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Sample records for genomic rosetta stone

  1. Rosetta stone method for detecting protein function and protein-protein interactions from genome sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, David; Marcotte, Edward M.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Thompson, Michael J.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2002-10-15

    A computational method system, and computer program are provided for inferring functional links from genome sequences. One method is based on the observation that some pairs of proteins A' and B' have homologs in another organism fused into a single protein chain AB. A trans-genome comparison of sequences can reveal these AB sequences, which are Rosetta Stone sequences because they decipher an interaction between A' and B. Another method compares the genomic sequence of two or more organisms to create a phylogenetic profile for each protein indicating its presence or absence across all the genomes. The profile provides information regarding functional links between different families of proteins. In yet another method a combination of the above two methods is used to predict functional links.

  2. Thomas Young and the Rosetta Stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Andrew

    2007-06-01

    Who deciphered the Rosetta Stone and the Egyptian hieroglyphs? The usual answer is Jean-François Champollion, beginning in 1822. But ever since that time, Egyptologists have debated the role of his rival, the polymath Thomas Young, the first person to publish a partially correct translation of the Rosetta Stone. A recent BBC television dramatisation rekindled the controversy by presenting Champollion as a 'lone genius' who succeeded independently of Young. While there is no doubt that Champollion deciphered the hieroglyphic script as a whole, the evidence suggests that Young's early detailed study of the Rosetta Stone created the conceptual framework that made possible Champollion's later breakthrough.

  3. Towards the Rosetta Stone of planet formation

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    Schmidt T.O.B.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Transiting exoplanets (TEPs observed just ~10 Myrs after formation of their host systems may serve as the Rosetta Stone for planet formation theories. They would give strong constraints on several aspects of planet formation, e.g. time-scales (planet formation would then be possible within 10 Myrs, the radius of the planet could indicate whether planets form by gravitational collapse (being larger when young or accretion growth (being smaller when young. We present a survey, the main goal of which is to find and then characterise TEPs in very young open clusters.

  4. Laying the Foundation for a Genomic Rosetta Stone: Creating Information Hubs through the User of Consensus Idenifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Brabant, Bart; Kyrpides, Nikos; Glockner, Frank Oliver; Gray, Tanya; Field, Dawn; De Vos, Paul; De Baets, Bernard; Dawyndt, Peter

    2007-05-01

    This paper presents a holistic approach that illustrates how the semantic hurdle for integration of biological databases might be overcome when mapping sources that provide information on individual genes and complete genomes to sources that provide information on the biological resources from which these sequences where derived, and vice versa. In particular we will explain how each of the completed and ongoing whole-genome sequencing projects in the Genomes OnLine Database and each of the ribosomal RNA sequences in the SILVA ribosomal RNA database have been persistently cross-referenced with the StrainInfo.net bioportal, serving both a genome centric and an organism centric view to the life on our blue planet as one more stepping stone towards the establishment of fully integrated and flexible biological information networks.

  5. Context: The strategic management Rosetta Stone

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    R. V. Weeks

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyse context as a means for interpreting and making sense of evolving strategic management theory and practice. Problem investigated: Traditional strategic management theory based on rational deductive methodologies assumes contextual predictability, yet contemporary conditions tend to contradict this assumption. In response, alternative theories and practices for dealing with complex contexts have emerged (Brews & Purohit, 2006; Grant, 2003; Kurt & Snowden, 2003and Stacey, 1995. Methodology: A literature study was undertaken to determine the nature of emergent strategic management theory and practice, in response to contextual complexity and how it differs from traditional practice (Mintzberg, 1994 and Weeks &Lessing, 1993. Findings: An important conclusion drawn from the study is that context acts as a determinant for making sense of the evolution of strategic management theory and practice. While traditional strategic management practice still assumes relevance in contexts of linear causality, it breaks down in complex contexts. Emergent strategic management theory, based on complex adaptive systems, is increasingly assuming relevance. Notably, many institutions are still attempting to make use of scenario planning in an attempt to deal with contextual complexity, a practice not supported by leading researchers(Stacey, 1995 and Kurt & Snowden, 2003. Value of the research: The insights gained from the study assume relevance, in view of the contextual complexity confronting modern-day institutions. The findings suggest that emergent strategy based on complex adaptive system theory needs to be considered as a means for dealing with increasing environmental turbulence. Conclusion: It is concluded that context serves as the Rosetta stone for making sense of strategic management theory and practice. In view of the research findings, as reflected in the literature, it would seem that the use of complex

  6. A Quantum Rosetta Stone for the Information Paradox

    CERN Document Server

    Zayas, Leopoldo A Pando

    2014-01-01

    The black hole information loss paradox epitomizes the contradictions between general relativity and quantum field theory. The AdS/CFT correspondence provides an implicit answer for the information loss paradox in black hole physics by equating a gravity theory with an explicitly unitary field theory. Gravitational collapse in asymptotically AdS spacetimes is generically turbulent. Given that the mechanism to read out the information about correlations functions in the field theory side is plagued by deterministic classical chaos, we argue that quantum chaos might provide the true Rosetta Stone for answering the information paradox in the context of the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  7. A quantum Rosetta Stone for the information paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pando Zayas, Leopoldo A.

    2014-11-01

    The black hole information loss paradox epitomizes the contradictions between general relativity and quantum field theory. The AdS/conformal field theory (CFT) correspondence provides an implicit answer for the information loss paradox in black hole physics by equating a gravity theory with an explicitly unitary field theory. Gravitational collapse in asymptotically AdS spacetimes is generically turbulent. Given that the mechanism to read out the information about correlations functions in the field theory side is plagued by deterministic classical chaos, we argue that quantum chaos might provide the true Rosetta Stone for answering the information paradox in the context of the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  8. Blackbody radiation: rosetta stone of heat bath models

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, R. F.

    2007-06-01

    The radiation field can be regarded as a collection of independent harmonic oscillators and, as such, constitutes a heat bath. Moreover, the known form of its interaction with charged particles provides a "rosetta stone" for deciding on and interpreting the correct interaction for the more general case of a quantum particle in an external potential and coupled to an arbitrary heat bath. In particular, combining QED with the machinery of stochastic physics, enables the usual scope of applications to be widened. We discuss blackbody radiation effects on: the equation of motion of a radiating electron (obtaining an equation of motion which is free from runaway solutions), anomalous diffusion, the spreading of a Gaussian wave packet, and decoherence effects due to zero-point oscillations. In addition, utilizing a formula we obtained for the free energy of an oscillator in a heat bath, enables us to determine all the quantum thermodynamic functions of interest (particularly in the areas of quantum information and nanophysics where small systems are involved) and from which we obtain temperature dependent Lamb shifts, quantum effects on the entropy at low temperature and implications for Nernst's law.

  9. The Rosetta Stone of isotope science and the uranium/lead system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Laeter, John

    2011-01-01

    The nucleosynthetic characteristics of U and Pb, together with the interconnectivity between these elements by two radioactive decay chains, are the foundation on which the U/Pb system was able to make a unique contribution to isotope science. The Rosetta Stone is an ancient Egyptian tablet that enabled previously indecipherable hieroglyphics to be translated. In a similar manner, the isotopic investigation of the U/Pb system, by a variety of mass spectrometric instrumentation, has led to our knowledge of the age of the Earth and contributed to thermochronology. In a similar manner, climate change information has been garnered by utilizing the U-Disequilibrium Series to measure the ages of marine archives. The impact of Pb in the environment has been demonstrated in human health, particularly at the peak of leaded petrol consumption in motor vehicles in the 1970s. Variations in the isotopic composition of lead in samples enable the source of the lead to be "fingerprinted" so as to trace the history of the Pb in ice cores and aerosols. The discovery of nuclear fission of (235)U led to the development of nuclear reactors and the isotopic investigation of the Oklo natural reactors. The mass spectrometer is the modern Rosetta Stone of isotope science, which has enabled the isotopic hieroglyphics of the U/Pb system to be investigated to reveal new horizons in our understanding of nature, and to address a number of societal and environmental problems.

  10. Is M. Duverger’s ‘Disparity Law’ the Rosetta Stone of Ukrainian Partology?

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    Yurij Shveda

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In November 24-25 2011 Kyiv hosted International conference "Party system of Ukraine: evolution, tendencies and perspectives of development," organized by I. F. Kuras Institute of Political and Ethno-National Studies at the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. The conference assembled a number of scholars from Ukraine and abroad, who are engaged in studying political parties. This was probably the first conference in Ukraine of such level exclusively dedicated to analyzing political parties, their role and place in the political life of Ukraine. The conference was unique and very productive in terms of the level of discussion and geography of participation. It has proved that Ukrainian studies of political parties - partology - has already formed and is dynamically developing. One particular point sparking lively discussion was defining the essence of the notion "political party" and whether it could be rightfully applied to Ukrainian political associations. The article suggests the author's considerations on the essence of the problem, which, in our view, is a central methodological problem (or the Rosetta stone of the Ukrainian partology. it may be rightfully stated that the solution of the problem will influence all further development of the discipline.

  11. The case of the composite Higgs: The model as a "Rosetta stone" in contemporary high-energy physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrelli, Arianna

    2012-08-01

    This paper analyses the practice of model-building "beyond the Standard Model" in contemporary high-energy physics and argues that its epistemic function can be grasped by regarding models as mediating between the phenomenology of the Standard Model and a number of "theoretical cores" of hybrid character, in which mathematical structures are combined with verbal narratives ("stories") and analogies referring back to empirical results in other fields ("empirical references"). Borrowing a metaphor from a physics research paper, model-building is likened to the search for a Rosetta stone, whose significance does not lie in its immediate content, but rather in the chance it offers to glimpse at and manipulate the components of hybrid theoretical constructs. I shall argue that the rise of hybrid theoretical constructs was prompted by the increasing use of nonrigorous mathematical heuristics in high-energy physics. Support for my theses will be offered in form of a historical-philosophical analysis of the emergence and development of the theoretical core centring on the notion that the Higgs boson is a composite particle. I will follow the heterogeneous elements which would eventually come to form this core from their individual emergence in the 1960s and 1970s, through their collective life as a theoretical core from 1979 until the present day.

  12. Correlating the magic numbers of inorganic nanomolecular assemblies with a {Pd84} molecular-ring Rosetta Stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Miras, Haralampos N; Scullion, Rachel A; Long, De-Liang; Thiel, Johannes; Cronin, Leroy

    2012-07-17

    Molecular self-assembly has often been suggested as the ultimate route for the bottom-up construction of building blocks atom-by-atom for functional nanotechnology, yet structural design or prediction of nanomolecular assemblies is still far from reach. Whereas nature uses complex machinery such as the ribosome, chemists use painstakingly engineered step-by-step approaches to build complex molecules but the size and complexity of such molecules, not to mention the accessible yields, can be limited. Herein we present the discovery of a palladium oxometalate {Pd(84)}-ring cluster 3.3 nm in diameter; [Pd(84)O(42)(OAc)(28)(PO(4))(42)](70-) ({Pd(84)} ≡ {Pd(12)}(7)) that is formed in water just by mixing two reagents at room temperature, giving crystals of the compound in just a few days. The structure of the {Pd(84)}-ring has sevenfold symmetry, comprises 196 building blocks, and we also show, using mass spectrometry, that a large library of other related nanostructures is present in solution. Finally, by analysis of the symmetry and the building block library that construct the {Pd(84)} we show that the correlation of the symmetry, subunit number, and overall cluster nuclearity can be used as a "Rosetta Stone" to rationalize the "magic numbers" defining a number of other systems. This is because the discovery of {Pd(84)} allows the relationship between seemingly unrelated families of molecular inorganic nanosystems to be decoded from the overall cluster magic-number nuclearity, to the symmetry and building blocks that define such structures allowing the prediction of other members of these nanocluster families.

  13. Class I Homeobox Genes, "The Rosetta Stone of the Cell Biology", in the Regulation of Cardiovascular Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procino, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Class I homeobox genes (Hox in mice and HOX in humans), encode for 39 transcription factors and display a unique genomic network organization mainly involved in the regulation of embryonic development and in the cell memory program. The HOX network controls the aberrant epigenetic modifications involving in the cell memory program. In details, the HOX cluster plays a crucial role in the generation and evolution of several diseases: congenic malformation, oncogenesis, metabolic processes and deregulation of cell cycle. In this review, I discussed about the role of HOX gene network in the control of cardiovascular development.

  14. Optimizing RNA Extraction of Renal Papilla Biopsy Tissue in Kidney Stone Formers: A New Methodology for Genomic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Kazumi; Usawachintachit, Manint; Hamamoto, Shuzo; Unno, Rei; Tzou, David T; Sherer, Benjamin A; Wang, Yongmei; Okada, Atsushi; Stoller, Marshall L; Yasui, Takahiro; Chi, Thomas

    2017-08-11

    Endoscopic tools have provided versatile examination and treatment for kidney stone procedures. Despite endourologists researching urinary stone disease using endoscopes to collect tissue, this tissue collection method is limited. Endoscopically removed tissues are small in size, restricting the types of genome-based examination possible. We investigated a new method of renal papilla biopsy and RNA extraction to establish a genomic research methodology for kidney stone disease. We conducted a prospective multi-institutional study and collected renal papilla specimens from consecutive percutaneous nephrolithotomy and ureteroscopy (URS) cases performed for removal of upper urinary tract stones. Renal papilla tissue was extracted using ureteroscopic biopsy forceps after stone removal. RNA was extracted using two different extraction kits, and their quantity and quality were examined. Additionally, the impact of biopsy on surgical complications was compared between cases performed with and without biopsy by matched case-control analysis adjusted for age, gender, body mass index, bilaterality, and stone burden. A total of 90 biopsies from 49 patients were performed, and the median duration between specimen collection and RNA extraction was 61 days. Both univariate and multivariate analyses showed BIGopsy(®) forceps usage significantly increased the total yield (p = 0.004) and quality (p = 0.001 for A260/280, p = 0.004 for A260/A230) of extracted RNA. Extraction using the RNeasy Micro Kit(®) also improved A260/A230, whereas reduced RNA integrity number of extracted RNA by univariate and multivariate analyses (p = 0.002 and p case-control study demonstrated that endoscopic renal papilla biopsy caused no significant surgical complications, including bleeding, decreased stone clearance and hematocrit, and renal dysfunction. Biopsies during URS imparted an average of 20 minutes of procedure time over nonbiopsy cases. We demonstrate a safe methodology for

  15. HD 65949: Rosetta stone or red herring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, C. R.; Hubrig, S.; Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.; Biémont, É.; Wahlgren, G. M.; Schütz, O.; González, J. F.

    2010-06-01

    HD 65949 is a late B star with exceptionally strong HgII λ3984, but it is not a typical HgMn star. The ReII spectrum is of extraordinary strength. Abundances or upper limits are derived here for 58 elements based on a model with Teff = 13100K and log (g) = 4.0. Even-Z elements through nickel show minor deviations from solar abundances. Anomalies among the odd-Z elements through copper are mostly small. Beyond the iron peak, a huge scatter is found. Enormous enhancements are found for the elements rhenium through mercury (Z = 75-80). We note the presence of ThIII in the spectrum. The abundance pattern of the heaviest elements resembles the N = 126 r-process peak of solar material, though not in detail. An odd-Z anomaly appears at the triplet (Zr Nb Mo), and there is a large abundance jump between Xe (Z = 54) and Ba (Z = 56). These are signatures of chemical fractionation. We find a significant correlation of the abundance excesses with second ionization potentials for elements with Z > 30. If this is not a red herring (false lead), it indicates the relevance of photospheric or near-photospheric processes. Large excesses (4-6 dex) require diffusion from deeper layers with the elements passing through a number of ionization stages. That would make the correlation with second ionization potential puzzling. We explore a model with mass accretion of exotic material followed by the more commonly accepted differentiation by diffusion. That model leads to a number of predictions which challenge future work. New observations confirm the orbital elements of Gieseking and Karimie, apart from the systemic velocity, which has increased. Likely primary and secondary masses are near 3.3 and 1.6 Msolar, with a separation of ca. 0.25 au. New atomic structure calculations are presented in two appendices. These include partition functions for the first through third spectra of Ru, Re and Os, as well as oscillator strengths in the ReII spectrum. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal and La Silla, Chile [ESO programmes 076.D-0172(A) and 081.D-0498(A)], HARPS data obtained during engineering nights and at the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito. E-mail: cowley@umich.edu

  16. The Rosetta mission

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    Taylor, Matt; Altobelli, Nicolas; Martin, Patrick; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Choukroun, Mathieu

    2016-10-01

    The Rosetta Mission is the third cornerstone mission the ESA programme Horizon 2000. The aim of the mission is to map the comet 67-P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by remote sensing, to examine its environment insitu and its evolution in the inner solar system. The lander Philae is the first device to land on a comet and perform in-situ science on the surface. Following its launch in March 2004, Rosetta underwent 3 Earth and 1 Mars flybys to achieve the correct trajectory to capture the comet, including flybys of asteroid on 2867 Steins and 21 Lutetia. For June 2011- January 2014 the spacecraft passed through a period of hibernation, due to lack of available power for full payload operation and following successful instrument commissioning, successfully rendezvoused with the comet in August 2014. Following an intense period of mapping and characterisation, a landing site for Philae was selected and on 12 November 2014, Philae was successfully deployed. Rosetta then embarked on the main phase of the mission, observing the comet on its way into and away from perihelion in August 2015. At the time of writing the mission is planned to terminate with the Rosetta orbiter impacting the comet surface on 30 September 2016. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the mission and its science. The first author is honoured to give this talk on behalf of all Rosetta mission science, instrument and operations teams, for it is they who have worked tirelessly to make this mission the success it is.

  17. Multiple horizontal gene transfer events and domain fusions have created novel regulatory and metabolic networks in the oomycete genome.

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    Paul Francis Morris

    Full Text Available Complex enzymes with multiple catalytic activities are hypothesized to have evolved from more primitive precursors. Global analysis of the Phytophthora sojae genome using conservative criteria for evaluation of complex proteins identified 273 novel multifunctional proteins that were also conserved in P. ramorum. Each of these proteins contains combinations of protein motifs that are not present in bacterial, plant, animal, or fungal genomes. A subset of these proteins were also identified in the two diatom genomes, but the majority of these proteins have formed after the split between diatoms and oomycetes. Documentation of multiple cases of domain fusions that are common to both oomycetes and diatom genomes lends additional support for the hypothesis that oomycetes and diatoms are monophyletic. Bifunctional proteins that catalyze two steps in a metabolic pathway can be used to infer the interaction of orthologous proteins that exist as separate entities in other genomes. We postulated that the novel multifunctional proteins of oomycetes could function as potential Rosetta Stones to identify interacting proteins of conserved metabolic and regulatory networks in other eukaryotic genomes. However ortholog analysis of each domain within our set of 273 multifunctional proteins against 39 sequenced bacterial and eukaryotic genomes, identified only 18 candidate Rosetta Stone proteins. Thus the majority of multifunctional proteins are not Rosetta Stones, but they may nonetheless be useful in identifying novel metabolic and regulatory networks in oomycetes. Phylogenetic analysis of all the enzymes in three pathways with one or more novel multifunctional proteins was conducted to determine the probable origins of individual enzymes. These analyses revealed multiple examples of horizontal transfer from both bacterial genomes and the photosynthetic endosymbiont in the ancestral genome of Stramenopiles. The complexity of the phylogenetic origins of these

  18. Unlocking the secrets of the universe, Rosetta lander named Philae

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-01

    Philae is the island in the river Nile on which an obelisk was found that had a bilingual inscription including the names of Cleopatra and Ptolemy in Egyptian hieroglyphs. This provided the French historian Jean-François Champollion with the final clues that enabled him to decipher the hieroglyphs of the Rosetta Stone and unlock the secrets of the civilisation of ancient Egypt. Just as the Philae Obelisk and the Rosetta Stone provided the keys to an ancient civilisation, the Philae lander and the Rosetta orbiter aim to unlock the mysteries of the oldest building blocks of our Solar System - comets. Germany, France, Italy and Hungary are the main contributors to the lander, working together with Austria, Finland, Ireland and the UK. The main contributors held national competitions to select the most appropriate name. Philae was proposed by 15-year-old Serena Olga Vismara from Arluno near Milan, Italy. Her hobbies are reading and surfing the internet, where she got the idea of naming the lander Philae. Her prize will be a visit to Kourou to attend the Rosetta launch. Study of Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko will allow scientists to look back 4600 million years to an epoch when no planets existed and only a vast swarm of asteroids and comets surrounded the Sun. On arrival at the comet in 2014, Philae will be commanded to self-eject from the orbiter and unfold its three legs, ready for a gentle touchdown. Immediately after touchdown, a harpoon will be fired to anchor Philae to the ground and prevent it escaping from the comet's extremely weak gravity. The legs can rotate, lift or tilt to return Philae to an upright position. Philae will determine the physical properties of the comet's surface and subsurface and their chemical, mineralogical and isotopic composition. This will complement the orbiter's studies of the overall characterisation of the comet's dynamic properties and surface morphology. Philae may provide the final clues enabling the Rosetta mission to unlock

  19. Introduction to the Rosetta Special Collection.

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    Sagar D Khare

    Full Text Available The Rosetta macromolecular modeling software is a versatile, rapidly developing set of tools that are now being routinely utilized to address state-of-the-art research challenges in academia and industrial research settings. A Rosetta Conference (RosettaCon describing updates to the Rosetta source code is held annually. Every two years, a Rosetta Conference (RosettaCon special collection describing the results presented at the annual conference by participating RosettaCommons labs is published by the Public Library of Science (PLOS. This is the introduction to the third RosettaCon 2014 Special Collection published by PLOS.

  20. Rosetta und Yella

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    Urs Urban

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available L’apparition de l’homo oeconomicus marque la fin des grands récits et par là de l’ensemble social que ceux-ci avaient légitimé. En même temps cependant il entre dans les récits littéraires – et filmiques, par exemple dans Rosetta (1999 des frères Dardenne et Yella (2007 de Christian Petzold. L’article se propose de montrer comment ces derniers réussissent à mettre en scène les apories existentielles d’un sujet produit par le dispositif économique en appliquant des procédés narratifs permettant de problématiser la narration elle-même.Mit dem Auftauchen des homo oeconomicus scheint das Ende der großen Erzählungen und des von diesen legitimierten sozialen Zusammenhangs besiegelt. Genau in diesem Moment indes beginnen sich die kleinen, die literarischen und filmischen Erzählformen für den ökonomischen Menschen zu interessieren. In dem Artikel geht es darum zu zeigen, wie die Brüder Dardenne und Christian Petzold die Aporien eines vom ökonomischen Dispositiv produzierten Subjekts in ihren Filmen Rosetta (1999 und Yella (2007 erzählerisch umsetzen und dabei genau diese erzählerische Umsetzbarkeit in Frage stellen.

  1. The PyRosetta Toolkit: a graphical user interface for the Rosetta software suite.

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    Jared Adolf-Bryfogle

    Full Text Available The Rosetta Molecular Modeling suite is a command-line-only collection of applications that enable high-resolution modeling and design of proteins and other molecules. Although extremely useful, Rosetta can be difficult to learn for scientists with little computational or programming experience. To that end, we have created a Graphical User Interface (GUI for Rosetta, called the PyRosetta Toolkit, for creating and running protocols in Rosetta for common molecular modeling and protein design tasks and for analyzing the results of Rosetta calculations. The program is highly extensible so that developers can add new protocols and analysis tools to the PyRosetta Toolkit GUI.

  2. The PyRosetta Toolkit: a graphical user interface for the Rosetta software suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolf-Bryfogle, Jared; Dunbrack, Roland L

    2013-01-01

    The Rosetta Molecular Modeling suite is a command-line-only collection of applications that enable high-resolution modeling and design of proteins and other molecules. Although extremely useful, Rosetta can be difficult to learn for scientists with little computational or programming experience. To that end, we have created a Graphical User Interface (GUI) for Rosetta, called the PyRosetta Toolkit, for creating and running protocols in Rosetta for common molecular modeling and protein design tasks and for analyzing the results of Rosetta calculations. The program is highly extensible so that developers can add new protocols and analysis tools to the PyRosetta Toolkit GUI.

  3. Hi-tech in space - Rosetta - a space sophisticate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-01

    s three legs are equipped with special shock-absorbers which take up most of the kinetic energy. The legs are also fitted with ice pitons; these bore into the ground immediately on touchdown. At the same moment, the lander fires a harpoon to anchor it to the ground - an opportunity also to investigate the mechanical properties of the surface. “If everything goes according to plan, the mission results could well fundamentally expand our knowledge of comets, just as the Rosetta Stone, after which the probe is named, helped unravel the mystery of Egyptian hieroglyphics,” said Manfred Warhaut. For further information on Rosetta and ESA projects, please consult our portal at: http://www.esa.int/science or directly at http://www.esa.int/rosetta

  4. Exploiting the parallels - maximising the outreach potentials for the European Space Agency's Rosetta comet chaser mission

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    Pillinger, C. T.; Pillinger, J. M.

    2013-09-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA)'s comet chaser mission, Rosetta, has been more than a quarter of a century in coming to fruition. Whilst it might sound a long time humankind has been interested in comets for much longer. For over a thousand years depictions of comets have been appearing in Art 1 including many humorous cartoons 2. There are numerous cometary metaphors throughout literature. With this in mind we have recognised that there is a tremendous opportunity with comets to introduce science to different non-scientific audiences who would not necessarily believe they were interested in science. A similar approach was adopted with great success for the Beagle 2 involvement in ESA's Mars Express 3,4. By exploiting the perhaps sometimes less obvious connections to the Rosetta mission we hope to capture the attention of non-scientists and introduce them to science unawares - a case of a little sugar to help the medicine go down. It is our belief that the Rosetta mission has enormous potential for bringing science to the unconverted. We give here one example of a connection between Art and the Rosetta mission. By choosing the allegorical name Rosetta for its cometary mission, ESA have immediately invited comparison with the stone tablet which provided the key to translating the languages of ancient cultures, particularly Egyptian hieroglyphics. It is well known that a scientist, Thomas Young, foreign secretary of The Royal Society, made the break through which recognised the name Ptolemy in a cartouche on the Rosetta stone which can be seen today at the British Museum. The events concerning the 'capture' of the Rosetta stone were witnessed by scientists Sir William Hamilton (a renowned geophysicist as well as husband of Horatio Nelson's notorious mistress Lady Hamilton) and Edward Daniel Clarke, a geologist who would become first Professor of Mineralogy at Cambridge and an early meteoricist. Young's inspiration allowed Jean-Francois Champollion to decipher the

  5. Network pharmacology: a Rosetta Stone for traditional Chinese medicine.

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    Hao, Da Cheng; Xiao, Pei Gen

    2014-08-01

    Network pharmacology, based on the theory of systems biology, is a new discipline that analyzes the biological network and screens out the nodes of particular interest, with the aim of designing poly-target drug molecule. It emphasizes maximizing drug efficacy and minimizing adverse effect via the multiple regulation of the signaling pathway. Coincidentally, almost all traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and worldwide ethnomedicine exert therapeutic effect by targeting multiple molecules of the human body. In this overview, we offer a critique on the present perception of TCM and network pharmacology; illustrate the utility of network pharmacology in the study of single herb, medicine pair, and TCM formula; and summarize the recent progress of TCM-based drug discovery inspired by network pharmacology. Network pharmacology could be of great help in decreasing drug attrition rate and thus is essential in rational and cost-effective drug development. We also pinpoint the current TCM issues that could be tackled by the flexible combined use of network pharmacology and relevant disciplines. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. A Rosetta Stone for Parameterized Tests of Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Sampson, Laura; Cornish, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Several model-independent parameterizations of deviations from General Relativity have been developed to test Einstein's theory. Although these different parameterizations were developed for different gravitational observables, they ultimately all test the same underlying physics. In this paper, we develop connections between the parameterized post-Newtonian, parameterized post-Keplerian, and the parameterized post-Einsteinian frameworks, developed to carry out tests of General Relativity with Solar System, binary pulsar, and gravitational wave observations respectively. These connections allow us to use knowledge gained from one framework to inform and guide tests using the others. Relating these parameterizations and combining the results from each approach strengthens our tests of General Relativity.

  7. Clumped Isotopes in Bahamian Dolomites: A Rosetta Stone?

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    Murray, S.; Swart, P. K.; Arienzo, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Low temperature dolomite formation continues to be an enigmatic process. However, with the advent of the clumped isotope technique, there is an opportunity to determine the temperature of formation as well as the δ18O of the fluid (δ18Ow) from which it formed. By using samples with a well constrained geologic and thermal history, we have attempted to accurately develop a technique for the application of clumped isotopes to varying dolomite systems. Samples for this study were taken from two cores, one from the island of San Salvador and one on Great Bahama Bank (known as Clino), located on the eastern and western edges respectively of the Bahamian Archipelago. Both cores penetrate through Pleistocene to Miocene aged carbonates. The San Salvador core has a 110m section of pure, near stoichiometric dolomite, while the Clino core is of a mixed carbonate composition with varying abundances (0% - 50%) of calcian dolomite (42-46 mol % MgCO3). The water temperature profile of the Bahamas can be assumed over time due to the stable geology and no influence of higher temperature waters. Because of its location and the present burial depth, the largest influence on dolomite formation has been changes in sea level. As the dolomites from San Salvador are 100% dolomite, the Δ47 was determined directly. The Clino dolomites however were only partially dolomitized and so were treated with buffered acetic acid to remove non-dolomite carbonates. This was carried out in stages, using X-ray diffraction to determine composition, followed by the measurement of Δ47 after each leaching episode. Because the dolomite formation temperature and δ18Ow can be constrained, it becomes possible to evaluate the applicability of the multitude of clumped isotope correction schemes that have been applied to various dolomite samples. Also tested were several different equations which link temperature to the δ18O of the dolomite allowing the δ18O of the water to be calculated. This is a necessary exercise for the study of dolomite because of the inability to properly standardize low temperature dolomite formation as well as the novelty of the clumped isotope technique. In doing so, we hope to establish accurate protocols in how to best handle low temperature dolomite clumped isotope data.

  8. Rosetta following a living comet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accomazzo, Andrea; Ferri, Paolo; Lodiot, Sylvain; Pellon-Bailon, Jose-Luis; Hubault, Armelle; Porta, Roberto; Urbanek, Jakub; Kay, Ritchie; Eiblmaier, Matthias; Francisco, Tiago

    2016-09-01

    The International Rosetta Mission was launched on 2nd March 2004 on its 10 year journey to rendezvous with comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Rosetta performed comet orbit insertion on the 6th of August 2014, after which it characterised the nucleus and orbited it at altitudes as low as a few kilometres. In November 2014 Rosetta delivered the lander Philae to perform the first soft landing ever on the surface of a comet. The critical landing operations have been conducted with remarkable accuracy and will constitute one of the most important achievements in the history of spaceflight. After this critical operation, Rosetta began the escort phase of the comet in its journey in the Solar System heading to the perihelion, reached in August 2015. Throughout this period, the comet environment kept changing with increasing gas and dust emissions. A first phase of bound orbits was followed by a sequence of complex flyby segments which allowed the scientific instruments to perform in depth investigation of the comet environment and nucleus. The unpredictable nature of the comet activity forced the mission control team to implement unplanned changes to the flight plan prepared for this mission phase and to plan the whole mission in a more dynamic way than originally conceived. This paper describes the details of the landing operations and of the main comet escort phase. It also includes the mission status as achieved after perihelion and the findings about the evolution of the comet and its environment from a mission operations point of view. The lessons learned from this unique and complex operations phase and the plans for the next mission phases, which include a mission extension into 2016, are also described.

  9. Assigning protein functions by comparative genome analysis protein phylogenetic profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Matteo; Marcotte, Edward M.; Thompson, Michael J.; Eisenberg, David; Grothe, Robert; Yeates, Todd O.

    2003-05-13

    A computational method system, and computer program are provided for inferring functional links from genome sequences. One method is based on the observation that some pairs of proteins A' and B' have homologs in another organism fused into a single protein chain AB. A trans-genome comparison of sequences can reveal these AB sequences, which are Rosetta Stone sequences because they decipher an interaction between A' and B. Another method compares the genomic sequence of two or more organisms to create a phylogenetic profile for each protein indicating its presence or absence across all the genomes. The profile provides information regarding functional links between different families of proteins. In yet another method a combination of the above two methods is used to predict functional links.

  10. Determining protein function and interaction from genome analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, David; Marcotte, Edward M.; Thompson, Michael J.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Yeates, Todd O.

    2004-08-03

    A computational method system, and computer program are provided for inferring functional links from genome sequences. One method is based on the observation that some pairs of proteins A' and B' have homologs in another organism fused into a single protein chain AB. A trans-genome comparison of sequences can reveal these AB sequences, which are Rosetta Stone sequences because they decipher an interaction between A' and B. Another method compares the genomic sequence of two or more organisms to create a phylogenetic profile for each protein indicating its presence or absence across all the genomes. The profile provides information regarding functional links between different families of proteins. In yet another method a combination of the above two methods is used to predict functional links.

  11. Rosetta Star Tracker and Navigation Camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Gøsta

    1998-01-01

    Proposal in response to the Invitation to Tender (ITT) issued by Matra Marconi Space (MSS) for the procurement of the ROSETTA Star Tracker and Navigation Camera.......Proposal in response to the Invitation to Tender (ITT) issued by Matra Marconi Space (MSS) for the procurement of the ROSETTA Star Tracker and Navigation Camera....

  12. Rosetta mission operations for landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accomazzo, Andrea; Lodiot, Sylvain; Companys, Vicente

    2016-08-01

    The International Rosetta Mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) was launched on 2nd March 2004 on its 10 year journey to comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko and has reached it early August 2014. The main mission objectives were to perform close observations of the comet nucleus throughout its orbit around the Sun and deliver the lander Philae to its surface. This paper describers the activities at mission operations level that allowed the landing of Philae. The landing preparation phase was mainly characterised by the definition of the landing selection process, to which several parties contributed, and by the definition of the strategy for comet characterisation, the orbital strategy for lander delivery, and the definition and validation of the operations timeline. The definition of the landing site selection process involved almost all components of the mission team; Rosetta has been the first, and so far only mission, that could not rely on data collected by previous missions for the landing site selection. This forced the teams to include an intensive observation campaign as a mandatory part of the process; several science teams actively contributed to this campaign thus making results from science observations part of the mandatory operational products. The time allocated to the comet characterisation phase was in the order of a few weeks and all the processes, tools, and interfaces required an extensive planning an validation. Being the descent of Philae purely ballistic, the main driver for the orbital strategy was the capability to accurately control the position and velocity of Rosetta at Philae's separation. The resulting operations timeline had to merge this need of frequent orbit determination and control with the complexity of the ground segment and the inherent risk of problems when doing critical activities in short times. This paper describes the contribution of the Mission Control Centre (MOC) at the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) to this

  13. Protein NMR structures refined with Rosetta have higher accuracy relative to corresponding X-ray crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Binchen; Tejero, Roberto; Baker, David; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2014-02-05

    We have found that refinement of protein NMR structures using Rosetta with experimental NMR restraints yields more accurate protein NMR structures than those that have been deposited in the PDB using standard refinement protocols. Using 40 pairs of NMR and X-ray crystal structures determined by the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, for proteins ranging in size from 5-22 kDa, restrained Rosetta refined structures fit better to the raw experimental data, are in better agreement with their X-ray counterparts, and have better phasing power compared to conventionally determined NMR structures. For 37 proteins for which NMR ensembles were available and which had similar structures in solution and in the crystal, all of the restrained Rosetta refined NMR structures were sufficiently accurate to be used for solving the corresponding X-ray crystal structures by molecular replacement. The protocol for restrained refinement of protein NMR structures was also compared with restrained CS-Rosetta calculations. For proteins smaller than 10 kDa, restrained CS-Rosetta, starting from extended conformations, provides slightly more accurate structures, while for proteins in the size range of 10-25 kDa the less CPU intensive restrained Rosetta refinement protocols provided equally or more accurate structures. The restrained Rosetta protocols described here can improve the accuracy of protein NMR structures and should find broad and general for studies of protein structure and function.

  14. Preliminary Results of De Novo Whole Genome Sequencing of the Siberian Larch (Larix sibirica Ledeb. and the Siberian Stone Pine (Pinus sibirica Du Tour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Krutovsky

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Illumina HiSeq2000 DNA sequencing generated 2 906 977 265 high quality paired-end nucleotide sequences (reads and 576 Gbp for Siberian larch (Larix sibirica Ledeb. that corresponds to 48X coverage of the larch genome (12.03 Gbp, and 3 427 566 813 reads and 679 Gbp for Siberian stone pine (Pinus sibirica Du Tour that corresponds to 29X coverage of its genome (23.6 Gbp. These data are not enough to assemble and annotate whole genomes, but the obtained nucleotide sequences have allowed us to discover and develop effective highly polymorphic molecular genetic markers, such as microsatellite loci that are required for population genetic studies and identification of the timber origin. Sequence data can be used also to discover single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Genomic studies of Russian boreal forests and major phytopathogens associated with them will also allow us to identify biomarkers that can be used for solving important scientific and economic problems related to the conservation of forest genetic resources and breeding more resilient and fast growing trees with improved timber and resistance to diseases and adverse environmental factors.

  15. The final year of the Rosetta mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accomazzo, Andrea; Ferri, Paolo; Lodiot, Sylvain; Pellon-Bailon, Jose-Luis; Hubault, Armelle; Urbanek, Jakub; Kay, Ritchie; Eiblmaier, Matthias; Francisco, Tiago

    2017-07-01

    The International Rosetta Mission was launched on 2nd March 2004 on its 10 year journey to rendezvous with comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Rosetta performed comet orbit insertion on the 6th of August 2014, after which it characterised the nucleus and orbited it at altitudes as low as a few kilometres. In November 2014 Rosetta delivered the lander Philae to perform the first soft landing ever on the surface of a comet. After this critical operation, Rosetta began the escort phase of the comet in its journey in the Solar System heading to the perihelion, reached in August 2015. Originally foreseen till the end of 2015, the mission was extended for another nine months to follow the comet on its outbound arc of the orbit. In view of the acquired experience and of the approaching end of mission the spacecraft was flown at much closer distances from the nucleus so that the scientific instruments had the chance to perform unique measurements. Following this phase of very close orbits, on the 30th of September 2016 Rosetta was set on a collision course trajectory with the comet to terminate the mission with a controlled impact. This paper describes the details of the extended mission phase and the issues encountered during these months. It also includes the changes implemented on the spacecraft and in the operations concept to optimise the remaining mission time. The paper also includes the lessons learned from this unique and complex mission phase.

  16. Bladder Stones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... does not include routine preventive screening for bladder cancer.If you do not treat bladder stones, you can have lasting damage. This includes repeat UTIs or injury to your bladder, kidney, or urethra. Questions to ask your doctor How do I ...

  17. Acute management of stones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Helene; Osther, Palle J S

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Stone management is often conservative due to a high spontaneous stone passage rate or non-symptomatic calyceal stones that do not necessarily require active treatment. However, stone disease may cause symptoms and complications requiring urgent intervention. MATERIAL AND METHODS......: In this review, we update latest research and current recommendations regarding acute management of stones, with particular focus on imaging, pain management, active stone interventions, medical expulsive therapy, and urolithiasis in pregnancy and childhood. RESULTS: Acute stone management should be planned...

  18. Improved chemical shift based fragment selection for CS-Rosetta using Rosetta3 fragment picker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernon, Robert [Hospital for Sick Children, Program in Molecular Structure and Function (Canada); Shen, Yang [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States); Baker, David [University of Washington, Department of Biochemistry (United States); Lange, Oliver F., E-mail: oliver.lange@tum.de [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department Chemie, Biomolecular NMR and Munich Center for Integrated Protein Science (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    A new fragment picker has been developed for CS-Rosetta that combines beneficial features of the original fragment picker, MFR, used with CS-Rosetta, and the fragment picker, NNMake, that was used for purely sequence based fragment selection in the context of ROSETTA de-novo structure prediction. Additionally, the new fragment picker has reduced sensitivity to outliers and other difficult to match data points rendering the protocol more robust and less likely to introduce bias towards wrong conformations in cases where data is bad, missing or inconclusive. The fragment picker protocol gives significant improvements on 6 of 23 CS-Rosetta targets. An independent benchmark on 39 protein targets, whose NMR data sets were published only after protocol optimization had been finished, also show significantly improved performance for the new fragment picker (van der Schot et al. in J Biomol NMR, 2013)

  19. Comparative Genomic and Phenotypic Characterization of Pathogenic and Non-Pathogenic Strains of Xanthomonas arboricola Reveals Insights into the Infection Process of Bacterial Spot Disease of Stone Fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garita-Cambronero, Jerson; Palacio-Bielsa, Ana; López, María M; Cubero, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas arboricola pv. pruni is the causal agent of bacterial spot disease of stone fruits, a quarantinable pathogen in several areas worldwide, including the European Union. In order to develop efficient control methods for this disease, it is necessary to improve the understanding of the key determinants associated with host restriction, colonization and the development of pathogenesis. After an initial characterization, by multilocus sequence analysis, of 15 strains of X. arboricola isolated from Prunus, one strain did not group into the pathovar pruni or into other pathovars of this species and therefore it was identified and defined as a X. arboricola pv. pruni look-a-like. This non-pathogenic strain and two typical strains of X. arboricola pv. pruni were selected for a whole genome and phenotype comparative analysis in features associated with the pathogenesis process in Xanthomonas. Comparative analysis among these bacterial strains isolated from Prunus spp. and the inclusion of 15 publicly available genome sequences from other pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of X. arboricola revealed variations in the phenotype associated with variations in the profiles of TonB-dependent transporters, sensors of the two-component regulatory system, methyl accepting chemotaxis proteins, components of the flagella and the type IV pilus, as well as in the repertoire of cell-wall degrading enzymes and the components of the type III secretion system and related effectors. These variations provide a global overview of those mechanisms that could be associated with the development of bacterial spot disease. Additionally, it pointed out some features that might influence the host specificity and the variable virulence observed in X. arboricola.

  20. ESA's Rosetta mission and the puzzles that Hale-Bopp left behind

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-01

    kilometres with a set of remote-sensing instruments. As the spacecraft moves around the nucleus at a very leisurely walking pace, other onboard instruments will analyse the dust and vapours, which will emanate from Comet Wirtanen with ever-increasing vigour as the Sun's rays warm it. Rosetta will drop a lander on to the comet's surface, for close inspection of its physical condition and chemical composition. The lander is a venture led by Germany, France and Italy, with participation from Austria, Finland, Hungary, Poland and the UK. As a box packed with scientific instruments and standing on three legs, the lander will be capable of anchoring itself to one spot and drilling into the surface. It may also be able to hop like a flea to visit another part of the nucleus. A combination of solar energy and electric batteries will enable operations to last for several months. "The combination of Rosetta in orbit around the comet and the lander on its surface is very powerful from a scientific point of view," says Gerhard Schwehm, ESA's project scientist for Rosetta. "We shall watch Comet Wirtanen brewing up like a volcano as it feels the heat of the Sun. In place of hazy impressions of the nucleus of a comet half hidden by its dust clouds, we shall see all the details with unprecedented clarity." Unanswered questions During and after the 1986 appearance of Halley's Comet, comet science made great progress. More recent comets have revealed important secrets to ESA's Infrared Space Observatory and to other space telescopes examining them at wavelengths unobservable from the Earth. Yet basic questions about comets remain unanswered. Just as the Rosetta Stone was the key that unlocked the meaning of Egyptian hieroglyphs, so the Rosetta spacecraft is intended to decipher the meaning of comets and their role in the origin and history of the Solar System. Here are a few of the main puzzles. * What does a comet weigh? Guesses about the density of cometary material vary widely, and only an

  1. Rosetta Lander - Philae: Status after three swing-bys and about 4 years in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulamec, S.; Biele, J.; Paetz, B.

    2007-12-01

    Rosetta is a Cornerstone Mission of the previous Horizon 2000 ESA Programme. It is going to rendezvous with comet 67/P Churyumov-Gerasimenko after a 10 years cruise and to study both its nucleus and coma through an orbiting spacecraft and a landed platform. The latter, named Philae, after the island where the obelisk was found which helped together with the stone of Rosetta to decipher the Egyptian hieroglyphs, has been designed to land softly on the comet nucleus and is equipped with 10 scientific instruments to perform in-situ studies of the cometary material. Philae has been provided by an international consortium with participation of Germany (lead), France, Italy, UK, Finland, Ireland, Hungary and Austria. Rosetta has been successfully launched on March 2, 2004 from Kourou in French Guyana. Philae is operated by the Lander Control Centre (LCC) at DLR, Cologne and the Science Operations and Navigation Centre (SONC) at CNES, Toulouse via ESOC in Darmstadt. Since the launch, (besides commissioning and several checkouts), two planetary swingbys at the Earth (March 2005 and November 2007) and one at Mars (February 2007) have been performed, where the Lander has been operational. Rosetta will reach 67/P Churyumov-Gerasimenko in spring 2014 and start to investigate the comet with remote sensing instruments. Those data will allow the selection of a preferred landing site for Philae. The delivery of the Lander to the surface of the comet is foreseen in November 2014 at a distance of about 3 Astronomical Units (AU) to the sun. One particular challenge of the mission is the landing on currently completely unknown terrain. Little is known about the target comet. The paper will discuss recent results on the nature of comets (e.g. by Deep Impact or Stardust) and their implications on the Philae Lander mission.

  2. Science Plan Visualisation for Rosetta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A.; Grieger, B.; Völk, S.

    2013-12-01

    Rosetta is a mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) to rendez-vous with comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko in mid-2014. The trajectories and their corresponding operations are flexible and particularly complex. To make informed decisions among the many free parameters novel ways to communicate operations to the community have been explored. To support science planning by communicating operational ideas and disseminating operational scenarios, the science ground segment makes use of Web-based visualisation technologies. To keep the threshold to analysing operations proposals as low as possible, various implementation techniques have been investigated. An important goal was to use the Web to make the content as accessible as possible. By adopting the recent standard WebGL and generating static pages of time-dependent three-dimensional views of the spacecraft as well as the corresponding field-of-views of instruments, directly from the operational and for-study files, users are given the opportunity to explore interactively in their Web browsers what is being proposed in addition to using the traditional file products and analysing them in detail. The scenes and animations can be viewed in any modern Web browser and be combined with other analyses. This is to facilitate verification and cross-validation of complex products, often done by comparing different independent analyses and studies. By providing different timesteps in animations, it is possible to focus on long-term planning or short-term planning without distracting the user from the essentials. This is particularly important since the information that can be displayed in a Web browser is somewhat related to data volume that can be transferred across the wire. In Web browsers, it is more challenging to do numerical calculations on demand. Since requests for additional data have to be passed through a Web server, they are more complex and also require a more complex infrastructure. The volume of data that can be

  3. A Web-Based Comparative Genomics Tutorial for Investigating Microbial Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Strong

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available As the number of completely sequenced microbial genomes continues to rise at an impressive rate, it is important to prepare students with the skills necessary to investigate microorganisms at the genomic level. As a part of the core curriculum for first-year graduate students in the biological sciences, we have implemented a web-based tutorial to introduce students to the fields of comparative and functional genomics. The tutorial focuses on recent computational methods for identifying functionally linked genes and proteins on a genome-wide scale and was used to introduce students to the Rosetta Stone, Phylogenetic Profile, conserved Gene Neighbor, and Operon computational methods. Students learned to use a number of publicly available web servers and databases to identify functionally linked genes in the Escherichia coli genome, with emphasis on genome organization and operon structure. The overall effectiveness of the tutorial was assessed based on student evaluations and homework assignments. The tutorial is available to other educators at http://www.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/~strong/m253.php.

  4. Protocols for Molecular Modeling with Rosetta3 and RosettaScripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Brian J; Cisneros, Alberto; Duran, Amanda M; Finn, Jessica A; Fu, Darwin; Lokits, Alyssa D; Mueller, Benjamin K; Sangha, Amandeep K; Sauer, Marion F; Sevy, Alexander M; Sliwoski, Gregory; Sheehan, Jonathan H; DiMaio, Frank; Meiler, Jens; Moretti, Rocco

    2016-08-30

    Previously, we published an article providing an overview of the Rosetta suite of biomacromolecular modeling software and a series of step-by-step tutorials [Kaufmann, K. W., et al. (2010) Biochemistry 49, 2987-2998]. The overwhelming positive response to this publication we received motivates us to here share the next iteration of these tutorials that feature de novo folding, comparative modeling, loop construction, protein docking, small molecule docking, and protein design. This updated and expanded set of tutorials is needed, as since 2010 Rosetta has been fully redesigned into an object-oriented protein modeling program Rosetta3. Notable improvements include a substantially improved energy function, an XML-like language termed "RosettaScripts" for flexibly specifying modeling task, new analysis tools, the addition of the TopologyBroker to control conformational sampling, and support for multiple templates in comparative modeling. Rosetta's ability to model systems with symmetric proteins, membrane proteins, noncanonical amino acids, and RNA has also been greatly expanded and improved.

  5. Protocols for Molecular Modeling with Rosetta3 and RosettaScripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we published an article providing an overview of the Rosetta suite of biomacromolecular modeling software and a series of step-by-step tutorials [Kaufmann, K. W., et al. (2010) Biochemistry 49, 2987–2998]. The overwhelming positive response to this publication we received motivates us to here share the next iteration of these tutorials that feature de novo folding, comparative modeling, loop construction, protein docking, small molecule docking, and protein design. This updated and expanded set of tutorials is needed, as since 2010 Rosetta has been fully redesigned into an object-oriented protein modeling program Rosetta3. Notable improvements include a substantially improved energy function, an XML-like language termed “RosettaScripts” for flexibly specifying modeling task, new analysis tools, the addition of the TopologyBroker to control conformational sampling, and support for multiple templates in comparative modeling. Rosetta’s ability to model systems with symmetric proteins, membrane proteins, noncanonical amino acids, and RNA has also been greatly expanded and improved. PMID:27490953

  6. The new rosetta targets observations, simulations and instrument performances

    CERN Document Server

    Epifani, Elena; Palumbo, Pasquale

    2004-01-01

    The Rosetta mission was successfully launched on March 2nd, 2004 for a rendezvous with the short period comet 67PChuryumov-Gerasimenko in 2014 The new baseline mission foresees also a double fly-by with asteroids 21 Lutetia and 2867 Steins, on the way towards the primary target This volume collects papers presented at the workshop on "The NEW Rosetta targets Observations, simulations and instrument performances", held in Capri on October 13-15, 2003 The papers cover the fields of observations of the new Rosetta targets, laboratory experiments and theoretical simulation of cometary processes, and the expected performances of Rosetta experiments Until real operations around 67PChuryumov-Gerasimenko will start in 10 years from now, new astronomical observations, laboratory experiments and theoretical models are required The goals are to increase knowledge about physics and chemistry of comets and to prepare to exploit at best Rosetta data

  7. Modeling disordered regions in proteins using Rosetta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Yu-Ruei Wang

    Full Text Available Protein structure prediction methods such as Rosetta search for the lowest energy conformation of the polypeptide chain. However, the experimentally observed native state is at a minimum of the free energy, rather than the energy. The neglect of the missing configurational entropy contribution to the free energy can be partially justified by the assumption that the entropies of alternative folded states, while very much less than unfolded states, are not too different from one another, and hence can be to a first approximation neglected when searching for the lowest free energy state. The shortcomings of current structure prediction methods may be due in part to the breakdown of this assumption. Particularly problematic are proteins with significant disordered regions which do not populate single low energy conformations even in the native state. We describe two approaches within the Rosetta structure modeling methodology for treating such regions. The first does not require advance knowledge of the regions likely to be disordered; instead these are identified by minimizing a simple free energy function used previously to model protein folding landscapes and transition states. In this model, residues can be either completely ordered or completely disordered; they are considered disordered if the gain in entropy outweighs the loss of favorable energetic interactions with the rest of the protein chain. The second approach requires identification in advance of the disordered regions either from sequence alone using for example the DISOPRED server or from experimental data such as NMR chemical shifts. During Rosetta structure prediction calculations the disordered regions make only unfavorable repulsive contributions to the total energy. We find that the second approach has greater practical utility and illustrate this with examples from de novo structure prediction, NMR structure calculation, and comparative modeling.

  8. Acute management of stones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Helene; Osther, Palle J S

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Stone management is often conservative due to a high spontaneous stone passage rate or non-symptomatic calyceal stones that do not necessarily require active treatment. However, stone disease may cause symptoms and complications requiring urgent intervention. MATERIAL AND METHODS......: In this review, we update latest research and current recommendations regarding acute management of stones, with particular focus on imaging, pain management, active stone interventions, medical expulsive therapy, and urolithiasis in pregnancy and childhood. RESULTS: Acute stone management should be planned...... with careful consideration of stone size and location, symptoms, patient comorbidity and radiation dose. CONCLUSION: In case of infective hydronephrosis, compromised renal function or persistent pain despite adequate analgesic treatment acute intervention is indicated....

  9. Rejoinder to Lynda Stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Mark E.

    1997-01-01

    Responds to Lynda Stone's comments on the author's essay on the interpretation of history. Demonstrates the linkages between his argument and those of Stone. Concludes by contesting some of her interpretations of his philosophical forebear, Edmund Husserl, and by pointing to the common objectives of both his and Stone's research. (DSK)

  10. Rejoinder to Lynda Stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Mark E.

    1997-01-01

    Responds to Lynda Stone's comments on the author's essay on the interpretation of history. Demonstrates the linkages between his argument and those of Stone. Concludes by contesting some of her interpretations of his philosophical forebear, Edmund Husserl, and by pointing to the common objectives of both his and Stone's research. (DSK)

  11. Rosetta-Mars fly-by, February 25, 2007 .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajola, M.; Magrin, S.; Lazzarin, M.; La Forgia, F.; Barbieri, C.

    On the 25 of February 2007, the ESA Rosetta mission approached planet Mars. This gravity assist gave the opportunity to the scientific community to get several sets of images through the use of OSIRIS instrument: Rosetta imaging camera. The entire surface of the Red Planet has been imaged as well as the atmosphere and the clouds which were partly covering it. The aim of this paper is to introduce and show the preliminary studies which have concentrated on three images sets obtained during Rosetta closest approach to Mars.

  12. Pathogenesis of Stone Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worcester, Elaine M.; Evan, Andrew P.; Coe, Fredric L.

    2008-09-01

    All stones share similar presenting symptoms, and urine supersaturation with respect to the mineral phase of the stone is essential for stone formation. However, recent studies using papillary biopsies of stone formers provide a view of the histology of renal crystal deposition which suggests that the early sequence of events leading to stone formation may differ depending on the type of stone and on the urine chemistry leading to supersaturation. Three general patterns of crystal deposition are seen: interstitial apatite plaque in idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers, which is the site of stone attachment; tubule deposition of apatite, seen in all calcium phosphate stone formers; and mixtures of apatite and another crystal phase, such as cystine or calcium oxalate, seen in patients with cystinuria or enteric hyperoxaluria. The presence of apatite crystal in either the interstitial or tubule compartment (and sometimes both) of the renal medulla in stone formers is the rule, and has implications for the initial steps of stone formation and the potential for renal injury.

  13. Serendipitous asteroid observations by OSIRIS/Rosetta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carry, B.; Berthier, J.; Vachier, F.; Küppers, M.

    2012-09-01

    In recent years, many efforts have been undertaken to extract the astrometry, photometry, and colors of Solar System Small Bodies from large surveys and widefield camera, such as the SDSS Moving Object Catalog [2] or EuroNear [3]. Since 2006, the IMCCE provides a service, called SkyBoT [1], that list all the Solar System Objects in a given field of view for a given epoch. Such a tool is of high interest for any data mining purpose of large archives. We will present an extension of SkyBoT from ground-based to space-based geometries. As a demonstration, we will present our search for serendipitously observed asteroids in the data archive of the OSIRIS instrument on-board the ESA Rosetta mission.

  14. Four small puzzles that Rosetta doesn't solve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhiju Das

    Full Text Available A complete macromolecule modeling package must be able to solve the simplest structure prediction problems. Despite recent successes in high resolution structure modeling and design, the Rosetta software suite fares poorly on small protein and RNA puzzles, some as small as four residues. To illustrate these problems, this manuscript presents Rosetta results for four well-defined test cases: the 20-residue mini-protein Trp cage, an even smaller disulfide-stabilized conotoxin, the reactive loop of a serine protease inhibitor, and a UUCG RNA tetraloop. In contrast to previous Rosetta studies, several lines of evidence indicate that conformational sampling is not the major bottleneck in modeling these small systems. Instead, approximations and omissions in the Rosetta all-atom energy function currently preclude discriminating experimentally observed conformations from de novo models at atomic resolution. These molecular "puzzles" should serve as useful model systems for developers wishing to make foundational improvements to this powerful modeling suite.

  15. Rosetta science operations in support of the Philae mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashman, Mike; Barthélémy, Maud; O`Rourke, Laurence; Almeida, Miguel; Altobelli, Nicolas; Costa Sitjà, Marc; García Beteta, Juan José; Geiger, Bernhard; Grieger, Björn; Heather, David; Hoofs, Raymond; Küppers, Michael; Martin, Patrick; Moissl, Richard; Múñoz Crego, Claudio; Pérez-Ayúcar, Miguel; Sanchez Suarez, Eduardo; Taylor, Matt; Vallat, Claire

    2016-08-01

    The international Rosetta mission was launched on 2nd March 2004 and after its ten year journey, arrived at its target destination of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, during 2014. Following the January 2014 exit from a two and half year hibernation period, Rosetta approached and arrived at the comet in August 2014. In November 2014, the Philae lander was deployed from Rosetta onto the comet's surface after which the orbiter continued its approximately one and a half year comet escort phase. The Rosetta Science Ground Segment's primary roles within the project are to support the Project Scientist and the Science Working Team, in order to ensure the coordination, development, validation and delivery of the desired science operations plans and their associated operational products throughout the mission., whilst also providing support to the Principle Investigator teams (including the Philae lander team) in order to ensure the provision of adequate data to the Planetary Science Archive. The lead up to, and execution of, the November 2014 Philae landing, and the subsequent Philae activities through 2015, have presented numerous unique challenges to the project teams. This paper discusses these challenges, and more specifically, their impact on the overall mission science planning activities. It details how the Rosetta Science Ground Segment has addressed these issues in collaboration with the other project teams in order to accommodate Philae operations within the continually evolving Rosetta science planning process.

  16. The CONSERT operations planning process for the Rosetta mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogez, Yves; Puget, Pascal; Zine, Sonia; Hérique, Alain; Kofman, Wlodek; Altobelli, Nicolas; Ashman, Mike; Barthélémy, Maud; Biele, Jens; Blazquez, Alejandro; Casas, Carlos M.; Sitjà, Marc Costa; Delmas, Cédric; Fantinati, Cinzia; Fronton, Jean-François; Geiger, Bernhard; Geurts, Koen; Grieger, Björn; Hahnel, Ronny; Hoofs, Raymond; Hubault, Armelle; Jurado, Eric; Küppers, Michael; Maibaum, Michael; Moussi-Souffys, Aurélie; Muñoz, Pablo; O'Rourke, Laurence; Pätz, Brigitte; Plettemeier, Dirk; Ulamec, Stephan; Vallat, Claire

    2016-08-01

    The COmet Nucleus Sounding Experiment by Radio wave Transmission (CONSERT / Rosetta) has been designed to sound the interior of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. This instrument consists of two parts: one onboard Rosetta and the other one onboard Philae. A good CONSERT science measurement sequence requires joint operations of both spacecrafts in a relevant geometry. The geometric constraints to be fulfilled involve the position and the orientation of both Rosetta and Philae. At the moment of planning the post-landing and long-term science operations for Rosetta instruments, the actual comet shape and the landing location remained largely unknown. In addition, the necessity of combining operations of Rosetta spacecraft and Philae spacecraft makes the planning process for CONSERT particularly complex. In this paper, we present the specific methods and tools we developed, in close collaboration with the mission and the science operation teams for both Rosetta and Philae, to identify, rank and plan the operations for CONSERT science measurements. The presented methods could be applied to other missions involving joint operations between two platforms, on a complex shaped object.

  17. DURABILITY OF DIMENSION STONE

    OpenAIRE

    Branko Crnković

    1991-01-01

    The paper presents a survey of the possible origins of the strain and deformation of stone. A range of origins which can be influenced is suggested, from those occurring under natural conditions in the deposit to those resulting from technologies applied in quarrying, stone processing and dressing, including environment with natural and technogenic factors. No new information can be given on the behavior of the stone processed and used in building according to the most recent technologies, be...

  18. ROSETTA lander Philae - soil strength analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll, Reinhard; Witte, Lars; Arnold, Walter

    2016-12-01

    The landing of Philae, the lander of ESA's ROSETTA-mission, on November 12th 2014 on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, was planned as a descent with passive landing activating a damper system and anchoring by harpoons at touch-down. The lander was not fixed to the ground at touch-down due to failing harpoons. The lander damper, however, was actuated for a length of 42.6 mm with a maximal speed of 0.08 m/s, while the lander speed was 1 m/s. Based on the damper data and a detailed mechanical model of Philae, an estimate can be made for the forces acting and the energy dissipated at touch-down inside the lander and the energy dissipated by ground penetration. The forces acting at ground penetration provide constraints on the mechanical strength of the soil. Two different soil models are investigated. Assuming constant compressive strength σ, one obtains σ ≈ 2 kPa. Assuming an increasing σs strength with penetration depth with results in σs = 3 kPa/m fits the damper data best.

  19. Mysterious Jiana Stone Compound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuBingshu

    2004-01-01

    In Tibetan-inhabited areas, visitors can often find piles of stone carved with six-word mystic teaching of truth or Buddhist sutras at lakesides, mountain entrances, monasteries, roadsides or burial sites. Those ubiquitous stone piles, painted in white, red or blue, are the mysterious and world famous Manipile, or called “holy pile”.

  20. Lower pole stones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanguedolce, Francesco; Breda, Alberto; Millan, Felix

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess efficacy and safety of prone- and supine percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) for the treatment of lower pole kidney stones. METHODS: Data from patients affected by lower pole kidney stones and treated with PCNL between December 2005 and August 2010 were collected retrospectivel...

  1. Bacterial sensing of bacteriophages in communities: the search for the Rosetta stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debarbieux, Laurent

    2014-08-01

    Billions of years of evolution have resulted in microbial viruses and their hosts communicating in such a way that neither of these antagonists can dominate the other definitively. Studies of the molecular mechanisms underlying this dialog, initially in bacteriophages, rapidly identified several of the ways in which bacteria resist bacteriophage infections and bacteriophages defeat bacterial defenses. From an ecological perspective, recent data have raised many questions about the dynamic interactions between bacteria and bacteriophages, the densities of which, in complex microbial populations, are only beginning to be investigated. The next challenge will be determining how the dialog between microbial viruses and their hosts modulates complex ecosystems, such as those found in healthy humans or infected patients.

  2. A Rosetta Stone for Quantum Mechanics with an Introduction to Quantum Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Lomonaco, S J

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of these lecture notes is to provide readers, who have some mathematical background but little or no exposure to quantum mechanics and quantum computation, with enough material to begin reading the research literature in quantum computation and quantum information theory. This paper is a written version of the first of eight one hour lectures given in the American Mathematical Society (AMS) Short Course on Quantum Computation held in conjunction with the Annual Meeting of the AMS in Washington, DC, USA in January 2000, and will appear in the AMS PSAPM volume entitled "Quantum Computation." Part 1 of the paper is an introduction the to the concept of the qubit. Part 2 gives an introduction to quantum mechanics covering such topics as Dirac notation, quantum measurement, Heisenberg uncertainty, Schrodinger's equation, density operators, partial trace, multipartite quantum systems, the Heisenberg versus the Schrodinger picture, quantum entanglement, EPR paradox, quantum entropy. Part 3 gives a brief ...

  3. A "Rosetta Stone" for protoplanetary disks: The synergy of multi-wavelength observations

    CERN Document Server

    Sicilia-Aguilar, A; Carmona, A; Stolker, T; Kama, M; Mendigutía, I; Garufi, A; Flaherty, K; van der Marel, N; Greaves, J

    2016-01-01

    The recent progress in instrumentation and telescope development has brought us different ways to observe protoplanetary disks, including interferometers, space missions, adaptive optics, polarimetry, and time- and spectrally-resolved data. While the new facilities have changed the way we can tackle the existing open problems in disk structure and evolution, there is a substantial lack of interconnection between different observing techniques and their user communities. Here, we explore the complementarity of some of the state-of-the-art observing techniques, and how they can be brought together in a collective effort to understand how disks evolve and disperse at the time of planet formation. This paper was born at the "Protoplanetary Discussions" meeting in Edinburgh, 2016. Its goal is to clarify where multi-wavelength observations of disks converge in unveiling disk structure and evolution, and where they diverge and challenge our current understanding. We discuss caveats that should be considered when lin...

  4. A `Rosetta Stone' for Protoplanetary Disks: The Synergy of Multi-Wavelength Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicilia-Aguilar, A.; Banzatti, A.; Carmona, A.; Stolker, T.; Kama, M.; Mendigutía, I.; Garufi, A.; Flaherty, K.; van der Marel, N.; Greaves, J.

    2016-12-01

    Recent progress in telescope development has brought us different ways to observe protoplanetary disks: interferometers, space missions, adaptive optics, polarimetry, and time- and spectrally-resolved data. While the new facilities have changed the way we can tackle open problems in disk structure and evolution, there is a substantial lack of interconnection between different observing communities. Here, we explore the complementarity of some of the state-of-the-art observing techniques, and how they can be brought together to understand disk dispersal and planet formation.

  5. Digital Rosetta Stone: A Conceptual Model for Maintaining Long-Term Access to Digital Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-12-01

    and the advice and opinions of digital preservation experts. This procedure has been chosen because: (1) this area of research is so new that it is...been dealt with in the past simply because humans have been writing things for thousands of years. However, digital documents and digital preservation are

  6. A Rosetta Stone Relating Conventions In Photo-Meson Partial Wave Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.M. Sandorfi, B. Dey, A. Sarantsev, L. Tiator, R. Workman

    2012-04-01

    A new generation of complete experiments in pseudoscalar meson photo-production is being pursued at several laboratories. While new data are emerging, there is some confusion regarding definitions of asymmetries and the conventions used in partial wave analyses (PWA). We present expressions for constructing asymmetries as coordinate-system independent ratios of cross sections, along with the names used for these ratios by different PWA groups.

  7. A magmatic mush column rosetta stone: The McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Bruce

    2004-11-01

    A long-running mystery of Earth science concerns the physical and dynamic connection between volcanism, plutonism, magma chambers, layered intrusions, and the production from mantle material of oceanic and continental crust. The basic chemical connection of fractionating melt from crystals and resorting crystals again and again is clear, but volcanologists and plutonists covet almost mutually exclusive, process-oriented sciences to explain the compositional sequences and textures found in stacks of lavas and expanses of plutons. Lavas present an extensive time series of quenched aliquots of magma without any clear measure of the evolutionary spatial context of sampling within the magmatic system. Plutons offer extensive spatial context without a clear physical connection to the greater active magmatic system and without a sequential capturing of time; critical original textural details are erased under long cooldown times. A deadly middle ground must be crossed to meld the timescales and textures captured by volcanism with the spatial scales and textural processes of plutonism into a conceptual representation of an integrated working magmatic system.

  8. Statistical analysis of dust signals observed by ROSINA/COPS onboard of the Rosetta spacecraft at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzou, Chia-Yu; altwegg, kathrin; Bieler, Andre; Calmonte, Ursina; Gasc, Sébastien; Le Roy, Léna; Rubin, Martin

    2016-10-01

    ROSINA is the in situ Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis on board of Rosetta, one of the corner stone missions of the European Space Agency (ESA) to land and orbit the Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P). ROSINA consists of two mass spectrometers and a pressure sensor. The Reflectron Time of Flight Spectrometer (RTOF) and the Double Focusing Mass Spectrometer (DFMS) complement each other in mass and time resolution.The Comet Pressure Sensor (COPS) provides density measurements of the neutral molecules in the cometary coma of 67P. COPS has two gauges, a nude gauge that measures the total neutral density and a ram gauge that measures the dynamic pressure from the comet. Combining the two COPS is also capable of providing gas dynamic information such as gas velocity and gas temperature of the coma.While Rosetta started orbiting around 67P in August 2014, COPS observed diurnal and seasonal variations of the neutral gas density in the coma. Surprisingly, additional to these major density variation patterns, COPS occasionally observed small spikes in the density that are associated with dust. These dust signals can be interpreted as a result of cometary dust releasing volatiles while heated up near COPS. A statistical analysis of dust signals detected by COPS will be presented.

  9. Virtis: An Imaging Spectrometer for the Rosetta Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coradini, A.; Capaccioni, F.; Drossart, P.; Arnold, G.; Ammannito, E.; Angrilli, F.; Barucci, A.; Bellucci, G.; Benkhoff, J.; Bianchini, G.; Bibring, J. P.; Blecka, M.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Capria, M. T.; Carlson, R.; Carsenty, U.; Cerroni, P.; Colangeli, L.; Combes, M.; Combi, M.; Crovisier, J.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Encrenaz, E. T.; Erard, S.; Federico, C.; Filacchione, G.; Fink, U.; Fonti, S.; Formisano, V.; Ip, W. H.; Jaumann, R.; Kuehrt, E.; Langevin, Y.; Magni, G.; McCord, T.; Mennella, V.; Mottola, S.; Neukum, G.; Palumbo, P.; Piccioni, G.; Rauer, H.; Saggin, B.; Schmitt, B.; Tiphene, D.; Tozzi, G.

    2007-02-01

    The VIRTIS (Visual IR Thermal Imaging Spectrometer) experiment has been one of the most successful experiments built in Europe for Planetary Exploration. VIRTIS, developed in cooperation among Italy, France and Germany, has been already selected as a key experiment for 3 planetary missions: the ESA-Rosetta and Venus Express and NASA-Dawn. VIRTIS on board Rosetta and Venus Express are already producing high quality data: as far as Rosetta is concerned, the Earth-Moon system has been successfully observed during the Earth Swing-By manouver (March 2005) and furthermore, VIRTIS will collect data when Rosetta flies by Mars in February 2007 at a distance of about 200 kilometres from the planet. Data from the Rosetta mission will result in a comparison using the same combination of sophisticated experiments of targets that are poorly differentiated and are representative of the composition of different environment of the primordial solar system. Comets and asteroids, in fact, are in close relationship with the planetesimals, which formed from the solar nebula 4.6 billion years ago. The Rosetta mission payload is designed to obtain this information combining in situ analysis of comet material, obtained by the small lander Philae, and by a long lasting and detailed remote sensing of the comet, obtained by instrument on board the orbiting Spacecraft. The combination of remote sensing and in situ measurements will increase the scientific return of the mission. In fact, the “ in situ” measurements will provide “ground-truth” for the remote sensing information, and, in turn, the locally collected data will be interpreted in the appropriate context provided by the remote sensing investigation. VIRTIS is part of the scientific payload of the Rosetta Orbiter and will detect and characterise the evolution of specific signatures such as the typical spectral bands of minerals and molecules arising from surface components and from materials dispersed in the coma. The

  10. "Hello, World!" Harnessing Social Media for the Rosetta Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, E.; Mignone, C.; Scuka, D.; Homfeld, A. M.; Ranero, K.; Rolfe, E.; Bennett, M.; Schepers, A.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Bauer, M.; McCaughrean, M.

    2016-03-01

    The European Space Agency's comet-chasing Rosetta mission was launched in 2004, before social media became a popular tool for mainstream communication. As it reached its destination ten years later, new audiences were reached and inspired by this once-in-a-lifetime event by harnessing a range of outlets for communicating the key messages. These included traditional online platforms, such as news websites, blogs, and Livestream, as well as Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Flickr, YouTube, Google+ and SoundCloud. In this article, we outline the role social media channels played in making Rosetta one of the European Space Agency's biggest communication and public engagement successes.

  11. Thermoluminescence of pyramid stones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomaa, M.A.; Eid, A.M. (Atomic Energy Establishment, Cairo (Egypt))

    1982-01-01

    It is the aim of the present study to investigate some thermoluminescence properties of pyramid stones. Using a few grammes of pyramid stones from Pyramids I and II, the TL glow peaks were observed at 250 and 310/sup 0/C, respectively. The TL glow peaks of samples annealed at 600/sup 0/C, then exposed to /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays were observed at 120, 190 and 310/sup 0/C, respectively. The accumulated dose of natural samples is estimated to be around 310 Gray (31 krad). By assuming an annual dose is 1 mGy, the estimated age of pyramid stones is 0.31 M year.

  12. DURABILITY OF DIMENSION STONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branko Crnković

    1991-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a survey of the possible origins of the strain and deformation of stone. A range of origins which can be influenced is suggested, from those occurring under natural conditions in the deposit to those resulting from technologies applied in quarrying, stone processing and dressing, including environment with natural and technogenic factors. No new information can be given on the behavior of the stone processed and used in building according to the most recent technologies, because the time-span of its exposure to the influence of natural and technogenic factors has been too short.

  13. Pharmacotherapy of kidney stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Charles Y C

    2008-06-01

    Kidney stones are associated with various biochemical disturbances in urine. Various drugs and dietary changes have been recommended to halt stone recurrence. To determine whether a correction of urinary abnormalities by appropriate pharmacological agents and dietary modification may ameliorate stone disease. A review of the literature was conducted on the role of diet, metabolic disorders and drugs for stone prevention. Metabolic risk factors are hypercalciuria, hypocitraturia, hyperoxaluria, hyperuricosuria, and abnormally low urinary pH. Dietary-environmental risk factors include high urinary sodium and low urine volume. Rare or less commonly encountered risk factors are high urinary cystine, and alkaline urine from an infection with urea-splitting organisms. To ameliorate or correct the above disturbances, all patients should be offered dietary modification, including restricted intake of sodium, oxalate and animal proteins. Useful drugs include thiazide or indapamide to control hypercalciuria, potassium citrate to correct hypocitraturia and undue urinary acidity, and allopurinol for co-existing hyperuricemia or marked hyperuricosuria.

  14. Stone fragmentation by ultrasound

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Shrivastava; Kailash

    2004-08-01

    The presence of kidney stone in the kidney causes discomfort to patients. Hence, removal of such stones is important which is commonly done these days, non-destructively, with lithotripters without surgery. Commercially, lithotripters like extra-corporeal shock wave lithotripters (ESWL) made by Siemens etc are in routine use. These methods are very cumbersome and expensive. Treatment of the patients also takes comparatively more time because of more number of sittings. Some delicate nerves and fibres in the surrounding areas of the stones present in the kidney are also damaged by high ultrasonic intensity used in such systems. In the present work, enhancement of the kidney stone fragmentation by using ultrasound is studied. The cavitation bubbles are found to implode faster, with more disintegration efficiency of the lithotripters, which give better treatment to the patients.

  15. Crushed Stone Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes crushed stone operations in the United States. These data were obtained from information reported voluntarily to the USGS by the aggregate...

  16. Kidney Stones (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... en los riñones Kidney stones are small, solid masses that can develop in the urinary tract . Also ... of salt and protein in their diet limit consumption of soda/soft/sports drinks If dietary changes ...

  17. Kidney Stones in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drinking the wrong types of fluids, such as soft drinks or drinks with caffeine, may cause substances in ... such as chocolate, peanut butter, and dark-colored soft drinks. Children who form uric acid or cystine stones ...

  18. Stone dusting process advance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matt Ryan; David Humphreys [Mining Attachments (Qld.) Pty Ltd. (Australia)

    2009-01-15

    The coal mining industry has, for many years, used dry stone dust or calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) in the prevention of the propagation of coal dust explosions throughout their underground mines in Australia. In the last decade wet stone dusting has been introduced. This is where stone dust and water are mixed together to form a paste like slurry. This mixture is pumped and sprayed on to the underground roadway surfaces. This method solved the contamination of the intake airways but brought with it a new problem known as 'caking'. Caking is the hardened layer that is formed as the stone dust slurry dries. It was proven that this hardened layer compromises the dispersal characteristics of the stone dust and therefore its ability to suppress a coal dust explosion. This project set out to prove a specially formulated, non toxic slurry additive and process that could overcome the caking effect. The slurry additive process combines dry stone dust with water to form a slurry. The slurry is then treated with the additive and compressed air to create a highly vesicular foam like stone dusted surface. The initial testing on a range of additives and the effectiveness in minimising the caking effect of wet dusting were performed at Applied Chemical's research laboratory in Melbourne, Victoria and independently tested at the SGS laboratory in Paget, Queensland. The results from these tests provided the platform to conduct full scale spraying trials at the Queensland Mines Rescue Station and Caledon Coal's Cook Colliery, Blackwater. The project moved into the final stage of completion with the collection of data. The intent was to compare the slurry additive process to dry stone dusting in full-scale methane explosions at the CSIR Kloppersbos explosion facility in Kloppersbos, South Africa.

  19. ROSETTA lander Philae: Touch-down reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll, Reinhard; Witte, Lars

    2016-06-01

    The landing of the ROSETTA-mission lander Philae on November 12th 2014 on Comet 67 P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko was planned as a descent with passive landing and anchoring by harpoons at touch-down. Actually the lander was not fixed at touch-down to the ground due to failing harpoons. The lander internal damper was actuated at touch-down for 42.6 mm with a speed of 0.08 m/s while the lander touch-down speed was 1 m/s. The kinetic energy before touch-down was 50 J, 45 J were dissipated by the lander internal damper and by ground penetration at touch-down, and 5 J kinetic energy are left after touch-down (0.325 m/s speed). Most kinetic energy was dissipated by ground penetration (41 J) while only 4 J are dissipated by the lander internal damper. Based on these data, a value for a constant compressive soil-strength of between 1.55 kPa and 1.8 kPa is calculated. This paper focuses on the reconstruction of the touch-down at Agilkia over a period of around 20 s from first ground contact to lift-off again. After rebound Philae left a strange pattern on ground documented by the OSIRIS Narrow Angle Camera (NAC). The analysis shows, that the touch-down was not just a simple damped reflection on the surface. Instead the lander had repeated contacts with the surface over a period of about 20 s±10 s. This paper discusses scenarios for the reconstruction of the landing sequence based on the data available and on computer simulations. Simulations are performed with a dedicated mechanical multi-body model of the lander, which was validated previously in numerous ground tests. The SIMPACK simulation software was used, including the option to set forces at the feet to the ground. The outgoing velocity vector is mostly influenced by the timing of the ground contact of the different feet. It turns out that ground friction during damping has strong impact on the lander outgoing velocity, on its rotation, and on its nutation. After the end of damping, the attitude of the lander can be

  20. WebGL for Rosetta Science Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Albrecht; Völk, Stefan; Grieger, Björn

    2013-04-01

    Rosetta is a mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) to rendez-vous with comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014. The trajectory and operations of the mission are particularly complex, have many free parameters and are novel to the community. To support science planning, communicate operational ideas and disseminate operational scenarios to the scientific community, the science ground segment makes use of Web-based visualisation technologies. Using the recent standard WebGL, static pages of time-dependent three-dimensional views of the spacecraft and the field-of-views of the instruments are generated, directly from the operational files. These can then be viewed in modern Web browsers for understanding or verification, be analysed and correlated with other studies. Variable timesteps make it possible to provide both overviews and detailed animated scenes. The technical challenges that are particular to Web-based environments include: (1) In traditional OpenGL, is much easier to compute needed data on demand since the visualisation runs natively on a usually quite powerful computer. In WebGL application, since requests for additional data have to be passed through a Web server, they are more complex and also require a more complex infrastructure. (2) The volume of data that can be kept in a browser environment is limited and has to be transferred over often slow network links. Thus, careful design and reduction of data is required. (3) Although browser support for WebGL has improved since the authors started using it, it is often not well supported on mobile and small devices. (4) Web browsers often only support limited end user interactions with a mouse or keyboards. While some of the challenges can be expected to become less important as technological progress continues, others seem to be more inherent to the approach. On the positive side, the authors' experiences include: (1) low threshold in the community to using the visualisations, (2), thus, cooperative use

  1. "Rosetta" Mission's "7 Hours of Terror" and "Philae's" Descent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Philip

    2015-01-01

    In November 2014 the "Rosetta" mission to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko made the headlines when its "Philae" lander completed a successful unpowered descent onto the surface of the comet nucleus after "7 hours of terror" for the mission scientists. 67P's irregular shape and rotation made this task even more…

  2. Data processing and visualisation in the Rosetta Science Ground Segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Bernhard

    2016-09-01

    Rosetta is the first space mission to rendezvous with a comet. The spacecraft encountered its target 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014 and currently escorts the comet through a complete activity cycle during perihelion passage. The Rosetta Science Ground Segment (RSGS) is in charge of planning and coordinating the observations carried out by the scientific instruments on board the Rosetta spacecraft. We describe the data processing system implemented at the RSGS in order to support data analysis and science operations planning. The system automatically retrieves and processes telemetry data in near real-time. The generated products include spacecraft and instrument housekeeping parameters, scientific data for some instruments, and derived quantities. Based on spacecraft and comet trajectory information a series of geometric variables are calculated in order to assess the conditions for scheduling the observations of the scientific instruments and analyse the respective measurements obtained. Images acquired by the Rosetta Navigation Camera are processed and distributed in near real-time to the instrument team community. A quicklook web-page displaying the images allows the RSGS team to monitor the state of the comet and the correct acquisition and downlink of the images. Consolidated datasets are later delivered to the long-term archive.

  3. Engaging the public via competitions - lessons learnt from Rosetta

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, Karen S.; Baldwin, Emily; Mignone, Claudia; Homfeld, Anne-Mareike; Bauer, Markus; McCaughrean, Mark J.

    2015-04-01

    2014 was an historic and challenging year for the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission as it awoke from a 957-day slumber, arrived at Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, and deployed a lander on the comet's surface. One of the biggest challenges facing the mission's science communicators was to awaken interest in the mission and generate a sustained engagement in the broadest possible audience in a relatively short time. New and innovative means were adopted alongside traditional approaches to achieve this goal. In this paper, we describe one of these outreach projects: engaging the public with open competitions. We describe three different competitions that were run for three important mission milestones: 'Wake Up Rosetta' - a video competition to celebrate the end of hibernation; 'Rosetta, are we there yet?' - a photo competition to coincide with Rosetta's rendevous with 67P, and 'Name Site J' - to name the landing site chosen for the Philae lander. We discuss our experiences of these competitions: the channels we used to promote them, the audience we reached, the different levels of engagement, the issues that we encountered, and the outcomes, including lessons learnt.

  4. "Rosetta" Mission's "7 Hours of Terror" and "Philae's" Descent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Philip

    2015-01-01

    In November 2014 the "Rosetta" mission to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko made the headlines when its "Philae" lander completed a successful unpowered descent onto the surface of the comet nucleus after "7 hours of terror" for the mission scientists. 67P's irregular shape and rotation made this task even more…

  5. Rosetta - a new target to solve planetary mysteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This delay meant that the original mission's target, Comet Wirtanen, could no longer be reached. Instead, a new target has been selected, Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, which Rosetta will encounter in 2014 after a ‘billiard ball’ journey through the Solar System lasting more than ten years. Rosetta’s name comes from the famous ‘Rosetta Stone’, from which Egyptian hieroglyphics were deciphered almost 200 years ago. In a similar way, scientists hope that the Rosetta spacecraft will unlock the mysteries of the Solar System. Comets are very interesting objects for scientists, since their composition reflects how the Solar System was when it was very young and still 'unfinished', more than 4600 million years ago. Comets have not changed much since then. In orbiting Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko and landing on it, Rosetta will collect information essential to an understanding of the origin and evolution of our Solar System. It will also help discover whether comets contributed to the beginnings of life on Earth. In fact comets are carriers of complex organic molecules that, delivered to Earth through impacts, perhaps played a role in the origin of living forms. Furthermore, ‘volatile’ light elements carried by comets might also have played an important role in forming the Earth’s oceans and atmosphere. “Rosetta is one of the most challenging missions undertaken so far,” says Professor David Southwood, ESA Director of Science. “No one has ever attempted such a mission, unique for its scientific implications as well as for its complex and spectacular interplanetary space manoeuvres.” Before reaching its target in 2014, Rosetta will circle the Sun four times on wide loops in the inner Solar System. During its long trek, the spacecraft will have to endure some extreme thermal conditions. Once it is close to Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, scientists will take it through a delicate braking manoeuvre; the spacecraft will then closely orbit the comet, and

  6. Fasting and Urinary Stones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shamsa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fasting is considered as one of the most important practices of Islam, and according to Prophet Mohammad, fasting is obligatory upon Muslims. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of fasting on urinary stones. Materials and Methods: Very few studies have been carried out on urinary stones and the effect of Ramadan fasting. The sources of the present study are Medline and articles presented by local and Muslim researchers. Meanwhile, since we are acquainted with three well-known researchers in the field of urology, we contacted them via email and asked for their professional opinions. Results: The results of studies about the relationship of urinary stones and their incidence in Ramadan are not alike, and are even sometimes contradictory. Some believe that increased incidence of urinary stones in Ramadan is related not to fasting, but to the rise of weather temperature in hot months, and an increase in humidity. Conclusion: Numerous biological and behavioral changes occur in people who fast in Ramadan and some researchers believe that urinary stone increases during this month.

  7. Fasting and urinary stones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shamsa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fasting is considered as one of the most important practices of Islam, and according to Prophet Mohammad, fasting is obligatory upon Muslims. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of fasting on urinary stones. Materials and Methods:Very few studies have been carried out on urinary stones and the effect of Ramadan fasting. The sources of the present study are Medline and articles presented by local and Muslim researchers. Meanwhile, since we are acquainted with three well-known researchers in the field  of urology, we contacted them via email and asked for their professional opinions. Results:The results of studies about the relationship of urinary stones and their incidence in Ramadan are not alike, and are even sometimes contradictory. Some believe that increased incidence of urinary stones in Ramadan is related not to fasting, but to the rise of weather temperature in hot months, and an increase in humidity. Conclusion: Numerous biological and behavioral changes occur in people who fast in Ramadan and some researchers believe that urinary stone increases during this month.

  8. Rosetta performs ESA's closest-ever Earth fly-by

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    The passage through the Earth-Moon system allowed ground controllers to test Rosetta's 'asteroid fly-by mode' (AFM) using the Moon as a 'fake' asteroid, rehearsing the fly-bys of asteroids Steins and Lutetia due in 2008 and 2010 respectively. The AFM test started at 23:01 GMT and ran for nine minutes during which the two onboard navigation cameras successfully tracked the Moon, allowing Rosetta's attitude to be automatically adjusted. Before and after closest approach, the navigation cameras also acquired a series of images of the Moon and Earth; these data will be downloaded early today for ground processing and are expected to be available by 8 March. In addition, other onboard instruments were switched on, including ALICE (ultraviolet imaging spectrometer), VIRTIS (visible and infrared mapping spectrometer) and MIRO (microwave instrument for the Rosetta orbiter), for calibration and general testing using the Earth and Moon as targets. The fly-by manoeuvre swung the three-tonne spacecraft around our planet and out towards Mars, where it will make a fly-by on 26 February 2007. Rosetta will return to Earth again in a series of four planet fly-bys (three times with Earth, once with Mars) before reaching Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014, when it will enter orbit and deliver a lander, Philae, onto the surface. The fly-bys are necessary to accelerate the spacecraft so as to eventually match the velocity of the target comet. They are a fuel-saving way to boost speed using planetary gravity. Yesterday's fly-by came one year and two days after launch and highlights the valuable opportunities for instrument calibration and data gathering available during the mission's multi-year voyage. In just three months, on 4 July, Rosetta will be in a good position to observe and gather data during NASA's spectacular Deep Impact event, when the Deep Impact probe will hurl a 380 kg projectile into Comet Tempel 1, revealing data on the comet's internal structure. Certain of

  9. Stones from bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worcester, Elaine M

    2002-12-01

    Kidney stones are increased in patients with bowel disease, particularly those who have had resection of part of their gastrointestinal tract. These stones are usually CaOx, but there is a marked increase in the tendency to form uric acid stones, as well, particularly in patients with colon resection. These patients all share a tendency to chronic volume contraction due to loss of water and salt in diarrheal stool, which leads to decreased urine volumes. They also have decreased absorption, and therefore diminished urinary excretion, of citrate and magnesium, which normally act as inhibitors of CaOx crystallization. Patients with colon resection and ileostomy form uric acid stones, as loss of bicarbonate in the ileostomy effluent leads to formation of an acid urine. This, coupled with low urine volume, decreases the solubility of uric acid, causing crystallization and stone formation. Prevention of stones requires treatment with alkalinizing agents to raise urine pH to about 6.5, and attempts to increase urine volume, which increases the solubility of uric acid and prevents crystallization. Patients with small bowel resection may develop steatorrhea; if the colon is present, they are at risk of hyperoxaluria due to increased permeability of the colon to oxalate in the presence of fatty acids, and increased concentrations of free oxalate in the bowel lumen due to fatty acid binding of luminal calcium. EH leads to supersaturation of urine with respect to CaOx, in conjunction with low volume, hypocitraturia and hypomagnesuria. Therapy involves a low-fat, low-oxalate diet, attempts to increase urine volume, and agents such as calcium given to bind oxalate in the gut lumen. Correction of hypocitraturia and hypomagnesuria are also helpful.

  10. Comet 67P as seen by Rosetta/OSIRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guettler, Carsten; Sierks, Holger; Barbieri, Cesare; Lamy, Philippe L.; Rodrigo, Rafael; Koschny, Detlef; Rickman, Hans; OSIRIS Team

    2016-10-01

    In September 2016, the ESA Rosetta mission will come to its ending. Having escorted comet 67P for more than two years, the scientific camera system OSIRIS onboard Rosetta witnessed all important milestones of the mission: after the first characterization and the Philae landing we saw the comet's activity increasing while it was approaching the Sun. During the peak of activity around perihel in August 2015, the spacecraft had to retreat to a safe distance but we witnessed strong but predictable jet activity and, at the same time, short lived eruptions, some of these being big outbursts. When the activity declined post perihelion and allowed the spacecraft to go back closer, comparison with the early characterization revealed numerous morphologic changes on the surface, which can be attributed to the strong activity during perihelion passage.The paper will give an overview of latest OSIRIS science and discoveries including the morphology, activity, and surface changes mentioned above. Implications on the nature of the comet and its mechanisms will be drawn from these. The current plan for the mission is to go to very close distances in August and September 2016 and finally land the spacecraft on 67P.Acknowledgements: OSIRIS was built by a consortium led by the Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Göttingen, Germany, in collaboration with CISAS, University of Padova, Italy, the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, France, the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucia, CSIC, Granada, Spain, the Scientific Support Office of the European Space Agency, Noordwijk, The Netherlands, the Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial, Madrid, Spain, the Universidad Politéchnica de Madrid, Spain, the Department of Physics and Astronomy of Uppsala University, Sweden, and the Institut für Datentechnik und Kommunikationsnetze der Technischen Universität Braunschweig, Germany.We thank the Rosetta Science Ground Segment at ESAC, the Rosetta Mission Operations Centre

  11. Diet for Kidney Stone Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from foods Uric Acid Stones Limit animal protein Reduce sodium Talk with a health care professional about how ... MSG sodium alginate sodium nitrate or nitrite To reduce sodium to help prevent kidney stones, avoid processed and ...

  12. Weighted recalibration of the Rosetta pedotransfer model with improved estimates of hydraulic parameter distributions and summary statistics (Rosetta3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yonggen; Schaap, Marcel G.

    2017-04-01

    Pedotransfer functions (PTFs) have been widely used to predict soil hydraulic parameters in favor of expensive laboratory or field measurements. Rosetta (Schaap et al., 2001, denoted as Rosetta1) is one of many PTFs and is based on artificial neural network (ANN) analysis coupled with the bootstrap re-sampling method which allows the estimation of van Genuchten water retention parameters (van Genuchten, 1980, abbreviated here as VG), saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), and their uncertainties. In this study, we present an improved set of hierarchical pedotransfer functions (Rosetta3) that unify the water retention and Ks submodels into one. Parameter uncertainty of the fit of the VG curve to the original retention data is used in the ANN calibration procedure to reduce bias of parameters predicted by the new PTF. One thousand bootstrap replicas were used to calibrate the new models compared to 60 or 100 in Rosetta1, thus allowing the uni-variate and bi-variate probability distributions of predicted parameters to be quantified in greater detail. We determined the optimal weights for VG parameters and Ks, the optimal number of hidden nodes in ANN, and the number of bootstrap replicas required for statistically stable estimates. Results show that matric potential-dependent bias was reduced significantly while root mean square error (RMSE) for water content were reduced modestly; RMSE for Ks was increased by 0.9% (H3w) to 3.3% (H5w) in the new models on log scale of Ks compared with the Rosetta1 model. It was found that estimated distributions of parameters were mildly non-Gaussian and could instead be described rather well with heavy-tailed α-stable distributions. On the other hand, arithmetic means had only a small estimation bias for most textures when compared with the mean-like ;shift; parameter of the α-stable distributions. Arithmetic means and (co-)variances are therefore still recommended as summary statistics of the estimated distributions. However, it

  13. The Strategy and Implementation of the Rosetta Communication Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, M.; McCaughrean, M.; Landeau-Constantin, J.

    2016-03-01

    The communication campaign for Rosetta has been the biggest success in the history of European Space Agency outreach, resulting in global awareness for the agency. The mission itself is an extraordinary operational and scientific success, but communicating only the operational and scientific firsts would likely not have brought the Rosetta orbiter and Philae lander to the attention of so many people, and would not have made the mission part of people's lives across the globe. The additional impact brought to the mission through the communication campaign was based on a strategic approach focusing on: real-time release of information with maximum transparency; direct real-time access for media and social media; adding a human dimension to the story; and communicating the risks openly in order to manage expectations. In this article we describe our overall strategy, illustrate its implementation, and provide the framework for subsequent articles in this journal highlighting specific aspects of the campaign in more detail.

  14. An Historic Encounter: Reviewing the Outreach around ESA's Rosetta Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzen, D.

    2016-03-01

    The Rosetta mission is a milestone in terms of science and public outreach. The European Space Agency and the Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt in particular did a marvellous job of sparking global public interest, driven by various events throughout the mission. In contrast, the actions of the Max Planck Society research group in charge of the high resolution Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System were, in my opinion, the cause of some concern and bring to light an important debate in the relationship between outreach and science. This article seeks to review the outreach that surrounded the Rosetta mission and to highlight both the best practice that made it a success and the bad practice that set some aspects behind.

  15. A Framework to Simplify Combined Sampling Strategies in Rosetta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin R Porter

    Full Text Available A core task in computational structural biology is the search of conformational space for low energy configurations of a biological macromolecule. Because conformational space has a very high dimensionality, the most successful search methods integrate some form of prior knowledge into a general sampling algorithm to reduce the effective dimensionality. However, integrating multiple types of constraints can be challenging. To streamline the incorporation of diverse constraints, we developed the Broker: an extension of the Rosetta macromolecular modeling suite that can express a wide range of protocols using constraints by combining small, independent modules, each of which implements a different set of constraints. We demonstrate expressiveness of the Broker through several code vignettes. The framework enables rapid protocol development in both biomolecular design and structural modeling tasks and thus is an important step towards exposing the rich functionality of Rosetta's core libraries to a growing community of users addressing a diverse set of tasks in computational biology.

  16. Rosetta - a comet ride to solve planetary mysteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Comets are very interesting objects for scientists, since their composition reflects how the Solar System was when it was very young and still 'unfinished', more than 4600 million years ago. Comets have not changed much since then. By orbiting Comet Wirtanen and landing on it, Rosetta will collect essential information to understand the origin and evolution of our Solar System. It will also help discover whether comets contributed to the beginnings of life on Earth. In fact comets are carriers of complex organic molecules, that - delivered to Earth through impacts - perhaps played a role in the origin of living forms. Furthermore, “volatile” light elements carried by comets may have also played an important role in forming the Earth’s oceans and atmopshere. “Rosetta is one of the most challenging missions ever undertaken so far”, says Prof. David Southwood, ESA Director of Science, “No one before attempted a similar mission, unique for its scientific implications as well as for its complex and spectacular interplanetary space manoeuvres”. Before reaching its target in 2011, Rosetta will circle the Sun almost four times on wide loops in the inner Solar System. During its long trek, the spacecraft will have to endure some extreme thermal conditions. Once it is close to Comet Wirtanen, scientists will take it through a delicate braking manoeuvre; then the spacecraft will closely orbit the comet, and gently drop a lander on it. It will be like landing on a small, fast-moving cosmic bullet that still has - at present - an almost unknown 'geography'. An amazing 8-year interplanetary trek Rosetta is a 3-tonne box-type spacecraft about 3 metres high, with two 14-metre long solar panels. It consists of an orbiter and a lander. The lander is approximately 1 metre across and 80 centimetres high. It will be attached to the side of the Rosetta orbiter during the journey to Comet Wirtanen. Rosetta carries 21 experiments in total, 10 of them on the lander. They will

  17. Kidney stones during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semins, Michelle J; Matlaga, Brian R

    2014-03-01

    Kidney stones affect 10% of people at some point in their lives and, for some unfortunate women, this happens during pregnancy. Pregnancy is a complex state and both physiological and mechanical changes alter risk factors for kidney stone formation. When a pregnant woman develops acute nephrolithiasis, the situation is more complicated than in nonpregnant women. Imaging limitations and treatment restrictions mean that special diagnostic and management algorithms are needed upon presentation. Ultrasonography remains the gold-standard first-line diagnostic imaging modality for kidney stones during pregnancy but several second-line alternatives exist. Acute renal colic during pregnancy is associated with risks to both mother and fetus. As such, these patients need to be handled with special attention. First-line management is generally conservative (trial of passage and pain management) and is associated with a high rate of stone passage. Presentation of obstructive nephrolithiasis with associated infection represents a unique and serious clinical situation requiring immediate drainage. If infection is not present and conservative management fails, ureteroscopy can be offered if clinically appropriate, but, in some circumstances, temporary drainage with ureteral stent or nephrostomy tube might be indicated. Shockwave lithotripsy and percutaneous nephrolithotomy are contraindicated during pregnancy.

  18. Modeling Stone Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Castro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the main modeling techniques for stone columns, both ordinary stone columns and geosynthetic-encased stone columns. The paper tries to encompass the more recent advances and recommendations in the topic. Regarding the geometrical model, the main options are the “unit cell”, longitudinal gravel trenches in plane strain conditions, cylindrical rings of gravel in axial symmetry conditions, equivalent homogeneous soil with improved properties and three-dimensional models, either a full three-dimensional model or just a three-dimensional row or slice of columns. Some guidelines for obtaining these simplified geometrical models are provided and the particular case of groups of columns under footings is also analyzed. For the latter case, there is a column critical length that is around twice the footing width for non-encased columns in a homogeneous soft soil. In the literature, the column critical length is sometimes given as a function of the column length, which leads to some disparities in its value. Here it is shown that the column critical length mainly depends on the footing dimensions. Some other features related with column modeling are also briefly presented, such as the influence of column installation. Finally, some guidance and recommendations are provided on parameter selection for the study of stone columns.

  19. Modeling Stone Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the main modeling techniques for stone columns, both ordinary stone columns and geosynthetic-encased stone columns. The paper tries to encompass the more recent advances and recommendations in the topic. Regarding the geometrical model, the main options are the “unit cell”, longitudinal gravel trenches in plane strain conditions, cylindrical rings of gravel in axial symmetry conditions, equivalent homogeneous soil with improved properties and three-dimensional models, either a full three-dimensional model or just a three-dimensional row or slice of columns. Some guidelines for obtaining these simplified geometrical models are provided and the particular case of groups of columns under footings is also analyzed. For the latter case, there is a column critical length that is around twice the footing width for non-encased columns in a homogeneous soft soil. In the literature, the column critical length is sometimes given as a function of the column length, which leads to some disparities in its value. Here it is shown that the column critical length mainly depends on the footing dimensions. Some other features related with column modeling are also briefly presented, such as the influence of column installation. Finally, some guidance and recommendations are provided on parameter selection for the study of stone columns. PMID:28773146

  20. A microelectronics approach for the ROSETTA surface science package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandau, Rainer (Editor); Alkalaj, Leon

    1996-01-01

    In relation to the Rosetta surface science package, the benefits of the application of advanced microelectronics packaging technologies and other output from the Mars environmental survey (MESUR) integrated microelectronics study are reported on. The surface science package will be designed to operate for tens of hours. Its limited mass and power consumption make necessary a highly integrated design with all the instruments and subunits operated from a centralized control and information management subsystem.

  1. Hello World: Harnessing social media for the Rosetta mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, E.; Mignone, C.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Homfeld, A.-M.; Bauer, M.; McCaughrean, M. J.

    2015-10-01

    The European Space Agency's (ESA) comet-chasing Rosetta mission was launched in 2004, before social media became a popular tool for mainstream communication. By harnessing a range of platforms for communicating the key messages of this unprecedented space adventure as the spacecraft reached its destination ten years later, a wide range of new audiences were reached and could follow this once-in-a-lifetime mission.

  2. RosettaRemodel: a generalized framework for flexible backbone protein design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Ssu Huang

    Full Text Available We describe RosettaRemodel, a generalized framework for flexible protein design that provides a versatile and convenient interface to the Rosetta modeling suite. RosettaRemodel employs a unified interface, called a blueprint, which allows detailed control over many aspects of flexible backbone protein design calculations. RosettaRemodel allows the construction and elaboration of customized protocols for a wide range of design problems ranging from loop insertion and deletion, disulfide engineering, domain assembly, loop remodeling, motif grafting, symmetrical units, to de novo structure modeling.

  3. The Rosetta mission: Clues on the origin of comet nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidsson, Bjorn; Stern, S. Alan; Kofman, Wlodek; Hilchenbach, Martin; rotundi, alessandra; Bentley, Mark; Hofstadter, Mark; Sierks, Holger; Altwegg, Kathrin; Nilsson, Hans; Burch, James L.; Eriksson, Anders I.; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Henri, Pierre; Carr, Christopher M.; Pätzold, Martin; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Boehnhardt, Hermann; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Fulle, Marco; Fulchignoni, Marcello; Gruen, Eberhard; Weissman, Paul R.; Taylor, Matt; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Choukroun, Mathieu; Altobelli, Nicolas; Snodgrass, Colin; Rosetta Science Working Team

    2016-10-01

    The Rosetta mission has been taking measurements of its target Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko sinceearly 2014 and will complete operations at the end of September 2016. The mission Science Management Plan,in 1994, laid out the the prime goals and themes of the mission. These five themes were:1) To study the global characterization of the Nucleus, the determination of the dynamics properties ,surface morphology and composition of the comet.2) Examination of the Chemical, Mineralogical and isotopic compositions of volatiles and refractoriesin a cometary nucleus.3) Physical interrelation of volatile and refractories in a cometary nucleus4) Study the development of cometary activity and the process in the surface layer of thenucleus and in the inner coma5) The origins of comets, the relationship between cometary and interstellar material and theimplications for the origin of the solar system,To cover all aspects of the Rosetta mission in this special Show case session, this abstracts isone of 5, with this particular presentation focusing on theme 5.Several scenarios for comet nucleus formation have been proposed, such as hierarchical agglomeration,or gravitational collapse of pebble swarms created either by turbulent eddies or by streaming instabilities.In addition, the question of survival of such primordial nuclei versus severe collisional processinghas been debated. The pros and cons of these hypotheses are discussed in the light of Rosetta's discoveries.

  4. The science planning process on the Rosetta mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallat, Claire; Altobelli, Nicolas; Geiger, Bernhard; Grieger, Bjoern; Kueppers, Michael; Muñoz Crego, Claudio; Moissl, Richard; Taylor, Matthew G. G. T.; Alexander, Claudia; Buratti, Bonnie; Choukroun, Mathieu

    2017-04-01

    The Rosetta mission arrived at comet 67 P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in Summer 2014, after more than 10 years in space. All previous mission encounters with a comet have provided a snapshot of the cometary activity at a given heliocentric distance. In contrast, Rosetta has escorted the comet nucleus for an extended period (>2 years) at a large range of cometo-centric and heliocentric distances, which has provided exceptional and unprecedented observing conditions to study, analyse and monitor 67 P during its passage to, through and away from perihelion. One of the biggest challenges of this mission is the development of an observation plan that adequately addresses the mission's science objectives while coping with a largely unknown and continuously evolving environment that constantly modifies the planning constraints. The Rosetta Science Ground Segment (RSGS), in support of the Project Scientist and the Science Working Team, is in charge of translating the high level mission science objectives into a low level pointing and operations plan. We present here the high-level science planning process adopted during the comet escort phase. We describe the main science objectives addressed along the mission lifetime, the different groups involved in the science planning, and the approach followed to translate those requirements into a viable and scientifically valid operations plan. Finally, we describe how the science planning scheme has evolved since arrival at the comet to react to the unexpected environment, largely reducing the planning lead times.

  5. Interaction of the solar wind with comets: a Rosetta perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2017-07-13

    The Rosetta mission provides an unprecedented possibility to study the interaction of comets with the solar wind. As the spacecraft accompanies comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from its very low-activity stage through its perihelion phase, the physics of mass loading is witnessed for various activity levels of the nucleus. While observations at other comets provided snapshots of the interaction region and its various plasma boundaries, Rosetta observations allow a detailed study of the temporal evolution of the innermost cometary magnetosphere. Owing to the short passage time of the solar wind through the interaction region, plasma instabilities such as ring--beam and non-gyrotropic instabilities are of less importance during the early life of the magnetosphere. Large-amplitude ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves, the 'singing' of the comet, is probably due to a modified ion Weibel instability. This instability drives a cross-field current of implanted cometary ions unstable. The initial pick-up of these ions causes a major deflection of the solar wind protons. Proton deflection, cross-field current and the instability induce a threefold structure of the innermost interaction region with the characteristic Mach cone and Whistler wings as stationary interaction signatures as well as the ULF waves representing the dynamic aspect of the interaction.This article is part of the themed issue 'Cometary science after Rosetta'. © 2017 The Authors.

  6. Rosetta Lander - Philae on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biele, J.; Ulamec, S.; Cozzoni, B.; Fantinati, C.; Gaudon, P.; Geurts, K.; Jurado, E.; Küchemann, O.; Lommatsch, V.; Finke, F.; Maibaum, M.; Moussi-Soffys, A.; Salatti, M.

    2015-10-01

    Rosetta is a Cornerstone Mission of the ESA Horizon 2000 programme. In August 2014 it reached comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko after a 10 year cruise. Both its nucleus and coma have been studied with its orbiter payload of eleven PI instruments, allowing the selection of a landing site for Philae. The landing on the comet nucleus successfully took place on November 12th 2014. Philae touched the comet surface seven hours after ejection from the orbiter. After several bounces it came to rest and continued to send scientific data to Earth. All ten instruments of its payload have been operated at least once. Due to the fact that the Lander could not be anchored, the originally planned first scientific sequence had to be modified. Philae went into hibernation on November 15th, after its primary battery ran out of energy. Re-activation of the Lander is expected in spring/summer 2015 (before the conference) when CG is closer to the sun and the solar generator of Philae will provide more power. The presentation will give an overview of the activities of Philae on the comet, including a status report on the re-activation after hibernation. Rosetta is an ESA mission with contributions from its member states and NASA. Rosetta's Philae lander is provided by a consortium led by DLR, MPS, CNES and ASI with additional contributions from Hungary, UK, Finland, Ireland and Austria.

  7. A Stone and a Diamond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    司亮

    2010-01-01

    一、故事内容 After a storm, a dry river is filled with water again. Many stones fall down into the river from the hill. Most of the stones are very happy. They sing and dance together. There are two special (特别的) stones. One is black, and the other is white. The white stone is as white as snow. She is proud of herself and she looks down on all the other stones. So no one wants to play with her.

  8. PACA_Rosetta67P: Global Amateur Observing Support for ESA/Rosetta Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma A.; Alexander, Claudia; Morales, Efrain; Feliciano-Rivera, Christiana

    2015-11-01

    The PACA (Professional - Amateur Collaborative Astronomy) Project is an ecosystem of several social media platforms (Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, Flickr, Vimeo) that takes advantage of the global and immediate connectivity amongst amateur astronomers worldwide, that can be galvanized to participate in a given observing campaign. The PACA Project has participated in organized campaigns such as Comet Observing Campaign (CIOC_ISON) in 2013 and Comet Siding Spring (CIOC_SidingSpring)in 2014. Currently the PACA Project is supporting ESA/Rosetta mission with ground-based observations of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (CG) through its perihelion in August 2015 and beyond; providing baseline observations of magnitude and evolution from locations around the globe. Comet 67P/CG will reach its brightest post-perihelion and pass closest to Earth in November 2015. We will present the various benefits of our professional - amateur collaboration: developing and building a core astronomer community; defining an observing campaign from basic information of the comet from its previous apparitions; coordinating with professionals and the mission to acquire observations, albeit low-resolution, but on a long timeline; while addressing the creation of several science products such as the variation of its magnitude over time and the changing morphology. We will present some of our results to date and compare with observations from professionals and previous apparations of the comet. We shall also highlight the challenges faced in building a successful collaborative partnership between the professional and amateur observers and their resolution. With the popularity of mobile platforms and instant connections with peers globally, the multi-faceted social universe has become a vital part of engagement of multiple communities for collaborative scientific partnerships and outreach. We shall also highlight other cometary observing campaigns that The PACA Project has initiated to evolve

  9. Rosetta mission: to decipher the origin of the solar system; Mision Rosetta: descifrar el origen del sistema solar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, B.

    2015-07-01

    Almost ten years after its launch and after 6000 million kilometers, the spacecraft Rosetta reached its destination orbit about 20 kilometers Comet 67P / Churyumov-Gerasimenko and make down to its surface to Philae module. With this initiative, the European Space Agency aims who know better how the solar system was in its origins, with the information it has collected and will collect this celestial body remains almost unchanged since billions of years. The probe continues its journey. (Author)

  10. Wanted: suitable replacement stones for the Lede stone (Belgium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kock, T.; Dewanckele, J.; Boone, M. A.; De Boever, W.; De Schutter, G.; Jacobs, P.; Cnudde, V.

    2012-04-01

    The Lede stone is an arenaceous limestone with a Lutetian age, occurring as discrete (most of the times three) stone banks in the marine sandy sediments of the Lede Formation (Belgium). It has a quartz content of approximate 40%. This increases abrasion strength and together with the cementation results in an average compressive strength of about 80-85 MPa. The cement is a microsparitic calcite cement. Other carbonate particles are both microfossils (mainly foraminifers) and macrofossils (bivalves, serpulids, echinoderms, …). This great diversity gives the stone a heterogeneous, animated appearance. The intra- and interparticle porosity is in total 5-10 % in average and the apparent density is 2400-2550 kg/m3. Another important constituent is glauconite, present in a few percent. In fresh state, the stone has a greenish-grey colour, but when it is exposed to atmospheric conditions for a couple of years, the stone acquires a yellowish to rust-coloured patina due to the weathering of glauconite. Sulphatation causes severe damage to the stone, and black gypsum crusts are common in urban environments on stones protected from runoff. This stone was excavated in both open air and underground quarries in the areas of Brussels and Ghent. The proximity of main rivers such as the Scheldt and Zenne provided transport routes for export towards the north (e.g. Antwerp and The Netherlands). Its first known use dates back to Roman times but the stone flourished in Gothic architecture due to its easy workability and its 'divine' light coloured patina. This results nowadays in a dominant occurrence in the cultural heritage of northwestern Belgium and the south of The Netherlands. Socio-economical reasons caused several declines and revivals of Lede stone in use. In the beginning of the 20th century, only a few excavation sites remained, with as main quarry the one located at Bambrugge (Belgium). By the end of the first half of the 20th century, however, no quarry sites remained

  11. Lessons from a Stone Farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, John P.; Rao, P. Nagaraj

    2007-04-01

    The stone farm is a system for measuring macroscopic stone growth of 12 calcium stones simultaneously. It is based on mixed suspension, mixed product removal continuous crystallization principles and the stones are grown continuously for about 500 hours or more. The growth of the stones follows a surface area dependent pattern and the growth rate constants are very similar irrespective of whether the stating materials are fragments of human stone or pieces of marble chip. Increasing citrate from 2mM to 6mM caused a significant growth inhibition which persisted in the presence of urinary macromolecules. Phytate was a very effective inhibitor (about 50% at sub-μM concentrations) but the effective concentration was increased by an order of magnitude in the presence of urinary macromolecules. The effective concentration for inhibition in a crystallization assay was a further two orders of magnitude higher. Urinary macromolecules or almost whole urine were also strongly inhibitory although neither human serum albumin nor bovine mucin had any great effect. The relationship between the size distribution of crystals in suspension and the stone enlargement rate suggests that the primary enlargement mechanism for these in vitro stones is through aggregation. The stone farm is a powerful tool with which to study crystallization inhibitors in a new light. Some differences between inhibition of crystallization and inhibition of stone growth have emerged and we have obtained quantitative evidence on the mechanism of stone enlargement in vitro. Our findings suggest that the interface between crystals in suspension and the stone surface is the key to controlling stone enlargement.

  12. Advances in percutaneous stone surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Hartman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of large renal stones has changed considerably in recent years. The increasing prevalence of nephrolithiasis has mandated that urologists perform more surgeries for large renal calculi than before, and this has been met with improvements in percutaneous stone surgery. In this review paper, we examine recent developments in percutaneous stone surgery, including advances in diagnosis and preoperative planning, renal access, patient position, tract dilation, nephroscopes, lithotripsy, exit strategies, and post-operative antibiotic prophylaxis.

  13. Adding diverse noncanonical backbones to rosetta: enabling peptidomimetic design.

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    Kevin Drew

    Full Text Available Peptidomimetics are classes of molecules that mimic structural and functional attributes of polypeptides. Peptidomimetic oligomers can frequently be synthesized using efficient solid phase synthesis procedures similar to peptide synthesis. Conformationally ordered peptidomimetic oligomers are finding broad applications for molecular recognition and for inhibiting protein-protein interactions. One critical limitation is the limited set of design tools for identifying oligomer sequences that can adopt desired conformations. Here, we present expansions to the ROSETTA platform that enable structure prediction and design of five non-peptidic oligomer scaffolds (noncanonical backbones, oligooxopiperazines, oligo-peptoids, [Formula: see text]-peptides, hydrogen bond surrogate helices and oligosaccharides. This work is complementary to prior additions to model noncanonical protein side chains in ROSETTA. The main purpose of our manuscript is to give a detailed description to current and future developers of how each of these noncanonical backbones was implemented. Furthermore, we provide a general outline for implementation of new backbone types not discussed here. To illustrate the utility of this approach, we describe the first tests of the ROSETTA molecular mechanics energy function in the context of oligooxopiperazines, using quantum mechanical calculations as comparison points, scanning through backbone and side chain torsion angles for a model peptidomimetic. Finally, as an example of a novel design application, we describe the automated design of an oligooxopiperazine that inhibits the p53-MDM2 protein-protein interaction. For the general biological and bioengineering community, several noncanonical backbones have been incorporated into web applications that allow users to freely and rapidly test the presented protocols (http://rosie.rosettacommons.org. This work helps address the peptidomimetic community's need for an automated and expandable

  14. DIMENSION STONE DEPOSITS IN CROATIA

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    Branko Crnković

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available The geology, petrographycal composition and properties of dimension stone deposits in Croatia are described. Dimension stone deposits in the conception of mobilistic view of the genesis and structure of Dinarides, as well as after stratigraphic units, are considered. Valuation of the dimension stones of the active quarries is exposed. The marketable categories of dimension stone in Croatia are different varietes of limestones and calcareous clastites, primarly of Cretaceous age, and to lesser degree of Jurassic and Paleogene. The greatest part of deposits is concentrated in the Adriatic carbonate platform or Adriaticum.

  15. Improved Rosetta Pedotransfer Estimation of Hydraulic Properties and Their Covariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Schaap, M. G.

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative knowledge of the soil hydraulic properties is necessary for most studies involving water flow and solute transport in the vadose zone. However, it is always expensive, difficult, and time consuming to measure hydraulic properties directly. Pedotransfer functions (PTFs) have been widely used to forecast soil hydraulic parameters. Rosetta is is one of many PTFs and based on artificial neural network analysis coupled with the bootstrap sampling method. The model provides hierarchical PTFs for different levels of input data for Rosetta (H1-H5 models, with higher order models requiring more input variables). The original Rosetta model consists of separate PTFs for the four "van Genuchten" (VG) water retention parameters and saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) because different numbers of samples were available for these characteristics. In this study, we present an improved Rosetta pedotransfer function that uses a single model for all five parameters combined; these parameters are weighed for each sample individually using the covariance matrix obtained from the curve-fit of the VG parameters to the primary data. The optimal number of hidden nodes, weights for saturated hydraulic conductivity and water retention parameters in the neural network and bootstrap realization were selected. Results show that root mean square error (RMSE) for water retention decreased from 0.076 to 0.072 cm3/cm3 for the H2 model and decreased from 0.044 to 0.039 cm3/cm3 for the H5 model. Mean errors which indicate variable matric potential-dependent bias were also reduced significantly in the new model. The RMSE for Ks increased slightly (H2: 0.717 to 0.722; H5: 0.581 to 0.594); this increase is minimal and a result of using a single model for water retention and Ks. Despite this small increase the new model is recommended because of its improved estimation of water retention, and because it is now possible to calculate the full covariance matrix of soil water retention

  16. Improved chemical shift prediction by Rosetta conformational sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Ye [Sanford Burnham Medical Research Institute (United States); Opella, Stanley J. [University of California San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Marassi, Francesca M., E-mail: fmarassi@sbmri.org [Sanford Burnham Medical Research Institute (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Chemical shift frequencies represent a time-average of all the conformational states populated by a protein. Thus, chemical shift prediction programs based on sequence and database analysis yield higher accuracy for rigid rather than flexible protein segments. Here we show that the prediction accuracy can be significantly improved by averaging over an ensemble of structures, predicted solely from amino acid sequence with the Rosetta program. This approach to chemical shift and structure prediction has the potential to be useful for guiding resonance assignments, especially in solid-state NMR structural studies of membrane proteins in proteoliposomes.

  17. Rosetta Mission's "7 Hours of Terror" and Philae's Descent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Philip

    2015-09-01

    In November 2014 the Rosetta mission to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko made the headlines when its Philae lander completed a successful unpowered descent onto the surface of the comet nucleus after "7 hours of terror" for the mission scientists. 67P's irregular shape and rotation made this task even more challenging. Philae fell almost radially towards 67P, as shown in an animation produced by the European Space Agency (ESA) prior to the event. Below, we investigate whether it is possible to model the spacecraft's descent time and impact speed using concepts taught in an introductory physics course.

  18. Villamayor stone (Golden Stone) as a Global Heritage Stone Resource from Salamanca (NW of Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Talegon, Jacinta; Iñigo, Adolfo; Vicente-Tavera, Santiago

    2013-04-01

    Villamayor stone is an arkosic stone of Middle Eocene age and belongs to the Cabrerizos Sandstone Formation that comprising braided fluvial systems and paleosoils at the top of each stratigraphic sequence. The sandstone is known by several names: i) the Villamayor Stone because the quarries are located in Villamayor de Armuña village that are situated at 7 km to the North from Salamanca city; ii) the Golden Stone due to its patina that produced a ochreous/golden color on the façades of monuments of Salamanca (World Heritage City,1988) built in this Natural stone (one of the silicated rocks utilised). We present in this work, the Villamayor Stone to be candidate as Global Heritage Stone Resource. The Villamayor Stone were quarrying for the construction and ornamentation of Romanesque religious monuments as the Old Cathedral and San Julian church; Gothic (Spanish plateresc style) as the New Cathedral, San Esteban church and the sculpted façade of the Salamanca University, one of the oldest University in Europe (it had established in 1250); and this stone was one of the type of one of the most sumptuous Baroque monuments is the Main Square of the its galleries and arcades (1729). Also, this stone was used in building palaces, walls and reconstruction of Roman bridge. Currently, Villamayor Stone is being quarried by small and family companies, without a modernized processing, for cladding of the façades of the new buildings until that the construction sector was burst (in 2008 the international economic crisis). However, Villamayor Stone is the main stone material used in the city of Salamanca for the restoration of monuments and, even in small quantities when compared with just before the economic crisis, it would be of great importance for future generations protect their quarries and the craft of masonry. Villamayor Stone has several varieties from channels facies to floodplains facies, in this work the selected varieties are: i) the fine-grained stone

  19. The systematic classification of gallbladder stones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tie Qiao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To develop a method for systematic classification of gallbladder stones, analyze the clinical characteristics of each type of stone and provide a theoretical basis for the study of the formation mechanism of different types of gallbladder stones. METHODOLOGY: A total of 807 consecutive patients with gallbladder stones were enrolled and their gallstones were studied. The material composition of gallbladder stones was analyzed using Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy and the distribution and microstructure of material components was observed with Scanning Electron Microscopy. The composition and distribution of elements were analyzed by an X-ray energy spectrometer. Gallbladder stones were classified accordingly, and then, gender, age, medical history and BMI of patients with each type of stone were analyzed. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gallbladder stones were classified into 8 types and more than ten subtypes, including cholesterol stones (297, pigment stones (217, calcium carbonate stones (139, phosphate stones (12, calcium stearate stones (9, protein stones (3, cystine stones (1 and mixed stones (129. Mixed stones were those stones with two or more than two kinds of material components and the content of each component was similar. A total of 11 subtypes of mixed stones were found in this study. Patients with cholesterol stones were mainly female between the ages of 30 and 50, with higher BMI and shorter medical history than patients with pigment stones (P<0.05, however, patients with pigment, calcium carbonate, phosphate stones were mainly male between the ages of 40 and 60. CONCLUSION: The systematic classification of gallbladder stones indicates that different types of stones have different characteristics in terms of the microstructure, elemental composition and distribution, providing an important basis for the mechanistic study of gallbladder stones.

  20. Renal stone disease: Pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pak, C.Y.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radiologic considerations; Physiochemistry of urinary stone formations; Nutritional aspects of stone disease; Prevention of recurrent nephrolithiasis; Struvite stones; and Contemporary approaches to removal of renal and ureteral calculi.

  1. Two Stage Battery System for the ROSETTA Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debus, André

    2002-01-01

    The ROSETTA mission, lead by ESA, will be launched by Ariane V from Kourou in January 2003 and after a long trip, the spacecraft will reach the comet Wirtanen 46P in 2011. The mission includes a lander, built under the leadership of DLR, on which CNES has a large participation and is concerned by providing a part of the payload and some lander systems. Among these, CNES delivers a specific battery system in order to comply with the mission environment and the mission scenario, avoiding particularly the use of radio-isotopic heaters and radio-isotopic electrical generators usually used for such missions far from the Sun. The battery system includes : - a pack of primary batteries of lithium/thionyl chloride cells, this kind of generator - a secondary stage, including rechargeable lithium-ion cells, used as redundancy for the - a specific electronic system dedicated to the battery handling and to secondary battery - a mechanical and thermal (insulation, and heating devices) structures permitting the The complete battery system has been designed, built and qualified in order to comply with the trip and mission requirements, keeping within low mass and low volume limits. This battery system is presently integrated into the Rosetta Lander flight model and will leave the Earth at the beginning of next year. Such a development and experience could be re-used in the frame of cometary and planetary missions.

  2. The Rosetta Mission - Where no Spacecraft has gone before

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    This Talk will provide an overview on the Scientific Highlights of the Rosetta Mission. After travelling through the Solar System for nearly 10 years Rosetta arrived at its main target, Comet 67/P Churyumov-Gerasimenko, in August 2014. Following an initial characterisation of the Comet, the lander unit Philae touched down on the partly active Nucleus on November 12 of the same year. The data acquired from the numerous instruments onboard the Spacecraft provides a unique insight into the properties of the Comets. While most of the measurements and processing of the data are still ongoing, the results from the Mission provide continuous surprises to the scientific community. While the Lander has been reactivated with some difficulties after a few months of inactivity due to low insolation levels, the Orbiter is pursuing its main mission objectives until the end of its extended Mission in Autumn 2016. During the long journey, the Spacecraft had encountered Earth, Mars and two Asteroids ( 2867 Šteins and 21 Lu...

  3. Mechanical design and test of ROSETTA Platform Louvres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Miguel; Ramírez, José Julián

    2003-09-01

    More than one hundred trimetal actuators and three hundred bearings will allow the blades movement in the 14 louvres fitted over the radiators of the ROSETTA S/C. Near the Sun, the blades shall be open to allow the radiators to dissipate heat into space. During the prolonged periods of hibernation and comet rendezvous, the blades shall be close in order to retain as much heat as possible in the spacecraft. SENER design of the Rosetta Platform Louvres consists of a framed array (397×430 mm) of highly specular reflecting blades which are individually pivoted to temperature-sensitive actuators. The novel actuators are trimetallic (traditionally were bimetallic) coil springs enclosed within a housing that is well isolated from the external environment but which maintains good thermal contact with the mounting panel requiring thermal control. The actuators are "calibrated" to cause the associated blades to be fully open and fully closed at prescribed temperatures. As the temperature of the panel begins to increase, the related rise in the actuators temperature creates a thermal moment which forces the louvres blades to open and hence lead to an increase in the radioactive power to space. Similarly, as the panel temperature decreases, the actuators tend to close the blades, which now offer a high resistance to radiation losses.

  4. Prey capture and phagocytosis in the choanoflagellate Salpingoeca rosetta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J Dayel

    Full Text Available Choanoflagellates are unicellular and colonial aquatic microeukaryotes that capture bacteria using an apical flagellum surrounded by a feeding collar composed of actin-filled microvilli. Flow produced by the apical flagellum drives prey bacteria to the feeding collar for phagocytosis. We report here on the cell biology of prey capture in rosette-shaped colonies and unicellular "thecate" or substrate attached cells from the choanoflagellate S. rosetta. In thecate cells and rosette colonies, phagocytosis initially involves fusion of multiple microvilli, followed by remodeling of the collar membrane to engulf the prey, and transport of engulfed bacteria into the cell. Although both thecate cells and rosette colony cells produce ∼ 70 nm "collar links" that connect and potentially stabilize adjacent microvilli, only thecate cells were observed to produce a lamellipod-like "collar skirt" that encircles the base of the collar. This study offers insight into the process of prey ingestion by S. rosetta, and provides a context within which to consider potential ecological differences between solitary cells and colonies in choanoflagellates.

  5. Econophysics of precious stones

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, A; Uchida, N

    2006-01-01

    The importance of the power law has been well realized in econophysics over the last decade. For instance, the distribution of the rate of stock price variation and of personal assets show the power law. While these results reveal the striking scale invariance of financial markets, the behaviour of price in real economy is less known in spite of its extreme importance. As an example of markets in real economy, here we take up the price of precious stones which increases with size while the amount of their production rapidly decreases with size. We show for the first time that the price of natural precious stones (quartz crystal ball, gemstones such as diamond, emerald, and sapphire) as a function of weight obeys the power law. This indicates that the price is determined by the same evaluation measure for different sizes. Our results demonstrate that not only the distribution of an economical observable but also the price itself obeys the power law. We anticipate our findings to be a starting point for the qua...

  6. Recumbent Stone Circles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    During the 1970s and early 1980s, British archaeoastronomers were striving to bridge the interpretative gulf between the "megalithic observatories" of Alexander Thom and an archaeological mainstream that, generally speaking, was hostile to any mention of astronomy in relation to the megalithic monuments of Neolithic and Early Bronze Age Britain. The Scottish recumbent stone circles (RSCs) came to represent an example where sounder methodology could overcome many of the data selection issues that had beset earlier studies and, with due restraint, produce credible interpretations. Systematic studies of their orientations consistently concluded that the RSCs had a strong lunar connection, and it was widely envisaged that they were the setting for ceremonies associated with the appearance of the moon over the recumbent stone. Other evidence such as the presence of white quartz and the spatial distribution of cupmarks appeared to back up this conclusion. New archaeological investigations since 1999 have challenged and modified these conclusions, confirming in particular that the circles were built to enclose cairns rather than to demarcate open spaces. Yet the restricted pattern of orientations of these structures could only have been achieved by reference to the basic diurnal motions of the skies, and orientation in relation to simple observations of the midsummer moon remains the most likely reading of the alignment evidence taken as a whole. On the other hand, a consideration of the broader context, which includes the nearby Clava cairns, highlights instead the symbolic importance of the sun.

  7. Scottish Short Stone Rows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    Short stone rows received a good deal of attention during the 1980s and 1990s, at a time when archaeoastronomy in prehistoric Britain and Ireland was moving beyond reassessments of Alexander Thom's "megalithic observatories" by identifying coherent groups of similar monuments with clear orientation trends. Many such rows are found in western Scotland, with the main concentration in Argyll and the island of Mull. Systematic analyses of their orientations produced credible evidence of an awareness of the 18.6-year lunar node cycle, within a "primary-secondary" pattern whereby isolated rows were oriented close to moonrise or moonset at the southern major standstill limit, while others oriented in this way were accompanied by a second row oriented in a declination range that could be interpreted either as lunar or solar. A detailed investigation of the landscape situation of the sites in northern Mull, accompanied by excavations at two of the sites, suggested that they were deliberately placed in locations where critical moonsets would be seen against prominent distant landscape features, but where the distant horizon in most or all other directions was hidden from view. A lack of independent archaeological evidence may help to explain why archaeoastronomical investigations at short stone rows have never progressed beyond "data-driven" studies of orientations and landscape situation. Nonetheless, the work that was done at these sites raised important general methodological issues, and pioneered techniques, that remain relevant across archaeoastronomy today.

  8. The U.S. Rosetta Project: Preparations for Prime Mission, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, C.; Chmielewski, A.; Aguinaldo, A. M.; Ko, A.; Accomazzo, A.; Taylor, M. G. G.

    2014-01-01

    In 2014, the International Rosetta mission will place a spacecraft in orbit around comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and deliver a lander to the comet's surface. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) contribution to the International Rosetta mission, designated the U.S. Rosetta Project, includes several instruments, tracking support, and science support for some non-US payloads. In July 2011 the spacecraft was placed in a long-duration hibernation mode planned to last approximately 37 months to conserve electrical power. Rosetta will rendezvous with 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014. On the eve of the mission's arrival at its target, this paper highlights three issues related to Rosetta's looming prime mission: (A) measures taken in 2009 to prepare the US Rosetta Project for the long-duration hibernation mode; (B) risk reviews conducted in 2013 to prepare the US Rosetta Project for exit from hibernation; (C) ESA and NASA preparations for use of NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) assets related to keyword files.

  9. Date stones in broiler's feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gualtieri, M.

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate date stones as dietary component for broilers, two trials were carried out. In the first trial, Tunisian Deglet date stones were used and in the second one, stones were the waste product of an Italian distillery. One-day-old Arbor Acres chickens were cage reared and fed for 6 weeks on 4 experimental diets, which were formulated to be isonitrogenous and isocaloric and differed in cereal component (maize or low tannin sorghum and in inclusion level (0 or 10 % of ground date stones. Birds ' performances were slightly different in the two trials, but overall results indicate that date stones are suitable for use in broiler's feeding under such conditions.

  10. Bath Stone - a Possible Global Heritage Stone from England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marker, Brian

    2014-05-01

    The Middle Jurassic strata of England have several horizons of oolitic and bioclastic limestones that provide high quality dimension stone. One of the most important is found in and near the City of Bath. The Great Oolite Group (Upper Bathonian) contains the Combe Down and Bath Oolites, consisting of current bedded oolites and shelly oolites, that have been used extensively as freestones for construction nearby, for prestigious buildings through much of southern England and more widely. The stone has been used to some extent since Roman times when the city, then known as Aquae Sulis, was an important hot spa. The stone was used to a limited extent through medieval times but from the early 18th century onwards was exploited on a large scale through surface quarrying and underground mining. The City was extensively redeveloped in the 18th to early 19th century, mostly using Bath Stone, when the spas made it a fashionable resort. Buildings from that period include architectural "gems" such as the Royal Crescent and Pulteney Bridge, as well as the renovated Roman Baths. Many buildings were designed by some of the foremost British architects of the time. The consistent use of this stone gives the City an architectural integrity throughout. These features led to the designation of the City as a World Heritage Site. It is a requirement in current City planning policy documents that Bath Stone should be used for new building to preserve the appearance of the City. More widely the stone was used in major houses (e.g. Buckingham Palace and Apsley House in London; King's Pavilion in Brighton); civic buildings (e.g. Bristol Guildhall; Dartmouth Naval College in Devon); churches and cathedrals (e.g. Truro Cathedral in Cornwall); and engineered structures (e.g. the large Dundas Aqueduct on the Kennet and Avon Canal). More widely, Bath Stone has been used in Union Station in Washington DC; Toronto Bible College and the Town Hall at Cape Town, South Africa. Extraction declined in

  11. Stone cladding engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sousa Camposinhos, Rui de

    2014-01-01

    This volume presents new methodologies for the design of dimension stone based on the concepts of structural design while preserving the excellence of stonemasonry practice in façade engineering. Straightforward formulae are provided for computing action on cladding, with special emphasis on the effect of seismic forces, including an extensive general methodology applied to non-structural elements. Based on the Load and Resistance Factor Design Format (LRDF), minimum slab thickness formulae are presented that take into consideration stress concentrations analysis based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) for the most commonly used modern anchorage systems. Calculation examples allow designers to solve several anchorage engineering problems in a detailed and objective manner, underlining the key parameters. The design of the anchorage metal parts, either in stainless steel or aluminum, is also presented.

  12. Asymptomatic common bile duct stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosseland, A R; Glomsaker, T B

    2000-11-01

    Patients with asymptomatic bile duct stones exhibit typical signs, such as elevated liver function tests, dilated bile ducts on ultrasound, a history of jaundice, or pancreatitis. The incidence of asymptomatic bile duct stones is about 10%, but up to 2% of patients show no signs of the disease. Bile duct stones can be diagnosed by using clinical judgement, scoring systems, or discriminant function tests. Which diagnostic modality is most reliable, cost-effective and safe, varies with different hospitals. Which therapy is most effective, safe and the cheapest also varies with different departments, but in the future an increasing number of departments will use the one-stage laparoscopic approach.

  13. Understanding Phosphorous Chemistry in Comets in Light of Rosetta Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boice, Daniel C.; de Almeida, Amaury A.

    2016-10-01

    Introduction: Phosphorous is a key element in all known forms of life. P-bearing compounds have been observed in the ISM and other regions of space. They are ubiquitous in meteorites, have been detected in the dust component in comets 1P/Halley and 81P/Wild 2, and in the gas phase (atomic P) of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by the Rosetta Mission. We present results from the first quantitative study of P-bearing molecules in comets to aid in future searches for this important element in comets, shedding light on issues of comet formation and prebiotic to biotic evolution of life. Results and Discussion: Our gas dynamics model of cometary comae with chemical kinetics has been adapted to study this problem. We used phosphine (PH3) as a native molecule with a cosmic abundance mixing ratio. Over 100 photo and gas-phase reactions and 30 P-bearing species were added to the chemical network. The chemistry of PH3 in the inner coma shows the major destruction channels are photo-dissociation and protonation with water-group ions, leading to the recycling of PH3 in this region and the eventual production of atomic P. Conclusion: The model identifies the relevant phosphine chemistry in cometary coma. Protonation reactions of PH3 with water-group ions are important due to its high proton affinity. Abundances are found to be on the order of 10-4 relative to water, about the same as isotopic species. The scale length of PH3 in the coma is about 13,000-16,000 km. We also comment on other Rosetta findings (e.g., O2 and H-). Collaborations with observers using modern telescopic facilities (e.g., Keck 2 and Subaru) are underway to search for phosphorus in comets. Acknowledgments: This work was supported by FAPESP under Grant No. 2015/03176-8 and the National Science Foundation Planetary Astronomy Program Grant No. 0908529.

  14. Rosetta Mission Status: Toward and From Perihelion Passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    Since the deployment and subsequent touchdown of its Philae Lander on the surface of comet C67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 12 November 2014, the Rosetta spacecraft has left bound orbits around the comet and passed a number of milestones contributing to further achieving the science return goals of the mission. It performed two very close flybys in February and March of this year, allowing for the collection of data and high-resolution images of the nucleus and its close environment at a time of increasing cometary activity. Such increase in activity actually led to orbiter operational issues as the star tracker navigation was seriously impacted by the presence of dust particles, and since then the spacecraft had to be moved further away from the nucleus so as to guarantee its safety. This has meant a complete redesign of the operational scheme for the mission, whose science planning implementation is now being uplinked to the spacecraft much closer to execution onboard, with the Flight Dynamics team defining trajectories as late and as close as possible to the comet. In addition to science data acquired from the northern hemisphere of the comet while it progresses toward perihelion, attempts are being made to communicate with the Lander since renewed signal with Philae was obtained in mid-June. The aim is to be able to achieve as much of the Long Term Science goals as possible during the remaining lifetime of the Lander, albeit within the orbiter safety constraints. With perihelion within reach, orbiter science of the southern hemisphere is taking on more importance, and the combination of such science with continued Lander contact attempts will mark Rosetta's passage across the perihelion for C67P.

  15. Rosetta: an operator basis translator for standard model effective field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falkowski, Adam [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, Bat. 210, Université Paris-Sud, 91405, Orsay (France); Fuks, Benjamin [Département Recherches Subatomiques, Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, Université de Strasbourg/CNRS-IN2P3, 23 rue du Loess, 67037, Strasbourg (France); Mawatari, Kentarou [Theoretische Natuurkunde and IIHE/ELEM, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, 1050, Brussels (Belgium); Mimasu, Ken, E-mail: k.mimasu@sussex.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, BN1 9QH, Brighton (United Kingdom); Riva, Francesco [CERN, Theory Division, 1211, Geneva (Switzerland); Sanz, Verónica [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, BN1 9QH, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-10

    We introduce Rosetta, a program allowing for the translation between different bases of effective field theory operators. We present the main functions of the program and provide an example of usage. One of the Lagrangians which Rosetta can translate into has been implemented into FeynRules, which allows Rosetta to be interfaced into various high-energy physics programs such as Monte Carlo event generators. In addition to popular bases choices, such as the Warsaw and Strongly Interacting Light Higgs bases already implemented in the program, we also detail how to add new operator bases into the Rosetta package. In this way, phenomenological studies using an effective field theory framework can be straightforwardly performed.

  16. Rosetta: an operator basis translator for standard model effective field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falkowski, Adam [Universite Paris-Sud, Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Bat. 210, Orsay (France); Fuks, Benjamin [Universite de Strasbourg/CNRS-IN2P3, Departement Recherches Subatomiques, Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, Strasbourg (France); Mawatari, Kentarou [Theoretische Natuurkunde and IIHE/ELEM, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, and International Solvay Institutes, Brussels (Belgium); Mimasu, Ken; Sanz, Veronica [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom); Riva, Francesco [CERN, Theory Division, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    We introduce Rosetta, a program allowing for the translation between different bases of effective field theory operators. We present the main functions of the program and provide an example of usage. One of the Lagrangians which Rosetta can translate into has been implemented into FeynRules, which allows Rosetta to be interfaced into various high-energy physics programs such as Monte Carlo event generators. In addition to popular bases choices, such as the Warsaw and Strongly Interacting Light Higgs bases already implemented in the program, we also detail how to add new operator bases into the Rosetta package. In this way, phenomenological studies using an effective field theory framework can be straightforwardly performed. (orig.)

  17. Incorporation of noncanonical amino acids into Rosetta and use in computational protein-peptide interface design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Douglas Renfrew

    Full Text Available Noncanonical amino acids (NCAAs can be used in a variety of protein design contexts. For example, they can be used in place of the canonical amino acids (CAAs to improve the biophysical properties of peptides that target protein interfaces. We describe the incorporation of 114 NCAAs into the protein-modeling suite Rosetta. We describe our methods for building backbone dependent rotamer libraries and the parameterization and construction of a scoring function that can be used to score NCAA containing peptides and proteins. We validate these additions to Rosetta and our NCAA-rotamer libraries by showing that we can improve the binding of a calpastatin derived peptides to calpain-1 by substituting NCAAs for native amino acids using Rosetta. Rosetta (executables and source, auxiliary scripts and code, and documentation can be found at (http://www.rosettacommons.org/.

  18. Rosetta: an operator basis translator for Standard Model effective field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Falkowski, Adam; Mawatari, Kentarou; Mimasu, Ken; Riva, Francesco; sanz, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    We introduce Rosetta, a program allowing for the translation between different bases of effective field theory operators. We present the main functions of the program and provide an example of usage. One of the bases which Rosetta can translate into has been implemented into FeynRules, which allows Rosetta to be interfaced into various high-energy physics programs such as Monte Carlo event generators. In addition to popular bases choices, such as the Warsaw and Strongly Interacting Light Higgs bases already implemented in the program, we also detail how to add new operator bases into the Rosetta package. In this way, phenomenological studies using an effective field theory framework can be straightforwardly performed.

  19. Nutritional Management of Kidney Stones (Nephrolithiasis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Adam M.; Seifter, Julian L.; Dwyer, Johanna T.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of kidney stones is common in the United States and treatments for them are very costly. This review article provides information about epidemiology, mechanism, diagnosis, and pathophysiology of kidney stone formation, and methods for the evaluation of stone risks for new and follow-up patients. Adequate evaluation and management can prevent recurrence of stones. Kidney stone prevention should be individualized in both its medical and dietary management, keeping in mind the specific risks involved for each type of stones. Recognition of these risk factors and development of long-term management strategies for dealing with them are the most effective ways to prevent recurrence of kidney stones. PMID:26251832

  20. Histopathology Predicts the Mechanism of Stone Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evan, Andrew P.

    2007-04-01

    About 5% of American women and 12% of men will develop a kidney stone at some time in their life and these numbers appear to be on the rise. Despite years of scientific research into the mechanisms of stone formation and growth, limited advances have been made until recently. Randall's original observations and thoughts on the mechanisms for kidney stone formation have been validated for idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers (ICSF) but not for most other stone forming groups. Our current studies on selected groups of human stone formers using intraoperative papillary biopsies has shown overwhelming evidence for the presence of Randall's plaque in ICSF and that stone formation and growth are exclusively linked to its availability to urinary ions and proteins. Intense investigation of the plaque-stone junction is needed if we are to understand the factors leading to the overgrowth process on exposed regions of plaque. Such information should allow the development of treatment strategies to block stone formation in ICSF patients. Patients who form brushite stones, or who form apatite stones because of distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA), or patients with calcium oxalate stones due to obesity bypass procedures, or patients with cystinuria, get plugged inner medullary collecting ducts (IMCD) which leads to total destruction of the lining cells and focal sites of interstitial fibrosis. These stone formers have plaque but at levels equal to or below non-stone formers, which would suggest that they form stones by a different mechanism than do ICSF patients.

  1. Purbeck Stone - A possible Global Heritage Stone from England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marker, Brian

    2014-05-01

    By definition, a Global Heritage Stone Resource (GHSR) should have international significance. The Purbeck Group of uppermost Jurassic to lowermost Cretaceous age (Tithonian- Berriasian) outcrops mainly in the Purbeck area of Dorset, England. It was deposited in shallow freshwater to brackish lagoons with occasional marine incursions. Limestones, mainly biosparites, occur at 6 main levels. Differences in bed thickness, jointing and hardness make it suitable for a variety of purposes including dimension stone, monumental and ornamental stone, roofing tiles, paving, flooring and rockery stone. Near the top of the sequence is a dark gastropod biosparite, traditionally called Purbeck Marble, easily carved, which has been extensively used for decorative interior work in churches and cathedrals particularly for fonts, tombs, flooring and facings on columns for example in the medieval cathedrals of Salisbury, Exeter, Durham, York and Wells and Worcester and Westminster Abbey. The stone was extracted at least from Roman times (1st century AD) through the medieval period. Quarrying expanded from about 1700 reaching a peak in the late 18th and 19th centuries. Stone was transported first by sea but later by rail for wider use. Used in many local buildings, it gives an important element of local character. Many of the villages are designated conservation areas with a requirement for repair, maintenance and new building using local stone. Initially the stone was taken from quarries but was later mined. The number of operating companies declined from 15 to 5 over the past 40 years, with 10 active small quarries. Outputs are from few hundred tonnes to a few thousand tonnes per annum or about 9 to 12 years of permitted reserves but the Planning Authority intends to make sufficient provision for production at recent levels for their development plan period. The extraction sites are in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and close to Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site. This might

  2. Mapping MgII Emission in the M82 Superwind: A Rosetta Stone for Understanding Feedback in the Distant Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Kate

    2013-10-01

    Galactic-scale outflows driven by star formation are a pervasive feature of galaxy formation models, and are required to prevent the overproduction of low-mass galaxies by regulating their cool gas supply. Winds from star-forming galaxies are commonly observed in the local Universe and out to z~6; however, empirical constraints on the spatial extent and energetics of winds in distant systems have been very challenging to obtain. Our group has pioneered the study of outflows in emission using resonantly-scattered MgII 2796, 2803 photons, a method which has the potential to map the spatial extent and morphology of galactic winds out to z~2. To take full advantage of this technique, we request 15 orbits for WFC3/UVIS narrow-band imaging of the prototypical starburst M82 to map its superwind in MgII emission. This map will trace photons resonantly scattered from cool, photoionized gas flowing from this galaxy for the first time. Unlike optical nebular lines, scattered MgII emission is an unbiased probe of Tlink between local and high-redshift studies of this phenomenon. Such constraints are fundamental to understanding the impact of feedback processes on galaxy evolution.

  3. The Earth as a Distant Planet A Rosetta Stone for the Search of Earth-Like Worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Vázquez, M; Montañés Rodríguez, P

    2010-01-01

    Is the Earth, in some way, special? Or is our planet but one of the millions of other inhabited planets within our galaxy? This is an exciting time to be asking this old question, because for the first time in history, the answer is within reach. In The Earth as a Distant Planet, the authors set themselves as external observers of our Solar System from an astronomical distance. From that perspective, the authors describe how the Earth, the third planet in distance to the central star, can be catalogued as having its own unique features and as capable of sustaining life. The knowledge gained from this original perspective is then applied to the ongoing search for planets outside the solar system, or exoplanets. Since the discovery in 1992 of the first exoplanet, the number of known planets has increased exponentially. Ambitious space missions are already being designed for the characterization of their atmospheres and to explore the possibility that they host life. The exploration of Earth and the rest of the ...

  4. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Leave no (spilled) stone unturned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilton, P B; Andy, O J; Peters, J J; Thomas, C F; Patel, V S; Scott-Conner, C E

    1993-01-01

    Stones are sometimes spilled at the time of cholecystectomy. Retrieval may be difficult, especially during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Little is known about the natural history of missed stones which are left behind in the peritoneal cavity. We present a case in which a patient developed an intraabdominal abscess around such a stone. The abscess recurred after drainage and removal of the stone was needed for resolution. This case suggests that care should be taken to avoid stone spillage, and that stones which are spilled into the abdomen should be retrieved.

  5. Canada's National Building Stone: Tyndall Stone from Manitoba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Brian R.; Young, Graham A.; Dobrzanski, Edward P.

    2016-04-01

    Tyndall Stone is a distinctively mottled and highly fossiliferous dolomitic limestone that belongs to the Selkirk Member of the Red River Formation, of Late Ordovician (Katian) age. It has been quarried at Garson, Manitoba, 37 km northeast of Winnipeg, since 1895, although other quarries in the area go back to 1832. Tyndall Stone, so named because it was shipped by rail from nearby Tyndall, is currently produced by Gillis Quarries Limited. It has various uses as a dimension stone. Large slabs, most often cut parallel to bedding, face the exterior or interior of many important buildings such as the Parliament Buildings and the Canadian Museum of Civilization in the Ottawa area, the Empress Hotel in Victoria, and the provincial legislatures in Winnipeg and Regina, as well as many commercial buildings especially in the Canadian prairies. At the quarries, the stone is cut vertically, using eight foot (2.44 m) diameter saws mounted on one hundred foot (30.5 m) tracks, then split into 6-8 tonne blocks that are moved using front-end loaders. Gillis Quarries operates a large finishing plant with an area of about 4000 m2. Stone is processed along advanced cutting lines that feature eight primary saws and six gantry saw stations, allowing it to be made into a variety of sizes, shapes, and finishes. The Selkirk Member is 43 m thick and the stone is extracted from a 6-8 m thick interval within the lower part. The upper beds tend to be more buff-coloured than the grey lower beds due to weathering by groundwater. The stone is massive, but extracted blocks are less than ~1m thick due to splitting along stylolites. Consisting of bioturbated wackestone to packstone, the Tyndall Stone was deposited in a shallow-marine environment within the photic zone, in the central part of the vast equatorial epicontinental sea that covered much of Laurentia. Scattered thin, bioclastic grainstone lenses record brief, low-energy storm events. The distinctive mottles are formed by dolomitized

  6. A walk around a comet with the Rosetta Plasma Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Burch, Jim; Carr, Chris; Eriksson, Anders; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Nilsson, Hans; Cupido, Emanuele; Goldstein, Ray; Henri, Pierre; Koenders, Christoph; Richter, Ingo

    2014-05-01

    Comets present a variety of plasma phenomena, which the Rosetta Plasma Consortium (RPC) is in a unique place to investigate. In particular, the possibility of long term in-situ monitoring of the evolution of the coma and its various plasma regions from a spacecraft moving at walking speed (meters per second) has no counterpart on any other space mission. In addition to much more details on the physics of features discovered on flyby missions like Giotto, e.g. the contact surface and ion pick-up processes, it will be possible to see how they evolve, study their stability, and to discover any entirely new phenomena. In this presentation, we show some data and results obtained earlier in the mission and recently during the recommissioning of the RPC after hibernation, with our expectations for the comet phase, particularly early activity signatures in the coming months. Among the first signs of cometary activity we expect to be ring and shell distributions of pick-up cometary ions directly detectable by the Ion Composition Analyzer (RPC-ICA) and the Ion and Electron Sensor (RPC-IES), and the ion cyclotron waves they generate should be picked up by the Fluxgate Magnetometer (RPC-MAG). Early electron density enhancements will be visible in the spacecraft potential accessible by the Langmuir probes (RPC-LAP) and any associated high frequency waves by the Mutual Impedance Probe (RPC-MIP).

  7. Improvements to robotics-inspired conformational sampling in rosetta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie Stein

    Full Text Available To accurately predict protein conformations in atomic detail, a computational method must be capable of sampling models sufficiently close to the native structure. All-atom sampling is difficult because of the vast number of possible conformations and extremely rugged energy landscapes. Here, we test three sampling strategies to address these difficulties: conformational diversification, intensification of torsion and omega-angle sampling and parameter annealing. We evaluate these strategies in the context of the robotics-based kinematic closure (KIC method for local conformational sampling in Rosetta on an established benchmark set of 45 12-residue protein segments without regular secondary structure. We quantify performance as the fraction of sub-Angstrom models generated. While improvements with individual strategies are only modest, the combination of intensification and annealing strategies into a new "next-generation KIC" method yields a four-fold increase over standard KIC in the median percentage of sub-Angstrom models across the dataset. Such improvements enable progress on more difficult problems, as demonstrated on longer segments, several of which could not be accurately remodeled with previous methods. Given its improved sampling capability, next-generation KIC should allow advances in other applications such as local conformational remodeling of multiple segments simultaneously, flexible backbone sequence design, and development of more accurate energy functions.

  8. Photometric Analysis of Asteroid (2867) Steins from Rosetta OSIRIS Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Forgia, F.; Magrin, S.; Bertini, I.; Lazzarin, M.; Pajola, M.; Barbieri, C.

    We present a method for analyzing the reflectance properties of atmosphereless bodies as asteroids and comet nuclei. The method is self-consistent, independent of the shape model of the object and can be easily applied for any space mission target. We used it for the E-type Main Belt asteroid (2867) Steins, observed from the OSIRIS-WAC camera onboard Rosetta spacecraft during a close approach on September 5, 2008. We investigate the reflectance dependence on phase angle which is interpreted in terms of the Hapke's theory of bidirectional reflectance. A deeper analysis allows to obtain an estimate of the typical size of the regolith grains. Steins regolith layer seems to be made of large, highly scattering iron-poor opaque silicate particles. The macroscopic roughness, probably influenced by the global irregular shape, appears fairly high, comparable with radar measurements of other E-type asteroids. Assuming an enstatite composition, we estimated a grain size of about 30-130 mu m and we noticed a correlation between grain size and wavelength, suggesting the existence of a grain size distribution, as expected from real surfaces. The comparison with more accurate calculations (Spjuth \\textit{et al.}, 2009) shows that our simplified method is robust and reliable for a preliminary and shape-independent analysis of the reflectance properties of atmosphereless bodies.

  9. Cross-link guided molecular modeling with ROSETTA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Kahraman

    Full Text Available Chemical cross-links identified by mass spectrometry generate distance restraints that reveal low-resolution structural information on proteins and protein complexes. The technology to reliably generate such data has become mature and robust enough to shift the focus to the question of how these distance restraints can be best integrated into molecular modeling calculations. Here, we introduce three workflows for incorporating distance restraints generated by chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry into ROSETTA protocols for comparative and de novo modeling and protein-protein docking. We demonstrate that the cross-link validation and visualization software Xwalk facilitates successful cross-link data integration. Besides the protocols we introduce XLdb, a database of chemical cross-links from 14 different publications with 506 intra-protein and 62 inter-protein cross-links, where each cross-link can be mapped on an experimental structure from the Protein Data Bank. Finally, we demonstrate on a protein-protein docking reference data set the impact of virtual cross-links on protein docking calculations and show that an inter-protein cross-link can reduce on average the RMSD of a docking prediction by 5.0 Å. The methods and results presented here provide guidelines for the effective integration of chemical cross-link data in molecular modeling calculations and should advance the structural analysis of particularly large and transient protein complexes via hybrid structural biology methods.

  10. Modern Approach to Ureteral Stones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geert G. Tailly

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Urolithiasis is a very common affliction of mankind. In western countries incidence is increasing steadily. An increasing proportion of patients are presenting with ureteral stones, of which renal colic most often is the first complaint and the most common reason for an emergency visit to a urologist. Proper imaging strategy is of paramount importance in the diagnosis of acute flank pain and in the subsequent therapy planning once a ureteral stone is diagnosed. Renal colic during pregnancy poses specific problems, both in imaging and therapy. Apart from the adequate treatment of renal colic, modern therapy of those ureteral calculi that will not pass spontaneously will consist of a judicious combination of ESWL (extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, endourology, and laparoscopy. Open surgery should only be reserved for limited and very specific indications. Although beyond the scope of this article, metaphylaxis should take an important role in the follow-up of stone patients in general.

  11. Performance of the WeNMR CS-Rosetta3 web server in CASD-NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Schot, Gijs; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2015-08-01

    We present here the performance of the WeNMR CS-Rosetta3 web server in CASD-NMR, the critical assessment of automated structure determination by NMR. The CS-Rosetta server uses only chemical shifts for structure prediction, in combination, when available, with a post-scoring procedure based on unassigned NOE lists (Huang et al. in J Am Chem Soc 127:1665-1674, 2005b, doi: 10.1021/ja047109h). We compare the original submissions using a previous version of the server based on Rosetta version 2.6 with recalculated targets using the new R3FP fragment picker for fragment selection and implementing a new annotation of prediction reliability (van der Schot et al. in J Biomol NMR 57:27-35, 2013, doi: 10.1007/s10858-013-9762-6), both implemented in the CS-Rosetta3 WeNMR server. In this second round of CASD-NMR, the WeNMR CS-Rosetta server has demonstrated a much better performance than in the first round since only converged targets were submitted. Further, recalculation of all CASD-NMR targets using the new version of the server demonstrates that our new annotation of prediction quality is giving reliable results. Predictions annotated as weak are often found to provide useful models, but only for a fraction of the sequence, and should therefore only be used with caution.

  12. Ionospheric plasma of comet 67P probed by Rosetta at 3 au from the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galand, M.; Héritier, K. L.; Odelstad, E.; Henri, P.; Broiles, T. W.; Allen, A. J.; Altwegg, K.; Beth, A.; Burch, J. L.; Carr, C. M.; Cupido, E.; Eriksson, A. I.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Johansson, F. L.; Lebreton, J.-P.; Mandt, K. E.; Nilsson, H.; Richter, I.; Rubin, M.; Sagnières, L. B. M.; Schwartz, S. J.; Sémon, T.; Tzou, C.-Y.; Vallières, X.; Vigren, E.; Wurz, P.

    2016-11-01

    We propose to identify the main sources of ionization of the plasma in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko at different locations in the coma and to quantify their relative importance, for the first time, for close cometocentric distances (3 au). The ionospheric model proposed is used as an organizing element of a multi-instrument data set from the Rosetta Plasma Consortium (RPC) plasma and particle sensors, from the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis and from the Microwave Instrument on the Rosetta Orbiter, all on board the ESA/Rosetta spacecraft. The calculated ionospheric density driven by Rosetta observations is compared to the RPC-Langmuir Probe and RPC-Mutual Impedance Probe electron density. The main cometary plasma sources identified are photoionization of solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation and energetic electron-impact ionization. Over the northern, summer hemisphere, the solar EUV radiation is found to drive the electron density - with occasional periods when energetic electrons are also significant. Over the southern, winter hemisphere, photoionization alone cannot explain the observed electron density, which reaches sometimes higher values than over the summer hemisphere; electron-impact ionization has to be taken into account. The bulk of the electron population is warm with temperature of the order of 7-10 eV. For increased neutral densities, we show evidence of partial energy degradation of the hot electron energy tail and cooling of the full electron population.

  13. Advances in Rosetta structure prediction for difficult molecular-replacement problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiMaio, Frank, E-mail: dimaio@u.washington.edu [University of Washington, UW Box 357350, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Modeling advances using Rosetta structure prediction to aid in solving difficult molecular-replacement problems are discussed. Recent work has shown the effectiveness of structure-prediction methods in solving difficult molecular-replacement problems. The Rosetta protein structure modeling suite can aid in the solution of difficult molecular-replacement problems using templates from 15 to 25% sequence identity; Rosetta refinement guided by noisy density has consistently led to solved structures where other methods fail. In this paper, an overview of the use of Rosetta for these difficult molecular-replacement problems is provided and new modeling developments that further improve model quality are described. Several variations to the method are introduced that significantly reduce the time needed to generate a model and the sampling required to improve the starting template. The improvements are benchmarked on a set of nine difficult cases and it is shown that this improved method obtains consistently better models in less running time. Finally, strategies for best using Rosetta to solve difficult molecular-replacement problems are presented and future directions for the role of structure-prediction methods in crystallography are discussed.

  14. [Rare cases of bladder stones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampalmieri, Gregorio; Moretti, Antonello; Sampalmieri, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    We present here two special cases of urolithiasis. The first one shows a giant bladder lithiasis resulting in severe renal insufficiency in a 63-year-old patient, who had previously had nicturia (2-3 times), occasional episodes of urinary frequency and burning micturition, in the absence of renal colic, hematuria or interrupted urination. The second case referes to an 85-year-old man suffering from prostatic enlargement and bladder stones, hospitalized to undergo intervention of trans-vesical prostatic adenomectomy, during which two star-shaped stones were found without obvious symptoms.

  15. 77 FR 27245 - Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge, Big Stone and Lac Qui Parle Counties, MN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-09

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge, Big Stone and Lac Qui Parle Counties, MN... comprehensive conservation plan (CCP) and environmental assessment (EA) for Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge...: r3planning@fws.gov . Include ``Big Stone Draft CCP/ EA'' in the subject line of the message. Fax:...

  16. Stone size limits the use of Hounsfield units for prediction of calcium oxalate stone composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Gregory; Johnson, Lewis; Ganesh, Halemane; Davenport, Daniel; Smelser, Woodson; Crispen, Paul; Venkatesh, Ramakrishna

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the role of stone size in predicting urinary calculus composition using Hounsfield units on noncontrasted computed tomography (CT) scan. A retrospective review was performed for all patients who underwent ureteroscopy or percutaneous nephrolithotomy during a 1-year period, had a stone analysis performed, and had CT imaging available for review. All CT scans were reviewed by a board-certified radiologist. Variables evaluated included age, sex, body mass index, stone size, stone location, Hounsfield units (HUs), and stone composition. We identified a total of 91 patients (41 men and 50 women) with CT imaging and stone analysis available for review. Stone analysis showed 41 calcium oxalate monohydrate (CaOxMH), 13 calcium oxalate dihydrate, 29 calcium phosphate, 5 uric acid, 2 struvite, and 1 cystine stone. Average age was 46 years, and average body mass index was 32 kg/m2. Measured HUs varied significantly with size for CaOxMH and calcium oxalate dihydrate stones (P values 10 mm) stones (55%). For calcium stones, the ability of CT HUs to predict stone composition was limited, likely due to the mixed stone composition. Within a cohort of CaOxMH stone formers, measured HUs varied linearly with stone size. All stones <5 mm were below thresholds for CaOxMH composition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Calcium Oxalate Stone Agglomeration Inhibition [tm] Reflects Renal Stone-Forming Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, J S; Cole, F E; Romani, W; Husserl, F E; Fuselier, H A; Kok, D J; Erwin, D T

    2000-04-01

    Louisiana and other Gulf South states comprise a "Stone Belt" where calcium oxalate stone formers (CaOx SFs) are found at a high rate of approximately 5%. In these patients, the agglomeration of small stone crystals, which are visible in nearly all morning urine collections, forms stones that can become trapped in the renal parenchyma and the renal pelvis. Without therapy, about half of CaOx SFs repeatedly form kidney stones, which can cause excruciating pain that can be relieved by passage, fragmentation (lithotripsy), or surgical removal. The absence of stones in "normal" patients suggests that there are stone inhibitors in "normal" urines.At the Ochsner Renal Stone Clinic, 24-hour urine samples are collected by the patient and sent to the Ochsner Renal Stone Research Program where calcium oxalate stone agglomeration inhibition [tm] measurements are performed. Urine from healthy subjects and inactive stone formers has demonstrated strongly inhibited stone growth [tm] in contrast to urine from recurrent CaOx SFs. [tm] data from 1500 visits of 700 kidney stone patients have been used to evaluate the risk of recurrence in Ochsner's CaOx SF patients. These data have also been used to demonstrate the interactive roles of certain identified urinary stone-growth inhibitors, citrate and Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP), which can be manipulated with medication to diminish recurrent stone formation. Our goal is to offer patients both financial and pain relief by reducing their stones with optimized medication, using medical management to avoid costly treatments.

  18. Intraperitoneal stone migration during percutaneos nephrolithotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akif Diri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneos nephrolithotomy (PNL is the standard care for renal stones larger than 2 cm. The procedure has some major and minor complications. Renal pelvis laceration and stone migration to the retroperitoneum is one of the rare condition. We report the first case of intraperitoneal stone migration during PNL.

  19. [Treatment of infection stones. I. Dissolution of experimental infection stones in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, H; Tomoyoshi, T

    1983-03-01

    The in vivo solubility of struvite stones experimentally induced in rats was investigated. The struvite stones implanted into bladders of normal rats were reduced in weight; and, they were dissolved by oral administration of ammonium chloride. Cefmetazone cured pyelonephritis and dissolved the bladder stones when it was administered to rats with urinary tract infection caused by Proteus mirabilis. Normalization of urine by antibiotics and acidifying agents may dissolve struvite stones, and help treat infection stones.

  20. Production and Characterisation of Comet Dust Analogues For The Rosetta Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotundi, A.; Brucato, J. R.; Colangeli, L.; Mennella, V.; Palumbo, P.

    Various instruments included in the Rosetta payload are aimed at characterizing the comet dust properties. A primary fundamental question mark concerns the properties of materials that they will have to analyse during actual operation. Organic (CHON), silicate and icy grains arranged in more or less heterogeneous fluffy agglomerates, appear plausible. Moreover, the dust will probably be characterised by different coex- isting textures: amorphous, partially structured and crystalline grains. On this ground the full success of the Rosetta mission will be achieved also thanks to the followingt activities: - test and calibration of on-board instruments by cometary representative marerials; - preparation to the interpretation of data returned by Rosetta on the basis of laboratory experiments on analogues of cometary materials. In this paper we report the results of laboratory activities performed along the previous lines.

  1. Stone Bracelet Production in Mali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Garin Carmagnani

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the manufacture of stone bangles in Neolithic France, we visited the Hombori region of Mali, to study the last surviving generation of makers of stone bangles there. From our field observations and from many interviews with various artisans, we obtained a considerable amount of information about a tradition of manufacture that has, until recently, been largely unknown. The details gathered cover every stage of the manufacturing process, from the way in which outcrops of the raw material are selected, to the manner in which the calcareous stone is worked in the manufacture of the bracelets. We documented the various phases involved in the chaîne opératoire and the ways in which the finished products are dispersed from their place of manufacture. Much still remains to be discovered, notably about the past history of bangle manufacture in Hombori, and the ways in which the finished bracelets were perceived by the people who acquired and used them. Nevertheless, we have been able to develop models that help us to understand the societies in post-Linearbandkeramik Europe that adopted the practice of wearing stone bracelets.

  2. RosettaEPR: rotamer library for spin label structure and dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan S Alexander

    Full Text Available An increasingly used parameter in structural biology is the measurement of distances between spin labels bound to a protein. One limitation to these measurements is the unknown position of the spin label relative to the protein backbone. To overcome this drawback, we introduce a rotamer library of the methanethiosulfonate spin label (MTSSL into the protein modeling program Rosetta. Spin label rotamers were derived from conformations observed in crystal structures of spin labeled T4 lysozyme and previously published molecular dynamics simulations. Rosetta's ability to accurately recover spin label conformations and EPR measured distance distributions was evaluated against 19 experimentally determined MTSSL labeled structures of T4 lysozyme and the membrane protein LeuT and 73 distance distributions from T4 lysozyme and the membrane protein MsbA. For a site in the core of T4 lysozyme, the correct spin label conformation (Χ1 and Χ2 is recovered in 99.8% of trials. In surface positions 53% of the trajectories agree with crystallized conformations in Χ1 and Χ2. This level of recovery is on par with Rosetta performance for the 20 natural amino acids. In addition, Rosetta predicts the distance between two spin labels with a mean error of 4.4 Å. The width of the experimental distance distribution, which reflects the flexibility of the two spin labels, is predicted with a mean error of 1.3 Å. RosettaEPR makes full-atom spin label modeling available to a wide scientific community in conjunction with the powerful suite of modeling methods within Rosetta.

  3. Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko: First science results by Rosetta/OSIRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Nicolas; Sierks, Holger; Barbieri, Cesare; Lamy, Philippe; Rodrigo, Rafael; Koschny, Detlef; Rickman, Hans; Agarwal, Jessica; A'Hearn, Michael; Angrilli, Francesco; Barucci, Antonella; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Bertini, Ivano; Besse, Sebastien; Bodewits, Dennis; Capanna, Claire; Cremonese, Gabriele; Da Deppo, Vania; Davidsson, Björn; Debei, Stefano; De Cecco, Mariolino; Ferri, Francesca; Fornasier, Sonia; Fulle, Marco; Gaskell, Robert; Groussin, Olivier; Güttler, Carsten; Gutierrez, Pedroj; Hviid, Stubbe; Ip, Wing-Huen; Jorda, Laurent; Keller, Horst Uwe; Knollenberg, Jörg; Kramm, Rainer; Kührt, Ekkehard; Küppers, Michael; LaForgia, Fiorangela; Lara, Luisa; Lazzarin, Monica; Leyrat, Cedric; Lopez Moreno, Jose Juan; Lowry, Stephen; Magrin, Sara; Marchi, Simone; Marzari, Francesco; Michalik, Harald; Mottola, Stefano; Naletto, Giampiero; Oklay, Nilda; Pajola, Maurizio; Sabau, Lola; Snodgrass, Colin; Tubiana, Cecilia; Vincent, Jean-Baptiste; Wenzel, Peter

    2014-11-01

    ESA’s Rosetta mission arrived on August 6, 2014, at target comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko after 10 years of cruise. OSIRIS (Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System) is the scientific imaging system onboard Rosetta. It comprises a Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) for nucleus surface and dust studies and a Wide Angle Camera (WAC) for the wide field coma investigations.We present the first science results achieved by OSIRIS from the arrival at the comet throughout the mapping phase. The overview will cover surface morphology and activity of the nucleus as seen in gas, dust, and local jets.AcknowledgementsOSIRIS was built by a consortium led by the Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Göttingen, Germany, in collaboration with CISAS, University of Padova, Italy, the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, France, the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucia, CSIC, Granada, Spain, the Scientific Support Office of the European Space Agency, Noordwijk, The Netherlands, the Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial, Madrid, Spain, the Universidad Politéchnica de Madrid, Spain, the Department of Physics and Astronomy of Uppsala University, Sweden, and the Institut für Datentechnik und Kommunikationsnetze der Technischen Universität Braunschweig, Germany. The support of the national funding agencies of Germany (DLR), France (CNES), Italy (ASI), Spain (MEC), Sweden (SNSB), and the ESA Technical Directorate is gratefully acknowledged. We thank the Rosetta Science Ground Segment at ESAC, the Rosetta Mission Operations Centre at ESOC and the Rosetta Project at ESTEC for their outstanding work enabling the science return of the Rosetta Mission.

  4. Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko - First Science Results by Rosetta/OSIRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierks, H.; Barbieri, C.; Lamy, P. L.; Rodrigo, R.; Koschny, D.; Rickman, H.; Agarwal, J.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Angrilli, F.; Barucci, M. A.; Bertaux, J. L.; Bertini, I.; Besse, S.; Bodewits, D.; Capanna, C.; Cremonese, G.; Da Deppo, V.; Davidsson, B.; Debei, S.; De Cecco, M.; Ferri, F.; Fornasier, S.; Fulle, M.; Gaskell, R. W.; Groussin, O.; Güttler, C.; Gutiérrez, P.; Hviid, S. F.; Ip, W. H.; Jorda, L.; Keller, H. U.; Joerg, K.; Kramm, R.; Kuhrt, E.; Küppers, M.; La Forgia, F.; Lara, L.; Lazzarin, M.; Leyrat, C.; Moreno, J. F.; Lowry, S.; Magrin, S.; Marchi, S.; Marzari, F.; Michalik, H.; Mottola, S.; Account, T.; Oklay, N.; Pajola, M.

    2014-12-01

    Abstract ESA's Rosetta mission arrived on August 6, 2014, at target comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko after 10 years of cruise. OSIRIS (Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System) is the scientific imaging system onboard Rosetta. It comprises a Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) for nucleus surface and dust studies and a Wide Angle Camera (WAC) for the wide field coma investigations. We present the first science results achieved by OSIRIS from the arrival at the comet throughout the mapping phase. The overview will cover surface morphology and activity of the nucleus as seen in gas, dust, and local jets. Acknowledgements OSIRIS was built by a consortium led by the Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Göttingen, Germany, in collaboration with CISAS, University of Padova, Italy, the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, France, the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucia, CSIC, Granada, Spain, the Scientific Support Office of the European Space Agency, Noordwijk, The Netherlands, the Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial, Madrid, Spain, the Universidad Politéchnica de Madrid, Spain, the Department of Physics and Astronomy of Uppsala University, Sweden, and the Institut für Datentechnik und Kommunikationsnetze der Technischen Universität Braunschweig, Germany. The support of the national funding agencies of Germany (DLR), France (CNES), Italy (ASI), Spain (MEC), Sweden (SNSB), and the ESA Technical Directorate is gratefully acknowledged. We thank the Rosetta Science Ground Segment at ESAC, the Rosetta Mission Operations Centre at ESOC and the Rosetta Project at ESTEC for their outstanding work enabling the science return of the Rosetta Mission.

  5. Mass spectrometric characterization of the Rosetta Spacecraft contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieler, A.; Altwegg, K.; Balsiger, H.; Berthelier, J.-J.; Calmonte, U.; Combi, M.; De Keyser, J.; Fiethe, B.; Fuselier, S. A.; Gasc, S.; Gombosi, T.; Hansen, K. C.; Hässig, M.; Korth, A.; Le Roy, L.; Mall, U.; Rème, H.; Rubin, M.; Sémon, T.; Tenishev, V.; Tzou, C.-Y.; Waite, J. H.; Wurz, P.

    2016-09-01

    Mass spectrometers are valuable tools for the in situ characterization of gaseous exo- and atmospheres and have been operated at various bodies in space. Typical measurements derive the elemental composition, relative abundances, and isotopic ratios of the examined environment. To sample tenuous gas environments around comets, icy moons, and the exosphere of Mercury, efficient instrument designs with high sensitivity are mandatory while the contamination by the spacecraft and the sensor itself should be kept as low as possible. With the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA), designed to characterize the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, we were able to quantify the effects of spacecraft contamination on such measurements. By means of 3D computational modeling of a helium leak in the thruster pressurization tubing that was detected during the cruise phase we examine the physics involved leading to the measurements of contamination. 3 types of contamination can be distinguished: i) Compounds from the decomposition of the spacecraft material. ii) Contamination from thruster firing during maneuvers. iii) Adsorption and desorption of the sampled environment on and from the spacecraft. We show that even after more than ten years in space the effects of i) are still detectable by ROSINA and impose an important constraint on the lower limit of gas number densities one can examine by means of mass spectrometry. Effects from ii) act on much shorter time scales and can be avoided or minimized by proper mission planning and data analysis afterwards. iii) is the most difficult effect to quantify as it changes over time and finally carries the fingerprint of the sampled environment which makes prior calibration not possible.

  6. Stones used in Milan architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folli, Luisa

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The city of Milan lies in a plain with clayey soil well suited to brick-making, but no stone deposits. An ample supply of stone is available, however, in the surrounding hills and mountains, which are connected to the city via both natural and artificial waterways. The types of stone used since Roman times include: granite, marble and gneiss from Ossola Valley; dolomite from Lake Maggiore; detrital limestone from Ceresio Valley; sandstone from the Brianza Hills; black limestone and marble from Lake Como; and conglomerate and sandstone from the Adda River basin. Traditionally, the chief uses have been dimension stone (all stones, column shafts (granite, slabs (marble, moulding (dolomite, limestone and ornamental (marble, dolomite, limestone.La ciudad de Milán se encuentra en una llanura de suelo arcilloso adecuado para la fabricación de ladrillos pero en la cual no hay yacimientos de rocas. No obstante, en las colinas y montañas circundantes, que están comunicadas con la ciudad mediante vías navegables naturales y artificiales, sí existe una abundante cantidad de piedra. Entre los tipos de piedra utilizados desde la época de los romanos se encuentran granitos, mármoles y gneises del valle de Ossola, dolomías del lago Mayor, calizas detríticas del valle de Ceresio (Lugano, areniscas de las colinas de la Brianza, calizas negras y mármoles del lago Como y conglomerados y areniscas de la cuenca del río Adda. Tradicionalmente, los principales usos han sido la piedra de fábrica (todas ellas, fustes de columnas (granito, losas (mármol, molduras (dolomía, caliza y ornamental (mármol, dolomía, caliza.

  7. Spontaneous dissolution of a guaifenesin stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thai T; Fallon, Bernard; Winfield, Howard N

    2005-08-01

    Guaifenesin is a commonly used expectorant whose use may lead to the occasional formation of guaifenesin urinary stones. We herein describe a patient who was taking 2400 mg Guaifenesin per day as part of his treatment for asthma. He had a past history of a guaifenesin stone removed ureteroscopically. His current presentation was with a 9 mm by 6 mm stone in the upper left ureter, seen on CT scan, and treated initially with a ureteral stent and hydration. After 3 weeks, the stone had disappeared, as confirmed by repeat CT scan. The genesis and treatment of guaifenesin stones is discussed.

  8. The White Stone Worship of Qiang People

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈卓

    2013-01-01

    The White Stone worship is an inseparable cultural part among Qiang People in the history and their daily lives. It has relationship with the God, with Qiang people’s fondness of the white color, with the fire-making, with the function of white stones as the tool and weapon for survival, and with the worship for Snow Mountain. The White Stone is the oblation in Qiang Families, the architecture—Blockhouse relating to the white stone is famous worldwide. The essay also discusses the links be⁃tween the white stone worship with Qiang people in the past and in the future

  9. The White Stone Worship of Qiang People

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈卓

    2013-01-01

    The White Stone worship is an inseparable cultural part among Qiang People in the history and their daily lives. It has relationship with the God, with Qiang people’ s fondness of the white color, with the fire-making, with the function of white stones as the tool and weapon for survival, and with the worship for Snow Mountain. The White Stone is the oblation in Qiang Families, the architecture—Blockhouse relating to the white stone is famous worldwide. The essay also discusses the links be⁃tween the white stone worship with Qiang people in the past and in the future.

  10. Piezoelectric composite transducers, ultrasonic materials characterization, and the ROSETTA Comet mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, W.; Gebhardt, W.; Licht, R.; Kröning, M.

    2001-04-01

    In 2003 the ROSETTA space mission to Comet 46P/Wirtanen will be launched by the European Space Agency (ESA). On board of the spacecraft will be a lander in order to carry out measurements on the comet surface. The so-called CASSE experiment aims to investigate the surface of the comet by transmitting, receiving and passively monitoring acoustic waves at frequencies from a few hundred to several kilohertz. The knowledge of the IZFP in modeling of NDT problems, in wave propagation in complex materials, and in the design of advanced transducers eventually led to its involvement in the ROSETTA mission. .

  11. How a Cartoon Series Helped the Public Care about Rosetta and Philae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignone, C.; Baldwin, E.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Homfeld, A. M.; Bauer, M.; McCaughrean, M.; Marcu, S.; Palazzari, C.

    2016-03-01

    Once upon a time... is a series of short cartoons that have been developed as part of the European Space Agency's communication campaign to raise awareness about the Rosetta mission. The series features two anthropomorphic characters depicting the Rosetta orbiter and Philae lander, introducing the mission story, goals and milestones with a fairy- tale air. This article explores the development of the cartoon series and the level of engagement it generated, as well as presenting various issues that were encountered using this approach. We also examine how different audiences responded to our decision to anthropomorphise the spacecraft.

  12. A variant in a Cis-regulatory element enhances claudin-14 expression and is associated with pediatric-onset hypercalciuria and kidney stones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ure, Megan E; Heydari, Emma; Pan, Wanling

    2017-01-01

    The greatest risk factor for kidney stones is hypercalciuria, the etiology of which is largely unknown. A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) linked hypercalciuria and kidney stones to a claudin-14 (CLDN14) risk haplotype. However, the underlying molecular mechanism was not delineated. Re...

  13. [Common bile duct stones and their complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millat, B; Borie, F

    2000-12-01

    At the time of cholecystectomy for symptomatic cholelithiasis, 7-20% of patients have common bile duct stones. Nearly one third of them are asymptomatic. Routine cholangiography during cholecystectomy allows the diagnosis and treatment of common bile duct stones during the same operation. Selective indication for the diagnosis of common bile duct stones based on the positive predictive value of indicators limits treatment to symptomatic cases. No single indicator is however completely accurate in predicting common bile duct stones and the natural history of asymptomatic cases is uncertain. Endoscopic stone extraction preceding cholecystectomy is not superior to one-stage surgical treatment. Diagnosis and treatment of common bile duct stones are feasible laparoscopically. Complications of common bile duct stones are cholangitis and acute pancreatitis; if severe, they require specific therapeutic approaches.

  14. Rosetta in context: Ground-based observations of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snodgrass, C.

    2014-04-01

    ESA's Rosetta mission to comet 67/Churyumov- Gerasimenko will produce a step change in our understanding of comets, as the first mission to rendezvous with, land on and then follow a comet as its activity evolves with decreasing solar distance. The first results from the pre-landing phase of the mission are expected to be presented during the 2014 EPSC conference, which falls during the intensive nucleus mapping phase prior to landing in November 2014. By September Rosetta will already have returned more detailed information on the nucleus of a comet than any previous mission, even though it will still be only starting its near-comet operations. While Rosetta will study 67P in incredible detail, the overall goal of the mission is to understand cometary processes in general. It is therefore necessary to link 67P to other Jupiter family comets, including the vast majority that will never be visited by spacecraft. Astronomical observations are therefore required to give context to the Rosetta mission, allowing direct comparison between 67P and other comets observed in the same ways from Earth. These observations also allow Rosetta results to be placed into the context of the wider coma - it is worth remembering that Rosetta orbits very close to the nucleus, around a 100km from it most of the time, but the comet's coma stretches over tens of thousands of km. For these reasons, there is an international campaign of observations in support of the Rosetta reason. The campaign, initiated through a Europlanet networking activity on coordination between space missions and observers, now brings together a large group of astronomers and Rosetta scientists. Throughout 2014 it is provided with observations of the comet by the ESO VLT, along with many other facilities worldwide. More details on the campaign are available at the website http://www.rosetta-campaign.net. In addition to the professional astronomer involvement, the campaign will also provide great opportunities for

  15. Challenges of archiving science data from long duration missions: the Rosetta case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather, David

    2016-07-01

    Rosetta is the first mission designed to orbit and land on a comet. It consists of an orbiter, carrying 11 science experiments, and a lander, called 'Philae', carrying 10 additional instruments. Rosetta was launched on 2 March 2004, and arrived at the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 6 August 2014. During its long journey, Rosetta has completed flybys of the Earth and Mars, and made two excursions to the main asteroid belt to observe (2867) Steins and (21) Lutetia. On 12 November 2014, the Philae probe soft landed on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the first time in history that such an extraordinary feat has been achieved. After the landing, the Rosetta orbiter followed the comet through its perihelion in August 2015, and will continue to accompany 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko as it recedes from the Sun until the end of the mission. There are significant challenges in managing the science archive of a mission such as Rosetta. The first data were returned from Rosetta more than 10 years ago, and there have been flybys of several planetary bodies, including two asteroids from which significant science data were returned by many of the instruments. The scientific applications for these flyby data can be very different to those taken during the main science phase at the comet, but there are severe limitations on the changes that can be applied to the data pipelines managed by the various science teams as resources are scarce. The priority is clearly on maximising the potential science from the comet phase, so data formats and pipelines have been designed with that in mind, and changes limited to managing issues found during official archiving authority and independent science reviews. In addition, in the time that Rosetta has been operating, the archiving standards themselves have evolved. All Rosetta data are archived following version 3 of NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) Standards. Currently, new and upcoming planetary science missions are delivering data

  16. Encounter of a different kind: Rosetta observes asteroid at close quarters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    ESA's comet chaser, Rosetta, last night flew by a small body in the main asteroid belt, asteroid Steins, collecting a wealth of information about this rare type of minor Solar System body. At 20:58 CEST (18:58 UT) last night, ESA's Rosetta probe approached asteroid 2867 Steins, coming to within a distance of only 800 km from it. Steins is Rosetta's first nominal scientific target in its 11½ year mission to ultimately explore the nucleus of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The success of this 'close' encounter was confirmed at 22:14 CEST, when ESA's ground control team at the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) in Darmstadt, Germany, received initial telemetry from the spacecraft. During the flyby operations, Rosetta was out of reach as regards communication links because its antenna had to be turned away from Earth. At a distance of about 2.41 AU (360 million kilometres) from our planet, the radio signal from the probe took 20 minutes to reach the ground. Steins is a small asteroid of irregular shape with a diameter of only 4.6 km. It belongs to the rare class of E-type asteroids, which had not been directly observed by an interplanetary spacecraft before. Such asteroids are quite small in size and orbit and are mostly found in the inner part of the main asteroid belt located between Mars and Jupiter. They probably originate from the mantle of larger asteroids destroyed in the early history of the Solar System, and are thought to be composed mainly of silicate minerals with little or no iron content. The data collected by Rosetta last night and which will be analysed over the coming days and weeks will finally unveil the true nature of Steins. Through the study of minor bodies such as asteroids, Rosetta is opening up a new window onto the early history of our Solar System. It will give us a better understanding of the origins and evolution of the planets, and also a key to better interpreting asteroid data collected from the ground. Under Rosetta's scope This

  17. Bariatric Surgery and Stone Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieske, John C.; Kumar, Rajiv

    2008-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment strategy for patients with morbid obesity that can result in effective weight loss, resolution of diabetes mellitus and other weight related complications, and even improved mortality. However, it also appears that hyperoxaluria is common after modern bariatric surgery, perhaps occurring in up to 50% of patients after Rouxen-Y gastric bypass. Although increasing numbers of patients are being seen with calcium oxalate kidney stones after bariatric surgery, and even a few with oxalosis and renal failure, the true risk of these outcomes remains unknown. The mechanisms that contribute to this enteric hyperoxaluria are also incompletely defined, although fat malabsorption may be an important component. Since increasing numbers of these procedures are likely to be performed in the coming years, further study regarding the prevalence and mechanisms of hyperoxaluria and kidney stones after bariatric surgery is needed to devise effective methods of treatment in order to prevent such complications.

  18. The Rosetta Mission to Comet 67P/ Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, Bonnie J.

    2017-06-01

    As remnant bodies left over from the formation of the Solar System, comets offer clues to the physical conditions and architecture of the protosolar nebula. The Rosetta spacecraft, which included an orbiter and a lander that were built and managed by the European Space Agency with NASA contributing four instruments and scientific expertise, was the first mission to orbit and study a comet through a perihelion passage. The targeted Jupiter-family comet 67P/ Churyumov-Gerasimenko, is seemingly two distinct planetesimals stuck together. The comet has not melted or been processed substantially, except for its outer layers, which consist of reaccreted dust and a crust of heated, devolatized, and annealed refractory materials and organics. The exceptionally low density (0.53 gm/cc) of 67P/ implies it is a rubble pile. The comet also appears to contain a hierarchy of building blocks: smaller spherically shaped meter-sized bodies can be seen in its interior, and even smaller cm-sized pebbles were imaged by the camera as the spacecraft made a soft crash landing on the comet’s surface on 30 September 2016. The unexpected discovery of molecular oxygen, nitrogen, and hydrogen imply that 67P/ was formed under cold conditions not exceeding 30K. The discovery of many organic compounds, including the amino acid glycine, lends support to the idea that comets, which originate in the Kuiper Belt and the Oort Cloud, brought the building blocks of life to Earth. More laboratory data on organic compounds would help to identify additional organic compounds on the comet. The differences between cometary and terrestrial D/H ratios suggest that comets are not the primary source of terrestrial water, although data on more comets is needed to confirm this result.Besides being primordial objects offering a window into the formation of solar systems, comets are astrophysical laboratories, ejecting dust and charged particles into the plasma comprising the solar wind. Several unusual phenomena

  19. Communication of Science Plans in the Rosetta Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Albrecht; Grieger, Björn; Völk, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Rosetta is a mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) to rendez-vous with comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko in mid-2014. The trajectories and their corresponding operations are both flexible and particularly complex. To make informed decisions among the many free parameters, novel ways to communicate operations to the community have been explored. To support science planning by communicating operational ideas and disseminating operational scenarios, the science ground segment makes use of Web-based visualisation technologies. To keep the threshold to analysing operations proposals as low as possible, various implementation techniques have been investigated. An important goal was to use the Web to make the content as accessible as possible. By adopting the recent standard WebGL and generating static pages of time-dependent three-dimensional views of the spacecraft as well as the corresponding field-of-views of instruments, directly from the operational and for-study files, users are given the opportunity to explore interactively in their Web browsers what is being proposed in addition to using the traditional file products and analysing them in detail. The scenes and animations can be viewed in any modern Web browser and be combined with other analyses. This is to facilitate verification and cross-validation of complex products, often done by comparing different independent analyses and studies. By providing different timesteps in animations, it is possible to focus on long-term planning or short-term planning without distracting the user from the essentials. This is particularly important since the information that can be displayed in a Web browser is somewhat related to data volume that can be transferred across the wire. In Web browsers, it is more challenging to do numerical calculations on demand. Since requests for additional data have to be passed through a Web server, they are more complex and also require a more complex infrastructure. The volume of data that

  20. Greco-Roman Stone Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Michael E.; Ruzhansky, Katherine

    2008-09-01

    Greek and Roman thought had a profound influence upon Western medical practice. From the fall of the Greek civilization to the fall of the Roman, remarkable progress of our understanding of human anatomy and physiology occurred. Here we review the attempts of Greek and Roman thinkers to develop the first understanding of the pathophysiology of urolithiasis, its epidemiology, differential diagnosis of renal versus bladder stones, medications for both colic and prevention, the role of familial syndromes, and dietary management.

  1. Rosetta Lander - Landing and operations on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulamec, Stephan; Fantinati, Cinzia; Maibaum, Michael; Geurts, Koen; Biele, Jens; Jansen, Sven; Küchemann, Oliver; Cozzoni, Barbara; Finke, Felix; Lommatsch, Valentina; Moussi-Soffys, Aurelie; Delmas, Cedric; O´Rourke, Laurence

    2016-08-01

    The Rosetta Lander Philae is part of the ESA Rosetta Mission which reached comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko after a 10 year cruise in August 2014. Since then, Rosetta has been studying both its nucleus and coma with instruments aboard the Orbiter. On November 12th, 2014 the Lander, Philae, was successfully delivered to the surface of the comet and operated for approximately 64 h after separation from the mother spacecraft. Since the active cold gas system aboard the Lander as well as the anchoring harpoons did not work, Philae bounced after the first touch-down at the planned landing site "Agilkia". At the final landing site, "Abydos", a modified First Scientific Sequence was performed. Due to the unexpectedly low illumination conditions and a lack of anchoring the sequence had to be adapted in order to minimize risk and maximize the scientific output. All ten instruments could be activated at least once, before Philae went into hibernation. In June 2015, the Lander contacted Rosetta again having survived successfully a long hibernation phase. This paper describes the Lander operations around separation, during descent and on the surface of the comet. We also address the partly successful attempts to re-establish contact with the Lander in June/July, when the internal temperature & power received were sufficient for Philae to become active again.

  2. High Resolution Optical Spectroscopy of Rosetta Target 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko Using Keck HIRES

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Adam; Cochran, Anita L.; Bodewits, Dennis; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Altwegg, Kathrin; Gulkis, Samuel; Snodgrass, Colin; Borro, Miguel de Val; Kelley, Michael S.; Feaga, Lori M.; Wooden, Diane H.; Bauer, James M.; Kramer, Emily A.

    2016-10-01

    We present high spectral resolution optical spectroscopy of Rosetta target 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko obtained on UT Dec 26 and 27, 2015 using the HIRES instrument on Keck I when the comet was at a heliocentric distance of approximately 2 AU post-perihelion. The spectra cover a spectral range of 3500-10000 Angstroms at a spectral resolution of 67,000. These observations aim to provide high spectral resolution, large projected field of view context for the high spatial resolution and small projected field of view observations obtained from the Rosetta instrument suite. We report detections of CN, NH2, and [OI] emission. From the [OI]6300 emission we derive a water production rate of approximately 2 x 1027 mol/s. Production rates (or upper limits) for other species will be presented and placed in context with recent results from Rosetta. We will also present results pertaining to the [OI]5577 line, which combined with the [OI]6300 emission can be used as a proxy for CO2. We will compare our results to observations obtained by Rosetta as well as NEOWISE and Spitzer.

  3. Structure prediction for CASP8 with all-atom refinement using Rosetta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Srivatsan; Vernon, Robert; Thompson, James; Tyka, Michael; Sadreyev, Ruslan; Pei, Jimin; Kim, David; Kellogg, Elizabeth; DiMaio, Frank; Lange, Oliver; Kinch, Lisa; Sheffler, Will; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Das, Rhiju; Grishin, Nick V.; Baker, David

    2012-01-01

    We describe predictions made using the Rosetta structure prediction methodology for the Eighth Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction. Aggressive sampling and all-atom refinement were carried out for nearly all targets. A combination of alignment methodologies was used to generate starting models from a range of templates, and the models were then subjected to Rosetta all atom refinement. For 50 targets with readily identified templates, the best submitted model was better than the best alignment to the best template in the Protein Data Bank for 24 domains, and improved over the best starting model for 43 domains. For 13 targets where only very distant sequence relationships to proteins of known structure were detected, models were generated using the Rosetta de novo structure prediction methodology followed by all-atom refinement; in several cases the submitted models were better than those based on the available templates. Of the 12 refinement challenges, the best submitted model improved on the starting model in 7 cases. These improvements over the starting template-based models and refinement tests demonstrate the power of Rosetta structure refinement in improving model accuracy. PMID:19701941

  4. RosettaTMH: a method for membrane protein structure elucidation combining EPR distance restraints with assembly of transmembrane helices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Leaver-Fay

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins make up approximately one third of all proteins, and they play key roles in a plethora of physiological processes. However, membrane proteins make up less than 2% of experimentally determined structures, despite significant advances in structure determination methods, such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and cryo-electron microscopy. One potential alternative means of structure elucidation is to combine computational methods with experimental EPR data. In 2011, Hirst and others introduced RosettaEPR and demonstrated that this approach could be successfully applied to fold soluble proteins. Furthermore, few computational methods for de novo folding of integral membrane proteins have been presented. In this work, we present RosettaTMH, a novel algorithm for structure prediction of helical membrane proteins. A benchmark set of 34 proteins, in which the proteins ranged in size from 91 to 565 residues, was used to compare RosettaTMH to Rosetta’s two existing membrane protein folding protocols: the published RosettaMembrane folding protocol (“MembraneAbinitio” and folding from an extended chain (“ExtendedChain”. When EPR distance restraints are used, RosettaTMH+EPR outperforms ExtendedChain+EPR for 11 proteins, including the largest six proteins tested. RosettaTMH+EPR is capable of achieving native-like folds for 30 of 34 proteins tested, including receptors and transporters. For example, the average RMSD100SSE relative to the crystal structure for rhodopsin was 6.1 ± 0.4 Å and 6.5 ± 0.6 Å for the 449-residue nitric oxide reductase subunit B, where the standard deviation reflects variance in RMSD100SSE values across ten different EPR distance restraint sets. The addition of RosettaTMH and RosettaTMH+EPR to the Rosetta family of de novo folding methods broadens the scope of helical membrane proteins that can be accurately modeled with this software suite.

  5. Stone composition among first-time symptomatic kidney stone formers in the community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prince; Enders, Felicity T.; Vaughan, Lisa E.; Bergstralh, Eric J; Knoedler, John J.; Krambeck, Amy E; Lieske, John C; Rule, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the variation in kidney stone composition and its relationship to risk factors and recurrence among first-time stone formers in the general population. Patients and Methods Medical records were manually reviewed and validated for symptomatic kidney stone episodes among Olmsted County, Minnesota residents from January 1, 1984 to December 31, 2012. Clinical and laboratory characteristics and the risk of symptomatic recurrence were compared between stone compositions. Results There were 2961 validated first-time symptomatic kidney stone formers. Stone composition analysis was obtained in 1508 (51%) at the first episode. Stone formers were divided into the following mutually exclusive groups: any brushite (0.9%), any struvite (0.9%), any uric acid (4.8%), majority calcium oxalate (76%) or majority hydroxyapatite (18%). Stone composition varied with clinical characteristics. A multivariable model had a 69% probability of correctly estimating stone composition, but assuming calcium oxalate monohydrate stone was correct 65% of the time. Symptomatic recurrence at 10 years was approximately 50% for brushite, struvite, and uric acid, but approximately 30% for calcium oxalate and hydroxyapatite stones (P<.001). Recurrence was similar across different proportions of calcium oxalate and hydroxyapatite (P-trend=.10). However, among calcium oxalate stones, 10-year recurrence rate ranged from 38% for 100% calcium oxalate dihydrate to 26% for 100% calcium oxalate monohydrate (P-trend=.007). Conclusion Calcium stones are more common (94% of stone formers) than has been previously reported. While clinical and laboratory factors associate with the stone composition, they are of limited utility for estimating stone composition. Rarer stone compositions are more likely to recur. PMID:26349951

  6. Guaifenesin stone matrix proteomics: a protocol for identifying proteins critical to stone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbach-Mandel, A M; Mandel, N S; Cohen, S R; Kleinman, J G; Ahmed, F; Mandel, I C; Wesson, J A

    2017-04-01

    Drug-related kidney stones are a diagnostic problem, since they contain a large matrix (protein) fraction and are frequently incorrectly identified as matrix stones. A urine proteomics study patient produced a guaifenesin stone during her participation, allowing us to both correctly diagnose her disease and identify proteins critical to this drug stone-forming process. The patient provided three random midday urine samples for proteomics studies; one of which contained stone-like sediment with two distinct fractions. These solids were characterized with optical microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Immunoblotting and quantitative mass spectrometry were used to quantitatively identify the proteins in urine and stone matrix. Infrared spectroscopy showed that the sediment was 60 % protein and 40 % guaifenesin and its metabolite guaiacol. Of the 156 distinct proteins identified in the proteomic studies, 49 were identified in the two stone-components with approximately 50 % of those proteins also found in this patient's urine. Many proteins observed in this drug-related stone have also been reported in proteomic matrix studies of uric acid and calcium containing stones. More importantly, nine proteins were highly enriched and highly abundant in the stone matrix and 8 were reciprocally depleted in urine, suggesting a critical role for these proteins in guaifenesin stone formation. Accurate stone analysis is critical to proper diagnosis and treatment of kidney stones. Many matrix proteins were common to all stone types, but likely not related to disease mechanism. This protocol defined a small set of proteins that were likely critical to guaifenesin stone formation based on their high enrichment and high abundance in stone matrix, and it should be applied to all stone types.

  7. Media event at ESOC: closest encounter between ESA's comet chaser Rosetta and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    The critical close swingby of Mars is needed to use the gravity of Mars to modify the spacecraft’s speed and direction. Rosetta will emerge from its martian encounter pointed towards its next target, Earth ! It arrives for a second swingby of our home planet on 13 November (the first having already taken place on 4 March 2005). To take advantage of this upcoming closest of encounters with the Red Planet, Rosetta’s instruments - as well as those on its lander - will be switched on over predefined time slots to perform a series of scientific observations, including planetary imaging. Flight controllers at ESA’s European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) have already set everything ready for this crucial manoeuvre. Launched on 2 March 2004 on an Ariane 5 rocket, Rosetta is the first probe ever designed to enter orbit around a comet’s nucleus and release a lander onto its surface. Arriving at comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014, the probe will take over a year to conduct a thorough scientific study of this remnant of the primitive nebula which gave birth to our solar system some 4.6 billion years ago. By the end of its epic journey, Rosetta will have performed three Earth and one Mars swingbys in all. It will also have studied asteroids Steins and Lutetia, in September 2008 and July 2010 respectively. Media representatives wishing to follow this Rosetta Mars swingby from the ESOC control centre in Darmstadt/Germany are requested to complete and return the attached reply form. For further information, please contact : ESA Communication Department Media Relations Office Tel: +33(0)1.53.69.7155 Fax: +33(0)1.53.69.7690 Programme Rosetta Mars swingby 25 February 2007, 2 a.m. start 02:00 - Doors open & Filming opportunity in Mission Control Room 02:40 - Welcome by David Southwood, ESA Director of Science Programme 02:50 - Rosetta Mars swingby the manoeuvres and flight dynamics, Uwe Feucht, Head of Flight Dynamics Division/Team 03:00 - En route science, first images

  8. Performance of the WeNMR CS-Rosetta3 web server in CASD-NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schot, Gijs van der [Uppsala University, Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology (Sweden); Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J., E-mail: a.m.j.j.bonvin@uu.nl [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science – Chemistry, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    We present here the performance of the WeNMR CS-Rosetta3 web server in CASD-NMR, the critical assessment of automated structure determination by NMR. The CS-Rosetta server uses only chemical shifts for structure prediction, in combination, when available, with a post-scoring procedure based on unassigned NOE lists (Huang et al. in J Am Chem Soc 127:1665–1674, 2005b, doi: 10.1021/ja047109h 10.1021/ja047109h ). We compare the original submissions using a previous version of the server based on Rosetta version 2.6 with recalculated targets using the new R3FP fragment picker for fragment selection and implementing a new annotation of prediction reliability (van der Schot et al. in J Biomol NMR 57:27–35, 2013, doi: 10.1007/s10858-013-9762-6 10.1007/s10858-013-9762-6 ), both implemented in the CS-Rosetta3 WeNMR server. In this second round of CASD-NMR, the WeNMR CS-Rosetta server has demonstrated a much better performance than in the first round since only converged targets were submitted. Further, recalculation of all CASD-NMR targets using the new version of the server demonstrates that our new annotation of prediction quality is giving reliable results. Predictions annotated as weak are often found to provide useful models, but only for a fraction of the sequence, and should therefore only be used with caution.

  9. Investigations of stone consolidants by neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hameed, F. [Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: hameed@ati.ac.at; Schillinger, B. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, FRM II and Physics Department E21, Garching (Germany); Rohatsch, A. [Institute for Engineering Geology, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Zawisky, M.; Rauch, H. [Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria)

    2009-06-21

    The chemical preservation and structural reintegration of natural stones applied in historical buildings is carried out by the use of different stone strengtheners. As these agents contain hydrogen, they offer good properties for neutron imaging. The main interest in the restoration process is the development of a suitable stone consolidant. In cooperation with the St. Stephans Cathedral and the geologists at Vienna University of Technology, we are investigating the penetration depth and distribution of different stone consolidants. These studies are being carried out with different stone samples, mostly porous natural building stones, limestones and sandstones. The two strengtheners used in this study are ethyl silicate ester (Wacker OH100) and dissolved polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA, Paraloid B72). Neutron radiography and neutron tomography can be used successfully to visualize the distribution of consolidants both in two and three dimensions.

  10. Quality Assessment of Urinary Stone Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siener, Roswitha; Buchholz, Noor; Daudon, Michel;

    2016-01-01

    After stone removal, accurate analysis of urinary stone composition is the most crucial laboratory diagnostic procedure for the treatment and recurrence prevention in the stone-forming patient. The most common techniques for routine analysis of stones are infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction...... and chemical analysis. The aim of the present study was to assess the quality of urinary stone analysis of laboratories in Europe. Nine laboratories from eight European countries participated in six quality control surveys for urinary calculi analyses of the Reference Institute for Bioanalytics, Bonn, Germany......, between 2010 and 2014. Each participant received the same blinded test samples for stone analysis. A total of 24 samples, comprising pure substances and mixtures of two or three components, were analysed. The evaluation of the quality of the laboratory in the present study was based on the attainment...

  11. Investigations of stone consolidants by neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, F.; Schillinger, B.; Rohatsch, A.; Zawisky, M.; Rauch, H.

    2009-06-01

    The chemical preservation and structural reintegration of natural stones applied in historical buildings is carried out by the use of different stone strengtheners. As these agents contain hydrogen, they offer good properties for neutron imaging. The main interest in the restoration process is the development of a suitable stone consolidant. In cooperation with the St. Stephans Cathedral and the geologists at Vienna University of Technology, we are investigating the penetration depth and distribution of different stone consolidants. These studies are being carried out with different stone samples, mostly porous natural building stones, limestones and sandstones. The two strengtheners used in this study are ethyl silicate ester (Wacker OH100) and dissolved polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA, Paraloid B72). Neutron radiography and neutron tomography can be used successfully to visualize the distribution of consolidants both in two and three dimensions.

  12. The Fifth National Day of Viewing Stone will Opening Soon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    In order to carry forward the culture of the viewing stone and spread the ideas of viewing stone appreciation as well as promote the cultural undertakings and industry of viewing stone towards the healthy development trend,Viewing Stone Association of China pioneered and established the National Day of Viewing Stone.With the background of national cultural development strategies,the

  13. CT diagnosis of gall stone ileus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leen, G.L.S.; Finlay, M. (Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne (UK). Dept. of Radiology Newcastle General Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne (UK). Dept. of Radiology)

    1990-09-01

    We report a case of gall stone ileus in which only small bowel obstruction was seen on the conventional abdominal film and the diagnosis was made by computed tomography (CT). With the availability of CT and its increasing use in the investigation of the acute abdomen, CT examination will occasionally be performed on gall stone ileus patients. Awareness of the CT findings in gall stone ileus will result in early diagnosis leading to a reduction in the mortality rate. (orig.).

  14. Calcium Oxalate Stone Agglomeration Inhibition [tm] Reflects Renal Stone-Forming Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Jill S.; Cole, Francis E.; Romani, William; Husserl, Fred E.; Fuselier, Harold A.; Kok, Dirk J.; Erwin, Donald T.

    2000-01-01

    Louisiana and other Gulf South states comprise a “Stone Belt” where calcium oxalate stone formers (CaOx SFs) are found at a high rate of approximately 5%. In these patients, the agglomeration of small stone crystals, which are visible in nearly all morning urine collections, forms stones that can become trapped in the renal parenchyma and the renal pelvis. Without therapy, about half of CaOx SFs repeatedly form kidney stones, which can cause excruciating pain that can be relieved by passage, fragmentation (lithotripsy), or surgical removal. The absence of stones in “normal” patients suggests that there are stone inhibitors in “normal” urines. At the Ochsner Renal Stone Clinic, 24-hour urine samples are collected by the patient and sent to the Ochsner Renal Stone Research Program where calcium oxalate stone agglomeration inhibition [tm] measurements are performed. Urine from healthy subjects and inactive stone formers has demonstrated strongly inhibited stone growth [tm] in contrast to urine from recurrent CaOx SFs. [tm] data from 1500 visits of 700 kidney stone patients have been used to evaluate the risk of recurrence in Ochsner's CaOx SF patients. These data have also been used to demonstrate the interactive roles of certain identified urinary stone-growth inhibitors, citrate and Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP), which can be manipulated with medication to diminish recurrent stone formation. Our goal is to offer patients both financial and pain relief by reducing their stones with optimized medication, using medical management to avoid costly treatments. PMID:21811395

  15. STONE 6: Artificial Sedimentary Meteorites in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westall, F.; Demets, R.; Brandstetter, F.; Edwards, H. G. M.; Cockell, C. S.; Parnell, J.; Pillinger, J.; Sancisi-Frey, S.; Franchi, I. A.; Kurat, G.; Brack, A.

    2008-03-01

    The STONE 6 experiment demonstrated the survivability of carbonaceous and microfossiliferous martian analogue sediments during atmospheric re-entry. Doped endoliths died but their carbonised cells remained.

  16. New developments in percutaneous stone surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Derisavifard

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous stone surgery is the gold standard in removing large renal calculi. In light of the increase in prevalence and size of renal stones being addressed in recent years, numerous advances have been made in attempts of improving the morbidity, efficacy, and technical ease of stone clearance. In this review article, we assess new advancements in percutaneous stone surgery including diagnosis and surgical planning, methods of renal access, patient positioning, tract dilation, nephroscopes, lithotripsy, and post-operative drainage and antibiotic prophylaxis.

  17. The Rosetta Science Archive: Status and Plans for Enhancing the Archive Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather, David; Barthelemy, Maud; Besse, Sebastien; Fraga, Diego; Grotheer, Emmanuel; O'Rourke, Laurence; Taylor, Matthew; Vallat, Claire

    2017-04-01

    On 30 September 2016, Rosetta completed its incredible mission by landing on the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Although this marked an end to the spacecraft's active operations, intensive work is still ongoing with instrument teams preparing their final science data deliveries for ingestion into ESA's Planetary Science Archive (PSA). In addition, ESA is establishing contracts with some instrument teams to enhance their data and documentation in an effort to provide the best long-term archive possible for the Rosetta mission. Currently, the majority of teams have delivered all of their data from the nominal mission (end of 2015), and are working on their remaining increments from the 1-year mission extension. The aim is to complete the nominal archiving with data from the complete mission by the end of this year, when a full mission archive review will be held. This review will assess the complete data holdings from Rosetta and ensure that the archive is ready for the long-term. With the resources from the operational mission coming to an end, ESA has established a number of 'enhanced archiving' contracts to ensure that the best possible data are delivered to the archive before instrument teams disband. Updates are focused on key aspects of an instrument's calibration or the production of higher level data / information, and are therefore specific to each instrument's needs. These contracts are currently being kicked off, and will run for various lengths depending upon the activities to be undertaken. The full 'archive enhancement' process will run until September 2019, when the post operations activities for Rosetta will end. Within these contracts, most instrument teams will work on providing a Science User Guide for their data, as well as updating calibrations. Several teams will also be delivering higher level and derived products. For example, the VIRTIS team will be updating both their spectral and geometrical calibrations, and will aim to

  18. Crystal sedimentation and stone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Johannes Markus; Affolter, Beat; Meyer, Rolf

    2010-02-01

    Mechanisms of crystal collision being the first step of aggregation (AGN) were analyzed for calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) directly produced in urine. COM was produced by oxalate titration in urine of seven healthy men, in solutions of urinary macromolecules and in buffered distilled water (control). Crystal formation and sedimentation were followed by a spectrophotometer and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Viscosity of urine was measured at 37 degrees C. From results, sedimentation rate (v (S)), particle diffusion (D) and incidences of collision of particles in suspension by sedimentation (I (S)) and by diffusion (I (D)) were calculated. Calculations were related to average volume and urinary transit time of renal collecting ducts (CD) and of renal pelvis. v (S) was in urine 0.026 +/- 0.012, in UMS 0.022 +/- 0.01 and in control 0.091 +/- 0.02 cm min(-1) (mean +/- SD). For urine, a D of 9.53 +/- 0.97 mum within 1 min can be calculated. At maximal crystal concentration, I (S) was only 0.12 and I (D) was 0.48 min(-1) cm(-3) which, even at an unrealistic permanent and maximal crystalluria, would only correspond to less than one crystal collision/week/CD, whereas to the same tubular wall being in horizontal position 1.3 crystals/min and to a renal stone 624 crystals/cm(2) min could drop by sedimentation. Sedimentation to renal tubular or pelvic wall, where crystals can accumulate and meet with a tissue calcification or a stone, is probably essential for stone formation. Since v (S) mainly depends on particle size, reducing urinary supersaturation and crystal growth by dietary oxalate restriction seems to be an important measure to prevent aggregation.

  19. Personifying space: how the public learned to care for Rosetta and Philae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignone, Claudia; Baldwin, Emily; O'Flaherty, Karen; Homfeld, Anne-Mareike; Bauer, Markus; McCaughrean, Mark

    2015-04-01

    One of the aspects in the communications campaign promoted by the European Space Agency (ESA) and its partner institutions throughout 2014 to raise awareness about the comet-chasing mission, Rosetta, was the development of two anthropomorphic characters depicting the Rosetta probe and the lander Philae. The two characters were featured in a series of short cartoons with a fairy-tale flair that were distributed on the internet with the aim of breaking into new audience groups. The cartoon series, named "Once upon a time", tells the adventures of Rosetta and Philae, depicted as two bold and friendly explorers on a pioneering journey across the Solar System. The episodes cover the mission milestones, from Rosetta's wake-up from deep-space hibernation to its rendezvous with the comet and Philae's landing. They were promoted through the mission's dedicated social media accounts (mainly Twitter and Facebook) and through ESA's existing social media channels as part of the broader Rosetta communications campaign. We discuss how visual storytelling was used to make the mission's scientific goals more accessible, allowing the audience to share both its excitement and risks. We describe the development of the cartoon series and the level of engagement it generated, using estimates based on the response received through our social media channels. Other tools were also used to help the public identify with the two space probes. In particular, the Twitter accounts @ESA_Rosetta (managed by ESA) and @philae2014 (managed by DLR) were run in first person, as to give the impression that the probes were writing the tweets themselves, and even interacting with one another - as is often done in the case of spacecraft Twitter accounts. All these elements added a personal feel to the comet landing, with members of the public empathising with the two space probes and caring for their well-being. This wave of interest culminated in the last few hours of Philae's operations on the comet

  20. Brushite Stone Disease as a Consequence of Lithotripsy?

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of calcium phosphate (CaP) stone disease has increased over the last three decades; specifically, brushite stones are diagnosed and treated more frequently than in previous years. Brushite is a unique form of CaP, which in certain patients can form into large symptomatic stones. Treatment of brushite stones can be difficult since the stones are resistant to shock wave and ultrasonic lithotripsy, and often require ballistic fragmentation. Patients suffering from brushite stone di...

  1. Stone-dwelling actinobacteria Blastococcus saxobsidens, Modestobacter marinus and Geodermatophilus obscurus proteogenomes

    KAUST Repository

    Sghaier, Haïtham

    2015-06-30

    The Geodermatophilaceae are unique model systems to study the ability to thrive on or within stones and their proteogenomes (referring to the whole protein arsenal encoded by the genome) could provide important insight into their adaptation mechanisms. Here we report the detailed comparative genome analysis of Blastococcus saxobsidens (Bs), Modestobacter marinus (Mm) and Geodermatophilus obscurus (Go) isolated respectively from the interior and the surface of calcarenite stones and from desert sandy soils. The genome-scale analysis of Bs, Mm and Go illustrates how adaptation to these niches can be achieved through various strategies including ‘molecular tinkering/opportunism’ as shown by the high proportion of lost, duplicated or horizontally transferred genes and ORFans. Using high-throughput discovery proteomics, the three proteomes under unstressed conditions were analyzed, highlighting the most abundant biomarkers and the main protein factors. Proteomic data corroborated previously demonstrated stone-related ecological distribution. For instance, these data showed starvation-inducible, biofilm-related and DNA-protection proteins as signatures of the microbes associated with the interior, surface and outside of stones, respectively.

  2. Mourning in Bits and Stone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabra, Jakob Borrits

    We mourn our dead, publicly and privately, online and offline. Cemeteries, web memorials and social network sites make up parts of todays intricately weaved and interrelated network of death, grief and memorialization practices [1]–[5]. Whether cut in stone or made of bits, graves, cemeteries, me...... and memorialization by discussing the publicly and privately digital and social death from a spatial, temporal, physical and digital angle. Further the paper will reflect on how to encompass shifting trends and technologies in ‘traditional’ spaces of mourning and remembrance.......We mourn our dead, publicly and privately, online and offline. Cemeteries, web memorials and social network sites make up parts of todays intricately weaved and interrelated network of death, grief and memorialization practices [1]–[5]. Whether cut in stone or made of bits, graves, cemeteries......, memorials, monuments, websites and social networking services (SNS) all are alterable, controllable and adaptive. They represent a certain rationale contrary to the emotive state of mourning (e.g. gravesites function as both spaces of internment and places of spiritual and emotional recollection). Following...

  3. Elemental Content of Calcium Oxalate Stones from a Canine Model of Urinary Stone Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Killilea

    Full Text Available One of the most common types of urinary stones formed in humans and some other mammals is composed of calcium oxalate in ordered hydrated crystals. Many studies have reported a range of metals other than calcium in human stones, but few have looked at stones from animal models such as the dog. Therefore, we determined the elemental profile of canine calcium oxalate urinary stones and compared it to reported values from human stones. The content of 19 elements spanning 7-orders of magnitude was quantified in calcium oxalate stones from 53 dogs. The elemental profile of the canine stones was highly overlapping with human stones, indicating similar inorganic composition. Correlation and cluster analysis was then performed on the elemental profile from canine stones to evaluate associations between the elements and test for potential subgrouping based on elemental content. No correlations were observed with the most abundant metal calcium. However, magnesium and sulfur content correlated with the mineral hydration form, while phosphorous and zinc content correlated with the neuter status of the dog. Inter-elemental correlation analysis indicated strong associations between barium, phosphorous, and zinc content. Additionally, cluster analysis revealed subgroups within the stones that were also based primarily on barium, phosphorous, and zinc. These data support the use of the dog as a model to study the effects of trace metal homeostasis in urinary stone disease.

  4. Guaifenesin- and ephedrine-induced stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assimos, D G; Langenstroer, P; Leinbach, R F; Mandel, N S; Stern, J M; Holmes, R P

    1999-11-01

    We report a new type of drug-induced stone that is caused by overconsumption of preparations containing guaifenesin and ephedrine. Clinical and stone analysis data from the Molecular Structure Laboratory at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, were reviewed. Stone analysis was performed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray crystallographic powder diffraction, or both. The urine and stone material from one of the subjects were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography. Stone analysis from seven patients demonstrated metabolites of guaifenesin. High-performance liquid chromatography revealed that the stone and urine from one subject had a high content of guaifenesin metabolites and a small amount of ephedrine. Demographic data were available on five patients. Three had a history of alcohol or drug dependency. All were consuming over-the-counter preparations containing ephedrine and guaifenesin. Four admitted to taking excessive quantities of these agents, mainly as a stimulant. Hypocitraturia was identified in two individuals subjected to urinary metabolic testing. These stones are radiolucent on standard X-ray imaging but can be demonstrated on unenhanced CT. Shockwave lithotripsy was performed in two patients, and the calculi fragmented easily. Individuals consuming large quantities of preparations containing ephedrine and guaifenesin may be at risk to develop stones derived mainly from metabolites of guaifenesin and small quantities of ephedrine. These patients may be prone to drug or alcohol dependency.

  5. Ventricular candidiasis in stone curlews (Burhinus oedicnemus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliendo, Valentina; Bull, Andrew

    2011-09-01

    Ventricular candidiasis is consistently one of the most prominent pathologic conditions diagnosed in stone curlews (Burhinus oedicnemus) in the United Arab Emirates, predominately affecting the captive population. Predisposing factors are a humid environment, stress, immunosuppression, inadequate nutrition, and an extended use of oral antibiotics. In this report, we describe the clinical signs, diagnosis, and pathologic result in stone curlews with ventricular candidiasis.

  6. Stone Formation in the Infected Pediatric Enterocystoplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.B. Mathoera (Rejiv)

    2003-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Proteus mirabilis is one of the most frequent bacterial agents that can induce infection stone formation by urease production. In recent years the influence of Proteus mirabilis on stone formation in enterocystoplasties has been primarily related to the presence of

  7. Gallstone Ileus following Endoscopic Stone Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiya Yamauchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An 85-year-old woman was an outpatient treated at Tokyo Rosai Hospital for cirrhosis caused by hepatitis B. She had previously been diagnosed as having common bile duct stones, for which she underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP. However, as stone removal was unsuccessful, a plastic stent was placed after endoscopic sphincterotomy. In October 2012, the stent was replaced endoscopically because she developed cholangitis due to stent occlusion. Seven days later, we performed ERCP to treat recurring cholangitis. During the procedure, the stone was successfully removed by a balloon catheter when cleaning the common bile duct. The next day, the patient developed abdominal pain, abdominal distension, and nausea and was diagnosed as having gallstone ileus based on abdominal computed tomography (CT and abdominal ultrasonography findings of an incarcerated stone in the terminal ileum. Although colonoscopy was performed after inserting an ileus tube, no stone was visible. Subsequent CT imaging verified the disappearance of the incarcerated stone from the ileum, suggesting that the stone had been evacuated naturally via the transanal route. Although it is extremely rare for gallstone ileus to develop as a complication of ERCP, physicians should be aware of gallstone ileus and follow patients carefully, especially after removing huge stones.

  8. Stability of Reshaping Breakwaters with Special Reference to Stone Durability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Hald, Tue; Burcharth, H. F.;

    1996-01-01

    to the stone motion a description of the overall wave climate during the structural lifetime must be derived involving knowledge of transport rates, movement patterns, stone velocities and stone quality. The main objective of the paper is to describe a tool enabling calculation of the anticipated armour stone...... inherently cause some breakage and abrasion of the individual stones and thereby also reduced stability. In order to avoid excessive abrasion a high stone quality is demanded or larger stones must be applied when constructed. To allow the designer to account for abrasion and armour stone breakage due...

  9. Kidney stone risk following modern bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Ricardo D; Canales, Benjamin K

    2014-05-01

    Over the past 10 years, a variety of reports have linked bariatric surgery to metabolic changes that alter kidney stone risk. Most of these studies were retrospective, lacked appropriate controls, or involved bariatric patients with a variety of inclusion criteria. Despite these limitations, recent clinical and experimental research has contributed to our understanding of the pathophysiology of stone disease in this high-risk population. This review summarizes the urinary chemistry profiles that may be responsible for the increased kidney stone incidence seen in contemporary epidemiological bariatric studies, outlines the mechanisms of hyperoxaluria and potential therapies through a newly described experimental bariatric animal model, and provides a focused appraisal of recommendations for reducing stone risk in bariatric stone formers.

  10. Gallstone ileus with a giant stone and associated multiple stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbalci, G S; Tanrikulu, Y; Kismet, K; Dinc, S; Akkus, M A

    2012-01-01

    Gallstone ileus is an uncommon cause of small bowel obstruction. Gallstone ileus accounts for only about 1-3 % of cases of mechanical obstructions of the small bowel. It usually occurs in the elderly with a female predominance and may result in high mortality rates. The diagnosis is difficult and early diagnosis reduces the mortality. Terminal ileum is the most common site of gallstone impaction. We report a case of gallstone ileus in an 81-year-old female patient who was admitted to our clinic for abdominal pain, vomiting and constipation. The ultrasonography of abdomen revealed a decrease in bowel motion, and dilated bowel segments. Intraoperatively, a giant gallstone and associated multiple stones were found in the ileum 80 cm from the ileocecal valve and extracted from a longitudinal enterotomy (Fig. 4, Ref. 24).

  11. Using RosettaLigand for small molecule docking into comparative models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian W Kaufmann

    Full Text Available Computational small molecule docking into comparative models of proteins is widely used to query protein function and in the development of small molecule therapeutics. We benchmark RosettaLigand docking into comparative models for nine proteins built during CASP8 that contain ligands. We supplement the study with 21 additional protein/ligand complexes to cover a wider space of chemotypes. During a full docking run in 21 of the 30 cases, RosettaLigand successfully found a native-like binding mode among the top ten scoring binding modes. From the benchmark cases we find that careful template selection based on ligand occupancy provides the best chance of success while overall sequence identity between template and target do not appear to improve results. We also find that binding energy normalized by atom number is often less than -0.4 in native-like binding modes.

  12. RosettaNet标准助力精简报价过程

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    飞兆半导体公司(Fairchild Semiconductor)和艾睿电子(Arrow Electronics)通过实施Rosetta Net标准,将其订单管理和报价过程所耗用的时间大幅削减超过一半。在实时的系统到系统(system-to-system)通信下,Rosetta Net标准可让供应商飞兆半导体和分销商艾睿电子之间自动交换信息,从而加强供应链运作的效率和准确性,帮助双方共有的电子组件客户提升生产力,并缩减回应时间。

  13. Ground truth of (sub-)micrometre cometary dust – Results of MIDAS onboard Rosetta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannel, Thurid; Bentley, Mark; Schmied, Roland; Torkar, Klaus; Jeszenszky, Harald; Romsted, Jens; Levasseur-Regourd, A.; Weber, Iris; Jessberger, Elmar K.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Köberl, Christian; Havnes, Ove

    2016-10-01

    The investigation of comet 67P by Rosetta has allowed the comprehensive characterisation of pristine cometary dust particles ejected from the nucleus. Flying alongside the comet at distances as small as a few kilometres, and with a relative velocity of only centimetres per second, the Rosetta payload sampled almost unaltered dust. A key instrument to study this dust was MIDAS (the Micro-Imaging Dust Analysis System), a dedicated atomic force microscope that scanned the surfaces of hundreds of (sub-)micrometre sized particles in 3D with resolutions down to nanometres. This offers the unique opportunity to explore the morphology of smallest cometary dust and expand our current knowledge about cometary material.Here we give an overview of dust collected and analysed by MIDAS and highlight its most important features. These include the ubiquitous agglomerate nature of the dust, which is found at all size scales from the largest (>10 µm) through to the smallest (common cometary origin.

  14. E-type asteroid (2867) Steins as imaged by OSIRIS on board Rosetta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, H U; Barbieri, C; Koschny, D; Lamy, P; Rickman, H; Rodrigo, R; Sierks, H; A'Hearn, M F; Angrilli, F; Barucci, M A; Bertaux, J-L; Cremonese, G; Da Deppo, V; Davidsson, B; De Cecco, M; Debei, S; Fornasier, S; Fulle, M; Groussin, O; Gutierrez, P J; Hviid, S F; Ip, W-H; Jorda, L; Knollenberg, J; Kramm, J R; Kührt, E; Küppers, M; Lara, L-M; Lazzarin, M; Lopez Moreno, J; Marzari, F; Michalik, H; Naletto, G; Sabau, L; Thomas, N; Wenzel, K-P; Bertini, I; Besse, S; Ferri, F; Kaasalainen, M; Lowry, S; Marchi, S; Mottola, S; Sabolo, W; Schröder, S E; Spjuth, S; Vernazza, P

    2010-01-08

    The European Space Agency's Rosetta mission encountered the main-belt asteroid (2867) Steins while on its way to rendezvous with comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Images taken with the OSIRIS (optical, spectroscopic, and infrared remote( )imaging system) cameras on board Rosetta show that Steins is an oblate body with an effective spherical diameter of 5.3 kilometers. Its surface does not show color variations. The morphology of Steins is dominated by linear faults and a large 2.1-kilometer-diameter crater near its south pole. Crater counts reveal a distinct lack of small craters. Steins is not solid rock but a rubble pile and has a conical appearance that is probably the result of reshaping due to Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) spin-up. The OSIRIS images constitute direct evidence for the YORP effect on a main-belt asteroid.

  15. Rosetta Lander - Philae: Operations on 67P and attempts for Long Term Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulamec, Stephan; Biele, Jens; Cozzoni, Barbara; Delmas, Cedric; Fantinati, Cinzia; Geurts, Koen; Jansen, Sven; Jurado, Eric; Küchemann, Oliver; Lommatsch, Valentina; Maibaum, Michael; O'Rourke, Laurence

    2016-04-01

    Philae is a comet Lander, part of Rosetta which is a Cornerstone Mission of the ESA Horizon 2000 programme. Philae successfully landed on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on November 12th, 2014 and performed a First Scientific Sequence, based on the energy stored in it's on board batteries. All ten instruments of the Philae payload have been operated at least once. Due to the fact that the final landing site (after several bounces) was poorly illuminated, Philae went into hibernation on November 15th, and the teams hoped for a wake-up at closer heliocentric distances. Signals from the Lander were indeed received on June 13th when 67P was at a distance of about 1.4 AU from the Sun. Housekeeping values showed that Philae had already been active earlier, but no RF contact with the mothership could be established. Seven more times, signals from Philae were received, the last ones on July 9th, 2015. Unfortunately, no reliable or predictable links could be achieved. The paper will give an overview of the activities with Philae after its hibernation, interpretation of the received housekeeping data and the various strategies to attempt more contacts and long term science measurements. Rosetta is an ESA mission with contributions from its member states and NASA. Rosetta's Philae Lander is provided by a consortium led by DLR, MPS, CNES and ASI with additional contributions from Hungary, UK, Finland, Ireland and Austria.

  16. Fully Flexible Docking of Medium Sized Ligand Libraries with RosettaLigand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel DeLuca

    Full Text Available RosettaLigand has been successfully used to predict binding poses in protein-small molecule complexes. However, the RosettaLigand docking protocol is comparatively slow in identifying an initial starting pose for the small molecule (ligand making it unfeasible for use in virtual High Throughput Screening (vHTS. To overcome this limitation, we developed a new sampling approach for placing the ligand in the protein binding site during the initial 'low-resolution' docking step. It combines the translational and rotational adjustments to the ligand pose in a single transformation step. The new algorithm is both more accurate and more time-efficient. The docking success rate is improved by 10-15% in a benchmark set of 43 protein/ligand complexes, reducing the number of models that typically need to be generated from 1000 to 150. The average time to generate a model is reduced from 50 seconds to 10 seconds. As a result we observe an effective 30-fold speed increase, making RosettaLigand appropriate for docking medium sized ligand libraries. We demonstrate that this improved initial placement of the ligand is critical for successful prediction of an accurate binding position in the 'high-resolution' full atom refinement step.

  17. Rosetta lander Philae: Flight Dynamics analyses for landing site selection and post-landing operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, Eric; Martin, Thierry; Canalias, Elisabet; Blazquez, Alejandro; Garmier, Romain; Ceolin, Thierry; Gaudon, Philippe; Delmas, Cedric; Biele, Jens; Ulamec, Stephan; Remetean, Emile; Torres, Alex; Laurent-Varin, Julien; Dolives, Benoit; Herique, Alain; Rogez, Yves; Kofman, Wlodek; Jorda, Laurent; Zakharov, Vladimir; Crifo, Jean-François; Rodionov, Alexander; Heinish, P.; Vincent, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-08-01

    On the 12th of November 2014, The Rosetta Lander Philae became the first spacecraft to softly land on a comet nucleus. Due to the double failure of the cold gas hold-down thruster and the anchoring harpoons that should have fixed Philae to the surface, it spent approximately two hours bouncing over the comet surface to finally come at rest one km away from its target site. Nevertheless it was operated during the 57 h of its First Science Sequence. The FSS, performed with the two batteries, should have been followed by the Long Term Science Sequence but Philae was in a place not well illuminated and fell into hibernation. Yet, thanks to reducing distance to the Sun and to seasonal effect, it woke up at end of April and on 13th of June it contacted Rosetta again. To achieve this successful landing, an intense preparation work had been carried out mainly between August and November 2014 to select the targeted landing site and define the final landing trajectory. After the landing, the data collected during on-comet operations have been used to assess the final position and orientation of Philae, and to prepare the wake-up. This paper addresses the Flight Dynamics studies done in the scope of this landing preparation from Lander side, in close cooperation with the team at ESA, responsible for Rosetta, as well as for the reconstruction of the bouncing trajectory and orientation of the Lander after touchdown.

  18. Ion composition at comet 67P near perihelion: Rosetta/ROSINA measurements and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beth, Arnaud; Altwegg, Kathrin; Balsiger, Hans; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Calmonte, Ursina; Combi, Michael R.; De Keyser, Johan; Dhooghe, Frederik; Fiethe, Björn; Fuselier, Stephen; Galand, Marina; Gasc, Sébastien; Gombosi, T. I.; Hansen, Kenneth C.; Hässig, Myrtha; Héritier, Kévin; Kopp, Ernest; Le Roy, Léna; Peroy, Solène; Rubin, Martin; Sémon, Thierry; Tzou, Chia-Yu; Vigren, Erik

    2016-10-01

    On August 13th, 2015, comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko reached its perihelion at 1.24 AU, a milestone for its cometary activity observed by the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft which arrived in August 2014. The Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA)/Comet Pressure Sensor (COPS) instrument onboard Rosetta measured local outgassing rates over 1028 molecules.s-1 in summer 2015. In the meantime, the ROSINA/Double Focusing Mass Spectrometer (DFMS) instrument measured the ion composition in the coma which was expected to be more diversified than during the early phase of the mission. Indeed, the increase in the cometary activity is expected to trigger new chemical pathways, yielding the formation of new cometary ions, other than the major water ions observed at larger heliocentric distances. Such new ion species can be produced from minor neutral species, such as those with proton affinity higher than that of water. This includes NH4+ whose detection has been recently reported (Beth et al., 2016).In this study, we propose to investigate other ion species during the perihelion period by:- analysing DFMS data to find any signature of substantial ion species,- modeling the ionosphere of 67P by driving the model with the neutral densities measured by DFMS and COPS to support or constrain the absence or the presence of these ion species,- discussing any discrepancy between observations and simulations.

  19. The KOALA Shape Modeling Technique Validated at (21) Lutetia by ESA Rosetta Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carry, Benoit; Merline, W. J.; Kaasalainen, M.; Conrad, A.; Drummond, J. D.; Dumas, C.; Kueppers, M.; OSIRIS Instrument Team

    2010-10-01

    We recently developed a shape reconstruction algorithm, dubbed KOALA (Kaasalainen, IPI 2010; Carry et al., Icarus 2010), which allows the determination of the size, shape, and spin properties of asteroids from a combined data set of disk-resolved images, optical lightcurves, and stellar occultations. Using adaptive optics (AO) imaging systems on the Keck and VLT telescopes, we acquired more than 300 images of the main-belt asteroid (21) Lutetia in 2007 and 2008. We combined these images with 50 lightcurves spanning some 48 years and including data taken almost up until the time of flyby. We produced a 3D shape model of Lutetia and determined the spin pole and rotation rate (Carry et al., submitted to A&A). On 2010 July 10, the International Rosetta Mission of the European Space Agency successfully encountered (21) Lutetia. The images recorded by the OSIRIS camera on-board Rosetta revealed our shape prediction to be accurate. We will present the KOALA (Knitted Occultation, Adaptive-optics, and Lightcurve Analysis) method, and a comparison of our shape model with the high-resolution images acquired by Rosetta during the flyby.

  20. Rosetta begins its 10-year journey to the origins of the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-01

    Rosetta’s mission began at 08h17 CET (07h17 GMT) on 2 March when a European Ariane 5 launch vehicle liftered off from the Guiana Space Centre, Europe’s spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. The launcher successfully placed its upper stage and payload into an eccentric coast orbit (200 x 4000 km). About two hours later, at 10h14 CET (09h14 GMT) the upper stage ignited its own engine to reach an escape velocity in order to leave the Earth’s gravity field and enter heliocentric orbit. The Rosetta probe was released about 18 minutes later. “After the recent success of Mars Express, Europe is now heading to deep space with another fantastic mission. We will have to be patient, as the rendezvous with the comet will not take place until ten years from now, but I think it’s worth the wait” said ESA’s Director General Jean-Jacques Dordain witnessing the launch from Kourou. ESA’s Operations Centre (ESOC) in Darmstadt, Germany, has established contact with the probe as it flies away from Earth at a relative speed of about 3.4 km/s. ESOC will be in charge of Rosetta operations and orbit determination throughout the mission. During the next eight months, the spacecraft’s onboard systems will be checked and its science payload will be commissioned. A 10-year odyssey Rosetta will be reactivated for planetary flybys, which will be used to modify its trajectory through gravity assist manoeuvres. During the trip, the probe could also observe one or more asteroids, observation of asteroids being one of the mission's secondary objectives. The first planetary encounter will be in March 2005, as Rosetta flies by the Earth for the first time. The gravity assist will boost Rosetta into an orbit that will take it to Mars two years later. During its close encounter with Mars in February 2007, Rosetta will approach to a distance of about 200 km and conduct science observations. This Martian flyby will be followed by another Earth flyby in November the same year. Both

  1. In bits, bytes and stone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabra, Jakob Borrits; Andersen, Hans Jørgen

    The digital spheres of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) and Social Network Services (SNS) are influencing 21st. century death. Today the dying and the bereaved attend mourning and remembrance both online and offline. Combined, the cemeteries, web memorials and social network sites...... designs'. Urns, coffins, graves, cemeteries, memorials, monuments, websites, applications and software services, whether cut in stone or made of bits, are all influenced by discourses of publics, economics, power, technology and culture. Designers, programmers, stakeholders and potential end-users often...... do not recognize the need or potential of working with or using, specific 'death-services/products', since they find little or no comfort in contemplating, working or playing around with the concept of death and its life changing consequences. Especially not while being alive and well...

  2. Shock Wave Lithotripsy in Ureteral Stones: Evaluation of Patient and Stone Related Predictive Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Yazici

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose:To evaluate the patient and stone related factors which may influence the final outcome of SWL in the management of ureteral stones.Materials and Methods:Between October 2011 and October 2013, a total of 204 adult patients undergoing SWL for single ureteral stone sizing 5 to 15 mm were included into the study program. The impact of both patient (age, sex, BMI, and stone related factors (laterality, location, longest diameter and density as CT HU along with BUN and lastly SSD (skin to stone distance on fragmentation were analysed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Stone free rates for proximal and distal ureteral stones were 68.8% and 72.7%, respectively with no statistically significant difference between two groups (p=0.7. According to univariate and multivariate analyses, while higher BMI (mean: 26.8 and 28.1, p=0.048 and stone density values (mean: 702 HU and 930 HU, p<0.0001 were detected as statistically significant independent predictors of treatment failure for proximal ureteral stones, the only statistically significant predicting parameter for the success rates of SWL in distal ureteral stones was the higher SSD value (median: 114 and 90, p=0.012.Conclusions:Our findings have clearly shown that while higher BMI and increased stone attenuation values detected by NCCT were significant factors influencing the final outcome of SWL treatment in proximal ureteral stones; opposite to the literature, high SSD was the only independent predictor of success for the SWL treatment of distal ureteral stones.

  3. Characterization of Technetium Speciation in Cast Stone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Wang, Guohui; Westsik, Joseph H.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-11-11

    This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-31 Support Program (EMSP) subtask, “Production and Long-Term Performance of Low Temperature Waste Forms” to provide additional information on technetium (Tc) speciation characterization in the Cast Stone waste form. To support the use of Cast Stone as an alternative to vitrification for solidifying low-activity waste (LAW) and as the current baseline waste form for secondary waste streams at the Hanford Site, additional understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone is needed to predict the long-term Tc leachability from Cast Stone and to meet the regulatory disposal-facility performance requirements for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Characterizations of the Tc speciation within the Cast Stone after leaching under various conditions provide insights into how the Tc is retained and released. The data generated by the laboratory tests described in this report provide both empirical and more scientific information to increase our understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone and its release mechanism under relevant leaching processes for the purpose of filling data gaps and to support the long-term risk and performance assessments of Cast Stone in the IDF at the Hanford Site.

  4. The Planning of Lander Science Observations after ROSETTA Deep Space Hibernation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthelemy, Maud; Ulamec, Stephan; Gaudon, Philippe; Biele, Jens; Pätz, Brigitte; Ashman, Mike

    2014-05-01

    After 10 years of its interplanetary journey, Rosetta has woken up from hibernation to meet Churyumov-Gerasimenko comet in the second term of 2014. The Rosetta spacecraft is composed of an Orbiter and a Lander part. The spacecraft will deliver the Lander, named Philae, to land on the surface of the comet in November 2014. During the Cruise Phase, the Lander, attached to the Orbiter, participated in several commissioning and payload checkout observations. In April 2014, after almost 3 years of hibernation, the Lander and the Orbiter will enter a commissioning phase to check the health of all instruments. Then, from May to November, Prelanding science activities can be planned, although the priority will go to those observations that help to select the landing site. The Lander project has, in much the same way as the Orbiter, its own ground segment: the Rosetta Lander Ground Segment (RLGS). The RLGS is composed of the Science Operations and Navigation Center - SONC - at CNES in Toulouse and the Lander Control Center - LCC - at DLR in Cologne. There are 10 instruments on board of Philae trying to conduct science observations during the life of the Lander. As the comet travels closer to the sun the temperature will eventually become too hot for Philae. The Orbiter, however, is planned to operate for much longer, until end of 2015, passing perihelion. Each of the 10 instruments is represented by a principal investigator. The Lander project also has Lead Scientists, who make sure that the science objectives of the Lander are fulfilled and are on hand to solve any eventual conflicts in this regard. To plan their observations, the Lander team listed their science objectives and ranked them. From these objectives, Specific On-Comet Operation Plan (SOCOP) documents are written by LCC describing the proposed observations. Then, at SONC, the MOST (Mission Operation Scheduling Tool) is used to generate a science experiment plan. This plan is confirmed by the PIs and the Lead

  5. Famous building stones of our Nation's capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2012-01-01

    The buildings of our Nation's Capital are constructed with rocks from quarries located throughout the United States and many distant lands. The earliest Government buildings, however, were constructed with stones from nearby sources because it was too difficult and expensive to move heavy materials such as stone any great distance without the aid of modern transportation methods, including large cargo ships, trains, and trucks. This fact sheet describes the source and appearance of three frequently used local stones employed in building Washington, D.C., and the geologic environment in which they were formed.

  6. Leave no "stone" unturned: understanding the genetic bases of calcium-containing urinary stones in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, S E; Stapleton, F B

    2000-01-01

    Urinary stones in children are being recognized with increasing frequency. Formerly thought to be the result of dehydration, urinary obstruction, or infection, most urinary calculi in children now are recognized to have an underlying metabolic abnormality. A number of challenges face pediatricians in evaluating and treating children with urinary stone disease. Often the clinical symptomatology is nonspecific and lacks the excruciating renal colic seen in adults. Furthermore, diagnostic clinical laboratory values vary with age and must be differentiated from normal values reported for adult patients. Both environmental and genetic factors are responsible for urinary stones. Many stones have a hereditary basis. Exciting new information is developing about the genetic propensity for urinary stones. Current medical therapies attempt either to reduce the production of a lithogenic solute or to increase urinary solubility. New therapies for prevention and treatment of urinary stone disease are likely to evolve as our understanding of the pathogenesis of these conditions grows.

  7. IGCP 637 Heritage Stone Designation: A UNESCO and IUGS project on natural stones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Dolores; Cooper, Barry; Schouenborg, Björn; Marker, Brian; Kramar, Sabina

    2017-04-01

    IGCP 637 was approved in 2015 to facilitate establishment of a new international geological standard for building and ornamental stones. Formal international recognition of those natural stone types that have achieved widespread utilization in human culture is now underway and the term "Global Heritage Stone Resource" (GHSR) has been proposed for this designation. Stones that have been used in heritage construction, sculptural masterpieces, as well as in utilitarian (yet culturally important) applications are obvious GHSR candidates. In co-ordination with these aims the project has an associated role to promote the adoption and use of the GHSR designation. Consequently an interim list of potential GHSRs is maintained and a register of GHSR approved stones is being created. IGCP 637 also enhances the capacity of the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) in the realm of dimension stone and geological standards as it is the first IUGS involvement in this subject. As a consequence, the largest known international grouping of dimension stone professionals has been established. Within IGCP 637 a web page has been created at www.globalheritagestone.com, including information on the Working Group and also specific information on the evolution of the project. Several researchers were funded to attend the Heritage Stone working group activities, including researchers from Algeria, Malawi, India, Italy and Russia. We also have produced many publications, both as individual papers and special issues in journals included in the Journal Citation Reports. Monographs are being prepared at present. Hopefully, IGCP 637 will help to widen the circle of researchers interested in natural stones as part of our geoheritage. Heritage Stone references: articles and special issues - Pereira, D. and Marker, B. (2016) The value of original natural stone in the context of architectural heritage. Geosciences, 6, 13. - Heritage Stone 1. Ed. Pereira and Pratt. (2016). Geoscience

  8. Portugues Marbles as Stone Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Luis; Martins, Ruben

    2013-04-01

    The main objective of this paper is to present and justify the reasons for the worldwide recognition of Portuguese Marbles as Stone Heritage. These marbles are also known as "Estremoz Marble" since was the first county were exploited. In the Estremoz Anticline marbles occupy an intermediate stratigraphic position being part of a volcano-sedimentary sequence of Cambrian age. The anticlinal structure has a Precambrian core and the younger rocks aged Devonian Period. This sequence has deformed by the Variscan Orogeny, which performed twice with different intensities both in ductile and brittle tension fields. The early Alpine Cycle also acts in the region and cause more fracturing of the marble. Practically in all the quarries is possible to perceive the spatial-temporal continuity of the deformation where one can describe a complete Wilson Cycle. Together all these geological features imprint the marbles beautiful aesthetic patterns that can be highlighted when used as dimension stone. Nowadays most of the quarries are placed in the counties of Borba and mainly in Vila Viçosa. This last city claims for itself the "Capital of the Marble" title and named the marble as "White Gold". In fact, according to the historical record, the marbles were quarried in Portuguese Alentejo's Province since the fourth century BC. Locally these geological materials are available easily accessible. Exhibit physical properties that allow the fabrication of structural and decorative elements and so were used since humans settled in the region and developed a structured Society. In the Roman period, the pieces of art made with Estremoz Marbles were exported abroad and today are represented in Museums and Archaeological Sites throughout Europe and North Africa countries. The Portuguese Marbles and Limestones, transformed into altars, stairways, columns, statues and pieces of wall cladding, were carried as ballast in the holds of ships. At the destination the Portuguese People had built

  9. Kidney Stones in Children and Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood but sometimes it is visible to the naked eye. Young children with kidney stones are usually ... Your doctor may also recommend that your child see a pediatric nephrologist or urologist who has experience ...

  10. The nutrition consult for recurrent stone formers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penniston, Kristina L

    2015-07-01

    Diet is implicated in stone formation and growth. Whether alone or in concert with pharmacologics, dietary changes may be useful in reducing recurrence but only when they correct dietary stone-forming risks. Patients benefit from recommendations individualized to their food preferences as well as to lifestyle, age, food knowledge and access, preparation skills, and cultural and ethnic identities. Urologists can provide general dietary recommendations but often lack the time to provide the full complement of individualized nutrition care offered by a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN). Urologists can partner with and refer patients to a RDN for any component of the nutrition care process: assessment of diet, diagnosis of dietary factors that contribute to stone risk factors, intervention formulation and implementation, and monitoring the effectiveness of the intervention and modifying it as needed to maintain suitably low dietary risk for stone recurrence.

  11. Primary liquid intake and urinary stone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, J; Finlayson, B; Scheaffer, R L; Sierakowski, R; Zoltek, J; Dzegede, S

    1985-01-01

    This investigation indicates that there are important associations between urinary stone disease and a person's primary liquid intake. Based on data collected from 2295 caucasian male patients from two geographical regions, the Carolinas (both North and South) and the Rockies (including Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, Montana, Utah and Wyoming) an important (p less than 0.01) positive association was found between urinary stone disease and soda (carbonated beverage) consumption within both geographical regions. It was also found that negative associations exist between urinary stone disease and both beer consumption and coffee consumption in the Rockies and that no important associations exist between urinary stone disease and any of milk, water, or tea, when these beverages represent a person's primary liquid intake. Moreover, soda can be viewed almost synonymously as sugared cola, since few subjects had diet sodas or sugared non-cola soda as primary fluid. No cause/effect relationships are implied in this paper.

  12. NEW FRONTIERS ON NEPHROLITHIASIS: PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT OF KIDNEY STONES

    OpenAIRE

    Malan Rajat; Walia Anu; Gupta Sumeet

    2011-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis (also known as kidney stones, renal stones, urinary stones, urolithiasis, and renal calculi) affects a great number of patients worldwide. These can be of different types like calcium-oxalate, struvite, uric acid, cysteine. Larger stones in the urinary tract can cause extreme pain in the lower back or side. Urinary tract infections, kidney disorders and certain metabolic disorders such as hyperparathyroidism are also linked to stone formation. Cystinuria, hyperoxaluria, Hyperc...

  13. Bariatric Surgery and Urinary Stone Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cevahir Ozer

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a major public health problem and has been suggested to play a role in the etiology of urinary tract stone disease. Furthermore, the increasingly widespread use of surgery in the treatment of obesity also is related with urinary stone disease. In daily practice, patients to whom obesity surgery has been planned or who have undergone obesity surgery are seen more frequently. This review aims to highlight the urological evaluation and management of this patient group.

  14. Stone structures in the Syrian Desert

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2011-01-01

    An arid land, known as the Syrian Desert, is covering a large part of the Middle East. In the past, this harsh environment, characterized by huge lava fields, the "harraat", was considered as a barrier between Levant and Mesopotamia. When we observe this desert from space, we discover that it is crossed by some stone structures, the "desert kites", which were the Neolithic traps for the game. Several stone circles are visible too, as many Stonehenge sites dispersed in the desert landscape.

  15. Evidence Report: Risk of Renal Stone Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibonga, Jean D.; Pietrzyk, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The formation of renal stones poses an in-flight health risk of high severity, not only because of the impact of renal colic on human performance but also because of complications that could potentially lead to crew evacuation, such as hematuria, infection, hydronephrosis, and sepsis. Evidence for risk factors comes from urine analyses of crewmembers, documenting changes to the urinary environment that are conducive to increased saturation of stone-forming salts, which are the driving force for nucleation and growth of a stone nidus. Further, renal stones have been documented in astronauts after return to Earth and in one cosmonaut during flight. Biochemical analysis of urine specimens has provided indication of hypercalciuria and hyperuricemia, reduced urine volumes, and increased urine saturation of calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate. A major contributor to the risk for renal stone formation is bone atrophy with increased turnover of the bone minerals. Dietary and fluid intakes also play major roles in the risk because of the influence on urine pH (more acidic) and on volume (decreased). Historically, specific assessments on urine samples from some Skylab crewmembers indicated that calcium excretion increased early in flight, notable by day 10 of flight, and almost exceeded the upper threshold for normal excretion (300mg/day in males). Other crewmember data documented reduced intake of fluid and reduced intake of potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, and citrate (an inhibitor of calcium stone formation) in the diet. Hence, data from both short-duration and long-duration missions indicate that space travel induces risk factors for renal stone formation that continue to persist after flight; this risk has been documented by reported kidney stones in crewmembers.

  16. Endoscopic management of bile duct stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivak, M V

    1989-09-01

    Endoscopic sphincterotomy is the procedure of choice for choledocholithiasis in patients who have had a cholecystectomy. The bile duct is cleared of stones in about 80 to 90 percent of patients. Available data, largely retrospective, suggest that surgery and endoscopic sphincterotomy are about equal with respect to removal of stones, morbidity, and mortality. Certain technical problems are discussed, including inability to insert the papillotome, the large stone, and problems relating to anatomy such as peripapillary diverticulum and prior gastrectomy. The treatment of patients with bile duct stones who have not had a cholecystectomy, with and without cholelithiasis, is controversial. Endoscopic sphincterotomy without subsequent cholecystectomy is adequate treatment for the majority of patients who are unfit for surgery, even if there are stones in the gallbladder, provided they are asymptomatic after endoscopic removal of stones from the bile ducts. Endoscopic sphincterotomy has been performed in the treatment of gallstone-induced pancreatitis, acute obstructive cholangitis, and sump syndrome. The complication rate for endoscopic sphincterotomy ranges from 6.5 to 8.7 percent, with a mortality rate of 0 to 1.3 percent. The most common serious complications are perforation, hemorrhage, acute pancreatitis, and sepsis.

  17. Water hardness and urinary stone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, J; Finlayson, B; Scheaffer, R; Sierakowski, R; Zoltek, J; Dzegede, S

    1982-08-01

    On the macrogeographic scale, a strong negative association exists in the United States between water hardness and urinary stone disease. This investigation studies the association on the microgeographical scale, where it is possible to control for confounding environmental factors. The study was conducted on 2,295 patients from 2 regions: the Carolinas which had soft water and high stone incidence, and the Rockies which had hard water and low stone incidence. Home tap water samples from urinary stone patient hospitalizations were compared with that of controls, concurrent inguinal hernia patient hospitalization. After adjusting for environmental factors, no significant difference (p = 0.59) between the 2 groups was obtained in tap water calcium, magnesium, and sodium concentrations. An incidental but potentially important finding was that those consuming water from a private well had an estimated relative risk of 1.5 (p less than 0.01) compared to those using public water. While no cause-effect relationship is suggested, stone-formers might consider avoiding private well water. On the other hand, water hardness should be a minor concern with respect to stone formation.

  18. Famous Stone Patients and Their Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Michael E.

    2007-04-01

    The fact that stone patients have endured much throughout the ages and that prior to our current era, when the ultimate horror, "being cut for the stone" was the only alternative to the repeated episodes of colic, should be recalled from time to time. Urolithiasis has affected humanity throughout the ages and has been indiscriminate to those lives it touched. A full accounting of those who have suffered and recorded their agonies is beyond the scope of this investigation; however, even a partial accounting is valuable for present day physicians who care for those with stone disease. For the present work, the historical accounts of stone disease literature were scrutinized for individual sufferers who could be cross-referenced from other sources as legitimately afflicted by stones. Only those patients that could be documented and were (or are) well known were included, because the internet is now a verdant repository of thousands of "not so well knowns." Reliable historical data was found for a variety of persons from the pre-Christian era to the present, including those remembered as philosophers and scientists, physicians, clergy, leaders and rulers, entertainers, athletes and fictitious/Hollywood-type individuals. Verified accounts of famous stone formers were chosen for this paper, and are presented in chronological order. The list of urolithiasis sufferers presented here is undoubtedly incomplete, but it is not through lack of trying that they are missing. Most often, the suffering do so silently, and that is always allowed.

  19. Sensitivity and fragmentation calibration of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer RTOF on board ESA's Rosetta mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasc, Sébastien; Altwegg, Kathrin; Fiethe, Björn; Jäckel, Annette; Korth, Axel; Le Roy, Léna; Mall, Urs; Rème, Henri; Rubin, Martin; Hunter Waite, J.; Wurz, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft, with the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA) onboard, has been following and observing comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since summer 2014. Prior to this period, and due to a technical failure also during this period, optimization and calibration campaigns have been conducted on ground with the Reflectron-type Time Of Flight (RTOF) mass spectrometer as a preparatory work for the analysis of data recorded during the science phase of the mission. In this work, we show the evolution of the performance of RTOF, and demonstrate and quantify the sensitivity and functionality of RTOF onboard Rosetta. We also present a fragmentation and sensitivity database for the most abundant molecules observed around the comet such as H2O, CO, CO2, as well as the noble gases.

  20. Introductory Overview of Stone Heritages in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hirokazu; Oikawa, Teruki; Fujita, Masayo; Yokoyama, Shunji

    2013-04-01

    As one contribution to 'Global Heritage Stone Resources' (GHSR), some stone heritages in Japan, which are nominated in the interim list, are briefly introduced. The geology of Japanese Islands where are the one of the most active areas in the history of the Earth, is very complicated. Therefore Japanese Islands consist of various kinds of minerals and rocks. Some of them were used to make stone implements and accessories. Japanese people also used to the best possible advantage to built tombstone, gate, pavement ,and the basement and wall of the large building such as temples, shrines, castles and modern buildings. 1. Stone Heritages of Pre-historical age: In the late Pleistocene and the early Holocene, ancient Japanese used obsidian cooled rapidly from rhyolitic magma.to make small implements and accessories. For example, Shirataki, Hokkaido (north island) is the largest place producing obsidian in Japan where Paleolithic people made arrowhead, knives and so on. Another example, Jade yielded in Itoigawa City, Japan Sea coast of central Japan, was made in the metamorphic rock about five hundred million years ago. Itoigawa area is only one place where jade is abundantly produced in Japan. Ancient people had been already collected and processed to ornaments although it is very hard and traded in wide area more than several thousand years ago. 2. Stone Heritages of Historical age: 2.1 Archaeological remains: In the Kofun (old mound) period (250 to 538 AD), stone burial chambers were used for old mounds to preserve against the putrefaction and to protect from the theft. For example, Ishibutai Kofun ("ishi" means "stone" and "butai" means "stage") in Nara old capital city, southwest Japan, is the largest known megalithic structure made of granite in Japan. 2.2 Stone walls of some typical castles Stones used is because of not only the rich reserves of rocks but also restriction of transportation. Osaka (second biggest city) castle, are composed of Cretaceous granite

  1. Assessing the Age of an Asteroid's Surface with Data from the International Rosetta Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Juan Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Rosetta is an international mission led by the European Space Agency (ESA) with key support and instrumentation from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Rosetta is currently on a ten-year mission to catch comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (C-G); throughout its voyage, the spacecraft has performed flybys of two main belt asteroids (MBA): Steins and Lutetia. Data on the physical, chemical, and geological properties of these asteroids are currently being processed and analyzed. Accurate interpretation of such data is fundamental in the success of Rosetta's mission and overall objectives. Post-flyby data analyses strive to correlate the size, shape, volume, and rotational rate of Lutetia, in addition to interpreting its multi-color imagining, albedo, and spectral mapping. Although advancements in science have contributed to the examination of celestial bodies, methods to analyze asteroids remain largely empirical, not semi-empirical, nor ab initio. This study aims to interpret and document the scientific methods currently utilized in the characterization of asteroid (21) Lutetia in order to render these processes and methods accessible to the public. Examples include a standardized technique for assessing the age of an asteroid surface, complete with clickable reference maps, methodology of grouping surface characteristics together, and a standardized power law equation for the age. Other examples include determining the density of an object. Context for what both density and age mean is a bi-product of this study. Results of the study will aid in the development of pedagogical material on asteroids for public use, and in creation of an academic database for selected targets that might be used as a reference.

  2. VIRTIS on board Rosetta: cryocoolers usage analysis in support of Comet phases observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuppi, Stefano; Politi, Romolo; Capria, Maria Teresa; Piccioni, Giuseppe; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Erard, Stéphane; Tosi, Federico; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Filacchione, Gianrico

    Rosetta is a planetary cornerstone mission of the European Space Agency (ESA). It is devoted to the study of minor bodies of our solar system and it will be the first mission ever to land on a comet (the Jupiter-family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko). VIRTIS-M is a sophisticated imaging spectrometer that combines two data channels in one compact instrument, respectively for the visible and the infrared range (0.25-5.0 μm). VIRTIS-H is devoted to infrared spectroscopy (2.5-5.0 μm) with high spectral resolution. Since the satellite will be inside the tail of the comet during one of the most important phases of the mission, it would not be appropriate to use a passive cooling system, due to the high flux of contaminants on the radiator. Therefore the IR sensors are cooled by two Stirling cycle cryocoolers. This paper focuses on the usage of VIRTIS cryocoolers from the beginning of the Rosetta mission till spacecraft hibernation in order to optimize their usage. After a description of the cryocooler used in the mission, a detailed information about time usage and power consumption is provided. On the basis of previous experiences with this kind of cryocoolers it has been made an estimation of the remaining working life of the VIRTIS coolers operating in Rosetta mission. Moreover an estimation of the minimum time between a cryocooler switch off and on again has been carried out in order to preserve the coolers working life.

  3. The dust environment of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko as seen through Rosetta/OSIRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubiana, Cecilia; Bertini, Ivano; Deller, Jakob; Drolshagen, Esther; Frattin, Elisa; Güttler, Carsten; Hofmann, Marc; Koschny, Detlef; Oklay, Nilda; Ott, Theresa; Shi, Xian; Sierks, Holger; Vincent, Jean-Baptiste; OSIRIS Team

    2016-10-01

    The ESA's Rosetta spacecraft had the unique opportunity to stay in the vicinity of the comet for two years, observing how the comet evolved while approaching the Sun, passing through perihelion and then moving outwards. OSIRIS, the Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System onboard Rosetta, imaged the nucleus and the dust environment of 67/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since the beginning of post-hibernation operations in March 2014. We focus here on dust studies carried on with OSIRIS.Images obtained in different filters in the visible wavelength range have been used to study the unresolved dust coma, investigating its diurnal and seasonal variations and providing insights into the dust composition. A correlation has been found between the level of diurnal activity and the region of the nucleus surface in sunlight, suggesting that the topography and/or composition of the surface play an important role. The overall activity increases while the comet is approaching the Sun, peaking about a month after perihelion. Comparison with ground-based observations will allow to understand if the dust coma behaves in similar ways at small scales - as observed by Rosetta/OSIRIS - and at large scales - as observed from ground. Several times during the mission, we acquired images spanning the phase angle range 0-165 degrees. They are used to determine the dust phase function in different wavelengths, its evolution with heliocentric distance and to investigate the intimate nature of cometary dust aggregates by solving the inverse scattering problem. A large amount of individual aggregates is present in the vicinity of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. We used OSIRIS NAC and WAC images to determine the aggregate properties: size and distance distributions, colors and rotation. Thanks to observations performed at different heliocentric distances, we address how those properties are changing with heliocentric distance.

  4. Retrograde intrarenal stone surgery for extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy-resistant kidney stones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Helene; Nørby, Bettina; Osther, Palle Jörn

    2006-01-01

    ) for extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL)-resistant kidney stones. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 38 consecutive patients (18 males, 20 females) participated in the study. All patients had undergone ESWL prior to RIRS without success. In all cases the stones could be reached with the endoscope. Calculi...

  5. Stones in 2015: Changes in stone management - suspending belief for evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambani, Sapan N; Ghani, Khurshid R

    2016-02-01

    In 2015, population-based studies in patients with urinary stones informed us of the changing trends in contemporary stone management and identified areas for improvement. Although meta-analyses aim to provide the highest level of evidence, a randomized controlled trial of medical expulsive therapy challenged current paradigms and was the defining publication of the year.

  6. Structure and Formation of Comets: Updates from Post-Rosetta Solid Fraction Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Bentley, M. S.; Kofman, W. W.; Brouet, Y.; Ciarletti, V.; Hadamcik, E.; Herique, A.; Lasue, J.; Mannel, T.; Schmied, R.

    2016-12-01

    The combination of investigations of 67P/C-G by Rosetta, theoretical and experimental studies, and remote observations allowed unprecedented insight into the structure and formation of comets. Rosetta mission has provided ground-truth for the low-density and high porosity of the nucleus, without heterogeneities larger than a few meters in its small lobe [1,2]. Further studies related to CONSERT experiment now suggest that the porosity increases inside the nucleus [3,4]. Rosetta has also provided ground-truth for the aggregated structure of dust particles within a wide range of sizes in the inner coma [e.g. 5-7]. Such discoveries confirm previous interpretations of remote observations of solar light scattered by dust in cometary comae. Differences in structure between the two parts of the nucleus, strongly suspected from previous high-resolution images of the surface [8] and possibly suggested from some remote observations in fragmenting sub-nuclei [9], might be pointed out from data obtained shortly before Rosetta controlled descent in September 2016. Further analyses by MIDAS of dust particles morphology at submicron-sizes [7,10], as well as compilations of remote observations of solar light scattered by 67P/C-G [11], are presently taking place. We will discuss how such results could lead to a better understanding of dust growth processes during the formation, specifically of 67P/C-G, and more generally, thanks to the link now provided between structural properties of dust and remote polarimetric observations, of comet's nuclei in the early Solar System. References. 1 Kofman et al. Science 2015. 2 Pätzold et al. Nature 2016. 3 Ciarletti et al. A&A 2015. 4 Brouet et al. MNRAS 2016 (under revision). 5. Rotundi et al. Science 2015. 6 Langevin et al. Icarus 2016. 7 Bentley et al. Nature 2016. 8 Massironi et al. Nature 2016. 9 Hadamcik et al. A&A 2016. 10. Mannel et al. Leiden symposium 2016. 11 Hadamcik et al. Leiden symposium 2016.

  7. Shape modeling technique KOALA validated by ESA Rosetta at (21) Lutetia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carry, B.; Kaasalainen, M.; Merline, W. J.; Müller, T. G.; Jorda, L.; Drummond, J. D.; Berthier, J.; O'Rourke, L.; Ďurech, J.; Küppers, M.; Conrad, A.; Tamblyn, P.; Dumas, C.; Sierks, H.; Osiris Team

    2012-06-01

    We present here a comparison of our results from ground-based observations of asteroid (21) Lutetia with imaging data acquired during the flyby of the asteroid by the ESA Rosetta mission. This flyby provided a unique opportunity to evaluate and calibrate our method of determination of size, 3-D shape, and spin of an asteroid from ground-based observations. Knowledge of certain observable physical properties of small bodies (e.g., size, spin, 3-D shape, and density) have far-reaching implications in furthering our understanding of these objects, such as composition, internal structure, and the effects of non-gravitational forces. We review the different observing techniques used to determine the above physical properties of asteroids and present our 3-D shape-modeling technique KOALA - Knitted Occultation, Adaptive-optics, and Lightcurve Analysis - which is based on multi-dataset inversion. We compare the results we obtained with KOALA, prior to the flyby, on asteroid (21) Lutetia with the high-spatial resolution images of the asteroid taken with the OSIRIS camera on-board the ESA Rosetta spacecraft, during its encounter with Lutetia on 2010 July 10. The spin axis determined with KOALA was found to be accurate to within 2°, while the KOALA diameter determinations were within 2% of the Rosetta-derived values. The 3-D shape of the KOALA model is also confirmed by the spectacular visual agreement between both 3-D shape models (KOALA pre- and OSIRIS post-flyby). We found a typical deviation of only 2 km at local scales between the profiles from KOALA predictions and OSIRIS images, resulting in a volume uncertainty provided by KOALA better than 10%. Radiometric techniques for the interpretation of thermal infrared data also benefit greatly from the KOALA shape model: the absolute size and geometric albedo can be derived with high accuracy, and thermal properties, for example the thermal inertia, can be determined unambiguously. The corresponding Lutetia analysis leads

  8. Studies on Thorium Adsorption Characteristics upon Activated Titanium Hydroxide Prepared from Rosetta Ilmenite Concentrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gado, M, E-mail: parq28@yahoo.com; Zaki, S [Nuclear Materials Authority, P. O. Box 530 El Maadi, Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-01-01

    The titanium hydroxide prepared from Rosetta ilmenite concentrate has been applied for Th (IV) adsorption from its acid aqueous solutions. The prepared hydroxide is first characterized by both Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum and thermogravimetric analysis. The relevant factors affecting the adsorption process have been studied. The obtained equilibrium data fits well with the Langmuir isotherm rather than Freundlich isotherm, while the adsorption kinetic data follow the pseudo-second order model. The different thermodynamic parameters have also been calculated and indicate that the adsorption process is spontaneous.

  9. Brushite stone disease as a consequence of lithotripsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krambeck, Amy E; Handa, Shelly E; Evan, Andrew P; Lingeman, James E

    2010-08-01

    The incidence of calcium phosphate (CaP) stone disease has increased over the last three decades; specifically, brushite stones have been diagnosed and treated more frequently than in previous years. Brushite is a unique form of CaP, which in certain patients can form into large symptomatic stones. Treatment of brushite stones can be difficult since the stones are resistant to shock wave and ultrasonic lithotripsy, and often require ballistic fragmentation. Patients suffering from brushite stone disease are less likely to be rendered stone free after surgical intervention and often experience stone recurrence despite maximal medical intervention. Studies have demonstrated an association between brushite stone disease and shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) treatment. Some have theorized that many brushite stone formers started as routine calcium oxalate (CaOx) stone formers who sustained an injury to the nephron (such as SWL). The injury to the nephron leads to failure of urine acidification and eventual brushite stone formation. We explore the association between brushite stone disease and iatrogenic transformation of CaOx stone disease to brushite by reviewing the current literature.

  10. Urinary stone composition in Oman: with high incidence of cystinuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Marhoon, Mohammed S; Bayoumi, Riad; Al-Farsi, Yahya; Al-Hinai, Abdullhakeem; Al-Maskary, Sultan; Venkiteswaran, Krishna; Al-Busaidi, Qassim; Mathew, Josephkunju; Rhman, Khalid; Sharif, Omar; Aquil, Shahid; Al-Hashmi, Intisar

    2015-06-01

    Urinary stones are a common problem in Oman and their composition is unknown. The aim of this study is to analyze the components of urinary stones of Omani patients and use the obtained data for future studies of etiology, treatment, and prevention. Urinary stones of 255 consecutive patients were collected at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital. Stones were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer. The biochemical, metabolic, and radiological data relating to the patients and stones were collected. The mean age was 41 years, with M:F ratio of 3.7:1. The common comorbidities associated with stone formation were hypertension; diabetes, benign prostate hyperplasia; urinary tract infection; obesity; and atrophic kidney. The common presentation was renal colic and flank pain (96%). Stones were surgically retrieved in 70% of patients. Mean stone size was 9 ± 0.5 mm (range 1.3-80). Stone formers had a BMI ≥ 25 in 56% (P = 0.006) and positive family history of stones in 3.8%. The most common stones in Oman were as follows: Calcium Oxalates 45% (114/255); Mixed calcium phosphates & calcium oxalates 22% (55/255); Uric Acid 16% (40/255); and Cystine 4% (10/255). The most common urinary stones in Oman are Calcium Oxalates. Overweight is an important risk factor associated with stone formation. The hereditary Cystine stones are three times more common in Oman than what is reported in the literature that needs further genetic studies.

  11. Biliary stenting for management of common bile duct stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, G; Sharma, B C; Saraswat, V A; Agarwal, D K; Baijal, S S

    1998-06-01

    Large and multiple common bile duct stones may defy extraction despite an adequate endoscopic papillotomy. We treated 65 patients with symptomatic bile duct stones with endoscopic stents after failed attempts at stone extraction. Of the 65 patients, bile duct stones were extracted in eight at a second attempt, 29 underwent elective surgery and 28 patients were followed with the stent in situ for 21-52 months (median 42 months). During follow up, two patients had recurrent pain and two required surgery. The remaining 24 patients remained asymptomatic. Biliary stenting is a safe and effective mode of treatment for common bile duct stones in patients who have failed stone extraction after endoscopic papillotomy.

  12. Impact of stone density on outcomes in percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anastasiadis, Anastasios; Onal, Bulent; Modi, Pranjal

    2013-01-01

    were assigned to a low stone density [LSD, ≤ 1000 Hounsfield units (HU)] or high stone density (HSD, > 1000 HU) group based on the radiological density of the primary renal stone. Preoperative characteristics and outcomes were compared in the two groups. Results. Retreatment for residual stones...... was more frequent in the LSD group. The overall stone-free rate achieved was higher in the HSD group (79.3% vs 74.8%, p = 0.113). By univariate regression analysis, the probability of achieving a stone-free outcome peaked at approximately 1250 HU. Below or above this density resulted in lower treatment...

  13. "Sydney sandstone": Heritage Stone from Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Barry; Kramar, Sabina

    2014-05-01

    Sydney is Australia's oldest city being founded in 1788. The city was fortunate to be established on an extensive and a relatively undeformed layer of lithified quartz sandstone of Triassic age that has proved to be an ideal building stone. The stone has been long identified by geologists as the Hawkesbury Sandstone. On the other hand the term "Sydney sandstone" has also been widely used over a long period, even to the extent of being utilised as the title of published books, so its formal designation as a heritage stone will immediately formalise this term. The oldest international usage is believed to be its use in the construction of the Stone Store at Kerikeri, New Zealand (1832-1836). In the late 19th century, public buildings such as hospitals, court houses as well as the prominent Sydney Town Hall, Sydney General Post Office, Art Gallery of New South Wales, State Library of New South Wales as well as numerous schools, churches, office building buildings, University, hotels, houses, retaining walls were all constructed using Sydney sandstone. Innumerable sculptures utilising the gold-coloured stone also embellished the city ranging from decorative friezes and capitals on building to significant monuments. Also in the late 19th and early 20th century, Sydney sandstone was used for major construction in most other major Australian cities especially Melbourne, Adelaide and Brisbane to the extent that complaints were expressed that suitable local stone materials were being neglected. Quarrying of Sydney sandstone continues today. In 2000 it was recorded noted that there were 33 significant operating Sydney sandstone quarries including aggregate and dimension stone operations. In addition sandstone continues to be sourced today from construction sites across the city area. Today major dimension stone producers (eg Gosford Quarries) sell Sydney sandstone not only into the Sydney market but also on national and international markets as cladding and paving products

  14. Endoscopic Management of Difficult Bile Duct Stones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Ell

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 90% of all common bile duct concrements can be removed via the endoscopic retrograde route via endoscopic sphincterotomy, stone extraction by baskets and balloon catheters, or mechanical lithotripsy. Oversized, very hard or impacted stones, however, often still resist conventional endoscopic therapy. Promising new or improved approaches for the treatment of these stones are intracorporeal or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Shockwave lithotriptors for extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy are currently available worldwide. However, for the waterbath first generation devices, general anesthesia is required since shockwaves are very painful. Furthermore, an x-ray localization system is essential to visualize the stones after having filled the bile duct over a nasobiliary catheter. An average of two shockwave treatments with additional two to four endoscopic sessions are required. ln tracorporeal lithotripsy promises more comfort and less effort for the patient. Shockwaves are generated either by means of the spark gap principle (electrohydraulic probes or by laser-induced plasma generation. Laser-induced shockwave lithotripsy appears to be more safer, since with dye and solid state lasers, athermal, well-controlled shockwaves can be generateJ without the risks for duct perfo ration (as described for the electrohydraulic system. Furthermore, a recently developed stone-tissue detection system integrated in a new dye laser system enchances the safety of laser-induced lithotripsy. ln consequence, lithotripsy without direct endoscopic control appears possible in selected cases.

  15. Is stone radiodensity a useful parameter for predicting outcome of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for stones < 2 cm?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina S. Krishnamurthy

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Several factors determine the success of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL for kidney stones: stone size, stone location within the collecting system, stone type, and the SWL machine used. It has been suggested that stone radiodensity, as determined either by plain radiography or computed tomography attenuation values, may be an independent predictor of SWL success. We examined the outcome of SWL for solitary stones less than or equal to 2 cm located within the renal pelvis, based on their radiodensity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 211 patients with solitary renal pelvic stones measuring less than or equal to 2 cm were treated on a Dornier Doli 50 lithotriptor under general anesthesia. The radiodensity of the stone was determined to be either less than, equal to, or greater than the radiodensity of the ipsilateral 12th rib. Stone-free rates (SFR were determined at 3 months by kidney, ureters and bladder (KUB plain X-rays. Patients requiring re-treatment or auxiliary procedures were considered failures of SWL. RESULTS: Follow-up SFR information was available in all 211 patients. Stone composition was available in 158 (75% treated patients, but no correlation was found between stone radiodensity and stone composition. For stones 12th rib compared to a SFR of 71% if the stone radiodensity was < 12th rib. However, these differences in SFRs were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: On the Doli machine, stone radiodensity alone does not predict lithotripsy treatment outcome for stones < 1 cm within the renal pelvis. This parameter is probably only useful as the stone size becomes larger than 1 cm, and should be used in conjunction with other stone parameters to select appropriate therapy.

  16. Large orthotopic reservoir stone burden: Role of open surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madbouly Khaled

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To present our experience in open poucholithotomy as a primary management of large orthotopic reservoir stone burden and discuss different management options. Materials and Methods: Records of men underwent radical cystectomy and orthotopic urinary diversion were retrospectively reviewed as regards pouch stone formation. Patients with large reservoir stone burden managed by open poucholithotomy were further selected. Results: Large reservoir stone burden was encountered in 12 post radical cystectomy men. All underwent open poucholithotomy as a primary management of their reservoir stones. Median age at cystectomy was 46 (range: 32-55 years with a median total follow up period of 214.15 (range: 147-257 months and a median interval to stone detection of 99 (range: 63-132 months. The median stone burden was 5260 (range: 3179-20410 mm 2 . All patients were continent during the day while 5 showed nocturnal enuresis; 2 of them became continent after removal of the stones. Post poucholithotomy, all patients had sterile urine cultures except one who showed occasional colonization. None of the 12 patients showed stone recurrence after poucholithotomy. Two patients underwent revision of a dessuscepted nipple valve in association with stone removal. Conclusions: Open poucholithotomy for large reservoir stone burden is a feasible and safe option. It saves the reservoir mesentery and adjacent bowel. It allows complete removal of the stone(s leaving no residual fragments. Furthermore, it permits correction of concomitant reservoir abnormalities.

  17. Co-expression and characterization of enterocin CRL35 and its mutant in Escherichia coli Rosetta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masías Emilse

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though many sequences and structures of bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria have been fully characterized so far, little information is currently available about bacteriocins heterologously produced by Escherichia coli. For this purpose, the structural gene of enterocin CRL35, munA, was PCR-amplified using specific primers and cloned downstream of PelB sequence in the pET22b (+ expression vector. E. coli Rosetta (DE3 pLysS was chosen as the host for production and enterocin was purified by an easy two-step protocol. The bacteriocin was correctly expressed with the expected intramolecular disulfide bond. Nevertheless, it was found that a variant of the enterocin, differing by 12 Da from the native polypeptide, was co-expressed by E. coli Rosetta in comparable amount. Indeed, the mutant bacteriocin contained two amino acid substitutions that were characterized by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF and HPLCelectrospray (ESI-Q-TOF tandem mass spectrometry (MS/ MS sequencing. This is the first report regarding the production of mutants of pediocin-like bacteriocins in the E. coli expression system.

  18. Visionary Critique. Gender, Self and Relationship in Rosetta and Two Days, One Night

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Knauss

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The films of Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne stand out for their complex, multi-dimen¬sional female and male characters whose representation disrupts gender stereotypes in numerous ways, both in how the characters themselves are depicted and in how they are shown to relate to other individuals and their social context. In this contri¬bution, I explore the themes of self, relationship, solidarity, family and work – all of them recurring issues in the films by the Dardennes – using gender as my primary category of analysis, and focusing in particular on the treatment of these themes in Rosetta (Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, FR/BE 1999 and Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night, Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, BE/FR/IT 2014. I argue that whereas Rosetta (1999 offers a critique of the damaging effects of the masculinized capital¬ist system on individuals and their relationships, Two Days, One Night (2014 can be understood as a vision of alternative possibilities of solidarity and women’s empower¬ment and agency even within the persistent context of masculinized capitalism.

  19. New hints on Phobos collisional capture origin from Rosetta-OSIRIS observation .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajola, M.; Lazzarin, M.; Bertini, I.; Turrini, D.; Marzari, F.; Magrin, S.; La Forgia, F.; Ferri, F.; Barbieri, C.

    On 2007 February 24 and 25, the ESA Rosetta mission flew by the planet Mars during its complex interplanetary trajectory towards its main target: comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The geometry of this gravitational assist gave the chance to image Phobos before and after Rosetta-Mars closest approach (CA) from a distance range between 115 000 to 21 000 km. Different surface areas of Phobos were observed belonging to the leading and trailing hemisphere of the anti-Mars hemisphere of the satellite, and also a section of its sub-Mars hemisphere. We compared our spectra, obtained during the pre- and the post-CA, with the reflectance spectra of D-type asteroids, showing that Phobos near-ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared (263.5-992.0 nm) reflectivity is within the spectral dispersion of the D-type asteroids. We investigated then the possibility of a dynamical collisional capture of Phobos similar to the origin of the irregular satellites of the giants planets. The coupled observational and dynamical ones suggest an early capture of Phobos in the first 10-100 Ma of the lifetime of the Solar System, consistently with the results of previous studies of the orbital evolution of Phobos.

  20. Rosetta/VIRTIS investigation of the chemistry and activity of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Drossart, Pierre; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Migliorini, Alessandra; Erard, Stéphane; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Filacchione, Gianrico; Fougere, Nicolas; Leyrat, Cedric; Crovisier, Jacques; Capaccioni, Fabrizio

    2016-07-01

    The composition of cometary ices inside cometary nuclei provides clues to the chemistry of the protoplanetary disk where they formed, 4.6 Gyr ago. These ices sublimate when the body approches the Sun, so that the coma molecular species give insights on the nucleus surface and sub-surface composition. So far, most investigations of the coma chemical composition were performed from telescopic observations from the ground or space plateforms. Since August 2014, the ESA/Rosetta spacecraft has been investigating the nucleus and inner coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. This talk will present an overview of the results obtained by the Visual and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS) instrument onboard Rosetta, focussing on observations of molecular species. VIRTIS is composed of two channels. The VIRTIS-M channel is a spectro-imager covering the 0.27-5.1 microns range, which allowed us to map the spatial distribution of H2O and CO2 (Migliorini et al. 2016, A&A in press). VIRTIS-H is a high-spectral resolution spectrometer covering the 2-5 microns range. Spectra obtained with VIRTIS-H show signatures of H2O, CO2 (both fundamental and hot bands), 13CO2, CH4 and other C-H bearing species (Bockelee-Morvan et al. A&A, 583, A6,2015). VIRTIS is a key instrument to investigate regional, diurnal and seasonal variations of the comet outgassing.

  1. Physical properties of ESA/NASA Rosetta target asteroid (21) Lutetia: Shape and flyby geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Carry, B; Leyrat, C; Merline, W J; Drummond, J D; Conrad, A; Weaver, H A; Tamblyn, P M; Chapman, C R; Dumas, C; Colas, F; Christou, J C; Dotto, E; Perna, D; Fornasier, S; Bernasconi, L; Behrend, R; Vachier, F; Kryszczynska, A; Polinska, M; Fulchignoni, M; Roy, R; Naves, R; Poncy, R; Wiggins, P

    2010-01-01

    Aims. We determine the physical properties (spin state and shape) of asteroid (21) Lutetia, target of the ESA/NASA Rosetta mission, to help in preparing for observations during the flyby on 2010 July 10 by predicting the orientation of Lutetia as seen from Rosetta. Methods. We use our novel KOALA inversion algorithm to determine the physical properties of asteroids from a combination of optical lightcurves, disk-resolved images, and stellar occultations, although the latter are not available for (21) Lutetia. Results. We find the spin axis of (21) Lutetia to lie within 5 degrees of ({\\lambda} = 52 deg., {\\beta} = -6 deg.) in Ecliptic J2000 reference frame (equatorial {\\alpha} = 52 deg., {\\delta} = +12 deg.), and determine an improved sidereal period of 8.168 270 \\pm 0.000 001 h. This pole solution implies the southern hemisphere of Lutetia will be in "seasonal" shadow at the time of the flyby. The apparent cross-section of Lutetia is triangular as seen "pole-on" and more rectangular as seen "equator-on". The ...

  2. Cosmic ray dose monitoring using RadFET sensors of the Rosetta instruments SESAME and COSIMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falke, Peter; Fischer, Hans-Herbert; Seidensticker, Klaus J.; Thiel, Klaus; Fischer, Henning; Hilchenbach, Martin; Henkel, Hartmut; Koch, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    On its more than 10 years journey to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, Rosetta carried RadFET ionising dose monitors in the central electronics of the orbiter instrument COSIMA and the lander instrument SESAME. The readings of the dosimeters were corrected for the temperature of the devices during measurements. Because the sensitivity of RadFETs depends on the energy of impinging charged particles, a mean efficiency factor for the prevalent proton radiation was determined by applying nine efficiency models to proton energy spectra of Rosetta's radiation environment. The resulting dose profiles show linear increases of the accumulated dose with time, mainly caused by galactic cosmic radiation, and the arrival of two solar particle events in 2005. The accumulated dose (in Silicon) during 3909 days in space from 2004-03-02 to 2014-11-14 was 3.2 ± 0.6 Gy in case of COSIMA and 1.9 ± 0.4 Gy for SESAME. The deviation of the two measurements is mainly due to the solar particle event in September 2005, which had a 5.3 ± 1.0 times stronger impact on the COSIMA RadFET. Measured dose levels are one order of magnitude lower than those expected before launch for not being exceeded on the 90% confidence level, which is mainly due to the low solar activity during the mission so far.

  3. Early Observations with the Rosetta/MIRO Instrument at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulkis, Samuel

    2015-04-01

    The MIRO (Microwave Instrument on the Rosetta Orbiter) is a dual frequency (560 GHz and 190 GHz) heterodyne instrument consisting of two broadband channels (one in each frequency band) for continuum measurements, and a very high spectral resolution (44 kHz, 4096 channels) spectrometer interfaced with the submillimeter radiometer. Broad scientific objectives are to understand heat transport and ice sublimation in comets as interrelated processes reflecting properties acquired at time of formation and subsequent evolution and to understand important processes in the coma. The spectroscopic receiver is fixed tuned to measure simultaneously 8 molecular transitions of water, carbon monoxide, ammonia, and methanol. The continuum channels probe the nucleus sub-surface temperatures; the spectrometer channels are sensitive to gas abundance, velocity, and temperature. This paper will present an overview of the MIRO instrument, status of observations, and early results. Early results include detection and monitoring of water vapor in the coma, measurements of water gas production rates and their temporal and spatial variability, and measurements of subsurface temperatures and temperature gradients in the nucleus at depths of a few centimeters. The authors acknowledge funding support from NASA, CNES and CNRS/INSU, National Central University, and SNSB (Sweden). A part of this work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. We thank the operational support teams from the ESA Rosetta Mission.

  4. Quality Assessment of Urinary Stone Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siener, Roswitha; Buchholz, Noor; Daudon, Michel

    2016-01-01

    and chemical analysis. The aim of the present study was to assess the quality of urinary stone analysis of laboratories in Europe. Nine laboratories from eight European countries participated in six quality control surveys for urinary calculi analyses of the Reference Institute for Bioanalytics, Bonn, Germany......, between 2010 and 2014. Each participant received the same blinded test samples for stone analysis. A total of 24 samples, comprising pure substances and mixtures of two or three components, were analysed. The evaluation of the quality of the laboratory in the present study was based on the attainment......, fulfilled the quality requirements. According to the current standard, chemical analysis is considered to be insufficient for stone analysis, whereas infrared spectroscopy or X-ray diffraction is mandatory. However, the poor results of infrared spectroscopy highlight the importance of equipment, reference...

  5. Pyramidal anchor stone from Baga waters of Goa, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tripati, S.

    Underwater exploration in the coastal region off Baga (Goa, India) led to the recovery of an isolated stone artefact, which resembles a pyramidal type of anchor stone. This anchor stone is unlike to other pyramidal anchor stones found elsewhere...

  6. Monitoring for Renal Stone Recurrence in Astronauts With History of Stone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, David P.; Sargsyan, Ashot; Locke, James; Davis, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    After an initial stone episode persons are at increased risk for future stone formation. A systematic approach is required to monitor the efficacy of treatment and preventive measures, and to assess the risk of developing new stones. This is important for persons working in critical jobs or austere environments, such as astronauts. A literature review of the current standards of care for renal stone monitoring and imaging was done. Military and civil aviation standards were also reviewed, as well as the medical precedents from the space program. Additionally, a new, more effective, renal stone ultrasound protocol has been developed. Using this work, a monitoring algorithm was proposed that takes into consideration the unique mission and operational environment of spaceflight. The approach to imaging persons with history of renal stones varies widely in the literature. Imaging is often done yearly or biannually, which may be too long for mission critical personnel. In the proposed algorithm astronauts with a history of renal stone, who may be under consideration for assignment, are imaged by a detailed, physiciandriven, ultrasound protocol. Unassigned personnel are monitored by yearly ultrasound and urine studies. Any positive ultrasound study is then followed by low-dose renal computed tomography scan. Other criteria are also established. The proposed algorithm provides a balanced approach between efficacy and reduced radiation exposure for the monitoring of astronauts with a renal stone history. This may eventually allow a transition from a risk-averse, to a risk-modifying approach that can enable continued service of individuals with history of renal stone that have adequately controlled risk factors.

  7. Management of Asymptomatic Renal Stones in Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, David; Locke, James

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Management guidelines were created to screen and manage asymptomatic renal stones in U.S. astronauts. The risks for renal stone formation in astronauts due to bone loss and hypercalcuria are unknown. Astronauts have a stone risk which is about the same as commercial aviation pilots, which is about half that of the general population. However, proper management of this condition is still crucial to mitigate health and mission risks in the spaceflight environment. Methods: An extensive review of the literature and current aeromedical standards for the monitoring and management of renal stones was done. The NASA Flight Medicine Clinic's electronic medical record and Longitudinal Survey of Astronaut Health were also reviewed. Using this work, a screening and management algorithm was created that takes into consideration the unique operational environment of spaceflight. Results: Renal stone screening and management guidelines for astronauts were created based on accepted standards of care, with consideration to the environment of spaceflight. In the proposed algorithm, all astronauts will receive a yearly screening ultrasound for renal calcifications, or mineralized renal material (MRM). Any areas of MRM, 3 millimeters or larger, are considered a positive finding. Three millimeters approaches the detection limit of standard ultrasound, and several studies have shown that any stone that is 3 millimeters or less has an approximately 95 percent chance of spontaneous passage. For mission-assigned astronauts, any positive ultrasound study is followed by low-dose renal computed tomography (CT) scan, and flexible ureteroscopy if CT is positive. Other specific guidelines were also created. Discussion: The term "MRM" is used to account for small areas of calcification that may be outside the renal collecting system, and allows objectivity without otherwise constraining the diagnostic and treatment process for potentially very small calcifications of uncertain

  8. Management of Asymptomatic Renal Stones in Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, David; Locke, James

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Management guidelines were created to screen and manage asymptomatic renal stones in U.S. astronauts. The risks for renal stone formation in astronauts due to bone loss and hypercalcuria are unknown. Astronauts have a stone risk which is about the same as commercial aviation pilots, which is about half that of the general population. However, proper management of this condition is still crucial to mitigate health and mission risks in the spaceflight environment. Methods: An extensive review of the literature and current aeromedical standards for the monitoring and management of renal stones was done. The NASA Flight Medicine Clinic's electronic medical record and Longitudinal Survey of Astronaut Health were also reviewed. Using this work, a screening and management algorithm was created that takes into consideration the unique operational environment of spaceflight. Results: Renal stone screening and management guidelines for astronauts were created based on accepted standards of care, with consideration to the environment of spaceflight. In the proposed algorithm, all astronauts will receive a yearly screening ultrasound for renal calcifications, or mineralized renal material (MRM). Any areas of MRM, 3 millimeters or larger, are considered a positive finding. Three millimeters approaches the detection limit of standard ultrasound, and several studies have shown that any stone that is 3 millimeters or less has an approximately 95 percent chance of spontaneous passage. For mission-assigned astronauts, any positive ultrasound study is followed by low-dose renal computed tomography (CT) scan, and flexible ureteroscopy if CT is positive. Other specific guidelines were also created. Discussion: The term "MRM" is used to account for small areas of calcification that may be outside the renal collecting system, and allows objectivity without otherwise constraining the diagnostic and treatment process for potentially very small calcifications of uncertain

  9. Prevention of Renal Stone Complications in Space Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AIM 1. Refine ultrasound probes to detect, reposition, and fragment kidney stones. Task 1.1. Select imaging probe for stone repositioning. Clinical trials are...

  10. Stability of Reshaping Breakwaters with Special Reference to Stone Durability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Hald, Tue; Burcharth, H. F.

    1998-01-01

    Traditionally, conventional rubble mound breakwaters are designed with stable armour units, and consequently, very large stones or even artificial armour units are required. reshaping breakwater designs allow reshaping of the seaward slope thus involving stone movements. Ultimately, dependent...

  11. Dental pulp stone formation during orthodontic treatment: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-21

    Jun 21, 2015 ... to determine the relationship between the pulp stone formation and orthodontic treatment. Key words: ... blood flow or vascular tissue pressure can affect the health of the dental pulp. ..... Prevalence of pulp stones in a teenage.

  12. Enhancements to the Rosetta Energy Function Enable Improved Identification of Small Molecules that Inhibit Protein-Protein Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bazzoli

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions are among today's most exciting and promising targets for therapeutic intervention. To date, identifying small-molecules that selectively disrupt these interactions has proven particularly challenging for virtual screening tools, since these have typically been optimized to perform well on more "traditional" drug discovery targets. Here, we test the performance of the Rosetta energy function for identifying compounds that inhibit protein interactions, when these active compounds have been hidden amongst pools of "decoys." Through this virtual screening benchmark, we gauge the effect of two recent enhancements to the functional form of the Rosetta energy function: the new "Talaris" update and the "pwSHO" solvation model. Finally, we conclude by developing and validating a new weight set that maximizes Rosetta's ability to pick out the active compounds in this test set. Looking collectively over the course of these enhancements, we find a marked improvement in Rosetta's ability to identify small-molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

  13. Surgical versus endoscopic treatment of bile duct stones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, D J; Vernon, D R; Toouli, J

    2006-01-01

    10% to 18% of patients undergoing cholecystectomy for gallstones have common bile duct (CBD) stones. Treatment options for these stones include pre- or post-operative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or open or laparoscopic surgery.......10% to 18% of patients undergoing cholecystectomy for gallstones have common bile duct (CBD) stones. Treatment options for these stones include pre- or post-operative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or open or laparoscopic surgery....

  14. Determinants of Brushite Stone Formation: A Case-Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: The occurrence of brushite stones has increased during recent years. However, the pathogenic factors driving the development of brushite stones remain unclear. METHODS: Twenty-eight brushite stone formers and 28 age-, sex- and BMI-matched healthy individuals were enrolled in this case-control study. Anthropometric, clinical, 24 h urinary parameters and dietary intake from 7-day weighed food records were assessed. RESULTS: Pure brushite stones were present in 46% of patients, while ca...

  15. Definition and Facts for Kidney Stones in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their lifetime. 1 Who is more likely to develop kidney stones? Men are more likely to develop kidney stones than women. If you have a ... of kidney stones, you are more likely to develop them. You are also more likely to develop ...

  16. Ships on hero stones from the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tripati, S.

    (Maharashtra, India) show naval warfare. The Old Goa stones belong to the Kadambas who ruled Goa from 950–1300 AD. The Eksar stones to the reign of king Bhoja of Malwa in 1020 AD. Similar hero stones with boat motifs of the 18th to 19th centuries AD have been...

  17. Summary of: Salivary stones: symptoms, aetiology, biochemical composition and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaij, S.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; Forouzanfar, T.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Brand, H.S.

    2014-01-01

    Salivary stones, also known as sialoliths, are calcified concrements in the salivary glands. Sialoliths are more frequently located in the submandibular gland (84%), than in the parotid gland (13%). The majority of the submandibular stones are located in Wharton's duct (90%), whereas parotid stones

  18. Salivary stones: symptoms, aetiology, biochemical composition and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaij, S.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; Forouzanfar, T.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Brand, H.S.

    2014-01-01

    Salivary stones, also known as sialoliths, are calcified concrements in the salivary glands. Sialoliths are more frequently located in the submandibular gland (84%), than in the parotid gland (13%). The majority of the submandibular stones are located in Wharton's duct (90%), whereas parotid stones

  19. Staghorn cystine stone in a 72-year-old recurrent calcium stone former.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupisti, Adamasco; Farnesi, Ilaria; Armillotta, Nicola; Francesca, Francesco

    2012-07-01

    This case deals with the first diagnosis of Type B cystinuria with cystine nephrolithiasis in a 72-year-old male. Cystinuria is an inherited disease that consists of congenital abnormalities of renal and intestinal transport of dibasic amino acids. It often leads to frequent recurrent stone formation. Cystine stones most frequently occur in the 1st through 3rd decades of life with a decreased incidence in old age. This case shows that the first diagnosis of cystinuria may be made even in the 8th decade, without any family history, and in a patient with a history of recurrent calcium stone disease. Therefore, the chance of cystinuria must be always considered, even in older calcium stone formers.

  20. Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge & Big Stone Wetland Management District: Annual Narrative Report: Calendar year 1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during the 1998 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of...

  1. If You Meet the Buddha on the Road with a Rosetta Stone: A Dialogue on Strategies of Inquiry and the New Rhetoric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Christina

    1985-01-01

    Presents a dialogue between two adherents of the process centered paradigm of rhetoric: one a "classicist" who sees art as the knowledge necessary for producing preconceived results by conscious, directed actions, and the other a "romantic," who sees art as "magical" inspiration. (HTH)

  2. The gap junction as a "Biological Rosetta Stone": implications of evolution, stem cells to homeostatic regulation of health and disease in the Barker hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosko, James E

    2011-03-01

    The discovery of the gap junction structure, its functions and the family of the "connexin" genes, has been basically ignored by the major biological disciplines. These connexin genes code for proteins that organize to form membrane-associated hemi-channels, "connexons", co-join with the connexons of neighboring cells to form gap junctions. Gap junctions appeared in the early evolution of the metazoan. Their fundamental functions, (e.g., to synchronize electrotonic and metabolic functions of societies of cells, and to regulate cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis), were accomplished via integrating the extra-cellular triggering of intra-cellular signaling, and therefore, regulating gene expression. These functions have been documented by genetic mutations of the connexin genes and by chemical modulation of gap junctions. Via genetic alteration of connexins in knock-out and transgenic mice, as well as inherited connexin mutations in various human syndromes, the gap junction has been shown to be directly linked to many normal cell functions and multiple diseases, such as birth defects, reproductive, neurological disorders, immune dysfunction and cancer. Specifically, the modulation of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), either by increasing or decreasing its functions by non-mutagenic chemicals or by oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes in normal or "initiated" stem cells and their progenitor cells, can have a major impact on tumor promotion or cancer chemoprevention and chemotherapy. The overview of the roles of the gap junction in the evolution of the metazoan and its potential in understanding a "systems" view of human health and aging and the diseases of aging will be attempted.

  3. Gap junctional intercellular communication as a biological "Rosetta stone" in understanding, in a systems biological manner, stem cell behavior, mechanisms of epigenetic toxicology, chemoprevention and chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosko, James E

    2007-08-01

    In spite of the early speculation by Loewenstein that one of the critical distinguishing phenotypes of cancers from normal cells was the dysfunction of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), this hypothesis has not captured the attention of most birth defects and cancer researchers. Moreover, even with later demonstrations that factors that influence normal development and carcinogenesis by modulating GJIC, such as chemical teratogens and tumor-promoting chemicals, inflammatory factors, hormones and growth factors, antisense connexin genes, knockout mouse models, human inherited mutated connexin genes, si-connexin RNA, chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic chemicals, it is rare that one sees any reference to these studies by the mainstream investigators in these fields. Based on the assumption that the evolutionarily conserved connexin genes found in metazoans are needed for normal development and the maintenance of health and T. Dobzhansky's statement "Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution," a short review of the roles of endogenous and exogenous modulators of GJIC will be made in the context of the multistage, multimechanism process of carcinogenesis, the stem cell theory of carcinogenesis, the discovery and characterization of normal adult stem "cancer stem" cells and the observation that two distinct classes of GJIC-deficient cancer cells are known. The implications of these observations to a "systems biological" view of the role of gap junctions and the nutritional prevention and treatment of several chronic diseases and cancer will be discussed.

  4. Systemic sclerosis in a stone cutter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanna N

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Several occupational hazards especially exposure to silica have been implicated as eliciting factors for the development of scleroderma-like disorders. We here report a case of manual stone-cutter who developed progressive scleroderma, interstitial lung disease and decreased oesophageal motility after several years of exposure to silica dust.

  5. Honors Education and Stone-Campbell Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willerton, Chris

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author explores the Stone-Campbell tradition, which produced the North American Disciples of Christ and Churches of Christ. In this tradition he finds the distinctive combination of three emphases to promote civic virtues in an honors context: (1) the individual pursuit of truth; (2) reliance on Scripture; and (3) the drive…

  6. Honors Education and Stone-Campbell Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willerton, Chris

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author explores the Stone-Campbell tradition, which produced the North American Disciples of Christ and Churches of Christ. In this tradition he finds the distinctive combination of three emphases to promote civic virtues in an honors context: (1) the individual pursuit of truth; (2) reliance on Scripture; and (3) the drive…

  7. Sign Plan : Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Big Stone NWR Sign Plan explains how signs are used on the Refuge to help guide and educate visitors. An inventory of current signs is given as well as a list of...

  8. Stone Stability in Non-uniform Flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoan, N.T.; Stive, M.J.F.; Booij, R.; Hofland, B.; Verhagen, H.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study on stone stability under nonuniform turbulent flow, in particular expanding flow. Detailed measurements of both flow and turbulence and the bed stability are described. Than various manners of quantifying the hydraulic loads exerted on the sto

  9. Effect of moisture on tuff stone degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.A.; Nijland, T.G.

    2016-01-01

    Tuff stone elements with a large length/width ratio often suffer damage in the form of cracks parallel to the surface and spalling of the outer layer. The response of tuff to moisture might be a reason for this behaviour. This research aimed at verifying if differential dilation between parts with d

  10. Large proximal ureteral stones: Ideal treatment modality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Kadyan

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Laparoscopic transperitoneal ureterolithotomy is a minimally invasive, safe and effective treatment modality and should be recommended to all patients of impacted large proximal stones, which are not amenable to URS or extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy or as a primary modality of choice especially if patient is otherwise candidate for open surgery.

  11. New developments in percutaneous stone surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S. Derisavifard

    2016-08-01

    Aug 1, 2016 ... Percutaneous stone surgery is the gold standard in removing large renal calculi. In light of the .... tailoring antibiotics if a patient were to develop sepsis. ..... small size of the micro-PCNL instrumentation, it is best suited for.

  12. Precious Stone Sparkles in All over Africa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bai Yifeng; Wu Wenbin

    2006-01-01

    @@ Baoshi is the name of Precious Stone in Chinese.It is also used as the name of a domestic sewing machine company. Zhejiang Gemsy Sewing Machine Co.,Ltd.(Gemsy) is also called Baoshi Sewing Machine Co.,Ltd.in Chinese.

  13. Microstructural characterization of stone wool fibre network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapelle, Lucie; Brøndsted, Povl; Kusano, Yukihiro;

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanical properties of fibrous network as complex as stone wool materials requires a relevant description of their microstructure and architecture. In this study, different methods have been proposed to characterize the fibre orientation, diameter and length of fibres as well...

  14. Improvement of the stone elimination roller mill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SunGuofeng

    2005-01-01

    Elimination roller mill as raw materials preparing equipments is universally used in brick making industry. Stone Elimination Roller Mill should have following characteristics: high machine strength and good wearresistant of roller shell, safety reliability, high machinery intensity (impact strength) and rigidity, reliable hermetically sealed construction.

  15. A CASE OF GALL STONE ILEUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husain M.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gall stone ileus causing intestinal obstruction is seen in 1 - 4% of cases. [ 1 ] We present a case of 66 years female presenting to us with features of acute intestinal obstruction. Investigations showed the features of cholecystoduodenal fistula with intestinal obstruction secondary to large gallstone in the ileum. We discussed here the presentation and management of patient with gallstone ileus.

  16. Rosetta at 67P: what we have learned about cometary activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Jean-Baptiste; Alice Team (PI Alan Stern), CONSERT Team (PI Wlodek Kofman), COSIMA Team (PI Martin Hilchenbach), GIADA Team (PI Alessandra Rotundi), MIDAS Team (PI Mark Bentley), MIRO Team (PI Mark Hofstadter), OSIRIS Team (PI Holger Sierks), ROSINA Team (PI Kathrin Altwegg), RPC Team (PIs Hans Nilsson, James Burch, Anders Eriksson, Karl Heinz-Glassmeier, Pierre Henri, Christopher Carr), RSI Team (PI Martin Paetzold), VIRTIS Team (PI Fabrizio Capaccioni), Lander Team (Lead Scientists: Hermann Boehnhardt and Jean-Pierre Bibring), IDS Team (Eberhard Gruen, Marcello Fulchignoni, Paul Weissman), Project Scientist Team (Matt Taylor, Bonnie Buratti, Nicolas Altobelli, Mathieu Choukroun), Ground-Based Observations Team (Colin Snodgrass)

    2016-10-01

    The Rosetta mission has been taking measurements of its target comet Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since early 2014 and will complete operations at the end of September 2016.The mission Science Management Plan, in 1994, laid out the the prime goals and themes of the mission. These five themes were:1) To study the global characterisation of the Nuclues, the determination of the dynamics properties, surface morpholy and composition of the comet.2) Examination of the Chemical, Mineralogical and isotopic compositions of volatiles and refractories in a cometary nucleus.3) Physical interrelation of volatile and refractories in a cometary nucleus4) Study the development of cometary activity and the process in the surface layer of the nucleus and in the inner coma5) The origins of comets, the relationship between cometary and interstellar material and the implications for the origin of the solar system,To cover all aspects of the Rosetta mission in this special Show case session, this abstracts is one of 5, with this particular presentation focusing on theme (4): Cometary ActivityWe will report on the progress made in our understanding of how the nucleus activity was monitored by many instruments on board Rosetta, and how it developed over the two years of the mission. Activity is the ensemble of processes leading to the release of volatiles and dust from the surface into the coma. It is a key to understand the evolution of comets, and thus get back to their origins.We will present how activity features such has jets and outbursts were detected in the coma, and linked to the topography. Due to activity some areas eroded away or collapsed, while other have been covered with a thick layer of dust, very likely transported from the active southern hemisphere to the northern one which is in polar winter at perihelion. Activity coupled with dust transport leads to compositional differences on the surface. Active areas, enriched in volatile material, have appeared or

  17. Monitoring Comet 67P/C-G Micrometer Dust Flux: GIADA onboard Rosetta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Corte, Vincenzo; Rotundi, Alessandra; Ivanovski, Stavro; Accolla, Mario; Ferrari, Marco; Sordini, Roberto; Lucarelli, Francesca; Zakharov, Vladimir; Fulle, Marco; Mazzotta Epifani, Elena; López-Moreno, José J.; Rodríguez, Julio; Colangeli, Luigi; Palumbo, Pasquale; Bussoletti, Ezio; Crifo, Jean-Francois; Esposito, Francesca; Green, Simon F.; Grün, Eberhard; Lamy, Philippe L.

    2015-04-01

    (21)ESA-ESAC, Camino Bajo del Castillo, s/n., Urb. Villafranca del Castillo, 28692 Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid, Spagna The MicroBalance System (MBS) is one of the three measurement subsystems of GIADA, the Grain Impact Analyzer and Dust Accumulator on board the Rosetta/ESA spacecraft (S/C). It consists of five Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCMs) in roughly orthogonal directions providing the cumulative dust flux of grains smaller than 10 microns. The MBS is continuously monitoring comet 67P/CG since the beginning of May 2014. During the first 4 months of measurements, before the insertion of the S/C in the bound orbit phase, there were no evidences of dust accumulation on the QCMs. Starting from the beginning of October, three out of five QCMs measured an increase of the deposited dust. The measured fluxes show, as expected, a strong anisotropy. In particular, the dust flux appears to be much higher from the Sun direction with respect to the comet direction. Acknowledgment: GIADA was built by a consortum led by the Univ. Napoli "Parthenope" & INAF- Oss. Astr. Capodimonte, in collaboration with the Inst. de Astrofisica de Andalucia, Selex-ES, FI and SENER. GIADA is presently managed & operated by Ist. di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali-INAF, IT. GIADA was funded and managed by the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, IT, with the support of the Spanish Ministry of Education and Science MEC, ES. GIADA was developed from a PI proposal from the University of Kent; sci. & tech. contribution were provided by CISAS, IT, Lab. d'Astr. Spat., FR, and Institutions from UK, IT, FR, DE and USA. We thank the RSGS/ESAC, RMOC/ESOC & Rosetta Project/ESTEC for their out-standing work. Science support provided was by NASA through the US Rosetta Project managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory/ California Institute of Technology. GIADA calibrated data will be available through ESA's PSA web site (www.rssd.esa.int/index.php? project=PSA&page=in dex). We would like to thank Angioletta

  18. Changes in Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko during the ROSETTA Era - Shape, Topography and Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskell, Robert W.; Jorda, Laurent; Sierks, Holger; Gutiérrez, Pedro; Faurschou Hviid, Stubbe; Keller, Horst Uwe; Mottola, Stefano; Capanna, Claire; OSIRIS Team

    2016-10-01

    The ROSETTA orbiter began mapping comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 1 Aug 2014. It was high summer on the comet, with a subsolar latitude of 45 degrees, meaning that little of the South was illuminated. At that time, the comet was rotating at a rate of 696 deg/day and was 3.6 AU from the Sun. From September through January 2015, ROSETTA was mostly within 30 km of the comet, at times venturing within 10 km. This allowed for detailed mapping of 67P's northern hemisphere. By the end of January, with the Sun still at 27 degrees North, the comet was at 2.4 AU and was becoming too active for close operations. At the same time, torques due to this activity began slowing the rotation rate until it reached a minimum of 694 deg/day around the end of April, shortly before the autumnal equinox. Except for a daring close approach (8 km) on Valentine's day 2015, ROSETTA would not get within 30 km for another year, just before the vernal equinox, precluding very high resolution mapping of the South. Meanwhile, increasing torques as the comet passed through perihelion in mid August 2015 (1.24 AU) were increasing the rotation rate - it is currently at 716 deg/day - while the direction of the pole has remained unchanged. Some areas of the comet, most notably in the Imhotep region, have shown significant changes in topography during the comet's passage by the Sun. These are being mapped and it is hoped that we shall be able to map additional changes by comparing early and late imaging. By the end of the mission in late September, 67P will have receded to about 3.8 AU and the rotation rate will probably have stabilized to its new value. By early August, the Sun will be about 16 degrees North, but the increased distance from the Sun will reduce the power available and an increasing distance from Earth will reduce data rates. 1 Aug 2016 will be our data cutoff for this work. Removing pre-perihelion images with subsolar latitude > 15 deg still provided enough data to map the North, so

  19. Modern concepts in the management of biliary stones (gallstones).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, M

    2001-06-01

    Biliary stones or gallstones are concretions formed anywhere in the biliary tree. Asymptomatic gall bladder stones do not need treatment except the conditions mentioned in this article. Symptomatic uncomplicated gall bladder stones may be treated by laparoscopic or open cholecystectomy or by non-surgical methods. Symptomatic complicated gall bladder stones need cholecystectomy or percutaneous cholecystolithotomy. Common bile duct stones once detected should always be removed and only in difficult cases drainage operations should be done. Treatment of some special conditions arising in gallstone disease has been discussed. Prevention of gallstones is in the experimental stage.

  20. A child with a large bladder stone: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulya Ozturk

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bladder stones account for approximately 5% of all urinary system stones and are prevalent among children living in poor or rural regions. The symptoms and findings in children with bladder stones are usually urgency, frequency, incontinence, dysuria, pyuria, difficulty voiding, and fever, small caliber of urinary stream, lower abdominal pain and urinary intermittency. Most bladder stones are composed of calcium oxalate, followed by calcium phosphate, and they are usually larger than 2.5 cm in diameter. We present a case of a larger-than 2.5-cm bladder stone in a child.

  1. Distal renal tubular acidosis in recurrent renal stone formers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, P J; Hansen, A B; Røhl, H F

    1989-01-01

    (1.1%) had complete distal renal tubular acidosis and 14 (15.5%) incomplete distal renal tubular acidosis. Our results confirm that distal renal tubular acidification defects are associated with a more severe form of stone disease and make distal renal tubular acidosis one of the most frequent...... metabolic disturbances in renal stone formers. Distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) was relatively more common in female stone formers and most often found in patients with bilateral stone disease (36%). Since prophylactic treatment in renal stone formers with renal acidification defects is available...

  2. Compatibility study and adaption of stone repair mortars for the Lede stone (Belgium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kock, T.; Vandevoorde, D.; Boone, M. A.; Dewanckele, J.; De Boever, W.; Lanzón, M.; De Schutter, G.; Van Hoorebeke, L.; Jacobs, P.; Cnudde, V.

    2012-04-01

    One of the main historic building materials in northern Belgium is the Lede stone. This arenaceous limestone from Lutetian age was excavated in the region of Ghent and Brussels and was transported northwards by main rivers such as the Scheldt and Zenne. Thanks to this natural transport route, the stone in also found in many cities which lie abroad the excavation area, such as Antwerp (Belgium) and various cities in the Netherlands (Breda, Zierikzee, …). Due to its dominant occurrence in our cultural heritage, it is frequently subjected to restoration and renovation works. Depending on the degree of decay, most frequent stone operations are cleaning, healing with mortar or replacing it by (often exotic) fresh blocks. Originally, this limestone has a greenish-gray colour, but when being exposed to atmospheric conditions it acquires a yellowish to rusty coloured patina. The origin of the latter is most likely the oxidation of glauconite minerals which are present in a few percent in the stone. In addition, the stone often demonstrates black crust formation due to sulphation. Cleaning of the stone often results in an excess removal of this black gypsum crusts and patina, thus exposing deeper parts of the stone which appear more greenish-gray again. When the stone is subsequently healed by adding repair mortar to damaged parts, the question rises which mortar colour is more appropriate. The choice of repair mortar is greatly depending on commercial aspects. When handling entire facades on monuments, a mineral mortar based on ZnCl is most often applied in Belgium. The big advantage of this mortar is its fast curing. Three colour types have been developed for the Lede stone in specific. However, the hardness of this mortar is sometimes in conflict with reversibility. For the handling of individual sculptures some conservators choose for the application of (hydraulic) lime mortars. The advantage of using such mortars is their high compatibility and reversibility. The

  3. Aerocapture guidance and navigation for the Rosetta Comet Nucleus Sample Return Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Martinez, J. B.; Hechler, M.

    The aerocapture/reentry phase of the Comet Nucleus Sample Return Mission Rosetta when returning from the Comet back to earth is discussed. The guidance and navigation process for a guided atmospheric entry to ground from an entry velocity of over 15 km/s has been simulated and the feasibility of such an entry at an entry angle of -10.5 deg, using an Apollo shape vehicle and guidance methods similar to those used for Apollo and the Shuttle Orbiter, has been demonstrated. Landing precision of less than 10 km at accelerations below 20 g can be reached. Critical areas of system design like the center of gravity location of the entry vehicle are addressed.

  4. Probing 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko's Electron Environment Through Ultraviolet Emission by Rosetta Alice Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindhelm, Eric; Noonan, John; Keeney, Brian A.; Broiles, Thomas; Bieler, Andre; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Feaga, Lori M.; Feldman, Paul D.; Parker, Joel Wm.; Steffl, Andrew Joseph; Stern, S. Alan; Weaver, Harold A.

    2016-10-01

    The Alice Far-Ultraviolet (FUV) Spectrograph onboard ESA's Rosetta spacecraft has observed the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from far approach in summer 2014 until the end of mission in September 2016. We present an overall perspective of the bright FUV emission lines (HI 1026 Å, OI 1302/1305/1306 Å multiplet, OI] 1356 Å, CO 1510 (1-0) Å, and CI 1657 Å) above the sunward hemisphere, detailing their spatial extent and brightness as a function of time and the heliocentric distance of the comet. We compare our observed gas column densities derived using electron temperatures and densities from the Ion Electron Sensor (IES) with those derived using the Inner Coma Environment Simulator (ICES) models in periods when electron-impact excited emission dominates over solar fluorescence emission. The electron population is characterized with 2 three-dimensional kappa functions, one dense and warm, one rarefied and hot.

  5. (21) Lutetia spectrophotometry from Rosetta-OSIRIS images and comparison to ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrin, S.; La Forgia, F.; Pajola, M.; Lazzarin, M.; Massironi, M.; Ferri, F.; da Deppo, V.; Barbieri, C.; Sierks, H.; Osiris Team

    2012-06-01

    Here we present some preliminary results on surface variegation found on (21) Lutetia from ROSETTA-OSIRIS images acquired on 2010-07-10. The spectrophotometry obtained by means of the two cameras NAC and WAC (Narrow and Wide Angle Cameras) is consistent with ground based observations, and does not show surface diversity above the data error bars. The blue and UV images (shortward 500 nm) may, however, indicate a variegation of the optical properties of the asteroid surface on the Baetica region (Sierks et al., 2011). We also speculate on the contribution due to different illumination and to different ground properties (composition or, more probably, grain size diversity). In particular a correlation with geologic units independently defined by Massironi et al. (2012) is evident, suggesting that the variegation of the ground optical properties is likely to be real.

  6. Kidney stones: Composition, frequency and relation to metabolic diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco R. Spivacow

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nephrolithiasis is one of the most frequent urologic diseases. The aim of this paper is to study the composition and frequency of 8854 patient kidney stones and in a subset of them their metabolic risk factors to be related to their type of calculi. Physicochemical and crystallographic methods were used to assess kidney stone composition. In a subset of 715 patients, we performed an ambulatory metabolic protocol with diagnostic purposes. From the total sample 79% of stones were made of calcium salts (oxalate and phosphate, followed by uric acid stones in 16.5%, calcium salts and uric acid in 2%, other salts in 1.9% and cystine in 0.6%. Male to female ratio was almost three times higher in calcium salts and other types of stones, reaching a marked male predominance in uric acid stones, M/F 18.8 /1.0. The major risk factors for calcium stones are idiopathic hypercalciuria, followed by unduly acidic urine pH and hyperuricosuria. In uric acid stones unduly acidic urine pH and less commonly hyperuricosuria are the most frequent biochemical diagnosis. Our results show that analysis of kidney stones composition and the corresponding metabolic diagnosis may provide a scientific basis for the best management and prevention of kidney stone formation, as well as it may help us to study the mechanisms of urine stone formation.

  7. Environmental factors of urinary stones mineralogy, Khouzestan Province, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarasvandi, Alireza; Carranza, E. J. M.; Heidari, Majid; Mousapour, Esmaeil

    2014-09-01

    Urinary stone diseases in the Khouzestan province (southwest Iran) are growing in number and it required extensive studies on various factors of the urinary stones formation in this province. In this research, in addition to distribution of urinary stones in different areas of province, the role of bioenvironmental (race), climate (temperature) and geology (water hardness) factors in urinary stones diversity has been studied. Mineralogical studied using X-ray diffraction showed that uricite and whewellite are the most frequency mineral phases. Struvite, Cystine, hydroxyapatite, weddellite, and Niahite can be observed as urinary stones, too. These data show that the urinary stone in the Khouzestan province can divide into 7 groups: calcium oxalate, phosphate, calcium oxalate/ phosphate, Urate, Urate/calcium, Urate/calcium oxalate/phosphate, Cystine/calcium oxalate. Also the results which attained from temperature effect investigation on the mineralogy of urinary stones, confirms that from Mediterranean sub-humid climates (northeastern area) to warm and dry climates (south and southwest area), calcium oxalate stones and urate stones concentration decreases and increases respectively. Comparison of data related to the drinking water hardness and mineralogy of urinary stones in different areas of Khouzestan province show that the combination of drinking water (especially water hardness) affects mineralogy of urinary stones in some areas (such az Ramhormoz and Hendijan). Finally, the data suggest that frequency of calcium oxalate in women is more than that of men. Moreover, there is direct relationship between the age (>45 years) and the increase in frequency of Urate minerals.

  8. Detection of Shoreline and Land Cover Changes around Rosetta Promontory, Egypt, Based on Remote Sensing Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Masria

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Rosetta Promontory, Egypt has been suffering from a continuous erosion problem. The dramatic retreatment was observed during the last century. It is basically due to the construction of Aswan High Dam in 1964, which reduced the flow and sediment discharges. In this paper, four Landsat images (two Thematic Mapper and two Enhanced Thematic Mapper covering the period from 1984 to 2014 were used. These Landsat images were radio-metrically and geometrically corrected, and then, multi-temporal post-classification analysis was performed to detect land cover changes, extracting shoreline positions to estimate shoreline change rates of the Nile delta coast around Rosetta Promontory. This method provides a viable means for examining long-term shoreline changes. Four categories, including seawater, developed (agriculture and urban, sabkhas (salt-flat, and undeveloped areas, were selected to evaluate their temporal changes by comparing the four selected images. Supervised classification technique was used with support vector machine algorithm to detect temporal changes. The overall accuracy assessment of this method ranged from 97% to 100%. In addition, the shoreline was extracted by applying two different techniques. The first method is based on a histogram threshold of Band 5, and the other uses the combination of histogram threshold of Band 5 and two band ratios (Band 2/Band 4 and Band 2/Band 5. For land cover change detection from 1984 to 2014, it was found that the developed area that increased by 9% although the land in the study area has been contracted by 1.6% due to coastal erosion. The shoreline retreat rate has decreased more than 70% from 1984 to 2014. Nevertheless, it still suffers from significant erosion with a maximum rate of 37 m/year. In comparison to ground survey and different remote sensing techniques, the established trend of shoreline change extracted using histogram threshold was found to be closely consistent with these studies

  9. Seasonal variation and enrichment of metals in sediments of Rosetta branch, Nile River, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwan, Mostafa; Elhaddad, Engy

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated heavy metal pollution in sediments of the Rosetta branch of the River Nile of Egypt to quantify the toxic distribution potential of metals into the surrounding environment. Sediment samples were collected at 9 sites during in four seasons. Organic matter and total metal concentrations were determined using loss on ignition and inductively coupled plasma spectrometry, respectively. Principal component analysis has been applied to evaluate the metal sources and the relationships between metals in sediments. Metal concentrations showed the following order: winter > autumn > spring > summer. Mean concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb in sediments were above the average background value of metals in shale. Pb and Cd showed higher enrichment during all seasons at stations N3/N4, Zn at stations N1 to N4, and Cu at stations N6/N8. The variations in heavy metal total concentration and organic matter are due to different input sources, physico-chemical conditions, and adsorption/precipitation/redox conditions in sediments. Mean values of Geo-accumulation index (Igeo) for Fe, Mn, and Cu were below 0 which were classified as unpolluted during spring, summer, and autumn, except Cu increased from unpolluted to moderately polluted during winter. Igeo values for Cd, Pb, and Zn increased from unpolluted-moderately polluted to highly-very highly polluted during autumn and winter. Pollution Load Index was recorded in highest values during winter, especially at Fuwwah/Basioun and in lowest values during summer at after the Edfina Barrage/before Kafer El-Zayat due to industrial/human activities. Both natural and anthropogenic sources contributed to the metal accumulations in sediments, and industrial, agricultural, and municipal sewage effluents discharged from non-point sources may be the main anthropogenic sources for metals in the Rosetta branch.

  10. Predicting the tolerated sequences for proteins and protein interfaces using RosettaBackrub flexible backbone design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin A Smith

    Full Text Available Predicting the set of sequences that are tolerated by a protein or protein interface, while maintaining a desired function, is useful for characterizing protein interaction specificity and for computationally designing sequence libraries to engineer proteins with new functions. Here we provide a general method, a detailed set of protocols, and several benchmarks and analyses for estimating tolerated sequences using flexible backbone protein design implemented in the Rosetta molecular modeling software suite. The input to the method is at least one experimentally determined three-dimensional protein structure or high-quality model. The starting structure(s are expanded or refined into a conformational ensemble using Monte Carlo simulations consisting of backrub backbone and side chain moves in Rosetta. The method then uses a combination of simulated annealing and genetic algorithm optimization methods to enrich for low-energy sequences for the individual members of the ensemble. To emphasize certain functional requirements (e.g. forming a binding interface, interactions between and within parts of the structure (e.g. domains can be reweighted in the scoring function. Results from each backbone structure are merged together to create a single estimate for the tolerated sequence space. We provide an extensive description of the protocol and its parameters, all source code, example analysis scripts and three tests applying this method to finding sequences predicted to stabilize proteins or protein interfaces. The generality of this method makes many other applications possible, for example stabilizing interactions with small molecules, DNA, or RNA. Through the use of within-domain reweighting and/or multistate design, it may also be possible to use this method to find sequences that stabilize particular protein conformations or binding interactions over others.

  11. Physical properties of the ESA Rosetta target asteroid (21) Lutetia. II. Shape and flyby geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carry, B.; Kaasalainen, M.; Leyrat, C.; Merline, W. J.; Drummond, J. D.; Conrad, A.; Weaver, H. A.; Tamblyn, P. M.; Chapman, C. R.; Dumas, C.; Colas, F.; Christou, J. C.; Dotto, E.; Perna, D.; Fornasier, S.; Bernasconi, L.; Behrend, R.; Vachier, F.; Kryszczynska, A.; Polinska, M.; Fulchignoni, M.; Roy, R.; Naves, R.; Poncy, R.; Wiggins, P.

    2010-11-01

    Aims: We determine the physical properties (spin state and shape) of asteroid (21) Lutetia, target of the International Rosetta Mission of the European Space Agency, to help in preparing for observations during the flyby on 2010 July 10 by predicting the orientation of Lutetia as seen from Rosetta. Methods: We use our novel KOALA inversion algorithm to determine the physical properties of asteroids from a combination of optical lightcurves, disk-resolved images, and stellar occultations, although the last are not available for (21) Lutetia. Results: We find the spin axis of (21) Lutetia to lie within 5° of (λ = 52°, β = -6°) in the Ecliptic J2000 reference frame (equatorial α = 52°, δ = +12°), and determine an improved sidereal period of 8.168 270 ± 0.000 001 h. This pole solution implies that the southern hemisphere of Lutetia will be in “seasonal” shadow at the time of the flyby. The apparent cross-section of Lutetia is triangular when seen “pole-on” and more rectangular “equator-on”. The best-fit model suggests there are several concavities. The largest of these is close to the north pole and may be associated with strong impacts. Based on observations collected at the W. M. Keck Observatory and at European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope (program ID: 079.C-0493, PI: E. Dotto). The W. M. Keck Observatory is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.Tables 1, 2, 4 and Figs. 3-5 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. Cover stones on liquefiable soil bed under waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Hatipoglu, Figen; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    of stone layers (including the effect of an intermediate filter layer) were investigated. Pore pressure was measured across the soil depth. The experiments show that the soil liquefaction depended mainly on two parameters: the packing density of stones, and the number of stone layers. When the liquefaction...... occurs, stones sink in the soil. Mechanisms of liquefaction and sinking are described, and practical guidelines are recommended.......The paper describes the results of an experimental study on the behavior of cover stones on a liquefiable soil bed exposed to a progressive wave. The soil was silt with d50=0.098mm. Stones, the size of 4cm, were used as cover material. The effect of packing density of stones, and that of number...

  13. Approach to Residual Kidney Stone Fragments After Shock Wave Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tumay Ižpekci

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available For kidney stones up to 2 cm in diameter shock wave therapy (SDT is safely applied and kidney stones smaller than 5mm remaining in the kidney after treatment are regarded as clinically insignificant. Management of this condition is still controversial among clinicians. These stones in the kidney may continue to persist without any clinical symptoms or begin to cause clinical signs. In the event that the clinical symptoms are present, it requires detailed urological examination and treatment. The aim in the surgical treatment of urinary tract stones is completely stone clearance but in stones that are not infected, not causing urinary tract obstruction and without clinical symptoms medical treatment is also beneficial fort he prevention of growth and recurrence. In addition, surgical intervention is also possible for the residual stone fragments which become symptomatic during follow-up.

  14. POTENTIAL OF MEDICINAL PLANTS IN KIDNEY, GALL AND URINARY STONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choubey Ankur

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants have been known for millennia and are highly esteemed all over the world as a rich source of therapeutic agents for the prevention of various ailments. Today large number of population suffers from kidney stone, gall stone and urinary calculi. Stone disease has gained increasing significance due to changes in living conditions i.e. industrialization and malnutrition. Changes in prevalence and incidence, the occurrence of stone types and stone location, and the manner of stone removal are explained. Medicinal plants are used from centuries due to its safety, efficacy, cultural acceptability and lesser side effects as compared to synthetic drugs. The present article deals with measures to be adopted for the potential of medicinal plants in stone dissolving activity.

  15. Composition of common bile duct stones in Chinese patients during and after endoscopic sphincterotomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Lun Tsai; Kwok-Hung Lai; Chiun-Ku Lin; Hoi-Hung Chan; Ching-Chu Lo; Ping-I Hsu; Wen-Chi Chen; Jin-Shiung Cheng; Gin-Ho Lo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) is a well-established therapeutic modality for the removal of common bile duct (CBD) stones. After ES there are still around 10% of patients that experience recurrent CBD stones. The aim of this study is to investigate the composition of CBD stones before and after ES and its clinical significance in Chinese patients.METHODS: From January 1996 to December 2003, 735Veterans General Hospital and stone specimens from 266patients were sent for analysis. Seventy-five patients had recurrent CBD stones and stone specimens from 44patients were sent for analysis. The composition of the stones was analyzed by infrared (IR) spectrometry and they were classified as cholesterol or bilirubinate stones according to the predominant composition. Clinical data were analyzed.RESULTS: In the initial 266 stone samples, 217 (82%)were bilirubinate stones, 42 (16%) were cholesterol stones,3 were calcium carbonate stones, 4 were mixed cholesterol and bilirubinate stones. Patients with bilirubinate stones were significantly older than patients with cholesterol stones (66±13 years vs 56±17 years, P= 0.001). In the 44 recurrent stone samples, 38 (86%) were bilirubinate stones, 3 (7%) were cholesterol stones, and 3 were mixed cholesterol and bilirubinate stones. In 27 patients, bothinitial and recurrent stone specimens can be obtained,23 patients had bilirubinate stones initially and 2 became cholesterol stones in the recurrent attack. In the four patients with initial cholesterol stones, three patients had bilirubinate stones and one patient had a cholesterol stone in the recurrent attack.CONCLUSION: Bilirubinate stone is the predominant composition of initial or recurrent CBD stone in Chinese patients. The composition of CBD stones may be different from initial stones after ES.

  16. Kidney stones in primary hyperoxaluria: new lessons learnt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorrit E Jacob

    Full Text Available To investigate potential differences in stone composition with regard to the type of Primary Hyperoxaluria (PH, and in relation to the patient's medical therapy (treatment naïve patients versus those on preventive medication we examined twelve kidney stones from ten PH I and six stones from four PH III patients. Unfortunately, no PH II stones were available for analysis. The study on this set of stones indicates a more diverse composition of PH stones than previously reported and a potential dynamic response of morphology and composition of calculi to treatment with crystallization inhibitors (citrate, magnesium in PH I. Stones formed by PH I patients under treatment are more compact and consist predominantly of calcium-oxalate monohydrate (COM, whewellite, while calcium-oxalate dihydrate (COD, weddellite is only rarely present. In contrast, the single stone available from a treatment naïve PH I patient as well as stones from PH III patients prior to and under treatment with alkali citrate contained a wide size range of aggregated COD crystals. No significant effects of the treatment were noted in PH III stones. In disagreement with findings from previous studies, stones from patients with primary hyperoxaluria did not exclusively consist of COM. Progressive replacement of COD by small COM crystals could be caused by prolonged stone growth and residence times in the urinary tract, eventually resulting in complete replacement of calcium-oxalate dihydrate by the monohydrate form. The noted difference to the naïve PH I stone may reflect a reduced growth rate in response to treatment. This pilot study highlights the importance of detailed stone diagnostics and could be of therapeutic relevance in calcium-oxalates urolithiasis, provided that the effects of treatment can be reproduced in subsequent larger studies.

  17. Biologically active substances of stone crop fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Makarkina

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Stone fruit crops are successfully cultivated in many regions of Russia. Their fruits contain a great diversity of biologically active and mineral substances. The stone fruit varietal collection of the All Russia Research Institute of Fruit Crop Breeding has been estimated on the content of biologically active substances (ascorbic acid and phenolic compounds in fruits: 80 sour cherry varieties, 28 sweet cherry varieties, 29 plum varieties and 24 apricot varieties. High cultivar variability of the content of ascorbic acid and P-active sub-stances in fruits has been determined in each crop. The best genotypes have been singled out according to each biochemical component and a complex of characters.

  18. Withdraw of the Ureteroscope Causes Fragmented Ureter Stones to Disperse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onder Canguven

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Ureteroscopy has improved from the first use of ureteroscope in the 1970's. Although the success rate increased in the last years, (1 new treatment techniques are being developed for impacted and large proximal ureter stones (2. Pneumatic lithotripsy has high efficiency with low complication rates (2. However, in case of steinstrasse and large (> 1 cm ureter stones, fragmented small stones may obstruct insertion of a ureteroscope after initial lithotripsy. In order to triumph over this issue, multiple ureteroscopic passages and manipulations needed for extraction of these small stones by forceps or basket catheters. The overall incidence of stricture was found upto 14.2% when the fragments were removed with a grasping forceps or a basket (3. We present our technique to disperse small fragmented stones in order to contact non-fragmented rest stone. Materials and Methods Ureteral lithotripsy was performed with an 8-9.8F semirigid ureteroscope using a pneumatic lithotripter (Swiss LithoClast, EMS, Nyon, Switzerland. The stone was fragmented into small pieces as small as 2-3 mm. by pneumatic lithotripter. Eventually, these fragmented stones interfered with vision and the lithotripter to get in touch with the rest stone. After fragmenting distal part of the large stone, the ureteroscope was pulled back out of ureter. While pulling back, the operating channel was closed and irrigation fluid was flowing in order not to decrease pressure behind the stones. Simultaneously, a person tilted the operating table to about 30° in reverse Trendelenburg position. When the ureteroscope was out of ureteral orifice, the operating channel was opened and irrigation fluid was stopped. This maneuver aided decreasing pressure in the bladder more rapidly in addition to feeding tube. Stone dust and antegrade fluid flow were easily seen out of the ureteral orifice. Ureteroscope was re-inserted after 30-60 seconds. While reaching the rest of the stone, small

  19. Surface analysis of stone and bone tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemp, W. James; Watson, Adam S.; Evans, Adrian A.

    2016-03-01

    Microwear (use-wear) analysis is a powerful method for identifying tool use that archaeologists and anthropologists employ to determine the activities undertaken by both humans and their hominin ancestors. Knowledge of tool use allows for more accurate and detailed reconstructions of past behavior, particularly in relation to subsistence practices, economic activities, conflict and ritual. It can also be used to document changes in these activities over time, in different locations, and by different members of society, in terms of gender and status, for example. Both stone and bone tools have been analyzed using a variety of techniques that focus on the observation, documentation and interpretation of wear traces. Traditionally, microwear analysis relied on the qualitative assessment of wear features using microscopes and often included comparisons between replicated tools used experimentally and the recovered artifacts, as well as functional analogies dependent upon modern implements and those used by indigenous peoples from various places around the world. Determination of tool use has also relied on the recovery and analysis of both organic and inorganic residues of past worked materials that survived in and on artifact surfaces. To determine tool use and better understand the mechanics of wear formation, particularly on stone and bone, archaeologists and anthropologists have increasingly turned to surface metrology and tribology to assist them in their research. This paper provides a history of the development of traditional microwear analysis in archaeology and anthropology and also explores the introduction and adoption of more modern methods and technologies for documenting and identifying wear on stone and bone tools, specifically those developed for the engineering sciences to study surface structures on micro- and nanoscales. The current state of microwear analysis is discussed as are the future directions in the study of microwear on stone and bone tools.

  20. Stone tools from locality Crkvine in Stubline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonović Dragana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stone artifacts from excavations in Crkvine in 2008. originate from two stratigraphic units, both chronologically defined as the final stage of the Vinča culture: 1. distruction layer above and 2. from the floor of House 1/2008. None of the stone artifact types showed any specific regularity in vertical distribution. However, in the southern part of the Structure/House 1 there is higher abundance in horizontal distribution of both types of tools. Abundance of cores, blades for rejuvenation of the cores and unretouched blades among the chipped artifacts suggest that, most probably, this object was a working place where the artifacts were made (Fig. 9/1. Ground stone artifacts - all rought-out and final products, whole and fragmented pieces, ground-edge and abrasive tools, are equally distributed in the House 1/2008 as well as in the distruction layer above it. Only non-determined fragments and pieces of raw material, both defined as products of making stone tools, are far more numerous in the distruction layer above the House 1/2008. Higher concentrations of finds are situated in the House 1/2008, especially in its southern part, on the floor and above it, while the number of finds out of the House significantly decreases (Fig. 9/2. Such distribution of ground stone artifacts indicates that the production of stone artifacts was done within the household (large number of flakes of „light white stone“, presence of grindstone and whetstone, as well as that there occurred active preparation of food within the Vinča’s objects (querns and pounders within the houses. Findings of numerous quartzite, chert and jasper pebbles out of the House 1/2008, 2 metres away from the northeastern angle of the House (pottery group 1, could not be connected with production of chipped and ground stone artifacts. There are no any traces of treatment and utilization on the pebbles, and the pebbles themselves do not belong to raw material of good quality due to

  1. Experimental investigations on dry stone masonry walls

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Brick unreinforced masonry walls have been widely studied both from experimental and numerical point of view, but scarce experimental information is available for dry stone masonry walls that constitute the material more frequently used in the construction of ancient historical constructions. Therefore, the present work aims at increasing the insight about the behavior of typical ancient masonry walls under cyclic loading. To attain such goal, different experimental approaches are consi...

  2. [A case of palatine tonsil stone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedrychowicz, B; Pogorzelski, A

    1993-01-01

    The authors presented a case of big stone of palatine tonsil surgical treated successfully. Qualitative and quantitative examination of tonsillith chemical composition was carried out with a LINK 90 spectrometer. It was found that the main components were calcium (Ca/K alpha), (Ca/K beta) about 60% and phosphorus (P) about 30%. Potassium (K), chlorine (Cl), sulphur (S), aluminum (Al and magnesium (Mg) were found in trace amounts.

  3. Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy of bile duct stones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Tae; Kim, Myung Joon; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Suh, Jung Ho; Lee, Moo Sang; Jo, Jang Hwan; Kim, Byung Ro [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-12-15

    During the past one and half year, we performed ESWL therapy in 13 patients with common bile duct and intrahepatic duct stones, applying Lithostar-R (Siemens co. West Germany) and analyzed their results. In 13 patients, 9 residual common bile duct stones and 7 intrahepatic duct stones were selected postoperatively. The size of stones were ranged from 0.7 cm to 3.5 cm in diameter. 2 stones were multiple and the remained 14 were single in number. The visualization of stones were done with fluoroscopy after the injection of contrast media via cholangiographic T-tube or ERCP. ESWL were applied continuously until stone disintegration was visible, or upto maximum number of 3500 discharge of shock wave. If not disintegrated upto 3500, patients were underwent second or third lithotripsy session with interval of one week. Our results showed that among 9 common bile duct stones, 4 were completely disintegrated and passed out spontaneously, but 3 partially fragmented and removed by the additional procedure. 2 were failed. Among 7 intrahepatic stones, 3 completely and 2 partially were succeeded. One stone partially fragmented were retained without removal and other one were failed. Skin petechia in all patients were revealed on the entry port of shock wave, but no serous complication was not occurred.

  4. Extracorporeal piezoelectric lithotripsy for complicated bile duct stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J; Adamek, H E; Riemann, J F

    1991-02-01

    Today, common bile duct stones are extracted endoscopically. After endoscopic sphincterotomy, nearly 90% of all stones can be removed with a Dormia basket or a mechanical lithotripter. Problems are encountered if there are larger stones or a duct stenosis. New conservative therapies do serve as an alternative to surgical intervention for those few patients in whom endoscopic measures have failed. Stone fragmentation can be achieved by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, and remaining fragments can be removed endoscopically. So far, authors of most reports on the successful disintegration of common bile duct stones used the Dornier lithotripter. Stone localization is thus achieved with x-rays, and the shock waves are generated by an underwater spark discharge. We report on our experiences and results with extracorporeal piezoelectric shock wave lithotripsy (EPL) in 19 patients with complicated bile duct stones. With this lithotripter, stones are visualized by ultrasound, and shock waves are produced by a piezoelectric acoustic generator. Fragmentation was achieved in 84.2%, and complete stone removal in 78.9%. These results show that piezoelectric lithotripsy is also a useful method for the treatment of complicated bile duct stones, as has already been proved for the electrohydraulic- and electromagnetic-generated shock waves systems. However, the renunciation of general anesthesia and the need for analgesia or sedation in only 25% of the treatments render this lithotripter system attractive, especially for elderly and frail patients.

  5. Pneumatic v electrokinetic lithotripsy in treatment of ureteral stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorreuther, R; Klotz, T; Heidenreich, A; Nayal, W; Engelmann, U

    1998-06-01

    Recently, a new device (Combilith) for electrokinetic lithotripsy (EKL) has become available which is very similar to the well-known device for pneumatic (ballistic) lithotripsy (Swiss Lithoclast). The Lithoclast uses air pressure to push a projectile within the handpiece against the end of a metal probe, which is thereby accelerated and thrown like a jackhammer against the stone. In principle, the same stroking movement of a small metal probe is provided by EKL; the difference is that instead of a projectile, a magnetic core within the handpiece is accelerated by the electromagnetic principle. This paper compares the clinical efficacy and the features of the two devices. Testing the devices on a stone model, taking into account stone propulsion, the systems turned out to equally effective regarding stone disintegration. However, stone displacement was more pronounced with the Lithoclast applied on easily breaking stones. In a second experiment, an optoelectronic movement-measuring apparatus (Zimmer camera) was employed to measure the range and velocity of the movement of the probe tip without any contact. The linear acceleration velocity ranged from 5 to a maximum of 12.5 m/sec with both systems, but the maximum height of the stroke was 2.5 mm with the Lithoclast and 1 mm with EKL. After the initial break-up of soft stones, further impact of the probe tip against the stone resulted merely in propulsion; thus, the greater probe stroke height is the cause of the stone displacement. In a clinical trial, 22 ureteral stones were treated with the Lithoclast and 35 with the EKL. The two devices were equally effective in terms of stone disintegration and safety margin. Fixation using a Dormia basket was necessary in 12 cases (8 Lithoclast, 4 EKL). Although a difference in probe stroke height was noted when comparing pneumatic and electrokinetic lithotripsy, there were no clinically significant differences in the efficacy of stone fragmentation or stone-free rates. At the

  6. Low power laser in the management of ureteral stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayib, Abdulmalik M

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the outcome of the low power Holmium-Yag laser in management of ureteral stones, and to report the incidence rate of different types of stones. One hundred and seventy patients underwent ureteroscopy and fragmentation of ureteral stones at the International Medical Center, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between March 2007 and August 2009. Stones were measured by their largest diameter on CT and classified according to their location from the ureter to the proximal middle and distal ureteral stones. We utilized 8-11 F Semi rigid or 7.5 F flexible ureteroscopes to identify the stones, and all stones were fragmented and evaporated using a 10 watt lower power Holmium-yag laser lithotripter. All stones were completely evaporated and fragmented using the Holmium-yag laser through ureteroscopy. The age of the patients varied between 21-76 years with a mean age of 38.6 years (males 113, and females 57). The largest diameter of the largest stone was 6-12mm (mean 8 mm) and classified according to its location in the ureter into proximal (93 [54.7%]), middle (26 [15.3%]), or distal ureteral stones (51 [30%]). We performed stone analysis in 122 patients (oxalate [n=87], uric acid [n=16], cystine [n=11], and calcium phosphate [n=8]). Laser lithotripsy using low power 10 watt laser lithotripter is safe and effective method for stone evaporation and disintegration, and can be carried out as a day care procedure. The types of stones in Saudi Arabia are same as it has been reported before in the literature.

  7. A “Rosetta Stone” for metazoan zooplankton: DNA barcode analysis of species diversity of the Sargasso Sea (Northwest Atlantic Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucklin, Ann; Ortman, Brian D.; Jennings, Robert M.; Nigro, Lisa M.; Sweetman, Christopher J.; Copley, Nancy J.; Sutton, Tracey; Wiebe, Peter H.

    2010-12-01

    Species diversity of the metazoan holozooplankton assemblage of the Sargasso Sea, Northwest Atlantic Ocean, was examined through coordinated morphological taxonomic identification of species and DNA sequencing of a ˜650 base-pair region of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (mtCOI) as a DNA barcode (i.e., short sequence for species recognition and discrimination). Zooplankton collections were made from the surface to 5,000 meters during April, 2006 on the R/V R.H. Brown. Samples were examined by a ship-board team of morphological taxonomists; DNA barcoding was carried out in both ship-board and land-based DNA sequencing laboratories. DNA barcodes were determined for a total of 297 individuals of 175 holozooplankton species in four phyla, including: Cnidaria (Hydromedusae, 4 species; Siphonophora, 47); Arthropoda (Amphipoda, 10; Copepoda, 34; Decapoda, 9; Euphausiacea, 10; Mysidacea, 1; Ostracoda, 27); and Mollusca (Cephalopoda, 8; Heteropoda, 6; Pteropoda, 15); and Chaetognatha (4). Thirty species of fish (Teleostei) were also barcoded. For all seven zooplankton groups for which sufficient data were available, Kimura-2-Parameter genetic distances were significantly lower between individuals of the same species (mean=0.0114; S.D. 0.0117) than between individuals of different species within the same group (mean=0.3166; S.D. 0.0378). This difference, known as the barcode gap, ensures that mtCOI sequences are reliable characters for species identification for the oceanic holozooplankton assemblage. In addition, DNA barcodes allow recognition of new or undescribed species, reveal cryptic species within known taxa, and inform phylogeographic and population genetic studies of geographic variation. The growing database of "gold standard" DNA barcodes serves as a Rosetta Stone for marine zooplankton, providing the key for decoding species diversity by linking species names, morphology, and DNA sequence variation. In light of the pivotal position of zooplankton in ocean

  8. RosettaStone的全球触角:专访总法律顾问迈克尔·吴

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    作为首家在股票交易所公开交易的语言学习软件公司,Rosetta Stone公司将其销售业绩及成功归功于全球化。虽然有人会说美国谢南多厄河谷(Shenandoah Valley)的山麓地处“荒郊野外”,但总法律顾问迈克尔·吴(Michael Wu)却说,位于Harrisonburg,Va.的RosettaStone运营总部已经成为一个全球会议场所。

  9. Rosetta and Mars Express observations of the influence of high solar wind pressure on the Martian plasma environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. T. Edberg

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on new simultaneous in-situ observations at Mars from Rosetta and Mars Express (MEX on how the Martian plasma environment is affected by high pressure solar wind. A significant sharp increase in solar wind density, magnetic field strength and turbulence followed by a gradual increase in solar wind velocity is observed during ~24 h in the combined data set from both spacecraft after Rosetta's closest approach to Mars on 25 February 2007. The bow shock and magnetic pileup boundary are coincidently observed by MEX to become asymmetric in their shapes. The fortunate orbit of MEX at this time allows a study of the inbound boundary crossings on one side of the planet and the outbound crossings on almost the opposite side, both very close to the terminator plane. The solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF downstream of Mars are monitored through simultaneous measurements provided by Rosetta. Possible explanations for the asymmetries are discussed, such as crustal magnetic fields and IMF direction. In the same interval, during the high solar wind pressure pulse, MEX observations show an increased amount of escaping planetary ions from the polar region of Mars. We link the high pressure solar wind with the observed simultaneous ion outflow and discuss how the pressure pulse could also be associated with the observed boundary shape asymmetry.

  10. Rotational variation of the spectral slope of (21) Lutetia, the second asteroid target of ESA Rosetta mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzarin, M.; Magrin, S.; Marchi, S.; Dotto, E.; Perna, D.; Barbieri, C.; Barucci, M. A.; Fulchignoni, M.

    2010-11-01

    The ESA Rosetta mission, launched in 2004 March, will flyby the second asteroid target (21) Lutetia in 2010 July. This asteroid is quite different from (2867) Steins, encountered by Rosetta in 2008 September. Lutetia is in fact a much larger asteroid, approximately 100km of diameter, as compared to the 5 km of Steins and also its surface composition seems fairly different. A wide international ground-based observational campaign has been carried out and is still going on to obtain information on the object. In this context, we observed Lutetia four times spectroscopically in the visible region totally covering its rotational period. In this paper we have compared all our observations, in order to try to shed more light on its nature. Moreover, an analysis of the geometric configuration of Lutetia during the several observations has also been performed. Our paper points out small variations of reflectance over the surface, possibly due to a large crater. However, the nature of Lutetia remains still elusive, probably because it could be a transition object between X and C taxonomic classes, pointing out to the crucial values of the forthcoming flyby to clarify the situation. Therefore, all the information we have gathered and here discussed have been very useful also to better define the observational strategy of the asteroid by Rosetta.

  11. Attitude reconstruction of ROSETTA's Lander PHILAE using two-point magnetic field observations by ROMAP and RPC-MAG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinisch, Philip; Auster, Hans-Ulrich; Richter, Ingo; Hercik, David; Jurado, Eric; Garmier, Romain; Güttler, Carsten; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2016-08-01

    As part of the European Space Agency's ROSETTA Mission the Lander PHILAE touched down on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on November 12, 2014. The magnetic field has been measured onboard the orbiter and the lander. The orbiter's tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer RPC-MAG is one of five sensors of the ROSETTA Plasma Consortium. The lander is also equipped with a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer as part of the ROSETTA Lander Magnetometer and Plasma-Monitor package (ROMAP). This unique setup makes a two point measurement between the two spacecrafts in a relatively small distance of less than 50 km possible. Both magnetometers were switched on during the entire descent, the initial touchdown, the bouncing between the touchdowns and after the final touchdown. We describe a method for attitude determination by correlating magnetic low-frequency waves, which was tested under different conditions and finally used to reconstruct PHILAE's attitude during descent and after landing. In these cases the attitude could be determined with an accuracy of better than ± 5 °. These results were essential not only for PHILAE operations planning but also for the analysis of the obtained scientific data, because nominal sources for this information, like solar panel currents and camera pictures could not provide sufficient information due to the unexpected landing position.

  12. Assessment of kidney stone and prevalence of its chemical compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandeya, A; Prajapati, R; Panta, P; Regmi, A

    2010-09-01

    Kidney stone analysis is the test done on the stone which cause problems when they block the flow of urine through or out of the kidneys. The stones cause severe pain and are also associated with morbidity and renal damage. There is also no clear understanding on the relative metabolic composition of renal calculi. Hence, the study is aimed to find out the chemical composition of it which can guide treatment and give information that may prevent more stones from forming. The study was carried out on the stones that had been sent to the department of Biochemistry (n = 99; M = 61; F = 38; Mean age: 33.6 +/- 14.4 years) Approximately 98.9% of stones were composed of oxalate, 95.9% of Calcium, 85.8% of phosphate, 62.6% of Urate, 46.4% of Ammonium and very few percentages of Carbonate.

  13. Introduction: Kidney Stone Research, Lessons From Human Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Fredric L.

    2007-04-01

    About 5% of American women and 12% of men will develop a kidney stone at some time in their life, the prevalence has been rising in both sexes. Approximately 80% of stones are composed of calcium oxalate, and calcium phosphate; 10% of struvite; 9% of uric acid; and the remaining 1% are composed of cystine or ammonium acid urate or are diagnosed as drug-related stone. Stones ultimately arise because of an unwanted phase change of these substances from liquid to solid state. In this introduction, I have outlined our current thinking of the possible mechanisms involved in stone formation based on our biopsy data collected from a series of human kidney stone formers. In addition, I have presented a set of questions as a means of focusing future research in this field.

  14. A RARE CONDITION OF MULTIPLE URETHRAL STONES WITH MEATAL STENOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navkiran Kaur

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiple urethral stones are a rare occurrence commonly resulting from migration of renal stones and rarely arising de novo secondary to the other pathology such as urethral diverticulum, strictures, neurogenic bladder, meatal stenosis, and obstructing tumours such as adenomatous metaplasia of the uroepithelium and hypospadias. We report the case of a 47-year-old male presenting with difficulty in micturition resulting from impaction of multiple stones within the urethra. On retrograde urethrogram, meatal stenosis was also seen along with multiple urethral stones. On ultrasonography of patient, renal stones were also found. Patient was managed surgically and stones were extracted. This paper summarises the topic and discusses the radiological and its clinical implication of this unusual condition.

  15. Raw Materials, Production and Distribution of Xuejiagang Stone Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Lina

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The Xuejiagang culture is associated with the latter part of the Neolithic period in southern China. Since the 1970s, we have found many cemeteries associated with this culture, in which stone implements make up an important and significant part of the funerary objects. The perforated stone knife, the yue axe and the adze were especially important. Analysis of the frequency and relationships between raw material, technology and tool types provides a basis for distinguishing between the different production sites associated with the Xuejiagang stone industry. This article discusses the relationship between rock types and stone tools, and between stone artefacts from different production sites. Thin-section analysis was used to identify and characterise stone used for implement manufacture.

  16. 7 CFR 330.301 - Stone and quarry products from certain areas in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stone and quarry products from certain areas in Canada...; PLANT PESTS; SOIL, STONE, AND QUARRY PRODUCTS; GARBAGE Movement of Soil, Stone, And Quarry Products § 330.301 Stone and quarry products from certain areas in Canada. Stone and quarry products from...

  17. Seasonal effects on the nucleus of comet 67P revealed by Rosetta/VIRTIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Federico; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Filacchione, Gianrico; Erard, Stéphane; Rouseeau, Batiste; Combe, Jean-Philippe; Capria, Maria Teresa; Leyrat, Cédric; Longobardo, Andrea; Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Kappel, David; Arnold, Gabriele; Fonti, Sergio; Mancarella, Francesca; Kuehrt, Ekkehard; Mottola, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    We describe thermal effects on the nucleus of comet 67P. Due to the overall low thermal inertia of the nucleus surface, the surface temperature is essentially dominated by the instantaneous value of the solar incidence angle and the heliocentric distance. However, for each location, the smallest achievable value of insolation angle depends on the season and topography. Given the substantial obliquity of comet 67P, seasons are such that the northern hemisphere is mainly illuminated at aphelion while the southern hemisphere receives most insolation soon after perihelion. In addition, the heliocentric distance strongly affects the surface temperature, all other parameters being equal. This is a larger effect in comets than in asteroids, due to the wide range of heliocentric distance values spanned by comets. When Rosetta started its global mapping observation campaign, in early August 2014, hyperspectral images acquired by the VIRTIS imaging spectrometer onboard the Rosetta Orbiter covered only the northern regions of the cometary surface, and the equatorial belt became gradually unveiled, while the southern region has been revealed from 2015 onwards. In parallel, the comet's heliocentric distance has been decreasing from ˜3.6 AU down to 1.24 AU, the distance at which the perihelion passage occurred on 13 August 2015. By relating surface temperatures as measured by VIRTIS to three variables: solar incidence angle, true local solar time and heliocentric distance, we aim to separate the relative contributions due to season and to the heliocentric distance. To do this, we use both VIRTIS-M data (namely data from the mapping spectrometer covering the 1-5 μm range, available up to April 2015, i.e. before the failure of the IR cryocooler) and VIRTIS-H data (namely data from the high-resolution point spectrometer covering the 2-5 μm range), and we focus in particular on three regions: one in the northern hemisphere, one in the equatorial region and one in the southern

  18. Renal pelvic stones: choosing shock wave lithotripsy or percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Marcovich; Smith, Arthur D.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction of minimally invasive techniques has revolutionized the surgical management of renal calculi. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and percutaneous nephrolithotomy are now both well-established procedures. Each modality has advantages and disadvantages, and the application of each should be based on well-defined factors. These variables include stone factors such as number, size, and composition; factors related to the stone's environment, including the stone's location, spatial...

  19. Dissolution of struvite urinary stones. Experimental studies in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, D P; Bragin, S; Musher, D M

    1976-03-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that struvite crystals form primarily as a result of urease-induced alkalinity and supersaturation. In vitro perfusion of struvite crystals with undersaturated urine caused crystal dissolution. The investigations reported herein demonstrate complete dissolution of human struvite urinary stones during 6 weeks of perfusion in vitro with undersaturated human urine. Human hydroxyapatite stones perfused similarly underwent only slight dissolution. A glycoprotein precipitated as the stones dissolved; the pathogenic significance of the glycoprotein is unknown.

  20. Natural stones of historic and future importance in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouenborg, Björn; Andersson, Jenny; Göransson, Mattias

    2013-04-01

    Several activities and responsibilities of the Geological Survey of Sweden (SGU) are related to the work of the newly formed international Heritage Stone Task Group (HSTG) for designating historically important stones. SGU is among other things a referral organization, frequently dealing with the preparation of statements in connection with the quarrying permit applications of stone producers. When preparing these statements, SGU takes into account a number of parameters, e.g. the importance for local and regional business development, historic importance, area of occurrence, quality of the geological documentation of the stone type, peculiarities of the stone types and technical properties relevant for the intended use. Traditionally, SGU has not worked with bedrock mapping looking at the potential of natural stones production but more commonly looking at the potential production of aggregates, industrial minerals and metals. The competence is, therefore, presently being built up with new databases over important natural stone types and definition of criteria for their selection etc. In this respect the criteria defined by the HSTG provide important help. This work goes hand in hand with the task of proposing stone-deposits and quarries of "national interest". The criteria for selection of a stone type, quarry etc as one of national interest are currently being revised. SGU plays an important role in this work. However, the final decision and appointment lies in the hands of the Swedish Board of Housing, Building and Planning (Boverket), an authority dealing with sustainable land use and regional development, town and country planning. Boverket supervises how the planning legislation is handled by the municipal authorities and the county administrative boards. The two latter organizations are those in charge of giving extraction permits for stone quarrying. The "Hallandia gneiss", of SW Sweden, is described as a case story and presented in this paper. Keywords

  1. Rosetta/OSIRIS: Nucleus morphology and activity of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierks, Holger

    2015-08-01

    Introduction: The Rosetta mission of the European Space Agency arrived on August 6, 2014, at the target comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko after 10 years of cruise. OSIRIS (Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System) is the scientific imaging system onboard Rosetta. It comprises a Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) for broad-band nucleus surface and dust studies and a Wide Angle Camera (WAC) for the wide field coma investigations.OSIRIS images the nucleus and the coma of comet 67P/C-G from the arrival throughout early mapping phase, PHILAE landing, and escort phase with close fly-by beginning of the year 2015.The team paper presents the surface morphology and activity of the nucleus as seen in gas, dust, and local jets and the larger scale coma studied by OSIRIS.Acknowledgements: OSIRIS was built by a consortium led by the Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Göttingen, Germany, in collaboration with CISAS, University of Padova, Italy, the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, France, the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucia, CSIC, Granada, Spain, the Scientific Support Office of the European Space Agency, Noordwijk, The Netherlands, the Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial, Madrid, Spain, the Universidad Politéchnica de Madrid, Spain, the Department of Physics and Astronomy of Uppsala University, Sweden, and the Institut für Datentechnik und Kommunikationsnetze der Technischen Universität Braunschweig, Germany.Additional Information: The OSIRIS team is H. Sierks, C. Barbieri, P. Lamy, R. Rodrigo, D. Koschny, H. Rickman, J. Agarwal, M. A'Hearn, I. Bertini, F. Angrilli, M. A. Barucci, J. L. Bertaux, G. Cremonese, V. Da Deppo, B. Davidsson, S. Debei, M. De Cecco, S. Fornasier, M. Fulle, O. Groussin, C. Güttler, P. Gutierrez, S. Hviid, W. Ip, L. Jorda, H. U. Keller, J. Knollenberg, R. Kramm, E. Kührt, M. Küppers, L. Lara, M. Lazzarin, J. J. Lopez, S. Lowry, S. Marchi, F. Marzari, H. Michalik, S. Mottola, G. Naletto, N. Oklay, L

  2. Extreme 3D reconstruction of the final ROSETTA/PHILAE landing site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capanna, Claire; Jorda, Laurent; Lamy, Philippe; Gesquiere, Gilles; Delmas, Cédric; Durand, Joelle; Garmier, Romain; Gaudon, Philippe; Jurado, Eric

    2016-04-01

    The Philae lander aboard the Rosetta spacecraft successfully landed at the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (hereafter 67P/C-G) after two rebounds on November 12, 2014. The final landing site, now known as « Abydos », has been identified on images acquired by the OSIRIS imaging system onboard the Rosetta orbiter[1]. The available images of Abydos are very limited in number and reveal a very extreme topography containing cliffs and overhangs. Furthermore, the surface is only observed under very high incidence angles of 60° on average, which implies that the images also exhibit lots of cast shadows. This makes it very difficult to reconstruct the 3D topography with standard methods such as photogrammetry or standard clinometry. We apply a new method called ''Multiresolution PhotoClinometry by Deformation'' (MPCD, [2]) to retrieve the 3D topography of the area around Abydos. The method works in two main steps: (i) a DTM of this region is extracted from a low resolution MPCD global shape model of comet 67P/C-G, and (ii) the resulting triangular mesh is progressively deformed at increasing spatial sampling down to 0.25 m in order to match a set of 14 images of Abydos with projected pixel scales between 1 and 8 m. The method used to perform the image matching is a quasi-Newton non-linear optimization method called L-BFGS-b[3] especially suited to large-scale problems. Finally, we also checked the compatibility of the final MPCD digital terrain model with a set of five panoramic images obtained by the CIVA-P instrument aboard Philae[4]. [1] Lamy et al., 2016, submitted. [2] Capanna et al., Three dimensional reconstruction using multiresoluton photoclinometry by deformation, The visual Computer, v. 29(6-8) pp. 825-835, 2013. [3] Morales et al., Remark on "Algorithm 778: L-BFGS-B: Fortran subroutines for large-scale bound constrained optimization", v.38(1) pp.1-4, ACM Trans. Math. Softw., 2011 [4] Bibring et al., 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko surface properties as

  3. Can Hounsfield Unit Value Predict Type of Urinary Stones?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Gok

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Aim of this study is to determine the role of Hounsfield unit (HU in predicting results of stone analysis. Material and Method: This study included 199 patients to whom percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL procedures were applied between January 2008 and May 2011 in our clinic. Before the procedure HU values of kidney stones were measured using non-contrast computed tomography. After the operation, obtained stone samples were analysed using X-ray diffraction technique. HU values were compared with stone analysis results. Results: Stone analysis revealed eight different stone types. Distribution of stone types and HU value ranges were as follows: 85% calcium oxalate monohydrate, 730-1130 HU; 38% calcium oxalate dihydrate, 510-810 HU; 21% uric acid, 320-550 HU; 23% struvite, 614-870 HU; 7% calcium hydrogene phosphate, 1100-1365 HU; 3% cystine, 630-674 HU; 15% mixed uric acid plus calcium oxalate, 499-840 HU; and 7% mixed cystine plus calcium phosphate, 430-520 HU. HU values of all stone types ranged between 320 and 1365. There was a statistically significant relation between HU values of uric acid and non uric acid stones (p

  4. Estimating the Rate of Occurrence of Renal Stones in Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, J.; Goodenow, D.; Gokoglu, S.; Kassemi, M.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in urine chemistry, during and post flight, potentially increases the risk of renal stones in astronauts. Although much is known about the effects of space flight on urine chemistry, no inflight incidence of renal stones in US astronauts exists and the question "How much does this risk change with space flight?" remains difficult to accurately quantify. In this discussion, we tackle this question utilizing a combination of deterministic and probabilistic modeling that implements the physics behind free stone growth and agglomeration, speciation of urine chemistry and published observations of population renal stone incidences to estimate changes in the rate of renal stone presentation. The modeling process utilizes a Population Balance Equation based model developed in the companion IWS abstract by Kassemi et al. (2016) to evaluate the maximum growth and agglomeration potential from a specified set of urine chemistry values. Changes in renal stone occurrence rates are obtained from this model in a probabilistic simulation that interrogates the range of possible urine chemistries using Monte Carlo techniques. Subsequently, each randomly sampled urine chemistry undergoes speciation analysis using the well-established Joint Expert Speciation System (JESS) code to calculate critical values, such as ionic strength and relative supersaturation. The Kassemi model utilizes this information to predict the mean and maximum stone size. We close the assessment loop by using a transfer function that estimates the rate of stone formation from combining the relative supersaturation and both the mean and maximum free stone growth sizes. The transfer function is established by a simulation analysis which combines population stone formation rates and Poisson regression. Training this transfer function requires using the output of the aforementioned assessment steps with inputs from known non-stone-former and known stone-former urine chemistries. Established in a Monte Carlo

  5. GIADA onboard Rosetta characterising comet 67/PChuryumov-Gerasimenko dust environment inbound to and outbound from perihelion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Corte, Vincenzo; Rotundi, Alessandra; Fulle, Marco

    2016-07-01

    GIADA (Grain Impact Analyzer and Dust Accumulator) is an in-situ instrument onboard Rosetta monitoring the dust environment of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. GIADA is composed of 3 sub-systems: 1) the Grain Detection System, based on particle detection through light scattering; 2) the Impact Sensor, measuring particle momentum; 3) the Micro-Balances System, constituted of 5 quartz crystal microbalances, providing cumulated dust from different directions. From the combination of the measurements performed by the three subsystems we retrieve: the number, the mass, the momentum, the speed of individual dust particles and the cumulative dust flux emitted from the comet nucleus. We will present the coma dust environment as observed by GIADA during the pre-landing and escort phases of the Rosetta space mission. GIADA was able to detect temporal and spatial variation of dust density distribution and to disentangle different types of impacting dust particles. Specific high dust spatial density sectors of the coma have been identified and their evolution with respect to the heliocentric distance was studied. From August 2014 to December 2015, i.e. inbound, at and outbound perihelion, Rosetta performed different trajectories around the nucleus and flybys with different close approach distances, different coordinates of the sub-spacecraft point and different observing geometry (phase angle), allowed GIADA to characterize the dust environment within the 67P/C-G coma and its temporal variation. Acknowledgements. GIADA was built by a consortium led by the Univ. Napoli "Parthenope" & INAF- Oss. Astr. Capodimonte, IT, in collaboration with the Inst. de Astrofisica de Andalucia, ES, Selex-ES s.p.a. and SENER. GIADA is presently managed & operated by Ist. di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali-INAF, IT. GIADA was funded and managed by the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, IT, with a support of the Spanish Ministry of Education and Science MEC, ES. GIADA was developed from a PI proposal

  6. Renal intratubular crystals and hyaluronan staining occur in stone formers with bypass surgery but not with idiopathic calcium oxalate stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evan, Andrew P; Coe, Fredric L; Gillen, Daniel; Lingeman, James E; Bledsoe, Sharon; Worcester, Elaine M

    2008-03-01

    Whether idiopathic calcium oxalate (CaOx) stone formers form inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) crystal deposits bears on pathogenetic mechanisms of stone formation. In prior work, using light and transmission electron microscopy, we have found no IMCD crystal deposits. Here, we searched serial sections of papillary biopsies from a prior study of 15 idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers, 4 intestinal bypass patients with CaOx stones, and 4 non-stone-forming subjects, and biopsies from an additional hitherto unreported 15 idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers and 1 bypass patient using polarized light oil immersion optics, for deposits overlooked in our original study. We found no IMCD deposits in any of 1,500 serial sections from the 30 idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers, nor in 87 additional sections from a frozen idiopathic calcium oxalate stone former biopsy sample processed without exposure to aqueous solutions. Among 4 of the 5 bypass patients but in none of the 30 idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers or 4 normal stone formers, we found tiny birefringent thin crystalline overlays on scattered IMCD cell membranes. We also found IMCD lumen deposits in two bypass patients that contained mixed birefringent and nonbirefringent crystals, presumably CaOx and apatite. In the bypass patients, we observed focal apical IMCD cell hyaluronan staining, which was absent in idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers. The absence of any IMCD deposits in 1,500 serial sections of biopsies from 30 idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers allows us to place the upper limit on the probability of their occurrence at approximately 0.002 and place the lower limit of their size at the resolution of the optics (crystal lesion.

  7. Drug dosage protocol for calcium oxalate stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marickar, Y M Fazil; Salim, Abiya

    2009-12-01

    In earlier studies, we have confirmed that in most patients with calcium oxalate stone formation, a combination of allopurinol and pyridoxine is best suited for treatment and prevention of the stone forming process. The objective of this study is to identify the most effective directed medical treatment of urinary stones. The drug dose adjustment was based on clinical, radiological, biochemical, and microscopic parameters. 444 patients with proved calcium oxalate stone disease who were getting a combination of allopurinol and pyridoxine for a minimum period of 36 months were enrolled in this prospective study. The dosage schedule of these patients was recorded. Dosage adjustment was made depending upon the various clinical, biochemical, microscopic, and radiological changes during the study period. The dosage schedules were in six categories, namely very high dose chemotherapy (VHDC), i.e. allopurinol 600 mg/day and pyridoxine 240 mg/day, high-dose chemotherapy (HDC), i.e. allopurinol 300 mg/day and pyridoxine 120 mg/day, moderate dose prophylaxis (MDP), i.e. allopurinol 200 mg/day and pyridoxine 80 mg/day, low-dose prophylaxis (LDP), i.e. allopurinol 100 mg/day and pyridoxine 40 mg/day, and very low-dose prophylaxis (VLDP), i.e. allopurinol 50 mg/day and pyridoxine 20 mg/day and intermittent VLDP, wherein the VLDP was given on alternate months and still later at longer intervals. The temporary risk was assessed at each visit and dosage adjustment was made. The effect of the intervention was assessed during the next visit. All the patients involved in the study needed dose adjustment. The following schedules were initiated: VHDC (12) 3.5%, HDC (103) 23.2%, MDP (78) 17.57%, or LDP (251) 56.53%. Patients who defaulted for more than a month were excluded from the study. During each visit for follow up, all patients were advised change over of dose depending upon the clinical situation at the time of review. Patients on VHDC were advised reduction to lower doses

  8. Humidity sorption on natural building stone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, C.; Mirwald, P.

    2003-04-01

    processes, physical, chemical or biological, depend on the presence of water. Like most porous materials building stone respond on humidity by water uptake. The sorption isotherm represents the equilibrium moisture, specific for each material. The determination of the isotherm for stone of low and small porosity like marble is difficult. With the help of a newly developed water sorption analysis chamber [2], which allows the simultaneous measurement of 11 samples, good results on stone/rock samples have been obtained. Even at marble species with pore volumes lower than 0.4 % isotherms are measured. This analytical method offers new insights in the pore behaviour of low porosity materials. The advantages of this technique which supplements other techniques (e.g. BET, Hg-porosimetry) are: i) the testing agent is identical to the weathering agent, water; ii) the atmospheric parameters at the measurement reflect the natural conditions - thus no changes to the material properties have to be considered; iii) due to the small diameter of the water molecule (~0.28 nm), smaller pores are reached than e.g. with N2 (~0.31 nm). Sorption isotherms of sandstone (Baumberg, Obernkirchen, Groeden), granite (Brixen), and marble (Sterzing, Laas) are presented. Particular as to marbles the resolution is considerably higher. A previously observed negative hysteresis [3] seems an effect due to limited data resolution. [1] Snethlage, R. (1984) Steinkonservierung, Bayer. LA Denkmalpflege, Ah. 22, 203 S. [2] Griesser, U.J., Dillenz, J. (2002) Neuartiges, vollautomatisches Feuchtesorptionsprüfgerät mit hohem Probendurchsatz, Feuchtetag 2002, Weimar, 85-93. [3] Fimmel, R. (1996) Verwitterungsverhalten der alpinen Marmore von Laas und Sterzing, Diss. Univ. Ibk, 116 S.

  9. 'Saurashtra stone anchors' (Ring-stones) from Dwarka and Somnath, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaur, A.S.; Sundaresh; Tripati, S.; Gudigar, P.; Bandodkar, S.N.

    that this also could be a lifting device of Grapnel type stone anchors (Raban 2001, Per. Comm.). This sug- gestion may not hold water in view of findings from Somnath. Of the total 44 anchors reported from Somnath, six are composite type and only 3 are grapnel...

  10. Cystone® for 1 year did not change urine chemistry or decrease stone burden in cystine stone formers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Stephen B; Vrtiska, Terri J; Canzanello, Vincent J; Lieske, John C

    2011-06-01

    Cystine kidney stones frequently recur because inadequate prevention exists. We recruited documented recurrent cystine kidney stone formers (6 men, 4 women, 44 ± 17 years) into a 2-phased study to assess safety and effectiveness of Cystone®, a herbal treatment used to prevent and facilitate passage of cystine kidney stones. The first phase was a randomized double-blinded 12 weeks crossover study assessing the effect of Cystone® versus placebo (2 tablets BID) on urinary chemistries. The second phase was an open label 1 year study of Cystone® to determine if renal stone burden decreased, as assessed by quantitative and subjective assessment of CT. There was no statistically significant change of urinary composition from baseline short (6 weeks) or long (52 weeks) term on Cystone®, including volume (2525, 2611, 2730 ml), pH (6.7, 6.7, 7.05), and cystine excretion (2770, 2889, 4025 μmol). Pre and post-CT was available in nine patients. Although seven kidneys lost stones spontaneously or surgically, overall stone burden increased in seven kidneys, was unchanged in nine, and fell in only two. Quantitative scoring increased in both the left and right kidneys (1602-1667 and 301-2064 volumetric units, respectively). Therefore, this study does not suggest that Cystone® has a favorable effect on urinary chemistries that could decrease cystine stone formation, nor does it appear to prevent stone growth or promote stone passage over a 1-year period.

  11. Simulation of calcium oxalate stone in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧阳健明; 姚秀琼; 苏泽轩; 崔福斋

    2003-01-01

    Crystallization of calcium oxalate is studied mainly in the diluted healthy urine using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and is compared with the crystallization in the diluted pathological urine. It suggests that the average sizes of calcium oxalate crystals are not in direct proportion to the concentrations of Ca2+ and Ox2- ions. Only in the concentration range of 0.60-0.90 mmol/L can larger size of CaOx crystals appear. When the concentrations of Ca2+ and Ox2- ions are 1.20, 0.80, 0.60, 0.30 and 0.15 mmol/L in the healthy urine, the average sizes of calcium oxalate crystallites are 9.5 × 6.5, 20.0 × 13.5 and 15.0 μm × 10.0 μm, respectively, for the former three samples after 6 d crystallization. No crystal appears even after 30 d crystallization for the samples of concentrations of 0.30 and 0.15 mmol/L due to their low supersaturations. The results theoretically explain why the probability of stone forming is clinically not in direct proportion to the concentrations of Ca 2+ and Ox2- ions. Laser scattering technology also confirms this point. The reason why healthy human has no risk of urinary stone but stone-formers have is that there are more urinary macromolecules in healthy human urines than that in stone-forming urines. These macromolecules may control the transformation in CaOx crystal structure from monohydrate calcium oxalate (COM) to dihydrate calcium oxalate (COD). COD has a weaker affinity for renal tubule cell membranes than COM. No remarkable effect of the crystallization time is observed on the crystal morphology of CaOx. All the crystals are obtuse hexagon. However, the sizes and the number of CaOx crystals can be affected by the crystallization time. In the early stage of crystallization (1-6 d), the sizes of CaOx crystals increase and the number of crystal particles changes little as increasing the crystallization time due to growth control. In the middle and late stages (6-30 d), the number of crystals increases markedly while the

  12. Arabia: from craters to stone circles

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2010-01-01

    The Arabia Shield has a volcanic nature inside. A region of the Western Saudi Arabia is in fact covered with vast fields of lava known as harraat. These lands are spotted by many stone circles and other quite interesting archaeological remains of the Neolithic period, such as the "desert kites", the hunters used to guide the game across the harrah in some corrals. With Google Maps, we can observe both sceneries, the volcanic nature of the land and a portrait of Arabia during the Neolithic times.

  13. Stone's representation theorem in fuzzy topology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Yingming(刘应明); ZHANG; Dexue(张德学)

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a complete solution to the problem of Stone's repesentation theorem in fuzzy topology is given for a class of completely distributive lattices. Precisely, it is proved that if L is a frame such that 0 ∈ L is a prime or 1 ∈ L is a coprime, then the category of distributive lattices is dually equivalent to the category of coherent L-locales and that if L is moreover completely distributive, then the category of distributive lattices is dually equivalent to the category of coherent stratified L-topological spaces.

  14. Spatial distribution of low-energy plasma around comet 67P/CG from Rosetta measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Edberg, N J T; Odelstad, E; Henri, P; Lebreton, J -P; Gasc, S; Rubin, M; André, M; Gill, R; Johansson, E P G; Johansson, F; Vigren, E; Wahlund, J E; Carr, C M; Cupido, E; Glassmeier, K -H; Goldstein, R; Koenders, C; Mandt, K; Nemeth, Z; Nilsson, H; Richter, I; Wieser, G Stenberg; Szego, K; Volwerk, M

    2016-01-01

    We use measurements from the Rosetta plasma consortium (RPC) Langmuir probe (LAP) and mutual impedance probe (MIP) to study the spatial distribution of low-energy plasma in the near-nucleus coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The spatial distribution is highly structured with the highest density in the summer hemisphere and above the region connecting the two main lobes of the comet, i.e. the neck region. There is a clear correlation with the neutral density and the plasma to neutral density ratio is found to be about 1-2x10^-6, at a cometocentric distance of 10 km and at 3.1 AU from the sun. A clear 6.2 h modulation of the plasma is seen as the neck is exposed twice per rotation. The electron density of the collisonless plasma within 260 km from the nucleus falls of with radial distance as about 1/r. The spatial structure indicates that local ionization of neutral gas is the dominant source of low-energy plasma around the comet.

  15. Inhomogeneities on the surface of 21 Lutetia: the asteroid target of the Rosetta mission

    CERN Document Server

    Perna, D; Lazzarin, M; Magrin, S; Fulchignoni, M; Barucci, M A; Fornasier, S; Marchi, S; Barbieri, C

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXT: In July 2010 the ESA spacecraft Rosetta will fly-by the main belt asteroid 21 Lutetia. Several observations of this asteroid have been so far performed, but its surface composition and nature are still a matter of debate. For long time Lutetia was supposed to have a metallic nature due to its high IRAS albedo. Later on it has been suggested to have a surface composition similar to primitive carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, while further observations proposed a possible genetic link with more evolved enstatite chondrite meteorites. AIMS: In order to give an important contribution in solving the conundrum of the nature of Lutetia, in November 2008 we performed visible spectroscopic observations of this asteroid at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG, La Palma, Spain). METHODS: Thirteen visible spectra have been acquired at different rotational phases. RESULTS: We confirm the presence of a narrow spectral feature at about 0.47-0.48 micron already found by Lazzarin et al. (2009) on the spectra of Lut...

  16. Rosetta:MSF: a modular framework for multi-state computational protein design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupfeld, Enrico; Sterner, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    Computational protein design (CPD) is a powerful technique to engineer existing proteins or to design novel ones that display desired properties. Rosetta is a software suite including algorithms for computational modeling and analysis of protein structures and offers many elaborate protocols created to solve highly specific tasks of protein engineering. Most of Rosetta’s protocols optimize sequences based on a single conformation (i. e. design state). However, challenging CPD objectives like multi-specificity design or the concurrent consideration of positive and negative design goals demand the simultaneous assessment of multiple states. This is why we have developed the multi-state framework MSF that facilitates the implementation of Rosetta’s single-state protocols in a multi-state environment and made available two frequently used protocols. Utilizing MSF, we demonstrated for one of these protocols that multi-state design yields a 15% higher performance than single-state design on a ligand-binding benchmark consisting of structural conformations. With this protocol, we designed de novo nine retro-aldolases on a conformational ensemble deduced from a (βα)8-barrel protein. All variants displayed measurable catalytic activity, testifying to a high success rate for this concept of multi-state enzyme design. PMID:28604768

  17. Characterization of dust aggregates in the vicinity of the Rosetta spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güttler, C.; Hasselmann, P. H.; Li, Y.; Fulle, M.; Tubiana, C.; Kovacs, G.; Agarwal, J.; Sierks, H.; Fornasier, S.; Hofmann, M.; Gutiérrez Marqués, P.; Ott, T.; Drolshagen, E.; Bertini, I.; Barbieri, C.; Lamy, P. L.; Rodrigo, R.; Koschny, D.; Rickman, H.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Barucci, M. A.; Bodewits, D.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Boudreault, S.; Cremonese, G.; Da Deppo, V.; Davidsson, B.; Debei, S.; De Cecco, M.; Deller, J.; Geiger, B.; Groussin, O.; Gutiérrez, P. J.; Hviid, S. F.; Ip, W.-H.; Jorda, L.; Keller, H. U.; Knollenberg, J.; Kramm, J. R.; Kührt, E.; Küppers, M.; Lara, L. M.; Lazzarin, M.; López-Moreno, J. J.; Marzari, F.; Mottola, S.; Naletto, G.; Oklay, N.; Pajola, M.; Shi, X.; Thomas, N.; Vincent, J.-B.

    2017-07-01

    In a Rosetta/OSIRIS imaging activity in 2015 June, we have observed the dynamic motion of particles close to the spacecraft. Due to the focal setting of the OSIRIS wide angle camera, these particles were blurred, which can be used to measure their distances to the spacecraft. We detected 109 dust aggregates over a 130 min long sequence, and find that their sizes are around a millimetre and their distances cluster between 2 and 40 m from the spacecraft. Their number densities are about a factor 10 higher than expected for the overall coma and highly fluctuating. Their velocities are small compared to the spacecraft orbital motion and directed away from the spacecraft, towards the comet. From this we conclude that they have interacted with the spacecraft and assess three possible scenarios. In the likeliest of the three scenarios, centimetre-sized aggregates collide with the spacecraft and we would observe the fragments. Ablation of a dust layer on the spacecraft's z panel (remote instrument viewing direction) when rotated towards the Sun is a reasonable alternative. We could also measure an acceleration for a subset of 18 aggregates, which is directed away from the Sun and can be explain by a rocket effect, which requires a minimum ice fraction of the order of 0.1 per cent.

  18. Special issue editorial - Plasma interactions with Solar System Objects: Anticipating Rosetta, Maven and Mars Orbiter Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, A. J.; Wellbrock, A.; Yamauchi, M.

    2015-12-01

    Within our solar system, the planets, moons, comets and asteroids all have plasma interactions. The interaction depends on the nature of the object, particularly the presence of an atmosphere and a magnetic field. Even the size of the object matters through the finite gyroradius effect and the scale height of cold ions of exospheric origin. It also depends on the upstream conditions, including position within the solar wind or the presence within a planetary magnetosphere. Soon after ESA's Rosetta reached comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, NASA's Maven and ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) reached Mars, and ESA's Venus Express mission was completed, this issue explores our understanding of plasma interactions with comets, Mars, Venus, and moons in the solar system. We explore the processes which characterise the interactions, such as ion pickup and field draping, and their effects such as plasma escape. Papers are based on data from current and recent space missions, modelling and theory, as we explore our local part of the 'plasma universe'.

  19. First albedo determination of 2867 Steins, target of the Rosetta mission

    CERN Document Server

    Fornasier, S; Fulchignoni, M; Barucci, M A; Barbieri, C

    2006-01-01

    We present the first albedo determination of 2867 Steins, the asteroid target o f the Rosetta space mission together with 21 Lutetia. The data were obtained in polarimetric mode at the ESO-VLT telescope with the FORS1 instrument in the V and R filters. Observations were carried out from Jun e to August 2005 covering the phase angle range from 10.3 deg. to 28.3 deg., allowing the determination of the asteroid albedo by the well known experimenta l relationship between the albedo and the slope of the polarimetric curve at th e inversion angle. The measured polarization values of Steins are small, confirming an E-type cla ssification for this asteroid, as already suggested from its spectral propertie s. The inversion angle of the polarization curve in the V and R filters is resp ectively of 17.3 +/-1.5deg. and 18.4+/-1.0 deg., and the corresponding sl ope parameter is of 0.037+/-0.003 %/deg and 0.032+/-0.003 %/deg. On the basis of its polarimetric slope value, we have derived an albedo of 0.45 +/-0.1, that gives...

  20. Vulnerability and fate of a coastal sand dune complex, Rosetta-Idku, northwestern Nile Delta, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Banna, Mahmoud M.

    2008-05-01

    Types, distribution, and origin of recent sand dunes between Rosetta and Idku, in the western sector of the Nile Delta, Egypt were investigated. Sand samples from the dunes, beach, and seafloor were studied for grain size distribution and mineralogical composition. It has been found that most of the dunes in the study area have been subjected to deterioration and removal due to the construction of buildings and the International Coastal Highway. The remnant constitutes a damaged belt of foredunes that extends from El Bouseily village to the west of Idku town. The dune’s origin is interpreted to be the result of coastal drifting and the subsequent transport of sediments of the former Canopic Nile branch eastward by the predominant longshore current and by aeolian processes. The blown sand grains accumulated to form a belt of coastal sand dunes of original longitudinal and crescentic forms. Urbanization of the coast has severely altered the landscape. The study area is considered vulnerable to the impacts of climate change and the expected rise in sea level. The outcome of potential sea level rise is serious; erosion problems are expected to be exacerbated and vast areas from land and property would be lost. Thus, protection and preservation the remaining dunes in the study area are vital requirements for shore protection.

  1. Chemical complexity in protoplanetary disks in the era of ALMA and Rosetta

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Comets provide a unique insight into the molecular composition and complexity of the material in the primordial solar nebula. Recent results from the Rosetta mission, currently monitoring comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in situ, and ALMA (the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array), have demonstrated a tantalising link between the chemical complexity now confirmed in disks (via the detection of gas-phase CH3CN; Oberg et al. 2015) and that confirmed on the surface of 67P (Goesmann et al. 2015), raising questions concerning the chemical origin of such species (cloud or inheritance versus disk synthesis). Results from an astrochemical model of a protoplanetary disk are presented in which complex chemistry is included and in which it is assumed that simple ices only are inherited from the parent molecular cloud. The model results show good agreement with the abundances of several COMs observed on the surface of 67P with Philae/COSAC. Cosmic-ray and X-ray-induced photoprocessing of predominantly simple ices ...

  2. Octarellin VI: using rosetta to design a putative artificial (β/α8 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano Figueroa

    Full Text Available The computational protein design protocol Rosetta has been applied successfully to a wide variety of protein engineering problems. Here the aim was to test its ability to design de novo a protein adopting the TIM-barrel fold, whose formation requires about twice as many residues as in the largest proteins successfully designed de novo to date. The designed protein, Octarellin VI, contains 216 residues. Its amino acid composition is similar to that of natural TIM-barrel proteins. When produced and purified, it showed a far-UV circular dichroism spectrum characteristic of folded proteins, with α-helical and β-sheet secondary structure. Its stable tertiary structure was confirmed by both tryptophan fluorescence and circular dichroism in the near UV. It proved heat stable up to 70°C. Dynamic light scattering experiments revealed a unique population of particles averaging 4 nm in diameter, in good agreement with our model. Although these data suggest the successful creation of an artificial α/β protein of more than 200 amino acids, Octarellin VI shows an apparent noncooperative chemical unfolding and low solubility.

  3. A mechanism for comet surface collapse as observed by Rosetta on 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prialnik, D.; Sierks, H.

    2017-07-01

    We explore a possible mechanism that may explain sudden depressions of surface areas on a comet nucleus, as suggested by observations of the Rosetta mission on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (hereafter, 67P/C-G). Assuming the area is covered by a thin, compact dust layer of low permeability to gas flow compared to deeper, porous layers, gas can accumulate below the surface when a surge of gas release from amorphous ice occurs upon crystallization. The gas pressure is found to exceed the hydrostatic pressure down to a depth of a few metres. The rapid build-up of pressure may weaken the already fragile, highly porous structure. Eventually, the high pressure gradient that arises drives the gas out and the pressure falls well below the hydrostatic pressure. The rapid pressure drop may result in collapse. Since the crystallization front lies at some depth below the surface, the location on the orbit when this phenomenon occurs is determined by the thermal lag, which, in turn, depends on the thermal conductivity. Numerical simulations show that mostly such activity occurs post-perihelion, but it may also occur pre-perihelion. When permeability is uniform, crystallization still causes increased gas production, but the gas pressure inside the nucleus remains below hydrostatic pressure.

  4. ProQ3: Improved model quality assessments using Rosetta energy terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uziela, Karolis; Shu, Nanjiang; Wallner, Björn; Elofsson, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Quality assessment of protein models using no other information than the structure of the model itself has been shown to be useful for structure prediction. Here, we introduce two novel methods, ProQRosFA and ProQRosCen, inspired by the state-of-art method ProQ2, but using a completely different description of a protein model. ProQ2 uses contacts and other features calculated from a model, while the new predictors are based on Rosetta energies: ProQRosFA uses the full-atom energy function that takes into account all atoms, while ProQRosCen uses the coarse-grained centroid energy function. The two new predictors also include residue conservation and terms corresponding to the agreement of a model with predicted secondary structure and surface area, as in ProQ2. We show that the performance of these predictors is on par with ProQ2 and significantly better than all other model quality assessment programs. Furthermore, we show that combining the input features from all three predictors, the resulting predictor ProQ3 performs better than any of the individual methods. ProQ3, ProQRosFA and ProQRosCen are freely available both as a webserver and stand-alone programs at http://proq3.bioinfo.se/. PMID:27698390

  5. Anatomical factors predicting lower calyceal stone clearance after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Khan

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: This study shows that lower infundibular length and width are significant anatomical factors in determining stone clearance following ESWL treatment of lower calyceal stones and these should be assessed before planning the treatment for lower calyceal stones.

  6. Prevalence of renal uric acid stones in the adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinchieri, Alberto; Montanari, Emanuele

    2017-03-03

    The aim of this study was to estimate uric acid renal stone prevalence rates of adults in different countries of the world. PubMed was searched for papers dealing with "urinary calculi and prevalence or composition" for the period from January 1996 to June 2016. Alternative searches were made to collect further information on specific topics. The prevalence rate of uric acid stones was computed by the general renal stone prevalence rate and the frequency of uric acid stones in each country. After the initial search, 2180 papers were extracted. Out of them, 79 papers were selected after the reading of the titles and of the abstracts. For ten countries, papers relating to both the renal stone prevalence in the general population and the frequency of uric stones were available. Additional search produced 13 papers that completed information on 11 more countries in 5 continents. Estimated prevalence rate of uric acid stones was >0.75% in Thailand, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Iran, South Africa (white population), United States and Australia; ranged 0.50-0.75% in Turkey, Israel, Italy, India (Southern), Spain, Taiwan, Germany, Brazil; and uric acid stone formation. A hot and dry climate increases fluid losses reducing urinary volume and urinary pH. A diet rich in meat protein causes low urinary pH and increased uric acid excretion. On the other hand, uric acid stone formation is frequently associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome and diabetes type 2 that are linked to dietary energy excess mainly from carbohydrate and saturated fat and also present with low urine pH values. An epidemic of uric acid stone formation could be if current nutritional trends will be maintained both in developed countries and in developing countries and the areas of greater climatic risk for the formation of uric acid stones will enlarge as result of the "global warming".

  7. Determination of solution structures of proteins up to 40 kDa using CS-Rosetta with sparse NMR data from deuterated samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Oliver F; Rossi, Paolo; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G; Song, Yifan; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Aramini, James M; Ertekin, Asli; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas B; Montelione, Gaetano T; Baker, David

    2012-07-03

    We have developed an approach for determining NMR structures of proteins over 20 kDa that utilizes sparse distance restraints obtained using transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopy experiments on perdeuterated samples to guide RASREC Rosetta NMR structure calculations. The method was tested on 11 proteins ranging from 15 to 40 kDa, seven of which were previously unsolved. The RASREC Rosetta models were in good agreement with models obtained using traditional NMR methods with larger restraint sets. In five cases X-ray structures were determined or were available, allowing comparison of the accuracy of the Rosetta models and conventional NMR models. In all five cases, the Rosetta models were more similar to the X-ray structures over both the backbone and side-chain conformations than the "best effort" structures determined by conventional methods. The incorporation of sparse distance restraints into RASREC Rosetta allows routine determination of high-quality solution NMR structures for proteins up to 40 kDa, and should be broadly useful in structural biology.

  8. 一种利用噬菌体裂解大肠杆菌 Rosetta 菌株菌体的方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷琎; 孙宇杰; 于达; 李胜菊; 林连兵

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli Rosetta 菌株是基因克隆表达的重要宿主菌,为了探索裂解 E.coli Rosetta 菌体的新方法,从污水中分离到1株能裂解 E.coli Rosetta 菌株的噬菌体,命名为 ETP -1,并研究其生物学特性和裂解效率。结果表明, EPT -1在双层平板上形成直径为1~3 mm 的噬菌斑;噬菌斑透明,周围有晕环;该噬菌体的潜伏期为20min,裂解期为70 min,在55℃以上以及 pH 值大于11时,噬菌体失去活性。在6 h 内,噬菌体可裂解73%的 E.coli Rosetta 菌体, ETP -1裂解其宿主细胞为 E.coli Rosetta 菌株菌体的破碎提供了新的方法。

  9. Operational properties of nanomodified stone mastic asphalt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inozemtsev Sergey Sergeevich

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to prolong the lifetime and to improve the quality of pavements made of asphalt concrete it is necessary to apply innovative solutions in the process of design of such building materials. In order to solve the problem of low durability of asphalt concrete a modifier was proposed, which consists of diatomite, iron hydroxide sol (III and silica sol. Application of the diatomite with nanoscale layer of nanomodifier allows getting a stone mastic asphalt, which has high values of physical and mechanical properties and allows refusing from expensive stabilizing additive. Mineral filler was replaced by diatomite, which has been modified by iron hydroxide sol (III and silica sol. Modified diatomite allows sorption of bitumen and increase the cohesive strength and resistance to shear at positive temperatures. The modified asphalt has higher resistance to rutting at high temperature, abrasion resistance at low temperature and impact of climatic factors: alternate freezing and thawing, wetting-drying, UV and IR radiations. It is achieved by formation of solid and dense bitumen film at the phase interface and controlling the content of light fractions of the bitumen. The modifier consists of sol of iron hydroxide, which blocks the oxidation and polymerization of bitumen during operation. The proposed material allows controlling the initial structure formation of stone mastic asphalt. It was shown that modern test methods allow assessing the durability of asphalt in the design phase compositions.

  10. Smartphone Sensors for Stone Lithography Authentication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirripa Spagnolo, Giuseppe; Cozzella, Lorenzo; Papalillo, Donato

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays mobile phones include quality photo and video cameras, access to wireless networks and the internet, GPS assistance and other innovative systems. These facilities open them to innovative uses, other than the classical telephonic communication one. Smartphones are a more sophisticated version of classic mobile phones, which have advanced computing power, memory and connectivity. Because fake lithographs are flooding the art market, in this work, we propose a smartphone as simple, robust and efficient sensor for lithograph authentication. When we buy an artwork object, the seller issues a certificate of authenticity, which contains specific details about the artwork itself. Unscrupulous sellers can duplicate the classic certificates of authenticity, and then use them to “authenticate” non-genuine works of art. In this way, the buyer will have a copy of an original certificate to attest that the “not original artwork” is an original one. A solution for this problem would be to insert a system that links together the certificate and the related specific artwork. To do this it is necessary, for a single artwork, to find unique, unrepeatable, and unchangeable characteristics. In this article we propose an innovative method for the authentication of stone lithographs. We use the color spots distribution captured by means of a smartphone camera as a non-cloneable texture of the specific artworks and an information management system for verifying it in mobility stone lithography. PMID:24811077

  11. River pollution caused by natural stone industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktriani, Ani; Darmajanti, Linda; Soesilo, Tri Edhi Budhi

    2017-03-01

    The natural stone industry is classified as small industry. Current wastewater treatment still causes pollution in the river. This thesis aims to analyze the performance of wastewater treatment in natural stones industry. The data was collected from water quality test (parameters: temperature, pH, DO, and TSS). The wastewater treatment performance was in a slightly higher position compared to the 2nd class quality standards of Government Regulation No. 82/2001. The parameter that exceeded quality standards was the concentration of TSS, which was up to 240.8 mg/l. The high concentration of TSS was affected by the absence of sludge management schedule, which resulted in non-optimal precipitation. Besides that, the design of sedimentation basin was still not adapted with wastewater debit. Referring to the results, this study suggests the government of Cirebon District to provide wastewater treatment development through the village staff. Furthermore, the government also needs to give strict punishment to business owner who does not treat waste correctly and does not have a business license. Moreover, the sale value of sludge as byproduct of wastewater treatment needs to be increased.

  12. Diagnosis and management of bile stone disease and its complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Anneline; Arvanitakis, Marianna

    2016-03-01

    Bile stone disease is one of the most prevalent gastroenterological diseases with a considerable geographical and ethnic variation. Bile stones can be classified according their origin, their localization and their biochemical structure. Development and clinical expression depend on a complex interaction between congenital and acquired risk factors. Indeed, bile stones can be either asymptomatic, or cause biliary colic or complications such as acute cholecystitis, jaundice, cholangitis and acute pancreatitis. Diagnosis is based on a combination of clinical features, laboratory findings and imaging techniques and correct identification of symptomatic gallstone patients is essential before cholecystectomy. Transabdominal ultrasonography is the gold standard for the diagnosis of gallstones. However, endoscopic ultrasonography, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and intraoperative cholangiography may also play a role in the diagnosis of bile stones. Management includes prevention measures against modifiable risk factors. Biliary colic and acute cholecystitis are common indications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, while endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy and stone extraction is the gold standard for the treatment of common bile duct (CBD) stones. Timing of ERCP and cholecystectomy are of critical importance in the management. Lithotripsy modalities are generally reserved for patients with technically difficult CBD stone removal. Percutaneous access combined with lithotripsy may be helpful for complicated intrahepatic stones.

  13. French City Calais Shows Great Appetite for Chinese Stone Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Hao

    2005-01-01

    @@ A French government delegation headed by the President of the Municipal Planning & Design Bureau of Calais City and Mr. Han Guogang, President of France China International Development Institution investigated Chinese stone materials market during April 28 to April 29, they showed great interest in some stone materials in good quality such as "China Black".

  14. Flow and edge scour in current adjacent to stone covers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Thor U.; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Bøgelund, Jon;

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation on edge scour adjacent to a stone cover laid on a sandy bed. The three-dimensional flow over the edge of the stone layer has been investigated by the use of particle image velocimetry. The flow measurements show a significant amount...

  15. Physicochemical analysis of urinary stones from Dharmapuri district

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslin Shamema, A.; Thanigai Arul, K.; Senthil Kumar, R.; Narayana Kalkura, S.

    2015-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a common disease caused by the multifactorial components such as geographical location, bacterial infection, low urine volume, and low intake of water. This disease induces severe metabolic abnormalities in the human body. As the prevalence of this disease was high in Dharmapuri district located in Tamil Nadu, urinary stones removed from the patients pertaining to this district were collected and to identify the toxic elements present in the stones. The presence of functional groups and phases of the stones were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The majority of stones were found to be calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and mixed stones having minor existence of struvite and uric acid. Hexagonal shaped COM crystals, needle shaped uric acid crystals and layered arrangement of struvite crystals in the core region were revealed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) was used to determine the thermal stability and the hardness of the stone which was measured using Vickers hardness (HV). The presence of toxic elements in stones such as zirconium and mercury was identified using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The EDS analysis showed higher concentration of zirconium in the core region compared to the periphery. The percentage of zirconium was relatively high compared to other toxic elements in the stones. The Vickers hardness results indicated that high HV values in the core region than the periphery and this might be due to the presence of zirconium.

  16. Imaging-based logics for ornamental stone quality chart definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Gargiulo, Aldo; Serranti, Silvia; Raspi, Costantino

    2007-02-01

    Ornamental stone products are commercially classified on the market according to several factors related both to intrinsic lythologic characteristics and to their visible pictorial attributes. Sometimes these latter aspects prevail in quality criteria definition and assessment. Pictorial attributes are in any case also influenced by the performed working actions and the utilized tools selected to realize the final stone manufactured product. Stone surface finishing is a critical task because it can contribute to enhance certain aesthetic features of the stone itself. The study was addressed to develop an innovative set of methodologies and techniques able to quantify the aesthetic quality level of stone products taking into account both the physical and the aesthetical characteristics of the stones. In particular, the degree of polishing of the stone surfaces and the presence of defects have been evaluated, applying digital image processing strategies. Morphological and color parameters have been extracted developing specific software architectures. Results showed as the proposed approaches allow to quantify the degree of polishing and to identify surface defects related to the intrinsic characteristics of the stone and/or the performed working actions.

  17. Radiopaque intrahepatic duct stones in plain radiograph: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Young; Suh, Chang Hae; Park, Chan Sup; Chung, Won Kyun [College of Medicine, Inha University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    We experienced 3 cases of intrahepatic duct stones detected on plain radiographs. The patients had history of multiple episodes of recurrent cholangitis. Radiographic characteristics of these stones included multiple, round or rectangular radiopaque densities surrounded by calcified rim; these densities showed a branching pattern along the intrahepatic ducts.

  18. The Neolithic Stone Implements of China: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Chi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Ground stone tools are characteristic of the Neolithic period in China. This article provides a general review of this material, encompassing raw material choices, geographical distribution, and the forms and functions of implements. This review provides a basis for inferring something about the social, economic and political conditions in which stone tools were produced and used at this time.

  19. Durability and Testing of Stone for use in Rubblemound structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magoon, O.T.; Baird, W.F.; Ahrends, J.P.;

    1993-01-01

    Rubblemound structures protected from wave action by a layer of quarried rock (stones) are the most common form of breakwaters. While extensive guidelines and procedures exist to select the size of stone there is very little information available on procedures to be followed to assure the quality...

  20. Anatomical factors predicting lower calyceal stone clearance after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Persistent stone fragments ≥6 months after the completion of treatment was defined as ... SPSS version 15.0 was utilized for all statistical analysis. ... Infundibulopelvic (IP) angle had no statistically significant effect on stone-free rate (p = 0.1).

  1. High carbonate level of apatite in kidney stones implies infection, but is it predictive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, Kate M; McAteer, James A; Lingeman, James E; Williams, James C

    2013-10-01

    The presence of infectious microorganisms in urinary stones is commonly inferred from stone composition, especially by the presence of struvite in a stone. The presence of highly carbonated apatite has also been proposed as a marker of the presence of bacteria within a stone. We retrospectively studied 368 patients who had undergone percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL), and who also had culture results for both stone and urine. Urine culture showed no association with stone mineral content, but stone culture was more often positive in struvite-containing stones (73 % positive) and majority apatite stones (65 %) than in other stone types (54 %, lower than the others, P carbonate content of apatite could be measured, carbonate in the apatite was weakly predictive of positive stone culture with an optimal cutoff value of 13.5 % carbonate (sensitivity 0.61, specificity 0.80). In positive cultures of stones (all mineral types combined), organisms that characteristically produce urease were present in 71 % of the cases, with no difference in this proportion among different types of stone. In summary, the type of mineral in the stone was predictive of positive stone culture, but this correlation is imperfect, as over half of non-struvite, non-apatite stones were found to harbor culturable organisms. We conclude that mineral type is an inadequate predictor of whether a stone contains infectious organisms, and that stone culture is more likely to provide information useful to the management of patients undergoing PCNL.

  2. In vitro study of transmission of bacteria from contaminated metal models to stone models via impressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sofou, A.; Larsen, T.; Öwall, B.

    2002-01-01

    Dental impression, stone model, bacterial contamination, cross-infection, dental clinic, dental laboratory......Dental impression, stone model, bacterial contamination, cross-infection, dental clinic, dental laboratory...

  3. Lioz: The Stone that made Lisbon reborn - A Global Heritage Stone Resource Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Luis

    2017-04-01

    Lioz: The Stone that made Lisbon reborn - A Global Heritage Stone Resource Proposal Explored since the Roman Period, the Lioz (Cenomanian age microcrystalline fossiliferous limestone) is the main stone used in the buildings and monuments of Lisbon. After the great cataclysm of 1755 (earthquake, tsunami and fire) of 1755, the already known great quality and the near occurrence of these limestones were wisely used in the great reconstruction of the "Capital do Império" (Capital of the Empire). At the time, Lisbon was one of the largest European cities and great business center of the World, so the necessary and urgent reconstruction was not so difficult to start. Sebastião José de Carvalho e Melo, better known as "Marquês de Pombal", Secretary of King José I, successfully took up the challenge of rebuilding Lisbon. Inside the actual Portuguese capital geographical limits, several quarries of the Cretaceous limestone were explored; some still exist and are classified as geomonuments (i.e., Rio Seco Geomonument, 38 ° 42'21 .67''N; 9 ° 11 '30.37''W). As the City boundaries expanded, the quarries stopped and now there is no one asset in Lisbon. The most important exploitation and processing Lioz stone center was situated in Pêro Pinheiro, 20 km NW of Lisbon. Most of the stones used in the National Palace-Convent of Mafra (1717) belongs to the four main types of Lioz (the cream/white "Abancado", the pink/dark pink "Encarnadão", the yellow "Amarelo de Negrais" and the blueish grey "Azulino"), either cut "against" (perpendicular to the bedding plane) or "along" (parallel to the bedding plane). The orientation stone cut deeply controls texture and mechanical properties of the rocks that behaves as different ones were considered. In the last two decades, the Lioz extraction was almost extinguished. However, some of the old quarries was reactivated and produces first quality blocks needed both for new works and restoration of historic buildings and monuments. The

  4. The S.T.O.N.E. Score: A new assessment tool to predict stone free rates in ureteroscopy from pre-operative radiological features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson R. Molina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop a user friendly system (S.T.O.N.E. Score to quantify and describe stone characteristics provided by computed axial tomography scan to predict ureteroscopy outcomes and to evaluate the characteristics that are thought to affect stone free rates. Materials and Methods: The S.T.O.N.E. score consists of 5 stone characteristics: (Size, (Topography (location of stone, (Obstruction, (Number of stones present, and (Evaluation of Hounsfield Units. Each component is scored on a 1-3 point scale. The S.T.O.N.E. Score was applied to 200 rigid and flexible ureteroscopies performed at our institution. A logistic model was applied to evaluate our data for stone free rates (SFR. Results: SFR were found to be correlated to S.T.O.N.E. Score. As S.T.O.N.E. Score increased, the SFR decreased with a logical regression trend (p 90% and typically falls off by 10% per point thereafter. Conclusions: The S.T.O.N.E. Score is a novel assessment tool to predict SFR in patients who require URS for the surgical therapy of ureteral and renal stone disease. The features of S.T.O.N.E. are relevant in predicting SFR with URS. Size, location, and degree of hydronephrosis were statistically significant factors in multivariate analysis. The S.T.O.N.E. Score establishes the framework for future analysis of the treatment of urolithiasis.

  5. Temporally variable macroinvertebrate-stone relationships in streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, D.

    2005-01-01

    Stones were used to sample macroinvertebrates and characterise microhabitats at monthly or bimonthly intervals in six Ecuadorian streams covering a gradient in four different stability measures and other stream characteristics. The physical variables current velocity, water depth, horizontal...... of families vs. individuals) were related to the physical characteristics of individual stone habitats. My second objective was to quantify temporal variability in fauna-stone relationships and to analyse if such variability was related to overall stability of stream reaches. Partial Least Squares (PLS......) multiple regression analyses showed high temporal variability between sampling dates in factor loadings of specific stone micro habitat variables. In spite of this, there was a clear negative effect of depth and a positive effect of current on density and number of families. Stone size was consistently...

  6. Deterioration Types of Stones Used in Suleymaniye Mosque (Istanbul, Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alptekin Bilen, Candan; Erisis, Sinem; Er, Selman; Yilmaz, Murat; Angi, Serkan; Tugrul, Atiye

    2016-10-01

    Suleymaniye Mosque located in the historic peninsula of Istanbul, is one of the most important monument of classical Ottoman Architecture. Different types of natural stones having varied lithological characteristics were used in the mosque. Chemical composition, mineralogical, petrographic characteristics and external conditions such as atmospheric effects, earthquake and human impacts have deteriorated these stones over time. The aim of this study is to investigate different natural stones and their deterioration types used in Suleymaniye Mosque. According to the results obtained, generally different types of granites, marbles, limestones, pudding stones, porphyry, serpentinite were used in Suleymaniye Mosque. Detachment, material loss, biological colonization, discoloration and deposits have been determined as a deterioration types on these stones.

  7. Use of hemiacidrin in management of infection stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoy, N J; Stamey, T A

    1976-12-01

    Unless all fragments are removed at the time of surgery for struvite stones a high incidence of recurrent infection and stone formation is likely. To reduce the recurrence rate of such stones the renal pelvis is irrigated postoperatively with 10 per cent hemiacidrin solution for at least 48 hours or until all fragments have been dissolved. We have managed successfully 35 patients (36 kidneys) without enxountering any complications. Included in our most recent series are 2 patients with solitary kidneys who had successful dissolution of stone fragments. Absolute contraindications to the use of hemiacidrin are infected urine, fever or flank discomfort. Although we have found hemiacidrin dissolution of renal stones to be safe and effective it is essential that the clinician be aware of the proper technique and its possible complications.

  8. Method of proportioning stone to stowing installations underground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szafarczyk, J.; Kubek, F.

    1992-07-01

    Reviews types of stowing intallations and the technology of supplying after-washing stone used. It is recommended to take advantage of downward inclined stowing pipeline sections for underground feeding of the stowing stone. Calculation of the mass of stone fed to a stowing pipeline is explained. First experience of using the method in the Jankowice black coal mine in 1991 is reported on. About 8,000 t of stone were stowed using the method during 7 months. The stowing installation consists of a tippler, a belt conveyor and a batcher of about 10 m[sup 3]. The capacity of the installation is 30 m[sup 3]/h. Suitable proportions of slag-crushed stone mixtures are recommended.

  9. A Stone Resource Assignment Model under the Fuzzy Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Yao

    2012-01-01

    to tackle a stone resource assignment problem with the aim of decreasing dust and waste water emissions. On the upper level, the local government wants to assign a reasonable exploitation amount to each stone plant so as to minimize total emissions and maximize employment and economic profit. On the lower level, stone plants must reasonably assign stone resources to produce different stone products under the exploitation constraint. To deal with inherent uncertainties, the object functions and constraints are defuzzified using a possibility measure. A fuzzy simulation-based improved simulated annealing algorithm (FS-ISA is designed to search for the Pareto optimal solutions. Finally, a case study is presented to demonstrate the practicality and efficiency of the model. Results and a comparison analysis are presented to highlight the performance of the optimization method, which proves to be very efficient compared with other algorithms.

  10. IUD migration into bladder and stone formation on it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Haidari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background : Ectopic migration of IUD into bladder and urethra with subsequent formation of ston on it is among the rare complications of IUD .Two women, 38 and 45years old with recurrent bladder stone due to their IUDs inserted 5-6 years before were admitted with urinary irritation symptoms .In primary cystoscopy , no trace was found of either IUDs or their penetration into the stones . The stones were broken by electrohydraulic , however with further observation in the subsequent admissions and a thorough investigation , it was realized that the IUD prong had penetrated about 0.5 cm into bladder and formed stones . Since the IUDs could not be removed by cystoscope, in order to prevent the next recurrence and formation of cystovaginal fistula, the IUDs and stones were removed by cystostomy. In a two- year follow –up no complications were reported .

  11. Extracorporeal piezoelectric lithotripsy for retained bile duct stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J; Adamek, H E; Riemann, J F

    1992-05-01

    Extracorporeal piezoelectric shock wave lithotripsy (EPL) was performed in 35 patients with endoscopically non-extractable stones. With this lithotripter, stones are visualized by ultrasound and shock waves are produced by a piezoelectric acoustic generator. The stones could be localized in 32 out of 35 patients. Fragmentation was achieved in 91.4% and complete stone removal in 77.1%. These results show that piezoelectric lithotripsy is also a useful method for the treatment of complicated bile duct stones, as already demonstrated for the electrohydraulically and electromagnetically generated shock waves systems. The piezoelectric system is especially useful in elderly and frail patients because no general anesthesia is needed and only 14% of cases require analgesia or sedation.

  12. Algal 'greening' and the conservation of stone heritage structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Nick A; Viles, Heather A; Ahmad, Samin; McCabe, Stephen; Smith, Bernard J

    2013-01-01

    In humid, temperate climates, green algae can make a significant contribution to the deterioration of building stone, both through unsightly staining ('greening') and, possibly, physical and chemical transformations. However, very little is known about the factors that influence the deteriorative impact and spatial distribution of green algal biofilms, hindering attempts to model the influence of climate change on building conservation. To address this problem, we surveyed four sandstone heritage structures in Belfast, UK. Our research had two aims: 1) to investigate the relationships between greening and the deterioration of stone structures and 2) to assess the impacts of environmental factors on the distribution of green biofilms. We applied an array of analytical techniques to measure stone properties indicative of deterioration status (hardness, colour and permeability) and environmental conditions related to algal growth (surface and sub-surface moisture, temperature and surface texture). Our results indicated that stone hardness was highly variable but only weakly related to levels of greening. Stone that had been exposed for many years was, on average, darker and greener than new stone of the same type, but there was no correlation between greening and darkening. Stone permeability was higher on 'old', weathered stone but not consistently related to the incidence of greening. However, there was evidence to suggest that thick algal biofilms were capable of reducing the ingress of moisture. Greening was negatively correlated with point measurements of surface temperature, but not moisture or surface texture. Our findings suggested that greening had little impact on the physical integrity of stone; indeed the influence of algae on moisture regimes in stone may have a broadly bioprotective action. Furthermore, the relationship between moisture levels and greening is not straightforward and is likely to be heavily dependent upon temporal patterns in moisture

  13. Determinants of brushite stone formation: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roswitha Siener

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The occurrence of brushite stones has increased during recent years. However, the pathogenic factors driving the development of brushite stones remain unclear. METHODS: Twenty-eight brushite stone formers and 28 age-, sex- and BMI-matched healthy individuals were enrolled in this case-control study. Anthropometric, clinical, 24 h urinary parameters and dietary intake from 7-day weighed food records were assessed. RESULTS: Pure brushite stones were present in 46% of patients, while calcium oxalate was the major secondary stone component. Urinary pH and oxalate excretion were significantly higher, whereas urinary citrate was lower in patients as compared to healthy controls. Despite lower dietary intake, urinary calcium excretion was significantly higher in brushite stone patients. Binary logistic regression analysis revealed pH>6.50 (OR 7.296; p = 0.035, calcium>6.40 mmol/24 h (OR 25.213; p = 0.001 and citrate excretion <2.600 mmol/24 h (OR 15.352; p = 0.005 as urinary risk factors for brushite stone formation. A total of 56% of patients exhibited distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA. Urinary pH, calcium and citrate excretion did not significantly differ between patients with or without dRTA. CONCLUSIONS: Hypercalciuria, a diminished citrate excretion and an elevated pH turned out to be the major urinary determinants of brushite stone formation. Interestingly, urinary phosphate was not associated with urolithiasis. The increased urinary oxalate excretion, possibly due to decreased calcium intake, promotes the risk of mixed stone formation with calcium oxalate. Neither dietary factors nor dRTA can account as cause for hypercalciuria, higher urinary pH and diminished citrate excretion. Further research is needed to define the role of dRTA in brushite stone formation and to evaluate the hypothesis of an acquired acidification defect.

  14. Contrasting histopathology and crystal deposits in kidneys of idiopathic stone formers who produce hydroxy apatite, brushite, or calcium oxalate stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evan, Andrew P; Lingeman, James E; Worcester, Elaine M; Sommer, Andre J; Phillips, Carrie L; Williams, James C; Coe, Fredric L

    2014-04-01

    Our previous work has shown that stone formers who form calcium phosphate (CaP) stones that contain any brushite (BRSF) have a distinctive renal histopathology and surgical anatomy when compared with idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers (ICSF). Here we report on another group of idiopathic CaP stone formers, those forming stone containing primarily hydroxyapatite, in order to clarify in what ways their pathology differs from BRSF and ICSF. Eleven hydroxyapatite stone formers (HASF) (2 males, 9 females) were studied using intra-operative digital photography and biopsy of papillary and cortical regions to measure tissue changes associated with stone formation. Our main finding is that HASF and BRSF differ significantly from each other and that both differ greatly from ICSF. Both BRSF and ICSF patients have significant levels of Randall's plaque compared with HASF. Intra-tubular deposit number is greater in HASF than BRSF and nonexistent in ICSF while deposit size is smaller in HASF than BRSF. Cortical pathology is distinctly greater in BRSF than HASF. Four attached stones were observed in HASF, three in 25 BRSF and 5-10 per ICSF patient. HASF and BRSF differ clinically in that both have higher average urine pH, supersaturation of CaP, and calcium excretion than ICSF. Our work suggests that HASF and BRSF are two distinct and separate diseases and both differ greatly from ICSF.

  15. The effect of inclined position on stone free rates in patients with lower caliceal stones during SWL session

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basri Cakiroglu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the outcomes of shock wave lithotripsy (SWL combined with inclined position and SWL alone in patients with lower pole calyx stones. Methods: Seven hundred forty patients who underwent SWL treatment for lower pole renal stones with a total diameter of 2 cm or less were prospectively randomized into two groups. They were comparable in terms of age, sex, and stone diameters. Patients with lower calyceal stones (4-20 mm were randomized to SWL (368 patients or SWL with simultaneous inclination (372 patients with 30o head down Trendelenburg position. Shock wave and session numbers were standardized according to stone size. Additional standardized shock waves were given to patients with stone fragments determined by kidney urinary bladder film and ultrasound at weeks 1, 4, 10. Results: The overall stone free rate (SFR was 73% (268/368 in patients with SWL alone and 81% (300/372 in SWL with inclination at the end of 12th week (p = 0.015. No significant adverse events were noted in both treatment groups. Conclusion: Simultaneous inclination of patients during SWL session increase SFR in lower caliceal stones significantly compared to SWL treatment alone.

  16. Consolidation of degraded ornamental porous limestone stone by calcium carbonate precipitation induced by the microbiota inhabiting the stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Lopez, C; Rodriguez-Navarro, C; Piñar, G; Carrillo-Rosúa, F J; Rodriguez-Gallego, M; Gonzalez-Muñoz, M T

    2007-08-01

    Although it has already been shown that calcareous stone can be consolidated by using a bacterially inoculated culture medium, a more user-friendly method is the in situ application of a sterile culture medium that is able to activate, among the microbial community of the stone, those bacteria with a potential for calcium carbonate precipitation. In order to test this new method for stone consolidation, non-sterilized decayed porous limestone was immersed in sterile nutritional media. Results were compared to those of the runs in which stone sterilized prior to the treatment was used. The effects of the microbial community on stone consolidation were determined by recording the evolution of the culture media chemistry. The treated stone was tested for mechanical resistance and porosity. Results demonstrate that the tested media were able to activate bacteria from the microbial community of the stone. As a consequence of the growth of these bacteria, an alkalinization occurred that resulted in calcium carbonate precipitation. The new precipitate was compatible with the substrate and consolidated the stone without pore plugging. Therefore, a good candidate to in situ consolidate decayed porous limestone is the application of a sterile culture medium with the characteristics specified in the present study.

  17. Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M.; Edwards, T. A.; Roberts, K. B.

    2013-10-02

    A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium

  18. Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M.; Roberts, K. A.; Edwards, T. B.

    2014-02-28

    A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium

  19. Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M.; Roberts, K. A.; Edwards, T. B.

    2013-09-17

    A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium

  20. First geological mapping of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko nucleus from Rosetta mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massironi, M.; Cremonese, G.; Giacomini, L.; Pajola, M.; Marchi, S.; Besse, S.; Thomas, N.; Vincent, J.-B.; Barucci, M. A.; Bertini, I.; Ferri, F.; Fornasier, S.; Lazzarin, M.; Magrin, S.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Marzari, F.; Snodgrass, C.; Naletto, G.; Barbieri, C.; Sierks, H.

    2014-04-01

    Up to date several cometary nuclei have been observed at different resolutions: 9P/Tempel 1 (up to 10 m/pixel), 19P/Borrelly (up to 47 m/pixel) 103P/Hartley 2 (up to 7m/pixel), 81/Wild2 (up to 14 m/pixel). These observations have revealed that geology and geomorphology of cometary nuclei are extremely variable but with several recurrent features such as spike/pitted and mottled terrains, flat floored craters, smooth and flat surfaces, mesas, ridges and troughs (e.g. [1], [2]). The great inhomogeneity of cometary surfaces is thought to be mostly due to different degree of repeated sublimation which leads to planation, slope retreats, development of lag deposits of variable thickness, focused ablation on pits, smoothening, widening and degradation of impact craters. Jet activity has been instead seen associated to rough areas and mounds on 103P/Hartley 2 comet [3], [4]. Finally layered terrains (recognized on 9P/Tempel 1 [5]), fractures, pits and faults can give important hints on the geological evolution of the body since they might reflect primordial aggregation (potentially defining boundaries of "cometesimals" sensu [6]) as well as later thermal and impacting evolution. All these geomorphological features are prone to modifications due to cometary activity, while the comet is approaching the Sun. The Rosetta mission, following the comet along its path towards the Sun will give the unique opportunity of realizing detailed geological maps with the aim of defining primary stratigraphic and structural relationships among geological bodies as well as monitoring surface changes. In particular on August 2nd, 2014, the Rosetta far approach trajectory towards 67P/C-G, will end up reaching a distance from the comet surface of about 720 km. At this time, the 67P/C-G nucleus will be imaged through 288 OSIRIS-Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) pixels covering its diameter with a spatial resolution of 13 m. From August 3rd, up to August 31st, i.e. during the Comet Approach Trajectory

  1. GIADA on-board Rosetta: comet 67P/C-G dust coma characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotundi, Alessandra; Della Corte, Vincenzo; Fulle, Marco; Sordini, Roberto; Ivanovski, Stavro; Accolla, Mario; Ferrari, Marco; Lucarelli, Francesca; Zakharov, Vladimir; Mazzotta Epifani, Elena; López-Moreno, José J.; Rodríguez, Julio; Colangeli, Luigi; Palumbo, Pasquale; Bussoletti, Ezio; Crifo, Jean-Francois; Esposito, Francesca; Green, Simon F.; Grün, Eberhard; Lamy, Philippe L.

    2015-04-01

    complete set of dust grain parameters, i.e., mass, speed, and geometrical cross-section. These detections allowed us to constraint the grain density. The GIADA detections type was studied as a function of the observational geometrical configuration. Acknowledgments: GIADA was built by a consortium led by the Univ. Napoli "Parthenope" & INAF- Oss. Astr. Capodimonte, in collaboration with the Inst. de Astrofisica de Andalucia, Selex-ES, FI and SENER. GIADA is presently managed & operated by Ist. di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali-INAF, IT. GIADA was funded and managed by the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, IT, with the support of the Spanish Ministry of Education and Science MEC, ES. GIADA was developed from a PI proposal from the University of Kent; sci. & tech. contribution were provided by CISAS, IT, Lab. d'Astr. Spat., FR, and Institutions from UK, IT, FR, DE and USA. We thank the RSGS/ESAC, RMOC/ESOC & Rosetta Project/ESTEC for their outstanding work. Science support provided was by NASA through the US Rosetta Project managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology. GIADA calibrated data will be available through ESA's PSA web site (www.rssd.esa.int/index.php?project=PSA&page=in dex). We would like to thank Angioletta Coradini for her contribution as a GIADA Co-I.

  2. Analysis of archaeological precious stones from Slovenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Šmit, Ž. [Facully of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana (Slovenia); Fajfar, H. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jeršsek, M. [Slovenian Museum of Natural History, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Knific, T. [National Museum of Slovenia, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kržic, A. [Higher Vocational Centre, Sezana (Slovenia); Lux, J. [Institute for the Protection of Cultural Heritage of Slovenia, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2013-07-01

    Full text: Precious stones have been attractive pieces of jewelry since ancient times. However, due to the limited sources of origin, the quality of applied items mainly depended on long-range commercial relations, but also on fashion. In Antiquity and Late Antiquity, stones much used and sought for were emeralds and garnets. In Slovenia, emeralds are typically related to the early Roman period and are incorporated in the finds of gold jewelry from the graves. Emerald is generally beryl colored by admixture of chromium, though green colors can also be due to admixtures of iron or vanadium. Garnets were increasingly used by various nations of the People Migration period, and mounted in gilded silver or gold objects by 'cloisonne' or 'en cabochon' techniques. In Slovenia, numerous jewelry items containing garnets were found in the graves and in post-Roman fortified settlements. Geologically, according to the admixtures of metal ions, the garnets are divided into several species, while the most common among archaeological finds are almandines and pyropes and their intermediate types. It is also common to divide garnets into five groups, the first two originating from India, the third from Ceylon and the fifth from Czech Republic. The measurements involved presumed emeralds from Roman jewelry finds in Slovenia and comparative samples of beryl from Siberia and Habachtal in Austria. The analysis determined the coloring ions and showed relations between particular stones. For garnets, ten samples from brooches, earrings and rings were selected for the analysis on the basis of previous micro Raman examination. The analysis was performed by a combined PIXE-PIGE technique using proton beam in air. The light elements of Na, Mg, AI were determined according to the emitted gamma rays, while X-rays were used for the elements heavier than silicon. Two X-ray spectra were measured in each measuring point, soft and hard X-ray; the latter was obtained using an

  3. A Web Resource for Standardized Benchmark Datasets, Metrics, and Rosetta Protocols for Macromolecular Modeling and Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ó Conchúir, Shane; Barlow, Kyle A; Pache, Roland A; Ollikainen, Noah; Kundert, Kale; O'Meara, Matthew J; Smith, Colin A; Kortemme, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    The development and validation of computational macromolecular modeling and design methods depend on suitable benchmark datasets and informative metrics for comparing protocols. In addition, if a method is intended to be adopted broadly in diverse biological applications, there needs to be information on appropriate parameters for each protocol, as well as metrics describing the expected accuracy compared to experimental data. In certain disciplines, there exist established benchmarks and public resources where experts in a particular methodology are encouraged to supply their most efficient implementation of each particular benchmark. We aim to provide such a resource for protocols in macromolecular modeling and design. We present a freely accessible web resource (https://kortemmelab.ucsf.edu/benchmarks) to guide the development of protocols for protein modeling and design. The site provides benchmark datasets and metrics to compare the performance of a variety of modeling protocols using different computational sampling methods and energy functions, providing a "best practice" set of parameters for each method. Each benchmark has an associated downloadable benchmark capture archive containing the input files, analysis scripts, and tutorials for running the benchmark. The captures may be run with any suitable modeling method; we supply command lines for running the benchmarks using the Rosetta software suite. We have compiled initial benchmarks for the resource spanning three key areas: prediction of energetic effects of mutations, protein design, and protein structure prediction, each with associated state-of-the-art modeling protocols. With the help of the wider macromolecular modeling community, we hope to expand the variety of benchmarks included on the website and continue to evaluate new iterations of current methods as they become available.

  4. Variations in cometary dust composition from Giotto to Rosetta, clues to their formation mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engrand, Cécile; Duprat, Jean; Dartois, Emmanuel; Benzerara, Karim; Leroux, Hugues; Baklouti, Donia; Bardyn, Anaïs; Briois, Christelle; Cottin, Hervé; Fischer, Henning; Fray, Nicolas; Godard, Marie; Hilchenbach, Martin; Langevin, Yves; Paquette, John; Rynö, Jouni; Schulz, Rita; Silén, Johan; Stenzel, Oliver; Thirkell, Laurent; Cosima Team

    2016-11-01

    This paper reviews the current knowledge on the composition of cometary dust (ice, minerals and organics) in order to constrain their origin and formation mechanisms. Comets have been investigated by astronomical observations, space missions (Giotto to Rosetta), and by the analysis of cometary dust particles collected on Earth, chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) and ultracarbonaceous Antarctic micrometeorites (UCAMMs). Most ices detected in the dense phases of the interstellar medium (ISM) have been identified in cometary volatiles. However, differences also suggest that cometary ices cannot be completely inherited from the ISM. Cometary minerals are dominated by crystalline Mg-rich silicates, Fe sulphides and glassy phases including GEMS (glass with embedded metals and sulphides). The crystalline nature and refractory composition of a significant fraction of the minerals in comets imply a high temperature formation/processing close to the proto-Sun, resetting a possible presolar signature of these phases. These minerals were further transported up to the external regions of the disc and incorporated in comet nuclei. Cometary matter contains a low abundance of isotopically anomalous minerals directly inherited from the presolar cloud. At least two different kinds of organic matter are found in dust of cometary origin, with low or high nitrogen content. N-poor organic matter is also observed in primitive interplanetary materials (like carbonaceous chondrites) and its origin is debated. The N-rich organic matter is only observed in CP-IDPs and UCAMMs and can be formed by Galactic cosmic ray irradiation of N2- and CH4-rich icy surface at large heliocentric distance beyond a `nitrogen snow line'.

  5. A Web Resource for Standardized Benchmark Datasets, Metrics, and Rosetta Protocols for Macromolecular Modeling and Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane Ó Conchúir

    Full Text Available The development and validation of computational macromolecular modeling and design methods depend on suitable benchmark datasets and informative metrics for comparing protocols. In addition, if a method is intended to be adopted broadly in diverse biological applications, there needs to be information on appropriate parameters for each protocol, as well as metrics describing the expected accuracy compared to experimental data. In certain disciplines, there exist established benchmarks and public resources where experts in a particular methodology are encouraged to supply their most efficient implementation of each particular benchmark. We aim to provide such a resource for protocols in macromolecular modeling and design. We present a freely accessible web resource (https://kortemmelab.ucsf.edu/benchmarks to guide the development of protocols for protein modeling and design. The site provides benchmark datasets and metrics to compare the performance of a variety of modeling protocols using different computational sampling methods and energy functions, providing a "best practice" set of parameters for each method. Each benchmark has an associated downloadable benchmark capture archive containing the input files, analysis scripts, and tutorials for running the benchmark. The captures may be run with any suitable modeling method; we supply command lines for running the benchmarks using the Rosetta software suite. We have compiled initial benchmarks for the resource spanning three key areas: prediction of energetic effects of mutations, protein design, and protein structure prediction, each with associated state-of-the-art modeling protocols. With the help of the wider macromolecular modeling community, we hope to expand the variety of benchmarks included on the website and continue to evaluate new iterations of current methods as they become available.

  6. Pre-hibernation performances of the OSIRIS cameras onboard the Rosetta spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrin, S.; La Forgia, F.; Da Deppo, V.; Lazzarin, M.; Bertini, I.; Ferri, F.; Pajola, M.; Barbieri, M.; Naletto, G.; Barbieri, C.; Tubiana, C.; Küppers, M.; Fornasier, S.; Jorda, L.; Sierks, H.

    2015-02-01

    Context. The ESA cometary mission Rosetta was launched in 2004. In the past years and until the spacecraft hibernation in June 2011, the two cameras of the OSIRIS imaging system (Narrow Angle and Wide Angle Camera, NAC and WAC) observed many different sources. On 20 January 2014 the spacecraft successfully exited hibernation to start observing the primary scientific target of the mission, comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Aims: A study of the past performances of the cameras is now mandatory to be able to determine whether the system has been stable through the time and to derive, if necessary, additional analysis methods for the future precise calibration of the cometary data. Methods: The instrumental responses and filter passbands were used to estimate the efficiency of the system. A comparison with acquired images of specific calibration stars was made, and a refined photometric calibration was computed, both for the absolute flux and for the reflectivity of small bodies of the solar system. Results: We found a stability of the instrumental performances within ±1.5% from 2007 to 2010, with no evidence of an aging effect on the optics or detectors. The efficiency of the instrumentation is found to be as expected in the visible range, but lower than expected in the UV and IR range. A photometric calibration implementation was discussed for the two cameras. Conclusions: The calibration derived from pre-hibernation phases of the mission will be checked as soon as possible after the awakening of OSIRIS and will be continuously monitored until the end of the mission in December 2015. A list of additional calibration sources has been determined that are to be observed during the forthcoming phases of the mission to ensure a better coverage across the wavelength range of the cameras and to study the possible dust contamination of the optics.

  7. The Shape of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from Rosetta/Osiris Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorda, L.; Gaskell, R. W.; Hviid, S. F.; Capanna, C.; Groussin, O.; Gutiérrez, P.; Philippe, L.; Scholten, F.; Preusker, F.; Keller, H. U.; Joerg, K.; Kuhrt, E.; Mottola, S.; Sierks, H.; Snodgrass, C.; Thomas, N.; Vincent, J. B.; Marchi, S.; Massironi, M.

    2014-12-01

    The ROSETTA mission has reached the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in early August, allowing a detailed mapping of its surface with the onboard OSIRIS imaging system, up to resolutions of 50 cm or even better in some areas. Shape reconstruction techniques have been used since July 2014 to build a very detailed 3D model of the comet surface and to retrieve highly accurate rotational parameters. The attached Figure shows an early 3D shape of the comet. The most striking property of the global shape is the presence of two clearly separated components. We use a combination of images and 3D models to quantitatively characterize their bulk and surface properties: relative position, volume, topography and roughness. The position of the center of mass and the direction of the principal axis of rotation are used to constrain the internal mass distribution. Digital terrain models, slope, gravity, and geo-referenced images of the most interesting features observed at the surface of the comet are presented and consequences for their formation are discussed. If they are detected, topographic changes which could have occured between August and December 2014 are also presented. Acknowledgements. OSIRIS was built by a consortium led by the Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Göttingen, Germany, in collaboration with CISAS, University of Padova, Italy, the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, France, the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucia, CSIC, Granada, Spain, the Scientific Support Office of the European Space Agency, Noordwijk, The Netherlands, the Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial, Madrid, Spain, the Universidad Politéchnica de Madrid, Spain, the Department of Physics and Astronomy of Uppsala

  8. Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 with Alice/Rosetta during the Deep Impact Encounter

    CERN Document Server

    Feldman, P D; Steffl, A J; Parker, J W; Slater, D C; A'Hearn, M F; Bertaux, J L; Festou, M C; Feldman, Paul D.; Steffl, Andrew J.; Parker, Joel Wm.; Slater, David C.; Hearn, Michael F. A'; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Festou, Michel C.

    2006-01-01

    We report on spectroscopic observations of periodic comet 9P/Tempel 1 by the Alice ultraviolet spectrograph on the Rosetta spacecraft in conjunction with NASA's Deep Impact mission. Our objectives were to measure an increase in atomic and molecular emissions produced by the excavation of volatile sub-surface material. We unambiguously detected atomic oxygen emission from the quiescent coma but no enhancement at the 10% (1-sigma) level following the impact. We derive a quiescent water production rate of 9 x 10^27 molecules per second with an estimated uncertainty of 30%. Our upper limits to the volatiles produced by the impact are consistent with other estimates.

  9. Sensitivity and fragmentation calibration of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer RTOF on board ESA's Rosetta mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasc, Sébastien; Altwegg, Kathrin; Jäckel, Annette; Le Roy, Léna; Rubin, Martin; Fiethe, Björn; Mall, Urs; Rème, Henri

    2014-05-01

    The European Space Agency's Rosetta mission will rendez-vous comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P) in September 2014. The Rosetta spacecraft with the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA) onboard will follow and survey 67P for more than a year until the comet reaches its perihelion and beyond. ROSINA will provide new information on the global molecular, elemental, and isotopic composition of the coma [1]. ROSINA consists of a pressure sensor (COPS) and two mass spectrometers, the Double Focusing Mass Spectrometer (DFMS) and the Reflectron Time Of Flight mass spectrometer (RTOF). RTOF has a wide mass range, from 1 amu/e to >300 amu/e, and contains two ion sources, a reflectron and two detectors. The two ion sources, the orthogonal and the storage source, are capable to measure cometary ions while the latter also allows measuring cometary neutral gas. In neutral gas mode the ionization is performed through electron impact. A built-in Gas Calibration Unit (GCU) contains a known gas mixture composed of He, CO2, and Kr that can be used for in-flight calibration of the instrument. Among other ROSINA specific scientific goals, RTOF's task will be to determine molecular composition of volatiles via measuring and separating heavy hydrocarbons; it has been designed to study the development of the cometary activity as well as the coma chemistry between 3.5 AU and perihelion. From the spectroscopic studies and in-situ observations of other comets, we expect to find molecules such as H2O, CO, CO2, hydrocarbons, alcohols, formaldehyde, and other organic compounds in the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko [2]. To demonstrate and quantify the sensitivity and functionality of RTOF, calibration measurements have been realized with more than 20 species among the most abundant molecules quoted above, as well as other species such as PAHs. We will describe the applied methods used to realize this calibration and will discuss our preliminary results, i

  10. GIADA On-Board Rosetta: Early Dust Grain Detections and Dust Coma Characterization of Comet 67P/C-G

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotundi, A.; Della Corte, V.; Accolla, M.; Ferrari, M.; Ivanovski, S.; Lucarelli, F.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.; Sordini, R.; Palumbo, P.; Colangeli, L.; Lopez-Moreno, J. J.; Rodriguez, J.; Fulle, M.; Bussoletti, E.; Crifo, J. F.; Esposito, F.; Green, S.; Grün, E.; Lamy, P. L.; McDonnell, T.; Mennella, V.; Molina, A.; Moreno, F.; Ortiz, J. L.; Palomba, E.; Perrin, J. M.; Rodrigo, R.; Weissman, P. R.; Zakharov, V.; Zarnecki, J.

    2014-12-01

    GIADA (Grain Impact Analyzer and Dust Accumulator) flying on-board Rosetta is devoted to study the cometary dust environment of 67P/Churiumov-Gerasimenko. GIADA is composed of 3 sub-systems: the GDS (Grain Detection System), based on grain detection through light scattering; an IS (Impact Sensor), giving momentum measurement detecting the impact on a sensed plate connected with 5 piezoelectric sensors; the MBS (MicroBalances System), constituted of 5 Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCMs), giving cumulative deposited dust mass by measuring the variations of the sensors' frequency. The combination of the measurements performed by these 3 subsystems provides: the number, the mass, the momentum and the velocity distribution of dust grains emitted from the cometary nucleus.No prior in situ dust dynamical measurements at these close distances from the nucleus and starting from such large heliocentric distances are available up to date. We present here the first results obtained from the beginning of the Rosetta scientific phase. We will report dust grains early detection at about 800 km from the nucleus in August 2014 and the following measurements that allowed us characterizing the 67P/C-G dust environment at distances less than 100 km from the nucleus and single grains dynamical properties. Acknowledgements. GIADA was built by a consortium led by the Univ. Napoli "Parthenope" & INAF-Oss. Astr. Capodimonte, IT, in collaboration with the Inst. de Astrofisica de Andalucia, ES, Selex-ES s.p.a. and SENER. GIADA is presently managed & operated by Ist. di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali-INAF, IT. GIADA was funded and managed by the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, IT, with a support of the Spanish Ministry of Education and Science MEC, ES. GIADA was developped from a PI proposal supported by the University of Kent; sci. & tech. contribution given by CISAS, IT, Lab. d'Astr. Spat., FR, and Institutions from UK, IT, FR, DE and USA. We thank the RSGS/ESAC, RMOC/ESOC & Rosetta Project

  11. Why the Spacecraft Is Named Rosetta%"罗塞塔"飞船名称的由来

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦维新

    2004-01-01

    @@ 2004年3月2日,欧洲航天局(ESA)发射了"罗塞塔"(Rosetta)彗星探测器,"罗塞塔"将用约10年时间追上一颗名叫丘留莫夫一格拉西缅科的彗星."罗塞塔"将成为人类首个近距离绕彗星运行的探测器,其施放的彗星表面着陆器被命名为"费雷"(Philae).

  12. The 2016 Feb 19 outburst of comet 67P/CG: an ESA Rosetta multi-instrument study

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The ESLAB 50 Symposium - spacecraft at comets from 1P/Halley to 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko; International audience; On 19 Feb. 2016 nine Rosetta instruments serendipitously observed an outburst of gas and dust from the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Among these instruments were cameras and spectrometers ranging from UV over visible to microwave wavelengths, in-situ gas, dust and plasma instruments, and one dust collector. At 9:40 a dust cloud developed at the edge of an image in t...

  13. Measuring stone volume - three-dimensional software reconstruction or an ellipsoid algebra formula?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, William; Johnston, Richard; Shaida, Nadeem; Winterbottom, Andrew; Wiseman, Oliver

    2014-04-01

    To determine the optimal method for assessing stone volume, and thus stone burden, by comparing the accuracy of scalene, oblate, and prolate ellipsoid volume equations with three-dimensional (3D)-reconstructed stone volume. Kidney stone volume may be helpful in predicting treatment outcome for renal stones. While the precise measurement of stone volume by 3D reconstruction can be accomplished using modern computer tomography (CT) scanning software, this technique is not available in all hospitals or with routine acute colic scanning protocols. Therefore, maximum diameters as measured by either X-ray or CT are used in the calculation of stone volume based on a scalene ellipsoid formula, as recommended by the European Association of Urology. In all, 100 stones with both X-ray and CT (1-2-mm slices) were reviewed. Complete and partial staghorn stones were excluded. Stone volume was calculated using software designed to measure tissue density of a certain range within a specified region of interest. Correlation coefficients among all measured outcomes were compared. Stone volumes were analysed to determine the average 'shape' of the stones. The maximum stone diameter on X-ray was 3-25 mm and on CT was 3-36 mm, with a reasonable correlation (r = 0.77). Smaller stones (15 mm towards scalene ellipsoids. There was no difference in stone shape by location within the kidney. As the average shape of renal stones changes with diameter, no single equation for estimating stone volume can be recommended. As the maximum diameter increases, calculated stone volume becomes less accurate, suggesting that larger stones have more asymmetric shapes. We recommend that research looking at stone clearance rates should use 3D-reconstructed stone volumes when available, followed by prolate, oblate, or scalene ellipsoid formulas depending on the maximum stone diameter. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  14. Laser cleaning of graffiti on stone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanassova, Victoria; Kostadinov, Ivan; Zahariev, Peter; Grozeva, Margarita; Miloushev, Ilko

    2016-01-01

    In present days graffiti is a common problem that many restorers have to deal with due to both its unaesthetic appearance and damaging nature for the surface beneath. We report laser cleaning of graffiti paints (black, white, blue, green and red) on limestone and granite. The efficiency of two laser systems is compared: high repetition rate (20 kHz) Copper Bromide Vapor Laser (CuBrVL) generating wavelength 510.6 nm and low repetition rate (up to 10 Hz) Q-switched Nd:YAG laser generating fundamental wavelength 1064 nm and its second harmonic 532 nm. The surface condition of the stone samples before and after cleaning is evaluated by means of optical microscopy. On that base, suitable working parameters are chosen in order to avoid under- or over-cleaning.

  15. Stone material of regional provenance from Sirmium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rižnar Igor

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The stone artefacts from Sirmium, held at the Museum of Srem, were sampled and analyzed in order to establish an archaeological database connected with Roman quarries and possible transport routes along the Sava and Danube Rivers. Of the artefacts made of Neogene limestone three lithotypes were identified. Two of them were determined as originating from the known Roman quarry in the Drina Valley (NE Bosnia. For the third lithotype and its subtypes a model of the hypothetical quarry is proposed, the location of which is suggested to be outside the Drina river basin. Beside limestone, the sampled artefacts also revealed two types of porous volcanoclastic rocks of andesitic composition, which supposedly originate from two different microlocations in the Drina river basin.

  16. Injury experience in stone mining, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of stone mining in the United States for 1992. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

  17. Stone mortars in Roman Cisalpine: new specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Caffini

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The mortar, made of stone or marble, represents artifact in Cisalpine widespread elsewhere in the Roman world. the morphologies are substantially grouped into two basic shapes: type 1 presents a hemispherical bowl more or less flattened, Type 2 is characterized by a conical reverse body, more or less flared. In the mortars were subjected to pounding and grinding, using a pestle driven by hand, raw materials of various origin. The fields of application were mainly three: alimentary, officinal and cosmetic. In some cases the generic definition of mortar is applied improperly to marble containers probably only be used for ornamental. It 'also demonstrated the use of artifacts attributable to type 2 as a function of urns. Therefore, in reference to decontextualized pieces, you should use a definition not unique, reflecting the different possible meanings of the artifact.

  18. ["Endoscopy in a stone quarry"--multiple pigment stones 6 weeks after delivery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmann, M; Fähndrich, M; Heike, M

    2010-03-01

    A 29-year-old African woman without any history of diseases was referred to our clinic because of recurrent abdominal pain. 6 weeks earlier she had delivered a healthy baby. Laboratory data revealed hypochromic microcytic anemia, elevated cholestatic liver enzymes, and an elevated bilirubin level of 2.2 mg/dl. Abdominal sonography showed choledocholithiasis. The endoscopic retrograde cholangiography showed the presence of more than 100 small stones in the intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts. An endoscopic papillotomy was performed and multiple small black stones were removed from the bile duct by basket into the duodenum. Because of the hypochromic microcytic anemia, the detection of pigment stones and the ethnic background of the patient we suspected a hemoglobinopathy. Hemoglobin electrophoresis showed 97 % HbC. The molecular genetic analysis revealed a homozygous mutation in codon 6 GAG > AAG for the beta globin chain (HbCC). HbC is a structurally abnormal hemoglobin with typical aggregates and tetragonal crystal formation which results in mild chronic hemolytic anemia. The cholezystectomy after 6 weeks was performed without complications.

  19. Stepping stones toward global space exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansdell, M.; Ehrenfreund, P.; McKay, C.

    2011-06-01

    Several nations are currently engaging in or planning for robotic and human space exploration programs that target the Moon, Mars and near-Earth asteroids. These ambitious plans to build new space infrastructures, transport systems and space probes will require international cooperation if they are to be sustainable and affordable. Partnerships must involve not only established space powers, but also emerging space nations and developing countries; the participation of these new space actors will provide a bottom-up support structure that will aid program continuity, generate more active members in the space community, and increase public awareness of space activities in both developed and developing countries. The integration of many stakeholders into a global space exploration program represents a crucial element securing political and programmatic stability. How can the evolving space community learn to cooperate on a truly international level while engaging emerging space nations and developing countries in a meaningful way? We propose a stepping stone approach toward a global space exploration program, featuring three major elements: (1) an international Earth-based field research program preparing for planetary exploration, (2) enhanced exploitation of the International Space Station (ISS) enabling exploration and (3) a worldwide CubeSat program supporting exploration. An international Earth-based field research program can serve as a truly global exploration testbed that allows both established and new space actors to gain valuable experience by working together to prepare for future planetary exploration missions. Securing greater exploitation of the ISS is a logical step during its prolonged lifetime; ISS experiments, partnerships and legal frameworks are valuable foundations for exploration beyond low Earth orbit. Cooperation involving small, low-cost missions could be a major stride toward exciting and meaningful participation from emerging space nations

  20. Drropulli Stone and Gjirokastra World Heritage in Albania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serjani, Afat; Kramar, Sabina

    2013-04-01

    Ancient Gjirokastra City and Dervician stone deposit, there are located next to each other, in south of Albania, at foots of eastern slope of "Wide Mountain". Building stone it is represented by micritic limestone of white, red and blue colour, formed during Palaeocene-Eocene Period. It contains fossils of rounded forms and it is known and exploited since the ancient times. Argjirokastra, Argjiro's City, appeared since the IV-th Century BC (V.Tola, 2011). Stone City has in its centre Majestic Fortress of a big cruiser view, which is seen from long distance, from all sides of Drinos Valley. "This Majestic Monument of Albanian vigour has an astonishing elegance" has written E. Hoxha (1983). Watching Gjirokastra you will remind "Chronic in Stone", the book of Ismail Kadare, great writer, born in Gjirokastra. All buildings here are of stone. The Large Fortress and high houses as castles are built by stone, and covered by stone tiles. The walls and minarets of religious buildings are of stone. The gates of houses and yards are of engraved stone, protected by metallic nets of artistic forms. The house's walls are built by big stone, while the walls of yards are by small stone of white colour, some times intercalated with lines of red, blue stone. The combination of different colour stone is another one artistic beauty of walls. The roads are paved by black cobblestones of flysch sandstone for protection by slips, some times combined with white limestone mosaics. Steps of houses and roads are by white stone, often reworked masterfully. "Such stones, reworked by very fine skilfully, can not be found in any other place of the World, only in Anadoll" has written on 1 665 Evliya Celepi (2003). Buildings are of specific architecture and by good style. The accounts of the basis are done to keep "houses as castle". The walls have wood antiseismic layers. The architecture of houses, gates, angles, windows, with predomination of arc forms, with engraved stones and ornaments it is

  1. RESEARCH ON VIBRATION MODES OF THE CHINESE CHIME STONE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yan-peng; Hou Xun; Lu Ke-qing; Wu Hong-cai

    2000-01-01

    Nearfield acoustical holography is a powerful tool for imaging of acoustic sources. In this article, the basic theory treating steady-state acoustic radiation with generalized holography has been discussed. By holographic imaging, the vibration characteristics of irregular objects, the Chinese ancient musical instrument, the one-tone chime stone and the two-tone chime stone provided by the Institute of Archaeology, the Museum of Hubei Province, have been researched. The results show that the ancient chime stone has two main vibration modes, which make up the base of sound produced by the instrument. As for the two-tone chime stone, it is not so long and wide as the single-tone chime stone, but thicker and smoother than the single-tone chime stone. When it is excited at different positions, although it radiates sounds of different frequencies, its vibration modes are similar. This may be related to its dimensions and shape. The research is helpful for studying the sound producing system and the radiated field characteristics of the chime stone.

  2. Association between dental pulp stones and calcifying nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jinfeng; Yang, Fang; Zhang, Wei; Gong, Qimei; Du, Yu; Ling, Junqi

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of dental pulp stones, one type of extraskeletal calcification disease, remains elusive to date. Calcifying nanoparticles (CNPs), formerly referred to as nanobacteria, were reported to be one etiological factor in a number of extraskeletal calcification diseases. We hypothesized that CNPs are involved in the calcification of the dental pulp tissue, and therefore investigated the link between CNPs and dental pulp stones. Sixty-five freshly collected dental pulp stones, each from a different patient, were analyzed. Thirteen of the pulp stones were examined for the existence of CNPs in situ by immunohistochemical staining (IHS), indirect immunofluorescence staining (IIFS), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The remaining 52 pulp stones were used for isolation and cultivation of CNPs; the cultured CNPs were identified and confirmed via their shape and growth characteristics. Among the dental pulp stones examined in situ, 84.6% of the tissue samples staines positive for CNPs antigen by IHS; the corresponding rate by IIFS was 92.3 %. In 88.2% of the cultured samples, CNPs were isolated and cultivated successfully. The CNPs were visible under TEM as 200–400 nm diameter spherical particles surrounded by a compact crust. CNPs could be detected and isolated from a high percentage of dental pulp stones, suggesting that CNPs might play an important role in the calcification of dental pulp. PMID:21289988

  3. Urinary Stones in Neonates: Dilemma Between Urolithiasis and Nephrocalcinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Narter

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Urinary stones are extremely rare in the neonatal population. Most of the urinary stones in the neonate contain calcium. Nephrolithiasis in the neonate may be as urolithiasis and/or nephrocalcinosis. The incidence of nephrocalcinosis is not yet clear and can be differ in many researches due to the etiology. On the other hand, the incidence of urolithiasis in childhood is almost 10% of that in adults. Especially in the first decade, it is more common in boys. It may occur with inherited metabolic changes such as hypercalciuria, primary hyperoxaluria or cystinuria. Stone formation can be effected by iatrogenic causes such as hyperalimentation (parenteral nutrition, diuretic therapy (furosemide, acetazolamide that is especially in the bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The stone formation may occur due to anatomic or functional obstructions and infections of urinary system. Most of the urinary stones in the neonatal period are diagnosed as a nephrocalcinosis. However there aren’t any exact differences between nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis. Some authors suggested nephrocalcinosis is the initial step of urinary stone formation. On the other hand, the others purposed that both of them are different pathologies. In this review, we tried to summarized differences and similarities, in the context of urinary stones and the nephrocalcinosis in the neonates.

  4. Recent management of urinary stone disease in a pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogdu, Ozgu; Karakose, Ayhan; Celik, Orcun; Atesci, Yusuf Ziya

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of stone disease has been increasing and the risk of recurrent stone formation is high in a pediatric population. It is crucial to use the most effective method with the primary goal of complete stone removal to prevent recurrence from residual fragments. While extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is still considered first line therapy in many clinics for urinary tract stones in children, endoscopic techniques are widely preferred due to miniaturization of instruments and evolution of surgical techniques. The standard procedures to treat urinary stone disease in children are the same as those used in an adult population. These include ESWL, ureterorenoscopy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy (standard PCNL or mini-perc), laparoscopic and open surgery. ESWL is currently the procedure of choice for treating most upper urinary tract calculi in a pediatric population. In recent years, endourological management of pediatric urinary stone disease is preferred in many centers with increasing experience in endourological techniques and decreasing sizes of surgical equipment. The management of pediatric stone disease has evolved with improvements in the technique and a decrease in the size of surgical instruments. Recently, endoscopic methods have been safely and effectively used in children with minor complications. In this review, we aim to summarize the recent management of urolithiasis in children.

  5. Effect of vegetarianism on development of gall stones in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pixley, F; Wilson, D; McPherson, K; Mann, J

    1985-07-01

    Real time ultrasonography was used to compare the prevalence of gall stones in two groups of women aged 40-69: 632 women recruited from general practice registers and 130 vegetarians. One hundred and fifty-six (25%) of the 632 women who ate meat and 15 (12%) of the 130 vegetarian women either had gall stones visible on ultrasonography or had previously undergone cholecystectomy (p less than 0.01). The prevalence of gall stones was found to increase with age and body mass index. The 2.5 fold increase in risk of developing gall stones in non-vegetarians compared with vegetarians was reduced to 1.9 when controlling for these two potentially confounding factors, but remained significant. A family history of gall stones was reported more often by women with gall stones, but no association was found with parity or use of exogenous oestrogens. Thus the importance of age and obesity to determine the prevalence of gall stone was confirmed, and a dietary factor associated with vegetarianism may prevent this common condition.

  6. Reproducing stone monument photosynthetic-based colonization under laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ana Zélia; Laiz, Leonila; Gonzalez, Juan Miguel; Dionísio, Amélia; Macedo, Maria Filomena; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2008-11-01

    In order to understand the biodeterioration process occurring on stone monuments, we analyzed the microbial communities involved in these processes and studied their ability to colonize stones under controlled laboratory experiments. In this study, a natural green biofilm from a limestone monument was cultivated, inoculated on stone probes of the same lithotype and incubated in a laboratory chamber. This incubation system, which exposes stone samples to intermittently sprinkling water, allowed the development of photosynthetic biofilms similar to those occurring on stone monuments. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis was used to evaluate the major microbial components of the laboratory biofilms. Cyanobacteria, green microalgae, bacteria and fungi were identified by DNA-based molecular analysis targeting the 16S and 18S ribosomal RNA genes. The natural green biofilm was mainly composed by the Chlorophyta Chlorella, Stichococcus, and Trebouxia, and by Cyanobacteria belonging to the genera Leptolyngbya and Pleurocapsa. A number of bacteria belonging to Alphaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Verrucomicrobia were identified, as well as fungi from the Ascomycota. The laboratory colonization experiment on stone probes showed a colonization pattern similar to that occurring on stone monuments. The methodology described in this paper allowed to reproduce a colonization equivalent to the natural biodeteriorating process.

  7. Transurethral use of nephroscope in the management of bladder stone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanshyam S Sigdel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Endoscopic management of bladder stone is a well established procedure. The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of transurethral use of nephroscope in the management of bladder stones. Materials and methods: We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of patients who had undergone treatment of bladder stones through transurethral use of nephroscope in our hospital. Various demographic, stone related, intraoperative and postoperative parameters were studied. Results: The mean stone size was 18.1± 6.8 millimetres. Mean operative time and duration of hospital stay were 42.2 minutes and 2.4 days respectively. Intraoperative and postoperative complications occurred in 8 and 16 percent respectively, which were minor and managed without further interventions. Stone free rate was 100 percent. Conclusion: Bladder stones in adults can be effectively managed with the transurethral use of nephroscope without significant complications. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2013, Vol-9, No-1, 14-18 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v9i1.9668

  8. Residual gallbladder stones after cholecystectomy: A literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowbey, Pradeep; Sharma, Anil; Goswami, Amit; Afaque, Yusuf; Najma, Khoobsurat; Baijal, Manish; Soni, Vandana; Khullar, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Incomplete gallbladder removal following open and laparoscopic techniques leads to residual gallbladder stones. The commonest presentation is abdominal pain, dyspepsia and jaundice. We reviewed the literature to report diagnostic modalities, management options and outcomes in patients with residual gallbladder stones after cholecystectomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Medline, Google and Cochrane library between 1993 and 2013 were reviewed using search terms residual gallstones, post-cholecystectomy syndrome, retained gallbladder stones, gallbladder remnant, cystic duct remnant and subtotal cholecystectomy. Bibliographical references from selected articles were also analyzed. The parameters that were assessed include demographics, time of detection, clinical presentation, mode of diagnosis, nature of intervention, site of stone, surgical findings, procedure performed, complete stone clearance, sequelae and follow-up. RESULTS: Out of 83 articles that were retrieved between 1993 and 2013, 22 met the inclusion criteria. In most series, primary diagnosis was established by ultrasound/computed tomography scan. Localization of calculi and delineation of biliary tract was performed using magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. In few series, diagnosis was established by endoscopic ultrasound, intraoperative cholangiogram and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography. Laparoscopic surgery, endoscopic techniques and open surgery were the most common treatment modalities. The most common sites of residual gallstones were gallbladder remnant, cystic duct remnant and common bile duct. CONCLUSION: Residual gallbladder stones following incomplete gallbladder removal is an important sequelae after cholecystectomy. Completion cholecystectomy (open or laparoscopic) is the most common treatment modality reported in the literature for the management of residual gallbladder stones. PMID:26622110

  9. Residual gallbladder stones after cholecystectomy: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Chowbey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Incomplete gallbladder removal following open and laparoscopic techniques leads to residual gallbladder stones. The commonest presentation is abdominal pain, dyspepsia and jaundice. We reviewed the literature to report diagnostic modalities, management options and outcomes in patients with residual gallbladder stones after cholecystectomy. Materials And Methods: Medline, Google and Cochrane library between 1993 and 2013 were reviewed using search terms residual gallstones, post-cholecystectomy syndrome, retained gallbladder stones, gallbladder remnant, cystic duct remnant and subtotal cholecystectomy. Bibliographical references from selected articles were also analyzed. The parameters that were assessed include demographics, time of detection, clinical presentation, mode of diagnosis, nature of intervention, site of stone, surgical findings, procedure performed, complete stone clearance, sequelae and follow-up. Results: Out of 83 articles that were retrieved between 1993 and 2013, 22 met the inclusion criteria. In most series, primary diagnosis was established by ultrasound/computed tomography scan. Localization of calculi and delineation of biliary tract was performed using magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. In few series, diagnosis was established by endoscopic ultrasound, intraoperative cholangiogram and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography. Laparoscopic surgery, endoscopic techniques and open surgery were the most common treatment modalities. The most common sites of residual gallstones were gallbladder remnant, cystic duct remnant and common bile duct. Conclusion: Residual gallbladder stones following incomplete gallbladder removal is an important sequelae after cholecystectomy. Completion cholecystectomy (open or laparoscopic is the most common treatment modality reported in the literature for the management of residual gallbladder

  10. Accurate stone analysis: the impact on disease diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Neil S; Mandel, Ian C; Kolbach-Mandel, Ann M

    2017-02-01

    This manuscript reviews the requirements for acceptable compositional analysis of kidney stones using various biophysical methods. High-resolution X-ray powder diffraction crystallography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are the only acceptable methods in our labs for kidney stone analysis. The use of well-constructed spectral reference libraries is the basis for accurate and complete stone analysis. The literature included in this manuscript identify errors in most commercial laboratories and in some academic centers. We provide personal comments on why such errors are occurring at such high rates, and although the work load is rather large, it is very worthwhile in providing accurate stone compositions. We also provide the results of our almost 90,000 stone analyses and a breakdown of the number of components we have observed in the various stones. We also offer advice on determining the method used by the various FTIR equipment manufacturers who also provide a stone analysis library so that the FTIR users can feel comfortable in the accuracy of their reported results. Such an analysis on the accuracy of the individual reference libraries could positively influence the reduction in their respective error rates.

  11. Epidemiology of bladder stone of children: precipitating events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Scott B

    2016-04-01

    Urological surgery evolved from the ancient practice of removing primary bladder stones from young boys. Bladder stones, once ubiquitous, long ago disappeared from the developed world while pockets of disease still exist in developing countries. Two epidemiological studies identified as precipitating events of bladder stone formation the practice of substitutive carbohydrate feedings to newborns. In Southeast Asia, masticated rice is fed to newborns in stone-endemic villages while in England, during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries pap or panada was used to hand-feed infants when breast milk was not available. Fresh milk from dairy animals was deemed preferable to pap. Lack of access to dairy cattle enhanced need for hand-feeding. In an epidemiological study, during mid-nineteenth century in England the prevalence of dairy cattle was inversely related to the prevalence of bladder stones. These epidemiological data relate stone formation to nutrition during the first few days or weeks of life. It is surmised that frequent use of or exclusive reliance on carbohydrate foods replacing milk feedings leads to a relative dietary deficiency in phosphates and the formation of insoluble urinary salts. Girls, with short, nontortuous urethras may pass much of the calculus debris without retaining nuclei in the bladder. In some males, stone nuclei are formed and retained. The growth of stones is determined thereafter by the net effect of depository and resorptive mechanisms operating over time distributing over many years the age that patients present for surgical stone removal. The role of early introduction of carbohydrate foods and reduced milk intake of neonates has not been incorporated into recommendations for feeding newborns in endemic countries nor comprehensively modeled in animals.

  12. Renal Stone Risk during Spaceflight: Assessment and Countermeasure Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitson, Peggy A.; Pietrzyk, Robert A.; Jones, Jeffery A.; Sams, Clarence F.; Hudson, Ed K.; Nelman-Gonzalez, Mayra

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Vision for Space Exploration centers on exploration class missions including the goals of returning to the moon and landing on Mars. One of NASA's objectives is to focus research on astronaut health and the development of countermeasures that will protect crewmembers during long duration voyages. Exposure to microgravity affects human physiology and results in changes in the urinary chemical composition favoring urinary supersaturation and an increased risk of stone formation. Nephrolithiasis is a multifactorial disease and development of a renal stone is significantly influenced by both dietary and environmental factors. Previous results from long duration Mir and short duration Shuttle missions have shown decreased urine volume, pH, and citrate levels and increased calcium. Citrate, an important inhibitor of calcium-containing stones, binds with urinary calcium reducing the amount of calcium available to form stones. Citrate inhibits renal stone recurrence by preventing crystal growth, aggregation, and nucleation and is one of the most common therapeutic agents used to prevent stone formation. Methods: Thirty long duration crewmembers (29 male, 1 female) participated in this study. 24-hour urines were collected and dietary monitoring was performed pre-, in-, and postflight. Crewmembers in the treatment group received two potassium citrate (KCIT) pills, 10 mEq/pill, ingested daily beginning 3 days before launch, all in-flight days and through 14 days postflight. Urinary biochemical and dietary analyses were completed. Results: KCIT treated subjects exhibited decreased urinary calcium excretion and maintained the levels of calcium oxalate supersaturation risk at their preflight levels. The increased urinary pH levels in these subjects reduced the risk of uric acid stones. Discussion: The current study investigated the use of potassium citrate as a countermeasure to minimize the risk of stone formation during ISS missions. Results suggest that supplementation

  13. Renal-Stone Risk Assessment During Space Shuttle Flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitson, Peggy A.; Pietrzyk, Robert A.; Pak, Charles Y. C.

    1996-01-01

    The metabolic and environmental factors influencing renal stone formation before, during, and after Space Shuttle flights were assessed. We established the contributing roles of dietary factors in relationship to the urinary risk factors associated with renal stone formation. 24-hr urine samples were collected prior to, during space flight, and following landing. Urinary factors associated with renal stone formation were analyzed and the relative urinary supersaturation ratios of calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate (brushite), sodium urate, struvite and uric acid were calculated. Food and fluid consumption was recorded for a 48-hr period ending with the urine collection. Urinary composition changed during flight to favor the crystallization of stone-forming salts. Factors that contributed to increased potential for stone formation during space flight were significant reductions in urinary pH and increases in urinary calcium. Urinary output and citrate, a potent inhibitor of calcium-containing stones, were slightly reduced during space flight. Dietary intakes were significantly reduced for a number of variables, including fluid, energy, protein, potassium, phosphorus and magnesium. This is the first in-flight characterization of the renal stone forming potential in astronauts. With the examination of urinary components and nutritional factors, it was possible to determine the factors that contributed to increased risk or protected from risk. In spite of the protective components, the negative contributions to renal stone risk predominated and resulted in a urinary environment that favored the supersaturation of stone-forming salts. The importance of the hypercalciuria was noted since renal excretion was high relative to the intake.

  14. NUMERICAL ANALYSES OF THE UNDERGROUND EXPLOITATION OF DIMENSION STONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Kovačević-Zelić

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Underground exploitation of dimension stone is spreading lately for three main reasons; economy, organisation and environment. Moreover, underground openings can be used for many purposes. Underground exploitation is different from surface quarrying only in the first stage, the removal of top slice, descending slices are worked as in conventional quarries. In underground stone quarries, stability problems require adequate studies in order to avoid expensive artificial support measures, The article presents numerical analyses of an underground stone quarry made using of the finite difference code FLAC (the paper is published in Croatian.

  15. [Intravesical migration of an intrauterine contraceptive device complicated by stones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joual, Abdenbi; Querfani, Badreddine; Taha, Abellatif; El Mejjad, Amine; Frougui, Younes; Rabii, Redouane; Debbagh, Adil; El Mrini, Mohamed

    2004-06-01

    Transuterine migration of an intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) is a rare complication. The authors report a case of IUCD that migrated into the bladder and subsequently became calcified, leading to a false diagnosis of bladder stones. A 38-year-old woman with an IUCD for 3 years presented with haematuria and signs of bladder irritation. Ultrasound and plain abdominal x-rays suggested a diagnosis of bladder stones. The positive diagnosis of migrated and calcified IUCD was only established after surgical extraction of the stone.

  16. Rapa Nui (Easter Island’s Stone Worlds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue Hamilton

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the spatial, architectural and conceptual relationships between landscape places, stone quarrying, and stone moving and building during Rapa Nui’s statue-building period. These are central themes of the ‘Rapa Nui Landscapes of Construction Project’ and are discussed using aspects of the findings of our recent fieldwork. The different scales of expression, from the detail of the domestic sphere to the monumental working of quarries, are considered. It is suggested that the impressiveness of Rapa Nui’s stone architecture is its conceptual coherence at the small scale as much as at the large scale.

  17. Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery for Small Renal Calyx Stones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevzat Sener

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Lower pole kidney stones are one of the most common problems is urology practice. For this group of patients, shock wave lithotripsy (SWL and retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS are established treatments with low morbidity and high efficacy. SWL has relatively lower success rates for lower pole stones. On the other hand, RIRS has as high as 100% success rates for lower pole stones. With advances in technology and experience we believe RIRS may be the first treatment option over SWL in the following years.

  18. Stone Columns - Determination of the soil improvement factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivarč, J.

    2011-09-01

    A stone column is one of the soil stabilizing methods that is used to increase strength, decrease the compressibility of soft and loose fine graded soils, accelerate a consolidation effect and reduce the liquefaction potential of soils. The columns consist of compacted gravel or crushed stone arranged by a vibrator. This paper deals with Priebe's theory (1976) on the design of an improvement factor, which belongs among the most used analytical methods and also describes the numerical and laboratory models of stone columns. The improvement factors calculated from numerical and laboratory models are compared with the improvement factors resulting from Priebe's theory.

  19. "Piedra Franca": the same name for many different natural stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Dolores; Navarro, Rafael; Baltuille, Jose Manuel

    2014-05-01

    The Spanish name "Piedra Franca" refers to all the stones of sedimentary origin that have uniform coloration and easeof cutting/carving in order to obtain dimensional blocks for construction. The first references to this denomination occurred during medieval times, when builders had to choose the best materials to construct magnificent cathedrals. The largest volume of such natural stones were extracted from Caen, northern France, and historic records use the English term, "freestone", ie stone easy to cut, and to work by the masons dedicated to build cathedrals ("freemasons") in contrast to the "roughstone", hard stones worked by the hard hewers or "rough masons". The original French name referred to the limestones extracted at Caen, but over time, the original meaning expanded to include other natural stones with similar coloration and ease to carve. Notably this included many sandstones that were used in adjacent countries such as Spain. In the latter, although the most popular for its importance in architectural heritage is the Villamayor sandstone from Salamanca, other historically important natural stones are also known as "Piedra Franca" including the calcarenite from Santa Pudia (Granada), the limestone from Alava, the sandstone from Jaen and the sandstone from Cádiz. All of them were used in the construction of Spanish architectonic heritage and share similar exterior characteristics. In fact, several are known as golden stones. However when conservation and restoration of architectonic heritage is involved, the correct and original material should be used. The existence of national networks (e.g. CONSTRUROCK) and international task groups (e.g. IUGS Heritage Stone Task Group) can help to properly characterize, document, and differentiate between the varieties of "Piedra Franca" and they should be consulted by builders, architects and any other stone professsionals involved in such activities. An error in choosing the natural stone can result in

  20. Calculated insulin resistance correlates with stone-forming urinary metabolic changes and greater stone burden in high-risk stone patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Timothy Y; Flynn, Mary; O'Bell, John; Pareek, Gyan

    2016-06-01

    Metabolic syndrome and diabetes are associated with nephrolithiasis. Proposed mechanisms of lithogenesis include insulin resistance causing low urine pH and hyperinsulinemia leading to hypercalciuria. Herein, we sought to determine whether insulin resistance was associated with differences in stone burden and lithogenic changes on 24-hour urine samples. All patients that underwent comprehensive metabolic workup including 24-hour urine samples and fasting insulin levels were included. Insulin resistance was defined as a homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance value > 5 (HOMA-IR = (glucose×insulin)/405). Patients on active metabolic therapy were excluded or the 24-hour urine sample predating treatment was utilized for analysis. Stone burden was determined by totaling the maximal diameter of all stones noted on CT. 18 of 30 patients (60.0%) had HOMA-IR > 5. Among patients with calculated insulin resistance, stone burden was greater (17.6 mm vs. 6.3 mm, p = 0.002) and 24-hour urine samples revealed higher urine calcium (293 mg/d vs. 159 mg/d, p = 0.02) and lower urine pH and citrate (454 mg/d vs. 639 mg/d, p = 0.04 and 5.83 vs. 6.33, p = 0.04, respectively). Previous studies have demonstrated a correlation between metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and nephrolithiasis. This report demonstrates a quantitative increase in stone burden among patients with calculated insulin resistance. The pathway for this greater stone burden may be related to the urinary metabolic changes noted among patients with insulin resistance. In the future, targeting reduction of fasting insulin levels may represent a key element of stone disease prevention.

  1. Simplified methods for the evaluation of the risk of forming renal stones and the follow-up of stone-forming propensity during the preventive treatment of stone-formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grases, Fèlix; Costa-Bauzá, Antonia

    2016-02-01

    Renal lithiasis is a complex multifactorial disease in which recurrence is common. Thus, simple and reliable procedures are needed to evaluate patients with previous kidney stones to determine the risk of recurrence. In this paper we review simple biochemical procedures that can be used to determine the risk for renal stone formation when the stone is available or unavailable for analysis. Our present knowledge of renal lithiasis indicates that renal stones form due to several well-defined factors. Analysis of the renal stone itself can provide important information about clinical factors that require further investigation. When the stone is unavailable, it is necessary to perform a general evaluation of main urinary risk factors associated to renal stone formation, but this study should be complemented considering information related to direct familial antecedents, recidivant degree, radiological images, medical history, and life style habits. Finally, tools for patient follow-up of stone-forming propensity during the preventive treatment are discussed .

  2. Differences in Ureteroscopic Stone Treatment and Outcomes for Distal, Mid-, Proximal, or Multiple Ureteral Locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez Castro, Enrique; Osther, Palle J S; Jinga, Viorel

    2014-01-01

    Ureteroscopy has traditionally been the preferred approach for treatment of distal and midureteral stones, with shock wave lithotripsy used for proximal ureteral stones.......Ureteroscopy has traditionally been the preferred approach for treatment of distal and midureteral stones, with shock wave lithotripsy used for proximal ureteral stones....

  3. AB094. Upper urinary stone management in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaogang; Liu, Jihong; Ye, Zhangqun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To give an overview of the contemporary management for upper urinary stones in China. Methods Contemporary treatment methods, especially novel or developing modality with Chinese characteristics, for upper urinary stones in China has been reviewed and introduced. Results Urolithiasis is one of the most prevalent diseases in the urologic clinic and usually affects people aged 20 to 60 years. In recent years, the overall morbidity of urolithiasis in Chinese population has increased with a significant reduction of lower urinary stone and an increase of upper urinary stone. Upper urinary stone may induce more severe complications and have been considered to be the main cause of nephrectomy besides urinary tumor. The management of upper urinary stone can be challenging somehow. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is usually the first choice for patients with simple upper urinary stone sized 2 cm or less. Recent years, according to the mechanism of lithecbole by vibration and body position, some Chinese urologists have developed a novel machine, external physical vibration lithecbole (EPVL), which can facilitate removal of urinary stone after ESWL or endoscopic lithotripsy. The combination of EPVL therapy with ESWL or endoscopic lithotripsy significantly improves the stone-free rate. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is increasingly employed as a major modality for patients with large and complex upper urinary stone. The minimally invasive PCNL (mPCNL), which was performed with a miniature endoscope by way of a small size tract (12-20 F), could decrease morbidity, especially uncontrolled hemorrhage. However, its efficiency of removing stone fragments is lower. The Chinese urologists have modified PCNL technique by using an 8/9.8 F rigid ureteroscope through the 14-18 F percutaneous tract under the guidance of ultrasound or X-ray. The results from a series of studies demonstrate that Chinese mPCNL is a safe, feasible and efficient method for treating

  4. The global surface composition of 67P/CG nucleus by Rosetta/VIRTIS. I) Prelanding mission phase

    CERN Document Server

    Filacchione, Gianrico; Ciarniello, Mauro; Raponi, Andrea; Tosi, Federico; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Erard, Stephane; Morvan, Dominique Bockelee; Leyrat, Cedric; Arnold, Gabriele; Schmitt, Bernard; Quirico, Eric; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Migliorini, Alessandra; Capria, Maria Teresa; Palomba, Ernesto; Cerroni, Priscilla; Longobardo, Andrea; Barucci, Antonella; Fornasier, Sonia; Carlson, Robert W; Jaumann, Ralf; Stephan, Katrin; Moroz, Lyuba V; Kappel, David; Rousseau, Batiste; Fonti, Sergio; Mancarella, Francesca; Despan, Daniela; Faure, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    From August to November 2014 the Rosetta orbiter has performed an extensive observation campaign aimed at the characterization of 67P/CG nucleus properties and to the selection of the Philae landing site. The campaign led to the production of a global map of the illuminated portion of 67P/CG nucleus. During this prelanding phase the comet's heliocentric distance decreased from 3.62 to 2.93 AU while Rosetta was orbiting around the nucleus at distances between 100 to 10 km. VIRTIS-M, the Visible and InfraRed Thermal Imaging Spectrometer - Mapping channel (Coradini et al. 2007) onboard the orbiter, has acquired 0.25-5.1 micron hyperspectral data of the entire illuminated surface, e.g. the north hemisphere and the equatorial regions, with spatial resolution between 2.5 and 25 m/pixel. I/F spectra have been corrected for thermal emission removal in the 3.5-5.1 micron range and for surface's photometric response. The resulting reflectance spectra have been used to compute several Cometary Spectral Indicators (CSI):...

  5. Mechanical and electrostatic experiments with dust particles collected in the inner coma of comet 67P by COSIMA onboard Rosetta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilchenbach, Martin; Fischer, Henning; Langevin, Yves; Merouane, Sihane; Paquette, John; Rynö, Jouni; Stenzel, Oliver; Briois, Christelle; Kissel, Jochen; Koch, Andreas; Schulz, Rita; Silen, Johan; Altobelli, Nicolas; Baklouti, Donia; Bardyn, Anais; Cottin, Herve; Engrand, Cecile; Fray, Nicolas; Haerendel, Gerhard; Henkel, Hartmut; Höfner, Herwig; Hornung, Klaus; Lehto, Harry; Mellado, Eva Maria; Modica, Paola; Le Roy, Lena; Siljeström, Sandra; Steiger, Wolfgang; Thirkell, Laurent; Thomas, Roger; Torkar, Klaus; Varmuza, Kurt; Zaprudin, Boris

    2017-05-01

    The in situ cometary dust particle instrument COSIMA (COmetary Secondary Ion Mass Analyser) onboard ESA's Rosetta mission has collected about 31 000 dust particles in the inner coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since August 2014. The particles are identified by optical microscope imaging and analysed by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. After dust particle collection by low speed impact on metal targets, the collected particle morphology points towards four families of cometary dust particles. COSIMA is an in situ laboratory that operates remotely controlled next to the comet nucleus. The particles can be further manipulated within the instrument by mechanical and electrostatic means after their collection by impact. The particles are stored above 0°C in the instrument and the experiments are carried out on the refractory, ice-free matter of the captured cometary dust particles. An interesting particle morphology class, the compact particles, is not fragmented on impact. One of these particles was mechanically pressed and thereby crushed into large fragments. The particles are good electrical insulators and transform into rubble pile agglomerates by the application of an energetic indium ion beam during the secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis. This article is part of the themed issue 'Cometary science after Rosetta'.

  6. The Rosetta Alice Ultraviolet Spectrograph Investigation: The First UV Spectrograph to Reach a Comet—Results Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, S. Alan; Parker, Joel Wm.; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Feaga, Lori M.; Feldman, Paul D.; Keeney, Brian A.; Noonan, John; Schindhelm, Eric; Steffl, Andrew; Weaver, Harold A.

    2016-10-01

    Numerous scientific results have been obtained from the exploration of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by the ESA/NASA Rosetta mission. The Alice far/extreme-UV spectrograph aboard Rosetta is one of three US instruments provided by NASA to this mission; it is the first UV spectrograph to reach any comet. We will summarize the main results obtained by the Alice instrument to date, including both surface and coma studies. Notable results we will highlight will include: the discovery of electron impact excitation as the dominant UV emission mechanism near the comet, the detection of molecular oxygen at surprisingly high abundance in the coma, the lack of strong water-ice signatures on the comet's surface during the approach to perihelion, numerous results concerning cometary outbursts, and a large database of systematics relating to atomic and molecular species abundances as the comet approached and then receded from the Sun over a span of two year surrounding the comet's August 2015 perihelion.

  7. Mechanical and electrostatic experiments with dust particles collected in the inner coma of comet 67P by COSIMA onboard Rosetta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilchenbach, Martin; Fischer, Henning; Langevin, Yves; Merouane, Sihane; Paquette, John; Rynö, Jouni; Stenzel, Oliver; Briois, Christelle; Kissel, Jochen; Koch, Andreas; Schulz, Rita; Silen, Johan; Altobelli, Nicolas; Baklouti, Donia; Bardyn, Anais; Cottin, Herve; Engrand, Cecile; Fray, Nicolas; Haerendel, Gerhard; Henkel, Hartmut; Höfner, Herwig; Hornung, Klaus; Lehto, Harry; Mellado, Eva Maria; Modica, Paola; Le Roy, Lena; Siljeström, Sandra; Steiger, Wolfgang; Thirkell, Laurent; Thomas, Roger; Torkar, Klaus; Varmuza, Kurt; Zaprudin, Boris

    2017-07-13

    The in situ cometary dust particle instrument COSIMA (COmetary Secondary Ion Mass Analyser) onboard ESA's Rosetta mission has collected about 31 000 dust particles in the inner coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since August 2014. The particles are identified by optical microscope imaging and analysed by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. After dust particle collection by low speed impact on metal targets, the collected particle morphology points towards four families of cometary dust particles. COSIMA is an in situ laboratory that operates remotely controlled next to the comet nucleus. The particles can be further manipulated within the instrument by mechanical and electrostatic means after their collection by impact. The particles are stored above 0°C in the instrument and the experiments are carried out on the refractory, ice-free matter of the captured cometary dust particles. An interesting particle morphology class, the compact particles, is not fragmented on impact. One of these particles was mechanically pressed and thereby crushed into large fragments. The particles are good electrical insulators and transform into rubble pile agglomerates by the application of an energetic indium ion beam during the secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis.This article is part of the themed issue 'Cometary science after Rosetta'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  8. Spectrophotometric properties of the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from the OSIRIS instrument onboard the ROSETTA spacecraft

    CERN Document Server

    Fornasier, S; Barucci, M A; Feller, C; Besse, S; Leyrat, C; Lara, L; Gutierrez, P J; Oklay, N; Tubiana, C; Scholten, F; Sierks, H; Barbieri, C; Lamy, P L; Rodrigo, R; Koschny, D; Rickman, H; Keller, H U; Agarwal, J; A'Hearn, M F; Bertaux, J -L; Bertini, I; Cremonese, G; Da Deppo, V; Davidsson, B; Debei, S; De Cecco, M; Fulle, M; Groussin, O; Güttler, C; Hviid, S F; Ip, W; Jorda, L; Knollenberg, J; Kovacs, G; Kramm, R; Kührt, E; Küppers, M; La Forgia, F; Lazzarin, M; Moreno, J J Lopez; Marzari, F; Matz, K -D; Michalik, H; Moreno, F; Mottola, S; Naletto, G; Pajola, M; Pommerol, A; Preusker, F; Shi, X; Snodgrass, C; Thomas, N; Vincent, J -B

    2015-01-01

    The Rosetta mission of the European Space Agency has been orbiting the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P) since August 2014 and is now in its escort phase. A large complement of scientific experiments designed to complete the most detailed study of a comet ever attempted are onboard Rosetta. We present results for the photometric and spectrophotometric properties of the nucleus of 67P derived from the OSIRIS imaging system, which consists of a Wide Angle Camera (WAC) and a Narrow Angle Camera (NAC). The disk-averaged phase function of the nucleus of 67P shows a strong opposition surge with a G parameter value of -0.13$\\pm$0.01 in the HG system formalism and an absolute magnitude $H_v(1,1,0)$ = 15.74$\\pm$0.02 mag. The integrated spectrophotometry in 20 filters covering the 250-1000 nm wavelength range shows a red spectral behavior, without clear absorption bands except for a potential absorption centered at $\\sim$ 290 nm that is possibly due to SO$_2$ ice. The nucleus shows strong phase reddening, with disk...

  9. Observations of corotating solar wind structures at radio sounding by signals of the Rosetta and Mars Express spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimov, A. I.; Lukanina, L. A.; Samoznaev, L. N.; Chashei, I. V.; Bird, M. K.; Pätzold, M.

    2016-05-01

    In the implementation of the space projects Rosetta and Mars Express, a large-scale series of experiments has been carried out on radio sounding circumsolar plasma by decimeter ( S-band) and centimeter ( X-band) signals of the Rosetta comet probe (from October 3 to October 31, 2010) and the Mars Express satellite of Mars (from December 25, 2010 to March 27, 2011). It was found that in the phase of ingress the spacecraft behind the Sun, the intensity of the frequency fluctuations increases in accordance with a power function whose argument is the solar offset distance of radio ray path, and when the spacecraft is removed from the Sun (the egress phase), frequency fluctuations are reduced. Periodic strong increases in the fluctuation level, exceeding by a factor of 3-12 the background values of this value determined by the regular radial dependences, are imposed on the regular dependences. It was found that increasing the fluctuations of radio waves alternates with the periodicity m × T or n × T, where m = 1/2, n = 1, and T is the synodic period of the Sun's rotation ( T ≈ 27 days). It was shown that the corotating structures associated with the interaction regions of different speed fluxes are formed in the area of solar wind acceleration and at distances of 6-20 solar radii already have a quasi-stationary character.

  10. Metabolic Evaluation of Kidney Transplant Recipients for Stone Disease and Comparison with Healthy Controls and Stone Formers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Savaşçı

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of this study was to determine the metabolic effects of kidney transplantation and calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs on stone formation in the post-transplant period. Materials and Methods Forty kidney transplant recipients (KTRs and 40 patients undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL operation due to kidney stone disease between January 2002 and January 2010 were evaluated retrospectively. For control group 20 patients who neither had urinary stone disease (USD nor a kidney transplant were chosen. Results No statistical difference was observed in terms of age, gender, body-mass index (BMI and urinary pH between the groups. Twenty-four hour urine volume was significantly higher in the KTRs (p=0.001. However 24 hour urinary oxalate, citrate, uric acid, sodium and calcium levels were lower in the KTRs when compared to two other groups (p=0.001, p=0.0001, p=0.004, p=0.046, p=0.017, respectively. Twenty-four hour urinary potassium levels in the control group and the phosphorus levels in the group undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy were higher compared to other groups (p=0.022, p=0.008. After follow-up of 23.55±14 (2-50 months none of the KTRs were diagnosed with a urinary stone.Conclusion Although no stones were detected in the transplant group, low levels of urinary citrate may lead to de novo stone formation in the longer follow-up. Low levels of urinary calcium, oxalate, phosphate, uric acid and increased urine volume may axplain the fact that no stone was detected in this group. CNIs may increase metabolic tendency to stone formation in addition to their nephrotoxic effects. However our data does not support routine citrate replacement therapy for preventing stone formation and minimizing the toxic effects of CNIs due to tubular acidosis.

  11. Endoscopic sphincterotomy for common bile duct stones during laparoscopic cholecystectomy is safe and effective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Henrik Loft; Vilmann, Peter; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Management strategy for common bile duct (CBD) stones is controversial with several treatment options if stones in the CBD are recognized intraoperatively. The aim of this study was to report our experience with same-session combined endoscopic-laparoscopic treatment of gallbladder and CBD stones....... We retrospectively evaluated 31 patients with cholecystolithiasis and CBD stones undergoing same-session combined endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with sphincterotomy and endoscopic stone extraction and laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Same-session ERCP and sphincterotomy were...... pancreatitis postoperatively and no other morbidity or mortality. In conclusion, same-session ERCP with stone extraction and laparoscopic cholecystectomy seems to be a safe and effective treatment strategy for CBD stones....

  12. Metabolic evaluation and medical management of upper urinary tract stone disease. Guidelines from the Scandinavian Cooperative Group for Urinary Stones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, P J; Grenabo, L; Haraldsson, G

    1999-01-01

    A set of simple guidelines for metabolic evaluation and medical/dietary management of patients with urolithiasis is presented. The evaluation scheme is based on the documented risk factors in the Nordic area and the results of controlled clinical trials, and takes its basis in the severity...... of the stone disease in the individual stone patient. The initial evaluation in all patients aims at diagnosing conditions with a definitive metabolic, infectious or anatomical/functional cause of stone formation (MIAF urolithiasis). Patients with MIAF urolithiasis are treated according to the nature...

  13. Compositional maps of 67P/CG nucleus surface after perihelion passage by Rosetta/VIRTIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchione, Gianrico; Ciarniello, M.; Capaccioni, F.; Raponi, A.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Tosi, F.; Migliorini, Alessandra; Piccioni, G.; Cerroni, P.; Capria, M. T.; Erard, S.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Leyrat, C.; Arnold, G.; Barucci, M. A.; Schmitt, B.; Quirico, E.

    2016-11-01

    Moving after perihelion passage (August 13th 2015), VIRTIS-M the 0.25-5.0 μm imaging spectrometer on board Rosetta has mapped again the north and equatorial regions of 67P/CG's nucleus with the scope to trace color and composition evolution of the surface. With the loss of the IR channel due to the active cryogenic cooler failure occurred in May 2015, VIRTIS-M has observed only with the VIS channel in the 0.25-1.0 μm spectral range. Despite this limitation, the returned data are valuable in performing a comparison of surface properties between pre and post-perihelion times. Approaching perihelion passage, 67P/CG's nucleus has experienced a general brightening due to the removal of the surficial dust layer caused by the more intense gaseous activity with the consequent exposure of a larger fraction of water ice. Coma observations by VIRTIS during pre-perihelion have shown a correlation between the areas of the nucleus where gaseous activity by water ice sublimation is more intense with the surface brightening caused by dust removal. After having applied data calibration and photometric correction, VIRTIS data are projected on the irregularly shaped digital model6 of 67P/CG with the aim to derive visible albedo and colors maps rendered with a spatial resolution of 0.5×0.5 deg in latitude-longitude, corresponding to a sampling of about 15 m/pixel. Dedicated mapping sequences executed at different heliocentric distances, are employed to follow the dynamical evolution of the surface. Direct comparison between compositional maps obtained at the same heliocentric distances along inbound and outbound orbits allows to evidence the changes occurred on the same areas of the surface. In this context, the first VIRTIS-M maps, obtained in August 2014 at heliocentric distance of 3.4 AU along the inbound orbit with a solar phase angle of about 30-45° are compared with the last ones, taken in June 2016 at 3.2 AU from the Sun on the outbound trajectory at solar phases of about

  14. Comet 67P's morphological dichotomy and surface evolution from the Rosetta/OSIRIS camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramy El-Maarry, M.; Thomas, Nicolas; Gracia-Berná, Antonio; Pajola, Maurizio; Groussin, Olivier; ROSETTA/OSIRIS

    2016-10-01

    The Rosetta mission orbited comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from Aug, 2014 to Sep, 2016. During this time, it obtained the most comprehensive image dataset for a comet's nucleus in terms of resolution, as well as spatial and temporal coverage, using the OSIRIS camera. These images have shown the surface of the comet to be very diverse in its texture and geology. In particular, the 2-year duration of the mission permitted imaging of both hemispheres and the possibility to assess the morphology and surface evolution of comet's 67P's northern hemisphere before and after perihelion passage (in Aug, 2015). The northern hemisphere (NH) is morphologically diverse including regions of consolidated, often fractured materials, smooth terrains showing aeolian-like landforms and seasonal variations, dust-covered areas suggestive of an air-fall-like mechanism, and irregular large-scale depressions suggestive of massive outburst activities. On the other hand, the southern hemisphere (SH) shows a clear dichotomy with the North showing regionally rougher terrains with little or no smooth deposits. Similarly, dusty coatings that were observed in the northern hemisphere are generally lacking in addition to the absence of large depressions. Overall, the SH shows significantly less topographical variation in comparison to the NH. The difference in relief between the NH and SH may be explained by the differences in erosional extent between both hemispheres. The SH has a shorter yet more intensive summer (close to perihelion), which could result in levels of erosion in the SH that are up to a factor of 3 higher than that of the NH. Another notable difference between both hemispheres is the absence of smooth deposits and dust coatings in the SH. The absence of similar deposits in the south may suggest that activity in the SH occurs with much higher intensity leading to ejection of dust particles at velocities exceeding comet's escape velocity. During the meeting, we plan to summarize the

  15. Cropland Management Plan : Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The cropland program on Big Stone NWR will be accomplished each year with a combination of: (1) force account farming of permanent farm units where there is no...

  16. The Stone Tool Industry of Hac Sa, Macau, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vin Davis

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This article considers some archaeological, geological and petrographical aspects of stone implements from a sand dune site in south-eastern China. A sample of preform, ground and polished stone implements from Macau, Coloane and Taipa are considered in relation to the archaeological landscape of the Zhujiang (Pearl River estuary. Particular attention is focused on evidence for the manufacturing technology of ornamental stone, jade and quartz rings. The possibility of selective exploitation of jade (quartz, which occurs locally as veins within the granitic outcrops, for tool and ring manufacture, and its relationship to mineralogical and textural characteristics, is considered. It is planned that more stone tools from Macau will be examined during 2009-12.

  17. Furbearer Management Plan : Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Big Stone NWR Furbearer Management Plan directs the management and regulation of trapping. The furbearer management program directly supports the environmental...

  18. Grassland Management Plan : Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The grassland management objectives for Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge are: (1) to provide secure nesting cover for ground nesting waterfowl. The refuge...

  19. Design the High Speed Kogge-Stone Adder by Using

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUX

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this Technical era the high speed and low area of VLSI chip are very- very essential factors. Day by day number of transistors and other active and passive elements are growing on VLSI chip. In Integral part of the processor adders play an important role. In this paper we are using proposed kogge-stone adders for binary addition to reduce the size and increase the efficiency or processors speed. Proposing kogge stone adder provides less components, less path delay and better speed compare to other existing kogge stone adder and other adders. Here we are comparing the kogge stone adders of different-different word size from other adders. The design and experiment can be done by the aid of Xilinx 14.1i Spartan 3 device family.

  20. Incidence and Distribution of Pulp Stones Found in Radiographic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... dental caries on the pulpal tissue can cause a vascular wall injury, resulting ... of pulp stones in a sample of Turkish dental patients using ..... panoramic radiographs show the entire mouth area—all teeth ... Sundell JR, Stanley HR, White CL.

  1. Kidney stones and crushed bones secondary to hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreelesh, K P; Sreejith, G Nair; Pranab, K Prabhakaran

    2016-01-01

    Here we report a 65-year-old woman with multiple brown tumors and renal stones secondary to primary hyperparathyroidism. This case highlights the need for early recognition of parathyroid hyperactivity.

  2. Topological Anisotropy of Stone-Wales Waves in Graphenic Fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai V. Putz

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Stone-Wales operators interchange four adjacent hexagons with two pentagon-heptagon 5|7 pairs that, graphically, may be iteratively propagated in the graphene layer, originating a new interesting structural defect called here Stone-Wales wave. By minimization, the Wiener index topological invariant evidences a marked anisotropy of the Stone-Wales defects that, topologically, are in fact preferably generated and propagated along the diagonal of the graphenic fragments, including carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons. This peculiar edge-effect is shown in this paper having a predominant topological origin, leaving to future experimental investigations the task of verifying the occurrence in nature of wave-like defects similar to the ones proposed here. Graph-theoretical tools used in this paper for the generation and the propagation of the Stone-Wales defects waves are applicable to investigate isomeric modifications of chemical structures with various dimensionality like fullerenes, nanotubes, graphenic layers, schwarzites, zeolites.

  3. Encrustation and stone formation: complication of indwelling ureteral stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, K A; Wettlaufer, J N; Oldani, G

    1985-06-01

    Severe encrustation and stone formation on indwelling ureteral stents in 2 patients with a lithogenic history are reported. In both cases this complication occurred in the presence of sterile urine and treatment required pyelolithotomy in one and renal pelvic irrigation with urologic G solution in the other. Analyses of these stones revealed struvite and apatite, respectively. Dissolution of encrustations and stones via renal pelvic irrigation is suggested as a viable alternative to surgical intervention for this problem. A review of the literature shows a correlation between chronic stone formers and stent encrustation, rather than from bacteriuria alone. Long-term antibiotic suppression, more frequent followup with abdominal roentgenograms, and shorter periods of internal stenting are suggested for patients with a lithogenic history.

  4. Annual Water Management Program - 1991 : Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The proposed water management program for 1991 focuses on managing unit water levels to maintain habitat on Big Stone NWR. During the winter of 1990/91, cattails...

  5. Stone anchors from the Okhamandal region, Gujarat Coast, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sundaresh; Gaur, A.S.; Gudigar, P.; Tripati, S.; Vora, K.H.; Bandodkar, S.N.

    During marine archaeological explorations since 1983, off Dwarka, a large number of stone anchors were discovered and dated to 1400 BC, comparing with anchors found in Mediterranean waters. In recent archaeological explorations off Dwarka, Bet...

  6. Influence of mineral water consumption and renal stone formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IRSAY Laszlo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The intake of minerals are very important in maintaining health, but in returning to health either. Mineral waters represents a source of minerals with high bioavailability. There are evidence based studies for the efficency of mineral waters in a series of disorders for both internal and external cures. The advantage of mineral waters in renal lithiasis are significant and the risks of stone formation are neglectable if medical advise is respected. Amongst the patients- but unfortunately also the medical staff- there is the incorrect oppinion that mineral water is a factor that causes renal stones in all consumers. The purpose of the present paper is to present the factors that favour the renal stones, but also scientific arguments that support the value of mineral water, that has a part not only in ensuring the right mineral balance but also, in certain situations, even in preventing renal stones.

  7. TOF-SIMS study of cystine and cholesterol stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghumman, C A A; Moutinho, A M C; Santos, A; Tolstogouzov, A; Teodoro, O M N D

    2012-05-01

    Two different human stones, cystine and cholesterol from the kidney and gall bladder, were examined by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry using Ga(+) primary ions as bombarding particles. The mass spectra of kidney stone were compared with those measured for the standard compounds, cystine and cysteine. Similar spectra were obtained for the stone and cystine. The most important identification was based on the existence of the protonated molecules [M + H](+) and deprotonated molecules [M-H](-). The presence of cystine salt was also revealed in the stone through the sodiated cystine [M + Na](+) and the associated fragments, which might be due to the patient treatment history. In the gallstone, the deprotonated molecules [M-H](+) of cholesterol along with relatively intense characteristic fragments [M-OH](+) were detected.

  8. Crushed Stone Operations in the United States - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer includes crushed stone operations in the United States. These data were obtained from information reported voluntarily to the USGS by the aggregate...

  9. EAARL Topography-Thomas Stone National Historic Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A first surface elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model or DEM) of Thomas Stone National Historic Site was produced from remotely-sensed,...

  10. Search and Rescue Plan: Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan outlines search and rescue protocols for staff at Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge. The primary concern of a search and rescue policy is the protection...

  11. Anatomical factors predicting lower calyceal stone clearance after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M. Khan

    2016-02-17

    Feb 17, 2016 ... Conclusions: This study shows that lower infundibular length and width are ... Stone disease is endemic in Pakistan and constitutes 60% of the ... lithotripsy session by plane X-ray abdomen and renal ultrasound. ... Pain was.

  12. Narrative report: Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge: Fiscal year 1974

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Big Stone NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1974 fiscal year. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  13. Topological Anisotropy of Stone-Wales Waves in Graphenic Fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ori, Ottorino; Cataldo, Franco; Putz, Mihai V.

    2011-01-01

    Stone-Wales operators interchange four adjacent hexagons with two pentagon-heptagon 5|7 pairs that, graphically, may be iteratively propagated in the graphene layer, originating a new interesting structural defect called here Stone-Wales wave. By minimization, the Wiener index topological invariant evidences a marked anisotropy of the Stone-Wales defects that, topologically, are in fact preferably generated and propagated along the diagonal of the graphenic fragments, including carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons. This peculiar edge-effect is shown in this paper having a predominant topological origin, leaving to future experimental investigations the task of verifying the occurrence in nature of wave-like defects similar to the ones proposed here. Graph-theoretical tools used in this paper for the generation and the propagation of the Stone-Wales defects waves are applicable to investigate isomeric modifications of chemical structures with various dimensionality like fullerenes, nanotubes, graphenic layers, schwarzites, zeolites. PMID:22174641

  14. EAARL Topography-Thomas Stone National Historic Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A first surface elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model or DEM) of Thomas Stone National Historic Site was produced from remotely-sensed,...

  15. Fisheries Management Recommendations : Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides objectives and recommendations which are intended to improve the fishery resources and enhance quality fishing opportunities. Big Stone National...

  16. Stone ingestion causing obstructed inguinal hernia with perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paiboon Sookpotarom

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of obstructed right inguinal hernia caused by ingested stones. A 2 year-old boy from Northern Thailand was transferred to our hospital with low-grade fever, vomiting, and acute painful swelling at his right hemiscrotum for one day. The physical examination revealed marked enlargement with inflammation in his right hemiscrotum. The radiological findings showed huge number of stones in the right hemiscrotum. At surgery, the content of hernia sac was ascending colon, which was full of hard masses. With the help of additional lower transverse abdominal incision, the obstructed segment was successfully reduced and revealed a perforation. Most of the stones were removed through the perforation. The colonic wound was primarily repaired and both incisions were primarily closed. Although he developed post-operative wound infection, the boy had uneventfully recovered. The psychological exploration in this "stone pica" revealed no other psychological disorders.

  17. Renal stones on portal venous phase contrast-enhanced CT: does intravenous contrast interfere with detection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dym, R. Joshua; Duncan, Dameon R.; Spektor, Michael; Cohen, Hillel W.; Scheinfeld, Meir H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the sensitivity of portal venous phase contrast-enhanced CT for the detection of renal stones. Methods This retrospective study included 97 CT examinations of the abdomen without and with intravenous contrast, including 85 (87.6%) examinations with at least one renal stone on the “gold standard” noncontrast images, as scored by a single radiologist. Three other radiologists each independently reviewed only the contrast-enhanced images from all 97 examinations and recorded all renal stones. Reviewer sensitivity for stones was categorized by stone diameter. Reviewer sensitivity and specificity for stone disease were also calculated on a per-kidney basis. Results The 97 cases included a total of 238 stones ≥1 mm, with a mean (±SD) of 1.2 ± 1.9 stones per kidney and a stone diameter of 3.5 ± 3.0 mm. Pooling data for the three reviewers, sensitivity for all stones was 81%; sensitivity for stones ≥2, ≥3, ≥4, and ≥5 mm was 88%, 95%, 99%, and 98%, respectively. Sensitivity for stone disease on a per-kidney basis was 94% when considering all stones; when considering only stones ≥2, ≥3, and ≥4 mm, sensitivity was 96%, 99%, and 100%, respectively. Specificity for stone disease on a per-kidney basis was 98% overall, 99% when considering only stones ≥2 mm, and 100% when considering only stones ≥3 mm. Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced CT is highly sensitive for the detection of renal stones ≥3 mm in diameter and less sensitive for smaller stones. In cases where the clinical diagnosis is uncertain and performance of a CT examination is being contemplated, intravenous contrast utilization would allow assessment for stone disease while also optimizing evaluation for other conditions. PMID:24504541

  18. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN BEBERAPA JENIS AIR BERDASARKAN KESADAHANNYA TERHADAP WAKTU PENGERASAN AKHIR DENTAL STONE TIPE IV

    OpenAIRE

    MA???RIFAT, SANI

    2014-01-01

    2014 Sani Ma???rifat. Kalsium sulfat ??-hemihidrat sering disebut sebagai dental stone. Dental stone terdiri atas tiga tipe yaitu Tipe III, Tipe IV (Kekuatan Tinggi), Tipe V (Kekuatan Tinggi, Ekspansi Tinggi). Dental Stone Tipe IV ( kadang disebut sebagai stone kelas II, densite atau improved stone) merupakan gipsum yang ideal digunakan untuk pembuatan dai, karena dai biasanya digunakan untuk preparasi kavitas dengan malam yang diukir sehingga dibutuhkan mod...

  19. Analysis of the dust jet imaged by Rosetta VIRTIS-M in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko on 2015 April 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenishev, V.; Fougere, N.; Borovikov, D.; Combi, M. R.; Bieler, A.; Hansen, K. C.; Gombosi, T. I.; Migliorini, A.; Capaccioni, F.; Rinaldi, G.; Filacchione, G.; Kolokolova, L.; Fink, U.

    2016-11-01

    This work is a part of a more global effort aimed at understanding and interpreting in situ and remote sensing data acquired by instruments on board Rosetta. This study aims at deriving the dust mass source rate and the location of the dust jet source observed by Rosetta VIRTIS-M on 2015 April 12. The analysis is performed by means of the coupled kinetic modelling of gas and dust in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, which were used for calculating the coma brightness as it would be seen from the Rosetta spacecraft. The dust mass production rate and a possible location of the jet origin needed to explain the Rosetta VIRTIS-M dust brightness image were inferred by comparing the calculated brightness with VIRTIS-M data. Our analysis suggests that the dust mass production rate needed to maintain the observed jet is about 1.9 kg s-1. According to our analysis, the location of the observed jet surface footprint is outside of the nucleus area characterized by the highest gas production rate, which suggests that gas and dust source rates are not necessarily proportional to each other across the entire nucleus surface. The inferred location of the possible jet origin is consistent with that of the observed active pits. In this paper, we show that the jet intensity is variable in time, and has a lifetime of at least 10 h.

  20. Participation of end users in the design of assistive technology for people with mild to severe cognitive problems; The European Rosetta project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meiland, F.J.M.; Hattink, B.J.J.; Overmars-Marx, T.; Boer, M.E. de; Jedlitschka, A.; Ebben, P.W.G.; Stalpers-Croeze, I.I.N.W.; Flick, S.; Leeuw, J. van der; Karkowski, I.P.; Dröes, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In the European Rosetta project three separate, previously developed, ICT systems were improved and integrated to create one modular system that helps community-dwelling people with mild cognitive impairment and dementia in different stages of the disease. The system aims to support them

  1. [Bladder stone surrounding a foreign body: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekak, H; Rabii, R; Moufid, K; Guessous, H; Joual, A; Bennani, S; Elmrini, M; Benjeloun, S

    2003-04-01

    The bladder can be the site of various foreign bodies. We report one case of bladder stone including a foreign body in a 24 years old man with a psychomotor deficiency who was admitted for pyuria, block miction and bladder symptoms. The pelvic X-Ray film showed a bladder stone including a sewing needle. We analysed the diagnosis, aspect and therapeutic management of this case.

  2. The Cost-Effectiveness of Treatment Modalities for Ureteral Stones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Ji-Yuen Siu MD

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Additional intervention and medical treatment of complications may follow the primary treatment of a ureteral stone. We investigated the cost of the treatment of ureteral stone(s within 45 days after initial intervention by means of retrospective analysis of the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan. All patients of ages ≥20 years diagnosed with ureteral stone(s( International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification/ICD-9-CM: 592.1 from January 2001 to December 2011 were enrolled. We included a comorbidity code only if the diagnosis appeared in at least 2 separate claims in a patient’s record. Treatment modalities (code included extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (SWL; 98.51, ureteroscopic lithotripsy (URSL; 56.31, percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PNL; 55.04, (open ureterolithotomy (56.20, and laparoscopy (ie, laparoscopic ureterolithotomy; 54.21. There were 28 513 patients with ureteral stones (13 848 men and 14 665 women in the randomized sample of 1 million patients. The mean cost was 526.4 ± 724.1 United States Dollar (USD. The costs of treatment were significantly increased in patients with comorbidities. The costs of treatment among each primary treatment modalities were 1212.2 ± 627.3, 1146.7 ± 816.8, 2507.4 ± 1333.5, 1533.3 ± 1137.1, 2566.4 ± 2594.3, and 209.8 ± 473.2 USD in the SWL, URSL, PNL, (open ureterolithotomy, laparoscopy (laparoscopic ureterolithotomy, and conservative treatment group, respectively. In conclusion, URSL was more cost-effective than SWL and PNL as a primary treatment modality for ureteral stone(s when the possible additional costs within 45 days after the initial operation were included in the calculation.

  3. Modified rubberized stone matrix asphalt for Nineveh roads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Al-Hadidy AI; TAN Yi-qiu

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of Crumb Rubber Modifiers (CRMS) on basic engineering properties (i. e.Marshall, tensile strength, and compressive strength) of stone matrix asphalt mixtures, the ASTM testing and procedures were employed. Results of the evaluation were used to quantify the effect of CRM source and CRM content on engineering properties at testing temperatures of 25℃and 60℃. Statistical models were developed, which represent the nature of effects on performance-related properties of stone matrix asphalt mixtures.

  4. Urinary stone disease in Kano, North Western Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S A Aji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary stone disease is the third most common affliction of the urinary tract after urinary tract infection and pathologic conditions of the prostate. Although the disease is commoner in the developed countries, the incidence is also increasing in the developing countries. In this study, we sought to determine the pattern and treatment given for patients with urinary stones in our institution. Patients and Method: A 5 year retrospective study of patients treated for urolithiasis was conducted in a Teaching Hospital in North-western Nigeria. The age, sex, clinical presentations, investigations and treatment offered to the patients were reviewed. Results: A total of seventy six patients were treated for urinary stones during the study period. 58(76.3% were males and 18(23.7% females. Majority of patients 39(51.3% presented with loin pain as the main presenting symptom. The diagnosis of stones was by plain abdominal Xray(KUB in 68 patients and abdominal ultrasound scan in 46 cases. Urine culture was positive in 27 patients with E. coli as the predominant organism. All had normal serum calcium, phosphate and uric acid. 56(73.7% patients had stones in the upper urinary tract and 20 (26.3% in the lower urinary tract. Thirty four (44.7% patients were found to have predisposing factors. Most of the patients 50(65.7% were treated by open surgery and 26(34.2% by endoscopic removal/lithotripsy. Conclusion: Urinary stone disease is common in this environment. Majority of the stones are radio-opaque on plain xrays. Significant number of patients had a predisposing factor and majority of the stones were found in the upper tract. Most of the patients were treated by open surgery while a significant number were treated with endoscopic removal/lithotripsy.

  5. Residual gallbladder stones after cholecystectomy: A literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Pradeep Chowbey; Anil Sharma; Amit Goswami; Yusuf Afaque; Khoobsurat Najma; Manish Baijal; Vandana Soni; Rajesh Khullar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Incomplete gallbladder removal following open and laparoscopic techniques leads to residual gallbladder stones. The commonest presentation is abdominal pain, dyspepsia and jaundice. We reviewed the literature to report diagnostic modalities, management options and outcomes in patients with residual gallbladder stones after cholecystectomy. Materials And Methods: Medline, Google and Cochrane library between 1993 and 2013 were reviewed using search terms residual gallstones, post-ch...

  6. Milk of calcium renal stone: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    守屋, 賢治; 西尾, 正一; 前川, 正信; 小早川, 等; 安本, 亮二

    1989-01-01

    A case of milk of calcium renal stone is reported. The patient was a 24-year-old woman who complained of dull flank pain on the right side. A plain film of the abdomen revealed a right renal stone, which showed peculiar radiopacity of a half-moon shape in the upright position. The operation was performed on July 6, 1984. Postoperative chemical analysis of sand granules showed calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate.

  7. Fad diets and their effect on urinary stone formation

    OpenAIRE

    Nouvenne, Antonio; Ticinesi, Andrea; Morelli, Ilaria; Guida, Loredana; Borghi, Loris; Meschi, Tiziana

    2014-01-01

    The influence of unhealthy dietary habits on urinary stone formation has been widely recognized in literature. Dietary advice is indeed the cornerstone prescription for prevention of nephrolithiasis as well. However, only a small amount of medical literature has addressed the influence of popular or fad diets, often self-prescribed for the management of obesity and overweight or for cultural beliefs, on the risk of kidney stones. Thereby in this paper we analyze the current knowledge on the e...

  8. Ureterocele containing a stone in a duplex system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Gharbi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of calcified stone in the ureterocele, a frequent event in adults, is very uncommon in a pediatric age. We present a case of a ureterocele containing a calcified stone in an 8-year-old girl. The diagnosis was made with radiological investigations (intravenous pyelogram, ultrasonography and, eventually, voiding cystourethrogram. Meatostomy and calculus extraction, or open surgery in more complicated cases, are the treatments of choice.

  9. Gallstone ileus of duodenum with huge duodenal stone

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Ehsan; Mohammad Reza Ahangaran

    2006-01-01

    Gastrointestinal obstruction by a gallstone is an uncommon but important complication of biliary stone disease which mostly affects the elderly. The classic triad of radiological features includes pneumobilia, ectopic gallstone and evidence of intestinal obstruction. Terminal ileum is the most common site of obstruction, followed by jejunum and gastric outlet. We present a case of duodenal gallstone ileus of a large, fluid-density mixed biliary stone with a peripheral rim of hyperdensity (ver...

  10. Rapa Nui (Easter Island)’s Stone Worlds

    OpenAIRE

    Sue Hamilton

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the spatial, architectural and conceptual relationships between landscape places, stone quarrying, and stone moving and building during Rapa Nui’s statue-building period. These are central themes of the ‘Rapa Nui Landscapes of Construction Project’ and are discussed using aspects of the findings of our recent fieldwork. The different scales of expression, from the detail of the domestic sphere to the monumental working of quarries, are considered. It is suggested that th...

  11. Mitigation of Liquefaction in Sandy Soils Using Stone Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcuk, Levent; Kayabalı, Kamil

    2010-05-01

    Soil liquefaction is one of the leading causes of earthquake-induced damage to structures. Soil improvement methods provide effective solutions to reduce the risk of soil liquefaction. Thus, soil ground treatments are applied using various techniques. However, except for a few ground treatment methods, they generally require a high cost and a lot of time. Especially in order to prevent the risk of soil liquefaction, stone columns conctructed by vibro-systems (vibro-compaction, vibro-replacement) are one of the traditional geotechnical methods. The construction of stone columns not only enhances the ability of clean sand to drain excess pore water during an earthquake, but also increases the relative density of the soil. Thus, this application prevents the development of the excess pore water pressure in sand during earthquakes and keeps the pore pressure ratio below a certain value. This paper presents the stone column methods used against soil liquefaction in detail. At this stage, (a) the performances of the stone columns were investigated in different spacing and diameters of columns during past earthquakes, (b) recent studies about design and field applications of stone columns were presented, and (c) a new design method considering the relative density of soil and the capacity of drenage of columns were explained in sandy soil. Furthermore, with this new method, earthquake performances of the stone columns constructed at different areas were investigated before the 1989 Loma Prieta and the 1994 Northbridge earthquakes, as case histories of field applications, and design charts were compiled for suitable spacing and diameters of stone columns with consideration to the different sandy soil parameters and earhquake conditions. Key Words: Soil improvement, stone column, excess pore water pressure

  12. Extended Leach Testing of Simulated LAW Cast Stone Monoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, Benjamin D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jung, H. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Guohui [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-09

    This report describes the results from long-term laboratory leach tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate the release of key constituents from monoliths of Cast Stone prepared with four simulated low-activity waste (LAW) liquid waste streams. Specific objectives of the Cast Stone long-term leach tests described in this report focused on four activities: 1. Extending the leaching times for selected ongoing EPA-1315 tests on monoliths made with LAW simulants beyond the conventional 63-day time period up to 609 days reported herein (with some tests continuing that will be documented later) in an effort to evaluate long-term leaching properties of Cast Stone to support future performance assessment activities. 2. Starting new EPA-1315 leach tests on archived Cast Stone monoliths made with four LAW simulants using two leachants (deionized water [DIW] and simulated Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) Site vadose zone pore water [VZP]). 3. Evaluating the impacts of varying the iodide loading (starting iodide concentrations) in one LAW simulant (7.8 M Na Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) Average) by manufacturing new Cast Stone monoliths and repeating the EPA-1315 leach tests using DIW and the VZP leachants. 4. Evaluating the impacts of using a non-pertechnetate form of Tc that is present in some Hanford tanks. In this activity one LAW simulant (7.8 M Na HTWOS Average) was spiked with a Tc(I)-tricarbonyl gluconate species and then solidified into Cast Stone monoliths. Cured monoliths were leached using the EPA-1315 leach protocol with DIW and VZP. The leach results for the Tc-Gluconate Cast Stone monoliths were compared to Cast Stone monoliths pertechnetate.

  13. Analysis of urinary stone composition in Eastern India by X-ray diffraction crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Jindal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stones in the urinary system are common in our country. This study was done to assess the composition of the urinary stones in eastern part of India. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was done over a period of thirty months. A total of 90 stones were analyzed in this time period by using X-ray diffraction crystallography. Results: Of the 90 stones analyzed, 77 were renal stones, 12 were ureteric stones and one was a bladder stone. Six stones (all renal did not have properties to be represented by X-ray diffraction crystallography. The overall prevalence of the oxalate containing stones was 85.7% with calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM being the major constituent. Calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD was the next most common constituent. Struvite stones constituted 9.5% of the stones analyzed. Pure calcium phosphate stones were found in 4.7% of the cases. Conclusion: Our study reveals that the stone composition in the eastern part of India is different from that in other parts of the country. We have a comparatively lower prevalence of oxalate stones while a higher prevalence of phosphate and struvite stones.

  14. Urinary stone analysis on 12,846 patients: a report from a single center in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenqi; Yang, Bicheng; Ou, Lili; Liang, Yeping; Wan, Shawpong; Li, Shujue; Zeng, Guohua

    2014-02-01

    We reported a retrospective review of the urinary stone compositions in 12,846 patients. Data on urinary stone compositions analyzed between January 2003 and December 2012 in our center were collected. Infrared spectroscopy was used for stone analysis. Predominant stone component was recorded. Patients were divided into four age groups: 0-18, 19-40, 41-60, and 61-92, and five categories by components. In order to determine the change of stone characteristics with respect to time, data were also divided into two periods, 2003-2007 and 2008-2012. A total of 12,846 stones were included in this study. The age of the patients ranged from 1 to 92 years with 7,736 males and 5,110 females. Stone made of single component was rare, 2.61%. Calcium oxalate stone was the most common component at 82.56%. Calcium oxalate and uric acid stones were more common in male than in female. The incidence of calcium phosphate stones and uric acid stones had increased during the past 5 years, while calcium oxalate stones decreased. We found the highest incidence of stone disease in the 41-60 years old group and the lowest in the 1-18 years old for both genders. Calcium oxalate was the dominant component in every group but was more prevalent in 19-40 years group. The percentage of magnesium ammonium phosphate stone and uric acid stone increased with age.

  15. Update on the medical management of stone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Chad R; Pearle, Margaret S

    2009-03-01

    Recurrent nephrolithiasis is a burden to the individual patient as well as the healthcare system. A lack of new medications for treatment of stone disease and continued poor compliance with drug therapy has led to a growing interest in dietary manipulation and novel therapies aimed at preventing recurrent stone formation. Despite initial enthusiasm for lemonade therapy, recent metabolic studies suggest that beverages with a high potassium citrate content, rather than citric acid, may be more effective in reducing stone risk because of the alkali load and citraturic response. In addition, there is increasing epidemiologic and metabolic evidence that obesity and dietary excess, including fructose-rich and purine-rich foods, are associated with increased stone risk. Finally, alternative measures for reducing urinary risk factors, such as probiotics, show promise in reducing urinary oxalate and may be effective in the treatment of primary and enteric hyperoxaluria or even idiopathic calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. Although changes in urinary stone risk factors may reduce the need for surgical treatment of stone disease, the best management for recurrent nephrolithiasis is likely a combination of surgical and medical therapy. Dietary measures and novel probiotic therapy are promising adjuncts for preventing recurrent nephrolithiasis.

  16. Scalable wavelet-based active network detection of stepping stones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Joseph I.; Robinson, David J.; Butts, Jonathan W.; Lacey, Timothy H.

    2012-06-01

    Network intrusions leverage vulnerable hosts as stepping stones to penetrate deeper into a network and mask malicious actions from detection. Identifying stepping stones presents a significant challenge because network sessions appear as legitimate traffic. This research focuses on a novel active watermark technique using discrete wavelet transformations to mark and detect interactive network sessions. This technique is scalable, resilient to network noise, and difficult for attackers to discern that it is in use. Previously captured timestamps from the CAIDA 2009 dataset are sent using live stepping stones in the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud service. The client system sends watermarked and unmarked packets from California to Virginia using stepping stones in Tokyo, Ireland and Oregon. Five trials are conducted in which the system sends simultaneous watermarked samples and unmarked samples to each target. The live experiment results demonstrate approximately 5% False Positive and 5% False Negative detection rates. Additionally, watermark extraction rates of approximately 92% are identified for a single stepping stone. The live experiment results demonstrate the effectiveness of discerning watermark traffic as applied to identifying stepping stones.

  17. NEW FRONTIERS ON NEPHROLITHIASIS: PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT OF KIDNEY STONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malan Rajat

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Nephrolithiasis (also known as kidney stones, renal stones, urinary stones, urolithiasis, and renal calculi affects a great number of patients worldwide. These can be of different types like calcium-oxalate, struvite, uric acid, cysteine. Larger stones in the urinary tract can cause extreme pain in the lower back or side. Urinary tract infections, kidney disorders and certain metabolic disorders such as hyperparathyroidism are also linked to stone formation. Cystinuria, hyperoxaluria, Hypercalciuria, drinking less water, consuming more salty food can cause stone formation in urinary tract. Various precautions and treatment are available includes life style changing (drinking more water or more fluid intake and reducing calcium rich diet intake, avoid junk food, Medical therapy (use of diuretics and other medicines, the over use of synthetic drugs which results in higher incidence of adverse drug reaction has motivated humans to return to nature for safe remedies and surgical treatment The present article revealed the update knowledge about remedy and treatment of nephrolithiasis for all those peoples who is having renal colic pain.

  18. The History of Urinary Stones: In Parallel with Civilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Tefekli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The roots of modern science and history of urinary stone disease go back to the Ancient Egyptians and Mesopotamia. Hippocrates defined the symptoms of bladder stones. The first recorded details of “perineal lithotomy” were those of Cornelius Celsus. Ancient Arabic medicine was based mainly on classical Greco-Roman works. Interestingly, the Fourth Lateran Council in 1215 forbade physicians from performing surgical procedures, as contact with blood or body fluids was viewed as contaminating to men. With Renaissance new procedures could be tried on criminals. The first recorded suprapubic lithotomy was carried out by Pierre Franco in 1561. In 1874, Bigelow developed a lithotrite, which was introduced into the bladder under anaesthesia (called as “litholopaxy”. Young was the first to report ureteroscopy (1929. With advances in intracorporeal lithotripsy techniques, ureteroscopy became the treatment of choice for ureteric stones. In 1976, Fernstrom and Johannson established percutaneous access to remove a renal stone. However, with the introduction of the first extracorporeal shock wave machine in 1980, a dramatic change in stone management was observed. Civilization in parallel with scientific developments has brought us to a point where we try not to “cut” our patients for stone disease, as Hippocrates admonishes, but rather manage them with minimal invasive alternatives.

  19. Renal struvite stones--pathogenesis, microbiology, and management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannigan, Ryan; Choy, Wai Ho; Chew, Ben; Lange, Dirk

    2014-06-01

    Infection stones-which account for 10-15% of all urinary calculi-are thought to form in the presence of urease-producing bacteria. These calculi can cause significant morbidity and mortality if left untreated or treated inadequately; optimal treatment involves complete stone eradication in conjunction with antibiotic therapy. The three key principles of treating struvite stones are: removal of all stone fragments, the use of antibiotics to treat the infection, and prevention of recurrence. Several methods to remove stone fragments have been described in the literature, including the use of urease inhibitors, acidification therapy, dissolution therapy, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, ureteroscopy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL), and anatrophic nephrolithotomy. PCNL is considered to be the gold-standard approach to treating struvite calculi, but adjuncts might be used when deemed necessary. When selecting antibiotics to treat infection, it is necessary to acquire a stone culture or, at the very least, urine culture from the renal pelvis at time of surgery, as midstream urine cultures do not always reflect the causative organism.

  20. The Stones and the Stars Building Scotland's Newest Megalith

    CERN Document Server

    Lunan, Duncan

    2013-01-01

    There are at least 48 identified prehistoric stone circles in Scotland.  In truth, very little is known about the people who erected them, and ultimately about what the stone circles were for.  Most stone circles are astronomically aligned, which has led to the modern debate over the significance of the alignments.  The megaliths certainly represented an enormous cooperative effort, would at the very least have demonstrated power and wealth, and being set away from any dwellings probably served a ceremonial, or perhaps religious, purpose. Observations at the site of the stone circles, of solar, lunar, and stellar events, have already cast light on some of the questions about the construction and use of ancient megalithic observatories. In his capacity as manager of the Glasgow Parks Department Astronomy Project, author Duncan Lunan designed and built in the late 1970s Sighthill, the first astronomically aligned stone circle in Britain in over 3,000 years.  The Stones and the Stars examines the case for as...