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Sample records for genomic dna clones

  1. cDNA, genomic sequence cloning and overexpression of ribosomal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RPS16 of eukaryote is a component of the 40S small ribosomal subunit encoded by RPS16 gene and is also a homolog of prokaryotic RPS9. The cDNA and genomic sequence of RPS16 was cloned successfully for the first time from the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using reverse transcription-polymerase chain ...

  2. Genomic libraries: II. Subcloning, sequencing, and assembling large-insert genomic DNA clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quail, Mike A; Matthews, Lucy; Sims, Sarah; Lloyd, Christine; Beasley, Helen; Baxter, Simon W

    2011-01-01

    Sequencing large insert clones to completion is useful for characterizing specific genomic regions, identifying haplotypes, and closing gaps in whole genome sequencing projects. Despite being a standard technique in molecular laboratories, DNA sequencing using the Sanger method can be highly problematic when complex secondary structures or sequence repeats are encountered in genomic clones. Here, we describe methods to isolate DNA from a large insert clone (fosmid or BAC), subclone the sample, and sequence the region to the highest industry standard. Troubleshooting solutions for sequencing difficult templates are discussed.

  3. Homologous recombination-mediated cloning and manipulation of genomic DNA regions using Gateway and recombineering systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozwadowski, Kevin; Yang, Wen; Kagale, Sateesh

    2008-11-17

    Employing genomic DNA clones to characterise gene attributes has several advantages over the use of cDNA clones, including the presence of native transcription and translation regulatory sequences as well as a representation of the complete repertoire of potential splice variants encoded by the gene. However, working with genomic DNA clones has traditionally been tedious due to their large size relative to cDNA clones and the presence, absence or position of particular restriction enzyme sites that may complicate conventional in vitro cloning procedures. To enable efficient cloning and manipulation of genomic DNA fragments for the purposes of gene expression and reporter-gene studies we have combined aspects of the Gateway system and a bacteriophage-based homologous recombination (i.e. recombineering) system. To apply the method for characterising plant genes we developed novel Gateway and plant transformation vectors that are of small size and incorporate selectable markers which enable efficient identification of recombinant clones. We demonstrate that the genomic coding region of a gene can be directly cloned into a Gateway Entry vector by recombineering enabling its subsequent transfer to Gateway Expression vectors. We also demonstrate how the coding and regulatory regions of a gene can be directly cloned into a plant transformation vector by recombineering. This construct was then rapidly converted into a novel Gateway Expression vector incorporating cognate 5' and 3' regulatory regions by using recombineering to replace the intervening coding region with the Gateway Destination cassette. Such expression vectors can be applied to characterise gene regulatory regions through development of reporter-gene fusions, using the Gateway Entry clones of GUS and GFP described here, or for ectopic expression of a coding region cloned into a Gateway Entry vector. We exemplify the utility of this approach with the Arabidopsis PAP85 gene and demonstrate that the expression

  4. cDNA, genomic cloning and sequence analysis of ribosomal protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ribosomal protein S4X (RPS4X) is one of the 40S ribosomal proteins encoded by the RPS4X gene. The cDNA and the genomic sequence of RPS4X were cloned successfully from giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and touchdown-PCR technology ...

  5. cDNA, genomic sequence cloning and analysis of the ribosomal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ribosomal protein L37A (RPL37A) is a component of 60S large ribosomal subunit encoded by the RPL37A gene, which belongs to the family of ribosomal L37AE proteins, located in the cytoplasm. The complementary deoxyribonucleic acid (cDNA) and the genomic sequence of RPL37A were cloned successfully from giant ...

  6. cDNA, genomic cloning and sequence analysis of ribosomal protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enoh

    2012-03-13

    Mar 13, 2012 ... Ribosomal protein S4X (RPS4X) is one of the 40S ribosomal proteins encoded by the RPS4X gene. The. cDNA and the genomic sequence of RPS4X were cloned successfully from giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and touchdown- ...

  7. A method for construction, cloning and expression of intron-less gene from unannotated genomic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Vineet; Gupta, Bharti; Banerjee, Uttam Chand; Roy, Nilanjan

    2008-11-01

    The present century has witnessed an unprecedented rise in genome sequences owing to various genome-sequencing programs. However, the same has not been replicated with cDNA or expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Hence, prediction of protein coding sequence of genes from this enormous collection of genomic sequences presents a significant challenge. While robust high throughput methods of cloning and expression could be used to meet protein requirements, lack of intron information creates a bottleneck. Computational programs designed for recognizing intron-exon boundaries for a particular organism or group of organisms have their own limitations. Keeping this in view, we describe here a method for construction of intron-less gene from genomic DNA in the absence of cDNA/EST information and organism-specific gene prediction program. The method outlined is a sequential application of bioinformatics to predict correct intron-exon boundaries and splicing by overlap extension PCR for spliced gene synthesis. The gene construct so obtained can then be cloned for protein expression. The method is simple and can be used for any eukaryotic gene expression.

  8. YAC cloning and identification of rice (Oriza sativa L.) genomic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Wang, J; Liu, W; Huang, W; Liu, L

    1996-01-01

    Construction of the genomic library by using yeast artificial chromosomes (YAC) has been an approach to a map-based gene cloning strategy. We have obtained more than 2000 YAC clones for the construction of a rice (Oriza sativa L.) genomic library through a procedure that could be summarized as follows: a fractionate by the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), the rice nucleic high molecular weight (HMW) DNA which is partially digested with EcoRI, and recovered fragments larger than 200 kb; ligate the fragments to the EcoRI digested YAC vector pairs pJS97 and pJS98; transform competent spheroplasts prepared from yeast strain YPH252; and select transformants directly on Ura-Trp-double selective media. Southern hybridization results indicated that the sizes of inserts were in the range of 200-820 kb.

  9. Osteoponin Promoter Controlled by DNA Methylation: Aberrant Methylation in Cloned Porcine Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Jie Shen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloned animals usually exhibited many defects in physical characteristics or aberrant epigenetic reprogramming, especially in some important organ development. Osteoponin (OPN is an extracellular-matrix protein involved in heart and bone development and diseases. In this study, we investigated the correlation between OPN mRNA and its promoter methylation changes by the 5-aza-dc treatment in fibroblast cell and promoter assay. Aberrant methylation of porcine OPN was frequently found in different tissues of somatic nuclear transferred cloning pigs, and bisulfite sequence data suggested that the OPN promoter region −2615 to −2239 nucleotides (nt may be a crucial regulation DNA element. In pig ear fibroblast cell culture study, the demethylation of OPN promoter was found in dose-dependent response of 5-aza-dc treatment and followed the OPN mRNA reexpression. In cloned pig study, discrepant expression pattern was identified in several cloned pig tissues, especially in brain, heart, and ear. Promoter assay data revealed that four methylated CpG sites presenting in the −2615 to −2239 nt region cause significant downregulation of OPN promoter activity. These data suggested that methylation in the OPN promoter plays a crucial role in the regulation of OPN expression that we found in cloned pigs genome.

  10. Genomic and cDNA cloning of a novel mouse lipoxygenase gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems van Dijk, K.; Steketee, K.; Havekes, L.; Frants, R.; Hofker, M.

    1995-01-01

    A novel 12- and 15-lipoxygenase related gene was isolated from a mouse strain 129 genomic phage library in a screen with a human 15-lipoxygenase cDNA probe. The complete genomic sequence revealed 14 exons and 13 introns covering 7.3 kb of DNA. The splice junctions were verified from the cDNA

  11. Construction of a genomic DNA library with a TA vector and its application in cloning of the phytoene synthase gene from the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis M-135

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikazu, Kawata; Shin-Ichi, Yano; Hiroyuki, Kojima

    1998-03-01

    An efficient and simple method for constructing a genomic DNA library using a TA cloning vector is presented. It is based on the sonicative cleavage of genomic DNA and modification of fragment ends with Taq DNA polymerase, followed by ligation using a TA vector. This method was applied for cloning of the phytoene synthase gene crt B from Spirulina platensis. This method is useful when genomic DNA cannot be efficiently digested with restriction enzymes, a problem often encountered during the construction of a genomic DNA library of cyanobacteria.

  12. Accurate DNA assembly and genome engineering with optimized uracil excision cloning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaleiro, Mafalda; Kim, Se Hyeuk; Seppala, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Simple and reliable DNA editing by uracil excision (a.k.a. USER cloning) has been described by several research groups, but the optimal design of cohesive DNA ends for multigene assembly remains elusive. Here, we use two model constructs based on expression of gfp and a four-gene pathway that pro...

  13. Partial retrotransposon-like DNA sequence in the genomic clone of Aspergillus flavus, pAF28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubara, Patricia A; Tibbot, Brian K; Tarun, Alice S; McAlpin, Cesaria E; Hua, Sui-Sheng T

    2003-07-01

    A genomic clone of the aflatoxin-producing fungus Aspergillus flavus, designated pAF28, has been used as a probe for Southern blot fingerprinting of fungal strains. A large number of A. flavus strains isolated from corn fields and tree-nut orchards can be distinguished because the DNA fingerprint patterns are highly polymorphic. We have completed the sequencing of a 6355 bp insert in pAF28. The sequence features motifs and open reading frames characteristic of transposable elements of the gypsy class. We have named this new element AfRTL-1, for A. flavus retrotransposon-like DNA.

  14. Alternative splicing of human elastin mRNA indicated by sequence analysis of cloned genomic and complementary DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indik, Z.; Yeh, H.; Ornstein-goldstein, N.; Sheppard, P.; Anderson, N.; Rosenbloom, J.C.; Peltonen, L.; Rosenbloom, J.

    1987-01-01

    Poly(A) + RNA, isolated from a single 7-mo fetal human aorta, was used to synthesize cDNA by the RNase H method, and the cDNA was inserted into λgt10. Recombinant phage containing elastin sequences were identified by hybridization with cloned, exon-containing fragments of the human elastin gene. Three clones containing inserts of 3.3, 2.7, and 2.3 kilobases were selected for further analysis. Three overlapping clones containing 17.8 kilobases of the human elastin gene were also isolated from genomic libraries. Complete sequence analysis of the six clones demonstrated that: (i) the cDNA encompassed the entire translated portion of the mRNA encoding 786 amino acids, including several unusual hydrophilic amino acid sequences not previously identified in porcine tropoelastin, (ii) exons encoding either hydrophobic or crosslinking domains in the protein alternated in the gene, and (iii) a great abundance of Alu repetitive sequences occurred throughout the introns. The data also indicated substantial alternative splicing of the mRNA. These results suggest the potential for significant variation in the precise molecular structure of the elastic fiber in the human population

  15. Infectious mutants of cassava latent virus generated in vivo from intact recombinant DNA clones containing single copies of the genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, J; Townsend, R

    1986-08-11

    Intact recombinant DNAs containing single copies of either component of the cassava latent virus genome can elicit infection when mechanically inoculated to host plants in the presence of the appropriate second component. Characterisation of infectious mutant progeny viruses, by analysis of virus-specific supercoiled DNA intermediates, indicates that most if not all of the cloning vector has been deleted, achieved at least in some cases by intermolecular recombination in vivo between DNAs 1 and 2. Significant rearrangements within the intergenic region of DNA 2, predominantly external to the common region, can be tolerated without loss of infectivity suggesting a somewhat passive role in virus multiplication for the sequences in question. Although packaging constraints might impose limits on the amount of DNA within geminate particles, isolation of an infectious coat protein mutant defective in virion production suggests that packaging is not essential for systemic spread of the viral DNA.

  16. cDNA Clones with Rare and Recurrent Mutations Found in Cancers | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CTD2 Center at UT- MD Anderson Cancer Center has developed High-Throughput Mutagenesis and Molecular Barcoding (HiTMMoB)1,2 pipeline to construct mutant alleles open reading frame expression clones that are either recurrent or rare in cancers. These barcoded genes can be used for context-specific functional validation, detection of novel biomarkers (pathway activation) and targets (drug sensitivity).

  17. Isolation and characterization of a steroid sulfatase cDNA clone: genomic deletions in patients with X-chromosome-linked ichthyosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballabio, A.; Parenti, G.; Carrozzo, R.; Sebastio, G.; Andria, G.; Buckle, V.; Fraser, N.; Craig, I.; Rocchi, M.; Romeo, G.; Jobsis, A.C.; Persico, M.G.

    1987-07-01

    The authors have isolated several cDNA clones from a lambdagt11 expression library by screening with antibodies prepared against the microsomal enzyme steroid sulfatase, which is deficient in classical X-chromosome-linked ichthyosis patients. One of these clones (p422) has been assigned by mapping with a somatic cell hybrid panel and by in situ hybridization to Xp22.3. Clone p422 therefore has a coincident localization with the previously identified locus for steroid sulfatase expression in the region of the X chromosome escaping from inactivation. Twelve steroid sulfatase-deficient patients, including eight cases of classical ichthyosis, were found to be deleted for genomic sequences detected by the clone.

  18. Isolation and characterization of a steroid sulfatase cDNA clone: genomic deletions in patients with X-chromosome-linked ichthyosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballabio, A.; Parenti, G.; Carrozzo, R.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have isolated several cDNA clones from a λgt11 expression library by screening with antibodies prepared against the microsomal enzyme steroid sulfatase, which is deficient in classical X-chromosome-linked ichthyosis patients. One of these clones (p422) has been assigned by mapping with a somatic cell hybrid panel and by in situ hybridization to Xp22.3. Clone p422 therefore has a coincident localization with the previously identified locus for steroid sulfatase expression in the region of the X chromosome escaping from inactivation. Twelve steroid sulfatase-deficient patients, including eight cases of classical ichthyosis, were found to be deleted for genomic sequences detected by the clone

  19. A xylanase gene directly cloned from the genomic DNA of alkaline wastewater sludge showing application potential in the paper industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanyu; Luo, Huiying; Meng, Kun; Shi, Pengjun; Wang, Guozeng; Yang, Peilong; Yuan, Tiezheng; Yao, Bin

    2011-09-01

    A xylanase gene, aws-2x, was directly cloned from the genomic DNA of the alkaline wastewater sludge using degenerated PCR and modified TAIL-PCR. The deduced amino acid sequence of AWS-2x shared the highest identity (60%) with the xylanase from Chryseobacterium gleum belonging to the glycosyl hydrolase GH family 10. Recombinant AWS-2x was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified to electrophoretic homogeneity. The enzyme showed maximal activity at pH 7.5 and 55 °C, maintained more than 50% of maximal activity when assayed at pH 9.0, and was stable over a wide pH range from 4.0 to 11.0. The specific activity of AWS-2x towards hardwood xylan (beechwood and birchwood xylan) was significantly higher than that to cereal xylan (oat spelt xylan and wheat arabinoxylan). These properties make AWS-2x a potential candidate for application in the pulp and paper industry.

  20. [DNA methylation and development abnormalities in cloned animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rong-Rong; Li, Xiang-Yun

    2007-09-01

    Most cloned animals by nuclear transfer were dead before their births, and only a few can develop to their late gestation or adulthood. Although some cloned offsprings can survive, they often have some development disfigurements and abnormal phenotypes in various degrees. DNA methylation is an important modifiable manner of epigenetic dominating the correct expression of gene. It is a main instrument of regulating genome function and plays a prominent part in the embryonic normal development. Through researching the pattern of DNA methylation, we found that there were many abnormal DNA methylation patterns in cloned animals, which might be the primary reasons for inducing premature death of cloned embryos and development abnormalities of cloned animals. This article discusses the function of DNA methylation, the aberrant DNA methylation patterns in cloned animals, and the reasons of inducing abnormal DNA methylation in cloned animals.

  1. Stable expression and replication of hepatitis B virus genome in an integrated state in a human hepatoma cell line transfected with the cloned viral DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsurimoto, T.; Fujiyama, A.; Matsubara, K.

    1987-01-01

    A human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (Huh6-c15) was transfected with a recombinant DNA molecule that consists of tandemly arranged hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome and a neomycin-resistant gene. One clone resistant to G-418 produces and releases surface antigen and e antigen into medium at a high level and accumulates core particles intracellularly. This clone has a chromosomally integrated set of the original recombinant DNA and produces a 3.5-kilobase transcript corresponding to the pregenome RNA as well as HBV DNAs in an extrachromosomal form. Most of these DNAs were in single-stranded or partially double-stranded form and were packaged in the intracellular core particles. In the medium, particles were detected that contained HBV DNA and were morphologically indistinguishable from Dane particles. These results demonstrate that the HBV genome in an integrated state acted as a template for viral gene expression and replication. The cells were maintained for more than 6 months without losing the ability to produce the extrachromosomal HBV DNA and Dane-like particles. Thus, the cells can be used as a model system for analyses of gene expression and DNA replication of HBV in human hepatocytes

  2. Stable expression and replication of hepatitis B virus genome in an integrated state in a human hepatoma cell line transfected with the cloned viral DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurimoto, T; Fujiyama, A; Matsubara, K

    1987-01-01

    A human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (Huh6-c15) was transfected with a recombinant DNA molecule that consists of tandemly arranged hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome and a neomycin-resistant gene. One clone resistant to G-418 produces and releases surface antigen and e antigen into medium at a high level and accumulates core particles intracellularly. This clone has a chromosomally integrated set of the original recombinant DNA and produces a 3.5-kilobase transcript corresponding to the pregenome RNA as well as HBV DNAs in an extrachromosomal form. Most of these DNAs were in single-stranded or partially double-stranded form and were packaged in the intracellular core particles. In the medium, particles were detected that contained HBV DNA and were morphologically indistinguishable from Dane particles. These results demonstrate that the HBV genome in an integrated state acted as a template for viral gene expression and replication. The cells were maintained for more than 6 months without losing the ability to produce the extrachromosomal HBV DNA and Dane-like particles. Thus, the cells can be used as a model system for analyses of gene expression and DNA replication of HBV in human hepatocytes.

  3. Functional annotation, genome organization and phylogeny of the grapevine (Vitis vinifera) terpene synthase gene family based on genome assembly, FLcDNA cloning, and enzyme assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Diane M; Aubourg, Sébastien; Schouwey, Marina B; Daviet, Laurent; Schalk, Michel; Toub, Omid; Lund, Steven T; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2010-10-21

    Terpenoids are among the most important constituents of grape flavour and wine bouquet, and serve as useful metabolite markers in viticulture and enology. Based on the initial 8-fold sequencing of a nearly homozygous Pinot noir inbred line, 89 putative terpenoid synthase genes (VvTPS) were predicted by in silico analysis of the grapevine (Vitis vinifera) genome assembly 1. The finding of this very large VvTPS family, combined with the importance of terpenoid metabolism for the organoleptic properties of grapevine berries and finished wines, prompted a detailed examination of this gene family at the genomic level as well as an investigation into VvTPS biochemical functions. We present findings from the analysis of the up-dated 12-fold sequencing and assembly of the grapevine genome that place the number of predicted VvTPS genes at 69 putatively functional VvTPS, 20 partial VvTPS, and 63 VvTPS probable pseudogenes. Gene discovery and annotation included information about gene architecture and chromosomal location. A dense cluster of 45 VvTPS is localized on chromosome 18. Extensive FLcDNA cloning, gene synthesis, and protein expression enabled functional characterization of 39 VvTPS; this is the largest number of functionally characterized TPS for any species reported to date. Of these enzymes, 23 have unique functions and/or phylogenetic locations within the plant TPS gene family. Phylogenetic analyses of the TPS gene family showed that while most VvTPS form species-specific gene clusters, there are several examples of gene orthology with TPS of other plant species, representing perhaps more ancient VvTPS, which have maintained functions independent of speciation. The highly expanded VvTPS gene family underpins the prominence of terpenoid metabolism in grapevine. We provide a detailed experimental functional annotation of 39 members of this important gene family in grapevine and comprehensive information about gene structure and phylogeny for the entire currently

  4. Succinyl-CoA:3-oxoacid transferase (SCOT): Human cDNA and genomic cloning and chromosomal mapping of the human gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassovska-Bratinova, S.; Mitchell, G.A. [Hopital Ste-Justine, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Duncan, A. [Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    SCOT (EC 2.8.3.5) mediates the activation and utilization of ketone bodies in extrahepatic tissues, especially brain, heart and kidney. Children with hereditary SCOT deficiency have episodes of severe ketoacidosis. Using a partial human heart SCOT cDNA, hSCOT-G, we detected a single {approximately}3 Kb mRNA in human heart and leukocytes, but not in liver. The length of the mouse SCOT mRNA detected with hSCOT-G in muscle, heart, kidney and brain is {approximately}3 Kb. We mapped the human SCOT gene to chromosome 5p13 by in situ hybridization. To date we have isolated human heart cDNAs spanning 2.9 Kb and including a 1248 bp open reading frame. The 3{prime} nontranslated region of the human SCOT mRNA extends at least 1712 bp, in contrast to the 209 bp sequence reported for pig SCOT cDNA. In one heart cDNA clone we detected a 58 bp insertion 258 bp downstream from the stop codon. We performed RT-PCR using a 5{prime} degenerate-sequence primer designed from the pig SCOT leader peptide sequence and 3{prime} human-specific primers. We obtained a fragment of the expected 320 bp length which strongly hybridizes to an internal oligonucleotide and which we are now characterizing. Human genomic Southern blot analysis with a partial human cDNA as probe suggests that the length of the human SCOT gene is about 40 K. Using hSCOT-G as a probe, we screened a human leukocyte genomic library in EMBL-3 phage and isolated two genomic clones. One of them contains a processed pseudogene. The other contains at least two exons of the human SCOT gene spanning cDNA residues 431 to 734. These findings will be useful for mutation analysis in SCOT-deficient patients.

  5. Molecular and Biological Characterization of an Isolate of Cucumber mosaic virus from Glycine soja by Generating its Infectious Full-genome cDNA Clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Sa Vo Phan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Molecular and biological characteristics of an isolate of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV from Glycine soja (wild soybean, named as CMV-209, was examined in this study. Comparison of nucleotide sequences and phylogenetic analyses of CMV-209 with the other CMV strains revealed that CMV-209 belonged to CMV subgroup I. However, CMV-209 showed some genetic distance from the CMV strains assigned to subgroup IA or subgroup IB. Infectious full-genome cDNA clones of CMV-209 were generated under the control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Infectivity of the CMV-209 clones was evaluated in Nicotiana benthamiana and various legume species. Our assays revealed that CMV-209 could systemically infect Glycine soja (wild soybean and Pisum sativum (pea as well as N. benthamiana, but not the other legume species.

  6. Functional Annotation, Genome Organization and Phylogeny of the Grapevine (Vitis vinifera Terpene Synthase Gene Family Based on Genome Assembly, FLcDNA Cloning, and Enzyme Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toub Omid

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Terpenoids are among the most important constituents of grape flavour and wine bouquet, and serve as useful metabolite markers in viticulture and enology. Based on the initial 8-fold sequencing of a nearly homozygous Pinot noir inbred line, 89 putative terpenoid synthase genes (VvTPS were predicted by in silico analysis of the grapevine (Vitis vinifera genome assembly 1. The finding of this very large VvTPS family, combined with the importance of terpenoid metabolism for the organoleptic properties of grapevine berries and finished wines, prompted a detailed examination of this gene family at the genomic level as well as an investigation into VvTPS biochemical functions. Results We present findings from the analysis of the up-dated 12-fold sequencing and assembly of the grapevine genome that place the number of predicted VvTPS genes at 69 putatively functional VvTPS, 20 partial VvTPS, and 63 VvTPS probable pseudogenes. Gene discovery and annotation included information about gene architecture and chromosomal location. A dense cluster of 45 VvTPS is localized on chromosome 18. Extensive FLcDNA cloning, gene synthesis, and protein expression enabled functional characterization of 39 VvTPS; this is the largest number of functionally characterized TPS for any species reported to date. Of these enzymes, 23 have unique functions and/or phylogenetic locations within the plant TPS gene family. Phylogenetic analyses of the TPS gene family showed that while most VvTPS form species-specific gene clusters, there are several examples of gene orthology with TPS of other plant species, representing perhaps more ancient VvTPS, which have maintained functions independent of speciation. Conclusions The highly expanded VvTPS gene family underpins the prominence of terpenoid metabolism in grapevine. We provide a detailed experimental functional annotation of 39 members of this important gene family in grapevine and comprehensive information

  7. Cloning human DNA repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeggo, P.A.; Carr, A.M.; Lehmann, A.R.

    1994-01-01

    Many human genes involved in the repair of UV damage have been cloned using different procedures and they have been of great value in assisting the understanding of the mechanism of nucleotide excision-repair. Genes involved in repair of ionizing radiation damage have proved more difficult to isolate. Positional cloning has localized the XRCC5 gene to a small region of chromosome 2q33-35, and a series of yeast artificial chromosomes covering this region have been isolated. Very recent work has shown that the XRCC5 gene encodes the 80 kDa subunit of the Ku DNA-binding protein. The Ku80 gene also maps to this region. Studies with fission yeast have shown that radiation sensitivity can result not only from defective DNA repair but also from abnormal cell cycle control following DNA damage. Several genes involved in this 'check-point' control in fission yeast have been isolated and characterized in detail. It is likely that a similar checkpoint control mechanism exists in human cells. (author)

  8. Successful application of FTA Classic Card technology and use of bacteriophage phi29 DNA polymerase for large-scale field sampling and cloning of complete maize streak virus genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owor, Betty E; Shepherd, Dionne N; Taylor, Nigel J; Edema, Richard; Monjane, Adérito L; Thomson, Jennifer A; Martin, Darren P; Varsani, Arvind

    2007-03-01

    Leaf samples from 155 maize streak virus (MSV)-infected maize plants were collected from 155 farmers' fields in 23 districts in Uganda in May/June 2005 by leaf-pressing infected samples onto FTA Classic Cards. Viral DNA was successfully extracted from cards stored at room temperature for 9 months. The diversity of 127 MSV isolates was analysed by PCR-generated RFLPs. Six representative isolates having different RFLP patterns and causing either severe, moderate or mild disease symptoms, were chosen for amplification from FTA cards by bacteriophage phi29 DNA polymerase using the TempliPhi system. Full-length genomes were inserted into a cloning vector using a unique restriction enzyme site, and sequenced. The 1.3-kb PCR product amplified directly from FTA-eluted DNA and used for RFLP analysis was also cloned and sequenced. Comparison of cloned whole genome sequences with those of the original PCR products indicated that the correct virus genome had been cloned and that no errors were introduced by the phi29 polymerase. This is the first successful large-scale application of FTA card technology to the field, and illustrates the ease with which large numbers of infected samples can be collected and stored for downstream molecular applications such as diversity analysis and cloning of potentially new virus genomes.

  9. Isolation and subcloning of chitinase clone from chickpea genomic library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, A; Tyagi, A; Koundal, K R; Sharma, R P

    1996-06-01

    Chickpea genomic library constructed earlier in phage lambda (EMBL-3) was screened for the presence of chitinase clone using tobacco chitinase cDNA as a probe. Positive clones obtained by primary screening of plaques (2 x 10(6)) were ascertained by secondary and tertiary screening. Presence of chitinase insert in the positive clones obtained, was further confirmed by restricting phage DNA with Sal I and then doing southern with tobacco chitinase. The insert band was eluted out and subcloned in puc 19 plasmid.

  10. Isolation of a human tissue-type plasminogen-activator genomic DNA clone and its expression in mouse L-cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Brown (Morris); A.W.R. Tyrrell; C.G. Chapman; J.E. Carey (Janet); D.M. Glover; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); I. Dodd; J.H. Robinson

    1985-01-01

    textabstractWe have isolated a cDNA clone corresponding to a substantial portion of the human tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) protein. It encodes almost all of the protein B chain and part of the 3' untranslated region. We have used this clone to screen bacteriophage lambda and cosmid

  11. Whitefly (Bemisia tabaci genome project: analysis of sequenced clones from egg, instar, and adult (viruliferous and non-viruliferous cDNA libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czosnek Henryk

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The past three decades have witnessed a dramatic increase in interest in the whitefly Bemisia tabaci, owing to its nature as a taxonomically cryptic species, the damage it causes to a large number of herbaceous plants because of its specialized feeding in the phloem, and to its ability to serve as a vector of plant viruses. Among the most important plant viruses to be transmitted by B. tabaci are those in the genus Begomovirus (family, Geminiviridae. Surprisingly, little is known about the genome of this whitefly. The haploid genome size for male B. tabaci has been estimated to be approximately one billion bp by flow cytometry analysis, about five times the size of the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. The genes involved in whitefly development, in host range plasticity, and in begomovirus vector specificity and competency, are unknown. Results To address this general shortage of genomic sequence information, we have constructed three cDNA libraries from non-viruliferous whiteflies (eggs, immature instars, and adults and two from adult insects that fed on tomato plants infected by two geminiviruses: Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV and Tomato mottle virus (ToMoV. In total, the sequence of 18,976 clones was determined. After quality control, and removal of 5,542 clones of mitochondrial origin 9,110 sequences remained which included 3,843 singletons and 1,017 contigs. Comparisons with public databases indicated that the libraries contained genes involved in cellular and developmental processes. In addition, approximately 1,000 bases aligned with the genome of the B. tabaci endosymbiotic bacterium Candidatus Portiera aleyrodidarum, originating primarily from the egg and instar libraries. Apart from the mitochondrial sequences, the longest and most abundant sequence encodes vitellogenin, which originated from whitefly adult libraries, indicating that much of the gene expression in this insect is directed toward the production

  12. Intraclonal genome diversity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa clones CHA and TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to different living conditions is accompanied by microevolution resulting in genomic diversity between strains of the same clonal lineage. In order to detect the impact of colonized habitats on P. aeruginosa microevolution we determined the genomic diversity between the highly virulent cystic fibrosis (CF) isolate CHA and two temporally and geographically unrelated clonal variants. The outcome was compared with the intraclonal genome diversity between three more closely related isolates of another clonal complex. Results The three clone CHA isolates differed in their core genome in several dozen strain specific nucleotide exchanges and small deletions from each other. Loss of function mutations and non-conservative amino acid replacements affected several habitat- and lifestyle-associated traits, for example, the key regulator GacS of the switch between acute and chronic disease phenotypes was disrupted in strain CHA. Intraclonal genome diversity manifested in an individual composition of the respective accessory genome whereby the highest number of accessory DNA elements was observed for isolate PT22 from a polluted aquatic habitat. Little intraclonal diversity was observed between three spatiotemporally related outbreak isolates of clone TB. Although phenotypically different, only a few individual SNPs and deletions were detected in the clone TB isolates. Their accessory genome mainly differed in prophage-like DNA elements taken up by one of the strains. Conclusions The higher geographical and temporal distance of the clone CHA isolates was associated with an increased intraclonal genome diversity compared to the more closely related clone TB isolates derived from a common source demonstrating the impact of habitat adaptation on the microevolution of P. aeruginosa. However, even short-term habitat differentiation can cause major phenotypic diversification driven by single genomic variation events and uptake of phage

  13. Mitochondrial DNA genotypes in nuclear transfer-derived cloned sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M J; Gurer, C; Loike, J D; Wilmut, I; Schnieke, A E; Schon, E A

    1999-09-01

    Eukaryotic cells contain two distinct genomes. One is located in the nucleus (nDNA) and is transmitted in a mendelian fashion, whereas the other is located in mitochondria (mtDNA) and is transmitted by maternal inheritance. Cloning of mammals typically has been achieved via nuclear transfer, in which a donor somatic cell is fused by electoporation with a recipient enucleated oocyte. During this whole-cell electrofusion, nDNA as well as mtDNA ought to be transferred to the oocyte. Thus, the cloned progeny should harbour mtDNAs from both the donor and recipient cytoplasms, resulting in heteroplasmy. Although the confirmation of nuclear transfer has been established using somatic cell-specific nDNA markers, no similar analysis of the mtDNA genotype has been reported. We report here the origin of the mtDNA in Dolly, the first animal cloned from an established adult somatic cell line, and in nine other nuclear transfer-derived sheep generated from fetal cells. The mtDNA of each of the ten nuclear-transfer sheep was derived exclusively from recipient enucleated oocytes, with no detectable contribution from the respective somatic donor cells. Thus, although these ten sheep are authentic nuclear clones, they are in fact genetic chimaeras, containing somatic cell-derived nuclear DNA but oocyte-derived mtDNA.

  14. Distribution and uses of legume DNA clone resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, N.D.

    2001-01-01

    Since 1990, my lab has developed and distributed various DNA clone resources for the legumes. In the first several years, the focus was on members of the tropical genus, Vigna, including the widely cultivated species, mungbean (V. radiata) and cowpea (V. unguiculata). Both of these grain legumes play key roles in agriculture in developing countries of Asia (mungbean) and Africa (cowpea). Moreover, because there is substantial genome conservation among legumes, these genetic resources have also been utilized by a wide range of researchers in other crop species. In 1997, my lab began to focus on the development and distribution of a new generation of DNA clone resources; Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes (BAC). A library of these clones was constructed in soybean (Glycine max) the most important legume species worldwide in terms of economic value. Again, the library has become a valuable resource for the legume research community and has been widely used in studies of legume genomics. (author)

  15. The proviral genome of radiation leukemia virus (RadLV): molecular cloning, restriction analysis and integration sites in tumor cell DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janowski, M.; Merregaert, J.; Nuyten, J.M.; Maisin, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    An infectious clone of the linear, unintegrated RadLV provirus was obtained by insertion in the plasmid pBR322. Its restriction map was indistinguishable from that of the majority of the multiple proviral copies, which are found apparently at random sites in the DNA of RadLV-induced rat thymic lymphomas [fr

  16. Whole genome comparison of donor and cloned dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hak-Min; Cho, Yun Sung; Kim, Hyunmin; Jho, Sungwoong; Son, Bongjun; Choi, Joung Yoon; Kim, Sangsoo; Lee, Byeong Chun; Bhak, Jong; Jang, Goo

    2013-01-01

    Cloning is a process that produces genetically identical organisms. However, the genomic degree of genetic resemblance in clones needs to be determined. In this report, the genomes of a cloned dog and its donor were compared. Compared with a human monozygotic twin, the genome of the cloned dog showed little difference from the genome of the nuclear donor dog in terms of single nucleotide variations, chromosomal instability, and telomere lengths. These findings suggest that cloning by somatic ...

  17. Whole genome comparison of donor and cloned dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak-Min; Cho, Yun Sung; Kim, Hyunmin; Jho, Sungwoong; Son, Bongjun; Choi, Joung Yoon; Kim, Sangsoo; Lee, Byeong Chun; Bhak, Jong; Jang, Goo

    2013-10-21

    Cloning is a process that produces genetically identical organisms. However, the genomic degree of genetic resemblance in clones needs to be determined. In this report, the genomes of a cloned dog and its donor were compared. Compared with a human monozygotic twin, the genome of the cloned dog showed little difference from the genome of the nuclear donor dog in terms of single nucleotide variations, chromosomal instability, and telomere lengths. These findings suggest that cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer produced an almost identical genome. The whole genome sequence data of donor and cloned dogs can provide a resource for further investigations on epigenetic contributions in phenotypic differences.

  18. Ultra-low background DNA cloning system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Goto

    Full Text Available Yeast-based in vivo cloning is useful for cloning DNA fragments into plasmid vectors and is based on the ability of yeast to recombine the DNA fragments by homologous recombination. Although this method is efficient, it produces some by-products. We have developed an "ultra-low background DNA cloning system" on the basis of yeast-based in vivo cloning, by almost completely eliminating the generation of by-products and applying the method to commonly used Escherichia coli vectors, particularly those lacking yeast replication origins and carrying an ampicillin resistance gene (Amp(r. First, we constructed a conversion cassette containing the DNA sequences in the following order: an Amp(r 5' UTR (untranslated region and coding region, an autonomous replication sequence and a centromere sequence from yeast, a TRP1 yeast selectable marker, and an Amp(r 3' UTR. This cassette allowed conversion of the Amp(r-containing vector into the yeast/E. coli shuttle vector through use of the Amp(r sequence by homologous recombination. Furthermore, simultaneous transformation of the desired DNA fragment into yeast allowed cloning of this DNA fragment into the same vector. We rescued the plasmid vectors from all yeast transformants, and by-products containing the E. coli replication origin disappeared. Next, the rescued vectors were transformed into E. coli and the by-products containing the yeast replication origin disappeared. Thus, our method used yeast- and E. coli-specific "origins of replication" to eliminate the generation of by-products. Finally, we successfully cloned the DNA fragment into the vector with almost 100% efficiency.

  19. DNA Methylation in Peripheral Blood Cells of Pigs Cloned by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Fei; Li, Shengting; Lin, Lin

    2011-01-01

    To date, the genome-wide DNA methylation status of cloned pigs has not been investigated. Due to the relatively low success rate of pig cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer, a better understanding of the epigenetic reprogramming and the global methylation patterns associated with development...... in cloned pigs is required. In this study we applied methylation-specific digital karyotyping tag sequencing by Solexa technology and investigated the genome-wide DNA methylation profiles of peripheral blood cells in cloned pigs with normal phenotypes in comparison with their naturally bred controls....... In the result, we found that globally there was no significant difference of DNA methylation patterns between the two groups. Locus-specifically, some genes involved in embryonic development presented a generally increased level of methylation. Our findings suggest that in cloned pigs with normal phenotypes...

  20. cDNA cloning and gene characterization of the mitochondrial large subunit (LSU) rRNA from the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica. Evidence of heterogeneity in the fluke mitochondrial genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita, M; Bieber, D; Ringold, G; Mansour, T E

    1988-01-01

    A cDNA clone that encodes the large subunit of mitochondrial ribosomal RNA (LSU rRNA) from the liver fluke F. hepatica was isolated and characterized. This RNA molecule is polyadenylated at the 3' end and represents 10% of the poly A+RNA in adult F. hepatica. Fluke LSU rRNA has significant sequence homology to mosquito mitochondria LSU rRNA and is more closely related to the mitochondrial rRNA of hermaphroditic than dioecious trematodes. Mitochondrial DNA constitutes approximately 10% of the total cellular DNA of adult flukes. This percentage is lower in non-embryonated eggs as are the levels of LSU rRNA indicating eggs have lower metabolic activity. Analysis of transcription and the number of mitochondrial genomes in S. mansoni shows that the LSU rRNA is more abundant in females than in males. Restriction endonuclease analysis of the fluke mitochondrial LSU rRNA genes suggests the presence of heterogeneous repeated copies in the mitochondrial genome or heterogeneity among individual genomes of mitochondria. Images PMID:3405756

  1. Molecular cloning and characterization of human papilloma virus DNA derived from a laryngeal papilloma.

    OpenAIRE

    Gissmann, L; Diehl, V; Schultz-Coulon, H J; zur Hausen, H

    1982-01-01

    Papilloma virus DNA from a laryngeal papilloma was cloned in phage lambda L 47 and characterized after cleavage with different restriction enzymes. Hybridization with the DNAs of human papilloma virus types 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 8 showed no homology under stringent hybridization conditions. Human papilloma virus type 6 DNA, however, was partially identical to laryngeal papilloma virus DNA; different restriction enzyme fragments hybridizing with the other DNA were identified on each genome. The d...

  2. Intra-strain polymorphisms are detected but no genomic alteration is found in cloned mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotoh, Koshichi; Inoue, Kimiko; Ogura, Atsuo; Oishi, Michio

    2006-01-01

    In-gel competitive reassociation (IGCR) is a method for differential subtraction of polymorphic (RFLP) DNA fragments between two DNA samples of interest without probes or specific sequence information. Here, we applied the IGCR procedure to two cloned mice derived from an F1 hybrid of the C57BL/6Cr and DBA/2 strains, in order to investigate the possibility of genomic alteration in the cloned mouse genomes. Each of the five of the genomic alterations we detected between the two cloned mice corresponded to the 'intra-strain' polymorphisms in the C57BL/6Cr and DBA/2 mouse strains. Our result suggests that no severe aberration of genome sequences occurs due to somatic cell nuclear transfer

  3. Simplified methods for the construction of RNA and DNA virus infectious clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Tatsuya; Inoue-Nagata, Alice Kazuko

    2015-01-01

    Infectious virus clones are one of the most powerful tools in plant pathology, molecular biology, and biotechnology. The construction of infectious clones of RNA and DNA viruses, however, usually requires laborious cloning and subcloning steps. In addition, instability of the RNA virus genome is frequently reported after its introduction into the vector and transference to Escherichia coli. These difficulties hamper the cloning procedures, making it tedious and cumbersome. This chapter describes two protocols for a simple construction of infectious viruses, an RNA virus, the tobamovirus Pepper mild mottle virus, and a DNA virus, a bipartite begomovirus. For this purpose, the strategy of overlap-extension PCR was used for the construction of infectious tobamovirus clone and of rolling circle amplification (RCA) for the construction of a dimeric form of the begomovirus clone.

  4. Cloning, sequencing and expression of cDNA encoding growth ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers representing the conserved regions of fish GH sequences the 3′ region of catfish GH cDNA (540 bp) was cloned by random amplification of cDNA ends and the clone was used as a probe to isolate recombinant phages carrying the full-length cDNA sequence. The full-length ...

  5. Cloning of Salmonella typhimurium DNA encoding mutagenic DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.M.; Sedgwick, S.G.

    1989-01-01

    Mutagenic DNA repair in Escherichia coli is encoded by the umuDC operon. Salmonella typhimurium DNA which has homology with E. coli umuC and is able to complement E. coli umuC122::Tn5 and umuC36 mutations has been cloned. Complementation of umuD44 mutants and hybridization with E. coli umuD also occurred, but these activities were much weaker than with umuC. Restriction enzyme mapping indicated that the composition of the cloned fragment is different from the E. coli umuDC operon. Therefore, a umu-like function of S. typhimurium has been found; the phenotype of this function is weaker than that of its E. coli counterpart, which is consistent with the weak mutagenic response of S. typhimurium to UV compared with the response in E. coli

  6. The Cloning of the Human Tumor Supressor Gene INGI: DNA Cloning into Plasmid Vector and DNA Analysis by Restriction Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Ibrahim Auerkari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA cloning is one of the most important techniques In the field of molecular biology, with a critical role in analyzing the structure and function of genes and their adjacent regulatory regions. DNA cloning is helpful in learning fundamental molecular biological techniques, since DNA cloning involves a series of them, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR, DNA ligation, bacterial transformation, bacterial culture, plasmid DNA extraction, DNA digestion with restriction enzymes and agarose gel electrophoresis. In this paper the cloning of the human tumor suppressor gene INGI has been used to illustrate the methodology. The gene was amplified by PCR, cloned into a TA-cloning vectore, and restriction enzyme mapping was used to distinguish the sense INGI construct from the antisense INGI construct.

  7. cDNA structure, genomic organization and expression patterns of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Visfatin was a newly identified adipocytokine, which was involved in various physiologic and pathologic processes of organisms. The cDNA structure, genomic organization and expression patterns of silver Prussian carp visfatin were described in this report. The silver Prussian carp visfatin cDNA cloned from the liver was ...

  8. cDNA structure, genomic organization and expression patterns of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-11-23

    Nov 23, 2011 ... Visfatin was a newly identified adipocytokine, which was involved in various physiologic and pathologic processes of organisms. The cDNA structure, genomic organization and expression patterns of silver Prussian carp visfatin were described in this report. The silver Prussian carp visfatin. cDNA cloned ...

  9. Mitochondrial HMG to CoA synthase (mHS): cDNA cloning in human, mouse and C. elegans, mapping to human chromosome 1p12-13 and partial human genomic cloning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boukaftane, Y.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A. [Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)]|[Kingston General Hospital, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    mHS catalyzes the rate-limiting first step of ketogenesis in the liver. A cytoplasmic HS isozyme, encoded by another gene, catalyzes an early step in cholesterol synthesis. Starting from a rat mHS cDNA obtained by RT-PCR from the published rat cDNA sequence, we obtained and sequenced human and mouse cDNAs spanning the entire coding sequence of natural human and mouse mHS, as well as sequencing C. elegans HS-like cDNA. Consensus sequences for 3 mitochondrial and 4 cytoplasmic HSs were created and compared to invertebrate HS sequences. We found high conversation in the active site and at other regions presumably important for HS function. We mapped the mHS locus, HMGCS2 by in situ hybridization to chromosome 1P12-13, in contrast to the human cHS locus (HMGCS1) known to be on chromosome 5p13. Comparative mapping results suggest that these two chromosomal regions may be contiguous in other species, constant with a recent gene duplication event. Furthermore, we have characterized a human genomic mHS subclone containing 4 mHS exons, and found the position of all splice junctions to be identical to that of the hamster cHS gene except for one site in the 3{prime} nontranslated region. We calculate that the mHS and cHS genes were derived from a common ancestor 400-700 Myrs ago, implying that ketogenesis from fat may have become possible around the time of emergence of vertebrates ({approximately}500 Myr ago). Ketogenesis has evolved into an important pathway of energy metabolism, and we predict the mHS deficiency may prove to be responsible for some as yet explained cases of Reye-like syndromes in humans. This hypothesis can now be tested at the molecular level without the necessity of obtaining hepatic tissue.

  10. Genetic stability of pestivirus genomes cloned into BACs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Reimann, Ilona; Uttenthal, Åse

    pestivirus genomes to demonstrate the suitability of the BAC vector for harbouring pestivirus genomes. Two BAC clones, comprising the complete genomes of BDV Gifhorn (pBeloGif3) and CSFV Paderborn (pBeloPader10) were passaged 15 times in E.coli representing at least 360 bacteria generations. From 15th...

  11. Genomic clones of bovine parvovirus: Construction and effect of deletions and terminal sequence inversions on infectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shull, B.C.; Chen, K.C.; Lederman, M.; Stout, E.R.; Bates, R.C. (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg (USA))

    1988-02-01

    Genomic clones of the autonomous parvovirus bovine parvovirus (BPV) were constructed by blunt-end ligation of reannealed virion plus and minus DNA strands into the plasmid pUC8. These clones were stable during propagation in Escherichia coli JM107. All clones tested were found to be infectious by the criteria of plaque titer and progressive cytophathic effect after transfection into bovine fetal lung cells. Sequencing of the recombinant plasmids demonstrated that all of the BPV inserts had left-end (3{prime})-terminal deletions of up to 34 bases. Defective genomes could also be detected in the progeny DNA even though the infection was initiated with homogeneous, cloned DNA. Full-length genomic clones with 3{prime} flip and 3{prime} flop conformations were constructed and were found to have equal infectivity. Expression of capsid proteins from tranfected genomes was demonstrated by hemagglutination, indirect immunofluorescence, and immunoprecipitation of ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled cell lysates. Use of appropriate antiserum for immunoprecipitation showed the synthesis of BPV capsid and noncapsid proteins after transfection. Independently, a series of genomic clones with increasingly larger 3{prime}-terminal deletions was prepared from separately subcloned 3{prime}-terminal fragments. Transfection of these clones into bovine fetal lung cells revealed that deletions of up to 34 bases at the 3{prime} end lowered but did not abolish infectivity, while deletions of greater than 52 bases were lethal. End-label analysis showed that the 34-base deletion was repaired to wild-type length in the progeny virus.

  12. Cloning, sequencing and expression of cDNA encoding growth ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    317. 2.4 cDNA sequencing and analysis. The nucleotide sequence of the cloned H. fossilis GH. cDNA was determined by Sanger's dideoxy chain termi- nation method, using Perkin Elmer bigdye terminator kit in an ABI Prism 377 automated DNA sequencer. All other computational analysis of the GH cDNA was done using.

  13. Construction of recombinant DNA clone for bovine viral diarrhea virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, S.G.; Cho, H.J.; Masri, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    Molecular cloning was carried out on the Danish strain of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) to construct strategy for the diagnostic tools and effective vaccine of BVD afterwards. A recombinant DNA clone (No. 29) was established successfully from cDNA for viral RNA tailed with adenine homopolymer at 3 -end. 32 P-labeled DNA probes of 300~1, 800bp fragments, originating from the clone 29, directed specific DNA-RNA hybridization results with BVDV RNA. Recombinant DNA of the clone 29 was about 5,200bp representing 41.6% of the full length of Danish strain's RNA, and restriction sites were recognized for EooR I, Sst I, Hind III and Pst I restriction enzymes in the DNA fragment

  14. Cloning and Transplantation of the Mesoplasma florum Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baby, Vincent; Labroussaa, Fabien; Brodeur, Joëlle; Matteau, Dominick; Gourgues, Géraldine; Lartigue, Carole; Rodrigue, Sébastien

    2018-01-19

    Cloning and transplantation of bacterial genomes is a powerful method for the creation of engineered microorganisms. However, much remains to be understood about the molecular mechanisms and limitations of this approach. We report the whole-genome cloning of Mesoplasma florum in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and use this model to investigate the impact of a bacterial chromosome in yeast cells. Our results indicate that the cloned M. florum genome is subjected to weak transcriptional activity, and causes no significant impact on yeast growth. We also report that the M. florum genome can be transplanted into Mycoplasma capricolum without any negative impact from the putative restriction enzyme encoding gene mfl307. Using whole-genome sequencing, we observed that a small number of mutations appeared in all M. florum transplants. Mutations also arose, albeit at a lower frequency, when the M. capricolum genome was transplanted into M. capricolum recipient cells. These observations suggest that genome transplantation is mutagenic, and that this phenomenon is magnified by the use of genome donor and recipient cell belonging to different species. No difference in efficiency was detected after three successive rounds of genome transplantation, suggesting that the observed mutations were not selected during the procedure. Taken together, our results provide a more accurate picture of the events taking place during bacterial genome cloning and transplantation.

  15. Genetics, genomes and cloning the biotechnology revolution

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    1999-01-01

    As this century draws to a close, spectacular advances in the fields of genomics and genetics are opening up dramatic new horizons for medicine. For much of the 20th century, genetic research has focused on rare diseases caused by mutations in a particular gene. However, more recently it has been realised that common genetic variations (polymorphisms), interacting with the environment, can influence an individual's susceptibility to diseases widely represented in our populations (e.g. mental illness and asthma), redefining the term "genetic disease". Officially starting in 1990, the Human Genome Project was a $3-billion, 15-year program to find the estimated 80,000 human genes and determine the sequence of the 3 billion DNA building blocks that underlie all of human biology and its diversity. The resulting boom in genetic information and technologies, not only from humans, but from many other organisms, means that we now have new tools to understand and treat normal and disease states. This information is bei...

  16. Molecular cloning and genomic organization of a second probable allatostatin receptor from Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenz, C; Williamson, M; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    2000-01-01

    We (C. Lenz et al. (2000) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 269, 91-96) and others (N. Birgül et al. (1999) EMBO J. 18, 5892-5900) have recently cloned a Drosophila receptor that was structurally related to the mammalian galanin receptors, but turned out to be a receptor for a Drosophila peptide...... with a Drosophila genomic database clone that contained a DNA sequence coding for a protein having, again, structural similarities with the rat galanin receptors. Using PCR with primers coding for the presumed exons of this second Drosophila receptor gene, 5'- and 3'-RACE, and Drosophila cDNA as template, we...

  17. Differential differences in methylation status of putative imprinted genes among cloned swine genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Jie Shen

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is a major epigenetic modification in the mammalian genome that regulates crucial aspects of gene function. Mammalian cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT often results in gestational or neonatal failure with only a small proportion of manipulated embryos producing live births. Many of the embryos that survive to term later succumb to a variety of abnormalities that are likely due to inappropriate epigenetic reprogramming. Aberrant methylation patterns of imprinted genes in cloned cattle and mice have been elucidated, but few reports have analyzed the cloned pig genome. Four surviving cloned sows that were created by ear fibroblast nuclear transfer, each with a different life span and multiple organ defects, such as heart defects and bone growth delay, were used as epigenetic study materials. First, we identified four putative differential methylation regions (DMR of imprinted genes in the wild-type pig genome, including two maternally imprinted loci (INS and IGF2 and two paternally imprinted loci (H19 and IGF2R. Aberrant DNA methylation, either hypermethylation or hypomethylation, commonly appeared in H19 (45% of imprinted loci hypermethylated vs. 30% hypomethylated, IGF2 (40% vs. 0%, INS (50% vs. 5%, and IGF2R (15% vs. 45% in multiple tissues from these four cloned sows compared with wild-type pigs. Our data suggest that aberrant epigenetic modifications occur frequently in the genome of cloned swine. Even with successful production of cloned swine that avoid prenatal or postnatal death, the perturbation of methylation in imprinted genes still exists, which may be one of reason for their adult pathologies and short life. Understanding the aberrant pattern of gene imprinting would permit improvements in future cloning techniques.

  18. Brief Guide to Genomics: DNA, Genes and Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... de genómica A Brief Guide to Genomics DNA, Genes and Genomes Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the chemical ... needed to build the entire human body. A gene traditionally refers to the unit of DNA that ...

  19. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: molecular cloning of genomic RNA and its diagnostic application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brock, K.V.

    1987-01-01

    Molecular cloning of a field isolate of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strain 72 RNA was done in this study. The sensitivity and specificity of cloned cDNA sequences in hybridization assays with various BVDV strains were determined. cDNA was synthesized from polyadenylated BVDV RNA templates with oligo-dT primers, reverse transcriptase, and DNA polymerase I. The newly synthesized double-stranded BVDV cDNA was C-tailed with terminal deoxytransferase and annealed into G-tailed, Pst-1-cut pUC9 plasmid. Escherichia coli was transformed with the recombinant plasmids and a library of approximately 200 BVDV specific cDNA clones varying in length from 0.5 to 2.6 kilobases were isolated. The sensitivity and specificity of hybridization between the labelled cDNA and BVDV target sequences were determined. Cloned BVDV sequences were isolated from pUC9 plasmid DNA and labelled with 32 P by nick translation. The detection limit by dot blot hybridization assay was 20 pg of purified genomic BVDV RNA. cDNA hybridization probes were specific for all strains of BVDV tested, regardless of whether they were noncytopathic and cytopathic, but did not hybridize with heterologous bovine viruses tested. Probes did not hybridize with uninfected cell culture or cellular RNA. Hybridization probes were at least as sensitive as infectivity assays in detecting homologous virus

  20. Human mitochondrial HMG CoA synthase: Liver cDNA and partial genomic cloning, chromosome mapping to 1p12-p13, and possible role in vertebrate evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boukaftane, Y.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A. [Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal (Canada)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    Mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA synthase (mHS) is the first enzyme of ketogenesis, whereas the cytoplasmic HS isozyme (cHS) mediates an early step in cholersterol synthesis. We here report the sequence of human and mouse liver mHS cDNAs, the sequence of an HS-like cDNA from Caenorhabditis elegans, the structure of a partial human mHS genomic clone, and the mapping of the human mHS gene to chromosome 1p12-p13. the nucleotide sequence of the human mHS cDNA encodes a mature mHS peptide of 471 residues, with a mean amino acid identity of 66.5% with cHS from mammals and chicken. Comparative analysis of all known mHS and cHS protein and DNA sequences shows a high degree of conservation near the N-terminus that decreases progressively toward the C-terminus and suggests that the two isozymes arose from a common ancestor gene 400-900 million years ago. Comparison of the gene structure of mHS and cHS is also consistant with a recent duplication event. We hypothesize that the physiologic result of the HS gene duplication was the appearance of HS within the mitochondria around the time of emergence of early vertebrates, which linked preexisting pathways of beta oxidation and leucine catabolism and created the HMG CoA pathway of ketogenesis, thus providing a lipid-derived energy source for the vertebrate brain. 56 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. cDNA cloning, structural analysis, SNP detection and tissue ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 96; Issue 2. cDNA cloning, structural analysis, SNP detection and tissue ... Abstract. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) plays an important role in growth, reproduction, foetal development and cell proliferation. The present study was conducted to clone and sequence the ...

  2. (PCR) for direct cloning of blunt-end DNA fragments

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-19

    Sep 19, 2011 ... interest by PCR using proof reading DNA polymerase, such as Pfu, KOD and Primerstar, is preferred since the. PCR products with a higher degree of fidelity are required in many investigations. However, traditional blunt-end cloning method for direct cloning of blunt-end PCR products is not efficient since ...

  3. Molecular cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enoh

    2012-03-29

    Nanjing) co., Ltd. The nucleotide sequences of these primers are as follows: ..... Ebizuka Y (2000). Molecular cloning and characterization of a cDNA for Glycyrrhiza glabra cycloartenol synthase. Biol. Pharm. Bull. 23(2):231-234.

  4. Cloning of the human androgen receptor cDNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govindan, M.V.; Burelle, M.; Cantin, C.; Kabrie, C.; Labrie, F.; Lachance, Y.; Leblanc, G.; Lefebvre, C.; Patel, P.; Simard, J.

    1988-01-01

    The authors discuss how in order to define the functional domains of the human androgen receptor, complementary DNA (cDNA) clones encoding the human androgen receptor (hAR) have been isolated from a human testis λgtll cDNA library using synthetic oligonnucleotide probes, homologous to segments of the human glucocorticoid, estradiol and progesterone receptors. The cDNA clones corresponding to the human glucocorticoid, estradiol and progesterone receptors were eliminated after cross-hybridization with their respective cDNA probes and/or after restriction mapping of the cDNA clones. The remaining cDNA clones were classified into different groups after analysis by restriction digestion and cross-hybridization. Two of the largest cDNA clones from each group were inserted into an expression vector in both orientations. The linearized plasmids were used as templates in in vitro transcription with T7 RNA polymerase. Subsequent in vitro translation of the purified transcripts in rabbit reticulocyte lysate followed by sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) permitted the characterization of the encoded polyeptides. The expressed proteins larger than 30,000 Da were analyzed for their ability to bind tritium-labelled dihydrotestosterone ([ 3 H] DHT) with high affinity and specificity

  5. Rapid CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Cloning of Full-Length Epstein-Barr Virus Genomes from Latently Infected Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Misako; Ikuta, Kazufumi; Kanda, Teru

    2018-04-03

    Herpesviruses have relatively large DNA genomes of more than 150 kb that are difficult to clone and sequence. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) cloning of herpesvirus genomes is a powerful technique that greatly facilitates whole viral genome sequencing as well as functional characterization of reconstituted viruses. We describe recently invented technologies for rapid BAC cloning of herpesvirus genomes using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated homology-directed repair. We focus on recent BAC cloning techniques of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genomes and discuss the possible advantages of a CRISPR/Cas9-mediated strategy comparatively with precedent EBV-BAC cloning strategies. We also describe the design decisions of this technology as well as possible pitfalls and points to be improved in the future. The obtained EBV-BAC clones are subjected to long-read sequencing analysis to determine complete EBV genome sequence including repetitive regions. Rapid cloning and sequence determination of various EBV strains will greatly contribute to the understanding of their global geographical distribution. This technology can also be used to clone disease-associated EBV strains and test the hypothesis that they have special features that distinguish them from strains that infect asymptomatically.

  6. Isolation and enrichment of Cryptosporidium DNA and verification of DNA purity for whole-genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yaqiong; Li, Na; Lysén, Colleen; Frace, Michael; Tang, Kevin; Sammons, Scott; Roellig, Dawn M; Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2015-02-01

    Whole-genome sequencing of Cryptosporidium spp. is hampered by difficulties in obtaining sufficient, highly pure genomic DNA from clinical specimens. In this study, we developed procedures for the isolation and enrichment of Cryptosporidium genomic DNA from fecal specimens and verification of DNA purity for whole-genome sequencing. The isolation and enrichment of genomic DNA were achieved by a combination of three oocyst purification steps and whole-genome amplification (WGA) of DNA from purified oocysts. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis of WGA products was used as an initial quality assessment of amplified genomic DNA. The purity of WGA products was assessed by Sanger sequencing of cloned products. Next-generation sequencing tools were used in final evaluations of genome coverage and of the extent of contamination. Altogether, 24 fecal specimens of Cryptosporidium parvum, C. hominis, C. andersoni, C. ubiquitum, C. tyzzeri, and Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype I were processed with the procedures. As expected, WGA products with low (sequences in Sanger sequencing. The cloning-sequencing analysis, however, showed significant contamination in 5 WGA products (proportion of positive colonies derived from Cryptosporidium genomic DNA, ≤25%). Following this strategy, 20 WGA products from six Cryptosporidium species or genotypes with low (mostly sequencing, generating sequence data covering 94.5% to 99.7% of Cryptosporidium genomes, with mostly minor contamination from bacterial, fungal, and host DNA. These results suggest that the described strategy can be used effectively for the isolation and enrichment of Cryptosporidium DNA from fecal specimens for whole-genome sequencing. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Invariants of DNA genomic signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristea, Paul Dan A.

    2005-02-01

    For large scale analysis purposes, the conversion of genomic sequences into digital signals opens the possibility to use powerful signal processing methods for handling genomic information. The study of complex genomic signals reveals large scale features, maintained over the scale of whole chromosomes, that would be difficult to find by using only the symbolic representation. Based on genomic signal methods and on statistical techniques, the paper defines parameters of DNA sequences which are invariant to transformations induced by SNPs, splicing or crossover. Re-orienting concatenated coding regions in the same direction, regularities shared by the genomic material in all exons are revealed, pointing towards the hypothesis of a regular ancestral structure from which the current chromosome structures have evolved. This property is not found in non-nuclear genomic material, e.g., plasmids.

  8. Isolation of a XP-A cell clone with intermediate UV sensitivity following transfection with genomic mouse DNA. Isolation and characterization of transfected sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, M.

    1987-04-01

    The work presented here describes an attempt to restore repair proficiency in xp cells of the most UV sensitive complementation group A by DNA mediated gene transfer. The transfection conditions employed for the cell line used here (XP12Rotk - 1) have been optimized. (orig./MG) [de

  9. Cloning of the cDNA for human 12-lipoxygenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, T.; Hoshiko, S.; Radmark, O.; Samuelsson, B.

    1990-01-01

    A full-length cDNA clone encoding 12-lipoxygenase was isolated from a human platelet cDNA library by using a cDNA for human reticulocyte 15-lipoxygenase as probe for the initial screening. The cDNA had an open reading frame encoding 662 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular weight of 75,590. Three independent clones revealed minor heterogeneities in their DNA sequences. Thus, in three positions of the deduced amino acid sequence, there is a choice between two different amino acids. The deduced sequence from the clone plT3 showed 65% identity with human reticulocyte 15-lipoxygenase and 42% identity with human leukocyte 5-lipoxygenase. The 12-lipoxygenase cDNA recognized a 3.0-kilobase mRNA species in platelets and human erythroleukemia cells (HEL cells). Phorbol 12-tetradecanoyl 13-acetate induced megakaryocytic differentiation of HEL cells and 12-lipoxygenase activity and increased mRNA for 12-lipoxygenase. The identity of the cloned 12-lipoxygenase was assured by expression in a mammalian cell line (COS cells). Human platelet 12-lipoxygenase has been difficult to purify to homogeneity. The cloning of this cDNA will increase the possibilities to elucidate the structure and function of this enzyme

  10. DNA microarrays : a molecular cloning manual

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sambrook, Joseph; Bowtell, David

    2002-01-01

    .... This manual, designed to extend and to complement the information in the best-selling Molecular Cloning, is a synthesis of the expertise and experience of more than 30 contributors all innovators in a fast moving field...

  11. A simple and efficient method for extraction of genomic DNA from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DNA extraction in many plants is difficult because of metabolites that interfere with DNA isolation procedures and subsequent applications, such as DNA restriction, amplification and cloning. We have developed a reliable and efficient method for isolating genomic DNA free from polysaccharide, polyphenols and protein ...

  12. New Approaches to Attenuated Hepatitis a Vaccine Development: Cloning and Sequencing of Cell-Culture Adapted Viral cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-13

    Insert frag- ments from p16 cDNA clones were subcloned into the phage vector Ml3mp8 or Ml3mpl9 qnd subjected to rapid sequencing using the...2), and selected cDNA insert fragments were subcloned into M13 vectors for sequencing. The sequence of the complete genome was determined, with over

  13. Rapid isolation of yeast genomic DNA: Bust n' Grab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Kenneth R

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutagenesis of yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs often requires analysis of large numbers of yeast clones to obtain correctly targeted mutants. Conventional ways to isolate yeast genomic DNA utilize either glass beads or enzymatic digestion to disrupt yeast cell wall. Using small glass beads is messy, whereas enzymatic digestion of the cells is expensive when many samples need to be analyzed. We sought to develop an easier and faster protocol than the existing methods for obtaining yeast genomic DNA from liquid cultures or colonies on plates. Results Repeated freeze-thawing of cells in a lysis buffer was used to disrupt the cells and release genomic DNA. Cell lysis was followed by extraction with chloroform and ethanol precipitation of DNA. Two hundred ng – 3 μg of genomic DNA could be isolated from a 1.5 ml overnight liquid culture or from a large colony. Samples were either resuspended directly in a restriction enzyme/RNase coctail mixture for Southern blot hybridization or used for several PCR reactions. We demonstrated the utility of this method by showing an analysis of yeast clones containing a mutagenized human β-globin locus YAC. Conclusion An efficient, inexpensive method for obtaining yeast genomic DNA from liquid cultures or directly from colonies was developed. This protocol circumvents the use of enzymes or glass beads, and therefore is cheaper and easier to perform when processing large numbers of samples.

  14. Molecular cloning of lupin leghemoglobin cDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konieczny, A; Jensen, E O; Marcker, K A

    1987-01-01

    Poly(A)+ RNA isolated from root nodules of yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus, var. Ventus) has been used as a template for the construction of a cDNA library. The ds cDNA was synthesized and inserted into the Hind III site of plasmid pBR 322 using synthetic Hind III linkers. Clones containing sequences...... its nucleotide sequence was consistent with known amino acid sequence of lupin Lb II. The cloned lupin Lb cDNA hybridized to poly(A)+ RNA from nodules only, which is in accordance with the general concept, that leghemoglobin is expressed exclusively in nodules. Udgivelsesdato: 1987-null...

  15. Efficient preparation of shuffled DNA libraries through recombination (Gateway) cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtonen, Soili I; Taskinen, Barbara; Ojala, Elina; Kukkurainen, Sampo; Rahikainen, Rolle; Riihimäki, Tiina A; Laitinen, Olli H; Kulomaa, Markku S; Hytönen, Vesa P

    2015-01-01

    Efficient and robust subcloning is essential for the construction of high-diversity DNA libraries in the field of directed evolution. We have developed a more efficient method for the subcloning of DNA-shuffled libraries by employing recombination cloning (Gateway). The Gateway cloning procedure was performed directly after the gene reassembly reaction, without additional purification and amplification steps, thus simplifying the conventional DNA shuffling protocols. Recombination-based cloning, directly from the heterologous reassembly reaction, conserved the high quality of the library and reduced the time required for the library construction. The described method is generally compatible for the construction of DNA-shuffled gene libraries. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Cloning of the DNA repair gene, uvsF, by transformation of Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oza, K; Käfer, E

    1990-06-01

    As a first step in the cloning of the DNA repair gene uvsF of Aspergillus nidulans, uvsF pyrG double mutant strains were transformed with a genomic library which carried the complementing Neurospora pyr-4 gene in the vector. Rare pyr+ uvs+ cotransformants were obtained on media lacking pyrimidines, overlayed with MMS (methyl-methane sulfonate) to which uvsF is hypersensitive. Among MMS-resistant transformants, Southerns revealed two types which showed single bands of different sizes when BglII-digested genomic DNA was probed with the vector. Both types produced uvsF- recombinants without vector sequences in homozygous crosses, but only those with the larger band also produced haploid uvs+ progeny. Using BglII-digested genomic DNA to transform Escherichia coli, plasmids of the corresponding two sizes could be rescued. Their inserts had a short internal region in common, giving evidence of rearrangement(s). In secondary transformation of uvsF mutants, only the plasmids with the larger insert showed complementation and these were used to screen Aspergillus libraries. Three types of genomic and two overlapping cDNA clones were identified. The cDNAs hybridized not only to each other, but also to the common region of the rescued plasmids. Therefore, cDNA subclones were used to map the putative uvsF sequences to a short segment in one genomic clone. In Northerns, the complementing large plasmid hybridized to three mRNAs, while the cDNA subclone identified one of these as the probable uvsF message.

  17. [Fingerprints identification of Gynostemma pentaphyllum by RAPD and cloning and analysis of its specific DNA fragment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jun-fu; Li, Xiong-ying; Wu, Yao-sheng; Luo, Yu; Zhao, Rui-qiang; Lan, Xiu-wan

    2009-02-01

    To identify the resources of Gynostemma pentaphyllum and its spurious breed plant Cayratia japonica at level of DNA. Two random primers ( WGS001, WGS004) screened were applied to do random amplification with genomic DNA extracted from Gynostemma pentaphyllum and Cayratia japonica which were collected from different habitats. After amplificated with WGS004, one characteristic fragment about 500 bp which was common to all Gynostemma pentaphyllum samples studied but not to Cayratia japonica was cloned and sequenced. Then these sequences obtained were analyzed for identity and compared by Blastn program in GenBank. There were obvious different bands amplified by above two primers in their fingerprints of genomic DNA. On the basis of these different bands of DNA fingerprints, they could distinguish Gynostemma pentaphyllum and Cayratia japonica obviously. Sequence alignment of seven cloned bands showed that their identities ranged from 45.7% - 94.5%. There was no similar genome sequences searched in GenBank. This indicated that these seven DNA fragments had not been reported before and they should be new sequences. RAPD technique can be used for the accurate identification of Gynostemma pentaphyllum and its counterfeit goods Cayratia japonica. Besides, these specific DNA sequences for Gynostemmna pentaphyllum in this study are useful for the further research on identification of species and assisted selection breeding in Gynostemma pentaphyllum.

  18. MOLECULAR CLONING OF OVINE cDNA LEPTIN GENE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CLAUDIA TEREZIA SOCOL

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available An efficient bacterial transformation system suitable for cloning the coding sequence of the ovine leptin gene in E. coli DH5α host cells using the pGEMT easy vector it is described in this paper. The necessity of producing leptin is based on the fact that the role of this molecule in the animal and human organism is still unknown, leptin not existing as commercial product on the Romanian market. The results obtained in the bacterial transformation, cloning, recombinant clones selection, control of the insertion experiments and DNA computational analysis represent the first steps in further genetic engineering experiments such as production of DNA libraries, DNA sequencing, protein expression, etc., for a further contribution in elucidating the role of leptin in the animal and human organism.

  19. Diversity of chloroplast genome among local clones of cocoa (Theobroma cacao, L.) from Central Sulawesi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwastika, I. Nengah; Pakawaru, Nurul Aisyah; Rifka, Rahmansyah, Muslimin, Ishizaki, Yoko; Cruz, André Freire; Basri, Zainuddin; Shiina, Takashi

    2017-02-01

    Chloroplast genomes typically range in size from 120 to 170 kilo base pairs (kb), which relatively conserved among plant species. Recent evaluation on several species, certain unique regions showed high variability which can be utilized in the phylogenetic analysis. Many fragments of coding regions, introns, and intergenic spacers, such as atpB-rbcL, ndhF, rbcL, rpl16, trnH-psbA, trnL-F, trnS-G, etc., have been used for phylogenetic reconstructions at various taxonomic levels. Based on that status, we would like to analysis the diversity of chloroplast genome within species of local cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) from Central Sulawesi. Our recent data showed, there were more than 20 clones from local farming in Central Sulawesi, and it can be detected based on phenotypic and nuclear-genome-based characterization (RAPD- Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA and SSR- Simple Sequences Repeat) markers. In developing DNA marker for this local cacao, here we also included analysis based on the variation of chloroplast genome. At least several regions such as rpl32-TurnL, it can be considered as chloroplast markers on our local clone of cocoa. Furthermore, we could develop phylogenetic analysis in between clones of cocoa.

  20. Molecular cloning of lupin leghemoglobin cDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konieczny, A; Jensen, E O; Marcker, K A

    1987-01-01

    Poly(A)+ RNA isolated from root nodules of yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus, var. Ventus) has been used as a template for the construction of a cDNA library. The ds cDNA was synthesized and inserted into the Hind III site of plasmid pBR 322 using synthetic Hind III linkers. Clones containing sequences...... specific for nodules were selected by differential colony hybridization using 32P-labeled cDNA synthesized either from nodule poly(A)+ RNA or from poly(A)+ RNA of uninfected root as probes. Among the recombinant plasmids, the cDNA gene for leghemoglobin was identified. The protein structure derived from...... its nucleotide sequence was consistent with known amino acid sequence of lupin Lb II. The cloned lupin Lb cDNA hybridized to poly(A)+ RNA from nodules only, which is in accordance with the general concept, that leghemoglobin is expressed exclusively in nodules. Udgivelsesdato: 1987-null...

  1. DNA microarrays : a molecular cloning manual

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sambrook, Joseph; Bowtell, David

    2002-01-01

    .... DNA Microarrays provides authoritative, detailed instruction on the design, construction, and applications of microarrays, as well as comprehensive descriptions of the software tools and strategies...

  2. Cloning and characterization of human DNA repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, L.H.; Brookman, K.W.; Weber, C.A.; Salazar, E.P.; Stewart, S.A.; Carrano, A.V.

    1987-01-01

    The isolation of two addition human genes that give efficient restoration of the repair defects in other CHO mutant lines is reported. The gene designated ERCC2 (Excision Repair Complementing Chinese hamster) corrects mutant UV5 from complementation group 1. They recently cloned this gene by first constructing a secondary transformant in which the human gene was shown to have become physically linked to the bacterial gpt dominant-marker gene by cotransfer in calcium phosphate precipitates in the primary transfection. Transformants expressing both genes were recovered by selecting for resistance to both UV radiation and mycophenolic acid. Using similar methods, the human gene that corrects CHO mutant EM9 was isolated in cosmids and named XRCC1 (X-ray Repair Complementing Chinese hamster). In this case, transformants were recovered by selecting for resistance to CldUrd, which kills EM9 very efficiently. In both genomic and cosmid transformants, the XRCC1 gene restored resistance to the normal range. DNA repair was studied using the kinetics of strand-break rejoining, which was measured after exposure to 137 Cs γ-rays

  3. PCR amplification, cloning, and construction of HIV-1 infectious molecular clones from virtually full-length HIV-1 genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, Philip K; Michael, Nelson L

    2005-01-01

    The development of mixtures of highly processive and high-fidelity thermostable DNA polymerases has enabled the routine recovery of DNA sequences in excess of 25 kb generated by polymerase chain reaction. This powerful tool has been instrumental in the ability to recover virtually full-length HIV-1 proviral DNA as a single, contiguous fragment. Such fragments allow for the clean interpretation of the genomic organization of HIV-1 provirus, as they are not confounded by molecular mosaicism that accrues to overlapping subgenomic amplification strategies. We detail here a robust procedure to produce virtually full-length, single contiguous 9.2-kb HIV-1 amplimers whose full-length infectious potential is reconstituted upon cloning into long terminal repeat-replacement vectors. Large numbers of HIV-1 proviral clones can now be quickly generated and screened to identify the fraction of the viral quasispecies with the highest capacity for viral replication. The methods used to construct long terminal repeat-replacement vectors, amplify HIV-1 provirus, reconstitute full-length provirus, and recover viral stocks will be illustrated using a circulating recombinant form 1 (CRF01_AE, formerly known as subtype E) primary isolate.

  4. Gene Cloning of Penicillin V Acylase from Bacillus sp BAC4 by Genomic Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELFI SUSANTI VH

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This research was aimed to clone and identify penicillin V acylase (PVA gene of Bacillus sp. BAC4 by genomic library. Chromosome DNA of Bacillus sp. BAC4 was isolated by Wang method. pHB201 of E. coli was isolated by alkali lyses method. Recombinant DNA of Bacillus sp. BAC4 chromosome fragment and pHB201 was made by ligase process using T4 DNA ligase. Transformation of E. coli using this recombinant plasmid was carried out according to Mandel-Higa method. The results indicated that chromosome DNA fragment of Bacillus sp. BAC4 was bigger 23 kb with purity 1,3. Plasmid DNA fragment of E coli was 6,5 kb. Transformants laboring pHB201 recombinant plasmid was screen as blue-white colonies in a medium containing IPTG/X-gal and chloramphenicol.

  5. Cloning and characterization of cDNA encoding xyloglucan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-22

    Aug 22, 2011 ... construction and restructuring of xyloglucan cross-links, thereby controlling the mechanical properties of cell wall. We cloned complete cDNA of an ..... are marked by horizontal lines. The conserved cysteine residues (amino acids 220, 229, 274 and 288 in P. glaucum) are marked by vertical blue arrows.

  6. cDNA cloning, structural analysis, SNP detection and tissue ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    THOMAS NAICY

    [Naicy T., Venkatachalapathy T., Aravindakshan T., Raghavan K. C., Mini M. and Shyama K. 2017 cDNA cloning, structural analysis, SNP detection and tissue expression profile of the IGF1 gene in Malabari and Attappady Black goats of India. J. Genet. 96, xx–xx]. Introduction. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), an important ...

  7. Rapid Construction of Stable Infectious Full-Length cDNA Clone of Papaya Leaf Distortion Mosaic Virus Using In-Fusion Cloning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decai Tuo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV is becoming a threat to papaya and transgenic papaya resistant to the related pathogen, papaya ringspot virus (PRSV. The generation of infectious viral clones is an essential step for reverse-genetics studies of viral gene function and cross-protection. In this study, a sequence- and ligation-independent cloning system, the In-Fusion® Cloning Kit (Clontech, Mountain View, CA, USA, was used to construct intron-less or intron-containing full-length cDNA clones of the isolate PLDMV-DF, with the simultaneous scarless assembly of multiple viral and intron fragments into a plasmid vector in a single reaction. The intron-containing full-length cDNA clone of PLDMV-DF was stably propagated in Escherichia coli. In vitro intron-containing transcripts were processed and spliced into biologically active intron-less transcripts following mechanical inoculation and then initiated systemic infections in Carica papaya L. seedlings, which developed similar symptoms to those caused by the wild-type virus. However, no infectivity was detected when the plants were inoculated with RNA transcripts from the intron-less construct because the instability of the viral cDNA clone in bacterial cells caused a non-sense or deletion mutation of the genomic sequence of PLDMV-DF. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the construction of an infectious full-length cDNA clone of PLDMV and the splicing of intron-containing transcripts following mechanical inoculation. In-Fusion cloning shortens the construction time from months to days. Therefore, it is a faster, more flexible, and more efficient method than the traditional multistep restriction enzyme-mediated subcloning procedure.

  8. Development of infectious cDNA clones of Salmonid alphavirus subtype 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsen Marius

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonid alphavirus (SAV is a widespread pathogen in European aquaculture of salmonid fish. Distinct viral subtypes have been suggested based on sequence comparisons and some of these have different geographical distributions. In Norway, only SAV subtype 3 have so far been identified. Little is known about viral mechanisms important for pathogenesis and transmission. Tools for detailed exploration of SAV genomes are therefore needed. Results Infectious cDNA clones in which a genome of subtype 3 SAV is under the control of a CMV promoter were constructed. The clones were designed to express proteins that are putatively identical to those previously reported for the SAVH20/03 strain. A polyclonal antiserum was raised against a part of the E2 glycoprotein in order to detect expression of the subgenomic open reading frame (ORF encoding structural viral proteins. Transfection of the cDNA clone revealed the expression of the E2 protein by IFAT, and in serial passages of the supernatant the presence of infectious recombinant virus was confirmed through RT-PCR, IFAT and the development of a cytopathic effect similar to that seen during infection with wild type SAV. Confirmation that the recovered virus originated from the infectious plasmid was done by sequence identification of an introduced genetic tag. The recombinant virus was infectious also when an additional ORF encoding an EGFP reporter gene under the control of a second subgenomic alphavirus promoter was added. Finally, we used the system to study the effect of selected point mutations on infectivity in Chinook salmon embryo cells. While introduced mutations in nsP2197, nsP3263 and nsP3323 severely reduced infectivity, a serine to proline mutation in E2206 appeared to enhance the virus titer production. Conclusion We have constructed infectious clones for SAV based on a subtype 3 genome. The clones may serve as a platform for further functional studies.

  9. Cloning and sequencing of cDNA encoding human DNA topoisomerase II and localization of the gene to chromosome region 17q21-22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai-Pflugfelder, M.; Liu, L.F.; Liu, A.A.; Tewey, K.M.; Whang-Peng, J.; Knutsen, T.; Huebner, K.; Croce, C.M.; Wang, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Two overlapping cDNA clones encoding human DNA topoisomerase II were identified by two independent methods. In one, a human cDNA library in phage λ was screened by hybridization with a mixed oligonucleotide probe encoding a stretch of seven amino acids found in yeast and Drosophila DNA topoisomerase II; in the other, a different human cDNA library in a λgt11 expression vector was screened for the expression of antigenic determinants that are recognized by rabbit antibodies specific to human DNA topoisomerase II. The entire coding sequences of the human DNA topoisomerase II gene were determined from these and several additional clones, identified through the use of the cloned human TOP2 gene sequences as probes. Hybridization between the cloned sequences and mRNA and genomic DNA indicates that the human enzyme is encoded by a single-copy gene. The location of the gene was mapped to chromosome 17q21-22 by in situ hybridization of a cloned fragment to metaphase chromosomes and by hybridization analysis with a panel of mouse-human hybrid cell lines, each retaining a subset of human chromosomes

  10. Chromosome microdissection and cloning in human genome and genetic disease analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Faten; Yu, Jingwei

    1991-01-01

    A procedure has been described for microdissection and microcloning of human chromosomal DNA sequences in which universal amplification of the dissected fragments by Mbo I linker adaptor and polymerase chain reaction is used. A very large library comprising 700,000 recombinant plasmid microclones from 30 dissected chromosomes of human chromosome 21 was constructed. Colony hybridization showed that 42% of the clones contained repetitive sequences and 58% contained single or low-copy sequences. The insert sizes generated by complete Mbo I cleavage ranged from 50 to 1,100 base pairs with a mean of 416 base pairs. Southern blot analysis of microclones from the library confirmed their human origin and chromosome 21 specificity. Some of these clones have also been regionally mapped to specific sites of chromosome 21 by using a regional mapping panel of cell hybrids. This chromosome microtechnology can generate large numbers of microclones with unique sequences from defined chromosomal regions and can be used for processes such as (i) isolating corresponding yeast artificial chromosome clones with large inserts, (ii) screening various cDNA libraries for isolating expressed sequences, and (iii) constructing region-specific libraries of the entire human genome. The studies described here demonstrate the power of this technology for high-resolution genome analysis and explicate their use in an efficient search for disease-associated genes localized to specific chromosomal regions

  11. Genome modifications and cloning using a conjugally transferable recombineering system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad J Hossain

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The genetic modification of primary bacterial disease isolates is challenging due to the lack of highly efficient genetic tools. Herein we describe the development of a modified PCR-based, λ Red-mediated recombineering system for efficient deletion of genes in Gram-negative bacteria. A series of conjugally transferrable plasmids were constructed by cloning an oriT sequence and different antibiotic resistance genes into recombinogenic plasmid pKD46. Using this system we deleted ten different genes from the genomes of Edwardsiella ictaluri and Aeromonas hydrophila. A temperature sensitive and conjugally transferable flp recombinase plasmid was developed to generate markerless gene deletion mutants. We also developed an efficient cloning system to capture larger bacterial genetic elements and clone them into a conjugally transferrable plasmid for facile transferring to Gram-negative bacteria. This system should be applicable in diverse Gram-negative bacteria to modify and complement genomic elements in bacteria that cannot be manipulated using available genetic tools.

  12. Direct detection of methylation in genomic DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bart, A.; van Passel, M. W. J.; van Amsterdam, K.; van der Ende, A.

    2005-01-01

    The identification of methylated sites on bacterial genomic DNA would be a useful tool to study the major roles of DNA methylation in prokaryotes: distinction of self and nonself DNA, direction of post-replicative mismatch repair, control of DNA replication and cell cycle, and regulation of gene

  13. cDNA cloning, structural analysis, SNP detection and tissue ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    THOMAS NAICY

    E-mail: naicy@kvasu.ac.in. and conception rate ... transformed into DH5α strain of Escherichia coli and the clones harbouring ... Primer pairs for caprine IGF1 and GAPDH were designed using Primer3 software (table 1). RTq-PCR was conducted in a 25 μL reaction volume containing 50 ng of cDNA and 2× Max- ima SYBR ...

  14. Construction of Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated tomato black ring virus infectious cDNA clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzyńska-Nowak, Aleksandra; Ferriol, Inmaculada; Falk, Bryce W; Borodynko-Filas, Natasza; Hasiów-Jaroszewska, Beata

    2017-02-15

    Tomato black ring virus (TBRV, genus Nepovirus) infects a wide range of economically important plants such as tomato, potato, tobacco and cucumber. Here, a successful construction of infectious full-length cDNA clones of the TBRV genomic RNAs (RNA1 and RNA2) is reported for the first time. The engineered constructs consisting of PCR-amplified DNAs were cloned into binary vector pJL89 immediately downstream of a double cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter, and upstream of the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and nopaline synthase terminator (NOS). The symptoms induced on plants agroinoculated with both constructs were indistinguishable from those caused by the wild-type virus. The infectivity of obtained clones was verified by reinoculation to Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi, Chenopodium quinoa and Cucumis sativus. The presence of viral particles and RNA was confirmed by electron microscopy and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Constructed full-length infectious cDNA clones will serve as an excellent tool to study virus-host-vector interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Cloning of the PYR3 gene of Ustilago maydis and its use in DNA transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, G.R.; Taylor, S.Y. (National Institute for Medical Research, London (England))

    1988-12-01

    The Ustilago maydis PYR3 gene encoding dihydroorotase activity was cloned by direct complementation of Escherichia coli pyrC mutations. PYR3 transformants of E. coli pyrC mutants expressed homologous transcripts of a variety of sizes and regained dihydroorotase activity. PYR3 also complemented Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura4 mutations, and again multiple transcripts were expressed in transformants, and enzyme activity was regained. A 1.25-kilobase poly(rA)+ PYR3 transcript was detected in U. maydis itself. Linear DNA carrying the PYR3 gene transformed a U. maydis pyr3-1 pyrimidine auxotroph to prototrophy. Hybridization analysis revealed that three different types of transformants could be generated, depending on the structure of the transforming DNA used. The first type involved exchange of chromosomal mutant gene sequences with the cloned wild-type plasmid sequences. A second type had integrated linear transforming DNA at the chromosomal PYR3 locus, probably via a single crossover event. The third type had integrated transforming DNA sequences at multiple sites in the U. maydis genome. In the last two types, tandemly reiterated copies of the transforming DNA were found to have been integrated. All three types had lost the sensitivity of the parental pyr3-1 mutant to UV irradiation. They had also regained dihydroorotase activity, although its level did not correlate with the PYR3 gene copy number.

  16. Development of a mutant strain of Escherichia coli for molecular cloning of highly methylated DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishr, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    A mutant strain of Escherichia coli designated as GR219 that allows efficient molecular cloning of highly methylated bean DNA has been developed by UV light mutation of the parent LE392 str r strain. This mutant strain, like the parent, is streptomycin resistant and is biologically contained, because it requires thymidine for growth. Both the wild type and the mutant strain have lambda phage receptors so both can be utilized for construction of genomic libraries using the phase as a vector. The efficiency of transformation of the parent and the mutant strain with a recombinant plasmid containing bean DNA was compared to the efficiency of transformation of the PLK-F' strain, which has a deletion of mcrA and mcrB genes and, therefore, allows transformation with methylated bean DNA. It has been found that the GR219 strain has the highest efficiency of transformation, while the PLK-F' strain shows less, and the parent LE392 str r strain the least efficiency of transformation. These results indicate that strains of E. coli with mcrA and mcrB genes can recognize and degrade highly methylated DNA. However, other undefined factors affected by the altered gene(s) in the GR219 strain are also involved in the recognition and degradation of any cloned foreign DNA

  17. Infectious Maize rayado fino virus from Cloned cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Michael C; Weiland, John J; Todd, Jane; Stewart, Lucy R

    2015-06-01

    A full-length cDNA clone was produced from a U.S. isolate of Maize rayado fino virus (MRFV), the type member of the genus Marafivirus within the family Tymoviridae. Infectivity of transcripts derived from cDNA clones was demonstrated by infection of maize plants and protoplasts, as well as by transmission via the known leafhopper vectors Dalbulus maidis and Graminella nigrifrons that transmit the virus in a persistent-propagative manner. Infection of maize plants through vascular puncture inoculation of seed with transcript RNA resulted in the induction of fine stipple stripe symptoms typical of those produced by wild-type MRFV and a frequency of infection comparable with that of the wild type. Northern and Western blotting confirmed the production of MRFV-specific RNAs and proteins in infected plants and protoplasts. An unanticipated increase in subgenomic RNA synthesis over levels in infected plants was observed in protoplasts infected with either wild-type or cloned virus. A conserved cleavage site motif previously demonstrated to function in both Oat blue dwarf virus capsid protein and tymoviral nonstructural protein processing was identified near the amino terminus of the MRFV replicase polyprotein, suggesting that cleavage at this site also may occur.

  18. Nucleotide sequence and infectious cDNA clone of the L1 isolate of Pea seed-borne mosaic potyvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, B S; Johansen, I E

    2001-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of Pea seed-borne mosaic potyvirus isolate L1 has been determined from cloned virus cDNA. The PSbMV L1 genome is 9895 nucleotides in length excluding the poly(A) tail. Computer analysis of the sequence revealed a single long open reading frame (ORF) of 9594 nucleotides. The ORF potentially encodes a polyprotein of 3198 amino acids with a deduced Mr of 363537. Nine putative proteolytic cleavage sites were identified by analogy to consensus sequences and genome arrangement in other potyviruses. Two full-length cDNA clones, p35S-L1-4 and p35S-L1-5, were assembled under control of an enhanced 35S promoter and nopaline synthase terminator. Clone p35S-L1-4 was constructed with four introns and p35S-L1-5 with five introns inserted in the cDNA. Clone p35S-L1-4 was unstable in Escherichia coli often resulting in amplification of plasmids with deletions. Clone p35S-L1-5 was stable and apparently less toxic to Escherichia coli resulting in larger bacterial colonies and higher plasmid yield. Both clones were infectious upon mechanical inoculation of plasmid DNA on susceptible pea cultivars Fjord, Scout, and Brutus. Eight pea genotypes resistant to L1 virus were also resistant to the cDNA derived L1 virus. Both native PSbMV L1 and the cDNA derived virus infected Chenopodium quinoa systemically giving rise to characteristic necrotic lesions on uninoculated leaves.

  19. Cloning of the DNA Repair Gene, Uvsf, by Transformation of Aspergillus Nidulans

    OpenAIRE

    Oza, K.; Kafer, E.

    1990-01-01

    As a first step in the cloning of the DNA repair gene uvsF of Aspergillus nidulans, uvsF pyrG double mutant strains were transformed with a genomic library which carried the complementing Neurospora pyr-4 gene in the vector. Rare pyr(+) uvs(+) cotransformants were obtained on media lacking pyrimidines, overlayed with MMS (methyl-methane sulfonate) to which uvsF is hypersensitive. Among MMS-resistant transformants, Southerns revealed two types which showed single bands of different sizes when ...

  20. Ancient DNA: extraction, characterization, molecular cloning, and enzymatic amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pääbo, S

    1989-03-01

    Several chemical and enzymatic properties were examined in the DNA extracted from dry remains of soft tissues that vary in age from 4 to 13,000 years and represent four species, including two extinct animals (the marsupial wolf and giant ground sloth). The DNA obtained was invariably of a low average molecular size and damaged by oxidative processes, which primarily manifest themselves as modifications of pyrimidines and sugar residues as well as baseless sites and intermolecular cross-links. This renders molecular cloning difficult. However, the polymerase chain reaction can be used to amplify and study short mitochondrial DNA sequences that are of anthropological and evolutionary significance. This opens up the prospect of performing diachronical studies of molecular evolutionary genetics.

  1. Genomic validation of PB 260 clone of rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) at Cikumpay Plantation by SSR marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royani, J. I.; Safarrida, A.; Rachmawati, I.; Khairiyah, H.; Mustika, I. P.; Suyono, A.; Rudiyana, Y.; Kubil; Nurjaya; Arianto, A.

    2017-05-01

    Rubber from Hevea brasiliensis is the only commercial natural rubber in the world. Propagation of rubber trees usually done by grafting and seed germination. BPPT had been producing rubber tree by in vitro technique with embryo somatic methods. Validation of mother plant for in vitro propagation is important to compare between mother plant and propagated plants. The aim for this research was to validation of PB 260 clone that planted at Cikumpay Plantation by SSR marker. Sampling of 10 rubber leaves were done at Cikumpay Plantation based on GPS position from the area of PB 260 clone. Rubber leaves were isolated with CTAB modification method to obtained DNA. Four of SSR primers from rubber, i.e.: hmac 4, hmac 5, hmct 1, and hmct 5, were used as primers to amplification of rubber DNA. The result showed that no band that different from 10 rubber of PB 260 clone at Cikumpay Plantation. This research will continue to compare genomic validation between mother plant and propagated plants that had been produced from BPPT.

  2. SLiCE: a novel bacterial cell extract-based DNA cloning method

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yongwei; Werling, Uwe; Edelmann, Winfried

    2012-01-01

    We describe a novel cloning method termed SLiCE (Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract) that utilizes easy to generate bacterial cell extracts to assemble multiple DNA fragments into recombinant DNA molecules in a single in vitro recombination reaction. SLiCE overcomes the sequence limitations of traditional cloning methods, facilitates seamless cloning by recombining short end homologies (≥15 bp) with or without flanking heterologous sequences and provides an effective strategy for directional s...

  3. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP cloning--seamless DNA insertion into any target plasmid without sequence constraints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Ulrich

    Full Text Available We present a fast, reliable and inexpensive restriction-free cloning method for seamless DNA insertion into any plasmid without sequence limitation. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP cloning requires two consecutive PCR steps and can be carried out in one day. We show that EMP cloning has a higher efficiency than restriction-free (RF cloning, especially for long inserts above 2.5 kb. EMP further enables simultaneous cloning of multiple inserts.

  4. Bacillus subtilis genome vector-based complete manipulation and reconstruction of genomic DNA for mouse transgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Tetsuo; Kaneko, Shinya; Shiwa, Yuh; Enomoto, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Hirota, Junji

    2013-05-03

    The Bacillus subtilis genome (BGM) vector is a novel cloning system for large DNA fragments, in which the entire 4.2 Mb genome of B. subtilis functions as a vector. The BGM vector system has several attractive properties, such as a large cloning capacity of over 3 Mb, stable propagation of cloned DNA and various modification strategies using RecA-mediated homologous recombination. However, genetic modifications using the BGM vector system have not been fully established, and this system has not been applied to transgenesis. In this study, we developed important additions to the genetic modification methods of the BGM vector system. To explore the potential of the BGM vector, we focused on the fish-like odorant receptor (class I OR) gene family, which consists of 158 genes and forms a single gene cluster. Although a cis-acting locus control region is expected to regulate transcription, this has not yet been determined experimentally. Using two contiguous bacterial artificial chromosome clones containing several class I OR genes, we constructed two transgenes in the BGM vector by inserting a reporter gene cassette into one class I OR gene. Because they were oriented in opposite directions, we performed an inversion modification to align their orientation and then fused them to enlarge the genomic structure. DNA sequencing revealed that no mutations occurred during gene manipulations with the BGM vector. We further demonstrated that the modified, reconstructed genomic DNA fragments could be used to generate transgenic mice. Transgenic mice carrying the enlarged transgene recapitulated the expression and axonal projection patterns of the target class I OR gene in the main olfactory system. We offer a complete genetic modification method for the BGM vector system, including insertion, deletion, inversion and fusion, to engineer genomic DNA fragments without any trace of modifications. In addition, we demonstrate that this system can be used for mouse transgenesis. Thus

  5. Isolation and characterization of full-length cDNA clones coding for cholinesterase from fetal human tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prody, C.A.; Zevin-Sonkin, D.; Gnatt, A.; Goldberg, O.; Soreq, H.

    1987-01-01

    To study the primary structure and regulation of human cholinesterases, oligodeoxynucleotide probes were prepared according to a consensus peptide sequence present in the active site of both human serum pseudocholinesterase and Torpedo electric organ true acetylcholinesterase. Using these probes, the authors isolated several cDNA clones from λgt10 libraries of fetal brain and liver origins. These include 2.4-kilobase cDNA clones that code for a polypeptide containing a putative signal peptide and the N-terminal, active site, and C-terminal peptides of human BtChoEase, suggesting that they code either for BtChoEase itself or for a very similar but distinct fetal form of cholinesterase. In RNA blots of poly(A) + RNA from the cholinesterase-producing fetal brain and liver, these cDNAs hybridized with a single 2.5-kilobase band. Blot hybridization to human genomic DNA revealed that these fetal BtChoEase cDNA clones hybridize with DNA fragments of the total length of 17.5 kilobases, and signal intensities indicated that these sequences are not present in many copies. Both the cDNA-encoded protein and its nucleotide sequence display striking homology to parallel sequences published for Torpedo AcChoEase. These finding demonstrate extensive homologies between the fetal BtChoEase encoded by these clones and other cholinesterases of various forms and species

  6. Genome instabilities arising from ribonucleotides in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Hannah L

    2017-08-01

    Genomic DNA is transiently contaminated with ribonucleotide residues during the process of DNA replication through misincorporation by the replicative DNA polymerases α, δ and ε, and by the normal replication process on the lagging strand, which uses RNA primers. These ribonucleotides are efficiently removed during replication by RNase H enzymes and the lagging strand synthesis machinery. However, when ribonucleotides remain in DNA they can distort the DNA helix, affect machineries for DNA replication, transcription and repair, and can stimulate genomic instabilities which are manifest as increased mutation, recombination and chromosome alterations. The genomic instabilities associated with embedded ribonucleotides are considered here, along with a discussion of the origin of the lesions that stimulate particular classes of instabilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Sequencing intractable DNA to close microbial genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Hurt

    Full Text Available Advancement in high throughput DNA sequencing technologies has supported a rapid proliferation of microbial genome sequencing projects, providing the genetic blueprint for in-depth studies. Oftentimes, difficult to sequence regions in microbial genomes are ruled "intractable" resulting in a growing number of genomes with sequence gaps deposited in databases. A procedure was developed to sequence such problematic regions in the "non-contiguous finished" Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 genome (6 intractable gaps and the Desulfovibrio africanus genome (1 intractable gap. The polynucleotides surrounding each gap formed GC rich secondary structures making the regions refractory to amplification and sequencing. Strand-displacing DNA polymerases used in concert with a novel ramped PCR extension cycle supported amplification and closure of all gap regions in both genomes. The developed procedures support accurate gene annotation, and provide a step-wise method that reduces the effort required for genome finishing.

  8. Molecular cloning of growth hormone encoding cDNA of Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A modified rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) strategy has been developed for cloning highly conserved cDNA sequences. Using this modified method, the growth hormone (GH) encoding cDNA sequences of Labeo rohita, Cirrhina mrigala and Catla catla have been cloned, characterized and overexpressed in ...

  9. Molecular cloning of growth hormone encoding cDNA of Indian

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A modified rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) strategy has been developed for cloning highly conserved cDNA sequences. Using this modified method, the growth hormone (GH) encoding cDNA sequences of Labeo rohita, Cirrhina mrigala and Catla catla have been cloned, characterized and overexpressed in ...

  10. Mutation Processes in 293-Based Clones Overexpressing the DNA Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica K Akre

    Full Text Available Molecular, cellular, and clinical studies have combined to demonstrate a contribution from the DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3B (A3B to the overall mutation load in breast, head/neck, lung, bladder, cervical, ovarian, and other cancer types. However, the complete landscape of mutations attributable to this enzyme has yet to be determined in a controlled human cell system. We report a conditional and isogenic system for A3B induction, genomic DNA deamination, and mutagenesis. Human 293-derived cells were engineered to express doxycycline-inducible A3B-eGFP or eGFP constructs. Cells were subjected to 10 rounds of A3B-eGFP exposure that each caused 80-90% cell death. Control pools were subjected to parallel rounds of non-toxic eGFP exposure, and dilutions were done each round to mimic A3B-eGFP induced population fluctuations. Targeted sequencing of portions of TP53 and MYC demonstrated greater mutation accumulation in the A3B-eGFP exposed pools. Clones were generated and microarray analyses were used to identify those with the greatest number of SNP alterations for whole genome sequencing. A3B-eGFP exposed clones showed global increases in C-to-T transition mutations, enrichments for cytosine mutations within A3B-preferred trinucleotide motifs, and more copy number aberrations. Surprisingly, both control and A3B-eGFP clones also elicited strong mutator phenotypes characteristic of defective mismatch repair. Despite this additional mutational process, the 293-based system characterized here still yielded a genome-wide view of A3B-catalyzed mutagenesis in human cells and a system for additional studies on the compounded effects of simultaneous mutation mechanisms in cancer cells.

  11. Shearing DNA for genomic library construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengen, P N

    1997-07-01

    Methods and reagents is a unique monthly column that highlights current discussion in the newsgroup bionet.molibio.methds-reagnts, available on the internet. This month's column discusses the pros and cons of various techniques used to shear DNA for shotgun cloning. For details on how to partake in the newsgroup, see the accompanying box.

  12. Cloning of monomeric human papillomavirus type 16 DNA integrated within cell DNA from a cervical carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsukura, T.; Kanda, T.; Furuno, A.; Yoshikawa, H.; Kawana, T.; Yoshiike, K.

    1986-06-01

    The authors have molecularly cloned and characterized monomeric human papillomavirus type 16 DNA with flanking cell DNA sequences from a cervical carcinoma. Determination of nucleotide sequence around the junctions of human papillomavirus and cell DNAs revealed that at the site of integration within cell DNA the cloned viral DNA had a deletion between nucleotides 1284 and 4471 (numbering system from K. Seedorf, G. Kraemmer, M. Duerst, S. Suhai, and W.G. Roewkamp), which includes the greater part of E1 gene and the entire E2 gene. In the remaining part of the E1 gene, three guanines were found at the location where two guanines at nucleotides 1137 and 1138 have been recorded. This additional guanine shifted the reading frame and erased an interruption in the E1 gene. The data strongly suggest that, like other papillomaviruses, human papillomavirus type 16 has an uninterrupted E1 gene.

  13. Molecular cloning and genomic organization of an allatostatin preprohormone from Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenz, C; Williamson, M; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    2000-01-01

    The insect allatostatins are neurohormones, acting on the corpora allata (where they block the release of juvenile hormone) and on the insect gut (where they block smooth muscle contraction). We screened the "Drosophila Genome Project" database with electronic sequences corresponding to various...... insect allatostatins. This resulted in alignment with a DNA sequence coding for some Drosophila allatostatins (drostatins). Using PCR with oligonucleotide primers directed against the presumed exons of this Drosophila allatostatin gene and subsequent 3'- and 5'-RACE, we were able to clone its c......DNA. The Drosophila allatostatin preprohormone contains four amino acid sequences that after processing would give rise to four Drosophila allatostatins: Val-Glu-Arg-Tyr-Ala-Phe-Gly-Leu-NH(2) (drostatin-1), Leu-Pro-Val-Tyr-Asn-Phe-Gly-Leu-NH(2) (drostatin-2), Ser-Arg-Pro-Tyr-Ser-Phe-Gly-Leu-NH(2) (drostatin-3...

  14. Cloning of low dose radiation induced gene RIG1 by RACE based on non-cloned cDNA library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Ying; Sui Jianli; Tie Yi; Zhang Yuanping; Zhou Pingkun; Sun Zhixian

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To obtain full-length cDNA of radiation induced new gene RIG1 based on its EST fragment. Methods: Based on non-cloned cDNA library, enhanced nested RACE PCR and biotin-avidin labelled probe for magnetic bead purification was used to obtain full-length cDNA of RIG1. Results: About 1 kb of 3' end of RIG1 gene was successfully cloned by this set of methods and cloning of RIG1 5' end is proceeding well. Conclusion: The result is consistent with the design of experiment. This set of protocol is useful for cloning of full-length gene based on EST fragment

  15. Positive-selection and ligation-independent cloning vectors for large scale in planta expression for plant functional genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sang-Keun; Kim, Saet-Byul; Yeom, Seon-In; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Choi, Doil

    2010-12-01

    Transient expression is an easy, rapid and powerful technique for producing proteins of interest in plants. Recombinational cloning is highly efficient but has disadvantages, including complicated, time consuming cloning procedures and expensive enzymes for large-scale gene cloning. To overcome these limitations, we developed new ligation-independent cloning (LIC) vectors derived from binary vectors including tobacco mosaic virus (pJL-TRBO), potato virus X (pGR106) and the pBI121 vector-based pMBP1. LIC vectors were modified to enable directional cloning of PCR products without restriction enzyme digestion or ligation reactions. In addition, the ccdB gene, which encodes a potent cell-killing protein, was introduced between the two LIC adapter sites in the pJL-LIC, pGR-LIC, and pMBP-LIC vectors for the efficient selection of recombinant clones. This new vector does not require restriction enzymes, alkaline phosphatase, or DNA ligase for cloning. To clone, the three LIC vectors are digested with SnaBI and treated with T4 DNA polymerase, which includes 3' to 5' exonuclease activity in the presence of only one dNTP (dGTP for the inserts and dCTP for the vector). To make recombinants, the vector plasmid and the insert PCR fragment were annealed at room temperature for 20 min prior to transformation into the host. Bacterial transformation was accomplished with 100% efficiency. To validate the new LIC vector systems, we were used to coexpressed the Phytophthora AVR and potato resistance (R) genes in N. benthamiana by infiltration of Agrobacterium. Coexpressed AVR and R genes in N. benthamiana induced the typical hypersensitive cell death resulting from in vivo interaction of the two proteins. These LIC vectors could be efficiently used for high-throughput cloning and laboratory-scale in planta expression. These vectors could provide a powerful tool for high-throughput transient expression assays for functional genomic studies in plants.

  16. Particle infectivity of HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones in a subtype C heterosexual transmission pair following high fidelity amplification and unbiased cloning

    OpenAIRE

    Deymier, Martin J.; Claiborne, Daniel T.; Ende, Zachary; Ratner, Hannah K.; Kilembe, William; Allen, Susan; Hunter, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The high genetic diversity of HIV-1 impedes high throughput, large-scale sequencing and full-length genome cloning by common restriction enzyme based methods. Applying novel methods that employ a high-fidelity polymerase for amplification and an unbiased fusion-based cloning strategy, we have generated several HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones from an epidemiologically linked transmission pair. These clones represent the transmitted/founder virus and phylogenetically divers...

  17. Simple cloning and DNA assembly in Escherichia coli by prolonged overlap extension PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Chun; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2014-01-01

    We developed a simple method (Simple Cloning) for subcloning one, two, or three DNA fragments into any location of a targeted vector without the need for restriction enzyme, ligase, exonuclease, or recombinase. This cloning technology can be applied to a few common Escherichia coli hosts (e.g., BL21(DE3), DH5α, JM109, TOP10). The protocol includes three steps: (a) linear DNA fragments (i.e., the insert DNA and the vector backbone) with two overlap ends were generated by regular high-fidelity PCR, (b) the DNA multimers were generated based on these equimolar DNA templates by using prolonged overlap extension PCR (POE-PCR) without primers added, and (c) the POE-PCR product was transformed to E. coli strains directly. Because positive colony efficiencies are very high, it is not necessary to identify desired clones by using colony PCR. Simple Cloning provides a new cloning and DNA assembly method with great simplicity and flexibility.

  18. Hibiscus latent Fort Pierce virus in Brazil and synthesis of its biologically active full-length cDNA clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ruimin; Niu, Shengniao; Dai, Weifang; Kitajima, Elliot; Wong, Sek-Man

    2016-10-01

    A Brazilian isolate of Hibiscus latent Fort Pierce virus (HLFPV-BR) was firstly found in a hibiscus plant in Limeira, SP, Brazil. RACE PCR was carried out to obtain the full-length sequences of HLFPV-BR which is 6453 nucleotides and has more than 99.15 % of complete genomic RNA nucleotide sequence identity with that of HLFPV Japanese isolate. The genomic structure of HLFPV-BR is similar to other tobamoviruses. It includes a 5' untranslated region (UTR), followed by open reading frames encoding for a 128-kDa protein and a 188-kDa readthrough protein, a 38-kDa movement protein, 18-kDa coat protein, and a 3' UTR. Interestingly, the unique feature of poly(A) tract is also found within its 3'-UTR. Furthermore, from the total RNA extracted from the local lesions of HLFPV-BR-infected Chenopodium quinoa leaves, a biologically active, full-length cDNA clone encompassing the genome of HLFPV-BR was amplified and placed adjacent to a T7 RNA polymerase promoter. The capped in vitro transcripts from the cloned cDNA were infectious when mechanically inoculated into C. quinoa and Nicotiana benthamiana plants. This is the first report of the presence of an isolate of HLFPV in Brazil and the successful synthesis of a biologically active HLFPV-BR full-length cDNA clone.

  19. DNA damage in Populus tremuloides clones exposed to elevated O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, Helen H.; Percy, Kevin E.; Karnosky, David F.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of elevated concentrations of atmospheric tropospheric ozone (O 3 ) on DNA damage in five trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) clones growing in a free-air enrichment experiment in the presence and absence of elevated concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) were examined. Growing season mean hourly O 3 concentrations were 36.3 and 47.3 ppb for ambient and elevated O 3 plots, respectively. The 4th highest daily maximum 8-h ambient and elevated O 3 concentrations were 79 and 89 ppb, respectively. Elevated CO 2 averaged 524 ppm (+150 ppm) over the growing season. Exposure to O 3 and CO 2 in combination with O 3 increased DNA damage levels above background as measured by the comet assay. Ozone-tolerant clones 271 and 8L showed the highest levels of DNA damage under elevated O 3 compared with ambient air; whereas less tolerant clone 216 and sensitive clones 42E and 259 had comparably lower levels of DNA damage with no significant differences between elevated O 3 and ambient air. Clone 8L was demonstrated to have the highest level of excision DNA repair. In addition, clone 271 had the highest level of oxidative damage as measured by lipid peroxidation. The results suggest that variation in cellular responses to DNA damage between aspen clones may contribute to O 3 tolerance or sensitivity. - Ozone tolerant clones and sensitive Populus tremuloides clones show differences in DNA damage and repair.

  20. Determination of radioinduced delay in DNA synthesis in two-garlic-clones cells (Allium Sativum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Lezcano, A.; Perez Talavera, S.

    1989-01-01

    To contribute to tech improvement of the use of ionizing radiations as an auxiliary tool in the fitoimprovement, dose-effect curves for the 'Martinez' and 'Sancti Spiritus-3' clones were stablished by using as effect the delay induced by radiations in DNA synthesis determined by the 'Martinez' clone which induces a delay of 50% in reference to the control is approximately 11 Gy, while the dose value for the 'Sancti Spiritus-3' clone is 18 Gy, thus the 'Martinez' clones has a higher sensitivity to radiations than the other clone, therefore it coincides with what we found for these clones other indexes are used as radiosensitivity criteria

  1. Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloning describes the processes used to create an exact genetic replica of another cell, tissue or organism. ... named Dolly. There are three different types of cloning: Gene cloning, which creates copies of genes or ...

  2. Molecular analysis and genomic organization of major DNA satellites in banana (Musa spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čížková, Jana; Hřibová, Eva; Humplíková, Lenka; Christelová, Pavla; Suchánková, Pavla; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2013-01-01

    Satellite DNA sequences consist of tandemly arranged repetitive units up to thousands nucleotides long in head-to-tail orientation. The evolutionary processes by which satellites arise and evolve include unequal crossing over, gene conversion, transposition and extra chromosomal circular DNA formation. Large blocks of satellite DNA are often observed in heterochromatic regions of chromosomes and are a typical component of centromeric and telomeric regions. Satellite-rich loci may show specific banding patterns and facilitate chromosome identification and analysis of structural chromosome changes. Unlike many other genomes, nuclear genomes of banana (Musa spp.) are poor in satellite DNA and the information on this class of DNA remains limited. The banana cultivars are seed sterile clones originating mostly from natural intra-specific crosses within M. acuminata (A genome) and inter-specific crosses between M. acuminata and M. balbisiana (B genome). Previous studies revealed the closely related nature of the A and B genomes, including similarities in repetitive DNA. In this study we focused on two main banana DNA satellites, which were previously identified in silico. Their genomic organization and molecular diversity was analyzed in a set of nineteen Musa accessions, including representatives of A, B and S (M. schizocarpa) genomes and their inter-specific hybrids. The two DNA satellites showed a high level of sequence conservation within, and a high homology between Musa species. FISH with probes for the satellite DNA sequences, rRNA genes and a single-copy BAC clone 2G17 resulted in characteristic chromosome banding patterns in M. acuminata and M. balbisiana which may aid in determining genomic constitution in interspecific hybrids. In addition to improving the knowledge on Musa satellite DNA, our study increases the number of cytogenetic markers and the number of individual chromosomes, which can be identified in Musa.

  3. Molecular analysis and genomic organization of major DNA satellites in banana (Musa spp..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Čížková

    Full Text Available Satellite DNA sequences consist of tandemly arranged repetitive units up to thousands nucleotides long in head-to-tail orientation. The evolutionary processes by which satellites arise and evolve include unequal crossing over, gene conversion, transposition and extra chromosomal circular DNA formation. Large blocks of satellite DNA are often observed in heterochromatic regions of chromosomes and are a typical component of centromeric and telomeric regions. Satellite-rich loci may show specific banding patterns and facilitate chromosome identification and analysis of structural chromosome changes. Unlike many other genomes, nuclear genomes of banana (Musa spp. are poor in satellite DNA and the information on this class of DNA remains limited. The banana cultivars are seed sterile clones originating mostly from natural intra-specific crosses within M. acuminata (A genome and inter-specific crosses between M. acuminata and M. balbisiana (B genome. Previous studies revealed the closely related nature of the A and B genomes, including similarities in repetitive DNA. In this study we focused on two main banana DNA satellites, which were previously identified in silico. Their genomic organization and molecular diversity was analyzed in a set of nineteen Musa accessions, including representatives of A, B and S (M. schizocarpa genomes and their inter-specific hybrids. The two DNA satellites showed a high level of sequence conservation within, and a high homology between Musa species. FISH with probes for the satellite DNA sequences, rRNA genes and a single-copy BAC clone 2G17 resulted in characteristic chromosome banding patterns in M. acuminata and M. balbisiana which may aid in determining genomic constitution in interspecific hybrids. In addition to improving the knowledge on Musa satellite DNA, our study increases the number of cytogenetic markers and the number of individual chromosomes, which can be identified in Musa.

  4. Molecular cloning and expression of Treponema pallidum DNA in Escherichia coli K12.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.D.A. van Embden; H.J.M. van de Donk; R.V.W. van Eijk (Ron); H.G. v.d. Heide; J.A. de Jong (Jan); M.F. van Olderen; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); L.M. Schouls

    1983-01-01

    textabstractA gene bank of Treponema pallidum DNA in Escherichia coli K-12 was constructed by cloning SauI-cleaved T. pallidum DNA into the cosmid pHC79. Sixteen of 800 clones investigated produced one or more antigens that reacted with antibodies from syphilitic patients. According to the

  5. [Cloning of the gene for thermostable Thermus aquaticus YT1 DNA polymerase and its expression in Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrushev, L I; Valiaev, A G; Golovchenko, P A; Vinogradov, S V; Chikindas, M L; Kiselev, V I

    1993-01-01

    Using the phasmid vector pSL5, the genomic DNA fragment of T. aquaticus YT1 which contained the thermostable DNA polymerase (Taq-polymerase) gene was cloned. The BglII fragment of this genome locus was subcloned in the BamHI site of the pUC19 plasmid. To optimize the Taq-polymerase gene expression in E. coli cells, the gene was cloned in the correct reading frame regarding the initiation ATG codon of the pPR-TGATG-1 expression vector. The gene expression in this vector was controlled by the phage lambda PR promoter and the temperature-sensitive phage lambda repressor. We used PCR to amplify the short 5'-end fragment of the Taq-polymerase gene coding for the part into which an artificial SacI site was introduced. This site has been used for cloning the PCR product into the pPR-TGATG-1 vector, and the missing gene part was cloned into the KpnI site of the PCR product from the natural cloned gene. The cells of the E. coli PVG-A1 strain, which was obtained in the end, expressed efficiently the Taq-polymerase gene at the nonpermissive temperature. The content of the recombinant Taq-polymerase in the cells was about 1-2% of total proteins. The purified nearly homogeneous Taq-polymerase amplified efficiently in the PCR DNA fragments up to 5.5 kb long and was useful in DNA sequencing the by Sanger method. The half-life of the purified Taq polymerase was about 60 min at 95 degrees C, it was active for at least 65 standard PCR circles. The specific activity of recombinant enzyme preparations was about 180-200,000 units per mg of protein. The E. coli PVG-A1 strain enables one to isolate up to 500,000 units of purified enzyme from 2 l of bacterial culture.

  6. Detection of Non-Amplified Genomic DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Corradini, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    This book offers a state-of-the-art overview on non amplified DNA detection methods and provides chemists, biochemists, biotechnologists and material scientists with an introduction to these methods. In fact all these fields have dedicated resources to the problem of nucleic acid detection, each contributing with their own specific methods and concepts. This book will explain the basic principles of the different non amplified DNA detection methods available, highlighting their respective advantages and limitations. The importance of non-amplified DNA sequencing technologies will be also discussed. Non-amplified DNA detection can be achieved by adopting different techniques. Such techniques have allowed the commercialization of innovative platforms for DNA detection that are expected to break into the DNA diagnostics market. The enhanced sensitivity required for the detection of non amplified genomic DNA has prompted new strategies that can achieve ultrasensitivity by combining specific materials with specifi...

  7. Cloning of cDNA of major antigen of foot and mouth disease virus and expression in E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küpper, Hans; Keller, Walter; Kurz, Christina; Forss, Sonja; Schaller, Heinz

    1981-02-01

    Double-stranded DNA copies of the single-stranded genomic RNA of foot and mouth disease virus have been cloned into the Escherichia coli plasmid pBR322. A restriction map of the viral genome was established and aligned with the biochemical map of foot and mouth disease virus. The coding sequence for structural protein VP1, the major antigen of the virus, was identified and inserted into a plasmid vector where the expression of this sequence is under control of the phage λ PL promoter. In an appropriate host the synthesis of antigenic polypeptide can be demonstrated by radioimmunoassay.

  8. Cost-effective sequencing of full-length cDNA clones powered by a de novo-reference hybrid assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginaldo M Kuroshu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sequencing full-length cDNA clones is important to determine gene structures including alternative splice forms, and provides valuable resources for experimental analyses to reveal the biological functions of coded proteins. However, previous approaches for sequencing cDNA clones were expensive or time-consuming, and therefore, a fast and efficient sequencing approach was demanded. METHODOLOGY: We developed a program, MuSICA 2, that assembles millions of short (36-nucleotide reads collected from a single flow cell lane of Illumina Genome Analyzer to shotgun-sequence approximately 800 human full-length cDNA clones. MuSICA 2 performs a hybrid assembly in which an external de novo assembler is run first and the result is then improved by reference alignment of shotgun reads. We compared the MuSICA 2 assembly with 200 pooled full-length cDNA clones finished independently by the conventional primer-walking using Sanger sequencers. The exon-intron structure of the coding sequence was correct for more than 95% of the clones with coding sequence annotation when we excluded cDNA clones insufficiently represented in the shotgun library due to PCR failure (42 out of 200 clones excluded, and the nucleotide-level accuracy of coding sequences of those correct clones was over 99.99%. We also applied MuSICA 2 to full-length cDNA clones from Toxoplasma gondii, to confirm that its ability was competent even for non-human species. CONCLUSIONS: The entire sequencing and shotgun assembly takes less than 1 week and the consumables cost only approximately US$3 per clone, demonstrating a significant advantage over previous approaches.

  9. Cost-effective sequencing of full-length cDNA clones powered by a de novo-reference hybrid assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroshu, Reginaldo M; Watanabe, Junichi; Sugano, Sumio; Morishita, Shinichi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kasahara, Masahiro

    2010-05-07

    Sequencing full-length cDNA clones is important to determine gene structures including alternative splice forms, and provides valuable resources for experimental analyses to reveal the biological functions of coded proteins. However, previous approaches for sequencing cDNA clones were expensive or time-consuming, and therefore, a fast and efficient sequencing approach was demanded. We developed a program, MuSICA 2, that assembles millions of short (36-nucleotide) reads collected from a single flow cell lane of Illumina Genome Analyzer to shotgun-sequence approximately 800 human full-length cDNA clones. MuSICA 2 performs a hybrid assembly in which an external de novo assembler is run first and the result is then improved by reference alignment of shotgun reads. We compared the MuSICA 2 assembly with 200 pooled full-length cDNA clones finished independently by the conventional primer-walking using Sanger sequencers. The exon-intron structure of the coding sequence was correct for more than 95% of the clones with coding sequence annotation when we excluded cDNA clones insufficiently represented in the shotgun library due to PCR failure (42 out of 200 clones excluded), and the nucleotide-level accuracy of coding sequences of those correct clones was over 99.99%. We also applied MuSICA 2 to full-length cDNA clones from Toxoplasma gondii, to confirm that its ability was competent even for non-human species. The entire sequencing and shotgun assembly takes less than 1 week and the consumables cost only approximately US$3 per clone, demonstrating a significant advantage over previous approaches.

  10. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aiuto, L.; Marzella, R.; Archidiacono, N.; Rocchi, M. (Universita di Bari (Italy)); Antonacci, R. (Instituto Anatomia Umana Normale, Modena (Italy))

    1993-11-01

    The authors have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Hyper-expansion of large DNA segments in the genome of kuruma shrimp, Marsupenaeus japonicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondo Hidehiro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Higher crustaceans (class Malacostraca represent the most species-rich and morphologically diverse group of non-insect arthropods and many of its members are commercially important. Although the crustacean DNA sequence information is growing exponentially, little is known about the genome organization of Malacostraca. Here, we constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library and performed BAC-end sequencing to provide genomic information for kuruma shrimp (Marsupenaeus japonicus, one of the most widely cultured species among crustaceans, and found the presence of a redundant sequence in the BAC library. We examined the BAC clone that includes the redundant sequence to further analyze its length, copy number and location in the kuruma shrimp genome. Results Mj024A04 BAC clone, which includes one redundant sequence, contained 27 putative genes and seemed to display a normal genomic DNA structure. Notably, of the putative genes, 3 genes encode homologous proteins to the inhibitor of apoptosis protein and 7 genes encode homologous proteins to white spot syndrome virus, a virulent pathogen known to affect crustaceans. Colony hybridization and PCR analysis of 381 BAC clones showed that almost half of the BAC clones maintain DNA segments whose sequences are homologous to the representative BAC clone Mj024A04. The Mj024A04 partial sequence was detected multiple times in the kuruma shrimp nuclear genome with a calculated copy number of at least 100. Microsatellites based BAC genotyping clearly showed that Mj024A04 homologous sequences were cloned from at least 48 different chromosomal loci. The absence of micro-syntenic relationships with the available genomic sequences of Daphnia and Drosophila suggests the uniqueness of these fragments in kuruma shrimp from current arthropod genome sequences. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that hyper-expansion of large DNA segments took place in the kuruma shrimp genome. Although we

  12. Isolation of Retroelement from Plant Genomic DNA

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Author: Pat Heslop-Harrison ### Abstract: Retroelements and their derivatives are an ubiquitous and abundant component of plant genomes. From the 1990s, PCR based techniques have been developed to isolate the elements from genomic DNA of different plants, and the methods and primers used are presented here. Major classes of retroelements include the Ty1-copia, the Ty3-gypsy and the LINE (non-LTR) groups. Mixed PCR products representing the full heterogeneous pool of retrotransposo...

  13. Profiling genome-wide DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Wai-Shin; Hsu, Fei-Man; Chen, Pao-Yang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that plays an important role in regulating gene expression and therefore a broad range of biological processes and diseases. DNA methylation is tissue-specific, dynamic, sequence-context-dependent and trans-generationally heritable, and these complex patterns of methylation highlight the significance of profiling DNA methylation to answer biological questions. In this review, we surveyed major methylation assays, along with comparisons and biological examples, to provide an overview of DNA methylation profiling techniques. The advances in microarray and sequencing technologies make genome-wide profiling possible at a single-nucleotide or even a single-cell resolution. These profiling approaches vary in many aspects, such as DNA input, resolution, genomic region coverage, and bioinformatics analysis, and selecting a feasible method requires knowledge of these methods. We first introduce the biological background of DNA methylation and its pattern in plants, animals and fungi. We present an overview of major experimental approaches to profiling genome-wide DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation and then extend to the single-cell methylome. To evaluate these methods, we outline their strengths and weaknesses and perform comparisons across the different platforms. Due to the increasing need to compute high-throughput epigenomic data, we interrogate the computational pipeline for bisulfite sequencing data and also discuss the concept of identifying differentially methylated regions (DMRs). This review summarizes the experimental and computational concepts for profiling genome-wide DNA methylation, followed by biological examples. Overall, this review provides researchers useful guidance for the selection of a profiling method suited to specific research questions.

  14. Isolation and characterization of cDNA clones for human erythrocyte β-spectrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prchal, J.T.; Morley, B.J.; Yoon, S.H.; Coetzer, T.L.; Palek, J.; Conboy, J.G.; Kan, Y.W.

    1987-01-01

    Spectrin is an important structural component of the membrane skeleton that underlies and supports the erythrocyte plasma membrane. It is composed of nonidentical α (M/sub r/ 240,000) and β (M/sub r/ 220,000) subunits, each of which contains multiple homologous 106-amino acid segments. The authors report here the isolation and characterization of a human erythroid-specific β-spectrin cDNA clone that encodes parts of the β-9 through β-12 repeat segments. This cDNA was used as a hybridization probe to assign the β-spectrin gene to human chromosome 14 and to begin molecular analysis of the gene and its mRNA transcripts. RNA transfer blot analysis showed that the reticulocyte β-spectrin mRNA is 7.8 kilobases in length. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA revealed the presence of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) within the β-spectrin gene locus. The isolation of human spectrin cDNA probes and the identification of closely linked RFLPs will facilitate analysis of mutant spectrin genes causing congenital hemolytic anemias associated with quantitative and qualitative spectrin abnormalities

  15. Pathotypes in the Entomophaga grylli species complex of grasshopper pathogens differentiated with random amplification of polymorphic DNA and cloned-DNA probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidochka, M J; Walsh, S R; Ramos, M E; Leger, R J; Silver, J C; Roberts, D W

    1995-01-01

    The zygomycetous fungus Entomophaga grylli is a pathogen that shows host-specific variance to grasshopper subfamilies. Three pathotypes of the E. grylli species complex were differentiated by three molecular techniques. In the first method, the three pathotypes showed different fragment patterns generated by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD). There was little or no interisolate variability in RAPD fragment patterns within each pathotype. Passage of an isolate of pathotype 3, originally from an Australian grasshopper (Praxibulus sp.), through a North America grasshopper resulted in no differences in the resultant RAPD fragment patterns. In the second method, polymorphic RAPD fragments were used to probe the genomic DNA from the three pathotypes, and pathotype-specific fragments were found. In the third method, restriction fragments from genomic DNA of the three pathotypes were cloned and screened for pathotype specificity. A genomic probe specific for each pathotype was isolated. These probes did not hybridize to DNA from Entomophaga aulicae or from grasshoppers. To facilitate the use of RAPD analysis and other molecular tools to identify pathotypes, a method for extracting DNA from resting spores from infected grasshoppers was developed. The DNA from the fractured resting spores was of sufficient integrity to be blotted and probed with the pathotype-specific DNA probes, thus validating the use of these probes for pathotype identification in field-collected grasshoppers. PMID:7574596

  16. The DNA-instability test as a specific marker of malignancy and its application to detect cancer clones in borderline malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Fukuda

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress in cytogenetic and biochemical mutator assay technologies has enabled us to detect single gene alterations and gross chromosomal rearrangements, and it became clear that all cancer cells are genetically unstable. In order to detect the genome-wide instability of cancer cells, a new simple method, the DNA-instability test, was developed. The methods to detect genomic instability so far reported have only demonstrated the presence of qualitative and quantitative alterations in certain specific genomic loci. In contrast to these commonly used methods to reveal the genomic instability at certain specific DNA regions, the newly introduced DNA-instability test revealed the presence of physical DNA-instability in the entire DNA molecule of a cancer cell nucleus as revealed by increased liability to denature upon HCl hydrolysis or formamide exposure. When this test was applied to borderline malignancies, cancer clones were detected in all cases at an early-stage of cancer progression. We proposed a new concept of “procancer” clones to define those cancer clones with “functional atypia” showing positivities for various cancer markers, as well as DNA-instability testing, but showing no remarkable ordinary “morphological atypia” which is commonly used as the basis of histopathological diagnosis of malignancy.

  17. Rapid Construction of Complex Plant RNA Virus Infectious cDNA Clones for Agroinfection Using a Yeast-E. coli-Agrobacterium Shuttle Vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Zhao, Danyang; Liu, Yong; Huang, Changjun; Zhang, Wei; Li, Zhenghe

    2017-11-07

    The availability of infectious full-length clone is indispensable for reverse genetics studies of virus biology, pathology and construction of viral vectors. However, for RNA viruses with large genome sizes or those exhibiting inherent cloning difficulties, procedure to generate biologically active circular DNA (cDNA) clones can be time-consuming or technically challenging. Here we have constructed a yeast- Escherichia coli - Agrobacterium shuttle vector that enables highly efficient homologous recombination in yeast for assembly of Agrobacterium compatible plant virus clones. Using this vector, we show that infectious cDNA clones of a plant negative-stranded RNA virus, sonchus yellow net rhabdovirus, can be rapidly assembled. In addition, one-step assembly of infectious clones of potato virus Y in yeast, either with or without intron, was readily achieved from as many as eight overlapping DNA fragments. More importantly, the recovered yeast plasmids can be transformed directly into Agrobacterium for inoculation, thereby obviating the E. coli cloning steps and associated toxicity issues. This method is rapid, highly efficient and cost-effective and should be readily applicable to a broad range of plant viruses.

  18. Cloning Should Be Simple: Escherichia coli DH5α-Mediated Assembly of Multiple DNA Fragments with Short End Homologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Ruth E.; Suzuki, Yo

    2015-01-01

    Numerous DNA assembly technologies exist for generating plasmids for biological studies. Many procedures require complex in vitro or in vivo assembly reactions followed by plasmid propagation in recombination-impaired Escherichia coli strains such as DH5α, which are optimal for stable amplification of the DNA materials. Here we show that despite its utility as a cloning strain, DH5α retains sufficient recombinase activity to assemble up to six double-stranded DNA fragments ranging in size from 150 bp to at least 7 kb into plasmids in vivo. This process also requires surprisingly small amounts of DNA, potentially obviating the need for upstream assembly processes associated with most common applications of DNA assembly. We demonstrate the application of this process in cloning of various DNA fragments including synthetic genes, preparation of knockout constructs, and incorporation of guide RNA sequences in constructs for clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) genome editing. This consolidated process for assembly and amplification in a widely available strain of E. coli may enable productivity gain across disciplines involving recombinant DNA work. PMID:26348330

  19. Identification of four genomic loci highly related to casein-kinase-2-alpha cDNA and characterization of a casein kinase-2-alpha pseudogene within the mouse genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Wehr, K; Hecht, R

    1992-01-01

    Using the coding region of the human CK-2 alpha cDNA as a probe for screening a genomic mouse library, positive clones representing four different genomic loci were isolated. Partial DNA sequences of these loci encompassing the first 120 nucleotides of the putative coding region are reported. One...

  20. DNA Microarrays in Comparative Genomics and Transcriptomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willenbrock, Hanni

    2007-01-01

    analysis, analysis of chromosomal aberrations and DNA sequence dependent gene expression. First, this thesis contains a description of how the gene expression profiles from children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia may be used to improve the diagnosis of these patients and potentially improve......During the past few years, innovations in the DNA sequencing technology has led to an explosion in available DNA sequence information. This has revolutionized biological research and promoted the development of high throughput analysis methods that can take advantage of the vast amount of sequence...... of each method’s ability to analyze DNA copy number data. Moreover, our study shows that analysis methods developed for cancer research may also successfully be applied to DNA copy number profiles from bacterial genomes. However, here the purpose is to characterize variations in the gene content...

  1. ReMixT: clone-specific genomic structure estimation in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Andrew W; Roth, Andrew; Ha, Gavin; Chauve, Cedric; Steif, Adi; de Souza, Camila P E; Eirew, Peter; Bouchard-Côté, Alexandre; Aparicio, Sam; Sahinalp, S Cenk; Shah, Sohrab P

    2017-07-27

    Somatic evolution of malignant cells produces tumors composed of multiple clonal populations, distinguished in part by rearrangements and copy number changes affecting chromosomal segments. Whole genome sequencing mixes the signals of sampled populations, diluting the signals of clone-specific aberrations, and complicating estimation of clone-specific genotypes. We introduce ReMixT, a method to unmix tumor and contaminating normal signals and jointly predict mixture proportions, clone-specific segment copy number, and clone specificity of breakpoints. ReMixT is free, open-source software and is available at http://bitbucket.org/dranew/remixt .

  2. Genomic signal processing for DNA sequence clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Mendizabal-Ruiz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomic signal processing (GSP methods which convert DNA data to numerical values have recently been proposed, which would offer the opportunity of employing existing digital signal processing methods for genomic data. One of the most used methods for exploring data is cluster analysis which refers to the unsupervised classification of patterns in data. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for performing cluster analysis of DNA sequences that is based on the use of GSP methods and the K-means algorithm. We also propose a visualization method that facilitates the easy inspection and analysis of the results and possible hidden behaviors. Our results support the feasibility of employing the proposed method to find and easily visualize interesting features of sets of DNA data.

  3. Genomic signal processing for DNA sequence clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendizabal-Ruiz, Gerardo; Román-Godínez, Israel; Torres-Ramos, Sulema; Salido-Ruiz, Ricardo A; Vélez-Pérez, Hugo; Morales, J Alejandro

    2018-01-01

    Genomic signal processing (GSP) methods which convert DNA data to numerical values have recently been proposed, which would offer the opportunity of employing existing digital signal processing methods for genomic data. One of the most used methods for exploring data is cluster analysis which refers to the unsupervised classification of patterns in data. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for performing cluster analysis of DNA sequences that is based on the use of GSP methods and the K-means algorithm. We also propose a visualization method that facilitates the easy inspection and analysis of the results and possible hidden behaviors. Our results support the feasibility of employing the proposed method to find and easily visualize interesting features of sets of DNA data.

  4. Toward a cDNA map of the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenberg, J.R.; Chen, X.N. [Cedars-Sinai Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Adams, M.D.; Venter, J.C. [Institute for Genomic Research, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1995-09-20

    Advances in the Human Genome Project are shaping the strategies for identifying the 50,000-100,000 human genes. High-resolution genetic maps of the human genome combined with sequencing herald an era of rapid regional definition of disease genes. However, only once their chromosomes band location is known will the systematic partial sequencing of thousands of random cDNA clones provide the reagents for the rapid assessment of the genes responsible for the inherited disorders. We now present an approach to the rapid determination of map position and therefore to the creation of a transcribed map of the human genome. Sensitive fluorescence in situ hybridization has been combined with high-resolution chromosome banding and random cDNA sequencing to 41 cDNAs with an average insert size of < 2 kb to single human chromosome bands. The results provide 15 new genes, with database and functional information, as candidates for human disease. These include the large extracellular single-related kinase (HUMERK), the ERK activator kinase (PRKMK1), a new member of the RAS oncogene family, protein phosphotase 2 regulatory subunit B alpha isoform (PPP2R2A), and a novel human gene with very high homology to a plant membrane transport family. Further, an analysis of expressed genes associated with pseudogenes showed that by using these techniques, it is possible to detect accurately the transcribed locus within a multigene or processed pseudogene family in most cases. These findings suggest that direct cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization provides an accurate and rapid approach to the definition of a transcribed map of the human genome. This low-cost, high-resolution (205 Mb) mapping greatly enhances the speed with which these genes can be subsequently assigned to contigs. This assignment provides a necessary first step in understanding the relationship of the genes to both acquired and inherited human diseases. 16 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  5. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in ovine fetuses and sheep cloned by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgstaller, Jörg P; Schinogl, Pamela; Dinnyes, Andras; Müller, Mathias; Steinborn, Ralf

    2007-12-21

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the cloned sheep "Dolly" and nine other ovine clones produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) was reported to consist only of recipient oocyte mtDNA without any detectable mtDNA contribution from the nucleus donor cell. In cattle, mouse and pig several or most of the clones showed transmission of nuclear donor mtDNA resulting in mitochondrial heteroplasmy. To clarify the discrepant transmission pattern of donor mtDNA in sheep clones we analysed the mtDNA composition of seven fetuses and five lambs cloned from fetal fibroblasts. The three fetal fibroblast donor cells used for SCNT harboured low mtDNA copy numbers per cell (A: 753 +/- 54, B: 292 +/- 33 and C: 561 +/- 88). The ratio of donor to recipient oocyte mtDNAs was determined using a quantitative amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) PCR (i.e. ARMS-qPCR). For quantification of SNP variants with frequencies below 0.1% we developed a restriction endonuclease-mediated selective quantitative PCR (REMS-qPCR). We report the first cases (n = 4 fetuses, n = 3 lambs) of recipient oocyte/nuclear donor mtDNA heteroplasmy in SCNT-derived ovine clones demonstrating that there is no species-effect hindering ovine nucleus-donor mtDNA from being transmitted to the somatic clonal offspring. Most of the heteroplasmic clones exhibited low-level heteroplasmy (0.1% to 0.9%, n = 6) indicating neutral transmission of parental mtDNAs. High-level heteroplasmy (6.8% to 46.5%) was observed in one case. This clone possessed a divergent recipient oocyte-derived mtDNA genotype with three rare amino acid changes compared to the donor including one substitution at an evolutionary conserved site. Our study using state-of-the-art techniques for mtDNA quantification, like ARMS-qPCR and the novel REMS-qPCR, documents for the first time the transmission of donor mtDNA into somatic sheep clones. MtDNA heteroplasmy was detected in seven of 12 clones tested, whereby all but one case revealed less

  6. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in ovine fetuses and sheep cloned by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Mathias

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA of the cloned sheep "Dolly" and nine other ovine clones produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT was reported to consist only of recipient oocyte mtDNA without any detectable mtDNA contribution from the nucleus donor cell. In cattle, mouse and pig several or most of the clones showed transmission of nuclear donor mtDNA resulting in mitochondrial heteroplasmy. To clarify the discrepant transmission pattern of donor mtDNA in sheep clones we analysed the mtDNA composition of seven fetuses and five lambs cloned from fetal fibroblasts. Results The three fetal fibroblast donor cells used for SCNT harboured low mtDNA copy numbers per cell (A: 753 ± 54, B: 292 ± 33 and C: 561 ± 88. The ratio of donor to recipient oocyte mtDNAs was determined using a quantitative amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS PCR (i.e. ARMS-qPCR. For quantification of SNP variants with frequencies below 0.1% we developed a restriction endonuclease-mediated selective quantitative PCR (REMS-qPCR. We report the first cases (n = 4 fetuses, n = 3 lambs of recipient oocyte/nuclear donor mtDNA heteroplasmy in SCNT-derived ovine clones demonstrating that there is no species-effect hindering ovine nucleus-donor mtDNA from being transmitted to the somatic clonal offspring. Most of the heteroplasmic clones exhibited low-level heteroplasmy (0.1% to 0.9%, n = 6 indicating neutral transmission of parental mtDNAs. High-level heteroplasmy (6.8% to 46.5% was observed in one case. This clone possessed a divergent recipient oocyte-derived mtDNA genotype with three rare amino acid changes compared to the donor including one substitution at an evolutionary conserved site. Conclusion Our study using state-of-the-art techniques for mtDNA quantification, like ARMS-qPCR and the novel REMS-qPCR, documents for the first time the transmission of donor mtDNA into somatic sheep clones. MtDNA heteroplasmy was detected in seven of 12 clones

  7. Genomic clone encoding the α chain of the OKM1, LFA-1, and platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosgrove, L.J.; Sandrin, M.S.; Rajasekariah, P.; McKenzie, I.F.C.

    1986-01-01

    LFA-1, an antigen involved in cytolytic T lymphocyte-mediated killing, and Mac-1, the receptor for complement component C3bi, constitute a family of structurally and functionally related cell surface glycoproteins involved in cellular interactions. In both mouse and man, Mac-1 (OKM1) and LFA-1 share a common 95-kDa β subunit but are distinguished by their α chains, which have different cellular distributions, apparent molecular masses (165 and 177 kDa, respectively), and peptide maps. The authors report the isolation of a genomic clone from a human genomic library that on transfection into mouse fibroblasts produced a molecule(s) reactive with monoclonal antibodies to OKM1, to LFA-1, and to platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa. This gene was cloned by several cycles of transfection of L cells with a human genomic library cloned in λ phase Charon 4A and subsequent rescue of the λ phage. Transfection with the purified recombinant λ DNA yielded a transfectant that expressed the three human α chains of OKM1, LFA-1, and glycoprotein IIb-IIIa, presumably in association with the murine β chain

  8. cDNA cloning and characterization of a mannose-binding lectin from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using RNA extracted from Zingiber officinale rhizomes and primers designed according to the conservative regions of monocot mannose-binding lectins, the full-length cDNA of Z. officinale agglutinin (ZOA) was cloned by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The full-length cDNA of zoa was 746 bp and contained a ...

  9. cDNA cloning and characterization of a mannose-binding lectin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using RNA extracted from Zingiber officinale rhizomes and primers designed according to the conservative regions of monocot mannose-binding lectins, the full-length cDNA of Z. officinale agglutinin (ZOA) was cloned by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The full-length cDNA of zoa was 746 bp and contained a ...

  10. Purification, characterisation and cDNA cloning of an antimicrobial peptide from Macadamia integrifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, J P; Goulter, K C; Green, J L; Harrison, S J; Manners, J M

    1997-03-15

    An antimicrobial peptide with no significant amino acid sequence similarity to previously described peptides has been isolated from the nut kernels of Macadcamia integrifolia. The peptide, termed MiAMP1, is highly basic with an estimated pI of 10.1, a mass of 8.1 kDa and contains 76 amino acids including 6 cysteine residues. A cDNA clone containing the entire coding region corresponding to the peptide was obtained. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cDNA indicated a 26-amino-acid signal peptide at the N-terminus of the preprotein. Purified MiAMP1 inhibited the growth of a variety of fungal, oomycete and gram-positive bacterial phytopathogens in vitro. Some pathogens exhibited close to 100% inhibition in less than 1 microM peptide (5 microg/ml). Antimicrobial activity was diminished against most, but not all, microbes in the presence of calcium and potassium chloride salts (1 mM and 50 mM, respectively). MiAMP1 was active against bakers yeast, was inactive against Escherichia coli and was non-toxic to plant and mammalian cells. Analysis of genomic DNA indicated that MiAMP1 was encoded on a single copy gene containing no introns. The MiAMP1 gene may prove useful in genetic manipulations to increase disease resistance in transgenic plants.

  11. Size-selection of cDNA libraries for the cloning of cDNAs after suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévesque, V; Fayad, T; Ndiaye, K; Nahé Diouf, M; Lussier, J G

    2003-07-01

    Here we describe the establishment of size-selected cDNA libraries for the cloning of full-length cDNAs that were initially identified by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) technology as being differentially expressed. First, the SSH-cDNA fragments were used as 32P-probes to verify their level and differential pattern of expression by virtual Northern and to establish their corresponding full-length cDNA size. Second, cDNAs were separated by size on agarose gels and used to construct size-selected cDNA plasmid libraries, which were then screened by colony hybridization with the SSH-cDNA fragments. We conclude that the described approach complements SSH technology by allowing efficient cloning and characterization of the corresponding full-length cDNA from any desired cell type or species. This approach will give researchers the ability to specifically target and study differentially expressed genes in an efficient manner for functional genomic studies.

  12. Gateway Recombinational Cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece-Hoyes, John S; Walhout, Albertha J M

    2018-01-02

    The Gateway recombinatorial cloning system was developed for cloning multiple DNA fragments in parallel (e.g., in 96-well formats) in a standardized manner using the same enzymes. Gateway cloning is based on the highly specific integration and excision reactions of bacteriophage λ into and out of the Escherichia coli genome. Because the sites of recombination (" att " sites) are much longer (25-242 bp) than restriction sites, they are extremely unlikely to occur by chance in DNA fragments. Therefore, the same recombination enzyme can be used to robustly clone many different fragments of variable size in parallel reactions. © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  13. Chromosomal mapping of canine-derived BAC clones to the red fox and American mink genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukekova, Anna V; Vorobieva, Nadegda V; Beklemisheva, Violetta R; Johnson, Jennifer L; Temnykh, Svetlana V; Yudkin, Dmitry V; Trut, Lyudmila N; Andre, Catherine; Galibert, Francis; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Acland, Gregory M; Graphodatsky, Alexander S

    2009-01-01

    High-quality sequencing of the dog (Canis lupus familiaris) genome has enabled enormous progress in genetic mapping of canine phenotypic variation. The red fox (Vulpes vulpes), another canid species, also exhibits a wide range of variation in coat color, morphology, and behavior. Although the fox genome has not yet been sequenced, canine genomic resources have been used to construct a meiotic linkage map of the red fox genome and begin genetic mapping in foxes. However, a more detailed gene-specific comparative map between the dog and fox genomes is required to establish gene order within homologous regions of dog and fox chromosomes and to refine breakpoints between homologous chromosomes of the 2 species. In the current study, we tested whether canine-derived gene-containing bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones can be routinely used to build a gene-specific map of the red fox genome. Forty canine BAC clones were mapped to the red fox genome by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Each clone was uniquely assigned to a single fox chromosome, and the locations of 38 clones agreed with cytogenetic predictions. These results clearly demonstrate the utility of FISH mapping for construction of a whole-genome gene-specific map of the red fox. The further possibility of using canine BAC clones to map genes in the American mink (Mustela vison) genome was also explored. Much lower success was obtained for this more distantly related farm-bred species, although a few BAC clones were mapped to the predicted chromosomal locations.

  14. Molecular cloning of the human hepatitis C virus genome from Japanese patients with non-A, non-B hepatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Nobuyuki; Hijikata, Makoto; Ootsuyama, Yuko; Nakagawa, Masanori; Ohkoshi, Showgo; Sugimura, Takashi; Shimotohno, Kunitada

    1990-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the Japanese type of hepatitis C virus (HCV-J) genome, consisting of 9413 nucleotides, was determined by analyses of cDNA clones from plasma specimens from Japanese patients with chronic hepatitis. HCV-J genome contains a long open reading frame that can encode a sequence of 3010 amino acid residues. Comparison of HCV-J with the American isolate of HCV showed 22.6% difference in nucleotide sequence and 15.1% difference in amino acid sequence. Thus HCV-J and the American isolate of HCV are probably different subtypes of HCV. The relationship of HCV-J with other animal RNA virus families and the putative organization of the HCV-J genome are discussed

  15. Synthesis and cell-free cloning of DNA libraries using programmable microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Yehezkel, Tuval; Rival, Arnaud; Raz, Ofir; Cohen, Rafael; Marx, Zipora; Camara, Miguel; Dubern, Jean-Frédéric; Koch, Birgit; Heeb, Stephan; Krasnogor, Natalio; Delattre, Cyril; Shapiro, Ehud

    2016-02-29

    Microfluidics may revolutionize our ability to write synthetic DNA by addressing several fundamental limitations associated with generating novel genetic constructs. Here we report the first de novo synthesis and cell-free cloning of custom DNA libraries in sub-microliter reaction droplets using programmable digital microfluidics. Specifically, we developed Programmable Order Polymerization (POP), Microfluidic Combinatorial Assembly of DNA (M-CAD) and Microfluidic In-vitro Cloning (MIC) and applied them to de novo synthesis, combinatorial assembly and cell-free cloning of genes, respectively. Proof-of-concept for these methods was demonstrated by programming an autonomous microfluidic system to construct and clone libraries of yeast ribosome binding sites and bacterial Azurine, which were then retrieved in individual droplets and validated. The ability to rapidly and robustly generate designer DNA molecules in an autonomous manner should have wide application in biological research and development. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Cloning and characterization of DNA complementary to the canine distemper virus mRNA encoding matrix, phosphoprotein, and nucleocapsid protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozenblatt, S.; Eizenberg, O.; Englund, G.; Bellini, W.J.

    1985-02-01

    Double-stranded cDNA synthesized from total polyadenylate-containing mRNA, extracted from monkey kidney cells infected with canine distemper virus (CDV), has been cloned into the PstI site of Escherichia coli plasmid pBR322. Clones containing canine distemper virus DNA were identified by hybridization to a canine distemper virus-specific, /sup 32/P-labeled cDNA. Four specific clones containing different classes of sequences have been identified. The cloned plasmids contain inserts of 800 (clone 44-80), 960 (clone 74-16), 1700 (clone 364), and 950 (clone 40-9) base pairs. The sizes of the mRNA species complementary to these inserts are 1500, 1850, 1850 and 2500 nucleotides, respectively, as determined by the Northern technique. Three of the cloned DNA fragments were further identified as the reverse transcripts of the mRNA coding for the matrix, phosphoprotein, and nucleocapsid protein of CDV.

  17. Cloning and characterization of DNA complementary to the canine distemper virus mRNA encoding matrix, phosphoprotein, and nucleocapsid protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenblatt, S.; Eizenberg, O.; Englund, G.; Bellini, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    Double-stranded cDNA synthesized from total polyadenylate-containing mRNA, extracted from monkey kidney cells infected with canine distemper virus (CDV), has been cloned into the PstI site of Escherichia coli plasmid pBR322. Clones containing canine distemper virus DNA were identified by hybridization to a canine distemper virus-specific, 32 P-labeled cDNA. Four specific clones containing different classes of sequences have been identified. The cloned plasmids contain inserts of 800 (clone 44-80), 960 (clone 74-16), 1700 (clone 364), and 950 (clone 40-9) base pairs. The sizes of the mRNA species complementary to these inserts are 1500, 1850, 1850 and 2500 nucleotides, respectively, as determined by the Northern technique. Three of the cloned DNA fragments were further identified as the reverse transcripts of the mRNA coding for the matrix, phosphoprotein, and nucleocapsid protein of CDV

  18. Construction of an infectious cDNA clone of foot-and-mouth disease ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A stable, full-length cDNA clone of FMDV type O1BFS 1860 preceded by a bacteriophage T7 polymerase promoter was assembled in a plasmid vector pGEMR-7Zf(–). An ∼8.2 kb PCR product was amplified from the cDNA clone and a full-length RNA was generated from it by in vitro transcription. Transfection of BHK-21 ...

  19. Cloning and functional expression of a human pancreatic islet glucose-transporter cDNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permutt, M.A.; Koranyi, L.; Keller, K.; Lacy, P.E.; Scharp, D.W.; Mueckler, M.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that pancreatic islet glucose transport is mediated by a high-K m , low-affinity facilitated transporter similar to that expressed in liver. To determine the relationship between islet and liver glucose transporters, liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA clones were isolated from a human liver cDNA library. The liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA clone hybridized to mRNA transcripts of the same size in human liver and pancreatic islet RNA. A cDNA library was prepared from purified human pancreatic islet tissue and screened with human liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA. The authors isolated two overlapping cDNA clones encompassing 2600 base pairs, which encode a pancreatic islet protein identical in sequence to that of the putative liver-type glucose-transporter protein. Xenopus oocytes injected with synthetic mRNA transcribed from a full-length cDNA construct exhibited increased uptake of 2-deoxyglucose, confirming the functional identity of the clone. These cDNA clones can now be used to study regulation of expression of the gene and to assess the role of inherited defects in this gene as a candidate for inherited susceptibility to non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

  20. Chromatin Dynamics in Genome Stability: Roles in Suppressing Endogenous DNA Damage and Facilitating DNA Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Nidhi; Shoaib, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Genomic DNA is compacted into chromatin through packaging with histone and non-histone proteins. Importantly, DNA accessibility is dynamically regulated to ensure genome stability. This is exemplified in the response to DNA damage where chromatin relaxation near genomic lesions serves to promote access of relevant enzymes to specific DNA regions for signaling and repair. Furthermore, recent data highlight genome maintenance roles of chromatin through the regulation of endogenous DNA-templated processes including transcription and replication. Here, we review research that shows the importance of chromatin structure regulation in maintaining genome integrity by multiple mechanisms including facilitating DNA repair and directly suppressing endogenous DNA damage. PMID:28698521

  1. Bacterial species determination from DNA-DNA hybridization by using genome fragments and DNA microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, J C; Tiedje, J M

    2001-08-01

    Whole genomic DNA-DNA hybridization has been a cornerstone of bacterial species determination but is not widely used because it is not easily implemented. We have developed a method based on random genome fragments and DNA microarray technology that overcomes the disadvantages of whole-genome DNA-DNA hybridization. Reference genomes of four fluorescent Pseudomonas species were fragmented, and 60 to 96 genome fragments of approximately 1 kb from each strain were spotted on microarrays. Genomes from 12 well-characterized fluorescent Pseudomonas strains were labeled with Cy dyes and hybridized to the arrays. Cluster analysis of the hybridization profiles revealed taxonomic relationships between bacterial strains tested at species to strain level resolution, suggesting that this approach is useful for the identification of bacteria as well as determining the genetic distance among bacteria. Since arrays can contain thousands of DNA spots, a single array has the potential for broad identification capacity. In addition, the method does not require laborious cross-hybridizations and can provide an open database of hybridization profiles, avoiding the limitations of traditional DNA-DNA hybridization.

  2. Foreign DNA acquisition by invertebrate genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drezen, J-M; Gauthier, J; Josse, T; Bézier, A; Herniou, E; Huguet, E

    2017-07-01

    Recent studies have highlighted that the accidental acquisition of DNA from other species by invertebrate genomes is much more common than originally thought. The transferred DNAs are of bacterial or eukaryote origin and in both cases the receiver species may end up utilising the transferred genes for its own benefit. Frequent contact with prokaryotic DNA from symbiotic endocellular bacteria may predispose invertebrates to incorporate this genetic material into their genomes. Increasing evidence also points to viruses as major players in transferring genes and mobile elements between the species they infect. Unexpectedly a gene flux between Hymenoptera and Lepidoptera mediated by endogenous viruses of parasitic wasps has been recently unravelled, suggesting we are probably just seeing the tip of the iceberg concerning horizontal gene transfers in invertebrates. In the context of insect for feed and food, if the new technology of insect genome editing (such as Crisper/Cas9) were used to modify the genome of reared insects it is important to take into account the risk that an introduced gene can be transferred. More generally, although insects are traditionally consumed in Asia and Africa, knowledge on insect viruses is still limited rendering it difficult to predict the impact they might have in the context of insect rearing at an industrial scale. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular genetics: DNA analysis of a putative dog clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Heidi G; Kruglyak, Leonid; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2006-03-09

    In August 2005, Lee et al. reported the first cloning of a domestic dog from adult somatic cells. This putative dog clone was the result of somatic-cell nuclear transfer from a fibroblast cell of a three-year-old male Afghan hound into a donor oocyte provided by a dog of mixed breed. In light of recent concerns regarding the creation of cloned human cell lines from the same institution, we have undertaken an independent test to determine the validity of the claims made by Lee et al..

  4. Cloning of the mouse cDNA encoding DNA topoisomerase I and chromosomal location of the gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koiwai, O; Yasui, Y; Sakai, Y; Watanabe, T; Ishii, K; Yanagihara, S; Andoh, T

    1993-03-30

    The mouse cDNA encoding DNA topoisomerase I (TopoI) was cloned and the nucleotide sequence of 3512 bp was determined. The cDNA clone contained an open reading frame encoding a protein of 767 amino acids (aa), which is 2 aa longer than its human counterpart. Overall aa sequence homology between the mouse and human, and between the mouse and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) sequences was 96% and 42%, respectively. The mouse TopI gene was mapped at position 54.5 on chromosome 2 from linkage analyses of a three-point cross test with Geg, Ada, and a as marker genes.

  5. Software-Supported USER Cloning Strategies for Site-Directed Mutagenesis and DNA Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genee, Hans Jasper; Bonde, Mads Tvillinggaard; Bagger, Frederik Otzen

    2015-01-01

    USER cloning is a fast and versatile method for engineering of plasmid DNA. We have developed a user friendly Web server tool that automates the design of optimal PCR primers for several distinct USER cloning-based applications. Our Web server, named AMUSER (Automated DNA Modifications with USER...... cloning), facilitates DNA assembly and introduction of virtually any type of site-directed mutagenesis by designing optimal PCR primers for the desired genetic changes. To demonstrate the utility, we designed primers for a simultaneous two-position site-directed mutagenesis of green fluorescent protein...... (GFP) to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), which in a single step reaction resulted in a 94% cloning efficiency. AMUSER also supports degenerate nucleotide primers, single insert combinatorial assembly, and flexible parameters for PCR amplification. AMUSER is freely available online at ....

  6. Nuclear transfer to prevent mitochondrial DNA disorders: revisiting the debate on reproductive cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredenoord, A L; Dondorp, W; Pennings, G; De Wert, G

    2011-02-01

    Preclinical experiments are currently performed to examine the feasibility of several types of nuclear transfer to prevent mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) disorders. Whereas the two most promising types of nuclear transfer to prevent mtDNA disorders, spindle transfer and pronuclear transfer, do not amount to reproductive cloning, one theoretical variant, blastomere transfer does. This seems the most challenging both technically and ethically. It is prohibited by many jurisdictions and also the scientific community seems to avoid it. Nevertheless, this paper examines the moral acceptability of blastomere transfer as a method to prevent mtDNA disorders. The reason for doing so is that most objections against reproductive cloning refer to reproductive adult cloning, while blastomere transfer would amount to reproductive embryo cloning. After clarifying this conceptual difference, this paper examines whether the main non-safety objections brought forward against reproductive cloning also apply in the context of blastomere transfer. The conclusion is that if this variant were to become safe and effective, dismissing it because it would involve reproductive cloning is unjustified. Nevertheless, as it may lead to more complex ethical appraisals than the other variants, researchers should initially focus on the development of the other types of nuclear transfer to prevent mtDNA disorders. Copyright © 2010 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Genomic DNA extraction method from pearl millet ( Pennisetum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DNA extraction is difficult in a variety of plants because of the presence of metabolites that interfere with DNA isolation procedures and downstream applications such as DNA restriction, amplification, and cloning. Here we describe a modified procedure based on the hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) method to ...

  8. Expression cloning screening of a unique and full-length set of cDNA clones is an efficient method for identifying genes involved in Xenopus neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Jana; Chen, Jun-An; Gilchrist, Mike; Amaya, Enrique; Papalopulu, Nancy

    2005-03-01

    Functional screens, where a large numbers of cDNA clones are assayed for certain biological activity, are a useful tool in elucidating gene function. In Xenopus, gain of function screens are performed by pool screening, whereby RNA transcribed in vitro from groups of cDNA clones, ranging from thousands to a hundred, are injected into early embryos. Once an activity is detected in a pool, the active clone is identified by sib-selection. Such screens are intrinsically biased towards potent genes, whose RNA is active at low quantities. To improve the sensitivity and efficiency of a gain of function screen we have bioinformatically processed an arrayed and EST sequenced set of 100,000 gastrula and neurula cDNA clones, to create a unique and full-length set of approximately 2500 clones. Reducing the redundancy and excluding truncated clones from the starting clone set reduced the total number of clones to be screened, in turn allowing us to reduce the pool size to just eight clones per pool. We report that the efficiency of screening this clone set is five-fold higher compared to a redundant set derived from the same libraries. We have screened 960 cDNA clones from this set, for genes that are involved in neurogenesis. We describe the overexpression phenotypes of 18 single clones, the majority of which show a previously uncharacterised phenotype and some of which are completely novel. In situ hybridisation analysis shows that a large number of these genes are specifically expressed in neural tissue. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of a unique full-length set of cDNA clones for uncovering players in a developmental pathway.

  9. Amplification and cloning of near full-length HIV-2 genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng

    2005-01-01

    The genomes of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2), like those of HIV-1, are not only extremely variable but are also highly recombinogenic. Determination of subtypes based on partial genomes cannot predict the subtype classification of other regions of the genome owing to the frequent occurrence of recombinant genomes among subtypes. To fully understand the genetic variation and evolution of HIV-2s, full-length viral genomes need to be obtained for genetic analysis. Full-length HIV-2 genomes can also be used as infectious clones to study viral biological characteristics and as reference sequences for phylogenetic analysis. More important, all genes in the obtained genomes can be cloned into expression vectors to produce proteins that can be used as antigens for diagnostic reagents or as immunogens for vaccine development. The long-range polymerase chain reaction technique has recently become a more preferred method than the lambda phage cloning method to obtain near-full-length HIV-2 genomes.

  10. Description of genomic islands associated to the multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clone ST277.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Melise Chaves; Albano, Rodolpho Mattos; Asensi, Marise Dutra; Carvalho-Assef, Ana Paula D'Alincourt

    2016-08-01

    Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clone ST277 is disseminated in Brazil where it is mainly associated with the presence of metallo-β-lactamase SPM-1. Furthermore, it carries the class I integron In163 and a 16S rRNA methylase rmtD that confers aminoglycoside resistance. To analyze the genetic characteristics that might be responsible for the success of this endemic clone, genomes of four P. aeruginosa strains that were isolated in distinct years and in different Brazilian states were sequenced. The strains differed regarding the presence of the genes blaSPM-1 and rmtD. Genomic comparisons that included genomes of other clones that have spread worldwide from this species were also performed. These analyses revealed a 763,863bp region in the P. aeruginosa chromosome that concentrates acquired genetic structures comprising two new genomic islands (PAGI-13 and PAGI-14), a mobile element that could be used for ST277 fingerprinting and a recently reported Integrative and Conjugative Element (ICE) associated to blaSPM-1. The genetic elements rmtD and In163 are inserted in PAGI-13 while PAGI-14 has genes encoding proteins related to type III restriction system and phages. The data reported in this study provide a basis for a clearer understanding of the genetic content of clone ST277 and illustrate the mechanisms that are responsible for the success of these endemic clones. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of cDNA clones expressing immunodiagnostic antigens from Trichinella spiralis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarlenga, D.; Gamble, H.R.

    1987-05-01

    A cDNA expression library was built in lambda gt11 phage using poly A mRNA isolated from Trichinella spiralis muscle stage larvae. This library was screened with rabbit antibodies to parasite excretory-secretory (ES) products and greater than 180 clones were isolated. Thirteen clones producing highly immunogenic protein antigens were plaque purified and rescreened with pig antisera to T.spiralis, Trichuris suis or Ascaris suum to identify clones producing epitopes specific to T.spiralis ES products, only. Two clones, TsAc-2 and TsAc-8, which displayed strong interactions with pig antisera to T. spiralis were lysogenized in E. coli Y1089 and the protein extracted. Western blots of the crude fusion proteins revealed molecular weights of 133 kD and 129 kD, respectively. Northern blot analysis of total RNA with TSP labelled cDNA:lambda gt11 probes indicated single RNA transcripts for each clone with molecular sizes corresponding to 800-850 nucleotides. dscDNA inserts were estimated by southern blot analysis to be 500 bp and 340 bp, respectively, with no cross-hybridization observed between the cloned sequences. Dot blots using pig sera to screen crude fusion protein preparations, total bacterial protein (negative controls) and crude worm extract or ES products from T.spiralis, T.suis and A.suum (positive controls) corroborated the specificity and sensitivity of these clones as potential diagnostic antigens for swine trichinellosis.

  12. Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... been cloned from somatic cells include: cat, deer, dog, horse, mule, ox, rabbit and rat. In addition, ... to make copies of animals with the potential benefits for the fields of medicine and agriculture. For ...

  13. AFEAP cloning: a precise and efficient method for large DNA sequence assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fanli; Zang, Jinping; Zhang, Suhua; Hao, Zhimin; Dong, Jingao; Lin, Yibin

    2017-11-14

    Recent development of DNA assembly technologies has spurred myriad advances in synthetic biology, but new tools are always required for complicated scenarios. Here, we have developed an alternative DNA assembly method named AFEAP cloning (Assembly of Fragment Ends After PCR), which allows scarless, modular, and reliable construction of biological pathways and circuits from basic genetic parts. The AFEAP method requires two-round of PCRs followed by ligation of the sticky ends of DNA fragments. The first PCR yields linear DNA fragments and is followed by a second asymmetric (one primer) PCR and subsequent annealing that inserts overlapping overhangs at both sides of each DNA fragment. The overlapping overhangs of the neighboring DNA fragments annealed and the nick was sealed by T4 DNA ligase, followed by bacterial transformation to yield the desired plasmids. We characterized the capability and limitations of new developed AFEAP cloning and demonstrated its application to assemble DNA with varying scenarios. Under the optimized conditions, AFEAP cloning allows assembly of an 8 kb plasmid from 1-13 fragments with high accuracy (between 80 and 100%), and 8.0, 11.6, 19.6, 28, and 35.6 kb plasmids from five fragments at 91.67, 91.67, 88.33, 86.33, and 81.67% fidelity, respectively. AFEAP cloning also is capable to construct bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC, 200 kb) with a fidelity of 46.7%. AFEAP cloning provides a powerful, efficient, seamless, and sequence-independent DNA assembly tool for multiple fragments up to 13 and large DNA up to 200 kb that expands synthetic biologist's toolbox.

  14. Cloning-free genome engineering in Sinorhizobium meliloti advances applications of Cre/loxP site-specific recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döhlemann, Johannes; Brennecke, Meike; Becker, Anke

    2016-09-10

    The soil-dwelling α-proteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti serves as model for studies of symbiotic nitrogen fixation, a highly important process in sustainable agriculture. Here, we report advancements of the genetic toolbox accelerating genome editing in S. meliloti. The hsdMSR operon encodes a type-I restriction-modification (R-M) system. Transformation of S. meliloti is counteracted by the restriction endonuclease HsdR degrading DNA which lacks the appropriate methylation pattern. We provide a stable S. meliloti hsdR deletion mutant showing enhanced transformation with Escherichia coli-derived plasmid DNA and demonstrate that using an E. coli plasmid donor, expressing S. meliloti methyl transferase genes, is an alternative strategy of increasing the transformation efficiency of S. meliloti. Furthermore, we devise a novel cloning-free genome editing (CFGE) method for S. meliloti, Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Xanthomonas campestris, and demonstrate the applicability of this method for intricate applications of the Cre/lox recombination system in S. meliloti. An enhanced Cre/lox system, allowing for serial deletions of large genomic regions, was established. An assay of lox spacer mutants identified a set of lox sites mediating specific recombination. The availability of several non-promiscuous Cre recognition sites enables simultaneous specific Cre/lox recombination events. CFGE combined with Cre/lox recombination is put forward as powerful approach for targeted genome editing, involving serial steps of manipulation to expedite the genetic accessibility of S. meliloti as chassis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [Cloning associated genes using microdissection-cDNA PCR-SSH in gastric dysplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Dong-mei; Sun, Xiu-ju; Zheng, Zhi-hong; He, Guang; Ma, Ming-chao; Xu, Hui-mian; Wang, Mei-xian; Sun, Kai-lai

    2003-10-01

    To construct cDNA subtracted libraries from gastric dysplasia and further screen differentially expressed genes. Relatively pure dysplasia and normal tissue were procured by manual microdissection, and amplified by cDNA-PCR, which was used to carry on for suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). Subtracted cDNA fragments were linked with vector, cloned, screened, sequenced, and made homologous search. Differentially expressed fragments were verified by dot hybridization. Two subtracted cDNA libraries were constructed. Among 26 sequenced clones, 15 fragments corresponded to known genes, 3 fragments were known EST and 8 fragments were unknown EST (GenBank BQ164614-BQ164616, BQ291516-BQ291520). Fifteen fragments were verified to be differentially expressed in gastric dysplasia. Subtracted cDNA libraries from gastric dysplasia are constructed using combination of microdissection-cDNA PCR and SSH setup in our laboratory. Some fragments have been screened and verified to help to search for novel associated genes with gastric carcinogenesis.

  16. Elucidating population histories using genomic DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigilant, Linda

    2009-04-01

    In 1993, Cliff Jolly suggested that rather than debating species definitions and classifications, energy would be better spent investigating multidimensional patterns of variation and gene flow among populations. Until now, however, genetic studies of wild primate populations have been limited to very small portions of the genome. Access to complete genome sequences of humans, chimpanzees, macaques, and other primates makes it possible to design studies surveying substantial amounts of DNA sequence variation at multiple genetic loci in representatives of closely related but distinct wild primate populations. Such data can be analyzed with new approaches that estimate not only when populations diverged but also the relative amounts and directions of subsequent gene flow. These analyses will reemphasize the difficulty of achieving consistent species and subspecies definitions by revealing the extent of variation in the amount and duration of gene flow accompanying population divergences.

  17. Biological Parameters and Molecular Markers of Clone CL Brener - The Reference Organism of the Trypanosoma cruzi Genome Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Zingales

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Clone CL Brener is the reference organism used in the Trypanosoma cruzi Genome Project. Some biological parameters of CL Brener were determined: (a the doubling time of epimastigote forms cultured in liver infusion-tryptose (LIT medium at 28oC is 58±13 hr; (b differentiation of epimastigotes to metacyclic trypomastigotes is obtained by incubation in LIT-20% Grace´s medium; (c trypomastigotes infect mammalian cultured cells and perform the complete intracellular cycle at 33 and 37oC; (d blood forms are highly infective to mice; (e blood forms are susceptible to nifurtimox and benznidazole. The molecular typing of CL Brener has been determined: (a isoenzymatic profiles are characteristic of zymodeme ZB; (b PCR amplification of a 24Sa ribosomal RNA sequence indicates it belongs to T. cruzi lineage 1; (c schizodeme, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD and DNA fingerprinting analyses were performed

  18. Isolation and sequence analysis of the wheat B genome subtelomeric DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huneau Cecile

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Telomeric and subtelomeric regions are essential for genome stability and regular chromosome replication. In this work, we have characterized the wheat BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome clones containing Spelt1 and Spelt52 sequences, which belong to the subtelomeric repeats of the B/G genomes of wheats and Aegilops species from the section Sitopsis. Results The BAC library from Triticum aestivum cv. Renan was screened using Spelt1 and Spelt52 as probes. Nine positive clones were isolated; of them, clone 2050O8 was localized mainly to the distal parts of wheat chromosomes by in situ hybridization. The distribution of the other clones indicated the presence of different types of repetitive sequences in BACs. Use of different approaches allowed us to prove that seven of the nine isolated clones belonged to the subtelomeric chromosomal regions. Clone 2050O8 was sequenced and its sequence of 119 737 bp was annotated. It is composed of 33% transposable elements (TEs, 8.2% Spelt52 (namely, the subfamily Spelt52.2 and five non-TE-related genes. DNA transposons are predominant, making up 24.6% of the entire BAC clone, whereas retroelements account for 8.4% of the clone length. The full-length CACTA transposon Caspar covers 11 666 bp, encoding a transposase and CTG-2 proteins, and this transposon accounts for 40% of the DNA transposons. The in situ hybridization data for 2050O8 derived subclones in combination with the BLAST search against wheat mapped ESTs (expressed sequence tags suggest that clone 2050O8 is located in the terminal bin 4BL-10 (0.95-1.0. Additionally, four of the predicted 2050O8 genes showed significant homology to four putative orthologous rice genes in the distal part of rice chromosome 3S and confirm the synteny to wheat 4BL. Conclusion Satellite DNA sequences from the subtelomeric regions of diploid wheat progenitor can be used for selecting the BAC clones from the corresponding regions of hexaploid wheat

  19. cDNA cloning and polymorphic domains of the major ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a highly polymorphic gene and plays an important role in immune system for vertebrate. To understand the polymorphism character of domestic, we cloned 32 cDNAs of MHC class I α genes of two local chicken breeds in different areas of China. There were 112 variable amino ...

  20. Molecular cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fritillaria thunbergii Miq., known as the bulbous plants of the genus fritillaria, produces a large amount of sterols. Homology based polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) with degenerate primers designed from the conserved sequences among the known cycloartenol synthase (CAS) resulted in cloning of a CAS from the ...

  1. cDNA cloning, structural analysis, SNP detection and tissue ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present study was conducted to clone and sequence the full-length coding sequence of the caprine IGF1 gene from Attappady Black and Malabari breeds, two indigenous goat breeds of south India, to analyse its structure, and to ascertainthe relative abundance of IGF1 mRNA in different tissues. The caprine IGF1 ...

  2. cDNA cloning, structural analysis, SNP detection and tissue ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    THOMAS NAICY

    Abstract. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) plays an important role in growth, reproduction, foetal development and cell proliferation. The present study was conducted to clone and sequence the full-length coding sequence of the caprine IGF1 gene from. Attappady Black and Malabari breeds, two indigenous goat breeds of ...

  3. cDNA cloning and polymorphic domains of the major ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-24

    Oct 24, 2011 ... Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a highly polymorphic gene and plays an important role in immune system for vertebrate. To understand the polymorphism character of domestic, we cloned 32. cDNAs of MHC class I α genes of two local chicken breeds in different areas of China. There were 112.

  4. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of cDNA for human β-glucuronidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, A.; Kyle, J.W.; Miller, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    The authors report here the cDNA sequence for human placental β-glucuronidase (β-D-glucuronoside glucuronosohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.31) and demonstrate expression of the human enzyme in transfected COS cells. They also sequenced a partial cDNA clone from human fibroblasts that contained a 153-base-pair deletion within the coding sequence and found a second type of cDNA clone from placenta that contained the same deletion. Nuclease S1 mapping studies demonstrated two types of mRNAs in human placenta that corresponded to the two types of cDNA clones isolated. The NH 2 -terminal amino acid sequence determined for human spleen β-glucuronidase agreed with that inferred from the DNA sequence of the two placental clones, beginning at amino acid 23, suggesting a cleaved signal sequence of 22 amino acids. When transfected into COS cells, plasmids containing either placental clone expressed an immunoprecipitable protein that contained N-linked oligosaccharides as evidenced by sensitivity to endoglycosidase F. However, only transfection with the clone containing the 153-base-pair segment led to expression of human β-glucuronidase activity. These studies provide the sequence for the full-length cDNA for human β-glucuronidase, demonstrate the existence of two populations of mRNA for β-glucuronidase in human placenta, only one of which specifies a catalytically active enzyme, and illustrate the importance of expression studies in verifying that a cDNA is functionally full-length

  5. Cloning of cDNA encoding steroid 11β-hydroxylase (P450c11)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chua, S.C.; Szabo, P.; Vitek, A.; Grzeschik, K.H.; John, M.; White, P.C.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have isolated bovine and human adrenal cDNA clones encoding the adrenal cytochrome P-450 specific for 11β-hydroxylation (P450c11). A bovine adrenal cDNA library constructed in the bacteriophage λ vector gt10 was probed with a previously isolated cDNA clone corresponding to part of the 3' untranslated region of the 4.2-kilobase (kb) mRNA encoding P450c11. Several clones with 3.2-kb cDNA inserts were isolated. Sequence analysis showed that they overlapped the original probe by 300 base pairs (bp). Combined cDNA and RNA sequence data demonstrated a continuous open reading frame of 1509 bases. P450c11 is predicted to contain 479 amino acid residues in the mature protein in addition to a 24-residue amino-terminal mitochondrial signal sequence. A bovine clone was used to isolate a homologous clone with a 3.5-kb insert from a human adrenal cDNA library. A region of 1100 bp was 81% homologous to 769 bp of the coding sequence of the bovine cDNA except for a 400-bp segment presumed to be an unprocessed intron. Hybridization of the human cDNA to DNA from a panel of human-rodent somatic cell hybrid lines and in situ hybridization to metaphase spreads of human chromosomes localized the gene to the middle of the long arm of chromosome 8. These data should be useful in developing reagents for heterozygote detection and prenatal diagnosis of 11β-hydroxylase deficiency, the second most frequent cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia

  6. The Flp double cross system a simple efficient procedure for cloning DNA fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadowski Paul D

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While conventional cloning methods using restriction enzymes and polynucleotide ligase are adequate for most DNAs, fragments made by the polymerase chain reaction are difficult to clone because the amplifying DNA polymerase tends to add untemplated nucleotides to the 3'-termini of the amplified strands. Conservative site-specific recombinases offer an efficient alternative to conventional cloning methods. Results In this paper I describe the use of the Flp site-specific recombinase for cloning PCR-amplified fragments. A DNA fragment is amplified with primers that contain at their ends inverted target sequences for Flp. Flp readily recombines these fragments in vitro into a vector that also contains two inverted Flp target sequences surrounding the α-complementing region of the lacZ gene of E. coli. The recombinants are conveniently detected as white colonies by the familiar blue/white screening test for lacZ activity. A useful feature of the system is that both orientations of the inserted DNA are usually obtained. If the recipient vector is cut between the two inverted Flp targets, Flp "heals" the double-strand break by inserting a linear fragment flanked by Flp targets. Conclusion This system ("The Flp Double Cross System" should be useful for cloning multiple PCR fragments into many sites in several vectors. It has certain advantages over other available recombinase-based cloning procedures.

  7. Construction of Infectious cDNA Clone of a Chrysanthemum stunt viroid Korean Isolate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Cho, In-Sook; Choi, Gug-Seoun; Choi, Seung-Kook

    2014-01-01

    Chrysanthemum stunt viroid (CSVd), a noncoding infectious RNA molecule, causes seriously economic losses of chrysanthemum for 3 or 4 years after its first infection. Monomeric cDNA clones of CSVd isolate SK1 (CSVd-SK1) were constructed in the plasmids pGEM-T easy vector and pUC19 vector. Linear positive-sense transcripts synthesized in vitro from the full-length monomeric cDNA clones of CSVd-SK1 could infect systemically tomato seedlings and chrysanthemum plants, suggesting that the linear CSVd RNA transcribed from the cDNA clones could be replicated as efficiently as circular CSVd in host species. However, direct inoculation of plasmid cDNA clones containing full-length monomeric cDNA of CSVd-SK1 failed to infect tomato and chrysanthemum and linear negative-sense transcripts from the plasmid DNAs were not infectious in the two plant species. The cDNA sequences of progeny viroid in systemically infected tomato and chrysanthemum showed a few substitutions at a specific nucleotide position, but there were no deletions and insertions in the sequences of the CSVd progeny from tomato and chrysanthemum plants. PMID:25288987

  8. Particle infectivity of HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones in a subtype C heterosexual transmission pair following high fidelity amplification and unbiased cloning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deymier, Martin J., E-mail: mdeymie@emory.edu [Emory Vaccine Center, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 Gatewood Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329 (United States); Claiborne, Daniel T., E-mail: dclaibo@emory.edu [Emory Vaccine Center, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 Gatewood Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329 (United States); Ende, Zachary, E-mail: zende@emory.edu [Emory Vaccine Center, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 Gatewood Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329 (United States); Ratner, Hannah K., E-mail: hannah.ratner@emory.edu [Emory Vaccine Center, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 Gatewood Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329 (United States); Kilembe, William, E-mail: wkilembe@rzhrg-mail.org [Zambia-Emory HIV Research Project (ZEHRP), B22/737 Mwembelelo, Emmasdale Post Net 412, P/BagE891, Lusaka (Zambia); Allen, Susan, E-mail: sallen5@emory.edu [Zambia-Emory HIV Research Project (ZEHRP), B22/737 Mwembelelo, Emmasdale Post Net 412, P/BagE891, Lusaka (Zambia); Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Hunter, Eric, E-mail: eric.hunter2@emory.edu [Emory Vaccine Center, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 Gatewood Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329 (United States); Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The high genetic diversity of HIV-1 impedes high throughput, large-scale sequencing and full-length genome cloning by common restriction enzyme based methods. Applying novel methods that employ a high-fidelity polymerase for amplification and an unbiased fusion-based cloning strategy, we have generated several HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones from an epidemiologically linked transmission pair. These clones represent the transmitted/founder virus and phylogenetically diverse non-transmitted variants from the chronically infected individual's diverse quasispecies near the time of transmission. We demonstrate that, using this approach, PCR-induced mutations in full-length clones derived from their cognate single genome amplicons are rare. Furthermore, all eight non-transmitted genomes tested produced functional virus with a range of infectivities, belying the previous assumption that a majority of circulating viruses in chronic HIV-1 infection are defective. Thus, these methods provide important tools to update protocols in molecular biology that can be universally applied to the study of human viral pathogens. - Highlights: • Our novel methodology demonstrates accurate amplification and cloning of full-length HIV-1 genomes. • A majority of plasma derived HIV variants from a chronically infected individual are infectious. • The transmitted/founder was more infectious than the majority of the variants from the chronically infected donor.

  9. Particle infectivity of HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones in a subtype C heterosexual transmission pair following high fidelity amplification and unbiased cloning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deymier, Martin J.; Claiborne, Daniel T.; Ende, Zachary; Ratner, Hannah K.; Kilembe, William; Allen, Susan; Hunter, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The high genetic diversity of HIV-1 impedes high throughput, large-scale sequencing and full-length genome cloning by common restriction enzyme based methods. Applying novel methods that employ a high-fidelity polymerase for amplification and an unbiased fusion-based cloning strategy, we have generated several HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones from an epidemiologically linked transmission pair. These clones represent the transmitted/founder virus and phylogenetically diverse non-transmitted variants from the chronically infected individual's diverse quasispecies near the time of transmission. We demonstrate that, using this approach, PCR-induced mutations in full-length clones derived from their cognate single genome amplicons are rare. Furthermore, all eight non-transmitted genomes tested produced functional virus with a range of infectivities, belying the previous assumption that a majority of circulating viruses in chronic HIV-1 infection are defective. Thus, these methods provide important tools to update protocols in molecular biology that can be universally applied to the study of human viral pathogens. - Highlights: • Our novel methodology demonstrates accurate amplification and cloning of full-length HIV-1 genomes. • A majority of plasma derived HIV variants from a chronically infected individual are infectious. • The transmitted/founder was more infectious than the majority of the variants from the chronically infected donor

  10. Game of clones: the genomic evolution of severe congenital neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touw, Ivo P

    2015-01-01

    Severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) is a genetically heterogeneous condition of bone marrow failure usually diagnosed in early childhood and characterized by a chronic and severe shortage of neutrophils. It is now well-established that mutations in HAX1 and ELANE (and more rarely in other genes) are the genetic cause of SCN. In contrast, it has remained unclear how these mutations affect neutrophil development. Innovative models based on induced pluripotent stem cell technology are being explored to address this issue. These days, most SCN patients receive life-long treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, CSF3). CSF3 therapy has greatly improved the life expectancy of SCN patients, but also unveiled a high frequency of progression toward myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and therapy refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Expansion of hematopoietic clones with acquired mutations in the gene encoding the G-CSF receptor (CSF3R) is regularly seen in SCN patients and AML usually descends from one of these CSF3R mutant clones. These findings raised the questions how CSF3R mutations affect CSF3 responses of myeloid progenitors, how they contribute to the pre-leukemic state of SCN, and which additional events are responsible for progression to leukemia. The vast (sub)clonal heterogeneity of AML and the presence of AML-associated mutations in normally aged hematopoietic clones make it often difficult to determine which mutations are responsible for the leukemic process. Leukemia predisposition syndromes such as SCN are unique disease models to identify the sequential acquisition of these mutations and to interrogate how they contribute to clonal selection and leukemic evolution. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  11. Purification and cloning of DNA fragments fractionated on agarose gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, H G; Gasson, M J

    1995-04-01

    Purification of DNA fragments from acrylamide or agarose gels is a commonly used technique in the molecular biology laboratory. This article describes a rapid, efficient, and inexpensive method of purifying DNA fractions from an agarose gel. The purified DNA is suitable for use in a wide range of applications including ligation using DNA ligase. The procedure uses standard high-melting-temperature agarose and normal TBE electrophoresis buffer. In addition, the protocol does not involve the use of highly toxic organic solvents such as phenol.

  12. Horse cDNA clones encoding two MHC class I genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbis, D.P.; Maher, J.K.; Stanek, J.; Klaunberg, B.A.; Antczak, D.F.

    1994-12-31

    Two full-length clones encoding MHC class I genes were isolated by screening a horse cDNA library, using a probe encoding in human HLA-A2.2Y allele. The library was made in the pcDNA1 vector (Invitrogen, San Diego, CA), using mRNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from a Thoroughbred stallion (No. 0834) homozygous for a common horse MHC haplotype (ELA-A2, -B2, -D2; Antczak et al. 1984; Donaldson et al. 1988). The clones were sequenced, using SP6 and T7 universal primers and horse-specific oligonucleotides designed to extend previously determined sequences.

  13. An "in Silico" DNA Cloning Experiment for the Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Kelly M.

    2011-01-01

    This laboratory exercise introduces students to concepts in recombinant DNA technology while accommodating a major semester project in protein purification, structure, and function in a biochemistry laboratory for junior- and senior-level undergraduate students. It is also suitable for forensic science courses focused in DNA biology and advanced…

  14. Complete Genomes of Classical Swine Fever Virus Cloned into Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Reimann, I.; Uttenthal, Åse

    Complete genome amplification of viral RNA provides a new tool for the generation of modified pestiviruses. We have used our full-genome amplification strategy for generation of amplicons representing complete genomes of classical swine fever virus. The amplicons were cloned directly into a stable...... single-copy bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) generating full-length pestivirus DNAs from which infectious RNA transcripts could be also derived. Our strategy allows construction of stable infectious BAC DNAs from a single full-length PCR product....

  15. Genomic cloning of the mouse LDL receptor related protein/_2-macroglobulin receptor gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, A. van der; Stas, L.; Hilleker, C.; Leuven, F. van; Dijk, K.W. van; Havekes, L; Frants, R.A.; Hofker, M.H.

    1994-01-01

    The LDL receptor-related protein (LRP) or alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor (A2mr) is encoded by a 15-kb mRNA in mouse and human. Probes encompassing different regions of the mouse cDNA were used to isolate clones from a cosmid library of mouse strain 129. Four overlapping cosmids were used for

  16. An unusual satellite DNA from Zamia paucijuga (Cycadales) characterised by two different organisations of the repetitive unit in the plant genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafasso, Donata; Cozzolino, Salvatore; De Luca, Paolo; Chinali, Gianni

    2003-06-05

    We have cloned and characterised a highly repetitive DNA family that represents about 5% of the nuclear genome of Zamia paucijuga, a member of Cycadales, an ancient and rare group of seed plants. The unit repeat, cloned from EcoRV digested genomic DNA, has a length of about 323 bp, an high GC content (65-70%) and a subtelomeric localisation. The DNA of Z. paucijuga was digested with various restriction enzymes and analysed by Southern blot using the cloned unit repeat as a probe. These experiments indicated that the repeat is present in the plant genome in an unusual organisation, as tandem arrays typical of satellite DNA and as dispersed elements. The characterisation of these unusual "dispersed satellite DNA" elements required a complex series of experiments using combined Southern blot analyses, PCR, cloning and sequencing. Our results indicate that most of these dispersed elements are formed by few units of the GC-rich satellite DNA repeats arranged in tandem and flanked at both sites by one copy of a 0.6 kb AT-rich direct repeat. This unusual satellite DNA organisation of GC-rich repeats is present in many species of genus Zamia, and, thus, likely represent an ancient rearrangement of the satellite DNA repeats that spread in the genome as dispersed elements.

  17. Cloning of human purine-nucleoside phosphorylase cDNA sequences by complementation in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Goddard, J M; Caput, D; Williams, S R; Martin, D W

    1983-01-01

    We have obtained cDNA clones that contain the entire coding region of the human purine-nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP; EC 2.4.2.1) mRNA. The cDNA sequences were generated by reverse transcription of PNP-enriched mRNA obtained by immunoadsorption of HeLa cell polyribosomes with monospecific antibody to human PNP. cDNA molecules that were close in length to PNP mRNA were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis and inserted into the Pst I site of the plasmid pBR322. Plasmid DNA from the pooled c...

  18. SLiCE: a novel bacterial cell extract-based DNA cloning method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongwei; Werling, Uwe; Edelmann, Winfried

    2012-01-01

    We describe a novel cloning method termed SLiCE (Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract) that utilizes easy to generate bacterial cell extracts to assemble multiple DNA fragments into recombinant DNA molecules in a single in vitro recombination reaction. SLiCE overcomes the sequence limitations of traditional cloning methods, facilitates seamless cloning by recombining short end homologies (≥15 bp) with or without flanking heterologous sequences and provides an effective strategy for directional subcloning of DNA fragments from Bacteria Artificial Chromosomes (BACs) or other sources. SLiCE is highly cost effective as a number of standard laboratory bacterial strains can serve as sources for SLiCE extract. In addition, the cloning efficiencies and capabilities of these strains can be greatly improved by simple genetic modifications. As an example, we modified the DH10B Escherichia coli strain to express an optimized λ prophage Red recombination system. This strain, termed PPY, facilitates SLiCE with very high efficiencies and demonstrates the versatility of the method. PMID:22241772

  19. SLiCE: a novel bacterial cell extract-based DNA cloning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongwei; Werling, Uwe; Edelmann, Winfried

    2012-04-01

    We describe a novel cloning method termed SLiCE (Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract) that utilizes easy to generate bacterial cell extracts to assemble multiple DNA fragments into recombinant DNA molecules in a single in vitro recombination reaction. SLiCE overcomes the sequence limitations of traditional cloning methods, facilitates seamless cloning by recombining short end homologies (≥15 bp) with or without flanking heterologous sequences and provides an effective strategy for directional subcloning of DNA fragments from Bacteria Artificial Chromosomes (BACs) or other sources. SLiCE is highly cost effective as a number of standard laboratory bacterial strains can serve as sources for SLiCE extract. In addition, the cloning efficiencies and capabilities of these strains can be greatly improved by simple genetic modifications. As an example, we modified the DH10B Escherichia coli strain to express an optimized λ prophage Red recombination system. This strain, termed PPY, facilitates SLiCE with very high efficiencies and demonstrates the versatility of the method.

  20. Ancient DNA: extraction, characterization, molecular cloning, and enzymatic amplification.

    OpenAIRE

    Pääbo, S

    1989-01-01

    Several chemical and enzymatic properties were examined in the DNA extracted from dry remains of soft tissues that vary in age from 4 to 13,000 years and represent four species, including two extinct animals (the marsupial wolf and giant ground sloth). The DNA obtained was invariably of a low average molecular size and damaged by oxidative processes, which primarily manifest themselves as modifications of pyrimidines and sugar residues as well as baseless sites and intermolecular cross-links....

  1. Whole-genome methylation caller designed for methyl-DNA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DNA methylation is an indispensable epigenetic modification required for regulating the expression of mammalian genomes. Continued efforts have been made to unravel the methylation states genome-wide, featuring the methyl-DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) coupled with next-generation sequencing. Our method ...

  2. Rapid DNA extraction of bacterial genome using laundry detergents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genomic DNA extraction from bacterial cells involves processes normally performed in most biological laboratories. Therefore, various methods have been offered, manually and kit, but these methods may be time consuming and costly. In this paper, genomic DNA extraction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated ...

  3. Efficient method for the extraction of genomic DNA from wormwood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Suitable method for isolation of genomic DNA is really important. The best method can make the best result for genetic study. About five differences methods were used amongst which were Sarkosyl Method, CTAB method, Kit Method, SDS Method and Phenol-Chloroform Method. Isolated genomic DNA showed high purity ...

  4. Rapid DNA extraction of bacterial genome using laundry detergents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-03

    Jan 3, 2012 ... Genomic DNA extraction from bacterial cells involves processes normally performed in most biological laboratories. Therefore, various methods have been offered, manually and kit, but these methods may be time consuming and costly. In this paper, genomic DNA extraction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ...

  5. Annotating the genome by DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedar, Howard; Razin, Aharon

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation plays a prominent role in setting up and stabilizing the molecular design of gene regulation and by understanding this process one gains profound insight into the underlying biology of mammals. In this article, we trace the discoveries that provided the foundations of this field, starting with the mapping of methyl groups in the genome and the experiments that helped clarify how methylation patterns are maintained through cell division. We then address the basic relationship between methyl groups and gene repression, as well as the molecular rules involved in controlling this process during development in vivo. Finally, we describe ongoing work aimed at defining the role of this modification in disease and deciphering how it may serve as a mechanism for sensing the environment.

  6. Use of homologous recombination in yeast to create chimeric bovine viral diarrhea virus cDNA clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Arenhart

    Full Text Available Abstract The open reading frame of a Brazilian bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV strain, IBSP4ncp, was recombined with the untranslated regions of the reference NADL strain by homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, resulting in chimeric full-length cDNA clones of BVDV (chi-NADL/IBSP4ncp#2 and chi-NADL/IBSP4ncp#3. The recombinant clones were successfully recovered, resulting in viable viruses, having the kinetics of replication, focus size, and morphology similar to those of the parental virus, IBSP4ncp. In addition, the chimeric viruses remained stable for at least 10 passages in cell culture, maintaining their replication efficiency unaltered. Nucleotide sequencing revealed a few point mutations; nevertheless, the phenotype of the rescued viruses was nearly identical to that of the parental virus in all experiments. Thus, genetic stability of the chimeric clones and their phenotypic similarity to the parental virus confirm the ability of the yeast-based homologous recombination to maintain characteristics of the parental virus from which the recombinant viruses were derived. The data also support possible use of the yeast system for the manipulation of the BVDV genome.

  7. Detecting the somatic mutations spectrum of Chinese lung cancer by analyzing the whole mitochondrial DNA genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yu; Huang, Jie; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Jun; Qiao, Fei; Chen, Hua-Mei; Hong, Zhi-Peng

    2015-02-01

    To detect the somatic mutations and character its spectrum in Chinese lung cancer patients. In this study, we sequenced the whole mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genomes for 10 lung cancer patients including the primary cancerous, matched paracancerous normal and distant normal tissues. By analyzing the 30 whole mtDNA genomes, eight somatic mutations were identified from five patients investigated, which were confirmed with the cloning and sequencing of the somatic mutations. Five of the somatic mutations were detected among control region and the rests were found at the coding region. Heterogeneity was the main character of the somatic mutations in Chinese lung cancer patients. Further potential disease-related screening showed that, except the C deletion at position 309 showed AD-weakly associated, most of them were not disease-related. Although the role of aforementioned somatic mutations was unknown, however, considering the relative higher frequency of somatic mutations among the whole mtDNA genomes, it hints that detecting the somatic mutation(s) from the whole mtDNA genomes can serve as a useful tool for the Chinese lung cancer diagnostic to some extent.

  8. Genetic transformation of Streptococcus pneumoniae by DNA cloned into the single-stranded bacteriophage f1.

    OpenAIRE

    Barany, F; Boeke, J D

    1983-01-01

    A Staphylococcus aureus plasmid derivative, pFB9, coding for erythromycin and chloramphenicol resistance was cloned into the filamentous Escherichia coli phage f1. Recombinant phage-plasmid hybrids, designated plasmids, were isolated from E. coli and purified by transformation into Streptococcus pneumoniae. Single-stranded DNA was prepared from E. coli cells infected with two different plasmids, fBB101 and fBB103. Introduction of fully or partially single-stranded DNA into Streptococcus pneum...

  9. cDNA cloning and mRNA expression of heat shock protein 70 gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the full-length heat shock protein 70 of Tegillarca granosa was cloned from cDNA library by rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE). The open reading frame (ORF) of heat shock protein 70 was 1968 bp, and it encoded a protein of 655 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 71.48 kDa and an ...

  10. cDNA cloning and immunological characterization of the rye grass allergen Lol p I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, M; Ishioka, G Y; Walker, L E; Chesnut, R W

    1990-09-25

    The complete amino acid sequence of two "isoallergenic" forms of Lol p I, the major rye grass (Lolium perenne) pollen allergen, was deduced from cDNA sequence analysis. cDNA clones isolated from a Lolium perenne pollen library contained an open reading frame coding for a 240-amino acid protein. Comparison of the nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence of two of these clones revealed four changes at the amino acid level and numerous nucleotide differences. Both clones contained one possible asparagine-linked glycosylation site. Northern blot analysis shows one RNA species of 1.2 kilobases. Based on the complete amino acid sequence of Lol p I, overlapping peptides covering the entire molecule were synthesized. Utilizing these peptides we have identified a determinant within the Lol p I molecule that is recognized by human leukocyte antigen class II-restricted T cells obtained from persons allergic to rye grass pollen.

  11. A new set of ESTs and cDNA clones from full-length and normalized libraries for gene discovery and functional characterization in citrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, M Carmen; Alonso-Cantabrana, Hugo; Forment, Javier; Arribas, Raquel; Alamar, Santiago; Conejero, Vicente; Perez-Amador, Miguel A

    2009-01-01

    Background Interpretation of ever-increasing raw sequence information generated by modern genome sequencing technologies faces multiple challenges, such as gene function analysis and genome annotation. Indeed, nearly 40% of genes in plants encode proteins of unknown function. Functional characterization of these genes is one of the main challenges in modern biology. In this regard, the availability of full-length cDNA clones may fill in the gap created between sequence information and biological knowledge. Full-length cDNA clones facilitate functional analysis of the corresponding genes enabling manipulation of their expression in heterologous systems and the generation of a variety of tagged versions of the native protein. In addition, the development of full-length cDNA sequences has the power to improve the quality of genome annotation. Results We developed an integrated method to generate a new normalized EST collection enriched in full-length and rare transcripts of different citrus species from multiple tissues and developmental stages. We constructed a total of 15 cDNA libraries, from which we isolated 10,898 high-quality ESTs representing 6142 different genes. Percentages of redundancy and proportion of full-length clones range from 8 to 33, and 67 to 85, respectively, indicating good efficiency of the approach employed. The new EST collection adds 2113 new citrus ESTs, representing 1831 unigenes, to the collection of citrus genes available in the public databases. To facilitate functional analysis, cDNAs were introduced in a Gateway-based cloning vector for high-throughput functional analysis of genes in planta. Herein, we describe the technical methods used in the library construction, sequence analysis of clones and the overexpression of CitrSEP, a citrus homolog to the Arabidopsis SEP3 gene, in Arabidopsis as an example of a practical application of the engineered Gateway vector for functional analysis. Conclusion The new EST collection denotes an

  12. A new set of ESTs and cDNA clones from full-length and normalized libraries for gene discovery and functional characterization in citrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alamar Santiago

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interpretation of ever-increasing raw sequence information generated by modern genome sequencing technologies faces multiple challenges, such as gene function analysis and genome annotation. Indeed, nearly 40% of genes in plants encode proteins of unknown function. Functional characterization of these genes is one of the main challenges in modern biology. In this regard, the availability of full-length cDNA clones may fill in the gap created between sequence information and biological knowledge. Full-length cDNA clones facilitate functional analysis of the corresponding genes enabling manipulation of their expression in heterologous systems and the generation of a variety of tagged versions of the native protein. In addition, the development of full-length cDNA sequences has the power to improve the quality of genome annotation. Results We developed an integrated method to generate a new normalized EST collection enriched in full-length and rare transcripts of different citrus species from multiple tissues and developmental stages. We constructed a total of 15 cDNA libraries, from which we isolated 10,898 high-quality ESTs representing 6142 different genes. Percentages of redundancy and proportion of full-length clones range from 8 to 33, and 67 to 85, respectively, indicating good efficiency of the approach employed. The new EST collection adds 2113 new citrus ESTs, representing 1831 unigenes, to the collection of citrus genes available in the public databases. To facilitate functional analysis, cDNAs were introduced in a Gateway-based cloning vector for high-throughput functional analysis of genes in planta. Herein, we describe the technical methods used in the library construction, sequence analysis of clones and the overexpression of CitrSEP, a citrus homolog to the Arabidopsis SEP3 gene, in Arabidopsis as an example of a practical application of the engineered Gateway vector for functional analysis. Conclusion The new

  13. A new set of ESTs and cDNA clones from full-length and normalized libraries for gene discovery and functional characterization in citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, M Carmen; Alonso-Cantabrana, Hugo; Forment, Javier; Arribas, Raquel; Alamar, Santiago; Conejero, Vicente; Perez-Amador, Miguel A

    2009-09-11

    Interpretation of ever-increasing raw sequence information generated by modern genome sequencing technologies faces multiple challenges, such as gene function analysis and genome annotation. Indeed, nearly 40% of genes in plants encode proteins of unknown function. Functional characterization of these genes is one of the main challenges in modern biology. In this regard, the availability of full-length cDNA clones may fill in the gap created between sequence information and biological knowledge. Full-length cDNA clones facilitate functional analysis of the corresponding genes enabling manipulation of their expression in heterologous systems and the generation of a variety of tagged versions of the native protein. In addition, the development of full-length cDNA sequences has the power to improve the quality of genome annotation. We developed an integrated method to generate a new normalized EST collection enriched in full-length and rare transcripts of different citrus species from multiple tissues and developmental stages. We constructed a total of 15 cDNA libraries, from which we isolated 10,898 high-quality ESTs representing 6142 different genes. Percentages of redundancy and proportion of full-length clones range from 8 to 33, and 67 to 85, respectively, indicating good efficiency of the approach employed. The new EST collection adds 2113 new citrus ESTs, representing 1831 unigenes, to the collection of citrus genes available in the public databases. To facilitate functional analysis, cDNAs were introduced in a Gateway-based cloning vector for high-throughput functional analysis of genes in planta. Herein, we describe the technical methods used in the library construction, sequence analysis of clones and the overexpression of CitrSEP, a citrus homolog to the Arabidopsis SEP3 gene, in Arabidopsis as an example of a practical application of the engineered Gateway vector for functional analysis. The new EST collection denotes an important step towards the

  14. Complete amino acid sequence of human intestinal aminopeptidase N as deduced from cloned cDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowell, G M; Kønigshøfer, E; Danielsen, E M

    1988-01-01

    The complete primary structure (967 amino acids) of an intestinal human aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2) was deduced from the sequence of a cDNA clone. Aminopeptidase N is anchored to the microvillar membrane via an uncleaved signal for membrane insertion. A domain constituting amino acid 250...

  15. Cloning of oleosin, a putative new hazelnut allergen, using a hazelnut cDNA library

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerdaas, Jaap H.; Schocker, Frauke; Vieths, Stefan; Versteeg, Serge; Zuidmeer, Laurian; Hefle, Sue L.; Aalberse, Rob C.; Richter, Klaus; Ferreira, Fatima; van Ree, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    The clinical presentation of non-pollen related allergy to hazelnut can be severe and systemic. So far, only a limited number of non-pollen related hazelnut allergens have been identified and characterized. The aim of this study was to identify and clone new hazelnut allergens. A lambda ZAP cDNA

  16. cDNA cloning and expression analysis of two distinct Sox8 genes in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-08-06

    Aug 6, 2010 ... cDNA cloning and expression analysis of two distinct Sox8 genes in. Paramisgurnus dabryanus (Cypriniformes). XIAOHUA XIA, JIE ZHAO, QIYAN DU and ZHONGJIE CHANG. ∗. Molecular and Genetic Laboratory, College of Life Sciences, Henan Normal University, 46 East of Construction Road,. Xinxiang ...

  17. Cloning, sequencing and expression of a novel xylanase cDNA from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A strain SH 2016, capable of producing xylanase, was isolated and identified as Aspergillus awamori, based on its physiological and biochemical characteristics as well as its ITS rDNA gene sequence analysis. A xylanase gene of 591 bp was cloned from this newly isolated A. awamori and the ORF sequence predicted a ...

  18. cDNA cloning and primary structure analysis of invariant chain in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cDNA cloning and primary structure analysis of invariant chain in Chinese Pengze crucian carp. X Liu, W Yu, J Li, F Chen, S Liu, C Wu, J Xu. Abstract. Invariant chain (Ii) plays an important role in MHC class II molecules assembly and exogenous peptide presentation in vertebrates. Although mammalian Ii has been ...

  19. Cloning of canine myocilin cDNA and molecular analysis of the myocilin gene in Shiba Inu dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kumiko; Sasaki, Nobuo; Matsunaga, Satoru; Nishimura, Ryohei; Ogawa, Hiroyuki

    2007-01-01

    To identify canine myocilin cDNA and compare its sequence in glaucomatous and nonglaucomatous Shiba Inu dogs with closed and open iridocorneal angles (ICAs). Total RNA was extracted from the ciliary body of the eyes of a healthy Beagle, and the canine myocilin gene was cloned and sequenced. Of the Shiba Inu dogs tested, five were glaucomatous with closed ICA, three were nonglaucomatous with open ICA, and two were nonglaucomatous with closed ICA. The genomic DNA of these dogs was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes. The exons of the canine myocilin gene were amplified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and sequenced. The frequency of mutation in canine myocilin DNA was verified in these dogs by using the myocilin cDNA of a Beagle. The canine myocilin cDNA was 1452 bp long and contained the entire open reading frame encoding 483 amino acids. A leucine zipper-like motif and olfactomedin-like domain were conserved in the amino acid residues. The presence of sequence variants in the genomic DNA of Shiba Inu dogs was independent of the occurrence of glaucoma and ICA grading. Myocilin RNA was detected in the ciliary body and trabecular meshwork (TM) of a Beagle. The myocilin sequence of Shiba Inu dogs suggests that myocilin mutations are unlikely to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of primary closed-angle glaucoma in this breed. However, several mutations in the myocilin gene in exon 1 of Shiba Inu dogs may predispose them to an obstruction in the anterior aqueous outflow.

  20. Genomic DNA k-mer Spectra: Models and Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chor, Benny; Horn, David; Goldman, Nick; Levy, Yaron; Massingham, Tim

    Background: The empirical frequencies of DNA k-mers in whole genome sequences provide an interesting perspective on genomic complexity, and the availability of large segments of genomic sequence from many organisms means that analysis of k-mers with non-trivial lengths is now possible.

  1. Cloning, sequencing and expression of cDNA encoding growth ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Vikas Anathy1 Thayanithy Venugopal1 Ramanathan Koteeswaran1 Thavamani J Pandian1 Sinnakaruppan Mathavan2. Department of Genetics, School of Biological Sciences, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021, India; Genome Institute of Singapore, National University of Singapore, 1, ...

  2. Cloning and characterisation of the sagA gene of Aspergillus nidulans: a gene which affects sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G W; Hooley, P; Farrington, S M; Shawcross, S G; Iwanejko, L A; Strike, P

    1999-03-01

    Mutations within the sagA gene of Aspergillus nidulans cause sensitisation to DNA-damaging chemicals but have no effect upon spontaneous or damage-induced mutation frequency. The sagA gene was cloned on a 19-kb cosmid-derived fragment by functional complementation of a sagA1 sagC3 double mutant; subsequently, a fragment of the gene was also isolated on a 3.9-kb genomic subclone. Initial sequencing of a small section of the 19-kb fragment allowed the design of primers that were subsequently used in RTPCR experiments to show that this DNA is transcribed. A 277-bp fragment derived from the transcribed region was used to screen an A. nidulans cDNA library, resulting in the isolation of a 1.4-kb partial cDNA clone which had sequence overlap with the genomic sagA fragment. This partial cDNA was incomplete but appeared to contain the whole coding region of sagA. The sagA1 mutant was shown to possess two mutations; a G-T transversion and a+ 1 frameshift due to insertion of a T. causing disruption to the C-terminal region of the SagA protein. Translation of the sagA cDNA predicts a protein of 378 amino acids, which has homology to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae End3 protein and also to certain mammalian proteins capable of causing cell transformation.

  3. Whole-genome pyrosequencing of an epidemic multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain belonging to the European clone II group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iacono, M.; Villa, L.; Fortini, D.

    2008-01-01

    The whole-genome sequence of an epidemic, multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain (strain ACICU) belonging to the European clone II group and carrying the plasmid-mediated bla(OXA-58) carbapenem resistance gene was determined. The A. baumannii ACICU genome was compared with the genomes...

  4. Analysis of the genome of a Korean isolate of the Pieris rapae granulovirus enabled by its separation from total host genomic DNA by pulse-field electrophoresis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Hun Jo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most traditional genome sequencing projects involving viruses include the culture and purification of the virus particles. However, purification of virions may yield insufficient material for traditional sequencing. The electrophoretic method described here provides a strategy whereby the genomic DNA of the Korean isolate of Pieris rapae granulovirus (PiraGV-K could be recovered in sufficient amounts for sequencing by purifying it directly from total host DNA by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The total genomic DNA of infected P. rapae was embedded in agarose plugs, treated with restriction nuclease and methylase, and then PFGE was used to separate PiraGV-K DNA from the DNA of P. rapae, followed by mapping of fosmid clones of the purified viral DNA. The double-stranded circular genome of PiraGV-K was found to encode 120 open reading frames (ORFs, which covered 92% of the sequence. BLAST and ORF arrangement showed the presence of 78 homologs to other genes in the database. The mean overall amino acid identity of PiraGV-K ORFs was highest with the Chinese isolate of PiraGV (~99%, followed up with Choristoneura occidentalis ORFs at 58%. PiraGV-K ORFs were grouped, according to function, into 10 genes involved in transcription, 11 involved in replication, 25 structural protein genes, and 15 auxiliary genes. Genes for Chitinase (ORF 10 and cathepsin (ORF 11, involved in the liquefaction of the host, were found in the genome. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The recovery of PiraGV-K DNA genome by pulse-field electrophoretic separation from host genomic DNA had several advantages, compared with its isolation from particles harvested as virions or inclusions from the P. rapae host. We have sequenced and analyzed the 108,658 bp PiraGV-K genome purified by the electrophoretic method. The method appears to be generally applicable to the analysis of genomes of large viruses.

  5. Genomic DNA extraction from sapwood of Pinus roxburghii for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ashish

    2013-02-22

    Feb 22, 2013 ... A method for extraction of genomic DNA from sapwood tissues of mature tall trees of Pinus roxburghii, .... DNA as a template. PCR was performed on a thermal cycler. (Biorad, Mycycler) incorporating 10 ng genomic DNA to a 25 µl reaction mix containing 1X Taq buffer, 3 mM MgCl2, 0.2 mM each of dNTPs ...

  6. Cloning, sequencing and expression of cDNA encoding growth ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    cell embryo and the expression was monitored continuously. The expression shown here is in developing embryo and freshly hatched fish. The intensity of green colour indicate the strong expression of EGFP in all the tissues of the embryo/fry. The expression of EGPF indicates the co-expression of catfish GH cDNA and the ...

  7. cDNA, genomic sequence cloning and overexpression of ribosomal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alignment analysis indicated that the nucleotide sequence of the coding sequence shows a high homology to those of Homo sapiens, Pongo abelii, Macaca fascicularis, Mus musculus, Bos taurus and Rattus norvegicus are 93.1, 92.5, 92.2, 91.1, 90.6 and 90.0% respectively. The amino acid sequence encoded by RPS20 ...

  8. cDNA, genomic sequence cloning and overexpression of ribosomal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-02

    Nov 2, 2009 ... Rattus norvegicus are 93.1, 92.5, 92.2, 91.1, 90.6 and 90.0% respectively. The amino acid sequence encoded by RPS20 gene of the Giant Panda shared a high homology (100%) with those of H. sapiens,. Mac. fascicularis, Mus musculus, B. taurus and R. norvegicus, except for P. abelii (99.88%). Primary.

  9. Isolating silkworm genomic DNA without liquid nitrogen suitable for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genomic DNA was isolated from posterior silk gland of silkworms, Antheraea assama. Absolute alcohol was used as tissue fixing solution instead of grinding in liquid nitrogen, which yielded high molecular weight DNA (>40 kb). Samples yielded similar amount of DNA when fixed in absolute alcohol (400 μmg/g of silk gland ...

  10. Genomic DNA extraction from sapwood of Pinus roxburghii for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A method for extraction of genomic DNA from sapwood tissues of mature tall trees of Pinus roxburghii, where collection of needle tissues is extremely difficult has been standardized. The extracted DNA was comparable to that obtained from the needle tissue in terms of yield and purity. The yield of extracted DNA ranged ...

  11. A universal, rapid, and inexpensive method for genomic DNA ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MOHAMMED BAQUR SAHIB A. AL-SHUHAIB

    Abstract. There is no 'one' procedure for extracting DNA from the whole blood of both mammals and birds, since each species has a unique property that require different methods to release its own DNA. Therefore, to obtain genomic DNA, a universal, rapid, and noncostly method was developed. A very simple biological ...

  12. Chromosomal localization of rDNA genes and genomic organization ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genomic organization analysis of 5S rDNA revealed two different types of 5S rDNA sequences, 5S type I and 5S type II. Moreover, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 5S rDNA probes showed six positive fluorescence signals on six chromosomes of all the analysed metaphases from the three tilapia samples.

  13. Particle infectivity of HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones in a subtype C heterosexual transmission pair following high fidelity amplification and unbiased cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deymier, Martin J; Claiborne, Daniel T; Ende, Zachary; Ratner, Hannah K; Kilembe, William; Allen, Susan; Hunter, Eric

    2014-11-01

    The high genetic diversity of HIV-1 impedes high throughput, large-scale sequencing and full-length genome cloning by common restriction enzyme based methods. Applying novel methods that employ a high-fidelity polymerase for amplification and an unbiased fusion-based cloning strategy, we have generated several HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones from an epidemiologically linked transmission pair. These clones represent the transmitted/founder virus and phylogenetically diverse non-transmitted variants from the chronically infected individual׳s diverse quasispecies near the time of transmission. We demonstrate that, using this approach, PCR-induced mutations in full-length clones derived from their cognate single genome amplicons are rare. Furthermore, all eight non-transmitted genomes tested produced functional virus with a range of infectivities, belying the previous assumption that a majority of circulating viruses in chronic HIV-1 infection are defective. Thus, these methods provide important tools to update protocols in molecular biology that can be universally applied to the study of human viral pathogens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Whole-genome sequencing and SNV genotyping of 'Nebbiolo' (Vitis vinifera L.) clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambino, Giorgio; Dal Molin, Alessandra; Boccacci, Paolo; Minio, Andrea; Chitarra, Walter; Avanzato, Carla Giuseppina; Tononi, Paola; Perrone, Irene; Raimondi, Stefano; Schneider, Anna; Pezzotti, Mario; Mannini, Franco; Gribaudo, Ivana; Delledonne, Massimo

    2017-12-11

    'Nebbiolo' (Vitis vinifera) is among the most ancient and prestigious wine grape varieties characterised by a wide genetic variability exhibited by a high number of clones (vegetatively propagated lines of selected mother plants). However, limited information is available for this cultivar at the molecular and genomic levels. The whole-genomes of three 'Nebbiolo' clones (CVT 71, CVT 185 and CVT 423) were re-sequenced and a de novo transcriptome assembly was produced. Important remarks about the genetic peculiarities of 'Nebbiolo' and its intra-varietal variability useful for clonal identification were reported. In particular, several varietal transcripts identified for the first time in 'Nebbiolo' were disease resistance genes and single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) identified in 'Nebbiolo', but not in other cultivars, were associated with genes involved in the stress response. Ten newly discovered SNVs were successfully employed to identify some periclinal chimeras and to classify 98 'Nebbiolo' clones in seven main genotypes, which resulted to be linked to the geographical origin of accessions. In addition, for the first time it was possible to discriminate some 'Nebbiolo' clones from the others.

  15. Cloning and biochemical characterization of Staphylococcus aureus type IA DNA topoisomerase comprised of distinct five domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Eun; Kim, Hyun Ik; Park, Jong Woo; Park, Jong Kun; Lee, Jung Sup

    2011-04-01

    DNA topoisomerases play critical roles in regulating DNA topology and are essential enzymes for cell survival. In this study, a gene encoding type IA DNA topoisomerase was cloned from Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) sp. strain C-66, and the biochemical properties of recombinant enzyme was characterized. The nucleotide sequence analysis showed that the cloned gene contained an open reading frame (2070 bp) that could encode a polypeptide of 689 amino acids. The cloned gene actually produced 79.1 kDa functional enzyme (named Sau-TopoI) in Escherichia coli (E. coli). Sau-TopoI enzyme purified from E. coli showed ATP-independent and Mg(2+)-dependent manners for relaxing negatively supercoiled DNA. The relaxation activity of Sau-TopoI was inhibited by camptothecin, but not by nalidixic acid and etoposide. Cleavage site mapping showed that the enzyme could preferentially bind to and cleave the sequence GGNN↓CAT (N and ↓ represent any nucleotide and cleavage site, respectively). All these results suggest that the purified enzyme is type IA DNA topoisomerase. In addition, domain mapping analysis showed that the enzyme was composed of conserved four domains (I through IV), together with a variable C-terminal region containing a unique domain V. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cloning and expression of full-length cDNA encoding human vitamin D receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, A.R.; McDonnell, D.P.; Hughes, M.; Crisp, T.M.; Mangelsdorf, D.J.; Haussler, M.R.; Pike, J.W.; Shine, J.; O' Malley, B.W. (California Biotechnology Inc., Mountain View (USA))

    1988-05-01

    Complementary DNA clones encoding the human vitamin D receptor have been isolated from human intestine and T47D cell cDNA libraries. The nucleotide sequence of the 4605-base pair (bp) cDNA includes a noncoding leader sequence of 115 bp, a 1281-bp open reading frame, and 3209 bp of 3{prime} noncoding sequence. Two polyadenylylation signals, AATAAA, are present 25 and 70 bp upstream of the poly(A) tail, respectively. RNA blot hybridization indicates a single mRNA species of {approx} 4600 bp. Transfection of the cloned sequences into COS-1 cells results in the production of a single receptor species indistinguishable from the native receptor. Sequence comparisons demonstrate that the vitamin D receptor belongs to the steroid-receptor gene family and is closest in size and sequence to another member of this family, the thyroid hormone receptor.

  17. DNA methylation, genomic silencing, and links to nutrition and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Dale C; Caudill, Marie A

    2005-06-01

    DNA methylation is a heritable epigenetic feature that is associated with transcriptional silencing, X-chromosome inactivation, genetic imprinting, and genomic stability. The addition of the methyl group is catalyzed by a family of DNA methyltransferases whose co-substrates are DNA and S-adenosylmethionine, the latter being derived from the methionine cycle. Aberrant DNA methylation is linked to numerous pathologies, including cancer. The purpose of this review is to describe DNA methylation and its functions, to examine the relationship between dietary methyl insufficiency and DNA methylation, and to evaluate the associations between DNA methylation and cancer.

  18. Draft Genome Sequences of the Probiotic Enterococcus faecalis Symbioflor 1 Clones DSM16430 and DSM16434

    OpenAIRE

    Fritzenwanker, Moritz; Chakraborty, Anindita; Hain, Torsten; Zimmermann, Kurt; Domann, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    The probiotic Symbioflor 1 is a historical concoction of 10 isolates of Enterococcus faecalis. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed two groups: one comprising eight identical clones (DSM16430, DSM16432, DSM16433, DSM16435 to DSM16439) and a further two isolates (DSM16431, DSM16434) with marginally different profiles. Here, we report a comparative analysis of the draft genome sequences of representative isolates.

  19. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Rapid Evolution of an Extreme-Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Clone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sean Yang-Yi; Chua, Song Lin; Liu, Yang; Høiby, Niels; Andersen, Leif Percival; Givskov, Michael; Song, Zhijun; Yang, Liang

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of extreme-drug-resistant (EDR) bacterial strains in hospital and nonhospital clinical settings is a big and growing public health threat. Understanding the antibiotic resistance mechanisms at the genomic levels can facilitate the development of next-generation agents. Here, comparative genomics has been employed to analyze the rapid evolution of an EDR Acinetobacter baumannii clone from the intensive care unit (ICU) of Rigshospitalet at Copenhagen. Two resistant A. baumannii strains, 48055 and 53264, were sequentially isolated from two individuals who had been admitted to ICU within a 1-month interval. Multilocus sequence typing indicates that these two isolates belonged to ST208. The A. baumannii 53264 strain gained colistin resistance compared with the 48055 strain and became an EDR strain. Genome sequencing indicates that A. baumannii 53264 and 48055 have almost identical genomes—61 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were found between them. The A. baumannii 53264 strain was assembled into 130 contigs, with a total length of 3,976,592 bp with 38.93% GC content. The A. baumannii 48055 strain was assembled into 135 contigs, with a total length of 4,049,562 bp with 39.00% GC content. Genome comparisons showed that this A. baumannii clone is classified as an International clone II strain and has 94% synteny with the A. baumannii ACICU strain. The ResFinder server identified a total of 14 antibiotic resistance genes in the A. baumannii clone. Proteomic analyses revealed that a putative porin protein was down-regulated when A. baumannii 53264 was exposed to antimicrobials, which may reduce the entry of antibiotics into the bacterial cell. PMID:23538992

  20. Cloning and sequencing of dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus, Coryphaenidae) growth hormone-encoding cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peduel, A D; Elizur, A; Knibb, W

    1994-01-01

    The cDNA encoding the preprotein growth hormone from the dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus) has been cloned and sequenced. The cDNA was derived by reverse transcription of RNA from the pituitary of a young fish using the method known as Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE). An oligonucleotide primer corresponding to the 5' region of Pagrus major and the universal RACE primer enabled amplification using the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The dolphinfish and yellow-tail, Seriola quineqeradiata, are both members of the sub-order Percoidei (Perciforme) and their GH sequences show a high level of homology.

  1. A secreted aspartic proteinase from Glomerella cingulata: purification of the enzyme and molecular cloning of the cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S J; Templeton, M D; Sullivan, P A

    1997-04-01

    A secreted aspartic proteinase from Glomerella cingulata (GcSAP) was purified to homogeneity by ion exchange chromatography. The enzyme has an M, of 36000 as estimated by SDS-PAGE, optimal activity from pH 3.5 to pH 4.0 and is inhibited by pepstatin. The N-terminal sequence, 23 residues long, was used to design a gene-specific primer. This was used in 3' RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) PCR to amplify a 1.2 kb fragment of the gcsap cDNA. A second gene-specific primer was designed and used in 5' RACE PCR to clone the 5' region. This yielded a 600 bp DNA fragment and completed the open reading frame. The gcsap open reading frame encodes a protein with a 78 residue prepro-sequence typical of other fungal secreted aspartic proteinases. Based on the deduced sequence, the mature enzyme contains 329 amino acids and shows approximately 40% identity to other fungal aspartic proteinases. Subsequent cloning and sequencing of gcsap fragments obtained from PCR with genomic DNA revealed a 73 bp intron beginning at nt 728. Southern analyses at medium and high stringency indicated that G. cingulata possesses one gene for the secreted aspartic proteinase, and Northern blots indicated that gene expression was induced by exogenous protein and repressed by ammonium salts. GcSAP is a putative pathogenicity factor of G. cingulata, and it will now be possible to create SAP-mutants and assess the role GcSAP plays in pathogenicity.

  2. Development of an HIV-based cDNA expression cloning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Maanen, Marc; Tidwell, Jennie K; Donehower, Lawrence A; Sutton, Richard E

    2003-07-01

    Expression cloning of cDNAs is a powerful tool with which to identify genes based on their specific functional properties. Here we describe the development of a cDNA library transfer system based on the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV). This system represents an improvement over current oncoretroviral cDNA expression systems in terms of target cell range and the inclusion of a selectable marker. By use of a simple packaging system, we were able to produce high-titer vector stocks from HIV vector-based cDNA libraries and demonstrate highly efficient cDNA expression cloning in three model experiments. First, HOS TK(-) cells, which are null for thymidine kinase (TK) expression, were transduced with an HIV-based cDNA library derived from primary human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) and functionally selected for TK expression. In a second experiment, hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase-1-deficient (HPRT(-)) fibroblasts were transduced with a T cell (PM1) line-derived cDNA library and selected for HPRT expression. Both TK (frequency 1 in 5.0 x 10(4)) and HPRT (frequency 1 in 2.0 x 10(4)) cDNAs were readily isolated from these HIV-based cDNA libraries. As a third example, we demonstrated the ability of this vector system to allow functional cDNA library screens to be performed in primary, mitotically inactive cell types. Using senescent HFFs as a target cell population, we were able to isolate SV40 large T antigen cDNA-containing clones (frequency 1 in 2.5 x 10(4)) based on their ability to overcome the senescence-induced block to cell proliferation. Thus, this system can be used to clone relatively low-abundance cDNAs based upon their expression. Because of the ability of HIV-based vectors to transduce primary and nondividing cells efficiently, this vector system will further broaden the range of cell types in which expression cloning studies can be performed.

  3. Molecular Profiling of Microbial Communities from Contaminated Sources: Use of Subtractive Cloning Methods and rDNA Spacer Sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb, Frank T.

    2001-04-10

    The major objective of this research was to provide appropriate sequences and assemble a DNA array of oligonucleotides to be used for rapid profiling of microbial populations from polluted areas and other areas of interest. The sequences to be assigned to the DNA array were chosen from cloned genomic DNA taken from groundwater sites having well characterized pollutant histories at Hanford Nuclear Plant and Lawrence Livermore Site 300. Glass-slide arrays were made and tested; and a new multiplexed, bead-based method was developed that uses nucleic acid hybridization on the surface of microscopic polystyrene spheres to identify specific sequences in heterogeneous mixtures of DNA sequences. The test data revealed considerable strain variation between sample sites showing a striking distribution of sequences. It also suggests that diversity varies greatly with bioremediation, and that there are many bacterial intergenic spacer region sequences that can indicate its effects. The bead method exhibited superior sequence discrimination and has features for easier and more accurate measurement.

  4. B-G cDNA clones have multiple small repeats and hybridize to both chicken MHC regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufman, J; Salomonsen, J; Skjødt, K

    1989-01-01

    in turn react with authentic B-G proteins. None of the clones represent a complete message, some--if not all--bear introns, and none of them match with any sequences presently stored in the data banks. The following new information did, however, emerge. At least two homologous transcripts are present...... hybridize with sequences in the chicken MHC as defined by congenic strains; the fusion proteins react with multiple immune but not preimmune sera, they select antibodies from the antisera to B-G, which then react with distinct erythrocyte B-G protein patterns, and they elicit antibodies from mice which...... could explain the bewildering variation in size of B-G proteins within and between haplotypes. Southern blots of genomic chicken DNA gave complex patterns for most probes, with many bands in common using different probes, but few bands in common between haplotypes. The sequences detected are all present...

  5. DNA-free genome editing methods for targeted crop improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchiswamy, Chidananda Nagamangala

    2016-07-01

    Evolution of the next-generation clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat/Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9) genome editing tools, ribonucleoprotein (RNA)-guided endonuclease (RGEN) RNPs, is paving the way for developing DNA-free genetically edited crop plants. In this review, I discuss the various methods of RGEN RNPs tool delivery into plant cells and their limitations to adopt this technology to numerous crop plants. Furthermore, focus is given on the importance of developing DNA-free genome edited crop plants, including perennial crop plants. The possible regulation on the DNA-free, next-generation genome-edited crop plants is also highlighted.

  6. Differentiation and diagnosis of Pseudocercosporella herpotrichoides (Fron) Deighton with genomic DNA probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frei, U; Wenzel, G.

    1993-01-01

    Repetitive genomic clones were used to differentiate between varieties within the species Pseudocercosporella herpotrichoides. From 21 clones tested 13 revealed restriction fragment length polymorphisms among isolates. Cluster analysis was performed based on these data. Differentiation of isolate...

  7. Genomic DNA extraction protocols from ovine hair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Nonato da Silva Prate

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Genomic DNA extracted from animal cells can be used for several purposes, for example, to know genetic variability and genetic relationships between individuals, breeds and/or species, paternity tests, to describe the genetic profile for registration of the animal at association of breeders, detect genetic polymorphisms (SNP related to characteristics of commercial interest, disease diagnose, assess resistance or susceptibility to pathogens, etc. For such evaluations, in general, DNA is amplified by PCR (polymerase chain reaction, and then subjected to various techniques as RFLP (restriction fragments length polymorphism, SSCP (single strand conformation polymorphism, and sequencing. The DNA may be obtained from blood, buccal swabs, meat, cartilage or hair bulb. Among all, the last biological material has been preferred by farmers for its ease acquisition. Several methods for extracting DNA from hair bulb were reported without any consensus for its implementation. This study aimed to optimize a protocol for efficient DNA extraction for use in PCR-RFLP analysis of the Prion gene. For this study, were collected hair samples containing hair bulb from 131 Santa Inês sheep belonging to the Institute of Zootechny, Nova Odessa - SP. Two DNA extraction protocols were evaluated. The first, called phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol (PCIA has long been used by Animal Genetic Laboratories, whose procedures are described below: in each microtube (1.5 mL containing 500 µL of TE-Tween solution (Tris-HCl 50 mM, EDTA 1 mM and 0.5% Tween 20 were added to approximately 30 hair bulb per animal which was incubated at 65°C with shaking at 170 rpm for 2 hours. Then was added 15 µL of proteinase K [10 mg mL-1] and incubated at 55°C at 170 rpm for 6-12 hours. At the end of digestion was added 1 volume of solution phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol (25:24:1 followed by vigorous shaking for 10 seconds and centrifuged at 8000 rpm and 4°C for 10 minutes. The upper phase

  8. [Cloning and characterization of a full-length HIV-1 genome of a prevalent subtype B-Thai strain in Henan Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Fu-min; Bao, Zuo-yi; Zhuang, Dao-min; Liu, Si-yang; Li, Lin; Li, Jing-yun

    2004-12-01

    To clone, identify and phylogenetically characterize a clade B-Thai HIV isolate representing the most prevalent virus in Henan province. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from an HIV-1 infected patient in Henan Province were separated, and co-cultivated with phytohemagglutinin-stimulated healthy donor PBMCs. Proviral DNA was extracted from productively infected PBMCs. The full-length HIV-1 genome was amplified by using the LA Tag long template PCR system. Primers were positioned in conserved regions within the HIV-1 long terminal repeats. Purified PCR products were T-A ligated into a pWSK29-T vector(CNHN 24 clone). Three recombinant clones containing virtually full-length HIV-1 genome were identified by PCR. The full-length genome was sequenced by using the primer-walking approach. Nucleotide sequence similarities were calculated by the local-homology algorithm. Phylogenetic trees of gag, pol and env reading frames were constructed using the Phylip software. HIV-1 C3V4 sequences indicate that the epidemic in this area was B-Thai subtype. V3 loop multiple amino acid sequence alignments showed amino acid alterations at nine positions. The 9,010 bp genomic sequence derived from isolate CNHN 24 contained all known structural and regulatory genes of an HIV-1 genome. No major deletions, insertions, or rearrangements were found. The highest homologies of the gag, pol, vpr, and vif reading frames to the corresponding clade B-Thai RL 42 sequences were 95.42%-97.08%. Phylogenetic trees showed the closest relationship of CNHN 24 and RL 42. The cloning and characterization of a virtually full-length HIV-1 B-Thai subtype in central China was completed in our laboratory. The data should be helpful to future studies on the genetic diversity of HIV-1.

  9. Enhanced specificity in immunoscreening of expression cDNA clones using radiolabeled antigen overlay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, S.; Chao, L.; Chao, J.

    1989-01-01

    A highly sensitive and specific method has been developed for immunoscreening clones from an expression cDNA library. The procedures utilize a radiolabeled antigen detection method described originally for the immunoblotting of plasma proteins. Screening of rat alpha 1-antitrypsin clones was used. Comparison between Western blots of alpha 1-antitrypsin using both labeled antigen and protein A detection methods showed that the former yielded lower background and greater sensitivity than the latter. Further, this technique was shown to have a lower detection limit of less than 20 ng through Western blot analysis of varying concentrations of alpha 1-antitrypsin. The procedures are based on the expression of the protein by cDNA clones containing the DNA inserts in the correct reading frame. Following the transfer of phage proteins to nitrocellulose membranes, the bivalent antibodies bind monovalently to both nitrocellulose-bound-antigen in the phage lysates and radiolabeled antigen. The radiolabeled antigen overlay method is superior to the protein A detection method in sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility. This improved method can be applied in general for screening expression cDNA libraries, provided that the specific antiserum and radiolabeled antigen are available

  10. Analysis of the mycoplasma genome by recombinant DNA technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, C; Frydenberg, J; Christiansen, Gunna

    1984-01-01

    A library of DNA fragments from Mycoplasma sp. strain PG50 has been made in the vector pBR325. Analysis in Escherichia coli minicells of randomly picked clones from this library demonstrated that many plasmids can promote synthesis of mycoplasma protein in the E. coli genetic background. Screenin...

  11. An automated annotation tool for genomic DNA sequences using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Introduction. DNA sequencing has evolved from a complicated labo- ratory process to an automated technique using high- throughput sequencers with fluorescent-dye-based chemistry. This technological advance coupled with the replacement of the traditional mapping and sequencing of clones in series to an integrated ...

  12. Targeted isolation, sequence assembly and characterization of two white spruce (Picea glauca BAC clones for terpenoid synthase and cytochrome P450 genes involved in conifer defence reveal insights into a conifer genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritland Carol

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conifers are a large group of gymnosperm trees which are separated from the angiosperms by more than 300 million years of independent evolution. Conifer genomes are extremely large and contain considerable amounts of repetitive DNA. Currently, conifer sequence resources exist predominantly as expressed sequence tags (ESTs and full-length (FLcDNAs. There is no genome sequence available for a conifer or any other gymnosperm. Conifer defence-related genes often group into large families with closely related members. The goals of this study are to assess the feasibility of targeted isolation and sequence assembly of conifer BAC clones containing specific genes from two large gene families, and to characterize large segments of genomic DNA sequence for the first time from a conifer. Results We used a PCR-based approach to identify BAC clones for two target genes, a terpene synthase (3-carene synthase; 3CAR and a cytochrome P450 (CYP720B4 from a non-arrayed genomic BAC library of white spruce (Picea glauca. Shotgun genomic fragments isolated from the BAC clones were sequenced to a depth of 15.6- and 16.0-fold coverage, respectively. Assembly and manual curation yielded sequence scaffolds of 172 kbp (3CAR and 94 kbp (CYP720B4 long. Inspection of the genomic sequences revealed the intron-exon structures, the putative promoter regions and putative cis-regulatory elements of these genes. Sequences related to transposable elements (TEs, high complexity repeats and simple repeats were prevalent and comprised approximately 40% of the sequenced genomic DNA. An in silico simulation of the effect of sequencing depth on the quality of the sequence assembly provides direction for future efforts of conifer genome sequencing. Conclusion We report the first targeted cloning, sequencing, assembly, and annotation of large segments of genomic DNA from a conifer. We demonstrate that genomic BAC clones for individual members of multi-member gene

  13. Human β satellite DNA: Genomic organization and sequence definition of a class of highly repetitive tandem DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waye, J.S.; Willard, H.F.

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe a class of human repetitive DNA, called β satellite, that, at a most fundamental level, exists as tandem arrays of diverged ∼68-base-pair monomer repeat units. The monomer units are organized as distinct subsets, each characterized by a multimeric higher-order repeat unit that is tandemly reiterated and represents a recent unit of amplification. They have cloned, characterized, and determined the sequence of two β satellite higher-order repeat units: one located on chromosome 9, the other on the acrocentric chromosomes (13, 14, 15, 21, and 22) and perhaps other sites in the genome. Analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis reveals that these tandem arrays are localized in large domains that are marked by restriction fragment length polymorphisms. In total, β-satellite sequences comprise several million base pairs of DNA in the human genome. Analysis of this DNA family should permit insights into the nature of chromosome-specific and nonspecific modes of satellite DNA evolution and provide useful tools for probing the molecular organization and concerted evolution of the acrocentric chromosomes

  14. Construction of an infectious cDNA clone of foot-and-mouth disease ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotype O is the most predominant among the endemic serotypes in India. A stable, full-length cDNA clone of FMDV type O1BFS 1860 preceded by a bacteriophage T7 polymerase promoter was assembled in a plasmid vector pGEMR-7Zf(–). An ~8.2 kb PCR product was amplified ...

  15. cDNA cloning and expression analysis of a mannose-binding lectin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pinellia pedatisecta agglutinin (PPA) is a very basic protein that accumulates in the tuber of P. pedatisecta. PPA is a hetero-tetramer protein of 40 kDa, composed of two polypeptide chains A (about 12 kDa) and two polypeptides chains B (about 12 kDa). The full-length cDNA of PPA was cloned from P. pedatisecta using ...

  16. Molecular cloning and organization of two leghaemoglobin genomic sequences of soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, D.; Brisson, N.; Goodchild, B.; Verma, D. P. S.

    1981-02-01

    The leghaemoglobins (Lb) are myoglobin-like proteins found in all nitrogen-fixing root nodules of legumes1-3. They are encoded by plant nuclear genes4 which are specifically induced and form the predominant protein in nodules developed in symbiosis with the appropriate species of Rhizobium. The Lb is located in the host-cell cytoplasm of the infected cell5 and is thought to facilitate oxygen diffusion6,7. Amino acid sequencing of the soybean Lbs has revealed at least four primary structures differing only in a few amino acids8-10. We have previously estimated about 40 copies of Lb sequences in the soybean (Glycine max L.) genome by cDNA hybridization4. To investigate Lb gene organization and function, we prepared and characterized a Lb cDNA recombinant molecule, pLb1, and used it to isolate two genomic Lb sequences from a library constructed in Charon 4. We report here that the organization of the two genomic Lb sequences is quite distinct and one of them seems to have an intervening sequence(s). Hybridization of pLb1 with genomic DNA from various tissues showed that Lb sequences are dispersed through more than 30 kilobases of genomic DNA and that there is no apparent sequence rearrangement or methylation changes following induction of Lb genes.

  17. An automated annotation tool for genomic DNA sequences using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genomic sequence data are often available well before the annotated sequence is published. We present a method for analysis of genomic DNA to identify coding sequences using the GeneScan algorithm and characterize these resultant sequences by BLAST. The routines are used to develop a system for automated ...

  18. Biased distribution of DNA uptake sequences towards genome maintenance genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, T.; Rodland, E.A.; Lagesen, K.

    2004-01-01

    Repeated sequence signatures are characteristic features of all genomic DNA. We have made a rigorous search for repeat genomic sequences in the human pathogens Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae and found that by far the most frequent 9-10mers residing within...

  19. An automated annotation tool for genomic DNA sequences using

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genomic sequence data are often available well before the annotated sequence is published. We present a method for analysis of genomic DNA to identify coding sequences using the GeneScan algorithm and characterize these resultant sequences by BLAST. The routines are used to develop a system for automated ...

  20. Solid-phase cloning for high-throughput assembly of single and multiple DNA parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundqvist, Magnus; Edfors, Fredrik; Sivertsson, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    present a robust automated protocol for restriction enzyme based SPC and its performance for the cloning of >60 000 unique human gene fragments into expression vectors. In addition, we report on SPC-based single-strand assembly for applications where exact control of the sequence between fragments...... is needed or where multiple inserts are to be assembled. In this approach, the solid support allows for head-to-tail assembly of DNA fragments based on hybridization and polymerase fill-in. The usefulness of head-to-tail SPC was demonstrated by assembly of >150 constructs with up to four DNA parts...

  1. Molecular cloning of goat 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasekara, Walimuni Samantha Nilanthi; Yonezawa, Tomohiro; Ishida, Maho; Yamanouchi, Keitaro; Nishihara, Masugi

    2004-06-01

    20Alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20alpha-HSD), which catalyzes the conversion of progesterone to its inactive form 20alpha-dihydroprogesterone, is expressed in murine placenta and has been suggested to play roles in maintaining pregnancy. To understand the role of 20alpha-HSD during pregnancy in the goat, as a first step, cloning and sequencing of 20alpha-HSD cDNA were performed. The full nucleotide sequence of 20alpha-HSD cDNA was determined on samples obtained from the corpus luteum at the luteal phase of the estrous cycle and the placenta in late pregnancy by RT-PCR and 3' and 5' RACE systems. Cloned 20alpha-HSD cDNA consisted of 1124 bp and belonged to the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. From the start codon to stop codon there were 323 amino acids, the same as in other species. To verify whether the protein derived from goat 20alpha-HSD cDNA had 20alpha-HSD activity, the cDNA was expressed by bacteria. Bacterially expressed goat 20alpha-HSD protein showed 20alpha-HSD enzyme activity. A tissue distribution study demonstrated that 20alpha-HSD was expressed in the placenta, but not in the adrenal gland, liver and spleen during pregnancy. The present study suggests that goat 20alpha-HSD is another member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily and that it plays a role in the placenta during pregnancy.

  2. Somatic DNA recombination yielding circular DNA and deletion of a genomic region in embryonic brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Toyoki; Chijiiwa, Yoshiharu; Tsuji, Hideo; Sakoda, Saburo; Tani, Kenzaburo; Suzuki, Tomokazu

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a mouse genomic region is identified that undergoes DNA rearrangement and yields circular DNA in brain during embryogenesis. External region-directed inverse polymerase chain reaction on circular DNA extracted from late embryonic brain tissue repeatedly detected DNA of this region containing recombination joints. Wide-range genomic PCR and digestion-circularization PCR analysis showed this region underwent recombination accompanied with deletion of intervening sequences, including the circularized regions. This region was mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization to C1 on mouse chromosome 16, where no gene and no physiological DNA rearrangement had been identified. DNA sequence in the region has segmental homology to an orthologous region on human chromosome 3q.13. These observations demonstrated somatic DNA recombination yielding genomic deletions in brain during embryogenesis

  3. IS-98-ST1 West Nile virus derived from an infectious cDNA clone retains neuroinvasiveness and neurovirulence properties of the original virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Bahuon

    Full Text Available Infectious clones of West Nile virus (WNV have previously been generated and used to decipher the role of viral proteins in WNV virulence. The majority of molecular clones obtained to date have been derived from North American, Australian, or African isolates. Here, we describe the construction of an infectious cDNA clone of a Mediterranean WNV strain, IS-98-ST1. We characterized the biological properties of the recovered recombinant virus in cell culture and in mice. The growth kinetics of recombinant and parental WNV were similar in Vero cells. Moreover, the phenotype of recombinant and parental WNV was indistinguishable as regards viremia, viral load in the brain, and mortality in susceptible and resistant mice. Finally, the pathobiology of the infectious clone was examined in embryonated chicken eggs. The capacity of different WNV strains to replicate in embryonated chicken eggs closely paralleled their ability to replicate in mice, suggesting that inoculation of embryonated chicken eggs could provide a practical in vivo model for the study of WNV pathogenesis. In conclusion, the IS-98-ST1 infectious clone will allow assessment of the impact of selected mutations and novel genomic changes appearing in emerging European strains pathogenicity and endemic or epidemic potential. This will be invaluable in the context of an increasing number of outbreaks and enhanced severity of infections in the Mediterranean basin and Eastern Europe.

  4. Human placental Na+, K+-ATPase α subunit: cDNA cloning, tissue expression, DNA polymorphism, and chromosomal localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chehab, F.F.; Kan, Y.W.; Law, M.L.; Hartz, J.; Kao, F.T.; Blostein, R.

    1987-01-01

    A 2.2-kilobase clone comprising a major portion of the coding sequence of the Na + , K + -ATPase α subunit was cloned from human placenta and its sequence was identical to that encoding the α subunit of human kidney and HeLa cells. Transfer blot analysis of the mRNA products of the Na + , K + -ATPase gene from various human tissues and cell lines revealed only one band (≅ 4.7 kilobases) under low and high stringency washing conditions. The levels of expression in the tissues were intestine > placenta > liver > pancreas, and in the cell lines the levels were human erythroleukemia > butyrate-induced colon > colon > brain > HeLa cells. mRNA was undetectable in reticulocytes, consistent with the authors failure to detect positive clones in a size-selected ( > 2 kilobases) λgt11 reticulocyte cDNA library. DNA analysis revealed by a polymorphic EcoRI band and chromosome localization by flow sorting and in situ hybridization showed that the α subunit is on the short is on the short arm (band p11-p13) of chromosome 1

  5. Whole-genome methylation caller designed for methyl- DNA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    etchie

    2013-02-20

    Feb 20, 2013 ... DNA methylation is an indispensable epigenetic modification required for regulating the expression of mammalian ... wide, featuring the methyl-DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) coupled with next-generation sequencing. Our method uses a ...... segmentation of chimpanzee genome. In Proceedings of the ...

  6. Small and large scale genomic DNA isolation protocol for chickpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Small and large scale genomic DNA isolation protocol for chickpea ( Cicer arietinum L.), suitable for molecular marker and transgenic analyses. ... Chickpea is an important food legume crop with high nutritional value. Lack of appropriate DNA isolation protocol is a limiting factor for any molecular studies of this crop.

  7. Genome-wide mapping of DNA strand breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Leduc

    Full Text Available Determination of cellular DNA damage has so far been limited to global assessment of genome integrity whereas nucleotide-level mapping has been restricted to specific loci by the use of specific primers. Therefore, only limited DNA sequences can be studied and novel regions of genomic instability can hardly be discovered. Using a well-characterized yeast model, we describe a straightforward strategy to map genome-wide DNA strand breaks without compromising nucleotide-level resolution. This technique, termed "damaged DNA immunoprecipitation" (dDIP, uses immunoprecipitation and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin end-labeling (TUNEL to capture DNA at break sites. When used in combination with microarray or next-generation sequencing technologies, dDIP will allow researchers to map genome-wide DNA strand breaks as well as other types of DNA damage and to establish a clear profiling of altered genes and/or intergenic sequences in various experimental conditions. This mapping technique could find several applications for instance in the study of aging, genotoxic drug screening, cancer, meiosis, radiation and oxidative DNA damage.

  8. Genomic DNA extraction method from Annona senegalensis Pers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... with starches. The isolated DNA proved amenable to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and restriction digestion. This technique is fast, reproducible, and can be applied for simple sequence repeats (SSR)-PCR markers identification. Key words: Annona senegalensis, genomic DNA, fruits, modified, markers.

  9. Isolation of full-length putative rat lysophospholipase cDNA using improved methods for mRNA isolation and cDNA cloning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, J.H.; Stratowa, C.; Rutter, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have cloned a full-length putative rat pancreatic lysophospholipase cDNA by an improved mRNA isolation method and cDNA cloning strategy using [ 32 P]-labelled nucleotides. These new methods allow the construction of a cDNA library from the adult rat pancreas in which the majority of recombinant clones contained complete sequences for the corresponding mRNAs. A previously recognized but unidentified long and relatively rare cDNA clone containing the entire sequence from the cap site at the 5' end to the poly(A) tail at the 3' end of the mRNA was isolated by single-step screening of the library. The size, amino acid composition, and the activity of the protein expressed in heterologous cells strongly suggest this mRNA codes for lysophospholipase

  10. Role of oxidative DNA damage in genome instability and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bignami, M.; Kunkel, T.

    2009-01-01

    Inactivation of mismatch repair (MMR) is associated with a dramatic genomic instability that is observed experimentally as a mutator phenotype and micro satellite instability (MSI). It has been implicit that the massive genetic instability in MMR defective cells simply reflects the accumulation of spontaneous DNA polymerase errors during DNA replication. We recently identified oxidation damage, a common threat to DNA integrity to which purines are very susceptible, as an important cofactor in this genetic instability

  11. Capturing Genomic Evolution of Lung Cancers through Liquid Biopsy for Circulating Tumor DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Offin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic sequencing of malignancies has become increasingly important to uncover therapeutic targets and capture the tumor’s dynamic changes to drug sensitivity and resistance through genomic evolution. In lung cancers, the current standard of tissue biopsy at the time of diagnosis and progression is not always feasible or practical and may underestimate intratumoral heterogeneity. Technological advances in genetic sequencing have enabled the use of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA analysis to obtain information on both targetable mutations and capturing real-time Darwinian evolution of tumor clones and drug resistance mechanisms under selective therapeutic pressure. The ability to analyze ctDNA from plasma, CSF, or urine enables a comprehensive view of cancers as systemic diseases and captures intratumoral heterogeneity. Here, we describe these recent advances in the setting of lung cancers and advocate for further research and the incorporation of ctDNA analysis in clinical trials of targeted therapies. By capturing genomic evolution in a noninvasive manner, liquid biopsy for ctDNA analysis could accelerate therapeutic discovery and deliver the next leap forward in precision medicine for patients with lung cancers and other solid tumors.

  12. Selective microbial genomic DNA isolation using restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Helen E; Liu, Guohong; Weston, Christopher Q; King, Paula; Pham, Long K; Waltz, Shannon; Helzer, Kimberly T; Day, Laura; Sphar, Dan; Yamamoto, Robert T; Forsyth, R Allyn

    2014-01-01

    To improve the metagenomic analysis of complex microbiomes, we have repurposed restriction endonucleases as methyl specific DNA binding proteins. As an example, we use DpnI immobilized on magnetic beads. The ten minute extraction technique allows specific binding of genomes containing the DpnI Gm6ATC motif common in the genomic DNA of many bacteria including γ-proteobacteria. Using synthetic genome mixtures, we demonstrate 80% recovery of Escherichia coli genomic DNA even when only femtogram quantities are spiked into 10 µg of human DNA background. Binding is very specific with less than 0.5% of human DNA bound. Next Generation Sequencing of input and enriched synthetic mixtures results in over 100-fold enrichment of target genomes relative to human and plant DNA. We also show comparable enrichment when sequencing complex microbiomes such as those from creek water and human saliva. The technique can be broadened to other restriction enzymes allowing for the selective enrichment of trace and unculturable organisms from complex microbiomes and the stratification of organisms according to restriction enzyme enrichment.

  13. Molecular cloning and characterization of satellite DNA sequences from constitutive heterochromatin of the habu snake (Protobothrops flavoviridis, Viperidae) and the Burmese python (Python bivittatus, Pythonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Kazumi; Uno, Yoshinobu; Srikulnath, Kornsorn; Seki, Risako; Nishida, Chizuko; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2015-12-01

    Highly repetitive DNA sequences of the centromeric heterochromatin provide valuable molecular cytogenetic markers for the investigation of genomic compartmentalization in the macrochromosomes and microchromosomes of sauropsids. Here, the relationship between centromeric heterochromatin and karyotype evolution was examined using cloned repetitive DNA sequences from two snake species, the habu snake (Protobothrops flavoviridis, Crotalinae, Viperidae) and Burmese python (Python bivittatus, Pythonidae). Three satellite DNA (stDNA) families were isolated from the heterochromatin of these snakes: 168-bp PFL-MspI from P. flavoviridis and 196-bp PBI-DdeI and 174-bp PBI-MspI from P. bivittatus. The PFL-MspI and PBI-DdeI sequences were localized to the centromeric regions of most chromosomes in the respective species, suggesting that the two sequences were the major components of the centromeric heterochromatin in these organisms. The PBI-MspI sequence was localized to the pericentromeric region of four chromosome pairs. The PFL-MspI and the PBI-DdeI sequences were conserved only in the genome of closely related species, Gloydius blomhoffii (Crotalinae) and Python molurus, respectively, although their locations on the chromosomes were slightly different. In contrast, the PBI-MspI sequence was also in the genomes of P. molurus and Boa constrictor (Boidae), and additionally localized to the centromeric regions of eight chromosome pairs in B. constrictor, suggesting that this sequence originated in the genome of a common ancestor of Pythonidae and Boidae, approximately 86 million years ago. The three stDNA sequences showed no genomic compartmentalization between the macrochromosomes and microchromosomes, suggesting that homogenization of the centromeric and/or pericentromeric stDNA sequences occurred in the macrochromosomes and microchromosomes of these snakes.

  14. DNA Repair and Genome Maintenance in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhart, Justin S.; Schroeder, Jeremy W.; Walsh, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: From microbes to multicellular eukaryotic organisms, all cells contain pathways responsible for genome maintenance. DNA replication allows for the faithful duplication of the genome, whereas DNA repair pathways preserve DNA integrity in response to damage originating from endogenous and exogenous sources. The basic pathways important for DNA replication and repair are often conserved throughout biology. In bacteria, high-fidelity repair is balanced with low-fidelity repair and mutagenesis. Such a balance is important for maintaining viability while providing an opportunity for the advantageous selection of mutations when faced with a changing environment. Over the last decade, studies of DNA repair pathways in bacteria have demonstrated considerable differences between Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. Here we review and discuss the DNA repair, genome maintenance, and DNA damage checkpoint pathways of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We present their molecular mechanisms and compare the functions and regulation of several pathways with known information on other organisms. We also discuss DNA repair during different growth phases and the developmental program of sporulation. In summary, we present a review of the function, regulation, and molecular mechanisms of DNA repair and mutagenesis in Gram-positive bacteria, with a strong emphasis on B. subtilis. PMID:22933559

  15. The nickel resistance determinant cloned from the enterobacterium Klebsiella oxytoca: conjugational transfer, expression, regulation and DNA homologies to various nickel-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoppel, R D; Meyer, M; Schlegel, H G

    1995-01-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca strain CCUG 15788, isolated from a mineral oil emulsion tank in Göteborg, Sweden, was found to be nickel-resistant (tolerating 10 mM NiCl2 in non-complexing mineral-gluconate media; inducible resistance). The nickel resistance determinants were transferred by helper-assisted conjugation to various strains of Escherichia coli and Citrobacter freundii and expressed to between 5 and 10 mM NiCl2. A 4.3 kb HindIII fragment was cloned from the genomic DNA of K. oxytoca. Ligated into the vector pSUP202, the fragment caused constitutive nickel resistance (of up to 3 or 10 mM Ni2+) in various E. coli strains. After cloning into the broad host range vector pVDZ'2 the fragment even expressed low nickel resistance in the transconjugant of Alcaligenes eutrophus AE104. With the 4.3 kb HindIII fragment as a biotinylated DNA probe it was shown by DNA-DNA hybridization that the nickel resistance determinant resides on the chromosome of K. oxytoca and not on its circular plasmid pKO1 (160 kb) or linear plasmid pKO2 (50 kb). Nickel resistance strongly correlated with the presence of the 4.3 kb HindIII fragment in the transconjugants. No homologies were detected when the nickel resistance determinants of other well-known nickel-resistant bacteria, such as A. eutrophus CH34 or A. denitrificans 4a-2, were used as target DNA. Among the 60 strains examined, positive signals only appeared with the 3.1 kb DNA fragment from A. xylosoxydans 31A and the genomic DNA of two enterobacterial strains (5-1 and 5-5) isolated from nickel-rich soil in New Caledonia.

  16. The complexity of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus genome characterised through detailed analysis of two BAC clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valle Manuel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus (Rmi a major cattle ectoparasite and tick borne disease vector, impacts on animal welfare and industry productivity. In arthropod research there is an absence of a complete Chelicerate genome, which includes ticks, mites, spiders, scorpions and crustaceans. Model arthropod genomes such as Drosophila and Anopheles are too taxonomically distant for a reference in tick genomic sequence analysis. This study focuses on the de-novo assembly of two R. microplus BAC sequences from the understudied R microplus genome. Based on available R. microplus sequenced resources and comparative analysis, tick genomic structure and functional predictions identify complex gene structures and genomic targets expressed during tick-cattle interaction. Results In our BAC analyses we have assembled, using the correct positioning of BAC end sequences and transcript sequences, two challenging genomic regions. Cot DNA fractions compared to the BAC sequences confirmed a highly repetitive BAC sequence BM-012-E08 and a low repetitive BAC sequence BM-005-G14 which was gene rich and contained short interspersed elements (SINEs. Based directly on the BAC and Cot data comparisons, the genome wide frequency of the SINE Ruka element was estimated. Using a conservative approach to the assembly of the highly repetitive BM-012-E08, the sequence was de-convoluted into three repeat units, each unit containing an 18S, 5.8S and 28S ribosomal RNA (rRNA encoding gene sequence (rDNA, related internal transcribed spacer and complex intergenic region. In the low repetitive BM-005-G14, a novel gene complex was found between to 2 genes on the same strand. Nested in the second intron of a large 9 Kb papilin gene was a helicase gene. This helicase overlapped in two exonic regions with the papilin. Both these genes were shown expressed in different tick life stage important in ectoparasite interaction with the host. Tick specific sequence

  17. Nuclear genome transfer in human oocytes eliminates mitochondrial DNA variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paull, Daniel; Emmanuele, Valentina; Weiss, Keren A; Treff, Nathan; Stewart, Latoya; Hua, Haiqing; Zimmer, Matthew; Kahler, David J; Goland, Robin S; Noggle, Scott A; Prosser, Robert; Hirano, Michio; Sauer, Mark V; Egli, Dieter

    2013-01-31

    Mitochondrial DNA mutations transmitted maternally within the oocyte cytoplasm often cause life-threatening disorders. Here we explore the use of nuclear genome transfer between unfertilized oocytes of two donors to prevent the transmission of mitochondrial mutations. Nuclear genome transfer did not reduce developmental efficiency to the blastocyst stage, and genome integrity was maintained provided that spontaneous oocyte activation was avoided through the transfer of incompletely assembled spindle-chromosome complexes. Mitochondrial DNA transferred with the nuclear genome was initially detected at levels below 1%, decreasing in blastocysts and stem-cell lines to undetectable levels, and remained undetectable after passaging for more than one year, clonal expansion, differentiation into neurons, cardiomyocytes or β-cells, and after cellular reprogramming. Stem cells and differentiated cells had mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme activities and oxygen consumption rates indistinguishable from controls. These results demonstrate the potential of nuclear genome transfer to prevent the transmission of mitochondrial disorders in humans.

  18. Mining olive genome through library sequencing and bioinformatics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As one of the initial steps of olive (Olea europaea L.) genome analysis, a small insert genomic DNA library was constructed (digesting olive genomic DNA with SmaI and cloning the digestion products into pUC19 vector) and randomly picked 83 colonies were sequenced. Analysis of the insert sequences revealed 12 clones ...

  19. The mitochondrial DNA sequence specificity of the anti-tumour drug bleomycin using end-labeled DNA and capillary electrophoresis and a comparison with genome-wide DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Long H; Murray, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The DNA sequence specificity of the cancer chemotherapeutic agent, bleomycin, was investigated in two human mitochondrial DNA sequences. Bleomycin was found to cleave preferentially at 5'-TGT*A-3' DNA sequences (where * is the cleavage site). The bleomycin analysis using capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence was determined on both DNA strands and each strand was independently fluorescently labelled at the 3'- and 5'-ends. There was a high level of correlation between the intensity of bleomycin cleavage sites analysed by 3'- and 5'-end labelling. This is the first occasion that a comprehensive comparison has been made between these two end-labelling procedures to quantify cleavage by a DNA damaging agent and to investigate end-label bias. A comparison was also made between the bleomycin DNA sequence specificity obtained from genome-wide next-generation sequencing with that obtained from purified plasmid DNA sequences. This was accomplished by cloning sections of human mitochondrial DNA and comparing these identical mitochondrial DNA in the human mitochondrial genome. At individual sites, there was a very low level of correlation between bleomycin cleavage in plasmid sequencing and genome-wide sequencing. However, the overall bleomycin DNA sequence specificity was very similar in the two environments, namely 5'-TGT*A-3'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. De novo assembly of the carrot mitochondrial genome using next generation sequencing of whole genomic DNA provides first evidence of DNA transfer into an angiosperm plastid genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iorizzo Massimo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence analysis of organelle genomes has revealed important aspects of plant cell evolution. The scope of this study was to develop an approach for de novo assembly of the carrot mitochondrial genome using next generation sequence data from total genomic DNA. Results Sequencing data from a carrot 454 whole genome library were used to develop a de novo assembly of the mitochondrial genome. Development of a new bioinformatic tool allowed visualizing contig connections and elucidation of the de novo assembly. Southern hybridization demonstrated recombination across two large repeats. Genome annotation allowed identification of 44 protein coding genes, three rRNA and 17 tRNA. Identification of the plastid genome sequence allowed organelle genome comparison. Mitochondrial intergenic sequence analysis allowed detection of a fragment of DNA specific to the carrot plastid genome. PCR amplification and sequence analysis across different Apiaceae species revealed consistent conservation of this fragment in the mitochondrial genomes and an insertion in Daucus plastid genomes, giving evidence of a mitochondrial to plastid transfer of DNA. Sequence similarity with a retrotransposon element suggests a possibility that a transposon-like event transferred this sequence into the plastid genome. Conclusions This study confirmed that whole genome sequencing is a practical approach for de novo assembly of higher plant mitochondrial genomes. In addition, a new aspect of intercompartmental genome interaction was reported providing the first evidence for DNA transfer into an angiosperm plastid genome. The approach used here could be used more broadly to sequence and assemble mitochondrial genomes of diverse species. This information will allow us to better understand intercompartmental interactions and cell evolution.

  1. Construction and biological activities of the first infectious cDNA clones of the genus Foveavirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Baozhong, E-mail: bmeng@uoguelph.ca [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G2W1 (Canada); Venkataraman, Srividhya; Li, Caihong; Wang, Weizhou [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G2W1 (Canada); Dayan-Glick, Cathy; Mawassi, Munir [The Plant Pathology Department-The Virology Unit, Plant Protection Institute, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet-Dagan 50250 (Israel)

    2013-01-20

    Grapevine rupestris stem pitting-associated virus (GRSPaV, genus Foveavirus, family Betaflexiviridae) is one of the most prevalent viruses in grapevines and is associated with three distinct diseases: rupestris stem pitting, vein necrosis and Syrah decline. Little is known about the biology and pathological properties of GRSPaV. In this work, we engineered a full-length infectious cDNA clone for GRSPaV and a GFP-tagged variant, both under the transcriptional control of Cauliflower mosaic virus 35 S promoter. We demonstrated that these cDNA clones were infectious in grapevines and Nicotiana benthamiana through fluorescence microscopy, RT-PCR, Western blotting and immuno electron microscopy. Interestingly, GRSPaV does not cause systemic infection in four of the most commonly used herbaceous plants, even in the presence of the movement proteins of two other viruses which are known to complement numerous movement-defective viruses. These infectious clones are the first of members of Foveavirus which would allow further investigations into mechanisms governing different aspects of replication for GRSPaV and perhaps related viruses.

  2. [Cloning, sequencing and subcloning of cDNA coding for group I allergen of Dermatophagoides farinae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qing-gui; Li, Chao-pin

    2004-06-01

    To clone, sequence and subclone the cDNA coding for group 1 allergen of Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f 1). The cDNA of Der f 1 was amplified by RT-PCR and PCR. After purified, the gene fragment was cloned into a vector pMD-18T. The recombinant plasmid pMD-18T-Der f 1 was transformed into E. coli JM109. Positive clones were screened and identified by PCR and digestion with restriction enzyme. The sequence of inserted Der f 1 gene fragment was also detected. Der f 1 was then subcloned into the vector of pET-32a(+). The Der f 1 gene fragment of Dermatophagoides farinae was specifically amplified from RNA by RT-PCR and PCR. The recombinant plasmid pMD-18T-Der f 1 and pET-32a(+)-Der f 1 was constructed and digested by Bam H I and Sac I, the size of gene fragment was 646 bp and in accordance with the expected one. The pET-32a(+)-Der f 1 subcloning has been constructed successfully.

  3. Integrative annotation of 21,037 human genes validated by full-length cDNA clones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Imanishi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The human genome sequence defines our inherent biological potential; the realization of the biology encoded therein requires knowledge of the function of each gene. Currently, our knowledge in this area is still limited. Several lines of investigation have been used to elucidate the structure and function of the genes in the human genome. Even so, gene prediction remains a difficult task, as the varieties of transcripts of a gene may vary to a great extent. We thus performed an exhaustive integrative characterization of 41,118 full-length cDNAs that capture the gene transcripts as complete functional cassettes, providing an unequivocal report of structural and functional diversity at the gene level. Our international collaboration has validated 21,037 human gene candidates by analysis of high-quality full-length cDNA clones through curation using unified criteria. This led to the identification of 5,155 new gene candidates. It also manifested the most reliable way to control the quality of the cDNA clones. We have developed a human gene database, called the H-Invitational Database (H-InvDB; http://www.h-invitational.jp/. It provides the following: integrative annotation of human genes, description of gene structures, details of novel alternative splicing isoforms, non-protein-coding RNAs, functional domains, subcellular localizations, metabolic pathways, predictions of protein three-dimensional structure, mapping of known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, identification of polymorphic microsatellite repeats within human genes, and comparative results with mouse full-length cDNAs. The H-InvDB analysis has shown that up to 4% of the human genome sequence (National Center for Biotechnology Information build 34 assembly may contain misassembled or missing regions. We found that 6.5% of the human gene candidates (1,377 loci did not have a good protein-coding open reading frame, of which 296 loci are strong candidates for non-protein-coding RNA

  4. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Rapid Evolution of an Extreme-Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Clone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Sean Yang-Yi; Chua, Song Lin; Liu, Yang

    2013-01-01

    , comparative genomics has been employed to analyze the rapid evolution of an EDR Acinetobacter baumannii clone from the intensive care unit (ICU) of Rigshospitalet at Copenhagen. Two resistant A. baumannii strains, 48055 and 53264, were sequentially isolated from two individuals who had been admitted to ICU...... within a 1-month interval. Multilocus sequence typing indicates that these two isolates belonged to ST208. The A. baumannii 53264 strain gained colistin resistance compared with the 48055 strain and became an EDR strain. Genome sequencing indicates that A. baumannii 53264 and 48055 have almost identical...... genomes—61 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were found between them. The A. baumannii 53264 strain was assembled into 130 contigs, with a total length of 3,976,592 bp with 38.93% GC content. The A. baumannii 48055 strain was assembled into 135 contigs, with a total length of 4,049,562 bp with 39...

  5. Cloning and characterization of the dnaKJ operon in Acetobacter aceti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto-Kainuma, Akiko; Yan, Wang; Fukaya, Masahiro; Tukamoto, Yoshinori; Ishikawa, Morio; Koizumi, Yukimichi

    2004-01-01

    The dnaKJ operon of Acetobacter aceti was cloned and sequenced. The profile of the gene configuration was similar to that of other alpha-proteobacteria. In the DnaK and DnaJ proteins of A. aceti, the characteristic domains/motifs reported in other organisms were well conserved. This operon was transcribed in response to a temperature shift and exposure to ethanol/acetic acid. The overexpression of this operon in A. aceti resulted in improved growth compared to the control strain at high temperature or in the presence of ethanol, suggesting a correlation to resistance against stressors present during fermentation, although the overexpression did not increase the resistance to acetic acid.

  6. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Full-Length cDNA of Calmodulin Gene from Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing-Xia; Yu, Wen-Chao; Cai, Zhong-Qiang; He, Cheng; Wei, Na; Wang, Xiao-Tong; Yue, Xi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The shell of the pearl oyster ( Pinctada fucata ) mainly comprises aragonite whereas that of the Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas ) is mainly calcite, thereby suggesting the different mechanisms of shell formation between above two mollusks. Calmodulin (CaM) is an important gene for regulating the uptake, transport, and secretion of calcium during the process of shell formation in pearl oyster. It is interesting to characterize the CaM in oysters, which could facilitate the understanding of the different shell formation mechanisms among mollusks. We cloned the full-length cDNA of Pacific oyster CaM (cgCaM) and found that the cgCaM ORF encoded a peptide of 113 amino acids containing three EF-hand calcium-binding domains, its expression level was highest in the mantle, hinting that the cgCaM gene is probably involved in shell formation of Pacific oyster, and the common ancestor of Gastropoda and Bivalvia may possess at least three CaM genes. We also found that the numbers of some EF hand family members in highly calcified species were higher than those in lowly calcified species and the numbers of these motifs in oyster genome were the highest among the mollusk species with whole genome sequence, further hinting the correlation between CaM and biomineralization.

  7. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Full-Length cDNA of Calmodulin Gene from Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-Xia Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The shell of the pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata mainly comprises aragonite whereas that of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas is mainly calcite, thereby suggesting the different mechanisms of shell formation between above two mollusks. Calmodulin (CaM is an important gene for regulating the uptake, transport, and secretion of calcium during the process of shell formation in pearl oyster. It is interesting to characterize the CaM in oysters, which could facilitate the understanding of the different shell formation mechanisms among mollusks. We cloned the full-length cDNA of Pacific oyster CaM (cgCaM and found that the cgCaM ORF encoded a peptide of 113 amino acids containing three EF-hand calcium-binding domains, its expression level was highest in the mantle, hinting that the cgCaM gene is probably involved in shell formation of Pacific oyster, and the common ancestor of Gastropoda and Bivalvia may possess at least three CaM genes. We also found that the numbers of some EF hand family members in highly calcified species were higher than those in lowly calcified species and the numbers of these motifs in oyster genome were the highest among the mollusk species with whole genome sequence, further hinting the correlation between CaM and biomineralization.

  8. The Arsenic Resistance-Associated Listeria Genomic Island LGI2 Exhibits Sequence and Integration Site Diversity and a Propensity for Three Listeria monocytogenes Clones with Enhanced Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangmi; Ward, Todd J; Jima, Dereje D; Parsons, Cameron; Kathariou, Sophia

    2017-11-01

    In the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes , arsenic resistance is encountered primarily in serotype 4b clones considered to have enhanced virulence and is associated with an arsenic resistance gene cluster within a 35-kb chromosomal region, Listeria genomic island 2 (LGI2). LGI2 was first identified in strain Scott A and includes genes putatively involved in arsenic and cadmium resistance, DNA integration, conjugation, and pathogenicity. However, the genomic localization and sequence content of LGI2 remain poorly characterized. Here we investigated 85 arsenic-resistant L. monocytogenes strains, mostly of serotype 4b. All but one of the 70 serotype 4b strains belonged to clonal complex 1 (CC1), CC2, and CC4, three major clones associated with enhanced virulence. PCR analysis suggested that 53 strains (62.4%) harbored an island highly similar to LGI2 of Scott A, frequently (42/53) in the same location as Scott A ( LMOf2365_2257 homolog). Random-primed PCR and whole-genome sequencing revealed seven novel insertion sites, mostly internal to chromosomal coding sequences, among strains harboring LGI2 outside the LMOf2365_2257 homolog. Interestingly, many CC1 strains harbored a noticeably diversified LGI2 (LGI2-1) in a unique location ( LMOf2365_0902 homolog) and with a novel additional gene. With few exceptions, the tested LGI2 genes were not detected in arsenic-resistant strains of serogroup 1/2, which instead often harbored a Tn 554 -associated arsenic resistance determinant not encountered in serotype 4b. These findings indicate that in L. monocytogenes , LGI2 has a propensity for certain serotype 4b clones, exhibits content diversity, and is highly promiscuous, suggesting an ability to mobilize various accessory genes into diverse chromosomal loci. IMPORTANCE Listeria monocytogenes is widely distributed in the environment and causes listeriosis, a foodborne disease with high mortality and morbidity. Arsenic and other heavy metals can powerfully shape the

  9. The identification of specific cDNA clones from tall and dwarf rice plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssefian, S.; Kamada, I.; Sano, H.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: The use of dwarfing genes in rice breeding has proceeded for several years without a clear understanding of the genetic, hormonal and physiological mechanisms involved. This issue was addressed by focussing on the isolation of specific clones from tall- and dwarf-derived cDNA libraries. The materials used include near-isogenic lines of the tall rice cultivar 'Shiokari', differing at the DGWG or 'Tanginbozu' dwarfing gene loci. Also used were tall and dwarf 'Ginbozu' rice, the latter having been induced by treatment with 5-azacytidine, a potent demethylating agent. Subtractive and differential hybridisation have, to date, identified several candidate tall- and dwarf-specific clones. Their further characterisation is currently underway. (author)

  10. cDNA cloning and expression analysis of two distinct Sox8 genes in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Sox9 gene attracts a lot of attention because of its connection with gonadal development and differentiation. However, Sox8, belonging to the same subgroup SoxE, has rarely been studied. To investigate the function as well as the evolutionary origin of SOXE subgroup, we amplified the genomic DNA of Paramisgurnus ...

  11. Cloning of partial cDNA encoding differentiation and tumor-associated mucin glycoproteins expressed by human mammary epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gender, S.J.; Burchell, J.M.; Duhig, T.; Lamport, D.; White, R.; Parker, M.; Taylor-Papadimitriou, J.

    1987-09-01

    Human mammary epithelial cells secrete and express on their cell surfaces complex mucin glycoproteins that are developmentally regulated, tumor-associated, and highly immunogenic. Studies using monoclonal antibodies directed to these glycoproteins suggest that their molecular structures can vary with differentiation stages in the normal gland and in malignancy. To analyze the molecular nature of these glycoproteins, milk mucin was affinity-purifed and deglycosylated with hydrogen fluoride, yielding bands at 68 and 72 kDa on silver-stained gels. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to the stripped core protein were developed and used to screen a lambdagt11 expression library of cDNA made from mRNA of the mammary tumor cell line MCF-7. Seven crossreacting clones were isolated, with inserts 0.1-1.8 kilobases long. RNA blot analysis, using as a probe the 1.8-kilobase insert subcloned in plasmid pUC8 (pMUC10), revealed transcripts of 4.7 and 6.4 kilobases in MCF-7 and T47D mammary tumor cells, whereas normal mammary epithelial cells from pooled milks have additional transcripts. The expression of mRNA correlates with antigen expression as determined by binding of two previously characterized anti-mucin monoclonal antibodies (HMFG-1 and HMFG-2) to seven cell lines. Restriction enzyme analysis detected a restriction fragment length polymorphism when human genomic DNA was digested with EcoRI or HinfI.

  12. Creation of Functional Viruses from Non-Functional cDNA Clones Obtained from an RNA Virus Population by the Use of Ancestral Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahnøe, Ulrik; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Dräger, Carolin

    2015-01-01

    necessarily be the descendant of a functional ancestor, we hypothesized that it should be possible to produce functional clones by reconstructing ancestral sequences. To test this we used phylogenetic methods to infer two ancestral sequences, which were then reconstructed as cDNA clones. Viruses rescued from...... the reconstructed cDNAs were tested in cell culture and pigs. Both reconstructed ancestral genomes proved functional, and displayed distinct phenotypes in vitro and in vivo. We suggest that reconstruction of ancestral viruses is a useful tool for experimental and computational investigations of virulence and viral...... evolution. Importantly, ancestral reconstruction can be done even on the basis of a set of sequences that all correspond to non-functional variants....

  13. Defining functional DNA elements in the human genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellis, Manolis; Wold, Barbara; Snyder, Michael P.; Bernstein, Bradley E.; Kundaje, Anshul; Marinov, Georgi K.; Ward, Lucas D.; Birney, Ewan; Crawford, Gregory E.; Dekker, Job; Dunham, Ian; Elnitski, Laura L.; Farnham, Peggy J.; Feingold, Elise A.; Gerstein, Mark; Giddings, Morgan C.; Gilbert, David M.; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Green, Eric D.; Guigo, Roderic; Hubbard, Tim; Kent, Jim; Lieb, Jason D.; Myers, Richard M.; Pazin, Michael J.; Ren, Bing; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Weng, Zhiping; White, Kevin P.; Hardison, Ross C.

    2014-01-01

    With the completion of the human genome sequence, attention turned to identifying and annotating its functional DNA elements. As a complement to genetic and comparative genomics approaches, the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements Project was launched to contribute maps of RNA transcripts, transcriptional regulator binding sites, and chromatin states in many cell types. The resulting genome-wide data reveal sites of biochemical activity with high positional resolution and cell type specificity that facilitate studies of gene regulation and interpretation of noncoding variants associated with human disease. However, the biochemically active regions cover a much larger fraction of the genome than do evolutionarily conserved regions, raising the question of whether nonconserved but biochemically active regions are truly functional. Here, we review the strengths and limitations of biochemical, evolutionary, and genetic approaches for defining functional DNA segments, potential sources for the observed differences in estimated genomic coverage, and the biological implications of these discrepancies. We also analyze the relationship between signal intensity, genomic coverage, and evolutionary conservation. Our results reinforce the principle that each approach provides complementary information and that we need to use combinations of all three to elucidate genome function in human biology and disease. PMID:24753594

  14. Creation of BAC genomic resources for cocoa ( Theobroma cacao L.) for physical mapping of RGA containing BAC clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, D; Lanaud, C; Sabau, X; Fouet, O; Le Cunff, L; Ruiz, E; Risterucci, A M; Glaszmann, J C; Piffanelli, P

    2004-05-01

    We have constructed and validated the first cocoa ( Theobroma cacao L.) BAC library, with the aim of developing molecular resources to study the structure and evolution of the genome of this perennial crop. This library contains 36,864 clones with an average insert size of 120 kb, representing approximately ten haploid genome equivalents. It was constructed from the genotype Scavina-6 (Sca-6), a Forastero clone highly resistant to cocoa pathogens and a parent of existing mapping populations. Validation of the BAC library was carried out with a set of 13 genetically-anchored single copy and one duplicated markers. An average of nine BAC clones per probe was identified, giving an initial experimental estimation of the genome coverage represented in the library. Screening of the library with a set of resistance gene analogues (RGAs), previously mapped in cocoa and co-localizing with QTL for resistance to Phytophthora traits, confirmed at the physical level the tight clustering of RGAs in the cocoa genome and provided the first insights into the relationships between genetic and physical distances in the cocoa genome. This library represents an available BAC resource for structural genomic studies or map-based cloning of genes corresponding to important QTLs for agronomic traits such as resistance genes to major cocoa pathogens like Phytophthora spp ( palmivora and megakarya), Crinipellis perniciosa and Moniliophthora roreri.

  15. De novo reconstruction of consensus master genomes of plant RNA and DNA viruses from siRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguin, Jonathan; Rajeswaran, Rajendran; Malpica-López, Nachelli; Martin, Robert R; Kasschau, Kristin; Dolja, Valerian V; Otten, Patricia; Farinelli, Laurent; Pooggin, Mikhail M

    2014-01-01

    Virus-infected plants accumulate abundant, 21-24 nucleotide viral siRNAs which are generated by the evolutionary conserved RNA interference (RNAi) machinery that regulates gene expression and defends against invasive nucleic acids. Here we show that, similar to RNA viruses, the entire genome sequences of DNA viruses are densely covered with siRNAs in both sense and antisense orientations. This implies pervasive transcription of both coding and non-coding viral DNA in the nucleus, which generates double-stranded RNA precursors of viral siRNAs. Consistent with our finding and hypothesis, we demonstrate that the complete genomes of DNA viruses from Caulimoviridae and Geminiviridae families can be reconstructed by deep sequencing and de novo assembly of viral siRNAs using bioinformatics tools. Furthermore, we prove that this 'siRNA omics' approach can be used for reliable identification of the consensus master genome and its microvariants in viral quasispecies. Finally, we utilized this approach to reconstruct an emerging DNA virus and two viroids associated with economically-important red blotch disease of grapevine, and to rapidly generate a biologically-active clone representing the wild type master genome of Oilseed rape mosaic virus. Our findings show that deep siRNA sequencing allows for de novo reconstruction of any DNA or RNA virus genome and its microvariants, making it suitable for universal characterization of evolving viral quasispecies as well as for studying the mechanisms of siRNA biogenesis and RNAi-based antiviral defense.

  16. Authentication of commercial candy ingredients using DNA PCR-cloning methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Colmenero, Marta; Martínez, Jose Luis; Roca, Agustín; García-Vázquez, Eva

    2016-02-01

    Commercial candies are consumed by all population age sectors worldwide. Methods for quality control and composition authentication are therefore needed for best compliance with consumers' preferences. In this study applications of DNA-based methodology for candy quality control have been tested. Eighteen samples of commercial candies (marshmallows, gumdrops, jelly, sherbet, gelatin-based desserts) produced by five countries were analyzed to identify the component species by polymerase chain reaction, cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA and ribulose -1,5-diphosphate carboxylase oxygenase genes, and the species determined from BLAST comparison with universal databases and phylogenetic analysis. Positive DNA extraction and amplification of the target genes were obtained for 94% of candies assayed, even those containing as little as candy labels only in a few products. DNA traces of undeclared species, including fish, were found in most samples, and two products were labeled as vegetarian but contained porcine DNA. Based on the inaccuracy found on the labels of sweets we recommend the use of DNA tests for quality control of these popular sweets. DNA tests have been useful in this field but next-generation sequencing methods could be more effective. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Cloning and characterization of human liver cDNA encoding a protein S precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskins, J.; Norman, D.K.; Beckmann, R.J.; Long, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    Human liver cDNA encoding a protein S precursor was isolated from two cDNA libraries by two different techniques. Based upon the frequency of positive clones, the abundance of mRNA for protein S is ≅ 0.01%. Blot hybridization of electrophoretically fractionated poly(A) + RNA revealed a major mRNA ≅ 4 kilobases long and two minor forms of ≅ 3.1 and ≅ 2.6 kilobases. One of the cDNA clones contains a segment encoding a 676 amino acid protein S precursor, as well as 108 and 1132 nucleotides of 5' and 3' noncoding sequence, respectively, plus a poly(A) region at the 3' end. The cDNAs are adenosine plus thymidine-rich (60%) except for the 5' noncoding region, where 78% of the nucleotides are guanosine or cytosine. The protein precursor consists of a 41 amino acid leader peptide followed by 635 amino acids corresponding to mature protein S. Comparison of the mature protein region with homologous vitamin K-dependent plasma proteins shows that it is composed of the following domains: an amino-terminal γ-carboxyglutamic acid-rich region of 37 amino acids; a 36 amino acid linker region rich in hydroxy amino acids; four epidermal growth factor-like segments, each ≅ 45 amino acids long; and a 387 amino acid carboxyl-terminal domain of unrecognized structure and unknown function

  18. cDNA cloning and mRNA expression of cat and dog Cdkal1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sako T

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Ichiro Yamamoto, Shingo Ishikawa, Li Gebin, Hiroshi Takemitsu, Megumi Fujiwara, Nobuko Mori, Yutaka Hatano, Tomoko Suzuki, Akihiro Mori, Nobuhiro Nakao, Koh Kawasumi, Toshinori Sako, Toshiro AraiLaboratory of Veterinary Biochemistry, Nippon Veterinary and Life Science University, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: The cyclin-dependent kinase 5 regulatory subunit–associated protein 1–like 1 (CDKAL1 gene encodes methylthiotransferase, and the gene contains risk variants for type 2 diabetes in humans. In this study, we performed complementary DNA cloning for Cdkal1 in the cat and dog and characterized the tissue expression profiles of its messenger RNA. Cat and dog Cdkal1 complementary DNA encoded 576 and 578 amino acids, showing very high sequence homology to mammalian CDKAL1 (>88.4%. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that Cdkal1 messenger RNA is highly expressed in smooth muscle and that tissue distribution of Cdkal1 is similar in cats and dogs. Genotyping analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphism for cat Cdkal1 revealed that obese cats had different tendencies from normal cats. These findings suggest that the cat and dog Cdkal1 gene is highly conserved among mammals and that cat Cdkal1 may be a candidate marker for genetic diagnosis of obesity.Keywords: cat, dog, Cdkal1, obese, cDNA cloning, Q-PCR

  19. Isolation and sequence analysis of a cDNA clone encoding the fifth complement component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundwall, Åke B; Wetsel, Rick A; Kristensen, Torsten

    1985-01-01

    clone of 1.85 kilobase pairs was isolated. Hybridization of the mixed-sequence probe to the complementary strand of the plasmid insert and sequence analysis by the dideoxy method predicted the expected protein sequence of C5a (positions 1-12), amino-terminal to the anticipated priming site. The sequence......We have used available protein sequence data for the anaphylatoxin (C5a) portion of the fifth component of human complement (residues 19-25) to synthesize a mixed-sequence oligonucleotide probe. The labeled oligonucleotide was then used to screen a human liver cDNA library, and a single candidate cDNA...... obtained further predicted an arginine-rich sequence (RPRR) immediately upstream of the N-terminal threonine of C5a, indicating that the promolecule form of C5 is synthesized with a beta alpha-chain orientation as previously shown for pro-C3 and pro-C4. The C5 cDNA clone was sheared randomly by sonication...

  20. Moloney murine sarcoma virus MuSVts110 DNA: cloning, nucleotide sequence, and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huai, L; Chiocca, S M; Gilbreth, M A; Ainsworth, J R; Bishop, L A; Murphy, E C

    1992-09-01

    We have cloned Moloney murine sarcoma virus (MuSV) MuSVts110 DNA by assembly of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified segments of integrated viral DNA from infected NRK cells (6m2 cells) and determined its complete sequence. Previously, by direct sequencing of MuSVts110 RNA transcribed in 6m2 cells, we established that the thermosensitive RNA splicing phenotype uniquely characteristic of MuSVts110 results from a deletion of 1,487 nucleotides of progenitor MuSV-124 sequences. As anticipated, the sequence obtained in this study contained precisely this same deletion. In addition, several other unexpected sequence differences were found between MuSVts110 and MuSV-124. For example, in the noncoding region upstream of the gag gene, MuSVts110 DNA contained a 52-nucleotide tract typical of murine leukemia virus rather than MuSV-124, suggesting that MuSVts110 originated as a MuSV-helper murine leukemia virus recombinant during reverse transcription rather than from a straightforward deletion within MuSV-124. In addition, both MuSVts110 long terminal repeats contained head-to-tail duplications of eight nucleotides in the U3 region. Finally, seven single-nucleotide substitutions were found scattered throughout MuSVts110 DNA. Three of the nucleotide substitutions were in the gag gene, resulting in one coding change in p15 and one in p30. All of the remaining nucleotide changes were found in the noncoding region between the 5' long terminal repeat and the gag gene. In NIH 3T3 cells transfected with the cloned MuSVts110 DNA, the pattern of viral RNA expression conformed with that observed in cells infected with authentic MuSVts110 virus in that viral RNA splicing was 30 to 40% efficient at growth temperatures between 28 and 33 degrees C but reduced to trace levels above 37 degrees C.

  1. Cloning and characterization of a female genital complex cDNA from the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita, M; Bieber, D; Ringold, G; Mansour, T E

    1987-01-01

    A cDNA clone whose RNA is abundant in the female genital complex of the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica has been isolated from a cDNA library in lambda gt10 by differential screening. The pattern of expression in different fluke tissues and at different stages of miracidium formation suggests that this gene is expressed in the F. hepatica vitelleria. The nucleotide sequence of the cloned cDNA was determined and the primary structure of the putative protein was deduced. The proposed protein is rich in glycine, lysine, and tyrosine and its overall amino acid composition agrees with that reported for the F. hepatica egg shell. The clone has homology with DNA from other trematodes; this homology is higher in organisms in which egg development is similar to that of F. hepatica and suggests that the protein is conserved in organisms in which miracidium formation occurs in fresh water. Images PMID:3470798

  2. Oxidative DNA damage causes mitochondrial genomic instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doudican, Nicole A; Song, Binwei; Shadel, Gerald S; Doetsch, Paul W

    2005-06-01

    Mitochondria contain their own genome, the integrity of which is required for normal cellular energy metabolism. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by normal mitochondrial respiration can damage cellular macromolecules, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and have been implicated in degenerative diseases, cancer, and aging. We developed strategies to elevate mitochondrial oxidative stress by exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2) or utilizing mutants lacking mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (sod2Delta). Experiments were conducted with strains compromised in mitochondrial base excision repair (ntg1Delta) and oxidative damage resistance (pif1Delta) in order to delineate the relationship between these pathways. We observed enhanced ROS production, resulting in a direct increase in oxidative mtDNA damage and mutagenesis. Repair-deficient mutants exposed to oxidative stress conditions exhibited profound genomic instability. Elimination of Ntg1p and Pif1p resulted in a synergistic corruption of respiratory competency upon exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2). Mitochondrial genomic integrity was substantially compromised in ntg1Delta pif1Delta sod2Delta strains, since these cells exhibit a total loss of mtDNA. A stable respiration-defective strain, possessing a normal complement of mtDNA damage resistance pathways, exhibited a complete loss of mtDNA upon exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2). This loss was preventable by Sod2p overexpression. These results provide direct evidence that oxidative mtDNA damage can be a major contributor to mitochondrial genomic instability and demonstrate cooperation of Ntg1p and Pif1p to resist the introduction of lesions into the mitochondrial genome.

  3. Molecular cloning of a cDNA and chromosomal localization of a human theta-class glutathione S-transferase gene (GSTT2) to chromosome 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, K.L.; Baker, R.T.; Board, P.G. [Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia)] [and others

    1995-01-20

    Until recently the Theta-class glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) were largely overlooked due to their low activity with the model substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and their failure to bind to immobilized glutathione affinity matrices. Little is known about the number of genes in this class. Recently, Pemble et al. reported the cDNA cloning of a human Theta-class GST, termed GSTT1. In this study, we describe the molecular cloning of a cDNA encoding a second human Theta-class GST (GSTT2) from a {lambda}gt11 human liver 5{prime}-stretch cDNA library. The encoded protein contains 244 amino acids and has 78.3% sequence identity with the rat subunit 12 and only 55.0% identity with human GSTT1. GSTT2 has been mapped to chromosome 22 by somatic cell hybrid analysis. The precise position of the gene was localized to subband 22q11.2 by in situ hybridization. The absence of other regions of hybridization suggests that there are no closely related sequences (e.g., reverse transcribed pseudogenes) scattered throughout the genome and that if there are closely related genes, they must be clustered near GSTT2. Southern blot analysis of human DNA digested with BamHI shows that the size of the GSTT2 gene is relatively small, as the coding sequence falls within a 3.6-kb BamHI fragment. 35 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Differential DNA Methylation Analysis without a Reference Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Klughammer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide DNA methylation mapping uncovers epigenetic changes associated with animal development, environmental adaptation, and species evolution. To address the lack of high-throughput methods for DNA methylation analysis in non-model organisms, we developed an integrated approach for studying DNA methylation differences independent of a reference genome. Experimentally, our method relies on an optimized 96-well protocol for reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS, which we have validated in nine species (human, mouse, rat, cow, dog, chicken, carp, sea bass, and zebrafish. Bioinformatically, we developed the RefFreeDMA software to deduce ad hoc genomes directly from RRBS reads and to pinpoint differentially methylated regions between samples or groups of individuals (http://RefFreeDMA.computational-epigenetics.org. The identified regions are interpreted using motif enrichment analysis and/or cross-mapping to annotated genomes. We validated our method by reference-free analysis of cell-type-specific DNA methylation in the blood of human, cow, and carp. In summary, we present a cost-effective method for epigenome analysis in ecology and evolution, which enables epigenome-wide association studies in natural populations and species without a reference genome.

  5. Isolation and characterization of sequences homologous to the tobacco clone axi 1 (auxin independent) from a Vicia sativa nodule cDNA library

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yalçin-Mendi, Y.; Çetiner, S.; Bisseling, T.

    2001-01-01

    In this research, partial nucleotide sequences of the axi 1 gene, which is related to auxin perception and transduction, isolated from Vicia sativa using cDNA library screening were investigated. Four V. sativa cDNA clones representing homologous of the tobacco axi 1 (auxin independent) cDNA clone

  6. Molecular characterization of a Leishmania donovani cDNA clone with similarity to human 20S proteasome a-type subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C B; Jørgensen, L; Jensen, A T

    2000-01-01

    Using plasma from patients infected or previously infected with Leishmania donovanii, we isolated a L. donovanii cDNA clone with similarity to the proteasome a-type subunit from humans and other eukaryotes. The cDNA clone, designated LePa, was DNA sequenced and Northern blot analysis of L...

  7. Efficient cDNA cloning by direct phenotypic correction of a mutant human cell line (HPRT-) using an Epstein-Barr virus derived cDNA expression vector.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.B.G.M. Belt; W. Jongmans; J. de Wit (Jan); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); C.M.P. Backendorf (Claude); P. van de Putte (Pieter)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractHuman cells are, in general, poor recipients of foreign DNA, which has severely hampered the cloning of genes by direct phenotypic correction of deficient human cell lines after DNA mediated gene transfer. In this communication a methodology is presented which largely circumvents this

  8. Effect of nickel chloride on Arabidopsis genomic DNA and methylation of 18S rDNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongai Li

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: NiCl2 application caused variation of DNA methylation of the Arabidopsis genomic and offspring's. NiCl2 also resulted in nucleolar injury and deformity of root tip cells. The methylation rate of 18S rDNA also changed by adding NiCl2.

  9. Analysis of phage Mu DNA transposition by whole-genome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    labelled ChIP DNA and Cy3-labelled whole-genome DNA, both amplified by random primers. The 'ratio' value of each probe (fluorescence intensity of Cy5 over Cy3) is the relative enrichment of that probe sequence in the ChIP sample, referred to as the relative MuB binding preference, or BBP. A scatter plot of log2 BBP ...

  10. Cloning, DNA sequence, and expression of Aeromonas caviae WS7b chitinase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Amarila; Wenuganen, S; Suwanto, Antonius; Tjahjono, Budi

    2003-01-01

    A chitinase-producing bacterium, designated WS7b, was isolated from a soil sample obtained from a black-pepper plantation on Bangka Island, Indonesia. Fatty-acid methyl-ester analysis indicated that the isolate was Aeromonas caviae. A chitinase gene from WS7b was cloned in a pUC19-based plasmid vector, but without its natural promoter. The complete nucleotide sequence of the gene was determined, and the structural gene consisted of a 2748-bp region encoding 864 amino acids. DNA sequence analysis indicated that the gene had been cloned without its promoter, and this was confirmed by chitinase-plate assay of the truncated version of the gene in Escherichia coli. The chitinase gene product showed amino-acid sequence similarity to chiA from A. caviae. Chitinase enzyme activity was determined spectrophotometrically, using colloidal chitin azure as substrate for extracellular and intracellular fractions. The ability of the chitinase cloned in E. coli to hydrolyze chitin was less than that of the enzyme in its indigenous host.

  11. Algebraic correction methods for computational assessment of clone overlaps in DNA fingerprint mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendl Michael C

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Sulston score is a well-established, though approximate metric for probabilistically evaluating postulated clone overlaps in DNA fingerprint mapping. It is known to systematically over-predict match probabilities by various orders of magnitude, depending upon project-specific parameters. Although the exact probability distribution is also available for the comparison problem, it is rather difficult to compute and cannot be used directly in most cases. A methodology providing both improved accuracy and computational economy is required. Results We propose a straightforward algebraic correction procedure, which takes the Sulston score as a provisional value and applies a power-law equation to obtain an improved result. Numerical comparisons indicate dramatically increased accuracy over the range of parameters typical of traditional agarose fingerprint mapping. Issues with extrapolating the method into parameter ranges characteristic of newer capillary electrophoresis-based projects are also discussed. Conclusion Although only marginally more expensive to compute than the raw Sulston score, the correction provides a vastly improved probabilistic description of hypothesized clone overlaps. This will clearly be important in overlap assessment and perhaps for other tasks as well, for example in using the ranking of overlap probabilities to assist in clone ordering.

  12. Cloning and physical mapping of DNA complementary to potato leafroll virus RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, O.P.

    1987-01-01

    Potato leafroll virus (PLRV) was aphid-transmitted from potato (Solanum tuberosum cultivar Russett Burbank) to ground cherry (Physalis floridana), where it was maintained by serial aphid transmission. Serological and plant differential tests indicated that the isolate was not contaminated with beet western yellows virus. Purified PLRV RNA was poly(A)-tailed in vitro and used as a template for reverse transcriptase, primed with oligo(dT). Alkaline gel electrophoresis of 32 P-labeled first-strand complementary DNA (cDNA) indicated a major size range of 0.1 to 3.5 kilobases (kb). A small percentage of transcripts corresponded to full length PLRV RNA. Following RNase H and DNA polymerase I-mediated second strand synthesis, double-stranded cDNA was cloned into the Pst I site of the plasmid pUC9 using oligo (dC)-oligo(dG) tailing methodology. Escherichia coli JM109 transformants were screened with first-strand 32 P-cDNA in colony hybridization experiments to confirm that recombinants contained PLRV-specific sequences

  13. Characterization of cDNA clones encoding rabbit and human serum paraoxonase: The mature protein retains its signal sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassett, C.; Richter, R.J.; Humbert, R.; Omiecinski, C.J.; Furlong, C.E. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States)); Chapline, C.; Crabb, J.W. (W.Alton Jones Cell Science Center, Lake Placid, NY (United States))

    1991-10-22

    Serum paraoxonase hydrolyzes the toxic metabolites of a variety of organophosphorus insecticides. High serum paraoxonase levels appear to protect against the neurotoxic effects of organophosphorus substrates of this enzyme. The amino acid sequence accounting for 42% of rabbit paraoxonase was determined. From these data, two oligonucleotide probes were synthesized and used to screen a rabbit liver cDNA library. Human paraoxonase clones were isolated from a liver cDNA library by using the rabbit cDNA as a hybridization probe. Inserts from three of the longest clones were sequenced, and one full-length clone contained an open reading frame encoding 355 amino acids, four less than the rabbit paraoxonase protein. Amino-terminal sequences derived from purified rabbit and human paraoxonase proteins suggested that the signal sequence is retained, with the exception of the initiator methionine residue. Characterization of the rabbit and human paraoxonase cDNA clones confirms that the signal sequences are not processed, except for the N-terminal methionine residue. The rabbit and human cDNA clones demonstrate striking nucleotide and deduced amino acid similarities (greater than 85%), suggesting an important metabolic role and constraints on the evolution of this protein.

  14. Molecular cloning and characterization of cDNA encoding fibrinolytic enzyme-3 from earthworm Eisenia foetida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Guo-Qing; Yuan, Xiao-Ling; Shan, Ya-Jun; Zhao, Zhen-Hu; Chen, Jia-Pei; Cong, Yu-Wen

    2004-04-01

    The earthworm fibrinolytic enzyme-3 (EFE-3, GenBank accession No: AY438622), from the earthworm Eisenia foetida, is a component of earthworm fibrinolytic enzymes. In this study, cDNA encoding the EFE-3 was cloned by RT-PCR. The cDNA contained an open reading frame of 741 nucleotides, which encoded a deduced protein of 247 amino acid residues, including signal sequences. EFE-3 showed a high degree of homology to earthworm (Lumbricus rebullus) proteases F-III-1, F-III-2, and bovine trypsin. The recombinant EFE-3 was expressed in E. coli as inclusion bodies, and the gene encoding the native form of EFE-3 was expressed in COS-7 cells in the medium. Both the refolding product of inclusion bodies and the secreted protease could dissolve the artificial fibrin plate.

  15. Hot Fusion: An Efficient Method to Clone Multiple DNA Fragments as Well as Inverted Repeats without Ligase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Changlin; Donovan, William P.; Shikapwashya-Hasser, Olga; Ye, Xudong; Cole, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular cloning is utilized in nearly every facet of biological and medical research. We have developed a method, termed Hot Fusion, to efficiently clone one or multiple DNA fragments into plasmid vectors without the use of ligase. The method is directional, produces seamless junctions and is not dependent on the availability of restriction sites for inserts. Fragments are assembled based on shared homology regions of 17–30 bp at the junctions, which greatly simplifies the construct design. Hot Fusion is carried out in a one-step, single tube reaction at 50°C for one hour followed by cooling to room temperature. In addition to its utility for multi-fragment assembly Hot Fusion provides a highly efficient method for cloning DNA fragments containing inverted repeats for applications such as RNAi. The overall cloning efficiency is in the order of 90–95%. PMID:25551825

  16. Bioinformatics and expressional analysis of cDNA clones from floral buds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawełkowicz, Magdalena Ewa; Skarzyńska, Agnieszka; Cebula, Justyna; Hincha, Dirck; ZiÄ bska, Karolina; PlÄ der, Wojciech; Przybecki, Zbigniew

    2017-08-01

    The application of genomic approaches may serve as an initial step in understanding the complexity of biochemical network and cellular processes responsible for regulation and execution of many developmental tasks. The molecular mechanism of sex expression in cucumber is still not elucidated. A study of differential expression was conducted to identify genes involved in sex determination and floral organ morphogenesis. Herein, we present generation of expression sequence tags (EST) obtained by differential hybridization (DH) and subtraction technique (cDNA-DSC) and their characteristic features such as molecular function, involvement in biology processes, expression and mapping position on the genome.

  17. Identification of differential genes by suppression subtractive hybridization: I. Preparation of subtracted cDNA or genomic DNA library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebrikov, Denis V

    2008-07-01

    INTRODUCTIONSuppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) is one of the most powerful and popular methods for generating subtracted cDNA or genomic DNA libraries. This technique can be used to compare two mRNA populations and obtain cDNAs representing genes that are either overexpressed or exclusively expressed in one population as compared to another. It can also be used for comparison of genomic DNA populations. This protocol describes the preparation of a subtracted cDNA or genomic DNA library, and includes methods for cDNA synthesis, tester and driver DNA digestion, and adapter ligation.

  18. Analysis of phage Mu DNA transposition by whole-genome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In vitro, MuB protein is responsible for target choice. In this work, we provide a comprehensive assessment of the genome-wide distribution of MuB and its relationship to Mu target selection using high-resolution Escherichia coli tiling DNA arrays. We have also assessed how MuB binding and Mu transposition are influenced ...

  19. An automated annotation tool for genomic DNA sequences using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    , New Delhi 110 067, India. Abstract ... analysis of genomic DNA to identify coding sequences using the GeneScan algorithm and characterize these resultant sequences by .... genes for the TCA cycle, while in mitochondria only a subset of the ...

  20. Nuclear DNA content and genome size of trout and human

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Bartoš, Jan; Voglmayr, H.; Greilhuber, J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 51, - (2003), s. 127-128 ISSN 0196-4763 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS5038104 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : flow cytometry * nuclear DNA content * genome size Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.095, year: 2003

  1. A universal, rapid, and inexpensive method for genomic DNA ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A very simple biological basis is followed in this procedure, in which, when the bloodis placed in water, it rapidly enters the RBCs by osmosis and causes cells to burst by hemolysis. The validity of extracting genomic DNA was confirmed by several molecular biological experiments. It was found that this method provides an ...

  2. Analysis of phage Mu DNA transposition by whole-genome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    by chromosome-organizing elements such as AT-rich DNA signatures, or the binding of the nucleoid-associated protein Fis, or ... able elements (TEs) have learnt to balance self-propagation with host survival. ..... Genome wide mapping of Mu transposition targets and MuB binding on the E. coli chromosome. Top panel, an ...

  3. Genomic DNA isolation from Artemisia species grown in cold desert ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... protocol to extract pure genomic DNA from different Artemisia species was tailored. The protocol was based on the CTAB method with slight modifications. In the study, 1.6 M NaCl, 2% cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), 3% polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and 0.5% β-mercaptoethanol was used in the extraction buffer.

  4. The white spot syndrome virus DNA genome sequence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulten, van M.C.W.; Witteveldt, J.; Peters, S.; Kloosterboer, N.; Tarchini, R.; Fiers, M.; Sandbrink, H.; Klein Lankhorst, R.; Vlak, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is at present a major scourge to worldwide shrimp cultivation. We have determined the entire sequence of the double-stranded, circular DNA genome of WSSV, which contains 292,967 nucleotides encompassing 184 major open reading frames (ORFs). Only 6 f the WSSV ORFs

  5. Comparative Genome Analyses of Streptococcus suis Isolates from Endocarditis Demonstrate Persistence of Dual Phenotypic Clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohya, Mari; Watanabe, Takayasu; Maruyama, Fumito; Arai, Sakura; Ota, Atsushi; Athey, Taryn B T; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Sekizaki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Many bacterial species coexist in the same niche as heterogeneous clones with different phenotypes; however, understanding of infectious diseases by polyphenotypic bacteria is still limited. In the present study, encapsulation in isolates of the porcine pathogen Streptococcus suis from persistent endocarditis lesions was examined. Coexistence of both encapsulated and unencapsulated S. suis isolates was found in 26 out of 59 endocarditis samples. The isolates were serotype 2, and belonged to two different sequence types (STs), ST1 and ST28. The genomes of each of the 26 pairs of encapsulated and unencapsulated isolates from the 26 samples were sequenced. The data showed that each pair of isolates had one or more unique nonsynonymous mutations in the cps gene, and the encapsulated and unencapsulated isolates from the same samples were closest to each other. Pairwise comparisons of the sequences of cps genes in 7 pairs of encapsulated and unencapsulated isolates identified insertion/deletions (indels) ranging from one to 104 bp in different cps genes of unencapsulated isolates. Capsule expression was restored in a subset of unencapsulated isolates by complementation in trans with cps expression vectors. Examination of gene content common to isolates indicated that mutation frequency was higher in ST28 pairs than in ST1 pairs. Genes within mobile genetic elements were mutation hot spots among ST28 isolates. Taken all together, our results demonstrate the coexistence of dual phenotype (encapsulated and unencapsulated) bacterial clones and suggest that the dual phenotypes arose independently in each farm by means of spontaneous mutations in cps genes.

  6. Discovery of cyanophage genomes which contain mitochondrial DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yi-Wah; Mohr, Remus; Millard, Andrew D; Holmes, Antony B; Larkum, Anthony W; Whitworth, Anna L; Mann, Nicholas H; Scanlan, David J; Hess, Wolfgang R; Clokie, Martha R J

    2011-08-01

    DNA polymerase γ is a family A DNA polymerase responsible for the replication of mitochondrial DNA in eukaryotes. The origins of DNA polymerase γ have remained elusive because it is not present in any known bacterium, though it has been hypothesized that mitochondria may have inherited the enzyme by phage-mediated nonorthologous displacement. Here, we present an analysis of two full-length homologues of this gene, which were found in the genomes of two bacteriophages, which infect the chlorophyll-d containing cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina. Phylogenetic analyses of these phage DNA polymerase γ proteins show that they branch deeply within the DNA polymerase γ clade and therefore share a common origin with their eukaryotic homologues. We also found homologues of these phage polymerases in the environmental Community Cyberinfrastructure for Advanced Microbial Ecology Research and Analysis (CAMERA) database, which fell in the same clade. An analysis of the CAMERA assemblies containing the environmental homologues together with the filter fraction metadata indicated some of these assemblies may be of bacterial origin. We also show that the phage-encoded DNA polymerase γ is highly transcribed as the phage genomes are replicated. These findings provide data that may assist in reconstructing the evolution of mitochondria.

  7. Comparison of three methods of parasitoid polydnavirus genomic DNA isolation to facilitate polydnavirus genomic sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A; Beckage, Nancy E

    2008-04-01

    A major long-term goal of polydnavirus (PDV) genome research is to identify novel virally encoded molecules that may serve as biopesticides to target insect pests that threaten agriculture and human health. As PDV viral replication in cell culture in vitro has not yet been achieved, several thousands of wasps must be dissected to yield enough viral DNA from the adult ovaries to carry out PDV genomic sequencing. This study compares three methods of PDV genomic DNA isolation for the PDV of Cotesia flavipes, which parasitizes the sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis, preparatory to sequencing the C. flavipes bracovirus genome. Two of these protocols incorporate phenol-chloroform DNA extraction steps in the procedure and the third protocol uses a modified Qiagen DNA kit method to extract viral DNA. The latter method proved significantly less time-consuming and more cost-effective. Efforts are currently underway to bioengineer insect pathogenic viruses with PDV genes, so that their gene products will enhance baculovirus virulence for agricultural insect pests, either via suppression of the immune system of the host or by PDV-mediated induction of its developmental arrest. Sequencing a growing number of complete PDV genomes will enhance those efforts, which will be facilitated by the study reported here. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. SMART amplification combined with cDNA size fractionation in order to obtain large full-length clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poustka Annemarie

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background cDNA libraries are widely used to identify genes and splice variants, and as a physical resource for full-length clones. Conventionally-generated cDNA libraries contain a high percentage of 5'-truncated clones. Current library construction methods that enrich for full-length mRNA are laborious, and involve several enzymatic steps performed on mRNA, which renders them sensitive to RNA degradation. The SMART technique for full-length enrichment is robust but results in limited cDNA insert size of the library. Results We describe a method to construct SMART full-length enriched cDNA libraries with large insert sizes. Sub-libraries were generated from size-fractionated cDNA with an average insert size of up to seven kb. The percentage of full-length clones was calculated for different size ranges from BLAST results of over 12,000 5'ESTs. Conclusions The presented technique is suitable to generate full-length enriched cDNA libraries with large average insert sizes in a straightforward and robust way. The representation of full-coding clones is high also for large cDNAs (70%, 4–10 kb, when high-quality starting mRNA is used.

  9. Heteroduplex DNA mismatch repair system of Streptococcus pneumoniae: cloning and expression of the hexA gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balganesh, T.S.; Lacks, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Mutations affecting heteroduplex DNA mismatch repair in Streptococcus pneumoniae were localized in two genes, hexA and hexB, by fractionation of restriction fragments carrying mutant alleles. A fragment containing the hexA4 allele was cloned in the S. pneumoniae cloning system, and the hexA + allele was introduced into the recombinant plasmid by chromosomal facilitation of plasmid transfer. Subcloning localized the functional hexA gene to a 3.5-kilobase segment of the cloned pneumococcal DNA. The product of this gene was shown in Bacillus subtilis minicells to be a polypeptide with an M/sub r/ of 86,000. Two mutant alleles of hexA showed partial expression of the repair system when present in multicopy plasmids. A model for mismatch repair, which depends on the interaction of two protein components to recognize the mismatched base pair and excise a segment of DNA between strand breaks surrounding the mismatch, is proposed

  10. Genome sequencing and molecular characterisation of Staphylococcus aureus ST772-MRSA-V, "Bengal Bay Clone".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monecke, Stefan; Baier, Vico; Coombs, Geoffrey W; Slickers, Peter; Ziegler, Albrecht; Ehricht, Ralf

    2013-12-20

    The PVL-positive ST772-MRSA-V is an emerging community-associated (CA-) MRSA clone that has been named Bengal Bay Clone since most patients have epidemiological connections to the Indian subcontinent. It is found increasingly common in other areas of the world. One isolate of ST772-MRSA-V was sequenced using the Illumina Genome Analyzer System. After initial assembling the multiple sequence contigs were analysed using different in-house annotation scripts. Results were compared to microarray hybridisation results of clinical isolates of ST772-MRSA-V, of related strains and to another ST772-MRSA-V genome sequence. According to MLST e-burst analysis, ST772-MRSA-V belongs to Clonal Complex (CC)1, differing from ST1 only in one MLST allele (pta-22). However, there are several additional differences including agr alleles (group II rather than III), capsule type (5 rather than 8), the presence of the egc enterotoxin gene cluster and of the enterotoxin homologue ORF CM14 as well as the absence of the enterotoxin H gene seh. Enterotoxin genes sec and sel are present. ST772-MRSA-V harbours the genes encoding enterotoxin A (sea) and PVL (lukS/F-PV). Both are located on the same prophage. ST772-MRSA-V may have emerged from the same lineage as globally spread CC1 and CC5 strains. It has acquired a variety of virulence factors, and for a CA-MRSA strain it has an unusually high number of genes associated with antibiotic resistance.

  11. Resurrection of DNA function in vivo from an extinct genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Pask

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a burgeoning repository of information available from ancient DNA that can be used to understand how genomes have evolved and to determine the genetic features that defined a particular species. To assess the functional consequences of changes to a genome, a variety of methods are needed to examine extinct DNA function. We isolated a transcriptional enhancer element from the genome of an extinct marsupial, the Tasmanian tiger (Thylacinus cynocephalus or thylacine, obtained from 100 year-old ethanol-fixed tissues from museum collections. We then examined the function of the enhancer in vivo. Using a transgenic approach, it was possible to resurrect DNA function in transgenic mice. The results demonstrate that the thylacine Col2A1 enhancer directed chondrocyte-specific expression in this extinct mammalian species in the same way as its orthologue does in mice. While other studies have examined extinct coding DNA function in vitro, this is the first example of the restoration of extinct non-coding DNA and examination of its function in vivo. Our method using transgenesis can be used to explore the function of regulatory and protein-coding sequences obtained from any extinct species in an in vivo model system, providing important insights into gene evolution and diversity.

  12. Criminal genomic pragmatism: prisoners' representations of DNA technology and biosecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Helena; Silva, Susana

    2012-01-01

    Within the context of the use of DNA technology in crime investigation, biosecurity is perceived by different stakeholders according to their particular rationalities and interests. Very little is known about prisoners' perceptions and assessments of the uses of DNA technology in solving crime. To propose a conceptual model that serves to analyse and interpret prisoners' representations of DNA technology and biosecurity. A qualitative study using an interpretative approach based on 31 semi-structured tape-recorded interviews was carried out between May and September 2009, involving male inmates in three prisons located in the north of Portugal. The content analysis focused on the following topics: the meanings attributed to DNA and assessments of the risks and benefits of the uses of DNA technology and databasing in forensic applications. DNA was described as a record of identity, an exceptional material, and a powerful biometric identifier. The interviewees believed that DNA can be planted to incriminate suspects. Convicted offenders argued for the need to extend the criteria for the inclusion of DNA profiles in forensic databases and to restrict the removal of profiles. The conceptual model entitled criminal genomic pragmatism allows for an understanding of the views of prison inmates regarding DNA technology and biosecurity.

  13. Criminal Genomic Pragmatism: Prisoners' Representations of DNA Technology and Biosecurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Machado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Within the context of the use of DNA technology in crime investigation, biosecurity is perceived by different stakeholders according to their particular rationalities and interests. Very little is known about prisoners’ perceptions and assessments of the uses of DNA technology in solving crime. Aim. To propose a conceptual model that serves to analyse and interpret prisoners’ representations of DNA technology and biosecurity. Methods. A qualitative study using an interpretative approach based on 31 semi-structured tape-recorded interviews was carried out between May and September 2009, involving male inmates in three prisons located in the north of Portugal. The content analysis focused on the following topics: the meanings attributed to DNA and assessments of the risks and benefits of the uses of DNA technology and databasing in forensic applications. Results. DNA was described as a record of identity, an exceptional material, and a powerful biometric identifier. The interviewees believed that DNA can be planted to incriminate suspects. Convicted offenders argued for the need to extend the criteria for the inclusion of DNA profiles in forensic databases and to restrict the removal of profiles. Conclusions. The conceptual model entitled criminal genomic pragmatism allows for an understanding of the views of prison inmates regarding DNA technology and biosecurity.

  14. Criminal Genomic Pragmatism: Prisoners' Representations of DNA Technology and Biosecurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Helena; Silva, Susana

    2012-01-01

    Background. Within the context of the use of DNA technology in crime investigation, biosecurity is perceived by different stakeholders according to their particular rationalities and interests. Very little is known about prisoners' perceptions and assessments of the uses of DNA technology in solving crime. Aim. To propose a conceptual model that serves to analyse and interpret prisoners' representations of DNA technology and biosecurity. Methods. A qualitative study using an interpretative approach based on 31 semi-structured tape-recorded interviews was carried out between May and September 2009, involving male inmates in three prisons located in the north of Portugal. The content analysis focused on the following topics: the meanings attributed to DNA and assessments of the risks and benefits of the uses of DNA technology and databasing in forensic applications. Results. DNA was described as a record of identity, an exceptional material, and a powerful biometric identifier. The interviewees believed that DNA can be planted to incriminate suspects. Convicted offenders argued for the need to extend the criteria for the inclusion of DNA profiles in forensic databases and to restrict the removal of profiles. Conclusions. The conceptual model entitled criminal genomic pragmatism allows for an understanding of the views of prison inmates regarding DNA technology and biosecurity. PMID:22791960

  15. Molecular cloning of the cDNA encoding aspartate aminotransferase from bean root nodules and determination of its role in nodule nitrogen metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvente, Sonia; Camas, Alberto; Lara, Miguel

    2003-06-01

    A cDNA clone encoding aspartate aminotransferase (PVAAT-2) (EC 2.6.1.1) was isolated from the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris nodule cDNA library. The nucleotide sequence analysis of the full-length cDNA allowed its identification by comparison with sequence databases. The amino acid sequence of the bean PvAAT-2 showed high similarity with the AAT-2 isoforms described in other leguminous plants. The amino-terminal region of the PvAAT-2 contains a sequence, which shares common features of plastid transit peptides. Southern blot analysis showed that the PvAAT-2 clone is encoded by a single gene in the P. vulgaris genome. Analysis of the PvAAT-2 mRNA levels suggests that the expression of this gene is nodule enhanced. The PvAAT-2 transcript is more abundant in nodules with increased synthesis of amides and is down-regulated in conditions where ureides accumulate. When plants were supplemented with ureides or with amides, PvAAT-2 expression was reduced, while it was not affected when plants were treated with allopurinol, an inhibitor of ureide synthesis. On the other hand, the expression of asparagine synthetase (another enzyme involved in the synthesis of amides) is not affected either by ureides or amides. These data suggest a role for AAT-2 in the mechanism involved in the synthesis of nitrogen compounds in bean nodules.

  16. Base-Resolution Analysis of Cisplatin–DNA Adducts at the Genome Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Shu, Xiaoting; Xiong, Xushen; Song, Jinghui; He, Chuan; Yi, Chengqi

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin, one of the most widely used anticancer drugs, crosslinks DNA and ultimately induces cell death. However, the genomic pattern of cisplatin–DNA adducts has remained unknown owing to the lack of a reliable and sensitive genome-wide method. Herein we present “cisplatin-seq” to identify genome-wide cisplatin crosslinking sites at base resolution. Cisplatin-seq reveals that mitochondrial DNA is a preferred target of cisplatin. For nuclear genomes, cisplatin–DNA adducts are enriched withi...

  17. In vitro and in silico cloning of Xenopus laevis SOD2 cDNA and its phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purrello, Michele; Di Pietro, Cinzia; Ragusa, Marco; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Giugno, Rosalba; Di Pietro, Valentina; Emmanuele, Giovanni; Travali, Salvo; Scalia, Marina; Shasha, Dennis; Ferro, Alfredo

    2005-02-01

    By using the methodology of both wet and dry biology (i.e., RT-PCR and cycle sequencing, and biocomputational technology, respectively) and the data obtained through the Genome Projects, we have cloned Xenopus laevis SOD2 (MnSOD) cDNA and determined its nucleotide sequence. These data and the deduced protein primary structure were compared with all the other SOD2 nucleotide and amino acid sequences from eukaryotes and prokaryotes, published in public databases. The analysis was performed by using both Clustal W, a well known and widely used program for sequence analysis, and AntiClustAl, a new algorithm recently created and implemented by our group. Our results demonstrate a very high conservation of the enzyme amino acid sequence during evolution, which proves a close structure-function relationship. This is to be expected for very ancient molecules endowed with critical biological functions, performed through a specific structural organization. The nucleotide sequence conservation is less pronounced: this too was foreseeable, due to neutral mutations and to the species-specific codon usage. The data obtained by using AntiClustAl are comparable with those produced with Clustal W, which validates this algorithm as an important new tool for biocomputational analysis. Finally, it is noteworthy that evolutionary trees, drawn by using all the available data on SOD2 nucleotide sequences and amino acid and either Clustal W or AntiClustAl, are comparable to those obtained through phylogenetic analysis based on fossil records.

  18. Cloning and characterization of the complementary DNA for the B chain of normal human serum C1q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, K B; Bentley, D R; Wood, K J

    1984-09-06

    Normal human C1q is a serum glycoprotein of 460 kDa containing 18 polypeptide chains (6A, 6B, 6C) each 226 amino acids long and each containing an N-terminal collagen-like domain and a C-terminal globular domain. Two unusual forms of C1q have been described: a genetically defective form, which has a molecular mass of approximately 160 kDa and is found in the sera of homozygotes for the defect who show a marked susceptibility to immune complex related disease; a fibroblast form, shown to be synthesized and secreted, in vitro, with a molecular mass of about 800 kDa and with chains approximately 16 kDa greater than those of normal C1q. A higher than normal molecular mass form of C1q has also been described in human colostrum and a form of C1q has been claimed to represent one of the types of Fc receptor on guinea-pig macrophages. To initiate studies, at the genomic level, on these various forms of C1q, and to investigate the possible relation between the C1q genes and the procollagen genes, the complementary DNA corresponding to the B chain of normal C1q has been cloned and characterized.

  19. Combination of native and denaturing PAGE for the detection of protein binding regions in long fragments of genomic DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metsis Madis

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a traditional electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA a 32P-labeled double-stranded DNA oligonucleotide or a restriction fragment bound to a protein is separated from the unbound DNA by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE in nondenaturing conditions. An extension of this method uses the large population of fragments derived from long genomic regions (approximately 600 kb for the identification of fragments containing protein binding regions. With this method, genomic DNA is fragmented by restriction enzymes, fragments are amplified by PCR, radiolabeled, incubated with nuclear proteins and the resulting DNA-protein complexes are separated by two-dimensional PAGE. Shifted DNA fragments containing protein binding sites are identified by using additional procedures, i. e. gel elution, PCR amplification, cloning and sequencing. Although the method allows simultaneous analysis of a large population of fragments, it is relatively laborious and can be used to detect only high affinity protein binding sites. Here we propose an alternative and straightforward strategy which is based on a combination of native and denaturing PAGE. This strategy allows the identification of DNA fragments containing low as well as high affinity protein binding regions, derived from genomic DNA ( Results We have combined an EMSA-based selection step with subsequent denaturing PAGE for the localization of protein binding regions in long (up to10 kb fragments of genomic DNA. Our strategy consists of the following steps: digestion of genomic DNA with a 4-cutter restriction enzyme (AluI, BsuRI, TruI, etc, separation of low and high molecular weight fractions of resultant DNA fragments, 32P-labeling with Klenow polymerase, traditional EMSA, gel elution and identification of the shifted bands (or smear by denaturing PAGE. The identification of DNA fragments containing protein binding sites is carried out by running the gel-eluted fragments alongside

  20. Cloning and Characterization of a Complex DNA Fingerprinting Probe for Candida parapsilosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enger, Lee; Joly, Sophie; Pujol, Claude; Simonson, Patricia; Pfaller, Michael; Soll, David R.

    2001-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis accounts for a significant number of nosocomial fungemias, but in fact, no effective and verified genetic fingerprinting method has emerged for assessing the relatedness of independent isolates for epidemiological studies. A complex 15-kb DNA fingerprinting probe, Cp3-13, was therefore isolated from a library of C. parapsilosis genomic DNA fragments. The efficacy of Cp3-13 for DNA fingerprinting was verified by a comparison of its clustering capacity with those of randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and internally transcribed spacer region sequencing, by testing species specificity, and by assessing its capacity to identify microevolutionary changes both in vitro and in vivo. Southern blot hybridization of EcoRI/SalI-digested DNA with Cp3-13 provides a fingerprinting system that (i) identifies the same strain in independent isolates, (ii) discriminates between unrelated isolates, (iii) separates independent isolates into valid groups in a dendrogram, (iv) identifies microevolution in infecting populations, and (v) is amenable to automatic computer-assisted DNA fingerprint analysis. This probe is now available for epidemiological studies. PMID:11158125

  1. Repetitive DNA in the pea (Pisum sativum L.) genome: comprehensive characterization using 454 sequencing and comparison to soybean and Medicago truncatula

    OpenAIRE

    Navrátilová Alice; Neumann Pavel; Macas Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Extraordinary size variation of higher plant nuclear genomes is in large part caused by differences in accumulation of repetitive DNA. This makes repetitive DNA of great interest for studying the molecular mechanisms shaping architecture and function of complex plant genomes. However, due to methodological constraints of conventional cloning and sequencing, a global description of repeat composition is available for only a very limited number of higher plants. In order to ...

  2. Cellular function reinstitution of offspring red blood cells cloned from the sickle cell disease patient blood post CRISPR genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jianguo; Tao, Wenjing; Hao, Suyang; Zu, Youli

    2017-06-13

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a disorder of red blood cells (RBCs) expressing abnormal hemoglobin-S (HbS) due to genetic inheritance of homologous HbS gene. However, people with the sickle cell trait (SCT) carry a single allele of HbS and do not usually suffer from SCD symptoms, thus providing a rationale to treat SCD. To validate gene therapy potential, hematopoietic stem cells were isolated from the SCD patient blood and treated with CRISPR/Cas9 approach. To precisely dissect genome-editing effects, erythroid progenitor cells were cloned from single colonies of CRISPR-treated cells and then expanded for simultaneous gene, protein, and cellular function studies. Genotyping and sequencing analysis revealed that the genome-edited erythroid progenitor colonies were converted to SCT genotype from SCD genotype. HPLC protein assays confirmed reinstallation of normal hemoglobin at a similar level with HbS in the cloned genome-edited erythroid progenitor cells. For cell function evaluation, in vitro RBC differentiation of the cloned erythroid progenitor cells was induced. As expected, cell sickling assays indicated function reinstitution of the genome-edited offspring SCD RBCs, which became more resistant to sickling under hypoxia condition. This study is an exploration of genome editing of SCD HSPCs.

  3. Cellular function reinstitution of offspring red blood cells cloned from the sickle cell disease patient blood post CRISPR genome editing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Wen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sickle cell disease (SCD is a disorder of red blood cells (RBCs expressing abnormal hemoglobin-S (HbS due to genetic inheritance of homologous HbS gene. However, people with the sickle cell trait (SCT carry a single allele of HbS and do not usually suffer from SCD symptoms, thus providing a rationale to treat SCD. Methods To validate gene therapy potential, hematopoietic stem cells were isolated from the SCD patient blood and treated with CRISPR/Cas9 approach. To precisely dissect genome-editing effects, erythroid progenitor cells were cloned from single colonies of CRISPR-treated cells and then expanded for simultaneous gene, protein, and cellular function studies. Results Genotyping and sequencing analysis revealed that the genome-edited erythroid progenitor colonies were converted to SCT genotype from SCD genotype. HPLC protein assays confirmed reinstallation of normal hemoglobin at a similar level with HbS in the cloned genome-edited erythroid progenitor cells. For cell function evaluation, in vitro RBC differentiation of the cloned erythroid progenitor cells was induced. As expected, cell sickling assays indicated function reinstitution of the genome-edited offspring SCD RBCs, which became more resistant to sickling under hypoxia condition. Conclusions This study is an exploration of genome editing of SCD HSPCs.

  4. Whole exome and whole genome sequencing with dried blood spot DNA without whole genome amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassaganyas, Laia; Freedman, George; Vaka, Dedeepya; Wan, Eunice; Lao, Richard; Chen, Flavia; Kvale, Mark; Currier, Robert J; Puck, Jennifer M; Kwok, Pui-Yan

    2018-01-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) for rare conditions is performed in all 50 states in the USA. We have partnered with the California Department of Public Health Genetic Disease Laboratory to determine whether sufficient DNA can be extracted from archived dried blood spots (DBS) for next-generation sequencing in the hopes that next-generation sequencing can play a role in NBS. We optimized the DNA extraction and sequencing library preparation protocols for residual infant DBS archived over 20 years ago and successfully obtained acceptable whole exome and whole genome sequencing data. This sequencing study using DBS DNA without whole genome amplification prior to sequencing library preparation provides evidence that properly stored residual newborn DBS are a satisfactory source of DNA for genetic studies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Design optimization methods for genomic DNA tiling arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertone, Paul; Trifonov, Valery; Rozowsky, Joel S; Schubert, Falk; Emanuelsson, Olof; Karro, John; Kao, Ming-Yang; Snyder, Michael; Gerstein, Mark

    2006-02-01

    A recent development in microarray research entails the unbiased coverage, or tiling, of genomic DNA for the large-scale identification of transcribed sequences and regulatory elements. A central issue in designing tiling arrays is that of arriving at a single-copy tile path, as significant sequence cross-hybridization can result from the presence of non-unique probes on the array. Due to the fragmentation of genomic DNA caused by the widespread distribution of repetitive elements, the problem of obtaining adequate sequence coverage increases with the sizes of subsequence tiles that are to be included in the design. This becomes increasingly problematic when considering complex eukaryotic genomes that contain many thousands of interspersed repeats. The general problem of sequence tiling can be framed as finding an optimal partitioning of non-repetitive subsequences over a prescribed range of tile sizes, on a DNA sequence comprising repetitive and non-repetitive regions. Exact solutions to the tiling problem become computationally infeasible when applied to large genomes, but successive optimizations are developed that allow their practical implementation. These include an efficient method for determining the degree of similarity of many oligonucleotide sequences over large genomes, and two algorithms for finding an optimal tile path composed of longer sequence tiles. The first algorithm, a dynamic programming approach, finds an optimal tiling in linear time and space; the second applies a heuristic search to reduce the space complexity to a constant requirement. A Web resource has also been developed, accessible at http://tiling.gersteinlab.org, to generate optimal tile paths from user-provided DNA sequences.

  6. The contribution of co-transcriptional RNA:DNA hybrid structures to DNA damage and genome instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamperl, Stephan; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2014-07-01

    Accurate DNA replication and DNA repair are crucial for the maintenance of genome stability, and it is generally accepted that failure of these processes is a major source of DNA damage in cells. Intriguingly, recent evidence suggests that DNA damage is more likely to occur at genomic loci with high transcriptional activity. Furthermore, loss of certain RNA processing factors in eukaryotic cells is associated with increased formation of co-transcriptional RNA:DNA hybrid structures known as R-loops, resulting in double-strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA damage. However, the molecular mechanisms by which R-loop structures ultimately lead to DNA breaks and genome instability is not well understood. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the formation, recognition and processing of RNA:DNA hybrids, and discuss possible mechanisms by which these structures contribute to DNA damage and genome instability in the cell. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Growth hormone and prolactin in Andrias davidianus: cDNA cloning, tissue distribution and phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liping; Meng, Zining; Liu, Yun; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Xiaochun; Lu, Danqi; Huang, Junhai; Lin, Haoran

    2010-01-15

    The Chinese giant salamander (Andrias davidianus) is one of the largest and 'living fossil' species of amphibian. To obtain genetic information for this species, the cDNAs encoding growth hormone (adGH) and prolactin (adPRL) were cloned from a pituitary cDNA library. The isolated adGH cDNA consisted of 864 bp and encoded a propeptide of 215 amino acids, while the cDNA of adPRL was 1106 bp in length and encoded a putative peptide of 229 amino acids. Expression of the GH and PRL mRNA was only detected in the pituitary. Phylogenetic analyses were performed based on the isolated pituitary hormone sequences using maximum parsimony and neighbor-joining algorithms. The clustering results are similar to that based on the morphological characteristics or the rRNA genes, which indicate that the two orders (Anura and Caudata) of amphibian were monophyletic, and that A. davidianus was diverged early in the Caudate clade. These results indicated that both the GH and PRL sequence might be useful to study the phylogenies of relatively moderate evolved groups.

  8. Purification, characterization and molecular cloning of TGP1, a novel G-DNA binding protein from Tetrahymena thermophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Q; Schierer, T; Kang, S G; Henderson, E

    1998-01-01

    G-DNA, a polymorphic family of four-stranded DNA structures, has been proposed to play roles in a variety of biological processes including telomere function, meiotic recombination and gene regulation. Here we report the purification and cloning of TGP1, a G-DNA specific binding protein from Tetrahymena thermophila. TGP1 was purified by three-column chromatographies, including a G-DNA affinity column. Two major proteins (approximately 80 and approximately 40 kDa) were present in the most high...

  9. cDNA cloning of human DNA topoisomerase I. Catalytic activity of a 67.7-kDa carboxyl-terminal fragment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Arpa, P.; Machlin, P.S.; Ratrie, H. III; Rothfield, N.F.; Cleveland, D.W.; Earnshaw, W.C.

    1988-01-01

    cDNA clones encoding human topoisomerase I were isolated from an expression vector library (λgt11) screened with autoimmune anti-topoisomerase I serum. One of these clones has been expressed as a fusion protein comprised of a 32-kDa fragment of the bacterial TrpE protein linked to 67.7 kDa of protein encoded by the cDNA. Three lines of evidence indicate that the cloned cDNA encodes topoisomerase I. (i) Proteolysis maps of the fusion protein and human nuclear topoisomerase I are essentially identical. (ii) The fusion protein relaxes supercoiled DNA, an activity that can be immunoprecipitated by anti-topoisomerase I serum. (iii) Sequence analysis has revealed that the longest cDNA clone (3645 base pairs) encodes a protein of 765 amino acids that shares 42% identity with Saccharomyces cerevisiae topoisomerase I. The sequence data also show that the catalytically active 67.7-kDa fragment is comprised of the carboxyl terminus

  10. Intervening sequences in a plant gene-comparison of the partial sequence of cDNA and genomic DNA of French bean phaseolin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, S. M.; Slightom, J. L.; Hall, T. C.

    1981-01-01

    A plant gene coding for the major storage protein (phaseolin, G1-globulin) of the French bean was isolated from a genomic library constructed in the phage vector Charon 24A. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence of part of the gene with that of the cloned messenger RNA (cDNA) revealed the presence of three intervening sequences, all beginning with GTand ending with AG. The 5' and 3' boundaries of intervening sequences TVS-A (88 base pairs) and IVS-B (124 base pairs) are similar to those described for animal and viral genes, but the 3' boundary of IVS-C (129 base pairs) shows some differences. A sequence of 185 amino acids deduced from the cloned DMAs represents about 40% of a phaseolin polypeptide.

  11. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water was analyzed using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from DNA extracts of 12 samples and compared to clone libraries previously generated using RNA extracts from the same samples. Phylogenetic analysis of 761 DNA-based ...

  12. Assessing genetic structure and diversity of airborne bacterial communities by DNA fingerprinting and 16S rDNA clone library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Pierre-Alain; Lejon, David P. H.; Carvalho, Esmeralda; Bizet, Karine; Lemanceau, Philippe; Ranjard, Lionel; Mougel, Christophe

    The density, genetic structure and diversity of airborne bacterial communities were assessed in the outdoor atmosphere. Two air samples were collected on the same location (north of France) at two dates (March 2003 (sample1) and May 2003 (sample 2)). Molecular culture -independent methods were used to characterise airborne bacterial communities regardless of the cell culturability. The automated-ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (A-RISA) was performed to characterise the community structure in each sample. For both sampling dates, complex A-RISA patterns were observed suggesting a highly diverse community structure, comparable to those found in soil, water or sediment environments. Furthermore, differences in the genetic structure of airborne bacterial communities were observed between samples 1 and 2 suggesting an important variability in time. A clone library of 16S rDNA directly amplified from air DNA of sample 1 was constructed and sequenced to analyse the community composition and diversity. The Proteobacteria group had the greatest representation (60%), with bacteria belonging to the different subdivisions α- (19%), β-(21%), γ-(12%) and δ-(8%). Firmicute and Actinobacteria were also well represented with 14% and 12%, respectively. Most of the identified bacteria are known to be commonly associated with soil or plant environments suggesting that the atmosphere is mainly colonised transiently by microorganisms from local sources, depending on air fluxes.

  13. Nucleotide sequence of cloned cDNA for human sphingolipid activator protein 1 precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewji, N.N.; Wenger, D.A.; O'Brien, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Two cDNA clones encoding prepro-sphingolipid activator protein 1 (SAP-1) were isolated from a λ gt11 human hepatoma expression library using polyclonal antibodies. These had inserts of ≅ 2 kilobases (λ-S-1.2 and λ-S-1.3) and both were both homologous with a previously isolated clone (λ-S-1.1) for mature SAP-1. The authors report here the nucleotide sequence of the longer two EcoRI fragments of S-1.2 and S-1.3 that were not the same and the derived amino acid sequences of mature SAP-1 and its prepro form. The open reading frame encodes 19 amino acids, which are colinear with the amino-terminal sequence of mature SAP-1, and extends far beyond the predicted carboxyl terminus of mature SAP-1, indicating extensive carboxyl-terminal processing. The nucleotide sequence of cDNA encoding prepro-SAP-1 includes 1449 bases from the assigned initiation codon ATG at base-pair 472 to the stop codon TGA at base-pair 1921. The first 23 amino acids coded after the initiation ATG are characteristic of a signal peptide. The calculated molecular mass for a polypeptide encoded by 1449 bases is ≅ 53 kDa, in keeping with the reported value for pro-SAP-1. The data indicate that after removal of the signal peptide mature SAP-1 is generated by removing an additional 7 amino acids from the amino terminus and ≅ 373 amino acids from the carboxyl terminus. One potential glycosylation site was previously found in mature SAP-1. Three additional potential glycosylation sites are present in the processed carboxyl-terminal polypeptide, which they designate as P-2

  14. Methylation-sensitive linking libraries enhance gene-enriched sequencing of complex genomes and map DNA methylation domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharti Arvind K

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many plant genomes are resistant to whole-genome assembly due to an abundance of repetitive sequence, leading to the development of gene-rich sequencing techniques. Two such techniques are hypomethylated partial restriction (HMPR and methylation spanning linker libraries (MSLL. These libraries differ from other gene-rich datasets in having larger insert sizes, and the MSLL clones are designed to provide reads localized to "epigenetic boundaries" where methylation begins or ends. Results A large-scale study in maize generated 40,299 HMPR sequences and 80,723 MSLL sequences, including MSLL clones exceeding 100 kb. The paired end reads of MSLL and HMPR clones were shown to be effective in linking existing gene-rich sequences into scaffolds. In addition, it was shown that the MSLL clones can be used for anchoring these scaffolds to a BAC-based physical map. The MSLL end reads effectively identified epigenetic boundaries, as indicated by their preferential alignment to regions upstream and downstream from annotated genes. The ability to precisely map long stretches of fully methylated DNA sequence is a unique outcome of MSLL analysis, and was also shown to provide evidence for errors in gene identification. MSLL clones were observed to be significantly more repeat-rich in their interiors than in their end reads, confirming the correlation between methylation and retroelement content. Both MSLL and HMPR reads were found to be substantially gene-enriched, with the SalI MSLL libraries being the most highly enriched (31% align to an EST contig, while the HMPR clones exhibited exceptional depletion of repetitive DNA (to ~11%. These two techniques were compared with other gene-enrichment methods, and shown to be complementary. Conclusion MSLL technology provides an unparalleled approach for mapping the epigenetic status of repetitive blocks and for identifying sequences mis-identified as genes. Although the types and natures of

  15. Comparative Genome Analyses of Streptococcus suis Isolates from Endocarditis Demonstrate Persistence of Dual Phenotypic Clones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Tohya

    Full Text Available Many bacterial species coexist in the same niche as heterogeneous clones with different phenotypes; however, understanding of infectious diseases by polyphenotypic bacteria is still limited. In the present study, encapsulation in isolates of the porcine pathogen Streptococcus suis from persistent endocarditis lesions was examined. Coexistence of both encapsulated and unencapsulated S. suis isolates was found in 26 out of 59 endocarditis samples. The isolates were serotype 2, and belonged to two different sequence types (STs, ST1 and ST28. The genomes of each of the 26 pairs of encapsulated and unencapsulated isolates from the 26 samples were sequenced. The data showed that each pair of isolates had one or more unique nonsynonymous mutations in the cps gene, and the encapsulated and unencapsulated isolates from the same samples were closest to each other. Pairwise comparisons of the sequences of cps genes in 7 pairs of encapsulated and unencapsulated isolates identified insertion/deletions (indels ranging from one to 104 bp in different cps genes of unencapsulated isolates. Capsule expression was restored in a subset of unencapsulated isolates by complementation in trans with cps expression vectors. Examination of gene content common to isolates indicated that mutation frequency was higher in ST28 pairs than in ST1 pairs. Genes within mobile genetic elements were mutation hot spots among ST28 isolates. Taken all together, our results demonstrate the coexistence of dual phenotype (encapsulated and unencapsulated bacterial clones and suggest that the dual phenotypes arose independently in each farm by means of spontaneous mutations in cps genes.

  16. A cDNA Clone-Launched Platform for High-Yield Production of Inactivated Zika Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujiao Yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A purified inactivated vaccine (PIV using the Zika virus (ZIKV Puerto Rico strain PRVABC59 showed efficacy in monkeys, and is currently in a phase I clinical trial. High-yield manufacture of this PIV is essential for its development and vaccine access. Here we report an infectious cDNA clone-launched platform to maximize its yield. A single NS1 protein substitution (K265E was identified to increase ZIKV replication on Vero cells (a cell line approved for vaccine production for both Cambodian FSS13025 and Puerto Rico PRVABC59 strains. The NS1 mutation did not affect viral RNA synthesis, but significantly increased virion assembly through an increased interaction between NS1 and NS2A (a known regulator of flavivirus assembly. The NS1 mutant virus retained wild-type virulence in the A129 mouse model, but decreased its competence to infect Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. To further increase virus yield, we constructed an infectious cDNA clone of the clinical trial PIV strain PRVABC59 containing three viral replication-enhancing mutations (NS1 K265E, prM H83R, and NS3 S356F. The mutant cDNA clone produced >25-fold more ZIKV than the wild-type parent on Vero cells. This cDNA clone-launched manufacture platform has the advantages of higher virus yield, shortened manufacture time, and minimized chance of contamination.

  17. Cloning and functional characterization of a testicular TSH receptor cDNA from the African catfish (Clarias gariepinus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vischer, H F; Bogerd, J.

    A cDNA encoding a putative thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (cfTSH-R) was cloned from the testis of the African catfish (Clarias gariepinus). The cfTSH-R showed the highest amino acid sequence identity with the TSH-Rs of other fish species. In addition, an insertion of approximately 50 amino

  18. Cloning of the human carnitine-acylcarnitine carrier cDNA and identification of the molecular defect in a patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizing, M.; Iacobazzi, V.; IJlst, L.; Savelkoul, P.; Ruitenbeek, W.; van den Heuvel, L.; Indiveri, C.; Smeitink, J.; Trijbels, F.; Wanders, R.; Palmieri, F.

    1997-01-01

    The carnitine-acylcarnitine carrier (CAC) catalyzes the translocation of long-chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane. We cloned and sequenced the human CAC cDNA, which has an open reading frame of 903 nucleotides. Northern blot studies revealed different expression levels of CAC

  19. cDNA cloning and transcriptional controlling of a novel low dose radiation-induced gene and its function analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Pingkun; Sui Jianli

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To clone a novel low dose radiation-induced gene (LRIGx) and study its function as well as its transcriptional changes after irradiation. Methods: Its cDNA was obtained by DDRT-PCR and RACE techniques. Northern blot hybridization was used to investigate the gene transcription. Bioinformatics was employed to analysis structure and function of this gene. Results: LRIGx cDNA was cloned. The sequence of LRIGx was identical to a DNA clone located in human chromosome 20 q 11.2-12 Bioinformatics analysis predicted an encoded protein with a conserved helicase domain. Northern analysis revealed a ∼8.5 kb transcript which was induced after 0.2 Gy as well as 0.02 Gy irradiation, and the transcript level was increased 5 times at 4 h after 0.2 Gy irradiation. The induced level of LRIGx transcript by 2.0 Gy high dose was lower than by 0.2 Gy. Conclusion: A novel low dose radiation-induced gene has been cloned. It encodes a protein with a conserved helicase domain that could involve in DNA metabolism in the cellular process of radiation response

  20. Characterization of noncoding regulatory DNA in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkon, Ran; Agami, Reuven

    2017-08-08

    Genetic variants associated with common diseases are usually located in noncoding parts of the human genome. Delineation of the full repertoire of functional noncoding elements, together with efficient methods for probing their biological roles, is therefore of crucial importance. Over the past decade, DNA accessibility and various epigenetic modifications have been associated with regulatory functions. Mapping these features across the genome has enabled researchers to begin to document the full complement of putative regulatory elements. High-throughput reporter assays to probe the functions of regulatory regions have also been developed but these methods separate putative regulatory elements from the chromosome so that any effects of chromatin context and long-range regulatory interactions are lost. Definitive assignment of function(s) to putative cis-regulatory elements requires perturbation of these elements. Genome-editing technologies are now transforming our ability to perturb regulatory elements across entire genomes. Interpretation of high-throughput genetic screens that incorporate genome editors might enable the construction of an unbiased map of functional noncoding elements in the human genome.

  1. Whole-genome methylation caller designed for methyl- DNA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    etchie

    2013-02-20

    Feb 20, 2013 ... Much of the human genome is CpG depleted with the exception of CpG islands which are defined as 200-bp stretches of DNA with a C+G content of 50% and an observed CpG/expected CpG exceeding 0.6(Gardiner-. Garden and Frommer, 1987). In the promotor region of genes CpG islands are abundant ...

  2. Plant DNA flow cytometry and estimation of nuclear genome size

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Bartoš, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 95, - (2005), s. 99-110 ISSN 0305-7364 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/03/0354; GA ČR GA204/04/1207 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : flow cytometry * nuclear genome size * DNA C-value Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.665, year: 2005

  3. An integrated encyclopedia of DNA elements in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-06

    The human genome encodes the blueprint of life, but the function of the vast majority of its nearly three billion bases is unknown. The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project has systematically mapped regions of transcription, transcription factor association, chromatin structure and histone modification. These data enabled us to assign biochemical functions for 80% of the genome, in particular outside of the well-studied protein-coding regions. Many discovered candidate regulatory elements are physically associated with one another and with expressed genes, providing new insights into the mechanisms of gene regulation. The newly identified elements also show a statistical correspondence to sequence variants linked to human disease, and can thereby guide interpretation of this variation. Overall, the project provides new insights into the organization and regulation of our genes and genome, and is an expansive resource of functional annotations for biomedical research.

  4. Identification of Methylated Deoxyadenosines in Genomic DNA by dA6m DNA Immunoprecipitation

    OpenAIRE

    Koziol, Magdalena J.; Bradshaw, Charles R.; Allen, George E.; Costa, Ana S.H.; Frezza, Christian

    2016-01-01

    dA6m DNA immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (DIP-Seq) is a key tool in identifying and studying the genome-wide distribution of N6-methyldeoxyadenosine (dA6m). The precise function of this novel DNA modification remains to be fully elucidated, but it is known to be absent from transcriptional start sites and excluded from exons, suggesting a role in transcriptional regulation (Koziol et al., 2015). Importantly, its existence suggests that DNA might be more diverse than previously...

  5. Retrotransposon silencing by DNA methylation can drive mammalian genomic imprinting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Suzuki

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Among mammals, only eutherians and marsupials are viviparous and have genomic imprinting that leads to parent-of-origin-specific differential gene expression. We used comparative analysis to investigate the origin of genomic imprinting in mammals. PEG10 (paternally expressed 10 is a retrotransposon-derived imprinted gene that has an essential role for the formation of the placenta of the mouse. Here, we show that an orthologue of PEG10 exists in another therian mammal, the marsupial tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii, but not in a prototherian mammal, the egg-laying platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus, suggesting its close relationship to the origin of placentation in therian mammals. We have discovered a hitherto missing link of the imprinting mechanism between eutherians and marsupials because tammar PEG10 is the first example of a differentially methylated region (DMR associated with genomic imprinting in marsupials. Surprisingly, the marsupial DMR was strictly limited to the 5' region of PEG10, unlike the eutherian DMR, which covers the promoter regions of both PEG10 and the adjacent imprinted gene SGCE. These results not only demonstrate a common origin of the DMR-associated imprinting mechanism in therian mammals but provide the first demonstration that DMR-associated genomic imprinting in eutherians can originate from the repression of exogenous DNA sequences and/or retrotransposons by DNA methylation.

  6. Amplification of a Zygosaccharomyces bailii DNA segment in wine yeast genomes by extrachromosomal circular DNA formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeote, Virginie; Bigey, Frédéric; Beyne, Emmanuelle; Novo, Maite; Legras, Jean-Luc; Casaregola, Serge; Dequin, Sylvie

    2011-03-10

    We recently described the presence of large chromosomal segments resulting from independent horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, mostly of wine origin. We report here evidence for the amplification of one of these segments, a 17 kb DNA segment from Zygosaccharomyces bailii, in the genome of S. cerevisiae strains. The copy number, organization and location of this region differ considerably between strains, indicating that the insertions are independent and that they are post-HGT events. We identified eight different forms in 28 S. cerevisiae strains, mostly of wine origin, with up to four different copies in a single strain. The organization of these forms and the identification of an autonomously replicating sequence functional in S. cerevisiae, strongly suggest that an extrachromosomal circular DNA (eccDNA) molecule serves as an intermediate in the amplification of the Z. bailii region in yeast genomes. We found little or no sequence similarity at the breakpoint regions, suggesting that the insertions may be mediated by nonhomologous recombination. The diversity between these regions in S. cerevisiae represents roughly one third the divergence among the genomes of wine strains, which confirms the recent origin of this event, posterior to the start of wine strain expansion. This is the first report of a circle-based mechanism for the expansion of a DNA segment, mediated by nonhomologous recombination, in natural yeast populations.

  7. Amplification of a Zygosaccharomyces bailii DNA segment in wine yeast genomes by extrachromosomal circular DNA formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Galeote

    Full Text Available We recently described the presence of large chromosomal segments resulting from independent horizontal gene transfer (HGT events in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, mostly of wine origin. We report here evidence for the amplification of one of these segments, a 17 kb DNA segment from Zygosaccharomyces bailii, in the genome of S. cerevisiae strains. The copy number, organization and location of this region differ considerably between strains, indicating that the insertions are independent and that they are post-HGT events. We identified eight different forms in 28 S. cerevisiae strains, mostly of wine origin, with up to four different copies in a single strain. The organization of these forms and the identification of an autonomously replicating sequence functional in S. cerevisiae, strongly suggest that an extrachromosomal circular DNA (eccDNA molecule serves as an intermediate in the amplification of the Z. bailii region in yeast genomes. We found little or no sequence similarity at the breakpoint regions, suggesting that the insertions may be mediated by nonhomologous recombination. The diversity between these regions in S. cerevisiae represents roughly one third the divergence among the genomes of wine strains, which confirms the recent origin of this event, posterior to the start of wine strain expansion. This is the first report of a circle-based mechanism for the expansion of a DNA segment, mediated by nonhomologous recombination, in natural yeast populations.

  8. Direct detection of chicken genomic DNA for gender determination by thymine-DNA glycosylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porat, N; Bogdanov, K; Danielli, A; Arie, A; Samina, I; Hadani, A

    2011-02-01

    1. Birds, especially nestlings, are generally difficult to sex by morphology and early detection of chick gender in ovo in the hatchery would facilitate removal of unwanted chicks and diminish welfare objections regarding culling after hatch. 2. We describe a method to determine chicken gender without the need for PCR via use of Thymine-DNA Glycosylase (TDG). TDG restores thymine (T)/guanine (G) mismatches to cytosine (C)/G. We show here, that like DNA Polymerase, TDG can recognise, bind and function on a primer hybridised to chicken genomic DNA. 3. The primer contained a T to mismatch a G in a chicken genomic template and the T/G was cleaved with high fidelity by TDG. Thus, the chicken genomic DNA can be identified without PCR amplification via direct and linear detection. Sensitivity was increased using gender specific sequences from the chicken genome. 4. Currently, these are laboratory results, but we anticipate that further development will allow this method to be used in non-laboratory settings, where PCR cannot be employed.

  9. Determination of cDNA and genomic DNA sequences of hevamine, a chitinase from the rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokma, E; Spiering, M; Chow, KS; Mulder, PPMFA; Subroto, T; Beintema, JJ

    Hevamine is a chitinase from the rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis and belongs to the family 18 glycosyl hydrolases. This paper describes the cloning of hevamine DNA and cDNA sequences. Hevamine contains a signal peptide at the N-terminus and a putative vacuolar targeting sequence at the C-terminus

  10. Phenoloxidase from the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus: cDNA cloning, expression and substrate specificity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jingwei; Zhou, Zunchun; Dong, Ying; Sun, Hongjuan; Chen, Zhong; Yang, Aifu; Gao, Shan; Wang, Bai; Jiang, Bei; Guan, Xiaoyan

    2014-02-01

    Phenoloxidase (PO) is a crucial component of the immune system of echinoderms. In the present study, the full-length cDNA of PO (AjPO) was cloned from coelomocytes of the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus using 3'- and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR method, which is 2508 bp, with an open reading frame (ORF) of 2040 bp encoding 679 amino acids. AjPO contains a transmembrane domain, and three Cu-oxidase domains with copper binding centers formed by 10 histidines, one cysteine and one methionine respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that AjPO was clustered with laccase-type POs of invertebrates. Using the isolated membrane proteins as crude AjPO, the enzyme could catalyze the substrates catechol, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), dopamine and hydroquinone, but failed to oxidize tyrosine. The results described above collectively proved that AjPO was a membrane-binding laccase-type PO. The quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed that AjPO mRNA was expressed in muscle, body wall, coelomocytes, tube feet, respiratory tree and intestine with the highest expression level in coelomocytes. AjPO could be significantly induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN), Zymosan A and polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (PolyI:C), suggesting AjPO is closely involved in the defense against the infection of bacteria, fungi and double-stranded RNA viruses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A polymerase chain reaction-based method for isolating clones from a complimentary DNA library in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Thor Einar; Stephenson, Sally; Xiao, Yin; Whitehead, Jon; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2014-10-01

    The sheep (Ovis aries) is favored by many musculoskeletal tissue engineering groups as a large animal model because of its docile temperament and ease of husbandry. The size and weight of sheep are comparable to humans, which allows for the use of implants and fixation devices used in human clinical practice. The construction of a complimentary DNA (cDNA) library can capture the expression of genes in both a tissue- and time-specific manner. cDNA libraries have been a consistent source of gene discovery ever since the technology became commonplace more than three decades ago. Here, we describe the construction of a cDNA library using cells derived from sheep bones based on the pBluescript cDNA kit. Thirty clones were picked at random and sequenced. This led to the identification of a novel gene, C12orf29, which our initial experiments indicate is involved in skeletal biology. We also describe a polymerase chain reaction-based cDNA clone isolation method that allows the isolation of genes of interest from a cDNA library pool. The techniques outlined here can be applied in-house by smaller tissue engineering groups to generate tools for biomolecular research for large preclinical animal studies and highlights the power of standard cDNA library protocols to uncover novel genes.

  12. Demonstration of paternal inheritance of plastids in Picea (Pinaceae). [Hybridization of cloned, sup 32 -P labeled, petunia cpDNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stine, M.

    1988-01-01

    Chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) was purified from Picea glauca, P. pungens, P. engelmannii, and P. omorika, and was digested with several restriction endonucleases. Interspecific restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) of cpDNA were identified. The RFLPs were identified as cpDNA by the hybridization of cloned, {sup 32}-P labeled, petunia cpDNA to the polymorphic bands, and by the lack of hybridization of a cloned and labeled mtDNA probe from maize. Chloroplast DNA RFLPs that showed no intraspecific variation when examined across the natural range for each species, were used as markers to follow the inheritance of plastids in interspecific hybrids. The inheritance of plastids was determined for F{sub 1}-hybrids from reciprocal crosses of P. glauca and P. pungens, P. glauca and P. omorika, and F{sub 1}-hybrids of P. engelmannii x pungens. All 31 F{sub 1}-hybrids examined showed the cpDNA genotypes of the pollen parent, or the paternal species.

  13. Reduced local mutation density in regulatory DNA of cancer genomes is linked to DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Paz; Lawrence, Michael S; Haugen, Eric; Stoletzki, Nina; Stojanov, Petar; Thurman, Robert E; Garraway, Levi A; Mirkin, Sergei; Getz, Gad; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Sunyaev, Shamil R

    2014-01-01

    Carcinogenesis and neoplastic progression are mediated by the accumulation of somatic mutations. Here we report that the local density of somatic mutations in cancer genomes is highly reduced specifically in accessible regulatory DNA defined by DNase I hypersensitive sites. This reduction is independent of any known factors influencing somatic mutation density and is observed in diverse cancer types, suggesting a general mechanism. By analyzing individual cancer genomes, we show that the reduced local mutation density within regulatory DNA is linked to intact global genome repair machinery, with nearly complete abrogation of the hypomutation phenomenon in individual cancers that possess mutations in components of the nucleotide excision repair system. Together, our results connect chromatin structure, gene regulation and cancer-associated somatic mutation.

  14. Complete DNA sequence of the linear mitochondrial genome of the pathogenic yeast Candida parapsilosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nosek, J.; Novotna, M.; Hlavatovicova, Z.

    2004-01-01

    The complete sequence of the mitochondrial DNA of the opportunistic yeast pathogen Candida parapsilosis was determined. The mitochondrial genome is represented by linear DNA molecules terminating with tandem repeats of a 738-bp unit. The number of repeats varies, thus generating a population...... mitochondrial genome of its close relative C. albicans. The complete sequence has implications for both mitochondrial DNA replication and the evolution of linear DNA genomes....

  15. An efficient genomic DNA extraction from whole blood using Nextractor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Tae-Dong; Cho, Young-Uk; Lee, Woochang; Chun, Sail; Min, Won-Ki

    2014-08-05

    We evaluated the performance of the Nextractor NX-48 nucleic acid extractor system for the extraction of genomic DNA from whole blood samples. We compared the performance of the Nextractor to that of the QIAamp DNA Blood Mini Kit and the Maxwell system, using five whole blood samples. Extraction efficiencies were compared based on the total amount of extracted DNA adjusted by input blood volume, and the purity was compared. Polymerase chain reaction analyses were performed using ACTB as a target. The real-time PCR assay was carried out for housekeeping gene GAPDH. Total elapsed time for DNA extraction was compared. Extraction efficiencies for the QIAamp, Maxwell, and Nextractor were 25.4±3.8ng/μL, 9.2±0.6ng/μL, and 31.0±5.6ng/μL, respectively. No significant differences in purity were observed among three methods. DNA extracted using the ACTB was successfully amplified in all three methods. There were no obvious differences in Ct values for GAPDH real-time PCR. Total elapsed time for DNA extraction was about 50min for the QIAamp, 40min for the Maxwell, and 20min for the Nextractor. As the Nextractor is faster and requires less hands-on time than manual procedures, it may be useful for molecular diagnostic testing in clinical laboratories. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Order and correlations in genomic DNA sequences. The spectral approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobzin, Vasilii V; Chechetkin, Vladimir R

    2000-01-01

    The structural analysis of genomic DNA sequences is discussed in the framework of the spectral approach, which is sufficiently universal due to the reciprocal correspondence and mutual complementarity of Fourier transform length scales. The spectral characteristics of random sequences of the same nucleotide composition possess the property of self-averaging for relatively short sequences of length M≥100-300. Comparison with the characteristics of random sequences determines the statistical significance of the structural features observed. Apart from traditional applications to the search for hidden periodicities, spectral methods are also efficient in studying mutual correlations in DNA sequences. By combining spectra for structure factors and correlation functions, not only integral correlations can be estimated but also their origin identified. Using the structural spectral entropy approach, the regularity of a sequence can be quantitatively assessed. A brief introduction to the problem is also presented and other major methods of DNA sequence analysis described. (reviews of topical problems)

  17. Complete mitochondrial DNA genome of Pseudobagrus truncatus (Siluriformes: Bagridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hong-wei; Meng, Yan; Li, Zhong; Zhang, Yan; Zou, Gui-wei

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence of Pseudobagrus truncatus (Siluriformes: Bagridae) was determined. The complete mtDNA genome sequence of P. truncatus is 16,533 bp in size. It consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and one non-coding control region. The gene order and genes were the same as that found in other previously reported catfishes. The overall-based composition was 31.6% A, 26.7% T, 14.9% G and 26.8% C, with a high A + T content (58.3%). This complete mitogenome of P. truncatus provides a basic data for studies on species identification, molecular systematics and conservation genetics.

  18. Genome-wide DNA methylome alterations in acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dandan; Yan, Jing; Yuan, Yunlong; Wang, Cheng; Wu, Jia; Chen, Qingwen; Song, Jiaxi; Wang, Junjun

    2018-01-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a common disease with high mortality and morbidity rates. The methylation status of blood DNA may serve as a potential early diagnosis and prevention biomarker for numerous diseases. The present study was designed to explore novel genome-wide aberrant DNA methylation patterns associated with ACS. The Infinium HumanMethylation450 assay was used to examine genome-wide DNA methylation profiles in 3 pairs of ACS and control group samples. Epigenome-wide DNA methylation, genomic distribution, Gene Ontology (GO) term and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analyses were performed. The results were confirmed using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) and Sequenom MassARRAY analyses in ACS, stable coronary artery disease (SCAD) and control samples. A total of 11,342 differentially methylated (DM) 5'-C-phosphate-G-3' (CpG) sites were identified, including 8,865 hypomethylated and 2,477 hypermethylated CpG sites in the ACS group compared with the control samples. They varied in frequency across genomic compartments, but were particularly notable in gene bodies and shores. The results of GO term and KEGG pathway enrichment analyses revealed that the methylated genes were associated with certain biological processes and pathways. Despite the considerable variability in methylation data, the candidate selected possessed significant methylation alteration in mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 3 (SMAD3) transcription start site 155 (Chr1:67356838-Chr1:67356942). MSP analysis from 81 ACS samples, 74 SCAD samples and 53 healthy samples, and Sequenom MassARRAY analysis, confirmed that differential CpG methylation of SMAD3 was significantly corrected with the reference results of the HumanMethylation450 array. The data identified an ACS-specific DNA methylation profile with a large number of novel DM CpG sites, some of which may serve as candidate markers for the early diagnosis of ACS.

  19. 5'-end sequences of budding yeast full-length cDNA clones and quality scores - Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project 5'-end sequences of budding yeast full-length cDNA clones and quality... scores Data detail Data name 5'-end sequences of budding yeast full-length cDNA clones and quality...or-capping method, the sequence quality score generated by the Phred software, and links to SGD, dbEST and U...es. FASTA format. Quality Phred's quality score About This Database Database Desc...g yeast full-length cDNA clones and quality scores - Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project | LSDB Archive ...

  20. Comparison of standard PCR/cloning to single genome sequencing for analysis of HIV-1 populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Michael R; Kearney, Mary; Palmer, Sarah; Shao, Wei; Maldarelli, Frank; Coakley, Eoin P; Chappey, Colombe; Wanke, Christine; Coffin, John M

    2010-09-01

    To compare standard PCR/cloning and single genome sequencing (SGS) in their ability to reflect actual intra-patient polymorphism of HIV-1 populations, a total of 530 HIV-1 pro-pol sequences obtained by both sequencing techniques from a set of 17 ART naïve patient specimens was analyzed. For each specimen, 12 and 15 sequences, on average, were characterized by the two techniques. Using phylogenetic analysis, tests for panmixia and entropy, and Bland-Altman plots, no difference in population structure or genetic diversity was shown in 14 of the 17 subjects. Evidence of sampling bias by the presence of subsets of identical sequences was found by either method. Overall, the study shows that neither method was more biased than the other, and providing that an adequate number of PCR templates is analyzed, and that the bulk sequencing captures the diversity of the viral population, either method is likely to provide a similar measure of population diversity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Purification, cDNA Cloning, and Developmental Expression of the Nodule-Specific Uricase from Phaseolus vulgaris L. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Federico; Campos, Francisco; Padilla, Jaime; Bonneville, Jean-Marc; Enríquez, Consuelo; Caput, Daniel

    1987-01-01

    Nodule-specific uricase (uricase II) from Phaseolus vulgaris L. was purified to homogeneity by chromatographic methods. Purification data indicated that uricase II is approximately 2% of the total soluble protein from mature nodules. Specific antiserum was raised and used to determine the developmental expression and for immunoselection of polysomes. Uricase II was antigenically detected early in nodule development, 2 to 3 days before nitrogen fixation. Uricase-encoding cDNA clones were isolated by hybridizing a nodule-specific pUC9 cDNA library with labeled mRNA from immunoselected polysomes and a 35,000 molecular weight uricase II-encoding cDNA from soybean. An homologous clone (pNF-UR07) was used to assess the expression pattern of the specific transcript during development. Northern-blot analysis indicated that uricase II mRNA is exclusively expressed in nodule tissue. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16665575

  2. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of growth hormone cDNA of Neotropical freshwater fish Pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janeth Silva Pinheiro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available RT-PCR was used for amplifying Piaractus mesopotamicus growth hormone (GH cDNA obtained from mRNA extracted from pituitary cells. The amplified fragment was cloned and the complete cDNA sequence was determined. The cloned cDNA encompassed a sequence of 543 nucleotides that encoded a polypeptide of 178 amino acids corresponding to mature P. mesopotamicus GH. Comparison with other GH sequences showed a gap of 10 amino acids localized in the N terminus of the putative polypeptide of P. mesopotamicus. This same gap was also observed in other members of the family. Neighbor-joining tree analysis with GH sequences from fishes belonging to different taxonomic groups placed the P. mesopotamicus GH within the Otophysi group. To our knowledge, this is the first GH sequence of a Neotropical characiform fish deposited in GenBank.

  3. Characterization of cDNA clones for differentially expressed genes in embryos of dormant and nondormant Avena fatua L. caryopses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R R; Cranston, H J; Chaverra, M E; Dyer, W E

    1995-04-01

    The molecular regulation of seed dormancy was investigated using differential display to visualize and isolate cDNAs representing differentially expressed genes during early imbibition of dormant and nondormant Avena fatua L. embryos. Of about 3000 cDNA bands examined, 5 cDNAs hybridized with mRNAs exhibiting dormancy-associated expression patterns during the first 48 h of inhibition, while many more nondormancy-associated cDNAs were observed. Dormancy-associated clone AFD1 hybridized with a 1.5 kb mRNA barely detectable in dry dormant and nondormant embryos that became more abundant in dormant embryos after 24 h of imbibition. Clone AFD2 hybridized with two mRNAs, a 1.3 kb message constitutively expressed in dormant and nondormant embryos and a 0.9 kb message present at higher levels in dormant embryos after 3 h of imbibition. Nondormancy-associated clones AFN1, AFN2 and AFN3 hybridized with 1.5 kb, 1.7 kb and 1.1 kb mRNAs, respectively, that were more abundant in nondormant embryos during imbibition. Expression patterns of some mRNAs in dormant embryos induced to germinate by GA3 treatment were different than water controls, but were not identical to those observed in nondormant embryos. DNA sequence analysis revealed 76% sequence identity between clone AFN3 and a Citrus sinensis glutathione peroxidase-like cDNA, while significant sequence similarities with known genes were not found for other clones. Southern hybridization analyses showed that all clones represent low (1 to 4) copy number genes.

  4. Synthesis, cloning, and identification of DNA sequences complementary to mRNAs for alpha and beta subunits of thyrotropin.

    OpenAIRE

    Vamvakopoulos, N C; Monahan, J J; Kourides, I A

    1980-01-01

    Double-stranded cDNA sequences were synthesized, by using as templates mRNA for alpha and beta subunits of thyrotropin purified from mouse thyrotrophic pituitary tumours and cloned in Escherichia coli RR1 by insertion in the Pst I site of the bacterial plasmid pBR322 by use of poly(dA) x poly(dT) homopolymeric extensions. Plasmids containing inserted cDNA sequences were selected by resistance to tetracycline and sensitivity to ampicillin; those containing thyrotropin cDNA sequences were ident...

  5. DNA probe for lactobacillus delbrueckii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delley, M.; Mollet, B.; Hottinger, H. (Nestle Research Centre, Lausanne (Switzerland))

    1990-06-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognized L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an {alpha}-{sup 32}P-labeled probe.

  6. DNA probe for lactobacillus delbrueckii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delley, M.; Mollet, B.; Hottinger, H.

    1990-01-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognized L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an α- 32 P-labeled probe

  7. Characterization of a pollen-specific cDNA clone from Nicotiana tabacum expressed during microgametogenesis and germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weterings, K; Reijnen, W; van Aarssen, R; Kortstee, A; Spijkers, J; van Herpen, M; Schrauwen, J; Wullems, G

    1992-04-01

    This report describes the isolation and characterization of a cDNA clone representing a gene specifically expressed in pollen. A cDNA library was constructed against mRNA from mature pollen of Nicotiana tabacum. It was screened differentially against cDNA from mRNA of leaf and of pollen. One clone, NTPc303, was further characterized. On northern blot this clone hybridizes to a transcript 2100 nucleotides in length. NTPc303 is abundant in pollen. Expression of the corresponding gene is restricted to pollen, because no other generative or vegetative tissue contains transcripts hybridizing to NTPc303. Expression of NTP303 is evolutionarily conserved: homologous transcripts are present in pollen from various plant species. The first NTP303 transcripts are detectable on northern blot at the early bi-nucleate stage and accumulate until the pollen has reached maturity. During germination and pollen tube growth in vitro new NTP303 transcripts appear. This transcription has been proved by northern blots as well as by pulse labelling experiments. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that NTPc303 has an open reading frame coding for a predicted protein of 62 kDa. This protein shares homology to ascorbate oxidase and other members of the blue copper oxidase family. A possible function for this clone during pollen germination is discussed.

  8. Isolation of genomic DNA encoding transcription factor TFIID from Acanthamoeba castellanii: characterization of the promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, J M; Liu, F; Bateman, E

    1992-01-01

    We have isolated a genomic clone encoding Acanthamoeba castellanii TFIID. The clone contains the entire TFIID gene, 300 bp of 5' promoter sequences and several hundred base pairs of 3' non-coding sequence. The coding region is interrupted by two short introns, but is otherwise identical to Acanthamoeba TFIID cDNA. Comparisons between forty four Acanthamoeba intron 5' and 3' boundaries suggest a 5' splice site consensus of GTACG(T/C) and a 3' consensus of CAG. We determined the position of the transcription initiation site used in vivo, and show that the same site is used in vitro by homologous nuclear extracts. Deletion analysis of the promoter region shows that the minimal promoter required for efficient expression in vitro is located between -97 and +4 relative to the transcription start site. Three regions within the promoter are important for transcription in vitro; sequences between -97 and -35, the TATAAA box and the initiation region. The initiation region is dispensable but appears to position the transcription start site relative to the TATAAA box. The TATAAA box is absolutely required for transcription initiation whereas the upstream region stimulates transcription approximately five-fold. Images PMID:1408796

  9. Molecular profiling of microbial communities from contaminated sources: Use of subtractive cloning methods and rDNA spacer sequences. 1998 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb, F.T.

    1998-06-01

    'The major objective of the research is to provide appropriate sequences and to assemble a high-density DNA array of oligonucleotides that can be used for rapid profiling of microbial populations from polluted areas. The sequences to be assigned to the DNA array are chosen from from cloned genomic DNA sequences (the ribosomal operon, described below) from groundwater at DOE sites containing organic solvents. The sites, Hanford Nuclear Plant and Lawrence Livermore Site 300, have well characterized pollutant histories, which have been provided by the collaborators. At this mid-point of the project, over 60 unique sequence classes of intergenic spacer region have been idedntified from the first sample site. The use of these sequences as hybridization probes, and their frequency of occurrence, allow a clear distinction between bacterial communities before and after remediation by acetate/nitrate pumping. The authors have developed the hybridization conditions for identifying PCR products in a 96 well format, a versatile alignment and visualization program (acronym: MALIGN) developed by Dr. Dennis Maeder, has been used to align the ISRs, which are variable in length and sometimes in position of the tRNAs. Finally, in collaboration with Dr. W. Chen and Dr. J. Zhou at ORNL, they have significant evidence that mass spectrometer analysis can be used to determine the lengths of PCR amplified intergenic spacer DNA.'

  10. Molecular profiling of microbial communities from contaminated sources: Use of subtractive cloning methods and rDNA spacer sequences. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robb, F.T.

    1998-01-01

    'The major objective of the research is to provide appropriate sequences and to assemble a high-density DNA array of oligonucleotides that can be used for rapid profiling of microbial populations from polluted areas. The sequences to be assigned to the DNA array are chosen from from cloned genomic DNA sequences (the ribosomal operon, described below) from groundwater at DOE sites containing organic solvents. The sites, Hanford Nuclear Plant and Lawrence Livermore Site 300, have well characterized pollutant histories, which have been provided by the collaborators. At this mid-point of the project, over 60 unique sequence classes of intergenic spacer region have been identified from the first sample site. The use of these sequences as hybridization probes, and their frequency of occurrence, allow a clear distinction between bacterial communities before and after remediation by acetate/nitrate pumping. The authors have developed the hybridization conditions for identifying PCR products in a 96 well format, a versatile alignment and visualization program (acronym: MALIGN) developed by Dr. Dennis Maeder, has been used to align the ISRs, which are variable in length and sometimes in position of the tRNAs. Finally, in collaboration with Dr. W. Chen and Dr. J. Zhou at ORNL, they have significant evidence that mass spectrometer analysis can be used to determine the lengths of PCR amplified intergenic spacer DNA.'

  11. Facilitating the indirect detection of genomic DNA in an electrochemical DNA biosensor using magnetic nanoparticles and DNA ligase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roozbeh Hushiarian

    2015-12-01

    This technique was found to be reliably repeatable. The indirect detection of genomic DNA using this method is significantly improved and showed high efficiency in small amounts of samples with the detection limit of 5.37 × 10−14 M.

  12. Analysis of 4,664 high-quality sequence-finished poplar full-length cDNA clones and their utility for the discovery of genes responding to insect feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Carl J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Populus includes poplars, aspens and cottonwoods, which will be collectively referred to as poplars hereafter unless otherwise specified. Poplars are the dominant tree species in many forest ecosystems in the Northern Hemisphere and are of substantial economic value in plantation forestry. Poplar has been established as a model system for genomics studies of growth, development, and adaptation of woody perennial plants including secondary xylem formation, dormancy, adaptation to local environments, and biotic interactions. Results As part of the poplar genome sequencing project and the development of genomic resources for poplar, we have generated a full-length (FL-cDNA collection using the biotinylated CAP trapper method. We constructed four FLcDNA libraries using RNA from xylem, phloem and cambium, and green shoot tips and leaves from the P. trichocarpa Nisqually-1 genotype, as well as insect-attacked leaves of the P. trichocarpa × P. deltoides hybrid. Following careful selection of candidate cDNA clones, we used a combined strategy of paired end reads and primer walking to generate a set of 4,664 high-accuracy, sequence-verified FLcDNAs, which clustered into 3,990 putative unique genes. Mapping FLcDNAs to the poplar genome sequence combined with BLAST comparisons to previously predicted protein coding sequences in the poplar genome identified 39 FLcDNAs that likely localize to gaps in the current genome sequence assembly. Another 173 FLcDNAs mapped to the genome sequence but were not included among the previously predicted genes in the poplar genome. Comparative sequence analysis against Arabidopsis thaliana and other species in the non-redundant database of GenBank revealed that 11.5% of the poplar FLcDNAs display no significant sequence similarity to other plant proteins. By mapping the poplar FLcDNAs against transcriptome data previously obtained with a 15.5 K cDNA microarray, we identified 153 FLcDNA clones

  13. Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Followed by CRIPSR/Cas9 Microinjection Results in Highly Efficient Genome Editing in Cloned Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy P. Sheets

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The domestic pig is an ideal “dual purpose” animal model for agricultural and biomedical research. With the availability of genome editing tools such as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR and associated nuclease Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9, it is now possible to perform site-specific alterations with relative ease, and will likely help realize the potential of this valuable model. In this article, we investigated for the first time a combination of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT and direct injection of CRISPR/Cas ribonucleoprotein complex targeting GRB10 into the reconstituted oocytes to generate GRB10 ablated Ossabaw fetuses. This strategy resulted in highly efficient (100% generation of biallelic modifications in cloned fetuses. By combining SCNT with CRISPR/Cas9 microinjection, genome edited animals can now be produced without the need to manage a founder herd, while simultaneously eliminating the need for laborious in vitro culture and screening. Our approach utilizes standard cloning techniques while simultaneously performing genome editing in the cloned zygotes of a large animal model for agriculture and biomedical applications.

  14. cDNA cloning, mRNA distribution and heterogeneity, chromosomal location, and RFLP analysis of human osteopontin (OPN)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, M F; Kerr, J M; Termine, J D

    1990-01-01

    on a region of 4q that is near the centromere. A high-frequency restriction fragment length polymorphism was evident in the DNA from 29 unrelated individuals using the enzyme BglII. Analysis of total genomic DNA by digestion with several restriction enzymes, Southern blotting, and hybridization with the human...

  15. Genomic and Molecular Landscape of DNA Damage Repair Deficiency across The Cancer Genome Atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theo A. Knijnenburg

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: DNA damage repair (DDR pathways modulate cancer risk, progression, and therapeutic response. We systematically analyzed somatic alterations to provide a comprehensive view of DDR deficiency across 33 cancer types. Mutations with accompanying loss of heterozygosity were observed in over 1/3 of DDR genes, including TP53 and BRCA1/2. Other prevalent alterations included epigenetic silencing of the direct repair genes EXO5, MGMT, and ALKBH3 in ∼20% of samples. Homologous recombination deficiency (HRD was present at varying frequency in many cancer types, most notably ovarian cancer. However, in contrast to ovarian cancer, HRD was associated with worse outcomes in several other cancers. Protein structure-based analyses allowed us to predict functional consequences of rare, recurrent DDR mutations. A new machine-learning-based classifier developed from gene expression data allowed us to identify alterations that phenocopy deleterious TP53 mutations. These frequent DDR gene alterations in many human cancers have functional consequences that may determine cancer progression and guide therapy. : Knijnenburg et al. present The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA Pan-Cancer analysis of DNA damage repair (DDR deficiency in cancer. They use integrative genomic and molecular analyses to identify frequent DDR alterations across 33 cancer types, correlate gene- and pathway-level alterations with genome-wide measures of genome instability and impaired function, and demonstrate the prognostic utility of DDR deficiency scores. Keywords: The Cancer Genome Atlas PanCanAtlas project, DNA damage repair, somatic mutations, somatic copy-number alterations, epigenetic silencing, DNA damage footprints, mutational signatures, integrative statistical analysis, protein structure analysis

  16. Comparison of three genomic DNA extraction methods to obtain high DNA quality from maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Latif, Amani; Osman, Gamal

    2017-01-01

    The world's top three cereals, based on their monetary value, are rice, wheat, and corn. In cereal crops, DNA extraction is difficult owing to rigid non-cellulose components in the cell wall of leaves and high starch and protein content in grains. The advanced techniques in molecular biology require pure and quick extraction of DNA. The majority of existing DNA extraction methods rely on long incubation and multiple precipitations or commercially available kits to produce contaminant-free high molecular weight DNA. In this study, we compared three different methods used for the isolation of high-quality genomic DNA from the grains of cereal crop, Zea mays , with minor modifications. The DNA from the grains of two maize hybrids, M10 and M321, was extracted using extraction methods DNeasy Qiagen Plant Mini Kit, CTAB-method (with/without 1% PVP) and modified Mericon extraction. Genes coding for 45S ribosomal RNA are organized in tandem arrays of up to several thousand copies and contain codes for 18S, 5.8S and 26S rRNA units separated by internal transcribed spacers ITS1 and ITS2. While the rRNA units are evolutionary conserved, ITS regions show high level of interspecific divergence and have been used frequently in genetic diversity and phylogenetic studies. In this study, the genomic DNA was then amplified with PCR using primers specific for ITS gene. PCR products were then visualized on agarose gel. The modified Mericon extraction method was found to be the most efficient DNA extraction method, capable to provide high DNA yields with better quality, affordable cost and less time.

  17. Adaptive Change Inferred from Genomic Population Analysis of the ST93 Epidemic Clone of Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinear, Timothy P.; Holt, Kathryn E.; Chua, Kyra; Stepnell, Justin; Tuck, Kellie L.; Coombs, Geoffrey; Harrison, Paul Francis; Seemann, Torsten; Howden, Benjamin P.

    2014-01-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has emerged as a major public health problem around the world. In Australia, ST93-IV[2B] is the dominant CA-MRSA clone and displays significantly greater virulence than other S. aureus. Here, we have examined the evolution of ST93 via genomic analysis of 12 MSSA and 44 MRSA ST93 isolates, collected from around Australia over a 17-year period. Comparative analysis revealed a core genome of 2.6 Mb, sharing greater than 99.7% nucleotide identity. The accessory genome was 0.45 Mb and comprised additional mobile DNA elements, harboring resistance to erythromycin, trimethoprim, and tetracycline. Phylogenetic inference revealed a molecular clock and suggested that a single clone of methicillin susceptible, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) positive, ST93 S. aureus likely spread from North Western Australia in the early 1970s, acquiring methicillin resistance at least twice in the mid 1990s. We also explored associations between genotype and important MRSA phenotypes including oxacillin MIC and production of exotoxins (α-hemolysin [Hla], δ-hemolysin [Hld], PSMα3, and PVL). High-level expression of Hla is a signature feature of ST93 and reduced expression in eight isolates was readily explained by mutations in the agr locus. However, subtle but significant decreases in Hld were also noted over time that coincided with decreasing oxacillin resistance and were independent of agr mutations. The evolution of ST93 S. aureus is thus associated with a reduction in both exotoxin expression and oxacillin MIC, suggesting MRSA ST93 isolates are under pressure for adaptive change. PMID:24482534

  18. Isolation and analysis of high quality nuclear DNA with reduced organellar DNA for plant genome sequencing and resequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdepski Anna

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High throughput sequencing (HTS technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics by drastically reducing the cost of sequencing, making it feasible for individual labs to sequence or resequence plant genomes. Obtaining high quality, high molecular weight DNA from plants poses significant challenges due to the high copy number of chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA, as well as high levels of phenolic compounds and polysaccharides. Multiple methods have been used to isolate DNA from plants; the CTAB method is commonly used to isolate total cellular DNA from plants that contain nuclear DNA, as well as chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA. Alternatively, DNA can be isolated from nuclei to minimize chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA contamination. Results We describe optimized protocols for isolation of nuclear DNA from eight different plant species encompassing both monocot and eudicot species. These protocols use nuclei isolation to minimize chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA contamination. We also developed a protocol to determine the number of chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA copies relative to the nuclear DNA using quantitative real time PCR (qPCR. We compared DNA isolated from nuclei to total cellular DNA isolated with the CTAB method. As expected, DNA isolated from nuclei consistently yielded nuclear DNA with fewer chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA copies, as compared to the total cellular DNA prepared with the CTAB method. This protocol will allow for analysis of the quality and quantity of nuclear DNA before starting a plant whole genome sequencing or resequencing experiment. Conclusions Extracting high quality, high molecular weight nuclear DNA in plants has the potential to be a bottleneck in the era of whole genome sequencing and resequencing. The methods that are described here provide a framework for researchers to extract and quantify nuclear DNA in multiple types of plants.

  19. Chromosomal Localization of DNA Amplifications in Neuroblastoma Tumors Using cDNA Microarray Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Beheshti

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional comparative genomic hybridization (CGH profiling of neuroblastomas has identified many genomic aberrations, although the limited resolution has precluded a precise localization of sequences of interest within amplicons. To map high copy number genomic gains in clinically matched stage IV neuroblastomas, CGH analysis using a 19,200-feature cDNA microarray was used. A dedicated (freely available algorithm was developed for rapid in silico determination of chromosomal localizations of microarray cDNA targets, and for generation of an ideogram-type profile of copy number changes. Using these methodologies, novel gene amplifications undetectable by chromosome CGH were identified, and larger MYCN amplicon sizes (in one tumor up to 6 Mb than those previously reported in neuroblastoma were identified. The genes HPCAL1, LPIN1/KIAA0188, NAG, and NSE1/LOC151354 were found to be coamplified with MYCN. To determine whether stage IV primary tumors could be further subclassified based on their genomic copy number profiles, hierarchical clustering was performed. Cluster analysis of microarray CGH data identified three groups: 1 no amplifications evident, 2 a small MYCN amplicon as the only detectable imbalance, and 3 a large MYCN amplicon with additional gene amplifications. Application of CGH to cDNA microarray targets will help to determine both the variation of amplicon size and help better define amplification-dependent and independent pathways of progression in neuroblastoma.

  20. Virulence potential and genomic mapping of the worldwide clone Escherichia coli ST131.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Lavigne

    Full Text Available Recently, the worldwide propagation of clonal CTX-M-15-producing Escherichia coli isolates, namely ST131 and O25b:H4, has been reported. Like the majority of extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli isolates, the pandemic clone ST131 belongs to phylogenetic group B2, and has recently been shown to be highly virulent in a mouse model, even though it lacks several genes encoding key virulence factors (Pap, Cnf1 and HlyA. Using two animal models, Caenorhabditis elegans and zebrafish embryos, we assessed the virulence of three E. coli ST131 strains (2 CTX-M-15- producing urine and 1 non-ESBL-producing faecal isolate, comparing them with five non-ST131 B2 and a group A uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC. In C. elegans, the three ST131 strains showed intermediate virulence between the non virulent group A isolate and the virulent non-ST131 B2 strains. In zebrafish, the CTX-M-15-producing ST131 UPEC isolates were also less virulent than the non-ST131 B2 strains, suggesting that the production of CTX-M-15 is not correlated with enhanced virulence. Amongst the non-ST131 B2 group isolates, variation in pathogenic potential in zebrafish embryos was observed ranging from intermediate to highly virulent. Interestingly, the ST131 strains were equally persistent in surviving embryos as the non-ST131-group B2 strains, suggesting similar mechanisms may account for development of persistent infection. Optical maps of the genome of the ST131 strains were compared with those of 24 reference E. coli strains. Although small differences were seen within the ST131 strains, the tree built on the optical maps showed that these strains belonged to a specific cluster (86% similarity with only 45% similarity with the other group B2 strains and 25% with strains of group A and D. Thus, the ST131 clone has a genetic composition that differs from other group B2 strains, and appears to be less virulent than previously suspected.

  1. The roles of adenoviral vectors and donor DNA structures on genome editing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holkers, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and efficient genome editing is primarily dependent on the generation of a sequence-specific, genomic double-stranded DNA break (DSB) combined with the introduction of an exogenous DNA template into target cells. The exogenous template, called donor DNA, normally contains the foreign

  2. Maintenance of Genome Integrity: How Mammalian Cells Orchestrate Genome Duplication by Coordinating Replicative and Specialized DNA Polymerases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Barnes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Precise duplication of the human genome is challenging due to both its size and sequence complexity. DNA polymerase errors made during replication, repair or recombination are central to creating mutations that drive cancer and aging. Here, we address the regulation of human DNA polymerases, specifically how human cells orchestrate DNA polymerases in the face of stress to complete replication and maintain genome stability. DNA polymerases of the B-family are uniquely adept at accurate genome replication, but there are numerous situations in which one or more additional DNA polymerases are required to complete genome replication. Polymerases of the Y-family have been extensively studied in the bypass of DNA lesions; however, recent research has revealed that these polymerases play important roles in normal human physiology. Replication stress is widely cited as contributing to genome instability, and is caused by conditions leading to slowed or stalled DNA replication. Common Fragile Sites epitomize “difficult to replicate” genome regions that are particularly vulnerable to replication stress, and are associated with DNA breakage and structural variation. In this review, we summarize the roles of both the replicative and Y-family polymerases in human cells, and focus on how these activities are regulated during normal and perturbed genome replication.

  3. Cloning, DNA sequence, and expression of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c/sub 2/ gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donohue, T.J.; McEwan, A.G.; Kaplan, S.

    1986-11-01

    The Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c/sub 2/ functions as a mobile electron carrier in both aerobic and photosynthetic electron transport chains. Synthetic deoxyoligonucleotide probes, based on the known amino acid sequence of this protein (M/sub r/ 14,000), were used to identify and clone the cytochrome c/sub 2/ structural gene (cycA). DNA sequence analysis of the cycA gene indicated the presence of a typical procaryotic 21-residue signal sequence, suggesting that this periplasmic protein is synthesized in vivo as a precursor. Synthesis of an immunoreactive cytochrome c/sub 2/ precursor protein (M/sub r/ 15,500) was observed in vitro when plasmids containing the cycA gene were used as templates in an R. sphaeroides coupled transcription-translation system. Approximately 500 base pairs of DNA upstream of the cycA gene was sufficient to allow expression of this gene product in vitro. Northern blot analysis with an internal cycA-specific probe identified at least two possibly monocistronic transcripts present in both different cellular levels and relative stoichiometries in steady-state cells grown under different physiological conditions. The ratio of the small (740-mucleotide) and large (920-nucleotide) cycA-specific mRNA species was dependent on cultural conditions but was not affected by light intensity under photosynthetic conditions. These results suggest that the increase in the cellular level of the cytochrome c/sub 2/ protein found in photosynthetic cells was due, in part, to increased transcription of the single-copy cyc operon.

  4. Genome-Wide Prediction of DNA Methylation Using DNA Composition and Sequence Complexity in Human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chengchao; Yao, Shixin; Li, Xinghao; Chen, Chujia; Hu, Xuehai

    2017-02-16

    DNA methylation plays a significant role in transcriptional regulation by repressing activity. Change of the DNA methylation level is an important factor affecting the expression of target genes and downstream phenotypes. Because current experimental technologies can only assay a small proportion of CpG sites in the human genome, it is urgent to develop reliable computational models for predicting genome-wide DNA methylation. Here, we proposed a novel algorithm that accurately extracted sequence complexity features (seven features) and developed a support-vector-machine-based prediction model with integration of the reported DNA composition features (trinucleotide frequency and GC content, 65 features) by utilizing the methylation profiles of embryonic stem cells in human. The prediction results from 22 human chromosomes with size-varied windows showed that the 600-bp window achieved the best average accuracy of 94.7%. Moreover, comparisons with two existing methods further showed the superiority of our model, and cross-species predictions on mouse data also demonstrated that our model has certain generalization ability. Finally, a statistical test of the experimental data and the predicted data on functional regions annotated by ChromHMM found that six out of 10 regions were consistent, which implies reliable prediction of unassayed CpG sites. Accordingly, we believe that our novel model will be useful and reliable in predicting DNA methylation.

  5. Cloning, Characterization, and Functional Expression of Phospholipase Dα cDNA from Banana (Musa acuminate L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Phospholipase D (PLD plays a key role in adaptive responses of postharvest fruits. A cDNA clone of banana (Musa acuminate L. PLDα (MaPLDα was obtained by RT-PCR in this study. The MaPLDα gene contains a complete open reading frame (ORF encoding a 92-kDa protein composed of 832 amino acid residues and possesses a characteristic C2 domain and two catalytic H×K×××D (abbr. HKD motifs. The two HKD motifs are separated by 341 amino acid residues in the primary structure. Relatively higher PLD activity and expression of MaPLDα mRNA were detected in developing tissues compared to senescent or mature tissues in individual leaves, flower, stem, and fruit organs, respectively. The expression profile of PLDα mRNA in postharvest banana fruits at different temperatures was determined, and the MaPLDα mRNA reached the highest expression peak on day 5 at 25°C and on day 7 at 12°C. The results provide useful information for maintaining postharvest quality and extending the storage life of banana fruit.

  6. cDNA cloning of prophenoloxidase from the freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus and its activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspán, A; Huang, T S; Cerenius, L; Söderhäll, K

    1995-02-14

    Prophenoloxidase (proPO), an enzyme that is the terminal component of the so-called proPO activating system, a defense and recognition system in crustaceans and insects, has been purified and cloned from a crayfish blood cell cDNA library. The deduced amino acid sequence codes for a polypeptide with a mass of 80,732 Da, which is close to 76 kDa, the apparent mass of the purified enzyme. proPO contains two copper atoms, and two putative copper-binding sites were found in the deduced amino acid sequence. Sequence comparisons show that these putative copper-binding sites are similar to the corresponding sites in arthropod hemocyanins and also, although the sequence similarities are less extensive, similar to tyrosinases from vertebrates and microorganisms. The purified enzyme is a typical tyrosinase because it hydroxylates monophenols and oxidizes o-diphenols but does not oxidize p-diphenols. If a homogeneous preparation of crayfish proPO were incubated with a homogeneous sample of the proPO activating enzyme, a serine proteinase, the cleavage of proPO by this trypsin-like enzyme was found to occur between Arg-176 and Thr-177.

  7. Characterization of cucumber fermentation spoilage bacteria by enrichment culture and 16S rDNA cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breidt, Fred; Medina, Eduardo; Wafa, Doria; Pérez-Díaz, Ilenys; Franco, Wendy; Huang, Hsin-Yu; Johanningsmeier, Suzanne D; Kim, Jae Ho

    2013-03-01

    Commercial cucumber fermentations are typically carried out in 40000 L fermentation tanks. A secondary fermentation can occur after sugars are consumed that results in the formation of acetic, propionic, and butyric acids, concomitantly with the loss of lactic acid and an increase in pH. Spoilage fermentations can result in significant economic loss for industrial producers. The microbiota that result in spoilage remain incompletely defined. Previous studies have implicated yeasts, lactic acid bacteria, enterobacteriaceae, and Clostridia as having a role in spoilage fermentations. We report that Propionibacterium and Pectinatus isolates from cucumber fermentation spoilage converted lactic acid to propionic acid, increasing pH. The analysis of 16S rDNA cloning libraries confirmed and expanded the knowledge gained from previous studies using classical microbiological methods. Our data show that Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria supersede Gram-positive Fermincutes species after the pH rises from around 3.2 to pH 5, and propionic and butyric acids are produced. Characterization of the spoilage microbiota is an important first step in efforts to prevent cucumber fermentation spoilage. An understanding of the microorganisms that cause commercial cucumber fermentation spoilage may aid in developing methods to prevent the spoilage from occurring. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. Massive depletion of bovine leukemia virus proviral clones located in genomic transcriptionally active sites during primary infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, Nicolas A; Gutiérrez, Gerónimo; Rodriguez, Sabrina M; de Brogniez, Alix; Renotte, Nathalie; Alvarez, Irene; Trono, Karina; Willems, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Deltaretroviruses such as human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and bovine leukemia virus (BLV) induce a persistent infection that remains generally asymptomatic but can also lead to leukemia or lymphoma. These viruses replicate by infecting new lymphocytes (i.e. the infectious cycle) or via clonal expansion of the infected cells (mitotic cycle). The relative importance of these two cycles in viral replication varies during infection. The majority of infected clones are created early before the onset of an efficient immune response. Later on, the main replication route is mitotic expansion of pre-existing infected clones. Due to the paucity of available samples and for ethical reasons, only scarce data is available on early infection by HTLV-1. Therefore, we addressed this question in a comparative BLV model. We used high-throughput sequencing to map and quantify the insertion sites of the provirus in order to monitor the clonality of the BLV-infected cells population (i.e. the number of distinct clones and abundance of each clone). We found that BLV propagation shifts from cell neoinfection to clonal proliferation in about 2 months from inoculation. Initially, BLV proviral integration significantly favors transcribed regions of the genome. Negative selection then eliminates 97% of the clones detected at seroconversion and disfavors BLV-infected cells carrying a provirus located close to a promoter or a gene. Nevertheless, among the surviving proviruses, clone abundance positively correlates with proximity of the provirus to a transcribed region. Two opposite forces thus operate during primary infection and dictate the fate of long term clonal composition: (1) initial integration inside genes or promoters and (2) host negative selection disfavoring proviruses located next to transcribed regions. The result of this initial response will contribute to the proviral load set point value as clonal abundance will benefit from carrying a provirus in transcribed

  9. Massive depletion of bovine leukemia virus proviral clones located in genomic transcriptionally active sites during primary infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas A Gillet

    Full Text Available Deltaretroviruses such as human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 and bovine leukemia virus (BLV induce a persistent infection that remains generally asymptomatic but can also lead to leukemia or lymphoma. These viruses replicate by infecting new lymphocytes (i.e. the infectious cycle or via clonal expansion of the infected cells (mitotic cycle. The relative importance of these two cycles in viral replication varies during infection. The majority of infected clones are created early before the onset of an efficient immune response. Later on, the main replication route is mitotic expansion of pre-existing infected clones. Due to the paucity of available samples and for ethical reasons, only scarce data is available on early infection by HTLV-1. Therefore, we addressed this question in a comparative BLV model. We used high-throughput sequencing to map and quantify the insertion sites of the provirus in order to monitor the clonality of the BLV-infected cells population (i.e. the number of distinct clones and abundance of each clone. We found that BLV propagation shifts from cell neoinfection to clonal proliferation in about 2 months from inoculation. Initially, BLV proviral integration significantly favors transcribed regions of the genome. Negative selection then eliminates 97% of the clones detected at seroconversion and disfavors BLV-infected cells carrying a provirus located close to a promoter or a gene. Nevertheless, among the surviving proviruses, clone abundance positively correlates with proximity of the provirus to a transcribed region. Two opposite forces thus operate during primary infection and dictate the fate of long term clonal composition: (1 initial integration inside genes or promoters and (2 host negative selection disfavoring proviruses located next to transcribed regions. The result of this initial response will contribute to the proviral load set point value as clonal abundance will benefit from carrying a provirus in

  10. Genomic distribution of H3K9me2 and DNA methylation in a maize genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick T West

    Full Text Available DNA methylation and dimethylation of lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me2 are two chromatin modifications that can be associated with gene expression or recombination rate. The maize genome provides a complex landscape of interspersed genes and transposons. The genome-wide distribution of DNA methylation and H3K9me2 were investigated in seedling tissue for the maize inbred B73 and compared to patterns of these modifications observed in Arabidopsis thaliana. Most maize transposons are highly enriched for DNA methylation in CG and CHG contexts and for H3K9me2. In contrast to findings in Arabidopsis, maize CHH levels in transposons are generally low but some sub-families of transposons are enriched for CHH methylation and these families exhibit low levels of H3K9me2. The profile of modifications over genes reveals that DNA methylation and H3K9me2 is quite low near the beginning and end of genes. Although elevated CG and CHG methylation are found within gene bodies, CHH and H3K9me2 remain low. Maize has much higher levels of CHG methylation within gene bodies than observed in Arabidopsis and this is partially attributable to the presence of transposons within introns for some maize genes. These transposons are associated with high levels of CHG methylation and H3K9me2 but do not appear to prevent transcriptional elongation. Although the general trend is for a strong depletion of H3K9me2 and CHG near the transcription start site there are some putative genes that have high levels of these chromatin modifications. This study provides a clear view of the relationship between DNA methylation and H3K9me2 in the maize genome and how the distribution of these modifications is shaped by the interplay of genes and transposons.

  11. Spatiotemporal diversification of intrapatient genomic clones and early drug development concepts realize the roadmap of precision cancer medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roukos, Dimitrios H

    2017-08-01

    The unmet clinical needs of high relapse and cancer-related death rates are reflected by the poor understanding of the genome-wide mutational landscape and molecular mechanisms orchestrating therapeutic resistance. Emerging potential solutions to this challenge include the exploration of cancer genome dynamic evolution in time and space. Breakthrough next-generation sequencing (NGS) applications including multiregional NGS for intratumor heterogeneity identification, repeated cell-free DNA/circulating tumor DNA-NGS for detecting circulating genomic subclones and their comparison to reveal intrapatient heterogeneity (IPH) could identify the dynamic emergence of resistant subclones in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant and metastatic setting. Based on genome-phenotype map, and potential promising findings, rigorous evaluation of IPH spatiotemporal evolution and early drug development concepts in innovative clinical trials could dramatically speed up the translational process to achieve clinical precision oncology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cloning and characterization of dispersed repetitive DNA derived from microdissected sex chromosomes of Rumex acetosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, Beatrice; Navajas-Pérez, Rafael; Lozano, Rafael; Parker, John S; de la Herrán, Roberto; Rejón, Carmelo Ruiz; Rejón, Manuel Ruiz; Garrido-Ramos, Manuel; Jamilena, Manuel

    2006-02-01

    Rumex acetosa is characterized by a multiple chromosome system (2n = 12 + XX for females, and 2n = 12 + XY1Y2 for males), in which sex is determined by the ratio between the number of X chromosomes and autosome sets. For a better understanding of the molecular structure and evolution of plant sex chromosomes, we have generated a sex chromosome specific library of R. acetosa by microdissection. The screening of this library has allowed us to identify 5 repetitive DNA families that have been characterized in detail. One of these families, DOP-20, has shown no homology with other sequences in databases. Nevertheless, the putative proteins encoded by the other 4 families, DOP-8, DOP-47, DOP-60, and DOP-61, show homology with proteins from different plant retroelements, including poly proteins from Ty3-gypsy- and Ty1-copia-like long terminal repeat (LTR) retroelements, and reverse transcriptase from non-LTR retro elements. Results indicate that sequences from these 5 families are dispersed throughout the genome of both males and females, but no appreciable accumulation or differentiation of these types of sequences have been found in the Y chromosomes. These repetitive DNA sequences are more conserved in the genome of other dioecious species such as Rumex papillaris, Rumex intermedius, Rumex thyrsoides, Rumex hastatulus, and Rumex suffruticosus, than in the polygamous, gynodioecious, or hermaphrodite species Rumex induratus, Rumex lunaria, Rumex con glom er atus, Rumex crispus, and Rumex bucephalo phorus, which supports a single origin of dioecious species in this genus. The implication of these transposable elements in the origin and evolution of the heteromorphic sex chromosomes of R. acetosa is discussed.

  13. A DNA minor groove electronegative potential genome map based on photo-chemical probing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; Nielsen, Peter Eigil; Hansen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    The double-stranded DNA of the genome contains both sequence information directly relating to the protein and RNA coding as well as functional and structural information relating to protein recognition. Only recently is the importance of DNA shape in this recognition process being fully appreciated...... resolution of any genome, and it is illustrated how such detailed studies of this sequence dependent, inherent property of the DNA may reflect on genome organization, gene expression and chromosomal condensation....

  14. Reverse gyrase functions in genome integrity maintenance by protecting DNA breaks in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Wenyuan; Feng, Xu; She, Qunxin

    2017-01-01

    Reverse gyrase introduces positive supercoils to circular DNA and is implicated in genome stability maintenance in thermophiles. The extremely thermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus encodes two reverse gyrase proteins, TopR1 (topoisomerase reverse gyrase 1) and TopR2, whose functions in thermophili...... genomic DNA degradation during MMS treatment, accompanied by a higher rate of cell death. Taken together, these results indicate that TopR1 probably facilitates genome integrity maintenance by protecting DNA breaks from thermo-degradation in vivo....

  15. Multi-scale coding of genomic information: From DNA sequence to genome structure and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arneodo, Alain, E-mail: alain.arneodo@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Vaillant, Cedric, E-mail: cedric.vaillant@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Audit, Benjamin, E-mail: benjamin.audit@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Argoul, Francoise, E-mail: francoise.argoul@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); D' Aubenton-Carafa, Yves, E-mail: daubenton@cgm.cnrs-gif.f [Centre de Genetique Moleculaire, CNRS, Allee de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Thermes, Claude, E-mail: claude.thermes@cgm.cnrs-gif.f [Centre de Genetique Moleculaire, CNRS, Allee de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2011-02-15

    Understanding how chromatin is spatially and dynamically organized in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells and how this affects genome functions is one of the main challenges of cell biology. Since the different orders of packaging in the hierarchical organization of DNA condition the accessibility of DNA sequence elements to trans-acting factors that control the transcription and replication processes, there is actually a wealth of structural and dynamical information to learn in the primary DNA sequence. In this review, we show that when using concepts, methodologies, numerical and experimental techniques coming from statistical mechanics and nonlinear physics combined with wavelet-based multi-scale signal processing, we are able to decipher the multi-scale sequence encoding of chromatin condensation-decondensation mechanisms that play a fundamental role in regulating many molecular processes involved in nuclear functions.

  16. Genome and Metagenome Sequencing: Using the Human Methyl-Binding Domain to Partition Genomic DNA Derived from Plant Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erbay Yigit

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Variation in the distribution of methylated CpG (methyl-CpG in genomic DNA (gDNA across the tree of life is biologically interesting and useful in genomic studies. We illustrate the use of human methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD2 to fractionate angiosperm DNA into eukaryotic nuclear (methyl-CpG-rich vs. organellar and prokaryotic (methyl-CpG-poor elements for genomic and metagenomic sequencing projects. Methods: MBD2 has been used to enrich prokaryotic DNA in animal systems. Using gDNA from five model angiosperm species, we apply a similar approach to identify whether MBD2 can fractionate plant gDNA into methyl-CpG-depleted vs. enriched methyl-CpG elements. For each sample, three gDNA libraries were sequenced: (1 untreated gDNA, (2 a methyl-CpG-depleted fraction, and (3 a methyl-CpG-enriched fraction. Results: Relative to untreated gDNA, the methyl-depleted libraries showed a 3.2–11.2-fold and 3.4–11.3-fold increase in chloroplast DNA (cpDNA and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, respectively. Methyl-enriched fractions showed a 1.8–31.3-fold and 1.3–29.0-fold decrease in cpDNA and mtDNA, respectively. Discussion: The application of MBD2 enabled fractionation of plant gDNA. The effectiveness was particularly striking for monocot gDNA (Poaceae. When sufficiently effective on a sample, this approach can increase the cost efficiency of sequencing plant genomes as well as prokaryotes living in or on plant tissues.

  17. Highly sensitive polymerase chain reaction-free quantum dot-based quantification of forensic genomic DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tak, Yu Kyung; Kim, Won Young; Kim, Min Jung; Han, Eunyoung; Han, Myun Soo; Kim, Jong Jin; Kim, Wook; Lee, Jong Eun; Song, Joon Myong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Genomic DNA quantification were performed using a quantum dot-labeled Alu sequence. ► This probe provided PCR-free determination of human genomic DNA. ► Qdot-labeled Alu probe-hybridized genomic DNAs had a 2.5-femtogram detection limit. ► Qdot-labeled Alu sequence was used to assess DNA samples for human identification. - Abstract: Forensic DNA samples can degrade easily due to exposure to light and moisture at the crime scene. In addition, the amount of DNA acquired at a criminal site is inherently limited. This limited amount of human DNA has to be quantified accurately after the process of DNA extraction. The accurately quantified extracted genomic DNA is then used as a DNA template in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification for short tandem repeat (STR) human identification. Accordingly, highly sensitive and human-specific quantification of forensic DNA samples is an essential issue in forensic study. In this work, a quantum dot (Qdot)-labeled Alu sequence was developed as a probe to simultaneously satisfy both the high sensitivity and human genome selectivity for quantification of forensic DNA samples. This probe provided PCR-free determination of human genomic DNA and had a 2.5-femtogram detection limit due to the strong emission and photostability of the Qdot. The Qdot-labeled Alu sequence has been used successfully to assess 18 different forensic DNA samples for STR human identification.

  18. HIV-1 Entry Cofactor: Functional cDNA Cloning of a Seven-Transmembrane, G Protein–Coupled Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Yu; Broder, Christopher C.; Kennedy, Paul E.; Berger, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    A cofactor for HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus-type 1) fusion and entry was identified with the use of a novel functional complementary DNA (cDNA) cloning strategy. This protein, designated “fusin,” is a putative G protein–coupled receptor with seven transmembrane segments. Recombinant fusin enabled CD4-expressing nonhuman cell types to support HIV-1 Env-mediated cell fusion and HIV-1 infection. Antibodies to fusin blocked cell fusion and infection with normal CD4-positive human target ce...

  19. Evidence that two types of 18S rDNA coexist in the genome of Dugesia (Schmidtea) mediterranea (Platyhelminthes, Turbellaria, Tricladida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, S; Giribet, G; Ribera, C; Baguñà; Riutort, M

    1996-07-01

    Sequences of 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) are increasingly being used to infer phylogenetic relationships among living taxa. Although the 18S rDNA belongs to a multigene family, all its copies are kept homogeneous by concerted evolution (Dover 1982; Hillis and Dixon 1991). To date, there is only one well-characterized exception to this rule, the protozoan Plasmodium (Gunderson et al. 1987; Waters, Syin, and McCutchan 1989; Qari et al. 1994). Here we report the 1st case of 18S rDNA polymorphism within a metazoan species. Two types (I and II) of 18S rDNA have been found and sequenced in the platyhelminth Dugesia (Schmidtea) mediterranea (Turbellaria, Seriata, Tricladida). Southern blot analysis suggested that both types of rDNA are present in the genome of this flatworm. This was confirmed through sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis using the neighbor-joining method and bootstrap test. Although secondary structure analysis suggests that both types are functional, only type I seems to be transcribed to RNA, as demonstrated by Northern blot analysis. The finding of different types of 18S rDNAs in a single genome stresses the need for analyzing a large number of clones whenever 18S sequences obtained by PCR amplification and cloning are being used in phylogenetic reconstruction.

  20. An efficient method for genomic DNA extraction from different molluscs species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jorge C; Chaves, Raquel; Bastos, Estela; Leitão, Alexandra; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique

    2011-01-01

    The selection of a DNA extraction method is a critical step when subsequent analysis depends on the DNA quality and quantity. Unlike mammals, for which several capable DNA extraction methods have been developed, for molluscs the availability of optimized genomic DNA extraction protocols is clearly insufficient. Several aspects such as animal physiology, the type (e.g., adductor muscle or gills) or quantity of tissue, can explain the lack of efficiency (quality and yield) in molluscs genomic DNA extraction procedure. In an attempt to overcome these aspects, this work describes an efficient method for molluscs genomic DNA extraction that was tested in several species from different orders: Veneridae, Ostreidae, Anomiidae, Cardiidae (Bivalvia) and Muricidae (Gastropoda), with different weight sample tissues. The isolated DNA was of high molecular weight with high yield and purity, even with reduced quantities of tissue. Moreover, the genomic DNA isolated, demonstrated to be suitable for several downstream molecular techniques, such as PCR sequencing among others.

  1. The mitochondrial and plastid genomes of Volvox carteri: bloated molecules rich in repetitive DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Robert W

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The magnitude of noncoding DNA in organelle genomes can vary significantly; it is argued that much of this variation is attributable to the dissemination of selfish DNA. The results of a previous study indicate that the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA of the green alga Volvox carteri abounds with palindromic repeats, which appear to be selfish elements. We became interested in the evolution and distribution of these repeats when, during a cursory exploration of the V. carteri nuclear DNA (nucDNA and plastid DNA (ptDNA sequences, we found palindromic repeats with similar structural features to those of the mtDNA. Upon this discovery, we decided to investigate the diversity and evolutionary implications of these palindromic elements by sequencing and characterizing large portions of mtDNA and ptDNA and then comparing these data to the V. carteri draft nuclear genome sequence. Results We sequenced 30 and 420 kilobases (kb of the mitochondrial and plastid genomes of V. carteri, respectively – resulting in partial assemblies of these genomes. The mitochondrial genome is the most bloated green-algal mtDNA observed to date: ~61% of the sequence is noncoding, most of which is comprised of short palindromic repeats spread throughout the intergenic and intronic regions. The plastid genome is the largest (>420 kb and most expanded (>80% noncoding ptDNA sequence yet discovered, with a myriad of palindromic repeats in the noncoding regions, which have a similar size and secondary structure to those of the mtDNA. We found that 15 kb (~0.01% of the nuclear genome are homologous to the palindromic elements of the mtDNA, and 50 kb (~0.05% are homologous to those of the ptDNA. Conclusion Selfish elements in the form of short palindromic repeats have propagated in the V. carteri mtDNA and ptDNA, resulting in the distension of these genomes. Copies of these same repeats are also found in a small fraction of the nucDNA, but appear to be inert in this

  2. Genome-Wide Discriminatory Information Patterns of Cytosine DNA Methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robersy Sanchez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cytosine DNA methylation (CDM is a highly abundant, heritable but reversible chemical modification to the genome. Herein, a machine learning approach was applied to analyze the accumulation of epigenetic marks in methylomes of 152 ecotypes and 85 silencing mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. In an information-thermodynamics framework, two measurements were used: (1 the amount of information gained/lost with the CDM changes I R and (2 the uncertainty of not observing a SNP L C R . We hypothesize that epigenetic marks are chromosomal footprints accounting for different ontogenetic and phylogenetic histories of individual populations. A machine learning approach is proposed to verify this hypothesis. Results support the hypothesis by the existence of discriminatory information (DI patterns of CDM able to discriminate between individuals and between individual subpopulations. The statistical analyses revealed a strong association between the topologies of the structured population of Arabidopsis ecotypes based on I R and on LCR, respectively. A statistical-physical relationship between I R and L C R was also found. Results to date imply that the genome-wide distribution of CDM changes is not only part of the biological signal created by the methylation regulatory machinery, but ensures the stability of the DNA molecule, preserving the integrity of the genetic message under continuous stress from thermal fluctuations in the cell environment.

  3. ThreaDNA: predicting DNA mechanics' contribution to sequence selectivity of proteins along whole genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevost, Jasmin; Vaillant, Cédric; Meyer, Sam; Rost, Burkhard

    2018-02-15

    Many DNA-binding proteins recognize their target sequences indirectly, by sensing DNA's response to mechanical distortion. ThreaDNA estimates this response based on high-resolution structures of the protein-DNA complex of interest. Implementing an efficient nanoscale modeling of DNA deformations involving essentially no adjustable parameters, it returns the profile of deformation energy along whole genomes, at base-pair resolution, within minutes on usual laptop/desktop computers. Our predictions can also be easily combined with estimations of direct selectivity through a generalized form of position-weight-matrices. The formalism of ThreaDNA is accessible to a wide audience. We demonstrate the importance of indirect readout for the nucleosome as well as the bacterial regulators Fis and CRP. Combined with the direct contribution provided by usual sequence motifs, it significantly improves the prediction of sequence selectivity, and allows quantifying the two distinct physical mechanisms underlying it. Python software available at bioinfo.insa-lyon.fr, natively executable on Linux/MacOS systems with a user-friendly graphical interface. Galaxy webserver version available. sam.meyer@insa-lyon.fr. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  4. Molecular cloning and nucleotide sequence of full-length cDNA for sweet potato catalase mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakajo, S; Nakamura, K; Asahi, T

    1987-06-01

    A nearly full-length cDNA clone for catalase (pCAS01) was obtained through immunological screening of cDNA expression library constructed from size-fractionated poly(A)-rich RNA of wounded sweet potato tuberous roots by Escherichia coli expression vector-primed cDNA synthesis. Two additional catalase cDNA clones (pCAS10 and pCAS13), which contained cDNA inserts slightly longer than that of pCAS01 at their 5'-termini, were identified by colony hybridization of another cDNA library. Those three catalase cDNAs contained primary structures not identical, but closely related, to one another based on their restriction enzyme and RNase cleavage mapping analyses, suggesting that microheterogeneity exists in catalase mRNAs. The cDNA insert of pCAS13 carried the entire catalase coding capacity, since the RNA transcribed in vitro from the cDNA under the SP6 phage promoter directed the synthesis of a catalase polypeptide in the wheat germ in vitro translation assay. The nucleotide sequencing of these catalase cDNAs indicated that 1900-base catalase mRNA contained a coding region of 1476 bases. The amino acid sequence of sweet potato catalase deduced from the nucleotide sequence was 35 amino acids shorter than rat liver catalase [Furuta, S., Hayashi, H., Hijikata, M., Miyazawa, S., Osumi, T. & Hashimoto, T. (1986) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 83, 313-317]. Although these two sequences showed only 38% homology, the sequences around the amino acid residues implicated in catalytic function, heme ligand or heme contact had been well conserved during evolution.

  5. Gross genomic damage measured by DNA image cytometry independently predicts gastric cancer patient survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belien, J.A.M.; Buffart, T.E.; Gill, A.; Broeckaert, M.A.M.; Quirke, P.; Meijer, G.A.; Grabsch, H.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: DNA aneuploidy reflects gross genomic changes. It can be measured by flow cytometry (FCM-DNA) or image cytometry (ICM-DNA). In gastric cancer, the prevalence of DNA aneuploidy has been reported to range from 27 to 100%, with conflicting associations with clinicopathological variables.

  6. Genome-wide DNA methylation scan in major depressive disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarven Sabunciyan

    Full Text Available While genome-wide association studies are ongoing to identify sequence variation influencing susceptibility to major depressive disorder (MDD, epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation, which can be influenced by environment, might also play a role. Here we present the first genome-wide DNA methylation (DNAm scan in MDD. We compared 39 postmortem frontal cortex MDD samples to 26 controls. DNA was hybridized to our Comprehensive High-throughput Arrays for Relative Methylation (CHARM platform, covering 3.5 million CpGs. CHARM identified 224 candidate regions with DNAm differences >10%. These regions are highly enriched for neuronal growth and development genes. Ten of 17 regions for which validation was attempted showed true DNAm differences; the greatest were in PRIMA1, with 12-15% increased DNAm in MDD (p = 0.0002-0.0003, and a concomitant decrease in gene expression. These results must be considered pilot data, however, as we could only test replication in a small number of additional brain samples (n = 16, which showed no significant difference in PRIMA1. Because PRIMA1 anchors acetylcholinesterase in neuronal membranes, decreased expression could result in decreased enzyme function and increased cholinergic transmission, consistent with a role in MDD. We observed decreased immunoreactivity for acetylcholinesterase in MDD brain with increased PRIMA1 DNAm, non-significant at p = 0.08.While we cannot draw firm conclusions about PRIMA1 DNAm in MDD, the involvement of neuronal development genes across the set showing differential methylation suggests a role for epigenetics in the illness. Further studies using limbic system brain regions might shed additional light on this role.

  7. Comparative evaluation of prokaryotic 16S rDNA clone libraries and SSCP in groundwater samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larentis, Michael; Alfreider, Albin

    2011-06-01

    A comparison of ribosomal RNA sequence analysis methods based on clone libraries and single-strand conformational polymorphism technique (SSCP) was performed with groundwater samples obtained between 523-555 meters below surface. The coverage of analyzed clones by phylotype-richness estimates was between 88-100%, confirming that the clone libraries were adequately examined. Analysis of individual bands retrieved from SSCP gels identified 1-6 different taxonomic units per band, suggesting that a single SSCP band does often represent more than one single prokaryotic species. The prokaryotic diversity obtained by both methods showed an overall difference of 42-80%. In comparison to SSCP, clone libraries underestimated the phylogenetic diversity and only 36-66% of the phylotypes observed with SSCP were also detected with the clone libraries. An exception was a sample where the SSCP analysis of Archaea identified only half of the phylotypes retrieved by the clone library. Overall, this study suggests that the clone library and the SSCP approach do not provide an identical picture of the prokaryotic diversity in groundwater samples. The results clearly show that the SSCP method, although this approach is prone to generate methodological artifacts, was able to detect significantly more phylotypes than microbial community analysis based on clone libraries. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Simultaneous Whole Mitochondrial Genome Sequencing with Short Overlapping Amplicons Suitable for Degraded DNA Using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaitanya, Lakshmi; Ralf, Arwin; van Oven, Mannis; Kupiec, Tomasz; Chang, Joseph; Lagacé, Robert; Kayser, Manfred

    2015-12-01

    Whole mitochondrial (mt) genome analysis enables a considerable increase in analysis throughput, and improves the discriminatory power to the maximum possible phylogenetic resolution. Most established protocols on the different massively parallel sequencing (MPS) platforms, however, invariably involve the PCR amplification of large fragments, typically several kilobases in size, which may fail due to mtDNA fragmentation in the available degraded materials. We introduce a MPS tiling approach for simultaneous whole human mt genome sequencing using 161 short overlapping amplicons (average 200 bp) with the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. We illustrate the performance of this new method by sequencing 20 DNA samples belonging to different worldwide mtDNA haplogroups. Additional quality control, particularly regarding the potential detection of nuclear insertions of mtDNA (NUMTs), was performed by comparative MPS analysis using the conventional long-range amplification method. Preliminary sensitivity testing revealed that detailed haplogroup inference was feasible with 100 pg genomic input DNA. Complete mt genome coverage was achieved from DNA samples experimentally degraded down to genomic fragment sizes of about 220 bp, and up to 90% coverage from naturally degraded samples. Overall, we introduce a new approach for whole mt genome MPS analysis from degraded and nondegraded materials relevant to resolve and infer maternal genetic ancestry at complete resolution in anthropological, evolutionary, medical, and forensic applications. © 2015 The Authors. **Human Mutation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Automated seamless DNA co-transformation cloning with direct expression vectors applying positive or negative insert selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frey Daniel

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular DNA cloning is crucial to many experiments and with the trend to higher throughput of modern approaches automated techniques are urgently required. We have established an automated, fast and flexible low-cost expression cloning approach requiring only vector and insert amplification by PCR and co-transformation of the products. Results Our vectors apply positive selection for the insert or negative selection against empty vector molecules and drive strong expression of target proteins in E.coli cells. Variable tags are available both in N-terminal or C-terminal position. A newly developed β-lactamase (ΔW290 selection cassette contains a segment inside the β-lactamase open reading frame encoding a stretch of hydrophilic amino acids that result in a T7 promoter when back-translated. This position of the promoter permits positive selection and attenuated expression of fusion proteins with C-terminal tags. We have tested eight vectors by inserting six target sequences of variable length, provenience and function. The target proteins were cloned, expressed and detected using an automated Tecan Freedom Evo II liquid handling work station. Only two colonies had to be picked to score with 85% correct inserts while 80% of those were positive in expression tests. Conclusions Our results establish co-transformation and positive/negative selection cloning in conjunction with the provided vectors and selection cassettes as an automatable alternative to commercialized high-throughput cloning systems like Gateway® or ligase-independent cloning (LIC .

  10. Subcloning of DNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struhl, K

    2001-05-01

    The essence of recombinant DNA technology is the joining of two or more separate segments of DNA to generate a single DNA molecule that is capable of autonomous replication in a given host. The simplest constructions of hybrid DNA molecules involve the cloning of insert sequences into plasmid or bacteriophage cloning vectors. The insert sequences can derive from essentially any organism, and they may be isolated directly from the genome, from mRNA, or from previously cloned DNA segments (in which case, the procedure is termed subcloning). Alternatively, insert DNAs can be created directly by DNA synthesis. This unit provides protocols for the subcloning of DNA fragments and ligation of DNA fragments in gels.

  11. Emergence of a new epidemic Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A Clone in the African meningitis belt: high-resolution picture of genomic changes that mediate immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamelas, Araceli; Harris, Simon R; Röltgen, Katharina; Dangy, Jean-Pierre; Hauser, Julia; Kingsley, Robert A; Connor, Thomas R; Sie, Ali; Hodgson, Abraham; Dougan, Gordon; Parkhill, Julian; Bentley, Stephen D; Pluschke, Gerd

    2014-10-21

    In the African "meningitis belt," outbreaks of meningococcal meningitis occur in cycles, representing a model for the role of host-pathogen interactions in epidemic processes. The periodicity of the epidemics is not well understood, nor is it currently possible to predict them. In our longitudinal colonization and disease surveys, we have observed waves of clonal replacement with the same serogroup, suggesting that immunity to noncapsular antigens plays a significant role in natural herd immunity. Here, through comparative genomic analysis of 100 meningococcal isolates, we provide a high-resolution view of the evolutionary changes that occurred during clonal replacement of a hypervirulent meningococcal clone (ST-7) by a descendant clone (ST-2859). We show that the majority of genetic changes are due to homologous recombination of laterally acquired DNA, with more than 20% of these events involving acquisition of DNA from other species. Signals of adaptation to evade herd immunity were indicated by genomic hot spots of recombination. Most striking is the high frequency of changes involving the pgl locus, which determines the glycosylation patterns of major protein antigens. High-frequency changes were also observed for genes involved in the regulation of pilus expression and the synthesis of Maf3 adhesins, highlighting the importance of these surface features in host-pathogen interaction and immune evasion. Importance: While established meningococcal capsule polysaccharide vaccines are protective through the induction of anticapsular antibodies, findings of our longitudinal studies in the African meningitis belt have indicated that immunity to noncapsular antigens plays a significant role in natural herd immunity. Our results show that meningococci evade herd immunity through the rapid homologous replacement of just a few key genomic loci that affect noncapsular cell surface components. Identification of recombination hot spots thus represents an eminent approach to

  12. Genome-Wide Analysis of DNA Methylation in Human Amnion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinsil; Pitlick, Mitchell M.; Christine, Paul J.; Schaefer, Amanda R.; Saleme, Cesar; Comas, Belén; Cosentino, Viviana; Gadow, Enrique; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    The amnion is a specialized tissue in contact with the amniotic fluid, which is in a constantly changing state. To investigate the importance of epigenetic events in this tissue in the physiology and pathophysiology of pregnancy, we performed genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of human amnion from term (with and without labor) and preterm deliveries. Using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip, we identified genes exhibiting differential methylation associated with normal labor and preterm birth. Functional analysis of the differentially methylated genes revealed biologically relevant enriched gene sets. Bisulfite sequencing analysis of the promoter region of the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene detected two CpG dinucleotides showing significant methylation differences among the three groups of samples. Hypermethylation of the CpG island of the solute carrier family 30 member 3 (SLC30A3) gene in preterm amnion was confirmed by methylation-specific PCR. This work provides preliminary evidence that DNA methylation changes in the amnion may be at least partially involved in the physiological process of labor and the etiology of preterm birth and suggests that DNA methylation profiles, in combination with other biological data, may provide valuable insight into the mechanisms underlying normal and pathological pregnancies. PMID:23533356

  13. Volume visualization of multiple alignment of large genomicDNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Nameeta; Dillard, Scott E.; Weber, Gunther H.; Hamann, Bernd

    2005-07-25

    Genomes of hundreds of species have been sequenced to date, and many more are being sequenced. As more and more sequence data sets become available, and as the challenge of comparing these massive ''billion basepair DNA sequences'' becomes substantial, so does the need for more powerful tools supporting the exploration of these data sets. Similarity score data used to compare aligned DNA sequences is inherently one-dimensional. One-dimensional (1D) representations of these data sets do not effectively utilize screen real estate. As a result, tools using 1D representations are incapable of providing informatory overview for extremely large data sets. We present a technique to arrange 1D data in 3D space to allow us to apply state-of-the-art interactive volume visualization techniques for data exploration. We demonstrate our technique using multi-millions-basepair-long aligned DNA sequence data and compare it with traditional 1D line plots. The results show that our technique is superior in providing an overview of entire data sets. Our technique, coupled with 1D line plots, results in effective multi-resolution visualization of very large aligned sequence data sets.

  14. Spectroscopic quantification of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in genomic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahal, Tamar; Gilat, Noa; Michaeli, Yael; Redy-Keisar, Orit; Shabat, Doron; Ebenstein, Yuval

    2014-08-19

    5-Hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), a modified form of the DNA base cytosine, is an important epigenetic mark linked to regulation of gene expression in development, and tumorigenesis. We have developed a spectroscopic method for a global quantification of 5hmC in genomic DNA. The assay is performed within a multiwell plate, which allows simultaneous recording of up to 350 samples. Our quantification procedure of 5hmC is direct, simple, and rapid. It relies on a two-step protocol that consists of enzymatic glucosylation of 5hmC with an azide-modified glucose, followed by a "click reaction" with an alkyne-fluorescent tag. The fluorescence intensity recorded from the DNA sample is proportional to its 5hmC content and can be quantified by a simple plate reader measurement. This labeling technique is specific and highly sensitive, allowing detection of 5hmC down to 0.002% of the total nucleotides. Our results reveal significant variations in the 5hmC content obtained from different mouse tissues, in agreement with previously reported data.

  15. Cloning and analysis of an HMG gene from the lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharman, A C; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Holland, P W

    1997-01-01

    Evolution has shaped the organisation of vertebrate genomes, including the human genome. To shed further light on genome history, we have cloned and analysed an HMG gene from lamprey, representing one of the earliest vertebrate lineages. Genes of the HMG1/2 family encode chromosomal proteins...... that bind DNA in a non-sequence-specific manner, and have been implicated in a variety of cellular processes dependent on chromatin structure. They are characterised by two copies of a conserved motif, the HMG box, followed by an acidic C-terminal region. We report here the cloning of a cDNA clone from...

  16. A genome-wide DNA methylation study in colorectal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dodsworth Charlotte

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We performed a genome-wide scan of 27,578 CpG loci covering 14,475 genes to identify differentially methylated loci (DML in colorectal carcinoma (CRC. Methods We used Illumina's Infinium methylation assay in paired DNA samples extracted from 24 fresh frozen CRC tissues and their corresponding normal colon tissues from 24 consecutive diagnosed patients at a tertiary medical center. Results We found a total of 627 DML in CRC covering 513 genes, of which 535 are novel DML covering 465 genes. We also validated the Illumina Infinium methylation data for top-ranking genes by non-bisulfite conversion q-PCR-based methyl profiler assay in a subset of the same samples. We also carried out integration of genome-wide copy number and expression microarray along with methylation profiling to see the functional effect of methylation. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA showed that among the major "gene sets" that are hypermethylated in CRC are the sets: "inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by G-protein signaling", "Rac guanyl-nucleotide exchange factor activity", "regulation of retinoic acid receptor signaling pathway" and "estrogen receptor activity". Two-level nested cross validation showed that DML-based predictive models may offer reasonable sensitivity (around 89%, specificity (around 95%, positive predictive value (around 95% and negative predictive value (around 89%, suggesting that these markers may have potential clinical application. Conclusion Our genome-wide methylation study in CRC clearly supports most of the previous findings; additionally we found a large number of novel DML in CRC tissue. If confirmed in future studies, these findings may lead to identification of genomic markers for potential clinical application.

  17. Molecular characterization of a Leishmania donovani cDNA clone with similarity to human 20S proteasome a-type subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C B; Jørgensen, L; Jensen, A T

    2000-01-01

    Using plasma from patients infected or previously infected with Leishmania donovanii, we isolated a L. donovanii cDNA clone with similarity to the proteasome a-type subunit from humans and other eukaryotes. The cDNA clone, designated LePa, was DNA sequenced and Northern blot analysis of L...... out of 25 patients with visceral leishmaniasis and four out of 18 patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis contained IgG antibodies which reacted with the purified LePa fusion protein as evaluated in an ELISA. The LePa DNA sequence was inserted into an eukaryotic expression vector and Balb/c mice were...

  18. Genetic discrimination for three gynogenetic clones of silver carp Hypophthalmichthys molitrix, based on restriction endonuclease analysis of Nd5-Nd6 region of mitochondrial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianfeng; Ye, Yuzhen; Wu, Qingjiang

    2005-03-01

    Three artificial gynogenetic clones of silver carp were produced for the analysis of restriction enzyme digestion patterns of ND5-ND6 region from mtDNA of the clones. It is revealed that all intraclonal individuals shared completely the same digestion patterns but among interclonal individuals did not. The three clones were mixed and cultured in a pond together for two years, and restriction endonuclease digestion patterns of ND5 ND6 were used as genetic markers to assess the growth performance of each clone.

  19. Molecular cloning, genomic organization, developmental regulation, and a knock-out mutant of a novel leu-rich repeats-containing G protein-coupled receptor (DLGR-2) from Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Kathrine Krageskov; Hauser, Frank; Schiøtt, Morten

    2000-01-01

    After screening the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project database with sequences from a recently characterized Leu-rich repeats-containing G protein-coupled receptor (LGR) fromDrosophila (DLGR-1), we identified a second gene for a different LGR (DLGR-2) and cloned its cDNA. DLGR-2 is 1360 amino acid...... LGRs (LGR-4 and LGR-5). This homology includes the seven transmembrane region (e.g., 49% amino acid identity with the human TSH receptor) and the very large extracellular amino terminus. This amino terminus contains 18 Leu-rich repeats-in contrast with the 3 mammalian glycoprotein hormone receptors...

  20. Array patterns and clones - RMOS | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ed by large scale cDNA analysis in RGP (rice genome research program). - Rice8987 f_array Our microarray wit...m about 40,000 cDNA clones isolated in the first research stage of the rice genome research project. Field 1

  1. Construction of an infectious cDNA clone of genotype 1 avian hepatitis E virus: characterization of its pathogenicity in broiler breeders and demonstration of its utility in studying the role of the hypervariable region in virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Jeong; Lee, Byung-Woo; Moon, Hyun-Woo; Sung, Haan Woo; Yoon, Byung-Il; Meng, Xiang-Jin; Kwon, Hyuk Moo

    2015-05-01

    A full-length infectious cDNA clone of the genotype 1 Korean avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) (pT11-aHEV-K) was constructed and its infectivity and pathogenicity were investigated in leghorn male hepatoma (LMH) chicken cells and broiler breeders. We demonstrated that capped RNA transcripts from the pT11-aHEV-K clone were translation competent when transfected into LMH cells and infectious when injected intrahepatically into the livers of chickens. Gross and microscopic pathological lesions underpinned the avian HEV infection and helped characterize its pathogenicity in broiler breeder chickens. The avian HEV genome contains a hypervariable region (HVR) in ORF1. To demonstrate the utility of the avian HEV infectious clone, several mutants with various deletions in and beyond the known HVR were derived from the pT11-aHEV-K clone. The HVR-deletion mutants were replication competent in LMH cells, although the deletion mutants extending beyond the known HVR were non-viable. By using the pT11-aHEV-K infectious clone as the backbone, an avian HEV luciferase reporter replicon and HVR-deletion mutant replicons were also generated. The luciferase assay results of the reporter replicon and its mutants support the data obtained from the infectious clone and its derived mutants. To further determine the effect of HVR deletion on virus replication, the capped RNA transcripts from the wild-type pT11-aHEV-K clone and its mutants were injected intrahepatically into chickens. The HVR-deletion mutants that were translation competent in LMH cells displayed in chickens an attenuation phenotype of avian HEV infectivity, suggesting that the avian HEV HVR is important in modulating the virus infectivity and pathogenicity. © 2015 The Authors.

  2. Hybridization study of developmental plastid gene expression in mustard (Sinapsis alba L.) with cloned probes for most plastid DNA regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, G

    1984-07-01

    An approach to assess the extent of developmental gene expression of various regions of plastid (pt)DNA in mustard (Sinapis alba L.) is described. It involves cloning of most ptDNA regions. The cloned regions then serve as hybridization probes to detect and assess the abundance of complementary RNA sequences represented in total plastid RNA. By comparison of the hybridization pattern observed with plastid RNA from either dark-grown or light-grown plants it was found that many ptDNA regions are constitutively expressed, while several 'inducible' regions account for much higher transcript levels in the chloroplast than in the etioplast stage. The reverse situation, i.e. 'repressed' regions which would account for higher transcript levels in the etioplast, was not observed. The hybridization results obtained with RNA from 'intermediatetype' plastids suggest that transient gene expression is a common feature during light-induced chloroplast development. The time-course of gene expression differs for various ptDNA regions.

  3. [Cloning and sequence analysis of Eg95 cDNA from different stages of Echinococcus granulosus in Xinjiang].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ren-yong; Ding, Jian-bing; Wen, Hao; Zhang, Wen-bao; Li, Jun; Lu, Xiao-mei

    2003-01-01

    To study expression and sequence differences of Echinococcus granulosus 95(Eg95) antigen cDNA from different stages of protoscolex, oncosphere and adult worm of E. granulosus from Xinjiang Uighur Aut. Reg. In accordance with the sequence of Eg95 antigen cDNA, the primers of Eg95 were designed. Eg95 antigen cDNAs were amplified by PCR from protoscolex, oncosphere and adult worm cDNA libraries of E. granulosus, respectively and were cloned into pUCm-T plasmid, and sequenced. The sequences were analyzed by DNAman and GenBank/BLAST biosoftware. PCR results showed that Eg95 antigen cDNA was amplified from three stages of E. granulosus cDNA libraries. Sequencing analysis indicated that the Eg95 cDNA length was 402 bp, same as the reported data in GenBank. The Eg95 antigen cDNA was expressed in the different life-cycle stages of E. granulosus in Xinjiang and there was no nucleic acid sequence difference of Eg95 antigen among the protoscolex, oncosphere and adult worm of E. granulosus.

  4. Molecular characterization of transgenic shallots (Allium cepa L.) by adaptor ligation PCR (AL-PCR) and sequencing of genomic DNA flanking T-DNA borders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, S.J.; Henken, G.; Sofiari, E.; Jacobsen, E.; Krens, F.A.

    2001-01-01

    Genomic DNA blot hybridization is traditionally used to demonstrate that, via genetic transformation, foreign genes are integrated into host genomes. However, in large genome species, such as Allium cepa L., the use of genomic DNA blot hybridization is pushed towards its limits, because a

  5. Molecular cloning and functional expression of a Drosophila receptor for the neuropeptides capa-1 and -2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Annette; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Williamson, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The Drosophila Genome Project website contains an annotated gene (CG14575) for a G protein-coupled receptor. We cloned this receptor and found that the cloned cDNA did not correspond to the annotated gene; it partly contained different exons and additional exons located at the 5(')-end of the ann......The Drosophila Genome Project website contains an annotated gene (CG14575) for a G protein-coupled receptor. We cloned this receptor and found that the cloned cDNA did not correspond to the annotated gene; it partly contained different exons and additional exons located at the 5(')-end...... of the annotated gene. We expressed the coding part of the cloned cDNA in Chinese hamster ovary cells and found that the receptor was activated by two neuropeptides, capa-1 and -2, encoded by the Drosophila capability gene. Database searches led to the identification of a similar receptor in the genome from...

  6. A protocol for large scale genomic DNA isolation for cacao genetics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Advances in DNA technology, such as marker assisted selection, detection of quantitative trait loci and genomic selection also require the isolation of DNA from a large number of samples and the preservation of tissue samples for future use in cacao genome studies. The present study proposes a method for the ...

  7. Simplified extraction of good quality genomic DNA from a variety of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Depending on the nature and complexity of plant material, proper method needs to be employed for extraction of genomic DNA, along with its performance evaluation by different molecular techniques. Here, we optimized and employed a simple genomic DNA isolation protocol suitable for a variety of plant materials ...

  8. A simple and rapid lysis method for preparation of genomic DNA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Moreover, the resultant genomic DNA was in good quantity and quality and can be used successfully for restriction endonucleases digestion, PCR amplification and others types of molecular biology manipulations. Keywords: Genomic DNA, lysis, carvacrol, Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli, Erwinia chrysanthemi ...

  9. Genomic DNA extraction and barcoding of endophytic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Patricia L; Hennell, James R; Sucher, Nikolaus J

    2012-01-01

    Endophytes live inter- and/or intracellularly inside healthy aboveground tissues of plants without causing disease. Endophytic fungi are found in virtually every vascular plant species examined. The origins of this symbiotic relationship between endophytes go back to the emergence of vascular plants. Endophytic fungi receive nutrition and protection from their hosts while the plants benefit from the production of fungal secondary metabolites, which enhance the host plants' resistance to herbivores, pathogens, and various abiotic stresses. Endophytic fungi have attracted increased interest as potential sources of secondary metabolites with agricultural, industrial, and medicinal use. This chapter provides detailed protocols for isolation of genomic DNA from fungal endophytes and its use in polymerase chain reaction-based amplification of the internal transcribed spacer region between the conserved flanking regions of the small and large subunit of ribosomal RNA for barcoding purposes.

  10. Human placental Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase. cap alpha. subunit: cDNA cloning, tissue expression, DNA polymorphism, and chromosomal localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chehab, F.F.; Kan, Y.W.; Law, M.L.; Hartz, J.; Kao, F.T.; Blostein, R.

    1987-11-01

    A 2.2-kilobase clone comprising a major portion of the coding sequence of the Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase ..cap alpha.. subunit was cloned from human placenta and its sequence was identical to that encoding the ..cap alpha.. subunit of human kidney and HeLa cells. Transfer blot analysis of the mRNA products of the Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase gene from various human tissues and cell lines revealed only one band (approx. = 4.7 kilobases) under low and high stringency washing conditions. The levels of expression in the tissues were intestine > placenta > liver > pancreas, and in the cell lines the levels were human erythroleukemia > butyrate-induced colon > colon > brain > HeLa cells. mRNA was undetectable in reticulocytes, consistent with the authors failure to detect positive clones in a size-selected ( > 2 kilobases) lambdagt11 reticulocyte cDNA library. DNA analysis revealed by a polymorphic EcoRI band and chromosome localization by flow sorting and in situ hybridization showed that the ..cap alpha.. subunit is on the short is on the short arm (band p11-p13) of chromosome 1.

  11. The detection of large deletions or duplications in genomic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J A L; Barton, D E; Cockburn, D J; Taylor, G R

    2002-11-01

    While methods for the detection of point mutations and small insertions or deletions in genomic DNA are well established, the detection of larger (>100 bp) genomic duplications or deletions can be more difficult. Most mutation scanning methods use PCR as a first step, but the subsequent analyses are usually qualitative rather than quantitative. Gene dosage methods based on PCR need to be quantitative (i.e., they should report molar quantities of starting material) or semi-quantitative (i.e., they should report gene dosage relative to an internal standard). Without some sort of quantitation, heterozygous deletions and duplications may be overlooked and therefore be under-ascertained. Gene dosage methods provide the additional benefit of reporting allele drop-out in the PCR. This could impact on SNP surveys, where large-scale genotyping may miss null alleles. Here we review recent developments in techniques for the detection of this type of mutation and compare their relative strengths and weaknesses. We emphasize that comprehensive mutation analysis should include scanning for large insertions and deletions and duplications. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Detecting single DNA copy number variations in complex genomes using one nanogram of starting DNA and BAC-array CGH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaud-Bataille, Marine; Valent, Alexander; Soularue, Pascal; Perot, Christine; Inda, Maria Mar; Receveur, Aline; Smaïli, Sadek; Roest Crollius, Hugues; Bénard, Jean; Bernheim, Alain; Gidrol, Xavier; Danglot, Gisèle

    2004-07-29

    Comparative genomic hybridization to bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-arrays (array-CGH) is a highly efficient technique, allowing the simultaneous measurement of genomic DNA copy number at hundreds or thousands of loci, and the reliable detection of local one-copy-level variations. We report a genome-wide amplification method allowing the same measurement sensitivity, using 1 ng of starting genomic DNA, instead of the classical 1 microg usually necessary. Using a discrete series of DNA fragments, we defined the parameters adapted to the most faithful ligation-mediated PCR amplification and the limits of the technique. The optimized protocol allows a 3000-fold DNA amplification, retaining the quantitative characteristics of the initial genome. Validation of the amplification procedure, using DNA from 10 tumour cell lines hybridized to BAC-arrays of 1500 spots, showed almost perfectly superimposed ratios for the non-amplified and amplified DNAs. Correlation coefficients of 0.96 and 0.99 were observed for regions of low-copy-level variations and all regions, respectively (including in vivo amplified oncogenes). Finally, labelling DNA using two nucleotides bearing the same fluorophore led to a significant increase in reproducibility and to the correct detection of one-copy gain or loss in >90% of the analysed data, even for pseudotriploid tumour genomes.

  13. Genome-wide cloning, identification, classification and functional analysis of cotton heat shock transcription factors in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Sun, Na; Deng, Ting; Zhang, Lida; Zuo, Kaijing

    2014-11-06

    Heat shock transcriptional factors (Hsfs) play important roles in the processes of biotic and abiotic stresses as well as in plant development. Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum, 2n=4x=(AD)2=52) is an important crop for natural fiber production. Due to continuous high temperature and intermittent drought, heat stress is becoming a handicap to improve cotton yield and lint quality. Recently, the related wild diploid species Gossypium raimondii genome (2n=2x=(D5)2=26) has been fully sequenced. In order to analyze the functions of different Hsfs at the genome-wide level, detailed characterization and analysis of the Hsf gene family in G. hirsutum is indispensable. EST assembly and genome-wide analyses were applied to clone and identify heat shock transcription factor (Hsf) genes in Upland cotton (GhHsf). Forty GhHsf genes were cloned, identified and classified into three main classes (A, B and C) according to the characteristics of their domains. Analysis of gene duplications showed that GhHsfs have occurred more frequently than reported in plant genomes such as Arabidopsis and Populus. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed that all GhHsf transcripts are expressed in most cotton plant tissues including roots, stems, leaves and developing fibers, and abundantly in developing ovules. Three expression patterns were confirmed in GhHsfs when cotton plants were exposed to high temperature for 1 h. GhHsf39 exhibited the most immediate response to heat shock. Comparative analysis of Hsfs expression differences between the wild-type and fiberless mutant suggested that Hsfs are involved in fiber development. Comparative genome analysis showed that Upland cotton D-subgenome contains 40 Hsf members, and that the whole genome of Upland cotton contains more than 80 Hsf genes due to genome duplication. The expression patterns in different tissues in response to heat shock showed that GhHsfs are important for heat stress as well as fiber development. These results provide an improved

  14. Cloning and molecular characterization of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-encoding gene and cDNA from the plant pathogenic fungus Glomerella cingulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, M D; Rikkerink, E H; Solon, S L; Crowhurst, R N

    1992-12-01

    The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (gpdA) has been identified from a genomic DNA library prepared from the plant pathogenic fungus Glomerella cingulata. Nucleotide sequence data revealed that this gene codes for a putative 338-amino-acid protein encoded by two exons of 129 and 885 bp, separated by an intron 216 bp long. The 5' leader sequence is also spliced by an intron of 156 bp. A cDNA clone was prepared using the polymerase chain reaction, the sequence of which was used to confirm the presence of the intron in the coding sequence and the splicing of the 5' leader sequence. The transcriptional start point (tsp) was mapped at -253 nt from the site of the initiation of translation by primer extension and is adjacent to a 42-bp pyrimidine-rich region. The general structure of the 5' flanking region shows similarities to gpdA from Aspergillus nidulans. The putative protein product is 71-86% identical at the aa level to GPDs from Aspergillus nidulans, Cryphonectria parasitica, Curvularia lunata, Podospora anserina and Ustilago maydis.

  15. Critical threshold levels of DNA methyltransferase 1 are required to maintain DNA methylation across the genome in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yi; Tsai, Hsing-Chen; Yen, Ray-Whay Chiu; Zhang, Yang W; Kong, Xiangqian; Wang, Wei; Xia, Limin; Baylin, Stephen B

    2017-04-01

    Reversing DNA methylation abnormalities and associated gene silencing, through inhibiting DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) is an important potential cancer therapy paradigm. Maximizing this potential requires defining precisely how these enzymes maintain genome-wide, cancer-specific DNA methylation. To date, there is incomplete understanding of precisely how the three DNMTs, 1, 3A, and 3B, interact for maintaining DNA methylation abnormalities in cancer. By combining genetic and shRNA depletion strategies, we define not only a dominant role for DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) but also distinct roles of 3A and 3B in genome-wide DNA methylation maintenance. Lowering DNMT1 below a threshold level is required for maximal loss of DNA methylation at all genomic regions, including gene body and enhancer regions, and for maximally reversing abnormal promoter DNA hypermethylation and associated gene silencing to reexpress key genes. It is difficult to reach this threshold with patient-tolerable doses of current DNMT inhibitors (DNMTIs). We show that new approaches, like decreasing the DNMT targeting protein, UHRF1, can augment the DNA demethylation capacities of existing DNA methylation inhibitors for fully realizing their therapeutic potential. © 2017 Cai et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  16. Human uroporphyrinogen III synthase: Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of a full-length cDNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Shihfeng; Bishop, D.F.; Desnick, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Uroporphyrinogen III synthase, the fourth enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, is responsible for conversion of the linear tetrapyrrole, hydroxymethylbilane, to the cyclic tetrapyrrole, uroporphyrinogen III. The deficient activity of URO-synthase is the enzymatic defect in the autosomal recessive disorder congenital erythropoietic porphyria. To facilitate the isolation of a full-length cDNA for human URO-synthase, the human erythrocyte enzyme was purified to homogeneity and 81 nonoverlapping amino acids were determined by microsequencing the N terminus and four tryptic peptides. Two synthetic oligonucleotide mixtures were used to screen 1.2 x 10 6 recombinants from a human adult liver cDNA library. Eight clones were positive with both oligonucleotide mixtures. Of these, dideoxy sequencing of the 1.3 kilobase insert from clone pUROS-2 revealed 5' and 3' untranslated sequences of 196 and 284 base pairs, respectively, and an open reading frame of 798 base pairs encoding a protein of 265 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 28,607 Da. The isolation and expression of this full-length cDNA for human URO-synthase should facilitate studies of the structure, organization, and chromosomal localization of this heme biosynthetic gene as well as the characterization of the molecular lesions causing congenital erythropoietic porphyria

  17. Purification of High Molecular Weight Genomic DNA from Powdery Mildew for Long-Read Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feehan, Joanna M; Scheibel, Katherine E; Bourras, Salim; Underwood, William; Keller, Beat; Somerville, Shauna C

    2017-03-31

    The powdery mildew fungi are a group of economically important fungal plant pathogens. Relatively little is known about the molecular biology and genetics of these pathogens, in part due to a lack of well-developed genetic and genomic resources. These organisms have large, repetitive genomes, which have made genome sequencing and assembly prohibitively difficult. Here, we describe methods for the collection, extraction, purification and quality control assessment of high molecular weight genomic DNA from one powdery mildew species, Golovinomyces cichoracearum. The protocol described includes mechanical disruption of spores followed by an optimized phenol/chloroform genomic DNA extraction. A typical yield was 7 µg DNA per 150 mg conidia. The genomic DNA that is isolated using this procedure is suitable for long-read sequencing (i.e., > 48.5 kbp). Quality control measures to ensure the size, yield, and purity of the genomic DNA are also described in this method. Sequencing of the genomic DNA of the quality described here will allow for the assembly and comparison of multiple powdery mildew genomes, which in turn will lead to a better understanding and improved control of this agricultural pathogen.

  18. Chemically synthesized silver nanoparticles as cell lysis agent for bacterial genomic DNA isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Gunajit; Boruah, Himangshu; Gautom, Trishnamoni; Jyoti Hazarika, Dibya; Barooah, Madhumita; Boro, Robin Chandra

    2017-12-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have seen a recent spurt of use in varied fields of science. In this paper, we showed a novel application of AgNP as a promising microbial cell-lysis agent for genomic DNA isolation. We utilized chemically synthesized AgNPs for lysing bacterial cells to isolate their genomic DNA. The AgNPs efficiently lysed bacterial cells to yield good quality DNA that could be subsequently used for several molecular biology works.

  19. Large-scale amplification, cloning and sequencing of near full-length HIV-1 subtype C genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Christine M; Birditt, Brian A; McKay, Angela R; Stoddard, Julia N; Lee, Tsan Chun; McLaughlin, Sherry; Moore, Sarah W; Shindo, Nice; Learn, Gerald H; Korber, Bette T; Brander, Christian; Goulder, Philip J R; Kiepiela, Photini; Walker, Bruce D; Mullins, James I

    2006-09-01

    Full-length HIV-1 genome sequencing provides important data needed to address several vaccine design, molecular epidemiologic and pathogenesis questions. A protocol is presented for obtaining near full-length genomes (NFLGs) from subjects infected with HIV-1 subtype C. This protocol was used to amplify NFLGs from 244 of 366 (67%) samples collected at two clinics in Durban, South Africa (SK and PS). Viral load was directly associated with frequency of successful NFLG amplification for both cohorts (PS; p = 0.005 and SK; p clones were obtained from all 244 NFLG-positive PCR products, and both strands of each genome were sequenced, using a primary set of 46 primers. These methods thus allow the large-scale collection of HIV-1 NFLGs from populations infected primarily with subtype C. The methods are readily adaptable to other HIV-1 subtypes, and provide materials for viral functional analyses and population-based molecular epidemiology studies that include analysis of viral genome chimerization.

  20. Extraction of human genomic DNA from whole blood using a magnetic microsphere method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Rui; Li, Shengying

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of molecular biology and the life sciences, magnetic extraction is a simple, automatic, and highly efficient method for separating biological molecules, performing immunoassays, and other applications. Human blood is an ideal source of human genomic DNA. Extracting genomic DNA by traditional methods is time-consuming, and phenol and chloroform are toxic reagents that endanger health. Therefore, it is necessary to find a more convenient and efficient method for obtaining human genomic DNA. In this study, we developed urea-formaldehyde resin magnetic microspheres and magnetic silica microspheres for extraction of human genomic DNA. First, a magnetic microsphere suspension was prepared and used to extract genomic DNA from fresh whole blood, frozen blood, dried blood, and trace blood. Second, DNA content and purity were measured by agarose electrophoresis and ultraviolet spectrophotometry. The human genomic DNA extracted from whole blood was then subjected to polymerase chain reaction analysis to further confirm its quality. The results of this study lay a good foundation for future research and development of a high-throughput and rapid extraction method for extracting genomic DNA from various types of blood samples.

  1. Cloned plasmid DNA fragments as calibrators for controlling GMOs: different real-time duplex quantitative PCR methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverniers, Isabel; Van Bockstaele, Erik; De Loose, Marc

    2004-03-01

    Analytical real-time PCR technology is a powerful tool for implementation of the GMO labeling regulations enforced in the EU. The quality of analytical measurement data obtained by quantitative real-time PCR depends on the correct use of calibrator and reference materials (RMs). For GMO methods of analysis, the choice of appropriate RMs is currently under debate. So far, genomic DNA solutions from certified reference materials (CRMs) are most often used as calibrators for GMO quantification by means of real-time PCR. However, due to some intrinsic features of these CRMs, errors may be expected in the estimations of DNA sequence quantities. In this paper, two new real-time PCR methods are presented for Roundup Ready soybean, in which two types of plasmid DNA fragments are used as calibrators. Single-target plasmids (STPs) diluted in a background of genomic DNA were used in the first method. Multiple-target plasmids (MTPs) containing both sequences in one molecule were used as calibrators for the second method. Both methods simultaneously detect a promoter 35S sequence as GMO-specific target and a lectin gene sequence as endogenous reference target in a duplex PCR. For the estimation of relative GMO percentages both "delta C(T)" and "standard curve" approaches are tested. Delta C(T) methods are based on direct comparison of measured C(T) values of both the GMO-specific target and the endogenous target. Standard curve methods measure absolute amounts of target copies or haploid genome equivalents. A duplex delta C(T) method with STP calibrators performed at least as well as a similar method with genomic DNA calibrators from commercial CRMs. Besides this, high quality results were obtained with a standard curve method using MTP calibrators. This paper demonstrates that plasmid DNA molecules containing either one or multiple target sequences form perfect alternative calibrators for GMO quantification and are especially suitable for duplex PCR reactions.

  2. The logic of DNA replication in double-stranded DNA viruses: insights from global analysis of viral genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazlauskas, Darius; Krupovic, Mart; Venclovas, Česlovas

    2016-06-02

    Genomic DNA replication is a complex process that involves multiple proteins. Cellular DNA replication systems are broadly classified into only two types, bacterial and archaeo-eukaryotic. In contrast, double-stranded (ds) DNA viruses feature a much broader diversity of DNA replication machineries. Viruses differ greatly in both completeness and composition of their sets of DNA replication proteins. In this study, we explored whether there are common patterns underlying this extreme diversity. We identified and analyzed all major functional groups of DNA replication proteins in all available proteomes of dsDNA viruses. Our results show that some proteins are common to viruses infecting all domains of life and likely represent components of the ancestral core set. These include B-family polymerases, SF3 helicases, archaeo-eukaryotic primases, clamps and clamp loaders of the archaeo-eukaryotic type, RNase H and ATP-dependent DNA ligases. We also discovered a clear correlation between genome size and self-sufficiency of viral DNA replication, the unanticipated dominance of replicative helicases and pervasive functional associations among certain groups of DNA replication proteins. Altogether, our results provide a comprehensive view on the diversity and evolution of replication systems in the DNA virome and uncover fundamental principles underlying the orchestration of viral DNA replication. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Isolation and Cloning of cDNA Fragment of Gene Encoding for Multidrug Resistance Associated Protein from M. affine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utut Widyastuti Suharsono

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Isolation and Cloning of cDNA Fragment of Gene Encoding for Multidrug Resistance Associated Protein from M. affine. M. affine can grow well in acid soil with high level of soluble aluminum. One of the important proteins in the detoxifying xenobiotic stress including acid and Al stresses is a multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP encoded by mrp gene. The objective of this research is to isolate and clone the cDNA fragment of MaMrp encoding MRP from M. affine. By reverse transcription, total cDNA had been synthesized from the total RNA as template. The fragment of cDNA MaMrp had been successfully isolated by PCR by using total cDNA as template and mrp primer designed from A. thaliana, yeast, and human. This fragment was successfully inserted into pGEM-T Easy and the recombinant plasmid was successfully introduced into E. coli DH5α. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that the lenght of MaMrp fragment is 633 bp encoding 208 amino acids. Local alignment analysis based on nucleotide of mRNA showed that MaMrp fragment is 69% identical to AtMrp1 and 63% to AtMrp from A. thaliana. Based on deduced amino acid sequence, MaMRP is 84% identical to part of AtMRP13, 77% to AtMRP12, and 73% to AtMRP1 from A. thaliana respectively. Alignment analysis with AtMRP1 showed that MaMRP fragment is located in TM1 and NBF1 domains and has a specific amino acid sequence QCKAQLQNMEEE.

  4. INSPIIRED: A Pipeline for Quantitative Analysis of Sites of New DNA Integration in Cellular Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Sherman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Integration of new DNA into cellular genomes mediates replication of retroviruses and transposons; integration reactions have also been adapted for use in human gene therapy. Tracking the distributions of integration sites is important to characterize populations of transduced cells and to monitor potential outgrow of pathogenic cell clones. Here, we describe a pipeline for quantitative analysis of integration site distributions named INSPIIRED (integration site pipeline for paired-end reads. We describe optimized biochemical steps for site isolation using Illumina paired-end sequencing, including new technology for suppressing recovery of unwanted contaminants, then software for alignment, quality control, and management of integration site sequences. During library preparation, DNAs are broken by sonication, so that after ligation-mediated PCR the number of ligation junction sites can be used to infer abundance of gene-modified cells. We generated integration sites of known positions in silico, and we describe optimization of sample processing parameters refined by comparison to truth. We also present a novel graph-theory-based method for quantifying integration sites in repeated sequences, and we characterize the consequences using synthetic and experimental data. In an accompanying paper, we describe an additional set of statistical tools for data analysis and visualization. Software is available at https://github.com/BushmanLab/INSPIIRED.

  5. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure on genomic expression profiling of porcine parthenogenetic activated and cloned embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Lin; Luo, Yonglun; Sørensen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Handmade cloning (HMC) has been used to generate transgenic pigs for biomedical research. Recently, we found that parthenogenetic activation (PA) of porcine oocytes and improved HMC efficiency could be achieved by treatment with sublethal high hydrostatic pressure (HHP). However, the molecular...

  6. Genomic Evolution Of The Mdr Serotype O12 Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Clone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Sandra Wingaard; Taylor, Véronique L.; Freschi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Since the 1980’s the serotype O12 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has emerged as the predominant serotype in clinical settings and in epidemic outbreaks. These serotype O12 isolates exhibit high levels of resistance to various classes of antibiotics.Methods: In this study, we explore how ......, and dangerous clones like O12 can be identified quickly....

  7. A CTAB Procedure Of Total Genomic DNA Extraction For Medicinal Mushrooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhar Mohamad; Muhammad Hussaini Mohd Mustafa; Muhammad Hanif Azhari Noor; Rosnani Abdul Rashid; Hasan Hamdani Hasan Mutaat; Meswan Meskom; Mat Rasol Awang

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal mushroom is defined as mushrooms used in medicine or medical research. Isolation of intact, high-molecular-mass genomic DNA is essential for many molecular biology applications including Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), endonuclease restriction digestion, Southern blot analysis, and genomic library construction. The most important and prerequisite towards reliable molecular biology work is the total genomic DNA of a sample must be in good quality. Five freshly samples of medicinal mushroom were used in this work known as Auriculariapolytricha, Lentinus edode, Pleurotus sayorcaju, Sczhizopyllum commune and Ganodermalucidum. 5 mg of each sample were used to extraction the DNA, prepared in 3 replications and repeated twice. PCR based technique by using ISSR markers were used in checking the amplification ability of the total genomic extraction. A standard Doyle and Doyle protocol for genomic DNA extraction was modified in optimizing the total genomic DNA from the medicinal mushroom.The modification parameters were percentage of CTAB, incubation period and temperature. The results reveal that each sample required a certain combinations of time and period of incubation. Besides, percentage of CTAB in the buffer was found significant in giving a high yielding of extracted total genomic DNA. The extracted total genomic DNA from the medicinal mushroom yielded from 39.7 ng/ μl to 919.1 ng/ μl. The different yield among the samples found to be corresponded to polysaccharide content in the medicinal mushrooms. The objective of this works is to optimize total genomic DNA extraction of medicinal mushrooms towards a high quality intact genomic DNA for molecular activities. (author)

  8. High accuracy genotyping directly from genomic DNA using a rolling circle amplification based assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Yuefen

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rolling circle amplification of ligated probes is a simple and sensitive means for genotyping directly from genomic DNA. SNPs and mutations are interrogated with open circle probes (OCP that can be circularized by DNA ligase when the probe matches the genotype. An amplified detection signal is generated by exponential rolling circle amplification (ERCA of the circularized probe. The low cost and scalability of ligation/ERCA genotyping makes it ideally suited for automated, high throughput methods. Results A retrospective study using human genomic DNA samples of known genotype was performed for four different clinically relevant mutations: Factor V Leiden, Factor II prothrombin, and two hemochromatosis mutations, C282Y and H63D. Greater than 99% accuracy was obtained genotyping genomic DNA samples from hundreds of different individuals. The combined process of ligation/ERCA was performed in a single tube and produced fluorescent signal directly from genomic DNA in less than an hour. In each assay, the probes for both normal and mutant alleles were combined in a single reaction. Multiple ERCA primers combined with a quenched-peptide nucleic acid (Q-PNA fluorescent detection system greatly accellerated the appearance of signal. Probes designed with hairpin structures reduced misamplification. Genotyping accuracy was identical from either purified genomic DNA or genomic DNA generated using whole genome amplification (WGA. Fluorescent signal output was measured in real time and as an end point. Conclusions Combining the optimal elements for ligation/ERCA genotyping has resulted in a highly accurate single tube assay for genotyping directly from genomic DNA samples. Accuracy exceeded 99 % for four probe sets targeting clinically relevant mutations. No genotypes were called incorrectly using either genomic DNA or whole genome amplified sample.

  9. Cloning of a cDNA encoding a novel human nuclear phosphoprotein belonging to the WD-40 family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Leffers, H; Madsen, Peder

    1994-01-01

    We have cloned and expressed in vaccinia virus a cDNA encoding an ubiquitous 501-amino-acid (aa) phosphoprotein that corresponds to protein IEF SSP 9502 (79,400 Da, pI 4.5) in the master 2-D-gel keratinocyte protein database [Celis et al., Electrophoresis 14 (1993) 1091-1198]. The deduced aa......-134]. The protein contains a nuclear targeting signal (KKKGK), and fractionation of transformed human amnion cells (AMA) in karyoplasts and cytoplasts confirmed that it is predominantly localized in the nucleus. Database searching indicated that IEF SSP 9502 is a putative human homologue of the Saccharomyces...

  10. "Direct cloning in Lactobacillus plantarum: electroporation with non-methylated plasmid DNA enhances transformation efficiency and makes shuttle vectors obsolete".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spath, Katharina; Heinl, Stefan; Grabherr, Reingard

    2012-10-25

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) play an important role in agricultural as well as industrial biotechnology. Development of improved LAB strains using e.g. library approaches is often limited by low transformation efficiencies wherefore one reason could be differences in the DNA methylation patterns between the Escherichia coli intermediate host for plasmid amplification and the final LAB host. In the present study, we examined the influence of DNA methylation on transformation efficiency in LAB and developed a direct cloning approach for Lactobacillus plantarum CD033. Therefore, we propagated plasmid pCD256 in E. coli strains with different dam/dcm-methylation properties. The obtained plasmid DNA was purified and transformed into three different L. plantarum strains and a selection of other LAB species. Best transformation efficiencies were obtained using the strain L. plantarum CD033 and non-methylated plasmid DNA. Thereby we achieved transformation efficiencies of ~ 10(9) colony forming units/μg DNA in L. plantarum CD033 which is in the range of transformation efficiencies reached with E. coli. Based on these results, we directly transformed recombinant expression vectors received from PCR/ligation reactions into L. plantarum CD033, omitting plasmid amplification in E. coli. Also this approach was successful and yielded a sufficient number of recombinant clones. Transformation efficiency of L. plantarum CD033 was drastically increased when non-methylated plasmid DNA was used, providing the possibility to generate expression libraries in this organism. A direct cloning approach, whereby ligated PCR-products where successfully transformed directly into L. plantarum CD033, obviates the construction of shuttle vectors containing E. coli-specific sequences, as e.g. a ColEI origin of replication, and makes amplification of these vectors in E. coli obsolete. Thus, plasmid constructs become much smaller and occasional structural instability or mutagenesis during E. coli

  11. Optimized paired-sgRNA/Cas9 cloning and expression cassette triggers high-efficiency multiplex genome editing in kiwifruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zupeng; Wang, Shuaibin; Li, Dawei; Zhang, Qiong; Li, Li; Zhong, Caihong; Liu, Yifei; Huang, Hongwen

    2018-01-13

    Kiwifruit is an important fruit crop; however, technologies for its functional genomic and molecular improvement are limited. The clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system has been successfully applied to genetic improvement in many crops, but its editing capability is variable depending on the different combinations of the synthetic guide RNA (sgRNA) and Cas9 protein expression devices. Optimizing conditions for its use within a particular species is therefore needed to achieve highly efficient genome editing. In this study, we developed a new cloning strategy for generating paired-sgRNA/Cas9 vectors containing four sgRNAs targeting the kiwifruit phytoene desaturase gene (AcPDS). Comparing to the previous method of paired-sgRNA cloning, our strategy only requires the synthesis of two gRNA-containing primers which largely reduces the cost. We further compared efficiencies of paired-sgRNA/Cas9 vectors containing different sgRNA expression devices, including both the polycistronic tRNA-sgRNA cassette (PTG) and the traditional CRISPR expression cassette. We found the mutagenesis frequency of the PTG/Cas9 system was 10-fold higher than that of the CRISPR/Cas9 system, coinciding with the relative expressions of sgRNAs in two different expression cassettes. In particular, we identified large chromosomal fragment deletions induced by the paired-sgRNAs of the PTG/Cas9 system. Finally, as expected, we found both systems can successfully induce the albino phenotype of kiwifruit plantlets regenerated from the G418-resistance callus lines. We conclude that the PTG/Cas9 system is a more powerful system than the traditional CRISPR/Cas9 system for kiwifruit genome editing, which provides valuable clues for optimizing CRISPR/Cas9 editing system in other plants. © 2018 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons

  12. Molecular cloning and expression of a hexamerin cDNA from the honey bee, Apis mellifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Adriana D; Nascimento, Adriana M; Guidugli, Karina R; Simões, Zilá L P; Bitondi, Márcia M G

    2005-10-01

    A cDNA encoding a hexamerin subunit of the Africanized honey bee (Apis mellifera) was isolated and completely sequenced. In the deduced translation product we identified the N-terminal sequence typical of the honey bee HEX 70b hexamerin. The genomic sequence consists of seven exons flanked by GT/AT exon/intron splicing sites, which encode a 683 amino acid polypeptide with an estimated molecular mass of 79.5 kDa, and pI value of 6.72. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR revealed high levels of Hex 70b message in larval stages, followed by an abrupt decrease during prepupal-pupal transition. This coincides with decaying titers of juvenile hormone (JH) and ecdysteroids that is the signal for the metamorphic molt. To verify whether the high Hex 70b expression is dependent on high hormone levels, we treated 5th instar larvae with JH or 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). In treated larvae, Hex 70b expression was maintained at high levels for a prolonged period of time than in the respective controls, thus indicating a positive hormone regulation at the transcriptional level. Experiments designed to verify the influence of the diet on Hex 70b expression showed similar transcript amounts in adult workers fed on a protein-enriched diet or fed exclusively on sugar. However, sugar-fed workers responded to the lack of dietary proteins by diminishing significantly the amount of HEX 70b subunits in hemolymph. Apparently, they use HEX 70b to compensate the lack of dietary proteins.

  13. Comparative analysis of the complete genome of an epidemic hospital sequence type 203 clone of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In this report we have explored the genomic and microbiological basis for a sustained increase in bloodstream infections at a major Australian hospital caused by Enterococcus faecium multi-locus sequence type (ST) 203, an outbreak strain that has largely replaced a predecessor ST17 sequence type. Results To establish a ST203 reference sequence we fully assembled and annotated the genome of Aus0085, a 2009 vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREfm) bloodstream isolate, and the first example of a completed ST203 genome. Aus0085 has a 3.2 Mb genome, comprising a 2.9 Mb circular chromosome and six circular plasmids (2 kb–130 kb). Twelve percent of the 3222 coding sequences (CDS) in Aus0085 are not present in ST17 E. faecium Aus0004 and ST18 E. faecium TX16. Extending this comparison to an additional 12 ST17 and 14 ST203 E. faecium hospital isolate genomes revealed only six genomic regions spanning 41 kb that were present in all ST203 and absent from all ST17 genomes. The 40 CDS have predicted functions that include ion transport, riboflavin metabolism and two phosphotransferase systems. Comparison of the vancomycin resistance-conferring Tn1549 transposon between Aus0004 and Aus0085 revealed differences in transposon length and insertion site, and van locus sequence variation that correlated with a higher vancomycin MIC in Aus0085. Additional phenotype comparisons between ST17 and ST203 isolates showed that while there were no differences in biofilm-formation and killing of Galleria mellonella, ST203 isolates grew significantly faster and out-competed ST17 isolates in growth assays. Conclusions Here we have fully assembled and annotated the first ST203 genome, and then characterized the genomic differences between ST17 and ST203 E. faecium. We also show that ST203 E. faecium are faster growing and can out-compete ST17 E. faecium. While a causal genetic basis for these phenotype differences is not provided here, this study revealed conserved genetic

  14. An Adenovirus DNA Replication Factor, but Not Incoming Genome Complexes, Targets PML Nuclear Bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Tetsuro; Nagata, Kyosuke; Wodrich, Harald

    2016-02-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) are subnuclear domains implicated in cellular antiviral responses. Despite the antiviral activity, several nuclear replicating DNA viruses use the domains as deposition sites for the incoming viral genomes and/or as sites for viral DNA replication, suggesting that PML-NBs are functionally relevant during early viral infection to establish productive replication. Although PML-NBs and their components have also been implicated in the adenoviral life cycle, it remains unclear whether incoming adenoviral genome complexes target PML-NBs. Here we show using immunofluorescence and live-cell imaging analyses that incoming adenovirus genome complexes neither localize at nor recruit components of PML-NBs during early phases of infection. We further show that the viral DNA binding protein (DBP), an early expressed viral gene and essential DNA replication factor, independently targets PML-NBs. We show that DBP oligomerization is required to selectively recruit the PML-NB components Sp100 and USP7. Depletion experiments suggest that the absence of one PML-NB component might not affect the recruitment of other components toward DBP oligomers. Thus, our findings suggest a model in which an adenoviral DNA replication factor, but not incoming viral genome complexes, targets and modulates PML-NBs to support a conducive state for viral DNA replication and argue against a generalized concept that PML-NBs target incoming viral genomes. The immediate fate upon nuclear delivery of genomes of incoming DNA viruses is largely unclear. Early reports suggested that incoming genomes of herpesviruses are targeted and repressed by PML-NBs immediately upon nuclear import. Genome localization and/or viral DNA replication has also been observed at PML-NBs for other DNA viruses. Thus, it was suggested that PML-NBs may immediately sense and target nuclear viral genomes and hence serve as sites for deposition of incoming viral genomes and

  15. Novel infectious cDNA clones of hepatitis C virus genotype 3a (strain S52) and 4a (strain ED43): genetic analyses and in vivo pathogenesis studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith; Scheel, Troels; Callendret, Benoit

    2010-01-01

    Previously, RNA transcripts of cDNA clones of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes 1a (strains H77, HCV-1, and HC-TN), 1b (HC-J4, Con1, and HCV-N), and 2a (HC-J6 and JFH1) were found to be infectious in chimpanzees. However, only JFH1 was infectious in human hepatoma Huh7 cells. We performed genetic...... analysis of HCV genotype 3a (strain S52) and 4a (strain ED43) prototype strains and generated full-length consensus cDNA clones (pS52 and pED43). Transfection of Huh7.5 cells with RNA transcripts of these clones did not yield cells expressing HCV Core. However, intrahepatic transfection of chimpanzees...... resulted in robust infection with peak HCV RNA titers of approximately 5.5 log(10) international units (IU)/ml. Genomic consensus sequences recovered from serum at the times of peak viral titers were identical to the sequences of the parental plasmids. Both chimpanzees developed acute hepatitis...

  16. Cloning of a cDNA encoding a surface antigen of Schistosoma mansoni schistosomula recognized by sera of vassinated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, J.P.; Tom, T.D.; Strand, M.

    1987-01-01

    Spleen cells of mice vaccinated with radiation-attenuated Schistosoma mansoni cercariae were used to produce monoclonal antibodies directed against newly transformed schistosomular surface antigens. One of these monoclonal antibodies recognized a polypeptide of 18 kDa. Binding was measured by radioimmunoassay. This glycoprotein was purified by monoclonal antibody immunoaffinity chromatography and a polyclonal antiserum was prepared against it. Immunofluorescence assays showed that the polyclonal antiserum bound to the surface of newly transformed schistosomula and lung-stage organisms but not to the surface of liver-stage and adult worms. Using this polyclonal antiserum we isolated recombinant clones from an adult worm cDNA expression library constructed in λgt11. Clone 654.2 contained an insert of 0.52 kilobase and hybridized to a 1.2-kilobase mRNA species from adult worms. Most importantly, clone 654.2 produced a fusion protein of 125 kDa that was reactive with sera of vaccinated mice that are capable of transferring resistance. This result encourages future vaccination trials with the fusion protein

  17. Cloning, expression, and mapping of GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase cDNA from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Li-Ping; Li, Han-Xia; Ouyang, Bo; Zhang, Jun-Hong; Ye, Zhi-Biao

    2006-08-01

    GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMP, EC 2.7.7.22) catalyzes the synthesis of GDP-D-mannose and represents the first committed step in plant ascorbic acid biosynthesis. Using potato GMP cDNA sequence as a querying probe, 65 highly homologous tomato ESTs were obtained from dbEST of GenBank and the putative cDNA sequence of tomato GMP was assembled. The full-length GMP cDNA of tomato was cloned by RACE-PCR with primers designed according to the assembled cDNA sequence. The full-length cDNA sequence contained a complete open reading frame (ORF) of 1,086 bp, which encoded 361 amino acid residues. This gene was designated as LeGMP (GenBank accession No. AY605668). Homology analysis of LeGMP showed a 96% identity with potato GMP and the deduced amino acid showed 99%, 97%, 91% and 89% homology with GMP from potato, tobacco, alfalfa and Arabidopsis thaliana, respectively. Northern blot analysis showed that LeGMP was constitutively expressed in roots, stems, leaves, flowers and fruits of tomato; but the expression levels varied. LeGMP was mapped to 3-D using 75 tomato introgression lines (ILs), each containing a single homozygous RFLP-defined chromosome segment from the green-fruited species Lycopersicon pennellii.

  18. RIKEN mouse genome encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-01-01

    We have been working to establish the comprehensive mouse full-length cDNA collection and sequence database to cover as many genes as we can, named Riken mouse genome encyclopedia. Recently we are constructing higher-level annotation (Functional ANnoTation Of Mouse cDNA; FANTOM) not only with homology search based annotation but also with expression data profile, mapping information and protein-protein database. More than 1,000,000 clones prepared from 163 tissues were end-sequenced to classify into 159,789 clusters and 60,770 representative clones were fully sequenced. As a conclusion, the 60,770 sequences contained 33,409 unique. The next generation of life science is clearly based on all of the genome information and resources. Based on our cDNA clones we developed the additional system to explore gene function. We developed cDNA microarray system to print all of these cDNA clones, protein-protein interaction screening system, protein-DNA interaction screening system and so on. The integrated database of all the information is very useful not only for analysis of gene transcriptional network and for the connection of gene to phenotype to facilitate positional candidate approach. In this talk, the prospect of the application of these genome resourced should be discussed. More information is available at the web page: http://genome.gsc.riken.go.jp/.

  19. Molecular cloning and analysis of full-length genome of HIV type 1 strains prevalent in countries of the former Soviet Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masharsky, Alexei E; Klimov, Nikolai A; Kozlov, Andrei P

    2003-10-01

    The HIV-1 epidemic among injecting drug users (IDUs) in countries of the former Soviet Union (FSU) was caused mainly by two HIV-1 variants: subtype A and CRF03-AB. To date only three full-length HIV-I genomes from the FSU have been sequenced: one subtype A from Byelorussia and two CRF03-AB from Russia. We report the full-length genome cloning and analysis of two more HIV-1 strains from the FSU countries (98UA0116 of subtype A and 98BY10443 of CRF03-AB). Isolate 98UA0116 is the second cloned and sequenced full-length HIV-1 genome of subtype A lineage from the FSU, which may be a novel subsubtype within sub-type A. Isolate 98BY10443 is the third full-length HIV-1 genome of CRF03-AB in the world to be cloned and sequenced. Additionally, it is the first CRF03-AB strain discovered in Byelorussia. Cloned genomic sequences of the FSU HIV-1 isolates are being used for the development of a region-specific HIV-1 vaccine.

  20. The emerging role of nuclear architecture in DNA repair and genome maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misteli, Tom; Soutoglou, Evi

    2009-04-01

    DNA repair and maintenance of genome stability are crucial to cellular and organismal function, and defects in these processes have been implicated in cancer and ageing. Detailed molecular, biochemical and genetic analyses have outlined the molecular framework involved in cellular DNA-repair pathways, but recent cell-biological approaches have revealed important roles for the spatial and temporal organization of the DNA-repair machinery during the recognition of DNA lesions and the assembly of repair complexes. It has also become clear that local higher-order chromatin structure, chromatin dynamics and non-random global genome organization are key factors in genome maintenance. These cell-biological features of DNA repair illustrate an emerging role for nuclear architecture in multiple aspects of genome maintenance.

  1. Extraction of high-molecular-weight genomic DNA for long-read sequencing of single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayjonade, Baptiste; Gouzy, Jérôme; Donnadieu, Cécile; Pouilly, Nicolas; Marande, William; Callot, Caroline; Langlade, Nicolas; Muños, Stéphane

    2016-10-01

    De novo sequencing of complex genomes is one of the main challenges for researchers seeking high-quality reference sequences. Many de novo assemblies are based on short reads, producing fragmented genome sequences. Third-generation sequencing, with read lengths >10 kb, will improve the assembly of complex genomes, but these techniques require high-molecular-weight genomic DNA (gDNA), and gDNA extraction protocols used for obtaining smaller fragments for short-read sequencing are not suitable for this purpose. Methods of preparing gDNA for bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries could be adapted, but these approaches are time-consuming, and commercial kits for these methods are expensive. Here, we present a protocol for rapid, inexpensive extraction of high-molecular-weight gDNA from bacteria, plants, and animals. Our technique was validated using sunflower leaf samples, producing a mean read length of 12.6 kb and a maximum read length of 80 kb.

  2. Purification, characterization, cDNA cloning, and expression of a xyloglucan endoglucanase from Geotrichum sp. M128.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaoi, Katsuro; Mitsuishi, Yasushi

    2004-02-27

    A novel xyloglucan-specific endo-beta-1,4-glucanase (XEG), xyloglucanase, with a molecular mass of 80 kDa and a pI of 4.8, was isolated from the fungus Geotrichum sp. M128. It was found to be an endoglucanase active toward xyloglucan and not active toward carboxymethylcellulose, Avicel, or barley 1,3-1,4-beta-glucan. Analysis of the precise substrate specificity using various xyloglucan oligosaccharide structures revealed that XEG has at least four subsites (-2 to +2) and specifically recognizes xylose branching at the +1 and +2 sites. The full-length cDNA encoding XEG was cloned and sequenced. It consists of a 2436-bp open reading frame encoding a 776-amino acid protein. From its deduced amino acid sequence, XEG can be classified as a family 74 glycosyl hydrolase. The cDNA encoding XEG was then expressed in Escherichia coli, and enzymatically active recombinant XEG was obtained.

  3. Rapid and reliable extraction of genomic DNA from various wild-type and transgenic plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Moon-Sik

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA extraction methods for PCR-quality DNA from calluses and plants are not time efficient, since they require that the tissues be ground in liquid nitrogen, followed by precipitation of the DNA pellet in ethanol, washing and drying the pellet, etc. The need for a rapid and simple procedure is urgent, especially when hundreds of samples need to be analyzed. Here, we describe a simple and efficient method of isolating high-quality genomic DNA for PCR amplification and enzyme digestion from calluses, various wild-type and transgenic plants. Results We developed new rapid and reliable genomic DNA extraction method. With our developed method, plant genomic DNA extraction could be performed within 30 min. The method was as follows. Plant tissue was homogenized with salt DNA extraction buffer using hand-operated homogenizer and extracted by phenol:chloroform:isoamyl alcohol (25:24:1. After centrifugation, the supernatant was directly used for DNA template for PCR, resulting in successful amplification for RAPD from various sources of plants and specific foreign genes from transgenic plants. After precipitating the supernatant, the DNA was completely digested by restriction enzymes. Conclusion This DNA extraction procedure promises simplicity, speed, and efficiency, both in terms of time and the amount of plant sample required. In addition, this method does not require expensive facilities for plant genomic DNA extraction.

  4. Cloning and expression of a cDNA covering the complete coding region of the P32 subunit of human pre-mRNA splicing factor SF2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Madsen, Peder; Rasmussen, H H

    1993-01-01

    We have cloned and expressed a cDNA encoding the 32-kDa subunit (P32) of the human pre-mRNA splicing factor, SF2. This cDNA extends beyond the 5'-end of a previously reported cDNA [Krainer et al., Cell 66 (1991) 383-394]. Importantly, our fragment includes an ATG start codon which was absent from...

  5. Purification, characterization and cDNA cloning of an endo-exonuclease from the basidiomycete fungus Armillaria mellea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, V; Doonan, S; McCarthy, T V

    1999-01-01

    We have purified an endo-exonuclease from the fruiting body of the basidiomycete fungus Armillaria mellea by using an ethanol fractionation step, followed by two rounds of column chromatography. The enzyme had an apparent molecular mass of 17500 Da and was shown to exist as a monomer by gel-filtration analysis. The nuclease was active on both double-stranded and single-stranded DNA but not on RNA. It was optimally active at pH8.5 and also exhibited a significant degree of thermostability. Three bivalent metal ions, Mg2+, Co2+ and Mn2+, acted as cofactors in the catalysis. It was also inhibited by high salt concentrations: activity was completely abolished at 150 mM NaCl. The nuclease possessed both endonuclease activity on supercoiled DNA and a 3'-5' (but not a 5'-3') exonuclease activity. It generated 5'-phosphomonoesters on its products that, after a prolonged incubation, were hydrolysed to a mixture of free mononucleotides and small oligonucleotides ranging in size from two to eight bases. Elucidation of its N-terminal amino acid sequence permitted the cDNA cloning of the A. mellea nuclease via a PCR-based approach. Peptide mapping of the purified enzyme generated patterns consistent with the amino acid sequence coded for by the cloned cDNA. A BLAST search of the SwissProt database revealed that A. mellea nuclease shared significant amino acid similarity with two nucleases from Bacillus subtilis, suggesting that the three might constitute a distinct class of nucleolytic enzymes. PMID:10215611

  6. Using Partial Genomic Fosmid Libraries for Sequencing CompleteOrganellar Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeal, Joel R.; Leebens-Mack, James H.; Arumuganathan, K.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; dePamphilis, Claude W.

    2005-08-26

    Organellar genome sequences provide numerous phylogenetic markers and yield insight into organellar function and molecular evolution. These genomes are much smaller in size than their nuclear counterparts; thus, their complete sequencing is much less expensive than total nuclear genome sequencing, making broader phylogenetic sampling feasible. However, for some organisms it is challenging to isolate plastid DNA for sequencing using standard methods. To overcome these difficulties, we constructed partial genomic libraries from total DNA preparations of two heterotrophic and two autotrophic angiosperm species using fosmid vectors. We then used macroarray screening to isolate clones containing large fragments of plastid DNA. A minimum tiling path of clones comprising the entire genome sequence of each plastid was selected, and these clones were shotgun-sequenced and assembled into complete genomes. Although this method worked well for both heterotrophic and autotrophic plants, nuclear genome size had a dramatic effect on the proportion of screened clones containing plastid DNA and, consequently, the overall number of clones that must be screened to ensure full plastid genome coverage. This technique makes it possible to determine complete plastid genome sequences for organisms that defy other available organellar genome sequencing methods, especially those for which limited amounts of tissue are available.

  7. cDNA cloning and expression analysis of a mannose-binding lectin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... with high expression being found in spadix, spathe and tuber. Cloning of the ppa gene not only provides a basis for further investigation of its structure, expression and regulatory mechanism, but also enables us to test its potential role in controlling pests and fungal diseases by transferring the gene into plants in the future ...

  8. cDNA cloning, identification and characterization of a novel cystatin from the tentacle of Cyanea capillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanzhen; Cun, Shujian; Peng, Lisheng; Xie, Xiaojin; Wei, Jianwen; Yang, Wenli; Xu, Anlong

    2003-10-01

    Cystatin is of interest from biochemical and evolutionary prospective, and also has been applied in biotechnology. In this paper, a novel cystatin was found by EST sequence analysis of the cDNA library of Cyanea capillata tentacle. The sequence of a full-length cDNA clone contained an open reading frame encoding a putative 18-residue signal peptide and a mature protein of 113 amino acids, which showed only 26% identities to Family 2 cystatins and had its own characteristic enzyme-binding motifs, Ser(97)-Trp(98), which had not been found in any other known cystatins. Thus, the novel cystatin cloned from jellyfish was designated as cystatin J, which may belong to a new family of cystatin, called Family 4. The mature cystatin J was produced in Escherichia coli as a thioredoxin (Trx) fusion protein using the pET expression system and purified by affinity and cation exchange chromatography. The recombinant cystatin J of approximately M(r) = 12,800 displayed an obvious inhibition of papain (K(i) value below 0.5 nM), in competition with substrate. Thus, the recombinant cystatin J was a functional cystatin in spite of relatively lower sequence similarity with other cystatins. Activity of the novel cystatin was stable at pH 4-11 at 4 degrees C, but unstable at neutral pH at >50 degrees C.

  9. Isolation and characterization of two novel, closely related ATF cDNA clones from HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaire, M; Chatton, B; Kedinger, C

    1990-01-01

    ATF or CRE binding proteins are cellular transcription factors involved in the regulation of adenovirus Ela-responsive and cellular cAMP-inducible promoters. We report the isolation from a HeLa cell cDNA library of two clones that encode proteins with specific ATF/CRE DNA binding activity. The two clones differ by a 63 bp element which is retained in one (ATF-a) and deleted from the other (ATF-a delta) and which may correspond to an alternative exon. The peptide sequences (483 and 462 amino acids, respectively) derived from each of these cDNAs are identical, except for the additional 21 amino acids in ATF-a, but clearly differ from the other ATF/CREB proteins reported. All of them, however, share a conserved leucine zipper domain also found in other transcription factors. ATF-a and ATF-a delta therefore represent two closely related members of a larger multigene family of proteins that interact with conserved promoter elements. Images PMID:1694576

  10. Epigenetic control of mobile DNA as an interface between experience and genome change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Shapiro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mobile DNA in the genome is subject to RNA-targeted epigenetic control. This control regulates the activity of transposons, retrotransposons and genomic proviruses. Many different life history experiences alter the activities of mobile DNA and the expression of genetic loci regulated by nearby insertions. The same experiences induce alterations in epigenetic formatting and lead to trans-generational modifications of genome expression and stability. These observations lead to the hypothesis that epigenetic formatting directed by non-coding RNA provides a molecular interface between life history events and genome alteration.

  11. The emerging role of nuclear architecture in DNA repair and genome maintenance

    OpenAIRE

    Misteli, Tom; Soutoglou, Evi

    2009-01-01

    DNA repair and maintenance of genome stability are crucial to cellular and organismal function, and defects in these processes have been implicated in cancer and ageing. Detailed molecular, biochemical and genetic analyses have outlined the molecular framework involved in cellular DNA-repair pathways, but recent cell-biological approaches have revealed important roles for the spatial and temporal organization of the DNA-repair machinery during the recognition of DNA lesions and the assembly o...

  12. The draft genome sequence of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CCBH4851, a nosocomial isolate belonging to clone SP (ST277 that is prevalent in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melise Silveira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The high occurrence of nosocomial multidrug-resistant (MDR microorganisms is considered a global health problem. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of a MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated in Brazil that belongs to the endemic clone ST277. The genome encodes important resistance determinant genes and consists of 6.7 Mb with a G+C content of 66.86% and 6,347 predicted coding regions including 60 RNAs.

  13. Isolation and characterization of cDNA clones for the gamma subunit of Xenopus fibrinogen, the product of a coordinately regulated gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, A; Shepard, A R; Moser, D R; Holland, L J

    1990-09-10

    Fibrinogen, the major structural protein involved in blood coagulation, is synthesized and secreted by the liver. In the frog Xenopus laevis, fibrinogen production is dramatically induced by glucocorticoids. The hormonal stimulation requires synthesis of three separate subunits, designated A alpha, B beta, and gamma. For investigation of the molecular mechanisms underlying this coordinate induction, we have isolated cDNA clones for the subunits of Xenopus fibrinogen. In this communication we describe the identification of clones for the gamma chain. Initially, a Xenopus liver cDNA library in pBR322 was screened with a rat gamma chain cDNA and a clone representing half of the 1600-base frog gamma mRNA was identified. This clone was shown to be complementary to gamma mRNA by hybrid selection of mRNA that translated in vitro into the gamma polypeptide. A clone about 1460 base pairs in length was then isolated from a Xenopus liver lambda gt10 cDNA library and subcloned into Bluescript SK-. This clone, designated X1 gamma 3, contains the entire 3'-end and lacks 38 bases at the 5'-end of gamma mRNA. The deduced amino acid sequence at the N-terminal is compatible with a signal peptide of 20-23 amino acids, in agreement with the calculated size of the frog gamma chain signal peptide. Following the signal sequence is a region of highly conserved amino acids that participate in disulfide bond formation critical for the maintenance of tertiary structure in mammalian fibrinogen. The gamma cDNA clone was used to measure gamma mRNA in purified Xenopus liver cells treated with glucocorticoids in primary culture.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Robustness of genome-wide scanning using archived dried blood spot samples as a DNA source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollegaard, Mads V; Grove, Jakob; Grauholm, Jonas; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Nørgaard, Mette; Benfield, Thomas L; Nørgaard-Pedersen, Bent; Mortensen, Preben B; Mors, Ole; Sørensen, Henrik T; Harboe, Zitta B; Børglum, Anders D; Demontis, Ditte; Ørntoft, Torben F; Bisgaard, Hans; Hougaard, David M

    2011-07-04

    The search to identify disease-susceptible genes requires access to biological material from numerous well-characterized subjects. Archived residual dried blood spot (DBS) samples, also known as Guthrie cards, from national newborn screening programs may provide a DNA source for entire populations. Combined with clinical information from medical registries, DBS samples could provide a rich source for productive research. However, the amounts of DNA which can be extracted from these precious samples are minute and may be prohibitive for numerous genotypings. Previously, we demonstrated that DBS DNA can be whole-genome amplified and used for reliable genetic analysis on different platforms, including genome-wide scanning arrays. However, it remains unclear whether this approach is workable on a large sample scale. We examined the robustness of using DBS samples for whole-genome amplification following genome-wide scanning, using arrays from Illumina and Affymetrix. This study is based on 4,641 DBS samples from the Danish Newborn Screening Biobank, extracted for three separate genome-wide association studies. The amount of amplified DNA was significantly (P Biobank represent a reliable resource of DNA for whole-genome amplification and subsequent genome-wide association studies. With call-rates equivalent to high quality DNA samples, our results point to new opportunities for using the neonatal biobanks available worldwide in the hunt for genetic components of disease.

  15. Robustness of genome-wide scanning using archived dried blood spot samples as a DNA source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Børglum Anders D

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The search to identify disease-susceptible genes requires access to biological material from numerous well-characterized subjects. Archived residual dried blood spot (DBS samples, also known as Guthrie cards, from national newborn screening programs may provide a DNA source for entire populations. Combined with clinical information from medical registries, DBS samples could provide a rich source for productive research. However, the amounts of DNA which can be extracted from these precious samples are minute and may be prohibitive for numerous genotypings. Previously, we demonstrated that DBS DNA can be whole-genome amplified and used for reliable genetic analysis on different platforms, including genome-wide scanning arrays. However, it remains unclear whether this approach is workable on a large sample scale. We examined the robustness of using DBS samples for whole-genome amplification following genome-wide scanning, using arrays from Illumina and Affymetrix. Results This study is based on 4,641 DBS samples from the Danish Newborn Screening Biobank, extracted for three separate genome-wide association studies. The amount of amplified DNA was significantly (P Conclusion Our study indicates that archived DBS samples from the Danish Newborn Screening Biobank represent a reliable resource of DNA for whole-genome amplification and subsequent genome-wide association studies. With call-rates equivalent to high quality DNA samples, our results point to new opportunities for using the neonatal biobanks available worldwide in the hunt for genetic components of disease.

  16. Genome size and sensitivity to DNA damage by X-rays-plant comets tell the story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einset, John; Collins, Andrew R

    2018-02-24

    Among several factors affecting radiation sensitivity, genome size has received limited attention during the last 50 years since research at Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) and other locations demonstrated substantial differences in radiation sensitivities, e.g. between tree species with large (e.g. conifers such as pines) versus small (e.g. dicots such as oaks) genome sizes. Taking advantage of the wide range of genome sizes among species, we investigated radiation sensitivity which we define in this study as DNA damage (break frequency) measured with the alkaline comet assay in isolated nuclei exposed to X-rays. As a starting point, we considered two possible explanations for the high radiation sensitivity of plants with large genome sizes: (i) inherently higher sensitivity of larger genomes and/or (ii) impaired DNA repair. In terms of genome size effects, experiments exposing isolated nuclei from six different plant species to X-rays, varying in genome sizes from 2.6 to 19.2 Gbp, showed that larger genomes are more sensitive to DNA damage by a relationship approximating the cube-root of the nuclear volume; e.g. a 10-fold increase in genome size increases sensitivity by about 2-fold. With regard to DNA repair, two conifer species, Sawara cypress (Chamaecyparis pisifera, 8.9 Gbp genome size) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris, 20 Gbp genome size), both effectively repaired DNA damage within 50 and 70 min, respectively, after acute X-ray exposures. Both species also showed delayed repair of double-strand DNA breaks, as we previously showed with Arabidopsis thaliana and Lolium multiflorum.

  17. Phage lambda cDNA cloning vectors for subtractive hybridization, fusion-protein synthesis and Cre-loxP automatic plasmid subcloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzolo, M J; Hamilton, B A; Ding, D L; Martin, C H; Mead, D A; Mierendorf, R C; Raghavan, K V; Meyerowitz, E M; Lipshitz, H D

    1990-03-30

    We describe the construction and use of two classes of cDNA cloning vectors. The first class comprises the lambda EXLX(+) and lambda EXLX(-) vectors that can be used for the expression in Escherichia coli of proteins encoded by cDNA inserts. This is achieved by the fusion of cDNA open reading frames to the T7 gene 10 promoter and protein-coding sequences. The second class, the lambda SHLX vectors, allows the generation of large amounts of single-stranded DNA or synthetic cRNA that can be used in subtractive hybridization procedures. Both classes of vectors are designed to allow directional cDNA cloning with non-enzymatic protection of internal restriction sites. In addition, they are designed to facilitate conversion from phage lambda to plasmid clones using a genetic method based on the bacteriophage P1 site-specific recombination system; we refer to this as automatic Cre-loxP plasmid subcloning. The phage lambda arms, lambda LOX, used in the construction of these vectors have unique restriction sites positioned between the two loxP sites. Insertion of a specialized plasmid between these sites will convert it into a phage lambda cDNA cloning vector with automatic plasmid subcloning capability.

  18. Study in mutation of alfalfa genome DNA due to low energy N+ implantation using RAPD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Roulei; Song Daojun; Yu Zengliang; Li Yufeng; Liang Yunzhang

    2001-01-01

    After implanted by various dosage N + beams, germination rate of alfalfa seeds appears to be saddle line with dosage increasing. The authors have studied in mutation of genome DNA due to low energy N + implantation, and concluded that 30 differential DNA fragments have been amplified by 8 primers (S 41 , S 42 , S 45 , S 46 , S 50 , S 52 , S 56 , S 58 ) in 100 primers, moreover, number of differential DNA fragments between CK and treatments increases with dosage. Consequently, low energy ion implantation can cause mutation of alfalfa genome DNA. The more dosage it is, the more mutation alfalfa will be

  19. A novel nucleo-cytoplasmic hybrid clone formed via androgenesis in polyploid gibel carp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Li

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unisexual vertebrates have been demonstrated to reproduce by gynogenesis, hybridogenesis, parthenogenesis, or kleptogenesis, however, it is uncertain how the reproduction mode contributes to the clonal diversity. Recently, polyploid gibel carp has been revealed to possess coexisting dual modes of unisexual gynogenesis and sexual reproduction and to have numerous various clones. Using sexual reproduction mating between clone D female and clone A male and subsequent 7 generation multiplying of unisexual gynogenesis, we have created a novel clone strain with more than several hundred millions of individuals. Here, we attempt to identify genetic background of the novel clone and to explore the significant implication for clonal diversity contribution. Methods Several nuclear genome markers and one cytoplasmic marker, the mitochondrial genome sequence, were used to identify the genetic organization of the randomly sampled individuals from different generations of the novel clone. Results Chromosome number, Cot-1 repetitive DNA banded karyotype, microsatellite patterns, AFLP profiles and transferrin alleles uniformly indicated that nuclear genome of the novel clone is identical to that of clone A, and significantly different from that of clone D. However, the cytoplasmic marker, its complete mtDNA genome sequence, is same to that of clone D, and different from that of clone A. Conclusions The present data indicate that the novel clone is a nucleo-cytoplasmic hybrid between the known clones A and D, because it originates from the offspring of gonochoristic sexual reproduction mating between clone D female and clone A male, and contains an entire nuclear genome from the paternal clone A and a mtDNA genome (cytoplasm from the maternal clone D. It is suggested to arise via androgenesis by a mechanism of ploidy doubling of clone A sperm in clone D ooplasm through inhibiting the first mitotic division. Significantly, the selected nucleo

  20. A novel nucleo-cytoplasmic hybrid clone formed via androgenesis in polyploid gibel carp

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Unisexual vertebrates have been demonstrated to reproduce by gynogenesis, hybridogenesis, parthenogenesis, or kleptogenesis, however, it is uncertain how the reproduction mode contributes to the clonal diversity. Recently, polyploid gibel carp has been revealed to possess coexisting dual modes of unisexual gynogenesis and sexual reproduction and to have numerous various clones. Using sexual reproduction mating between clone D female and clone A male and subsequent 7 generation multiplying of unisexual gynogenesis, we have created a novel clone strain with more than several hundred millions of individuals. Here, we attempt to identify genetic background of the novel clone and to explore the significant implication for clonal diversity contribution. Methods Several nuclear genome markers and one cytoplasmic marker, the mitochondrial genome sequence, were used to identify the genetic organization of the randomly sampled individuals from different generations of the novel clone. Results Chromosome number, Cot-1 repetitive DNA banded karyotype, microsatellite patterns, AFLP profiles and transferrin alleles uniformly indicated that nuclear genome of the novel clone is identical to that of clone A, and significantly different from that of clone D. However, the cytoplasmic marker, its complete mtDNA genome sequence, is same to that of clone D, and different from that of clone A. Conclusions The present data indicate that the novel clone is a nucleo-cytoplasmic hybrid between the known clones A and D, because it originates from the offspring of gonochoristic sexual reproduction mating between clone D female and clone A male, and contains an entire nuclear genome from the paternal clone A and a mtDNA genome (cytoplasm) from the maternal clone D. It is suggested to arise via androgenesis by a mechanism of ploidy doubling of clone A sperm in clone D ooplasm through inhibiting the first mitotic division. Significantly, the selected nucleo-cytoplasmic hybrid female