WorldWideScience

Sample records for genomic features shared

  1. Hepadnaviruses and retroviruses share genome homology and features of replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, W S; Miller, R H; Marion, P L

    1987-01-01

    The hepadnavirus family includes hepatitis B virus (HBV), woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV), ground squirrel hepatitis virus (GSHV) and duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV). These viruses share unique ultrastructural, molecular and biological features. HBV has great medical importance in many parts of the world. More important numerically than acute hepatitis B in high prevalence geographic regions is the liver disease associated with chronic infection. There appear to be more than 200 million chronically infected humans in the world, and these HBV infections appear to be the single most common cause of chronic liver disease and liver cancer in man. All hepadnaviruses share the propensity for silent infection in early life leading to persistence of the virus, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is clearly associated with long-standing persistent infection in man, woodchucks and ground squirrels. Although the viral DNA has been found to be integrated in cellular DNA of many HCC in man, woodchucks and ground squirrels, the precise role of the virus in tumor formation has not been defined. Hepadna viruses have an interesting molecular structure and mechanisms of replication, and they appear to share certain important features with retroviruses as reviewed here. It is of interest to define similarities and differences between hepadnaviruses and retroviruses in order to understand their evolutionary relationship and to determine whether they share a common oncogenic mechanism, since infection with members of both virus families is associated with neoplastic disease.

  2. Comparative genomics of flatworms (platyhelminthes) reveals shared genomic features of ecto- and endoparastic neodermata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Christoph; Fromm, Bastian; Bachmann, Lutz

    2014-05-01

    The ectoparasitic Monogenea comprise a major part of the obligate parasitic flatworm diversity. Although genomic adaptations to parasitism have been studied in the endoparasitic tapeworms (Cestoda) and flukes (Trematoda), no representative of the Monogenea has been investigated yet. We present the high-quality draft genome of Gyrodactylus salaris, an economically important monogenean ectoparasite of wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). A total of 15,488 gene models were identified, of which 7,102 were functionally annotated. The controversial phylogenetic relationships within the obligate parasitic Neodermata were resolved in a phylogenomic analysis using 1,719 gene models (alignment length of >500,000 amino acids) for a set of 16 metazoan taxa. The Monogenea were found basal to the Cestoda and Trematoda, which implies ectoparasitism being plesiomorphic within the Neodermata and strongly supports a common origin of complex life cycles. Comparative analysis of seven parasitic flatworm genomes identified shared genomic features for the ecto- and endoparasitic lineages, such as a substantial reduction of the core bilaterian gene complement, including the homeodomain-containing genes, and a loss of the piwi and vasa genes, which are considered essential for animal development. Furthermore, the shared loss of functional fatty acid biosynthesis pathways and the absence of peroxisomes, the latter organelles presumed ubiquitous in eukaryotes except for parasitic protozoans, were inferred. The draft genome of G. salaris opens for future in-depth analyses of pathogenicity and host specificity of poorly characterized G. salaris strains, and will enhance studies addressing the genomics of host-parasite interactions and speciation in the highly diverse monogenean flatworms.

  3. Comparative Genomics of Flatworms (Platyhelminthes) Reveals Shared Genomic Features of Ecto- and Endoparastic Neodermata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Christoph; Fromm, Bastian; Bachmann, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    The ectoparasitic Monogenea comprise a major part of the obligate parasitic flatworm diversity. Although genomic adaptations to parasitism have been studied in the endoparasitic tapeworms (Cestoda) and flukes (Trematoda), no representative of the Monogenea has been investigated yet. We present the high-quality draft genome of Gyrodactylus salaris, an economically important monogenean ectoparasite of wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). A total of 15,488 gene models were identified, of which 7,102 were functionally annotated. The controversial phylogenetic relationships within the obligate parasitic Neodermata were resolved in a phylogenomic analysis using 1,719 gene models (alignment length of >500,000 amino acids) for a set of 16 metazoan taxa. The Monogenea were found basal to the Cestoda and Trematoda, which implies ectoparasitism being plesiomorphic within the Neodermata and strongly supports a common origin of complex life cycles. Comparative analysis of seven parasitic flatworm genomes identified shared genomic features for the ecto- and endoparasitic lineages, such as a substantial reduction of the core bilaterian gene complement, including the homeodomain-containing genes, and a loss of the piwi and vasa genes, which are considered essential for animal development. Furthermore, the shared loss of functional fatty acid biosynthesis pathways and the absence of peroxisomes, the latter organelles presumed ubiquitous in eukaryotes except for parasitic protozoans, were inferred. The draft genome of G. salaris opens for future in-depth analyses of pathogenicity and host specificity of poorly characterized G. salaris strains, and will enhance studies addressing the genomics of host–parasite interactions and speciation in the highly diverse monogenean flatworms. PMID:24732282

  4. Genomic Feature Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Peter; Edwards, Stefan McKinnon; Rohde, Palle Duun

    Whole-genome sequences and multiple trait phenotypes from large numbers of individuals will soon be available in many populations. Well established statistical modeling approaches enable the genetic analyses of complex trait phenotypes while accounting for a variety of additive and non-additive g...... regions and gene ontologies) that provide better model fit and increase predictive ability of the statistical model for this trait....

  5. GFVO: the Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Joachim; Durgahee, Bibi Sehnaaz Begum; Eilbeck, Karen; Antezana, Erick; Hoehndorf, Robert; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Falling costs in genomic laboratory experiments have led to a steady increase of genomic feature and variation data. Multiple genomic data formats exist for sharing these data, and whilst they are similar, they are addressing slightly different data viewpoints and are consequently not fully compatible with each other. The fragmentation of data format specifications makes it hard to integrate and interpret data for further analysis with information from multiple data providers. As a solution, a new ontology is presented here for annotating and representing genomic feature and variation dataset contents. The Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology (GFVO) specifically addresses genomic data as it is regularly shared using the GFF3 (incl. FASTA), GTF, GVF and VCF file formats. GFVO simplifies data integration and enables linking of genomic annotations across datasets through common semantics of genomic types and relations. Availability and implementation. The latest stable release of the ontology is available via its base URI; previous and development versions are available at the ontology's GitHub repository: https://github.com/BioInterchange/Ontologies; versions of the ontology are indexed through BioPortal (without external class-/property-equivalences due to BioPortal release 4.10 limitations); examples and reference documentation is provided on a separate web-page: http://www.biointerchange.org/ontologies.html. GFVO version 1.0.2 is licensed under the CC0 1.0 Universal license (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0) and therefore de facto within the public domain; the ontology can be appropriated without attribution for commercial and non-commercial use.

  6. GFVO: the Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology

    KAUST Repository

    Baran, Joachim

    2015-05-05

    Falling costs in genomic laboratory experiments have led to a steady increase of genomic feature and variation data. Multiple genomic data formats exist for sharing these data, and whilst they are similar, they are addressing slightly different data viewpoints and are consequently not fully compatible with each other. The fragmentation of data format specifications makes it hard to integrate and interpret data for further analysis with information from multiple data providers. As a solution, a new ontology is presented here for annotating and representing genomic feature and variation dataset contents. The Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology (GFVO) specifically addresses genomic data as it is regularly shared using the GFF3 (incl. FASTA), GTF, GVF and VCF file formats. GFVO simplifies data integration and enables linking of genomic annotations across datasets through common semantics of genomic types and relations. Availability and implementation. The latest stable release of the ontology is available via its base URI; previous and development versions are available at the ontology’s GitHub repository: https://github.com/BioInterchange/Ontologies; versions of the ontology are indexed through BioPortal (without external class-/property-equivalences due to BioPortal release 4.10 limitations); examples and reference documentation is provided on a separate web-page: http://www.biointerchange.org/ontologies.html. GFVO version 1.0.2 is licensed under the CC0 1.0 Universal license (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0) and therefore de facto within the public domain; the ontology can be appropriated without attribution for commercial and non-commercial use.

  7. GFVO: the Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Baran

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Falling costs in genomic laboratory experiments have led to a steady increase of genomic feature and variation data. Multiple genomic data formats exist for sharing these data, and whilst they are similar, they are addressing slightly different data viewpoints and are consequently not fully compatible with each other. The fragmentation of data format specifications makes it hard to integrate and interpret data for further analysis with information from multiple data providers. As a solution, a new ontology is presented here for annotating and representing genomic feature and variation dataset contents. The Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology (GFVO specifically addresses genomic data as it is regularly shared using the GFF3 (incl. FASTA, GTF, GVF and VCF file formats. GFVO simplifies data integration and enables linking of genomic annotations across datasets through common semantics of genomic types and relations.Availability and implementation. The latest stable release of the ontology is available via its base URI; previous and development versions are available at the ontology’s GitHub repository: https://github.com/BioInterchange/Ontologies; versions of the ontology are indexed through BioPortal (without external class-/property-equivalences due to BioPortal release 4.10 limitations; examples and reference documentation is provided on a separate web-page: http://www.biointerchange.org/ontologies.html. GFVO version 1.0.2 is licensed under the CC0 1.0 Universal license (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0 and therefore de facto within the public domain; the ontology can be appropriated without attribution for commercial and non-commercial use.

  8. myGenomeBrowser: building and sharing your own genome browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrere, Sébastien; Gouzy, Jérôme

    2017-04-15

    myGenomeBrowser is a web-based environment that provides biologists with a way to build, query and share their genome browsers. This tool, that builds on JBrowse, is designed to give users more autonomy while simplifying and minimizing intervention from system administrators. We have extended genome browser basic features to allow users to query, analyze and share their data. myGenomeBrowser is freely available at https://bbric-pipelines.toulouse.inra.fr/myGenomeBrowser and includes tutorial screencasts. Source code and installation instructions can be found at https://framagit.org/BBRIC/myGenomeBrowser . myGenomeBrowser is open-source and mainly implemented in Perl, JavaScript, Apache and Docker. sebastien.carrere@inra.fr.

  9. CULTURAL FEATURES SHARED BY INFORMATION SYSTEMS USERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilena Maldonado

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Problems may arise when organizational culture is not considered in the development of information systems, such as difficulties in system implementation, since users do not accept changes in their work cultures. However, current methodology designs do not contemplate cultural factors. The objective of this investigation was to identify the main cultural features shared by the users of information systems in an Argentinean university. As result of this work it was possible to identify the memes shared by the members of the community selected, and to categorize such memes according to their incidence grade. This work seeks to be an initial step towards the construction of systems that evolve along with the organizational culture they are an integral part of.

  10. Building a data sharing model for global genomic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosseim, Patricia; Dove, Edward S; Baggaley, Carman; Meslin, Eric M; Cate, Fred H; Kaye, Jane; Harris, Jennifer R; Knoppers, Bartha M

    2014-08-11

    Data sharing models designed to facilitate global business provide insights for improving transborder genomic data sharing. We argue that a flexible, externally endorsed, multilateral arrangement, combined with an objective third-party assurance mechanism, can effectively balance privacy with the need to share genomic data globally.

  11. GENOMIC FEATURES OF COTESIA PLUTELLAE POLYDNAVIRUS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUCai-ling; ZHUXiang-xiong; FuWen-jun; ZHAOMu-jun

    2003-01-01

    Polydnavirus was purified from the calyx fluid of Cotesia plutellae ovary. The genomic features of C. plutellae polydnavirus (CpPDV) were investigated. The viral genome consists of at least 12 different segments and the aggregate genome size is a lower estimate of 80kbp. By partial digestion of CpPDV DNA with BamHI and subsequent ligation with BamHI-cut plasmid Bluescript, a representative library of CpPDV genome was obtained.

  12. Business models of sharing economy companies : exploring features responsible for sharing economy companies’ internationalization

    OpenAIRE

    Kosintceva, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to the sharing economy business models and their features responsible for internationalization. The study proposes derived definitions for the concepts of “sharing economy” and “business model” and first generic sharing economy business models typology. The typology was created through the qualitative analysis of secondary data on twenty sharing economy companies from nine different industries. The outlined categories of sharing economy business models a...

  13. Classifying Genomic Sequences by Sequence Feature Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Hua Liu; Dian Jiao; Xiao Sun

    2005-01-01

    Traditional sequence analysis depends on sequence alignment. In this study, we analyzed various functional regions of the human genome based on sequence features, including word frequency, dinucleotide relative abundance, and base-base correlation. We analyzed the human chromosome 22 and classified the upstream,exon, intron, downstream, and intergenic regions by principal component analysis and discriminant analysis of these features. The results show that we could classify the functional regions of genome based on sequence feature and discriminant analysis.

  14. BEDOPS: high-performance genomic feature operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neph, Shane; Kuehn, M Scott; Reynolds, Alex P; Haugen, Eric; Thurman, Robert E; Johnson, Audra K; Rynes, Eric; Maurano, Matthew T; Vierstra, Jeff; Thomas, Sean; Sandstrom, Richard; Humbert, Richard; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A

    2012-07-15

    The large and growing number of genome-wide datasets highlights the need for high-performance feature analysis and data comparison methods, in addition to efficient data storage and retrieval techniques. We introduce BEDOPS, a software suite for common genomic analysis tasks which offers improved flexibility, scalability and execution time characteristics over previously published packages. The suite includes a utility to compress large inputs into a lossless format that can provide greater space savings and faster data extractions than alternatives. http://code.google.com/p/bedops/ includes binaries, source and documentation.

  15. New complete genome sequences of human rhinoviruses shed light on their phylogeny and genomic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdobnov Evgeny M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human rhinoviruses (HRV, the most frequent cause of respiratory infections, include 99 different serotypes segregating into two species, A and B. Rhinoviruses share extensive genomic sequence similarity with enteroviruses and both are part of the picornavirus family. Nevertheless they differ significantly at the phenotypic level. The lack of HRV full-length genome sequences and the absence of analysis comparing picornaviruses at the whole genome level limit our knowledge of the genomic features supporting these differences. Results Here we report complete genome sequences of 12 HRV-A and HRV-B serotypes, more than doubling the current number of available HRV sequences. The whole-genome maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis suggests that HRV-B and human enteroviruses (HEV diverged from the last common ancestor after their separation from HRV-A. On the other hand, compared to HEV, HRV-B are more related to HRV-A in the capsid and 3B-C regions. We also identified the presence of a 2C cis-acting replication element (cre in HRV-B that is not present in HRV-A, and that had been previously characterized only in HEV. In contrast to HEV viruses, HRV-A and HRV-B share also markedly lower GC content along the whole genome length. Conclusion Our findings provide basis to speculate about both the biological similarities and the differences (e.g. tissue tropism, temperature adaptation or acid lability of these three groups of viruses.

  16. Sharing the Knowledge: Sharing Aggregate Genomic Findings with Research Participants in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerasidou, Angeliki

    2015-12-01

    Returning research results to participants is recognised as an obligation that researchers should always try to fulfil. But can we ascribe the same obligation to researchers who conduct genomics research producing only aggregated findings? And what about genomics research conducted in developing countries? This paper considers Beskow's et al. argument that aggregated findings should also be returned to research participants. This recommendation is examined in the context of genomics research conducted in developing countries. The risks and benefits of attempting such an exercise are identified, and suggestions on ways to avoid some of the challenges are proposed. I argue that disseminating the findings of genomic research to participating communities should be seen as sharing knowledge rather than returning results. Calling the dissemination of aggregate, population level information returning results can be confusing and misleading as participants might expect to receive individual level information. Talking about sharing knowledge is a more appropriate way of expressing and communicating the outcome of population genomic research. Considering the knowledge produced by genomics research a worthwhile output that should be shared with the participants and approaching the exercise as a 'sharing of knowledge', could help mitigate the risks of unrealistic expectations and misunderstanding of findings, whilst promoting trusting and long lasting relationships with the participating communities.

  17. Genomic donor cassette sharing during VLRA and VLRC assembly in jawless vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sabyasachi; Li, Jianxu; Holland, Stephen J; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Hirano, Masayuki; Schorpp, Michael; Aravind, L; Cooper, Max D; Boehm, Thomas

    2014-10-14

    Lampreys possess two T-like lymphocyte lineages that express either variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) A or VLRC antigen receptors. VLRA(+) and VLRC(+) lymphocytes share many similarities with the two principal T-cell lineages of jawed vertebrates expressing the αβ and γδ T-cell receptors (TCRs). During the assembly of VLR genes, several types of genomic cassettes are inserted, in step-wise fashion, into incomplete germ-line genes to generate the mature forms of antigen receptor genes. Unexpectedly, the structurally variable components of VLRA and VLRC receptors often possess partially identical sequences; this phenomenon of module sharing between these two VLR isotypes occurs in both lampreys and hagfishes. By contrast, VLRA and VLRC molecules typically do not share their building blocks with the structurally analogous VLRB receptors that are expressed by B-like lymphocytes. Our studies reveal that VLRA and VLRC germ-line genes are situated in close proximity to each other in the lamprey genome and indicate the interspersed arrangement of isotype-specific and shared genomic donor cassettes; these features may facilitate the shared cassette use. The genomic structure of the VLRA/VLRC locus in lampreys is reminiscent of the interspersed nature of the TCRA/TCRD locus in jawed vertebrates that also allows the sharing of some variable gene segments during the recombinatorial assembly of TCR genes.

  18. Genome features of Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.L.T.O. Nascimento

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available We report novel features of the genome sequence of Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni, a highly invasive spirochete. Leptospira species colonize a significant proportion of rodent populations worldwide and produce life-threatening infections in mammals. Genomic sequence analysis reveals the presence of a competent transport system with 13 families of genes encoding for major transporters including a three-member component efflux system compatible with the long-term survival of this organism. The leptospiral genome contains a broad array of genes encoding regulatory system, signal transduction and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, reflecting the organism's ability to respond to diverse environmental stimuli. The identification of a complete set of genes encoding the enzymes for the cobalamin biosynthetic pathway and the novel coding genes related to lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis should bring new light to the study of Leptospira physiology. Genes related to toxins, lipoproteins and several surface-exposed proteins may facilitate a better understanding of the Leptospira pathogenesis and may serve as potential candidates for vaccine.

  19. Social insect genomes exhibit dramatic evolution in gene composition and regulation while preserving regulatory features linked to sociality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simola, Daniel F.; Wissler, Lothar; Donahue, Greg

    2013-01-01

    Genomes of eusocial insects code for dramatic examples of phenotypic plasticity and social organization. We compared the genomes of seven ants, the honeybee, and various solitary insects to examine whether eusocial lineages share distinct features of genomic organization. Each ant lineage contain...

  20. GFF-Ex: a genome feature extraction package

    OpenAIRE

    Rastogi, Achal; Gupta, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Background Genomic features of whole genome sequences emerging from various sequencing and annotation projects are represented and stored in several formats. Amongst these formats, the GFF (Generic/General Feature Format) has emerged as a widely accepted, portable and successfully used flat file format for genome annotation storage. With an increasing interest in genome annotation projects and secondary and meta-analysis, there is a need for efficient tools to extract sequences of interests f...

  1. Genomic Research and Wide Data Sharing: Views of Prospective Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinidad, Susan Brown; Fullerton, Stephanie M.; Bares, Julie M.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Larson, Eric B.; Burke, Wylie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Sharing study data within the research community generates tension between two important goods: promoting scientific goals and protecting the privacy interests of study participants. The present study was designed to explore the perceptions, beliefs, and attitudes of research participants and possible future participants regarding genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and repository-based research. Methods Focus group sessions with (1) current research participants, (2) surrogate decision-makers, and (3) three age-defined cohorts (18–34 years, 35–50, >50). Results Participants expressed a variety of opinions about the acceptability of wide sharing of genetic and phenotypic information for research purposes through large, publicly accessible data repositories. Most believed that making de-identified study data available to the research community is a social good that should be pursued. Privacy and confidentiality concerns were common, though they would not necessarily preclude participation. Many participants voiced reservations about sharing data with for-profit organizations. Conclusions Trust is central in participants’ views regarding GWAS data sharing. Further research is needed to develop governance models that enact the values of stewardship. PMID:20535021

  2. Beyond Our Borders? Public Resistance to Global Genomic Data Sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Mary A; Cook-Deegan, Robert; McGuire, Amy L

    2016-11-01

    Prospects have never seemed better for a truly global approach to science to improve human health, with leaders of national initiatives laying out their vision of a worldwide network of related projects. An extensive literature addresses obstacles to global genomic data sharing, yet a series of public polls suggests that the scientific community may be overlooking a significant barrier: potential public resistance to data sharing across national borders. In several large United States surveys, university researchers in other countries were deemed the least acceptable group of data users, and a just-completed US survey found a marked increase in privacy and security concerns related to data access by non-US researchers. Furthermore, diminished support for sharing beyond national borders is not unique to the US, although the limited data from outside the US suggest variation across countries as well as demographic groups. Possible sources of resistance include apprehension about privacy and security protections. Strategies for building public support include making the affirmative case for global data sharing, addressing privacy, security, and other legitimate concerns, and investigating public concerns in greater depth.

  3. Comparative Genomic and Phylogenomic Analyses Reveal a Conserved Core Genome Shared by Estuarine and Oceanic Cyanopodoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sijun; Zhang, Si; Jiao, Nianzhi; Chen, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Podoviruses are among the major viral groups that infect marine picocyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus. Here, we reported the genome sequences of five Synechococcus podoviruses isolated from the estuarine environment, and performed comparative genomic and phylogenomic analyses based on a total of 20 cyanopodovirus genomes. The genomes of all the known marine cyanopodoviruses are highly syntenic. A pan-genome of 349 clustered orthologous groups was determined, among which 15 were core genes. These core genes make up nearly half of each genome in length, reflecting the high level of genome conservation among this cyanophage type. The whole genome phylogenies based on concatenated core genes and gene content were highly consistent and confirmed the separation of two discrete marine cyanopodovirus clusters MPP-A and MPP-B. The genomes within cluster MPP-B grouped into subclusters mainly corresponding to Prochlorococcus or Synechococcus host types. Auxiliary metabolic genes tend to occur in a specific phylogenetic group of these cyanopodoviruses. All the MPP-B phages analyzed here encode the photosynthesis gene psbA, which are absent in all the MPP-A genomes thus far. Interestingly, all the MPP-B and two MPP-A Synechococcus podoviruses encode the thymidylate synthase gene thyX, while at the same genome locus all the MPP-B Prochlorococcus podoviruses encode the transaldolase gene talC. Both genes are hypothesized to have the potential to facilitate the biosynthesis of deoxynucleotide for phage replication. Inheritance of specific functional genes could be important to the evolution and ecological fitness of certain cyanophage genotypes. Our analyses demonstrate that cyanopodoviruses of estuarine and oceanic origins share a conserved core genome and suggest that accessory genes may be related to environmental adaptation. PMID:26569403

  4. Comparative Genomic and Phylogenomic Analyses Reveal a Conserved Core Genome Shared by Estuarine and Oceanic Cyanopodoviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijun Huang

    Full Text Available Podoviruses are among the major viral groups that infect marine picocyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus. Here, we reported the genome sequences of five Synechococcus podoviruses isolated from the estuarine environment, and performed comparative genomic and phylogenomic analyses based on a total of 20 cyanopodovirus genomes. The genomes of all the known marine cyanopodoviruses are highly syntenic. A pan-genome of 349 clustered orthologous groups was determined, among which 15 were core genes. These core genes make up nearly half of each genome in length, reflecting the high level of genome conservation among this cyanophage type. The whole genome phylogenies based on concatenated core genes and gene content were highly consistent and confirmed the separation of two discrete marine cyanopodovirus clusters MPP-A and MPP-B. The genomes within cluster MPP-B grouped into subclusters mainly corresponding to Prochlorococcus or Synechococcus host types. Auxiliary metabolic genes tend to occur in a specific phylogenetic group of these cyanopodoviruses. All the MPP-B phages analyzed here encode the photosynthesis gene psbA, which are absent in all the MPP-A genomes thus far. Interestingly, all the MPP-B and two MPP-A Synechococcus podoviruses encode the thymidylate synthase gene thyX, while at the same genome locus all the MPP-B Prochlorococcus podoviruses encode the transaldolase gene talC. Both genes are hypothesized to have the potential to facilitate the biosynthesis of deoxynucleotide for phage replication. Inheritance of specific functional genes could be important to the evolution and ecological fitness of certain cyanophage genotypes. Our analyses demonstrate that cyanopodoviruses of estuarine and oceanic origins share a conserved core genome and suggest that accessory genes may be related to environmental adaptation.

  5. Metabolic Cycles in Yeast Share Features Conserved among Circadian Rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causton, Helen C; Feeney, Kevin A; Ziegler, Christine A; O'Neill, John S

    2015-04-20

    Cell-autonomous circadian rhythms allow organisms to temporally orchestrate their internal state to anticipate and/or resonate with the external environment. Although ∼24-hr periodicity is observed across aerobic eukaryotes, the central mechanism has been hard to dissect because few simple models exist, and known clock proteins are not conserved across phylogenetic kingdoms. In contrast, contributions to circadian rhythmicity made by a handful of post-translational mechanisms, such as phosphorylation of clock proteins by casein kinase 1 (CK1) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), appear conserved among phyla. These kinases have many other essential cellular functions and are better conserved in their contribution to timekeeping than any of the clock proteins they phosphorylate. Rhythmic oscillations in cellular redox state are another universal feature of circadian timekeeping, e.g., over-oxidation cycles of abundant peroxiredoxin proteins. Here, we use comparative chronobiology to distinguish fundamental clock mechanisms from species and/or tissue-specific adaptations and thereby identify features shared between circadian rhythms in mammalian cells and non-circadian temperature-compensated respiratory oscillations in budding yeast. We find that both types of oscillations are coupled with the cell division cycle, exhibit period determination by CK1 and GSK3, and have peroxiredoxin over-oxidation cycles. We also explore how peroxiredoxins contribute to YROs. Our data point to common mechanisms underlying both YROs and circadian rhythms and suggest two interpretations: either certain biochemical systems are simply permissive for cellular oscillations (with frequencies from hours to days) or this commonality arose via divergence from an ancestral cellular clock.

  6. Characteristics of genomic test consumers who spontaneously share results with their health care provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darst, Burcu F; Madlensky, Lisa; Schork, Nicholas J; Topol, Eric J; Bloss, Cinnamon S

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of direct-to-consumer (DTC) genomic test consumers who spontaneously shared their test results with their health care provider. Utilizing data from the Scripps Genomic Health Initiative, we compared demographic, behavioral, and attitudinal characteristics of DTC genomic test consumers who shared their results with their physician or health care provider versus those who did not share. We also compared genomic risk estimates between the two groups. Of 2,024 individuals assessed at approximately 6 months post testing, 540 individuals (26.5%) reported sharing their results with their physician or health care provider. Those who shared were older (p consumers.

  7. Whole-genome phylogeny of Escherichia coli/Shigella group by feature frequency profiles (FFPs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Gregory E.; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2011-01-01

    A whole-genome phylogeny of the Escherichia coli/Shigella group was constructed by using the feature frequency profile (FFP) method. This alignment-free approach uses the frequencies of l-mer features of whole genomes to infer phylogenic distances. We present two phylogenies that accentuate different aspects of E. coli/Shigella genomic evolution: (i) one based on the compositions of all possible features of length l = 24 (∼8.4 million features), which are likely to reveal the phenetic grouping and relationship among the organisms and (ii) the other based on the compositions of core features with low frequency and low variability (∼0.56 million features), which account for ∼69% of all commonly shared features among 38 taxa examined and are likely to have genome-wide lineal evolutionary signal. Shigella appears as a single clade when all possible features are used without filtering of noncore features. However, results using core features show that Shigella consists of at least two distantly related subclades, implying that the subclades evolved into a single clade because of a high degree of convergence influenced by mobile genetic elements and niche adaptation. In both FFP trees, the basal group of the E. coli/Shigella phylogeny is the B2 phylogroup, which contains primarily uropathogenic strains, suggesting that the E. coli/Shigella ancestor was likely a facultative or opportunistic pathogen. The extant commensal strains diverged relatively late and appear to be the result of reductive evolution of genomes. We also identify clade distinguishing features and their associated genomic regions within each phylogroup. Such features may provide useful information for understanding evolution of the groups and for quick diagnostic identification of each phylogroup. PMID:21536867

  8. DHPC: a new tool to express genome structural features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xuegong; Deng, Xuemei; Rayner, Simon; Liu, Xiangdong; Zhang, Qingling; Yang, Yupu; Li, Ning

    2008-05-01

    The DHPC (DNA Hilbert-Peano curve) is a new tool for visualizing large-scale genome sequences by mapping sequences into a two-dimensional square. It utilizes the space-filling function of Hilbert-Peano mapping. By applying a Gauss smoothing technique and a user-defined color function, a large-scale genome sequence can be mapped into a two-dimensional color image. In the calculated DHPCs, many genome characteristics are revealed. In this article we introduce the method and show how DHPCs may be used to identify regions of different base composition. The power of the method is demonstrated by presenting multiple examples such as repeating sequences, degree of base bias, regions of homogeneity and their boundaries, and mark of annotated segments. We also present several genome curves generated by DHPC to demonstrate how DHPC can be used to find previously unidentified sequence features in these genomes.

  9. PromBase: a web resource for various genomic features and predicted promoters in prokaryotic genomes

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    Bansal Manju

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As more and more genomes are being sequenced, an overview of their genomic features and annotation of their functional elements, which control the expression of each gene or transcription unit of the genome, is a fundamental challenge in genomics and bioinformatics. Findings Relative stability of DNA sequence has been used to predict promoter regions in 913 microbial genomic sequences with GC-content ranging from 16.6% to 74.9%. Irrespective of the genome GC-content the relative stability based promoter prediction method has already been proven to be robust in terms of recall and precision. The predicted promoter regions for the 913 microbial genomes have been accumulated in a database called PromBase. Promoter search can be carried out in PromBase either by specifying the gene name or the genomic position. Each predicted promoter region has been assigned to a reliability class (low, medium, high, very high and highest based on the difference between its average free energy and the downstream region. The recall and precision values for each class are shown graphically in PromBase. In addition, PromBase provides detailed information about base composition, CDS and CG/TA skews for each genome and various DNA sequence dependent structural properties (average free energy, curvature and bendability in the vicinity of all annotated translation start sites (TLS. Conclusion PromBase is a database, which contains predicted promoter regions and detailed analysis of various genomic features for 913 microbial genomes. PromBase can serve as a valuable resource for comparative genomics study and help the experimentalist to rapidly access detailed information on various genomic features and putative promoter regions in any given genome. This database is freely accessible for academic and non- academic users via the worldwide web http://nucleix.mbu.iisc.ernet.in/prombase/.

  10. Shared genetic variance between the features of the metabolic syndrome: Heritability studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Povel, C.M.; Boer, J.M.A.; Feskens, E.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Heritability estimates of MetS range from approximately 10%–30%. The genetic variation that is shared among MetS features can be calculated by genetic correlation coefficients. The objective of this paper is to identify MetS feature as well as MetS related features which have much genetic variation

  11. Senescing cells share common features with dedifferentiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damri, Meytal; Granot, Gila; Ben-Meir, Hagit; Avivi, Yigal; Plaschkes, Inbar; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered; Wolfson, Marina; Fraifeld, Vadim; Grafi, Gideon

    2009-12-01

    Dedifferentiation signifies the capacity of somatic cells to acquire stem cell-like properties. This process can be induced during normal development and as a response to various stimuli, such as pathogen infection and wounding. Dedifferentiation also characterizes the transition of differentiated leaf cells into protoplasts (plant cells devoid of cell walls), a transition accompanied by widespread chromatin decondensation. Transcriptome profiling of dedifferentiating protoplast cells revealed striking similarities with senescing cells; both display a large increase in the expression of genes of specific transcription factor (TF) families, including ANAC, WRKY, bZIP, and C2H2. Further analysis showed that leaves induced to senesce by exposure to dark display characteristic features of dedifferentiating cells, including chromatin decondensation, disruption of the nucleolus, and condensation of rRNA genes. Considering that premature senescence can be induced by various stress conditions both in plant and animal cells, our results suggest that the response of plant and also animal cells to certain stresses converges on cellular dedifferentiation whereby cells first acquire stem cell-like state prior to acquisition of a new cell fate (e.g., reentry into the cell cycle or death).

  12. An International Framework for Data Sharing: Moving Forward with the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimzadeh, Vasiliki; Dyke, Stephanie O M; Knoppers, Bartha M

    2016-06-01

    The Global Alliance for Genomics and Health is marshaling expertise in biomedical research and data sharing policy to propel bench-to-bedside translation of genomics in parallel with many of the BioSHaRE-EU initiatives described at length in this Issue. Worldwide representation of institutions, funders, researchers, and patient advocacy groups at the Global Alliance is testament to a shared ideal that sees maximizing the public good as a chief priority of genomic innovation in health. The Global Alliance has made a critical stride in this regard with the development of its Framework for Responsible Sharing of Genomic and Health-related Data.(1) This article first discusses the human rights pillars that underlie the Framework and mission of the Global Alliance. Second, it outlines the Global Alliance's use of data governance policies through a number of demonstration projects. Finally, the authors describe how the Global Alliance envisions international data sharing moving forward in the postgenomic era.

  13. Genomic Data-Sharing: What will be our legacy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawneequa eCallier

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Prior to 1974, the Tuskegee Syphilis experiments, expansive use of the HeLa cells, and other blatant instances of research abuse pervaded the medical research field. Discussion today about these challenges have caused the general public to develop a reluctance and distrust for medical research. This has significant implications for the advancement of genomic science, and the public's perception of genomic research.

  14. Shared and nonshared genomic divergence in parallel ecotypes of Littorina saxatilis at a local scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravinet, Mark; Westram, Anja; Johannesson, Kerstin; Butlin, Roger; André, Carl; Panova, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Parallel speciation occurs when selection drives repeated, independent adaptive divergence that reduces gene flow between ecotypes. Classical examples show parallel speciation originating from shared genomic variation, but this does not seem to be the case in the rough periwinkle (Littorina saxatilis) that has evolved considerable phenotypic diversity across Europe, including several distinct ecotypes. Small 'wave' ecotype snails inhabit exposed rocks and experience strong wave action, while thick-shelled, 'crab' ecotype snails are larger and experience crab predation on less exposed shores. Crab and wave ecotypes appear to have arisen in parallel, and recent evidence suggests only marginal sharing of molecular variation linked to evolution of similar ecotypes in different parts of Europe. However, the extent of genomic sharing is expected to increase with gene flow and more recent common ancestry. To test this, we used de novo RAD-sequencing to quantify the extent of shared genomic divergence associated with phenotypic similarities amongst ecotype pairs on three close islands (<10 km distance) connected by weak gene flow (Nm ~ 0.03) and with recent common ancestry (<10 000 years). After accounting for technical issues, including a large proportion of null alleles due to a large effective population size, we found ~8-28% of positive outliers were shared between two islands and ~2-9% were shared amongst all three islands. This low level of sharing suggests that parallel phenotypic divergence in this system is not matched by shared genomic divergence despite a high probability of gene flow and standing genetic variation.

  15. The need to redefine genomic data sharing: A focus on data accessibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tempest A. van Schaik

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available DNAdigest's mission is to investigate and address the issues hindering efficient and ethical genomic data sharing in the human genomics research community. We conducted contextual interviews with human genomics researchers in clinical, academic or industrial R&D settings about their experience with accessing and sharing human genomic data. The qualitative interviews were followed by an online survey which provided quantitative support for our findings. Here we present the generalised workflow for accessing human genomic data through both public and restricted-access repositories and discuss reported points of frustration and their possible improvements. We discuss how data discoverability and accessibility are lacking in current mechanisms and how these are the prerequisites for adoption of best practices in the research community. We summarise current initiatives related to genomic data discovery and present a new data discovery platform available at http://nucleobase.co.uk.

  16. Genome display tool: visualizing features in complex data sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Yue

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The enormity of the information contained in large data sets makes it difficult to develop intuitive understanding. It would be useful to have software that allows visualization of possible correlations between properties that can be associated with a core data set. In the case of bacterial genomes, existing visualization tools focus on either global properties such as variations in composition or detailed local displays of the features that comprise the annotation. It is not easy to visualize other information in the context of this core information. Results A Java based software known as the Genome Display Tool (GDT, allows the user to simultaneously view the distribution of multiple attributes pertaining to genes and intragenic regions in a single bacterial genome using different colours and shapes on a single screen. The display represents each gene by small boxes that correlate with physical position in the genome. The size of the boxes is dynamically allocated based on the number of genes and a zoom feature allows close-up inspection of regions of interest. The display is interfaced with a MS-Access relational database and can display any feature in the database that can be represented by discrete values. Data is readily added to the database from an MS-Excel spread sheet. The functionality of GDT is demonstrated by comparing the results of two predictions of recent horizontal transfer events in the genome of Synechocystis PCC-6803. The resulting display allows the user to immediately see how much agreement exists between the two methods and also visualize how genes in various categories (e.g. predicted in both methods, one method etc are distributed in the genome. Conclusion The GDT software provides the user with a powerful tool that allows development of an intuitive understanding of the relative distribution of features in a large data set. As additional features are added to the data set, the number of possible

  17. The Social Meaning of Sharing and Geocoding: Features and Social Processes in Online Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Li

    2012-01-01

    This study examines how emergent communities might show different patterns of uses and perceptions for communication and profile features when geolocation features are used. It explores the ways that location awareness moderates the social and cognitive processes that motivate people's participation in the sharing of personal information…

  18. Knocking down the obstacles to functional genomics data sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Kaylene J; Smith, Jennifer A

    2017-03-01

    This week, Scientific Data published a collection of eight papers that describe datasets from high-throughput functional genomics screens, primarily utilizing RNA interference (RNAi). The publications explore host-pathogen dependencies, innate immune response, disease pathways, and cell morphology and motility at the genome-level. All data, including raw images from the high content screens, are publically available in PubChem BioAssay, figshare, Harvard Dataverse or the Image Data Resource (IDR). Detailed data descriptors enable use of these data for analysis algorithm design, machine learning, data comparisons, as well as generating new scientific hypotheses.

  19. Knocking down the obstacles to functional genomics data sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Kaylene J.; Smith, Jennifer A.

    2017-01-01

    This week, Scientific Data published a collection of eight papers that describe datasets from high-throughput functional genomics screens, primarily utilizing RNA interference (RNAi). The publications explore host-pathogen dependencies, innate immune response, disease pathways, and cell morphology and motility at the genome-level. All data, including raw images from the high content screens, are publically available in PubChem BioAssay, figshare, Harvard Dataverse or the Image Data Resource (IDR). Detailed data descriptors enable use of these data for analysis algorithm design, machine learning, data comparisons, as well as generating new scientific hypotheses. PMID:28248922

  20. Participants' recall and understanding of genomic research and large-scale data sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jill Oliver; Slashinski, Melody J; Wang, Tao; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; McGuire, Amy L

    2013-10-01

    As genomic researchers are urged to openly share generated sequence data with other researchers, it is important to examine the utility of informed consent documents and processes, particularly as these relate to participants' engagement with and recall of the information presented to them, their objective or subjective understanding of the key elements of genomic research (e.g., data sharing), as well as how these factors influence or mediate the decisions they make. We conducted a randomized trial of three experimental informed consent documents (ICDs) with participants (n = 229) being recruited to genomic research studies; each document afforded varying control over breadth of release of genetic information. Recall and understanding, their impact on data sharing decisions, and comfort in decision making were assessed in a follow-up structured interview. Over 25% did not remember signing an ICD to participate in a genomic study, and the majority (54%) could not correctly identify with whom they had agreed to share their genomic data. However, participants felt that they understood enough to make an informed decision, and lack of recall did not impact final data sharing decisions or satisfaction with participation. These findings raise questions about the types of information participants need in order to provide valid informed consent, and whether subjective understanding and comfort with decision making are sufficient to satisfy the ethical principle of respect for persons.

  1. Feature selection and survival modeling in The Cancer Genome Atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim H

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hyunsoo Kim,1 Markus Bredel2 1Department of Pathology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, and Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA Purpose: Personalized medicine is predicated on the concept of identifying subgroups of a common disease for better treatment. Identifying biomarkers that predict disease subtypes has been a major focus of biomedical science. In the era of genome-wide profiling, there is controversy as to the optimal number of genes as an input of a feature selection algorithm for survival modeling. Patients and methods: The expression profiles and outcomes of 544 patients were retrieved from The Cancer Genome Atlas. We compared four different survival prediction methods: (1 1-nearest neighbor (1-NN survival prediction method; (2 random patient selection method and a Cox-based regression method with nested cross-validation; (3 least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO optimization using whole-genome gene expression profiles; or (4 gene expression profiles of cancer pathway genes. Results: The 1-NN method performed better than the random patient selection method in terms of survival predictions, although it does not include a feature selection step. The Cox-based regression method with LASSO optimization using whole-genome gene expression data demonstrated higher survival prediction power than the 1-NN method, but was outperformed by the same method when using gene expression profiles of cancer pathway genes alone. Conclusion: The 1-NN survival prediction method may require more patients for better performance, even when omitting censored data. Using preexisting biological knowledge for survival prediction is reasonable as a means to understand the biological system of a cancer, unless the analysis goal is to identify completely unknown genes relevant to cancer biology. Keywords: brain, feature selection

  2. Novel giant siphovirus from Bacillus anthracis features unusual genome characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly H Ganz

    Full Text Available Here we present vB_BanS-Tsamsa, a novel temperate phage isolated from Bacillus anthracis, the agent responsible for anthrax infections in wildlife, livestock and humans. Tsamsa phage is a giant siphovirus (order Caudovirales, featuring a long, flexible and non-contractile tail of 440 nm (not including baseplate structure and an isometric head of 82 nm in diameter. We induced Tsamsa phage in samples from two different carcass sites in Etosha National Park, Namibia. The Tsamsa phage genome is the largest sequenced Bacillus siphovirus, containing 168,876 bp and 272 ORFs. The genome features an integrase/recombinase enzyme, indicative of a temperate lifestyle. Among bacterial strains tested, the phage infected only certain members of the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group (B. anthracis, B. cereus and B. thuringiensis and exhibited moderate specificity for B. anthracis. Tsamsa lysed seven out of 25 B. cereus strains, two out of five B. thuringiensis strains and six out of seven B. anthracis strains tested. It did not lyse B. anthracis PAK-1, an atypical strain that is also resistant to both gamma phage and cherry phage. The Tsamsa endolysin features a broader lytic spectrum than the phage host range, indicating possible use of the enzyme in Bacillus biocontrol.

  3. Novel giant siphovirus from Bacillus anthracis features unusual genome characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Holly H; Law, Christina; Schmuki, Martina; Eichenseher, Fritz; Calendar, Richard; Loessner, Martin J; Getz, Wayne M; Korlach, Jonas; Beyer, Wolfgang; Klumpp, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Here we present vB_BanS-Tsamsa, a novel temperate phage isolated from Bacillus anthracis, the agent responsible for anthrax infections in wildlife, livestock and humans. Tsamsa phage is a giant siphovirus (order Caudovirales), featuring a long, flexible and non-contractile tail of 440 nm (not including baseplate structure) and an isometric head of 82 nm in diameter. We induced Tsamsa phage in samples from two different carcass sites in Etosha National Park, Namibia. The Tsamsa phage genome is the largest sequenced Bacillus siphovirus, containing 168,876 bp and 272 ORFs. The genome features an integrase/recombinase enzyme, indicative of a temperate lifestyle. Among bacterial strains tested, the phage infected only certain members of the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group (B. anthracis, B. cereus and B. thuringiensis) and exhibited moderate specificity for B. anthracis. Tsamsa lysed seven out of 25 B. cereus strains, two out of five B. thuringiensis strains and six out of seven B. anthracis strains tested. It did not lyse B. anthracis PAK-1, an atypical strain that is also resistant to both gamma phage and cherry phage. The Tsamsa endolysin features a broader lytic spectrum than the phage host range, indicating possible use of the enzyme in Bacillus biocontrol.

  4. Three Prochlorococcus cyanophage genomes: signature features and ecological interpretations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Matthew B; Coleman, Maureen L; Weigele, Peter; Rohwer, Forest; Chisholm, Sallie W

    2005-05-01

    The oceanic cyanobacteria Prochlorococcus are globally important, ecologically diverse primary producers. It is thought that their viruses (phages) mediate population sizes and affect the evolutionary trajectories of their hosts. Here we present an analysis of genomes from three Prochlorococcus phages: a podovirus and two myoviruses. The morphology, overall genome features, and gene content of these phages suggest that they are quite similar to T7-like (P-SSP7) and T4-like (P-SSM2 and P-SSM4) phages. Using the existing phage taxonomic framework as a guideline, we examined genome sequences to establish "core" genes for each phage group. We found the podovirus contained 15 of 26 core T7-like genes and the two myoviruses contained 43 and 42 of 75 core T4-like genes. In addition to these core genes, each genome contains a significant number of "cyanobacterial" genes, i.e., genes with significant best BLAST hits to genes found in cyanobacteria. Some of these, we speculate, represent "signature" cyanophage genes. For example, all three phage genomes contain photosynthetic genes (psbA, hliP) that are thought to help maintain host photosynthetic activity during infection, as well as an aldolase family gene (talC) that could facilitate alternative routes of carbon metabolism during infection. The podovirus genome also contains an integrase gene (int) and other features that suggest it is capable of integrating into its host. If indeed it is, this would be unprecedented among cultured T7-like phages or marine cyanophages and would have significant evolutionary and ecological implications for phage and host. Further, both myoviruses contain phosphate-inducible genes (phoH and pstS) that are likely to be important for phage and host responses to phosphate stress, a commonly limiting nutrient in marine systems. Thus, these marine cyanophages appear to be variations of two well-known phages-T7 and T4-but contain genes that, if functional, reflect adaptations for infection of

  5. Three Prochlorococcus cyanophage genomes: signature features and ecological interpretations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Sullivan

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The oceanic cyanobacteria Prochlorococcus are globally important, ecologically diverse primary producers. It is thought that their viruses (phages mediate population sizes and affect the evolutionary trajectories of their hosts. Here we present an analysis of genomes from three Prochlorococcus phages: a podovirus and two myoviruses. The morphology, overall genome features, and gene content of these phages suggest that they are quite similar to T7-like (P-SSP7 and T4-like (P-SSM2 and P-SSM4 phages. Using the existing phage taxonomic framework as a guideline, we examined genome sequences to establish "core" genes for each phage group. We found the podovirus contained 15 of 26 core T7-like genes and the two myoviruses contained 43 and 42 of 75 core T4-like genes. In addition to these core genes, each genome contains a significant number of "cyanobacterial" genes, i.e., genes with significant best BLAST hits to genes found in cyanobacteria. Some of these, we speculate, represent "signature" cyanophage genes. For example, all three phage genomes contain photosynthetic genes (psbA, hliP that are thought to help maintain host photosynthetic activity during infection, as well as an aldolase family gene (talC that could facilitate alternative routes of carbon metabolism during infection. The podovirus genome also contains an integrase gene (int and other features that suggest it is capable of integrating into its host. If indeed it is, this would be unprecedented among cultured T7-like phages or marine cyanophages and would have significant evolutionary and ecological implications for phage and host. Further, both myoviruses contain phosphate-inducible genes (phoH and pstS that are likely to be important for phage and host responses to phosphate stress, a commonly limiting nutrient in marine systems. Thus, these marine cyanophages appear to be variations of two well-known phages-T7 and T4-but contain genes that, if functional, reflect adaptations for

  6. Information-seeking and sharing behavior following genomic testing for diabetes risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Rachel; Powell, Jill; Barry, William; Haga, Susanne B

    2015-02-01

    As the practice of medicine has become more patient-driven, patients are increasingly seeking health information within and outside of their doctor's office. Patients looking for information and support are often turning to the Internet as well as family and friends. As part of a study to understand the impact of delivery method of genomic testing for type 2 diabetes risk on comprehension and health-related behaviors, we assessed participants' information-seeking and sharing behaviors after receiving their results in-person with a genetic counselor or online through the testing company's website. We found that 32.6 % of participants sought information after receiving the genomic test results for T2DM; 80.8 % of those that did seek information turned to the Internet. Eighty-eight percent of participants reported that they shared their T2DM risk results, primarily with their spouse/partner (65 %) and other family members (57 %) and children (19 %); 14 % reported sharing results with their health provider. Sharing was significantly increased in those who received results in-person from the genetic counselor (p = 0.0001). Understanding patients' interests and needs for additional information after genomic testing and with whom they share details of their health is important as more information and clinical services are available and accessed outside the clinician's office. Genetic counselors' expertise and experience in creating educational materials and promoting sharing of genetic information can facilitate patient engagement and education.

  7. Uncovering genomic features and maternal origin of korean native chicken by whole genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Woori; Song, Ki-Duk; Oh, Jae-Don; Heo, Kang-Nyeong; Lee, Jun-Heon; Lee, Woon Kyu; Yoon, Sook Hee; Kim, Heebal; Cho, Seoae; Lee, Hak-Kyo

    2014-01-01

    The Korean Native Chicken (KNC) is an important endemic biological resource in Korea. While numerous studies have been conducted exploring this breed, none have used next-generation sequencing to identify its specific genomic features. We sequenced five strains of KNC and identified 10.9 million SNVs and 1.3 million InDels. Through the analysis, we found that the highly variable region common to all 5 strains had genes like PCHD15, CISD1, PIK3C2A, and NUCB2 that might be related to the phenotypic traits of the chicken such as auditory sense, growth rate and egg traits. In addition, we assembled unaligned reads that could not be mapped to the reference genome. By assembling the unaligned reads, we were able to present genomic sequences characteristic to the KNC. Based on this, we also identified genes related to the olfactory receptors and antigen that are common to all 5 strains. Finally, through the reconstructed mitochondrial genome sequences, we performed phylogenomic analysis and elucidated the maternal origin of the artificially restored KNC. Our results revealed that the KNC has multiple maternal origins which are in agreement with Korea's history of chicken breed imports. The results presented here provide a valuable basis for future research on genomic features of KNC and further understanding of KNC's origin.

  8. Uncovering genomic features and maternal origin of korean native chicken by whole genome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woori Kwak

    Full Text Available The Korean Native Chicken (KNC is an important endemic biological resource in Korea. While numerous studies have been conducted exploring this breed, none have used next-generation sequencing to identify its specific genomic features. We sequenced five strains of KNC and identified 10.9 million SNVs and 1.3 million InDels. Through the analysis, we found that the highly variable region common to all 5 strains had genes like PCHD15, CISD1, PIK3C2A, and NUCB2 that might be related to the phenotypic traits of the chicken such as auditory sense, growth rate and egg traits. In addition, we assembled unaligned reads that could not be mapped to the reference genome. By assembling the unaligned reads, we were able to present genomic sequences characteristic to the KNC. Based on this, we also identified genes related to the olfactory receptors and antigen that are common to all 5 strains. Finally, through the reconstructed mitochondrial genome sequences, we performed phylogenomic analysis and elucidated the maternal origin of the artificially restored KNC. Our results revealed that the KNC has multiple maternal origins which are in agreement with Korea's history of chicken breed imports. The results presented here provide a valuable basis for future research on genomic features of KNC and further understanding of KNC's origin.

  9. Discovery and genomic characterization of a novel bat sapovirus with unusual genomic features and phylogenetic position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Herman; Chan, Wan-Mui; Li, Kenneth S M; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2012-01-01

    Sapovirus is a genus of caliciviruses that are known to cause enteric disease in humans and animals. There is considerable genetic diversity among the sapoviruses, which are classified into different genogroups based on phylogenetic analysis of the full-length capsid protein sequence. While several mammalian species, including humans, pigs, minks, and dogs, have been identified as animal hosts for sapoviruses, there were no reports of sapoviruses in bats in spite of their biological diversity. In this report, we present the results of a targeted surveillance study in different bat species in Hong Kong. Five of the 321 specimens from the bat species, Hipposideros pomona, were found to be positive for sapoviruses by RT-PCR. Complete or nearly full-length genome sequences of approximately 7.7 kb in length were obtained for three strains, which showed similar organization of the genome compared to other sapoviruses. Interestingly, they possess many genomic features atypical of most sapoviruses, like high G+C content and minimal CpG suppression. Phylogenetic analysis of the viral proteins suggested that the bat sapovirus descended from an ancestral sapovirus lineage and is most closely related to the porcine sapoviruses. Codon usage analysis showed that the bat sapovirus genome has greater codon usage bias relative to other sapovirus genomes. In summary, we report the discovery and genomic characterization of the first bat calicivirus, which appears to have evolved under different conditions after early divergence from other sapovirus lineages.

  10. Discovery and genomic characterization of a novel bat sapovirus with unusual genomic features and phylogenetic position.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Tse

    Full Text Available Sapovirus is a genus of caliciviruses that are known to cause enteric disease in humans and animals. There is considerable genetic diversity among the sapoviruses, which are classified into different genogroups based on phylogenetic analysis of the full-length capsid protein sequence. While several mammalian species, including humans, pigs, minks, and dogs, have been identified as animal hosts for sapoviruses, there were no reports of sapoviruses in bats in spite of their biological diversity. In this report, we present the results of a targeted surveillance study in different bat species in Hong Kong. Five of the 321 specimens from the bat species, Hipposideros pomona, were found to be positive for sapoviruses by RT-PCR. Complete or nearly full-length genome sequences of approximately 7.7 kb in length were obtained for three strains, which showed similar organization of the genome compared to other sapoviruses. Interestingly, they possess many genomic features atypical of most sapoviruses, like high G+C content and minimal CpG suppression. Phylogenetic analysis of the viral proteins suggested that the bat sapovirus descended from an ancestral sapovirus lineage and is most closely related to the porcine sapoviruses. Codon usage analysis showed that the bat sapovirus genome has greater codon usage bias relative to other sapovirus genomes. In summary, we report the discovery and genomic characterization of the first bat calicivirus, which appears to have evolved under different conditions after early divergence from other sapovirus lineages.

  11. Confidentiality and data sharing: vulnerabilities of the Mexican Genomics Sovereignty Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Martínez, Augusto

    2015-07-01

    A law known as "Genomic Sovereignty Act", instituted in 2011, regulates research on the human genome in Mexico. This law establishes Government regulations for the exportation of DNA samples from Mexican nationals for population genetics studies. The Genomic Sovereignty Act protects fundamental human values, as confidentiality and non-discrimination based on personal genetic information. It also supports the development of the genome-based medical biotechnology and the bio-economy. Current laws for the protection of the genomic confidentiality, however, are inexplicit and insufficient, and the legal and technological instruments are primitive and insufficient to safeguard this bioethical principle. In addition, this law may undermine efforts of the national and international scientific communities to cooperate with big-data analysis for the development of the genome-based biomedical sciences. The argument of this article is that deficiencies in the protection of the confidentiality of genomic information and limitations in data sharing severely weaken the objectives and scope of the Genomic Sovereignty Act. In addition, the Act may compromise the national biomedical development and the international cooperation for research and development in the field of human genomics.

  12. An open access pilot freely sharing cancer genomic data from participants in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becnel, Lauren B; Pereira, Stacey; Drummond, Jennifer A; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Covington, Kyle R; Kovar, Christie L; Doddapaneni, Harsha Vardhan; Hu, Jianhong; Muzny, Donna; McGuire, Amy L; Wheeler, David A; Gibbs, Richard A

    2016-02-16

    Genomic data sharing in cancer has been restricted to aggregate or controlled-access initiatives to protect the privacy of research participants. By limiting access to these data, it has been argued that the autonomy of individuals who decide to participate in data sharing efforts has been superseded and the utility of the data as research and educational tools reduced. In a pilot Open Access (OA) project from the CPRIT-funded Texas Cancer Research Biobank, many Texas cancer patients were willing to openly share genomic data from tumor and normal matched pair specimens. For the first time, genetic data from 7 human cancer cases with matched normal are freely available without requirement for data use agreements nor any major restriction except that end users cannot attempt to re-identify the participants (http://txcrb.org/open.html).

  13. Attitudes towards Social Networking and Sharing Behaviors among Consumers of Direct-to-Consumer Personal Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sandra Soo-Jin; Vernez, Simone L; Ormond, K E; Granovetter, Mark

    2013-10-14

    Little is known about how consumers of direct-to-consumer personal genetic services share personal genetic risk information. In an age of ubiquitous online networking and rapid development of social networking tools, understanding how consumers share personal genetic risk assessments is critical in the development of appropriate and effective policies. This exploratory study investigates how consumers share personal genetic information and attitudes towards social networking behaviors. Adult participants aged 23 to 72 years old who purchased direct-to-consumer genetic testing from a personal genomics company were administered a web-based survey regarding their sharing activities and social networking behaviors related to their personal genetic test results. 80 participants completed the survey; of those, 45% shared results on Facebook and 50.9% reported meeting or reconnecting with more than 10 other individuals through the sharing of their personal genetic information. For help interpreting test results, 70.4% turned to Internet websites and online sources, compared to 22.7% who consulted their healthcare providers. Amongst participants, 51.8% reported that they believe the privacy of their personal genetic information would be breached in the future. Consumers actively utilize online social networking tools to help them share and interpret their personal genetic information. These findings suggest a need for careful consideration of policy recommendations in light of the current ambiguity of regulation and oversight of consumer initiated sharing activities.

  14. Attitudes towards Social Networking and Sharing Behaviors among Consumers of Direct-to-Consumer Personal Genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Granovetter

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about how consumers of direct-to-consumer personal genetic services share personal genetic risk information. In an age of ubiquitous online networking and rapid development of social networking tools, understanding how consumers share personal genetic risk assessments is critical in the development of appropriate and effective policies. This exploratory study investigates how consumers share personal genetic information and attitudes towards social networking behaviors. Methods: Adult participants aged 23 to 72 years old who purchased direct-to-consumer genetic testing from a personal genomics company were administered a web-based survey regarding their sharing activities and social networking behaviors related to their personal genetic test results. Results: 80 participants completed the survey; of those, 45% shared results on Facebook and 50.9% reported meeting or reconnecting with more than 10 other individuals through the sharing of their personal genetic information. For help interpreting test results, 70.4% turned to Internet websites and online sources, compared to 22.7% who consulted their healthcare providers. Amongst participants, 51.8% reported that they believe the privacy of their personal genetic information would be breached in the future. Conclusion: Consumers actively utilize online social networking tools to help them share and interpret their personal genetic information. These findings suggest a need for careful consideration of policy recommendations in light of the current ambiguity of regulation and oversight of consumer initiated sharing activities.

  15. The Dockstore: enabling modular, community-focused sharing of Docker-based genomics tools and workflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Brian D; Yuen, Denis; Chung, Vincent; Duncan, Andrew G; Liu, Xiang Kun; Patricia, Janice; Paten, Benedict; Stein, Lincoln; Ferretti, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    As genomic datasets continue to grow, the feasibility of downloading data to a local organization and running analysis on a traditional compute environment is becoming increasingly problematic. Current large-scale projects, such as the ICGC PanCancer Analysis of Whole Genomes (PCAWG), the Data Platform for the U.S. Precision Medicine Initiative, and the NIH Big Data to Knowledge Center for Translational Genomics, are using cloud-based infrastructure to both host and perform analysis across large data sets. In PCAWG, over 5,800 whole human genomes were aligned and variant called across 14 cloud and HPC environments; the processed data was then made available on the cloud for further analysis and sharing. If run locally, an operation at this scale would have monopolized a typical academic data centre for many months, and would have presented major challenges for data storage and distribution. However, this scale is increasingly typical for genomics projects and necessitates a rethink of how analytical tools are packaged and moved to the data. For PCAWG, we embraced the use of highly portable Docker images for encapsulating and sharing complex alignment and variant calling workflows across highly variable environments. While successful, this endeavor revealed a limitation in Docker containers, namely the lack of a standardized way to describe and execute the tools encapsulated inside the container. As a result, we created the Dockstore ( https://dockstore.org), a project that brings together Docker images with standardized, machine-readable ways of describing and running the tools contained within. This service greatly improves the sharing and reuse of genomics tools and promotes interoperability with similar projects through emerging web service standards developed by the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH).

  16. Complete DNA sequence of Kuraishia capsulata illustrates novel genomic features among budding yeasts (Saccharomycotina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Lucia; Noel, Benjamin; Porcel, Betina; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Hullo, Marie-Francoise; Sacerdot, Christine; Tekaia, Fredj; Leh-Louis, Véronique; Despons, Laurence; Khanna, Varun; Aury, Jean-Marc; Barbe, Valérie; Couloux, Arnaud; Labadie, Karen; Pelletier, Eric; Souciet, Jean-Luc; Boekhout, Teun; Gabaldon, Toni; Wincker, Patrick; Dujon, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    The numerous yeast genome sequences presently available provide a rich source of information for functional as well as evolutionary genomics but unequally cover the large phylogenetic diversity of extant yeasts. We present here the complete sequence of the nuclear genome of the haploid-type strain of Kuraishia capsulata (CBS1993(T)), a nitrate-assimilating Saccharomycetales of uncertain taxonomy, isolated from tunnels of insect larvae underneath coniferous barks and characterized by its copious production of extracellular polysaccharides. The sequence is composed of seven scaffolds, one per chromosome, totaling 11.4 Mb and containing 6,029 protein-coding genes, ~13.5% of which being interrupted by introns. This GC-rich yeast genome (45.7%) appears phylogenetically related with the few other nitrate-assimilating yeasts sequenced so far, Ogataea polymorpha, O. parapolymorpha, and Dekkera bruxellensis, with which it shares a very reduced number of tRNA genes, a novel tRNA sparing strategy, and a common nitrate assimilation cluster, three specific features to this group of yeasts. Centromeres were recognized in GC-poor troughs of each scaffold. The strain bears MAT alpha genes at a single MAT locus and presents a significant degree of conservation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes, suggesting that it can perform sexual cycles in nature, although genes involved in meiosis were not all recognized. The complete absence of conservation of synteny between K. capsulata and any other yeast genome described so far, including the three other nitrate-assimilating species, validates the interest of this species for long-range evolutionary genomic studies among Saccharomycotina yeasts.

  17. Complete DNA Sequence of Kuraishia capsulata Illustrates Novel Genomic Features among Budding Yeasts (Saccharomycotina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Lucia; Noel, Benjamin; Porcel, Betina; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Hullo, Marie-Francoise; Sacerdot, Christine; Tekaia, Fredj; Leh-Louis, Véronique; Despons, Laurence; Khanna, Varun; Aury, Jean-Marc; Barbe, Valérie; Couloux, Arnaud; Labadie, Karen; Pelletier, Eric; Souciet, Jean-Luc; Boekhout, Teun; Gabaldon, Toni; Wincker, Patrick; Dujon, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    The numerous yeast genome sequences presently available provide a rich source of information for functional as well as evolutionary genomics but unequally cover the large phylogenetic diversity of extant yeasts. We present here the complete sequence of the nuclear genome of the haploid-type strain of Kuraishia capsulata (CBS1993T), a nitrate-assimilating Saccharomycetales of uncertain taxonomy, isolated from tunnels of insect larvae underneath coniferous barks and characterized by its copious production of extracellular polysaccharides. The sequence is composed of seven scaffolds, one per chromosome, totaling 11.4 Mb and containing 6,029 protein-coding genes, ∼13.5% of which being interrupted by introns. This GC-rich yeast genome (45.7%) appears phylogenetically related with the few other nitrate-assimilating yeasts sequenced so far, Ogataea polymorpha, O. parapolymorpha, and Dekkera bruxellensis, with which it shares a very reduced number of tRNA genes, a novel tRNA sparing strategy, and a common nitrate assimilation cluster, three specific features to this group of yeasts. Centromeres were recognized in GC-poor troughs of each scaffold. The strain bears MAT alpha genes at a single MAT locus and presents a significant degree of conservation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes, suggesting that it can perform sexual cycles in nature, although genes involved in meiosis were not all recognized. The complete absence of conservation of synteny between K. capsulata and any other yeast genome described so far, including the three other nitrate-assimilating species, validates the interest of this species for long-range evolutionary genomic studies among Saccharomycotina yeasts. PMID:24317973

  18. Shared genomic segment analysis: the power to find rare disease variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Stacey; Abo, Ryan P; Abel, Haley J; Neklason, Deborah W; Tuohy, Therese M; Burt, Randall W; Thomas, Alun; Camp, Nicola J

    2012-11-01

    Shared genomic segment (SGS) analysis uses dense single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping in high-risk (HR) pedigrees to identify regions of sharing between cases. Here, we illustrate the power of SGS to identify dominant rare risk variants. Using simulated pedigrees, we consider 12 disease models based on disease prevalence, minor allele frequency and penetrance to represent disease loci that explain 0.2-99.8% of total disease risk. Pedigrees were required to contain ≥ 15 meioses between all cases and to be HR based on significant excess of disease (P power for a single pedigree ranged widely. Nonetheless, fewer than 10 pedigrees were sufficient for excellent power in the majority of models. Power increased with the risk attributable to the disease locus, penetrance and the excess of disease in the pedigree. Sharing allowing for one sporadic case was uniformly more powerful than sharing using all cases. Furthermore, an SGS analysis using a large attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis pedigree identified a 1.96 Mb region containing the known causal APC gene with genome-wide significance. SGS is a powerful method for detecting rare variants and a valuable complement to genome-wide association studies and linkage analysis.

  19. The roles of shared vs. distinctive conceptual features in lexical access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieth, Harrison E; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary models of spoken word production assume conceptual feature sharing determines the speed with which objects are named in categorically-related contexts. However, statistical models of concept representation have also identified a role for feature distinctiveness, i.e., features that identify a single concept and serve to distinguish it quickly from other similar concepts. In three experiments we investigated whether distinctive features might explain reports of counter-intuitive semantic facilitation effects in the picture word interference (PWI) paradigm. In Experiment 1, categorically-related distractors matched in terms of semantic similarity ratings (e.g., zebra and pony) and manipulated with respect to feature distinctiveness (e.g., a zebra has stripes unlike other equine species) elicited interference effects of comparable magnitude. Experiments 2 and 3 investigated the role of feature distinctiveness with respect to reports of facilitated naming with part-whole distractor-target relations (e.g., a hump is a distinguishing part of a CAMEL, whereas knee is not, vs. an unrelated part such as plug). Related part distractors did not influence target picture naming latencies significantly when the part denoted by the related distractor was not visible in the target picture (whether distinctive or not; Experiment 2). When the part denoted by the related distractor was visible in the target picture, non-distinctive part distractors slowed target naming significantly at SOA of -150 ms (Experiment 3). Thus, our results show that semantic interference does occur for part-whole distractor-target relations in PWI, but only when distractors denote features shared with the target and other category exemplars. We discuss the implications of these results for some recently developed, novel accounts of lexical access in spoken word production.

  20. The roles of shared vs. distinctive conceptual features in lexical access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison eVieth

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary models of spoken word production assume conceptual feature sharing determines the speed with which objects are named in categorically-related contexts. However, statistical models of concept representation have also identified a role for feature distinctiveness, i.e., features that identify a single concept and serve to distinguish it quickly from other similar concepts. In three experiments we investigated whether distinctive features might explain reports of counter-intuitive semantic facilitation effects in the picture word interference (PWI paradigm. In Experiment 1, categorically-related distractors matched in terms of semantic similarity ratings (e.g., zebra and pony and manipulated with respect to feature distinctiveness (e.g., a zebra has stripes unlike other equine species elicited interference effects of comparable magnitude. Experiments 2 and 3 investigated the role of feature distinctiveness with respect to reports of facilitated naming with part-whole distractor-target relations (e.g., a hump is a distinguishing part of a CAMEL, whereas knee is not, vs. an unrelated part such as plug. Related part distractors did not influence target picture naming latencies significantly when the part denoted by the related distractor was not visible in the target picture (whether distinctive or not; Experiment 2. When the part denoted by the related distractor was visible in the target picture, non-distinctive part distractors slowed target naming significantly at SOA of -150 ms (Experiment 3. Thus, our results show that semantic interference does occur for part-whole distractor-target relations in PWI, but only when distractors denote features shared with the target and other category exemplars. We discuss the implications of these results for some recently developed, novel accounts of lexical access in spoken word production.

  1. 论共享的三重特性%On the Triple Features of Sharing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易小兵

    2016-01-01

    共享具有三重特性:人民主体性、公正性、平等性。人民主体性是共享的本质属性,主张全体人民共同自觉创造并共同享有物质成果和精神成果,以实现人的全面发展为依归。公正性是共享的内在要求,彰显了党和国家的公益精神和对社会主义公平正义的价值追求。平等性是共享的重要准则,是在形式平等和实质平等之间内在张力下的逻辑展开,体现了党和国家对实质共享的价值追求。%Sharing has triple features, namely, the people’s subjectivity, justice, equality.People’s subjectivity, as the essential attribute of sharing , advocates all the people together to create consciously and share material achievements and spiritual achievements, and to realize people's development in an all-round way.Justice, as the inherent requirement of sharing , highlights the public spirit and the pursuit of the value of socialist fairness and justice of the CCP and the state .Equality , as the important criterion of sharing , is the logic expansion under the inherent tension between formal equality and substantial equality , and re-flects the pursuit of the value of the essence of sharing of the CCP and the state .

  2. Integrating genome-based informatics to modernize global disease monitoring, information sharing, and response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Brown, Eric W; Detter, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The rapid advancement of genome technologies holds great promise for improving the quality and speed of clinical and public health laboratory investigations and for decreasing their cost. The latest generation of genome DNA sequencers can provide highly detailed and robust information on disease......-causing microbes, and in the near future these technologies will be suitable for routine use in national, regional, and global public health laboratories. With additional improvements in instrumentation, these next- or third-generation sequencers are likely to replace conventional culture-based and molecular...... typing methods to provide point-of-care clinical diagnosis and other essential information for quicker and better treatment of patients. Provided there is free-sharing of information by all clinical and public health laboratories, these genomic tools could spawn a global system of linked databases...

  3. Regulatory Features for Odorant Receptor Genes in the Mouse Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degl'Innocenti, Andrea; D'Errico, Anna

    2017-01-01

    The odorant receptor genes, seven transmembrane receptor genes constituting the vastest mammalian gene multifamily, are expressed monogenically and monoallelicaly in each sensory neuron in the olfactory epithelium. This characteristic, often referred to as the one neuron-one receptor rule, is driven by mostly uncharacterized molecular dynamics, generally named odorant receptor gene choice. Much attention has been paid by the scientific community to the identification of sequences regulating the expression of odorant receptor genes within their loci, where related genes are usually arranged in genomic clusters. A number of studies identified transcription factor binding sites on odorant receptor promoter sequences. Similar binding sites were also found on a number of enhancers that regulate in cis their transcription, but have been proposed to form interchromosomal networks. Odorant receptor gene choice seems to occur via the local removal of strongly repressive epigenetic markings, put in place during the maturation of the sensory neuron on each odorant receptor locus. Here we review the fast-changing state of art for the study of regulatory features for odorant receptor genes.

  4. Nonimmunoglobulin target loci of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) share unique features with immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Lucia; Begum, Nasim A; Burroughs, A Maxwell; Doi, Tomomitsu; Kawai, Jun; Daub, Carsten O; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Honjo, Tasuku

    2012-02-14

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is required for both somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination in activated B cells. AID is also known to target nonimmunoglobulin genes and introduce mutations or chromosomal translocations, eventually causing tumors. To identify as-yet-unknown AID targets, we screened early AID-induced DNA breaks by using two independent genome-wide approaches. Along with known AID targets, this screen identified a set of unique genes (SNHG3, MALAT1, BCL7A, and CUX1) and confirmed that these loci accumulated mutations as frequently as Ig locus after AID activation. Moreover, these genes share three important characteristics with the Ig gene: translocations in tumors, repetitive sequences, and the epigenetic modification of chromatin by H3K4 trimethylation in the vicinity of cleavage sites.

  5. Genome-wide association study identifies shared risk loci common to two malignancies in golden retrievers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Tonomura

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dogs, with their breed-determined limited genetic background, are great models of human disease including cancer. Canine B-cell lymphoma and hemangiosarcoma are both malignancies of the hematologic system that are clinically and histologically similar to human B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and angiosarcoma, respectively. Golden retrievers in the US show significantly elevated lifetime risk for both B-cell lymphoma (6% and hemangiosarcoma (20%. We conducted genome-wide association studies for hemangiosarcoma and B-cell lymphoma, identifying two shared predisposing loci. The two associated loci are located on chromosome 5, and together contribute ~20% of the risk of developing these cancers. Genome-wide p-values for the top SNP of each locus are 4.6×10-7 and 2.7×10-6, respectively. Whole genome resequencing of nine cases and controls followed by genotyping and detailed analysis identified three shared and one B-cell lymphoma specific risk haplotypes within the two loci, but no coding changes were associated with the risk haplotypes. Gene expression analysis of B-cell lymphoma tumors revealed that carrying the risk haplotypes at the first locus is associated with down-regulation of several nearby genes including the proximal gene TRPC6, a transient receptor Ca2+-channel involved in T-cell activation, among other functions. The shared risk haplotype in the second locus overlaps the vesicle transport and release gene STX8. Carrying the shared risk haplotype is associated with gene expression changes of 100 genes enriched for pathways involved in immune cell activation. Thus, the predisposing germ-line mutations in B-cell lymphoma and hemangiosarcoma appear to be regulatory, and affect pathways involved in T-cell mediated immune response in the tumor. This suggests that the interaction between the immune system and malignant cells plays a common role in the tumorigenesis of these relatively different cancers.

  6. Genome-wide patterns of promoter sharing and co-expression in bovine skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalrymple Brian P

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene regulation by transcription factors (TF is species, tissue and time specific. To better understand how the genetic code controls gene expression in bovine muscle we associated gene expression data from developing Longissimus thoracis et lumborum skeletal muscle with bovine promoter sequence information. Results We created a highly conserved genome-wide promoter landscape comprising 87,408 interactions relating 333 TFs with their 9,242 predicted target genes (TGs. We discovered that the complete set of predicted TGs share an average of 2.75 predicted TF binding sites (TFBSs and that the average co-expression between a TF and its predicted TGs is higher than the average co-expression between the same TF and all genes. Conversely, pairs of TFs sharing predicted TGs showed a co-expression correlation higher that pairs of TFs not sharing TGs. Finally, we exploited the co-occurrence of predicted TFBS in the context of muscle-derived functionally-coherent modules including cell cycle, mitochondria, immune system, fat metabolism, muscle/glycolysis, and ribosome. Our findings enabled us to reverse engineer a regulatory network of core processes, and correctly identified the involvement of E2F1, GATA2 and NFKB1 in the regulation of cell cycle, fat, and muscle/glycolysis, respectively. Conclusion The pivotal implication of our research is two-fold: (1 there exists a robust genome-wide expression signal between TFs and their predicted TGs in cattle muscle consistent with the extent of promoter sharing; and (2 this signal can be exploited to recover the cellular mechanisms underpinning transcription regulation of muscle structure and development in bovine. Our study represents the first genome-wide report linking tissue specific co-expression to co-regulation in a non-model vertebrate.

  7. Oral acantholytic squamous cell carcinoma shares clinical and histological features with angiosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleinheinz Johannes

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background acantholytic squamous cell carcinomas (ASCC and intraoral angiosarcoma share similar histopathological features. Aim of this study was to find marker for a clear distinction. Methods Four oral acantholytic squamous cell carcinomas and one intraoral angiosarcoma are used to compare the eruptive intraoral growth-pattern, age-peak, unfavourable prognosis and slit-like intratumorous spaces in common histological staining as identical clinical and histopathological features. Immunohistochemical staining for pancytokeratin, cytokeratin, collagen type IV, γ2-chain of laminin-5, endothelial differentiation marker CD31 and CD34, F VIII-associated antigen, Ki 67-antigen, β-catenin, E-cadherin, α-smooth-muscle-actin and Fli-1 were done. Results Cytokeratin-immunoreactive cells can be identified in both lesions. The large vascularization of ASCC complicates the interpretation of vascular differential markers being characteristic for angiosarcoma. Loss of cell-cell-adhesion, monitored by loss of E-cadherin and β-catenin membrane-staining, are indetified as reasons for massive expression of invasion-factor ln-5 in ASCC and considered responsible for unfavourable prognosis of ASCC. Expression of Fli-1 in angiosarcoma and cellular immunoreaction for ln-5 in ASCC are worked out as distinguishing features of both entities. Conclusion Fli-1 in angiosarcoma and ln-5 in ASCC are distinguishing features.

  8. Shared Genetic Susceptibility to Ischemic Stroke and Coronary Artery Disease A Genome-Wide Analysis of Common Variants

    OpenAIRE

    Dichgans, Martin; Malik, Rainer; König, Inke R.; Rosand, Jonathan; Clarke, Robert; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Levi, Christopher; O′Donnell, Christopher J.; Fornage, Myriam; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Psaty, Bruce M.; Hengstenberg, Christian

    2014-01-01

    To access publisher's full text version of this article, please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field or click on the hyperlink at the top of the page marked Files. This article is open access. Ischemic stroke (IS) and coronary artery disease (CAD) share several risk factors and each has a substantial heritability. We conducted a genome-wide analysis to evaluate the extent of shared genetic determination of the two diseases. Genome-wide association data were obtained from ...

  9. Research Update: The materials genome initiative: Data sharing and the impact of collaborative ab initio databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anubhav; Persson, Kristin A.; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2016-05-01

    Materials innovations enable new technological capabilities and drive major societal advancements but have historically required long and costly development cycles. The Materials Genome Initiative (MGI) aims to greatly reduce this time and cost. In this paper, we focus on data reuse in the MGI and, in particular, discuss the impact of three different computational databases based on density functional theory methods to the research community. We also discuss and provide recommendations on technical aspects of data reuse, outline remaining fundamental challenges, and present an outlook on the future of MGI's vision of data sharing.

  10. Cyber infrastructure for Fusarium: three integrated platforms supporting strain identification, phylogenetics, comparative genomics and knowledge sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bongsoo; Park, Jongsun; Cheong, Kyeong-Chae; Choi, Jaeyoung; Jung, Kyongyong; Kim, Donghan; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Ward, Todd J; O'Donnell, Kerry; Geiser, David M; Kang, Seogchan

    2011-01-01

    The fungal genus Fusarium includes many plant and/or animal pathogenic species and produces diverse toxins. Although accurate species identification is critical for managing such threats, it is difficult to identify Fusarium morphologically. Fortunately, extensive molecular phylogenetic studies, founded on well-preserved culture collections, have established a robust foundation for Fusarium classification. Genomes of four Fusarium species have been published with more being currently sequenced. The Cyber infrastructure for Fusarium (CiF; http://www.fusariumdb.org/) was built to support archiving and utilization of rapidly increasing data and knowledge and consists of Fusarium-ID, Fusarium Comparative Genomics Platform (FCGP) and Fusarium Community Platform (FCP). The Fusarium-ID archives phylogenetic marker sequences from most known species along with information associated with characterized isolates and supports strain identification and phylogenetic analyses. The FCGP currently archives five genomes from four species. Besides supporting genome browsing and analysis, the FCGP presents computed characteristics of multiple gene families and functional groups. The Cart/Favorite function allows users to collect sequences from Fusarium-ID and the FCGP and analyze them later using multiple tools without requiring repeated copying-and-pasting of sequences. The FCP is designed to serve as an online community forum for sharing and preserving accumulated experience and knowledge to support future research and education.

  11. Cyber infrastructure for Fusarium: three integrated platforms supporting strain identification, phylogenetics, comparative genomics and knowledge sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bongsoo; Park, Jongsun; Cheong, Kyeong-Chae; Choi, Jaeyoung; Jung, Kyongyong; Kim, Donghan; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Ward, Todd J.; O'Donnell, Kerry; Geiser, David M.; Kang, Seogchan

    2011-01-01

    The fungal genus Fusarium includes many plant and/or animal pathogenic species and produces diverse toxins. Although accurate species identification is critical for managing such threats, it is difficult to identify Fusarium morphologically. Fortunately, extensive molecular phylogenetic studies, founded on well-preserved culture collections, have established a robust foundation for Fusarium classification. Genomes of four Fusarium species have been published with more being currently sequenced. The Cyber infrastructure for Fusarium (CiF; http://www.fusariumdb.org/) was built to support archiving and utilization of rapidly increasing data and knowledge and consists of Fusarium-ID, Fusarium Comparative Genomics Platform (FCGP) and Fusarium Community Platform (FCP). The Fusarium-ID archives phylogenetic marker sequences from most known species along with information associated with characterized isolates and supports strain identification and phylogenetic analyses. The FCGP currently archives five genomes from four species. Besides supporting genome browsing and analysis, the FCGP presents computed characteristics of multiple gene families and functional groups. The Cart/Favorite function allows users to collect sequences from Fusarium-ID and the FCGP and analyze them later using multiple tools without requiring repeated copying-and-pasting of sequences. The FCP is designed to serve as an online community forum for sharing and preserving accumulated experience and knowledge to support future research and education. PMID:21087991

  12. Design models as emergent features: An empirical study in communication and shared mental models in instructional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucca Botturi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of an empirical study that investigated the instructional design process of three teams involved in the development of an e-learning unit. The teams declared they were using the same fast-prototyping design and development model, and were composed of the same roles (although with a different number of SMEs. Results indicate that the design and development model actually informs the activities of the group, but that it is interpreted and adapted by the team for the specific project. Thus, the actual practice model of each team can be regarded as an emergent feature. This analysis delivers insights concerning issues about team communication, shared understanding, individual perspectives and the implementation of prescriptive instructional design models.

  13. Shared genetic susceptibility to ischemic stroke and coronary artery disease: a genome-wide analysis of common variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichgans, Martin; Malik, Rainer; König, Inke R; Rosand, Jonathan; Clarke, Robert; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Mitchell, Braxton D; Assimes, Themistocles L; Levi, Christopher; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Fornage, Myriam; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Psaty, Bruce M; Hengstenberg, Christian; Seshadri, Sudha; Erdmann, Jeanette; Bis, Joshua C; Peters, Annette; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B; März, Winfried; Meschia, James F; Kathiresan, Sekar; Ikram, M Arfan; McPherson, Ruth; Stefansson, Kari; Sudlow, Cathie; Reilly, Muredach P; Thompson, John R; Sharma, Pankaj; Hopewell, Jemma C; Chambers, John C; Watkins, Hugh; Rothwell, Peter M; Roberts, Robert; Markus, Hugh S; Samani, Nilesh J; Farrall, Martin; Schunkert, Heribert

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke (IS) and coronary artery disease (CAD) share several risk factors and each has a substantial heritability. We conducted a genome-wide analysis to evaluate the extent of shared genetic determination of the two diseases. Genome-wide association data were obtained from the METASTROKE, Coronary Artery Disease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-analysis (CARDIoGRAM), and Coronary Artery Disease (C4D) Genetics consortia. We first analyzed common variants reaching a nominal threshold of significance (Pstroke (LAS) subtype. Common variants associated with CAD at Pgenetic risk of IS and particularly the LAS subtype with CAD.

  14. Estimation of heritability from limited family data using genome-wide identity-by-descent sharing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ødegård Jørgen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In classical pedigree-based analysis, additive genetic variance is estimated from between-family variation, which requires the existence of larger phenotyped and pedigreed populations involving numerous families (parents. However, estimation is often complicated by confounding of genetic and environmental family effects, with the latter typically occurring among full-sibs. For this reason, genetic variance is often inferred based on covariance among more distant relatives, which reduces the power of the analysis. This simulation study shows that genome-wide identity-by-descent sharing among close relatives can be used to quantify additive genetic variance solely from within-family variation using data on extremely small family samples. Methods Identity-by-descent relationships among full-sibs were simulated assuming a genome size similar to that of humans (effective number of loci ~80. Genetic variance was estimated from phenotypic data assuming that genomic identity-by-descent relationships could be accurately re-created using information from genome-wide markers. The results were compared with standard pedigree-based genetic analysis. Results For a polygenic trait and a given number of phenotypes, the most accurate estimates of genetic variance were based on data from a single large full-sib family only. Compared with classical pedigree-based analysis, the proposed method is more robust to selection among parents and for confounding of environmental and genetic effects. Furthermore, in some cases, satisfactory results can be achieved even with less ideal data structures, i.e., for selectively genotyped data and for traits for which the genetic variance is largely under the control of a few major genes. Conclusions Estimation of genetic variance using genomic identity-by-descent relationships is especially useful for studies aiming at estimating additive genetic variance of highly fecund species, using data from small

  15. Atypical sensory sensitivity as a shared feature between synaesthesia and autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jamie; Hoadley, Claire; Hughes, James E. A.; Smith, Paula; Allison, Carrie; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Simner, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that there is a link between synaesthesia and autism but the nature of that link remains poorly characterised. The present study considers whether atypical sensory sensitivity may be a common link between the conditions. Sensory hypersensitivity (aversion to certain sounds, touch, etc., or increased ability to make sensory discriminations) and/or hyposensitivity (desire to stimulate the senses , or a reduced response to sensory stimuli are a recently introduced diagnostic feature of autism spectrum conditions (ASC). Synaesthesia is defined by unusual sensory experiences and has also been linked to a typical cortical hyper-excitability. The Glasgow Sensory Questionnaire (GSQ) was administered to synaesthetes and people with ASC. Both groups reported increased sensory sensitivity relative to controls with a large effect size. Both groups also reported a similar pattern of both increased hyper- and hypo-sensitivities across multiple senses. The AQ (Autism-Spectrum Quotient) scores were elevated in the synaesthetes, and one subscale of this measure (attention to detail) placed synaesthetes within the autistic range. A standard laboratory test of visual stress (the Pattern Glare Test), administered online, corroborated the findings of increased sensitivity to aversive visual stimuli in synaesthetes. We conclude that atypical sensory sensitivity is an important shared feature between autism and synaesthesia. PMID:28266503

  16. Shared Y chromosome repetitive DNA sequences in stallion and donkey as visualized using whole-genomic comparative hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mezzanotte

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The genome of stallion (Spanish breed and donkey (Spanish endemic Zamorano-Leonés were compared using whole comparative genomic in situ hybridization (W-CGH technique, with special reference to the variability observed in the Y chromosome. Results show that these diverging genomes still share some highly repetitive DNA families localized in pericentromeric regions and, in the particular case of the Y chromosome, a sub-family of highly repeated DNA sequences, greatly expanded in the donkey genome, accounts for a large part of the chromatin in the stallion Y chromosome.

  17. Shared Y chromosome repetitive DNA sequences in stallion and donkey as visualized using whole-genomic comparative hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gosalvez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The genome of stallion (Spanish breed and donkey (Spanish endemic Zamorano-Leonés were compared using whole comparative genomic in situ hybridization (W-CGH technique, with special reference to the variability observed in the Y chromosome. Results show that these diverging genomes still share some highly repetitive DNA families localized in pericentromeric regions and, in the particular case of the Y chromosome, a sub-family of highly repeated DNA sequences, greatly expanded in the donkey genome, accounts for a large part of the chromatin in the stallion Y chromosome.

  18. Phylogeny Inference of Closely Related Bacterial Genomes: Combining the Features of Both Overlapping Genes and Collinear Genomic Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Cong; Lin, Kui

    2015-01-01

    Overlapping genes (OGs) represent one type of widespread genomic feature in bacterial genomes and have been used as rare genomic markers in phylogeny inference of closely related bacterial species. However, the inference may experience a decrease in performance for phylogenomic analysis of too closely or too distantly related genomes. Another drawback of OGs as phylogenetic markers is that they usually take little account of the effects of genomic rearrangement on the similarity estimation, such as intra-chromosome/genome translocations, horizontal gene transfer, and gene losses. To explore such effects on the accuracy of phylogeny reconstruction, we combine phylogenetic signals of OGs with collinear genomic regions, here called locally collinear blocks (LCBs). By putting these together, we refine our previous metric of pairwise similarity between two closely related bacterial genomes. As a case study, we used this new method to reconstruct the phylogenies of 88 Enterobacteriale genomes of the class Gammaproteobacteria. Our results demonstrated that the topological accuracy of the inferred phylogeny was improved when both OGs and LCBs were simultaneously considered, suggesting that combining these two phylogenetic markers may reduce, to some extent, the influence of gene loss on phylogeny inference. Such phylogenomic studies, we believe, will help us to explore a more effective approach to increasing the robustness of phylogeny reconstruction of closely related bacterial organisms. PMID:26715828

  19. Two strains of Crocosphaera watsonii with highly conserved genomes are distinguished by strain-specific features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shellie Roxanne Bench

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Unicellular nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria are important components of marine phytoplankton. Although non-nitrogen-fixing marine phytoplankton generally exhibit high gene sequence and genomic diversity, gene sequences of natural populations and isolated strains of Crocosphaera watsonii, one of two most abundant open ocean unicellular cyanobacteria groups, have been shown to be 98-100% identical.. The low sequence diversity in Crocosphaera is a dramatic contrast to sympatric species of Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, and raises the question of how genome differences can explain observed phenotypic diversity among Crocosphaera strains. Here we show, through whole genome comparisons of two phenotypically different strains, that there are strain-specific sequences in each genome, and numerous genome rearrangements, despite exceptionally low sequence diversity in shared genomic regions. Some of the strain-specific sequences encode functions that explain observed phenotypic differences, such as exopolysaccharide biosynthesis. The pattern of strain-specific sequences distributed throughout the genomes, along with rearrangements in shared sequences is evidence of significant genetic mobility that may be attributed to the hundreds of transposase genes found in both strains. Furthermore, such genetic mobility appears to be the main mechanism of strain divergence in Crocosphaera which do not accumulate DNA microheterogeneity over the vast majority of their genomes. The strain-specific sequences found in this study provide tools for future physiological studies, as well as genetic markers to help determine the relative abundance of phenotypes in natural populations.

  20. Controlling the signal: Practical privacy protection of genomic data sharing through Beacon services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zhiyu; Vorobeychik, Yevgeniy; Kantarcioglu, Murat; Malin, Bradley

    2017-07-26

    Genomic data is increasingly collected by a wide array of organizations. As such, there is a growing demand to make summary information about such collections available more widely. However, over the past decade, a series of investigations have shown that attacks, rooted in statistical inference methods, can be applied to discern the presence of a known individual's DNA sequence in the pool of subjects. Recently, it was shown that the Beacon Project of the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health, a web service for querying about the presence (or absence) of a specific allele, was vulnerable. The Integrating Data for Analysis, Anonymization, and Sharing (iDASH) Center modeled a track in their third Privacy Protection Challenge on how to mitigate the Beacon vulnerability. We developed the winning solution for this track. This paper describes our computational method to optimize the tradeoff between the utility and the privacy of the Beacon service. We generalize the genomic data sharing problem beyond that which was introduced in the iDASH Challenge to be more representative of real world scenarios to allow for a more comprehensive evaluation. We then conduct a sensitivity analysis of our method with respect to several state-of-the-art methods using a dataset of 400,000 positions in Chromosome 10 for 500 individuals from Phase 3 of the 1000 Genomes Project. All methods are evaluated for utility, privacy and efficiency. Our method achieves better performance than all state-of-the-art methods, irrespective of how key factors (e.g., the allele frequency in the population, the size of the pool and utility weights) change from the original parameters of the problem. We further illustrate that it is possible for our method to exhibit subpar performance under special cases of allele query sequences. However, we show our method can be extended to address this issue when the query sequence is fixed and known a priori to the data custodian, so that they may plan stage their

  1. Visualization of shared genomic regions and meiotic recombination in high-density SNP data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisha D O Roberson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A fundamental goal of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotyping is to determine the sharing of alleles between individuals across genomic loci. Such analyses have diverse applications in defining the relatedness of individuals (including unexpected relationships in nominally unrelated individuals, or consanguinity within pedigrees, analyzing meiotic crossovers, and identifying a broad range of chromosomal anomalies such as hemizygous deletions and uniparental disomy, and analyzing population structure. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present SNPduo, a command-line and web accessible tool for analyzing and visualizing the relatedness of any two individuals using identity by state. Using identity by state does not require prior knowledge of allele frequencies or pedigree information, and is more computationally tractable and is less affected by population stratification than calculating identity by descent probabilities. The web implementation visualizes shared genomic regions, and generates UCSC viewable tracks. The command-line version requires pedigree information for compatibility with existing software and determining specified relationships even though pedigrees are not required for IBS calculation, generates no visual output, is written in portable C++, and is well-suited to analyzing large datasets. We demonstrate how the SNPduo web tool identifies meiotic crossover positions in siblings, and confirm our findings by visualizing meiotic recombination in synthetic three-generation pedigrees. We applied SNPduo to 210 nominally unrelated Phase I / II HapMap samples and, consistent with previous findings, identified six undeclared pairs of related individuals. We further analyzed identity by state in 2,883 individuals from multiplex families with autism and identified a series of anomalies including related parents, an individual with mosaic loss of chromosome 18, an individual with maternal heterodisomy of chromosome 16, and

  2. Shared genetic susceptibility to ischemic stroke and coronary artery disease – a genome-wide analysis of common variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichgans, Martin; Malik, Rainer; König, Inke R.; Rosand, Jonathan; Clarke, Robert; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Levi, Christopher; O′Donnell, Christopher J.; Fornage, Myriam; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Psaty, Bruce M.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Seshadri, Sudha; Erdmann, Jeanette; Bis, Joshua C.; Peters, Annette; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B.; März, Winfried; Meschia, James F.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Ikram, M. Arfan; McPherson, Ruth; Stefansson, Kari; Sudlow, Cathie; Reilly, Muredach P.; Thompson, John R.; Sharma, Pankaj; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Chambers, John C.; Watkins, Hugh; Rothwell, Peter M.; Roberts, Robert; Markus, Hugh S.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Farrall, Martin; Schunkert, Heribert

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background and Purpose Ischemic stroke (IS) and coronary artery disease (CAD) share several risk factors and each have a substantial heritability. We conducted a genome-wide analysis to evaluate the extent of shared genetic determination of the two diseases. Methods Genome-wide association data were obtained from the METASTROKE, CARDIoGRAM, and C4D consortia. We first analyzed common variants reaching a nominal threshold of significance (pstroke (LAS) subtype. Results Common variants associated with CAD at pgenetic risk of ischemic stroke and particularly the large artery stroke subtype with coronary artery disease. PMID:24262325

  3. Global features of the Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2 genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reva, Oleg N.; Hallin, Peter Fischer; Willenbrock, Hanni

    2008-01-01

    The global feature of the completely sequenced Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2 type strain chromosome is its symmetry and homogeneity. The origin and terminus of replication are located opposite to each other in the chromosome and are discerned with high signal to noise ratios by maximal oligonucleot...

  4. Comprehensive definition of genome features in Spirodela polyrhiza by high-depth physical mapping and short-read DNA sequencing strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Todd P; Bryant, Douglas; Gutierrez, Ryan; Borisjuk, Nikolai; Chu, Philomena; Zhang, Hanzhong; Xia, Jing; Zhou, Junfei; Peng, Hai; El Baidouri, Moaine; Ten Hallers, Boudewijn; Hastie, Alex R; Liang, Tiffany; Acosta, Kenneth; Gilbert, Sarah; McEntee, Connor; Jackson, Scott A; Mockler, Todd C; Zhang, Weixiong; Lam, Eric

    2017-02-01

    Spirodela polyrhiza is a fast-growing aquatic monocot with highly reduced morphology, genome size and number of protein-coding genes. Considering these biological features of Spirodela and its basal position in the monocot lineage, understanding its genome architecture could shed light on plant adaptation and genome evolution. Like many draft genomes, however, the 158-Mb Spirodela genome sequence has not been resolved to chromosomes, and important genome characteristics have not been defined. Here we deployed rapid genome-wide physical maps combined with high-coverage short-read sequencing to resolve the 20 chromosomes of Spirodela and to empirically delineate its genome features. Our data revealed a dramatic reduction in the number of the rDNA repeat units in Spirodela to fewer than 100, which is even fewer than that reported for yeast. Consistent with its unique phylogenetic position, small RNA sequencing revealed 29 Spirodela-specific microRNA, with only two being shared with Elaeis guineensis (oil palm) and Musa balbisiana (banana). Combining DNA methylation data and small RNA sequencing enabled the accurate prediction of 20.5% long terminal repeats (LTRs) that doubled the previous estimate, and revealed a high Solo:Intact LTR ratio of 8.2. Interestingly, we found that Spirodela has the lowest global DNA methylation levels (9%) of any plant species tested. Taken together our results reveal a genome that has undergone reduction, likely through eliminating non-essential protein coding genes, rDNA and LTRs. In addition to delineating the genome features of this unique plant, the methodologies described and large-scale genome resources from this work will enable future evolutionary and functional studies of this basal monocot family. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Toward the commoditization of translational genomic research: Design and implementation features of the Galaxy genomic workbench.

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Although there is now plenty of genomic data and no shortage of analysis methods for translational genomic research, many biologists do not have efficient and transparent access to the computational resources they need. No single data resource or analysis application is ever likely to efficiently address all aspects of any individual researcher’s needs, so most researchers are forced to manually integrate data and outputs from multiple resources. The inevitable heterogeneity of data formats a...

  6. SVGenes: a library for rendering genomic features in scalable vector graphic format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etherington, Graham J; MacLean, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Drawing genomic features in attractive and informative ways is a key task in visualization of genomics data. Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) format is a modern and flexible open standard that provides advanced features including modular graphic design, advanced web interactivity and animation within a suitable client. SVGs do not suffer from loss of image quality on re-scaling and provide the ability to edit individual elements of a graphic on the whole object level independent of the whole image. These features make SVG a potentially useful format for the preparation of publication quality figures including genomic objects such as genes or sequencing coverage and for web applications that require rich user-interaction with the graphical elements. SVGenes is a Ruby-language library that uses SVG primitives to render typical genomic glyphs through a simple and flexible Ruby interface. The library implements a simple Page object that spaces and contains horizontal Track objects that in turn style, colour and positions features within them. Tracks are the level at which visual information is supplied providing the full styling capability of the SVG standard. Genomic entities like genes, transcripts and histograms are modelled in Glyph objects that are attached to a track and take advantage of SVG primitives to render the genomic features in a track as any of a selection of defined glyphs. The feature model within SVGenes is simple but flexible and not dependent on particular existing gene feature formats meaning graphics for any existing datasets can easily be created without need for conversion. The library is provided as a Ruby Gem from https://rubygems.org/gems/bio-svgenes under the MIT license, and open source code is available at https://github.com/danmaclean/bioruby-svgenes also under the MIT License. dan.maclean@tsl.ac.uk.

  7. The highly reduced and fragmented mitochondrial genome of the early-branching dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina shares characteristics with both apicomplexan and dinoflagellate mitochondrial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slamovits, Claudio H; Saldarriaga, Juan F; Larocque, Allen; Keeling, Patrick J

    2007-09-14

    The mitochondrial genome and the expression of the genes within it have evolved to be highly unusual in several lineages. Within alveolates, apicomplexans and dinoflagellates share the most reduced mitochondrial gene content on record, but differ from one another in organisation and function. To clarify how these characteristics originated, we examined mitochondrial genome form and expression in a key lineage that arose close to the divergence of apicomplexans and dinoflagellates, Oxyrrhis marina. We show that Oxyrrhis is a basal member of the dinoflagellate lineage whose mitochondrial genome has some unique characteristics while sharing others with apicomplexans or dinoflagellates. Specifically, Oxyrrhis has the smallest gene complement known, with several rRNA fragments and only two protein coding genes, cox1 and a cob-cox3 fusion. The genome appears to be highly fragmented, like that of dinoflagellates, but genes are frequently arranged as tandem copies, reminiscent of the repeating nature of the Plasmodium genome. In dinoflagellates and Oxyrrhis, genes are found in many arrangements, but the Oxyrrhis genome appears to be more structured, since neighbouring genes or gene fragments are invariably the same: cox1 and the cob-cox3 fusion were never found on the same genomic fragment. Analysing hundreds of cDNAs for both genes and circularized mRNAs from cob-cox3 showed that neither uses canonical start or stop codons, although a UAA terminator is created in the cob-cox3 fusion mRNA by post-transcriptional oligoadenylation. mRNAs from both genes also use a novel 5' oligo(U) cap. Extensive RNA editing is characteristic of dinoflagellates, but we find no editing in Oxyrrhis. Overall, the combination of characteristics found in the Oxyrrhis genome allows us to plot the sequence of many events that led to the extreme organisation of apicomplexan and dinoflalgellate mitochondrial genomes.

  8. The 'atom-splitting' moment of synthetic biology: Nuclear physics and synthetic biology share common features

    OpenAIRE

    Valentine, Alex J; Kleinert, Aleysia; Verdier, Jerome

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic biology and nuclear physics share many commonalities in terms of public perception and funding. Synthetic biologists could learn valuable lessons from the history of the atomic bomb and nuclear power.

  9. Systematic dissection of genomic features determining transcription factor binding and enhancer function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Sharon R.; Zhang, Xiaolan; Wang, Li; Engreitz, Jesse; Melnikov, Alexandre; Rogov, Peter; Tewhey, Ryan; Isakova, Alina; Deplancke, Bart; Bernstein, Bradley E.; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S.; Lander, Eric S.

    2017-01-01

    Enhancers regulate gene expression through the binding of sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs) to cognate motifs. Various features influence TF binding and enhancer function—including the chromatin state of the genomic locus, the affinities of the binding site, the activity of the bound TFs, and interactions among TFs. However, the precise nature and relative contributions of these features remain unclear. Here, we used massively parallel reporter assays (MPRAs) involving 32,115 natural and synthetic enhancers, together with high-throughput in vivo binding assays, to systematically dissect the contribution of each of these features to the binding and activity of genomic regulatory elements that contain motifs for PPARγ, a TF that serves as a key regulator of adipogenesis. We show that distinct sets of features govern PPARγ binding vs. enhancer activity. PPARγ binding is largely governed by the affinity of the specific motif site and higher-order features of the larger genomic locus, such as chromatin accessibility. In contrast, the enhancer activity of PPARγ binding sites depends on varying contributions from dozens of TFs in the immediate vicinity, including interactions between combinations of these TFs. Different pairs of motifs follow different interaction rules, including subadditive, additive, and superadditive interactions among specific classes of TFs, with both spatially constrained and flexible grammars. Our results provide a paradigm for the systematic characterization of the genomic features underlying regulatory elements, applicable to the design of synthetic regulatory elements or the interpretation of human genetic variation. PMID:28137873

  10. GeneViTo: Visualizing gene-product functional and structural features in genomic datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Promponas Vasilis J

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of increasing amounts of sequence data from completely sequenced genomes boosts the development of new computational methods for automated genome annotation and comparative genomics. Therefore, there is a need for tools that facilitate the visualization of raw data and results produced by bioinformatics analysis, providing new means for interactive genome exploration. Visual inspection can be used as a basis to assess the quality of various analysis algorithms and to aid in-depth genomic studies. Results GeneViTo is a JAVA-based computer application that serves as a workbench for genome-wide analysis through visual interaction. The application deals with various experimental information concerning both DNA and protein sequences (derived from public sequence databases or proprietary data sources and meta-data obtained by various prediction algorithms, classification schemes or user-defined features. Interaction with a Graphical User Interface (GUI allows easy extraction of genomic and proteomic data referring to the sequence itself, sequence features, or general structural and functional features. Emphasis is laid on the potential comparison between annotation and prediction data in order to offer a supplement to the provided information, especially in cases of "poor" annotation, or an evaluation of available predictions. Moreover, desired information can be output in high quality JPEG image files for further elaboration and scientific use. A compilation of properly formatted GeneViTo input data for demonstration is available to interested readers for two completely sequenced prokaryotes, Chlamydia trachomatis and Methanococcus jannaschii. Conclusions GeneViTo offers an inspectional view of genomic functional elements, concerning data stemming both from database annotation and analysis tools for an overall analysis of existing genomes. The application is compatible with Linux or Windows ME-2000-XP operating

  11. Association testing by haplotype-sharing methods applicable to whole-genome analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolte, Ilja M.; Vries, André R. de; Spijker, Geert T.; Jansen, Ritsert C.; Brinza, Dumitru; Zelikovsky, Alexander; Meerman, Gerard J. te

    2007-01-01

    We propose two new haplotype-sharing methods for identifying disease loci: the haplotype sharing statistic (HSS), which compares length of shared haplotypes between cases and controls, and the CROSS test, which tests whether a case and a control haplotype show less sharing than two random

  12. P-value based analysis for shared controls design in genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaykin, Dmitri V; Kozbur, Damian O

    2010-11-01

    An appealing genome-wide association study design compares one large control group against several disease samples. A pioneering study by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium that employed such a design has identified multiple susceptibility regions, many of which have been independently replicated. While reusing a control sample provides effective utilization of data, it also creates correlation between association statistics across diseases. An observation of a large association statistic for one of the diseases may greatly increase chances of observing a spuriously large association for a different disease. Accounting for the correlation is also particularly important when screening for SNPs that might be involved in a set of diseases with overlapping etiology. We describe methods that correct association statistics for dependency due to shared controls, and we describe ways to obtain a measure of overall evidence and to combine association signals across multiple diseases. The methods we describe require no access to individual subject data, instead, they efficiently utilize information contained in P-values for association reported for individual diseases. P-value based combined tests for association are flexible and essentially as powerful as the approach based on aggregating the individual subject data.

  13. Genome-wide association study of corticobasal degeneration identifies risk variants shared with progressive supranuclear palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouri, Naomi; Ross, Owen A.; Dombroski, Beth; Younkin, Curtis S.; Serie, Daniel J.; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra; Baker, Matthew; Finch, Ni Cole A.; Yoon, Hyejin; Kim, Jungsu; Fujioka, Shinsuke; McLean, Catriona A.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Spina, Salvatore; Cantwell, Laura B.; Farlow, Martin R.; Grafman, Jordan; Huey, Edward D.; Ryung Han, Mi; Beecher, Sherry; Geller, Evan T.; Kretzschmar, Hans A.; Roeber, Sigrun; Gearing, Marla; Juncos, Jorge L.; Vonsattel, Jean Paul G.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Grossman, Murray; Hurtig, Howard I.; Gross, Rachel G.; Arnold, Steven E.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.; Wenning, Gregor K.; White, Charles L.; Höglinger, Günter U.; Müller, Ulrich; Devlin, Bernie; Golbe, Lawrence I.; Crook, Julia; Parisi, Joseph E.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Josephs, Keith A.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Uitti, Ryan J.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Litvan, Irene; Younkin, Steven G.; Wang, Li-San; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer; Rademakers, Rosa; Hakonarsen, Hakon; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Dickson, Dennis W.

    2015-01-01

    Corticobasal degeneration (CBD) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting movement and cognition, definitively diagnosed only at autopsy. Here, we conduct a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in CBD cases (n=152) and 3,311 controls, and 67 CBD cases and 439 controls in a replication stage. Associations with meta-analysis were 17q21 at MAPT (P=1.42 × 10−12), 8p12 at lnc-KIF13B-1, a long non-coding RNA (rs643472; P=3.41 × 10−8), and 2p22 at SOS1 (rs963731; P=1.76 × 10−7). Testing for association of CBD with top progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) GWAS single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified associations at MOBP (3p22; rs1768208; P=2.07 × 10−7) and MAPT H1c (17q21; rs242557; P=7.91 × 10−6). We previously reported SNP/transcript level associations with rs8070723/MAPT, rs242557/MAPT, and rs1768208/MOBP and herein identified association with rs963731/SOS1. We identify new CBD susceptibility loci and show that CBD and PSP share a genetic risk factor other than MAPT at 3p22 MOBP (myelin-associated oligodendrocyte basic protein). PMID:26077951

  14. Analysis on n-gram statistics and linguistic features of whole genome protein sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Qi-wen; WANG Xiao-long; LIN Lei

    2008-01-01

    To obtain the statistical sequence analysis on a large number of genomic and proteomie sequences available for different organisms,the n-grams of whole genome protein sequences from 20 organisms were extracted.Their linguistic features were analyzed by two tests:Zipf power law and Shannon entropy,developed for analysis of natural languages and symbolic sequences.The natural genome proteins and the artificial genome proteins were compared with each other and some statistical features of n-grams were discovered.The results show that:the n-grams of whole genome protein sequences approximately follow the Zipf law when n is larger than 4;the Shannon n-gram entropy of natural genome proteins is lower than that of artificial proteins;a simple unigram model can distinguish different organisms;there exist organism-specific usages of "phrases" in protein sequences.It is suggested that further detailed analysis on n-gram of whole genome protein sequences will result in a powerful model for mapping the relationship of protein sequence,structure and function.

  15. Avian picornaviruses: molecular evolution, genome diversity and unusual genome features of a rapidly expanding group of viruses in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boros, Ákos; Pankovics, Péter; Reuter, Gábor

    2014-12-01

    Picornaviridae is one of the most diverse families of viruses infecting vertebrate species. In contrast to the relative small number of mammal species compared to other vertebrates, the abundance of mammal-infecting picornaviruses was significantly overrepresented among the presently known picornaviruses. Therefore most of the current knowledge about the genome diversity/organization patterns and common genome features were based on the analysis of mammal-infecting picornaviruses. Beside the well known reservoir role of birds in case of several emerging viral pathogens, little is known about the diversity of picornaviruses circulating among birds, although in the last decade the number of known avian picornavirus species with complete genome was increased from one to at least 15. However, little is known about the geographic distribution, host spectrum or pathogenic potential of the recently described picornaviruses of birds. Despite the low number of known avian picornaviruses, the phylogenetic and genome organization diversity of these viruses were remarkable. Beside the common L-4-3-4 and 4-3-4 genome layouts unusual genome patterns (3-4-4; 3-5-4, 3-6-4; 3-8-4) with variable, multicistronic 2A genome regions were found among avian picornaviruses. The phylogenetic and genomic analysis revealed the presence of several conserved structures at the untranslated regions among phylogenetically distant avian and non-avian picornaviruses as well as at least five different avian picornavirus phylogenetic clusters located in every main picornavirus lineage with characteristic genome layouts which suggests the complex evolution history of these viruses. Based on the remarkable genetic diversity of the few known avian picornaviruses, the emergence of further divergent picornaviruses causing challenges in the current taxonomy and also in the understanding of the evolution and genome organization of picornaviruses will be strongly expected. In this review we would like to

  16. Evaluation of shared genetic susceptibility loci between autoimmune diseases and schizophrenia based on genome-wide association studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeffding, Louise K; Rosengren, Anders; Thygesen, Johan H;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have documented higher than expected comorbidity (or, in some cases, inverse comorbidity) between schizophrenia and several autoimmune disorders. It remains unknown whether this comorbidity reflects shared genetic susceptibility loci. AIMS: The present study...... aimed to investigate whether verified genome wide significant variants of autoimmune disorders confer risk of schizophrenia, which could suggest a common genetic basis. METHODS: Seven hundred and fourteen genome wide significant risk variants of 25 autoimmune disorders were extracted from the NHGRI GWAS...... catalogue and examined for association to schizophrenia in the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium schizophrenia GWAS samples (36,989 cases and 113,075 controls). RESULTS: Two independent loci at 4q24 and 6p21.32-33 originally identified from GWAS of autoimmune diseases were found genome wide associated...

  17. Evolutionary dynamics of selfish DNA generates pseudo-linguistic features of genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Sheinman; Anna Ramisch; Florian Massip; Arndt, Peter F.

    2016-01-01

    Since the sequencing of large genomes, many statistical features of their sequences have been found. One intriguing feature is that certain subsequences are much more abundant than others. In fact, abundances of subsequences of a given length are distributed with a scale-free power-law tail, resembling properties of human texts, such as the Zipf's law. Despite recent efforts, the understanding of this phenomenon is still lacking. Here we find that selfish DNA elements, such as those belonging...

  18. Sequencing of bovine herpesvirus 4 v.test strain reveals important genome features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillet Laurent

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4 is a useful model for the human pathogenic gammaherpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus. Although genome manipulations of this virus have been greatly facilitated by the cloning of the BoHV-4 V.test strain as a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC, the lack of a complete genome sequence for this strain limits its experimental use. Methods In this study, we have determined the complete sequence of BoHV-4 V.test strain by a pyrosequencing approach. Results The long unique coding region (LUR consists of 108,241 bp encoding at least 79 open reading frames and is flanked by several polyrepetitive DNA units (prDNA. As previously suggested, we showed that the prDNA unit located at the left prDNA-LUR junction (prDNA-G differs from the other prDNA units (prDNA-inner. Namely, the prDNA-G unit lacks the conserved pac-2 cleavage and packaging signal in its right terminal region. Based on the mechanisms of cleavage and packaging of herpesvirus genomes, this feature implies that only genomes bearing left and right end prDNA units are encapsulated into virions. Conclusions In this study, we have determined the complete genome sequence of the BAC-cloned BoHV-4 V.test strain and identified genome organization features that could be important in other herpesviruses.

  19. Predicting DNA Methylation State of CpG Dinucleotide Using Genome Topological Features and Deep Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiheng; Liu, Tong; Xu, Dong; Shi, Huidong; Zhang, Chaoyang; Mo, Yin-Yuan; Wang, Zheng

    2016-01-22

    The hypo- or hyper-methylation of the human genome is one of the epigenetic features of leukemia. However, experimental approaches have only determined the methylation state of a small portion of the human genome. We developed deep learning based (stacked denoising autoencoders, or SdAs) software named "DeepMethyl" to predict the methylation state of DNA CpG dinucleotides using features inferred from three-dimensional genome topology (based on Hi-C) and DNA sequence patterns. We used the experimental data from immortalised myelogenous leukemia (K562) and healthy lymphoblastoid (GM12878) cell lines to train the learning models and assess prediction performance. We have tested various SdA architectures with different configurations of hidden layer(s) and amount of pre-training data and compared the performance of deep networks relative to support vector machines (SVMs). Using the methylation states of sequentially neighboring regions as one of the learning features, an SdA achieved a blind test accuracy of 89.7% for GM12878 and 88.6% for K562. When the methylation states of sequentially neighboring regions are unknown, the accuracies are 84.82% for GM12878 and 72.01% for K562. We also analyzed the contribution of genome topological features inferred from Hi-C. DeepMethyl can be accessed at http://dna.cs.usm.edu/deepmethyl/.

  20. Confidentiality and data sharing: vulnerabilities of the Mexican Genomics Sovereignty Act

    OpenAIRE

    Rojas-Martínez, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    A law known as “Genomic Sovereignty Act”, instituted in 2011, regulates research on the human genome in Mexico. This law establishes Government regulations for the exportation of DNA samples from Mexican nationals for population genetics studies. The Genomic Sovereignty Act protects fundamental human values, as confidentiality and non-discrimination based on personal genetic information. It also supports the development of the genome-based medical biotechnology and the bio-economy. Current la...

  1. Using Extracted Behavioral Features to Improve Privacy for Shared Route Tracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Schaarup; Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2012-01-01

    Track-based services, such as road pricing, usage-based insurance, and sports trackers, require users to share entire tracks of locations, however this may seriously violate users’ privacy. Existing privacy methods suffer from the fact that they degrade service quality when adding privacy....... In this paper, we present the concept of privacy by substitution that addresses the problem without degrading service quality by substituting location tracks with less privacy invasive behavioral data extracted from raw tracks of location data or other sensing data. We explore this concept by designing...... and implementing TracM, a track-based community service for runners to share and compare their running performance. We show how such a service can be implemented by substituting location tracks with less privacy invasive behavioral data. Furthermore, we discuss the lessons learned from building TracM and discuss...

  2. The Complete Chloroplast Genome of the Hare’s Ear Root, Bupleurum falcatum: Its Molecular Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Kang, Sang-Ho; Ahn, Byung-Ohg; Kim, Chang-Kug

    2016-01-01

    Bupleurum falcatum, which belongs to the family Apiaceae, has long been applied for curative treatments, especially as a liver tonic, in herbal medicine. The chloroplast (cp) genome has been an ideal model to perform the evolutionary and comparative studies because of its highly conserved features and simple structure. The Apiaceae family is taxonomically close to the Araliaceae family and there have been numerous complete chloroplast genome sequences reported in the Araliaceae family, while little is known about the Apiaceae family. In this study, the complete sequence of the B. falcatum chloroplast genome was obtained. The full-length of the cp genome is 155,989 nucleotides with a 37.66% overall guanine-cytosine (GC) content and shows a quadripartite structure composed of three nomenclatural regions: a large single-copy (LSC) region, a small single-copy (SSC) region, and a pair of inverted repeat (IR) regions. The genome occupancy is 85,912-bp, 17,517-bp, and 26,280-bp for LSC, SSC, and IR, respectively. B. falcatum was shown to contain 111 unique genes (78 for protein-coding, 29 for tRNAs, and four for rRNAs, respectively) on its chloroplast genome. Genic comparison found that B. falcatum has no pseudogenes and has two gene losses, accD in the LSC and ycf15 in the IRs. A total of 55 unique tandem repeat sequences were detected in the B. falcatum cp genome. This report is the first to describe the complete chloroplast genome sequence in B. falcatum and will open up further avenues of research to understand the evolutionary panorama and the chloroplast genome conformation in related plant species. PMID:27187480

  3. The Complete Chloroplast Genome of the Hare’s Ear Root, Bupleurum falcatum: Its Molecular Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Ho Shin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bupleurum falcatum, which belongs to the family Apiaceae, has long been applied for curative treatments, especially as a liver tonic, in herbal medicine. The chloroplast (cp genome has been an ideal model to perform the evolutionary and comparative studies because of its highly conserved features and simple structure. The Apiaceae family is taxonomically close to the Araliaceae family and there have been numerous complete chloroplast genome sequences reported in the Araliaceae family, while little is known about the Apiaceae family. In this study, the complete sequence of the B. falcatum chloroplast genome was obtained. The full-length of the cp genome is 155,989 nucleotides with a 37.66% overall guanine-cytosine (GC content and shows a quadripartite structure composed of three nomenclatural regions: a large single-copy (LSC region, a small single-copy (SSC region, and a pair of inverted repeat (IR regions. The genome occupancy is 85,912-bp, 17,517-bp, and 26,280-bp for LSC, SSC, and IR, respectively. B. falcatum was shown to contain 111 unique genes (78 for protein-coding, 29 for tRNAs, and four for rRNAs, respectively on its chloroplast genome. Genic comparison found that B. falcatum has no pseudogenes and has two gene losses, accD in the LSC and ycf15 in the IRs. A total of 55 unique tandem repeat sequences were detected in the B. falcatum cp genome. This report is the first to describe the complete chloroplast genome sequence in B. falcatum and will open up further avenues of research to understand the evolutionary panorama and the chloroplast genome conformation in related plant species.

  4. Virulence and genomic feature of multidrug resistant Campylobacter jejuni isolated from broiler chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haihong Hao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to reveal the molecular mechanism involved in multidrug resistance and virulence of Campylobacter jejuni isolated from broiler chickens. The virulence of six multidrug resistant C. jejuni was determined by in vitro and in vivo methods. The de novo whole genome sequencing technology and molecular biology methods were used to analyze the genomic features associated with the multidrug resistance and virulence of a selected isolate (C. jejuni 1655. The comparative genomic analyses revealed a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms, deletions, rearrangements, and inversions in C. jejuni 1655 compared to reference C. jejuni genomes. The co-emergence of Thr-86-Ile mutation in gyrA gene, A2075G mutation in 23S rRNA gene, tetO, aphA and aadE genes and pTet plasmid in C. jejuni 1655 contributed its multidrug resistance to fluoroquinolones, macrolides, tetracycline and aminoglycosides. The combination of multiple virulence genes may work together to confer the relative higher virulence in C. jejuni 1655. The co-existence of mobile gene elements (e.g. pTet and CRISPR-Cas system in C. jejuni 1655 may play an important role in the gene transfer and immune defense. The present study provides basic information of phenotypic and genomic features of C. jejuni 1655, a strain recently isolated from a chicken displaying multidrug resistance and relatively high level of virulence.

  5. Virulence and Genomic Feature of Multidrug Resistant Campylobacter jejuni Isolated from Broiler Chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Haihong; Ren, Ni; Han, Jing; Foley, Steven L.; Iqbal, Zahid; Cheng, Guyue; Kuang, Xiuhua; Liu, Jie; Liu, Zhenli; Dai, Menghong; Wang, Yulian; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the molecular mechanism involved in multidrug resistance and virulence of Campylobacter jejuni isolated from broiler chickens. The virulence of six multidrug resistant C. jejuni was determined by in vitro and in vivo methods. The de novo whole genome sequencing technology and molecular biology methods were used to analyze the genomic features associated with the multidrug resistance and virulence of a selected isolate (C. jejuni 1655). The comparative genomic analyses revealed a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms, deletions, rearrangements, and inversions in C. jejuni 1655 compared to reference C. jejuni genomes. The co-emergence of Thr-86-Ile mutation in gyrA gene, A2075G mutation in 23S rRNA gene, tetO, aphA and aadE genes and pTet plasmid in C. jejuni 1655 contributed its multidrug resistance to fluoroquinolones, macrolides, tetracycline, and aminoglycosides. The combination of multiple virulence genes may work together to confer the relative higher virulence in C. jejuni 1655. The co-existence of mobile gene elements (e.g., pTet) and CRISPR-Cas system in C. jejuni 1655 may play an important role in the gene transfer and immune defense. The present study provides basic information of phenotypic and genomic features of C. jejuni 1655, a strain recently isolated from a chicken displaying multidrug resistance and relatively high level of virulence. PMID:27790202

  6. ClusTrack: feature extraction and similarity measures for clustering of genome-wide data sets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halfdan Rydbeck

    Full Text Available Clustering is a popular technique for explorative analysis of data, as it can reveal subgroupings and similarities between data in an unsupervised manner. While clustering is routinely applied to gene expression data, there is a lack of appropriate general methodology for clustering of sequence-level genomic and epigenomic data, e.g. ChIP-based data. We here introduce a general methodology for clustering data sets of coordinates relative to a genome assembly, i.e. genomic tracks. By defining appropriate feature extraction approaches and similarity measures, we allow biologically meaningful clustering to be performed for genomic tracks using standard clustering algorithms. An implementation of the methodology is provided through a tool, ClusTrack, which allows fine-tuned clustering analyses to be specified through a web-based interface. We apply our methods to the clustering of occupancy of the H3K4me1 histone modification in samples from a range of different cell types. The majority of samples form meaningful subclusters, confirming that the definitions of features and similarity capture biological, rather than technical, variation between the genomic tracks. Input data and results are available, and can be reproduced, through a Galaxy Pages document at http://hyperbrowser.uio.no/hb/u/hb-superuser/p/clustrack. The clustering functionality is available as a Galaxy tool, under the menu option "Specialized analyzis of tracks", and the submenu option "Cluster tracks based on genome level similarity", at the Genomic HyperBrowser server: http://hyperbrowser.uio.no/hb/.

  7. Feature context-dependency and complexity-reduction in probability landscapes for integrative genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benecke Arndt

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The question of how to integrate heterogeneous sources of biological information into a coherent framework that allows the gene regulatory code in eukaryotes to be systematically investigated is one of the major challenges faced by systems biology. Probability landscapes, which include as reference set the probabilistic representation of the genomic sequence, have been proposed as a possible approach to the systematic discovery and analysis of correlations amongst initially heterogeneous and un-relatable descriptions and genome-wide measurements. Much of the available experimental sequence and genome activity information is de facto, but not necessarily obviously, context dependent. Furthermore, the context dependency of the relevant information is itself dependent on the biological question addressed. It is hence necessary to develop a systematic way of discovering the context-dependency of functional genomics information in a flexible, question-dependent manner. Results We demonstrate here how feature context-dependency can be systematically investigated using probability landscapes. Furthermore, we show how different feature probability profiles can be conditionally collapsed to reduce the computational and formal, mathematical complexity of probability landscapes. Interestingly, the possibility of complexity reduction can be linked directly to the analysis of context-dependency. Conclusion These two advances in our understanding of the properties of probability landscapes not only simplify subsequent cross-correlation analysis in hypothesis-driven model building and testing, but also provide additional insights into the biological gene regulatory problems studied. Furthermore, insights into the nature of individual features and a classification of features according to their minimal context-dependency are achieved. The formal structure proposed contributes to a concrete and tangible basis for attempting to formulate novel

  8. Contrast features of CpG islands in the promoter and other regions in the dog genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Leng; Zhao, Zhongming

    2009-08-01

    The recent release of the domestic dog genome provides us with an ideal opportunity to investigate dog-specific genomic features. In this study, we performed a systematic analysis of CpG islands (CGIs), which are often considered gene markers, in the dog genome. Relative to the human and mouse genomes, the dog genome has a remarkably large number of CGIs and high CGI density, which is contributed by its noncoding sequences. Surprisingly, the dog genome has fewer CGIs associated with the promoter regions of genes than the human or the mouse. Further examination of functional features of dog-human-mouse homologous genes suggests that the dog might have undergone a faster erosion rate of promoter-associated CGIs than the human or mouse. Some genetic or genomic factors such as local recombination rate and karyotype may be related to the unique dog CGI features.

  9. Attracting Views and Going Viral: How Message Features and News-Sharing Channels Affect Health News Diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Suk

    2015-06-01

    This study examined how intrinsic as well as perceived message features affect the extent to which online health news stories prompt audience selections and social retransmissions, and how news-sharing channels (e-mail vs. social media) shape what goes viral. The study analyzed actual behavioral data on audience viewing and sharing of New York Times health news articles, and associated article content and context data. News articles with high informational utility and positive sentiment invited more frequent selections and retransmissions. Articles were also more frequently selected when they presented controversial, emotionally evocative, and familiar content. Informational utility and novelty had stronger positive associations with e-mail-specific virality, while emotional evocativeness, content familiarity, and exemplification played a larger role in triggering social media-based retransmissions.

  10. Integrating genome-based informatics to modernize global disease monitoring, information sharing, and response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Brown, Eric W; Detter, Chris;

    2012-01-01

    The rapid advancement of genome technologies holds great promise for improving the quality and speed of clinical and public health laboratory investigations and for decreasing their cost. The latest generation of genome DNA sequencers can provide highly detailed and robust information on disease-...

  11. Efficient and exact maximum likelihood quantisation of genomic features using dynamic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mingzhou; Haralick, Robert M; Boissinot, Stéphane

    2010-01-01

    An efficient and exact dynamic programming algorithm is introduced to quantise a continuous random variable into a discrete random variable that maximises the likelihood of the quantised probability distribution for the original continuous random variable. Quantisation is often useful before statistical analysis and modelling of large discrete network models from observations of multiple continuous random variables. The quantisation algorithm is applied to genomic features including the recombination rate distribution across the chromosomes and the non-coding transposable element LINE-1 in the human genome. The association pattern is studied between the recombination rate, obtained by quantisation at genomic locations around LINE-1 elements, and the length groups of LINE-1 elements, also obtained by quantisation on LINE-1 length. The exact and density-preserving quantisation approach provides an alternative superior to the inexact and distance-based univariate iterative k-means clustering algorithm for discretisation.

  12. Identification of genomic features in environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inherited sperm epimutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Guerrero-Bosagna

    Full Text Available A variety of environmental toxicants have been shown to induce the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and phenotypic variation. The process involves exposure of a gestating female and the developing fetus to environmental factors that promote permanent alterations in the epigenetic programming of the germline. The molecular aspects of the phenomenon involve epigenetic modifications (epimutations in the germline (e.g. sperm that are transmitted to subsequent generations. The current study integrates previously described experimental epigenomic transgenerational data and web-based bioinformatic analyses to identify genomic features associated with these transgenerationally transmitted epimutations. A previously identified genomic feature associated with these epimutations is a low CpG density (<12/100bp. The current observations suggest the transgenerational differential DNA methylation regions (DMR in sperm contain unique consensus DNA sequence motifs, zinc finger motifs and G-quadruplex sequences. Interaction of molecular factors with these sequences could alter chromatin structure and accessibility of proteins with DNA methyltransferases to alter de novo DNA methylation patterns. G-quadruplex regions can promote the opening of the chromatin that may influence the action of DNA methyltransferases, or factors interacting with them, for the establishment of epigenetic marks. Zinc finger binding factors can also promote this chromatin remodeling and influence the expression of non-coding RNA. The current study identified genomic features associated with sperm epimutations that may explain in part how these sites become susceptible for transgenerational programming.

  13. Identification of genomic features in environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inherited sperm epimutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Weeks, Shelby; Skinner, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    A variety of environmental toxicants have been shown to induce the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and phenotypic variation. The process involves exposure of a gestating female and the developing fetus to environmental factors that promote permanent alterations in the epigenetic programming of the germline. The molecular aspects of the phenomenon involve epigenetic modifications (epimutations) in the germline (e.g. sperm) that are transmitted to subsequent generations. The current study integrates previously described experimental epigenomic transgenerational data and web-based bioinformatic analyses to identify genomic features associated with these transgenerationally transmitted epimutations. A previously identified genomic feature associated with these epimutations is a low CpG density (transgenerational differential DNA methylation regions (DMR) in sperm contain unique consensus DNA sequence motifs, zinc finger motifs and G-quadruplex sequences. Interaction of molecular factors with these sequences could alter chromatin structure and accessibility of proteins with DNA methyltransferases to alter de novo DNA methylation patterns. G-quadruplex regions can promote the opening of the chromatin that may influence the action of DNA methyltransferases, or factors interacting with them, for the establishment of epigenetic marks. Zinc finger binding factors can also promote this chromatin remodeling and influence the expression of non-coding RNA. The current study identified genomic features associated with sperm epimutations that may explain in part how these sites become susceptible for transgenerational programming.

  14. Learning representation hierarchies by sharing visual features: a computational investigation of Persian character recognition with unsupervised deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Zahra; Testolin, Alberto

    2017-08-01

    In humans, efficient recognition of written symbols is thought to rely on a hierarchical processing system, where simple features are progressively combined into more abstract, high-level representations. Here, we present a computational model of Persian character recognition based on deep belief networks, where increasingly more complex visual features emerge in a completely unsupervised manner by fitting a hierarchical generative model to the sensory data. Crucially, high-level internal representations emerging from unsupervised deep learning can be easily read out by a linear classifier, achieving state-of-the-art recognition accuracy. Furthermore, we tested the hypothesis that handwritten digits and letters share many common visual features: A generative model that captures the statistical structure of the letters distribution should therefore also support the recognition of written digits. To this aim, deep networks trained on Persian letters were used to build high-level representations of Persian digits, which were indeed read out with high accuracy. Our simulations show that complex visual features, such as those mediating the identification of Persian symbols, can emerge from unsupervised learning in multilayered neural networks and can support knowledge transfer across related domains.

  15. Nonprogressing HIV-infected children share fundamental immunological features of nonpathogenic SIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muenchhoff, Maximilian; Adland, Emily; Karimanzira, Owen

    2016-01-01

    nonprogressors. These children therefore express two cardinal immunological features of nonpathogenic SIV infection in sooty mangabeys-low immune activation despite high viremia and low CCR5 expression on long-lived central memory CD4 T cells-suggesting closer similarities with nonpathogenetic mechanisms evolved......Disease-free infection in HIV-infected adults is associated with human leukocyte antigen-mediated suppression of viremia, whereas in the sooty mangabey and other healthy natural hosts of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), viral replication continues unabated. To better understand factors...... preventing HIV disease, we investigated pediatric infection, where AIDS typically develops more rapidly than in adults. Among 170 nonprogressing antiretroviral therapy-naïve children aged >5 years maintaining normal-for-Age CD4 T cell counts, immune activation levels were low despite high viremia (median, 26...

  16. Assumption-free estimation of heritability from genome-wide identity-by-descent sharing between full siblings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M Visscher

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of continuously varying, quantitative traits is important in evolutionary biology, agriculture, and medicine. Variation in such traits is attributable to many, possibly interacting, genes whose expression may be sensitive to the environment, which makes their dissection into underlying causative factors difficult. An important population parameter for quantitative traits is heritability, the proportion of total variance that is due to genetic factors. Response to artificial and natural selection and the degree of resemblance between relatives are all a function of this parameter. Following the classic paper by R. A. Fisher in 1918, the estimation of additive and dominance genetic variance and heritability in populations is based upon the expected proportion of genes shared between different types of relatives, and explicit, often controversial and untestable models of genetic and non-genetic causes of family resemblance. With genome-wide coverage of genetic markers it is now possible to estimate such parameters solely within families using the actual degree of identity-by-descent sharing between relatives. Using genome scans on 4,401 quasi-independent sib pairs of which 3,375 pairs had phenotypes, we estimated the heritability of height from empirical genome-wide identity-by-descent sharing, which varied from 0.374 to 0.617 (mean 0.498, standard deviation 0.036. The variance in identity-by-descent sharing per chromosome and per genome was consistent with theory. The maximum likelihood estimate of the heritability for height was 0.80 with no evidence for non-genetic causes of sib resemblance, consistent with results from independent twin and family studies but using an entirely separate source of information. Our application shows that it is feasible to estimate genetic variance solely from within-family segregation and provides an independent validation of previously untestable assumptions. Given sufficient data, our new paradigm will

  17. Assumption-free estimation of heritability from genome-wide identity-by-descent sharing between full siblings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of continuously varying, quantitative traits is important in evolutionary biology, agriculture, and medicine. Variation in such traits is attributable to many, possibly interacting, genes whose expression may be sensitive to the environment, which makes their dissection into underlying causative factors difficult. An important population parameter for quantitative traits is heritability, the proportion of total variance that is due to genetic factors. Response to artificial and natural selection and the degree of resemblance between relatives are all a function of this parameter. Following the classic paper by R. A. Fisher in 1918, the estimation of additive and dominance genetic variance and heritability in populations is based upon the expected proportion of genes shared between different types of relatives, and explicit, often controversial and untestable models of genetic and non-genetic causes of family resemblance. With genome-wide coverage of genetic markers it is now possible to estimate such parameters solely within families using the actual degree of identity-by-descent sharing between relatives. Using genome scans on 4,401 quasi-independent sib pairs of which 3,375 pairs had phenotypes, we estimated the heritability of height from empirical genome-wide identity-by-descent sharing, which varied from 0.374 to 0.617 (mean 0.498, standard deviation 0.036. The variance in identity-by-descent sharing per chromosome and per genome was consistent with theory. The maximum likelihood estimate of the heritability for height was 0.80 with no evidence for non-genetic causes of sib resemblance, consistent with results from independent twin and family studies but using an entirely separate source of information. Our application shows that it is feasible to estimate genetic variance solely from within-family segregation and provides an independent validation of previously untestable assumptions. Given sufficient data, our new paradigm will

  18. Nonprogressing HIV-infected children share fundamental immunological features of nonpathogenic SIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenchhoff, Maximilian; Adland, Emily; Karimanzira, Owen; Crowther, Carol; Pace, Matthew; Csala, Anna; Leitman, Ellen; Moonsamy, Angeline; McGregor, Callum; Hurst, Jacob; Groll, Andreas; Mori, Masahiko; Sinmyee, Smruti; Thobakgale, Christina; Tudor-Williams, Gareth; Prendergast, Andrew J; Kloverpris, Henrik; Roider, Julia; Leslie, Alasdair; Shingadia, Delane; Brits, Thea; Daniels, Samantha; Frater, John; Willberg, Christian B; Walker, Bruce D; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Jooste, Pieter; Moore, Penny L; Morris, Lynn; Goulder, Philip

    2016-09-28

    Disease-free infection in HIV-infected adults is associated with human leukocyte antigen-mediated suppression of viremia, whereas in the sooty mangabey and other healthy natural hosts of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), viral replication continues unabated. To better understand factors preventing HIV disease, we investigated pediatric infection, where AIDS typically develops more rapidly than in adults. Among 170 nonprogressing antiretroviral therapy-naïve children aged >5 years maintaining normal-for-age CD4 T cell counts, immune activation levels were low despite high viremia (median, 26,000 copies/ml). Potent, broadly neutralizing antibody responses in most of the subjects and strong virus-specific T cell activity were present but did not drive pediatric nonprogression. However, reduced CCR5 expression and low HIV infection in long-lived central memory CD4 T cells were observed in pediatric nonprogressors. These children therefore express two cardinal immunological features of nonpathogenic SIV infection in sooty mangabeys-low immune activation despite high viremia and low CCR5 expression on long-lived central memory CD4 T cells-suggesting closer similarities with nonpathogenetic mechanisms evolved over thousands of years in natural SIV hosts than those operating in HIV-infected adults.

  19. BiGG Models: A platform for integrating, standardizing and sharing genome-scale models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Zachary A; Lu, Justin; Dräger, Andreas; Miller, Philip; Federowicz, Stephen; Lerman, Joshua A; Ebrahim, Ali; Palsson, Bernhard O; Lewis, Nathan E

    2016-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models are mathematically-structured knowledge bases that can be used to predict metabolic pathway usage and growth phenotypes. Furthermore, they can generate and test hypotheses when integrated with experimental data. To maximize the value of these models, centralized repositories of high-quality models must be established, models must adhere to established standards and model components must be linked to relevant databases. Tools for model visualization further enhance their utility. To meet these needs, we present BiGG Models (http://bigg.ucsd.edu), a completely redesigned Biochemical, Genetic and Genomic knowledge base. BiGG Models contains more than 75 high-quality, manually-curated genome-scale metabolic models. On the website, users can browse, search and visualize models. BiGG Models connects genome-scale models to genome annotations and external databases. Reaction and metabolite identifiers have been standardized across models to conform to community standards and enable rapid comparison across models. Furthermore, BiGG Models provides a comprehensive application programming interface for accessing BiGG Models with modeling and analysis tools. As a resource for highly curated, standardized and accessible models of metabolism, BiGG Models will facilitate diverse systems biology studies and support knowledge-based analysis of diverse experimental data.

  20. NCBI Reference Sequences (RefSeq): current status, new features and genome annotation policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Kim D; Tatusova, Tatiana; Brown, Garth R; Maglott, Donna R

    2012-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Reference Sequence (RefSeq) database is a collection of genomic, transcript and protein sequence records. These records are selected and curated from public sequence archives and represent a significant reduction in redundancy compared to the volume of data archived by the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration. The database includes over 16,00 organisms, 2.4 × 0(6) genomic records, 13 × 10(6) proteins and 2 × 10(6) RNA records spanning prokaryotes, eukaryotes and viruses (RefSeq release 49, September 2011). The RefSeq database is maintained by a combined approach of automated analyses, collaboration and manual curation to generate an up-to-date representation of the sequence, its features, names and cross-links to related sources of information. We report here on recent growth, the status of curating the human RefSeq data set, more extensive feature annotation and current policy for eukaryotic genome annotation via the NCBI annotation pipeline. More information about the resource is available online (see http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/RefSeq/).

  1. Ecology and genomic features of infection with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Adel S; Hsu, Chung-Yi; Darwish, Samah F; Ghosh, Pallab; AbdEl-Fatah, Eman M; Behour, Tahani S; Talaat, Adel M

    2015-04-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) is the causative agent of paratuberculosis, or Johne's disease, in cattle, with potential involvement in cases of Crohn's disease in humans. Johne's disease is found worldwide and is economically important for both beef and dairy industries. In an effort to characterize this important infection in Egypt, we analysed the ecological and genomic features of recent isolates of M. paratuberculosis. In this report, we examined 26 Holstein dairy herds distributed throughout Egypt, from 2010 to 2013. Using PCR analysis of faecal samples, we estimated a mean herd-level prevalence of 65.4 %, with animal-level infection that reached a mean of 13.6 % among animals suffering from diarrhoea. Whole genome sequencing of field isolates identified numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms among field isolates relative to the standard M. paratuberculosis K10 genome. Interestingly, the virulence of M. paratuberculosis isolates from Egypt revealed diverse virulence phenotypes in the murine model of paratuberculosis, with significant differences in tissue colonization, particularly during the chronic stage of infection. Overall, our analysis confirmed that Johne's disease is a newly identified problem in Egypt and indicated that M. paratuberculosis has potentially diverse genotypes that impact its virulence. Further ecological mapping and genomic analysis of M. paratuberculosis will enhance our understanding of the transmission and evolutionary dynamics of this pathogen under natural field conditions.

  2. Clade- and species-specific features of genome evolution in the Saccharomycetaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Kenneth H; Armisén, David; Proux-Wera, Estelle; ÓhÉigeartaigh, Seán S; Azam, Haleema; Gordon, Jonathan L; Byrne, Kevin P

    2015-08-01

    Many aspects of the genomes of yeast species in the family Saccharomycetaceae have been well conserved during evolution. They have similar genome sizes, genome contents, and extensive collinearity of gene order along chromosomes. Gene functions can often be inferred reliably by using information from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Beyond this conservative picture however, there are many instances where a species or a clade diverges substantially from the S. cerevisiae paradigm-for example, by the amplification of a gene family, or by the absence of a biochemical pathway or a protein complex. Here, we review clade-specific features, focusing on genomes sequenced in our laboratory from the post-WGD genera Naumovozyma, Kazachstania and Tetrapisispora, and from the non-WGD species Torulaspora delbrueckii. Examples include the loss of the pathway for histidine synthesis in the cockroach-associated species Tetrapisispora blattae; the presence of a large telomeric GAL gene cluster in To. delbrueckii; losses of the dynein and dynactin complexes in several independent yeast lineages; fragmentation of the MAT locus and loss of the HO gene in Kazachstania africana; and the patchy phylogenetic distribution of RNAi pathway components. © FEMS 2015.

  3. Genomic sharing surrounding alleles identical by descent : Effects of genetic drift and population growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Meerman, G J; Van der Meulen, M A

    1997-01-01

    The number of identical deleterious mutations present in a population may become very large, depending on the combined effect of genetic drift, population growth and limited negative selection. The distribution of the length of the shared area between two random chromosomes carrying the mutations ha

  4. Genomic sharing surrounding alleles identical by descent : Effects of genetic drift and population growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Meerman, G J; Meulen ,van der Martin

    1997-01-01

    The number of identical deleterious mutations present in a population may become very large, depending on the combined effect of genetic drift, population growth and limited negative selection. The distribution of the length of the shared area between two random chromosomes carrying the mutations ha

  5. Plant carbohydrate scavenging through tonB-dependent receptors: a feature shared by phytopathogenic and aquatic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanvillain, Servane; Meyer, Damien; Boulanger, Alice; Lautier, Martine; Guynet, Catherine; Denancé, Nicolas; Vasse, Jacques; Lauber, Emmanuelle; Arlat, Matthieu

    2007-02-21

    TonB-dependent receptors (TBDRs) are outer membrane proteins mainly known for the active transport of iron siderophore complexes in Gram-negative bacteria. Analysis of the genome of the phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), predicts 72 TBDRs. Such an overrepresentation is common in Xanthomonas species but is limited to only a small number of bacteria. Here, we show that one Xcc TBDR transports sucrose with a very high affinity, suggesting that it might be a sucrose scavenger. This TBDR acts with an inner membrane transporter, an amylosucrase and a regulator to utilize sucrose, thus defining a new type of carbohydrate utilization locus, named CUT locus, involving a TBDR for the transport of substrate across the outer membrane. This sucrose CUT locus is required for full pathogenicity on Arabidopsis, showing its importance for the adaptation to host plants. A systematic analysis of Xcc TBDR genes and a genome context survey suggested that several Xcc TBDRs belong to other CUT loci involved in the utilization of various plant carbohydrates. Interestingly, several Xcc TBDRs and CUT loci are conserved in aquatic bacteria such as Caulobacter crescentus, Colwellia psychrerythraea, Saccharophagus degradans, Shewanella spp., Sphingomonas spp. or Pseudoalteromonas spp., which share the ability to degrade a wide variety of complex carbohydrates and display TBDR overrepresentation. We therefore propose that TBDR overrepresentation and the presence of CUT loci designate the ability to scavenge carbohydrates. Thus CUT loci, which seem to participate to the adaptation of phytopathogenic bacteria to their host plants, might also play a very important role in the biogeochemical cycling of plant-derived nutrients in marine environments. Moreover, the TBDRs and CUT loci identified in this study are clearly different from those characterized in the human gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, which allow glycan foraging, suggesting a convergent

  6. Plant carbohydrate scavenging through tonB-dependent receptors: a feature shared by phytopathogenic and aquatic bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servane Blanvillain

    Full Text Available TonB-dependent receptors (TBDRs are outer membrane proteins mainly known for the active transport of iron siderophore complexes in Gram-negative bacteria. Analysis of the genome of the phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc, predicts 72 TBDRs. Such an overrepresentation is common in Xanthomonas species but is limited to only a small number of bacteria. Here, we show that one Xcc TBDR transports sucrose with a very high affinity, suggesting that it might be a sucrose scavenger. This TBDR acts with an inner membrane transporter, an amylosucrase and a regulator to utilize sucrose, thus defining a new type of carbohydrate utilization locus, named CUT locus, involving a TBDR for the transport of substrate across the outer membrane. This sucrose CUT locus is required for full pathogenicity on Arabidopsis, showing its importance for the adaptation to host plants. A systematic analysis of Xcc TBDR genes and a genome context survey suggested that several Xcc TBDRs belong to other CUT loci involved in the utilization of various plant carbohydrates. Interestingly, several Xcc TBDRs and CUT loci are conserved in aquatic bacteria such as Caulobacter crescentus, Colwellia psychrerythraea, Saccharophagus degradans, Shewanella spp., Sphingomonas spp. or Pseudoalteromonas spp., which share the ability to degrade a wide variety of complex carbohydrates and display TBDR overrepresentation. We therefore propose that TBDR overrepresentation and the presence of CUT loci designate the ability to scavenge carbohydrates. Thus CUT loci, which seem to participate to the adaptation of phytopathogenic bacteria to their host plants, might also play a very important role in the biogeochemical cycling of plant-derived nutrients in marine environments. Moreover, the TBDRs and CUT loci identified in this study are clearly different from those characterized in the human gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, which allow glycan foraging

  7. Draft genome sequence of Acinetobacter pittii ST643 shared by cystic fibrosis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Géssica A; Ferreira, Alex G; Lima, Danielle F; Leão, Robson S; Carvalho-Assef, Ana Paula D; Folescu, Tânia W; Albano, Rodolpho M; Marques, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter pittii has emerged as an important hospital pathogen that is associated with outbreaks and drug resistance. In cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, the detection of Acinetobacter spp. is rare; however, we isolated the A. pittii sequence type ST643 in several Brazilian CF patients treated in the same centre. The current study describes the draft genome of A. pittii ST643. PMID:27653362

  8. BiGG Models: A platform for integrating, standardizing and sharing genome-scale models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models are mathematically-structured knowledge bases that can be used to predict metabolic pathway usage and growth phenotypes. Furthermore, they can generate and test hypotheses when integrated with experimental data. To maximize the value of these models, centralized...

  9. The genome of Pelobacter carbinolicus reveals surprising metabolic capabilities and physiological features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aklujkar Muktak

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Pelobacter carbinolicus is able to grow by fermentation, syntrophic hydrogen/formate transfer, or electron transfer to sulfur from short-chain alcohols, hydrogen or formate; it does not oxidize acetate and is not known to ferment any sugars or grow autotrophically. The genome of P. carbinolicus was sequenced in order to understand its metabolic capabilities and physiological features in comparison with its relatives, acetate-oxidizing Geobacter species. Results Pathways were predicted for catabolism of known substrates: 2,3-butanediol, acetoin, glycerol, 1,2-ethanediol, ethanolamine, choline and ethanol. Multiple isozymes of 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase, ATP synthase and [FeFe]-hydrogenase were differentiated and assigned roles according to their structural properties and genomic contexts. The absence of asparagine synthetase and the presence of a mutant tRNA for asparagine encoded among RNA-active enzymes suggest that P. carbinolicus may make asparaginyl-tRNA in a novel way. Catabolic glutamate dehydrogenases were discovered, implying that the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle can function catabolically. A phosphotransferase system for uptake of sugars was discovered, along with enzymes that function in 2,3-butanediol production. Pyruvate:ferredoxin/flavodoxin oxidoreductase was identified as a potential bottleneck in both the supply of oxaloacetate for oxidation of acetate by the TCA cycle and the connection of glycolysis to production of ethanol. The P. carbinolicus genome was found to encode autotransporters and various appendages, including three proteins with similarity to the geopilin of electroconductive nanowires. Conclusions Several surprising metabolic capabilities and physiological features were predicted from the genome of P. carbinolicus, suggesting that it is more versatile than anticipated.

  10. Bionimbus: a cloud for managing, analyzing and sharing large genomics datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Allison P; Greenway, Matthew; Powell, Raymond; Spring, Jonathan; Suarez, Rafael; Hanley, David; Bandlamudi, Chai; McNerney, Megan E; White, Kevin P; Grossman, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    As large genomics and phenotypic datasets are becoming more common, it is increasingly difficult for most researchers to access, manage, and analyze them. One possible approach is to provide the research community with several petabyte-scale cloud-based computing platforms containing these data, along with tools and resources to analyze it. Bionimbus is an open source cloud-computing platform that is based primarily upon OpenStack, which manages on-demand virtual machines that provide the required computational resources, and GlusterFS, which is a high-performance clustered file system. Bionimbus also includes Tukey, which is a portal, and associated middleware that provides a single entry point and a single sign on for the various Bionimbus resources; and Yates, which automates the installation, configuration, and maintenance of the software infrastructure required. Bionimbus is used by a variety of projects to process genomics and phenotypic data. For example, it is used by an acute myeloid leukemia resequencing project at the University of Chicago. The project requires several computational pipelines, including pipelines for quality control, alignment, variant calling, and annotation. For each sample, the alignment step requires eight CPUs for about 12 h. BAM file sizes ranged from 5 GB to 10 GB for each sample. Most members of the research community have difficulty downloading large genomics datasets and obtaining sufficient storage and computer resources to manage and analyze the data. Cloud computing platforms, such as Bionimbus, with data commons that contain large genomics datasets, are one choice for broadening access to research data in genomics. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Bionimbus: a cloud for managing, analyzing and sharing large genomics datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Allison P; Greenway, Matthew; Powell, Raymond; Spring, Jonathan; Suarez, Rafael; Hanley, David; Bandlamudi, Chai; McNerney, Megan E; White, Kevin P; Grossman, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    Background As large genomics and phenotypic datasets are becoming more common, it is increasingly difficult for most researchers to access, manage, and analyze them. One possible approach is to provide the research community with several petabyte-scale cloud-based computing platforms containing these data, along with tools and resources to analyze it. Methods Bionimbus is an open source cloud-computing platform that is based primarily upon OpenStack, which manages on-demand virtual machines that provide the required computational resources, and GlusterFS, which is a high-performance clustered file system. Bionimbus also includes Tukey, which is a portal, and associated middleware that provides a single entry point and a single sign on for the various Bionimbus resources; and Yates, which automates the installation, configuration, and maintenance of the software infrastructure required. Results Bionimbus is used by a variety of projects to process genomics and phenotypic data. For example, it is used by an acute myeloid leukemia resequencing project at the University of Chicago. The project requires several computational pipelines, including pipelines for quality control, alignment, variant calling, and annotation. For each sample, the alignment step requires eight CPUs for about 12 h. BAM file sizes ranged from 5 GB to 10 GB for each sample. Conclusions Most members of the research community have difficulty downloading large genomics datasets and obtaining sufficient storage and computer resources to manage and analyze the data. Cloud computing platforms, such as Bionimbus, with data commons that contain large genomics datasets, are one choice for broadening access to research data in genomics. PMID:24464852

  12. Human and non-human primate genomes share hotspots of positive selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Enard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Among primates, genome-wide analysis of recent positive selection is currently limited to the human species because it requires extensive sampling of genotypic data from many individuals. The extent to which genes positively selected in human also present adaptive changes in other primates therefore remains unknown. This question is important because a gene that has been positively selected independently in the human and in other primate lineages may be less likely to be involved in human specific phenotypic changes such as dietary habits or cognitive abilities. To answer this question, we analysed heterozygous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs in the genomes of single human, chimpanzee, orangutan, and macaque individuals using a new method aiming to identify selective sweeps genome-wide. We found an unexpectedly high number of orthologous genes exhibiting signatures of a selective sweep simultaneously in several primate species, suggesting the presence of hotspots of positive selection. A similar significant excess is evident when comparing genes positively selected during recent human evolution with genes subjected to positive selection in their coding sequence in other primate lineages and identified using a different test. These findings are further supported by comparing several published human genome scans for positive selection with our findings in non-human primate genomes. We thus provide extensive evidence that the co-occurrence of positive selection in humans and in other primates at the same genetic loci can be measured with only four species, an indication that it may be a widespread phenomenon. The identification of positive selection in humans alongside other primates is a powerful tool to outline those genes that were selected uniquely during recent human evolution.

  13. The composition of the global and feature specific cyanobacterial core-genomes

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    Stefan eSimm

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes important for many ecosystems with a high potential for biotechnological usage e.g. in the production of bioactive molecules. Either asks for a deep understanding of the functionality of cyanobacteria and their interaction with the environment. This in part can be inferred from the analysis of their genomes or proteomes. Today, many cyanobacterial genomes have been sequenced and annotated. This information can be used to identify biological pathways present in all cyanobacteria as proteins involved in such processes are encoded by a so called core-genome. However, beside identification of fundamental processes, genes specific for certain cyanobacterial features can be identified by a holistic genome analysis as well. We identified 559 genes that define the core-genome of 58 analyzed cyanobacteria, as well as 3 genes likely to be signature genes for thermophilic and 57 genes likely to be signature genes for heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria. To get insights into cyanobacterial systems for the interaction with the environment we also inspected the diversity of the outer membrane proteome with focus on β-barrel proteins. We observed that most of the transporting outer membrane β-barrel proteins are not globally conserved in the cyanobacterial phylum. In turn, the occurrence of β-barrel proteins shows high strain specificity. The core set of outer membrane proteins globally conserved in cyanobacteria comprises three proteins only, namely the outer membrane β-barrel assembly protein Omp85, the lipid A transfer protein LptD and an OprB-type porin. Thus, we conclude that cyanobacteria have developed individual strategies for the interaction with the environment, while other intracellular processes like the regulation of the protein homeostasis are globally conserved.

  14. Filtering high-throughput protein-protein interaction data using a combination of genomic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Ashwini

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interaction data used in the creation or prediction of molecular networks is usually obtained from large scale or high-throughput experiments. This experimental data is liable to contain a large number of spurious interactions. Hence, there is a need to validate the interactions and filter out the incorrect data before using them in prediction studies. Results In this study, we use a combination of 3 genomic features – structurally known interacting Pfam domains, Gene Ontology annotations and sequence homology – as a means to assign reliability to the protein-protein interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae determined by high-throughput experiments. Using Bayesian network approaches, we show that protein-protein interactions from high-throughput data supported by one or more genomic features have a higher likelihood ratio and hence are more likely to be real interactions. Our method has a high sensitivity (90% and good specificity (63%. We show that 56% of the interactions from high-throughput experiments in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have high reliability. We use the method to estimate the number of true interactions in the high-throughput protein-protein interaction data sets in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster and Homo sapiens to be 27%, 18% and 68% respectively. Our results are available for searching and downloading at http://helix.protein.osaka-u.ac.jp/htp/. Conclusion A combination of genomic features that include sequence, structure and annotation information is a good predictor of true interactions in large and noisy high-throughput data sets. The method has a very high sensitivity and good specificity and can be used to assign a likelihood ratio, corresponding to the reliability, to each interaction.

  15. Abraham's children in the genome era: major Jewish diaspora populations comprise distinct genetic clusters with shared Middle Eastern Ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzmon, Gil; Hao, Li; Pe'er, Itsik; Velez, Christopher; Pearlman, Alexander; Palamara, Pier Francesco; Morrow, Bernice; Friedman, Eitan; Oddoux, Carole; Burns, Edward; Ostrer, Harry

    2010-06-11

    For more than a century, Jews and non-Jews alike have tried to define the relatedness of contemporary Jewish people. Previous genetic studies of blood group and serum markers suggested that Jewish groups had Middle Eastern origin with greater genetic similarity between paired Jewish populations. However, these and successor studies of monoallelic Y chromosomal and mitochondrial genetic markers did not resolve the issues of within and between-group Jewish genetic identity. Here, genome-wide analysis of seven Jewish groups (Iranian, Iraqi, Syrian, Italian, Turkish, Greek, and Ashkenazi) and comparison with non-Jewish groups demonstrated distinctive Jewish population clusters, each with shared Middle Eastern ancestry, proximity to contemporary Middle Eastern populations, and variable degrees of European and North African admixture. Two major groups were identified by principal component, phylogenetic, and identity by descent (IBD) analysis: Middle Eastern Jews and European/Syrian Jews. The IBD segment sharing and the proximity of European Jews to each other and to southern European populations suggested similar origins for European Jewry and refuted large-scale genetic contributions of Central and Eastern European and Slavic populations to the formation of Ashkenazi Jewry. Rapid decay of IBD in Ashkenazi Jewish genomes was consistent with a severe bottleneck followed by large expansion, such as occurred with the so-called demographic miracle of population expansion from 50,000 people at the beginning of the 15th century to 5,000,000 people at the beginning of the 19th century. Thus, this study demonstrates that European/Syrian and Middle Eastern Jews represent a series of geographical isolates or clusters woven together by shared IBD genetic threads.

  16. Clusters of ancestrally related genes that show paralogy in whole or in part are a major feature of the genomes of humans and other species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Walker

    Full Text Available Arrangements of genes along chromosomes are a product of evolutionary processes, and we can expect that preferable arrangements will prevail over the span of evolutionary time, often being reflected in the non-random clustering of structurally and/or functionally related genes. Such non-random arrangements can arise by two distinct evolutionary processes: duplications of DNA sequences that give rise to clusters of genes sharing both sequence similarity and common sequence features and the migration together of genes related by function, but not by common descent. To provide a background for distinguishing between the two, which is important for future efforts to unravel the evolutionary processes involved, we here provide a description of the extent to which ancestrally related genes are found in proximity.Towards this purpose, we combined information from five genomic datasets, InterPro, SCOP, PANTHER, Ensembl protein families, and Ensembl gene paralogs. The results are provided in publicly available datasets (http://cgd.jax.org/datasets/clustering/paraclustering.shtml describing the extent to which ancestrally related genes are in proximity beyond what is expected by chance (i.e. form paraclusters in the human and nine other vertebrate genomes, as well as the D. melanogaster, C. elegans, A. thaliana, and S. cerevisiae genomes. With the exception of Saccharomyces, paraclusters are a common feature of the genomes we examined. In the human genome they are estimated to include at least 22% of all protein coding genes. Paraclusters are far more prevalent among some gene families than others, are highly species or clade specific and can evolve rapidly, sometimes in response to environmental cues. Altogether, they account for a large portion of the functional clustering previously reported in several genomes.

  17. Privacy-Preserving Data Sharing for Genome-Wide Association Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Uhler, Caroline; Fienberg, Stephen E

    2012-01-01

    Traditional statistical methods for confidentiality protection of statistical databases do not scale well to deal with GWAS (genome-wide association studies) databases especially in terms of guarantees regarding protection from linkage to external information. The more recent concept of differential privacy, introduced by the cryptographic community, is an approach which provides a rigorous definition of privacy with meaningful privacy guarantees in the presence of arbitrary external information, although the guarantees come at a serious price in terms of data utility. Building on such notions, we propose new methods to release aggregate GWAS data without compromising an individual's privacy. We present methods for releasing differentially private minor allele frequencies, chi-square statistics and p-values. We compare these approaches on simulated data and on a GWAS study of canine hair length involving 685 dogs. We also propose a privacy-preserving method for finding genome-wide associations based on a diff...

  18. Microarray karyotyping of commercial wine yeast strains reveals shared, as well as unique, genomic signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levine R Paul

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic differences between yeast strains used in wine-making may account for some of the variation seen in their fermentation properties and may also produce differing sensory characteristics in the final wine product itself. To investigate this, we have determined genomic differences among several Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains by using a "microarray karyotyping" (also known as "array-CGH" or "aCGH" technique. Results We have studied four commonly used commercial wine yeast strains, assaying three independent isolates from each strain. All four wine strains showed common differences with respect to the laboratory S. cerevisiae strain S288C, some of which may be specific to commercial wine yeasts. We observed very little intra-strain variation; i.e., the genomic karyotypes of different commercial isolates of the same strain looked very similar, although an exception to this was seen among the Montrachet isolates. A moderate amount of inter-strain genomic variation between the four wine strains was observed, mostly in the form of depletions or amplifications of single genes; these differences allowed unique identification of each strain. Many of the inter-strain differences appear to be in transporter genes, especially hexose transporters (HXT genes, metal ion sensors/transporters (CUP1, ZRT1, ENA genes, members of the major facilitator superfamily, and in genes involved in drug response (PDR3, SNQ1, QDR1, RDS1, AYT1, YAR068W. We therefore used halo assays to investigate the response of these strains to three different fungicidal drugs (cycloheximide, clotrimazole, sulfomethuron methyl. Strains with fewer copies of the CUP1 loci showed hypersensitivity to sulfomethuron methyl. Conclusion Microarray karyotyping is a useful tool for analyzing the genome structures of wine yeasts. Despite only small to moderate variations in gene copy numbers between different wine yeast strains and within different isolates of a given

  19. Enhancer identification in mouse embryonic stem cells using integrative modeling of chromatin and genomic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chih-yu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic modifications, transcription factor (TF availability and differences in chromatin folding influence how the genome is interpreted by the transcriptional machinery responsible for gene expression. Enhancers buried in non-coding regions are found to be associated with significant differences in histone marks between different cell types. In contrast, gene promoters show more uniform modifications across cell types. Here we used histone modification and chromatin-associated protein ChIP-Seq data sets in mouse embryonic stem (ES cells as well as genomic features to identify functional enhancer regions. Using co-bound sites of OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG (co-OSN, validated enhancers and co-bound sites of MYC and MYCN (limited enhancer activity as enhancer positive and negative training sets, we performed multinomial logistic regression with LASSO regularization to identify key features. Results Cross validations reveal that a combination of p300, H3K4me1, MED12 and NIPBL features to be top signatures of co-OSN regions. Using a model from 10 signatures, 83% of top 1277 putative 1 kb enhancer regions (probability greater than or equal to 0.8 overlapped with at least one TF peak from 7 mouse ES cell ChIP-Seq data sets. These putative enhancers are associated with increased gene expression of neighbouring genes and significantly enriched in multiple TF bound loci in agreement with combinatorial models of TF binding. Furthermore, we identified several motifs of known TFs significantly enriched in putative enhancer regions compared to random promoter regions and background. Comparison with an active H3K27ac mark in various cell types confirmed cell type-specificity of these enhancers. Conclusions The top enhancer signatures we identified (p300, H3K4me1, MED12 and NIPBL will allow for the identification of cell type-specific enhancer regions in diverse cell types.

  20. Genome-wide Association Study of Cannabis Dependence Severity, Novel Risk Variants, and Shared Genetic Risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherva, Richard; Wang, Qian; Kranzler, Henry; Zhao, Hongyu; Koesterer, Ryan; Herman, Aryeh; Farrer, Lindsay A; Gelernter, Joel

    2016-05-01

    Cannabis dependence (CAD) is a serious problem worldwide and is of growing importance in the United States because cannabis is increasingly available legally. Although genetic factors contribute substantially to CAD risk, at present no well-established specific genetic risk factors for CAD have been elucidated. To report findings for DSM-IV CAD criteria from association analyses performed in large cohorts of African American and European American participants from 3 studies of substance use disorder genetics. This genome-wide association study for DSM-IV CAD criterion count was performed in 3 independent substance dependence cohorts (the Yale-Penn Study, Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment [SAGE], and International Consortium on the Genetics of Heroin Dependence [ICGHD]). A referral sample and volunteers recruited in the community and from substance abuse treatment centers included 6000 African American and 8754 European American participants, including some from small families. Participants from the Yale-Penn Study were recruited from 2000 to 2013. Data were collected for the SAGE trial from 1990 to 2007 and for the ICGHD from 2004 to 2009. Data were analyzed from January 2, 2013, to November 9, 2015. Criterion count for DSM-IV CAD. Among the 14 754 participants, 7879 were male, 6875 were female, and the mean (SD) age was 39.2 (10.2) years. Three independent regions with genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphism associations were identified, considering the largest possible sample. These included rs143244591 (β = 0.54, P = 4.32 × 10-10 for the meta-analysis) in novel antisense transcript RP11-206M11.7;rs146091982 (β = 0.54, P = 1.33 × 10-9 for the meta-analysis) in the solute carrier family 35 member G1 gene (SLC35G1); and rs77378271 (β = 0.29, P = 2.13 × 10-8 for the meta-analysis) in the CUB and Sushi multiple domains 1 gene (CSMD1). Also noted was evidence of genome-level pleiotropy between CAD and

  1. Adhesion, Biofilm Formation, and Genomic Features of Campylobacter jejuni Bf, an Atypical Strain Able to Grow under Aerobic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronnec, Vicky; Turoňová, Hana; Bouju, Agnès; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Rodrigues, Ramila; Demnerova, Katerina; Tresse, Odile; Haddad, Nabila; Zagorec, Monique

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial enteritis in Europe. Human campylobacteriosis cases are frequently associated to the consumption of contaminated poultry meat. To survive under environmental conditions encountered along the food chain, i.e., from poultry digestive tract its natural reservoir to the consumer’s plate, this pathogen has developed adaptation mechanisms. Among those, biofilm lifestyle has been suggested as a strategy to survive in the food environment and under atmospheric conditions. Recently, the clinical isolate C. jejuni Bf has been shown to survive and grow under aerobic conditions, a property that may help this strain to better survive along the food chain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adhesion capacity of C. jejuni Bf and its ability to develop a biofilm. C. jejuni Bf can adhere to abiotic surfaces and to human epithelial cells, and can develop biofilm under both microaerobiosis and aerobiosis. These two conditions have no influence on this strain, unlike results obtained with the reference strain C. jejuni 81-176, which harbors only planktonic cells under aerobic conditions. Compared to 81-176, the biofilm of C. jejuni Bf is more homogenous and cell motility at the bottom of biofilm was not modified whatever the atmosphere used. C. jejuni Bf whole genome sequence did not reveal any gene unique to this strain, suggesting that its unusual property does not result from acquisition of new genetic material. Nevertheless some genetic particularities seem to be shared only between Bf and few others strains. Among the main features of C. jejuni Bf genome we noticed (i) a complete type VI secretion system important in pathogenicity and environmental adaptation; (ii) a mutation in the oorD gene involved in oxygen metabolism; and (iii) the presence of an uncommon insertion of a 72 amino acid coding sequence upstream from dnaK, which is involved in stress resistance. Therefore, the atypical behavior of this strain under

  2. Nine Loci for Ocular Axial Length Identified through Genome-wide Association Studies, Including Shared Loci with Refractive Error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Schache, Maria; Ikram, M. Kamran; Young, Terri L.; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Vitart, Veronique; MacGregor, Stuart; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Barathi, Veluchamy A.; Liao, Jiemin; Hysi, Pirro G.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; St. Pourcain, Beate; Kemp, John P.; McMahon, George; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Evans, David M.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mishra, Aniket; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Jie Jin; Rochtchina, Elena; Polasek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F.; Amin, Najaf; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Wilson, James F.; Pennell, Craig E.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; de Jong, Paulus T.V.M.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Peng; Li, Ruoying; Tay, Wan-Ting; Zheng, Yingfeng; Chew, Merwyn; Rahi, Jugnoo S.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Yamashiro, Kenji; Miyake, Masahiro; Delcourt, Cécile; Maubaret, Cecilia; Williams, Cathy; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Northstone, Kate; Ring, Susan M.; Davey-Smith, George; Craig, Jamie E.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Fogarty, Rhys D.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Chew, Emily; Janmahasathian, Sarayut; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Chew, Emily; Janmahasathian, Sarayut; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; MacGregor, Stuart; Lu, Yi; Jonas, Jost B.; Xu, Liang; Saw, Seang-Mei; Baird, Paul N.; Rochtchina, Elena; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Jonas, Jost B.; Nangia, Vinay; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F.; Vitart, Veronique; Polasek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Vitart, Veronique; Rudan, Igor; Vatavuk, Zoran; Vitart, Veronique; Paterson, Andrew D.; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Fondran, Jeremy R.; Young, Terri L.; Feng, Sheng; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Klaver, Caroline C.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Metspalu, Andres; Haller, Toomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Pärssinen, Olavi; Wedenoja, Juho; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; Wojciechowski, Robert; Baird, Paul N.; Schache, Maria; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Höhn, René; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Peng; Meitinger, Thomas; Oexle, Konrad; Wegner, Aharon; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Yamashiro, Kenji; Miyake, Masahiro; Pärssinen, Olavi; Yip, Shea Ping; Ho, Daniel W.H.; Pirastu, Mario; Murgia, Federico; Portas, Laura; Biino, Genevra; Wilson, James F.; Fleck, Brian; Vitart, Veronique; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; Hewitt, Alex W.; Ang, Wei; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Klaver, Caroline C.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Saw, Seang-Mei; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Tai, E-Shyong; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Mackey, David A.; MacGregor, Stuart; Hammond, Christopher J.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Deangelis, Margaret M.; Morrison, Margaux; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Wei; Paterson, Andrew D.; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Meguro, Akira; Lehtimäki, Terho; Mäkelä, Kari-Matti; Raitakari, Olli; Kähönen, Mika; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Craig, Jamie E.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Lass, Jonathan H.; Reinhart, William; Belin, Michael W.; Schultze, Robert L.; Morason, Todd; Sugar, Alan; Mian, Shahzad; Soong, Hunson Kaz; Colby, Kathryn; Jurkunas, Ula; Yee, Richard; Vital, Mark; Alfonso, Eduardo; Karp, Carol; Lee, Yunhee; Yoo, Sonia; Hammersmith, Kristin; Cohen, Elisabeth; Laibson, Peter; Rapuano, Christopher; Ayres, Brandon; Croasdale, Christopher; Caudill, James; Patel, Sanjay; Baratz, Keith; Bourne, William; Maguire, Leo; Sugar, Joel; Tu, Elmer; Djalilian, Ali; Mootha, Vinod; McCulley, James; Bowman, Wayne; Cavanaugh, H. Dwight; Verity, Steven; Verdier, David; Renucci, Ann; Oliva, Matt; Rotkis, Walter; Hardten, David R.; Fahmy, Ahmad; Brown, Marlene; Reeves, Sherman; Davis, Elizabeth A.; Lindstrom, Richard; Hauswirth, Scott; Hamilton, Stephen; Lee, W. Barry; Price, Francis; Price, Marianne; Kelly, Kathleen; Peters, Faye; Shaughnessy, Michael; Steinemann, Thomas; Dupps, B.J.; Meisler, David M.; Mifflin, Mark; Olson, Randal; Aldave, Anthony; Holland, Gary; Mondino, Bartly J.; Rosenwasser, George; Gorovoy, Mark; Dunn, Steven P.; Heidemann, David G.; Terry, Mark; Shamie, Neda; Rosenfeld, Steven I.; Suedekum, Brandon; Hwang, David; Stone, Donald; Chodosh, James; Galentine, Paul G.; Bardenstein, David; Goddard, Katrina; Chin, Hemin; Mannis, Mark; Varma, Rohit; Borecki, Ingrid; Chew, Emily Y.; Haller, Toomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Metspalu, Andres; Wedenoja, Juho; Simpson, Claire L.; Wojciechowski, Robert; Höhn, René; Mirshahi, Alireza; Zeller, Tanja; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Lackner, Karl J.; Donnelly, Peter; Barroso, Ines; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Bramon, Elvira; Brown, Matthew A.; Casas, Juan P.; Corvin, Aiden; Deloukas, Panos; Duncanson, Audrey; Jankowski, Janusz; Markus, Hugh S.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Plomin, Robert; Rautanen, Anna; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Trembath, Richard C.; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Band, Gavin; Bellenguez, Céline; Freeman, Colin; Hellenthal, Garrett; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Pirinen, Matti; Pearson, Richard; Strange, Amy; Su, Zhan; Vukcevic, Damjan; Donnelly, Peter; Langford, Cordelia; Hunt, Sarah E.; Edkins, Sarah; Gwilliam, Rhian; Blackburn, Hannah; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Dronov, Serge; Gillman, Matthew; Gray, Emma; Hammond, Naomi; Jayakumar, Alagurevathi; McCann, Owen T.; Liddle, Jennifer; Potter, Simon C.; Ravindrarajah, Radhi; Ricketts, Michelle; Waller, Matthew; Weston, Paul; Widaa, Sara; Whittaker, Pamela; Barroso, Ines; Deloukas, Panos; Mathew, Christopher G.; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Brown, Matthew A.; Corvin, Aiden; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Bettecken, Thomas; Meitinger, Thomas; Oexle, Konrad; Pirastu, Mario; Portas, Laura; Nag, Abhishek; Williams, Katie M.; Yonova-Doing, Ekaterina; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E.; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Paterson, Andrew D.; Genuth, S.; Nathan, D.M.; Zinman, B.; Crofford, O.; Crandall, J.; Reid, M.; Brown-Friday, J.; Engel, S.; Sheindlin, J.; Martinez, H.; Shamoon, H.; Engel, H.; Phillips, M.; Gubitosi-Klug, R.; Mayer, L.; Pendegast, S.; Zegarra, H.; Miller, D.; Singerman, L.; Smith-Brewer, S.; Novak, M.; Quin, J.; Dahms, W.; Genuth, Saul; Palmert, M.; Brillon, D.; Lackaye, M.E.; Kiss, S.; Chan, R.; Reppucci, V.; Lee, T.; Heinemann, M.; Whitehouse, F.; Kruger, D.; Jones, J.K.; McLellan, M.; Carey, J.D.; Angus, E.; Thomas, A.; Galprin, A.; Bergenstal, R.; Johnson, M.; Spencer, M.; Morgan, K.; Etzwiler, D.; Kendall, D.; Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Golden, E.; Jacobson, A.; Beaser, R.; Ganda, O.; Hamdy, O.; Wolpert, H.; Sharuk, G.; Arrigg, P.; Schlossman, D.; Rosenzwieg, J.; Rand, L.; Nathan, D.M.; Larkin, M.; Ong, M.; Godine, J.; Cagliero, E.; Lou, P.; Folino, K.; Fritz, S.; Crowell, S.; Hansen, K.; Gauthier-Kelly, C.; Service, J.; Ziegler, G.; Luttrell, L.; Caulder, S.; Lopes-Virella, M.; Colwell, J.; Soule, J.; Fernandes, J.; Hermayer, K.; Kwon, S.; Brabham, M.; Blevins, A.; Parker, J.; Lee, D.; Patel, N.; Pittman, C.; Lindsey, P.; Bracey, M.; Lee, K.; Nutaitis, M.; Farr, A.; Elsing, S.; Thompson, T.; Selby, J.; Lyons, T.; Yacoub-Wasef, S.; Szpiech, M.; Wood, D.; Mayfield, R.; Molitch, M.; Schaefer, B.; Jampol, L.; Lyon, A.; Gill, M.; Strugula, Z.; Kaminski, L.; Mirza, R.; Simjanoski, E.; Ryan, D.; Kolterman, O.; Lorenzi, G.; Goldbaum, M.; Sivitz, W.; Bayless, M.; Counts, D.; Johnsonbaugh, S.; Hebdon, M.; Salemi, P.; Liss, R.; Donner, T.; Gordon, J.; Hemady, R.; Kowarski, A.; Ostrowski, D.; Steidl, S.; Jones, B.; Herman, W.H.; Martin, C.L.; Pop-Busui, R.; Sarma, A.; Albers, J.; Feldman, E.; Kim, K.; Elner, S.; Comer, G.; Gardner, T.; Hackel, R.; Prusak, R.; Goings, L.; Smith, A.; Gothrup, J.; Titus, P.; Lee, J.; Brandle, M.; Prosser, L.; Greene, D.A.; Stevens, M.J.; Vine, A.K.; Bantle, J.; Wimmergren, N.; Cochrane, A.; Olsen, T.; Steuer, E.; Rath, P.; Rogness, B.; Hainsworth, D.; Goldstein, D.; Hitt, S.; Giangiacomo, J.; Schade, D.S.; Canady, J.L.; Chapin, J.E.; Ketai, L.H.; Braunstein, C.S.; Bourne, P.A.; Schwartz, S.; Brucker, A.; Maschak-Carey, B.J.; Baker, L.; Orchard, T.; Silvers, N.; Ryan, C.; Songer, T.; Doft, B.; Olson, S.; Bergren, R.L.; Lobes, L.; Rath, P. Paczan; Becker, D.; Rubinstein, D.; Conrad, P.W.; Yalamanchi, S.; Drash, A.; Morrison, A.; Bernal, M.L.; Vaccaro-Kish, J.; Malone, J.; Pavan, P.R.; Grove, N.; Iyer, M.N.; Burrows, A.F.; Tanaka, E.A.; Gstalder, R.; Dagogo-Jack, S.; Wigley, C.; Ricks, H.; Kitabchi, A.; Murphy, M.B.; Moser, S.; Meyer, D.; Iannacone, A.; Chaum, E.; Yoser, S.; Bryer-Ash, M.; Schussler, S.; Lambeth, H.; Raskin, P.; Strowig, S.; Zinman, B.; Barnie, A.; Devenyi, R.; Mandelcorn, M.; Brent, M.; Rogers, S.; Gordon, A.; Palmer, J.; Catton, S.; Brunzell, J.; Wessells, H.; de Boer, I.H.; Hokanson, J.; Purnell, J.; Ginsberg, J.; Kinyoun, J.; Deeb, S.; Weiss, M.; Meekins, G.; Distad, J.; Van Ottingham, L.; Dupre, J.; Harth, J.; Nicolle, D.; Driscoll, M.; Mahon, J.; Canny, C.; May, M.; Lipps, J.; Agarwal, A.; Adkins, T.; Survant, L.; Pate, R.L.; Munn, G.E.; Lorenz, R.; Feman, S.; White, N.; Levandoski, L.; Boniuk, I.; Grand, G.; Thomas, M.; Joseph, D.D.; Blinder, K.; Shah, G.; Boniuk; Burgess; Santiago, J.; Tamborlane, W.; Gatcomb, P.; Stoessel, K.; Taylor, K.; Goldstein, J.; Novella, S.; Mojibian, H.; Cornfeld, D.; Lima, J.; Bluemke, D.; Turkbey, E.; van der Geest, R.J.; Liu, C.; Malayeri, A.; Jain, A.; Miao, C.; Chahal, H.; Jarboe, R.; Maynard, J.; Gubitosi-Klug, R.; Quin, J.; Gaston, P.; Palmert, M.; Trail, R.; Dahms, W.; Lachin, J.; Cleary, P.; Backlund, J.; Sun, W.; Braffett, B.; Klumpp, K.; Chan, K.; Diminick, L.; Rosenberg, D.; Petty, B.; Determan, A.; Kenny, D.; Rutledge, B.; Younes, Naji; Dews, L.; Hawkins, M.; Cowie, C.; Fradkin, J.; Siebert, C.; Eastman, R.; Danis, R.; Gangaputra, S.; Neill, S.; Davis, M.; Hubbard, L.; Wabers, H.; Burger, M.; Dingledine, J.; Gama, V.; Sussman, R.; Steffes, M.; Bucksa, J.; Nowicki, M.; Chavers, B.; O’Leary, D.; Polak, J.; Harrington, A.; Funk, L.; Crow, R.; Gloeb, B.; Thomas, S.; O’Donnell, C.; Soliman, E.; Zhang, Z.M.; Prineas, R.; Campbell, C.; Ryan, C.; Sandstrom, D.; Williams, T.; Geckle, M.; Cupelli, E.; Thoma, F.; Burzuk, B.; Woodfill, T.; Low, P.; Sommer, C.; Nickander, K.; Budoff, M.; Detrano, R.; Wong, N.; Fox, M.; Kim, L.; Oudiz, R.; Weir, G.; Espeland, M.; Manolio, T.; Rand, L.; Singer, D.; Stern, M.; Boulton, A.E.; Clark, C.; D’Agostino, R.; Lopes-Virella, M.; Garvey, W.T.; Lyons, T.J.; Jenkins, A.; Virella, G.; Jaffa, A.; Carter, Rickey; Lackland, D.; Brabham, M.; McGee, D.; Zheng, D.; Mayfield, R.K.; Boright, A.; Bull, S.; Sun, L.; Scherer, S.; Zinman, B.; Natarajan, R.; Miao, F.; Zhang, L.; Chen;, Z.; Nathan, D.M.; Makela, Kari-Matti; Lehtimaki, Terho; Kahonen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Chen, Li Jia; Pang, Chi Pui; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K.H.; Meguro, Akira; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Foster, Paul J.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Vithana, Eranga; Tai, E-Shyong; Fan, Qiao; Xu, Liang; Campbell, Harry; Fleck, Brian; Rudan, Igor; Aung, Tin; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G.; Bencic, Goran; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Forward, Hannah; Pärssinen, Olavi; Mitchell, Paul; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hewitt, Alex W.; Williams, Cathy; Oostra, Ben A.; Teo, Yik-Ying; Hammond, Christopher J.; Stambolian, Dwight; Mackey, David A.; Klaver, Caroline C.W.; Wong, Tien-Yin; Saw, Seang-Mei; Baird, Paul N.

    2013-01-01

    Refractive errors are common eye disorders of public health importance worldwide. Ocular axial length (AL) is the major determinant of refraction and thus of myopia and hyperopia. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for AL, combining 12,531 Europeans and 8,216 Asians. We identified eight genome-wide significant loci for AL (RSPO1, C3orf26, LAMA2, GJD2, ZNRF3, CD55, MIP, and ALPPL2) and confirmed one previously reported AL locus (ZC3H11B). Of the nine loci, five (LAMA2, GJD2, CD55, ALPPL2, and ZC3H11B) were associated with refraction in 18 independent cohorts (n = 23,591). Differential gene expression was observed for these loci in minus-lens-induced myopia mouse experiments and human ocular tissues. Two of the AL genes, RSPO1 and ZNRF3, are involved in Wnt signaling, a pathway playing a major role in the regulation of eyeball size. This study provides evidence of shared genes between AL and refraction, but importantly also suggests that these traits may have unique pathways. PMID:24144296

  3. FOXO3 Shares Common Targets with ASCL1 Genome-wide and Inhibits ASCL1-Dependent Neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley E. Webb

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available FOXO transcription factors are central regulators of longevity from worms to humans. FOXO3, the FOXO isoform associated with exceptional human longevity, preserves adult neural stem cell pools. Here, we identify FOXO3 direct targets genome-wide in primary cultures of adult neural progenitor cells (NPCs. Interestingly, FOXO3-bound sites are enriched for motifs for bHLH transcription factors, and FOXO3 shares common targets with the proneuronal bHLH transcription factor ASCL1/MASH1 in NPCs. Analysis of the chromatin landscape reveals that FOXO3 and ASCL1 are particularly enriched at the enhancers of genes involved in neurogenic pathways. Intriguingly, FOXO3 inhibits ASCL1-dependent neurogenesis in NPCs and direct neuronal conversion in fibroblasts. FOXO3 also restrains neurogenesis in vivo. Our study identifies a genome-wide interaction between the prolongevity transcription factor FOXO3 and the cell-fate determinant ASCL1 and raises the possibility that FOXO3’s ability to restrain ASCL1-dependent neurogenesis may help preserve the neural stem cell pool.

  4. Nine loci for ocular axial length identified through genome-wide association studies, including shared loci with refractive error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Schache, Maria; Ikram, M Kamran; Young, Terri L; Guggenheim, Jeremy A; Vitart, Veronique; MacGregor, Stuart; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Liao, Jiemin; Hysi, Pirro G; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; St Pourcain, Beate; Kemp, John P; McMahon, George; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Montgomery, Grant W; Mishra, Aniket; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Jie Jin; Rochtchina, Elena; Polasek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F; Amin, Najaf; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Wilson, James F; Pennell, Craig E; van Duijn, Cornelia M; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Vingerling, Johannes R; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Peng; Li, Ruoying; Tay, Wan-Ting; Zheng, Yingfeng; Chew, Merwyn; Burdon, Kathryn P; Craig, Jamie E; Iyengar, Sudha K; Igo, Robert P; Lass, Jonathan H; Chew, Emily Y; Haller, Toomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Metspalu, Andres; Wedenoja, Juho; Simpson, Claire L; Wojciechowski, Robert; Höhn, René; Mirshahi, Alireza; Zeller, Tanja; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Lackner, Karl J; Bettecken, Thomas; Meitinger, Thomas; Oexle, Konrad; Pirastu, Mario; Portas, Laura; Nag, Abhishek; Williams, Katie M; Yonova-Doing, Ekaterina; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Paterson, Andrew D; Makela, Kari-Matti; Lehtimaki, Terho; Kahonen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Chen, Li Jia; Pang, Chi Pui; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K H; Meguro, Akira; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Foster, Paul J; Zhao, Jing Hua; Vithana, Eranga; Tai, E-Shyong; Fan, Qiao; Xu, Liang; Campbell, Harry; Fleck, Brian; Rudan, Igor; Aung, Tin; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Bencic, Goran; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Forward, Hannah; Pärssinen, Olavi; Mitchell, Paul; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hewitt, Alex W; Williams, Cathy; Oostra, Ben A; Teo, Yik-Ying; Hammond, Christopher J; Stambolian, Dwight; Mackey, David A; Klaver, Caroline C W; Wong, Tien-Yin; Saw, Seang-Mei; Baird, Paul N

    2013-08-08

    Refractive errors are common eye disorders of public health importance worldwide. Ocular axial length (AL) is the major determinant of refraction and thus of myopia and hyperopia. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for AL, combining 12,531 Europeans and 8,216 Asians. We identified eight genome-wide significant loci for AL (RSPO1, C3orf26, LAMA2, GJD2, ZNRF3, CD55, MIP, and ALPPL2) and confirmed one previously reported AL locus (ZC3H11B). Of the nine loci, five (LAMA2, GJD2, CD55, ALPPL2, and ZC3H11B) were associated with refraction in 18 independent cohorts (n = 23,591). Differential gene expression was observed for these loci in minus-lens-induced myopia mouse experiments and human ocular tissues. Two of the AL genes, RSPO1 and ZNRF3, are involved in Wnt signaling, a pathway playing a major role in the regulation of eyeball size. This study provides evidence of shared genes between AL and refraction, but importantly also suggests that these traits may have unique pathways. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Patients Carrying 9q31.1-q32 Deletion Share Common Features with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixue Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS is a rare but severe clinically heterogeneous developmental disorder characterized by facial dysmorphia, growth and cognitive retardation, and abnormalities of limb development. Objectives: To determine the pathogenesis of a patient with CdLS. Methods: We studied a patient with CdLS by whole exome sequencing, karyotyping and Agilent CGH Array. The results were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis of the patient and her parents. Further comparison of our patient and cases with partially overlapping deletions retrieved from the literature and databases was undertaken. Results: Whole exome sequencing had excluded the mutation of cohesion genes such as NIPBL,SMC1A and SMC3. The result of karyotyping showed a deletion of chromosome 9q31.1-q32 and the result of Agilent CGH Array further displayed a 12.01-Mb region of deletion at chromosome bands 9q31.1-q32. Reported cases with the deletion of 9q31.1-q32 share similar features with our CdLS patient. One of the genes in the deleted region, SMC2, belongs to the Structural Maintenance of Chromosomes (SMC family and regulates gene expression and DNA repair. Conclusions: Patients carrying the deletion of 9q31.1-q32 showed similar phenotypes with CdLS.

  6. Patients carrying 9q31.1-q32 deletion share common features with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ruixue; Pu, Tian; Fang, Shaohai; Long, Fei; Xie, Jing; Xu, Yuejuan; Chen, Sun; Sun, Kun; Xu, Rang

    2015-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is a rare but severe clinically heterogeneous developmental disorder characterized by facial dysmorphia, growth and cognitive retardation, and abnormalities of limb development. To determine the pathogenesis of a patient with CdLS. We studied a patient with CdLS by whole exome sequencing, karyotyping and Agilent CGH Array. The results were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis of the patient and her parents. Further comparison of our patient and cases with partially overlapping deletions retrieved from the literature and databases was undertaken. Whole exome sequencing had excluded the mutation of cohesion genes such as NIPBL,SMC1A and SMC3. The result of karyotyping showed a deletion of chromosome 9q31.1-q32 and the result of Agilent CGH Array further displayed a 12.01-Mb region of deletion at chromosome bands 9q31.1-q32. Reported cases with the deletion of 9q31.1-q32 share similar features with our CdLS patient. One of the genes in the deleted region, SMC2, belongs to the Structural Maintenance of Chromosomes (SMC) family and regulates gene expression and DNA repair. Patients carrying the deletion of 9q31.1-q32 showed similar phenotypes with CdLS. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Molecular bases of K+ secretory cells in the inner ear: shared and distinct features between birds and mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilms, Viviane; Köppl, Christine; Söffgen, Chris; Hartmann, Anna-Maria; Nothwang, Hans Gerd

    2016-01-01

    In the cochlea, mammals maintain a uniquely high endolymphatic potential (EP), which is not observed in other vertebrate groups. However, a high [K+] is always present in the inner ear endolymph. Here, we show that Kir4.1, which is required in the mammalian stria vascularis to generate the highly positive EP, is absent in the functionally equivalent avian tegmentum vasculosum. In contrast, the molecular repertoire required for K+ secretion, specifically NKCC1, KCNQ1, KCNE1, BSND and CLC-K, is shared between the tegmentum vasculosum, the vestibular dark cells and the marginal cells of the stria vascularis. We further show that in barn owls, the tegmentum vasculosum is enlarged and a higher EP (~+34 mV) maintained, compared to other birds. Our data suggest that both the tegmentum vasculosum and the stratified stria vascularis evolved from an ancestral vestibular epithelium that already featured the major cell types of the auditory epithelia. Genetic recruitment of Kir4.1 specifically to strial melanocytes was then a crucial step in mammalian evolution enabling an increase in the cochlear EP. An increased EP may be related to high-frequency hearing, as this is a hallmark of barn owls among birds and mammals among amniotes. PMID:27680950

  8. Exon-focused genome-wide association study of obsessive-compulsive disorder and shared polygenic risk with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costas, J; Carrera, N; Alonso, P; Gurriarán, X; Segalàs, C; Real, E; López-Solà, C; Mas, S; Gassó, P; Domènech, L; Morell, M; Quintela, I; Lázaro, L; Menchón, J M; Estivill, X; Carracedo, Á

    2016-03-29

    Common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) account for a large proportion of the heritability of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Co-ocurrence of OCD and schizophrenia is commoner than expected based on their respective prevalences, complicating the clinical management of patients. This study addresses two main objectives: to identify particular genes associated with OCD by SNP-based and gene-based tests; and to test the existence of a polygenic risk shared with schizophrenia. The primary analysis was an exon-focused genome-wide association study of 370 OCD cases and 443 controls from Spain. A polygenic risk model based on the Psychiatric Genetics Consortium schizophrenia data set (PGC-SCZ2) was tested in our OCD data. A polygenic risk model based on our OCD data was tested on previous data of schizophrenia from our group. The most significant association at the gene-based test was found at DNM3 (P=7.9 × 10(-5)), a gene involved in synaptic vesicle endocytosis. The polygenic risk model from PGC-SCZ2 data was strongly associated with disease status in our OCD sample, reaching its most significant value after removal of the major histocompatibility complex region (lowest P=2.3 × 10(-6), explaining 3.7% of the variance). The shared polygenic risk was confirmed in our schizophrenia data. In conclusion, DNM3 may be involved in risk to OCD. The shared polygenic risk between schizophrenia and OCD may be partially responsible for the frequent comorbidity of both disorders, explaining epidemiological data on cross-disorder risk. This common etiology may have clinical implications.

  9. Can BI-RADS features on mammography be used as a surrogate for expensive genomic testing in breast cancer patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harowicz, Michael R.; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Marcom, P. Kelly; Mazurowski, Maciej A.

    2017-03-01

    Medical oncologists increasingly rely on expensive genomic analysis to stratify patients for different treatment. The genomic markers are able to divide patients into groups that behave differently in terms of tumor presentation, likelihood of metastatic spread, and response to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In recent years there has been a rapid increase in the number of genomic tests available, like the Oncotype DX test, which provides the risk of cancer recurrence for a subset of patients. Radiogenomics, a new field that investigates the relationship between imaging phenotypes and genomic characteristics, may offer a less expensive and less invasive imaging surrogate for molecular subtype and Oncotype DX recurrence score (ODRS). This retrospective study analyzes the relationship between Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) features as assessed by radiologists on mammograms with molecular subtype and ODRS. We used data from patients with BI-RADS features (shape or margin) and a genomic feature (subtype or ODRS) for the following cohort: shape vs. subtype (n=69), margin vs. subtype (n=78), shape vs. ODRS (n=20), and margin vs. ODRS (n=18). The association between features was assessed using a Fisher's exact test. Our results show that shape assessed by radiologists according to the BI-RADS lexicon is associated with molecular subtype (p=0.0171), while BI-RADS features of shape and margin were not significantly associated with ODRS (p=0.7839, p=0.6047 respectively).

  10. Scalable privacy-preserving data sharing methodology for genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fei; Fienberg, Stephen E; Slavković, Aleksandra B; Uhler, Caroline

    2014-08-01

    The protection of privacy of individual-level information in genome-wide association study (GWAS) databases has been a major concern of researchers following the publication of "an attack" on GWAS data by Homer et al. (2008). Traditional statistical methods for confidentiality and privacy protection of statistical databases do not scale well to deal with GWAS data, especially in terms of guarantees regarding protection from linkage to external information. The more recent concept of differential privacy, introduced by the cryptographic community, is an approach that provides a rigorous definition of privacy with meaningful privacy guarantees in the presence of arbitrary external information, although the guarantees may come at a serious price in terms of data utility. Building on such notions, Uhler et al. (2013) proposed new methods to release aggregate GWAS data without compromising an individual's privacy. We extend the methods developed in Uhler et al. (2013) for releasing differentially-private χ(2)-statistics by allowing for arbitrary number of cases and controls, and for releasing differentially-private allelic test statistics. We also provide a new interpretation by assuming the controls' data are known, which is a realistic assumption because some GWAS use publicly available data as controls. We assess the performance of the proposed methods through a risk-utility analysis on a real data set consisting of DNA samples collected by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium and compare the methods with the differentially-private release mechanism proposed by Johnson and Shmatikov (2013).

  11. Improving biological understanding and complex trait prediction by integrating prior information in genomic feature models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Stefan McKinnon

    externally founded information, such as KEGG pathways, Gene Ontology gene sets, or genomic features, and estimate the joint contribution of the genetic variants within these sets to complex trait phenotypes. The analysis of complex trait phenotypes is hampered by the myriad of genes that control the trait......In this thesis we investigate an approach to integrate external data into the analysis of genetic variants. The goal is similar to that of gene-set enrichment tests, but relies on the robust statistical framework of linear mixed models. This approach has allowed us to integrate virtually any......, as these genes have small to moderate effects that can be difficult to detect. However, by looking at sets of genes, as in gene-set enrichment tests, it may become easier to assess an association between the set of genes and the complex trait. ---  The linear mixed models applied here are the same as used...

  12. Genome-wide analysis of functional and evolutionary features of tele-enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Di; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2014-04-16

    We investigated sequence features of enhancers separated from their target gene by at least one intermediate gene/exon (named tele-enhancers in this study) and enhancers residing inside their target gene locus. In this study, we used whole genome enhancer maps and gene expression profiles to establish a large panel of tele-enhancers. By contrasting tele-enhancers to proximal enhancers targeting heart genes, we observed that heart tele-enhancers use unique regulatory mechanisms based on the cardiac transcription factors SRF, TEAD, and NKX-2.5, whereas proximal heart enhancers rely on GATA4 instead. A functional analysis showed that tele-enhancers preferentially regulate house-keeping genes and genes with a metabolic role during heart development. In addition, tele-enhancers are significantly more conserved than their proximal counterparts. Similar trends have been observed for non-heart tissues and cell types, suggesting that our findings represent general characteristics of tele-enhancers.

  13. Shared versus specific features of psychological symptoms and cigarettes per day: structural relations and mediation by negative- and positive-reinforcement smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameringer, Katherine J; Chou, Chih-Ping; Leventhal, Adam M

    2015-04-01

    This study examined the extent to which shared versus specific features across multiple manifestations of psychological symptoms (depression, anxiety, ADHD, aggression, alcohol misuse) associated with cigarettes per day. Subsequently, we investigated whether negative- (i.e., withdrawal relief) and positive- (i.e., pleasure enhancement) reinforcement smoking motivations mediated relations. Adult daily smokers (N = 338) completed self-report measures and structural equation modeling was used to construct a 3-factor (low positive affect-negative affect-disinhibition) model of affective and behavioral symptoms and to test relations of each latent factor (shared features) and indicator residual (specific features) to smoking level. Shared dimensions of low positive affect, negative affect, and disinhibition associated with smoking rate. Negative-reinforcement smoking mediated the link between latent negative affect and heavier daily smoking. Specific features of psychological symptoms unique from latent factors were generally not associated with cigarettes per day. Features shared across several forms of psychological symptoms appear to underpin relations between psychological symptoms and smoking rate.

  14. A genome-wide association meta-analysis of self-reported allergy identifies shared and allergy-specific susceptibility loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, David A; McMahon, George; Kiefer, Amy K; Do, Chuong B; Eriksson, Nicholas; Evans, David M; St Pourcain, Beate; Ring, Susan M; Mountain, Joanna L; Francke, Uta; Davey-Smith, George; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tung, Joyce Y

    2013-08-01

    Allergic disease is very common and carries substantial public-health burdens. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide associations with self-reported cat, dust-mite and pollen allergies in 53,862 individuals. We used generalized estimating equations to model shared and allergy-specific genetic effects. We identified 16 shared susceptibility loci with association Pallergies at 6p21.32 in the class II human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region (rs17533090, P=1.7×10(-12)), which was strongly associated with cat allergy. Our study sheds new light on the shared etiology of immune and autoimmune disease.

  15. KSHV 2.0: a comprehensive annotation of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus genome using next-generation sequencing reveals novel genomic and functional features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Arias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Productive herpesvirus infection requires a profound, time-controlled remodeling of the viral transcriptome and proteome. To gain insights into the genomic architecture and gene expression control in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, we performed a systematic genome-wide survey of viral transcriptional and translational activity throughout the lytic cycle. Using mRNA-sequencing and ribosome profiling, we found that transcripts encoding lytic genes are promptly bound by ribosomes upon lytic reactivation, suggesting their regulation is mainly transcriptional. Our approach also uncovered new genomic features such as ribosome occupancy of viral non-coding RNAs, numerous upstream and small open reading frames (ORFs, and unusual strategies to expand the virus coding repertoire that include alternative splicing, dynamic viral mRNA editing, and the use of alternative translation initiation codons. Furthermore, we provide a refined and expanded annotation of transcription start sites, polyadenylation sites, splice junctions, and initiation/termination codons of known and new viral features in the KSHV genomic space which we have termed KSHV 2.0. Our results represent a comprehensive genome-scale image of gene regulation during lytic KSHV infection that substantially expands our understanding of the genomic architecture and coding capacity of the virus.

  16. Development of an ultra-dense genetic map of the sunflower genome based on single-feature polymorphisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E Bowers

    Full Text Available The development of ultra-dense genetic maps has the potential to facilitate detailed comparative genomic analyses and whole genome sequence assemblies. Here we describe the use of a custom Affymetrix GeneChip containing nearly 2.4 million features (25 bp sequences targeting 86,023 unigenes from sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. and related species to test for single-feature polymorphisms (SFPs in a recombinant inbred line (RIL mapping population derived from a cross between confectionery and oilseed sunflower lines (RHA280×RHA801. We then employed an existing genetic map derived from this same population to rigorously filter out low quality data and place 67,486 features corresponding to 22,481 unigenes on the sunflower genetic map. The resulting map contains a substantial fraction of all sunflower genes and will thus facilitate a number of downstream applications, including genome assembly and the identification of candidate genes underlying QTL or traits of interest.

  17. Genome sequence of Candidatus Nitrososphaera evergladensis from group I.1b enriched from Everglades soil reveals novel genomic features of the ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna V Zhalnina

    Full Text Available The activity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA leads to the loss of nitrogen from soil, pollution of water sources and elevated emissions of greenhouse gas. To date, eight AOA genomes are available in the public databases, seven are from the group I.1a of the Thaumarchaeota and only one is from the group I.1b, isolated from hot springs. Many soils are dominated by AOA from the group I.1b, but the genomes of soil representatives of this group have not been sequenced and functionally characterized. The lack of knowledge of metabolic pathways of soil AOA presents a critical gap in understanding their role in biogeochemical cycles. Here, we describe the first complete genome of soil archaeon Candidatus Nitrososphaera evergladensis, which has been reconstructed from metagenomic sequencing of a highly enriched culture obtained from an agricultural soil. The AOA enrichment was sequenced with the high throughput next generation sequencing platforms from Pacific Biosciences and Ion Torrent. The de novo assembly of sequences resulted in one 2.95 Mb contig. Annotation of the reconstructed genome revealed many similarities of the basic metabolism with the rest of sequenced AOA. Ca. N. evergladensis belongs to the group I.1b and shares only 40% of whole-genome homology with the closest sequenced relative Ca. N. gargensis. Detailed analysis of the genome revealed coding sequences that were completely absent from the group I.1a. These unique sequences code for proteins involved in control of DNA integrity, transporters, two-component systems and versatile CRISPR defense system. Notably, genomes from the group I.1b have more gene duplications compared to the genomes from the group I.1a. We suggest that the presence of these unique genes and gene duplications may be associated with the environmental versatility of this group.

  18. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection of Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes Shares Features of Both Pathogenic and Non-pathogenic Lentiviral Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J D Greenwood

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The virus-host relationship in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV infected chimpanzees is thought to be different from that found in other SIV infected African primates. However, studies of captive SIVcpz infected chimpanzees are limited. Previously, the natural SIVcpz infection of one chimpanzee, and the experimental infection of six chimpanzees was reported, with limited follow-up. Here, we present a long-term study of these seven animals, with a retrospective re-examination of the early stages of infection. The only clinical signs consistent with AIDS or AIDS associated disease was thrombocytopenia in two cases, associated with the development of anti-platelet antibodies. However, compared to uninfected and HIV-1 infected animals, SIVcpz infected animals had significantly lower levels of peripheral blood CD4+ T-cells. Despite this, levels of T-cell activation in chronic infection were not significantly elevated. In addition, while plasma levels of β2 microglobulin, neopterin and soluble TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (sTRAIL were elevated in acute infection, these markers returned to near-normal levels in chronic infection, reminiscent of immune activation patterns in 'natural host' species. Furthermore, plasma soluble CD14 was not elevated in chronic infection. However, examination of the secondary lymphoid environment revealed persistent changes to the lymphoid structure, including follicular hyperplasia in SIVcpz infected animals. In addition, both SIV and HIV-1 infected chimpanzees showed increased levels of deposition of collagen and increased levels of Mx1 expression in the T-cell zones of the lymph node. The outcome of SIVcpz infection of captive chimpanzees therefore shares features of both non-pathogenic and pathogenic lentivirus infections.

  19. Genome-Wide Meta-Analyses of Breast, Ovarian, and Prostate Cancer Association Studies Identify Multiple New Susceptibility Loci Shared by at Least Two Cancer Types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kar, S.P.; Beesley, J.; Olama, A. Amin Al; Michailidou, K.; Tyrer, J.; Kote-Jarai, Z.; Lawrenson, K.; Lindstrom, S.; Ramus, S.J.; Thompson, D.J.; Kibel, A.S.; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, A.; Michael, A.; Dieffenbach, A.K.; Gentry-Maharaj, A.; Whittemore, A.S.; Wolk, A.; Monteiro, A.; Peixoto, A.; Kierzek, A.; Cox, A; Rudolph, A.; Gonzalez-Neira, A.; Wu, A.H.; Lindblom, A.; Swerdlow, A.; Ziogas, A.; Ekici, A.B.; Burwinkel, B.; Karlan, B.Y.; Nordestgaard, B.G.; Blomqvist, C.; Phelan, C.; McLean, C.; Pearce, C.L.; Vachon, C.; Cybulski, C.; Slavov, C.; Stegmaier, C.; Maier, C.; Ambrosone, C.B.; Hogdall, C.K.; Teerlink, C.C.; Kang, D.; Tessier, D.C.; Schaid, D.J.; Stram, D.O.; Cramer, D.W; Neal, D.E.; Eccles, D.; Flesch-Janys, D.; Edwards, D.R.; Wokozorczyk, D.; Levine, D.A.; Yannoukakos, D.; Sawyer, E.J.; Bandera, E.V.; Poole, E.M.; Goode, E.L.; Khusnutdinova, E.; Hogdall, E.; Song, F.; Bruinsma, F.; Heitz, F.; Modugno, F.; Hamdy, F.C.; Wiklund, F.; Giles, G.G.; Olsson, H.; Wildiers, H.; Ulmer, H.U.; Pandha, H.; Risch, H.A.; Darabi, H.; Salvesen, H.B.; Nevanlinna, H.; Gronberg, H.; Brenner, H.; Brauch, H.; Anton-Culver, H.; Song, H.; Lim, H.Y.; McNeish, I.; Campbell, I.; Vergote, I.; Gronwald, J.; Lubinski, J.; Stanford, J.L.; Benitez, J.; Doherty, J.A.; Permuth, J.B.; Chang-Claude, J.; Donovan, J.L.; Dennis, J.; Schildkraut, J.M.; Schleutker, J.; Hopper, J.L.; Kupryjanczyk, J.; Park, J.Y.; Figueroa, J.; Kiemeney, L.A.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.

    2016-01-01

    Breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers are hormone-related and may have a shared genetic basis, but this has not been investigated systematically by genome-wide association (GWA) studies. Meta-analyses combining the largest GWA meta-analysis data sets for these cancers totaling 112,349 cases and

  20. Genome-wide association meta-analysis of neuropathologic features of Alzheimer's disease and related dementias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary W Beecham

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD and related dementias are a major public health challenge and present a therapeutic imperative for which we need additional insight into molecular pathogenesis. We performed a genome-wide association study and analysis of known genetic risk loci for AD dementia using neuropathologic data from 4,914 brain autopsies. Neuropathologic data were used to define clinico-pathologic AD dementia or controls, assess core neuropathologic features of AD (neuritic plaques, NPs; neurofibrillary tangles, NFTs, and evaluate commonly co-morbid neuropathologic changes: cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA, Lewy body disease (LBD, hippocampal sclerosis of the elderly (HS, and vascular brain injury (VBI. Genome-wide significance was observed for clinico-pathologic AD dementia, NPs, NFTs, CAA, and LBD with a number of variants in and around the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE. GalNAc transferase 7 (GALNT7, ATP-Binding Cassette, Sub-Family G (WHITE, Member 1 (ABCG1, and an intergenic region on chromosome 9 were associated with NP score; and Potassium Large Conductance Calcium-Activated Channel, Subfamily M, Beta Member 2 (KCNMB2 was strongly associated with HS. Twelve of the 21 non-APOE genetic risk loci for clinically-defined AD dementia were confirmed in our clinico-pathologic sample: CR1, BIN1, CLU, MS4A6A, PICALM, ABCA7, CD33, PTK2B, SORL1, MEF2C, ZCWPW1, and CASS4 with 9 of these 12 loci showing larger odds ratio in the clinico-pathologic sample. Correlation of effect sizes for risk of AD dementia with effect size for NFTs or NPs showed positive correlation, while those for risk of VBI showed a moderate negative correlation. The other co-morbid neuropathologic features showed only nominal association with the known AD loci. Our results discovered new genetic associations with specific neuropathologic features and aligned known genetic risk for AD dementia with specific neuropathologic changes in the largest brain autopsy study of AD and related

  1. A 100%-complete sequence reveals unusually simple genomic features in the hot-spring red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshida Yamato

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All previously reported eukaryotic nuclear genome sequences have been incomplete, especially in highly repeated units and chromosomal ends. Because repetitive DNA is important for many aspects of biology, complete chromosomal structures are fundamental for understanding eukaryotic cells. Our earlier, nearly complete genome sequence of the hot-spring red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae revealed several unique features, including just three ribosomal DNA copies, very few introns, and a small total number of genes. However, because the exact structures of certain functionally important repeated elements remained ambiguous, that sequence was not complete. Obviously, those ambiguities needed to be resolved before the unique features of the C. merolae genome could be summarized, and the ambiguities could only be resolved by completing the sequence. Therefore, we aimed to complete all previous gaps and sequence all remaining chromosomal ends, and now report the first nuclear-genome sequence for any eukaryote that is 100% complete. Results Our present complete sequence consists of 16546747 nucleotides covering 100% of the 20 linear chromosomes from telomere to telomere, representing the simple and unique chromosomal structures of the eukaryotic cell. We have unambiguously established that the C. merolae genome contains the smallest known histone-gene cluster, a unique telomeric repeat for all chromosomal ends, and an extremely low number of transposons. Conclusion By virtue of these attributes and others that we had discovered previously, C. merolae appears to have the simplest nuclear genome of the non-symbiotic eukaryotes. These unusually simple genomic features in the 100% complete genome sequence of C. merolae are extremely useful for further studies of eukaryotic cells.

  2. A 100%-complete sequence reveals unusually simple genomic features in the hot-spring red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Hisayoshi; Takano, Hiroyoshi; Misumi, Osami; Terasawa, Kimihiro; Matsuzaki, Motomichi; Maruyama, Shinichiro; Nishida, Keiji; Yagisawa, Fumi; Yoshida, Yamato; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Takio, Susumu; Tamura, Katsunori; Chung, Sung Jin; Nakamura, Soichi; Kuroiwa, Haruko; Tanaka, Kan; Sato, Naoki; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi

    2007-01-01

    Background All previously reported eukaryotic nuclear genome sequences have been incomplete, especially in highly repeated units and chromosomal ends. Because repetitive DNA is important for many aspects of biology, complete chromosomal structures are fundamental for understanding eukaryotic cells. Our earlier, nearly complete genome sequence of the hot-spring red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae revealed several unique features, including just three ribosomal DNA copies, very few introns, and a small total number of genes. However, because the exact structures of certain functionally important repeated elements remained ambiguous, that sequence was not complete. Obviously, those ambiguities needed to be resolved before the unique features of the C. merolae genome could be summarized, and the ambiguities could only be resolved by completing the sequence. Therefore, we aimed to complete all previous gaps and sequence all remaining chromosomal ends, and now report the first nuclear-genome sequence for any eukaryote that is 100% complete. Results Our present complete sequence consists of 16546747 nucleotides covering 100% of the 20 linear chromosomes from telomere to telomere, representing the simple and unique chromosomal structures of the eukaryotic cell. We have unambiguously established that the C. merolae genome contains the smallest known histone-gene cluster, a unique telomeric repeat for all chromosomal ends, and an extremely low number of transposons. Conclusion By virtue of these attributes and others that we had discovered previously, C. merolae appears to have the simplest nuclear genome of the non-symbiotic eukaryotes. These unusually simple genomic features in the 100% complete genome sequence of C. merolae are extremely useful for further studies of eukaryotic cells. PMID:17623057

  3. Genomic Features of Environmental and Clinical Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates Lacking Recognized Virulence Factors Are Dissimilar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronholm, J; Petronella, N; Chew Leung, C; Pightling, A W; Banerjee, S K

    2015-12-04

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a bacterial pathogen that can cause illness after the consumption or handling of contaminated seafood. The primary virulence factors associated with V. parahaemolyticus illness are thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and Tdh-related hemolysin (TRH). However, clinical strains lacking tdh and trh have recently been isolated, and these clinical isolates are poorly understood. To help understand the emergence of clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates, a genomic approach was used to comprehensively compare 4 clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates with 16 environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates and 34 clinical isolates positive for tdh or trh, or both, with the objective of identifying genomic features that are unique to clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The prevalence of pathogenicity islands (PAIs) common to clinical isolates was thoroughly examined in each of the clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The tdh PAI was not present in any clinical or environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The trh PAI was not present in any environmental isolates; however, in clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolate 10-4238, the majority of the trh PAI including a partial trh1 gene was present, which resulted in reclassification of this isolate as a tdh-negative and trh-positive isolate. In the other clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates, neither the trh gene nor the trh PAI was present. We identified 862 genes in clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates but not in environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates. Many of these genes are highly homologous to genes found in common enteric bacteria and included genes encoding a number of chemotaxis proteins and a novel putative type VI secretion system (T6SS) effector and immunity protein (T6SS1). The availability of genome sequences from clinical V. parahaemolyticus tdh- and trh-negative isolates and the comparative analysis may help provide an understanding of how this pathotype is able to

  4. Genomic Features and Niche-Adaptation of Enterococcus faecium Strains from Korean Soybean-Fermented Foods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Eun Bae; Jin, Gwi-Deuk; Lee, Jun-Yeong; Choi, Yun-Jaie

    2016-01-01

    .... faecium from soybean fermentation, we sequenced the genomes of 10 E. faecium strains from Korean soybean-fermented foods and analyzed their genomes by comparing them with 51 clinical and 52 non-clinical strains of different origins...

  5. Plant carbohydrate scavenging through tonB-dependent receptors: a feature shared by phytopathogenic and aquatic bacteria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blanvillain, Servane; Meyer, Damien; Boulanger, Alice; Lautier, Martine; Guynet, Catherine; Denancé, Nicolas; Vasse, Jacques; Lauber, Emmanuelle; Arlat, Matthieu

    2007-01-01

    .... Analysis of the genome of the phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), predicts 72 TBDRs. Such an overrepresentation is common in Xanthomonas species but is limited to only a small number of bacteria...

  6. Complete DNA sequence of Kuraishia capsulata illustrates novel genomic features among budding yeasts (Saccharomycotina)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales, L.; Noel, B.; Porcel, B.; Marcet-Houben, M.; Hullo, M.F.; Sacerdot, C.; Tekaia, F.; Leh-Louis, V.; Despons, L.; Khanna, V.; Aury, J.M.; Barbe, V.; Couloux, A.; Labadie, K.; Pelletier, E.; Souciet, J.L.; Boekhout, T.; Gabaldon, T.; Wincker, P.; Dujon, B.

    2013-01-01

    The numerous yeast genome sequences presently available provide a rich source of information for functional as well as evolutionary genomics, but unequally cover the large phylogenetic diversity of extant yeasts. We present here the complete sequence of the nuclear genome of the haploid type strain

  7. Complete DNA sequence of Kuraishia capsulata illustrates novel genomic features among budding yeasts (Saccharomycotina)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales, L.; Noel, B.; Porcel, B.; Marcet-Houben, M.; Hullo, M.F.; Sacerdot, C.; Tekaia, F.; Leh-Louis, V.; Despons, L.; Khanna, V.; Aury, J.M.; Barbe, V.; Couloux, A.; Labadie, K.; Pelletier, E.; Souciet, J.L.; Boekhout, T.; Gabaldon, T.; Wincker, P.; Dujon, B.

    2013-01-01

    The numerous yeast genome sequences presently available provide a rich source of information for functional as well as evolutionary genomics, but unequally cover the large phylogenetic diversity of extant yeasts. We present here the complete sequence of the nuclear genome of the haploid type strain

  8. A genome-wide association scan in admixed Latin Americans identifies loci influencing facial and scalp hair features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fontanil, Tania; Cal, Santiago; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Chacón-Duque, Juan-Camilo; Al-Saadi, Farah; Johansson, Jeanette A; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Barquera Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín Pérez, Gastón; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Gonzalez-José, Rolando; Headon, Denis; López-Otín, Carlos; Tobin, Desmond J; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-03-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan in over 6,000 Latin Americans for features of scalp hair (shape, colour, greying, balding) and facial hair (beard thickness, monobrow, eyebrow thickness). We found 18 signals of association reaching genome-wide significance (P values 5 × 10(-8) to 3 × 10(-119)), including 10 novel associations. These include novel loci for scalp hair shape and balding, and the first reported loci for hair greying, monobrow, eyebrow and beard thickness. A newly identified locus influencing hair shape includes a Q30R substitution in the Protease Serine S1 family member 53 (PRSS53). We demonstrate that this enzyme is highly expressed in the hair follicle, especially the inner root sheath, and that the Q30R substitution affects enzyme processing and secretion. The genome regions associated with hair features are enriched for signals of selection, consistent with proposals regarding the evolution of human hair.

  9. Improved prediction of genetic predisposition to psychiatric disorders using genomic feature best linear unbiased prediction models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Palle Duun; Demontis, Ditte; Børglum, Anders

    Introduction: Accurate prediction of unobserved phenotypes from observed genotypes is essential for the success in predicting disease risk from genotypes. However, the performance is somewhat limited. Genomic feature best linear unbiased prediction (GFBLUP) models separate the total genomic...... is enriched for causal variants. Here we apply the GFBLUP model to a small schizophrenia case-control study to test the promise of this model on psychiatric disorders, and hypothesize that the performance will be increased when applying the model to a larger ADHD case-control study if the genomic feature...... contains the causal variants. Materials and Methods: The schizophrenia study consisted of 882 controls and 888 schizophrenia cases genotyped for 520,000 SNPs. The ADHD study contained 25,954 controls and 16,663 ADHD cases with 8,4 million imputed genotypes. Results: The predictive ability for schizophrenia...

  10. Mosaicism for genome-wide paternal uniparental disomy with features of multiple imprinting disorders: diagnostic and management issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inbar-Feigenberg, Michal; Choufani, Sanaa; Cytrynbaum, Cheryl; Chen, Yi-An; Steele, Leslie; Shuman, Cheryl; Ray, Peter N; Weksberg, Rosanna

    2013-01-01

    Mosaicism for genome-wide paternal uniparental disomy (UPD) has been reported in only seven live born individuals to date. Clinical presentation includes manifestations of multiple paternal UPD syndromes with high variability, likely due to the variable levels of mosaicism in different somatic tissues. We report an eighth case in a female patient with mosaicism for genome-wide paternal UPD which highlights the complex clinical presentation. Our patient had features of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), Angelman syndrome, and congenital hyperinsulinism. The clinical findings included prematurity, organomegaly, hemihyperplasia, developmental delay, benign tumors, and cystic lesions. The diagnosis in our patient was established utilizing microarray-based genome-wide DNA methylation analysis performed on leukocyte DNA. Targeted multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis of chromosome regions 11p15 and 15q13 confirmed mosaicism for paternal UPD at these genomic regions. This case represents the first report of microarray-based genome-wide DNA methylation analysis in the diagnosis of genome-wide paternal UPD. The application of microarray-based genome-wide DNA methylation analysis on selected individuals with complex clinical presentations could be a valuable diagnostic tool to improve the detection rate of mosaic genome-wide paternal UPD. This approach, which screens many loci simultaneously, is more cost-effective and less labor-intensive than performing multiple targeted DNA methylation-based assays. Identification of individuals with mosaicism for genome-wide paternal UPD is an important goal as it confers a low recurrence risk for the family and identifies individuals who require surveillance due to increased tumor risk.

  11. Genome-wide analysis of tandem repeats in Tribolium castaneum genome reveals abundant and highly dynamic tandem repeat families with satellite DNA features in euchromatic chromosomal arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlek, Martina; Gelfand, Yevgeniy; Plohl, Miroslav; Meštrović, Nevenka

    2015-12-01

    Although satellite DNAs are well-explored components of heterochromatin and centromeres, little is known about emergence, dispersal and possible impact of comparably structured tandem repeats (TRs) on the genome-wide scale. Our bioinformatics analysis of assembled Tribolium castaneum genome disclosed significant contribution of TRs in euchromatic chromosomal arms and clear predominance of satellite DNA-typical 170 bp monomers in arrays of ≥5 repeats. By applying different experimental approaches, we revealed that the nine most prominent TR families Cast1-Cast9 extracted from the assembly comprise ∼4.3% of the entire genome and reside almost exclusively in euchromatic regions. Among them, seven families that build ∼3.9% of the genome are based on ∼170 and ∼340 bp long monomers. Results of phylogenetic analyses of 2500 monomers originating from these families show high-sequence dynamics, evident by extensive exchanges between arrays on non-homologous chromosomes. In addition, our analysis shows that concerted evolution acts more efficiently on longer than on shorter arrays. Efficient genome-wide distribution of nine TR families implies the role of transposition only in expansion of the most dispersed family, and involvement of other mechanisms is anticipated. Despite similarities in sequence features, FISH experiments indicate high-level compartmentalization of centromeric and euchromatic tandem repeats.

  12. Shared versus specific features of psychological symptoms and cigarettes per day: structural relations and mediation by negative- and positive-reinforcement smoking

    OpenAIRE

    Ameringer, Katherine J.; Chou, Chih-Ping; Leventhal, Adam M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which shared versus specific features across multiple manifestations of psychological symptoms (depression, anxiety, ADHD, aggression, alcohol misuse) associated with cigarettes per day. Subsequently, we investigated whether negative- (i.e., withdrawal relief) and positive- (i.e., pleasure enhancement) reinforcement smoking motivations mediated relations. Adult daily smokers (N = 338) completed self-report measures and structural equation modeling was used to...

  13. Complex repeat structures and novel features in the mitochondrial genomes of the diatoms Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudot-Le Secq, Marie-Pierre; Green, Beverley R

    2011-05-01

    The mitochondrial genome of the raphid pennate diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum has several novel features compared with the mitochondrial genomes of the centric diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana and the araphid pennate diatom Synedra acus. It is almost double the size (77,356 bp) due to a 35,454 bp sequence block consisting of an elaborate combination of direct repeats, making it the largest stramenopile (heterokont) mitochondrial genome known. In addition, the cox1 gene has a +1 translational frameshift involving Pro codons CCC and CCT, the first translational frameshift to be detected in an algal mitochondrial genome. The nad9 and rps14 genes are fused by the insertion of an in-frame sequence and cotranscribed. The nad11 gene is split into two parts corresponding to the FeS and molybdate-binding domains, but both parts are still on the mitochondrial genome, in contrast to the brown algae where the second domain appears to have been transferred to the nucleus. In contrast to P. tricornutum, the repeat region of T. pseudonana consists of a much smaller 4790 bp string of almost identical double-hairpin elements, evidence of slipped-strand mispairing and active gene conversion. The diatom mitochondrial genomes have undergone considerable gene rearrangement since the three lineages of diatoms diverged, but all three have kept their repeat regions segregated from their relatively compact coding regions.

  14. Prevalent role of gene features in determining evolutionary fates of whole-genome duplication duplicated genes in flowering plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen-kai; Liu, Yun-long; Xia, En-hua; Gao, Li-zhi

    2013-04-01

    The evolution of genes and genomes after polyploidization has been the subject of extensive studies in evolutionary biology and plant sciences. While a significant number of duplicated genes are rapidly removed during a process called fractionation, which operates after the whole-genome duplication (WGD), another considerable number of genes are retained preferentially, leading to the phenomenon of biased gene retention. However, the evolutionary mechanisms underlying gene retention after WGD remain largely unknown. Through genome-wide analyses of sequence and functional data, we comprehensively investigated the relationships between gene features and the retention probability of duplicated genes after WGDs in six plant genomes, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), poplar (Populus trichocarpa), soybean (Glycine max), rice (Oryza sativa), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and maize (Zea mays). The results showed that multiple gene features were correlated with the probability of gene retention. Using a logistic regression model based on principal component analysis, we resolved evolutionary rate, structural complexity, and GC3 content as the three major contributors to gene retention. Cluster analysis of these features further classified retained genes into three distinct groups in terms of gene features and evolutionary behaviors. Type I genes are more prone to be selected by dosage balance; type II genes are possibly subject to subfunctionalization; and type III genes may serve as potential targets for neofunctionalization. This study highlights that gene features are able to act jointly as primary forces when determining the retention and evolution of WGD-derived duplicated genes in flowering plants. These findings thus may help to provide a resolution to the debate on different evolutionary models of gene fates after WGDs.

  15. Identification of shared genetic susceptibility locus for coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity: a meta-analysis of genome-wide studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Chaoneng

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Type 2 diabetes (2DM, obesity, and coronary artery disease (CAD are frequently coexisted being as key components of metabolic syndrome. Whether there is shared genetic background underlying these diseases remained unclear. We performed a meta-analysis of 35 genome screens for 2DM, 36 for obesity or body mass index (BMI-defined obesity, and 21 for CAD using genome search meta-analysis (GSMA, which combines linkage results to identify regions with only weak evidence and provide genetic interactions among different diseases. For each study, 120 genomic bins of approximately 30 cM were defined and ranked according to the best linkage evidence within each bin. For each disease, bin 6.2 achieved genomic significanct evidence, and bin 9.3, 10.5, 16.3 reached suggestive level for 2DM. Bin 11.2 and 16.3, and bin 10.5 and 9.3, reached suggestive evidence for obesity and CAD respectively. In pooled all three diseases, bin 9.3 and 6.5 reached genomic significant and suggestive evidence respectively, being relatively much weaker for 2DM/CAD or 2DM/obesity or CAD/obesity. Further, genomewide significant evidence was observed of bin 16.3 and 4.5 for 2DM/obesity, which is decreased when CAD was added. These findings indicated that bin 9.3 and 6.5 are most likely to be shared by 2DM, obesity and CAD. And bin 16.3 and 4.5 are potentially common regions to 2DM and obesity only. The observed shared susceptibility regions imply a partly overlapping genetic aspects of disease development. Fine scanning of these regions will definitely identify more susceptibility genes and causal variants.

  16. Complete mitochondrial genomes of Ceratobaeus sp. and Idris sp. (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae): shared gene rearrangements as potential phylogenetic markers at the tribal level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Meng; Dowton, Mark

    2014-10-01

    We sequenced the complete mitochondrial genomes of two sceliond taxa (Ceratobaeus sp. and Idris sp.). An atypical tRNA-Arg which lacks a D-stem was identified in both taxa, and represents a potentially derived character of sceliond wasps. A number of tRNA genes have rearranged in the two mitochondrial genomes compared with the ancestral organization. Some of these derived genome organizations are shared, and thus have much potential as phylogenetic markers at the tribal level in the subfamily Scelioninae. We test the influence of third codon inclusion/exclusion, alignment methods and partition schemes on the reconstruction of phylogenetic relationships. The results show that inclusion of third codon positions does not appear to be problematic when investigating the phylogeny of closely related taxa. Muscle and PartitionFinder schemes significantly improve the likelihood scores.

  17. The candidate phylum Poribacteria by single-cell genomics: new insights into phylogeny, cell-compartmentation, eukaryote-like repeat proteins, and other genomic features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Kamke

    Full Text Available The candidate phylum Poribacteria is one of the most dominant and widespread members of the microbial communities residing within marine sponges. Cell compartmentalization had been postulated along with their discovery about a decade ago and their phylogenetic association to the Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Chlamydiae superphylum was proposed soon thereafter. In the present study we revised these features based on genomic data obtained from six poribacterial single cells. We propose that Poribacteria form a distinct monophyletic phylum contiguous to the PVC superphylum together with other candidate phyla. Our genomic analyses supported the possibility of cell compartmentalization in form of bacterial microcompartments. Further analyses of eukaryote-like protein domains stressed the importance of such proteins with features including tetratricopeptide repeats, leucin rich repeats as well as low density lipoproteins receptor repeats, the latter of which are reported here for the first time from a sponge symbiont. Finally, examining the most abundant protein domain family on poribacterial genomes revealed diverse phyH family proteins, some of which may be related to dissolved organic posphorus uptake.

  18. The candidate phylum Poribacteria by single-cell genomics: new insights into phylogeny, cell-compartmentation, eukaryote-like repeat proteins, and other genomic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamke, Janine; Rinke, Christian; Schwientek, Patrick; Mavromatis, Kostas; Ivanova, Natalia; Sczyrba, Alexander; Woyke, Tanja; Hentschel, Ute

    2014-01-01

    The candidate phylum Poribacteria is one of the most dominant and widespread members of the microbial communities residing within marine sponges. Cell compartmentalization had been postulated along with their discovery about a decade ago and their phylogenetic association to the Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Chlamydiae superphylum was proposed soon thereafter. In the present study we revised these features based on genomic data obtained from six poribacterial single cells. We propose that Poribacteria form a distinct monophyletic phylum contiguous to the PVC superphylum together with other candidate phyla. Our genomic analyses supported the possibility of cell compartmentalization in form of bacterial microcompartments. Further analyses of eukaryote-like protein domains stressed the importance of such proteins with features including tetratricopeptide repeats, leucin rich repeats as well as low density lipoproteins receptor repeats, the latter of which are reported here for the first time from a sponge symbiont. Finally, examining the most abundant protein domain family on poribacterial genomes revealed diverse phyH family proteins, some of which may be related to dissolved organic posphorus uptake.

  19. The Candidate Phylum Poribacteria by Single-Cell Genomics: New Insights into Phylogeny, Cell-Compartmentation, Eukaryote-Like Repeat Proteins, and Other Genomic Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamke, Janine; Rinke, Christian; Schwientek, Patrick; Mavromatis, Kostas; Ivanova, Natalia; Sczyrba, Alexander; Woyke, Tanja; Hentschel, Ute

    2014-01-01

    The candidate phylum Poribacteria is one of the most dominant and widespread members of the microbial communities residing within marine sponges. Cell compartmentalization had been postulated along with their discovery about a decade ago and their phylogenetic association to the Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Chlamydiae superphylum was proposed soon thereafter. In the present study we revised these features based on genomic data obtained from six poribacterial single cells. We propose that Poribacteria form a distinct monophyletic phylum contiguous to the PVC superphylum together with other candidate phyla. Our genomic analyses supported the possibility of cell compartmentalization in form of bacterial microcompartments. Further analyses of eukaryote-like protein domains stressed the importance of such proteins with features including tetratricopeptide repeats, leucin rich repeats as well as low density lipoproteins receptor repeats, the latter of which are reported here for the first time from a sponge symbiont. Finally, examining the most abundant protein domain family on poribacterial genomes revealed diverse phyH family proteins, some of which may be related to dissolved organic posphorus uptake. PMID:24498082

  20. Genomic Analyses of Dominant U.S. Clonal Lineages of Phytophthora infestans Reveals a Shared Common Ancestry for Clonal Lineages US11 and US18 and a Lack of Recently Shared Ancestry Among All Other U.S. Lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaus, B J; Tabima, J F; Davis, C E; Judelson, H S; Grünwald, N J

    2016-11-01

    Populations of the potato and tomato late-blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans are well known for emerging as novel clonal lineages. These successions of dominant clones have historically been named US1 through US24, in order of appearance, since their first characterization using molecular markers. Hypothetically, these lineages can emerge through divergence from other U.S. lineages, recombination among lineages, or as novel, independent lineages originating outside the United States. We tested for the presence of phylogenetic relationships among U.S. lineages using a population of 31 whole-genome sequences, including dominant U.S. clonal lineages as well as available samples from global populations. We analyzed ancestry of the whole mitochondrial genome and samples of nuclear loci, including supercontigs 1.1 and 1.5 as well as several previously characterized coding regions. We found support for a shared ancestry among lineages US11 and US18 from the mitochondrial genome as well as from one nuclear haplotype on each supercontig analyzed. The other nuclear haplotype from each sample assorted independently, indicating an independent ancestry. We found no support for emergence of any other of the U.S. lineages from a common ancestor shared with the other U.S. lineages. Each of the U.S. clonal lineages fit a model where populations of new clonal lineages emerge via migration from a source population that is sexual in nature and potentially located in central Mexico or elsewhere. This work provides novel insights into patterns of emergence of clonal lineages in plant pathogen genomes.

  1. Genomic Targets and Features of BarA-UvrY (-SirA Signal Transduction Systems.

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    Tesfalem R Zere

    Full Text Available The two-component signal transduction system BarA-UvrY of Escherichia coli and its orthologs globally regulate metabolism, motility, biofilm formation, stress resistance, virulence of pathogens and quorum sensing by activating the transcription of genes for regulatory sRNAs, e.g. CsrB and CsrC in E. coli. These sRNAs act by sequestering the RNA binding protein CsrA (RsmA away from lower affinity mRNA targets. In this study, we used ChIP-exo to identify, at single nucleotide resolution, genomic sites for UvrY (SirA binding in E. coli and Salmonella enterica. The csrB and csrC genes were the strongest targets of crosslinking, which required UvrY phosphorylation by the BarA sensor kinase. Crosslinking occurred at two sites, an inverted repeat sequence far upstream of the promoter and a site near the -35 sequence. DNAse I footprinting revealed specific binding of UvrY in vitro only to the upstream site, indicative of additional binding requirements and/or indirect binding to the downstream site. Additional genes, including cspA, encoding the cold-shock RNA-binding protein CspA, showed weaker crosslinking and modest or negligible regulation by UvrY. We conclude that the global effects of UvrY/SirA on gene expression are primarily mediated by activating csrB and csrC transcription. We also used in vivo crosslinking and other experimental approaches to reveal new features of csrB/csrC regulation by the DeaD and SrmB RNA helicases, IHF, ppGpp and DksA. Finally, the phylogenetic distribution of BarA-UvrY was analyzed and found to be uniquely characteristic of γ-Proteobacteria and strongly anti-correlated with fliW, which encodes a protein that binds to CsrA and antagonizes its activity in Bacillus subtilis. We propose that BarA-UvrY and orthologous TCS transcribe sRNA antagonists of CsrA throughout the γ-Proteobacteria, but rarely or never perform this function in other species.

  2. Genomic Targets and Features of BarA-UvrY (-SirA) Signal Transduction Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zere, Tesfalem R; Vakulskas, Christopher A; Leng, Yuanyuan; Pannuri, Archana; Potts, Anastasia H; Dias, Raquel; Tang, Dongjie; Kolaczkowski, Bryan; Georgellis, Dimitris; Ahmer, Brian M M; Romeo, Tony

    2015-01-01

    The two-component signal transduction system BarA-UvrY of Escherichia coli and its orthologs globally regulate metabolism, motility, biofilm formation, stress resistance, virulence of pathogens and quorum sensing by activating the transcription of genes for regulatory sRNAs, e.g. CsrB and CsrC in E. coli. These sRNAs act by sequestering the RNA binding protein CsrA (RsmA) away from lower affinity mRNA targets. In this study, we used ChIP-exo to identify, at single nucleotide resolution, genomic sites for UvrY (SirA) binding in E. coli and Salmonella enterica. The csrB and csrC genes were the strongest targets of crosslinking, which required UvrY phosphorylation by the BarA sensor kinase. Crosslinking occurred at two sites, an inverted repeat sequence far upstream of the promoter and a site near the -35 sequence. DNAse I footprinting revealed specific binding of UvrY in vitro only to the upstream site, indicative of additional binding requirements and/or indirect binding to the downstream site. Additional genes, including cspA, encoding the cold-shock RNA-binding protein CspA, showed weaker crosslinking and modest or negligible regulation by UvrY. We conclude that the global effects of UvrY/SirA on gene expression are primarily mediated by activating csrB and csrC transcription. We also used in vivo crosslinking and other experimental approaches to reveal new features of csrB/csrC regulation by the DeaD and SrmB RNA helicases, IHF, ppGpp and DksA. Finally, the phylogenetic distribution of BarA-UvrY was analyzed and found to be uniquely characteristic of γ-Proteobacteria and strongly anti-correlated with fliW, which encodes a protein that binds to CsrA and antagonizes its activity in Bacillus subtilis. We propose that BarA-UvrY and orthologous TCS transcribe sRNA antagonists of CsrA throughout the γ-Proteobacteria, but rarely or never perform this function in other species.

  3. Genomic and functional features of the biosurfactant producing Bacillus sp. AM13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaligram, Shraddha; Kumbhare, Shreyas V; Dhotre, Dhiraj P; Muddeshwar, Manohar G; Kapley, Atya; Joseph, Neetha; Purohit, Hemant P; Shouche, Yogesh S; Pawar, Shrikant P

    2016-09-01

    Genomic studies provide deeper insights into secondary metabolites produced by diverse bacterial communities, residing in various environmental niches. This study aims to understand the potential of a biosurfactant producing Bacillus sp. AM13, isolated from soil. An integrated approach of genomic and chemical analysis was employed to characterize the antibacterial lipopeptide produced by the strain AM13. Genome analysis revealed that strain AM13 harbors a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) cluster; highly similar with known biosynthetic gene clusters from surfactin family: lichenysin (85 %) and surfactin (78 %). These findings were substantiated with supplementary experiments of oil displacement assay and surface tension measurements, confirming the biosurfactant production. Further investigation using LCMS approach exhibited similarity of the biomolecule with biosurfactants of the surfactin family. Our consolidated effort of functional genomics provided chemical as well as genetic leads for understanding the biochemical characteristics of the bioactive compound.

  4. The complete mitochondrial genome of the enigmatic bigheadedturtle (Platysternon): description of unusual genomic features and thereconciliation of phylogenetic hypotheses based on mitochondrial andnuclear DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parham, James F.; Feldman, Chris R.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-12-28

    The big-headed turtle (Platysternon megacephalum) from east Asia is the sole living representative of a poorly-studied turtle lineage (Platysternidae). It has no close living relatives, and its phylogenetic position within turtles is one of the outstanding controversies in turtle systematics. Platysternon was traditionally considered to be close to snapping turtles (Chelydridae) based on some studies of its morphology and mitochondrial (mt) DNA, however, other studies of morphology and nuclear (nu) DNA do not support that hypothesis. We sequenced the complete mt genome of Platysternon and the nearly complete mt genomes of two other relevant turtles and compared them to turtle mt genomes from the literature to form the largest molecular dataset used to date to address this issue. The resulting phylogeny robustly rejects the placement of Platysternon with Chelydridae, but instead shows that it is a member of the Testudinoidea, a diverse, nearly globally-distributed group that includes pond turtles and tortoises. We also discovered that Platysternon mtDNA has large-scale gene rearrangements and possesses two, nearly identical, control regions, features that distinguish it from all other studied turtles. Our study robustly determines the phylogenetic placement of Platysternon and provides a well-resolved outline of major turtle lineages, while demonstrating the significantly greater resolving power of comparing large amounts of mt sequence over that of short fragments. Earlier phylogenies placing Platysternon with chelydrids required a temporal gap in the fossil record that is now unnecessary. The duplicated control regions and gene rearrangements of the Platysternon mt DNA probably resulted from the duplication of part of the genome and then the subsequent loss of redundant genes. Although it is possible that having two control regions may provide some advantage, explaining why the control regions would be maintained while some of the duplicated genes were eroded

  5. G-quadruplex DNA sequences are evolutionarily conserved and associated with distinct genomic features in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    John A Capra

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available G-quadruplex DNA is a four-stranded DNA structure formed by non-Watson-Crick base pairing between stacked sets of four guanines. Many possible functions have been proposed for this structure, but its in vivo role in the cell is still largely unresolved. We carried out a genome-wide survey of the evolutionary conservation of regions with the potential to form G-quadruplex DNA structures (G4 DNA motifs across seven yeast species. We found that G4 DNA motifs were significantly more conserved than expected by chance, and the nucleotide-level conservation patterns suggested that the motif conservation was the result of the formation of G4 DNA structures. We characterized the association of conserved and non-conserved G4 DNA motifs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with more than 40 known genome features and gene classes. Our comprehensive, integrated evolutionary and functional analysis confirmed the previously observed associations of G4 DNA motifs with promoter regions and the rDNA, and it identified several previously unrecognized associations of G4 DNA motifs with genomic features, such as mitotic and meiotic double-strand break sites (DSBs. Conserved G4 DNA motifs maintained strong associations with promoters and the rDNA, but not with DSBs. We also performed the first analysis of G4 DNA motifs in the mitochondria, and surprisingly found a tenfold higher concentration of the motifs in the AT-rich yeast mitochondrial DNA than in nuclear DNA. The evolutionary conservation of the G4 DNA motif and its association with specific genome features supports the hypothesis that G4 DNA has in vivo functions that are under evolutionary constraint.

  6. "Tandem duplication-random loss" is not a real feature of oyster mitochondrial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Guofan

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Duplications and rearrangements of coding genes are major themes in the evolution of mitochondrial genomes, bearing important consequences in the function of mitochondria and the fitness of organisms. Yu et al. (BMC Genomics 2008, 9:477 reported the complete mt genome sequence of the oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis (16,475 bp and found that a DNA segment containing four tRNA genes (trnK1, trnC, trnQ1 and trnN, a duplicated (rrnS and a split rRNA gene (rrnL5' was absent compared with that of two other Crassostrea species. It was suggested that the absence was a novel case of "tandem duplication-random loss" with evolutionary significance. We independently sequenced the complete mt genome of three C. hongkongensis individuals, all of which were 18,622 bp and contained the segment that was missing in Yu et al.'s sequence. Further, we designed primers, verified sequences and demonstrated that the sequence loss in Yu et al.'s study was an artifact caused by placing primers in a duplicated region. The duplication and split of ribosomal RNA genes are unique for Crassostrea oysters and not lost in C. hongkongensis. Our study highlights the need for caution when amplifying and sequencing through duplicated regions of the genome.

  7. Genomic and proteomic features of mycobacteriophage SWU1 isolated from China soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiangyu; Yan, Jianlong; Xie, Longxiang; Zeng, Lanying; Young, Ryland F.; Xie, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteriophage SWU1 is a newly isolated phage from soil sample collected in Sichuan province, China using Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155 as host. Plaque, phage morphology and one-step growth curve were characterized. The complete genomic sequence of phage SWU1 was determined by shotgun sequencing. The ends of SWU1 were determined. Structural proteins of SWU1 were analyzed by NanoLC-ESI-MS/MS. Seven ORFs were identified as structural protein encoded by SWU1 genome. The genetic basis underlying the SWU1 plaque was explored using comparative genomics. Prophages homologous to SWU1 were identified in two pathogens, Segniliparus rugosus ATCC BAA-974 and Mycobacterium rhodesiae JS60. Genus Segniliparus is a member of the order Corynebacteriales. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Mycobacterium prophages in different genera. PMID:25701596

  8. Proposal of fifteen new species of Parasynechococcus based on genomic, physiological and ecological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, F H; Dutilh, B E; Thompson, C C; Thompson, F L

    2016-12-01

    Members of the recently proposed genus Parasynechococcus (Cyanobacteria) are extremely abundant throughout the global ocean and contribute significantly to global primary productivity. However, the taxonomy of these organisms remains poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to propose a new taxonomic framework for Parasynechococcus based on a genomic taxonomy approach that incorporates genomic, physiological and ecological data. Through in silico DNA-DNA hybridization, average amino acid identity, dinucleotide signatures and phylogenetic reconstruction, a total of 15 species of Parasynechococcus could be delineated. Each species was then described on the basis of their gene content, light and nutrient utilization strategies, geographical distribution patterns throughout the oceans and response to environmental parameters.

  9. 2q23.1 microdeletion identified by array comparative genomic hybridisation: an emerging phenotype with Angelman-like features?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaillard, S; Dubourg, C; Gérard-Blanluet, M; Delahaye, A; Pasquier, L; Dupont, C; Henry, C; Tabet, A-C; Lucas, J; Aboura, A; David, V; Benzacken, B; Odent, S; Pipiras, E

    2009-12-01

    Genome-wide screening of patients with mental retardation using array comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) has identified several novel imbalances. With this genotype-first approach, the 2q22.3q23.3 deletion was recently described as a novel microdeletion syndrome. The authors report two unrelated patients with a de novo interstitial deletion mapping in this genomic region and presenting similar "pseudo-Angelman" phenotypes, including severe psychomotor retardation, speech impairment, epilepsy, microcephaly, ataxia, and behavioural disabilities. The microdeletions were identified by array CGH using oligonucleotide and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) arrays, and further confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The boundaries and sizes of the deletions in the two patients were different but an overlapping region of about 250 kb was defined, which mapped to 2q23.1 and included two genes: MBD5 and EPC2. The SIP1 gene associated with the Mowat-Wilson syndrome was not included in the deleted genomic region. Haploinsufficiency of one of the deleted genes (MBD5 or EPC2) could be responsible for the common clinical features observed in the 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome, and this hypothesis needs further investigation.

  10. Features of 5'-splice-site efficiency derived from disease-causing mutations and comparative genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roca, Xavier; Olson, Andrew J; Rao, Atmakuri R

    2007-01-01

    Many human diseases, including Fanconi anemia, hemophilia B, neurofibromatosis, and phenylketonuria, can be caused by 5'-splice-site (5'ss) mutations that are not predicted to disrupt splicing, according to position weight matrices. By using comparative genomics, we identify pairwise dependencies...

  11. Unique features of a Japanese 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' strain revealed by whole genome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Katoh

    Full Text Available Citrus greening (huanglongbing is the most destructive disease of citrus worldwide. It is spread by citrus psyllids and is associated with phloem-limited bacteria of three species of α-Proteobacteria, namely, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', 'Ca. L. americanus', and 'Ca. L. africanus'. Recent findings suggested that some Japanese strains lack the bacteriophage-type DNA polymerase region (DNA pol, in contrast to the Floridian psy62 strain. The whole genome sequence of the pol-negative 'Ca. L. asiaticus' Japanese isolate Ishi-1 was determined by metagenomic analysis of DNA extracted from 'Ca. L. asiaticus'-infected psyllids and leaf midribs. The 1.19-Mb genome has an average 36.32% GC content. Annotation revealed 13 operons encoding rRNA and 44 tRNA genes, but no typical bacterial pathogenesis-related genes were located within the genome, similar to the Floridian psy62 and Chinese gxpsy. In contrast to other 'Ca. L. asiaticus' strains, the genome of the Japanese Ishi-1 strain lacks a prophage-related region.

  12. The genome of Spodoptera exigua multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus : a study on unique features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJkel, W.F.J.

    2001-01-01

    The Baculoviridae are a family of rod-shaped viruses with large circular double-stranded DNA genomes (Chapter 1). The family is subdivided into two genera, Granulovirus (GV) and Nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) on the basis of the

  13. Vpu downmodulates two distinct targets, tetherin and gibbon ape leukemia virus envelope, through shared features in the Vpu cytoplasmic tail.

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    Tiffany M Lucas

    Full Text Available During human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 assembly, the host proteins CD4 (the HIV-1 receptor and tetherin (an interferon stimulated anti-viral protein both reduce viral fitness. The HIV-1 accessory gene Vpu counteracts both of these proteins, but it is thought to do so through two distinct mechanisms. Modulation of CD4 likely occurs through proteasomal degradation from the endoplasmic reticulum. The exact mechanism of tetherin modulation is less clear, with possible roles for degradation and alteration of protein transport to the plasma membrane. Most investigations of Vpu function have used different assays for CD4 and tetherin. In addition, many of these investigations used exogenously expressed Vpu, which could result in variable expression levels. Thus, few studies have investigated these two Vpu functions in parallel assays, making direct comparisons difficult. Here, we present results from a rapid assay used to simultaneously investigate Vpu-targeting of both tetherin and a viral glycoprotein, gibbon ape leukemia virus envelope (GaLV Env. We previously reported that Vpu modulates GaLV Env and prevents its incorporation into HIV-1 particles through a recognition motif similar to that found in CD4. Using this assay, we performed a comprehensive mutagenic scan of Vpu in its native proviral context to identify features required for both types of activity. We observed considerable overlap in the Vpu sequences required to modulate tetherin and GaLV Env. We found that features in the cytoplasmic tail of Vpu, specifically within the cytoplasmic tail hinge region, were required for modulation of both tetherin and GaLV Env. Interestingly, these same regions features have been determined to be critical for CD4 downmodulation. We also observed a role for the transmembrane domain in the restriction of tetherin, as previously reported, but not of GaLV Env. We propose that Vpu may target both proteins in a mechanistically similar manner, albeit in

  14. Vpu Downmodulates Two Distinct Targets, Tetherin and Gibbon Ape Leukemia Virus Envelope, through Shared Features in the Vpu Cytoplasmic Tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Edward B.; Johnson, Marc C.

    2012-01-01

    During human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) assembly, the host proteins CD4 (the HIV-1 receptor) and tetherin (an interferon stimulated anti-viral protein) both reduce viral fitness. The HIV-1 accessory gene Vpu counteracts both of these proteins, but it is thought to do so through two distinct mechanisms. Modulation of CD4 likely occurs through proteasomal degradation from the endoplasmic reticulum. The exact mechanism of tetherin modulation is less clear, with possible roles for degradation and alteration of protein transport to the plasma membrane. Most investigations of Vpu function have used different assays for CD4 and tetherin. In addition, many of these investigations used exogenously expressed Vpu, which could result in variable expression levels. Thus, few studies have investigated these two Vpu functions in parallel assays, making direct comparisons difficult. Here, we present results from a rapid assay used to simultaneously investigate Vpu-targeting of both tetherin and a viral glycoprotein, gibbon ape leukemia virus envelope (GaLV Env). We previously reported that Vpu modulates GaLV Env and prevents its incorporation into HIV-1 particles through a recognition motif similar to that found in CD4. Using this assay, we performed a comprehensive mutagenic scan of Vpu in its native proviral context to identify features required for both types of activity. We observed considerable overlap in the Vpu sequences required to modulate tetherin and GaLV Env. We found that features in the cytoplasmic tail of Vpu, specifically within the cytoplasmic tail hinge region, were required for modulation of both tetherin and GaLV Env. Interestingly, these same regions features have been determined to be critical for CD4 downmodulation. We also observed a role for the transmembrane domain in the restriction of tetherin, as previously reported, but not of GaLV Env. We propose that Vpu may target both proteins in a mechanistically similar manner, albeit in different cellular

  15. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in celiac disease and rheumatoid arthritis identifies fourteen non-HLA shared loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Zhernakova

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiology and candidate gene studies indicate a shared genetic basis for celiac disease (CD and rheumatoid arthritis (RA, but the extent of this sharing has not been systematically explored. Previous studies demonstrate that 6 of the established non-HLA CD and RA risk loci (out of 26 loci for each disease are shared between both diseases. We hypothesized that there are additional shared risk alleles and that combining genome-wide association study (GWAS data from each disease would increase power to identify these shared risk alleles. We performed a meta-analysis of two published GWAS on CD (4,533 cases and 10,750 controls and RA (5,539 cases and 17,231 controls. After genotyping the top associated SNPs in 2,169 CD cases and 2,255 controls, and 2,845 RA cases and 4,944 controls, 8 additional SNPs demonstrated P<5 × 10(-8 in a combined analysis of all 50,266 samples, including four SNPs that have not been previously confirmed in either disease: rs10892279 near the DDX6 gene (P(combined =  1.2 × 10(-12, rs864537 near CD247 (P(combined =  2.2 × 10(-11, rs2298428 near UBE2L3 (P(combined =  2.5 × 10(-10, and rs11203203 near UBASH3A (P(combined =  1.1 × 10(-8. We also confirmed that 4 gene loci previously established in either CD or RA are associated with the other autoimmune disease at combined P<5 × 10(-8 (SH2B3, 8q24, STAT4, and TRAF1-C5. From the 14 shared gene loci, 7 SNPs showed a genome-wide significant effect on expression of one or more transcripts in the linkage disequilibrium (LD block around the SNP. These associations implicate antigen presentation and T-cell activation as a shared mechanism of disease pathogenesis and underscore the utility of cross-disease meta-analysis for identification of genetic risk factors with pleiotropic effects between two clinically distinct diseases.

  16. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in celiac disease and rheumatoid arthritis identifies fourteen non-HLA shared loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Zhernakova

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiology and candidate gene studies indicate a shared genetic basis for celiac disease (CD and rheumatoid arthritis (RA, but the extent of this sharing has not been systematically explored. Previous studies demonstrate that 6 of the established non-HLA CD and RA risk loci (out of 26 loci for each disease are shared between both diseases. We hypothesized that there are additional shared risk alleles and that combining genome-wide association study (GWAS data from each disease would increase power to identify these shared risk alleles. We performed a meta-analysis of two published GWAS on CD (4,533 cases and 10,750 controls and RA (5,539 cases and 17,231 controls. After genotyping the top associated SNPs in 2,169 CD cases and 2,255 controls, and 2,845 RA cases and 4,944 controls, 8 additional SNPs demonstrated P<5 × 10(-8 in a combined analysis of all 50,266 samples, including four SNPs that have not been previously confirmed in either disease: rs10892279 near the DDX6 gene (P(combined =  1.2 × 10(-12, rs864537 near CD247 (P(combined =  2.2 × 10(-11, rs2298428 near UBE2L3 (P(combined =  2.5 × 10(-10, and rs11203203 near UBASH3A (P(combined =  1.1 × 10(-8. We also confirmed that 4 gene loci previously established in either CD or RA are associated with the other autoimmune disease at combined P<5 × 10(-8 (SH2B3, 8q24, STAT4, and TRAF1-C5. From the 14 shared gene loci, 7 SNPs showed a genome-wide significant effect on expression of one or more transcripts in the linkage disequilibrium (LD block around the SNP. These associations implicate antigen presentation and T-cell activation as a shared mechanism of disease pathogenesis and underscore the utility of cross-disease meta-analysis for identification of genetic risk factors with pleiotropic effects between two clinically distinct diseases.

  17. Chloroplast DNA sequence of the green alga Oedogonium cardiacum (Chlorophyceae: Unique genome architecture, derived characters shared with the Chaetophorales and novel genes acquired through horizontal transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemieux Claude

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To gain insight into the branching order of the five main lineages currently recognized in the green algal class Chlorophyceae and to expand our understanding of chloroplast genome evolution, we have undertaken the sequencing of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA from representative taxa. The complete cpDNA sequences previously reported for Chlamydomonas (Chlamydomonadales, Scenedesmus (Sphaeropleales, and Stigeoclonium (Chaetophorales revealed tremendous variability in their architecture, the retention of only few ancestral gene clusters, and derived clusters shared by Chlamydomonas and Scenedesmus. Unexpectedly, our recent phylogenies inferred from these cpDNAs and the partial sequences of three other chlorophycean cpDNAs disclosed two major clades, one uniting the Chlamydomonadales and Sphaeropleales (CS clade and the other uniting the Oedogoniales, Chaetophorales and Chaetopeltidales (OCC clade. Although molecular signatures provided strong support for this dichotomy and for the branching of the Oedogoniales as the earliest-diverging lineage of the OCC clade, more data are required to validate these phylogenies. We describe here the complete cpDNA sequence of Oedogonium cardiacum (Oedogoniales. Results Like its three chlorophycean homologues, the 196,547-bp Oedogonium chloroplast genome displays a distinctive architecture. This genome is one of the most compact among photosynthetic chlorophytes. It has an atypical quadripartite structure, is intron-rich (17 group I and 4 group II introns, and displays 99 different conserved genes and four long open reading frames (ORFs, three of which are clustered in the spacious inverted repeat of 35,493 bp. Intriguingly, two of these ORFs (int and dpoB revealed high similarities to genes not usually found in cpDNA. At the gene content and gene order levels, the Oedogonium genome most closely resembles its Stigeoclonium counterpart. Characters shared by these chlorophyceans but missing in members

  18. Structural features of conopeptide genes inferred from partial sequences of the Conus tribblei genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghi, Neda; Concepcion, Gisela P; Olivera, Baldomero M; Lluisma, Arturo O

    2016-02-01

    The evolvability of venom components (in particular, the gene-encoded peptide toxins) in venomous species serves as an adaptive strategy allowing them to target new prey types or respond to changes in the prey field. The structure, organization, and expression of the venom peptide genes may provide insights into the molecular mechanisms that drive the evolution of such genes. Conus is a particularly interesting group given the high chemical diversity of their venom peptides, and the rapid evolution of the conopeptide-encoding genes. Conus genomes, however, are large and characterized by a high proportion of repetitive sequences. As a result, the structure and organization of conopeptide genes have remained poorly known. In this study, a survey of the genome of Conus tribblei was undertaken to address this gap. A partial assembly of C. tribblei genome was generated; the assembly, though consisting of a large number of fragments, accounted for 2160.5 Mb of sequence. A large number of repetitive genomic elements consisting of 642.6 Mb of retrotransposable elements, simple repeats, and novel interspersed repeats were observed. We characterized the structural organization and distribution of conotoxin genes in the genome. A significant number of conopeptide genes (estimated to be between 148 and 193) belonging to different superfamilies with complete or nearly complete exon regions were observed, ~60 % of which were expressed. The unexpressed conopeptide genes represent hidden but significant conotoxin diversity. The conotoxin genes also differed in the frequency and length of the introns. The interruption of exons by long introns in the conopeptide genes and the presence of repeats in the introns may indicate the importance of introns in facilitating recombination, evolution and diversification of conotoxins. These findings advance our understanding of the structural framework that promotes the gene-level molecular evolution of venom peptides.

  19. SigWin-detector: a Grid-enabled workflow for discovering enriched windows of genomic features related to DNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wibisono Adianto

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosome location is often used as a scaffold to organize genomic information in both the living cell and molecular biological research. Thus, ever-increasing amounts of data about genomic features are stored in public databases and can be readily visualized by genome browsers. To perform in silico experimentation conveniently with this genomics data, biologists need tools to process and compare datasets routinely and explore the obtained results interactively. The complexity of such experimentation requires these tools to be based on an e-Science approach, hence generic, modular, and reusable. A virtual laboratory environment with workflows, workflow management systems, and Grid computation are therefore essential. Findings Here we apply an e-Science approach to develop SigWin-detector, a workflow-based tool that can detect significantly enriched windows of (genomic features in a (DNA sequence in a fast and reproducible way. For proof-of-principle, we utilize a biological use case to detect regions of increased and decreased gene expression (RIDGEs and anti-RIDGEs in human transcriptome maps. We improved the original method for RIDGE detection by replacing the costly step of estimation by random sampling with a faster analytical formula for computing the distribution of the null hypothesis being tested and by developing a new algorithm for computing moving medians. SigWin-detector was developed using the WS-VLAM workflow management system and consists of several reusable modules that are linked together in a basic workflow. The configuration of this basic workflow can be adapted to satisfy the requirements of the specific in silico experiment. Conclusion As we show with the results from analyses in the biological use case on RIDGEs, SigWin-detector is an efficient and reusable Grid-based tool for discovering windows enriched for features of a particular type in any sequence of values. Thus, SigWin-detector provides the

  20. The carnitine biosynthetic pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana shares similar features with the pathway of mammals and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippa, Sonia; Zhao, Yingjuan; Merlier, Franck; Charrier, Aurélie; Perrin, Yolande

    2012-11-01

    Carnitine is an essential quaternary ammonium amino acid that occurs in the microbial, plant and animal kingdoms. The role and synthesis of this compound are very well documented in bacteria, fungi and mammals. On the contrary, although the presence of carnitine in plant tissue has been reported four decades ago and information about its biological implication are available, nothing is known about its synthesis in plants. We designed experiments to determine if the carnitine biosynthetic pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana is similar to the pathway in mammals and in the fungi Neurospora crassa and Candida albicans. We first checked for the presence of trimetyllysine (TML) and γ-butyrobetaine (γ-BB), two precursors of carnitine in fungi and in mammals, using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). Both compounds were shown to be present in plant extracts at concentrations in the picomole range per mg of dry weight. We next synthesized deuterium-labeled TML and transferred A. thaliana seedlings on growth medium supplemented with 1 mM of the deuterated precursor. LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of plant extracts clearly highlighted the synthesis of deuterium labeled γ-BB and labeled carnitine in deuterated-TML fed plants. The similarities between plant, fungal and mammalian pathways provide very useful information to search homologies between genomes. As a matter of fact the analysis of A. thaliana protein database provides homology for several enzymes responsible for carnitine synthesis in fungi and mammals. The study of mutants affected in the corresponding genes would be very useful to elucidate the plant carnitine biosynthetic pathway and to investigate further the role of carnitine in plant physiology.

  1. Genomic Features of Environmental and Clinical Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates Lacking Recognized Virulence Factors Are Dissimilar

    OpenAIRE

    Ronholm, J.; Petronella, N.; Chew Leung, C.; Pightling, A. W.; Banerjee, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a bacterial pathogen that can cause illness after the consumption or handling of contaminated seafood. The primary virulence factors associated with V. parahaemolyticus illness are thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and Tdh-related hemolysin (TRH). However, clinical strains lacking tdh and trh have recently been isolated, and these clinical isolates are poorly understood. To help understand the emergence of clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates, a genomic approac...

  2. [Bacteria of the Burkholderia cepacia complex: specific features of diagnostics, genome organization and metabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaginian, I A; Chernukha, M Iu

    2003-01-01

    Modern data, related with the identification and typing of the complex B. cepacia bacteria, are analyzed in the article by using the poly-phase taxonomic approach. An optimal scheme for identifying and typing the complex B. cepacia bacteria, involving the microbiological and molecular-biological methods of laboratory diagnostics, is presented. The key and assumed factors of pathogenicity of the discussed bacteria are described. The possible phylogenetic relations of the complex B. cepacia bacteria with phytopathgens as well as with pathogenic bacteria of species Burkholderia, Pseudomonas, Escherichia, B. mallei, B. pdeudomallei, P. seruginosa and E. coli are described. A possible role of genome alterations and mutations in the genome of the complex B. cepacia bacteria (with the latter genome having unusual properties, i.e. a big size, and a considerable quantity of insertion sequences) in creating the conditions for the "pulsing" evolution "jerks", i.e. for a rapid change-over from saprophytism in the soil to a pathogenic causative agent of a viral-and-bacteriological infection. Such mechanism can be regarded as a rapid and radical adaptation of a microorganism under the conditions of changing ecological niches.

  3. Identifying master regulators of cancer and their downstream targets by integrating genomic and epigenomic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevaert, Olivier; Plevritis, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    Vast amounts of molecular data characterizing the genome, epigenome and transcriptome are becoming available for a variety of cancers. The current challenge is to integrate these diverse layers of molecular biology information to create a more comprehensive view of key biological processes underlying cancer. We developed a biocomputational algorithm that integrates copy number, DNA methylation, and gene expression data to study master regulators of cancer and identify their targets. Our algorithm starts by generating a list of candidate driver genes based on the rationale that genes that are driven by multiple genomic events in a subset of samples are unlikely to be randomly deregulated. We then select the master regulators from the candidate driver and identify their targets by inferring the underlying regulatory network of gene expression. We applied our biocomputational algorithm to identify master regulators and their targets in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and serous ovarian cancer. Our results suggest that the expression of candidate drivers is more likely to be influenced by copy number variations than DNA methylation. Next, we selected the master regulators and identified their downstream targets using module networks analysis. As a proof-of-concept, we show that the GBM and ovarian cancer module networks recapitulate known processes in these cancers. In addition, we identify master regulators that have not been previously reported and suggest their likely role. In summary, focusing on genes whose expression can be explained by their genomic and epigenomic aberrations is a promising strategy to identify master regulators of cancer.

  4. Characterization of soybean genomic features by analysis of its expressed sequence tags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Ai-Guo; Wang, Jun; Cui, Peng

    2004-01-01

    We analyzed 314,254 soybean expressed sequence tags (ESTs), including 29,540 from our laboratory and 284,714 from GenBank. These ESTs were assembled into 56,147 unigenes. About 76.92% of the unigenes were homologous to genes from Arabidopsis thaliana ( Arabidopsis). The putative products of these......We analyzed 314,254 soybean expressed sequence tags (ESTs), including 29,540 from our laboratory and 284,714 from GenBank. These ESTs were assembled into 56,147 unigenes. About 76.92% of the unigenes were homologous to genes from Arabidopsis thaliana ( Arabidopsis). The putative products...... to be fast-evolving. Soybean unigenes with no match to genes within the Arabidopsis genome were identified as soybean-specific genes. These genes were mainly involved in nodule development and the synthesis of seed storage proteins. In addition, we also identified 61 genes regulated by salicylic acid, 1......,322 transcription factor genes and 326 disease resistance-like genes from soybean unigenes. SSR analysis showed that the soybean genome was more complex than the Arabidopsis and the Medicago truncatula genomes. GC content in soybean unigene sequences is similar to that in Arabidopsis and M. truncatula. Furthermore...

  5. Matching of array CGH and gene expression microarray features for the purpose of integrative genomic analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Wieringen Wessel N

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing number of genomic studies interrogating more than one molecular level is published. Bioinformatics follows biological practice, and recent years have seen a surge in methodology for the integrative analysis of genomic data. Often such analyses require knowledge of which elements of one platform link to those of another. Although important, many integrative analyses do not or insufficiently detail the matching of the platforms. Results We describe, illustrate and discuss six matching procedures. They are implemented in the R-package sigaR (available from Bioconductor. The principles underlying the presented matching procedures are generic, and can be combined to form new matching approaches or be applied to the matching of other platforms. Illustration of the matching procedures on a variety of data sets reveals how the procedures differ in the use of the available data, and may even lead to different results for individual genes. Conclusions Matching of data from multiple genomics platforms is an important preprocessing step for many integrative bioinformatic analysis, for which we present six generic procedures, both old and new. They have been implemented in the R-package sigaR, available from Bioconductor.

  6. Somatic Genomics and Clinical Features of Lung Adenocarcinoma: A Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bin; Wang, Mingyi; Pariscenti, Gianluca; Jones, Kristine; Bouk, Aaron J.; Boland, Joseph; Luke, Brian T.; Song, Lei; Duan, Jubao; Liu, Pengyuan; Kohno, Takashi; Chen, Qingrong; Meerzaman, Daoud; Marconett, Crystal; Mills, Ian; Caporaso, Neil E.; Gail, Mitchell H.; Pesatori, Angela C.; Consonni, Dario; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Chanock, Stephen J.; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD) is the most common histologic subtype of lung cancer and has a high risk of distant metastasis at every disease stage. We aimed to characterize the genomic landscape of LUAD and identify mutation signatures associated with tumor progression. Methods and Findings We performed an integrative genomic analysis, incorporating whole exome sequencing (WES), determination of DNA copy number and DNA methylation, and transcriptome sequencing for 101 LUAD samples from the Environment And Genetics in Lung cancer Etiology (EAGLE) study. We detected driver genes by testing whether the nonsynonymous mutation rate was significantly higher than the background mutation rate and replicated our findings in public datasets with 724 samples. We performed subclonality analysis for mutations based on mutant allele data and copy number alteration data. We also tested the association between mutation signatures and clinical outcomes, including distant metastasis, survival, and tumor grade. We identified and replicated two novel candidate driver genes, POU class 4 homeobox 2 (POU4F2) (mutated in 9 [8.9%] samples) and ZKSCAN1 (mutated in 6 [5.9%] samples), and characterized their major deleterious mutations. ZKSCAN1 was part of a mutually exclusive gene set that included the RTK/RAS/RAF pathway genes BRAF, EGFR, KRAS, MET, and NF1, indicating an important driver role for this gene. Moreover, we observed strong associations between methylation in specific genomic regions and somatic mutation patterns. In the tumor evolution analysis, four driver genes had a significantly lower fraction of subclonal mutations (FSM), including TP53 (p = 0.007), KEAP1 (p = 0.012), STK11 (p = 0.0076), and EGFR (p = 0.0078), suggesting a tumor initiation role for these genes. Subclonal mutations were significantly enriched in APOBEC-related signatures (p < 2.5×10−50). The total number of somatic mutations (p = 0.0039) and the fraction of transitions (p = 5.5×10−4) were

  7. Nine Loci for Ocular Axial Length Identified through Genome-wide Association Studies, Including Shared Loci with Refractive Error

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Schache, Maria; Ikram, M. Kamran; Young, Terri L.; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Vitart, Veronique; MacGregor, Stuart; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Barathi, Veluchamy A.; Liao, Jiemin; Hysi, Pirro G.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; St. Pourcain, Beate; Kemp, John P.; McMahon, George

    2013-01-01

    Refractive errors are common eye disorders of public health importance worldwide. Ocular axial length (AL) is the major determinant of refraction and thus of myopia and hyperopia. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for AL, combining 12,531 Europeans and 8,216 Asians. We identified eight genome-wide significant loci for AL (RSPO1, C3orf26, LAMA2, GJD2, ZNRF3, CD55, MIP, and ALPPL2) and confirmed one previously reported AL locus (ZC3H11B). Of the nine loci, five (LA...

  8. Salient features of otoacoustic emissions are common across tetrapod groups and suggest shared properties of generation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergevin, Christopher; Manley, Geoffrey A; Köppl, Christine

    2015-03-17

    Otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) are faint sounds generated by healthy inner ears that provide a window into the study of auditory mechanics. All vertebrate classes exhibit OAEs to varying degrees, yet the biophysical origins are still not well understood. Here, we analyzed both spontaneous (SOAE) and stimulus-frequency (SFOAE) otoacoustic emissions from a bird (barn owl, Tyto alba) and a lizard (green anole, Anolis carolinensis). These species possess highly disparate macromorphologies of the inner ear relative to each other and to mammals, thereby allowing for novel insights into the biomechanical mechanisms underlying OAE generation. All ears exhibited robust OAE activity, and our chief observation was that SFOAE phase accumulation between adjacent SOAE peak frequencies clustered about an integral number of cycles. Being highly similar to published results from human ears, we argue that these data indicate a common underlying generator mechanism of OAEs across all vertebrates, despite the absence of morphological features thought essential to mammalian cochlear mechanics. We suggest that otoacoustic emissions originate from phase coherence in a system of coupled oscillators, which is consistent with the notion of "coherent reflection" but does not explicitly require a mammalian-type traveling wave. Furthermore, comparison between SFOAE delays and auditory nerve fiber responses for the barn owl strengthens the notion that most OAE delay can be attributed to tuning.

  9. Abacavir induced T cell reactivity from drug naïve individuals shares features of allo-immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Jacqueline; Wuillemin, Natascha; Watkins, Stephan; Jamin, Heidi; Eriksson, Klara K; Villiger, Peter; Fontana, Stefano; Pichler, Werner J; Yerly, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Abacavir hypersensitivity is a severe hypersensitivity reaction which occurs exclusively in carriers of the HLA-B*57∶01 allele. In vitro culture of PBMC with abacavir results in the outgrowth of abacavir-reacting CD8+ T cells, which release IFNγ and are cytotoxic. How this immune response is induced and what is recognized by these T cells is still a matter of debate. We analyzed the conditions required to develop an abacavir-dependent T cell response in vitro. The abacavir reactivity was independent of co-stimulatory signals, as neither DC maturation nor release of inflammatory cytokines were observed upon abacavir exposure. Abacavir induced T cells arose in the absence of professional APC and stemmed from naïve and memory compartments. These features are reminiscent of allo-reactivity. Screening for allo-reactivity revealed that about 5% of generated T cell clones (n = 136) from three donors were allo-reactive exclusively to the related HLA-B*58∶01. The addition of peptides which can bind to the HLA-B*57∶01-abacavir complex and to HLA-B*58∶01 during the induction phase increased the proportion of HLA-B*58∶01 allo-reactive T cell clones from 5% to 42%. In conclusion, abacavir can alter the HLA-B*57∶01-peptide complex in a way that mimics an allo-allele ('altered self-allele') and create the potential for robust T cell responses.

  10. The complete mitochondrial genome of the enigmatic bigheaded turtle (Platysternon: description of unusual genomic features and the reconciliation of phylogenetic hypotheses based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feldman Chris R

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The big-headed turtle (Platysternon megacephalum from east Asia is the sole living representative of a poorly-studied turtle lineage (Platysternidae. It has no close living relatives, and its phylogenetic position within turtles is one of the outstanding controversies in turtle systematics. Platysternon was traditionally considered to be close to snapping turtles (Chelydridae based on some studies of its morphology and mitochondrial (mt DNA, however, other studies of morphology and nuclear (nu DNA do not support that hypothesis. Results We sequenced the complete mt genome of Platysternon and the nearly complete mt genomes of two other relevant turtles and compared them to turtle mt genomes from the literature to form the largest molecular dataset used to date to address this issue. The resulting phylogeny robustly rejects the placement of Platysternon with Chelydridae, but instead shows that it is a member of the Testudinoidea, a diverse, nearly globally-distributed group that includes pond turtles and tortoises. We also discovered that Platysternon mtDNA has large-scale gene rearrangements and possesses two, nearly identical, control regions, features that distinguish it from all other studied turtles. Conclusion Our study robustly determines the phylogenetic placement of Platysternon and provides a well-resolved outline of major turtle lineages, while demonstrating the significantly greater resolving power of comparing large amounts of mt sequence over that of short fragments. Earlier phylogenies placing Platysternon with chelydrids required a temporal gap in the fossil record that is now unnecessary. The duplicated control regions and gene rearrangements of the Platysternon mtDNA probably resulted from the duplication of part of the genome and then the subsequent loss of redundant genes. Although it is possible that having two control regions may provide some advantage, explaining why the control regions would be

  11. DNAshape: a method for the high-throughput prediction of DNA structural features on a genomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tianyin; Yang, Lin; Lu, Yan; Dror, Iris; Dantas Machado, Ana Carolina; Ghane, Tahereh; Di Felice, Rosa; Rohs, Remo

    2013-01-01

    We present a method and web server for predicting DNA structural features in a high-throughput (HT) manner for massive sequence data. This approach provides the framework for the integration of DNA sequence and shape analyses in genome-wide studies. The HT methodology uses a sliding-window approach to mine DNA structural information obtained from Monte Carlo simulations. It requires only nucleotide sequence as input and instantly predicts multiple structural features of DNA (minor groove width, roll, propeller twist and helix twist). The results of rigorous validations of the HT predictions based on DNA structures solved by X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy, hydroxyl radical cleavage data, statistical analysis and cross-validation, and molecular dynamics simulations provide strong confidence in this approach. The DNAshape web server is freely available at http://rohslab.cmb.usc.edu/DNAshape/. PMID:23703209

  12. Current status of genetics and genomics of reared penaeid shrimp: information relevant to access and benefit sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriantahina, Farafidy; Liu, Xiaolin; Feng, Tingting; Xiang, Jianhai

    2013-08-01

    At present, research and progress in shrimp genomics and genetics show significant developments. Shrimp genetics and genomics also show immense potential for an increased production in a way that meets shrimp culture progress goals for the third millennium. This review article aims to provide an overview of its current status and future direction, discusses questions that need focused research to address them, and summarizes areas where genetics and genomics knowledge can make a positive difference to shrimp culture sustainability. Sustainable progress of penaeid shrimps will depend upon feasible solutions for environmental, research, economic, consumer problems, proper development, and planning policy enforcement. It is recommended that increased funding for biotechnology research and progress be directed to expand worldwide commercial shrimp culture and address environmental and public health issues. For any researcher or shrimp company member who has attempted to or whom would like to thoroughly search the literature to gain a complete understanding of the current state of shrimp genetics and genomics, this publication will be an invaluable source of reference materials, some of which is reported here for the first time.

  13. Identification of genomic loci associated with resting heart rate and shared genetic predictors with all-cause mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eppinga, Ruben N.; Hagemeijer, Yanick; Burgess, Stephen; Hinds, David A.; Stefansson, Kari; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Verweij, Niek; van der Harst, Pim

    2016-01-01

    Resting heart rate is a heritable trait correlated with life span. Little is known about the genetic contribution to resting heart rate and its relationship with mortality. We performed a genome-wide association discovery and replication analysis starting with 19.9 million genetic variants and study

  14. Physiological and genomic characterization of Arcobacter anaerophilus IR-1 reveals new metabolic features in Epsilonproteobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene eRoalkvam

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study we characterized and sequenced the genome of Arcobacter anaerophilus strain IR-1 isolated from enrichment cultures used in nitrate-amended corrosion experiments. A. anaerophilus IR-1 could grow lithoautotrophically on hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide and lithoheterothrophically on thiosulfate and elemental sulfur. In addition, the strain grew organoheterotrophically on yeast extract, peptone and various organic acids. We show for the first time that Arcobacter could grow on the complex organic substrate tryptone and oxidize acetate with elemental sulfur as electron acceptor. Electron acceptors utilized by most Epsilonproteobacteria, such as oxygen, nitrate and sulfur, were also used by A. anaerophilus IR-1. Strain IR-1 was also uniquely able to use iron citrate as electron acceptor. Comparative genomics of the Arcobacter strains A. butzleri RM4018, A. nitrofigilis CI and A. anaerophilus IR-1 revealed that the free-living strains had a wider metabolic range and more genes in common compared to the pathogen strain. The presence of genes for NAD+-reducing hydrogenase (hox and dissimilatory iron reduction (fre were unique for A. anaerophilus IR-1 among Epsilonproteobacteria. Finally, the new strain had an incomplete denitrification pathway where the end product was nitrite, which is different from other Arcobacter strains where the end product is ammonia. Altogether, our study shows that traditional characterization in combination with a modern genomics approach can expand our knowledge on free-living Arcobacter, and that this complementary approach could also provide invaluable knowledge about the physiology and metabolic pathways in other Epsilonproteobacteria from various environments.

  15. Mitogenomes from The 1000 Genome Project reveal new Near Eastern features in present-day Tuscans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Gómez-Carballa

    Full Text Available Genetic analyses have recently been carried out on present-day Tuscans (Central Italy in order to investigate their presumable recent Near East ancestry in connection with the long-standing debate on the origins of the Etruscan civilization. We retrieved mitogenomes and genome-wide SNP data from 110 Tuscans analyzed within the context of The 1000 Genome Project. For phylogeographic and evolutionary analysis we made use of a large worldwide database of entire mitogenomes (>26,000 and partial control region sequences (>180,000.Different analyses reveal the presence of typical Near East haplotypes in Tuscans representing isolated members of various mtDNA phylogenetic branches. As a whole, the Near East component in Tuscan mitogenomes can be estimated at about 8%; a proportion that is comparable to previous estimates but significantly lower than admixture estimates obtained from autosomal SNP data (21%. Phylogeographic and evolutionary inter-population comparisons indicate that the main signal of Near Eastern Tuscan mitogenomes comes from Iran.Mitogenomes of recent Near East origin in present-day Tuscans do not show local or regional variation. This points to a demographic scenario that is compatible with a recent arrival of Near Easterners to this region in Italy with no founder events or bottlenecks.

  16. Mitogenomes from The 1000 Genome Project Reveal New Near Eastern Features in Present-Day Tuscans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Amigo, Jorge; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic analyses have recently been carried out on present-day Tuscans (Central Italy) in order to investigate their presumable recent Near East ancestry in connection with the long-standing debate on the origins of the Etruscan civilization. We retrieved mitogenomes and genome-wide SNP data from 110 Tuscans analyzed within the context of The 1000 Genome Project. For phylogeographic and evolutionary analysis we made use of a large worldwide database of entire mitogenomes (>26,000) and partial control region sequences (>180,000). Results Different analyses reveal the presence of typical Near East haplotypes in Tuscans representing isolated members of various mtDNA phylogenetic branches. As a whole, the Near East component in Tuscan mitogenomes can be estimated at about 8%; a proportion that is comparable to previous estimates but significantly lower than admixture estimates obtained from autosomal SNP data (21%). Phylogeographic and evolutionary inter-population comparisons indicate that the main signal of Near Eastern Tuscan mitogenomes comes from Iran. Conclusions Mitogenomes of recent Near East origin in present-day Tuscans do not show local or regional variation. This points to a demographic scenario that is compatible with a recent arrival of Near Easterners to this region in Italy with no founder events or bottlenecks. PMID:25786119

  17. Genomic and secretomic analyses reveal unique features of the lignocellulolytic enzyme system of Penicillium decumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guodong; Zhang, Lei; Wei, Xiaomin; Zou, Gen; Qin, Yuqi; Ma, Liang; Li, Jie; Zheng, Huajun; Wang, Shengyue; Wang, Chengshu; Xun, Luying; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Zhou, Zhihua; Qu, Yinbo

    2013-01-01

    Many Penicillium species could produce extracellular enzyme systems with good lignocellulose hydrolysis performance. However, these species and their enzyme systems are still poorly understood and explored due to the lacking of genetic information. Here, we present the genomic and secretomic analyses of Penicillium decumbens that has been used in industrial production of lignocellulolytic enzymes in China for more than fifteen years. Comparative genomics analysis with the phylogenetically most similar species Penicillium chrysogenum revealed that P. decumbens has evolved with more genes involved in plant cell wall degradation, but fewer genes in cellular metabolism and regulation. Compared with the widely used cellulase producer Trichoderma reesei, P. decumbens has a lignocellulolytic enzyme system with more diverse components, particularly for cellulose binding domain-containing proteins and hemicellulases. Further, proteomic analysis of secretomes revealed that P. decumbens produced significantly more lignocellulolytic enzymes in the medium with cellulose-wheat bran as the carbon source than with glucose. The results expand our knowledge on the genetic information of lignocellulolytic enzyme systems in Penicillium species, and will facilitate rational strain improvement for the production of highly efficient enzyme systems used in lignocellulose utilization from Penicillium species.

  18. Features of protein-protein interactions in two-component signaling deduced from genomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Robert A; Szurmant, Hendrik; Hoch, James A; Hwa, Terence

    2007-01-01

    As more and more sequence data become available, new approaches for extracting information from these data become feasible. This chapter reports on one such method that has been applied to elucidate protein-protein interactions in bacterial two-component signaling pathways. The method identifies residues involved in the interaction through an analysis of over 2500 functionally coupled proteins and a precise determination of the substitutional constraints placed on one protein by its signaling mate. Once identified, a simple log-likelihood scoring procedure is applied to these residues to build a predictive tool for assigning signaling mates. The ability to apply this method is based on a proliferation of related domains within multiple organisms. Paralogous evolution through gene duplication and divergence of two-component systems has commonly resulted in tens of closely related interacting pairs within one organism with a roughly one-to-one correspondence between signal and response. This provides us with roughly an order of magnitude more protein pairs than there are unique, fully sequenced bacterial species. Consequently, this chapter serves as both a detailed exposition of the method that has provided more depth to our knowledge of bacterial signaling and a look ahead to what would be possible on a more widespread scale, that is, to protein-protein interactions that have only one example per genome, as the number of genomes increases by a factor of 10.

  19. Genomic and secretomic analyses reveal unique features of the lignocellulolytic enzyme system of Penicillium decumbens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Liu

    Full Text Available Many Penicillium species could produce extracellular enzyme systems with good lignocellulose hydrolysis performance. However, these species and their enzyme systems are still poorly understood and explored due to the lacking of genetic information. Here, we present the genomic and secretomic analyses of Penicillium decumbens that has been used in industrial production of lignocellulolytic enzymes in China for more than fifteen years. Comparative genomics analysis with the phylogenetically most similar species Penicillium chrysogenum revealed that P. decumbens has evolved with more genes involved in plant cell wall degradation, but fewer genes in cellular metabolism and regulation. Compared with the widely used cellulase producer Trichoderma reesei, P. decumbens has a lignocellulolytic enzyme system with more diverse components, particularly for cellulose binding domain-containing proteins and hemicellulases. Further, proteomic analysis of secretomes revealed that P. decumbens produced significantly more lignocellulolytic enzymes in the medium with cellulose-wheat bran as the carbon source than with glucose. The results expand our knowledge on the genetic information of lignocellulolytic enzyme systems in Penicillium species, and will facilitate rational strain improvement for the production of highly efficient enzyme systems used in lignocellulose utilization from Penicillium species.

  20. Wrapper-based selection of genetic features in genome-wide association studies through fast matrix operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahikkala, Tapio; Okser, Sebastian; Airola, Antti; Salakoski, Tapio; Aittokallio, Tero

    2012-05-02

    Through the wealth of information contained within them, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have the potential to provide researchers with a systematic means of associating genetic variants with a wide variety of disease phenotypes. Due to the limitations of approaches that have analyzed single variants one at a time, it has been proposed that the genetic basis of these disorders could be determined through detailed analysis of the genetic variants themselves and in conjunction with one another. The construction of models that account for these subsets of variants requires methodologies that generate predictions based on the total risk of a particular group of polymorphisms. However, due to the excessive number of variants, constructing these types of models has so far been computationally infeasible. We have implemented an algorithm, known as greedy RLS, that we use to perform the first known wrapper-based feature selection on the genome-wide level. The running time of greedy RLS grows linearly in the number of training examples, the number of features in the original data set, and the number of selected features. This speed is achieved through computational short-cuts based on matrix calculus. Since the memory consumption in present-day computers can form an even tighter bottleneck than running time, we also developed a space efficient variation of greedy RLS which trades running time for memory. These approaches are then compared to traditional wrapper-based feature selection implementations based on support vector machines (SVM) to reveal the relative speed-up and to assess the feasibility of the new algorithm. As a proof of concept, we apply greedy RLS to the Hypertension - UK National Blood Service WTCCC dataset and select the most predictive variants using 3-fold external cross-validation in less than 26 minutes on a high-end desktop. On this dataset, we also show that greedy RLS has a better classification performance on independent test data than a

  1. A Review on Genomics APIs

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    Rajeswari Swaminathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The constant improvement and falling prices of whole human genome Next Generation Sequencing (NGS has resulted in rapid adoption of genomic information at both clinics and research institutions. Considered together, the complexity of genomics data, due to its large volume and diversity along with the need for genomic data sharing, has resulted in the creation of Application Programming Interface (API for secure, modular, interoperable access to genomic data from different applications, platforms, and even organizations. The Genomics APIs are a set of special protocols that assist software developers in dealing with multiple genomic data sources for building seamless, interoperable applications leading to the advancement of both genomic and clinical research. These APIs help define a standard for retrieval of genomic data from multiple sources as well as to better package genomic information for integration with Electronic Health Records. This review covers three currently available Genomics APIs: a Google Genomics, b SMART Genomics, and c 23andMe. The functionalities, reference implementations (if available and authentication protocols of each API are reviewed. A comparative analysis of the different features across the three APIs is provided in the Discussion section. Though Genomics APIs are still under active development and have yet to reach widespread adoption, they hold the promise to make building of complicated genomics applications easier with downstream constructive effects on healthcare.

  2. Genome-scale analysis of metazoan replication origins reveals their organization in specific but flexible sites defined by conserved features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayrou, Christelle; Coulombe, Philippe; Vigneron, Alice; Stanojcic, Slavica; Ganier, Olivier; Peiffer, Isabelle; Rivals, Eric; Puy, Aurore; Laurent-Chabalier, Sabine; Desprat, Romain; Méchali, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    In metazoans, thousands of DNA replication origins (Oris) are activated at each cell cycle. Their genomic organization and their genetic nature remain elusive. Here, we characterized Oris by nascent strand (NS) purification and a genome-wide analysis in Drosophila and mouse cells. We show that in both species most CpG islands (CGI) contain Oris, although methylation is nearly absent in Drosophila, indicating that this epigenetic mark is not crucial for defining the activated origin. Initiation of DNA synthesis starts at the borders of CGI, resulting in a striking bimodal distribution of NS, suggestive of a dual initiation event. Oris contain a unique nucleotide skew around NS peaks, characterized by G/T and C/A overrepresentation at the 5′ and 3′ of Ori sites, respectively. Repeated GC-rich elements were detected, which are good predictors of Oris, suggesting that common sequence features are part of metazoan Oris. In the heterochromatic chromosome 4 of Drosophila, Oris correlated with HP1 binding sites. At the chromosome level, regions rich in Oris are early replicating, whereas Ori-poor regions are late replicating. The genome-wide analysis was coupled with a DNA combing analysis to unravel the organization of Oris. The results indicate that Oris are in a large excess, but their activation does not occur at random. They are organized in groups of site-specific but flexible origins that define replicons, where a single origin is activated in each replicon. This organization provides both site specificity and Ori firing flexibility in each replicon, allowing possible adaptation to environmental cues and cell fates. PMID:21750104

  3. Exploring metabolic pathway reconstruction and genome-wide expression profiling in Lactobacillus reuteri to define functional probiotic features.

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    Delphine M Saulnier

    Full Text Available The genomes of four Lactobacillus reuteri strains isolated from human breast milk and the gastrointestinal tract have been recently sequenced as part of the Human Microbiome Project. Preliminary genome comparisons suggested that these strains belong to two different clades, previously shown to differ with respect to antimicrobial production, biofilm formation, and immunomodulation. To explain possible mechanisms of survival in the host and probiosis, we completed a detailed genomic comparison of two breast milk-derived isolates representative of each group: an established probiotic strain (L. reuteri ATCC 55730 and a strain with promising probiotic features (L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475. Transcriptomes of L. reuteri strains in different growth phases were monitored using strain-specific microarrays, and compared using a pan-metabolic model representing all known metabolic reactions present in these strains. Both strains contained candidate genes involved in the survival and persistence in the gut such as mucus-binding proteins and enzymes scavenging reactive oxygen species. A large operon predicted to encode the synthesis of an exopolysaccharide was identified in strain 55730. Both strains were predicted to produce health-promoting factors, including antimicrobial agents and vitamins (folate, vitamin B(12. Additionally, a complete pathway for thiamine biosynthesis was predicted in strain 55730 for the first time in this species. Candidate genes responsible for immunomodulatory properties of each strain were identified by transcriptomic comparisons. The production of bioactive metabolites by human-derived probiotics may be predicted using metabolic modeling and transcriptomics. Such strategies may facilitate selection and optimization of probiotics for health promotion, disease prevention and amelioration.

  4. Scalable privacy-preserving data sharing methodology for genome-wide association studies: an application to iDASH healthcare privacy protection challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fei; Ji, Zhanglong

    2014-01-01

    In response to the growing interest in genome-wide association study (GWAS) data privacy, the Integrating Data for Analysis, Anonymization and SHaring (iDASH) center organized the iDASH Healthcare Privacy Protection Challenge, with the aim of investigating the effectiveness of applying privacy-preserving methodologies to human genetic data. This paper is based on a submission to the iDASH Healthcare Privacy Protection Challenge. We apply privacy-preserving methods that are adapted from Uhler et al. 2013 and Yu et al. 2014 to the challenge's data and analyze the data utility after the data are perturbed by the privacy-preserving methods. Major contributions of this paper include new interpretation of the χ2 statistic in a GWAS setting and new results about the Hamming distance score, a key component for one of the privacy-preserving methods.

  5. New vaccine design based on defective genomes that combines features of attenuated and inactivated vaccines.

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    Teresa Rodríguez-Calvo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: New vaccine designs are needed to control diseases associated with antigenically variable RNA viruses. Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD is a highly contagious disease of livestock that inflicts severe economic losses. Although the current whole-virus chemically inactivated vaccine has proven effective, it has led to new outbreaks of FMD because of incomplete inactivation of the virus or the escape of infectious virus from vaccine production premises. We have previously shown that serial passages of FMD virus (FMDV C-S8c1 at high multiplicity of infection in cell culture resulted in virus populations consisting of defective genomes that are infectious by complementation (termed C-S8p260. PRINCIPAL FINDING: Here we evaluate the immunogenicity of C-S8p260, first in a mouse model system to establish a proof of principle, and second, in swine, the natural host of FMDV C-S8c1. Mice were completely protected against a lethal challenge with FMDV C-S8c1, after vaccination with a single dose of C-S8p260. Pigs immunized with different C-S8p260 doses and challenged with FMDV C-S8c1 either did not develop any clinical signs or showed delayed and mild disease symptoms. C-S8p260 induced high titers of both FMDV-specific, neutralizing antibodies and activated FMDV-specific T cells in swine, that correlated with solid protection against FMDV. CONCLUSIONS: The defective virus-based vaccine did not produce detectable levels of transmissible FMDV. Therefore, a segmented, replication-competent form of a virus, such as FMDV C-S8p260, can provide the basis of a new generation of attenuated antiviral vaccines with two safety barriers. The design can be extended to any viral pathogen that encodes trans-acting gene products, allowing complementation between replication-competent, defective forms.

  6. New vaccine design based on defective genomes that combines features of attenuated and inactivated vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Calvo, Teresa; Ojosnegros, Samuel; Sanz-Ramos, Marta; García-Arriaza, Juan; Escarmís, Cristina; Domingo, Esteban; Sevilla, Noemí

    2010-04-29

    New vaccine designs are needed to control diseases associated with antigenically variable RNA viruses. Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of livestock that inflicts severe economic losses. Although the current whole-virus chemically inactivated vaccine has proven effective, it has led to new outbreaks of FMD because of incomplete inactivation of the virus or the escape of infectious virus from vaccine production premises. We have previously shown that serial passages of FMD virus (FMDV) C-S8c1 at high multiplicity of infection in cell culture resulted in virus populations consisting of defective genomes that are infectious by complementation (termed C-S8p260). Here we evaluate the immunogenicity of C-S8p260, first in a mouse model system to establish a proof of principle, and second, in swine, the natural host of FMDV C-S8c1. Mice were completely protected against a lethal challenge with FMDV C-S8c1, after vaccination with a single dose of C-S8p260. Pigs immunized with different C-S8p260 doses and challenged with FMDV C-S8c1 either did not develop any clinical signs or showed delayed and mild disease symptoms. C-S8p260 induced high titers of both FMDV-specific, neutralizing antibodies and activated FMDV-specific T cells in swine, that correlated with solid protection against FMDV. The defective virus-based vaccine did not produce detectable levels of transmissible FMDV. Therefore, a segmented, replication-competent form of a virus, such as FMDV C-S8p260, can provide the basis of a new generation of attenuated antiviral vaccines with two safety barriers. The design can be extended to any viral pathogen that encodes trans-acting gene products, allowing complementation between replication-competent, defective forms.

  7. Codon-triplet context unveils unique features of the Candida albicans protein coding genome

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    Oliveira José L

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolutionary forces that determine the arrangement of synonymous codons within open reading frames and fine tune mRNA translation efficiency are not yet understood. In order to tackle this question we have carried out a large scale study of codon-triplet contexts in 11 fungal species to unravel associations or relationships between codons present at the ribosome A-, P- and E-sites during each decoding cycle. Results Our analysis unveiled high bias within the context of codon-triplets, in particular strong preference for triplets of identical codons. We have also identified a surprisingly large number of codon-triplet combinations that vanished from fungal ORFeomes. Candida albicans exacerbated these features, showed an unbalanced tRNA population for decoding its pool of codons and used near-cognate decoding for a large set of codons, suggesting that unique evolutionary forces shaped the evolution of its ORFeome. Conclusion We have developed bioinformatics tools for large-scale analysis of codon-triplet contexts. These algorithms identified codon-triplets context biases, allowed for large scale comparative codon-triplet analysis, and identified rules governing codon-triplet context. They could also detect alterations to the standard genetic code.

  8. Metabolic potential of microbial mats and microbialites: Autotrophic capabilities described by an in silico stoichiometric approach from shared genomic resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueda-García, Daniel; Falcón, Luisa I

    2016-08-01

    Microbialites and microbial mats are complex communities with high phylogenetic diversity. These communities are mostly composed of bacteria and archaea, which are the earliest living forms on Earth and relevant to biogeochemical evolution. In this study, we identified the shared metabolic pathways for uptake of inorganic C and N in microbial mats and microbialites based on metagenomic data sets. An in silico analysis for autotrophic pathways was used to trace the paths of C and N to the system, following an elementary flux modes (EFM) approach, resulting in a stoichiometric model. The fragility was analyzed by the minimal cut sets method. We found four relevant pathways for the incorporation of CO2 (Calvin cycle, reverse tricarboxylic acid cycle, reductive acetyl-CoA pathway, and dicarboxylate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle), some of them present only in archaea, while nitrogen fixation was the most important source of N to the system. The metabolic potential to incorporate nitrate to biomass was also relevant. The fragility of the network was low, suggesting a high redundancy of the autotrophic pathways due to their broad metabolic diversity, and highlighting the relevance of reducing power source. This analysis suggests that microbial mats and microbialites are "metabolic pumps" for the incorporation of inorganic gases and formation of organic matter.

  9. Cloning and subcellular location of an arabidopsis receptor-like protein that shares common features with protein-sorting receptors of eukaryotic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, S.U.; Bar-Peled, M.; Raikhel, N.V. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Many receptors involved in clathrin-mediated protein transport through the endocytic and secretary pathways of yeast and animal cells share common features. They are all type I integral membrane proteins containing cysteine-rich lumenal domains and cytoplasmic tails with tyrosine-containing sorting signals. The cysteine-rich domains are thought to be involved in ligand binding, whereas the cytoplasmic tyrosine motifs interact with clathrin-associated adaptor proteins during protein sorting along these pathways. in addition, tyrosine-containing signals are required for the retention and recycling of some of these membrane proteins to the trans-Golgi network. Here we report the characterization of an approximately 80-kD epidermal growth factor receptor-like type I integral membrane protein containing all of these functional motifs from Arabidopsis thaliana (called AtELP for A. thaliana Epidermal growth factor receptor-Like Protein). Biochemical analysis indicates that AtELP is a membrane protein found at high levels in the roots of both monocots and dicots. Subcellular fractionation studies indicate that the AtELP protein is present in two membrane fractions corresponding to a novel, undefined compartment and a fraction enriched in vesicles containing clathrin and its associated adaptor proteins. AtELP may therefore serve as a marker for compartments involved in intracellular protein trafficking in the plant cell. 87 refs., 7 figs.

  10. The structure of the genomic Bacillus subtilis dUTPase: novel features in the Phe-lid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Nafría, Javier; Burchell, Lynn; Takezawa, Mine; Rzechorzek, Neil J; Fogg, Mark J; Wilson, Keith S

    2010-09-01

    dUTPases are a ubiquitous family of enzymes that are essential for all organisms and catalyse the breakdown of 2-deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP). In Bacillus subtilis there are two homotrimeric dUTPases: a genomic and a prophage form. Here, the structures of the genomic dUTPase and of its complex with the substrate analogue dUpNHpp and calcium are described, both at 1.85 A resolution. The overall fold resembles that of previously solved trimeric dUTPases. The C-terminus, which contains one of the conserved sequence motifs, is disordered in both structures. The crystal of the complex contains six independent protomers which accommodate six dUpNHpp molecules, with three triphosphates in the trans conformation and the other three in the active gauche conformation. The structure of the complex confirms the role of several key residues that are involved in ligand binding and the position of the catalytic water. Asp82, which has previously been proposed to act as a general base, points away from the active site. In the complex Ser64 reorients in order to hydrogen bond the phosphate chain of the substrate. A novel feature has been identified: the position in the sequence of the ;Phe-lid', which packs against the uracil moiety, is adjacent to motif III, whereas in all other dUTPase structures the lid is in a conserved position in motif V of the flexible C-terminal arm. This requires a reconsideration of some aspects of the accepted mechanism.

  11. Gene expression in chicken reveals correlation with structural genomic features and conserved patterns of transcription in the terrestrial vertebrates.

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    Haisheng Nie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The chicken is an important agricultural and avian-model species. A survey of gene expression in a range of different tissues will provide a benchmark for understanding expression levels under normal physiological conditions in birds. With expression data for birds being very scant, this benchmark is of particular interest for comparative expression analysis among various terrestrial vertebrates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We carried out a gene expression survey in eight major chicken tissues using whole genome microarrays. A global picture of gene expression is presented for the eight tissues, and tissue specific as well as common gene expression were identified. A Gene Ontology (GO term enrichment analysis showed that tissue-specific genes are enriched with GO terms reflecting the physiological functions of the specific tissue, and housekeeping genes are enriched with GO terms related to essential biological functions. Comparisons of structural genomic features between tissue-specific genes and housekeeping genes show that housekeeping genes are more compact. Specifically, coding sequence and particularly introns are shorter than genes that display more variation in expression between tissues, and in addition intergenic space was also shorter. Meanwhile, housekeeping genes are more likely to co-localize with other abundantly or highly expressed genes on the same chromosomal regions. Furthermore, comparisons of gene expression in a panel of five common tissues between birds, mammals and amphibians showed that the expression patterns across tissues are highly similar for orthologous genes compared to random gene pairs within each pair-wise comparison, indicating a high degree of functional conservation in gene expression among terrestrial vertebrates. CONCLUSIONS: The housekeeping genes identified in this study have shorter gene length, shorter coding sequence length, shorter introns, and shorter intergenic regions, there seems

  12. Analysis of Heritability and Shared Heritability Based on Genome-Wide Association Studies for 13 Cancer Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, William A.; Yeager, Meredith; Panagiotou, Orestis; Wang, Zhaoming; Berndt, Sonja I.; Lan, Qing; Abnet, Christian C.; Amundadottir, Laufey T.; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Mirabello, Lisa; Savage, Sharon A.; Taylor, Philip R.; Vivo, Immaculata De; McGlynn, Katherine A.; Purdue, Mark P.; Rajaraman, Preetha; Adami, Hans-Olov; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Amary, Maria Fernanda; An, She-Juan; Andersson, Ulrika; Andriole, Gerald; Andrulis, Irene L.; Angelucci, Emanuele; Ansell, Stephen M.; Arici, Cecilia; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Arslan, Alan A.; Austin, Melissa A.; Baris, Dalsu; Barkauskas, Donald A.; Bassig, Bryan A.; Becker, Nikolaus; Benavente, Yolanda; Benhamou, Simone; Berg, Christine; Van Den Berg, David; Bernstein, Leslie; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Birmann, Brenda M.; Black, Amanda; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M.; Brinton, Louise; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Burdett, Laurie; Buring, Julie; Butler, Mary Ann; Cai, Qiuyin; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Carrato, Alfredo; Carreon, Tania; Carta, Angela; Chan, John K. C.; Chang, Ellen T.; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, I-Shou; Chang, Jiang; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Chu; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Constance; Chen, Hongyan; Chen, Kexin; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Chen, Ying; Chen, Ying-Hsiang; Chen, Yi-Song; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chien, Li-Hsin; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Choi, Jin Eun; Choi, Yi Young; Chow, Wong-Ho; Chung, Charles C.; Clavel, Jacqueline; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Cocco, Pierluigi; Colt, Joanne S.; Comperat, Eva; Conde, Lucia; Connors, Joseph M.; Conti, David; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Cotterchio, Michelle; Cozen, Wendy; Crouch, Simon; Crous-Bou, Marta; Cussenot, Olivier; Davis, Faith G.; Ding, Ti; Diver, W. Ryan; Dorronsoro, Miren; Dossus, Laure; Duell, Eric J.; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Erickson, Ralph L.; Feychting, Maria; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Foretova, Lenka; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Freedman, Neal D.; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Fuchs, Charles; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; García-Closas, Reina; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giffen, Carol; Giles, Graham G.; Giovannucci, Edward; Glimelius, Bengt; Goggins, Michael; Gokgoz, Nalan; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Gorlick, Richard; Gross, Myron; Grubb, Robert; Gu, Jian; Guan, Peng; Gunter, Marc; Guo, Huan; Habermann, Thomas M.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Halai, Dina; Hallmans, Goran; Hassan, Manal; Hattinger, Claudia; He, Qincheng; He, Xingzhou; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Henderson, Brian; Henriksson, Roger; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Hohensee, Chancellor; Holford, Theodore R.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N.; Horn-Ross, Pamela L.; Hosain, G. M. Monawar; Hosgood, H. Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hu, Zhibin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Huerta, Jose-Maria; Hung, Jen-Yu; Hutchinson, Amy; Inskip, Peter D.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Jacobs, Eric J.; Jenab, Mazda; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Ji, Bu-Tian; Jin, Guangfu; Jin, Li; Johansen, Christoffer; Johnson, Alison; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kaaks, Rudolph; Kamineni, Aruna; Kane, Eleanor; Kang, Chang Hyun; Karagas, Margaret R.; Kelly, Rachel S.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Christopher; Kim, Hee Nam; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Jun Suk; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Kim, Young-Chul; Kitahara, Cari M.; Klein, Alison P.; Klein, Robert J.; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kohno, Takashi; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kricker, Anne; Krogh, Vittorio; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kurtz, Robert C.; Kweon, Sun-Seog; LaCroix, Andrea; Lawrence, Charles; Lecanda, Fernando; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Li, Donghui; Li, Haixin; Li, Jihua; Li, Yao-Jen; Li, Yuqing; Liao, Linda M.; Liebow, Mark; Lightfoot, Tracy; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lin, Chien-Chung; Lin, Dongxin; Lindstrom, Sara; Linet, Martha S.; Link, Brian K.; Liu, Chenwei; Liu, Jianjun; Liu, Li; Ljungberg, Börje; Lloreta, Josep; Lollo, Simonetta Di; Lu, Daru; Lund, Eiluv; Malats, Nuria; Mannisto, Satu; Marchand, Loic Le; Marina, Neyssa; Masala, Giovanna; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Matsuo, Keitaro; Maynadie, Marc; McKay, James; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Melbye, Mads; Melin, Beatrice S.; Michaud, Dominique S.; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Monnereau, Alain; Montalvan, Rebecca; Moore, Lee E.; Mortensen, Lotte Maxild; Nieters, Alexandra; North, Kari E.; Novak, Anne J.; Oberg, Ann L.; Offit, Kenneth; Oh, In-Jae; Olson, Sara H.; Palli, Domenico; Pao, William; Park, In Kyu; Park, Jae Yong; Park, Kyong Hwa; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Pavanello, Sofia; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Perng, Reury-Perng; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M.; Picci, Piero; Pike, Malcolm C.; Porru, Stefano; Prescott, Jennifer; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Qian, Biyun; Qiao, You-Lin; Rais, Marco; Riboli, Elio; Riby, Jacques; Risch, Harvey A.; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Rodabough, Rebecca; Roman, Eve; Roupret, Morgan; Ruder, Avima M.; de Sanjose, Silvia; Scelo, Ghislaine; Schned, Alan; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schwartz, Kendra; Schwenn, Molly; Scotlandi, Katia; Seow, Adeline; Serra, Consol; Serra, Massimo; Sesso, Howard D.; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Severi, Gianluca; Severson, Richard K.; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Wei; Shin, Min-Ho; Shiraishi, Kouya; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Siddiq, Afshan; Sierrasesúmaga, Luis; Sihoe, Alan Dart Loon; Skibola, Christine F.; Smith, Alex; Smith, Martyn T.; Southey, Melissa C.; Spinelli, John J.; Staines, Anthony; Stampfer, Meir; Stern, Marianna C.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S.; Su, Jian; Su, Wu-Chou; Sund, Malin; Sung, Jae Sook; Sung, Sook Whan; Tan, Wen; Tang, Wei; Tardón, Adonina; Thomas, David; Thompson, Carrie A.; Tinker, Lesley F.; Tirabosco, Roberto; Tjønneland, Anne; Travis, Ruth C.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Tucker, Margaret; Turner, Jenny; Vajdic, Claire M.; Vermeulen, Roel C. H.; Villano, Danylo J.; Vineis, Paolo; Virtamo, Jarmo; Visvanathan, Kala; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wang, Chaoyu; Wang, Chih-Liang; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wang, Junwen; Wei, Fusheng; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weiner, George J.; Weinstein, Stephanie; Wentzensen, Nicolas; White, Emily; Witzig, Thomas E.; Wolpin, Brian M.; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Chen; Wu, Guoping; Wu, Junjie; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Wei; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Yi-Long; Wunder, Jay S.; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Xu, Jun; Xu, Ping; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Ye, Yuanqing; Yin, Zhihua; Yokota, Jun; Yoon, Ho-Il; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yu, Herbert; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zelenetz, Andrew; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Zhang, Yawei; Zhao, Xueying; Zhao, Zhenhong; Zheng, Hong; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Zhu, Meng; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Boca, Simina M.; Cerhan, James R.; Ferri, Giovanni M.; Hartge, Patricia; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Magnani, Corrado; Miligi, Lucia; Morton, Lindsay M.; Smedby, Karin E.; Teras, Lauren R.; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Sophia S.; Brennan, Paul; Caporaso, Neil E.; Hunter, David J.; Kraft, Peter; Rothman, Nathaniel; Silverman, Debra T.; Slager, Susan L.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Studies of related individuals have consistently demonstrated notable familial aggregation of cancer. We aim to estimate the heritability and genetic correlation attributable to the additive effects of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for cancer at 13 anatomical sites. Methods: Between 2007 and 2014, the US National Cancer Institute has generated data from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for 49 492 cancer case patients and 34 131 control patients. We apply novel mixed model methodology (GCTA) to this GWAS data to estimate the heritability of individual cancers, as well as the proportion of heritability attributable to cigarette smoking in smoking-related cancers, and the genetic correlation between pairs of cancers. Results: GWAS heritability was statistically significant at nearly all sites, with the estimates of array-based heritability, hl 2, on the liability threshold (LT) scale ranging from 0.05 to 0.38. Estimating the combined heritability of multiple smoking characteristics, we calculate that at least 24% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 14% to 37%) and 7% (95% CI = 4% to 11%) of the heritability for lung and bladder cancer, respectively, can be attributed to genetic determinants of smoking. Most pairs of cancers studied did not show evidence of strong genetic correlation. We found only four pairs of cancers with marginally statistically significant correlations, specifically kidney and testes (ρ = 0.73, SE = 0.28), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and pediatric osteosarcoma (ρ = 0.53, SE = 0.21), DLBCL and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) (ρ = 0.51, SE =0.18), and bladder and lung (ρ = 0.35, SE = 0.14). Correlation analysis also indicates that the genetic architecture of lung cancer differs between a smoking population of European ancestry and a nonsmoking Asian population, allowing for the possibility that the genetic etiology for the same disease can vary by population and environmental exposures. Conclusion: Our

  13. Influence of Feature Encoding and Choice of Classifier on Disease Risk Prediction in Genome-Wide Association Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Mittag

    Full Text Available Various attempts have been made to predict the individual disease risk based on genotype data from genome-wide association studies (GWAS. However, most studies only investigated one or two classification algorithms and feature encoding schemes. In this study, we applied seven different classification algorithms on GWAS case-control data sets for seven different diseases to create models for disease risk prediction. Further, we used three different encoding schemes for the genotypes of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and investigated their influence on the predictive performance of these models. Our study suggests that an additive encoding of the SNP data should be the preferred encoding scheme, as it proved to yield the best predictive performances for all algorithms and data sets. Furthermore, our results showed that the differences between most state-of-the-art classification algorithms are not statistically significant. Consequently, we recommend to prefer algorithms with simple models like the linear support vector machine (SVM as they allow for better subsequent interpretation without significant loss of accuracy.

  14. Parents Sharing Books with Young Deaf Children in Spoken English and in BSL: The Common and Diverse Features of Different Language Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanwick, Ruth; Watson, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Twelve parents of young deaf children were recorded sharing books with their deaf child--six from families using British Sign Language (BSL) and six from families using spoken English. Although all families were engaged in sharing books with their deaf child and concerned to promote literacy development, they approached the task differently and…

  15. Genome-wide Meta-analyses of Breast, Ovarian and Prostate Cancer Association Studies Identify Multiple New Susceptibility Loci Shared by At Least Two Cancer Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Siddhartha P.; Beesley, Jonathan; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan; Kote-Jarai, ZSofia; Lawrenson, Kate; Lindstrom, Sara; Ramus, Susan J.; Thompson, Deborah J.; Kibel, Adam S.; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Michael, Agnieszka; Dieffenbach, Aida K.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wolk, Alicja; Monteiro, Alvaro; Peixoto, Ana; Kierzek, Andrzej; Cox, Angela; Rudolph, Anja; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Wu, Anna H.; Lindblom, Annika; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ekici, Arif B.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Blomqvist, Carl; Phelan, Catherine; McLean, Catriona; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Vachon, Celine; Cybulski, Cezary; Slavov, Chavdar; Stegmaier, Christa; Maier, Christiane; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Høgdall, Claus K.; Teerlink, Craig C.; Kang, Daehee; Tessier, Daniel C.; Schaid, Daniel J.; Stram, Daniel O.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Neal, David E.; Eccles, Diana; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Velez Edwards, Digna R.; Wokozorczyk, Dominika; Levine, Douglas A.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Goode, Ellen L.; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Høgdall, Estrid; Song, Fengju; Bruinsma, Fiona; Heitz, Florian; Modugno, Francesmary; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Giles, Graham G.; Olsson, Håkan; Wildiers, Hans; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Pandha, Hardev; Risch, Harvey A.; Darabi, Hatef; Salvesen, Helga B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Gronberg, Henrik; Brenner, Hermann; Brauch, Hiltrud; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Song, Honglin; Lim, Hui-Yi; McNeish, Iain; Campbell, Ian; Vergote, Ignace; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubiński, Jan; Stanford, Janet L.; Benítez, Javier; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Permuth, Jennifer B.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Donovan, Jenny L.; Dennis, Joe; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Schleutker, Johanna; Hopper, John L.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Park, Jong Y.; Figueroa, Jonine; Clements, Judith A.; Knight, Julia A.; Peto, Julian; Cunningham, Julie M.; Pow-Sang, Julio; Batra, Jyotsna; Czene, Kamila; Lu, Karen H.; Herkommer, Kathleen; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Matsuo, Keitaro; Muir, Kenneth; Offitt, Kenneth; Chen, Kexin; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Odunsi, Kunle; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Fitzgerald, Liesel M.; Cook, Linda S.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Hooning, Maartje J.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Luedeke, Manuel; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Goodman, Marc T.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Riggan, Marjorie; Aly, Markus; Rossing, Mary Anne; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Moisse, Matthieu; Sanderson, Maureen; Southey, Melissa C.; Jones, Michael; Lush, Michael; Hildebrandt, Michelle A. T.; Hou, Ming-Feng; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Bogdanova, Natalia; Rahman, Nazneen; Le, Nhu D.; Orr, Nick; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Pashayan, Nora; Peterlongo, Paolo; Guénel, Pascal; Brennan, Paul; Paulo, Paula; Webb, Penelope M.; Broberg, Per; Fasching, Peter A.; Devilee, Peter; Wang, Qin; Cai, Qiuyin; Li, Qiyuan; Kaneva, Radka; Butzow, Ralf; Kopperud, Reidun Kristin; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Stephenson, Robert A.; MacInnis, Robert J.; Hoover, Robert N.; Winqvist, Robert; Ness, Roberta; Milne, Roger L.; Travis, Ruth C.; Benlloch, Sara; Olson, Sara H.; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Maia, Sofia; Berndt, Sonja; Lee, Soo Chin; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Kjær, Susanne Krüger; Pejovic, Tanja; Tammela, Teuvo L.J.; Dörk, Thilo; Brüning, Thomas; Wahlfors, Tiina; Key, Tim J.; Edwards, Todd L.; Menon, Usha; Hamann, Ute; Mitev, Vanio; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Kristensen, Vessela; Arndt, Volker; Vogel, Walther; Zheng, Wei; Sieh, Weiva; Blot, William J.; Kluzniak, Wojciech; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Gao, Yu-Tang; Schumacher, Fredrick; Freedman, Matthew L.; Berchuck, Andrew; Dunning, Alison M.; Simard, Jacques; Haiman, Christopher A.; Spurdle, Amanda; Sellers, Thomas A.; Hunter, David J.; Henderson, Brian E.; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Hall, Per; Gayther, Simon A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Eeles, Rosalind; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Lambrechts, Diether

    2016-01-01

    Breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers are hormone-related and may have a shared genetic basis but this has not been investigated systematically by genome-wide association (GWA) studies. Meta-analyses combining the largest GWA meta-analysis data sets for these cancers totaling 112,349 cases and 116,421 controls of European ancestry, all together and in pairs, identified at P < 10−8 seven new cross-cancer loci: three associated with susceptibility to all three cancers (rs17041869/2q13/BCL2L11; rs7937840/11q12/INCENP; rs1469713/19p13/GATAD2A), two breast and ovarian cancer risk loci (rs200182588/9q31/SMC2; rs8037137/15q26/RCCD1), and two breast and prostate cancer risk loci (rs5013329/1p34/NSUN4; rs9375701/6q23/L3MBTL3). Index variants in five additional regions previously associated with only one cancer also showed clear association with a second cancer type. Cell-type specific expression quantitative trait locus and enhancer-gene interaction annotations suggested target genes with potential cross-cancer roles at the new loci. Pathway analysis revealed significant enrichment of death receptor signaling genes near loci with P < 10−5 in the three-cancer meta-analysis. PMID:27432226

  16. Genome Analysis of a Zygomycete Fungus Choanephora cucurbitarum Elucidates Necrotrophic Features Including Bacterial Genes Related to Plant Colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Byoungnam; Park, Ji-Hyun; Park, Hongjae; Shin, Hyeon-Dong; Choi, In-Geol

    2017-01-01

    A zygomycete fungus, Choanephora cucurbitarum is a plant pathogen that causes blossom rot in cucurbits and other plants. Here we report the genome sequence of Choanephora cucurbitarum KUS-F28377 isolated from squash. The assembled genome has a size of 29.1 Mbp and 11,977 protein-coding genes. The genome analysis indicated that C. cucurbitarum may employ a plant pathogenic mechanism similar to that of bacterial plant pathogens. The genome contained 11 genes with a Streptomyces subtilisin inhibitor-like domain, which plays an important role in the defense against plant immunity. This domain has been found only in bacterial genomes. Carbohydrate active enzyme analysis detected 312 CAZymes in this genome where carbohydrate esterase family 6, rarely found in dikaryotic fungal genomes, was comparatively enriched. The comparative genome analysis showed that the genes related to sexual communication such as the biosynthesis of β-carotene and trisporic acid were conserved and diverged during the evolution of zygomycete genomes. Overall, these findings will help us to understand how zygomycetes are associated with plants. PMID:28091548

  17. Fine-structured multi-scaling long-range correlations in completely sequenced genomes - features, origin and classification.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); M. Göcker; R. Lohner (Rudolf); A. Abuseiris (Anis); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe sequential organization of genomes, i.e. the relations between distant base pairs and regions within sequences, and its connection to the three-dimensional organization of genomes is still a largely unresolved problem. Long-range power-law correlations were found using correlation

  18. Fine-structured multi-scaling long-range correlations in completely sequenced genomes - features, origin and classification.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); M. Göcker; R. Lohner (Rudolf); A. Abuseiris (Anis); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe sequential organization of genomes, i.e. the relations between distant base pairs and regions within sequences, and its connection to the three-dimensional organization of genomes is still a largely unresolved problem. Long-range power-law correlations were found using correlation an

  19. Exploring metabolic pathway reconstruction and genome-wide expression profiling in Lactobacillus reuteri to define functional probiotic features.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saulnier, D.M.; Santos, F.; Roos, S.; Mistretta, T.A.; Spinler, J.K.; Molenaar, D.; Teusink, B.; Versalovic, J.

    2011-01-01

    The genomes of four Lactobacillus reuteri strains isolated from human breast milk and the gastrointestinal tract have been recently sequenced as part of the Human Microbiome Project. Preliminary genome comparisons suggested that these strains belong to two different clades, previously shown to diffe

  20. Exploring Metabolic Pathway Reconstruction and Genome-Wide Expression Profiling in Lactobacillus reuteri to Define Functional Probiotic Features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saulnier, D.M.; santos, F.; Roos, S.; Mistretta, T.-A.; Spinler, J.K.; Molenaar, D.; Teusink, B.; Versalovic, J.

    2011-01-01

    The genomes of four Lactobacillus reuteri strains isolated from human breast milk and the gastrointestinal tract have been recently sequenced as part of the Human Microbiome Project. Preliminary genome comparisons suggested that these strains belong to two different clades, previously shown to diffe

  1. Analysis of genome-wide association studies of Alzheimer disease and of Parkinson disease to determine if these 2 diseases share a common genetic risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskvina, Valentina; Harold, Denise; Russo, GianCarlo; Vedernikov, Alexey; Sharma, Manu; Saad, Mohamed; Holmans, Peter; Bras, Jose M; Bettella, Francesco; Keller, Margaux F; Nicolaou, Nayia; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Gibbs, J Raphael; Schulte, Claudia; Durr, Alexandra; Guerreiro, Rita; Hernandez, Dena; Brice, Alexis; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Majamaa, Kari; Gasser, Thomas; Heutink, Peter; Wood, Nick; Martinez, Maria; Singleton, Andrew B; Nalls, Michael A; Hardy, John; Owen, Michael J; O'Donovan, Michael C; Williams, Julie; Morris, Huw R; Williams, Nigel M

    2013-10-01

    Despite Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson disease (PD) being clinically distinct entities, there is a possibility of a pathological overlap, with some genome-wide association (GWA) studies suggesting that the 2 diseases represent a biological continuum. The application of GWA studies to idiopathic forms of AD and PD have identified a number of loci that contain genetic variants that increase the risk of these disorders. To assess the genetic overlap between PD and AD by testing for the presence of potentially pleiotropic loci in 2 recent GWA studies of PD and AD. Combined GWA analysis. Data sets from the United Kingdom, Germany, France, and the United States. Thousands of patients with AD or PD and their controls. Meta-analysis of GWA studies of AD and PD. To identify evidence for potentially pleiotropic alleles that increased the risk for both PD and AD, we performed a combined PD-AD meta-analysis and compared the results with those obtained in the primary GWA studies.We also tested for a net effect of potentially polygenic alleles that were shared by both disorders by performing a polygenic score analysis. Finally, we also performed a gene-based association analysis that was aimed at detecting genes that harbor multiple disease-causing single-nucleotide polymorphisms, some of which confer a risk of PD and some a risk of AD. Detailed interrogation of the single-nucleotide polymorphism, polygenic, and gene-based analyses resulted in no significant evidence that supported the presence of loci that increase the risk of both PD and AD. Our findings therefore imply that loci that increase the risk of both PD and AD are not widespread and that the pathological overlap could instead be “downstream” of the primary susceptibility genes that increase the risk of each disease.

  2. TU-CD-BRB-07: Identification of Associations Between Radiologist-Annotated Imaging Features and Genomic Alterations in Breast Invasive Carcinoma, a TCGA Phenotype Research Group Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, A; Net, J [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Brandt, K [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Huang, E [National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States); Freymann, J; Kirby, J [Leidos Biomedical Research Inc., Frederick, MD (United States); Burnside, E [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Morris, E; Sutton, E [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Bonaccio, E [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Giger, M; Jaffe, C [Univ Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Ganott, M; Zuley, M [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center - Magee Womens Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Le-Petross, H [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dogan, B [UT MDACC, Houston, TX (United States); Whitman, G [UTMDACC, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine associations between radiologist-annotated MRI features and genomic measurements in breast invasive carcinoma (BRCA) from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Methods: 98 TCGA patients with BRCA were assessed by a panel of radiologists (TCGA Breast Phenotype Research Group) based on a variety of mass and non-mass features according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS). Batch corrected gene expression data was obtained from the TCGA Data Portal. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to assess correlations between categorical image features and tumor-derived genomic features (such as gene pathway activity, copy number and mutation characteristics). Image-derived features were also correlated with estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu) status. Multiple hypothesis correction was done using Benjamini-Hochberg FDR. Associations at an FDR of 0.1 were selected for interpretation. Results: ER status was associated with rim enhancement and peritumoral edema. PR status was associated with internal enhancement. Several components of the PI3K/Akt pathway were associated with rim enhancement as well as heterogeneity. In addition, several components of cell cycle regulation and cell division were associated with imaging characteristics.TP53 and GATA3 mutations were associated with lesion size. MRI features associated with TP53 mutation status were rim enhancement and peritumoral edema. Rim enhancement was associated with activity of RB1, PIK3R1, MAP3K1, AKT1,PI3K, and PIK3CA. Margin status was associated with HIF1A/ARNT, Ras/ GTP/PI3K, KRAS, and GADD45A. Axillary lymphadenopathy was associated with RB1 and BCL2L1. Peritumoral edema was associated with Aurora A/GADD45A, BCL2L1, CCNE1, and FOXA1. Heterogeneous internal nonmass enhancement was associated with EGFR, PI3K, AKT1, HF/MET, and EGFR/Erbb4/neuregulin 1. Diffuse nonmass enhancement was associated with HGF/MET/MUC20/SHIP

  3. Obligate Biotrophy Features Unraveled by the Genomic Analysis of the Rust Fungi, Melampsora larici-populina and Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duplessis, Sebastien; Cuomo, Christina A.; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Aerts, Andrea; Tisserant, Emilie; Veneault-Fourrey, Claire; Joly, David L.; Hacquard, Stephane; Amselem, Joelle; Cantarel, Brandi; Chiu, Readman; Couthinho, Pedro; Feau, Nicolas; Field, Matthew; Frey, Pascal; Gelhaye, Eric; Goldberg, Jonathan; Grabherr, Manfred; Kodira, Chinnappa; Kohler, Annegret; Kues, Ursula; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Mago, Rohit; Mauceli, Evan; Morin, Emmanuelle; Murat, Claude; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Park, Robert; Pearson, Matthew; Quesneville, Hadi; Rouhier, Nicolas; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Salamov, Asaf A.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Selles, Benjamin; Shapiro, Harris; Tangay, Philippe; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Peer, Yves Van de; Henrissat, Bernard; Rouze, Pierre; Ellis, Jeffrey G.; Dodds, Peter N.; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Zhong, Shaobin; Hamelin, Richard C.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Szabo, Les J.; Martin1, Francis

    2011-04-27

    Rust fungi are some of the most devastating pathogens of crop plants. They are obligate biotrophs, which extract nutrients only from living plant tissues and cannot grow apart from their hosts. Their lifestyle has slowed the dissection of molecular mechanisms underlying host invasion and avoidance or suppression of plant innate immunity. We sequenced the 101 mega base pair genome of Melampsora larici-populina, the causal agent of poplar leaf rust, and the 89 mega base pair genome of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat and barley stem rust. We then compared the 16,841 predicted proteins of M. larici-populina to the 18,241 predicted proteins of P. graminis f. sp tritici. Genomic features related to their obligate biotrophic life-style include expanded lineage-specific gene families, a large repertoire of effector-like small secreted proteins (SSPs), impaired nitrogen and sulfur assimilation pathways, and expanded families of amino-acid, oligopeptide and hexose membrane transporters. The dramatic upregulation of transcripts coding for SSPs, secreted hydrolytic enzymes, and transporters in planta suggests that they play a role in host infection and nutrient acquisition. Some of these genomic hallmarks are mirrored in the genomes of other microbial eukaryotes that have independently evolved to infect plants, indicating convergent adaptation to a biotrophic existence inside plant cells

  4. Reassessment of the succession of lactic acid bacteria in commercial cucumber fermentations and physiological and genomic features associated with their dominance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Díaz, I M; Hayes, J; Medina, E; Anekella, K; Daughtry, K; Dieck, S; Levi, M; Price, R; Butz, N; Lu, Z; Azcarate-Peril, M A

    2017-05-01

    A compositional re-assessment of the microbiota present in commercial cucumber fermentation using culture independent and dependent methods was conducted, with emphasis on lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Two commercial cucumber fermentation tanks were monitored by measuring pH, dissolved oxygen and temperature, and used as sources of samples for microbial plating, genomic DNA extraction and measurement of organic acids and carbohydrates by HPLC. Six additional commercial tanks were included to identify the dominant microorganisms using molecular methods. A comparative analysis of the publically available genome sequences corresponding to the LAB found in cucumber fermentations was completed to gain an understanding of genomic features possibly enabling dominance. Analyses of the microbiota suggest Lactobacillales prevail in cucumber fermentations, including in order of prevalence Lactobacillus pentosus, Lb. plantarum, Lb. brevis, Weissella spp., Pediococcus ethanolidurans, Leuconostoc spp. and Lactococcus spp. It was observed that Lb. pentosus and Lb. plantarum have comparatively larger genomes, higher gene counts, uniquely distribute the ribosomal clusters across the genome as opposed to close to the origin of replication, and possess more predicted amino acids prototrophies and selected biosynthesis related genes. It is theorized that Lb. pentosus and Lb. plantarum dominance in cucumber fermentations is the result of their genetic make-up. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. IMG-ABC: new features for bacterial secondary metabolism analysis and targeted biosynthetic gene cluster discovery in thousands of microbial genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjithomas, Michalis; Chen, I-Min A.; Chu, Ken; Huang, Jinghua; Ratner, Anna; Palaniappan, Krishna; Andersen, Evan; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Ivanova, Natalia N.

    2017-01-01

    Secondary metabolites produced by microbes have diverse biological functions, which makes them a great potential source of biotechnologically relevant compounds with antimicrobial, anti-cancer and other activities. The proteins needed to synthesize these natural products are often encoded by clusters of co-located genes called biosynthetic gene clusters (BCs). In order to advance the exploration of microbial secondary metabolism, we developed the largest publically available database of experimentally verified and predicted BCs, the Integrated Microbial Genomes Atlas of Biosynthetic gene Clusters (IMG-ABC) (https://img.jgi.doe.gov/abc/). Here, we describe an update of IMG-ABC, which includes ClusterScout, a tool for targeted identification of custom biosynthetic gene clusters across 40 000 isolate microbial genomes, and a new search capability to query more than 700 000 BCs from isolate genomes for clusters with similar Pfam composition. Additional features enable fast exploration and analysis of BCs through two new interactive visualization features, a BC function heatmap and a BC similarity network graph. These new tools and features add to the value of IMG-ABC's vast body of BC data, facilitating their in-depth analysis and accelerating secondary metabolite discovery. PMID:27903896

  6. Shared lives, shared energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, P.; Goss, K.

    1982-07-01

    A social experiment in Denmark is described in which 25 families combine private ownership (each family owns its own home) and collectivism (each family owns 1/25 of the grounds, large common house and other facilities). The superinsulated individual homes are small (< 1000 ft/sup 2/) but the common house (7800 ft/sup 2/) provides dining and meeting facilities for all 25 families as well as a central heating plant. Heat may be supplied from solar, wind and/or oil-fired boiler. Adequate hot water storage is provided using solar collectors and a 55 kW Vesta wind generator (surplus power is sold). All south facing roof surfaces are fitted with solar collectors (4455 ft/sup 2/ total). A total of 70% of the energy used is produced on site (solar and wind). The manner of living and sharing (child care, automobiles, cooking, etc.) is described as well as typical floor plans for the units. Other collective housing in Denmark is described and it is postulated that overdrevet may serve as a model. (MJJ)

  7. Chromatin extrusion explains key features of loop and domain formation in wild-type and engineered genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanborn, Adrian; Rao, Suhas; Huang, Su-Chen; Durand, Neva; Huntley, Miriam; Jewett, Andrew; Bochkov, Ivan; Chinnappan, Dharmaraj; Cutkosky, Ashok; Li, Jian; Geeting, Kristopher; McKenna, Doug; Stamenova, Elena; Gnirke, Andreas; Melnikov, Alexandre; Lander, Eric; Aiden, Erez

    Our recent kilobase-resolution genome-wide maps of DNA self-contacts demonstrated that mammalian genomes are organized into domains and loops demarcated by the DNA-binding protein CTCF. Here, we combine these maps with new Hi-C, microscopy, and genome-editing experiments to study the physical structure of chromatin fibers, domains, and loops. We find that domains are inconsistent with equilibrium and fractal models. Instead, we use physical simulations to study two models of genome folding. In one, intermonomer attraction during condensation leads to formation of an anisotropic ``tension globule.'' In the other, CTCF and cohesin act together to extrude unknotted loops. Both models are consistent with the observed domains and loops. However, the extrusion model explains a far wider array of observations, such as why the CTCF-binding motifs at pairs of loop anchors lie in the convergent orientation. Finally, we perform 13 genome-editing experiments examining the effect of altering CTCF-binding sites on chromatin folding. The extrusion model predicts in silico the experimental maps using only CTCF-binding sites. Thus, we show that it is possible to disrupt, restore, and move loops and domains using targeted mutations as small as a single base pair.

  8. Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marton, Attila; Constantiou, Ioanna; Thoma, Antonela

    De spite the hype the notion of the sharing economy is surrounded by, our understanding of sharing is surprisingly undertheorized. In this paper, we make a first step towards rem edying this state of affairs by analy sing sharing as a s ocial practice. Based on a multi ple - case study, we analyse...... the institutional assemblage of sharing on online platforms to counter the prevalent assumpti o n i n the literature that sharing derives primarily from the shareability of goods and resources. Sharing, we contend, is a fundament al human practice that, in our case study, takes the particular form of coord inated...

  9. K-mer Content, Correlation, and Position Analysis of Genome DNA Sequences for the Identification of Function and Evolutionary Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievers, Aaron; Bosiek, Katharina; Bisch, Marc; Dreessen, Chris; Riedel, Jascha; Froß, Patrick; Hausmann, Michael; Hildenbrand, Georg

    2017-04-19

    In genome analysis, k-mer-based comparison methods have become standard tools. However, even though they are able to deliver reliable results, other algorithms seem to work better in some cases. To improve k-mer-based DNA sequence analysis and comparison, we successfully checked whether adding positional resolution is beneficial for finding and/or comparing interesting organizational structures. A simple but efficient algorithm for extracting and saving local k-mer spectra (frequency distribution of k-mers) was developed and used. The results were analyzed by including positional information based on visualizations as genomic maps and by applying basic vector correlation methods. This analysis was concentrated on small word lengths (1 ≤ k ≤ 4) on relatively small viral genomes of Papillomaviridae and Herpesviridae, while also checking its usability for larger sequences, namely human chromosome 2 and the homologous chromosomes (2A, 2B) of a chimpanzee. Using this alignment-free analysis, several regions with specific characteristics in Papillomaviridae and Herpesviridae formerly identified by independent, mostly alignment-based methods, were confirmed. Correlations between the k-mer content and several genes in these genomes have been found, showing similarities between classified and unclassified viruses, which may be potentially useful for further taxonomic research. Furthermore, unknown k-mer correlations in the genomes of Human Herpesviruses (HHVs), which are probably of major biological function, are found and described. Using the chromosomes of a chimpanzee and human that are currently known, identities between the species on every analyzed chromosome were reproduced. This demonstrates the feasibility of our approach for large data sets of complex genomes. Based on these results, we suggest k-mer analysis with positional resolution as a method for closing a gap between the effectiveness of alignment-based methods (like NCBI BLAST) and the high pace of

  10. Comparative genomic analysis identifies divergent genomic features of pathogenic Enterococcus cecorum including a type IC CRISPR-Cas system, a capsule locus, an epa-like locus, and putative host tissue binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borst, Luke B; Suyemoto, M Mitsu; Scholl, Elizabeth H; Fuller, Fredrick J; Barnes, H John

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus cecorum (EC) is the dominant enteric commensal of adult chickens and contributes to the gut consortia of many avian and mammalian species. While EC infection is an uncommon zoonosis, like other enterococcal species it can cause life-threating nosocomial infection in people. In contrast to other enterococci which are considered opportunistic pathogens, emerging pathogenic strains of EC cause outbreaks of musculoskeletal disease in broiler chickens. Typical morbidity and mortality is comparable to other important infectious diseases of poultry. In molecular epidemiologic studies, pathogenic EC strains were found to be genetically clonal. These findings suggested acquisition of specific virulence determinants by pathogenic EC. To identify divergent genomic features and acquired virulence determinants in pathogenic EC; comparative genomic analysis was performed on genomes of 3 pathogenic and 3 commensal strains of EC. Pathogenic isolates had smaller genomes with a higher GC content, and they demonstrated large regions of synteny compared to commensal isolates. A molecular phylogenetic analysis demonstrated sequence divergence in pathogenic EC genomes. At a threshold of 98% identity, 414 predicted proteins were identified that were highly conserved in pathogenic EC but not in commensal EC. Among these, divergent CRISPR-cas defense loci were observed. In commensal EC, the type IIA arrangement typical for enterococci was present; however, pathogenic EC had a type IC locus, which is novel in enterococci but commonly observed in streptococci. Potential mediators of virulence identified in this analysis included a polysaccharide capsular locus similar to that recently described for E. faecium, an epa-like locus, and cell wall associated proteins which may bind host extracellular matrix. This analysis identified specific genomic regions, coding sequences, and predicted proteins which may be related to the divergent evolution and increased virulence of emerging

  11. Genome-wide epigenetic analysis delineates a biologically distinct immature acute leukemia with myeloid/T-lymphoid features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E. Figueroa (Maria Eugenia); B.J. Wouters (Bas); L. Skrabanek (Lucy); J. Glass (Jacob); Y. Li (Yushan); C.A.J. Erpelinck (Claudia); A.W. Langerak (Anton); B. Löwenberg (Bob); M. Fazzari (Melissa); J.M. Greally (John); P.J.M. Valk (Peter); A. Melnick (Ari); H.R. Delwel (Ruud)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAcute myeloid leukemia is a heterogeneous disease from the molecular and biologic standpoints, and even patients with a specific gene expression profile may present clinical and molecular heterogeneity. We studied the epigenetic profiles of a cohort of patients who shared a common gene

  12. Genome-wide epigenetic analysis delineates a biologically distinct immature acute leukemia with myeloid/T-lymphoid features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E. Figueroa (Maria Eugenia); B.J. Wouters (Bas); L. Skrabanek (Lucy); J. Glass (Jacob); Y. Li (Yushan); C.A.J. Erpelinck (Claudia); A.W. Langerak (Anton); B. Löwenberg (Bob); M. Fazzari (Melissa); J.M. Greally (John); P.J.M. Valk (Peter); A. Melnick (Ari); H.R. Delwel (Ruud)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAcute myeloid leukemia is a heterogeneous disease from the molecular and biologic standpoints, and even patients with a specific gene expression profile may present clinical and molecular heterogeneity. We studied the epigenetic profiles of a cohort of patients who shared a common gene e

  13. Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marton, Attila; Constantiou, Ioanna; Thoma, Antonela

    De spite the hype the notion of the sharing economy is surrounded by, our understanding of sharing is surprisingly undertheorized. In this paper, we make a first step towards rem edying this state of affairs by analy sing sharing as a s ocial practice. Based on a multi ple - case study, we analyse...

  14. Single-cell genomics reveals features of a Colwellia species that was dominant during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia eMason

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available During the Deepwater Horizon (DWH oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico a deep-sea hydrocarbon plume developed resulting in a rapid succession of bacteria. Colwellia eventually supplanted Oceanospirillales, which dominated the plume early in the spill. These successional changes may have resulted, in part, from the changing composition and abundance of hydrocarbons over time. Colwellia abundance peaked when gaseous and simple aromatic hydrocarbons increased, yet the metabolic pathway used by Colwellia in hydrocarbon disposition is unknown. Here we used single-cell genomics to gain insights into the genome properties of a Colwellia enriched during the DWH deep-sea plume. A single amplified genome (SAG of a Colwellia cell isolated from a DWH plume, closely related (avg. 98% 16S rRNA gene similarity to other plume Colwellia, was sequenced and annotated. The SAG was similar to the sequenced isolate Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H (84% avg. nucleotide identity. Both had genes for denitrification, chemotaxis and motility, adaptations to cold environments, and a suite of nutrient acquisition genes. The Colwellia SAG may be capable of gaseous and aromatic hydrocarbon degradation, which contrasts with a DWH plume Oceanospirillales SAG genome which encoded non-gaseous n-alkane and cycloalkane degradation. The disparate hydrocarbon degradation pathways are consistent with hydrocarbons that were abundant at different times in the deep-sea plume; first, non-gaseous n-alkanes and cycloalkanes that could be degraded by Oceanospirillales, followed by gaseous, and simple aromatic hydrocarbons that may have been degraded by Colwellia. These insights into the genomic properties of a Colwellia species, which were supported by existing metagenomic sequence data from the plume and DWH contaminated sediments, help further our understanding of the successional changes in the dominant microbial players in the plume over the course of the DWH spill.

  15. Haplosufficient genomic androgen receptor signaling is adequate to protect female mice from induction of polycystic ovary syndrome features by prenatal hyperandrogenization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, A S L; Eid, S; Kay, C R; Jimenez, M; McMahon, A C; Desai, R; Allan, C M; Smith, J T; Handelsman, D J; Walters, Kirsty A

    2015-04-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with reproductive, endocrine, and metabolic abnormalities. Because hyperandrogenism is the most consistent PCOS feature, we used wild-type (WT) and androgen receptor (AR) knockout (ARKO) mice, together with a mouse model of PCOS, to investigate the contribution of genomic AR-mediated actions in the development of PCOS traits. PCOS features were induced by prenatal exposure to dihydrotestosterone (250 μg) or oil vehicle (control) on days 16-18 of gestation in WT, heterozygote, and homozygote ARKO mice. DHT treatment of WT mice induced ovarian cysts (100% vs 0%), disrupted estrous cycles (42% vs 100% cycling), and led to fewer corpora lutea (5.0±0.4 vs 9.8±1.8). However, diestrus serum LH and FSH, and estradiol-induced-negative feedback as well as hypothalamic expression of kisspeptin, neurokinin B, and dynorphin, were unaffected by DHT treatment in WT mice. DHT-treated WT mice exhibited a more than 48% increase in adipocyte area but without changes in body fat. In contrast, heterozygous and homozygous ARKO mice exposed to DHT maintained comparable ovarian (histo)morphology, estrous cycling, and corpora lutea numbers, without any increase in adipocyte size. These findings provide strong evidence that genomic AR signaling is an important mediator in the development of these PCOS traits with a dose dependency that allows even AR haplosufficiency to prevent induction by prenatal androgenization of PCOS features in adult life.

  16. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association scans identifies IL18RAP, PTPN2, TAGAP, and PUS10 as shared risk loci for Crohn's disease and celiac disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora A M Festen

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease (CD and celiac disease (CelD are chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases, involving genetic and environmental factors in their pathogenesis. The two diseases can co-occur within families, and studies suggest that CelD patients have a higher risk to develop CD than the general population. These observations suggest that CD and CelD may share common genetic risk loci. Two such shared loci, IL18RAP and PTPN2, have already been identified independently in these two diseases. The aim of our study was to explicitly identify shared risk loci for these diseases by combining results from genome-wide association study (GWAS datasets of CD and CelD. Specifically, GWAS results from CelD (768 cases, 1,422 controls and CD (3,230 cases, 4,829 controls were combined in a meta-analysis. Nine independent regions had nominal association p-value <1.0 x 10⁻⁵ in this meta-analysis and showed evidence of association to the individual diseases in the original scans (p-value < 1 x 10⁻² in CelD and < 1 x 10⁻³ in CD. These include the two previously reported shared loci, IL18RAP and PTPN2, with p-values of 3.37 x 10⁻⁸ and 6.39 x 10⁻⁹, respectively, in the meta-analysis. The other seven had not been reported as shared loci and thus were tested in additional CelD (3,149 cases and 4,714 controls and CD (1,835 cases and 1,669 controls cohorts. Two of these loci, TAGAP and PUS10, showed significant evidence of replication (Bonferroni corrected p-values <0.0071 in the combined CelD and CD replication cohorts and were firmly established as shared risk loci of genome-wide significance, with overall combined p-values of 1.55 x 10⁻¹⁰ and 1.38 x 10⁻¹¹ respectively. Through a meta-analysis of GWAS data from CD and CelD, we have identified four shared risk loci: PTPN2, IL18RAP, TAGAP, and PUS10. The combined analysis of the two datasets provided the power, lacking in the individual GWAS for single diseases, to detect shared loci with a

  17. Sharing City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This magazine offers an insight into the growing commercial innovation, civic movements, and political narratives surrounding sharing economy services, solutions and organisational types. It presents a cross-section of the manifold sharing economy services and solutions that can be found in Denmark....... Solutions of sharing that seeks to improve our cities and local communities in both urban and rural environments. 24 sharing economy organisations and businesses addressing urban and rural issues are being portrayed and seven Danish municipalities that have explored the potentials of sharing economy....... Moreover, 15 thought leading experts - professionals and academic - have been invited to give their perspective on sharing economy for cities. This magazine touches upon aspects of the sharing economy as mobility, communities, sustainability, business development, mobility, and urban-rural relation....

  18. Genome-scale NAD(H/(+ availability patterns as a differentiating feature between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Scheffersomyces stipitis in relation to fermentative metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Acevedo

    Full Text Available Scheffersomyces stipitis is a yeast able to ferment pentoses to ethanol, unlike Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it does not present the so-called overflow phenomenon. Metabolic features characterizing the presence or not of this phenomenon have not been fully elucidated. This work proposes that genome-scale metabolic response to variations in NAD(H/(+ availability characterizes fermentative behavior in both yeasts. Thus, differentiating features in S. stipitis and S. cerevisiae were determined analyzing growth sensitivity response to changes in available reducing capacity in relation to ethanol production capacity and overall metabolic flux span. Using genome-scale constraint-based metabolic models, phenotypic phase planes and shadow price analyses, an excess of available reducing capacity for growth was found in S. cerevisiae at every metabolic phenotype where growth is limited by oxygen uptake, while in S. stipitis this was observed only for a subset of those phenotypes. Moreover, by using flux variability analysis, an increased metabolic flux span was found in S. cerevisiae at growth limited by oxygen uptake, while in S. stipitis flux span was invariant. Therefore, each yeast can be characterized by a significantly different metabolic response and flux span when growth is limited by oxygen uptake, both features suggesting a higher metabolic flexibility in S. cerevisiae. By applying an optimization-based approach on the genome-scale models, three single reaction deletions were found to generate in S. stipitis the reducing capacity availability pattern found in S. cerevisiae, two of them correspond to reactions involved in the overflow phenomenon. These results show a close relationship between the growth sensitivity response given by the metabolic network and fermentative behavior.

  19. Genome-Scale NAD(H/+) Availability Patterns as a Differentiating Feature between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Scheffersomyces stipitis in Relation to Fermentative Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Alejandro; Aroca, German; Conejeros, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Scheffersomyces stipitis is a yeast able to ferment pentoses to ethanol, unlike Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it does not present the so-called overflow phenomenon. Metabolic features characterizing the presence or not of this phenomenon have not been fully elucidated. This work proposes that genome-scale metabolic response to variations in NAD(H/+) availability characterizes fermentative behavior in both yeasts. Thus, differentiating features in S. stipitis and S. cerevisiae were determined analyzing growth sensitivity response to changes in available reducing capacity in relation to ethanol production capacity and overall metabolic flux span. Using genome-scale constraint-based metabolic models, phenotypic phase planes and shadow price analyses, an excess of available reducing capacity for growth was found in S. cerevisiae at every metabolic phenotype where growth is limited by oxygen uptake, while in S. stipitis this was observed only for a subset of those phenotypes. Moreover, by using flux variability analysis, an increased metabolic flux span was found in S. cerevisiae at growth limited by oxygen uptake, while in S. stipitis flux span was invariant. Therefore, each yeast can be characterized by a significantly different metabolic response and flux span when growth is limited by oxygen uptake, both features suggesting a higher metabolic flexibility in S. cerevisiae. By applying an optimization-based approach on the genome-scale models, three single reaction deletions were found to generate in S. stipitis the reducing capacity availability pattern found in S. cerevisiae, two of them correspond to reactions involved in the overflow phenomenon. These results show a close relationship between the growth sensitivity response given by the metabolic network and fermentative behavior. PMID:24489927

  20. Patients with electrical status epilepticus in sleep share similar clinical features regardless of their focal or generalized sleep potentiation of epileptiform activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Iván Sánchez; Peters, Jurriaan; Takeoka, Masanori; Rotenberg, Alexander; Prabhu, Sanjay; Gregas, Matt; Riviello, James J; Kothare, Sanjeev; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    The study objective was to compare qualitatively the clinical features of patients with electrical status epilepticus in sleep with focal versus generalized sleep potentiated epileptiform activity. We enrolled patients 2 to 20 years of age, studied between 2001 and 2009, and with sleep potentiated epileptiform activity defined as an increase of epileptiform activity of 50% or more during non-rapid eye movement sleep compared with wakefulness. Eighty-five patients met the inclusion criteria, median age was 7.3 years, and 54 (63.5%) were boys. Sixty-seven (78.8%) patients had focal sleep potentiated epileptiform activity, whereas 18 (21.2%) had generalized sleep potentiated epileptiform activity. The 2 groups did not differ with respect to sex, age, presence of a structural brain abnormality, epilepsy, or other qualitative cognitive, motor, or behavioral problems. Our data suggest that there are no qualitative differences in the clinical features of patients with focal versus generalized sleep potentiated epileptiform activity.

  1. Sharing code

    OpenAIRE

    Kubilius, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Sharing code is becoming increasingly important in the wake of Open Science. In this review I describe and compare two popular code-sharing utilities, GitHub and Open Science Framework (OSF). GitHub is a mature, industry-standard tool but lacks focus towards researchers. In comparison, OSF offers a one-stop solution for researchers but a lot of functionality is still under development. I conclude by listing alternative lesser-known tools for code and materials sharing.

  2. Metabolic Versatility and Antibacterial Metabolite Biosynthesis Are Distinguishing Genomic Features of the Fire Blight Antagonist Pantoea vagans C9-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Theo H. M.; Rezzonico, Fabio; Kamber, Tim; Blom, Jochen; Goesmann, Alexander; Ishimaru, Carol A.; Frey, Jürg E.; Stockwell, Virginia O.; Duffy, Brion

    2011-01-01

    Background Pantoea vagans is a commercialized biological control agent used against the pome fruit bacterial disease fire blight, caused by Erwinia amylovora. Compared to other biocontrol agents, relatively little is currently known regarding Pantoea genetics. Better understanding of antagonist mechanisms of action and ecological fitness is critical to improving efficacy. Principal Findings Genome analysis indicated two major factors contribute to biocontrol activity: competition for limiting substrates and antibacterial metabolite production. Pathways for utilization of a broad diversity of sugars and acquisition of iron were identified. Metabolism of sorbitol by P. vagans C9-1 may be a major metabolic feature in biocontrol of fire blight. Biosynthetic genes for the antibacterial peptide pantocin A were found on a chromosomal 28-kb genomic island, and for dapdiamide E on the plasmid pPag2. There was no evidence of potential virulence factors that could enable an animal or phytopathogenic lifestyle and no indication of any genetic-based biosafety risk in the antagonist. Conclusions Identifying key determinants contributing to disease suppression allows the development of procedures to follow their expression in planta and the genome sequence contributes to rationale risk assessment regarding the use of the biocontrol strain in agricultural systems. PMID:21789243

  3. Metabolic versatility and antibacterial metabolite biosynthesis are distinguishing genomic features of the fire blight antagonist Pantoea vagans C9-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theo H M Smits

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pantoea vagans is a commercialized biological control agent used against the pome fruit bacterial disease fire blight, caused by Erwinia amylovora. Compared to other biocontrol agents, relatively little is currently known regarding Pantoea genetics. Better understanding of antagonist mechanisms of action and ecological fitness is critical to improving efficacy. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genome analysis indicated two major factors Contribute to biocontrol activity: competition for limiting substrates and antibacterial metabolite production. Pathways for utilization of a broad diversity of sugars and acquisition of iron were identified. Metabolism of sorbitol by P. vagans C9-1 may be a major metabolic feature in biocontrol of fire blight. Biosynthetic genes for the antibacterial peptide pantocin A were found on a chromosomal 28-kb genomic island, and for dapdiamide E on the plasmid pPag2. There was no evidence of potential virulence factors that could enable an animal or phytopathogenic lifestyle and no indication of any genetic-based biosafety risk in the antagonist. CONCLUSIONS: Identifying key determinants contributing to disease suppression allows the development of procedures to follow their expression in planta and the genome sequence contributes to rationale risk assessment regarding the use of the biocontrol strain in agricultural systems.

  4. Metabolic versatility and antibacterial metabolite biosynthesis are distinguishing genomic features of the fire blight antagonist Pantoea vagans C9-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Theo H M; Rezzonico, Fabio; Kamber, Tim; Blom, Jochen; Goesmann, Alexander; Ishimaru, Carol A; Frey, Jürg E; Stockwell, Virginia O; Duffy, Brion

    2011-01-01

    Pantoea vagans is a commercialized biological control agent used against the pome fruit bacterial disease fire blight, caused by Erwinia amylovora. Compared to other biocontrol agents, relatively little is currently known regarding Pantoea genetics. Better understanding of antagonist mechanisms of action and ecological fitness is critical to improving efficacy. Genome analysis indicated two major factors Contribute to biocontrol activity: competition for limiting substrates and antibacterial metabolite production. Pathways for utilization of a broad diversity of sugars and acquisition of iron were identified. Metabolism of sorbitol by P. vagans C9-1 may be a major metabolic feature in biocontrol of fire blight. Biosynthetic genes for the antibacterial peptide pantocin A were found on a chromosomal 28-kb genomic island, and for dapdiamide E on the plasmid pPag2. There was no evidence of potential virulence factors that could enable an animal or phytopathogenic lifestyle and no indication of any genetic-based biosafety risk in the antagonist. Identifying key determinants contributing to disease suppression allows the development of procedures to follow their expression in planta and the genome sequence contributes to rationale risk assessment regarding the use of the biocontrol strain in agricultural systems.

  5. The genome sequence of Geobacter metallireducens: features of metabolism, physiology and regulation common and dissimilar to Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aklujkar, Muktak [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Krushkal, Julia [University of Texas, Austin; DiBartolo, Genevieve [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lovley, Derek [University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    2009-01-01

    Background. The genome sequence of Geobacter metallireducens is the second to be completed from the metal-respiring genus Geobacter, and is compared in this report to that of Geobacter sulfurreducens in order to understand their metabolic, physiological and regulatory similarities and differences. Results. The experimentally observed greater metabolic versatility of G. metallireducens versus G. sulfurreducens is borne out by the presence of more numerous genes for metabolism of organic acids including acetate, propionate, and pyruvate. Although G. metallireducens lacks a dicarboxylic acid transporter, it has acquired a second succinate dehydrogenase/fumarate reductase complex, suggesting that respiration of fumarate was important until recently in its evolutionary history. Vestiges of the molybdate (ModE) regulon of G. sulfurreducens can be detected in G. metallireducens, which has lost the global regulatory protein ModE but retained some putative ModE-binding sites and multiplied certain genes of molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis. Several enzymes of amino acid metabolism are of different origin in the two species, but significant patterns of gene organization are conserved. Whereas most Geobacteraceae are predicted to obtain biosynthetic reducing equivalents from electron transfer pathways via a ferredoxin oxidoreductase, G. metallireducens can derive them from the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. In addition to the evidence of greater metabolic versatility, the G. metallireducens genome is also remarkable for the abundance of multicopy nucleotide sequences found in intergenic regions and even within genes. Conclusion. The genomic evidence suggests that metabolism, physiology Background. The genome sequence of Geobacter metallireducens is the second to be completed from the metal-respiring genus Geobacter, and is compared in this report to that of Geobacter sulfurreducens in order to understand their metabolic, physiological and regulatory similarities and

  6. Shared Consumption : A Technological Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    John A. Weymark

    2004-01-01

    James Buchanan (Economica, [1966]) has argued that Alfred Marshall's theory of jointly-supplied goods can be extended to analyze the allocation of impure public goods. This article introduces a way of modelling sharing technologies for jointly-supplied goods that captures the essential features of Buchanan's proposal. Public and private goods are special cases of shared goods obtained by appropriately specifying the sharing technology. Necessary conditions for an allocation in a shared goods ...

  7. The genome sequence of Geobacter metallireducens: features of metabolism, physiology and regulation common and dissimilar to Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aklujkar Muktak

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genome sequence of Geobacter metallireducens is the second to be completed from the metal-respiring genus Geobacter, and is compared in this report to that of Geobacter sulfurreducens in order to understand their metabolic, physiological and regulatory similarities and differences. Results The experimentally observed greater metabolic versatility of G. metallireducens versus G. sulfurreducens is borne out by the presence of more numerous genes for metabolism of organic acids including acetate, propionate, and pyruvate. Although G. metallireducens lacks a dicarboxylic acid transporter, it has acquired a second putative succinate dehydrogenase/fumarate reductase complex, suggesting that respiration of fumarate was important until recently in its evolutionary history. Vestiges of the molybdate (ModE regulon of G. sulfurreducens can be detected in G. metallireducens, which has lost the global regulatory protein ModE but retained some putative ModE-binding sites and multiplied certain genes of molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis. Several enzymes of amino acid metabolism are of different origin in the two species, but significant patterns of gene organization are conserved. Whereas most Geobacteraceae are predicted to obtain biosynthetic reducing equivalents from electron transfer pathways via a ferredoxin oxidoreductase, G. metallireducens can derive them from the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. In addition to the evidence of greater metabolic versatility, the G. metallireducens genome is also remarkable for the abundance of multicopy nucleotide sequences found in intergenic regions and even within genes. Conclusion The genomic evidence suggests that metabolism, physiology and regulation of gene expression in G. metallireducens may be dramatically different from other Geobacteraceae.

  8. The genome and proteome of a Campylobacter coli bacteriophage vB_CcoM-IBB_35 reveal unusual features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Carla M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Campylobacter is the leading cause of foodborne diseases worldwide. Bacteriophages (phages are naturally occurring predators of bacteria, ubiquitous in the environment, with high host specificity and thus considered an appealing option to control bacterial pathogens. Nevertheless for an effective use of phages as antimicrobial agents, it is important to understand phage biology which renders crucial the analysis of phage genomes and proteomes. The lack of sequence data from Campylobacter phages adds further importance to these studies. Methods vB_CcoM-IBB_35 is a broad lytic spectrum Myoviridae Campylobacter phage with high potential for therapeutic use. The genome of this phage was obtained by pyrosequencing and the sequence data was further analyzed. The proteomic analysis was performed by SDS-PAGE and Mass spectrometry. Results and conclusions The DNA sequence data of vB_CcoM-IBB_35 consists of five contigs for a total of 172,065 bp with an average GC content of 27%. Attempts to close the gaps between contigs were unsuccessful since the DNA preparations appear to contain substances that inhibited Taq and ϕ29 polymerases. From the 210 identified ORFs, around 60% represent proteins that were not functionally assigned. Homology exists with members of the Teequatrovirinae namely for T4 proteins involved in morphogenesis, nucleotide metabolism, transcription, DNA replication and recombination. Tandem mass spectrometric analysis revealed 38 structural proteins as part of the mature phage particle. Conclusions Genes encoding proteins involved in the carbohydrate metabolism along with several incidences of gene duplications, split genes with inteins and introns have been rarely found in other phage genomes yet are found in this phage. We identified the genes encoding for tail fibres and for the lytic cassette, this later, expressing enzymes for bacterial capsular polysaccharides (CPS degradation, which has not been reported

  9. The genome sequence of Geobacter metallireducens: features of metabolism, physiology and regulation common and dissimilar to Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aklujkar, Muktak; Krushkal, Julia; DiBartolo, Genevieve; Lapidus, Alla; Land, Miriam L.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2008-12-01

    Background: The genome sequence of Geobacter metallireducens is the second to be completed from the metal-respiring genus Geobacter, and is compared in this report to that of Geobacter sulfurreducens in order to understand their metabolic, physiological and regulatory similarities and differences. Results: The experimentally observed greater metabolic versatility of G. metallireducens versus G. sulfurreducens is borne out by the presence of more numerous genes for metabolism of organic acids including acetate, propionate, and pyruvate. Although G. metallireducens lacks a dicarboxylic acid transporter, it has acquired a second succinate dehydrogenase/fumarate reductase complex, suggesting that respiration of fumarate was important until recently in its evolutionary history. Vestiges of the molybdate (ModE) regulon of G. sulfurreducens can be detected in G. metallireducens, which has lost the global regulatory protein ModE but retained some putative ModE-binding sites and multiplied certain genes of molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis. Several enzymes of amino acid metabolism are of different origin in the two species, but significant patterns of gene organization are conserved. Whereas most Geobacteraceae are predicted to obtain biosynthetic reducing equivalents from electron transfer pathways via a ferredoxin oxidoreductase, G. metallireducens can derive them from the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. In addition to the evidence of greater metabolic versatility, the G. metallireducens genome is also remarkable for the abundance of multicopy nucleotide sequences found in intergenic regions and even within genes. Conclusion: The genomic evidence suggests that metabolism, physiology and regulation of gene expression in G. metallireducens may be dramatically different from other Geobacteraceae.

  10. Professional SharePoint 2013 administration

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Shane; Klindt, Todd

    2013-01-01

    SharePoint admin author gurus return to prepare you for working with the new features of SharePoint 2013! The new iteration of SharePoint boasts exciting new features. However, any new version also comes with its fair share of challenges and that's where this book comes in. The team of SharePoint admin gurus returns to presents a fully updated resource that prepares you for making all the new SharePoint 2013 features work right. They cover all of the administration components of SharePoint 2013 in detail, and present a clear understanding of how they affect the role of the adminis

  11. Genomic Data Commons launches

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Genomic Data Commons (GDC), a unified data system that promotes sharing of genomic and clinical data between researchers, launched today with a visit from Vice President Joe Biden to the operations center at the University of Chicago.

  12. Clinical and cytogenetic features of a patient with partial trisomy 8q and partial monosomy 13q delineated by array comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Young Bae; Yun, Jun No; Park, Sang-Jin; Park, Moon Sung; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Jang Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Partial trisomy 8q is rare and has distinctive clinical features, including severe mental retardation, growth impairment, dysmorphic facial appearances, cleft palate, congenital heart disease, and urogenital anomalies. Partial monosomy 13q is a rare genetic disorder displaying a variety of phenotypic characteristics including mental retardation, dysmorphic facial features, and congenital anomalies. Here, we describe for the first time clinical observations and cytogenetic analysis of a patient with a concomitant occurrence of partial trisomy of 8q (8q21.3→qter) and partial monosomy 13q(13q34→qter). The patient was a female neonate with facial dysmorphia, agenesis of the corpus callosum, cleft palate, and congenital heart disease. G-band standard karyotype was 46,XX,add(13)(q34). To determine the origin of additional genomic gain in chromosome 13, array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was performed. Array CGH showed a 56.8 Mb sized gain on chromosome 8q and a 0.28 Mb sized loss on chromosome 13q. Therefore, the final karyotype of the patient was defined as 46,XX, der(13)t(8;13)(q21.3;q34). In conclusion, we described the clinical and cytogenetic analysis of the patient with concomitant occurrence of partial trisomy 8q and partial monosomy 13q delineated by array CGH. This report suggests that the array CGH would be a valuable diagnostic tool for identifying the origin of small additional genetic materials.

  13. Genomic Data Commons | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI’s Center for Cancer Genomics launches the Genomic Data Commons (GDC), a unified data sharing platform for the cancer research community. The mission of the GDC is to enable data sharing across the entire cancer research community, to ultimately support precision medicine in oncology.

  14. Use of genomic DNA control features and predicted operon structure in microarray data analysis: ArrayLeaRNA – a Bayesian approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin Carmen

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays are widely used for the study of gene expression; however deciding on whether observed differences in expression are significant remains a challenge. Results A computing tool (ArrayLeaRNA has been developed for gene expression analysis. It implements a Bayesian approach which is based on the Gumbel distribution and uses printed genomic DNA control features for normalization and for estimation of the parameters of the Bayesian model and prior knowledge from predicted operon structure. The method is compared with two other approaches: the classical LOWESS normalization followed by a two fold cut-off criterion and the OpWise method (Price, et al. 2006. BMC Bioinformatics. 7, 19, a published Bayesian approach also using predicted operon structure. The three methods were compared on experimental datasets with prior knowledge of gene expression. With ArrayLeaRNA, data normalization is carried out according to the genomic features which reflect the results of equally transcribed genes; also the statistical significance of the difference in expression is based on the variability of the equally transcribed genes. The operon information helps the classification of genes with low confidence measurements. ArrayLeaRNA is implemented in Visual Basic and freely available as an Excel add-in at http://www.ifr.ac.uk/safety/ArrayLeaRNA/ Conclusion We have introduced a novel Bayesian model and demonstrated that it is a robust method for analysing microarray expression profiles. ArrayLeaRNA showed a considerable improvement in data normalization, in the estimation of the experimental variability intrinsic to each hybridization and in the establishment of a clear boundary between non-changing and differentially expressed genes. The method is applicable to data derived from hybridizations of labelled cDNA samples as well as from hybridizations of labelled cDNA with genomic DNA and can be used for the analysis of datasets where

  15. CBS: an open platform that integrates predictive methods and epigenetics information to characterize conserved regulatory features in multiple Drosophila genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanco Enrique

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information about the composition of regulatory regions is of great value for designing experiments to functionally characterize gene expression. The multiplicity of available applications to predict transcription factor binding sites in a particular locus contrasts with the substantial computational expertise that is demanded to manipulate them, which may constitute a potential barrier for the experimental community. Results CBS (Conserved regulatory Binding Sites, http://compfly.bio.ub.es/CBS is a public platform of evolutionarily conserved binding sites and enhancers predicted in multiple Drosophila genomes that is furnished with published chromatin signatures associated to transcriptionally active regions and other experimental sources of information. The rapid access to this novel body of knowledge through a user-friendly web interface enables non-expert users to identify the binding sequences available for any particular gene, transcription factor, or genome region. Conclusions The CBS platform is a powerful resource that provides tools for data mining individual sequences and groups of co-expressed genes with epigenomics information to conduct regulatory screenings in Drosophila.

  16. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis due to anticonvulsants share certain clinical and laboratory features with drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome, despite differences in cutaneous presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraki, Y; Shibuya, M; Izaki, S

    2010-10-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS)/drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is characterized by late disease onset, fever, rash, hepatic dysfunction, haematological abnormalities, lymphadenopathy and often, human herpesvirus (HHV) reactivation. The diagnosis of DIHS is based on the combined presence of these findings. Anticonvulsants are a major cause of DIHS and may also cause Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). We examined whether SJS/TEN due to anticonvulsants display similar clinical and laboratory features seen in DIHS. Patients diagnosed with SJS or TEN due to anticonvulsants (n = 8) were examined and their clinical features and laboratory findings were compared with patients with anticonvulsant-related DIHS (n = 6). Seven of the eight patients with SJS/TEN developed symptoms > 3 weeks after starting anticonvulsants. Hepatic dysfunction was present in six patients with SJS/TEN and five patients with DIHS. Leucocytosis and/or eosinophilia was noted in seven patients with SJS/TEN and four patients with DIHS. Only one patient in the SJS/TEN group had atypical lymphocytosis; this was present in four patients with DIHS. Reactivation of HHV-6 was detected in one of the four patients tested in the SJS/TEN group, although it was seen in five of the six patients with DIHS. TSJS/TEN due to anticonvulsants may exhibit some clinical and laboratory features of DIHS. The nature of the cutaneous involvement should be emphasized in the diagnosis of DIHS. © 2009 The Author(s). Journal compilation © 2009 British Association of Dermatologists.

  17. File sharing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, N.

    2011-01-01

    ‘File sharing’ has become generally accepted on the Internet. Users share files for downloading music, films, games, software etc. In this note, we have a closer look at the definition of file sharing, the legal and policy-based context as well as enforcement issues. The economic and cultural impact

  18. Shared leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm; Müller, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold. First, this paper comprehensively will review the conceptual and empirical literature to identify such critical underlying mechanisms which enable shared or collective leadership. Second, this article identifies the antecedents and outcomes of shared leadership...... according to the literature review to develop a re-conceptualised and synthesized framework for managing the organizational issues associated with shared leadership on various organizational levels. The paper rectifies this by identifying the critical factors and mechanisms which enable shared leadership...... and its antecedents and outcomes, and to develop a re-conceptualized and synthesized framework of shared leadership. The paper closes with a brief discussion of avenues for future research and implications for managers....

  19. Sharing Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Sahasranand, K R

    2010-01-01

    Almost all known secret sharing schemes work on numbers. Such methods will have difficulty in sharing graphs since the number of graphs increases exponentially with the number of nodes. We propose a secret sharing scheme for graphs where we use graph intersection for reconstructing the secret which is hidden as a sub graph in the shares. Our method does not rely on heavy computational operations such as modular arithmetic or polynomial interpolation but makes use of very basic operations like assignment and checking for equality, and graph intersection can also be performed visually. In certain cases, the secret could be reconstructed using just pencil and paper by authorised parties but cannot be broken by an adversary even with unbounded computational power. The method achieves perfect secrecy for (2, n) scheme and requires far fewer operations compared to Shamir's algorithm. The proposed method could be used to share objects such as matrices, sets, plain text and even a heterogeneous collection of these. S...

  20. Shared leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm; Müller, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold. First, this paper comprehensively will review the conceptual and empirical literature to identify such critical underlying mechanisms which enable shared or collective leadership. Second, this article identifies the antecedents and outcomes of shared leadership...... according to the literature review to develop a re-conceptualised and synthesized framework for managing the organizational issues associated with shared leadership on various organizational levels. The paper rectifies this by identifying the critical factors and mechanisms which enable shared leadership...... and its antecedents and outcomes, and to develop a re-conceptualized and synthesized framework of shared leadership. The paper closes with a brief discussion of avenues for future research and implications for managers....

  1. Complete Genome Sequencing of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus 1, Subgenotypes 1n and 1o.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Asuka; Tateishi, Kentaro; Shinohara, Minami; Naoi, Yuki; Shiokawa, Mai; Aoki, Hiroshi; Ohmori, Keitaro; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Shirai, Junsuke; Nagai, Makoto

    2016-02-18

    To gain further insight into the genomic features of bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (BVDV-1) subgenotypes, we sequenced the complete genome of BVDV-1n Shitara/02/06 and BVDV-1o IS26NCP/01. The complete genome of Shitara/02/06 and IS26NCP/01 shared 77.7 to 79.3% and 78.0 to 85.7% sequence identities with other BVDV-1 subgenotype strains, respectively.

  2. The PRC2-binding long non-coding RNAs in human and mouse genomes are associated with predictive sequence features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Shiqi; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Shao, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    Recently, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as an important class of molecules involved in many cellular processes. One of their primary functions is to shape epigenetic landscape through interactions with chromatin modifying proteins. However, mechanisms contributing to the specificity of such interactions remain poorly understood. Here we took the human and mouse lncRNAs that were experimentally determined to have physical interactions with Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), and systematically investigated the sequence features of these lncRNAs by developing a new computational pipeline for sequences composition analysis, in which each sequence is considered as a series of transitions between adjacent nucleotides. Through that, PRC2-binding lncRNAs were found to be associated with a set of distinctive and evolutionarily conserved sequence features, which can be utilized to distinguish them from the others with considerable accuracy. We further identified fragments of PRC2-binding lncRNAs that are enriched with these sequence features, and found they show strong PRC2-binding signals and are more highly conserved across species than the other parts, implying their functional importance.

  3. Shared Attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shteynberg, Garriy

    2015-09-01

    Shared attention is extremely common. In stadiums, public squares, and private living rooms, people attend to the world with others. Humans do so across all sensory modalities-sharing the sights, sounds, tastes, smells, and textures of everyday life with one another. The potential for attending with others has grown considerably with the emergence of mass media technologies, which allow for the sharing of attention in the absence of physical co-presence. In the last several years, studies have begun to outline the conditions under which attending together is consequential for human memory, motivation, judgment, emotion, and behavior. Here, I advance a psychological theory of shared attention, defining its properties as a mental state and outlining its cognitive, affective, and behavioral consequences. I review empirical findings that are uniquely predicted by shared-attention theory and discuss the possibility of integrating shared-attention, social-facilitation, and social-loafing perspectives. Finally, I reflect on what shared-attention theory implies for living in the digital world.

  4. Genome-wide association studies reveal similar genetic architecture with shared and unique QTL for Bacterial Cold Water Disease resistance in two rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) breeding populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) causes significant mortality and economic losses in salmonid aquaculture. In previous studies, we identified moderate-large effect QTL for BCWD resistance in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). However, the recent availability of a 57K SNP array and a genome phys...

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of the Avian Paramyxovirus Serotype 5 Strain APMV-5/budgerigar/Japan/TI/75

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiono, Takahiro; Matsuno, Keita; Tuchiya, Kotaro; Lin, Zhifeng; Okamatsu, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the avian paramyxovirus serotype 5 strain APMV-5/budgerigar/Japan/TI/75, which was determined using the Illumina MiSeq platform. The determined sequence shares 97% homology and similar genetic features with the previously known genome sequence of avian paramyxovirus serotype 5 strain APMV-5/budgerigar/Japan/Kunitachi/74. PMID:27660785

  6. Adverse genomic alterations and stemness features are induced by field cancerization in the microenvironment of hepatocellular carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castven, Darko; Fischer, Michael; Becker, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) commonly develops in chronically damaged liver tissues. The resulting regenerative and inflammatory processes create an adverse milieu that promotes tumor-initiation and progression. A better understanding of the hepatic tumor-microenvironment interaction might infer.......Prognostic significance of the permissive liver microenvironment might be a consequence of a pro-oncogenic field effect that is caused by chronic regenerative processes. Activation of key oncogenic features and immune-response signaling indicates that the cross-talk between tumor and microenvironment might be a promising...

  7. Knowledge Sharing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdt Christensen, Peter

    The concept of knowledge management has, indeed, become a buzzword that every single organization is expected to practice and live by. Knowledge management is about managing the organization's knowledge for the common good of the organization -but practicing knowledge management is not as simple...... as that. This article focuses on knowledge sharing as the process seeking to reduce the resources spent on reinventing the wheel.The article introduces the concept of time sensitiveness; i.e. that knowledge is either urgently needed, or not that urgently needed. Furthermore, knowledge sharing...... is considered as either a push or pull system. Four strategies for sharing knowledge - help, post-it, manuals and meeting, and advice are introduced. Each strategy requires different channels for sharing knowledge. An empirical analysis in a production facility highlights how the strategies can be practiced....

  8. Identifying genomic and metabolic features that can underlie early successional and opportunistic lifestyles of human gut symbionts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozupone, Catherine; Faust, Karoline; Raes, Jeroen; Faith, Jeremiah J.; Frank, Daniel N.; Zaneveld, Jesse; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Knight, Rob

    2012-01-01

    We lack a deep understanding of genetic and metabolic attributes specializing in microbial consortia for initial and subsequent waves of colonization of our body habitats. Here we show that phylogenetically interspersed bacteria in Clostridium cluster XIVa, an abundant group of bacteria in the adult human gut also known as the Clostridium coccoides or Eubacterium rectale group, contains species that have evolved distribution patterns consistent with either early successional or stable gut communities. The species that specialize to the infant gut are more likely to associate with systemic infections and can reach high abundances in individuals with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), indicating that a subset of the microbiota that have adapted to pioneer/opportunistic lifestyles may do well in both early development and with disease. We identified genes likely selected during adaptation to pioneer/opportunistic lifestyles as those for which early succession association and not phylogenetic relationships explain genomic abundance. These genes reveal potential mechanisms by which opportunistic gut bacteria tolerate osmotic and oxidative stress and potentially important aspects of their metabolism. These genes may not only be biomarkers of properties associated with adaptation to early succession and disturbance, but also leads for developing therapies aimed at promoting reestablishment of stable gut communities following physiologic or pathologic disturbances. PMID:22665442

  9. Serro 2 Virus Highlights the Fundamental Genomic and Biological Features of a Natural Vaccinia Virus Infecting Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Giliane de Souza; Emerson, Ginny L.; Sammons, Scott; Frace, Michael; Govil, Dhwani; Fernandes Mota, Bruno Eduardo; Abrahão, Jônatas Santos; de Assis, Felipe Lopes; Olsen-Rasmussen, Melissa; Goldsmith, Cynthia S.; Li, Yu; Carroll, Darin; Guimarães da Fonseca, Flavio; Kroon, Erna; Damon, Inger K.

    2016-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) has been implicated in infections of dairy cattle and humans, and outbreaks have substantially impacted local economies and public health in Brazil. During a 2005 outbreak, a VACV strain designated Serro 2 virus (S2V) was collected from a 30-year old male milker. Our aim was to phenotypically and genetically characterize this VACV Brazilian isolate. S2V produced small round plaques without associated comets when grown in BSC40 cells. Furthermore, S2V was less virulent than the prototype strain VACV-Western Reserve (WR) in a murine model of intradermal infection, producing a tiny lesion with virtually no surrounding inflammation. The genome of S2V was sequenced by primer walking. The coding region spans 184,572 bp and contains 211 predicted genes. Mutations in envelope genes specifically associated with small plaque phenotypes were not found in S2V; however, other alterations in amino acid sequences within these genes were identified. In addition, some immunomodulatory genes were truncated in S2V. Phylogenetic analysis using immune regulatory-related genes, besides the hemagglutinin gene, segregated the Brazilian viruses into two clusters, grouping the S2V into Brazilian VACV group 1. S2V is the first naturally-circulating human-associated VACV, with a low passage history, to be extensively genetically and phenotypically characterized. PMID:27973399

  10. Is gastric lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma a special subtype of EBV-associated gastric carcinoma? New insight based on clinicopathological features and EBV genome polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Na; Hui, Da-yang; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Na-na; Jiang, Ye; Han, Jing; Li, Hai-Gang; Ding, Yun-Gang; Du, Hong; Chen, Jian-Ning; Shao, Chun-Kui

    2015-04-01

    Gastric lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma (LELC) is a rare entity that is closely associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). However, the EBV latency pattern and genome polymorphisms in gastric LELC have not been systematically explored. The clinicopathological features, EBV latency pattern and genome polymorphisms of EBV-positive gastric LELC in Guangzhou, southern China were investigated and compared with those of ordinary EBV-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC) in the same area. Ten (1.42%) of 702 gastric carcinoma cases were identified as gastric LELC, in which eight (80%) cases were EBV-positive. The clinicopathological characteristics and EBV latency pattern of EBV-positive gastric LELC were similar to those of ordinary EBVaGC. In EBV genotype analysis, type A strain, type F, I, mut-W1/I, XhoI- and del-LMP1 variants were predominant among EBV-positive gastric LELCs, accounting for eight (100%), six (75%), eight (100%), seven (87.5%), five (62.5%) and six (75%) cases, respectively, which are similar to those in ordinary EBVaGC. For EBNA1 polymorphisms, the V-leu and P-ala subtypes were predominant in EBV-positive gastric LELC, which is different from the predominant V-val subtype in ordinary EBVaGC. EBV-positive gastric LELC has a favorable prognosis when compared to ordinary EBVaGC (median survival time 43.0 vs. 18.0 months). Gastric LELC is strongly associated with EBV and EBV-positive gastric LELC should be regarded as a special subtype of EBVaGC. This, to our best knowledge, is the first time in the world that the EBV latency pattern and genome polymorphisms of EBV-positive gastric LELC are systematically revealed.

  11. Chromosome deletion of 14q32.33 detected by array comparative genomic hybridization in a patient with features of dubowitz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darcy, Diana C; Rosenthal, Scott; Wallerstein, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    We report a 4-year-old girl of Mexican origins with a clinical diagnosis of Dubowitz syndrome who carries a de novo terminal deletion at the 14q32.33 locus identified by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Dubowitz syndrome is a rare condition characterized by a constellation of features including growth retardation, short stature, microcephaly, micrognathia, eczema, telecanthus, blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, round-tipped nose, mild to moderate developmental delay, and high-pitched hoarse voice. This syndrome is thought to be autosomal recessive; however, the etiology has not been determined. This is the first report of this deletion in association with this phenotype; it is possible that this deletion may be causal for a Dubowitz phenocopy.

  12. Chromosome Deletion of 14q32.33 Detected by Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization in a Patient with Features of Dubowitz Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana C. Darcy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 4-year-old girl of Mexican origins with a clinical diagnosis of Dubowitz syndrome who carries a de novo terminal deletion at the 14q32.33 locus identified by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH. Dubowitz syndrome is a rare condition characterized by a constellation of features including growth retardation, short stature, microcephaly, micrognathia, eczema, telecanthus, blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, round-tipped nose, mild to moderate developmental delay, and high-pitched hoarse voice. This syndrome is thought to be autosomal recessive; however, the etiology has not been determined. This is the first report of this deletion in association with this phenotype; it is possible that this deletion may be causal for a Dubowitz phenocopy.

  13. BAC array CGH in patients with Velocardiofacial syndrome-like features reveals genomic aberrations on chromosome region 1q21.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estivill Xavier

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microdeletion of the chromosome 22q11.2 region is the most common genetic aberration among patients with velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS but a subset of subjects do not show alterations of this chromosome region. Methods We analyzed 18 patients with VCFS-like features by comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH array and performed a face-to-face slide hybridization with two different arrays: a whole genome and a chromosome 22-specific BAC array. Putative rearrangements were confirmed by FISH and MLPA assays. Results One patient carried a combination of rearrangements on 1q21.1, consisting in a microduplication of 212 kb and a close microdeletion of 1.15 Mb, previously reported in patients with variable phenotypes, including mental retardation, congenital heart defects (CHD and schizophrenia. While 326 control samples were negative for both 1q21.1 rearrangements, one of 73 patients carried the same 212-kb microduplication, reciprocal to TAR microdeletion syndrome. Also, we detected four copy number variants (CNVs inherited from one parent (a 744-kb duplication on 10q11.22; a 160 kb duplication and deletion on 22q11.21 in two cases; and a gain of 140 kb on 22q13.2, not present in control subjects, raising the potential role of these CNVs in the VCFS-like phenotype. Conclusions Our results confirmed aCGH as a successful strategy in order to characterize additional submicroscopic aberrations in patients with VCF-like features that fail to show alterations in 22q11.2 region. We report a 212-kb microduplication on 1q21.1, detected in two patients, which may contribute to CHD.

  14. SNPs and other features as they predispose to complex disease: genome-wide predictive analysis of a quantitative phenotype for hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joong-Ho Won

    Full Text Available Though recently they have fallen into some disrepute, genome-wide association studies (GWAS have been formulated and applied to understanding essential hypertension. The principal goal here is to use data gathered in a GWAS to gauge the extent to which SNPs and their interactions with other features can be combined to predict mean arterial blood pressure (MAP in 3138 pre-menopausal and naturally post-menopausal white women. More precisely, we quantify the extent to which data as described permit prediction of MAP beyond what is possible from traditional risk factors such as blood cholesterol levels and glucose levels. Of course, these traditional risk factors are genetic, though typically not explicitly so. In all, there were 44 such risk factors/clinical variables measured and 377,790 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs genotyped. Data for women we studied are from first visit measurements taken as part of the Atherosclerotic Risk in Communities (ARIC study. We begin by assessing non-SNP features in their abilities to predict MAP, employing a novel regression technique with two stages, first the discovery of main effects and next discovery of their interactions. The long list of SNPs genotyped is reduced to a manageable list for combining with non-SNP features in prediction. We adapted Efron's local false discovery rate to produce this reduced list. Selected non-SNP and SNP features and their interactions are used to predict MAP using adaptive linear regression. We quantify quality of prediction by an estimated coefficient of determination (R(2. We compare the accuracy of prediction with and without information from SNPs.

  15. 基于共享特征的高分辨率遥感影像多级分类%Multi-stage Classification of High Resolution Remote Sensing Image Based on Sharing Features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康萌萌; 郑来文; 霍宏; 方涛

    2013-01-01

    高分辨率遥感影像细节丰富,具有类内差异大、类间差异不明显的特点。为此,模拟人的目视解译方式,提出一种基于共享特征的多级二叉树分类算法,把多类分类问题划分为多个两类分类问题,每级两类分类都提取共享特征,仅解译一类目标,已解译的类别不再参加后面的分类,利用这样的逐步淘汰机制完成一幅遥感影像的全部解译。实验结果表明,与K近邻、支持向量机等其他多类分类算法相比,该算法具有更高的分类精度。%High resolution remote sensing images with abundant details generally have characteristics of great within class differences and unobvious between class differences. Simulating the visual interpretation, this paper proposes a multi-stage binary tree-structured classification algorithm based on sharing features. The multi-class classification problem is divided into multiple binary classification problems, sharing features are extracted to interpret objects of only one class at each binary classification stage, and each interpreted class will not participate in later classification. The proposed method makes use of the phase-out mechanism to complete the whole interpretation of a remote sensing image. Experimental results show that this algorithm has higher classification accuracy compared with other multi-class classification algorithms like K Nearest Neighbor(KNN), Support Vector Machine(SVM) and so on.

  16. Whole genome analysis of Vietnamese G2P[4] rotavirus strains possessing the NSP2 gene sharing an ancestral sequence with Chinese sheep and goat rotavirus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Loan Phuong; Doan, Yen Hai; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Gauchan, Punita; Kaneko, Miho; Agbemabiese, Chantal; Dang, Anh Duc; Nakagomi, Osamu

    2015-10-01

    Because imminent introduction into Vietnam of a vaccine against Rotavirus A is anticipated, baseline information on the whole genome of representative strains is needed to understand changes in circulating strains that may occur after vaccine introduction. In this study, the whole genomes of two G2P[4] strains detected in Nha Trang, Vietnam in 2008 were sequenced, this being the last period during which virtually no rotavirus vaccine was used in this country. The two strains were found to be >99.9% identical in sequence and had a typical DS-1 like G2-P[4]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 genotype constellation. Analysis of the Vietnamese strains with >184 G2P[4] strains retrieved from GenBank/EMBL/DDBJ DNA databases placed the Vietnamese strains in one of the lineages commonly found among contemporary strains, with the exception of the NSP2 and NSP4 genes. The NSP2 genes were found to belong to a previously undescribed lineage that diverged from Chinese sheep and goat rotavirus strains, including a Chinese rotavirus vaccine strain LLR with 95% nucleotide identity; the time of their most recent common ancestor was 1975. The NSP4 genes were found to belong, together with Thai and USA strains, to an emergent lineage (VIII), adding further diversity to ever diversifying NSP4 lineages. Thus, there is a need to enhance surveillance of locally-circulating strains from both children and animals at the whole genome level to address the effect of rotavirus vaccines on changing strain distribution.

  17. Genome-wide association study of CNVs in 16,000 cases of eight common diseases and 3,000 shared controls

    OpenAIRE

    Craddock, Nick; Matthew E. Hurles; Cardin, Niall; Pearson, Richard D.; Plagnol, Vincent; Robson, Samuel; Vukcevic, Damjan; Barnes, Chris; Conrad, Donald F.; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Holmes, Chris; Marchini, Jonathan L.; Stirrups, Kathy; Tobin, Martin D.; Wain, Louise V.

    2010-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) account for a major proportion of human genetic polymorphism and have been predicted to have an important role in genetic susceptibility to common disease. To address this we undertook a large, direct genome-wide study of association between CNVs and eight common human diseases. Using a purpose-designed array we typed 19,000 individuals into distinct copy-number classes at 3,432 polymorphic CNVs, including an estimated 50% of all common CNVs larger than 500 base pa...

  18. Regulating the sharing economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristofer Erickson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this introductory essay, we explore definitions of the ‘sharing economy’, a concept indicating both social (relational, communitarian and economic (allocative, profit-seeking aspects which appear to be in tension. We suggest combining the social and economic logics of the sharing economy to focus on the central features of network enabled, aggregated membership in a pool of offers and demands (for goods, services, creative expressions. This definition of the sharing economy distinguishes it from other related peer-to-peer and collaborative forms of production. Understanding the social and economic motivations for and implications of participating in the sharing economy is important to its regulation. Each of the papers in this special issue contributes to knowledge by linking the social and economic aspects of sharing economy practices to regulatory norms and mechanisms. We conclude this essay by suggesting future research to further clarify and render intelligible the sharing economy, not as a contradiction in terms but as an empirically observable realm of socio-economic activity.

  19. Genome-wide progesterone receptor binding: cell type-specific and shared mechanisms in T47D breast cancer cells and primary leiomyoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Yin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Progesterone, via its nuclear receptor (PR, exerts an overall tumorigenic effect on both uterine fibroid (leiomyoma and breast cancer tissues, whereas the antiprogestin RU486 inhibits growth of these tissues through an unknown mechanism. Here, we determined the interaction between common or cell-specific genome-wide binding sites of PR and mRNA expression in RU486-treated uterine leiomyoma and breast cancer cells. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ChIP-sequencing revealed 31,457 and 7,034 PR-binding sites in breast cancer and uterine leiomyoma cells, respectively; 1,035 sites overlapped in both cell types. Based on the chromatin-PR interaction in both cell types, we statistically refined the consensus progesterone response element to G•ACA• • •TGT•C. We identified two striking differences between uterine leiomyoma and breast cancer cells. First, the cis-regulatory elements for HSF, TEF-1, and C/EBPα and β were statistically enriched at genomic RU486/PR-targets in uterine leiomyoma, whereas E2F, FOXO1, FOXA1, and FOXF sites were preferentially enriched in breast cancer cells. Second, 51.5% of RU486-regulated genes in breast cancer cells but only 6.6% of RU486-regulated genes in uterine leiomyoma cells contained a PR-binding site within 5 kb from their transcription start sites (TSSs, whereas 75.4% of RU486-regulated genes contained a PR-binding site farther than 50 kb from their TSSs in uterine leiomyoma cells. RU486 regulated only seven mRNAs in both cell types. Among these, adipophilin (PLIN2, a pro-differentiation gene, was induced via RU486 and PR via the same regulatory region in both cell types. CONCLUSIONS: Our studies have identified molecular components in a RU486/PR-controlled gene network involved in the regulation of cell growth, cell migration, and extracellular matrix function. Tissue-specific and common patterns of genome-wide PR binding and gene regulation may determine the therapeutic effects of antiprogestins in

  20. Genome-Wide Meta-Analyses of Breast, Ovarian, and Prostate Cancer Association Studies Identify Multiple New Susceptibility Loci Shared by at Least Two Cancer Types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kar, Siddhartha P; Beesley, Jonathan; Amin Al Olama, Ali

    2016-01-01

    ,349 cases and 116,421 controls of European ancestry, all together and in pairs, identified at P risk loci......: We demonstrate that combining large-scale GWA meta-analysis findings across cancer types can identify completely new risk loci common to breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers. We show that the identification of such cross-cancer risk loci has the potential to shed new light on the shared biology...... (rs200182588/9q31/SMC2; rs8037137/15q26/RCCD1), and two breast and prostate cancer risk loci (rs5013329/1p34/NSUN4; rs9375701/6q23/L3MBTL3). Index variants in five additional regions previously associated with only one cancer also showed clear association with a second cancer type. Cell...

  1. BAC-end microsatellites from intra and inter-genic regions of the common bean genome and their correlation with cytogenetic features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Wohlgemuth Blair

    Full Text Available Highly polymorphic markers such as simple sequence repeats (SSRs or microsatellites are very useful for genetic mapping. In this study novel SSRs were identified in BAC-end sequences (BES from non-contigged, non-overlapping bacterial artificial clones (BACs in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.. These so called "singleton" BACs were from the G19833 Andean gene pool physical map and the new BES-SSR markers were used for the saturation of the inter-gene pool, DOR364×G19833 genetic map. A total of 899 SSR loci were found among the singleton BES, but only 346 loci corresponded to the single di- or tri-nucleotide motifs that were likely to be polymorphic (ATT or AG motifs, principally and useful for primer design and individual marker mapping. When these novel SSR markers were evaluated in the DOR364×G19833 population parents, 136 markers revealed polymorphism and 106 were mapped. Genetic mapping resulted in a map length of 2291 cM with an average distance between markers of 5.2 cM. The new genetic map was compared to the most recent cytogenetic analysis of common bean chromosomes. We found that the new singleton BES-SSR were helpful in filling peri-centromeric spaces on the cytogenetic map. Short genetic distances between some new singleton-derived BES-SSR markers was common showing suppressed recombination in these regions compared to other parts of the genome. The correlation of singleton-derived SSR marker distribution with other cytogenetic features of the bean genome is discussed.

  2. Pro SharePoint 2013 administration

    CERN Document Server

    Garrett, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Pro SharePoint 2013 Administration is a practical guide to SharePoint 2013 for intermediate to advanced SharePoint administrators and power users, covering the out-of-the-box feature set and capabilities of Microsoft's collaboration and business productivity platform. SharePoint 2013 is an incredibly complex product, with many moving parts, new features, best practices, and 'gotchas.' Author Rob Garrett distills SharePoint's portfolio of features, capabilities, and utilities into an in-depth professional guide-with no fluff and copious advice-that is designed from scratch to be the manual Micr

  3. Professional SharePoint 2010 Development

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzo, Tom; Fried, Jeff; Swider, Paul J; Hillier, Scot; Schaefer, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Updated guidance on how to take advantage of the newest features of SharePoint programmability More than simply a portal, SharePoint is Microsoft's popular content management solution for building intranets and websites or hosting wikis and blogs. Offering broad coverage on all aspects of development for the SharePoint platform, this comprehensive book shows you exactly what SharePoint does, how to build solutions, and what features are accessible within SharePoint. Written by a team of SharePoint experts, this new edition offers an extensive selection of field-tested best practices that shows

  4. Major depression with psychotic features

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000933.htm Major depression with psychotic features To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Major depression with psychotic features is a mental disorder in ...

  5. Genome-wide association study of CNVs in 16,000 cases of eight common diseases and 3,000 shared controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Nick; Hurles, Matthew E; Cardin, Niall; Pearson, Richard D; Plagnol, Vincent; Robson, Samuel; Vukcevic, Damjan; Barnes, Chris; Conrad, Donald F; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Holmes, Chris; Marchini, Jonathan L; Stirrups, Kathy; Tobin, Martin D; Wain, Louise V; Yau, Chris; Aerts, Jan; Ahmad, Tariq; Andrews, T Daniel; Arbury, Hazel; Attwood, Anthony; Auton, Adam; Ball, Stephen G; Balmforth, Anthony J; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Barroso, Inês; Barton, Anne; Bennett, Amanda J; Bhaskar, Sanjeev; Blaszczyk, Katarzyna; Bowes, John; Brand, Oliver J; Braund, Peter S; Bredin, Francesca; Breen, Gerome; Brown, Morris J; Bruce, Ian N; Bull, Jaswinder; Burren, Oliver S; Burton, John; Byrnes, Jake; Caesar, Sian; Clee, Chris M; Coffey, Alison J; Connell, John M C; Cooper, Jason D; Dominiczak, Anna F; Downes, Kate; Drummond, Hazel E; Dudakia, Darshna; Dunham, Andrew; Ebbs, Bernadette; Eccles, Diana; Edkins, Sarah; Edwards, Cathryn; Elliot, Anna; Emery, Paul; Evans, David M; Evans, Gareth; Eyre, Steve; Farmer, Anne; Ferrier, I Nicol; Feuk, Lars; Fitzgerald, Tomas; Flynn, Edward; Forbes, Alistair; Forty, Liz; Franklyn, Jayne A; Freathy, Rachel M; Gibbs, Polly; Gilbert, Paul; Gokumen, Omer; Gordon-Smith, Katherine; Gray, Emma; Green, Elaine; Groves, Chris J; Grozeva, Detelina; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hall, Anita; Hammond, Naomi; Hardy, Matt; Harrison, Pile; Hassanali, Neelam; Hebaishi, Husam; Hines, Sarah; Hinks, Anne; Hitman, Graham A; Hocking, Lynne; Howard, Eleanor; Howard, Philip; Howson, Joanna M M; Hughes, Debbie; Hunt, Sarah; Isaacs, John D; Jain, Mahim; Jewell, Derek P; Johnson, Toby; Jolley, Jennifer D; Jones, Ian R; Jones, Lisa A; Kirov, George; Langford, Cordelia F; Lango-Allen, Hana; Lathrop, G Mark; Lee, James; Lee, Kate L; Lees, Charlie; Lewis, Kevin; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Maisuria-Armer, Meeta; Maller, Julian; Mansfield, John; Martin, Paul; Massey, Dunecan C O; McArdle, Wendy L; McGuffin, Peter; McLay, Kirsten E; Mentzer, Alex; Mimmack, Michael L; Morgan, Ann E; Morris, Andrew P; Mowat, Craig; Myers, Simon; Newman, William; Nimmo, Elaine R; O'Donovan, Michael C; Onipinla, Abiodun; Onyiah, Ifejinelo; Ovington, Nigel R; Owen, Michael J; Palin, Kimmo; Parnell, Kirstie; Pernet, David; Perry, John R B; Phillips, Anne; Pinto, Dalila; Prescott, Natalie J; Prokopenko, Inga; Quail, Michael A; Rafelt, Suzanne; Rayner, Nigel W; Redon, Richard; Reid, David M; Renwick; Ring, Susan M; Robertson, Neil; Russell, Ellie; St Clair, David; Sambrook, Jennifer G; Sanderson, Jeremy D; Schuilenburg, Helen; Scott, Carol E; Scott, Richard; Seal, Sheila; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Shields, Beverley M; Simmonds, Matthew J; Smyth, Debbie J; Somaskantharajah, Elilan; Spanova, Katarina; Steer, Sophia; Stephens, Jonathan; Stevens, Helen E; Stone, Millicent A; Su, Zhan; Symmons, Deborah P M; Thompson, John R; Thomson, Wendy; Travers, Mary E; Turnbull, Clare; Valsesia, Armand; Walker, Mark; Walker, Neil M; Wallace, Chris; Warren-Perry, Margaret; Watkins, Nicholas A; Webster, John; Weedon, Michael N; Wilson, Anthony G; Woodburn, Matthew; Wordsworth, B Paul; Young, Allan H; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Carter, Nigel P; Frayling, Timothy M; Lee, Charles; McVean, Gil; Munroe, Patricia B; Palotie, Aarno; Sawcer, Stephen J; Scherer, Stephen W; Strachan, David P; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Brown, Matthew A; Burton, Paul R; Caulfield, Mark J; Compston, Alastair; Farrall, Martin; Gough, Stephen C L; Hall, Alistair S; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hill, Adrian V S; Mathew, Christopher G; Pembrey, Marcus; Satsangi, Jack; Stratton, Michael R; Worthington, Jane; Deloukas, Panos; Duncanson, Audrey; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P; McCarthy, Mark I; Ouwehand, Willem; Parkes, Miles; Rahman, Nazneen; Todd, John A; Samani, Nilesh J; Donnelly, Peter

    2010-04-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) account for a major proportion of human genetic polymorphism and have been predicted to have an important role in genetic susceptibility to common disease. To address this we undertook a large, direct genome-wide study of association between CNVs and eight common human diseases. Using a purpose-designed array we typed approximately 19,000 individuals into distinct copy-number classes at 3,432 polymorphic CNVs, including an estimated approximately 50% of all common CNVs larger than 500 base pairs. We identified several biological artefacts that lead to false-positive associations, including systematic CNV differences between DNAs derived from blood and cell lines. Association testing and follow-up replication analyses confirmed three loci where CNVs were associated with disease-IRGM for Crohn's disease, HLA for Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis and type 1 diabetes, and TSPAN8 for type 2 diabetes-although in each case the locus had previously been identified in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based studies, reflecting our observation that most common CNVs that are well-typed on our array are well tagged by SNPs and so have been indirectly explored through SNP studies. We conclude that common CNVs that can be typed on existing platforms are unlikely to contribute greatly to the genetic basis of common human diseases.

  6. Complete genome sequence of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora CFBP 1430 and comparison to other Erwinia spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Theo H M; Rezzonico, Fabio; Kamber, Tim; Blom, Jochen; Goesmann, Alexander; Frey, Jürg E; Duffy, Brion

    2010-04-01

    Fire blight, caused by the enterobacterium Erwinia amylovora, is a devastating disease of rosaceous plants that has global economic importance for apple and pear production and trade. The complete genome of E. amylovora CFBP 1430 was sequenced, annotated, and compared with the genomes of other Erwinia spp. Several singleton and shared features of the E. amylovora CFBP 1430 genome were identified that offer a first view into evolutionary aspects within the genus Erwinia. Comparative genomics identified or clarified virulence and fitness determinants and secretion systems. Novel insights revealed in the genome of E. amylovora CFBP 1430 hold potential for exploitation to improve the design of more effective fire blight control strategies.

  7. Labia Majora Share

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hanjing; Yap, Yan Lin; Low, Jeffrey Jen Hui

    2017-01-01

    Defects involving specialised areas with characteristic anatomical features, such as the nipple, upper eyelid, and lip, benefit greatly from the use of sharing procedures. The vulva, a complex 3-dimensional structure, can also be reconstructed through a sharing procedure drawing upon the contralateral vulva. In this report, we present the interesting case of a patient with chronic, massive, localised lymphedema of her left labia majora that was resected in 2011. Five years later, she presented with squamous cell carcinoma over the left vulva region, which is rarely associated with chronic lymphedema. To the best of our knowledge, our management of the radical vulvectomy defect with a labia majora sharing procedure is novel and has not been previously described. The labia major flap presented in this report is a shared flap; that is, a transposition flap based on the dorsal clitoral artery, which has consistent vascular anatomy, making this flap durable and reliable. This procedure epitomises the principle of replacing like with like, does not interfere with leg movement or patient positioning, has minimal donor site morbidity, and preserves other locoregional flap options for future reconstruction. One limitation is the need for a lax contralateral vulva. This labia majora sharing procedure is a viable option in carefully selected patients. PMID:28194353

  8. Unusual features of control region and a novel NADH 6 genes in mitochondrial genome of the finespot goby, Chaeturichthys stigmatias (Perciformes, Gobiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuena; Wei, Tao; Jin, Xiaoxiao

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we determined the complete mitogenome of finespot goby Chaeturichthys stigmatias with emphasis on the arranged gene order and gene feature with published Gobiidae species. The C. stigmatias mtDNA was 18,562 bp in length (56.94% AT), and comprised 37 genes (13 protein genes, 2 rRNAs and 22 tRNAs) that was typical for mitochondrial genome of Gobiidae species. Unusually, the NADH 6 gene was very large in length compared with other Gobiidae species. Mitogenome of C. stigmatias had a long putative control region with high AT content (71.28%). Within this sequence, we determined repeat regions, the termination-associated sequence and the conserved sequence block for this region. The origin of L-strand replication in C. stigmatias was located in a cluster of five tRNA genes (WANCY). The conserved motif (5'-GCCGG-3') was also determined at the base of the stem in the tRNA-Cys gene. This study will provide a better understanding of Gobiidae mitogenomes and offer useful information for future studies concerning Gobiidae mitogenome evolution.

  9. The vertebrate ancestral repertoire of visual opsins, transducin alpha subunits and oxytocin/vasopressin receptors was established by duplication of their shared genomic region in the two rounds of early vertebrate genome duplications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagman, David; Ocampo Daza, Daniel; Widmark, Jenny; Abalo, Xesús M; Sundström, Görel; Larhammar, Dan

    2013-11-02

    Vertebrate color vision is dependent on four major color opsin subtypes: RH2 (green opsin), SWS1 (ultraviolet opsin), SWS2 (blue opsin), and LWS (red opsin). Together with the dim-light receptor rhodopsin (RH1), these form the family of vertebrate visual opsins. Vertebrate genomes contain many multi-membered gene families that can largely be explained by the two rounds of whole genome duplication (WGD) in the vertebrate ancestor (2R) followed by a third round in the teleost ancestor (3R). Related chromosome regions resulting from WGD or block duplications are said to form a paralogon. We describe here a paralogon containing the genes for visual opsins, the G-protein alpha subunit families for transducin (GNAT) and adenylyl cyclase inhibition (GNAI), the oxytocin and vasopressin receptors (OT/VP-R), and the L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (CACNA1-L). Sequence-based phylogenies and analyses of conserved synteny show that the above-mentioned gene families, and many neighboring gene families, expanded in the early vertebrate WGDs. This allows us to deduce the following evolutionary scenario: The vertebrate ancestor had a chromosome containing the genes for two visual opsins, one GNAT, one GNAI, two OT/VP-Rs and one CACNA1-L gene. This chromosome was quadrupled in 2R. Subsequent gene losses resulted in a set of five visual opsin genes, three GNAT and GNAI genes, six OT/VP-R genes and four CACNA1-L genes. These regions were duplicated again in 3R resulting in additional teleost genes for some of the families. Major chromosomal rearrangements have taken place in the teleost genomes. By comparison with the corresponding chromosomal regions in the spotted gar, which diverged prior to 3R, we could time these rearrangements to post-3R. We present an extensive analysis of the paralogon housing the visual opsin, GNAT and GNAI, OT/VP-R, and CACNA1-L gene families. The combined data imply that the early vertebrate WGD events contributed to the evolution of vision and the

  10. IL1- and TGFβ-Nox4 signaling, oxidative stress and DNA damage response are shared features of replicative, oncogene-induced, and drug-induced paracrine ‘Bystander senescence’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubackova, Sona; Krejcikova, Katerina; Bartek, Jiri; Hodny, Zdenek

    2012-01-01

    Many cancers arise at sites of infection and inflammation. Cellular senescence, a permanent state of cell cycle arrest that provides a barrier against tumorigenesis, is accompanied by elevated proinflammatory cytokines such as IL1, IL6, IL8 and TNFα. Here we demonstrate that media conditioned by cells undergoing any of the three main forms of senescence, i.e. replicative, oncogene- and drug-induced, contain high levels of IL1, IL6, and TGFb capable of inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated DNA damage response (DDR). Persistent cytokine signaling and activated DDR evoke senescence in normal bystander cells, accompanied by activation of the JAK/STAT, TGFβ/SMAD and IL1/NFκB signaling pathways. Whereas inhibition of IL6/STAT signaling had no effect on DDR induction in bystander cells, inhibition of either TGFβ/SMAD or IL1/NFκB pathway resulted in decreased ROS production and reduced DDR in bystander cells. Simultaneous inhibition of both TGFβ/SMAD and IL1/NFκB pathways completely suppressed DDR indicating that IL1 and TGFβ cooperate to induce and/or maintain bystander senescence. Furthermore, the observed IL1- and TGFβ-induced expression of NAPDH oxidase Nox4 indicates a mechanistic link between the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) and DNA damage signaling as a feature shared by development of all major forms of paracrine bystander senescence. PMID:23385065

  11. Hellbender genome sequences shed light on genomic expansion at the base of crown salamanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cheng; Mueller, Rachel Lockridge

    2014-07-01

    Among animals, genome sizes range from 20 Mb to 130 Gb, with 380-fold variation across vertebrates. Most of the largest vertebrate genomes are found in salamanders, an amphibian clade of 660 species. Thus, salamanders are an important system for studying causes and consequences of genomic gigantism. Previously, we showed that plethodontid salamander genomes accumulate higher levels of long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons than do other vertebrates, although the evolutionary origins of such sequences remained unexplored. We also showed that some salamanders in the family Plethodontidae have relatively slow rates of DNA loss through small insertions and deletions. Here, we present new data from Cryptobranchus alleganiensis, the hellbender. Cryptobranchus and Plethodontidae span the basal phylogenetic split within salamanders; thus, analyses incorporating these taxa can shed light on the genome of the ancestral crown salamander lineage, which underwent expansion. We show that high levels of LTR retrotransposons likely characterize all crown salamanders, suggesting that disproportionate expansion of this transposable element (TE) class contributed to genomic expansion. Phylogenetic and age distribution analyses of salamander LTR retrotransposons indicate that salamanders' high TE levels reflect persistence and diversification of ancestral TEs rather than horizontal transfer events. Finally, we show that relatively slow DNA loss rates through small indels likely characterize all crown salamanders, suggesting that a decreased DNA loss rate contributed to genomic expansion at the clade's base. Our identification of shared genomic features across phylogenetically distant salamanders is a first step toward identifying the evolutionary processes underlying accumulation and persistence of high levels of repetitive sequence in salamander genomes.

  12. Identification, genotypic relation, and clinical features of colistin-resistant isolates of Acinetobacter genomic species 13BJ/14TU from bloodstreams of patients in a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Yeob; Shin, Jong Hee; Park, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Ju Hee; Shin, Myung Geun; Suh, Soon Pal; Ryang, Dong Wook; Kim, Soo Hyun

    2014-03-01

    Colistin resistance remains rare among clinical isolates of Acinetobacter species. We noted the emergence of colistin-resistant bloodstream isolates of the Acinetobacter genomic species (GS) 13BJ/14TU from patients at a university hospital between 2003 and 2011. We report here, for the first time, the microbiological and molecular characteristics of these isolates, with clinical features of Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU bacteremia. All 11 available patient isolates were correctly identified as Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU using partial rpoB gene sequencing but were misidentified using the phenotypic methods Vitek 2 (mostly as Acinetobacter baumannii), MicroScan (mostly as A. baumannii/Acinetobacter haemolyticus), and the API 20 NE system (all as A. haemolyticus). Most isolates were susceptible to commonly used antibiotics, including carbapenems, but all were resistant to colistin, for which it is unknown whether the resistance is acquired or intrinsic. However, the fact that none of the patients had a history of colistin therapy strongly suggests that Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU is innately resistant to colistin. The phylogenetic tree of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) showed that all 11 isolates formed a separate cluster from other Acinetobacter species and yielded five sequence types. However, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) revealed 11 distinct patterns, suggesting that the bacteremia had occurred sporadically. Four patients showed persistent bacteremia (6 to 17 days), and all 11 patients had excellent outcomes with cleared bacteremia, suggesting that patients with Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU-associated bacteremia show a favorable outcome. These results emphasize the importance of precise species identification, especially regarding colistin resistance in Acinetobacter species. In addition, MLST offers another approach to the identification of Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU, whereas PFGE is useful for genotyping for this species.

  13. Antarctic Genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex D. Rogers

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available With the development of genomic science and its battery of technologies, polar biology stands on the threshold of a revolution, one that will enable the investigation of important questions of unprecedented scope and with extraordinary depth and precision. The exotic organisms of polar ecosystems are ideal candidates for genomic analysis. Through such analyses, it will be possible to learn not only the novel features that enable polar organisms to survive, and indeed thrive, in their extreme environments, but also fundamental biological principles that are common to most, if not all, organisms. This article aims to review recent developments in Antarctic genomics and to demonstrate the global context of such studies.

  14. SharePoint 2013 for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Withee, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The bestselling guide on running SharePoint, now updated to cover all the new features of SharePoint 2013 SharePoint Portal Server is an essential part of the enterprise infrastructure for many businesses. Building on the success of previous versions of SharePoint For Dummies, this new edition covers all the latest features of SharePoint 2013 and provides you with an easy-to-understand resource for making the most of all that this version has to offer. You'll learn how to get a site up and running, branded, and populated with content, workflow, and management. In addition, t

  15. Pseudomonas lini Strain ZBG1 Revealed Carboxylic Acid Utilization and Copper Resistance Features Required for Adaptation to Vineyard Soil Environment: A Draft Genome Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kok-Gan; Chong, Teik-Min; Adrian, Tan-Guan-Sheng; Kher, Heng Leong; Grandclément, Catherine; Faure, Denis; Yin, Wai-Fong; Dessaux, Yves; Hong, Kar-Wai

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas lini strain ZBG1 was isolated from the soil of vineyard in Zellenberg, France and the draft genome was reported in this study. Bioinformatics analyses of the genome revealed presence of genes encoding tartaric and malic acid utilization as well as copper resistance that correspond to the adaptation this strain in vineyard soil environment. PMID:27512520

  16. Sharing values, sharing a vision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    Teamwork, partnership and shared values emerged as recurring themes at the Third Technology Transfer/Communications Conference. The program drew about 100 participants who sat through a packed two days to find ways for their laboratories and facilities to better help American business and the economy. Co-hosts were the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, where most meetings took place. The conference followed traditions established at the First Technology Transfer/Communications Conference, conceived of and hosted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory in May 1992 in Richmond, Washington, and the second conference, hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in January 1993 in Golden, Colorado. As at the other conferences, participants at the third session represented the fields of technology transfer, public affairs and communications. They came from Department of Energy headquarters and DOE offices, laboratories and production facilities. Continued in this report are keynote address; panel discussion; workshops; and presentations in technology transfer.

  17. Population genetics and benefit sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoppers, B M

    2000-01-01

    The majority of international or national guidelines, specific to human genetics concentrate on actual or potential clinical applications. In contrast, the Ethics Committee of the Human Genome Organisation (HUGO) attempts to provide guidance to the bench scientists engaged in fundamental research in genomics prior to any clinical applications. Often confused as constituting the Human Genome Project (HGP) itself, HUGO's (Human Genome Organization) ultimate goal is to assist in the worldwide collaboration underpinning the HGP. It is an international organisation with 1,229 members in approximately 60 countries. The Ethics Committee is one of HUGO's six international advisory committees. Composed of experts from a number of countries and disciplines, the HUGO Ethics Committee promotes discussion and understanding of social, legal, and ethical issues as they relate to the conduct of, and knowledge derived from, the Genome Initiative. Currently, it has 13 members from 11 difference countries. It has produced statements on the conduct of genetic research, on cloning, and, has most recently presented a 'Statement on Benefit-Sharing', April 11, 2000. The Intellectual Property Committee of HUGO has been active in the controversial area of patenting. The issue of benefit-sharing is one that has its source in the mandate of both committees. How to avoid both commodification of the person through payment for access to DNA and biopiracy with no return to benefits to the families or community? While patents are a legitimate form of recognition for innovation, there seems to be no therapeutic exception to some of its stringent rules and the 'morality' exclusion has lain dormant. The HUGO 'Statement on Benefit-Sharing' examines the issues of defining community, common heritage, distributive justice and solidarity before arriving at its conclusions in benefit-sharing. This communication reviews some of these issues.

  18. Shared Memories?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wæhrens, Anne

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses how the memory of the Holocaust has been addressed in the European Parliament from 1989 to 2009. I identify two major changes that occurred in the 1990s and after the 2004 enlargement of the European Union respectively. In the 1990s the war in Bosnia and the question of restit......This paper analyses how the memory of the Holocaust has been addressed in the European Parliament from 1989 to 2009. I identify two major changes that occurred in the 1990s and after the 2004 enlargement of the European Union respectively. In the 1990s the war in Bosnia and the question...... of restitution universalised the memory of the Holocaust and made it present. The 2004 enlargement brought the memory of Soviet Communism into the Union and made it a central task to construct a community of memory that includes both the memory of the Holocaust and of Soviet Communism. The analysis also...... identifies what seems to be a political memory split between Left and Right; and it shows that the time might not be ripe for a shared European memory....

  19. Chromosome catastrophes involve replication mechanisms generating complex genomic rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengfei; Erez, Ayelet; Nagamani, Sandesh C Sreenath; Dhar, Shweta U; Kołodziejska, Katarzyna E; Dharmadhikari, Avinash V; Cooper, M Lance; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Zhang, Feng; Withers, Marjorie A; Bacino, Carlos A; Campos-Acevedo, Luis Daniel; Delgado, Mauricio R; Freedenberg, Debra; Garnica, Adolfo; Grebe, Theresa A; Hernández-Almaguer, Dolores; Immken, LaDonna; Lalani, Seema R; McLean, Scott D; Northrup, Hope; Scaglia, Fernando; Strathearn, Lane; Trapane, Pamela; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau Wai; Hastings, P J; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Lupski, James R; Bi, Weimin

    2011-09-16

    Complex genomic rearrangements (CGRs) consisting of two or more breakpoint junctions have been observed in genomic disorders. Recently, a chromosome catastrophe phenomenon termed chromothripsis, in which numerous genomic rearrangements are apparently acquired in one single catastrophic event, was described in multiple cancers. Here, we show that constitutionally acquired CGRs share similarities with cancer chromothripsis. In the 17 CGR cases investigated, we observed localization and multiple copy number changes including deletions, duplications, and/or triplications, as well as extensive translocations and inversions. Genomic rearrangements involved varied in size and complexities; in one case, array comparative genomic hybridization revealed 18 copy number changes. Breakpoint sequencing identified characteristic features, including small templated insertions at breakpoints and microhomology at breakpoint junctions, which have been attributed to replicative processes. The resemblance between CGR and chromothripsis suggests similar mechanistic underpinnings. Such chromosome catastrophic events appear to reflect basic DNA metabolism operative throughout an organism's life cycle.

  20. Metabolic Environments and Genomic Features Associated with Pathogenic and Mutualistic Interactions between Bacteria and Plants is accepted for publication in MPMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpinets, Tatiana V [ORNL; Park, Byung H [ORNL; Syed, Mustafa H [ORNL; Klotz, Martin G [University of North Carolina, Charlotte; Uberbacher, Edward C [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Most bacterial symbionts of plants are phenotypically characterized by their parasitic or matualistic relationship with the host; however, the genomic characteristics that likely discriminate mutualistic symbionts from pathogens of plants are poorly understood. This study comparatively analyzed the genomes of 54 plant-symbiontic bacteria, 27 mutualists and 27 pathogens, to discover genomic determinants of their parasitic and mutualistic nature in terms of protein family domains, KEGG orthologous groups, metabolic pathways and families of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes). We further used all bacteria with sequenced genomesl, published microarrays and transcriptomics experimental datasets, and literature to validate and to explore results of the comparison. The analysis revealed that genomes of mutualists are larger in size and higher in GC content and encode greater molecular, functional and metabolic diversity than the investigated genomes of pathogens. This enriched molecular and functional enzyme diversity included constructive biosynthetic signatures of CAZymes and metabolic pathways in genomes of mutualists compared with catabolic signatures dominant in the genomes of pathogens. Another discriminative characteristic of mutualists is the co-occurence of gene clusters required for the expression and function of nitrogenase and RuBisCO. Analysis of previously published experimental data indicate that nitrogen-fixing mutualists may employ Rubisco to fix CO2 not in the canonical Calvin-Benson-Basham cycle but in a novel metabolic pathway, here called Rubisco-based glycolysis , to increase efficiency of sugar utilization during the symbiosis with plants. An important discriminative characteristic of plant pathogenic bacteria is two groups of genes likely encoding effector proteins involved in host invasion and a genomic locus encoding a putative secretion system that includes a DUF1525 domain protein conserved in pathogens of plants and of other organisms. The

  1. Exploration of plant genomes in the FLAGdb++ environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leplé Jean-Charles

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the contexts of genomics, post-genomics and systems biology approaches, data integration presents a major concern. Databases provide crucial solutions: they store, organize and allow information to be queried, they enhance the visibility of newly produced data by comparing them with previously published results, and facilitate the exploration and development of both existing hypotheses and new ideas. Results The FLAGdb++ information system was developed with the aim of using whole plant genomes as physical references in order to gather and merge available genomic data from in silico or experimental approaches. Available through a JAVA application, original interfaces and tools assist the functional study of plant genes by considering them in their specific context: chromosome, gene family, orthology group, co-expression cluster and functional network. FLAGdb++ is mainly dedicated to the exploration of large gene groups in order to decipher functional connections, to highlight shared or specific structural or functional features, and to facilitate translational tasks between plant species (Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa, Populus trichocarpa and Vitis vinifera. Conclusion Combining original data with the output of experts and graphical displays that differ from classical plant genome browsers, FLAGdb++ presents a powerful complementary tool for exploring plant genomes and exploiting structural and functional resources, without the need for computer programming knowledge. First launched in 2002, a 15th version of FLAGdb++ is now available and comprises four model plant genomes and over eight million genomic features.

  2. REVIEW OF DIGITAL IMAGE SHARING BY DIVERSE IMAGE MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayuri Sonkusare

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A natural-image-based VSS scheme (NVSS scheme that shares secret images. A natural-imagebasedsecret image sharing scheme (NSISS that can share a color secret image over n - 1 arbitrary naturalimages and one noise-like share image. Instead of altering the contents of the natural images, the encryptionprocess extracts feature images from each natural image. In order to protect the secret image from transmissionphase. (n, n - NVSS scheme shared secret image over n-1 natural share. The natural shares will be digital imageand printed image. By extracting the features of natural shares we can prepare noise-like share. After thatencryption carried out with noise-like share and secret image. Propose possible ways to hide the noise like shareto reduce the transmission risk problem for the share. In this paper Initially Feature Extraction process has beenperformed for Natural Shares. Here Digital image and Printed image have been used as Natural Shares. Withthat extracted features secret image will be encrypted by (n, n - NVSS scheme where process carried by (n-1natural shares. This Encrypted result will be hided using Share-Hiding Algorithm where generated the QR code.In the Recovering of the secret image will be done by Share Extraction Algorithm and also decryptionalgorithm. Finally the secret image with all pixels has been obtained. This proposed possible ways to hide thenoise like share to reduce the transmission risk problem for the share.

  3. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gevers Dirk

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it is an open question to what extent the two chromosomes themselves share a common history since their formation. Results Single copy genes from each chromosome (142 genes from chromosome I and 42 genes from chromosome II were identified from 19 sequenced Vibrionales genomes and their phylogenetic comparison suggests consistent phylogenies for each chromosome. Additionally, study of the gene organization and phylogeny of the respective origins of replication confirmed the shared history. Conclusions Thus, while elements within the chromosomes may have experienced significant genetic mobility, the backbones share a common history. This allows conclusions based on multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA for one chromosome to be applied equally to both chromosomes.

  4. Detecting shared pathogenesis from the shared genetics of immune-related diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhernakova, Alexandra; van Diemen, Cleo C.; Wijmenga, Cisca

    Recent genetic studies have revealed shared immunological mechanisms in several immune-related disorders that further our understanding of the development and concomitance of these diseases. Our Review focuses on these shared aspects, using the novel findings of recently performed genome-wide

  5. Beginning SharePoint 2010 Development

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Discover how to take advantage of the many new features in SharePoint 2010. SharePoint provides content management (enterprise content management, Web content management, records management, and more), workflow, and social media features, and the new version boasts enhanced capabilities. This introductory-level book walks you through the process of learning, developing, and deploying SharePoint 2010 solutions. You'll leverage your existing skills and tools to grasp the fundamental programming concepts and practices of SharePoint 2010. The author clearly explains how to develop your first appli

  6. Simple Math is Enough: Two Examples of Inferring Functional Associations from Genomic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shoudan

    2003-01-01

    Non-random features in the genomic data are usually biologically meaningful. The key is to choose the feature well. Having a p-value based score prioritizes the findings. If two proteins share a unusually large number of common interaction partners, they tend to be involved in the same biological process. We used this finding to predict the functions of 81 un-annotated proteins in yeast.

  7. Wrox SharePoint 2010 SharePoint911 three-pack

    CERN Document Server

    Klindt, Todd; Mason, Jennifer; Rogers, Laura; Drisgill, Randy; Ross, John; Riemann, Larry; Perran, Amanda; Perran, Shane; Sanford, Jacob J; Stubbs, Paul; Caravajal, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The Wrox SharePoint 2010 SharePoint911 Three-Pack combines the contents of three full e-books written by the experts from SharePoint911.  That's over 1800 pages of hands-on advice from Todd Klindt, Shane Young, Laura Rogers, Randy Drisgill, Jennifer Mason, John Ross, and Larry Riemann, among others. In Beginning SharePoint 2010: Building Business Solutions with SharePoint (ISBN 978-0-470-61789-2) by Amanda Perran, Shane Perran, Jennifer Mason, and Laura Rogers, readers learn the core concepts, terminology, and features of SharePoint 2010. In Professiona

  8. Combination of Whole Genome Sequencing, Linkage and Functional Studies Implicates a Missense Mutation in Titin as a Cause of Autosomal Dominant Cardiomyopathy with Features of Left Ventricular Non-Compaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Charlotte; Ormondroyd, Liz; Pagnamenta, Alistair; Lise, Stefano; Salatino, Silvia; Knight, Samantha JL; Taylor, Jenny C.; Thomson, Kate L.; Arnold, Linda; Chatziefthimiou, Spyros D.; Konarev, Petr V.; Wilmanns, Matthias; Ehler, Elisabeth; Ghisleni, Andrea; Gautel, Mathias; Blair, Edward; Watkins, Hugh; Gehmlich, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Background High throughput next generation sequencing techniques have made whole genome sequencing accessible in clinical practice, however, the abundance of variation in the human genomes makes the identification of a disease-causing mutation on a background of benign rare variants challenging. Methods and Results Here we combine whole genome sequencing with linkage analysis in a three-generation family affected by cardiomyopathy with features of autosomal dominant left-ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy. A missense mutation in the giant protein titin is the only plausible disease-causing variant that segregates with disease amongst the eight surviving affected individuals, with interrogation of the entire genome excluding other potential causes. This A178D missense mutation, affecting a conserved residue in the second immunoglobulin-like domain of titin, was introduced in a bacterially expressed recombinant protein fragment and biophysically characterised in comparison to its wild-type counterpart. Multiple experiments, including size exclusion chromatography, small angle X-ray scattering and circular dichroism spectroscopy suggest partial unfolding and domain destabilisation in the presence of the mutation. Moreover, binding experiments in mammalian cells show that the mutation markedly impairs binding to the titin ligand telethonin. Conclusions Here we present genetic and functional evidence implicating the novel A178D missense mutation in titin as the cause of a highly penetrant familial cardiomyopathy with features of left-ventricular non-compaction. This expands the spectrum of titin’s roles in cardiomyopathies. It furthermore highlights that rare titin missense variants, currently often ignored or left un-interpreted, should be considered to be relevant for cardiomyopathies and can be identified by the approach presented here. PMID:27625337

  9. ZINC-INDUCED FACILITATOR-LIKE family in plants: lineage-specific expansion in monocotyledons and conserved genomic and expression features among rice (Oryza sativa paralogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes Karina L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duplications are very common in the evolution of plant genomes, explaining the high number of members in plant gene families. New genes born after duplication can undergo pseudogenization, neofunctionalization or subfunctionalization. Rice is a model for functional genomics research, an important crop for human nutrition and a target for biofortification. Increased zinc and iron content in the rice grain could be achieved by manipulation of metal transporters. Here, we describe the ZINC-INDUCED FACILITATOR-LIKE (ZIFL gene family in plants, and characterize the genomic structure and expression of rice paralogs, which are highly affected by segmental duplication. Results Sequences of sixty-eight ZIFL genes, from nine plant species, were comparatively analyzed. Although related to MSF_1 proteins, ZIFL protein sequences consistently grouped separately. Specific ZIFL sequence signatures were identified. Monocots harbor a larger number of ZIFL genes in their genomes than dicots, probably a result of a lineage-specific expansion. The rice ZIFL paralogs were named OsZIFL1 to OsZIFL13 and characterized. The genomic organization of the rice ZIFL genes seems to be highly influenced by segmental and tandem duplications and concerted evolution, as rice genome contains five highly similar ZIFL gene pairs. Most rice ZIFL promoters are enriched for the core sequence of the Fe-deficiency-related box IDE1. Gene expression analyses of different plant organs, growth stages and treatments, both from our qPCR data and from microarray databases, revealed that the duplicated ZIFL gene pairs are mostly co-expressed. Transcripts of OsZIFL4, OsZIFL5, OsZIFL7, and OsZIFL12 accumulate in response to Zn-excess and Fe-deficiency in roots, two stresses with partially overlapping responses. Conclusions We suggest that ZIFL genes have different evolutionary histories in monocot and dicot lineages. In rice, concerted evolution affected ZIFL duplicated genes

  10. Comprehensive evaluation of Toxoplasma gondii VEG and Neospora caninum LIV genomes with tachyzoite stage transcriptome and proteome defines novel transcript features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaprasad, Abhinay; Mourier, Tobias; Naeem, Raeece; Malas, Tareq B; Moussa, Ehab; Panigrahi, Aswini; Vermont, Sarah J; Otto, Thomas D; Wastling, Jonathan; Pain, Arnab

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an important protozoan parasite that infects all warm-blooded animals and causes opportunistic infections in immuno-compromised humans. Its closest relative, Neospora caninum, is an important veterinary pathogen that causes spontaneous abortion in livestock. Comparative genomics of these two closely related coccidians has been of particular interest to identify genes that contribute to varied host cell specificity and disease. Here, we describe a manual evaluation of these genomes based on strand-specific RNA sequencing and shotgun proteomics from the invasive tachyzoite stages of these two parasites. We have corrected predicted structures of over one third of the previously annotated gene models and have annotated untranslated regions (UTRs) in over half of the predicted protein-coding genes. We observe distinctly long UTRs in both the organisms, almost four times longer than other model eukaryotes. We have also identified a putative set of cis-natural antisense transcripts (cis-NATs) and long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs). We have significantly improved the annotation quality in these genomes that would serve as a manually curated dataset for Toxoplasma and Neospora research communities.

  11. Comprehensive Evaluation of Toxoplasma gondii VEG and Neospora caninum LIV Genomes with Tachyzoite Stage Transcriptome and Proteome Defines Novel Transcript Features

    KAUST Repository

    Ramaprasad, Abhinay

    2015-04-13

    Toxoplasma gondii is an important protozoan parasite that infects all warm-blooded animals and causes opportunistic infections in immuno-compromised humans. Its closest relative, Neospora caninum, is an important veterinary pathogen that causes spontaneous abortion in livestock. Comparative genomics of these two closely related coccidians has been of particular interest to identify genes that contribute to varied host cell specificity and disease. Here, we describe a manual evaluation of these genomes based on strand-specific RNA sequencing and shotgun proteomics from the invasive tachyzoite stages of these two parasites. We have corrected predicted structures of over one third of the previously annotated gene models and have annotated untranslated regions (UTRs) in over half of the predicted protein-coding genes. We observe distinctly long UTRs in both the organisms, almost four times longer than other model eukaryotes. We have also identified a putative set of cis-natural antisense transcripts (cis-NATs) and long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs). We have significantly improved the annotation quality in these genomes that would serve as a manually curated dataset for Toxoplasma and Neospora research communities.

  12. Genome features of the endophytic actinobacterium Micromonospora lupini strain Lupac 08: on the process of adaptation to an endophytic life style?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Martha E; Bacigalupe, Rodrigo; Pujic, Petar; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Benito, Patricia; Riesco, Raúl; Médigue, Claudine; Normand, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Endophytic microorganisms live inside plants for at least part of their life cycle. According to their life strategies, bacterial endophytes can be classified as "obligate" or "facultative". Reports that members of the genus Micromonospora, Gram-positive Actinobacteria, are normal occupants of nitrogen-fixing nodules has opened up a question as to what is the ecological role of these bacteria in interactions with nitrogen-fixing plants and whether it is in a process of adaptation from a terrestrial to a facultative endophytic life. The aim of this work was to analyse the genome sequence of Micromonospora lupini Lupac 08 isolated from a nitrogen fixing nodule of the legume Lupinus angustifolius and to identify genomic traits that provide information on this new plant-microbe interaction. The genome of M. lupini contains a diverse array of genes that may help its survival in soil or in plant tissues, while the high number of putative plant degrading enzyme genes identified is quite surprising since this bacterium is not considered a plant-pathogen. Functionality of several of these genes was demonstrated in vitro, showing that Lupac 08 degraded carboxymethylcellulose, starch and xylan. In addition, the production of chitinases detected in vitro, indicates that strain Lupac 08 may also confer protection to the plant. Micromonospora species appears as new candidates in plant-microbe interactions with an important potential in agriculture and biotechnology. The current data strongly suggests that a beneficial effect is produced on the host-plant.

  13. Genome features of the endophytic actinobacterium Micromonospora lupini strain Lupac 08: on the process of adaptation to an endophytic life style?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha E Trujillo

    Full Text Available Endophytic microorganisms live inside plants for at least part of their life cycle. According to their life strategies, bacterial endophytes can be classified as "obligate" or "facultative". Reports that members of the genus Micromonospora, Gram-positive Actinobacteria, are normal occupants of nitrogen-fixing nodules has opened up a question as to what is the ecological role of these bacteria in interactions with nitrogen-fixing plants and whether it is in a process of adaptation from a terrestrial to a facultative endophytic life. The aim of this work was to analyse the genome sequence of Micromonospora lupini Lupac 08 isolated from a nitrogen fixing nodule of the legume Lupinus angustifolius and to identify genomic traits that provide information on this new plant-microbe interaction. The genome of M. lupini contains a diverse array of genes that may help its survival in soil or in plant tissues, while the high number of putative plant degrading enzyme genes identified is quite surprising since this bacterium is not considered a plant-pathogen. Functionality of several of these genes was demonstrated in vitro, showing that Lupac 08 degraded carboxymethylcellulose, starch and xylan. In addition, the production of chitinases detected in vitro, indicates that strain Lupac 08 may also confer protection to the plant. Micromonospora species appears as new candidates in plant-microbe interactions with an important potential in agriculture and biotechnology. The current data strongly suggests that a beneficial effect is produced on the host-plant.

  14. The mitochondrial genome of Xiphinema americanum sensu stricto (Nematoda: Enoplea): considerable economization in the length and structural features of encoded genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Y; Jones, J; Armstrong, M; Lamberti, F; Moens, M

    2005-12-01

    The complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome of the plant parasitic nematode Xiphinema americanum sensu stricto has been determined. At 12626bp it is the smallest metazoan mitochondrial genome reported to date. Genes are transcribed from both strands. Genes coding for 12 proteins, 2 rRNAs and 17 putative tRNAs (with the tRNA-C, I, N, S1, S2 missing) are predicted from the sequence. The arrangement of genes within the X. americanum mitochondrial genome is unique and includes gene overlaps. Comparisons with the mtDNA of other nematodes show that the small size of the X. americanum mtDNA is due to a combination of factors. The two mitochondrial rRNA genes are considerably smaller than those of other nematodes, with most of the protein encoding and tRNA genes also slightly smaller. In addition, five tRNAs genes are absent, lengthy noncoding regions are not present in the mtDNA, and several gene overlaps are present.

  15. The complete mitochondrial genome of the stomatopod crustacean Squilla mantis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cook Charles E

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal mitochondrial genomes are physically separate from the much larger nuclear genomes and have proven useful both for phylogenetic studies and for understanding genome evolution. Within the phylum Arthropoda the subphylum Crustacea includes over 50,000 named species with immense variation in body plans and habitats, yet only 23 complete mitochondrial genomes are available from this subphylum. Results I describe here the complete mitochondrial genome of the crustacean Squilla mantis (Crustacea: Malacostraca: Stomatopoda. This 15994-nucleotide genome, the first described from a hoplocarid, contains the standard complement of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, and a non-coding AT-rich region that is found in most other metazoans. The gene order is identical to that considered ancestral for hexapods and crustaceans. The 70% AT base composition is within the range described for other arthropods. A single unusual feature of the genome is a 230 nucleotide non-coding region between a serine transfer RNA and the nad1 gene, which has no apparent function. I also compare gene order, nucleotide composition, and codon usage of the S. mantis genome and eight other malacostracan crustaceans. A translocation of the histidine transfer RNA gene is shared by three taxa in the order Decapoda, infraorder Brachyura; Callinectes sapidus, Portunus trituberculatus and Pseudocarcinus gigas. This translocation may be diagnostic for the Brachyura. For all nine taxa nucleotide composition is biased towards AT-richness, as expected for arthropods, and is within the range reported for other arthropods. Codon usage is biased, and much of this bias is probably due to the skew in nucleotide composition towards AT-richness. Conclusion The mitochondrial genome of Squilla mantis contains one unusual feature, a 230 base pair non-coding region has so far not been described in any other malacostracan. Comparisons with other

  16. The complete mitochondrial genome of the common sea slater, Ligia oceanica (Crustacea, Isopoda bears a novel gene order and unusual control region features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podsiadlowski Lars

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence data and other characters from mitochondrial genomes (gene translocations, secondary structure of RNA molecules are useful in phylogenetic studies among metazoan animals from population to phylum level. Moreover, the comparison of complete mitochondrial sequences gives valuable information about the evolution of small genomes, e.g. about different mechanisms of gene translocation, gene duplication and gene loss, or concerning nucleotide frequency biases. The Peracarida (gammarids, isopods, etc. comprise about 21,000 species of crustaceans, living in many environments from deep sea floor to arid terrestrial habitats. Ligia oceanica is a terrestrial isopod living at rocky seashores of the european North Sea and Atlantic coastlines. Results The study reveals the first complete mitochondrial DNA sequence from a peracarid crustacean. The mitochondrial genome of Ligia oceanica is a circular double-stranded DNA molecule, with a size of 15,289 bp. It shows several changes in mitochondrial gene order compared to other crustacean species. An overview about mitochondrial gene order of all crustacean taxa yet sequenced is also presented. The largest non-coding part (the putative mitochondrial control region of the mitochondrial genome of Ligia oceanica is unexpectedly not AT-rich compared to the remainder of the genome. It bears two repeat regions (4× 10 bp and 3× 64 bp, and a GC-rich hairpin-like secondary structure. Some of the transfer RNAs show secondary structures which derive from the usual cloverleaf pattern. While some tRNA genes are putative targets for RNA editing, trnR could not be localized at all. Conclusion Gene order is not conserved among Peracarida, not even among isopods. The two isopod species Ligia oceanica and Idotea baltica show a similarly derived gene order, compared to the arthropod ground pattern and to the amphipod Parhyale hawaiiensis, suggesting that most of the translocation events were already

  17. The genome sequence of Caenorhabditis briggsae: a platform for comparative genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lincoln D Stein

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The soil nematodes Caenorhabditis briggsae and Caenorhabditis elegans diverged from a common ancestor roughly 100 million years ago and yet are almost indistinguishable by eye. They have the same chromosome number and genome sizes, and they occupy the same ecological niche. To explore the basis for this striking conservation of structure and function, we have sequenced the C. briggsae genome to a high-quality draft stage and compared it to the finished C. elegans sequence. We predict approximately 19,500 protein-coding genes in the C. briggsae genome, roughly the same as in C. elegans. Of these, 12,200 have clear C. elegans orthologs, a further 6,500 have one or more clearly detectable C. elegans homologs, and approximately 800 C. briggsae genes have no detectable matches in C. elegans. Almost all of the noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs known are shared between the two species. The two genomes exhibit extensive colinearity, and the rate of divergence appears to be higher in the chromosomal arms than in the centers. Operons, a distinctive feature of C. elegans, are highly conserved in C. briggsae, with the arrangement of genes being preserved in 96% of cases. The difference in size between the C. briggsae (estimated at approximately 104 Mbp and C. elegans (100.3 Mbp genomes is almost entirely due to repetitive sequence, which accounts for 22.4% of the C. briggsae genome in contrast to 16.5% of the C. elegans genome. Few, if any, repeat families are shared, suggesting that most were acquired after the two species diverged or are undergoing rapid evolution. Coclustering the C. elegans and C. briggsae proteins reveals 2,169 protein families of two or more members. Most of these are shared between the two species, but some appear to be expanding or contracting, and there seem to be as many as several hundred novel C. briggsae gene families. The C. briggsae draft sequence will greatly improve the annotation of the C. elegans genome. Based on similarity to C

  18. Genome sequence of thermotolerant Bacillus methanolicus: features and regulation related to methylotrophy and production of L-lysine and L-glutamate from methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggeset, Tonje M B; Krog, Anne; Balzer, Simone; Wentzel, Alexander; Ellingsen, Trond E; Brautaset, Trygve

    2012-08-01

    Bacillus methanolicus can utilize methanol as its sole carbon and energy source, and the scientific interest in this thermotolerant bacterium has focused largely on exploring its potential as a biocatalyst for the conversion of methanol into L-lysine and L-glutamate. We present here the genome sequences of the important B. methanolicus model strain MGA3 (ATCC 53907) and the alternative wild-type strain PB1 (NCIMB13113). The physiological diversity of these two strains was demonstrated by a comparative fed-batch methanol cultivation displaying highly different methanol consumption and respiration profiles, as well as major differences in their L-glutamate production levels (406 mmol liter(-1) and 11 mmol liter(-1), respectively). Both genomes are small (ca 3.4 Mbp) compared to those of other related bacilli, and MGA3 has two plasmids (pBM19 and pBM69), while PB1 has only one (pBM20). In particular, we focus here on genes representing biochemical pathways for methanol oxidation and concomitant formaldehyde assimilation and dissimilation, the important phosphoenol pyruvate/pyruvate anaplerotic node, the tricarboxylic acid cycle including the glyoxylate pathway, and the biosynthetic pathways for L-lysine and L-glutamate. Several unique findings were made, including the discovery of three different methanol dehydrogenase genes in each of the two B. methanolicus strains, and the genomic analyses were accompanied by gene expression studies. Our results provide new insight into a number of peculiar physiological and metabolic traits of B. methanolicus and open up possibilities for system-level metabolic engineering of this bacterium for the production of amino acids and other useful compounds from methanol.

  19. Comprehensive evaluation of Toxoplasma gondii VEG and Neospora caninum LIV genomes with tachyzoite stage transcriptome and proteome defines novel transcript features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramaprasad, Abhinay; Mourier, Tobias; Naeem, Raeece;

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an important protozoan parasite that infects all warm-blooded animals and causes opportunistic infections in immuno-compromised humans. Its closest relative, Neospora caninum, is an important veterinary pathogen that causes spontaneous abortion in livestock. Comparative...... than other model eukaryotes. We have also identified a putative set of cis-natural antisense transcripts (cis-NATs) and long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs). We have significantly improved the annotation quality in these genomes that would serve as a manually curated dataset for Toxoplasma...

  20. The complete mitochondrial genome of the mantid shrimp Oratosquilla oratoria (Crustacea: Malacostraca: Stomatopoda): Novel non-coding regions features and phylogenetic implications of the Stomatopoda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Cui, Zhaoxia

    2010-09-01

    The complete mitochondrial (mt) genome sequence of Oratosquilla oratoria (Crustacea: Malacostraca: Stomatopoda) was determined; a circular molecule of 15,783 bp in length. The gene content and arrangement are consistent with the pancrustacean ground pattern. The mt control region of O. oratoria is characterized by no GA-block near the 3' end and different position of [TA(A)]n-blocks compared with other reported Stomatopoda species. The sequence of the second hairpin structure is relative conserved which suggests this region may be a synapomorphic character for the Stomatopoda. In addition, a relative large intergenic spacer (101 bp) with higher A+T content than that in control region was identified between the tRNA(Glu) and tRNA(Phe) genes. Phylogenetic analyses based on the current dataset of complete mt genomes strongly support the Stomatopoda is closely related to Euphausiacea. They in turn cluster with Penaeoidea and Caridea clades while other decapods form a separate group, which rejects the monophyly of Decapoda. This challenges the suitability of Stomatopoda as an outgroup of Decapoda in phylogenetic analyses. The basal position of Stomatopoda within Eumalacostraca according to the morphological characters is also questioned.

  1. The potential of shared value creation: a theoretical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Victor Danciu

    2016-01-01

    The urgent issues economy, environment and society are facing need new approaches which allow a well-balanced sharing of value created by the economy. A step forward is the concept of shared value creation. This paper aims to analyze the main features, the content of strategy of shared value creation and to propose the social innovation as main strategic way of shared value creation. At the beginning, the drivers and challenges of shared value creation are investigated in a systematized manne...

  2. Mastering Microsoft SharePoint Foundation 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Callahan, C A

    2011-01-01

    Everything IT professionals need to create collaborative solutions. SharePoint Foundation 2010 is the newest version of a powerful collaboration tool used in many Exchange-enabled organizations. This book gets network professionals and business application administrators up to speed on the updates, features, and installation procedures, preparing them to create powerful collaboration structures for their companies.: Microsoft SharePoint Foundation 2010 is the successor to Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 and is used with Microsoft Office SharePoint Server to enable collaboration; this guide pre

  3. Sinorhizobium meliloti Phage ΦM9 Defines a New Group of T4 Superfamily Phages with Unusual Genomic Features but a Common T=16 Capsid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew C.; Tatum, Kelsey B.; Lynn, Jason S.; Brewer, Tess E.; Lu, Stephen; Washburn, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Relatively little is known about the phages that infect agriculturally important nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria. Here we report the genome and cryo-electron microscopy structure of the Sinorhizobium meliloti-infecting T4 superfamily phage ΦM9. This phage and its close relative Rhizobium phage vB_RleM_P10VF define a new group of T4 superfamily phages. These phages are distinctly different from the recently characterized cyanophage-like S. meliloti phages of the ΦM12 group. Structurally, ΦM9 has a T=16 capsid formed from repeating units of an extended gp23-like subunit that assemble through interactions between one subunit and the adjacent E-loop insertion domain. Though genetically very distant from the cyanophages, the ΦM9 capsid closely resembles that of the T4 superfamily cyanophage Syn9. ΦM9 also has the same T=16 capsid architecture as the very distant phage SPO1 and the herpesviruses. Despite their overall lack of similarity at the genomic and structural levels, ΦM9 and S. meliloti phage ΦM12 have a small number of open reading frames in common that appear to encode structural proteins involved in interaction with the host and which may have been acquired by horizontal transfer. These proteins are predicted to encode tail baseplate proteins, tail fibers, tail fiber assembly proteins, and glycanases that cleave host exopolysaccharide. IMPORTANCE Despite recent advances in the phylogenetic and structural characterization of bacteriophages, only a small number of phages of plant-symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria have been studied at the molecular level. The effects of phage predation upon beneficial bacteria that promote plant growth remain poorly characterized. First steps in understanding these soil bacterium-phage dynamics are genetic, molecular, and structural characterizations of these groups of phages. The T4 superfamily phages are among the most complex phages; they have large genomes packaged within an icosahedral head and a long

  4. Microbial genomic taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Cristiane C; Chimetto, Luciane; Edwards, Robert A; Swings, Jean; Stackebrandt, Erko; Thompson, Fabiano L

    2013-12-23

    A need for a genomic species definition is emerging from several independent studies worldwide. In this commentary paper, we discuss recent studies on the genomic taxonomy of diverse microbial groups and a unified species definition based on genomics. Accordingly, strains from the same microbial species share >95% Average Amino Acid Identity (AAI) and Average Nucleotide Identity (ANI), >95% identity based on multiple alignment genes, genomic signature, and > 70% in silico Genome-to-Genome Hybridization similarity (GGDH). Species of the same genus will form monophyletic groups on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, Multilocus Sequence Analysis (MLSA) and supertree analysis. In addition to the established requirements for species descriptions, we propose that new taxa descriptions should also include at least a draft genome sequence of the type strain in order to obtain a clear outlook on the genomic landscape of the novel microbe. The application of the new genomic species definition put forward here will allow researchers to use genome sequences to define simultaneously coherent phenotypic and genomic groups.

  5. Share your Sweets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrnit, Jill; Høgh-Olesen, Henrik; Makransky, Guido

    2015-01-01

    as sharing in which group members were allowed to co-feed or remove food from the stock of the food possessor, and the introduction of high-value food resulted in more sharing, not less. Food sharing behavior differed between species in that chimpanzees displayed significantly more begging behavior than......All over the world, humans (Homo sapiens) display resource-sharing behavior, and common patterns of sharing seem to exist across cultures. Humans are not the only primates to share, and observations from the wild have long documented food sharing behavior in our closest phylogenetic relatives......, chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and bonobos (Pan paniscus). However, few controlled studies have been made where groups of Pan are introduced to food items that may be shared or monopolized by a first food possessor, and very few studies have examined what happens to these sharing patterns if the food...

  6. Sharing Data between LSDBs and Central Repositories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Dunnen, Johan T.; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Andersen, Paal S.; Vihinen, Mauno; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Rossetti, Sandro; Talbot, C. Conover; Hardison, Ross C.; Povey, Sue; Cotton, Richard G. H.

    2009-01-01

    Several Locus-Specific DataBases (LSDBs) have recently been approached by larger, more general data repositories (including NCBI and UCSC) with the request to share the DNA variant data they have collected. Within the Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) a document was generated summarizing the iss

  7. Quantitative analysis of viral load per haploid genome revealed the different biological features of Merkel cell polyomavirus infection in skin tumor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ota

    Full Text Available Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV has recently been identified in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC, an aggressive cancer that occurs in sun-exposed skin. Conventional technologies, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR and immunohistochemistry, have produced conflicting results for MCPyV infections in non-MCC tumors. Therefore, we performed quantitative analyses of the MCPyV copy number in various skin tumor tissues, including MCC (n = 9 and other sun exposure-related skin tumors (basal cell carcinoma [BCC, n = 45], actinic keratosis [AK, n = 52], Bowen's disease [n = 34], seborrheic keratosis [n = 5], primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma [n = 5], malignant melanoma [n = 5], and melanocytic nevus [n = 6]. In a conventional PCR analysis, MCPyV DNA was detected in MCC (9 cases; 100%, BCC (1 case; 2%, and AK (3 cases; 6%. We then used digital PCR technology to estimate the absolute viral copy number per haploid human genome in these tissues. The viral copy number per haploid genome was estimated to be around 1 in most MCC tissues, and there were marked differences between the MCC (0.119-42.8 and AK (0.02-0.07 groups. PCR-positive BCC tissue showed a similar viral load as MCC tissue (0.662. Immunohistochemistry with a monoclonal antibody against the MCPyV T antigen (CM2B4 demonstrated positive nuclear localization in most of the high-viral-load tumor groups (8 of 9 MCC and 1 BCC, but not in the low-viral-load or PCR-negative tumor groups. These results demonstrated that MCPyV infection is possibly involved in a minority of sun-exposed skin tumors, including BCC and AK, and that these tumors display different modes of infection.

  8. Genome Analysis of a Novel Broad Host Range Proteobacteria Phage Isolated from a Bioreactor Treating Industrial Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leeuw, Marina; Baron, Maayan; Brenner, Asher; Kushmaro, Ariel

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria, and consequently they have a major impact on the development of a microbial population. In this study, the genome of a novel broad host range bacteriophage, Aquamicrobium phage P14, isolated from a wastewater treatment plant, was analyzed. The Aquamicrobium phage P14 was found to infect members of different Proteobacteria classes (Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria). This phage contains a 40,551 bp long genome and 60% of its genes had blastx hits. Furthermore, the bacteriophage was found to share more than 50% of its genes with several podoviruses and has the same gene order as other polyvalent bacteriophages. The results obtained in this study led to the conclusion that indeed general features of the genome of the Aquamicrobium phage P14 are shared with other broad host range bacteriophages, however further analysis of the genome is needed in order to identify the specific mechanisms which enable the bacteriophage to infect both Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. PMID:28106814

  9. SharePoint 2010 Six-in-One

    CERN Document Server

    Geier, Chris; Bertram, Becky

    2011-01-01

    A team of SharePoint authorities addresses the six most essential areas of SharePoint 2010. SharePoint enables Web sites to host shared workspaces and is a leading solution for Enterprise Content Management. This book serves as one-stop shopping for concise coverage on six key areas that you need to know in order to get up and running with SharePoint 2010 quickly. After an introduction to the new features of SharePoint 2010, the author team of SharePoint experts walk you through branding and customization, workflow, business connectivity services, social networking and tools, the search functi

  10. Pervasive Sharing of Genetic Effects in Autoimmune Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cotsapas, Chris; Voight, Benjamin F.; Rossin, Elizabeth; Lage, Kasper; Neale, Benjamin M.; Wallace, Chris; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Behrens, Timothy; Cho, Judy; De Jager, Philip L.; Elder, James T.; Graham, Robert R.; Gregersen, Peter; Klareskog, Lars; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; van Heel, David A.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Worthington, Jane; Todd, John A.; Hafler, David A.; Rich, Stephen S.; Daly, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified numerous, replicable, genetic associations between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and risk of common autoimmune and inflammatory (immune-mediated) diseases, some of which are shared between two diseases. Along with epidemiological

  11. Comparative genomics of oral isolates of Streptococcus mutans by in silico genome subtraction does not reveal accessory DNA associated with severe early childhood caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argimón, Silvia; Konganti, Kranti; Chen, Hao; Alekseyenko, Alexander V; Brown, Stuart; Caufield, Page W

    2014-01-01

    Comparative genomics is a popular method for the identification of microbial virulence determinants, especially since the sequencing of a large number of whole bacterial genomes from pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains has become relatively inexpensive. The bioinformatics pipelines for comparative genomics usually include gene prediction and annotation and can require significant computer power. To circumvent this, we developed a rapid method for genome-scale in silico subtractive hybridization, based on blastn and independent of feature identification and annotation. Whole genome comparisons by in silico genome subtraction were performed to identify genetic loci specific to Streptococcus mutans strains associated with severe early childhood caries (S-ECC), compared to strains isolated from caries-free (CF) children. The genome similarity of the 20 S. mutans strains included in this study, calculated by Simrank k-mer sharing, ranged from 79.5% to 90.9%, confirming this is a genetically heterogeneous group of strains. We identified strain-specific genetic elements in 19 strains, with sizes ranging from 200 to 39 kb. These elements contained protein-coding regions with functions mostly associated with mobile DNA. We did not, however, identify any genetic loci consistently associated with dental caries, i.e., shared by all the S-ECC strains and absent in the CF strains. Conversely, we did not identify any genetic loci specific with the healthy group. Comparison of previously published genomes from pathogenic and carriage strains of Neisseria meningitidis with our in silico genome subtraction yielded the same set of genes specific to the pathogenic strains, thus validating our method. Our results suggest that S. mutans strains derived from caries active or caries free dentitions cannot be differentiated based on the presence or absence of specific genetic elements. Our in silico genome subtraction method is available as the Microbial Genome Comparison (MGC) tool

  12. Urban sharing culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjalland, Emmy Laura Perez

    In urban areas sharing cultures, services and economies are rising. People share, rent and recycle their homes, cars, bikes, rides, tools, cloths, working space, knowhow and so on. The sharing culture can be understood as mobilities (Kesselring and Vogl 2013) of goods, values and ideas reshaping...... our cities. The sharing economy has the power to democratise access the urban space, resources and raw materials (Steen Nielsen 2008; Harvey 2000); it holds the ability to change the current dominant understandings and structures of economy and growth (Steen Nielsen 2008); solve emerging environmental...... and trust. (Thomsen 2013; Bauman 2000; Beck 1992; Giddens 1991). The sharing economy is currently hyper trendy but before claiming capitalism as dead we need to understand the basics of the sharing economies and cultures asking who can share and what will we share. Furthermore it is crucial to study what...

  13. Telomeres and Viruses: Common Themes of Genome Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong eDeng

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome maintenance mechanisms actively suppress genetic instability associated with cancer and aging. Some viruses provoke genetic instability by subverting the host’s control of genome maintenance. Viruses have their own specialized strategies for genome maintenance, which can mimic and modify host cell processes. Here, we review some of the common features of genome maintenance utilized by viruses and host chromosomes, with a particular focus on terminal repeat elements. The terminal repeats of cellular chromosomes, better known as telomeres, have well-established roles in cellular chromosome stability. Cellular telomeres are themselves maintained by viral-like mechanisms, including self-propagation by reverse transcription, recombination, and retro-transposition. Viral terminal repeat elements, like cellular telomeres, are essential for viral genome stability and propagation. We review the structure and function of viral repeat elements and discuss how they may share telomere-like structures and genome protection functions. We consider how viral infections modulate telomere regulatory factors for viral repurposing and can alter normal host telomere structure and chromosome stability. Understanding the common strategies of viral and cellular genome maintenance may provide new insights into viral-host interactions and the mechanisms driving genetic instability in cancer.

  14. Nannochloropsis genomes reveal evolution of microalgal oleaginous traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongmei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oleaginous microalgae are promising feedstock for biofuels, yet the genetic diversity, origin and evolution of oleaginous traits remain largely unknown. Here we present a detailed phylogenomic analysis of five oleaginous Nannochloropsis species (a total of six strains and one time-series transcriptome dataset for triacylglycerol (TAG synthesis on one representative strain. Despite small genome sizes, high coding potential and relative paucity of mobile elements, the genomes feature small cores of ca. 2,700 protein-coding genes and a large pan-genome of >38,000 genes. The six genomes share key oleaginous traits, such as the enrichment of selected lipid biosynthesis genes and certain glycoside hydrolase genes that potentially shift carbon flux from chrysolaminaran to TAG synthesis. The eleven type II diacylglycerol acyltransferase genes (DGAT-2 in every strain, each expressed during TAG synthesis, likely originated from three ancient genomes, including the secondary endosymbiosis host and the engulfed green and red algae. Horizontal gene transfers were inferred in most lipid synthesis nodes with expanded gene doses and many glycoside hydrolase genes. Thus multiple genome pooling and horizontal genetic exchange, together with selective inheritance of lipid synthesis genes and species-specific gene loss, have led to the enormous genetic apparatus for oleaginousness and the wide genomic divergence among present-day Nannochloropsis. These findings have important implications in the screening and genetic engineering of microalgae for biofuels.

  15. Crystal structures of the staphylococcal toxin SSL5 in complex with sialyl Lewis X reveal a conserved binding site that shares common features with viral and bacterial sialic acid binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Heather M; Basu, Indira; Chung, Matthew C; Caradoc-Davies, Tom; Fraser, John D; Baker, Edward N

    2007-12-14

    Staphylococcus aureus is a significant human pathogen. Among its large repertoire of secreted toxins is a group of staphylococcal superantigen-like proteins (SSLs). These are homologous to superantigens but do not have the same activity. SSL5 is shown here to bind to human granulocytes and to the cell surface receptors for human IgA (Fc alphaRI) and P-selectin [P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1)] in a sialic acid (Sia)-dependent manner. Co-crystallization of SSL5 with the tetrasaccharide sialyl Lewis X (sLe(X)), a key determinant of PSGL-1 binding to P-selectin, led to crystal structures of the SSL5-sLe(X) complex at resolutions of 1.65 and 2.75 A for crystals at two pH values. In both structures, sLe(X) bound to a specific site on the surface of the C-terminal domain of SSL5 in a conformation identical with that bound by P-selectin. Conservation of the key carbohydrate binding residues indicates that this ability to bind human glycans is shared by a substantial subgroup of the SSLs, including SSL2, SSL3, SSL4, SSL5, SSL6, and SSL11. This indicates that the ability to target human glycans is an important property of this group of toxins. Structural comparisons also showed that the Sia binding site in SSL5 contains a substructure that is shared by other Sia binding proteins from bacteria as well as viruses and represents a common binding motif.

  16. Crystal Structures of the Staphylococcal Toxin SSL5 in Complex With Sialyl-Lewis X Reveal a Conserved Binding Site That Shares Common Features With Viral And Bacterial Sialic Acid-Binding Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, H.M.; Basu, I.; Chung, M.C.; Caradoc-Davies, T.; Fraser, J.D.; Baker, E.N.

    2009-06-02

    Staphylococcus aureus is a significant human pathogen. Among its large repertoire of secreted toxins is a group of staphylococcal superantigen-like proteins (SSLs). These are homologous to superantigens but do not have the same activity. SSL5 is shown here to bind to human granulocytes and to the cell surface receptors for human IgA (Fc alphaRI) and P-selectin [P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1)] in a sialic acid (Sia)-dependent manner. Co-crystallization of SSL5 with the tetrasaccharide sialyl Lewis X (sLe(X)), a key determinant of PSGL-1 binding to P-selectin, led to crystal structures of the SSL5-sLe(X) complex at resolutions of 1.65 and 2.75 A for crystals at two pH values. In both structures, sLe(X) bound to a specific site on the surface of the C-terminal domain of SSL5 in a conformation identical with that bound by P-selectin. Conservation of the key carbohydrate binding residues indicates that this ability to bind human glycans is shared by a substantial subgroup of the SSLs, including SSL2, SSL3, SSL4, SSL5, SSL6, and SSL11. This indicates that the ability to target human glycans is an important property of this group of toxins. Structural comparisons also showed that the Sia binding site in SSL5 contains a substructure that is shared by other Sia binding proteins from bacteria as well as viruses and represents a common binding motif.

  17. Estimation of genome length

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The genome length is a fundamental feature of a species. This note outlined the general concept and estimation method of the physical and genetic length. Some formulae for estimating the genetic length were derived in detail. As examples, the genome genetic length of Pinus pinaster Ait. and the genetic length of chromosome Ⅵ of Oryza sativa L. were estimated from partial linkage data.

  18. Depiction of carbohydrate-active enzyme diversity in Caldicellulosiruptor sp. F32 at the genome level reveals insights into distinct polysaccharide degradation features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Dong-Dong; Ying, Yu; Zhang, Kun-Di; Lu, Ming; Li, Fu-Li

    2015-11-01

    Thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor sp. F32 can utilize cellulose-, hemicellulose-containing biomass, including unpretreated wheat straw. We have conducted a bioinformatics analysis of the carbohydrate-active enzyme (CAZyme) in the genome of Caldicellulosiruptor sp. F32, which reveals a broad substrate range of the strain. Among 2285 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), 73 (3.2%) CAZyme encoding genes, including 44 glycoside hydrolases (GHs) distributing in 22 GH families, 6 carbohydrate esterases (CEs), 3 polysaccharide lyases (PLs), 21 glycosyl transferases (GTs), and 25 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) were found. An in-depth bioinformatics analysis of CAZyme families that target cellulose, hemicellulose, chitin, pectin, starch, and β-1,3-1,4-glucan degradation were performed to highlight specialized polysaccharide degrading abilities of strain F32. A great number of orthologous multimodular CAZymes of Caldicellulosiruptor sp. F32 were found in other strains of genus Caldicellulosiruptor. While, a portion of the CAZymes of Caldicellulosiruptor sp. F32 showed sequence identity with proteins from strains of genus Clostridium. A thermostable β-glucosidase BlgA synergistically facilitated the enzymatic degradation of Avicel by endo-1,4-β-glucanase CelB, which indicated that the synchronous action of synergism between CAZymes enhanced the lignocellulose degradation by Caldicellulosiruptor sp. F32.

  19. Satisfaction and 'comparison sharing'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amilon, Anna

    2009-01-01

    the probability of satisfaction. Results show that comparison sharing impacts satisfaction for women, and that those women who share more equally than their peers are more likely to be satisfied, whereas comparison sharing has no influence on satisfaction for men. Also, parents are less likely to be satisfied...

  20. Most parsimonious haplotype allele sharing determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jiaofen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The "common disease – common variant" hypothesis and genome-wide association studies have achieved numerous successes in the last three years, particularly in genetic mapping in human diseases. Nevertheless, the power of the association study methods are still low, in particular on quantitative traits, and the description of the full allelic spectrum is deemed still far from reach. Given increasing density of single nucleotide polymorphisms available and suggested by the block-like structure of the human genome, a popular and prosperous strategy is to use haplotypes to try to capture the correlation structure of SNPs in regions of little recombination. The key to the success of this strategy is thus the ability to unambiguously determine the haplotype allele sharing status among the members. The association studies based on haplotype sharing status would have significantly reduced degrees of freedom and be able to capture the combined effects of tightly linked causal variants. Results For pedigree genotype datasets of medium density of SNPs, we present two methods for haplotype allele sharing status determination among the pedigree members. Extensive simulation study showed that both methods performed nearly perfectly on breakpoint discovery, mutation haplotype allele discovery, and shared chromosomal region discovery. Conclusion For pedigree genotype datasets, the haplotype allele sharing status among the members can be deterministically, efficiently, and accurately determined, even for very small pedigrees. Given their excellent performance, the presented haplotype allele sharing status determination programs can be useful in many downstream applications including haplotype based association studies.

  1. Functional profiling of cyanobacterial genomes and its role in ecological adaptations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Prabha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available With the availability of complete genome sequences of many cyanobacterial species, it is becoming feasible to study the broad prospective of the environmental adaptation and the overall changes at transcriptional and translational level in these organisms. In the evolutionary phase, niche-specific competitive forces have resulted in specific features of the cyanobacterial genomes. In this study, functional composition of the 84 different cyanobacterial genomes and their adaptations to different environments was examined by identifying the genomic composition for specific cellular processes, which reflect their genomic functional profile and ecological adaptation. It was identified that among cyanobacterial genomes, metabolic genes have major share over other categories and differentiation of genomic functional profile was observed for the species inhabiting different habitats. The cyanobacteria of freshwater and other habitats accumulate large number of poorly characterized genes. Strain specific functions were also reported in many cyanobacterial members, of which an important feature was the occurrence of phage-related sequences. From this study, it can be speculated that habitat is one of the major factors in giving the shape of functional composition of cyanobacterial genomes towards their ecological adaptations.

  2. Genome Maps, a new generation genome browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Ignacio; Salavert, Francisco; Sanchez, Rubén; de Maria, Alejandro; Alonso, Roberto; Escobar, Pablo; Bleda, Marta; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2013-07-01

    Genome browsers have gained importance as more genomes and related genomic information become available. However, the increase of information brought about by new generation sequencing technologies is, at the same time, causing a subtle but continuous decrease in the efficiency of conventional genome browsers. Here, we present Genome Maps, a genome browser that implements an innovative model of data transfer and management. The program uses highly efficient technologies from the new HTML5 standard, such as scalable vector graphics, that optimize workloads at both server and client sides and ensure future scalability. Thus, data management and representation are entirely carried out by the browser, without the need of any Java Applet, Flash or other plug-in technology installation. Relevant biological data on genes, transcripts, exons, regulatory features, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, karyotype and so forth, are imported from web services and are available as tracks. In addition, several DAS servers are already included in Genome Maps. As a novelty, this web-based genome browser allows the local upload of huge genomic data files (e.g. VCF or BAM) that can be dynamically visualized in real time at the client side, thus facilitating the management of medical data affected by privacy restrictions. Finally, Genome Maps can easily be integrated in any web application by including only a few lines of code. Genome Maps is an open source collaborative initiative available in the GitHub repository (https://github.com/compbio-bigdata-viz/genome-maps). Genome Maps is available at: http://www.genomemaps.org.

  3. Genome Maps, a new generation genome browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Ignacio; Salavert, Francisco; Sanchez, Rubén; de Maria, Alejandro; Alonso, Roberto; Escobar, Pablo; Bleda, Marta; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2013-01-01

    Genome browsers have gained importance as more genomes and related genomic information become available. However, the increase of information brought about by new generation sequencing technologies is, at the same time, causing a subtle but continuous decrease in the efficiency of conventional genome browsers. Here, we present Genome Maps, a genome browser that implements an innovative model of data transfer and management. The program uses highly efficient technologies from the new HTML5 standard, such as scalable vector graphics, that optimize workloads at both server and client sides and ensure future scalability. Thus, data management and representation are entirely carried out by the browser, without the need of any Java Applet, Flash or other plug-in technology installation. Relevant biological data on genes, transcripts, exons, regulatory features, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, karyotype and so forth, are imported from web services and are available as tracks. In addition, several DAS servers are already included in Genome Maps. As a novelty, this web-based genome browser allows the local upload of huge genomic data files (e.g. VCF or BAM) that can be dynamically visualized in real time at the client side, thus facilitating the management of medical data affected by privacy restrictions. Finally, Genome Maps can easily be integrated in any web application by including only a few lines of code. Genome Maps is an open source collaborative initiative available in the GitHub repository (https://github.com/compbio-bigdata-viz/genome-maps). Genome Maps is available at: http://www.genomemaps.org. PMID:23748955

  4. Plastid endosymbiosis, genome evolution and the origin of green plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller, John W

    2007-09-01

    Evolutionary relationships among complex, multicellular eukaryotes are generally interpreted within the framework of molecular sequence-based phylogenies that suggest green plants and animals are only distantly related on the eukaryotic tree. However, important anomalies have been reported in phylogenomic analyses, including several that relate specifically to green plant evolution. In addition, plants and animals share molecular, biochemical and genome-level features that suggest a relatively close relationship between the two groups. This article explores the impacts of plastid endosymbioses on nuclear genomes, how they can explain incongruent phylogenetic signals in molecular data sets and reconcile conflicts among different sources of comparative data. Specifically, I argue that the large influx of plastid DNA into plant and algal nuclear genomes has resulted in tree-building artifacts that obscure a relatively close evolutionary relationship between green plants and animals.

  5. Evolution of cancer suppression as revealed by mammalian comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollis, Marc; Schiffman, Joshua D; Boddy, Amy M

    2017-02-02

    Cancer suppression is an important feature in the evolution of large and long-lived animals. While some tumor suppression pathways are conserved among all multicellular organisms, others mechanisms of cancer resistance are uniquely lineage specific. Comparative genomics has become a powerful tool to discover these unique and shared molecular adaptations in respect to cancer suppression. These findings may one day be translated to human patients through evolutionary medicine. Here, we will review theory and methods of comparative cancer genomics and highlight major findings of cancer suppression across mammals. Our current knowledge of cancer genomics suggests that more efficient DNA repair and higher sensitivity to DNA damage may be the key to tumor suppression in large or long-lived mammals.

  6. Sharing and helping: predictors of adolescents' willingness to share diabetes personal health information with peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaala, Sarah E; Lee, Joyce M; Hood, Korey K; Mulvaney, Shelagh A

    2017-05-29

    Sharing personal information about type 1 diabetes (T1D) can help adolescents obtain social support, enhance social learning, and improve self-care. Diabetes technologies, online communities, and health interventions increasingly feature data-sharing components. This study examines factors underlying adolescents' willingness to share personal T1D information with peers. Participants were 134 adolescents (12-17 years of age; 56% female) who completed an online survey regarding experiences helping others with T1D, perceived social resources, beliefs about the value of sharing information and helping others, and willingness to share T1D information. Hemoglobin A1c values were obtained from medical records. Adolescents were more willing to share how they accomplished T1D tasks than how often they completed them, and least willing to share glucose control status. In multivariate analyses, sharing/helping beliefs (β = 0.26, P  value; β = -0.26, P  personal health information. Glucose control moderated relationships such that adolescents with worse A1c values had stronger relationships between sharing/helping beliefs and willingness to share (β = 0.18, P  personal health information, particularly if they have better diabetes health status and a stronger belief in the benefits of sharing. Social learning and social media components may improve intervention participation, engagement, and outcomes by boosting adolescents' beliefs about the benefits of sharing information and helping others.

  7. Geo-locked photo sharing on mobile devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vyas, Dhaval; Keijl, Edwin; Akker, op den Rieks; Nijholt, Anton; Veer, van der Gerrit

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the idea of geo-locking through a mobile phone based photo sharing application called Picalilly. Using its geo-locking feature, Picalilly allows its users to manually define geographical boundaries for sharing photos – limiting sharing within user-defined boundaries as well as facilitat

  8. Sharing Data for Global Infectious Disease Surveillance and Outbreak Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Koopmans, Marion G.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid global sharing and comparison of epidemiological and genomic data on infectious diseases would enable more rapid and efficient global outbreak control and tracking of diseases. Several barriers for global sharing exist but, in our opinion, the presumed magnitude of the problems appears larg...

  9. Full Genome Sequence Analysis of Two Isolates Reveals a Novel Xanthomonas Species Close to the Sugarcane Pathogen Xanthomonas albilineans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Pieretti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Xanthomonas albilineans is the bacterium responsible for leaf scald, a lethal disease of sugarcane. Within the Xanthomonas genus, X. albilineans exhibits distinctive genomic characteristics including the presence of significant genome erosion, a non-ribosomal peptide synthesis (NRPS locus involved in albicidin biosynthesis, and a type 3 secretion system (T3SS of the Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1 family. We sequenced two X. albilineans-like strains isolated from unusual environments, i.e., from dew droplets on sugarcane leaves and from the wild grass Paspalum dilatatum, and compared these genomes sequences with those of two strains of X. albilineans and three of Xanthomonas sacchari. Average nucleotide identity (ANI and multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA showed that both X. albilineans-like strains belong to a new species close to X. albilineans that we have named “Xanthomonas pseudalbilineans”. X. albilineans and “X. pseudalbilineans” share many genomic features including (i the lack of genes encoding a hypersensitive response and pathogenicity type 3 secretion system (Hrp-T3SS, and (ii genome erosion that probably occurred in a common progenitor of both species. Our comparative analyses also revealed specific genomic features that may help X. albilineans interact with sugarcane, e.g., a PglA endoglucanase, three TonB-dependent transporters and a glycogen metabolism gene cluster. Other specific genomic features found in the “X. pseudalbilineans” genome may contribute to its fitness and specific ecological niche.

  10. A Profile of Native Integration Sites Used by φC31 Integrase in the Bovine Genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lijuan Qu; Qingwen Ma; Zaiwei Zhou; Haiyan Ma; Ying Huang; Shuzhen Huang; Fanyi Zeng; Yitao Zeng

    2012-01-01

    The Streptomyces phage φC31 integrase can efficiently target attB-beadng transgenes to endogenous pseudo attP sites within mammalian genomes.To better understand the activity of φC31 integrase in the bovine genome,DNA sequences of 44 integration events were analyzed,and 32 pseudo attP sites were identified.The majority of these sites share a sequence motif that contains inverted repeats and has similarities to wild-type attP site.Genomic DNA flanking these sites typically contained repetitive sequence elements,such as short and long interspersed repetitive elements.These sequence features indicate that DNA sequence recognition plays an important role in guiding φC31-mediated site-specific integration.In addition,BF27 integration hotspot sites were identified in the bovine genome,which accounted for 13.6% of all isolated integration events and mapped to an intron of the deleted in liver cancer 1 (DLC1) gene.Also we found that the pseudo attP sites in the bovine genome had other features in common with those in the human genome.This study represents the first time that the sequence features of pseudo attP sites in the bovine genome were analyzed.We conclude that this sitespecific integrase system has great potential for applied modifications of the bovine genome.

  11. The mitochondrial genome of the entomoparasitic green alga helicosporidium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Pombert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicosporidia are achlorophyllous, non-photosynthetic protists that are obligate parasites of invertebrates. Highly specialized, these pathogens feature an unusual cyst stage that dehisces inside the infected organism and releases a filamentous cell displaying surface projections, which will penetrate the host gut wall and eventually reproduce in the hemolymph. Long classified as incertae sedis or as relatives of other parasites such as Apicomplexa or Microsporidia, the Helicosporidia were surprisingly identified through molecular phylogeny as belonging to the Chlorophyta, a phylum of green algae. Most phylogenetic analyses involving Helicosporidia have placed them within the subgroup Trebouxiophyceae and further suggested a close affiliation between the Helicosporidia and the genus Prototheca. Prototheca species are also achlorophyllous and pathogenic, but they infect vertebrate hosts, inducing protothecosis in humans. The complete plastid genome of an Helicosporidium species was recently described and is a model of compaction and reduction. Here we describe the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the same strain, Helicosporidium sp. ATCC 50920 isolated from the black fly Simulium jonesi. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The circular mapping 49343 bp mitochondrial genome of Helicosporidium closely resembles that of the vertebrate parasite Prototheca wickerhamii. The two genomes share an almost identical gene complement and display a level of synteny that is higher than any other sequenced chlorophyte mitochondrial DNAs. Interestingly, the Helicosporidium mtDNA feature a trans-spliced group I intron, and a second group I intron that contains two open reading frames that appear to be degenerate maturase/endonuclease genes, both rare characteristics for this type of intron. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The architecture, genome content, and phylogeny of the Helicosporidium mitochondrial genome are all congruent with its close

  12. Achromobacter xylosoxidans genomic characterization and correlation of randomly amplified polymorphic DNA profiles with relevant clinical features [corrected] of cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magni, Annarita; Trancassini, Maria; Varesi, Paola; Iebba, Valerio; Curci, Anna; Pecoraro, Claudia; Cimino, Giuseppe; Schippa, Serena; Quattrucci, Serena

    2010-04-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an emerging pathogen increasingly being isolated from respiratory samples of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Its role and clinical significance in lung pathogenesis have not yet been clarified. The aim of the present study was to genetically characterize A. xylosoxidans strains isolated from CF patients by use of randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profiles and to look for a possible correlation between RAPD profiles and the patients' clinical features, such as their spirometry values, the presence of concomitant chronic bacterial flora at the time of isolation, and the persistent or intermittent presence of A. xylosoxidans strains. A set of 106 strains of A. xylosoxidans were typed by RAPD analysis, and their profiles were analyzed by agglomerative hierarchical classification (AHC) and associated with the patient characteristics mentioned above by factorial discriminant analysis (FDA). The overall results obtained in this study showed that (i) there is a marked genetic relationship between strains isolated from the same patients at different times, (ii) characteristic RAPD profiles are associated with different predicted classes for forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1%), (iii) some characteristic RAPD profiles are associated with different concomitant chronic flora (CCF) profiles, and (iv) there is a significant division of RAPD profiles into "persistent strains" and "intermittent strains" of A. xylosoxidans. These findings seem to imply that the lung habitats found in CF patients are capable of shaping and selecting the colonizing bacterial flora, as seems to be the case for the A. xylosoxidans strains studied.

  13. Genomics of Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, Holger; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Chapeton-Montes, Diana; Plourde, Lucile; Speck, Denis; Popoff, Michel R

    2015-05-01

    Genomic information about Clostridium tetani, the causative agent of the tetanus disease, is scarce. The genome of strain E88, a strain used in vaccine production, was sequenced about 10 years ago. One additional genome (strain 12124569) has recently been released. Here we report three new genomes of C. tetani and describe major differences among all five C. tetani genomes. They all harbor tetanus-toxin-encoding plasmids that contain highly conserved genes for TeNT (tetanus toxin), TetR (transcriptional regulator of TeNT) and ColT (collagenase), but substantially differ in other plasmid regions. The chromosomes share a large core genome that contains about 85% of all genes of a given chromosome. The non-core chromosome comprises mainly prophage-like genomic regions and genes encoding environmental interaction and defense functions (e.g. surface proteins, restriction-modification systems, toxin-antitoxin systems, CRISPR/Cas systems) and other fitness functions (e.g. transport systems, metabolic activities). This new genome information will help to assess the level of genome plasticity of the species C. tetani and provide the basis for detailed comparative studies.

  14. The Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avital, Michel; Carroll, John M.; Hjalmarsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The sharing economy is spreading rapidly worldwide in a number of industries and markets. The disruptive nature of this phenomenon has drawn mixed responses ranging from active conflict to adoption and assimilation. Yet, in spite of the growing attention to the sharing economy, we still do not know...... much about it. With the abundant enthusiasm about the benefits that the sharing economy can unleash and the weekly reminders about its dark side, further examination is required to determine the potential of the sharing economy while mitigating its undesirable side effects. The panel will join...... the ongoing debate about the sharing economy and contribute to the discourse with insights about how digital technologies are critical in shaping this turbulent ecosystem. Furthermore, we will define an agenda for future research on the sharing economy as it becomes part of the mainstream society as well...

  15. Comparative Genomics of Four Isosphaeraceae Planctomycetes: A Common Pool of Plasmids and Glycoside Hydrolase Genes Shared by Paludisphaera borealis PX4T, Isosphaera pallida IS1BT, Singulisphaera acidiphila DSM 18658T, and Strain SH-PL62

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Anastasia A.; Naumoff, Daniil G.; Miroshnikov, Kirill K.; Liesack, Werner; Dedysh, Svetlana N.

    2017-01-01

    The family Isosphaeraceae accommodates stalk-free planctomycetes with spherical cells, which can be assembled in short chains, long filaments, or aggregates. These bacteria inhabit a wide variety of terrestrial environments, among those the recently described Paludisphaera borealis PX4T that was isolated from acidic boreal wetlands. Here, we analyzed its finished genome in comparison to those of three other members of the Isosphaeraceae: Isosphaera pallida IS1BT, Singulisphaera acidiphila DSM 18658T, and the uncharacterized planctomycete strain SH-PL62. The complete genome of P. borealis PX4T consists of a 7.5 Mb chromosome and two plasmids, 112 and 43 kb in size. Annotation of the genome sequence revealed 5802 potential protein-coding genes of which 2775 could be functionally assigned. The genes encoding metabolic pathways common for chemo-organotrophic bacteria, such as glycolysis, citrate cycle, pentose-phosphate pathway, and oxidative phosphorylation were identified. Several genes involved in the synthesis of peptidoglycan as well as N-methylated ornithine lipids were present in the genome of P. borealis PX4T. A total of 26 giant genes with a size >5 kb were detected. The genome encodes a wide repertoire of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) including 44 glycoside hydrolases (GH) and 83 glycosyltransferases (GT) affiliated with 21 and 13 CAZy families, respectively. The most-represented families are GH5, GH13, GH57, GT2, GT4, and GT83. The experimentally determined carbohydrate utilization pattern agrees well with the genome-predicted capabilities. The CAZyme repertoire in P. borealis PX4T is highly similar to that in the uncharacterized planctomycete SH-PL62 and S. acidiphila DSM 18658T, but different to that in the thermophile I. pallida IS1BT. The latter strain has a strongly reduced CAZyme content. In P. borealis PX4T, many of its CAZyme genes are organized in clusters. Contrary to most other members of the order Planctomycetales, all four analyzed

  16. Comparative Genomics of Four Isosphaeraceae Planctomycetes: A Common Pool of Plasmids and Glycoside Hydrolase Genes Shared by Paludisphaera borealis PX4(T), Isosphaera pallida IS1B(T), Singulisphaera acidiphila DSM 18658(T), and Strain SH-PL62.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Anastasia A; Naumoff, Daniil G; Miroshnikov, Kirill K; Liesack, Werner; Dedysh, Svetlana N

    2017-01-01

    The family Isosphaeraceae accommodates stalk-free planctomycetes with spherical cells, which can be assembled in short chains, long filaments, or aggregates. These bacteria inhabit a wide variety of terrestrial environments, among those the recently described Paludisphaera borealis PX4(T) that was isolated from acidic boreal wetlands. Here, we analyzed its finished genome in comparison to those of three other members of the Isosphaeraceae: Isosphaera pallida IS1B(T), Singulisphaera acidiphila DSM 18658(T), and the uncharacterized planctomycete strain SH-PL62. The complete genome of P. borealis PX4(T) consists of a 7.5 Mb chromosome and two plasmids, 112 and 43 kb in size. Annotation of the genome sequence revealed 5802 potential protein-coding genes of which 2775 could be functionally assigned. The genes encoding metabolic pathways common for chemo-organotrophic bacteria, such as glycolysis, citrate cycle, pentose-phosphate pathway, and oxidative phosphorylation were identified. Several genes involved in the synthesis of peptidoglycan as well as N-methylated ornithine lipids were present in the genome of P. borealis PX4(T). A total of 26 giant genes with a size >5 kb were detected. The genome encodes a wide repertoire of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) including 44 glycoside hydrolases (GH) and 83 glycosyltransferases (GT) affiliated with 21 and 13 CAZy families, respectively. The most-represented families are GH5, GH13, GH57, GT2, GT4, and GT83. The experimentally determined carbohydrate utilization pattern agrees well with the genome-predicted capabilities. The CAZyme repertoire in P. borealis PX4(T) is highly similar to that in the uncharacterized planctomycete SH-PL62 and S. acidiphila DSM 18658(T), but different to that in the thermophile I. pallida IS1B(T). The latter strain has a strongly reduced CAZyme content. In P. borealis PX4(T), many of its CAZyme genes are organized in clusters. Contrary to most other members of the order Planctomycetales, all

  17. Factors Impacting Knowledge Sharing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulzmann, David; Slepniov, Dmitrij

    The purpose of this paper is to examine various factors affecting knowledge sharing at the R&D center of a Western MNE in China. The paper employs qualitative methodology and is based on the action research and case study research techniques. The findings of the paper advance our understanding...... about factors that affect knowledge sharing. The main emphasis is given to the discussion on how to improve knowledge sharing in global R&D organizations....

  18. Facilitating Knowledge Sharing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdt Christensen, Peter

    Abstract This paper argues that knowledge sharing can be conceptualized as different situations of exchange in which individuals relate to each other in different ways, involving different rules, norms and traditions of reciprocity regulating the exchange. The main challenge for facilitating...... and the intermediaries regulating the exchange, and facilitating knowledge sharing should therefore be viewed as a continuum of practices under the influence of opportunistic behaviour, obedience or organizational citizenship behaviour. Keywords: Knowledge sharing, motivation, organizational settings, situations...

  19. Facilitating Knowledge Sharing

    OpenAIRE

    Holdt Christensen, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Abstract This paper argues that knowledge sharing can be conceptualized as different situations of exchange in which individuals relate to each other in different ways, involving different rules, norms and traditions of reciprocity regulating the exchange. The main challenge for facilitating knowledge sharing is to ensure that the exchange is seen as equitable for the parties involved, and by viewing the problems of knowledge sharing as motivational problems situated in different organization...

  20. A Data Sharing Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercè Crosas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available From the early days of modern science through this century of Big Data, data sharing has enabled some of the greatest advances in science. In the digital age, technology can facilitate more effective and efficient data sharing and preservation practices, and provide incentives for making data easily accessible among researchers. At the Institute for Quantitative Social Science at Harvard University, we have developed an open-source software to share, cite, preserve, discover and analyze data, named the Dataverse Network. We share here the project’s motivation, its growth and successes, and likely evolution.

  1. Phenomenology of experiential sharing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    León, Felipe; Zahavi, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The chapter explores the topic of experiential sharing by drawing on the early contributions of the phenomenologists Alfred Schutz and Gerda Walther. It is argued that both Schutz and Walther support, from complementary perspectives, an approach to experiential sharing that has tended...... to be overlooked in current debates. This approach highlights specific experiential interrelations taking place among individuals who are jointly engaged and located in a common environment, and situates this type of sharing within a broader and richer spectrum of sharing phe- nomena. Whereas Schutz’ route...

  2. Phenomenology of experiential sharing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    León, Felipe; Zahavi, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The chapter explores the topic of experiential sharing by drawing on the early contributions of the phenomenologists Alfred Schutz and Gerda Walther. It is argued that both Schutz and Walther support, from complementary perspectives, an approach to experiential sharing that has tended to be overl......The chapter explores the topic of experiential sharing by drawing on the early contributions of the phenomenologists Alfred Schutz and Gerda Walther. It is argued that both Schutz and Walther support, from complementary perspectives, an approach to experiential sharing that has tended...

  3. Genomics of oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Margaret J

    2003-01-01

    Advances in bacterial genetics came with the discovery of the genetic code, followed by the development of recombinant DNA technologies. Now the field is undergoing a new revolution because of investigators' ability to sequence and assemble complete bacterial genomes. Over 200 genome projects have been completed or are in progress, and the oral microbiology research community has benefited through projects for oral bacteria and their non-oral-pathogen relatives. This review describes features of several oral bacterial genomes, and emphasizes the themes of species relationships, comparative genomics, and lateral gene transfer. Genomics is having a broad impact on basic research in microbial pathogenesis, and will lead to new approaches in clinical research and therapeutics. The oral microbiota is a unique community especially suited for new challenges to sequence the metagenomes of microbial consortia, and the genomes of uncultivable bacteria.

  4. Genomics and transcriptomics across the diversity of the Nematoda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaxter, M; Kumar, S; Kaur, G; Koutsovoulos, G; Elsworth, B

    2012-01-01

    The diversity of biology in nematodes is reflected in the diversity of their genomes. Parasitic species in particular have evolved mechanisms to invade and outwit their hosts, and these offer opportunities for the development of control measures. Genomic analyses can reveal the molecular underpinnings of phenotypes such as parasitism and thus, initiate and support research programmes that explore the manipulation of host and parasite physiologies to achieve favourable outcomes. Wide sampling across nematode diversity allows phylogenetically informed formulation of research hypotheses, identification of core features shared by all species or important evolutionary novelties present in isolated clades. Many nematode species have been investigated through the use of the expressed sequence tag approach, which samples from the transcribed genome. Gene catalogues generated in this way can be explored to reveal the patterns of expression associated with parasitism and candidates for testing as drug targets or vaccine components. Analysis environments, such as NEMBASE facilitate exploitation of these data. The development of new high-throughput DNA-sequencing technologies has facilitated transcriptomic and genomic approaches to parasite biology. Whole genome sequencing offers more complete catalogues of genes and assists a systems approach to phenotype dissection. These efforts are being coordinated through the 959 Nematode Genomes initiative.

  5. Genome Sequence of Azospirillum brasilense CBG497 and Comparative Analyses of Azospirillum Core and Accessory Genomes provide Insight into Niche Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor González

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the genus Azospirillum colonize roots of important cereals and grasses, and promote plant growth by several mechanisms, notably phytohormone synthesis. The genomes of several Azospirillum strains belonging to different species, isolated from various host plants and locations, were recently sequenced and published. In this study, an additional genome of an A. brasilense strain, isolated from maize grown on an alkaline soil in the northeast of Mexico, strain CBG497, was obtained. Comparative genomic analyses were performed on this new genome and three other genomes (A. brasilense Sp245, A. lipoferum 4B and Azospirillum sp. B510. The Azospirillum core genome was established and consists of 2,328 proteins, representing between 30% to 38% of the total encoded proteins within a genome. It is mainly chromosomally-encoded and contains 74% of genes of ancestral origin shared with some aquatic relatives. The non-ancestral part of the core genome is enriched in genes involved in signal transduction, in transport and in metabolism of carbohydrates and amino-acids, and in surface properties features linked to adaptation in fluctuating environments, such as soil and rhizosphere. Many genes involved in colonization of plant roots, plant-growth promotion (such as those involved in phytohormone biosynthesis, and properties involved in rhizosphere adaptation (such as catabolism of phenolic compounds, uptake of iron are restricted to a particular strain and/or species, strongly suggesting niche-specific adaptation.

  6. Genome Sequence of Azospirillum brasilense CBG497 and Comparative Analyses of Azospirillum Core and Accessory Genomes provide Insight into Niche Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski-Dyé, Florence; Lozano, Luis; Acosta-Cruz, Erika; Borland, Stéphanie; Drogue, Benoît; Prigent-Combaret, Claire; Rouy, Zoé; Barbe, Valérie; Mendoza Herrera, Alberto; González, Victor; Mavingui, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Azospirillum colonize roots of important cereals and grasses, and promote plant growth by several mechanisms, notably phytohormone synthesis. The genomes of several Azospirillum strains belonging to different species, isolated from various host plants and locations, were recently sequenced and published. In this study, an additional genome of an A. brasilense strain, isolated from maize grown on an alkaline soil in the northeast of Mexico, strain CBG497, was obtained. Comparative genomic analyses were performed on this new genome and three other genomes (A. brasilense Sp245, A. lipoferum 4B and Azospirillum sp. B510). The Azospirillum core genome was established and consists of 2,328 proteins, representing between 30% to 38% of the total encoded proteins within a genome. It is mainly chromosomally-encoded and contains 74% of genes of ancestral origin shared with some aquatic relatives. The non-ancestral part of the core genome is enriched in genes involved in signal transduction, in transport and in metabolism of carbohydrates and amino-acids, and in surface properties features linked to adaptation in fluctuating environments, such as soil and rhizosphere. Many genes involved in colonization of plant roots, plant-growth promotion (such as those involved in phytohormone biosynthesis), and properties involved in rhizosphere adaptation (such as catabolism of phenolic compounds, uptake of iron) are restricted to a particular strain and/or species, strongly suggesting niche-specific adaptation. PMID:24705077

  7. Lowering medical costs through the sharing of savings by physicians and patients: inclusive shared savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Harald; Emanuel, Ezekiel J

    2014-12-01

    Current approaches to controlling health care costs have strengths and weaknesses. We propose an alternative, "inclusive shared savings," that aims to lower medical costs through savings that are shared by physicians and patients. Inclusive shared savings may be particularly attractive in situations in which treatments, such as those for gastric cancer, are similar in clinical effectiveness and have modest differences in convenience but substantially differ in cost. Inclusive shared savings incorporates features of typical insurance coverage, shared savings, and value-based insurance design but differs from value-based insurance design, which merely seeks to decrease or eliminate out-of-pocket costs. Inclusive shared savings offers financial incentives to physicians and patients to promote the use of lower-cost, but equally effective, interventions and should be evaluated in a rigorous trial or demonstration project.

  8. Genomics of Ecological Adaptation in Cactophilic Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillén, Yolanda; Rius, Núria; Delprat, Alejandra; Williford, Anna; Muyas, Francesc; Puig, Marta; Casillas, Sònia; Ràmia, Miquel; Egea, Raquel; Negre, Barbara; Mir, Gisela; Camps, Jordi; Moncunill, Valentí; Ruiz-Ruano, Francisco J.; Cabrero, Josefa; de Lima, Leonardo G.; Dias, Guilherme B.; Ruiz, Jeronimo C.; Kapusta, Aurélie; Garcia-Mas, Jordi; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo G.; Torrents, David; Camacho, Juan P.; Kuhn, Gustavo C.S.; Feschotte, Cédric; Clark, Andrew G.; Betrán, Esther; Barbadilla, Antonio; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Cactophilic Drosophila species provide a valuable model to study gene–environment interactions and ecological adaptation. Drosophila buzzatii and Drosophila mojavensis are two cactophilic species that belong to the repleta group, but have very different geographical distributions and primary host plants. To investigate the genomic basis of ecological adaptation, we sequenced the genome and developmental transcriptome of D. buzzatii and compared its gene content with that of D. mojavensis and two other noncactophilic Drosophila species in the same subgenus. The newly sequenced D. buzzatii genome (161.5 Mb) comprises 826 scaffolds (>3 kb) and contains 13,657 annotated protein-coding genes. Using RNA sequencing data of five life-stages we found expression of 15,026 genes, 80% protein-coding genes, and 20% noncoding RNA genes. In total, we detected 1,294 genes putatively under positive selection. Interestingly, among genes under positive selection in the D. mojavensis lineage, there is an excess of genes involved in metabolism of heterocyclic compounds that are abundant in Stenocereus cacti and toxic to nonresident Drosophila species. We found 117 orphan genes in the shared D. buzzatii–D. mojavensis lineage. In addition, gene duplication analysis identified lineage-specific expanded families with functional annotations associated with proteolysis, zinc ion binding, chitin binding, sensory perception, ethanol tolerance, immunity, physiology, and reproduction. In summary, we identified genetic signatures of adaptation in the shared D. buzzatii–D. mojavensis lineage, and in the two separate D. buzzatii and D. mojavensis lineages. Many of the novel lineage-specific genomic features are promising candidates for explaining the adaptation of these species to their distinct ecological niches. PMID:25552534

  9. High-Throughput Genomics Enhances Tomato Breeding Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, A; Di Matteo, A; Carputo, D; Frusciante, L

    2009-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is considered a model plant species for a group of economically important crops, such as potato, pepper, eggplant, since it exhibits a reduced genomic size (950 Mb), a short generation time, and routine transformation technologies. Moreover, it shares with the other Solanaceous plants the same haploid chromosome number and a high level of conserved genomic organization. Finally, many genomic and genetic resources are actually available for tomato, and the sequencing of its genome is in progress. These features make tomato an ideal species for theoretical studies and practical applications in the genomics field. The present review describes how structural genomics assist the selection of new varieties resistant to pathogens that cause damage to this crop. Many molecular markers highly linked to resistance genes and cloned resistance genes are available and could be used for a high-throughput screening of multiresistant varieties. Moreover, a new genomics-assisted breeding approach for improving fruit quality is presented and discussed. It relies on the identification of genetic mechanisms controlling the trait of interest through functional genomics tools. Following this approach, polymorphisms in major gene sequences responsible for variability in the expression of the trait under study are then exploited for tracking simultaneously favourable allele combinations in breeding programs using high-throughput genomic technologies. This aims at pyramiding in the genetic background of commercial cultivars alleles that increase their performances. In conclusion, tomato breeding strategies supported by advanced technologies are expected to target increased productivity and lower costs of improved genotypes even for complex traits. PMID:19721805

  10. The Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avital, Michel; Carroll, John M.; Hjalmarsson, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    The sharing economy is spreading rapidly worldwide in a number of industries and markets. The disruptive nature of this phenomenon has drawn mixed responses ranging from active conflict to adoption and assimilation. Yet, in spite of the growing attention to the sharing economy, we still do not kn...

  11. Limitations to sharing entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jeong San; Sanders, Barry C

    2011-01-01

    We discuss limitations to sharing entanglement known as monogamy of entanglement. Our pedagogical approach commences with simple examples of limited entanglement sharing for pure three-qubit states and progresses to the more general case of mixed-state monogamy relations with multiple qudits.

  12. 5G Spectrum Sharing

    OpenAIRE

    Nekovee, Maziar; Rudd, Richard

    2017-01-01

    In this paper an overview is given of the current status of 5G industry standards, spectrum allocation and use cases, followed by initial investigations of new opportunities for spectrum sharing in 5G using cognitive radio techniques, considering both licensed and unlicensed scenarios. A particular attention is given to sharing millimeter-wave frequencies, which are of prominent importance for 5G.

  13. Shared Parenting Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkat, Ira Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Joint custody of children is the most prevalent court ordered arrangement for families of divorce. A growing body of literature indicates that many parents engage in behaviors that are incompatible with shared parenting. This article provides specific criteria for a definition of the Shared Parenting Dysfunction. Clinical aspects of the phenomenon…

  14. Exploring the Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netter, Sarah

    tensions experience by sharing platforms by looking at the case of mobile fashion reselling and swapping markets. The final paper combines the perspectives of different sharing economy stakeholders and outlines some of the micro and macro tensions arising in and influencing the organization of these multi...... and to provide a more nuanced understanding of the micro- and macro-level tensions that characterize the sharing economy. This thesis consists of four research papers, each using different literature, methodology, and data sets. The first paper investigates how the sharing economy is diffused and is ‘talked...... into existence’ by the communicative acts of a number of different actors. The second paper looks at how the reality of these narratives is actually experienced by the representatives of one type of sharing platform, i.e., fashion libraries. The third paper further expands the understanding of micro-level...

  15. Exploring the Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netter, Sarah

    Despite the growing interest on the part of proponents and opponents - ranging from business, civil society, media, to policy-makers alike - there is still limited knowledge about the working mechanisms of the sharing economy. The thesis is dedicated to explore this understudied phenomenon...... and to provide a more nuanced understanding of the micro- and macro-level tensions that characterize the sharing economy. This thesis consists of four research papers, each using different literature, methodology, and data sets. The first paper investigates how the sharing economy is diffused and is ‘talked......-level tensions experience by sharing platforms by looking at the case of mobile fashion reselling and swapping markets. The final paper combines the perspectives of different sharing economy stakeholders and outlines some of the micro and macro tensions arising in and influencing the organization of these multi...

  16. RACE pulls for shared control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, M. B., Jr.; Cassiday, B. K.

    1993-02-01

    Maintaining and supporting an aircraft fleet, in a climate of reduced manpower and financial resources, dictates effective utilization of robotics and automation technologies. To help develop a winning robotics and automation program the Air Force Logistics Command created the Robotics and Automation Center of Excellence (RACE). RACE is a command wide focal point. Race is an organic source of expertise to assist the Air Logistic Center (ALC) product directorates in improving process productivity through the judicious insertion of robotics and automation technologies. RACE is a champion for pulling emerging technologies into the aircraft logistic centers. One of those technology pulls is shared control. Small batch sizes, feature uncertainty, and varying work load conspire to make classic industrial robotic solutions impractical. One can view ALC process problems in the context of space robotics without the time delay. The ALC's will benefit greatly from the implementation of a common architecture that supports a range of control actions from fully autonomous to teleoperated. Working with national laboratories and private industry, we hope to transition shared control technology to the depot floor. This paper provides an overview of the RACE internal initiatives and customer support, with particular emphasis on production processes that will benefit from shared control technology.

  17. Chimpanzees share forbidden fruit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberley J Hockings

    Full Text Available The sharing of wild plant foods is infrequent in chimpanzees, but in chimpanzee communities that engage in hunting, meat is frequently used as a 'social tool' for nurturing alliances and social bonds. Here we report the only recorded example of regular sharing of plant foods by unrelated, non-provisioned wild chimpanzees, and the contexts in which these sharing behaviours occur. From direct observations, adult chimpanzees at Bossou (Republic of Guinea, West Africa very rarely transferred wild plant foods. In contrast, they shared cultivated plant foods much more frequently (58 out of 59 food sharing events. Sharing primarily consists of adult males allowing reproductively cycling females to take food that they possess. We propose that hypotheses focussing on 'food-for-sex and -grooming' and 'showing-off' strategies plausibly account for observed sharing behaviours. A changing human-dominated landscape presents chimpanzees with fresh challenges, and our observations suggest that crop-raiding provides adult male chimpanzees at Bossou with highly desirable food commodities that may be traded for other currencies.

  18. Array comparative genomic hybridization of keratoacanthomas and squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jian; Wang, Kai; Gao, Fei

    2012-01-01

    Keratoacanthoma (KA) is a benign keratinocytic neoplasm that spontaneously regresses after 3-6 months and shares features with squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Furthermore, there are reports of KAs that have metastasized, invoking the question of whether KA is a variant of SCC (Hodak et al., 1993......). To date, no reported criteria are sensitive enough to discriminate reliably between KA and SCC, and consequently there is a clinical need for discriminating markers. Our previous study analyzed 132 KAs and 29 SCCs and revealed significantly different regions of genomic aberrations using chromosomal...

  19. Genomic and evolutionary features of the SPI-1 type III secretion system that is present in Xanthomonas albilineans but is not essential for xylem colonization and symptom development of sugarcane leaf scald.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marguerettaz, Mélanie; Pieretti, Isabelle; Gayral, Philippe; Puig, Jérôme; Brin, Chrystelle; Cociancich, Stéphane; Poussier, Stéphane; Rott, Philippe; Royer, Monique

    2011-02-01

    Xanthomonas albilineans is the causal agent of sugarcane leaf scald. Interestingly, this bacterium, which is not known to be insect or animal associated, possesses a type III secretion system (T3SS) belonging to the injectisome family Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1). The T3SS SPI-1 of X. albilineans shares only low similarity with other available T3SS SPI-1 sequences. Screening of a collection of 128 plant-pathogenic bacteria revealed that this T3SS SPI-1 is present in only two species of Xanthomonas: X. albilineans and X. axonopodis pv. phaseoli. Inoculation of sugarcane with knockout mutants showed that this system is not required by X. albilineans to spread within xylem vessels and to cause disease symptoms. This result was confirmed by the absence of this T3SS SPI-1 in an X. albilineans strain isolated from diseased sugarcane. To investigate the importance of the T3SS SPI-1 during the life cycle of X. albilineans, we analyzed T3SS SPI-1 sequences from 11 strains spanning the genetic diversity of this species. No nonsense mutations or frameshifting indels were observed in any of these strains, suggesting that the T3SS SPI-1 system is maintained within the species X. albilineans. Evolutionary features of T3SS SPI-1 based on phylogenetic, recombination, and selection analyses are discussed in the context of the possible functional importance of T3SS SPI-1 in the ecology of X. albilineans.

  20. Knowledge grows when shared

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elbæk, Mikael Karstensen

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge is one of the few commodities that don’t devalue when used. Actually knowledge grows when shared and the free online access to peer-reviewed scientific publications is a potent ingredient the process of sharing. The sharing of knowledge is facilitated by the Open Access Movement. However...... infrastructure for Open Access was launched in Ghent, Belgium. This project and initiative is facilitating the success of the Open Access Pilot in FP7 as presented earlier in this journal. In this brief article I will present some of the most interesting issues that were discussed during the first session...

  1. Global resource sharing

    CERN Document Server

    Frederiksen, Linda; Nance, Heidi

    2011-01-01

    Written from a global perspective, this book reviews sharing of library resources on a global scale. With expanded discovery tools and massive digitization projects, the rich and extensive holdings of the world's libraries are more visible now than at any time in the past. Advanced communication and transmission technologies, along with improved international standards, present a means for the sharing of library resources around the globe. Despite these significant improvements, a number of challenges remain. Global Resource Sharing provides librarians and library managers with a comprehensive

  2. Too Much Information Sharing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganuza, Juan José; Jansen, Jos

    2013-01-01

    By using general information structures and precision criteria based on the dispersion of conditional expectations, we study how oligopolists’ information acquisition decisions may change the effects of information sharing on the consumer surplus. Sharing information about individual cost...... parameters gives the following trade-off in Cournot oligopoly. On the one hand, it decreases the expected consumer surplus for a given information precision, as the literature shows. On the other hand, information sharing increases the firms’ incentives to acquire information, and the consumer surplus...... increases in the precision of the firms’ information. Interestingly, the latter effect may dominate the former effect....

  3. Getting Behind B Shares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    China Ocean Shipping(Group)Co.(COSCO) employs an experimental strategy of making acquisitions through the purchase of B shares COSCO Pacific Ltd.and its affili- ated companies held 4.5 million shares of China International Marine Containers(Grouo)Co.Ltd.(CIMC) as of March 6. Four months ago,the board of direc- tors of COSCO Container Industries Ltd. (COSCO Container)decided to buy more B shares of CIMC through the securities mar- ket.COSCO Container is a shell company registered in the British Virgin Islands with a

  4. A First Insight into the Genome of the Filter-Feeder Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgarella, Maria; Puiu, Daniela; Novoa, Beatriz; Figueras, Antonio; Posada, David; Canchaya, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Mussels belong to the phylum Mollusca, one of the largest and most diverse taxa in the animal kingdom. Despite their importance in aquaculture and in biology in general, genomic resources from mussels are still scarce. To broaden and increase the genomic knowledge in this family, we carried out a whole-genome sequencing study of the cosmopolitan Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis). We sequenced its genome (32X depth of coverage) on the Illumina platform using three pair-end libraries with different insert sizes. The large number of contigs obtained pointed out a highly complex genome of 1.6 Gb where repeated elements seem to be widespread (~30% of the genome), a feature that is also shared with other marine molluscs. Notwithstanding the limitations of our genome sequencing, we were able to reconstruct two mitochondrial genomes and predict 10,891 putative genes. A comparative analysis with other molluscs revealed a gene enrichment of gene ontology categories related to multixenobiotic resistance, glutamate biosynthetic process, and the maintenance of ciliary structures.

  5. Comparative genomic and morphological analyses of Listeria phages isolated from farm environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denes, Thomas; Vongkamjan, Kitiya; Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang; Moreno Switt, Andrea I; Wiedmann, Martin; den Bakker, Henk C

    2014-08-01

    The genus Listeria is ubiquitous in the environment and includes the globally important food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. While the genomic diversity of Listeria has been well studied, considerably less is known about the genomic and morphological diversity of Listeria bacteriophages. In this study, we sequenced and analyzed the genomes of 14 Listeria phages isolated mostly from New York dairy farm environments as well as one related Enterococcus faecalis phage to obtain information on genome characteristics and diversity. We also examined 12 of the phages by electron microscopy to characterize their morphology. These Listeria phages, based on gene orthology and morphology, together with previously sequenced Listeria phages could be classified into five orthoclusters, including one novel orthocluster. One orthocluster (orthocluster I) consists of large genome (~135-kb) myoviruses belonging to the genus “Twort-like viruses,” three orthoclusters (orthoclusters II to IV) contain small-genome (36- to 43-kb) siphoviruses with icosahedral heads, and the novel orthocluster V contains medium-sized-genome (~66-kb) siphoviruses with elongated heads. A novel orthocluster (orthocluster VI) of E. faecalis phages, with medium-sized genomes (~56 kb), was identified, which grouped together and shares morphological features with the novel Listeria phage orthocluster V. This new group of phages (i.e., orthoclusters V and VI) is composed of putative lytic phages that may prove to be useful in phage-based applications for biocontrol, detection, and therapeutic purposes.

  6. A First Insight into the Genome of the Filter-Feeder Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Murgarella

    Full Text Available Mussels belong to the phylum Mollusca, one of the largest and most diverse taxa in the animal kingdom. Despite their importance in aquaculture and in biology in general, genomic resources from mussels are still scarce. To broaden and increase the genomic knowledge in this family, we carried out a whole-genome sequencing study of the cosmopolitan Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis. We sequenced its genome (32X depth of coverage on the Illumina platform using three pair-end libraries with different insert sizes. The large number of contigs obtained pointed out a highly complex genome of 1.6 Gb where repeated elements seem to be widespread (~30% of the genome, a feature that is also shared with other marine molluscs. Notwithstanding the limitations of our genome sequencing, we were able to reconstruct two mitochondrial genomes and predict 10,891 putative genes. A comparative analysis with other molluscs revealed a gene enrichment of gene ontology categories related to multixenobiotic resistance, glutamate biosynthetic process, and the maintenance of ciliary structures.

  7. Integration and visualization of systems biology data in context of the genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenenbaum Dan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-density tiling arrays and new sequencing technologies are generating rapidly increasing volumes of transcriptome and protein-DNA interaction data. Visualization and exploration of this data is critical to understanding the regulatory logic encoded in the genome by which the cell dynamically affects its physiology and interacts with its environment. Results The Gaggle Genome Browser is a cross-platform desktop program for interactively visualizing high-throughput data in the context of the genome. Important features include dynamic panning and zooming, keyword search and open interoperability through the Gaggle framework. Users may bookmark locations on the genome with descriptive annotations and share these bookmarks with other users. The program handles large sets of user-generated data using an in-process database and leverages the facilities of SQL and the R environment for importing and manipulating data. A key aspect of the Gaggle Genome Browser is interoperability. By connecting to the Gaggle framework, the genome browser joins a suite of interconnected bioinformatics tools for analysis and visualization with connectivity to major public repositories of sequences, interactions and pathways. To this flexible environment for exploring and combining data, the Gaggle Genome Browser adds the ability to visualize diverse types of data in relation to its coordinates on the genome. Conclusions Genomic coordinates function as a common key by which disparate biological data types can be related to one another. In the Gaggle Genome Browser, heterogeneous data are joined by their location on the genome to create information-rich visualizations yielding insight into genome organization, transcription and its regulation and, ultimately, a better understanding of the mechanisms that enable the cell to dynamically respond to its environment.

  8. ReplicationDomain: a visualization tool and comparative database for genome-wide replication timing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokochi Tomoki

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic DNA replication is regulated at the level of large chromosomal domains (0.5–5 megabases in mammals within which replicons are activated relatively synchronously. These domains replicate in a specific temporal order during S-phase and our genome-wide analyses of replication timing have demonstrated that this temporal order of domain replication is a stable property of specific cell types. Results We have developed ReplicationDomain http://www.replicationdomain.org as a web-based database for analysis of genome-wide replication timing maps (replication profiles from various cell lines and species. This database also provides comparative information of transcriptional expression and is configured to display any genome-wide property (for instance, ChIP-Chip or ChIP-Seq data via an interactive web interface. Our published microarray data sets are publicly available. Users may graphically display these data sets for a selected genomic region and download the data displayed as text files, or alternatively, download complete genome-wide data sets. Furthermore, we have implemented a user registration system that allows registered users to upload their own data sets. Upon uploading, registered users may choose to: (1 view their data sets privately without sharing; (2 share with other registered users; or (3 make their published or "in press" data sets publicly available, which can fulfill journal and funding agencies' requirements for data sharing. Conclusion ReplicationDomain is a novel and powerful tool to facilitate the comparative visualization of replication timing in various cell types as well as other genome-wide chromatin features and is considerably faster and more convenient than existing browsers when viewing multi-megabase segments of chromosomes. Furthermore, the data upload function with the option of private viewing or sharing of data sets between registered users should be a valuable resource for the

  9. Shared decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the rest of your life Having major surgery Getting genetic or cancer screening tests Talking together about your options helps your provider know how you feel and what you value. How Shared Decision Making Works When facing a decision, your ...

  10. Genomic Database Searching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, James R A

    2017-01-01

    The availability of reference genome sequences for virtually all species under active research has revolutionized biology. Analyses of genomic variations in many organisms have provided insights into phenotypic traits, evolution and disease, and are transforming medicine. All genomic data from publicly funded projects are freely available in Internet-based databases, for download or searching via genome browsers such as Ensembl, Vega, NCBI's Map Viewer, and the UCSC Genome Browser. These online tools generate interactive graphical outputs of relevant chromosomal regions, showing genes, transcripts, and other genomic landmarks, and epigenetic features mapped by projects such as ENCODE.This chapter provides a broad overview of the major genomic databases and browsers, and describes various approaches and the latest resources for searching them. Methods are provided for identifying genomic locus and sequence information using gene names or codes, identifiers for DNA and RNA molecules and proteins; also from karyotype bands, chromosomal coordinates, sequences, motifs, and matrix-based patterns. Approaches are also described for batch retrieval of genomic information, performing more complex queries, and analyzing larger sets of experimental data, for example from next-generation sequencing projects.

  11. [Landscape and ecological genomics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetushkin, E Ia

    2013-10-01

    Landscape genomics is the modern version of landscape genetics, a discipline that arose approximately 10 years ago as a combination of population genetics, landscape ecology, and spatial statistics. It studies the effects of environmental variables on gene flow and other microevolutionary processes that determine genetic connectivity and variations in populations. In contrast to population genetics, it operates at the level of individual specimens rather than at the level of population samples. Another important difference between landscape genetics and genomics and population genetics is that, in the former, the analysis of gene flow and local adaptations takes quantitative account of landforms and features of the matrix, i.e., hostile spaces that separate species habitats. Landscape genomics is a part of population ecogenomics, which, along with community genomics, is a major part of ecological genomics. One of the principal purposes of landscape genomics is the identification and differentiation of various genome-wide and locus-specific effects. The approaches and computation tools developed for combined analysis of genomic and landscape variables make it possible to detect adaptation-related genome fragments, which facilitates the planning of conservation efforts and the prediction of species' fate in response to expected changes in the environment.

  12. Sharing resources@CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    The library is launching a 'sharing resources@CERN' campaign, aiming to increase the library's utility by including the thousands of books bought by individual groups at CERN. This will improve sharing of information among CERN staff and users. Photo 01: L. to r. Eduardo Aldaz, from the PS division, Corrado Pettenati, Head Librarian, and Isabel Bejar, from the ST division, read their divisional copies of the same book.

  13. The Tradable Shares Puzzle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A huge number of restricted shares were made tradable in March in the mainland stock market,testing the capability of the fragile capital market Ping An of China has been made the main scapegoat of this year s stock market plunge.A month after its refinancing plan announcement- equivalent to recreating a new Ping An- its 3.12 billion restricted shares were made tradable on March 3,accounting for almost

  14. Performing the sharing economy.

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, L

    2015-01-01

    The sharing economy converges around activities facilitated through digital platforms that enable peer-to-peer access to goods and services. It constitutes an apparent paradox, framed as both part of the capitalist economy and as an alternative. This duplicity necessitates focusing on the performances of the sharing economy: how it simultaneously constructs diverse economic activities whilst also inviting the deconstruction of ongoing practices of dominance. Such performances hold open the qu...

  15. Shared Representations and the Translation Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaeffer, Moritz; Carl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present chapter is to investigate automated processing during translation. We provide evidence from a translation priming study which suggests that translation involves activation of shared lexico-semantic and syntactical representations, i.e., the activation of features of bot...

  16. Information partnerships--shared data, shared scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konsynski, B R; McFarlan, F W

    1990-01-01

    How can one company gain access to another's resources or customers without merging ownership, management, or plotting a takeover? The answer is found in new information partnerships, enabling diverse companies to develop strategic coalitions through the sharing of data. The key to cooperation is a quantum improvement in the hardware and software supporting relational databases: new computer speeds, cheaper mass-storage devices, the proliferation of fiber-optic networks, and networking architectures. Information partnerships mean that companies can distribute the technological and financial exposure that comes with huge investments. For the customer's part, partnerships inevitably lead to greater simplification on the desktop and more common standards around which vendors have to compete. The most common types of partnership are: joint marketing partnerships, such as American Airline's award of frequent flyer miles to customers who use Citibank's credit card; intraindustry partnerships, such as the insurance value-added network service (which links insurance and casualty companies to independent agents); customer-supplier partnerships, such as Baxter Healthcare's electronic channel to hospitals for medical and other equipment; and IT vendor-driven partnerships, exemplified by ESAB (a European welding supplies and equipment company), whose expansion strategy was premised on a technology platform offered by an IT vendor. Partnerships that succeed have shared vision at the top, reciprocal skills in information technology, concrete plans for an early success, persistence in the development of usable information for all partners, coordination on business policy, and a new and imaginative business architecture.

  17. Implementing genomics and pharmacogenomics in the clinic: The National Human Genome Research Institute's genomic medicine portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolio, Teri A

    2016-10-01

    Increasing knowledge about the influence of genetic variation on human health and growing availability of reliable, cost-effective genetic testing have spurred the implementation of genomic medicine in the clinic. As defined by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), genomic medicine uses an individual's genetic information in his or her clinical care, and has begun to be applied effectively in areas such as cancer genomics, pharmacogenomics, and rare and undiagnosed diseases. In 2011 NHGRI published its strategic vision for the future of genomic research, including an ambitious research agenda to facilitate and promote the implementation of genomic medicine. To realize this agenda, NHGRI is consulting and facilitating collaborations with the external research community through a series of "Genomic Medicine Meetings," under the guidance and leadership of the National Advisory Council on Human Genome Research. These meetings have identified and begun to address significant obstacles to implementation, such as lack of evidence of efficacy, limited availability of genomics expertise and testing, lack of standards, and difficulties in integrating genomic results into electronic medical records. The six research and dissemination initiatives comprising NHGRI's genomic research portfolio are designed to speed the evaluation and incorporation, where appropriate, of genomic technologies and findings into routine clinical care. Actual adoption of successful approaches in clinical care will depend upon the willingness, interest, and energy of professional societies, practitioners, patients, and payers to promote their responsible use and share their experiences in doing so.

  18. Professional Business Connectivity Services in SharePoint 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Hillier, Scot

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive coverage on Business Connectivity Services within SharePoint 2010 As Microsoft's new multipurpose portal technology, Business Connectivity Services (BCS) is a brand new way for SharePoint users to seamlessly access and integrate data from any application or databases within SharePoint 2010. With this in-depth guide, a team of SharePoint experts walks you through the features of the new BCS, including the ability for users to view and modify the data from SharePoint 2010 with BCS. You'll explore how to use BCS, deploy solutions, create external content types and lists, create .NET

  19. Comparative analysis of super-shedder strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 reveals distinctive genomic features and a strongly aggregative adherent phenotype on bovine rectoanal junction squamous epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Cote

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157 are significant foodborne pathogens and pose a serious threat to public health worldwide. The major reservoirs of O157 are asymptomatic cattle which harbor the organism in the terminal recto-anal junction (RAJ. Some colonized animals, referred to as "super-shedders" (SS, are known to shed O157 in exceptionally large numbers (>104 CFU/g of feces. Recent studies suggest that SS cattle play a major role in the prevalence and transmission of O157, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms associated with super-shedding. Whole genome sequence analysis of an SS O157 strain (SS17 revealed a genome of 5,523,849 bp chromosome with 5,430 open reading frames and two plasmids, pO157 and pSS17, of 94,645 bp and 37,446 bp, respectively. Comparative analyses showed that SS17 is clustered with spinach-associated O157 outbreak strains, and belongs to the lineage I/II, clade 8, D group, and genotype 1, a subgroup of O157 with predicted hyper-virulence. A large number of non-synonymous SNPs and other polymorphisms were identified in SS17 as compared with other O157 strains (EC4115, EDL933, Sakai, TW14359, including in key adherence- and virulence-related loci. Phenotypic analyses revealed a distinctive and strongly adherent aggregative phenotype of SS17 on bovine RAJ stratified squamous epithelial (RSE cells that was conserved amongst other SS isolates. Molecular genetic and functional analyses of defined mutants of SS17 suggested that the strongly adherent aggregative phenotype amongst SS isolates is LEE-independent, and likely results from a novel mechanism. Taken together, our study provides a rational framework for investigating the molecular mechanisms associated with SS, and strong evidence that SS O157 isolates have distinctive features and use a LEE-independent mechanism for hyper-adherence to bovine rectal epithelial cells.

  20. Genomic Databases for Crop Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Edwards

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Genomics is playing an increasing role in plant breeding and this is accelerating with the rapid advances in genome technology. Translating the vast abundance of data being produced by genome technologies requires the development of custom bioinformatics tools and advanced databases. These range from large generic databases which hold specific data types for a broad range of species, to carefully integrated and curated databases which act as a resource for the improvement of specific crops. In this review, we outline some of the features of plant genome databases, identify specific resources for the improvement of individual crops and comment on the potential future direction of crop genome databases.

  1. ISA-TAB-Nano: a specification for sharing nanomaterial research data in spreadsheet-based format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Dennis G; Gaheen, Sharon; Harper, Stacey L; Fritts, Martin; Klaessig, Fred; Hahn-Dantona, Elizabeth; Paik, David; Pan, Sue; Stafford, Grace A; Freund, Elaine T; Klemm, Juli D; Baker, Nathan A

    2013-01-14

    The high-throughput genomics communities have been successfully using standardized spreadsheet-based formats to capture and share data within labs and among public repositories. The nanomedicine community has yet to adopt similar standards to share the diverse and multi-dimensional types of data (including metadata) pertaining to the description and characterization of nanomaterials. Owing to the lack of standardization in representing and sharing nanomaterial data, most of the data currently shared via publications and data resources are incomplete, poorly-integrated, and not suitable for meaningful interpretation and re-use of the data. Specifically, in its current state, data cannot be effectively utilized for the development of predictive models that will inform the rational design of nanomaterials. We have developed a specification called ISA-TAB-Nano, which comprises four spreadsheet-based file formats for representing and integrating various types of nanomaterial data. Three file formats (Investigation, Study, and Assay files) have been adapted from the established ISA-TAB specification; while the Material file format was developed de novo to more readily describe the complexity of nanomaterials and associated small molecules. In this paper, we have discussed the main features of each file format and how to use them for sharing nanomaterial descriptions and assay metadata. The ISA-TAB-Nano file formats provide a general and flexible framework to record and integrate nanomaterial descriptions, assay data (metadata and endpoint measurements) and protocol information. Like ISA-TAB, ISA-TAB-Nano supports the use of ontology terms to promote standardized descriptions and to facilitate search and integration of the data. The ISA-TAB-Nano specification has been submitted as an ASTM work item to obtain community feedback and to provide a nanotechnology data-sharing standard for public development and adoption.

  2. Comparative genomic analysis shows that avian pathogenic Escherichia coli isolate IMT5155 (O2:K1:H5; ST complex 95, ST140 shares close relationship with ST95 APEC O1:K1 and human ExPEC O18:K1 strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangkai Zhu Ge

    Full Text Available Avian pathogenic E. coli and human extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli serotypes O1, O2 and O18 strains isolated from different hosts are generally located in phylogroup B2 and ST complex 95, and they share similar genetic characteristics and pathogenicity, with no or minimal host specificity. They are popular objects for the study of ExPEC genetic characteristics and pathogenesis in recent years. Here, we investigated the evolution and genetic blueprint of APEC pathotype by performing phylogenetic and comparative genome analysis of avian pathogenic E. coli strain IMT5155 (O2:K1:H5; ST complex 95, ST140 with other E. coli pathotypes. Phylogeny analyses indicated that IMT5155 has closest evolutionary relationship with APEC O1, IHE3034, and UTI89. Comparative genomic analysis showed that IMT5155 and APEC O1 shared significant genetic overlap/similarities with human ExPEC dominant O18:K1 strains (IHE3034 and UTI89. Furthermore, the unique PAI I5155 (GI-12 was identified and found to be conserved in APEC O2 serotype isolates. GI-7 and GI-16 encoding two typical T6SSs in IMT5155 might be useful markers for the identification of ExPEC dominant serotypes (O1, O2, and O18 strains. IMT5155 contained a ColV plasmid p1ColV5155, which defined the APEC pathotype. The distribution analysis of 10 sequenced ExPEC pan-genome virulence factors among 47 sequenced E. coli strains provided meaningful information for B2 APEC/ExPEC-specific virulence factors, including several adhesins, invasins, toxins, iron acquisition systems, and so on. The pathogenicity tests of IMT5155 and other APEC O1:K1 and O2:K1 serotypes strains (isolated in China through four animal models showed that they were highly virulent for avian colisepticemia and able to cause septicemia and meningitis in neonatal rats, suggesting zoonotic potential of these APEC O1:K1 and O2:K1 isolates.

  3. Comparative genomic analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage PaMx25 reveals a novel siphovirus group related to phages infecting hosts of different taxonomic classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Víctor; Sepúlveda-Robles, Omar; Cazares, Adrián; Kameyama, Luis; Guarneros, Gabriel

    2017-08-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are estimated to be the most abundant and diverse entities in the biosphere harboring vast amounts of novel genetic information. Despite the genetic diversity observed, many phages share common features, such as virion morphology, genome size and organization, and can readily be associated with clearly defined phage groups. However, other phages display unique genomes or, alternatively, mosaic genomes composed of regions that share homology with those of phages of diverse origins; thus, their relationships cannot be easily assessed. In this work, we present a functional and comparative genomic analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage PaMx25, a virulent member of the Siphoviridae family. The genomes of PaMx25 and a highly homologous phage NP1, bore sequence homology and synteny with the genomes of phages that infect hosts different than Pseudomonas. In order to understand the relationship of the PaMx25 genome with that of other phages, we employed several computational approaches. We found that PaMx25 and NP1 effectively bridged several phage groups. It is expected that as more phage genomes become available, more gaps will be filled, blurring the boundaries that currently separate phage groups.

  4. Early Transcriptomic Adaptation to Na2CO3 Stress Altered the Expression of a Quarter of the Total Genes in the Maize Genome and Exhibited Shared and Distinctive Profiles with NaCl and High pH Stresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiMin Zhang; XiangGuo Liu; XinNing Qu; Ying Yu; SiPing Han; Yao Dou; YaoYao Xu; HaiChun Jing; DongYun Hao

    2013-01-01

    Sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) presents a huge challenge to plants by the combined damaging effects of Naþ, high pH, and CO32-. Little is known about the cellular responses to Na2CO3 stress. In this study, the transcriptome of maize (Zea mays L. cv. B73) roots exposed to Na2CO3 stress for 5 h was compared with those of NaCl and NaOH stresses. The expression of 8,319 genes, representing over a quarter of the total number of genes in the maize genome, was altered by Na2CO3 stress, and the downregulated genes (5,232) outnumbered the upregulated genes (3,087). The effects of Na2CO3 differed from those of NaCl and NaOH, primarily by downregulating different categories of genes. Pathways commonly altered by Na2CO3, NaCl, and NaOH were enriched in phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, as well as the metabolism of secondary metabolites. Genes for brassinosteroid biosynthesis were specifically upregulated by Na2CO3, while genes involved in ascorbate and aldarate metabolism, protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum and by N-glycosylation, fatty acid biosynthesis, and the circadian rhythm were downregulated. This work provides the first holistic picture of early transcriptomic adaptation to Na2CO3 stress, and highlights potential molecular pathways that could be manipulated to improve tolerance in maize.

  5. The CGView Server: a comparative genomics tool for circular genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jason R; Stothard, Paul

    2008-07-01

    The CGView Server generates graphical maps of circular genomes that show sequence features, base composition plots, analysis results and sequence similarity plots. Sequences can be supplied in raw, FASTA, GenBank or EMBL format. Additional feature or analysis information can be submitted in the form of GFF (General Feature Format) files. The server uses BLAST to compare the primary sequence to up to three comparison genomes or sequence sets. The BLAST results and feature information are converted to a graphical map showing the entire sequence, or an expanded and more detailed view of a region of interest. Several options are included to control which types of features are displayed and how the features are drawn. The CGView Server can be used to visualize features associated with any bacterial, plasmid, chloroplast or mitochondrial genome, and can aid in the identification of conserved genome segments, instances of horizontal gene transfer, and differences in gene copy number. Because a collection of sequences can be used in place of a comparison genome, maps can also be used to visualize regions of a known genome covered by newly obtained sequence reads. The CGView Server can be accessed at http://stothard.afns.ualberta.ca/cgview_server/

  6. Complete Genome Sequences of Six Legionella pneumophila Isolates from Two Collocated Outbreaks of Legionnaires’ Disease in 2005 and 2008 in Sarpsborg/Fredrikstad, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarskaug, Tone; Fykse, Else-Marie; Henie Madslien, Elisabeth; Blatny, Janet Martha

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequences of Legionella pneumophila isolates from two collocated outbreaks of Legionnaires’ disease in 2005 and 2008 in Sarpsborg/Fredrikstad, Norway. One clinical and two environmental isolates were sequenced from each outbreak. The genome of all six isolates consisted of a 3.36 Mb-chromosome, while the 2005 genomes featured an additional 68 kb-episome sharing high sequence similarity with the L. pneumophila Lens plasmid. All six genomes contained multiple mobile genetic elements including novel combinations of type-IVA secretion systems. A comparative genomics study will be launched to resolve the genetic relationship between the L. pneumophila isolates. PMID:27979936

  7. Shared care (comanagement).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero Ruiz, E

    2016-01-01

    Surgical departments have increasing difficulties in caring for their hospitalised patients due to the patients' advanced age and comorbidity, the growing specialisation in medical training and the strong political-healthcare pressure that a healthcare organisation places on them, where surgical acts take precedence over other activities. The pressure exerted by these departments on the medical area and the deficient response by the interconsultation system have led to the development of a different healthcare organisation model: Shared care, which includes perioperative medicine. In this model, 2 different specialists share the responsibility and authority in caring for hospitalised surgical patients. Internal Medicine is the most appropriate specialty for shared care. Internists who exercise this responsibility should have certain characteristics and must overcome a number of concerns from the surgeon and anaesthesiologist. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  8. Sharing big biomedical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toga, Arthur W; Dinov, Ivo D

    The promise of Big Biomedical Data may be offset by the enormous challenges in handling, analyzing, and sharing it. In this paper, we provide a framework for developing practical and reasonable data sharing policies that incorporate the sociological, financial, technical and scientific requirements of a sustainable Big Data dependent scientific community. Many biomedical and healthcare studies may be significantly impacted by using large, heterogeneous and incongruent datasets; however there are significant technical, social, regulatory, and institutional barriers that need to be overcome to ensure the power of Big Data overcomes these detrimental factors. Pragmatic policies that demand extensive sharing of data, promotion of data fusion, provenance, interoperability and balance security and protection of personal information are critical for the long term impact of translational Big Data analytics.

  9. Genomic understanding of dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Senjie

    2011-01-01

    The phylum of dinoflagellates is characterized by many unusual and interesting genomic and physiological features, the imprint of which, in its immense genome, remains elusive. Much novel understanding has been achieved in the last decade on various aspects of dinoflagellate biology, but most remarkably about the structure, expression pattern and epigenetic modification of protein-coding genes in the nuclear and organellar genomes. Major findings include: 1) the great diversity of dinoflagellates, especially at the base of the dinoflagellate tree of life; 2) mini-circularization of the genomes of typical dinoflagellate plastids (with three membranes, chlorophylls a, c1 and c2, and carotenoid peridinin), the scrambled mitochondrial genome and the extensive mRNA editing occurring in both systems; 3) ubiquitous spliced leader trans-splicing of nuclear-encoded mRNA and demonstrated potential as a novel tool for studying dinoflagellate transcriptomes in mixed cultures and natural assemblages; 4) existence and expression of histones and other nucleosomal proteins; 5) a ribosomal protein set expected of typical eukaryotes; 6) genetic potential of non-photosynthetic solar energy utilization via proton-pump rhodopsin; 7) gene candidates in the toxin synthesis pathways; and 8) evidence of a highly redundant, high gene number and highly recombined genome. Despite this progress, much more work awaits genome-wide transcriptome and whole genome sequencing in order to unfold the molecular mechanisms underlying the numerous mysterious attributes of dinoflagellates.

  10. Sharing the dance -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Jing; Ravn, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    to the highly specialized field of elite sports dance, we aim at exploring the way in which reciprocity unfolds in intensive deliberate practices of movement. In our analysis, we specifically argue that the ongoing dynamics of two separate flows of movement constitute a shared experience of dancing together....... In this sense, moving together, in sports dance, is a practical way of understanding each other. In agreement with Zahavi, our analysis emphasizes the bi-directed nature of sharing. However, at the same time, we contribute to Zahavi’s ongoing endeavour as the special case of sports dance reveals how reciprocity...

  11. Towards A Shared Mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunstrup, Jørgen; Orth Gaarn-Larsen, Carsten

    A mission shared by stakeholders, management and employees is a prerequisite for an engaging dialog about the many and substantial changes and challenges currently facing universities. Too often this essen-tial dialog reveals mistrust and misunderstandings about the role and outcome of the univer......A mission shared by stakeholders, management and employees is a prerequisite for an engaging dialog about the many and substantial changes and challenges currently facing universities. Too often this essen-tial dialog reveals mistrust and misunderstandings about the role and outcome...

  12. Shared values and normality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-hua; PANG Xue-cheng

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between the normality and the shared values for a meromorphic function on the unit disc △.Based on Marty's normality criterion and through a detailed analysis of the meromorphic functions,it is shown that if for every f∈F,f and f(k) share a and b on △ and the zeros of f(z)-a are of multiplicity k≥3,then F is normal on △,where F is a family of meromorphic functions on the unit disc △,and a and b are distinct values.

  13. Genome mining of the genetic diversity in the Aspergillus genus - from a collection of more than 30 Aspergillus species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jane Lind Nybo; Vesth, Tammi Camilla; Theobald, Sebastian;

    In the era of high-throughput sequencing, comparative genomics can be applied for evaluating species diversity. In this project we aim to compare the genomes of 300 species of filamentous fungi from the Aspergillus genus, a complex task. To be able to define species, clade, and core features......, this project uses BLAST on the amino acid level to discover orthologs. With a potential of 300 Aspergillus species each having ~12,000 annotated genes, traditional clustering will demand supercomputing. Instead, our approach reduces the search space by identifying isoenzymes within each genome creating...... intragenomic protein families (iPFs), and then connecting iPFs across all genomes. The initial findings in a set of 31 species show that ~48% of the annotated genes are core genes (genes shared between all species) and 2-24% of the genes are defining the individual species. The methods presented here...

  14. Best Practices for Data Sharing in Phylogenetic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranston, Karen; Harmon, Luke J.; O'Leary, Maureen A.; Lisle, Curtis

    2014-01-01

    As phylogenetic data becomes increasingly available, along with associated data on species’ genomes, traits, and geographic distributions, the need to ensure data availability and reuse become more and more acute. In this paper, we provide ten “simple rules” that we view as best practices for data sharing in phylogenetic research. These rules will help lead towards a future phylogenetics where data can easily be archived, shared, reused, and repurposed across a wide variety of projects. PMID:24987572

  15. Sharing Economy vs Sharing Cultures? Designing for social, economic and environmental good

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Light

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the story behind a crowdfunding service as an example of sharing technology. Research in a small neighborhood of London showed how locally-developed initiatives can differ in tone, scale, ambition and practice to those getting attention in the so-called sharing economy. In local accounts, we see an emphasis on organizing together to create shared spaces for collaborative use of resources and joint ownership of projects and places. Whereas, many global business models feature significant elements of renting, leasing and hiring and focus only on resource management, sometimes at the expense of community growth. The service we discuss is based in the area we studied and has a collective model of sharing, but hopes to be part of the new global movement. We use this hybridity to problematize issues of culture, place and scalability in developing sharing resources and addressing sustainability concerns. We relate this to the motivation, rhetoric and design choices of other local sharing enterprises and other global sharing economy initiatives, arguing, in conclusion, that there is no sharing economy, but a variety of new cultures being fostered.

  16. The integrated microbial genome resource of analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checcucci, Alice; Mengoni, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Integrated Microbial Genomes and Metagenomes (IMG) is a biocomputational system that allows to provide information and support for annotation and comparative analysis of microbial genomes and metagenomes. IMG has been developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE)-Joint Genome Institute (JGI). IMG platform contains both draft and complete genomes, sequenced by Joint Genome Institute and other public and available genomes. Genomes of strains belonging to Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya domains are present as well as those of viruses and plasmids. Here, we provide some essential features of IMG system and case study for pangenome analysis.

  17. SharePoint 2010 Administration Instant Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Randy

    2011-01-01

    Fast, accurate answers on SharePoint 2010 administration-in an instant If you're a SharePoint administrator and are looking for fast, accurate, easy-to-understand answers and solutions, then this reference is for you. Thumb tabs, secondary and tertiary tables of contents, and special heading treatments ensure quick and easy ways to find practical solutions on the spot. In addition, quick-reference tables, lists, and step-by-step instruction provide even more helpful information on the day-to-day administration of Microsoft's newest collaboration solution.Features invaluable answers and solutio

  18. Pro SharePoint 2010 Solution Development

    CERN Document Server

    Hild, E

    2010-01-01

    This book takes a practical problem-solution approach to common business challenges. You'll not only encounter interesting code samples, but also see how to combine these examples with the Microsoft collaboration platform's services. The book's solutions focus on using Visual Studio 2008 and its built-in Office development tools to construct the user interface layer. And solutions can interact with SharePoint as a service provider, taking advantage of SharePoint's many collaboration features like document repositories, collaboration sites, and search functions. This book is unique because it s

  19. BPhyOG: An interactive server for genome-wide inference of bacterial phylogenies based on overlapping genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Kui

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overlapping genes (OGs in bacterial genomes are pairs of adjacent genes of which the coding sequences overlap partly or entirely. With the rapid accumulation of sequence data, many OGs in bacterial genomes have now been identified. Indeed, these might prove a consistent feature across all microbial genomes. Our previous work suggests that OGs can be considered as robust markers at the whole genome level for the construction of phylogenies. An online, interactive web server for inferring phylogenies is needed for biologists to analyze phylogenetic relationships among a set of bacterial genomes of interest. Description BPhyOG is an online interactive server for reconstructing the phylogenies of completely sequenced bacterial genomes on the basis of their shared overlapping genes. It provides two tree-reconstruction methods: Neighbor Joining (NJ and Unweighted Pair-Group Method using Arithmetic averages (UPGMA. Users can apply the desired method to generate phylogenetic trees, which are based on an evolutionary distance matrix for the selected genomes. The distance between two genomes is defined by the normalized number of their shared OG pairs. BPhyOG also allows users to browse the OGs that were used to infer the phylogenetic relationships. It provides detailed annotation for each OG pair and the features of the component genes through hyperlinks. Users can also retrieve each of the homologous OG pairs that have been determined among 177 genomes. It is a useful tool for analyzing the tree of life and overlapping genes from a genomic standpoint. Conclusion BPhyOG is a useful interactive web server for genome-wide inference of any potential evolutionary relationship among the genomes selected by users. It currently includes 177 completely sequenced bacterial genomes containing 79,855 OG pairs, the annotation and homologous OG pairs of which are integrated comprehensively. The reliability of phylogenies complemented by

  20. Women and Heart Disease: Sharing Advice from the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women and Heart Disease Sharing Advice From The Heart Past Issues / Spring ... gowns in an effort to raise awareness that heart disease is the leading cause of death among women. ...

  1. Understanding Legacy Features with Featureous

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olszak, Andrzej; Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard

    2011-01-01

    Feature-centric comprehension of source code is essential during software evolution. However, such comprehension is oftentimes difficult to achieve due the discrepancies between structural and functional units of object-oriented programs. We present a tool for feature-centric analysis of legacy...

  2. SharedSpaces mingle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Handberg, L.; Gullström, C.; Kort, J.; Nyström, J.

    2016-01-01

    SharedSpaces is a WebRTC design prototype that creates a virtual media space where people can mingle and interact. Although you are in different locations, you appear side by side in front of a chosen backdrop. This interactive installation addresses spatial and social connectedness, stressing the

  3. Shared goals and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Olle

    2015-01-01

    undemanding for children to engage in, and therefore has the potential to play a part in fostering their understanding of other minds. Part of the functional role of shared goals is to enable agents to choose means that are appropriate to realising a goal with others rather than individually. By offering...

  4. Shared Oral Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Børge; Elmelund Poulsen,, Johan; Christophersen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    Shared Oral Care - Forebyggelse af orale sygdomme på plejecentre Introduktion og formål: Mangelfuld mundhygiejne hos plejekrævende ældre er et alment og veldokumenteret sundhedsproblem, der kan føre til massiv udvikling af tandsygdomme, og som yderligere kan være medvirkende årsag til alvorlige...

  5. Shared Care in Diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Keld

    2006-01-01

    The Danish National Board of Health has recently released a report that is intended to mark the start of a new project to establish it support for shared care in diabetes. In this paper I raise a number of concerns where lack of attention towards participation from prospective users constitute...

  6. Sharing Expertise: Consulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Bill

    2011-01-01

    A special breed of superintendents who have developed expertise in a particular area find ways of sharing it in other venues as outside consultants. They pull extra duty to put their special skills into practice, to give back to their communities, to stay current and grounded in the field, or to enhance their professional reputations. They teach…

  7. 'Smart Power' for' Sharing'

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Ting

    2010-01-01

    @@ As an attitude of life The Interstoff Asia Essential Spring will be held from March 17th to 19th,2010,in Hong Kong Convention & Exhibition Centre.During this exhibition,the Interstoff Asia Directions trend committee will present its apparel fabric trend forecast for next season's wardrobes,unfolding a story of'Smart Power' of 'Sharing'.

  8. Decreasing serial cost sharing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Østerdal, Lars Peter Raahave

    2009-01-01

    The increasing serial cost sharing rule of Moulin and Shenker (Econometrica 60:1009-1037, 1992) and the decreasing serial rule of de Frutos (J Econ Theory 79:245-275, 1998) are known by their intuitive appeal and striking incentive properties. An axiomatic characterization of the increasing serial...

  9. Promoting teachers’ knowledge sharing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Runhaar, P.R.; Sanders, K.

    2016-01-01

    Teachers’ professional development is nowadays seen as key in efforts to improve education. Knowledge sharing is a learning activity with which teachers not only professionalize themselves, but contribute to the professional development of their colleagues as well. This paper presents two studies,

  10. Decreasing Serial Cost Sharing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Østerdal, Lars Peter

    The increasing serial cost sharing rule of Moulin and Shenker [Econometrica 60 (1992) 1009] and the decreasing serial rule of de Frutos [Journal of Economic Theory 79 (1998) 245] have attracted attention due to their intuitive appeal and striking incentive properties. An axiomatic characterization...

  11. Sharing Research Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    There are many ways to share a collection of data and students' thinking about that data. Explaining the results of science inquiry is important--working scientists and amateurs both contribute information to the body of scientific knowledge. Students can collect data about an activity that is already happening in a classroom (e.g., the qualities…

  12. Promoting teachers’ knowledge sharing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Runhaar, P.R.; Sanders, K.

    2016-01-01

    Teachers’ professional development is nowadays seen as key in efforts to improve education. Knowledge sharing is a learning activity with which teachers not only professionalize themselves, but contribute to the professional development of their colleagues as well. This paper presents two studies, a

  13. Share the Fruits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Procter & Gamble Co,extends its employee stock ownership plan to benefit its Chinese employees The Procter & Gamble Co.(P&G) launched its Chinese employee stock ownership plan(ESOP)on April 1 after five years of preparation.The plan entitles its more than 7,000 employees in China to buy P&G stocks and share its growth benefits.

  14. Beyond processor sharing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalto, S.; Ayesta, U.; Borst, S.C.; Misra, V.; Núñez Queija, R.

    2007-01-01

    While the (Egalitarian) Processor-Sharing (PS) discipline offers crucial insights in the performance of fair resource allocation mechanisms, it is inherently limited in analyzing and designing differentiated scheduling algorithms such as Weighted Fair Queueing and Weighted Round-Robin. The Discrimin

  15. Power Sharing Courts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Graziadei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I introduce a novel concept, the one of power sharing courts. Scholars of judicial politics look at the reasons behind judicial selection and the patterns of decision making within courts through the lens of ideology (left-right. However, the resulting fertile scholarly analysis has not been extended to divided societies, where the main cleavages are not partisan but ethno-national. In these societies, the liberal model of selecting judges and taking decisions within an apex court is often corrected to specifically include politically salient ascriptive cleavages (such as ethnicity/nationality/language/religion. The main thrust of my argument is that there is a model of selecting judges, taking decisions and sharing posts of influence within apex courts in divided societies that has not yet been conceptually captured: power sharing courts. In analogy to consociationalism in the political system, power sharing in the judiciary aims to solve salient inter-community conflicts by including all relevant groups in these bodies on a basis of parity or proportionality. The paper is of equal interest to scholars of constitutional courts, consociationalists, comparatists, as well as country specialists.

  16. The Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamari, Juho; Sjöklint, Mimmi; Ukkonen, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Information and communications technologies (ICTs) have enabled the rise of so-called “Collaborative Consumption” (CC): the peer-to-peer-based activity of obtaining, giving, or sharing the access to goods and services, coordinated through community-based online services. CC has been expected...

  17. Promoting teachers’ knowledge sharing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Runhaar, P.R.; Sanders, K.

    2016-01-01

    Teachers’ professional development is nowadays seen as key in efforts to improve education. Knowledge sharing is a learning activity with which teachers not only professionalize themselves, but contribute to the professional development of their colleagues as well. This paper presents two studies, a

  18. Supporting the development of shared understanding in distributed design teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cash, Philip; Dekoninck, Elies A; Ahmed-Kristensen, Saeema

    2017-01-01

    Distributed teams are an increasingly common feature of engineeringdesign work. One key factor in the success of these teams isthe development of short- and longer-term shared understanding.A lack of shared understanding has been recognized as a significantchallenge, particularly in the context o...

  19. Knowledge sharing within teams : Enabling and constraining factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosendaal, Bastiaan; Bijlsma-Frankema, Katinka

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we tested the effects of several team features on knowledge sharing within teams of primary school teachers. We hypothesized that trust in team leader and trust in colleagues, mediated by team identification, will have a positive effect on knowledge sharing. We found indirect effects

  20. Site Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of various site features from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different times...

  1. Feature Extraction

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Feature selection and reduction are key to robust multivariate analyses. In this talk I will focus on pros and cons of various variable selection methods and focus on those that are most relevant in the context of HEP.

  2. Solar Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of solar feature datasets contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide.

  3. Multiuser-based Gray-level Watermarking Sharing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Luo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel watermarking sharing system having the ability of sharing gray-level secret images with multi-user is proposed. Multiple-based number system is used to split the secret into n meaningless shares, each share is embedded into respective cover image with controlled distortion and to be assigned to each user afterwards. The architecture of the proposed watermarking system is an open issue, which means the system is easy to be implemented according to the purposes and concerns of the users. The main feature of the proposed system is sharing a secret of gray-level image among multi-users; another application of such system is ownership verification. To reveal the secret, the necessary amount of shares has to be presented. That is, the secret can be recovered even if some shares were lost. Simulation results show that the recovered secret has robustness against a wide range of imaging processing operations.

  4. Comparative genome research between maize and rice using genomic in situ hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Using the genomic DNAs of maize and rice as probes respectively,the homology of maize and rice genomes was assessed by genomic in situ hybridization. When rice genomic DNAs were hybridized to maize, all chromosomes displayed many multiple discrete regions, while each rice chromosome delineated a single consecutive chromosomal region after they were hybridized with maize genomic DNAs. The results indicate that the genomes of maize and rice share high homology, and confirm the proposal that maize and rice are diverged from a common ancestor.

  5. Policy enabled information sharing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Craig R.; Nelson, Brian D.; Ratheal, Steve W.

    2014-09-02

    A technique for dynamically sharing information includes executing a sharing policy indicating when to share a data object responsive to the occurrence of an event. The data object is created by formatting a data file to be shared with a receiving entity. The data object includes a file data portion and a sharing metadata portion. The data object is encrypted and then automatically transmitted to the receiving entity upon occurrence of the event. The sharing metadata portion includes metadata characterizing the data file and referenced in connection with the sharing policy to determine when to automatically transmit the data object to the receiving entity.

  6. Comparative chloroplast genomics: analyses including new sequences from the angiosperms Nuphar advena and Ranunculus macranthus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boore Jeffrey L

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of completely sequenced plastid genomes available is growing rapidly. This array of sequences presents new opportunities to perform comparative analyses. In comparative studies, it is often useful to compare across wide phylogenetic spans and, within angiosperms, to include representatives from basally diverging lineages such as the genomes reported here: Nuphar advena (from a basal-most lineage and Ranunculus macranthus (a basal eudicot. We report these two new plastid genome sequences and make comparisons (within angiosperms, seed plants, or all photosynthetic lineages to evaluate features such as the status of ycf15 and ycf68 as protein coding genes, the distribution of simple sequence repeats (SSRs and longer dispersed repeats (SDR, and patterns of nucleotide composition. Results The Nuphar [GenBank:NC_008788] and Ranunculus [GenBank:NC_008796] plastid genomes share characteristics of gene content and organization with many other chloroplast genomes. Like other plastid genomes, these genomes are A+T-rich, except for rRNA and tRNA genes. Detailed comparisons of Nuphar with Nymphaea, another Nymphaeaceae, show that more than two-thirds of these genomes exhibit at least 95% sequence identity and that most SSRs are shared. In broader comparisons, SSRs vary among genomes in terms of abundance and length and most contain repeat motifs based on A and T nucleotides. Conclusion SSR and SDR abundance varies by genome and, for SSRs, is proportional to genome size. Long SDRs are rare in the genomes assessed. SSRs occur less frequently than predicted and, although the majority of the repeat motifs do include A and T nucleotides, the A+T bias in SSRs is less than that predicted from the underlying genomic nucleotide composition. In codon usage third positions show an A+T bias, however variation in codon usage does not correlate with differences in A+T-richness. Thus, although plastome nucleotide composition shows "A

  7. The mitochondrial genome of the ascalaphid owlfly Libelloides macaronius and comparative evolutionary mitochondriomics of neuropterid insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrisolo, Enrico; Babbucci, Massimiliano; Patarnello, Tomaso

    2011-05-10

    shares many features with known neuropteran genomes but differs in its low A+T content. Comparative analysis of neuropterid mitochondrial genes showed that they experienced distinct evolutionary patterns. Both tRNA families and ribosomal RNAs show composite substitution pathways. The neuropterid mitochondrial genome is characterized by a complex evolutionary history.

  8. Genomic taxonomy of vibrios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iida Tetsuya

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vibrio taxonomy has been based on a polyphasic approach. In this study, we retrieve useful taxonomic information (i.e. data that can be used to distinguish different taxonomic levels, such as species and genera from 32 genome sequences of different vibrio species. We use a variety of tools to explore the taxonomic relationship between the sequenced genomes, including Multilocus Sequence Analysis (MLSA, supertrees, Average Amino Acid Identity (AAI, genomic signatures, and Genome BLAST atlases. Our aim is to analyse the usefulness of these tools for species identification in vibrios. Results We have generated four new genome sequences of three Vibrio species, i.e., V. alginolyticus 40B, V. harveyi-like 1DA3, and V. mimicus strains VM573 and VM603, and present a broad analyses of these genomes along with other sequenced Vibrio species. The genome atlas and pangenome plots provide a tantalizing image of the genomic differences that occur between closely related sister species, e.g. V. cholerae and V. mimicus. The vibrio pangenome contains around 26504 genes. The V. cholerae core genome and pangenome consist of 1520 and 6923 genes, respectively. Pangenomes might allow different strains of V. cholerae to occupy different niches. MLSA and supertree analyses resulted in a similar phylogenetic picture, with a clear distinction of four groups (Vibrio core group, V. cholerae-V. mimicus, Aliivibrio spp., and Photobacterium spp.. A Vibrio species is defined as a group of strains that share > 95% DNA identity in MLSA and supertree analysis, > 96% AAI, ≤ 10 genome signature dissimilarity, and > 61% proteome identity. Strains of the same species and species of the same genus will form monophyletic groups on the basis of MLSA and supertree. Conclusion The combination of different analytical and bioinformatics tools will enable the most accurate species identification through genomic computational analysis. This endeavour will culminate in

  9. The mitochondrial genome of Phallusia mammillata and Phallusia fumigata (Tunicata, Ascidiacea: high genome plasticity at intra-genus level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pesole Graziano

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within Chordata, the subphyla Vertebrata and Cephalochordata (lancelets are characterized by a remarkable stability of the mitochondrial (mt genome, with constancy of gene content and almost invariant gene order, whereas the limited mitochondrial data on the subphylum Tunicata suggest frequent and extensive gene rearrangements, observed also within ascidians of the same genus. Results To confirm this evolutionary trend and to better understand the evolutionary dynamics of the mitochondrial genome in Tunicata Ascidiacea, we have sequenced and characterized the complete mt genome of two congeneric ascidian species, Phallusia mammillata and Phallusia fumigata (Phlebobranchiata, Ascidiidae. The two mtDNAs are surprisingly rearranged, both with respect to one another and relative to those of other tunicates and chordates, with gene rearrangements affecting both protein-coding and tRNA genes. The new data highlight the extraordinary variability of ascidian mt genome in base composition, tRNA secondary structure, tRNA gene content, and non-coding regions (number, size, sequence and location. Indeed, both Phallusia genomes lack the trnD gene, show loss/acquisition of DHU-arm in two tRNAs, and have a G+C content two-fold higher than other ascidians. Moreover, the mt genome of P. fumigata presents two identical copies of trnI, an extra tRNA gene with uncertain amino acid specificity, and four almost identical sequence regions. In addition, a truncated cytochrome b, lacking a C-terminal tail that commonly protrudes into the mt matrix, has been identified as a new mt feature probably shared by all tunicates. Conclusion The frequent occurrence of major gene order rearrangements in ascidians both at high taxonomic level and within the same genus makes this taxon an excellent model to study the mechanisms of gene rearrangement, and renders the mt genome an invaluable phylogenetic marker to investigate molecular biodiversity and speciation

  10. The genomics of adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Jacek; Babik, Wiesław

    2012-12-22

    The amount and nature of genetic variation available to natural selection affect the rate, course and outcome of evolution. Consequently, the study of the genetic basis of adaptive evolutionary change has occupied biologists for decades, but progress has been hampered by the lack of resolution and the absence of a genome-level perspective. Technological advances in recent years should now allow us to answer many long-standing questions about the nature of adaptation. The data gathered so far are beginning to challenge some widespread views of the way in which natural selection operates at the genomic level. Papers in this Special Feature of Proceedings of the Royal Society B illustrate various aspects of the broad field of adaptation genomics. This introductory article sets up a context and, on the basis of a few selected examples, discusses how genomic data can advance our understanding of the process of adaptation.

  11. Lophotrochozoan mitochondrial genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valles, Yvonne; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-10-01

    Progress in both molecular techniques and phylogeneticmethods has challenged many of the interpretations of traditionaltaxonomy. One example is in the recognition of the animal superphylumLophotrochozoa (annelids, mollusks, echiurans, platyhelminthes,brachiopods, and other phyla), although the relationships within thisgroup and the inclusion of some phyla remain uncertain. While much ofthis progress in phylogenetic reconstruction has been based on comparingsingle gene sequences, we are beginning to see the potential of comparinglarge-scale features of genomes, such as the relative order of genes.Even though tremendous progress is being made on the sequencedetermination of whole nuclear genomes, the dataset of choice forgenome-level characters for many animals across a broad taxonomic rangeremains mitochondrial genomes. We review here what is known aboutmitochondrial genomes of the lophotrochozoans and discuss the promisethat this dataset will enable insight into theirrelationships.

  12. Structure of the acidianus filamentous virus 3 and comparative genomics of related archaeal lipothrixviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Gisle Alberg; Aramayo, Ricardo; Basta, Tamara;

    2008-01-01

    be assigned specific functions, including a putative helicase involved in Holliday junction branch migration, a nuclease, a protein phosphatase, transcriptional regulators, and glycosyltransferases. The AFV7 genome appears to have undergone intergenomic recombination with a large section of an AFV2-like viral...... genome, apparently resulting in phenotypic changes, as revealed by the presence of AFV2-like termini in the AFV7 virions. Shared features of the genomes include (i) large inverted terminal repeats exhibiting conserved, regularly spaced direct repeats; (ii) a highly conserved operon encoding the two major...... structural proteins; (iii) multiple overlapping open reading frames, which may be indicative of gene recoding; (iv) putative 12-bp genetic elements; and (v) partial gene sequences corresponding closely to spacer sequences of chromosomal repeat clusters....

  13. The first complete genome sequences of the acI lineage, the most abundant freshwater Actinobacteria, obtained by whole-genome-amplification of dilution-to-extinction cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ilnam; Kim, Suhyun; Islam, Md. Rashedul; Cho, Jang-Cheon

    2017-01-01

    The acI lineage of the phylum Actinobacteria is the most abundant bacterial group in most freshwater lakes. However, due to difficulties in laboratory cultivation, only two mixed cultures and some incomplete single-amplified or metagenome-derived genomes have been reported for the lineage. Here, we report the initial cultivation and complete genome sequences of four novel strains of the acI lineage from the tribes acI-A1, -A4, -A7, and -C1. The acI strains, initially isolated by dilution-to-extinction culturing, eventually failed to be maintained as axenic cultures. However, the first complete genomes of the acI lineage were successfully obtained from these initial cultures through whole genome amplification applied to more than hundreds of cultured acI cells. The genome sequences exhibited features of genome streamlining and showed that the strains are aerobic chemoheterotrophs sharing central metabolic pathways, with some differences among tribes that may underlie niche diversification within the acI lineage. Actinorhodopsin was found in all strains, but retinal biosynthesis was complete in only A1 and A4 tribes. PMID:28186143

  14. Shared care and boundaries:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winthereik, Brit Ross

    2008-01-01

    and technology studies. Findings – The paper shows how a version of “the responsible patient” emerges from the project which is different from the version envisioned by the project organisation. The emerging one is concerned with the boundary between primary and secondary sector care, and not with the boundary...... of healthcare in relation to IT design. Originality/value – The paper shows that “unshared” care does not exist; care is always shared among human and nonhuman actors. It also points to the value of studying how boundaries are enacted in projects that seek to create continuity across boundaries. Udgivelsesdato......Purpose – The paper seeks to examine how an online maternity record involving pregnant women worked as a means to create shared maternity care. Design/methodology/approach – Ethnographic techniques have been used. The paper adopts a theoretical/methodological framework based on science...

  15. Shared goals and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Olle

    2015-01-01

    In 'Joint Action and Development', Stephen Butterfill argues that if several agents' actions are driven by what he calls a "shared goal" -- a certain pattern of goal-relations and expectations -- then these actions constitute a joint action. This kind of joint action is sufficiently cognitively...... undemanding for children to engage in, and therefore has the potential to play a part in fostering their understanding of other minds. Part of the functional role of shared goals is to enable agents to choose means that are appropriate to realising a goal with others rather than individually. By offering...... a counterexample, I show that the pattern of goal-relations and expectations specified by Butterfill cannot play this role. I then provide a