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Sample records for genomic activation clinical

  1. Clinical Interpretation of Genomic Variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayitoğlu, Müge

    2016-09-05

    Novel high-throughput sequencing technologies generate large-scale genomic data and are used extensively for disease mapping of monogenic and/or complex disorders, personalized treatment, and pharmacogenomics. Next-generation sequencing is rapidly becoming routine tool for diagnosis and molecular monitoring of patients to evaluate therapeutic efficiency. The next-generation sequencing platforms generate huge amounts of genetic variation data and it remains a challenge to interpret the variations that are identified. Such data interpretation needs close collaboration among bioinformaticians, clinicians, and geneticists. There are several problems that must be addressed, such as the generation of new algorithms for mapping and annotation, harmonization of the terminology, correct use of nomenclature, reference genomes for different populations, rare disease variant databases, and clinical reports.

  2. Clinical genomics information management software linking cancer genome sequence and clinical decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Stuart; Jiao, Wei; Brown, Andrew M K; Petrocelli, Teresa; Tran, Ben; Zhang, Tong; McPherson, John D; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Bedard, Philippe L; Onetto, Nicole; Hudson, Thomas J; Dancey, Janet; Siu, Lillian L; Stein, Lincoln; Ferretti, Vincent

    2013-09-01

    Using sequencing information to guide clinical decision-making requires coordination of a diverse set of people and activities. In clinical genomics, the process typically includes sample acquisition, template preparation, genome data generation, analysis to identify and confirm variant alleles, interpretation of clinical significance, and reporting to clinicians. We describe a software application developed within a clinical genomics study, to support this entire process. The software application tracks patients, samples, genomic results, decisions and reports across the cohort, monitors progress and sends reminders, and works alongside an electronic data capture system for the trial's clinical and genomic data. It incorporates systems to read, store, analyze and consolidate sequencing results from multiple technologies, and provides a curated knowledge base of tumor mutation frequency (from the COSMIC database) annotated with clinical significance and drug sensitivity to generate reports for clinicians. By supporting the entire process, the application provides deep support for clinical decision making, enabling the generation of relevant guidance in reports for verification by an expert panel prior to forwarding to the treating physician.

  3. Standards for Clinical Grade Genomic Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohe, Sophia L; Carter, Alexis B; Pfeifer, John D; Crawford, James M; Cushman-Vokoun, Allison; Caughron, Samuel; Leonard, Debra G B

    2015-11-01

    Next-generation sequencing performed in a clinical environment must meet clinical standards, which requires reproducibility of all aspects of the testing. Clinical-grade genomic databases (CGGDs) are required to classify a variant and to assist in the professional interpretation of clinical next-generation sequencing. Applying quality laboratory standards to the reference databases used for sequence-variant interpretation presents a new challenge for validation and curation. To define CGGD and the categories of information contained in CGGDs and to frame recommendations for the structure and use of these databases in clinical patient care. Members of the College of American Pathologists Personalized Health Care Committee reviewed the literature and existing state of genomic databases and developed a framework for guiding CGGD development in the future. Clinical-grade genomic databases may provide different types of information. This work group defined 3 layers of information in CGGDs: clinical genomic variant repositories, genomic medical data repositories, and genomic medicine evidence databases. The layers are differentiated by the types of genomic and medical information contained and the utility in assisting with clinical interpretation of genomic variants. Clinical-grade genomic databases must meet specific standards regarding submission, curation, and retrieval of data, as well as the maintenance of privacy and security. These organizing principles for CGGDs should serve as a foundation for future development of specific standards that support the use of such databases for patient care.

  4. Implementing genomics and pharmacogenomics in the clinic: The National Human Genome Research Institute's genomic medicine portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolio, Teri A

    2016-10-01

    Increasing knowledge about the influence of genetic variation on human health and growing availability of reliable, cost-effective genetic testing have spurred the implementation of genomic medicine in the clinic. As defined by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), genomic medicine uses an individual's genetic information in his or her clinical care, and has begun to be applied effectively in areas such as cancer genomics, pharmacogenomics, and rare and undiagnosed diseases. In 2011 NHGRI published its strategic vision for the future of genomic research, including an ambitious research agenda to facilitate and promote the implementation of genomic medicine. To realize this agenda, NHGRI is consulting and facilitating collaborations with the external research community through a series of "Genomic Medicine Meetings," under the guidance and leadership of the National Advisory Council on Human Genome Research. These meetings have identified and begun to address significant obstacles to implementation, such as lack of evidence of efficacy, limited availability of genomics expertise and testing, lack of standards, and difficulties in integrating genomic results into electronic medical records. The six research and dissemination initiatives comprising NHGRI's genomic research portfolio are designed to speed the evaluation and incorporation, where appropriate, of genomic technologies and findings into routine clinical care. Actual adoption of successful approaches in clinical care will depend upon the willingness, interest, and energy of professional societies, practitioners, patients, and payers to promote their responsible use and share their experiences in doing so.

  5. Clinical Microfluidics for Neutrophil Genomics and Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Neutrophils play critical roles in modulating the immune response. We present a robust methodology for rapidly isolating neutrophils directly from whole blood and develop ‘on-chip’ processing for mRNA and protein isolation for genomics and proteomics. We validate this device with an ex vivo stimulation experiment and by comparison with standard bulk isolation methodologies. Lastly, we implement this tool as part of a near patient blood processing system within a multi-center clinical study of...

  6. Clinical microfluidics for neutrophil genomics and proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotz, Kenneth T; Xiao, Wenzong; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Qian, Wei-Jun; Russom, Aman; Warner, Elizabeth A; Moldawer, Lyle L; De, Asit; Bankey, Paul E; Petritis, Brianne O; Camp, David G; Rosenbach, Alan E; Goverman, Jeremy; Fagan, Shawn P; Brownstein, Bernard H; Irimia, Daniel; Xu, Weihong; Wilhelmy, Julie; Mindrinos, Michael N; Smith, Richard D; Davis, Ronald W; Tompkins, Ronald G; Toner, Mehmet

    2010-09-01

    Neutrophils have key roles in modulating the immune response. We present a robust methodology for rapidly isolating neutrophils directly from whole blood with 'on-chip' processing for mRNA and protein isolation for genomics and proteomics. We validate this device with an ex vivo stimulation experiment and by comparison with standard bulk isolation methodologies. Last, we implement this tool as part of a near-patient blood processing system within a multi-center clinical study of the immune response to severe trauma and burn injury. The preliminary results from a small cohort of subjects in our study and healthy controls show a unique time-dependent gene expression pattern clearly demonstrating the ability of this tool to discriminate temporal transcriptional events of neutrophils within a clinical setting.

  7. Transforming clinical microbiology with bacterial genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didelot, Xavier; Bowden, Rory; Wilson, Daniel J; Peto, Tim E A; Crook, Derrick W

    2012-09-01

    Whole-genome sequencing of bacteria has recently emerged as a cost-effective and convenient approach for addressing many microbiological questions. Here, we review the current status of clinical microbiology and how it has already begun to be transformed by using next-generation sequencing. We focus on three essential tasks: identifying the species of an isolate, testing its properties, such as resistance to antibiotics and virulence, and monitoring the emergence and spread of bacterial pathogens. We predict that the application of next-generation sequencing will soon be sufficiently fast, accurate and cheap to be used in routine clinical microbiology practice, where it could replace many complex current techniques with a single, more efficient workflow.

  8. Comparative genomic hybridization in clinical cytogenetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryndorf, T.; Kirchhoff, M.; Rose, H. [and others

    1995-11-01

    We report the results of applying comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) in a cytogenetic service laboratory for (1) determination of the origin of extra and missing chromosomal material in intricate cases of unbalanced aberrations and (2) detection of common prenatal numerical chromosome aberrations. A total of 11 fetal samples were analyzed. Seven cases of complex unbalanced aberrations that could not be identified reliably by conventional cytogenetics were successfully resolved by CGH analysis. CGH results were validated by using FISH with chromosome-specific probes. Four cases representing common prenatal numerical aberrations (trisomy 21, 18, and 13 and monosomy X) were also successfully diagnosed by CGH. We conclude that CGH is a powerful adjunct to traditional cytogenetic techniques that makes it possible to solve clinical cases of intricate unbalanced aberrations in a single hybridization. CGH may also be a useful adjunct to screen for euchromatic involvement in marker chromosomes. Further technical development may render CGH applicable for routine aberration screening. 16 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Genome-wide association study of clinical dimensions of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fanous, Ayman H; Zhou, Baiyu; Aggen, Steven H;

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sources of evidence suggest that genetic factors influence variation in clinical features of schizophrenia. The authors present the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of dimensional symptom scores among individuals with schizophrenia....

  10. CRISPR-Cas : revolutionising genome engineering : in practice - clinical update

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pepper, M.S; Nicholson, S.A

    2016-01-01

    ... technologies, genome engineering looks set to become a clinical reality in the near future. This article discusses recent advancements in the technology called 'clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated genes' (CRISPR-Cas...

  11. Whole genome sequencing in clinical and public health microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, J C; McCallum, N; Sintchenko, V; Howden, B P

    2015-04-01

    Genomics and whole genome sequencing (WGS) have the capacity to greatly enhance knowledge and understanding of infectious diseases and clinical microbiology.The growth and availability of bench-top WGS analysers has facilitated the feasibility of genomics in clinical and public health microbiology.Given current resource and infrastructure limitations, WGS is most applicable to use in public health laboratories, reference laboratories, and hospital infection control-affiliated laboratories.As WGS represents the pinnacle for strain characterisation and epidemiological analyses, it is likely to replace traditional typing methods, resistance gene detection and other sequence-based investigations (e.g., 16S rDNA PCR) in the near future.Although genomic technologies are rapidly evolving, widespread implementation in clinical and public health microbiology laboratories is limited by the need for effective semi-automated pipelines, standardised quality control and data interpretation, bioinformatics expertise, and infrastructure.

  12. Clinical implications of genomics for cancer risk genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David M; James, Paul A; Ballinger, Mandy L

    2015-06-01

    The study of human genetics has provided substantial insight into cancer biology. With an increase in sequencing capacity and a reduction in sequencing costs, genomics will probably transform clinical cancer genetics. A heritable basis for many cancers is accepted, but so far less than half the genetic drivers have been identified. Genomics will increasingly be applied to populations irrespective of family history, which will change the framework of phenotype-directed genetic testing. Panel testing and whole genome sequencing will identify novel, polygenic, and de-novo determinants of cancer risk, often with lower penetrance, which will challenge present binary clinical classification systems and management algorithms. In the future, genotype-stratified public screening and prevention programmes could form part of tailored population risk management. The integration of research with clinical practice will result in so-called discovery cohorts that will help identify clinically significant genetic variation.

  13. Plasmodium knowlesi genome sequences from clinical isolates reveal extensive genomic dimorphism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel M Pinheiro

    Full Text Available Plasmodium knowlesi is a newly described zoonosis that causes malaria in the human population that can be severe and fatal. The study of P. knowlesi parasites from human clinical isolates is relatively new and, in order to obtain maximum information from patient sample collections, we explored the possibility of generating P. knowlesi genome sequences from archived clinical isolates. Our patient sample collection consisted of frozen whole blood samples that contained excessive human DNA contamination and, in that form, were not suitable for parasite genome sequencing. We developed a method to reduce the amount of human DNA in the thawed blood samples in preparation for high throughput parasite genome sequencing using Illumina HiSeq and MiSeq sequencing platforms. Seven of fifteen samples processed had sufficiently pure P. knowlesi DNA for whole genome sequencing. The reads were mapped to the P. knowlesi H strain reference genome and an average mapping of 90% was obtained. Genes with low coverage were removed leaving 4623 genes for subsequent analyses. Previously we identified a DNA sequence dimorphism on a small fragment of the P. knowlesi normocyte binding protein xa gene on chromosome 14. We used the genome data to assemble full-length Pknbpxa sequences and discovered that the dimorphism extended along the gene. An in-house algorithm was developed to detect SNP sites co-associating with the dimorphism. More than half of the P. knowlesi genome was dimorphic, involving genes on all chromosomes and suggesting that two distinct types of P. knowlesi infect the human population in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. We use P. knowlesi clinical samples to demonstrate that Plasmodium DNA from archived patient samples can produce high quality genome data. We show that analyses, of even small numbers of difficult clinical malaria isolates, can generate comprehensive genomic information that will improve our understanding of malaria parasite diversity and

  14. A histone timer for zygotic genome activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriaco, Giorgia; Tamkun, John W

    2013-09-30

    Histone H1 variants play key roles in the regulation of higher-order chromatin structure and have been implicated in numerous developmental processes. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Pérez-Montero et al. (2013) present evidence that the Drosophila histone H1 variant dBigH1 prevents premature activation of the zygotic genome during early embryogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The human genome project: Prospects and implications for clinical medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, E.D.; Waterston, R.H. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States))

    1991-10-09

    The recently initiated human genome project is a large international effort to elucidate the genetic architecture of the genomes of man and several model organisms. The initial phases of this endeavor involve the establishment of rough blueprints (maps) of the genetic landscape of these genomes, with the long-term goal of determining their precise nucleotide sequences and identifying the genes. The knowledge gained by these studies will provide a vital tool for the study of many biologic processes and will have a profound impact on clinical medicine.

  16. Reproductive medicine involving genome editing: clinical uncertainties and embryological needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    Genome editing based on site-directed nucleases facilitated efficient and versatile genetic modifications in human cells. However, recent reports, demonstrating CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing in human embryos have raised profound concerns worldwide. This commentary explores the clinical justification and feasibility of reproductive medicine using germline genome editing. Despite the perceived utility of reproductive medicine for treating intractable infertility, it is difficult to justify germline genome editing from the perspective of the prospective child. As suggested by the UK legalization regarding mitochondrial donation, the prevention of genetic disease in offspring by genome editing might be acceptable in limited cases of serious or life-threatening conditions, where no alternative medicine is available. Nonetheless, the mosaicism underlying human embryos as well as the off-target effect by artificial nucleases will likely hamper preimplantation genetic diagnosis prior to embryo transfer. Such considerations suggest that this type of reproductive medicine should not be developed toward a clinical application. However, the clinical uncertainties underscore the need for embryology that can address fundamental questions regarding germline aneuploidy and mosaicism using genome editing. Copyright © 2016 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Patient-controlled encrypted genomic data: an approach to advance clinical genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trakadis Yannis J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The revolution in DNA sequencing technologies over the past decade has made it feasible to sequence an individual’s whole genome at a relatively low cost. The potential value of the information generated by genomic technologies for medicine and society is enormous. However, in order for exome sequencing, and eventually whole genome sequencing, to be implemented clinically, a number of major challenges need to be overcome. For instance, obtaining meaningful informed-consent, managing incidental findings and the great volume of data generated (including multiple findings with uncertain clinical significance, re-interpreting the genomic data and providing additional counselling to patients as genetic knowledge evolves are issues that need to be addressed. It appears that medical genetics is shifting from the present “phenotype-first” medical model to a “data-first” model which leads to multiple complexities. Discussion This manuscript discusses the different challenges associated with integrating genomic technologies into clinical practice and describes a “phenotype-first” approach, namely, “Individualized Mutation-weighed Phenotype Search”, and its benefits. The proposed approach allows for a more efficient prioritization of the genes to be tested in a clinical lab based on both the patient’s phenotype and his/her entire genomic data. It simplifies “informed-consent” for clinical use of genomic technologies and helps to protect the patient’s autonomy and privacy. Overall, this approach could potentially render widespread use of genomic technologies, in the immediate future, practical, ethical and clinically useful. Summary The “Individualized Mutation-weighed Phenotype Search” approach allows for an incremental integration of genomic technologies into clinical practice. It ensures that we do not over-medicalize genomic data but, rather, continue our current medical model which is based on serving

  18. The clinical applications of genome editing in HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cathy X; Cannon, Paula M

    2016-05-26

    HIV/AIDS has long been at the forefront of the development of gene- and cell-based therapies. Although conventional gene therapy approaches typically involve the addition of anti-HIV genes to cells using semirandomly integrating viral vectors, newer genome editing technologies based on engineered nucleases are now allowing more precise genetic manipulations. The possible outcomes of genome editing include gene disruption, which has been most notably applied to the CCR5 coreceptor gene, or the introduction of small mutations or larger whole gene cassette insertions at a targeted locus. Disruption of CCR5 using zinc finger nucleases was the first-in-human application of genome editing and remains the most clinically advanced platform, with 7 completed or ongoing clinical trials in T cells and hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). Here we review the laboratory and clinical findings of CCR5 editing in T cells and HSPCs for HIV therapy and summarize other promising genome editing approaches for future clinical development. In particular, recent advances in the delivery of genome editing reagents and the demonstration of highly efficient homology-directed editing in both T cells and HSPCs are expected to spur the development of even more sophisticated applications of this technology for HIV therapy.

  19. Toward clinical genomics in everyday medicine: perspectives and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Susan K; Hultner, Michael L; Jacob, Howard J; Ledbetter, David H; McCarthy, Jeanette J; Ball, Michael; Beckman, Kenneth B; Belmont, John W; Bloss, Cinnamon S; Christman, Michael F; Cosgrove, Andy; Damiani, Stephen A; Danis, Timothy; Delledonne, Massimo; Dougherty, Michael J; Dudley, Joel T; Faucett, W Andrew; Friedman, Jennifer R; Haase, David H; Hays, Tom S; Heilsberg, Stu; Huber, Jeff; Kaminsky, Leah; Ledbetter, Nikki; Lee, Warren H; Levin, Elissa; Libiger, Ondrej; Linderman, Michael; Love, Richard L; Magnus, David C; Martland, AnneMarie; McClure, Susan L; Megill, Scott E; Messier, Helen; Nussbaum, Robert L; Palaniappan, Latha; Patay, Bradley A; Popovich, Bradley W; Quackenbush, John; Savant, Mark J; Su, Michael M; Terry, Sharon F; Tucker, Steven; Wong, William T; Green, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Precision or personalized medicine through clinical genome and exome sequencing has been described by some as a revolution that could transform healthcare delivery, yet it is currently used in only a small fraction of patients, principally for the diagnosis of suspected Mendelian conditions and for targeting cancer treatments. Given the burden of illness in our society, it is of interest to ask how clinical genome and exome sequencing can be constructively integrated more broadly into the routine practice of medicine for the betterment of public health. In November 2014, 46 experts from academia, industry, policy and patient advocacy gathered in a conference sponsored by Illumina, Inc. to discuss this question, share viewpoints and propose recommendations. This perspective summarizes that work and identifies some of the obstacles and opportunities that must be considered in translating advances in genomics more widely into the practice of medicine.

  20. The fiduciary relationship model for managing clinical genomic "incidental" findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro-Muñoz, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines how the application of legal fiduciary principles (e.g., physicians' duty of loyalty and care, duty to inform, and duty act within the scope of authority), can serve as a framework to promote management of clinical genomic "incidental" or secondary target findings that is patient-centered and consistent with recognized patient autonomy rights. The application of fiduciary principles to the clinical genomic testing context gives rise to at least four physician fiduciary duties in conflict with recent recommendations by the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG). These recommendations have generated much debate among lawyers, clinicians, and bioethicists hence I believe this publication will be of value and interest to your readership. © 2014 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  1. Health Care Infrastructure for Financially Sustainable Clinical Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennerz, Jochen K; McLaughlin, Heather M; Baron, Jason M; Rasmussen, David; Sumbada Shin, Meini; Berners-Lee, Nancy; Miller Batten, Julie; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Gala, Manish K; Winter, Harland S; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Sweetser, David A; Boswell, Marianne; Pacula, Maciej; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Le, Long P; Hynes, William; Rehm, Heidi L; Klibanski, Anne; Black-Schaffer, Stephen W; Golden, Jeffrey A; Louis, David N; Weiss, Scott T; Iafrate, A John

    2016-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing has evolved technically and economically into the method of choice for interrogating the genome in cancer and inherited disorders. The introduction of procedural code sets for whole-exome and genome sequencing is a milestone toward financially sustainable clinical implementation; however, achieving reimbursement is currently a major challenge. As part of a prospective quality-improvement initiative to implement the new code sets, we adopted Agile, a development methodology originally devised in software development. We implemented eight functionally distinct modules (request review, cost estimation, preauthorization, accessioning, prebilling, testing, reporting, and reimbursement consultation) and obtained feedback via an anonymous survey. We managed 50 clinical requests (January to June 2015). The fraction of pursued-to-requested cases (n = 15/50; utilization management fraction, 0.3) aimed for a high rate of preauthorizations. In 13 of 15 patients the insurance plan required preauthorization, which we obtained in 70% and ultimately achieved reimbursement in 50%. Interoperability enabled assessment of 12 different combinations of modules that underline the importance of an adaptive workflow and policy tailoring to achieve higher yields of reimbursement. The survey confirmed a positive attitude toward self-organizing teams. We acknowledge the individuals and their interactions and termed the infrastructure: human pipeline. Nontechnical barriers currently are limiting the scope and availability of clinical genomic sequencing. The presented human pipeline is one approach toward long-term financial sustainability of clinical genomics.

  2. Computational Biology in Clinical Proteomics and Chromatin Genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuleman, W.

    2012-01-01

    The work in this thesis is concerned with two very distinct biological fields. The first part pertains to the development of techniques to aid in the search for clinical biomarkers for use in the early detection of cancer. The second part aims to elucidate in what way a genome is organised in a cell

  3. Whole genome sequencing of clinical isolates of Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanevik, K; Bakken, R; Brattbakk, H R; Saghaug, C S; Langeland, N

    2015-02-01

    Clinical isolates from protozoan parasites such as Giardia lamblia are at present practically impossible to culture. By using simple cyst purification methods, we show that Giardia whole genome sequencing of clinical stool samples is possible. Immunomagnetic separation after sucrose gradient flotation gave superior results compared to sucrose gradient flotation alone. The method enables detailed analysis of a wide range of genes of interest for genotyping, virulence and drug resistance.

  4. Perspectives on Clinical Informatics: Integrating Large-Scale Clinical, Genomic, and Health Information for Clinical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Young Choi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The advances in electronic medical records (EMRs and bioinformatics (BI represent two significant trends in healthcare. The widespread adoption of EMR systems and the completion of the Human Genome Project developed the technologies for data acquisition, analysis, and visualization in two different domains. The massive amount of data from both clinical and biology domains is expected to provide personalized, preventive, and predictive healthcare services in the near future. The integrated use of EMR and BI data needs to consider four key informatics areas: data modeling, analytics, standardization, and privacy. Bioclinical data warehouses integrating heterogeneous patient-related clinical or omics data should be considered. The representative standardization effort by the Clinical Bioinformatics Ontology (CBO aims to provide uniquely identified concepts to include molecular pathology terminologies. Since individual genome data are easily used to predict current and future health status, different safeguards to ensure confidentiality should be considered. In this paper, we focused on the informatics aspects of integrating the EMR community and BI community by identifying opportunities, challenges, and approaches to provide the best possible care service for our patients and the population.

  5. Perspectives on clinical informatics: integrating large-scale clinical, genomic, and health information for clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, In Young; Kim, Tae-Min; Kim, Myung Shin; Mun, Seong K; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2013-12-01

    The advances in electronic medical records (EMRs) and bioinformatics (BI) represent two significant trends in healthcare. The widespread adoption of EMR systems and the completion of the Human Genome Project developed the technologies for data acquisition, analysis, and visualization in two different domains. The massive amount of data from both clinical and biology domains is expected to provide personalized, preventive, and predictive healthcare services in the near future. The integrated use of EMR and BI data needs to consider four key informatics areas: data modeling, analytics, standardization, and privacy. Bioclinical data warehouses integrating heterogeneous patient-related clinical or omics data should be considered. The representative standardization effort by the Clinical Bioinformatics Ontology (CBO) aims to provide uniquely identified concepts to include molecular pathology terminologies. Since individual genome data are easily used to predict current and future health status, different safeguards to ensure confidentiality should be considered. In this paper, we focused on the informatics aspects of integrating the EMR community and BI community by identifying opportunities, challenges, and approaches to provide the best possible care service for our patients and the population.

  6. [Bacterial genomics and metagenomics: clinical applications and medical relevance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diene, S M; Bertelli, C; Pillonel, T; Schrenzel, J; Greub, G

    2014-11-12

    New sequencing technologies provide in a short time and at low cost high amount of genomic sequences useful for applications such as: a) development of diagnostic PCRs and/or serological tests; b) detection of virulence factors (virulome) or genes/SNPs associated with resistance to antibiotics (resistome) and c) investigation of transmission and dissemination of bacterial pathogens. Thus, bacterial genomics of medical importance is useful to clinical microbiologists, to infectious diseases specialists as well as to epidemiologists. Determining the microbial composition of a sample by metagenomics is another application of new sequencing technologies, useful to understand the impact of bacteria on various non-infectious diseases such as obesity, asthma, or diabetes. Genomics and metagenomics will likely become a specialized diagnostic analysis.

  7. Transcriptional Activation of the Zygotic Genome in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Melissa M; Eisen, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    During the first stages of metazoan development, the genomes of the highly specified sperm and egg must unite and be reprogrammed to allow for the generation of a new organism. This process is controlled by maternally deposited products. Initially, the zygotic genome is largely transcriptionally quiescent, and it is not until hours later that the zygotic genome takes control of development. The transcriptional activation of the zygotic genome is tightly coordinated with the degradation of the maternal products. Here, we review the current understanding of the processes that mediate the reprogramming of the early embryonic genome and facilitate transcriptional activation during the early stages of Drosophila development.

  8. [Research activity in clinical biochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, H.L.; Larsen, B.; Ingwersen, P.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quantitative bibliometric measurements of research activity are frequently used, e.g. for evaluating applicants for academic positions. The purpose of this investigation is to assess research activity within the medical speciality of Clinical Biochemistry by comparing it with a matched...... Clinical Biochemistry, 57 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Each of these 57 was matched according to medical title with two randomly chosen specialists from other specialities, totaling 114. Using Medline and the Web of Science, the number of publications and the number of citations were then ascertained....... RESULTS: 25% of the 11,691 specialists held a PhD degree or doctoral degree, DMSci, (Clinical Biochemistry: 61%). The 171 specialists included in the study had 9,823 papers in Medline and 10,140 papers in the Web of Science. The number of Medline papers per specialist was 71 for Clinical Biochemistry...

  9. Population and clinical genetics of human transposable elements in the (post) genomic era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishishwar, Lavanya; Wang, Lu; Clayton, Evan A.; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo; McDonald, John F.; Jordan, I. King

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent technological developments—in genomics, bioinformatics and high-throughput experimental techniques—are providing opportunities to study ongoing human transposable element (TE) activity at an unprecedented level of detail. It is now possible to characterize genome-wide collections of TE insertion sites for multiple human individuals, within and between populations, and for a variety of tissue types. Comparison of TE insertion site profiles between individuals captures the germline activity of TEs and reveals insertion site variants that segregate as polymorphisms among human populations, whereas comparison among tissue types ascertains somatic TE activity that generates cellular heterogeneity. In this review, we provide an overview of these new technologies and explore their implications for population and clinical genetic studies of human TEs. We cover both recent published results on human TE insertion activity as well as the prospects for future TE studies related to human evolution and health.

  10. Low-pass whole-genome sequencing in clinical cytogenetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Zirui; Zhang, Jun; Hu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Chromosomal microarray analysis is the gold standard for copy-number variant (CNV) detection in prenatal and postnatal diagnosis. We aimed to determine whether next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology could be an alternative method for CNV detection in routine clinical application...... Genetics and Genomics guidelines. Results: Overall, a total of 198 abortuses, 37 stillbirths, 149 prenatal, and 186 postnatal samples were tested. Our approach yielded results in 549 samples (96.3%). In addition to 119 subjects with aneuploidies, 103 pCNVs (74 losses and 29 gains) were identified in 82...

  11. Telomerase activation by genomic rearrangements in high-risk neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peifer, Martin; Hertwig, Falk; Roels, Frederik; Dreidax, Daniel; Gartlgruber, Moritz; Menon, Roopika; Krämer, Andrea; Roncaioli, Justin L; Sand, Frederik; Heuckmann, Johannes M; Ikram, Fakhera; Schmidt, Rene; Ackermann, Sandra; Engesser, Anne; Kahlert, Yvonne; Vogel, Wenzel; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Thierry-Mieg, Jean; Thierry-Mieg, Danielle; Mariappan, Aruljothi; Heynck, Stefanie; Mariotti, Erika; Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Gloeckner, Christian; Bosco, Graziella; Leuschner, Ivo; Schweiger, Michal R; Savelyeva, Larissa; Watkins, Simon C; Shao, Chunxuan; Bell, Emma; Höfer, Thomas; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Theissen, Jessica; Volland, Ruth; Saadati, Maral; Eggert, Angelika; de Wilde, Bram; Berthold, Frank; Peng, Zhiyu; Zhao, Chen; Shi, Leming; Ortmann, Monika; Büttner, Reinhard; Perner, Sven; Hero, Barbara; Schramm, Alexander; Schulte, Johannes H; Herrmann, Carl; O'Sullivan, Roderick J; Westermann, Frank; Thomas, Roman K; Fischer, Matthias

    2015-10-29

    Neuroblastoma is a malignant paediatric tumour of the sympathetic nervous system. Roughly half of these tumours regress spontaneously or are cured by limited therapy. By contrast, high-risk neuroblastomas have an unfavourable clinical course despite intensive multimodal treatment, and their molecular basis has remained largely elusive. Here we have performed whole-genome sequencing of 56 neuroblastomas (high-risk, n = 39; low-risk, n = 17) and discovered recurrent genomic rearrangements affecting a chromosomal region at 5p15.33 proximal of the telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (TERT). These rearrangements occurred only in high-risk neuroblastomas (12/39, 31%) in a mutually exclusive fashion with MYCN amplifications and ATRX mutations, which are known genetic events in this tumour type. In an extended case series (n = 217), TERT rearrangements defined a subgroup of high-risk tumours with particularly poor outcome. Despite a large structural diversity of these rearrangements, they all induced massive transcriptional upregulation of TERT. In the remaining high-risk tumours, TERT expression was also elevated in MYCN-amplified tumours, whereas alternative lengthening of telomeres was present in neuroblastomas without TERT or MYCN alterations, suggesting that telomere lengthening represents a central mechanism defining this subtype. The 5p15.33 rearrangements juxtapose the TERT coding sequence to strong enhancer elements, resulting in massive chromatin remodelling and DNA methylation of the affected region. Supporting a functional role of TERT, neuroblastoma cell lines bearing rearrangements or amplified MYCN exhibited both upregulated TERT expression and enzymatic telomerase activity. In summary, our findings show that remodelling of the genomic context abrogates transcriptional silencing of TERT in high-risk neuroblastoma and places telomerase activation in the centre of transformation in a large fraction of these tumours.

  12. An Integrative Pathway-based Clinical-genomic Model for Cancer Survival Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Wang, Lily; Ishwaran, Hemant

    2010-09-01

    Prediction models that use gene expression levels are now being proposed for personalized treatment of cancer, but building accurate models that are easy to interpret remains a challenge. In this paper, we describe an integrative clinical-genomic approach that combines both genomic pathway and clinical information. First, we summarize information from genes in each pathway using Supervised Principal Components (SPCA) to obtain pathway-based genomic predictors. Next, we build a prediction model based on clinical variables and pathway-based genomic predictors using Random Survival Forests (RSF). Our rationale for this two-stage procedure is that the underlying disease process may be influenced by environmental exposure (measured by clinical variables) and perturbations in different pathways (measured by pathway-based genomic variables), as well as their interactions. Using two cancer microarray datasets, we show that the pathway-based clinical-genomic model outperforms gene-based clinical-genomic models, with improved prediction accuracy and interpretability.

  13. The transcriptionally active regions in the genome of Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Jarmer, Hanne Østergaard

    2009-01-01

    The majority of all genes have so far been identified and annotated systematically through in silico gene finding. Here we report the finding of 3662 strand-specific transcriptionally active regions (TARs) in the genome of Bacillus subtilis by the use of tiling arrays. We have measured the genome...

  14. Programming biological operating systems: genome design, assembly and activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Daniel G

    2014-05-01

    The DNA technologies developed over the past 20 years for reading and writing the genetic code converged when the first synthetic cell was created 4 years ago. An outcome of this work has been an extraordinary set of tools for synthesizing, assembling, engineering and transplanting whole bacterial genomes. Technical progress, options and applications for bacterial genome design, assembly and activation are discussed.

  15. Cost analysis of whole genome sequencing in German clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plöthner, Marika; Frank, Martin; von der Schulenburg, J-Matthias Graf

    2017-06-01

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is an emerging tool in clinical diagnostics. However, little has been said about its procedure costs, owing to a dearth of related cost studies. This study helps fill this research gap by analyzing the execution costs of WGS within the setting of German clinical practice. First, to estimate costs, a sequencing process related to clinical practice was undertaken. Once relevant resources were identified, a quantification and monetary evaluation was conducted using data and information from expert interviews with clinical geneticists, and personnel at private enterprises and hospitals. This study focuses on identifying the costs associated with the standard sequencing process, and the procedure costs for a single WGS were analyzed on the basis of two sequencing platforms-namely, HiSeq 2500 and HiSeq Xten, both by Illumina, Inc. In addition, sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the influence of various uses of sequencing platforms and various coverage values on a fixed-cost degression. In the base case scenario-which features 80 % utilization and 30-times coverage-the cost of a single WGS analysis with the HiSeq 2500 was estimated at €3858.06. The cost of sequencing materials was estimated at €2848.08; related personnel costs of €396.94 and acquisition/maintenance costs (€607.39) were also found. In comparison, the cost of sequencing that uses the latest technology (i.e., HiSeq Xten) was approximately 63 % cheaper, at €1411.20. The estimated costs of WGS currently exceed the prediction of a 'US$1000 per genome', by more than a factor of 3.8. In particular, the material costs in themselves exceed this predicted cost.

  16. Clinical pertinence metric enables hypothesis-independent genome-phenome analysis for neurologic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Michael M; Abdellateef, Mostafa; El-Hattab, Ayman W; Hilbush, Brian S; De La Vega, Francisco M; Tromp, Gerard; Williams, Marc S; Betensky, Rebecca A; Gleeson, Joseph

    2015-06-01

    We describe an "integrated genome-phenome analysis" that combines both genomic sequence data and clinical information for genomic diagnosis. It is novel in that it uses robust diagnostic decision support and combines the clinical differential diagnosis and the genomic variants using a "pertinence" metric. This allows the analysis to be hypothesis-independent, not requiring assumptions about mode of inheritance, number of genes involved, or which clinical findings are most relevant. Using 20 genomic trios with neurologic disease, we find that pertinence scores averaging 99.9% identify the causative variant under conditions in which a genomic trio is analyzed and family-aware variant calling is done. The analysis takes seconds, and pertinence scores can be improved by clinicians adding more findings. The core conclusion is that automated genome-phenome analysis can be accurate, rapid, and efficient. We also conclude that an automated process offers a methodology for quality improvement of many components of genomic analysis.

  17. DNA Break Mapping Reveals Topoisomerase II Activity Genome-Wide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Baranello

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Genomic DNA is under constant assault by endogenous and exogenous DNA damaging agents. DNA breakage can represent a major threat to genome integrity but can also be necessary for genome function. Here we present approaches to map DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs and single-strand breaks (SSBs at the genome-wide scale by two methods called DSB- and SSB-Seq, respectively. We tested these methods in human colon cancer cells and validated the results using the Topoisomerase II (Top2-poisoning agent etoposide (ETO. Our results show that the combination of ETO treatment with break-mapping techniques is a powerful method to elaborate the pattern of Top2 enzymatic activity across the genome.

  18. [Transcription activator-like effectors(TALEs)based genome engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mei-Wei; Duan, Cheng-Li; Liu, Jiang

    2013-10-01

    Systematic reverse-engineering of functional genome architecture requires precise modifications of gene sequences and transcription levels. The development and application of transcription activator-like effectors(TALEs) has created a wealth of genome engineering possibilities. TALEs are a class of naturally occurring DNA-binding proteins found in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas species. The DNA-binding domain of each TALE typically consists of tandem 34-amino acid repeat modules rearranged according to a simple cipher to target new DNA sequences. Customized TALEs can be used for a wide variety of genome engineering applications, including transcriptional modulation and genome editing. Such "genome engineering" has now been established in human cells and a number of model organisms, thus opening the door to better understanding gene function in model organisms, improving traits in crop plants and treating human genetic disorders.

  19. Composition and organization of active centromere sequences in complex genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayden Karen E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Centromeres are sites of chromosomal spindle attachment during mitosis and meiosis. While the sequence basis for centromere identity remains a subject of considerable debate, one approach is to examine the genomic organization at these active sites that are correlated with epigenetic marks of centromere function. Results We have developed an approach to characterize both satellite and non-satellite centromeric sequences that are missing from current assemblies in complex genomes, using the dog genome as an example. Combining this genomic reference with an epigenetic dataset corresponding to sequences associated with the histone H3 variant centromere protein A (CENP-A, we identify active satellite sequence domains that appear to be both functionally and spatially distinct within the overall definition of satellite families. Conclusions These findings establish a genomic and epigenetic foundation for exploring the functional role of centromeric sequences in the previously sequenced dog genome and provide a model for similar studies within the context of less-characterized genomes.

  20. Physician Attitudes toward Adopting Genome-Guided Prescribing through Clinical Decision Support

    OpenAIRE

    Casey Lynnette Overby; Angelika Ludtke Erwin; Abul-Husn, Noura S.; Ellis, Stephen B; Scott, Stuart A.; Aniwaa Owusu Obeng; Kannry, Joseph L.; George Hripcsak; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Omri Gottesman

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed physician attitudes toward adopting genome-guided prescribing through clinical decision support (CDS), prior to enlisting in the Clinical Implementation of Personalized Medicine through Electronic Health Records and Genomics pilot pharmacogenomics project (CLIPMERGE PGx). We developed a survey instrument that includes the Evidence Based Practice Attitude Scale, adapted to measure attitudes toward adopting genome-informed interventions (EBPAS-GII). The survey also includes ...

  1. Personalized oncogenomics: clinical experience with malignant peritoneal mesothelioma using whole genome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon S Sheffield

    Full Text Available Peritoneal mesothelioma is a rare and sometimes lethal malignancy that presents a clinical challenge for both diagnosis and management. Recent studies have led to a better understanding of the molecular biology of peritoneal mesothelioma. Translation of the emerging data into better treatments and outcome is needed. From two patients with peritoneal mesothelioma, we derived whole genome sequences, RNA expression profiles, and targeted deep sequencing data. Molecular data were made available for translation into a clinical treatment plan. Treatment responses and outcomes were later examined in the context of molecular findings. Molecular studies presented here provide the first reported whole genome sequences of peritoneal mesothelioma. Mutations in known mesothelioma-related genes NF2, CDKN2A, LATS2, amongst others, were identified. Activation of MET-related signaling pathways was demonstrated in both cases. A hypermutated phenotype was observed in one case (434 vs. 18 single nucleotide variants and was associated with a favourable outcome despite sarcomatoid histology and multifocal disease. This study represents the first report of whole genome analyses of peritoneal mesothelioma, a key step in the understanding and treatment of this disease.

  2. Personalized oncogenomics: clinical experience with malignant peritoneal mesothelioma using whole genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Brandon S; Tinker, Anna V; Shen, Yaoqing; Hwang, Harry; Li-Chang, Hector H; Pleasance, Erin; Ch'ng, Carolyn; Lum, Amy; Lorette, Julie; McConnell, Yarrow J; Sun, Sophie; Jones, Steven J M; Gown, Allen M; Huntsman, David G; Schaeffer, David F; Churg, Andrew; Yip, Stephen; Laskin, Janessa; Marra, Marco A

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal mesothelioma is a rare and sometimes lethal malignancy that presents a clinical challenge for both diagnosis and management. Recent studies have led to a better understanding of the molecular biology of peritoneal mesothelioma. Translation of the emerging data into better treatments and outcome is needed. From two patients with peritoneal mesothelioma, we derived whole genome sequences, RNA expression profiles, and targeted deep sequencing data. Molecular data were made available for translation into a clinical treatment plan. Treatment responses and outcomes were later examined in the context of molecular findings. Molecular studies presented here provide the first reported whole genome sequences of peritoneal mesothelioma. Mutations in known mesothelioma-related genes NF2, CDKN2A, LATS2, amongst others, were identified. Activation of MET-related signaling pathways was demonstrated in both cases. A hypermutated phenotype was observed in one case (434 vs. 18 single nucleotide variants) and was associated with a favourable outcome despite sarcomatoid histology and multifocal disease. This study represents the first report of whole genome analyses of peritoneal mesothelioma, a key step in the understanding and treatment of this disease.

  3. Relationship between Genomic Types of Escherichia coli and Clinical Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meiying YI; Ruen LIU; Hanju HUANG

    2008-01-01

    In this study, by analysis of genome structures of E. coli, the relationships Between the genomic types of E. coli and the associated diseases were investigated. Samples of sputum, urine and other excretions from patients with different infective diseases were collected. And 62 E. coli strains were isolated from these samples. Intact bacterial genomic DNA was cleaved with I-CeuI, separated by pulsed field gel electrophoresis and then typed on the basis of cleavage map. The results showed that 7 I-CeuI sites were found in all the genome structures of the 62 E. coli, indicating that there were 7 rrn operons in the genomes. The size of genome ranged from 4500 kb to 5000 kb. According to thegenome structures, 62 E. coli strains were divided into 30 genome types. It was concluded that genome structures of E. coli isolated from the patients with different infective diseases varied to some extent, suggesting that some genome types of E. coli were closely related to some infective diseases.

  4. Genome sequence of vibrio cholerae G4222, a South African clinical isolate

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Le Rouw, Wouter J

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available sequences of V. cholerae MJ-1236 (7) and V. cholerae O1 biovar El Tor strain N16961 (8) with the NCBI Genomic (NG) Aligner tool of the NCBI Genome Workbench v2.5.5. A further 38 gaps were closed by PCR ampli- fication and Sanger sequencing. This resulted.... 2013. Genome sequence of Vibrio cholerae G4222, a South African clinical isolate. Genome Announc. 1(2):e00040-13. doi:10.1128/genomeA.00040-13. Copyright © 2013 le Roux et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative...

  5. CRISPR Technology for Genome Activation and Repression in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Dan; Qi, Lei S

    2016-01-04

    Targeted modulation of transcription is necessary for understanding complex gene networks and has great potential for medical and industrial applications. CRISPR is emerging as a powerful system for targeted genome activation and repression, in addition to its use in genome editing. This protocol describes how to design, construct, and experimentally validate the function of sequence-specific single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) for sequence-specific repression (CRISPRi) or activation (CRISPRa) of transcription in mammalian cells. In this technology, the CRISPR-associated protein Cas9 is catalytically deactivated (dCas9) to provide a general platform for RNA-guided DNA targeting of any locus in the genome. Fusion of dCas9 to effector domains with distinct regulatory functions enables stable and efficient transcriptional repression or activation in mammalian cells. Delivery of multiple sgRNAs further enables activation or repression of multiple genes. By using scaffold RNAs (scRNAs), different effectors can be recruited to different genes for simultaneous activation of some and repression of others. The CRISPRi and CRISPRa methods provide powerful tools for sequence-specific control of gene expression on a genome-wide scale to aid understanding gene functions and for engineering genetic regulatory systems.

  6. Quantitative assay for TALEN activity at endogenous genomic loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Hisano

    2013-02-01

    Artificially designed nucleases such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs can induce a targeted DNA double-strand break at the specific target genomic locus, leading to the frameshift-mediated gene disruption. However, the assays for their activity on the endogenous genomic loci remain limited. Herein, we describe a versatile modified lacZ assay to detect frameshifts in the nuclease target site. Short fragments of the genome DNA at the target or putative off-target loci were amplified from the genomic DNA of TALEN-treated or control embryos, and were inserted into the lacZα sequence for the conventional blue–white selection. The frequency of the frameshifts in the fragment can be estimated from the numbers of blue and white colonies. Insertions and/or deletions were easily determined by sequencing the plasmid DNAs recovered from the positive colonies. Our technique should offer broad application to the artificial nucleases for genome editing in various types of model organisms.

  7. Evolutionary active transposable elements in the genome of the coelacanth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalopin, Domitille; Fan, Shaohua; Simakov, Oleg; Meyer, Axel; Schartl, Manfred; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2014-09-01

    The apparent morphological stasis in the lineage of the coelacanth, which has been called a "living fossil" by many, has been suggested to be causally related to a slow evolution of its genome, with strongly reduced activity of transposable elements (TEs). Analysis of the African coelacanth showed that at least 25% of its genome is constituted of transposable elements including retrotransposons, endogenous retroviruses and DNA transposons, with a strong predominance of non-Long Terminal Repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons. The coelacanth genome has been shaped by four major general bursts of transposition during evolution, with major contributions of LINE1, LINE2, CR1, and Deu non-LTR retrotransposons. Many transposable elements are expressed in different tissues and might be active. The number of TE families in coelacanth, but also in lungfish, is lower than in teleost fish, but is higher than in chicken and human. This observation is in agreement with the hypothesis of a sequential elimination of many TE families in the sarcopterygian lineage during evolution. Taken together, our analysis indicates that the coelacanth contains more TE families than birds and mammals, and that these elements have been active during the evolution of the coelacanth lineage. Hence, at the level of transposable element activity, the coelacanth genome does not appear to evolve particularly slowly.

  8. Clinic-Genomic Association Mining for Colorectal Cancer Using Publicly Available Datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a growing number of researchers began to focus on how to establish associations between clinical and genomic data. However, up to now, there is lack of research mining clinic-genomic associations by comprehensively analysing available gene expression data for a single disease. Colorectal cancer is one of the malignant tumours. A number of genetic syndromes have been proven to be associated with colorectal cancer. This paper presents our research on mining clinic-genomic associations for colorectal cancer under biomedical big data environment. The proposed method is engineered with multiple technologies, including extracting clinical concepts using the unified medical language system (UMLS, extracting genes through the literature mining, and mining clinic-genomic associations through statistical analysis. We applied this method to datasets extracted from both gene expression omnibus (GEO and genetic association database (GAD. A total of 23517 clinic-genomic associations between 139 clinical concepts and 7914 genes were obtained, of which 3474 associations between 31 clinical concepts and 1689 genes were identified as highly reliable ones. Evaluation and interpretation were performed using UMLS, KEGG, and Gephi, and potential new discoveries were explored. The proposed method is effective in mining valuable knowledge from available biomedical big data and achieves a good performance in bridging clinical data with genomic data for colorectal cancer.

  9. Genome and exome sequencing in the clinic: unbiased genomic approaches with a high diagnostic yield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelen, M.; Veltman, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    For the reasons discussed here, we think whole-genome- or exome-based approaches are currently most suited for diagnostic implementation in genetically heterogeneous diseases, initially to complement and later to replace Sanger sequencing, qPCR and genomic microarrays. Patients do need to be counsel

  10. Clinical Decision Support for Whole Genome Sequence Information Leveraging a Service-Oriented Architecture: a Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Brandon M.; Rodriguez-Loya, Salvador; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information could soon be routinely available to clinicians to support the personalized care of their patients. At such time, clinical decision support (CDS) integrated into the clinical workflow will likely be necessary to support genome-guided clinical care. Nevertheless, developing CDS capabilities for WGS information presents many unique challenges that need to be overcome for such approaches to be effective. In this manuscript, we describe the development of a prototype CDS system that is capable of providing genome-guided CDS at the point of care and within the clinical workflow. To demonstrate the functionality of this prototype, we implemented a clinical scenario of a hypothetical patient at high risk for Lynch Syndrome based on his genomic information. We demonstrate that this system can effectively use service-oriented architecture principles and standards-based components to deliver point of care CDS for WGS information in real-time. PMID:25954430

  11. The path to clinical proteomics research: integration of proteomics, genomics, clinical laboratory and regulatory science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boja, Emily S; Rodriguez, Henry

    2011-04-01

    Better biomarkers are urgently needed to cancer detection, diagnosis, and prognosis. While the genomics community is making significant advances in understanding the molecular basis of disease, proteomics will delineate the functional units of a cell, proteins and their intricate interaction network and signaling pathways for the underlying disease. Great progress has been made to characterize thousands of proteins qualitatively and quantitatively in complex biological systems by utilizing multi-dimensional sample fractionation strategies, mass spectrometry and protein microarrays. Comparative/quantitative analysis of high-quality clinical biospecimen (e.g., tissue and biofluids) of human cancer proteome landscape has the potential to reveal protein/peptide biomarkers responsible for this disease by means of their altered levels of expression, post-translational modifications as well as different forms of protein variants. Despite technological advances in proteomics, major hurdles still exist in every step of the biomarker development pipeline. The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer initiative (NCI-CPTC) has taken a critical step to close the gap between biomarker discovery and qualification by introducing a pre-clinical "verification" stage in the pipeline, partnering with clinical laboratory organizations to develop and implement common standards, and developing regulatory science documents with the US Food and Drug Administration to educate the proteomics community on analytical evaluation requirements for multiplex assays in order to ensure the safety and effectiveness of these tests for their intended use.

  12. Genomic islands as a marker to differentiate between clinical and environmental Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanatchaporn Bartpho

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, as a saprophytic bacterium that can cause a severe sepsis disease named melioidosis, has preserved several extra genes in its genome for survival. The sequenced genome of the organism showed high diversity contributed mainly from genomic islands (GIs. Comparative genome hybridization (CGH of 3 clinical and 2 environmental isolates, using whole genome microarrays based on B. pseudomallei K96243 genes, revealed a difference in the presence of genomic islands between clinical and environmental isolates. The largest GI, GI8, of B. pseudomallei was observed as a 2 sub-GI named GIs8.1 and 8.2 with distinguishable %GC content and unequal presence in the genome. GIs8.1, 8.2 and 15 were found to be more common in clinical isolates. A new GI, GI16c, was detected on chromosome 2. Presences of GIs8.1, 8.2, 15 and 16c were evaluated in 70 environmental and 64 clinical isolates using PCR assays. A combination of GIs8.1 and 16c (positivity of either GI was detected in 70% of clinical isolates and 11.4% of environmental isolates (P0.05. Some virulence genes located in the absent GIs and the difference of GIs seems to contribute less to bacterial virulence. The PCR detection of 2 GIs could be used as a cost effective and rapid tool to detect potentially virulent isolates that were contaminated in soil.

  13. Proteomics Data on UCSC Genome Browser - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium scientists are working together with the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genomics Institute to provide public access to cancer proteomics data.

  14. First Draft Genome Sequences of Malaysian Clinical Isolates of Corynebacterium diphtheriae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Norazah; Mohd Khalid, Mohd Khairul Nizam; Abd Wahab, Muhammad Adib; Hashim, Rohaidah; Tang, Soo Nee; Liow, Yii Ling; Hamzah, Hazwani; Dahalan, Nurul Ain; Seradja, Valentinus

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Corynebacterium diphtheriae has caused multiple isolated diphtheria cases in Malaysia over the years. Here, we report the first draft genome sequences of 15 Malaysia C. diphtheriae clinical isolates collected from the years 1981 to 2016. PMID:28254972

  15. Connecting Genomic Alterations to Cancer Biology with Proteomics: The NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Matthew; Gillette, Michael; Carr, Steven A.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Townsend, Reid; Kinsinger, Christopher; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Liebler, Daniel

    2013-10-03

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium is applying the latest generation of proteomic technologies to genomically annotated tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program, a joint initiative of the NCI and the National Human Genome Research Institute. By providing a fully integrated accounting of DNA, RNA, and protein abnormalities in individual tumors, these datasets will illuminate the complex relationship between genomic abnormalities and cancer phenotypes, thus producing biologic insights as well as a wave of novel candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets amenable to verifi cation using targeted mass spectrometry methods.

  16. Clinical Implications of Human Population Differences in Genome-wide Rates of Functional Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali eTorkamani

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available There have been a number of recent successes in the use of whole genome sequencing and sophisticated bioinformatics techniques to identify pathogenic DNA sequence variants responsible for individual idiopathic congenital conditions. However, the success of this identification process is heavily influenced by the ancestry or genetic background of a patient with an idiopathic condition. This is so because potential pathogenic variants in a patient’s genome must be contrasted with variants in a reference set of genomes made up of other individuals’ genomes of the same ancestry as the patient. We explored the effect of ignoring the ancestries of both an individual patient and the individuals used to construct reference genomes. We pursued this exploration in two major steps. We first considered variation in the per-genome number and rates likely functional derived (i.e., non-ancestral, based on the chimp genome single nucleotide variants and small indels in 52 individual whole human genomes sampled from 10 different global populations. We took advantage of a suite of computational and bioinformatics techniques to predict the functional effect of over 24 million genomic variants, both coding and non-coding, across these genomes. We found that the typical human genome harbors ~5.5-6.1 million total derived variants, of which ~12,000 are likely to have a functional effect (~5000 coding and ~7000 non-coding. We also found that the rates of functional genotypes per the total number of genotypes in individual whole genomes differ dramatically between human populations. We then created tables showing how the use of comparator or reference genome panels comprised of genomes from individuals that do not have the same ancestral background as a patient can negatively impact pathogenic variant identification. Our results have important implications for clinical sequencing initiatives.

  17. Potential Impact on Clinical Decision Making via a Genome-Wide Expression Profiling: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Kim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Management of men with prostate cancer is fraught with uncertainty as physicians and patients balance efficacy with potential toxicity and diminished quality of life. Utilization of genomics as a prognostic biomarker has improved the informed decision-making process by enabling more rationale treatment choices. Recently investigations have begun to determine whether genomic information from tumor transcriptome data can be used to impact clinical decision-making beyond prognosis. Here we discuss the potential of genomics to alter management of a patient who presented with high-risk prostate adenocarcinoma. We suggest that this information help selecting patients for advanced imaging, chemotherapies, or clinical trial.

  18. From days to hours: reporting clinically actionable variants from whole genome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Middha

    Full Text Available As the cost of whole genome sequencing (WGS decreases, clinical laboratories will be looking at broadly adopting this technology to screen for variants of clinical significance. To fully leverage this technology in a clinical setting, results need to be reported quickly, as the turnaround rate could potentially impact patient care. The latest sequencers can sequence a whole human genome in about 24 hours. However, depending on the computing infrastructure available, the processing of data can take several days, with the majority of computing time devoted to aligning reads to genomics regions that are to date not clinically interpretable. In an attempt to accelerate the reporting of clinically actionable variants, we have investigated the utility of a multi-step alignment algorithm focused on aligning reads and calling variants in genomic regions of clinical relevance prior to processing the remaining reads on the whole genome. This iterative workflow significantly accelerates the reporting of clinically actionable variants with no loss of accuracy when compared to genotypes obtained with the OMNI SNP platform or to variants detected with a standard workflow that combines Novoalign and GATK.

  19. NCI Workshop Report: Clinical and Computational Requirements for Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivka Colen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The National Cancer Institute (NCI Cancer Imaging Program organized two related workshops on June 26–27, 2013, entitled “Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures Research” and “Scalable Computational Resources as Required for Imaging-Genomics Decision Support Systems.” The first workshop focused on clinical and scientific requirements, exploring our knowledge of phenotypic characteristics of cancer biological properties to determine whether the field is sufficiently advanced to correlate with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes, and exploring new scientific methods to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses. The second workshop focused on computational methods that explore informatics and computational requirements to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses and improve the accessibility and speed of dissemination of existing NIH resources. These workshops linked clinical and scientific requirements of currently known phenotypic and genotypic cancer biology characteristics with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes. The group generated a set of recommendations to NCI leadership and the research community that encourage and support development of the emerging radiogenomics research field to address short-and longer-term goals in cancer research.

  20. Center for Cancer Genomics | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Center for Cancer Genomics (CCG) was established to unify the National Cancer Institute's activities in cancer genomics, with the goal of advancing genomics research and translating findings into the clinic to improve the precise diagnosis and treatment of cancers. In addition to promoting genomic sequencing approach

  1. Genomic and clinical predictors for improving estimator precision in randomized trials of breast cancer treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Patil

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: Adjusting only for clinical variables led to substantial precision gains (at least 5% in three of the four data sets, with a 1% precision loss in the remaining data set. These gains were unchanged or increased when sample sizes were doubled in our simulations. The precision gains due to incorporating genomic information, beyond the gains from adjusting for clinical variables, were not substantial.

  2. A Year of Infection in the Intensive Care Unit: Prospective Whole Genome Sequencing of Bacterial Clinical Isolates Reveals Cryptic Transmissions and Novel Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, David J; Burton, Joshua N; Lee, Choli; Stackhouse, Bethany; Butler-Wu, Susan M; Cookson, Brad T; Shendure, Jay; Salipante, Stephen J

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial whole genome sequencing holds promise as a disruptive technology in clinical microbiology, but it has not yet been applied systematically or comprehensively within a clinical context. Here, over the course of one year, we performed prospective collection and whole genome sequencing of nearly all bacterial isolates obtained from a tertiary care hospital's intensive care units (ICUs). This unbiased collection of 1,229 bacterial genomes from 391 patients enables detailed exploration of several features of clinical pathogens. A sizable fraction of isolates identified as clinically relevant corresponded to previously undescribed species: 12% of isolates assigned a species-level classification by conventional methods actually qualified as distinct, novel genomospecies on the basis of genomic similarity. Pan-genome analysis of the most frequently encountered pathogens in the collection revealed substantial variation in pan-genome size (1,420 to 20,432 genes) and the rate of gene discovery (1 to 152 genes per isolate sequenced). Surprisingly, although potential nosocomial transmission of actively surveilled pathogens was rare, 8.7% of isolates belonged to genomically related clonal lineages that were present among multiple patients, usually with overlapping hospital admissions, and were associated with clinically significant infection in 62% of patients from which they were recovered. Multi-patient clonal lineages were particularly evident in the neonatal care unit, where seven separate Staphylococcus epidermidis clonal lineages were identified, including one lineage associated with bacteremia in 5/9 neonates. Our study highlights key differences in the information made available by conventional microbiological practices versus whole genome sequencing, and motivates the further integration of microbial genome sequencing into routine clinical care.

  3. Economic evidence on identifying clinically actionable findings with whole-genome sequencing: a scoping review.

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) recommends that mutations in 56 genes for 24 conditions are clinically actionable and should be reported as secondary findings after whole-genome sequencing (WGS). Our aim was to identify published economic evaluations of detecting mutations in these genes among the general population or among targeted/high-risk populations and conditions and identify gaps in knowledge. A targeted PubMed search from 1994 through November 2014 was pe...

  4. Clinical implications of genomic alterations in the tumour and circulation of pancreatic cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sausen, Mark; Phallen, Jillian; Adleff, Vilmos;

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma has the worst mortality of any solid cancer. In this study, to evaluate the clinical implications of genomic alterations in this tumour type, we perform whole-exome analyses of 24 tumours, targeted genomic analyses of 77 tumours, and use non-invasive approaches to examine...... imaging. These observations provide genetic predictors of outcome in pancreatic cancer and have implications for new avenues of therapeutic intervention....

  5. Implementing Genomic Clinical Decision Support for Drug‐Based Precision Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formea, CM; Hoffman, JM; Matey, E; Peterson, JF; Boyce, RD

    2017-01-01

    The explosive growth of patient‐specific genomic information relevant to drug therapy will continue to be a defining characteristic of biomedical research. To implement drug‐based personalized medicine (PM) for patients, clinicians need actionable information incorporated into electronic health records (EHRs). New clinical decision support (CDS) methods and informatics infrastructure are required in order to comprehensively integrate, interpret, deliver, and apply the full range of genomic data for each patient.1 PMID:28109071

  6. Whole Genome Analysis of 132 Clinical Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Reveals Extensive Ploidy Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuan O.; Sherlock, Gavin; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2016-01-01

    Budding yeast has undergone several independent transitions from commercial to clinical lifestyles. The frequency of such transitions suggests that clinical yeast strains are derived from environmentally available yeast populations, including commercial sources. However, despite their important role in adaptive evolution, the prevalence of polyploidy and aneuploidy has not been extensively analyzed in clinical strains. In this study, we have looked for patterns governing the transition to clinical invasion in the largest screen of clinical yeast isolates to date. In particular, we have focused on the hypothesis that ploidy changes have influenced adaptive processes. We sequenced 144 yeast strains, 132 of which are clinical isolates. We found pervasive large-scale genomic variation in both overall ploidy (34% of strains identified as 3n/4n) and individual chromosomal copy numbers (36% of strains identified as aneuploid). We also found evidence for the highly dynamic nature of yeast genomes, with 35 strains showing partial chromosomal copy number changes and eight strains showing multiple independent chromosomal events. Intriguingly, a lineage identified to be baker’s/commercial derived with a unique damaging mutation in NDC80 was particularly prone to polyploidy, with 83% of its members being triploid or tetraploid. Polyploidy was in turn associated with a >2× increase in aneuploidy rates as compared to other lineages. This dataset provides a rich source of information on the genomics of clinical yeast strains and highlights the potential importance of large-scale genomic copy variation in yeast adaptation. PMID:27317778

  7. Genomic Features of Environmental and Clinical Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates Lacking Recognized Virulence Factors Are Dissimilar

    OpenAIRE

    Ronholm, J.; Petronella, N.; Chew Leung, C.; Pightling, A. W.; Banerjee, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a bacterial pathogen that can cause illness after the consumption or handling of contaminated seafood. The primary virulence factors associated with V. parahaemolyticus illness are thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and Tdh-related hemolysin (TRH). However, clinical strains lacking tdh and trh have recently been isolated, and these clinical isolates are poorly understood. To help understand the emergence of clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates, a genomic approac...

  8. Draft Genome Sequences of Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Type Strain ATCC 13883 and Three Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arivett, Brock A; Ream, David C; Fiester, Steven E; Mende, Katrin; Murray, Clinton K; Thompson, Mitchell G; Kanduru, Shrinidhi; Summers, Amy M; Roth, Amanda L; Zurawski, Daniel V; Actis, Luis A

    2015-01-15

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative human pathogen capable of causing hospital-acquired infections with an increasing risk to human health. The total DNA from four clinically relevant strains was sequenced to >100× coverage, providing high-quality genome assemblies for K. pneumoniae strains ATCC 13883, KP4640, 101488, and 101712.

  9. Clinical application of whole-genome sequencing to inform treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witney, Adam A; Gould, Katherine A; Arnold, Amber; Coleman, David; Delgado, Rachel; Dhillon, Jasvir; Pond, Marcus J; Pope, Cassie F; Planche, Tim D; Stoker, Neil G; Cosgrove, Catherine A; Butcher, Philip D; Harrison, Thomas S; Hinds, Jason

    2015-05-01

    The treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis cases is challenging, as drug options are limited, and the existing diagnostics are inadequate. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) has been used in a clinical setting to investigate six cases of suspected extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (XDR-TB) encountered at a London teaching hospital between 2008 and 2014. Sixteen isolates from six suspected XDR-TB cases were sequenced; five cases were analyzed in a clinically relevant time frame, with one case sequenced retrospectively. WGS identified mutations in the M. tuberculosis genes associated with antibiotic resistance that are likely to be responsible for the phenotypic resistance. Thus, an evidence base was developed to inform the clinical decisions made around antibiotic treatment over prolonged periods. All strains in this study belonged to the East Asian (Beijing) lineage, and the strain relatedness was consistent with the expectations from the case histories, confirming one contact transmission event. We demonstrate that WGS data can be produced in a clinically relevant time scale some weeks before drug sensitivity testing (DST) data are available, and they actively help clinical decision-making through the assessment of whether an isolate (i) has a particular resistance mutation where there are absent or contradictory DST results, (ii) has no further resistance markers and therefore is unlikely to be XDR, or (iii) is identical to an isolate of known resistance (i.e., a likely transmission event). A small number of discrepancies between the genotypic predictions and phenotypic DST results are discussed in the wider context of the interpretation and reporting of WGS results.

  10. Meier-Gorlin syndrome Clinical genetics and genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. de Munnik (Sonja); E.H. Hoefsloot (Elisabeth H.); J. Roukema (Jolt); J. Schoots (Jeroen); N.V.A.M. Knoers (Nine); H.G. Brunner; A.P. Jackson (Andrew); E. Bongers (Ernie)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractMeier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a rare autosomal recessive primordial dwarfism disorder, characterized by microtia, patellar applasia/hypoplasia, and a proportionate short stature. Associated clinical features encompass feeding problems, congenital pulmonary emphysema, mammary hypoplasia

  11. Meier-Gorlin syndrome Clinical genetics and genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Munnik, Sonja A.; Hoefsloot, Elisabeth H.; Roukema, Jolt; Schoots, Jeroen; Knoers, Nine Vam; Brunner, Han G.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Bongers, Ernie Mhf

    2015-01-01

    Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a rare autosomal recessive primordial dwarfism disorder, characterized by microtia, patellar applasia/hypoplasia, and a proportionate short stature. Associated clinical features encompass feeding problems, congenital pulmonary emphysema, mammary hypoplasia in females

  12. Meier-Gorlin syndrome Clinical genetics and genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Munnik, Sonja A.; Hoefsloot, Elisabeth H.; Roukema, Jolt; Schoots, Jeroen; Knoers, Nine Vam; Brunner, Han G.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Bongers, Ernie Mhf

    2015-01-01

    Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a rare autosomal recessive primordial dwarfism disorder, characterized by microtia, patellar applasia/hypoplasia, and a proportionate short stature. Associated clinical features encompass feeding problems, congenital pulmonary emphysema, mammary hypoplasia in females a

  13. Meier-Gorlin syndrome Clinical genetics and genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. de Munnik (Sonja); E.H. Hoefsloot (Elisabeth H.); J. Roukema (Jolt); J. Schoots (Jeroen); N.V.A.M. Knoers (Nine); H.G. Brunner; A.P. Jackson (Andrew); E. Bongers (Ernie)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractMeier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a rare autosomal recessive primordial dwarfism disorder, characterized by microtia, patellar applasia/hypoplasia, and a proportionate short stature. Associated clinical features encompass feeding problems, congenital pulmonary emphysema, mammary hypoplasia

  14. Bioinformatics Workflow for Clinical Whole Genome Sequencing at Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen A. Tsai

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Effective implementation of precision medicine will be enhanced by a thorough understanding of each patient’s genetic composition to better treat his or her presenting symptoms or mitigate the onset of disease. This ideally includes the sequence information of a complete genome for each individual. At Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine, we have developed a clinical process for whole genome sequencing (WGS with application in both healthy individuals and those with disease. In this manuscript, we will describe our bioinformatics strategy to efficiently process and deliver genomic data to geneticists for clinical interpretation. We describe the handling of data from FASTQ to the final variant list for clinical review for the final report. We will also discuss our methodology for validating this workflow and the cost implications of running WGS.

  15. Sex differences in brain aromatase activity: genomic and non-genomic controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques eBalthazart

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Aromatization of testosterone into estradiol in the preoptic area plays a critical role in the activation of male copulation in quail and in many other vertebrate species. Aromatase expression in quail and in other birds is higher than in rodents and other mammals, which has facilitated the study of the controls and functions of this enzyme. Over relatively long time periods (days to months, brain aromatase activity and transcription are markedly (4-6 fold increased by genomic actions of sex steroids. Initial work indicated that the preoptic aromatase activity is higher in males than in females and it was hypothesized that this differential production of estrogen could be a critical factor responsible for the lack of behavioral activation in females. Subsequent studies revealed, however, that this enzymatic sex difference might contribute but is not sufficient to explain the sex difference in behavior. Studies of aromatase activity, immunoreactivity and mRNA concentrations revealed that sex differences observed when measuring enzymatic activity are not necessarily observed when one measures mRNA concentrations. Discrepancies potentially reflect post-translational controls of the enzymatic activity. Aromatase activity in quail brain homogenates is rapidly inhibited by phosphorylation processes. Similar rapid inhibitions occur in hypothalamic explants maintained in vitro and exposed to agents affecting intracellular calcium concentrations or to glutamate agonists. Rapid changes in aromatase activity have also been observed in vivo following sexual interactions or exposure to short-term restraint stress and these rapid changes in estrogen production modulate expression of male sexual behaviors. These data suggest that brain estrogens display most if not all characteristics of neuromodulators if not neurotransmitters. Many questions remain however concerning the mechanisms controlling these rapid changes in estrogen production and their behavioral

  16. Physician Attitudes toward Adopting Genome-Guided Prescribing through Clinical Decision Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey Lynnette Overby

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed physician attitudes toward adopting genome-guided prescribing through clinical decision support (CDS, prior to enlisting in the Clinical Implementation of Personalized Medicine through Electronic Health Records and Genomics pilot pharmacogenomics project (CLIPMERGE PGx. We developed a survey instrument that includes the Evidence Based Practice Attitude Scale, adapted to measure attitudes toward adopting genome-informed interventions (EBPAS-GII. The survey also includes items to measure physicians’ characteristics (awareness, experience, and perceived usefulness, attitudes about personal genome testing (PGT services, and comfort using technology. We surveyed 101 General Internal Medicine physicians from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISMMS. The majority were residency program trainees (~88%. Prior to enlisting into CLIPMERGE PGx, most physicians were aware of and had used decision support aids. Few physicians, however, were aware of and had used genome-guided prescribing. The majority of physicians viewed decision support aids and genotype data as being useful for making prescribing decisions. Most physicians had not heard of, but were willing to use, PGT services and felt comfortable interpreting PGT results. Most physicians were comfortable with technology. Physicians who perceived genotype data to be useful in making prescribing decisions, had more positive attitudes toward adopting genome-guided prescribing through CDS. Our findings suggest that internal medicine physicians have a deficit in their familiarity and comfort interpreting and using genomic information. This has reinforced the importance of gathering feedback and guidance from our enrolled physicians when designing genome-guided CDS and the importance of prioritizing genomic medicine education at our institutions.

  17. Physician Attitudes toward Adopting Genome-Guided Prescribing through Clinical Decision Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overby, Casey Lynnette; Erwin, Angelika Ludtke; Abul-Husn, Noura S; Ellis, Stephen B; Scott, Stuart A; Obeng, Aniwaa Owusu; Kannry, Joseph L; Hripcsak, George; Bottinger, Erwin P; Gottesman, Omri

    2014-02-27

    This study assessed physician attitudes toward adopting genome-guided prescribing through clinical decision support (CDS), prior to enlisting in the Clinical Implementation of Personalized Medicine through Electronic Health Records and Genomics pilot pharmacogenomics project (CLIPMERGE PGx). We developed a survey instrument that includes the Evidence Based Practice Attitude Scale, adapted to measure attitudes toward adopting genome-informed interventions (EBPAS-GII). The survey also includes items to measure physicians' characteristics (awareness, experience, and perceived usefulness), attitudes about personal genome testing (PGT) services, and comfort using technology. We surveyed 101 General Internal Medicine physicians from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISMMS). The majority were residency program trainees (~88%). Prior to enlisting into CLIPMERGE PGx, most physicians were aware of and had used decision support aids. Few physicians, however, were aware of and had used genome-guided prescribing. The majority of physicians viewed decision support aids and genotype data as being useful for making prescribing decisions. Most physicians had not heard of, but were willing to use, PGT services and felt comfortable interpreting PGT results. Most physicians were comfortable with technology. Physicians who perceived genotype data to be useful in making prescribing decisions, had more positive attitudes toward adopting genome-guided prescribing through CDS. Our findings suggest that internal medicine physicians have a deficit in their familiarity and comfort interpreting and using genomic information. This has reinforced the importance of gathering feedback and guidance from our enrolled physicians when designing genome-guided CDS and the importance of prioritizing genomic medicine education at our institutions.

  18. Full Genome Sequence and sfRNA Interferon Antagonist Activity of Zika Virus from Recife, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezelj, Veronica V.; Clark, Jordan J.; Cordeiro, Marli T.; Freitas de Oliveira França, Rafael; Pena, Lindomar J.; Wilkie, Gavin S.; Da Silva Filipe, Ana; Davis, Christopher; Hughes, Joseph; Varjak, Margus; Selinger, Martin; Zuvanov, Luíza; Owsianka, Ania M.; Patel, Arvind H.; McLauchlan, John; Lindenbach, Brett D.; Fall, Gamou; Sall, Amadou A.; Biek, Roman; Rehwinkel, Jan; Schnettler, Esther; Kohl, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Background The outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) in the Americas has transformed a previously obscure mosquito-transmitted arbovirus of the Flaviviridae family into a major public health concern. Little is currently known about the evolution and biology of ZIKV and the factors that contribute to the associated pathogenesis. Determining genomic sequences of clinical viral isolates and characterization of elements within these are an important prerequisite to advance our understanding of viral replicative processes and virus-host interactions. Methodology/Principal findings We obtained a ZIKV isolate from a patient who presented with classical ZIKV-associated symptoms, and used high throughput sequencing and other molecular biology approaches to determine its full genome sequence, including non-coding regions. Genome regions were characterized and compared to the sequences of other isolates where available. Furthermore, we identified a subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA) in ZIKV-infected cells that has antagonist activity against RIG-I induced type I interferon induction, with a lesser effect on MDA-5 mediated action. Conclusions/Significance The full-length genome sequence including non-coding regions of a South American ZIKV isolate from a patient with classical symptoms will support efforts to develop genetic tools for this virus. Detection of sfRNA that counteracts interferon responses is likely to be important for further understanding of pathogenesis and virus-host interactions. PMID:27706161

  19. Comparative genomic hybridization: technical development and cytogenetic aspects for routine use in clinical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapierre, J M; Cacheux, V; Da Silva, F; Collot, N; Hervy, N; Wiss, J; Tachdjian, G

    1998-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) offers a new global approach for detection of chromosomal material imbalances of the entire genome in a single experiment without cell culture. In this paper, we discuss the technical development and the cytogenetic aspects of CGH in a clinical laboratory. Based only on the visual inspection of CGH metaphase spreads, the correct identification of numerical and structural anomalies are reported. No commercial image analysis software was required in these experiments. We have demonstrated that this new technology can be set up easily for routine use in a clinical cytogenetics laboratory.

  20. A transcription activator-like effector toolbox for genome engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjana, Neville E; Cong, Le; Zhou, Yang; Cunniff, Margaret M; Feng, Guoping; Zhang, Feng

    2012-01-05

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are a class of naturally occurring DNA-binding proteins found in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas sp. The DNA-binding domain of each TALE consists of tandem 34-amino acid repeat modules that can be rearranged according to a simple cipher to target new DNA sequences. Customized TALEs can be used for a wide variety of genome engineering applications, including transcriptional modulation and genome editing. Here we describe a toolbox for rapid construction of custom TALE transcription factors (TALE-TFs) and nucleases (TALENs) using a hierarchical ligation procedure. This toolbox facilitates affordable and rapid construction of custom TALE-TFs and TALENs within 1 week and can be easily scaled up to construct TALEs for multiple targets in parallel. We also provide details for testing the activity in mammalian cells of custom TALE-TFs and TALENs using quantitative reverse-transcription PCR and Surveyor nuclease, respectively. The TALE toolbox described here will enable a broad range of biological applications.

  1. Ethical issues and best practice in clinically based genomic research: Exeter Stakeholders Meeting Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrieri, D; Bewshea, C; Walker, G; Ahmad, T; Bowen, W; Hall, A; Kelly, S

    2016-09-27

    Current guidelines on consenting individuals to participate in genomic research are diverse. This creates problems for participants and also for researchers, particularly for clinicians who provide both clinical care and research to their patients. A group of 14 stakeholders met on 7 October 2015 in Exeter to discuss the ethical issues and the best practice arising in clinically based genomic research, with particular emphasis on the issue of returning results to study participants/patients in light of research findings affecting research and clinical practices. The group was deliberately multidisciplinary to ensure that a diversity of views was represented. This report outlines the main ethical issues, areas of best practice and principles underlying ethical clinically based genomic research discussed during the meeting. The main point emerging from the discussion is that ethical principles, rather than being formulaic, should guide researchers/clinicians to identify who the main stakeholders are to consult with for a specific project and to incorporate their voices/views strategically throughout the lifecycle of each project. We believe that the mix of principles and practical guidelines outlined in this report can contribute to current debates on how to conduct ethical clinically based genomic research.

  2. Ethical issues and best practice in clinically based genomic research: Exeter Stakeholders Meeting Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrieri, D; Bewshea, C; Walker, G; Ahmad, T; Bowen, W; Hall, A; Kelly, S

    2016-01-01

    Current guidelines on consenting individuals to participate in genomic research are diverse. This creates problems for participants and also for researchers, particularly for clinicians who provide both clinical care and research to their patients. A group of 14 stakeholders met on 7 October 2015 in Exeter to discuss the ethical issues and the best practice arising in clinically based genomic research, with particular emphasis on the issue of returning results to study participants/patients in light of research findings affecting research and clinical practices. The group was deliberately multidisciplinary to ensure that a diversity of views was represented. This report outlines the main ethical issues, areas of best practice and principles underlying ethical clinically based genomic research discussed during the meeting. The main point emerging from the discussion is that ethical principles, rather than being formulaic, should guide researchers/clinicians to identify who the main stakeholders are to consult with for a specific project and to incorporate their voices/views strategically throughout the lifecycle of each project. We believe that the mix of principles and practical guidelines outlined in this report can contribute to current debates on how to conduct ethical clinically based genomic research. PMID:27677925

  3. Genome Engineering Using Adeno-associated Virus: Basic and Clinical Research Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaj, Thomas; Epstein, Benjamin E; Schaffer, David V

    2016-03-01

    In addition to their broad potential for therapeutic gene delivery, adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors possess the innate ability to stimulate homologous recombination in mammalian cells at high efficiencies. This process--referred to as AAV-mediated gene targeting--has enabled the introduction of a diverse array of genomic modifications both in vitro and in vivo. With the recent emergence of targeted nucleases, AAV-mediated genome engineering is poised for clinical translation. Here, we review key properties of AAV vectors that underscore its unique utility in genome editing. We highlight the broad range of genome engineering applications facilitated by this technology and discuss the strong potential for unifying AAV with targeted nucleases for next-generation gene therapy.

  4. Translation of the human genome into clinical allergy, part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirohisa Saito

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available After completion of sequencing of the human genome, you will no longer be able to discover a new gene and may not be able to find a new molecule in the human body. Instead, you may find many new molecule networks. It will be possible to select information obtained from animal models just where orthologous genes are functioning similarly. Mouse disease models will not be used any longer where key orthologous genes are working differently than in humans. Analysis of cell type-selective transcripts from database searches is now available to minimize the efforts required for drug discovery. As such, it will soon be possible to use computational modeling to analyze integrative biological function and to test hypotheses without performing any in vivo or in vitro experimentation. However, before establishing a system simulating the human body, which consists of a variety of organs, which further consist of various types of cells, which then consist of various types of proteins, which consist of 20 types of amino acids, there are many steps that need to be understood.

  5. PARP Inhibitors in Clinical Use Induce Genomic Instability in Normal Human Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhei Ito

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs are the first proteins involved in cellular DNA repair pathways to be targeted by specific inhibitors for clinical benefit. Tumors harboring genetic defects in homologous recombination (HR, a DNA double-strand break (DSB repair pathway, are hypersensitive to PARP inhibitors (PARPi. Early phase clinical trials with PARPi have been promising in patients with advanced BRCA1 or BRCA2-associated breast, ovary and prostate cancer and have led to limited approval for treatment of BRCA-deficient ovary cancer. Unlike HR-defective cells, HR-proficient cells manifest very low cytotoxicity when exposed to PARPi, although they mount a DNA damage response. However, the genotoxic effects on normal human cells when agents including PARPi disturb proficient cellular repair processes have not been substantially investigated. We quantified cytogenetic alterations of human cells, including primary lymphoid cells and non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic epithelial cell lines, exposed to PARPi at clinically relevant doses by both sister chromatid exchange (SCE assays and chromosome spreading. As expected, both olaparib and veliparib effectively inhibited poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR, and caused marked hypersensitivity in HR-deficient cells. Significant dose-dependent increases in SCEs were observed in normal and non-tumorigenic cells with minimal residual PAR activity. Clinically relevant doses of the FDA-approved olaparib led to a marked increase of SCEs (5-10-fold and chromatid aberrations (2-6-fold. Furthermore, olaparib potentiated SCE induction by cisplatin in normal human cells. Our data have important implications for therapies with regard to sustained genotoxicity to normal cells. Genomic instability arising from PARPi warrants consideration, especially if these agents will be used in people with early stage cancers, in prevention strategies or for non-oncologic indications.

  6. The impact of array genomic hybridization on mental retardation research: a review of current technologies and their clinical utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahir, F; Friedman, J M

    2007-10-01

    Our understanding of the causes of mental retardation is benefiting greatly from whole-genome scans to detect submicroscopic pathogenic copy number variants (CNVs) that are undetectable by conventional cytogenetic analysis. The current method of choice for performing whole-genome scans for CNVs is array genomic hybridization (AGH). Several platforms are available for AGH, each with its own strengths and limitations. This review discusses considerations that are relevant to the clinical use of whole-genome AGH platforms for the diagnosis of pathogenic CNVs in children with mental retardation. Whole-genome AGH studies are a maturing technology, but their high diagnostic utility assures their increasing use in clinical genetics.

  7. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Clinical and Environmental Vibrio Vulnificus Isolates Revealed Biotype 3 Evolutionary Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael eKotton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1996 a common-source outbreak of severe soft tissue and bloodstream infections erupted among Israeli fish farmers and fish consumers due to changes in fish marketing policies. The causative pathogen was a new strain of Vibrio vulnificus, named biotype 3, which displayed a unique biochemical and genotypic profile. Initial observations suggested that the pathogen erupted as a result of genetic recombination between two distinct populations. We applied a whole genome shotgun sequencing approach using several V. vulnificus strains from Israel in order to study the pan genome of V. vulnificus and determine the phylogenetic relationship of biotype 3 with existing populations. The core genome of V. vulnificus based on 16 draft and complete genomes consisted of 3068 genes, representing between 59% and 78% of the whole genome of 16 strains. The accessory genome varied in size from 781 kbp to 2044 kbp. Phylogenetic analysis based on whole, core, and accessory genomes displayed similar clustering patterns with two main clusters, clinical (C and environmental (E, all biotype 3 strains formed a distinct group within the E cluster. Annotation of accessory genomic regions found in biotype 3 strains and absent from the core genome yielded 1732 genes, of which the vast majority encoded hypothetical proteins, phage-related proteins, and mobile element proteins. A total of 1916 proteins (including 713 hypothetical proteins were present in all human pathogenic strains (both biotype 3 and non-biotype 3 and absent from the environmental strains. Clustering analysis of the non-hypothetical proteins revealed 148 protein clusters shared by all human pathogenic strains; these included transcriptional regulators, arylsulfatases, methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, acetyltransferases, GGDEF family proteins, transposases, type IV secretory system (T4SS proteins, and integrases. Our study showed that V. vulnificus biotype 3 evolved from environmental populations and

  8. Genomic analyses of DNA transformation and penicillin resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fani, Fereshteh; Leprohon, Philippe; Zhanel, George G; Bergeron, Michel G; Ouellette, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in penicillin-binding proteins, the target enzymes for β-lactam antibiotics, are recognized as primary penicillin resistance mechanisms in Streptococcus pneumoniae. Few studies have analyzed penicillin resistance at the genome scale, however, and we report the sequencing of S. pneumoniae R6 transformants generated while reconstructing the penicillin resistance phenotypes from three penicillin-resistant clinical isolates by serial genome transformation. The genome sequences of the three last-level transformants T2-18209, T5-1983, and T3-55938 revealed that 16.2 kb, 82.7 kb, and 137.2 kb of their genomes had been replaced with 5, 20, and 37 recombinant sequence segments derived from their respective parental clinical isolates, documenting the extent of DNA transformation between strains. A role in penicillin resistance was confirmed for some of the mutations identified in the transformants. Several multiple recombination events were also found to have happened at single loci coding for penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) that increase resistance. Sequencing of the transformants with MICs for penicillin similar to those of the parent clinical strains confirmed the importance of mosaic PBP2x, -2b, and -1a as a driving force in penicillin resistance. A role in resistance for mosaic PBP2a was also observed for two of the resistant clinical isolates.

  9. Factors influencing success of clinical genome sequencing across a broad spectrum of disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Jenny C; Martin, Hilary C; Lise, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    To assess factors influencing the success of whole-genome sequencing for mainstream clinical diagnosis, we sequenced 217 individuals from 156 independent cases or families across a broad spectrum of disorders in whom previous screening had identified no pathogenic variants. We quantified the numb...

  10. Draft Genome Sequences of Pandrug-Resistant Serratia marcescens Clinical Isolates Harboring blaNDM-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yancheng; Falgenhauer, Linda; Kempf, Volkhard A. J.; Hogardt, Michael; Göttig, Stephan; Imirzalioglu, Can

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The draft genome sequences of two clonal, pandrug-resistant Serratia marcescens clinical isolates were determined. The resistance phenotype was plasmid driven, as 14 of 17 resistance genes were present on large IncFIB(K), IncHI2, and IncA/C2 plasmids indicating a large pool of transmissible antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:28104656

  11. Draft Genome Sequences of Clinical Isolates of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Keesha E.; Madinger, Nancy E.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report here the draft genome sequences of two clinically isolated Acinetobacter baumannii strains. These samples were obtained from patients at the University of Colorado Hospital in 2007 and 2013 and encode an estimated 20 and 13 resistance genes, respectively. PMID:28153899

  12. Clinical Application of Whole Genome Sequencing In Patients with Primary Immunodeficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousallem, Talal; Urban, Thomas J.; McSweeney, K. Melodi; Kleinstein, Sarah E.; Zhu, Mingfu; Adeli, Mehdi; Parrott, Roberta E.; Roberts, Joseph L.; Krueger, Brian; Buckley, Rebecca H.; Goldstein, David B

    2016-01-01

    Summary This report illustrates the value of whole genome sequencing (WGS) in elucidating the genetic cause of disease in patients with primary immunodeficiency (PID). As sequencing costs decline, we predict that utilization of next generation sequencing (NGS) in the clinical setting will increase. PMID:25981738

  13. Comprehensive genomic sequencing and the molecular profiles of clinically advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jeffrey S; Gay, Laurie M

    2017-02-01

    Targeting specific mutations that have arisen within a tumour is a promising means of increasing the efficacy of treatments, and breast cancer is no exception to this new paradigm of personalised medicine. Traditional DNA sequencing methods used to characterise clinical cancer specimens and impact treatment decisions are highly sensitive, but are often limited in their scope to known mutational hot spots. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies can also test for these well-known hot spots, as well as identifying insertions and deletions, copy number changes such as ERBB2 (HER2) gene amplification, and a wide array of fusion or rearrangement events. By rapidly analysing many genes in parallel, NGS technologies can make efficient use of precious biopsy material. Comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) by NGS can reveal targetable, clinically relevant genomic alterations that can stratify tumours by predicted sensitivity to a variety of therapies, including HER2- or MTOR-targeted therapies, immunotherapies, and other kinase inhibitors. Many clinically relevant genomic alterations would not be identified by IHC or hotspot testing, but can be detected by NGS. In addition to the most common breast carcinoma subtypes, rare subtypes analysed with CGP also harbour clinically relevant genomic alterations that can potentially direct therapy selection, illustrating that CGP is a powerful tool for guiding treatment across all breast cancer subtypes.

  14. Genomes of Two Clinical Isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Odisha, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Mohammad; Qureshi, Asifa; Yerra, Priyadarshini; Kumar, Ashutosh; Kumar, Mandala Kiran; Tiruvayipati, Suma; Baddam, Ramani; Shaik, Sabiha; Srikantam, Aparna

    2014-01-01

    We report whole-genome sequences of two clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from patients in Odisha, India. The sequence analysis revealed that these isolates are of an ancestral type and might represent some of the “pristine” isolates in India that have not admixed with other lineages. PMID:24652981

  15. Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium: Accelerating Evidence-Based Practice of Genomic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert C; Goddard, Katrina A B; Jarvik, Gail P; Amendola, Laura M; Appelbaum, Paul S; Berg, Jonathan S; Bernhardt, Barbara A; Biesecker, Leslie G; Biswas, Sawona; Blout, Carrie L; Bowling, Kevin M; Brothers, Kyle B; Burke, Wylie; Caga-Anan, Charlisse F; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Chung, Wendy K; Clayton, Ellen W; Cooper, Gregory M; East, Kelly; Evans, James P; Fullerton, Stephanie M; Garraway, Levi A; Garrett, Jeremy R; Gray, Stacy W; Henderson, Gail E; Hindorff, Lucia A; Holm, Ingrid A; Lewis, Michelle Huckaby; Hutter, Carolyn M; Janne, Pasi A; Joffe, Steven; Kaufman, David; Knoppers, Bartha M; Koenig, Barbara A; Krantz, Ian D; Manolio, Teri A; McCullough, Laurence; McEwen, Jean; McGuire, Amy; Muzny, Donna; Myers, Richard M; Nickerson, Deborah A; Ou, Jeffrey; Parsons, Donald W; Petersen, Gloria M; Plon, Sharon E; Rehm, Heidi L; Roberts, J Scott; Robinson, Dan; Salama, Joseph S; Scollon, Sarah; Sharp, Richard R; Shirts, Brian; Spinner, Nancy B; Tabor, Holly K; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Veenstra, David L; Wagle, Nikhil; Weck, Karen; Wilfond, Benjamin S; Wilhelmsen, Kirk; Wolf, Susan M; Wynn, Julia; Yu, Joon-Ho

    2016-06-02

    Despite rapid technical progress and demonstrable effectiveness for some types of diagnosis and therapy, much remains to be learned about clinical genome and exome sequencing (CGES) and its role within the practice of medicine. The Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) consortium includes 18 extramural research projects, one National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) intramural project, and a coordinating center funded by the NHGRI and National Cancer Institute. The consortium is exploring analytic and clinical validity and utility, as well as the ethical, legal, and social implications of sequencing via multidisciplinary approaches; it has thus far recruited 5,577 participants across a spectrum of symptomatic and healthy children and adults by utilizing both germline and cancer sequencing. The CSER consortium is analyzing data and creating publically available procedures and tools related to participant preferences and consent, variant classification, disclosure and management of primary and secondary findings, health outcomes, and integration with electronic health records. Future research directions will refine measures of clinical utility of CGES in both germline and somatic testing, evaluate the use of CGES for screening in healthy individuals, explore the penetrance of pathogenic variants through extensive phenotyping, reduce discordances in public databases of genes and variants, examine social and ethnic disparities in the provision of genomics services, explore regulatory issues, and estimate the value and downstream costs of sequencing. The CSER consortium has established a shared community of research sites by using diverse approaches to pursue the evidence-based development of best practices in genomic medicine.

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of the Campylobacter ureolyticus Clinical Isolate RIGS 9880

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, William G; Yee, Emma; On, Stephen L W;

    2015-01-01

    The emerging pathogen Campylobacter ureolyticus has been isolated from human and animal genital infections, human periodontal disease, domestic and food animals, and from cases of human gastroenteritis. We report the whole-genome sequence of the human clinical isolate RIGS 9880, which is the first...

  17. Two patients walk into a clinic...a genomics perspective on the future of schizophrenia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Corvin, Aiden P

    2011-11-11

    Abstract Progress is being made in schizophrenia genomics, suggesting that this complex brain disorder involves rare, moderate to high-risk mutations and the cumulative impact of small genetic effects, coupled with environmental factors. The genetic heterogeneity underlying schizophrenia and the overlap with other neurodevelopmental disorders suggest that it will not continue to be viewed as a single disease. This has radical implications for clinical practice, as diagnosis and treatment will be guided by molecular etiology rather than clinical diagnostic criteria.

  18. Genome-wide investigation of schizophrenia associated plasma Ndel1 enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadelha, Ary; Coleman, Jonathan; Breen, Gerome; Mazzoti, Diego Robles; Yonamine, Camila M; Pellegrino, Renata; Ota, Vanessa Kiyomi; Belangero, Sintia Iole; Glessner, Joseph; Sleiman, Patrick; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hayashi, Mirian A F; Bressan, Rodrigo A

    2016-04-01

    Ndel1 is a DISC1-interacting oligopeptidase that cleaves in vitro neuropeptides as neurotensin and bradykinin, and which has been associated with both neuronal migration and neurite outgrowth. We previously reported that plasma Ndel1 enzyme activity is lower in patients with schizophrenia (SCZ) compared to healthy controls (HCs). To our knowledge, no previous study has investigated the genetic factors associated with the plasma Ndel1 enzyme activity. In the current analyses, samples from 83 SCZ patients and 92 control subjects that were assayed for plasma Ndel1 enzyme activity were genotyped on Illumina Omni Express arrays. A genetic relationship matrix using genome-wide information was then used for ancestry correction, and association statistics were calculated genome-wide. Ndel1 enzyme activity was significantly lower in patients with SCZ (t=4.9; pCAMK1D, MAGI2, CCDC25, and GABGR3, at a level of suggestive significance (p<10(-6)), independent of the clinical status. Then, we performed a model to investigate the observed differences for case/control measures. 2 SNPs at region 1p22.2 reached the p<10(-7) level. ZFPM2 and MAD1L1 were the only two genes with more than one hit at 10(-6) order of p value. Therefore, Ndel1 enzyme activity is a complex trait influenced by many different genetic variants that may contribute to SCZ physiopathology.

  19. Mapping the Ethics of Translational Genomics: Situating Return of Results and Navigating the Research-Clinical Divide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Susan M; Burke, Wylie; Koenig, Barbara A

    2015-01-01

    Both bioethics and law have governed human genomics by distinguishing research from clinical practice. Yet the rise of translational genomics now makes this traditional dichotomy inadequate. This paper pioneers a new approach to the ethics of translational genomics. It maps the full range of ethical approaches needed, proposes a "layered" approach to determining the ethics framework for projects combining research and clinical care, and clarifies the key role that return of results can play in advancing translation.

  20. Genomic Testing and Therapies for Breast Cancer in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Jennifer S.; Phillips, Kathryn A.; Liang, Su-Ying; Hassett, Michael J.; Keohane, Carol; Elkin, Elena B.; Armstrong, Joanne; Toscano, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Given the likely proliferation of targeted testing and treatment strategies for cancer, a better understanding of the utilization patterns of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) testing and trastuzumab and newer gene expression profiling (GEP) for risk stratification and chemotherapy decision making are important. Study Design: Cross-sectional. Methods: We performed a medical record review of women age 35 to 65 years diagnosed between 2006 and 2007 with invasive localized breast cancer, identified using claims from a large national health plan (N = 775). Results: Almost all women received HER2 testing (96.9%), and 24.9% of women with an accepted indication received GEP. Unexplained socioeconomic differences in GEP use were apparent after adjusting for age and clinical characteristics; specifically, GEP use increased with income. For example, those in the lowest income category (< $40,000) were less likely than those with an income of $125,000 or more to receive GEP (odds ratio, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.16 to 0.73). A majority of women (57.7%) with HER2-positive disease received trastuzumab; among these women, differences in age and clinical characteristics were not apparent, although surprisingly, those in the lowest income category were more likely than those in the high-income category to receive trastuzumab (P = .02). Among women who did not have a positive HER2 test, 3.9% still received trastuzumab. Receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy increased as GEP score indicated greater risk of recurrence. Conclusion: Identifying and eliminating unnecessary variation in the use of these expensive tests and treatments should be part of quality improvement and efficiency programs. PMID:21886507

  1. Glioblastoma subclasses can be defined by activity among signal transduction pathways and associated genomic alterations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Brennan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is an umbrella designation that includes a heterogeneous group of primary brain tumors. Several classification strategies of GBM have been reported, some by clinical course and others by resemblance to cell types either in the adult or during development. From a practical and therapeutic standpoint, classifying GBMs by signal transduction pathway activation and by mutation in pathway member genes may be particularly valuable for the development of targeted therapies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed targeted proteomic analysis of 27 surgical glioma samples to identify patterns of coordinate activation among glioma-relevant signal transduction pathways, then compared these results with integrated analysis of genomic and expression data of 243 GBM samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA. In the pattern of signaling, three subclasses of GBM emerge which appear to be associated with predominance of EGFR activation, PDGFR activation, or loss of the RAS regulator NF1. The EGFR signaling class has prominent Notch pathway activation measured by elevated expression of Notch ligands, cleaved Notch receptor, and downstream target Hes1. The PDGF class showed high levels of PDGFB ligand and phosphorylation of PDGFRbeta and NFKB. NF1-loss was associated with lower overall MAPK and PI3K activation and relative overexpression of the mesenchymal marker YKL40. These three signaling classes appear to correspond with distinct transcriptomal subclasses of primary GBM samples from TCGA for which copy number aberration and mutation of EGFR, PDGFRA, and NF1 are signature events. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Proteomic analysis of GBM samples revealed three patterns of expression and activation of proteins in glioma-relevant signaling pathways. These three classes are comprised of roughly equal numbers showing either EGFR activation associated with amplification and mutation of the receptor, PDGF-pathway activation

  2. Simplifying the Use of Pharmacogenomics in Clinical Practice: Building the Genomic Prescribing System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danahey, Keith; Borden, Brittany A; Furner, Brian; Yukman, Patrick; Hussain, Sheena; Saner, Donald; Volchenboum, Samuel L; Ratain, Mark J; O'Donnell, Peter H

    2017-09-26

    A barrier to the use of genomic information during prescribing is the limited number of software solutions that combine a user-friendly interface with complex medical data. We built and designed an online, secure, electronic custom interface termed the Genomic Prescribing System (GPS). Actionable pharmacogenomic (PGx) information was reviewed, collected, and stored in the back-end of GPS to enable creation of customized drug- and variant-specific clinical decision support (CDS) summaries. The database architecture utilized the star schema to store information. Patient raw genomic data underwent transformation via custom-designed algorithms to enable gene and phenotype-level associations. Multiple external data sets (PubMed, The Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED), National Drug File - Reference Terminology (ND-FRT), and a publically-available PGx knowledgebase) were integrated to facilitate the delivery of patient, drug, disease, and genomic information. Institutional security infrastructure was leveraged to securely store patient genomic and clinical data on a HIPAA-compliant server farm. As of May 17, 2016, the GPS back-end housed 257 CDS encompassing 112 genetic variants, 42 genes, and 46 PGx-actionable drugs. The GPS user interface presented patient-specific CDS alongside a recognizable traffic light symbol (green/yellow/red), denoting PGx risk for each genomic result. The number of traffic lights per visit increased with the corresponding increase in the number of available PGx-annotated drugs over time. An integrated drug and disease search functionality, links to primary literature sources, and potential alternative PGx drugs were indicated. The system, which was initially used as stand-alone CDS software within our clinical environment, was then integrated with the institutional electronic medical record for enhanced usability. There have been nearly 2000 logins in 43 months since inception, with usage exceeding 56 logins per month and system up

  3. Factors influencing success of clinical genome sequencing across a broad spectrum of disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lise, Stefano; Broxholme, John; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Rimmer, Andy; Kanapin, Alexander; Lunter, Gerton; Fiddy, Simon; Allan, Chris; Aricescu, A. Radu; Attar, Moustafa; Babbs, Christian; Becq, Jennifer; Beeson, David; Bento, Celeste; Bignell, Patricia; Blair, Edward; Buckle, Veronica J; Bull, Katherine; Cais, Ondrej; Cario, Holger; Chapel, Helen; Copley, Richard R; Cornall, Richard; Craft, Jude; Dahan, Karin; Davenport, Emma E; Dendrou, Calliope; Devuyst, Olivier; Fenwick, Aimée L; Flint, Jonathan; Fugger, Lars; Gilbert, Rodney D; Goriely, Anne; Green, Angie; Greger, Ingo H.; Grocock, Russell; Gruszczyk, Anja V; Hastings, Robert; Hatton, Edouard; Higgs, Doug; Hill, Adrian; Holmes, Chris; Howard, Malcolm; Hughes, Linda; Humburg, Peter; Johnson, David; Karpe, Fredrik; Kingsbury, Zoya; Kini, Usha; Knight, Julian C; Krohn, Jonathan; Lamble, Sarah; Langman, Craig; Lonie, Lorne; Luck, Joshua; McCarthy, Davis; McGowan, Simon J; McMullin, Mary Frances; Miller, Kerry A; Murray, Lisa; Németh, Andrea H; Nesbit, M Andrew; Nutt, David; Ormondroyd, Elizabeth; Oturai, Annette Bang; Pagnamenta, Alistair; Patel, Smita Y; Percy, Melanie; Petousi, Nayia; Piazza, Paolo; Piret, Sian E; Polanco-Echeverry, Guadalupe; Popitsch, Niko; Powrie, Fiona; Pugh, Chris; Quek, Lynn; Robbins, Peter A; Robson, Kathryn; Russo, Alexandra; Sahgal, Natasha; van Schouwenburg, Pauline A; Schuh, Anna; Silverman, Earl; Simmons, Alison; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Sweeney, Elizabeth; Taylor, John; Thakker, Rajesh V; Tomlinson, Ian; Trebes, Amy; Twigg, Stephen RF; Uhlig, Holm H; Vyas, Paresh; Vyse, Tim; Wall, Steven A; Watkins, Hugh; Whyte, Michael P; Witty, Lorna; Wright, Ben; Yau, Chris; Buck, David; Humphray, Sean; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Bell, John I; Wilkie, Andrew OM; Bentley, David; Donnelly, Peter; McVean, Gilean

    2015-01-01

    To assess factors influencing the success of whole genome sequencing for mainstream clinical diagnosis, we sequenced 217 individuals from 156 independent cases across a broad spectrum of disorders in whom prior screening had identified no pathogenic variants. We quantified the number of candidate variants identified using different strategies for variant calling, filtering, annotation and prioritisation. We found that jointly calling variants across samples, filtering against both local and external databases, deploying multiple annotation tools and using familial transmission above biological plausibility contributed to accuracy. Overall, we identified disease causing variants in 21% of cases, rising to 34% (23/68) for Mendelian disorders and 57% (8/14) in trios. We also discovered 32 potentially clinically actionable variants in 18 genes unrelated to the referral disorder, though only four were ultimately considered reportable. Our results demonstrate the value of genome sequencing for routine clinical diagnosis, but also highlight many outstanding challenges. PMID:25985138

  4. Genetic counselors' (GC) knowledge, awareness, understanding of clinical next-generation sequencing (NGS) genomic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, P M; Ruth, K; Matro, J M; Rainey, K L; Fang, C Y; Wong, Y N; Daly, M B; Hall, M J

    2015-12-01

    Genomic tests are increasingly complex, less expensive, and more widely available with the advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS). We assessed knowledge and perceptions among genetic counselors pertaining to NGS genomic testing via an online survey. Associations between selected characteristics and perceptions were examined. Recent education on NGS testing was common, but practical experience limited. Perceived understanding of clinical NGS was modest, specifically concerning tumor testing. Greater perceived understanding of clinical NGS testing correlated with more time spent in cancer-related counseling, exposure to NGS testing, and NGS-focused education. Substantial disagreement about the role of counseling for tumor-based testing was seen. Finally, a majority of counselors agreed with the need for more education about clinical NGS testing, supporting this approach to optimizing implementation.

  5. Key Lessons Learned from Moffitt's Molecular Tumor Board: The Clinical Genomics Action Committee Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knepper, Todd C; Bell, Gillian C; Hicks, J Kevin; Padron, Eric; Teer, Jamie K; Vo, Teresa T; Gillis, Nancy K; Mason, Neil T; McLeod, Howard L; Walko, Christine M

    2017-02-01

    The increasing practicality of genomic sequencing technology has led to its incorporation into routine clinical practice. Successful identification and targeting of driver genomic alterations that provide proliferative and survival advantages to tumor cells have led to approval and ongoing development of several targeted cancer therapies. Within many major cancer centers, molecular tumor boards are constituted to shepherd precision medicine into clinical practice. In July 2014, the Clinical Genomics Action Committee (CGAC) was established as the molecular tumor board companion to the Personalized Medicine Clinical Service (PMCS) at Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida. The processes and outcomes of the program were assessed in order to help others move into the practice of precision medicine. Through the establishment and initial 1,400 patients of the PMCS and its associated molecular tumor board at a major cancer center, five practical lessons of broad applicability have been learned: transdisciplinary engagement, the use of the molecular report as an aid to clinical management, clinical actionability, getting therapeutic options to patients, and financial considerations. Value to patients includes access to cutting-edge practice merged with individualized preferences in treatment and care. Genomic-driven cancer medicine is increasingly becoming a part of routine clinical practice. For successful implementation of precision cancer medicine, strategically organized molecular tumor boards are critical to provide objective evidence-based translation of observed molecular alterations into patient-centered clinical action. Molecular tumor board implementation models along with clinical and economic outcomes will define future treatment standards. The Oncologist 2017;22:144-151Implications for Practice: It is clear that the increasing practicality of genetic tumor sequencing technology has led to its incorporation as part of routine clinical practice. Subsequently

  6. High Telomerase Activity Correlates with the Stabilities of Genome and DNA Ploidy in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Izumi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant tumors have telomerase activity, which is thought to play a critical role in tumor growth. However, the relation between telomerase activity and genomic DNA status in tumor cells is poorly understood. In the present study, we examined telomerase activity in 13 clear cell type renal cell carcinomas (CRCCs with similar clinicopathologic features by telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay (TRAP. Based on TRAP assay results, we divided the CRCCs into two groups: a high telomerase activity group and a low/no telomerase activity group. We then analyzed genomic aberration, DNA ploidy, and telomere status in these two groups by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH, laser scanning cytometry (LSC, and telomere-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (T-FISH, respectively. CGH showed the high telomerase activity group to have fewer genomic changes than the low/no telomerase activity group, which had many genomic aberrations. Moreover, with LSC, DNA diploid cells were found more frequently in the high telomerase activity group than in the low/no telomerase activity group. In addition, T-FISH revealed strong telomere signal intensity in the high telomerase activity group compared with that of the low/no telomerase activity group. These results suggest that telomerase activity is linked to genomic DNA status and that high telomerase activity is associated with genomic stability, DNA ploidy, and telomere length in CRCC.

  7. Genome-based versus gene-based theory of cancer: Possible implications for clinical practice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nataša Todorović-Raković

    2011-09-01

    The current state in oncology research indicates that the attempts to explain such complex process as cancerogenesis by a single or several genetic mutations were not successful enough. On the other hand, chromosomal/genomic instability – almost universal features of malignant tumours which influence a global pattern of gene expression and, subsequently, many oncogenic pathways – were often disregarded and considered nonessential to clinical application. However, a new arising field of system biology including ‘new forms’ of genome diversity such as copy number variations (CNV) and high-throughput oncogene mutation profiling now reveal all the complexity of cancer and provide the final explanation of the oncogenic pathways, based on stochastic (onco)genomic variation rather than on (onco)genic concepts.

  8. Germ line genome editing in clinics: the approaches, objectives and global society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    Genome editing allows for the versatile genetic modification of somatic cells, germ cells and embryos. In particular, CRISPR/Cas9 is worldwide used in biomedical research. Although the first report on Cas9-mediated gene modification in human embryos focused on the prevention of a genetic disease in offspring, it raised profound ethical and social concerns over the safety of subsequent generations and the potential misuse of genome editing for human enhancement. The present article considers germ line genome editing approaches from various clinical and ethical viewpoints and explores its objectives. The risks and benefits of the following three likely objectives are assessed: the prevention of monogenic diseases, personalized assisted reproductive technology (ART) and genetic enhancement. Although genetic enhancement should be avoided, the international regulatory landscape suggests the inevitability of this misuse at ART centers. Under these circumstances, possible regulatory responses and the potential roles of public dialogue are discussed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  9. Developing genomic knowledge bases and databases to support clinical management: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huser, Vojtech; Sincan, Murat; Cimino, James J

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine, the ability to tailor diagnostic and treatment decisions for individual patients, is seen as the evolution of modern medicine. We characterize here the informatics resources available today or envisioned in the near future that can support clinical interpretation of genomic test results. We assume a clinical sequencing scenario (germline whole-exome sequencing) in which a clinical specialist, such as an endocrinologist, needs to tailor patient management decisions within his or her specialty (targeted findings) but relies on a genetic counselor to interpret off-target incidental findings. We characterize the genomic input data and list various types of knowledge bases that provide genomic knowledge for generating clinical decision support. We highlight the need for patient-level databases with detailed lifelong phenotype content in addition to genotype data and provide a list of recommendations for personalized medicine knowledge bases and databases. We conclude that no single knowledge base can currently support all aspects of personalized recommendations and that consolidation of several current resources into larger, more dynamic and collaborative knowledge bases may offer a future path forward.

  10. Genome comparison of Candida orthopsilosis clinical strains reveals the existence of hybrids between two distinct subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryszcz, Leszek P; Németh, Tibor; Gácser, Attila; Gabaldón, Toni

    2014-05-01

    The Candida parapsilosis species complex comprises a group of emerging human pathogens of varying virulence. This complex was recently subdivided into three different species: C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, C. metapsilosis, and C. orthopsilosis. Within the latter, at least two clearly distinct subspecies seem to be present among clinical isolates (Type 1 and Type 2). To gain insight into the genomic differences between these subspecies, we undertook the sequencing of a clinical isolate classified as Type 1 and compared it with the available sequence of a Type 2 clinical strain. Unexpectedly, the analysis of the newly sequenced strain revealed a highly heterozygous genome, which we show to be the consequence of a hybridization event between both identified subspecies. This implicitly suggests that C. orthopsilosis is able to mate, a so-far unanswered question. The resulting hybrid shows a chimeric genome that maintains a similar gene dosage from both parental lineages and displays ongoing loss of heterozygosity. Several of the differences found between the gene content in both strains relate to virulent-related families, with the hybrid strain presenting a higher copy number of genes coding for efflux pumps or secreted lipases. Remarkably, two clinical strains isolated from distant geographical locations (Texas and Singapore) are descendants of the same hybrid line, raising the intriguing possibility of a relationship between the hybridization event and the global spread of a virulent clone.

  11. Clinical characteristics and outcome of patients with neuroblastoma presenting genomic amplification of loci other than MYCN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Guimier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Somatically acquired genomic alterations with MYCN amplification (MNA are key features of neuroblastoma (NB, the most common extra-cranial malignant tumour of childhood. Little is known about the frequency, clinical characteristics and outcome of NBs harbouring genomic amplification(s distinct from MYCN. METHODS: Genomic profiles of 1100 NBs from French centres studied by array-CGH were re-examined specifically to identify regional amplifications. Patients were included if amplifications distinct from the MYCN locus were seen. A subset of NBs treated at Institut Curie and harbouring MNA as determined by array-CGH without other amplification was also studied. Clinical and histology data were retrospectively collected. RESULTS: In total, 56 patients were included and categorised into 3 groups. Group 1 (n = 8 presented regional amplification(s without MNA. Locus 12q13-14 was a recurrent amplified region (4/8 cases. This group was heterogeneous in terms of INSS stages, primary localisations and histology, with atypical clinical features. Group 2 (n = 26 had MNA as well as other regional amplifications. These patients shared clinical features of those of a group of NBs MYCN amplified (Group 3, n = 22. Overall survival for group 1 was better than that of groups 2 and 3 (5 year OS: 87.5%±11% vs 34.9%±7%, log-rank p<0.05. CONCLUSION: NBs harbouring regional amplification(s without MNA are rare and seem to show atypical features in clinical presentation and genomic profile. Further high resolution genetic explorations are justified in this heterogeneous group, especially when considering these alterations as predictive markers for targeted therapy.

  12. Therapeutic potential of PRL-3 targeting and clinical significance of PRL-3 genomic amplification in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishimiya Hiroshi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 (PRL-3 has deserved attention as a crucial molecule in the multiple steps of metastasis. In the present study, we examined the mechanisms regulating PRL-3 expression, and assessed the clinical potential of PRL-3-targeted therapy in gastric cancer. Methods PRL-3 genomic amplification was analyzed using quantitative-polymerase chain reaction and/or fluorescence in situ hybridization in 77 primary gastric tumors. The anticancer activity of PRL-3 inhibitor (1-4-bromo-2-benzylidene rhodanine treatment was evaluated against cancer cells with different genetic and expression status. Results PRL-3 genomic amplification was closely concordant with high level of its protein expression in cell lines, and was found in 20% (8/40 among human primary tumors with its expression, which were all stage III/IV disease (40%, 8/20, but in none (0/37 among those without expression. Additionally, PRL-3 genomic amplification was associated with metastatic lymph node status, leading to advanced stage and thereby poor outcomes in patients with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.021. PRL-3 small interfering RNA robustly repressed metastatic properties, including cell proliferation, invasion, and anchorage-independent colony formation. Although neither PRL-3 genomic amplification nor expression level was responsible for the sensitivity to PRL-3 inhibitor treatment, the inhibitor showed dose-dependent anticancer efficacy, and remarkably induced apoptosis on all the tested cell lines with PRL-3 expression. Conclusions We have for the first time, demonstrated that PRL-3 genomic amplification is one of the predominant mechanisms inducing its expression, especially in more advanced stage, and that PRL-3-targeted therapy may have a great potential against gastric cancer with its expression.

  13. A Clinical Service to Support the Return of Secondary Genomic Findings in Human Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, Andrew J.; Austin, Howard; Bluemke, David A.; Cannon, Richard O.; Fischbeck, Kenneth; Gahl, William; Goldman, David; Grady, Christine; Greene, Mark H.; Holland, Steven M.; Hull, Sara Chandros; Porter, Forbes D.; Resnik, David; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2016-01-01

    Human genome and exome sequencing are powerful research tools that can generate secondary findings beyond the scope of the research. Most secondary genomic findings are of low importance, but some (for a current estimate of 1%–3% of individuals) confer high risk of a serious disease that could be mitigated by timely medical intervention. The impact and scope of secondary findings in genome and exome sequencing will only increase in the future. There is considerable agreement that high-impact findings should be returned to participants, but many researchers performing genomic research studies do not have the background, skills, or resources to identify, verify, interpret, and return such variants. Here, we introduce a proposal for the formation of a secondary-genomic-findings service (SGFS) that would support researchers by enabling the return of clinically actionable sequencing results to research participants in a standardized manner. We describe a proposed structure for such a centralized service and evaluate the advantages and challenges of the approach. We suggest that such a service would be of greater benefit to all parties involved than present practice, which is highly variable. We encourage research centers to consider the adoption of a centralized SGFS. PMID:26942283

  14. Genomic Features of Environmental and Clinical Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates Lacking Recognized Virulence Factors Are Dissimilar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronholm, J; Petronella, N; Chew Leung, C; Pightling, A W; Banerjee, S K

    2015-12-04

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a bacterial pathogen that can cause illness after the consumption or handling of contaminated seafood. The primary virulence factors associated with V. parahaemolyticus illness are thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and Tdh-related hemolysin (TRH). However, clinical strains lacking tdh and trh have recently been isolated, and these clinical isolates are poorly understood. To help understand the emergence of clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates, a genomic approach was used to comprehensively compare 4 clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates with 16 environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates and 34 clinical isolates positive for tdh or trh, or both, with the objective of identifying genomic features that are unique to clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The prevalence of pathogenicity islands (PAIs) common to clinical isolates was thoroughly examined in each of the clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The tdh PAI was not present in any clinical or environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The trh PAI was not present in any environmental isolates; however, in clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolate 10-4238, the majority of the trh PAI including a partial trh1 gene was present, which resulted in reclassification of this isolate as a tdh-negative and trh-positive isolate. In the other clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates, neither the trh gene nor the trh PAI was present. We identified 862 genes in clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates but not in environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates. Many of these genes are highly homologous to genes found in common enteric bacteria and included genes encoding a number of chemotaxis proteins and a novel putative type VI secretion system (T6SS) effector and immunity protein (T6SS1). The availability of genome sequences from clinical V. parahaemolyticus tdh- and trh-negative isolates and the comparative analysis may help provide an understanding of how this pathotype is able to

  15. Genome analysis of environmental and clinical P. aeruginosa isolates from sequence type-1146.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sánchez

    Full Text Available The genomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates of the new sequence type ST-1146, three environmental (P37, P47 and P49 and one clinical (SD9 isolates, with differences in their antibiotic susceptibility profiles have been sequenced and analysed. The genomes were mapped against P. aeruginosa PAO1-UW and UCBPP-PA14. The allelic profiles showed that the highest number of differences were in "Related to phage, transposon or plasmid" and "Secreted factors" categories. The clinical isolate showed a number of exclusive alleles greater than that for the environmental isolates. The phage Pf1 region in isolate SD9 accumulated the highest number of nucleotide substitutions. The ORF analysis of the four genomes assembled de novo indicated that the number of isolate-specific genes was higher in isolate SD9 (132 genes than in isolates P37 (24 genes, P47 (16 genes and P49 (21 genes. CRISPR elements were found in all isolates and SD9 showed differences in the spacer region. Genes related to bacteriophages F116 and H66 were found only in isolate SD9. Genome comparisons indicated that the isolates of ST-1146 are close related, and most genes implicated in pathogenicity are highly conserved, suggesting a genetic potential for infectivity in the environmental isolates similar to the clinical one. Phage-related genes are responsible of the main differences among the genomes of ST-1146 isolates. The role of bacteriophages has to be considered in the adaptation processes of isolates to the host and in microevolution studies.

  16. Post-genome integrative biology: so that's what they call clinical science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, J

    2001-01-01

    Medical science is increasingly dominated by slogans, a characteristic reflecting its growing bureaucratic and corporate structure. Chief amongst these slogans is the idea that genomics will transform the public health. I believe this view is mistaken. Using studies of the genetics of skin cancer and the genetics of skin pigmentation, I describe how recent discoveries have contributed to our understanding of these topics and of human evolution. I contrast these discoveries with insights gained from other approaches, particularly those based on clinical studies. The 'IKEA model of medical advance'--you just do the basic science in the laboratory and self-assemble in the clinic--is not only damaging to clinical advance, but reflects a widespread ignorance about the nature of disease and how clinical discovery arises. We need to think more about disease and less about genes; more in the clinic and less in the laboratory.

  17. Predictive biomarker discovery through the parallel integration of clinical trial and functional genomics datasets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swanton, C.; Larkin, J.M.; Gerlinger, M.

    2010-01-01

    RNA screens to identify and validate functionally important genomic or transcriptomic predictive biomarkers of individual drug response in patients. PREDICT's approach to predictive biomarker discovery differs from conventional associative learning approaches, which can be susceptible to the detection...... inhibitor. Through the analysis of tumour tissue derived from pre-operative renal cell carcinoma (RCC) clinical trials, the PREDICT consortium will use established and novel methods to integrate comprehensive tumour-derived genomic data with personalised tumour-derived shRNA and high throughput si......, reducing ineffective therapy in drug resistant disease, leading to improved quality of life and higher cost efficiency, which in turn should broaden patient access to beneficial therapeutics, thereby enhancing clinical outcome and cancer survival. The consortium will also establish and consolidate...

  18. Molecular Cytogenetics: Genomic Imbalances in Colorectal Cancer and their Clinical Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Grade

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal aberrations play a dominant role in colorectal carcinogenesis. The application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH based techniques such as comparative genomic hybridization (CGH and spectral karyotyping (SKY revealed that colorectal carcinomas are characterized by a specific pattern of chromosomal imbalances which sequentially accumulate during cancer progression. This review aims to summarize molecular cytogenetic studies, provides a background on the functional relevance of chromosomal aberrations for colorectal cancer progression and discusses their potential clinical impact.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of the First Hypermucoviscous Klebsiella variicola Clinical Isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza-Ramos, Ulises; Silva-Sanchez, Jesus; Barrios, Humberto; Rodriguez-Medina, Nadia; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesus; Andrade, Veronica

    2015-04-09

    An antibiotic-susceptible and hypermucoviscous clinical isolate of Klebsiella variicola (K. variicola 8917) was obtained from the sputum of an adult patient. This work reports the complete draft genome sequence of K. variicola 8917 with 103 contigs and an annotation that revealed a 5,686,491-bp circular chromosome containing a total of 5,621 coding DNA sequences, 65 tRNA genes, and an average G+C content of 56.98%.

  20. Combined array CGH plus SNP genome analyses in a single assay for optimized clinical testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiszniewska, Joanna; Bi, Weimin; Shaw, Chad; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Pursley, Amber N; Lalani, Seema; Hixson, Patricia; Gambin, Tomasz; Tsai, Chun-hui; Bock, Hans-Georg; Descartes, Maria; Probst, Frank J; Scaglia, Fernando; Beaudet, Arthur L; Lupski, James R; Eng, Christine; Cheung, Sau Wai; Bacino, Carlos; Patel, Ankita

    2014-01-01

    In clinical diagnostics, both array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping have proven to be powerful genomic technologies utilized for the evaluation of developmental delay, multiple congenital anomalies, and neuropsychiatric disorders. Differences in the ability to resolve genomic changes between these arrays may constitute an implementation challenge for clinicians: which platform (SNP vs array CGH) might best detect the underlying genetic cause for the disease in the patient? While only SNP arrays enable the detection of copy number neutral regions of absence of heterozygosity (AOH), they have limited ability to detect single-exon copy number variants (CNVs) due to the distribution of SNPs across the genome. To provide comprehensive clinical testing for both CNVs and copy-neutral AOH, we enhanced our custom-designed high-resolution oligonucleotide array that has exon-targeted coverage of 1860 genes with 60,000 SNP probes, referred to as Chromosomal Microarray Analysis - Comprehensive (CMA-COMP). Of the 3240 cases evaluated by this array, clinically significant CNVs were detected in 445 cases including 21 cases with exonic events. In addition, 162 cases (5.0%) showed at least one AOH region >10 Mb. We demonstrate that even though this array has a lower density of SNP probes than other commercially available SNP arrays, it reliably detected AOH events >10 Mb as well as exonic CNVs beyond the detection limitations of SNP genotyping. Thus, combining SNP probes and exon-targeted array CGH into one platform provides clinically useful genetic screening in an efficient manner.

  1. Two patients walk into a clinic...a genomics perspective on the future of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corvin Aiden P

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Progress is being made in schizophrenia genomics, suggesting that this complex brain disorder involves rare, moderate to high-risk mutations and the cumulative impact of small genetic effects, coupled with environmental factors. The genetic heterogeneity underlying schizophrenia and the overlap with other neurodevelopmental disorders suggest that it will not continue to be viewed as a single disease. This has radical implications for clinical practice, as diagnosis and treatment will be guided by molecular etiology rather than clinical diagnostic criteria.

  2. Rapid whole genome sequencing for the detection and characterization of microorganisms directly from clinical samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, Henrik; Saputra, Dhany; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas;

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is becoming available as a routine tool for clinical microbiology. If applied directly on clinical samples this could further reduce diagnostic time and thereby improve control and treatment. A major bottle-neck is the availability of fast and reliable bioinformatics...... information and drastically reduce diagnostic time. This may prove very useful, but the need for data analysis is still a hurdle to clinical implementation. To overcome this problem a publicly available bioinformatics tool was developed in this study....... tools. This study was conducted to evaluate the applicability of WGS directly on clinical samples and to develop easy-to-use bioinformatics tools for analysis of the sequencing data. Thirty-five random urine samples from patients with suspected urinary tract infections were examined using conventional...

  3. Opportunities and challenges associated with clinical diagnostic genome sequencing: a report of the Association for Molecular Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrijver, Iris; Aziz, Nazneen; Farkas, Daniel H; Furtado, Manohar; Gonzalez, Andrea Ferreira; Greiner, Timothy C; Grody, Wayne W; Hambuch, Tina; Kalman, Lisa; Kant, Jeffrey A; Klein, Roger D; Leonard, Debra G B; Lubin, Ira M; Mao, Rong; Nagan, Narasimhan; Pratt, Victoria M; Sobel, Mark E; Voelkerding, Karl V; Gibson, Jane S

    2012-11-01

    This report of the Whole Genome Analysis group of the Association for Molecular Pathology illuminates the opportunities and challenges associated with clinical diagnostic genome sequencing. With the reality of clinical application of next-generation sequencing, technical aspects of molecular testing can be accomplished at greater speed and with higher volume, while much information is obtained. Although this testing is a next logical step for molecular pathology laboratories, the potential impact on the diagnostic process and clinical correlations is extraordinary and clinical interpretation will be challenging. We review the rapidly evolving technologies; provide application examples; discuss aspects of clinical utility, ethics, and consent; and address the analytic, postanalytic, and professional implications.

  4. Getting personalized cancer genome analysis into the clinic: the challenges in bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Alfonso; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Progress in genomics has raised expectations in many fields, and particularly in personalized cancer research. The new technologies available make it possible to combine information about potential disease markers, altered function and accessible drug targets, which, coupled with pathological and medical information, will help produce more appropriate clinical decisions. The accessibility of such experimental techniques makes it all the more necessary to improve and adapt computational strategies to the new challenges. This review focuses on the critical issues associated with the standard pipeline, which includes: DNA sequencing analysis; analysis of mutations in coding regions; the study of genome rearrangements; extrapolating information on mutations to the functional and signaling level; and predicting the effects of therapies using mouse tumor models. We describe the possibilities, limitations and future challenges of current bioinformatics strategies for each of these issues. Furthermore, we emphasize the need for the collaboration between the bioinformaticians who implement the software and use the data resources, the computational biologists who develop the analytical methods, and the clinicians, the systems' end users and those ultimately responsible for taking medical decisions. Finally, the different steps in cancer genome analysis are illustrated through examples of applications in cancer genome analysis.

  5. Comparative genomics of Helicobacter pylori strains of China associated with different clinical outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanhai You

    Full Text Available In this study, a whole-genome CombiMatrix Custom oligonucleotide tiling microarray with 90,000 probes covering six sequenced Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori genomes was designed. This microarray was used to compare the genomic profiles of eight unsequenced strains isolated from patients with different gastroduodenal diseases in Heilongjiang province of China. Since significant genomic variation was found among these strains, an additional 76 H. pylori strains associated with different clinical outcomes were isolated from various provinces of China. These strains were tested by polymerase chain reaction to demonstrate this distinction. We identified several highly variable regions in strains associated with gastritis, gastric ulceration, and gastric cancer. These regions are associated with genes involved in the bacterial type I, type II, and type III R-M systems. They were also associated with the virB gene, which lies on the well-studied cag pathogenic island. While previous studies have reported on the diverse genetic characterization of this pathogenic island, in this study, we find that it is conserved in all strains tested by microarray. Moreover, a number of genes involved in the type IV secretion system, which is related to horizontal DNA transfer between H. pylori strains, were identified in the comparative analysis of the strain-specific genes. These findings may provide insight into new biomarkers for the prediction of gastric diseases.

  6. Clinical genomics, big data, and electronic medical records: reconciling patient rights with research when privacy and science collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greely, Henry T.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Widespread use of medical records for research, without consent, attracts little scrutiny compared to biospecimen research, where concerns about genomic privacy prompted recent federal proposals to mandate consent. This paper explores an important consequence of the proliferation of electronic health records (EHRs) in this permissive atmosphere: with the advent of clinical gene sequencing, EHR-based secondary research poses genetic privacy risks akin to those of biospecimen research, yet regulators still permit researchers to call gene sequence data ‘de-identified’, removing such data from the protection of the federal Privacy Rule and federal human subjects regulations. Medical centers and other providers seeking to offer genomic ‘personalized medicine’ now confront the problem of governing the secondary use of clinical genomic data as privacy risks escalate. We argue that regulators should no longer permit HIPAA-covered entities to treat dense genomic data as de-identified health information. Even with this step, the Privacy Rule would still permit disclosure of clinical genomic data for research, without consent, under a data use agreement, so we also urge that providers give patients specific notice before disclosing clinical genomic data for research, permitting (where possible) some degree of choice and control. To aid providers who offer clinical gene sequencing, we suggest both general approaches and specific actions to reconcile patients’ rights and interests with genomic research. PMID:28852559

  7. Genomic diversity of EPEC associated with clinical presentations of differing severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, Tracy H.; Donnenberg, Michael S.; Panchalingam, Sandra; Antonio, Martin; Hossain, Anowar; Mandomando, Inacio; Ochieng, John Benjamin; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Tamboura, Boubou; Qureshi, Shahida; Quadri, Farheen; Zaidi, Anita; Kotloff, Karen L.; Levine, Myron M.; Barry, Eileen M.; Kaper, James B.; Rasko, David A.; Nataro, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) are diarrhoeagenic E. coli, and are a significant cause of gastrointestinal illness among young children in developing countries. Typical EPEC are identified by the presence of the bundle-forming pilus encoded by a virulence plasmid, which has been linked to an increased severity of illness, while atypical EPEC lack this feature. Comparative genomics of 70 total EPEC from lethal (LI), non-lethal symptomatic (NSI) or asymptomatic (AI) cases of diarrhoeal illness in children enrolled in the Global Enteric Multicenter Study was used to investigate the genomic differences in EPEC isolates obtained from individuals with various clinical outcomes. A comparison of the genomes of isolates from different clinical outcomes identified genes that were significantly more prevalent in EPEC isolates of symptomatic and lethal outcomes than in EPEC isolates of asymptomatic outcomes. These EPEC isolates exhibited previously unappreciated phylogenomic diversity and combinations of virulence factors. These comparative results highlight the diversity of the pathogen, as well as the complexity of the EPEC virulence factor repertoire. PMID:27571975

  8. Genome Consortium for Active Teaching: Meeting the Goals of BIO2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A. Malcolm; Ledbetter, Mary Lee S.; Hoopes, Laura L. M.; Eckdahl, Todd T.; Heyer, Laurie J.; Rosenwald, Anne; Fowlks, Edison; Tonidandel, Scott; Bucholtz, Brooke; Gottfried, Gail

    2007-01-01

    The Genome Consortium for Active Teaching (GCAT) facilitates the use of modern genomics methods in undergraduate education. Initially focused on microarray technology, but with an eye toward diversification, GCAT is a community working to improve the education of tomorrow's life science professionals. GCAT participants have access to affordable…

  9. High-throughput genome sequencing of two Listeria monocytogenes clinical isolates during a large foodborne outbreak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trout-Yakel Keri M

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large, multi-province outbreak of listeriosis associated with ready-to-eat meat products contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes serotype 1/2a occurred in Canada in 2008. Subtyping of outbreak-associated isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE revealed two similar but distinct AscI PFGE patterns. High-throughput pyrosequencing of two L. monocytogenes isolates was used to rapidly provide the genome sequence of the primary outbreak strain and to investigate the extent of genetic diversity associated with a change of a single restriction enzyme fragment during PFGE. Results The chromosomes were collinear, but differences included 28 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and three indels, including a 33 kbp prophage that accounted for the observed difference in AscI PFGE patterns. The distribution of these traits was assessed within further clinical, environmental and food isolates associated with the outbreak, and this comparison indicated that three distinct, but highly related strains may have been involved in this nationwide outbreak. Notably, these two isolates were found to harbor a 50 kbp putative mobile genomic island encoding translocation and efflux functions that has not been observed in other Listeria genomes. Conclusions High-throughput genome sequencing provided a more detailed real-time assessment of genetic traits characteristic of the outbreak strains than could be achieved with routine subtyping methods. This study confirms that the latest generation of DNA sequencing technologies can be applied during high priority public health events, and laboratories need to prepare for this inevitability and assess how to properly analyze and interpret whole genome sequences in the context of molecular epidemiology.

  10. Comparative whole-genome analysis of clinical isolates reveals characteristic architecture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis pangenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periwal, Vinita; Patowary, Ashok; Vellarikkal, Shamsudheen Karuthedath; Gupta, Anju; Singh, Meghna; Mittal, Ashish; Jeyapaul, Shamini; Chauhan, Rajendra Kumar; Singh, Ajay Vir; Singh, Pravin Kumar; Garg, Parul; Katoch, Viswa Mohan; Katoch, Kiran; Chauhan, Devendra Singh; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Scaria, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    The tubercle complex consists of closely related mycobacterium species which appear to be variants of a single species. Comparative genome analysis of different strains could provide useful clues and insights into the genetic diversity of the species. We integrated genome assemblies of 96 strains from Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), which included 8 Indian clinical isolates sequenced and assembled in this study, to understand its pangenome architecture. We predicted genes for all the 96 strains and clustered their respective CDSs into homologous gene clusters (HGCs) to reveal a hard-core, soft-core and accessory genome component of MTBC. The hard-core (HGCs shared amongst 100% of the strains) was comprised of 2,066 gene clusters whereas the soft-core (HGCs shared amongst at least 95% of the strains) comprised of 3,374 gene clusters. The change in the core and accessory genome components when observed as a function of their size revealed that MTBC has an open pangenome. We identified 74 HGCs that were absent from reference strains H37Rv and H37Ra but were present in most of clinical isolates. We report PCR validation on 9 candidate genes depicting 7 genes completely absent from H37Rv and H37Ra whereas 2 genes shared partial homology with them accounting to probable insertion and deletion events. The pangenome approach is a promising tool for studying strain specific genetic differences occurring within species. We also suggest that since selecting appropriate target genes for typing purposes requires the expected target gene be present in all isolates being typed, therefore estimating the core-component of the species becomes a subject of prime importance.

  11. Comparative whole-genome analysis of clinical isolates reveals characteristic architecture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis pangenome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinita Periwal

    Full Text Available The tubercle complex consists of closely related mycobacterium species which appear to be variants of a single species. Comparative genome analysis of different strains could provide useful clues and insights into the genetic diversity of the species. We integrated genome assemblies of 96 strains from Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC, which included 8 Indian clinical isolates sequenced and assembled in this study, to understand its pangenome architecture. We predicted genes for all the 96 strains and clustered their respective CDSs into homologous gene clusters (HGCs to reveal a hard-core, soft-core and accessory genome component of MTBC. The hard-core (HGCs shared amongst 100% of the strains was comprised of 2,066 gene clusters whereas the soft-core (HGCs shared amongst at least 95% of the strains comprised of 3,374 gene clusters. The change in the core and accessory genome components when observed as a function of their size revealed that MTBC has an open pangenome. We identified 74 HGCs that were absent from reference strains H37Rv and H37Ra but were present in most of clinical isolates. We report PCR validation on 9 candidate genes depicting 7 genes completely absent from H37Rv and H37Ra whereas 2 genes shared partial homology with them accounting to probable insertion and deletion events. The pangenome approach is a promising tool for studying strain specific genetic differences occurring within species. We also suggest that since selecting appropriate target genes for typing purposes requires the expected target gene be present in all isolates being typed, therefore estimating the core-component of the species becomes a subject of prime importance.

  12. Genome-wide association study of clinically defined gout identifies multiple risk loci and its association with clinical subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Ken; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Chiba, Toshinori; Takahashi, Atsushi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Takada, Yuzo; Danjoh, Inaho; Shimizu, Seiko; Abe, Junko; Kawamura, Yusuke; Terashige, Sho; Ogata, Hiraku; Tatsukawa, Seishiro; Yin, Guang; Okada, Rieko; Morita, Emi; Naito, Mariko; Tokumasu, Atsumi; Onoue, Hiroyuki; Iwaya, Keiichi; Ito, Toshimitsu; Takada, Tappei; Inoue, Katsuhisa; Kato, Yukio; Nakamura, Yukio; Sakurai, Yutaka; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Hosoya, Tatsuo; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Inoue, Ituro; Kubo, Michiaki; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Toru; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Gout, caused by hyperuricaemia, is a multifactorial disease. Although genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of gout have been reported, they included self-reported gout cases in which clinical information was insufficient. Therefore, the relationship between genetic variation and clinical subtypes of gout remains unclear. Here, we first performed a GWAS of clinically defined gout cases only. Methods A GWAS was conducted with 945 patients with clinically defined gout and 1213 controls in a Japanese male population, followed by replication study of 1048 clinically defined cases and 1334 controls. Results Five gout susceptibility loci were identified at the genome-wide significance level (p<5.0×10−8), which contained well-known urate transporter genes (ABCG2 and SLC2A9) and additional genes: rs1260326 (p=1.9×10−12; OR=1.36) of GCKR (a gene for glucose and lipid metabolism), rs2188380 (p=1.6×10−23; OR=1.75) of MYL2-CUX2 (genes associated with cholesterol and diabetes mellitus) and rs4073582 (p=6.4×10−9; OR=1.66) of CNIH-2 (a gene for regulation of glutamate signalling). The latter two are identified as novel gout loci. Furthermore, among the identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we demonstrated that the SNPs of ABCG2 and SLC2A9 were differentially associated with types of gout and clinical parameters underlying specific subtypes (renal underexcretion type and renal overload type). The effect of the risk allele of each SNP on clinical parameters showed significant linear relationships with the ratio of the case–control ORs for two distinct types of gout (r=0.96 [p=4.8×10−4] for urate clearance and r=0.96 [p=5.0×10−4] for urinary urate excretion). Conclusions Our findings provide clues to better understand the pathogenesis of gout and will be useful for development of companion diagnostics. PMID:25646370

  13. A national clinical decision support infrastructure to enable the widespread and consistent practice of genomic and personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Lobach, David F; Willard, Huntington F; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S

    2009-03-23

    In recent years, the completion of the Human Genome Project and other rapid advances in genomics have led to increasing anticipation of an era of genomic and personalized medicine, in which an individual's health is optimized through the use of all available patient data, including data on the individual's genome and its downstream products. Genomic and personalized medicine could transform healthcare systems and catalyze significant reductions in morbidity, mortality, and overall healthcare costs. Critical to the achievement of more efficient and effective healthcare enabled by genomics is the establishment of a robust, nationwide clinical decision support infrastructure that assists clinicians in their use of genomic assays to guide disease prevention, diagnosis, and therapy. Requisite components of this infrastructure include the standardized representation of genomic and non-genomic patient data across health information systems; centrally managed repositories of computer-processable medical knowledge; and standardized approaches for applying these knowledge resources against patient data to generate and deliver patient-specific care recommendations. Here, we provide recommendations for establishing a national decision support infrastructure for genomic and personalized medicine that fulfills these needs, leverages existing resources, and is aligned with the Roadmap for National Action on Clinical Decision Support commissioned by the U.S. Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. Critical to the establishment of this infrastructure will be strong leadership and substantial funding from the federal government. A national clinical decision support infrastructure will be required for reaping the full benefits of genomic and personalized medicine. Essential components of this infrastructure include standards for data representation; centrally managed knowledge repositories; and standardized approaches for leveraging these knowledge

  14. A national clinical decision support infrastructure to enable the widespread and consistent practice of genomic and personalized medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willard Huntington F

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, the completion of the Human Genome Project and other rapid advances in genomics have led to increasing anticipation of an era of genomic and personalized medicine, in which an individual's health is optimized through the use of all available patient data, including data on the individual's genome and its downstream products. Genomic and personalized medicine could transform healthcare systems and catalyze significant reductions in morbidity, mortality, and overall healthcare costs. Discussion Critical to the achievement of more efficient and effective healthcare enabled by genomics is the establishment of a robust, nationwide clinical decision support infrastructure that assists clinicians in their use of genomic assays to guide disease prevention, diagnosis, and therapy. Requisite components of this infrastructure include the standardized representation of genomic and non-genomic patient data across health information systems; centrally managed repositories of computer-processable medical knowledge; and standardized approaches for applying these knowledge resources against patient data to generate and deliver patient-specific care recommendations. Here, we provide recommendations for establishing a national decision support infrastructure for genomic and personalized medicine that fulfills these needs, leverages existing resources, and is aligned with the Roadmap for National Action on Clinical Decision Support commissioned by the U.S. Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. Critical to the establishment of this infrastructure will be strong leadership and substantial funding from the federal government. Summary A national clinical decision support infrastructure will be required for reaping the full benefits of genomic and personalized medicine. Essential components of this infrastructure include standards for data representation; centrally managed knowledge repositories; and

  15. DO CANCER CLINICAL TRIAL POPULATIONS TRULY REPRESENT CANCER PATIENTS? A COMPARISON OF OPEN CLINICAL TRIALS TO THE CANCER GENOME ATLAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geifman, Nophar; Butte, Atul J

    2016-01-01

    Open clinical trial data offer many opportunities for the scientific community to independently verify published results, evaluate new hypotheses and conduct meta-analyses. These data provide a springboard for scientific advances in precision medicine but the question arises as to how representative clinical trials data are of cancer patients overall. Here we present the integrative analysis of data from several cancer clinical trials and compare these to patient-level data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Comparison of cancer type-specific survival rates reveals that these are overall lower in trial subjects. This effect, at least to some extent, can be explained by the more advanced stages of cancer of trial subjects. This analysis also reveals that for stage IV cancer, colorectal cancer patients have a better chance of survival than breast cancer patients. On the other hand, for all other stages, breast cancer patients have better survival than colorectal cancer patients. Comparison of survival in different stages of disease between the two datasets reveals that subjects with stage IV cancer from the trials dataset have a lower chance of survival than matching stage IV subjects from TCGA. One likely explanation for this observation is that stage IV trial subjects have lower survival rates since their cancer is less likely to respond to treatment. To conclude, we present here a newly available clinical trials dataset which allowed for the integration of patient-level data from many cancer clinical trials. Our comprehensive analysis reveals that cancer-related clinical trials are not representative of general cancer patient populations, mostly due to their focus on the more advanced stages of the disease. These and other limitations of clinical trials data should, perhaps, be taken into consideration in medical research and in the field of precision medicine.

  16. Genome editing: the road of CRISPR/Cas9 from bench to clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Ayman; Mahfouz, Magdy M

    2016-01-01

    Molecular scissors engineered for site-specific modification of the genome hold great promise for effective functional analyses of genes, genomes and epigenomes and could improve our understanding of the molecular underpinnings of disease states and facilitate novel therapeutic applications. Several platforms for molecular scissors that enable targeted genome engineering have been developed, including zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and, most recently, clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated-9 (Cas9). The CRISPR/Cas9 system's simplicity, facile engineering and amenability to multiplexing make it the system of choice for many applications. CRISPR/Cas9 has been used to generate disease models to study genetic diseases. Improvements are urgently needed for various aspects of the CRISPR/Cas9 system, including the system's precision, delivery and control over the outcome of the repair process. Here, we discuss the current status of genome engineering and its implications for the future of biological research and gene therapy. PMID:27741224

  17. Genome editing: the road of CRISPR/Cas9 from bench to clinic

    KAUST Repository

    Eid, Ayman

    2016-10-14

    Molecular scissors engineered for site-specific modification of the genome hold great promise for effective functional analyses of genes, genomes and epigenomes and could improve our understanding of the molecular underpinnings of disease states and facilitate novel therapeutic applications. Several platforms for molecular scissors that enable targeted genome engineering have been developed, including zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and, most recently, clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated-9 (Cas9). The CRISPR/Cas9 system\\'s simplicity, facile engineering and amenability to multiplexing make it the system of choice for many applications. CRISPR/Cas9 has been used to generate disease models to study genetic diseases. Improvements are urgently needed for various aspects of the CRISPR/Cas9 system, including the system\\'s precision, delivery and control over the outcome of the repair process. Here, we discuss the current status of genome engineering and its implications for the future of biological research and gene therapy.

  18. Common minor histocompatibility antigen discovery based upon patient clinical outcomes and genomic data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Armistead

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Minor histocompatibility antigens (mHA mediate much of the graft vs. leukemia (GvL effect and graft vs. host disease (GvHD in patients who undergo allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT. Therapeutic decision making and treatments based upon mHAs will require the evaluation of multiple candidate mHAs and the selection of those with the potential to have the greatest impact on clinical outcomes. We hypothesized that common, immunodominant mHAs, which are presented by HLA-A, B, and C molecules, can mediate clinically significant GvL and/or GvHD, and that these mHAs can be identified through association of genomic data with clinical outcomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Because most mHAs result from donor/recipient cSNP disparities, we genotyped 57 myeloid leukemia patients and their donors at 13,917 cSNPs. We correlated the frequency of genetically predicted mHA disparities with clinical evidence of an immune response and then computationally screened all peptides mapping to the highly associated cSNPs for their ability to bind to HLA molecules. As proof-of-concept, we analyzed one predicted antigen, T4A, whose mHA mismatch trended towards improved overall and disease free survival in our cohort. T4A mHA mismatches occurred at the maximum theoretical frequency for any given SCT. T4A-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTLs were detected in 3 of 4 evaluable post-transplant patients predicted to have a T4A mismatch. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our method is the first to combine clinical outcomes data with genomics and bioinformatics methods to predict and confirm a mHA. Refinement of this method should enable the discovery of clinically relevant mHAs in the majority of transplant patients and possibly lead to novel immunotherapeutics.

  19. Clinical Implementation of Integrated Genomic Profiling in Patients with Advanced Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borad, Mitesh J; Egan, Jan B; Condjella, Rachel M; Liang, Winnie S; Fonseca, Rafael; Ritacca, Nicole R; McCullough, Ann E; Barrett, Michael T; Hunt, Katherine S; Champion, Mia D; Patel, Maitray D; Young, Scott W; Silva, Alvin C; Ho, Thai H; Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R; McWilliams, Robert R; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N; Ramanathan, Ramesh K; Baker, Angela; Aldrich, Jessica; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Izatt, Tyler; Christoforides, Alexis; Cherni, Irene; Nasser, Sara; Reiman, Rebecca; Cuyugan, Lori; McDonald, Jacquelyn; Adkins, Jonathan; Mastrian, Stephen D; Valdez, Riccardo; Jaroszewski, Dawn E; Von Hoff, Daniel D; Craig, David W; Stewart, A Keith; Carpten, John D; Bryce, Alan H

    2016-12-23

    DNA focused panel sequencing has been rapidly adopted to assess therapeutic targets in advanced/refractory cancer. Integrated Genomic Profiling (IGP) utilising DNA/RNA with tumour/normal comparisons in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) compliant setting enables a single assay to provide: therapeutic target prioritisation, novel target discovery/application and comprehensive germline assessment. A prospective study in 35 advanced/refractory cancer patients was conducted using CLIA-compliant IGP. Feasibility was assessed by estimating time to results (TTR), prioritising/assigning putative therapeutic targets, assessing drug access, ascertaining germline alterations, and assessing patient preferences/perspectives on data use/reporting. Therapeutic targets were identified using biointelligence/pathway analyses and interpreted by a Genomic Tumour Board. Seventy-five percent of cases harboured 1-3 therapeutically targetable mutations/case (median 79 mutations of potential functional significance/case). Median time to CLIA-validated results was 116 days with CLIA-validation of targets achieved in 21/22 patients. IGP directed treatment was instituted in 13 patients utilising on/off label FDA approved drugs (n = 9), clinical trials (n = 3) and single patient IND (n = 1). Preliminary clinical efficacy was noted in five patients (two partial response, three stable disease). Although barriers to broader application exist, including the need for wider availability of therapies, IGP in a CLIA-framework is feasible and valuable in selection/prioritisation of anti-cancer therapeutic targets.

  20. In vivo characterization of estrogen receptor modulators with reduced genomic versus nongenomic activity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Christiane; Fuchs, Iris; Altmann, Helga; Klewer, Mario; Schwarz, Gilda; Bohlmann, Rolf; Nguyen, Duy; Zorn, Ludwig; Vonk, Richardus; Prelle, Katja; Osterman, Thua; Malmström, Chira; Fritzemeier, Karl-Heinrich

    2008-07-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) ligands that are able to prevent postmenopausal bone loss, but have reduced activity in the uterus and the mammary gland might be of great value for hormone therapy. It is well established that the classical ER can activate genomic as well as nongenomic signal transduction pathways. In this study, we analyse the in vivo behaviour of ER ligands that stimulate nongenomic ER effects to the same extent as estradiol, but show clearly reduced activation of genomic ER effects in vitro. Using different readout parameters such as morphological changes, cellular proliferation, and target gene induction, we are able to demonstrate that ER ligands with reduced genomic activity in vitro show a better dissociation of bone versus uterine and mammary gland effects than estradiol that stimulates genomic and nongenomic effects to the same extent. We conclude that pathway-selective ER ligands may represent an interesting option for hormone therapy.

  1. OncDRS: An integrative clinical and genomic data platform for enabling translational research and precision medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Orechia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We live in the genomic era of medicine, where a patient's genomic/molecular data is becoming increasingly important for disease diagnosis, identification of targeted therapy, and risk assessment for adverse reactions. However, decoding the genomic test results and integrating it with clinical data for retrospective studies and cohort identification for prospective clinical trials is still a challenging task. In order to overcome these barriers, we developed an overarching enterprise informatics framework for translational research and personalized medicine called Synergistic Patient and Research Knowledge Systems (SPARKS and a suite of tools called Oncology Data Retrieval Systems (OncDRS. OncDRS enables seamless data integration, secure and self-navigated query and extraction of clinical and genomic data from heterogeneous sources. Within a year of release, the system has facilitated more than 1500 research queries and has delivered data for more than 50 research studies.

  2. Beyond the clinic: 'direct-to-consumer' genomic profiling services and pharmacogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prainsack, Barbara; Vayena, Effy

    2013-03-01

    This article provides an overview of commercial pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics testing services offered online. The concept of 'beyond-the-clinic' (BTC) genomic testing is introduced to refer to the variety of formats in which these tests are offered and a typology of BTC models is developed. The authors review such models in relation to tests for individual drug response that are currently on offer. In conclusion, the authors argue that the evolving BTC domain provides opportunities for the pioneering of integrated data repositories, whose gatekeepers are patients or citizens. The authors anticipate that such developments will benefit pharmacogenomics sooner than other areas of medical practice.

  3. Genomic imbalances in patients with a clinical presentation in the spectrum of Cornelia de Lange syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a rare autosomal-dominant disorder characterised by facial dysmorphism, growth and psychomotor developmental delay and skeletal defects. To date, causative mutations in the NIPBL (cohesin regulator) and SMC1A (cohesin structural subunit) genes account for > 50% and 6% of cases, respectively. Methods We recruited 50 patients with a CdLS clinical diagnosis or with features that overlap with CdLS, who were negative for mutations at NIPBL and SMC1A at molecular screening. Chromosomal rearrangements accounting for the clinical diagnosis were screened for using array Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (aCGH). Results Four patients were shown to carry imbalances considered to be candidates for having pathogenic roles in their clinical phenotypes: patient 1 had a 4.2 Mb de novo deletion at chromosome 20q11.2-q12; patient 2 had a 4.8 Mb deletion at chromosome 1p36.23-36.22; patient 3 carried an unbalanced translocation, t(7;17), with a 14 Mb duplication of chromosome 17q24.2-25.3 and a 769 Kb deletion at chromosome 7p22.3; patient 4 had an 880 Kb duplication of chromosome 19p13.3, for which his mother, who had a mild phenotype, was also shown to be a mosaic. Conclusions Notwithstanding the variability in size and gene content of the rearrangements comprising the four different imbalances, they all map to regions containing genes encoding factors involved in cell cycle progression or genome stability. These functional similarities, also exhibited by the known CdLS genes, may explain the phenotypic overlap between the patients included in this study and CdLS. Our findings point to the complexity of the clinical diagnosis of CdLS and confirm the existence of phenocopies, caused by imbalances affecting multiple genomic regions, comprising 8% of patients included in this study, who did not have mutations at NIPBL and SMC1A. Our results suggests that analysis by aCGH should be recommended for CdLS spectrum cases with an

  4. Small-fragment genomic libraries for the display of putative epitopes from clinically significant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henics, T; Winkler, B; Pfeifer, U; Gill, S R; Buschle, M; von Gabain, A; Meinke, A L

    2003-07-01

    Taking advantage of whole genome sequences of bacterial pathogens in many thriving diseases with global impact, we developed a comprehensive screening procedure for the identification of putative vaccine candidate antigens. Importantly, this procedure relies on highly representative small-fragment genomic libraries that are expressed to display frame-selected epitope-size peptides on a bacterial cell surface and to interact directly with carefully selected disease-relevant high-titer sera. Here we describe the generation of small-fragment genomic libraries of Gram-positive and Gram-negative clinically significant pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis, Helicobacter pylori, Chlamydia pneumoniae, the enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, and Campylobacter jejuni. Large-scale sequencing revealed that the libraries, which provide an average of 20-fold coverage, were random and, as demonstrated with two S. aureus libraries, highly representative. Consistent with the comprehensive nature of this approach is the identification of epitopes that reside in both annotated and putatively novel open reading frames. The use of these libraries therefore allows for the rapid and direct identification of immunogenic epitopes with no apparent bias or difficulty that often associate with conventional expression methods.

  5. A Review on Genomics APIs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeswari Swaminathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The constant improvement and falling prices of whole human genome Next Generation Sequencing (NGS has resulted in rapid adoption of genomic information at both clinics and research institutions. Considered together, the complexity of genomics data, due to its large volume and diversity along with the need for genomic data sharing, has resulted in the creation of Application Programming Interface (API for secure, modular, interoperable access to genomic data from different applications, platforms, and even organizations. The Genomics APIs are a set of special protocols that assist software developers in dealing with multiple genomic data sources for building seamless, interoperable applications leading to the advancement of both genomic and clinical research. These APIs help define a standard for retrieval of genomic data from multiple sources as well as to better package genomic information for integration with Electronic Health Records. This review covers three currently available Genomics APIs: a Google Genomics, b SMART Genomics, and c 23andMe. The functionalities, reference implementations (if available and authentication protocols of each API are reviewed. A comparative analysis of the different features across the three APIs is provided in the Discussion section. Though Genomics APIs are still under active development and have yet to reach widespread adoption, they hold the promise to make building of complicated genomics applications easier with downstream constructive effects on healthcare.

  6. Development and clinical application of an integrative genomic approach to personalized cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzilov, Andrew V; Ding, Wei; Fink, Marc Y; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Brohl, Andrew S; Davis, Claire; Lau, Chun Yee; Pandya, Chetanya; Shah, Hardik; Kasai, Yumi; Powell, James; Micchelli, Mark; Castellanos, Rafael; Zhang, Zhongyang; Linderman, Michael; Kinoshita, Yayoi; Zweig, Micol; Raustad, Katie; Cheung, Kakit; Castillo, Diane; Wooten, Melissa; Bourzgui, Imane; Newman, Leah C; Deikus, Gintaras; Mathew, Bino; Zhu, Jun; Glicksberg, Benjamin S; Moe, Aye S; Liao, Jun; Edelmann, Lisa; Dudley, Joel T; Maki, Robert G; Kasarskis, Andrew; Holcombe, Randall F; Mahajan, Milind; Hao, Ke; Reva, Boris; Longtine, Janina; Starcevic, Daniela; Sebra, Robert; Donovan, Michael J; Li, Shuyu; Schadt, Eric E; Chen, Rong

    2016-06-01

    Personalized therapy provides the best outcome of cancer care and its implementation in the clinic has been greatly facilitated by recent convergence of enormous progress in basic cancer research, rapid advancement of new tumor profiling technologies, and an expanding compendium of targeted cancer therapeutics. We developed a personalized cancer therapy (PCT) program in a clinical setting, using an integrative genomics approach to fully characterize the complexity of each tumor. We carried out whole exome sequencing (WES) and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray genotyping on DNA from tumor and patient-matched normal specimens, as well as RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) on available frozen specimens, to identify somatic (tumor-specific) mutations, copy number alterations (CNAs), gene expression changes, gene fusions, and also germline variants. To provide high sensitivity in known cancer mutation hotspots, Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel v2 (CHPv2) was also employed. We integrated the resulting data with cancer knowledge bases and developed a specific workflow for each cancer type to improve interpretation of genomic data. We returned genomics findings to 46 patients and their physicians describing somatic alterations and predicting drug response, toxicity, and prognosis. Mean 17.3 cancer-relevant somatic mutations per patient were identified, 13.3-fold, 6.9-fold, and 4.7-fold more than could have been detected using CHPv2, Oncomine Cancer Panel (OCP), and FoundationOne, respectively. Our approach delineated the underlying genetic drivers at the pathway level and provided meaningful predictions of therapeutic efficacy and toxicity. Actionable alterations were found in 91 % of patients (mean 4.9 per patient, including somatic mutations, copy number alterations, gene expression alterations, and germline variants), a 7.5-fold, 2.0-fold, and 1.9-fold increase over what could have been uncovered by CHPv2, OCP, and FoundationOne, respectively. The findings altered

  7. Somatic Genomics and Clinical Features of Lung Adenocarcinoma: A Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bin; Wang, Mingyi; Pariscenti, Gianluca; Jones, Kristine; Bouk, Aaron J.; Boland, Joseph; Luke, Brian T.; Song, Lei; Duan, Jubao; Liu, Pengyuan; Kohno, Takashi; Chen, Qingrong; Meerzaman, Daoud; Marconett, Crystal; Mills, Ian; Caporaso, Neil E.; Gail, Mitchell H.; Pesatori, Angela C.; Consonni, Dario; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Chanock, Stephen J.; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD) is the most common histologic subtype of lung cancer and has a high risk of distant metastasis at every disease stage. We aimed to characterize the genomic landscape of LUAD and identify mutation signatures associated with tumor progression. Methods and Findings We performed an integrative genomic analysis, incorporating whole exome sequencing (WES), determination of DNA copy number and DNA methylation, and transcriptome sequencing for 101 LUAD samples from the Environment And Genetics in Lung cancer Etiology (EAGLE) study. We detected driver genes by testing whether the nonsynonymous mutation rate was significantly higher than the background mutation rate and replicated our findings in public datasets with 724 samples. We performed subclonality analysis for mutations based on mutant allele data and copy number alteration data. We also tested the association between mutation signatures and clinical outcomes, including distant metastasis, survival, and tumor grade. We identified and replicated two novel candidate driver genes, POU class 4 homeobox 2 (POU4F2) (mutated in 9 [8.9%] samples) and ZKSCAN1 (mutated in 6 [5.9%] samples), and characterized their major deleterious mutations. ZKSCAN1 was part of a mutually exclusive gene set that included the RTK/RAS/RAF pathway genes BRAF, EGFR, KRAS, MET, and NF1, indicating an important driver role for this gene. Moreover, we observed strong associations between methylation in specific genomic regions and somatic mutation patterns. In the tumor evolution analysis, four driver genes had a significantly lower fraction of subclonal mutations (FSM), including TP53 (p = 0.007), KEAP1 (p = 0.012), STK11 (p = 0.0076), and EGFR (p = 0.0078), suggesting a tumor initiation role for these genes. Subclonal mutations were significantly enriched in APOBEC-related signatures (p < 2.5×10−50). The total number of somatic mutations (p = 0.0039) and the fraction of transitions (p = 5.5×10−4) were

  8. A hypervariable genomic island identified in clinical and environmental Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis isolates from Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchini, Andrea; Semmler, Torsten; Mao, Lei; Kumar, Narender; Dematheis, Flavia; Tandon, Kshitij; Peddireddy, Vidyullatha; Ahmed, Niyaz; Lewin, Astrid

    2016-11-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH) is an opportunistic human pathogen widespread in the environment. Genomic islands (GI)s represent a part of the accessory genome of bacteria and influence virulence, drug-resistance or fitness and trigger bacterial evolution. We previously identified a novel GI in four MAH genomes. Here, we further explored this GI in a larger collection of MAH isolates from Germany (n=41), including 20 clinical and 21 environmental isolates. Based on comparative whole genome analysis, we detected this GI in 39/41 (95.1%) isolates. Although all these GIs integrated in the same insertion hotspot, there is high variability in the genetic structure of this GI: eight different types of GI have been identified, designated A-H (sized 6.2-73.3kb). These GIs were arranged as single GI (23/41, 56.1%), combination of two different GIs (14/41, 34.1%) or combination of three different GIs (2/41, 4.9%) in the insertion hotspot. Moreover, two GI types shared more than 80% sequence identity with sequences of M. canettii, responsible for Tuberculosis. A total of 253 different genes were identified in all GIs, among which the previously documented virulence-related genes mmpL10 and mce. The diversity of the GI and the sequence similarity with other mycobacteria suggests cross-species transfer, involving also highly pathogenic species. Shuffling of potential virulence genes such as mmpL10 via this GI may create new pathogens that can cause future outbreaks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Selective Whole-Genome Amplification Is a Robust Method That Enables Scalable Whole-Genome Sequencing of Plasmodium vivax from Unprocessed Clinical Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie N. Cowell

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Whole-genome sequencing (WGS of microbial pathogens from clinical samples is a highly sensitive tool used to gain a deeper understanding of the biology, epidemiology, and drug resistance mechanisms of many infections. However, WGS of organisms which exhibit low densities in their hosts is challenging due to high levels of host genomic DNA (gDNA, which leads to very low coverage of the microbial genome. WGS of Plasmodium vivax, the most widely distributed form of malaria, is especially difficult because of low parasite densities and the lack of an ex vivo culture system. Current techniques used to enrich P. vivax DNA from clinical samples require significant resources or are not consistently effective. Here, we demonstrate that selective whole-genome amplification (SWGA can enrich P. vivax gDNA from unprocessed human blood samples and dried blood spots for high-quality WGS, allowing genetic characterization of isolates that would otherwise have been prohibitively expensive or impossible to sequence. We achieved an average genome coverage of 24×, with up to 95% of the P. vivax core genome covered by ≥5 reads. The single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP characteristics and drug resistance mutations seen were consistent with those of other P. vivax sequences from a similar region in Peru, demonstrating that SWGA produces high-quality sequences for downstream analysis. SWGA is a robust tool that will enable efficient, cost-effective WGS of P. vivax isolates from clinical samples that can be applied to other neglected microbial pathogens.

  10. Selective Whole-Genome Amplification Is a Robust Method That Enables Scalable Whole-Genome Sequencing of Plasmodium vivax from Unprocessed Clinical Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loy, Dorothy E.; Sundararaman, Sesh A.; Valdivia, Hugo; Fisch, Kathleen; Lescano, Andres G.; Baldeviano, G. Christian; Durand, Salomon; Gerbasi, Vince; Sutherland, Colin J.; Nolder, Debbie; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of microbial pathogens from clinical samples is a highly sensitive tool used to gain a deeper understanding of the biology, epidemiology, and drug resistance mechanisms of many infections. However, WGS of organisms which exhibit low densities in their hosts is challenging due to high levels of host genomic DNA (gDNA), which leads to very low coverage of the microbial genome. WGS of Plasmodium vivax, the most widely distributed form of malaria, is especially difficult because of low parasite densities and the lack of an ex vivo culture system. Current techniques used to enrich P. vivax DNA from clinical samples require significant resources or are not consistently effective. Here, we demonstrate that selective whole-genome amplification (SWGA) can enrich P. vivax gDNA from unprocessed human blood samples and dried blood spots for high-quality WGS, allowing genetic characterization of isolates that would otherwise have been prohibitively expensive or impossible to sequence. We achieved an average genome coverage of 24×, with up to 95% of the P. vivax core genome covered by ≥5 reads. The single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) characteristics and drug resistance mutations seen were consistent with those of other P. vivax sequences from a similar region in Peru, demonstrating that SWGA produces high-quality sequences for downstream analysis. SWGA is a robust tool that will enable efficient, cost-effective WGS of P. vivax isolates from clinical samples that can be applied to other neglected microbial pathogens. PMID:28174312

  11. Exploring the potential duty of care in clinical genomics under UK law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploem, Corrette; Chico, Victoria; Ormondroyd, Elizabeth; Hall, Alison; Wallace, Susan; Fay, Michael; Goodwin, Deirdre; Bell, Jessica; Phillips, Simon; Taylor, Jenny C.; Hennekam, Raoul; Kaye, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide sequencing technologies are beginning to be used in projects that have both clinical diagnostic and research components. The clinical application of this technology, which generates a huge amount of information of varying diagnostic certainty, involves addressing a number of challenges to establish appropriate standards. In this article, we explore the way that UK law may respond to three of these key challenges and could establish new legal duties in relation to feedback of findings that are unrelated to the presenting condition (secondary, additional or incidental findings); duties towards genetic relatives as well as the patient and duties on the part of researchers and professionals who do not have direct contact with patients. When considering these issues, the courts will take account of European and international comparisons, developing guidance and relevant ethical, social and policy factors. The UK courts will also be strongly influenced by precedent set in case law. PMID:28943725

  12. BioStar models of clinical and genomic data for biomedical data warehouse design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangjiang; Zhang, Aidong; Ramanathan, Murali

    2005-01-01

    Biomedical research is now generating large amounts of data, ranging from clinical test results to microarray gene expression profiles. The scale and complexity of these datasets give rise to substantial challenges in data management and analysis. It is highly desirable that data warehousing and online analytical processing technologies can be applied to biomedical data integration and mining. The major difficulty probably lies in the task of capturing and modelling diverse biological objects and their complex relationships. This paper describes multidimensional data modelling for biomedical data warehouse design. Since the conventional models such as star schema appear to be insufficient for modelling clinical and genomic data, we develop a new model called BioStar schema. The new model can capture the rich semantics of biomedical data and provide greater extensibility for the fast evolution of biological research methodologies.

  13. Open-Access Cancer Genomics - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The completion of the Human Genome Project sparked a revolution in high-throughput genomics applied towards deciphering genetically complex diseases, like cancer. Now, almost 10 years later, we have a mountain of genomics data on many different cancer type

  14. Integrated clinical, whole-genome, and transcriptome analysis of multisampled lethal metastatic prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bova, G. Steven; Kallio, Heini M.L.; Annala, Matti; Kivinummi, Kati; Högnäs, Gunilla; Häyrynen, Sergei; Rantapero, Tommi; Kivinen, Virpi; Isaacs, William B.; Tolonen, Teemu; Nykter, Matti; Visakorpi, Tapio

    2016-01-01

    We report the first combined analysis of whole-genome sequence, detailed clinical history, and transcriptome sequence of multiple prostate cancer metastases in a single patient (A21). Whole-genome and transcriptome sequence was obtained from nine anatomically separate metastases, and targeted DNA sequencing was performed in cancerous and noncancerous foci within the primary tumor specimen removed 5 yr before death. Transcriptome analysis revealed increased expression of androgen receptor (AR)-regulated genes in liver metastases that harbored an AR p.L702H mutation, suggesting a dominant effect by the mutation despite being present in only one of an estimated 16 copies per cell. The metastases harbored several alterations to the PI3K/AKT pathway, including a clonal truncal mutation in PIK3CG and present in all metastatic sites studied. The list of truncal genomic alterations shared by all metastases included homozygous deletion of TP53, hemizygous deletion of RB1 and CHD1, and amplification of FGFR1. If the patient were treated today, given this knowledge, the use of second-generation androgen-directed therapies, cessation of glucocorticoid administration, and therapeutic inhibition of the PI3K/AKT pathway or FGFR1 receptor could provide personalized benefit. Three previously unreported truncal clonal missense mutations (ABCC4 p.R891L, ALDH9A1 p.W89R, and ASNA1 p.P75R) were expressed at the RNA level and assessed as druggable. The truncal status of mutations may be critical for effective actionability and merit further study. Our findings suggest that a large set of deeply analyzed cases could serve as a powerful guide to more effective prostate cancer basic science and personalized cancer medicine clinical trials. PMID:27148588

  15. Pediatric Brain Tumors: Innovative Genomic Information Is Transforming the Diagnostic and Clinical Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajjar, Amar; Bowers, Daniel C; Karajannis, Matthias A; Leary, Sarah; Witt, Hendrik; Gottardo, Nicholas G

    2015-09-20

    Pediatric neuro-oncology has undergone an exciting and dramatic transformation during the past 5 years. This article summarizes data from collaborative group and institutional trials that have advanced the science of pediatric brain tumors and survival of patients with these tumors. Advanced genomic analysis of the entire spectrum of pediatric brain tumors has heralded an era in which stakeholders in the pediatric neuro-oncology community are being challenged to reconsider their current research and diagnostic and treatment strategies. The incorporation of this new information into the next-generation treatment protocols will unleash new challenges. This review succinctly summarizes the key advances in our understanding of the common pediatric brain tumors (ie, medulloblastoma, low- and high-grade gliomas, diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, and ependymoma) and some selected rare tumors (ie, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor and CNS primitive neuroectodermal tumor). The potential impact of this new information on future clinical protocols also is discussed. Cutting-edge genomics technologies and the information gained from such studies are facilitating the identification of molecularly defined subgroups within patients with particular pediatric brain tumors. The number of evaluable patients in each subgroup is small, particularly in the subgroups of rare diseases. Therefore, international collaboration will be crucial to draw meaningful conclusions about novel approaches to treating pediatric brain tumors. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  16. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults – from genomics to the clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenderian SS

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Saad Sirop Kenderian, Mark R Litzow Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in adolescents and young adults (AYA represents a unique and challenging disease entity. Despite the recent improvement of survival in this population over the last decade, it is still lagging behind the excellent cure rates obtained in pediatric ALL. This special population of AYA receives care from pediatric as well as adult hematologists and can be treated on pediatric or adult protocols. There is a substantial difference in disease biology, response to chemotherapy, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation between pediatric and AYA patients. This review discusses current controversies in the management of AYA, outcomes following treatment with pediatric and adult protocols, and the role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. It focuses on the unique clinical, biological, and socioeconomic characteristics of this population that might partly explain the inferior outcomes. This review also explores recent advances in genomic profiling and emerging treatments in ALL. Keywords: novel agents, monoclonal antibodies, stem cell transplantation, bone marrow transplantation, Philadelphia positive ALL, genomic profile

  17. Genome-wide association study of Lp-PLA(2 activity and mass in the Framingham Heart Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Suchindran

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2 (Lp-PLA(2 is an emerging risk factor and therapeutic target for cardiovascular disease. The activity and mass of this enzyme are heritable traits, but major genetic determinants have not been explored in a systematic, genome-wide fashion. We carried out a genome-wide association study of Lp-PLA(2 activity and mass in 6,668 Caucasian subjects from the population-based Framingham Heart Study. Clinical data and genotypes from the Affymetrix 550K SNP array were obtained from the open-access Framingham SHARe project. Each polymorphism that passed quality control was tested for associations with Lp-PLA(2 activity and mass using linear mixed models implemented in the R statistical package, accounting for familial correlations, and controlling for age, sex, smoking, lipid-lowering-medication use, and cohort. For Lp-PLA(2 activity, polymorphisms at four independent loci reached genome-wide significance, including the APOE/APOC1 region on chromosome 19 (p = 6 x 10(-24; CELSR2/PSRC1 on chromosome 1 (p = 3 x 10(-15; SCARB1 on chromosome 12 (p = 1x10(-8 and ZNF259/BUD13 in the APOA5/APOA1 gene region on chromosome 11 (p = 4 x 10(-8. All of these remained significant after accounting for associations with LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, or triglycerides. For Lp-PLA(2 mass, 12 SNPs achieved genome-wide significance, all clustering in a region on chromosome 6p12.3 near the PLA2G7 gene. Our analyses demonstrate that genetic polymorphisms may contribute to inter-individual variation in Lp-PLA(2 activity and mass.

  18. Genome-Wide Association Study of Lp-PLA2 Activity and Mass in the Framingham Heart Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchindran, Sunil; Rivedal, David; Guyton, John R.; Milledge, Tom; Gao, Xiaoyi; Benjamin, Ashlee; Rowell, Jennifer; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.; McCarthy, Jeanette J.

    2010-01-01

    Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) is an emerging risk factor and therapeutic target for cardiovascular disease. The activity and mass of this enzyme are heritable traits, but major genetic determinants have not been explored in a systematic, genome-wide fashion. We carried out a genome-wide association study of Lp-PLA2 activity and mass in 6,668 Caucasian subjects from the population-based Framingham Heart Study. Clinical data and genotypes from the Affymetrix 550K SNP array were obtained from the open-access Framingham SHARe project. Each polymorphism that passed quality control was tested for associations with Lp-PLA2 activity and mass using linear mixed models implemented in the R statistical package, accounting for familial correlations, and controlling for age, sex, smoking, lipid-lowering-medication use, and cohort. For Lp-PLA2 activity, polymorphisms at four independent loci reached genome-wide significance, including the APOE/APOC1 region on chromosome 19 (p = 6×10−24); CELSR2/PSRC1 on chromosome 1 (p = 3×10−15); SCARB1 on chromosome 12 (p = 1×10−8) and ZNF259/BUD13 in the APOA5/APOA1 gene region on chromosome 11 (p = 4×10−8). All of these remained significant after accounting for associations with LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, or triglycerides. For Lp-PLA2 mass, 12 SNPs achieved genome-wide significance, all clustering in a region on chromosome 6p12.3 near the PLA2G7 gene. Our analyses demonstrate that genetic polymorphisms may contribute to inter-individual variation in Lp-PLA2 activity and mass. PMID:20442857

  19. Radiation-enhanced murine sarcoma virus genome rescue activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, K.S.S.

    1975-01-01

    Although the doses of x ray (312-2,500 R) used for irradiation of cells caused impairment of DNA synthesis and cell replication, co-cultivation of x-irradiated MuLV-carrier cells with un-irradiated nonproducer cells of MSV-induced tumour resulted in as much as a 20-fold increase in MSV retrieval compared with the un-irradiated control. The enhancement was apparent also as a 3-fold increase in the number of cells producing MSV (infectious centers) in the co-cultivation plate. This suggested that the MSV genome rescue efficiency in terms of MSV per cell, as well as the number of cells producing MSV, increased markedly. By uridine-/sup 3/H-labeling and focus assay experiments, evidence was presented which suggested that an increase in MSV/MuLV ratio in the culture fluid of co-cultivation plates was obtained when the MuLV-carrier cells were pre-irradiated. By contrast, x irradiation of the nonproducer cells prior to co-cultivation caused only reductions in MSV genome rescue efficiency. However, use of x irradiated MuLV-carrier cells for co-cultivation with x-irradiated nonproducer cells restored this efficiency to some extent. The dose-survival curve of the nonproducer cells was not much different from those of the MuLV-carrier cells after x irradiation. It was suggested that the viability of non-producer cells was required for replication of MuLV transferred from the carrier cells and for subsequent MSV genome rescue.

  20. Use of Whole Genome Sequencing for Diagnosis and Discovery in the Cancer Genetics Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha B. Foley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the potential of whole-genome sequencing (WGS to improve patient diagnosis and care, the empirical value of WGS in the cancer genetics clinic is unknown. We performed WGS on members of two cohorts of cancer genetics patients: those with BRCA1/2 mutations (n = 176 and those without (n = 82. Initial analysis of potentially pathogenic variants (PPVs, defined as nonsynonymous variants with allele frequency < 1% in ESP6500 in 163 clinically-relevant genes suggested that WGS will provide useful clinical results. This is despite the fact that a majority of PPVs were novel missense variants likely to be classified as variants of unknown significance (VUS. Furthermore, previously reported pathogenic missense variants did not always associate with their predicted diseases in our patients. This suggests that the clinical use of WGS will require large-scale efforts to consolidate WGS and patient data to improve accuracy of interpretation of rare variants. While loss-of-function (LoF variants represented only a small fraction of PPVs, WGS identified additional cancer risk LoF PPVs in patients with known BRCA1/2 mutations and led to cancer risk diagnoses in 21% of non-BRCA cancer genetics patients after expanding our analysis to 3209 ClinVar genes. These data illustrate how WGS can be used to improve our ability to discover patients' cancer genetic risks.

  1. Qualification study of two genomic DNA extraction methods in different clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Alireza; Shamaei, Masoud; Mohammadi Ziazi, Leila; Pourabdollah, Mihan; Dorudinia, Atosa; Seyedmehdi, Seyed Mohammad; Karimi, Shirin

    2014-01-01

    The purity of genomic DNA (gDNA) extracted from different clinical specimens optimizes sensitivity of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. This study attempted to compare two different DNA extraction techniques namely salting-out and classic phenol-chloroform. Qualification of two different DNA extraction techniques for 634 clinical specimens highly suspected of having mycobacterial infection was performed. Genomic DNA was extracted from 330 clinical samples using phenol-chloroform and 304 by non-toxic salting-out. Qualification of obtained gDNA was done through amplification of internal controls, β-actin and β-globin. β-actin-positive was detected in 279/330 (84%) and 272/304 (89%) samples by phenol-chloroform technique and salting-out, respectively. PCR inhibitor was found for the gDNA of 13/304 (4%) patient samples were negative by β-actin and β-globin tests via salting-out technique in comparison with gDNAs from 27/330 (8.5%) samples extracted by phenol-chloroform procedure. No statistically significant difference was found between phenol-chloroform technique and salting-out for 385 sputum, 29 bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), 105 gastric washing, and 38 body fluid (P=0.04) samples. This illustrates that both techniques have the same quality for extracting gDNA. This study discloses salting-out as a non-toxic DNA extraction procedure with a superior time-efficiency and cost-effectiveness in comparison with phenol-chloroform and it can be routinely used in resource-limited laboratory settings.

  2. Investigations into genome diversity of Haemophilus influenzae using whole genome sequencing of clinical isolates and laboratory transformants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Power Peter M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haemophilus influenzae is an important human commensal pathogen associated with significant levels of disease. High-throughput DNA sequencing was used to investigate differences in genome content within this species. Results Genomic DNA sequence was obtained from 85 strains of H. influenzae and from other related species, selected based on geographical site of isolation, disease association and documented genotypic and phenotypic differences. When compared by Mauve alignment these indicated groupings of H. influenzae that were consistent with previously published analyses; capsule expressing strains fell into two distinct groups and those of serotype b (Hib were found in two closely positioned lineages. For 18 Hib strains representing both lineages we found many discrete regions (up to 40% of the total genome displaying sequence variation when compared to a common reference strain. Evidence that this naturally occurring pattern of inter-strain variation in H. influenzae can be mediated by transformation was obtained through sequencing DNA obtained from a pool of 200 independent transformants of a recipient (strain Rd using donor DNA from a heterologous Hib strain (Eagan. Conclusion Much of the inter-strain variation in genome sequence in H. influenzae is likely the result of inter-strain exchanges of DNA, most plausibly through transformation.

  3. The Third International Genomic Medicine Conference (3rd IGMC, 2015: overall activities and outcome highlights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Abu-Elmagd

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Third International Genomic Medicine Conference (3rd IGMC was organised by the Centre of Excellence in Genomic Medicine Research (CEGMR at the King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA. This conference is a continuation of a series of meetings, which began with the first International Genomic Medicine Conference (1st IGMC, 2011 followed by the second International Genomic Medicine Conference (2nd IGMC, 2013. The 3rd IGMC meeting presented as a timely opportunity to bring scientists from across the world to gather, discuss, and exchange recent advances in the field of genomics and genetics in general as well as practical information on using these new technologies in different basic and clinical applications. The meeting undoubtedly inspired young male and female Saudi researchers, who attended the conference in large numbers, as evidenced by the oversubscribed oral and poster presentations. The conference also witnessed the launch of the first content for npj Genomic Medicine, a high quality new journal was established in partnership by CEGMR with Springer Nature and published as part of the Nature Partner Journal series. Here, we present a brief summary report of the 2-day meeting including highlights from the oral presentations, poster presentations, workshops, poster prize-winners and comments from the distinguished scientists.

  4. The Third International Genomic Medicine Conference (3rd IGMC, 2015): overall activities and outcome highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Elmagd, Muhammad; Assidi, Mourad; Dallol, Ashraf; Buhmeida, Abdelbaset; Pushparaj, Peter Natesan; Kalamegam, Gauthaman; Al-Hamzi, Emad; Shay, Jerry W; Scherer, Stephen W; Agarwal, Ashok; Budowle, Bruce; Gari, Mamdooh; Chaudhary, Adeel; Abuzenadah, Adel; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed

    2016-10-17

    The Third International Genomic Medicine Conference (3(rd) IGMC) was organised by the Centre of Excellence in Genomic Medicine Research (CEGMR) at the King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). This conference is a continuation of a series of meetings, which began with the first International Genomic Medicine Conference (1(st) IGMC, 2011) followed by the second International Genomic Medicine Conference (2(nd) IGMC, 2013). The 3(rd) IGMC meeting presented as a timely opportunity to bring scientists from across the world to gather, discuss, and exchange recent advances in the field of genomics and genetics in general as well as practical information on using these new technologies in different basic and clinical applications. The meeting undoubtedly inspired young male and female Saudi researchers, who attended the conference in large numbers, as evidenced by the oversubscribed oral and poster presentations. The conference also witnessed the launch of the first content for npj Genomic Medicine, a high quality new journal was established in partnership by CEGMR with Springer Nature and published as part of the Nature Partner Journal series. Here, we present a brief summary report of the 2-day meeting including highlights from the oral presentations, poster presentations, workshops, poster prize-winners and comments from the distinguished scientists.

  5. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Takashi; Enokida, Hideki; Hayami, Hiroshi; Kawahara, Motoshi; Nakagawa, Masayuki

    2012-04-01

    Coincident with their worldwide use, resistance to fluoroquinolones in Escherichia coli has increased. To identify the gene expression profiles underlying fluoroquinolone resistance, we carried out genome-wide transcriptome analysis of fluoroquinolone-sensitive E. coli. Four fluoroquinolone-sensitive E. coli and five fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli clinical isolates were subjected to complementary deoxyribonucleic acid microarray analysis. Some upregulated genes' expression was verified by real-time polymerase chain reaction using 104 E. coli clinical isolates, and minimum inhibitory concentration tests were carried out by using their transformants. A total of 40 genes were significantly upregulated in fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli isolates (P fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli. One of the phage shock protein operons, pspC, was significantly upregulated in 50 fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli isolates (P fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli. Deoxyribonucleic acid adenine methyltransferase (dam), which represses type I fimbriae genes, was significantly upregulated in the clinical fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli isolates (P = 0.007). We established pspC- and dam-expressing E. coli transformants from fluoroquinolone-sensitive E. coli, and the minimum inhibitory concentration tests showed that the transformants acquired fluoroquinolone resistance, suggesting that upregulation of these genes contributes to acquiring fluoroquinolone resistance. Upregulation of psp operones and dam underlying pilus operons downregulation might be associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli. © 2011 The Japanese Urological Association.

  6. Clinical, polysomnographic and genome-wide association analyses of narcolepsy with cataplexy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luca, Gianina; Haba-Rubio, José; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2013-01-01

    diagnosed according to International Classification of Sleep Disorders-2. Demographic and clinical characteristics, polysomnography and multiple sleep latency test data, hypocretin-1 levels, and genome-wide genotypes were available. We found a significantly lower age at sleepiness onset (men versus women...... diagnostic delay were young age at diagnosis, cataplexy as the first symptom and higher frequency of cataplexy attacks. The mean multiple sleep latency negatively correlated with Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and with the number of sleep-onset rapid eye movement periods (SOREMPs), but none...... of the polysomnographic variables was associated with subjective or objective measures of sleepiness. Variant rs2859998 in UBXN2B gene showed a strong association (P = 1.28E-07) with the age at onset of excessive daytime sleepiness, and rs12425451 near the transcription factor TEAD4 (P = 1.97E-07) with the age at onset...

  7. Genomic variant annotation workflow for clinical applications [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Thurnherr

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Annotation and interpretation of DNA aberrations identified through next-generation sequencing is becoming an increasingly important task. Even more so in the context of data analysis pipelines for medical applications, where genomic aberrations are associated with phenotypic and clinical features. Here we describe a workflow to identify potential gene targets in aberrated genes or pathways and their corresponding drugs. To this end, we provide the R/Bioconductor package rDGIdb, an R wrapper to query the drug-gene interaction database (DGIdb. DGIdb accumulates drug-gene interaction data from 15 different resources and allows filtering on different levels. The rDGIdb package makes these resources and tools available to R users. Moreover, rDGIdb queries can be automated through incorporation of the rDGIdb package into NGS sequencing pipelines.

  8. Complete genome sequence of a clinical Bordetella pertussis isolate from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Gabriel N Andrade

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There has been a resurgence in the number of pertussis cases in Brazil and around the world. Here, the genome of a clinical Bordetella pertussis strain (Bz181 that was recently isolated in Brazil is reported. Analysis of the virulence-associated genes defining the pre- and post-vaccination lineages revealed the presence of the prn2-ptxS1A-fim3B-ptxP3 allelic profile in Bz181, which is characteristic of the current pandemic lineage. A putative metallo-β-lactamase gene presenting all of the conserved zinc-binding motifs that characterise the catalytic site was identified, in addition to a multidrug efflux pump of the RND family that could confer resistance to erythromycin, which is the antibiotic of choice for treating pertussis disease.

  9. Complete genome sequence of a clinical Bordetella pertussis isolate from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Bruno Gabriel N; Marin, Michel F Abanto; Cambuy, Diego Duque; Fonseca, Erica Lourenço; Souza, Nadjla Ferreira; Vicente, Ana Carolina P

    2014-11-01

    There has been a resurgence in the number of pertussis cases in Brazil and around the world. Here, the genome of a clinical Bordetella pertussis strain (Bz181) that was recently isolated in Brazil is reported. Analysis of the virulence-associated genes defining the pre- and post-vaccination lineages revealed the presence of the prn2-ptxS1A-fim3B-ptxP3 allelic profile in Bz181, which is characteristic of the current pandemic lineage. A putative metallo-β-lactamase gene presenting all of the conserved zinc-binding motifs that characterise the catalytic site was identified, in addition to a multidrug efflux pump of the RND family that could confer resistance to erythromycin, which is the antibiotic of choice for treating pertussis disease.

  10. Characterization of neurophysiologic and neurocognitive biomarkers for use in genomic and clinical outcome studies of schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A Light

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endophenotypes are quantitative, laboratory-based measures representing intermediate links in the pathways between genetic variation and the clinical expression of a disorder. Ideal endophenotypes exhibit deficits in patients, are stable over time and across shifts in psychopathology, and are suitable for repeat testing. Unfortunately, many leading candidate endophenotypes in schizophrenia have not been fully characterized simultaneously in large cohorts of patients and controls across these properties. The objectives of this study were to characterize the extent to which widely-used neurophysiological and neurocognitive endophenotypes are: 1 associated with schizophrenia, 2 stable over time, independent of state-related changes, and 3 free of potential practice/maturation or differential attrition effects in schizophrenia patients (SZ and nonpsychiatric comparison subjects (NCS. Stability of clinical and functional measures was also assessed. METHODS: Participants (SZ n = 341; NCS n = 205 completed a battery of neurophysiological (MMN, P3a, P50 and N100 indices, PPI, startle habituation, antisaccade, neurocognitive (WRAT-3 Reading, LNS-forward, LNS-reorder, WCST-64, CVLT-II. In addition, patients were rated on clinical symptom severity as well as functional capacity and status measures (GAF, UPSA, SOF. 223 subjects (SZ n = 163; NCS n = 58 returned for retesting after 1 year. RESULTS: Most neurophysiological and neurocognitive measures exhibited medium-to-large deficits in schizophrenia, moderate-to-substantial stability across the retest interval, and were independent of fluctuations in clinical status. Clinical symptoms and functional measures also exhibited substantial stability. A Longitudinal Endophenotype Ranking System (LERS was created to rank neurophysiological and neurocognitive biomarkers according to their effect sizes across endophenotype criteria. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of neurophysiological and

  11. Novel phenotypes and loci identified through clinical genomics approaches to pediatric cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nisha; Anand, Deepti; Monies, Dorota; Maddirevula, Sateesh; Khan, Arif O; Algoufi, Talal; Alowain, Mohammed; Faqeih, Eissa; Alshammari, Muneera; Qudair, Ahmed; Alsharif, Hadeel; Aljubran, Fatimah; Alsaif, Hessa S; Ibrahim, Niema; Abdulwahab, Firdous M; Hashem, Mais; Alsedairy, Haifa; Aldahmesh, Mohammed A; Lachke, Salil A; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric cataract is highly heterogeneous clinically and etiologically. While mostly isolated, cataract can be part of many multisystem disorders, further complicating the diagnostic process. In this study, we applied genomic tools in the form of a multi-gene panel as well as whole-exome sequencing on unselected cohort of pediatric cataract (166 patients from 74 families). Mutations in previously reported cataract genes were identified in 58% for a total of 43 mutations, including 15 that are novel. GEMIN4 was independently mutated in families with a syndrome of cataract, global developmental delay with or without renal involvement. We also highlight a recognizable syndrome that resembles galactosemia (a fulminant infantile liver disease with cataract) caused by biallelic mutations in CYP51A1. A founder mutation in RIC1 (KIAA1432) was identified in patients with cataract, brain atrophy, microcephaly with or without cleft lip and palate. For non-syndromic pediatric cataract, we map a novel locus in a multiplex consanguineous family on 4p15.32 where exome sequencing revealed a homozygous truncating mutation in TAPT1. We report two further candidates that are biallelically inactivated each in a single cataract family: TAF1A (cataract with global developmental delay) and WDR87 (non-syndromic cataract). In addition to positional mapping data, we use iSyTE developmental lens expression and gene-network analysis to corroborate the proposed link between the novel candidate genes and cataract. Our study expands the phenotypic, allelic and locus heterogeneity of pediatric cataract. The high diagnostic yield of clinical genomics supports the adoption of this approach in this patient group.

  12. Genomic characterization of group C Orthobunyavirus reference strains and recent South American clinical isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Hang

    Full Text Available Group C orthobunyaviruses (family Bunyaviridae, genus Orthobunyavirus, discovered in the 1950s, are vector-borne human pathogens in the Americas. Currently there is a gap in genomic information for group C viruses. In this study, we obtained complete coding region sequences of reference strains of Caraparu (CARV, Oriboca (ORIV, Marituba (MTBV and Madrid (MADV viruses, and five clinical isolates from Peru and Bolivia, using an unbiased de novo approach consisting of random reverse transcription, random anchored PCR amplification, and high throughput pyrosequencing. The small, medium, and large segments encode for a 235 amino acid nucleocapsid protein, an approximately 1430 amino acid surface glycoprotein polyprotein precursor, and a 2248 amino acid RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, respectively. Additionally, the S segment encodes for an 83 amino acid non-structural protein, although this protein is truncated or silenced in some isolates. Phylogenetically, three clinical isolates clustered with CARV, one clustered with MTBV, and one isolate appeared to be a reassortant or a genetic drift resulted from the high variability of the medium segment which was also seen in a few other orthobunyaviruses. These data represent the first complete coding region sequences for this serocomplex of pathogenic orthobunyaviruses. The genome-wide phylogeny of reference strains is consistent with the antigenic properties of the viruses reported in the original serological studies conducted in the 1960s. Comparative analysis of conserved protein regions across group C virus strains and the other orthobunyavirus groups revealed that these group C viruses contain characteristic domains of potential structural and functional significance. Our results provide the basis for the developments of diagnostics, further genetic analyses, and future epidemiologic studies of group C viruses.

  13. A 'joint venture' model of recontacting in clinical genomics: challenges for responsible implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheensa, Sandi; Carrieri, Daniele; Kelly, Susan; Clarke, Angus; Doheny, Shane; Turnpenny, Peter; Lucassen, Anneke

    2017-07-01

    Advances in genomics often lead healthcare professionals (HCPs) to learn new information, e.g., about reinterpreted variants that could have clinical significance for patients seen previously. A question arises of whether HCPs should recontact these former patients. We present some findings interrogating the views of patients (or parents of patients) with a rare or undiagnosed condition about how such recontacting might be organised ethically and practically. Forty-one interviews were analysed thematically. Participants suggested a 'joint venture' model in which efforts to recontact are shared with HCPs. Some proposed an ICT-approach involving an electronic health record that automatically alerts them to potentially relevant updates. The need for rigorous privacy controls and transparency about who could access their data was emphasised. Importantly, these findings highlight that the lack of clarity about recontacting is a symptom of a wider problem: the lack of necessary infrastructure to pool genomic data responsibly, to aggregate it with other health data, and to enable patients/parents to receive updates. We hope that our findings will instigate a debate about the way responsibilities for recontacting under any joint venture model could be allocated, as well as the limitations and normative implications of using ICT as a solution to this intractable problem. As a first step to delineating responsibilities in the clinical setting, we suggest HCPs should routinely discuss recontacting with patients/parents, including the new information that should trigger a HCP to initiate recontact, as part of the consent process for genetic testing. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative genomics of Tunisian Leishmania major isolates causing human cutaneous leishmaniasis with contrasting clinical severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghouila, Amel; Guerfali, Fatma Z; Atri, Chiraz; Bali, Aymen; Attia, Hanene; Sghaier, Rabiaa M; Mkannez, Ghada; Dickens, Nicholas J; Laouini, Dhafer

    2017-06-01

    Zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (L.) major parasites affects urban and suburban areas in the center and south of Tunisia where the disease is endemo-epidemic. Several cases were reported in human patients for which infection due to L. major induced lesions with a broad range of severity. However, very little is known about the mechanisms underlying this diversity. Our hypothesis is that parasite genomic variability could, in addition to the host immunological background, contribute to the intra-species clinical variability observed in patients and explain the lesion size differences observed in the experimental model. Based on several epidemiological, in vivo and in vitro experiments, we focused on two clinical isolates showing contrasted severity in patients and BALB/c experimental mice model. We used DNA-seq as a high-throughput technology to facilitate the identification of genetic variants with discriminating potential between both isolates. Our results demonstrate that various levels of heterogeneity could be found between both L. major isolates in terms of chromosome or gene copy number variation (CNV), and that the intra-species divergence could surprisingly be related to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and Insertion/Deletion (InDels) events. Interestingly, we particularly focused here on genes affected by both types of variants and correlated them with the observed gene CNV. Whether these differences are sufficient to explain the severity in patients is obviously still open to debate, but we do believe that additional layers of -omic information is needed to complement the genomic screen in order to draw a more complete map of severity determinants.

  15. Genomics-based early-phase clinical trials in oncology: recommendations from the task force on Methodology for the Development of Innovative Cancer Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Stephen V; Miller, Vincent A; Lobbezoo, Marinus W; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2014-11-01

    The Methodology for the Development of Innovative Cancer Therapies (MDICT) task force discussed incorporation of genomic profiling into early (Phase I and II) clinical trials in oncology. The task force reviewed the challenges of standardising genomics data in a manner conducive to conducting clinical trials. Current barriers to successful and efficient implementation were identified and discussed, as well as the methods of genomic analysis, the proper setting for study and strategies to facilitate timely completion of genomics-based studies. The importance of properly capturing and cataloguing outcomes was also discussed. Several recommendations regarding the use of genomics in these trials are provided.

  16. Zelda overcomes the high intrinsic nucleosome barrier at enhancers during Drosophila zygotic genome activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yujia; Nien, Chung-Yi; Chen, Kai; Liu, Hsiao-Yun; Johnston, Jeff; Zeitlinger, Julia; Rushlow, Christine

    2015-11-01

    The Drosophila genome activator Vielfaltig (Vfl), also known as Zelda (Zld), is thought to prime enhancers for activation by patterning transcription factors (TFs). Such priming is accompanied by increased chromatin accessibility, but the mechanisms by which this occurs are poorly understood. Here, we analyze the effect of Zld on genome-wide nucleosome occupancy and binding of the patterning TF Dorsal (Dl). Our results show that early enhancers are characterized by an intrinsically high nucleosome barrier. Zld tackles this nucleosome barrier through local depletion of nucleosomes with the effect being dependent on the number and position of Zld motifs. Without Zld, Dl binding decreases at enhancers and redistributes to open regions devoid of enhancer activity. We propose that Zld primes enhancers by lowering the high nucleosome barrier just enough to assist TFs in accessing their binding motifs and promoting spatially controlled enhancer activation if the right patterning TFs are present. We envision that genome activators in general will utilize this mechanism to activate the zygotic genome in a robust and precise manner.

  17. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Pharmacologically active: clinical trials and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-01-22

    Jan 22, 2008 ... Manufacturers Association, on the basis of a survey of its members ... from this information. The US database, on the other hand, clearly identifies 172 ... workforce involved in clinical trials outside the public sector. This figure ...

  18. Analyzing SNOMED CT and HL7 terminology binding for semantic interoperability on post-genomic clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Santiago; Perez-Rey, David; Alonso-Calvo, Raul; Rico-Diez, Antonio; Bucur, Anca; Claerhout, Brecht; Maojo, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Current post-genomic clinical trials in cancer involve the collaboration of several institutions. Multi-centric retrospective analysis requires advanced methods to ensure semantic interoperability. In this scenario, the objective of the EU funded INTEGRATE project, is to provide an infrastructure to share knowledge and data in post-genomic breast cancer clinical trials. This paper presents the process carried out in this project, to bind domain terminologies in the area, such as SNOMED CT, with the HL7 v3 Reference Information Model (RIM). The proposed terminology binding follow the HL7 recommendations, but should also consider important issues such as overlapping concepts and domain terminology coverage. Although there are limitations due to the large heterogeneity of the data in the area, the proposed process has been successfully applied within the context of the INTEGRATE project. An improvement in semantic interoperability of patient data from modern breast cancer clinical trials, aims to enhance the clinical practice in oncology.

  19. Differential clustering of sperm subpopulations in infertile males with clinical varicocele and carriers of rearranged genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Peiró, Agustín; Oliver-Bonet, María; Navarro, Joaquima; Abad, Carlos; Amengual, María José; López-Fernández, Carmen; Gosálvez, Jaime; Benet, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Some methods for determining sperm DNA fragmentation, such as the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) and the sperm chromatin dispersion test (SCD), provide additional information about particular subgroups of spermatozoa with specific irregularities. Thus, SCSA recognizes a specific sperm subpopulation, the high-DNA stainability sperm subpopulation (HDS), and SCD recognizes the so-called DNA-degraded sperm (DDS) subpopulation. Although some studies associate the presence of these subpopulations with specific aspects related to infertility, the relationship between both sperm subpopulations and their preponderance in specific clinical groups of infertile males has not been extensively investigated. In this study, HDS and DDS subpopulations were determined in a total of 37 human males: 8 males with proven fertility, 9 infertile males with asthenoteratozoospermia, 10 carriers of chromosomal reorganizations, and 10 infertile males with clinical varicocele. Results showed a significant increase of the DDS subpopulation (P HDS subpopulation (P = .542), but the highest values were found in the varicocele and rearranged-genome groups. However, no correlation between the HDS and DDS subpopulations were found (r = 0.196; P = .244), suggesting that both represent a different class of sperm subpopulation in the ejaculate. A significant increase in HDS, and especially DDS, can be associated with the presence of varicocele or the rearrangement of chromosomes. Specific diagnostic tests to confirm the diagnosis must be performed in patients with increased DDS and HDS values.

  20. Biomedical informatics: development of a comprehensive data warehouse for clinical and genomic breast cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hai; Brzeski, Henry; Hutchins, Joe; Ramaraj, Mohan; Qu, Long; Xiong, Richard; Kalathil, Surendran; Kato, Rand; Tenkillaya, Santhosh; Carney, Jerry; Redd, Rosann; Arkalgudvenkata, Sheshkumar; Shahzad, Kashif; Scott, Richard; Cheng, Hui; Meadow, Stephen; McMichael, John; Sheu, Shwu-Lin; Rosendale, David; Kvecher, Leonid; Ahern, Stephen; Yang, Song; Zhang, Yonghong; Jordan, Rick; Somiari, Stella B; Hooke, Jeffrey; Shriver, Craig D; Somiari, Richard I; Liebman, Michael N

    2004-10-01

    The Windber Research Institute is an integrated high-throughput research center employing clinical, genomic and proteomic platforms to produce terabyte levels of data. We use biomedical informatics technologies to integrate all of these operations. This report includes information on a multi-year, multi-phase hybrid data warehouse project currently under development in the Institute. The purpose of the warehouse is to host the terabyte-level of internal experimentally generated data as well as data from public sources. We have previously reported on the phase I development, which integrated limited internal data sources and selected public databases. Currently, we are completing phase II development, which integrates our internal automated data sources and develops visualization tools to query across these data types. This paper summarizes our clinical and experimental operations, the data warehouse development, and the challenges we have faced. In phase III we plan to federate additional manual internal and public data sources and then to develop and adapt more data analysis and mining tools. We expect that the final implementation of the data warehouse will greatly facilitate biomedical informatics research.

  1. Zygotic Genome Activation Revisited: Looking Through the Expression and Function of Zscan4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, M S H

    2016-01-01

    Zygotic genome activation (ZGA, a.k.a. zygotic gene activation) is a critical event in development, when the paternally derived genome and maternally derived genome begin to be activated and transcribed after fertilization. Major ZGA occurs at the two-cell stage in mice and the four- to eight-cell stage in human preimplantation embryos. It has been thought that ZGA exists to provide RNAs and proteins supporting embryonic development after supplies stored in oocytes are used up; however, this paradigm does not seem to explain recent findings. For example, many ZGA genes-once activated-are quickly turned off, and thus ZGA forms a transient wave of transcriptional activation. In addition, ZGA genes are not evolutionarily conserved. In this review, we address these issues by focusing on Zscan4 (zinc finger and SCAN domain-containing 4), which was identified for its specific expression in preimplantation embryos during ZGA. Detailed molecular analyses of Zscan4 expression and function have revealed common features of Zscan4-associated events (Z4 events) in mouse embryonic stem cells and ZGA in preimplantation embryos. One feature is a rapid derepression and rerepression of constitutive heterochromatin, which includes pericentromeric major satellites and telomeres, and facultative heterochromatin, which includes retrotransposons and Z4 event-associated genes. We propose that the Z4 event superimposed on ZGA plays a critical role in the maintenance of genome and chromosome integrity in preimplantation embryos by promoting correction of DNA damage and chromosome abnormalities.

  2. Next-generation sequencing-based genome diagnostics across clinical genetics centers : implementation choices and their effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijenhoek, Terry; Kraaijeveld, Ken; Elferink, Martin; de Ligt, Joep; Kranendonk, Elcke; Santen, Gijs; Nijman, Isaac J.; Butler, Derek; Claes, Godelieve; Costessi, Adalberto; Dorlijn, Wim; van Eyndhoven, Winfried; Halley, Dicky J. J.; van den Hout, Mirjam C. G. N.; van Hove, Steven; Johansson, Lennart F.; Jongbloed, Jan D. H.; Kamps, Rick; Kockx, Christel E. M.; de Koning, Bart; Kriek, Marjolein; Deprez, Ronald Lekanne Dit; Lunstroo, Hans; Mannens, Marcel; Mook, Olaf R.; Nelen, Marcel; Ploem, Corrette; Rijnen, Marco; Saris, Jasper J.; Sinke, Richard; Sistermans, Erik; van Slegtenhorst, Marjon; Sleutels, Frank; van der Stoep, Nienke; van Tienhoven, Marianne; Vermaat, Martijn; Vogel, Maartje; Waisfisz, Quinten; Weiss, Janneke Marjan; van den Wijngaard, Arthur; van Workum, Wilbert; Ijntema, Helger; van der Zwaag, Bert; van IJcken, Wilfred F. J.; den Dunnen, Johan T.; Veltman, Joris A.; Hennekam, Raoul; Cuppen, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Implementation of next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) technology into routine diagnostic genome care requires strategic choices. Instead of theoretical discussions on the consequences of such choices, we compared NGS-based diagnostic practices in eight clinical genetic centers in the Netherlands, b

  3. Milestones in Medical Research, The Human Genome and ClinicalTrials.gov | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn Javascript on. Milestones in Medical Research, The Human Genome and ClinicalTrials.gov Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents Donald West King, M.D. FNLM ... genetic foundation of all human beings; the second, a comprehensive information service to ...

  4. Social and behavioral research in genomic sequencing: approaches from the Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium Outcomes and Measures Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Stacy W; Martins, Yolanda; Feuerman, Lindsay Z; Bernhardt, Barbara A; Biesecker, Barbara B; Christensen, Kurt D; Joffe, Steven; Rini, Christine; Veenstra, David; McGuire, Amy L

    2014-10-01

    The routine use of genomic sequencing in clinical medicine has the potential to dramatically alter patient care and medical outcomes. To fully understand the psychosocial and behavioral impact of sequencing integration into clinical practice, it is imperative that we identify the factors that influence sequencing-related decision making and patient outcomes. In an effort to develop a collaborative and conceptually grounded approach to studying sequencing adoption, members of the National Human Genome Research Institute's Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium formed the Outcomes and Measures Working Group. Here we highlight the priority areas of investigation and psychosocial and behavioral outcomes identified by the Working Group. We also review some of the anticipated challenges to measurement in social and behavioral research related to genomic sequencing; opportunities for instrument development; and the importance of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method approaches. This work represents the early, shared efforts of multiple research teams as we strive to understand individuals' experiences with genomic sequencing. The resulting body of knowledge will guide recommendations for the optimal use of sequencing in clinical practice.

  5. An international effort towards developing standards for best practices in analysis, interpretation and reporting of clinical genome sequencing results in the CLARITY Challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brownstein, Catherine A; Beggs, Alan H; Homer, Nils

    2014-01-01

    Background : There is tremendous potential for genome sequencing to improve clinical diagnosis and care once it becomes routinely accessible, but this will require formalizing research methods into clinical best practices in the areas of sequence data generation, analysis, interpretation...

  6. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's activities to prepare for regulatory and risk assessment applications of genomics information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, William H; Gallagher, Kathryn; McClintock, J Thomas

    2007-06-01

    Genomics is expected to have significant implications for risk assessment and regulatory decision making. Since 2002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has undertaken a number of cross-agency activities to further prepare itself to receive, interpret, and apply genomics information for risk assessment and regulatory purposes. These activities include: (1) the issuance of an Interim Genomics Policy on the use of genomics information in risk assessments and decision making, (2) the release of the 2004 Genomics White Paper, which outlines potential applications and implications of genomics for EPA, and (3) the recent release of the external review draft of the Interim Guidance on Microarray-Based Assays, which outlines data submission, quality, analysis, management, and training considerations for such data. This manuscript discusses these activities and more recent follow-up activities with the aim of further communicating these efforts to the broader scientific and stakeholder community.

  7. Draft Genome Sequences of Three Clinical Isolates of Tannerella forsythia Isolated from Subgingival Plaque from Periodontitis Patients in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Stafford, G.P.; Chaudhuri, R. R.; Haraszthy, V.; Friedrich, V.; Schäffer, C.; Ruscitto, A.; Honma, K.; Sharma, A.

    2016-01-01

    We report the genome sequences of three clinical isolates of Tannerella forsythia from the subgingival plaque of periodontitis patients attending clinics at the School of Dental Medicine, University at Buffalo. The availability of these genome sequences will aid the understanding of the pathogenesis of periodontitis.

  8. Draft Genome Sequences of Three Clinical Isolates of Tannerella forsythia Isolated from Subgingival Plaque from Periodontitis Patients in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Graham P; Chaudhuri, Roy R; Haraszthy, Violet; Friedrich, Valentin; Schäffer, Christina; Ruscitto, Angela; Honma, Kiyonobu; Sharma, Ashu

    2016-12-01

    We report the genome sequences of three clinical isolates of Tannerella forsythia from the subgingival plaque of periodontitis patients attending clinics at the School of Dental Medicine, University at Buffalo. The availability of these genome sequences will aid the understanding of the pathogenesis of periodontitis.

  9. Comparative Genomics Reveal That Host-Innate Immune Responses Influence the Clinical Prevalence of Legionella pneumophila Serogroups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Adil Khan

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is the primary etiologic agent of legionellosis, a potentially fatal respiratory illness. Amongst the sixteen described L. pneumophila serogroups, a majority of the clinical infections diagnosed using standard methods are serogroup 1 (Sg1. This high clinical prevalence of Sg1 is hypothesized to be linked to environmental specific advantages and/or to increased virulence of strains belonging to Sg1. The genetic determinants for this prevalence remain unknown primarily due to the limited genomic information available for non-Sg1 clinical strains. Through a systematic attempt to culture Legionella from patient respiratory samples, we have previously reported that 34% of all culture confirmed legionellosis cases in Ontario (n = 351 are caused by non-Sg1 Legionella. Phylogenetic analysis combining multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis and sequence based typing profiles of all non-Sg1 identified that L. pneumophila clinical strains (n = 73 belonging to the two most prevalent molecular types were Sg6. We conducted whole genome sequencing of two strains representative of these sequence types and one distant neighbour. Comparative genomics of the three L. pneumophila Sg6 genomes reported here with published L. pneumophila serogroup 1 genomes identified genetic differences in the O-antigen biosynthetic cluster. Comparative optical mapping analysis between Sg6 and Sg1 further corroborated this finding. We confirmed an altered O-antigen profile of Sg6, and tested its possible effects on growth and replication in in vitro biological models and experimental murine infections. Our data indicates that while clinical Sg1 might not be better suited than Sg6 in colonizing environmental niches, increased bloodstream dissemination through resistance to the alternative pathway of complement mediated killing in the human host may explain its higher prevalence.

  10. Miniaturization and globalization of clinical laboratory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Murilo R; Clark, Samantha; Barrio, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    Clinical laboratories provide an invaluable service to millions of people around the world in the form of quality diagnostic care. Within the clinical laboratory industry the impetus for change has come from technological development (miniaturization, nanotechnology, and their collective effect on point-of-care testing; POCT) and the increasingly global nature of laboratory services. Potential technological gains in POCT include: the development of bio-sensors, microarrays, genetics and proteomics testing, and enhanced web connectivity. In globalization, prospective opportunities lie in: medical tourism, the migration of healthcare workers, cross-border delivery of testing, and the establishment of accredited laboratories in previously unexplored markets. Accompanying these impressive opportunities are equally imposing challenges. Difficulty transitioning from research to clinical use, poor infrastructure in developing countries, cultural differences and national barriers to global trade are only a few examples. Dealing with the issues presented by globalization and the impact of developing technology on POCT, and on the clinical laboratory services industry in general, will be a daunting task. Despite such concerns, with appropriate countermeasures it will be possible to address the challenges posed. Future laboratory success will be largely dependent on one's ability to adapt in this perpetually shifting landscape.

  11. Whole-Genome Sequence of Starmerella bacillaris PAS13, a Nonconventional Enological Yeast with Antifungal Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos Junior, Wilson José Fernandes; Treu, Laura; da Silva Duarte, Vinícius; Carlot, Milena; Nadai, Chiara; Campanaro, Stefano; Giacomini, Alessio; Corich, Viviana

    2017-08-10

    Starmerella bacillaris is a fermentative yeast commonly found in vineyards. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of S. bacillaris PAS13, a nonconventional enological yeast with a potential role as a biocontrol agent. This gene sequence will provide insights into the genetic basis of yeast activity against gray mold disease (Botrytis cinerea). Copyright © 2017 Lemos Junior et al.

  12. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor subtype- and cell-type-specific activation of genomic target genes upon adenoviral transgene delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ronni; Grøntved, Lars; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G

    2006-01-01

    Investigations of the molecular events involved in activation of genomic target genes by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been hampered by the inability to establish a clean on/off state of the receptor in living cells. Here we show that the combination of adenoviral...... delivery and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is ideal for dissecting these mechanisms. Adenoviral delivery of PPARs leads to a rapid and synchronous expression of the PPAR subtypes, establishment of transcriptional active complexes at genomic loci, and immediate activation of even silent target genes....... We demonstrate that PPARgamma2 possesses considerable ligand-dependent as well as independent transactivation potential and that agonists increase the occupancy of PPARgamma2/retinoid X receptor at PPAR response elements. Intriguingly, by direct comparison of the PPARs (alpha, gamma, and beta...

  13. Nothing in Evolution Makes Sense Except in the Light of Genomics: Read-Write Genome Evolution as an Active Biological Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, James A

    2016-06-08

    The 21st century genomics-based analysis of evolutionary variation reveals a number of novel features impossible to predict when Dobzhansky and other evolutionary biologists formulated the neo-Darwinian Modern Synthesis in the middle of the last century. These include three distinct realms of cell evolution; symbiogenetic fusions forming eukaryotic cells with multiple genome compartments; horizontal organelle, virus and DNA transfers; functional organization of proteins as systems of interacting domains subject to rapid evolution by exon shuffling and exonization; distributed genome networks integrated by mobile repetitive regulatory signals; and regulation of multicellular development by non-coding lncRNAs containing repetitive sequence components. Rather than single gene traits, all phenotypes involve coordinated activity by multiple interacting cell molecules. Genomes contain abundant and functional repetitive components in addition to the unique coding sequences envisaged in the early days of molecular biology. Combinatorial coding, plus the biochemical abilities cells possess to rearrange DNA molecules, constitute a powerful toolbox for adaptive genome rewriting. That is, cells possess "Read-Write Genomes" they alter by numerous biochemical processes capable of rapidly restructuring cellular DNA molecules. Rather than viewing genome evolution as a series of accidental modifications, we can now study it as a complex biological process of active self-modification.

  14. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs): a highly efficient and versatile tool for genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ning; Zhao, Huimin

    2013-07-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) nucleases (TALENs) have recently emerged as a revolutionary genome editing tool in many different organisms and cell types. The site-specific chromosomal double-strand breaks introduced by TALENs significantly increase the efficiency of genomic modification. The modular nature of the TALE central repeat domains enables researchers to tailor DNA recognition specificity with ease and target essentially any desired DNA sequence. Here, we comprehensively review the development of TALEN technology in terms of scaffold optimization, DNA recognition, and repeat array assembly. In addition, we provide some perspectives on the future development of this technology.

  15. Genome Modification of Pluripotent Cells by Using Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri-Ghahfarokhi, Amir; Malaver-Ortega, Luis F; Sumer, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Interest is increasing in transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) as a tool to introduce targeted double-strand breaks into the large genomes of human and animal cell lines. The produced DNA lesions stimulate DNA repair pathways, error-prone but dominant non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and accurate but less occurring homology-directed repair (HDR), and as a result targeted genes can be modified. Here, we describe a modified Golden-Gate cloning method for generating TALENs and also details for targeting genes in mouse embryonic stem cells. The protocol described here can be used for modifying the genome of a broad range of pluripotent cell lines.

  16. Draft genome sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis 147, a Brazilian strain with high insecticidal activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Luiz Carlos Bertucci; Farias, Débora Lopes; Silva, Isabella de Moraes Guimarães; Melo, Fernando Lucas; Ribeiro, Bergmann Morais; Aguiar, Raimundo Wagner de Souza

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a ubiquitous Gram-positive and sporulating bacterium. Its crystals and secreted toxins are useful tools against larvae of diverse insect orders and, as a consequence, an alternative to recalcitrant chemical insecticides. We report here the draft genome sequence ofB. thuringiensis 147, a strain isolated from Brazil and with high insecticidal activity. The assembled genome contained 6,167,994 bp and was distributed in seven replicons (a chromosome and 6 plasmids). We identified 12 coding regions, located in two plasmids, which encode insecticidal proteins. PMID:26517667

  17. Prepatterning of developmental gene expression by modified histones before zygotic genome activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindeman, Leif C.; Andersen, Ingrid S.; Reiner, Andrew H.

    2011-01-01

    A hallmark of anamniote vertebrate development is a window of embryonic transcription-independent cell divisions before onset of zygotic genome activation (ZGA). Chromatin determinants of ZGA are unexplored; however, marking of developmental genes by modified histones in sperm suggests a predictive...... role of histone marks for ZGA. In zebrafish, pre-ZGA development for ten cell cycles provides an opportunity to examine whether genomic enrichment in modified histones is present before initiation of transcription. By profiling histone H3 trimethylation on all zebrafish promoters before and after ZGA...

  18. An Introduction to CRISPR Technology for Genome Activation and Repression in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Dan; Qi, Lei S

    2016-01-04

    CRISPR interference/activation (CRISPRi/a) technology provides a simple and efficient approach for targeted repression or activation of gene expression in the mammalian genome. It is highly flexible and programmable, using an RNA-guided nuclease-deficient Cas9 (dCas9) protein fused with transcriptional regulators for targeting specific genes to effect their regulation. Multiple studies have shown how this method is an effective way to achieve efficient and specific transcriptional repression or activation of single or multiple genes. Sustained transcriptional modulation can be obtained by stable expression of CRISPR components, which enables directed reprogramming of cell fate. Here, we introduce the basics of CRISPRi/a technology for genome repression or activation.

  19. Culture-independent genome sequencing of clinical samples reveals an unexpected heterogeneity of infections by Chlamydia pecorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Nathan L; Sullivan, Mitchell J; Jelocnik, Martina; Myers, Garry S A; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2015-05-01

    Chlamydia pecorum is an important global pathogen of livestock, and it is also a significant threat to the long-term survival of Australia's koala populations. This study employed a culture-independent DNA capture approach to sequence C. pecorum genomes directly from clinical swab samples collected from koalas with chlamydial disease as well as from sheep with arthritis and conjunctivitis. Investigations into single-nucleotide polymorphisms within each of the swab samples revealed that a portion of the reads in each sample belonged to separate C. pecorum strains, suggesting that all of the clinical samples analyzed contained mixed populations of genetically distinct C. pecorum isolates. This observation was independent of the anatomical site sampled and the host species. Using the genomes of strains identified in each of these samples, whole-genome phylogenetic analysis revealed that a clade containing a bovine and a koala isolate is distinct from other clades comprised of livestock or koala C. pecorum strains. Providing additional evidence to support exposure of koalas to Australian livestock strains, two minor strains assembled from the koala swab samples clustered with livestock strains rather than koala strains. Culture-independent probe-based genome capture and sequencing of clinical samples provides the strongest evidence yet to suggest that naturally occurring chlamydial infections are comprised of multiple genetically distinct strains.

  20. Genome response to tissue plasminogen activator in experimental ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Dazhi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA is known to have functions beyond fibrinolysis in acute ischemic stroke, such as blood brain barrier disruption. To further delineate tPA functions in the blood, we examined the gene expression profiles induced by tPA in a rat model of ischemic stroke. Results tPA differentially expressed 929 genes in the blood of rats (p ≤ 0.05, fold change ≥ |1.2|. Genes identified had functions related to modulation of immune cells. tPA gene expression was found to be dependent on the reperfusion status of cerebral vasculature. The majority of genes regulated by tPA were different from genes regulated by ischemic stroke. Conclusions tPA modulates gene expression in the blood of rats involving immune cells in a manner that is dependent on the status of vascular reperfusion. These non-fibrinolytic activities of tPA in the blood serve to better understand tPA-related complications.

  1. Potential impact of stress activated retrotransposons on genome evolution in a marine diatom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardi Assaf

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transposable elements (TEs are mobile DNA sequences present in the genomes of most organisms. They have been extensively studied in animals, fungi, and plants, and have been shown to have important functions in genome dynamics and species evolution. Recent genomic data can now enlarge the identification and study of TEs to other branches of the eukaryotic tree of life. Diatoms, which belong to the heterokont group, are unicellular eukaryotic algae responsible for around 40% of marine primary productivity. The genomes of a centric diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana, and a pennate diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, that likely diverged around 90 Mya, have recently become available. Results In the present work, we establish that LTR retrotransposons (LTR-RTs are the most abundant TEs inhabiting these genomes, with a much higher presence in the P. tricornutum genome. We show that the LTR-RTs found in diatoms form two new phylogenetic lineages that appear to be diatom specific and are also found in environmental samples taken from different oceans. Comparative expression analysis in P. tricornutum cells cultured under 16 different conditions demonstrate high levels of transcriptional activity of LTR retrotransposons in response to nitrate limitation and upon exposure to diatom-derived reactive aldehydes, which are known to induce stress responses and cell death. Regulatory aspects of P. tricornutum retrotransposon transcription also include the occurrence of nitrate limitation sensitive cis-regulatory components within LTR elements and cytosine methylation dynamics. Differential insertion patterns in different P. tricornutum accessions isolated from around the world infer the role of LTR-RTs in generating intraspecific genetic variability. Conclusion Based on these findings we propose that LTR-RTs may have been important for promoting genome rearrangements in diatoms.

  2. Dissecting inflammatory complications in critically injured patients by within-patient gene expression changes: a longitudinal clinical genomics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyur H Desai

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trauma is the number one killer of individuals 1-44 y of age in the United States. The prognosis and treatment of inflammatory complications in critically injured patients continue to be challenging, with a history of failed clinical trials and poorly understood biology. New approaches are therefore needed to improve our ability to diagnose and treat this clinical condition. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a large-scale study on 168 blunt-force trauma patients over 28 d, measuring ∼400 clinical variables and longitudinally profiling leukocyte gene expression with ∼800 microarrays. Marshall MOF (multiple organ failure clinical score trajectories were first utilized to organize the patients into five categories of increasingly poor outcomes. We then developed an analysis framework modeling early within-patient expression changes to produce a robust characterization of the genomic response to trauma. A quarter of the genome shows early expression changes associated with longer-term post-injury complications, captured by at least five dynamic co-expression modules of functionally related genes. In particular, early down-regulation of MHC-class II genes and up-regulation of p38 MAPK signaling pathway were found to strongly associate with longer-term post-injury complications, providing discrimination among patient outcomes from expression changes during the 40-80 h window post-injury. CONCLUSIONS: The genomic characterization provided here substantially expands the scope by which the molecular response to trauma may be characterized and understood. These results may be instrumental in furthering our understanding of the disease process and identifying potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Additionally, the quantitative approach we have introduced is potentially applicable to future genomics studies of rapidly progressing clinical conditions. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00257231

  3. Whole genome sequence of Enterobacter ludwigii type strain EN-119T, isolated from clinical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gengmi; Hu, Zonghai; Zeng, Ping; Zhu, Bing; Wu, Lijuan

    2015-04-01

    Enterobacter ludwigii strain EN-119(T) is the type strain of E. ludwigii, which belongs to the E. cloacae complex (Ecc). This strain was first reported and nominated in 2005 and later been found in many hospitals. In this paper, the whole genome sequencing of this strain was carried out. The total genome size of EN-119(T) is 4952,770 bp with 4578 coding sequences, 88 tRNAs and 10 rRNAs. The genome sequence of EN-119(T) is the first whole genome sequence of E. ludwigii, which will further our understanding of Ecc.

  4. Clinical Activity in General Practice and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjertholm, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS Cancer is a common, serious disease and early diagnosis is a cornerstone in the effort to improve the outcome from cancer disease. The general practitioner (GP) plays a crucial role in achieving this goal. Little is known about GPs’ suspicion of cancer and the activities the GPs...... institute in relation to such suspicion. Knowledge is also sparse on any effects of different diagnostic activities in general practice. The overall aims of this thesis were therefore: -to describe how often Danish GPs suspected cancer or other serious diseases and how they acted on the suspicion......, and to analyse how a suspicion influenced the demand for health care services and predicted a future diagnosis of serious disease - to investigate whether variation in GPs’ diagnostic activity influences cancer patients’ prognosis in relation to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing and prostate cancer...

  5. Active surveillance for clinically localized prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik B; Brasso, Klaus; Klotz, Laurence H

    2014-01-01

    Active surveillance (AS) has been introduced as an observational strategy to delay or avoid curative treatment without compromising long-term cancer-specific survival. The 10 studies included in this review, published between 2008 and 2013, generally agreed upon patients selection for the AS stra......Active surveillance (AS) has been introduced as an observational strategy to delay or avoid curative treatment without compromising long-term cancer-specific survival. The 10 studies included in this review, published between 2008 and 2013, generally agreed upon patients selection...

  6. 139 Clinically Applicable and Biologically Validated MRI Radiomic Test Method Predicts Glioblastoma Genomic Landscape and Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, Pascal O; Singh, Sanjay K; Kotrotsou, Aikaterini; Zandi, Faramak; Thomas, Ginu; Hatami, Masumeh; Luedi, Markus M; Elakkad, Ahmed; Hassan, Islam; Gumin, Joy; Sulman, Erik P; Lang, Frederick F; Colen, Rivka R

    2016-08-01

    Imaging is the modality of choice for noninvasive characterization of biological tissue and organ systems; imaging serves as early diagnostic tool for most disease processes and is rapidly evolving, thus transforming the way we diagnose and follow patients over time. A vast number of cancer imaging characteristics have been correlated to underlying genomics; however, none have established causality. Therefore, our objectives were to test if there is a causal relationship between imaging and genomic information; and to develop a clinically relevant radiomic pipeline for glioblastoma molecular characterization. Functional validation was performed using a prototypic in vivo RNA-interference-based orthotopic xenograft mouse model. The automated pipeline collects 4800 MRI-derived texture features per tumor. Using univariate feature selection and boosted tree predictive modeling, a patient-specific genomic probability map was derived and patient survival predicted (The Cancer Genome Atlas/MD Anderson data sets). Data demonstrated a significant xenograft to human association (area under the curve [AUC] 84%, P applicable analytical imaging method termed Radiome Sequencing to allow for automated image analysis, prediction of key genomic events, and survival. This method is scalable and applicable to any type of medical imaging. Further, it allows for human-mouse matched coclinical trials, in-depth end point analysis, and upfront noninvasive high-resolution radiomics-based diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarker development.

  7. Genomic array as compared to karyotyping in myelodysplastic syndromes in a prospective clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens-Kroef, Marian J; Olde Weghuis, Daniel; ElIdrissi-Zaynoun, Najat; van der Reijden, Bert; Cremers, Eline M P; Alhan, Canan; Westers, Theresia M; Visser-Wisselaar, Heleen A; Chitu, Dana A; Cunha, Sonia M; Vellenga, Edo; Klein, Saskia K; Wijermans, Pierre; de Greef, Georgine E; Schaafsma, M Ron; Muus, Petra; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A; Jansen, Joop H

    2017-01-01

    Karyotyping is considered as the gold standard in the genetic subclassification of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Oligo/SNP-based genomic array profiling is a high-resolution tool that also enables genome wide analysis. We compared karyotyping with oligo/SNP-based array profiling in 104 MDS patient

  8. Whole genome sequencing as a tool for phylogenetic analysis of clinical strains of Mitis group streptococci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmusen, L. H.; Dargis, R.; Iversen, Katrine Højholt

    2016-01-01

    with infective endocarditis were whole genome sequenced. We compared the phylogenetic analyses based on single genes (recA, sodA, gdh), multigene (MLSA), SNPs, and core-genome sequences. The six phylogenetic analyses generally showed a similar pattern of six monophyletic clusters, though a few differences were...

  9. Epidemiological studies in the information and genomics era: experience of the Clinical Genome of Cancer Project in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wünsch-Filho V.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomics is expanding the horizons of epidemiology, providing a new dimension for classical epidemiological studies and inspiring the development of large-scale multicenter studies with the statistical power necessary for the assessment of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in cancer etiology and prognosis. This paper describes the methodology of the Clinical Genome of Cancer Project in São Paulo, Brazil (CGCP, which includes patients with nine types of tumors and controls. Three major epidemiological designs were used to reach specific objectives: cross-sectional studies to examine gene expression, case-control studies to evaluate etiological factors, and follow-up studies to analyze genetic profiles in prognosis. The clinical groups included patients' data in the electronic database through the Internet. Two approaches were used for data quality control: continuous data evaluation and data entry consistency. A total of 1749 cases and 1509 controls were entered into the CGCP database from the first trimester of 2002 to the end of 2004. Continuous evaluation showed that, for all tumors taken together, only 0.5% of the general form fields still included potential inconsistencies by the end of 2004. Regarding data entry consistency, the highest percentage of errors (11.8% was observed for the follow-up form, followed by 6.7% for the clinical form, 4.0% for the general form, and only 1.1% for the pathology form. Good data quality is required for their transformation into useful information for clinical application and for preventive measures. The use of the Internet for communication among researchers and for data entry is perhaps the most innovative feature of the CGCP. The monitoring of patients' data guaranteed their quality.

  10. Nothing in Evolution Makes Sense Except in the Light of Genomics: Read–Write Genome Evolution as an Active Biological Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Shapiro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The 21st century genomics-based analysis of evolutionary variation reveals a number of novel features impossible to predict when Dobzhansky and other evolutionary biologists formulated the neo-Darwinian Modern Synthesis in the middle of the last century. These include three distinct realms of cell evolution; symbiogenetic fusions forming eukaryotic cells with multiple genome compartments; horizontal organelle, virus and DNA transfers; functional organization of proteins as systems of interacting domains subject to rapid evolution by exon shuffling and exonization; distributed genome networks integrated by mobile repetitive regulatory signals; and regulation of multicellular development by non-coding lncRNAs containing repetitive sequence components. Rather than single gene traits, all phenotypes involve coordinated activity by multiple interacting cell molecules. Genomes contain abundant and functional repetitive components in addition to the unique coding sequences envisaged in the early days of molecular biology. Combinatorial coding, plus the biochemical abilities cells possess to rearrange DNA molecules, constitute a powerful toolbox for adaptive genome rewriting. That is, cells possess “Read–Write Genomes” they alter by numerous biochemical processes capable of rapidly restructuring cellular DNA molecules. Rather than viewing genome evolution as a series of accidental modifications, we can now study it as a complex biological process of active self-modification.

  11. Functional genomics of bio-energy plants and related patent activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2013-04-01

    With dwindling fossil oil resources and increased economic growth of many developing countries due to globalization, energy driven from an alternative source such as bio-energy in a sustainable fashion is the need of the hour. However, production of energy from biological source is relatively expensive due to low starch and sugar contents of bioenergy plants leading to lower oil yield and reduced quality along with lower conversion efficiency of feedstock. In this context genetic improvement of bio-energy plants offers a viable solution. In this manuscript, we reviewed the current status of functional genomics studies and related patent activities in bio-energy plants. Currently, genomes of considerable bio-energy plants have been sequenced or are in progress and also large amount of expression sequence tags (EST) or cDNA sequences are available from them. These studies provide fundamental data for more reliable genome annotation and as a result, several genomes have been annotated in a genome-wide level. In addition to this effort, various mutagenesis tools have also been employed to develop mutant populations for characterization of genes that are involved in bioenergy quantitative traits. With the progress made on functional genomics of important bio-energy plants, more patents were filed with a significant number of them focusing on genes and DNA sequences which may involve in improvement of bio-energy traits including higher yield and quality of starch, sugar and oil. We also believe that these studies will lead to the generation of genetically altered plants with improved tolerance to various abiotic and biotic stresses.

  12. Small terminase couples viral DNA binding to genome-packaging ATPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ankoor; Bhardwaj, Anshul; Datta, Pinaki; Lander, Gabriel C; Cingolani, Gino

    2012-08-08

    Packaging of viral genomes into empty procapsids is powered by a large DNA-packaging motor. In most viruses, this machine is composed of a large (L) and a small (S) terminase subunit complexed with a dodecamer of portal protein. Here we describe the 1.75 Å crystal structure of the bacteriophage P22 S-terminase in a nonameric conformation. The structure presents a central channel ∼23 Å in diameter, sufficiently large to accommodate hydrated B-DNA. The last 23 residues of S-terminase are essential for binding to DNA and assembly to L-terminase. Upon binding to its own DNA, S-terminase functions as a specific activator of L-terminase ATPase activity. The DNA-dependent stimulation of ATPase activity thus rationalizes the exclusive specificity of genome-packaging motors for viral DNA in the crowd of host DNA, ensuring fidelity of packaging and avoiding wasteful ATP hydrolysis. This posits a model for DNA-dependent activation of genome-packaging motors of general interest in virology.

  13. A lack of genetic basis for biovar differentiation in clinically important Corynebacterium diphtheriae from whole genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangal, Vartul; Burkovski, Andreas; Hunt, Alison C; Edwards, Becky; Blom, Jochen; Hoskisson, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    The differentiation of clinically important Corynebacterium diphtheriae into specific biovars is complex and phylogenetically unclear. Comparative genomic analyses of 17 strains indicate that the division of C. diphtheriae into different biovars does not correlate with the variation in the gene content in the relevant metabolic categories that are potentially involved in the biovar discrimination. The biochemical separation is also not supported by phylogenetic analyses, suggesting molecular methods of typing C. diphtheriae strains should be adopted much more widely.

  14. RNA profiles of porcine embryos during genome activation reveal complex metabolic switch sensitive to in vitro conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østrup, Olga; Olbricht, Gayla; Østrup, Esben

    2013-01-01

    Fertilization is followed by complex changes in cytoplasmic composition and extensive chromatin reprogramming which results in the abundant activation of totipotent embryonic genome at embryonic genome activation (EGA). While chromatin reprogramming has been widely studied in several species, onl...

  15. Identification and Characterization of Reverse Transcriptase Domain of Transcriptionally Active Retrotransposons in Wheat Genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Miao TANG; You-Zhi MA; Lian-Cheng LI; Xing-Guo YE

    2005-01-01

    To clarify activation characterization of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) retrotransposons, transcriptionally active Ty1-copia retrotransposons were found in wheat by using RT-PCR to amplify the RT domain. Sequence analysis of random RT-PCR clones reveals that Ty1-copia retrotransposons are highly heterogeneous and can be divided into at least four groups, which are tentatively named TaRT-1 to TaRT-4.Dot blot hybridization indicates that TaRT- 1 exists in the wheat genome as multiple copies (at 30 000 copies/a hexaploid genome (ABD)). Northern blot hybridization showed that TaRT-1 is only expressed at a low level under normal conditions in seedlings, but at a high level when induced by powdery mildew fungus, jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA). These results suggest that the TaRT-1 expression is highly sensitive to biotic and abiotic stresses.

  16. Risk assessment models in genetics clinic for array comparative genomic hybridization: Clinical information can be used to predict the likelihood of an abnormal result in patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, Rachel M; Mercurio, Laura; Kanter, Rebecca; Doyle, Richard; Abuelo, Dianne; Morrow, Eric M; Shur, Natasha

    2013-03-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) testing can diagnose chromosomal microdeletions and duplications too small to be detected by conventional cytogenetic techniques. We need to consider which patients are more likely to receive a diagnosis from aCGH testing versus patients that have lower likelihood and may benefit from broader genome wide scanning. We retrospectively reviewed charts of a population of 200 patients, 117 boys and 83 girls, who underwent aCGH testing in Genetics Clinic at Rhode Island hospital between 1 January/2008 and 31 December 2010. Data collected included sex, age at initial clinical presentation, aCGH result, history of seizures, autism, dysmorphic features, global developmental delay/intellectual disability, hypotonia and failure to thrive. aCGH analysis revealed abnormal results in 34 (17%) and variants of unknown significance in 24 (12%). Patients with three or more clinical diagnoses had a 25.0% incidence of abnormal aCGH findings, while patients with two or fewer clinical diagnoses had a 12.5% incidence of abnormal aCGH findings. Currently, we provide families with a range of 10-30% of a diagnosis with aCGH testing. With increased clinical complexity, patients have an increased probability of having an abnormal aCGH result. With this, we can provide individualized risk estimates for each patient.

  17. Proximal genomic localization of STAT1 binding and regulated transcriptional activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smyth Gordon K

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT proteins are key regulators of gene expression in response to the interferon (IFN family of anti-viral and anti-microbial cytokines. We have examined the genomic relationship between STAT1 binding and regulated transcription using multiple tiling microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation microarray (ChIP-chip experiments from public repositories. Results In response to IFN-γ, STAT1 bound proximally to regions of the genome that exhibit regulated transcriptional activity. This finding was consistent between different tiling microarray platforms, and between different measures of transcriptional activity, including differential binding of RNA polymerase II, and differential mRNA transcription. Re-analysis of tiling microarray data from a recent study of IFN-γ-induced STAT1 ChIP-chip and mRNA expression revealed that STAT1 binding is tightly associated with localized mRNA transcription in response to IFN-γ. Close relationships were also apparent between STAT1 binding, STAT2 binding, and mRNA transcription in response to IFN-α. Furthermore, we found that sites of STAT1 binding within the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE region are precisely correlated with sites of either enhanced or diminished binding by the RNA polymerase II complex. Conclusion Together, our results indicate that STAT1 binds proximally to regions of the genome that exhibit regulated transcriptional activity. This finding establishes a generalized basis for the positioning of STAT1 binding sites within the genome, and supports a role for STAT1 in the direct recruitment of the RNA polymerase II complex to the promoters of IFN-γ-responsive genes.

  18. Regulation of DnaA Assembly and Activity: Taking Directions From the Genome

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    To ensure proper timing of chromosome duplication during the cell cycle, bacteria must carefully regulate the activity of initiator protein, DnaA, and its interactions with the unique replication origin, oriC. Although several protein regulators of DnaA are known, recent evidence suggests that DnaA recognition sites, in multiple genomic locations, also play an important role in controlling assembly of pre-replication complexes. In oriC, closely spaced high and low affinity recognition sites d...

  19. Structure of a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) within a genomic island from a clinical strain of Acinetobacter baumannii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Bhumika S., E-mail: bhumika.shah@mq.edu.au; Tetu, Sasha G. [Macquarie University, Research Park Drive, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Harrop, Stephen J. [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Paulsen, Ian T.; Mabbutt, Bridget C. [Macquarie University, Research Park Drive, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia)

    2014-09-25

    The structure of a short-chain dehydrogenase encoded within genomic islands of A. baumannii strains has been solved to 2.4 Å resolution. This classical SDR incorporates a flexible helical subdomain. The NADP-binding site and catalytic side chains are identified. Over 15% of the genome of an Australian clinical isolate of Acinetobacter baumannii occurs within genomic islands. An uncharacterized protein encoded within one island feature common to this and other International Clone II strains has been studied by X-ray crystallography. The 2.4 Å resolution structure of SDR-WM99c reveals it to be a new member of the classical short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. The enzyme contains a nucleotide-binding domain and, like many other SDRs, is tetrameric in form. The active site contains a catalytic tetrad (Asn117, Ser146, Tyr159 and Lys163) and water molecules occupying the presumed NADP cofactor-binding pocket. An adjacent cleft is capped by a relatively mobile helical subdomain, which is well positioned to control substrate access.

  20. Draft genome sequences of five clinical Enterococcus cecorum strains isolated from different poultry species in Poland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolka, Beata; Olsen, Rikke Heidemann; Thøfner, Ida;

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report five draft genome sequences of Enterococcus cecorum strains that were isolated from different bird species of affected poultry flocks (commercial broilers [CB], broiler breeders [BB], commercial layers [CL], ducks [D], and geese [G]) in Poland....

  1. Whole genome sequencing as a tool for phylogenetic analysis of clinical strains of Mitis group streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, L H; Dargis, R; Højholt, K; Christensen, J J; Skovgaard, O; Justesen, U S; Rosenvinge, F S; Moser, C; Lukjancenko, O; Rasmussen, S; Nielsen, X C

    2016-10-01

    Identification of Mitis group streptococci (MGS) to the species level is challenging for routine microbiology laboratories. Correct identification is crucial for the diagnosis of infective endocarditis, identification of treatment failure, and/or infection relapse. Eighty MGS from Danish patients with infective endocarditis were whole genome sequenced. We compared the phylogenetic analyses based on single genes (recA, sodA, gdh), multigene (MLSA), SNPs, and core-genome sequences. The six phylogenetic analyses generally showed a similar pattern of six monophyletic clusters, though a few differences were observed in single gene analyses. Species identification based on single gene analysis showed their limitations when more strains were included. In contrast, analyses incorporating more sequence data, like MLSA, SNPs and core-genome analyses, provided more distinct clustering. The core-genome tree showed the most distinct clustering.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Strain G-12-005

    OpenAIRE

    Berland, Jean-Luc; Carvalho, Fabíola Marques; de Almeida, Luiz Gonzaga Paula; Bablishvili, Nino; Gauthier, Marie; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Infection caused by drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a growing concern, especially in eastern Europe. We report an annotated draft genome sequence of M. tuberculosis strain G-12-005 obtained from a patient in Georgia.

  3. Germ line genome editing in clinics: the approaches, objectives and global society

    OpenAIRE

    Ishii, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Genome editing allows for the versatile genetic modification of somatic cells, germ cells and embryos. In particular, CRISPR/Cas9 is worldwide used in biomedical research. Although the first report on Cas9-mediated gene modification in human embryos focused on the prevention of a genetic disease in offspring, it raised profound ethical and social concerns over the safety of subsequent generations and the potential misuse of genome editing for human enhancement. The present article considers g...

  4. The Molecular Genetics of Autism Spectrum Disorders: Genomic Mechanisms, Neuroimmunopathology, and Clinical Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Guerra, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have become increasingly common in recent years. The discovery of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and accompanying copy number variations within the genome has increased our understanding of the architecture of the disease. These genetic and genomic alterations coupled with epigenetic phenomena have pointed to a neuroimmunopathological mechanism for ASD. Model animal studies, developmental biology, and affective neuroscience laid a foundation for dissecting th...

  5. Germ line genome editing in clinics: the approaches, objectives and global society

    OpenAIRE

    Ishii, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    Genome editing allows for the versatile genetic modification of somatic cells, germ cells and embryos. In particular, CRISPR/ Cas9 is worldwide used in biomedical research. Although the first report on Cas9-mediated gene modification in human embryos focused on the prevention of a genetic disease in offspring, it raised profound ethical and social concerns over the safety of subsequent generations and the potential misuse of genome editing for human enhancement. The present article considers ...

  6. Genomic sequence and activity of KS10, a transposable phage of the Burkholderia cepacia complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrivastava Savita

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC is a versatile group of Gram negative organisms that can be found throughout the environment in sources such as soil, water, and plants. While BCC bacteria can be involved in beneficial interactions with plants, they are also considered opportunistic pathogens, specifically in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic granulomatous disease. These organisms also exhibit resistance to many antibiotics, making conventional treatment often unsuccessful. KS10 was isolated as a prophage of B. cenocepacia K56-2, a clinically relevant strain of the BCC. Our objective was to sequence the genome of this phage and also determine if this prophage encoded any virulence determinants. Results KS10 is a 37,635 base pairs (bp transposable phage of the opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia. Genome sequence analysis and annotation of this phage reveals that KS10 shows the closest sequence homology to Mu and BcepMu. KS10 was found to be a prophage in three different strains of B. cenocepacia, including strains K56-2, J2315, and C5424, and seven tested clinical isolates of B. cenocepacia, but no other BCC species. A survey of 23 strains and 20 clinical isolates of the BCC revealed that KS10 is able to form plaques on lawns of B. ambifaria LMG 19467, B. cenocepacia PC184, and B. stabilis LMG 18870. Conclusion KS10 is a novel phage with a genomic organization that differs from most phages in that its capsid genes are not aligned into one module but rather separated by approximately 11 kb, giving evidence of one or more prior genetic rearrangements. There were no potential virulence factors identified in KS10, though many hypothetical proteins were identified with no known function.

  7. Academic physiatry. Balancing clinical practice and academic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabois, M

    1992-04-01

    The need for continued and diversified growth of both scholarly and clinical activities within academic physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) departments is discussed with reference to the demands placed on academic departments by the various components of their mission, such as administration, clinical service, education and research. The expansion and improvement of clinical services should include the following components: program development, resources needed, finances required and marketing. Clinical subspecialization of faculty and solid affiliation with nonacademic hospitals and rehabilitation facilities is essential for academic PM&R. The faculty should include three categories: clinical faculty, clinical-research faculty and research faculty. Adequate financial resources must comprise an appropriate balance of academic funds, clinical income and grant sources. Clinical funds will play a greater role as other sources of funds diminish. Any practice plan must recognize the equality of the differing faculty members' practices, whether their interests are clinical, educational or research-oriented. The expansion and intensification of clinical programs by academy PM&R departments could increase competition in the medical community. Sensitivity to the perceptions of other practitioners and institutions, careful planning and cooperation will help the field grow and improve levels of care for the patients we serve in light of the changing medical care environment.

  8. Global identification and characterization of transcriptionally active regions in the rice genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Li

    Full Text Available Genome tiling microarray studies have consistently documented rich transcriptional activity beyond the annotated genes. However, systematic characterization and transcriptional profiling of the putative novel transcripts on the genome scale are still lacking. We report here the identification of 25,352 and 27,744 transcriptionally active regions (TARs not encoded by annotated exons in the rice (Oryza. sativa subspecies japonica and indica, respectively. The non-exonic TARs account for approximately two thirds of the total TARs detected by tiling arrays and represent transcripts likely conserved between japonica and indica. Transcription of 21,018 (83% japonica non-exonic TARs was verified through expression profiling in 10 tissue types using a re-array in which annotated genes and TARs were each represented by five independent probes. Subsequent analyses indicate that about 80% of the japonica TARs that were not assigned to annotated exons can be assigned to various putatively functional or structural elements of the rice genome, including splice variants, uncharacterized portions of incompletely annotated genes, antisense transcripts, duplicated gene fragments, and potential non-coding RNAs. These results provide a systematic characterization of non-exonic transcripts in rice and thus expand the current view of the complexity and dynamics of the rice transcriptome.

  9. Genome-wide signatures of transcription factor activity: connecting transcription factors, disease, and small molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    Full Text Available Identifying transcription factors (TF involved in producing a genome-wide transcriptional profile is an essential step in building mechanistic model that can explain observed gene expression data. We developed a statistical framework for constructing genome-wide signatures of TF activity, and for using such signatures in the analysis of gene expression data produced by complex transcriptional regulatory programs. Our framework integrates ChIP-seq data and appropriately matched gene expression profiles to identify True REGulatory (TREG TF-gene interactions. It provides genome-wide quantification of the likelihood of regulatory TF-gene interaction that can be used to either identify regulated genes, or as genome-wide signature of TF activity. To effectively use ChIP-seq data, we introduce a novel statistical model that integrates information from all binding "peaks" within 2 Mb window around a gene's transcription start site (TSS, and provides gene-level binding scores and probabilities of regulatory interaction. In the second step we integrate these binding scores and regulatory probabilities with gene expression data to assess the likelihood of True REGulatory (TREG TF-gene interactions. We demonstrate the advantages of TREG framework in identifying genes regulated by two TFs with widely different distribution of functional binding events (ERα and E2f1. We also show that TREG signatures of TF activity vastly improve our ability to detect involvement of ERα in producing complex diseases-related transcriptional profiles. Through a large study of disease-related transcriptional signatures and transcriptional signatures of drug activity, we demonstrate that increase in statistical power associated with the use of TREG signatures makes the crucial difference in identifying key targets for treatment, and drugs to use for treatment. All methods are implemented in an open-source R package treg. The package also contains all data used in the analysis

  10. Key Challenges to Maintenance Activities in Clinical Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Azman Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Objective Maintenance of biomedical equipment has undergone tremendous improvements over the last several decades since the publication of Ralph Nader’s fateful article in 1971. The uproar caused by Nader’s article had called for stringent electrical safety testing. Clinical engineering fraternities worldwide hurried to provide solutions and addressed the damage. In the process, we saw improvements in many areas of clinical engineering. Yet, despite these improvements, clinical engineering is still grappling with challenges in its maintenance activities that seem to persist. This paper seeks to identify these challenges which have caused difficulties, and to some extent, impede the performance of effective maintenance. The paper also seeks to propose solutions and recommendations for improvements. Methods Over the course of his work, the author has noticed areas that have posed major challenges in clinical engineering. One such challenge is in the area of clinical engineering competency. Non-standardization in maintenance activities is another area where some tough decisions may be needed. Other challenges will be identified, explained and where possible, solutions will be offered. Results In this paper, the author identifies ten major challenges that have affected the provision of clinical engineering services. Most of these challenges, if properly addressed may significantly improve healthcare delivery and/or provide clinical engineering with clear guidelines on the breadth and limits of the discipline. Some have severely affected maintenance performances while several have been left unattended and unresolved. Regardless, the ten challenges are common and normally experienced at clinical engineering department across the globe. Conclusion By pointing out these key challenges, clinical engineering practitioners would be able to identify shortfalls and trends in clinical engineering maintenance and systematically focus their attention towards assisting in

  11. National Human Genome Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Director Organization Reports & Publications Español The National Human Genome Research Institute conducts genetic and genomic research, funds ... Landscape Social Media Videos Image Gallery Fact Sheets Human Genome Project Clinical Studies Genomic Careers DNA Day Calendar ...

  12. A semantic Grid Infrastructure Enabling Integrated Access and Knowledge Discovery from Multilevel Data in Ppost-Genomic Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiknakis, Manolis; Sfakianakis, Stelios; Potamias, George; Zacharioudakis, Giorgos; Kafetzopoulos, Dimitris

    This paper reports on original results of the ACGT integrated project focusing on the design and development of a European Biomedical Grid infrastructure in support of multicentric, post genomic clinical trials on Cancer. The paper provides a presentation of the needs of users involved in post-genomic CTs, and presents such needs in the form of scenarios which drive the requirements engineering phase of the project. Subsequently, the initial architecture specified by the project is presented and its services are classified and discussed. The Master Ontology on Cancer, been developed by the project, is presented and our approach to develop the required metadata registries, which provide semantically rich information about available data and computational services, is provided. Finally, a short discussion of the work lying ahead is included.

  13. The Molecular Genetics of Autism Spectrum Disorders: Genomic Mechanisms, Neuroimmunopathology, and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Guerra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs have become increasingly common in recent years. The discovery of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and accompanying copy number variations within the genome has increased our understanding of the architecture of the disease. These genetic and genomic alterations coupled with epigenetic phenomena have pointed to a neuroimmunopathological mechanism for ASD. Model animal studies, developmental biology, and affective neuroscience laid a foundation for dissecting the neural pathways impacted by these disease-generating mechanisms. The goal of current autism research is directed toward a systems biological approach to find the most basic genetic and environmental causes to this severe developmental disease. It is hoped that future genomic and neuroimmunological research will be directed toward finding the road toward prevention, treatment, and cure of ASD.

  14. The molecular genetics of autism spectrum disorders: genomic mechanisms, neuroimmunopathology, and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Daniel J

    2011-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have become increasingly common in recent years. The discovery of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and accompanying copy number variations within the genome has increased our understanding of the architecture of the disease. These genetic and genomic alterations coupled with epigenetic phenomena have pointed to a neuroimmunopathological mechanism for ASD. Model animal studies, developmental biology, and affective neuroscience laid a foundation for dissecting the neural pathways impacted by these disease-generating mechanisms. The goal of current autism research is directed toward a systems biological approach to find the most basic genetic and environmental causes to this severe developmental disease. It is hoped that future genomic and neuroimmunological research will be directed toward finding the road toward prevention, treatment, and cure of ASD.

  15. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases enable efficient plant genome engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Feng; Li, Xiaohong; Baller, Joshua A; Qi, Yiping; Starker, Colby G; Bogdanove, Adam J; Voytas, Daniel F

    2013-01-01

    The ability to precisely engineer plant genomes offers much potential for advancing basic and applied plant biology. Here, we describe methods for the targeted modification of plant genomes using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). Methods were optimized using tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) protoplasts and TALENs targeting the acetolactate synthase (ALS) gene. Optimal TALEN scaffolds were identified using a protoplast-based single-strand annealing assay in which TALEN cleavage creates a functional yellow fluorescent protein gene, enabling quantification of TALEN activity by flow cytometry. Single-strand annealing activity data for TALENs with different scaffolds correlated highly with their activity at endogenous targets, as measured by high-throughput DNA sequencing of polymerase chain reaction products encompassing the TALEN recognition sites. TALENs introduced targeted mutations in ALS in 30% of transformed cells, and the frequencies of targeted gene insertion approximated 14%. These efficiencies made it possible to recover genome modifications without selection or enrichment regimes: 32% of tobacco calli generated from protoplasts transformed with TALEN-encoding constructs had TALEN-induced mutations in ALS, and of 16 calli characterized in detail, all had mutations in one allele each of the duplicate ALS genes (SurA and SurB). In calli derived from cells treated with a TALEN and a 322-bp donor molecule differing by 6 bp from the ALS coding sequence, 4% showed evidence of targeted gene replacement. The optimized reagents implemented in plant protoplasts should be useful for targeted modification of cells from diverse plant species and using a variety of means for reagent delivery.

  16. Genomic copy number variation associated with clinical outcome in canine cutaneous mast cell tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jark, Paulo C; Mundin, Deborah B P; de Carvalho, Marcio

    2017-01-01

    from Group ST>12 and six from Group STGenomic DNA was extracted, and aCGH was performed using Agilent Canine Genome CGH Microarray 4×180 (ID-252 552 - Agilent, USA). Data analysis was carried out using Nexus program version 5.0 (Biodiscovery, USA). The group ST>12 presented 11±3.3 CNVs, while...... in DNA isolated from tumor cells by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). The aim of this study was to compare copy number variations (CNVs) in cutaneous mast cell tumors of dogs that survived less than six (ST12months (ST>12) from the date of diagnosis. Ten animals were used: four...

  17. Reporting incidental findings in genomic scale clinical sequencing--a clinical laboratory perspective: a report of the Association for Molecular Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Madhuri; Bale, Sherri; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Gibson, Jane; Jeng, Linda Jo Bone; Joseph, Loren; Laser, Jordan; Lubin, Ira M; Miller, Christine E; Ross, Lainie F; Rothberg, Paul G; Tanner, Alice K; Vitazka, Patrik; Mao, Rong

    2015-03-01

    Advances in sequencing technologies have facilitated concurrent testing for many disorders, and the results generated may provide information about a patient's health that is unrelated to the clinical indication, commonly referred to as incidental findings. This is a paradigm shift from traditional genetic testing in which testing and reporting are tailored to a patient's specific clinical condition. Clinical laboratories and physicians are wrestling with this increased complexity in genomic testing and reporting of the incidental findings to patients. An enormous amount of discussion has taken place since the release of a set of recommendations from the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. This discussion has largely focused on the content of the incidental findings, but the laboratory perspective and patient autonomy have been overlooked. This report by the Association of Molecular Pathology workgroup discusses the pros and cons of next-generation sequencing technology, potential benefits, and harms for reporting of incidental findings, including the effect on both the laboratory and the patient, and compares those with other areas of medicine. The importance of genetic counseling to preserve patient autonomy is also reviewed. The discussion and recommendations presented by the workgroup underline the need for continued research and discussion among all stakeholders to improve our understanding of the effect of different policies on patients, providers, and laboratories.

  18. Cortisone and hydrocortisone inhibit human Kv1.3 activity in a non-genomic manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing; Park, Mi-Hyeong; Choi, Se-Young; Jo, Su-Hyun

    2015-06-01

    Glucocorticoids are hormones released in response to stress that are involved in various physiological processes including immune functions. One immune-modulating mechanism is achieved by the Kv1.3 voltage-dependent potassium channel, which is expressed highly in lymphocytes including effector memory T lymphocytes (TEM). Although glucocorticoids are known to inhibit Kv1.3 function, the detailed inhibitory mechanism is not yet fully understood. Here we studied the rapid non-genomic effects of cortisone and hydrocortisone on the human Kv1.3 channel expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Both cortisone and hydrocortisone reduced the amplitude of the Kv1.3 channel current in a concentration-dependent manner. Both cortisone and hydrocortisone rapidly and irreversibly inhibited Kv1.3 currents, eliminating the possibility of genomic regulation. Inhibition rate was stable relative to the degree of depolarization. Kinetically, cortisone altered the activating gate of Kv1.3 and hydrocortisone interacted with this channel in an open state. These results suggest that cortisone and hydrocortisone inhibit Kv1.3 currents via a non-genomic mechanism, providing a mechanism for the immunosuppressive effects of glucocorticoids.

  19. Carbohydrate-active enzymes from pigmented Bacilli: a genomic approach to assess carbohydrate utilization and degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrissat Bernard

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spore-forming Bacilli are Gram-positive bacteria commonly found in a variety of natural habitats, including soil, water and the gastro-intestinal (GI-tract of animals. Isolates of various Bacillus species produce pigments, mostly carotenoids, with a putative protective role against UV irradiation and oxygen-reactive forms. Results We report the annotation of carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes of two pigmented Bacilli isolated from the human GI-tract and belonging to the Bacillus indicus and B. firmus species. A high number of glycoside hydrolases (GHs and carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs were found in both isolates. A detailed analysis of CAZyme families, was performed and supported by growth data. Carbohydrates able to support growth as the sole carbon source negatively effected carotenoid formation in rich medium, suggesting that a catabolite repression-like mechanism controls carotenoid biosynthesis in both Bacilli. Experimental results on biofilm formation confirmed genomic data on the potentials of B. indicus HU36 to produce a levan-based biofilm, while mucin-binding and -degradation experiments supported genomic data suggesting the ability of both Bacilli to degrade mammalian glycans. Conclusions CAZy analyses of the genomes of the two pigmented Bacilli, compared to other Bacillus species and validated by experimental data on carbohydrate utilization, biofilm formation and mucin degradation, suggests that the two pigmented Bacilli are adapted to the intestinal environment and are suited to grow in and colonize the human gut.

  20. Carbohydrate-active enzymes from pigmented Bacilli: a genomic approach to assess carbohydrate utilization and degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Spore-forming Bacilli are Gram-positive bacteria commonly found in a variety of natural habitats, including soil, water and the gastro-intestinal (GI)-tract of animals. Isolates of various Bacillus species produce pigments, mostly carotenoids, with a putative protective role against UV irradiation and oxygen-reactive forms. Results We report the annotation of carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes) of two pigmented Bacilli isolated from the human GI-tract and belonging to the Bacillus indicus and B. firmus species. A high number of glycoside hydrolases (GHs) and carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) were found in both isolates. A detailed analysis of CAZyme families, was performed and supported by growth data. Carbohydrates able to support growth as the sole carbon source negatively effected carotenoid formation in rich medium, suggesting that a catabolite repression-like mechanism controls carotenoid biosynthesis in both Bacilli. Experimental results on biofilm formation confirmed genomic data on the potentials of B. indicus HU36 to produce a levan-based biofilm, while mucin-binding and -degradation experiments supported genomic data suggesting the ability of both Bacilli to degrade mammalian glycans. Conclusions CAZy analyses of the genomes of the two pigmented Bacilli, compared to other Bacillus species and validated by experimental data on carbohydrate utilization, biofilm formation and mucin degradation, suggests that the two pigmented Bacilli are adapted to the intestinal environment and are suited to grow in and colonize the human gut. PMID:21892951

  1. Carbohydrate-active enzymes from pigmented Bacilli: a genomic approach to assess carbohydrate utilization and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Nicola; D'Apuzzo, Enrica; Coutinho, Pedro M; Cutting, Simon M; Henrissat, Bernard; Ricca, Ezio

    2011-09-05

    Spore-forming Bacilli are gram-positive bacteria commonly found in a variety of natural habitats, including soil, water and the gastro-intestinal (GI)-tract of animals. Isolates of various Bacillus species produce pigments, mostly carotenoids, with a putative protective role against UV irradiation and oxygen-reactive forms. We report the annotation of carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes) of two pigmented Bacilli isolated from the human GI-tract and belonging to the Bacillus indicus and B. firmus species. A high number of glycoside hydrolases (GHs) and carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) were found in both isolates. A detailed analysis of CAZyme families, was performed and supported by growth data. Carbohydrates able to support growth as the sole carbon source negatively effected carotenoid formation in rich medium, suggesting that a catabolite repression-like mechanism controls carotenoid biosynthesis in both Bacilli. Experimental results on biofilm formation confirmed genomic data on the potentials of B. indicus HU36 to produce a levan-based biofilm, while mucin-binding and -degradation experiments supported genomic data suggesting the ability of both Bacilli to degrade mammalian glycans. CAZy analyses of the genomes of the two pigmented Bacilli, compared to other Bacillus species and validated by experimental data on carbohydrate utilization, biofilm formation and mucin degradation, suggests that the two pigmented Bacilli are adapted to the intestinal environment and are suited to grow in and colonize the human gut.

  2. Genome-level and biochemical diversity of the acyl-activating enzyme superfamily in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shockey, Jay; Browse, John

    2011-04-01

    In higher plants, the superfamily of carboxyl-CoA ligases and related proteins, collectively called acyl activating enzymes (AAEs), has evolved to provide enzymes for many pathways of primary and secondary metabolism and for the conjugation of hormones to amino acids. Across the superfamily there is only limited sequence similarity, but a series of highly conserved motifs, including the AMP-binding domain, make it easy to identify members. These conserved motifs are best understood in terms of the unique domain-rotation architecture that allows AAE enzymes to catalyze the two distinct steps of the CoA ligase reaction. Arabidopsis AAE sequences were used to identify the AAE gene families in the sequenced genomes of green algae, mosses, and trees; the size of the respective families increased with increasing degree of organismal cellular complexity, size, and generation time. Large-scale genome duplications and small-scale tandem gene duplications have contributed to AAE gene family complexity to differing extents in each of the multicellular species analyzed. Gene duplication and evolution of novel functions in Arabidopsis appears to have occurred rapidly, because acquisition of new substrate specificity is relatively easy in this class of proteins. Convergent evolution has also occurred between members of distantly related clades. These features of the AAE superfamily make it difficult to use homology searches and other genomics tools to predict enzyme function. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd. No claim to original US government works.

  3. Genome-wide mapping for clinically relevant predictors of lamotrigine- and phenytoin-induced hypersensitivity reactions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCormack, Mark

    2012-03-01

    An association between carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity and HLA-A*3101 has been reported in populations of both European and Asian descent. We aimed to investigate HLA-A*3101 and other common variants across the genome as markers for cutaneous adverse drug reactions (cADRs) attributed to lamotrigine and phenytoin.

  4. Complete Genome Sequences of Three Important Methicillin-Resistant Clinical Isolates of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Matthew C.; Bemis, David A.

    2016-01-01

    We report the first complete genome sequences of three predominant clones (ST68, ST71, and ST84) of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in North America. All strains were isolated from canine infections and have different SCCmec elements and antibiotic resistance gene patterns. PMID:27795289

  5. Clinical utilization of genomics data produced by the international Pseudomonas aeruginosa consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freschi, Luca; Jeukens, Julie; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Boyle, Brian; Dupont, Marie-Josée; Laroche, Jérôme; Larose, Stéphane; Maaroufi, Halim; Fothergill, Joanne L.; Moore, Matthew; Winsor, Geoffrey L.; Aaron, Shawn D.; Barbeau, Jean; Bell, Scott C.; Burns, Jane L.; Camara, Miguel; Cantin, André; Charette, Steve J.; Dewar, Ken; Déziel, Éric; Grimwood, Keith; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Harrison, Joe J.; Heeb, Stephan; Jelsbak, Lars; Jia, Baofeng; Kenna, Dervla T.; Kidd, Timothy J.; Klockgether, Jens; Lam, Joseph S.; Lamont, Iain L.; Lewenza, Shawn; Loman, Nick; Malouin, François; Manos, Jim; McArthur, Andrew G.; McKeown, Josie; Milot, Julie; Naghra, Hardeep; Nguyen, Dao; Pereira, Sheldon K.; Perron, Gabriel G.; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Rainey, Paul B.; Rousseau, Simon; Santos, Pedro M.; Stephenson, Anne; Taylor, Véronique; Turton, Jane F.; Waglechner, Nicholas; Williams, Paul; Thrane, Sandra W.; Wright, Gerard D.; Brinkman, Fiona S. L.; Tucker, Nicholas P.; Tümmler, Burkhard; Winstanley, Craig; Levesque, Roger C.

    2015-01-01

    The International Pseudomonas aeruginosa Consortium is sequencing over 1000 genomes and building an analysis pipeline for the study of Pseudomonas genome evolution, antibiotic resistance and virulence genes. Metadata, including genomic and phenotypic data for each isolate of the collection, are available through the International Pseudomonas Consortium Database (http://ipcd.ibis.ulaval.ca/). Here, we present our strategy and the results that emerged from the analysis of the first 389 genomes. With as yet unmatched resolution, our results confirm that P. aeruginosa strains can be divided into three major groups that are further divided into subgroups, some not previously reported in the literature. We also provide the first snapshot of P. aeruginosa strain diversity with respect to antibiotic resistance. Our approach will allow us to draw potential links between environmental strains and those implicated in human and animal infections, understand how patients become infected and how the infection evolves over time as well as identify prognostic markers for better evidence-based decisions on patient care. PMID:26483767

  6. Clinical utilization of genomics data produced by the international Pseudomonas aeruginosa consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca eFreschi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The International Pseudomonas aeruginosa Consortium is sequencing over 1000 genomes and building an analysis pipeline for the study of Pseudomonas genome evolution, antibiotic resistance and virulence genes. Metadata, including genomic and phenotypic data for each isolate of the collection, are available through the International Pseudomonas Consortium Database (http://ipcd.ibis.ulaval.ca/. Here, we present our strategy and the results that emerged from the analysis of the first 389 genomes. With as yet unmatched resolution, our results confirm that P. aeruginosa strains can be divided into three major groups that are further divided into subgroups, some not previously reported in the literature. We also provide the first snapshot of P. aeruginosa strain diversity with respect to antibiotic resistance. Our approach will allow us to draw potential links between environmental strains and those implicated in human and animal infections, understand how patients become infected and how the infection evolves over time as well as identify prognostic markers for better evidence-based decisions on patient care.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Strain G-12-005

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Fabíola Marques; de Almeida, Luiz Gonzaga Paula; Bablishvili, Nino; Gauthier, Marie; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Infection caused by drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a growing concern, especially in eastern Europe. We report an annotated draft genome sequence of M. tuberculosis strain G-12-005 obtained from a patient in Georgia. PMID:24812221

  8. Draft Genome Sequences of Five Clinical Strains of Brucella melitensis Isolated from Patients Residing in Kuwait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohd Wasif; Habibi, Nazima; Shaheed, Faraz

    2016-01-01

    Human brucellosis is a neglected and underrecognized infection of widespread geographic distribution. Brucellosis is present on all inhabited continents and endemic in many areas of the world, including Kuwait and the Middle East. Here, we present draft genome assemblies of five Brucella melitensis strains isolated from brucellosis patients in Kuwait. PMID:27811090

  9. Expanded national database collection and data coverage in the FINDbase worldwide database for clinically relevant genomic variation allele frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viennas, Emmanouil; Komianou, Angeliki; Mizzi, Clint; Stojiljkovic, Maja; Mitropoulou, Christina; Muilu, Juha; Vihinen, Mauno; Grypioti, Panagiota; Papadaki, Styliani; Pavlidis, Cristiana; Zukic, Branka; Katsila, Theodora; van der Spek, Peter J; Pavlovic, Sonja; Tzimas, Giannis; Patrinos, George P

    2017-01-04

    FINDbase (http://www.findbase.org) is a comprehensive data repository that records the prevalence of clinically relevant genomic variants in various populations worldwide, such as pathogenic variants leading mostly to monogenic disorders and pharmacogenomics biomarkers. The database also records the incidence of rare genetic diseases in various populations, all in well-distinct data modules. Here, we report extensive data content updates in all data modules, with direct implications to clinical pharmacogenomics. Also, we report significant new developments in FINDbase, namely (i) the release of a new version of the ETHNOS software that catalyzes development curation of national/ethnic genetic databases, (ii) the migration of all FINDbase data content into 90 distinct national/ethnic mutation databases, all built around Microsoft's PivotViewer (http://www.getpivot.com) software (iii) new data visualization tools and (iv) the interrelation of FINDbase with DruGeVar database with direct implications in clinical pharmacogenomics. The abovementioned updates further enhance the impact of FINDbase, as a key resource for Genomic Medicine applications.

  10. The Genome-Wide Influence on Human BMI Depends on Physical Activity, Life Course, and Historical Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Guang; Liu, Hexuan; Wang, Ling; Shen, Haipeng; Hu, Wen

    2015-10-01

    In this analysis, guided by an evolutionary framework, we investigate how the human genome as a whole interacts with historical period, age, and physical activity to influence body mass index (BMI). The genomic influence is estimated by (1) heritability or the proportion of variance in BMI explained by genome-wide genotype data, and (2) the random effects or the best linear unbiased predictors (BLUPs) of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) data on BMI. Data were used from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) in the United States. The study was initiated in 1948, and the obesity data were collected repeatedly over the subsequent decades. The analyses draw analysis samples from a pool of >8,000 individuals in the FHS. The hypothesis testing based on Pitman test, permutation Pitman test, F test, and permutation F test produces three sets of significant findings. First, the genomic influence on BMI is substantially larger after the mid-1980s than in the few decades before the mid-1980s within each age group of 21-40, 41-50, 51-60, and >60. Second, the genomic influence on BMI weakens as one ages across the life course, or the genomic influence on BMI tends to be more important during reproductive ages than after reproductive ages within each of the two historical periods. Third, within the age group of 21-50 and not in the age group of >50, the genomic influence on BMI among physically active individuals is substantially smaller than the influence on those who are not physically active. In summary, this study provides evidence that the influence of human genome as a whole on obesity depends on historical period, age, and level of physical activity.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. Strain In5 Isolated from a Greenlandic Disease Suppressive Soil with Potent Antimicrobial Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennessy, Rosanna C.; Glaring, Mikkel Andreas; Frydenlund Michelsen, Charlotte;

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. In5 is an isolate of disease suppressive soil with potent activity against pathogens. Its antifungal activity has been linked to a gene cluster encoding nonribosomal peptide synthetases producing the peptides nunamycin and nunapeptin. The genome sequence will provide insight...... into the genetics behind the antimicrobial activity of this strain....

  12. The application of transcription activator-like effector nucleases for genome editing in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Peishan; Li, Wei; Ou, Guangshuo

    2014-08-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been a powerful model system for biomedical research in the past decades, however, the efficient genetic tools are still demanding for gene knockout, knock-in or conditional gene mutations. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that comprise a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain fused to a FokI nuclease domain facilitate the targeted genome editing in various cell types or organisms. Here we summarize the recent progresses and protocols using TALENs in C. elegans that generate gene mutations and knock-ins in the germ line and the conditional gene knockout in somatic tissues.

  13. Genome-wide association study using high-density single nucleotide polymorphism arrays and whole-genome sequences for clinical mastitis traits in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahana, G; Guldbrandtsen, B; Thomsen, B; Holm, L-E; Panitz, F; Brøndum, R F; Bendixen, C; Lund, M S

    2014-11-01

    Mastitis is a mammary disease that frequently affects dairy cattle. Despite considerable research on the development of effective prevention and treatment strategies, mastitis continues to be a significant issue in bovine veterinary medicine. To identify major genes that affect mastitis in dairy cattle, 6 chromosomal regions on Bos taurus autosome (BTA) 6, 13, 16, 19, and 20 were selected from a genome scan for 9 mastitis phenotypes using imputed high-density single nucleotide polymorphism arrays. Association analyses using sequence-level variants for the 6 targeted regions were carried out to map causal variants using whole-genome sequence data from 3 breeds. The quantitative trait loci (QTL) discovery population comprised 4,992 progeny-tested Holstein bulls, and QTL were confirmed in 4,442 Nordic Red and 1,126 Jersey cattle. The targeted regions were imputed to the sequence level. The highest association signal for clinical mastitis was observed on BTA 6 at 88.97 Mb in Holstein cattle and was confirmed in Nordic Red cattle. The peak association region on BTA 6 contained 2 genes: vitamin D-binding protein precursor (GC) and neuropeptide FF receptor 2 (NPFFR2), which, based on known biological functions, are good candidates for affecting mastitis. However, strong linkage disequilibrium in this region prevented conclusive determination of the causal gene. A different QTL on BTA 6 located at 88.32 Mb in Holstein cattle affected mastitis. In addition, QTL on BTA 13 and 19 were confirmed to segregate in Nordic Red cattle and QTL on BTA 16 and 20 were confirmed in Jersey cattle. Although several candidate genes were identified in these targeted regions, it was not possible to identify a gene or polymorphism as the causal factor for any of these regions. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The latent origin of replication of Epstein-Barr virus directs viral genomes to active regions of the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Manuel J; Ott, Elisabeth; Papior, Peer; Schepers, Aloys

    2010-03-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus efficiently infects human B cells. The EBV genome is maintained extrachromosomally and replicates synchronously with the host's chromosomes. The latent origin of replication (oriP) guarantees plasmid stability by mediating two basic functions: replication and segregation of the viral genome. While the segregation process of EBV genomes is well understood, little is known about its chromatin association and nuclear distribution during interphase. Here, we analyzed the nuclear localization of EBV genomes and the role of functional oriP domains FR and DS for basic functions such as the transformation of primary cells, their role in targeting EBV genomes to distinct nuclear regions, and their association with epigenetic domains. Fluorescence in situ hybridization visualized the localization of extrachromosomal EBV genomes in the regions adjacent to chromatin-dense territories called the perichromatin. Further, immunofluorescence experiments demonstrated a preference of the viral genome for histone 3 lysine 4-trimethylated (H3K4me3) and histone 3 lysine 9-acetylated (H3K9ac) nuclear regions. To determine the role of FR and DS for establishment and subnuclear localization of EBV genomes, we transformed primary human B lymphocytes with recombinant mini-EBV genomes containing different oriP mutants. The loss of DS results in a slightly increased association in H3K27me3 domains. This study demonstrates that EBV genomes or oriP-based extrachromosomal vector systems are integrated into the higher order nuclear organization. We found that viral genomes are not randomly distributed in the nucleus. FR but not DS is crucial for the localization of EBV in perichromatic regions that are enriched for H3K4me3 and H3K9ac, which are hallmarks of transcriptionally active regions.

  15. Exploring Patient Activation in the Clinic: Measurement from Three Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledford, Christy J. W.; Ledford, Christopher C.; Childress, Marc A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To further conceptualize and operationalize patient activation (PA), using measures from patient, physician, and researcher perspectives. Data Source/Study Setting. Multimethod observation in 2010 within a family medicine clinic. Study Design. Part of an intervention with 130 patients with type 2 diabetes, this observational study…

  16. Active Interventions in Clinical Practice: Contributions of Gestalt Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammert, Marilyn; Dolan, Mary M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes two dimensions of Gestalt therapy that can enhance clinical practice--orientation to the present and active-experimental style--and examines them in relation to some traditional principles of practice. Gestalt theory offers a method of discovery that is a combination of phenomenology and behaviorism. (JAC)

  17. The Clinical Study of Telomerase Activity in Gastric Tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XI Weihong; NI Xiaoqian; SHEN Yuqin; HUANG Qinmei

    2002-01-01

    Telomerase activity was detected with both telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) - silver stain and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) - enzyme linked immuno - sorbent assay (ELISA). We have studied the telomerase activity in the 68 gastric tumors and their neighboring tissues,25 gastric ulcer, and 3 tumor cell colonies. The positive rate of telomerase activity in gastric tumors was 86.8% (59/68) and which was obviously higher than 7.3% (5/68) in the normal tissues adjacent to the tumors and 4% (1/25) in gastric ulcer. The telomerase activity was 100% (3/3) in the tumor colonies. It allowed to be seen that higher telomerase activity was associated with the origin and development of the gastric tumor. We believe that telomerase activity may be a useful clinical diagnostic marker for the gastric tumor.

  18. The UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser: update 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanborn, J Zachary; Benz, Stephen C; Craft, Brian; Szeto, Christopher; Kober, Kord M; Meyer, Laurence; Vaske, Charles J; Goldman, Mary; Smith, Kayla E; Kuhn, Robert M; Karolchik, Donna; Kent, W James; Stuart, Joshua M; Haussler, David; Zhu, Jingchun

    2011-01-01

    The UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser (https://genome-cancer.ucsc.edu) comprises a suite of web-based tools to integrate, visualize and analyze cancer genomics and clinical data. The browser displays whole-genome views of genome-wide experimental measurements for multiple samples alongside their associated clinical information. Multiple data sets can be viewed simultaneously as coordinated 'heatmap tracks' to compare across studies or different data modalities. Users can order, filter, aggregate, classify and display data interactively based on any given feature set including clinical features, annotated biological pathways and user-contributed collections of genes. Integrated standard statistical tools provide dynamic quantitative analysis within all available data sets. The browser hosts a growing body of publicly available cancer genomics data from a variety of cancer types, including data generated from the Cancer Genome Atlas project. Multiple consortiums use the browser on confidential prepublication data enabled by private installations. Many new features have been added, including the hgMicroscope tumor image viewer, hgSignature for real-time genomic signature evaluation on any browser track, and 'PARADIGM' pathway tracks to display integrative pathway activities. The browser is integrated with the UCSC Genome Browser; thus inheriting and integrating the Genome Browser's rich set of human biology and genetics data that enhances the interpretability of the cancer genomics data.

  19. Transcriptional activity, chromosomal distribution and expression effects of transposable elements in Coffea genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício R Lopes

    Full Text Available Plant genomes are massively invaded by transposable elements (TEs, many of which are located near host genes and can thus impact gene expression. In flowering plants, TE expression can be activated (de-repressed under certain stressful conditions, both biotic and abiotic, as well as by genome stress caused by hybridization. In this study, we examined the effects of these stress agents on TE expression in two diploid species of coffee, Coffea canephora and C. eugenioides, and their allotetraploid hybrid C. arabica. We also explored the relationship of TE repression mechanisms to host gene regulation via the effects of exonized TE sequences. Similar to what has been seen for other plants, overall TE expression levels are low in Coffea plant cultivars, consistent with the existence of effective TE repression mechanisms. TE expression patterns are highly dynamic across the species and conditions assayed here are unrelated to their classification at the level of TE class or family. In contrast to previous results, cell culture conditions per se do not lead to the de-repression of TE expression in C. arabica. Results obtained here indicate that differing plant drought stress levels relate strongly to TE repression mechanisms. TEs tend to be expressed at significantly higher levels in non-irrigated samples for the drought tolerant cultivars but in drought sensitive cultivars the opposite pattern was shown with irrigated samples showing significantly higher TE expression. Thus, TE genome repression mechanisms may be finely tuned to the ideal growth and/or regulatory conditions of the specific plant cultivars in which they are active. Analysis of TE expression levels in cell culture conditions underscored the importance of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD pathways in the repression of Coffea TEs. These same NMD mechanisms can also regulate plant host gene expression via the repression of genes that bear exonized TE sequences.

  20. MLLT1 YEATS domain mutations in clinically distinctive Favourable Histology Wilms tumours | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilms tumour is an embryonal tumour of childhood that closely resembles the developing kidney. Genomic changes responsible for the development of the majority of Wilms tumours remain largely unknown. Here we identify recurrent mutations within Wilms tumours that involve the highly conserved YEATS domain of MLLT1 (ENL), a gene known to be involved in transcriptional elongation during early development. The mutant MLLT1 protein shows altered binding to acetylated histone tails.

  1. Decreased antitoxic activities among children with clinical episodes of malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; McKay, V; N'Jie, R

    1998-01-01

    Healthy Gambian children, children with clinical Plasmodium falciparum malaria, and children with asymptomatic P. falciparum infections were studied to investigate whether antitoxic activities may contribute to protection against malarial symptoms. Markers of inflammatory reactions, soluble tumor...... necrosis factor receptor I, and C-reactive protein were found in high concentrations in children with symptomatic P. falciparum malaria compared with levels in children with asymptomatic P. falciparum infections or in healthy children, indicating that inflammatory reactions are induced only in children...... decreased capacity to block induction of LAL activation by P. falciparum exoantigen. The decreased blocking activity was restored in the following dry season, when the children had no clinical malaria. Symptomatic children also had the highest immunoglobulin G (IgG) reactivities to conserved P. falciparum...

  2. Active chromatin domains are defined by acetylation islands revealed by genome-wide mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Tae-Young; Cuddapah, Suresh; Zhao, Keji

    2005-03-01

    The identity and developmental potential of a human cell is specified by its epigenome that is largely defined by patterns of chromatin modifications including histone acetylation. Here we report high-resolution genome-wide mapping of diacetylation of histone H3 at Lys 9 and Lys 14 in resting and activated human T cells by genome-wide mapping technique (GMAT). Our data show that high levels of the H3 acetylation are detected in gene-rich regions. The chromatin accessibility and gene expression of a genetic domain is correlated with hyperacetylation of promoters and other regulatory elements but not with generally elevated acetylation of the entire domain. Islands of acetylation are identified in the intergenic and transcribed regions. The locations of the 46,813 acetylation islands identified in this study are significantly correlated with conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs) and many of them are colocalized with known regulatory elements in T cells. TCR signaling induces 4045 new acetylation loci that may mediate the global chromatin remodeling and gene activation. We propose that the acetylation islands are epigenetic marks that allow prediction of functional regulatory elements.

  3. Maintenance of genomic imprinting at the Arabidopsis medea locus requires zygotic DDM1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielle-Calzada, J P; Thomas, J; Spillane, C; Coluccio, A; Hoeppner, M A; Grossniklaus, U

    1999-11-15

    In higher plants, seed development requires maternal gene activity in the haploid (gametophytic) as well as diploid (sporophytic) tissues of the developing ovule. The Arabidopsis thaliana gene MEDEA (MEA) encodes a SET-domain protein of the Polycomb group that regulates cell proliferation by exerting a gametophytic maternal control during seed development. Seeds derived from female gametocytes (embryo sacs) carrying a mutant mea allele abort and exhibit cell proliferation defects in both the embryo and the endosperm. In this study we show that the mea mutation affects an imprinted gene expressed maternally in cells of the female gametophyte and after fertilization only from maternally inherited MEA alleles. Paternally inherited MEA alleles are transcriptionally silent in both the young embryo and endosperm. Mutations at the decrease in DNA methylation1 (ddm1) locus are able to rescue mea seeds by functionally reactivating paternally inherited MEA alleles during seed development. Rescued seeds are larger than the wild type and exhibit some of the abnormalities found in aborting mea seeds. Our results indicate that the maintenance of the genomic imprint at the mea locus requires zygotic DDM1 activity. Because DDM1 encodes a putative chromatin remodeling factor, chromatin structure is likely to be interrelated with genomic imprinting in Arabidopsis.

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and whole genome sequencing: a practical guide and online tools available for the clinical microbiologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satta, G; Atzeni, A; McHugh, T D

    2017-02-01

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) has the potential to revolutionize the diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection but the lack of bioinformatic expertise among clinical microbiologists is a barrier for adoption. Software products for analysis should be simple, free of charge, able to accept data directly from the sequencer (FASTQ files) and to provide the basic functionalities all-in-one. The main aim of this narrative review is to provide a practical guide for the clinical microbiologist, with little or no practical experience of WGS analysis, with a specific focus on software products tailor-made for M. tuberculosis analysis. With sequencing performed by an external provider, it is now feasible to implement WGS analysis in the routine clinical practice of any microbiology laboratory, with the potential to detect resistance weeks before traditional phenotypic culture methods, but the clinical microbiologist should be aware of the limitations of this approach. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetic variation in Micro-RNA genes of host genome affects clinical manifestation of symptomatic Human Cytomegalovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Maneesh Kumar; Mishra, Aditi; Pandey, Shashi Kant; Kapoor, Rakesh; Sharma, Raj Kumar; Agrawal, Suraksha

    2015-10-01

    Micro-RNAs are implicated in various physiological and pathologic processes. In this study, we tested whether Micro-RNA gene variants of host-genome affect clinical manifestation of symptomatic HCMV infection. HCMV infection was detected by fluorescent PCR and immuno-histochemistry. The detection of genetic variants of four studied Micro-RNA tag-SNPs was done through PCR-RFLP assay and validated with DNA sequencing. We observed an increased risk ranged from 3-folds to 5-folds among symptomatic HCMV cases for mutant genotype of rs2910164 (crude OR=3.11, p=0.009 and adjusted OR=3.25, p=0.007), rs11614913 (crude OR=3.20, p=0.006 and adjusted OR=3.48, p=0.004) and rs3746444 (crude OR=4.91, p=0.002 and adjusted OR=5.28, p=0.002) tag-SNPs. Interestingly, all the tag-SNPs that were significant after multiple comparisons at a FDR of 5% in symptomatic HCMV cases remained significant even after bootstrap analysis, providing internal validation to these results. Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MDR) analysis revealed 5-folds increased risk for symptomatic HCMV cases under the four-factor model (rs2910164, rs2292832, rs11614913 and rs3746444). These results suggest that Micro-RNA gene variants of host-genome may affect clinical manifestation of symptomatic HCMV infection. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparative analysis of the genomes of clinical isolates of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis regarding virulence-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, Brendan; Rose, Sasha J; Gilbert, Kerrigan; Lewis, Matthew; Bermudez, Luiz E

    2017-07-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis is a member of the M. avium complex, a heterogeneous group of bacteria that cause lung infection in immunocompetent patients or disseminated infection in patients with immunosuppression. The bacteria belonging to this complex have variable virulence, depending on the strain considered, and therefore a representative of the most common clinical phenotype was analysed. The genomic sequences of four M. avium subsp. hominissuis isolates obtained from clinical specimens were completed. Mav101, Mav100 and MavA5 were isolated from the blood of patients with AIDS. MavA5 was disseminated from the lung, while Mav3388 was isolated from the lungs of a patient with chronic lung disease. The sequences were annotated using the published Mav104 genome as a blueprint. Functional and virulence analyses of the sequences were carried out. Mice studies comparing the virulence of the strains were performed. Findings showed that while Mav101 was very similar to Mav104, there were numerous differences between Mav104 and the remaining strains at nucleotide and predicted protein levels. The presence of genes associated with biofilm formation and several known virulence-related genes were sometimes differentially present among the isolates, suggesting overlapping functions by different genetic determinants. The sequences provided important information about M. avium heterogenicity and evolution as a pathogen. The limitation is the lack of understanding on possible overlapping functions of genes/proteins.

  7. It's a dirty job--A robust method for the purification and de novo genome assembly of Cryptosporidium from clinical material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Sofia; Sikora, Per; Karlberg, Maria L; Winiecka-Krusnell, Jadwiga; Alm, Erik; Beser, Jessica; Arrighi, Romanico B G

    2015-06-01

    We have developed a novel strategy for the purification of Cryptosporidium oocysts from clinical samples using IMS and PCR amplification of target DNA to facilitate uniform coverage genome sequencing and de novo assembly. Our procedure could also be used for other microbial pathogens from clinical specimens.

  8. Genome-Wide DNA Copy Number Analysis of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Identifies New Genetic Markers Associated with Clinical Outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maribel Forero-Castro

    Full Text Available Identifying additional genetic alterations associated with poor prognosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is still a challenge.To characterize the presence of additional DNA copy number alterations (CNAs in children and adults with ALL by whole-genome oligonucleotide array (aCGH analysis, and to identify their associations with clinical features and outcome. Array-CGH was carried out in 265 newly diagnosed ALLs (142 children and 123 adults. The NimbleGen CGH 12x135K array (Roche was used to analyze genetic gains and losses. CNAs were analyzed with GISTIC and aCGHweb software. Clinical and biological variables were analyzed. Three of the patients showed chromothripsis (cth6, cth14q and cth15q. CNAs were associated with age, phenotype, genetic subtype and overall survival (OS. In the whole cohort of children, the losses on 14q32.33 (p = 0.019 and 15q13.2 (p = 0.04 were related to shorter OS. In the group of children without good- or poor-risk cytogenetics, the gain on 1p36.11 was a prognostic marker independently associated with shorter OS. In adults, the gains on 19q13.2 (p = 0.001 and Xp21.1 (p = 0.029, and the loss of 17p (p = 0.014 were independent markers of poor prognosis with respect to OS. In summary, CNAs are frequent in ALL and are associated with clinical parameters and survival. Genome-wide DNA copy number analysis allows the identification of genetic markers that predict clinical outcome, suggesting that detection of these genetic lesions will be useful in the management of patients newly diagnosed with ALL.

  9. A Global Genomic Screening Strategy Reveals Diverse Activators of Constitutive Activated Receptor (CAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A comprehensive survey of conditions that activate CAR in the mouse liver has not been carried out but would be useful in understanding their impact on CAR-dependent liver tumor induction. A gene signature dependent on CAR activation was identified by comparing the transcript pr...

  10. DNA-PK Mediates AKT Activation and Apoptosis Inhibition in Clinically Acquired Platinum Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euan A. Stronach

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Clinical resistance to chemotherapy is a frequent event in cancer treatment and is closely linked to poor outcome. High-grade serous (HGS ovarian cancer is characterized by p53 mutation and high levels of genomic instability. Treatment includes platinum-based chemotherapy and initial response rates are high; however, resistance is frequently acquired, at which point treatment options are largely palliative. Recent data indicate that platinumresistant clones exist within the sensitive primary tumor at presentation, implying resistant cell selection after treatment with platinum chemotherapy. The AKT pathway is central to cell survival and has been implicated in platinum resistance. Here, we show that platinum exposure induces an AKT-dependent, prosurvival, DNA damage response in clinically platinum-resistant but not platinum-sensitive cells. AKT relocates to the nucleus of resistant cells where it is phosphorylated specifically on S473 by DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK, and this activation inhibits cisplatin-mediated apoptosis. Inhibition of DNA-PK or AKT, but not mTORC2, restores platinum sensitivity in a panel of clinically resistant HGS ovarian cancer cell lines: we also demonstrate these effects in other tumor types. Re-sensitization is associated with prevention of AKT-mediated BAD phosphorylation. Strikingly, in patient-matched sensitive cells, we do not see enhanced apoptosis on combining cisplatin with AKT or DNA-PK inhibition. Insulin-mediated activation of AKT is unaffected by DNA-PK inhibitor treatment, suggesting that this effect is restricted to DNA damage–mediated activation of AKT and that, clinically, DNA-PK inhibition might prevent platinum-induced AKT activation without interfering with normal glucose homeostasis, an unwanted toxicity of direct AKT inhibitors.

  11. Genome-scale transcriptional activation by an engineered CRISPR-Cas9 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konermann, Silvana; Brigham, Mark D; Trevino, Alexandro E; Joung, Julia; Abudayyeh, Omar O; Barcena, Clea; Hsu, Patrick D; Habib, Naomi; Gootenberg, Jonathan S; Nishimasu, Hiroshi; Nureki, Osamu; Zhang, Feng

    2015-01-29

    Systematic interrogation of gene function requires the ability to perturb gene expression in a robust and generalizable manner. Here we describe structure-guided engineering of a CRISPR-Cas9 complex to mediate efficient transcriptional activation at endogenous genomic loci. We used these engineered Cas9 activation complexes to investigate single-guide RNA (sgRNA) targeting rules for effective transcriptional activation, to demonstrate multiplexed activation of ten genes simultaneously, and to upregulate long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) transcripts. We also synthesized a library consisting of 70,290 guides targeting all human RefSeq coding isoforms to screen for genes that, upon activation, confer resistance to a BRAF inhibitor. The top hits included genes previously shown to be able to confer resistance, and novel candidates were validated using individual sgRNA and complementary DNA overexpression. A gene expression signature based on the top screening hits correlated with markers of BRAF inhibitor resistance in cell lines and patient-derived samples. These results collectively demonstrate the potential of Cas9-based activators as a powerful genetic perturbation technology.

  12. A metadata approach for clinical data management in translational genomics studies in breast cancer

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    Davies Jim

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In molecular profiling studies of cancer patients, experimental and clinical data are combined in order to understand the clinical heterogeneity of the disease: clinical information for each subject needs to be linked to tumour samples, macromolecules extracted, and experimental results. This may involve the integration of clinical data sets from several different sources: these data sets may employ different data definitions and some may be incomplete. Methods In this work we employ semantic web techniques developed within the CancerGrid project, in particular the use of metadata elements and logic-based inference to annotate heterogeneous clinical information, integrate and query it. Results We show how this integration can be achieved automatically, following the declaration of appropriate metadata elements for each clinical data set; we demonstrate the practicality of this approach through application to experimental results and clinical data from five hospitals in the UK and Canada, undertaken as part of the METABRIC project (Molecular Taxonomy of Breast Cancer International Consortium. Conclusion We describe a metadata approach for managing similarities and differences in clinical datasets in a standardized way that uses Common Data Elements (CDEs. We apply and evaluate the approach by integrating the five different clinical datasets of METABRIC.

  13. Dysfunctional telomeres promote genomic instability and metastasis in the absence of telomerase activity in oncogene induced mammary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojovic, Bojana; Crowe, David L

    2013-02-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein that maintains the ends of chromosomes (telomeres). In normal cells lacking telomerase activity, telomeres shorten with each cell division because of the inability to completely synthesize the lagging strand. Critically shortened telomeres elicit DNA damage responses and limit cellular division and lifespan, providing an important tumor suppressor function. Most human cancer cells express telomerase which contributes significantly to the tumor phenotype. In human breast cancer, telomerase expression is predictive of clinical outcomes such as lymph node metastasis and survival. In mouse models of mammary cancer, telomerase expression is also upregulated. Telomerase overexpression resulted in spontaneous mammary tumor development in aged female mice. Increased mammary cancer also was observed when telomerase deficient mice were crossed with p53 null mutant animals. However, the effects of telomerase and telomere length on oncogene driven mammary cancer have not been completely characterized. To address these issues we characterized neu proto-oncogene driven mammary tumor formation in G1 Terc-/- (telomerase deficient with long telomeres), G3 Terc-/- (telomerase deficient with short telomeres), and Terc+/+ mice. Telomerase deficiency reduced the number of mammary tumors and increased tumor latency regardless of telomere length. Decreased tumor formation correlated with increased apoptosis in Terc deficient tumors. Short telomeres dramatically increased lung metastasis which correlated with increased genomic instability, and specific alterations in DNA copy number and gene expression. We concluded that short telomeres promote metastasis in the absence of telomerase activity in neu oncogene driven mammary tumors.

  14. Clinical relevance and public health significance of hepatitis B virus genomic variations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Wen Cao

    2009-01-01

    Ten hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes (A-J) and 34 HBV subgenotypes have been identified so far. HBV genotypes and subgenotypes have distinct geographical distributions, and have been shown to differ with regard to clinical outcome, prognosis, and response to interferon treatment. Infection with subgenotype A2 is frequently associated with high viral load, resulting in acute infection via horizontal transmission. Genotypes A and B are more sensitive to interferon treatment than genotypes D and C, respectively. Genotype B is more frequent in acute hepatitis than genotype C, whereas genotype C (C2) is more frequently associated with an increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), mostly cirrhotic, as compared with genotype B (B2). Genotype mixture is associated with high viral load and worse outcome of HBV infection. HBV mutations in the S genes, especially amino acids substitution at position 145 (G145R), are associated with immune escape, whereas mutations in the PreS or S genes which impair HBsAg secretion could present a risk to blood safety. HBV variants harboring mutations in the viral polymerase gene that confer resistance to nucleoside analogs may be selected during antiviral therapy. Different genotypes have distinct mutation patterns in the PreS and EnhⅡ/BCP/Precore regions.PreS deletions, C1653T, T1753V, and A1762T/G1764A are associated with an increased risk of HCC. HCCassociated HBV mutants may not transmit via motherto- child transmission, and are likely generated during HBV-induced pathogenesis. Examination of HBV mutations alone or in combination and host genetic suscep susceptibility will be helpful in classifying the HBV-infected subjects who will develop HCC and need active antiviral treatments.

  15. Clinical and arthroscopic findings in recreationally active patients

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    Fowler Elizabeth M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To examine the diagnostic accuracy of standard clinical tests for the shoulder in recreational athletes with activity related pain. Design Cohort study with index test of clinical examination and reference standard of arthroscopy. Setting Sports Medicine clinic in Sheffield, U.K. Participants 101 recreational athletes (82 male, 19 female; mean age 40.8 ± 14.6 years over a six year period. Interventions Bilateral evaluation of movements of the shoulder followed by standardized shoulder tests, formulation of clinical diagnosis and shoulder arthroscopy conducted by the same surgeon. Main Outcome Measurements Sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratio for a positive test and over-all accuracy of clinical examination was examined retrospectively and compared with arthroscopy. Results Isolated pathology was rare, most patients (72% having more than one injury recorded. O'Brien's clinical test had a mediocre sensitivity (64% and over-all accuracy (54% for diagnosing SLAP lesions. Hawkins test and Jobe's test had the highest but still not impressive over-all accuracy (67% and sensitivity (67% for rotator cuff pathology respectively. External and internal impingement tests showed similar levels of accuracy. When a positive test was observed in one of a combination of shoulder tests used for diagnosing SLAP lesions or rotator cuff disease, sensitivity increased substantially whilst specificity decreased. Conclusions The diagnostic accuracy of isolated standard shoulder tests in recreational athletes was over-all very poor, potentially due to the majority of athletes (71% having concomitant shoulder injuries. Most likely, this means that many of these injuries are missed in general practice and treatment is therefore delayed. Clinical examination of the shoulder should involve a combination of clinical tests in order to identify likely intra articular pathology which may warrant referral to specialist for surgery.

  16. Dry and wet approaches for genome-wide functional annotation of conventional and unconventional transcriptional activators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Levati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors (TFs are master gene products that regulate gene expression in response to a variety of stimuli. They interact with DNA in a sequence-specific manner using a variety of DNA-binding domain (DBD modules. This allows to properly position their second domain, called “effector domain”, to directly or indirectly recruit positively or negatively acting co-regulators including chromatin modifiers, thus modulating preinitiation complex formation as well as transcription elongation. At variance with the DBDs, which are comprised of well-defined and easily recognizable DNA binding motifs, effector domains are usually much less conserved and thus considerably more difficult to predict. Also not so easy to identify are the DNA-binding sites of TFs, especially on a genome-wide basis and in the case of overlapping binding regions. Another emerging issue, with many potential regulatory implications, is that of so-called “moonlighting” transcription factors, i.e., proteins with an annotated function unrelated to transcription and lacking any recognizable DBD or effector domain, that play a role in gene regulation as their second job. Starting from bioinformatic and experimental high-throughput tools for an unbiased, genome-wide identification and functional characterization of TFs (especially transcriptional activators, we describe both established (and usually well affordable as well as newly developed platforms for DNA-binding site identification. Selected combinations of these search tools, some of which rely on next-generation sequencing approaches, allow delineating the entire repertoire of TFs and unconventional regulators encoded by the any sequenced genome.

  17. Human gene encoding prostacyclin synthase (PTGIS): Genomic organization, chromosomal localization, and promoter activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Chieko; Yabuki, Tomoko; Inoue, Hiroyasu [National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, Osaka (Japan)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    The prostacyclin synthase gene isolated from human genomic libraries (PTGIS) consists of 10 exons spanning approximately 60 kb. All the splice donor and acceptor sites conform to the GT/AG rule. Genomic Southern blot and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses revealed that the human prostacyclin synthase gene is present as a single copy per haploid genome and is localized on chromosome 20q13.11-q13.13. The 1.5-kb sequence of the 5{prime} of the translational initiation site contained both GC-rich and pyrimidine-rich regions and consensus sequences of the transcription factor recognition sites such as Sp1, AP-2, the interferon-{gamma} response element, GATA, NF-{kappa}B, the CACCC box, and the glucocorticoid response element. The core binding sequence (GAGACC) of the shear stress responsive element was also found in the 5{prime}-flanking region of the gene. The major product of the primer extension analysis suggested that the transcription of the gene started from the positions around 49 bp upstream of the translational initiation codon. Transient transfection experiments using human aortic and bovine arterial endothelial cells demonstrated that the GC-rich region (positions -145 to -10) possessed a significant promoter activity. The 6-kb downstream sequence of the translational termination codon contained multiple polyadenylation signals, Alu repeat sequences, and the consensus sequence of the primate-repetitive DNA element, MER1. Two sizes of the prostacyclin synthase mRNAs (approximately 6 and 3.3 kb) were detected with the human aorta and lung. RNA blot hybridization analysis using the 3{prime}-untranslated region as probe indicated that the sizes of the 3{prime}-flanking regions were different in the major 6-kb and minor 3.3-kb mRNAs. 54 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Complete Genome Sequences of Three Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype 19A with Different Susceptibilities to the Myxobacterial Metabolite Carolacton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunk, Boyke; Schober, Isabel; Spröer, Cathrin; Bergmann, Simone; Jarek, Michael; Overmann, Jörg; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The full-genome sequences of three drug- and multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical isolates of serotype 19A were determined by PacBio single-molecule real-time sequencing, in combination with Illumina MiSeq sequencing. A comparison to the genomes of other pneumococci indicates a high nucleotide sequence identity to strains Hungary19A-6 and TCH8431/19A. PMID:28209832

  19. Clinical activity of alvocidib (flavopiridol) in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidner, Joshua F; Karp, Judith E

    2015-12-01

    There have been minimal therapeutic advancements in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) over the past 4 decades and outcomes remain unsatisfactory. Alvocidib (formerly flavopiridol) is a multi-serine threonine cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor with demonstrable in vitro and clinical activity in AML when combined in a timed sequential chemotherapy regimen, FLAM (alvocidib followed by cytarabine continuous infusion and mitoxantrone). FLAM has been evaluated in sequential phase 1 and phase 2 studies in 149 and 256 relapsed/refractory and newly diagnosed non-favorable risk AML patients, respectively, with encouraging findings in both patient populations warranting further investigation. This review highlights the mechanism of action of alvocidib, pre-clinical studies of alvocidib in AML, and the clinical trials evaluating alvocidib alone and in combination with cytotoxic agents (FLAM) in AML.

  20. MALT1-ubiquitination triggers non-genomic NF-κB/IKK signaling upon platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Zubair A; Vemana, Hari Priya; Khasawneh, Fadi T

    2015-01-01

    We have recently shown that IKK complex plays an important non-genomic role in platelet function, i.e., regulates SNARE machinery-dependent membrane fusion. In this connection, it is well known that MALT1, whose activity is modulated by proteasome, plays an important role in the regulation of IKK complex. Therefore, the present studies investigated the mechanism by which IKK signaling is regulated in the context of the platelet proteasome. It was found that platelets express a functional proteasome, and form CARMA/MALT1/Bcl10 (CBM) complex when activated. Using a pharmacological inhibitor, the proteasome was found to regulate platelet function (aggregation, integrin activation, secretion, phosphatidylserine exposure and changes in intracellular calcium). It was also found to regulate thrombogenesis and physiologic hemostasis. We also observed, upon platelet activation, that MALT1 is ubiquitinated, and this coincides with the activation of the IKK/NF-κB-signaling pathway. Finally, we observed that the proteasome inhibitor blocks CBM complex formation and the interaction of IKKγ and MALT1; abrogates SNARE formation, and the association of MALT1 with TAK1 and TAB2, which are upstream of the CBM complex. Thus, our data demonstrate that MALT1 ubiquitination is critical for the engagement of CBM and IKK complexes, thereby directing platelet signals to the NF-κB pathway.

  1. MALT1-ubiquitination triggers non-genomic NF-κB/IKK signaling upon platelet activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubair A Karim

    Full Text Available We have recently shown that IKK complex plays an important non-genomic role in platelet function, i.e., regulates SNARE machinery-dependent membrane fusion. In this connection, it is well known that MALT1, whose activity is modulated by proteasome, plays an important role in the regulation of IKK complex. Therefore, the present studies investigated the mechanism by which IKK signaling is regulated in the context of the platelet proteasome. It was found that platelets express a functional proteasome, and form CARMA/MALT1/Bcl10 (CBM complex when activated. Using a pharmacological inhibitor, the proteasome was found to regulate platelet function (aggregation, integrin activation, secretion, phosphatidylserine exposure and changes in intracellular calcium. It was also found to regulate thrombogenesis and physiologic hemostasis. We also observed, upon platelet activation, that MALT1 is ubiquitinated, and this coincides with the activation of the IKK/NF-κB-signaling pathway. Finally, we observed that the proteasome inhibitor blocks CBM complex formation and the interaction of IKKγ and MALT1; abrogates SNARE formation, and the association of MALT1 with TAK1 and TAB2, which are upstream of the CBM complex. Thus, our data demonstrate that MALT1 ubiquitination is critical for the engagement of CBM and IKK complexes, thereby directing platelet signals to the NF-κB pathway.

  2. The clinical application of genome-wide sequencing for monogenic diseases in Canada: Position Statement of the Canadian College of Medical Geneticists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boycott, Kym; Hartley, Taila; Adam, Shelin; Bernier, Francois; Chong, Karen; Fernandez, Bridget A; Friedman, Jan M; Geraghty, Michael T; Hume, Stacey; Knoppers, Bartha M; Laberge, Anne-Marie; Majewski, Jacek; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Meyn, M Stephen; Michaud, Jacques L; Nelson, Tanya N; Richer, Julie; Sadikovic, Bekim; Skidmore, David L; Stockley, Tracy; Taylor, Sherry; van Karnebeek, Clara; Zawati, Ma'n H; Lauzon, Julie; Armour, Christine M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose and scope The aim of this Position Statement is to provide recommendations for Canadian medical geneticists, clinical laboratory geneticists, genetic counsellors and other physicians regarding the use of genome-wide sequencing of germline DNA in the context of clinical genetic diagnosis. This statement has been developed to facilitate the clinical translation and development of best practices for clinical genome-wide sequencing for genetic diagnosis of monogenic diseases in Canada; it does not address the clinical application of this technology in other fields such as molecular investigation of cancer or for population screening of healthy individuals. Methods of statement development Two multidisciplinary groups consisting of medical geneticists, clinical laboratory geneticists, genetic counsellors, ethicists, lawyers and genetic researchers were assembled to review existing literature and guidelines on genome-wide sequencing for clinical genetic diagnosis in the context of monogenic diseases, and to make recommendations relevant to the Canadian context. The statement was circulated for comment to the Canadian College of Medical Geneticists (CCMG) membership-at-large and, following incorporation of feedback, approved by the CCMG Board of Directors. The CCMG is a Canadian organisation responsible for certifying medical geneticists and clinical laboratory geneticists, and for establishing professional and ethical standards for clinical genetics services in Canada. Results and conclusions Recommendations include (1) clinical genome-wide sequencing is an appropriate approach in the diagnostic assessment of a patient for whom there is suspicion of a significant monogenic disease that is associated with a high degree of genetic heterogeneity, or where specific genetic tests have failed to provide a diagnosis; (2) until the benefits of reporting incidental findings are established, we do not endorse the intentional clinical analysis of disease-associated genes

  3. The genome of the square archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi : life at the limits of water activity

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    Rodriguez-Valera Francisco

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The square halophilic archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi dominates NaCl-saturated and MgCl2 enriched aquatic ecosystems, which imposes a serious desiccation stress, caused by the extremely low water activity. The genome sequence was analyzed and physiological and physical experiments were carried out in order to reveal how H. walsbyi has specialized into its narrow and hostile ecological niche and found ways to cope with the desiccation stress. Results A rich repertoire of proteins involved in phosphate metabolism, phototrophic growth and extracellular protective polymers, including the largest archaeal protein (9159 amino acids, a homolog to eukaryotic mucins, are amongst the most outstanding features. A relatively low GC content (47.9%, 15–20% less than in other halophilic archaea, and one of the lowest coding densities (76.5% known for prokaryotes might be an indication for the specialization in its unique environment Conclusion Although no direct genetic indication was found that can explain how this peculiar organism retains its square shape, the genome revealed several unique adaptive traits that allow this organism to thrive in its specific and extreme niche.

  4. Genome Editing in Astyanax mexicanus Using Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases (TALENs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalko, Johanna E; Ma, Li; Jeffery, William R

    2016-06-20

    Identifying alleles of genes underlying evolutionary change is essential to understanding how and why evolution occurs. Towards this end, much recent work has focused on identifying candidate genes for the evolution of traits in a variety of species. However, until recently it has been challenging to functionally validate interesting candidate genes. Recently developed tools for genetic engineering make it possible to manipulate specific genes in a wide range of organisms. Application of this technology in evolutionarily relevant organisms will allow for unprecedented insight into the role of candidate genes in evolution. Astyanax mexicanus (A. mexicanus) is a species of fish with both surface-dwelling and cave-dwelling forms. Multiple independent lines of cave-dwelling forms have evolved from ancestral surface fish, which are interfertile with one another and with surface fish, allowing elucidation of the genetic basis of cave traits. A. mexicanus has been used for a number of evolutionary studies, including linkage analysis to identify candidate genes responsible for a number of traits. Thus, A. mexicanus is an ideal system for the application of genome editing to test the role of candidate genes. Here we report a method for using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to mutate genes in surface A. mexicanus. Genome editing using TALENs in A. mexicanus has been utilized to generate mutations in pigmentation genes. This technique can also be utilized to evaluate the role of candidate genes for a number of other traits that have evolved in cave forms of A. mexicanus.

  5. Genomic organisation, activity and distribution analysis of the microbial putrescine oxidase degradation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Alexander; Barnes, Nicole; Speight, Robert; Keane, Mark A

    2013-10-01

    The catalytic action of putrescine specific amine oxidases acting in tandem with 4-aminobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase is explored as a degradative pathway in Rhodococcus opacus. By limiting the nitrogen source, increased catalytic activity was induced leading to a coordinated response in the oxidative deamination of putrescine to 4-aminobutyraldehyde and subsequent dehydrogenation to 4-aminobutyrate. Isolating the dehydrogenase by ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration revealed that the enzyme acts principally on linear aliphatic aldehydes possessing an amino moiety. Michaelis-Menten kinetic analysis delivered a Michaelis constant (K(M)=0.014 mM) and maximum rate (Vmax=11.2 μmol/min/mg) for the conversion of 4-aminobutyraldehyde to 4-aminobutyrate. The dehydrogenase identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis (E value=0.031, 23% coverage) belongs to a functionally related genomic cluster that includes the amine oxidase, suggesting their association in a directed cell response. Key regulatory, stress and transport encoding genes have been identified, along with candidate dehydrogenases and transaminases for the further conversion of 4-aminobutyrate to succinate. Genomic analysis has revealed highly similar metabolic gene clustering among members of Actinobacteria, providing insight into putrescine degradation notably among Micrococcaceae, Rhodococci and Corynebacterium by a pathway that was previously uncharacterised in bacteria.

  6. Inferring Properties of Ancient Cyanobacteria from Biogeochemical Activity and Genomes of Siderophilic Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, David S.; Brown, I. I.; Tringe, S. G.; Thomas-Keprta, K. E.; Bryant, D. A.; Sarkisova, S. S.; Malley, K.; Sosa, O.; Klatt, C. G.; McKay, D. S.

    2010-01-01

    Interrelationships between life and the planetary system could have simultaneously left landmarks in genomes of microbes and physicochemical signatures in the lithosphere. Verifying the links between genomic features in living organisms and the mineralized signatures generated by these organisms will help to reveal traces of life on Earth and beyond. Among contemporary environments, iron-depositing hot springs (IDHS) may represent one of the most appropriate natural models [1] for insights into ancient life since organisms may have originated on Earth and probably Mars in association with hydrothermal activity [2,3]. IDHS also seem to be appropriate models for studying certain biogeochemical processes that could have taken place in the late Archean and,-or early Paleoproterozoic eras [4, 5]. It has been suggested that inorganic polyphosphate (PPi), in chains of tens to hundreds of phosphate residues linked by high-energy bonds, is environmentally ubiquitous and abundant [6]. Cyanobacteria (CB) react to increased heavy metal concentrations and UV by enhanced generation of PPi bodies (PPB) [7], which are believed to be signatures of life [8]. However, the role of PPi in oxygenic prokaryotes for the suppression of oxidative stress induced by high Fe is poorly studied. Here we present preliminary results of a new mechanism of Fe mineralization in oxygenic prokaryotes, the effect of Fe on the generation of PPi bodies in CB, as well as preliminary analysis of the diversity and phylogeny of proteins involved in the prevention of oxidative stress in phototrophs inhabiting IDHS.

  7. Genome-wide analysis of LXRα activation reveals new transcriptional networks in human atherosclerotic foam cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Radmila; Fischer, Cornelius; Kodelja, Vitam; Behrens, Sarah; Haas, Stefan; Vingron, Martin; Timmermann, Bernd; Geikowski, Anne; Sauer, Sascha

    2013-04-01

    Increased physiological levels of oxysterols are major risk factors for developing atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Lipid-loaded macrophages, termed foam cells, are important during the early development of atherosclerotic plaques. To pursue the hypothesis that ligand-based modulation of the nuclear receptor LXRα is crucial for cell homeostasis during atherosclerotic processes, we analysed genome-wide the action of LXRα in foam cells and macrophages. By integrating chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) and gene expression profile analyses, we generated a highly stringent set of 186 LXRα target genes. Treatment with the nanomolar-binding ligand T0901317 and subsequent auto-regulatory LXRα activation resulted in sequence-dependent sharpening of the genome-binding patterns of LXRα. LXRα-binding loci that correlated with differential gene expression revealed 32 novel target genes with potential beneficial effects, which in part explained the implications of disease-associated genetic variation data. These observations identified highly integrated LXRα ligand-dependent transcriptional networks, including the APOE/C1/C4/C2-gene cluster, which contribute to the reversal of cholesterol efflux and the dampening of inflammation processes in foam cells to prevent atherogenesis.

  8. [Chronic active hepatitis: clinical, biochemical, and histopathologic correlation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subauste, M C

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective study over 26 female patients with chronic active hepatitis was made. The mean age was 39 years old, the mean length of illness of 8 months; 5 patients had positive markers for hepatitis B. Patients were selected with the grade of histological activity: 8 patients had a mild form from disease (2A) and 16 with a severe one (2B). The predominant group was 2B. Severe inflammatory infiltration was the hallmark and multiobulillar necrosis, bridging, eosinophils and hiperplasia of kuppfer cells were found only in this group. Clinical features range from hepatic manifestations to systemic ones. Chronic active hepatitis may present with cholestasis, but the latter is not always related with the grade of activity. Group 2B had elevated aminotransferases and a low concentration for protrobine.

  9. Genome-wide analysis of antiviral signature genes in porcine macrophages at different activation statuses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongming Sang

    Full Text Available Macrophages (MФs can be polarized to various activation statuses, including classical (M1, alternative (M2, and antiviral states. To study the antiviral activation status of porcine MФs during porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV infection, we used RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq for transcriptomic analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs. Sequencing assessment and quality evaluation showed that our RNA-Seq data met the criteria for genome-wide transcriptomic analysis. Comparisons of any two activation statuses revealed more than 20,000 DEGs that were normalized to filter out 153-5,303 significant DEGs [false discovery rate (FDR ≤0.001, fold change ≥2] in each comparison. The highest 5,303 significant DEGs were found between lipopolysaccharide- (LPS and interferon (IFNγ-stimulated M1 cells, whereas only 153 significant DEGs were detected between interleukin (IL-10-polarized M2 cells and control mock-activated cells. To identify signature genes for antiviral regulation pertaining to each activation status, we identified a set of DEGs that showed significant up-regulation in only one activation state. In addition, pathway analyses defined the top 20-50 significantly regulated pathways at each activation status, and we further analyzed DEGs pertinent to pathways mediated by AMP kinase (AMPK and epigenetic mechanisms. For the first time in porcine macrophages, our transcriptomic analyses not only compared family-wide differential expression of most known immune genes at different activation statuses, but also revealed transcription evidence of multiple gene families. These findings show that using RNA-Seq transcriptomic analyses in virus-infected and status-synchronized macrophages effectively profiled signature genes and gene response pathways for antiviral regulation, which may provide a framework for optimizing antiviral immunity and immune homeostasis.

  10. A genome-wide association study for clinical mastitis in first parity US Holstein cows using a single-step approach and a genomic matrix re-weighting procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinical mastitis (CM) is one of the health disorders with largest impacts on dairy farming profitability and animal welfare. Previous studies have consistently shown that CM is under genetic control but knowledge about regions of the genome associated with resistance to CM in US Holstein is lacking...

  11. Clinical and Genomic Analysis of Liver Abscess-Causing Klebsiella pneumoniae Identifies New Liver Abscess-Associated Virulence Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Meiping; Tu, Jianfei; Jiang, Jianping; Bi, Yingmin; You, Weibo; Zhang, Yanliang; Ren, Jianmin; Zhu, Taohui; Cao, Zhuo; Yu, Zuochun; Shao, Chuxiao; Shen, Zhen; Ding, Baixing; Yuan, Jinyi; Zhao, Xu; Guo, Qinglan; Xu, Xiaogang; Huang, Jinwei; Wang, Minggui

    2016-01-01

    Hypervirulent variants of Klebsiella pneumoniae (hvKp) that cause invasive community-acquired pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) have emerged globally. Little is known about the virulence determinants associated with hvKp, except for the virulence genes rmpA/A2 and siderophores (iroBCD/iucABCD) carried by the pK2044-like large virulence plasmid. Here, we collected most recent clinical isolates of hvKp from PLA samples in China, and performed clinical, molecular, and genomic sequencing analyses. We found that 90.9% (40/44) of the pathogens causing PLA were K. pneumoniae. Among the 40 LA-Kp, K1 (62.5%), and K2 (17.5%) were the dominant serotypes, and ST23 (47.5%) was the major sequence type. S1-PFGE analyses demonstrated that although 77.5% (31/40) of the LA-Kp isolates harbored a single large virulence plasmid varied in size, 5 (12.5%) isolates had no plasmid and 4 (10%) had two or three plasmids. Whole genome sequencing and comparative analysis of 3 LA-Kp and 3 non-LA-Kp identified 133 genes present only in LA-Kp. Further, large scale screening of the 133 genes in 45 LA-Kp and 103 non-LA-Kp genome sequences from public databases identified 30 genes that were highly associated with LA-Kp, including iroBCD, iucABCD and rmpA/A2 and 21 new genes. Then, these 21 new genes were analyzed in 40 LA-Kp and 86 non-LA-Kp clinical isolates collected in this study by PCR, showing that new genes were present 80–100% among LA-Kp isolates while 2–11% in K. pneumoniae isolates from sputum and urine. Several of the 21 genes have been proposed as virulence factors in other bacteria, such as the gene encoding SAM-dependent methyltransferase and pagO which protects bacteria from phagocytosis. Taken together, these genes are likely new virulence factors contributing to the hypervirulence phenotype of hvKp, and may deepen our understanding of virulence mechanism of hvKp. PMID:27965935

  12. Clinical and Genomic Analysis of Liver Abscess-Causing Klebsiella pneumoniae Identifies New Liver Abscess-Associated Virulence Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiping Ye

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hypervirulent variants of Klebsiella pneumoniae (hvKp that cause invasive community-acquired pyogenic liver abscess have emerged globally. Little is known about the virulence determinants associated with hvKp, except for the virulence genes rmpA/A2 and siderophores (iroBCD/iucABCD carried by the pK2044-like large virulence plasmid. Here, we collected most recent clinical isolates of hvKp from pyogenic liver abscess (PLA samples in China, and performed clinical, molecular, and genomic sequencing analyses. We found that 90.9% (40/44 of the pathogens causing PLA were K. pneumoniae. Among the 40 LA-Kp, K1 (62.5% and K2 (17.5% were the dominant serotypes, and ST23 (47.5% was the major sequence type. S1-PFGE analyses demonstrated that although 77.5% (31/40 of the LA-Kp isolates harbored a single large virulence plasmid varied in size, 5 (12.5% isolates had no plasmid and 4 (10% had two or three plasmids. Whole genome sequencing and comparative analysis of 3 LA-Kp and 3 non-LA-Kp identified 133 genes present only in LA-Kp. Further, large scale screening of the 133 genes in 45 LA-Kp and 103 non-LA-Kp genome sequences from public databases identified 30 genes that were highly associated with LA-Kp, including iroBCD, iucABCD and rmpA/A2 and 21 new genes. Then, these 21 new genes were analyzed in 40 LA-Kp and 86 non-LA-Kp clinical isolates collected in this study by PCR, showing that new genes were present 80-100% among LA-Kp isolates while 2-11% in K. pneumoniae isolates from sputum and urine. Several of the 21 genes have been proposed as virulence factors in other bacteria, such as the gene encoding SAM-dependent methyltransferase and pagO which protects bacteria from phagocytosis. Taken together, these genes are likely new virulence factors contributing to the hypervirulence phenotype of hvKp, and may deepen our understanding of virulence mechanism of hvKp.

  13. “Cancer 2015”: A Prospective, Population-Based Cancer Cohort—Phase 1: Feasibility of Genomics-Guided Precision Medicine in the Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Parisot

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available “Cancer 2015” is a longitudinal and prospective cohort. It is a phased study whose aim was to pilot recruiting 1000 patients during phase 1 to establish the feasibility of providing a population-based genomics cohort. Newly diagnosed adult patients with solid cancers, with residual tumour material for molecular genomics testing, were recruited into the cohort for the collection of a dataset containing clinical, molecular pathology, health resource use and outcomes data. 1685 patients have been recruited over almost 3 years from five hospitals. Thirty-two percent are aged between 61–70 years old, with a median age of 63 years. Diagnostic tumour samples were obtained for 90% of these patients for multiple parallel sequencing. Patients identified with somatic mutations of potentially “actionable” variants represented almost 10% of those tumours sequenced, while 42% of the cohort had no mutations identified. These genomic data were annotated with information such as cancer site, stage, morphology, treatment and patient outcomes and health resource use and cost. This cohort has delivered its main objective of establishing an upscalable genomics cohort within a clinical setting and in phase 2 aims to develop a protocol for how genomics testing can be used in real-time clinical decision-making, providing evidence on the value of precision medicine to clinical practice.

  14. Whole genome analysis of diverse Chlamydia trachomatis strains identifies phylogenetic relationships masked by current clinical typing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Simon R.; Clarke, Ian N.; Seth-Smith, Helena M. B.; Solomon, Anthony W.; Cutcliffe, Lesley T.; Marsh, Peter; Skilton, Rachel J.; Holland, Martin J.; Mabey, David; Peeling, Rosanna W.; Lewis, David A.; Spratt, Brian G.; Unemo, Magnus; Persson, Kenneth; Bjartling, Carina; Brunham, Robert; de Vries, Henry J.C.; Morré, Servaas A.; Speksnijder, Arjen; Bébéar, Cécile M.; Clerc, Maïté; de Barbeyrac, Bertille; Parkhill, Julian; Thomson, Nicholas R.

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is responsible for both trachoma and sexually transmitted infections causing substantial morbidity and economic cost globally. Despite this, our knowledge of its population and evolutionary genetics is limited. Here we present a detailed whole genome phylogeny from representative strains of both trachoma and lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) biovars from temporally and geographically diverse sources. Our analysis demonstrates that predicting phylogenetic structure using the ompA gene, traditionally used to classify Chlamydia, is misleading because extensive recombination in this region masks true relationships. We show that in many instances ompA is a chimera that can be exchanged in part or whole, both within and between biovars. We also provide evidence for exchange of, and recombination within, the cryptic plasmid, another important diagnostic target. We have used our phylogenetic framework to show how genetic exchange has manifested itself in ocular, urogenital and LGV C. trachomatis strains, including the epidemic LGV serotype L2b. PMID:22406642

  15. Combining Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Genome Editing Technologies for Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Yu; Ting, Hsiao-Chien; Su, Hong-Lin; Jeng, Jing-Ren

    2017-02-17

    In this review, we introduce current developments in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), site-specific nuclease (SSN)-mediated genome editing tools, and the combined application of these two novel technologies in biomedical research and therapeutic trials. The sustainable pluripotent property of iPSCs in vitro not only provides unlimited cell sources for basic research but also benefits precision medicines for human diseases. In addition, rapidly evolving SSN tools efficiently tailor genetic manipulations for exploring gene functions and can be utilized to correct genetic defects of congenital diseases in the near future. Combining iPSC and SSN technologies will create new reliable human disease models with isogenic backgrounds in vitro and provide new solutions for cell replacement and precise therapies.

  16. Genome-wide association studies - A summary for the clinical gastroenterologist

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Espen Melum; Andre Franke; Tom H Karlsen

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been applied to various gastrointestinal and liver diseases in recent years.A large number of susceptibility genes and key biological pathways in disease development have been identified.So far, studies in inflammatory bowel diseases, and in particular Crohn's disease, have been especially successful in defining new susceptibility loci using the GWAS design.The identification of associations related to autophagy as well as several genes involved in immunological response will be important to future research on Crohn's disease.In this review, key methodological aspects of GWAS, the importance of proper cohort collection, genotyping issues and statistical methods are summarized.Ways of addressing the shortcomings of the GWAS design, when it comes to rare variants, are also discussed.For each of the relevant conditions, findings from the various GWAS are summarized with a focus on the affected biological systems.

  17. Expanded activity of dimer nucleases by combining ZFN and TALEN for genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; Smith, Cory; Cheng, Linzhao

    2013-01-01

    Our ability to precisely and efficiently edit mammalian and plant genomes has been significantly improved in recent years, partially due to increasing use of designer nucleases that recognize a pre-determined DNA sequence, make a specific DNA double-strand break, and stimulate gene targeting. A pair of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) or transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that recognize two adjacent unique DNA sequences dimerize through the fused FokI nuclease domain and cut in the middle of target DNA sequences. We report here that increasing the length of recognition DNA sequences by TALENs or ZFNs does not necessarily translate to a higher efficiency or specificity. We also discover that one subunit of ZFNs and one subunit of TALENs can form a pair of hybrid nucleases with expanded specificity at two diverse targets, and stimulate gene targeting in multiple cell types including human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells with improved efficiency.

  18. Expression of Active Subunit of Nitrogenase via Integration into Plant Organelle Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groat, Jeanna; Staub, Jeffrey M.; Stephens, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen availability is crucial for crop yield with nitrogen fertilizer accounting for a large percentage of farmers’ expenses. However, an untimely or excessive application of fertilizer can increase risks of negative environmental effects. These factors, along with the environmental and energy costs of synthesizing nitrogen fertilizer, led us to seek out novel biotechnology-driven approaches to supply nitrogen to plants. The strategy we focused on involves transgenic expression of nitrogenase, a bacterial multi-subunit enzyme that can capture atmospheric nitrogen. Here we report expression of the active Fe subunit of nitrogenase via integration into the tobacco plastid genome of bacterial gene sequences modified for expression in plastid. Our study suggests that it will be possible to engineer plants that are able to produce their own nitrogen fertilizer by expressing nitrogenase genes in plant plastids. PMID:27529475

  19. Recent Perspectives on Genome, Transmission, Clinical Manifestation, Diagnosis, Therapeutic Strategies, Vaccine Developments, and Challenges of Zika Virus Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apoorva Shankar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the potential threats to public health microbiology in 21st century is the increased mortality rate caused by Zika virus (ZIKV, a mosquito-borne flavivirus. The severity of ZIKV infection urged World Health Organization (WHO to declare this virus as a global concern. The limited knowledge on the structure, virulent factors, and replication mechanism of the virus posed as hindrance for vaccine development. Several vector and non-vector-borne mode of transmission are observed for spreading the disease. The similarities of the virus with other flaviviruses such as dengue and West Nile virus are worrisome; hence, there is high scope to undertake ZIKV research that probably provide insight for novel therapeutic intervention. Thus, this review focuses on the recent aspect of ZIKV research which includes the outbreak, genome structure, multiplication and propagation of the virus, current animal models, clinical manifestations, available treatment options (probable vaccines and therapeutics, and the recent advancements in computational drug discovery pipelines, challenges and limitation to undertake ZIKV research. The review suggests that the infection due to ZIKV became one of the universal concerns and an interdisciplinary environment of in vitro cellular assays, genomics, proteomics, and computational biology approaches probably contribute insights for screening of novel molecular targets for drug design. The review tried to provide cutting edge knowledge in ZIKV research with future insights required for the development of novel therapeutic remedies to curtail ZIKV infection.

  20. Comparative genomic profiling of Dutch clinical Bordetella pertussis isolates using DNA microarrays: Identification of genes absent from epidemic strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Gent Marjolein

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whooping cough caused by Bordetella pertussis in humans, is re-emerging in many countries despite vaccination. Several studies have shown that significant shifts have occurred in the B. pertussis population resulting in antigenic divergence between vaccine strains and circulating strains and suggesting pathogen adaptation. In the Netherlands, the resurgence of pertussis is associated with the rise of B. pertussis strains with an altered promoter region for pertussis toxin (ptxP3. Results We used Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST, Multiple-Locus Variable Number of Tandem Repeat Analysis (MLVA and microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH to characterize the ptxP3 strains associated with the Dutch epidemic. For CGH analysis, we developed an oligonucleotide (70-mers microarray consisting of 3,581 oligonucleotides representing 94% of the gene repertoire of the B. pertussis strain Tohama I. Nine different MLST profiles and 38 different MLVA types were found in the period 1993 to 2004. Forty-three Dutch clinical isolates were analyzed with CGH, 98 genes were found to be absent in at least one of the B. pertussis strains tested, these genes were clustered in 8 distinct regions of difference. Conclusion The presented MLST, MLVA and CGH-analysis identified distinctive characteristics of ptxP3 B. pertussis strains -the most prominent of which was a genomic deletion removing about 23,000 bp. We propose a model for the emergence of ptxP3 strains.

  1. Chlamydia psittaci: new insights into genomic diversity, clinical pathology, host-pathogen interaction and anti-bacterial immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knittler, Michael R; Berndt, Angela; Böcker, Selina; Dutow, Pavel; Hänel, Frank; Heuer, Dagmar; Kägebein, Danny; Klos, Andreas; Koch, Sophia; Liebler-Tenorio, Elisabeth; Ostermann, Carola; Reinhold, Petra; Saluz, Hans Peter; Schöfl, Gerhard; Sehnert, Philipp; Sachse, Konrad

    2014-10-01

    The distinctive and unique features of the avian and mammalian zoonotic pathogen Chlamydia (C.) psittaci include the fulminant course of clinical disease, the remarkably wide host range and the high proportion of latent infections that are not leading to overt disease. Current knowledge on associated diseases is rather poor, even in comparison to other chlamydial agents. In the present paper, we explain and summarize the major findings of a national research network that focused on the elucidation of host-pathogen interactions in vitro and in animal models of C. psittaci infection, with the objective of improving our understanding of genomics, pathology, pathophysiology, molecular pathogenesis and immunology, and conceiving new approaches to therapy. We discuss new findings on comparative genome analysis, the complexity of pathophysiological interactions and systemic consequences, local immune response, the role of the complement system and antigen presentation pathways in the general context of state-of-the-art knowledge on chlamydial infections in humans and animals and single out relevant research topics to fill remaining knowledge gaps on this important yet somewhat neglected pathogen.

  2. Using Short-Term Enrichments and Metagenomics to Obtain Genomes from uncultured Activated Sludge Microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karst, Søren Michael; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Albertsen, Mads;

    is that they depend on system-specific reference genomes in order to analyze the vast amounts of data (Albertsen et al., 2012). This limits the application of -omics to environments for which a comprehensive catalogue of reference genomes exists e.g. the human gut. Several strategies for obtaining microbial genomes...... was reduced by short-term enrichment under defined conditions favoring certain functional groups of organisms. Bioinformatic genome extraction was greatly improved by utilizing multiple metagenomes where the microorganisms were in different abundances. In this study we retrieved 15 complete genomes...

  3. In vitro activity of ceftobiprole against Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Sara; Sánchez-Céspedes, Javier; Espinal, Paula; Vila, Jordi

    2009-09-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a multiresistant opportunistic nosocomial pathogen responsible for outbreaks worldwide. The main infection caused by this microorganism is nosocomial pneumonia, in particular ventilator-associated pneumonia in patients in Intensive Care Units. Treatment of these nosocomial infections is becoming problematic because the level of resistance to antimicrobial agents is rising. Ceftobiprole is a new cephalosporin with activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens. This study evaluated the in vitro activity of ceftobiprole against a collection of 58 A. baumannii clinical isolates and showed that the activity of ceftobiprole was superior to ceftazidime and cefepime when the bla(ADC)-like gene was not expressed or was expressed at a low level.

  4. Impact of a bronchial genomic classifier on clinical decision making in patients undergoing diagnostic evaluation for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, J Scott; Van Wert, Ryan; Choi, Yoonha; Rosenbluth, Michael J; Smith, Kate Porta; Huang, Jing; Spira, Avrum

    2016-05-17

     %, p = 0.003). Our findings suggest that a negative (low risk) bronchial genomic classifier result reduces invasive procedure recommendations following an inconclusive bronchoscopy and that the classifier overall reduces invasive procedure recommendations among patients ultimately diagnosed with benign disease. These results support the potential clinical utility of the classifier to improve management of patients undergoing bronchoscopy for suspect lung cancer by reducing additional invasive procedures in the setting of benign disease.

  5. Genomic and Transcriptomic Analyses of Colistin-Resistant Clinical Isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae Reveal Multiple Pathways of Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Meredith S.; Suzuki, Yo; Jones, Marcus B.; Marshall, Steven H.; Rudin, Susan D.; van Duin, David; Kaye, Keith; Jacobs, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Klebsiella pneumoniae has resulted in a more frequent reliance on treatment using colistin. However, resistance to colistin (Colr) is increasingly reported from clinical settings. The genetic mechanisms that lead to Colr in K. pneumoniae are not fully characterized. Using a combination of genome sequencing and transcriptional profiling by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis, distinct genetic mechanisms were found among nine Colr clinical isolates. Colr was related to mutations in three different genes in K. pneumoniae strains, with distinct impacts on gene expression. Upregulation of the pmrH operon encoding 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose (Ara4N) modification of lipid A was found in all Colr strains. Alteration of the mgrB gene was observed in six strains. One strain had a mutation in phoQ. Common among these seven strains was elevated expression of phoPQ and unaltered expression of pmrCAB, which is involved in phosphoethanolamine addition to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In two strains, separate mutations were found in a previously uncharacterized histidine kinase gene that is part of a two-component regulatory system (TCRS) now designated crrAB. In these strains, expression of pmrCAB, crrAB, and an adjacent glycosyltransferase gene, but not that of phoPQ, was elevated. Complementation with the wild-type allele restored colistin susceptibility in both strains. The crrAB genes are present in most K. pneumoniae genomes, but not in Escherichia coli. Additional upregulated genes in all strains include those involved in cation transport and maintenance of membrane integrity. Because the crrAB genes are present in only some strains, Colr mechanisms may be dependent on the genetic background. PMID:25385117

  6. Discriminatory accuracy and potential clinical utility of genomic profiling for breast cancer risk in BRCA-negative women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comen, E; Balistreri, L; Gönen, M; Dutra-Clarke, A; Fazio, M; Vijai, J; Stadler, Z; Kauff, N; Kirchhoff, T; Hudis, C; Offit, K; Robson, M

    2011-06-01

    Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. The clinical utility of genotyping individuals at these loci is not known. Subjects were 519 unaffected women without BRCA mutations. Gail, Claus, and IBIS models were used to estimate absolute breast cancer risks. Subjects were then genotyped at 15 independent risk loci. Published per-allele and genotype-specific odds ratios were used to calculate the composite cumulative genomic risk (CGR) for each subject. Affected age- and ethnicity-matched BRCA mutation-negative women were also genotyped as a comparison group for the calculation of discriminatory accuracy. The CGR was used to adjust absolute breast cancer risks calculated by Gail, Claus and IBIS models to determine the proportion of subjects whose recommendations for chemoprevention or MRI screening might be altered (reclassified) by such adjustment. Mean lifetime breast cancer risks calculated using the Gail, Claus, and IBIS models were 19.4, 13.0, and 17.7%, respectively. CGR did not correlate with breast cancer risk as calculated using any model. CGR was significantly higher in affected women (mean 3.35 vs. 3.12, P = 0.009). The discriminatory accuracy of the CGR alone was 0.55 (SE 0.019; P = 0.006). CGR adjustment of model-derived absolute risk estimates would have altered clinical recommendations for chemoprevention in 11-19% of subjects and for MRI screening in 8-32%. CGR has limited discriminatory accuracy. However, the use of a genomic risk term to adjust model-derived estimates has the potential to alter individual recommendations. These observations warrant investigation to evaluate the calibration of adjusted risk estimates.

  7. Complete genome sequence of the cold-active bacteriophage VMY22 from Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Kunhao; Cheng, Benxu; Zhang, Shengting; Wang, Nan; Fang, Yuan; Zhang, Qi; Kuang, Anxiu; Lin, Lianbing; Ji, Xiuling; Wei, Yunlin

    2016-06-01

    The cold-active bacteriophage VMY22, belonging to the Podoviridae family, was isolated from Mingyong Glacier in China. Sequence analysis revealed that the genome is 18,609 bp long, with an overall G + C content of 36.4 mol%, and 25 open reading frames (ORFs). The sequence contains 46 potential promoters, 6 transcription terminators, and no tRNAs. Most of the ORFs show a high degree of similarity to B103 (NC_004165). Two noteworthy findings were made. First, one of the predicted proteins, ORF 19, shows high sequence similarity to the bacteriocin biosynthesis protein from Bacillus cereus. From this information, we propose that the VMY22 phage is at an intermediate phase in its coevolution with its bacterial host. Second, seven of the hypothetical proteins appear to be unique to this cold-active B. cereus phage (i.e., not found in temperate-active B. cereus phages). These observations add to our current knowledge about the coevolution of bacteriophages and their hosts. The identification of a novel group of gene and protein structures and functions will lead to a better understanding of cold-adaptation mechanisms in bacteria and their bacteriophages.

  8. Draft Genome of the Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strain A155 Clinical Isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arivett, Brock A; Fiester, Steven E; Ream, David C; Centrón, Daniela; Ramírez, Maria S; Tolmasky, Marcelo E; Actis, Luis A

    2015-03-26

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a bacterial pathogen with serious implications on human health, due to increasing reports of multidrug-resistant strains isolated from patients. Total DNA from the multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strain A155 clinical isolate was sequenced to greater than 65× coverage, providing high-quality contig assemblies.

  9. Putting the Pieces Together: Clinically Relevant Genetic and Genomic Resources for Hospitalists and Neonatologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Rebecca; Khromykh, Alina; Babcock, Holly; Jenevein, Callie; Solomon, Benjamin D

    2017-02-01

    Genetic conditions are individually rare but are common in aggregate, and they often present in the neonatal and early pediatric periods. These conditions are often severe, can be difficult to diagnose and manage, and may heavily affect patients, families, health care systems, and society. Because of recent technological advances, the availability and uptake of genetic and genomic testing are increasing rapidly. However, there is a dearth of trained geneticists and genetic counselors to help guide and explain these conditions and relevant tests. To help hospitalists, neonatologists, and related practitioners navigate this complex and evolving field, we have compiled a list of free (mostly Web-based) resources relevant to the diagnosis and management of genetic conditions and related disorders. These resources, which we describe individually, can be useful for nongeneticist clinicians, and some also include material that can be used to explain concepts and conditions to patients or families. The resources presented are divided into the following categories (which overlap): general information, databases of genetic conditions, resources that can help generate differential diagnoses, databases of genetic testing laboratories (to help with logistics of ordering tests), information on newborn screening, and other resources. We also include a separate list of helpful textbooks and manuals. We conclude with 2 examples describing how some of these resources would be used by a pediatric hospitalist or neonatologist during the inpatient management of a child with a suspected genetic condition. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  10. Gender-Associated Genomic Differences in Colorectal Cancer: Clinical Insight from Feminization of Male Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rola H. Ali

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Gender-related differences in colorectal cancer (CRC are not fully understood. Recent studies have shown that CRC arising in females are significantly associated with CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP-high. Using array comparative genomic hybridization, we analyzed a cohort of 116 CRCs (57 males, 59 females for chromosomal copy number aberrations (CNA and found that CRC in females had significantly higher numbers of gains involving chromosome arms 1q21.2–q21.3, 4q13.2, 6p21.1 and 16p11.2 and copy number losses of chromosome arm 11q25 compared to males. Interestingly, a subset of male CRCs (46% exhibited a "feminization" phenomenon in the form of gains of X chromosomes (or an arm of X and/or losses of the Y chromosome. Feminization of cancer cells was significantly associated with microsatellite-stable CRCs (p-value 0.003 and wild-type BRAF gene status (p-value 0.009. No significant association with other clinicopathological parameters was identified including disease-free survival. In summary, our data show that some CNAs in CRC may be gender specific and that male cancers characterized by feminization may constitute a specific subset of CRCs that warrants further investigation.

  11. Gender-associated genomic differences in colorectal cancer: clinical insight from feminization of male cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Rola H; Marafie, Makia J; Bitar, Milad S; Al-Dousari, Fahad; Ismael, Samar; Bin Haider, Hussain; Al-Ali, Waleed; Jacob, Sindhu P; Al-Mulla, Fahd

    2014-09-29

    Gender-related differences in colorectal cancer (CRC) are not fully understood. Recent studies have shown that CRC arising in females are significantly associated with CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP-high). Using array comparative genomic hybridization, we analyzed a cohort of 116 CRCs (57 males, 59 females) for chromosomal copy number aberrations (CNA) and found that CRC in females had significantly higher numbers of gains involving chromosome arms 1q21.2-q21.3, 4q13.2, 6p21.1 and 16p11.2 and copy number losses of chromosome arm 11q25 compared to males. Interestingly, a subset of male CRCs (46%) exhibited a "feminization" phenomenon in the form of gains of X chromosomes (or an arm of X) and/or losses of the Y chromosome. Feminization of cancer cells was significantly associated with microsatellite-stable CRCs (p-value 0.003) and wild-type BRAF gene status (p-value 0.009). No significant association with other clinicopathological parameters was identified including disease-free survival. In summary, our data show that some CNAs in CRC may be gender specific and that male cancers characterized by feminization may constitute a specific subset of CRCs that warrants further investigation.

  12. Metagenomics, metatranscriptomics and single cell genomics reveal functional response of active Oceanospirillales to Gulf oil spill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, Olivia U.; Hazen, Terry C.; Borglin, Sharon; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Dubinsky, Eric A.; Fortney, Julian L.; Han, James; Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Hultman, Jenni; Lamendella, Regina; Mackelprang, Rachel; Malfatti, Stephanie; Tom, Lauren M.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Woyke, Tanja; Zhou, Jizhong; Rubin, Edward M.; Jansson, Janet K.

    2012-06-12

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico resulted in a deep-sea hydrocarbon plume that caused a shift in the indigenous microbial community composition with unknown ecological consequences. Early in the spill history, a bloom of uncultured, thus uncharacterized, members of the Oceanospirillales was previously detected, but their role in oil disposition was unknown. Here our aim was to determine the functional role of the Oceanospirillales and other active members of the indigenous microbial community using deep sequencing of community DNA and RNA, as well as single-cell genomics. Shotgun metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing revealed that genes for motility, chemotaxis and aliphatic hydrocarbon degradation were significantly enriched and expressed in the hydrocarbon plume samples compared with uncontaminated seawater collected from plume depth. In contrast, although genes coding for degradation of more recalcitrant compounds, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, total xylenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, were identified in the metagenomes, they were expressed at low levels, or not at all based on analysis of the metatranscriptomes. Isolation and sequencing of two Oceanospirillales single cells revealed that both cells possessed genes coding for n-alkane and cycloalkane degradation. Specifically, the near-complete pathway for cyclohexane oxidation in the Oceanospirillales single cells was elucidated and supported by both metagenome and metatranscriptome data. The draft genome also included genes for chemotaxis, motility and nutrient acquisition strategies that were also identified in the metagenomes and metatranscriptomes. These data point towards a rapid response of members of the Oceanospirillales to aliphatic hydrocarbons in the deep sea.

  13. Clinical whole-genome sequencing in severe early-onset epilepsy reveals new genes and improves molecular diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Hilary C; Kim, Grace E; Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Murakami, Yoshiko; Carvill, Gemma L; Meyer, Esther; Copley, Richard R; Rimmer, Andrew; Barcia, Giulia; Fleming, Matthew R; Kronengold, Jack; Brown, Maile R; Hudspith, Karl A; Broxholme, John; Kanapin, Alexander; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Kinoshita, Taroh; Nabbout, Rima; Bentley, David; McVean, Gil; Heavin, Sinéad; Zaiwalla, Zenobia; McShane, Tony; Mefford, Heather C; Shears, Deborah; Stewart, Helen; Kurian, Manju A; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Blair, Edward; Donnelly, Peter; Kaczmarek, Leonard K; Taylor, Jenny C

    2014-06-15

    In severe early-onset epilepsy, precise clinical and molecular genetic diagnosis is complex, as many metabolic and electro-physiological processes have been implicated in disease causation. The clinical phenotypes share many features such as complex seizure types and developmental delay. Molecular diagnosis has historically been confined to sequential testing of candidate genes known to be associated with specific sub-phenotypes, but the diagnostic yield of this approach can be low. We conducted whole-genome sequencing (WGS) on six patients with severe early-onset epilepsy who had previously been refractory to molecular diagnosis, and their parents. Four of these patients had a clinical diagnosis of Ohtahara Syndrome (OS) and two patients had severe non-syndromic early-onset epilepsy (NSEOE). In two OS cases, we found de novo non-synonymous mutations in the genes KCNQ2 and SCN2A. In a third OS case, WGS revealed paternal isodisomy for chromosome 9, leading to identification of the causal homozygous missense variant in KCNT1, which produced a substantial increase in potassium channel current. The fourth OS patient had a recessive mutation in PIGQ that led to exon skipping and defective glycophosphatidyl inositol biosynthesis. The two patients with NSEOE had likely pathogenic de novo mutations in CBL and CSNK1G1, respectively. Mutations in these genes were not found among 500 additional individuals with epilepsy. This work reveals two novel genes for OS, KCNT1 and PIGQ. It also uncovers unexpected genetic mechanisms and emphasizes the power of WGS as a clinical tool for making molecular diagnoses, particularly for highly heterogeneous disorders.

  14. Genome-wide physical activity interactions in adiposity - A meta-analysis of 200,452 adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, Mariaelisa; Scott, Robert A; Justice, Anne E

    2017-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) may modify the genetic effects that give rise to increased risk of obesity. To identify adiposity loci whose effects are modified by PA, we performed genome-wide interaction meta-analyses of BMI and BMI-adjusted waist circumference and waist-hip ratio from up to 200,452 adu...

  15. Genome-wide physical activity interactions in adiposity ― A meta-analysis of 200,452 adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Graff (Maud J.L.); R.A. Scott (Robert); A.E. Justice (Anne); Young, K.L. (Kristin L.); M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); Barata, L. (Llilda); T.W. Winkler (Thomas W.); A.Y. Chu (Audrey); A. Mahajan (Anubha); Hadley, D. (David); L. Xue (Luting); T. Workalemahu (Tsegaselassie); N.L. Heard-Costa (Nancy); M. den Hoed (Marcel); T.S. Ahluwalia (Tarunveer Singh); Q. Qi; J.S. Ngwa; F. Renström (Frida); L. Quaye (Lydia); Eicher, J.D. (John D.); Hayes, J.E. (James E.); M. Cornelis (Marilyn); Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); Lim, E. (Elise); J. Luan (Jian'An); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); Zhang, W. (Weihua); W. Zhao (Wei); Griffin, P.J. (Paula J.); T. Haller (Toomas); S. Ahmad (Shafqat); P. Marques-Vidal (Pedro); Bien, S. (Stephanie); L. Yengo (Loic); A. Teumer (Alexander); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); M. Kumari (Meena); Harder, M.N. (Marie Neergaard); J.M. Justesen (Johanne M.); M.E. Kleber (Marcus); Hollensted, M. (Mette); Lohman, K. (Kurt); N.V. Rivera (Natalia); J.B. Whitfield (John B.); Zhao, J.H. (Jing Hua); H.M. Stringham (Heather); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); Huppertz, C. (Charlotte); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); W.J. Peyrot (Wouter ); Y. Wu (Ying); K. Kristiansson (Kati); A. Demirkan (Ayşe); M. Fornage (Myriam); Hassinen, M. (Maija); L.F. Bielak (Lawrence F.); G. Cadby (Gemma); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); R. Mägi (Reedik); P.J. van der Most (Peter); A.U. Jackson (Anne); Bragg-Gresham, J.L. (Jennifer L.); Vitart, V. (Veronique); J. Marten (Jonathan); P. Navarro (Pau); C. Bellis (Claire); D. Pasko (Dorota); Johansson, Å. (Åsa); S. Snitker (Soren); Cheng, Y.-C. (Yu-Ching); J. Eriksson (Joel); Lim, U. (Unhee); Aadahl, M. (Mette); L.S. Adair (Linda); N. Amin (Najaf); B. Balkau (Beverley); Auvinen, J. (Juha); J.P. Beilby (John); Bergman, R.N. (Richard N.); S.M. Bergmann (Sven); Bertoni, A.G. (Alain G.); J. Blangero (John); A. Bonnefond (Amélie); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); J.B. Borja (Judith); S. Brage (Soren); F. Busonero; S. Buyske (Steven); H. Campbell (Harry); P.S. Chines (Peter); F.S. Collins (Francis); T. Corre (Tanguy); Smith, G.D. (George Davey); G. Delgado; N. Dueker (Nicole); M. Dörr (Marcus); T. Ebeling (Tapani); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); T. Esko (Tõnu); J.D. Faul (Jessica D.); M. Fu (Mao); Færch, K. (Kristine); C. Gieger (Christian); S. Gläser; Gong, J. (Jian); P. Gordon-Larsen (Penny); H. Grallert (Harald); T.B. Grammer (Tanja B); N. Grarup (Niels); G. van Grootheest (Gerard); K. Harald (Kennet); N. Hastie (Nick); A.S. Havulinna (Aki); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); L.A. Hindorff (Lucia A); L.J. Hocking (Lynne); Holmens, O.L. (Oddgeir L.); C. Holzapfel (Christina); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); J. Huang (Jian); Huang, T. (Tao); J. Hui (Jennie); C. Huth (Cornelia); Hutri-Kähönen, N. (Nina); A. James (Alan); Jansson, J.-O. (John-Olov); M.A. Jhun (Min A.); Juonala, M. (Markus); L. Kinnunen (Leena); H. Koistinen (Heikki); I. Kolcic (Ivana); P. Komulainen (Pirjo); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); K. Kvaløy (Kirsti); M. Kähönen (Mika); T.A. Lakka (Timo); L.J. Launer (Lenore); Lehne, B. (Benjamin); C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia M.); M. Lorentzon (Mattias); R.N. Luben (Robert); M. Marre (Michel); Milaneschi, Y. (Yuri); K.L. Monda (Keri); Montgomery, G.W. (Grant W.); M.H.M. de Moor; Mulas, A. (Antonella); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); Musk, A.W.; Männikkö, R. (Reija); S. Männistö (Satu); N. Narisu (Narisu); M. Nauck (Matthias); J.A. Nettleton (Jennifer ); I.M. Nolte (Ilja M.); A.J. Oldehinkel (Albertine); M. Olden (Matthias); Ong, K.K. (Ken K.); S. Padmanabhan (Sandosh); L. Paternoster (Lavinia); Perez, J. (Jeremiah); M. Perola (Markus); A. Peters (Annette); U. Peters (Ulrike); P.A. Peyser (Patricia A.); I. Prokopenko (Inga); Puolijoki, H. (Hannu); Raitakari, O.T. (Olli T.); T. Rankinen (Tuomo); Rasmussen-Torvik, L.J. (Laura J.); R. Rawal (R.); P.M. Ridker (Paul); L.M. Rose (Lynda); I. Rudan (Igor); Sarti, C. (Cinzia); M.A. Sarzynski (Mark A.); K. Savonen (Kai); W.R. Scott (William R.); S. Sanna (Serena); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); Sidney, S. (Steve); G. Silbernagel (Günther); B.H. Smith; J.A. Smith (Jennifer A); H. Snieder (Harold); A. Stancáková (Alena); Sternfeld, B. (Barbara); A.J. Swift (Amy); Tammelin, T. (Tuija); S.-T. Tan (Sian-Tsung); B. Thorand (Barbara); D. Thuillier (Dorothee); L. Vandenput (Liesbeth); Vestergaard, H. (Henrik); J.V. van Vliet-Ostaptchouk (Jana); M.-C. Vohl (Marie-Claude); U. Völker (Uwe); G. Waeber (Gérard); Walker, M. (Mark); Wild, S. (Sarah); A. Wong (Andrew); A.F. Wright (Alan); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); Zubair, N. (Niha); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); L. LeMarchand (Loic); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); C. Ohlsson (Claes); A. Hofman (Albert); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); L. Perusse (Louis); J.F. Wilson (James); C. Hayward (Caroline); O. Polasek (Ozren); F. Cucca (Francesco); K. Hveem (Kristian); C.A. Hartman (Catharina A.); A. Tönjes (Anke); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); Palmer, L.J. (Lyle J.); Kardia, S.L.R. (Sharon L. R.); R. Rauramaa (Rainer); T.I.A. Sørensen (Thorkild); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); V. Salomaa (Veikko); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); M. Mangino (Massimo); Laakso, M. (Markku); C. Bouchard (Claude); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); D. Kuh (Diana); Y. Liu (Yongmei); A. Linneberg (Allan); W. März (Winfried); K. Strauch (Konstantin); M. Kivimaki (Mika); T.B. Harris (Tamara); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); H. Völzke (Henry); Qi, L. (Lu); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); J.C. Chambers (John); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal S.); P. Froguel (Philippe); C. Kooperberg (Charles); P. Vollenweider (Peter); G. Hallmans (Göran); T. Hansen (T.); O. Pedersen (Oluf); A. Metspalu (Andres); N.J. Wareham (Nick); C. Langenberg (Claudia); D.R. Weir (David); D.J. Porteous (David J.); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); Abecasis, G.R. (Gonçalo R.); I. Barroso (Inês); McCarthy, M.I. (Mark I.); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); O’Connell, J.R. (Jeffrey R.); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); M. Boehnke (Michael); I.M. Heid (Iris); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); D.P. Strachan (David); C.S. Fox (Caroline); Liu, C.-T. (Ching-Ti); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); Klein, R.J. (Robert J.); A.D. Johnson (Andrew); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); P.W. Franks (Paul); K.E. North (Kari); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); T.O. Kilpeläinen (Tuomas)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractPhysical activity (PA) may modify the genetic effects that give rise to increased risk of obesity. To identify adiposity loci whose effects are modified by PA, we performed genome-wide interaction meta-analyses of BMI and BMI-adjusted waist circumference and waist-hip ratio from up to 20

  16. Genome-wide physical activity interactions in adiposity. A meta-analysis of 200,452 adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graff, Mariaelisa; Scott, Robert A.; Justice, Anne E.; Young, Kristin L.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Barata, Llilda; Winkler, Thomas W.; Chu, Audrey Y.; Mahajan, Anubha; Hadley, David; Xue, Luting; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; den Hoed, Marcel; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Qi, Qibin; Ngwa, Julius S.; Renstrom, Frida; Quaye, Lydia; Eicher, John D.; Hayes, James E.; Cornelis, Marilyn; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lim, Elise; Luan, Jian'an; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Wei; Griffin, Paula J.; Haller, Toomas; Ahmad, Shafqat; Marques-Vidal, Pedro M.; Bien, Stephanie; Yengo, Loic; Teumer, Alexander; Smith, Albert Vernon; Kumari, Meena; Harder, Marie Neergaard; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Kleber, Marcus E.; Hollensted, Mette; Lohman, Kurt; Rivera, Natalia V.; Whitfield, John B.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Stringham, Heather M.; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Huppertz, Charlotte; Willemsen, Gonneke; Peyrot, Wouter J.; Wu, Ying; Kristiansson, Kati; Demirkan, Ayse; Fornage, Myriam; Hassinen, Maija; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Cadby, Gemma; Tanaka, Toshiko; Magl, Reedlk; Van der Most, Peter J.; Jackson, Anne U.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Vitart, Veronique; Marten, Jonathan; Navarro, Pau; Bellis, Claire; Pasko, Dorota; Johansson, Asa; Snitker, Soren; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Eriksson, Joel; Lim, Unhee; Aadahl, Mette; Adair, Linda S.; Amin, Najaf; Balkau, Beverley; Auvinen, Juha; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Bertoni, Alain G.; Blangero, John; Bonnefond, Amelle; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Borja, Judith B.; Brage, Soren; Busonero, Fabio; Buyske, Steve; Campbell, Harry; Chines, Peter S.; Collins, Francis S.; Corre, Tanguy; Smith, George Davey; Delgado, Graciela E.; Dueker, Nicole; Doerr, Marcus; Ebeling, Tapani; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Esko, Tonu; Faul, Jessica D.; Fu, Mao; Faerch, Kristine; Gieger, Christian; Glaeser, Sven; Gong, Jian; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B.; Grarup, Niels; van Grootheest, Gerard; Harald, Kennet; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hernandez, Dena; Hindorff, Lucia; Hocking, Lynne J.; Holmens, Oddgeir L.; Holzapfel, Christina; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Huang, Jie; Huang, Tao; Hui, Jennie; Huth, Cornelia; Hutri-Kahonen, Nina; James, Alan L.; Jansson, John-Olov; Jhun, Min A.; Juonala, Markus; Kinnunen, Leena; Koistinen, Heikki A.; Kolcic, Ivana; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kvaloy, Kirsti; Kahonen, Mika; Lakka, Timo A.; Launer, Lenore J.; Lehne, Benjamin; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert; Marre, Michel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Monda, Keri L.; Montgomery, Grant W.; De Moor, Marleen H. M.; Mulas, Antonella; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Musk, A. W.; Mannikko, Reija; Mannisto, Satu; Narisu, Narisu; Nauck, Matthias; Nettleton, Jennifer A.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Olden, Matthias; Ong, Ken K.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Paternoster, Lavinia; Perez, Jeremiah; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Peters, Ulrike; Peyser, Patricia A.; Prokopenko, Inga; Puolijoki, Hannu; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Rawal, Rajesh; Ridker, Paul M.; Rose, Lynda M.; Rudan, Igor; Sarti, Cinzia; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Savonen, Kai; Scott, William R.; Sanna, Serena; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sidney, Steve; Silbernagel, Guenther; Smith, Blair H.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Snieder, Harold; Stancakova, Alena; Sternfeld, Barbara; Swift, Amy J.; Tammelin, Tuija; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Thorand, Barbara; Thuillier, Dorothee; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Vestergaard, Henrik; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Voelker, Uwe; Waeber, Gerard; Walker, Mark; Wild, Sarah; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Zubair, Niha; Haiman, Christopher A.; Lemarchand, Loic; Gyllensten, Ulf; Ohlsson, Claes; Ohlsson, Claes; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Perusse, Louis; Wilson, James F.; Hayward, Caroline; Polasek, Ozren; Cucca, Francesco; Hveem, Kristian; Hartman, Catharina A.; Toenjes, Anke; Bandinelli, Stefania; Palmer, Lyle J.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Rauramaa, Rainer; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Salomaa, Veikko; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Lehtimaki, Terho; Mangino, Massimo; Laakso, Markku; Bouchard, Claude; Martin, Nicholas G.; Kuh, Diana; Liu, Yongmei; Linneberg, Allan; Maerz, Winfried; Strauch, Konstantin; Kivimaki, Mika; Harris, Tamara B.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Voelzke, Henry; Qi, Lu; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Chambers, John C.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Froguel, Philippe; Kooperberg, Charles; Vollenweider, Peter; Hallmans, Goran; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Metspalu, Andres; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Langenberg, Claudia; Weir, David R.; Porteous, David J.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chasman, Daniel I.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Barroso, Ines; McCarthy, Mark I.; Frayling, Timothy M.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Boehnke, Michael; Heid, Iris M.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Strachan, David P.; Fox, Caroline S.; Liu, Ching-Ti; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Klein, Robert J.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Franks, Paul W.; North, Kari E.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Kilpelainen, Tuomas O.

    2017-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) may modify the genetic effects that give rise to increased risk of obesity. To identify adiposity loci whose effects are modified by PA, we performed genome-wide interaction meta-analyses of BMI and BMI-adjusted waist circumference and waist-hip ratio from up to 200,452 adults

  17. Preventing AID, a physiological mutator, from deleterious activation: regulation of the genomic instability that is associated with antibody diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Hitoshi; Tran, Thinh Huy; Kobayashi, Maki; Aida, Masatoshi; Honjo, Tasuku

    2010-04-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential and sufficient to accomplish class-switch recombination and somatic hypermutation, which are two genetic events required for the generation of antibody-mediated memory responses. However, AID can also introduce genomic instability, giving rise to chromosomal translocation and/or mutations in proto-oncogenes. It is therefore important for cells to suppress AID expression unless B lymphocytes are stimulated by pathogens. The mechanisms for avoiding the accidental activation of AID and thereby avoiding genomic instability can be classified into three types: (i) transcriptional regulation, (ii) post-transcriptional regulation and (iii) target specificity. This review summarizes the recently elucidated comprehensive transcriptional regulation mechanisms of the AID gene and the post-transcriptional regulation that may be critical for preventing excess AID activity. Finally, we discuss why AID targets not only Igs but also other proto-oncogenes. AID targets many genes but it is not totally promiscuous and the criteria that specify its targets are unclear. A recent finding that a non-B DNA structure forms upon a decrease in topoisomerase 1 expression may explain this paradoxical target specificity determination. Evolution has chosen AID as a mutator of Ig genes because of its efficient DNA cleavage activity, even though its presence increases the risk of genomic instability. This is probably because immediate protection against pathogens is more critical for species survival than complete protection from the slower acting consequences of genomic instability, such as tumor formation.

  18. Genomic content of Bordetella pertussis clinical isolates circulating in areas of intensive children vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Bouchez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The objective of the study was to analyse the evolution of Bordetella pertussis population and the influence of herd immunity in different areas of the world where newborns and infants are highly vaccinated. METHODOLOGY: The analysis was performed using DNA microarray on 15 isolates, PCR on 111 isolates as well as GS-FLX sequencing technology on 3 isolates and the B. pertussis reference strain, Tohama I. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our analyses demonstrate that the current circulating isolates are continuing to lose genetic material as compared to isolates circulating during the pre-vaccine era whatever the area of the world considered. The lost genetic material does not seem to be important for virulence. Our study confirms that the use of whole cell vaccines has led to the control of isolates that were similar to vaccine strains. GS-FLX sequencing technology shows that current isolates did not acquire any additional material when compared with vaccine strains or with isolates of the pre-vaccine era and that the sequenced strain Tohama I is not representative of the isolates. Furthermore, this technology allowed us to observe that the number of Insertion Sequence elements contained in the genome of the isolates is temporally increasing or varying between isolates. CONCLUSIONS: B. pertussis adaptation to humans is still in progress by losing genetic material via Insertion Sequence elements. Furthermore, recent isolates did not acquire any additional material when compared with vaccine strains or with isolates of the pre-vaccine era. Herd immunity, following intensive vaccination of infants and children with whole cell vaccines, has controlled isolates similar to the vaccine strains without modifying significantly the virulence of the isolates. With the replacement of whole cell vaccines by subunit vaccines, containing only few bacterial antigens targeting the virulence of the bacterium, one could hypothesize the circulation of isolates

  19. Random Mutagenesis of the Aspergillus oryzae Genome Results in Fungal Antibacterial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory A. Leonard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant bacteria cause severe infections in hospitals and communities. Development of new drugs to combat resistant microorganisms is needed. Natural products of microbial origin are the source of most currently available antibiotics. We hypothesized that random mutagenesis of Aspergillus oryzae would result in secretion of antibacterial compounds. To address this hypothesis, we developed a screen to identify individual A. oryzae mutants that inhibit the growth of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in vitro. To randomly generate A. oryzae mutant strains, spores were treated with ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS. Over 3000 EMS-treated A. oryzae cultures were tested in the screen, and one isolate, CAL220, exhibited altered morphology and antibacterial activity. Culture supernatant from this isolate showed antibacterial activity against Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but not Klebsiella pneumonia or Proteus vulgaris. The results of this study support our hypothesis and suggest that the screen used is sufficient and appropriate to detect secreted antibacterial fungal compounds resulting from mutagenesis of A. oryzae. Because the genome of A. oryzae has been sequenced and systems are available for genetic transformation of this organism, targeted as well as random mutations may be introduced to facilitate the discovery of novel antibacterial compounds using this system.

  20. FusX: A Rapid One-Step Transcription Activator-Like Effector Assembly System for Genome Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Alvin C; McNulty, Melissa S; Poshusta, Tanya L; Campbell, Jarryd M; Martínez-Gálvez, Gabriel; Argue, David P; Lee, Han B; Urban, Mark D; Bullard, Cassandra E; Blackburn, Patrick R; Man, Toni K; Clark, Karl J; Ekker, Stephen C

    2016-06-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are extremely effective, single-molecule DNA-targeting molecular cursors used for locus-specific genome science applications, including high-precision molecular medicine and other genome engineering applications. TALEs are used in genome engineering for locus-specific DNA editing and imaging, as artificial transcriptional activators and repressors, and for targeted epigenetic modification. TALEs as nucleases (TALENs) are effective editing tools and offer high binding specificity and fewer sequence constraints toward the targeted genome than other custom nuclease systems. One bottleneck of broader TALE use is reagent accessibility. For example, one commonly deployed method uses a multitube, 5-day assembly protocol. Here we describe FusX, a streamlined Golden Gate TALE assembly system that (1) is backward compatible with popular TALE backbones, (2) is functionalized as a single-tube 3-day TALE assembly process, (3) requires only commonly used basic molecular biology reagents, and (4) is cost-effective. More than 100 TALEN pairs have been successfully assembled using FusX, and 27 pairs were quantitatively tested in zebrafish, with each showing high somatic and germline activity. Furthermore, this assembly system is flexible and is compatible with standard molecular biology laboratory tools, but can be scaled with automated laboratory support. To demonstrate, we use a highly accessible and commercially available liquid-handling robot to rapidly and accurately assemble TALEs using the FusX TALE toolkit. Together, the FusX system accelerates TALE-based genomic science applications from basic science screening work for functional genomics testing and molecular medicine applications.

  1. Genomic Data Commons launches

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Genomic Data Commons (GDC), a unified data system that promotes sharing of genomic and clinical data between researchers, launched today with a visit from Vice President Joe Biden to the operations center at the University of Chicago.

  2. Activity-based costing for clinical paths. An example to improve clinical cost & efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, M J; Baltz, W A

    1996-01-01

    How much does this medical service or surgical procedure cost the hospital to provide? What is the most efficient clinical pathway that maximizes the quality of patient care while minimizing costs? More and more hospitals are discovering that they don't have solid answers to these critically important questions. In an age of managed care and capitation, however, it is imperative for management to know if the patient care services they provide are making or losing money-and by how much. This article discusses how a powerful new tool called activity-based costing (ABC) can be used to help hospitals accurately determine patient care costs. We show how to build a model that combines both clinical and financial data to measure how efficiently the operation allocates human, material and capital resources to provide its services. The modeling approach described in this article can be used to better analyze a wide range of important operational and financial issues, including: How to efficiently allocate resources, and what resources will be needed as patient demand changes-ideal for operational management and planning; How efficiently activities and processes are performed to meet patient needs-effective for measuring performance and improving quality; Determining clinical pathway profitability-essential for understanding where you're making or losing money; Cycle time, throughput and the impact of resource capacity constraints-critical for meeting patient demand; Costs of idle capacity-important for using resources more efficiently. We will illustrate with an example how this modeling technique can be used to develop and implement efficient clinical pathways.

  3. Early experience with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) based commercial clinical genomic profiling of gliomas-robust and informative with caveats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movassaghi, Masoud; Shabihkhani, Maryam; Hojat, Seyed A; Williams, Ryan R; Chung, Lawrance K; Im, Kyuseok; Lucey, Gregory M; Wei, Bowen; Mareninov, Sergey; Wang, Michael W; Ng, Denise W; Tashjian, Randy S; Magaki, Shino; Perez-Rosendahl, Mari; Yang, Isaac; Khanlou, Negar; Vinters, Harry V; Liau, Linda M; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L; Lai, Albert; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Yong, William H

    2017-08-01

    Commercial targeted genomic profiling with next generation sequencing using formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue has recently entered into clinical use for diagnosis and for the guiding of therapy. However, there is limited independent data regarding the accuracy or robustness of commercial genomic profiling in gliomas. As part of patient care, FFPE samples of gliomas from 71 patients were submitted for targeted genomic profiling to one commonly used commercial vendor, Foundation Medicine. Genomic alterations were determined for the following grades or groups of gliomas; Grade I/II, Grade III, primary glioblastomas (GBMs), recurrent primary GBMs, and secondary GBMs. In addition, FFPE samples from the same patients were independently assessed with conventional methods such as immunohistochemistry (IHC), Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), or Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for three genetic alterations: IDH1 mutations, EGFR amplification, and EGFRvIII expression. A total of 100 altered genes were detected by the aforementioned targeted genomic profiling assay. The number of different genomic alterations was significantly different between the five groups of gliomas and consistent with the literature. CDKN2A/B, TP53, and TERT were the most common genomic alterations seen in primary GBMs, whereas IDH1, TP53, and PIK3CA were the most common in secondary GBMs. Targeted genomic profiling demonstrated 92.3%-100% concordance with conventional methods. The targeted genomic profiling report provided an average of 5.5 drugs, and listed an average of 8.4 clinical trials for the 71 glioma patients studied but only a third of the trials were appropriate for glioma patients. In this limited comparison study, this commercial next generation sequencing based-targeted genomic profiling showed a high concordance rate with conventional methods for the 3 genetic alterations and identified mutations expected for the type of glioma. While it may not be feasible to

  4. Genome-wide association study of virologic response with efavirenz-containing or abacavir-containing regimens in AIDS clinical trials group protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann, David S; Ribaudo, Heather J; Daar, Eric S; Gulick, Roy M; Haubrich, Richard H; Robbins, Gregory K; de Bakker, Paul I W; Haas, David W; McLaren, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Efavirenz and abacavir are components of recommended first-line regimens for HIV-1 infection. We used genome-wide genotyping and clinical data to explore genetic associations with virologic failure among patients randomized to efavirenz-containing or abacavir-containing regimens in AIDS

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter bereziniae HPC229, a Carbapenem-Resistant Clinical Strain from Argentina Harboring blaNDM-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovedan, Marco; Marchiaro, Patricia M.; Morán-Barrio, Jorgelina; Revale, Santiago; Cameranesi, Marcela; Brambilla, Luciano; Viale, Alejandro M.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of an NDM-1-producing Acinetobacter bereziniae clinical strain, HPC229. This strain harbors both plasmid and chromosomal resistance determinants toward different β-lactams and aminoglycosides as well as several types of multidrug efflux pumps, most likely representing an adaptation strategy for survival under different environments. PMID:26966220

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus aureus 6850, a Highly Cytotoxic and Clinically Virulent Methicillin-Sensitive Strain with Distant Relatedness to Prototype Strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraunholz, Martin; Bernhardt, Jörg; Schuldes, Jörg; Daniel, Rolf; Hecker, Michael; Sinha, Bhanu

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent human commensal bacterium and pathogen. Here we report the complete genome sequence of strain 6850 (spa type t185; sequence type 50 [ST50]), a highly cytotoxic and clinically virulent methicillin-sensitive strain from a patient with complicated S. aureus bacteremi

  7. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis YC-10, a novel active strain against plant-parasitic nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Feixue; Wang, Jian; Song, Zhiqiang; Cheng, Ju'e; Zhang, Deyong; Liu, Yong

    2015-09-20

    Bacillus thuringiensis is an important microbial biopesticide for controlling agricultural pests by the production of toxic parasporal crystals proteins.Here,we report the finished annotated genome sequence of B. thuringiensis YC-10,which is highly toxic to nematodes.The complete genome sequence consists of a circular chromosome and nine circular plasmids,which the biggest plasmid harbors six parasporal crystals proteins genes consisting of cry1Aa, cry1Ac, cry1Ia, cry2Aa, cry2Ab and cryB1. The crystals proteins of Cry1Ia and Cry1Aa have high nematicidal activity against Meloidogyne incognita.

  8. Activation of endogenous C-type retroviral genomes by internal alpha-irradiation of mice with /sup 224/Radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, J.; Erfle, V.; Mueller, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    Sensitive co-cultivation techniques were applied to study the radiation-induced activation of endogenous retroviral genomes in different mouse strains by the alpha-emitting radionuclide /sup 224/Radium. Activated infectious C-type retroviruses were detected in spleen, bone marrow and bone tissues of C57BL/6-, BALB/c- and NMRI mice. The titres of high-dose-irradiated animals were higher than those found in low-dose-irradiated animals. Infectious retrovirus could be detected with a dose of 13.2 rad (maximum dose rate 0.9 rad/day) in the skeleton, and a dose of 4.2 rad (maximum dose rate 0.3 rad/day) in the spleen. The virus activation pattern was different in the three mouse strains. These data indicate that activation of endogenous retroviral genomes by alpha-irradiation shows a dose-effect relationship and a dependence on the genetic background of the mouse.

  9. Activities and interactions of baccalaureate nursing students in clinical practica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polifroni, E C; Packard, S A; Shah, H S; MacAvoy, S

    1995-01-01

    Basic nursing education is governed by individual state rules and regulations lacking in uniformity across the United States and based on unstated and perhaps mistaken assumptions. At the same time, there is increasing evidence of problems and difficulties with the current traditional model of nursing education. Before proposing changes in said model, the authors chose to examine what it is that a nursing student does in a clinical area. The perspective of activities and interactions was chosen to illustrate, through a nonparticipant observation study, the patterns and utilization of time during a scheduled clinical experience for baccalaureate nursing students. The goal of the study was to determine who, other than the client/patient, influences the student learning at the clinical site and how learning time is spent. Two schools (one private and one public) and nine clinical sites with 37 observations were used to collect the data for this study. Findings are best summarized in four (overlapping) categories of school time, registered nurse (RN) staff time, hospital staff time, and supervised time. School time, or time spent interacting with the instructor, another student, and/or the student on his/her own in the practice setting (time exclusive of staff input) constituted 84 per cent of all time. RN staff time that was time spent with either the primary nurse or other RNs on the unit used 10 per cent of the student time, Fourteen per cent of student time was spent in hospital staff time, which includes interactions with any nursing staff or other hospital personnel.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Up-regulation effect of hepatitis B virus genome A1846T mutation on viral replication and core promoter activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling JIANG

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To evaluate the influence of hepatitis B virus (HBV genome nucleotide A1846T mutation on the viral replication capacity and the transcription activity of HBV core promoter (CP in vitro. Methods  A total of 385 patients with hepatitis B admitted to the 302 Hospital of PLA were enrolled in the study, including 116 with moderate chronic hepatitis B (CHB-M, 123 with severe chronic hepatitis B (CHB-S, and 146 with acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF. Serum HBV DNA was isolated and full-length HBV genome was amplified. The incidence of A1846T was analyzed. Full-length HBV genomes containing 1846T mutation were cloned into pGEM-T easy vector, and the counterpart wild-type 1846A plasmids were obtained by site-directed mutagenesis. The full-length HBV genome was released from recombinant plasmid by BspQ Ⅰ/Sca Ⅰ digestion, and then transfected into HepG2 cells. Secreted HBsAg level and intracellular HBV core particles were measured 72 hours post-transfection to analyze the replication capacity (a 1.0-fold HBV genome model. 1846 mutant and wild-type full-length HBV genomes were extracted to amplify the fragment of HBV CP region, and the dual luciferase reporter of the pGL3-CP was constructed. The luciferase activity was detected 48 hours post-transfection. Results  The incidence of A1846T mutation gradually increased with the severity of hepatitis B, reaching 31.03%, 42.27%, and 55.48% in CHB-M, CHB-S and ACLF patients respectively (P<0.01. The replication capacity of 1846T mutants, level of secreted HBsAg, and transcriptional activity of CP promoter were increased by 320%, 28% and 85% respectively, compared with 1846A wild-type strains. While the more common double mutation A1762T/G1764A in CP region was increased by 67%, 9% and 72% respectively, compared with its counterpart wild-type strains. A1846T had a greater influence on viral replication capacity in vitro. Conclusions A1846T mutation could significantly increase the

  11. Mining clinical attributes of genomic variants through assisted literature curation in Egas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Sérgio; Campos, David; Pinho, Renato; Silva, Raquel M; Mort, Matthew; Cooper, David N; Oliveira, José Luís

    2016-01-01

    The veritable deluge of biological data over recent years has led to the establishment of a considerable number of knowledge resources that compile curated information extracted from the literature and store it in structured form, facilitating its use and exploitation. In this article, we focus on the curation of inherited genetic variants and associated clinical attributes, such as zygosity, penetrance or inheritance mode, and describe the use of Egas for this task. Egas is a web-based platform for text-mining assisted literature curation that focuses on usability through modern design solutions and simple user interactions. Egas offers a flexible and customizable tool that allows defining the concept types and relations of interest for a given annotation task, as well as the ontologies used for normalizing each concept type. Further, annotations may be performed on raw documents or on the results of automated concept identification and relation extraction tools. Users can inspect, correct or remove automatic text-mining results, manually add new annotations, and export the results to standard formats. Egas is compatible with the most recent versions of Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Internet Explorer and Safari and is available for use at https://demo.bmd-software.com/egas/Database URL: https://demo.bmd-software.com/egas/.

  12. Approaches to informed consent for hypothesis-testing and hypothesis-generating clinical genomics research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Facio Flavia M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Massively-parallel sequencing (MPS technologies create challenges for informed consent of research participants given the enormous scale of the data and the wide range of potential results. Discussion We propose that the consent process in these studies be based on whether they use MPS to test a hypothesis or to generate hypotheses. To demonstrate the differences in these approaches to informed consent, we describe the consent processes for two MPS studies. The purpose of our hypothesis-testing study is to elucidate the etiology of rare phenotypes using MPS. The purpose of our hypothesis-generating study is to test the feasibility of using MPS to generate clinical hypotheses, and to approach the return of results as an experimental manipulation. Issues to consider in both designs include: volume and nature of the potential results, primary versus secondary results, return of individual results, duty to warn, length of interaction, target population, and privacy and confidentiality. Summary The categorization of MPS studies as hypothesis-testing versus hypothesis-generating can help to clarify the issue of so-called incidental or secondary results for the consent process, and aid the communication of the research goals to study participants.

  13. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement Update: Genetic and Genomic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Mark E; Bradbury, Angela R; Arun, Banu; Domchek, Susan M; Ford, James M; Hampel, Heather L; Lipkin, Stephen M; Syngal, Sapna; Wollins, Dana S; Lindor, Noralane M

    2015-11-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has long affirmed that the recognition and management of individuals with an inherited susceptibility to cancer are core elements of oncology care. ASCO released its first statement on genetic testing in 1996 and updated that statement in 2003 and 2010 in response to developments in the field. In 2014, the Cancer Prevention and Ethics Committees of ASCO commissioned another update to reflect the impact of advances in this area on oncology practice. In particular, there was an interest in addressing the opportunities and challenges arising from the application of massively parallel sequencing-also known as next-generation sequencing-to cancer susceptibility testing. This technology introduces a new level of complexity into the practice of cancer risk assessment and management, requiring renewed effort on the part of ASCO to ensure that those providing care to patients with cancer receive the necessary education to use this new technology in the most effective, beneficial manner. The purpose of this statement is to explore the challenges of new and emerging technologies in cancer genetics and provide recommendations to ensure their optimal deployment in oncology practice. Specifically, the statement makes recommendations in the following areas: germline implications of somatic mutation profiling, multigene panel testing for cancer susceptibility, quality assurance in genetic testing, education of oncology professionals, and access to cancer genetic services.

  14. Clinical applications of in vivo neutron-activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohn, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation has opened a new era of both clinical diagnosis and therapy evaluation, and investigation into and modelling of body composition. The techniques are new, but it is already clear that considerable strides can be made in increasing accuracy and precision, increasing the number of elements susceptible to measurement, enhancing uniformity, and reducing the dose required for the measurement. The work presently underway will yield significant data on a variety of environmental contaminants such as Cd. Compositional studies are determining the level of vital constituents such as nitrogen and potassium in both normal subjects and in patients with a variety of metabolic disorders. Therapeutic programs can be assessed while in progress.

  15. In-vivo neutron activation analysis: principles and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohn, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation has opened a new era of both clinical diagnosis and therapy evaluation, and investigation into and modelling of body composition. The techniques are new, but it is already clear that considerable strides can be made in increasing accuracy and precision, increasing the number of elements susceptible to measurement, enhancing uniformity, and reducing the dose required for the measurement. The work presently underway will yield significant data on a variety of environmental contaminants such as Cd. Compositional studies are determining the level of vital constituents such as nitrogen and potassium in both normal subjects and in patients with a variety of metabolic disorders. Therapeutic programs can be assessed while in progress. It seems likely that by the end of this century there will have been significant progress with this research tool, and exciting insights obtained into the nature and dynamics of human body composition.

  16. Mutation of HIV-1 genomes in a clinical population treated with the mutagenic nucleoside KP1461.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James I Mullins

    Full Text Available The deoxycytidine analog KP1212, and its prodrug KP1461, are prototypes of a new class of antiretroviral drugs designed to increase viral mutation rates, with the goal of eventually causing the collapse of the viral population. Here we present an extensive analysis of viral sequences from HIV-1 infected volunteers from the first "mechanism validation" phase II clinical trial of a mutagenic base analog in which individuals previously treated with antiviral drugs received 1600 mg of KP1461 twice per day for 124 days. Plasma viral loads were not reduced, and overall levels of viral mutation were not increased during this short-term study, however, the mutation spectrum of HIV was altered. A large number (N = 105 per sample of sequences were analyzed, each derived from individual HIV-1 RNA templates, after 0, 56 and 124 days of therapy from 10 treated and 10 untreated control individuals (>7.1 million base pairs of unique viral templates were sequenced. We found that private mutations, those not found in more than one viral sequence and likely to have occurred in the most recent rounds of replication, increased in treated individuals relative to controls after 56 (p = 0.038 and 124 (p = 0.002 days of drug treatment. The spectrum of mutations observed in the treated group showed an excess of A to G and G to A mutations (p = 0.01, and to a lesser extent T to C and C to T mutations (p = 0.09, as predicted by the mechanism of action of the drug. These results validate the proposed mechanism of action in humans and should spur development of this novel antiretroviral approach.

  17. Mutation of HIV-1 genomes in a clinical population treated with the mutagenic nucleoside KP1461.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, James I; Heath, Laura; Hughes, James P; Kicha, Jessica; Styrchak, Sheila; Wong, Kim G; Rao, Ushnal; Hansen, Alexis; Harris, Kevin S; Laurent, Jean-Pierre; Li, Deyu; Simpson, Jeffrey H; Essigmann, John M; Loeb, Lawrence A; Parkins, Jeffrey

    2011-01-14

    The deoxycytidine analog KP1212, and its prodrug KP1461, are prototypes of a new class of antiretroviral drugs designed to increase viral mutation rates, with the goal of eventually causing the collapse of the viral population. Here we present an extensive analysis of viral sequences from HIV-1 infected volunteers from the first "mechanism validation" phase II clinical trial of a mutagenic base analog in which individuals previously treated with antiviral drugs received 1600 mg of KP1461 twice per day for 124 days. Plasma viral loads were not reduced, and overall levels of viral mutation were not increased during this short-term study, however, the mutation spectrum of HIV was altered. A large number (N = 105 per sample) of sequences were analyzed, each derived from individual HIV-1 RNA templates, after 0, 56 and 124 days of therapy from 10 treated and 10 untreated control individuals (>7.1 million base pairs of unique viral templates were sequenced). We found that private mutations, those not found in more than one viral sequence and likely to have occurred in the most recent rounds of replication, increased in treated individuals relative to controls after 56 (p = 0.038) and 124 (p = 0.002) days of drug treatment. The spectrum of mutations observed in the treated group showed an excess of A to G and G to A mutations (p = 0.01), and to a lesser extent T to C and C to T mutations (p = 0.09), as predicted by the mechanism of action of the drug. These results validate the proposed mechanism of action in humans and should spur development of this novel antiretroviral approach.

  18. Comparative genome analysis of Lactobacillus rhamnosus clinical isolates from initial stages of dental pulp infection: identification of a new exopolysaccharide cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Mangala A; Chen, Zhiliang; Wilkins, Marc R; Hunter, Neil

    2014-01-01

    The human oral microbiome has a major role in oral diseases including dental caries. Our studies on progression of caries infection through dentin and more recently, the invasion of vital dental pulp, detected Lactobacillus rhamnosus in the initial stages of infection of vital pulp tissue. In this study employing current high-throughput next generation sequencing technology we sought to obtain insight into genomic traits of tissue invasive L. rhamnosus, to recognise biomarkers that could provide an understanding of pathogenic potential of lactobacilli, generally regarded as safe. Roche GS FLX+ technology was used to generate whole genome sequences of two clinical isolates of L. rhamnosus infecting vital pulp. Detailed genome-wide comparison of the genetic profiles of tissue invasive L. rhamnosus with probiotic L. rhamnosus was performed to test the hypothesis that specific strains of L. rhamnosus possessing a unique gene complement are selected for the capacity to invade vital pulp tissue. Analysis identified 264 and 258 genes respectively, from dental pulp-invasive L. rhamnosus strains LRHMDP2 and LRHMDP3 isolated from two different subjects that were not present in the reference probiotic L. rhamnosus strain ATCC 53103 (GG). Distinct genome signatures identified included the presence of a modified exopolysaccharide cluster, a characteristic confirmed in a further six clinical isolates. Additional features of LRHMDP2 and LRHMDP3 were altered transcriptional regulators from RpoN, NtrC, MutR, ArsR and zinc-binding Cro/CI families, as well as changes in the two-component sensor kinase response regulator and ABC transporters for ferric iron. Both clinical isolates of L. rhamnosus contained a single SpaFED cluster, as in L. rhamnosus Lc705, instead of the two Spa clusters (SpaCBA and SpaFED) identified in L. rhamnosus ATCC 53103 (GG). Genomic distance analysis and SNP divergence confirmed a close relationship of the clinical isolates but segregation from the reference

  19. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of neuroblastic tumors reveals clinically relevant epigenetic events and large-scale epigenomic alterations localized to telomeric regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Patrick G; Das, Sudipto; Bryan, Kenneth; Watters, Karen M; Alcock, Leah; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Stallings, Raymond L

    2011-05-15

    The downregulation of specific genes through DNA hypermethylation is a major hallmark of cancer, although the extent and genomic distribution of hypermethylation occurring within cancer genomes is poorly understood. We report on the first genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation alterations in different neuroblastic tumor subtypes and cell lines, revealing higher order organization and clinically relevant alterations of the epigenome. The methylation status of 33,485 discrete loci representing all annotated CpG islands and RefSeq gene promoters was assessed in primary neuroblastic tumors and cell lines. A comparison of genes that were hypermethylated exclusively in the clinically favorable ganglioneuroma/ganglioneuroblastoma tumors revealed that nine genes were associated with poor clinical outcome when overexpressed in the unfavorable neuroblastoma (NB) tumors. Moreover, an integrated DNA methylation and copy number analysis identified 80 genes that were recurrently concomitantly deleted and hypermethylated in NB, with 37 reactivated by 5-aza-deoxycytidine. Lower expression of four of these genes was correlated with poor clinical outcome, further implicating their inactivation in aggressive disease pathogenesis. Analysis of genome-wide hypermethylation patterns revealed 70 recurrent large-scale blocks of contiguously hypermethylated promoters/CpG islands, up to 590 kb in length, with a distribution bias toward telomeric regions. Genome-wide hypermethylation events in neuroblastic tumors are extensive and frequently occur in large-scale blocks with a significant bias toward telomeric regions, indicating that some methylation alterations have occurred in a coordinated manner. Our results indicate that methylation contributes toward the clinicopathological features of neuroblastic tumors, revealing numerous genes associated with poor patient survival in NB.

  20. Comparative genome analysis of Lactobacillus rhamnosus clinical isolates from initial stages of dental pulp infection: identification of a new exopolysaccharide cluster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangala A Nadkarni

    Full Text Available The human oral microbiome has a major role in oral diseases including dental caries. Our studies on progression of caries infection through dentin and more recently, the invasion of vital dental pulp, detected Lactobacillus rhamnosus in the initial stages of infection of vital pulp tissue. In this study employing current high-throughput next generation sequencing technology we sought to obtain insight into genomic traits of tissue invasive L. rhamnosus, to recognise biomarkers that could provide an understanding of pathogenic potential of lactobacilli, generally regarded as safe. Roche GS FLX+ technology was used to generate whole genome sequences of two clinical isolates of L. rhamnosus infecting vital pulp. Detailed genome-wide comparison of the genetic profiles of tissue invasive L. rhamnosus with probiotic L. rhamnosus was performed to test the hypothesis that specific strains of L. rhamnosus possessing a unique gene complement are selected for the capacity to invade vital pulp tissue. Analysis identified 264 and 258 genes respectively, from dental pulp-invasive L. rhamnosus strains LRHMDP2 and LRHMDP3 isolated from two different subjects that were not present in the reference probiotic L. rhamnosus strain ATCC 53103 (GG. Distinct genome signatures identified included the presence of a modified exopolysaccharide cluster, a characteristic confirmed in a further six clinical isolates. Additional features of LRHMDP2 and LRHMDP3 were altered transcriptional regulators from RpoN, NtrC, MutR, ArsR and zinc-binding Cro/CI families, as well as changes in the two-component sensor kinase response regulator and ABC transporters for ferric iron. Both clinical isolates of L. rhamnosus contained a single SpaFED cluster, as in L. rhamnosus Lc705, instead of the two Spa clusters (SpaCBA and SpaFED identified in L. rhamnosus ATCC 53103 (GG. Genomic distance analysis and SNP divergence confirmed a close relationship of the clinical isolates but segregation

  1. Complete genome sequence of a low-temperature active and alkaline-stable endoglucanase-producing Paenibacillus sp. strain IHB B 3084 from the Indian Trans-Himalayas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Hena; Swarnkar, Mohit Kumar; Rana, Aditi; Kaushal, Kanishak; Singh, Anil Kumar; Kasana, Ramesh Chand; Gulati, Arvind

    2016-07-20

    A genome of 5.88Mb with 46.83% G+C content is reported for an endoglucanase-producing bacterium Paenibacillus sp. strain IHB B 3084 isolated from the cold environments of the Indian Trans-Himalayas. The psychrotrophic bacterium produces low-temperature active and alkaline-stable endoglucanases of industrial importance. The genomic data has provided insight into genomic basis of cellulase production and survival of the bacterium in the cold environments.

  2. Importance of high-throughput cell separation technologies for genomics/proteomics-based clinical diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, James F.; Szaniszlo, Peter; Prow, Tarl W.; Reece, Lisa M.; Wang, Nan; Asmuth, David M.

    2002-06-01

    be about 100 times more sensitive than they are now to be able to do many biologically and biomedically meaningful experiments and clinical tests.

  3. Genomic and in situ investigations of the novel uncultured Chloroflexi associated with 0092 morphotype filamentous bulking in activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlroy, Simon Jon; Karst, Søren Michael; Nierychlo, Marta; Dueholm, Morten Simonsen; Albertsen, Mads; Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; Seviour, Robert James; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2016-09-01

    Overgrowth of filamentous bacteria in activated sludge wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) leads to impaired sludge settleability, a condition known as bulking, which is a common operational problem worldwide. Filaments with the Eikelboom 0092 morphotype are commonly associated with such bulking episodes. Members of the uncultured B45 phylotype, which is embraced within the phylum Chloroflexi, were recently shown to exhibit this morphology. Although these organisms are among the most abundant populations recorded in activated sludge processes, nothing is known about their metabolic characteristics. In this study, a genome sequence, representing the B45 phylotype, was retrieved from a metagenome generated from an activated sludge WWTP. The genome consisted of two chromosomes and one plasmid, which were 4.0, 1.0 and 0.04 Mbps in size, respectively. A metabolic model was constructed for this organism, based on annotation of its genome, showing its ability to generate energy by respiration, utilizing oxygen, nitrite or nitrous oxide as electron acceptors, or by fermentation of sugars. The ability of B45 members to ferment sugars under anaerobic conditions was validated in situ with microautoradiography-fluorescence in situ hybridization. The provisional name of 'Candidatus Promineofilum breve' is proposed for this species. This study represents the first detailed information on an uncultured genus of filamentous organisms from activated sludge.

  4. Creative Activities in Music – A Genome-Wide Linkage Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikkonen, Jaana; Kuusi, Tuire; Peltonen, Petri; Raijas, Pirre; Ukkola-Vuoti, Liisa; Karma, Kai; Onkamo, Päivi; Järvelä, Irma

    2016-01-01

    Creative activities in music represent a complex cognitive function of the human brain, whose biological basis is largely unknown. In order to elucidate the biological background of creative activities in music we performed genome-wide linkage and linkage disequilibrium (LD) scans in musically experienced individuals characterised for self-reported composing, arranging and non-music related creativity. The participants consisted of 474 individuals from 79 families, and 103 sporadic individuals. We found promising evidence for linkage at 16p12.1-q12.1 for arranging (LOD 2.75, 120 cases), 4q22.1 for composing (LOD 2.15, 103 cases) and Xp11.23 for non-music related creativity (LOD 2.50, 259 cases). Surprisingly, statistically significant evidence for linkage was found for the opposite phenotype of creative activity in music (neither composing nor arranging; NCNA) at 18q21 (LOD 3.09, 149 cases), which contains cadherin genes like CDH7 and CDH19. The locus at 4q22.1 overlaps the previously identified region of musical aptitude, music perception and performance giving further support for this region as a candidate region for broad range of music-related traits. The other regions at 18q21 and 16p12.1-q12.1 are also adjacent to the previously identified loci with musical aptitude. Pathway analysis of the genes suggestively associated with composing suggested an overrepresentation of the cerebellar long-term depression pathway (LTD), which is a cellular model for synaptic plasticity. The LTD also includes cadherins and AMPA receptors, whose component GSG1L was linked to arranging. These results suggest that molecular pathways linked to memory and learning via LTD affect music-related creative behaviour. Musical creativity is a complex phenotype where a common background with musicality and intelligence has been proposed. Here, we implicate genetic regions affecting music-related creative behaviour, which also include genes with neuropsychiatric associations. We also propose

  5. Creative Activities in Music--A Genome-Wide Linkage Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaana Oikkonen

    Full Text Available Creative activities in music represent a complex cognitive function of the human brain, whose biological basis is largely unknown. In order to elucidate the biological background of creative activities in music we performed genome-wide linkage and linkage disequilibrium (LD scans in musically experienced individuals characterised for self-reported composing, arranging and non-music related creativity. The participants consisted of 474 individuals from 79 families, and 103 sporadic individuals. We found promising evidence for linkage at 16p12.1-q12.1 for arranging (LOD 2.75, 120 cases, 4q22.1 for composing (LOD 2.15, 103 cases and Xp11.23 for non-music related creativity (LOD 2.50, 259 cases. Surprisingly, statistically significant evidence for linkage was found for the opposite phenotype of creative activity in music (neither composing nor arranging; NCNA at 18q21 (LOD 3.09, 149 cases, which contains cadherin genes like CDH7 and CDH19. The locus at 4q22.1 overlaps the previously identified region of musical aptitude, music perception and performance giving further support for this region as a candidate region for broad range of music-related traits. The other regions at 18q21 and 16p12.1-q12.1 are also adjacent to the previously identified loci with musical aptitude. Pathway analysis of the genes suggestively associated with composing suggested an overrepresentation of the cerebellar long-term depression pathway (LTD, which is a cellular model for synaptic plasticity. The LTD also includes cadherins and AMPA receptors, whose component GSG1L was linked to arranging. These results suggest that molecular pathways linked to memory and learning via LTD affect music-related creative behaviour. Musical creativity is a complex phenotype where a common background with musicality and intelligence has been proposed. Here, we implicate genetic regions affecting music-related creative behaviour, which also include genes with neuropsychiatric associations. We

  6. Creative Activities in Music--A Genome-Wide Linkage Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikkonen, Jaana; Kuusi, Tuire; Peltonen, Petri; Raijas, Pirre; Ukkola-Vuoti, Liisa; Karma, Kai; Onkamo, Päivi; Järvelä, Irma

    2016-01-01

    Creative activities in music represent a complex cognitive function of the human brain, whose biological basis is largely unknown. In order to elucidate the biological background of creative activities in music we performed genome-wide linkage and linkage disequilibrium (LD) scans in musically experienced individuals characterised for self-reported composing, arranging and non-music related creativity. The participants consisted of 474 individuals from 79 families, and 103 sporadic individuals. We found promising evidence for linkage at 16p12.1-q12.1 for arranging (LOD 2.75, 120 cases), 4q22.1 for composing (LOD 2.15, 103 cases) and Xp11.23 for non-music related creativity (LOD 2.50, 259 cases). Surprisingly, statistically significant evidence for linkage was found for the opposite phenotype of creative activity in music (neither composing nor arranging; NCNA) at 18q21 (LOD 3.09, 149 cases), which contains cadherin genes like CDH7 and CDH19. The locus at 4q22.1 overlaps the previously identified region of musical aptitude, music perception and performance giving further support for this region as a candidate region for broad range of music-related traits. The other regions at 18q21 and 16p12.1-q12.1 are also adjacent to the previously identified loci with musical aptitude. Pathway analysis of the genes suggestively associated with composing suggested an overrepresentation of the cerebellar long-term depression pathway (LTD), which is a cellular model for synaptic plasticity. The LTD also includes cadherins and AMPA receptors, whose component GSG1L was linked to arranging. These results suggest that molecular pathways linked to memory and learning via LTD affect music-related creative behaviour. Musical creativity is a complex phenotype where a common background with musicality and intelligence has been proposed. Here, we implicate genetic regions affecting music-related creative behaviour, which also include genes with neuropsychiatric associations. We also propose

  7. Genome Analysis of Latin American Cervical Cancer: Frequent Activation of the PIK3CA Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Hong; Villagran, Guillermo; Boland, Joseph F; Im, Kate M; Polo, Sarita; Zhou, Weiyin; Odey, Ushie; Juárez-Torres, Eligia; Medina-Martínez, Ingrid; Roman-Basaure, Edgar; Mitchell, Jason; Roberson, David; Sawitzke, Julie; Garland, Lisa; Rodríguez-Herrera, Maria; Wells, David; Troyer, Jennifer; Pinto, Francisco Castillo; Bass, Sara; Zhang, Xijun; Castillo, Miriam; Gold, Bert; Morales, Hesler; Yeager, Meredith; Berumen, Jaime; Alvirez, Enrique; Gharzouzi, Eduardo; Dean, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer mortality for women living in poverty, causing more than 28,000 deaths annually in Latin America and 266,000 worldwide. To better understand the molecular basis of the disease, we ascertained blood and tumor samples from Guatemala and Venezuela and performed genomic characterization. We performed human papillomavirus (HPV) typing and identified somatically mutated genes using exome and ultra-deep targeted sequencing with confirmation in samples from Mexico. Copy number changes were also assessed in the exome sequence. Cervical cancer cases in Guatemala and Venezuela have an average age of diagnosis of 50 years and 5.6 children. Analysis of 675 tumors revealed activation of PIK3CA and other PI3K/AKT pathway genes in 31% of squamous carcinomas and 24% of adeno- and adenosquamous tumors, predominantly at two sites (E542K, E545K) in the helical domain of the PIK3CA gene. This distribution of PIK3CA mutations is distinct from most other cancer types and does not result in the in vitro phosphorylation of AKT. Somatic mutations were more frequent in squamous carcinomas diagnosed after the age of 50 years. Frequent gain of chromosome 3q was found, and low PIK3CA mutation fractions in many tumors suggest that PI3K mutation can be a late event in tumor progression. PI3K pathway mutation is important to cervical carcinogenesis in Latin America. Therapeutic agents that directly target PI3K could play a role in the therapy of this common malignancy. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory- Completing the Human Genome Project and Triggering Nearly $1 Trillion in U.S. Economic Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Jeffrey S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-28

    The success of the Human Genome project is already nearing $1 Trillion dollars of U.S. economic activity. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was a co-leader in one of the biggest biological research effort in history, sequencing the Human Genome Project. This ambitious research effort set out to sequence the approximately 3 billion nucleotides in the human genome, an effort many thought was nearly impossible. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was discovered in 1869, and by 1943 came the discovery that DNA was a molecule that encodes the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of living organisms and many viruses. To make full use of the information, scientists needed to first sequence the billions of nucleotides to begin linking them to genetic traits and illnesses, and eventually more effective treatments. New medical discoveries and improved agriculture productivity were some of the expected benefits. While the potential benefits were vast, the timeline (over a decade) and cost ($3.8 Billion) exceeded what the private sector would normally attempt, especially when this would only be the first phase toward the path to new discoveries and market opportunities. The Department of Energy believed its best research laboratories could meet this Grand Challenge and soon convinced the National Institute of Health to formally propose the Human Genome project to the federal government. The U.S. government accepted the risk and challenge to potentially create new healthcare and food discoveries that could benefit the world and the U.S. Industry.

  9. Genome editing systems in novel therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yoon-Young; Cai, Liuhong; Ye, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing is the process in which DNA sequences at precise genomic locations are modified. In the past three decades, genome editing by homologous recombination has been successfully performed in mouse for generating genetic models. The low efficiency of this process in human cells, however, had prevented its clinical application until the recent advancements in designer endonuclease technologies. The significantly improved genome editing efficiencies aided by ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR systems provide unprecedented opportunities not only for biomedical research, but also for developing novel therapies. Applications based on these genome editing tools to disrupt deleterious genes, correct genetic mutations, deliver functional transgenes more effectively or even modify the epigenetic landscape are being actively investigated for gene and cell therapy purposes. Encouraging results have been obtained in limited clinical trials in the past two years. While most of the applications are still in proof-of-principle or preclinical development stages, it is anticipated that the coming years will see increasing clinical success in novel therapies based on the modern genome editing technologies. It should be noted that critical issues still remain before the technologies can be translated into more reliable therapies. These key issues include off-target evaluation, establishing appropriate preclinical models and improving the currently low efficiency of homology-based precise gene replacement. In this review we discuss the preclinical and clinical studies aiming at translating the genome editing technologies as well as the issues that are important for more successful translation.

  10. A Biophysical Model of CRISPR/Cas9 Activity for Rational Design of Genome Editing and Gene Regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Farasat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to precisely modify genomes and regulate specific genes will greatly accelerate several medical and engineering applications. The CRISPR/Cas9 (Type II system binds and cuts DNA using guide RNAs, though the variables that control its on-target and off-target activity remain poorly characterized. Here, we develop and parameterize a system-wide biophysical model of Cas9-based genome editing and gene regulation to predict how changing guide RNA sequences, DNA superhelical densities, Cas9 and crRNA expression levels, organisms and growth conditions, and experimental conditions collectively control the dynamics of dCas9-based binding and Cas9-based cleavage at all DNA sites with both canonical and non-canonical PAMs. We combine statistical thermodynamics and kinetics to model Cas9:crRNA complex formation, diffusion, site selection, reversible R-loop formation, and cleavage, using large amounts of structural, biochemical, expression, and next-generation sequencing data to determine kinetic parameters and develop free energy models. Our results identify DNA supercoiling as a novel mechanism controlling Cas9 binding. Using the model, we predict Cas9 off-target binding frequencies across the lambdaphage and human genomes, and explain why Cas9's off-target activity can be so high. With this improved understanding, we propose several rules for designing experiments for minimizing off-target activity. We also discuss the implications for engineering dCas9-based genetic circuits.

  11. A Biophysical Model of CRISPR/Cas9 Activity for Rational Design of Genome Editing and Gene Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farasat, Iman; Salis, Howard M.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to precisely modify genomes and regulate specific genes will greatly accelerate several medical and engineering applications. The CRISPR/Cas9 (Type II) system binds and cuts DNA using guide RNAs, though the variables that control its on-target and off-target activity remain poorly characterized. Here, we develop and parameterize a system-wide biophysical model of Cas9-based genome editing and gene regulation to predict how changing guide RNA sequences, DNA superhelical densities, Cas9 and crRNA expression levels, organisms and growth conditions, and experimental conditions collectively control the dynamics of dCas9-based binding and Cas9-based cleavage at all DNA sites with both canonical and non-canonical PAMs. We combine statistical thermodynamics and kinetics to model Cas9:crRNA complex formation, diffusion, site selection, reversible R-loop formation, and cleavage, using large amounts of structural, biochemical, expression, and next-generation sequencing data to determine kinetic parameters and develop free energy models. Our results identify DNA supercoiling as a novel mechanism controlling Cas9 binding. Using the model, we predict Cas9 off-target binding frequencies across the lambdaphage and human genomes, and explain why Cas9’s off-target activity can be so high. With this improved understanding, we propose several rules for designing experiments for minimizing off-target activity. We also discuss the implications for engineering dCas9-based genetic circuits. PMID:26824432

  12. Genomic risk profiling: attitudes and use in personal and clinical care of primary care physicians who offer risk profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, Susanne B; Carrig, Madeline M; O'Daniel, Julianne M; Orlando, Lori A; Killeya-Jones, Ley A; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Cho, Alex

    2011-08-01

    Genomic risk profiling involves the analysis of genetic variations linked through statistical associations to a range of disease states. There is considerable controversy as to how, and even whether, to incorporate these tests into routine medical care. To assess physician attitudes and uptake of genomic risk profiling among an 'early adopter' practice group. We surveyed members of MDVIP, a national group of primary care physicians (PCPs), currently offering genomic risk profiling as part of their practice. All physicians in the MDVIP network (N = 356) We obtained a 44% response rate. One third of respondents had ordered a test for themselves and 42% for a patient. The odds of having ordered personal testing were 10.51-fold higher for those who felt well-informed about genomic risk testing (p risk profiling. Educational and interpretive support may enhance uptake of genomic risk profiling.

  13. Induction of genomic instability and activation of autophagy in artificial human aneuploid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ariyoshi, Kentaro [Hirosaki University, Institute of Radiation Emergency Medicine, 66-1 Hon-cho, Hirosaki 036-8564 (Japan); Miura, Tomisato; Kasai, Kosuke; Fujishima, Yohei [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 66-1 Hon-cho, Hirosaki 036-8564 (Japan); Oshimura, Mitsuo [Chromosome Engineering Research Center (CERC), Tottori University, Nishicho 86, Yonago, Tottori 683-8503 (Japan); Yoshida, Mitsuaki A., E-mail: ariyoshi@hirosaki-u.ac.jp [Hirosaki University, Institute of Radiation Emergency Medicine, 66-1 Hon-cho, Hirosaki 036-8564 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Clones with artificial aneuploidy of chromosome 8 or chromosome 22 both show inhibited proliferation and genomic instability. • Increased autophagy was observed in the artificially aneuploid clones. • Inhibition of autophagy resulted in increased genomic instability and DNA damage. • Intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species were up-regulated in the artificially aneuploid clones. - Abstract: Chromosome missegregation can lead to a change in chromosome number known as aneuploidy. Although aneuploidy is a known hallmark of cancer cells, the various mechanisms by which altered gene and/or DNA copy number facilitate tumorigenesis remain unclear. To understand the effect of aneuploidy occurring in non-tumorigenic human breast epithelial cells, we generated clones harboring artificial aneuploidy using microcell-mediated chromosome transfer. Our results demonstrate that clones with artificial aneuploidy of chromosome 8 or chromosome 22 both show inhibited proliferation and genomic instability. Also, the increased autophagy was observed in the artificially aneuploidy clones, and inhibition of autophagy resulted in increased genomic instability and DNA damage. In addition, the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species were up-regulated in the artificially aneuploid clones, and inhibition of autophagy further increased the production of reactive oxygen species. Together, these results suggest that even a single extraneous chromosome can induce genomic instability, and that autophagy triggered by aneuploidy-induced stress is a mechanism to protect cells bearing abnormal chromosome number.

  14. Clinical application of transcriptional activators of bile salt transporters☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdasaryan, Anna; Chiba, Peter; Trauner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Hepatobiliary bile salt (BS) transporters are critical determinants of BS homeostasis controlling intracellular concentrations of BSs and their enterohepatic circulation. Genetic or acquired dysfunction of specific transport systems causes intrahepatic and systemic retention of potentially cytotoxic BSs, which, in high concentrations, may disturb integrity of cell membranes and subcellular organelles resulting in cell death, inflammation and fibrosis. Transcriptional regulation of canalicular BS efflux through bile salt export pump (BSEP), basolateral elimination through organic solute transporters alpha and beta (OSTα/OSTβ) as well as inhibition of hepatocellular BS uptake through basolateral Na+-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) represent critical steps in protection from hepatocellular BS overload and can be targeted therapeutically. In this article, we review the potential clinical implications of the major BS transporters BSEP, OSTα/OSTβ and NTCP in the pathogenesis of hereditary and acquired cholestatic syndromes, provide an overview on transcriptional control of these transporters by the key regulatory nuclear receptors and discuss the potential therapeutic role of novel transcriptional activators of BS transporters in cholestasis. PMID:24333169

  15. [Activated protein C resistance and factor V Leiden: clinical interest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guermazi, S; Znazen, R

    2011-10-01

    Activated protein C resistance (APCR) is a coagulation abnormality often linked to FV Leiden mutation, a single nucleotide G1691A substitution resulting in arginine 506→glutamine missense factor V mutation. FV Leiden has a frequency of 20 to 30% in groups of patients with venous thrombosis while it is of 4 to 10% in normal subjects. FV Leiden is considered as a weak risk factor of thrombosis except in homozygote. FV Leiden is implicated in deep venous thrombosis occurrence. Duration of oral anticoagulant treatment is six months in patients developing a first venous thrombosis except in patients with combined defects or a clinical context suggesting a high risk of severe relapse. Detection of APCR by coagulation methods is often used in first intention with a high specificity if plasmas tested are diluted in factor V deficient plasma. Genotyping study is essential to establish the heterozygote or homozygote statute and certain teams perform it directly. Nevertheless, APCR not related to FV Leiden could be an independent thrombosis risk factor. APCR and FV Leiden are included in laboratory investigations of thrombophilic markers in patients less than 50 years with venous thrombosis. In arterial thrombosis, FV Leiden implication is weak or absent. FV Leiden increases the risk of thrombosis in other situations as in patients with cancer. An association with recurrent miscarriages and other vasculoplacental complications is also reported in many studies but the data concerning the efficacy of antithrombotic treatment to prevent recurrence are currently insufficient. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of five newly isolated bacteriophages active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatek, Magdalena; Mizak, Lidia; Parasion, Sylwia; Gryko, Romuald; Olender, Alina; Niemcewicz, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes serious infections, especially in patients with immunodeficiency. It exhibits multiple mechanisms of resistance, including efflux pumps, antibiotic modifying enzymes and limited membrane permeability. The primary reason for the development of novel therapeutics for P. aeruginosa infections is the declining efficacy of conventional antibiotic therapy. These clinical problems caused a revitalization of interest in bacteriophages, which are highly specific and have very effective antibacterial activity as well as several other advantages over traditional antimicrobial agents. Above all, so far, no serious or irreversible side effects of phage therapy have been described. Five newly purified P. aeruginosa phages named vB_PaeM_WP1, vB_PaeM_WP2, vB_PaeM_WP3, vB_PaeM_WP4 and vB_PaeP_WP5 have been characterized as potential candidates for use in phage therapy. They are representatives of the Myoviridae and Podoviridae families. Their host range, genome size, structural proteins and stability in various physical and chemical conditions were tested. The results of these preliminary investigations indicate that the newly isolated bacteriophages may be considered for use in phagotherapy.

  17. Use of whole-genome sequencing to distinguish relapse from reinfection in a completed tuberculosis clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witney, Adam A; Bateson, Anna L E; Jindani, Amina; Phillips, Patrick P J; Coleman, David; Stoker, Neil G; Butcher, Philip D; McHugh, Timothy D

    2017-03-29

    RIFAQUIN was a tuberculosis chemotherapy trial in southern Africa including regimens with high-dose rifapentine with moxifloxacin. Here, the application of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) is evaluated within RIFAQUIN for identifying new infections in treated patients as either relapses or reinfections. WGS is further compared with mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) typing. This is the first report of WGS being used to evaluate new infections in a completed clinical trial for which all treatment and epidemiological data are available for analysis. DNA from 36 paired samples of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cultured from patients before and after treatment was typed using 24-loci MIRU-VNTR, in silico spoligotyping and WGS. Following WGS, the sequences were mapped against the reference strain H37Rv, the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) differences between pairs were identified, and a phylogenetic reconstruction was performed. WGS indicated that 32 of the paired samples had a very low number of SNP differences (0-5; likely relapses). One pair had an intermediate number of SNP differences, and was likely the result of a mixed infection with a pre-treatment minor genotype that was highly related to the post-treatment genotype; this was reclassified as a relapse, in contrast to the MIRU-VNTR result. The remaining three pairs had very high SNP differences (>750; likely reinfections). WGS and MIRU-VNTR both similarly differentiated relapses and reinfections, but WGS provided significant extra information. The low proportion of reinfections seen suggests that in standard chemotherapy trials with up to 24 months of follow-up, typing the strains brings little benefit to an analysis of the trial outcome in terms of differentiating relapse and reinfection. However, there is a benefit to using WGS as compared to MIRU-VNTR in terms of the additional genotype information obtained, in particular for defining the presence of mixed

  18. Targetable kinase-activating lesions in Ph-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Publication Abstract:  Philadelphia chromosome-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph-like ALL) is characterized by a gene-expression profile similar to that of BCR-ABL1-positive ALL, alterations of lymphoid transcription factor genes, and a poor outcome. The frequency and spectrum of genetic alterations in Ph-like ALL and its responsiveness to tyrosine kinase inhibition are undefined, especially in adolescents and adults. We performed genomic profiling of 1725 patients with precursor B-cell ALL and detailed genomic analysis of 154 patients with Ph-like ALL.

  19. Identification of Novel Genetic Markers Associated with Clinical Phenotypes of Systemic Sclerosis through a Genome-Wide Association Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Jun; Teruel, Maria; Diaz-Gallo, Lina-Marcela; Broen, Jasper C.; Vonk, Madelon C.; Simeon, Carmen P.; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Coenen, Marieke J. H.; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; Schuerwegh, Annemie J.; van Riel, Piet L. C. M.; Vanthuyne, Marie; van 't Slot, Ruben; Italiaander, Annet; Ophoff, Roel A.; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Fonollosa, Vicente; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; González-Gay, Miguel A.; García-Hernández, Francisco J.; González-Escribano, María F.; Airo, Paolo; van Laar, Jacob; Worthington, Jane; Hesselstrand, Roger; Smith, Vanessa; de Keyser, Filip; Houssiau, Fredric; Chee, Meng May; Madhok, Rajan; Shiels, Paul G.; Westhovens, Rene; Kreuter, Alexander; de Baere, Elfride; Witte, Torsten; Padyukov, Leonid; Nordin, Annika; Scorza, Raffaella; Lunardi, Claudio; Lie, Benedicte A.; Hoffmann-Vold, Anna-Maria; Palm, Øyvind; García de la Peña, Paloma; Carreira, Patricia; Varga, John; Hinchcliff, Monique; Lee, Annette T.; Gourh, Pravitt; Amos, Christopher I.; Wigley, Frederick M.; Hummers, Laura K.; Hummers, J.; Nelson, J. Lee; Riemekasten, Gabriella; Herrick, Ariane; Beretta, Lorenzo; Fonseca, Carmen; Denton, Christopher P.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Agarwal, Sandeep; Assassi, Shervin; Tan, Filemon K.; Arnett, Frank C.; Radstake, Timothy R. D. J.; Mayes, Maureen D.; Martin, Javier

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine, through a genome-wide association study (GWAS), the genetic components contributing to different clinical sub-phenotypes of systemic sclerosis (SSc). We considered limited (lcSSc) and diffuse (dcSSc) cutaneous involvement, and the relationships with presence of the SSc-specific auto-antibodies, anti-centromere (ACA), and anti-topoisomerase I (ATA). Four GWAS cohorts, comprising 2,296 SSc patients and 5,171 healthy controls, were meta-analyzed looking for associations in the selected subgroups. Eighteen polymorphisms were further tested in nine independent cohorts comprising an additional 3,175 SSc patients and 4,971 controls. Conditional analysis for associated SNPs in the HLA region was performed to explore their independent association in antibody subgroups. Overall analysis showed that non-HLA polymorphism rs11642873 in IRF8 gene to be associated at GWAS level with lcSSc (P = 2.32×10−12, OR = 0.75). Also, rs12540874 in GRB10 gene (P = 1.27 × 10−6, OR = 1.15) and rs11047102 in SOX5 gene (P = 1.39×10−7, OR = 1.36) showed a suggestive association with lcSSc and ACA subgroups respectively. In the HLA region, we observed highly associated allelic combinations in the HLA-DQB1 locus with ACA (P = 1.79×10−61, OR = 2.48), in the HLA-DPA1/B1 loci with ATA (P = 4.57×10−76, OR = 8.84), and in NOTCH4 with ACA P = 8.84×10−21, OR = 0.55) and ATA (P = 1.14×10−8, OR = 0.54). We have identified three new non-HLA genes (IRF8, GRB10, and SOX5) associated with SSc clinical and auto-antibody subgroups. Within the HLA region, HLA-DQB1, HLA-DPA1/B1, and NOTCH4 associations with SSc are likely confined to specific auto-antibodies. These data emphasize the differential genetic components of subphenotypes of SSc. PMID:21779181

  20. Identification of novel genetic markers associated with clinical phenotypes of systemic sclerosis through a genome-wide association strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Gorlova

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine, through a genome-wide association study (GWAS, the genetic components contributing to different clinical sub-phenotypes of systemic sclerosis (SSc. We considered limited (lcSSc and diffuse (dcSSc cutaneous involvement, and the relationships with presence of the SSc-specific auto-antibodies, anti-centromere (ACA, and anti-topoisomerase I (ATA. Four GWAS cohorts, comprising 2,296 SSc patients and 5,171 healthy controls, were meta-analyzed looking for associations in the selected subgroups. Eighteen polymorphisms were further tested in nine independent cohorts comprising an additional 3,175 SSc patients and 4,971 controls. Conditional analysis for associated SNPs in the HLA region was performed to explore their independent association in antibody subgroups. Overall analysis showed that non-HLA polymorphism rs11642873 in IRF8 gene to be associated at GWAS level with lcSSc (P = 2.32×10(-12, OR = 0.75. Also, rs12540874 in GRB10 gene (P = 1.27 × 10(-6, OR = 1.15 and rs11047102 in SOX5 gene (P = 1.39×10(-7, OR = 1.36 showed a suggestive association with lcSSc and ACA subgroups respectively. In the HLA region, we observed highly associated allelic combinations in the HLA-DQB1 locus with ACA (P = 1.79×10(-61, OR = 2.48, in the HLA-DPA1/B1 loci with ATA (P = 4.57×10(-76, OR = 8.84, and in NOTCH4 with ACA P = 8.84×10(-21, OR = 0.55 and ATA (P = 1.14×10(-8, OR = 0.54. We have identified three new non-HLA genes (IRF8, GRB10, and SOX5 associated with SSc clinical and auto-antibody subgroups. Within the HLA region, HLA-DQB1, HLA-DPA1/B1, and NOTCH4 associations with SSc are likely confined to specific auto-antibodies. These data emphasize the differential genetic components of subphenotypes of SSc.

  1. Identification of novel genetic markers associated with clinical phenotypes of systemic sclerosis through a genome-wide association strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Gorlova

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine, through a genome-wide association study (GWAS, the genetic components contributing to different clinical sub-phenotypes of systemic sclerosis (SSc. We considered limited (lcSSc and diffuse (dcSSc cutaneous involvement, and the relationships with presence of the SSc-specific auto-antibodies, anti-centromere (ACA, and anti-topoisomerase I (ATA. Four GWAS cohorts, comprising 2,296 SSc patients and 5,171 healthy controls, were meta-analyzed looking for associations in the selected subgroups. Eighteen polymorphisms were further tested in nine independent cohorts comprising an additional 3,175 SSc patients and 4,971 controls. Conditional analysis for associated SNPs in the HLA region was performed to explore their independent association in antibody subgroups. Overall analysis showed that non-HLA polymorphism rs11642873 in IRF8 gene to be associated at GWAS level with lcSSc (P = 2.32×10(-12, OR = 0.75. Also, rs12540874 in GRB10 gene (P = 1.27 × 10(-6, OR = 1.15 and rs11047102 in SOX5 gene (P = 1.39×10(-7, OR = 1.36 showed a suggestive association with lcSSc and ACA subgroups respectively. In the HLA region, we observed highly associated allelic combinations in the HLA-DQB1 locus with ACA (P = 1.79×10(-61, OR = 2.48, in the HLA-DPA1/B1 loci with ATA (P = 4.57×10(-76, OR = 8.84, and in NOTCH4 with ACA P = 8.84×10(-21, OR = 0.55 and ATA (P = 1.14×10(-8, OR = 0.54. We have identified three new non-HLA genes (IRF8, GRB10, and SOX5 associated with SSc clinical and auto-antibody subgroups. Within the HLA region, HLA-DQB1, HLA-DPA1/B1, and NOTCH4 associations with SSc are likely confined to specific auto-antibodies. These data emphasize the differential genetic components of subphenotypes of SSc.

  2. Complete genome analysis of three Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates in China for insight into the diversification of drug resistance elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingxiang Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The emergence and rapid spreading of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strains has become a major health threat worldwide. To better understand the genetic recombination related with the acquisition of drug-resistant elements during bacterial infection, we performed complete genome analysis on three newly isolated multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains from Beijing using next-generation sequencing technology. METHODOLOGIES/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Whole genome comparison revealed that all 3 strains share some common drug resistant elements including carbapenem-resistant bla OXA-23 and tetracycline (tet resistance islands, but the genome structures are diversified among strains. Various genomic islands intersperse on the genome with transposons and insertions, reflecting the recombination flexibility during the acquisition of the resistant elements. The blood-isolated BJAB07104 and ascites-isolated BJAB0868 exhibit high similarity on their genome structure with most of the global clone II strains, suggesting these two strains belong to the dominant outbreak strains prevalent worldwide. A large resistance island (RI of about 121-kb, carrying a cluster of resistance-related genes, was inserted into the ATPase gene on BJAB07104 and BJAB0868 genomes. A 78-kb insertion element carrying tra-locus and bla OXA-23 island, can be either inserted into one of the tniB gene in the 121-kb RI on the chromosome, or transformed to conjugative plasmid in the two BJAB strains. The third strains of this study, BJAB0715, which was isolated from spinal fluid, exhibit much more divergence compared with above two strains. It harbors multiple drug-resistance elements including a truncated AbaR-22-like RI on its genome. One of the unique features of this strain is that it carries both bla OXA-23 and bla OXA-58 genes on its genome. Besides, an Acinetobacter lwoffii adeABC efflux element was found inserted into the ATPase position in BJAB0715. CONCLUSIONS

  3. Whole-Genome Sequence of a blaOXA-48-Harboring Raoultella ornithinolytica Clinical Isolate from Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bayssari, Charbel; Olaitan, Abiola Olumuyiwa; Leangapichart, Thongpan; Okdah, Liliane; Dabboussi, Fouad; Hamze, Monzer; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2016-04-01

    We analyzed the whole-genome sequence of ablaOXA-48-harboringRaoultella ornithinolyticaclinical isolate from a patient in Lebanon. The size of theRaoultella ornithinolyticaCMUL058 genome was 5,622,862 bp, with a G+C content of 55.7%. We deciphered all the molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance, and we compared our genome to other availableR. ornithinolyticagenomes in GenBank. The resistome consisted of 9 antibiotic resistance genes, including a plasmidicblaOXA-48gene whose genetic organization is also described.

  4. Browser Based Platform in Maintaining Clinical Activities - Use of The iPads in Head and Neck Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, W. Y.; Moore, J.; Quon, H.; Evans, K.; Sharabi, A.; Herman, J.; Hacker-Prietz, A.; McNutt, T.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Incompatibility between documentation and clinical workflow causes physician resistance in organized data collection, which in turn complicates the use of data in patient care improvement. To resolve the gap, we developed an iPad compatible in situ browser-based platform that integrates clinical activity with data collection and analysis presentation. The ability to perform in-clinic activities and monitor decision making using the iPad was evaluated. Methods: A browser-based platform that can exchange and present analysed data from the MOSAIQ database was developed in situ, the iPads were distributed in head and neck clinics to present the browser for clinical activities, data collection and assessment monitoring. Performance of the iPads for in-clinic activities was observed. Results: All in-clinic documentation activities can be performed without workstation computers. Accessing patient record and previous assessments was significantly faster without having to open the MOSAIQ application. Patient assessments can be completed with the physician facing the patient. Graphical presentation of toxicity progression and patient radiation plans to the patient can be performed in single interface without patient leaving the seating area. Updates in patient treatment status and medical history were presented in real time without having to move paper charts around. Conclusions: The iPad can be used in clinical activities independent of computer workstations. Improvements in clinical workflow can be critical in reducing physician resistance in data maintenance. Using the iPad in providing real-time quality monitoring is intuitive to both providers and patients.

  5. Transcriptional Activation of a Constitutive Heterochromatic Domain of the Human Genome in Response to Heat ShockD⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, Nicoletta; Denegri, Marco; Chiodi, Ilaria; Corioni, Margherita; Valgardsdottir, Rut; Cobianchi, Fabio; Riva, Silvano; Biamonti, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    Heat shock triggers the assembly of nuclear stress bodies that contain heat shock factor 1 and a subset of RNA processing factors. These structures are formed on the pericentromeric heterochromatic regions of specific human chromosomes, among which chromosome 9. In this article we show that these heterochromatic domains are characterized by an epigenetic status typical of euchromatic regions. Similarly to transcriptionally competent portions of the genome, stress bodies are, in fact, enriched in acetylated histone H4. Acetylation peaks at 6 h of recovery from heat shock. Moreover, heterochromatin markers, such as HP1 and histone H3 methylated on lysine 9, are excluded from these nuclear districts. In addition, heat shock triggers the transient accumulation of RNA molecules, heterogeneous in size, containing the subclass of satellite III sequences found in the pericentromeric heterochromatin of chromosome 9. This is the first report of a transcriptional activation of a constitutive heterochromatic portion of the genome in response to stress stimuli. PMID:14617804

  6. Delivery technologies for genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hao; Kauffman, Kevin J; Anderson, Daniel G

    2017-03-24

    With the recent development of CRISPR technology, it is becoming increasingly easy to engineer the genome. Genome-editing systems based on CRISPR, as well as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), are becoming valuable tools for biomedical research, drug discovery and development, and even gene therapy. However, for each of these systems to effectively enter cells of interest and perform their function, efficient and safe delivery technologies are needed. This Review discusses the principles of biomacromolecule delivery and gene editing, examines recent advances and challenges in non-viral and viral delivery methods, and highlights the status of related clinical trials.

  7. Integrated Genomic Analysis Identifies Clinically Relevant Subtypes of Glioblastoma Characterized by Abnormalities in PDGFRA, IDH1, EGFR, and NF1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhaak, Roel GW; Hoadley, Katherine A; Purdom, Elizabeth; Wang, Victoria; Qi, Yuan; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Miller, C Ryan; Ding, Li; Golub, Todd; Mesirov, Jill P; Alexe, Gabriele; Lawrence, Michael; O' Kelly, Michael; Tamayo, Pablo; Weir, Barbara A; Gabriel, Stacey; Winckler, Wendy; Gupta, Supriya; Jakkula, Lakshmi; Feiler, Heidi S; Hodgson, J Graeme; James, C David; Sarkaria, Jann N; Brennan, Cameron; Kahn, Ari; Spellman, Paul T; Wilson, Richard K; Speed, Terence P; Gray, Joe W; Meyerson, Matthew; Getz, Gad; Perou, Charles M; Hayes, D Neil; Network, The Cancer Genome Atlas Research

    2009-09-03

    The Cancer Genome Atlas Network recently cataloged recurrent genomic abnormalities in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). We describe a robust gene expression-based molecular classification of GBM into Proneural, Neural, Classical, and Mesenchymal subtypes and integrate multidimensional genomic data to establish patterns of somatic mutations and DNA copy number. Aberrations and gene expression of EGFR, NF1, and PDGFRA/IDH1 each define the Classical, Mesenchymal, and Proneural subtypes, respectively. Gene signatures of normal brain cell types show a strong relationship between subtypes and different neural lineages. Additionally, response to aggressive therapy differs by subtype, with the greatest benefit in the Classical subtype and no benefit in the Proneural subtype. We provide a framework that unifies transcriptomic and genomic dimensions for GBM molecular stratification with important implications for future studies.

  8. Evidence for sequential and increasing activation of replication origins along replication timing gradients in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbaud, Guillaume; Rappailles, Aurélien; Baker, Antoine; Chen, Chun-Long; Arneodo, Alain; Goldar, Arach; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Thermes, Claude; Audit, Benjamin; Hyrien, Olivier

    2011-12-01

    Genome-wide replication timing studies have suggested that mammalian chromosomes consist of megabase-scale domains of coordinated origin firing separated by large originless transition regions. Here, we report a quantitative genome-wide analysis of DNA replication kinetics in several human cell types that contradicts this view. DNA combing in HeLa cells sorted into four temporal compartments of S phase shows that replication origins are spaced at 40 kb intervals and fire as small clusters whose synchrony increases during S phase and that replication fork velocity (mean 0.7 kb/min, maximum 2.0 kb/min) remains constant and narrowly distributed through S phase. However, multi-scale analysis of a genome-wide replication timing profile shows a broad distribution of replication timing gradients with practically no regions larger than 100 kb replicating at less than 2 kb/min. Therefore, HeLa cells lack large regions of unidirectional fork progression. Temporal transition regions are replicated by sequential activation of origins at a rate that increases during S phase and replication timing gradients are set by the delay and the spacing between successive origin firings rather than by the velocity of single forks. Activation of internal origins in a specific temporal transition region is directly demonstrated by DNA combing of the IGH locus in HeLa cells. Analysis of published origin maps in HeLa cells and published replication timing and DNA combing data in several other cell types corroborate these findings, with the interesting exception of embryonic stem cells where regions of unidirectional fork progression seem more abundant. These results can be explained if origins fire independently of each other but under the control of long-range chromatin structure, or if replication forks progressing from early origins stimulate initiation in nearby unreplicated DNA. These findings shed a new light on the replication timing program of mammalian genomes and provide a general

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of a Colistin-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Strain Carrying the blaNDM-1 Carbapenemase Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhihong; Feng, Yu; Lin, Ji

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Klebsiella pneumoniae strain WCHKP1845, recovered from the sputum of a patient with pneumonia, was resistant to colistin and carried the carbapenemase gene blaNDM-1. Here, we report its 5.4-Mb draft genome sequence, comprising 140 contigs with an average 57.33% G+C content. The genome contains 5,118 coding sequences and 88 tRNA genes. PMID:28209835

  10. SOLiD™ sequencing of genomes of clinical isolates of Leishmania donovani from India confirm leptomonas co-infection and raise some key questions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeloo Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Known as 'neglected disease' because relatively little effort has been applied to finding cures, leishmaniasis kills more than 150,000 people every year and debilitates millions more. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL, also called Kala Azar (KA or black fever in India, claims around 20,000 lives every year. Whole genome analysis presents an excellent means to identify new targets for drugs, vaccine and diagnostics development, and also provide an avenue into the biological basis of parasite virulence in the L. donovani complex prevalent in India. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In our presently described study, the next generation SOLiD™ platform was successfully utilized for the first time to carry out whole genome sequencing of L. donovani clinical isolates from India. We report the exceptional occurrence of insect trypanosomatids in clinical cases of visceral leishmaniasis (Kala Azar patients in India. We confirm with whole genome sequencing analysis data that isolates which were sequenced from Kala Azar (visceral leishmaniasis cases were genetically related to Leptomonas. The co-infection in splenic aspirate of these patients with a species of Leptomonas and how likely is it that the infection might be pathogenic, are key questions which need to be investigated. We discuss our results in the context of some important probable hypothesis in this article. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our intriguing results of unusual cases of Kala Azar found to be most similar to Leptomonas species put forth important clinical implications for the treatment of Kala Azar in India. Leptomonas have been shown to be highly susceptible to several standard leishmaniacides in vitro. There is very little divergence among these two species viz. Leishmania sp. and L. seymouri, in terms of genomic sequence and organization. A more extensive perception of the phenomenon of co-infection needs to be addressed from molecular pathogenesis and eco

  11. Characterization and genome sequencing of a Citrobacter freundii phage CfP1 harboring a lysin active against multidrug-resistant isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Hugo; Pinto, Graça; Oliveira, Ana; Oliveira, Carla; Faustino, Maria Alberta; Briers, Yves; Domingues, Lucília; Azeredo, Joana

    2016-12-01

    Citrobacter spp., although frequently ignored, is emerging as an important nosocomial bacterium able to cause various superficial and systemic life-threatening infections. Considered to be hard-to-treat bacterium due to its pattern of high antibiotic resistance, it is important to develop effective measures for early and efficient therapy. In this study, the first myovirus (vB_CfrM_CfP1) lytic for Citrobacter freundii was microbiologically and genomically characterized. Its morphology, activity spectrum, burst size, and biophysical stability spectrum were determined. CfP1 specifically infects C. freundii, has broad host range (>85 %; 21 strains tested), a burst size of 45 PFU/cell, and is very stable under different temperatures (-20 to 50 °C) and pH (3 to 11) values. CfP1 demonstrated to be highly virulent against multidrug-resistant clinical isolates up to 12 antibiotics, including penicillins, cephalosporins, carbapenems, and fluroquinoles. Genomically, CfP1 has a dsDNA molecule with 180,219 bp with average GC content of 43.1 % and codes for 273 CDSs. The genome architecture is organized into function-specific gene clusters typical for tailed phages, sharing 46 to 94 % nucleotide identity to other Citrobacter phages. The lysin gene encoding a predicted D-Ala-D-Ala carboxypeptidase was also cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and its activity evaluated in terms of pH, ionic strength, and temperature. The lysine optimum activity was reached at 20 mM HEPES, pH 7 at 37 °C, and was able to significantly reduce all C. freundii (>2 logs) as well as Citrobacter koseri (>4 logs) strains tested. Interestingly, the antimicrobial activity of this enzyme was performed without the need of pretreatment with outer membrane-destabilizing agents. These results indicate that CfP1 lysin is a good candidate to control problematic Citrobacter infections, for which current antibiotics are no longer effective.

  12. The Juan non-LTR retrotransposon in mosquitoes: genomic impact, vertical transmission and indications of recent and widespread activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tu Zhijian

    2007-07-01

    retrotransposing recently in evolutionary history. There are also indications that Juan has been recently active in a wide range of mosquito species. Furthermore, our research demonstrates that a Jockey clade non-LTR without target site-specificity has been sustained by vertical transmission in the mosquito family. These results strengthen the argument that non-LTRs tend to be genomic elements capable of persistence by vertical descent over a long evolutionary time.

  13. Identification and activation of novel biosynthetic gene clusters by genome mining in the kirromycin producer Streptomyces collinus Tü 365.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftime, Dumitrita; Kulik, Andreas; Härtner, Thomas; Rohrer, Sabrina; Niedermeyer, Timo Horst Johannes; Stegmann, Evi; Weber, Tilmann; Wohlleben, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    Streptomycetes are prolific sources of novel biologically active secondary metabolites with pharmaceutical potential. S. collinus Tü 365 is a Streptomyces strain, isolated 1972 from Kouroussa (Guinea). It is best known as producer of the antibiotic kirromycin, an inhibitor of the protein biosynthesis interacting with elongation factor EF-Tu. Genome Mining revealed 32 gene clusters encoding the biosynthesis of diverse secondary metabolites in the genome of Streptomyces collinus Tü 365, indicating an enormous biosynthetic potential of this strain. The structural diversity of secondary metabolisms predicted for S. collinus Tü 365 includes PKS, NRPS, PKS-NRPS hybrids, a lanthipeptide, terpenes and siderophores. While some of these gene clusters were found to contain genes related to known secondary metabolites, which also could be detected in HPLC-MS analyses, most of the uncharacterized gene clusters are not expressed under standard laboratory conditions. With this study we aimed to characterize the genome information of S. collinus Tü 365 to make use of gene clusters, which previously have not been described for this strain. We were able to connect the gene clusters of a lanthipeptide, a carotenoid, five terpenoid compounds, an ectoine, a siderophore and a spore pigment-associated gene cluster to their respective biosynthesis products.

  14. An efficient antiviral strategy for targeting hepatitis B virus genome using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jieliang; Zhang, Wen; Lin, Junyu; Wang, Fan; Wu, Min; Chen, Cuncun; Zheng, Ye; Peng, Xiuhua; Li, Jianhua; Yuan, Zhenghong

    2014-02-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a DNA virus that can cause chronic hepatitis B (CHB) in humans. Current therapies for CHB infection are limited in efficacy and do not target the pre-existing viral genomic DNA, which are present in the nucleus as a covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) form. The transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nucleases (TALENs) are newly developed enzymes that can cleave sequence-specific DNA targets. Here, TALENs targeting the conserved regions of the viral genomic DNA among different HBV genotypes were constructed. The expression of TALENs in Huh7 cells transfected with monomeric linear full-length HBV DNA significantly reduced the viral production of HBeAg, HBsAg, HBcAg, and pgRNA, resulted in a decreased cccDNA level and misrepaired cccDNAs without apparent cytotoxic effects. The anti-HBV effect of TALENs was further demonstrated in a hydrodynamic injection-based mouse model. In addition, an enhanced antiviral effect with combinations of TALENs and interferon-α (IFN-α) treatment was observed and expression of TALENs restored HBV suppressed IFN-stimulated response element-directed transcription. Taken together, these data indicate that TALENs can specifically target and successfully inactivate the HBV genome and are potently synergistic with IFN-α, thus providing a potential therapeutic strategy for treating CHB infection.

  15. Preferential genome targeting of the CBP co-activator by Rel and Smad proteins in early Drosophila melanogaster embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per-Henrik Holmqvist

    Full Text Available CBP and the related p300 protein are widely used transcriptional co-activators in metazoans that interact with multiple transcription factors. Whether CBP/p300 occupies the genome equally with all factors or preferentially binds together with some factors is not known. We therefore compared Drosophila melanogaster CBP (nejire ChIP-seq peaks with regions bound by 40 different transcription factors in early embryos, and we found high co-occupancy with the Rel-family protein Dorsal. Dorsal is required for CBP occupancy in the embryo, but only at regions where few other factors are present. CBP peaks in mutant embryos lacking nuclear Dorsal are best correlated with TGF-ß/Dpp-signaling and Smad-protein binding. Differences in CBP occupancy in mutant embryos reflect gene expression changes genome-wide, but CBP also occupies some non-expressed genes. The presence of CBP at silent genes does not result in histone acetylation. We find that Polycomb-repressed H3K27me3 chromatin does not preclude CBP binding, but restricts histone acetylation at CBP-bound genomic sites. We conclude that CBP occupancy in Drosophila embryos preferentially overlaps factors controlling dorso-ventral patterning and that CBP binds silent genes without causing histone hyperacetylation.

  16. Preferential Genome Targeting of the CBP Co-Activator by Rel and Smad Proteins in Early Drosophila melanogaster Embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmqvist, Per-Henrik; Boija, Ann; Philip, Philge; Crona, Filip; Stenberg, Per; Mannervik, Mattias

    2012-01-01

    CBP and the related p300 protein are widely used transcriptional co-activators in metazoans that interact with multiple transcription factors. Whether CBP/p300 occupies the genome equally with all factors or preferentially binds together with some factors is not known. We therefore compared Drosophila melanogaster CBP (nejire) ChIP–seq peaks with regions bound by 40 different transcription factors in early embryos, and we found high co-occupancy with the Rel-family protein Dorsal. Dorsal is required for CBP occupancy in the embryo, but only at regions where few other factors are present. CBP peaks in mutant embryos lacking nuclear Dorsal are best correlated with TGF-ß/Dpp-signaling and Smad-protein binding. Differences in CBP occupancy in mutant embryos reflect gene expression changes genome-wide, but CBP also occupies some non-expressed genes. The presence of CBP at silent genes does not result in histone acetylation. We find that Polycomb-repressed H3K27me3 chromatin does not preclude CBP binding, but restricts histone acetylation at CBP-bound genomic sites. We conclude that CBP occupancy in Drosophila embryos preferentially overlaps factors controlling dorso-ventral patterning and that CBP binds silent genes without causing histone hyperacetylation. PMID:22737084

  17. Full-length genome sequence analysis of four subgroup J avian leukosis virus strains isolated from chickens with clinical hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lulu; Wang, Peikun; Yang, Yongli; Li, Haijuan; Huang, Teng; Wei, Ping

    2017-07-17

    Since 2014, cases of hemangioma associated with avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) have been emerging in commercial chickens in Guangxi. In this study, four strains of the subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J), named GX14HG01, GX14HG04, GX14LT07, and GX14ZS14, were isolated from chickens with clinical hemangioma in 2014 by DF-1 cell culture and then identified with ELISA detection of ALV group specific antigen p27, the detection of subtype specific PCR and indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) with ALV-J specific monoclonal antibody. The complete genomes of the isolates were sequenced and it was found that the gag and pol were relatively conservative, while env was variable especially the gp85 gene. Homology analysis of the env gene sequences showed that the env gene of all the four isolates had higher similarities with the hemangioma (HE)-type reference strains than that of the myeloid leukosis (ML)-type strains, and moreover, the HE-type strains' specific deletion of 205-bp sequence covering the rTM and DR1 in 3'UTR fragment was also found in the four isolates. Further analysis on the sequences of subunits of env gene revealed an interesting finding: the gp85 of isolates GX14ZS14 and GX14HG04 had a higher similarity with HPRS-103 and much lower similarity with the HE-type reference strains resulting in GX14ZS14, GX14HG04, and HPRS-103 being clustered in the same branch, while gp37 had higher similarities with the HE-type reference strains when compared to that of HPRS-103, resulted in GX14ZS14, GX14HG04, and HE-type reference strains being clustered in the same branch. The results suggested that isolates GX14ZS14 and GX14HG04 may be the recombinant strains of the foreign strain HPRS-103 with the local epidemic HE-type strains of ALV-J.

  18. Anti-tumor activity of calcitriol: pre-clinical and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trump, Donald L; Hershberger, Pamela A; Bernardi, Ronald J; Ahmed, Sharmilla; Muindi, Josephia; Fakih, Marwan; Yu, Wei-Dong; Johnson, Candace S

    2004-05-01

    1,25-Dihydroxycholecalciferol (calcitriol) is recognized widely for its effects on bone and mineral metabolism. Epidemiological data suggest that low Vitamin D levels may play a role in the genesis of prostate cancer and perhaps other tumors. Calcitriol is a potent anti-proliferative agent in a wide variety of malignant cell types. In prostate, breast, colorectal, head/neck and lung cancer as well as lymphoma, leukemia and myeloma model systems calcitriol has significant anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Calcitriol effects are associated with an increase in G0/G1 arrest, induction of apoptosis and differentiation, modulation of expression of growth factor receptors. Glucocorticoids potentiate the anti-tumor effect of calcitriol and decrease calcitriol-induced hypercalcemia. Calcitriol potentiates the antitumor effects of many cytotoxic agents and inhibits motility and invasiveness of tumor cells and formation of new blood vessels. Phase I and II trials of calcitriol either alone or in combination with carboplatin, taxanes or dexamethasone have been initiated in patients with androgen dependent and independent prostate cancer and advanced cancer. Data indicate that high-dose calcitriol is feasible on an intermittent schedule, no dose-limiting toxicity has been encountered and optimal dose and schedule are being delineated. Clinical responses have been seen with the combination of high dose calcitriol+dexamethasone in androgen independent prostate cancer (AIPC) and apparent potentiation of the antitumor effects of docetaxel have been seen in AIPC. These results demonstrate that high intermittent doses of calcitriol can be administered to patients without toxicity, that the MTD is yet to be determined and that calcitriol has potential as an anti-cancer agent.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Lactobacillus plantarum LZ206, a potential probiotic strain with antimicrobial activity against food-borne pathogenic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Gu, Qing; Zhou, Qingqing

    2016-11-20

    Lactobacilli strains have been considered as important candidates for manufacturing "natural food", due to their antimicrobial properties and generally regarded as safe (GRAS) status. Lactobacillus plantarum LZ206 is a potential probiotic strain isolated from raw cow milk, with antimicrobial activity against various pathogens, including Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes), Gram-negtive bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica), and fungus Candida albicans. To better understand molecular base for its antimicrobial activity, entire genome of LZ206 was sequenced. It was revealed that genome of LZ206 contained a circular 3,212,951-bp chromosome, two circular plasmids and one predicted linear plasmid. A plantaricin gene cluster, which is responsible for bacteriocins biosynthesis and could be associated with its broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, was identified based on comparative genomic analysis. Whole genome sequencing of L. plantarum LZ206 might facilitate its applications to protect food products from pathogens' contamination in the dairy industry.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of the Antitrypanosomally Active Sponge-Associated Bacterium Actinokineospora sp. Strain EG49

    KAUST Repository

    Harjes, Janno

    2014-03-06

    The marine sponge-associated bacterium Actinokineospora sp. strain EG49 produces the antitrypanosomal angucycline-like compound actinosporin A. The draft genome of Actinokineospora sp. EG49 has a size of 7.5 megabases and a GC content of 72.8% and contains 6,629 protein-coding sequences (CDS). antiSMASH predicted 996 genes residing in 36 secondary metabolite gene clusters.

  1. Recommendations for reporting of secondary findings in clinical exome and genome sequencing, 2016 update (ACMG SF v2.0): a policy statement of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalia, Sarah S; Adelman, Kathy; Bale, Sherri J; Chung, Wendy K; Eng, Christine; Evans, James P; Herman, Gail E; Hufnagel, Sophia B; Klein, Teri E; Korf, Bruce R; McKelvey, Kent D; Ormond, Kelly E; Richards, C Sue; Vlangos, Christopher N; Watson, Michael; Martin, Christa L; Miller, David T

    2017-02-01

    Disclaimer: These recommendations are designed primarily as an educational resource for medical geneticists and other healthcare providers to help them provide quality medical services. Adherence to these recommendations is completely voluntary and does not necessarily assure a successful medical outcome. These recommendations should not be considered inclusive of all proper procedures and tests or exclusive of other procedures and tests that are reasonably directed toward obtaining the same results. In determining the propriety of any specific procedure or test, the clinician should apply his or her own professional judgment to the specific clinical circumstances presented by the individual patient or specimen. Clinicians are encouraged to document the reasons for the use of a particular procedure or test, whether or not it is in conformance with this statement. Clinicians also are advised to take notice of the date this statement was adopted and to consider other medical and scientific information that becomes available after that date. It also would be prudent to consider whether intellectual property interests may restrict the performance of certain tests and other procedures.To promote standardized reporting of actionable information from clinical genomic sequencing, in 2013, the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) published a minimum list of genes to be reported as incidental or secondary findings. The goal was to identify and manage risks for selected highly penetrant genetic disorders through established interventions aimed at preventing or significantly reducing morbidity and mortality. The ACMG subsequently established the Secondary Findings Maintenance Working Group to develop a process for curating and updating the list over time. We describe here the new process for accepting and evaluating nominations for updates to the secondary findings list. We also report outcomes from six nominations received in the initial 15 months after

  2. Transcription Activator-Like Effectors (TALEs) Hybrid Nucleases for Genome Engineering Application

    KAUST Repository

    Wibowo, Anjar

    2011-06-06

    Gene targeting is a powerful genome engineering tool that can be used for a variety of biotechnological applications. Genomic double-strand DNA breaks generated by engineered site-specific nucleases can stimulate gene targeting. Hybrid nucleases are composed of DNA binding module and DNA cleavage module. Zinc Finger Nucleases were used to generate double-strand DNA breaks but it suffers from failures and lack of reproducibility. The transcription activator–like effectors (TALEs) from plant pathogenic Xanthomonas contain a unique type of DNA-binding domain that bind specific DNA targets. The purpose of this study is to generate novel sequence specific nucleases by fusing a de novo engineered Hax3 TALE-based DNA binding domain to a FokI cleavage domain. Our data show that the de novo engineered TALE nuclease can bind to its target sequence and create double-strand DNA breaks in vitro. We also show that the de novo engineered TALE nuclease is capable of generating double-strand DNA breaks in its target sequence in vivo, when transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that TALE-based hybrid nucleases can be tailored to bind a user-selected DNA sequence and generate site-specific genomic double-strand DNA breaks. TALE-based hybrid nucleases hold much promise as powerful molecular tools for gene targeting applications.

  3. A Compendium of Chromatin Contact Maps Reveals Spatially Active Regions in the Human Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Anthony D; Hu, Ming; Jung, Inkyung; Xu, Zheng; Qiu, Yunjiang; Tan, Catherine L; Li, Yun; Lin, Shin; Lin, Yiing; Barr, Cathy L; Ren, Bing

    2016-11-15

    The three-dimensional configuration of DNA is integral to all nuclear processes in eukaryotes, yet our knowledge of the chromosome architecture is still limited. Genome-wide chromosome conformation capture studies have uncovered features of chromatin organization in cultured cells, but genome architecture in human tissues has yet to be explored. Here, we report the most comprehensive survey to date of chromatin organization in human tissues. Through integrative analysis of chromatin contact maps in 21 primary human tissues and cell types, we find topologically associating domains highly conserved in different tissues. We also discover genomic regions that exhibit unusually high levels of local chromatin interactions. These frequently interacting regions (FIREs) are enriched for super-enhancers and are near tissue-specifically expressed genes. They display strong tissue-specificity in local chromatin interactions. Additionally, FIRE formation is partially dependent on CTCF and the Cohesin complex. We further show that FIREs can help annotate the function of non-coding sequence variants. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Review of cytological studies on cellular and molecular mechanisms of uniparental (maternal or paternal) inheritance of plastid and mitochondrial genomes induced by active digestion of organelle nuclei (nucleoids).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi

    2010-03-01

    In most sexual organisms, including isogamous, anisogamous and oogamous organisms, uniparental transmission is a striking and universal characteristic of the transmission of organelle (plastid and mitochondrial) genomes (DNA). Using genetic, biochemical and molecular biological techniques, mechanisms of uniparental (maternal and parental) and biparental transmission of organelle genomes have been studied and reviewed. Although to date there has been no cytological review of the transmission of organelle genomes, cytology offers advantages in terms of direct evidence and can enhance global studies of the transmission of organelle genomes. In this review, I focus on the cytological mechanism of uniparental inheritance by "active digestion of male or female organelle nuclei (nucleoids, DNA)" which is universal among isogamous, anisogamous, and oogamous organisms. The global existence of uniparental transmission since the evolution of sexual eukaryotes may imply that the cell nuclear genome continues to inhibit quantitative evolution of organelles by organelle recombination.

  5. Improving genetic evaluation using a multitrait single-step genomic model for ability to resume cycling after calving, measured by activity tags in Holstein cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ismael, Ahmed; Løvendahl, Peter; Fogh, Anders

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the improvement of the accuracy of estimated breeding values for ability to recycle after calving by using information of genomic markers and phenotypic information of correlated traits. The traits in this study were the interval from calving to first...... to first high activity, and the genetic correlation between both traits was strong (0.87). Breeding values were obtained using 4 models: conventional single-trait BLUP; conventional multitrait BLUP with pedigree-based relationship matrix; single-trait single-step genomic BLUP; and multitrait single......-step genomic BLUP model with joint relationship matrix combining pedigree and genomic information. The results showed that reliabilities of estimated breeding values (EBV) from single-step genomic BLUP models were about 40% higher than those from conventional BLUP models for both traits. Furthermore, using...

  6. Biological and Clinical Relevance of Associated Genomic Alterations in MYD88 L265P and non-L265P-Mutated Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: Analysis of 361 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Sydney; Viailly, Pierre-Julien; Bohers, Elodie; Bertrand, Philippe; Ruminy, Philippe; Marchand, Vinciane; Maingonnat, Catherine; Mareschal, Sylvain; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Penther, Dominique; Jais, Jean-Philippe; Tesson, Bruno; Peyrouze, Pauline; Figeac, Martin; Desmots, Fabienne; Fest, Thierry; Haioun, Corinne; Lamy, Thierry; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Fabiani, Bettina; Delarue, Richard; Peyrade, Frédéric; André, Marc; Ketterer, Nicolas; Leroy, Karen; Salles, Gilles; Molina, Thierry J; Tilly, Hervé; Jardin, Fabrice

    2017-05-01

    Purpose:MYD88 mutations, notably the recurrent gain-of-function L265P variant, are a distinguishing feature of activated B-cell like (ABC) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), leading to constitutive NFκB pathway activation. The aim of this study was to examine the distinct genomic profiles of MYD88-mutant DLBCL, notably according to the presence of the L265P or other non-L265P MYD88 variants.Experimental Design: A cohort of 361 DLBCL cases (94 MYD88 mutant and 267 MYD88 wild-type) was submitted to next-generation sequencing (NGS) focusing on 34 genes to analyze associated mutations and copy number variations, as well as gene expression profiling, and clinical and prognostic analyses.Results: Importantly, we highlighted different genomic profiles for MYD88 L265P and MYD88 non-L265P-mutant DLBCL, shedding light on their divergent backgrounds. Clustering analysis also segregated subgroups according to associated genetic alterations among patients with the same MYD88 mutation. We showed that associated CD79B and MYD88 L265P mutations act synergistically to increase NFκB pathway activation, although the majority of MYD88 L265P-mutant cases harbors downstream NFκB alterations, which can predict BTK inhibitor resistance. Finally, although the MYD88 L265P variant was not an independent prognostic factor in ABC DLBCL, associated CD79B mutations significantly improved the survival of MYD88 L265P-mutant ABC DLBCL in our cohort.Conclusions: This study highlights the relative heterogeneity of MYD88-mutant DLBCL, adding to the field's knowledge of the theranostic importance of MYD88 mutations, but also of associated alterations, emphasizing the usefulness of genomic profiling to best stratify patients for targeted therapy. Clin Cancer Res; 23(9); 2232-44. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. High-Throughput Sequencing, a VersatileWeapon to Support Genome-Based Diagnosis in Infectious Diseases: Applications to Clinical Bacteriology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ségolène Caboche

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The recent progresses of high-throughput sequencing (HTS technologies enable easy and cost-reduced access to whole genome sequencing (WGS or re-sequencing. HTS associated with adapted, automatic and fast bioinformatics solutions for sequencing applications promises an accurate and timely identification and characterization of pathogenic agents. Many studies have demonstrated that data obtained from HTS analysis have allowed genome-based diagnosis, which has been consistent with phenotypic observations. These proofs of concept are probably the first steps toward the future of clinical microbiology. From concept to routine use, many parameters need to be considered to promote HTS as a powerful tool to help physicians and clinicians in microbiological investigations. This review highlights the milestones to be completed toward this purpose.

  8. The Human Gene Mutation Database: building a comprehensive mutation repository for clinical and molecular genetics, diagnostic testing and personalized genomic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenson, Peter D; Mort, Matthew; Ball, Edward V; Shaw, Katy; Phillips, Andrew; Cooper, David N

    2014-01-01

    The Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD®) is a comprehensive collection of germline mutations in nuclear genes that underlie, or are associated with, human inherited disease. By June 2013, the database contained over 141,000 different lesions detected in over 5,700 different genes, with new mutation entries currently accumulating at a rate exceeding 10,000 per annum. HGMD was originally established in 1996 for the scientific study of mutational mechanisms in human genes. However, it has since acquired a much broader utility as a central unified disease-oriented mutation repository utilized by human molecular geneticists, genome scientists, molecular biologists, clinicians and genetic counsellors as well as by those specializing in biopharmaceuticals, bioinformatics and personalized genomics. The public version of HGMD (http://www.hgmd.org) is freely available to registered users from academic institutions/non-profit organizations whilst the subscription version (HGMD Professional) is available to academic, clinical and commercial users under license via BIOBASE GmbH.

  9. Genome-wide physical activity interactions in adiposity ― A meta-analysis of 200,452 adults

    OpenAIRE

    Graff, Mariaelisa; Scott, Robert A.; Justice, Anne E; Young, Kristin L.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Barata, Llilda; Winkler, Thomas W; Chu, Audrey Y.; Mahajan, Anubha; Hadley, David; Xue, Luting; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Nancy L Heard-Costa; den Hoed, Marcel; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S

    2017-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) may modify the genetic effects that give rise to increased risk of obesity. To identify adiposity loci whose effects are modified by PA, we performed genome-wide interaction meta-analyses of BMI and BMI-adjusted waist circumference and waist-hip ratio from up to 200,452 adults of European (n = 180,423) or other ancestry (n = 20,029). We standardized PA by categorizing it into a dichotomous variable where, on average, 23% of participants were categorized as inactive and ...

  10. Autophagy plays a critical role in the degradation of active RHOA, the control of cell cytokinesis, and genomic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaid, Amine; Cerezo, Michaël; Chargui, Abderrahman; Corcelle-Termeau, Elisabeth; Pedeutour, Florence; Giuliano, Sandy; Ilie, Marius; Rubera, Isabelle; Tauc, Michel; Barale, Sophie; Bertolotto, Corinne; Brest, Patrick; Vouret-Craviari, Valérie; Klionsky, Daniel J; Carle, Georges F; Hofman, Paul; Mograbi, Baharia

    2013-07-15

    Degradation of signaling proteins is one of the most powerful tumor-suppressive mechanisms by which a cell can control its own growth. Here, we identify RHOA as the molecular target by which autophagy maintains genomic stability. Specifically, inhibition of autophagosome degradation by the loss of the v-ATPase a3 (TCIRG1) subunit is sufficient to induce aneuploidy. Underlying this phenotype, active RHOA is sequestered via p62 (SQSTM1) within autolysosomes and fails to localize to the plasma membrane or to the spindle midbody. Conversely, inhibition of autophagosome formation by ATG5 shRNA dramatically increases localization of active RHOA at the midbody, followed by diffusion to the flanking zones. As a result, all of the approaches we examined that compromise autophagy (irrespective of the defect: autophagosome formation, sequestration, or degradation) drive cytokinesis failure, multinucleation, and aneuploidy, processes that directly have an impact upon cancer progression. Consistently, we report a positive correlation between autophagy defects and the higher expression of RHOA in human lung carcinoma. We therefore propose that autophagy may act, in part, as a safeguard mechanism that degrades and thereby maintains the appropriate level of active RHOA at the midbody for faithful completion of cytokinesis and genome inheritance.

  11. Genome-wide physical activity interactions in adiposity - A meta-analysis of 200,452 adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariaelisa Graff

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity (PA may modify the genetic effects that give rise to increased risk of obesity. To identify adiposity loci whose effects are modified by PA, we performed genome-wide interaction meta-analyses of BMI and BMI-adjusted waist circumference and waist-hip ratio from up to 200,452 adults of European (n = 180,423 or other ancestry (n = 20,029. We standardized PA by categorizing it into a dichotomous variable where, on average, 23% of participants were categorized as inactive and 77% as physically active. While we replicate the interaction with PA for the strongest known obesity-risk locus in the FTO gene, of which the effect is attenuated by ~30% in physically active individuals compared to inactive individuals, we do not identify additional loci that are sensitive to PA. In additional genome-wide meta-analyses adjusting for PA and interaction with PA, we identify 11 novel adiposity loci, suggesting that accounting for PA or other environmental factors that contribute to variation in adiposity may facilitate gene discovery.

  12. NAHR-mediated copy-number variants in a clinical population: mechanistic insights into both genomic disorders and Mendelizing traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittwald, Piotr; Gambin, Tomasz; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Li, Jian; Amato, Stephen; Divon, Michael Y; Rodríguez Rojas, Lisa Ximena; Elton, Lindsay E; Scott, Daryl A; Schaaf, Christian P; Torres-Martinez, Wilfredo; Stevens, Abby K; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Agadi, Satish; Francis, David; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Breman, Amy; Lalani, Seema R; Bacino, Carlos A; Bi, Weimin; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Beaudet, Arthur L; Patel, Ankita; Shaw, Chad A; Lupski, James R; Gambin, Anna; Cheung, Sau Wai; Stankiewicz, Pawel

    2013-09-01

    We delineated and analyzed directly oriented paralogous low-copy repeats (DP-LCRs) in the most recent version of the human haploid reference genome. The computationally defined DP-LCRs were cross-referenced with our chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) database of 25,144 patients subjected to genome-wide assays. This computationally guided approach to the empirically derived large data set allowed us to investigate genomic rearrangement relative frequencies and identify new loci for recurrent nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR)-mediated copy-number variants (CNVs). The most commonly observed recurrent CNVs were NPHP1 duplications (233), CHRNA7 duplications (175), and 22q11.21 deletions (DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome, 166). In the ∼25% of CMA cases for which parental studies were available, we identified 190 de novo recurrent CNVs. In this group, the most frequently observed events were deletions of 22q11.21 (48), 16p11.2 (autism, 34), and 7q11.23 (Williams-Beuren syndrome, 11). Several features of DP-LCRs, including length, distance between NAHR substrate elements, DNA sequence identity (fraction matching), GC content, and concentration of the homologous recombination (HR) hot spot motif 5'-CCNCCNTNNCCNC-3', correlate with the frequencies of the recurrent CNVs events. Four novel adjacent DP-LCR-flanked and NAHR-prone regions, involving 2q12.2q13, were elucidated in association with novel genomic disorders. Our study quantitates genome architectural features responsible for NAHR-mediated genomic instability and further elucidates the role of NAHR in human disease.

  13. Cleveland Clinic television series enhances branding in active market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, T

    2001-01-01

    "Medical Miracles" premiered April 26. It is an information-packed series of programs showcasing The Cleveland Clinic's advanced medical practices. The Cleveland Clinic teamed with local NBC-affiliate, WKYC to develop half-hour shows on topics including neuro-sciences, orthopedics, eye, heart, pediatrics and cancer. As of this writing, three of the half-hour shows already have aired. They will resume in September, October and November, following a summer break. The collaboration is a healthy prospect all the way around. For Cleveland Clinic, it provides highly credible visibility in a competitive marketplace. And, according to WKYC president and general manager, Brooke Spectorsky, " Medical news and information is a high priority among our viewers."

  14. NCC-AUC: an AUC optimization method to identify multi-biomarker panel for cancer prognosis from genomic and clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Meng; Liu, Zhaoqi; Zhang, Xiang-Sun; Wang, Yong

    2015-10-15

    In prognosis and survival studies, an important goal is to identify multi-biomarker panels with predictive power using molecular characteristics or clinical observations. Such analysis is often challenged by censored, small-sample-size, but high-dimensional genomic profiles or clinical data. Therefore, sophisticated models and algorithms are in pressing need. In this study, we propose a novel Area Under Curve (AUC) optimization method for multi-biomarker panel identification named Nearest Centroid Classifier for AUC optimization (NCC-AUC). Our method is motived by the connection between AUC score for classification accuracy evaluation and Harrell's concordance index in survival analysis. This connection allows us to convert the survival time regression problem to a binary classification problem. Then an optimization model is formulated to directly maximize AUC and meanwhile minimize the number of selected features to construct a predictor in the nearest centroid classifier framework. NCC-AUC shows its great performance by validating both in genomic data of breast cancer and clinical data of stage IB Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC). For the genomic data, NCC-AUC outperforms Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Support Vector Machine-based Recursive Feature Elimination (SVM-RFE) in classification accuracy. It tends to select a multi-biomarker panel with low average redundancy and enriched biological meanings. Also NCC-AUC is more significant in separation of low and high risk cohorts than widely used Cox model (Cox proportional-hazards regression model) and L1-Cox model (L1 penalized in Cox model). These performance gains of NCC-AUC are quite robust across 5 subtypes of breast cancer. Further in an independent clinical data, NCC-AUC outperforms SVM and SVM-RFE in predictive accuracy and is consistently better than Cox model and L1-Cox model in grouping patients into high and low risk categories. In summary, NCC-AUC provides a rigorous optimization framework to

  15. Cephalopod genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertin, Caroline B.; Bonnaud, Laure; Brown, C. Titus

    2012-01-01

    The Cephalopod Sequencing Consortium (CephSeq Consortium) was established at a NESCent Catalysis Group Meeting, ``Paths to Cephalopod Genomics-Strategies, Choices, Organization,'' held in Durham, North Carolina, USA on May 24-27, 2012. Twenty-eight participants representing nine countries (Austria......, Australia, China, Denmark, France, Italy, Japan, Spain and the USA) met to address the pressing need for genome sequencing of cephalopod mollusks. This group, drawn from cephalopod biologists, neuroscientists, developmental and evolutionary biologists, materials scientists, bioinformaticians and researchers...... active in sequencing, assembling and annotating genomes, agreed on a set of cephalopod species of particular importance for initial sequencing and developed strategies and an organization (CephSeq Consortium) to promote this sequencing. The conclusions and recommendations of this meeting are described...

  16. Entrustable Professional Activities: Teaching and Assessing Clinical Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaliwal, Upreet; Gupta, Piyush; Singh, Tejinder

    2015-07-01

    Entrustable Professional Activities are gaining acceptance as tools to demonstrate acquisition of competencies in a competency-based curriculum. The main advantage of Entrustable Professional Activities are that they are observable activities (thus assessable), are related to day-to-day functioning as a health care provider (thus relevant), and are awarded once the learner can be trusted to perform the activity effectively and safely, without supervision, and by integrating across different competency domains. In this article, we describe how Entrustable Professional Activities can serve as a useful learning and assessment tool. We have described the steps in formulation, the pitfalls to avoid, and the possible role of the Medical Council of India and the Indian Academy of Pediatrics in encouraging the use of Entrustable Professional Activities for executing competency-based modules.

  17. Glucocorticoid exerts its non-genomic effect on IPSC by activation of a phospholipase C-dependent pathway in prefrontal cortex of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Zenghui; Zhang, Mingyue; Zhao, Minggao; Zhang, Weiqi

    2013-07-01

    In response to stressor, the brain activates a comprehensive stress system. Among others, this stress system causes release of glucocorticoids that also feed back to the brain. Glucocorticoids affect brain function by activation of both delayed, genomic and rapid, non-genomic mechanisms in rodents. Here we report that application of the potent glucocorticoid receptor agonist dexamethasone (DEX) caused a rapid increase of spontaneous and miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) and elicited intermittent burst activities through a non-genomic pathway, involving membrane-located receptors. The onset of the rapid effect in prefrontal cortex (PFC, hippocampus (glucocorticoids could rapidly enhance IPSCs and evoke burst activities by activation of at least two different signalling pathways in hippocampus and PFC of rats.

  18. Nothing in Evolution Makes Sense Except in the Light of Genomics: Read–Write Genome Evolution as an Active Biological Process

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro, James A

    2016-01-01

    The 21st century genomics-based analysis of evolutionary variation reveals a number of novel features impossible to predict when Dobzhansky and other evolutionary biologists formulated the neo-Darwinian Modern Synthesis in the middle of the last century. These include three distinct realms of cell evolution; symbiogenetic fusions forming eukaryotic cells with multiple genome compartments; horizontal organelle, virus and DNA transfers; functional organization of proteins as systems of interact...

  19. Sirtuin 7 promotes cellular survival following genomic stress by attenuation of DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiran, Shashi; Oddi, Vineesha [Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad, Telangana, 500001 (India); Ramakrishna, Gayatri, E-mail: gayatrirama1@gmail.com [Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad, Telangana, 500001 (India); Laboratory of Cancer Cell Biology, Department of Research, Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences, Delhi 110070 (India)

    2015-02-01

    Maintaining the genomic integrity is a constant challenge in proliferating cells. Amongst various proteins involved in this process, Sirtuins play a key role in DNA damage repair mechanisms in yeast as well as mammals. In the present work we report the role of one of the least explored Sirtuin viz., SIRT7, under conditions of genomic stress when treated with doxorubicin. Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells to DNA damage induced cell death by doxorubicin. SIRT7 overexpression in NIH3T3 delayed cell cycle progression by causing delay in G1 to S transition. SIRT7 overexpressing cells when treated with low dose of doxorubicin (0.25 µM) showed delayed onset of senescence, lesser accumulation of DNA damage marker γH2AX and lowered levels of growth arrest markers viz., p53 and p21 when compared to doxorubicin treated control GFP expressing cells. Resistance to DNA damage following SIRT7 overexpression was also evident by EdU incorporation studies where cellular growth arrest was significantly delayed. When treated with higher dose of doxorubicin (>1 µM), SIRT7 conferred resistance to apoptosis by attenuating stress activated kinases (SAPK viz., p38 and JNK) and p53 response thereby shifting the cellular fate towards senescence. Interestingly, relocalization of SIRT7 from nucleolus to nucleoplasm together with its co-localization with SAPK was an important feature associated with DNA damage. SIRT7 mediated resistance to doxorubicin induced apoptosis and senescence was lost when p53 level was restored by nutlin treatment. Overall, we propose SIRT7 attenuates DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response thereby promoting cellular survival under conditions of genomic stress. - Highlights: • Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized cells to DNA damage induced apoptosis. • SIRT7 delayed onset of premature senescence by attenuating DNA damage response. • Overexpression of SIRT7 delayed cell cycle progression by delaying G1/S transition. • Upon DNA damage SIRT

  20. Development of functional genomic tools in trematodes: RNA interference and luciferase reporter gene activity in Fasciola hepatica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Rinaldi

    Full Text Available The growing availability of sequence information from diverse parasites through genomic and transcriptomic projects offer new opportunities for the identification of key mediators in the parasite-host interaction. Functional genomics approaches and methods for the manipulation of genes are essential tools for deciphering the roles of genes and to identify new intervention targets in parasites. Exciting advances in functional genomics for parasitic helminths are starting to occur, with transgene expression and RNA interference (RNAi reported in several species of nematodes, but the area is still in its infancy in flatworms, with reports in just three species. While advancing in model organisms, there is a need to rapidly extend these technologies to other parasites responsible for several chronic diseases of humans and cattle. In order to extend these approaches to less well studied parasitic worms, we developed a test method for the presence of a viable RNAi pathway by silencing the exogenous reporter gene, firefly luciferase (fLUC. We established the method in the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni and then confirmed its utility in the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica. We transformed newly excysted juveniles of F. hepatica by electroporation with mRNA of fLUC and three hours later were able to detect luciferase enzyme activity, concentrated mainly in the digestive ceca. Subsequently, we tested the presence of an active RNAi pathway in F. hepatica by knocking down the exogenous luciferase activity by introduction into the transformed parasites of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA specific for fLUC. In addition, we tested the RNAi pathway targeting an endogenous F. hepatica gene encoding leucine aminopeptidase (FhLAP, and observed a significant reduction in specific mRNA levels. In summary, these studies demonstrated the utility of RNAi targeting reporter fLUC as a reporter gene assay to establish the presence of an intact RNAi pathway in helminth

  1. RNA profiles of porcine embryos during genome activation reveal complex metabolic switch sensitive to in vitro conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Østrup

    Full Text Available Fertilization is followed by complex changes in cytoplasmic composition and extensive chromatin reprogramming which results in the abundant activation of totipotent embryonic genome at embryonic genome activation (EGA. While chromatin reprogramming has been widely studied in several species, only a handful of reports characterize changing transcriptome profiles and resulting metabolic changes in cleavage stage embryos. The aims of the current study were to investigate RNA profiles of in vivo developed (ivv and in vitro produced (ivt porcine embryos before (2-cell stage and after (late 4-cell stage EGA and determine major metabolic changes that regulate totipotency. The period before EGA was dominated by transcripts responsible for cell cycle regulation, mitosis, RNA translation and processing (including ribosomal machinery, protein catabolism, and chromatin remodelling. Following EGA an increase in the abundance of transcripts involved in transcription, translation, DNA metabolism, histone and chromatin modification, as well as protein catabolism was detected. The further analysis of members of overlapping GO terms revealed that despite that comparable cellular processes are taking place before and after EGA (RNA splicing, protein catabolism, different metabolic pathways are involved. This strongly suggests that a complex metabolic switch accompanies EGA. In vitro conditions significantly altered RNA profiles before EGA, and the character of these changes indicates that they originate from oocyte and are imposed either before oocyte aspiration or during in vitro maturation. IVT embryos have altered content of apoptotic factors, cell cycle regulation factors and spindle components, and transcription factors, which all may contribute to reduced developmental competence of embryos produced in vitro. Overall, our data are in good accordance with previously published, genome-wide profiling data in other species. Moreover, comparison with mouse and

  2. Developing Clinical Competency in Crisis Event Management: An Integrated Simulation Problem-Based Learning Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, S. Y.; Chen, F. G.; Klainin, P.; Brammer, J.; O'Brien, A.; Samarasekera, D. D.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the integration of a simulation based learning activity on nursing students' clinical crisis management performance in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum. It was hypothesized that the clinical performance of first year nursing students who participated in a simulated learning activity during the PBL session…

  3. Developing Clinical Competency in Crisis Event Management: An Integrated Simulation Problem-Based Learning Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, S. Y.; Chen, F. G.; Klainin, P.; Brammer, J.; O'Brien, A.; Samarasekera, D. D.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the integration of a simulation based learning activity on nursing students' clinical crisis management performance in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum. It was hypothesized that the clinical performance of first year nursing students who participated in a simulated learning activity during the PBL session…

  4. Small terminase couples viral DNA-binding to genome-packaging ATPase activity

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Ankoor; Bhardwaj, Anshul; Datta, Pinaki; Lander, Gabriel C.; Cingolani, Gino

    2012-01-01

    Packaging of viral genomes into empty procapsids is powered by a large DNA-packaging motor. In most viruses, this machine is composed of a large (L) and a small (S) terminase subunit complexed with a dodecamer of portal protein. Here, we describe the 1.75 Å crystal structure of the bacteriophage P22 S-terminase in a nonameric conformation. The structure presents a central channel ~23 Å in diameter, sufficiently large to accommodate hydrated B-DNA. The last 23 residues of S-terminase are essen...

  5. Finished Genome Sequence of Bacillus cereus Strain 03BB87, a Clinical Isolate with B. anthracis Virulence Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Shannon L; Minogue, Timothy D; Teshima, Hazuki; Davenport, Karen W; Shea, April A; Miner, Haven L; Wolcott, Mark J; Chain, Patrick S G

    2015-01-15

    Bacillus cereus strain 03BB87, a blood culture isolate, originated in a 56-year-old male muller operator with a fatal case of pneumonia in 2003. Here we present the finished genome sequence of that pathogen, including a 5.46-Mb chromosome and two plasmids (209 and 52 Kb, respectively).

  6. RNA-seq Analysis of Clinical-Grade Osteochondral Allografts Reveals Activation of Early Response Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yang; Lewallen, Eric A.; Camilleri, Emily T.; Bonin, Carolina A.; Jones, Dakota L.; Dudakovic, Amel; Galeano-Garces, Catalina; Wang, Wei; Karperien, Marcel J.; Larson, Annalise N.; Dahm, Diane L.; Stuart, Michael J.; Levy, Bruce A.; Smith, Jay; Ryssman, Daniel B.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.; Im, Hee-Jeong; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Riester, Scott M.; Krych, Aaron J.

    2016-01-01

    Preservation of osteochondral allografts used for transplantation is critical to ensure favorable outcomes for patients after surgical treatment of cartilage defects. To study the biological effects of protocols currently used for cartilage storage, we investigated differences in gene expression between stored allograft cartilage and fresh cartilage from living donors using high throughput molecular screening strategies. We applied next generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and real-time reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) to assess genome-wide differences in mRNA expression between stored allograft cartilage and fresh cartilage tissue from living donors. Gene ontology analysis was used to characterize biological pathways associated with differentially expressed genes. Our studies establish reduced levels of mRNAs encoding cartilage related extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins (i.e., COL1A1, COL2A1, COL10A1, ACAN, DCN, HAPLN1, TNC, and COMP) in stored cartilage. These changes occur concomitantly with increased expression of “early response genes” that encode transcription factors mediating stress/cytoprotective responses (i.e., EGR1, EGR2, EGR3, MYC, FOS, FOSB, FOSL1, FOSL2, JUN, JUNB, and JUND). The elevated expression of “early response genes” and reduced levels of ECM-related mRNAs in stored cartilage allografts suggests that tissue viability may be maintained by a cytoprotective program that reduces cell metabolic activity. These findings have potential implications for future studies focused on quality assessment and clinical optimization of osteochondral allografts used for cartilage transplantation. PMID:26909883

  7. Genome-wide analysis of immune activation in human T and B cells reveals distinct classes of alternatively spliced genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevgeniy A Grigoryev

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA is a mechanism that increases the protein diversity of a single gene by differential exon inclusion/exclusion during post-transcriptional processing. While alternative splicing is established to occur during lymphocyte activation, little is known about the role it plays during the immune response. Our study is among the first reports of a systematic genome-wide analysis of activated human T and B lymphocytes using whole exon DNA microarrays integrating alternative splicing and differential gene expression. Purified human CD2(+ T or CD19(+ B cells were activated using protocols to model the early events in post-transplant allograft immunity and sampled as a function of time during the process of immune activation. Here we show that 3 distinct classes of alternatively spliced and/or differentially expressed genes change in an ordered manner as a function of immune activation. We mapped our results to function-based canonical pathways and demonstrated that some are populated by only one class of genes, like integrin signaling, while other pathways, such as purine metabolism and T cell receptor signaling, are populated by all three classes of genes. Our studies augment the current view of T and B cell activation in immunity that has been based exclusively upon differential gene expression by providing evidence for a large number of molecular networks populated as a function of time and activation by alternatively spliced genes, many of which are constitutively expressed.

  8. Clinical and cytogenetic features of a patient with partial trisomy 8q and partial monosomy 13q delineated by array comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Young Bae; Yun, Jun No; Park, Sang-Jin; Park, Moon Sung; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Jang Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Partial trisomy 8q is rare and has distinctive clinical features, including severe mental retardation, growth impairment, dysmorphic facial appearances, cleft palate, congenital heart disease, and urogenital anomalies. Partial monosomy 13q is a rare genetic disorder displaying a variety of phenotypic characteristics including mental retardation, dysmorphic facial features, and congenital anomalies. Here, we describe for the first time clinical observations and cytogenetic analysis of a patient with a concomitant occurrence of partial trisomy of 8q (8q21.3→qter) and partial monosomy 13q(13q34→qter). The patient was a female neonate with facial dysmorphia, agenesis of the corpus callosum, cleft palate, and congenital heart disease. G-band standard karyotype was 46,XX,add(13)(q34). To determine the origin of additional genomic gain in chromosome 13, array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was performed. Array CGH showed a 56.8 Mb sized gain on chromosome 8q and a 0.28 Mb sized loss on chromosome 13q. Therefore, the final karyotype of the patient was defined as 46,XX, der(13)t(8;13)(q21.3;q34). In conclusion, we described the clinical and cytogenetic analysis of the patient with concomitant occurrence of partial trisomy 8q and partial monosomy 13q delineated by array CGH. This report suggests that the array CGH would be a valuable diagnostic tool for identifying the origin of small additional genetic materials.

  9. Characterization of Vibrio parahaemolyticus clinical strains from Maryland (2012-2013 and comparisons to a locally and globally diverse V. parahaemolyticus strains by Whole-Genome Sequence Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie eHaendiges

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of foodborne illnesses in the US associated with the consumption of raw shellfish. Previous population studies of V. parahaemolyticus have used Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST or Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE. Whole genome sequencing (WGS provides a much higher level of resolution, but has been used to characterize only a few United States (US clinical isolates. Here we report the WGS characterization of 34 genomes of V. parahaemolyticus strains that were isolated from clinical cases in the state of Maryland (MD during two years (2012-2013. Among these MD isolates, 28% were negative for tdh and trh, 8% were tdh positive only, 11% were trh positive only, and 53% contained both genes. We compared this set of V. parahaemolyticus genomes to those of a collection of 17 archival strains from the US (10 previously sequenced strains and 7 from NCBI, collected between 1988 and 2004 and 15 international strains, isolated from geographically-diverse environmental and clinical sources (collected between 1980 and 2010. A WGS phylogenetic analysis of these strains revealed the regional outbreak strains from MD are highly diverse and yet genetically distinct from the international strains. Some of the MD strains caused outbreaks two years in a row, indicating a local source of contamination (e.g. ST631. Advances in WGS will enable this type of analysis to become routine, providing an excellent tool for improved surveillance. Databases built with phylogenetic data will help pinpoint sources of contamination in future outbreaks and contribute to faster outbreak control.

  10. Characterization of Vibrio parahaemolyticus clinical strains from Maryland (2012-2013) and comparisons to a locally and globally diverse V. parahaemolyticus strains by whole-genome sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haendiges, Julie; Timme, Ruth; Allard, Marc W; Myers, Robert A; Brown, Eric W; Gonzalez-Escalona, Narjol

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of foodborne illnesses in the US associated with the consumption of raw shellfish. Previous population studies of V. parahaemolyticus have used Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST) or Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Whole genome sequencing (WGS) provides a much higher level of resolution, but has been used to characterize only a few United States (US) clinical isolates. Here we report the WGS characterization of 34 genomes of V. parahaemolyticus strains that were isolated from clinical cases in the state of Maryland (MD) during 2 years (2012-2013). These 2 years saw an increase of V. parahaemolyticus cases compared to previous years. Among these MD isolates, 28% were negative for tdh and trh, 8% were tdh positive only, 11% were trh positive only, and 53% contained both genes. We compared this set of V. parahaemolyticus genomes to those of a collection of 17 archival strains from the US (10 previously sequenced strains and 7 from NCBI, collected between 1988 and 2004) and 15 international strains, isolated from geographically-diverse environmental and clinical sources (collected between 1980 and 2010). A WGS phylogenetic analysis of these strains revealed the regional outbreak strains from MD are highly diverse and yet genetically distinct from the international strains. Some MD strains caused outbreaks 2 years in a row, indicating a local source of contamination (e.g., ST631). Advances in WGS will enable this type of analysis to become routine, providing an excellent tool for improved surveillance. Databases built with phylogenetic data will help pinpoint sources of contamination in future outbreaks and contribute to faster outbreak control.

  11. A Survey of 6,300 Genomic Fragments for cis-Regulatory Activity in the Imaginal Discs of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Jory

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Over 6,000 fragments from the genome of Drosophila melanogaster were analyzed for their ability to drive expression of GAL4 reporter genes in the third-instar larval imaginal discs. About 1,200 reporter genes drove expression in the eye, antenna, leg, wing, haltere, or genital imaginal discs. The patterns ranged from large regions to individual cells. About 75% of the active fragments drove expression in multiple discs; 20% were expressed in ventral, but not dorsal, discs (legs, genital, and antenna, whereas ∼23% were expressed in dorsal but not ventral discs (wing, haltere, and eye. Several patterns, for example, within the leg chordotonal organ, appeared a surprisingly large number of times. Unbiased searches for DNA sequence motifs suggest candidate transcription factors that may regulate enhancers with shared activities. Together, these expression patterns provide a valuable resource to the community and offer a broad overview of how transcriptional regulatory information is distributed in the Drosophila genome.

  12. "VIRTUAL QUIZ": A TOOL FOR ACTIVE LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT IN CLINICAL ANATOMY

    OpenAIRE

    Manuela Ribeiro; Margarida Amaral; Hugo Ribeiro; Machado, J.; Ana Povo; Milton Severo; M. Amélia Ferreira

    2009-01-01

    Clinical Anatomy, introduced in different medical curricula around the world, is considered of relevance for future physicians, since it allows the integration of anatomical knowledge with clinical activity developed by health professionals. Besides helping to develop the essential "critical anatomical reasoning" identified as crucial to the acquisition of "clinical reasoning", this area of knowledge contributes to the translation between the basic and the clinical areas in Medical Education....

  13. Report on activities and attitudes of organizations active in the clinical practice guidelines field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, A O; Battista, R N; Hodge, M J; Lewis, S; Basinski, A; Davis, D

    1995-10-01

    The organizing committee of a workshop on clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) surveyed invited organizations on their attitudes and activities related to five topics to be covered during the workshop sessions: organizational roles, priority setting, guidelines implementation, guidelines evaluation and development of a network of those active in the CPG field. Organizational roles: The national specialty societies were felt to have the largest role to play; the smallest roles were assigned to consumers, who were seen to have a role mainly in priority setting, and to industry and government, both of which were seen to have primarily a funding role. Many barriers to collaboration were identified, the solutions to all of which appeared to be better communication, establishment of common principles and clear role definitions. Priority setting: There was considerable agreement on the criteria that should be used to set priorities for CPG activities: the burden of disease on population health, the state of scientific knowledge, the cost of treatment and the economic burden of disease on society were seen as important factors, whereas the costs of guidelines development and practitioner interest in guidelines development were seen as less important. Organizations were unable to give much information on how they set priorities. Guidelines implementation: Most of the organizations surveyed did not actively try to ensure the implementation of guidelines, although a considerable minority devoted resources to implementation. The 38% of organizations that implemented guidelines actively listed a wide variety of activities, including training, use of local opinion leaders, information technology, local consensus processes and counter detailing. Guidelines evaluation: Formal evaluation of guidelines was undertaken by fewer than 13% of the responding organizations. All the evaluations incorporated assessments before and after guideline implementation, and some used primary patient

  14. Complete genome sequence of Arthrobacter sp. ERGS1:01, a putative novel bacterium with prospective cold active industrial enzymes, isolated from East Rathong glacier in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rakshak; Singh, Dharam; Swarnkar, Mohit Kumar; Singh, Anil Kumar; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-11-20

    We report the complete genome sequence of Arthrobacter sp. ERGS1:01, a novel bacterium which produces industrial enzymes at low temperature. East Rathong glacier in Sikkim Himalayas is untouched and unexplored for microbial diversity though it has a rich source of glaciers, alpine and meadows. Genome sequence has provided the basis for understanding its adaptation under harsh condition of Himalayan glacier, its ability to produce cold active industrial enzymes and has unlocked opportunities for microbial bioprospection from East Rathong glacier.

  15. Immunomodulatory activities of five clinically used Chinese herbal polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiping Lu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Polysaccharide is a natural macromolecular compound with complex, important and multifaceted biological activities. Some of polysaccharides have been marketed in China as drugs or healthy products. More studies confirm that the active ingredient of many traditional Chinese medicine exist in the form of polysaccharides. They play a role in disease therapy by activating immune cells and the complement system; regulating the cytokines expression; promoting the production of antibodies; inhibiting tumor cell proliferation and inducing tumor cell apoptosis; inhibiting virus entering cells and replication; increasing activity of antioxidant enzyme; scavenging free radicals; and inhibiting lipid peroxidation. In this review, we focus on the immunomodulatory effects and its possible mechanism of polysaccharides from Chinese herbal polysaccharides products, including Lentinan, Astragalus polysaccharide, Polyporus polysaccharide and Achyranthes bidentata polysaccharide. The immunomodulatory activities of polysaccharides were categorized in the paper into general immunoregulatory activity, anti-tumor, anti-infections, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, anti-mutagenic and radioprotective, anti-complementary, anti-adhesive, and anti-allergy since all the activities are related to modulate immune responses by the polysaccharides. Also the challenges in the research of polysaccharides will be discussed. [J Exp Integr Med 2012; 2(1.000: 15-27

  16. The changing nature of clinical decision support systems: a focus on consumers, genomics, public health and decision safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coiera, E; Lau, A Y S; Tsafnat, G; Sintchenko, V; Magrabi, F

    2009-01-01

    To review the recent research literature in clinical decision support systems (CDSS). A review of recent literature was undertaken, focussing on CDSS evaluation, consumers and public health, the impact of translational bioinformatics on CDSS design, and CDSS safety. In recent years, researchers have concentrated much less on the development of decision technologies, and have focussed more on the impact of CDSS in the clinical world. Recent work highlights that traditional process measures of CDSS effectiveness, such as document relevance are poor proxy measures for decision outcomes. Measuring the dynamics of decision making, for example via decision velocity, may produce a more accurate picture of effectiveness. Another trend is the broadening of user base for CDSS beyond front line clinicians. Consumers are now a major focus for biomedical informatics, as are public health officials, tasked with detecting and managing disease outbreaks at a health system, rather than individual patient level. Bioinformatics is also changing the nature of CDSS. Apart from personalisation of therapy recommendations, translational bioinformatics is creating new challenges in the interpretation of the meaning of genetic data. Finally, there is much recent interest in the safety and effectiveness of computerised physician order entry (CPOE) systems, given that prescribing and administration errors are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Of note, there is still much controversy surrounding the contention that poorly designed, implemented or used CDSS may actually lead to harm. CDSS research remains an active and evolving area of research, as CDSS penetrate more widely beyond their traditional domain into consumer decision support, and as decisions become more complex, for example by involving sequence level genetic data.

  17. Antiasthmatic activity of Moringa oleifera Lam: A clinical study

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the efficacy and safety of seed kernels of Moringa oleifera in the treatment of bronchial asthma. Twenty patients of either sex with mild-to-moderate asthma were given finely powdered dried seed kernels in dose of 3 g for 3 weeks. The clinical efficacy with respect to symptoms and respiratory functions were assessed using a spirometer prior to and at the end of the treatment. Hematological parameters were not changed markedly by treatment with ...

  18. Multiple source genes of HAmo SINE actively expanded and ongoing retroposition in cyprinid genomes relying on its partner LINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan Xiaoni

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We recently characterized HAmo SINE and its partner LINE in silver carp and bighead carp based on hybridization capture of repetitive elements from digested genomic DNA in solution using a bead-probe 1. To reveal the distribution and evolutionary history of SINEs and LINEs in cyprinid genomes, we performed a multi-species search for HAmo SINE and its partner LINE using the bead-probe capture and internal-primer-SINE polymerase chain reaction (PCR techniques. Results Sixty-seven full-size and 125 internal-SINE sequences (as well as 34 full-size and 9 internal sequences previously reported in bighead carp and silver carp from 17 species of the family Cyprinidae were aligned as well as 14 new isolated HAmoL2 sequences. Four subfamilies (type I, II, III and IV, which were divided based on diagnostic nucleotides in the tRNA-unrelated region, expanded preferentially within a certain lineage or within the whole family of Cyprinidae as multiple active source genes. The copy numbers of HAmo SINEs were estimated to vary from 104 to 106 in cyprinid genomes by quantitative RT-PCR. Over one hundred type IV members were identified and characterized in the primitive cyprinid Danio rerio genome but only tens of sequences were found to be similar with type I, II and III since the type IV was the oldest subfamily and its members dispersed in almost all investigated cyprinid fishes. For determining the taxonomic distribution of HAmo SINE, inter-primer SINE PCR was conducted in other non-cyprinid fishes, the results shows that HAmo SINE- related sequences may disperse in other families of order Cypriniforms but absent in other orders of bony fishes: Siluriformes, Polypteriformes, Lepidosteiformes, Acipenseriformes and Osteoglossiforms. Conclusions Depending on HAmo LINE2, multiple source genes (subfamilies of HAmo SINE actively expanded and underwent retroposition in a certain lineage or within the whole family of Cyprinidae. From this

  19. Genome-Scale Architecture of Small Molecule Regulatory Networks and the Fundamental Trade-Off between Regulation and Enzymatic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed Reznik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic flux is in part regulated by endogenous small molecules that modulate the catalytic activity of an enzyme, e.g., allosteric inhibition. In contrast to transcriptional regulation of enzymes, technical limitations have hindered the production of a genome-scale atlas of small molecule-enzyme regulatory interactions. Here, we develop a framework leveraging the vast, but fragmented, biochemical literature to reconstruct and analyze the small molecule regulatory network (SMRN of the model organism Escherichia coli, including the primary metabolite regulators and enzyme targets. Using metabolic control analysis, we prove a fundamental trade-off between regulation and enzymatic activity, and we combine it with metabolomic measurements and the SMRN to make inferences on the sensitivity of enzymes to their regulators. Generalizing the analysis to other organisms, we identify highly conserved regulatory interactions across evolutionarily divergent species, further emphasizing a critical role for small molecule interactions in the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis.

  20. Congruence-Incongruence Patterns in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Couples' Genetic Determinist Beliefs and Perceived Control over Genes: Implications for Clinical and Public Health Genomic Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Roxanne L; Smith, Rachel A; Hong, Soo Jung; Worthington, Amber

    2015-06-01

    Genomics makes possible the isolation of multiple genes as co-factors that increase, but do not determine, risk for many adult-onset medical conditions, including alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD). Those diagnosed with an adult-onset medical condition, such as AATD, are often married and make decisions about testing and care as a couple. We examined genetic essentialist and threat beliefs, focusing on beliefs about the genetic contribution to disease susceptibility and severity, as well as perceptions of control related to genes and health for married couples (N =59), in which one spouse has been tested for genetic mutations associated with AATD. The intraclass correlation for spouses' beliefs about genetic essentialism was strong and statistically significant, but the associations for their other beliefs were not. Incongruence between AATD participants and their spouses regarding genes' influence on disease severity directly related to incongruent perceptions of control and genetic contribution to disease susceptibility. Results revealed an inverse relationship to AATD participants' perceptions of behavioral control and a direct relationship to their beliefs about genes' influence on disease severity. This suggests a pattern of incongruence in which AATD participants have low levels of perceived control over genes' influence on health and high levels of perceived genetic influence on disease severity compared to spouses. With public health communication efforts lagging behind the science of genomics, insights regarding the congruence or incongruence associated with married couples' beliefs about genes' influence on disease afford pathways to guide clinical and public health communication about genomics.

  1. Population Genomics and the Statistical Values of Race: An Interdisciplinary Perspective on the Biological Classification of Human Populations and Implications for Clinical Genetic Epidemiological Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglo, Koffi N.; Mersha, Tesfaye B.; Martin, Lisa J.

    2016-01-01

    The biological status and biomedical significance of the concept of race as applied to humans continue to be contentious issues despite the use of advanced statistical and clustering methods to determine continental ancestry. It is thus imperative for researchers to understand the limitations as well as potential uses of the concept of race in biology and biomedicine. This paper deals with the theoretical assumptions behind cluster analysis in human population genomics. Adopting an interdisciplinary approach, it demonstrates that the hypothesis that attributes the clustering of human populations to “frictional” effects of landform barriers at continental boundaries is empirically incoherent. It then contrasts the scientific status of the “cluster” and “cline” constructs in human population genomics, and shows how cluster may be instrumentally produced. It also shows how statistical values of race vindicate Darwin's argument that race is evolutionarily meaningless. Finally, the paper explains why, due to spatiotemporal parameters, evolutionary forces, and socio-cultural factors influencing population structure, continental ancestry may be pragmatically relevant to global and public health genomics. Overall, this work demonstrates that, from a biological systematic and evolutionary taxonomical perspective, human races/continental groups or clusters have no natural meaning or objective biological reality. In fact, the utility of racial categorizations in research and in clinics can be explained by spatiotemporal parameters, socio-cultural factors, and evolutionary forces affecting disease causation and treatment response. PMID:26925096

  2. Population Genomics and the Statistical Values of Race:An Interdisciplinary Perspective on the Biological Classification of Human Populations and Implications for Clinical Genetic Epidemiological Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koffi N. Maglo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The biological status and biomedical significance of the concept of race as applied to humans continue to be contentious issues despite the use of advanced statistical and clustering methods to determine continental ancestry. It is thus imperative for researchers to understand the limitations as well as potential uses of the concept of race in biology and biomedicine. This paper deals with the theoretical assumptions behind cluster analysis in human population genomics. Adopting an interdisciplinary approach, it demonstrates that the hypothesis that attributes the clustering of human populations to frictional effects of landform barriers at continental boundaries is empirically incoherent. It then contrasts the scientific status of the cluster and cline constructs in human population genomics, and shows how cluster may be instrumentally produced. It also shows how statistical values of race vindicate Darwin’s argument that race is evolutionarily meaningless. Finally, the paper explains why, due to spatiotemporal parameters, evolutionary forces and socio-cultural factors influencing population structure, continental ancestry may be pragmatically relevant to global and public health genomics. Overall, this work demonstrates that, from a biological systematic and evolutionary taxonomical perspective, human races/continental groups or clusters have no natural meaning or objective biological reality. In fact, the utility of racial categorizations in research and in clinics can be explained by spatiotemporal parameters, socio-cultural factors and evolutionary forces affecting disease causation and treatment response.

  3. Interrelationship among physical activity, quality of life, clinical and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, and quality of life was assessed using the Diabetes. Quality of Life .... is a generic scale and has a reliability of 0.80 and criterion ... diabetes care behaviours and satisfaction with diabetes.

  4. Screening marine organisms for antimicrobial activity against clinical pathogens

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrabhaDevi; Wahidullah, S.; Tonima, K.; DeSouza, L.

    ) and Hospital. Antimicrobial assay Antibacterial activity of different extracts was assessed using standard disc-diffusion assay on marine agar as described earlier5. Extracts and fractions, each, were dissolved in the respective solvents and loaded...

  5. The master activator of IncA/C conjugative plasmids stimulates genomic islands and multidrug resistance dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, Nicolas; Matteau, Dominick; Luo, Peng; Rodrigue, Sébastien; Burrus, Vincent

    2014-10-01

    Dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes occurs mostly by conjugation, which mediates DNA transfer between cells in direct contact. Conjugative plasmids of the IncA/C incompatibility group have become a substantial threat due to their broad host-range, the extended spectrum of antimicrobial resistance they confer, their prevalence in enteric bacteria and their very efficient spread by conjugation. However, their biology remains largely unexplored. Using the IncA/C conjugative plasmid pVCR94ΔX as a prototype, we have investigated the regulatory circuitry that governs IncA/C plasmids dissemination and found that the transcriptional activator complex AcaCD is essential for the expression of plasmid transfer genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with exonuclease digestion (ChIP-exo) and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) approaches, we have identified the sequences recognized by AcaCD and characterized the AcaCD regulon. Data mining using the DNA motif recognized by AcaCD revealed potential AcaCD-binding sites upstream of genes involved in the intracellular mobility functions (recombination directionality factor and mobilization genes) in two widespread classes of genomic islands (GIs) phylogenetically unrelated to IncA/C plasmids. The first class, SGI1, confers and propagates multidrug resistance in Salmonella enterica and Proteus mirabilis, whereas MGIVmi1 in Vibrio mimicus belongs to a previously uncharacterized class of GIs. We have demonstrated that through expression of AcaCD, IncA/C plasmids specifically trigger the excision and mobilization of the GIs at high frequencies. This study provides new evidence of the considerable impact of IncA/C plasmids on bacterial genome plasticity through their own mobility and the mobilization of genomic islands.

  6. LLNL's Big Science Capabilities Help Spur Over $796 Billion in U.S. Economic Activity Sequencing the Human Genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Jeffrey S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-28

    LLNL’s successful history of taking on big science projects spans beyond national security and has helped create billions of dollars per year in new economic activity. One example is LLNL’s role in helping sequence the human genome. Over $796 billion in new economic activity in over half a dozen fields has been documented since LLNL successfully completed this Grand Challenge.

  7. Cytotoxic activities of alkylphosphocholines against clinical isolates of Acanthamoeba spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walochnik, Julia; Duchêne, Michael; Seifert, Karin; Obwaller, Andreas; Hottkowitz, Thomas; Wiedermann, Gerhard; Eibl, Hansjörg; Aspöck, Horst

    2002-03-01

    Free-living amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba are causing serious chronic conditions such as destructive keratitis in contact lens wearers or granulomatous amoebic encephalitis in individuals with compromised immune systems. Both are characterized by the lack of availability of sufficiently effective and uncomplicated, manageable treatments. Hexadecylphosphocholine (miltefosine) is licensed for use as a topical antineoplastic agent, but it is also active in vitro against several protozoan parasites, and it was applied very successfully for the treatment of human visceral leishmaniasis. The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of hexadecylphosphocholine and other alkylphosphocholines (APCs) against Acanthamoeba spp. The in vitro activities of eight different APCs against three Acanthamoeba strains of various pathogenicities were determined. All substances showed at least amoebostatic effects, and some of them disrupted the amoebae, as shown by the release of cytoplasmic enzyme activity. Hexadecylphosphocholine exhibited the highest degree of cytotoxicity against trophozoites, resulting in complete cell death at a concentration as low as 40 microM, and also displayed significant cysticidal activity. Hexadecylphosphocholine may be a promising new candidate for the topical treatment of Acanthamoeba keratitis and, conceivably, even for the oral treatment of granulomatous amoebic encephalitis.

  8. Predicting activities after stroke : what is clinically relevant?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakkel, G.; Kollen, B. J.

    Knowledge about factors that determine the final outcome after stroke is important for early stroke management, rehabilitation goals, and discharge planning. This narrative review provides an overview of current knowledge about the prediction of activities after stroke. We reviewed the pattern of

  9. Cold-active bacteriophages from the Baltic Sea ice have diverse genomes and virus-host interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senčilo, Ana; Luhtanen, Anne-Mari; Saarijärvi, Mikko; Bamford, Dennis H; Roine, Elina

    2015-10-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria are the major prokaryotic component of the Baltic Sea ice microbiome, and it is postulated that phages are among their major parasites. In this study, we sequenced the complete genomes of six earlier reported phage isolates from the Baltic Sea ice infecting Shewanella sp. and Flavobacterium sp. hosts as well as characterized the phage-host interactions. Based on the genome sequences, the six phages were classified into five new genera. Only two phages, 1/4 and 1/40, both infecting Shewanella sp. strains, showed significant nucleotide sequence similarity to each other and could be grouped into the same genus. These two phages are also related to Vibrio-specific phages sharing approximately 25% of the predicted gene products. Nevertheless, cross-titrations showed that the cold-active phages studied are host specific: none of the seven additionally tested, closely related Shewanella strains served as hosts for the phages. Adsorption experiments of two Shewanella phages, 1/4 and 3/49, conducted at 4 °C and at 15 °C revealed relatively fast adsorption rates that are, for example, comparable with those of phages infective in mesophilic conditions. Despite the small number of Shewanella phages characterized here, we could already find different types of phage-host interactions including a putative abortive infection.

  10. Efficient genome engineering by targeted homologous recombination in mouse embryos using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Daniel; Peters, Annika; Wirtz, Tristan; Mai, Maren; Ackermann, Justus; Thabet, Yasser; Schmidt, Jürgen; Weighardt, Heike; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Degen, Joachim; Schultze, Joachim L; Beyer, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Generation of mouse models by introducing transgenes using homologous recombination is critical for understanding fundamental biology and pathology of human diseases. Here we investigate whether artificial transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs)-powerful tools that induce DNA double-strand breaks at specific genomic locations-can be combined with a targeting vector to induce homologous recombination for the introduction of a transgene in embryonic stem cells and fertilized murine oocytes. We describe the generation of a conditional mouse model using TALENs, which introduce double-strand breaks at the genomic locus of the special AT-rich sequence-binding protein-1 in combination with a large 14.4 kb targeting template vector. We report successful germline transmission of this allele and demonstrate its recombination in primary cells in the presence of Cre-recombinase. These results suggest that TALEN-assisted induction of DNA double-strand breaks can facilitate homologous recombination of complex targeting constructs directly in oocytes.

  11. Microenvironmental influence on pre-clinical activity of polo-like kinase inhibition in multiple myeloma: implications for clinical translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas W McMillin

    Full Text Available Polo-like kinases (PLKs play an important role in cell cycle progression, checkpoint control and mitosis. The high mitotic index and chromosomal instability of advanced cancers suggest that PLK inhibitors may be an attractive therapeutic option for presently incurable advanced neoplasias with systemic involvement, such as multiple myeloma (MM. We studied the PLK 1, 2, 3 inhibitor BI 2536 and observed potent (IC50<40 nM and rapid (commitment to cell death <24 hrs in vitro activity against MM cells in isolation, as well as in vivo activity against a traditional subcutaneous xenograft mouse model. Tumor cells in MM patients, however, don't exist in isolation, but reside in and interact with the bone microenvironment. Therefore conventional in vitro and in vivo preclinical assays don't take into account how interactions between MM cells and the bone microenvironment can potentially confer drug resistance. To probe this question, we performed tumor cell compartment-specific bioluminescence imaging assays to compare the preclinical anti-MM activity of BI 2536 in vitro in the presence vs. absence of stromal cells or osteoclasts. We observed that the presence of these bone marrow non-malignant cells led to decreased anti-MM activity of BI 2536. We further validated these results in an orthotopic in vivo mouse model of diffuse MM bone lesions where tumor cells interact with non-malignant cells of the bone microenvironment. We again observed that BI 2536 had decreased activity in this in vivo model of tumor-bone microenvironment interactions highlighting that, despite BI 2536's promising activity in conventional assays, its lack of activity in microenvironmental models raises concerns for its clinical development for MM. More broadly, preclinical drug testing in the absence of relevant tumor microenvironment interactions may overestimate potential clinical activity, thus explaining at least in part the gap between preclinical vs. clinical efficacy in MM

  12. The copy number of Epstein-Barr virus latent genome correlates with the oncogenicity by the activation level of LMP1 and NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Lielian; Yu, Haibo; Liu, Lingzhi; Tang, Yunlian; Wu, Hongzhuan; Yang, Jing; Zhu, Meijuan; Du, Shujuan; Zhao, Lian; Cao, Li; Li, Guiyuan; Lu, Jianhong

    2015-12-01

    A tumor model that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent infection facilitated the tumorigenicity was previously established using the Maxi-EBV system. In the present approach, EBV-lost cell clones demonstrated significantly decreased tumorigenesis. On the other hand, the LMP1 gene in Maxi-EBV genome was replaced by that of nasopharyngeal carcinoma origin. The resultant cell line, 293-1/NL showed much lower malignancy than the original 293-EBV. The result was opposite to our expectation. The change of 293 sublineage cells for EBV harboring also got similar result. To seek the underlying reason, the copy number of EBV genome in all the cell lines was detected. The result indicated that 293-EBV contained about 4.5-fold higher EBV copies than 293-1/NL did. Parallel EBV genomes led to relatively stable copies in different 293 sublineages, suggesting the viral genome structure is a factor for the sustainability of EBV's copy number. Moreover, the LMP1 transcription in high copy-containing cells showed abnormally high level. Furthermore, the main LMP1-driven pathway, transcription factor NF-κB, was highly activated in high-copy cells. Here we first manifest by experimental model that the copy number of EBV latent genome correlates with the viral pathogenesis, which depends on the activation level of LMP1 and NF-κB. Overall, both the presence and amount of EBV genome are crucial for the viral oncogenicity.

  13. HIV-induced immune activation - pathogenesis and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stellbrink HJ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This manuscript is communicated by the German AIDS Society (DAIG http://www.daignet.de. It summarizes a series of presentations and discussions during a workshop on immune activation due to HIV infection. The workshop was held on November 22nd 2008 in Hamburg, Germany. It was organized by the ICH Hamburg under the auspices of the German AIDS Society (DAIG e.V..

  14. Activity restriction in mild COPD: a challenging clinical problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Donnell DE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Denis E O'Donnell,1 Kevin B Gebke2 1Division of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Respiratory Investigation Unit, Queen's University and Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, ON, Canada; 2Primary Care Sports Medicine Program, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA Abstract: Dyspnea, exercise intolerance, and activity restriction are already apparent in mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. However, patients may not seek medical help until their symptoms become troublesome and persistent and significant respiratory impairment is already present; as a consequence, further sustained physical inactivity may contribute to disease progression. Ventilatory and gas exchange impairment, cardiac dysfunction, and skeletal muscle dysfunction are present to a variable degree in patients with mild COPD, and collectively may contribute to exercise intolerance. As such, there is increasing interest in evaluating exercise tolerance and physical activity in symptomatic patients with COPD who have mild airway obstruction, as defined by spirometry. Simple questionnaires, eg, the modified British Medical Research Council dyspnea scale and the COPD Assessment Test, or exercise tests, eg, the 6-minute or incremental and endurance exercise tests can be used to assess exercise performance and functional status. Pedometers and accelerometers are used to evaluate physical activity, and endurance tests (cycle or treadmill using constant work rate protocols are used to assess the effects of interventions such as pulmonary rehabilitation. In addition, alternative outcome measurements, such as tests of small airway dysfunction and laboratory-based exercise tests, are used to measure the extent of physiological impairment in individuals with persistent dyspnea. This review describes the mechanisms of exercise limitation in patients with mild COPD and the interventions that can potentially improve exercise tolerance. Also discussed are the

  15. Clinical application of an active electrode using an operational amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, S; Tomita, Y; Horiuchi, T

    1992-10-01

    An active electrode (d10 mm, t6 mm) is presented, that functions as an impedance transformer (an input impedance > 10 G omega, an output impedance < 1 omega) by means of which we can derive surface EMG without any skin preparation and paste. This electrode was compared with a conventional one, and it was ascertained that the electrode could be replaced with the conventional one, and, moreover, it was preferable because it required less preparation time, and was less affected by environmental noise.

  16. The G1613A mutation in the HBV genome affects HBeAg expression and viral replication through altered core promoter activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man-Shan Li

    Full Text Available Infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV causes acute and chronic hepatitis and is closely associated with the development of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Previously, we demonstrated that the G1613A mutation in the HBV negative regulatory element (NRE is a hotspot mutation in HCC patients. In this study, we further investigated the functional consequences of this mutation in the context of the full length HBV genome and its replication. We showed that the G1613A mutation significantly suppresses the secretion of e antigen (HBeAg and enhances the synthesis of viral DNA, which is in consistence to our clinical result that the G1613A mutation associates with high viral load in chronic HBV carriers. To further investigate the molecular mechanism of the mutation, we performed the electrophoretic mobility shift assay with the recombinant RFX1 protein, a trans-activator that was shown to interact with the NRE of HBV. Intriguingly, RFX1 binds to the G1613A mutant with higher affinity than the wild-type sequence, indicating that the mutation possesses the trans-activating effect to the core promoter via NRE. The trans-activating effect was further validated by the enhancement of the core promoter activity after overexpression of RFX1 in liver cell line. In summary, our results suggest the functional consequences of the hotspot G1613A mutation found in HBV. We also provide a possible molecular mechanism of this hotspot mutation to the increased viral load of HBV carriers, which increases the risk to HCC.

  17. Peer assisted learning in the clinical setting: an activity systems analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Deirdre; O'Flynn, Siun; Kelly, Martina

    2015-08-01

    Peer assisted learning (PAL) is a common feature of medical education. Understanding of PAL has been based on processes and outcomes in controlled settings, such as clinical skills labs. PAL in the clinical setting, a complex learning environment, requires fresh evaluation. Socio-cultural theory is proposed as a means to understand educational interventions in ways that are practical and meaningful. We describe the evaluation of a PAL intervention, introduced to support students' transition into full time clinical attachments, using activity theory and activity systems analysis (ASA). Our research question was How does PAL transfer to the clinical environment? Junior students on their first clinical attachments undertook a weekly same-level, reciprocal PAL activity. Qualitative data was collected after each session, and focus groups (n = 3) were held on completion. Data was analysed using ASA. ASA revealed two competing activity systems on clinical attachment; Learning from Experts, which students saw as the primary function of the attachment and Learning with Peers, the PAL intervention. The latter took time from the first and was in tension with it. Tensions arose from student beliefs about how learning takes place in clinical settings, and the importance of social relationships, leading to variable engagement with PAL. Differing perspectives within the group were opportunities for expansive learning. PAL in the clinical environment presents challenges specific to that context. Using ASA helped to describe student activity on clinical attachment and to highlight tensions and contradictions relating PAL in that setting. Planning learning opportunities on clinical placements, must take account of how students learn in workplaces, and the complexity of the multiple competing activity systems related to learning and social activities.

  18. Regulation of AID, the B-cell genome mutator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim, Celia; Kazadi, David; Rothschild, Gerson; Basu, Uttiya

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which B cells somatically engineer their genomes to generate the vast diversity of antibodies required to challenge the nearly infinite number of antigens that immune systems encounter are of tremendous clinical and academic interest. The DNA cytidine deaminase activation-induced deaminase (AID) catalyzes two of these mechanisms: class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). Recent discoveries indicate a significant promiscuous targeting of this B-cell mutator enzyme genome-wide. Here we discuss the various regulatory elements that control AID activity and prevent AID from inducing genomic instability and thereby initiating oncogenesis.

  19. An imprinted non-coding genomic cluster at 14q32 defines clinically relevant molecular subtypes in osteosarcoma across multiple independent datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Katherine E; Kelly, Andrew D; Kuijjer, Marieke L; Barry, William; Rattani, Ahmed; Garbutt, Cassandra C; Kissick, Haydn; Janeway, Katherine; Perez-Atayde, Antonio; Goldsmith, Jeffrey; Gebhardt, Mark C; Arredouani, Mohamed S; Cote, Greg; Hornicek, Francis; Choy, Edwin; Duan, Zhenfeng; Quackenbush, John; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Spentzos, Dimitrios

    2017-05-15

    A microRNA (miRNA) collection on the imprinted 14q32 MEG3 region has been associated with outcome in osteosarcoma. We assessed the clinical utility of this miRNA set and their association with methylation status. We integrated coding and non-coding RNA data from three independent annotated clinical osteosarcoma cohorts (n = 65, n = 27, and n = 25) and miRNA and methylation data from one in vitro (19 cell lines) and one clinical (NCI Therapeutically Applicable Research to Generate Effective Treatments (TARGET) osteosarcoma dataset, n = 80) dataset. We used time-dependent receiver operating characteristic (tdROC) analysis to evaluate the clinical value of candidate miRNA profiles and machine learning approaches to compare the coding and non-coding transcriptional programs of high- and low-risk osteosarcoma tumors and high- versus low-aggressiveness cell lines. In the cell line and TARGET datasets, we also studied the methylation patterns of the MEG3 imprinting control region on 14q32 and their association with miRNA expression and tumor aggressiveness. In the tdROC analysis, miRNA sets on 14q32 showed strong discriminatory power for recurrence and survival in the three clinical datasets. High- or low-risk tumor classification was robust to using different microRNA sets or classification methods. Machine learning approaches showed that genome-wide miRNA profiles and miRNA regulatory networks were quite different between the two outcome groups and mRNA profiles categorized the samples in a manner concordant with the miRNAs, suggesting potential molecular subtypes. Further, miRNA expression patterns were reproducible in comparing high-aggressiveness versus low-aggressiveness cell lines. Methylation patterns in the MEG3 differentially methylated region (DMR) also distinguished high-aggressiveness from low-aggressiveness cell lines and were associated with expression of several 14q32 miRNAs in both the cell lines and the large TARGET clinical dataset

  20. Synovitis and osteitis are very frequent in rheumatoid arthritis clinical remission: results from an MRI study of 294 patients in clinical remission or low disease activity state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gandjbakhch, Frédérique; Conaghan, Philip G; Ejbjerg, Bo;

    2011-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), radiographic progression may occur despite clinical remission. This may be explained by subclinical inflammation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a greater sensitivity than clinical examination and radiography for assessing disease activity. Our objective w...... was to determine the MRI characteristics of RA patients in clinical remission or low disease activity (LDA) state....

  1. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Analysis Identifies Novel Hypomethylated Non-Pericentromeric Genes with Potential Clinical Implications in ICF Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simo-Riudalbas, L; Diaz-Lagares, A; Gatto, S; Gagliardi, M; Crujeiras, A B; Matarazzo, M R; Esteller, M; Sandoval, J

    2015-01-01

    Immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial anomalies syndrome (ICF) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, characterized by severe hypomethylation in pericentromeric regions of chromosomes (1, 16 and 9), marked immunodeficiency and facial anomalies. The majority of ICF patients present mutations in the DNMT3B gene, affecting the DNA methyltransferase activity of the protein. In the present study, we have used the Infinium 450K DNA methylation array to evaluate the methylation level of 450,000 CpGs in lymphoblastoid cell lines and untrasformed fibroblasts derived from ICF patients and healthy donors. Our results demonstrate that ICF-specific DNMT3B variants A603T/STP807ins and V699G/R54X cause global DNA hypomethylation compared to wild-type protein. We identified 181 novel differentially methylated positions (DMPs) including subtelomeric and intrachromosomic regions, outside the classical ICF-related pericentromeric hypomethylated positions. Interestingly, these sites were mainly located in intergenic regions and inside the CpG islands. Among the identified hypomethylated CpG-island associated genes, we confirmed the overexpression of three selected genes, BOLL, SYCP2 and NCRNA00221, in ICF compared to healthy controls, which are supposed to be expressed in germ line and silenced in somatic tissues. In conclusion, this study contributes in clarifying the direct relationship between DNA methylation defect and gene expression impairment in ICF syndrome, identifying novel direct target genes of DNMT3B. A high percentage of the DMPs are located in the subtelomeric regions, indicating a specific role of DNMT3B in methylating these chromosomal sites. Therefore, we provide further evidence that hypomethylation in specific non-pericentromeric regions of chromosomes might be involved in the molecular pathogenesis of ICF syndrome. The detection of DNA hypomethylation at BOLL, SYCP2 and NCRNA00221 may pave the way for the development of specific clinical biomarkers

  2. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Analysis Identifies Novel Hypomethylated Non-Pericentromeric Genes with Potential Clinical Implications in ICF Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Simo-Riudalbas

    Full Text Available Immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial anomalies syndrome (ICF is a rare autosomal recessive disease, characterized by severe hypomethylation in pericentromeric regions of chromosomes (1, 16 and 9, marked immunodeficiency and facial anomalies. The majority of ICF patients present mutations in the DNMT3B gene, affecting the DNA methyltransferase activity of the protein. In the present study, we have used the Infinium 450K DNA methylation array to evaluate the methylation level of 450,000 CpGs in lymphoblastoid cell lines and untrasformed fibroblasts derived from ICF patients and healthy donors. Our results demonstrate that ICF-specific DNMT3B variants A603T/STP807ins and V699G/R54X cause global DNA hypomethylation compared to wild-type protein. We identified 181 novel differentially methylated positions (DMPs including subtelomeric and intrachromosomic regions, outside the classical ICF-related pericentromeric hypomethylated positions. Interestingly, these sites were mainly located in intergenic regions and inside the CpG islands. Among the identified hypomethylated CpG-island associated genes, we confirmed the overexpression of three selected genes, BOLL, SYCP2 and NCRNA00221, in ICF compared to healthy controls, which are supposed to be expressed in germ line and silenced in somatic tissues.In conclusion, this study contributes in clarifying the direct relationship between DNA methylation defect and gene expression impairment in ICF syndrome, identifying novel direct target genes of DNMT3B. A high percentage of the DMPs are located in the subtelomeric regions, indicating a specific role of DNMT3B in methylating these chromosomal sites. Therefore, we provide further evidence that hypomethylation in specific non-pericentromeric regions of chromosomes might be involved in the molecular pathogenesis of ICF syndrome. The detection of DNA hypomethylation at BOLL, SYCP2 and NCRNA00221 may pave the way for the development of specific

  3. [Ethical and legal principles for the activities of bioprospection in relation to human beings and the human genome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo Casabona, Carlos María

    2012-01-01

    During recent decades, bioprospecting has become an important field of research, which looks for development alternatives, entry into global (environmental) markets, and the subsequent obtention of benefits under sustainable development principles. However, there is still so much to discuss regarding the social and environmental impacts produced by this activity, as well as its main limitations. To this end, the Forum/round-table discussion, entitled "Bioprospección, Etica y Sociedad" was organised to take place on 28 March 2012 at the National University of Colombia. Its main objective was to enrich our knowledge on bioprospecting considering the ethical considerations that involve society. The presentation given by Professor ROMEO CASABONA, regarding the connection between bioprospecting and the human genome deserves special attention and is presented below.

  4. CLINICAL SURFACES -- Activity-Based Computing for Distributed Multi-Display Environments in Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Bunde-Pedersen, Jonathan; Doryab, Afsaneh

    2009-01-01

    and browsing of patient data on public displays. We present the design and implementation of CLINICAL SURFACES, and report from an evaluation of the system at a large hospital. The evaluation shows that using distributed public displays to support activity-based computing inside a hospital is very useful...... and activities that the MDE is being used for. This paper presents a novel approach to support activity-based computing in distributed MDEs, where displays are physically distributed across a large building. CLINICAL SURFACES was designed for clinical work in hospitals, and enables context-sensitive retrieval...... for clinical work, and that the apparent contradiction between maintaining privacy of medical data in a public display environment can be mitigated by the use of CLINICAL SURFACES....

  5. Antiasthmatic activity of Moringa oleifera Lam: A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Babita; Mehta, Anita

    2008-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the efficacy and safety of seed kernels of Moringa oleifera in the treatment of bronchial asthma. Twenty patients of either sex with mild-to-moderate asthma were given finely powdered dried seed kernels in dose of 3 g for 3 weeks. The clinical efficacy with respect to symptoms and respiratory functions were assessed using a spirometer prior to and at the end of the treatment. Hematological parameters were not changed markedly by treatment with M. oleifera. However, the majority of patients showed a significant increase in hemoglobin (Hb) values and Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was significantly reduced. Significant improvement was also observed in symptom score and severity of asthmatic attacks. Treatment with the drug for 3 weeks produced significant improvement in forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, and peak expiratory flow rate values by 32.97 ± 6.03%, 30.05 ± 8.12%, and 32.09 ± 11.75%, respectively, in asthmatic subjects. Improvement was also observed in % predicted values. None of the patients showed any adverse effects with M. oleifera. The results of the present study suggest the usefulness of M. oleifera seed kernel in patients of bronchial asthma.

  6. [Active acromegaly and gigantism: some clinical characteristics of 50 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumarino, H; Oviedo, S; Michelsen, H; Campino, C

    1991-08-01

    50 patients with autonomous growth hormone excess (48 with adult acromegaly and 2 with gigantism) were studied between 1966 to 1986 (2.38 pts/year). Characteristic clinical presentation, an increase in growth hormone (GH) uninhibited by glucose, and/or hyperphosphemia and hyperhydroxiprolinuria were present in all patients. No cases of hypercalcemia were recorded. Phosphemia was increased in 55.8%, alkaline phosphatases in 61.7%, calciuria in 26.9% and hydroxyprolinuria in 74.2% of the patients. Basal GH was over 5 ng/ml (89.9 DS +/- 170.9) in 42 pts, and in 37 was not suppressed after glucose administration, 38% had an increased (paradoxical response) and 62% a flat response (less than 50% change of basal values). TRH test was performed in 14 patients, 8 presented an increase in GH titer. Hyperprolactinemia was seen in 4 of 12 patients in whom this hormone was measured. The size of the sella turcica was increased in 93%, and although the larger sellar size correlated to higher levels of GH, correlation was not significant. 20% of the pts had rheumatological disease, 14% goiter, 12% cardiac disease, 26.5% had diastolic hypertension and 4% renal lithiasis (hypercalciuric pts). 38% had hyperglycemia with a diabetic glucose tolerance test and 18% had non-diabetic abnormal glucose tolerance test.

  7. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Amygdala Activation in Youths with and without Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinmin; Akula, Nirmala; Skup, Martha; Brotman, Melissa A.; Leibenluft, Ellen; McMahon, Francis J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Functional magnetic resonance imaging is commonly used to characterize brain activity underlying a variety of psychiatric disorders. A previous functional magnetic resonance imaging study found that amygdala activation during a face-processing task differed between pediatric patients with bipolar disorder (BD) and healthy controls. We…

  8. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Amygdala Activation in Youths with and without Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinmin; Akula, Nirmala; Skup, Martha; Brotman, Melissa A.; Leibenluft, Ellen; McMahon, Francis J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Functional magnetic resonance imaging is commonly used to characterize brain activity underlying a variety of psychiatric disorders. A previous functional magnetic resonance imaging study found that amygdala activation during a face-processing task differed between pediatric patients with bipolar disorder (BD) and healthy controls. We…

  9. Genome-wide analysis of PPAR Alpha activation in murine small intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bünger, M.; Bosch, van den H.M.; Meijde, van der J.; Kersten, A.H.; Hooiveld, G.J.E.J.; Müller, M.R.

    2007-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR) is a fatty acid-activated transcription factor that governs a variety of biological processes. Little is known about the role of PPAR in the small intestine. Since this organ is frequently exposed to high levels of PPAR ligands via the

  10. [Hyperprolactinemia and sexual activity of men--clinical aspect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medraś, Marek; Jankowska, Ewa Anita

    2004-03-01

    Hyperprolactinemia, particularly resulting from microprolactinoma, is known to induce erectile dysfunction. Contemporary published data do not allow to ascertain which prolactin (PRL) levels result in this type of sexual dysfunctions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the extent of hyperprolactinemia and erectile dysfunction in 9 men with microprolactinoma and 8 patients with hyperprolactinemia as side-effects of sulpiride therapy. In all hyperprolactinemic males plasma PRL, LH, FSH and total testosterone levels were measured. The results showed that all patients with iatrogenic hyperprolactinemia were characterised by satisfactory sexual activity, although in 3 men hypotestosteronemia was revealed and in one patient gynecomastia was found. A range of PRL levels was 35-108 ng/ml. Among men with microprolactinoma the capability to lead a satisfactory sexual activity existed, even though in one patient PRL level was 2177 ng/ml, but in 3 other patients importance was observed when PRL concentrations were 281, 195 and 328 ng/ml. After bromocriptine therapy, when PRL levels diminished until 189, 78.3 and 110 ng/ml, the erectile dysfunction disappeared. Authors presume that sexual dysfunctions are not strictly connected with hyperprolactinemia and/or hypotestosterionemia, but probably are conditioned by other unexplicit factors (for example: a heterogeneous structure of PRL complexes).

  11. HTLV-1 integration into transcriptionally active genomic regions is associated with proviral expression and with HAM/TSP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran N Meekings

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 causes leukaemia or chronic inflammatory disease in approximately 5% of infected hosts. The level of proviral expression of HTLV-1 differs significantly among infected people, even at the same proviral load (proportion of infected mononuclear cells in the circulation. A high level of expression of the HTLV-1 provirus is associated with a high proviral load and a high risk of the inflammatory disease of the central nervous system known as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. But the factors that control the rate of HTLV-1 proviral expression remain unknown. Here we show that proviral integration sites of HTLV-1 in vivo are not randomly distributed within the human genome but are associated with transcriptionally active regions. Comparison of proviral integration sites between individuals with high and low levels of proviral expression, and between provirus-expressing and provirus non-expressing cells from within an individual, demonstrated that frequent integration into transcription units was associated with an increased rate of proviral expression. An increased frequency of integration sites in transcription units in individuals with high proviral expression was also associated with the inflammatory disease HAM/TSP. By comparing the distribution of integration sites in human lymphocytes infected in short-term cell culture with those from persistent infection in vivo, we infer the action of two selective forces that shape the distribution of integration sites in vivo: positive selection for cells containing proviral integration sites in transcriptionally active regions of the genome, and negative selection against cells with proviral integration sites within transcription units.

  12. Whole-genome sequencing for identification of Mendelian disorders in critically ill infants: a retrospective analysis of diagnostic and clinical findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willig, Laurel K; Petrikin, Josh E; Smith, Laurie D; Saunders, Carol J; Thiffault, Isabelle; Miller, Neil A; Soden, Sarah E; Cakici, Julie A; Herd, Suzanne M; Twist, Greyson; Noll, Aaron; Creed, Mitchell; Alba, Patria M; Carpenter, Shannon L; Clements, Mark A; Fischer, Ryan T; Hays, J Allyson; Kilbride, Howard; McDonough, Ryan J; Rosterman, Jamie L; Tsai, Sarah L; Zellmer, Lee; Farrow, Emily G; Kingsmore, Stephen F

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Genetic disorders and congenital anomalies are the leading causes of infant mortality. Diagnosis of most genetic diseases in neonatal and paediatric intensive care units (NICU and PICU) is not sufficiently timely to guide acute clinical management. We used rapid whole-genome sequencing (STATseq) in a level 4 NICU and PICU to assess the rate and types of molecular diagnoses, and the prevalence, types, and effect of diagnoses that are likely to change medical management in critically ill infants. Methods We did a retrospective comparison of STATseq and standard genetic testing in a case series from the NICU and PICU of a large children's hospital between Nov 11, 2011, and Oct 1, 2014. The participants were families with an infant younger than 4 months with an acute illness of suspected genetic cause. The intervention was STATseq of trios (both parents and their affected infant). The main measures were the diagnostic rate, time to diagnosis, and rate of change in management after standard genetic testing and STATseq. Findings 20 (57%) of 35 infants were diagnosed with a genetic disease by use of STATseq and three (9%) of 32 by use of standard genetic testing (p=0·0002). Median time to genome analysis was 5 days (range 3–153) and median time to STATseq report was 23 days (5–912). 13 (65%) of 20 STATseq diagnoses were associated with de-novo mutations. Acute clinical usefulness was noted in 13 (65%) of 20 infants with a STATseq diagnosis, four (20%) had diagnoses with strongly favourable effects on management, and six (30%) were started on palliative care. 120-day mortality was 57% (12 of 21) in infants with a genetic diagnosis. Interpretation In selected acutely ill infants, STATseq had a high rate of diagnosis of genetic disorders. Most diagnoses altered the management of infants in the NICU or PICU. The very high infant mortality rate indicates a substantial need for rapid genomic diagnoses to be allied with a novel framework for precision

  13. Reductions in disease activity in the AMPLE trial: clinical response by baseline disease duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, Michael; Weinblatt, Michael E; Valente, Robert; Citera, Gustavo; Maldonado, Michael; Massarotti, Elena; Yazici, Yusuf; Fleischmann, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate clinical response by baseline disease duration using 2-year data from the AMPLE trial. Methods Patients were randomised to subcutaneous abatacept 125 mg weekly or adalimumab 40 mg bi-weekly, with background methotrexate. As part of a post hoc analysis, the achievement of validated definitions of remission (Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI) ≤2.8, Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI) ≤3.3, Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data 3 (RAPID3) ≤3.0, Boolean score ≤1), low disease activity (CDAI 6 months). Disease Activity Score 28 (C-reactive protein) 6 months) across multiple clinical measures. Conclusions Abatacept or adalimumab with background methotrexate were associated with similar onset and sustainability of response over 2 years. Patients treated early or later in the disease course achieved comparable clinical responses. Trial registration number NCT00929864, Post-results. PMID:27110385

  14. A computational method for clinically relevant cancer stratification and driver mutation module discovery using personal genomics profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Li, Fuhai; Sheng, Jianting; Wong, Stephen T C

    2015-01-01

    Personalized genomics instability, e.g., somatic mutations, is believed to contribute to the heterogeneous drug responses in patient cohorts. However, it is difficult to discover personalized driver mutations that are predictive of drug sensitivity owing to diverse and complex mutations of individual patients. To circumvent this problem, a novel computational method is presented to discover potential drug sensitivity relevant cancer subtypes and identify driver mutation modules of individual subtypes by coupling differentially expressed genes (DEGs) based subtyping analysis with the driver mutation network analysis. The proposed method was applied to breast cancer and lung cancer samples available from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Cancer subtypes were uncovered with significantly different survival rates, and more interestingly, distinct driver mutation modules were also discovered among different subtypes, indicating the potential mechanism of heterogeneous drug sensitivity. The research findings can be used to help guide the repurposing of known drugs and their combinations in order to target these dysfunctional modules and their downstream signaling effectively for achieving personalized or precision medicine treatment.

  15. Implementation of High Resolution Whole Genome Array CGH in the Prenatal Clinical Setting: Advantages, Challenges, and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Evangelidou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization analysis is replacing postnatal chromosomal analysis in cases of intellectual disabilities, and it has been postulated that it might also become the first-tier test in prenatal diagnosis. In this study, array CGH was applied in 64 prenatal samples with whole genome oligonucleotide arrays (BlueGnome, Ltd. on DNA extracted from chorionic villi, amniotic fluid, foetal blood, and skin samples. Results were confirmed with Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization or Real-Time PCR. Fifty-three cases had normal karyotype and abnormal ultrasound findings, and seven samples had balanced rearrangements, five of which also had ultrasound findings. The value of array CGH in the characterization of previously known aberrations in five samples is also presented. Seventeen out of 64 samples carried copy number alterations giving a detection rate of 26.5%. Ten of these represent benign or variables of unknown significance, giving a diagnostic capacity of the method to be 10.9%. If karyotype is performed the additional diagnostic capacity of the method is 5.1% (3/59. This study indicates the ability of array CGH to identify chromosomal abnormalities which cannot be detected during routine prenatal cytogenetic analysis, therefore increasing the overall detection rate. In addition a thorough review of the literature is presented.

  16. Potential impacts of aquatic pollutants: Sub-clinical antibiotic concentrations induce genome changes and promote antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise eChow

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are disseminated into aquatic environments via human waste streams and agricultural run-off. Here they can persist at low, but biologically relevant, concentrations. Antibiotic pollution establishes a selection gradient for resistance and may also raise the frequency of events that generate resistance: point mutations; recombination; and lateral gene transfer. This study examined the response of bacteria to sub-inhibitory levels of antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas protegens were exposed kanamycin, tetracycline or ciprofloxacin at 1/10 the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC in a serial streaking experiment over 40 passages. Significant changes in rep-PCR fingerprints were noted in both species when exposed to sub-inhibitory antibiotic concentrations. These changes were observed in as few as five passages, despite the fact that the protocols used sample less than 0.3% of the genome, in turn suggesting much more widespread alterations to sequence and genome architecture. Experimental lines also displayed variant colony morphologies. The final MICs were significantly higher in some experimental lineages of Ps. protegens, suggesting that 1/10 the MIC induces de-novo mutation events that generate resistance phenotypes. The implications of these results are clear: exposure of the environmental microbiome to antibiotic pollution will induce similar changes, including generating newly resistant species that may be of

  17. Phenotypic, molecular characterization, antimicrobial susceptibility and draft genome sequence of Corynebacterium argentoratense strains isolated from clinical samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Fernández-Natal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available During a 12-year period we isolated five Corynebacterium argentoratense strains identified by phenotypic methods, including the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. In addition, antimicrobial susceptibility was determined, and genome sequencing for the detection of antibiotic resistance genes was performed. The organisms were isolated from blood and throat cultures and could be identified by all methods used. All strains were resistant to cotrimoxazole, and resistance to β-lactams was partly present. Two strains were resistant to erythromycin and clindamycin. The draft genome sequences of theses isolates revealed the presence of the erm(X resistance gene that is embedded in the genetic structure of the transposable element Tn5423. Although rarely reported as a human pathogen, C. argentoratense can be involved in bacteraemia and probably in other infections. Our results also show that horizontal transfer of genes responsible for antibiotic resistance is occurring in this species.

  18. Regulation of selected genome loci using de novo-engineered transcription activator-like effector (TALE)-type transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbitzer, Robert; Römer, Patrick; Boch, Jens; Lahaye, Thomas

    2010-12-14

    Proteins that can be tailored to bind desired DNA sequences are key tools for molecular biology. Previous studies suggested that DNA-binding specificity of transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) from the bacterial genus Xanthomonas is defined by repeat-variable diresidues (RVDs) of tandem-arranged 34/35-amino acid repeat units. We have studied chimeras of two TALEs differing in RVDs and non-RVDs and found that, in contrast to the critical contributions by RVDs, non-RVDs had no major effect on the DNA-binding specificity of the chimeras. This finding suggests that one needs only to modify the RVDs to generate designer TALEs (dTALEs) to activate transcription of user-defined target genes. We used the scaffold of the TALE AvrBs3 and changed its RVDs to match either the tomato Bs4, the Arabidopsis EGL3, or the Arabidopsis KNAT1 promoter. All three dTALEs transcriptionally activated the desired promoters in a sequence-specific manner as mutations within the targeted DNA sequences abolished promoter activation. This study is unique in showing that chromosomal loci can be targeted specifically by dTALEs. We also engineered two AvrBs3 derivatives with four additional repeat units activating specifically either the pepper Bs3 or UPA20 promoter. Because AvrBs3 activates both promoters, our data show that addition of repeat units facilitates TALE-specificity fine-tuning. Finally, we demonstrate that the RVD NK mediates specific interaction with G nucleotides that thus far could not be targeted specifically by any known RVD type. In summary, our data demonstrate that the TALE scaffold can be tailored to target user-defined DNA sequences in whole genomes.

  19. Is gene activity in plant cells affected by UMTS-irradiation? A whole genome approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia C Engelmann

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Julia C Engelmann3,* Rosalia Deeken1,* Tobias Müller3, Günter Nimtz2, M Rob G Roelfsema1, Rainer Hedrich11Molecular Plant Physiology and Biophysics, Julius-von-Sachs Institute for Biosciences; 2Institute of Physics II, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 3Department of Bioinformatics, Biocenter, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany; *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Mobile phone technology makes use of radio frequency (RF electromagnetic fields transmitted through a dense network of base stations in Europe. Possible harmful effects of RF fields on humans and animals are discussed, but their effect on plants has received little attention. In search for physiological processes of plant cells sensitive to RF fields, cell suspension cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana were exposed for 24 h to a RF field protocol representing typical microwave exposition in an urban environment. mRNA of exposed cultures and controls was used to hybridize Affymetrix-ATH1 whole genome microarrays. Differential expression analysis revealed significant changes in transcription of 10 genes, but they did not exceed a fold change of 2.5. Besides that 3 of them are dark-inducible, their functions do not point to any known responses of plants to environmental stimuli. The changes in transcription of these genes were compared with published microarray datasets and revealed a weak similarity of the microwave to light treatment experiments. Considering the large changes described in published experiments, it is questionable if the small alterations caused by a 24 h continuous microwave exposure would have any impact on the growth and reproduction of whole plants.Keywords: suspension cultured plant cells, radio frequency electromagnetic fields, microarrays, Arabidopsis thaliana

  20. Overexpression of Elafin in Ovarian Carcinoma Is Driven by Genomic Gains and Activation of the Nuclear Factor κB Pathway and Is Associated with Poor Overall Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Clauss

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is a leading cause of cancer mortality in women. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether whey acidic protein (WAP genes on chromosome 20q13.12, a region frequently amplified in this cancer, are expressed in serous carcinoma, the most common form of the disease. Herein, we report that a trio of WAP genes (HE4, SLPI, and Elafin is overexpressed and secreted by serous ovarian carcinomas. To our knowledge, this is the first report linking Elafin to ovarian cancer. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of primary tumors demonstrates genomic gains of the Elafin locus in a majority of cases. In addition, a combination of peptidomimetics, RNA interference, and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments shows that Elafin expression can be transcriptionally upregulated by inflammatory cytokines through activation of the nuclear factor κB pathway. Importantly, using a clinically annotated tissue microarray composed of late-stage, high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas, we show that Elafin expression correlates with poor overall survival. These results, combined with our observation that Elafin is secreted by ovarian tumors and is minimally expressed in normal tissues, suggest that Elafin may serve as a determinant of poor survival in this disease.

  1. Genomic sequence of bacteriophage ATCC 8074-B1 and activity of its endolysin and engineered variants against Clostridium sporogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Melinda J; Gasson, Michael J; Narbad, Arjan

    2012-05-01

    Lytic bacteriophage ATCC 8074-B1 produces large plaques on its host Clostridium sporogenes. Sequencing of the 47,595-bp genome allowed the identification of 82 putative open reading frames, including those encoding proteins for head and tail morphogenesis and lysis. However, sequences commonly associated with lysogeny were absent. ORF 22 encodes an endolysin, CS74L, that shows homology to N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidases, and when expressed in Escherichia coli, the protein causes effective lysis of C. sporogenes cells when added externally. CS74L was also active on Clostridium tyrobutyricum and Clostridium acetobutylicum. The catalytic domain expressed alone (CS74L(1-177)) exhibited a similar activity and the same host range as the full-length endolysin. A chimeric endolysin consisting of the CS74L catalytic domain fused to the C-terminal domain of endolysin CD27L, derived from Clostridium difficile bacteriophage ΦCD27, was produced. This chimera (CSCD) lysed C. sporogenes cells with an activity equivalent to that of the catalytic domain alone. In contrast, the CD27L C-terminal domain reduced the efficacy of the CS74L catalytic domain when tested against C. tyrobutyricum. The addition of the CD27L C-terminal domain did not enable the lysin to target C. difficile or other CD27L-sensitive bacteria.

  2. Motor activation SPECT for the neurosurgical diseases. Clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Shoichiro; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Imai, Teruhiko; Ohishi, Hajime [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    We evaluated and analyzed the motor activation single photon emission computed tomography (M-SPECT) findings on patients with ischemic cerebrovascular diseases (CVD). The M-SPECT studies were carried out on 91 patients with ischemic cerebrovascular diseases. The M-SPECT study was performed using the finger opposition task in each case. The SPECT images were superimposed on the magnetic resonance images (MRIs) for each case using Image Fusion Software. The result of the M-SPECT was expressed as positive or negative. The cases with a marked increase of blood flow in the sensorio-motor cortex after the finger opposition task were categorized as positive, and those cases showing no marked increase of blood flow were categorized as negative. Among the 91 cases examined, 53 (58%) were categorized as positive in the M-SPECT study. Among the negative M-SPECT cases treated with revascularization surgery, there were some cases showing positive M-SPECT results postoperatively. The cases without any revascularization surgery did not change the M-SPECT findings in each during the follow-up period. The M-SPECT procedure for examining intracranial lesions could provide the cortical localization of the motor function. The M-SPECT procedure in the ischemic CVDs contributes to knowledge about the choices of treatment and the evaluation of the treatment result. (author)

  3. Comprehensive genomic analysis reveals FLT3 activation and a therapeutic strategy for a patient with relapsed adult B-lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Malachi; Griffith, Obi L; Krysiak, Kilannin; Skidmore, Zachary L; Christopher, Matthew J; Klco, Jeffery M; Ramu, Avinash; Lamprecht, Tamara L; Wagner, Alex H; Campbell, Katie M; Lesurf, Robert; Hundal, Jasreet; Zhang, Jin; Spies, Nicholas C; Ainscough, Benjamin J; Larson, David E; Heath, Sharon E; Fronick, Catrina; O'Laughlin, Shelly; Fulton, Robert S; Magrini, Vincent; McGrath, Sean; Smith, Scott M; Miller, Christopher A; Maher, Christopher A; Payton, Jacqueline E; Walker, Jason R; Eldred, James M; Walter, Matthew J; Link, Daniel C; Graubert, Timothy A; Westervelt, Peter; Kulkarni, Shashikant; DiPersio, John F; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Ley, Timothy J

    2016-07-01

    The genomic events responsible for the pathogenesis of relapsed adult B-lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) are not yet clear. We performed integrative analysis of whole-genome, whole-exome, custom capture, whole-transcriptome (RNA-seq), and locus-specific genomic assays across nine time points from a patient with primary de novo B-ALL. Comprehensive genome and transcriptome characterization revealed a dramatic tumor evolution during progression, yielding a tumor with complex clonal architecture at second relapse. We observed and validated point mutations in EP300 and NF1, a highly expressed EP300-ZNF384 gene fusion, a microdeletion in IKZF1, a focal deletion affecting SETD2, and large deletions affecting RB1, PAX5, NF1, and ETV6. Although the genome analysis revealed events of potential biological relevance, no clinically actionable treatment options were evident at the time of the second relapse. However, transcriptome analysis identified aberrant overexpression of the targetable protein kinase encoded by the FLT3 gene. Although the patient had refractory disease after salvage therapy for the second relapse, treatment with the FLT3 inhibitor sunitinib rapidly induced a near complete molecular response, permitting the patient to proceed to a matched-unrelated donor stem cell transplantation. The patient remains in complete remission more than 4 years later. Analysis of this patient's relapse genome revealed an unexpected, actionable therapeutic target that led to a specific therapy associated with a rapid clinical response. For some patients with relapsed or refractory cancers, this approach may indicate a novel therapeutic intervention that could alter outcome.

  4. Characterization of clinically-attenuated Burkholderia mallei by whole genome sequencing: candidate strain for exclusion from Select Agent lists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven E Schutzer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Burkholderia mallei is an understudied biothreat agent responsible for glanders which can be lethal in humans and animals. Research with this pathogen has been hampered in part by constraints of Select Agent regulations for safety reasons. Whole genomic sequencing (WGS is an apt approach to characterize newly discovered or poorly understood microbial pathogens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed WGS on a strain of B. mallei, SAVP1, previously pathogenic, that was experimentally infected in 6 equids (4 ponies, 1 mule, 1 donkey, natural hosts, for purposes of producing antibodies. Multiple high inocula were used in some cases. Unexpectedly SAVP1 appeared to be avirulent in the ponies and mule, and attenuated in the donkey, but induced antibodies. We determined the genome sequence of SAVP1 and compared it to a strain that was virulent in horses and a human. In comparison, this phenotypic avirulent SAVP1 strain was missing multiple genes including all the animal type III secretory system (T3SS complex of genes demonstrated to be essential for virulence in mice and hamster models. The loss of these genes in the SAVP1 strain appears to be the consequence of a multiple gene deletion across insertion sequence (IS elements in the B. mallei genome. Therefore, the strain by itself is unlikely to revert naturally to its virulent phenotype. There were other genes present in one strain and not the other and vice-versa. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The discovery that this strain of B. mallei was both avirulent in the natural host ponies, and did not possess T3SS associated genes may be fortuitous to advance biodefense research. The deleted virulence-essential T3SS is not likely to be re-acquired naturally. These findings may provide a basis for exclusion of SAVP1 from the Select Agent regulation or at least discussion of what else would be required for exclusion. This exclusion could accelerate research by investigators not possessing BSL-3

  5. Clinical, polysomnographic and genome-wide association analyses of narcolepsy with cataplexy: a European Narcolepsy Network study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luca, G. De; Haba-Rubio, J; Dauvilliers, Y; Lammers, G.J; Overeem, S; Donjacour, C.E; Mayer, G; Javidi, S; Iranzo, A; Santamaria, J; Peraita-Aados, R; Hor, H; Kutalik, Z; Plazzi, G; Poli, F; Pizza, F; Arnulf, I; Leceneux, M; Bassetti, C; Mathis, J; Heinzer, R; Jennum, P; Knudsen, S; Geisler, P; Wierzbicka, A; Feketeova, E; Pfister, C; Khatami, R; Baumann, C; Tafti, M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the clinical and PSG characteristics of narcolepsy with cataplexy and their genetic predisposition by using the retrospective patient database of the European Narcolepsy Network (EU-NN...

  6. Whole-exome/genome sequencing and genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grody, Wayne W; Thompson, Barry H; Hudgins, Louanne

    2013-12-01

    As medical genetics has progressed from a descriptive entity to one focused on the functional relationship between genes and clinical disorders, emphasis has been placed on genomics. Genomics, a subelement of genetics, is the study of the genome, the sum total of all the genes of an organism. The human genome, which is contained in the 23 pairs of nuclear chromosomes and in the mitochondrial DNA of each cell, comprises >6 billion nucleotides of genetic code. There are some 23,000 protein-coding genes, a surprisingly small fraction of the total genetic material, with the remainder composed of noncoding DNA, regulatory sequences, and introns. The Human Genome Project, launched in 1990, produced a draft of the genome in 2001 and then a finished sequence in 2003, on the 50th anniversary of the initial publication of Watson and Crick's paper on the double-helical structure of DNA. Since then, this mass of genetic information has been translated at an ever-increasing pace into useable knowledge applicable to clinical medicine. The recent advent of massively parallel DNA sequencing (also known as shotgun, high-throughput, and next-generation sequencing) has brought whole-genome analysis into the clinic for the first time, and most of the current applications are directed at children with congenital conditions that are undiagnosable by using standard genetic tests for single-gene disorders. Thus, pediatricians must become familiar with this technology, what it can and cannot offer, and its technical and ethical challenges. Here, we address the concepts of human genomic analysis and its clinical applicability for primary care providers.

  7. A Global Genomic Screening Strategy Reveals Genetic and Chemical Activators ofPeroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor alpha (PPARalpha)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A comprehensive survey of chemical, diet and genetic perturbations that activate PPARalpha in the mouse liver has not been carried out but would be useful to identify the factors that may contribute to PPARalpha-dependent liver tumors. A gene signature dependent on PPARalpha ac...

  8. Genome-wide association studies: results from the first few years and potential implications for clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschhorn, Joel N; Gajdos, Zofia K Z

    2011-01-01

    Most common diseases and quantitative traits are heritable: determined in part by genetic variation within the population. The inheritance is typically polygenic in that combined effects of variants in numerous genes, plus nongenetic factors, determine outcome. The genes influencing common disease and quantitative traits remained largely unknown until the implementation in 2006 of genome-wide association (GWA) studies that comprehensively surveyed common genetic variation (frequency>5%). By 2010, GWA studies identified>1,000 genetic variants for polygenic traits. Typically, these variants together account for a modest fraction (10%-30%) of heritability, but they have highlighted genes in both known and new biological pathways and genes of unknown function. This initial effort prefigures new studies aimed at rarer variation and decades of functional work to decipher newly glimpsed biology. The greatest impact of GWA studies may not be in predictive medicine but rather in the development over the next decades of therapies based on novel biological insights.

  9. Regulatory genomic regions active in immune cell types explain a large proportion of the genetic risk of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangovan, Ramyiadarsini I; Disanto, Giulio; Berlanga-Taylor, Antonio J; Ramagopalan, Sreeram V; Handunnetthi, Lahiru

    2014-04-01

    There is little understanding of how genetic variants discovered in recent genome-wide association studies are involved in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). We aimed to investigate which chromatin states and cell types explain genetic risk in MS. We used genotype data from 1854 MS patients and 5164 controls produced by the International Multiple Sclerosis Genetics Consortium and Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. We estimated the proportion of phenotypic variance between cases and controls explained by cell-specific chromatin state and DNase I hypersensitivity sites (DHSs) using the Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis software. A large proportion of variance was explained by single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in strong enhancer (SE) elements of immortalized B lymphocytes (5.39%). Three independent SNPs located within SE showed suggestive evidence of association with MS: rs12928822 (odds ratio (OR)=0.81, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.73-0.89, P=2.48E-05), rs727263 (OR=0.75, 95% CI=0.66-0.85, P=3.26E-06) and rs4674923 (OR=0.85, 95% CI=0.79-0.92, P=1.63E-05). Genetic variants located within DHSs of CD19+ B cells explained the greatest proportion of variance. Genetic variants influencing the risk of MS are located within regulatory elements active in immune cells. This study also identifies a number of immune cell types likely to be involved in the causal cascade and that carry important implications for future studies of therapeutic design.

  10. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure on genomic expression profiling of porcine parthenogenetic activated and cloned embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Lin; Luo, Yonglun; Sørensen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Handmade cloning (HMC) has been used to generate transgenic pigs for biomedical research. Recently, we found that parthenogenetic activation (PA) of porcine oocytes and improved HMC efficiency could be achieved by treatment with sublethal high hydrostatic pressure (HHP). However, the molecular...

  11. Functionally Charged Polystyrene Particles Activate Immortalized Mouse Microglia (BV2): Cellular and Genomic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of particle surface charge on the biological activation of immortalized mouse microglia (BV2) was examined. Same size (~850-950 nm) spherical polystyrene microparticles (SPM) with net negative (carboxyl, COOH-) or positive (dimethyl amino, CH3)2

  12. Genomics of oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Margaret J

    2003-01-01

    Advances in bacterial genetics came with the discovery of the genetic code, followed by the development of recombinant DNA technologies. Now the field is undergoing a new revolution because of investigators' ability to sequence and assemble complete bacterial genomes. Over 200 genome projects have been completed or are in progress, and the oral microbiology research community has benefited through projects for oral bacteria and their non-oral-pathogen relatives. This review describes features of several oral bacterial genomes, and emphasizes the themes of species relationships, comparative genomics, and lateral gene transfer. Genomics is having a broad impact on basic research in microbial pathogenesis, and will lead to new approaches in clinical research and therapeutics. The oral microbiota is a unique community especially suited for new challenges to sequence the metagenomes of microbial consortia, and the genomes of uncultivable bacteria.

  13. Complete genome sequence of Pseudoalteromononas piscicida strain DE2-B, a bacterium with broad inhibitory activity toward human and fish pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudoalteromonas piscicida strain DE2-B is a halophilic bacterium which has broad inhibitory activity toward vibrios and other human and fish pathogens. We report the first closed genome sequence for this species which consists of two chromosomes (4,128,210 and 1,188,838 bp). Annotation revealed ...

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis BSn5, an Endophytic Bacterium of Amorphophallus konjac with Antimicrobial Activity for the Plant Pathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Yun; Zhu, Yiguang; Wang, Pengxia; Zhu, Lei; Zheng, Jinshui; Li, Rong; Ruan, Lifang; Peng, Donghai; Sun, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Here, we present the complete genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis strain BSn5, isolated from Amorphophallus konjac calli tissue and showing strong inhibitory activity to Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora, which causes Amorphophallus soft rot disease and affects the industry development of this organism.

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis BSn5, an Endophytic Bacterium of Amorphophallus konjac with Antimicrobial Activity for the Plant Pathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yun; Zhu, Yiguang; Wang, Pengxia; Zhu, Lei; Zheng, Jinshui; Li, Rong; Ruan, Lifang; Peng, Donghai; Sun, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Here, we present the complete genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis strain BSn5, isolated from Amorphophallus konjac calli tissue and showing strong inhibitory activity to Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora, which causes Amorphophallus soft rot disease and affects the industry development of this organism. PMID:21317323

  16. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis BSn5, an endophytic bacterium of Amorphophallus konjac with antimicrobial activity for the plant pathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yun; Zhu, Yiguang; Wang, Pengxia; Zhu, Lei; Zheng, Jinshui; Li, Rong; Ruan, Lifang; Peng, Donghai; Sun, Ming

    2011-04-01

    Here, we present the complete genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis strain BSn5, isolated from Amorphophallus konjac calli tissue and showing strong inhibitory activity to Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora, which causes Amorphophallus soft rot disease and affects the industry development of this organism.

  17. In Situ Expression of Acidic and Thermophilic Carbohydrate Active Enzymes by Filamentous Fungi (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosier, Annika [Stanford University

    2012-03-22

    Annika Mosier, graduate student from Stanford University presents a talk titled "In Situ Expression of Acidic and Thermophilic Carbohydrate Active Enzymes by Filamentous Fungi" at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

  18. Stress activation and genomic impact of Tnt1 retrotransposons in Solanaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandbastien, M-A; Audeon, C; Bonnivard, E; Casacuberta, J M; Chalhoub, B; Costa, A-P P; Le, Q H; Melayah, D; Petit, M; Poncet, C; Tam, S M; Van Sluys, M-A; Mhiri, C

    2005-01-01

    Tnt1 elements are a superfamily of LTR-retrotransposons distributed in the Solanaceae plant family and represent good model systems for studying regulatory and evolutionary controls established between hosts and transposable elements. Tnt1 retrotransposons tightly control their activation, by restricting expression to specific conditions. The Tnt1A element, originally discovered in tobacco, is expressed in response to stress, and its activation by microbial factors is followed by amplification, demonstrating that factors of pathogen origin can generate genetic diversity in plants. The Tnt1A promoter has the potential to be activated by various biotic and abiotic stimuli but a number of these are specifically repressed in tobacco and are revealed only when the LTR promoter is placed in a heterologous context. We propose that a tobacco- and stimulus-specific repression has been established in order to minimize activation in conditions that might generate germinal transposition. In addition to tight transcriptional controls, Tnt1A retrotransposons self-regulate their activity through gradual generation of defective copies that have reduced transcriptional activity. Tnt1 retrotransposons found in various Solanaceae species are characterized by a high level of variability in the LTR sequences involved in transcription, and have evolved by gaining new expression patterns, mostly associated with responses to diverse stress conditions. Tnt1A insertions associated with genic regions are initi