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Sample records for genomics reciprocal chromosome

  1. Molecular and classical cytogenetic analyses demonstrate an apomorphic reciprocal chromosomal translocation in Gorilla gorilla

    OpenAIRE

    Stanyon, Roscoe; Wienberg, Johannes; Romagno, D.; Bigoni, F.; Jauch, Anna; Cremer, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    The existence of an apomorphic reciprocal chromosomal translocation in the gorilla lineage has been asserted or denied by various cytogeneticists. We employed a new molecular cytogenetic strategy (chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization) combined with high-resolution banding, replication sequence analysis, and fluorochrome staining to demonstrate that a reciprocal translocation between ancestral chromosomes homologous to human chromosome 5 and 17 has indeed occurred.

  2. Chromosome homologies of the highly rearranged karyotypes of four Akodon species (Rodentia, Cricetidae) resolved by reciprocal chromosome painting: the evolution of the lowest diploid number in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Karen; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Yonenaga-Yassuda, Yatiyo; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally comparative cytogenetic studies are based mainly on banding patterns. Nevertheless, when dealing with species with highly rearranged genomes, as in Akodon species, or with other highly divergent species, cytogenetic comparisons of banding patterns prove inadequate. Hence, comparative chromosome painting has become the method of choice for genome comparisons at the cytogenetic level since it allows complete chromosome probes of a species to be hybridized in situ onto chromosomes of other species, detecting homologous genomic regions between them. In the present study, we have explored the highly rearranged complements of the Akodon species using reciprocal chromosome painting through species-specific chromosome probes obtained by chromosome sorting. The results revealed complete homology among the complements of Akodon sp. n. (ASP), 2n = 10; Akodon cursor (ACU), 2n = 15; Akodon montensis (AMO), 2n = 24; and Akodon paranaensis (APA), 2n = 44, and extensive chromosome rearrangements have been detected within the species with high precision. Robertsonian and tandem rearrangements, pericentric inversions and/or centromere repositioning, paracentric inversion, translocations, insertions, and breakpoints, where chromosomal rearrangements, seen to be favorable, were observed. Chromosome painting using the APA set of 21 autosomes plus X and Y revealed eight syntenic segments that are shared with A. montensis, A. cursor, and ASP, and one syntenic segment shared by A. montensis and A. cursor plus five exclusive chromosome associations for A. cursor and six for ASP chromosome X, except for the heterochromatin region of ASP X, and even chromosome Y shared complete homology among the species. These data indicate that all those closely related species have experienced a recent extensive process of autosomal rearrangement in which, except for ASP, there is still complete conservation of sex chromosomes homologies.

  3. Chromosome-specific families in Vibrio genomes

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    Oksana eLukjancenko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We have compared chromosome-specific genes in a set of 18 finished Vibrio genomes, and, in addition, also calculated the pan- and core-genomes from a data set of more than 250 draft Vibrio genome sequences. These genomes come from 9 known species and 2 unknown species. Within the finished chromosomes, we find a core set of 1269 encoded protein families for chromosome 1, and a core of 252 encoded protein families for chromosome 2. Many of these core proteins are also found in the draft genomes (although which chromosome they are located on is unknown. Of the chromosome specific core protein families, 1169 and 153 are uniquely found in chromosomes 1 and 2, respectively. Gene ontology (GO terms for each of the protein families were determined, and the different sets for each chromosome were compared. A total of 363 different `Molecular Function` GO categories were found for chromosome 1 specific protein families, and these include several broad activities: pyridoxine 5' phosphate synthetase, glucosylceramidase, heme transport, DNA ligase, amino acid binding, and ribosomal components; in contrast, chromosome 2 specific protein families have only 66 Molecular Function GO terms and include many membrane-associated activities, such as ion channels, transmembrane transporters, and electron transport chain proteins. Thus, it appears that whilst there are many 'housekeeping systems' encoded in chromosome 1, there are far fewer core functions found in chromosome 2. However, the presence of many membrane-associated encoded proteins in chromosome 2 is surprising.

  4. Cloning chromosome specific genes by reciprocal probing of arrayed cDNA and cosmid libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, A.; Lee, C.C.; Wehnert, M. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A human gene map will greatly facilitate the association of genes to single locus diseases and provide candidates for genes involved in complex genetic traits. Given the estimated 100,000 human genes an integrated strategy with a high throughput approach for isolation and mapping of expressed sequences is needed to create such a gene map. We have developed an approach that allows high throughput gene isolation and mapping using arrayed genomic and cDNA lambda libraries. Reciprocal probing of the arrayed genomic and cDNA cosmic libraries can rapidly establish cDNA-cosmid associations. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosomal mapping and expressed sequence tag/sequence tag site (EST/STS) primers generated from DNA sequence of PCR-based mapping using somatic hybrid cell line mapping panels were utilized to characterize further the hybridization-based cDNA cosmid association. We have applied this approach to chromosome 17 using a placental cDNA library and have identified a total of 30 genes out of which 11 are novel. Furthermore seven cDNAs were mapped to 17q21 in this study, providing novel candidate genes for BRCA-1 gene for early onset breast cancer. The results of our study clearly show that an integration of an expression map into physical and genetic maps can provide candidate genes for human diseases that have been mapped to specific regions. This approach combined with the current physical mapping efforts could efficiently provide a detailed human gene map.

  5. Reciprocal genomic evolution in the ant-fungus agricultural symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Sanne; Hu, Haofu; Li, Cai;

    2016-01-01

    The attine ant-fungus agricultural symbiosis evolved over tens of millions of years, producing complex societies with industrial-scale farming analogous to that of humans. Here we document reciprocal shifts in the genomes and transcriptomes of seven fungus-farming ant species and their fungal cul...

  6. Reciprocal genomic evolution in the ant-fungus agricultural symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Sanne; Hu, Haofu; Li, Cai

    2016-01-01

    The attine ant-fungus agricultural symbiosis evolved over tens of millions of years, producing complex societies with industrial-scale farming analogous to that of humans. Here we document reciprocal shifts in the genomes and transcriptomes of seven fungus-farming ant species and their fungal...

  7. Reciprocal genomic evolution in the ant-fungus agricultural symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Sanne; Hu, Haofu; Li, Cai;

    2016-01-01

    The attine ant-fungus agricultural symbiosis evolved over tens of millions of years, producing complex societies with industrial-scale farming analogous to that of humans. Here we document reciprocal shifts in the genomes and transcriptomes of seven fungus-farming ant species and their fungal...

  8. Genome architecture: domain organization of interphase chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickmore, Wendy A; van Steensel, Bas

    2013-03-14

    The architecture of interphase chromosomes is important for the regulation of gene expression and genome maintenance. Chromosomes are linearly segmented into hundreds of domains with different protein compositions. Furthermore, the spatial organization of chromosomes is nonrandom and is characterized by many local and long-range contacts among genes and other sequence elements. A variety of genome-wide mapping techniques have made it possible to chart these properties at high resolution. Combined with microscopy and computational modeling, the results begin to yield a more coherent picture that integrates linear and three-dimensional (3D) views of chromosome organization in relation to gene regulation and other nuclear functions.

  9. Detection of unbalanced chromosome segregations in preimplantation genetic diagnosis of translocations by short comparative genomic hibridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius, Mariona; Obradors, Albert; Daina, Gemma; Ramos, Laia; Pujol, Aïda; Martínez-Passarell, Olga; Marquès, Laura; Oliver-Bonet, Maria; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2011-07-01

    To apply a comprehensive chromosomal screening through short comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) in the preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of translocations. Clinical research study. A PGD laboratory and two IVF clinics. Three Robertsonian translocation carriers, two reciprocal translocation carriers, and a double-translocation carrier. After using the short-CGH approach in the reanalysis of two unbalanced embryos, discarded from a PGD for a reciprocal translocation carrier, the same method was applied in the PGD of day-3 embryos of translocation carriers. Ability of short CGH to detect partial chromosomal abnormalities in unbalanced embryos, translocation segregation proportions, and proportion of embryos carrying chromosomal abnormalities not related to the translocations. The short-CGH technique detected errors resulting from the meiotic segregation of the chromosomes involved in the translocations and other abnormalities affecting the remaining chromosomes. Alternate segregation was detected most frequently among Robertsonian translocation cases, whereas unbalanced chromosome segregations were found predominantly in reciprocal ones. Aneuploidy and structural chromosome errors were found more frequently in Robertsonian than in reciprocal translocation carriers. Application of short-CGH PGD achieved pregnancy in two cases. Short CGH is a reliable approach for PGD of translocations, as it is capable of detecting partial chromosome errors caused by unbalanced segregations simultaneously to the screening of all chromosomes, and it may improve the results after PGD for translocation carriers. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Temporal genomic evolution of bird sex chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zongji; Zhang, Jilin; Yang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    ('fast-Z' evolution). And species with a lower level of intronic heterozygosities tend to evolve even faster on the Z chromosome. Further analysis of fast-evolving genes' enriched functional categories and sex-biased expression patterns support that, fast-Z evolution in birds is mainly driven by genetic...... driving forces of Z chromosome evolution, we analyze here 45 newly available bird genomes and four species' transcriptomes, over their course of recombination loss between the sex chromosomes. RESULTS: We show Z chromosomes in general have a significantly higher substitution rate in introns and synonymous...... protein-coding sites than autosomes, driven by the male-to-female mutation bias ('male-driven evolution' effect). Our genome-wide estimate reveals that the degree of such a bias ranges from 1.6 to 3.8 among different species. G + C content of third codon positions exhibits the same trend of gradual...

  11. Temporal genomic evolution of bird sex chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zongji; Zhang, Jilin; Yang, Wei;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sex chromosomes exhibit many unusual patterns in sequence and gene expression relative to autosomes. Birds have evolved a female heterogametic sex system (male ZZ, female ZW), through stepwise suppression of recombination between chrZ and chrW. To address the broad patterns and complex...... driving forces of Z chromosome evolution, we analyze here 45 newly available bird genomes and four species' transcriptomes, over their course of recombination loss between the sex chromosomes. RESULTS: We show Z chromosomes in general have a significantly higher substitution rate in introns and synonymous...... changes with that of introns, between chrZ and autosomes or regions with increasing ages of becoming Z-linked, therefore codon usage bias in birds is probably driven by the mutational bias. On the other hand, Z chromosomes also evolve significantly faster at nonsynonymous sites relative to autosomes...

  12. The genomics of plant sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyskot, Boris; Hobza, Roman

    2015-07-01

    Around six percent of flowering species are dioecious, with separate female and male individuals. Sex determination is mostly based on genetics, but morphologically distinct sex chromosomes have only evolved in a few species. Of these, heteromorphic sex chromosomes have been most clearly described in the two model species - Silene latifolia and Rumex acetosa. In both species, the sex chromosomes are the largest chromosomes in the genome. They are hence easily distinguished, can be physically separated and analyzed. This review discusses some recent experimental data on selected model dioecious species, with a focus on S. latifolia. Phylogenetic analyses show that dioecy in plants originated independently and repeatedly even within individual genera. A cogent question is whether there is genetic degeneration of the non-recombining part of the plant Y chromosome, as in mammals, and, if so, whether reduced levels of gene expression in the heterogametic sex are equalized by dosage compensation. Current data provide no clear conclusion. We speculate that although some transcriptome analyses indicate the first signs of degeneration, especially in S. latifolia, the evolutionary processes forming plant sex chromosomes in plants may, to some extent, differ from those in animals.

  13. Genetic modification of mammalian genome at chromosome level

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    OLEG L. SEROV

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The review is concerned with a progress in genetic modification of a mammalian genome in vitro and in vivo at chromosomal level. Recently three new approaches for the chromosome biotechnology have been developed: Using Cre/loxP-system a researcher is able to produce targeted rearrangements of whole chromosomes or their segments or particular genes within the genome, and therefore to modify the set, position and copy number of the endogenous elements of the genome. Mammalian artificial chromosomes (MACs provide a possibility to introduce into genome relatively large segments of alien chromosome material, either artificially constructed or derived from the genome of different species. Using ES-somatic cell hybrids allows to transfer whole chromosomes or their fragments between different genomes within and between species. Advantages and limitations of these approaches are discussed.

  14. Chromosomes in the flow to simplify genome analysis.

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    Doležel, Jaroslav; Vrána, Jan; Safář, Jan; Bartoš, Jan; Kubaláková, Marie; Simková, Hana

    2012-08-01

    Nuclear genomes of human, animals, and plants are organized into subunits called chromosomes. When isolated into aqueous suspension, mitotic chromosomes can be classified using flow cytometry according to light scatter and fluorescence parameters. Chromosomes of interest can be purified by flow sorting if they can be resolved from other chromosomes in a karyotype. The analysis and sorting are carried out at rates of 10(2)-10(4) chromosomes per second, and for complex genomes such as wheat the flow sorting technology has been ground-breaking in reducing genome complexity for genome sequencing. The high sample rate provides an attractive approach for karyotype analysis (flow karyotyping) and the purification of chromosomes in large numbers. In characterizing the chromosome complement of an organism, the high number that can be studied using flow cytometry allows for a statistically accurate analysis. Chromosome sorting plays a particularly important role in the analysis of nuclear genome structure and the analysis of particular and aberrant chromosomes. Other attractive but not well-explored features include the analysis of chromosomal proteins, chromosome ultrastructure, and high-resolution mapping using FISH. Recent results demonstrate that chromosome flow sorting can be coupled seamlessly with DNA array and next-generation sequencing technologies for high-throughput analyses. The main advantages are targeting the analysis to a genome region of interest and a significant reduction in sample complexity. As flow sorters can also sort single copies of chromosomes, shotgun sequencing DNA amplified from them enables the production of haplotype-resolved genome sequences. This review explains the principles of flow cytometric chromosome analysis and sorting (flow cytogenetics), discusses the major uses of this technology in genome analysis, and outlines future directions.

  15. Genome size, karyotype polymorphism and chromosomal evolution in Trypanosoma cruzi.

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    Renata T Souza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Trypanosoma cruzi genome was sequenced from a hybrid strain (CL Brener. However, high allelic variation and the repetitive nature of the genome have prevented the complete linear sequence of chromosomes being determined. Determining the full complement of chromosomes and establishing syntenic groups will be important in defining the structure of T. cruzi chromosomes. A large amount of information is now available for T. cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei, providing the opportunity to compare and describe the overall patterns of chromosomal evolution in these parasites. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The genome sizes, repetitive DNA contents, and the numbers and sizes of chromosomes of nine strains of T. cruzi from four lineages (TcI, TcII, TcV and TcVI were determined. The genome of the TcI group was statistically smaller than other lineages, with the exception of the TcI isolate Tc1161 (José-IMT. Satellite DNA content was correlated with genome size for all isolates, but this was not accompanied by simultaneous amplification of retrotransposons. Regardless of chromosomal polymorphism, large syntenic groups are conserved among T. cruzi lineages. Duplicated chromosome-sized regions were identified and could be retained as paralogous loci, increasing the dosage of several genes. By comparing T. cruzi and T. brucei chromosomes, homologous chromosomal regions in T. brucei were identified. Chromosomes Tb9 and Tb11 of T. brucei share regions of syntenic homology with three and six T. cruzi chromosomal bands, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Despite genome size variation and karyotype polymorphism, T. cruzi lineages exhibit conservation of chromosome structure. Several syntenic groups are conserved among all isolates analyzed in this study. The syntenic regions are larger than expected if rearrangements occur randomly, suggesting that they are conserved owing to positive selection. Mapping of the syntenic regions on T. cruzi chromosomal bands

  16. Genome editing by targeted chromosomal mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Dana

    2015-01-01

    The tools for genome engineering have become very powerful and accessible over the last several years. CRISPR/Cas nucleases, TALENs and ZFNs can all be designed to produce highly specific double-strand breaks in chromosomal DNA. These breaks are processed by cellular DNA repair machinery leading to localized mutations and to intentional sequence replacements. Because these repair processes are common to essentially all organisms, the targetable nucleases have been applied successfully to a wide range of animals, plants, and cultured cells. In each case, the mode of delivery of the nuclease, the efficiency of cleavage and the repair outcome depend on the biology of the particular system being addressed. These reagents are being used to introduce favorable characteristics into organisms of economic significance, and the prospects for enhancing human gene therapy appear very bright.

  17. Detection of chromosomal abnormalities by comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapierre, Jean-Michel; Tachdjian, Gérard

    2005-04-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a modified in-situ hybridization technique. In this type of analysis, two differentially labeled genomic DNAs (study and reference) are cohybridized to normal metaphase spreads or to microarray. Chromosomal locations of copy number changes in the DNA segments of the study genome are revealed by a variable fluorescence intensity ratio along each target chromosome. Thus, CGH allows detection and mapping of DNA sequence copy differences between two genomes in a single experiment. Since its development, comparative genomic hybridization has been applied mostly as a research tool in the field of cancer cytogenetics to identify genetic changes in many previously unknown regions. It is also a powerful tool for detection and identification of unbalanced chromosomal abnormalities in prenatal, postnatal and preimplantation diagnostics. The development of comparative genomic hybridization and increase in resolution analysis by using the microarray-based technique offer new information on chromosomal pathologies and thus better management of patients.

  18. Induced dicentric chromosome formation promotes genomic rearrangements and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascoigne, Karen E; Cheeseman, Iain M

    2013-07-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements can radically alter gene products and their function, driving tumor formation or progression. However, the molecular origins and evolution of such rearrangements are varied and poorly understood, with cancer cells often containing multiple, complex rearrangements. One mechanism that can lead to genomic rearrangements is the formation of a "dicentric" chromosome containing two functional centromeres. Indeed, such dicentric chromosomes have been observed in cancer cells. Here, we tested the ability of a single dicentric chromosome to contribute to genomic instability and neoplastic conversion in vertebrate cells. We developed a system to transiently and reversibly induce dicentric chromosome formation on a single chromosome with high temporal control. We find that induced dicentric chromosomes are frequently damaged and mis-segregated during mitosis, and that this leads to extensive chromosomal rearrangements including translocations with other chromosomes. Populations of pre-neoplastic cells in which a single dicentric chromosome is induced acquire extensive genomic instability and display hallmarks of cellular transformation including anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. Our results suggest that a single dicentric chromosome could contribute to tumor initiation.

  19. Tolerance of Whole-Genome Doubling Propagates Chromosomal Instability and Accelerates Cancer Genome Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dewhurst, Sally M.; McGranahan, Nicholas; Burrell, Rebecca A.;

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of whole-genome doubling to chromosomal instability (CIN) and tumor evolution is unclear. We use long-term culture of isogenic tetraploid cells from a stable diploid colon cancer progenitor to investigate how a genome-doubling event affects genome stability over time. Rare cells...... that survive genome doubling demonstrate increased tolerance to chromosome aberrations. Tetraploid cells do not exhibit increased frequencies of structural or numerical CIN per chromosome. However, the tolerant phenotype in tetraploid cells, coupled with a doubling of chromosome aberrations per cell, allows...... chromosome abnormalities to evolve specifically in tetraploids, recapitulating chromosomal changes in genomically complex colorectal tumors. Finally, a genome-doubling event is independently predictive of poor relapse-free survival in early-stage disease in two independent cohorts in multivariate analyses...

  20. Induced dicentric chromosome formation promotes genomic rearrangements and tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Gascoigne, Karen E; Cheeseman, Iain M.

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements can radically alter gene products and their function, driving tumor formation or progression. However, the molecular origins and evolution of such rearrangements are varied and poorly understood, with cancer cells often containing multiple, complex rearrangements. One mechanism that can lead to genomic rearrangements is the formation of a “dicentric” chromosome containing two functional centromeres. Indeed, such dicentric chromosomes have been observed in cancer cel...

  1. Genome Update: alignment of bacterial chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Jensen, Mette; Poulsen, Tine Rugh

    2004-01-01

    There are four new microbial genomes listed in this month's Genome Update, three belonging to Gram-positive bacteria and one belonging to an archaeon that lives at pH 0; all of these genomes are listed in Table 1⇓. The method of genome comparison this month is that of genome alignment and......, as an example, an alignment of seven Staphylococcus aureus genomes and one Staphylococcus epidermidis genome is presented....

  2. Genome landscape and evolutionary plasticity of chromosomes in malaria mosquitoes.

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    Ai Xia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nonrandom distribution of rearrangements is a common feature of eukaryotic chromosomes that is not well understood in terms of genome organization and evolution. In the major African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, polymorphic inversions are highly nonuniformly distributed among five chromosomal arms and are associated with epidemiologically important adaptations. However, it is not clear whether the genomic content of the chromosomal arms is associated with inversion polymorphism and fixation rates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To better understand the evolutionary dynamics of chromosomal inversions, we created a physical map for an Asian malaria mosquito, Anopheles stephensi, and compared it with the genome of An. gambiae. We also developed and deployed novel Bayesian statistical models to analyze genome landscapes in individual chromosomal arms An. gambiae. Here, we demonstrate that, despite the paucity of inversion polymorphisms on the X chromosome, this chromosome has the fastest rate of inversion fixation and the highest density of transposable elements, simple DNA repeats, and GC content. The highly polymorphic and rapidly evolving autosomal 2R arm had overrepresentation of genes involved in cellular response to stress supporting the role of natural selection in maintaining adaptive polymorphic inversions. In addition, the 2R arm had the highest density of regions involved in segmental duplications that clustered in the breakpoint-rich zone of the arm. In contrast, the slower evolving 2L, 3R, and 3L, arms were enriched with matrix-attachment regions that potentially contribute to chromosome stability in the cell nucleus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results highlight fundamental differences in evolutionary dynamics of the sex chromosome and autosomes and revealed the strong association between characteristics of the genome landscape and rates of chromosomal evolution. We conclude that a unique combination of various

  3. Incipient Genome Differentiation in Gossypium. III. Comparison of Chromosomes of G. HIRSUTUM and Asiatic Diploids Using Heterozygous Translocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, M Y; Hasenkampf, C A; Stewart, J M

    1982-01-01

    Hybrids between upland cotton (G. hirsutum, genome constitution 2A(h)D(h)) and either A-genome or D-genome diploid species exhibit 26 paired and 13 unpaired chromosomes at metaphase I. The A(h) and D(h) genomes are therefore considered homoeologous with those of the respective diploids. Previous studies, nevertheless, revealed a low level of ("incipient") differentiation between D(h) and various diploid D genomes. The diploid A genomes have been regarded as more closely homologous to A(h) on the basis of low preferential pairing and autotetraploid segregation ratios in allohexaploids.-The present study addressed the following questions: Are the diploid A genomes differentiated from A(h) in meiotic homology? If so, is the differentiation manifested equally by all 13 chromosomes or is it localized in certain chromosomes?-Three diploid A-genome lines representing G. herbaceum and G. arboreum were hybridized by in ovulo culture of embryos (1) with a standard line of G. hirsutum, which differs from G. herbaceum by two and from G. arboreum by three naturally occurring reciprocal translocations involving chromosomes 1-5, and (2) with six lines homozygous for experimental translocations involving chromosomes 6, 7, 10, 11, 12 and 13. Chiasma frequencies in hybrids were compared with those in appropriate G. hirsutum controls. In every comparison overall chiasma frequencies were slightly lower in the hybrids. Therefore A(h) appears to be differentiated from the diploid A genomes. No localized differentiation was detected in chromosomes marked by experimental translocations. The differentiation may be localized mainly in chromosomes 4 and 5.

  4. Genomic Dark Matter Illuminated: Anopheles Y Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Seth N; Neafsey, Daniel E

    2016-08-01

    Hall et al. have strategically used long-read sequencing technology to characterize the structure and highly repetitive content of the Y chromosome in Anopheles malaria mosquitoes. Their work confirms that this important but elusive heterochromatic sex chromosome is evolving extremely rapidly and harbors a remarkably small number of genes.

  5. Chromosome segregation analysis in human embryos obtained from couples involving male carriers of reciprocal or Robertsonian translocation.

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    Ahmet Yilmaz

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the frequency and type of chromosome segregation patterns in cleavage stage embryos obtained from male carriers of Robertsonian (ROB and reciprocal (REC translocations undergoing preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD at our reproductive center. We used FISH to analyze chromosome segregation in 308 day 3 cleavage stage embryos obtained from 26 patients. The percentage of embryos consistent with normal or balanced segregation (55.1% vs. 27.1% and clinical pregnancy (62.5% vs. 19.2% rates were higher in ROB than the REC translocation carriers. Involvement of non-acrocentric chromosome(s or terminal breakpoint(s in reciprocal translocations was associated with an increase in the percent of embryos consistent with adjacent 1 but with a decrease in 3∶1 segregation. Similar results were obtained in the analysis of nontransferred embryos donated for research. 3∶1 segregation was the most frequent segregation type in both day 3 (31% and spare (35% embryos obtained from carriers of t(11;22(q23;q11, the only non-random REC with the same breakpoint reported in a large number of unrelated families mainly identified by the birth of a child with derivative chromosome 22. These results suggest that chromosome segregation patterns in day 3 and nontransferred embryos obtained from male translocation carriers vary with the type of translocation and involvement of acrocentric chromosome(s or terminal breakpoint(s. These results should be helpful in estimating reproductive success in translocation carriers undergoing PGD.

  6. Genomic analysis of plant chromosomes based on meiotic pairing

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    Lisete Chamma Davide

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This review presents the principles and applications of classical genomic analysis, with emphasis on plant breeding. The main mathematical models used to estimate the preferential chromosome pairing in diploid or polyploid, interspecific or intergenera hybrids are presented and discussed, with special reference to the applications and studies for the definition of genome relationships among species of the Poaceae family.

  7. Modeling chromosomes in mouse to explore the function of genes, genomic disorders, and chromosomal organization.

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    Véronique Brault

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the challenges of genomic research after the completion of the human genome project is to assign a function to all the genes and to understand their interactions and organizations. Among the various techniques, the emergence of chromosome engineering tools with the aim to manipulate large genomic regions in the mouse model offers a powerful way to accelerate the discovery of gene functions and provides more mouse models to study normal and pathological developmental processes associated with aneuploidy. The combination of gene targeting in ES cells, recombinase technology, and other techniques makes it possible to generate new chromosomes carrying specific and defined deletions, duplications, inversions, and translocations that are accelerating functional analysis. This review presents the current status of chromosome engineering techniques and discusses the different applications as well as the implication of these new techniques in future research to better understand the function of chromosomal organization and structures.

  8. Genomic regulatory landscapes and chromosomal rearrangements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladegaard, Elisabete L Engenheiro

    2008-01-01

    The main objectives of the PhD study are to identify and characterise chromosomal rearrangements within evolutionarily conserved regulatory landscapes around genes involved in the regulation of transcription and/or development (trans-dev genes). A frequent feature of trans-dev genes...... the complex spatio-temporal expression of the associated trans-dev gene. Rare chromosomal breakpoints that disrupt the integrity of these regulatory landscapes may be used as a tool, not only to make genotype-phenotype associations, but also to link the associated phenotype with the position and tissue...... specificity of the individual CNEs. In this PhD study I have studied several chromosomal rearrangements with breakpoints in the vicinity of trans-dev genes. This included chromosomal rearrangements compatible with known phenotype-genotype associations (Rieger syndrome-PITX2, Mowat-Wilson syndrome-ZEB2...

  9. Affected chromosome homeostasis and genomic instability of clonal yeast cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Panek, Anita; Golec, Ewelina; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-05-01

    Yeast cells originating from one single colony are considered genotypically and phenotypically identical. However, taking into account the cellular heterogeneity, it seems also important to monitor cell-to-cell variations within a clone population. In the present study, a comprehensive yeast karyotype screening was conducted using single chromosome comet assay. Chromosome-dependent and mutation-dependent changes in DNA (DNA with breaks or with abnormal replication intermediates) were studied using both single-gene deletion haploid mutants (bub1, bub2, mad1, tel1, rad1 and tor1) and diploid cells lacking one active gene of interest, namely BUB1/bub1, BUB2/bub2, MAD1/mad1, TEL1/tel1, RAD1/rad1 and TOR1/tor1 involved in the control of cell cycle progression, DNA repair and the regulation of longevity. Increased chromosome fragility and replication stress-mediated chromosome abnormalities were correlated with elevated incidence of genomic instability, namely aneuploid events-disomies, monosomies and to a lesser extent trisomies as judged by in situ comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). The tor1 longevity mutant with relatively balanced chromosome homeostasis was found the most genomically stable among analyzed mutants. During clonal yeast culture, spontaneously formed abnormal chromosome structures may stimulate changes in the ploidy state and, in turn, promote genomic heterogeneity. These alterations may be more accented in selected mutated genetic backgrounds, namely in yeast cells deficient in proper cell cycle regulation and DNA repair.

  10. Ac/Ds-induced chromosomal rearrangements in rice genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Yuan Hu; Zhang, Jianbo; Peterson, Thomas; Han, Chang-Deok

    2012-03-01

    A closely-linked pair of Ac/Ds elements induces chromosomal rearrangements in Arabidopsis and maize. This report summarizes the Ac/Ds systems that generate an exceptionally high frequency of chromosomal rearrangements in rice genomes. From a line containing a single Ds element inserted at the OsRLG5 locus, plants containing a closely-linked pair of inversely-oriented Ds elements were obtained at 1% frequency among the population regenerated from tissue culture. Subsequent regeneration of the lines containing cis-paired Ds elements via tissue culture led to a high frequency (35.6%) of plants containing chromosomal rearrangements at the OsRLG5 locus. Thirty-four rearrangement events were characterized, revealing diverse chromosomal aberrations including deletions, inversions and duplications. Many rearrangements could be explained by sister chromatid transposition (SCT) and homologous recombination (HR), events previously demonstrated in Arabidopsis and maize. In addition, novel events were detected and presumably generated via a new alternative transposition mechanism. This mechanism, termed single chromatid transposition (SLCT), resulted in juxtaposed inversions and deletions on the same chromosome. This study demonstrated that the Ac/Ds system coupled with tissue culture-mediated plant regeneration could induce higher frequencies and a greater diversity of chromosomal rearrangements than previously reported. Understanding transposon-induced chromosomal rearrangements can provide new insights into the relationship between transposable elements and genome evolution, as well as a means to perform chromosomal engineering for crop improvement. Rice is a staple cereal crop worldwide. Complete genome sequencing and rich genetic resources are great advantages for the study of the genomic complexity induced by transposable elements.(1) (-) (2) The combination of tissue culture with genetic lines carrying a pair of closely located Ac/Ds elements greatly increases the

  11. The 3D Genome as Moderator of Chromosomal Communication.

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    Dekker, Job; Mirny, Leonid

    2016-03-10

    Proper expression of genes requires communication with their regulatory elements that can be located elsewhere along the chromosome. The physics of chromatin fibers imposes a range of constraints on such communication. The molecular and biophysical mechanisms by which chromosomal communication is established, or prevented, have become a topic of intense study, and important roles for the spatial organization of chromosomes are being discovered. Here we present a view of the interphase 3D genome characterized by extensive physical compartmentalization and insulation on the one hand and facilitated long-range interactions on the other. We propose the existence of topological machines dedicated to set up and to exploit a 3D genome organization to both promote and censor communication along and between chromosomes.

  12. Chromosome catastrophes involve replication mechanisms generating complex genomic rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengfei; Erez, Ayelet; Nagamani, Sandesh C Sreenath; Dhar, Shweta U; Kołodziejska, Katarzyna E; Dharmadhikari, Avinash V; Cooper, M Lance; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Zhang, Feng; Withers, Marjorie A; Bacino, Carlos A; Campos-Acevedo, Luis Daniel; Delgado, Mauricio R; Freedenberg, Debra; Garnica, Adolfo; Grebe, Theresa A; Hernández-Almaguer, Dolores; Immken, LaDonna; Lalani, Seema R; McLean, Scott D; Northrup, Hope; Scaglia, Fernando; Strathearn, Lane; Trapane, Pamela; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau Wai; Hastings, P J; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Lupski, James R; Bi, Weimin

    2011-09-16

    Complex genomic rearrangements (CGRs) consisting of two or more breakpoint junctions have been observed in genomic disorders. Recently, a chromosome catastrophe phenomenon termed chromothripsis, in which numerous genomic rearrangements are apparently acquired in one single catastrophic event, was described in multiple cancers. Here, we show that constitutionally acquired CGRs share similarities with cancer chromothripsis. In the 17 CGR cases investigated, we observed localization and multiple copy number changes including deletions, duplications, and/or triplications, as well as extensive translocations and inversions. Genomic rearrangements involved varied in size and complexities; in one case, array comparative genomic hybridization revealed 18 copy number changes. Breakpoint sequencing identified characteristic features, including small templated insertions at breakpoints and microhomology at breakpoint junctions, which have been attributed to replicative processes. The resemblance between CGR and chromothripsis suggests similar mechanistic underpinnings. Such chromosome catastrophic events appear to reflect basic DNA metabolism operative throughout an organism's life cycle.

  13. Holocentric chromosomes: convergent evolution, meiotic adaptations, and genomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melters, Daniël P; Paliulis, Leocadia V; Korf, Ian F; Chan, Simon W L

    2012-07-01

    In most eukaryotes, the kinetochore protein complex assembles at a single locus termed the centromere to attach chromosomes to spindle microtubules. Holocentric chromosomes have the unusual property of attaching to spindle microtubules along their entire length. Our mechanistic understanding of holocentric chromosome function is derived largely from studies in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, but holocentric chromosomes are found over a broad range of animal and plant species. In this review, we describe how holocentricity may be identified through cytological and molecular methods. By surveying the diversity of organisms with holocentric chromosomes, we estimate that the trait has arisen at least 13 independent times (four times in plants and at least nine times in animals). Holocentric chromosomes have inherent problems in meiosis because bivalents can attach to spindles in a random fashion. Interestingly, there are several solutions that have evolved to allow accurate meiotic segregation of holocentric chromosomes. Lastly, we describe how extensive genome sequencing and experiments in nonmodel organisms may allow holocentric chromosomes to shed light on general principles of chromosome segregation.

  14. Chromosomal imbalances revealed in primary rhabdomyosarcomas by comparative genomic hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qiao-xin; LIU Chun-xia; CHUN Cai-pu; QI Yan; CHANG Bin; LI Xin-xia; CHEN Yun-zhao; NONG Wei-xia; LI Hong-an; LI Feng

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous cytogenetic studies revealed aberrations varied among the throe subtypes of rhabdomyosarcoma. We profiled chromosomal imbalances in the different subtypes and investigated the relationships between clinical parameters and genomic aberrations.Methods Comparative genomic hybridization was used to investigate genomic imbalances in 25 cases of primary rhabdomyosarcomas and two rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines. Specimens were reviewed to determine histological type, pathological grading and clinical staging.Results Changes involving one or more regions of the genome were seen in all rhabdomyosarcomal patients. For rhabdomyosarcoma, DNA sequence gains were most frequently (>30%) seen in chromosomes 2p, 12q, 6p, 9q, 10q, 1p,2q, 6q, 8q, 15q and 18q; losses from 3p, 11p and 6p. In aggressive alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, frequent gains were seen on chromosomes 12q, 2p, 6p, 2q, 4q, 10q and 15q; losses from 3p, 6p, 1q and 5q. For embryonic rhabdomyosarcoma, frequent gains were on 7p, 9q, 2p, 18q, 1p and 8q; losses only from 11p. Frequently gained chromosome arms of translocation associated with rhabdomyosarcoma were 12q, 2, 6, 10q, 4q and 15q; losses from 3p,6p and 5q. The frequently gained chromosome arms of nontranslocation associated with rhabdomyosarcoma were 2p,9q and 18q, while 11p and 14q were the frequently lost chromosome arms. Gains on chromosome 12q were significantly correlated with translocation type. Gains on chromosome 9q were significantly correlated with clinical staging. Conclusions Gains on chromosomes 2p, 12q, 6p, 9q, 10q, 1p, 2q, 6q, 8q, 15q and 18q and losses on chromosomes 3p, 11p and 6p may be related to rhabdomyosarcomal carcinogenesis. Furthermore, gains on chromosome 12q may be correlated with translocation and gains on chromosome 9q with the early stages of rhabdomyosarcoma.

  15. The bat genome: GC-biased small chromosomes associated with reduction in genome size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Fumio; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A

    2013-12-01

    Bats are distinct from other mammals in their small genome size as well as their high metabolic rate, possibly related to flight ability. Although the genome sequence has been published in two species, the data lack cytogenetic information. In this study, the size and GC content of each chromosome are measured from the flow karyotype of the mouse-eared bat, Myotis myotis (MMY). The smaller chromosomes are GC-rich compared to the larger chromosomes, and the relative proportions of homologous segments between MMY and human differ among the MMY chromosomes. The MMY genome size calculated from the sum of the chromosome sizes is 2.25 Gb, and the total GC content is 42.3%, compared to human and dog with 41.0 and 41.2%, respectively. The GC-rich small MMY genome is characterised by GC-biased smaller chromosomes resulting from preferential loss of AT-rich sequences. Although the association between GC-rich small chromosomes and small genome size has been reported only in birds so far, we show in this paper, for the first time, that the same phenomenon is observed in at least one group of mammals, implying that this may be a mechanism common to genome evolution in general.

  16. Chromosome structuring limits genome plasticity in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Esnault

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome organizations of related bacterial genera are well conserved despite a very long divergence period. We have assessed the forces limiting bacterial genome plasticity in Escherichia coli by measuring the respective effect of altering different parameters, including DNA replication, compositional skew of replichores, coordination of gene expression with DNA replication, replication-associated gene dosage, and chromosome organization into macrodomains. Chromosomes were rearranged by large inversions. Changes in the compositional skew of replichores, in the coordination of gene expression with DNA replication or in the replication-associated gene dosage have only a moderate effect on cell physiology because large rearrangements inverting the orientation of several hundred genes inside a replichore are only slightly detrimental. By contrast, changing the balance between the two replication arms has a more drastic effect, and the recombinational rescue of replication forks is required for cell viability when one of the chromosome arms is less than half than the other one. Macrodomain organization also appears to be a major factor restricting chromosome plasticity, and two types of inverted configurations severely affect the cell cycle. First, the disruption of the Ter macrodomain with replication forks merging far from the normal replichore junction provoked chromosome segregation defects. The second major problematic configurations resulted from inversions between Ori and Right macrodomains, which perturb nucleoid distribution and early steps of cytokinesis. Consequences for the control of the bacterial cell cycle and for the evolution of bacterial chromosome configuration are discussed.

  17. Reconstructing the Evolution of Brachypodium Genomes Using Comparative Chromosome Painting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Betekhtin

    Full Text Available Brachypodium distachyon is a model for the temperate cereals and grasses and has a biology, genomics infrastructure and cytogenetic platform fit for purpose. It is a member of a genus with fewer than 20 species, which have different genome sizes, basic chromosome numbers and ploidy levels. The phylogeny and interspecific relationships of this group have not to date been resolved by sequence comparisons and karyotypical studies. The aims of this study are not only to reconstruct the evolution of Brachypodium karyotypes to resolve the phylogeny, but also to highlight the mechanisms that shape the evolution of grass genomes. This was achieved through the use of comparative chromosome painting (CCP which hybridises fluorescent, chromosome-specific probes derived from B. distachyon to homoeologous meiotic chromosomes of its close relatives. The study included five diploids (B. distachyon 2n = 10, B. sylvaticum 2n = 18, B. pinnatum 2n = 16; 2n = 18, B. arbuscula 2n = 18 and B. stacei 2n = 20 three allotetraploids (B. pinnatum 2n = 28, B. phoenicoides 2n = 28 and B. hybridum 2n = 30, and two species of unknown ploidy (B. retusum 2n = 38 and B. mexicanum 2n = 40. On the basis of the patterns of hybridisation and incorporating published data, we propose two alternative, but similar, models of karyotype evolution in the genus Brachypodium. According to the first model, the extant genome of B. distachyon derives from B. mexicanum or B. stacei by several rounds of descending dysploidy, and the other diploids evolve from B. distachyon via ascending dysploidy. The allotetraploids arise by interspecific hybridisation and chromosome doubling between B. distachyon and other diploids. The second model differs from the first insofar as it incorporates an intermediate 2n = 18 species between the B. mexicanum or B. stacei progenitors and the dysploidic B. distachyon.

  18. Herpesvirus Genome Integration into Telomeric Repeats of Host Cell Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Wallaschek, Nina; Kaufer, Benedikt B

    2014-11-01

    It is well known that numerous viruses integrate their genetic material into host cell chromosomes. Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and oncogenic Marek's disease virus (MDV) have been shown to integrate their genomes into host telomeres of latently infected cells. This is unusual for herpesviruses as most maintain their genomes as circular episomes during the quiescent stage of infection. The genomic DNA of HHV-6, MDV, and several other herpesviruses harbors telomeric repeats (TMRs) that are identical to host telomere sequences (TTAGGG). At least in the case of MDV, viral TMRs facilitate integration into host telomeres. Integration of HHV-6 occurs not only in lymphocytes but also in the germline of some individuals, allowing vertical virus transmission. Although the molecular mechanism of telomere integration is poorly understood, the presence of TMRs in a number of herpesviruses suggests it is their default program for genome maintenance during latency and also allows efficient reactivation.

  19. Genetic compensation abilities of Aegilops speltoides chromosomes for homoeologous B-genome chromosomes of polyploid wheat in disomic S(B) chromosome substitution lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    The S genome of Aegilops speltoides is closely related to the B and G genomes of polyploid wheats. However, little work has been reported on the genetic relationships between the S-genome and B-genome chromosomes of polyploid wheat. Here we report the isolation of a set of disomic substitutions (DS)...

  20. Comparative genomics reveals mobile pathogenicity chromosomes in Fusarium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Li Jun; van der Does, H. C.; Borkovich, Katherine A.; Coleman, Jeffrey J.; Daboussi, Marie-Jose; Di Pietro, Antonio; Dufresne, Marie; Freitag, Michael; Grabherr, Manfred; Henrissat, Bernard; Houterman, Petra M.; Kang, Seogchan; Shim, Won-Bo; Wolochuk, Charles; Xie, Xiaohui; Xu, Jin Rong; Antoniw, John; Baker, Scott E.; Bluhm, Burton H.; Breakspear, Andrew; Brown, Daren W.; Butchko, Robert A.; Chapman, Sinead; Coulson, Richard; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Danchin, Etienne G.; Diener, Andrew; Gale, Liane R.; Gardiner, Donald; Goff, Steven; Hammond-Kossack, Kim; Hilburn, Karen; Hua-Van, Aurelie; Jonkers, Wilfried; Kazan, Kemal; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; Koehrsen, Michael; Kumar, Lokesh; Lee, Yong Hwan; Li, Liande; Manners, John M.; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Mukherjee, Mala; Park, Gyungsoon; Park, Jongsun; Park, Sook Young; Proctor, Robert H.; Regev, Aviv; Ruiz-Roldan, M. C.; Sain, Divya; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Sykes, Sean; Schwartz, David C.; Turgeon, Barbara G.; Wapinski, Ilan; Yoder, Olen; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Zhou, Shiguo; Galagan, James; Cuomo, Christina A.; Kistler, H. Corby; Rep, Martijn

    2010-03-18

    Fusarium species are among the most important phytopathogenic and toxigenic fungi, having significant impact on crop production and animal health. Distinctively, members of the F. oxysporum species complex exhibit wide host range but discontinuously distributed host specificity, reflecting remarkable genetic adaptability. To understand the molecular underpinnings of diverse phenotypic traits and their evolution in Fusarium, we compared the genomes of three economically important and phylogenetically related, yet phenotypically diverse plant-pathogenic species, F. graminearum, F. verticillioides and F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. Our analysis revealed greatly expanded lineage-specific (LS) genomic regions in F. oxysporum that include four entire chromosomes, accounting for more than one-quarter of the genome. LS regions are rich in transposons and genes with distinct evolutionary profiles but related to pathogenicity. Experimentally, we demonstrate for the first time the transfer of two LS chromosomes between strains of F. oxysporum, resulting in the conversion of a non-pathogenic strain into a pathogen. Transfer of LS chromosomes between otherwise genetically isolated strains explains the polyphyletic origin of host specificity and the emergence of new pathogenic lineages in the F. oxysporum species complex, putting the evolution of fungal pathogenicity into a new perspective.

  1. Status of dosage compensation of X chromosome in bovine genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ka, Sojeong; Ahn, Hyeonju; Seo, Minseok; Kim, Heebal; Kim, Jin Nam; Lee, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-08-01

    Dosage compensation system with X chromosome upregulation and inactivation have evolved to overcome the genetic imbalance between sex chromosomes in both male and female of mammals. Although recent development of chromosome-wide technologies has allowed us to test X upregulation, discrete data processing and analysis methods draw disparate conclusions. A series of expression studies revealed status of dosage compensation in some species belonging to monotremes, marsupials, rodents and primates. However, X upregulation in the Artiodactyla order including cattle have not been studied yet. In this study, we surveyed the genome-wide transcriptional upregulation in X chromosome in cattle RNA-seq data using different gene filtration methods. Overall examination of RNA-seq data revealed that X chromosome in the pituitary gland expressed more genes than in other peripheral tissues, which was consistent with the previous results observed in human and mouse. When analyzed with globally expressed genes, a median X:A expression ratio was 0.94. The ratio of 1-to-1 ortholog genes between chicken and mammals, however, showed considerable reduction to 0.68. These results indicate that status of dosage compensation for cattle is not deviated from those found in rodents and primate, and this is consistent with the evolutionary history of cattle.

  2. West syndrome associated with a novel chromosomal anomaly; partial trisomy 8P together with partial monosomy 9P, resulting from a familial unbalanced reciprocal translocation

    OpenAIRE

    Ilknur Erol; Semra Saygi; Senay Demir; Fusun Alehan; Feride Iffet Sahin

    2015-01-01

    West syndrome is classified according to the underlying etiology into an acquired West syndrome, a congenital/developmental West syndrome, and West syndrome of unknown etiology. Causes of a congenital/developmental West syndrome are extensive and include chromosomal anomalies. We report on a patient carrying a derivative chromosome originating from the reciprocal unbalanced translocation t (8;9) (p11.2;p22) and presenting with macrocephaly, West syndrome, severe mental motor retardation and h...

  3. Genomic hallmarks of genes involved in chromosomal translocations in hematological cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Shugay

    Full Text Available Reciprocal chromosomal translocations (RCTs leading to the formation of fusion genes are important drivers of hematological cancers. Although the general requirements for breakage and fusion are fairly well understood, quantitative support for a general mechanism of RCT formation is still lacking. The aim of this paper is to analyze available high-throughput datasets with computational and robust statistical methods, in order to identify genomic hallmarks of translocation partner genes (TPGs. Our results show that fusion genes are generally overexpressed due to increased promoter activity of 5' TPGs and to more stable 3'-UTR regions of 3' TPGs. Furthermore, expression profiling of 5' TPGs and of interaction partners of 3' TPGs indicates that these features can help to explain tissue specificity of hematological translocations. Analysis of protein domains retained in fusion proteins shows that the co-occurrence of specific domain combinations is non-random and that distinct functional classes of fusion proteins tend to be associated with different components of the gene fusion network. This indicates that the configuration of fusion proteins plays an important role in determining which 5' and 3' TPGs will combine in specific fusion genes. It is generally accepted that chromosomal proximity in the nucleus can explain the specific pairing of 5' and 3' TPGS and the recurrence of hematological translocations. Using recently available data for chromosomal contact probabilities (Hi-C we show that TPGs are preferentially located in early replicated regions and occupy distinct clusters in the nucleus. However, our data suggest that, in general, nuclear position of TPGs in hematological cancers explains neither TPG pairing nor clinical frequency. Taken together, our results support a model in which genomic features related to regulation of expression and replication timing determine the set of candidate genes more likely to be translocated in

  4. CViT: “Chromosome Visualization Tool” – A whole-genome viewer

    Science.gov (United States)

    CViT (Chromosome Visualization Tool) is a Perl utility for quickly generating images of features on a whole genome at once. It reads GFF3-format data representing chromosomes (linkage groups or pseudomolecules), and features on those chromosomes. It can display features on any chromosomal unit syste...

  5. West syndrome associated with a novel chromosomal anomaly; partial trisomy 8P together with partial monosomy 9P, resulting from a familial unbalanced reciprocal translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Ilknur; Saygı, Semra; Demir, Şenay; Alehan, Fusun; Sahin, Feride Iffet

    2015-01-01

    West syndrome is classified according to the underlying etiology into an acquired West syndrome, a congenital/developmental West syndrome, and West syndrome of unknown etiology. Causes of a congenital/developmental West syndrome are extensive and include chromosomal anomalies. We report on a patient carrying a derivative chromosome originating from the reciprocal unbalanced translocation t (8;9) (p11.2;p22) and presenting with macrocephaly, West syndrome, severe mental motor retardation and hypotonia. As far as we know, this is a new chromosomal anomaly associated with West syndrome.

  6. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Fa-Ten.

    1991-01-01

    We have made important progress since the beginning of the current grant year. We have further developed the microdissection and PCR- assisted microcloning techniques using the linker-adaptor method. We have critically evaluated the microdissection libraries constructed by this microtechnology and proved that they are of high quality. We further demonstrated that these microdissection clones are useful in identifying corresponding YAC clones for a thousand-fold expansion of the genomic coverage and for contig construction. We are also improving the technique of cloning the dissected fragments in test tube by the TDT method. We are applying both of these PCR cloning technique to human chromosomes 2 and 5 to construct region-specific libraries for physical mapping purposes of LLNL and LANL. Finally, we are exploring efficient procedures to use unique sequence microclones to isolate cDNA clones from defined chromosomal regions as valuable resources for identifying expressed gene sequences in the human genome. We believe that we are making important progress under the auspices of this DOE human genome program grant and we will continue to make significant contributions in the coming year. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Identification of Chromosomes from Multiple Rice Genomes Using a Universal Molecular Cytogenetic Marker System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaomin Tang; Weidong Bao; Wenli Zhang; Zhukuan Cheng

    2007-01-01

    To develop reliable techniques for chromosome identification is critical for cytogenetic research, especially for genomes with a large number and smaller-sized chromosomes. An efficient approach using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAG) clones as molecular cytological markers has been developed for many organisms. Herein, we present a set of chromosomal arm-specific molecular cytological markers derived from the gene-enriched regions of the sequenced rice genome. All these markers are able to generate very strong signals on the pachytene chromosomes of Oryza satlva L. (AA genome) when used as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes. We further probed those markers to the pachytene chromosomes of O. punctata (BB genome) and O. officinalis (CC genome) and also got very strong signals on the relevant pachytene chromosomes. The signal position of each marker on the related chromosomes from the three different rice genomes was pretty much stable, which enabled us to identify different chromosomes among various rice genomes. We also constructed the karyotype for both O. punctata and O. officinalis with the BB and CC genomes, respectively, by analysis of 10 pachytene cells anchored by these chromosomal arm-specific markers.

  8. The Oxytricha trifallax macronuclear genome: a complex eukaryotic genome with 16,000 tiny chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estienne C Swart

    Full Text Available The macronuclear genome of the ciliate Oxytricha trifallax displays an extreme and unique eukaryotic genome architecture with extensive genomic variation. During sexual genome development, the expressed, somatic macronuclear genome is whittled down to the genic portion of a small fraction (∼5% of its precursor "silent" germline micronuclear genome by a process of "unscrambling" and fragmentation. The tiny macronuclear "nanochromosomes" typically encode single, protein-coding genes (a small portion, 10%, encode 2-8 genes, have minimal noncoding regions, and are differentially amplified to an average of ∼2,000 copies. We report the high-quality genome assembly of ∼16,000 complete nanochromosomes (∼50 Mb haploid genome size that vary from 469 bp to 66 kb long (mean ∼3.2 kb and encode ∼18,500 genes. Alternative DNA fragmentation processes ∼10% of the nanochromosomes into multiple isoforms that usually encode complete genes. Nucleotide diversity in the macronucleus is very high (SNP heterozygosity is ∼4.0%, suggesting that Oxytricha trifallax may have one of the largest known effective population sizes of eukaryotes. Comparison to other ciliates with nonscrambled genomes and long macronuclear chromosomes (on the order of 100 kb suggests several candidate proteins that could be involved in genome rearrangement, including domesticated MULE and IS1595-like DDE transposases. The assembly of the highly fragmented Oxytricha macronuclear genome is the first completed genome with such an unusual architecture. This genome sequence provides tantalizing glimpses into novel molecular biology and evolution. For example, Oxytricha maintains tens of millions of telomeres per cell and has also evolved an intriguing expansion of telomere end-binding proteins. In conjunction with the micronuclear genome in progress, the O. trifallax macronuclear genome will provide an invaluable resource for investigating programmed genome rearrangements, complementing

  9. Major Chromosomal Rearrangements Distinguish Willow and Poplar After the Ancestral "Salicoid" Genome Duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jing; Ye, Ning; Dong, Zhongyuan; Lu, Mengzhu; Li, Laigeng; Yin, Tongming

    2016-06-27

    Populus (poplar) and Salix (willow) are sister genera in the Salicaceae family. In both lineages extant species are predominantly diploid. Genome analysis previously revealed that the two lineages originated from a common tetraploid ancestor. In this study, we conducted a syntenic comparison of the corresponding 19 chromosome members of the poplar and willow genomes. Our observations revealed that almost every chromosomal segment had a parallel paralogous segment elsewhere in the genomes, and the two lineages shared a similar syntenic pinwheel pattern for most of the chromosomes, which indicated that the two lineages diverged after the genome reorganization in the common progenitor. The pinwheel patterns showed distinct differences for two chromosome pairs in each lineage. Further analysis detected two major interchromosomal rearrangements that distinguished the karyotypes of willow and poplar. Chromosome I of willow was a conjunction of poplar chromosome XVI and the lower portion of poplar chromosome I, whereas willow chromosome XVI corresponded to the upper portion of poplar chromosome I. Scientists have suggested that Populus is evolutionarily more primitive than Salix. Therefore, we propose that, after the "salicoid" duplication event, fission and fusion of the ancestral chromosomes first give rise to the diploid progenitor of extant Populus species. During the evolutionary process, fission and fusion of poplar chromosomes I and XVI subsequently give rise to the progenitor of extant Salix species. This study contributes to an improved understanding of genome divergence after ancient genome duplication in closely related lineages of higher plants.

  10. Functional gene groups are concentrated within chromosomes, among chromosomes and in the nuclear space of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thévenin, Annelyse; Ein-Dor, Liat; Ozery-Flato, Michal; Shamir, Ron

    2014-09-01

    Genomes undergo changes in organization as a result of gene duplications, chromosomal rearrangements and local mutations, among other mechanisms. In contrast to prokaryotes, in which genes of a common function are often organized in operons and reside contiguously along the genome, most eukaryotes show much weaker clustering of genes by function, except for few concrete functional groups. We set out to check systematically if there is a relation between gene function and gene organization in the human genome. We test this question for three types of functional groups: pairs of interacting proteins, complexes and pathways. We find a significant concentration of functional groups both in terms of their distance within the same chromosome and in terms of their dispersal over several chromosomes. Moreover, using Hi-C contact map of the tendency of chromosomal segments to appear close in the 3D space of the nucleus, we show that members of the same functional group that reside on distinct chromosomes tend to co-localize in space. The result holds for all three types of functional groups that we tested. Hence, the human genome shows substantial concentration of functional groups within chromosomes and across chromosomes in space.

  11. Mitotic-chromosome-based physical mapping of the Culex quinquefasciatus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumenko, Anastasia N; Timoshevskiy, Vladimir A; Kinney, Nicholas A; Kokhanenko, Alina A; deBruyn, Becky S; Lovin, Diane D; Stegniy, Vladimir N; Severson, David W; Sharakhov, Igor V; Sharakhova, Maria V

    2015-01-01

    The genome assembly of southern house mosquito Cx. quinquefasciatus is represented by a high number of supercontigs with no order or orientation on the chromosomes. Although cytogenetic maps for the polytene chromosomes of this mosquito have been developed, their utilization for the genome mapping remains difficult because of the low number of high-quality spreads in chromosome preparations. Therefore, a simple and robust mitotic-chromosome-based approach for the genome mapping of Cx. quinquefasciatus still needs to be developed. In this study, we performed physical mapping of 37 genomic supercontigs using fluorescent in situ hybridization on mitotic chromosomes from imaginal discs of 4th instar larvae. The genetic linkage map nomenclature was adopted for the chromosome numbering based on the direct positioning of 58 markers that were previously genetically mapped. The smallest, largest, and intermediate chromosomes were numbered as 1, 2, and 3, respectively. For idiogram development, we analyzed and described in detail the morphology and proportions of the mitotic chromosomes. Chromosomes were subdivided into 19 divisions and 72 bands of four different intensities. These idiograms were used for mapping the genomic supercontigs/genetic markers. We also determined the presence of length polymorphism in the q arm of sex-determining chromosome 1 in Cx. quinquefasciatus related to the size of ribosomal locus. Our physical mapping and previous genetic linkage mapping resulted in the chromosomal assignment of 13% of the total genome assembly to the chromosome bands. We provided the first detailed description, nomenclature, and idiograms for the mitotic chromosomes of Cx. quinquefasciatus. Further application of the approach developed in this study will help to improve the quality of the southern house mosquito genome.

  12. Genome-wide detection of chromosomal rearrangements, indels, and mutations in circular chromosomes by short read sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Ole; Bak, Mads; Løbner-Olesen, Anders;

    2011-01-01

    a combination of WGS and genome copy number analysis, for the identification of mutations that suppress the growth deficiency imposed by excessive initiations from the Escherichia coli origin of replication, oriC. The E. coli chromosome, like the majority of bacterial chromosomes, is circular, and DNA...... replication is initiated by assembling two replication complexes at the origin, oriC. These complexes then replicate the chromosome bidirectionally toward the terminus, ter. In a population of growing cells, this results in a copy number gradient, so that origin-proximal sequences are more frequent than...... origin-distal sequences. Major rearrangements in the chromosome are, therefore, readily identified by changes in copy number, i.e., certain sequences become over- or under-represented. Of the eight mutations analyzed in detail here, six were found to affect a single gene only, one was a large chromosomal...

  13. Human telomeres that carry an integrated copy of human herpesvirus 6 are often short and unstable, facilitating release of the viral genome from the chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Hidalgo-Bravo, Alberto; Zhang, Enjie; Cotton, Victoria E; Mendez-Bermudez, Aaron; Wig, Gunjan; Medina-Calzada, Zahara; Neumann, Rita; Jeffreys, Alec J; Winney, Bruce; Wilson, James F; Clark, Duncan A; Dyer, Martin J; Royle, Nicola J

    2014-01-01

    Linear chromosomes are stabilized by telomeres, but the presence of short dysfunctional telomeres triggers cellular senescence in human somatic tissues, thus contributing to ageing. Approximately 1% of the population inherits a chromosomally integrated copy of human herpesvirus 6 (CI-HHV-6), but the consequences of integration for the virus and for the telomere with the insertion are unknown. Here we show that the telomere on the distal end of the integrated virus is frequently the shortest measured in somatic cells but not the germline. The telomere carrying the CI-HHV-6 is also prone to truncations that result in the formation of a short telomere at a novel location within the viral genome. We detected extra-chromosomal circular HHV-6 molecules, some surprisingly comprising the entire viral genome with a single fully reconstituted direct repeat region (DR) with both terminal cleavage and packaging elements (PAC1 and PAC2). Truncated CI-HHV-6 and extra-chromosomal circular molecules are likely reciprocal products that arise through excision of a telomere-loop (t-loop) formed within the CI-HHV-6 genome. In summary, we show that the CI-HHV-6 genome disrupts stability of the associated telomere and this facilitates the release of viral sequences as circular molecules, some of which have the potential to become fully functioning viruses.

  14. Characterization of the Arachis (Leguminosae D genome using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH chromosome markers and total genome DNA hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Robledo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome markers were developed for Arachis glandulifera using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH of the 5S and 45S rRNA genes and heterochromatic 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI positive bands. We used chromosome landmarks identified by these markers to construct the first Arachis species ideogram in which all the homologous chromosomes were precisely identified. The comparison of this ideogram with those published for other Arachis species revealed very poor homeologies with all A and B genome taxa, supporting the special genome constitution (D genome of A. glandulifera. Genomic affinities were further investigated by dot blot hybridization of biotinylated A. glandulifera total DNA to DNA from several Arachis species, the results indicating that the D genome is positioned between the A and B genomes.

  15. Telomere-centric genome repatterning determines recurring chromosome number reductions during the evolution of eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiyin; Jin, Dianchuan; Wang, Zhenyi; Guo, Hui; Zhang, Lan; Wang, Li; Li, Jingping; Paterson, Andrew H

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome duplication (WGD) is central to the evolution of many eukaryotic genomes, in particular rendering angiosperm (flowering plant) genomes much less stable than those of animals. Following repeated duplication/triplication(s), angiosperm chromosome numbers have usually been restored to a narrow range, as one element in a 'diploidization' process that re-establishes diploid heredity. In several angiosperms affected by WGD, we show that chromosome number reduction (CNR) is best explained by intra- and/or inter-chromosomal crossovers to form new chromosomes that utilize the existing telomeres of 'invaded' and centromeres of 'invading' chromosomes, the alternative centromeres and telomeres being lost. Comparison with the banana (Musa acuminata) genome supports a 'fusion model' for the evolution of rice (Oryza sativa) chromosomes 2 and 3, implying that the grass common ancestor had seven chromosomes rather than the five implied by a 'fission model.' The 'invading' and 'invaded' chromosomes are frequently homoeologs, originating from duplication of a common ancestral chromosome and with greater-than-average DNA-level correspondence to one another. Telomere-centric CNR following recursive WGD in plants is also important in mammals and yeast, and may be a general mechanism of restoring small linear chromosome numbers in higher eukaryotes. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. Chromosome-scale scaffolding of de novo genome assemblies based on chromatin interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Joshua N.; Adey, Andrew; Patwardhan, Rupali P.; Qiu, Ruolan; Kitzman, Jacob O.; Shendure, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Genomes assembled de novo from short reads are highly fragmented relative to the finished chromosomes of H. sapiens and key model organisms generated by the Human Genome Project. To address this, we need scalable, cost-effective methods enabling chromosome-scale contiguity. Here we show that genome-wide chromatin interaction datasets, such as those generated by Hi-C, are a rich source of long-range information for assigning, ordering and orienting genomic sequences to chromosomes, including across centromeres. To exploit this, we developed an algorithm that uses Hi-C data for ultra-long-range scaffolding of de novo genome assemblies. We demonstrate the approach by combining shotgun fragment and short jump mate-pair sequences with Hi-C data to generate chromosome-scale de novo assemblies of the human, mouse and Drosophila genomes, achieving – for human – 98% accuracy in assigning scaffolds to chromosome groups and 99% accuracy in ordering and orienting scaffolds within chromosome groups. Hi-C data can also be used to validate chromosomal translocations in cancer genomes. PMID:24185095

  17. Genomic composition and evolution of Aedes aegypti chromosomes revealed by the analysis of physically mapped supercontigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background An initial comparative genomic study of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae and the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti revealed striking differences in the genome assembly size and in the abundance of transposable elements between the two species. However, the chromosome arms homology between An. gambiae and Ae. aegypti, as well as the distribution of genes and repetitive elements in chromosomes of Ae. aegypti, remained largely unexplored because of the lack of a detailed physical genome map for the yellow fever mosquito. Results Using a molecular landmark-guided fluorescent in situ hybridization approach, we mapped 624 Mb of the Ae. aegypti genome to mitotic chromosomes. We used this map to analyze the distribution of genes, tandem repeats and transposable elements along the chromosomes and to explore the patterns of chromosome homology and rearrangements between Ae. aegypti and An. gambiae. The study demonstrated that the q arm of the sex-determining chromosome 1 had the lowest gene content and the highest density of minisatellites. A comparative genomic analysis with An. gambiae determined that the previously proposed whole-arm synteny is not fully preserved; a number of pericentric inversions have occurred between the two species. The sex-determining chromosome 1 had a higher rate of genome rearrangements than observed in autosomes 2 and 3 of Ae. aegypti. Conclusions The study developed a physical map of 45% of the Ae. aegypti genome and provided new insights into genomic composition and evolution of Ae. aegypti chromosomes. Our data suggest that minisatellites rather than transposable elements played a major role in rapid evolution of chromosome 1 in the Aedes lineage. The research tools and information generated by this study contribute to a more complete understanding of the genome organization and evolution in mosquitoes. PMID:24731704

  18. Multiple sex-associated regions and a putative sex chromosome in zebrafish revealed by RAD mapping and population genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jennifer L; Rodríguez Marí, Adriana; Braasch, Ingo; Amores, Angel; Hohenlohe, Paul; Batzel, Peter; Postlethwait, John H

    2012-01-01

    Within vertebrates, major sex determining genes can differ among taxa and even within species. In zebrafish (Danio rerio), neither heteromorphic sex chromosomes nor single sex determination genes of large effect, like Sry in mammals, have yet been identified. Furthermore, environmental factors can influence zebrafish sex determination. Although progress has been made in understanding zebrafish gonad differentiation (e.g. the influence of germ cells on gonad fate), the primary genetic basis of zebrafish sex determination remains poorly understood. To identify genetic loci associated with sex, we analyzed F(2) offspring of reciprocal crosses between Oregon *AB and Nadia (NA) wild-type zebrafish stocks. Genome-wide linkage analysis, using more than 5,000 sequence-based polymorphic restriction site associated (RAD-tag) markers and population genomic analysis of more than 30,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms in our *ABxNA crosses revealed a sex-associated locus on the end of the long arm of chr-4 for both cross families, and an additional locus in the middle of chr-3 in one cross family. Additional sequencing showed that two SNPs in dmrt1 previously suggested to be functional candidates for sex determination in a cross of ABxIndia wild-type zebrafish, are not associated with sex in our AB fish. Our data show that sex determination in zebrafish is polygenic and that different genes may influence sex determination in different strains or that different genes become more important under different environmental conditions. The association of the end of chr-4 with sex is remarkable because, unique in the karyotype, this chromosome arm shares features with known sex chromosomes: it is highly heterochromatic, repetitive, late replicating, and has reduced recombination. Our results reveal that chr-4 has functional and structural properties expected of a sex chromosome.

  19. Multiple sex-associated regions and a putative sex chromosome in zebrafish revealed by RAD mapping and population genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Anderson

    Full Text Available Within vertebrates, major sex determining genes can differ among taxa and even within species. In zebrafish (Danio rerio, neither heteromorphic sex chromosomes nor single sex determination genes of large effect, like Sry in mammals, have yet been identified. Furthermore, environmental factors can influence zebrafish sex determination. Although progress has been made in understanding zebrafish gonad differentiation (e.g. the influence of germ cells on gonad fate, the primary genetic basis of zebrafish sex determination remains poorly understood. To identify genetic loci associated with sex, we analyzed F(2 offspring of reciprocal crosses between Oregon *AB and Nadia (NA wild-type zebrafish stocks. Genome-wide linkage analysis, using more than 5,000 sequence-based polymorphic restriction site associated (RAD-tag markers and population genomic analysis of more than 30,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms in our *ABxNA crosses revealed a sex-associated locus on the end of the long arm of chr-4 for both cross families, and an additional locus in the middle of chr-3 in one cross family. Additional sequencing showed that two SNPs in dmrt1 previously suggested to be functional candidates for sex determination in a cross of ABxIndia wild-type zebrafish, are not associated with sex in our AB fish. Our data show that sex determination in zebrafish is polygenic and that different genes may influence sex determination in different strains or that different genes become more important under different environmental conditions. The association of the end of chr-4 with sex is remarkable because, unique in the karyotype, this chromosome arm shares features with known sex chromosomes: it is highly heterochromatic, repetitive, late replicating, and has reduced recombination. Our results reveal that chr-4 has functional and structural properties expected of a sex chromosome.

  20. Deciphering neo-sex and B chromosome evolution by the draft genome of Drosophila albomicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Qi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drosophila albomicans is a unique model organism for studying both sex chromosome and B chromosome evolution. A pair of its autosomes comprising roughly 40% of the whole genome has fused to the ancient X and Y chromosomes only about 0.12 million years ago, thereby creating the youngest and most gene-rich neo-sex system reported to date. This species also possesses recently derived B chromosomes that show non-Mendelian inheritance and significantly influence fertility. Methods We sequenced male flies with B chromosomes at 124.5-fold genome coverage using next-generation sequencing. To characterize neo-Y specific changes and B chromosome sequences, we also sequenced inbred female flies derived from the same strain but without B's at 28.5-fold. Results We assembled a female genome and placed 53% of the sequence and 85% of the annotated proteins into specific chromosomes, by comparison with the 12 Drosophila genomes. Despite its very recent origin, the non-recombining neo-Y chromosome shows various signs of degeneration, including a significant enrichment of non-functional genes compared to the neo-X, and an excess of tandem duplications relative to other chromosomes. We also characterized a B-chromosome linked scaffold that contains an actively transcribed unit and shows sequence similarity to the subcentromeric regions of both the ancient X and the neo-X chromosome. Conclusions Our results provide novel insights into the very early stages of sex chromosome evolution and B chromosome origination, and suggest an unprecedented connection between the births of these two systems in D. albomicans.

  1. Homoeologous chromosomes of Xenopus laevis are highly conserved after whole-genome duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Y; Nishida, C; Takagi, C; Ueno, N; Matsuda, Y

    2013-11-01

    It has been suggested that whole-genome duplication (WGD) occurred twice during the evolutionary process of vertebrates around 450 and 500 million years ago, which contributed to an increase in the genomic and phenotypic complexities of vertebrates. However, little is still known about the evolutionary process of homoeologous chromosomes after WGD because many duplicate genes have been lost. Therefore, Xenopus laevis (2n=36) and Xenopus (Silurana) tropicalis (2n=20) are good animal models for studying the process of genomic and chromosomal reorganization after WGD because X. laevis is an allotetraploid species that resulted from WGD after the interspecific hybridization of diploid species closely related to X. tropicalis. We constructed a comparative cytogenetic map of X. laevis using 60 complimentary DNA clones that covered the entire chromosomal regions of 10 pairs of X. tropicalis chromosomes. We consequently identified all nine homoeologous chromosome groups of X. laevis. Hybridization signals on two pairs of X. laevis homoeologous chromosomes were detected for 50 of 60 (83%) genes, and the genetic linkage is highly conserved between X. tropicalis and X. laevis chromosomes except for one fusion and one inversion and also between X. laevis homoeologous chromosomes except for two inversions. These results indicate that the loss of duplicated genes and inter- and/or intrachromosomal rearrangements occurred much less frequently in this lineage, suggesting that these events were not essential for diploidization of the allotetraploid genome in X. laevis after WGD.

  2. Comparative Genomics of Interreplichore Translocations in Bacteria: A Measure of Chromosome Topology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khedkar, Supriya; Seshasayee, Aswin Sai Narain

    2016-06-01

    Genomes evolve not only in base sequence but also in terms of their architecture, defined by gene organization and chromosome topology. Whereas genome sequence data inform us about the changes in base sequences for a large variety of organisms, the study of chromosome topology is restricted to a few model organisms studied using microscopy and chromosome conformation capture techniques. Here, we exploit whole genome sequence data to study the link between gene organization and chromosome topology in bacteria. Using comparative genomics across ∼250 pairs of closely related bacteria we show that: (a) many organisms show a high degree of interreplichore translocations throughout the chromosome and not limited to the inversion-prone terminus (ter) or the origin of replication (oriC); (b) translocation maps may reflect chromosome topologies; and (c) symmetric interreplichore translocations do not disrupt the distance of a gene from oriC or affect gene expression states or strand biases in gene densities. In summary, we suggest that translocation maps might be a first line in defining a gross chromosome topology given a pair of closely related genome sequences.

  3. Meiotic chromosome configurations in triploid progeny from reciprocal crosses between wild-type diploid and natural tetraploid loach Misgurnus anguillicaudatus in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya-Juan; Gao, Yang-Chun; Zhou, He; Ma, Hai-Yan; Li, Jia-Qi; Arai, Katsutoshi

    2015-10-01

    Here, we showed meiotic chromosome configurations prepared from oocyte germinal vesicles and spermatocytes of triploid loaches produced from reciprocal crosses between wild-type diploids (2n = 50) obtained from Dalian, Liaoning Province, China and natural tetraploids (4n = 100) from Chibi, Hubei Province, China. Major meiotic cells in triploids comprised 25 bivalents and 25 univalents, but cells with one to five trivalents were also observed. When three homologous chromosomes bearing nucleolar organizing regions (NOR) were identified with the detection of signals or positive sites by silver staining, chromomycin A3 staining and fluorescence in situ hybridization with a 5.8S + 28S rDNA probe, two third of selected triploid cells gave a configuration including one bivalent with two NORs (association of two homologous chromosomes) and one univalent with one NOR. However, other triploid cells showed three univalent each of which had one NOR, suggesting a failure of synapsis between homologous chromosomes. These results suggested that triploid female and male should produce aneuploid gametes with the theoretical mode at 1.5n (37 or 38 chromosomes).

  4. Computational Comparison of Human Genomic Sequence Assemblies for a Region of Chromosome 4

    OpenAIRE

    Semple, Colin; Stewart W. Morris; Porteous, David J.; Evans, Kathryn L.

    2002-01-01

    Much of the available human genomic sequence data exist in a fragmentary draft state following the completion of the initial high-volume sequencing performed by the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium (IHGSC) and Celera Genomics (CG). We compared six draft genome assemblies over a region of chromosome 4p (D4S394–D4S403), two consecutive releases by the IHGSC at University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC), two consecutive releases from the National Centre for Biotechnology Informa...

  5. Construction and characterization of genomic libraries from specific human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumlauf, R; Jeanpierre, M; Young, B D

    1982-05-01

    Highly purified fractions of human chromosomes 21 and 22 were isolated from a suspension of metaphase chromosomes stained with ethidium bromide by using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS II). Two recombinant DNA libraries, representing chromosomes 21 and 22, were constructed by complete digestion of DNA from these fractions with EcoRI and insertion into the vector lambda gtWES lambda B. Twenty clones selected at random from the chromosome 22 library hybridized to EcoRI-digested human DNA, and five of these clones hybridized to single bands identical in size to the phage inserts. These five single-copy sequences and a clone coding for an 8S RNA isolated by screening the chromosome 22 library for expressed sequences were characterized in detail. Hybridization of all six clones to a panel of sorted chromosomes and hybrid cell lines confirmed the assignment of the sequences to chromosome 22. The sequences were localized to regions of chromosome 22 by hybridization to translocated chromosomes sorted from a cell line having a balanced translocation t(17;22)(p13;q11) and to hybrid cell lines containing the various portions of another translocation t(X;22)(q13;q112). Five clones reside on the long arm of chromosome 22 between q112 and pter, while one clone and an 18S rRNA gene isolated from the chromosome 22 library reside pter and g112. The construction of chromosome-specific libraries by this method has the advantage of being direct and applicable to nearly all human chromosomes and will be important in molecular analysis of human genetic diseases.

  6. Comparative Sex Chromosome Genomics in Snakes: Differentiation, Evolutionary Strata, and Lack of Global Dosage Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zektser, Yulia; Mahajan, Shivani; Bachtrog, Doris

    2013-01-01

    Snakes exhibit genetic sex determination, with female heterogametic sex chromosomes (ZZ males, ZW females). Extensive cytogenetic work has suggested that the level of sex chromosome heteromorphism varies among species, with Boidae having entirely homomorphic sex chromosomes, Viperidae having completely heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and Colubridae showing partial differentiation. Here, we take a genomic approach to compare sex chromosome differentiation in these three snake families. We identify homomorphic sex chromosomes in boas (Boidae), but completely heteromorphic sex chromosomes in both garter snakes (Colubridae) and pygmy rattlesnake (Viperidae). Detection of W-linked gametologs enables us to establish the presence of evolutionary strata on garter and pygmy rattlesnake sex chromosomes where recombination was abolished at different time points. Sequence analysis shows that all strata are shared between pygmy rattlesnake and garter snake, i.e., recombination was abolished between the sex chromosomes before the two lineages diverged. The sex-biased transmission of the Z and its hemizygosity in females can impact patterns of molecular evolution, and we show that rates of evolution for Z-linked genes are increased relative to their pseudoautosomal homologs, both at synonymous and amino acid sites (even after controlling for mutational biases). This demonstrates that mutation rates are male-biased in snakes (male-driven evolution), but also supports faster-Z evolution due to differential selective effects on the Z. Finally, we perform a transcriptome analysis in boa and pygmy rattlesnake to establish baseline levels of sex-biased expression in homomorphic sex chromosomes, and show that heteromorphic ZW chromosomes in rattlesnakes lack chromosome-wide dosage compensation. Our study provides the first full scale overview of the evolution of snake sex chromosomes at the genomic level, thus greatly expanding our knowledge of reptilian and vertebrate sex chromosomes

  7. Comparative sex chromosome genomics in snakes: differentiation, evolutionary strata, and lack of global dosage compensation.

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    Beatriz Vicoso

    Full Text Available Snakes exhibit genetic sex determination, with female heterogametic sex chromosomes (ZZ males, ZW females. Extensive cytogenetic work has suggested that the level of sex chromosome heteromorphism varies among species, with Boidae having entirely homomorphic sex chromosomes, Viperidae having completely heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and Colubridae showing partial differentiation. Here, we take a genomic approach to compare sex chromosome differentiation in these three snake families. We identify homomorphic sex chromosomes in boas (Boidae, but completely heteromorphic sex chromosomes in both garter snakes (Colubridae and pygmy rattlesnake (Viperidae. Detection of W-linked gametologs enables us to establish the presence of evolutionary strata on garter and pygmy rattlesnake sex chromosomes where recombination was abolished at different time points. Sequence analysis shows that all strata are shared between pygmy rattlesnake and garter snake, i.e., recombination was abolished between the sex chromosomes before the two lineages diverged. The sex-biased transmission of the Z and its hemizygosity in females can impact patterns of molecular evolution, and we show that rates of evolution for Z-linked genes are increased relative to their pseudoautosomal homologs, both at synonymous and amino acid sites (even after controlling for mutational biases. This demonstrates that mutation rates are male-biased in snakes (male-driven evolution, but also supports faster-Z evolution due to differential selective effects on the Z. Finally, we perform a transcriptome analysis in boa and pygmy rattlesnake to establish baseline levels of sex-biased expression in homomorphic sex chromosomes, and show that heteromorphic ZW chromosomes in rattlesnakes lack chromosome-wide dosage compensation. Our study provides the first full scale overview of the evolution of snake sex chromosomes at the genomic level, thus greatly expanding our knowledge of reptilian and vertebrate sex

  8. Birth of a W sex chromosome by horizontal transfer of Wolbachia bacterial symbiont genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Sébastien; Thézé, Julien; Chebbi, Mohamed Amine; Giraud, Isabelle; Moumen, Bouziane; Ernenwein, Lise; Grève, Pierre; Cordaux, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Sex determination is a fundamental developmental pathway governing male and female differentiation, with profound implications for morphology, reproductive strategies, and behavior. In animals, sex differences between males and females are generally determined by genetic factors carried by sex chromosomes. Sex chromosomes are remarkably variable in origin and can differ even between closely related species, indicating that transitions occur frequently and independently in different groups of organisms. The evolutionary causes underlying sex chromosome turnover are poorly understood, however. Here we provide evidence indicating that Wolbachia bacterial endosymbionts triggered the evolution of new sex chromosomes in the common pillbug Armadillidium vulgare. We identified a 3-Mb insert of a feminizing Wolbachia genome that was recently transferred into the pillbug nuclear genome. The Wolbachia insert shows perfect linkage to the female sex, occurs in a male genetic background (i.e., lacking the ancestral W female sex chromosome), and is hemizygous. Our results support the conclusion that the Wolbachia insert is now acting as a female sex-determining region in pillbugs, and that the chromosome carrying the insert is a new W sex chromosome. Thus, bacteria-to-animal horizontal genome transfer represents a remarkable mechanism underpinning the birth of sex chromosomes. We conclude that sex ratio distorters, such as Wolbachia endosymbionts, can be powerful agents of evolutionary transitions in sex determination systems in animals. PMID:27930295

  9. Three-dimensional genome architecture influences partner selection for chromosomal translocations in human disease.

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    Jesse M Engreitz

    Full Text Available Chromosomal translocations are frequent features of cancer genomes that contribute to disease progression. These rearrangements result from formation and illegitimate repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, a process that requires spatial colocalization of chromosomal breakpoints. The "contact first" hypothesis suggests that translocation partners colocalize in the nuclei of normal cells, prior to rearrangement. It is unclear, however, the extent to which spatial interactions based on three-dimensional genome architecture contribute to chromosomal rearrangements in human disease. Here we intersect Hi-C maps of three-dimensional chromosome conformation with collections of 1,533 chromosomal translocations from cancer and germline genomes. We show that many translocation-prone pairs of regions genome-wide, including the cancer translocation partners BCR-ABL and MYC-IGH, display elevated Hi-C contact frequencies in normal human cells. Considering tissue specificity, we find that translocation breakpoints reported in human hematologic malignancies have higher Hi-C contact frequencies in lymphoid cells than those reported in sarcomas and epithelial tumors. However, translocations from multiple tissue types show significant correlation with Hi-C contact frequencies, suggesting that both tissue-specific and universal features of chromatin structure contribute to chromosomal alterations. Our results demonstrate that three-dimensional genome architecture shapes the landscape of rearrangements directly observed in human disease and establish Hi-C as a key method for dissecting these effects.

  10. Chromosome arm-specific BAC end sequences permit comparative analysis of homoeologous chromosomes and genomes of polyploid wheat

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    Sehgal Sunish K

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bread wheat, one of the world’s staple food crops, has the largest, highly repetitive and polyploid genome among the cereal crops. The wheat genome holds the key to crop genetic improvement against challenges such as climate change, environmental degradation, and water scarcity. To unravel the complex wheat genome, the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC is pursuing a chromosome- and chromosome arm-based approach to physical mapping and sequencing. Here we report on the use of a BAC library made from flow-sorted telosomic chromosome 3A short arm (t3AS for marker development and analysis of sequence composition and comparative evolution of homoeologous genomes of hexaploid wheat. Results The end-sequencing of 9,984 random BACs from a chromosome arm 3AS-specific library (TaaCsp3AShA generated 11,014,359 bp of high quality sequence from 17,591 BAC-ends with an average length of 626 bp. The sequence represents 3.2% of t3AS with an average DNA sequence read every 19 kb. Overall, 79% of the sequence consisted of repetitive elements, 1.38% as coding regions (estimated 2,850 genes and another 19% of unknown origin. Comparative sequence analysis suggested that 70-77% of the genes present in both 3A and 3B were syntenic with model species. Among the transposable elements, gypsy/sabrina (12.4% was the most abundant repeat and was significantly more frequent in 3A compared to homoeologous chromosome 3B. Twenty novel repetitive sequences were also identified using de novo repeat identification. BESs were screened to identify simple sequence repeats (SSR and transposable element junctions. A total of 1,057 SSRs were identified with a density of one per 10.4 kb, and 7,928 junctions between transposable elements (TE and other sequences were identified with a density of one per 1.39 kb. With the objective of enhancing the marker density of chromosome 3AS, oligonucleotide primers were successfully designed from

  11. The X chromosome: does it have a role in Bloom syndrome, a genomic instability disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Deniz

    2014-01-01

    The Bloom syndrome, caused by mutations in a single gene [BLM (15q26.1)], is a rare genomic instability syndrome. Despite its autosomal recessive transmission, it shows a male dominance, suggesting the possibility of a subgroup with X-linked recessive inheritance. In view of the latest molecular developments achieved in the other genomic instability syndromes, the potential functions of the X chromosome in maintaining genomic stability, and particularly, the first clues of Bloom syndrome development by mechanisms other than the BLM, we suggest herein that the X chromosome should be investigated in Bloom syndrome.

  12. Genomic Imbalances in Neonates With Birth Defects: High Detection Rates by Using Chromosomal Microarray Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xin-Yan; Phung, Mai T.; Shaw, Chad A.; Pham, Kim; Neil, Sarah E.; Patel, Ankita; Sahoo, Trilochan; Bacino, Carlos A.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Lee Kang, Sung-Hae; Lalani, Seema; Chinault, A. Craig; Lupski, James R.; Cheung, Sau W.; Beaudet, Arthur L.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Our aim was to determine the frequency of genomic imbalances in neonates with birth defects by using targeted array-based comparative genomic hybridization, also known as chromosomal microarray analysis. METHODS Between March 2006 and September 2007, 638 neonates with various birth defects were referred for chromosomal microarray analysis. Three consecutive chromosomal microarray analysis versions were used: bacterial artificial chromosome-based versions V5 and V6 and bacterial artificial chromosome emulated oligonucleotide-based version V6 Oligo. Each version had targeted but increasingly extensive genomic coverage and interrogated >150 disease loci with enhanced coverage in genomic rearrangement-prone pericentromeric and subtelomeric regions. RESULTS Overall, 109 (17.1%) patients were identified with clinically significant abnormalities with detection rates of 13.7%, 16.6%, and 19.9% on V5, V6, and V6 Oligo, respectively. The majority of these abnormalities would not be defined by using karyotype analysis. The clinically significant detection rates by use of chromosomal microarray analysis for various clinical indications were 66.7% for “possible chromosomal abnormality” ± “others” (other clinical indications), 33.3% for ambiguous genitalia ± others, 27.1% for dysmorphic features + multiple congenital anomalies ± others, 24.6% for dysmorphic features ± others, 21.8% for congenital heart disease ± others, 17.9% for multiple congenital anomalies ± others, and 9.5% for the patients referred for others that were different from the groups defined. In all, 16 (2.5%) patients had chromosomal aneuploidies, and 81 (12.7%) patients had segmental aneusomies including common microdeletion or microduplication syndromes and other genomic disorders. Chromosomal mosaicism was found in 12 (1.9%) neonates. CONCLUSIONS Chromosomal microarray analysis is a valuable clinical diagnostic tool that allows precise and rapid identification of genomic imbalances

  13. Evolution of genome organizations of squirrels (Sciuridae) revealed by cross-species chromosome painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tangliang; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Biltueva, Larisa; Fu, Beiyuan; Wang, Jinhuan; Nie, Wenhui; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Yang, Fengtang

    2004-01-01

    With complete sets of chromosome-specific painting probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of human and grey squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis), the whole genome homologies between human and representatives of tree squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis, Callosciurus erythraeus), flying squirrels (Petaurista albiventer) and chipmunks (Tamias sibiricus) have been defined by cross-species chromosome painting. The results show that, unlike the highly rearranged karyotypes of mouse and rat, the karyotypes of squirrels are highly conserved. Two methods have been used to reconstruct the genome phylogeny of squirrels with the laboratory rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) as the out-group: (1) phylogenetic analysis by parsimony using chromosomal characters identified by comparative cytogenetic approaches; (2) mapping the genome rearrangements onto recently published sequence-based molecular trees. Our chromosome painting results, in combination with molecular data, show that flying squirrels are phylogenetically close to New World tree squirrels. Chromosome painting and G-banding comparisons place chipmunks (Tamias sibiricus ), with a derived karyotype, outside the clade comprising tree and flying squirrels. The superorder Glires (orde Rodentia + order Lagomorpha) is firmly supported by two conserved syntenic associations between human chromosomes 1 and 10p homologues, and between 9 and 11 homologues.

  14. Chromosomal distribution of microsatellite repeats in Amazon cichlids genome (Pisces, Cichlidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Carlos Henrique; Gross, Maria Claudia; Terencio, Maria Leandra; de Tavares, Édika Sabrina Girão Mitozo; Martins, Cesar; Feldberg, Eliana

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fish of the family Cichlidae are recognized as an excellent model for evolutionary studies because of their morphological and behavioral adaptations to a wide diversity of explored ecological niches. In addition, the family has a dynamic genome with variable structure, composition and karyotype organization. Microsatellites represent the most dynamic genomic component and a better understanding of their organization may help clarify the role of repetitive DNA elements in the mechanisms of chromosomal evolution. Thus, in this study, microsatellite sequences were mapped in the chromosomes of Cichla monoculus Agassiz, 1831, Pterophyllum scalare Schultze, 1823, and Symphysodon discus Heckel, 1840. Four microsatellites demonstrated positive results in the genome of Cichla monoculus and Symphysodon discus, and five demonstrated positive results in the genome of Pterophyllum scalare. In most cases, the microsatellite was dispersed in the chromosome with conspicuous markings in the centromeric or telomeric regions, which suggests that sequences contribute to chromosome structure and may have played a role in the evolution of this fish family. The comparative genome mapping data presented here provide novel information on the structure and organization of the repetitive DNA region of the cichlid genome and contribute to a better understanding of this fish family’s genome. PMID:26753076

  15. Chromosomal distribution of microsatellite repeats in Amazon cichlids genome (Pisces, Cichlidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Carlos Henrique; Gross, Maria Claudia; Terencio, Maria Leandra; de Tavares, Édika Sabrina Girão Mitozo; Martins, Cesar; Feldberg, Eliana

    2015-01-01

    Fish of the family Cichlidae are recognized as an excellent model for evolutionary studies because of their morphological and behavioral adaptations to a wide diversity of explored ecological niches. In addition, the family has a dynamic genome with variable structure, composition and karyotype organization. Microsatellites represent the most dynamic genomic component and a better understanding of their organization may help clarify the role of repetitive DNA elements in the mechanisms of chromosomal evolution. Thus, in this study, microsatellite sequences were mapped in the chromosomes of Cichla monoculus Agassiz, 1831, Pterophyllum scalare Schultze, 1823, and Symphysodon discus Heckel, 1840. Four microsatellites demonstrated positive results in the genome of Cichla monoculus and Symphysodon discus, and five demonstrated positive results in the genome of Pterophyllum scalare. In most cases, the microsatellite was dispersed in the chromosome with conspicuous markings in the centromeric or telomeric regions, which suggests that sequences contribute to chromosome structure and may have played a role in the evolution of this fish family. The comparative genome mapping data presented here provide novel information on the structure and organization of the repetitive DNA region of the cichlid genome and contribute to a better understanding of this fish family's genome.

  16. "Islands of Divergence" in the Atlantic Cod Genome Represent Polymorphic Chromosomal Rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodeland, Marte; Jorde, Per Erik; Lien, Sigbjørn; Jentoft, Sissel; Berg, Paul R; Grove, Harald; Kent, Matthew P; Arnyasi, Mariann; Olsen, Esben Moland; Knutsen, Halvor

    2016-04-11

    In several species genetic differentiation across environmental gradients or between geographically separate populations has been reported to center at "genomic islands of divergence," resulting in heterogeneous differentiation patterns across genomes. Here, genomic regions of elevated divergence were observed on three chromosomes of the highly mobile fish Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) within geographically fine-scaled coastal areas. The "genomic islands" extended at least 5, 9.5, and 13 megabases on linkage groups 2, 7, and 12, respectively, and coincided with large blocks of linkage disequilibrium. For each of these three chromosomes, pairs of segregating, highly divergent alleles were identified, with little or no gene exchange between them. These patterns of recombination and divergence mirror genomic signatures previously described for large polymorphic inversions, which have been shown to repress recombination across extensive chromosomal segments. The lack of genetic exchange permits divergence between noninverted and inverted chromosomes in spite of gene flow. For the rearrangements on linkage groups 2 and 12, allelic frequency shifts between coastal and oceanic environments suggest a role in ecological adaptation, in agreement with recently reported associations between molecular variation within these genomic regions and temperature, oxygen, and salinity levels. Elevated genetic differentiation in these genomic regions has previously been described on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, and we therefore suggest that these polymorphisms are involved in adaptive divergence across the species distributional range. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  17. Unique genomic structure and distinct mitotic behavior of ring chromosome 21 in two unrelated cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H Z; Xu, F; Seashore, M; Li, P

    2012-01-01

    A ring chromosome replacing a normal chromosome could involve variable structural rearrangements and mitotic instability. However, most previously reported cases lacked further genomic characterization. High-resolution oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization with single-nucleotide polymorphism typing (aCGH+SNP) was used to study 2 unrelated cases with a ring chromosome 21. Case 1 had severe myopia, hypotonia, joint hypermobility, speech delay, and dysmorphic features. aCGH detected a 1.275-Mb duplication of 21q22.12-q22.13 and a 6.731-Mb distal deletion at 21q22.2. Case 2 showed severe growth and developmental retardations, intractable seizures, and dysmorphic features. aCGH revealed a contiguous pattern of a 3.612- Mb deletion of 21q22.12-q22.2, a 4.568-Mb duplication of 21q22.2-q22.3, and a 2.243-Mb distal deletion at 21q22.3. Mitotic instability was noted in 13, 30, and 76% of in vitro cultured metaphase cells, interphase cells, and leukocyte DNA, respectively. The different phenotypes of these 2 cases are likely associated with the unique genomic structure and distinct mitotic behavior of their ring chromosome 21. These 2 cases represent a subtype of ring chromosome 21 probably involving somatic dicentric ring breakage and reunion. A cytogenomic approach is proposed for characterizing the genomic structure and mitotic instability of ring chromosome abnormalities.

  18. The development of chromosome microdissection and microcloning technique and its applications in genomic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ruo-Nan; Hu, Zan-Min

    2007-03-01

    The technique of chromosome microdissection and microcloning has been developed for more than 20 years. As a bridge between cytogenetics and molecular genetics, it leads to a number of applications: chromosome painting probe isolation, genetic linkage map and physical map construction, and expressed sequence tags generation. During those 20 years, this technique has not only been benefited from other technological advances but also cross-fertilized with other techniques. Today, it becomes a practicality with extensive uses. The purpose of this article is to review the development of this technique and its application in the field of genomic research. Moreover, a new method of generating ESTs of specific chromosomes developed by our lab is introduced. By using this method, the technique of chromosome microdissection and microcloning would be more valuable in the advancement of genomic research.

  19. High-quality genome (re)assembly using chromosomal contact data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie-Nelly, Hervé; Marbouty, Martial; Cournac, Axel; Flot, Jean-François; Liti, Gianni; Parodi, Dante Poggi; Syan, Sylvie; Guillén, Nancy; Margeot, Antoine; Zimmer, Christophe; Koszul, Romain

    2014-12-17

    Closing gaps in draft genome assemblies can be costly and time-consuming, and published genomes are therefore often left 'unfinished.' Here we show that genome-wide chromosome conformation capture (3C) data can be used to overcome these limitations, and present a computational approach rooted in polymer physics that determines the most likely genome structure using chromosomal contact data. This algorithm--named GRAAL--generates high-quality assemblies of genomes in which repeated and duplicated regions are accurately represented and offers a direct probabilistic interpretation of the computed structures. We first validated GRAAL on the reference genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as other yeast isolates, where GRAAL recovered both known and unknown complex chromosomal structural variations. We then applied GRAAL to the finishing of the assembly of Trichoderma reesei and obtained a number of contigs congruent with the know karyotype of this species. Finally, we showed that GRAAL can accurately reconstruct human chromosomes from either fragments generated in silico or contigs obtained from de novo assembly. In all these applications, GRAAL compared favourably to recently published programmes implementing related approaches.

  20. Chromosomal imbalances in nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a meta-analysis of comparative genomic hybridization results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Ping

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is a highly prevalent disease in Southeast Asia and its prevalence is clearly affected by genetic background. Various theories have been suggested for its high incidence in this geographical region but to these days no conclusive explanation has been identified. Chromosomal imbalances identifiable through comparative genomic hybridization may shed some light on common genetic alterations that may be of relevance to the onset and progression of NPC. Review of the literature, however, reveals contradictory results among reported findings possibly related to factors associated with patient selection, stage of disease, differences in methodological details etc. To increase the power of the analysis and attempt to identify commonalities among the reported findings, we performed a meta-analysis of results described in NPC tissues based on chromosomal comparative genomic hybridization (CGH. This meta-analysis revealed consistent patters in chromosomal abnormalities that appeared to cluster in specific "hot spots" along the genome following a stage-dependent progression.

  1. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH) on Pachytene Chromosomes as a Tool for Genome Characterization. In: Legume Genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, R.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of international genome consortia have initiated large-scale sequencing projects for most of the major crop species. This huge amount of information not only boosted genetic and physical mapping research, but it also enabled novel applications on the level of chromosome biology incl

  2. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH) on Pachytene Chromosomes as a Tool for Genome Characterization. In: Legume Genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, R.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of international genome consortia have initiated large-scale sequencing projects for most of the major crop species. This huge amount of information not only boosted genetic and physical mapping research, but it also enabled novel applications on the level of chromosome biology

  3. Chromosome Numbers and Genome Size Variation in Indian Species of Curcuma (Zingiberaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong-Škorničková, Jana; Šída, Otakar; Jarolímová, Vlasta; Sabu, Mamyil; Fér, Tomáš; Trávníček, Pavel; Suda, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Genome size and chromosome numbers are important cytological characters that significantly influence various organismal traits. However, geographical representation of these data is seriously unbalanced, with tropical and subtropical regions being largely neglected. In the present study, an investigation was made of chromosomal and genome size variation in the majority of Curcuma species from the Indian subcontinent, and an assessment was made of the value of these data for taxonomic purposes. Methods Genome size of 161 homogeneously cultivated plant samples classified into 51 taxonomic entities was determined by propidium iodide flow cytometry. Chromosome numbers were counted in actively growing root tips using conventional rapid squash techniques. Key Results Six different chromosome counts (2n = 22, 42, 63, >70, 77 and 105) were found, the last two representing new generic records. The 2C-values varied from 1·66 pg in C. vamana to 4·76 pg in C. oligantha, representing a 2·87-fold range. Three groups of taxa with significantly different homoploid genome sizes (Cx-values) and distinct geographical distribution were identified. Five species exhibited intraspecific variation in nuclear DNA content, reaching up to 15·1 % in cultivated C. longa. Chromosome counts and genome sizes of three Curcuma-like species (Hitchenia caulina, Kaempferia scaposa and Paracautleya bhatii) corresponded well with typical hexaploid (2n = 6x = 42) Curcuma spp. Conclusions The basic chromosome number in the majority of Indian taxa (belonging to subgenus Curcuma) is x = 7; published counts correspond to 6x, 9x, 11x, 12x and 15x ploidy levels. Only a few species-specific C-values were found, but karyological and/or flow cytometric data may support taxonomic decisions in some species alliances with morphological similarities. Close evolutionary relationships among some cytotypes are suggested based on the similarity in homoploid genome sizes and geographical grouping

  4. Small genomes and large seeds: chromosome numbers, genome size and seed mass in diploid Aesculus species (Sapindaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahulcová, Anna; Trávnícek, Pavel; Krahulec, František; Rejmánek, Marcel

    2017-04-01

    Aesculus L. (horse chestnut, buckeye) is a genus of 12-19 extant woody species native to the temperate Northern Hemisphere. This genus is known for unusually large seeds among angiosperms. While chromosome counts are available for many Aesculus species, only one has had its genome size measured. The aim of this study is to provide more genome size data and analyse the relationship between genome size and seed mass in this genus. Chromosome numbers in root tip cuttings were confirmed for four species and reported for the first time for three additional species. Flow cytometric measurements of 2C nuclear DNA values were conducted on eight species, and mean seed mass values were estimated for the same taxa. The same chromosome number, 2 n = 40, was determined in all investigated taxa. Original measurements of 2C values for seven Aesculus species (eight taxa), added to just one reliable datum for A. hippocastanum , confirmed the notion that the genome size in this genus with relatively large seeds is surprisingly low, ranging from 0·955 pg 2C -1 in A. parviflora to 1·275 pg 2C -1 in A. glabra var. glabra. The chromosome number of 2 n = 40 seems to be conclusively the universal 2 n number for non-hybrid species in this genus. Aesculus genome sizes are relatively small, not only within its own family, Sapindaceae, but also within woody angiosperms. The genome sizes seem to be distinct and non-overlapping among the four major Aesculus clades. These results provide an extra support for the most recent reconstruction of Aesculus phylogeny. The correlation between the 2C values and seed masses in examined Aesculus species is slightly negative and not significant. However, when the four major clades are treated separately, there is consistent positive association between larger genome size and larger seed mass within individual lineages.

  5. Genomic in situ hybridization analysis of Thinopyrum chromatin in a wheat-Th. intermedium partial amphiploid and six derived chromosome addition lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen; Conner; Laroche; Ji; Armstrong; Fedak

    1999-12-01

    The genomic origin of alien chromosomes present in a wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium partial amphiploid TAF46 (2n = 8x = 56) and six derived chromosome addition lines were analyzed by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) using S genomic DNA from Pseudoroegneria strigosa (2n = 2x = 14, SS) as a probe. The GISH analysis clearly showed that the chromosome complement of the partial amphiploid TAF46 consists of an entire wheat genome plus one synthetic genome consisting of a mixture of six S genome chromosomes and eight J (=E) genome chromosomes derived from Th. intermedium (2n = 6x = 42, JJJ(s)J(s)SS). There were no Js genome chromosomes present in TAF46. The J genome chromosomes present in TAF46 displayed a unique GISH hybridization pattern with the S genomic DNA probe, in which S genome DNA strongly hybridized at the terminal regions and weakly hybridized over the remaining parts of the chromosomes. This provides a diagnostic marker for distinguishing J genome chromosomes from Js or S genome or wheat ABD genome chromosomes. The genomic origin of the alien chromosomes present in the six derived chromosome addition lines were identified by their characteristic GISH hybridization patterns with S genomic DNA probe. GISH analysis showed that addition lines L1, L2, L3, and L5 carried one pair of J genome chromosomes, while addition lines L4 and L7 each carried one pair of S genome chromosomes. GISH patterns detected by the S genome probe on addition line of L1 were identical to those of the J genome chromosomes present in the partial amphiploid TAF46, suggesting that these chromosomes were not structurally altered when they were transferred from TAF46 to addition lines.

  6. Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromosomes are structures found in the center (nucleus) of cells that carry long pieces of DNA. DNA ... is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist in ...

  7. Generation of meiomaps of genome-wide recombination and chromosome segregation in human oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottolini, Christian S; Capalbo, Antonio; Newnham, Louise

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a protocol for the generation of genome-wide maps (meiomaps) of recombination and chromosome segregation for the three products of human female meiosis: the first and second polar bodies (PB1 and PB2) and the corresponding oocyte. PB1 is biopsied and the oocyte is artificially......-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genome-wide by microarray. Informative maternal heterozygous SNPs are phased using a haploid PB2 or oocyte as a reference. A simple algorithm is then used to identify the maternal haplotypes for each chromosome, in all of the products of meiosis for each oocyte. This allows mapping...

  8. A fragmented metazoan organellar genome: the two mitochondrial chromosomes of Hydra magnipapillata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wörheide Gert

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal mitochondrial (mt genomes are characteristically circular molecules of ~16–20 kb. Medusozoa (Cnidaria excluding Anthozoa are exceptional in that their mt genomes are linear and sometimes subdivided into two to presumably four different molecules. In the genus Hydra, the mt genome comprises one or two mt chromosomes. Here, we present the whole mt genome sequence from the hydrozoan Hydra magnipapillata, comprising the first sequence of a fragmented metazoan mt genome encoded on two linear mt chromosomes (mt1 and mt2. Results The H. magnipapillata mt chromosomes contain the typical metazoan set of 13 genes for respiratory proteins, the two rRNA genes and two tRNA genes. All genes are unidirectionally oriented on mt1 and mt2, and several genes overlap. The gene arrangement suggests that the two mt chromosomes originated from one linear molecule that separated between nd5 and rns. Strong correlations between the AT content of rRNA genes (rns and rnl and the AT content of protein-coding genes among 24 cnidarian genomes imply that base composition is mainly determined by mt genome-wide constraints. We show that identical inverted terminal repeats (ITR occur on both chromosomes; these ITR contain a partial copy or part of the 3' end of cox1 (54 bp. Additionally, both mt chromosomes possess identical oriented sequences (IOS at the 5' and 3' ends (5' and 3' IOS adjacent to the ITR. The 5' IOS contains trnM and non-coding sequences (119 bp, whereas the 3' IOS comprises a larger part (mt2 with a larger partial copy of cox1 (243 bp. Conclusion ITR are also documented in the two other available medusozoan mt genomes (Aurelia aurita and Hydra oligactis. In H. magnipapillata, the arrangement of ITR and 5' IOS and 3' IOS suggest that these regions are crucial for mt DNA replication and/or transcription initiation. An analogous organization occurs in a highly fragmented ichthyosporean mt genome. With our data, we can reject a model of

  9. Origin and evolution of B chromosomes in the cichlid fish Astatotilapia latifasciata based on integrated genomic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Guilherme T; Conte, Matthew A; Fantinatti, Bruno E A; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo C; Carvalho, Robson F; Vicari, Marcelo R; Kocher, Thomas D; Martins, Cesar

    2014-08-01

    Approximately 15% of eukaryotes contain supernumerary B chromosomes. When present, B chromosomes frequently represent as much as 5% of the genome. Despite thousands of reports describing the distribution of supernumeraries in various taxa, a comprehensive theory for the origin, maintenance, and evolution of B chromosomes has not emerged. Here, we sequence the complete genomes of individual cichlid fish (Astatotilapia latifasciata) with and without B chromosomes, as well as microdissected B chromosomes, to identify DNA sequences on the B. B sequences were further analyzed through quantitative polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization. We find that the B chromosome contains thousands of sequences duplicated from essentially every chromosome in the ancestral karyotype. Although most genes on the B chromosome are fragmented, a few are largely intact, and we detect evidence that at least three of them are transcriptionally active. We propose a model in which the B chromosome originated early in the evolutionary history of Lake Victoria cichlids from a small fragment of one autosome. DNA sequences originating from several autosomes, including protein-coding genes and transposable elements, subsequently inserted into this proto-B. We propose that intact B chromosome genes involved with microtubule organization, kinetochore structure, recombination and progression through the cell cycle may play a role in driving the transmission of the B chromosome. Furthermore, our work suggests that karyotyping is an essential step prior to genome sequencing to avoid problems in genome assembly and analytical biases created by the presence of high copy number sequences on the B chromosome.

  10. Efficient assembly of de novo human artificial chromosomes from large genomic loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stromberg Gregory

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Artificial Chromosomes (HACs are potentially useful vectors for gene transfer studies and for functional annotation of the genome because of their suitability for cloning, manipulating and transferring large segments of the genome. However, development of HACs for the transfer of large genomic loci into mammalian cells has been limited by difficulties in manipulating high-molecular weight DNA, as well as by the low overall frequencies of de novo HAC formation. Indeed, to date, only a small number of large (>100 kb genomic loci have been reported to be successfully packaged into de novo HACs. Results We have developed novel methodologies to enable efficient assembly of HAC vectors containing any genomic locus of interest. We report here the creation of a novel, bimolecular system based on bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs for the construction of HACs incorporating any defined genomic region. We have utilized this vector system to rapidly design, construct and validate multiple de novo HACs containing large (100–200 kb genomic loci including therapeutically significant genes for human growth hormone (HGH, polycystic kidney disease (PKD1 and ß-globin. We report significant differences in the ability of different genomic loci to support de novo HAC formation, suggesting possible effects of cis-acting genomic elements. Finally, as a proof of principle, we have observed sustained ß-globin gene expression from HACs incorporating the entire 200 kb ß-globin genomic locus for over 90 days in the absence of selection. Conclusion Taken together, these results are significant for the development of HAC vector technology, as they enable high-throughput assembly and functional validation of HACs containing any large genomic locus. We have evaluated the impact of different genomic loci on the frequency of HAC formation and identified segments of genomic DNA that appear to facilitate de novo HAC formation. These genomic loci

  11. Genome haploidisation with chromosome 7 retention in oncocytic follicular thyroid carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem E Corver

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recurrent non-medullary thyroid carcinoma (NMTC is a rare disease. We initially characterized 27 recurrent NMTC: 13 papillary thyroid cancers (PTC, 10 oncocytic follicular carcinomas (FTC-OV, and 4 non-oncocytic follicular carcinomas (FTC. A validation cohort composed of benign and malignant (both recurrent and non-recurrent thyroid tumours was subsequently analysed (n = 20. METHODS: Data from genome-wide SNP arrays and flow cytometry were combined to determine the chromosomal dosage (allelic state in these tumours, including mutation analysis of components of PIK3CA/AKT and MAPK pathways. RESULTS: All FTC-OVs showed a very distinct pattern of genomic alterations. Ten out of 10 FTC-OV cases showed near-haploidisation with or without subsequent genome endoreduplication. Near-haploidisation was seen in 5/10 as extensive chromosome-wide monosomy (allelic state [A] with near-haploid DNA indices and retention of especially chromosome 7 (seen as a heterozygous allelic state [AB]. In the remaining 5/10 chromosomal allelic states AA with near diploid DNA indices were seen with allelic state AABB of chromosome 7, suggesting endoreduplication after preceding haploidisation. The latter was supported by the presence of both near-haploid and endoreduplicated tumour fractions in some of the cases. Results were confirmed using FISH analysis. Relatively to FTC-OV limited numbers of genomic alterations were identified in other types of recurrent NMTC studied, except for chromosome 22q which showed alterations in 6 of 13 PTCs. Only two HRAS, but no mutations of EGFR or BRAF were found in FTC-OV. The validation cohort showed two additional tumours with the distinct pattern of genomic alterations (both with oncocytic features and recurrent. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate that recurrent FTC-OV is frequently characterised by genome-wide DNA haploidisation, heterozygous retention of chromosome 7, and endoreduplication of a near-haploid genome. Whether normal

  12. Comparative genomics reveals mobile pathogenicity chromosomes in Fusarium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, L.-J.; van der Does, H.C.; Borkovich, K.A.; Coleman, J.J.; Daboussi, M.J.; Di Pietro, A.; Dufresne, M.; Freitag, M.; Grabherr, M.; Henrissat, B.; Houterman, P.M.; Kang, S.; Shim, W.B.; Woloshuk, C.; Xie, X.; Xu, J.-R; Antoniw, J.; Baker, S.E.; Bluhm, B.H.; Breakspear, A.; Brown, D.W.; Butchko, R.A.E.; Chapman, S.; Coulson, R.; Coutinho, P.M.; Danchin, E.G.J.; Diener, A.; Gale, L.R.; Gardiner, D.M.; Goff, S.; Hammond-Kosack, K.E.; Hilburn, K.; Hua-Van, A.; Jonkers, W.; Kazan, K.; Kodira, C.D.; Koehrsen, M.; Kumar, L.; Lee, Y.H.; Li, L.; Manners, J.M.; Miranda-Saavedra, D.; Mukherjee, M.; Park, G.; Park, J.; Park, S.Y.; Proctor, R.H.; Regev, A.; Ruiz-Roldan, M.C.; Sain, D.; Sakthikumar, S.; Sykes, S.; Schwartz, D.C.; Gillian Turgeon, B.; Wapinski, I.; Yoder, O.; Young, S.; Zeng, Q.; Zhou, S.; Galagan, J.; Cuomo, C.A.; Kistler, H.C.; Rep, M.

    2010-01-01

    Fusarium species are among the most important phytopathogenic and toxigenic fungi. To understand the molecular underpinnings of pathogenicity in the genus Fusarium, we compared the genomes of three phenotypically diverse species: Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium oxysporum

  13. Localizing introgression on the chromosome of rice by genomic in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-07-26

    Jul 26, 2010 ... 1Department of Genetics, Hazara University, Garden Campus, Mansehra, Pakistan. ... Genomic in situ hybridization was used to detect introgressed segment .... Gene transfer and molecular characterization of introgression.

  14. The genome of Nectria haematococca: contribution of supernumerary chromosomes to gene expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, J.J.; Rounsley, S.D.; Rodriguez-Carres, M.; Kuo, A.; Wasmann, C.c.; Grimwood, J.; Schmutz, J.; Taga, M.; White, G.J.; Zhuo, S.; Schwartz, D.C.; Freitag, M.; Ma, L.-J.; Danchin, E.G.J.; Henrissat, B.; Cutinho, P.M.; Nelson, D.R.; Straney, D.; Napoli, C.A.; Baker, B.M.; Gribskov, M.; Rep, M.; Kroken, S.; Molnar, I.; Rensing, C.; Kennell, J.C.; Zamora, J.; Farman, M.L.; Selker, E.U.; Salamov, A.; Shapiro, H.; Pangilinan, J.; Lindquist, E.; Lamers, C.; Grigoriev, I.V.; Geiser, D.M.; Covert, S.F.; Temporini, S.; VanEtten, H.D.

    2009-04-20

    The ascomycetous fungus Nectria haematococca, (asexual name Fusarium solani), is a member of a group of .50 species known as the"Fusarium solani species complex". Members of this complex have diverse biological properties including the ability to cause disease on .100 genera of plants and opportunistic infections in humans. The current research analyzed the most extensively studied member of this complex, N. haematococca mating population VI (MPVI). Several genes controlling the ability of individual isolates of this species to colonize specific habitats are located on supernumerary chromosomes. Optical mapping revealed that the sequenced isolate has 17 chromosomes ranging from 530 kb to 6.52 Mb and that the physical size of the genome, 54.43 Mb, and the number of predicted genes, 15,707, are among the largest reported for ascomycetes. Two classes of genes have contributed to gene expansion: specific genes that are not found in other fungi including its closest sequenced relative, Fusarium graminearum; and genes that commonly occur as single copies in other fungi but are present as multiple copies in N. haematococca MPVI. Some of these additional genes appear to have resulted from gene duplication events, while others may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. The supernumerary nature of three chromosomes, 14, 15, and 17, was confirmed by their absence in pulsed field gel electrophoresis experiments of some isolates and by demonstrating that these isolates lacked chromosome-specific sequences found on the ends of these chromosomes. These supernumerary chromosomes contain more repeat sequences, are enriched in unique and duplicated genes, and have a lower G+C content in comparison to the other chromosomes. Although the origin(s) of the extra genes and the supernumerary chromosomes is not known, the gene expansion and its large genome size are consistent with this species' diverse range of habitats. Furthermore, the presence of unique genes on

  15. The genome of Nectria haematococca: contribution of supernumerary chromosomes to gene expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J Coleman

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The ascomycetous fungus Nectria haematococca, (asexual name Fusarium solani, is a member of a group of >50 species known as the "Fusarium solani species complex". Members of this complex have diverse biological properties including the ability to cause disease on >100 genera of plants and opportunistic infections in humans. The current research analyzed the most extensively studied member of this complex, N. haematococca mating population VI (MPVI. Several genes controlling the ability of individual isolates of this species to colonize specific habitats are located on supernumerary chromosomes. Optical mapping revealed that the sequenced isolate has 17 chromosomes ranging from 530 kb to 6.52 Mb and that the physical size of the genome, 54.43 Mb, and the number of predicted genes, 15,707, are among the largest reported for ascomycetes. Two classes of genes have contributed to gene expansion: specific genes that are not found in other fungi including its closest sequenced relative, Fusarium graminearum; and genes that commonly occur as single copies in other fungi but are present as multiple copies in N. haematococca MPVI. Some of these additional genes appear to have resulted from gene duplication events, while others may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. The supernumerary nature of three chromosomes, 14, 15, and 17, was confirmed by their absence in pulsed field gel electrophoresis experiments of some isolates and by demonstrating that these isolates lacked chromosome-specific sequences found on the ends of these chromosomes. These supernumerary chromosomes contain more repeat sequences, are enriched in unique and duplicated genes, and have a lower G+C content in comparison to the other chromosomes. Although the origin(s of the extra genes and the supernumerary chromosomes is not known, the gene expansion and its large genome size are consistent with this species' diverse range of habitats. Furthermore, the presence of unique

  16. Comprehensive prediction of chromosome dimer resolution sites in bacterial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arakawa Kazuharu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the replication process of bacteria with circular chromosomes, an odd number of homologous recombination events results in concatenated dimer chromosomes that cannot be partitioned into daughter cells. However, many bacteria harbor a conserved dimer resolution machinery consisting of one or two tyrosine recombinases, XerC and XerD, and their 28-bp target site, dif. Results To study the evolution of the dif/XerCD system and its relationship with replication termination, we report the comprehensive prediction of dif sequences in silico using a phylogenetic prediction approach based on iterated hidden Markov modeling. Using this method, dif sites were identified in 641 organisms among 16 phyla, with a 97.64% identification rate for single-chromosome strains. The dif sequence positions were shown to be strongly correlated with the GC skew shift-point that is induced by replicational mutation/selection pressures, but the difference in the positions of the predicted dif sites and the GC skew shift-points did not correlate with the degree of replicational mutation/selection pressures. Conclusions The sequence of dif sites is widely conserved among many bacterial phyla, and they can be computationally identified using our method. The lack of correlation between dif position and the degree of GC skew suggests that replication termination does not occur strictly at dif sites.

  17. Recurrent reciprocal genomic rearrangements of 17q12 are associated with renal disease, diabetes, and epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mefford, Heather C; Clauin, Severine; Sharp, Andrew J

    2007-01-01

    of the microdeletions, identified in a fetus with multicystic dysplastic kidneys, encompasses the TCF2 gene on 17q12, previously shown to be mutated in maturity-onset diabetes, as well as in a subset of pediatric renal abnormalities. Fine-scale mapping of the breakpoints in different patient cohorts revealed...... a recurrent 1.5-Mb de novo deletion in individuals with phenotypes that ranged from congenital renal abnormalities to maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 5. We also identified the reciprocal duplication, which appears to be enriched in samples from patients with epilepsy. We describe the first example...

  18. Genomic imbalances in 5918 malignant epithelial tumors: an explorative meta-analysis of chromosomal CGH data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baudis Michael

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with most human malignancies, with gains and losses on some genomic regions associated with particular entities. Methods Of the 15429 cases collected for the Progenetix molecular-cytogenetic database, 5918 malignant epithelial neoplasias analyzed by chromosomal Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH were selected for further evaluation. For the 22 clinico-pathological entities with more than 50 cases, summary profiles for genomic imbalances were generated from case specific data and analyzed. Results With large variation in overall genomic instability, recurring genomic gains and losses were prominent. Most entities showed frequent gains involving 8q2, while gains on 20q, 1q, 3q, 5p, 7q and 17q were frequent in different entities. Loss "hot spots" included 3p, 4q, 13q, 17p and 18q among others. Related average imbalance patterns were found for clinically distinct entities, e.g. hepatocellular carcinomas (ca. and ductal breast ca., as well as for histologically related entities (squamous cell ca. of different sites. Conclusion Although considerable case-by-case variation of genomic profiles can be found by CGH in epithelial malignancies, a limited set of variously combined chromosomal imbalances may be typical for carcinogenesis. Focus on the respective regions should aid in target gene detection and pathway deduction.

  19. Low rate of genomic repatterning in Xenarthra inferred from chromosome painting data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobigny, G; Yang, F; O'Brien, P C M; Volobouev, V; Kovács, A; Pieczarka, J C; Ferguson-Smith, M A; Robinson, T J

    2005-01-01

    Comparative cytogenetic studies on Xenarthra, one of the most basal mammalian clades in the Placentalia, are virtually absent, being restricted largely to descriptions of conventional karyotypes and diploid numbers. We present a molecular cytogenetic comparison of chromosomes from the two-toed (Choloepus didactylus, 2n = 65) and three-toed sloth species (Bradypus tridactylus, 2n = 52), an anteater (Tamandua tetradactyla, 2n = 54) which, together with some data on the six-banded armadillo (Euphractus sexcinctus, 2n = 58), collectively represent all the major xenarthran lineages. Our results, based on interspecific chromosome painting using flow-sorted two-toed sloth chromosomes as painting probes, show the sloth species to be karyotypically closely related but markedly different from the anteater. We also test the synteny disruptions and segmental associations identified within Pilosa (anteaters and sloths) against the chromosomes of the six-banded armadillo as outgroup taxon. We could thus polarize the 35 non-ambiguously identified chromosomal changes characterizing the evolution of the anteater and sloth genomes and map these to a published sequence-based phylogeny for the group. These data suggest a low rate of genomic repatterning when placed in the context of divergence estimates based on molecular and fossil data. Finally, our results provide a glimpse of a likely ancestral karyotype for the extant Xenarthra, a pivotal group for understanding eutherian genome evolution.

  20. Chromosomal mapping of specific DNA gains and losses in solid tumors using comparative genomic hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrock, E.; Manoir, S. du; Speicher, M. [National Center for Human Genome Research, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a new molecular cytogenetic technique that is based on two color FISH and quantitative digital imaging microscopy. CGH is used to comprehensively survey tumor genomes for copy number changes and to determine the map position of amplification sites on normal reference chromosomes. CGH was used to analyze 107 different solid tumors, including 16 low grade astrocytomas, 15 recurrent astrocytic tumors, 13 high grade astrocytomas, 13 small cell lung cancers (SCLC), 14 breast cancer samples (7 diploid and 7 aneupoid tumors), 18 chromophobe renal cell carcinomas and 5 seminomas. Tumor DNA was extracted from frozen tissue, autopic material and formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples. Our results revealed tumor specific gains and losses of certain chromosomes or chromosomal subregions (e.g., chromosomes 7 and 10 in glioblastomas, chromosomes 3 and 5 in SCLC). Numerous DNA-amplifications were mapped on reference metaphase and prometaphase chromosomes. The frequent amplification of the EGFR gene (malignant gliomas), protooncogenes of the myc family (SCLC) and of c-myc, int-2 and c-erbB2 (breast cancer) was confirmed. Many additional amplification sites, however, were mapped that were not described before. The results of CGH analysis were independently confirmed by means of cytogenetic banding analysis, interphase cytogenetics with region specific DNA-clones, Southern-Blot analysis, DNA-cytometry and studies of loss of heterozygosity.

  1. Chromosomal localization of two novel repetitive sequences isolated from the Chenopodium quinoa Willd. genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolano, B; Gardunia, B W; Michalska, M; Bonifacio, A; Fairbanks, D; Maughan, P J; Coleman, C E; Stevens, M R; Jellen, E N; Maluszynska, J

    2011-09-01

    The chromosomal organization of two novel repetitive DNA sequences isolated from the Chenopodium quinoa Willd. genome was analyzed across the genomes of selected Chenopodium species. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis with the repetitive DNA clone 18-24J in the closely related allotetraploids C. quinoa and Chenopodium berlandieri Moq. (2n = 4x = 36) evidenced hybridization signals that were mainly present on 18 chromosomes; however, in the allohexaploid Chenopodium album L. (2n = 6x = 54), cross-hybridization was observed on all of the chromosomes. In situ hybridization with rRNA gene probes indicated that during the evolution of polyploidy, the chenopods lost some of their rDNA loci. Reprobing with rDNA indicated that in the subgenome labeled with 18-24J, one 35S rRNA locus and at least half of the 5S rDNA loci were present. A second analyzed sequence, 12-13P, localized exclusively in pericentromeric regions of each chromosome of C. quinoa and related species. The intensity of the FISH signals differed considerably among chromosomes. The pattern observed on C. quinoa chromosomes after FISH with 12-13P was very similar to GISH results, suggesting that the 12-13P sequence constitutes a major part of the repetitive DNA of C. quinoa.

  2. Relative entropy differences in bacterial chromosomes, plasmids, phages and genomic islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohlin, J.; Passel, van M.W.J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: We sought to assess whether the concept of relative entropy (information capacity), could aid our understanding of the process of horizontal gene transfer in microbes. We analyzed the differences in information capacity between prokaryotic chromosomes, genomic islands (GI), phages, and

  3. Relative entropy differences in bacterial chromosomes, plasmids, phages and genomic islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohlin, J.; Passel, van M.W.J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: We sought to assess whether the concept of relative entropy (information capacity), could aid our understanding of the process of horizontal gene transfer in microbes. We analyzed the differences in information capacity between prokaryotic chromosomes, genomic islands (GI), phages, and p

  4. A nine-scaffold genome assembly of the nine chromosome sugar beet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over the course of 20 months, we assembled a sugar beet genome (700 - 800 Mb) into a close representation of the nine haploid chromosomes of beet. This result was obtained by sequentially assembling sequences >40 kb in length, orienting these assemblies via optical mapping, and scaffolding with in v...

  5. Mapping of 5q35 chromosomal rearrangements within a genomically unstable region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buysse, Karen; Crepel, An; Menten, Björn

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent molecular studies of breakpoints of recurrent chromosome rearrangements revealed the role of genomic architecture in their formation. In particular, segmental duplications representing blocks of >1 kb with >90% sequence homology were shown to mediate non-allelic homologous reco...

  6. Shared Y chromosome repetitive DNA sequences in stallion and donkey as visualized using whole-genomic comparative hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mezzanotte

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The genome of stallion (Spanish breed and donkey (Spanish endemic Zamorano-Leonés were compared using whole comparative genomic in situ hybridization (W-CGH technique, with special reference to the variability observed in the Y chromosome. Results show that these diverging genomes still share some highly repetitive DNA families localized in pericentromeric regions and, in the particular case of the Y chromosome, a sub-family of highly repeated DNA sequences, greatly expanded in the donkey genome, accounts for a large part of the chromatin in the stallion Y chromosome.

  7. Shared Y chromosome repetitive DNA sequences in stallion and donkey as visualized using whole-genomic comparative hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gosalvez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The genome of stallion (Spanish breed and donkey (Spanish endemic Zamorano-Leonés were compared using whole comparative genomic in situ hybridization (W-CGH technique, with special reference to the variability observed in the Y chromosome. Results show that these diverging genomes still share some highly repetitive DNA families localized in pericentromeric regions and, in the particular case of the Y chromosome, a sub-family of highly repeated DNA sequences, greatly expanded in the donkey genome, accounts for a large part of the chromatin in the stallion Y chromosome.

  8. Comparative genomics analysis of rice and pineapple contributes to understand the chromosome number reduction and genomic changes in grasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinpeng Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rice is one of the most researched model plant, and has a genome structure most resembling that of the grass common ancestor after a grass common tetraploidization ~100 million years ago. There has been a standing controversy whether there had been 5 or 7 basic chromosomes, before the tetraploidization, which were tackled but could not be well solved for the lacking of a sequenced and assembled outgroup plant to have a conservative genome structure. Recently, the availability of pineapple genome, which has not been subjected to the grass-common tetraploidization, provides a precious opportunity to solve the above controversy and to research into genome changes of rice and other grasses. Here, we performed a comparative genomics analysis of pineapple and rice, and found solid evidence that grass-common ancestor had 2n =2x =14 basic chromosomes before the tetraploidization and duplicated to 2n = 4x = 28 after the event. Moreover, we proposed that enormous gene missing from duplicated regions in rice should be explained by an allotetraploid produced by prominently divergent parental lines, rather than gene losses after their divergence. This means that genome fractionation might have occurred before the formation of the allotetraploid grass ancestor.

  9. B chromosomes of Aegilops speltoides are enriched in organelle genome-derived sequences.

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    Alevtina Ruban

    Full Text Available B chromosomes (Bs are dispensable components of the genome exhibiting non-Mendelian inheritance. Chromosome counts and flow cytometric analysis of the grass species Aegilops speltoides revealed a tissue-type specific distribution of the roughly 570 Mbp large B chromosomes. To address the question whether organelle-to-nucleus DNA transfer is a mechanism that drives the evolution of Bs, in situ hybridization was performed with labelled organellar DNA. The observed B-specific accumulation of chloroplast- and mitochondria-derived sequences suggests a reduced selection against the insertion of organellar DNA in supernumerary chromosomes. The distribution of B-localised organellar-derived sequences and other sequences differs between genotypes of different geographical origins.

  10. A selective sweep of >8 Mb on chromosome 26 in the Boxer genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altet Laura

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modern dog breeds display traits that are either breed-specific or shared by a few breeds as a result of genetic bottlenecks during the breed creation process and artificial selection for breed standards. Selective sweeps in the genome result from strong selection and can be detected as a reduction or elimination of polymorphism in a given region of the genome. Results Extended regions of homozygosity, indicative of selective sweeps, were identified in a genome-wide scan dataset of 25 Boxers from the United Kingdom genotyped at ~20,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. These regions were further examined in a second dataset of Boxers collected from a different geographical location and genotyped using higher density SNP arrays (~170,000 SNPs. A selective sweep previously associated with canine brachycephaly was detected on chromosome 1. A novel selective sweep of over 8 Mb was observed on chromosome 26 in Boxer and for a shorter region in English and French bulldogs. It was absent in 171 samples from eight other dog breeds and 7 Iberian wolf samples. A region of extended increased heterozygosity on chromosome 9 overlapped with a previously reported copy number variant (CNV which was polymorphic in multiple dog breeds. Conclusion A selective sweep of more than 8 Mb on chromosome 26 was identified in the Boxer genome. This sweep is likely caused by strong artificial selection for a trait of interest and could have inadvertently led to undesired health implications for this breed. Furthermore, we provide supporting evidence for two previously described regions: a selective sweep on chromosome 1 associated with canine brachycephaly and a CNV on chromosome 9 polymorphic in multiple dog breeds.

  11. Chromosomal Speciation in the Genomics Era: Disentangling Phylogenetic Evolution of Rock-wallabies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Sally; Bragg, Jason G.; Blom, Mozes P. K.; Deakin, Janine E.; Kirkpatrick, Mark; Eldridge, Mark D. B.; Moritz, Craig

    2017-01-01

    The association of chromosome rearrangements (CRs) with speciation is well established, and there is a long history of theory and evidence relating to “chromosomal speciation.” Genomic sequencing has the potential to provide new insights into how reorganization of genome structure promotes divergence, and in model systems has demonstrated reduced gene flow in rearranged segments. However, there are limits to what we can understand from a small number of model systems, which each only tell us about one episode of chromosomal speciation. Progressing from patterns of association between chromosome (and genic) change, to understanding processes of speciation requires both comparative studies across diverse systems and integration of genome-scale sequence comparisons with other lines of evidence. Here, we showcase a promising example of chromosomal speciation in a non-model organism, the endemic Australian marsupial genus Petrogale. We present initial phylogenetic results from exon-capture that resolve a history of divergence associated with extensive and repeated CRs. Yet it remains challenging to disentangle gene tree heterogeneity caused by recent divergence and gene flow in this and other such recent radiations. We outline a way forward for better integration of comparative genomic sequence data with evidence from molecular cytogenetics, and analyses of shifts in the recombination landscape and potential disruption of meiotic segregation and epigenetic programming. In all likelihood, CRs impact multiple cellular processes and these effects need to be considered together, along with effects of genic divergence. Understanding the effects of CRs together with genic divergence will require development of more integrative theory and inference methods. Together, new data and analysis tools will combine to shed light on long standing questions of how chromosome and genic divergence promote speciation. PMID:28265284

  12. [The human genome--chromosome 10 and the collagen genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brdicka, R

    1995-05-17

    In relation to locuses of the 10th chromosome at present the following are in the focus of interest: tumours of endocrine glands, medullary carcinoma of the thyroid gland (MTC) and multiple endocrine neoplasias (MEN). It seems that the unifying basis is the oncogene RET, responsible for the development of Hirschsprung's disease HSCR. The authors mentions also metabolically important locuses for choline acetyltransferase (CHAT), uriporphyrinogen synthase (UROS) and methyl guanine methyltransferase (MGMT). A special paragraph is devoted to a list of collagenous genes COL1-COL18 and diseases associated with them.

  13. Complete Genomes of Classical Swine Fever Virus Cloned into Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Reimann, I.; Uttenthal, Åse;

    Complete genome amplification of viral RNA provides a new tool for the generation of modified pestiviruses. We have used our full-genome amplification strategy for generation of amplicons representing complete genomes of classical swine fever virus. The amplicons were cloned directly into a stabl...... single-copy bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) generating full-length pestivirus DNAs from which infectious RNA transcripts could be also derived. Our strategy allows construction of stable infectious BAC DNAs from a single full-length PCR product....

  14. Nucleotide diversity maps reveal variation in diversity among wheat genomes and chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGuire Patrick E

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A genome-wide assessment of nucleotide diversity in a polyploid species must minimize the inclusion of homoeologous sequences into diversity estimates and reliably allocate individual haplotypes into their respective genomes. The same requirements complicate the development and deployment of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers in polyploid species. We report here a strategy that satisfies these requirements and deploy it in the sequencing of genes in cultivated hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum, genomes AABBDD and wild tetraploid wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides, genomes AABB from the putative site of wheat domestication in Turkey. Data are used to assess the distribution of diversity among and within wheat genomes and to develop a panel of SNP markers for polyploid wheat. Results Nucleotide diversity was estimated in 2114 wheat genes and was similar between the A and B genomes and reduced in the D genome. Within a genome, diversity was diminished on some chromosomes. Low diversity was always accompanied by an excess of rare alleles. A total of 5,471 SNPs was discovered in 1791 wheat genes. Totals of 1,271, 1,218, and 2,203 SNPs were discovered in 488, 463, and 641 genes of wheat putative diploid ancestors, T. urartu, Aegilops speltoides, and Ae. tauschii, respectively. A public database containing genome-specific primers, SNPs, and other information was constructed. A total of 987 genes with nucleotide diversity estimated in one or more of the wheat genomes was placed on an Ae. tauschii genetic map, and the map was superimposed on wheat deletion-bin maps. The agreement between the maps was assessed. Conclusions In a young polyploid, exemplified by T. aestivum, ancestral species are the primary source of genetic diversity. Low effective recombination due to self-pollination and a genetic mechanism precluding homoeologous chromosome pairing during polyploid meiosis can lead to the loss of diversity from large

  15. Insights into the dynamics of genome size and chromosome evolution in the early diverging angiosperm lineage Nymphaeales (water lilies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicer, J; Kelly, L J; Magdalena, C; Leitch, I J

    2013-08-01

    Nymphaeales are the most species-rich lineage of the earliest diverging angiosperms known as the ANA grade (Amborellales, Nymphaeales, Austrobaileyales), and they have received considerable attention from morphological, physiological, and ecological perspectives. Although phylogenetic relationships between these three lineages of angiosperms are mainly well resolved, insights at the whole genome level are still limited because of a dearth of information. To address this, genome sizes and chromosome numbers in 34 taxa, comprising 28 species were estimated and analysed together with previously published data to provide an overview of genome size and chromosome diversity in Nymphaeales. Overall, genome sizes were shown to vary 10-fold and chromosome numbers and ploidy levels ranged from 2n = 2x = 18 to 2n = 16x = ∼224. Distinct patterns of genome diversity were apparent, reflecting the differential incidence of polyploidy, changes in repetitive DNA content, and chromosome rearrangements within and between genera. Using model-based approaches, ancestral genome size and basic chromosome numbers were reconstructed to provide insights into the dynamics of genome size and chromosome number evolution. Finally, by combining additional data from Amborellales and Austrobaileyales, a comprehensive overview of genome sizes and chromosome numbers in these early diverging angiosperms is presented.

  16. Final report. Human artificial episomal chromosome (HAEC) for building large genomic libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jean-Michael H. Vos

    1999-12-09

    Collections of human DNA fragments are maintained for research purposes as clones in bacterial host cells. However for unknown reasons, some regions of the human genome appear to be unclonable or unstable in bacteria. Their team has developed a system using episomes (extrachromosomal, autonomously replication DNA) that maintains large DNA fragments in human cells. This human artificial episomal chromosomal (HAEC) system may prove useful for coverage of these especially difficult regions. In the broader biomedical community, the HAEC system also shows promise for use in functional genomics and gene therapy. Recent improvements to the HAEC system and its application to mapping, sequencing, and functionally studying human and mouse DNA are summarized. Mapping and sequencing the human genome and model organisms are only the first steps in determining the function of various genetic units critical for gene regulation, DNA replication, chromatin packaging, chromosomal stability, and chromatid segregation. Such studies will require the ability to transfer and manipulate entire functional units into mammalian cells.

  17. Chromosomal evolution of Arvicolinae (Cricetidae, Rodentia). I. The genome homology of tundra vole, field vole, mouse and golden hamster revealed by comparative chromosome painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnikova, Natalia A; Romanenko, Svetlana A; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Perelman, Polina L; Fu, Beiyuan; Rubtsova, Nadezhda V; Serdukova, Natalya A; Golenishchev, Feodor N; Trifonov, Vladimir A; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Yang, Fengtang; Graphodatsky, Alexander S

    2007-01-01

    Cross-species chromosome painting has become the mainstay of comparative cytogenetic and chromosome evolution studies. Here we have made a set of chromosomal painting probes for the field vole (Microtus agrestis) by DOP-PCR amplification of flow-sorted chromosomes. Together with painting probes of golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) and mouse (Mus musculus), the field vole probes have been hybridized onto the metaphases of the tundra vole (Microtus oeconomus). A comparative chromosome map between these two voles, golden hamster and mouse has been established based on the results of cross-species chromosome painting and G-banding comparisons. The sets of paints from the field vole, golden hamster and mouse identified a total of 27, 40 and 47 homologous autosomal regions, respectively, in the genome of tundra vole; 16, 41 and 51 fusion/fission rearrangements differentiate the karyotype of the tundra vole from the karyotypes of the field vole, golden hamster and mouse, respectively.

  18. Precise Manipulation of Chromosomes in Vivo Enables Genome-Wide Codon Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Farren J.; Carr, Peter A.; Wang, Harris H.; Lajoie, Marc J.; Sterling, Bram; Kraal, Laurens; Tolonen, Andrew C.; Gianoulis, Tara A.; Goodman, Daniel B.; Reppas, Nikos B.; Emig, Christopher J.; Bang, Duhee; Hwang, Samuel J.; Jewett, Michael C.; Jacobson, Joseph M.; Church, George M.

    2016-01-01

    We present genome engineering technologies that are capable of fundamentally reengineering genomes from the nucleotide to the megabase scale. We used multiplex automated genome engineering (MAGE) to site-specifically replace all 314 TAG stop codons with synonymous TAA codons in parallel across 32 Escherichia coli strains. This approach allowed us to measure individual recombination frequencies, confirm viability for each modification, and identify associated phenotypes. We developed hierarchical conjugative assembly genome engineering (CAGE) to merge these sets of codon modifications into genomes with 80 precise changes, which demonstrate that these synonymous codon substitutions can be combined into higher-order strains without synthetic lethal effects. Our methods treat the chromosome as both an editable and an evolvable template, permitting the exploration of vast genetic landscapes. PMID:21764749

  19. Construction and characterization of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) containing herpes simplex virus full-length genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Claus-Henning; Pohlmann, Anja; Sodeik, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) are suitable vectors not only to maintain the large genomes of herpesviruses in Escherichia coli but also to enable the traceless introduction of any mutation using modern tools of bacterial genetics. To clone a herpes simplex virus genome, a BAC replication origin is first introduced into the viral genome by homologous recombination in eukaryotic host cells. As part of their nuclear replication cycle, genomes of herpesviruses circularize and these replication intermediates are then used to transform bacteria. After cloning, the integrity of the recombinant viral genomes is confirmed by restriction length polymorphism analysis and sequencing. The BACs may then be used to design virus mutants. Upon transfection into eukaryotic cells new herpesvirus strains harboring the desired mutations can be recovered and used for experiments in cultured cells as well as in animal infection models.

  20. Construction of a llama bacterial artificial chromosome library with approximately 9-fold genome equivalent coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airmet, K W; Hinckley, J D; Tree, L T; Moss, M; Blumell, S; Ulicny, K; Gustafson, A K; Weed, M; Theodosis, R; Lehnardt, M; Genho, J; Stevens, M R; Kooyman, D L

    2012-01-01

    The Ilama is an important agricultural livestock in much of South America. The llama is increasing in popularity in the United States as a companion animal. Little work has been done to improve llama production using modern technology. A paucity of information is available regarding the llama genome. We report the construction of a llama bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of about 196,224 clones in the vector pECBAC1. Using flow cytometry and bovine, human, mouse, and chicken as controls, we determined the llama genome size to be 2.4 × 10⁹ bp. The average insert size of the library is 137.8 kb corresponding to approximately 9-fold genome coverage. Further studies are needed to further characterize the library and llama genome. We anticipate that this new library will help facilitate future genomic studies in the llama.

  1. Structural and functional studies of FKHR-PAX3, a reciprocal fusion gene of the t(2;13 chromosomal translocation in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiande Hu

    Full Text Available Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS is an aggressive pediatric cancer of skeletal muscle. More than 70% of ARMS tumors carry balanced t(2;13 chromosomal translocation that leads to the production of two novel fusion genes, PAX3-FKHR and FKHR-PAX3. While the PAX3-FKHR gene has been intensely studied, the reciprocal FKHR-PAX3 gene has rarely been described. We report here the cloning and functional characterization of the FKHR-PAX3 gene as the first step towards a better understanding of its potential impact on ARMS biology. From RH30 ARMS cells, we detected and isolated three versions of FKHR-PAX3 cDNAs whose C-terminal sequences corresponded to PAX3c, PAX3d, and PAX3e isoforms. Unlike the nuclear-specific localization of PAX3-FKHR, the reciprocal FKHR-PAX3 proteins stayed predominantly in the cytoplasm. FKHR-PAX3 potently inhibited myogenesis in both non-transformed myoblast cells and ARMS cells. We showed that FKHR-PAX3 was not a classic oncogene but could act as a facilitator in oncogenic pathways by stabilizing PAX3-FKHR expression, enhancing cell proliferation, clonogenicity, anchorage-independent growth, and matrix adhesion in vitro, and accelerating the onset of tumor formation in xenograft mouse model in vivo. In addition to these pro-oncogenic behaviors, FKHR-PAX3 also negatively affected cell migration and invasion in vitro and lung metastasis in vivo. Taken together, these functional characteristics suggested that FKHR-PAX3 might have a critical role in the early stage of ARMS development.

  2. A genome-wide map of aberrantly expressed chromosomal islands in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castanos-Velez Esmeralda

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer development is accompanied by genetic phenomena like deletion and amplification of chromosome parts or alterations of chromatin structure. It is expected that these mechanisms have a strong effect on regional gene expression. Results We investigated genome-wide gene expression in colorectal carcinoma (CRC and normal epithelial tissues from 25 patients using oligonucleotide arrays. This allowed us to identify 81 distinct chromosomal islands with aberrant gene expression. Of these, 38 islands show a gain in expression and 43 a loss of expression. In total, 7.892 genes (25.3% of all human genes are located in aberrantly expressed islands. Many chromosomal regions that are linked to hereditary colorectal cancer show deregulated expression. Also, many known tumor genes localize to chromosomal islands of misregulated expression in CRC. Conclusion An extensive comparison with published CGH data suggests that chromosomal regions known for frequent deletions in colon cancer tend to show reduced expression. In contrast, regions that are often amplified in colorectal tumors exhibit heterogeneous expression patterns: even show a decrease of mRNA expression. Because for several islands of deregulated expression chromosomal aberrations have never been observed, we speculate that additional mechanisms (like abnormal states of regional chromatin also have a substantial impact on the formation of co-expression islands in colorectal carcinoma.

  3. Unexpected structural complexity of supernumerary marker chromosomes characterized by microarray comparative genomic hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hing Anne V

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Supernumerary marker chromosomes (SMCs are structurally abnormal extra chromosomes that cannot be unambiguously identified by conventional banding techniques. In the past, SMCs have been characterized using a variety of different molecular cytogenetic techniques. Although these techniques can sometimes identify the chromosome of origin of SMCs, they are cumbersome to perform and are not available in many clinical cytogenetic laboratories. Furthermore, they cannot precisely determine the region or breakpoints of the chromosome(s involved. In this study, we describe four patients who possess one or more SMCs (a total of eight SMCs in all four patients that were characterized by microarray comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH. Results In at least one SMC from all four patients, array CGH uncovered unexpected complexity, in the form of complex rearrangements, that could have gone undetected using other molecular cytogenetic techniques. Although array CGH accurately defined the chromosome content of all but two minute SMCs, fluorescence in situ hybridization was necessary to determine the structure of the markers. Conclusion The increasing use of array CGH in clinical cytogenetic laboratories will provide an efficient method for more comprehensive characterization of SMCs. Improved SMC characterization, facilitated by array CGH, will allow for more accurate SMC/phenotype correlation.

  4. Reconstruction of ancestral chromosome architecture and gene repertoire reveals principles of genome evolution in a model yeast genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakirlis, Nikolaos; Sarilar, Véronique; Drillon, Guénola; Fleiss, Aubin; Agier, Nicolas; Meyniel, Jean-Philippe; Blanpain, Lou; Carbone, Alessandra; Devillers, Hugo; Dubois, Kenny; Gillet-Markowska, Alexandre; Graziani, Stéphane; Huu-Vang, Nguyen; Poirel, Marion; Reisser, Cyrielle; Schott, Jonathan; Schacherer, Joseph; Lafontaine, Ingrid; Llorente, Bertrand; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Fischer, Gilles

    2016-07-01

    Reconstructing genome history is complex but necessary to reveal quantitative principles governing genome evolution. Such reconstruction requires recapitulating into a single evolutionary framework the evolution of genome architecture and gene repertoire. Here, we reconstructed the genome history of the genus Lachancea that appeared to cover a continuous evolutionary range from closely related to more diverged yeast species. Our approach integrated the generation of a high-quality genome data set; the development of AnChro, a new algorithm for reconstructing ancestral genome architecture; and a comprehensive analysis of gene repertoire evolution. We found that the ancestral genome of the genus Lachancea contained eight chromosomes and about 5173 protein-coding genes. Moreover, we characterized 24 horizontal gene transfers and 159 putative gene creation events that punctuated species diversification. We retraced all chromosomal rearrangements, including gene losses, gene duplications, chromosomal inversions and translocations at single gene resolution. Gene duplications outnumbered losses and balanced rearrangements with 1503, 929, and 423 events, respectively. Gene content variations between extant species are mainly driven by differential gene losses, while gene duplications remained globally constant in all lineages. Remarkably, we discovered that balanced chromosomal rearrangements could be responsible for up to 14% of all gene losses by disrupting genes at their breakpoints. Finally, we found that nonsynonymous substitutions reached fixation at a coordinated pace with chromosomal inversions, translocations, and duplications, but not deletions. Overall, we provide a granular view of genome evolution within an entire eukaryotic genus, linking gene content, chromosome rearrangements, and protein divergence into a single evolutionary framework.

  5. Chromosomal instability in Afrotheria: fragile sites, evolutionary breakpoints and phylogenetic inference from genome sequence assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz-Herrera Aurora

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extant placental mammals are divided into four major clades (Laurasiatheria, Supraprimates, Xenarthra and Afrotheria. Given that Afrotheria is generally thought to root the eutherian tree in phylogenetic analysis of large nuclear gene data sets, the study of the organization of the genomes of afrotherian species provides new insights into the dynamics of mammalian chromosomal evolution. Here we test if there are chromosomal bands with a high tendency to break and reorganize in Afrotheria, and by analyzing the expression of aphidicolin-induced common fragile sites in three afrotherian species, whether these are coincidental with recognized evolutionary breakpoints. Results We described 29 fragile sites in the aardvark (OAF genome, 27 in the golden mole (CAS, and 35 in the elephant-shrew (EED genome. We show that fragile sites are conserved among afrotherian species and these are correlated with evolutionary breakpoints when compared to the human (HSA genome. Inddition, by computationally scanning the newly released opossum (Monodelphis domestica and chicken sequence assemblies for use as outgroups to Placentalia, we validate the HSA 3/21/5 chromosomal synteny as a rare genomic change that defines the monophyly of this ancient African clade of mammals. On the other hand, support for HSA 1/19p, which is also thought to underpin Afrotheria, is currently ambiguous. Conclusion We provide evidence that (i the evolutionary breakpoints that characterise human syntenies detected in the basal Afrotheria correspond at the chromosomal band level with fragile sites, (ii that HSA 3p/21 was in the amniote ancestor (i.e., common to turtles, lepidosaurs, crocodilians, birds and mammals and was subsequently disrupted in the lineage leading to marsupials. Its expansion to include HSA 5 in Afrotheria is unique and (iii that its fragmentation to HSA 3p/21 + HSA 5/21 in elephant and manatee was due to a fission within HSA 21 that is probably shared

  6. Repair-mediated duplication by capture of proximal chromosomal DNA has shaped vertebrate genome evolution.

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    John K Pace

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are a common form of cellular damage that can lead to cell death if not repaired promptly. Experimental systems have shown that DSB repair in eukaryotic cells is often imperfect and may result in the insertion of extra chromosomal DNA or the duplication of existing DNA at the breakpoint. These events are thought to be a source of genomic instability and human diseases, but it is unclear whether they have contributed significantly to genome evolution. Here we developed an innovative computational pipeline that takes advantage of the repetitive structure of genomes to detect repair-mediated duplication events (RDs that occurred in the germline and created insertions of at least 50 bp of genomic DNA. Using this pipeline we identified over 1,000 probable RDs in the human genome. Of these, 824 were intra-chromosomal, closely linked duplications of up to 619 bp bearing the hallmarks of the synthesis-dependent strand-annealing repair pathway. This mechanism has duplicated hundreds of sequences predicted to be functional in the human genome, including exons, UTRs, intron splice sites and transcription factor binding sites. Dating of the duplication events using comparative genomics and experimental validation revealed that the mechanism has operated continuously but with decreasing intensity throughout primate evolution. The mechanism has produced species-specific duplications in all primate species surveyed and is contributing to genomic variation among humans. Finally, we show that RDs have also occurred, albeit at a lower frequency, in non-primate mammals and other vertebrates, indicating that this mechanism has been an important force shaping vertebrate genome evolution.

  7. A comparative physical map reveals the pattern of chromosomal evolution between the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo and chicken (Gallus gallus genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delany Mary E

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A robust bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC-based physical map is essential for many aspects of genomics research, including an understanding of chromosome evolution, high-resolution genome mapping, marker-assisted breeding, positional cloning of genes, and quantitative trait analysis. To facilitate turkey genetics research and better understand avian genome evolution, a BAC-based integrated physical, genetic, and comparative map was developed for this important agricultural species. Results The turkey genome physical map was constructed based on 74,013 BAC fingerprints (11.9 × coverage from two independent libraries, and it was integrated with the turkey genetic map and chicken genome sequence using over 41,400 BAC assignments identified by 3,499 overgo hybridization probes along with > 43,000 BAC end sequences. The physical-comparative map consists of 74 BAC contigs, with an average contig size of 13.6 Mb. All but four of the turkey chromosomes were spanned on this map by three or fewer contigs, with 14 chromosomes spanned by a single contig and nine chromosomes spanned by two contigs. This map predicts 20 to 27 major rearrangements distinguishing turkey and chicken chromosomes, despite up to 40 million years of separate evolution between the two species. These data elucidate the chromosomal evolutionary pattern within the Phasianidae that led to the modern turkey and chicken karyotypes. The predominant rearrangement mode involves intra-chromosomal inversions, and there is a clear bias for these to result in centromere locations at or near telomeres in turkey chromosomes, in comparison to interstitial centromeres in the orthologous chicken chromosomes. Conclusion The BAC-based turkey-chicken comparative map provides novel insights into the evolution of avian genomes, a framework for assembly of turkey whole genome shotgun sequencing data, and tools for enhanced genetic improvement of these important agricultural and

  8. Chromosome-level genome assembly and transcriptome of the green alga Chromochloris zofingiensis illuminates astaxanthin production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Melissa S.; Cokus, Shawn J.; Gallaher, Sean D.; Walter, Andreas; Lopez, David; Erickson, Erika; Endelman, Benjamin; Westcott, Daniel; Larabell, Carolyn A.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Pellegrini, Matteo

    2017-01-01

    Microalgae have potential to help meet energy and food demands without exacerbating environmental problems. There is interest in the unicellular green alga Chromochloris zofingiensis, because it produces lipids for biofuels and a highly valuable carotenoid nutraceutical, astaxanthin. To advance understanding of its biology and facilitate commercial development, we present a C. zofingiensis chromosome-level nuclear genome, organelle genomes, and transcriptome from diverse growth conditions. The assembly, derived from a combination of short- and long-read sequencing in conjunction with optical mapping, revealed a compact genome of ∼58 Mbp distributed over 19 chromosomes containing 15,274 predicted protein-coding genes. The genome has uniform gene density over chromosomes, low repetitive sequence content (∼6%), and a high fraction of protein-coding sequence (∼39%) with relatively long coding exons and few coding introns. Functional annotation of gene models identified orthologous families for the majority (∼73%) of genes. Synteny analysis uncovered localized but scrambled blocks of genes in putative orthologous relationships with other green algae. Two genes encoding beta-ketolase (BKT), the key enzyme synthesizing astaxanthin, were found in the genome, and both were up-regulated by high light. Isolation and molecular analysis of astaxanthin-deficient mutants showed that BKT1 is required for the production of astaxanthin. Moreover, the transcriptome under high light exposure revealed candidate genes that could be involved in critical yet missing steps of astaxanthin biosynthesis, including ABC transporters, cytochrome P450 enzymes, and an acyltransferase. The high-quality genome and transcriptome provide insight into the green algal lineage and carotenoid production. PMID:28484037

  9. Initial characterization of the large genome of the salamander Ambystoma mexicanum using shotgun and laser capture chromosome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keinath, Melissa C; Timoshevskiy, Vladimir A; Timoshevskaya, Nataliya Y; Tsonis, Panagiotis A; Voss, S Randal; Smith, Jeramiah J

    2015-11-10

    Vertebrates exhibit substantial diversity in genome size, and some of the largest genomes exist in species that uniquely inform diverse areas of basic and biomedical research. For example, the salamander Ambystoma mexicanum (the Mexican axolotl) is a model organism for studies of regeneration, development and genome evolution, yet its genome is ~10× larger than the human genome. As part of a hierarchical approach toward improving genome resources for the species, we generated 600 Gb of shotgun sequence data and developed methods for sequencing individual laser-captured chromosomes. Based on these data, we estimate that the A. mexicanum genome is ~32 Gb. Notably, as much as 19 Gb of the A. mexicanum genome can potentially be considered single copy, which presumably reflects the evolutionary diversification of mobile elements that accumulated during an ancient episode of genome expansion. Chromosome-targeted sequencing permitted the development of assemblies within the constraints of modern computational platforms, allowed us to place 2062 genes on the two smallest A. mexicanum chromosomes and resolves key events in the history of vertebrate genome evolution. Our analyses show that the capture and sequencing of individual chromosomes is likely to provide valuable information for the systematic sequencing, assembly and scaffolding of large genomes.

  10. Chromosome mapping of dragline silk genes in the genomes of widow spiders (Araneae, Theridiidae.

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    Yonghui Zhao

    Full Text Available With its incredible strength and toughness, spider dragline silk is widely lauded for its impressive material properties. Dragline silk is composed of two structural proteins, MaSp1 and MaSp2, which are encoded by members of the spidroin gene family. While previous studies have characterized the genes that encode the constituent proteins of spider silks, nothing is known about the physical location of these genes. We determined karyotypes and sex chromosome organization for the widow spiders, Latrodectus hesperus and L. geometricus (Araneae, Theridiidae. We then used fluorescence in situ hybridization to map the genomic locations of the genes for the silk proteins that compose the remarkable spider dragline. These genes included three loci for the MaSp1 protein and the single locus for the MaSp2 protein. In addition, we mapped a MaSp1 pseudogene. All the MaSp1 gene copies and pseudogene localized to a single chromosomal region while MaSp2 was located on a different chromosome of L. hesperus. Using probes derived from L. hesperus, we comparatively mapped all three MaSp1 loci to a single region of a L. geometricus chromosome. As with L. hesperus, MaSp2 was found on a separate L. geometricus chromosome, thus again unlinked to the MaSp1 loci. These results indicate orthology of the corresponding chromosomal regions in the two widow genomes. Moreover, the occurrence of multiple MaSp1 loci in a conserved gene cluster across species suggests that MaSp1 proliferated by tandem duplication in a common ancestor of L. geometricus and L. hesperus. Unequal crossover events during recombination could have given rise to the gene copies and could also maintain sequence similarity among gene copies over time. Further comparative mapping with taxa of increasing divergence from Latrodectus will pinpoint when the MaSp1 duplication events occurred and the phylogenetic distribution of silk gene linkage patterns.

  11. Polytene chromosomes of Chironomidae (Diptera as a bioassay of trace-metal-induced genome instability

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    Paraskeva Vladimirova Michailova

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Chironomids are a ubiquitous group of aquatic insects that are very sensitive to environmental stress. Due to the presence of polytene (‘giant’ salivary gland chromosomes, it is possible to define the genome response of several Chironomid species to various stress agents. The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxic changes in populations of widely distributed chironomid species from aquatic basins in Bulgaria, Italy, Russia, U.K. and Poland, which were exposed to high concentrations of trace metals. We analyzed the structural and functional alterations of polytene chromosomes of the salivary glands of larvae belonging to three different cytocomplexes of the genus Chironomus (“thummi”, “lacunarius”, “pseudothummi”, and genera Glyptotendipes and Kiefferulus. Somatic structural chromosome rearrangements (para- and pericentric heterozygous inversions, deletions, deficiencies and amplifications were used to estimate a Somatic index (S for each population. The highest S indexes were detected in Chironomus riparius populations from locations with high concentrations of trace metals in the sediment. Each species showed specific genome responses to stress agents which we discussed in the light of the specific DNA structures and cytogenetic characteristics of the species. In larvae from polluted sediments two key structures of the salivary gland chromosomes (Balbiani Rings and Nucleolar Organizer sharply reduced their activity to levels below those observed under non-polluted conditions. It is concluded that polytene chromosomes can be used as tools for evaluating the genotoxicity of the aquatic environment. Structural and functional chromosome alterations provide cost-effective early-warning signals of genotoxic concentrations of environmental pollutants.doi: 10.5324/fn.v31i0.1355.Published online: 17 October 2012.

  12. Comparison of C. elegans and C. briggsae genome sequences reveals extensive conservation of chromosome organization and synteny.

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    LaDeana W Hillier

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available To determine whether the distinctive features of Caenorhabditis elegans chromosomal organization are shared with the C. briggsae genome, we constructed a single nucleotide polymorphism-based genetic map to order and orient the whole genome shotgun assembly along the six C. briggsae chromosomes. Although these species are of the same genus, their most recent common ancestor existed 80-110 million years ago, and thus they are more evolutionarily distant than, for example, human and mouse. We found that, like C. elegans chromosomes, C. briggsae chromosomes exhibit high levels of recombination on the arms along with higher repeat density, a higher fraction of intronic sequence, and a lower fraction of exonic sequence compared with chromosome centers. Despite extensive intrachromosomal rearrangements, 1:1 orthologs tend to remain in the same region of the chromosome, and colinear blocks of orthologs tend to be longer in chromosome centers compared with arms. More strikingly, the two species show an almost complete conservation of synteny, with 1:1 orthologs present on a single chromosome in one species also found on a single chromosome in the other. The conservation of both chromosomal organization and synteny between these two distantly related species suggests roles for chromosome organization in the fitness of an organism that are only poorly understood presently.

  13. Spontaneous and divergent hexaploid triticales derived from common wheat × rye by complete elimination of D-genome chromosomes.

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    Hao Li

    Full Text Available Hexaploid triticale could be either synthesized by crossing tetraploid wheat with rye, or developed by crossing hexaploid wheat with a hexaploid triticale or an octoploid triticale.Here two hexaploid triticales with great morphologic divergence derived from common wheat cultivar M8003 (Triticum aestivum L. × Austrian rye (Secale cereale L. were reported, exhibiting high resistance for powdery mildew and stripe rust and potential for wheat improvement. Sequential fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and genomic in situ hybridization (GISH karyotyping revealed that D-genome chromosomes were completely eliminated and the whole A-genome, B-genome and R-genome chromosomes were retained in both lines. Furthermore, plentiful alterations of wheat chromosomes including 5A and 7B were detected in both triticales and additionally altered 5B, 7A chromosome and restructured chromosome 2A was assayed in N9116H and N9116M, respectively, even after selfing for several decades. Besides, meiotic asynchrony was displayed and a variety of storage protein variations were assayed, especially in the HMW/LMW-GS region and secalins region in both triticales.This study confirms that whole D-genome chromosomes could be preferentially eliminated in the hybrid of common wheat × rye, "genome shock" was accompanying the allopolyploidization of nascent triticales, and great morphologic divergence might result from the genetic variations. Moreover, new hexaploid triticale lines contributing potential resistance resources for wheat improvement were produced.

  14. Should the markers on X chromosome be used for genomic prediction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Guosheng; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Aamand, Gert Pedersen;

    2013-01-01

    excluding the X chromosome.Averaged over 15 traits, the gains in reliability from the X chromosome rangedfrom 0.3% to 0.5% points among the three data sets and models. Using a model with a G-matrix accounting for sex-linkedrelationship appropriately or a model which divided genomic breeding value intoan......This study investigated theaccuracy of imputation from LD (7K) to 54K panel and compared accuracy ofgenomic prediction with or without the X chromosome information, based on data ofNordic Holstein bulls. Beagle and Findhap were used for imputation. Averagedover two imputation datasets, the allele...... correct rates of imputation usingFindhap were 98.2% for autosomal markers, 89.7% for markers on the pseudoautosomal region of the X chromosome, and 96.4% for X-specific markers. Theallele correct rates were 98.9%, 91.2% and 96.8%, respectively, when usingBeagle. Genomic predictions were carried out for 15...

  15. Physical Mapping and Refinement of the Painted Turtle Genome (Chrysemys picta) Inform Amniote Genome Evolution and Challenge Turtle-Bird Chromosomal Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badenhorst, Daleen; Hillier, LaDeana W; Literman, Robert; Montiel, Eugenia Elisabet; Radhakrishnan, Srihari; Shen, Yingjia; Minx, Patrick; Janes, Daniel E; Warren, Wesley C; Edwards, Scott V; Valenzuela, Nicole

    2015-06-24

    Comparative genomics continues illuminating amniote genome evolution, but for many lineages our understanding remains incomplete. Here, we refine the assembly (CPI 3.0.3 NCBI AHGY00000000.2) and develop a cytogenetic map of the painted turtle (Chrysemys picta-CPI) genome, the first in turtles and in vertebrates with temperature-dependent sex determination. A comparison of turtle genomes with those of chicken, selected nonavian reptiles, and human revealed shared and novel genomic features, such as numerous chromosomal rearrangements. The largest conserved syntenic blocks between birds and turtles exist in four macrochromosomes, whereas rearrangements were evident in these and other chromosomes, disproving that turtles and birds retain fully conserved macrochromosomes for greater than 300 Myr. C-banding revealed large heterochromatic blocks in the centromeric region of only few chromosomes. The nucleolar-organizing region (NOR) mapped to a single CPI microchromosome, whereas in some turtles and lizards the NOR maps to nonhomologous sex-chromosomes, thus revealing independent translocations of the NOR in various reptilian lineages. There was no evidence for recent chromosomal fusions as interstitial telomeric-DNA was absent. Some repeat elements (CR1-like, Gypsy) were enriched in the centromeres of five chromosomes, whereas others were widespread in the CPI genome. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones were hybridized to 18 of the 25 CPI chromosomes and anchored to a G-banded ideogram. Several CPI sex-determining genes mapped to five chromosomes, and homology was detected between yet other CPI autosomes and the globally nonhomologous sex chromosomes of chicken, other turtles, and squamates, underscoring the independent evolution of vertebrate sex-determining mechanisms.

  16. Genomic and expression array profiling of chromosome 20q amplicon in human colon cancer cells

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    Carter Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gain of the q arm of chromosome 20 in human colorectal cancer has been associated with poorer survival time and has been reported to increase in frequency from adenomas to metastasis. The increasing frequency of chromosome 20q amplification during colorectal cancer progression and the presence of this amplification in carcinomas of other tissue origin has lead us to hypothesize that 20q11-13 harbors one or more genes which, when over expressed promote tumor invasion and metastasis. Aims: Generate genomic and expression profiles of the 20q amplicon in human cancer cell lines in order to identify genes with increased copy number and expression. Materials and Methods: Utilizing genomic sequencing clones and amplification mapping data from our lab and other previous studies, BAC/ PAC tiling paths spanning the 20q amplicon and genomic microarrays were generated. Array-CGH on the custom array with human cancer cell line DNAs was performed to generate genomic profiles of the amplicon. Expression array analysis with RNA from these cell lines using commercial oligo microarrays generated expression profiles of the amplicon. The data were then combined in order to identify genes with increased copy number and expression. Results: Over expressed genes in regions of increased copy number were identified and a list of potential novel genetic tumor markers was assembled based on biological functions of these genes Conclusions: Performing high-resolution genomic microarray profiling in conjunction with expression analysis is an effective approach to identify potential tumor markers.

  17. Centrosome Dysfunction Contributes To Chromosome Instability, Chromoanagenesis And Genome Reprograming In Cancer.

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    German A Pihan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The unique ability of centrosomes to nucleate and organize microtubules makes them unrivaled conductors of important interphase processes, such as intracellular payload traffic, cell polarity, cell locomotion, and organization of the immunologic synapse. But it is in mitosis that centrosomes loom large, for they orchestrate, with clockmaker’s precision, the assembly and functioning of the mitotic spindle, ensuring the equal partitioning of the replicated genome into daughter cells. Centrosome dysfunction is inextricably linked to aneuploidy and chromosome instability, both hallmarks of cancer cells. Several aspects of centrosome function in normal and cancer cells have been molecularly characterized during the last two decades, greatly enhancing our mechanistic understanding of this tiny organelle. Whether centrosome defects alone can cause cancer, remains unanswered. Until recently, the aggregate of the evidence had suggested that centrosome dysfunction, by deregulating the fidelity of chromosome segregation, promotes and accelerates the characteristic Darwinian evolution of the cancer genome enabled by increased mutational load and/or decreased DNA repair. Very recent experimental work has shown that missegreated chromosomes resulting from centrosome dysfunction may experience extensive DNA damage, suggesting additional dimensions to the role of centrosomes in cancer. Centrosome dysfunction is particularly prevalent in tumors in which the genome has undergone extensive structural rearrangements and chromosome domain reshuffling. Ongoing gene reshuffling reprograms the genome for continuous growth, survival, and evasion of the immune system. Manipulation of molecular networks controlling centrosome function may soon become a viable target for specific therapeutic intervention in cancer, particularly since normal cells, which lack centrosome alterations, may be spared the toxicity of such therapies.

  18. Next generation haplotyping to decipher nuclear genomic interspecific admixture in Citrus species: analysis of chromosome 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curk, Franck; Ancillo, Gema; Garcia-Lor, Andres; Luro, François; Perrier, Xavier; Jacquemoud-Collet, Jean-Pierre; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2014-12-29

    The most economically important Citrus species originated by natural interspecific hybridization between four ancestral taxa (Citrus reticulata, Citrus maxima, Citrus medica, and Citrus micrantha) and from limited subsequent interspecific recombination as a result of apomixis and vegetative propagation. Such reticulate evolution coupled with vegetative propagation results in mosaic genomes with large chromosome fragments from the basic taxa in frequent interspecific heterozygosity. Modern breeding of these species is hampered by their complex heterozygous genomic structures that determine species phenotype and are broken by sexual hybridisation. Nevertheless, a large amount of diversity is present in the citrus gene pool, and breeding to allow inclusion of desirable traits is of paramount importance. However, the efficient mobilization of citrus biodiversity in innovative breeding schemes requires previous understanding of Citrus origins and genomic structures. Haplotyping of multiple gene fragments along the whole genome is a powerful approach to reveal the admixture genomic structure of current species and to resolve the evolutionary history of the gene pools. In this study, the efficiency of parallel sequencing with 454 methodology to decipher the hybrid structure of modern citrus species was assessed by analysis of 16 gene fragments on chromosome 2. 454 amplicon libraries were established using the Fluidigm array system for 48 genotypes and 16 gene fragments from chromosome 2. Haplotypes were established from the reads of each accession and phylogenetic analyses were performed using the haplotypic data for each gene fragment. The length of 454 reads and the level of differentiation between the ancestral taxa of modern citrus allowed efficient haplotype phylogenetic assignations for 12 of the 16 gene fragments. The analysis of the mixed genomic structure of modern species and cultivars (i) revealed C. maxima introgressions in modern mandarins, (ii) was

  19. The massive mitochondrial genome of the angiosperm Silene noctiflora is evolving by gain or loss of entire chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiqiang; Cuthbert, Jocelyn M; Taylor, Douglas R; Sloan, Daniel B

    2015-08-18

    Across eukaryotes, mitochondria exhibit staggering diversity in genomic architecture, including the repeated evolution of multichromosomal structures. Unlike in the nucleus, where mitosis and meiosis ensure faithful transmission of chromosomes, the mechanisms of inheritance in fragmented mitochondrial genomes remain mysterious. Multichromosomal mitochondrial genomes have recently been found in multiple species of flowering plants, including Silene noctiflora, which harbors an unusually large and complex mitochondrial genome with more than 50 circular-mapping chromosomes totaling ∼7 Mb in size. To determine the extent to which such genomes are stably maintained, we analyzed intraspecific variation in the mitochondrial genome of S. noctiflora. Complete genomes from two populations revealed a high degree of similarity in the sequence, structure, and relative abundance of mitochondrial chromosomes. For example, there are no inversions between the genomes, and there are only nine SNPs in 25 kb of protein-coding sequence. Remarkably, however, these genomes differ in the presence or absence of 19 entire chromosomes, all of which lack any identifiable genes or contain only duplicate gene copies. Thus, these mitochondrial genomes retain a full gene complement but carry a highly variable set of chromosomes that are filled with presumably dispensable sequence. In S. noctiflora, conventional mechanisms of mitochondrial sequence divergence are being outstripped by an apparently nonadaptive process of whole-chromosome gain/loss, highlighting the inherent challenge in maintaining a fragmented genome. We discuss the implications of these findings in relation to the question of why mitochondria, more so than plastids and bacterial endosymbionts, are prone to the repeated evolution of multichromosomal genomes.

  20. Genomic structure and paralogous regions of the inversion breakpoint occurring between human chromosome 3p12.3 and orangutan chromosome 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Y; Grossmann, B; Tsend-Ayush, E; Grützner, F; Ferguson-Smith, M A; Yang, F; Haaf, T

    2005-01-01

    Intrachromosomal duplications play a significant role in human genome pathology and evolution. To better understand the molecular basis of evolutionary chromosome rearrangements, we performed molecular cytogenetic and sequence analyses of the breakpoint region that distinguishes human chromosome 3p12.3 and orangutan chromosome 2. FISH with region-specific BAC clones demonstrated that the breakpoint-flanking sequences are duplicated intrachromosomally on orangutan 2 and human 3q21 as well as at many pericentromeric and subtelomeric sites throughout the genomes. Breakage and rearrangement of the human 3p12.3-homologous region in the orangutan lineage were associated with a partial loss of duplicated sequences in the breakpoint region. Consistent with our FISH mapping results, computational analysis of the human chromosome 3 genomic sequence revealed three 3p12.3-paralogous sequence blocks on human chromosome 3q21 and smaller blocks on the short arm end 3p26-->p25. This is consistent with the view that sequences from an ancestral site at 3q21 were duplicated at 3p12.3 in a common ancestor of orangutan and humans. Our results show that evolutionary chromosome rearrangements are associated with microduplications and microdeletions, contributing to the DNA differences between closely related species. Copyright (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Chromosome conformation capture uncovers potential genome-wide interactions between human conserved non-coding sequences.

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    Daniel Robyr

    Full Text Available Comparative analyses of various mammalian genomes have identified numerous conserved non-coding (CNC DNA elements that display striking conservation among species, suggesting that they have maintained specific functions throughout evolution. CNC function remains poorly understood, although recent studies have identified a role in gene regulation. We hypothesized that the identification of genomic loci that interact physically with CNCs would provide information on their functions. We have used circular chromosome conformation capture (4C to characterize interactions of 10 CNCs from human chromosome 21 in K562 cells. The data provide evidence that CNCs are capable of interacting with loci that are enriched for CNCs. The number of trans interactions varies among CNCs; some show interactions with many loci, while others interact with few. Some of the tested CNCs are capable of driving the expression of a reporter gene in the mouse embryo, and associate with the oligodendrocyte genes OLIG1 and OLIG2. Our results underscore the power of chromosome conformation capture for the identification of targets of functional DNA elements and raise the possibility that CNCs exert their functions by physical association with defined genomic regions enriched in CNCs. These CNC-CNC interactions may in part explain their stringent conservation as a group of regulatory sequences.

  2. Combining Chromosomal Arm Status and Significantly Aberrant Genomic Locations Reveals New Cancer Subtypes

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    Tal Shay

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Many types of tumors exhibit characteristic chromosomal losses or gains, as well as local amplifications and deletions. Within any given tumor type, sample specific amplifications and deletions are also observed. Typically, a region that is aberrant in more tumors, or whose copy number change is stronger, would be considered as a more promising candidate to be biologically relevant to cancer. We sought for an intuitive method to define such aberrations and prioritize them. We define V, the “volume” associated with an aberration, as the product of three factors: (a fraction of patients with the aberration, (b the aberration’s length and (c its amplitude. Our algorithm compares the values of V derived from the real data to a null distribution obtained by permutations, and yields the statistical significance (p-value of the measured value of V. We detected genetic locations that were significantly aberrant, and combine them with chromosomal arm status (gain/loss to create a succinct fingerprint of the tumor genome. This genomic fingerprint is used to visualize the tumors, highlighting events that are co-occurring or mutually exclusive. We apply the method on three different public array CGH datasets of Medulloblastoma and Neuroblastoma, and demonstrate its ability to detect chromosomal regions that were known to be altered in the tested cancer types, as well as to suggest new genomic locations to be tested. We identified a potential new subtype of Medulloblastoma, which is analogous to Neuroblastoma type 1.

  3. Hi-C-constrained physical models of human chromosomes recover functionally-related properties of genome organization

    CERN Document Server

    Di Stefano, Marco; Lien, Tonje G; Hovig, Eivind; Micheletti, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Combining genome-wide structural models with phenomenological data is at the forefront of efforts to understand the organizational principles regulating the human genome. Here, we use chromosome-chromosome contact data as knowledge-based constraints for large-scale three-dimensional models of the human diploid genome. The resulting models remain minimally entangled and acquire several functional features that are observed in vivo and that were never used as input for the model. We find, for instance, that gene-rich, active regions are drawn towards the nuclear center, while gene poor and lamina-associated domains are pushed to the periphery. These and other properties persist upon adding local contact constraints, suggesting their compatibility with non-local constraints for the genome organization. The results show that suitable combinations of data analysis and physical modelling can expose the unexpectedly rich functionally-related properties implicit in chromosome-chromosome contact data. Specific directi...

  4. Deletion of DXZ4 on the human inactive X chromosome alters higher-order genome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Emily M; Huntley, Miriam H; Dudchenko, Olga; Stamenova, Elena K; Durand, Neva C; Sun, Zhuo; Huang, Su-Chen; Sanborn, Adrian L; Machol, Ido; Shamim, Muhammad; Seberg, Andrew P; Lander, Eric S; Chadwick, Brian P; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2016-08-02

    During interphase, the inactive X chromosome (Xi) is largely transcriptionally silent and adopts an unusual 3D configuration known as the "Barr body." Despite the importance of X chromosome inactivation, little is known about this 3D conformation. We recently showed that in humans the Xi chromosome exhibits three structural features, two of which are not shared by other chromosomes. First, like the chromosomes of many species, Xi forms compartments. Second, Xi is partitioned into two huge intervals, called "superdomains," such that pairs of loci in the same superdomain tend to colocalize. The boundary between the superdomains lies near DXZ4, a macrosatellite repeat whose Xi allele extensively binds the protein CCCTC-binding factor. Third, Xi exhibits extremely large loops, up to 77 megabases long, called "superloops." DXZ4 lies at the anchor of several superloops. Here, we combine 3D mapping, microscopy, and genome editing to study the structure of Xi, focusing on the role of DXZ4 We show that superloops and superdomains are conserved across eutherian mammals. By analyzing ligation events involving three or more loci, we demonstrate that DXZ4 and other superloop anchors tend to colocate simultaneously. Finally, we show that deleting DXZ4 on Xi leads to the disappearance of superdomains and superloops, changes in compartmentalization patterns, and changes in the distribution of chromatin marks. Thus, DXZ4 is essential for proper Xi packaging.

  5. Characterization of perfect microsatellite based on genome-wide and chromosome level in Rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yongtao; Hu, Zongxiu; Wang, Chen; Zhang, Xiuyue; Li, Jing; Yue, Bisong

    2016-11-05

    Microsatellite studies based on chromosomes level would contribute to the biometric correlation analysis of chromosome and microsatellite applications on the specific chromosome. In this study, the total microsatellite length of 1,141,024 loci was 21.8Mb, which covered about 0.74% of the male Rhesus monkey genome. Perfect mononucleotide SSRs were the most abundant, followed by the pattern: perfect di->tetra->tri->penta->hexanucleotide SSRs. The main range of repeat times focused on 12-32 times (mono-), 7-23 times (di-), 5-10 times (tri-), 4-14 times (tetra-), 4-9 times (penta-), 4-8 times (hexa-), respectively. The largest SSRs number was found in chromosome 1 with 94,347 loci, followed by chromosome 3, 2, 7 and 5, and the smallest number was in chromosome 18. The predominant repeat types in male Rhesus monkey genome and chromosome Y were basically A, AC, AG, AAT, AAC, AAAT, AAAC, AAAG, AAACA and AAACAA. SSRs number of all chromosomes was closely positively correlated with chromosome sequence size (r=0.969, pmicrosatellite density (r=-0.456, 0.01microsatellites structural function, composition mode and molecular markers development in Rhesus monkey genome.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli S51, a Chicken Isolate Harboring a Chromosomally Encoded mcr-1 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurfluh, Katrin; Tasara, Taurai; Poirel, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice; Stephan, Roger

    2016-08-04

    We present the draft genome of Escherichia coli S51, a colistin-resistant extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing strain isolated in 2015 from raw chicken meat imported from Germany. Assembly and annotation of this draft genome resulted in a 4,994,918-bp chromosome and revealed a chromosomally encoded mcr-1 gene responsible for the colistin resistance of the strain. Copyright © 2016 Zurfluh et al.

  7. Sequencing and Analyzing the "t" (1;7) Reciprocal Translocation Breakpoints Associated with a Case of Childhood-Onset Schizophrenia/Autistic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idol, Jacquelyn R.; Addington, Anjene M.; Long, Robert T.; Rapoport, Judith L.; Green, Eric D.

    2008-01-01

    We characterized a "t"(1;7)(p22;q21) reciprocal translocation in a patient with childhood-onset schizophrenia (COS) and autism using genome mapping and sequencing methods. Based on genomic maps of human chromosome 7 and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies, we delimited the region of 7q21 harboring the translocation breakpoint to a…

  8. Evolution of genome size and chromosome number in the carnivorous plant genus Genlisea (Lentibulariaceae), with a new estimate of the minimum genome size in angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Andreas; Michael, Todd P; Rivadavia, Fernando; Sousa, Aretuza; Wang, Wenqin; Temsch, Eva M; Greilhuber, Johann; Müller, Kai F; Heubl, Günther

    2014-12-01

    Some species of Genlisea possess ultrasmall nuclear genomes, the smallest known among angiosperms, and some have been found to have chromosomes of diminutive size, which may explain why chromosome numbers and karyotypes are not known for the majority of species of the genus. However, other members of the genus do not possess ultrasmall genomes, nor do most taxa studied in related genera of the family or order. This study therefore examined the evolution of genome sizes and chromosome numbers in Genlisea in a phylogenetic context. The correlations of genome size with chromosome number and size, with the phylogeny of the group and with growth forms and habitats were also examined. Nuclear genome sizes were measured from cultivated plant material for a comprehensive sampling of taxa, including nearly half of all species of Genlisea and representing all major lineages. Flow cytometric measurements were conducted in parallel in two laboratories in order to compare the consistency of different methods and controls. Chromosome counts were performed for the majority of taxa, comparing different staining techniques for the ultrasmall chromosomes. Genome sizes of 15 taxa of Genlisea are presented and interpreted in a phylogenetic context. A high degree of congruence was found between genome size distribution and the major phylogenetic lineages. Ultrasmall genomes with 1C values of <100 Mbp were almost exclusively found in a derived lineage of South American species. The ancestral haploid chromosome number was inferred to be n = 8. Chromosome numbers in Genlisea ranged from 2n = 2x = 16 to 2n = 4x = 32. Ascendant dysploid series (2n = 36, 38) are documented for three derived taxa. The different ploidy levels corresponded to the two subgenera, but were not directly correlated to differences in genome size; the three different karyotype ranges mirrored the different sections of the genus. The smallest known plant genomes were not found in G. margaretae, as previously reported

  9. Context-based FISH localization of genomic rearrangements within chromosome 15q11.2q13 duplicons

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    Knoll Joan HM

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Segmental duplicons (SDs predispose to an increased frequency of chromosomal rearrangements. These rearrangements can cause a diverse range of phenotypes due to haploinsufficiency, in cis positional effects or gene interruption. Genomic microarray analysis has revealed gene dosage changes adjacent to duplicons, but the high degree of similarity between duplicon sequences has confounded unequivocal assignment of chromosome breakpoints within these intervals. In this study, we localize rearrangements within duplicon-enriched regions of Angelman/Prader-Willi (AS/PWS syndrome chromosomal deletions with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. Results Breakage intervals in AS deletions were localized recursively with short, coordinate-defined, single copy (SC and low copy (LC genomic FISH probes. These probes were initially coincident with duplicons and regions of previously reported breakage in AS/PWS. Subsequently, probes developed from adjacent genomic intervals more precisely delineated deletion breakage intervals involving genes, pseudogenes and duplicons in 15q11.2q13. The observed variability in the deletion boundaries within previously described Class I and Class II deletion AS samples is related to the local genomic architecture in this chromosomal region. Conclusions Chromosome 15 abnormalities associated with SDs were precisely delineated at a resolution equivalent to genomic Southern analysis. This context-dependent approach can define the boundaries of chromosome rearrangements for other genomic disorders associated with SDs.

  10. The chromosomes of Afrotheria and their bearing on mammalian genome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svartman, M; Stanyon, R

    2012-01-01

    Afrotheria is the clade of placental mammals that, together with Xenarthra, Euarchontoglires and Laurasiatheria, represents 1 of the 4 main recognized supraordinal eutherian clades. It reunites 6 orders of African origin: Proboscidea, Sirenia, Hyracoidea, Macroscelidea, Afrosoricida and Tubulidentata. The apparently unlikely relationship among such disparate morphological taxa and their possible basal position at the base of the eutherian phylogenetic tree led to a great deal of attention and research on the group. The use of biomolecular data was pivotal in Afrotheria studies, as they were the basis for the recognition of this clade. Although morphological evidence is still scarce, a plethora of molecular data firmly attests to the phylogenetic relationship among these mammals of African origin. Modern cytogenetic techniques also gave a significant contribution to the study of Afrotheria, revealing chromosome signatures for the group as a whole, as well as for some of its internal relationships. The associations of human chromosomes HSA1/19 and 5/21 were found to be chromosome signatures for the group and provided further support for Afrotheria. Additional chromosome synapomorphies were also identified linking elephants and manatees in Tethytheria (the associations HSA2/3, 3/13, 8/22, 18/19 and the lack of HSA4/8) and elephant shrews with the aardvark (HSA2/8, 3/20 and 10/17). Herein, we review the current knowledge on Afrotheria chromosomes and genome evolution. The already available data on the group suggests that further work on this apparently bizarre assemblage of mammals will provide important data to a better understanding on mammalian genome evolution.

  11. Genome-wide translocation sequencing reveals mechanisms of chromosome breaks and rearrangements in B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarle, Roberto; Zhang, Yu; Frock, Richard L; Lewis, Susanna M; Molinie, Benoit; Ho, Yu-Jui; Myers, Darienne R; Choi, Vivian W; Compagno, Mara; Malkin, Daniel J; Neuberg, Donna; Monti, Stefano; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Gostissa, Monica; Alt, Frederick W

    2011-09-30

    Whereas chromosomal translocations are common pathogenetic events in cancer, mechanisms that promote them are poorly understood. To elucidate translocation mechanisms in mammalian cells, we developed high-throughput, genome-wide translocation sequencing (HTGTS). We employed HTGTS to identify tens of thousands of independent translocation junctions involving fixed I-SceI meganuclease-generated DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) within the c-myc oncogene or IgH locus of B lymphocytes induced for activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-dependent IgH class switching. DSBs translocated widely across the genome but were preferentially targeted to transcribed chromosomal regions. Additionally, numerous AID-dependent and AID-independent hot spots were targeted, with the latter comprising mainly cryptic I-SceI targets. Comparison of translocation junctions with genome-wide nuclear run-ons revealed a marked association between transcription start sites and translocation targeting. The majority of translocation junctions were formed via end-joining with short microhomologies. Our findings have implications for diverse fields, including gene therapy and cancer genomics.

  12. Chromosomal Localization of DNA Amplifications in Neuroblastoma Tumors Using cDNA Microarray Comparative Genomic Hybridization

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    Ben Beheshti

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional comparative genomic hybridization (CGH profiling of neuroblastomas has identified many genomic aberrations, although the limited resolution has precluded a precise localization of sequences of interest within amplicons. To map high copy number genomic gains in clinically matched stage IV neuroblastomas, CGH analysis using a 19,200-feature cDNA microarray was used. A dedicated (freely available algorithm was developed for rapid in silico determination of chromosomal localizations of microarray cDNA targets, and for generation of an ideogram-type profile of copy number changes. Using these methodologies, novel gene amplifications undetectable by chromosome CGH were identified, and larger MYCN amplicon sizes (in one tumor up to 6 Mb than those previously reported in neuroblastoma were identified. The genes HPCAL1, LPIN1/KIAA0188, NAG, and NSE1/LOC151354 were found to be coamplified with MYCN. To determine whether stage IV primary tumors could be further subclassified based on their genomic copy number profiles, hierarchical clustering was performed. Cluster analysis of microarray CGH data identified three groups: 1 no amplifications evident, 2 a small MYCN amplicon as the only detectable imbalance, and 3 a large MYCN amplicon with additional gene amplifications. Application of CGH to cDNA microarray targets will help to determine both the variation of amplicon size and help better define amplification-dependent and independent pathways of progression in neuroblastoma.

  13. Whole-genome and chromosome evolution associated with host adaptation and speciation of the wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola.

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    Eva H Stukenbrock

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The fungus Mycosphaerella graminicola has been a pathogen of wheat since host domestication 10,000-12,000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent. The wheat-infecting lineage emerged from closely related Mycosphaerella pathogens infecting wild grasses. We use a comparative genomics approach to assess how the process of host specialization affected the genome structure of M. graminicola since divergence from the closest known progenitor species named M. graminicola S1. The genome of S1 was obtained by Illumina sequencing resulting in a 35 Mb draft genome sequence of 32X. Assembled contigs were aligned to the previously sequenced M. graminicola genome. The alignment covered >90% of the non-repetitive portion of the M. graminicola genome with an average divergence of 7%. The sequenced M. graminicola strain is known to harbor thirteen essential chromosomes plus eight dispensable chromosomes. We found evidence that structural rearrangements significantly affected the dispensable chromosomes while the essential chromosomes were syntenic. At the nucleotide level, the essential and dispensable chromosomes have evolved differently. The average synonymous substitution rate in dispensable chromosomes is considerably lower than in essential chromosomes, whereas the average non-synonymous substitution rate is three times higher. Differences in molecular evolution can be related to different transmission and recombination patterns, as well as to differences in effective population sizes of essential and dispensable chromosomes. In order to identify genes potentially involved in host specialization or speciation, we calculated ratios of synonymous and non-synonymous substitution rates in the >9,500 aligned protein coding genes. The genes are generally under strong purifying selection. We identified 43 candidate genes showing evidence of positive selection, one encoding a potential pathogen effector protein. We conclude that divergence of these pathogens was

  14. De novo assembly of the Aedes aegypti genome using Hi-C yields chromosome-length scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudchenko, Olga; Batra, Sanjit S; Omer, Arina D; Nyquist, Sarah K; Hoeger, Marie; Durand, Neva C; Shamim, Muhammad S; Machol, Ido; Lander, Eric S; Aiden, Aviva Presser; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2017-04-07

    The Zika outbreak, spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, highlights the need to create high-quality assemblies of large genomes in a rapid and cost-effective way. Here we combine Hi-C data with existing draft assemblies to generate chromosome-length scaffolds. We validate this method by assembling a human genome, de novo, from short reads alone (67× coverage). We then combine our method with draft sequences to create genome assemblies of the mosquito disease vectors Aeaegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus, each consisting of three scaffolds corresponding to the three chromosomes in each species. These assemblies indicate that almost all genomic rearrangements among these species occur within, rather than between, chromosome arms. The genome assembly procedure we describe is fast, inexpensive, and accurate, and can be applied to many species.

  15. BAC array CGH in patients with Velocardiofacial syndrome-like features reveals genomic aberrations on chromosome region 1q21.1

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    Estivill Xavier

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microdeletion of the chromosome 22q11.2 region is the most common genetic aberration among patients with velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS but a subset of subjects do not show alterations of this chromosome region. Methods We analyzed 18 patients with VCFS-like features by comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH array and performed a face-to-face slide hybridization with two different arrays: a whole genome and a chromosome 22-specific BAC array. Putative rearrangements were confirmed by FISH and MLPA assays. Results One patient carried a combination of rearrangements on 1q21.1, consisting in a microduplication of 212 kb and a close microdeletion of 1.15 Mb, previously reported in patients with variable phenotypes, including mental retardation, congenital heart defects (CHD and schizophrenia. While 326 control samples were negative for both 1q21.1 rearrangements, one of 73 patients carried the same 212-kb microduplication, reciprocal to TAR microdeletion syndrome. Also, we detected four copy number variants (CNVs inherited from one parent (a 744-kb duplication on 10q11.22; a 160 kb duplication and deletion on 22q11.21 in two cases; and a gain of 140 kb on 22q13.2, not present in control subjects, raising the potential role of these CNVs in the VCFS-like phenotype. Conclusions Our results confirmed aCGH as a successful strategy in order to characterize additional submicroscopic aberrations in patients with VCF-like features that fail to show alterations in 22q11.2 region. We report a 212-kb microduplication on 1q21.1, detected in two patients, which may contribute to CHD.

  16. Anchoring genome sequence to chromosomes of the central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) enables reconstruction of ancestral squamate macrochromosomes and identifies sequence content of the Z chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deakin, Janine E; Edwards, Melanie J; Patel, Hardip; O'Meally, Denis; Lian, Jinmin; Stenhouse, Rachael; Ryan, Sam; Livernois, Alexandra M; Azad, Bhumika; Holleley, Clare E; Li, Qiye; Georges, Arthur

    2016-06-10

    Squamates (lizards and snakes) are a speciose lineage of reptiles displaying considerable karyotypic diversity, particularly among lizards. Understanding the evolution of this diversity requires comparison of genome organisation between species. Although the genomes of several squamate species have now been sequenced, only the green anole lizard has any sequence anchored to chromosomes. There is only limited gene mapping data available for five other squamates. This makes it difficult to reconstruct the events that have led to extant squamate karyotypic diversity. The purpose of this study was to anchor the recently sequenced central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) genome to chromosomes to trace the evolution of squamate chromosomes. Assigning sequence to sex chromosomes was of particular interest for identifying candidate sex determining genes. By using two different approaches to map conserved blocks of genes, we were able to anchor approximately 42 % of the dragon genome sequence to chromosomes. We constructed detailed comparative maps between dragon, anole and chicken genomes, and where possible, made broader comparisons across Squamata using cytogenetic mapping information for five other species. We show that squamate macrochromosomes are relatively well conserved between species, supporting findings from previous molecular cytogenetic studies. Macrochromosome diversity between members of the Toxicofera clade has been generated by intrachromosomal, and a small number of interchromosomal, rearrangements. We reconstructed the ancestral squamate macrochromosomes by drawing upon comparative cytogenetic mapping data from seven squamate species and propose the events leading to the arrangements observed in representative species. In addition, we assigned over 8 Mbp of sequence containing 219 genes to the Z chromosome, providing a list of genes to begin testing as candidate sex determining genes. Anchoring of the dragon genome has provided substantial insight into

  17. Genomic study of the critical region of chromosome 21 associated to Down syndrome

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    Julio César Montoya

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Previous reports have identified a region of chromosome 21 known as Down ayndrome critical region (DSCR in which the expression of some genes would modulate the main clinical characteristics of this pathology. In this sense, there is currently limited information on the architecture of the DSCR associated.Objective: To obtain in silico a detailed vision of the chromatin structure associated with the evaluation of genomic covariables contained in public data bases.Methods: Taking as reference the information consigned in the National Center for Biotechnology Information, the Genome Browser from the University of California at Santa Cruz and from the HapMap project, a chromosome walk along 21 Mb of the distal portion of chromosome 21q arm was performed. In this distal portion, the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP, number of CpG islands, repetitive elements, recombination frequencies, and topographical state of that chromatin were recorded.Results: The frequency of CpG islands and Ref genes increased in the more distal 1.2 Mb DSCR that contrast with those localized near to the centromere. The highest level of recombination calculated for women was registered in the 21q22.12 to 22.3 bands. DSCR 6 and 9 genes showed a high percentage of methylation in CpG islands in DNA from normal and trisomic fibroblasts. The DSCR2 gene exhibited high levels of open chromatin and also methylation in some lysine residues of the histone H3 as relevant characteristics.Conclusion: The existence of a genomic environment characterized by high values of recombination frequencies and CpG methylation in DSCR 6 and 9 and also DSCR2 genes led us to postulate that in non-disjunction detected in Down syndrome, complex genomic, epigenetic and environmental relationships regulate some processes of meiosis.

  18. Genomic study of the critical region of chromosome 21 associated to Down syndrome

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    Julio César Montoya

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Previous reports have identified a region of chromosome 21 known as Down ayndrome critical region (DSCR in which the expression of some genes would modulate the main clinical characteristics of this pathology. In this sense, there is currently limited information on the architecture of the DSCR associated. Objective: To obtain in silico a detailed vision of the chromatin structure associated with the evaluation of genomic covariables contained in public data bases. Methods: Taking as reference the information consigned in the National Center for Biotechnology Information, the Genome Browser from the University of California at Santa Cruz and from the HapMap project, a chromosome walk along 21 Mb of the distal portion of chromosome 21q arm was performed. In this distal portion, the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP, number of CpG islands, repetitive elements, recombination frequencies, and topographical state of that chromatin were recorded. Results: The frequency of CpG islands and Ref genes increased in the more distal 1.2 Mb DSCR that contrast with those localized near to the centromere. The highest level of recombination calculated for women was registered in the 21q22.12 to 22.3 bands. DSCR 6 and 9 genes showed a high percentage of methylation in CpG islands in DNA from normal and trisomic fibroblasts. The DSCR2 gene exhibited high levels of open chromatin and also methylation in some lysine residues of the histone H3 as relevant characteristics. Conclusion: The existence of a genomic environment characterized by high values of recombination frequencies and CpG methylation in DSCR 6 and 9 and also DSCR2 genes led us to postulate that in non-disjunction detected in Down syndrome, complex genomic, epigenetic and environmental relationships regulate some processes of meiosis.

  19. Recurrence of Chromosome Rearrangements and Reuse of DNA Breakpoints in the Evolution of the Triticeae Genomes

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    Wanlong Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal rearrangements (CRs play important roles in karyotype diversity and speciation. While many CR breakpoints have been characterized at the sequence level in yeast, insects, and primates, little is known about the structure of evolutionary CR breakpoints in plant genomes, which are much more dynamic in genome size and sequence organization. Here, we report identification of breakpoints of a translocation between chromosome arms 4L and 5L of Triticeae, which is fixed in several species, including diploid wheat and rye, by comparative mapping and analysis of the draft genome and chromosome survey sequences of the Triticeae species. The wheat translocation joined the ends of breakpoints downstream of a WD40 gene on 4AL and a gene of the PMEI family on 5AL. A basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor gene in 5AL junction was significantly restructured. Rye and wheat share the same position for the 4L breakpoint, but the 5L breakpoint positions are not identical, although very close in these two species, indicating the recurrence of 4L/5L translocations in the Triticeae. Although barley does not carry the translocation, collinearity across the breakpoints was violated by putative inversions and/or transpositions. Alignment with model grass genomes indicated that the translocation breakpoints coincided with ancient inversion junctions in the Triticeae ancestor. Our results show that the 4L/5L translocation breakpoints represent two CR hotspots reused during Triticeae evolution, and support breakpoint reuse as a widespread mechanism in all eukaryotes. The mechanisms of the recurrent translocation and its role in Triticeae evolution are also discussed.

  20. Integration sites of Epstein-Barr virus genome on chromosomes of human lymphoblastoid cell lines

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    Wuu, K.D.; Chen, Y.J.; Wang-Wuu, S. [Institute of Genetics, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1994-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the pathogen of infectious mononucleosis. The viral genome is present in more than 95% of the African cases of Burkitt lymphoma and it is usually maintained in episomal form in the tumor cells. Viral integration has been described only for Nanalwa which is a Burkitt lymphoma cell line lacking episomes. In order to examine the role of EBV in the immortalization of human Blymphocytes, we investigated whether the EBV integration into the human genome is essential. If the integration does occur, we would like to know whether the integration is randomly distributed or whether the viral DNA integrates preferentially at certain sites. Fourteen in vitro immortalized human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) were examined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a biotinylated EBV BamHI w DNA fragment as probe. The episomal form of EBV DNA was found in all cells of these cell lines, while only about 65% of the cells have the integrated viral DNA. This might suggest that integration is not a pre-requisite for cell immortalization. Although all chromosomes, except Y, have been found with integrated viral genome, chromsomes 1 and 5 are the most frequent EBV DNA carrier (p<0.05). Nine chromosome bands, namely, 1p31, 1q31, 2q32, 3q13, 3q26, 5q14, 6q24, 7q31 and 12q21, are preferential targets for EBV integration (p<0.001). Eighty percent of the total 938 EBV hybridization signals were found to be at G-band-positive area. This suggests that the mechanism of EBV integration might be different from that of the retroviruses, which specifically integrate to G-band-negative areas. Thus, we conclude that the integration of EBV to host genome is non-random and it may have something to do with the structure of chromosome and DNA sequences.

  1. Chromosome-wise Protein Interaction Patterns and Their Impact on Functional Implications of Large-Scale Genomic Aberrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Isa Kristina; Weinhold, Nils; Belling, Kirstine González-Izarzugaza

    2017-01-01

    Gene copy-number changes influence phenotypes through gene-dosage alteration and subsequent changes of protein complex stoichiometry. Human trisomies where gene copy numbers are increased uniformly over entire chromosomes provide generic cases for studying these relationships. In most trisomies......, gene and protein level alterations have fatal consequences. We used genome-wide protein-protein interaction data to identify chromosome-specific patterns of protein interactions. We found that some chromosomes encode proteins that interact infrequently with each other, chromosome 21 in particular. We...

  2. Prenatal Diagnosis of a Fetus with de novo Supernumerary Ring Chromosome 16 Characterized by Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

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    Pietro Cignini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A fetus with de novo ring chromosome 16 is presented. At 20 weeks' gestation, ultrasound examination demonstrated bilateral clubfoot, bilateral renal pyelectasis, hypoplasia of the corpus callosum, and transposition of the great vessel. Amniocentesis was performed. Chromosome analysis identified a ring chromosome 16 [47,XY,r(16] and array comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH demonstrated that the ring included the euchromatic portion 16p11.2. Postmortem examination confirmed prenatal findings. This is the first case of de novo ring chromosome 16 diagnosed prenatally with a new phenotypic pattern and also reinforces the importance of offering amniocentesis with a-CGH if fetal anomalies are detected.

  3. Identification of the human chromosomal region containing the iridogoniodysgenesis anomaly locus by genomic-mismatch scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzayans, F; Mears, A J; Guo, S W; Pearce, W G; Walter, M A

    1997-01-01

    Genome-mismatch scanning (GMS) is a new method of linkage analysis that rapidly isolates regions of identity between two genomes. DNA molecules from regions of identity by descent from two relatives are isolated based on their ability to form extended mismatch-free heteroduplexes. We have applied this rapid technology to identify the chromosomal region shared by two fifth-degree cousins with autosomal dominant iridogoniodysgenesis anomaly (IGDA), a rare ocular neurocristopathy. Markers on the short arm of human chromosome 6p were recovered, consistent with the results of conventional linkage analysis conducted in parallel, indicating linkage of IGDA to 6p25. Control markers tested on a second human chromosome were not recovered. A GMS error rate of approximately 11% was observed, well within an acceptable range for a rapid, first screening approach, especially since GMS results would be confirmed by family analysis with selected markers from the putative region of identity by descent. These results demonstrate not only the value of this technique in the rapid mapping of human genetic traits, but the first application of GMS to a multicellular organism. Images Figure 2 PMID:9245991

  4. The mouse Fau gene: genomic structure, chromosomal localization, and characterization of two retropseudogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casteels, D; Poirier, C; Guénet, J L; Merregaert, J

    1995-01-01

    The Fau gene is the cellular homolog of the fox sequence of the Finkel-Biskis-Reilly murine sarcoma virus (FBR-MuSV). FBR-MuSV acquired the Fau gene by transduction in a transcriptional orientation opposite to that of the genomic Fau gene. The genomic structure of the mouse Fau gene (MMFAU) and its upstream elements have been determined and are similar to those of the human FAU gene. The gene consists of five exons and is located on chromosome 19. The first exon is not translated. The promoter region has no well-defined TATA box but contains the polypyrimidine initiator flanked by regions of high GC content (65%) and shows all of the characteristics of a housekeeping gene. The 5' end of the mRNA transcript was determined by 5' RACE analysis and is located, as expected, in the polypyrimidine initiator site. Furthermore, the sequences of two retropseudogenes (Fau-ps1 and Fau-ps2) are reported. Both pseudogenes are approximately 75% identical to the Fau cDNA, but both are shorter due to a deletion at the 5' end and do not encode a functional protein. Fau-prs is interrupted by an AG-rich region of about 350 bp within the S30 region of the Fau cDNA. Fau-ps1 was localized on chromosome 1 and Fau-ps2 on chromosome 7.

  5. Comparative genomic analyses of Streptococcus mutans provide insights into chromosomal shuffling and species-specific content

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    Nakai Kenta

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus mutans is the major pathogen of dental caries, and it occasionally causes infective endocarditis. While the pathogenicity of this species is distinct from other human pathogenic streptococci, the species-specific evolution of the genus Streptococcus and its genomic diversity are poorly understood. Results We have sequenced the complete genome of S. mutans serotype c strain NN2025, and compared it with the genome of UA159. The NN2025 genome is composed of 2,013,587 bp, and the two strains show highly conserved core-genome. However, comparison of the two S. mutans strains showed a large genomic inversion across the replication axis producing an X-shaped symmetrical DNA dot plot. This phenomenon was also observed between other streptococcal species, indicating that streptococcal genetic rearrangements across the replication axis play an important role in Streptococcus genetic shuffling. We further confirmed the genomic diversity among 95 clinical isolates using long-PCR analysis. Genomic diversity in S. mutans appears to occur frequently between insertion sequence (IS elements and transposons, and these diversity regions consist of restriction/modification systems, antimicrobial peptide synthesis systems, and transporters. S. mutans may preferentially reject the phage infection by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs. In particular, the CRISPR-2 region, which is highly divergent between strains, in NN2025 has long repeated spacer sequences corresponding to the streptococcal phage genome. Conclusion These observations suggest that S. mutans strains evolve through chromosomal shuffling and that phage infection is not needed for gene acquisition. In contrast, S. pyogenes tolerates phage infection for acquisition of virulence determinants for niche adaptation.

  6. Chromosomal organizations of major repeat families on potato (Solanum tuberosum) and further exploring in its sequenced genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaomin; Datema, Erwin; Guzman, Myriam Olortegui; de Boer, Jan M; van Eck, Herman J; Bachem, Christian W B; Visser, Richard G F; de Jong, Hans

    2014-12-01

    One of the most powerful technologies in unraveling the organization of a eukaryotic plant genome is high-resolution Fluorescent in situ hybridization of repeats and single copy DNA sequences on pachytene chromosomes. This technology allows the integration of physical mapping information with chromosomal positions, including centromeres, telomeres, nucleolar-organizing region, and euchromatin and heterochromatin. In this report, we established chromosomal positions of different repeat fractions of the potato genomic DNA (Cot100, Cot500 and Cot1000) on the chromosomes. We also analysed various repeat elements that are unique to potato including the moderately repetitive P5 and REP2 elements, where the REP2 is part of a larger Gypsy-type LTR retrotransposon and cover most chromosome regions, with some brighter fluorescing spots in the heterochromatin. The most abundant tandem repeat is the potato genomic repeat 1 that covers subtelomeric regions of most chromosome arms. Extensive multiple alignments of these repetitive sequences in the assembled RH89-039-16 potato BACs and the draft assembly of the DM1-3 516 R44 genome shed light on the conservation of these repeats within the potato genome. The consensus sequences thus obtained revealed the native complete transposable elements from which they were derived.

  7. Array comparative genomic hybridization analysis of small supernumerary marker chromosomes in human infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guediche, N; Tosca, L; Kara Terki, A; Bas, C; Lecerf, L; Young, J; Briand-Suleau, A; Tou, B; Bouligand, J; Brisset, S; Misrahi, M; Guiochon-Mantel, A; Goossens, M; Tachdjian, G

    2012-01-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are structurally abnormal chromosomes that cannot be unambiguously identified by conventional banding cytogenetics. This study describes four patients with sSMC in relation with infertility. Patient 1 had primary infertility. His brother, fertile, carried the same sSMC (patient 2). Patient 3 presented polycystic ovary syndrome and patient 4 primary ovarian insufficiency. Cytogenetic studies, array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and sperm analyses were compared with cases previously reported. sSMC corresponded to the 15q11.2 region (patients 1 and 2), the centromeric chromosome 15 region (patient 3) and the 21p11.2 region (patient 4). Array CGH showed 3.6-Mb gain for patients 1 and 2 and 0.266-Mb gain for patient 4. Sperm fluorescent in-situ hybridization analyses found ratios of 0.37 and 0.30 of sperm nuclei with sSMC(15) for patients 1 and 2, respectively (P < 0.001). An increase of sperm nuclei with disomy X, Y and 18 was noted for patient 1 compared with control and patient 2 (P < 0.001). Among the genes mapped in the unbalanced chromosomal regions, POTE B and BAGE are related to the testis and ovary, respectively. The implication of sSMC in infertility could be due to duplication, but also to mechanical effects perturbing meiosis.

  8. Variation, evolution, and correlation analysis of C+G content and genome or chromosome size in different kingdoms and phyla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiu-Qing; Du, Donglei

    2014-01-01

    C+G content (GC content or G+C content) is known to be correlated with genome/chromosome size in bacteria but the relationship for other kingdoms remains unclear. This study analyzed genome size, chromosome size, and base composition in most of the available sequenced genomes in various kingdoms. Genome size tends to increase during evolution in plants and animals, and the same is likely true for bacteria. The genomic C+G contents were found to vary greatly in microorganisms but were quite similar within each animal or plant subkingdom. In animals and plants, the C+G contents are ranked as follows: monocot plants>mammals>non-mammalian animals>dicot plants. The variation in C+G content between chromosomes within species is greater in animals than in plants. The correlation between average chromosome C+G content and chromosome length was found to be positive in Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria (but not in other analyzed bacterial phyla), Ascomycota fungi, and likely also in some plants; negative in some animals, insignificant in two protist phyla, and likely very weak in Archaea. Clearly, correlations between C+G content and chromosome size can be positive, negative, or not significant depending on the kingdoms/groups or species. Different phyla or species exhibit different patterns of correlation between chromosome-size and C+G content. Most chromosomes within a species have a similar pattern of variation in C+G content but outliers are common. The data presented in this study suggest that the C+G content is under genetic control by both trans- and cis- factors and that the correlation between C+G content and chromosome length can be positive, negative, or not significant in different phyla.

  9. Two molecular markers based on mitochondrial genomes for varieties identification of the northern snakehead (Channa argus) and blotched snakehead (Channa maculata) and their reciprocal hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xincheng, Zhang; Kunci, Chen; Xinping, Zhu; Jian, Zhao; Qing, Luo; Xiaoyou, Hong; Wei, Li; Fengfang, Xiao

    2015-08-01

    The northern snakehead (Channa argus) and blotched snakehead (Channa maculata) and their reciprocal hybrids have played important roles in the Chinese freshwater aquaculture industry, with an annual production in China exceeding 400 thousand tons. While these are popular aquaculture breeds in China, it is not easy to identify northern snakehead, blotched snakehead, and their hybrids. Thus, a method should be developed to identify these varieties. To distinguish between the reciprocal hybrids (C. argus ♀ × C. maculata ♂ and C. maculata ♀ × C. argus ♂), the mitochondrial genome sequences of northern snakehead and blotched snakehead and their reciprocal hybrids were compared. Following the alignment and analysis of mtDNA sequences of northern snakehead, blotched snakehead and their hybrids, two pairs of specific primers were designed based on identified differences ranging from 12S rRNA to 16S rRNA gene. The BY1 primers amplified the same bands in the blotched snakehead and the hybrid (C. maculata ♀ × C. argus ♂), while producing no products in northern snakehead and the hybrid (C. argus ♀ × C. maculata ♂). Amplification with WY1 yielded the opposite results. Then, 30 individuals per fish were randomized to verify the primers, and the results showed that the primers were specific for breeds, as intended. The specific primers can not only simply distinguish between two kinds of hybrids, but also rapidly identify the two parents. This study provides a method of molecular marker identification to identify reciprocal hybrids.

  10. Comprehensive cytological characterization of the Gossypium hirsutum genome based on the development of a set of chromosome cytological markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Shan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cotton is the world's most important natural fiber crop. It is also a model system for studying polyploidization, genomic organization, and genome-size variation. Integrating the cytological characterization of cotton with its genetic map will be essential for understanding its genome structure and evolution, as well as for performing further genetic-map based mapping and cloning. In this study, we isolated a complete set of bacterial artificial chromosome clones anchored to each of the 52 chromosome arms of the tetraploid cotton Gossypium hirsutum. Combining these with telomere and centromere markers, we constructed a standard karyotype for the G. hirsutum inbred line TM-1. We dissected the chromosome arm localizations of the 45S and 5S rDNA and suggest a centromere repositioning event in the homoeologous chromosomes AT09 and DT09. By integrating a systematic karyotype analysis with the genetic linkage map, we observed different genome sizes and chromosomal structures between the subgenomes of the tetraploid cotton and those of its diploid ancestors. Using evidence of conserved coding sequences, we suggest that the different evolutionary paths of non-coding retrotransposons account for most of the variation in size between the subgenomes of tetraploid cotton and its diploid ancestors. These results provide insights into the cotton genome and will facilitate further genome studies in G. hirsutum.

  11. Genomic structures of the kW1 loci on the Z and W chromosomes in ratite birds: structural changes at an early stage of W chromosome differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishijima, Junko; Uno, Yoshinobu; Nishida, Chizuko; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    The W chromosome of ratite birds shows minimal morphological differentiation and retains homology of genetic linkage and gene order with a substantial stretch of the Z chromosome; however, the molecular structure in the differentiated region is still not well known. The kW1 sequence was isolated from the kiwi as a W-specific DNA marker for PCR-based molecular sexing of ratite birds. In ratite W chromosomes, this sequence commonly contains a ∼200-bp deletion. To characterize the very early event of avian sex chromosome differentiation, we performed molecular cytogenetic analyses of kW1 and its flanking sequences in paleognathous and neognathous birds and reptiles. Female-specific repeats were found in the kW1-flanking sequence of the cassowary (Casuarius casuarius), and the repeats have been amplified in the pericentromeric region of the W chromosomes of ratites, which may have resulted from the cessation of meiotic recombination between the Z and W chromosomes at an early stage of sex chromosome differentiation. The presence of the kW1 sequence in neognathous birds and a crocodilian species suggests that the kW1 sequence was present in the ancestral genome of Archosauria; however, it disappeared in other reptilian taxa and several lineages of neognathous birds.

  12. Genomic and expression analysis of multiple Sry loci from a single Rattus norvegicus Y chromosome

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    Farkas Joel

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sry is a gene known to be essential for testis determination but is also transcribed in adult male tissues. The laboratory rat, Rattus norvegicus, has multiple Y chromosome copies of Sry while most mammals have only a single copy. DNA sequence comparisons with other rodents with multiple Sry copies are inconsistent in divergence patterns and functionality of the multiple copies. To address hypotheses of divergence, gene conversion and functional constraints, we sequenced Sry loci from a single R. norvegicus Y chromosome from the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat strain (SHR and analyzed DNA sequences for homology among copies. Next, to determine whether all copies of Sry are expressed, we developed a modification of the fluorescent marked capillary electrophoresis method to generate three different sized amplification products to identify Sry copies. We applied this fragment analysis method to both genomic DNA and cDNA prepared from mRNA from testis and adrenal gland of adult male rats. Results Y chromosome fragments were amplified and sequenced using primers that included the entire Sry coding region and flanking sequences. The analysis of these sequences identified six Sry loci on the Y chromosome. These are paralogous copies consistent with a single phylogeny and the divergence between any two copies is less than 2%. All copies have a conserved reading frame and amino acid sequence consistent with function. Fragment analysis of genomic DNA showed close approximations of experimental with predicted values, validating the use of this method to identify proportions of each copy. Using the fragment analysis procedure with cDNA samples showed the Sry copies expressed were significantly different from the genomic distribution (testis p Sry transcript expression, analyzed by real-time PCR, showed significantly higher levels of Sry in testis than adrenal gland (p, 0.001. Conclusion The SHR Y chromosome contains at least 6 full length

  13. Generation of chicken Z-chromosome painting probes by microdissection for screening large-insert genomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, R; King, W A; Verrinder Gibbins, A M

    1997-01-01

    A strategy for rapid generation of chicken sex chromosome-Z painting probes has been developed using microdissection. Whole chromosome painting probes (WCPs) were prepared from 10-15 copies of mitotic metaphase chicken Z chromosomes. The microisolated chromosomes were subjected to PEG/proteinase K treatment in a collection drop to release DNA, which was then amplified using a degenerate oligonucleotide-primed shuttle PCR (DOP-Shuttle-PCR) strategy. Size distributions of the PCR products were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis and smears of DNA were revealed that ranged in size from 200-800 bp, without any evidence of preferential amplification. Both specificity and complexity of the probes have been analyzed by Southern blot and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Non-specific hybridization was efficiently blocked by using chicken competitor DNA. Analysis of the WCPs produced shows that collectively they provide uniform hybridization signals along the entire length of the chicken Z chromosome. To demonstrate one possible application of these complex probes, we screened a large-insert bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) chicken genomic library to select Z chromosome-specific clones. To address specificity of the selected clones and to physically map them to the Z chromosome, FISH analysis was used. Of the 3 clones initially tested, one clone (C3) carrying a 250-kb insert mapped to the distal portion of the short arm of the chicken Z chromosome. Therefore, this technique has provided appropriate probes for screening large-insert genomic libraries. Further application of these probes includes the analysis of chromosome rearrangements, studies of cases of heteroploidy involving the Z chromosome, positional cloning of Z-linked genes and studies on mechanisms of sex-chromosome evolution in birds.

  14. Mutations in MAPT gene cause chromosome instability and introduce copy number variations widely in the genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Giacomina; Conconi, Donatella; Panzeri, Elena; Redaelli, Serena; Piccoli, Elena; Paoletta, Laura; Dalprà, Leda; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the main function of promoting polymerization and stabilization of microtubules, other roles are being attributed to tau, now considered a multifunctional protein. In particular, previous studies suggest that tau is involved in chromosome stability and genome protection. We performed cytogenetic analysis, including molecular karyotyping, on lymphocytes and fibroblasts from patients affected by frontotemporal lobar degeneration carrying different mutations in the microtubule-associated protein tau gene, to investigate the effects of these mutations on genome stability. Furthermore, we analyzed the response of mutated lymphoblastoid cell lines to genotoxic agents to evaluate the participation of tau to DNA repair systems. We found a significantly higher level of chromosome aberrations in mutated than in control cells. Mutated lymphocytes showed higher percentages of stable lesions, clonal and total aneuploidy (medians: 2 versus 0, p $\\ll$ 0.01; 1.5 versus 0, p $\\ll$ 0.01; 16.5 versus 0, p $\\ll$ 0.01, respectively). Fibroblasts of patients showed higher percentages of stable lesions, structural aberrations and total aneuploidy (medians: 0 versus 0, p = 0.03; 5.8 versus 0, p = 0.02; 26.5 versus 12.6, p $\\ll$ 0.01, respectively). In addition, the in depth analysis of DNA copy number variations showed a higher tendency to non-allelic homologous recombination in mutated cells. Finally, while our analysis did not support an involvement of tau in DNA repair systems, it revealed its role in stabilization of chromatin. In summary, our findings indicate a role of tau in genome and chromosome stability that can be ascribed to its function as a microtubule-associated protein as well as a protein protecting chromatin integrity through interaction with DNA.

  15. Wolbachia genome integrated in an insect chromosome: evolution and fate of laterally transferred endosymbiont genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoh, Naruo; Tanaka, Kohjiro; Shibata, Fukashi; Kondo, Natsuko; Hizume, Masahiro; Shimada, Masakazu; Fukatsu, Takema

    2008-02-01

    Recent accumulation of microbial genome data has demonstrated that lateral gene transfers constitute an important and universal evolutionary process in prokaryotes, while those in multicellular eukaryotes are still regarded as unusual, except for endosymbiotic gene transfers from mitochondria and plastids. Here we thoroughly investigated the bacterial genes derived from a Wolbachia endosymbiont on the nuclear genome of the beetle Callosobruchus chinensis. Exhaustive PCR detection and Southern blot analysis suggested that approximately 30% of Wolbachia genes, in terms of the gene repertoire of wMel, are present on the insect nuclear genome. Fluorescent in situ hybridization located the transferred genes on the proximal region of the basal short arm of the X chromosome. Molecular evolutionary and other lines of evidence indicated that the transferred genes are probably derived from a single lateral transfer event. The transferred genes were, for the length examined, structurally disrupted, freed from functional constraints, and transcriptionally inactive. Hence, most, if not all, of the transferred genes have been pseudogenized. Notwithstanding this, the transferred genes were ubiquitously detected from Japanese and Taiwanese populations of C. chinensis, while the number of the transferred genes detected differed between the populations. The transferred genes were not detected from congenic beetle species, indicating that the transfer event occurred after speciation of C. chinensis, which was estimated to be one or several million years ago. These features of the laterally transferred endosymbiont genes are compared with the evolutionary patterns of mitochondrial and plastid genome fragments acquired by nuclear genomes through recent endosymbiotic gene transfers.

  16. Fossilized nuclei and chromosomes reveal 180 million years of genomic stasis in royal ferns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomfleur, Benjamin; McLoughlin, Stephen; Vajda, Vivi

    2014-03-21

    Rapidly permineralized fossils can provide exceptional insights into the evolution of life over geological time. Here, we present an exquisitely preserved, calcified stem of a royal fern (Osmundaceae) from Early Jurassic lahar deposits of Sweden in which authigenic mineral precipitation from hydrothermal brines occurred so rapidly that it preserved cytoplasm, cytosol granules, nuclei, and even chromosomes in various stages of cell division. Morphometric parameters of interphase nuclei match those of extant Osmundaceae, indicating that the genome size of these reputed "living fossils" has remained unchanged over at least 180 million years-a paramount example of evolutionary stasis.

  17. Genomic structure and refined chromosomal localization of the mouse Ptch2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, L; Liu, Z; Beier, D R; Lanske, B

    2002-01-01

    The vertebrate Patched 2 (Ptch2) gene encodes a putative membrane-embedded protein which may have roles in Hedgehog signaling during development and in tumorigenesis. We determined the genomic structure of the mouse Ptch2 gene and show that Ptch2 is composed of 22 exons spanning approximately 18 kb of genomic DNA. The exon-intron boundaries were found to be conserved within the human and mouse Ptch2 genes. Analysis of the 5' flanking region revealed a CpG island, the putative promoter region and the transcriptional start site while a polyadenylation signal as well as a mRNA destabilizing motif were identified in the 3' flanking region. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis was used to map mouse Ptch2 to chromosome 4 between the microsatellite markers D4Mit20 and D4Mit334.

  18. Chromosomal localization of a novel repetitive sequence in the Chenopodium quinoa genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolano, Bozena; Plucienniczak, Andrzej; Kwasniewski, Miroslaw; Maluszynska, Jolanta

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a novel repetitive sequence pTaq10 was isolated from the Taq I digest of the genomic DNA of the pseudocereal Chenopodium quinoa. Sequence analysis indicated that this 286-bp monomer is not homologous to any known retroelement sequence. FISH and Southern blot analysis showed that this sequence is characterized by an interspersed genomic organization. After FISH, hybridization signals were observed as small dots spread throughout all of the chromosomes. pTaq hybridization signals were excluded from 45S rRNA gene loci, but they partly overlapped with 5S rDNA loci. pTaq10 is not a species-specific sequence, as it was also detected in C. berlandieri.

  19. Homoeologous chromosome pairing in the distant hybrid Alstroemeria aurea x A. inodora and the genome composition of its backcross derivatives determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization with species-specific probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamstra, S A; Ramanna, M S; de Jeu, M J; Kuipers, A G; Jacobsen, E

    1999-01-01

    A distant hybrid between two diploid species (2n = 2x = 16), Alstroemeria aurea and A. inodora, was investigated for homoeologous chromosome pairing, crossability with A. inodora and chromosome transmission to its BC1 offspring. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with two species-specific probes, A001-I (A. aurea specific) and D32-13 (A. inodora specific), was used to analyse chromosome pairing in the hybrid and the genome constitution of its BC1 progeny plants. High frequencies of associated chromosomes were observed in both genotypes of the F1 hybrid, A1P2-2 and A1P4. In the former, both univalents and bivalents were found at metaphase I, whereas the latter plant also showed tri- and quadrivalents. Based on the hybridization sites of DNA probes on the chromosomes of both parental species, it was established that hybrid A1P4 contains a reciprocal translocation between the short arm of chromosome 1 and the long arm of chromosome 8 of A. inodora. Despite regular homoeologous chromosome pairing in 30% of the pollen mother cells, both hybrids were highly sterile. They were backcrossed reciprocally with one of the parental species, A. inodora. Two days after pollination, embryo rescue was applied and, eventually, six BC1 progeny plants were obtained. Among these, two were aneuploids (2n = 2x + 1 = 17) and four were triploids (2n = 3x = 24). The aneuploid plants had originated when the interspecific hybrid was used as a female parent, indicating that n eggs were functional in the hybrid. In addition, 2n gametes were also functional in the hybrid, resulting in the four triploid BC1 plants. Of these four plants, three had received 2n pollen grains from the hybrid and one a 2n egg. Using FISH, homoeologous crossing over between the chromosomes of the two parental species in the hybrid was clearly detected in all BC1 plants. The relevance of these results for the process of introgression and the origin of n and 2n gametes are discussed.

  20. Genomic structure and evolution of the ancestral chromosome fusion site in 2q13-2q14.1 and paralogous regions on other human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuxin; Linardopoulou, Elena; Friedman, Cynthia; Williams, Eleanor; Trask, Barbara J

    2002-11-01

    Human chromosome 2 was formed by the head-to-head fusion of two ancestral chromosomes that remained separate in other primates. Sequences that once resided near the ends of the ancestral chromosomes are now interstitially located in 2q13-2q14.1. Portions of these sequences had duplicated to other locations prior to the fusion. Here we present analyses of the genomic structure and evolutionary history of >600 kb surrounding the fusion site and closely related sequences on other human chromosomes. Sequence blocks that closely flank the inverted arrays of degenerate telomere repeats marking the fusion site are duplicated at many, primarily subtelomeric, locations. In addition, large portions of a 168-kb centromere-proximal block are duplicated at 9pter, 9p11.2, and 9q13, with 98%-99% average sequence identity. A 67-kb block on the distal side of the fusion site is highly homologous to sequences at 22qter. A third ~100-kb segment is 96% identical to a region in 2q11.2. By integrating data on the extent and similarity of these paralogous blocks, including the presence of phylogenetically informative repetitive elements, with observations of their chromosomal distribution in nonhuman primates, we infer the order of the duplications that led to their current arrangement. Several of these duplicated blocks may be associated with breakpoints of inversions that occurred during primate evolution and of recurrent chromosome rearrangements in humans.

  1. Cytogenetic maps of homoeologous chromosomes A h01 and D h01 and their integration with the genome assembly in Gossypium hirsutum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuling Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic maps of Gossypium hirsutum (Linnaeus, 1753 homoeologous chromosomes Ah01 and Dh01 were constructed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, using eleven homoeologous-chromosomes-shared bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs clones and one chromosome-specific BAC clone respectively. We compared the cytogenetic maps with the genetic linkage and draft genome assembly maps based on a standardized map unit, relative map position (RMP, which allowed a global view of the relationship of genetic and physical distances along each chromosome, and assembly quality of the draft genome assembly map. By integration of cytogenetic maps with sequence maps of the two chromosomes (Ah01 and Dh01, we inferred the locations of two scaffolds and speculated that some homologous sequences belonging to homoeologous chromosomes were removed as repetitiveness during the sequence assembly. The result offers molecular tools for cotton genomics research and also provides valuable information for the improvement of the draft genome assembly.

  2. Asplenia syndrome in a child with a reciprocal translocation of chromosomes 11 and 20 [46,XX,t(11;20)(q13.1;q13.13)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, S.B.; Muraldharan, K.; Pettay, D. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Failure to establish the left-right embryonic axis results in abnormalities of laterality; situs solitus is replaced by situs inversus totalis or various degrees of heterotaxy involving the heart, great vessels, lungs, liver, spleen, and/or bowel. Laterality syndromes are likely to be genetically heterogeneous although specific human genes have not been identified. Families with dominant, recessive, and X-linked laterality syndromes have been reported as well as individuals with situs abnormalities and chromosome rearrangements. The latter offer the possibility of narrowing the gene search to specific chromosome regions. A recent report described an infant with polysplenia syndrome and a paracentric inversion of chromosome 11 [46,XX,inv(11)(q13q25)pat]. We report the second case of a child with laterality abnormalities and a chromosome rearrangement involving a similar breakpoint on chromosome 11. The proband is a 6 y/o female with mental retardation, dysmorphic features, pulmonic stenosis, asplenia, Hirschsprung disease, and a balanced, reciprocal translocation involving chromosomes 11 and 20 [46,XX,t(11;20)(q13,1;q13.13)pat]. Using DNA probes we have excluded uniparental disomy for chromosomes 11 and 20. If a gene for determination of laterality lies in the 11q13 region, the proband`s abnormalities could be the result of her receiving an allele disrupted by the paternal translocation as well as a mutant allele from her mother. To investigate this possibility, we are studying the segregation of maternal chromosome 11 markers in the proband and her balanced carrier and non-carrier siblings.

  3. Chromosomal context and epigenetic mechanisms control the efficacy of genome editing by rare-cutting designer endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daboussi, Fayza; Zaslavskiy, Mikhail; Poirot, Laurent; Loperfido, Mariana; Gouble, Agnès; Guyot, Valerie; Leduc, Sophie; Galetto, Roman; Grizot, Sylvestre; Oficjalska, Danusia; Perez, Christophe; Delacôte, Fabien; Dupuy, Aurélie; Chion-Sotinel, Isabelle; Le Clerre, Diane; Lebuhotel, Céline; Danos, Olivier; Lemaire, Frédéric; Oussedik, Kahina; Cédrone, Frédéric; Epinat, Jean-Charles; Smith, Julianne; Yáñez-Muñoz, Rafael J; Dickson, George; Popplewell, Linda; Koo, Taeyoung; VandenDriessche, Thierry; Chuah, Marinee K; Duclert, Aymeric; Duchateau, Philippe; Pâques, Frédéric

    2012-07-01

    The ability to specifically engineer the genome of living cells at precise locations using rare-cutting designer endonucleases has broad implications for biotechnology and medicine, particularly for functional genomics, transgenics and gene therapy. However, the potential impact of chromosomal context and epigenetics on designer endonuclease-mediated genome editing is poorly understood. To address this question, we conducted a comprehensive analysis on the efficacy of 37 endonucleases derived from the quintessential I-CreI meganuclease that were specifically designed to cleave 39 different genomic targets. The analysis revealed that the efficiency of targeted mutagenesis at a given chromosomal locus is predictive of that of homologous gene targeting. Consequently, a strong genome-wide correlation was apparent between the efficiency of targeted mutagenesis (≤ 0.1% to ≈ 6%) with that of homologous gene targeting (≤ 0.1% to ≈ 15%). In contrast, the efficiency of targeted mutagenesis or homologous gene targeting at a given chromosomal locus does not correlate with the activity of individual endonucleases on transiently transfected substrates. Finally, we demonstrate that chromatin accessibility modulates the efficacy of rare-cutting endonucleases, accounting for strong position effects. Thus, chromosomal context and epigenetic mechanisms may play a major role in the efficiency rare-cutting endonuclease-induced genome engineering.

  4. Comparative genome sequencing of drosophila pseudoobscura: Chromosomal, gene and cis-element evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, Stephen; Liu, Yue; Bettencourt, Brian R.; Hradecky, Pavel; Letovsky, Stan; Nielsen, Rasmus; Thornton, Kevin; Todd, Melissa J.; Chen, Rui; Meisel, Richard P.; Couronne, Olivier; Hua, Sujun; Smith, Mark A.; Bussemaker, Harmen J.; van Batenburg, Marinus F.; Howells, Sally L.; Scherer, Steven E.; Sodergren, Erica; Matthews, Beverly B.; Crosby, Madeline A.; Schroeder, Andrew J.; Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel; Rives, Catherine M.; Metzker, Michael L.; Muzny, Donna M.; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Havlak, Paul; Durbin, K. James; Egan, Amy; Gill, Rachel; Hume, Jennifer; Morgan, Margaret B.; Miner, George; Hamilton, Cerissa; Huang, Yanmei; Waldron, Lenee; Verduzco, Daniel; Blankenburg, Kerstin P.; Dubchak, Inna; Noor, Mohamed A.F.; Anderson, Wyatt; White, Kevin P.; Clark, Andrew G.; Schaeffer, Stephen W.; Gelbart, William; Weinstock, George M.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2004-04-01

    The genome sequence of a second fruit fly, D. pseudoobscura, presents an opportunity for comparative analysis of a primary model organism D. melanogaster. The vast majority of Drosophila genes have remained on the same arm, but within each arm gene order has been extensively reshuffled leading to the identification of approximately 1300 syntenic blocks. A repetitive sequence is found in the D. pseudoobscura genome at many junctions between adjacent syntenic blocks. Analysis of this novel repetitive element family suggests that recombination between offset elements may have given rise to many paracentric inversions, thereby contributing to the shuffling of gene order in the D. pseudoobscura lineage. Based on sequence similarity and synteny, 10,516 putative orthologs have been identified as a core gene set conserved over 35 My since divergence. Genes expressed in the testes had higher amino acid sequence divergence than the genome wide average consistent with the rapid evolution of sex-specific proteins. Cis-regulatory sequences are more conserved than control sequences between the species but the difference is slight, suggesting that the evolution of cis-regulatory elements is flexible. Overall, a picture of repeat mediated chromosomal rearrangement, and high co-adaptation of both male genes and cis-regulatory sequences emerges as important themes of genome divergence between these species of Drosophila.

  5. Chromosomal aberrations in benign and malignant Bilharzia-associated bladder lesions analyzed by comparative genomic hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Muntaser

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bilharzia-associated bladder cancer (BAC is a major health problem in countries where urinary schistosomiasis is endemic. Characterization of the genetic alterations in this cancer might enhance our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of the disease but, in contrast to nonbilharzia bladder cancer, BAC has rarely been the object of such scrutiny. In the present study, we aimed to characterize chromosomal imbalances in benign and malignant post-bilharzial lesions, and to determine whether their unique etiology yields a distinct cytogenetic profile as compared to chemically induced bladder tumors. Methods DNAs from 20 archival paraffin-embedded post-bilharzial bladder lesions (6 benign and 14 malignant obtained from Sudanese patients (12 males and 8 females with a history of urinary bilharziasis were investigated for chromosomal imbalances using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH. Subsequent FISH analysis with pericentromeric probes was performed on paraffin sections of the same cases to confirm the CGH results. Results Seven of the 20 lesions (6 carcinomas and one granuloma showed chromosomal imbalances varying from 1 to 6 changes. The most common chromosomal imbalances detected were losses of 1p21-31, 8p21-pter, and 9p and gain of 19p material, seen in three cases each, including the benign lesion. Conclusion Most of the detected imbalances have been repeatedly reported in non-bilharzial bladder carcinomas, suggesting that the cytogenetic profiles of chemical- and bilharzia-induced carcinomas are largely similar. However, loss of 9p seems to be more ubiquitous in BAC than in bladder cancer in industrialized countries.

  6. Microarray comparative genomic hybridization detection of chromosomal imbalances in uterine cervix carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García José

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH has been applied to all stages of cervical carcinoma progression, defining a specific pattern of chromosomal imbalances in this tumor. However, given its limited spatial resolution, chromosomal CGH has offered only general information regarding the possible genetic targets of DNA copy number changes. Methods In order to further define specific DNA copy number changes in cervical cancer, we analyzed 20 cervical samples (3 pre-malignant lesions, 10 invasive tumors, and 7 cell lines, using the GenoSensor microarray CGH system to define particular genetic targets that suffer copy number changes. Results The most common DNA gains detected by array CGH in the invasive samples were located at the RBP1-RBP2 (3q21-q22 genes, the sub-telomeric clone C84C11/T3 (5ptel, D5S23 (5p15.2 and the DAB2 gene (5p13 in 58.8% of the samples. The most common losses were found at the FHIT gene (3p14.2 in 47% of the samples, followed by deletions at D8S504 (8p23.3, CTDP1-SHGC- 145820 (18qtel, KIT (4q11-q12, D1S427-FAF1 (1p32.3, D9S325 (9qtel, EIF4E (eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E, 4q24, RB1 (13q14, and DXS7132 (Xq12 present in 5/17 (29.4% of the samples. Conclusion Our results confirm the presence of a specific pattern of chromosomal imbalances in cervical carcinoma and define specific targets that are suffering DNA copy number changes in this neoplasm.

  7. Microarray comparative genomic hybridization detection of chromosomal imbalances in uterine cervix carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Alfredo; Baudis, Michael; Petersen, Iver; Arreola, Hugo; Piña, Patricia; Vázquez-Ortiz, Guelaguetza; Hernández, Dulce; González, José; Lazos, Minerva; López, Ricardo; Pérez, Carlos; García, José; Vázquez, Karla; Alatorre, Brenda; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2005-01-01

    Background Chromosomal Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) has been applied to all stages of cervical carcinoma progression, defining a specific pattern of chromosomal imbalances in this tumor. However, given its limited spatial resolution, chromosomal CGH has offered only general information regarding the possible genetic targets of DNA copy number changes. Methods In order to further define specific DNA copy number changes in cervical cancer, we analyzed 20 cervical samples (3 pre-malignant lesions, 10 invasive tumors, and 7 cell lines), using the GenoSensor microarray CGH system to define particular genetic targets that suffer copy number changes. Results The most common DNA gains detected by array CGH in the invasive samples were located at the RBP1-RBP2 (3q21-q22) genes, the sub-telomeric clone C84C11/T3 (5ptel), D5S23 (5p15.2) and the DAB2 gene (5p13) in 58.8% of the samples. The most common losses were found at the FHIT gene (3p14.2) in 47% of the samples, followed by deletions at D8S504 (8p23.3), CTDP1-SHGC- 145820 (18qtel), KIT (4q11-q12), D1S427-FAF1 (1p32.3), D9S325 (9qtel), EIF4E (eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E, 4q24), RB1 (13q14), and DXS7132 (Xq12) present in 5/17 (29.4%) of the samples. Conclusion Our results confirm the presence of a specific pattern of chromosomal imbalances in cervical carcinoma and define specific targets that are suffering DNA copy number changes in this neoplasm. PMID:16004614

  8. Genome-wide copy number profiling on high-density bacterial artificial chromosomes, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and oligonucleotide microarrays: a platform comparison based on statistical power analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hehir-Kwa, J.Y.; Egmont-Peterson, M.; Janssen, I.M.; Smeets, D.F.C.M.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.; Veltman, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, comparative genomic hybridization onto bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) arrays (array-based comparative genomic hybridization) has proved to be successful for the detection of submicroscopic DNA copy-number variations in health and disease. Technological improvements to achieve a

  9. The chromosomal distribution of microsatellite repeats in the genome of the wolf fish Hoplias malabaricus, focusing on the sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioffi, M B; Kejnovsky, E; Bertollo, L A C

    2011-01-01

    Distribution of 12 mono-, di- and tri-nucleotide microsatellites on the chromosomes of 2 karyomorphs with 2 distinct sex chromosome systems (a simple XX/XY - karyomorph B and a multiple X(1)X(1)X(2)X(2)/X(1)X(2)Y - karyomorph D) in Hoplias malabaricus, commonly referred to as wolf fish, was studied using their physical mapping with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The distribution patterns of different microsatellites along the chromosomes varied considerably. Strong hybridization signals were observed at subtelomeric and heterochromatic regions of several autosomes, with a different accumulation on the sex chromosomes. A massive accumulation was found in the heterochromatic region of the X chromosome of karyomorph B, whereas microsatellites were gathered at centromeres of both X chromosomes as well as in corresponding regions of the neo-Y chromosome in karyomorph D. Our findings are likely in agreement with models that predict the accumulation of repetitive DNA sequences in regions with very low recombination. This process is however in contrast with what was observed in multiple systems, where such a reduction might be facilitated by the chromosomal rearrangements that are directly associated with the origin of these systems.

  10. High resolution radiation hybrid maps of bovine chromosomes 19 and 29: comparison with the bovine genome sequence assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Womack James E

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High resolution radiation hybrid (RH maps can facilitate genome sequence assembly by correctly ordering genes and genetic markers along chromosomes. The objective of the present study was to generate high resolution RH maps of bovine chromosomes 19 (BTA19 and 29 (BTA29, and compare them with the current 7.1X bovine genome sequence assembly (bovine build 3.1. We have chosen BTA19 and 29 as candidate chromosomes for mapping, since many Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL for the traits of carcass merit and residual feed intake have been identified on these chromosomes. Results We have constructed high resolution maps of BTA19 and BTA29 consisting of 555 and 253 Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP markers respectively using a 12,000 rad whole genome RH panel. With these markers, the RH map of BTA19 and BTA29 extended to 4591.4 cR and 2884.1 cR in length respectively. When aligned with the current bovine build 3.1, the order of markers on the RH map for BTA19 and 29 showed inconsistencies with respect to the genome assembly. Maps of both the chromosomes show that there is a significant internal rearrangement of the markers involving displacement, inversion and flips within the scaffolds with some scaffolds being misplaced in the genome assembly. We also constructed cattle-human comparative maps of these chromosomes which showed an overall agreement with the comparative maps published previously. However, minor discrepancies in the orientation of few homologous synteny blocks were observed. Conclusion The high resolution maps of BTA19 (average 1 locus/139 kb and BTA29 (average 1 locus/208 kb presented in this study suggest that by the incorporation of RH mapping information, the current bovine genome sequence assembly can be significantly improved. Furthermore, these maps can serve as a potential resource for fine mapping QTL and identification of causative mutations underlying QTL for economically important traits.

  11. Genomic Structure and Evolution of the Ancestral Chromosome Fusion Site in 2q13–2q14.1 and Paralogous Regions on Other Human Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuxin; Linardopoulou, Elena; Friedman, Cynthia; Williams, Eleanor; Trask, Barbara J.

    2002-01-01

    Human chromosome 2 was formed by the head-to-head fusion of two ancestral chromosomes that remained separate in other primates. Sequences that once resided near the ends of the ancestral chromosomes are now interstitially located in 2q13–2q14.1. Portions of these sequences had duplicated to other locations prior to the fusion. Here we present analyses of the genomic structure and evolutionary history of >600 kb surrounding the fusion site and closely related sequences on other human chromosomes. Sequence blocks that closely flank the inverted arrays of degenerate telomere repeats marking the fusion site are duplicated at many, primarily subtelomeric, locations. In addition, large portions of a 168-kb centromere-proximal block are duplicated at 9pter, 9p11.2, and 9q13, with 98%–99% average sequence identity. A 67-kb block on the distal side of the fusion site is highly homologous to sequences at 22qter. A third ∼100-kb segment is 96% identical to a region in 2q11.2. By integrating data on the extent and similarity of these paralogous blocks, including the presence of phylogenetically informative repetitive elements, with observations of their chromosomal distribution in nonhuman primates, we infer the order of the duplications that led to their current arrangement. Several of these duplicated blocks may be associated with breakpoints of inversions that occurred during primate evolution and of recurrent chromosome rearrangements in humans. [Supplemental material is available online at http://www.genome.org. The following individuals kindly provided reagents, samples, or unpublished information as indicated in the paper: T. Newman, C. Harris, and J. Young.] PMID:12421751

  12. Molecular characterization of a genomic interval with highly uneven recombination distribution on maize chromosome 10 L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Xu, Jianping; Tang, Yuanping; Zhou, Liangliang; Wang, Fei; Xu, Zhengkai; Song, Rentao

    2011-09-01

    Homologous recombination in meiosis provides the evolutionary driving force in eukaryotic organisms by generating genetic variability. Meiotic recombination does not always occur evenly across the chromosome, and therefore genetic and physical distances are not consistently in proportion. We discovered a 278 kb interval on the long arm of chromosome 10 (10 L) through analyzed 13,933 descendants of backcross population. The recombinant events distributed unevenly in the interval. The ratio of genetic to physical distance in the interval fluctuated about 47-fold. With the assistance of molecular markers, the interval was divided into several subintervals for further characterization. In agreement with previous observations, high gene-density regions such as subinterval A and B were also genetic recombination hot subintervals, and repetitive sequence-riched region such as subinterval C was also found to be recombination inert at the detection level of the study. However, we found an unusual subinterval D, in which the 72-kb region contained 6 genes. The gene-density of subinterval D was 5.8 times that of the genome-wide average. The ratio of genetic to physical distance in subinterval D was 0.58 cM/Mb, only about 3/4 of the genome average. We carried out an analysis of sequence polymorphisms and methylation status in subinterval D, and the potential causes of recombination suppression were discussed. This study was another case of a detailed genetic analysis of an unusual recombination region in the maize genome. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

  13. Whole-genome sequencing identifies genomic heterogeneity at a nucleotide and chromosomal level in bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Carl D.; Liu, Pengyuan; Woloszynska-Read, Anna; Zhang, Jianmin; Luo, Wei; Qin, Maochun; Bshara, Wiam; Conroy, Jeffrey M.; Sabatini, Linda; Vedell, Peter; Xiong, Donghai; Liu, Song; Wang, Jianmin; Shen, He; Li, Yinwei; Omilian, Angela R.; Hill, Annette; Head, Karen; Guru, Khurshid; Kunnev, Dimiter; Leach, Robert; Eng, Kevin H.; Darlak, Christopher; Hoeflich, Christopher; Veeranki, Srividya; Glenn, Sean; You, Ming; Pruitt, Steven C.; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    Using complete genome analysis, we sequenced five bladder tumors accrued from patients with muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (TCC-UB) and identified a spectrum of genomic aberrations. In three tumors, complex genotype changes were noted. All three had tumor protein p53 mutations and a relatively large number of single-nucleotide variants (SNVs; average of 11.2 per megabase), structural variants (SVs; average of 46), or both. This group was best characterized by chromothripsis and the presence of subclonal populations of neoplastic cells or intratumoral mutational heterogeneity. Here, we provide evidence that the process of chromothripsis in TCC-UB is mediated by nonhomologous end-joining using kilobase, rather than megabase, fragments of DNA, which we refer to as “stitchers,” to repair this process. We postulate that a potential unifying theme among tumors with the more complex genotype group is a defective replication–licensing complex. A second group (two bladder tumors) had no chromothripsis, and a simpler genotype, WT tumor protein p53, had relatively few SNVs (average of 5.9 per megabase) and only a single SV. There was no evidence of a subclonal population of neoplastic cells. In this group, we used a preclinical model of bladder carcinoma cell lines to study a unique SV (translocation and amplification) of the gene glutamate receptor ionotropic N-methyl D-aspertate as a potential new therapeutic target in bladder cancer. PMID:24469795

  14. Reciprocal uniparental disomy in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Sabrina L; Petes, Thomas D

    2012-06-19

    In the diploid cells of most organisms, including humans, each chromosome is usually distinguishable from its partner homolog by multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms. One common type of genetic alteration observed in tumor cells is uniparental disomy (UPD), in which a pair of homologous chromosomes are derived from a single parent, resulting in loss of heterozygosity for all single-nucleotide polymorphisms while maintaining diploidy. Somatic UPD events are usually explained as reflecting two consecutive nondisjunction events. Here we report a previously undescribed mode of chromosome segregation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which one cell division produces daughter cells with reciprocal UPD for the same pair of chromosomes without an aneuploid intermediate. One pair of sister chromatids is segregated into one daughter cell and the other pair is segregated into the other daughter cell, mimicking a meiotic chromosome segregation pattern. We term this process "reciprocal uniparental disomy."

  15. From amplification to gene in thyroid cancer: A high-resolution mapped bacterial-artificial-chromosome resource for cancer chromosome aberrations guides gene discovery after comparative genome hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, X.N.; Gonsky, R.; Korenberg, J.R. [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Cedars-Sinai Research Inst.; Knauf, J.A.; Fagin, J.A. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Div. of Endocrinology/Metabolism; Wang, M.; Lai, E.H. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Pharmacology; Chissoe, S. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States). Genome Sequencing

    1998-08-01

    Chromosome rearrangements associated with neoplasms provide a rich resource for definition of the pathways of tumorigenesis. The power of comparative genome hybridization (CGH) to identify novel genes depends on the existence of suitable markers, which are lacking throughout most of the genome. The authors now report a general approach that translates CGH data into higher-resolution genomic-clone data that are then used to define the genes located in aneuploid regions. They used CGH to study 33 thyroid-tumor DNAs and two tumor-cell-line DNAs. The results revealed amplifications of chromosome band 2p21, with less-intense amplification on 2p13, 19q13.1, and 1p36 and with least-intense amplification on 1p34, 1q42, 5q31, 5q33-34, 9q32-34, and 14q32. To define the 2p21 region amplified, a dense array of 373 FISH-mapped chromosome 2 bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) was constructed, and 87 of these were hybridized to a tumor-cell line. Four BACs carried genomic DNA that was amplified in these cells. The maximum amplified region was narrowed to 3--6 Mb by multicolor FISH with the flanking BACs, and the minimum amplicon size was defined by a contig of 420 kb. Sequence analysis of the amplified BAC 1D9 revealed a fragment of the gene, encoding protein kinase C epsilon (PKC{epsilon}), that was then shown to be amplified and rearranged in tumor cells. In summary, CGH combined with a dense mapped resource of BACs and large-scale sequencing has led directly to the definition of PKC{epsilon} as a previously unmapped candidate gene involved in thyroid tumorigenesis.

  16. A dense linkage map for Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) reveals variable chromosomal divergence after an ancestral whole genome duplication event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieuc, Marine S O; Waters, Charles D; Seeb, James E; Naish, Kerry A

    2014-03-20

    Comparisons between the genomes of salmon species reveal that they underwent extensive chromosomal rearrangements following whole genome duplication that occurred in their lineage 58-63 million years ago. Extant salmonids are diploid, but occasional pairing between homeologous chromosomes exists in males. The consequences of re-diploidization can be characterized by mapping the position of duplicated loci in such species. Linkage maps are also a valuable tool for genome-wide applications such as genome-wide association studies, quantitative trait loci mapping or genome scans. Here, we investigated chromosomal evolution in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) after genome duplication by mapping 7146 restriction-site associated DNA loci in gynogenetic haploid, gynogenetic diploid, and diploid crosses. In the process, we developed a reference database of restriction-site associated DNA loci for Chinook salmon comprising 48528 non-duplicated loci and 6409 known duplicated loci, which will facilitate locus identification and data sharing. We created a very dense linkage map anchored to all 34 chromosomes for the species, and all arms were identified through centromere mapping. The map positions of 799 duplicated loci revealed that homeologous pairs have diverged at different rates following whole genome duplication, and that degree of differentiation along arms was variable. Many of the homeologous pairs with high numbers of duplicated markers appear conserved with other salmon species, suggesting that retention of conserved homeologous pairing in some arms preceded species divergence. As chromosome arms are highly conserved across species, the major resources developed for Chinook salmon in this study are also relevant for other related species.

  17. Hi-C-constrained physical models of human chromosomes recover functionally-related properties of genome organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Stefano, Marco; Paulsen, Jonas; Lien, Tonje G.; Hovig, Eivind; Micheletti, Cristian

    2016-10-01

    Combining genome-wide structural models with phenomenological data is at the forefront of efforts to understand the organizational principles regulating the human genome. Here, we use chromosome-chromosome contact data as knowledge-based constraints for large-scale three-dimensional models of the human diploid genome. The resulting models remain minimally entangled and acquire several functional features that are observed in vivo and that were never used as input for the model. We find, for instance, that gene-rich, active regions are drawn towards the nuclear center, while gene poor and lamina associated domains are pushed to the periphery. These and other properties persist upon adding local contact constraints, suggesting their compatibility with non-local constraints for the genome organization. The results show that suitable combinations of data analysis and physical modelling can expose the unexpectedly rich functionally-related properties implicit in chromosome-chromosome contact data. Specific directions are suggested for further developments based on combining experimental data analysis and genomic structural modelling.

  18. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis shows different epidemiology of chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-carrying Clostridium perfringens type A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Päivi Lahti

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens, one of the most common causes of food poisonings, can carry the enterotoxin gene, cpe, in its chromosome or on a plasmid. C. perfringens food poisonings are more frequently caused by the chromosomal cpe-carrying strains, while the plasmid-borne cpe-positive genotypes are more commonly found in the human feces and environmental samples. Different tolerance to food processing conditions by the plasmid-borne and chromosomal cpe-carrying strains has been reported, but the reservoirs and contamination routes of enterotoxin-producing C. perfringens remain unknown. A comparative genomic hybridization (CGH analysis with a DNA microarray based on three C. perfringens type A genomes was conducted to shed light on the epidemiology of C. perfringens food poisonings caused by plasmid-borne and chromosomal cpe-carrying strains by comparing chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-positive and cpe-negative C. perfringens isolates from human, animal, environmental, and food samples. The chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-positive C. perfringens genotypes formed two distinct clusters. Variable genes were involved with myo-inositol, ethanolamine and cellobiose metabolism, suggesting a new epidemiological model for C. perfringens food poisonings. The CGH results were complemented with growth studies, which demonstrated different myo-inositol, ethanolamine, and cellobiose metabolism between the chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-carrying strains. These findings support a ubiquitous occurrence of the plasmid-borne cpe-positive strains and their adaptation to the mammalian intestine, whereas the chromosomal cpe-positive strains appear to have a narrow niche in environments containing degrading plant material. Thus the epidemiology of the food poisonings caused by two populations appears different, the plasmid-borne cpe-positive strains probably contaminating foods via humans and the chromosomal strains being connected to plant material.

  19. The SIDER2 elements, interspersed repeated sequences that populate the Leishmania genomes, constitute subfamilies showing chromosomal proximity relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M Carmen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania are causative agents of a diverse spectrum of human diseases collectively known as leishmaniasis. These eukaryotic pathogens that diverged early from the main eukaryotic lineage possess a number of unusual genomic, molecular and biochemical features. The completion of the genome projects for three Leishmania species has generated invaluable information enabling a direct analysis of genome structure and organization. Results By using DNA macroarrays, made with Leishmania infantum genomic clones and hybridized with total DNA from the parasite, we identified a clone containing a repeated sequence. An analysis of the recently completed genome sequence of L. infantum, using this repeated sequence as bait, led to the identification of a new class of repeated elements that are interspersed along the different L. infantum chromosomes. These elements turned out to be homologues of SIDER2 sequences, which were recently identified in the Leishmania major genome; thus, we adopted this nomenclature for the Leishmania elements described herein. Since SIDER2 elements are very heterogeneous in sequence, their precise identification is rather laborious. We have characterized 54 LiSIDER2 elements in chromosome 32 and 27 ones in chromosome 20. The mean size for these elements is 550 bp and their sequence is G+C rich (mean value of 66.5%. On the basis of sequence similarity, these elements can be grouped in subfamilies that show a remarkable relationship of proximity, i.e. SIDER2s of a given subfamily locate close in a chromosomal region without intercalating elements. For comparative purposes, we have identified the SIDER2 elements existing in L. major and Leishmania braziliensis chromosomes 32. While SIDER2 elements are highly conserved both in number and location between L. infantum and L. major, no such conservation exists when comparing with SIDER2s in L. braziliensis chromosome 32. Conclusion

  20. Complete Sequencing and Chromosome-Scale Genome Assembly of the Industrial Progenitor Strain P2niaD18 from the Penicillin Producer Penicillium chrysogenum

    OpenAIRE

    Specht, Thomas; Dahlmann, Tim A.; Zadra, Ivo; Kürnsteiner, Hubert; Kück, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum is the major industrial producer of the β-lactam antibiotic penicillin. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the industrial progenitor strain P. chrysogenum P2niaD18 in a chromosome-scale genome assembly. P2niaD18 is distinguished from the recently sequenced P. chrysogenum Wisconsin 54-1255 strain by major chromosomal rearrangements leading to a modified chromosomal architecture.

  1. Tracembler – software for in-silico chromosome walking in unassembled genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilkerson Matthew D

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole genome shotgun sequencing produces increasingly higher coverage of a genome with random sequence reads. Progressive whole genome assembly and eventual finishing sequencing is a process that typically takes several years for large eukaryotic genomes. In the interim, all sequence reads of public sequencing projects are made available in repositories such as the NCBI Trace Archive. For a particular locus, sequencing coverage may be high enough early on to produce a reliable local genome assembly. We have developed software, Tracembler, that facilitates in silico chromosome walking by recursively assembling reads of a selected species from the NCBI Trace Archive starting with reads that significantly match sequence seeds supplied by the user. Results Tracembler takes one or multiple DNA or protein sequence(s as input to the NCBI Trace Archive BLAST engine to identify matching sequence reads from a species of interest. The BLAST searches are carried out recursively such that BLAST matching sequences identified in previous rounds of searches are used as new queries in subsequent rounds of BLAST searches. The recursive BLAST search stops when either no more new matching sequences are found, a given maximal number of queries is exhausted, or a specified maximum number of rounds of recursion is reached. All the BLAST matching sequences are then assembled into contigs based on significant sequence overlaps using the CAP3 program. We demonstrate the validity of the concept and software implementation with an example of successfully recovering a full-length Chrm2 gene as well as its upstream and downstream genomic regions from Rattus norvegicus reads. In a second example, a query with two adjacent Medicago truncatula genes as seeds resulted in a contig that likely identifies the microsyntenic homologous soybean locus. Conclusion Tracembler streamlines the process of recursive database searches, sequence assembly, and gene

  2. Identification and chromosomal distribution of copia-like retrotransposon sequences in the coffee (Coffea L. genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Carlos Herrera

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of copia-like transposable elements in seven coffee (Coffea sp. species, including the cultivated Coffea arabica, was investigated. The highly conserved domains of the reverse transcriptase (RT present in the copia retrotransposons were amplified by PCR using degenerated primers. Fragments of roughly 300 bp were obtained and the nucleotide sequence was determined for 36 clones, 19 of which showed good quality. The deduced amino acid sequences were compared by multiple alignment analysis. The data suggested two distinct coffee RT groups, designated as CRTG1 and CRTG2. The sequence identities among the groups ranged from 52 to 60% for CRTG1 and 74 to 85% for CRTG2. The multiple alignment analysis revealed that some of the clones in CRTG1 were closely related to the representative elements present in other plant species such as Brassica napus, Populus ciliata and Picea abis. Furthermore, the chromosomal localization of the RT domains in C. arabica and their putative ancestors was investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analysis. FISH signals were observed throughout the chromosomes following a similar dispersed pattern with some localized regions exhibiting higher concentrations of those elements, providing new evidence of their relative conservation and stability in the coffee genome

  3. Detecting Spatial Chromatin Organization by Chromosome Conformation Capture II: Genome-Wide Profiling by Hi-C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vietri Rudan, Matteo; Hadjur, Suzana; Sexton, Tom

    2017-01-01

    The chromosome conformation capture (3C) method has been invaluable in studying chromatin interactions in a population of cells at a resolution surpassing that of light microscopy, for example in the detection of functional contacts between enhancers and promoters. Recent developments in sequencing-based chromosomal contact mapping (Hi-C, 5C and 4C-Seq) have allowed researchers to interrogate pairwise chromatin interactions on a wider scale, shedding light on the three-dimensional organization of chromosomes. These methods present significant technical and bioinformatic challenges to consider at the start of the project. Here, we describe two alternative methods for Hi-C, depending on the size of the genome, and discuss the major computational approaches to convert the raw sequencing data into meaningful models of how genomes are organized.

  4. Comparative genome sequencing of Drosophila pseudoobscura: Chromosomal, gene, and cis-element evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richards, Stephen; Liu, Yue; Bettencourt, Brian R.;

    2005-01-01

    between the species-but the difference is slight, suggesting that the evolution of cis-regulatory elements is flexible. Overall, a pattern of repeat-mediated chromosomal rearrangement, and high coadaptation of both male genes and cis-regulatory sequences emerges as important themes of genome divergence...

  5. The Reciprocalizer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2013-01-01

    The geometry of reciprocal structures is extremely difficult to predict and control, and it cannot be described with the available CAD software or by hierarchical, associative parametric modellers. The geometry of a network of reciprocally connected elements is a characteristic that emerges, bottom......-up, from the complex interaction between all the elements shape, topology and position, and requires numerical solution of the geometric compatibility. This paper presents a design tool, the “Reciprocalizer”, that is able to solve the geometry of reciprocal structures. The tool has been tested...

  6. Chromosomal Copy Number Variation in Saccharomyces pastorianus Is Evidence for Extensive Genome Dynamics in Industrial Lager Brewing Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, M; Bolat, I; Nijkamp, J F; Ramos, E; Luttik, M A H; Koopman, F; Geertman, J M; de Ridder, D; Pronk, J T; Daran, J-M

    2015-09-01

    Lager brewing strains of Saccharomyces pastorianus are natural interspecific hybrids originating from the spontaneous hybridization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces eubayanus. Over the past 500 years, S. pastorianus has been domesticated to become one of the most important industrial microorganisms. Production of lager-type beers requires a set of essential phenotypes, including the ability to ferment maltose and maltotriose at low temperature, the production of flavors and aromas, and the ability to flocculate. Understanding of the molecular basis of complex brewing-related phenotypic traits is a prerequisite for rational strain improvement. While genome sequences have been reported, the variability and dynamics of S. pastorianus genomes have not been investigated in detail. Here, using deep sequencing and chromosome copy number analysis, we showed that S. pastorianus strain CBS1483 exhibited extensive aneuploidy. This was confirmed by quantitative PCR and by flow cytometry. As a direct consequence of this aneuploidy, a massive number of sequence variants was identified, leading to at least 1,800 additional protein variants in S. pastorianus CBS1483. Analysis of eight additional S. pastorianus strains revealed that the previously defined group I strains showed comparable karyotypes, while group II strains showed large interstrain karyotypic variability. Comparison of three strains with nearly identical genome sequences revealed substantial chromosome copy number variation, which may contribute to strain-specific phenotypic traits. The observed variability of lager yeast genomes demonstrates that systematic linking of genotype to phenotype requires a three-dimensional genome analysis encompassing physical chromosomal structures, the copy number of individual chromosomes or chromosomal regions, and the allelic variation of copies of individual genes.

  7. Chromosome Scale Genome Assembly andTranscriptome Profiling of Nannochloropsisgaditana in Nitrogen Depletion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Nannochloropsis is rapidly emerging as a model organism for the study of biofuel production in microalgae.Here, we report a high-quality genomic assembly of Nannochloropsis gaditana, consisting of large contigs, up to 500 kbplong, and scaffolds that in most cases span the entire length of the chromosomes. We identified 10646 complete genesand characterized possible alternative transcripts. The annotation of the predicted genes and the analysis of cellular pro-cesses revealed traits relevant for the genetic improvement of this organism such as genes involved in DNA recombina-tion, RNA silencing, and cell wall synthesis. We also analyzed the modification of the transcriptional profile in nitrogendeficiencyma condition known to stimulate lipid accumulation. While the content of lipids increased, we did not detectmajor changes in expression of the genes involved in their biosynthesis. At the same time, we observed a very signifi-cant down-regulation of mitochondrial gene expression, suggesting that part of the AcetyI-CoA and NAD(P)H, normallyoxidized through the mitochondrial respiration, would be made available for fatty acids synthesis, increasing the fluxthrough the lipid biosynthetic pathway. Finally, we released an information resource of the genomic data of IV. gaditana,available online at www.nannochloropsis.org.

  8. Construction and Preliminary Characterization Analysis of Wuzhishan Miniature Pig Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Library with Approximately 8-Fold Genome Equivalent Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changqing Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries have been invaluable tools for the genome-wide genetic dissection of complex organisms. Here, we report the construction and characterization of a high-redundancy BAC library from a very valuable pig breed in China, Wuzhishan miniature pig (Sus scrofa, using its blood cells and fibroblasts, respectively. The library contains approximately 153,600 clones ordered in 40 superpools of 10 × 384-deep well microplates. The average insert size of BAC clones was estimated to be 152.3 kb, representing approximately 7.68 genome equivalents of the porcine haploid genome and a 99.93% statistical probability of obtaining at least one clone containing a unique DNA sequence in the library. 19 pairs of microsatellite marker primers covering porcine chromosomes were used for screening the BAC library, which showed that each of these markers was positive in the library; the positive clone number was 2 to 9, and the average number was 7.89, which was consistent with 7.68-fold coverage of the porcine genome. And there were no significant differences of genomic BAC library from blood cells and fibroblast cells. Therefore, we identified 19 microsatellite markers that could potentially be used as genetic markers. As a result, this BAC library will serve as a valuable resource for gene identification, physical mapping, and comparative genomics and large-scale genome sequencing in the porcine.

  9. Reconstruction of genomic rearrangements in great apes and gibbons by chromosome painting

    OpenAIRE

    Jauch, Anna; Wienberg, Johannes; Stanyon, Roscoe; Arnold, N; S. Tofanelli; ISHIDA, T.; Cremer, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    The homology between hylobatid chromosomes and other primates has long remained elusive. We used chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization of all human chromosome-specific DNA libraries to "paint" the chromosomes of primates and establish homologies between the human, great ape (chimpanzee, gorilla, and orangutan), and gibbon karyotypes (Hylobates lar species group, 2n = 44). The hybridization patterns unequivocally demonstrate the high degree of chromosomal homology and synteny of great ...

  10. New sequence-based data on the relative DNA contents of chromosomes in the normal male and female human diploid genomes for radiation molecular cytogenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Repin Mikhail V

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this work is to obtain the correct relative DNA contents of chromosomes in the normal male and female human diploid genomes for the use at FISH analysis of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. Results The relative DNA contents of chromosomes in the male and female human diploid genomes have been calculated from the publicly available international Human Genome Project data. New sequence-based data on the relative DNA contents of human chromosomes were compared with the data recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency in 2001. The differences in the values of the relative DNA contents of chromosomes obtained by using different approaches for 15 human chromosomes, mainly for large chromosomes, were below 2%. For the chromosomes 13, 17, 20 and 22 the differences were above 5%. Conclusion New sequence-based data on the relative DNA contents of chromosomes in the normal male and female human diploid genomes were obtained. This approach, based on the genome sequence, can be recommended for the use in radiation molecular cytogenetics.

  11. Human gene encoding prostacyclin synthase (PTGIS): Genomic organization, chromosomal localization, and promoter activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Chieko; Yabuki, Tomoko; Inoue, Hiroyasu [National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, Osaka (Japan)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    The prostacyclin synthase gene isolated from human genomic libraries (PTGIS) consists of 10 exons spanning approximately 60 kb. All the splice donor and acceptor sites conform to the GT/AG rule. Genomic Southern blot and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses revealed that the human prostacyclin synthase gene is present as a single copy per haploid genome and is localized on chromosome 20q13.11-q13.13. The 1.5-kb sequence of the 5{prime} of the translational initiation site contained both GC-rich and pyrimidine-rich regions and consensus sequences of the transcription factor recognition sites such as Sp1, AP-2, the interferon-{gamma} response element, GATA, NF-{kappa}B, the CACCC box, and the glucocorticoid response element. The core binding sequence (GAGACC) of the shear stress responsive element was also found in the 5{prime}-flanking region of the gene. The major product of the primer extension analysis suggested that the transcription of the gene started from the positions around 49 bp upstream of the translational initiation codon. Transient transfection experiments using human aortic and bovine arterial endothelial cells demonstrated that the GC-rich region (positions -145 to -10) possessed a significant promoter activity. The 6-kb downstream sequence of the translational termination codon contained multiple polyadenylation signals, Alu repeat sequences, and the consensus sequence of the primate-repetitive DNA element, MER1. Two sizes of the prostacyclin synthase mRNAs (approximately 6 and 3.3 kb) were detected with the human aorta and lung. RNA blot hybridization analysis using the 3{prime}-untranslated region as probe indicated that the sizes of the 3{prime}-flanking regions were different in the major 6-kb and minor 3.3-kb mRNAs. 54 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Repetitive genome elements in a European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, bacterial artificial chromosome library were indicated by bacterial artificial chromosome end sequencing and development of sequence tag site markers: implications for lepidopteran genomic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Brad S; Sumerford, Douglas V; Hellmich, Richard L; Lewis, Leslie C

    2009-01-01

    The European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, is a serious pest of food, fiber, and biofuel crops in Europe, North America, and Asia and a model system for insect olfaction and speciation. A bacterial artificial chromosome library constructed for O. nubilalis contains 36 864 clones with an estimated average insert size of >or=120 kb and genome coverage of 8.8-fold. Screening OnB1 clones comprising approximately 2.76 genome equivalents determined the physical position of 24 sequence tag site markers, including markers linked to ecologically important and Bacillus thuringiensis toxin resistance traits. OnB1 bacterial artificial chromosome end sequence reads (GenBank dbGSS accessions ET217010 to ET217273) showed homology to annotated genes or expressed sequence tags and identified repetitive genome elements, O. nubilalis miniature subterminal inverted repeat transposable elements (OnMITE01 and OnMITE02), and ezi-like long interspersed nuclear elements. Mobility of OnMITE01 was demonstrated by the presence or absence in O. nubilalis of introns at two different loci. A (GTCT)n tetranucleotide repeat at the 5' ends of OnMITE01 and OnMITE02 are evidence for transposon-mediated movement of lepidopteran microsatellite loci. The number of repetitive elements in lepidopteran genomes will affect genome assembly and marker development. Single-locus sequence tag site markers described here have downstream application for integration within linkage maps and comparative genomic studies.

  13. The human glia maturation factor-gamma gene: genomic structure and mutation analysis in gliomas with chromosome 19q loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, N; Smith, J S; Tachibana, I; Lee, H K; Pohl, U; Portier, B P; Louis, D N; Jenkins, R B

    1999-09-01

    Human glia maturation factor-gamma (hGMF-gamma) is a recently identified gene that may be involved in glial differentiation, neural regeneration, and inhibition of tumor cell proliferation. The gene maps to the long arm of chromosome 19 at band q13.2, a region that is frequently deleted in human malignant gliomas and is thus suspected to harbor a glioma tumor suppressor gene. Given the putative role of hGMF-gamma in cell differentiation and proliferation and its localization to chromosome 19q13, this gene is an interesting candidate for the chromosome 19q glioma tumor suppressor gene. To evaluate this possibility, we determined the genomic structure of human hGMF-gamma and performed mutation screening in a series of 41 gliomas with and without allelic loss of chromosome 19q. Mutations were not detected, which suggests that hGMF-gamma is not the chromosome 19q glioma suppressor gene. However, the elucidation of the genomic structure of hGMF-gamma may prove useful in future investigations of hGMF-gamma in the normal adult and developing human nervous system.

  14. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Final progress report, 1 March 1991--28 February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, F.T.

    1994-04-01

    The objectives of this grant proposal include (1) development of a chromosome microdissection and PCR-mediated microcloning technology, (2) application of this microtechnology to the construction of region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. During this grant period, the authors have successfully developed this microtechnology and have applied it to the construction of microdissection libraries for the following chromosome regions: a whole chromosome 21 (21E), 2 region-specific libraries for the long arm of chromosome 2, 2q35-q37 (2Q1) and 2q33-q35 (2Q2), and 4 region-specific libraries for the entire short arm of chromosome 2, 2p23-p25 (2P1), 2p21-p23 (2P2), 2p14-p16 (wP3) and 2p11-p13 (2P4). In addition, 20--40 unique sequence microclones have been isolated and characterized for genomic studies. These region-specific libraries and the single-copy microclones from the library have been used as valuable resources for (1) isolating microsatellite probes in linkage analysis to further refine the disease locus; (2) isolating corresponding clones with large inserts, e.g. YAC, BAC, P1, cosmid and phage, to facilitate construction of contigs for high resolution physical mapping; and (3) isolating region-specific cDNA clones for use as candidate genes. These libraries are being deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) for general distribution.

  15. The use of whole genome amplification to study chromosomal changes in prostate cancer: insights into genome-wide signature of preneoplasia associated with cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Squire Jeremy A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer (CaP is a disease with multifactorial etiology that includes both genetic and environmental components. The knowledge of the genetic basis of CaP has increased over the past years, mainly in the pathways that underlie tumourigenesis, progression and drug resistance. The vast majority of cases of CaP are adenocarcinomas that likely develop through a pre-malignant lesion and high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HPIN. Histologically, CaP is a heterogeneous disease consisting of multiple, discrete foci of invasive carcinoma and HPIN that are commonly interspersed with benign glands and stroma. This admixture with benign tissue can complicate genomic analyses in CaP. Specifically, when DNA is bulk-extracted the genetic information obtained represents an average for all of the cells within the sample. Results To minimize this problem, we obtained DNA from individual foci of HPIN and CaP by laser capture microdissection (LCM. The small quantities of DNA thus obtained were then amplified by means of multiple-displacement amplification (MDA, for use in genomic DNA array comparative genomic hybridisation (gaCGH. Recurrent chromosome copy number abnormalities (CNAs were observed in both HPIN and CaP. In HPIN, chromosomal imbalances involving chromosome 8 where common, whilst in CaP additional chromosomal changes involving chromosomes 6, 10, 13 and 16 where also frequently observed. Conclusion An overall increase in chromosomal changes was seen in CaP compared to HPIN, suggesting a universal breakdown in chromosomal stability. The accumulation of CNAs, which occurs during this process is non-random and may indicate chromosomal regions important in tumourigenesis. It is therefore likely that the alterations in copy number are part of a programmed cycle of events that promote tumour development, progression and survival. The combination of LCM, MDA and gaCGH is ideally suited for the identification of CNAs from

  16. Copy number variations of chromosome 16p13.1 region associated with schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingason, A.; Rujescu, D.; Cichon, S.; Sigurdsson, E.; Sigmundsson, T.; Pietilainen, O.P.H.; Buizer-Voskamp, J.E.; Strengman, E.; Francks, C.; Muglia, P.; Gylfason, A.; Gustafsson, O.; Olason, P.I.; Steinberg, S.; Hansen, T.; Jakobsen, K.D.; Rasmussen, H.B.; Giegling, I.; Moller, H.J.; Hartmann, A.; Crombie, C.; Fraser, G.; Walker, N.; Lonnqvist, J.; Suvisaari, J.; Tuulio-Henriksson, A.; Bramon, E.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Franke, B.; Murray, R.; Vassos, E.; Toulopoulou, T.; Muhleisen, T.W.; Tosato, S.; Ruggeri, M.; Djurovic, S.; Andreassen, O.A.; Zhang, Z.; Werge, T.; Ophoff, R.A.; Rietschel, M.; Nothen, M.M.; Petursson, H.; Stefansson, H.; Peltonen, L.; Collier, D.; Stefansson, K.; St Clair, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    Deletions and reciprocal duplications of the chromosome 16p13.1 region have recently been reported in several cases of autism and mental retardation (MR). As genomic copy number variants found in these two disorders may also associate with schizophrenia, we examined 4345 schizophrenia patients and 3

  17. Allocation of the S-genome chromosomes of Aegilops variabilis Eig. carrying powdery mildew resistance in triticale (× Triticosecale Wittmack).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatek, M; Belter, J; Majka, M; Wiśniewska, H

    2016-03-01

    It has been hypothesized that the powdery mildew adult plant resistance (APR) controlled by the Pm13 gene in Aegilops longissima Schweinf. & Muschl. (S(l)S(l)) has been evolutionary transferred to Aegilops variabilis Eig. (UUSS). The molecular marker analysis and the visual evaluation of powdery mildew symptoms in Ae. variabilis and the Ae. variabilis × Secale cereale amphiploid forms (2n = 6x = 42, UUSSRR) showed the presence of product that corresponded to Pm13 marker and the lower infection level compared to susceptible model, respectively. This study also describes the transfer of Ae. variabilis Eig. (2n = 4x = 28, U(v)U(v)S(v)S(v)) chromosomes, carrying powdery mildew resistance, into triticale (× Triticosecale Wittm., 2n = 6x = 42, AABBRR) using Ae. variabilis × S. cereale amphiploid forms. The individual chromosomes of Ae. variabilis, triticale 'Lamberto' and hybrids were characterized by genomic and fluorescence in situ hybridization (GISH/FISH). The chromosome configurations of obtained hybrid forms were studied at first metaphase of meiosis of pollen mother cells (PMCs) using GISH. The statistical analysis showed that the way of S-genome chromosome pairing and transmission to subsequent hybrid generations was diploid-like and had no influence on chromosome pairing of triticale chromosomes. The cytogenetic study of hybrid forms were supported by the marker-assisted selection using Pm13 marker and visual evaluation of natural infection by Blumeria graminis, that allowed to select the addition or substitution lines of hybrids carrying chromosome 3S(v) which were tolerant to the powdery mildew infection.

  18. Chromosomal imbalances detected in primary bone tumors by comparative genomic hybridization and interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization

    OpenAIRE

    Baruffi Marcelo Razera; Engel Edgard Edward; Squire Jeremy Andrew; Tone Luis Gonzaga; Rogatto Silvia Regina

    2003-01-01

    We applied a combination of comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), to characterize the genetic aberrations in three osteosarcomas (OS) and one Ewing's sarcoma. CGH identified recurrent chromosomal losses at 10p14-pter and gains at 8q22.3-24.1 in OS. Interphase FISH allowed to confirm 8q gain in two cases. A high amplification level of 11q12-qter was detected in one OS. The Ewing's sarcoma showed gain at 1p32-36.1 as the sole chromosome alteratio...

  19. Genomic annotation of the meningioma tumor suppressor locus on chromosome 1p34.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulman, Erik P; White, Peter S; Brodeur, Garrett M

    2004-01-29

    Meningioma is a frequently occurring tumor of the meninges surrounding the central nervous system. Loss of the short arm of chromosome 1 (1p) is the second most frequent chromosomal abnormality observed in these tumors. Previously, we identified a 3.7 megabase (Mb) region of consistent deletion on 1p33-p34 in a panel of 157 tumors. Loss of this region was associated with advanced disease and predictive for tumor relapse. In this report, a high-resolution integrated map of the region was constructed (CompView) to identify all markers in the smallest region of overlapping deletion (SRO). A regional somatic cell hybrid panel was used to more precisely localize those markers identified in CompView as within or overlapping the region. Additional deletion mapping using microsatellites localized to the region narrowed the SRO to approximately 2.8 Mb. The 88 markers remaining in the SRO were used to screen genomic databases to identify large-insert clones. Clones were assembled into a physical map of the region by PCR-based, sequence-tagged site (STS) content mapping. A sequence from clones was used to validate STS content by electronic PCR and to identify transcripts. A minimal tiling path of 43 clones was constructed across the SRO. Sequence data from the most current sequence assembly were used for further validation. A total of 59 genes were ordered within the SRO. In all, 17 of these were selected as likely candidates based on annotation using Gene Ontology Consortium terms, including the MUTYH, PRDX1, FOXD2, FOXE3, PTCH2, and RAD54L genes. This annotation of a putative tumor suppressor locus provides a resource for further analysis of meningioma candidate genes.

  20. Genome-wide association study identified a narrow chromosome 1 region associated with chicken growth traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Xie

    Full Text Available Chicken growth traits are important economic traits in broilers. A large number of studies are available on finding genetic factors affecting chicken growth. However, most of these studies identified chromosome regions containing putative quantitative trait loci and finding causal mutations is still a challenge. In this genome-wide association study (GWAS, we identified a narrow 1.5 Mb region (173.5-175 Mb of chicken (Gallus gallus chromosome (GGA 1 to be strongly associated with chicken growth using 47,678 SNPs and 489 F2 chickens. The growth traits included aggregate body weight (BW at 0-90 d of age measured weekly, biweekly average daily gains (ADG derived from weekly body weight, and breast muscle weight (BMW, leg muscle weight (LMW and wing weight (WW at 90 d of age. Five SNPs in the 1.5 Mb KPNA3-FOXO1A region at GGA1 had the highest significant effects for all growth traits in this study, including a SNP at 8.9 Kb upstream of FOXO1A for BW at 22-48 d and 70 d, a SNP at 1.9 Kb downstream of FOXO1A for WW, a SNP at 20.9 Kb downstream of ENSGALG00000022732 for ADG at 29-42 d, a SNP in INTS6 for BW at 90 d, and a SNP in KPNA3 for BMW and LMW. The 1.5 Mb KPNA3-FOXO1A region contained two microRNA genes that could bind to messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA of IGF1, FOXO1A and KPNA3. It was further indicated that the 1.5 Mb GGA1 region had the strongest effects on chicken growth during 22-42 d.

  1. Detection of short repeated genomic sequences on metaphase chromosomes using padlock probes and target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stougaard Magnus

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In situ detection of short sequence elements in genomic DNA requires short probes with high molecular resolution and powerful specific signal amplification. Padlock probes can differentiate single base variations. Ligated padlock probes can be amplified in situ by rolling circle DNA synthesis and detected by fluorescence microscopy, thus enhancing PRINS type reactions, where localized DNA synthesis reports on the position of hybridization targets, to potentially reveal the binding of single oligonucleotide-size probe molecules. Such a system has been presented for the detection of mitochondrial DNA in fixed cells, whereas attempts to apply rolling circle detection to metaphase chromosomes have previously failed, according to the literature. Methods Synchronized cultured cells were fixed with methanol/acetic acid to prepare chromosome spreads in teflon-coated diagnostic well-slides. Apart from the slide format and the chromosome spreading everything was done essentially according to standard protocols. Hybridization targets were detected in situ with padlock probes, which were ligated and amplified using target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis, and detected by fluorescence labeling. Results An optimized protocol for the spreading of condensed metaphase chromosomes in teflon-coated diagnostic well-slides was developed. Applying this protocol we generated specimens for target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis of padlock probes recognizing a 40 nucleotide sequence in the male specific repetitive satellite I sequence (DYZ1 on the Y-chromosome and a 32 nucleotide sequence in the repetitive kringle IV domain in the apolipoprotein(a gene positioned on the long arm of chromosome 6. These targets were detected with good efficiency, but the efficiency on other target sites was unsatisfactory. Conclusion Our aim was to test the applicability of the method used on mitochondrial DNA to the analysis of nuclear genomes, in particular as

  2. DNM1DN: a new class of paralogous genomic segments (duplicons) with highly conserved copies on chromosomes Y and 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrinou, E; Fox, M; Wolfe, J; Cameron, J; Taylor, K; Edwards, Y H

    2004-03-01

    Screening a testis cDNA selection library for Y-linked genes yielded 79 cDNAs. Of these, 9 matched the 3' region of the dynamin 1 gene (DNM1) on chromosome 9q34 with >90% identity. Fluoresence in situ hybridisation and PCR amplification were used to localise a large number of DNM1-like sequences to human chromosomes 15 and Y. PCR amplification of overlapping Y-linked YACs allowed a more accurate mapping of the Y-linked DNM1-like cDNAs to a euchromatic locus in close proximity to heterochromatin at Yq11.23. A search of the genome database identified 64 highly homologous copies of the DNM1 fragment. Most of these copies were localised to chromosomes 15 and Y, but others mapped to chromosomes 5, 8, 10, 12, 19 and 22. These sequences exhibit all the major features of a duplicon and have been designated DNM1DN (DNM1 duplicon). Evolutionary studies using fluorescence in situ hybridisation indicate that transposition of the DNM1DN sequence to chromosome 15 took place earlier in primate evolution than the transposition to the Y chromosome. The translocation to the Y took place at a time following the divergence of a common ancestor from gorilla, approximately 4-7 million years ago.

  3. Spatial organization of the budding yeast genome in the cell nucleus and identification of specific chromatin interactions from multi-chromosome constrained chromatin model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürsoy, Gamze; Xu, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear landmarks and biochemical factors play important roles in the organization of the yeast genome. The interaction pattern of budding yeast as measured from genome-wide 3C studies are largely recapitulated by model polymer genomes subject to landmark constraints. However, the origin of inter-chromosomal interactions, specific roles of individual landmarks, and the roles of biochemical factors in yeast genome organization remain unclear. Here we describe a multi-chromosome constrained self-avoiding chromatin model (mC-SAC) to gain understanding of the budding yeast genome organization. With significantly improved sampling of genome structures, both intra- and inter-chromosomal interaction patterns from genome-wide 3C studies are accurately captured in our model at higher resolution than previous studies. We show that nuclear confinement is a key determinant of the intra-chromosomal interactions, and centromere tethering is responsible for the inter-chromosomal interactions. In addition, important genomic elements such as fragile sites and tRNA genes are found to be clustered spatially, largely due to centromere tethering. We uncovered previously unknown interactions that were not captured by genome-wide 3C studies, which are found to be enriched with tRNA genes, RNAPIII and TFIIS binding. Moreover, we identified specific high-frequency genome-wide 3C interactions that are unaccounted for by polymer effects under landmark constraints. These interactions are enriched with important genes and likely play biological roles. PMID:28704374

  4. Construction of whole genome radiation hybrid panels and map of chromosome 5A of wheat using asymmetric somatic hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanen Zhou

    Full Text Available To explore the feasibility of constructing a whole genome radiation hybrid (WGRH map in plant species with large genomes, asymmetric somatic hybridization between wheat (Triticum aestivum L. and Bupleurum scorzonerifolium Willd. was performed. The protoplasts of wheat were irradiated with ultraviolet light (UV and gamma-ray and rescued by protoplast fusion using B. scorzonerifolium as the recipient. Assessment of SSR markers showed that the radiation hybrids have the average marker retention frequency of 15.5%. Two RH panels (RHPWI and RHPWII that contained 92 and 184 radiation hybrids, respectively, were developed and used for mapping of 68 SSR markers in chromosome 5A of wheat. A total of 1557 and 2034 breaks were detected in each panel. The RH map of chromosome 5A based on RHPWII was constructed. The distance of the comprehensive map was 2103 cR and the approximate resolution was estimated to be ∼501.6 kb/break. The RH panels evaluated in this study enabled us to order the ESTs in a single deletion bin or in the multiple bins cross the chromosome. These results demonstrated that RH mapping via protoplast fusion is feasible at the whole genome level for mapping purposes in wheat and the potential value of this mapping approach for the plant species with large genomes.

  5. Characterization of the Arachis (Leguminosae) D genome using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome markers and total genome DNA hybridization

    OpenAIRE

    Germán Robledo; Guillermo Seijo

    2008-01-01

    Chromosome markers were developed for Arachis glandulifera using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of the 5S and 45S rRNA genes and heterochromatic 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) positive bands. We used chromosome landmarks identified by these markers to construct the first Arachis species ideogram in which all the homologous chromosomes were precisely identified. The comparison of this ideogram with those published for other Arachis species revealed very poor homeologies with a...

  6. Genomic association analysis suggests chromosome 12 locus influencing antihypertensive response to thiazide diuretic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Stephen T; Bailey, Kent R; Fridley, Brooke L; Chapman, Arlene B; Schwartz, Gary L; Chai, High Seng; Sicotte, Hugues; Kocher, Jean-Pierre; Rodin, Andréi S; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2008-08-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study to identify novel genes influencing diastolic blood pressure (BP) response to hydrochlorothiazide, a commonly prescribed thiazide diuretic preferred for the treatment of high BP. Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 100K Arrays were used to measure single nucleotide polymorphisms across the 22 autosomes in 194 non-Hispanic black subjects and 195 non-Hispanic white subjects with essential hypertension selected from opposite tertiles of the race- and sex-specific distributions of age-adjusted diastolic BP response to hydrochlorothiazide (25 mg daily, PO, for 4 weeks). The black sample consisted of 97 "good" responders (diastolic BP response [mean+/-SD]=-18.3+/-4.2 mm Hg; age=47.1+/-6.1 years; 51.5% women) and 97 "poor" responders (diastolic BP response=-0.18+/-4.3; age=47.4+/-6.5 years; 51.5% women). Haplotype trend regression identified a region of chromosome 12q15 in which haplotypes constructed from 3 successive single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs317689, rs315135, and rs7297610) in proximity to lysozyme (LYZ), YEATS domain containing 4 (YEATS4), and fibroblast growth receptor substrate 2 (FRS2) were significantly associated with diastolic BP response (nominal P=2.39 x 10(-7); Bonferroni corrected P=0.024; simulated experiment-wise P=0.040). Genotyping of 35 additional single nucleotide polymorphisms selected to "tag" linkage disequilibrium blocks in these genes provided corroboration that variation in LYZ and YEATS4 was associated with diastolic BP response in a statistically independent data set of 291 black subjects and in the sample of 294 white subjects. These results support the use of genome-wide association analyses to identify novel genes influencing antihypertensive drug responses.

  7. A genome-wide association analysis of chromosomal aberrations and Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Joon Seol; Koh, InSong; Cheong, Hyun Sub; Seo, Jeong-Meen; Kim, Dae-Yeon; Oh, Jung-Tak; Kim, Hyun-Young; Jung, Kyuwhan; Sul, Jae Hoon; Park, Woong-Yang; Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Shin, Hyoung Doo

    2016-11-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is a neurocristopathy characterized by the absence of intramural ganglion cells along variable lengths of the gastrointestinal tract. Although the RET proto-oncogene is considered to be the main risk factor for HSCR, only about 30% of the HSCR cases can be explained by variations in previously known genes including RET. Recently, copy number variation (CNV) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) have emerged as new ways to understand human genomic variation. The goal of this present study is to identify new HSCR genetic factors related to CNV in Korean patients. In the genome-wide genotyping, using Illumina's HumanOmni1-Quad BeadChip (1,140,419 markers), of 123 HSCR patients and 432 unaffected subjects (total n = 555), a total of 8,188 CNVs (1 kb ∼ 1 mb) were identified by CNVpartition. As a result, 16 CNV regions and 13 LOH regions were identified as associated with HSCR (minimum P = 0.0005). Two top CNV regions (deletions at chr6:32675155-32680480 and chr22:20733495-21607293) were successfully validated by additional real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. In addition, 2 CNV regions (6p21.32 and 22q11.21) and 2 LOH regions (3p22.2 and 14q23.3) were discovered to be unique to the HSCR patients group. Regarding the large-scale chromosomal aberrations (>1 mb), 11 large aberrations in the HSCR patients group were identified, which suggests that they may be a risk factor for HSCR. Although further replication in a larger cohort is needed, our findings may contribute to the understanding of the etiology of HSCR.

  8. Electromagnetic Reciprocity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldridge, David F.

    2014-11-01

    A reciprocity theorem is an explicit mathematical relationship between two different wavefields that can exist within the same space - time configuration. Reciprocity theorems provi de the theoretical underpinning for mod ern full waveform inversion solutions, and also suggest practical strategies for speed ing up large - scale numerical modeling of geophysical datasets . In the present work, several previously - developed electromagnetic r eciprocity theorems are generalized to accommodate a broader range of medi um, source , and receiver types. Reciprocity relations enabling the interchange of various types of point sources and point receivers within a three - dimensional electromagnetic model are derived. Two numerical modeling algorithms in current use are successfully tested for adherence to reciprocity. Finally, the reciprocity theorem forms the point of departure for a lengthy derivation of electromagnetic Frechet derivatives. These mathe matical objects quantify the sensitivity of geophysical electromagnetic data to variatio ns in medium parameters, and thus constitute indispensable tools for solution of the full waveform inverse problem. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Sandia National Labor atories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000. Signif icant portions of the work reported herein were conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and CARBO Ceramics Incorporated. The author acknowledges Mr. Chad Cannan and Mr. Terry Pa lisch of CARBO Ceramics, and Ms. Amy Halloran, manager of SNL's Geophysics and Atmospheric Sciences Department, for their interest in and encouragement of this work. Special thanks are due to Dr . Lewis C. Bartel ( recently retired from Sandia National Labo ratories

  9. Chromosomal location of genomic SSR markers associated with yellow rust resistance in Turkish bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F. Senturk Akfirat; F. Ertugrul; S. Hasancebi; Y. Aydin; K. Akan; Z. Mert; M. Cakir; A. Altinkut Uncuoglu

    2013-08-01

    We have previously reported Xgwm382 as a diagnostic marker for disease resistance against yellow rust in Izgi2001 × ES14 F2 population. Among the same earlier tested 230 primers, one SSR marker (Xgwm311) also amplified a fragment which is present in the resistant parent and in the resistant bulks, but absent in the susceptible parent and in the susceptible bulks. To understand the chromosome group location of these diagnostic markers, Xgwm382 and Xgwm311, in the same population, we selected 16 SSR markers mapped only in one genome of chromosome group 2 around 1–21 cM distance to these diagnostic markers based on the SSR consensus map of wheat. Out of 16 SSRs, Xwmc658 identified resistant F2 individuals as a diagnostic marker for yellow rust disease and provided the location of Xgwm382 and Xgwm311 on chromosome 2AL in our plant material.

  10. Recurrent chromosomal aberrations in intravenous leiomyomatosis of the uterus: high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buza, Natalia; Xu, Fang; Wu, Weiqing; Carr, Ryan J; Li, Peining; Hui, Pei

    2014-09-01

    Uterine intravenous leiomyomatosis (IVL) is a distinct smooth muscle neoplasm with a potential of clinical aggressiveness due to its ability to extend into intrauterine and extrauterine vasculature. In this study, chromosomal alterations analyzed by oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization were performed in 9 cases of IVL. The analysis was informative in all cases with multiple copy number losses and/or gains observed in each tumor. The most frequent recurrent loss of 22q12.3-q13.1 was observed in 6 tumors (66.7%), followed by losses of 22q11.23-q13.31, 1p36.13-p33, 2p25.3-p23.3, and 2q24.2-q32.2 and gains of 6p22.2, 2q37.3 and 10q22.2-q22.3, in decreasing order of frequency. Copy number variants were identified at 14q11.2, 15q11.1-q11.2, and 15q26.2. Genes mapping to the regions of loss include CHEK2, EWS, NF2, PDGFB, and MAP3K7IP1 on chromosome 22q, HEI10 on chromosome 14q, and succinate dehydrogenase subunit B, E2F2, ARID1A KPNA6, EIF3S2 , PTCH2, and PIK3R3 on chromosome 1p. Regional losses on chromosomes 22q and 1p and gains on chromosomes 12q showed overlaps with those previously observed in uterine leiomyosarcomas. In addition, presence of multiple chromosomal aberrations implies a higher level of genetic instability. Follow-up polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sequencing analysis of MED12 gene revealed absence of G> A transition at nucleotides c.130 or c.131 in all 9 cases, a frequent mutation found in uterine leiomyoma and its variants. In conclusion, this is the first report of high-resolution, genome-wide investigation of IVL by oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization. The presence of high frequencies of recurrent regional loss involving several chromosomes is an important finding and likely related to the pathogenesis of the disease.

  11. High resolution physical map of porcine chromosome 7 QTL region and comparative mapping of this region among vertebrate genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demeure Olivier

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background On porcine chromosome 7, the region surrounding the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC contains several Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL influencing many traits including growth, back fat thickness and carcass composition. Previous studies highlighted that a fragment of ~3.7 Mb is located within the Swine Leucocyte Antigen (SLA complex. Internal rearrangements of this fragment were suggested, and partial contigs had been built, but further characterization of this region and identification of all human chromosomal fragments orthologous to this porcine fragment had to be carried out. Results A whole physical map of the region was constructed by integrating Radiation Hybrid (RH mapping, BAC fingerprinting data of the INRA BAC library and anchoring BAC end sequences on the human genome. 17 genes and 2 reference microsatellites were ordered on the high resolution IMNpRH212000rad Radiation Hybrid panel. A 1000:1 framework map covering 550 cR12000 was established and a complete contig of the region was developed. New micro rearrangements were highlighted between the porcine and human genomes. A bovine RH map was also developed in this region by mapping 16 genes. Comparison of the organization of this region in pig, cattle, human, mouse, dog and chicken genomes revealed that 1 the translocation of the fragment described previously is observed only on the bovine and porcine genomes and 2 the new internal micro rearrangements are specific of the porcine genome. Conclusion We estimate that the region contains several rearrangements and covers 5.2 Mb of the porcine genome. The study of this complete BAC contig showed that human chromosomal fragments homologs of this heavily rearranged QTL region are all located in the region of HSA6 that surrounds the centromere. This work allows us to define a list of all candidate genes that could explain these QTL effects.

  12. A high-resolution whole-genome cattle-human comparative map reveals details of mammalian chromosome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everts-van der Wind, Annelie; Larkin, Denis M; Green, Cheryl A; Elliott, Janice S; Olmstead, Colleen A; Chiu, Readman; Schein, Jacqueline E; Marra, Marco A; Womack, James E; Lewin, Harris A

    2005-12-20

    Approximately 3,000 cattle bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-end sequences were added to the Illinois-Texas 5,000-rad RH (RH, radiation hybrid) map. The BAC-end sequences selected for mapping are approximately 1 Mbp apart on the human chromosomes as determined by blastn analysis. The map has 3,484 ordered markers, of which 3,204 are anchored in the human genome. Two hundred-and-one homologous synteny blocks (HSBs) were identified, of which 27 are previously undiscovered, 79 are extended, 26 were formed by previously unrecognized breakpoints in 18 previously defined HSBs, and 23 are the result of fusions. The comparative coverage relative to the human genome is approximately 91%, or 97% of the theoretical maximum. The positions of 64% of all cattle centromeres and telomeres were reassigned relative to their positions on the previous map, thus facilitating a more detailed comparative analysis of centromere and telomere evolution. As an example of the utility of the high-resolution map, 22 cattle BAC fingerprint contigs were directly anchored to cattle chromosome 19 [Bos taurus, (BTA) 19]. The order of markers on the cattle RH and fingerprint maps of BTA19 and the sequence-based map of human chromosome 17 [Homo sapiens, (HSA) 17] were found to be highly consistent, with only two minor ordering discrepancies between the RH map and fingerprint contigs. The high-resolution Illinois-Texas 5,000-rad RH and comparative maps will facilitate identification of candidate genes for economically important traits, the phylogenomic analysis of mammalian chromosomes, proofing of the BAC fingerprint map and, ultimately, aid the assembly of cattle whole-genome sequence.

  13. Genome-wide analysis of tandem repeats in Tribolium castaneum genome reveals abundant and highly dynamic tandem repeat families with satellite DNA features in euchromatic chromosomal arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlek, Martina; Gelfand, Yevgeniy; Plohl, Miroslav; Meštrović, Nevenka

    2015-12-01

    Although satellite DNAs are well-explored components of heterochromatin and centromeres, little is known about emergence, dispersal and possible impact of comparably structured tandem repeats (TRs) on the genome-wide scale. Our bioinformatics analysis of assembled Tribolium castaneum genome disclosed significant contribution of TRs in euchromatic chromosomal arms and clear predominance of satellite DNA-typical 170 bp monomers in arrays of ≥5 repeats. By applying different experimental approaches, we revealed that the nine most prominent TR families Cast1-Cast9 extracted from the assembly comprise ∼4.3% of the entire genome and reside almost exclusively in euchromatic regions. Among them, seven families that build ∼3.9% of the genome are based on ∼170 and ∼340 bp long monomers. Results of phylogenetic analyses of 2500 monomers originating from these families show high-sequence dynamics, evident by extensive exchanges between arrays on non-homologous chromosomes. In addition, our analysis shows that concerted evolution acts more efficiently on longer than on shorter arrays. Efficient genome-wide distribution of nine TR families implies the role of transposition only in expansion of the most dispersed family, and involvement of other mechanisms is anticipated. Despite similarities in sequence features, FISH experiments indicate high-level compartmentalization of centromeric and euchromatic tandem repeats.

  14. The chicken transforming growth factor-beta 3 gene: genomic structure, transcriptional analysis, and chromosomal location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, D W; Dey, B R; Paton, I R; Morrice, D R; Law, A S

    1995-02-01

    In this paper, we report the isolation, characterization, and mapping of the chicken transforming growth factor-beta 3 (TGF-beta 3) gene. The gene contains seven exons and six introns spanning 16-kb of the chicken genome. A comparison of the 5'-flanking regions of human and chicken TGF-beta 3 genes reveals two regions of sequence conservation. The first contains ATF/CRE and TBP/TATA sequence motifs within an 87-bp region. The second is a 162-bp region with no known sequence motifs. Identification of transcription start sites using chicken RNA isolated from various embryonic and adult tissues reveals two sites of initiation, P1 and P2, which map to these two conserved regions. Comparison of 3'-flanking regions of chicken and mammalian TGF-beta 3 genes also revealed conserved sequences. The most significant homologies were found in the 3'-most end of the transcribed region. DNA sequence analysis of chicken TGF-beta 3 cDNAs isolated by 3'-RACE revealed multiple polyadenylation sites unusually distant from a poly(A) signal motif. A Msc I restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) marker was used to map the TGFB3 locus to linkage group E7 on the East Lansing reference backcross. Linkage to the TH locus showed that the TGFB3 locus was physically located on chicken chromosome 5.

  15. Suppression of genome instability in pRB-deficient cells by enhancement of chromosome cohesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Amity L; Yazinski, Stephanie A; Nicolay, Brandon; Bryll, Alysia; Zou, Lee; Dyson, Nicholas J

    2014-03-20

    Chromosome instability (CIN), a common feature of solid tumors, promotes tumor evolution and increases drug resistance during therapy. We previously demonstrated that loss of the retinoblastoma protein (pRB) tumor suppressor causes changes in centromere structure and generates CIN. However, the mechanism and significance of this change was unclear. Here, we show that defects in cohesion are key to the pRB loss phenotype. pRB loss alters H4K20 methylation, a prerequisite for efficient establishment of cohesion at centromeres. Changes in cohesin regulation are evident during S phase, where they compromise replication and increase DNA damage. Ultimately, such changes compromise mitotic fidelity following pRB loss. Remarkably, increasing cohesion suppressed all of these phenotypes and dramatically reduced CIN in cancer cells lacking functional pRB. These data explain how loss of pRB undermines genomic integrity. Given the frequent functional inactivation of pRB in cancer, conditions that increase cohesion may provide a general strategy to suppress CIN.

  16. A genomic approach to study Down syndrome and cancer inverse comorbidity: Untangling the Chromosome 21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume eForés-Martos

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS, one of the most common birth defects and the most widespread genetic cause of intellectual disabilities, is caused by extra genetic material on chromosome 21 (HSA21. The increased genomic dosage of trisomy 21 is thought to be responsible for the distinct DS phenotypes, including an increased risk of developing some types of childhood leukemia and germ cell tumors. Patients with DS, however, have a strikingly lower incidence of many other solid tumors. We hypothesized that the third copy of genes located in HSA21 may have an important role on the protective effect that DS patients show against most types of solid tumors. Focusing on Copy Number Variation (CNV array data, we have generated frequencies of deleted regions in HSA21 in four different tumor types from which DS patients have been reported to be protected. We describe three different regions of deletion pointing to a set of candidate genes that could explain the inverse comorbidity phenomenon between DS and solid tumors. In particular we found RCAN1 gene in Wilms tumors and the miR-99A, miR-125B2 and miR-LET7C in lung, breast and melanoma tumors as the main candidates for explaining the inverse comorbidity observed between solid tumors and DS.

  17. New Tools for Embryo Selection: Comprehensive Chromosome Screening by Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of comprehensive chromosome screening (CCS using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH. The study included 1420 CCS cycles for recurrent miscarriage (n=203; repetitive implantation failure (n=188; severe male factor (n=116; previous trisomic pregnancy (n=33; and advanced maternal age (n=880. CCS was performed in cycles with fresh oocytes and embryos (n=774; mixed cycles with fresh and vitrified oocytes (n=320; mixed cycles with fresh and vitrified day-2 embryos (n=235; and mixed cycles with fresh and vitrified day-3 embryos (n=91. Day-3 embryo biopsy was performed and analyzed by aCGH followed by day-5 embryo transfer. Consistent implantation (range: 40.5–54.2% and pregnancy rates per transfer (range: 46.0–62.9% were obtained for all the indications and independently of the origin of the oocytes or embryos. However, a lower delivery rate per cycle was achieved in women aged over 40 years (18.1% due to the higher percentage of aneuploid embryos (85.3% and lower number of cycles with at least one euploid embryo available per transfer (40.3%. We concluded that aneuploidy is one of the major factors which affect embryo implantation.

  18. Cytotoxic chromosomal targeting by CRISPR/Cas systems can reshape bacterial genomes and expel or remodel pathogenicity islands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuben B Vercoe

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In prokaryotes, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs and their associated (Cas proteins constitute a defence system against bacteriophages and plasmids. CRISPR/Cas systems acquire short spacer sequences from foreign genetic elements and incorporate these into their CRISPR arrays, generating a memory of past invaders. Defence is provided by short non-coding RNAs that guide Cas proteins to cleave complementary nucleic acids. While most spacers are acquired from phages and plasmids, there are examples of spacers that match genes elsewhere in the host bacterial chromosome. In Pectobacterium atrosepticum the type I-F CRISPR/Cas system has acquired a self-complementary spacer that perfectly matches a protospacer target in a horizontally acquired island (HAI2 involved in plant pathogenicity. Given the paucity of experimental data about CRISPR/Cas-mediated chromosomal targeting, we examined this process by developing a tightly controlled system. Chromosomal targeting was highly toxic via targeting of DNA and resulted in growth inhibition and cellular filamentation. The toxic phenotype was avoided by mutations in the cas operon, the CRISPR repeats, the protospacer target, and protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM beside the target. Indeed, the natural self-targeting spacer was non-toxic due to a single nucleotide mutation adjacent to the target in the PAM sequence. Furthermore, we show that chromosomal targeting can result in large-scale genomic alterations, including the remodelling or deletion of entire pre-existing pathogenicity islands. These features can be engineered for the targeted deletion of large regions of bacterial chromosomes. In conclusion, in DNA-targeting CRISPR/Cas systems, chromosomal interference is deleterious by causing DNA damage and providing a strong selective pressure for genome alterations, which may have consequences for bacterial evolution and pathogenicity.

  19. Cytotoxic chromosomal targeting by CRISPR/Cas systems can reshape bacterial genomes and expel or remodel pathogenicity islands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuben B Vercoe

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In prokaryotes, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs and their associated (Cas proteins constitute a defence system against bacteriophages and plasmids. CRISPR/Cas systems acquire short spacer sequences from foreign genetic elements and incorporate these into their CRISPR arrays, generating a memory of past invaders. Defence is provided by short non-coding RNAs that guide Cas proteins to cleave complementary nucleic acids. While most spacers are acquired from phages and plasmids, there are examples of spacers that match genes elsewhere in the host bacterial chromosome. In Pectobacterium atrosepticum the type I-F CRISPR/Cas system has acquired a self-complementary spacer that perfectly matches a protospacer target in a horizontally acquired island (HAI2 involved in plant pathogenicity. Given the paucity of experimental data about CRISPR/Cas-mediated chromosomal targeting, we examined this process by developing a tightly controlled system. Chromosomal targeting was highly toxic via targeting of DNA and resulted in growth inhibition and cellular filamentation. The toxic phenotype was avoided by mutations in the cas operon, the CRISPR repeats, the protospacer target, and protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM beside the target. Indeed, the natural self-targeting spacer was non-toxic due to a single nucleotide mutation adjacent to the target in the PAM sequence. Furthermore, we show that chromosomal targeting can result in large-scale genomic alterations, including the remodelling or deletion of entire pre-existing pathogenicity islands. These features can be engineered for the targeted deletion of large regions of bacterial chromosomes. In conclusion, in DNA-targeting CRISPR/Cas systems, chromosomal interference is deleterious by causing DNA damage and providing a strong selective pressure for genome alterations, which may have consequences for bacterial evolution and pathogenicity.

  20. The genomic distribution of sex-biased genes in drosophila serrata: X chromosome demasculinization, feminization, and hyperexpression in both sexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Scott L; Bonduriansky, Russell; Chenoweth, Stephen F

    2013-01-01

    The chromosomal distribution of genes with sex-biased expression is often nonrandom, and in species with XY sex chromosome systems, it is common to observe a deficit of X-linked male-biased genes and an excess of X-linked female-biased genes. One explanation for this pattern is that sex-specific selection has shaped the gene content of the X. Alternatively, the deficit of male-biased and excess of female-biased genes could be an artifact of differences between the sexes in the global expression level of their X chromosome(s), perhaps brought about by a lack of dosage compensation in males and hyperexpression in females. In the montium fruit fly, Drosophila serrata, both these explanations can account for a deficit of male-biased and excess of female-biased X-linked genes. Using genome-wide expression data from multiple male and female tissues (n = 176 hybridizations), we found that testis- and accessory gland-specific genes are underrepresented whereas female ovary-specific genes are overrepresented on the X chromosome, suggesting that X-linkage is disfavored for male function genes but favored for female function genes. However, genes with such sex-specific functions did not fully account for the deficit of male-biased and excess of female-biased X-linked genes. We did, however, observe sex differences in the global expression level of the X chromosome and autosomes. Surprisingly, and in contrast to other species where a lack of dosage compensation in males is responsible, we found that hyperexpression of X-linked genes in both sexes leads to this imbalance in D. serrata. Our results highlight how common genomic distributions of sex-biased genes, even among closely related species, may arise via quite different evolutionary processes.

  1. Cytotoxic Chromosomal Targeting by CRISPR/Cas Systems Can Reshape Bacterial Genomes and Expel or Remodel Pathogenicity Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercoe, Reuben B.; Chang, James T.; Dy, Ron L.; Taylor, Corinda; Gristwood, Tamzin; Clulow, James S.; Richter, Corinna; Przybilski, Rita; Pitman, Andrew R.; Fineran, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    In prokaryotes, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and their associated (Cas) proteins constitute a defence system against bacteriophages and plasmids. CRISPR/Cas systems acquire short spacer sequences from foreign genetic elements and incorporate these into their CRISPR arrays, generating a memory of past invaders. Defence is provided by short non-coding RNAs that guide Cas proteins to cleave complementary nucleic acids. While most spacers are acquired from phages and plasmids, there are examples of spacers that match genes elsewhere in the host bacterial chromosome. In Pectobacterium atrosepticum the type I-F CRISPR/Cas system has acquired a self-complementary spacer that perfectly matches a protospacer target in a horizontally acquired island (HAI2) involved in plant pathogenicity. Given the paucity of experimental data about CRISPR/Cas–mediated chromosomal targeting, we examined this process by developing a tightly controlled system. Chromosomal targeting was highly toxic via targeting of DNA and resulted in growth inhibition and cellular filamentation. The toxic phenotype was avoided by mutations in the cas operon, the CRISPR repeats, the protospacer target, and protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) beside the target. Indeed, the natural self-targeting spacer was non-toxic due to a single nucleotide mutation adjacent to the target in the PAM sequence. Furthermore, we show that chromosomal targeting can result in large-scale genomic alterations, including the remodelling or deletion of entire pre-existing pathogenicity islands. These features can be engineered for the targeted deletion of large regions of bacterial chromosomes. In conclusion, in DNA–targeting CRISPR/Cas systems, chromosomal interference is deleterious by causing DNA damage and providing a strong selective pressure for genome alterations, which may have consequences for bacterial evolution and pathogenicity. PMID:23637624

  2. Chromosomal imbalances detected in primary bone tumors by comparative genomic hybridization and interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baruffi Marcelo Razera

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We applied a combination of comparative genomic hybridization (CGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, to characterize the genetic aberrations in three osteosarcomas (OS and one Ewing's sarcoma. CGH identified recurrent chromosomal losses at 10p14-pter and gains at 8q22.3-24.1 in OS. Interphase FISH allowed to confirm 8q gain in two cases. A high amplification level of 11q12-qter was detected in one OS. The Ewing's sarcoma showed gain at 1p32-36.1 as the sole chromosome alteration. These studies demonstrate the value of molecular cytogenetic methods in the characterization of recurrent genomic alterations in bone tumor tissue.

  3. Chromosomal-Level Assembly of the Asian Seabass Genome Using Long Sequence Reads and Multi-layered Scaffolding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubha Vij

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We report here the ~670 Mb genome assembly of the Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer, a tropical marine teleost. We used long-read sequencing augmented by transcriptomics, optical and genetic mapping along with shared synteny from closely related fish species to derive a chromosome-level assembly with a contig N50 size over 1 Mb and scaffold N50 size over 25 Mb that span ~90% of the genome. The population structure of L. calcarifer species complex was analyzed by re-sequencing 61 individuals representing various regions across the species' native range. SNP analyses identified high levels of genetic diversity and confirmed earlier indications of a population stratification comprising three clades with signs of admixture apparent in the South-East Asian population. The quality of the Asian seabass genome assembly far exceeds that of any other fish species, and will serve as a new standard for fish genomics.

  4. Gene mutations and genomic rearrangements in the mouse as a result of transposon mobilization from chromosomal concatemers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aron M Geurts

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies of the Sleeping Beauty (SB transposon system, as an insertional mutagen in the germline of mice, have used reverse genetic approaches. These studies have led to its proposed use for regional saturation mutagenesis by taking a forward-genetic approach. Thus, we used the SB system to mutate a region of mouse Chromosome 11 in a forward-genetic screen for recessive lethal and viable phenotypes. This work represents the first reported use of an insertional mutagen in a phenotype-driven approach. The phenotype-driven approach was successful in both recovering visible and behavioral mutants, including dominant limb and recessive behavioral phenotypes, and allowing for the rapid identification of candidate gene disruptions. In addition, a high frequency of recessive lethal mutations arose as a result of genomic rearrangements near the site of transposition, resulting from transposon mobilization. The results suggest that the SB system could be used in a forward-genetic approach to recover interesting phenotypes, but that local chromosomal rearrangements should be anticipated in conjunction with single-copy, local transposon insertions in chromosomes. Additionally, these mice may serve as a model for chromosome rearrangements caused by transposable elements during the evolution of vertebrate genomes.

  5. Mosaic maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15 in Prader-Willi syndrome: utility of genome-wide SNP array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Kosuke; Santani, Avni B; Deardorff, Matthew A; Feret, Holly A; Tischler, Tanya; Thiel, Brian D; Mulchandani, Surabhi; Stolle, Catherine A; Spinner, Nancy B; Zackai, Elaine H; Conlin, Laura K

    2013-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome is caused by the loss of paternal gene expression on 15q11.2-q13.2, and one of the mechanisms resulting in Prader-Willi syndrome phenotype is maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15. Various mechanisms including trisomy rescue, monosomy rescue, and post fertilization errors can lead to uniparental disomy, and its mechanism can be inferred from the pattern of uniparental hetero and isodisomy. Detection of a mosaic cell line provides a unique opportunity to understand the mechanism of uniparental disomy; however, mosaic uniparental disomy is a rare finding in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome. We report on two infants with Prader-Willi syndrome caused by mosaic maternal uniparental disomy 15. Patient 1 has mosaic uniparental isodisomy of the entire chromosome 15, and Patient 2 has mosaic uniparental mixed iso/heterodisomy 15. Genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism array was able to demonstrate the presence of chromosomally normal cell line in the Patient 1 and trisomic cell line in Patient 2, and provide the evidence that post-fertilization error and trisomy rescue as a mechanism of uniparental disomy in each case, respectively. Given its ability of detecting small percent mosaicism as well as its capability of identifying the loss of heterozygosity of chromosomal regions, genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism array should be utilized as an adjunct to the standard methylation analysis in the evaluation of Prader-Willi syndrome.

  6. Identification of chromosome aberrations in sporadic microsatellite stable and unstable colorectal cancers using array comparative genomic hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Dyrsø; Li, Jian; Wang, Kai;

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers in Denmark and in the western world in general, and the prognosis is generally poor. According to the traditional molecular classification of sporadic colorectal cancer, microsatellite stable (MSS)/chromosome unstable (CIN) colorectal...... cancers constitute approximately 85% of sporadic cases, whereas microsatellite unstable (MSI) cases constitute the remaining 15%. In this study, we used array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to identify genomic hotspot regions that harbor recurrent copy number changes. The study material...

  7. American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics technical standards and guidelines: microarray analysis for chromosome abnormalities in neoplastic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Linda D; Lebo, Matthew; Li, Marilyn M; Slovak, Marilyn L; Wolff, Daynna J

    2013-06-01

    Microarray methodologies, to include array comparative genomic hybridization and single-nucleotide polymorphism-based arrays, are innovative methods that provide genomic data. These data should be correlated with the results from the standard methods, chromosome and/or fluorescence in situ hybridization, to ascertain and characterize the genomic aberrations of neoplastic disorders, both liquid and solid tumors. Over the past several decades, standard methods have led to an accumulation of genetic information specific to many neoplasms. This specificity is now used for the diagnosis and classification of neoplasms. Cooperative studies have revealed numerous correlations between particular genetic aberrations and therapeutic outcomes. Molecular investigation of chromosomal abnormalities identified by standard methods has led to discovery of genes, and gene function and dysfunction. This knowledge has led to improved therapeutics and, in some disorders, targeted therapies. Data gained from the higher-resolution microarray methodologies will enhance our knowledge of the genomics of specific disorders, leading to more effective therapeutic strategies. To assist clinical laboratories in validation of the methods, their consistent use, and interpretation and reporting of results from these microarray methodologies, the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics has developed the following professional standard and guidelines.

  8. Construction of Reference Chromosome-Scale Pseudomolecules for Potato: Integrating the Potato Genome with Genetic and Physical Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar; Bolser, Daniel; de Boer, Jan; Sønderkær, Mads; Amoros, Walter; Carboni, Martin Federico; D’Ambrosio, Juan Martín; de la Cruz, German; Di Genova, Alex; Douches, David S.; Eguiluz, Maria; Guo, Xiao; Guzman, Frank; Hackett, Christine A.; Hamilton, John P.; Li, Guangcun; Li, Ying; Lozano, Roberto; Maass, Alejandro; Marshall, David; Martinez, Diana; McLean, Karen; Mejía, Nilo; Milne, Linda; Munive, Susan; Nagy, Istvan; Ponce, Olga; Ramirez, Manuel; Simon, Reinhard; Thomson, Susan J.; Torres, Yerisf; Waugh, Robbie; Zhang, Zhonghua; Huang, Sanwen; Visser, Richard G. F.; Bachem, Christian W. B.; Sagredo, Boris; Feingold, Sergio E.; Orjeda, Gisella; Veilleux, Richard E.; Bonierbale, Merideth; Jacobs, Jeanne M. E.; Milbourne, Dan; Martin, David Michael Alan; Bryan, Glenn J.

    2013-01-01

    The genome of potato, a major global food crop, was recently sequenced. The work presented here details the integration of the potato reference genome (DM) with a new sequence-tagged site marker−based linkage map and other physical and genetic maps of potato and the closely related species tomato. Primary anchoring of the DM genome assembly was accomplished by the use of a diploid segregating population, which was genotyped with several types of molecular genetic markers to construct a new ~936 cM linkage map comprising 2469 marker loci. In silico anchoring approaches used genetic and physical maps from the diploid potato genotype RH89-039-16 (RH) and tomato. This combined approach has allowed 951 superscaffolds to be ordered into pseudomolecules corresponding to the 12 potato chromosomes. These pseudomolecules represent 674 Mb (~93%) of the 723 Mb genome assembly and 37,482 (~96%) of the 39,031 predicted genes. The superscaffold order and orientation within the pseudomolecules are closely collinear with independently constructed high density linkage maps. Comparisons between marker distribution and physical location reveal regions of greater and lesser recombination, as well as regions exhibiting significant segregation distortion. The work presented here has led to a greatly improved ordering of the potato reference genome superscaffolds into chromosomal “pseudomolecules”. PMID:24062527

  9. Finished genome of the fungal wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola reveals dispensome structure, chromosome plasticity, and stealth pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen B Goodwin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The plant-pathogenic fungus Mycosphaerella graminicola (asexual stage: Septoria tritici causes septoria tritici blotch, a disease that greatly reduces the yield and quality of wheat. This disease is economically important in most wheat-growing areas worldwide and threatens global food production. Control of the disease has been hampered by a limited understanding of the genetic and biochemical bases of pathogenicity, including mechanisms of infection and of resistance in the host. Unlike most other plant pathogens, M. graminicola has a long latent period during which it evades host defenses. Although this type of stealth pathogenicity occurs commonly in Mycosphaerella and other Dothideomycetes, the largest class of plant-pathogenic fungi, its genetic basis is not known. To address this problem, the genome of M. graminicola was sequenced completely. The finished genome contains 21 chromosomes, eight of which could be lost with no visible effect on the fungus and thus are dispensable. This eight-chromosome dispensome is dynamic in field and progeny isolates, is different from the core genome in gene and repeat content, and appears to have originated by ancient horizontal transfer from an unknown donor. Synteny plots of the M. graminicola chromosomes versus those of the only other sequenced Dothideomycete, Stagonospora nodorum, revealed conservation of gene content but not order or orientation, suggesting a high rate of intra-chromosomal rearrangement in one or both species. This observed "mesosynteny" is very different from synteny seen between other organisms. A surprising feature of the M. graminicola genome compared to other sequenced plant pathogens was that it contained very few genes for enzymes that break down plant cell walls, which was more similar to endophytes than to pathogens. The stealth pathogenesis of M. graminicola probably involves degradation of proteins rather than carbohydrates to evade host defenses during the biotrophic

  10. Construction of a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Library of TM-1, a Standard Line for Genetics and Genomics in Upland Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Hu; Wang-Zhen Guo; Tian-Zhen Zhang

    2009-01-01

    A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library was constructed for Gossyplum hirsutum acc. TM-1, a genetic and genomic standard line for Upland cotton. The library consists of 147 456 clones with an average insert size of 122.8 kb ranging from 97 to 240 kb. About 96.0% of the clones have inserts over 100 kb. Therefore, this library represents theoretically 7.4 haploid genome equivalents based on an AD genome size of 2 425 Mb. Clones were stored in 384 384- well plates and arrayed into multiplex pools for rapid and reliable library screening. BAC screening was carded out by four-round polymerase chain reactions using 23 simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers, three sequence-related amplified polymorphism markers and one pair of pdmere for a gene associated with fiber development to test the quality of the library. Correspondingly, in total 92 positive BAC clones were Identified with an average four positive clones per SSR marker, ranging from one to eight hits. Additionally, since these SSR markers have been localized to chromosome 12 (A12) and 26 (D12) according to the genetic map, these BAC clonee are expected to serve as seeds for the physical mapping of these two homologous chromosomes, sequentially map-based cloning of quantitative trait loci or genes associated with Important agronomic traits.

  11. Genome-Wide Analysis in Three Fusarium Pathogens Identifies Rapidly Evolving Chromosomes and Genes Associated with Pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperschneider, Jana; Gardiner, Donald M; Thatcher, Louise F; Lyons, Rebecca; Singh, Karam B; Manners, John M; Taylor, Jennifer M

    2015-05-19

    Pathogens and hosts are in an ongoing arms race and genes involved in host-pathogen interactions are likely to undergo diversifying selection. Fusarium plant pathogens have evolved diverse infection strategies, but how they interact with their hosts in the biotrophic infection stage remains puzzling. To address this, we analyzed the genomes of three Fusarium plant pathogens for genes that are under diversifying selection. We found a two-speed genome structure both on the chromosome and gene group level. Diversifying selection acts strongly on the dispensable chromosomes in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici and on distinct core chromosome regions in Fusarium graminearum, all of which have associations with virulence. Members of two gene groups evolve rapidly, namely those that encode proteins with an N-terminal [SG]-P-C-[KR]-P sequence motif and proteins that are conserved predominantly in pathogens. Specifically, 29 F. graminearum genes are rapidly evolving, in planta induced and encode secreted proteins, strongly pointing toward effector function. In summary, diversifying selection in Fusarium is strongly reflected as genomic footprints and can be used to predict a small gene set likely to be involved in host-pathogen interactions for experimental verification. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  12. Impact of sperm genome decay on Day-3 embryo chromosomal abnormalities from advanced-maternal-age patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaarouch, Ismail; Bouamoud, Nouzha; Louanjli, Noureddine; Madkour, Aicha; Copin, Henri; Benkhalifa, Moncef; Sefrioui, Omar

    2015-10-01

    Infertile male patients often exhibit unconventional semen parameters, including DNA fragmentation, chromatin dispersion, and aneuploidy-collectively referred to as sperm genome decay (SGD). We investigated the correlation of SGD to embryo chromosomal abnormalities and its effect on clinical pregnancy rates in patients with advanced maternal age (AMA) (>40 years) who were undergoing intracytoplasmic sperm injection-preimplantation genetic screening (ICSI-PGS). Three groups were assessed: patients with AMA and male partners with normal sperm (AMA-N); AMA patients and male partners presenting with SGD (AMA-SGD); and young fertile female patients and male partners with SGD (Y-SGD). We found a significant increase in embryonic chromosomal abnormalities-polyploidy, nullisomy, mosaicism, and chaotic anomaly rates-when semen parameters are altered (76% vs. 67% and 66% in AMA-SGD vs. AMA-N and Y-SGD groups, respectively). Statistical analysis showed a correlation between SGD and aneuploidies of embryonic chromosomes 13, 16, 21, X, and Y, as well as negative clinical outcomes. Incorporation of molecular sperm analyses should therefore significantly minimize the risk of transmission of chromosomal anomalies from spermatozoa to embryos, and may provide better predictors of pregnancy than conventional sperm analyses. We also demonstrated that an ICSI-PGS program should be implemented for SGD patients in order to limit transmission of chromosomal paternal anomalies and to improve clinical outcome.

  13. Characterization of the genomic structure, chromosomal location, promoter, and development expression of the alpha-globin transcription factor CP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swendeman, S L; Spielholz, C; Jenkins, N A; Gilbert, D J; Copeland, N G; Sheffery, M

    1994-04-15

    We recently cloned murine and human cDNAs that encode CP2, a cellular transcription factor that interacts with the alpha-globin promoter as well as with additional cellular and viral promoter elements. We have now characterized the genomic structure, chromosome location, promoter, and expression pattern of the factor. Genes for the murine and human mRNAs contained 16 and 15 exons, respectively. Both genes spanned approximately 30 kilobases of chromosomal DNA, and among coding exons, all exon/intron boundaries were conserved. The human gene for CP2 was found to reside on chromosome 12 while the murine gene mapped to the distal end of chromosome 15, near Gdc-1, Wnt-1, and Rarg, a region syntenic with human chromosome 12. The murine and human promoters initiated mRNAs at multiple start sites in a conserved region that spanned more than 450 nucleotides. Lastly, a study of the pattern of CP2 gene expression showed that the factor was expressed in all adult and fetal murine tissues examined from at least day 9.5 of development.

  14. In silico detection of phylogenetic informative Y-chromosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms from whole genome sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Geystelen, Anneleen; Wenseleers, Tom; Decorte, Ronny; Caspers, Maarten J L; Larmuseau, Maarten H D

    2014-11-01

    A state-of-the-art phylogeny of the human Y-chromosome is an essential tool for forensic genetics. The explosion of whole genome sequencing (WGS) data due to the rapid progress of next-generation sequencing facilities is useful to optimize and to increase the resolution of the phylogenetic Y-chromosomal tree. The most interesting Y-chromosomal variants to increase the phylogeny are SNPs (Y-SNPs) especially since the software to call them in WGS data and to genotype them in forensic assays has been optimized over the past years. The PENNY software presented here detects potentially phylogenetic interesting Y-SNPs in silico based on SNP calling data files and classifies them into different types according to their position in the currently used Y-chromosomal tree. The software utilized 790 available male WGS samples of which 172 had a high SNP calling quality. In total, 1269 Y-SNPs potentially capable of increasing the resolution of the Y-chromosomal phylogenetic tree were detected based on a first run with PENNY. Based on a test panel of 57 high-quality and 618 low-quality WGS samples, we could prove that these newly added Y-SNPs indeed increased the resolution of the phylogenetic Y-chromosomal analysis substantially. Finally, we performed a second run with PENNY whereby all samples including those of the test panel are used and this resulted in 509 additional phylogenetic promising Y-SNPs. By including these additional Y-SNPs, a final update of the present phylogenetic Y-chromosomal tree which is useful for forensic applications was generated. In order to find more convincing forensic interesting Y-SNPs with this PENNY software, the number of samples and variety of the haplogroups to which these samples belong needs to increase. The PENNY software (inclusive the user manual) is freely available on the website http://bio.kuleuven.be/eeb/lbeg/software.

  15. Chromosome-level genome map provides insights into diverse defense mechanisms in the medicinal fungus Ganoderma sinense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yingjie; Xu, Jiang; Sun, Chao; Zhou, Shiguo; Xu, Haibin; Nelson, David R; Qian, Jun; Song, Jingyuan; Luo, Hongmei; Xiang, Li; Li, Ying; Xu, Zhichao; Ji, Aijia; Wang, Lizhi; Lu, Shanfa; Hayward, Alice; Sun, Wei; Li, Xiwen; Schwartz, David C; Wang, Yitao; Chen, Shilin

    2015-06-05

    Fungi have evolved powerful genomic and chemical defense systems to protect themselves against genetic destabilization and other organisms. However, the precise molecular basis involved in fungal defense remain largely unknown in Basidiomycetes. Here the complete genome sequence, as well as DNA methylation patterns and small RNA transcriptomes, was analyzed to provide a holistic overview of secondary metabolism and defense processes in the model medicinal fungus, Ganoderma sinense. We reported the 48.96 Mb genome sequence of G. sinense, consisting of 12 chromosomes and encoding 15,688 genes. More than thirty gene clusters involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, as well as a large array of genes responsible for their transport and regulation were highlighted. In addition, components of genome defense mechanisms, namely repeat-induced point mutation (RIP), DNA methylation and small RNA-mediated gene silencing, were revealed in G. sinense. Systematic bioinformatic investigation of the genome and methylome suggested that RIP and DNA methylation combinatorially maintain G. sinense genome stability by inactivating invasive genetic material and transposable elements. The elucidation of the G. sinense genome and epigenome provides an unparalleled opportunity to advance our understanding of secondary metabolism and fungal defense mechanisms.

  16. Construction and analysis of Siberian tiger bacterial artificial chromosome library with approximately 6.5-fold genome equivalent coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changqing; Bai, Chunyu; Guo, Yu; Liu, Dan; Lu, Taofeng; Li, Xiangchen; Ma, Jianzhang; Ma, Yuehui; Guan, Weijun

    2014-03-07

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries are extremely valuable for the genome-wide genetic dissection of complex organisms. The Siberian tiger, one of the most well-known wild primitive carnivores in China, is an endangered animal. In order to promote research on its genome, a high-redundancy BAC library of the Siberian tiger was constructed and characterized. The library is divided into two sub-libraries prepared from blood cells and two sub-libraries prepared from fibroblasts. This BAC library contains 153,600 individually archived clones; for PCR-based screening of the library, BACs were placed into 40 superpools of 10 × 384-deep well microplates. The average insert size of BAC clones was estimated to be 116.5 kb, representing approximately 6.46 genome equivalents of the haploid genome and affording a 98.86% statistical probability of obtaining at least one clone containing a unique DNA sequence. Screening the library with 19 microsatellite markers and a SRY sequence revealed that each of these markers were present in the library; the average number of positive clones per marker was 6.74 (range 2 to 12), consistent with 6.46 coverage of the tiger genome. Additionally, we identified 72 microsatellite markers that could potentially be used as genetic markers. This BAC library will serve as a valuable resource for physical mapping, comparative genomic study and large-scale genome sequencing in the tiger.

  17. Condensation patterns of prophase/prometaphase chromosome are correlated with H4K5 histone acetylation and genomic DNA contents in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feitoza, Lidiane; Costa, Lucas; Guerra, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    Mitotic prophase chromosome condensation plays an essential role in nuclear division being therefore regulated by highly conserved mechanisms. However, degrees of chromatin condensation in prophase-prometaphase cells may vary along the chromosomes resulting in specific condensation patterns. We examined different condensation patterns (CPs) of prophase and prometaphase chromosomes and investigated their relationship with genome size and distribution of histone H4 acetylated at lysine 5 (H4K5ac) in 17 plant species. Our results showed that most species with small genomes (2C < 5 pg) (Arachis pusilla, Bixa orellana, Costus spiralis, Eleutherine bulbosa, Indigofera campestris, Phaseolus lunatus, P. vulgaris, Poncirus trifoliata, and Solanum lycopersicum) displayed prophase chromosomes with late condensing terminal regions that were highly enriched in H4K5ac, and early condensing regions with apparently non-acetylated proximal chromatin. The species with large genomes (Allium cepa, Callisia repens, Araucaria angustifolia and Nothoscordum pulchellum) displayed uniformly condensed and acetylated prophase/prometaphase chromosomes. Three species with small genomes (Eleocharis geniculata, Rhynchospora pubera, and R. tenuis) displayed CP and H4K5ac labeling patterns similar to species with large genomes, whereas a forth species (Emilia sonchifolia) exhibited a gradual chromosome labeling, being more acetylated in the terminal regions and less acetylated in the proximal ones. The nucleolus organizer chromatin was the only chromosomal region that in prometaphase or metaphase could be hyperacetylated, hypoacetylated or non-acetylated, depending on the species. Our data indicate that the CP of a plant chromosome complement is influenced but not exclusively determined by nuclear and chromosomal DNA contents, whereas the CP of individual chromosomes is clearly correlated with H4K5ac distribution.

  18. Construction of a nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library and a preliminary genome survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inoko Hidetoshi

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sharks are members of the taxonomic class Chondrichthyes, the oldest living jawed vertebrates. Genomic studies of this group, in comparison to representative species in other vertebrate taxa, will allow us to theorize about the fundamental genetic, developmental, and functional characteristics in the common ancestor of all jawed vertebrates. Aims In order to obtain mapping and sequencing data for comparative genomics, we constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library for the nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum. Results The BAC library consists of 313,344 clones with an average insert size of 144 kb, covering ~4.5 × 1010 bp and thus providing an 11-fold coverage of the haploid genome. BAC end sequence analyses revealed, in addition to LINEs and SINEs commonly found in other animal and plant genomes, two new groups of nurse shark-specific repetitive elements, NSRE1 and NSRE2 that seem to be major components of the nurse shark genome. Screening the library with single-copy or multi-copy gene probes showed 6–28 primary positive clones per probe of which 50–90% were true positives, demonstrating that the BAC library is representative of the different regions of the nurse shark genome. Furthermore, some BAC clones contained multiple genes, making physical mapping feasible. Conclusion We have constructed a deep-coverage, high-quality, large insert, and publicly available BAC library for a cartilaginous fish. It will be very useful to the scientific community interested in shark genomic structure, comparative genomics, and functional studies. We found two new groups of repetitive elements specific to the nurse shark genome, which may contribute to the architecture and evolution of the nurse shark genome.

  19. Chromosomal abnormalities in patients with autism spectrum disorders from Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hsiao-Mei; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Tsai, Wen-Che; Fang, Jye-Siung; Su, Ying-Cheng; Chou, Miao-Chun; Liu, Shih-Kai; Chou, Wen-Jiun; Wu, Yu-Yu; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-10-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are childhood-onset neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by verbal communication impairments, social reciprocity deficits, and the presence of restricted interests and stereotyped behaviors. Genetic factors contribute to the incidence of ASD evidently. However, the genetic spectrum of ASD is highly heterogeneous. Chromosomal abnormalities contribute significantly to the genetic deficits of syndromic and non-syndromic ASD. In this study, we conducted karyotyping analysis in a sample of 500 patients (447 males, 53 females) with ASD from Taiwan, the largest cohort in Asia, to the best of our knowledge. We found three patients having sex chromosome aneuploidy, including two cases of 47, XXY and one case of 47, XYY. In addition, we detected a novel reciprocal chromosomal translocation between long arms of chromosomes 4 and 14, designated t(4;14)(q31.3;q24.1), in a patient with Asperger's disorder. This translocation was inherited from his unaffected father, suggesting it might not be pathogenic or it needs further hits to become pathogenic. In line with other studies, our study revealed that subjects with sex chromosomal aneuploidy are liable to neurodevelopmental disorders, including ASD, and conventional karyotyping analysis is still a useful tool in detecting chromosomal translocation in patients with ASD, given that array-based comparative genomic hybridization technology can provide better resolution in detecting copy number variations of genomic DNA.

  20. Modeling Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Learning about chromosomes is standard fare in biology classrooms today. However, students may find it difficult to understand the relationships among the "genome", "chromosomes", "genes", a "gene locus", and "alleles". In the simple activity described in this article, which follows the 5E approach…

  1. Evidence of Genomic Exchanges between Homeologous Chromosomes in a Cross of Peanut with Newly Synthetized Allotetraploid Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguepjop, Joel R.; Tossim, Hodo-Abalo; Bell, Joseph M.; Rami, Jean-François; Sharma, Shivali; Courtois, Brigitte; Mallikarjuna, Nalini; Sane, Djibril; Fonceka, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Cultivated peanut and synthetics are allotetraploids (2n = 4x = 40) with two homeologous sets of chromosomes. Meiosis in allotetraploid peanut is generally thought to show diploid-like behavior. However, a recent study pointed out the occurrence of recombination between homeologous chromosomes, especially when synthetic allotetraploids are used, challenging the view of disomic inheritance in peanut. In this study, we investigated the meiotic behavior of allotetraploid peanut using 380 SSR markers and 90 F2 progeny derived from the cross between Arachis hypogaea cv Fleur 11 (AABB) and ISATGR278-18 (AAKK), a synthetic allotetraploid that harbors a K-genome that was reported to pair with the cultivated B-genome during meiosis. Segregation analysis of SSR markers showed 42 codominant SSRs with unexpected null bands among some progeny. Chi-square tests for these loci deviate from the expected 1:2:1 Mendelian ratio under disomic inheritance. A linkage map of 357 codominant loci aligned on 20 linkage groups (LGs) with a total length of 1728 cM, averaging 5.1 cM between markers, was developed. Among the 10 homeologous sets of LGs, one set consisted of markers that all segregated in a polysomic-like pattern, six in a likely disomic pattern and the three remaining in a mixed pattern with disomic and polysomic loci clustered on the same LG. Moreover, we reported a substitution of homeologous chromosomes in some progeny. Our results suggest that the homeologous recombination events occurred between the A and K genomes in the newly synthesized allotetraploid and have been highlighted in the progeny. Homeologous exchanges are rarely observed in tetraploid peanut and have not yet been reported for AAKK and AABB genomes. The implications of these results on peanut breeding are discussed. PMID:27847512

  2. Evidence of genomic exchanges between homeologous chromosomes in a cross of peanut with newly synthetized allotetraploid hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Romaric Nguepjop

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cultivated peanut and synthetics are allotetraploids (2n=4x=40 with two homeologous sets of chromosomes. Meiosis in allotetraploid peanut is generally thought to show diploid-like behavior. However, a recent study pointed out the occurrence of recombination between homeologous chromosomes, especially when synthetic allotetraploids are used, challenging the view of disomic inheritance in peanut. In this study, we investigated the meiotic behavior of allotetraploid peanut using 380 SSR markers and 90 F2 progeny derived from the cross between Arachis hypogaea cv Fleur 11 (AABB and ISATGR278-18 (AAKK, a synthetic allotetraploid that harbors a K-genome that was reported to pair with the cultivated B-genome during meiosis. Segregation analysis of SSR markers showed 42 codominant SSRs with unexpected null bands among some progeny. Chi-square tests for these loci deviate from the expected 1:2:1 Mendelian ratio under disomic inheritance. A linkage map of 357 codominant loci aligned on 20 linkage groups (LGs with a total length of 1728 cM, averaging 5.1 cM between markers, was developed. Among the ten homeologous sets of LGs, one set consisted of markers that all segregated in a polysomic-like pattern, 6 in a likely disomic pattern and the 3 remaining in a mixed pattern with disomic and polysomic loci clustered on the same LG. Moreover, we reported a substitution of homeologous chromosomes in some progeny. Our results suggest that the homeologous recombination events occurred between the A and K genomes in the newly synthesized allotetraploid and have been highlighted in the progeny. Homeologous exchanges are rarely observed in tetraploid peanut and have not yet been reported for AAKK and AABB genomes. The implications of these results on peanut breeding are discussed.

  3. Rapid detection of genomic imbalances using micro-arrays consisting of pooled BACs covering all human chromosome arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knijnenburg, Jeroen; van der Burg, Marja; Nilsson, Philomeen; Ploos van Amstel, Hans Kristian; Tanke, Hans; Szuhai, Károly

    2005-10-12

    A strategy is presented to select, pool and spot human BAC clones on an array in such a way that each spot contains five well performing BAC clones, covering one chromosome arm. A mini-array of 240 spots was prepared representing all human chromosome arms in a 5-fold as well as some controls, and used for comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) of 10 cell lines with aneusomies frequently found in clinical cytogenetics and oncology. Spot-to-spot variation within five replicates was below 6% and all expected abnormalities were detected 100% correctly. Sensitivity was such that replacing one BAC clone in a given spot of five by a BAC clone from another chromosome, thus resulting in a change in ratio of 20%, was reproducibly detected. Incubation time of the mini-array was varied and the fluorescently labelled target DNA was diluted. Typically, aneusomies could be detected using 30 ng of non-amplified random primed labelled DNA amounts in a 4 h hybridization reaction. Potential application of these mini-arrays for genomic profiling of disseminated tumour cells or of blastomeres for preimplantation genetic diagnosis, using specially designed DNA amplification methods, are discussed.

  4. Construction and Characterization of a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Library for the A-Genome of Cotton (G. arboreum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Hu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library for the A-genome of cotton has been constructed from the leaves of G. arboreum L cv. Jianglinzhongmian. It is used as elite A-genome germplasm resources in the present cotton breeding program and has been used to build a genetic reference map of cotton. The BAC library consists of 123,648 clones stored in 322 384-well plates. Statistical analysis of a set of 103 randomly selected BAC clones indicated that each clone has an average insert length of 100.2 kb per plasmid, with a range of 30 to 190 kb. Theoretically, this represents 7.2 haploid genome equivalents based on an A-genome size of 1697 Mb. The BAC library has been arranged in column pools and superpools allowing screening with various PCR-based markers. In the future, the A-genome cotton BAC library will serve as both a giant gene resource and a valuable tool for map-based gene isolation, physical mapping and comparative genome analysis.

  5. Construction and characterization of a 10-genome equivalent yeast artificial chromosome library for the laboratory rat, Rattus norvegicus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, L.; Zee, R.Y.L. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Schalkwyk, L.C. [Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Berlin (Germany)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Increasing attention has been focused in recent years on the rat as a model organism for genetic studies, in particular for the investigation of complex traits, but progress has been limited by the lack of availability of large-insert genomic libraries. Here, we report the construction and characterization of an arrayed yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) library for the rat genome containing approximately 40,000 clones in the AB1380 host using the pCGS966 vector. An average size of 736 kb was estimated from 166 randomly chosen clones; thus the library provides 10-fold coverage of the genome, with a 99.99% probability of containing a unique sequence. Eight of 39 YACs analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization were found to be chimeric, indicating a proportion of about 20-30% of chimeric clones. The library was spotted on high-density filters to allow the identification of YAC clones by hybridization and was pooled using a 3-dimensional scheme for screening by PCR. Among 48 probes used to screen the library, an average of 9.3 positive clones were found, consistent with the calculated 10-fold genomic coverage of the library. This YAC library represents the first large-insert genomic library for the rat. It will be made available to the research community at large as an important new resource for complex genome analysis in this species. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Comparison of genomes of eight species of sections Linum and Adenolinum from the genus Linum based on chromosome banding, molecular markers and RAPD analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muravenko, Olga V; Yurkevich, Olga Yu; Bolsheva, Nadezhda L; Samatadze, Tatiana E; Nosova, Inna V; Zelenina, Daria A; Volkov, Alexander A; Popov, Konstantin V; Zelenin, Alexander V

    2009-03-01

    Karyotypes of species sects. Linum and Adenolinum have been studied using C/DAPI-banding, Ag-NOR staining, FISH with 5S and 26S rDNA and RAPD analysis. C/DAPI-banding patterns enabled identification of all homologous chromosome pairs in the studied karyotypes. The revealed high similarity between species L. grandiflorum (2n = 16) and L. decumbens by chromosome and molecular markers proved their close genome relationship and identified the chromosome number in L. decumbens as 2n = 16. The similarity found for C/DAPI-banding patterns between species with the same chromosome numbers corresponds with the results obtained by RAPD-analysis, showing clusterization of 16-, 18- and 30-chromosome species into three separate groups. 5S rDNA and 26S rDNA were co-localized in NOR-chromosome 1 in the genomes of all species investigated. In 30-chromosome species, there were three separate 5S rDNA sites in chromosomes 3, 8 and 13. In 16-chromosome species, a separate 5S rDNA site was also located in chromosome 3, whereas in 18-chromosome species it was found in the long arm of NOR-chromosome 1. Thus, the difference in localization of rDNA sites in species with 2n = 16, 2n = 30 and 2n = 18 confirms taxonomists opinion, who attributed these species to different sects. Linum and Adenolinum, respectively. The obtained results suggest that species with 2n = 16, 2n = 18 and 2n = 30 originated from a 16-chromosome ancestor.

  7. Genomic Organization of Repetitive DNA Elements and Its Implications for the Chromosomal Evolution of Channid Fishes (Actinopterygii, Perciformes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioffi, Marcelo de Bello; Bertollo, Luiz Antonio Carlos; Villa, Mateo Andres; de Oliveira, Ezequiel Aguiar; Tanomtong, Alongklod; Yano, Cassia Fernanda; Supiwong, Weerayuth; Chaveerach, Arunrat

    2015-01-01

    Channid fishes, commonly referred to as “snakeheads”, are currently very important in Asian fishery and aquaculture due to the substantial decline in natural populations because of overexploitation. A large degree of chromosomal variation has been found in this family, mainly through the use of conventional cytogenetic investigations. In this study, we analyzed the karyotype structure and the distribution of 7 repetitive DNA sequences in several Channa species from different Thailand river basins. The aim of this study was to investigate the chromosomal differentiation among species and populations to improve upon the knowledge of its biodiversity and evolutionary history. Rearrangements, such as pericentric inversions, fusions and polyploidization, appear to be important events during the karyotypic evolution of this genus, resulting in the chromosomal diversity observed among the distinct species and even among populations of the same species. In addition, such variability is also increased by the genomic dynamism of repetitive elements, particularly by the differential distribution and accumulation of rDNA sequences on chromosomes. This marked diversity is likely linked to the lifestyle of the snakehead fishes and their population fragmentation, as already identified for other fish species. The karyotypic features highlight the biodiversity of the channid fishes and justify a taxonomic revision of the genus Channa, as well as of the Channidae family as a whole, as some nominal species may actually constitute species complexes. PMID:26067030

  8. Genomic Organization of Repetitive DNA Elements and Its Implications for the Chromosomal Evolution of Channid Fishes (Actinopterygii, Perciformes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Bello Cioffi

    Full Text Available Channid fishes, commonly referred to as "snakeheads", are currently very important in Asian fishery and aquaculture due to the substantial decline in natural populations because of overexploitation. A large degree of chromosomal variation has been found in this family, mainly through the use of conventional cytogenetic investigations. In this study, we analyzed the karyotype structure and the distribution of 7 repetitive DNA sequences in several Channa species from different Thailand river basins. The aim of this study was to investigate the chromosomal differentiation among species and populations to improve upon the knowledge of its biodiversity and evolutionary history. Rearrangements, such as pericentric inversions, fusions and polyploidization, appear to be important events during the karyotypic evolution of this genus, resulting in the chromosomal diversity observed among the distinct species and even among populations of the same species. In addition, such variability is also increased by the genomic dynamism of repetitive elements, particularly by the differential distribution and accumulation of rDNA sequences on chromosomes. This marked diversity is likely linked to the lifestyle of the snakehead fishes and their population fragmentation, as already identified for other fish species. The karyotypic features highlight the biodiversity of the channid fishes and justify a taxonomic revision of the genus Channa, as well as of the Channidae family as a whole, as some nominal species may actually constitute species complexes.

  9. Human artificial chromosome assembly by transposon-based retrofitting of genomic BACs with synthetic alpha-satellite arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Joydeep; Willard, Huntington F; Stromberg, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    The development of methodologies for the rapid assembly of synthetic alpha-satellite arrays recapitulating the higher-order periodic organization of native human centromeres permits the systematic investigation of the significance of primary sequence and sequence organization in centromere function. Synthetic arrays with defined mutations affecting sequence and/or organization may be evaluated in a de novo human artificial chromosome assay. This unit describes strategies for the assembly of custom built alpha-satellite arrays containing any desired mutation as well as strategies for the construction and manipulation of alpha satellite-based transposons. Transposons permit the rapid and reliable retrofitting of any genomic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) with synthetic alpha-satellite arrays and other functional components, thereby facilitating conversion into BAC-based human artificial chromosome vectors. These techniques permit identification and optimization of the critical parameters underlying the unique ability of alpha-satellite DNA to facilitate de novo centromere assembly, and they will establish the foundation for the next generation of human artificial chromosome vectors.

  10. Zinc-finger nuclease-driven targeted integration into mammalian genomes using donors with limited chromosomal homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Salvatore J.; Santiago, Yolanda; DeKelver, Russell C.; Freyvert, Yevgeniy; Boydston, Elizabeth A.; Moehle, Erica A.; Choi, Vivian M.; Gopalan, Sunita M.; Lou, Jacqueline F.; Li, James; Miller, Jeffrey C.; Holmes, Michael C.; Gregory, Philip D.; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Cost, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    We previously demonstrated high-frequency, targeted DNA addition mediated by the homology-directed DNA repair pathway. This method uses a zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) to create a site-specific double-strand break (DSB) that facilitates copying of genetic information into the chromosome from an exogenous donor molecule. Such donors typically contain two ∼750 bp regions of chromosomal sequence required for homology-directed DNA repair. Here, we demonstrate that easily-generated linear donors with extremely short (50 bp) homology regions drive transgene integration into 5–10% of chromosomes. Moreover, we measure the overhangs produced by ZFN cleavage and find that oligonucleotide donors with single-stranded 5′ overhangs complementary to those made by ZFNs are efficiently ligated in vivo to the DSB. Greater than 10% of all chromosomes directly incorporate this exogenous DNA via a process that is dependent upon and guided by complementary 5′ overhangs on the donor DNA. Finally, we extend this non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ)-based technique by directly inserting donor DNA comprising recombinase sites into large deletions created by the simultaneous action of two separate ZFN pairs. Up to 50% of deletions contained a donor insertion. Targeted DNA addition via NHEJ complements our homology-directed targeted integration approaches, adding versatility to the manipulation of mammalian genomes. PMID:20530528

  11. Evolutionary break point analysis between the proximal half of bovine chromosome 27 and conserved segments of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldammer, T; Kuehn, C; Brunner, R M; Weikard, R

    2009-01-01

    The proximal half of Bos taurus chromosome 27 (BTA27prox) delimited by microsatellite markers BM3507 and CSSM043 reveals complex rearrangements compared to its corresponding Homo sapiens chromosome (HSA) fragments. A comparative mapping approach combining somatic and radiation hybrid cell mapping techniques and related cytogenetic data resulted in an improved physical map for BTA27prox, which provides candidate genes for several important economic traits. The generated comprehensive map includes anchor loci for 103 genes and microsatellite markers. Mapping of genes proximal to BM3507 matching a region from 0.60 to 2.78 megabase pairs (Mb) of HSA8 confirmed recent sequence annotations on BTA27. Assignments of loci predicted to be on BTA27 to BTA1, BTA8, and BTA17 narrowed down evolutionary chromosome break points compared with corresponding chromosome segments in human. New physical anchors obtained in this study confirm in more detail the described evolutionary conservation between the proximal half of BTA27 and homologous segments of HSA4 and HSA8 and will contribute to the completion of the cattle DNA genome sequence.

  12. Effects on Genome Constitution and Novel Cell Wall Formation Caused by the Addition of 5RS Rye Chromosome to Common Wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Jun Cheng; Minoru Murata; Sodmergen; Xiao-Mei Li; Hai Nian; Jian-Min Wan

    2008-01-01

    The cytological instability of common wheat-rye addition lines was investigated in the present study. The chromosome numbers of almost all addition lines were considerably stable, but those of CS + 5R were very variable. The rye chromosome added in this line was found to be much shorter than expected. Fluorescent in situ hybridization with 5S rDNA and the centromere-specific probes clearly revealed that the short rye chromosome contains only a short arm of chromosome 5R (5RS). In this line, chromosome numbers of both 5RS and common wheat were changeable. The chromosome numbers ranged from 2n = 36 to 2n = 44 in the cells carrying two 5RS, and ranged from 2n = 31 to 2n = 44 in one 5RS cells. In addition to the chromosome instability, the multicells wrapped in a sac-like structure were frequently observed in the root meristematic tissues of CS + 5RS after the enzyme treatment for chromosome preparation. Genomic in situ hybridization with rye DNA as a probe showed that all cells in sacs investigated were at the interphase stage and contained one or two 5RS chromosomes. An electron microscopic analysis revealed that the cells of CS + 5RS, particularly in sacs, have abnormal (irregular and curved) cell walls. These results indicate that 5RS has (a) specific factor(s) influencing the cell wall development as well as the genome stability.

  13. Genome-wide copy number profiling on high-density bacterial artificial chromosomes, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and oligonucleotide microarrays: a platform comparison based on statistical power analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hehir-Kwa, J.Y.; Egmont-Peterson, M.; Janssen, I.M.; Smeets, D.F.C.M.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.; Veltman, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, comparative genomic hybridization onto bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) arrays (array-based comparative genomic hybridization) has proved to be successful for the detection of submicroscopic DNA copy-number variations in health and disease. Technological improvements to achieve a high

  14. Mechanical continuity and reversible chromosome disassembly within intact genomes removed from living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniotis, A. J.; Bojanowski, K.; Ingber, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    Chromatin is thought to be structurally discontinuous because it is packaged into morphologically distinct chromosomes that appear physically isolated from one another in metaphase preparations used for cytogenetic studies. However, analysis of chromosome positioning and movement suggest that different chromosomes often behave as if they were physically connected in interphase as well as mitosis. To address this paradox directly, we used a microsurgical technique to physically remove nucleoplasm or chromosomes from living cells under isotonic conditions. Using this approach, we found that pulling a single nucleolus or chromosome out from interphase or mitotic cells resulted in sequential removal of the remaining nucleoli and chromosomes, interconnected by a continuous elastic thread. Enzymatic treatments of interphase nucleoplasm and chromosome chains held under tension revealed that mechanical continuity within the chromatin was mediated by elements sensitive to DNase or micrococcal nuclease, but not RNases, formamide at high temperature, or proteases. In contrast, mechanical coupling between mitotic chromosomes and the surrounding cytoplasm appeared to be mediated by gelsolin-sensitive microfilaments. Furthermore, when ion concentrations were raised and lowered, both the chromosomes and the interconnecting strands underwent multiple rounds of decondensation and recondensation. As a result of these dynamic structural alterations, the mitotic chains also became sensitive to disruption by restriction enzymes. Ion-induced chromosome decondensation could be blocked by treatment with DNA binding dyes, agents that reduce protein disulfide linkages within nuclear matrix, or an antibody directed against histones. Fully decondensed chromatin strands also could be induced to recondense into chromosomes with pre-existing size, shape, number, and position by adding anti-histone antibodies. Conversely, removal of histones by proteolysis or heparin treatment produced chromosome

  15. Karyotype evolution in apomictic Boechera and the origin of the aberrant chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandáková, Terezie; Schranz, M Eric; Sharbel, Timothy F; de Jong, Hans; Lysak, Martin A

    2015-06-01

    Chromosome rearrangements may result in both decrease and increase of chromosome numbers. Here we have used comparative chromosome painting (CCP) to reconstruct the pathways of descending and ascending dysploidy in the genus Boechera (tribe Boechereae, Brassicaceae). We describe the origin and structure of three Boechera genomes and establish the origin of the previously described aberrant Het and Del chromosomes found in Boechera apomicts with euploid (2n = 14) and aneuploid (2n = 15) chromosome number. CCP analysis allowed us to reconstruct the origin of seven chromosomes in sexual B. stricta and apomictic B. divaricarpa from the ancestral karyotype (n = 8) of Brassicaceae lineage I. Whereas three chromosomes (BS4, BS6, and BS7) retained their ancestral structure, five chromosomes were reshuffled by reciprocal translocations to form chromosomes BS1-BS3 and BS5. The reduction of the chromosome number (from x = 8 to x = 7) was accomplished through the inactivation of a paleocentromere on chromosome BS5. In apomictic 2n = 14 plants, CCP identifies the largely heterochromatic chromosome (Het) being one of the BS1 homologues with the expansion of pericentromeric heterochromatin. In apomictic B. polyantha (2n = 15), the Het has undergone a centric fission resulting in two smaller chromosomes - the submetacentric Het' and telocentric Del. Here we show that new chromosomes can be formed by a centric fission and can be fixed in populations due to the apomictic mode of reproduction.

  16. Analysis of segmental duplications, mouse genome synteny and recurrent cancer-associated amplicons in human chromosome 6p21-p12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J W; Yoshimoto, M; Ludkovski, O; Thorner, P S; Zielenska, M; Squire, J A; Nuin, P A S

    2010-06-01

    It has been proposed that regions of microhomology in the human genome could facilitate genomic rearrangements, copy number transitions, and rapid genomic change during tumor progression. To investigate this idea, this study examines the role of repetitive sequence elements, and corresponding syntenic mouse genomic features, in targeting cancer-associated genomic instability of specific regions of the human genome. Automated database-mining algorithms designed to search for frequent copy number transitions and genomic breakpoints were applied to 2 publicly-available online databases and revealed that 6p21-p12 is one of the regions of the human genome most frequently involved in tumor-specific alterations. In these analyses, 6p21-p12 exhibited the highest frequency of genomic amplification in osteosarcomas. Analysis of repetitive elements in regions of homology between human chromosome 6p and the syntenic regions of the mouse genome revealed a strong association between the location of segmental duplications greater than 5 kilobase-pairs and the position of discontinuities at the end of the syntenic region. The presence of clusters of segmental duplications flanking these syntenic regions also correlated with a high frequency of amplification and genomic alteration. Collectively, the experimental findings, in silico analyses, and comparative genomic studies presented here suggest that segmental duplications may facilitate cancer-associated copy number transitions and rearrangements at chromosome 6p21-p12. This process may involve homology-dependent DNA recombination and/or repair, which may also contribute towards the overall plasticity of the human genome.

  17. High-resolution linkage map and chromosome-scale genome assembly for cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) from 10 populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-11

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is a major staple crop in Africa, Asia, and South America, and its starchy roots provide nourishment for 800 million people worldwide. Although native to South America, cassava was brought to Africa 400-500 years ago and is now widely cultivated across sub-Saharan Africa, but it is subject to biotic and abiotic stresses. To assist in the rapid identification of markers for pathogen resistance and crop traits, and to accelerate breeding programs, we generated a framework map for M. esculenta Crantz from reduced representation sequencing [genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS)]. The composite 2412-cM map integrates 10 biparental maps (comprising 3480 meioses) and organizes 22,403 genetic markers on 18 chromosomes, in agreement with the observed karyotype. We used the map to anchor 71.9% of the draft genome assembly and 90.7% of the predicted protein-coding genes. The chromosome-anchored genome sequence will be useful for breeding improvement by assisting in the rapid identification of markers linked to important traits, and in providing a framework for genomic selection-enhanced breeding of this important crop.

  18. Nested chromosomal fragmentation in yeast using the meganuclease I-Sce I: a new method for physical mapping of eukaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierry, A; Dujon, B

    1992-11-11

    We have developed a new method for the physical mapping of genomes and the rapid sorting of genomic libraries which is based on chromosome fragmentation by the meganuclease I-Sce I, the first available member of a new class of endonucleases with very long recognition sequences. I-Sce I allows complete cleavage at a single artificially inserted site in an entire genome. Sites can be inserted by homologous recombination using specific cassettes containing selectable markers or, at random, using transposons. This method has been applied to the physical mapping of chromosome XI (620 kb) of Saccharomyces cerevisi and to the sorting of a cosmid library. Our strategy has potential applications to various genome mapping projects. A set of transgenic yeast strains carrying the I-Sce I sites at various locations along a chromosome defines physical intervals against which new genes, DNA fragments or clones can be mapped directly by simple hybridizations.

  19. Genome-health nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics: nutritional requirements or 'nutriomes' for chromosomal stability and telomere maintenance at the individual level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Caroline; Fenech, Michael

    2008-05-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that (a) risk for developmental and degenerative disease increases with more DNA damage, which in turn is dependent on nutritional status, and (b) the optimal concentration of micronutrients for prevention of genome damage is also dependent on genetic polymorphisms that alter the function of genes involved directly or indirectly in the uptake and metabolism of micronutrients required for DNA repair and DNA replication. The development of dietary patterns, functional foods and supplements that are designed to improve genome-health maintenance in individuals with specific genetic backgrounds may provide an important contribution to an optimum health strategy based on the diagnosis and individualised nutritional prevention of genome damage, i.e. genome health clinics. The present review summarises some of the recent knowledge relating to micronutrients that are associated with chromosomal stability and provides some initial insights into the likely nutritional factors that may be expected to have an impact on the maintenance of telomeres. It is evident that developing effective strategies for defining nutrient doses and combinations or 'nutriomes' for genome-health maintenance at the individual level is essential for further progress in this research field.

  20. Identification and characterization of genomic regions on chromosomes 4 and 8 that control the rate of photosynthesis in rice leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Shunsuke; Tsuru, Yukiko; Nito, Naoko; Murata, Kazumasa; Yamamoto, Toshio; Ebitani, Takeshi; Ookawa, Taiichiro; Hirasawa, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    DNA marker-assisted selection appears to be a promising strategy for improving rates of leaf photosynthesis in rice. The rate of leaf photosynthesis was significantly higher in a high-yielding indica variety, Habataki, than in the most popular Japanese variety, Koshihikari, at the full heading stage as a result of the higher level of leaf nitrogen at the same rate of application of nitrogen and the higher stomatal conductance even when the respective levels of leaf nitrogen were the same. The higher leaf nitrogen content of Habataki was caused by the greater accumulation of nitrogen by plants. The higher stomatal conductance of Habataki was caused by the higher hydraulic conductance. Using progeny populations and selected lines derived from a cross between Koshihikari and Habataki, it was possible to identify the genomic regions responsible for the rate of photosynthesis within a 2.1 Mb region between RM17459 and RM17552 and within a 1.2 Mb region between RM6999 and RM22529 on the long arm of chromosome 4 and on the short arm of chromosome 8, respectively. The designated region on chromosome 4 of Habataki was responsible for both the increase in the nitrogen content of leaves and hydraulic conductance in the plant by increasing the root surface area. The designated region on chromosome 8 of Habataki was responsible for the increase in hydraulic conductance by increasing the root hydraulic conductivity. The results suggest that it may be possible to improve photosynthesis in rice leaves by marker-assisted selection that focuses on these regions of chromosomes 4 and 8. PMID:21296764

  1. Identification and characterization of genomic regions on chromosomes 4 and 8 that control the rate of photosynthesis in rice leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Shunsuke; Tsuru, Yukiko; Nito, Naoko; Murata, Kazumasa; Yamamoto, Toshio; Ebitani, Takeshi; Ookawa, Taiichiro; Hirasawa, Tadashi

    2011-03-01

    DNA marker-assisted selection appears to be a promising strategy for improving rates of leaf photosynthesis in rice. The rate of leaf photosynthesis was significantly higher in a high-yielding indica variety, Habataki, than in the most popular Japanese variety, Koshihikari, at the full heading stage as a result of the higher level of leaf nitrogen at the same rate of application of nitrogen and the higher stomatal conductance even when the respective levels of leaf nitrogen were the same. The higher leaf nitrogen content of Habataki was caused by the greater accumulation of nitrogen by plants. The higher stomatal conductance of Habataki was caused by the higher hydraulic conductance. Using progeny populations and selected lines derived from a cross between Koshihikari and Habataki, it was possible to identify the genomic regions responsible for the rate of photosynthesis within a 2.1 Mb region between RM17459 and RM17552 and within a 1.2 Mb region between RM6999 and RM22529 on the long arm of chromosome 4 and on the short arm of chromosome 8, respectively. The designated region on chromosome 4 of Habataki was responsible for both the increase in the nitrogen content of leaves and hydraulic conductance in the plant by increasing the root surface area. The designated region on chromosome 8 of Habataki was responsible for the increase in hydraulic conductance by increasing the root hydraulic conductivity. The results suggest that it may be possible to improve photosynthesis in rice leaves by marker-assisted selection that focuses on these regions of chromosomes 4 and 8.

  2. Construction of male and female PAC genomic libraries suitable for identification of Y-chromosome-specific clones from the liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, S; Fujisawa, M; Sone, T; Nakayama, S; Nishiyama, R; Takenaka, M; Yamaoka, S; Sakaida, M; Kono, K; Takahama, M; Yamato, K T; Fukuzawa, H; Brennicke, A; Ohyama, K

    2000-11-01

    Unlike higher plants, the dioecious liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha, has uniquely small sex chromosomes, with X chromosomes present only in female gametophytes and Y chromosomes only in male gametophytes. We have constructed respective genomic libraries for male and female plantlets using a P1-derived artificial chromosome (pCYPAC2). With an average insert size of approximately 90 kb, each PAC library is estimated to cover the entire genome with a probability of more than 99.9%. Male-specific PAC clones were screened for by differential hybridization using male and female genomic DNAs as separate probes. Seventy male-specific PAC clones were identified. The male specificity of one of the clones, pMM4G7, was verified by Southern hybridization and PCR analysis. This clone was indeed located on the Y chromosome as verified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This result shows that the Y chromosome contains unique sequences that are not present either on the X chromosome or any of the autosomes. Thus, the respective male and female libraries for M. polymorpha offer an opportunity to identify key genes involved in the process of sex differentiation and this unique system of sex determination.

  3. A genetic map of Peromyscus with chromosomal assignment of linkage groups (a Peromyscus genetic map).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney-Hunt, Jane; Lewandowski, Adrienne; Glenn, Travis C; Glenn, Julie L; Tsyusko, Olga V; O'Neill, Rachel J; Brown, Judy; Ramsdell, Clifton M; Nguyen, Quang; Phan, Tony; Shorter, Kimberly R; Dewey, Michael J; Szalai, Gabor; Vrana, Paul B; Felder, Michael R

    2014-04-01

    The rodent genus Peromyscus is the most numerous and species-rich mammalian group in North America. The naturally occurring diversity within this genus allows opportunities to investigate the genetic basis of adaptation, monogamy, behavioral and physiological phenotypes, growth control, genomic imprinting, and disease processes. Increased genomic resources including a high quality genetic map are needed to capitalize on these opportunities. We produced interspecific hybrids between the prairie deer mouse (P. maniculatus bairdii) and the oldfield mouse (P. polionotus) and scored meiotic recombination events in backcross progeny. A genetic map was constructed by genotyping of backcross progeny at 185 gene-based and 155 microsatellite markers representing all autosomes and the X-chromosome. Comparison of the constructed genetic map with the molecular maps of Mus and Rattus and consideration of previous results from interspecific reciprocal whole chromosome painting allowed most linkage groups to be unambiguously assigned to specific Peromyscus chromosomes. Based on genomic comparisons, this Peromyscus genetic map covers ~83% of the Rattus genome and 79% of the Mus genome. This map supports previous results that the Peromyscus genome is more similar to Rattus than Mus. For example, coverage of the 20 Rattus autosomes and the X-chromosome is accomplished with only 28 segments of the Peromyscus map, but coverage of the 19 Mus autosomes and the X-chromosome requires 40 chromosomal segments of the Peromyscus map. Furthermore, a single Peromyscus linkage group corresponds to about 91% of the rat and only 76% of the mouse X-chromosomes.

  4. Avian sex, sex chromosomes, and dosage compensation in the age of genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2014-04-01

    Comparisons of the sex chromosome systems in birds and mammals are widening our view and deepening our understanding of vertebrate sex chromosome organization, function, and evolution. Birds have a very conserved ZW system of sex determination in which males have two copies of a large, gene-rich Z chromosome, and females have a single Z and a female-specific W chromosome. The avian ZW system is quite the reverse of the well-studied mammalian XY chromosome system, and evolved independently from different autosomal blocs. Despite the different gene content of mammal and bird sex chromosomes, there are many parallels. Genes on the bird Z and the mammal X have both undergone selection for male-advantage functions, and there has been amplification of male-advantage genes and accumulation of LINEs. The bird W and mammal Y have both undergone extensive degradation, but some birds retain early stages and some mammals terminal stages of the process, suggesting that the process is more advanced in mammals. Different sex-determining genes, DMRT1 and SRY, define the ZW and XY systems, but DMRT1 is involved in downstream events in mammals. Birds show strong cell autonomous specification of somatic sex differences in ZZ and ZW tissue, but there is growing evidence for direct X chromosome effects on sexual phenotype in mammals. Dosage compensation in birds appears to be phenotypically and molecularly quite different from X inactivation, being partial and gene-specific, but both systems use tools from the same molecular toolbox and there are some signs that galliform birds represent an early stage in the evolution of a coordinated system.

  5. Macronuclear genome structure of the ciliate Nyctotherus ovalis: Single-gene chromosomes and tiny introns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landweber Laura F

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nyctotherus ovalis is a single-celled eukaryote that has hydrogen-producing mitochondria and lives in the hindgut of cockroaches. Like all members of the ciliate taxon, it has two types of nuclei, a micronucleus and a macronucleus. N. ovalis generates its macronuclear chromosomes by forming polytene chromosomes that subsequently develop into macronuclear chromosomes by DNA elimination and rearrangement. Results We examined the structure of these gene-sized macronuclear chromosomes in N. ovalis. We determined the telomeres, subtelomeric regions, UTRs, coding regions and introns by sequencing a large set of macronuclear DNA sequences (4,242 and cDNAs (5,484 and comparing them with each other. The telomeres consist of repeats CCC(AAAACCCCn, similar to those in spirotrichous ciliates such as Euplotes, Sterkiella (Oxytricha and Stylonychia. Per sequenced chromosome we found evidence for either a single protein-coding gene, a single tRNA, or the complete ribosomal RNAs cluster. Hence the chromosomes appear to encode single transcripts. In the short subtelomeric regions we identified a few overrepresented motifs that could be involved in gene regulation, but there is no consensus polyadenylation site. The introns are short (21–29 nucleotides, and a significant fraction (1/3 of the tiny introns is conserved in the distantly related ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia. As has been observed in P. tetraurelia, the N. ovalis introns tend to contain in-frame stop codons or have a length that is not dividable by three. This pattern causes premature termination of mRNA translation in the event of intron retention, and potentially degradation of unspliced mRNAs by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway. Conclusion The combination of short leaders, tiny introns and single genes leads to very minimal macronuclear chromosomes. The smallest we identified contained only 150 nucleotides.

  6. Genomic organization of repetitive DNAs highlights chromosomal evolution in the genus Clarias (Clariidae, Siluriformes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneechot, Nuntiya; Yano, Cassia Fernanda; Bertollo, Luiz Antonio Carlos; Getlekha, Nuntaporn; Molina, Wagner Franco; Ditcharoen, Sukhonthip; Tengjaroenkul, Bundit; Supiwong, Weerayuth; Tanomtong, Alongklod; de Bello Cioffi, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The genus Clarias (Clariidae, Siluriformes) contains at least 61 species naturally spread over vast regions of Asia, India and Africa. However, Clarias species have also been introduced in many different countries and represent the most widespread catfishes in the world. These fishes are also known as "walking catfishes" due to their ability to move over land. A large degree of chromosomal variation has been previously found in this family, mainly using conventional cytogenetic investigations, with diploid chromosome numbers ranging between 48 and 100. In this study, we analyzed the karyotype structure and distribution of four repetitive DNA sequences (5S and 18S rDNAs and (CA)15 and (GA)15 microsatellites) in three Clarias species (C. batrachus, C. gariepinus, C. macrocephalus), as well as in a probable natural hybrid of the two latter species from different Thailand river basins. Clarias gariepinus and C. macrocephalus had 2n = 56 and 2n = 54, respectively, as well as karyotypes composed mainly by metacentric and submetacentric chromosomes. Their karyotypes differed in the number and location of 5S and 18S rDNA sites and in the degree of microsatellite accumulation. An intermediate chromosomal pattern incorporating those of the parental species was found in the probable hybrid, confirming its interspecific origin. Clarias batrachus had 2n = 104 chromosomes and its karyotype was dominated by mainly acrocentric elements, indicating that unusual multiple centric fissions were involved in its karyotype differentiation. The karyotype of this species presented an unexpected dispersion of ribosomal DNAs, possessing 54 and 12 sites of 5S and 18S rDNAs, respectively, as well as a high accumulation and differential distribution of both microsatellite repeats, representing 'hot spots' for chromosomal rearrangement. Both conventional and molecular cytogenetic markers were useful tools for demonstrating remarkable evolutionary dynamism and highlighting multiple

  7. Integration of high-resolution physical and genetic map reveals differential recombination frequency between chromosomes and the genome assembling quality in cucumber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Qunfeng; He, Yuhua; Cheng, Chunyan; Zhang, Zhonghua; Li, Ji; Huang, Sanwen; Chen, Jinfeng

    2013-01-01

    Cucumber is an important model crop and the first species sequenced in Cucurbitaceae family. Compared to the fast increasing genetic and genomics resources, the molecular cytogenetic researches in cucumber are still very limited, which results in directly the shortage of relation between plenty of physical sequences or genetic data and chromosome structure. We mapped twenty-three fosmids anchored by SSR markers from LG-3, the longest linkage group, and LG-4, the shortest linkage group on pachytene chromosomes 3 and 4, using uorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Integrated molecular cytogenetic maps of chromosomes 3 and 4 were constructed. Except for three SSR markers located on heterochromatin region, the cytological order of markers was concordant with those on the linkage maps. Distinct structural differences between chromosomes 3 and 4 were revealed by the high resolution pachytene chromosomes. The extreme difference of genetic length between LG-3 and LG-4 was mainly attributed to the difference of overall recombination frequency. The significant differentiation of heterochromatin contents in chromosomes 3 and 4 might have a direct correlation with recombination frequency. Meanwhile, the uneven distribution of recombination frequency along chromosome 4 was observed, and recombination frequency of the long arm was nearly 3.5 times higher than that of the short arm. The severe suppression of recombination was exhibited in centromeric and heterochromatin domains of chromosome 4. Whereas a close correlation between the gene density and recombination frequency was observed in chromosome 4, no significant correlation was observed between them along chromosome 3. The comparison between cytogenetic and sequence maps revealed a large gap on the pericentromeric heterochromatin region of sequence map of chromosome 4. These results showed that integrated molecular cytogenetic maps can provide important information for the study of genetic and genomics in cucumber.

  8. Integration of high-resolution physical and genetic map reveals differential recombination frequency between chromosomes and the genome assembling quality in cucumber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qunfeng Lou

    Full Text Available Cucumber is an important model crop and the first species sequenced in Cucurbitaceae family. Compared to the fast increasing genetic and genomics resources, the molecular cytogenetic researches in cucumber are still very limited, which results in directly the shortage of relation between plenty of physical sequences or genetic data and chromosome structure. We mapped twenty-three fosmids anchored by SSR markers from LG-3, the longest linkage group, and LG-4, the shortest linkage group on pachytene chromosomes 3 and 4, using uorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. Integrated molecular cytogenetic maps of chromosomes 3 and 4 were constructed. Except for three SSR markers located on heterochromatin region, the cytological order of markers was concordant with those on the linkage maps. Distinct structural differences between chromosomes 3 and 4 were revealed by the high resolution pachytene chromosomes. The extreme difference of genetic length between LG-3 and LG-4 was mainly attributed to the difference of overall recombination frequency. The significant differentiation of heterochromatin contents in chromosomes 3 and 4 might have a direct correlation with recombination frequency. Meanwhile, the uneven distribution of recombination frequency along chromosome 4 was observed, and recombination frequency of the long arm was nearly 3.5 times higher than that of the short arm. The severe suppression of recombination was exhibited in centromeric and heterochromatin domains of chromosome 4. Whereas a close correlation between the gene density and recombination frequency was observed in chromosome 4, no significant correlation was observed between them along chromosome 3. The comparison between cytogenetic and sequence maps revealed a large gap on the pericentromeric heterochromatin region of sequence map of chromosome 4. These results showed that integrated molecular cytogenetic maps can provide important information for the study of genetic and genomics

  9. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in si

  10. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in

  11. Beyond Reciprocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afsah, Ebrahim

    2010-01-01

    , reflecting rather the enormous diversity of the human condition. This makes it difficult to speak of the phenomenon of war as one common observable fact, majestically constant throughout time and space. This historical, cultural, and operational diversity considerably complicates the analysis of war and its...... the effectiveness of reciprocal moderation on which the law of war has traditionally relied as its chief enforcement mechanism. This study seeks to understand why norms take a particular form rather than laying out the applicable rules and applying them to different categories of people under different...... and logically questionable because any privileged regime presupposes a standard regime. The privileges to which lawful combatants are entitled when they become prisoners of war are important, but they must not detract from the far more elementary protections to which anybody else is entitled to...

  12. X-Chromosome Control of Genome-Scale Recombination Rates in House Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Beth L

    2017-02-03

    Sex differences in recombination are widespread in mammals, but the causes of this pattern are poorly understood. Previously, males from two interfertile subspecies of house mice, Mus musculus musculus and M. m. castaneus, were shown to exhibit a ~30% difference in their global crossover frequencies. Much of this crossover rate divergence is explained by six autosomal loci and a large-effect locus on the X chromosome. Intriguingly, the allelic effects at this X-linked locus are transgressive, with the allele conferring increased crossover rate transmitted by the low crossover rate M. m. castaneus parent. Despite the pronounced divergence between males, females from these subspecies exhibit similar crossover rates, raising the question of how recombination is genetically controlled in this sex. Here, I analyze publicly available genotype data from early generations of the Collaborative Cross, an 8-way panel of recombinant inbred strains, to estimate crossover frequencies in female mice with sex chromosome genotypes of diverse sub-specific origins. Consistent with the transgressive influence of the X chromosome in males, I show that females inheriting a M. m. castaneus X possess higher average crossover rates than females lacking the M. m. castaneus X chromosome. The differential inheritance of the X chromosome in males and females provides a simple genetic explanation for sex-limited evolution of this trait. Further, the presence of X-linked and autosomal crossover rate modifiers with antagonistic effects hints at an underlying genetic conflict fueled by selection for distinct crossover rate optima in males and females.

  13. Physical mapping of a large plant genome using global high-information-content-fingerprinting: the distal region of the wheat ancestor Aegilops tauschii chromosome 3DS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Frank M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical maps employing libraries of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clones are essential for comparative genomics and sequencing of large and repetitive genomes such as those of the hexaploid bread wheat. The diploid ancestor of the D-genome of hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum, Aegilops tauschii, is used as a resource for wheat genomics. The barley diploid genome also provides a good model for the Triticeae and T. aestivum since it is only slightly larger than the ancestor wheat D genome. Gene co-linearity between the grasses can be exploited by extrapolating from rice and Brachypodium distachyon to Ae. tauschii or barley, and then to wheat. Results We report the use of Ae. tauschii for the construction of the physical map of a large distal region of chromosome arm 3DS. A physical map of 25.4 Mb was constructed by anchoring BAC clones of Ae. tauschii with 85 EST on the Ae. tauschii and barley genetic maps. The 24 contigs were aligned to the rice and B. distachyon genomic sequences and a high density SNP genetic map of barley. As expected, the mapped region is highly collinear to the orthologous chromosome 1 in rice, chromosome 2 in B. distachyon and chromosome 3H in barley. However, the chromosome scale of the comparative maps presented provides new insights into grass genome organization. The disruptions of the Ae. tauschii-rice and Ae. tauschii-Brachypodium syntenies were identical. We observed chromosomal rearrangements between Ae. tauschii and barley. The comparison of Ae. tauschii physical and genetic maps showed that the recombination rate across the region dropped from 2.19 cM/Mb in the distal region to 0.09 cM/Mb in the proximal region. The size of the gaps between contigs was evaluated by comparing the recombination rate along the map with the local recombination rates calculated on single contigs. Conclusions The physical map reported here is the first physical map using fingerprinting of a complete

  14. Algorithms to model single gene, single chromosome, and whole genome copy number changes jointly in tumor phylogenetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Akhter Chowdhury

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We present methods to construct phylogenetic models of tumor progression at the cellular level that include copy number changes at the scale of single genes, entire chromosomes, and the whole genome. The methods are designed for data collected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, an experimental technique especially well suited to characterizing intratumor heterogeneity using counts of probes to genetic regions frequently gained or lost in tumor development. Here, we develop new provably optimal methods for computing an edit distance between the copy number states of two cells given evolution by copy number changes of single probes, all probes on a chromosome, or all probes in the genome. We then apply this theory to develop a practical heuristic algorithm, implemented in publicly available software, for inferring tumor phylogenies on data from potentially hundreds of single cells by this evolutionary model. We demonstrate and validate the methods on simulated data and published FISH data from cervical cancers and breast cancers. Our computational experiments show that the new model and algorithm lead to more parsimonious trees than prior methods for single-tumor phylogenetics and to improved performance on various classification tasks, such as distinguishing primary tumors from metastases obtained from the same patient population.

  15. Algorithms to model single gene, single chromosome, and whole genome copy number changes jointly in tumor phylogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Salim Akhter; Shackney, Stanley E; Heselmeyer-Haddad, Kerstin; Ried, Thomas; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Schwartz, Russell

    2014-07-01

    We present methods to construct phylogenetic models of tumor progression at the cellular level that include copy number changes at the scale of single genes, entire chromosomes, and the whole genome. The methods are designed for data collected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), an experimental technique especially well suited to characterizing intratumor heterogeneity using counts of probes to genetic regions frequently gained or lost in tumor development. Here, we develop new provably optimal methods for computing an edit distance between the copy number states of two cells given evolution by copy number changes of single probes, all probes on a chromosome, or all probes in the genome. We then apply this theory to develop a practical heuristic algorithm, implemented in publicly available software, for inferring tumor phylogenies on data from potentially hundreds of single cells by this evolutionary model. We demonstrate and validate the methods on simulated data and published FISH data from cervical cancers and breast cancers. Our computational experiments show that the new model and algorithm lead to more parsimonious trees than prior methods for single-tumor phylogenetics and to improved performance on various classification tasks, such as distinguishing primary tumors from metastases obtained from the same patient population.

  16. Construction of representative NotI linking libraries specific for the total human genome and for human chromosome 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabarovsky, E R; Allikmets, R; Kholodnyuk, I; Zabarovska, V I; Paulsson, N; Bannikov, V M; Kashuba, V I; Dean, M; Kisselev, L L; Klein, G

    1994-03-15

    NotI linking clones represent valuable tools for both physical and genetic mapping. Using procedures that we have previously described, several chromosome 3-specific NotI linking libraries have been constructed. Here, we describe the construction of six independent NotI linking libraries specific for the total human genome. These libraries were made using three different vectors and two combinations of restriction enzymes. Altogether, these six libraries contain more than 1 million recombinant phages. Considering that the human genome contains about 3000-5000 NotI sites, it is likely that all clonable NotI sites are present in these libraries. Two of the six libraries were transferred into plasmid form. At the same time, a chromosome 3-specific EcoRI-NotI library (NRL1) was constructed. This library considerably increases the representation of cloned NotI sites in combination with previously constructed libraries that were made using BamHI-NotI digestion. All libraries are available on request.

  17. Construction of representative NotI linking libraries specific for the total human genome and for human chromosome 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabarovsky, E.R.; Kholodnyuk, I.; Zabarovska, V.I.; Paulsson, N.; Bannikov, V.M.; Kashuba, V.I.; Klein, G. (Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)); Allikmets, R.; Dean, M. (National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD (United States)); Kisselev, L.L. (Engelhardt Institute of Molecular Biology, Moscow (Russian Federation))

    1994-03-15

    NotI linking clones represent valuable tools for both physical and genetic mapping. Using procedures previously described, several chromosome 3-specific NotI linking libraries have been constructed. Here, the authors describe the construction of six independent NotI linking libraries specific for the total human genome. These libraries were made using three different vectors and two combinations of restriction enzymes. Altogether, these six libraries contain more than 1 million recombinant phages. Considering that the human genome contains about 3000-5000 NotI sites, it is likely that all clonable NotI sites are present in these libraries. Two of the six libraries were transferred into plasmid form. At the same time, a chromosome 3-specific EcoRI-NotI library (NRL1) was constructed. This library considerably increases the representation of cloned NotI sites in combination with previously constructed libraries that were made using BamHI-NotI digestion. All libraries are available on request. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Engineered chromosome-based genetic mapping establishes a 3.7-Mb critical genomic region for Down syndrome-associated heart defects in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chunhong; Morishima, Masae; Jiang,Xiaoling; Yu, Tao; Meng, Kai; Ray, Debjit; Pao, Annie; Ye, Ping; Parmacek, Michael S.; Yu, Y. Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Trisomy 21 (Down syndrome, DS) is the most common human genetic anomaly associated with heart defects. Based on evolutionary conservation, DS-associated heart defects have been modeled in mice. By generating and analyzing mouse mutants carrying different genomic rearrangements in human chromosome 21 (Hsa21) syntenic regions, we found the triplication of the Tiam1-Kcnj6 region on mouse chromosome 16 (Mmu16) resulted in DS-related cardiovascular abnormalities. In this study, we developed two ta...

  19. Development of new transformation-competent artificial chromosome vectors and rice genomic libraries for efficient gene cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao-Guang; Liu, Hongmei; Chen, Letian; Qiu, Weihua; Zhang, Qunyu; Wu, Hao; Yang, Chunyi; Su, Jing; Wang, Zhonghua; Tian, Dongsheng; Mei, Mantong

    2002-01-09

    The transformation-competent artificial chromosome vector (TAC) system has been shown to be very useful for efficient gene isolation in Arabidopsis thaliana (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 96 (1998) 6535). To adapt the vector system for gene isolation in crops, two new TAC vectors and rice genomic libraries were developed. The new vectors pYLTAC17 and pYLTAC27 use the Bar gene and Hpt gene driven by the rice Act1 promoter as the plant selectable markers, respectively, and are suitable for transformation of rice and other grasses. Two representative genomic libraries (I and II) of an Indica rice variety Minghui63, a fertility restorer line for hybrid rice, were constructed with pYLTAC17 using different size classes of partially digested DNA fragments. Library I and library II consisted of 34,560 and 1.2 x 10(5) clones, with average insert sizes of approximately 77 and 39 kb, respectively. The genome coverage of the libraries I and II was estimated to be about 5 and 11 haploid genome equivalents, respectively. Clones of the library I were stored individually in ninety 384-well plates, and those of the library II were collected as bulked pools each containing 30-50 clones and stored in eight 384-well plates. A number of probes were used to hybridize high-density colony filters of the library I prepared by an improved replicating method and each detected 2-9 positive clones. A method for rapid screening of the library II by pooled colony hybridization was developed. A TAC clone having an 80 kb rice DNA insert was successfully transferred into rice genome via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The new vectors and the genomic libraries should be useful for gene cloning and genetic engineering in rice and other crops.

  20. Comparative chromosomal localization of 45S and 5S rDNAs and implications for genome evolution in Cucumis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen-Tao; Yang, Shu-Qiong; Li, Zi-Ang; Zhang, Yun-Xia; Wang, Yun-Zhu; Cheng, Chun-Yan; Li, Ji; Chen, Jin-Feng; Lou, Qun-Feng

    2016-07-01

    Ribosomal DNAs are useful cytogenetic markers for chromosome analysis. Studies investigating site numbers and distributions of rDNAs have provided important information for elucidating genome organization and chromosomal relationships of many species by fluorescence in situ hybridization. But relevant studies are scarce for species of the genus Cucumis, especially in wild species. In the present study, FISH was conducted to investigate the organization of 45S and 5S rDNA among 20 Cucumis accessions, including cultivars and wild accessions. Our results showed that the number of 45S rDNA sites varied from one to five pairs in different accessions, and most of these sites are located at the terminal regions of chromosomes. Interestingly, up to five pairs of 45S rDNA sites were observed in C. sativus var. sativus, the species which has the lowest chromosome number, i.e., 2n = 14. Only one pair of 5S rDNA sites was detected in all accessions, except for C. heptadactylus, C. sp, and C. spp that had two pairs of 5S rDNA sites. The distributions of 5S rDNA sites showed more variation than 45S rDNA sites. The phylogenetic analysis in this study showed that 45S and 5S rDNA have contrasting evolutionary patterns. We find that 5S rDNA has a polyploidization-related tendency towards the terminal location from an interstitial location but maintains a conserved site number, whereas the 45S rDNA showed a trend of increasing site number but a relatively conserved location.

  1. Genomic Organization of Repetitive DNA in Woodpeckers (Aves, Piciformes): Implications for Karyotype and ZW Sex Chromosome Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Thays Duarte; Kretschmer, Rafael; Bertocchi, Natasha Avila; Degrandi, Tiago Marafiga; de Oliveira, Edivaldo Herculano Corrêa; Cioffi, Marcelo de Bello; Garnero, Analía Del Valle; Gunski, Ricardo José

    2017-01-01

    Birds are characterized by a low proportion of repetitive DNA in their genome when compared to other vertebrates. Among birds, species belonging to Piciformes order, such as woodpeckers, show a relatively higher amount of these sequences. The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of different classes of repetitive DNA-including microsatellites, telomere sequences and 18S rDNA-in the karyotype of three Picidae species (Aves, Piciformes)-Colaptes melanochloros (2n = 84), Colaptes campestris (2n = 84) and Melanerpes candidus (2n = 64)-by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization. Clusters of 18S rDNA were found in one microchromosome pair in each of the three species, coinciding to a region of (CGG)10 sequence accumulation. Interstitial telomeric sequences were found in some macrochromosomes pairs, indicating possible regions of fusions, which can be related to variation of diploid number in the family. Only one, from the 11 different microsatellite sequences used, did not produce any signals. Both species of genus Colaptes showed a similar distribution of microsatellite sequences, with some difference when compared to M. candidus. Microsatellites were found preferentially in the centromeric and telomeric regions of micro and macrochromosomes. However, some sequences produced patterns of interstitial bands in the Z chromosome, which corresponds to the largest element of the karyotype in all three species. This was not observed in the W chromosome of Colaptes melanochloros, which is heterochromatic in most of its length, but was not hybridized by any of the sequences used. These results highlight the importance of microsatellite sequences in differentiation of sex chromosomes, and the accumulation of these sequences is probably responsible for the enlargement of the Z chromosome.

  2. Genomic Organization of Repetitive DNA in Woodpeckers (Aves, Piciformes): Implications for Karyotype and ZW Sex Chromosome Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmer, Rafael; Bertocchi, Natasha Avila; Degrandi, Tiago Marafiga; de Oliveira, Edivaldo Herculano Corrêa; Cioffi, Marcelo de Bello; Garnero, Analía del Valle; Gunski, Ricardo José

    2017-01-01

    Birds are characterized by a low proportion of repetitive DNA in their genome when compared to other vertebrates. Among birds, species belonging to Piciformes order, such as woodpeckers, show a relatively higher amount of these sequences. The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of different classes of repetitive DNA—including microsatellites, telomere sequences and 18S rDNA—in the karyotype of three Picidae species (Aves, Piciformes)—Colaptes melanochloros (2n = 84), Colaptes campestris (2n = 84) and Melanerpes candidus (2n = 64)–by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization. Clusters of 18S rDNA were found in one microchromosome pair in each of the three species, coinciding to a region of (CGG)10 sequence accumulation. Interstitial telomeric sequences were found in some macrochromosomes pairs, indicating possible regions of fusions, which can be related to variation of diploid number in the family. Only one, from the 11 different microsatellite sequences used, did not produce any signals. Both species of genus Colaptes showed a similar distribution of microsatellite sequences, with some difference when compared to M. candidus. Microsatellites were found preferentially in the centromeric and telomeric regions of micro and macrochromosomes. However, some sequences produced patterns of interstitial bands in the Z chromosome, which corresponds to the largest element of the karyotype in all three species. This was not observed in the W chromosome of Colaptes melanochloros, which is heterochromatic in most of its length, but was not hybridized by any of the sequences used. These results highlight the importance of microsatellite sequences in differentiation of sex chromosomes, and the accumulation of these sequences is probably responsible for the enlargement of the Z chromosome. PMID:28081238

  3. Comprehensive meiotic segregation analysis of a 4-breakpoint t(1;3;6) complex chromosome rearrangement using single sperm array comparative genomic hybridization and FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornak, Miroslav; Vozdova, Miluse; Musilova, Petra; Prinosilova, Petra; Oracova, Eva; Linkova, Vlasta; Vesela, Katerina; Rubes, Jiri

    2014-10-01

    Complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCR) represent rare structural chromosome abnormalities frequently associated with infertility. In this study, meiotic segregation in spermatozoa of an infertile normospermic carrier of a 4-breakpoint t(1;3;6) CCR was analysed. A newly developed array comparative genomic hybridization protocol was used, and all chromosomes in 50 single sperm cells were simultaneously examined. Three-colour FISH was used to analyse chromosome segregation in 1557 other single sperm cells. It was also used to measure an interchromosomal effect; sperm chromatin structure assay was used to measure chromatin integrity. A high-frequency of unbalanced spermatozoa (84%) was observed, mostly arising from the 3:3 symmetrical segregation mode. Array comparative genomic hybridization was used to detect additional aneuploidies in two out of 50 spermatozoa (4%) in chromosomes not involved in the complex chromosome rearrangement. Significantly increased rates of diploidy and XY disomy were found in the CCR carrier compared with the control group (P < 0.001). Defective condensation of sperm chromatin was also found in 22.7% of spermatozoa by sperm chromatin structure assay. The results indicate that the infertility in the man with CCR and normal spermatozoa was caused by a production of chromosomally unbalanced, XY disomic and diploid spermatozoa and spermatozoa with defective chromatin condensation.

  4. Characterization of the genomic organization of the region bordering the centromere of chromosome V of Podospora anserina by direct sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silar, Philippe; Barreau, Christian; Debuchy, Robert; Kicka, Sébastien; Turcq, Béatrice; Sainsard-Chanet, Annie; Sellem, Carole H; Billault, Alain; Cattolico, Laurence; Duprat, Simone; Weissenbach, Jean

    2003-08-01

    A Podospora anserina BAC library of 4800 clones has been constructed in the vector pBHYG allowing direct selection in fungi. Screening of the BAC collection for centromeric sequences of chromosome V allowed the recovery of clones localized on either sides of the centromere, but no BAC clone was found to contain the centromere. Seven BAC clones containing 322,195 and 156,244bp from either sides of the centromeric region were sequenced and annotated. One 5S rRNA gene, 5 tRNA genes, and 163 putative coding sequences (CDS) were identified. Among these, only six CDS seem specific to P. anserina. The gene density in the centromeric region is approximately one gene every 2.8kb. Extrapolation of this gene density to the whole genome of P. anserina suggests that the genome contains about 11,000 genes. Synteny analyses between P. anserina and Neurospora crassa show that co-linearity extends at the most to a few genes, suggesting rapid genome rearrangements between these two species.

  5. Genetic characterization of dogs via chromosomal analysis and array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M H; Reimann-Berg, N; Bullerdiek, J; Murua Escobar, H

    2012-01-01

    The results of cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic investigations revealed similarities in genetic background and biological behaviour between tumours and genetic diseases of humans and dogs. These findings classify the dog a good and accepted model for human cancers such as osteosarcomas, mammary carcinomas, oral melanomas and others. With the appearance of new studies and advances in canine genome sequencing, the number of known homologies in diseases between these species raised and still is expected to increase. In this context, array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) provides a novel tool to rapidly characterize numerical aberrations in canine tumours or to detect copy number aberrations between different breeds. As it is possible to spot probes covering the whole genome on each chip to discover copy number aberrations of all chromosomes simultaneously, this method is time-saving and cost-effective - considering the relation of costs and the amount of data obtained. Complemented with traditional methods like karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses, the aCGH is able to provide new insights into the underlying causes of canine carcinogenesis.

  6. A genome-wide association study of COPD identifies a susceptibility locus on chromosome 19q13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Michael H; Castaldi, Peter J; Wan, Emily S; Siedlinski, Mateusz; Hersh, Craig P; Demeo, Dawn L; Himes, Blanca E; Sylvia, Jody S; Klanderman, Barbara J; Ziniti, John P; Lange, Christoph; Litonjua, Augusto A; Sparrow, David; Regan, Elizabeth A; Make, Barry J; Hokanson, John E; Murray, Tanda; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B; Pillai, Sreekumar G; Kong, Xiangyang; Anderson, Wayne H; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Lomas, David A; Coxson, Harvey O; Edwards, Lisa D; MacNee, William; Vestbo, Jørgen; Yates, Julie C; Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M A; Celli, Bartolome; Crim, Courtney; Rennard, Stephen; Wouters, Emiel; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Crapo, James D; Beaty, Terri H; Silverman, Edwin K

    2012-02-15

    The genetic risk factors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are still largely unknown. To date, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of limited size have identified several novel risk loci for COPD at CHRNA3/CHRNA5/IREB2, HHIP and FAM13A; additional loci may be identified through larger studies. We performed a GWAS using a total of 3499 cases and 1922 control subjects from four cohorts: the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE); the Normative Aging Study (NAS) and National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT); Bergen, Norway (GenKOLS); and the COPDGene study. Genotyping was performed on Illumina platforms with additional markers imputed using 1000 Genomes data; results were summarized using fixed-effect meta-analysis. We identified a new genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 19q13 (rs7937, OR = 0.74, P = 2.9 × 10(-9)). Genotyping this single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and another nearby SNP in linkage disequilibrium (rs2604894) in 2859 subjects from the family-based International COPD Genetics Network study (ICGN) demonstrated supportive evidence for association for COPD (P = 0.28 and 0.11 for rs7937 and rs2604894), pre-bronchodilator FEV(1) (P = 0.08 and 0.04) and severe (GOLD 3&4) COPD (P = 0.09 and 0.017). This region includes RAB4B, EGLN2, MIA and CYP2A6, and has previously been identified in association with cigarette smoking behavior.

  7. Cloning of genomic DNA of rice 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate synthase gene and chromosomal localization of the gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐军望; 冯德江; 李旭刚; 常团结; 朱祯

    2002-01-01

    The shikimate pathway enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate synthase (EPSPs) is the target of nonselective herbicide glyphosate. A partial rice epsps cDNA was generated by RT-PCR with primers designed according to EST sequence in GenBank and used as probe for rice genomic library screening. In a screen of approximately 8.0×104 clones from the rice genomic library, sixteen positive clones were obtained, which strongly hybridized to the probe. One clone, E11, was selected for further analysis and the full-length 3661 bp rice epsps genomic sequence was obtained. Sequence analysis and homologous comparison revealed that epsps gene is composed of 8 exons and 7 introns. Analysis by restriction fragment length polymorphism with the probe of rice epsps cDNA fragment confirmed that rice epsps is located on chromosome 6 with an indica-japonica (ZYQ8-JX17) double-haploid (DH) population. This is the first report on the EPSP synthase from monocotyledons.

  8. Genome-Based Identification of Chromosomal Regions Specific for Salmonella spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen-Wester, Imke; Hensel, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Acquisition of genomic elements by horizontal gene transfer represents an important mechanism in the evolution of bacterial species. Pathogenicity islands are a subset of horizontally acquired elements present in various pathogens. These elements are frequently located adjacent to tRNA genes. We performed a comparative genome analysis of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Typhimurium and Escherichia coli and scanned tRNA loci for the presence of species-specific, horizontally acquired gen...

  9. Genomic restructuring in the Tasmanian devil facial tumour: chromosome painting and gene mapping provide clues to evolution of a transmissible tumour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine E Deakin

    Full Text Available Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD is a fatal, transmissible malignancy that threatens the world's largest marsupial carnivore, the Tasmanian devil, with extinction. First recognised in 1996, DFTD has had a catastrophic effect on wild devil numbers, and intense research efforts to understand and contain the disease have since demonstrated that the tumour is a clonal cell line transmitted by allograft. We used chromosome painting and gene mapping to deconstruct the DFTD karyotype and determine the chromosome and gene rearrangements involved in carcinogenesis. Chromosome painting on three different DFTD tumour strains determined the origins of marker chromosomes and provided a general overview of the rearrangement in DFTD karyotypes. Mapping of 105 BAC clones by fluorescence in situ hybridisation provided a finer level of resolution of genome rearrangements in DFTD strains. Our findings demonstrate that only limited regions of the genome, mainly chromosomes 1 and X, are rearranged in DFTD. Regions rearranged in DFTD are also highly rearranged between different marsupials. Differences between strains are limited, reflecting the unusually stable nature of DFTD. Finally, our detailed maps of both the devil and tumour karyotypes provide a physical framework for future genomic investigations into DFTD.

  10. Genomic profiling identifies common HPV-associated chromosomal alterations in squamous cell carcinomas of cervix and head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leemans C René

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well known that a persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV is causally involved in the development of squamous cell carcinomas of the uterine cervix (CxSCCs and a subset of SCCs of the head and neck (HNSCCs. The latter differ from hrHPV-negative HNSCCs at the clinical and molecular level. Methods To determine whether hrHPV-associated SCCs arising from different organs have specific chromosomal alterations in common, we compared genome-wide chromosomal profiles of 10 CxSCCs (all hrHPV-positive with 12 hrHPV-positive HNSCCs and 30 hrHPV-negative HNSCCs. Potential organ-specific alterations and alterations shared by SCCs in general were investigated as well. Results Unsupervised hierarchical clustering resulted in one mainly hrHPV-positive and one mainly hrHPV-negative cluster. Interestingly, loss at 13q and gain at 20q were frequent in HPV-positive carcinomas of both origins, but uncommon in hrHPV-negative HNSCCs, indicating that these alterations are associated with hrHPV-mediated carcinogenesis. Within the group of hrHPV-positive carcinomas, HNSCCs more frequently showed gains of multiple regions at 8q whereas CxSCCs more often showed loss at 17p. Finally, gains at 3q24-29 and losses at 11q22.3-25 were frequent (>50% in all sample groups. Conclusion In this study hrHPV-specific, organ-specific, and pan-SCC chromosomal alterations were identified. The existence of hrHPV-specific alterations in SCCs of different anatomical origin, suggests that these alterations are crucial for hrHPV-mediated carcinogenesis.

  11. Speciation genomics and a role for the Z chromosome in the early stages of divergence between Mexican ducks and mallards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavretsky, Philip; Dacosta, Jeffrey M; Hernández-Baños, Blanca E; Engilis, Andrew; Sorenson, Michael D; Peters, Jeffrey L

    2015-11-01

    Speciation is a continuous and dynamic process, and studying organisms during the early stages of this process can aid in identifying speciation mechanisms. The mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and Mexican duck (A. [p.] diazi) are two recently diverged taxa with a history of hybridization and controversial taxonomy. To understand their evolutionary history, we conducted genomic scans to characterize patterns of genetic diversity and divergence across the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region, 3523 autosomal loci and 172 Z-linked sex chromosome loci. Between the two taxa, Z-linked loci (ΦST  = 0.088) were 5.2 times more differentiated than autosomal DNA (ΦST  = 0.017) but comparable to mtDNA (ΦST  = 0.092). This elevated Z differentiation deviated from neutral expectations inferred from simulated data that incorporated demographic history and differences in effective population sizes between marker types. Furthermore, 3% of Z-linked loci, compared to speciation. Our results contribute to a growing body of literature indicating elevated divergence on the Z chromosome and its likely importance in avian speciation.

  12. Characterisation of the genomic architecture of human chromosome 17q and evaluation of different methods for haplotype block definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ollier William

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The selection of markers in association studies can be informed through the use of haplotype blocks. Recent reports have determined the genomic architecture of chromosomal segments through different haplotype block definitions based on linkage disequilibrium (LD measures or haplotype diversity criteria. The relative applicability of distinct block definitions to association studies, however, remains unclear. We compared different block definitions in 6.1 Mb of chromosome 17q in 189 unrelated healthy individuals. Using 137 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, at a median spacing of 15.5 kb, we constructed haplotype block maps using published methods and additional methods we have developed. Haplotype tagging SNPs (htSNPs were identified for each map. Results Blocks were found to be shorter and coverage of the region limited with methods based on LD measures, compared to the method based on haplotype diversity. Although the distribution of blocks was highly variable, the number of SNPs that needed to be typed in order to capture the maximum number of haplotypes was consistent. Conclusion For the marker spacing used in this study, choice of block definition is not important when used as an initial screen of the region to identify htSNPs. However, choice of block definition has consequences for the downstream interpretation of association study results.

  13. Chromosomal aberrations in human hepatocellular carcinomas associated with hepatitis C virus infection detected by comparative genomic hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakura, C; Hagiwara, A; Taniguchi, H; Yamaguchi, T; Yamagishi, H; Takahashi, T; Koyama, K; Nakamura, Y; Abe, T; Inazawa, J

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-five hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) were analysed by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), to screen for changes in copy-number of DNA sequences. Chromosomal losses were noted in 1p34–36 (37%), 4q12–21 (48%), 5q13–21 (35%), 6q13–16 (23%), 8p21–23 (28%), 13q (20%), 16q (33%) and 17p13 (37%). Gains were noted in 1q (46%), 6p (20%), 8q21–24 (31%) and 17q (43%). High level gains indicative of gene amplifications were found in 7q31 (3%), 11q13 (3%), 14q12 (6%) and 17q12 (3%); amplification at 14q12 may be characteristic for HCCs. No significant difference in chromosomal aberrations was noted between carcinomas associated with HCV-infection in our study and those reported earlier in HCCs infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), indicating that both HBV- and HCV-related carcinomas may progress through a similar cascade of molecular events. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10471057

  14. Characterisation of the genomic architecture of human chromosome 17q and evaluation of different methods for haplotype block definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeggini, Eleftheria; Barton, Anne; Eyre, Stephen; Ward, Daniel; Ollier, William; Worthington, Jane; John, Sally

    2005-04-25

    The selection of markers in association studies can be informed through the use of haplotype blocks. Recent reports have determined the genomic architecture of chromosomal segments through different haplotype block definitions based on linkage disequilibrium (LD) measures or haplotype diversity criteria. The relative applicability of distinct block definitions to association studies, however, remains unclear. We compared different block definitions in 6.1 Mb of chromosome 17q in 189 unrelated healthy individuals. Using 137 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), at a median spacing of 15.5 kb, we constructed haplotype block maps using published methods and additional methods we have developed. Haplotype tagging SNPs (htSNPs) were identified for each map. Blocks were found to be shorter and coverage of the region limited with methods based on LD measures, compared to the method based on haplotype diversity. Although the distribution of blocks was highly variable, the number of SNPs that needed to be typed in order to capture the maximum number of haplotypes was consistent. For the marker spacing used in this study, choice of block definition is not important when used as an initial screen of the region to identify htSNPs. However, choice of block definition has consequences for the downstream interpretation of association study results.

  15. Genomic characterisation, chromosomal assignment and in vivo localisation of the canine High Mobility Group A1 (HMGA1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reimann-Berg Nicola

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high mobility group A1 proteins (HMGA1a/HMGA1b are highly conserved between mammalian species and widely described as participating in various cellular processes. By inducing DNA conformation changes the HMGA1 proteins indirectly influence the binding of various transcription factors and therefore effect the transcription regulation. In humans chromosomal aberrations affecting the HMGA1 gene locus on HSA 6p21 were described to be the cause for various benign mesenchymal tumours while high titres of HMGA1 proteins were shown to be associated with the neoplastic potential of various types of cancer. Interestingly, the absence of HMGA1 proteins was shown to cause insulin resistance and diabetes in humans and mice. Due to the various similarities in biology and presentation of human and canine cancers the dog has joined the common rodent animal model for therapeutic and preclinical studies. Accordingly, the canine genome was sequenced completely twice but unfortunately this could not solve the structure of canine HMGA1 gene. Results Herein we report the characterisation of the genomic structure of the canine HMGA1 gene consisting of 7 exons and 6 introns spanning in total 9524 bp, the in vivo localisation of the HMGA1 protein to the nucleus, and a chromosomal assignment of the gene by FISH to CFA12q11. Additionally, we evaluated a described canine HMGA1 exon 6 SNP in 55 Dachshunds. Conclusion The performed characterisations will make comparative analyses of aberrations affecting the human and canine gene and proteins possible, thereby providing a basis for revealing mechanisms involved in HMGA1 related pathogenesis in both species.

  16. Chromosomal copy number variation, selection and uneven rates of recombination reveal cryptic genome diversity linked to pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhys A Farrer

    Full Text Available Pathogenic fungi constitute a growing threat to both plant and animal species on a global scale. Despite a clonal mode of reproduction dominating the population genetic structure of many fungi, putatively asexual species are known to adapt rapidly when confronted by efforts to control their growth and transmission. However, the mechanisms by which adaptive diversity is generated across a clonal background are often poorly understood. We sequenced a global panel of the emergent amphibian pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, to high depth and characterized rapidly changing features of its genome that we believe hold the key to the worldwide success of this organism. Our analyses show three processes that contribute to the generation of de novo diversity. Firstly, we show that the majority of wild isolates manifest chromosomal copy number variation that changes over short timescales. Secondly, we show that cryptic recombination occurs within all lineages of Bd, leading to large regions of the genome being in linkage equilibrium, and is preferentially associated with classes of genes of known importance for virulence in other pathosystems. Finally, we show that these classes of genes are under directional selection, and that this has predominantly targeted the Global Panzootic Lineage (BdGPL. Our analyses show that Bd manifests an unusually dynamic genome that may have been shaped by its association with the amphibian host. The rates of variation that we document likely explain the high levels of phenotypic variability that have been reported for Bd, and suggests that the dynamic genome of this pathogen has contributed to its success across multiple biomes and host-species.

  17. Structure, evolution, and comparative genomics of tetraploid cotton based on a high-density genetic linkage map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ximei; Jin, Xin; Wang, Hantao; Zhang, Xianlong; Lin, Zhongxu

    2016-06-01

    A high-density linkage map was constructed using 1,885 newly obtained loci and 3,747 previously published loci, which included 5,152 loci with 4696.03 cM in total length and 0.91 cM in mean distance. Homology analysis in the cotton genome further confirmed the 13 expected homologous chromosome pairs and revealed an obvious inversion on Chr10 or Chr20 and repeated inversions on Chr07 or Chr16. In addition, two reciprocal translocations between Chr02 and Chr03 and between Chr04 and Chr05 were confirmed. Comparative genomics between the tetraploid cotton and the diploid cottons showed that no major structural changes exist between DT and D chromosomes but rather between AT and A chromosomes. Blast analysis between the tetraploid cotton genome and the mixed genome of two diploid cottons showed that most AD chromosomes, regardless of whether it is from the AT or DT genome, preferentially matched with the corresponding homologous chromosome in the diploid A genome, and then the corresponding homologous chromosome in the diploid D genome, indicating that the diploid D genome underwent converted evolution by the diploid A genome to form the DT genome during polyploidization. In addition, the results reflected that a series of chromosomal translocations occurred among Chr01/Chr15, Chr02/Chr14, Chr03/Chr17, Chr04/Chr22, and Chr05/Chr19.

  18. Genomic analysis of a 1 Mb region near the telomere of Hessian fly chromosome X2 and avirulence gene vH13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ming-Shun

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To have an insight into the Mayetiola destructor (Hessian fly genome, we performed an in silico comparative genomic analysis utilizing genetic mapping, genomic sequence and EST sequence data along with data available from public databases. Results Chromosome walking and FISH were utilized to identify a contig of 50 BAC clones near the telomere of the short arm of Hessian fly chromosome X2 and near the avirulence gene vH13. These clones enabled us to correlate physical and genetic distance in this region of the Hessian fly genome. Sequence data from these BAC ends encompassing a 760 kb region, and a fully sequenced and assembled 42.6 kb BAC clone, was utilized to perform a comparative genomic study. In silico gene prediction combined with BLAST analyses was used to determine putative orthology to the sequenced dipteran genomes of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, and the malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, and to infer evolutionary relationships. Conclusion This initial effort enables us to advance our understanding of the structure, composition and evolution of the genome of this important agricultural pest and is an invaluable tool for a whole genome sequencing effort.

  19. Highly Conserved Elements and Chromosome Structure Evolution in Mitochondrial Genomes in Ciliates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman A. Gershgorin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent phylogenetic analyses are incorporating ultraconserved elements (UCEs and highly conserved elements (HCEs. Models of evolution of the genome structure and HCEs initially faced considerable algorithmic challenges, which gave rise to (often unnatural constraints on these models, even for conceptually simple tasks such as the calculation of distance between two structures or the identification of UCEs. In our recent works, these constraints have been addressed with fast and efficient solutions with no constraints on the underlying models. These approaches have led us to an unexpected result: for some organelles and taxa, the genome structure and HCE set, despite themselves containing relatively little information, still adequately resolve the evolution of species. We also used the HCE identification to search for promoters and regulatory elements that characterize the functional evolution of the genome.

  20. Detection of chromosomal aberrations in seminomatous germ cell tumours using comparative genomic hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, A M; Kirchhoff, M; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    1997-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was used to evaluate tissue specimens from 16 seminomas in order to elucidate the pathogenesis of germ cell tumours in males. A characteristic pattern of losses and gains within the entire genomes was detected in 94% of the seminomas by comparing the ratio...... was demonstrated in the seminomas by improved detection criteria, which increased specificity and sensitivity. The rare aberrations, which appeared only in tumours in improved detection criteria, which increased specificity and sensitivity. The rare aberrations, which appeared only in tumours in clinical stage II...

  1. The complete genome sequence of Vibrio cholerae: a tale of two chromosomes and of two lifestyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoolnik, G K; Yildiz, F H

    2000-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 has figured prominently in the history of infectious diseases as a cause of periodic global epidemics, an affliction of refugees in areas of social strife and as the disease first subjected to modern epidemiological analysis during the classic investigations of John Snow in mid-19th century London [1]. Thus, publication of the entire genome sequence of V. cholerae O1 (biotype El Tor) in Nature [2] by a consortium of investigators from The Institute for Genomic Research, the University of Maryland and Harvard Medical School is properly regarded as an historic event that will trigger a paradigm shift in the study of this organism.

  2. Genome-wide analysis of host-chromosome binding sites for Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Pu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1 protein is required for the establishment of EBV latent infection in proliferating B-lymphocytes. EBNA1 is a multifunctional DNA-binding protein that stimulates DNA replication at the viral origin of plasmid replication (OriP, regulates transcription of viral and cellular genes, and tethers the viral episome to the cellular chromosome. EBNA1 also provides a survival function to B-lymphocytes, potentially through its ability to alter cellular gene expression. To better understand these various functions of EBNA1, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the viral and cellular DNA sites associated with EBNA1 protein in a latently infected Burkitt lymphoma B-cell line. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP combined with massively parallel deep-sequencing (ChIP-Seq was used to identify cellular sites bound by EBNA1. Sites identified by ChIP-Seq were validated by conventional real-time PCR, and ChIP-Seq provided quantitative, high-resolution detection of the known EBNA1 binding sites on the EBV genome at OriP and Qp. We identified at least one cluster of unusually high-affinity EBNA1 binding sites on chromosome 11, between the divergent FAM55 D and FAM55B genes. A consensus for all cellular EBNA1 binding sites is distinct from those derived from the known viral binding sites, suggesting that some of these sites are indirectly bound by EBNA1. EBNA1 also bound close to the transcriptional start sites of a large number of cellular genes, including HDAC3, CDC7, and MAP3K1, which we show are positively regulated by EBNA1. EBNA1 binding sites were enriched in some repetitive elements, especially LINE 1 retrotransposons, and had weak correlations with histone modifications and ORC binding. We conclude that EBNA1 can interact with a large number of cellular genes and chromosomal loci in latently infected cells, but that these sites are likely to represent a complex ensemble of direct and indirect EBNA

  3. Interspecific Chromosome Substitution Lines as Genetic Resources for Improvement,Trait Analysis and Genomic Inference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RASKA Dwaine A; SAHA Sukumar; JENKINS Johnie N; MCCARTY Jack C; WU Ji-xiang; STELLY David M

    2008-01-01

    @@ The genetic base that cotton breeders commonly use to improve Upland cultivars is very narrow.The AD-genome species Gossypium barbadense,G.tomentosum,and G.mustelinum are part of the primary germplasm pool,too,and constitute genetic reservoirs of genes for resistance to abiotic stress,pests,and pathogens,as well as agronomic and fiber traits.

  4. A genome-wide association study identifies an osteoarthritis susceptibility locus on chromosome 7q22

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Kerkhof (Hanneke); R.J. Lories (Rik); I. Meulenbelt (Ingrid); I. Jonsdottir (Ingileif); A.M. Valdes (Ana Maria); P.P. Arp (Pascal); T. Ingvarsson (Torvaldur); M. Jhamai (Mila); H. Jonsson (Helgi); L. Stolk (Lisette); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); G. Zhai (Guangju); F. Zhang (Feng); Y. Zhu (Yicheng); R. van der Breggen (Ruud); M. Doherty (Michael); D. Felson; A. Gonzalez (Antonio); B.V. Halldorsson (Bjarni); D.J. Hart (Deborah); V.B. Hauksson (Valdimar); A. Hofman (Albert); J.P.A. Ioannidis (John); M. Kloppenburg (Margreet); N.E. Lane (Nancy); J. Loughlin (John); F.P. Luyten (Frank); M.C. Nevitt (Michael); N. Parimi (Neeta); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); E. Slagboom (Eline); U. Styrkarsdottir (Unnur); A. Tsezou (Aspasia); T. van de Putte (Tom); J. Zmuda (Joseph); T.D. Spector (Timothy); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); A.J. Carr (Andrew Jonathan)

    2010-01-01

    markdownabstract__Objective__ To identify novel genes involved in osteoarthritis (OA), by means of a genome-wide association study. Methods. We tested 500,510 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1,341 Dutch Caucasian OA cases and 3,496 Dutch Caucasian controls. SNPs associated with at least 2

  5. Comparative genomic analysis of catfish linkage group 8 reveals two homologous chromosomes in zebrafish and other teleosts with extensive inter-chromosomal rearrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background Comparative genomics is a powerful tool to transfer genomic information from model species to related non-model species. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) is the primary aquaculture species in the United States. Its existing genome resources such as genomic sequences generated from n...

  6. Cloning of cDNA and genomic DNA encoding human type XVIII collagen and localization of the [alpha]1 (XVIII) collagen gene to mouse chromosome 10 and human chromosome 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, S.P.; Warman, M.L.; Timmons, S.; Olsen, B.R.; Knoll, J.H.M. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Seldin, M.F. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)); Cheng, Sou-De (Children' s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States))

    1994-02-01

    Types XV and XVIII collagen belong to a unique and novel subclass of the collagen superfamily for which the authors have proposed the name the MULTIPLEXIN family. Members of this class contain polypeptides with multiple triple-helical domains separated and flanked by non-triple-helical regions. In this paper, they report the isolation of human cDNAs and genomic DNAs encoding the [alpha]1 (XVIII) collagen chain. Utilizing a genomic clone as probe, they have mapped the COL18A1 gene to chromosome 21q22.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. In addition, using an interspecific backcross panel, they have shown that the murine Col18a1 locus is on chromosome 10, close to the loci for Col6a1 and Col6a2. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Genomic imprinting on the X chromosome: implications for brain and behavioral phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, William

    2010-09-01

    Imprinted genes, in contrast to most mammalian genes, are monoallelically expressed in a parent-of-origin dependent manner. The idiosyncratic expression profile associated with imprinted genes arises from the differential epigenetic marking of the alleles in the paternal and maternal germlines. Although small in number, imprinted genes can profoundly influence key developmental and physiological processes, including those in the brain; work in animal models and in humans has shown that such genes can affect behavioral traits and cognition and may confer vulnerability to common mental illnesses. As a consequence of how the X chromosome is inherited, X-linked imprinting may elicit or indeed attenuate sexually dimorphic phenotypes. Thus, studying X-linked imprinting is likely to provide important general information about the evolutionary and mechanistic underpinnings of imprinting, as well as the molecular processes underlying sex-specific neurobiology and sex-biased vulnerability to psychiatric disorders.

  8. Isolation of a Genomic Region Affecting Most Components of Metabolic Syndrome in a Chromosome-16 Congenic Rat Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Šedová

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is a highly prevalent human disease with substantial genomic and environmental components. Previous studies indicate the presence of significant genetic determinants of several features of metabolic syndrome on rat chromosome 16 (RNO16 and the syntenic regions of human genome. We derived the SHR.BN16 congenic strain by introgression of a limited RNO16 region from the Brown Norway congenic strain (BN-Lx into the genomic background of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR strain. We compared the morphometric, metabolic, and hemodynamic profiles of adult male SHR and SHR.BN16 rats. We also compared in silico the DNA sequences for the differential segment in the BN-Lx and SHR parental strains. SHR.BN16 congenic rats had significantly lower weight, decreased concentrations of total triglycerides and cholesterol, and improved glucose tolerance compared with SHR rats. The concentrations of insulin, free fatty acids, and adiponectin were comparable between the two strains. SHR.BN16 rats had significantly lower systolic (18-28 mmHg difference and diastolic (10-15 mmHg difference blood pressure throughout the experiment (repeated-measures ANOVA, P < 0.001. The differential segment spans approximately 22 Mb of the telomeric part of the short arm of RNO16. The in silico analyses revealed over 1200 DNA variants between the BN-Lx and SHR genomes in the SHR.BN16 differential segment, 44 of which lead to missense mutations, and only eight of which (in Asb14, Il17rd, Itih1, Syt15, Ercc6, RGD1564958, Tmem161a, and Gatad2a genes are predicted to be damaging to the protein product. Furthermore, a number of genes within the RNO16 differential segment associated with metabolic syndrome components in human studies showed polymorphisms between SHR and BN-Lx (including Lpl, Nrg3, Pbx4, Cilp2, and Stab1. Our novel congenic rat model demonstrates that a limited genomic region on RNO16 in the SHR significantly affects many of the features of metabolic

  9. Construction of a full bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of Oryza sativa genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAOQUANZHOU; HAIYINGZHAO; 等

    1994-01-01

    We have constructed a full BAC library for the superior early indica variety of Oryza sativa,Guang Lu Ai 4.The MAX Efficiency DH10B with increased stability of inserts was used as BAC host cells.The potent pBelo BACII with double selection markers was used as cloning vector.The cloning efficiency we have reached was as high as 98%,and the transformation efficiency was raised up to 106 transformants/μg of large fragment DNA.The BAC recombinant transformants were picked at random and analyzed for the size of inserts,which turned out to be of 120 kb in length on average.We have obtained more than 20,000 such BAC clones.According to conventional probability equation,they covered the entire rice genome of 420,000 kb in length.The entire length of inserts of the library obtained has the 5-to 6-fold coverage of the genome.To our knowledge,this is the first reported full BAC library for a complex genome.

  10. Transcriptional activity, chromosomal distribution and expression effects of transposable elements in Coffea genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício R Lopes

    Full Text Available Plant genomes are massively invaded by transposable elements (TEs, many of which are located near host genes and can thus impact gene expression. In flowering plants, TE expression can be activated (de-repressed under certain stressful conditions, both biotic and abiotic, as well as by genome stress caused by hybridization. In this study, we examined the effects of these stress agents on TE expression in two diploid species of coffee, Coffea canephora and C. eugenioides, and their allotetraploid hybrid C. arabica. We also explored the relationship of TE repression mechanisms to host gene regulation via the effects of exonized TE sequences. Similar to what has been seen for other plants, overall TE expression levels are low in Coffea plant cultivars, consistent with the existence of effective TE repression mechanisms. TE expression patterns are highly dynamic across the species and conditions assayed here are unrelated to their classification at the level of TE class or family. In contrast to previous results, cell culture conditions per se do not lead to the de-repression of TE expression in C. arabica. Results obtained here indicate that differing plant drought stress levels relate strongly to TE repression mechanisms. TEs tend to be expressed at significantly higher levels in non-irrigated samples for the drought tolerant cultivars but in drought sensitive cultivars the opposite pattern was shown with irrigated samples showing significantly higher TE expression. Thus, TE genome repression mechanisms may be finely tuned to the ideal growth and/or regulatory conditions of the specific plant cultivars in which they are active. Analysis of TE expression levels in cell culture conditions underscored the importance of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD pathways in the repression of Coffea TEs. These same NMD mechanisms can also regulate plant host gene expression via the repression of genes that bear exonized TE sequences.

  11. Copy number variations of chromosome 16p13.1 region associated with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingason, A; Rujescu, D; Cichon, S

    2011-01-01

    Deletions and reciprocal duplications of the chromosome 16p13.1 region have recently been reported in several cases of autism and mental retardation (MR). As genomic copy number variants found in these two disorders may also associate with schizophrenia, we examined 4345 schizophrenia patients an...... disorder and dyslexia. Candidate genes in the region include NTAN1 and NDE1. We conclude that duplications and perhaps also deletions of chromosome 16p13.1, previously reported to be associated with autism and MR, also confer risk of schizophrenia....

  12. A second generation genetic map of the bumblebee Bombus terrestris (Linnaeus, 1758 reveals slow genome and chromosome evolution in the Apidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kube Michael

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bumblebee Bombus terrestris is an ecologically and economically important pollinator and has become an important biological model system. To study fundamental evolutionary questions at the genomic level, a high resolution genetic linkage map is an essential tool for analyses ranging from quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping to genome assembly and comparative genomics. We here present a saturated linkage map and match it with the Apis mellifera genome using homologous markers. This genome-wide comparison allows insights into structural conservations and rearrangements and thus the evolution on a chromosomal level. Results The high density linkage map covers ~ 93% of the B. terrestris genome on 18 linkage groups (LGs and has a length of 2'047 cM with an average marker distance of 4.02 cM. Based on a genome size of ~ 430 Mb, the recombination rate estimate is 4.76 cM/Mb. Sequence homologies of 242 homologous markers allowed to match 15 B. terrestris with A. mellifera LGs, five of them as composites. Comparing marker orders between both genomes we detect over 14% of the genome to be organized in synteny and 21% in rearranged blocks on the same homologous LG. Conclusions This study demonstrates that, despite the very high recombination rates of both A. mellifera and B. terrestris and a long divergence time of about 100 million years, the genomes' genetic architecture is highly conserved. This reflects a slow genome evolution in these bees. We show that data on genome organization and conserved molecular markers can be used as a powerful tool for comparative genomics and evolutionary studies, opening up new avenues of research in the Apidae.

  13. The Precarious Prokaryotic Chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary selection for optimal genome preservation, replication, and expression should yield similar chromosome organizations in any type of cells. And yet, the chromosome organization is surprisingly different between eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The nuclear versus cytoplasmic accommodation of genetic material accounts for the distinct eukaryotic and prokaryotic modes of genome evolution, but it falls short of explaining the differences in the chromosome organization. I propose that the t...

  14. High-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization of chromosome 8q: evaluation of putative progression markers for gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duin, M; van Marion, R; Vissers, K J; Hop, W C J; Dinjens, W N M; Tilanus, H W; Siersema, P D; van Dekken, H

    2007-01-01

    Amplification of 8q is frequently found in gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. It is usually detected in high-grade, high-stage GEJ adenocarcinomas. Moreover, it has been implicated in tumor progression in other cancer types. In this study, a detailed genomic analysis of 8q was performed on a series of GEJ adenocarcinomas, including 22 primary adenocarcinomas, 13 cell lines and two xenografts, by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) with a whole chromosome 8q contig array. Of the 37 specimens, 21 originated from the esophagus and 16 were derived from the gastric cardia. Commonly overrepresented regions were identified at distal 8q, i.e. 124-125 Mb (8q24.13), at 127-128 Mb (8q24.21), and at 141-142 Mb (8q24.3). From these regions six genes were selected with putative relevance to cancer: ANXA13, MTSS1, FAM84B (alias NSE2), MYC, C8orf17 (alias MOST-1) and PTK2 (alias FAK). In addition, the gene EXT1 was selected since it was found in a specific amplification in cell line SK-GT-5. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of these seven genes was subsequently performed on a panel of 24 gastroesophageal samples, including 13 cell lines, two xenografts and nine normal stomach controls. Significant overexpression was found for MYC and EXT1 in GEJ adenocarcinoma cell lines and xenografts compared to normal controls. Expression of the genes MTSS1, FAM84B and C8orf17 was found to be significantly decreased in this set of cell lines and xenografts. We conclude that, firstly, there are other genes than MYC involved in the 8q amplification in GEJ cancer. Secondly, the differential expression of these genes contributes to unravel the biology of GEJ adenocarcinomas.

  15. High occurrence of functional new chimeric genes in survey of rice chromosome 3 short arm genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengjun; Wang, Jun; Marowsky, Nicholas C; Long, Manyuan; Wing, Rod A; Fan, Chuanzhu

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to identify newly evolved genes in rice, we searched the genomes of Asian-cultivated rice Oryza sativa ssp. japonica and its wild progenitors, looking for lineage-specific genes. Using genome pairwise comparison of approximately 20-Mb DNA sequences from the chromosome 3 short arm (Chr3s) in six rice species, O. sativa, O. nivara, O. rufipogon, O. glaberrima, O. barthii, and O. punctata, combined with synonymous substitution rate tests and other evidence, we were able to identify potential recently duplicated genes, which evolved within the last 1 Myr. We identified 28 functional O. sativa genes, which likely originated after O. sativa diverged from O. glaberrima. These genes account for around 1% (28/3,176) of all annotated genes on O. sativa's Chr3s. Among the 28 new genes, two recently duplicated segments contained eight genes. Fourteen of the 28 new genes consist of chimeric gene structure derived from one or multiple parental genes and flanking targeting sequences. Although the majority of these 28 new genes were formed by single or segmental DNA-based gene duplication and recombination, we found two genes that were likely originated partially through exon shuffling. Sequence divergence tests between new genes and their putative progenitors indicated that new genes were most likely evolving under natural selection. We showed all 28 new genes appeared to be functional, as suggested by Ka/Ks analysis and the presence of RNA-seq, cDNA, expressed sequence tag, massively parallel signature sequencing, and/or small RNA data. The high rate of new gene origination and of chimeric gene formation in rice may demonstrate rice's broad diversification, domestication, its environmental adaptation, and the role of new genes in rice speciation.

  16. Genome-wide scan in Portuguese Island families implicates multiple loci in bipolar disorder: fine mapping adds support on chromosomes 6 and 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pato, Carlos N; Pato, M T; Kirby, A; Petryshen, T L; Medeiros, H; Carvalho, C; Macedo, A; Dourado, A; Coelho, I; Valente, J; Soares, M J; Ferreira, C P; Lei, M; Verner, A; Hudson, T J; Morley, C P; Kennedy, J L; Azevedo, M H; Daly, M J; Sklar, P

    2004-05-15

    As part of an extensive study in the Portuguese Island population of families with multiple patients suffering from bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, we performed an initial genome-wide scan of 16 extended families with bipolar disorder that identified three regions on chromosomes 2, 11, and 19 with genome-wide suggestive linkage and several other regions, including chromosome 6q, also approached suggestive levels of significance. Dick et al. [2003: Am J Hum Genet 73:107-114] recently reported in a study of 250 families with bipolar disorder a maxLOD score of 3.61 near marker D6S1021 on chromosome 6q. This study replicates this finding having detected a peak NPL = 2.02 (P = 0.025) with the same marker D6S1021(104.7 Mb). Higher-density mapping provided additional support for loci on chromosome 6 including marker D6S1021 with an NPL = 2.59 (P = 0.0068) and peaking at marker D6S1639 (125 Mb) with an NPL = 3.06 (P = 0.0019). A similar pattern was detected with higher-density mapping of chromosome 11 with an NPL = 3.15 (P = 0.0014) at marker D11S1883 (63.1 Mb). Simulations at the density of our fine mapping data indicate that less than 1 scan out of 10 would find two such scores genome-wide in the same scan by chance. Our findings provide additional support for a susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder on 6q, as well as, suggesting the importance of denser scans. Published 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Chromosomal Aberrations in ETV6/RUNX1-positive Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia using 244K Oligonucleotide Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakaria Zubaidah

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is a heterogeneous form of hematological cancer consisting of various subtypes. We are interested to study the genetic aberration in precursor B-cell ALL with specific t(12;21 translocation in childhood ALL patients. A high resolution 244K array-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization (array-CGH was used to study eleven ETV6/RUNX1-positive childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patients. Result 155 chromosomal aberrations (119 losses, 36 gains were reported in the array findings, corresponding to 76.8% deletions and 23.2% amplifications. The ETV6 gene deletion occurred in 4 of the patients, corresponding to 45% of the sample. The most common alterations above 1 Mb were deletion 6q (13%, 12p (12% and 9p (8%, and duplication 4q (6% and Xq (4%. Other genes important in ALL were also identified in this study including RUNX1, CDKN2A, FHIT, and PAX5. The array-CGH technique was able to detect microdeletion as small as 400 bp. Conclusion The results demonstrate the usefulness of high resolution array-CGH as a complementary tool in the investigation of ALL.

  18. Gene conversion in the rice genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Shuqing; Clark, Terry; Zheng, Hongkun;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene conversion causes a non-reciprocal transfer of genetic information between similar sequences. Gene conversion can both homogenize genes and recruit point mutations thereby shaping the evolution of multigene families. In the rice genome, the large number of duplicated genes...... is not tightly linked to natural selection in the rice genome. To assess the contribution of segmental duplication on gene conversion statistics, we determined locations of conversion partners with respect to inter-chromosomal segment duplication. The number of conversions associated with segmentation is less...

  19. Detection of Hereditary 1,25-Hydroxyvitamin D-Resistant Rickets Caused by Uniparental Disomy of Chromosome 12 Using Genome-Wide Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Mayuko; Isojima, Tsuyoshi; Kawashima, Minae; Yoshida, Hideki; Yamamoto, Keiko; Kitaoka, Taichi; Namba, Noriyuki; Oka, Akira; Ozono, Keiichi; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Kitanaka, Sachiko

    2015-01-01

    Context Hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-resistant rickets (HVDRR) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by biallelic mutations in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene. No patients have been reported with uniparental disomy (UPD). Objective Using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array to confirm whether HVDRR was caused by UPD of chromosome 12. Materials and Methods A 2-year-old girl with alopecia and short stature and without any family history of consanguinity was diagnosed with HVDRR by typical laboratory data findings and clinical features of rickets. Sequence analysis of VDR was performed, and the origin of the homozygous mutation was investigated by target SNP sequencing, short tandem repeat analysis, and genome-wide SNP array. Results The patient had a homozygous p.Arg73Ter nonsense mutation. Her mother was heterozygous for the mutation, but her father was negative. We excluded gross deletion of the father’s allele or paternal discordance. Genome-wide SNP array of the family (the patient and her parents) showed complete maternal isodisomy of chromosome 12. She was successfully treated with high-dose oral calcium. Conclusions This is the first report of HVDRR caused by UPD, and the third case of complete UPD of chromosome 12, in the published literature. Genome-wide SNP array was useful for detecting isodisomy and the parental origin of the allele. Comprehensive examination of the homozygous state is essential for accurate genetic counseling of recurrence risk and appropriate monitoring for other chromosome 12 related disorders. Furthermore, oral calcium therapy was effective as an initial treatment for rickets in this instance. PMID:26153892

  20. Toward functional genomics in bacteria: Analysis of gene expression in Escherichia coli from a bacterial artificial chromosome library of Bacillus cereus

    OpenAIRE

    Rondon, Michelle R.; Sandra J Raffel; Goodman, Robert M.; Handelsman, Jo

    1999-01-01

    As the study of microbes moves into the era of functional genomics, there is an increasing need for molecular tools for analysis of a wide diversity of microorganisms. Currently, biological study of many prokaryotes of agricultural, medical, and fundamental scientific interest is limited by the lack of adequate genetic tools. We report the application of the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vector to prokaryotic biology as a powerful approach to address this need. We constructed a BAC li...

  1. Detection of Hereditary 1,25-Hydroxyvitamin D-Resistant Rickets Caused by Uniparental Disomy of Chromosome 12 Using Genome-Wide Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayuko Tamura

    Full Text Available Hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-resistant rickets (HVDRR is an autosomal recessive disease caused by biallelic mutations in the vitamin D receptor (VDR gene. No patients have been reported with uniparental disomy (UPD.Using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array to confirm whether HVDRR was caused by UPD of chromosome 12.A 2-year-old girl with alopecia and short stature and without any family history of consanguinity was diagnosed with HVDRR by typical laboratory data findings and clinical features of rickets. Sequence analysis of VDR was performed, and the origin of the homozygous mutation was investigated by target SNP sequencing, short tandem repeat analysis, and genome-wide SNP array.The patient had a homozygous p.Arg73Ter nonsense mutation. Her mother was heterozygous for the mutation, but her father was negative. We excluded gross deletion of the father's allele or paternal discordance. Genome-wide SNP array of the family (the patient and her parents showed complete maternal isodisomy of chromosome 12. She was successfully treated with high-dose oral calcium.This is the first report of HVDRR caused by UPD, and the third case of complete UPD of chromosome 12, in the published literature. Genome-wide SNP array was useful for detecting isodisomy and the parental origin of the allele. Comprehensive examination of the homozygous state is essential for accurate genetic counseling of recurrence risk and appropriate monitoring for other chromosome 12 related disorders. Furthermore, oral calcium therapy was effective as an initial treatment for rickets in this instance.

  2. Genome size, chromosome number, and rDNA organisation in Algerian populations of Artemisia herba-alba (Asteraceae, a basic plant for animal feeding facing overgrazing erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youcef Bougoutaia

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Artemisia herba-alba is a largely-distributed and often landscape-dominating taxon in arid areas of the Mediterranean and Irano-Turanian regions. In Algeria, in 2010 its communities covered 10% of the steppe territory, but its populations have been subjected to overgrazing. A karyological study based on 22 populations together with a cytogenetic characterisation of this species has been performed for the first time in Algerian materials, through genome size and chromosome number determination. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH was also used to assess the rDNA loci number and distribution in the two ploidy levels detected. The studied accessions are diploid (2n = 2x = 18 chromosomes, 6 populations or tetraploid (2n = 4x = 36 chromosomes, 15 populations. One population, occupying a more or less central geographic position among the studied area, presented both cytotypes. Genome size reflects well the two ploidy levels, with no evidence of downsizing with polyploidy. The karyotypes are rather symmetric (2A Stebbins’ class. FISH analyses detected four signals (2 loci in diploid and eight signals (4 loci in tetraploid cytotypes for both ribosomal DNA genes, which present an L-type (linked organisation, i.e. with loci from both rDNA genes colocalised. The presence of two ploidy levels suggest a genomic dynamism and even a possible differentiation underlying the morphological uniformity and despite the dramatic decrease experienced by this plant in Algeria in terms of surface coverage.

  3. High frequency of submicroscopic chromosomal imbalances in patients with syndromic craniosynostosis detected by a combined approach of microsatellite segregation analysis, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and array-based comparative genome hybridisation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jehee, F.S.; Krepischi-Santos, A.C.; Rocha, K.M.; Cavalcanti, D.P.; Kim, C.A.; Bertola, D.R.; Alonso, L.G.; D'Angelo, C.S.; Mazzeu, J.F.; Froyen, G.; Lugtenberg, D.; Vianna-Morgante, A.M.; Rosenberg, C.; Passos-Bueno, M.R.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first comprehensive study, to our knowledge, on genomic chromosomal analysis in syndromic craniosynostosis. In total, 45 patients with craniosynostotic disorders were screened with a variety of methods including conventional karyotype, microsatellite segregation analysis, subtelomeric

  4. An integrated approach of comparative genomics and heritability analysis of pig and human on obesity trait: evidence for candidate genes on human chromosome 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Traditional candidate gene approach has been widely used for the study of complex diseases including obesity. However, this approach is largely limited by its dependence on existing knowledge of presumed biology of the phenotype under investigation. Our combined strategy of comparative genomics and chromosomal heritability estimate analysis of obesity traits, subscapular skinfold thickness and back-fat thickness in Korean cohorts and pig (Sus scrofa), may overcome the limitations of candidate gene analysis and allow us to better understand genetic predisposition to human obesity. Results We found common genes including FTO, the fat mass and obesity associated gene, identified from significant SNPs by association studies of each trait. These common genes were related to blood pressure and arterial stiffness (P = 1.65E-05) and type 2 diabetes (P = 0.00578). Through the estimation of variance of genetic component (heritability) for each chromosome by SNPs, we observed a significant positive correlation (r = 0.479) between genetic contributions of human and pig to obesity traits. Furthermore, we noted that human chromosome 2 (syntenic to pig chromosomes 3 and 15) was most important in explaining the phenotypic variance for obesity. Conclusions Obesity genetics still awaits further discovery. Navigating syntenic regions suggests obesity candidate genes on chromosome 2 that are previously known to be associated with obesity-related diseases: MRPL33, PARD3B, ERBB4, STK39, and ZNF385B. PMID:23253381

  5. An integrated approach of comparative genomics and heritability analysis of pig and human on obesity trait: evidence for candidate genes on human chromosome 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jaemin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traditional candidate gene approach has been widely used for the study of complex diseases including obesity. However, this approach is largely limited by its dependence on existing knowledge of presumed biology of the phenotype under investigation. Our combined strategy of comparative genomics and chromosomal heritability estimate analysis of obesity traits, subscapular skinfold thickness and back-fat thickness in Korean cohorts and pig (Sus scrofa, may overcome the limitations of candidate gene analysis and allow us to better understand genetic predisposition to human obesity. Results We found common genes including FTO, the fat mass and obesity associated gene, identified from significant SNPs by association studies of each trait. These common genes were related to blood pressure and arterial stiffness (P = 1.65E-05 and type 2 diabetes (P = 0.00578. Through the estimation of variance of genetic component (heritability for each chromosome by SNPs, we observed a significant positive correlation (r = 0.479 between genetic contributions of human and pig to obesity traits. Furthermore, we noted that human chromosome 2 (syntenic to pig chromosomes 3 and 15 was most important in explaining the phenotypic variance for obesity. Conclusions Obesity genetics still awaits further discovery. Navigating syntenic regions suggests obesity candidate genes on chromosome 2 that are previously known to be associated with obesity-related diseases: MRPL33, PARD3B, ERBB4, STK39, and ZNF385B.

  6. Genomic insights into hybridization in a localized region of sympatr y between pewee sister species (Contopus sordidulus × C. virens) and their chromosomal patterns of differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joseph D Manthey; and Mark B Robbins

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Great Plains of the United States includes a large number of hybrid and contact zones between bird species. The amount of gene lfow between sister species in these zones ranges from very rare hybridization events to widespread and prevalent introgression. Some of these avian systems have been studied extensively, while others have been indeterminate of whether hybridization exists in areas of sympatry. Using genomic-level approaches allows investigation of genomic patterns of hybridization and gene lfow between species—or lack thereof. Methods: We investigated a narrow zone of sympatry in Nebraska, USA between pewee species (Contopus sordidu-lus and C. virens), for which no hybridization has been conifrmed. We used thousands of single nucleotide polymor-phisms to identify potential hybridization and investigate genomic patterns of differentiation between these two species. Results: We found evidence of multiple hybrid individuals in the contact zone. Little genomic variation was ifxed between species, but a large proportion had differentiated allele frequencies between species. There was a positive relationship between genetic differentiation and chromosome size. Conclusions: We provided the ifrst conclusive evidence of hybridization between C. sordidulus and C. virens, in a region where secondary contact likely occurred due to human disturbance and habitat modiifcation. The genomic patterns of differentiation affrm that these species split in the relatively recent past. Finally, the relationship of chro-mosome size and genetic differentiation may have resulted from differential rates of chromosomal recombination in songbirds and genetic differentiation between species largely due to genetic drift (possibly in concert with selection).

  7. Genomic and expression profiling of human spermatocytic seminomas: primary spermatocyte as tumorigenic precursor and DMRT1 as candidate chromosome 9 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looijenga, Leendert H J; Hersmus, Remko; Gillis, Ad J M; Pfundt, Rolph; Stoop, Hans J; van Gurp, Ruud J H L M; Veltman, Joris; Beverloo, H Berna; van Drunen, Ellen; van Kessel, Ad Geurts; Pera, Renee Reijo; Schneider, Dominik T; Summersgill, Brenda; Shipley, Janet; McIntyre, Alan; van der Spek, Peter; Schoenmakers, Eric; Oosterhuis, J Wolter

    2006-01-01

    Spermatocytic seminomas are solid tumors found solely in the testis of predominantly elderly individuals. We investigated these tumors using a genome-wide analysis for structural and numerical chromosomal changes through conventional karyotyping, spectral karyotyping, and array comparative genomic hybridization using a 32 K genomic tiling-path resolution BAC platform (confirmed by in situ hybridization). Our panel of five spermatocytic seminomas showed a specific pattern of chromosomal imbalances, mainly numerical in nature (range, 3-24 per tumor). Gain of chromosome 9 was the only consistent anomaly, which in one case also involved amplification of the 9p21.3-pter region. Parallel chromosome level expression profiling as well as microarray expression analyses (Affymetrix U133 plus 2.0) was also done. Unsupervised cluster analysis showed that a profile containing transcriptional data on 373 genes (difference of > or = 3.0-fold) is suitable for distinguishing these tumors from seminomas/dysgerminomas. The diagnostic markers SSX2-4 and POU5F1 (OCT3/OCT4), previously identified by us, were among the top discriminatory genes, thereby validating the experimental set-up. In addition, novel discriminatory markers suitable for diagnostic purposes were identified, including Deleted in Azospermia (DAZ). Although the seminomas/dysgerminomas were characterized by expression of stem cell-specific genes (e.g., POU5F1, PROM1/CD133, and ZFP42), spermatocytic seminomas expressed multiple cancer testis antigens, including TSP50 and CTCFL (BORIS), as well as genes known to be expressed specifically during prophase meiosis I (TCFL5, CLGN, and LDHc). This is consistent with different cells of origin, the primordial germ cell and primary spermatocyte, respectively. Based on the region of amplification defined on 9p and the associated expression plus confirmatory immunohistochemistry, DMRT1 (a male-specific transcriptional regulator) was identified as a likely candidate gene for

  8. A genome-wide association study on androstenone levels in pigs reveals a cluster of candidate genes on chromosome 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groenen Martien AM

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many countries, male piglets are castrated shortly after birth because a proportion of un-castrated male pigs produce meat with an unpleasant flavour and odour. Main compounds of boar taint are androstenone and skatole. The aim of this high-density genome-wide association study was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with androstenone levels in a commercial sire line of pigs. The identification of major genetic effects causing boar taint would accelerate the reduction of boar taint through breeding to finally eliminate the need for castration. Results The Illumina Porcine 60K+SNP Beadchip was genotyped on 987 pigs divergent for androstenone concentration from a commercial Duroc-based sire line. The association analysis with 47,897 SNPs revealed that androstenone levels in fat tissue were significantly affected by 37 SNPs on pig chromosomes SSC1 and SSC6. Among them, the 5 most significant SNPs explained together 13.7% of the genetic variance in androstenone. On SSC6, a larger region of 10 Mb was shown to be associated with androstenone covering several candidate genes potentially involved in the synthesis and metabolism of androgens. Besides known candidate genes, such as cytochrome P450 A19 (CYP2A19, sulfotransferases SULT2A1, and SULT2B1, also new members of the cytochrome P450 CYP2 gene subfamilies and of the hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenases (HSD17B14 were found. In addition, the gene encoding the ß-chain of the luteinizing hormone (LHB which induces steroid synthesis in the Leydig cells of the testis at onset of puberty maps to this area on SSC6. Interestingly, the gene encoding the α-chain of LH is also located in one of the highly significant areas on SSC1. Conclusions This study reveals several areas of the genome at high resolution responsible for variation of androstenone levels in intact boars. Major genetic factors on SSC1 and SSC6 showing moderate to large effects on androstenone

  9. Positive selection in the chromosome 16 VKORC1 genomic region has contributed to the variability of anticoagulant response in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blandine Patillon

    Full Text Available VKORC1 (vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1, 16p11.2 is the main genetic determinant of human response to oral anticoagulants of antivitamin K type (AVK. This gene was recently suggested to be a putative target of positive selection in East Asian populations. In this study, we genotyped the HGDP-CEPH Panel for six VKORC1 SNPs and downloaded chromosome 16 genotypes from the HGDP-CEPH database in order to characterize the geographic distribution of footprints of positive selection within and around this locus. A unique VKORC1 haplotype carrying the promoter mutation associated with AVK sensitivity showed especially high frequencies in all the 17 HGDP-CEPH East Asian population samples. VKORC1 and 24 neighboring genes were found to lie in a 505 kb region of strong linkage disequilibrium in these populations. Patterns of allele frequency differentiation and haplotype structure suggest that this genomic region has been submitted to a near complete selective sweep in all East Asian populations and only in this geographic area. The most extreme scores of the different selection tests are found within a smaller 45 kb region that contains VKORC1 and three other genes (BCKDK, MYST1 (KAT8, and PRSS8 with different functions. Because of the strong linkage disequilibrium, it is not possible to determine if VKORC1 or one of the three other genes is the target of this strong positive selection that could explain present-day differences among human populations in AVK dose requirement. Our results show that the extended region surrounding a presumable single target of positive selection should be analyzed for genetic variation in a wide range of genetically diverse populations in order to account for other neighboring and confounding selective events and the hitchhiking effect.

  10. Positive selection in the chromosome 16 VKORC1 genomic region has contributed to the variability of anticoagulant response in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patillon, Blandine; Luisi, Pierre; Blanché, Hélène; Patin, Etienne; Cann, Howard M; Génin, Emmanuelle; Sabbagh, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    VKORC1 (vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1, 16p11.2) is the main genetic determinant of human response to oral anticoagulants of antivitamin K type (AVK). This gene was recently suggested to be a putative target of positive selection in East Asian populations. In this study, we genotyped the HGDP-CEPH Panel for six VKORC1 SNPs and downloaded chromosome 16 genotypes from the HGDP-CEPH database in order to characterize the geographic distribution of footprints of positive selection within and around this locus. A unique VKORC1 haplotype carrying the promoter mutation associated with AVK sensitivity showed especially high frequencies in all the 17 HGDP-CEPH East Asian population samples. VKORC1 and 24 neighboring genes were found to lie in a 505 kb region of strong linkage disequilibrium in these populations. Patterns of allele frequency differentiation and haplotype structure suggest that this genomic region has been submitted to a near complete selective sweep in all East Asian populations and only in this geographic area. The most extreme scores of the different selection tests are found within a smaller 45 kb region that contains VKORC1 and three other genes (BCKDK, MYST1 (KAT8), and PRSS8) with different functions. Because of the strong linkage disequilibrium, it is not possible to determine if VKORC1 or one of the three other genes is the target of this strong positive selection that could explain present-day differences among human populations in AVK dose requirement. Our results show that the extended region surrounding a presumable single target of positive selection should be analyzed for genetic variation in a wide range of genetically diverse populations in order to account for other neighboring and confounding selective events and the hitchhiking effect.

  11. Genome scan of human systemic lupus erythematosus: Evidence for linkage on chromosome 1q in African-American pedigrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Kathy L.; Neas, Barbara R.; Salmon, Jane E.; Yu, Hua; Gray-McGuire, Courtney; Asundi, Neeraj; Bruner, Gail R.; Fox, Jerome; Kelly, Jennifer; Henshall, Stephanie; Bacino, Debra; Dietz, Myron; Hogue, Robert; Koelsch, Gerald; Nightingale, Lydia; Shaver, Tim; Abdou, Nabih I.; Albert, Daniel A.; Carson, Craig; Petri, Michelle; Treadwell, Edward L.; James, Judith A.; Harley, John B.

    1998-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by production of autoantibodies against intracellular antigens including DNA, ribosomal P, Ro (SS-A), La (SS-B), and the spliceosome. Etiology is suspected to involve genetic and environmental factors. Evidence of genetic involvement includes: associations with HLA-DR3, HLA-DR2, Fcγ receptors (FcγR) IIA and IIIA, and hereditary complement component deficiencies, as well as familial aggregation, monozygotic twin concordance >20%, λs > 10, purported linkage at 1q41–42, and inbred mouse strains that consistently develop lupus. We have completed a genome scan in 94 extended multiplex pedigrees by using model-based linkage analysis. Potential [log10 of the odds for linkage (lod) > 2.0] SLE loci have been identified at chromosomes 1q41, 1q23, and 11q14–23 in African-Americans; 14q11, 4p15, 11q25, 2q32, 19q13, 6q26–27, and 12p12–11 in European-Americans; and 1q23, 13q32, 20q13, and 1q31 in all pedigrees combined. An effect for the FcγRIIA candidate polymorphism) at 1q23 (lod = 3.37 in African-Americans) is syntenic with linkage in a murine model of lupus. Sib-pair and multipoint nonparametric analyses also support linkage (P 2.0). Our results are consistent with the presumed complexity of genetic susceptibility to SLE and illustrate racial origin is likely to influence the specific nature of these genetic effects. PMID:9843982

  12. The Philadelphia chromosome in leukemogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhiJieKang; JinSongYan; QuentinLiu; YuFeiLiu; LingZhiXu; ZiJieLong; DanHuang; YaYang; BingLiu; JiuXingFeng; YuJiaPan

    2016-01-01

    The truncated chromosome 22 that results from the reciprocal translocation t(9;22)(q34;q11) is known as the Phila‑delphia chromosome (Ph) and is a hallmark of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). In leukemia cells, Ph not only impairs the physiological signaling pathways but also disrupts genomic stability. This aberrant fusion gene encodes the breakpoint cluster region‑proto‑oncogene tyrosine‑protein kinase (BCR‑ABL1) oncogenic protein with persistently enhanced tyrosine kinase activity. The kinase activity is responsible for maintaining proliferation, inhibiting differentia‑tion, and conferring resistance to cell death. During the progression of CML from the chronic phase to the accelerated phase and then to the blast phase, the expression patterns of different BCR‑ABL1 transcripts vary. Each BCR‑ABL1 transcript is present in a distinct leukemia phenotype, which predicts both response to therapy and clinical outcome. Besides CML, the Ph is found in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and mixed‑phenotype acute leukemia. Here, we provide an overview of the clinical presentation and cellular biology of different phenotypes of Ph‑positive leukemia and highlight key ifndings regarding leukemogenesis.

  13. Three-Color FISH Analysis of TMPRSS2/ERG Fusions in Prostate Cancer Indicates That Genomic Microdeletion of Chromosome 21 Is Associated with Rearrangement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maisa Yoshimoto

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent description of novel recurrent gene fusions in ~80% of prostate cancer (PCa cases has generated increased interest in the search for new translocations in other epithelial cancers and emphasizes the importance of understanding the origins and biologic implications of these genomic rearrangements. Analysis of 15 PCa cases by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to detect six ERG-related gene fusion transcripts with TMPRSS2. No TMPRSS2/ETV1 chimeric fusion was detected in this series. Three-color fluorescence in situ hybridization confirms that TMPRSS2/ERG fusion may be accompanied by a small hemizygous sequence deletion on chromosome 21 between ERG and TMPRSS2 genes. Analysis of genomic architecture in the region of genomic rearrangement suggests that tracts of microhomology could facilitate TMPRSS2/ERG fusion events.

  14. Chromosomal microarray analysis in a girl with mental retardation and spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Abdallah, Inesse; Hannachi, Hanene; Soyah, Najla; Saad, Ali; Elghezal, Hatem

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal imbalances comprise a major cause of mental retardation, particularly in association with congenital malformations and dysmorphic features. Chromosomal analysis using banded karyotyping is limited by the low resolution of this technique, and cryptic chromosomal rearrangements cannot be detected. We describe a 6-year-old girl with mental retardation, mild growth, congenital malformation, and facial anomalies. Chromosomal analysis with karyotyping produced normal results. Because the phenotype suggested chromosomal abnormality, microarray comparative genomic hybridization was used to search for a possible cryptic anomaly. A subtelomeric chromosomal imbalance, consisting of partial trisomy 2q35 and partial monosomy 3p26, was detected and confirmed using fluorescence in situ hybridization. This rearrangement was inherited from an equilibrated maternal t(2;3) reciprocal translocation. Comparative genomic hybridization array in similar situations is useful in detecting cryptic chromosomal rearrangements, identifying genes contained in deleted or duplicated regions, establishing a precise phenotype-genotype correlation, and offering unambiguous genetic counseling. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A new chromosome nomenclature system for oat (Avena sativa L. and A. byzantina C. Koch) based on FISH analysis of monosomic lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, M J; Jellen, E N; Loarce, Y; Irigoyen, M L; Ferrer, E; Fominaya, A

    2010-11-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with multiple probes was used to analyze mitotic and meiotic chromosome spreads of Avena sativa cv 'Sun II' monosomic lines, and of A. byzantina cv 'Kanota' monosomic lines from spontaneous haploids. The probes used were A. strigosa pAs120a (a repetitive sequence abundant in A-genome chromatin), A. murphyi pAm1 (a repetitive sequence abundant in C-genome chromatin), A. strigosa pITS (internal transcribed spacer of rDNA) and the wheat rDNA probes pTa71 (nucleolus organizer region or NOR) and pTa794 (5S). Simultaneous and sequential FISH employing pairs of these probes allowed the identification and genome assignation of all chromosomes. FISH mapping using mitotic and meiotic metaphases facilitated the genomic and chromosomal identification of the monosome in each line. Of the 17 'Sun II' lines analyzed, 13 distinct monosomic lines were found, corresponding to four monosomes of the A-genome, five of the C-genome and four of the D-genome. In addition, 12 distinct monosomic lines were detected among the 20 'Kanota' lines examined, corresponding to six monosomes of the A-genome, three of the C-genome and three of the D-genome. The results show that 19 chromosomes out of 21 of the complement are represented by monosomes between the two genetic backgrounds. The identity of the remaining chromosomes can be deduced either from one intergenomic translocation detected on both 'Sun II' and 'Kanota' lines, or from the single reciprocal, intergenomic translocation detected among the 'Sun II' lines. These results permit a new system to be proposed for numbering the 21 chromosome pairs of the hexaploid oat complement. Accordingly, the A-genome contains chromosomes 8A, 11A, 13A, 15A, 16A, 17A and 19A; the C-genome contains chromosomes 1C, 2C, 3C, 4C, 5C, 6C and 7C; and the D-genome consists of chromosomes 9D, 10D, 12D, 14D, 18D, 20D and 21D. Moreover, the FISH patterns of 16 chromosomes in 'Sun II' and 15 in 'Kanota' suggest that these

  16. Comparative sequence analysis of Solanum and Arabidopsis in a hot spot for pathogen resistance on potato chromosome V reveals a patchwork of conserved and rapidly evolving genome segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruggmann Rémy

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative phenotypic variation of agronomic characters in crop plants is controlled by environmental and genetic factors (quantitative trait loci = QTL. To understand the molecular basis of such QTL, the identification of the underlying genes is of primary interest and DNA sequence analysis of the genomic regions harboring QTL is a prerequisite for that. QTL mapping in potato (Solanum tuberosum has identified a region on chromosome V tagged by DNA markers GP21 and GP179, which contains a number of important QTL, among others QTL for resistance to late blight caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans and to root cyst nematodes. Results To obtain genomic sequence for the targeted region on chromosome V, two local BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome contigs were constructed and sequenced, which corresponded to parts of the homologous chromosomes of the diploid, heterozygous genotype P6/210. Two contiguous sequences of 417,445 and 202,781 base pairs were assembled and annotated. Gene-by-gene co-linearity was disrupted by non-allelic insertions of retrotransposon elements, stretches of diverged intergenic sequences, differences in gene content and gene order. The latter was caused by inversion of a 70 kbp genomic fragment. These features were also found in comparison to orthologous sequence contigs from three homeologous chromosomes of Solanum demissum, a wild tuber bearing species. Functional annotation of the sequence identified 48 putative open reading frames (ORF in one contig and 22 in the other, with an average of one ORF every 9 kbp. Ten ORFs were classified as resistance-gene-like, 11 as F-box-containing genes, 13 as transposable elements and three as transcription factors. Comparing potato to Arabidopsis thaliana annotated proteins revealed five micro-syntenic blocks of three to seven ORFs with A. thaliana chromosomes 1, 3 and 5. Conclusion Comparative sequence analysis revealed highly conserved collinear regions

  17. Genetic effects on birth weight in reciprocal Brahman-Simmental crossbred calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, J A; Riley, D G; Herring, A D; Sanders, J O; Thallman, R M

    2015-02-01

    Brahman-cross calves exhibit unusual inheritance of birth weight: Brahman-sired crossbreds out of females are heavier with greater difference between sexes than calves of the reciprocal cross. The objectives of this work were to confirm that unusual inheritance and to investigate non-Mendelian genetic effects that may influence differences in Brahman × Simmental crossbred calves. Crossbred calves were produced by embryo transfer ( = 2,862) and natural service or artificial insemination ( = 2,125) from 1983 to 1991 by a private seedstock producer. Brahman-sired F embryos out of Simmental donors weighed 9.4 ± 1.1 ( Brahman donor cows when transferred to comparable recipients. This reciprocal difference was accompanied by sexual dimorphism: within Brahman-sired F calves, males were 5.0 ± 1.4 kg heavier than females, whereas within Simmental-sired F calves, females were 0.7 ± 0.5 kg heavier than males. Covariates were constructed from the pedigree to represent genetic effects: proportion Brahman in calves and dams (direct and maternal breed effects), direct and maternal breed heterozygosity, probability of Brahman mitochondrial origin, probability of Brahman Y chromosome, probability of Brahman X chromosome, genomic imprinting (the difference between the probabilities of Brahman in the genetic dam and in the sire), nonrandom X inactivation by breed of origin (the probability of breed heterozygosity of the X chromosomes of a female), and nonrandom X inactivation by parent of origin (the difference between probabilities of a female inheriting a paternal or maternal Brahman X chromosome). The maternal breed heterozygosity, genomic imprinting, probability of Brahman X chromosome, and genomic imprinting × sex effect covariates from the full model were significant with regression coefficients of 1.1 ± 0.5 ( < 0.05), ‒8.3 ± 2.3 ( < 0.01), ‒3.5 ± 1.3 ( < 0.01), and ‒5.3 ± 2.0 ( < 0.01), respectively. Results suggest that sex-specific genomic imprinting may be

  18. A feasible strategy of preimplantation genetic diagnosis for carriers with chromosomal translocation: Using blastocyst biopsy and array comparative genomic hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu-Chun Huang

    2013-09-01

    Conclusion: Our study demonstrates an effective PGD strategy with promising outcomes. Blastocyst biopsy can retrieve more genetic material and may provide more reliable results, and aCGH offers not only detection of chromosomal translocation but also more comprehensive analysis of 24 chromosomes than traditional FISH. More cases are needed to verify our results and this strategy might be considered in general clinical practice.

  19. A genome-wide linkage study of bipolar disorder and co-morbid migraine: replication of migraine linkage on chromosome 4q24, and suggestion of an overlapping susceptibility region for both disorders on chromosome 20p11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oedegaard, K J; Greenwood, T A; Lunde, A; Fasmer, O B; Akiskal, H S; Kelsoe, J R

    2010-04-01

    Migraine and Bipolar Disorder (BPAD) are clinically heterogeneous disorders of the brain with a significant, but complex, genetic component. Epidemiological and clinical studies have demonstrated a high degree of co-morbidity between migraine and BPAD. Several genome-wide linkage studies in BPAD and migraine have shown overlapping regions of linkage on chromosomes, and two functionally similar voltage-dependent calcium channels CACNA1A and CACNA1C have been identified in familial hemiplegic migraine and recently implicated in two whole genome BPAD association studies, respectively. We hypothesized that using migraine co-morbidity to look at subsets of BPAD families in a genetic linkage analysis would prove useful in identifying genetic susceptibility regions in both of these disorders. We used BPAD with co-morbid migraine as an alternative phenotype definition in a re-analysis of the NIMH Bipolar Genetics Initiative wave 4 data set. In this analysis we selected only those families in which at least two members were diagnosed with migraine by a doctor according to patients' reports. Nonparametric linkage analysis performed on 31 families segregating both BPAD and migraine identified a linkage signal on chromosome 4q24 for migraine (but not BPAD) with a peak LOD of 2.26. This region has previously been implicated in two independent migraine linkage studies. In addition we identified a locus on chromosome 20p11 with overlapping elevated LOD scores for both migraine (LOD=1.95) and BPAD (LOD=1.67) phenotypes. This region has previously been implicated in two BPAD linkage studies, and, interestingly, it harbors a known potassium dependant sodium/calcium exchanger gene, SLC24A3, that plays a critical role in neuronal calcium homeostasis. Our findings replicate a previously identified migraine linkage locus on chromosome 4 (not co-segregating with BPAD) in a sample of BPAD families with co-morbid migraine, and suggest a susceptibility locus on chromosome 20, harboring a

  20. Cloning of a parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor (PTHR) cDNA from a rat osteosarcoma (UMR 106) cell line: Chromosomal assignment of the gene in the human, mouse, and rat genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pausova, Z.; Bourdon, J.; Clayton, D.; Janicic, N.; Goltzman, D.; Hendy, G.N. (McGill Univ. and Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal Quebec (Canada)); Mattei, M.G. (INSERM, Marseille (France)); Seldin, M.F. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)); Riviere, M.; Szpirer, J. (Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Rhode-St-Genese (Belgium)) (and others)

    1994-03-01

    Complementary DNAs spanning the entire coding region of the rat parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor (PTHR) were isolated from a rat osteosarcoma (UMR 106) cell-line cDNA library. The longest of these clones (rPTHrec4) was used to chromosomally assign the PTHR gene in the human, rat, and mouse genomes. By somatic cell hybrid analysis, the gene was localized to human chromosome 3 and rat chromosome 8; by in situ hybridization, the gene was mapped to human chromosome 3p21.1-p22 and to mouse chromosome 9 band F; and by interspecific backcross analysis, the Pthr gene segregated with the transferrin (Trf) gene in chromosome 9 band F. Mouse chromosome 9 and rat chromosome 8 are known to be highly homologous and to also show synteny conservation with human chromosome 3. These three chromosomes share the transferrin gene (TF), the myosin light polypeptide 3 gene (MYL3), and the acelpeptide hydrolase gene (APEH). These results add a fourth gene, the PTHR gene, to the synteny group conserved in these chromosomes. 34 refs., 7 figs. 1 tab.

  1. Cloning of a parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor (PTHR) cDNA from a rat osteosarcoma (UMR 106) cell line: chromosomal assignment of the gene in the human, mouse, and rat genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausova, Z; Bourdon, J; Clayton, D; Mattei, M G; Seldin, M F; Janicic, N; Rivière, M; Szpirer, J; Levan, G; Szpirer, C

    1994-03-01

    Complementary DNAs spanning the entire coding region of the rat parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor (PTHR) were isolated from a rat osteosarcoma (UMR 106) cell-line cDNA library. The longest of these clones (rPTHrec4) was used to chromosomally assign the PTHR gene in the human, rat, and mouse genomes. By somatic cell hybrid analysis, the gene was localized to human chromosome 3 and rat chromosome 8; by in situ hybridization, the gene was mapped to human chromosome 3p21.1-p22 and to mouse chromosome 9 band F; and by interspecific backcross analysis, the Pthr gene segregated with the transferrin (Trf) gene in chromosome 9 band F. Mouse chromosome 9 and rat chromosome 8 are known to be highly homologous and to also show synteny conservation with human chromosome 3. These three chromosomes share the transferrin gene (TF), the myosin light polypeptide 3 gene (MYL3), and the acylpeptide hydrolase gene (APEH). Our results add a fourth gene, the PTHR gene, to the synteny group conserved in these chromosomes.

  2. Chromosomal localization of rDNA genes and genomic organization of 5S rDNA in Oreochromis mossambicus, O. urolepis hornorum and their hybrid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hua Ping Zhu; Mai Xin Lu; Feng Ying Gao; Zhang Han Huang; Li Ping Yang; Jain Fang Gui

    2010-08-01

    In this study, classical and molecular cytogenetic analyses were performed in tilapia fishes, Oreochromis mossambicus (XX/XY sex determination system), O. urolepis hornorum (WZ/ZZ sex determination system) and their hybrid by crossing O. mossambicus female × O. u. hornorum male. An identical karyotype (($2n = 44$, NF (total number of chromosomal arms) = 50) was obtained from three examined tilapia samples. Genomic organization analysis of 5S rDNA revealed two different types of 5S rDNA sequences, 5S type I and 5S type II. Moreover, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 5S rDNA probes showed six positive fluorescence signals on six chromosomes of all the analysed metaphases from the three tilapia samples. Subsequently, 45S rDNA probes were also prepared, and six positive fluorescence signals were observed on three chromosome pairs in all analysed metaphases of the three tilapia samples. The correlation between 45 rDNA localization and nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) was confirmed by silver nitrate staining in tilapia fishes. Further, different chromosomal localizations of 5S rDNA and 45S rDNA were verified by two different colour FISH probes. Briefly, the current data provide an insights for hybridization projects and breeding improvement of tilapias.

  3. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies a 78 kb Insertion from Chromosome 8 as the Cause of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy CMTX3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Megan H.; Chaudhry, Rabia; Qi, Jessica; Kidambi, Aditi; Drew, Alexander P.; Ryan, Monique M.; Subramanian, Gopinath M.; Young, Helen K.; Zuchner, Stephan; Reddel, Stephen W.; Nicholson, Garth A.; Kennerson, Marina L.

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of whole exome sequencing, cases where no pathogenic coding mutations can be found are increasingly being observed in many diseases. In two large, distantly-related families that mapped to the Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy CMTX3 locus at chromosome Xq26.3-q27.3, all coding mutations were excluded. Using whole genome sequencing we found a large DNA interchromosomal insertion within the CMTX3 locus. The 78 kb insertion originates from chromosome 8q24.3, segregates fully with the disease in the two families, and is absent from the general population as well as 627 neurologically normal chromosomes from in-house controls. Large insertions into chromosome Xq27.1 are known to cause a range of diseases and this is the first neuropathy phenotype caused by an interchromosomal insertion at this locus. The CMTX3 insertion represents an understudied pathogenic structural variation mechanism for inherited peripheral neuropathies. Our finding highlights the importance of considering all structural variation types when studying unsolved inherited peripheral neuropathy cases with no pathogenic coding mutations. PMID:27438001

  4. The Value of Reciprocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molm, Linda D.; Schaefer, David R.; Collett, Jessica L.

    2007-01-01

    The value of reciprocity in social exchange potentially comprises both instrumental value (the value of the actual benefits received from exchange) and communicative or symbolic value (the expressive and uncertainty reduction value conveyed by features of the act of reciprocity itself). While all forms of exchange provide instrumental value, we…

  5. The Structure of Reciprocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molm, Linda D.

    2010-01-01

    Reciprocity is one of the defining features of social exchange and social life, yet exchange theorists have tended to take it for granted. Drawing on work from a decade-long theoretical research program, I argue that reciprocity is structured and variable across different forms of exchange, that these variations in the structure of reciprocity…

  6. The Reciprocity Controversy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Carter

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Reciprocity (or ―reciprocal altruism‖ was once considered an important and widespread evolutionary explanation for cooperation, yet many reviews now conclude that it is rare or absent outside of humans. Here, I show that nonhuman reciprocity seems rare mainly because its meaning has changed over time. The original broad concept of reciprocity is well supported by evidence, but subsequent divergent uses of the term have relied on various translations of the strategy ‗tit-for-tat‘ in the repeated Prisoner‘s Dilemma game. This model has resulted in four problematic approaches to defining and testing reciprocity. Authors that deny evidence of nonhuman reciprocity tend to (1 assume that it requires sophisticated cognition, (2 focus exclusively on short-term contingency with a single partner, (3 require paradoxical evidence for a temporary lifetime fitness cost, and (4 assume that responses to investments are fixed. While these restrictions basically define reciprocity out of existence, evidence shows that fungi, plants, fish, birds, rats, and primates enforce mutual benefit by contingently altering their cooperative investments based on the cooperative returns, just as predicted by the original reciprocity theory.

  7. Isolation and characterization of a steroid sulfatase cDNA clone: genomic deletions in patients with X-chromosome-linked ichthyosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballabio, A.; Parenti, G.; Carrozzo, R.; Sebastio, G.; Andria, G.; Buckle, V.; Fraser, N.; Craig, I.; Rocchi, M.; Romeo, G.; Jobsis, A.C.; Persico, M.G.

    1987-07-01

    The authors have isolated several cDNA clones from a lambdagt11 expression library by screening with antibodies prepared against the microsomal enzyme steroid sulfatase, which is deficient in classical X-chromosome-linked ichthyosis patients. One of these clones (p422) has been assigned by mapping with a somatic cell hybrid panel and by in situ hybridization to Xp22.3. Clone p422 therefore has a coincident localization with the previously identified locus for steroid sulfatase expression in the region of the X chromosome escaping from inactivation. Twelve steroid sulfatase-deficient patients, including eight cases of classical ichthyosis, were found to be deleted for genomic sequences detected by the clone.

  8. Genomic organization, complete sequence, and chromosomal location of the gene for human eotaxin (SCYA11), an eosinophil-specific CC chemokine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Zepeda, E.A.; Sarafi, M.N.; Luster, A.D. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA (United States)]|[Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    Eotaxin is a CC chemokine that is a specific chemoattractant for eosinophils and is implicated in the pathogenesis of eosinophilic inflammatory diseases, such as asthma. We describe the genomic organization, complete sequence, including 1354 bp 5{prime} of the RNA initiation site, and chromosomal localization of the human eotaxin gene. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis localized eotaxin to human chromosome 17, in the region q21.1-q21.2, and the human gene name SCYA11 was assigned. We also present the 5{prime} flanking sequence of the mouse eotaxin gene and have identified several regulatory elements that are conserved between the murine and the human promoters. In particular, the presence of elements such as NF-{Kappa}B, interferon-{gamma} response element, and glucocorticoid response element may explain the observed regulation of the eotaxin gene by cytokines and glucocorticoids. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Vibrio chromosome-specific families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukjancenko, Oksana; Ussery, David

    2014-01-01

    families, 1169 and 153 are uniquely found in chromosomes 1 and 2, respectively. Gene ontology (GO) terms for each of the protein families were determined, and the different sets for each chromosome were compared. A total of 363 different "Molecular Function" GO categories were found for chromosome 1......We have compared chromosome-specific genes in a set of 18 finished Vibrio genomes, and, in addition, also calculated the pan- and core-genomes from a data set of more than 250 draft Vibrio genome sequences. These genomes come from 9 known species and 2 unknown species. Within the finished...

  10. An Ac transposon system based on maize chromosome 4S for isolating long-distance-transposed Ac tags in the maize genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Li, Zhaoying; Fan, Jun; Li, Pengfei; Hu, Wei; Wang, Gang; Xu, Zhengkai; Song, Rentao

    2010-12-01

    Transposon tagging is an important tool for gene isolation and functional studies. In maize, several transposon-tagging systems have been developed, mostly using Activator/Dissociation (Ac/Ds) and Mutator systems. Here, we establish another Ac-based transposon system with the donor Ac tightly linked with sugary1 (su1) on maize chromosome 4S. Newly transposed Ac (tr-Acs) were detected based on a negative dosage effect, and long-distance-transposed Ac events were identified and isolated from the donor Ac by a simple backcross scheme. In this study, we identified 208 independent long-distance-transposed Ac lines. Thirty-one flanking sequences of these tr-Acs were isolated and localized in the maize genome. As found in previous studies, the tr-Acs preferentially inserted into genic sequences. The distribution of tr-Acs is not random. In our study, the tr-Acs preferentially transposed into chromosomes 1, 2, 9 and 10. We discuss the preferential distribution of tr-Acs from Ac systems. Our system is complementary to two other Ac-based regional-mutagenesis systems in maize, and the combined use of these systems will achieve an even and high-density distribution of Ac elements throughout the maize genome for functional-genomics studies.

  11. High-resolution genome-wide array-based comparative genome hybridization reveals cryptic chromosome changes in AML and MDS cases with trisomy 8 as the sole cytogenetic aberration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsson, K; Heidenblad, M; Strömbeck, B; Staaf, J; Jönsson, G; Borg, A; Fioretos, T; Johansson, B

    2006-05-01

    Although trisomy 8 as the sole chromosome aberration is the most common numerical abnormality in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), little is known about its pathogenetic effects. Considering that +8 is a frequent secondary change in AML/MDS, cryptic--possibly primary--genetic aberrations may occur in cases with trisomy 8 as the apparently single anomaly. However, no such hidden anomalies have been reported. We performed a high-resolution genome-wide array-based comparative genome hybridization (array CGH) analysis of 10 AML/MDS cases with isolated +8, utilizing a 32K bacterial artificial chromosome array set, providing >98% coverage of the genome with a resolution of 100 kb. Array CGH revealed intrachromosomal imbalances, not corresponding to known genomic copy number polymorphisms, in 4/10 cases, comprising nine duplications and hemizygous deletions ranging in size from 0.5 to 2.2 Mb. A 1.8 Mb deletion at 7p14.1, which had occurred prior to the +8, was identified in MDS transforming to AML. Furthermore, a deletion including ETV6 was present in one case. The remaining seven imbalances involved more than 40 genes. The present results show that cryptic genetic abnormalities are frequent in trisomy 8-positive AML/MDS cases and that +8 as the sole cytogenetic aberration is not always the primary genetic event.

  12. The effects of exposure to different clastogens on the pattern of chromosomal aberrations detected by FISH whole chromosome painting in occupationally exposed individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beskid, O. [Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Dusek, Z. [Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Solansky, I. [Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Sram, R.J. [Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague 4 (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: sram@biomed.cas.cz

    2006-02-22

    The pattern of chromosomal aberrations (CA) was studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique (whole chromosomes 1 and 4 painting) in workers occupationally exposed to any of the four following conditions: acrylonitrile (ACN), ethyl benzene (EB), carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (c-PAHs), and irradiation in nuclear power plants (NPP), respectively. Decrease in the relative frequency of translocations was observed in EB group, and an increase in reciprocal translocations in ACN and NPP-exposed groups. An increase in a relative number of insertions was registered under all four conditions (significant at ACN, EB, c-PAHs, quasisignificant at NPP-exposed groups). Significant differences in the percentage of lymphocytes with aberrations on chromosome 1 (58.8 {+-} 32.7%, versus 73.8 {+-} 33.6% in the controls, P < 0.05), and chromosome 4 (47.0 {+-} 34.1%, versus 29.4 {+-} 32.2%, P < 0.01) were found in workers exposed to ACN. Similarly, a decrease in the proportion of cells with aberration on chromosome 1 (61.0 {+-} 24.0%, versus 73.8 {+-} 33.6%, P < 0.05) and an increase on chromosome 4 (45.6 {+-} 24.6%, versus 29.4 {+-} 32.2%, P < 0.05) were observed in workers exposed to EB. Frequency of aberrant cells (%AB.C.) as well as genomic frequency of translocations (F {sub G}/100) increased with age (P < 0.001). Aging also increased the percentage of translocations and reciprocal translocations (P < 0.05), but decreased the relative number of acentric fragments (P < 0.01). Smoking led to significantly increased F {sub G}/100 (P < 0.05), but did not affect the pattern of chromosomal aberrations. Our results seem to indicate that different carcinogens may induce a different pattern of chromosomal aberrations.

  13. Engineered chromosome-based genetic mapping establishes a 3.7 Mb critical genomic region for Down syndrome-associated heart defects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunhong; Morishima, Masae; Jiang, Xiaoling; Yu, Tao; Meng, Kai; Ray, Debjit; Pao, Annie; Ye, Ping; Parmacek, Michael S; Yu, Y Eugene

    2014-06-01

    Trisomy 21 (Down syndrome, DS) is the most common human genetic anomaly associated with heart defects. Based on evolutionary conservation, DS-associated heart defects have been modeled in mice. By generating and analyzing mouse mutants carrying different genomic rearrangements in human chromosome 21 (Hsa21) syntenic regions, we found the triplication of the Tiam1-Kcnj6 region on mouse chromosome 16 (Mmu16) resulted in DS-related cardiovascular abnormalities. In this study, we developed two tandem duplications spanning the Tiam1-Kcnj6 genomic region on Mmu16 using recombinase-mediated genome engineering, Dp(16)3Yey and Dp(16)4Yey, spanning the 2.1 Mb Tiam1-Il10rb and 3.7 Mb Ifnar1-Kcnj6 regions, respectively. We found that Dp(16)4Yey/+, but not Dp(16)3Yey/+, led to heart defects, suggesting the triplication of the Ifnar1-Kcnj6 region is sufficient to cause DS-associated heart defects. Our transcriptional analysis of Dp(16)4Yey/+ embryos showed that the Hsa21 gene orthologs located within the duplicated interval were expressed at the elevated levels, reflecting the consequences of the gene dosage alterations. Therefore, we have identified a 3.7 Mb genomic region, the smallest critical genomic region, for DS-associated heart defects, and our results should set the stage for the final step to establish the identities of the causal gene(s), whose elevated expression(s) directly underlie this major DS phenotype.

  14. Chromosomal rearrangements in cattle and pigs revealed by chromosome microdissection and chromosome painting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yerle Martine

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A pericentric inversion of chromosome 4 in a boar, as well as a case of (2q-;5p+ translocation mosaicism in a bull were analysed by chromosome painting using probes generated by conventional microdissection. For the porcine inversion, probes specific for p arms and q arms were produced and hybridised simultaneously on metaphases of a heterozygote carrier. In the case of the bovine translocation, two whole chromosome probes (chromosome 5, and derived chromosome 5 were elaborated and hybridised independently on chromosomal preparations of the bull who was a carrier of the mosaic translocation. The impossibility of differentiating chromosomes 2 and der(2 from other chromosomes of the metaphases did not allow the production of painting probes for these chromosomes. For all experiments, the quality of painting was comparable to that usually observed with probes obtained from flow-sorted chromosomes. The results obtained allowed confirmation of the interpretations proposed with G-banding karyotype analyses. In the bovine case, however, the reciprocity of the translocation could not be proven. The results presented in this paper show the usefulness of the microdissection technique for characterising chromosomal rearrangements in species for which commercial probes are not available. They also confirmed that the main limiting factor of the technique is the quality of the chromosomal preparations, which does not allow the identification of target chromosomes or chromosome fragments in all cases.

  15. Genome-wide association study to identify chromosomal regions associated with antibody response to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in milk of Dutch Holstein-Friesians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hulzen, K J E; Schopen, G C B; van Arendonk, J A M; Nielen, M; Koets, A P; Schrooten, C; Heuven, H C M

    2012-05-01

    Heritability of susceptibility to Johne's disease in cattle has been shown to vary from 0.041 to 0.159. Although the presence of genetic variation involved in susceptibility to Johne's disease has been demonstrated, the understanding of genes contributing to the genetic variance is far from complete. The objective of this study was to contribute to further understanding of genetic variation involved in susceptibility to Johne's disease by identifying associated chromosomal regions using a genome-wide association approach. Log-transformed ELISA test results of 265,290 individual Holstein-Friesian cows from 3,927 herds from the Netherlands were analyzed to obtain sire estimated breeding values for Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP)-specific antibody response in milk using a sire-maternal grandsire model with fixed effects for parity, year of birth, lactation stage, and herd; a covariate for milk yield on test day; and random effects for sire, maternal grandsire, and error. For 192 sires with estimated breeding values with a minimum reliability of 70%, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing was conducted by a multiple SNP analysis with a random polygenic effect fitting 37,869 SNP simultaneously. Five SNP associated with MAP-specific antibody response in milk were identified distributed over 4 chromosomal regions (chromosome 4, 15, 18, and 28). Thirteen putative SNP associated with MAP-specific antibody response in milk were identified distributed over 10 chromosomes (chromosome 4, 14, 16, 18, 19, 20, 21, 26, 27, and 29). This knowledge contributes to the current understanding of genetic variation involved in Johne's disease susceptibility and facilitates control of Johne's disease and improvement of health status by breeding.

  16. Introgression of tomato chromosomes into the potato genome: an analysis through molecular marker and in situ hybridisation techniques.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calderé, F.G.

    1998-01-01

    Transfer of alien chromosomes and genes across intergeneric boundaries can be useful not only for the introgression of desirable characters but also for fundamental genetic studies. The successful demonstration of hybridisation of potato ( Solanum tuberosum ) and tomato ( Lycopersicon esculentum ) t

  17. Genome Analysis of Kingella kingae Strain KWG1 Reveals How a β-Lactamase Gene Inserted in the Chromosome of This Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidet, Philippe; Basmaci, Romain; Guglielmini, Julien; Doit, Catherine; Jost, Christelle; Birgy, André; Bonacorsi, Stéphane

    2015-11-16

    We describe the genome of a penicillinase-producing Kingella kingae strain (KWG1), the first to be isolated in continental Europe, whose bla(TEM-1) gene was, for the first time in this species, found to be chromosomally inserted. The bla(TEM) gene is located in an integrative and conjugative element (ICE) inserted in Met-tRNA and comprising genes that encode resistance to sulfonamides, streptomycin, and tetracycline. This ICE is homologous to resistance-conferring plasmids of K. kingae and other Gram-negative bacteria.

  18. Intermittency as a universal characteristic of the complete chromosome DNA sequences of eukaryotes: From protozoa to human genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybalko, S.; Larionov, S.; Poptsova, M.; Loskutov, A.

    2011-10-01

    Large-scale dynamical properties of complete chromosome DNA sequences of eukaryotes are considered. Using the proposed deterministic models with intermittency and symbolic dynamics we describe a wide spectrum of large-scale patterns inherent in these sequences, such as segmental duplications, tandem repeats, and other complex sequence structures. It is shown that the recently discovered gene number balance on the strands is not of a random nature, and certain subsystems of a complete chromosome DNA sequence exhibit the properties of deterministic chaos.

  19. Construction of Genomic Fosmid Library of Brassicajuncea and Screening of Cytological Markers for B-genome Chromosomes%芥菜Fosmid文库构建及B基因组细胞学标记的筛选利用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭元凤; 孟德璇; 黄玉碧; 王桂香

    2012-01-01

    构建了由60000个克隆组成的芥菜无偏倚Fosmid文库,该文库外源片段插入率为100%,外源DNA平均插入长度为32kb,文库覆盖率约为芥菜基因组的1.8倍。利用不同来源的分子标记筛选文库,得到的阳性单克隆经荧光原位杂交(FISH)鉴定后,获得两类B基因组细胞学标记,一类在所有染色体上都有信号,另一类仅在一对染色体上有信号。%In this study, an unbiased Fosmid library of Brassica juncea was established, which consisted of 60 000 clones with 100% inserting frequency. In the constructed library, the size of average inserts was approximately 32 kb, corresponding to 1.8 genome equivalents. Subsequently, two types of B-genome cytological markers were identified by means of library screening and chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) . One type was that the signal located on all chromosomes, and the other one was that the signal was detected only on one pair of chromosomes.

  20. A novel mitochondrial genome architecture in thrips (Insecta: Thysanoptera): extreme size asymmetry among chromosomes and possible recent control region duplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multi-partite mitochondrial genomes are very rare in animals but have been found previously in two insect orders with highly rearranged genomes, the Phthiraptera (parasitic lice), and the Psocoptera (booklice/barklice). We provide the first report of a multi-partite mitochondrial genome architecture...

  1. Genetic Segregation and Genomic Hybridization Patterns Support an Allotetraploid Structure and Disomic Inheritance for Salix Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianni Barcaccia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Salix alba L. (white willow—Salix fragilis L. (crack willow complex includes closely related polyploid species, mainly tetraploid (2n = 4x = 76, which are dioecious and hence obligate allogamous. Because little is known about the genome constitution and chromosome behavior of these pure willow trees, genetic analysis of their naturally occurring interspecific polyploid hybrids is still very difficult. A two-way pseudo-testcross strategy was exploited using single-dose AFLP markers in order to assess the main inheritance patterns of tetraploid biotypes (disomy vs. tetrasomy in segregating populations stemmed from S. alba × S. fragilis crosses and reciprocals. In addition, a genomic in situ hybridization (GISH technology was implemented in willow to shed some light on the genome structure of S. alba and S. fragilis species, and their hybrids (allopolyploidy vs. autopolyploidy. The frequency of S. alba-specific molecular markers was almost double compared to that of S. fragilis-specific ones, suggesting the phylogenetic hypothesis of S. fragilis as derivative species from S. alba-like progenitors. Cytogenetic observations at pro-metaphase revealed about half of the chromosome complements being less contracted than the remaining ones, supporting an allopolyploid origin of both S. alba and S. fragilis. Both genetic segregation and genomic hybridization data are consistent with an allotetraploid nature of the Salix species. In particular, the vast majority of the AFLP markers were inherited according to disomic patterns in S. alba × S. fragilis populations and reciprocals. Moreover, in all S. alba against S. fragilis hybridizations and reciprocals, GISH signals were observed only on the contracted chromosomes whereas the non-contracted chromosomes were never hybridized. In conclusion, half of the chromosomes of the pure species S. alba and S. fragilis are closely related and they could share a common diploid ancestor, while the rest of

  2. Comparative Analysis of Growth, Genome Size, Chromosome Numbers and Phylogeny of Arabidopsis thaliana and Three Cooccurring Species of the Brassicaceae from Uzbekistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias H. Hoffmann

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Contrary to literature data Arabidopsis thaliana was rarely observed in Middle Asia during a collection trip in 2001. Instead, three other Brassicaceae species were frequently found at places where A. thaliana was expected. To reveal reasons for this frequency pattern, we studied chromosome numbers, genome sizes, phylogenetic relationships, developmental rates, and reproductive success of A. thaliana, Olimarabidopsis pumila, Arabis montbretiana, and Arabis auriculata from Uzbekistan in two temperature treatments. There are little but partially significant differences between phenotypes. All studied species have very small genomes. The 1Cx-values of different genotypes within the sampled species are correlated with altitude. Developmental rates are also correlated with 1Cx-values. In our growth experiments, Arabidopsis had high seed sterility at higher temperature, which might be one reason for the rarity of A. thaliana in Middle Asia.

  3. Attribution and reciprocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sebald, Alexander Christopher

    2010-01-01

    , in turn, influence behavior. Dufwenberg and Kirchsteiger [Dufwenberg, M., Kirchsteiger, G., 2004. A theory of sequential reciprocity. Games Econ. Behav. 47 (2), 268-298] formalize this empirical finding in their ‘theory of sequential reciprocity'. This paper extends their analysis by moves of chance. More...... precisely, an extended framework is presented which allows for the analysis of strategic interactions of reciprocal agents in situations in which material outcomes also depend on chance. Moves of chance influence the attribution of responsibilities, people's perceptions about the (un)kindness of others and......, hence, their reciprocal behavior. Furthermore, with the help of two applications it is demonstrated how this framework can be used to explain experimental findings showing that people react very differently in outcomewise-identical situations depending on the moves of chance involved....

  4. Balanced reciprocal translocation 5,18: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Savad

    2014-05-01

    Conclusion: A balanced reciprocal translocation carrier is phenotypically normal, but during meiosis І, carrier chromosomes cant pair normally and form quadrivalant instead of bivalant that depend on type of their segregation (alternate, adjacent 1, adjacent 2,3:1,4:0, produce gametes that are chromosomally unbalanced which can result in early fetus abortion. Considering the number of abnormal gametes, the most effective way to help couples with this problem seems to be PGD 24sure, since it can identify reciprocal and Robertsonian translocation and allows concurrent screening of all chromosomes for aneuploidy. Another technique that can be compared with PGD 24sure is fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, but it has several technical limitations such as it is expensive and complexity, in addition it has only few probes (for chromosomes 21, 13, 18, X, Y so sometimes necessary to create patient specific protocols.

  5. The Diversity of Sequence and Chromosomal Distribution of New Transposable Element-Related Segments in the Rye Genome Revealed by FISH and Lineage Annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingxin Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Transposable elements (TEs in plant genomes exhibit a great variety of structure, sequence content and copy number, making them important drivers for species diversity and genome evolution. Even though a genome-wide statistic summary of TEs in rye has been obtained using high-throughput DNA sequencing technology, the accurate diversity of TEs in rye, as well as their chromosomal distribution and evolution, remains elusive due to the repetitive sequence assembling problems and the high dynamic and nested nature of TEs. In this study, using genomic plasmid library construction combined with dot-blot hybridization and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analysis, we successfully isolated 70 unique FISH-positive TE-related sequences including 47 rye genome specific ones: 30 showed homology or partial homology with previously FISH characterized sequences and 40 have not been characterized. Among the 70 sequences, 48 sequences carried Ty3/gypsy-derived segments, 7 sequences carried Ty1/copia-derived segments and 15 sequences carried segments homologous with multiple TE families. 26 TE lineages were found in the 70 sequences, and among these lineages, Wilma was found in sequences dispersed in all chromosome regions except telomeric positions; Abiba was found in sequences predominantly located at pericentromeric and centromeric positions; Wis, Carmilla, and Inga were found in sequences displaying signals dispersed from distal regions toward pericentromeric positions; except DNA transposon lineages, all the other lineages were found in sequences displaying signals dispersed from proximal regions toward distal regions. A high percentage (21.4% of chimeric sequences were identified in this study and their high abundance in rye genome suggested that new TEs might form through recombination and nested transposition. Our results also gave proofs that diverse TE lineages were arranged at centromeric and pericentromeric positions in rye, and lineages like

  6. A genome-wide search for chromosomal loci linked to mental health wellness in relatives at high risk for bipolar affective disorder among the Old Order Amish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginns, E I; St Jean, P; Philibert, R A; Galdzicka, M; Damschroder-Williams, P; Thiel, B; Long, R T; Ingraham, L J; Dalwaldi, H; Murray, M A; Ehlert, M; Paul, S; Remortel, B G; Patel, A P; Anderson, M C; Shaio, C; Lau, E; Dymarskaia, I; Martin, B M; Stubblefield, B; Falls, K M; Carulli, J P; Keith, T P; Fann, C S; Lacy, L G; Allen, C R; Hostetter, A M; Elston, R C; Schork, N J; Egeland, J A; Paul, S M

    1998-12-22

    Bipolar affective disorder (BPAD; manic-depressive illness) is characterized by episodes of mania and/or hypomania interspersed with periods of depression. Compelling evidence supports a significant genetic component in the susceptibility to develop BPAD. To date, however, linkage studies have attempted only to identify chromosomal loci that cause or increase the risk of developing BPAD. To determine whether there could be protective alleles that prevent or reduce the risk of developing BPAD, similar to what is observed in other genetic disorders, we used mental health wellness (absence of any psychiatric disorder) as the phenotype in our genome-wide linkage scan of several large multigeneration Old Order Amish pedigrees exhibiting an extremely high incidence of BPAD. We have found strong evidence for a locus on chromosome 4p at D4S2949 (maximum GENEHUNTER-PLUS nonparametric linkage score = 4.05, P = 5. 22 x 10(-4); SIBPAL Pempirical value <3 x 10(-5)) and suggestive evidence for a locus on chromosome 4q at D4S397 (maximum GENEHUNTER-PLUS nonparametric linkage score = 3.29, P = 2.57 x 10(-3); SIBPAL Pempirical value <1 x 10(-3)) that are linked to mental health wellness. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that certain alleles could prevent or modify the clinical manifestations of BPAD and perhaps other related affective disorders.

  7. Genome organization and DNA methylation patterns of B chromosomes in the red fox and Chinese raccoon dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugno-Poniewierska, Monika; Solek, Przemysław; Wronski, Mariusz; Potocki, Leszek; Jezewska-Witkowska, Grażyna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2014-12-01

    The molecular structure of B chromosomes (Bs) is relatively well studied. Previous research demonstrates that Bs of various species usually contain two types of repetitive DNA sequences, satellite DNA and ribosomal DNA, but Bs also contain genes encoding histone proteins and many others. However, many questions remain regarding the origin and function of these chromosomes. Here, we focused on the comparative cytogenetic characteristics of the red fox and Chinese raccoon dog B chromosomes with particular attention to the distribution of repetitive DNA sequences and their methylation status. We confirmed that the small Bs of the red fox show a typical fluorescent telomeric distal signal, whereas medium-sized Bs of the Chinese raccoon dog were characterized by clusters of telomeric sequences along their length. We also found different DNA methylation patterns for the B chromosomes of both species. Therefore, we concluded that DNA methylation may maintain the transcriptional inactivation of DNA sequences localized to B chromosomes and may prevent genetic unbalancing and several negative phenotypic effects.

  8. A genome-wide association study of congenital cardiovascular left-sided lesions shows association with a locus on chromosome 20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanchard, Neil A; Swaminathan, Shanker; Bucasas, Kristine; Furthner, Dieter; Fernbach, Susan; Azamian, Mahshid S; Wang, Xueqing; Lewin, Mark; Towbin, Jeffrey A; D'Alessandro, Lisa C A; Morris, Shaine A; Dreyer, William; Denfield, Susan; Ayres, Nancy A; Franklin, Wayne J; Justino, Henri; Lantin-Hermoso, M Regina; Ocampo, Elena C; Santos, Alexia B; Parekh, Dhaval; Moodie, Douglas; Jeewa, Aamir; Lawrence, Emily; Allen, Hugh D; Penny, Daniel J; Fraser, Charles D; Lupski, James R; Popoola, Mojisola; Wadhwa, Lalita; Brook, J David; Bu'Lock, Frances A; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Lalani, Seema R; Zender, Gloria A; Fitzgerald-Butt, Sara M; Bowman, Jessica; Corsmeier, Don; White, Peter; Lecerf, Kelsey; Zapata, Gladys; Hernandez, Patricia; Goodship, Judith A; Garg, Vidu; Keavney, Bernard D; Leal, Suzanne M; Cordell, Heather J; Belmont, John W; McBride, Kim L

    2016-06-01

    Congenital heart defects involving left-sided lesions (LSLs) are relatively common birth defects with substantial morbidity and mortality. Previous studies have suggested a high heritability with a complex genetic architecture, such that only a few LSL loci have been identified. We performed a genome-wide case-control association study to address the role of common variants using a discovery cohort of 778 cases and 2756 controls. We identified a genome-wide significant association mapping to a 200 kb region on chromosome 20q11 [P= 1.72 × 10(-8) for rs3746446; imputed Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) rs6088703 P= 3.01 × 10(-9), odds ratio (OR)= 1.6 for both]. This result was supported by transmission disequilibrium analyses using a subset of 541 case families (lowest P in region= 4.51 × 10(-5), OR= 1.5). Replication in a cohort of 367 LSL cases and 5159 controls showed nominal association (P= 0.03 for rs3746446) resulting in P= 9.49 × 10(-9) for rs3746446 upon meta-analysis of the combined cohorts. In addition, a group of seven SNPs on chromosome 1q21.3 met threshold for suggestive association (lowest P= 9.35 × 10(-7) for rs12045807). Both regions include genes involved in cardiac development-MYH7B/miR499A on chromosome 20 and CTSK, CTSS and ARNT on chromosome 1. Genome-wide heritability analysis using case-control genotyped SNPs suggested that the mean heritability of LSLs attributable to common variants is moderately high ([Formula: see text] range= 0.26-0.34) and consistent with previous assertions. These results provide evidence for the role of common variation in LSLs, proffer new genes as potential biological candidates, and give further insight to the complex genetic architecture of congenital heart disease. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Construction of a river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis whole-genome radiation hybrid panel and preliminary RH mapping of chromosomes 3 and 10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.E. Womack

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The buffalo (Bubalus bubalis not only is a useful source of milk, it also provides meat and works as a natural source of labor and biogas. To establish a project for buffalo genome mapping a 5,000-rad whole genome radiation hybrid panel was constructed for river buffalo and used to build preliminary RH maps from two chromosomes (BBU 3 and BBU10. The preliminary maps contain 66 markers, including coding genes, cattle ESTs and microsatellite loci. The RH maps presented here are the starting point for mapping additional loci, in particular, genes and expressed sequence tags that will allow detailed comparative maps between buffalo, cattle and other species to be constructed. A large quantity of DNA has been prepared from the cell lines forming the RH panel reported here and will be made publicly available to the international community both for the study of chromosome evolution and for the improvement of traits important to the role of buffalo in animal agriculture.

  10. A genome-wide survey of hybrid incompatibility factors by the introgression of marked segments of Drosophila mauritiana chromosomes into Drosophila simulans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    True, J.R.; Laurie, C.C. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Weir, B.S. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1996-03-01

    In hybrids between Drosophila simulans and D. mauritiana, males are sterile and females are fertile, in compliance with HALDANE`s rule. The genetic basis of this phenomenon was investigated by introgression of segments of the mauritiana genome into a simulans background. A total of 87 positions throughout the mauritiana genome were marked with P-element insertions and replicate introgressions were made by repeated backcrossing to simulans for 15 generations. The fraction of hemizygous X chromosomal introgressions that are male sterile is {approximately}50% greater than the fraction of homozygous autosomal segments. This result suggests that male sterility factors have evolved at a higher rate on the X, but chromosomal differences in segment length cannot be ruled out. The fraction of homozygous autosomal introgressions that are male sterile is several times greater than the fraction that are either female sterile or inviable. This observation strongly indicates that male sterility factors have evolved more rapidly than either female sterility or inviability factors. These results, combined with previous work on these and other species, suggest that HALDANE`s rule has at least two causes: recessivity of incompatibility factors and differential accumulation of sterility factors affecting males and females. 50 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Fusion of nearby inverted repeats by a replication-based mechanism leads to formation of dicentric and acentric chromosomes that cause genome instability in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Andrew L; Kaochar, Salma; Jones, Hope; Elezaby, Aly; Shanks, Lisa; Weinert, Ted

    2009-12-15

    Large-scale changes (gross chromosomal rearrangements [GCRs]) are common in genomes, and are often associated with pathological disorders. We report here that a specific pair of nearby inverted repeats in budding yeast fuse to form a dicentric chromosome intermediate, which then rearranges to form a translocation and other GCRs. We next show that fusion of nearby inverted repeats is general; we found that many nearby inverted repeats that are present in the yeast genome also fuse, as does a pair of synthetically constructed inverted repeats. Fusion occurs between inverted repeats that are separated by several kilobases of DNA and share >20 base pairs of homology. Finally, we show that fusion of inverted repeats, surprisingly, does not require genes involved in double-strand break (DSB) repair or genes involved in other repeat recombination events. We therefore propose that fusion may occur by a DSB-independent, DNA replication-based mechanism (which we term "faulty template switching"). Fusion of nearby inverted repeats to form dicentrics may be a major cause of instability in yeast and in other organisms.

  12. Isolation of Ty1-copia-like Retrotransposon Sequences from the Apple Genome by Chromosome Walking Based on Modified SiteFinding-polymerase Chain Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons are powerful tools for studying genetic biodiversity,genome evolution, gene mutation, gene cloning and gene expression. The scarcity of retrotransposon sequence information restricts the development of these studies in higher plants. In the present study, 31 reverse transcriptase (RT) genes of Tyl-copia-like retrotransposons were identified from the apple genome by amplifying the RT coding region using degenerate primers. Nineteen RT genes showed extreme heterogeneity in terms of fragment size, base pair composition and open reading frame integrality. Originating from one 266 bp cloned RT gene, a 1966 bp Ty1-copia-like retrotransposon (named Tcrm1), including RT-ribonuclease H-LTR domain sequences, was achieved by chromosome walking based on modified SiteFinding-polymerase chain reaction. The comparison between Tcrm1 and other LTR retrotransposons in gene structure and sequence homology shows that Tcrm1 is the first Ty1-copia-like retrotransposon including an LTR domain in the apple genome. Dot blot analysis revealed that Tcrm1 copy number in the apple was approximately 1×103 copies per haploid genome.

  13. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gevers Dirk

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it is an open question to what extent the two chromosomes themselves share a common history since their formation. Results Single copy genes from each chromosome (142 genes from chromosome I and 42 genes from chromosome II were identified from 19 sequenced Vibrionales genomes and their phylogenetic comparison suggests consistent phylogenies for each chromosome. Additionally, study of the gene organization and phylogeny of the respective origins of replication confirmed the shared history. Conclusions Thus, while elements within the chromosomes may have experienced significant genetic mobility, the backbones share a common history. This allows conclusions based on multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA for one chromosome to be applied equally to both chromosomes.

  14. Bacterial chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possoz, Christophe; Junier, Ivan; Espeli, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Dividing cells have mechanisms to ensure that their genomes are faithfully segregated into daughter cells. In bacteria, the description of these mechanisms has been considerably improved in the recent years. This review focuses on the different aspects of bacterial chromosome segregation that can be understood thanks to the studies performed with model organisms: Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Caulobacter crescentus and Vibrio cholerae. We describe the global positionning of the nucleoid in the cell and the specific localization and dynamics of different chromosomal loci, kinetic and biophysic aspects of chromosome segregation are presented. Finally, a presentation of the key proteins involved in the chromosome segregation is made.

  15. A First Generation Comparative Chromosome Map between Guinea Pig (Cavia porcellus) and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, Svetlana A; Perelman, Polina L; Trifonov, Vladimir A; Serdyukova, Natalia A; Li, Tangliang; Fu, Beiyuan; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Ng, Bee L; Nie, Wenhui; Liehr, Thomas; Stanyon, Roscoe; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Yang, Fengtang

    2015-01-01

    The domesticated guinea pig, Cavia porcellus (Hystricomorpha, Rodentia), is an important laboratory species and a model for a number of human diseases. Nevertheless, genomic tools for this species are lacking; even its karyotype is poorly characterized. The guinea pig belongs to Hystricomorpha, a widespread and important group of rodents; so far the chromosomes of guinea pigs have not been compared with that of other hystricomorph species or with any other mammals. We generated full sets of chromosome-specific painting probes for the guinea pig by flow sorting and microdissection, and for the first time, mapped the chromosomal homologies between guinea pig and human by reciprocal chromosome painting. Our data demonstrate that the guinea pig karyotype has undergone extensive rearrangements: 78 synteny-conserved human autosomal segments were delimited in the guinea pig genome. The high rate of genome evolution in the guinea pig may explain why the HSA7/16 and HSA16/19 associations presumed ancestral for eutherians and the three syntenic associations (HSA1/10, 3/19, and 9/11) considered ancestral for rodents were not found in C. porcellus. The comparative chromosome map presented here is a starting point for further development of physical and genetic maps of the guinea pig as well as an aid for genome assembly assignment to specific chromosomes. Furthermore, the comparative mapping will allow a transfer of gene map data from other species. The probes developed here provide a genomic toolkit, which will make the guinea pig a key species to unravel the evolutionary biology of the Hystricomorph rodents.

  16. Genome size and chromosome number of Micromeria acropolitana (Lamiaceae), a steno-endemic of Greece

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siljak-Yakovlev, Sonia; Tan, Kit; Tsounis, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    The chromosome number 2n = 30, and nuclear DNA amount 2C = 0.79 pg, are determined for the first time for Micromeria acropolitana, a rare and endangered species from the Acropolis in Athens, Greece. The plant was considered extinct but rediscovered in 2006, a hundred years later. Its current status...

  17. Genome Sequences of the Oxytetracycline Production Strain Streptomyces rimosus R6-500 and Two Mutants with Chromosomal Rearrangements

    KAUST Repository

    Baranasic, Damir

    2014-07-17

    The genome sequence of Streptomyces rimosus R6-500, an industrially improved strain which produces high titers of the important antibiotic oxytetracycline, is reported, as well as the genome sequences of two derivatives arising due to the genetic instability of the strain.

  18. X-ray induced visible alterations in the giant chromosomes of Phryne cincta (Nematocera, Diptera): relation of radiation sensitivity to pronuclear chromosome structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelewski, N

    1975-12-10

    In order to induce chromosomal rearrangements, males were exposed to x-rays and then mated to non-irradiated females. The number of each type of structural alteration was determined by examination of the polytene chromosomes of the F1 progeny. -- A comparison of the results with similar studies made on Drosophila revealed a significantly greater sensitivity in Phryne. Parallel to that an extremely high frequency of small inversions was ascertained in Phryne, and the observed ratio of inversions to translocations was the inverse of that which would be expected from purely mathematical considerations based on the lengths of the different chromosomes. These facts allow the conclusion that the paternal pronuclear chromosomes in Phryne are highly spiralized. Besides, the kinetochore-to-translocation-breakpoint distance was measured in both of the chromosomes involved in each reciprocal translocation and the differences (kinetochore-break distance differences) were registered and from them the arrangement of the chromosomes in the pronucleus of Phryne deduced. The data obtained support the assumption of an ordered, polar-field type of orientation. In Drosophila, in contrast, the comparable data showed that the pronuclear chromosomes are not spiralized and are randomly arranged (Bauer, 1939). -- These results seem to indicate that a close correlation exists between the different radiation sensitivities of Drosophila and Phryne and the different states of spiralisation and arrangements of their chromosomes in the pronucleus stage. It is hypothesized that the influence of the maternal genome on the degree of spiralization of the paternal chromosomes could account for differences in the pronuclear chromosome structure of both species.

  19. The genome of a Bacillus isolate causing anthrax in chimpanzees combines chromosomal properties of B. cereus with B. anthracis virulence plasmids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke R Klee

    Full Text Available Anthrax is a fatal disease caused by strains of Bacillus anthracis. Members of this monophyletic species are non motile and are all characterized by the presence of four prophages and a nonsense mutation in the plcR regulator gene. Here we report the complete genome sequence of a Bacillus strain isolated from a chimpanzee that had died with clinical symptoms of anthrax. Unlike classic B. anthracis, this strain was motile and lacked the four prohages and the nonsense mutation. Four replicons were identified, a chromosome and three plasmids. Comparative genome analysis revealed that the chromosome resembles those of non-B. anthracis members of the Bacillus cereus group, whereas two plasmids were identical to the anthrax virulence plasmids pXO1 and pXO2. The function of the newly discovered third plasmid with a length of 14 kbp is unknown. A detailed comparison of genomic loci encoding key features confirmed a higher similarity to B. thuringiensis serovar konkukian strain 97-27 and B. cereus E33L than to B. anthracis strains. For the first time we describe the sequence of an anthrax causing bacterium possessing both anthrax plasmids that apparently does not belong to the monophyletic group of all so far known B. anthracis strains and that differs in important diagnostic features. The data suggest that this bacterium has evolved from a B. cereus strain independently from the classic B. anthracis strains and established a B. anthracis lifestyle. Therefore we suggest to designate this isolate as "B. cereus variety (var. anthracis".

  20. Genome-wide linkage and copy number variation analysis reveals 710 kb duplication on chromosome 1p31.3 responsible for autosomal dominant omphalocele

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishna, Uppala; Nath, Swapan K; McElreavey, Ken; Ratnamala, Uppala; Sun, Celi; Maiti, Amit K; Gagnebin, Maryline; Béna, Frédérique; Newkirk, Heather L; Sharp, Andrew J; Everman, David B; Murray, Jeffrey C; Schwartz, Charles E; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Butler, Merlin G

    2017-01-01

    Background Omphalocele is a congenital birth defect characterised by the presence of internal organs located outside of the ventral abdominal wall. The purpose of this study was to identify the underlying genetic mechanisms of a large autosomal dominant Caucasian family with omphalocele. Methods and findings A genetic linkage study was conducted in a large family with an autosomal dominant transmission of an omphalocele using a genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. The analysis revealed significant evidence of linkage (non-parametric NPL = 6.93, p=0.0001; parametric logarithm of odds (LOD) = 2.70 under a fully penetrant dominant model) at chromosome band 1p31.3. Haplotype analysis narrowed the locus to a 2.74 Mb region between markers rs2886770 (63014807 bp) and rs1343981 (65757349 bp). Molecular characterisation of this interval using array comparative genomic hybridisation followed by quantitative microsphere hybridisation analysis revealed a 710 kb duplication located at 63.5–64.2 Mb. All affected individuals who had an omphalocele and shared the haplotype were positive for this duplicated region, while the duplication was absent from all normal individuals of this family. Multipoint linkage analysis using the duplication as a marker yielded a maximum LOD score of 3.2 at 1p31.3 under a dominant model. The 710 kb duplication at 1p31.3 band contains seven known genes including FOXD3, ALG6, ITGB3BP, KIAA1799, DLEU2L, PGM1, and the proximal portion of ROR1. Importantly, this duplication is absent from the database of genomic variants. Conclusions The present study suggests that development of an omphalocele in this family is controlled by overexpression of one or more genes in the duplicated region. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first reported association of an inherited omphalocele condition with a chromosomal rearrangement. PMID:22499347

  1. Reciprocal inhibition in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crone, C

    1993-11-01

    Reciprocal inhibition is the automatic antagonist alpha motor neurone inhibition which is evoked by contraction of the agonist muscle. This so-called natural reciprocal inhibition is a ubiquitous and pronounced phenomenon in man and must be suspected of playing a major role in the control of voluntary movements. The spinal pathways underlying this inhibitory phenomenon were studied. The disynaptic reciprocal Ia inhibitory pathway between the tibial anterior muscle and the soleus alpha motor neurones was identified and described in man. It was shown that the inhibition can be evoked in most healthy subjects at rest, but the degree of inhibition varies considerably from one subject to another. It was concluded that it corresponds to the disynaptic reciprocal Ia inhibitory pathway which has been extensively described in animal experiments. The disynaptic reciprocal inhibition was shown to increase during the dynamic phase of a dorsiflexion movement of the foot, but not during the tonic phase. However, when the peripheral afferent feedback from the contracting muscle was blocked by ischaemia, an increase of the inhibition was revealed also during the tonic phase of the dorsiflexion. The concealment of this increase during unrestrained peripheral feedback from the muscle was thought to be due to the post-activation depression mechanism; a mechanism which was described further and which probably involves reduced transmitter release at Ia afferent terminals as a result of previous activation of these afferent fibers. Hence the hypothesis was supported that alpha motor neurones and the corresponding inhibitory interneurones, which project reciprocal inhibition to the antagonist motor neurones, are activated in parallel during voluntary contraction of agonist muscles. An additional reciprocal inhibitory mechanism, the long latency reciprocal inhibition, was described between the tibial anterior muscle and the soleus alpha motor neurones. It was shown to be evoked by group I

  2. Control of meiotic recombination frequency in plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Ian R

    2012-11-01

    Sexual eukaryotes reproduce via the meiotic cell division, where ploidy is halved and homologous chromosomes undergo reciprocal genetic exchange, termed crossover (CO). CO frequency has a profound effect on patterns of genetic variation and species evolution. Relative CO rates vary extensively both within and between plant genomes. Plant genome size varies by over 1000-fold, largely due to differential expansion of repetitive sequences, and increased genome size is associated with reduced CO frequency. Gene versus repeat sequences associate with distinct chromatin modifications, and evidence from plant genomes indicates that this epigenetic information influences CO patterns. This is consistent with data from diverse eukaryotes that demonstrate the importance of chromatin structure for control of meiotic recombination. In this review I will discuss CO frequency patterns in plant genomes and recent advances in understanding recombination distributions.

  3. Renal cell tumors with clear cell histology and intact VHL and chromosome 3p: a histological review of tumors from the Cancer Genome Atlas database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favazza, Laura; Chitale, Dhananjay A; Barod, Ravi; Rogers, Craig G; Kalyana-Sundaram, Shanker; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Gupta, Nilesh S; Williamson, Sean R

    2017-07-21

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma is by far the most common form of kidney cancer; however, a number of histologically similar tumors are now recognized and considered distinct entities. The Cancer Genome Atlas published data set was queried (http://cbioportal.org) for clear cell renal cell carcinoma tumors lacking VHL gene mutation and chromosome 3p loss, for which whole-slide images were reviewed. Of the 418 tumors in the published Cancer Genome Atlas clear cell renal cell carcinoma database, 387 had VHL mutation, copy number loss for chromosome 3p, or both (93%). Of the remaining, 27/31 had whole-slide images for review. One had 3p loss based on karyotype but not sequencing, and three demonstrated VHL promoter hypermethylation. Nine could be reclassified as distinct or emerging entities: translocation renal cell carcinoma (n=3), TCEB1 mutant renal cell carcinoma (n=3), papillary renal cell carcinoma (n=2), and clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (n=1). Of the remaining, 6 had other clear cell renal cell carcinoma-associated gene alterations (PBRM1, SMARCA4, BAP1, SETD2), leaving 11 specimens, including 2 high-grade or sarcomatoid renal cell carcinomas and 2 with prominent fibromuscular stroma (not TCEB1 mutant). One of the remaining tumors exhibited gain of chromosome 7 but lacked histological features of papillary renal cell carcinoma. Two tumors previously reported to harbor TFE3 gene fusions also exhibited VHL mutation, chromosome 3p loss, and morphology indistinguishable from clear cell renal cell carcinoma, the significance of which is uncertain. In summary, almost all clear cell renal cell carcinomas harbor VHL mutation, 3p copy number loss, or both. Of tumors with clear cell histology that lack these alterations, a subset can now be reclassified as other entities. Further study will determine whether additional entities exist, based on distinct genetic pathways that may have implications for treatment.Modern Pathology advance online publication, 21

  4. Transmission of the Aegilops ovata chromosomes carrying gametocidal factors in hexaploid triticale (×Triticosecale Wittm.) hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatek, M; Majka, M; Ślusarkiewicz-Jarzina, A; Ponitka, A; Pudelska, H; Belter, J; Wiśniewska, H

    2016-08-01

    The main aim of this work was to induce the chromosome rearrangements between Aegilops ovata (UUMM) and hexaploid triticale (AABBRR) by expression of the gametocidal factor located on the chromosome 4M. The Aegilops ovata × Secale cereale (UUMMRR) amphiploids and triticale 'Moreno' were used to produce hybrids by reciprocal crosses. Chromosome dynamics was observed in subsequent generations of hybrids during mitotic metaphase of root meristems and first metaphase of meiosis of pollen mother cells. Chromosomes were identified by genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) using pTa71, pTa791, pSc119.2 and pAs1 DNA probes. It has been shown that the origin of the genetic background had an influence on Aegilops chromosome transmission. Moreover, it has been reported that the preferential transmission of chromosome 4M appeared during both androgenesis and gynogenesis. It is also hypothesised that the expression of the triticale Gc gene suppressor had an influence on the semi-fertility of hybrids but did not inhibit the chromosome rearrangements. This paper also describes the double haploid production, which enabled to obtain plants with two identical copies of triticale chromosomes with translocations of Aegilops chromatin segments.

  5. Karyotype evolution in Rhinolophus bats (Rhinolophidae, Chiroptera) illuminated by cross-species chromosome painting and G-banding comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiuguang; Nie, Wenhui; Wang, Jinhuan; Su, Weiting; Ao, Lei; Feng, Qing; Wang, Yingxiang; Volleth, Marianne; Yang, Fengtang

    2007-01-01

    Rhinolophus (Rhinolophidae) is the second most speciose genus in Chiroptera and has extensively diversified diploid chromosome numbers (from 2n = 28 to 62). In spite of many attempts to explore the karyotypic evolution of this genus, most studies have been based on conventional Giemsa staining rather than G-banding. Here we have made a whole set of chromosome-specific painting probes from flow-sorted chromosomes of Aselliscus stoliczkanus (Hipposideridae). These probes have been utilized to establish the first genome-wide homology maps among six Rhinolophus species with four different diploid chromosome numbers (2n = 36, 44, 58, and 62) and three species from other families: Rousettus leschenaulti (2n = 36, Pteropodidae), Hipposideros larvatus (2n = 32, Hipposideridae), and Myotis altarium (2n = 44, Vespertilionidae) by fluorescence in situ hybridization. To facilitate integration with published maps, human paints were also hybridized to A. stoliczkanus chromosomes. Our painting results substantiate the wide occurrence of whole-chromosome arm conservation in Rhinolophus bats and suggest that Robertsonian translocations of different combinations account for their karyotype differences. Parsimony analysis using chromosomal characters has provided some new insights into the Rhinolophus ancestral karyotype and phylogenetic relationships among these Rhinolophus species so far studied. In addition to Robertsonian translocations, our results suggest that whole-arm (reciprocal) translocations involving multiple non-homologous chromosomes as well could have been involved in the karyotypic evolution within Rhinolophus, in particular those bats with low and medium diploid numbers.

  6. Toward functional genomics in bacteria: analysis of gene expression in Escherichia coli from a bacterial artificial chromosome library of Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondon, M R; Raffel, S J; Goodman, R M; Handelsman, J

    1999-05-25

    As the study of microbes moves into the era of functional genomics, there is an increasing need for molecular tools for analysis of a wide diversity of microorganisms. Currently, biological study of many prokaryotes of agricultural, medical, and fundamental scientific interest is limited by the lack of adequate genetic tools. We report the application of the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vector to prokaryotic biology as a powerful approach to address this need. We constructed a BAC library in Escherichia coli from genomic DNA of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus cereus. This library provides 5.75-fold coverage of the B. cereus genome, with an average insert size of 98 kb. To determine the extent of heterologous expression of B. cereus genes in the library, we screened it for expression of several B. cereus activities in the E. coli host. Clones expressing 6 of 10 activities tested were identified in the library, namely, ampicillin resistance, zwittermicin A resistance, esculin hydrolysis, hemolysis, orange pigment production, and lecithinase activity. We analyzed selected BAC clones genetically to identify rapidly specific B. cereus loci. These results suggest that BAC libraries will provide a powerful approach for studying gene expression from diverse prokaryotes.

  7. A genomic island present along the bacterial chromosome of the Parachlamydiaceae UWE25, an obligate amoebal endosymbiont, encodes a potentially functional F-like conjugative DNA transfer system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Lionel

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genome of Protochlamydia amoebophila UWE25, a Parachlamydia-related endosymbiont of free-living amoebae, was recently published, providing the opportunity to search for genomic islands (GIs. Results On the residual cumulative G+C content curve, a G+C-rich 19-kb region was observed. This sequence is part of a 100-kb chromosome region, containing 100 highly co-oriented ORFs, flanked by two 17-bp direct repeats. Two identical gly-tRNA genes in tandem are present at the proximal end of this genetic element. Several mobility genes encoding transposases and bacteriophage-related proteins are located within this chromosome region. Thus, this region largely fulfills the criteria of GIs. The G+C content analysis shows that several modules compose this GI. Surprisingly, one of them encodes all genes essential for F-like conjugative DNA transfer (traF, traG, traH, traN, traU, traW, and trbC, involved in sex pilus retraction and mating pair stabilization, strongly suggesting that, similarly to the other F-like operons, the parachlamydial tra unit is devoted to DNA transfer. A close relatedness of this tra unit to F-like tra operons involved in conjugative transfer is confirmed by phylogenetic analyses performed on concatenated genes and gene order conservation. These analyses and that of gly-tRNA distribution in 140 GIs suggest a proteobacterial origin of the parachlamydial tra unit. Conclusions A GI of the UWE25 chromosome encodes a potentially functional F-like DNA conjugative system. This is the first hint of a putative conjugative system in chlamydiae. Conjugation most probably occurs within free-living amoebae, that may contain hundreds of Parachlamydia bacteria tightly packed in vacuoles. Such a conjugative system might be involved in DNA transfer between internalized bacteria. Since this system is absent from the sequenced genomes of Chlamydiaceae, we hypothesize that it was acquired after the divergence between

  8. A small (sSMC) chromosome 22 due to a maternal translocation between chromosomes 8 and 22: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundhofir, F E P; Kooper, A J A; Winarni, T I; Smits, A P T; Faradz, S M H; Hamel, B C J

    2010-01-01

    We report on a boy with partial trisomies for chromosomes 8 and 22 caused by the presence of a small supernumerary marker chromosome (sSMC), a der(22)t(8;22)(p22;q11.21), inherited from a t(8;22)(p22;q11.21) translocation carrier mother. He has mild mental retardation, unability to speak distinct words and several minor anomalies i.e. high forehead and hairline, telecanthus, upslanting palpebral fissures, depressed nasal bridge, nail hypoplasia, toe position anomaly and 5th finger clinodactyly. He has two maternal uncles and one maternal aunt with mental retardation. G-banding technique showed 47,XY,+mar whilst his mother's karyotype showed a balanced reciprocal translocation between the chromosomes 8 and 22. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) technique with probes for centromere 22 and 8pter were used to detect the origin of marker chromosome and confirmed the marker chromosome in the proband showing to be extra chromosomal material originated from chromosome 8 and 22. Additional genome wide microarray analysis, using the Affymetrix Nspl 250K SNP array platform was performed to further characterize the marker chromosome and resulted in a der(22)t(8;22)(p22;q11.21). Furthermore, cytogenetic analysis of three affected family members showed the same unbalanced translocation, due to 3:1 meiotic segregation. This indicated the viability of this unbalanced pattern and combined with the recurrent miscarriages by the proband's mother, the mechanism of transmitting extrachromosomal material is probably not a random process. Since, there is no similar translocation (8p;22q) reported and the chromosomal translocation largely exists of additional 8p22-8pter we compare the clinical outcomes with reported cases of 8p22-8pter triplication, although there is a part of genetic material derived from chromosome 22 present. This unique familial chromosome translocation case from Indonesia will give insight in the underlying mechanism of this recurrent chromosomal abnormality

  9. Chromosomal contacts connect loci associated with autism, BMI and head circumference phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loviglio, M N; Leleu, M; Männik, K

    2017-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) are major contributors to genomic imbalance disorders. Phenotyping of 137 unrelated deletion and reciprocal duplication carriers of the distal 16p11.2 220 kb BP2-BP3 interval showed that these rearrangements are associated with autism spectrum disorders and mirror phen...... similarly display mirror phenotypes on head circumference and weight. Our results indicate that chromosomal contacts' maps could uncover functionally and clinically related genes.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 31 May 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.84....

  10. Imaginal Discs – A New Source of Chromosomes for Genome Mapping of the Yellow Fever Mosquito Aedes aegypti

    OpenAIRE

    Sharakhova, Maria V.; Vladimir A Timoshevskiy; Fan Yang; Sergei Iu Demin; Severson, David W; Sharakhov, Igor V

    2011-01-01

    Author Summary Dengue fever is an emerging health threat to as much as half of the human population around the world. No vaccines or drug treatments are currently available. Thus, disease prevention is largely based on efforts to control its major mosquito vector Ae. aegypti. Novel vector control strategies, such as population replacement with pathogen-incompetent transgenic mosquitoes, rely on detailed knowledge of the genome organization for the mosquito. However, the current genome assembl...

  11. Identification of chromosomal alpha-proteobacterial small RNAs by comparative genome analysis and detection in Sinorhizobium meliloti strain 1021

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    Barloy-Hubler Frédérique

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small untranslated RNAs (sRNAs seem to be far more abundant than previously believed. The number of sRNAs confirmed in E. coli through various approaches is above 70, with several hundred more sRNA candidate genes under biological validation. Although the total number of sRNAs in any one species is still unclear, their importance in cellular processes has been established. However, unlike protein genes, no simple feature enables the prediction of the location of the corresponding sequences in genomes. Several approaches, of variable usefulness, to identify genomic sequences encoding sRNA have been described in recent years. Results We used a combination of in silico comparative genomics and microarray-based transcriptional profiling. This approach to screening identified ~60 intergenic regions conserved between Sinorhizobium meliloti and related members of the alpha-proteobacteria sub-group 2. Of these, 14 appear to correspond to novel non-coding sRNAs and three are putative peptide-coding or 5' UTR RNAs (ORF smaller than 100 aa. The expression of each of these new small RNA genes was confirmed by Northern blot hybridization. Conclusion Small non coding RNA (sra genes can be found in the intergenic regions of alpha-proteobacteria genomes. Some of these sra genes are only present in S. meliloti, sometimes in genomic islands; homologues of others are present in related genomes including those of the pathogens Brucella and Agrobacterium.

  12. A simple and efficient method to visualize and quantify the efficiency of chromosomal mutations from genome editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liezhen; Wen, Luan; Luu, Nga; Shi, Yun-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing with designer nucleases such as TALEN and CRISPR/Cas enzymes has broad applications. Delivery of these designer nucleases into organisms induces various genetic mutations including deletions, insertions and nucleotide substitutions. Characterizing those mutations is critical for evaluating the efficacy and specificity of targeted genome editing. While a number of methods have been developed to identify the mutations, none other than sequencing allows the identification of the most desired mutations, i.e., out-of-frame insertions/deletions that disrupt genes. Here we report a simple and efficient method to visualize and quantify the efficiency of genomic mutations induced by genome-editing. Our approach is based on the expression of a two-color fusion protein in a vector that allows the insertion of the edited region in the genome in between the two color moieties. We show that our approach not only easily identifies developing animals with desired mutations but also efficiently quantifies the mutation rate in vivo. Furthermore, by using LacZα and GFP as the color moieties, our approach can even eliminate the need for a fluorescent microscope, allowing the analysis with simple bright field visualization. Such an approach will greatly simplify the screen for effective genome-editing enzymes and identify the desired mutant cells/animals. PMID:27748423

  13. Optimized CRISPR-Cas9 Genome Editing for Leishmania and Its Use To Target a Multigene Family, Induce Chromosomal Translocation, and Study DNA Break Repair Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Wei; Lypaczewski, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome editing has recently been adapted for Leishmania spp. parasites, the causative agents of human leishmaniasis. We have optimized this genome-editing tool by selecting for cells with CRISPR-Cas9 activity through cotargeting the miltefosine transporter gene; mutation of this gene leads to miltefosine resistance. This cotargeting strategy integrated into a triple guide RNA (gRNA) expression vector was used to delete all 11 copies of the A2 multigene family; this was not previously possible with the traditional gene-targeting method. We found that the Leishmania donovani rRNA promoter is more efficient than the U6 promoter in driving gRNA expression, and sequential transfections of the oligonucleotide donor significantly eased the isolation of edited mutants. A gRNA and Cas9 coexpression vector was developed that was functional in all tested Leishmania species, including L. donovani, L. major, and L. mexicana. By simultaneously targeting sites from two different chromosomes, all four types of targeted chromosomal translocations were generated, regardless of the polycistronic transcription direction from the parent chromosomes. It was possible to use this CRISPR system to create a single conserved amino acid substitution (A189G) mutation for both alleles of RAD51, a DNA recombinase involved in homology-directed repair. We found that RAD51 is essential for L. donovani survival based on direct observation of the death of mutants with both RAD51 alleles disrupted, further confirming that this CRISPR system can reveal gene essentiality. Evidence is also provided that microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) plays a major role in double-strand DNA break repair in L. donovani. IMPORTANCE Leishmania parasites cause human leishmaniasis. To accelerate characterization of Leishmania genes for new drug and vaccine development, we optimized and simplified the CRISPR-Cas9 genome-editing tool for Leishmania. We show that co-CRISPR targeting

  14. The Nature of Disclosure Reciprocity: Three Forms of Reciprocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, John H.; Archer, Richard L.

    Several theoretical approaches have been offered to explain the phenomenon of reciprocity: trust-liking, social exchange, and modeling. The emphasis of previous research on self-disclosure reciprocity (descriptive reciprocation), the intimacy of the facts an individual reveals about him- or herself, stems largely from the fact that these…

  15. Genome-wide scan for serum ghrelin detects linkage on chromosome 1p36 in Hispanic children: results from the Viva La Familia study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voruganti, V Saroja; Göring, Harald H H; Diego, Vincent P; Cai, Guowen; Mehta, Nitesh R; Haack, Karin; Cole, Shelley A; Butte, Nancy F; Comuzzie, Anthony G

    2007-10-01

    This study was conducted to investigate genetic influence on serum ghrelin and its relationship with adiposity-related phenotypes in Hispanic children (n=1030) from the Viva La Familia study (VFS). Anthropometric measurements and levels of serum ghrelin were estimated and genetic analyses conducted according to standard procedures. Mean age, body mass index (BMI), and serum ghrelin were 11+/-0.13 y, 25+/-0.24 kg/m2 and 38+/-0.5 ng/mL, respectively. Significant heritabilities (p<0.001) were obtained for BMI, weight, fat mass, percent fat, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio, and ghrelin. Bivariate analyses of ghrelin with adiposity traits showed significant negative genetic correlations (p<0.0001) with weight, BMI, fat mass, percent fat, waist circumference, and waist-to-height ratio. A genome-wide scan for ghrelin detected significant linkage on chromosome 1p36.2 between STR markers D1S2697 and D1S199 (LOD=3.2). The same region on chromosome 1 was the site of linkage for insulin (LOD=3.3), insulinlike growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) (LOD=3.4), homeostatic model assessment method (HOMA) (LOD=2.9), and C-peptide (LOD=2.0). Several family-based studies have reported linkages for obesity-related phenotypes in the region of 1p36. These results indicate the importance of this region in relation to adiposity in children from the VFS.

  16. Isolation, cDNA, and genomic structure of a conserved gene (NOF) at chromosome 11q13 next to FAU and oriented in the opposite transcriptional orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kas, K; Lemahieu, V; Meyen, E; Van de Ven, W J; Merregaert, J

    1996-06-15

    In our effort to characterize a gene at chromosome 11q13 involved in a t(11;17)(q13;q21) translocation in B-non-Hodgkin lymphoma, we have identified a novel human gene, NOF (Neighbour of FAU). It maps right next to FAU in a head to head configuration separated by a maximum of 146 nucleotides. cDNA clones representing NOF hybridized to a 2. 2-kb mRNA present in all tissues tested. The largest open reading frame appeared to contain 166 amino acids and is proline rich, and the sequence shows no homology with any known gene in the public databases. The NOF gene consists of 4 exons and 3 introns spanning approximately 5 kb, and the boundaries between exons and introns follow the GT/AG rule. The NOF locus is conserved during evolution, with the predicted protein having over 80% identity to three translated mouse and rat ESTs of unknown function. Moreover, the mouse ESTs map in the same organization, closely linked to the FAU gene, in the mouse genome. NOF, however, is not affected by the t(11;17)(q13;q21) chromosomal translocation.

  17. Genome-wide linkage in a highly consanguineous pedigree reveals two novel loci on chromosome 7 for non-syndromic familial Premature Ovarian Failure.

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    Sandrine Caburet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human condition known as Premature Ovarian Failure (POF is characterized by loss of ovarian function before the age of 40. A majority of POF cases are sporadic, but 10-15% are familial, suggesting a genetic origin of the disease. Although several causal mutations have been identified, the etiology of POF is still unknown for about 90% of the patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report a genome-wide linkage and homozygosity analysis in one large consanguineous Middle-Eastern POF-affected family presenting an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. We identified two regions with a LOD(max of 3.26 on chromosome 7p21.1-15.3 and 7q21.3-22.2, which are supported as candidate regions by homozygosity mapping. Sequencing of the coding exons and known regulatory sequences of three candidate genes (DLX5, DLX6 and DSS1 included within the largest region did not reveal any causal mutations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We detect two novel POF-associated loci on human chromosome 7, opening the way to the identification of new genes involved in the control of ovarian development and function.

  18. Series of Reciprocal Triangular Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckman, Paul; Dence, Joseph B.; Dence, Thomas P.; Young, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Reciprocal triangular numbers have appeared in series since the very first infinite series were summed. Here we attack a number of subseries of the reciprocal triangular numbers by methodically expressing them as integrals.

  19. Chromosomal location and comparative genomics analysis of powdery mildew resistance gene Pm51 in a putative wheat-Thinopyrum ponticum introgression line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Haixian; Li, Guangrong; Zhang, Xiaojun; Li, Xin; Guo, Huijuan; Gong, Wenping; Jia, Juqing; Qiao, Linyi; Ren, Yongkang; Yang, Zujun; Chang, Zhijian

    2014-01-01

    Powdery mildew (PM) is a very destructive disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Wheat-Thinopyrum ponticum introgression line CH7086 was shown to possess powdery mildew resistance possibly originating from Th. ponticum. Genomic in situ hybridization and molecular characterization of the alien introgression failed to identify alien chromatin. To study the genetics of resistance, CH7086 was crossed with susceptible genotypes. Segregation in F2 populations and F2:3 lines tested with Chinese Bgt race E09 under controlled conditions indicated that CH7086 carries a single dominant gene for powdery mildew resistance. Fourteen SSR and EST-PCR markers linked with the locus were identified. The genetic distances between the locus and the two flanking markers were 1.5 and 3.2 cM, respectively. Based on the locations of the markers by nullisomic-tetrasomic and deletion lines of 'Chinese Spring', the resistance gene was located in deletion bin 2BL-0.89-1.00. Conserved orthologous marker analysis indicated that the genomic region flanking the resistance gene has a high level of collinearity to that of rice chromosome 4 and Brachypodium chromosome 5. Both resistance specificities and tests of allelism suggested the resistance gene in CH7086 was different from previously reported powdery mildew resistance genes on 2BL, and the gene was provisionally designated PmCH86. Molecular analysis of PmCH86 compared with other genes for resistance to Bgt in the 2BL-0.89-1.00 region suggested that PmCH86 may be a new PM resistance gene, and it was therefore designated as Pm51. The closely linked flanking markers could be useful in exploiting this putative wheat-Thinopyrum translocation line for rapid transfer of Pm51 to wheat breeding programs.

  20. Association between chromosomal aberration of COX8C and tethered spinal cord syndrome: array-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-jiong Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Copy number variations have been found in patients with neural tube abnormalities. In this study, we performed genome-wide screening using high-resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization in three children with tethered spinal cord syndrome and two healthy parents. Of eight copy number variations, four were non-polymorphic. These non-polymorphic copy number variations were associated with Angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes, and microcephaly. Gene function enrichment analysis revealed that COX8C, a gene associated with metabolic disorders of the nervous system, was located in the copy number variation region of Patient 1. Our results indicate that array-based comparative genomic hybridization can be used to diagnose tethered spinal cord syndrome. Our results may help determine the pathogenesis of tethered spinal cord syndrome and prevent occurrence of this disease.

  1. Chromosome choreography: the meiotic ballet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Scott L; Hawley, R Scott

    2003-08-08

    The separation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis in eukaryotes is the physical basis of Mendelian inheritance. The core of the meiotic process is a specialized nuclear division (meiosis I) in which homologs pair with each other, recombine, and then segregate from each other. The processes of chromosome alignment and pairing allow for homolog recognition. Reciprocal meiotic recombination ensures meiotic chromosome segregation by converting sister chromatid cohesion into mechanisms that hold homologous chromosomes together. Finally, the ability of sister kinetochores to orient to a single pole at metaphase I allows the separation of homologs to two different daughter cells. Failures to properly accomplish this elegant chromosome dance result in aneuploidy, a major cause of miscarriage and birth defects in human beings.

  2. De novo unbalanced translocations in Prader-Willi and Angelman syndrome might be the reciprocal product of inv dup(15s.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Rossi

    Full Text Available The 15q11-q13 region is characterized by high instability, caused by the presence of several paralogous segmental duplications. Although most mechanisms dealing with cryptic deletions and amplifications have been at least partly characterized, little is known about the rare translocations involving this region. We characterized at the molecular level five unbalanced translocations, including a jumping one, having most of 15q transposed to the end of another chromosome, whereas the der(15(pter->q11-q13 was missing. Imbalances were associated either with Prader-Willi or Angelman syndrome. Array-CGH demonstrated the absence of any copy number changes in the recipient chromosome in three cases, while one carried a cryptic terminal deletion and another a large terminal deletion, already diagnosed by classical cytogenetics. We cloned the breakpoint junctions in two cases, whereas cloning was impaired by complex regional genomic architecture and mosaicism in the others. Our results strongly indicate that some of our translocations originated through a prezygotic/postzygotic two-hit mechanism starting with the formation of an acentric 15qter->q1::q1->qter representing the reciprocal product of the inv dup(15 supernumerary marker chromosome. An embryo with such an acentric chromosome plus a normal chromosome 15 inherited from the other parent could survive only if partial trisomy 15 rescue would occur through elimination of part of the acentric chromosome, stabilization of the remaining portion with telomere capture, and formation of a derivative chromosome. All these events likely do not happen concurrently in a single cell but are rather the result of successive stabilization attempts occurring in different cells of which only the fittest will finally survive. Accordingly, jumping translocations might represent successful rescue attempts in different cells rather than transfer of the same 15q portion to different chromosomes. We also hypothesize that

  3. A highly conserved gene island of three genes on chromosome 3B of hexaploid wheat: diverse gene function and genomic structure maintained in a tightly linked block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Wujun

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complexity of the wheat genome has resulted from waves of retrotransposable element insertions. Gene deletions and disruptions generated by the fast replacement of repetitive elements in wheat have resulted in disruption of colinearity at a micro (sub-megabase level among the cereals. In view of genomic changes that are possible within a given time span, conservation of genes between species tends to imply an important functional or regional constraint that does not permit a change in genomic structure. The ctg1034 contig completed in this paper was initially studied because it was assigned to the Sr2 resistance locus region, but detailed mapping studies subsequently assigned it to the long arm of 3B and revealed its unusual features. Results BAC shotgun sequencing of the hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Spring genome has been used to assemble a group of 15 wheat BACs from the chromosome 3B physical map FPC contig ctg1034 into a 783,553 bp genomic sequence. This ctg1034 sequence was annotated for biological features such as genes and transposable elements. A three-gene island was identified among >80% repetitive DNA sequence. Using bioinformatics analysis there were no observable similarity in their gene functions. The ctg1034 gene island also displayed complete conservation of gene order and orientation with syntenic gene islands found in publicly available genome sequences of Brachypodium distachyon, Oryza sativa, Sorghum bicolor and Zea mays, even though the intergenic space and introns were divergent. Conclusion We propose that ctg1034 is located within the heterochromatic C-band region of deletion bin 3BL7 based on the identification of heterochromatic tandem repeats and presence of significant matches to chromodomain-containing gypsy LTR retrotransposable elements. We also speculate that this location, among other highly repetitive sequences, may account for the relative stability in gene order and

  4. Widespread over-expression of the X chromosome in sterile F₁hybrid mice.

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    Jeffrey M Good

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The X chromosome often plays a central role in hybrid male sterility between species, but it is unclear if this reflects underlying regulatory incompatibilities. Here we combine phenotypic data with genome-wide expression data to directly associate aberrant expression patterns with hybrid male sterility between two species of mice. We used a reciprocal cross in which F₁ males are sterile in one direction and fertile in the other direction, allowing us to associate expression differences with sterility rather than with other hybrid phenotypes. We found evidence of extensive over-expression of the X chromosome during spermatogenesis in sterile but not in fertile F₁ hybrid males. Over-expression was most pronounced in genes that are normally expressed after meiosis, consistent with an X chromosome-wide disruption of expression during the later stages of spermatogenesis. This pattern was not a simple consequence of faster evolutionary divergence on the X chromosome, because X-linked expression was highly conserved between the two species. Thus, transcriptional regulation of the X chromosome during spermatogenesis appears particularly sensitive to evolutionary divergence between species. Overall, these data provide evidence for an underlying regulatory basis to reproductive isolation in house mice and underscore the importance of transcriptional regulation of the X chromosome to the evolution of hybrid male sterility.

  5. The murine decorin. Complete cDNA cloning, genomic organization, chromosomal assignment, and expression during organogenesis and tissue differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholzen, T; Solursh, M; Suzuki, S; Reiter, R; Morgan, J L; Buchberg, A M; Siracusa, L D; Iozzo, R V

    1994-11-11

    Decorin, a proteoglycan known to interact with collagen and growth factors, may play key roles during ontogenesis, tissue remodeling, and cancer. We have deciphered the complete protein sequence of the murine decorin by cDNA cloning, elucidated its gene structure and chromosomal location, and investigated its expression in the developing embryo. The decorin protein and the gene were highly conserved vis à vis the human counterpart; however, the murine gene lacked a leader exon, exon Ib, which was found only in the human. Using interspecific backcrossing, we assigned the gene to chromosome 10 just proximally to the Steel gene locus. In situ hybridization studies of developing mouse embryos showed a distinct pattern of expression with a progressive increase of decorin mRNA during ontogenesis. At early stages (day 11 postconception), decorin was detectable only in the floor plate region. Subsequently (days 13-16 postconception), decorin expression was especially prominent in the meninges and mesothelial linings of pericardium, pleura, and coelomic cavity, as well as in the dermis and subepithelial layers of the intestine and urinary bladder. In contrast, the major parenchymal organs were only weakly positive for decorin mRNA. These findings suggest that decorin may play a role in epithelial/mesenchymal interactions during organ development and shaping.

  6. Genomic organization and chromosomal localization of the human and mouse genes encoding the alpha receptor component for ciliary neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, D M; Rojas, E; Le Beau, M M; Espinosa, R; Brannan, C I; McClain, J; Masiakowski, P; Ip, N Y; Copeland, N G; Jenkins, N A

    1995-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has recently been found to share receptor components with, and to be structurally related to, a family of broadly acting cytokines, including interleukin-6, leukemia inhibitory factor, and oncostatin M. However, the CNTF receptor complex also includes a CNTF-specific component known as CNTF receptor alpha (CNTFR alpha). Here we describe the molecular cloning of the human and mouse genes encoding CNTFR. We report that the human and mouse genes have an identical intron-exon structure that correlates well with the domain structure of CNTFR alpha. That is, the signal peptide and the immunoglobulin-like domain are each encoded by single exons, the cytokine receptor-like domain is distributed among 4 exons, and the C-terminal glycosyl phosphatidylinositol recognition domain is encoded by the final coding exon. The position of the introns within the cytokine receptor-like domain corresponds to those found in other members of the cytokine receptor superfamily. Confirming a recent study using radiation hybrids, we have also mapped the human CNTFR gene to chromosome band 9p13 and the mouse gene to a syntenic region of chromosome 4.

  7. Validation of genome-wide intervertebral disc calcification associations in Dachshund and further investigation of the chromosome 12 susceptibility locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette Sloth eMogensen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Herniation of the intervertebral disc is a common cause of neurological dysfunction in the dog, particularly in the Dachshund. Using the Illumina CanineHD BeadChip, we have previously identified a major locus on canine chromosome 12 nucleotide positions 36,750,205-38,524,449 that strongly associates with intervertebral disc calcification in Danish wire-haired Dachshunds. In this study, targeted resequencing identified two synonymous variants in MB21D1 and one in the 5’-untranslated region of KCNQ5 that associates with intervertebral disc calcification in an independent sample of wire-haired Dachshunds. Haploview identified seven linkage disequilibrium blocks across the disease associated region. The effect of haplotype windows on disc calcification shows that all haplotype windows are significantly associated with disc calcification. However, our predictions imply that the causal variant(s are most likely to be found between nucleotide 36,750,205-37,494,845 as this region explains the highest proportion of variance in the dataset. Finally, we develop a risk prediction model for wire-haired Dachshunds.We validated the association of the chromosome 12 locus with disc calcification in an independent sample of wire-haired Dachshunds and identify potential risk variants. Additionally, we estimated haplotype effects and set up a model for prediction of disc calcifications in wire-haired dachshunds based on genotype data. This genetic prediction model may prove useful in selection of breeding animals in future breeding programs

  8. A genome-wide association study of COPD identifies a susceptibility locus on chromosome 19q13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, Michael H; Castaldi, Peter J; Wan, Emily S

    2012-01-01

    The genetic risk factors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are still largely unknown. To date, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of limited size have identified several novel risk loci for COPD at CHRNA3/CHRNA5/IREB2, HHIP and FAM13A; additional loci may be identified through...

  9. Complex chromosome rearrangements related 15q14 microdeletion plays a relevant role in phenotype expression and delineates a novel recurrent syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaiuolo Anna

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Complex chromosome rearrangements are constitutional structural rearrangements involving three or more chromosomes or having more than two breakpoints. These are rarely seen in the general population but their frequency should be much higher due to balanced states with no phenotypic presentation. These abnormalities preferentially occur de novo during spermatogenesis and are transmitted in families through oogenesis. Here, we report a de novo complex chromosome rearrangement that interests eight chromosomes in eighteen-year-old boy with an abnormal phenotype consisting in moderate developmental delay, cleft palate, and facial dysmorphisms. Standard G-banding revealed four apparently balanced traslocations involving the chromosomes 1;13, 3;19, 9;15 and 14;18 that appeared to be reciprocal. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis showed no imbalances at all the breakpoints observed except for an interstitial microdeletion on chromosome 15. This deletion is 1.6 Mb in size and is located at chromosome band 15q14, distal to the Prader-Willi/Angelman region. Comparing the features of our patient with published reports of patients with 15q14 deletion this finding corresponds to the smallest genomic region of overlap. The deleted segment at 15q14 was investigated for gene content.

  10. Discovery of Western European R1b1a2 Y chromosome variants in 1000 genomes project data: an online community approach.

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    Richard A Rocca

    Full Text Available The authors have used an online community approach, and tools that were readily available via the Internet, to discover genealogically and therefore phylogenetically relevant Y-chromosome polymorphisms within core haplogroup R1b1a2-L11/S127 (rs9786076. Presented here is the analysis of 135 unrelated L11 derived samples from the 1000 Genomes Project. We were able to discover new variants and build a much more complex phylogenetic relationship for L11 sub-clades. Many of the variants were further validated using PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. The identification of these new variants will help further the understanding of population history including patrilineal migrations in Western and Central Europe where R1b1a2 is the most frequent haplogroup. The fine-grained phylogenetic tree we present here will also help to refine historical genetic dating studies. Our findings demonstrate the power of citizen science for analysis of whole genome sequence data.

  11. Reciprocity, World Prices and Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raimondos-Møller, Pascalis; Woodland, Alan D.

    We examine in detail the circumstances under which reciprocity, as defined in Bagwell and Staiger (1999), leads to fixed world prices. We show that a change of tariffs satisfying reciprocity does not necessarily imply constant world prices in a world of many goods and countries. While...... it is possible to find tariff reforms that are consistent with both reciprocity and constant world prices, these reforms do not follow from the reciprocity condition, but rather from the requirement of unchanged world prices. We propose an alternative reciprocity rule that is guaranteed to raise the welfare...

  12. B chromosomes and sex in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, J P M; Schmid, M; Cabrero, J

    2011-01-01

    Supernumerary (B) chromosomes are dispensable elements found in many eukaryote genomes in addition to standard (A) chromosomes. In many respects, B chromosomes resemble sex chromosomes, so that a common ancestry for them has frequently been suggested. For instance, B chromosomes in grasshoppers, and other insects, show a pycnotic cycle of condensation-decondensation during meiosis remarkably similar to that of the X chromosome. In some cases, B chromosome size is even very similar to that of the X chromosome. These resemblances have led to suggest the X as the B ancestor in many cases. In addition, sex chromosome origin from B chromosomes has also been suggested. In this article, we review the existing evidence for both evolutionary pathways, as well as sex differences for B frequency at adult and embryo progeny levels, B chromosome effects or B chromosome transmission. In addition, we review cases found in the literature showing sex-ratio distortion associated with B chromosome presence, the most extreme case being the paternal sex ratio (PSR) chromosomes in some Hymenoptera. We finally analyse the possibility of B chromosome regularisation within the host genome and, as a consequence of it, whether B chromosomes can become regular members of the host genome.

  13. 白眉长臂猿基因组BAC文库的构建%Construction of Genome Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Library of Hylobates Hoolock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王起明; 孙烨超; 厉申捷; 叶建平

    2015-01-01

    High quality genomic DNA of Hylobates hoolock was obtained by gentle physical homogenization. The DNA was partially digested with EcoRⅠand EcoRⅠmethylase, and cloned to pCC1BAC vector. The positive clones were stored in 384-well plates. The constructed BAC library consists of 85800 clones. DNA from randomly selected 250 BAC clones was restricted with Not I restriction enzyme and fragments were separated by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The result shows that the average insert size is estimated as approximately 110 kb, and the ratio of non-recombinant clones is 10. 0%. If the genome size of Hylobates hoolock is 3 ×106 kilo-base, the library could cover 3 times the number of genome.%通过温和的物理方法获得白眉长臂猿高质量的基因组DNA,EcoRⅠ和EcoRⅠ甲基化酶部分酶切后经回收、连接、转化、阳性克隆的保存,构建了含有85800个克隆的全基因组BAC( Bacterial artificial chromosome)文库.随机选取250个BAC克隆进行Not I酶切及脉冲场电泳分析,结果表明该文库的平均插入片段大小为110 kb,非重组克隆(无插入片段)的比率为10.0%.假定白眉长臂猿的基因组大小为3×106 kb,根据文库的平均插入片段大小,则该文库具有3倍的基因组覆盖率.

  14. Validation of genome-wide intervertebral disk calcification associations in Dachshund and further investigation of the chromosome 12 susceptibility locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryt-Hansen, Mette Egesborg; Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    associates with intervertebral disk calcification in Danish wire-haired Dachshunds. In this study, targeted resequencing identified two synonymous variants in MB21D1 and one in the 5'-untranslated region of KCNQ5 that associates with intervertebral disk calcification in an independent sample of wire......-haired Dachshunds. Haploview identified seven linkage disequilibrium blocks across the disease-associated region. The effect of haplotype windows on disk calcification shows that all haplotype windows are significantly associated with disk calcification. However, our predictions imply that the causal variant......(s) are most likely to be found between nucleotide 36,750,205-37,494,845 as this region explains the highest proportion of variance in the dataset. Finally, we develop a risk prediction model for wire-haired Dachshunds. We validated the association of the chromosome 12 locus with disk calcification...

  15. A homozygous balanced reciprocal translocation suggests LINC00237 as a candidate gene for MOMO (macrosomia, obesity, macrocephaly, and ocular abnormalities) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Phi Yen; Toutain, Jérôme; Cappellen, David; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Daoud, Hussein; El Moneim, Azza Abd; Barat, Pascal; Montaubin, Orianne; Bonnet, Françoise; Dai, Zong Qi; Philippe, Christophe; Tran, Cong Toai; Rooryck, Caroline; Arveiler, Benoît; Saura, Robert; Briault, Sylvain; Lacombe, Didier; Taine, Laurence

    2012-11-01

    Macrosomia, obesity, macrocephaly, and ocular abnormalities syndrome (MOMO syndrome) has been reported in only four patients to date. In these sporadic cases, no chromosomal or molecular abnormality has been identified thus far. Here, we report on the clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular findings in a child of healthy consanguineous parents suffering from MOMO syndrome. Conventional karyotyping revealed an inherited homozygous balanced reciprocal translocation (16;20)(q21;p11.2). Uniparental disomy testing showed bi-parental inheritance for both derivative chromosomes 16 and 20. The patient's oligonucleotide array-comparative genomic hybridization profile revealed no abnormality. From the homozygous balanced reciprocal translocation (16;20)(q21;p11.2), a positional cloning strategy, designed to narrow 16q21 and 20p11.2 breakpoints, revealed the disruption of a novel gene located at 20p11.23. This gene is now named LINC00237, according to the HUGO (Human Genome Organization) nomenclature. The gene apparently leads to the production of a non-coding RNA. We established that LINC00237 was expressed in lymphocytes of control individuals while normal transcripts were absent in lymphocytes of our MOMO patient. LINC00237 was not ubiquitously expressed in control tissues, but it was notably highly expressed in the brain. Our results suggested autosomal recessive inheritance of MOMO syndrome. LINC00237 could play a role in the pathogenesis of this syndrome and could provide new insights into hyperphagia-related obesity and intellectual disability. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Novel methods for physical mapping of the human genome applied to the long arm of chromosome 5. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClelland, M.

    1991-12-01

    The object of our current grant is to develop novel methods for mapping of the human genome. The techniques to be assessed were: (1) three methods for the production of unique sequence clones from the region of interest; (2) novel methods for the production and separation of multi-megabase DNA fragments; (3) methods for the production of ``physical linking clones`` that contain rare restriction sites; (4) application of these methods and available resources to map the region of interest. Progress includes: In the first two years methods were developed for physical mapping and the production of arrayed clones; We have concentrated on developing rare- cleavage tools based or restriction endonucleases and methylases; We studied the effect of methylation on enzymes used for PFE mapping of the human genome; we characterized two new isoschizomers of rare cutting endonucleases; we developed a reliable way to produce partial digests of DNA in agarose plugs and applied it to the human genome; and we applied a method to double the apparent specificity of the ``rare-cutter`` endonucleases.

  17. Novel methods for physical mapping of the human genome applied to the long arm of chromosome 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClelland, M.

    1991-12-01

    The object of our current grant is to develop novel methods for mapping of the human genome. The techniques to be assessed were: (1) three methods for the production of unique sequence clones from the region of interest; (2) novel methods for the production and separation of multi-megabase DNA fragments; (3) methods for the production of physical linking clones'' that contain rare restriction sites; (4) application of these methods and available resources to map the region of interest. Progress includes: In the first two years methods were developed for physical mapping and the production of arrayed clones; We have concentrated on developing rare- cleavage tools based or restriction endonucleases and methylases; We studied the effect of methylation on enzymes used for PFE mapping of the human genome; we characterized two new isoschizomers of rare cutting endonucleases; we developed a reliable way to produce partial digests of DNA in agarose plugs and applied it to the human genome; and we applied a method to double the apparent specificity of the rare-cutter'' endonucleases.

  18. Isolation of cDNAs from the human X chromosome and derivation of related STSs. Final progress report, April 1992--March 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, D.L.

    1995-09-01

    Over the course of this funding period, the number of genes assigned to the human X chromosome has approximately tripled from less than one hundred to nearly three hundred characterized, cloned genes assigned to it. The aims of this project were to develop methods for gene identification and to identify and characterize expressed sequences from the X chromosome. The rapidly changing environment of the human genome project provided abundant resources for gene characterization, and since methods for gene identification became rather robust over this period, these aims were de-emphasized during the project. Among the methods developed was a local one (reciprocal probing) that was developed by Drs. Cheng Chi Lee and C. Thomas Caskey, with emphasis on the human X chromosome. The development of this method offered significant expressed sequence resources for this project, particularly when coupled with the efforts to identify cosmid clones from specific X chromosome locations, as the reciprocal probing process results in paired genomic (cosmid) and cDNA materials. Attention, then has been paid to characterization of genes rather than to their identification.

  19. A new case of an inherited reciprocal translocation in cattle: rcp(13;26) (q24;q11).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biltueva, Larisa; Kulemzina, Anastasia; Vorobieva, Nadezhda; Perelman, Polina; Kochneva, Marina; Zhidenova, Alexandra; Graphodatsky, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    This study reports on a unique balanced reciprocal chromosome translocation detected in a phenotypically normal cattle dam and her calf. CBG-, GTG-banding and FISH using bovine whole-chromosome and telomere probes were applied. The analyses showed that the breakpoints were located near to the centromere in chromosome 26 (q11) and exceptionally close to the telomere in chromosome 13 (q24). The whole euchromatin segment of chromosome 26 was translocated onto chromosome 13. The distal end of chromosome 13 was translocated to the subcentromeric region of chromosome 26. We describe this aberration as a balanced reciprocal translocation rcp(13;26) (q24;q11). It appears that this aberration was maternally derived and may have originated de novo in the dam. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Application of Micro-Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization on Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Chromosome Translocation%微阵列比较基因组杂交技术在染色体易位胚胎植入前遗传学诊断中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈鉴东; 吴畏; 蔡令波; 谢佳孜; 马龙; 孙雪萍; 高超; 崔毓桂; 刘嘉茵

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To estimate the efficiency of preimplantation genetic diagnosis for reciprocal and Robertsonian translocations using the array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) technology. Methods:Cell biopsy was carried out on the cleavage-stage embryos (Day3). Single cell was firstly lysed and DNA amplified by whole genome amplification (WGA). WGA product was then processed by aCGH. Embryos with normal and balanced chromosomes were transferred. Results:Total of 90 cases of clinical PGD oocyte retrieval cycles included 58 cases of reciprocal balanced translocation and 32 cases of Robertsonian translocation. Total of 528 embryos were biopsied, of which 518(98.1%) embryos got the confirmed diagnoses. Single embryo transfer was adopted with the clinical ongoing pregnancy rate of 46.8%. The ongoing pregnancy rate of the reciprocal balanced translocation in fresh cycles was 38.7%, and that in freezed cycles 45.0%. The Robertsonian translocation pregnancy rate in freezed cycles was 61.5%. Conclusions:Application of aCGH in the reciprocal and Robertsonian translocation PGD can obviously improve clinical outcomes.%目的:评估微阵列比较基因组杂交(aCGH)技术在染色体相互平衡易位和罗氏易位胚胎植入前遗传学诊断(PGD)中的应用效果。方法:卵裂期胚胎活检单个卵裂球,用于全基因组扩增后,利用aCGH技术进行染色体组拷贝数变异检测,选择染色体平衡的胚胎移植,随访跟踪临床结局。结果:90例临床PGD取卵周期中,相互平衡易位58例,罗氏易位32例,共活检卵裂期胚胎528枚,明确诊断518枚(98.1%),总体单胚胎移植临床持续妊娠率46.8%。其中,相互平衡易位新鲜周期移植持续妊娠率38.7%,冷冻周期持续妊娠率45.0%;罗氏易位冷冻周期持续妊娠率61.5%。结论:aCGH技术在染色体易位PGD中应用能够获得理想的临床妊娠结局。

  1. Effects of ERBB2 amplicon size and genomic alterations of chromosomes 1, 3, and 10 on patient response to trastuzumab in metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Larry E; Jewell, Susan S; Usha, Lydia; Blondin, Beth A; Rao, Ruta D; Tabesh, Bita; Kemper, Matthew; Batus, Marta; Coon, John S

    2007-04-01

    Trastuzumab is widely used for advanced breast cancer patients with ERBB2-amplified tumors. Nevertheless, over half of these patients do not have an objective response. One reason may be altered expression of genes that might compensate for ERBB2 inhibition. We previously mapped the gene-rich region of chromosome 17 telomeric to ERBB2, and reported considerable variability in the telomeric extent of the ERBB2 amplicon. Here we examined whether the variable amplicon size may be associated with patient response to trastuzumab. In addition, we looked at associations between response and several signaling pathway-related genes unrelated to the ERBB2 amplicon, including AKT3, PTEN, PIK3CA, and PTGS2. In 35 patients with ERBB2-amplified metastatic breast cancer, with 40% overall response to trastuzumab, fluorescence in situ hybridization identified the telomeric extent of the ERBB2 amplicon and the status of the several pathway-related genes. Objective response strongly correlated with the telomeric amplicon size, with 62% of patients with shorter amplicons responding, compared with only 7% of patients with longer amplicons (P = 0.0015). Abnormal copy number of PTGS2 was marginally associated with objective response (P = 0.066), while abnormal copy numbers of two reference loci, 1q25 and the chromosome 10 centromere, were significantly associated with response. Pairwise combinations of copy number status of these loci and ERBB2 amplicon size provided stronger associations and identified a group of patients without responders. These results suggest that patient selection for trastuzumab may be improved by considering ERBB2 amplicon size and genomic status of the 1q25, PTGS2, and centromere 10 loci.

  2. Genome scan for loci predisposing to anxiety disorders using a novel multivariate approach: strong evidence for a chromosome 4 risk locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaabi, Belhassen; Gelernter, Joel; Woods, Scott W; Goddard, Andrew; Page, Grier P; Elston, Robert C

    2006-04-01

    We conducted a 10-centimorgan linkage autosomal genome scan in a set of 19 extended American pedigrees (219 subjects) ascertained through probands with panic disorder. Several anxiety disorders--including social phobia, agoraphobia, and simple phobia--in addition to panic disorder segregate in these families. In previous studies of this sample, linkage analyses were based separately on each of the individual categorical affection diagnoses. Given the substantial comorbidity between anxiety disorders and their probable shared genetic liability, it is clear that this method discards a considerable amount of information. In this article, we propose a new approach that considers panic disorder, simple phobia, social phobia, and agoraphobia as expressions of the same multivariate, putatively genetically influenced trait. We applied the most powerful multipoint Haseman-Elston method, using the grade of membership score generated from a fuzzy clustering of these phenotypes as the dependent variable in Haseman-Elston regression. One region on chromosome 4q31-q34, at marker D4S413 (with multipoint and single-point nominal P values < .00001), showed strong evidence of linkage (genomewide significance at P<.05). The same region is known to be the site of a neuropeptide Y receptor gene, NPY1R (4q31-q32), that was recently connected to anxiolytic-like effects in rats. Several other regions on four chromosomes (4q21.21-22.3, 5q14.2-14.3, 8p23.1, and 14q22.3-23.3) met criteria for suggestive linkage (multipoint nominal P values < .01). Family-by-family analysis did not show any strong evidence of heterogeneity. Our findings support the notion that the major anxiety disorders, including phobias and panic disorder, are complex traits that share at least one susceptibility locus. This method could be applied to other complex traits for which shared genetic-liability factors are thought to be important, such as substance dependencies.

  3. Balanced reciprocal translocation at amniocentesis: cytogenetic detection and implications for genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H G; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, H Y; Tian, T; Xu, S B; Liu, R Z

    2016-08-19

    Balanced translocation is a common structural chromosomal rearrangement in humans. Carriers can be phenotypically normal but have an increased risk of pregnancy loss, fetal death, and the transmission of chromosomal abnormalities to their offspring. Existing prenatal screening technologies and diagnostic procedures fail to detect balanced translocation, so genetic counseling for carriers remains a challenge. Here, we report the characteristics of chromosomal reciprocal translocation in 3807 amniocentesis cases. Of the 16 detected cases of fetal reciprocal translocation, 8 cases (50%) showed positive biochemical marker screening; 3 cases (18.75%) were the parental carriers of a chromosomal abnormality; 2 (12.5%) were of advanced maternal age, 2 (12.5%) had a previous history of children with genetic disorders, and 1 case (6.25%) was associated with positive soft markers in obstetric ultrasound. Chromosomes 5 and 19 were the most commonly involved chromosomes in balanced translocations. Of the 13 cases with fetal balanced translocations, 8 (61.5%) were inherited from a paternal chromosome, 3 (23.1%) from a maternal chromosome, and 2 (15.4%) cases were de novo. The incidence of balanced translocation at amniocentesis was 0.42%. Male carriers of reciprocal chromosome translocation appear to have a higher chance of becoming a parent of a child born by normal childbirth than female carriers.

  4. Allergic rhinitis - a total genome-scan for susceptibility genes suggests a locus on chromosome 4q24-q27

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagerup, A; Bjerke, T; Schøitz, P O

    2001-01-01

    of allergic rhinitis on the contrary have as yet been most sparse. To identify candidate regions holding genes for allergic rhinitis we performed a total genome-scan on affected sib-pair families. From 100 Danish sib-pair families selected for allergy, families containing sib-pairs matching a phenotype...... definition of both clinical allergic rhinitis and confirmed specific allergy were chosen. Thirty-three affected sib-pair families qualified for the scan that was undertaken using 446 microsatellite markers. Non-parametric linkage results were obtained from MAPMAKER/SIBS computer program. The study revealed...

  5. The database of chromosome imbalance regions and genes resided in lung cancer from Asian and Caucasian identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Fang-Yi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer-related genes show racial differences. Therefore, identification and characterization of DN