

  15. Genomic profiling of histological special types of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horlings, Hugo M.; Weigelt, Britta; Anderson, Eric M.; Lambros, Maryou B.; Mackay, Alan; Natrajan, Rachael; Ng, Charlotte K. Y.; Geyer, Felipe C.; van de Vijver, Marc J.; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.

    2013-01-01

    Histological special types of breast cancer have distinctive morphological features and account for up to 25 % of all invasive breast cancers. We sought to determine whether at the genomic level, histological special types of breast cancer are distinct from grade- and estrogen receptor (ER)-matched

  16. Comprehensive genomic profiles of small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Julie; Lim, Jing Shan; Jang, Se Jin; Cun, Yupeng; Ozretić, Luka; Kong, Gu; Leenders, Frauke; Lu, Xin; Fernández-Cuesta, Lynnette; Bosco, Graziella; Müller, Christian; Dahmen, Ilona; Jahchan, Nadine S.; Park, Kwon-Sik; Yang, Dian; Karnezis, Anthony N.; Vaka, Dedeepya; Torres, Angela; Wang, Maia Segura; Korbel, Jan O.; Menon, Roopika; Chun, Sung-Min; Kim, Deokhoon; Wilkerson, Matt; Hayes, Neil; Engelmann, David; Pützer, Brigitte; Bos, Marc; Michels, Sebastian; Vlasic, Ignacija; Seidel, Danila; Pinther, Berit; Schaub, Philipp; Becker, Christian; Altmüller, Janine; Yokota, Jun; Kohno, Takashi; Iwakawa, Reika; Tsuta, Koji; Noguchi, Masayuki; Muley, Thomas; Hoffmann, Hans; Schnabel, Philipp A.; Petersen, Iver; Chen, Yuan; Soltermann, Alex; Tischler, Verena; Choi, Chang-min; Kim, Yong-Hee; Massion, Pierre P.; Zou, Yong; Jovanovic, Dragana; Kontic, Milica; Wright, Gavin M.; Russell, Prudence A.; Solomon, Benjamin; Koch, Ina; Lindner, Michael; Muscarella, Lucia A.; la Torre, Annamaria; Field, John K.; Jakopovic, Marko; Knezevic, Jelena; Castaños-Vélez, Esmeralda; Roz, Luca; Pastorino, Ugo; Brustugun, Odd-Terje; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Thunnissen, Erik; Köhler, Jens; Schuler, Martin; Botling, Johan; Sandelin, Martin; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montserrat; Salvesen, Helga B.; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Bogus, Magdalena; Schneider, Peter M.; Zander, Thomas; Ansén, Sascha; Hallek, Michael; Wolf, Jürgen; Vingron, Martin; Yatabe, Yasushi; Travis, William D.; Nürnberg, Peter; Reinhardt, Christian; Perner, Sven; Heukamp, Lukas; Büttner, Reinhard; Haas, Stefan A.; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Peifer, Martin; Sage, Julien; Thomas, Roman K.

    2016-01-01

    We have sequenced the genomes of 110 small cell lung cancers (SCLC), one of the deadliest human cancers. In nearly all the tumours analysed we found bi-allelic inactivation of TP53 and RB1, sometimes by complex genomic rearrangements. Two tumours with wild-type RB1 had evidence of chromothripsis leading to overexpression of cyclin D1 (encoded by the CCND1 gene), revealing an alternative mechanism of Rb1 deregulation. Thus, loss of the tumour suppressors TP53 and RB1 is obligatory in SCLC. We discovered somatic genomic rearrangements of TP73 that create an oncogenic version of this gene, TP73Δex2/3. In rare cases, SCLC tumours exhibited kinase gene mutations, providing a possible therapeutic opportunity for individual patients. Finally, we observed inactivating mutations in NOTCH family genes in 25% of human SCLC. Accordingly, activation of Notch signalling in a pre-clinical SCLC mouse model strikingly reduced the number of tumours and extended the survival of the mutant mice. Furthermore, neuroendocrine gene expression was abrogated by Notch activity in SCLC cells. This first comprehensive study of somatic genome alterations in SCLC uncovers several key biological processes and identifies candidate therapeutic targets in this highly lethal form of cancer. PMID:26168399

  17. Genome-wide transcriptional changes induced by phagocytosis or growth on bacteria in Dictyostelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peracino Barbara

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phagocytosis plays a major role in the defense of higher organisms against microbial infection and provides also the basis for antigen processing in the immune response. Cells of the model organism Dictyostelium are professional phagocytes that exploit phagocytosis of bacteria as the preferred way to ingest food, besides killing pathogens. We have investigated Dictyostelium differential gene expression during phagocytosis of non-pathogenic bacteria, using DNA microarrays, in order to identify molecular functions and novel genes involved in phagocytosis. Results The gene expression profiles of cells incubated for a brief time with bacteria were compared with cells either incubated in axenic medium or growing on bacteria. Transcriptional changes during exponential growth in axenic medium or on bacteria were also compared. We recognized 443 and 59 genes that are differentially regulated by phagocytosis or by the different growth conditions (growth on bacteria vs. axenic medium, respectively, and 102 genes regulated by both processes. Roughly one third of the genes are up-regulated compared to macropinocytosis and axenic growth. Functional annotation of differentially regulated genes with different tools revealed that phagocytosis induces profound changes in carbohydrate, aminoacid and lipid metabolism, and in cytoskeletal components. Genes regulating translation and mitochondrial biogenesis are mostly up-regulated. Genes involved in sterol biosynthesis are selectively up-regulated, suggesting a shift in membrane lipid composition linked to phagocytosis. Very few changes were detected in genes required for vesicle fission/fusion, indicating that the intracellular traffic machinery is mostly in common between phagocytosis and macropinocytosis. A few putative receptors, including GPCR family 3 proteins, scaffolding and adhesion proteins, components of signal transduction and transcription factors have been identified, which could

  18. Genomic profiling of ER+ breast cancers after short-term estrogen suppression reveals alterations associated with endocrine resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giltnane, J.M.; Hutchinson, K.E.; Stricker, T.P.; Formisano, L.; Young, C.D.; Estrada, M.V.; Nixon, M.J.; Du, L.; Sanchez, V.; Ericsson, P. Gonzalez; Kuba, M.G.; Sanders, M.E.; Mu, X.J.; Van Allen, E.M.; Wagle, N.; Mayer, I.; Abramson, V.; Gómez, H.; Rizzo, M.; Toy, W.; Chandarlapaty, S.; Mayer, E.L.; Christiansen, J.; Murphy, D.; Fitzgerald, K.; Wang, K.; Ross, J.S.; Miller, V.A.; Stephens, P.J.; Yelensky, R.; Garraway, L.; Shyr, Y.; Meszoely, I.; Balko, J.M.; Arteaga, C.L.

    2017-01-01

    Proliferative inhibition of estrogen-receptor positive (ER+) breast cancers after short-term antiestrogen therapy correlates with long-term patient outcome. We profiled 155 ER+/HER2– early breast cancers from 143 patients treated with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole for 10-21 days before surgery. Twenty-one percent of tumors remained highly proliferative suggesting these tumors harbor alterations associated with intrinsic endocrine therapy resistance. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a correlation between 8p11-12 and 11q13 gene amplifications, including FGFR1 and CCND1, respectively, and high Ki67. We corroborated these findings in a separate cohort of serial pre-treatment, post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and recurrent ER+ tumors. Combined inhibition of FGFR1 and CDK4/6 reversed antiestrogen resistance in ER+ FGFR1/CCND1 co-amplified CAMA1 breast cancer cells. RNA sequencing of letrozole-treated tumors revealed intrachromosomal ESR1 fusion transcripts and gene expression signatures in cancers with high Ki67, indicative of enhanced E2F-mediated transcription and cell cycle processes. These data suggest short-term pre-operative estrogen deprivation followed by genomic profiling can be used to identify druggable alterations potentially causal to intrinsic endocrine therapy resistance. PMID:28794284

  19. Gene expression profiling to characterize sediment toxicity – a pilot study using Caenorhabditis elegans whole genome microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Ralph; Swain, Suresh C; Hoess, Sebastian; Claus, Evelyn; Menzel, Stefanie; Steinberg, Christian EW; Reifferscheid, Georg; Stürzenbaum, Stephen R

    2009-01-01

    Background Traditionally, toxicity of river sediments is assessed using whole sediment tests with benthic organisms. The challenge, however, is the differentiation between multiple effects caused by complex contaminant mixtures and the unspecific toxicity endpoints such as survival, growth or reproduction. The use of gene expression profiling facilitates the identification of transcriptional changes at the molecular level that are specific to the bio-available fraction of pollutants. Results In this pilot study, we exposed the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to three sediments of German rivers with varying (low, medium and high) levels of heavy metal and organic contamination. Beside chemical analysis, three standard bioassays were performed: reproduction of C. elegans, genotoxicity (Comet assay) and endocrine disruption (YES test). Gene expression was profiled using a whole genome DNA-microarray approach to identify overrepresented functional gene categories and derived cellular processes. Disaccharide and glycogen metabolism were found to be affected, whereas further functional pathways, such as oxidative phosphorylation, ribosome biogenesis, metabolism of xenobiotics, aging and several developmental processes were found to be differentially regulated only in response to the most contaminated sediment. Conclusion This study demonstrates how ecotoxicogenomics can identify transcriptional responses in complex mixture scenarios to distinguish different samples of river sediments. PMID:19366437

  20. Genome-wide functional profiling identifies genes and processes important for zinc-limited growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Matthew; Steffen, Janet; Loguinov, Alex V; Zimmerman, Ginelle R; Vulpe, Chris D; Eide, David J

    2012-01-01

    Zinc is an essential nutrient because it is a required cofactor for many enzymes and transcription factors. To discover genes and processes in yeast that are required for growth when zinc is limiting, we used genome-wide functional profiling. Mixed pools of ∼4,600 deletion mutants were inoculated into zinc-replete and zinc-limiting media. These cells were grown for several generations, and the prevalence of each mutant in the pool was then determined by microarray analysis. As a result, we identified more than 400 different genes required for optimal growth under zinc-limiting conditions. Among these were several targets of the Zap1 zinc-responsive transcription factor. Their importance is consistent with their up-regulation by Zap1 in low zinc. We also identified genes that implicate Zap1-independent processes as important. These include endoplasmic reticulum function, oxidative stress resistance, vesicular trafficking, peroxisome biogenesis, and chromatin modification. Our studies also indicated the critical role of macroautophagy in low zinc growth. Finally, as a result of our analysis, we discovered a previously unknown role for the ICE2 gene in maintaining ER zinc homeostasis. Thus, functional profiling has provided many new insights into genes and processes that are needed for cells to thrive under the stress of zinc deficiency.

  1. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of two soybean genotypes under dehydration and rehydration conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Soybean is an important crop that provides valuable proteins and oils for human use. Because soybean growth and development is extremely sensitive to water deficit, quality and crop yields are severely impacted by drought stress. In the face of limited water resources, drought-responsive genes are therefore of interest. Identification and analysis of dehydration- and rehydration-inducible differentially expressed genes (DEGs) would not only aid elucidation of molecular mechanisms of stress response, but also enable improvement of crop stress tolerance via gene transfer. Using Digital Gene Expression Tag profiling (DGE), a new technique based on Illumina sequencing, we analyzed expression profiles between two soybean genotypes to identify drought-responsive genes. Results Two soybean genotypes—drought-tolerant Jindou21 and drought-sensitive Zhongdou33—were subjected to dehydration and rehydration conditions. For analysis of DEGs under dehydration conditions, 20 cDNA libraries were generated from roots and leaves at two different time points under well-watered and dehydration conditions. We also generated eight libraries for analysis under rehydration conditions. Sequencing of the 28 libraries produced 25,000–33,000 unambiguous tags, which were mapped to reference sequences for annotation of expressed genes. Many genes exhibited significant expression differences among the libraries. DEGs in the drought-tolerant genotype were identified by comparison of DEGs among treatments and genotypes. In Jindou21, 518 and 614 genes were differentially expressed under dehydration in leaves and roots, respectively, with 24 identified both in leaves and roots. The main functional categories enriched in these DEGs were metabolic process, response to stresses, plant hormone signal transduction, protein processing, and plant-pathogen interaction pathway; the associated genes primarily encoded transcription factors, protein kinases, and other regulatory proteins. The

  2. Subgroup-specific intrinsic disorder profiles of arabidopsis NAC transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Emil G.; O'Shea, Charlotte; Skriver, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Protein intrinsic disorder (ID), referring to the lack of a fixed tertiary structure, is significant in signaling and transcription. We recently characterized ID in 6 phylogenetically representative Arabidopsis thaliana NAC transcription factors. Their transcription regulatory domains are mostly...

  3. Transcriptional Profiling of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in Response to Porphyromonas gingivalis Secreted Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddi, Durga; Belibasakis, Georgios N.

    2012-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious inflammatory disease that destroys the tooth-supporting (periodontal) tissues. Porphyromonas gingivalis is an oral pathogen highly implicated in the pathogenesis of this disease. It can exert its effects to a number of cells, including osteogenic bone marrow stromal cells which are important for homeostastic capacity of the tissues. By employing gene microarray technology, this study aimed to describe the overall transcriptional events (>2-fold regulation) elicited by P. gingivalis secreted products in bone marrow stromal cells, and to dissect further the categories of genes involved in bone metabolism, inflammatory and immune responses. After 6 h of challenge with P. gingivalis, 271 genes were up-regulated whereas 209 genes were down-regulated, whereas after 24 h, these numbers were 259 and 109, respectively. The early (6 h) response was characterised by regulation of genes associated with inhibition of cell cycle, induction of apoptosis and loss of structural integrity, whereas the late (24 h) response was characterised by induction of chemokines, cytokines and their associated intracellular pathways (such as NF-κB), mediators of connective tissue and bone destruction, and suppression of regulators of osteogenic differentiation. The most strongly up-regulated genes were lipocalin 2 (LCN2) and serum amyloid A3 (SAA3), both encoding for proteins of the acute phase inflammatory response. Collectively, these transcriptional changes elicited by P. gingivalis denote that the fundamental cellular functions are hindered, and that the cells acquire a phenotype commensurate with propagated innate immune response and inflammatory-mediated tissue destruction. In conclusion, the global transcriptional profile of bone marrow stromal cells in response to P. gingivalis is marked by deregulated homeostatic functions, with implications in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. PMID:22937121

  4. Transcription profiling in environmental diagnostics: health assessments in Columbia River basin steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connon, Richard E; D'Abronzo, Leandro S; Hostetter, Nathan J; Javidmehr, Alireza; Roby, Daniel D; Evans, Allen F; Loge, Frank J; Werner, Inge

    2012-06-05

    The health condition of out-migrating juvenile salmonids can influence migration success. Physical damage, pathogenic infection, contaminant exposure, and immune system status can affect survival probability. The present study is part of a wider investigation of out-migration success in juvenile steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and focuses on the application of molecular profiling to assess sublethal effects of environmental stressors in field-collected fish. We used a suite of genes in O. mykiss to specifically assess responses that could be directly related to steelhead health condition during out-migration. These biomarkers were used on juvenile steelhead captured in the Snake River, a tributary of the Columbia River, in Washington, USA, and were applied on gill and anterior head kidney tissue to assess immune system responses, pathogen-defense (NRAMP, Mx, CXC), general stress (HSP70), metal-binding (metallothionein-A), and xenobiotic metabolism (Cyp1a1) utilizing quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology. Upon capture, fish were ranked according to visual external physical conditions into good, fair, poor, and bad categories; gills and kidney tissues were then dissected and preserved for gene analyses. Transcription responses were tissue-specific for gill and anterior head kidney with less significant responses in gill tissue than in kidney. Significant differences between the condition ranks were attributed to NRAMP, MX, CXC, and Cyp1a1 responses. Gene profiling correlated gene expression with pathogen presence, and results indicated that gene profiling can be a useful tool for identifying specific pathogen types responsible for disease. Principal component analysis (PCA) further correlated these responses with specific health condition categories, strongly differentiating good, poor, and bad condition ranks. We conclude that molecular profiling is an informative and useful tool that could be applied to indicate and monitor numerous population

  5. Expression and Genomic Profiling of Minute Breast Cancer Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Alteration of gene expression profiles of peripheral mononuclear blood cells by tobacco smoke : implications for periodontal diseases . Oral...potentially revolutionize (2) the existing cancer staging system and the management of early disease . Microarray- based gene expression profiling and...2002) Understanding disease cell by cell. Science, 296, 1329-1330. 15. Emmert-Buck, M.R., Bonner, R.F., Smith, P.D., Chuaqui, R.F., Zhuang, Z

  6. Mutation Profile of JAK2 Transcripts in Patients with Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wanlong; Kantarjian, Hagop; Zhang, Xi; Yeh, Chen-Hsiung; Zhang, Zhong J.; Verstovsek, Srdan; Albitar, Maher

    2009-01-01

    Here, we describe the JAK2 mutation profile in a series of approximately 20,000 blood samples from patients with clinically suspected myeloproliferative neoplasias. Using a sensitive reverse transcription-PCR and direct sequencing approach on RNA rather than DNA, we detected JAK2 mutations in exons 12–15 in approximately 20% of these patients. We identified new mutations in addition to the known V617F and exon 12 mutations, which were the most common. Most of the novel mutations are located in the pseudokinase domain and therefore are expected to relieve the autoinhibitory function of this domain on JAK2 kinase activity. Our data suggest that molecular testing of JAK2 mutations should not be restricted to the V617F and exon 12 mutations, but perhaps should extend to most of the pseudokinase domain coding region as well. Furthermore, mutation screening using RNA is highly sensitive and could replace DNA-based testing because of the relative abundance of target transcripts and the ease in detecting deletion of the entire exon. PMID:19074595

  7. Differences between flocculating yeast and regular industrial yeast in transcription and metabolite profiling during ethanol fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To improve ethanolic fermentation performance of self-flocculating yeast, difference between a flocculating yeast strain and a regular industrial yeast strain was analyzed by transcriptional and metabolic approaches. Results: The number of down-regulated (industrial yeast YIC10 vs. flocculating yeast GIM2.71 and up-regulated genes were 4503 and 228, respectively. It is the economic regulation for YIC10 that non-essential genes were down-regulated, and cells put more “energy” into growth and ethanol production. Hexose transport and phosphorylation were not the limiting-steps in ethanol fermentation for GIM2.71 compared to YIC10, whereas the reaction of 1,3-disphosphoglycerate to 3-phosphoglycerate, the decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetaldehyde and its subsequent reduction to ethanol were the most limiting steps. GIM2.71 had stronger stress response than non-flocculating yeast and much more carbohydrate was distributed to other bypass, such as glycerol, acetate and trehalose synthesis. Conclusions: Differences between flocculating yeast and regular industrial yeast in transcription and metabolite profiling will provide clues for improving the fermentation performance of GIM2.71.

  8. Transcript profiling of aquaporins during basidiocarp development in Laccaria bicolor ectomycorrhizal with Picea glauca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao; Navarro-Ródenas, Alfonso; Cooke, Janice E K; Zwiazek, Janusz J

    2016-01-01

    Sporocarp formation is part of the reproductive stage in the life cycle of many mycorrhizal macrofungi. Sporocarp formation is accompanied by a transcriptomic switch and profound changes in regulation of the gene families that play crucial roles in the sporocarp initiation and maturation. Since sporocarp growth requires efficient water delivery, in the present study, we investigated changes in transcript abundance of six fungal aquaporin genes that could be cloned from the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor strain UAMH8232, during the initiation and development of its basidiocarp. Aquaporins are intrinsic membrane proteins facilitating the transmembrane transport of water and other small neutral molecules. In controlled-environment experiments, we induced basidiocarp formation in L. bicolor, which formed ectomycorrhizal associations with white spruce (Picea glauca) seedlings. We profiled transcript abundance corresponding to six fungal aquaporin genes at six different developmental stages of basidiocarp growth and development. We also compared physiological parameters of non-inoculated to mycorrhizal seedlings with and without the presence of basidiocarps. Two L. bicolor aquaporins--JQ585592, a functional channel for CO2, NO and H2O2, and JQ585595, a functional water channel--showed the greatest degree of upregulation during development of the basidiocarp. Our findings point to the importance of aquaporin-mediated transmembrane water and CO2 transport during distinct stages of basidiocarp development.

  9. Correlation of the electrophysiological profiles and sodium channel transcripts of individual rat dorsal root ganglia neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier eTheriault

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Voltage gated sodium channels (Na+ channels play an important role in nociceptive transmission. They are intimately tied to the genesis and transmission of neuronal firing. Five different isoforms (Nav1.3, Nav1.6, Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 have been linked to nociceptive responses. A change in the biophysical properties of these channels or in their expression levels occurs in different pathological pain states. However, the precise involvement of the isoforms in the genesis and transmission of nociceptive responses is unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the synergy between the different populations Na+ channels that give individual neurons a unique electrophysical profile.We used the patch-clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration to record Na+ currents and action potentials from acutely dissociated small diameter DRG neurons (<30 µM from adult rats. We also performed single cell qPCR on the same neurons. Our results revealed that there is a strong correlation between Na+ currents and mRNA transcripts in individual neurons. A cluster analysis showed that subgroups formed by Na+ channel transcripts by mRNA quantification have different biophysical properties. In addition, the firing frequency of the neurons was not affected by the relative populations of Na+ channel. The synergy between populations of Na+ channel in individual small diameter DRG neurons gives each neuron a unique electrophysiological profile. The Na+ channel remodeling that occurs in different pathological pain states may be responsible for the sensitization of the neurons.

  10. Discrimination of Carcinogens by Hepatic Transcript Profiling in Rats Following 28-day Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Matsumoto

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at discriminating carcinogens on the basis of hepatic transcript profiling in the rats administrated with a variety of carcinogens and non-carcinogens. We conducted 28-day toxicity tests in male F344 rats with 47 carcinogens and 26 non- carcinogens, and then investigated periodically the hepatic gene expression profiles using custom microarrays. By hierarchical cluster analysis based on significantly altered genes, carcinogens were clustered into three major groups (Group 1 to 3. The formation of these groups was not affected by the gene sets used as well as the administration period, indicating that the grouping of carcinogens was universal independent of the conditions of both statistical analysis and toxicity testing. Seventeen carcinogens belonging to Group 1 were composed of mainly rat hepatocarcinogens, most of them being mutagenic ones. Group 2 was formed by three subgroups, which were composed of 23 carcinogens exhibiting distinct properties in terms of genotoxicity and target tissues, namely nonmutagenic hepatocarcinogens, and mutagenic and nonmutagenic carcinogens both of which are targeted to other tissues. Group 3 contained 6 carcinogens including 4 estrogenic substances, implying the group of estrogenic carcinogens. Gene network analyses revealed that the significantly altered genes in Group 1 included Bax, Tnfrsf6, Btg2, Mgmt and Abcb1b, suggesting that p53-mediated signaling pathway involved in early pathologic alterations associated with preceding mutagenic carcinogenesis. Thus, the common transcriptional signatures for each group might reflect the early molecular events of carcinogenesis and hence would enable us to identify the biomarker genes, and then to develop a new assay for carcinogenesis prediction.

  11. The transcription elongation factor Bur1-Bur2 interacts with replication protein A and maintains genome stability during replication stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausing, Emanuel; Mayer, Andreas; Chanarat, Sittinan

    2010-01-01

    Multiple DNA-associated processes such as DNA repair, replication, and recombination are crucial for the maintenance of genome integrity. Here, we show a novel interaction between the transcription elongation factor Bur1-Bur2 and replication protein A (RPA), the eukaryotic single-stranded DNA......-binding protein with functions in DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Bur1 interacted via its C-terminal domain with RPA, and bur1-¿C mutants showed a deregulated DNA damage response accompanied by increased sensitivity to DNA damage and replication stress as well as increased levels of persisting Rad52...... foci. Interestingly, the DNA damage sensitivity of an rfa1 mutant was suppressed by bur1 mutation, further underscoring a functional link between these two protein complexes. The transcription elongation factor Bur1-Bur2 interacts with RPA and maintains genome integrity during DNA replication stress....

  12. Gene discovery and transcript analyses in the corn smut pathogen Ustilago maydis: expressed sequence tag and genome sequence comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saville Barry J

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ustilago maydis is the basidiomycete fungus responsible for common smut of corn and is a model organism for the study of fungal phytopathogenesis. To aid in the annotation of the genome sequence of this organism, several expressed sequence tag (EST libraries were generated from a variety of U. maydis cell types. In addition to utility in the context of gene identification and structure annotation, the ESTs were analyzed to identify differentially abundant transcripts and to detect evidence of alternative splicing and anti-sense transcription. Results Four cDNA libraries were constructed using RNA isolated from U. maydis diploid teliospores (U. maydis strains 518 × 521 and haploid cells of strain 521 grown under nutrient rich, carbon starved, and nitrogen starved conditions. Using the genome sequence as a scaffold, the 15,901 ESTs were assembled into 6,101 contiguous expressed sequences (contigs; among these, 5,482 corresponded to predicted genes in the MUMDB (MIPS Ustilago maydis database, while 619 aligned to regions of the genome not yet designated as genes in MUMDB. A comparison of EST abundance identified numerous genes that may be regulated in a cell type or starvation-specific manner. The transcriptional response to nitrogen starvation was assessed using RT-qPCR. The results of this suggest that there may be cross-talk between the nitrogen and carbon signalling pathways in U. maydis. Bioinformatic analysis identified numerous examples of alternative splicing and anti-sense transcription. While intron retention was the predominant form of alternative splicing in U. maydis, other varieties were also evident (e.g. exon skipping. Selected instances of both alternative splicing and anti-sense transcription were independently confirmed using RT-PCR. Conclusion Through this work: 1 substantial sequence information has been provided for U. maydis genome annotation; 2 new genes were identified through the discovery of 619

  13. Transcriptional profiling reveals gland-specific differential expression in the three major salivary glands of the adult mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Oei, Maria S; Ovitt, Catherine E; Sincan, Murat; Melvin, James E

    2018-04-01

    RNA-Seq was used to better understand the molecular nature of the biological differences among the three major exocrine salivary glands in mammals. Transcriptional profiling found that the adult murine parotid, submandibular, and sublingual salivary glands express greater than 14,300 protein-coding genes, and nearly 2,000 of these genes were differentially expressed. Principle component analysis of the differentially expressed genes revealed three distinct clusters according to gland type. The three salivary gland transcriptomes were dominated by a relatively few number of highly expressed genes (6.3%) that accounted for more than 90% of transcriptional output. Of the 912 transcription factors expressed in the major salivary glands, greater than 90% of them were detected in all three glands, while expression for ~2% of them was enriched in an individual gland. Expression of these unique transcription factors correlated with sublingual and parotid specific subsets of both highly expressed and differentially expressed genes. Gene ontology analyses revealed that the highly expressed genes common to all glands were associated with global functions, while many of the genes expressed in a single gland play a major role in the function of that gland. In summary, transcriptional profiling of the three murine major salivary glands identified a limited number of highly expressed genes, differentially expressed genes, and unique transcription factors that represent the transcriptional signatures underlying gland-specific biological properties.

  14. Quantitative profiling of housekeeping and Epstein-Barr virus gene transcription in Burkitt lymphoma cell lines using an oligonucleotide microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niggli Felix K

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is associated with lymphoid malignancies, including Burkitt's lymphoma (BL, and can transform human B cells in vitro. EBV-harboring cell lines are widely used to investigate lymphocyte transformation and oncogenesis. Qualitative EBV gene expression has been extensively described, but knowledge of quantitative transcription is lacking. We hypothesized that transcription levels of EBNA1, the gene essential for EBV persistence within an infected cell, are similar in BL cell lines. Results To compare quantitative gene transcription in the BL cell lines Namalwa, Raji, Akata, Jijoye, and P3HR1, we developed an oligonucleotide microarray chip, including 17 housekeeping genes, six latent EBV genes (EBNA1, EBNA2, EBNA3A, EBNA3C, LMP1, LMP2, and four lytic EBV genes (BZLF1, BXLF2, BKRF2, BZLF2, and used the cell line B95.8 as a reference for EBV gene transcription. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays were used to validate microarray results. We found that transcription levels of housekeeping genes differed considerably among BL cell lines. Using a selection of housekeeping genes with similar quantitative transcription in the tested cell lines to normalize EBV gene transcription data, we showed that transcription levels of EBNA1 were quite similar in very different BL cell lines, in contrast to transcription levels of other EBV genes. As demonstrated with Akata cells, the chip allowed us to accurately measure EBV gene transcription changes triggered by treatment interventions. Conclusion Our results suggest uniform EBNA1 transcription levels in BL and that microarray profiling can reveal novel insights on quantitative EBV gene transcription and its impact on lymphocyte biology.

  15. Genomics DNA Profiling in Elite Professional Soccer Players: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kambouris, M; Del Buono, A; Maffulli, N

    2014-01-01

    Functional variants in exonic regions have been associated with development of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer. Athletic performance can be considered a multi-factorial complex phenotype. Genomic DNA was extracted from buccal swabs of seven soccer players from the Fulham football team. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) genotyping was undertaken. To achieve optimal athletic performance, predictive genomics DNA profiling for sports performance can be used to aid in sport selecti...

  16. Distinct transcriptional and metabolic profiles associated with empathy in Buddhist priests: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Junji; Ayuzawa, Satoshi; Nakamura, Seiji; Sakamoto, Shigeko; Hori, Miyo; Sasaoka, Tomoko; Takimoto-Ohnishi, Eriko; Tanatsugu, Masakazu; Murakami, Kazuo

    2017-09-02

    Growing evidence suggests that spiritual/religious involvement may have beneficial effects on both psychological and physical functions. However, the biological basis for this relationship remains unclear. This study explored the role of spiritual/religious involvement across a wide range of biological markers, including transcripts and metabolites, associated with the psychological aspects of empathy in Buddhist priests. Ten professional Buddhist priests and 10 age-matched non-priest controls were recruited. The participants provided peripheral blood samples for the analysis of gene expression and metabolic profiles. The participants also completed validated questionnaires measuring empathy, the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile-II (HPLP-II), and a brief-type self-administered diet history questionnaire (BDHQ). The microarray analyses revealed that the distinct transcripts in the Buddhist priests included up-regulated genes related to type I interferon (IFN) innate anti-viral responses (i.e., MX1, RSAD2, IFIT1, IFIT3, IFI27, IFI44L, and HERC5), and the genes C17orf97 (ligand of arginyltranseferase 1; ATE1), hemoglobin γA (HBG1), keratin-associated protein (KRTAP10-12), and sialic acid Ig-like lectin 14 (SIGLEC14) were down-regulated at baseline. The metabolomics analysis revealed that the metabolites, including 3-aminoisobutylic acid (BAIBA), choline, several essential amino acids (e.g., methionine, phenylalanine), and amino acid derivatives (e.g., 2-aminoadipic acid, asymmetric dimethyl-arginine (ADMA), symmetric dimethyl-arginine (SMDA)), were elevated in the Buddhist priests. By contrast, there was no significant difference of healthy lifestyle behaviors and daily nutrient intakes between the priests and the controls in this study. With regard to the psychological aspects, the Buddhist priests showed significantly higher empathy compared with the control. Spearman's rank correlation analysis showed that empathy aspects in the priests were significantly

  17. Transcriptional profiling of cattle infected with Trypanosoma congolense highlights gene expression signatures underlying trypanotolerance and trypanosusceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naessens Jan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background African animal trypanosomiasis (AAT caused by tsetse fly-transmitted protozoa of the genus Trypanosoma is a major constraint on livestock and agricultural production in Africa and is among the top ten global cattle diseases impacting on the poor. Here we show that a functional genomics approach can be used to identify temporal changes in host peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC gene expression due to disease progression. We also show that major gene expression differences exist between cattle from trypanotolerant and trypanosusceptible breeds. Using bovine long oligonucleotide microarrays and real time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR validation we analysed PBMC gene expression in naïve trypanotolerant and trypanosusceptible cattle experimentally challenged with Trypanosoma congolense across a 34-day infection time course. Results Trypanotolerant N'Dama cattle displayed a rapid and distinct transcriptional response to infection, with a ten-fold higher number of genes differentially expressed at day 14 post-infection compared to trypanosusceptible Boran cattle. These analyses identified coordinated temporal gene expression changes for both breeds in response to trypanosome infection. In addition, a panel of genes were identified that showed pronounced differences in gene expression between the two breeds, which may underlie the phenomena of trypanotolerance and trypanosusceptibility. Gene ontology (GO analysis demonstrate that the products of these genes may contribute to increased mitochondrial mRNA translational efficiency, a more pronounced B cell response, an elevated activation status and a heightened response to stress in trypanotolerant cattle. Conclusion This study has revealed an extensive and diverse range of cellular processes that are altered temporally in response to trypanosome infection in African cattle. Results indicate that the trypanotolerant N'Dama cattle respond more rapidly and with a

  18. Transcriptional profiling of the host cell response to feline immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Reinhard; Klein, Dieter

    2014-03-19

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a widespread pathogen of the domestic cat and an important animal model for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) research. In contrast to HIV, only limited information is available on the transcriptional host cell response to FIV infections. This study aims to identify FIV-induced gene expression changes in feline T-cells during the early phase of the infection. Illumina RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) was used identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) at 24 h after FIV infection. After removal of low-quality reads, the remaining sequencing data were mapped against the cat genome and the numbers of mapping reads were counted for each gene. Regulated genes were identified through the comparison of FIV and mock-infected data sets. After statistical analysis and the removal of genes with insufficient coverage, we detected a total of 69 significantly DEGs (44 up- and 25 down-regulated genes) upon FIV infection. The results obtained by RNA-seq were validated by reverse transcription qPCR analysis for 10 genes. Out of the most distinct DEGs identified in this study, several genes are already known to interact with HIV in humans, indicating comparable effects of both viruses on the host cell gene expression and furthermore, highlighting the importance of FIV as a model system for HIV. In addition, a set of new genes not previously linked to virus infections could be identified. The provided list of virus-induced genes may represent useful information for future studies focusing on the molecular mechanisms of virus-host interactions in FIV pathogenesis.

  19. Genome-Wide Phylogenetic Comparative Analysis of Plant Transcriptional Regulation: A Timeline of Loss, Gain, Expansion, and Correlation with Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Daniel; Weiche, Benjamin; Timmerhaus, Gerrit; Richardt, Sandra; Riaño-Pachón, Diego M.; Corrêa, Luiz G. G.; Reski, Ralf; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Rensing, Stefan A.

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary retention of duplicated genes encoding transcription-associated proteins (TAPs, comprising transcription factors and other transcriptional regulators) has been hypothesized to be positively correlated with increasing morphological complexity and paleopolyploidizations, especially within the plant kingdom. Here, we present the most comprehensive set of classification rules for TAPs and its application for genome-wide analyses of plants and algae. Using a dated species tree and phylogenetic comparative (PC) analyses, we define the timeline of TAP loss, gain, and expansion among Viridiplantae and find that two major bursts of gain/expansion occurred, coinciding with the water-to-land transition and the radiation of flowering plants. For the first time, we provide PC proof for the long-standing hypothesis that TAPs are major driving forces behind the evolution of morphological complexity, the latter in Plantae being shaped significantly by polyploidization and subsequent biased paleolog retention. Principal component analysis incorporating the number of TAPs per genome provides an alternate and significant proxy for complexity, ideally suited for PC genomics. Our work lays the ground for further interrogation of the shaping of gene regulatory networks underlying the evolution of organism complexity. PMID:20644220

  20. The genome-wide identification and transcriptional levels of DNA methyltransferases and demethylases in globe artichoke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Gianoglio

    Full Text Available Changes to the cytosine methylation status of DNA, driven by the activity of C5 methyltransferases (C5-MTases and demethylases, exert an important influence over development, transposon movement, gene expression and imprinting. Three groups of C5-MTase enzymes have been identified in plants, namely MET (methyltransferase 1, CMT (chromomethyltransferases and DRM (domains rearranged methyltransferases. Here the repertoire of genes encoding C5-MTase and demethylase by the globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus is described, based on sequence homology, a phylogenetic analysis and a characterization of their functional domains. A total of ten genes encoding C5-MTase (one MET, five CMTs and four DRMs and five demethylases was identified. An analysis of their predicted product's protein structure suggested an extensive level of conservation has been retained by the C5-MTases. Transcriptional profiling based on quantitative real time PCR revealed a number of differences between the genes encoding maintenance and de novo methyltransferases, sometimes in a tissue- or development-dependent manner, which implied a degree of functional specialization.

  1. Gene Transcriptional and Metabolic Profile Changes in Mimetic Aging Mice Induced by D-Galactose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yue-Yue; Ji, Xiong-Fei; Fu, Jian-Ping; Zhu, Xiao-Juan; Li, Rong-Hua; Mu, Chang-Kao; Wang, Chun-Lin; Song, Wei-Wei

    2015-01-01

    D-galactose injection has been shown to induce many changes in mice that represent accelerated aging. This mouse model has been widely used for pharmacological studies of anti-aging agents. The underlying mechanism of D-galactose induced aging remains unclear, however, it appears to relate to glucose and 1ipid metabolic disorders. Currently, there has yet to be a study that focuses on investigating gene expression changes in D-galactose aging mice. In this study, integrated analysis of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-based metabonomics and gene expression profiles was used to investigate the changes in transcriptional and metabolic profiles in mimetic aging mice injected with D-galactose. Our findings demonstrated that 48 mRNAs were differentially expressed between control and D-galactose mice, and 51 potential biomarkers were identified at the metabolic level. The effects of D-galactose on aging could be attributed to glucose and 1ipid metabolic disorders, oxidative damage, accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), reduction in abnormal substance elimination, cell apoptosis, and insulin resistance.

  2. Spatial profiling of nuclear receptor transcription patterns over the course of Drosophila development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Ronit; Hu, Jack; Krause, Henry M

    2013-07-08

    Previous work has shown that many of the 18 family members of Drosophila nuclear receptor transcription factors function in a temporal hierarchy to coordinate developmental progression and growth with the rate limiting process of metabolism. To gain further insight into these interactions and processes, we have undertaken a whole-family analysis of nuclear receptor mRNA spatial expression patterns over the entire process of embryogenesis, as well as the 3rd instar wandering larva stage, by using high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization. Overall, the patterns of expression are remarkably consistent with previously mapped spatial activity profiles documented during the same time points, with similar hot spots and temporal profiles in endocrine and metabolically important tissues. Among the more remarkable of the findings is that the majority of mRNA expression patterns observed show striking subcellular distributions, indicating potentially critical roles in the control of protein synthesis and subsequent subcellular distributions. These patterns will serve as a useful reference for future studies on the tissue-specific roles and interactions of nuclear receptor proteins, partners, cofactors and ligands.

  3. Prognostic impact of array-based genomic profiles in esophageal squamous cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carneiro, Ana; Isinger, Anna; Karlsson, Anna

    2008-01-01

    applied array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to obtain a whole genome copy number profile relevant for identifying deranged pathways and clinically applicable markers. METHODS: A 32 k aCGH platform was used for high resolution mapping of copy number changes in 30 stage I-IV ESCC. Potential......p13.3 independently predicted poor survival in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: aCGH profiling verified genetic complexity in ESCC and herein identified imbalances of multiple central tumorigenic pathways. Distinct gains correlate with clinicopathological variables and independently predict...

  4. Effect of genome and environment on metabolic and inflammatory profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Sirota

    Full Text Available Twin and family studies have established the contribution of genetic factors to variation in metabolic, hematologic and immunological parameters. The majority of these studies analyzed single or combined traits into pre-defined syndromes. In the present study, we explore an alternative multivariate approach in which a broad range of metabolic, hematologic, and immunological traits are analyzed simultaneously to determine the resemblance of monozygotic (MZ twin pairs, twin-spouse pairs and unrelated, non-cohabiting individuals. A total of 517 participants from the Netherlands Twin Register, including 210 MZ twin pairs and 64 twin-spouse pairs, took part in the study. Data were collected on body composition, blood pressure, heart rate, and multiple biomarkers assessed in fasting blood samples, including lipid levels, glucose, insulin, liver enzymes, hematological measurements and cytokine levels. For all 51 measured traits, pair-wise Pearson correlations, correcting for family relatedness, were calculated across all the individuals in the cohort. Hierarchical clustering techniques were applied to group the measured traits into sub-clusters based on similarity. Sub-clusters were observed among metabolic traits and among inflammatory markers. We defined a phenotypic profile as the collection of all the traits measured for a given individual. Average within-pair similarity of phenotypic profiles was determined for the groups of MZ twin pairs, spouse pairs and pairs of unrelated individuals. The average similarity across the full phenotypic profile was higher for MZ twin pairs than for spouse pairs, and lowest for pairs of unrelated individuals. Cohabiting MZ twins were more similar in their phenotypic profile compared to MZ twins who no longer lived together. The correspondence in the phenotypic profile is therefore determined to a large degree by familial, mostly genetic, factors, while household factors contribute to a lesser degree to profile

  5. Integrated genomic and gene expression profiling identifies two major genomic circuits in urothelial carcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Lindgren, David; Sjödahl, Gottfrid; Lauss, Martin; Staaf, Johan; Chebil, Gunilla; Lövgren, Kristina; Gudjonsson, Sigurdur; Liedberg, Fredrik; Patschan, Oliver; Månsson, Wiking; Fernö, Mårten; Höglund, Mattias

    2012-01-01

    Similar to other malignancies, urothelial carcinoma (UC) is characterized by specific recurrent chromosomal aberrations and gene mutations. However, the interconnection between specific genomic alterations, and how patterns of chromosomal alterations adhere to different molecular subgroups of UC, is less clear. We applied tiling resolution array CGH to 146 cases of UC and identified a number of regions harboring recurrent focal genomic amplifications and deletions. Several potential oncogenes...

  6. Global Gene Expression Profiling of Human Genome Following Exposure to Sarin and Soman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalakrishnakone, P.; Pachiappan, A.; Srinivasan, K. N.; Loke, W. K.; Lee, F. K.

    2007-01-01

    Toxicogenomics merges genomics with toxicology is a rapidly expanding field on the assumption that the transcriptional responses of cells to different toxic exposure are sufficiently distinct robust and reproducible to discriminate toxin from different families/classes which can be called as 'fingerprints' or 'Atlases'. In this study chemical weapons sarin was studied in a time and dose dependent manner after exposure to human neuroblastoma cell line. (Sarin or GB) exerts its effect through inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity and induction of delayed neurotoxicity in a dose [EC 50 50 ppm, (around 372.4 μM)] and time-dependent manner. The effect and/or the mechanism of single or repeated exposures to GB, however, are less clear and yet to be explored at cellular level. The present study aims to scrutinize, the global gene expression profile following sarin toxicity in neuronal cells using Affymetrix-GeneChips. A tim-course study on the effect of a single (3 or 24h) or repeated (24 or 48h) doses of sarin (5ppm) on SHSY5Y cells was carried out. Using GeneSpring (PCA) analysis, 550 genes whose expression was significantly (p less than 0.01) altered by at least 2.5-fold, were selected. The results indicate that the low-level single dose exposure do not always parallel acute toxicity, but can cause a reversible down-regulation of genes and a range of anti-cholinesterase effects. In contrast, repeated doses produced persistent irreversible down-regulation of genes related to neurodegenerative mechanism at 48h. Real-time PCR and western blot analysis confirmed the reduced expression of presenilin 1 (TMP21), 2 and dopa.decarboxylase (DDC) mRNA and proteins. Besides providing an in vitro experimental model for studies on the neuropathophysiology and brain cells this investigation indicate possible mechanisms by which sarin could mediate neuro-degeneration. A comparison will be made with similar study with soman. (author)

  7. Comparing cancer vs normal gene expression profiles identifies new disease entities and common transcriptional programs in AML patients