WorldWideScience

Sample records for genome-scale promoter mapping

  1. A genomic scale map of genetic diversity in Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ackermann Alejandro A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas Disease, affects more than 16 million people in Latin America. The clinical outcome of the disease results from a complex interplay between environmental factors and the genetic background of both the human host and the parasite. However, knowledge of the genetic diversity of the parasite, is currently limited to a number of highly studied loci. The availability of a number of genomes from different evolutionary lineages of T. cruzi provides an unprecedented opportunity to look at the genetic diversity of the parasite at a genomic scale. Results Using a bioinformatic strategy, we have clustered T. cruzi sequence data available in the public domain and obtained multiple sequence alignments in which one or two alleles from the reference CL-Brener were included. These data covers 4 major evolutionary lineages (DTUs: TcI, TcII, TcIII, and the hybrid TcVI. Using these set of alignments we have identified 288,957 high quality single nucleotide polymorphisms and 1,480 indels. In a reduced re-sequencing study we were able to validate ~ 97% of high-quality SNPs identified in 47 loci. Analysis of how these changes affect encoded protein products showed a 0.77 ratio of synonymous to non-synonymous changes in the T. cruzi genome. We observed 113 changes that introduce or remove a stop codon, some causing significant functional changes, and a number of tri-allelic and tetra-allelic SNPs that could be exploited in strain typing assays. Based on an analysis of the observed nucleotide diversity we show that the T. cruzi genome contains a core set of genes that are under apparent purifying selection. Interestingly, orthologs of known druggable targets show statistically significant lower nucleotide diversity values. Conclusions This study provides the first look at the genetic diversity of T. cruzi at a genomic scale. The analysis covers an estimated ~ 60% of the genetic diversity present in the

  2. Construction of an E. Coli genome-scale atom mapping model for MFA calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikirthi, Prabhasa; Suthers, Patrick F; Maranas, Costas D

    2011-06-01

    Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) has so far been restricted to lumped networks lacking many important pathways, partly due to the difficulty in automatically generating isotope mapping matrices for genome-scale metabolic networks. Here we introduce a procedure that uses a compound matching algorithm based on the graph theoretical concept of pattern recognition along with relevant reaction information to automatically generate genome-scale atom mappings which trace the path of atoms from reactants to products for every reaction. The procedure is applied to the iAF1260 metabolic reconstruction of Escherichia coli yielding the genome-scale isotope mapping model imPR90068. This model maps 90,068 non-hydrogen atoms that span all 2,077 reactions present in iAF1260 (previous largest mapping model included 238 reactions). The expanded scope of the isotope mapping model allows the complete tracking of labeled atoms through pathways such as cofactor and prosthetic group biosynthesis and histidine metabolism. An EMU representation of imPR90068 is also constructed and made available.

  3. MapMaker and PathTracer for tracking carbon in genome-scale metabolic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervo, Christopher J; Reed, Jennifer L

    2016-05-01

    Constraint-based reconstruction and analysis (COBRA) modeling results can be difficult to interpret given the large numbers of reactions in genome-scale models. While paths in metabolic networks can be found, existing methods are not easily combined with constraint-based approaches. To address this limitation, two tools (MapMaker and PathTracer) were developed to find paths (including cycles) between metabolites, where each step transfers carbon from reactant to product. MapMaker predicts carbon transfer maps (CTMs) between metabolites using only information on molecular formulae and reaction stoichiometry, effectively determining which reactants and products share carbon atoms. MapMaker correctly assigned CTMs for over 97% of the 2,251 reactions in an Escherichia coli metabolic model (iJO1366). Using CTMs as inputs, PathTracer finds paths between two metabolites. PathTracer was applied to iJO1366 to investigate the importance of using CTMs and COBRA constraints when enumerating paths, to find active and high flux paths in flux balance analysis (FBA) solutions, to identify paths for putrescine utilization, and to elucidate a potential CO2 fixation pathway in E. coli. These results illustrate how MapMaker and PathTracer can be used in combination with constraint-based models to identify feasible, active, and high flux paths between metabolites.

  4. Mapping condition-dependent regulation of metabolism in yeast through genome-scale modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Österlund, Tobias; Nookaew, Intawat; Bordel, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The genome-scale metabolic model of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, first presented in 2003, was the first genome-scale network reconstruction for a eukaryotic organism. Since then continuous efforts have been made in order to improve and expand the yeast metabolic network. RESULTS......: Here we present iTO977, a comprehensive genome-scale metabolic model that contains more reactions, metabolites and genes than previous models. The model was constructed based on two earlier reconstructions, namely iIN800 and the consensus network, and then improved and expanded using gap......-filling methods and by introducing new reactions and pathways based on studies of the literature and databases. The model was shown to perform well both for growth simulations in different media and gene essentiality analysis for single and double knock-outs. Further, the model was used as a scaffold...

  5. Genome-Scale Mapping of Escherichia coli σ54 Reveals Widespread, Conserved Intragenic Binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P Bonocora

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial RNA polymerases must associate with a σ factor to bind promoter DNA and initiate transcription. There are two families of σ factor: the σ70 family and the σ54 family. Members of the σ54 family are distinct in their ability to bind promoter DNA sequences, in the context of RNA polymerase holoenzyme, in a transcriptionally inactive state. Here, we map the genome-wide association of Escherichia coli σ54, the archetypal member of the σ54 family. Thus, we vastly expand the list of known σ54 binding sites to 135. Moreover, we estimate that there are more than 250 σ54 sites in total. Strikingly, the majority of σ54 binding sites are located inside genes. The location and orientation of intragenic σ54 binding sites is non-random, and many intragenic σ54 binding sites are conserved. We conclude that many intragenic σ54 binding sites are likely to be functional. Consistent with this assertion, we identify three conserved, intragenic σ54 promoters that drive transcription of mRNAs with unusually long 5' UTRs.

  6. Genome-Scale Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergdahl, Basti; Sonnenschein, Nikolaus; Machado, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    An introduction to genome-scale models, how to build and use them, will be given in this chapter. Genome-scale models have become an important part of systems biology and metabolic engineering, and are increasingly used in research, both in academica and in industry, both for modeling chemical pr...

  7. Genome-scale regression analysis reveals a linear relationship for promoters and enhancers after combinatorial drug treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Rapakoulia, Trisevgeni

    2017-08-09

    Motivation: Drug combination therapy for treatment of cancers and other multifactorial diseases has the potential of increasing the therapeutic effect, while reducing the likelihood of drug resistance. In order to reduce time and cost spent in comprehensive screens, methods are needed which can model additive effects of possible drug combinations. Results: We here show that the transcriptional response to combinatorial drug treatment at promoters, as measured by single molecule CAGE technology, is accurately described by a linear combination of the responses of the individual drugs at a genome wide scale. We also find that the same linear relationship holds for transcription at enhancer elements. We conclude that the described approach is promising for eliciting the transcriptional response to multidrug treatment at promoters and enhancers in an unbiased genome wide way, which may minimize the need for exhaustive combinatorial screens.

  8. Promoting Conceptual Understanding via Adaptive Concept Maps

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Jacob Preston

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the feasibility and effectiveness of a scalable concept map based navigation system for a digital textbook. A literature review has been conducted to identify possible methods to promote conceptual understanding in the context of a digital textbook, and these hypothesized solutions will be evaluated through a prototype tool. The primary method that has been selected for this study to promote conceptual understanding in textbooks is the concept map. When...

  9. Healthy Universities: Mapping Health-Promotion Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Juan Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to map out and characterize existing health-promotion initiatives at Florida International University (FIU) in the USA in order to inform decision makers involved in the development of a comprehensive and a long-term healthy university strategy. Design/methodology/approach: This study encompasses a narrative…

  10. Promoting Conceptual Understanding via Adaptive Concept Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jacob P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the feasibility and effectiveness of a scalable concept map based navigation system for a digital textbook. A literature review has been conducted to identify possible methods to promote conceptual understanding in the context of a digital textbook, and these hypothesized solutions will be evaluated through…

  11. Genome scale engineering techniques for metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rongming; Bassalo, Marcelo C; Zeitoun, Ramsey I; Gill, Ryan T

    2015-11-01

    Metabolic engineering has expanded from a focus on designs requiring a small number of genetic modifications to increasingly complex designs driven by advances in genome-scale engineering technologies. Metabolic engineering has been generally defined by the use of iterative cycles of rational genome modifications, strain analysis and characterization, and a synthesis step that fuels additional hypothesis generation. This cycle mirrors the Design-Build-Test-Learn cycle followed throughout various engineering fields that has recently become a defining aspect of synthetic biology. This review will attempt to summarize recent genome-scale design, build, test, and learn technologies and relate their use to a range of metabolic engineering applications.

  12. 13C metabolic flux analysis at a genome-scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Saratram; Maranas, Costas D

    2015-11-01

    Metabolic models used in 13C metabolic flux analysis generally include a limited number of reactions primarily from central metabolism. They typically omit degradation pathways, complete cofactor balances, and atom transition contributions for reactions outside central metabolism. This study addresses the impact on prediction fidelity of scaling-up mapping models to a genome-scale. The core mapping model employed in this study accounts for (75 reactions and 65 metabolites) primarily from central metabolism. The genome-scale metabolic mapping model (GSMM) (697 reaction and 595 metabolites) is constructed using as a basis the iAF1260 model upon eliminating reactions guaranteed not to carry flux based on growth and fermentation data for a minimal glucose growth medium. Labeling data for 17 amino acid fragments obtained from cells fed with glucose labeled at the second carbon was used to obtain fluxes and ranges. Metabolic fluxes and confidence intervals are estimated, for both core and genome-scale mapping models, by minimizing the sum of square of differences between predicted and experimentally measured labeling patterns using the EMU decomposition algorithm. Overall, we find that both topology and estimated values of the metabolic fluxes remain largely consistent between core and GSM model. Stepping up to a genome-scale mapping model leads to wider flux inference ranges for 20 key reactions present in the core model. The glycolysis flux range doubles due to the possibility of active gluconeogenesis, the TCA flux range expanded by 80% due to the availability of a bypass through arginine consistent with labeling data, and the transhydrogenase reaction flux was essentially unresolved due to the presence of as many as five routes for the inter-conversion of NADPH to NADH afforded by the genome-scale model. By globally accounting for ATP demands in the GSMM model the unused ATP decreased drastically with the lower bound matching the maintenance ATP requirement. A non

  13. Integrated genome-scale analysis of the transcriptional regulatory landscape in a blood stem/progenitor cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nicola K; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Hannah, Rebecca; Sánchez Castillo, Manuel; Schütte, Judith; Ladopoulos, Vasileios; Mitchelmore, Joanna; Goode, Debbie K; Calero-Nieto, Fernando J; Moignard, Victoria; Wilkinson, Adam C; Jimenez-Madrid, Isabel; Kinston, Sarah; Spivakov, Mikhail; Fraser, Peter; Göttgens, Berthold

    2016-03-31

    Comprehensive study of transcriptional control processes will be required to enhance our understanding of both normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Modern sequencing technologies have revolutionized our ability to generate genome-scale expression and histone modification profiles, transcription factor (TF)-binding maps, and also comprehensive chromatin-looping information. Many of these technologies, however, require large numbers of cells, and therefore cannot be applied to rare hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) populations. The stem cell factor-dependent multipotent progenitor cell line HPC-7 represents a well-recognized cell line model for HSPCs. Here we report genome-wide maps for 17 TFs, 3 histone modifications, DNase I hypersensitive sites, and high-resolution promoter-enhancer interactomes in HPC-7 cells. Integrated analysis of these complementary data sets revealed TF occupancy patterns of genomic regions involved in promoter-anchored loops. Moreover, preferential associations between pairs of TFs bound at either ends of chromatin loops led to the identification of 4 previously unrecognized protein-protein interactions between key blood stem cell regulators. All HPC-7 data sets are freely available both through standard repositories and a user-friendly Web interface. Together with previously generated genome-wide data sets, this study integrates HPC-7 data into a genomic resource on par with ENCODE tier 1 cell lines and, importantly, is the only current model with comprehensive genome-scale data that is relevant to HSPC biology. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  14. Genome scale metabolic modeling of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Avlant; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    been used as scaffolds for analysis of high throughput data to allow mechanistic interpretation of changes in expression. Finally, GEMs allow quantitative flux predictions using flux balance analysis (FBA). Here we critically review the requirements for successful FBA simulations of cancer cells......Cancer cells reprogram metabolism to support rapid proliferation and survival. Energy metabolism is particularly important for growth and genes encoding enzymes involved in energy metabolism are frequently altered in cancer cells. A genome scale metabolic model (GEM) is a mathematical formalization...... of metabolism which allows simulation and hypotheses testing of metabolic strategies. It has successfully been applied to many microorganisms and is now used to study cancer metabolism. Generic models of human metabolism have been reconstructed based on the existence of metabolic genes in the human genome...

  15. Modeling cancer metabolism on a genome scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizhak, Keren; Chaneton, Barbara; Gottlieb, Eyal; Ruppin, Eytan

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells have fundamentally altered cellular metabolism that is associated with their tumorigenicity and malignancy. In addition to the widely studied Warburg effect, several new key metabolic alterations in cancer have been established over the last decade, leading to the recognition that altered tumor metabolism is one of the hallmarks of cancer. Deciphering the full scope and functional implications of the dysregulated metabolism in cancer requires both the advancement of a variety of omics measurements and the advancement of computational approaches for the analysis and contextualization of the accumulated data. Encouragingly, while the metabolic network is highly interconnected and complex, it is at the same time probably the best characterized cellular network. Following, this review discusses the challenges that genome-scale modeling of cancer metabolism has been facing. We survey several recent studies demonstrating the first strides that have been done, testifying to the value of this approach in portraying a network-level view of the cancer metabolism and in identifying novel drug targets and biomarkers. Finally, we outline a few new steps that may further advance this field. PMID:26130389

  16. Genome-scale reconstruction of the sigma factor network in Escherichia coli: topology and functional states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, Byung-Kwan; Kim, Donghyuk; Knight, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    to transcription units (TUs), representing an increase of more than 300% over what has been previously reported. The reconstructed network was used to investigate competition between alternative sigma-factors (the sigma(70) and sigma(38) regulons), confirming the competition model of sigma substitution......Background: At the beginning of the transcription process, the RNA polymerase (RNAP) core enzyme requires a sigma-factor to recognize the genomic location at which the process initiates. Although the crucial role of sigma-factors has long been appreciated and characterized for many individual...... promoters, we do not yet have a genome-scale assessment of their function. Results: Using multiple genome-scale measurements, we elucidated the network of s-factor and promoter interactions in Escherichia coli. The reconstructed network includes 4,724 sigma-factor-specific promoters corresponding...

  17. Rapid genome-scale mapping of chromatin accessibility in tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Bandle, Russell; John, Sam;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The challenge in extracting genome-wide chromatin features from limiting clinical samples poses a significant hurdle in identification of regulatory marks that impact the physiological or pathological state. Current methods that identify nuclease accessible chromatin are reliant...

  18. Rapid genome-scale mapping of chromatin accessibility in tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The challenge in extracting genome-wide chromatin features from limiting clinical samples poses a significant hurdle in identification of regulatory marks that impact the physiological or pathological state. Current methods that identify nuclease accessible chromatin are reliant on large amounts of purified nuclei as starting material. This complicates analysis of trace clinical tissue samples that are often stored frozen. We have developed an alternative nuclease based procedure to bypass nuclear preparation to interrogate nuclease accessible regions in frozen tissue samples. Results Here we introduce a novel technique that specifically identifies Tissue Accessible Chromatin (TACh). The TACh method uses pulverized frozen tissue as starting material and employs one of the two robust endonucleases, Benzonase or Cyansase, which are fully active under a range of stringent conditions such as high levels of detergent and DTT. As a proof of principle we applied TACh to frozen mouse liver tissue. Combined with massive parallel sequencing TACh identifies accessible regions that are associated with euchromatic features and accessibility at transcriptional start sites correlates positively with levels of gene transcription. Accessible chromatin identified by TACh overlaps to a large extend with accessible chromatin identified by DNase I using nuclei purified from freshly isolated liver tissue as starting material. The similarities are most pronounced at highly accessible regions, whereas identification of less accessible regions tends to be more divergence between nucleases. Interestingly, we show that some of the differences between DNase I and Benzonase relate to their intrinsic sequence biases and accordingly accessibility of CpG islands is probed more efficiently using TACh. Conclusion The TACh methodology identifies accessible chromatin derived from frozen tissue samples. We propose that this simple, robust approach can be applied across a broad range of clinically relevant samples to allow demarcation of regulatory elements of considerable prognostic significance. PMID:22734930

  19. Rapid genome-scale mapping of chromatin accessibility in tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grøntved Lars

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The challenge in extracting genome-wide chromatin features from limiting clinical samples poses a significant hurdle in identification of regulatory marks that impact the physiological or pathological state. Current methods that identify nuclease accessible chromatin are reliant on large amounts of purified nuclei as starting material. This complicates analysis of trace clinical tissue samples that are often stored frozen. We have developed an alternative nuclease based procedure to bypass nuclear preparation to interrogate nuclease accessible regions in frozen tissue samples. Results Here we introduce a novel technique that specifically identifies Tissue Accessible Chromatin (TACh. The TACh method uses pulverized frozen tissue as starting material and employs one of the two robust endonucleases, Benzonase or Cyansase, which are fully active under a range of stringent conditions such as high levels of detergent and DTT. As a proof of principle we applied TACh to frozen mouse liver tissue. Combined with massive parallel sequencing TACh identifies accessible regions that are associated with euchromatic features and accessibility at transcriptional start sites correlates positively with levels of gene transcription. Accessible chromatin identified by TACh overlaps to a large extend with accessible chromatin identified by DNase I using nuclei purified from freshly isolated liver tissue as starting material. The similarities are most pronounced at highly accessible regions, whereas identification of less accessible regions tends to be more divergence between nucleases. Interestingly, we show that some of the differences between DNase I and Benzonase relate to their intrinsic sequence biases and accordingly accessibility of CpG islands is probed more efficiently using TACh. Conclusion The TACh methodology identifies accessible chromatin derived from frozen tissue samples. We propose that this simple, robust approach can be applied across a broad range of clinically relevant samples to allow demarcation of regulatory elements of considerable prognostic significance.

  20. Pantograph: A template-based method for genome-scale metabolic model reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loira, Nicolas; Zhukova, Anna; Sherman, David James

    2015-04-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models are a powerful tool to study the inner workings of biological systems and to guide applications. The advent of cheap sequencing has brought the opportunity to create metabolic maps of biotechnologically interesting organisms. While this drives the development of new methods and automatic tools, network reconstruction remains a time-consuming process where extensive manual curation is required. This curation introduces specific knowledge about the modeled organism, either explicitly in the form of molecular processes, or indirectly in the form of annotations of the model elements. Paradoxically, this knowledge is usually lost when reconstruction of a different organism is started. We introduce the Pantograph method for metabolic model reconstruction. This method combines a template reaction knowledge base, orthology mappings between two organisms, and experimental phenotypic evidence, to build a genome-scale metabolic model for a target organism. Our method infers implicit knowledge from annotations in the template, and rewrites these inferences to include them in the resulting model of the target organism. The generated model is well suited for manual curation. Scripts for evaluating the model with respect to experimental data are automatically generated, to aid curators in iterative improvement. We present an implementation of the Pantograph method, as a toolbox for genome-scale model reconstruction, curation and validation. This open source package can be obtained from: http://pathtastic.gforge.inria.fr.

  1. The OME Framework for genome-scale systems biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palsson, Bernhard O. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Ebrahim, Ali [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Federowicz, Steve [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-12-19

    The life sciences are undergoing continuous and accelerating integration with computational and engineering sciences. The biology that many in the field have been trained on may be hardly recognizable in ten to twenty years. One of the major drivers for this transformation is the blistering pace of advancements in DNA sequencing and synthesis. These advances have resulted in unprecedented amounts of new data, information, and knowledge. Many software tools have been developed to deal with aspects of this transformation and each is sorely needed [1-3]. However, few of these tools have been forced to deal with the full complexity of genome-scale models along with high throughput genome- scale data. This particular situation represents a unique challenge, as it is simultaneously necessary to deal with the vast breadth of genome-scale models and the dizzying depth of high-throughput datasets. It has been observed time and again that as the pace of data generation continues to accelerate, the pace of analysis significantly lags behind [4]. It is also evident that, given the plethora of databases and software efforts [5-12], it is still a significant challenge to work with genome-scale metabolic models, let alone next-generation whole cell models [13-15]. We work at the forefront of model creation and systems scale data generation [16-18]. The OME Framework was borne out of a practical need to enable genome-scale modeling and data analysis under a unified framework to drive the next generation of genome-scale biological models. Here we present the OME Framework. It exists as a set of Python classes. However, we want to emphasize the importance of the underlying design as an addition to the discussions on specifications of a digital cell. A great deal of work and valuable progress has been made by a number of communities [13, 19-24] towards interchange formats and implementations designed to achieve similar goals. While many software tools exist for handling genome-scale

  2. The genome-scale metabolic extreme pathway structure in Haemophilus influenzae shows significant network redundancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papin, Jason A; Price, Nathan D; Edwards, Jeremy S; Palsson B, Bernhard Ø

    2002-03-07

    Genome-scale metabolic networks can be characterized by a set of systemically independent and unique extreme pathways. These extreme pathways span a convex, high-dimensional space that circumscribes all potential steady-state flux distributions achievable by the defined metabolic network. Genome-scale extreme pathways associated with the production of non-essential amino acids in Haemophilus influenzae were computed. They offer valuable insight into the functioning of its metabolic network. Three key results were obtained. First, there were multiple internal flux maps corresponding to externally indistinguishable states. It was shown that there was an average of 37 internal states per unique exchange flux vector in H. influenzae when the network was used to produce a single amino acid while allowing carbon dioxide and acetate as carbon sinks. With the inclusion of succinate as an additional output, this ratio increased to 52, a 40% increase. Second, an analysis of the carbon fates illustrated that the extreme pathways were non-uniformly distributed across the carbon fate spectrum. In the detailed case study, 45% of the distinct carbon fate values associated with lysine production represented 85% of the extreme pathways. Third, this distribution fell between distinct systemic constraints. For lysine production, the carbon fate values that represented 85% of the pathways described above corresponded to only 2 distinct ratios of 1:1 and 4:1 between carbon dioxide and acetate. The present study analysed single outputs from one organism, and provides a start to genome-scale extreme pathways studies. These emergent system-level characterizations show the significance of metabolic extreme pathway analysis at the genome-scale.

  3. Using Genome-scale Models to Predict Biological Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O’Brien, Edward J.; Monk, Jonathan M.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2015-01-01

    Constraint-based reconstruction and analysis (COBRA) methods at the genome scale have been under development since the first whole-genome sequences appeared in the mid-1990s. A few years ago, this approach began to demonstrate the ability to predict a range of cellular functions, including cellular...... growth capabilities on various substrates and the effect of gene knockouts at the genome scale. Thus, much interest has developed in understanding and applying these methods to areas such as metabolic engineering, antibiotic design, and organismal and enzyme evolution. This Primer will get you started....

  4. Use of genome-scale microbial models for metabolic engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patil, Kiran Raosaheb; Åkesson, M.; Nielsen, Jens

    2004-01-01

    network structures. The major challenge for metabolic engineering in the post-genomic era is to broaden its design methodologies to incorporate genome-scale biological data. Genome-scale stoichiometric models of microorganisms represent a first step in this direction.......Metabolic engineering serves as an integrated approach to design new cell factories by providing rational design procedures and valuable mathematical and experimental tools. Mathematical models have an important role for phenotypic analysis, but can also be used for the design of optimal metabolic...

  5. In vitro mapping of Myotonic Dystrophy (DM) gene promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storbeck, C.J.; Sabourin, L. [Univ. of Ottawa (Canada); Baird, S. [Children`s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Myotonic Dystrophy Kinase (DMK) gene has been cloned and shared homology to serine/threonine protein kinases. Overexpression of this gene in stably transfected mouse myoblasts has been shown to inhibit fusion into myotubes while myoblasts stably transfected with an antisense construct show increased fusion potential. These experiments, along with data showing that the DM gene is highly expressed in muscle have highlighted the possibility of DMK being involved in myogenesis. The promoter region of the DM gene lacks a consensus TATA box and CAAT box, but harbours numerous transcription binding sites. Clones containing extended 5{prime} upstream sequences (UPS) of DMK only weakly drive the reporter gene chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) when transfected into C2C12 mouse myoblasts. However, four E-boxes are present in the first intron of the DM gene and transient assays show increased expression of the CAT gene when the first intron is present downstream of these 5{prime} UPS in an orientation dependent manner. Comparison between mouse and human sequence reveals that the regions in the first intron where the E-boxes are located are highly conserved. The mapping of the promoter and the importance of the first intron in the control of DMK expression will be presented.

  6. Genome-scale reconstruction of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolic network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Förster, Jochen; Famili, I.; Fu, P.

    2003-01-01

    and the environment were included. A total of 708 structural open reading frames (ORFs) were accounted for in the reconstructed network, corresponding to 1035 metabolic reactions. Further, 140 reactions were included on the basis of biochemical evidence resulting in a genome-scale reconstructed metabolic network...... with Escherichia coli. The reconstructed metabolic network is the first comprehensive network for a eukaryotic organism, and it may be used as the basis for in silico analysis of phenotypic functions....

  7. Determination of sample size in genome-scale RNAi screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas; Heyse, Joseph F

    2009-04-01

    For genome-scale RNAi research, it is critical to investigate sample size required for the achievement of reasonably low false negative rate (FNR) and false positive rate. The analysis in this article reveals that current design of sample size contributes to the occurrence of low signal-to-noise ratio in genome-scale RNAi projects. The analysis suggests that (i) an arrangement of 16 wells per plate is acceptable and an arrangement of 20-24 wells per plate is preferable for a negative control to be used for hit selection in a primary screen without replicates; (ii) in a confirmatory screen or a primary screen with replicates, a sample size of 3 is not large enough, and there is a large reduction in FNRs when sample size increases from 3 to 4. To search a tradeoff between benefit and cost, any sample size between 4 and 11 is a reasonable choice. If the main focus is the selection of siRNAs with strong effects, a sample size of 4 or 5 is a good choice. If we want to have enough power to detect siRNAs with moderate effects, sample size needs to be 8, 9, 10 or 11. These discoveries about sample size bring insight to the design of a genome-scale RNAi screen experiment.

  8. Reconstruction of genome-scale metabolic models for 126 human tissues using mCADRE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuliang; Eddy, James A; Price, Nathan D

    2012-12-13

    Human tissues perform diverse metabolic functions. Mapping out these tissue-specific functions in genome-scale models will advance our understanding of the metabolic basis of various physiological and pathological processes. The global knowledgebase of metabolic functions categorized for the human genome (Human Recon 1) coupled with abundant high-throughput data now makes possible the reconstruction of tissue-specific metabolic models. However, the number of available tissue-specific models remains incomplete compared with the large diversity of human tissues. We developed a method called metabolic Context-specificity Assessed by Deterministic Reaction Evaluation (mCADRE). mCADRE is able to infer a tissue-specific network based on gene expression data and metabolic network topology, along with evaluation of functional capabilities during model building. mCADRE produces models with similar or better functionality and achieves dramatic computational speed up over existing methods. Using our method, we reconstructed draft genome-scale metabolic models for 126 human tissue and cell types. Among these, there are models for 26 tumor tissues along with their normal counterparts, and 30 different brain tissues. We performed pathway-level analyses of this large collection of tissue-specific models and identified the eicosanoid metabolic pathway, especially reactions catalyzing the production of leukotrienes from arachidnoic acid, as potential drug targets that selectively affect tumor tissues. This large collection of 126 genome-scale draft metabolic models provides a useful resource for studying the metabolic basis for a variety of human diseases across many tissues. The functionality of the resulting models and the fast computational speed of the mCADRE algorithm make it a useful tool to build and update tissue-specific metabolic models.

  9. Genome-scale metabolic flux analysis of Streptomyces lividans growing on a complex medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Huys, Pieter-Jan; Lule, Ivan; Vercammen, Dominique; Anné, Jozef; Van Impe, Jan F; Bernaerts, Kristel

    2012-09-15

    Constraint-based metabolic modeling comprises various excellent tools to assess experimentally observed phenotypic behavior of micro-organisms in terms of intracellular metabolic fluxes. In combination with genome-scale metabolic networks, micro-organisms can be investigated in much more detail and under more complex environmental conditions. Although complex media are ubiquitously applied in industrial fermentations and are often a prerequisite for high protein secretion yields, such multi-component conditions are seldom investigated using genome-scale flux analysis. In this paper, a systematic and integrative approach is presented to determine metabolic fluxes in Streptomyces lividans TK24 grown on a nutritious and complex medium. Genome-scale flux balance analysis and randomized sampling of the solution space are combined to extract maximum information from exometabolome profiles. It is shown that biomass maximization cannot predict the observed metabolite production pattern as such. Although this cellular objective commonly applies to batch fermentation data, both input and output constraints are required to reproduce the measured biomass production rate. Rich media hence not necessarily lead to maximum biomass growth. To eventually identify a unique intracellular flux vector, a hierarchical optimization of cellular objectives is adopted. Out of various tested secondary objectives, maximization of the ATP yield per flux unit returns the closest agreement with the maximum frequency in flux histograms. This unique flux estimation is hence considered as a reasonable approximation for the biological fluxes. Flux maps for different growth phases show no active oxidative part of the pentose phosphate pathway, but NADPH generation in the TCA cycle and NADPH transdehydrogenase activity are most important in fulfilling the NADPH balance. Amino acids contribute to biomass growth by augmenting the pool of available amino acids and by boosting the TCA cycle, particularly

  10. Comparative Genome-Scale Reconstruction of Gapless Metabolic Networks for Present and Ancestral Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkänen, Esa; Jouhten, Paula; Hou, Jian; Syed, Muhammad Fahad; Blomberg, Peter; Kludas, Jana; Oja, Merja; Holm, Liisa; Penttilä, Merja; Rousu, Juho; Arvas, Mikko

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a novel computational approach, CoReCo, for comparative metabolic reconstruction and provide genome-scale metabolic network models for 49 important fungal species. Leveraging on the exponential growth in sequenced genome availability, our method reconstructs genome-scale gapless metabolic networks simultaneously for a large number of species by integrating sequence data in a probabilistic framework. High reconstruction accuracy is demonstrated by comparisons to the well-curated Saccharomyces cerevisiae consensus model and large-scale knock-out experiments. Our comparative approach is particularly useful in scenarios where the quality of available sequence data is lacking, and when reconstructing evolutionary distant species. Moreover, the reconstructed networks are fully carbon mapped, allowing their use in 13C flux analysis. We demonstrate the functionality and usability of the reconstructed fungal models with computational steady-state biomass production experiment, as these fungi include some of the most important production organisms in industrial biotechnology. In contrast to many existing reconstruction techniques, only minimal manual effort is required before the reconstructed models are usable in flux balance experiments. CoReCo is available at http://esaskar.github.io/CoReCo/. PMID:24516375

  11. Comparative genome-scale reconstruction of gapless metabolic networks for present and ancestral species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esa Pitkänen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a novel computational approach, CoReCo, for comparative metabolic reconstruction and provide genome-scale metabolic network models for 49 important fungal species. Leveraging on the exponential growth in sequenced genome availability, our method reconstructs genome-scale gapless metabolic networks simultaneously for a large number of species by integrating sequence data in a probabilistic framework. High reconstruction accuracy is demonstrated by comparisons to the well-curated Saccharomyces cerevisiae consensus model and large-scale knock-out experiments. Our comparative approach is particularly useful in scenarios where the quality of available sequence data is lacking, and when reconstructing evolutionary distant species. Moreover, the reconstructed networks are fully carbon mapped, allowing their use in 13C flux analysis. We demonstrate the functionality and usability of the reconstructed fungal models with computational steady-state biomass production experiment, as these fungi include some of the most important production organisms in industrial biotechnology. In contrast to many existing reconstruction techniques, only minimal manual effort is required before the reconstructed models are usable in flux balance experiments. CoReCo is available at http://esaskar.github.io/CoReCo/.

  12. A genome-scale metabolic model of the lipid-accumulating yeast Yarrowia lipolytica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loira Nicolas

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yarrowia lipolytica is an oleaginous yeast which has emerged as an important microorganism for several biotechnological processes, such as the production of organic acids, lipases and proteases. It is also considered a good candidate for single-cell oil production. Although some of its metabolic pathways are well studied, its metabolic engineering is hindered by the lack of a genome-scale model that integrates the current knowledge about its metabolism. Results Combining in silico tools and expert manual curation, we have produced an accurate genome-scale metabolic model for Y. lipolytica. Using a scaffold derived from a functional metabolic model of the well-studied but phylogenetically distant yeast S. cerevisiae, we mapped conserved reactions, rewrote gene associations, added species-specific reactions and inserted specialized copies of scaffold reactions to account for species-specific expansion of protein families. We used physiological measures obtained under lab conditions to validate our predictions. Conclusions Y. lipolytica iNL895 represents the first well-annotated metabolic model of an oleaginous yeast, providing a base for future metabolic improvement, and a starting point for the metabolic reconstruction of other species in the Yarrowia clade and other oleaginous yeasts.

  13. Genome-scale constraint-based modeling of Geobacter metallireducens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Famili Iman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geobacter metallireducens was the first organism that can be grown in pure culture to completely oxidize organic compounds with Fe(III oxide serving as electron acceptor. Geobacter species, including G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens, are used for bioremediation and electricity generation from waste organic matter and renewable biomass. The constraint-based modeling approach enables the development of genome-scale in silico models that can predict the behavior of complex biological systems and their responses to the environments. Such a modeling approach was applied to provide physiological and ecological insights on the metabolism of G. metallireducens. Results The genome-scale metabolic model of G. metallireducens was constructed to include 747 genes and 697 reactions. Compared to the G. sulfurreducens model, the G. metallireducens metabolic model contains 118 unique reactions that reflect many of G. metallireducens' specific metabolic capabilities. Detailed examination of the G. metallireducens model suggests that its central metabolism contains several energy-inefficient reactions that are not present in the G. sulfurreducens model. Experimental biomass yield of G. metallireducens growing on pyruvate was lower than the predicted optimal biomass yield. Microarray data of G. metallireducens growing with benzoate and acetate indicated that genes encoding these energy-inefficient reactions were up-regulated by benzoate. These results suggested that the energy-inefficient reactions were likely turned off during G. metallireducens growth with acetate for optimal biomass yield, but were up-regulated during growth with complex electron donors such as benzoate for rapid energy generation. Furthermore, several computational modeling approaches were applied to accelerate G. metallireducens research. For example, growth of G. metallireducens with different electron donors and electron acceptors were studied using the genome-scale

  14. Informed Consent in Genome-Scale Research: What Do Prospective Participants Think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinidad, Susan Brown; Fullerton, Stephanie M.; Bares, Julie M.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Larson, Eric B.; Burke, Wylie

    2012-01-01

    Background To promote effective genome-scale research, genomic and clinical data for large population samples must be collected, stored, and shared. Methods We conducted focus groups with 45 members of a Seattle-based integrated healthcare delivery system to learn about their views and expectations for informed consent in genome-scale studies. Results Participants viewed information about study purpose, aims, and how and by whom study data could be used to be at least as important as information about risks and possible harms. They generally supported a tiered consent approach for specific issues, including research purpose, data sharing, and access to individual research results. Participants expressed a continuum of opinions with respect to the acceptability of broad consent, ranging from completely acceptable to completely unacceptable. Older participants were more likely to view the consent process in relational – rather than contractual – terms, compared with younger participants. The majority of participants endorsed seeking study subjects’ permission regarding material changes in study purpose and data sharing. Conclusions Although this study sample was limited in terms of racial and socioeconomic diversity, our results suggest a strong positive interest in genomic research on the part of at least some prospective participants and indicate a need for increased public engagement, as well as strategies for ongoing communication with study participants. PMID:23493836

  15. Genome Scale Transcriptomics of Baculovirus-Insect Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Reid

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Baculovirus-insect cell technologies are applied in the production of complex proteins, veterinary and human vaccines, gene delivery vectors‚ and biopesticides. Better understanding of how baculoviruses and insect cells interact would facilitate baculovirus-based production. While complete genomic sequences are available for over 58 baculovirus species, little insect genomic information is known. The release of the Bombyx mori and Plutella xylostella genomes, the accumulation of EST sequences for several Lepidopteran species, and especially the availability of two genome-scale analysis tools, namely oligonucleotide microarrays and next generation sequencing (NGS, have facilitated expression studies to generate a rich picture of insect gene responses to baculovirus infections. This review presents current knowledge on the interaction dynamics of the baculovirus-insect system‚ which is relatively well studied in relation to nucleocapsid transportation, apoptosis, and heat shock responses, but is still poorly understood regarding responses involved in pro-survival pathways, DNA damage pathways, protein degradation, translation, signaling pathways, RNAi pathways, and importantly metabolic pathways for energy, nucleotide and amino acid production. We discuss how the two genome-scale transcriptomic tools can be applied for studying such pathways and suggest that proteomics and metabolomics can produce complementary findings to transcriptomic studies.

  16. Current state of genome-scale modeling in filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, Julian; Andersen, Mikael R

    2015-06-01

    The group of filamentous fungi contains important species used in industrial biotechnology for acid, antibiotics and enzyme production. Their unique lifestyle turns these organisms into a valuable genetic reservoir of new natural products and biomass degrading enzymes that has not been used to full capacity. One of the major bottlenecks in the development of new strains into viable industrial hosts is the alteration of the metabolism towards optimal production. Genome-scale models promise a reduction in the time needed for metabolic engineering by predicting the most potent targets in silico before testing them in vivo. The increasing availability of high quality models and molecular biological tools for manipulating filamentous fungi renders the model-guided engineering of these fungal factories possible with comprehensive metabolic networks. A typical fungal model contains on average 1138 unique metabolic reactions and 1050 ORFs, making them a vast knowledge-base of fungal metabolism. In the present review we focus on the current state as well as potential future applications of genome-scale models in filamentous fungi.

  17. Genome scale transcriptomics of baculovirus-insect interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quan; Nielsen, Lars K; Reid, Steven

    2013-11-12

    Baculovirus-insect cell technologies are applied in the production of complex proteins, veterinary and human vaccines, gene delivery vectors' and biopesticides. Better understanding of how baculoviruses and insect cells interact would facilitate baculovirus-based production. While complete genomic sequences are available for over 58 baculovirus species, little insect genomic information is known. The release of the Bombyx mori and Plutella xylostella genomes, the accumulation of EST sequences for several Lepidopteran species, and especially the availability of two genome-scale analysis tools, namely oligonucleotide microarrays and next generation sequencing (NGS), have facilitated expression studies to generate a rich picture of insect gene responses to baculovirus infections. This review presents current knowledge on the interaction dynamics of the baculovirus-insect system' which is relatively well studied in relation to nucleocapsid transportation, apoptosis, and heat shock responses, but is still poorly understood regarding responses involved in pro-survival pathways, DNA damage pathways, protein degradation, translation, signaling pathways, RNAi pathways, and importantly metabolic pathways for energy, nucleotide and amino acid production. We discuss how the two genome-scale transcriptomic tools can be applied for studying such pathways and suggest that proteomics and metabolomics can produce complementary findings to transcriptomic studies.

  18. Improved Evidence-Based Genome-scale Metabolic Models for Maize Leaf, Embryo, and Endosperm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaver, Samuel M.D.; Frelin, Oceane; Bradbury, Louis M.T.; Zarecki, Raphy; Ruppin, Eytan; Hanson, Andrew D.; Henry, Christopher S.

    2015-03-10

    There is a growing demand for genome-scale metabolic reconstructions for plants, fueled by the need to understand the metabolic basis of crop yield and by progress in genome and transcriptome sequencing. Methods are also required to enable the interpretation of plant transcriptome data to study how cellular metabolic activity varies under different growth conditions or even within different organs, tissues, and developmental stages. Such methods depend extensively on the accuracy with which genes have been mapped to the biochemical reactions in the plant metabolic pathways. Errors in these mappings lead to metabolic reconstructions with an inflated number of reactions and possible generation of unreliable metabolic phenotype predictions. Here we introduce a new evidence-based genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of maize, with significant improvements in the quality of the gene-reaction associations included within our model. We also present a new approach for applying our model to predict active metabolic genes based on transcriptome data. This method includes a minimal set of reactions associated with low expression genes to enable activity of a maximum number of reactions associated with high expression genes. We apply this method to construct an organ-specific model for the maize leaf, and tissue specific models for maize embryo and endosperm cells. We validate our models using fluxomics data for the endosperm and embryo, demonstrating an improved capacity of our models to fit the available fluxomics data. All models are publicly available via the DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase and PlantSEED, and our new method is generally applicable for analysis transcript profiles from any plant, paving the way for further in silico studies with a wide variety of plant genomes.

  19. Improved Evidence-Based Genome-scale Metabolic Models for Maize Leaf, Embryo, and Endosperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel eSeaver

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing demand for genome-scale metabolic reconstructions for plants, fueled by the need to understand the metabolic basis of crop yield and by progress in genome and transcriptome sequencing. Methods are also required to enable the interpretation of plant transcriptome data to study how cellular metabolic activity varies under different growth conditions or even within different organs, tissues, and developmental stages. Such methods depend extensively on the accuracy with which genes have been mapped to the biochemical reactions in the plant metabolic pathways. Errors in these mappings lead to metabolic reconstructions with an inflated number of reactions and possible generation of unreliable metabolic phenotype predictions. Here we introduce a new evidence-based genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of maize, with significant improvements in the quality of the gene-reaction associations included within our model. We also present a new approach for applying our model to predict active metabolic genes based on transcriptome data. This method includes a minimal set of reactions associated with low expression genes to enable activity of a maximum number of reactions associated with high expression genes. We apply this method to construct an organ-specific model for the maize leaf, and tissue specific models for maize embryo and endosperm cells. We validate our models using fluxomics data for the endosperm and embryo, demonstrating an improved capacity of our models to fit the available fluxomics data. All models are publicly available via the DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase and PlantSEED, and our new method is generally applicable for analysis transcript profiles from any plant, paving the way for further in silico studies with a wide variety of plant genomes.

  20. Genome-scale engineering for systems and synthetic biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esvelt, Kevin M; Wang, Harris H

    2013-01-01

    Genome-modification technologies enable the rational engineering and perturbation of biological systems. Historically, these methods have been limited to gene insertions or mutations at random or at a few pre-defined locations across the genome. The handful of methods capable of targeted gene editing suffered from low efficiencies, significant labor costs, or both. Recent advances have dramatically expanded our ability to engineer cells in a directed and combinatorial manner. Here, we review current technologies and methodologies for genome-scale engineering, discuss the prospects for extending efficient genome modification to new hosts, and explore the implications of continued advances toward the development of flexibly programmable chasses, novel biochemistries, and safer organismal and ecological engineering. PMID:23340847

  1. Genome-scale engineering for systems and synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esvelt, Kevin M; Wang, Harris H

    2013-01-01

    Genome-modification technologies enable the rational engineering and perturbation of biological systems. Historically, these methods have been limited to gene insertions or mutations at random or at a few pre-defined locations across the genome. The handful of methods capable of targeted gene editing suffered from low efficiencies, significant labor costs, or both. Recent advances have dramatically expanded our ability to engineer cells in a directed and combinatorial manner. Here, we review current technologies and methodologies for genome-scale engineering, discuss the prospects for extending efficient genome modification to new hosts, and explore the implications of continued advances toward the development of flexibly programmable chasses, novel biochemistries, and safer organismal and ecological engineering.

  2. Genome-scale validation of deep-sequencing libraries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Schmidt

    Full Text Available Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput (HTP sequencing (ChIP-seq is a powerful tool to establish protein-DNA interactions genome-wide. The primary limitation of its broad application at present is the often-limited access to sequencers. Here we report a protocol, Mab-seq, that generates genome-scale quality evaluations for nucleic acid libraries intended for deep-sequencing. We show how commercially available genomic microarrays can be used to maximize the efficiency of library creation and quickly generate reliable preliminary data on a chromosomal scale in advance of deep sequencing. We also exploit this technique to compare enriched regions identified using microarrays with those identified by sequencing, demonstrating that they agree on a core set of clearly identified enriched regions, while characterizing the additional enriched regions identifiable using HTP sequencing.

  3. Current state of genome-scale modeling in filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandl, Julian; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2015-01-01

    The group of filamentous fungi contains important species used in industrial biotechnology for acid, antibiotics and enzyme production. Their unique lifestyle turns these organisms into a valuable genetic reservoir of new natural products and biomass degrading enzymes that has not been used to full...... testing them in vivo. The increasing availability of high quality models and molecular biological tools for manipulating filamentous fungi renders the model-guided engineering of these fungal factories possible with comprehensive metabolic networks. A typical fungal model contains on average 1138 unique...... metabolic reactions and 1050 ORFs, making them a vast knowledge-base of fungal metabolism. In the present review we focus on the current state as well as potential future applications of genome-scale models in filamentous fungi....

  4. Next-generation genome-scale models for metabolic engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    King, Zachary A.; Lloyd, Colton J.; Feist, Adam M.

    2015-01-01

    Constraint-based reconstruction and analysis (COBRA) methods have become widely used tools for metabolic engineering in both academic and industrial laboratories. By employing a genome-scale in silico representation of the metabolic network of a host organism, COBRA methods can be used to predict...... optimal genetic modifications that improve the rate and yield of chemical production. A new generation of COBRA models and methods is now being developed. -. encompassing many biological processes and simulation strategies. -. and next-generation models enable new types of predictions. Here, three key...... examples of applying COBRA methods to strain optimization are presented and discussed. Then, an outlook is provided on the next generation of COBRA models and the new types of predictions they will enable for systems metabolic engineering....

  5. Next-generation genome-scale models for metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Zachary A; Lloyd, Colton J; Feist, Adam M; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2015-12-01

    Constraint-based reconstruction and analysis (COBRA) methods have become widely used tools for metabolic engineering in both academic and industrial laboratories. By employing a genome-scale in silico representation of the metabolic network of a host organism, COBRA methods can be used to predict optimal genetic modifications that improve the rate and yield of chemical production. A new generation of COBRA models and methods is now being developed--encompassing many biological processes and simulation strategies-and next-generation models enable new types of predictions. Here, three key examples of applying COBRA methods to strain optimization are presented and discussed. Then, an outlook is provided on the next generation of COBRA models and the new types of predictions they will enable for systems metabolic engineering.

  6. Modeling Lactococcus lactis using a genome-scale flux model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Jens

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-scale flux models are useful tools to represent and analyze microbial metabolism. In this work we reconstructed the metabolic network of the lactic acid bacteria Lactococcus lactis and developed a genome-scale flux model able to simulate and analyze network capabilities and whole-cell function under aerobic and anaerobic continuous cultures. Flux balance analysis (FBA and minimization of metabolic adjustment (MOMA were used as modeling frameworks. Results The metabolic network was reconstructed using the annotated genome sequence from L. lactis ssp. lactis IL1403 together with physiological and biochemical information. The established network comprised a total of 621 reactions and 509 metabolites, representing the overall metabolism of L. lactis. Experimental data reported in the literature was used to fit the model to phenotypic observations. Regulatory constraints had to be included to simulate certain metabolic features, such as the shift from homo to heterolactic fermentation. A minimal medium for in silico growth was identified, indicating the requirement of four amino acids in addition to a sugar. Remarkably, de novo biosynthesis of four other amino acids was observed even when all amino acids were supplied, which is in good agreement with experimental observations. Additionally, enhanced metabolic engineering strategies for improved diacetyl producing strains were designed. Conclusion The L. lactis metabolic network can now be used for a better understanding of lactococcal metabolic capabilities and potential, for the design of enhanced metabolic engineering strategies and for integration with other types of 'omic' data, to assist in finding new information on cellular organization and function.

  7. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MAP2K4 promotes human prostate cancer metastasis.

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    Janet M Pavese

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is the second leading cause of cancer death in the US. Death from PCa primarily results from metastasis. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MAP2K4 is overexpressed in invasive PCa lesions in humans, and can be inhibited by small molecule therapeutics that demonstrate favorable activity in phase II studies. However, MAP2K4's role in regulating metastatic behavior is controversial and unknown. To investigate, we engineered human PCa cell lines which overexpress either wild type or constitutive active MAP2K4. Orthotopic implantation into mice demonstrated MAP2K4 increases formation of distant metastasis. Constitutive active MAP2K4, though not wild type, increases tumor size and circulating tumor cells in the blood and bone marrow. Complementary in vitro studies establish stable MAP2K4 overexpression promotes cell invasion, but does not affect cell growth or migration. MAP2K4 overexpression increases the expression of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27 protein and protease production, with the largest effect upon matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2, both in vitro and in mouse tumor samples. Further, MAP2K4-mediated increases in cell invasion are dependent upon heat shock protein 27 (HSP27 and MMP-2, but not upon MAP2K4's immediate downstream targets, p38 MAPK or JNK. We demonstrate that MAP2K4 increases human PCa metastasis, and prolonged over expression induces long term changes in cell signaling pathways leading to independence from p38 MAPK and JNK. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for human studies linking increases in HSP27 and MMP-2 to progression to metastatic disease. MAP2K4 is validated as an important therapeutic target for inhibiting human PCa metastasis.

  8. Incorporating Protein Biosynthesis into the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genome-scale Metabolic Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivares Hernandez, Roberto

    Based on stoichiometric biochemical equations that occur into the cell, the genome-scale metabolic models can quantify the metabolic fluxes, which are regarded as the final representation of the physiological state of the cell. For Saccharomyces Cerevisiae the genome scale model has been......, translation initiation, translation elongation, translation termination, translation elongation, and mRNA decay. Considering these information from the mechanisms of transcription and translation, we will include this stoichiometric reactions into the genome scale model for S. Cerevisiae to obtain the first...

  9. Functional states of the genome-scale Escherichia coli transcriptional regulatory system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin P Gianchandani

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A transcriptional regulatory network (TRN constitutes the collection of regulatory rules that link environmental cues to the transcription state of a cell's genome. We recently proposed a matrix formalism that quantitatively represents a system of such rules (a transcriptional regulatory system [TRS] and allows systemic characterization of TRS properties. The matrix formalism not only allows the computation of the transcription state of the genome but also the fundamental characterization of the input-output mapping that it represents. Furthermore, a key advantage of this "pseudo-stoichiometric" matrix formalism is its ability to easily integrate with existing stoichiometric matrix representations of signaling and metabolic networks. Here we demonstrate for the first time how this matrix formalism is extendable to large-scale systems by applying it to the genome-scale Escherichia coli TRS. We analyze the fundamental subspaces of the regulatory network matrix (R to describe intrinsic properties of the TRS. We further use Monte Carlo sampling to evaluate the E. coli transcription state across a subset of all possible environments, comparing our results to published gene expression data as validation. Finally, we present novel in silico findings for the E. coli TRS, including (1 a gene expression correlation matrix delineating functional motifs; (2 sets of gene ontologies for which regulatory rules governing gene transcription are poorly understood and which may direct further experimental characterization; and (3 the appearance of a distributed TRN structure, which is in stark contrast to the more hierarchical organization of metabolic networks.

  10. Functional states of the genome-scale Escherichia coli transcriptional regulatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianchandani, Erwin P; Joyce, Andrew R; Palsson, Bernhard Ø; Papin, Jason A

    2009-06-01

    A transcriptional regulatory network (TRN) constitutes the collection of regulatory rules that link environmental cues to the transcription state of a cell's genome. We recently proposed a matrix formalism that quantitatively represents a system of such rules (a transcriptional regulatory system [TRS]) and allows systemic characterization of TRS properties. The matrix formalism not only allows the computation of the transcription state of the genome but also the fundamental characterization of the input-output mapping that it represents. Furthermore, a key advantage of this "pseudo-stoichiometric" matrix formalism is its ability to easily integrate with existing stoichiometric matrix representations of signaling and metabolic networks. Here we demonstrate for the first time how this matrix formalism is extendable to large-scale systems by applying it to the genome-scale Escherichia coli TRS. We analyze the fundamental subspaces of the regulatory network matrix (R) to describe intrinsic properties of the TRS. We further use Monte Carlo sampling to evaluate the E. coli transcription state across a subset of all possible environments, comparing our results to published gene expression data as validation. Finally, we present novel in silico findings for the E. coli TRS, including (1) a gene expression correlation matrix delineating functional motifs; (2) sets of gene ontologies for which regulatory rules governing gene transcription are poorly understood and which may direct further experimental characterization; and (3) the appearance of a distributed TRN structure, which is in stark contrast to the more hierarchical organization of metabolic networks.

  11. A Genome-Scale Model of Shewanella piezotolerans Simulates Mechanisms of Metabolic Diversity and Energy Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufault-Thompson, Keith; Jian, Huahua; Cheng, Ruixue; Li, Jiefu; Wang, Fengping; Zhang, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Shewanella piezotolerans strain WP3 belongs to the group 1 branch of the Shewanella genus and is a piezotolerant and psychrotolerant species isolated from the deep sea. In this study, a genome-scale model was constructed for WP3 using a combination of genome annotation, ortholog mapping, and physiological verification. The metabolic reconstruction contained 806 genes, 653 metabolites, and 922 reactions, including central metabolic functions that represented nonhomologous replacements between the group 1 and group 2 Shewanella species. Metabolic simulations with the WP3 model demonstrated consistency with existing knowledge about the physiology of the organism. A comparison of model simulations with experimental measurements verified the predicted growth profiles under increasing concentrations of carbon sources. The WP3 model was applied to study mechanisms of anaerobic respiration through investigating energy conservation, redox balancing, and the generation of proton motive force. Despite being an obligate respiratory organism, WP3 was predicted to use substrate-level phosphorylation as the primary source of energy conservation under anaerobic conditions, a trait previously identified in other Shewanella species. Further investigation of the ATP synthase activity revealed a positive correlation between the availability of reducing equivalents in the cell and the directionality of the ATP synthase reaction flux. Comparison of the WP3 model with an existing model of a group 2 species, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, revealed that the WP3 model demonstrated greater flexibility in ATP production under the anaerobic conditions. Such flexibility could be advantageous to WP3 for its adaptation to fluctuating availability of organic carbon sources in the deep sea. IMPORTANCE The well-studied nature of the metabolic diversity of Shewanella bacteria makes species from this genus a promising platform for investigating the evolution of carbon metabolism and energy conservation

  12. Wakeful rest promotes the integration of spatial memories into accurate cognitive maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Michael; Dewar, Michaela; Harris, Mathew A; Della Sala, Sergio; Wolbers, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Flexible spatial navigation, e.g. the ability to take novel shortcuts, is contingent upon accurate mental representations of environments-cognitive maps. These cognitive maps critically depend on hippocampal place cells. In rodents, place cells replay recently travelled routes, especially during periods of behavioural inactivity (sleep/wakeful rest). This neural replay is hypothesised to promote not only the consolidation of specific experiences, but also their wider integration, e.g. into accurate cognitive maps. In humans, rest promotes the consolidation of specific experiences, but the effect of rest on the wider integration of memories remained unknown. In the present study, we examined the hypothesis that cognitive map formation is supported by rest-related integration of new spatial memories. We predicted that if wakeful rest supports cognitive map formation, then rest should enhance knowledge of overarching spatial relations that were never experienced directly during recent navigation. Forty young participants learned a route through a virtual environment before either resting wakefully or engaging in an unrelated perceptual task for 10 min. Participants in the wakeful rest condition performed more accurately in a delayed cognitive map test, requiring the pointing to landmarks from a range of locations. Importantly, the benefit of rest could not be explained by active rehearsal, but can be attributed to the promotion of consolidation-related activity. These findings (i) resonate with the demonstration of hippocampal replay in rodents, and (ii) provide the first evidence that wakeful rest can improve the integration of new spatial memories in humans, a function that has, hitherto, been associated with sleep.

  13. Genome-Scale Metabolic Modeling in the Simulation of Field-Scale Uranium Bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabusaki, S.; Wilkins, M.; Fang, Y.; Williams, K. H.; Waichler, S.; Long, P. E.

    2015-12-01

    Coupled variably saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport modeling is used to improve understanding of the processes, properties, and conditions controlling uranium bio-immobilization in a field experiment where uranium-contaminated groundwater was amended with acetate and bicarbonate. The acetate stimulates indigenous microorganisms that catalyze metal reduction, including the conversion of aqueous U(VI) to solid-phase U(IV), which effectively removes uranium from solution. The initiation of the bicarbonate amendment prior to biostimulation was designed to promote U(VI) desorption that would increase the aqueous U(VI) available for bioreduction. The three-dimensional simulations were able to largely reproduce the timing and magnitude of the physical, chemical and biological responses to the acetate and bicarbonate amendment in the context of changing water table elevation and gradient. A time series of groundwater proteomic samples exhibited correlations between the most abundant Geobacter metallireducens proteins and the genome-scale metabolic model-predicted fluxes of intra-cellular reactions associated with each of those proteins. The desorption of U(VI) induced by the bicarbonate amendment led to initially higher rates of bioreduction compared to locations with minimal bicarbonate exposure. After bicarbonate amendment ceased, bioreduction continued at these locations whereas U(VI) sorption was the dominant removal mechanism at the bicarbonate-impacted sites.

  14. Revealing the mystery of metabolic adaptations using a genome scale model of Leishmania infantum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Abhishek; Sarkar, Ram Rup

    2017-08-31

    Human macrophage phagolysosome and sandfly midgut provide antagonistic ecological niches for Leishmania parasites to survive and proliferate. Parasites optimize their metabolism to utilize the available inadequate resources by adapting to those environments. Lately, a number of metabolomics studies have revived the interest to understand metabolic strategies utilized by the Leishmania parasite for optimal survival within its hosts. For the first time, we propose a reconstructed genome-scale metabolic model for Leishmania infantum JPCM5, the analyses of which not only captures observations reported by metabolomics studies in other Leishmania species but also divulges novel features of the L. infantum metabolome. Our results indicate that Leishmania metabolism is organized in such a way that the parasite can select appropriate alternatives to compensate for limited external substrates. A dynamic non-essential amino acid motif exists within the network that promotes a restricted redistribution of resources to yield required essential metabolites. Further, subcellular compartments regulate this metabolic re-routing by reinforcing the physiological coupling of specific reactions. This unique metabolic organization is robust against accidental errors and provides a wide array of choices for the parasite to achieve optimal survival.

  15. Mapping long-range promoter contacts in human cells with high-resolution capture Hi-C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifsud, Borbala; Tavares-Cadete, Filipe; Young, Alice N; Sugar, Robert; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Ferreira, Lauren; Wingett, Steven W; Andrews, Simon; Grey, William; Ewels, Philip A; Herman, Bram; Happe, Scott; Higgs, Andy; LeProust, Emily; Follows, George A; Fraser, Peter; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Osborne, Cameron S

    2015-06-01

    Transcriptional control in large genomes often requires looping interactions between distal DNA elements, such as enhancers and target promoters. Current chromosome conformation capture techniques do not offer sufficiently high resolution to interrogate these regulatory interactions on a genomic scale. Here we use Capture Hi-C (CHi-C), an adapted genome conformation assay, to examine the long-range interactions of almost 22,000 promoters in 2 human blood cell types. We identify over 1.6 million shared and cell type-restricted interactions spanning hundreds of kilobases between promoters and distal loci. Transcriptionally active genes contact enhancer-like elements, whereas transcriptionally inactive genes interact with previously uncharacterized elements marked by repressive features that may act as long-range silencers. Finally, we show that interacting loci are enriched for disease-associated SNPs, suggesting how distal mutations may disrupt the regulation of relevant genes. This study provides new insights and accessible tools to dissect the regulatory interactions that underlie normal and aberrant gene regulation.

  16. Do turning visited routes in black maps into white promote sightseeing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Tomoko; Nakatani, Yoshio

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a new approach for promoting visiting various areas during a sightseeing based on the "FUrther BENEfit of a Kind of Inconvenience" (FUBEN-EKI) theory. FUBEN-EKI is a theory such that an inconvenient system in some aspect enables users to obtain more hidden benefits than convenient systems. Familiar navigation systems lead tourists to time efficient routes, and so the systems may limit their opportunities for new discoveries during their sightseeing. It is supposed that if tourists walk freely in various areas then they will have more change to find new discoveries. To promote visiting various areas, we propose a blacked-out map: The map is hidden by a black filter initially, but only the area where the user moves becomes clear. Since the user cannot see the map of unvisited area, the user thinks that the unvisited area might have interesting sightseeing spots. Moreover, to make all of the area clear, the user have to go to all of the area on the map.

  17. GeoMapApp: Using Authentic Geoscience Data to Promote Student Engagement and Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwillie, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    We increasingly expect geoscience data to be readily and freely accessible via the web in formats that are easy to handle. Yet, we are often required to compile data sets with different formats from multiple sources and, sometimes, we give up in frustration. Fortunately, recent advances in web-enabled technologies are helping to lower barriers by bridging the gap of data accessibility and integration. GeoMapApp (http://www.geomapapp.org), a free data discovery and visualisation tool developed with NSF funding at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory provides users with an intuitive map-based interface. GeoMapApp offers free access to hundreds of integrated research-grade geoscience data sets. Examples include earthquake and volcano data, geological maps, lithospheric plate boundary information, geochemical, oceanographic, and environmental data. Users can also import their own data files. The GeoMapApp interface presents data in its proper geographical context that enhances geospatial awareness and helps students more easily gain insight and understanding from the data. Simple tools for data manipulation help students analyse the data in different ways. An improved Save Session function allows users to store a pre-loaded state of GeoMapApp. When shared with a class, the saved file frees up valuable classroom time for students to explore and interrogate the data by allowing every student to open GeoMapApp at exactly the same starting point. GeoMapApp is adaptable to a range of learning environments from lab sessions, group projects, and homework assignments to in-class pop-ups. A wide range of undergraduate enquiry-driven education modules for GeoMapApp is already available at SERC. In this presentation, we will show GeoMapApp-based activities that promote student engagement with authentic geoscience data and that provide a better sense of data "ownership" and of academic equality - GeoMapApp presents the same data in the same tool used by researchers. Topics covered

  18. The `MOON Mapping' Project to Promote Cooperation Between Students of Italy and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaioni, M.; Giommi, P.; Brunetti, M. T.; Carli, C.; Cerroni, P.; Cremonese, G.; Forlani, G.; Gamba, P.; Lavagna, M.; Melis, M. T.; Massironi, M.; Ori, G.; Salese, F.; Zinzi, A.; Xie, G.; Kang, Z.; Shi, R.; Sun, Y.; Wu, Y.

    2016-06-01

    The research project `Moon Mapping' has been established in 2014 between the Italian and Chinese Governments to promote cooperation and exchange between undergraduate students from both countries. The operational phase of the project started in early 2015, and will end in 2017, for a total length of three years. The main aim is to train new scholars to be able to work on different kinds of remotely-sensed data collected over the Moon surface by the Chinese space missions Chang'E-1/2. The project coordination has been assigned to the Italian Space Agency for the Italian side and to the Center of Space Exploration, China Ministry of Education, for the Chinese side. Several Chinese universities and Italian national research institutes and universities have been officially involved in this project. Six main research topics have been identified: (1) map of the solar wind ion; (2) geomorphological map of the Moon; (3) data preprocessing of Chang'E-1 mission; (4) map of element distribution; (5) establishment of 3D digital visualization system; and (6) compilation and publication of a tutorial on joint lunar mapping.

  19. TIGER: Toolbox for integrating genome-scale metabolic models, expression data, and transcriptional regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Paul A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several methods have been developed for analyzing genome-scale models of metabolism and transcriptional regulation. Many of these methods, such as Flux Balance Analysis, use constrained optimization to predict relationships between metabolic flux and the genes that encode and regulate enzyme activity. Recently, mixed integer programming has been used to encode these gene-protein-reaction (GPR relationships into a single optimization problem, but these techniques are often of limited generality and lack a tool for automating the conversion of rules to a coupled regulatory/metabolic model. Results We present TIGER, a Toolbox for Integrating Genome-scale Metabolism, Expression, and Regulation. TIGER converts a series of generalized, Boolean or multilevel rules into a set of mixed integer inequalities. The package also includes implementations of existing algorithms to integrate high-throughput expression data with genome-scale models of metabolism and transcriptional regulation. We demonstrate how TIGER automates the coupling of a genome-scale metabolic model with GPR logic and models of transcriptional regulation, thereby serving as a platform for algorithm development and large-scale metabolic analysis. Additionally, we demonstrate how TIGER's algorithms can be used to identify inconsistencies and improve existing models of transcriptional regulation with examples from the reconstructed transcriptional regulatory network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conclusion The TIGER package provides a consistent platform for algorithm development and extending existing genome-scale metabolic models with regulatory networks and high-throughput data.

  20. Genome-Scale Assessment of Age-Related DNA Methylation Changes in Mouse Spermatozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Norio; Okae, Hiroaki; Hiura, Hitoshi; Chiba, Hatsune; Shirakata, Yoshiki; Hara, Kenshiro; Tanemura, Kentaro; Arima, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation plays important roles in the production and functioning of spermatozoa. Recent studies have suggested that DNA methylation patterns in spermatozoa can change with age, but the regions susceptible to age-related methylation changes remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we conducted genome-scale DNA methylation profiling of spermatozoa obtained from C57BL/6N mice at 8 weeks (8w), 18 weeks (18w) and 17 months of age (17m). There was no substantial difference in the global DNA methylation patterns between 18w and 17m samples except for a slight increase of methylation levels in long interspersed nuclear elements in the 17m samples. We found that maternally methylated imprinting control regions (mICRs) and spermatogenesis-related gene promoters had 5–10% higher methylation levels in 8w samples than in 18w or 17m samples. Analysis of individual sequence reads suggested that these regions were fully methylated (80–100%) in a subset of 8w spermatozoa. These regions are also known to be highly methylated in a subset of postnatal spermatogonia, which might be the source of the increased DNA methylation in 8w spermatozoa. Another possible source was contamination by somatic cells. Although we carefully purified the spermatozoa, it was difficult to completely exclude the possibility of somatic cell contamination. Further studies are needed to clarify the source of the small increase in DNA methylation in the 8w samples. Overall, our findings suggest that DNA methylation patterns in mouse spermatozoa are relatively stable throughout reproductive life. PMID:27880848

  1. Accomplishments in genome-scale in silico modeling for industrial and medical biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Caroline B; Kim, Pan-Jun; Eddy, James A; Price, Nathan D

    2009-12-01

    Driven by advancements in high-throughput biological technologies and the growing number of sequenced genomes, the construction of in silico models at the genome scale has provided powerful tools to investigate a vast array of biological systems and applications. Here, we review comprehensively the uses of such models in industrial and medical biotechnology, including biofuel generation, food production, and drug development. While the use of in silico models is still in its early stages for delivering to industry, significant initial successes have been achieved. For the cases presented here, genome-scale models predict engineering strategies to enhance properties of interest in an organism or to inhibit harmful mechanisms of pathogens. Going forward, genome-scale in silico models promise to extend their application and analysis scope to become a trans-formative tool in biotechnology.

  2. Systems biology as a foundation for genome-scale synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Christian L; Kim, Tae Yong; Kim, Hyun Uk; Palsson, Bernhard Ø; Lee, Sang Yup

    2006-10-01

    As the ambitions of synthetic biology approach genome-scale engineering, comprehensive characterization of cellular systems is required, as well as a means to accurately model cell-scale molecular interactions. These requirements are coincident with the goals of systems biology and, thus, systems biology will become the foundation for genome-scale synthetic biology. Systems biology will form this foundation through its efforts to reconstruct and integrate cellular systems, develop the mathematics, theory and software tools for the accurate modeling of these integrated systems, and through evolutionary mechanisms. As genome-scale synthetic biology is so enabled, it will prove to be a positive feedback driver of systems biology by exposing and forcing researchers to confront those aspects of systems biology which are inadequately understood.

  3. Modeling Method for Increased Precision and Scope of Directly Measurable Fluxes at a Genome-Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCloskey, Douglas; Young, Jamey D.; Xu, Sibei

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) is considered to be the gold standard for determining the intracellular flux distribution of biological systems. The majority of work using MFA has been limited to core models of metabolism due to challenges in implementing genome-scale MFA and the undesirable trade...... distributions (MIDs),(1) it was found that a total of 232 net fluxes of central and peripheral metabolism could be resolved in the E. coli network. The increase in scope was shown to cover the full biosynthetic route to an expanded set of bioproduction pathways, which should facilitate applications......-off between increased scope and decreased precision in flux estimations. This work presents a tunable workflow for expanding the scope of MFA to the genome-scale without trade-offs in flux precision. The genome-scale MFA model presented here, iDM2014, accounts for 537 net reactions, which includes the core...

  4. Research Techniques Made Simple: Bioinformatics for Genome-Scale Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulkes, Amy C; Watson, David S; Griffiths, Christopher E M; Warren, Richard B; Huber, Wolfgang; Barnes, Michael R

    2017-09-01

    High-throughput biology presents unique opportunities and challenges for dermatological research. Drawing on a small handful of exemplary studies, we review some of the major lessons of these new technologies. We caution against several common errors and introduce helpful statistical concepts that may be unfamiliar to researchers without experience in bioinformatics. We recommend specific software tools that can aid dermatologists at varying levels of computational literacy, including platforms with command line and graphical user interfaces. The future of dermatology lies in integrative research, in which clinicians, laboratory scientists, and data analysts come together to plan, execute, and publish their work in open forums that promote critical discussion and reproducibility. In this article, we offer guidelines that we hope will steer researchers toward best practices for this new and dynamic era of data intensive dermatology. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. New approach for phylogenetic tree recovery based on genome-scale metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamermann, Daniel; Montagud, Arnaud; Conejero, J Alberto; Urchueguía, Javier F; de Córdoba, Pedro Fernández

    2014-07-01

    A wide range of applications and research has been done with genome-scale metabolic models. In this work, we describe an innovative methodology for comparing metabolic networks constructed from genome-scale metabolic models and how to apply this comparison in order to infer evolutionary distances between different organisms. Our methodology allows a quantification of the metabolic differences between different species from a broad range of families and even kingdoms. This quantification is then applied in order to reconstruct phylogenetic trees for sets of various organisms.

  6. Intervention Mapping to Develop a Print Resource for Dog-Walking Promotion in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Julia; Dwyer, John J M; Coe, Jason B

    2016-10-25

    Promoting dog walking among dog owners is consistent with One Health, which focuses on the mutual health benefits of the human-animal relationship for people and animals. In this study, we used intervention mapping (a framework to develop programs and resources for health promotion) to develop a clearer understanding of the determinants of dog walking to develop curricular and educational resources for promoting regular dog walking among dog owners. Twenty-six adult dog owners in Ontario participated in a semi-structured interview about dog walking in 2014. Thematic analysis entailing open, axial, and selective coding was conducted. Among the reasons why the participating dog owners walk their dog were the obligation to the dog, the motivation from the dog, self-efficacy, the dog's health, the owner's health, socialization, a well-behaved dog, and having a routine. The main barriers to dog walking were weather, lack of time, the dog's behavior while walking, and feeling unsafe. We compared interview results to findings in previous studies of dog walking to create a list of determinants of dog walking that we used to create a matrix of change objectives. Based on these results, we developed a print resource to promote regular dog walking among dog owners. The findings can be used by veterinary educators to inform course content that specifically educates veterinary students on the promotion of dog walking among dog owners and the benefits to both humans and animals. The study also offers veterinarians a further understanding upon which to initiate a conversation and develop educational resources for promoting regular dog walking among dog-owning clients.

  7. BiGG Models: A platform for integrating, standardizing and sharing genome-scale models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models are mathematically-structured knowledge bases that can be used to predict metabolic pathway usage and growth phenotypes. Furthermore, they can generate and test hypotheses when integrated with experimental data. To maximize the value of these models, centralized...

  8. Reliable and efficient solution of genome-scale models of Metabolism and macromolecular Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ding; Yang, Laurence; Fleming, Ronan M. T.

    2017-01-01

    Constraint-Based Reconstruction and Analysis (COBRA) is currently the only methodology that permits integrated modeling of Metabolism and macromolecular Expression (ME) at genome-scale. Linear optimization computes steady-state flux solutions to ME models, but flux values are spread over many...

  9. Interplay between Constraints, Objectives, and Optimality for Genome-Scale Stoichiometric Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maarleveld, T.R.; Wortel, M.; Olivier, B.G.; Teusink, B.; Bruggeman, F.J.

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput data generation and genome-scale stoichiometric models have greatly facilitated the comprehensive study of metabolic networks. The computation of all feasible metabolic routes with these models, given stoichiometric, thermodynamic, and steady-state constraints, provides important ins

  10. MultiMetEval : Comparative and Multi-Objective Analysis of Genome-Scale Metabolic Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zakrzewski, Piotr; Medema, Marnix H.; Gevorgyan, Albert; Kierzek, Andrzej M.; Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko; Fong, Stephen S.

    2012-01-01

    Comparative metabolic modelling is emerging as a novel field, supported by the development of reliable and standardized approaches for constructing genome-scale metabolic models in high throughput. New software solutions are needed to allow efficient comparative analysis of multiple models in the co

  11. Challenges in experimental data integration within genome-scale metabolic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Képès François

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A report of the meeting "Challenges in experimental data integration within genome-scale metabolic models", Institut Henri Poincaré, Paris, October 10-11 2009, organized by the CNRS-MPG joint program in Systems Biology.

  12. The architecture of ArgR-DNA complexes at the genome-scale in> Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, Suhyung; Cho, Yoo-Bok; Kang, Taek Jin;

    2015-01-01

    DNA-binding motifs that are recognized by transcription factors (TFs) have been well studied; however, challenges remain in determining the in vivo architecture of TF-DNA complexes on a genome-scale. Here, we determined the in vivo architecture of Escherichia coli arginine repressor (ArgR)-DNA co...

  13. A versatile genome-scale PCR-based pipeline for high-definition DNA FISH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bienko, M.; Crosetto, N.; Teytelman, L.; Klemm, S.; Itzkovitz, S.; van Oudenaarden, A.

    2013-01-01

    We developed a cost-effective genome-scale PCR-based method for high-definition DNA FISH (HD-FISH). We visualized gene loci with diffraction-limited resolution, chromosomes as spot clusters and single genes together with transcripts by combining HD-FISH with single-molecule RNA FISH. We provide a da

  14. Comparative genome-scale metabolic modeling of actinomycetes : The topology of essential core metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alam, Mohammad Tauqeer; Medema, Marnix H.; Takano, Eriko; Breitling, Rainer; Gojobori, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Actinomycetes are highly important bacteria. On one hand, some of them cause severe human and plant diseases, on the other hand, many species are known for their ability to produce antibiotics. Here we report the results of a comparative analysis of genome-scale metabolic models of 37 species of act

  15. Comparative genome-scale metabolic modeling of actinomycetes: the topology of essential core metabolism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alam, M.T.; Medema, M.H.; Takano, E.; Breitling, R.

    2011-01-01

    Actinomycetes are highly important bacteria. On one hand, some of them cause severe human and plant diseases, on the other hand, many species are known for their ability to produce antibiotics. Here we report the results of a comparative analysis of genome-scale metabolic models of 37 species of act

  16. Comparative genome-scale metabolic modeling of actinomycetes: the topology of essential core metabolism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alam, M.T.; Medema, M.H.; Takano, E.; Breitling, R.

    2011-01-01

    Actinomycetes are highly important bacteria. On one hand, some of them cause severe human and plant diseases, on the other hand, many species are known for their ability to produce antibiotics. Here we report the results of a comparative analysis of genome-scale metabolic models of 37 species of

  17. Comparative genome-scale metabolic modeling of actinomycetes : The topology of essential core metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alam, Mohammad Tauqeer; Medema, Marnix H.; Takano, Eriko; Breitling, Rainer; Gojobori, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Actinomycetes are highly important bacteria. On one hand, some of them cause severe human and plant diseases, on the other hand, many species are known for their ability to produce antibiotics. Here we report the results of a comparative analysis of genome-scale metabolic models of 37 species of

  18. A genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) and its application to photorespiratory metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huili; Cheung, C Y Maurice; Poolman, Mark G; Hilbers, Peter A J; van Riel, Natal A W

    2016-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) has been studied extensively due to its high economic value in the market, and high content in health-promoting antioxidant compounds. Tomato is also considered as an excellent model organism for studying the development and metabolism of fleshy fruits. However, the growth, yield and fruit quality of tomatoes can be affected by drought stress, a common abiotic stress for tomato. To investigate the potential metabolic response of tomato plants to drought, we reconstructed iHY3410, a genome-scale metabolic model of tomato leaf, and used this metabolic network to simulate tomato leaf metabolism. The resulting model includes 3410 genes and 2143 biochemical and transport reactions distributed across five intracellular organelles including cytosol, plastid, mitochondrion, peroxisome and vacuole. The model successfully described the known metabolic behaviour of tomato leaf under heterotrophic and phototrophic conditions. The in silico investigation of the metabolic characteristics for photorespiration and other relevant metabolic processes under drought stress suggested that: (i) the flux distributions through the mevalonate (MVA) pathway under drought were distinct from that under normal conditions; and (ii) the changes in fluxes through core metabolic pathways with varying flux ratio of RubisCO carboxylase to oxygenase may contribute to the adaptive stress response of plants. In addition, we improved on previous studies of reaction essentiality analysis for leaf metabolism by including potential alternative routes for compensating reaction knockouts. Altogether, the genome-scale model provides a sound framework for investigating tomato metabolism and gives valuable insights into the functional consequences of abiotic stresses. © 2015 The Authors.The Plant Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Development and experimental verification of a genome-scale metabolic model for Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirasawa Takashi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In silico genome-scale metabolic models enable the analysis of the characteristics of metabolic systems of organisms. In this study, we reconstructed a genome-scale metabolic model of Corynebacterium glutamicum on the basis of genome sequence annotation and physiological data. The metabolic characteristics were analyzed using flux balance analysis (FBA, and the results of FBA were validated using data from culture experiments performed at different oxygen uptake rates. Results The reconstructed genome-scale metabolic model of C. glutamicum contains 502 reactions and 423 metabolites. We collected the reactions and biomass components from the database and literatures, and made the model available for the flux balance analysis by filling gaps in the reaction networks and removing inadequate loop reactions. Using the framework of FBA and our genome-scale metabolic model, we first simulated the changes in the metabolic flux profiles that occur on changing the oxygen uptake rate. The predicted production yields of carbon dioxide and organic acids agreed well with the experimental data. The metabolic profiles of amino acid production phases were also investigated. A comprehensive gene deletion study was performed in which the effects of gene deletions on metabolic fluxes were simulated; this helped in the identification of several genes whose deletion resulted in an improvement in organic acid production. Conclusion The genome-scale metabolic model provides useful information for the evaluation of the metabolic capabilities and prediction of the metabolic characteristics of C. glutamicum. This can form a basis for the in silico design of C. glutamicum metabolic networks for improved bioproduction of desirable metabolites.

  20. Ensconsin/Map7 promotes microtubule growth and centrosome separation in Drosophila neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaud, Emmanuel; Caous, Renaud; Pascal, Aude; Bazile, Franck; Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Huet, Sébastien; Poirier, Guy G; Chrétien, Denis; Richard-Parpaillon, Laurent; Giet, Régis

    2014-03-31

    The mitotic spindle is crucial to achieve segregation of sister chromatids. To identify new mitotic spindle assembly regulators, we isolated 855 microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) from Drosophila melanogaster mitotic or interphasic embryos. Using RNAi, we screened 96 poorly characterized genes in the Drosophila central nervous system to establish their possible role during spindle assembly. We found that Ensconsin/MAP7 mutant neuroblasts display shorter metaphase spindles, a defect caused by a reduced microtubule polymerization rate and enhanced by centrosome ablation. In agreement with a direct effect in regulating spindle length, Ensconsin overexpression triggered an increase in spindle length in S2 cells, whereas purified Ensconsin stimulated microtubule polymerization in vitro. Interestingly, ensc-null mutant flies also display defective centrosome separation and positioning during interphase, a phenotype also detected in kinesin-1 mutants. Collectively, our results suggest that Ensconsin cooperates with its binding partner Kinesin-1 during interphase to trigger centrosome separation. In addition, Ensconsin promotes microtubule polymerization during mitosis to control spindle length independent of Kinesin-1.

  1. Genotype to phenotype mapping and the fitness landscape of the E. coli lac promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Otwinowski

    Full Text Available Genotype-to-phenotype maps and the related fitness landscapes that include epistatic interactions are difficult to measure because of their high dimensional structure. Here we construct such a map using the recently collected corpora of high-throughput sequence data from the 75 base pairs long mutagenized E. coli lac promoter region, where each sequence is associated with its phenotype, the induced transcriptional activity measured by a fluorescent reporter. We find that the additive (non-epistatic contributions of individual mutations account for about two-thirds of the explainable phenotype variance, while pairwise epistasis explains about 7% of the variance for the full mutagenized sequence and about 15% for the subsequence associated with protein binding sites. Surprisingly, there is no evidence for third order epistatic contributions, and our inferred fitness landscape is essentially single peaked, with a small amount of antagonistic epistasis. There is a significant selective pressure on the wild type, which we deduce to be multi-objective optimal for gene expression in environments with different nutrient sources. We identify transcription factor (CRP and RNA polymerase binding sites in the promotor region and their interactions without difficult optimization steps. In particular, we observe evidence for previously unexplored genetic regulatory mechanisms, possibly kinetic in nature. We conclude with a cautionary note that inferred properties of fitness landscapes may be severely influenced by biases in the sequence data.

  2. The RWP-RK factor GROUNDED promotes embryonic polarity by facilitating YODA MAP kinase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sangho; Palmer, Travis M; Lukowitz, Wolfgang

    2011-08-09

    The division of plant zygotes is typically asymmetric, generating daughter cells with different developmental fates. In Arabidopsis, the apical daughter cell produces the proembryo, whereas the basal daughter cell forms the mostly extraembryonic suspensor. Establishment of apical and basal fates is known to depend on the YODA (YDA) mitogen-associated protein (MAP) kinase cascade and WUSCHEL-LIKE HOMEOBOX (WOX) homeodomain transcription factors. Mutations in GROUNDED (GRD) cause anatomical defects implying a partial loss of developmental asymmetry in the first division. Subsequently, suspensor-specific WOX8 expression disappears while proembryo-specific ZLL expression expands in the mutants, revealing that basal fates are confounded. GRD encodes a small nuclear protein of the RWP-RK family and is broadly transcribed in the early embryo. Loss of GRD eliminates the dominant effects of hyperactive YDA variants, indicating that GRD is required for YDA-dependent signaling in the embryo. However, GRD function is not regulated via direct phosphorylation by MAP kinases, and forced expression of GRD does not suppress the effect of yda mutations. In a strong synthetic interaction, grd;wox8;wox9 triple mutants arrest as zygotes or one-cell embryos lacking apparent polarity. The predicted transcription factor GRD acts cooperatively with WOX homeodomain proteins to establish embryonic polarity in the first division. Like YDA, GRD promotes zygote elongation and basal cell fates. GRD function is required for YDA-dependent signaling but apparently not regulated by the YDA MAP kinase cascade. Similarity of GRD to Chlamydomonas MID suggests a conserved role for small RWP-RK proteins in regulating the transcriptional programs of generative cells and the zygote. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Acorn: A grid computing system for constraint based modeling and visualization of the genome scale metabolic reaction networks via a web interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bushell Michael E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Constraint-based approaches facilitate the prediction of cellular metabolic capabilities, based, in turn on predictions of the repertoire of enzymes encoded in the genome. Recently, genome annotations have been used to reconstruct genome scale metabolic reaction networks for numerous species, including Homo sapiens, which allow simulations that provide valuable insights into topics, including predictions of gene essentiality of pathogens, interpretation of genetic polymorphism in metabolic disease syndromes and suggestions for novel approaches to microbial metabolic engineering. These constraint-based simulations are being integrated with the functional genomics portals, an activity that requires efficient implementation of the constraint-based simulations in the web-based environment. Results Here, we present Acorn, an open source (GNU GPL grid computing system for constraint-based simulations of genome scale metabolic reaction networks within an interactive web environment. The grid-based architecture allows efficient execution of computationally intensive, iterative protocols such as Flux Variability Analysis, which can be readily scaled up as the numbers of models (and users increase. The web interface uses AJAX, which facilitates efficient model browsing and other search functions, and intuitive implementation of appropriate simulation conditions. Research groups can install Acorn locally and create user accounts. Users can also import models in the familiar SBML format and link reaction formulas to major functional genomics portals of choice. Selected models and simulation results can be shared between different users and made publically available. Users can construct pathway map layouts and import them into the server using a desktop editor integrated within the system. Pathway maps are then used to visualise numerical results within the web environment. To illustrate these features we have deployed Acorn and created a

  4. Metingear: a development environment for annotating genome-scale metabolic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, John W; James, A Gordon; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2013-09-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models often lack annotations that would allow them to be used for further analysis. Previous efforts have focused on associating metabolites in the model with a cross reference, but this can be problematic if the reference is not freely available, multiple resources are used or the metabolite is added from a literature review. Associating each metabolite with chemical structure provides unambiguous identification of the components and a more detailed view of the metabolism. We have developed an open-source desktop application that simplifies the process of adding database cross references and chemical structures to genome-scale metabolic models. Annotated models can be exported to the Systems Biology Markup Language open interchange format. Source code, binaries, documentation and tutorials are freely available at http://johnmay.github.com/metingear. The application is implemented in Java with bundles available for MS Windows and Macintosh OS X.

  5. Genome-scale metabolic model of Pichia pastoris with native and humanized glycosylation of recombinant proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irani, Zahra Azimzadeh; Kerkhoven, Eduard J.; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas;

    2016-01-01

    Pichia pastoris is used for commercial production of human therapeutic proteins, and genome-scale models of P. pastoris metabolism have been generated in the past to study the metabolism and associated protein production by this yeast. A major challenge with clinical usage of recombinant proteins...... produced by P. pastoris is the difference in N-glycosylation of proteins produced by humans and this yeast. However, through metabolic engineering, a P. pastoris strain capable of producing humanized N-glycosylated proteins was constructed. The current genome-scale models of P. pastoris do not address...... native nor humanized N-glycosylation, and we therefore developed ihGlycopastoris, an extension to the iLC915 model with both native and humanized N-glycosylation for recombinant protein production, but also an estimation of N-glycosylation of P. pastoris native proteins. This new model gives a better...

  6. Basic and applied uses of genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCloskey, Douglas; Palsson, Bernhard; Feist, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The genome-scale model (GEM) of metabolism in the bacterium Escherichia coli K-12 has been in development for over a decade and is now in wide use. GEM-enabled studies of E. coli have been primarily focused on six applications: (1) metabolic engineering, (2) model-driven discovery, (3) prediction...... of cellular phenotypes, (4) analysis of biological network properties, (5) studies of evolutionary processes, and (6) models of interspecies interactions. In this review, we provide an overview of these applications along with a critical assessment of their successes and limitations, and a perspective...... on likely future developments in the field. Taken together, the studies performed over the past decade have established a genome-scale mechanistic understanding of genotype-phenotype relationships in E. coli metabolism that forms the basis for similar efforts for other microbial species. Future challenges...

  7. Generation and Evaluation of a Genome-Scale Metabolic Network Model of Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Triana

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of genome-scale metabolic models and their applications represent a great advantage of systems biology. Through their use as metabolic flux simulation models, production of industrially-interesting metabolites can be predicted. Due to the growing number of studies of metabolic models driven by the increasing genomic sequencing projects, it is important to conceptualize steps of reconstruction and analysis. We have focused our work in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942, for which several analyses and insights are unveiled. A comprehensive approach has been used, which can be of interest to lead the process of manual curation and genome-scale metabolic analysis. The final model, iSyf715 includes 851 reactions and 838 metabolites. A biomass equation, which encompasses elementary building blocks to allow cell growth, is also included. The applicability of the model is finally demonstrated by simulating autotrophic growth conditions of Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942.

  8. Integration of expression data in genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna S. Blazier

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of high-throughput technologies, the field of systems biology has amassed an abundance of omics data, quantifying thousands of cellular components across a variety of scales, ranging from mRNA transcript levels to metabolite quantities. Methods are needed to not only integrate this omics data but to also use this data to heighten the predictive capabilities of computational models. Several recent studies have successfully demonstrated how flux balance analysis (FBA, a constraint-based modeling approach, can be used to integrate transcriptomic data into genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions to generate predictive computational models. In this review, we summarize such FBA-based methods for integrating expression data into genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions, highlighting their advantages as well as their limitations.

  9. Generation and Evaluation of a Genome-Scale Metabolic Network Model of Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triana, Julián; Montagud†, Arnau; Siurana, Maria; Fuente, David; Urchueguía, Arantxa; Gamermann, Daniel; Torres, Javier; Tena, Jose; de Córdoba, Pedro Fernández; Urchueguía, Javier F.

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of genome-scale metabolic models and their applications represent a great advantage of systems biology. Through their use as metabolic flux simulation models, production of industrially-interesting metabolites can be predicted. Due to the growing number of studies of metabolic models driven by the increasing genomic sequencing projects, it is important to conceptualize steps of reconstruction and analysis. We have focused our work in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942, for which several analyses and insights are unveiled. A comprehensive approach has been used, which can be of interest to lead the process of manual curation and genome-scale metabolic analysis. The final model, iSyf715 includes 851 reactions and 838 metabolites. A biomass equation, which encompasses elementary building blocks to allow cell growth, is also included. The applicability of the model is finally demonstrated by simulating autotrophic growth conditions of Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942. PMID:25141288

  10. In Silico Genome-Scale Reconstruction and Validation of the Corynebacterium glutamicum Metabolic Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Kjeld Raunkjær; Nielsen, J.

    2009-01-01

    A genome-scale metabolic model of the Gram-positive bacteria Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 was constructed comprising 446 reactions and 411 metabolite, based on the annotated genome and available biochemical information. The network was analyzed using constraint based methods. The model...... and lactate. Comparable flux values between in silico model and experimental values were seen, although some differences in the phenotypic behavior between the model and the experimental data were observed,...

  11. A versatile genome-scale PCR-based pipeline for high-definition DNA FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienko, Magda; Crosetto, Nicola; Teytelman, Leonid; Klemm, Sandy; Itzkovitz, Shalev; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2013-02-01

    We developed a cost-effective genome-scale PCR-based method for high-definition DNA FISH (HD-FISH). We visualized gene loci with diffraction-limited resolution, chromosomes as spot clusters and single genes together with transcripts by combining HD-FISH with single-molecule RNA FISH. We provide a database of over 4.3 million primer pairs targeting the human and mouse genomes that is readily usable for rapid and flexible generation of probes.

  12. High-throughput mapping of the promoters of the mouse olfactory receptor genes reveals a new type of mammalian promoter and provides insight into olfactory receptor gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clowney, E Josephine; Magklara, Angeliki; Colquitt, Bradley M; Pathak, Nidhi; Lane, Robert P; Lomvardas, Stavros

    2011-08-01

    The olfactory receptor (OR) genes are the largest mammalian gene family and are expressed in a monogenic and monoallelic fashion in olfactory neurons. Using a high-throughput approach, we mapped the transcription start sites of 1085 of the 1400 murine OR genes and performed computational analysis that revealed potential transcription factor binding sites shared by the majority of these promoters. Our analysis produced a hierarchical model for OR promoter recognition in which unusually high AT content, a unique epigenetic signature, and a stereotypically positioned O/E site distinguish OR promoters from the rest of the murine promoters. Our computations revealed an intriguing correlation between promoter AT content and evolutionary plasticity, as the most AT-rich promoters regulate rapidly evolving gene families. Within the AT-rich promoter category the position of the TATA-box does not correlate with the transcription start site. Instead, a spike in GC composition might define the exact location of the TSS, introducing the concept of "genomic contrast" in transcriptional regulation. Finally, our experiments show that genomic neighborhood rather than promoter sequence correlates with the probability of different OR genes to be expressed in the same olfactory cell.

  13. Diagnostics for stochastic genome-scale modeling via model slicing and debugging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J Tsai

    Full Text Available Modeling of biological behavior has evolved from simple gene expression plots represented by mathematical equations to genome-scale systems biology networks. However, due to obstacles in complexity and scalability of creating genome-scale models, several biological modelers have turned to programming or scripting languages and away from modeling fundamentals. In doing so, they have traded the ability to have exchangeable, standardized model representation formats, while those that remain true to standardized model representation are faced with challenges in model complexity and analysis. We have developed a model diagnostic methodology inspired by program slicing and debugging and demonstrate the effectiveness of the methodology on a genome-scale metabolic network model published in the BioModels database. The computer-aided identification revealed specific points of interest such as reversibility of reactions, initialization of species amounts, and parameter estimation that improved a candidate cell's adenosine triphosphate production. We then compared the advantages of our methodology over other modeling techniques such as model checking and model reduction. A software application that implements the methodology is available at http://gel.ym.edu.tw/gcs/.

  14. Genome-scale modeling of human metabolism - a systems biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardinoglu, Adil; Gatto, Francesco; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-09-01

    Altered metabolism is linked to the appearance of various human diseases and a better understanding of disease-associated metabolic changes may lead to the identification of novel prognostic biomarkers and the development of new therapies. Genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) have been employed for studying human metabolism in a systematic manner, as well as for understanding complex human diseases. In the past decade, such metabolic models - one of the fundamental aspects of systems biology - have started contributing to the understanding of the mechanistic relationship between genotype and phenotype. In this review, we focus on the construction of the Human Metabolic Reaction database, the generation of healthy cell type- and cancer-specific GEMs using different procedures, and the potential applications of these developments in the study of human metabolism and in the identification of metabolic changes associated with various disorders. We further examine how in silico genome-scale reconstructions can be employed to simulate metabolic flux distributions and how high-throughput omics data can be analyzed in a context-dependent fashion. Insights yielded from this mechanistic modeling approach can be used for identifying new therapeutic agents and drug targets as well as for the discovery of novel biomarkers. Finally, recent advancements in genome-scale modeling and the future challenge of developing a model of whole-body metabolism are presented. The emergent contribution of GEMs to personalized and translational medicine is also discussed. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Modeling Method for Increased Precision and Scope of Directly Measurable Fluxes at a Genome-Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, Douglas; Young, Jamey D; Xu, Sibei; Palsson, Bernhard O; Feist, Adam M

    2016-04-05

    Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) is considered to be the gold standard for determining the intracellular flux distribution of biological systems. The majority of work using MFA has been limited to core models of metabolism due to challenges in implementing genome-scale MFA and the undesirable trade-off between increased scope and decreased precision in flux estimations. This work presents a tunable workflow for expanding the scope of MFA to the genome-scale without trade-offs in flux precision. The genome-scale MFA model presented here, iDM2014, accounts for 537 net reactions, which includes the core pathways of traditional MFA models and also covers the additional pathways of purine, pyrimidine, isoprenoid, methionine, riboflavin, coenzyme A, and folate, as well as other biosynthetic pathways. When evaluating the iDM2014 using a set of measured intracellular intermediate and cofactor mass isotopomer distributions (MIDs),1 it was found that a total of 232 net fluxes of central and peripheral metabolism could be resolved in the E. coli network. The increase in scope was shown to cover the full biosynthetic route to an expanded set of bioproduction pathways, which should facilitate applications such as the design of more complex bioprocessing strains and aid in identifying new antimicrobials. Importantly, it was found that there was no loss in precision of core fluxes when compared to a traditional core model, and additionally there was an overall increase in precision when considering all observable reactions.

  16. Diagnostics for stochastic genome-scale modeling via model slicing and debugging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kevin J; Chang, Chuan-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    Modeling of biological behavior has evolved from simple gene expression plots represented by mathematical equations to genome-scale systems biology networks. However, due to obstacles in complexity and scalability of creating genome-scale models, several biological modelers have turned to programming or scripting languages and away from modeling fundamentals. In doing so, they have traded the ability to have exchangeable, standardized model representation formats, while those that remain true to standardized model representation are faced with challenges in model complexity and analysis. We have developed a model diagnostic methodology inspired by program slicing and debugging and demonstrate the effectiveness of the methodology on a genome-scale metabolic network model published in the BioModels database. The computer-aided identification revealed specific points of interest such as reversibility of reactions, initialization of species amounts, and parameter estimation that improved a candidate cell's adenosine triphosphate production. We then compared the advantages of our methodology over other modeling techniques such as model checking and model reduction. A software application that implements the methodology is available at http://gel.ym.edu.tw/gcs/.

  17. BiGG Models: A platform for integrating, standardizing and sharing genome-scale models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Zachary A; Lu, Justin; Dräger, Andreas; Miller, Philip; Federowicz, Stephen; Lerman, Joshua A; Ebrahim, Ali; Palsson, Bernhard O; Lewis, Nathan E

    2016-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models are mathematically-structured knowledge bases that can be used to predict metabolic pathway usage and growth phenotypes. Furthermore, they can generate and test hypotheses when integrated with experimental data. To maximize the value of these models, centralized repositories of high-quality models must be established, models must adhere to established standards and model components must be linked to relevant databases. Tools for model visualization further enhance their utility. To meet these needs, we present BiGG Models (http://bigg.ucsd.edu), a completely redesigned Biochemical, Genetic and Genomic knowledge base. BiGG Models contains more than 75 high-quality, manually-curated genome-scale metabolic models. On the website, users can browse, search and visualize models. BiGG Models connects genome-scale models to genome annotations and external databases. Reaction and metabolite identifiers have been standardized across models to conform to community standards and enable rapid comparison across models. Furthermore, BiGG Models provides a comprehensive application programming interface for accessing BiGG Models with modeling and analysis tools. As a resource for highly curated, standardized and accessible models of metabolism, BiGG Models will facilitate diverse systems biology studies and support knowledge-based analysis of diverse experimental data.

  18. Activation of stress-activated MAP protein kinases up-regulates expression of transgenes driven by the cytomegalovirus immediate/early promoter.

    OpenAIRE

    Bruening, W; Giasson, B; Mushynski, W; Durham, H D

    1998-01-01

    The immediate/early promoter/enhancer of cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter) is one of the most commonly used promoters for expression of transgenes in eukaryotic cells. In practice, the CMV promoter is often thought of as a constitutively active unregulated promoter. However, we have observed that transcription from the CMV promoter can be up-regulated by a variety of environmental stresses. Many forms of cellular stress stimulate MAP kinase signalling pathways, resulting in activation of stress-...

  19. Genome-scale reconstruction of the Streptococcus pyogenes M49 metabolic network reveals growth requirements and indicates potential drug targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levering, J.; Fiedler, T.; Sieg, A.; van Grinsven, K.W.A.; Hering, S.; Veith, N.; Olivier, B.G.; Klett, L.; Hugenholtz, J.; Teusink, B.; Kreikemeyer, B.; Kummer, U.

    2016-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models comprise stoichiometric relations between metabolites, as well as associations between genes and metabolic reactions and facilitate the analysis of metabolism. We computationally reconstructed the metabolic network of the lactic acid bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes M49

  20. Characterizing the optimal flux space of genome-scale metabolic reconstructions through modified latin-hypercube sampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaudhary, N.; Tøndel, K.; Bhatnagar, R.; Martins dos Santos, V.A.P.; Puchalka, J.

    2016-01-01

    Genome-Scale Metabolic Reconstructions (GSMRs), along with optimization-based methods, predominantly Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) and its derivatives, are widely applied for assessing and predicting the behavior of metabolic networks upon perturbation, thereby enabling identification of potential nov

  1. Systematic planning of genome-scale experiments in poorly studied species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yuanfang; Dunham, Maitreya; Caudy, Amy; Troyanskaya, Olga

    2010-03-05

    Genome-scale datasets have been used extensively in model organisms to screen for specific candidates or to predict functions for uncharacterized genes. However, despite the availability of extensive knowledge in model organisms, the planning of genome-scale experiments in poorly studied species is still based on the intuition of experts or heuristic trials. We propose that computational and systematic approaches can be applied to drive the experiment planning process in poorly studied species based on available data and knowledge in closely related model organisms. In this paper, we suggest a computational strategy for recommending genome-scale experiments based on their capability to interrogate diverse biological processes to enable protein function assignment. To this end, we use the data-rich functional genomics compendium of the model organism to quantify the accuracy of each dataset in predicting each specific biological process and the overlap in such coverage between different datasets. Our approach uses an optimized combination of these quantifications to recommend an ordered list of experiments for accurately annotating most proteins in the poorly studied related organisms to most biological processes, as well as a set of experiments that target each specific biological process. The effectiveness of this experiment- planning system is demonstrated for two related yeast species: the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the comparatively poorly studied Saccharomyces bayanus. Our system recommended a set of S. bayanus experiments based on an S. cerevisiae microarray data compendium. In silico evaluations estimate that less than 10% of the experiments could achieve similar functional coverage to the whole microarray compendium. This estimation was confirmed by performing the recommended experiments in S. bayanus, therefore significantly reducing the labor devoted to characterize the poorly studied genome. This experiment-planning framework could

  2. Genome-scale dynamic modeling of the competition between Rhodoferax and Geobacter in anoxic subsurface environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Kai; Izallalen, Mounir; Mouser, Paula; Richter, Hanno; Risso, Carla; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Lovley, Derek R

    2011-02-01

    The advent of rapid complete genome sequencing, and the potential to capture this information in genome-scale metabolic models, provide the possibility of comprehensively modeling microbial community interactions. For example, Rhodoferax and Geobacter species are acetate-oxidizing Fe(III)-reducers that compete in anoxic subsurface environments and this competition may have an influence on the in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater. Therefore, genome-scale models of Geobacter sulfurreducens and Rhodoferax ferrireducens were used to evaluate how Geobacter and Rhodoferax species might compete under diverse conditions found in a uranium-contaminated aquifer in Rifle, CO. The model predicted that at the low rates of acetate flux expected under natural conditions at the site, Rhodoferax will outcompete Geobacter as long as sufficient ammonium is available. The model also predicted that when high concentrations of acetate are added during in situ bioremediation, Geobacter species would predominate, consistent with field-scale observations. This can be attributed to the higher expected growth yields of Rhodoferax and the ability of Geobacter to fix nitrogen. The modeling predicted relative proportions of Geobacter and Rhodoferax in geochemically distinct zones of the Rifle site that were comparable to those that were previously documented with molecular techniques. The model also predicted that under nitrogen fixation, higher carbon and electron fluxes would be diverted toward respiration rather than biomass formation in Geobacter, providing a potential explanation for enhanced in situ U(VI) reduction in low-ammonium zones. These results show that genome-scale modeling can be a useful tool for predicting microbial interactions in subsurface environments and shows promise for designing bioremediation strategies.

  3. Rapid Prototyping of Microbial Cell Factories via Genome-scale Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Tong; Xiao, Han; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-01-01

    Advances in reading, writing and editing genetic materials have greatly expanded our ability to reprogram biological systems at the resolution of a single nucleotide and on the scale of a whole genome. Such capacity has greatly accelerated the cycles of design, build and test to engineer microbes for efficient synthesis of fuels, chemicals and drugs. In this review, we summarize the emerging technologies that have been applied, or are potentially useful for genome-scale engineering in microbial systems. We will focus on the development of high-throughput methodologies, which may accelerate the prototyping of microbial cell factories. PMID:25450192

  4. The future of genome-scale modeling of yeast through integration of a transcriptional regulatory network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Guodong; Marras, Antonio; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    regulatory information is necessary to improve the accuracy and predictive ability of metabolic models. Here we review the strategies for the reconstruction of a transcriptional regulatory network (TRN) for yeast and the integration of such a reconstruction into a flux balance analysis-based metabolic model......Metabolism is regulated at multiple levels in response to the changes of internal or external conditions. Transcriptional regulation plays an important role in regulating many metabolic reactions by altering the concentrations of metabolic enzymes. Thus, integration of the transcriptional...... transcriptional regulatory interactions to genome-scale metabolic models in a quantitative manner....

  5. Rapid prototyping of microbial cell factories via genome-scale engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Tong; Xiao, Han; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-11-15

    Advances in reading, writing and editing genetic materials have greatly expanded our ability to reprogram biological systems at the resolution of a single nucleotide and on the scale of a whole genome. Such capacity has greatly accelerated the cycles of design, build and test to engineer microbes for efficient synthesis of fuels, chemicals and drugs. In this review, we summarize the emerging technologies that have been applied, or are potentially useful for genome-scale engineering in microbial systems. We will focus on the development of high-throughput methodologies, which may accelerate the prototyping of microbial cell factories.

  6. Genome-scale cold stress response regulatory networks in ten Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barah, Pankaj; Jayavelu, Naresh Doni; Rasmussen, Simon

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low temperature leads to major crop losses every year. Although several studies have been conducted focusing on diversity of cold tolerance level in multiple phenotypically divergent Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) ecotypes, genome-scale molecular understanding is still lacking...... using Arabidopsis NimbleGen ATH6 microarrays. In total 6061 transcripts were significantly cold regulated (p ... be crucial for their local geographic adaptation to cold temperature. Additionally, since the approach presented here is general, it could be adapted to study networks regulating biological process in any biological systems....

  7. Mapping of INS promoter interactions reveals its role in long-range regulation of SYT8 transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhixiong; Wei, Gang; Chepelev, Iouri; Zhao, Keji; Felsenfeld, Gary

    2011-03-01

    Insulin (INS) synthesis and secretion from pancreatic β-cells are tightly regulated; their deregulation causes diabetes. Here we map INS-associated loci in human pancreatic islets by 4C and 3C techniques and show that the INS gene physically interacts with the SYT8 gene, located over 300 kb away. This interaction is elevated by glucose and accompanied by increases in SYT8 expression. Inactivation of the INS promoter by promoter-targeting siRNA reduces SYT8 gene expression. SYT8-INS interaction and SYT8 transcription are attenuated by CTCF depletion. Furthermore, SYT8 knockdown decreases insulin secretion in islets. These results reveal a nonredundant role for SYT8 in insulin secretion and indicate that the INS promoter acts from a distance to stimulate SYT8 transcription. This suggests a function for the INS promoter in coordinating insulin transcription and secretion through long-range regulation of SYT8 expression in human islets.

  8. MAPs/bFGF-PLGA microsphere composite-coated titanium surfaces promote increased adhesion and proliferation of fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongshan; Wu, Guofeng; Bai, Shizhu; Feng, Zhihong; Dong, Yan; Zhou, Jian; Qin, Haiyan; Zhao, Yimin

    2014-06-01

    Infection and epithelial downgrowth are two major problems with maxillofacial transcutaneous implants, and both are mainly due to lack of stable closure of soft tissues at transcutaneous sites. Fibroblasts have been shown to play a key role in the formation of biological seals. In this work, titanium (Ti) model surfaces were coated with mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs) utilizing its unique adhesion ability on diverse inorganic and organic surfaces in wet environments. Prepared basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres can be easily synthesized and combined onto MAPs-coated Ti surfaces, due to the negative surface charges of microspheres in aqueous solution, which is in contrast to the positive charges of MAPs. Titanium model surfaces were divided into three groups. Group A: MAPs/bFGF-PLGA microspheres composite-coated Ti surfaces. Group B: MAPs-coated Ti surfaces. Group C: uncoated Ti surfaces. The effects of coated Ti surfaces on adhesion of fibroblasts, cytoskeletal organization, proliferation, and extracellular matrix (ECM)-related gene expressions were examined. The results revealed increased adhesion (P composite-coated Ti surfaces had the ability to increase fibroblast functionality. In addition, MAPs/bFGF-PLGA microsphere composite-coated Ti surfaces should be studied further as a method of promoting formation of stable biological seals around transcutaneous sites.

  9. Genome-Scale Model Reveals Metabolic Basis of Biomass Partitioning in a Model Diatom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Levering

    Full Text Available Diatoms are eukaryotic microalgae that contain genes from various sources, including bacteria and the secondary endosymbiotic host. Due to this unique combination of genes, diatoms are taxonomically and functionally distinct from other algae and vascular plants and confer novel metabolic capabilities. Based on the genome annotation, we performed a genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction for the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum. Due to their endosymbiotic origin, diatoms possess a complex chloroplast structure which complicates the prediction of subcellular protein localization. Based on previous work we implemented a pipeline that exploits a series of bioinformatics tools to predict protein localization. The manually curated reconstructed metabolic network iLB1027_lipid accounts for 1,027 genes associated with 4,456 reactions and 2,172 metabolites distributed across six compartments. To constrain the genome-scale model, we determined the organism specific biomass composition in terms of lipids, carbohydrates, and proteins using Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. Our simulations indicate the presence of a yet unknown glutamine-ornithine shunt that could be used to transfer reducing equivalents generated by photosynthesis to the mitochondria. The model reflects the known biochemical composition of P. tricornutum in defined culture conditions and enables metabolic engineering strategies to improve the use of P. tricornutum for biotechnological applications.

  10. Genome-scale reconstruction of metabolic networks of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 and 12A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Vinay-Lara

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus casei strains are widely used in industry and the utility of this organism in these industrial applications is strain dependent. Hence, tools capable of predicting strain specific phenotypes would have utility in the selection of strains for specific industrial processes. Genome-scale metabolic models can be utilized to better understand genotype-phenotype relationships and to compare different organisms. To assist in the selection and development of strains with enhanced industrial utility, genome-scale models for L. casei ATCC 334, a well characterized strain, and strain 12A, a corn silage isolate, were constructed. Draft models were generated from RAST genome annotations using the Model SEED database and refined by evaluating ATP generating cycles, mass-and-charge-balances of reactions, and growth phenotypes. After the validation process was finished, we compared the metabolic networks of these two strains to identify metabolic, genetic and ortholog differences that may lead to different phenotypic behaviors. We conclude that the metabolic capabilities of the two networks are highly similar. The L. casei ATCC 334 model accounts for 1,040 reactions, 959 metabolites and 548 genes, while the L. casei 12A model accounts for 1,076 reactions, 979 metabolites and 640 genes. The developed L. casei ATCC 334 and 12A metabolic models will enable better understanding of the physiology of these organisms and be valuable tools in the development and selection of strains with enhanced utility in a variety of industrial applications.

  11. Metingear: a development environment for annotating genome-scale metabolic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, John W.; James, A. Gordon; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Genome-scale metabolic models often lack annotations that would allow them to be used for further analysis. Previous efforts have focused on associating metabolites in the model with a cross reference, but this can be problematic if the reference is not freely available, multiple resources are used or the metabolite is added from a literature review. Associating each metabolite with chemical structure provides unambiguous identification of the components and a more detailed view of the metabolism. We have developed an open-source desktop application that simplifies the process of adding database cross references and chemical structures to genome-scale metabolic models. Annotated models can be exported to the Systems Biology Markup Language open interchange format. Availability: Source code, binaries, documentation and tutorials are freely available at http://johnmay.github.com/metingear. The application is implemented in Java with bundles available for MS Windows and Macintosh OS X. Contact: johnmay@ebi.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23766418

  12. Genome-Scale Model Reveals Metabolic Basis of Biomass Partitioning in a Model Diatom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levering, Jennifer; Broddrick, Jared; Dupont, Christopher L; Peers, Graham; Beeri, Karen; Mayers, Joshua; Gallina, Alessandra A; Allen, Andrew E; Palsson, Bernhard O; Zengler, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms are eukaryotic microalgae that contain genes from various sources, including bacteria and the secondary endosymbiotic host. Due to this unique combination of genes, diatoms are taxonomically and functionally distinct from other algae and vascular plants and confer novel metabolic capabilities. Based on the genome annotation, we performed a genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction for the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum. Due to their endosymbiotic origin, diatoms possess a complex chloroplast structure which complicates the prediction of subcellular protein localization. Based on previous work we implemented a pipeline that exploits a series of bioinformatics tools to predict protein localization. The manually curated reconstructed metabolic network iLB1027_lipid accounts for 1,027 genes associated with 4,456 reactions and 2,172 metabolites distributed across six compartments. To constrain the genome-scale model, we determined the organism specific biomass composition in terms of lipids, carbohydrates, and proteins using Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. Our simulations indicate the presence of a yet unknown glutamine-ornithine shunt that could be used to transfer reducing equivalents generated by photosynthesis to the mitochondria. The model reflects the known biochemical composition of P. tricornutum in defined culture conditions and enables metabolic engineering strategies to improve the use of P. tricornutum for biotechnological applications.

  13. Genome-scale metabolic network of Cordyceps militaris useful for comparative analysis of entomopathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongsangnak, Wanwipa; Raethong, Nachon; Mujchariyakul, Warasinee; Nguyen, Nam Ninh; Leong, Hon Wai; Laoteng, Kobkul

    2017-08-30

    The first genome-scale metabolic network of Cordyceps militaris (iWV1170) was constructed representing its whole metabolisms, which consisted of 894 metabolites and 1,267 metabolic reactions across five compartments, including the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, mitochondria, peroxisome and extracellular space. The iWV1170 could be exploited to explain its phenotypes of growth ability, cordycepin and other metabolites production on various substrates. A high number of genes encoding extracellular enzymes for degradation of complex carbohydrates, lipids and proteins were existed in C. militaris genome. By comparative genome-scale analysis, the adenine metabolic pathway towards putative cordycepin biosynthesis was reconstructed, indicating their evolutionary relationships across eleven species of entomopathogenic fungi. The overall metabolic routes involved in the putative cordycepin biosynthesis were also identified in C. militaris, including central carbon metabolism, amino acid metabolism (glycine, l-glutamine and l-aspartate) and nucleotide metabolism (adenosine and adenine). Interestingly, a lack of the sequence coding for ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor was observed in C. militaris that might contribute to its over-production of cordycepin. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. A mixed-integer linear programming approach to the reduction of genome-scale metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhl, Annika; Bockmayr, Alexander

    2017-01-03

    Constraint-based analysis has become a widely used method to study metabolic networks. While some of the associated algorithms can be applied to genome-scale network reconstructions with several thousands of reactions, others are limited to small or medium-sized models. In 2015, Erdrich et al. introduced a method called NetworkReducer, which reduces large metabolic networks to smaller subnetworks, while preserving a set of biological requirements that can be specified by the user. Already in 2001, Burgard et al. developed a mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) approach for computing minimal reaction sets under a given growth requirement. Here we present an MILP approach for computing minimum subnetworks with the given properties. The minimality (with respect to the number of active reactions) is not guaranteed by NetworkReducer, while the method by Burgard et al. does not allow specifying the different biological requirements. Our procedure is about 5-10 times faster than NetworkReducer and can enumerate all minimum subnetworks in case there exist several ones. This allows identifying common reactions that are present in all subnetworks, and reactions appearing in alternative pathways. Applying complex analysis methods to genome-scale metabolic networks is often not possible in practice. Thus it may become necessary to reduce the size of the network while keeping important functionalities. We propose a MILP solution to this problem. Compared to previous work, our approach is more efficient and allows computing not only one, but even all minimum subnetworks satisfying the required properties.

  15. Investigating host-pathogen behavior and their interaction using genome-scale metabolic network models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhukhan, Priyanka P; Raghunathan, Anu

    2014-01-01

    Genome Scale Metabolic Modeling methods represent one way to compute whole cell function starting from the genome sequence of an organism and contribute towards understanding and predicting the genotype-phenotype relationship. About 80 models spanning all the kingdoms of life from archaea to eukaryotes have been built till date and used to interrogate cell phenotype under varying conditions. These models have been used to not only understand the flux distribution in evolutionary conserved pathways like glycolysis and the Krebs cycle but also in applications ranging from value added product formation in Escherichia coli to predicting inborn errors of Homo sapiens metabolism. This chapter describes a protocol that delineates the process of genome scale metabolic modeling for analysing host-pathogen behavior and interaction using flux balance analysis (FBA). The steps discussed in the process include (1) reconstruction of a metabolic network from the genome sequence, (2) its representation in a precise mathematical framework, (3) its translation to a model, and (4) the analysis using linear algebra and optimization. The methods for biological interpretations of computed cell phenotypes in the context of individual host and pathogen models and their integration are also discussed.

  16. An experimentally-supported genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction for Yersinia pestis CO92

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motin Vladimir L

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yersinia pestis is a gram-negative bacterium that causes plague, a disease linked historically to the Black Death in Europe during the Middle Ages and to several outbreaks during the modern era. Metabolism in Y. pestis displays remarkable flexibility and robustness, allowing the bacterium to proliferate in both warm-blooded mammalian hosts and cold-blooded insect vectors such as fleas. Results Here we report a genome-scale reconstruction and mathematical model of metabolism for Y. pestis CO92 and supporting experimental growth and metabolite measurements. The model contains 815 genes, 678 proteins, 963 unique metabolites and 1678 reactions, accurately simulates growth on a range of carbon sources both qualitatively and quantitatively, and identifies gaps in several key biosynthetic pathways and suggests how those gaps might be filled. Furthermore, our model presents hypotheses to explain certain known nutritional requirements characteristic of this strain. Conclusions Y. pestis continues to be a dangerous threat to human health during modern times. The Y. pestis genome-scale metabolic reconstruction presented here, which has been benchmarked against experimental data and correctly reproduces known phenotypes, provides an in silico platform with which to investigate the metabolism of this important human pathogen.

  17. A Method to Constrain Genome-Scale Models with 13C Labeling Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor García Martín

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Current limitations in quantitatively predicting biological behavior hinder our efforts to engineer biological systems to produce biofuels and other desired chemicals. Here, we present a new method for calculating metabolic fluxes, key targets in metabolic engineering, that incorporates data from 13C labeling experiments and genome-scale models. The data from 13C labeling experiments provide strong flux constraints that eliminate the need to assume an evolutionary optimization principle such as the growth rate optimization assumption used in Flux Balance Analysis (FBA. This effective constraining is achieved by making the simple but biologically relevant assumption that flux flows from core to peripheral metabolism and does not flow back. The new method is significantly more robust than FBA with respect to errors in genome-scale model reconstruction. Furthermore, it can provide a comprehensive picture of metabolite balancing and predictions for unmeasured extracellular fluxes as constrained by 13C labeling data. A comparison shows that the results of this new method are similar to those found through 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis (13C MFA for central carbon metabolism but, additionally, it provides flux estimates for peripheral metabolism. The extra validation gained by matching 48 relative labeling measurements is used to identify where and why several existing COnstraint Based Reconstruction and Analysis (COBRA flux prediction algorithms fail. We demonstrate how to use this knowledge to refine these methods and improve their predictive capabilities. This method provides a reliable base upon which to improve the design of biological systems.

  18. Quantitative assessment of thermodynamic constraints on the solution space of genome-scale metabolic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Joshua J; Dwivedi, Vivek; Reed, Jennifer L

    2013-07-16

    Constraint-based methods provide powerful computational techniques to allow understanding and prediction of cellular behavior. These methods rely on physiochemical constraints to eliminate infeasible behaviors from the space of available behaviors. One such constraint is thermodynamic feasibility, the requirement that intracellular flux distributions obey the laws of thermodynamics. The past decade has seen several constraint-based methods that interpret this constraint in different ways, including those that are limited to small networks, rely on predefined reaction directions, and/or neglect the relationship between reaction free energies and metabolite concentrations. In this work, we utilize one such approach, thermodynamics-based metabolic flux analysis (TMFA), to make genome-scale, quantitative predictions about metabolite concentrations and reaction free energies in the absence of prior knowledge of reaction directions, while accounting for uncertainties in thermodynamic estimates. We applied TMFA to a genome-scale network reconstruction of Escherichia coli and examined the effect of thermodynamic constraints on the flux space. We also assessed the predictive performance of TMFA against gene essentiality and quantitative metabolomics data, under both aerobic and anaerobic, and optimal and suboptimal growth conditions. Based on these results, we propose that TMFA is a useful tool for validating phenotypes and generating hypotheses, and that additional types of data and constraints can improve predictions of metabolite concentrations.

  19. Network thermodynamic curation of human and yeast genome-scale metabolic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Verónica S; Quek, Lake-Ee; Nielsen, Lars K

    2014-07-15

    Genome-scale models are used for an ever-widening range of applications. Although there has been much focus on specifying the stoichiometric matrix, the predictive power of genome-scale models equally depends on reaction directions. Two-thirds of reactions in the two eukaryotic reconstructions Homo sapiens Recon 1 and Yeast 5 are specified as irreversible. However, these specifications are mainly based on biochemical textbooks or on their similarity to other organisms and are rarely underpinned by detailed thermodynamic analysis. In this study, a to our knowledge new workflow combining network-embedded thermodynamic and flux variability analysis was used to evaluate existing irreversibility constraints in Recon 1 and Yeast 5 and to identify new ones. A total of 27 and 16 new irreversible reactions were identified in Recon 1 and Yeast 5, respectively, whereas only four reactions were found with directions incorrectly specified against thermodynamics (three in Yeast 5 and one in Recon 1). The workflow further identified for both models several isolated internal loops that require further curation. The framework also highlighted the need for substrate channeling (in human) and ATP hydrolysis (in yeast) for the essential reaction catalyzed by phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxylase in purine metabolism. Finally, the framework highlighted differences in proline metabolism between yeast (cytosolic anabolism and mitochondrial catabolism) and humans (exclusively mitochondrial metabolism). We conclude that network-embedded thermodynamics facilitates the specification and validation of irreversibility constraints in compartmentalized metabolic models, at the same time providing further insight into network properties.

  20. An Experimentally-Supported Genome-Scale Metabolic Network Reconstruction for Yersinia pestis CO92

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charusanti, Pep; Chauhan, Sadhana; Mcateer, Kathleen; Lerman, Joshua A.; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Motin, Vladimir L.; Ansong, Charles; Adkins, Joshua N.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2011-10-13

    Yersinia pestis is a gram-negative bacterium that causes plague, a disease linked historically to the Black Death in Europe during the Middle Ages and to several outbreaks during the modern era. Metabolism in Y. pestis displays remarkable flexibility and robustness, allowing the bacterium to proliferate in both warm-blooded mammalian hosts and cold-blooded insect vectors such as fleas. Here we report a genome-scale reconstruction and mathematical model of metabolism for Y. pestis CO92 and supporting experimental growth and metabolite measurements. The model contains 815 genes, 678 proteins, 963 unique metabolites and 1678 reactions, accurately simulates growth on a range of carbon sources both qualitatively and quantitatively, and identifies gaps in several key biosynthetic pathways and suggests how those gaps might be filled. Furthermore, our model presents hypotheses to explain certain known nutritional requirements characteristic of this strain. Y. pestis continues to be a dangerous threat to human health during modern times. The Y. pestis genome-scale metabolic reconstruction presented here, which has been benchmarked against experimental data and correctly reproduces known phenotypes, thus provides an in silico platform with which to investigate the metabolism of this important human pathogen.

  1. Cross-species mapping of bidirectional promoters enables prediction of unannotated 5' UTRs and identification of species-specific transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewin Harris A

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bidirectional promoters are shared regulatory regions that influence the expression of two oppositely oriented genes. This type of regulatory architecture is found more frequently than expected by chance in the human genome, yet many specifics underlying the regulatory design are unknown. Given that the function of most orthologous genes is similar across species, we hypothesized that the architecture and regulation of bidirectional promoters might also be similar across species, representing a core regulatory structure and enabling annotation of these regions in additional mammalian genomes. Results By mapping the intergenic distances of genes in human, chimpanzee, bovine, murine, and rat, we show an enrichment for pairs of genes equal to or less than 1,000 bp between their adjacent 5' ends ("head-to-head" compared to pairs of genes that fall in the same orientation ("head-to-tail" or whose 3' ends are side-by-side ("tail-to-tail". A representative set of 1,369 human bidirectional promoters was mapped to orthologous sequences in other mammals. We confirmed predictions for 5' UTRs in nine of ten manual picks in bovine based on comparison to the orthologous human promoter set and in six of seven predictions in human based on comparison to the bovine dataset. The two predictions that did not have orthology as bidirectional promoters in the other species resulted from unique events that initiated transcription in the opposite direction in only those species. We found evidence supporting the independent emergence of bidirectional promoters from the family of five RecQ helicase genes, which gained their bidirectional promoters and partner genes independently rather than through a duplication process. Furthermore, by expanding our comparisons from pairwise to multispecies analyses we developed a map representing a core set of bidirectional promoters in mammals. Conclusion We show that the orthologous positions of bidirectional

  2. Cross-species mapping of bidirectional promoters enables prediction of unannotated 5' UTRs and identification of species-specific transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piontkivska, Helen; Yang, Mary Q; Larkin, Denis M; Lewin, Harris A; Reecy, James; Elnitski, Laura

    2009-04-24

    Bidirectional promoters are shared regulatory regions that influence the expression of two oppositely oriented genes. This type of regulatory architecture is found more frequently than expected by chance in the human genome, yet many specifics underlying the regulatory design are unknown. Given that the function of most orthologous genes is similar across species, we hypothesized that the architecture and regulation of bidirectional promoters might also be similar across species, representing a core regulatory structure and enabling annotation of these regions in additional mammalian genomes. By mapping the intergenic distances of genes in human, chimpanzee, bovine, murine, and rat, we show an enrichment for pairs of genes equal to or less than 1,000 bp between their adjacent 5' ends ("head-to-head") compared to pairs of genes that fall in the same orientation ("head-to-tail") or whose 3' ends are side-by-side ("tail-to-tail"). A representative set of 1,369 human bidirectional promoters was mapped to orthologous sequences in other mammals. We confirmed predictions for 5' UTRs in nine of ten manual picks in bovine based on comparison to the orthologous human promoter set and in six of seven predictions in human based on comparison to the bovine dataset. The two predictions that did not have orthology as bidirectional promoters in the other species resulted from unique events that initiated transcription in the opposite direction in only those species. We found evidence supporting the independent emergence of bidirectional promoters from the family of five RecQ helicase genes, which gained their bidirectional promoters and partner genes independently rather than through a duplication process. Furthermore, by expanding our comparisons from pairwise to multispecies analyses we developed a map representing a core set of bidirectional promoters in mammals. We show that the orthologous positions of bidirectional promoters provide a reliable guide to directly annotate over

  3. Using a genome-scale metabolic network model to elucidate the mechanism of chloroquine action in Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivendra G. Tewari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Chloroquine, long the default first-line treatment against malaria, is now abandoned in large parts of the world because of widespread drug-resistance in Plasmodium falciparum. In spite of its importance as a cost-effective and efficient drug, a coherent understanding of the cellular mechanisms affected by chloroquine and how they influence the fitness and survival of the parasite remains elusive. Here, we used a systems biology approach to integrate genome-scale transcriptomics to map out the effects of chloroquine, identify targeted metabolic pathways, and translate these findings into mechanistic insights. Specifically, we first developed a method that integrates transcriptomic and metabolomic data, which we independently validated against a recently published set of such data for Krebs-cycle mutants of P. falciparum. We then used the method to calculate the effect of chloroquine treatment on the metabolic flux profiles of P. falciparum during the intraerythrocytic developmental cycle. The model predicted dose-dependent inhibition of DNA replication, in agreement with earlier experimental results for both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant P. falciparum strains. Our simulations also corroborated experimental findings that suggest differences in chloroquine sensitivity between ring- and schizont-stage P. falciparum. Our analysis also suggests that metabolic fluxes that govern reduced thioredoxin and phosphoenolpyruvate synthesis are significantly decreased and are pivotal to chloroquine-based inhibition of P. falciparum DNA replication. The consequences of impaired phosphoenolpyruvate synthesis and redox metabolism are reduced carbon fixation and increased oxidative stress, respectively, both of which eventually facilitate killing of the parasite. Our analysis suggests that a combination of chloroquine (or an analogue and another drug, which inhibits carbon fixation and/or increases oxidative stress, should increase the clearance of P

  4. Toward the automated generation of genome-scale metabolic networks in the SEED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gould John

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current methods for the automated generation of genome-scale metabolic networks focus on genome annotation and preliminary biochemical reaction network assembly, but do not adequately address the process of identifying and filling gaps in the reaction network, and verifying that the network is suitable for systems level analysis. Thus, current methods are only sufficient for generating draft-quality networks, and refinement of the reaction network is still largely a manual, labor-intensive process. Results We have developed a method for generating genome-scale metabolic networks that produces substantially complete reaction networks, suitable for systems level analysis. Our method partitions the reaction space of central and intermediary metabolism into discrete, interconnected components that can be assembled and verified in isolation from each other, and then integrated and verified at the level of their interconnectivity. We have developed a database of components that are common across organisms, and have created tools for automatically assembling appropriate components for a particular organism based on the metabolic pathways encoded in the organism's genome. This focuses manual efforts on that portion of an organism's metabolism that is not yet represented in the database. We have demonstrated the efficacy of our method by reverse-engineering and automatically regenerating the reaction network from a published genome-scale metabolic model for Staphylococcus aureus. Additionally, we have verified that our method capitalizes on the database of common reaction network components created for S. aureus, by using these components to generate substantially complete reconstructions of the reaction networks from three other published metabolic models (Escherichia coli, Helicobacter pylori, and Lactococcus lactis. We have implemented our tools and database within the SEED, an open-source software environment for comparative

  5. iAK692: A genome-scale metabolic model of Spirulina platensis C1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis is a well-known filamentous cyanobacterium used in the production of many industrial products, including high value compounds, healthy food supplements, animal feeds, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics, for example. It has been increasingly studied around the world for scientific purposes, especially for its genome, biology, physiology, and also for the analysis of its small-scale metabolic network. However, the overall description of the metabolic and biotechnological capabilities of S. platensis requires the development of a whole cellular metabolism model. Recently, the S. platensis C1 (Arthrospira sp. PCC9438) genome sequence has become available, allowing systems-level studies of this commercial cyanobacterium. Results In this work, we present the genome-scale metabolic network analysis of S. platensis C1, iAK692, its topological properties, and its metabolic capabilities and functions. The network was reconstructed from the S. platensis C1 annotated genomic sequence using Pathway Tools software to generate a preliminary network. Then, manual curation was performed based on a collective knowledge base and a combination of genomic, biochemical, and physiological information. The genome-scale metabolic model consists of 692 genes, 837 metabolites, and 875 reactions. We validated iAK692 by conducting fermentation experiments and simulating the model under autotrophic, heterotrophic, and mixotrophic growth conditions using COBRA toolbox. The model predictions under these growth conditions were consistent with the experimental results. The iAK692 model was further used to predict the unique active reactions and essential genes for each growth condition. Additionally, the metabolic states of iAK692 during autotrophic and mixotrophic growths were described by phenotypic phase plane (PhPP) analysis. Conclusions This study proposes the first genome-scale model of S. platensis C1, iAK692, which is a predictive metabolic platform

  6. iAK692: A genome-scale metabolic model of Spirulina platensis C1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klanchui Amornpan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis is a well-known filamentous cyanobacterium used in the production of many industrial products, including high value compounds, healthy food supplements, animal feeds, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics, for example. It has been increasingly studied around the world for scientific purposes, especially for its genome, biology, physiology, and also for the analysis of its small-scale metabolic network. However, the overall description of the metabolic and biotechnological capabilities of S. platensis requires the development of a whole cellular metabolism model. Recently, the S. platensis C1 (Arthrospira sp. PCC9438 genome sequence has become available, allowing systems-level studies of this commercial cyanobacterium. Results In this work, we present the genome-scale metabolic network analysis of S. platensis C1, iAK692, its topological properties, and its metabolic capabilities and functions. The network was reconstructed from the S. platensis C1 annotated genomic sequence using Pathway Tools software to generate a preliminary network. Then, manual curation was performed based on a collective knowledge base and a combination of genomic, biochemical, and physiological information. The genome-scale metabolic model consists of 692 genes, 837 metabolites, and 875 reactions. We validated iAK692 by conducting fermentation experiments and simulating the model under autotrophic, heterotrophic, and mixotrophic growth conditions using COBRA toolbox. The model predictions under these growth conditions were consistent with the experimental results. The iAK692 model was further used to predict the unique active reactions and essential genes for each growth condition. Additionally, the metabolic states of iAK692 during autotrophic and mixotrophic growths were described by phenotypic phase plane (PhPP analysis. Conclusions This study proposes the first genome-scale model of S. platensis C1, iAK692, which is a

  7. A metabolite-centric view on flux distributions in genome-scale metabolic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemer, S Alexander; Rex, René; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2013-04-12

    Genome-scale metabolic models are important tools in systems biology. They permit the in-silico prediction of cellular phenotypes via mathematical optimisation procedures, most importantly flux balance analysis. Current studies on metabolic models mostly consider reaction fluxes in isolation. Based on a recently proposed metabolite-centric approach, we here describe a set of methods that enable the analysis and interpretation of flux distributions in an integrated metabolite-centric view. We demonstrate how this framework can be used for the refinement of genome-scale metabolic models. We applied the metabolite-centric view developed here to the most recent metabolic reconstruction of Escherichia coli. By compiling the balance sheets of a small number of currency metabolites, we were able to fully characterise the energy metabolism as predicted by the model and to identify a possibility for model refinement in NADPH metabolism. Selected branch points were examined in detail in order to demonstrate how a metabolite-centric view allows identifying functional roles of metabolites. Fructose 6-phosphate aldolase and the sedoheptulose bisphosphate bypass were identified as enzymatic reactions that can carry high fluxes in the model but are unlikely to exhibit significant activity in vivo. Performing a metabolite essentiality analysis, unconstrained import and export of iron ions could be identified as potentially problematic for the quality of model predictions. The system-wide analysis of split ratios and branch points allows a much deeper insight into the metabolic network than reaction-centric analyses. Extending an earlier metabolite-centric approach, the methods introduced here establish an integrated metabolite-centric framework for the interpretation of flux distributions in genome-scale metabolic networks that can complement the classical reaction-centric framework. Analysing fluxes and their metabolic context simultaneously opens the door to systems biological

  8. Exome-based Variant Detection in Core Promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeong C; Cui, Jian; Luo, Jiangtao; Xiao, Fengxia; Downs, Bradley; Wang, San Ming

    2016-07-28

    Core promoter controls the initiation of transcription. Core promoter sequence change can disrupt transcriptional regulation, lead to impairment of gene expression and ultimately diseases. Therefore, comprehensive characterization of core promoters is essential to understand normal and abnormal gene expression in biomedical studies. Here we report the development of EVDC (Exome-based Variant Detection in Core promoters) method for genome-scale analysis of core-promoter sequence variation. This method is based on the fact that exome sequences contain the sequences not only from coding exons but also from non-coding region including core promoters generated by random fragmentation in exome sequencing process. Using exome data from three cell types of CD4+ T cells, CD19+ B cells and neutrophils of a single individual, we characterized the features of core promoter-mapped exome sequences, and analysed core-promoter variation in this individual genome. We also compared the core promoters between YRI (Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigeria) and the CEU (Utah residents of European decedent) populations using the exome data generated by the 1000 Genome project, and observed much higher variation in YRI population than in CEU population. Our study demonstrates that the EVDC method provides a simple but powerful means for genome-wile de novo characterization of core promoter sequence variation.

  9. A systems approach to predict oncometabolites via context-specific genome-scale metabolic networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojung Nam

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Altered metabolism in cancer cells has been viewed as a passive response required for a malignant transformation. However, this view has changed through the recently described metabolic oncogenic factors: mutated isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDH, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH, and fumarate hydratase (FH that produce oncometabolites that competitively inhibit epigenetic regulation. In this study, we demonstrate in silico predictions of oncometabolites that have the potential to dysregulate epigenetic controls in nine types of cancer by incorporating massive scale genetic mutation information (collected from more than 1,700 cancer genomes, expression profiling data, and deploying Recon 2 to reconstruct context-specific genome-scale metabolic models. Our analysis predicted 15 compounds and 24 substructures of potential oncometabolites that could result from the loss-of-function and gain-of-function mutations of metabolic enzymes, respectively. These results suggest a substantial potential for discovering unidentified oncometabolites in various forms of cancers.

  10. Moving image analysis to the cloud: A case study with a genome-scale tomographic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Kevin; Stampanoni, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, the time required to measure a terabyte of microscopic imaging data has gone from years to minutes. This shift has moved many of the challenges away from experimental design and measurement to scalable storage, organization, and analysis. As many scientists and scientific institutions lack training and competencies in these areas, major bottlenecks have arisen and led to substantial delays and gaps between measurement, understanding, and dissemination. We present in this paper a framework for analyzing large 3D datasets using cloud-based computational and storage resources. We demonstrate its applicability by showing the setup and costs associated with the analysis of a genome-scale study of bone microstructure. We then evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages associated with local versus cloud infrastructures.

  11. Genome-scale cold stress response regulatory networks in ten Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barah, Pankaj; Jayavelu, Naresh Doni; Rasmussen, Simon

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low temperature leads to major crop losses every year. Although several studies have been conducted focusing on diversity of cold tolerance level in multiple phenotypically divergent Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) ecotypes, genome-scale molecular understanding is still lacking...... using Arabidopsis NimbleGen ATH6 microarrays. In total 6061 transcripts were significantly cold regulated (p majority of the transcripts (75%) showed ecotype specific expression pattern. By using sequence data...... available from Arabidopsis thaliana 1001 genome project, we further investigated sequence polymorphisms in the core cold stress regulon genes. Significant numbers of non-synonymous amino acid changes were observed in the coding region of the CBF regulon genes. Considering the limited knowledge about...

  12. Reliable and efficient solution of genome-scale models of Metabolism and macromolecular Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ding; Yang, Laurence; Fleming, Ronan M. T.; Thiele, Ines; Palsson, Bernhard O.; Saunders, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Constraint-Based Reconstruction and Analysis (COBRA) is currently the only methodology that permits integrated modeling of Metabolism and macromolecular Expression (ME) at genome-scale. Linear optimization computes steady-state flux solutions to ME models, but flux values are spread over many orders of magnitude. Data values also have greatly varying magnitudes. Standard double-precision solvers may return inaccurate solutions or report that no solution exists. Exact simplex solvers based on rational arithmetic require a near-optimal warm start to be practical on large problems (current ME models have 70,000 constraints and variables and will grow larger). We have developed a quadruple-precision version of our linear and nonlinear optimizer MINOS, and a solution procedure (DQQ) involving Double and Quad MINOS that achieves reliability and efficiency for ME models and other challenging problems tested here. DQQ will enable extensive use of large linear and nonlinear models in systems biology and other applications involving multiscale data.

  13. Genome-scale analysis of positional clustering of mouse testis-specific genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Bernett TK

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genes are not randomly distributed on a chromosome as they were thought even after removal of tandem repeats. The positional clustering of co-expressed genes is known in prokaryotes and recently reported in several eukaryotic organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, and Homo sapiens. In order to further investigate the mode of tissue-specific gene clustering in higher eukaryotes, we have performed a genome-scale analysis of positional clustering of the mouse testis-specific genes. Results Our computational analysis shows that a large proportion of testis-specific genes are clustered in groups of 2 to 5 genes in the mouse genome. The number of clusters is much higher than expected by chance even after removal of tandem repeats. Conclusion Our result suggests that testis-specific genes tend to cluster on the mouse chromosomes. This provides another piece of evidence for the hypothesis that clusters of tissue-specific genes do exist.

  14. A Consensus Genome-scale Reconstruction of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hefzi, Hooman; Ang, Kok Siong; Hanscho, Michael

    2016-01-01

    in CHO and associated them with >1,700 genes in the Cricetulus griseus genome. The genome-scale metabolic model based on this reconstruction, iCHO1766, and cell-line-specific models for CHO-K1, CHO-S, and CHO-DG44 cells provide the biochemical basis of growth and recombinant protein production......Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells dominate biotherapeutic protein production and are widely used in mammalian cell line engineering research. To elucidate metabolic bottlenecks in protein production and to guide cell engineering and bioprocess optimization, we reconstructed the metabolic pathways...... simulations show that the metabolic resources in CHO are more than three times more efficiently utilized for growth or recombinant protein synthesis following targeted efforts to engineer the CHO secretory pathway. This model will further accelerate CHO cell engineering and help optimize bioprocesses....

  15. Genome scale models of yeast: towards standardized evaluation and consistent omic integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez, Benjamin J.; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Genome scale models (GEMs) have enabled remarkable advances in systems biology, acting as functional databases of metabolism, and as scaffolds for the contextualization of high-throughput data. In the case of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast), several GEMs have been published...... and are currently used for metabolic engineering and elucidating biological interactions. Here we review the history of yeast's GEMs, focusing on recent developments. We study how these models are typically evaluated, using both descriptive and predictive metrics. Additionally, we analyze the different ways...... in which all levels of omics data (from gene expression to flux) have been integrated in yeast GEMs. Relevant conclusions and current challenges for both GEM evaluation and omic integration are highlighted....

  16. Integration of gene expression data into genome-scale metabolic models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åkesson, M.; Förster, Jochen; Nielsen, Jens

    2004-01-01

    of gene expression from chemostat and batch cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were combined with a recently developed genome-scale model, and the computed metabolic flux distributions were compared to experimental values from carbon labeling experiments and metabolic network analysis. The integration......A framework for integration of transcriptome data into stoichiometric metabolic models to obtain improved flux predictions is presented. The key idea is to exploit the regulatory information in the expression data to give additional constraints on the metabolic fluxes in the model. Measurements...... of expression data resulted in improved predictions of metabolic behavior in batch cultures, enabling quantitative predictions of exchange fluxes as well as qualitative estimations of changes in intracellular fluxes. A critical discussion of correlation between gene expression and metabolic fluxes is given....

  17. Improved annotation through genome-scale metabolic modeling of Aspergillus oryzae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vongsangnak, Wanwipa; Olsen, Peter; Hansen, Kim;

    2008-01-01

    to a genome scale metabolic model of A. oryzae. Results: Our assembled EST sequences we identified 1,046 newly predicted genes in the A. oryzae genome. Furthermore, it was possible to assign putative protein functions to 398 of the newly predicted genes. Noteworthy, our annotation strategy resulted......Background: Since ancient times the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae has been used in the fermentation industry for the production of fermented sauces and the production of industrial enzymes. Recently, the genome sequence of A. oryzae with 12,074 annotated genes was released but the number...... of hypothetical proteins accounted for more than 50% of the annotated genes. Considering the industrial importance of this fungus, it is therefore valuable to improve the annotation and further integrate genomic information with biochemical and physiological information available for this microorganism and other...

  18. Improving the phenotype predictions of a yeast genome-scale metabolic model by incorporating enzymatic constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez, Benjamin J.; Zhang, Xi-Cheng; Nilsson, Avlant

    2017-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) are widely used to calculate metabolic phenotypes. They rely on defining a set of constraints, the most common of which is that the production of metabolites and/or growth are limited by the carbon source uptake rate. However, enzyme abundances and kinetics......, which act as limitations on metabolic fluxes, are not taken into account. Here, we present GECKO, a method that enhances a GEM to account for enzymes as part of reactions, thereby ensuring that each metabolic flux does not exceed its maximum capacity, equal to the product of the enzyme's abundance...... with stress, or overexpressing a specific pathway. GECKO also allows to directly integrate quantitative proteomics data; by doing so, we significantly reduced flux variability of the model, in over 60% of metabolic reactions. Additionally, the model gives insight into the distribution of enzyme usage between...

  19. Identifying anti-growth factors for human cancer cell lines through genome-scale metabolic modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghaffari, Pouyan; Mardinoglu, Adil; Asplund, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Human cancer cell lines are used as important model systems to study molecular mechanisms associated with tumor growth, hereunder how genomic and biological heterogeneity found in primary tumors affect cellular phenotypes. We reconstructed Genome scale metabolic models (GEMs) for eleven cell lines...... based on RNA-Seq data and validated the functionality of these models with data from metabolite profiling. We used cell line-specific GEMs to analyze the differences in the metabolism of cancer cell lines, and to explore the heterogeneous expression of the metabolic subsystems. Furthermore, we predicted...... antimetabolites using two cell lines with different phenotypic origins, and found that it is effective in inhibiting the growth of these cell lines. Using immunohistochemistry, we also showed high or moderate expression levels of proteins targeted by the validated antimetabolite. Identified anti-growth factors...

  20. Genome-scale modeling of the protein secretory machinery in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizi, Amir; Österlund, Tobias; Petranovic, Dina; Bordel, Sergio; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The protein secretory machinery in Eukarya is involved in post-translational modification (PTMs) and sorting of the secretory and many transmembrane proteins. While the secretory machinery has been well-studied using classic reductionist approaches, a holistic view of its complex nature is lacking. Here, we present the first genome-scale model for the yeast secretory machinery which captures the knowledge generated through more than 50 years of research. The model is based on the concept of a Protein Specific Information Matrix (PSIM: characterized by seven PTMs features). An algorithm was developed which mimics secretory machinery and assigns each secretory protein to a particular secretory class that determines the set of PTMs and transport steps specific to each protein. Protein abundances were integrated with the model in order to gain system level estimation of the metabolic demands associated with the processing of each specific protein as well as a quantitative estimation of the activity of each component of the secretory machinery.

  1. Principles of proteome allocation are revealed using proteomic data and genome-scale models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Laurence; Yurkovich, James T.; Lloyd, Colton J.

    2016-01-01

    , prediction errors for growth rate and metabolic fluxes were 69% and 14% lower, respectively. The sector-constrained ME model thus represents a generalist ME model reflecting both growth rate maximization and "hedging" against uncertain environments and stresses, as indicated by significant enrichment...... of these sectors for the general stress response sigma factor sigma(S). Finally, the sector constraints represent a general formalism for integrating omics data from any experimental condition into constraint-based ME models. The constraints can be fine-grained (individual proteins) or coarse-grained (functionally......Integrating omics data to refine or make context-specific models is an active field of constraint-based modeling. Proteomics now cover over 95% of the Escherichia coli proteome by mass. Genome-scale models of Metabolism and macromolecular Expression (ME) compute proteome allocation linked...

  2. Moving image analysis to the cloud: A case study with a genome-scale tomographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mader, Kevin [4Quant Ltd., Switzerland & Institute for Biomedical Engineering at University and ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Stampanoni, Marco [Institute for Biomedical Engineering at University and ETH Zurich, Switzerland & Swiss Light Source at Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-01-28

    Over the last decade, the time required to measure a terabyte of microscopic imaging data has gone from years to minutes. This shift has moved many of the challenges away from experimental design and measurement to scalable storage, organization, and analysis. As many scientists and scientific institutions lack training and competencies in these areas, major bottlenecks have arisen and led to substantial delays and gaps between measurement, understanding, and dissemination. We present in this paper a framework for analyzing large 3D datasets using cloud-based computational and storage resources. We demonstrate its applicability by showing the setup and costs associated with the analysis of a genome-scale study of bone microstructure. We then evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages associated with local versus cloud infrastructures.

  3. Integrated genome-scale prediction of detrimental mutations in transcription networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Francesconi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A central challenge in genetics is to understand when and why mutations alter the phenotype of an organism. The consequences of gene inhibition have been systematically studied and can be predicted reasonably well across a genome. However, many sequence variants important for disease and evolution may alter gene regulation rather than gene function. The consequences of altering a regulatory interaction (or "edge" rather than a gene (or "node" in a network have not been as extensively studied. Here we use an integrative analysis and evolutionary conservation to identify features that predict when the loss of a regulatory interaction is detrimental in the extensively mapped transcription network of budding yeast. Properties such as the strength of an interaction, location and context in a promoter, regulator and target gene importance, and the potential for compensation (redundancy associate to some extent with interaction importance. Combined, however, these features predict quite well whether the loss of a regulatory interaction is detrimental across many promoters and for many different transcription factors. Thus, despite the potential for regulatory diversity, common principles can be used to understand and predict when changes in regulation are most harmful to an organism.

  4. Biofilm Formation Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Predicted via Genome-Scale Kinetic Models of Bacterial Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vital-Lopez, Francisco G; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2015-10-01

    A hallmark of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its ability to establish biofilm-based infections that are difficult to eradicate. Biofilms are less susceptible to host inflammatory and immune responses and have higher antibiotic tolerance than free-living planktonic cells. Developing treatments against biofilms requires an understanding of bacterial biofilm-specific physiological traits. Research efforts have started to elucidate the intricate mechanisms underlying biofilm development. However, many aspects of these mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we addressed questions regarding biofilm metabolism using a genome-scale kinetic model of the P. aeruginosa metabolic network and gene expression profiles. Specifically, we computed metabolite concentration differences between known mutants with altered biofilm formation and the wild-type strain to predict drug targets against P. aeruginosa biofilms. We also simulated the altered metabolism driven by gene expression changes between biofilm and stationary growth-phase planktonic cultures. Our analysis suggests that the synthesis of important biofilm-related molecules, such as the quorum-sensing molecule Pseudomonas quinolone signal and the exopolysaccharide Psl, is regulated not only through the expression of genes in their own synthesis pathway, but also through the biofilm-specific expression of genes in pathways competing for precursors to these molecules. Finally, we investigated why mutants defective in anthranilate degradation have an impaired ability to form biofilms. Alternative to a previous hypothesis that this biofilm reduction is caused by a decrease in energy production, we proposed that the dysregulation of the synthesis of secondary metabolites derived from anthranilate and chorismate is what impaired the biofilms of these mutants. Notably, these insights generated through our kinetic model-based approach are not accessible from previous constraint-based model analyses of P. aeruginosa biofilm

  5. Genome-scale consequences of cofactor balancing in engineered pentose utilization pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Ghosh

    Full Text Available Biofuels derived from lignocellulosic biomass offer promising alternative renewable energy sources for transportation fuels. Significant effort has been made to engineer Saccharomyces cerevisiae to efficiently ferment pentose sugars such as D-xylose and L-arabinose into biofuels such as ethanol through heterologous expression of the fungal D-xylose and L-arabinose pathways. However, one of the major bottlenecks in these fungal pathways is that the cofactors are not balanced, which contributes to inefficient utilization of pentose sugars. We utilized a genome-scale model of S. cerevisiae to predict the maximal achievable growth rate for cofactor balanced and imbalanced D-xylose and L-arabinose utilization pathways. Dynamic flux balance analysis (DFBA was used to simulate batch fermentation of glucose, D-xylose, and L-arabinose. The dynamic models and experimental results are in good agreement for the wild type and for the engineered D-xylose utilization pathway. Cofactor balancing the engineered D-xylose and L-arabinose utilization pathways simulated an increase in ethanol batch production of 24.7% while simultaneously reducing the predicted substrate utilization time by 70%. Furthermore, the effects of cofactor balancing the engineered pentose utilization pathways were evaluated throughout the genome-scale metabolic network. This work not only provides new insights to the global network effects of cofactor balancing but also provides useful guidelines for engineering a recombinant yeast strain with cofactor balanced engineered pathways that efficiently co-utilizes pentose and hexose sugars for biofuels production. Experimental switching of cofactor usage in enzymes has been demonstrated, but is a time-consuming effort. Therefore, systems biology models that can predict the likely outcome of such strain engineering efforts are highly useful for motivating which efforts are likely to be worth the significant time investment.

  6. Identification of novel targets for breast cancer by exploring gene switches on a genome scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Ming

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important feature that emerges from analyzing gene regulatory networks is the "switch-like behavior" or "bistability", a dynamic feature of a particular gene to preferentially toggle between two steady-states. The state of gene switches plays pivotal roles in cell fate decision, but identifying switches has been difficult. Therefore a challenge confronting the field is to be able to systematically identify gene switches. Results We propose a top-down mining approach to exploring gene switches on a genome-scale level. Theoretical analysis, proof-of-concept examples, and experimental studies demonstrate the ability of our mining approach to identify bistable genes by sampling across a variety of different conditions. Applying the approach to human breast cancer data identified genes that show bimodality within the cancer samples, such as estrogen receptor (ER and ERBB2, as well as genes that show bimodality between cancer and non-cancer samples, where tumor-associated calcium signal transducer 2 (TACSTD2 is uncovered. We further suggest a likely transcription factor that regulates TACSTD2. Conclusions Our mining approach demonstrates that one can capitalize on genome-wide expression profiling to capture dynamic properties of a complex network. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt in applying mining approaches to explore gene switches on a genome-scale, and the identification of TACSTD2 demonstrates that single cell-level bistability can be predicted from microarray data. Experimental confirmation of the computational results suggest TACSTD2 could be a potential biomarker and attractive candidate for drug therapy against both ER+ and ER- subtypes of breast cancer, including the triple negative subtype.

  7. Characterizing acetogenic metabolism using a genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagarajan, H; Sahin, M; Nogales, J; Latif, H; Lovley, DR; Ebrahim, A; Zengler, K

    2013-11-25

    Background: The metabolic capabilities of acetogens to ferment a wide range of sugars, to grow autotrophically on H-2/CO2, and more importantly on synthesis gas (H-2/CO/CO2) make them very attractive candidates as production hosts for biofuels and biocommodities. Acetogenic metabolism is considered one of the earliest modes of bacterial metabolism. A thorough understanding of various factors governing the metabolism, in particular energy conservation mechanisms, is critical for metabolic engineering of acetogens for targeted production of desired chemicals. Results: Here, we present the genome-scale metabolic network of Clostridium ljungdahlii, the first such model for an acetogen. This genome-scale model (iHN637) consisting of 637 genes, 785 reactions, and 698 metabolites captures all the major central metabolic and biosynthetic pathways, in particular pathways involved in carbon fixation and energy conservation. A combination of metabolic modeling, with physiological and transcriptomic data provided insights into autotrophic metabolism as well as aided the characterization of a nitrate reduction pathway in C. ljungdahlii. Analysis of the iHN637 metabolic model revealed that flavin based electron bifurcation played a key role in energy conservation during autotrophic growth and helped identify genes for some of the critical steps in this mechanism. Conclusions: iHN637 represents a predictive model that recapitulates experimental data, and provides valuable insights into the metabolic response of C. ljungdahlii to genetic perturbations under various growth conditions. Thus, the model will be instrumental in guiding metabolic engineering of C. ljungdahlii for the industrial production of biocommodities and biofuels.

  8. Zea mays iRS1563: a comprehensive genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of maize metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Rajib; Suthers, Patrick F; Maranas, Costas D

    2011-01-01

    The scope and breadth of genome-scale metabolic reconstructions have continued to expand over the last decade. Herein, we introduce a genome-scale model for a plant with direct applications to food and bioenergy production (i.e., maize). Maize annotation is still underway, which introduces significant challenges in the association of metabolic functions to genes. The developed model is designed to meet rigorous standards on gene-protein-reaction (GPR) associations, elementally and charged balanced reactions and a biomass reaction abstracting the relative contribution of all biomass constituents. The metabolic network contains 1,563 genes and 1,825 metabolites involved in 1,985 reactions from primary and secondary maize metabolism. For approximately 42% of the reactions direct literature evidence for the participation of the reaction in maize was found. As many as 445 reactions and 369 metabolites are unique to the maize model compared to the AraGEM model for A. thaliana. 674 metabolites and 893 reactions are present in Zea mays iRS1563 that are not accounted for in maize C4GEM. All reactions are elementally and charged balanced and localized into six different compartments (i.e., cytoplasm, mitochondrion, plastid, peroxisome, vacuole and extracellular). GPR associations are also established based on the functional annotation information and homology prediction accounting for monofunctional, multifunctional and multimeric proteins, isozymes and protein complexes. We describe results from performing flux balance analysis under different physiological conditions, (i.e., photosynthesis, photorespiration and respiration) of a C4 plant and also explore model predictions against experimental observations for two naturally occurring mutants (i.e., bm1 and bm3). The developed model corresponds to the largest and more complete to-date effort at cataloguing metabolism for a plant species.

  9. Genome-scale Metabolic Reaction Modeling: a New Approach to Geomicrobial Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKernan, S. E.; Shapiro, B.; Jin, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Geomicrobial rates, rates of microbial metabolism in natural environments, are a key parameter of theoretical and practical problems in geobiology and biogeochemistry. Both laboratory- and field-based approaches have been applied to study rates of geomicrobial processes. Laboratory-based approaches analyze geomicrobial kinetics by incubating environmental samples under controlled laboratory conditions. Field methods quantify geomicrobial rates by observing the progress of geomicrobial processes. To take advantage of recent development in biogeochemical modeling and genome-scale metabolic modeling, we suggest that geomicrobial rates can also be predicted by simulating metabolic reaction networks of microbes. To predict geomicrobial rates, we developed a genome-scale metabolic model that describes enzyme reaction networks of microbial metabolism, and simulated the network model by accounting for the kinetics and thermodynamics of enzyme reactions. The model is simulated numerically to solve cellular enzyme abundance and hence metabolic rates under the constraints of cellular physiology. The new modeling approach differs from flux balance analysis of system biology in that it accounts for the thermodynamics and kinetics of enzymatic reactions. It builds on subcellular metabolic reaction networks, and hence also differs from classical biogeochemical reaction modeling. We applied the new approach to Methanosarcina acetivorans, an anaerobic, marine methanogen capable of disproportionating acetate to carbon dioxide and methane. The input of the new model includes (1) enzyme reaction network of acetoclastic methanogenesis, and (2) representative geochemical conditions of freshwater sedimentary environments. The output of the simulation includes the proteomics, metabolomics, and energy and matter fluxes of M. acetivorans. Our simulation results demonstrate the predictive power of the new modeling approach. Specifically, the results illustrate how methanogenesis rates vary

  10. CFMDS: CUDA-based fast multidimensional scaling for genome-scale data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungin; Shin, Soo-Yong; Hwang, Kyu-Baek

    2012-01-01

    Multidimensional scaling (MDS) is a widely used approach to dimensionality reduction. It has been applied to feature selection and visualization in various areas. Among diverse MDS methods, the classical MDS is a simple and theoretically sound solution for projecting data objects onto a low dimensional space while preserving the original distances among them as much as possible. However, it is not trivial to apply it to genome-scale data (e.g., microarray gene expression profiles) on regular desktop computers, because of its high computational complexity. We implemented a highly-efficient software application, called CFMDS (CUDA-based Fast MultiDimensional Scaling), which produces an approximate solution of the classical MDS based on CUDA (compute unified device architecture) and the divide-and-conquer principle. CUDA is a parallel computing architecture exploiting the power of the GPU (graphics processing unit). The principle of divide-and-conquer was adopted for circumventing the small memory problem of usual graphics cards. Our application software has been tested on various benchmark datasets including microarrays and compared with the classical MDS algorithms implemented using C# and MATLAB. In our experiments, CFMDS was more than a hundred times faster for large data than such general solutions. Regarding the quality of dimensionality reduction, our approximate solutions were as good as those from the general solutions, as the Pearson's correlation coefficients between them were larger than 0.9. CFMDS is an expeditious solution for the data dimensionality reduction problem. It is especially useful for efficient processing of genome-scale data consisting of several thousands of objects in several minutes.

  11. Zea mays iRS1563: a comprehensive genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of maize metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajib Saha

    Full Text Available The scope and breadth of genome-scale metabolic reconstructions have continued to expand over the last decade. Herein, we introduce a genome-scale model for a plant with direct applications to food and bioenergy production (i.e., maize. Maize annotation is still underway, which introduces significant challenges in the association of metabolic functions to genes. The developed model is designed to meet rigorous standards on gene-protein-reaction (GPR associations, elementally and charged balanced reactions and a biomass reaction abstracting the relative contribution of all biomass constituents. The metabolic network contains 1,563 genes and 1,825 metabolites involved in 1,985 reactions from primary and secondary maize metabolism. For approximately 42% of the reactions direct literature evidence for the participation of the reaction in maize was found. As many as 445 reactions and 369 metabolites are unique to the maize model compared to the AraGEM model for A. thaliana. 674 metabolites and 893 reactions are present in Zea mays iRS1563 that are not accounted for in maize C4GEM. All reactions are elementally and charged balanced and localized into six different compartments (i.e., cytoplasm, mitochondrion, plastid, peroxisome, vacuole and extracellular. GPR associations are also established based on the functional annotation information and homology prediction accounting for monofunctional, multifunctional and multimeric proteins, isozymes and protein complexes. We describe results from performing flux balance analysis under different physiological conditions, (i.e., photosynthesis, photorespiration and respiration of a C4 plant and also explore model predictions against experimental observations for two naturally occurring mutants (i.e., bm1 and bm3. The developed model corresponds to the largest and more complete to-date effort at cataloguing metabolism for a plant species.

  12. Use of concept maps to promote electrocardiogram diagnosis learning in undergraduate medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ruimin; Yang, Xiaoyan; Xing, Bangrong; Zou, Zihao; Zheng, Zhenda; Xie, Xujing; Zhu, Jieming; Chen, Lin; Zhou, Hanjian

    2015-01-01

    Concept mapping is an effective method in teaching and learning, however this strategy has not been evaluated among electrocardiogram (ECG) diagnosis learning. This study explored the use of concept maps to assist ECG study, and sought to analyze whether this method could improve undergraduate students' ECG interpretation skills. There were 126 undergraduate medical students who were randomly selected and assigned to two groups, group A (n = 63) and group B (n = 63). Group A was taught to use concept maps to learn ECG diagnosis, while group B was taught by traditional methods. After the course, all of the students were assessed by having an ECG diagnostic test. Quantitative data which comprised test score and ECG features completion index was compared by using the unpaired Student's t-test between the two groups. Further, a feedback questionnaire on concept maps used was also completed by group A, comments were evaluated by a five-point Likert scale. The test scores of ECGs interpretation was 7.36 ± 1.23 in Group A and 6.12 ± 1.39 in Group B. A significant advantage (P = 0.018) of concept maps was observed in ECG interpretation accuracy. No difference in the average ECG features completion index was observed between Group A (66.75 ± 15.35%) and Group B (62.93 ± 13.17%). According qualitative analysis, majority of students accepted concept maps as a helpful tool. Difficult to learn at the beginning and time consuming are the two problems in using this method, nevertheless most of the students indicated to continue using it. Concept maps could be a useful pedagogical tool in enhancing undergraduate medical students' ECG interpretation skills. Furthermore, students indicated a positive attitude to it, and perceived it as a resource for learning.

  13. Use of concept maps to promote electrocardiogram diagnosis learning in undergraduate medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ruimin; Yang, Xiaoyan; Xing, Bangrong; Zou, Zihao; Zheng, Zhenda; Xie, Xujing; Zhu, Jieming; Chen, Lin; Zhou, Hanjian

    2015-01-01

    Concept mapping is an effective method in teaching and learning, however this strategy has not been evaluated among electrocardiogram (ECG) diagnosis learning. This study explored the use of concept maps to assist ECG study, and sought to analyze whether this method could improve undergraduate students’ ECG interpretation skills. There were 126 undergraduate medical students who were randomly selected and assigned to two groups, group A (n = 63) and group B (n = 63). Group A was taught to use concept maps to learn ECG diagnosis, while group B was taught by traditional methods. After the course, all of the students were assessed by having an ECG diagnostic test. Quantitative data which comprised test score and ECG features completion index was compared by using the unpaired Student’s t-test between the two groups. Further, a feedback questionnaire on concept maps used was also completed by group A, comments were evaluated by a five-point Likert scale. The test scores of ECGs interpretation was 7.36 ± 1.23 in Group A and 6.12 ± 1.39 in Group B. A significant advantage (P = 0.018) of concept maps was observed in ECG interpretation accuracy. No difference in the average ECG features completion index was observed between Group A (66.75 ± 15.35%) and Group B (62.93 ± 13.17%). According qualitative analysis, majority of students accepted concept maps as a helpful tool. Difficult to learn at the beginning and time consuming are the two problems in using this method, nevertheless most of the students indicated to continue using it. Concept maps could be a useful pedagogical tool in enhancing undergraduate medical students’ ECG interpretation skills. Furthermore, students indicated a positive attitude to it, and perceived it as a resource for learning. PMID:26221331

  14. Specific degradation of the mucus adhesion-promoting protein (MapA) of Lactobacillus reuteri to an antimicrobial peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøhle, Liv Anette; Brede, Dag Anders; Diep, Dzung B; Holo, Helge; Nes, Ingolf F

    2010-11-01

    The intestinal flora of mammals contains lactic acid bacteria (LAB) that may provide positive health effects for the host. Such bacteria are referred to as probiotic bacteria. From a pig, we have isolated a Lactobacillus reuteri strain that produces an antimicrobial peptide (AMP). The peptide was purified and characterized, and it was unequivocally shown that the AMP was a well-defined degradation product obtained from the mucus adhesion-promoting protein (MapA); it was therefore termed AP48-MapA. This finding demonstrates how large proteins might inherit unexpected pleiotropic functions by conferring antimicrobial capacities on the producer. The MapA/AP48-MapA system is the first example where a large protein of an intestinal LAB is shown to give rise to such an AMP. It is also of particular interest that the protein that provides this AMP is associated with the binding of the bacterium producing it to the surface/lining of the gut. This finding gives us new perspective on how some probiotic bacteria may successfully compete in this environment and thereby contribute to a healthy microbiota.

  15. Web Mapping for Promoting Interaction and Collaboration in Community Land Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenendaal, B.; Dhliwayo, M.

    2013-10-01

    There is an inherent advantage of geographic information Systems (GIS) and mapping in facilitating dialogue between experts and non-experts during land use plan development. Combining visual mapping information and effective user interaction can result in considerable benefits for developing countries like Botswana. Although the adoption of information and communication technologies has lagged behind that for developed countries, initiatives by the Botswana government in providing suitable information infrastructures, including internet and web based communications, are enabling multiple users to interact and collaborate in community land planning. A web mapping application was developed for the Maun Development Plan (MDP) in the Okavango Delta region in Botswana. It was designed according to requirements of land planners and managers and implemented using ArcGIS Viewer for Flex. Land planners and managers from two organisations in Maun involved in the development of the MDP were asked to evaluate the web mapping tools. This paper describes the results of implementation and some preliminary results of the web mapping evaluation.

  16. Systematically reviewing the potential of concept mapping technologies to promote self-regulated learning in primary and secondary science education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, Matthew Peter; Hartmeyer, Rikke; Bentsen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    analysis assessing how each technology affects self-regulated learning through cognitive, metacognitive, and motivation strategies, according to Schraw et al. (2006)'s model. We suggest concept mapping technologies may affect self-regulated learning through enhancing these strategies to varying degrees....... Computer software was particularly useful for developing cognitive strategies through ease of use. Teaching agents were particularly useful for developing metacognitive strategies by coupling visualisation of knowledge patterns with performance monitoring, aided by a teaching metaphor. Finally, mobile......We systematically searched five databases to assess the potential of concept mapping-based technologies to promote self-regulated learning in science education. Our search uncovered 17 relevant studies that investigated seven different types of learning technologies. We performed a narrative...

  17. Healthy and productive workers: using intervention mapping to design a workplace health promotion and wellness program to improve presenteeism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammendolia, Carlo; Côté, Pierre; Cancelliere, Carol; Cassidy, J David; Hartvigsen, Jan; Boyle, Eleanor; Soklaridis, Sophie; Stern, Paula; Amick, Benjamin

    2016-11-25

    Presenteeism is a growing problem in developed countries mostly due to an aging workforce. The economic costs related to presenteeism exceed those of absenteeism and employer health costs. Employers are implementing workplace health promotion and wellness programs to improve health among workers and reduce presenteeism. How best to design, integrate and deliver these programs are unknown. The main purpose of this study was to use an intervention mapping approach to develop a workplace health promotion and wellness program aimed at reducing presenteeism. We partnered with a large international financial services company and used a qualitative synthesis based on an intervention mapping methodology. Evidence from systematic reviews and key articles on reducing presenteeism and implementing health promotion programs was combined with theoretical models for changing behavior and stakeholder experience. This was then systematically operationalized into a program using discussion groups and consensus among experts and stakeholders. The top health problem impacting our workplace partner was mental health. Depression and stress were the first and second highest cause of productivity loss respectively. A multi-pronged program with detailed action steps was developed and directed at key stakeholders and health conditions. For mental health, regular sharing focus groups, social networking, monthly personal stories from leadership using webinars and multi-media communications, expert-led workshops, lunch and learn sessions and manager and employee training were part of a comprehensive program. Comprehensive, specific and multi-pronged strategies were developed and aimed at encouraging healthy behaviours that impact presenteeism such as regular exercise, proper nutrition, adequate sleep, smoking cessation, socialization and work-life balance. Limitations of the intervention mapping process included high resource and time requirements, the lack of external input and viewpoints

  18. Mapping of the methylation pattern of the hMSH2 promoter in colon cancer, using bisulfite genomic sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hua

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The detailed methylation status of CpG sites in the promoter region of hMSH2 gene has yet not to be reported. We have mapped the complete methylation status of the hMSH2 promoter, a region that contains 75 CpG sites, using bisulfite genomic sequencing in 60 primary colorectal cancers. And the expression of hMSH2 was detected by immunohistochemistry. The hypermethylation of hMSH2 was detected in 18.33% (11/60 of tumor tissues. The protein of hMSH2 was detected in 41.67% (25/60 of tumor tissues. No hypermethylation of hMSH2 was detected in normal tissues. The protein of hMSH2 was detected in all normal tissues. Our study demonstrated that hMSH2 hypermethylation and protein expression were associated with the development of colorectal cancer.

  19. redGEM: Systematic reduction and analysis of genome-scale metabolic reconstructions for development of consistent core metabolic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataman, Meric; Hernandez Gardiol, Daniel F; Fengos, Georgios; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2017-07-01

    Genome-scale metabolic reconstructions have proven to be valuable resources in enhancing our understanding of metabolic networks as they encapsulate all known metabolic capabilities of the organisms from genes to proteins to their functions. However the complexity of these large metabolic networks often hinders their utility in various practical applications. Although reduced models are commonly used for modeling and in integrating experimental data, they are often inconsistent across different studies and laboratories due to different criteria and detail, which can compromise transferability of the findings and also integration of experimental data from different groups. In this study, we have developed a systematic semi-automatic approach to reduce genome-scale models into core models in a consistent and logical manner focusing on the central metabolism or subsystems of interest. The method minimizes the loss of information using an approach that combines graph-based search and optimization methods. The resulting core models are shown to be able to capture key properties of the genome-scale models and preserve consistency in terms of biomass and by-product yields, flux and concentration variability and gene essentiality. The development of these "consistently-reduced" models will help to clarify and facilitate integration of different experimental data to draw new understanding that can be directly extendable to genome-scale models.

  20. redGEM: Systematic reduction and analysis of genome-scale metabolic reconstructions for development of consistent core metabolic models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meric Ataman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome-scale metabolic reconstructions have proven to be valuable resources in enhancing our understanding of metabolic networks as they encapsulate all known metabolic capabilities of the organisms from genes to proteins to their functions. However the complexity of these large metabolic networks often hinders their utility in various practical applications. Although reduced models are commonly used for modeling and in integrating experimental data, they are often inconsistent across different studies and laboratories due to different criteria and detail, which can compromise transferability of the findings and also integration of experimental data from different groups. In this study, we have developed a systematic semi-automatic approach to reduce genome-scale models into core models in a consistent and logical manner focusing on the central metabolism or subsystems of interest. The method minimizes the loss of information using an approach that combines graph-based search and optimization methods. The resulting core models are shown to be able to capture key properties of the genome-scale models and preserve consistency in terms of biomass and by-product yields, flux and concentration variability and gene essentiality. The development of these "consistently-reduced" models will help to clarify and facilitate integration of different experimental data to draw new understanding that can be directly extendable to genome-scale models.

  1. Analysis of growth of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 on a complex medium using a genome-scale metabolic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teusink, B.; Wiersma, A.; Molenaar, D.; Francke, C.; Vos, de W.M.; Siezen, R.J.; Smid, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    A genome-scale metabolic model of the lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 was constructed based on genomic content and experimental data. The complete model includes 721 genes, 643 reactions, and 531 metabolites. Different stoichiometric modeling techniques were used for interpretati

  2. Genome-scale identification method applied to find cryptic aminoglycoside resistance genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie M Struble

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ability of bacteria to rapidly evolve resistance to antibiotics is a critical public health problem. Resistance leads to increased disease severity and death rates, as well as imposes pressure towards the discovery and development of new antibiotic therapies. Improving understanding of the evolution and genetic basis of resistance is a fundamental goal in the field of microbiology. RESULTS: We have applied a new genomic method, Scalar Analysis of Library Enrichments (SCALEs, to identify genomic regions that, given increased copy number, may lead to aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa at the genome scale. We report the result of selections on highly representative genomic libraries for three different aminoglycoside antibiotics (amikacin, gentamicin, and tobramycin. At the genome-scale, we show significant (p<0.05 overlap in genes identified for each aminoglycoside evaluated. Among the genomic segments identified, we confirmed increased resistance associated with an increased copy number of several genomic regions, including the ORF of PA5471, recently implicated in MexXY efflux pump related aminoglycoside resistance, PA4943-PA4946 (encoding a probable GTP-binding protein, a predicted host factor I protein, a delta 2-isopentenylpyrophosphate transferase, and DNA mismatch repair protein mutL, PA0960-PA0963 (encoding hypothetical proteins, a probable cold shock protein, a probable DNA-binding stress protein, and aspartyl-tRNA synthetase, a segment of PA4967 (encoding a topoisomerase IV subunit B, as well as a chimeric clone containing two inserts including the ORFs PA0547 and PA2326 (encoding a probable transcriptional regulator and a probable hypothetical protein, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The studies reported here demonstrate the application of new a genomic method, SCALEs, which can be used to improve understanding of the evolution of antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa. In our demonstration studies, we

  3. Spatial metaphor in language can promote the development of cross-modal mappings in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayan, Shakila; Ozturk, Ozge; Bowerman, Melissa; Majid, Asifa

    2014-07-01

    Pitch is often described metaphorically: for example, Farsi and Turkish speakers use a 'thickness' metaphor (low sounds are 'thick' and high sounds are 'thin'), while German and English speakers use a height metaphor ('low', 'high'). This study examines how child and adult speakers of Farsi, Turkish, and German map pitch and thickness using a cross-modal association task. All groups, except for German children, performed significantly better than chance. German-speaking adults' success suggests the pitch-to-thickness association can be learned by experience. But the fact that German children were at chance indicates that this learning takes time. Intriguingly, Farsi and Turkish children's performance suggests that learning cross-modal associations can be boosted through experience with consistent metaphorical mappings in the input language.

  4. Genome-Scale Analysis of Cell-Specific Regulatory Codes Using Nuclear Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technologies have made it possible for biologists to generate genome-wide profiles of chromatin features at the nucleotide resolution. Enzymes such as nucleases or transposes have been instrumental as a chromatin-probing agent due to their ability to target accessible chromatin for cleavage or insertion. On the scale of a few hundred base pairs, preferential action of the nuclear enzymes on accessible chromatin allows mapping of cell state-specific accessibility in vivo. Such accessible regions contain functionally important regulatory sites, including promoters and enhancers, which undergo active remodeling for cells adapting in a dynamic environment. DNase-seq and the more recent ATAC-seq are two assays that are gaining popularity. Deep sequencing of DNA libraries from these assays, termed genomic footprinting, has been proposed to enable the comprehensive construction of protein occupancy profiles over the genome at the nucleotide level. Recent studies have discovered limitations of genomic footprinting which reduce the scope of detectable proteins. In addition, the identification of putative factors that bind to the observed footprints remains challenging. Despite these caveats, the methodology still presents significant advantages over alternative techniques such as ChIP-seq or FAIRE-seq. Here we describe computational approaches and tools for analysis of chromatin accessibility and genomic footprinting. Proper experimental design and assay-specific data analysis ensure the detection sensitivity and maximize retrievable information. The enzyme-based chromatin profiling approaches represent a powerful and evolving methodology which facilitates our understanding of how the genome is regulated.

  5. What Do We Know about "How" to Promote Physical Activity to Adolescents? A Mapping Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Paula Louise; García Bengoechea, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    To date, adolescent physical activity (PA) intervention research has focused on the school setting and suggests a need to extend interventions beyond this setting to influence teenagers' overall level of PA. But, the relative effectiveness of PA promotion strategies that can be part of such multi-setting interventions remains unknown. We completed…

  6. Morphed and moving: TNFα-driven motility promotes cell dissemination through MAP4K4-induced cytoskeleton remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Ma

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell dissemination from an initial site of growth is a highly coordinated and controlled process that depends on cell motility. The mechanistic principles that orchestrate cell motility, namely cell shape control, traction and force generation, are highly conserved between cells of different origins. Correspondingly, the molecular mechanisms that regulate these critical aspects of migrating cells are likely functionally conserved too. Thus, cell motility deregulation of unrelated pathogenesis could be caused and maintained by similar mechanistic principles. One such motility deregulation disorder is the leukoproliferative cattle disease Tropical Theileriosis, which is caused by the intracellular, protozoan parasite Theileria annulata. T. annulata transforms its host cell and promotes the dissemination of parasite-infected cells throughout the body of the host. An analogous condition with a fundamentally different pathogenesis is metastatic cancer, where oncogenically transformed cells disseminate from the primary tumor to form distant metastases. Common to both diseases is the dissemination of motile cells from the original site. However, unlike metastatic cancer, host cell transformation by Theileria parasites can be reverted by drug treatment and cell signaling be analyzed under transformed and non-transformed conditions. We have used this reversible transformation model and investigated parasite control of host cell motile properties in the context of inflammatory signaling in Ma M. et al. [PLoS Pathog (2014 10: e1004003]. We found that parasite infection promotes the production of the inflammatory cytokine TNFα in the host macrophage. We demonstrated that increased TNFα triggers motile and invasive properties by enhancing actin cytoskeleton remodeling and cell motility through the ser/thr kinase MAP4K4. We concluded that inflammatory conditions resulting in increased TNFα could facilitate cell dissemination by activating the actin

  7. Further developments towards a genome-scale metabolic model of yeast

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    Dunn Warwick B

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, several genome-scale network reconstructions have been used to describe the metabolism of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, each differing in scope and content. The recent community-driven reconstruction, while rigorously evidenced and well annotated, under-represented metabolite transport, lipid metabolism and other pathways, and was not amenable to constraint-based analyses because of lack of pathway connectivity. Results We have expanded the yeast network reconstruction to incorporate many new reactions from the literature and represented these in a well-annotated and standards-compliant manner. The new reconstruction comprises 1102 unique metabolic reactions involving 924 unique metabolites - significantly larger in scope than any previous reconstruction. The representation of lipid metabolism in particular has improved, with 234 out of 268 enzymes linked to lipid metabolism now present in at least one reaction. Connectivity is emphatically improved, with more than 90% of metabolites now reachable from the growth medium constituents. The present updates allow constraint-based analyses to be performed; viability predictions of single knockouts are comparable to results from in vivo experiments and to those of previous reconstructions. Conclusions We report the development of the most complete reconstruction of yeast metabolism to date that is based upon reliable literature evidence and richly annotated according to MIRIAM standards. The reconstruction is available in the Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML and via a publicly accessible database http://www.comp-sys-bio.org/yeastnet/.

  8. Expanding a dynamic flux balance model of yeast fermentation to genome-scale

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    Agosin Eduardo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yeast is considered to be a workhorse of the biotechnology industry for the production of many value-added chemicals, alcoholic beverages and biofuels. Optimization of the fermentation is a challenging task that greatly benefits from dynamic models able to accurately describe and predict the fermentation profile and resulting products under different genetic and environmental conditions. In this article, we developed and validated a genome-scale dynamic flux balance model, using experimentally determined kinetic constraints. Results Appropriate equations for maintenance, biomass composition, anaerobic metabolism and nutrient uptake are key to improve model performance, especially for predicting glycerol and ethanol synthesis. Prediction profiles of synthesis and consumption of the main metabolites involved in alcoholic fermentation closely agreed with experimental data obtained from numerous lab and industrial fermentations under different environmental conditions. Finally, fermentation simulations of genetically engineered yeasts closely reproduced previously reported experimental results regarding final concentrations of the main fermentation products such as ethanol and glycerol. Conclusion A useful tool to describe, understand and predict metabolite production in batch yeast cultures was developed. The resulting model, if used wisely, could help to search for new metabolic engineering strategies to manage ethanol content in batch fermentations.

  9. Genome-Scale Metabolic Modeling of Archaea Lends Insight into Diversity of Metabolic Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Decades of biochemical, bioinformatic, and sequencing data are currently being systematically compiled into genome-scale metabolic reconstructions (GEMs). Such reconstructions are knowledge-bases useful for engineering, modeling, and comparative analysis. Here we review the fifteen GEMs of archaeal species that have been constructed to date. They represent primarily members of the Euryarchaeota with three-quarters comprising representative of methanogens. Unlike other reviews on GEMs, we specially focus on archaea. We briefly review the GEM construction process and the genealogy of the archaeal models. The major insights gained during the construction of these models are then reviewed with specific focus on novel metabolic pathway predictions and growth characteristics. Metabolic pathway usage is discussed in the context of the composition of each organism's biomass and their specific energy and growth requirements. We show how the metabolic models can be used to study the evolution of metabolism in archaea. Conservation of particular metabolic pathways can be studied by comparing reactions using the genes associated with their enzymes. This demonstrates the utility of GEMs to evolutionary studies, far beyond their original purpose of metabolic modeling; however, much needs to be done before archaeal models are as extensively complete as those for bacteria. PMID:28133437

  10. Genome-scale metabolic network validation of Shewanella oneidensis using transposon insertion frequency analysis.

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    Hong Yang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Transposon mutagenesis, in combination with parallel sequencing, is becoming a powerful tool for en-masse mutant analysis. A probability generating function was used to explain observed miniHimar transposon insertion patterns, and gene essentiality calls were made by transposon insertion frequency analysis (TIFA. TIFA incorporated the observed genome and sequence motif bias of the miniHimar transposon. The gene essentiality calls were compared to: 1 previous genome-wide direct gene-essentiality assignments; and, 2 flux balance analysis (FBA predictions from an existing genome-scale metabolic model of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. A three-way comparison between FBA, TIFA, and the direct essentiality calls was made to validate the TIFA approach. The refinement in the interpretation of observed transposon insertions demonstrated that genes without insertions are not necessarily essential, and that genes that contain insertions are not always nonessential. The TIFA calls were in reasonable agreement with direct essentiality calls for S. oneidensis, but agreed more closely with E. coli essentiality calls for orthologs. The TIFA gene essentiality calls were in good agreement with the MR-1 FBA essentiality predictions, and the agreement between TIFA and FBA predictions was substantially better than between the FBA and the direct gene essentiality predictions.

  11. Advances in the integration of transcriptional regulatory information into genome-scale metabolic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivek-Ananth, R P; Samal, Areejit

    2016-09-01

    A major goal of systems biology is to build predictive computational models of cellular metabolism. Availability of complete genome sequences and wealth of legacy biochemical information has led to the reconstruction of genome-scale metabolic networks in the last 15 years for several organisms across the three domains of life. Due to paucity of information on kinetic parameters associated with metabolic reactions, the constraint-based modelling approach, flux balance analysis (FBA), has proved to be a vital alternative to investigate the capabilities of reconstructed metabolic networks. In parallel, advent of high-throughput technologies has led to the generation of massive amounts of omics data on transcriptional regulation comprising mRNA transcript levels and genome-wide binding profile of transcriptional regulators. A frontier area in metabolic systems biology has been the development of methods to integrate the available transcriptional regulatory information into constraint-based models of reconstructed metabolic networks in order to increase the predictive capabilities of computational models and understand the regulation of cellular metabolism. Here, we review the existing methods to integrate transcriptional regulatory information into constraint-based models of metabolic networks.

  12. AtPID: a genome-scale resource for genotype–phenotype associations in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Qi; Lan, Yiheng; Shi, Yan; Wang, Huan; Pan, Xia; Li, Peng; Shi, Tieliu

    2017-01-01

    AtPID (Arabidopsis thaliana Protein Interactome Database, available at http://www.megabionet.org/atpid) is an integrated database resource for protein interaction network and functional annotation. In the past few years, we collected 5564 mutants with significant morphological alterations and manually curated them to 167 plant ontology (PO) morphology categories. These single/multiple-gene mutants were indexed and linked to 3919 genes. After integrated these genotype–phenotype associations with the comprehensive protein interaction network in AtPID, we developed a Naïve Bayes method and predicted 4457 novel high confidence gene-PO pairs with 1369 genes as the complement. Along with the accumulated novel data for protein interaction and functional annotation, and the updated visualization toolkits, we present a genome-scale resource for genotype–phenotype associations for Arabidopsis in AtPID 5.0. In our updated website, all the new genotype–phenotype associations from mutants, protein network, and the protein annotation information can be vividly displayed in a comprehensive network view, which will greatly enhance plant protein function and genotype–phenotype association studies in a systematical way. PMID:27899679

  13. Genome scale evolution of myxoma virus reveals host-pathogen adaptation and rapid geographic spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Peter J; Rogers, Matthew B; Fitch, Adam; Depasse, Jay V; Cattadori, Isabella M; Twaddle, Alan C; Hudson, Peter J; Tscharke, David C; Read, Andrew F; Holmes, Edward C; Ghedin, Elodie

    2013-12-01

    The evolutionary interplay between myxoma virus (MYXV) and the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) following release of the virus in Australia in 1950 as a biological control is a classic example of host-pathogen coevolution. We present a detailed genomic and phylogeographic analysis of 30 strains of MYXV, including the Australian progenitor strain Standard Laboratory Strain (SLS), 24 Australian viruses isolated from 1951 to 1999, and three isolates from the early radiation in Britain from 1954 and 1955. We show that in Australia MYXV has spread rapidly on a spatial scale, with multiple lineages cocirculating within individual localities, and that both highly virulent and attenuated viruses were still present in the field through the 1990s. In addition, the detection of closely related virus lineages at sites 1,000 km apart suggests that MYXV moves freely in geographic space, with mosquitoes, fleas, and rabbit migration all providing means of transport. Strikingly, despite multiple introductions, all modern viruses appear to be ultimately derived from the original introductions of SLS. The rapidity of MYXV evolution was also apparent at the genomic scale, with gene duplications documented in a number of viruses. Duplication of potential virulence genes may be important in increasing the expression of virulence proteins and provides the basis for the evolution of novel functions. Mutations leading to loss of open reading frames were surprisingly frequent and in some cases may explain attenuation, but no common mutations that correlated with virulence or attenuation were identified.

  14. Genome-scale reconstruction of metabolic network for a halophilic extremophile, Chromohalobacter salexigens DSM 3043

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    Oner Ebru

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromohalobacter salexigens (formerly Halomonas elongata DSM 3043 is a halophilic extremophile with a very broad salinity range and is used as a model organism to elucidate prokaryotic osmoadaptation due to its strong euryhaline phenotype. Results C. salexigens DSM 3043's metabolism was reconstructed based on genomic, biochemical and physiological information via a non-automated but iterative process. This manually-curated reconstruction accounts for 584 genes, 1386 reactions, and 1411 metabolites. By using flux balance analysis, the model was extensively validated against literature data on the C. salexigens phenotypic features, the transport and use of different substrates for growth as well as against experimental observations on the uptake and accumulation of industrially important organic osmolytes, ectoine, betaine, and its precursor choline, which play important roles in the adaptive response to osmotic stress. Conclusions This work presents the first comprehensive genome-scale metabolic model of a halophilic bacterium. Being a useful guide for identification and filling of knowledge gaps, the reconstructed metabolic network iOA584 will accelerate the research on halophilic bacteria towards application of systems biology approaches and design of metabolic engineering strategies.

  15. Reframed Genome-Scale Metabolic Model to Facilitate Genetic Design and Integration with Expression Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Deqing; Jian, Xingxing; Zhang, Cheng; Hua, Qiang

    2016-06-08

    Genome-scale metabolic network models (GEMs) have played important roles in the design of genetically engineered strains and helped biologists to decipher metabolism. However, due to the complex gene-reaction relationships that exist in model systems, most algorithms have limited capabilities with respect to directly predicting accurate genetic design for metabolic engineering. In particular, methods that predict reaction knockout strategies leading to overproduction are often impractical in terms of gene manipulations. Recently, we proposed a method named LTM (logical transformation of model) to simplify the gene-reaction associations by introducing intermediate pseudo reactions, which makes it possible to generate genetic design. Here, we propose an alternative method to relieve researchers from deciphering complex gene-reactions by adding pseudo gene controlling reactions. In comparison to LTM, this new method introduces fewer pseudo reactions and generates a much smaller model system named as gModel. We showed that gModel allows two seldom reported applications: identification of minimal genomes and design of minimal cell factories within a modified OptKnock framework. In addition, gModel could be used to integrate expression data directly and improve the performance of the E-Fmin method for predicting fluxes. In conclusion, the model transformation procedure will facilitate genetic research based on GEMs, extending their applications.

  16. A genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of Mycoplasma genitalium, iPS189.

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    Patrick F Suthers

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available With a genome size of approximately 580 kb and approximately 480 protein coding regions, Mycoplasma genitalium is one of the smallest known self-replicating organisms and, additionally, has extremely fastidious nutrient requirements. The reduced genomic content of M. genitalium has led researchers to suggest that the molecular assembly contained in this organism may be a close approximation to the minimal set of genes required for bacterial growth. Here, we introduce a systematic approach for the construction and curation of a genome-scale in silico metabolic model for M. genitalium. Key challenges included estimation of biomass composition, handling of enzymes with broad specificities, and the lack of a defined medium. Computational tools were subsequently employed to identify and resolve connectivity gaps in the model as well as growth prediction inconsistencies with gene essentiality experimental data. The curated model, M. genitalium iPS189 (262 reactions, 274 metabolites, is 87% accurate in recapitulating in vivo gene essentiality results for M. genitalium. Approaches and tools described herein provide a roadmap for the automated construction of in silico metabolic models of other organisms.

  17. A Consensus Genome-scale Reconstruction of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Metabolism

    KAUST Repository

    Hefzi, Hooman

    2016-11-23

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells dominate biotherapeutic protein production and are widely used in mammalian cell line engineering research. To elucidate metabolic bottlenecks in protein production and to guide cell engineering and bioprocess optimization, we reconstructed the metabolic pathways in CHO and associated them with >1,700 genes in the Cricetulus griseus genome. The genome-scale metabolic model based on this reconstruction, iCHO1766, and cell-line-specific models for CHO-K1, CHO-S, and CHO-DG44 cells provide the biochemical basis of growth and recombinant protein production. The models accurately predict growth phenotypes and known auxotrophies in CHO cells. With the models, we quantify the protein synthesis capacity of CHO cells and demonstrate that common bioprocess treatments, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors, inefficiently increase product yield. However, our simulations show that the metabolic resources in CHO are more than three times more efficiently utilized for growth or recombinant protein synthesis following targeted efforts to engineer the CHO secretory pathway. This model will further accelerate CHO cell engineering and help optimize bioprocesses.

  18. On the road to synthetic life: the minimal cell and genome-scale engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhas, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology employs rational engineering principles to build biological systems from the libraries of standard, well characterized biological parts. Biological systems designed and built by synthetic biologists fulfill a plethora of useful purposes, ranging from better healthcare and energy production to biomanufacturing. Recent advancements in the synthesis, assembly and "booting-up" of synthetic genomes and in low and high-throughput genome engineering have paved the way for engineering on the genome-wide scale. One of the key goals of genome engineering is the construction of minimal genomes consisting solely of essential genes (genes indispensable for survival of living organisms). Besides serving as a toolbox to understand the universal principles of life, the cell encoded by minimal genome could be used to build a stringently controlled "cell factory" with a desired phenotype. This review provides an update on recent advances in the genome-scale engineering with particular emphasis on the engineering of minimal genomes. Furthermore, it presents an ongoing discussion to the scientific community for better suitability of minimal or robust cells for industrial applications.

  19. Genome-scale DNA sequence recognition by hybridization to short oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosavljević, A; Savković, S; Crkvenjakov, R; Salbego, D; Serrato, H; Kreuzer, H; Gemmell, A; Batus, S; Grujić, D; Carnahan, S; Tepavcević, J

    1996-01-01

    Recently developed hybridization technology (Drmanac et al. 1994) enables economical large-scale detection of short oligomers within DNA fragments. The newly developed recognition method (Milosavljević 1995b) enables comparison of lists of oligomers detected within DNA fragments against known DNA sequences. We here describe an experiment involving a set of 4,513 distinct genomic E.coli clones of average length 2kb, each hybridized with 636 randomly selected short oligomer probes. High hybridization signal with a particular probe was used as an indication of the presence of a complementary oligomer in the particular clone. For each clone, a list of oligomers with highest hybridization signals was compiled. The database consisting of 4,513 oligomer lists was then searched using known E.coli sequences as queries in an attempt to identify the clones that match the query sequence. Out of a total of 11 clones that were recognized at highest significance level by our method, 8 were single-pass sequenced from both ends. The single-pass sequenced ends were then compared against the query sequences. The sequence comparisons confirmed 7 out of the total of 8 examined recognitions. This experiment represents the first successful example of genome-scale sequence recognition based on hybridization data.

  20. Deriving metabolic engineering strategies from genome-scale modeling with flux ratio constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Jiun Y; Nazem-Bokaee, Hadi; Freedman, Benjamin G; Athamneh, Ahmad I M; Senger, Ryan S

    2013-05-01

    Optimized production of bio-based fuels and chemicals from microbial cell factories is a central goal of systems metabolic engineering. To achieve this goal, a new computational method of using flux balance analysis with flux ratios (FBrAtio) was further developed in this research and applied to five case studies to evaluate and design metabolic engineering strategies. The approach was implemented using publicly available genome-scale metabolic flux models. Synthetic pathways were added to these models along with flux ratio constraints by FBrAtio to achieve increased (i) cellulose production from Arabidopsis thaliana; (ii) isobutanol production from Saccharomyces cerevisiae; (iii) acetone production from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803; (iv) H2 production from Escherichia coli MG1655; and (v) isopropanol, butanol, and ethanol (IBE) production from engineered Clostridium acetobutylicum. The FBrAtio approach was applied to each case to simulate a metabolic engineering strategy already implemented experimentally, and flux ratios were continually adjusted to find (i) the end-limit of increased production using the existing strategy, (ii) new potential strategies to increase production, and (iii) the impact of these metabolic engineering strategies on product yield and culture growth. The FBrAtio approach has the potential to design "fine-tuned" metabolic engineering strategies in silico that can be implemented directly with available genomic tools.

  1. Analysis of genetic variation and potential applications in genome-scale metabolic modeling

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    João Gonçalo Rocha Cardoso

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variation is the motor of evolution and allows organisms to overcome the environmental challenges they encounter. It can be both beneficial and harmful in the process of engineering cell factories for the production of proteins and chemicals. Throughout the history of biotechnology, there have been efforts to exploit genetic variation in our favor to create strains with favorable phenotypes. Genetic variation can either be present in natural populations or it can be artificially created by mutagenesis and selection or adaptive laboratory evolution. On the other hand, unintended genetic variation during a long term production process may lead to significant economic losses and it is important to understand how to control this type of variation. With the emergence of next-generation sequencing technologies, genetic variation in microbial strains can now be determined on an unprecedented scale and resolution by re-sequencing thousands of strains systematically. In this article, we review challenges in the integration and analysis of large-scale re-sequencing data, present an extensive overview of bioinformatics methods for predicting the effects of genetic variants on protein function, and discuss approaches for interfacing existing bioinformatics approaches with genome-scale models of cellular processes in order to predict effects of sequence variation on cellular phenotypes.

  2. Development of an Evidence-Informed Blog to Promote Healthy Eating Among Mothers: Use of the Intervention Mapping Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Low adherence to dietary guidelines and a concurrent rise of obesity-related chronic diseases emphasize the need for effective interventions to promote healthy eating. There is growing recognition that behavior change interventions should draw on theories of behavior change. Online interventions grounded in theory lead to increased effectiveness for health behavior change; however, few theory-driven social media-based health promotion interventions have been described in the literature. Objective The objective of this study was to describe the application of the Intervention Mapping (IM) protocol to develop an evidence-informed blog to promote healthy eating among French-Canadian mothers of preschool and school-aged children. Methods The following six steps of the IM protocol were performed. In Step 1, a preliminary needs assessment included a literature search on theoretical domains predicting Vegetables and Fruits intakes and Milk and Alternatives intakes in adults (ie, knowledge, beliefs about capabilities, beliefs about consequences, intention/goals) and a qualitative study including focus groups to identify female Internet users’ perceptions of their use of healthy eating blogs. In Step 2, two behavioral outcomes were selected (ie, increase daily intakes of Vegetables and Fruits and Milk and Alternatives of mothers to reach Canadian dietary recommendations) and subsequently divided into six performance objectives inspired by national and international dietary recommendations such as planning for healthy meals. A matrix of change objectives was then created by crossing performance objectives with theoretical domains predicting Vegetables and Fruits intakes and Milk and Alternatives intakes in adults. Step 3 consisted of selecting theory-based intervention methods (eg, modeling and goal setting) and translating them into practical applications for the context of a dietary intervention delivered through a blog. A 6-month intervention was developed in

  3. Determining the control circuitry of redox metabolism at the genome-scale.

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    Stephen Federowicz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Determining how facultative anaerobic organisms sense and direct cellular responses to electron acceptor availability has been a subject of intense study. However, even in the model organism Escherichia coli, established mechanisms only explain a small fraction of the hundreds of genes that are regulated during electron acceptor shifts. Here we propose a qualitative model that accounts for the full breadth of regulated genes by detailing how two global transcription factors (TFs, ArcA and Fnr of E. coli, sense key metabolic redox ratios and act on a genome-wide basis to regulate anabolic, catabolic, and energy generation pathways. We first fill gaps in our knowledge of this transcriptional regulatory network by carrying out ChIP-chip and gene expression experiments to identify 463 regulatory events. We then interfaced this reconstructed regulatory network with a highly curated genome-scale metabolic model to show that ArcA and Fnr regulate >80% of total metabolic flux and 96% of differential gene expression across fermentative and nitrate respiratory conditions. Based on the data, we propose a feedforward with feedback trim regulatory scheme, given the extensive repression of catabolic genes by ArcA and extensive activation of chemiosmotic genes by Fnr. We further corroborated this regulatory scheme by showing a 0.71 r(2 (p<1e-6 correlation between changes in metabolic flux and changes in regulatory activity across fermentative and nitrate respiratory conditions. Finally, we are able to relate the proposed model to a wealth of previously generated data by contextualizing the existing transcriptional regulatory network.

  4. A Genome-Scale Modeling Approach to Quantify Biofilm Component Growth of Salmonella Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribaudo, Nicholas; Li, Xianhua; Davis, Brett; Wood, Thomas K; Huang, Zuyi Jacky

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) is an extremely dangerous foodborne bacterium that infects both animal and human subjects, causing fatal diseases around the world. Salmonella's robust virulence, antibiotic-resistant nature, and capacity to survive under harsh conditions are largely due to its ability to form resilient biofilms. Multiple genome-scale metabolic models have been developed to study the complex and diverse nature of this organism's metabolism; however, none of these models fully integrated the reactions and mechanisms required to study the influence of biofilm formation. This work developed a systems-level approach to study the adjustment of intracellular metabolism of S. typhimurium during biofilm formation. The most advanced metabolic reconstruction currently available, STM_v1.0, was 1st extended to include the formation of the extracellular biofilm matrix. Flux balance analysis was then employed to study the influence of biofilm formation on cellular growth rate and the production rates of biofilm components. With biofilm formation present, biomass growth was examined under nutrient rich and nutrient deficient conditions, resulting in overall growth rates of 0.8675 and 0.6238 h(-1) respectively. Investigation of intracellular flux variation during biofilm formation resulted in the elucidation of 32 crucial reactions, and associated genes, whose fluxes most significantly adapt during the physiological response. Experimental data were found in the literature to validate the importance of these genes for the biofilm formation of S. typhimurium. This preliminary investigation on the adjustment of intracellular metabolism of S. typhimurium during biofilm formation will serve as a platform to generate hypotheses for further experimental study on the biofilm formation of this virulent bacterium.

  5. Noise analysis of genome-scale protein synthesis using a discrete computational model of translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racle, Julien; Stefaniuk, Adam Jan; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2015-07-28

    Noise in genetic networks has been the subject of extensive experimental and computational studies. However, very few of these studies have considered noise properties using mechanistic models that account for the discrete movement of ribosomes and RNA polymerases along their corresponding templates (messenger RNA (mRNA) and DNA). The large size of these systems, which scales with the number of genes, mRNA copies, codons per mRNA, and ribosomes, is responsible for some of the challenges. Additionally, one should be able to describe the dynamics of ribosome exchange between the free ribosome pool and those bound to mRNAs, as well as how mRNA species compete for ribosomes. We developed an efficient algorithm for stochastic simulations that addresses these issues and used it to study the contribution and trade-offs of noise to translation properties (rates, time delays, and rate-limiting steps). The algorithm scales linearly with the number of mRNA copies, which allowed us to study the importance of genome-scale competition between mRNAs for the same ribosomes. We determined that noise is minimized under conditions maximizing the specific synthesis rate. Moreover, sensitivity analysis of the stochastic system revealed the importance of the elongation rate in the resultant noise, whereas the translation initiation rate constant was more closely related to the average protein synthesis rate. We observed significant differences between our results and the noise properties of the most commonly used translation models. Overall, our studies demonstrate that the use of full mechanistic models is essential for the study of noise in translation and transcription.

  6. Genome-scale metabolic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum for bioethanol production

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    Brooks J Paul

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microorganisms possess diverse metabolic capabilities that can potentially be leveraged for efficient production of biofuels. Clostridium thermocellum (ATCC 27405 is a thermophilic anaerobe that is both cellulolytic and ethanologenic, meaning that it can directly use the plant sugar, cellulose, and biochemically convert it to ethanol. A major challenge in using microorganisms for chemical production is the need to modify the organism to increase production efficiency. The process of properly engineering an organism is typically arduous. Results Here we present a genome-scale model of C. thermocellum metabolism, iSR432, for the purpose of establishing a computational tool to study the metabolic network of C. thermocellum and facilitate efforts to engineer C. thermocellum for biofuel production. The model consists of 577 reactions involving 525 intracellular metabolites, 432 genes, and a proteomic-based representation of a cellulosome. The process of constructing this metabolic model led to suggested annotation refinements for 27 genes and identification of areas of metabolism requiring further study. The accuracy of the iSR432 model was tested using experimental growth and by-product secretion data for growth on cellobiose and fructose. Analysis using this model captures the relationship between the reduction-oxidation state of the cell and ethanol secretion and allowed for prediction of gene deletions and environmental conditions that would increase ethanol production. Conclusions By incorporating genomic sequence data, network topology, and experimental measurements of enzyme activities and metabolite fluxes, we have generated a model that is reasonably accurate at predicting the cellular phenotype of C. thermocellum and establish a strong foundation for rational strain design. In addition, we are able to draw some important conclusions regarding the underlying metabolic mechanisms for observed behaviors of C. thermocellum

  7. Genome-scale co-evolutionary inference identifies functions and clients of bacterial Hsp90.

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    Maximilian O Press

    Full Text Available The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is essential in eukaryotes, in which it facilitates the folding of developmental regulators and signal transduction proteins known as Hsp90 clients. In contrast, Hsp90 is not essential in bacteria, and a broad characterization of its molecular and organismal function is lacking. To enable such characterization, we used a genome-scale phylogenetic analysis to identify genes that co-evolve with bacterial Hsp90. We find that genes whose gain and loss were coordinated with Hsp90 throughout bacterial evolution tended to function in flagellar assembly, chemotaxis, and bacterial secretion, suggesting that Hsp90 may aid assembly of protein complexes. To add to the limited set of known bacterial Hsp90 clients, we further developed a statistical method to predict putative clients. We validated our predictions by demonstrating that the flagellar protein FliN and the chemotaxis kinase CheA behaved as Hsp90 clients in Escherichia coli, confirming the predicted role of Hsp90 in chemotaxis and flagellar assembly. Furthermore, normal Hsp90 function is important for wild-type motility and/or chemotaxis in E. coli. This novel function of bacterial Hsp90 agreed with our subsequent finding that Hsp90 is associated with a preference for multiple habitats and may therefore face a complex selection regime. Taken together, our results reveal previously unknown functions of bacterial Hsp90 and open avenues for future experimental exploration by implicating Hsp90 in the assembly of membrane protein complexes and adaptation to novel environments.

  8. GMATA: an integrated software package for genome-scale SSR mining, marker development and viewing

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    Xuewen Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Simple sequence repeats (SSRs, also referred to as microsatellites, are highly variable tandem DNAs that are widely used as genetic markers. The increasing availability of whole-genome and transcript sequences provides information resources for SSR marker development. However, efficient software is required to efficiently identify and display SSR information along with other gene features at a genome scale. We developed novel software package Genome-wide Microsatellite Analyzing Tool Package (GMATA integrating SSR mining, statistical analysis and plotting, marker design, polymorphism screening and marker transferability, and enabled simultaneously display SSR markers with other genome features. GMATA applies novel strategies for SSR analysis and primer design in large genomes, which allows GMATA to perform faster calculation and provides more accurate results than existing tools. Our package is also capable of processing DNA sequences of any size on a standard computer. GMATA is user friendly, only requires mouse clicks or types inputs on the command line, and is executable in multiple computing platforms. We demonstrated the application of GMATA in plants genomes and reveal a novel distribution pattern of SSRs in 15 grass genomes. The most abundant motifs are dimer GA/TC, the A/T monomer and the GCG/CGC trimer, rather than the rich G/C content in DNA sequence. We also revealed that SSR count is a linear to the chromosome length in fully assembled grass genomes. GMATA represents a powerful application tool that facilitates genomic sequence analyses. GAMTA is freely available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/gmata/?source=navbar.

  9. Genome-scale reconstruction and analysis of the metabolic network in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus.

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    Thomas Ulas

    Full Text Available We describe the reconstruction of a genome-scale metabolic model of the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus, a hyperthermoacidophilic microorganism. It grows in terrestrial volcanic hot springs with growth occurring at pH 2-4 (optimum 3.5 and a temperature of 75-80°C (optimum 80°C. The genome of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 contains 2,992,245 bp on a single circular chromosome and encodes 2,977 proteins and a number of RNAs. The network comprises 718 metabolic and 58 transport/exchange reactions and 705 unique metabolites, based on the annotated genome and available biochemical data. Using the model in conjunction with constraint-based methods, we simulated the metabolic fluxes induced by different environmental and genetic conditions. The predictions were compared to experimental measurements and phenotypes of S. solfataricus. Furthermore, the performance of the network for 35 different carbon sources known for S. solfataricus from the literature was simulated. Comparing the growth on different carbon sources revealed that glycerol is the carbon source with the highest biomass flux per imported carbon atom (75% higher than glucose. Experimental data was also used to fit the model to phenotypic observations. In addition to the commonly known heterotrophic growth of S. solfataricus, the crenarchaeon is also able to grow autotrophically using the hydroxypropionate-hydroxybutyrate cycle for bicarbonate fixation. We integrated this pathway into our model and compared bicarbonate fixation with growth on glucose as sole carbon source. Finally, we tested the robustness of the metabolism with respect to gene deletions using the method of Minimization of Metabolic Adjustment (MOMA, which predicted that 18% of all possible single gene deletions would be lethal for the organism.

  10. Factors affecting reproducibility between genome-scale siRNA-based screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, Nicholas J.; Le Sommer, Caroline; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A.; Pearson, James L.

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference-based screening is a powerful new genomic technology which addresses gene function en masse. To evaluate factors influencing hit list composition and reproducibility, we performed two identically designed small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based, whole genome screens for host factors supporting yellow fever virus infection. These screens represent two separate experiments completed five months apart and allow the direct assessment of the reproducibility of a given siRNA technology when performed in the same environment. Candidate hit lists generated by sum rank, median absolute deviation, z-score, and strictly standardized mean difference were compared within and between whole genome screens. Application of these analysis methodologies within a single screening dataset using a fixed threshold equivalent to a p-value ≤ 0.001 resulted in hit lists ranging from 82 to 1,140 members and highlighted the tremendous impact analysis methodology has on hit list composition. Intra- and inter-screen reproducibility was significantly influenced by the analysis methodology and ranged from 32% to 99%. This study also highlighted the power of testing at least two independent siRNAs for each gene product in primary screens. To facilitate validation we conclude by suggesting methods to reduce false discovery at the primary screening stage. In this study we present the first comprehensive comparison of multiple analysis strategies, and demonstrate the impact of the analysis methodology on the composition of the “hit list”. Therefore, we propose that the entire dataset derived from functional genome-scale screens, especially if publicly funded, should be made available as is done with data derived from gene expression and genome-wide association studies. PMID:20625183

  11. GMATA: An Integrated Software Package for Genome-Scale SSR Mining, Marker Development and Viewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuewen; Wang, Le

    2016-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs), also referred to as microsatellites, are highly variable tandem DNAs that are widely used as genetic markers. The increasing availability of whole-genome and transcript sequences provides information resources for SSR marker development. However, efficient software is required to efficiently identify and display SSR information along with other gene features at a genome scale. We developed novel software package Genome-wide Microsatellite Analyzing Tool Package (GMATA) integrating SSR mining, statistical analysis and plotting, marker design, polymorphism screening and marker transferability, and enabled simultaneously display SSR markers with other genome features. GMATA applies novel strategies for SSR analysis and primer design in large genomes, which allows GMATA to perform faster calculation and provides more accurate results than existing tools. Our package is also capable of processing DNA sequences of any size on a standard computer. GMATA is user friendly, only requires mouse clicks or types inputs on the command line, and is executable in multiple computing platforms. We demonstrated the application of GMATA in plants genomes and reveal a novel distribution pattern of SSRs in 15 grass genomes. The most abundant motifs are dimer GA/TC, the A/T monomer and the GCG/CGC trimer, rather than the rich G/C content in DNA sequence. We also revealed that SSR count is a linear to the chromosome length in fully assembled grass genomes. GMATA represents a powerful application tool that facilitates genomic sequence analyses. GAMTA is freely available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/gmata/?source=navbar. PMID:27679641

  12. SHARP: genome-scale identification of gene-protein-reaction associations in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnakumar, S; Durai, Dilip A; Wangikar, Pramod P; Viswanathan, Ganesh A

    2013-11-01

    Genome scale metabolic model provides an overview of an organism's metabolic capability. These genome-specific metabolic reconstructions are based on identification of gene to protein to reaction (GPR) associations and, in turn, on homology with annotated genes from other organisms. Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes which have diverged appreciably from their nonphotosynthetic counterparts. They also show significant evolutionary divergence from plants, which are well studied for their photosynthetic apparatus. We argue that context-specific sequence and domain similarity can add to the repertoire of the GPR associations and significantly expand our view of the metabolic capability of cyanobacteria. We took an approach that combines the results of context-specific sequence-to-sequence similarity search with those of sequence-to-profile searches. We employ PSI-BLAST for the former, and CDD, Pfam, and COG for the latter. An optimization algorithm was devised to arrive at a weighting scheme to combine the different evidences with KEGG-annotated GPRs as training data. We present the algorithm in the form of software "Systematic, Homology-based Automated Re-annotation for Prokaryotes (SHARP)." We predicted 3,781 new GPR associations for the 10 prokaryotes considered of which eight are cyanobacteria species. These new GPR associations fall in several metabolic pathways and were used to annotate 7,718 gaps in the metabolic network. These new annotations led to discovery of several pathways that may be active and thereby providing new directions for metabolic engineering of these species for production of useful products. Metabolic model developed on such a reconstructed network is likely to give better phenotypic predictions.

  13. Noise analysis of genome-scale protein synthesis using a discrete computational model of translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racle, Julien; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily, E-mail: vassily.hatzimanikatis@epfl.ch [Laboratory of Computational Systems Biotechnology, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Stefaniuk, Adam Jan [Laboratory of Computational Systems Biotechnology, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-07-28

    Noise in genetic networks has been the subject of extensive experimental and computational studies. However, very few of these studies have considered noise properties using mechanistic models that account for the discrete movement of ribosomes and RNA polymerases along their corresponding templates (messenger RNA (mRNA) and DNA). The large size of these systems, which scales with the number of genes, mRNA copies, codons per mRNA, and ribosomes, is responsible for some of the challenges. Additionally, one should be able to describe the dynamics of ribosome exchange between the free ribosome pool and those bound to mRNAs, as well as how mRNA species compete for ribosomes. We developed an efficient algorithm for stochastic simulations that addresses these issues and used it to study the contribution and trade-offs of noise to translation properties (rates, time delays, and rate-limiting steps). The algorithm scales linearly with the number of mRNA copies, which allowed us to study the importance of genome-scale competition between mRNAs for the same ribosomes. We determined that noise is minimized under conditions maximizing the specific synthesis rate. Moreover, sensitivity analysis of the stochastic system revealed the importance of the elongation rate in the resultant noise, whereas the translation initiation rate constant was more closely related to the average protein synthesis rate. We observed significant differences between our results and the noise properties of the most commonly used translation models. Overall, our studies demonstrate that the use of full mechanistic models is essential for the study of noise in translation and transcription.

  14. Genome-scale reconstruction of the metabolic network in Yersinia pestis, strain 91001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navid, A; Almaas, E

    2009-01-13

    The gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis, the aetiological agent of bubonic plague, is one the deadliest pathogens known to man. Despite its historical reputation, plague is a modern disease which annually afflicts thousands of people. Public safety considerations greatly limit clinical experimentation on this organism and thus development of theoretical tools to analyze the capabilities of this pathogen is of utmost importance. Here, we report the first genome-scale metabolic model of Yersinia pestis biovar Mediaevalis based both on its recently annotated genome, and physiological and biochemical data from literature. Our model demonstrates excellent agreement with Y. pestis known metabolic needs and capabilities. Since Y. pestis is a meiotrophic organism, we have developed CryptFind, a systematic approach to identify all candidate cryptic genes responsible for known and theoretical meiotrophic phenomena. In addition to uncovering every known cryptic gene for Y. pestis, our analysis of the rhamnose fermentation pathway suggests that betB is the responsible cryptic gene. Despite all of our medical advances, we still do not have a vaccine for bubonic plague. Recent discoveries of antibiotic resistant strains of Yersinia pestis coupled with the threat of plague being used as a bioterrorism weapon compel us to develop new tools for studying the physiology of this deadly pathogen. Using our theoretical model, we can study the cell's phenotypic behavior under different circumstances and identify metabolic weaknesses which may be harnessed for the development of therapeutics. Additionally, the automatic identification of cryptic genes expands the usage of genomic data for pharmaceutical purposes.

  15. A multi-tissue type genome-scale metabolic network for analysis of whole-body systems physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Feist Adam M; Bordbar Aarash; Usaite-Black Renata; Woodcock Joseph; Palsson Bernhard O; Famili Iman

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Genome-scale metabolic reconstructions provide a biologically meaningful mechanistic basis for the genotype-phenotype relationship. The global human metabolic network, termed Recon 1, has recently been reconstructed allowing the systems analysis of human metabolic physiology and pathology. Utilizing high-throughput data, Recon 1 has recently been tailored to different cells and tissues, including the liver, kidney, brain, and alveolar macrophage. These models have shown ut...

  16. Promoting Virtue or Punishing Fraud: Mapping Contrasts in the Language of 'Scientific Integrity'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horbach, S P J M; Halffman, W

    2016-12-19

    Even though integrity is widely considered to be an essential aspect of research, there is an ongoing debate on what actually constitutes research integrity. The understanding of integrity ranges from the minimal, only considering falsification, fabrication and plagiarism, to the maximum, blending into science ethics. Underneath these obvious contrasts, there are more subtle differences that are not as immediately evident. The debate about integrity is usually presented as a single, universal discussion, with shared concerns for researchers, policymakers and 'the public'. In this article, we show that it is not. There are substantial differences between the language of research integrity in the scientific arena and in the public domain. Notably, scientists and policymakers adopt different approaches to research integrity. Scientists tend to present integrity as a virtue that must be kindled, while policy documents and newspapers stress norm enforcement. Rather than performing a conceptual analysis through philosophical reasoning and discussion, we aimed to clarify the discourse of 'scientific integrity' by studying its usage in written documents. To this end, large numbers of scientific publications, policy documents and newspaper articles were analysed by means of scientometric and content analysis techniques. The texts were analysed on their usage of the term 'integrity' and of frequently co-occurring terms and concepts. A comparison was made between the usage in the various media, as well as between different periods in which they were published through co-word analysis, mapping co-occurrence networks of significant terms and themes.

  17. Genome-scale modeling using flux ratio constraints to enable metabolic engineering of clostridial metabolism in silico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McAnulty Michael J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-scale metabolic networks and flux models are an effective platform for linking an organism genotype to its phenotype. However, few modeling approaches offer predictive capabilities to evaluate potential metabolic engineering strategies in silico. Results A new method called “flux balance analysis with flux ratios (FBrAtio” was developed in this research and applied to a new genome-scale model of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 (iCAC490 that contains 707 metabolites and 794 reactions. FBrAtio was used to model wild-type metabolism and metabolically engineered strains of C. acetobutylicum where only flux ratio constraints and thermodynamic reversibility of reactions were required. The FBrAtio approach allowed solutions to be found through standard linear programming. Five flux ratio constraints were required to achieve a qualitative picture of wild-type metabolism for C. acetobutylicum for the production of: (i acetate, (ii lactate, (iii butyrate, (iv acetone, (v butanol, (vi ethanol, (vii CO2 and (viii H2. Results of this simulation study coincide with published experimental results and show the knockdown of the acetoacetyl-CoA transferase increases butanol to acetone selectivity, while the simultaneous over-expression of the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase greatly increases ethanol production. Conclusions FBrAtio is a promising new method for constraining genome-scale models using internal flux ratios. The method was effective for modeling wild-type and engineered strains of C. acetobutylicum.

  18. Population resizing on fitness improvement genetic algorithm to optimize promotion visit route based on android and google maps API

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listyorini, Tri; Muzid, Syafiul

    2017-06-01

    The promotion team of Muria Kudus University (UMK) has done annual promotion visit to several senior high schools in Indonesia. The visits were done to numbers of schools in Kudus, Jepara, Demak, Rembang and Purwodadi. To simplify the visit, each visit round is limited to 15 (fifteen) schools. However, the team frequently faces some obstacles during the visit, particularly in determining the route that they should take toward the targeted school. It is due to the long distance or the difficult route to reach the targeted school that leads to elongated travel duration and inefficient fuel cost. To solve these problems, the development of a certain application using heuristic genetic algorithm method based on the dynamic of population size or Population Resizing on Fitness lmprovement Genetic Algorithm (PRoFIGA), was done. This android-based application was developed to make the visit easier and to determine a shorter route for the team, hence, the visiting period will be effective and efficient. The result of this research was an android-based application to determine the shortest route by combining heuristic method and Google Maps Application Programming lnterface (API) that display the route options for the team.

  19. Weighted Statistical Binning: Enabling Statistically Consistent Genome-Scale Phylogenetic Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayzid, Md Shamsuzzoha; Mirarab, Siavash; Boussau, Bastien; Warnow, Tandy

    2015-01-01

    Because biological processes can result in different loci having different evolutionary histories, species tree estimation requires multiple loci from across multiple genomes. While many processes can result in discord between gene trees and species trees, incomplete lineage sorting (ILS), modeled by the multi-species coalescent, is considered to be a dominant cause for gene tree heterogeneity. Coalescent-based methods have been developed to estimate species trees, many of which operate by combining estimated gene trees, and so are called "summary methods". Because summary methods are generally fast (and much faster than more complicated coalescent-based methods that co-estimate gene trees and species trees), they have become very popular techniques for estimating species trees from multiple loci. However, recent studies have established that summary methods can have reduced accuracy in the presence of gene tree estimation error, and also that many biological datasets have substantial gene tree estimation error, so that summary methods may not be highly accurate in biologically realistic conditions. Mirarab et al. (Science 2014) presented the "statistical binning" technique to improve gene tree estimation in multi-locus analyses, and showed that it improved the accuracy of MP-EST, one of the most popular coalescent-based summary methods. Statistical binning, which uses a simple heuristic to evaluate "combinability" and then uses the larger sets of genes to re-calculate gene trees, has good empirical performance, but using statistical binning within a phylogenomic pipeline does not have the desirable property of being statistically consistent. We show that weighting the re-calculated gene trees by the bin sizes makes statistical binning statistically consistent under the multispecies coalescent, and maintains the good empirical performance. Thus, "weighted statistical binning" enables highly accurate genome-scale species tree estimation, and is also statistically

  20. Weighted Statistical Binning: Enabling Statistically Consistent Genome-Scale Phylogenetic Analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Shamsuzzoha Bayzid

    Full Text Available Because biological processes can result in different loci having different evolutionary histories, species tree estimation requires multiple loci from across multiple genomes. While many processes can result in discord between gene trees and species trees, incomplete lineage sorting (ILS, modeled by the multi-species coalescent, is considered to be a dominant cause for gene tree heterogeneity. Coalescent-based methods have been developed to estimate species trees, many of which operate by combining estimated gene trees, and so are called "summary methods". Because summary methods are generally fast (and much faster than more complicated coalescent-based methods that co-estimate gene trees and species trees, they have become very popular techniques for estimating species trees from multiple loci. However, recent studies have established that summary methods can have reduced accuracy in the presence of gene tree estimation error, and also that many biological datasets have substantial gene tree estimation error, so that summary methods may not be highly accurate in biologically realistic conditions. Mirarab et al. (Science 2014 presented the "statistical binning" technique to improve gene tree estimation in multi-locus analyses, and showed that it improved the accuracy of MP-EST, one of the most popular coalescent-based summary methods. Statistical binning, which uses a simple heuristic to evaluate "combinability" and then uses the larger sets of genes to re-calculate gene trees, has good empirical performance, but using statistical binning within a phylogenomic pipeline does not have the desirable property of being statistically consistent. We show that weighting the re-calculated gene trees by the bin sizes makes statistical binning statistically consistent under the multispecies coalescent, and maintains the good empirical performance. Thus, "weighted statistical binning" enables highly accurate genome-scale species tree estimation, and is also

  1. LocateP: Genome-scale subcellular-location predictor for bacterial proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Miaomiao

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past decades, various protein subcellular-location (SCL predictors have been developed. Most of these predictors, like TMHMM 2.0, SignalP 3.0, PrediSi and Phobius, aim at the identification of one or a few SCLs, whereas others such as CELLO and Psortb.v.2.0 aim at a broader classification. Although these tools and pipelines can achieve a high precision in the accurate prediction of signal peptides and transmembrane helices, they have a much lower accuracy when other sequence characteristics are concerned. For instance, it proved notoriously difficult to identify the fate of proteins carrying a putative type I signal peptidase (SPIase cleavage site, as many of those proteins are retained in the cell membrane as N-terminally anchored membrane proteins. Moreover, most of the SCL classifiers are based on the classification of the Swiss-Prot database and consequently inherited the inconsistency of that SCL classification. As accurate and detailed SCL prediction on a genome scale is highly desired by experimental researchers, we decided to construct a new SCL prediction pipeline: LocateP. Results LocateP combines many of the existing high-precision SCL identifiers with our own newly developed identifiers for specific SCLs. The LocateP pipeline was designed such that it mimics protein targeting and secretion processes. It distinguishes 7 different SCLs within Gram-positive bacteria: intracellular, multi-transmembrane, N-terminally membrane anchored, C-terminally membrane anchored, lipid-anchored, LPxTG-type cell-wall anchored, and secreted/released proteins. Moreover, it distinguishes pathways for Sec- or Tat-dependent secretion and alternative secretion of bacteriocin-like proteins. The pipeline was tested on data sets extracted from literature, including experimental proteomics studies. The tests showed that LocateP performs as well as, or even slightly better than other SCL predictors for some locations and outperforms

  2. Expression induction of P450 genes by imidacloprid in Nilaparvata lugens: A genome-scale analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianhua; Zhang, Yixi; Wang, Yunchao; Yang, Yuanxue; Cang, Xinzhu; Liu, Zewen

    2016-09-01

    The overexpression of P450 monooxygenase genes is a main mechanism for the resistance to imidacloprid, a representative neonicotinoid insecticide, in Nilaparvata lugens (brown planthopper, BPH). However, only two P450 genes (CYP6AY1 and CYP6ER1), among fifty-four P450 genes identified from BPH genome database, have been reported to play important roles in imidacloprid resistance until now. In this study, after the confirmation of important roles of P450s in imidacloprid resistance by the synergism analysis, the expression induction by imidacloprid was determined for all P450 genes. In the susceptible (Sus) strain, eight P450 genes in Clade4, eight in Clade3 and two in Clade2 were up-regulated by imidacloprid, among which three genes (CYP6CS1, CYP6CW1 and CYP6ER1, all in Clade3) were increased to above 4.0-fold and eight genes to above 2.0-fold. In contrast, no P450 genes were induced in Mito clade. Eight genes induced to above 2.0-fold were selected to determine their expression and induced levels in Huzhou population, in which piperonyl butoxide showed the biggest effects on imidacloprid toxicity among eight field populations. The expression levels of seven P450 genes were higher in Huzhou population than that in Sus strain, with the biggest differences for CYP6CS1 (9.8-fold), CYP6ER1 (7.7-fold) and CYP6AY1 (5.1-fold). The induction levels for all tested genes were bigger in Sus strain than that in Huzhou population except CYP425B1. Screening the induction of P450 genes by imidacloprid in the genome-scale will provide an overall view on the possible metabolic factors in the resistance to neonicotinoid insecticides. The further work, such as the functional study of recombinant proteins, will be performed to validate the roles of these P450s in imidacloprid resistance.

  3. Mapping the transcription start points of the Staphylococcus aureus eap, emp, and vwb promoters reveals a conserved octanucleotide sequence that is essential for expression of these genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harraghy, Niamh; Homerova, Dagmar; Herrmann, Mathias; Kormanec, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Mapping the transcription start points of the eap, emp, and vwb promoters revealed a conserved octanucleotide sequence (COS). Deleting this sequence abolished the expression of eap, emp, and vwb. However, electrophoretic mobility shift assays gave no evidence that this sequence was a binding site for SarA or SaeR, known regulators of eap and emp.

  4. The Epstein-Barr Virus-encoded miR-BART22 targets MAP3K5 to promote host cell proliferative and invasive abilities in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruichao; Zhang, Minfeng; Li, Qiulian; Xiong, Hanzhen; Liu, Shaoyan; Fang, Weiyi; Zhang, Qianbing; Liu, Zhen; Xu, Xuehu; Jiang, Qingping

    2017-01-01

    miR-BART22, a new discovered Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) miRNA, is abundant in Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). It has been reported that miR-BART22 promoted the tumor development by down-modulating EBV LMP2 expression to evade the host immune response. But its cell target genes have still been obscure. We have reported an inverse correlation between the BART-22 and MAP3K5 protein expression in NPC tissues and NPC cell lines. Meanwhile, MAP3K5 protein expression level was significantly decreased in primary NPC tissues compared with nasopharyngitis when MAP3K5 mRNA expression was consistent in two group tissues. According to our data and target prediction by miRnada, we assume MAP3K5 is an important target gene of NPC. MAP3K5, also named apoptosis signal-regulating kinase1 (ASK1), is an important early answer gene in P38MAPK pathway and an apoptosis-related gene. In present study, MAP3K5 was verified the target gene of miR-BART22 by luciferase assay. miRBART-22 decreased MAP3K5 protein level. Moreover, it also decreased MAP3K5 downstream gene MAP2K4 expression in P38MAPK pathway, and even their activated phosphorylation forms. Additionally, we found stable transfection of miR-BAT22 could improve tumor cells' proliferative and invasive abilities in NPC cell line 5-8F. The data highlight the role of the EBV miR-BART22 in regulating genes involving in apoptosis and some important pathways to promote cancer development. And it also raises the possibility that inhibitors of miR-BART22 can be as a therapeutic strategy for NPC and other EBV-infected tumors treatment. PMID:28243335

  5. Provision of health promotion programmes to people with serious mental illness: a mapping exercise of four South London boroughs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, C; Gardner-Sood, P; Corlett, S K; Ismail, K; Smith, S; Atakan, Z; Greenwood, K; Joseph, C; Gaughran, F

    2014-03-01

    People with serious mental illness (SMI) are at increased risk of developing various physical health diseases, contributing to significantly reduced life expectancies compared with the general population. In light of this, the Department of Health have set the physical health of people with mental health problems as a priority for improvement. Additionally, the UK government encourages the NHS and local authorities to develop health promotion programmes (HPPs) for people with SMI. To document how many and what types of HPPs were available to people with SMI across four South London boroughs, UK. We found 145 HPPs were available to people with SMI across the four boroughs, but with an inequitable distribution. We also found that certain HPPs set admission criteria that were likely to act as a barrier to improving health. A more integrated approach of documenting and providing information regarding the provision of HPPs for or inclusive of people with SMI is needed. People with serious mental illness (SMI) such as schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorders and bipolar disorder are at increased risk of developing diabetes, cardiovascular disease and respiratory disease, contributing to significantly reduced life expectancies. As a result, emphasis has been placed on developing Health Promotion Programmes (HPPs) to modify the risk of poor physical health in SMI. We examined how many and what types of HPPs are available for or inclusive of people with SMI across four borough in South London, UK. A cross-sectional mapping study was carried out to identify the number of HPPs available to people with SMI. We found 145 HPPs available to people with SMI existed across the four boroughs but with an inequitable distribution, which in some boroughs we anticipate may not meet need. In some cases, HPPs set admission conditions which were likely to further impede access. We recommend that accurate and readily available information on the provision of HPPs for or inclusive of people

  6. Mercator: a fast and simple web server for genome scale functional annotation of plant sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Marc; Nagel, Axel; Herter, Thomas; May, Patrick; Schroda, Michael; Zrenner, Rita; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R; Stitt, Mark; Usadel, Björn

    2014-05-01

    Next-generation technologies generate an overwhelming amount of gene sequence data. Efficient annotation tools are required to make these data amenable to functional genomics analyses. The Mercator pipeline automatically assigns functional terms to protein or nucleotide sequences. It uses the MapMan 'BIN' ontology, which is tailored for functional annotation of plant 'omics' data. The classification procedure performs parallel sequence searches against reference databases, compiles the results and computes the most likely MapMan BINs for each query. In the current version, the pipeline relies on manually curated reference classifications originating from the three reference organisms (Arabidopsis, Chlamydomonas, rice), various other plant species that have a reviewed SwissProt annotation, and more than 2000 protein domain and family profiles at InterPro, CDD and KOG. Functional annotations predicted by Mercator achieve accuracies above 90% when benchmarked against manual annotation. In addition to mapping files for direct use in the visualization software MapMan, Mercator provides graphical overview charts, detailed annotation information in a convenient web browser interface and a MapMan-to-GO translation table to export results as GO terms. Mercator is available free of charge via http://mapman.gabipd.org/web/guest/app/Mercator.

  7. Cell-permeable p38 MAP kinase promotes migration of adult neural stem/progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamanoue, Makoto; Morioka, Kazuhito; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Ohsawa, Keiko; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Tsuburaya, Kayo; Akasaka, Yoshikiyo; Mikami, Tetsuo; Ogata, Toru; Takamatsu, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) can migrate toward sites of injury, but the migration activity of NPCs is insufficient to regenerate damaged brain tissue. In this study, we showed that p38 MAP kinase (p38) is expressed in doublecortin-positive adult NPCs. Experiments using the p38 inhibitor SB203580 revealed that endogenous p38 participates in NPC migration. To enhance NPC migration, we generated a cell-permeable wild-type p38 protein (PTD-p38WT) in which the HIV protein transduction domain (PTD) was fused to the N-terminus of p38. Treatment with PTD-p38WT significantly promoted the random migration of adult NPCs without affecting cell survival or differentiation; this effect depended on the cell permeability and kinase activity of the fusion protein. These findings indicate that PTD-p38WT is a novel and useful tool for unraveling the roles of p38, and that this protein provides a reasonable approach for regenerating the injured brain by enhancing NPC migration. PMID:27067799

  8. A mucus adhesion promoting protein, MapA, mediates the adhesion of Lactobacillus reuteri to Caco-2 human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Yukihiro; Okada, Sanae; Uchimura, Tai; Satoh, Eiichi

    2006-07-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri is one of the dominant lactobacilli found in the gastrointestinal tract of various animals. A surface protein of L. reuteri 104R, mucus adhesion promoting protein (MapA), is considered to be an adhesion factor of this strain. We investigated the relation between MapA and adhesion of L. reuteri to human intestinal (Caco-2) cells. Quantitative analysis of the adhesion of L. reuteri strains to Caco-2 cells showed that various L. reuteri strains bind not only to mucus but also to intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, purified MapA bound to Caco-2 cells, and this binding inhibited the adhesion of L. reuteri in a concentration-dependent manner. Based on these observations, the adhesion of L. reuteri appears due to the binding of MapA to receptor-like molecules on Caco-2 cells. Further, far-western analysis indicated the existence of multiple receptor-like molecules in Caco-2 cells.

  9. Genome-scale metabolic model for Lactococcus lactis MG1363 and its application to the analysis of flavor formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flahaut, Nicolas A L; Wiersma, Anne; van de Bunt, Bert; Martens, Dirk E; Schaap, Peter J; Sijtsma, Lolke; Dos Santos, Vitor A Martins; de Vos, Willem M

    2013-10-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 is a paradigm strain for lactococci used in industrial dairy fermentations. However, despite of its importance for process development, no genome-scale metabolic model has been reported thus far. Moreover, current models for other lactococci only focus on growth and sugar degradation. A metabolic model that includes nitrogen metabolism and flavor-forming pathways is instrumental for the understanding and designing new industrial applications of these lactic acid bacteria. A genome-scale, constraint-based model of the metabolism and transport in L. lactis MG1363, accounting for 518 genes, 754 reactions, and 650 metabolites, was developed and experimentally validated. Fifty-nine reactions are directly or indirectly involved in flavor formation. Flux Balance Analysis and Flux Variability Analysis were used to investigate flux distributions within the whole metabolic network. Anaerobic carbon-limited continuous cultures were used for estimating the energetic parameters. A thorough model-driven analysis showing a highly flexible nitrogen metabolism, e.g., branched-chain amino acid catabolism which coupled with the redox balance, is pivotal for the prediction of the formation of different flavor compounds. Furthermore, the model predicted the formation of volatile sulfur compounds as a result of the fermentation. These products were subsequently identified in the experimental fermentations carried out. Thus, the genome-scale metabolic model couples the carbon and nitrogen metabolism in L. lactis MG1363 with complete known catabolic pathways leading to flavor formation. The model provided valuable insights into the metabolic networks underlying flavor formation and has the potential to contribute to new developments in dairy industries and cheese-flavor research.

  10. A genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of Pseudomonas putida KT2440: iJN746 as a cell factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiele Ines

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas putida is the best studied pollutant degradative bacteria and is harnessed by industrial biotechnology to synthesize fine chemicals. Since the publication of P. putida KT2440's genome, some in silico analyses of its metabolic and biotechnology capacities have been published. However, global understanding of the capabilities of P. putida KT2440 requires the construction of a metabolic model that enables the integration of classical experimental data along with genomic and high-throughput data. The constraint-based reconstruction and analysis (COBRA approach has been successfully used to build and analyze in silico genome-scale metabolic reconstructions. Results We present a genome-scale reconstruction of P. putida KT2440's metabolism, iJN746, which was constructed based on genomic, biochemical, and physiological information. This manually-curated reconstruction accounts for 746 genes, 950 reactions, and 911 metabolites. iJN746 captures biotechnologically relevant pathways, including polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis and catabolic pathways of aromatic compounds (e.g., toluene, benzoate, phenylacetate, nicotinate, not described in other metabolic reconstructions or biochemical databases. The predictive potential of iJN746 was validated using experimental data including growth performance and gene deletion studies. Furthermore, in silico growth on toluene was found to be oxygen-limited, suggesting the existence of oxygen-efficient pathways not yet annotated in P. putida's genome. Moreover, we evaluated the production efficiency of polyhydroxyalkanoates from various carbon sources and found fatty acids as the most prominent candidates, as expected. Conclusion Here we presented the first genome-scale reconstruction of P. putida, a biotechnologically interesting all-surrounder. Taken together, this work illustrates the utility of iJN746 as i a knowledge-base, ii a discovery tool, and iii an engineering platform to explore P

  11. Exploring the metabolic network of the epidemic pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 via genome-scale reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panda Gurudutta

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia cenocepacia is a threatening nosocomial epidemic pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF or a compromised immune system. Its high level of antibiotic resistance is an increasing concern in treatments against its infection. Strain B. cenocepacia J2315 is the most infectious isolate from CF patients. There is a strong demand to reconstruct a genome-scale metabolic network of B. cenocepacia J2315 to systematically analyze its metabolic capabilities and its virulence traits, and to search for potential clinical therapy targets. Results We reconstructed the genome-scale metabolic network of B. cenocepacia J2315. An iterative reconstruction process led to the establishment of a robust model, iKF1028, which accounts for 1,028 genes, 859 internal reactions, and 834 metabolites. The model iKF1028 captures important metabolic capabilities of B. cenocepacia J2315 with a particular focus on the biosyntheses of key metabolic virulence factors to assist in understanding the mechanism of disease infection and identifying potential drug targets. The model was tested through BIOLOG assays. Based on the model, the genome annotation of B. cenocepacia J2315 was refined and 24 genes were properly re-annotated. Gene and enzyme essentiality were analyzed to provide further insights into the genome function and architecture. A total of 45 essential enzymes were identified as potential therapeutic targets. Conclusions As the first genome-scale metabolic network of B. cenocepacia J2315, iKF1028 allows a systematic study of the metabolic properties of B. cenocepacia and its key metabolic virulence factors affecting the CF community. The model can be used as a discovery tool to design novel drugs against diseases caused by this notorious pathogen.

  12. Using a Genome-Scale Metabolic Network Model to Elucidate the Mechanism of Chloroquine Action in Plasmodium falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-22

    Parasitology: Drugs and Drug Resistance journal homepage: www.elsevier .com/locate/ i jpddrUsing a genome-scale metabolic network model to elucidate...the mechanism of chloroquine action in Plasmodium falciparum Shivendra G. Tewari a , *, Sean T. Prigge b, Jaques Reifman a , Anders Wallqvist a , * a ...authors. E-mail addresses: stewari@bhsai.org (S.G. (S.T. Prigge), jaques.reifman.civ@mail.mil (J. Reifma mil ( A . Wallqvist). http://dx.doi.org/10.1016

  13. Parvovirus B19 promoter at map unit 6 confers autonomous replication competence and erythroid specificity to adeno-associated virus 2 in primary human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X S; Yoder, M C; Zhou, S Z; Srivastava, A

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenic human parvovirus B19 is an autonomously replicating virus with a remarkable tropism for human erythroid progenitor cells. Although the target cell specificity for B19 infection has been suggested to be mediated by the erythrocyte P-antigen receptor (globoside), a number of nonerythroid cells that express this receptor are nonpermissive for B19 replication. To directly test the role of expression from the B19 promoter at map unit 6 (B19p6) in the erythroid cell specificity of B19, we constructed a recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV), in which the authentic AAV promoter at map unit 5 (AAVp5) was replaced by the B19p6 promoter. Although the wild-type (wt) AAV requires a helper virus for its optimal replication, we hypothesized that inserting the B19p6 promoter in a recombinant AAV would permit autonomous viral replication, but only in erythroid progenitor cells. In this report, we provide evidence that the B19p6 promoter is necessary and sufficient to impart autonomous replication competence and erythroid specificity to AAV in primary human hematopoietic progenitor cells. Thus, expression from the B19p6 promoter plays an important role in post-P-antigen receptor erythroid-cell specificity of parvovirus B19. The AAV-B19 hybrid vector system may also prove to be useful in potential gene therapy of human hemoglobinopathies. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8618912

  14. Construction of a Genome-Scale Metabolic Model of Arthrospira platensis NIES-39 and Metabolic Design for Cyanobacterial Bioproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Katsunori; Aikawa, Shimpei; Kojima, Yuta; Toya, Yoshihiro; Furusawa, Chikara; Kondo, Akihiko; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis is a promising feedstock and host strain for bioproduction because of its high accumulation of glycogen and superior characteristics for industrial production. Metabolic simulation using a genome-scale metabolic model and flux balance analysis is a powerful method that can be used to design metabolic engineering strategies for the improvement of target molecule production. In this study, we constructed a genome-scale metabolic model of A. platensis NIES-39 including 746 metabolic reactions and 673 metabolites, and developed novel strategies to improve the production of valuable metabolites, such as glycogen and ethanol. The simulation results obtained using the metabolic model showed high consistency with experimental results for growth rates under several trophic conditions and growth capabilities on various organic substrates. The metabolic model was further applied to design a metabolic network to improve the autotrophic production of glycogen and ethanol. Decreased flux of reactions related to the TCA cycle and phosphoenolpyruvate reaction were found to improve glycogen production. Furthermore, in silico knockout simulation indicated that deletion of genes related to the respiratory chain, such as NAD(P)H dehydrogenase and cytochrome-c oxidase, could enhance ethanol production by using ammonium as a nitrogen source.

  15. Construction of a Genome-Scale Metabolic Model of Arthrospira platensis NIES-39 and Metabolic Design for Cyanobacterial Bioproduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsunori Yoshikawa

    Full Text Available Arthrospira (Spirulina platensis is a promising feedstock and host strain for bioproduction because of its high accumulation of glycogen and superior characteristics for industrial production. Metabolic simulation using a genome-scale metabolic model and flux balance analysis is a powerful method that can be used to design metabolic engineering strategies for the improvement of target molecule production. In this study, we constructed a genome-scale metabolic model of A. platensis NIES-39 including 746 metabolic reactions and 673 metabolites, and developed novel strategies to improve the production of valuable metabolites, such as glycogen and ethanol. The simulation results obtained using the metabolic model showed high consistency with experimental results for growth rates under several trophic conditions and growth capabilities on various organic substrates. The metabolic model was further applied to design a metabolic network to improve the autotrophic production of glycogen and ethanol. Decreased flux of reactions related to the TCA cycle and phosphoenolpyruvate reaction were found to improve glycogen production. Furthermore, in silico knockout simulation indicated that deletion of genes related to the respiratory chain, such as NAD(PH dehydrogenase and cytochrome-c oxidase, could enhance ethanol production by using ammonium as a nitrogen source.

  16. An effective method for controlling false discovery and false nondiscovery rates in genome-scale RNAi screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas

    2010-10-01

    In most genome-scale RNA interference (RNAi) screens, the ultimate goal is to select siRNAs with a large inhibition or activation effect. The selection of hits typically requires statistical control of 2 errors: false positives and false negatives. Traditional methods of controlling false positives and false negatives do not take into account the important feature in RNAi screens: many small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) may have very small but real nonzero average effects on the measured response and thus cannot allow us to effectively control false positives and false negatives. To address for deficiencies in the application of traditional approaches in RNAi screening, the author proposes a new method for controlling false positives and false negatives in RNAi high-throughput screens. The false negatives are statistically controlled through a false-negative rate (FNR) or false nondiscovery rate (FNDR). FNR is the proportion of false negatives among all siRNAs examined, whereas FNDR is the proportion of false negatives among declared nonhits. The author also proposes new concepts, q*-value and p*-value, to control FNR and FNDR, respectively. The proposed method should have broad utility for hit selection in which one needs to control both false discovery and false nondiscovery rates in genome-scale RNAi screens in a robust manner.

  17. The RAVEN toolbox and its use for generating a genome-scale metabolic model for Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agren, Rasmus; Liu, Liming; Shoaie, Saeed; Vongsangnak, Wanwipa; Nookaew, Intawat; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    We present the RAVEN (Reconstruction, Analysis and Visualization of Metabolic Networks) Toolbox: a software suite that allows for semi-automated reconstruction of genome-scale models. It makes use of published models and/or the KEGG database, coupled with extensive gap-filling and quality control features. The software suite also contains methods for visualizing simulation results and omics data, as well as a range of methods for performing simulations and analyzing the results. The software is a useful tool for system-wide data analysis in a metabolic context and for streamlined reconstruction of metabolic networks based on protein homology. The RAVEN Toolbox workflow was applied in order to reconstruct a genome-scale metabolic model for the important microbial cell factory Penicillium chrysogenum Wisconsin54-1255. The model was validated in a bibliomic study of in total 440 references, and it comprises 1471 unique biochemical reactions and 1006 ORFs. It was then used to study the roles of ATP and NADPH in the biosynthesis of penicillin, and to identify potential metabolic engineering targets for maximization of penicillin production.

  18. Sequential computation of elementary modes and minimal cut sets in genome-scale metabolic networks using alternate integer linear programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hyun-Seob; Goldberg, Noam; Mahajan, Ashutosh; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami

    2017-03-27

    Elementary (flux) modes (EMs) have served as a valuable tool for investigating structural and functional properties of metabolic networks. Identification of the full set of EMs in genome-scale networks remains challenging due to combinatorial explosion of EMs in complex networks. It is often, however, that only a small subset of relevant EMs needs to be known, for which optimization-based sequential computation is a useful alternative. Most of the currently available methods along this line are based on the iterative use of mixed integer linear programming (MILP), the effectiveness of which significantly deteriorates as the number of iterations builds up. To alleviate the computational burden associated with the MILP implementation, we here present a novel optimization algorithm termed alternate integer linear programming (AILP). Results: Our algorithm was designed to iteratively solve a pair of integer programming (IP) and linear programming (LP) to compute EMs in a sequential manner. In each step, the IP identifies a minimal subset of reactions, the deletion of which disables all previously identified EMs. Thus, a subsequent LP solution subject to this reaction deletion constraint becomes a distinct EM. In cases where no feasible LP solution is available, IP-derived reaction deletion sets represent minimal cut sets (MCSs). Despite the additional computation of MCSs, AILP achieved significant time reduction in computing EMs by orders of magnitude. The proposed AILP algorithm not only offers a computational advantage in the EM analysis of genome-scale networks, but also improves the understanding of the linkage between EMs and MCSs.

  19. The RAVEN toolbox and its use for generating a genome-scale metabolic model for Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Agren

    Full Text Available We present the RAVEN (Reconstruction, Analysis and Visualization of Metabolic Networks Toolbox: a software suite that allows for semi-automated reconstruction of genome-scale models. It makes use of published models and/or the KEGG database, coupled with extensive gap-filling and quality control features. The software suite also contains methods for visualizing simulation results and omics data, as well as a range of methods for performing simulations and analyzing the results. The software is a useful tool for system-wide data analysis in a metabolic context and for streamlined reconstruction of metabolic networks based on protein homology. The RAVEN Toolbox workflow was applied in order to reconstruct a genome-scale metabolic model for the important microbial cell factory Penicillium chrysogenum Wisconsin54-1255. The model was validated in a bibliomic study of in total 440 references, and it comprises 1471 unique biochemical reactions and 1006 ORFs. It was then used to study the roles of ATP and NADPH in the biosynthesis of penicillin, and to identify potential metabolic engineering targets for maximization of penicillin production.

  20. A genome-scale CRISPR-Cas9 screening method for protein stability reveals novel regulators of Cdc25A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuanzhong; Zhou, Liwen; Wang, Xin; Lu, Jinping; Zhang, Ruhua; Liang, Xiaoting; Wang, Li; Deng, Wuguo; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Huang, Haojie; Kang, Tiebang

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of stability is particularly crucial for unstable proteins in cells. However, a convenient and unbiased method of identifying regulators of protein stability remains to be developed. Recently, a genome-scale CRISPR-Cas9 library has been established as a genetic tool to mediate loss-of-function screening. Here, we developed a protein stability regulators screening assay (Pro-SRSA) by combining the whole-genome CRISPR-Cas9 library with a dual-fluorescence-based protein stability reporter and high-throughput sequencing to screen for regulators of protein stability. Using Cdc25A as an example, Cul4B-DDB1(DCAF8) was identified as a new E3 ligase for Cdc25A. Moreover, the acetylation of Cdc25A at lysine 150, which was acetylated by p300/CBP and deacetylated by HDAC3, prevented the ubiquitin-mediated degradation of Cdc25A by the proteasome. This is the first study to report that acetylation, as a novel posttranslational modification, modulates Cdc25A stability, and we suggest that this unbiased CRISPR-Cas9 screening method at the genome scale may be widely used to globally identify regulators of protein stability.

  1. A Genome-Scale Resource for the Functional Characterization of Arabidopsis Transcription Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L. Pruneda-Paz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Extensive transcriptional networks play major roles in cellular and organismal functions. Transcript levels are in part determined by the combinatorial and overlapping functions of multiple transcription factors (TFs bound to gene promoters. Thus, TF-promoter interactions provide the basic molecular wiring of transcriptional regulatory networks. In plants, discovery of the functional roles of TFs is limited by an increased complexity of network circuitry due to a significant expansion of TF families. Here, we present the construction of a comprehensive collection of Arabidopsis TFs clones created to provide a versatile resource for uncovering TF biological functions. We leveraged this collection by implementing a high-throughput DNA binding assay and identified direct regulators of a key clock gene (CCA1 that provide molecular links between different signaling modules and the circadian clock. The resources introduced in this work will significantly contribute to a better understanding of the transcriptional regulatory landscape of plant genomes.

  2. Genome-wide mapping of RNA Pol-II promoter usage in mouse tissues by ChIP-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hao; Wu, Jiejun; Wickramasinghe, Priyankara; Pal, Sharmistha; Gupta, Ravi; Bhattacharyya, Anirban; Agosto-Perez, Francisco J; Showe, Louise C; Huang, Tim H-M; Davuluri, Ramana V

    2011-01-01

    Alternative promoters that are differentially used in various cellular contexts and tissue types add to the transcriptional complexity in mammalian genome. Identification of alternative promoters and the annotation of their activity in different tissues is one of the major challenges in understanding the transcriptional regulation of the mammalian genes and their isoforms. To determine the use of alternative promoters in different tissues, we performed ChIP-seq experiments using antibody against RNA Pol-II, in five adult mouse tissues (brain, liver, lung, spleen and kidney). Our analysis identified 38 639 Pol-II promoters, including 12 270 novel promoters, for both protein coding and non-coding mouse genes. Of these, 6384 promoters are tissue specific which are CpG poor and we find that only 34% of the novel promoters are located in CpG-rich regions, suggesting that novel promoters are mostly tissue specific. By identifying the Pol-II bound promoter(s) of each annotated gene in a given tissue, we found that 37% of the protein coding genes use alternative promoters in the five mouse tissues. The promoter annotations and ChIP-seq data presented here will aid ongoing efforts of characterizing gene regulatory regions in mammalian genomes.

  3. The value of the participatory network mapping tool to facilitate and evaluate coordinated action in health promotion networks: two Dutch case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijenberg, Evianne; Wagemakers, Annemarie; Herens, Marion; Hartog, Franciska den; Koelen, Maria

    2017-08-01

    Facilitating processes for coordinated action in the field of health promotion is a challenge. Poorthuis and Bijl's (2006) Participatory Network Mapping Tool (PNMT) uses visualization and discussion to map the positions and roles of network actors, stimulate learning processes, and elicit actionable knowledge. This article describes the results from the application of the PNMT in networks of two Dutch health promotion programmes (Health Race and BeweegKuur) with the aim of determining the value of the PNMT to partners in health promotions networks. A qualitative secondary analysis (QSA) was conducted to clarify positions and roles, learning processes, and actionable knowledge of network actors in existing data sets including five group interviews of the Health Race programme and 16 individual interviews and 15 group interviews of the BeweegKuur programme. The PNMT maps both positions and roles of (missing) actors and makes successes (e.g. knowing each other) and challenges (e.g. implementing new activities) visible. Thus, the PNMT provides a starting point for discussion and reflection and eliciting actionable knowledge such as involving new actors and target populations in the programme. The PNMT contributes to the facilitation of coordinated action in health promotion networks by making positions and roles of network partners visible. In combination with dialogue and reflection the PNMT helps to elucidate factors influencing coordinated action and outcomes. The PNMT is valuable in grasping intangible aspects between actors by stimulating collective learning. These insights can be used by researchers and network actors to achieve more successful coordinated action for health promotion.

  4. Lewis Acid-Promoted Mukaiyama Aldol-Prins (MAP) Cyclizations of Acetals, Ketals, α-Acetoxy Ethers, and Orthoformates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesinski, Michael R; Van Orden, Lori J; Rychnovsky, Scott D

    2008-02-12

    The Mukaiyama aldol-Prins (MAP) cyclization of acetals stereoselectively provided substituted tetrahydropyrans. The scope of the reaction has been expanded to include other electrophiles, including ketals and α-acetoxy ethers. Finally, a double MAP cyclization with orthoformates is described.

  5. Lewis Acid-Promoted Mukaiyama Aldol–Prins (MAP) Cyclizations of Acetals, Ketals, α-Acetoxy Ethers, and Orthoformates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesinski, Michael R.; Van Orden, Lori J.; Rychnovsky, Scott D.

    2009-01-01

    The Mukaiyama aldol–Prins (MAP) cyclization of acetals stereoselectively provided substituted tetrahydropyrans. The scope of the reaction has been expanded to include other electrophiles, including ketals and α-acetoxy ethers. Finally, a double MAP cyclization with orthoformates is described. PMID:20936058

  6. Identification of genetic determinants of breast cancer immune phenotypes by integrative genome-scale analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeone, Ines; Anjum, Samreen; Mokrab, Younes; Bertucci, François; Finetti, Pascal; Curigliano, Giuseppe; Cerulo, Luigi; Tomei, Sara; Delogu, Lucia Gemma; Maccalli, Cristina; Miller, Lance D.; Ceccarelli, Michele

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cancer immunotherapy is revolutionizing the clinical management of several tumors, but has demonstrated limited activity in breast cancer. The development of more effective treatments is hindered by incomplete knowledge of the genetic determinant of immune responsiveness. To fill this gap, we mined copy number alteration, somatic mutation, and expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). By using RNA-sequencing data from 1,004 breast cancers, we defined distinct immune phenotypes characterized by progressive expression of transcripts previously associated with immune-mediated rejection. The T helper 1 (Th-1) phenotype (ICR4), which also displays upregulation of immune-regulatory transcripts such as PDL1, PD1, FOXP3, IDO1, and CTLA4, was associated with prolonged patients' survival. We validated these findings in an independent meta-cohort of 1,954 breast cancer gene expression data. Chromosome segment 4q21, which includes genes encoding for the Th-1 chemokines CXCL9-11, was significantly amplified only in the immune favorable phenotype (ICR4). The mutation and neoantigen load progressively decreased from ICR4 to ICR1 but could not fully explain immune phenotypic differences. Mutations of TP53 were enriched in the immune favorable phenotype (ICR4). Conversely, the presence of MAP3K1 and MAP2K4 mutations were tightly associated with an immune-unfavorable phenotype (ICR1). Using both the TCGA and the validation dataset, the degree of MAPK deregulation segregates breast tumors according to their immune disposition. These findings suggest that mutation-driven perturbations of MAPK pathways are linked to the negative regulation of intratumoral immune response in breast cancer. Modulations of MAPK pathways could be experimentally tested to enhance breast cancer immune sensitivity. PMID:28344865

  7. Selection of objective function in genome scale flux balance analysis for process feed development in antibiotic production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khannapho, Chiraphan; Zhao, Hongjuan; Bonde, Bhushan K; Kierzek, Andrzej M; Avignone-Rossa, Claudio A; Bushell, Michael E

    2008-09-01

    Using flux variability analysis of a genome scale metabolic network of Streptomyces coelicolor, a series of reactions were identified, from disparate pathways that could be combined into an actinorhodin-generating mini-network. Candidate process feed nutrients that might be expected to influence this network were used in process simulations and in silico predictions compared to experimental findings. Ranking potential process feeds by flux balance analysis optimisation, using either growth or antibiotic production as objective function, did not correlate with experimental actinorhodin yields in fed processes. However, the effect of the feeds on glucose assimilation rate (using glucose uptake as objective function) ranked them in the same order as in vivo antibiotic production efficiency, consistent with results of a robustness analysis of the effect of glucose assimilation on actinorhodin production.

  8. IMGMD: A platform for the integration and standardisation of In silico Microbial Genome-scale Metabolic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chao; Xu, Nan; Dong, Chuan; Ye, Yuannong; Zou, Xuan; Chen, Xiulai; Guo, Fengbiao; Liu, Liming

    2017-04-07

    Genome-scale metabolic models (GSMMs) constitute a platform that combines genome sequences and detailed biochemical information to quantify microbial physiology at the system level. To improve the unity, integrity, correctness, and format of data in published GSMMs, a consensus IMGMD database was built in the LAMP (Linux + Apache + MySQL + PHP) system by integrating and standardizing 328 GSMMs constructed for 139 microorganisms. The IMGMD database can help microbial researchers download manually curated GSMMs, rapidly reconstruct standard GSMMs, design pathways, and identify metabolic targets for strategies on strain improvement. Moreover, the IMGMD database facilitates the integration of wet-lab and in silico data to gain an additional insight into microbial physiology. The IMGMD database is freely available, without any registration requirements, at http://imgmd.jiangnan.edu.cn/database.

  9. Genome-Scale Architecture of Small Molecule Regulatory Networks and the Fundamental Trade-Off between Regulation and Enzymatic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed Reznik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic flux is in part regulated by endogenous small molecules that modulate the catalytic activity of an enzyme, e.g., allosteric inhibition. In contrast to transcriptional regulation of enzymes, technical limitations have hindered the production of a genome-scale atlas of small molecule-enzyme regulatory interactions. Here, we develop a framework leveraging the vast, but fragmented, biochemical literature to reconstruct and analyze the small molecule regulatory network (SMRN of the model organism Escherichia coli, including the primary metabolite regulators and enzyme targets. Using metabolic control analysis, we prove a fundamental trade-off between regulation and enzymatic activity, and we combine it with metabolomic measurements and the SMRN to make inferences on the sensitivity of enzymes to their regulators. Generalizing the analysis to other organisms, we identify highly conserved regulatory interactions across evolutionarily divergent species, further emphasizing a critical role for small molecule interactions in the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis.

  10. Understanding the Causes and Implications of Endothelial Metabolic Variation in Cardiovascular Disease through Genome-Scale Metabolic Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGarrity, Sarah; Halldórsson, Haraldur; Palsson, Sirus

    2016-01-01

    of endothelial cell (EC) metabolism and its connections to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and explore the use of genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) for integrating metabolic and genomic data. GEMs combine gene expression and metabolic data acting as frameworks for their analysis and, ultimately, afford...... mechanistic understanding of how genetic variation impacts metabolism. We demonstrate how GEMs can be used to investigate CVD-related genetic variation, drug resistance mechanisms, and novel metabolic pathways in ECs. The application of GEMs in personalized medicine is also highlighted. Particularly, we focus...... on the potential of GEMs to identify metabolic biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction and to discover methods of stratifying treatments for CVDs based on individual genetic markers. Recent advances in systems biology methodology, and how these methodologies can be applied to understand EC metabolism in both health...

  11. Comparative genome-scale modelling of Staphylococcus aureus strains identifies strain-specific metabolic capabilities linked to pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosi, Emanuele; Monk, Jonathan M; Aziz, Ramy K; Fondi, Marco; Nizet, Victor; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2016-06-28

    Staphylococcus aureus is a preeminent bacterial pathogen capable of colonizing diverse ecological niches within its human host. We describe here the pangenome of S. aureus based on analysis of genome sequences from 64 strains of S. aureus spanning a range of ecological niches, host types, and antibiotic resistance profiles. Based on this set, S. aureus is expected to have an open pangenome composed of 7,411 genes and a core genome composed of 1,441 genes. Metabolism was highly conserved in this core genome; however, differences were identified in amino acid and nucleotide biosynthesis pathways between the strains. Genome-scale models (GEMs) of metabolism were constructed for the 64 strains of S. aureus These GEMs enabled a systems approach to characterizing the core metabolic and panmetabolic capabilities of the S. aureus species. All models were predicted to be auxotrophic for the vitamins niacin (vitamin B3) and thiamin (vitamin B1), whereas strain-specific auxotrophies were predicted for riboflavin (vitamin B2), guanosine, leucine, methionine, and cysteine, among others. GEMs were used to systematically analyze growth capabilities in more than 300 different growth-supporting environments. The results identified metabolic capabilities linked to pathogenic traits and virulence acquisitions. Such traits can be used to differentiate strains responsible for mild vs. severe infections and preference for hosts (e.g., animals vs. humans). Genome-scale analysis of multiple strains of a species can thus be used to identify metabolic determinants of virulence and increase our understanding of why certain strains of this deadly pathogen have spread rapidly throughout the world.

  12. Sequential computation of elementary modes and minimal cut sets in genome-scale metabolic networks using alternate integer linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyun-Seob; Goldberg, Noam; Mahajan, Ashutosh; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami

    2017-08-01

    Elementary (flux) modes (EMs) have served as a valuable tool for investigating structural and functional properties of metabolic networks. Identification of the full set of EMs in genome-scale networks remains challenging due to combinatorial explosion of EMs in complex networks. It is often, however, that only a small subset of relevant EMs needs to be known, for which optimization-based sequential computation is a useful alternative. Most of the currently available methods along this line are based on the iterative use of mixed integer linear programming (MILP), the effectiveness of which significantly deteriorates as the number of iterations builds up. To alleviate the computational burden associated with the MILP implementation, we here present a novel optimization algorithm termed alternate integer linear programming (AILP). Our algorithm was designed to iteratively solve a pair of integer programming (IP) and linear programming (LP) to compute EMs in a sequential manner. In each step, the IP identifies a minimal subset of reactions, the deletion of which disables all previously identified EMs. Thus, a subsequent LP solution subject to this reaction deletion constraint becomes a distinct EM. In cases where no feasible LP solution is available, IP-derived reaction deletion sets represent minimal cut sets (MCSs). Despite the additional computation of MCSs, AILP achieved significant time reduction in computing EMs by orders of magnitude. The proposed AILP algorithm not only offers a computational advantage in the EM analysis of genome-scale networks, but also improves the understanding of the linkage between EMs and MCSs. The software is implemented in Matlab, and is provided as supplementary information . hyunseob.song@pnnl.gov. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  13. Comparative genome-scale modelling of Staphylococcus aureus strains identifies strain-specific metabolic capabilities linked to pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosi, Emanuele; Monk, Jonathan M.; Aziz, Ramy K.; Fondi, Marco; Nizet, Victor; Palsson, Bernhard Ø.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a preeminent bacterial pathogen capable of colonizing diverse ecological niches within its human host. We describe here the pangenome of S. aureus based on analysis of genome sequences from 64 strains of S. aureus spanning a range of ecological niches, host types, and antibiotic resistance profiles. Based on this set, S. aureus is expected to have an open pangenome composed of 7,411 genes and a core genome composed of 1,441 genes. Metabolism was highly conserved in this core genome; however, differences were identified in amino acid and nucleotide biosynthesis pathways between the strains. Genome-scale models (GEMs) of metabolism were constructed for the 64 strains of S. aureus. These GEMs enabled a systems approach to characterizing the core metabolic and panmetabolic capabilities of the S. aureus species. All models were predicted to be auxotrophic for the vitamins niacin (vitamin B3) and thiamin (vitamin B1), whereas strain-specific auxotrophies were predicted for riboflavin (vitamin B2), guanosine, leucine, methionine, and cysteine, among others. GEMs were used to systematically analyze growth capabilities in more than 300 different growth-supporting environments. The results identified metabolic capabilities linked to pathogenic traits and virulence acquisitions. Such traits can be used to differentiate strains responsible for mild vs. severe infections and preference for hosts (e.g., animals vs. humans). Genome-scale analysis of multiple strains of a species can thus be used to identify metabolic determinants of virulence and increase our understanding of why certain strains of this deadly pathogen have spread rapidly throughout the world. PMID:27286824

  14. Genome-scale comparison and constraint-based metabolic reconstruction of the facultative anaerobic Fe(III-reducer Rhodoferax ferrireducens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daugherty Sean

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhodoferax ferrireducens is a metabolically versatile, Fe(III-reducing, subsurface microorganism that is likely to play an important role in the carbon and metal cycles in the subsurface. It also has the unique ability to convert sugars to electricity, oxidizing the sugars to carbon dioxide with quantitative electron transfer to graphite electrodes in microbial fuel cells. In order to expand our limited knowledge about R. ferrireducens, the complete genome sequence of this organism was further annotated and then the physiology of R. ferrireducens was investigated with a constraint-based, genome-scale in silico metabolic model and laboratory studies. Results The iterative modeling and experimental approach unveiled exciting, previously unknown physiological features, including an expanded range of substrates that support growth, such as cellobiose and citrate, and provided additional insights into important features such as the stoichiometry of the electron transport chain and the ability to grow via fumarate dismutation. Further analysis explained why R. ferrireducens is unable to grow via photosynthesis or fermentation of sugars like other members of this genus and uncovered novel genes for benzoate metabolism. The genome also revealed that R. ferrireducens is well-adapted for growth in the subsurface because it appears to be capable of dealing with a number of environmental insults, including heavy metals, aromatic compounds, nutrient limitation and oxidative stress. Conclusion This study demonstrates that combining genome-scale modeling with the annotation of a new genome sequence can guide experimental studies and accelerate the understanding of the physiology of under-studied yet environmentally relevant microorganisms.

  15. Genome-scale analysis of gene function in the hydrogenotrophic methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Felipe; Mrázek, Jan; Whitman, William B

    2013-03-19

    A comprehensive whole-genome analysis of gene function by transposon mutagenesis and deep sequencing methodology has been implemented successfully in a representative of the Archaea domain. Libraries of transposon mutants were generated for the hydrogenotrophic, methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis S2 using a derivative of the Tn5 transposon. About 89,000 unique insertions were mapped to the genome, which allowed for the classification of 526 genes or about 30% of the genome as possibly essential or strongly advantageous for growth in rich medium. Many of these genes were homologous to eukaryotic genes that encode fundamental processes in replication, transcription, and translation, providing direct evidence for their importance in Archaea. Some genes classified as possibly essential were unique to the archaeal or methanococcal lineages, such as that encoding DNA polymerase PolD. In contrast, the archaeal homolog to the gene encoding DNA polymerase B was not essential for growth, a conclusion confirmed by construction of an independent deletion mutation. Thus PolD, and not PolB, likely plays a fundamental role in DNA replication in methanococci. Similarly, 121 hypothetical ORFs were classified as possibly essential and likely play fundamental roles in methanococcal information processing or metabolism that are not established outside this group of prokaryotes.

  16. CATMA, a comprehensive genome-scale resource for silencing and transcript profiling of Arabidopsis genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreau Yves

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Complete Arabidopsis Transcript MicroArray (CATMA initiative combines the efforts of laboratories in eight European countries 1 to deliver gene-specific sequence tags (GSTs for the Arabidopsis research community. The CATMA initiative offers the power and flexibility to regularly update the GST collection according to evolving knowledge about the gene repertoire. These GST amplicons can easily be reamplified and shared, subsets can be picked at will to print dedicated arrays, and the GSTs can be cloned and used for other functional studies. This ongoing initiative has already produced approximately 24,000 GSTs that have been made publicly available for spotted microarray printing and RNA interference. Results GSTs from the CATMA version 2 repertoire (CATMAv2, created in 2002 were mapped onto the gene models from two independent Arabidopsis nuclear genome annotation efforts, TIGR5 and PSB-EuGène, to consolidate a list of genes that were targeted by previously designed CATMA tags. A total of 9,027 gene models were not tagged by any amplified CATMAv2 GST, and 2,533 amplified GSTs were no longer predicted to tag an updated gene model. To validate the efficacy of GST mapping criteria and design rules, the predicted and experimentally observed hybridization characteristics associated to GST features were correlated in transcript profiling datasets obtained with the CATMAv2 microarray, confirming the reliability of this platform. To complete the CATMA repertoire, all 9,027 gene models for which no GST had yet been designed were processed with an adjusted version of the Specific Primer and Amplicon Design Software (SPADS. A total of 5,756 novel GSTs were designed and amplified by PCR from genomic DNA. Together with the pre-existing GST collection, this new addition constitutes the CATMAv3 repertoire. It comprises 30,343 unique amplified sequences that tag 24,202 and 23,009 protein-encoding nuclear gene models in the TAIR6 and Eu

  17. Genome-scale screen for DNA methylation-based detection markers for ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Campan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The identification of sensitive biomarkers for the detection of ovarian cancer is of high clinical relevance for early detection and/or monitoring of disease recurrence. We developed a systematic multi-step biomarker discovery and verification strategy to identify candidate DNA methylation markers for the blood-based detection of ovarian cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used the Illumina Infinium platform to analyze the DNA methylation status of 27,578 CpG sites in 41 ovarian tumors. We employed a marker selection strategy that emphasized sensitivity by requiring consistency of methylation across tumors, while achieving specificity by excluding markers with methylation in control leukocyte or serum DNA. Our verification strategy involved testing the ability of identified markers to monitor disease burden in serially collected serum samples from ovarian cancer patients who had undergone surgical tumor resection compared to CA-125 levels. We identified one marker, IFFO1 promoter methylation (IFFO1-M, that is frequently methylated in ovarian tumors and that is rarely detected in the blood of normal controls. When tested in 127 serially collected sera from ovarian cancer patients, IFFO1-M showed post-resection kinetics significantly correlated with serum CA-125 measurements in six out of 16 patients. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We implemented an effective marker screening and verification strategy, leading to the identification of IFFO1-M as a blood-based candidate marker for sensitive detection of ovarian cancer. Serum levels of IFFO1-M displayed post-resection kinetics consistent with a reflection of disease burden. We anticipate that IFFO1-M and other candidate markers emerging from this marker development pipeline may provide disease detection capabilities that complement existing biomarkers.

  18. Revealing genome-scale transcriptional regulatory landscape of OmpR highlights its expanded regulatory roles under osmotic stress in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seo, Sang Woo; Gao, Ye; Kim, Donghyuk

    2017-01-01

    A transcription factor (TF), OmpR, plays a critical role in transcriptional regulation of the osmotic stress response in bacteria. Here, we reveal a genome-scale OmpR regulon in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. Integrative data analysis reveals that a total of 37 genes in 24 transcription units (TUs...

  19. Pore-scale simulation of microbial growth using a genome-scale metabolic model: Implications for Darcy-scale reactive transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovsky, G. D.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Scheibe, T. D.; Fang, Y.; Mahadevan, R.; Lovley, D. R.

    2013-09-01

    Recent advances in microbiology have enabled the quantitative simulation of microbial metabolism and growth based on genome-scale characterization of metabolic pathways and fluxes. We have incorporated a genome-scale metabolic model of the iron-reducing bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens into a pore-scale simulation of microbial growth based on coupling of iron reduction to oxidation of a soluble electron donor (acetate). In our model, fluid flow and solute transport is governed by a combination of the Navier-Stokes and advection-diffusion-reaction equations. Microbial growth occurs only on the surface of soil grains where solid-phase mineral iron oxides are available. Mass fluxes of chemical species associated with microbial growth are described by the genome-scale microbial model, implemented using a constraint-based metabolic model, and provide the Robin-type boundary condition for the advection-diffusion equation at soil grain surfaces. Conventional models of microbially-mediated subsurface reactions use a lumped reaction model that does not consider individual microbial reaction pathways, and describe reactions rates using empirically-derived rate formulations such as the Monod-type kinetics. We have used our pore-scale model to explore the relationship between genome-scale metabolic models and Monod-type formulations, and to assess the manifestation of pore-scale variability (microenvironments) in terms of apparent Darcy-scale microbial reaction rates. The genome-scale model predicted lower biomass yield, and different stoichiometry for iron consumption, in comparison to prior Monod formulations based on energetics considerations. We were able to fit an equivalent Monod model, by modifying the reaction stoichiometry and biomass yield coefficient, that could effectively match results of the genome-scale simulation of microbial behaviors under excess nutrient conditions, but predictions of the fitted Monod model deviated from those of the genome-scale model

  20. Pore-scale simulation of microbial growth using a genome-scale metabolic model: Implications for Darcy-scale reactive transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Fang, Yilin; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Lovley, Derek R.

    2013-09-07

    Recent advances in microbiology have enabled the quantitative simulation of microbial metabolism and growth based on genome-scale characterization of metabolic pathways and fluxes. We have incorporated a genome-scale metabolic model of the iron-reducing bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens into a pore-scale simulation of microbial growth based on coupling of iron reduction to oxidation of a soluble electron donor (acetate). In our model, fluid flow and solute transport is governed by a combination of the Navier-Stokes and advection-diffusion-reaction equations. Microbial growth occurs only on the surface of soil grains where solid-phase mineral iron oxides are available. Mass fluxes of chemical species associated with microbial growth are described by the genome-scale microbial model, implemented using a constraint-based metabolic model, and provide the Robin-type boundary condition for the advection-diffusion equation at soil grain surfaces. Conventional models of microbially-mediated subsurface reactions use a lumped reaction model that does not consider individual microbial reaction pathways, and describe reactions rates using empirically-derived rate formulations such as the Monod-type kinetics. We have used our pore-scale model to explore the relationship between genome-scale metabolic models and Monod-type formulations, and to assess the manifestation of pore-scale variability (microenvironments) in terms of apparent Darcy-scale microbial reaction rates. The genome-scale model predicted lower biomass yield, and different stoichiometry for iron consumption, in comparisonto prior Monod formulations based on energetics considerations. We were able to fit an equivalent Monod model, by modifying the reaction stoichiometry and biomass yield coefficient, that could effectively match results of the genome-scale simulation of microbial behaviors under excess nutrient conditions, but predictions of the fitted Monod model deviated from those of the genome-scale model under

  1. Direct coupling of a genome-scale microbial in silico model and a groundwater reactive transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yilin; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Garg, Srinath; Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2011-03-01

    The activity of microorganisms often plays an important role in dynamic natural attenuation or engineered bioremediation of subsurface contaminants, such as chlorinated solvents, metals, and radionuclides. To evaluate and/or design bioremediated systems, quantitative reactive transport models are needed. State-of-the-art reactive transport models often ignore the microbial effects or simulate the microbial effects with static growth yield and constant reaction rate parameters over simulated conditions, while in reality microorganisms can dynamically modify their functionality (such as utilization of alternative respiratory pathways) in response to spatial and temporal variations in environmental conditions. Constraint-based genome-scale microbial in silico models, using genomic data and multiple-pathway reaction networks, have been shown to be able to simulate transient metabolism of some well studied microorganisms and identify growth rate, substrate uptake rates, and byproduct rates under different growth conditions. These rates can be identified and used to replace specific microbially-mediated reaction rates in a reactive transport model using local geochemical conditions as constraints. We previously demonstrated the potential utility of integrating a constraint-based microbial metabolism model with a reactive transport simulator as applied to bioremediation of uranium in groundwater. However, that work relied on an indirect coupling approach that was effective for initial demonstration but may not be extensible to more complex problems that are of significant interest (e.g., communities of microbial species and multiple constraining variables). Here, we extend that work by presenting and demonstrating a method of directly integrating a reactive transport model (FORTRAN code) with constraint-based in silico models solved with IBM ILOG CPLEX linear optimizer base system (C library). The models were integrated with BABEL, a language interoperability tool. The

  2. Designing intracellular metabolism for production of target compounds by introducing a heterologous metabolic reaction based on a Synechosystis sp. 6803 genome-scale model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, Tomokazu; Osanai, Takashi; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-18

    Designing optimal intracellular metabolism is essential for using microorganisms to produce useful compounds. Computerized calculations for flux balance analysis utilizing a genome-scale model have been performed for such designs. Many genome-scale models have been developed for different microorganisms. However, optimal designs of intracellular metabolism aimed at producing a useful compound often utilize metabolic reactions of only the host microbial cells. In the present study, we added reactions other than the metabolic reactions with Synechosystis sp. 6803 as a host to its genome-scale model, and constructed a metabolic model of hybrid cells (SyHyMeP) using computerized analysis. Using this model provided a metabolic design that improves the theoretical yield of succinic acid, which is a useful compound. Constructing the SyHyMeP model enabled new metabolic designs for producing useful compounds. In the present study, we developed a metabolic design that allowed for improved theoretical yield in the production of succinic acid during glycogen metabolism by Synechosystis sp. 6803. The theoretical yield of succinic acid production using a genome-scale model of these cells was 1.00 mol/mol-glucose, but use of the SyHyMeP model enabled a metabolic design with which a 33 % increase in theoretical yield is expected due to the introduction of isocitrate lyase, adding activations of endogenous tree reactions via D-glycerate in Synechosystis sp. 6803. The SyHyMeP model developed in this study has provided a new metabolic design that is not restricted only to the metabolic reactions of individual microbial cells. The concept of construction of this model requires only replacement of the genome-scale model of the host microbial cells and can thus be applied to various useful microorganisms for metabolic design to produce compounds.

  3. Singular value decomposition of genome-scale mRNA lengths distribution reveals asymmetry in RNA gel electrophoresis band broadening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, Orly; Golub, Gene H

    2006-08-01

    We describe the singular value decomposition (SVD) of yeast genome-scale mRNA lengths distribution data measured by DNA microarrays. SVD uncovers in the mRNA abundance levels data matrix of genes x arrays, i.e., electrophoretic gel migration lengths or mRNA lengths, mathematically unique decorrelated and decoupled "eigengenes." The eigengenes are the eigenvectors of the arrays x arrays correlation matrix, with the corresponding series of eigenvalues proportional to the series of the "fractions of eigen abundance." Each fraction of eigen abundance indicates the significance of the corresponding eigengene relative to all others. We show that the eigengenes fit "asymmetric Hermite functions," a generalization of the eigenfunctions of the quantum harmonic oscillator and the integral transform which kernel is a generalized coherent state. The fractions of eigen abundance fit a geometric series as do the eigenvalues of the integral transform which kernel is a generalized coherent state. The "asymmetric generalized coherent state" models the measured data, where the profiles of mRNA abundance levels of most genes as well as the distribution of the peaks of these profiles fit asymmetric Gaussians. We hypothesize that the asymmetry in the distribution of the peaks of the profiles is due to two competing evolutionary forces. We show that the asymmetry in the profiles of the genes might be due to a previously unknown asymmetry in the gel electrophoresis thermal broadening of a moving, rather than a stationary, band of RNA molecules.

  4. Improved genome-scale multi-target virtual screening via a novel collaborative filtering approach to cold-start problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hansaim; Gray, Paul; Xie, Lei; Poleksic, Aleksandar

    2016-12-01

    Conventional one-drug-one-gene approach has been of limited success in modern drug discovery. Polypharmacology, which focuses on searching for multi-targeted drugs to perturb disease-causing networks instead of designing selective ligands to target individual proteins, has emerged as a new drug discovery paradigm. Although many methods for single-target virtual screening have been developed to improve the efficiency of drug discovery, few of these algorithms are designed for polypharmacology. Here, we present a novel theoretical framework and a corresponding algorithm for genome-scale multi-target virtual screening based on the one-class collaborative filtering technique. Our method overcomes the sparseness of the protein-chemical interaction data by means of interaction matrix weighting and dual regularization from both chemicals and proteins. While the statistical foundation behind our method is general enough to encompass genome-wide drug off-target prediction, the program is specifically tailored to find protein targets for new chemicals with little to no available interaction data. We extensively evaluate our method using a number of the most widely accepted gene-specific and cross-gene family benchmarks and demonstrate that our method outperforms other state-of-the-art algorithms for predicting the interaction of new chemicals with multiple proteins. Thus, the proposed algorithm may provide a powerful tool for multi-target drug design.

  5. A multi-tissue type genome-scale metabolic network for analysis of whole-body systems physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feist Adam M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-scale metabolic reconstructions provide a biologically meaningful mechanistic basis for the genotype-phenotype relationship. The global human metabolic network, termed Recon 1, has recently been reconstructed allowing the systems analysis of human metabolic physiology and pathology. Utilizing high-throughput data, Recon 1 has recently been tailored to different cells and tissues, including the liver, kidney, brain, and alveolar macrophage. These models have shown utility in the study of systems medicine. However, no integrated analysis between human tissues has been done. Results To describe tissue-specific functions, Recon 1 was tailored to describe metabolism in three human cells: adipocytes, hepatocytes, and myocytes. These cell-specific networks were manually curated and validated based on known cellular metabolic functions. To study intercellular interactions, a novel multi-tissue type modeling approach was developed to integrate the metabolic functions for the three cell types, and subsequently used to simulate known integrated metabolic cycles. In addition, the multi-tissue model was used to study diabetes: a pathology with systemic properties. High-throughput data was integrated with the network to determine differential metabolic activity between obese and type II obese gastric bypass patients in a whole-body context. Conclusion The multi-tissue type modeling approach presented provides a platform to study integrated metabolic states. As more cell and tissue-specific models are released, it is critical to develop a framework in which to study their interdependencies.

  6. ReacKnock: identifying reaction deletion strategies for microbial strain optimization based on genome-scale metabolic network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zixiang Xu

    Full Text Available Gene knockout has been used as a common strategy to improve microbial strains for producing chemicals. Several algorithms are available to predict the target reactions to be deleted. Most of them apply mixed integer bi-level linear programming (MIBLP based on metabolic networks, and use duality theory to transform bi-level optimization problem of large-scale MIBLP to single-level programming. However, the validity of the transformation was not proved. Solution of MIBLP depends on the structure of inner problem. If the inner problem is continuous, Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT method can be used to reformulate the MIBLP to a single-level one. We adopt KKT technique in our algorithm ReacKnock to attack the intractable problem of the solution of MIBLP, demonstrated with the genome-scale metabolic network model of E. coli for producing various chemicals such as succinate, ethanol, threonine and etc. Compared to the previous methods, our algorithm is fast, stable and reliable to find the optimal solutions for all the chemical products tested, and able to provide all the alternative deletion strategies which lead to the same industrial objective.

  7. Integration of genome-scale modeling and transcript profiling reveals metabolic pathways underlying light and temperature acclimation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töpfer, Nadine; Caldana, Camila; Grimbs, Sergio; Willmitzer, Lothar; Fernie, Alisdair R; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2013-04-01

    Understanding metabolic acclimation of plants to challenging environmental conditions is essential for dissecting the role of metabolic pathways in growth and survival. As stresses involve simultaneous physiological alterations across all levels of cellular organization, a comprehensive characterization of the role of metabolic pathways in acclimation necessitates integration of genome-scale models with high-throughput data. Here, we present an integrative optimization-based approach, which, by coupling a plant metabolic network model and transcriptomics data, can predict the metabolic pathways affected in a single, carefully controlled experiment. Moreover, we propose three optimization-based indices that characterize different aspects of metabolic pathway behavior in the context of the entire metabolic network. We demonstrate that the proposed approach and indices facilitate quantitative comparisons and characterization of the plant metabolic response under eight different light and/or temperature conditions. The predictions of the metabolic functions involved in metabolic acclimation of Arabidopsis thaliana to the changing conditions are in line with experimental evidence and result in a hypothesis about the role of homocysteine-to-Cys interconversion and Asn biosynthesis. The approach can also be used to reveal the role of particular metabolic pathways in other scenarios, while taking into consideration the entirety of characterized plant metabolism.

  8. Candidate states of Helicobacter pylori's genome-scale metabolic network upon application of "loop law" thermodynamic constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Nathan D; Thiele, Ines; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2006-06-01

    Constraint-based modeling has proven to be a useful tool in the analysis of biochemical networks. To date, most studies in this field have focused on the use of linear constraints, resulting from mass balance and capacity constraints, which lead to the definition of convex solution spaces. One additional constraint arising out of thermodynamics is known as the "loop law" for reaction fluxes, which states that the net flux around a closed biochemical loop must be zero because no net thermodynamic driving force exists. The imposition of the loop-law can lead to nonconvex solution spaces making the analysis of the consequences of its imposition challenging. A four-step approach is developed here to apply the loop-law to study metabolic network properties: 1), determine linear equality constraints that are necessary (but not necessarily sufficient) for thermodynamic feasibility; 2), tighten V(max) and V(min) constraints to enclose the remaining nonconvex space; 3), uniformly sample the convex space that encloses the nonconvex space using standard Monte Carlo techniques; and 4), eliminate from the resulting set all solutions that violate the loop-law, leaving a subset of steady-state solutions. This subset of solutions represents a uniform random sample of the space that is defined by the additional imposition of the loop-law. This approach is used to evaluate the effect of imposing the loop-law on predicted candidate states of the genome-scale metabolic network of Helicobacter pylori.

  9. Flux balance analysis of genome-scale metabolic model of rice (Oryza sativa): Aiming to increase biomass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rahul Shaw; Sudip Kundu

    2015-10-01

    Due to socio-economic reasons, it is essential to design efficient stress-tolerant, more nutritious, high yielding rice varieties. A systematic understanding of the rice cellular metabolism is essential for this purpose. Here, we analyse a genome-scale metabolic model of rice leaf using Flux Balance Analysis to investigate whether it has potential metabolic flexibility to increase the biosynthesis of any of the biomass components. We initially simulate the metabolic responses under an objective to maximize the biomass components. Using the estimated maximum value of biomass synthesis as a constraint, we further simulate the metabolic responses optimizing the cellular economy. Depending on the physiological conditions of a cell, the transport capacities of intracellular transporters (ICTs) can vary. To mimic this physiological state, we randomly vary the ICTs’ transport capacities and investigate their effects. The results show that the rice leaf has the potential to increase glycine and starch in a wide range depending on the ICTs’ transport capacities. The predicted biosynthesis pathways vary slightly at the two different optimization conditions. With the constraint of biomass composition, the cell also has the metabolic plasticity to fix a wide range of carbon-nitrogen ratio.

  10. Parallel Mutual Information Based Construction of Genome-Scale Networks on the Intel® Xeon Phi™ Coprocessor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Sanchit; Pamnany, Kiran; Aluru, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    Construction of whole-genome networks from large-scale gene expression data is an important problem in systems biology. While several techniques have been developed, most cannot handle network reconstruction at the whole-genome scale, and the few that can, require large clusters. In this paper, we present a solution on the Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor, taking advantage of its multi-level parallelism including many x86-based cores, multiple threads per core, and vector processing units. We also present a solution on the Intel® Xeon® processor. Our solution is based on TINGe, a fast parallel network reconstruction technique that uses mutual information and permutation testing for assessing statistical significance. We demonstrate the first ever inference of a plant whole genome regulatory network on a single chip by constructing a 15,575 gene network of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana from 3,137 microarray experiments in only 22 minutes. In addition, our optimization for parallelizing mutual information computation on the Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor holds out lessons that are applicable to other domains.

  11. Genome-scale transcriptome analysis in response to nitric oxide in birch cells: implications of the triterpene biosynthetic pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fansuo Zeng

    Full Text Available Evidence supporting nitric oxide (NO as a mediator of plant biochemistry continues to grow, but its functions at the molecular level remains poorly understood and, in some cases, controversial. To study the role of NO at the transcriptional level in Betula platyphylla cells, we conducted a genome-scale transcriptome analysis of these cells. The transcriptome of untreated birch cells and those treated by sodium nitroprusside (SNP were analyzed using the Solexa sequencing. Data were collected by sequencing cDNA libraries of birch cells, which had a long period to adapt to the suspension culture conditions before SNP-treated cells and untreated cells were sampled. Among the 34,100 UniGenes detected, BLASTX search revealed that 20,631 genes showed significant (E-values≤10-5 sequence similarity with proteins from the NR-database. Numerous expressed sequence tags (i.e., 1374 were identified as differentially expressed between the 12 h SNP-treated cells and control cells samples: 403 up-regulated and 971 down-regulated. From this, we specifically examined a core set of NO-related transcripts. The altered expression levels of several transcripts, as determined by transcriptome analysis, was confirmed by qRT-PCR. The results of transcriptome analysis, gene expression quantification, the content of triterpenoid and activities of defensive enzymes elucidated NO has a significant effect on many processes including triterpenoid production, carbohydrate metabolism and cell wall biosynthesis.

  12. The use of concept mapping and vee heuristics in higher education to promote critical reflection and meaningful learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Vanhear

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Higher Education is currently undergoing relentless change worldwide in order to respond effectively to the aspirations of the 21st century. Consequently, prevalent literature in Higher Education calls for more emphasis on the studentsʼ learning process through increased metacognition and critical reflection. This paper starts off with the assumption that learning takes place through the integration of thinking, feeling and acting. As a result, this paper will present a model of teaching and learning in Higher Education through the integrated use of Vee Heuristics and Concept Mapping. This research will suggest that when using Concept Maps, Vee Heuristics along with an awareness of how students prefer to learn, the students will go through a metacognitive learning process which would eventually lead to critical reflection and meaningful learning. Using University studentsʼ work products, this study traces the effect of a learnerʼs mental operations on the learnerʼs use of Vee Heuristics and Concept Mapping as the learner embeds and retrieves new and scaffolded knowledge. The data collected reveals the powerful effect which this combination of learning tolos yielded on student achievement and transformation.

  13. Genome-scale metabolic reconstruction and in silico analysis of methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris for strain improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Bevan KS

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pichia pastoris has been recognized as an effective host for recombinant protein production. A number of studies have been reported for improving this expression system. However, its physiology and cellular metabolism still remained largely uncharacterized. Thus, it is highly desirable to establish a systems biotechnological framework, in which a comprehensive in silico model of P. pastoris can be employed together with high throughput experimental data analysis, for better understanding of the methylotrophic yeast's metabolism. Results A fully compartmentalized metabolic model of P. pastoris (iPP668, composed of 1,361 reactions and 1,177 metabolites, was reconstructed based on its genome annotation and biochemical information. The constraints-based flux analysis was then used to predict achievable growth rate which is consistent with the cellular phenotype of P. pastoris observed during chemostat experiments. Subsequent in silico analysis further explored the effect of various carbon sources on cell growth, revealing sorbitol as a promising candidate for culturing recombinant P. pastoris strains producing heterologous proteins. Interestingly, methanol consumption yields a high regeneration rate of reducing equivalents which is substantial for the synthesis of valuable pharmaceutical precursors. Hence, as a case study, we examined the applicability of P. pastoris system to whole-cell biotransformation and also identified relevant metabolic engineering targets that have been experimentally verified. Conclusion The genome-scale metabolic model characterizes the cellular physiology of P. pastoris, thus allowing us to gain valuable insights into the metabolism of methylotrophic yeast and devise possible strategies for strain improvement through in silico simulations. This computational approach, combined with synthetic biology techniques, potentially forms a basis for rational analysis and design of P. pastoris metabolic network

  14. Integration of Genome-Scale Metabolic Nodels of Iron-Reducing Bacteria With Subsurface Flow and Geochemical Reactive Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibe, T. D.; Mahadevan, R.; Fang, Y.; Garg, S.; Long, P. E.; Lovley, D. M.

    2008-12-01

    Several field and laboratory experiments have demonstrated that the growth and activity of iron-reducing bacteria can be stimulated in many subsurface environments by amendment of groundwater with a soluble electron donor. Under strong iron-reducing conditions, these organisms mediate reactions that can impact a wide range of subsurface contaminants including chlorinated hydrocarbons, metals, and radionuclides. Therefore there is strong interest in in-situ bioremediation as a potential technology for cleanup of contaminated aquifers. To evaluate and design bioremediation systems, as well as to evaluate the viability of monitored natural attenuation as an alternative, quantitative models of biogeochemically reactive transport are needed. To date, most such models represent microbial activity in terms of kinetic rate (e.g., Monod- type) formulations. Such models do not account for fundamental changes in microbial functionality (such as utilization of alternative respiratory pathways) that occur as the result of spatial and temporal variations in the geochemical environment experienced by microorganisms. Constraint-based genome-scale in silico models of microbial metabolism present an alternative to simplified rate formulations that provide flexibility to account for changes in microbial function in response to local geochemical conditions. We have developed and applied a methodology for coupling a constraint-based in silico model of Geobacter sulfurreducens with a conventional model of groundwater flow, transport, and geochemical reaction. Two uses of the in silico model are tested: 1) incorporation of modified microbial growth yield coefficients based on the in silico model, and 2) variation of reaction rates in a reactive transport model based on in silico modeling of a range of local geochemical conditions. Preliminary results from this integrated model will be presented.

  15. Genome-scale reconstruction and analysis of the Pseudomonas putida KT2440 metabolic network facilitates applications in biotechnology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Puchałka

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A cornerstone of biotechnology is the use of microorganisms for the efficient production of chemicals and the elimination of harmful waste. Pseudomonas putida is an archetype of such microbes due to its metabolic versatility, stress resistance, amenability to genetic modifications, and vast potential for environmental and industrial applications. To address both the elucidation of the metabolic wiring in P. putida and its uses in biocatalysis, in particular for the production of non-growth-related biochemicals, we developed and present here a genome-scale constraint-based model of the metabolism of P. putida KT2440. Network reconstruction and flux balance analysis (FBA enabled definition of the structure of the metabolic network, identification of knowledge gaps, and pin-pointing of essential metabolic functions, facilitating thereby the refinement of gene annotations. FBA and flux variability analysis were used to analyze the properties, potential, and limits of the model. These analyses allowed identification, under various conditions, of key features of metabolism such as growth yield, resource distribution, network robustness, and gene essentiality. The model was validated with data from continuous cell cultures, high-throughput phenotyping data, (13C-measurement of internal flux distributions, and specifically generated knock-out mutants. Auxotrophy was correctly predicted in 75% of the cases. These systematic analyses revealed that the metabolic network structure is the main factor determining the accuracy of predictions, whereas biomass composition has negligible influence. Finally, we drew on the model to devise metabolic engineering strategies to improve production of polyhydroxyalkanoates, a class of biotechnologically useful compounds whose synthesis is not coupled to cell survival. The solidly validated model yields valuable insights into genotype-phenotype relationships and provides a sound framework to explore this versatile

  16. Genome-scale metabolic reconstructions of Pichia stipitis and Pichia pastoris and in silico evaluation of their potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caspeta Luis

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pichia stipitis and Pichia pastoris have long been investigated due to their native abilities to metabolize every sugar from lignocellulose and to modulate methanol consumption, respectively. The latter has been driving the production of several recombinant proteins. As a result, significant advances in their biochemical knowledge, as well as in genetic engineering and fermentation methods have been generated. The release of their genome sequences has allowed systems level research. Results In this work, genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs of P. stipitis (iSS884 and P. pastoris (iLC915 were reconstructed. iSS884 includes 1332 reactions, 922 metabolites, and 4 compartments. iLC915 contains 1423 reactions, 899 metabolites, and 7 compartments. Compared with the previous GEMs of P. pastoris, PpaMBEL1254 and iPP668, iLC915 contains more genes and metabolic functions, as well as improved predictive capabilities. Simulations of physiological responses for the growth of both yeasts on selected carbon sources using iSS884 and iLC915 closely reproduced the experimental data. Additionally, the iSS884 model was used to predict ethanol production from xylose at different oxygen uptake rates. Simulations with iLC915 closely reproduced the effect of oxygen uptake rate on physiological states of P. pastoris expressing a recombinant protein. The potential of P. stipitis for the conversion of xylose and glucose into ethanol using reactors in series, and of P. pastoris to produce recombinant proteins using mixtures of methanol and glycerol or sorbitol are also discussed. Conclusions In conclusion the first GEM of P. stipitis (iSS884 was reconstructed and validated. The expanded version of the P. pastoris GEM, iLC915, is more complete and has improved capabilities over the existing models. Both GEMs are useful frameworks to explore the versatility of these yeasts and to capitalize on their biotechnological potentials.

  17. Characterizing the optimal flux space of genome-scale metabolic reconstructions through modified latin-hypercube sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Neha; Tøndel, Kristin; Bhatnagar, Rakesh; dos Santos, Vítor A P Martins; Puchałka, Jacek

    2016-03-01

    Genome-Scale Metabolic Reconstructions (GSMRs), along with optimization-based methods, predominantly Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) and its derivatives, are widely applied for assessing and predicting the behavior of metabolic networks upon perturbation, thereby enabling identification of potential novel drug targets and biotechnologically relevant pathways. The abundance of alternate flux profiles has led to the evolution of methods to explore the complete solution space aiming to increase the accuracy of predictions. Herein we present a novel, generic algorithm to characterize the entire flux space of GSMR upon application of FBA, leading to the optimal value of the objective (the optimal flux space). Our method employs Modified Latin-Hypercube Sampling (LHS) to effectively border the optimal space, followed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to identify and explain the major sources of variability within it. The approach was validated with the elementary mode analysis of a smaller network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and applied to the GSMR of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (iMO1086). It is shown to surpass the commonly used Monte Carlo Sampling (MCS) in providing a more uniform coverage for a much larger network in less number of samples. Results show that although many fluxes are identified as variable upon fixing the objective value, majority of the variability can be reduced to several main patterns arising from a few alternative pathways. In iMO1086, initial variability of 211 reactions could almost entirely be explained by 7 alternative pathway groups. These findings imply that the possibilities to reroute greater portions of flux may be limited within metabolic networks of bacteria. Furthermore, the optimal flux space is subject to change with environmental conditions. Our method may be a useful device to validate the predictions made by FBA-based tools, by describing the optimal flux space associated with these predictions, thus to improve them.

  18. Metabolic stasis in an ancient symbiosis: genome-scale metabolic networks from two Blattabacterium cuenoti strains, primary endosymbionts of cockroaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Domenech, Carmen Maria; Belda, Eugeni; Patiño-Navarrete, Rafael; Moya, Andrés; Peretó, Juli; Latorre, Amparo

    2012-01-18

    Cockroaches are terrestrial insects that strikingly eliminate waste nitrogen as ammonia instead of uric acid. Blattabacterium cuenoti (Mercier 1906) strains Bge and Pam are the obligate primary endosymbionts of the cockroaches Blattella germanica and Periplaneta americana, respectively. The genomes of both bacterial endosymbionts have recently been sequenced, making possible a genome-scale constraint-based reconstruction of their metabolic networks. The mathematical expression of a metabolic network and the subsequent quantitative studies of phenotypic features by Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) represent an efficient functional approach to these uncultivable bacteria. We report the metabolic models of Blattabacterium strains Bge (iCG238) and Pam (iCG230), comprising 296 and 289 biochemical reactions, associated with 238 and 230 genes, and 364 and 358 metabolites, respectively. Both models reflect both the striking similarities and the singularities of these microorganisms. FBA was used to analyze the properties, potential and limits of the models, assuming some environmental constraints such as aerobic conditions and the net production of ammonia from these bacterial systems, as has been experimentally observed. In addition, in silico simulations with the iCG238 model have enabled a set of carbon and nitrogen sources to be defined, which would also support a viable phenotype in terms of biomass production in the strain Pam, which lacks the first three steps of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. FBA reveals a metabolic condition that renders these enzymatic steps dispensable, thus offering a possible evolutionary explanation for their elimination. We also confirm, by computational simulations, the fragility of the metabolic networks and their host dependence. The minimized Blattabacterium metabolic networks are surprisingly similar in strains Bge and Pam, after 140 million years of evolution of these endosymbionts in separate cockroach lineages. FBA performed on the

  19. Folding Free Energies of 5'-UTRs Impact Post-Transcriptional Regulation on a Genomic Scale in Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Using high-throughput technologies, abundances and other features of genes and proteins have been measured on a genome-wide scale in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast, secondary structure in 5'-untranslated regions (UTRs of mRNA has only been investigated for a limited number of genes. Here, the aim is to study genome-wide regulatory effects of mRNA 5'-UTR folding free energies. We performed computations of secondary structures in 5'-UTRs and their folding free energies for all verified genes in S. cerevisiae. We found significant correlations between folding free energies of 5'-UTRs and various transcript features measured in genome-wide studies of yeast. In particular, mRNAs with weakly folded 5'-UTRs have higher translation rates, higher abundances of the corresponding proteins, longer half-lives, and higher numbers of transcripts, and are upregulated after heat shock. Furthermore, 5'-UTRs have significantly higher folding free energies than other genomic regions and randomized sequences. We also found a positive correlation between transcript half-life and ribosome occupancy that is more pronounced for short-lived transcripts, which supports a picture of competition between translation and degradation. Among the genes with strongly folded 5'-UTRs, there is a huge overrepresentation of uncharacterized open reading frames. Based on our analysis, we conclude that (i there is a widespread bias for 5'-UTRs to be weakly folded, (ii folding free energies of 5'-UTRs are correlated with mRNA translation and turnover on a genomic scale, and (iii transcripts with strongly folded 5'-UTRs are often rare and hard to find experimentally.

  20. Non-essential genes form the hubs of genome scale protein function and environmental gene expression networks in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkrantz, Jesper T.; Aarts, Henk; Abee, Tjakko

    2013-01-01

    Background: Salmonella Typhimurium is an important pathogen of human and animals. It shows a broad growth range and survives in harsh conditions. The aim of this study was to analyze transcriptional responses to a number of growth and stress conditions as well as the relationship of metabolic...... pathways and/or cell functions at the genome-scale-level by network analysis, and further to explore whether highly connected genes ( hubs) in these networks were essential for growth, stress adaptation and virulence. Results: De novo generated as well as published transcriptional data for 425 selected...... genes under a number of growth and stress conditions were used to construct a bipartite network connecting culture conditions and significantly regulated genes (transcriptional network). Also, a genome scale network was constructed for strain LT2. The latter connected genes with metabolic pathways...

  1. Mapping the World's Marine Protected and Managed Areas - Promoting Awareness, Compliance, and Enforcement via Open Data and Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, T.; Zetterlind, V.; Tougher, B.

    2016-12-01

    Marine Protected and Managed Areas (MPAs) are a cornerstone of coastal and ocean conservation efforts and reflect years of dedicated effort to protect species and habitats through science-based regulation. When they are effective, biomass increases dramatically, and up to 14 fold and play a significant role in conserving biodiversity. Effective MPAs have enforcement. Enforcement cannot occur without awareness of their location among ocean stakeholders and the general public. The Anthropocene Institute, in partnership with the NOAA Marine Protected Area Center, is creating an actively managed, free and open, worldwide database of MPAs, including normalized metadata and regulation summaries, full GIS boundaries, revision history, and public facing interactive web maps. This project employs 2 full-time lawyers that first comb the relevant regulation; 2 full-time geographers and a full-time GIS database/web engineer.

  2. Boston University Pre-Majors Program (BU Pre-Map): Promoting Diversity through First-Year Undergraduate Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    One of largest points of attrition for underrepresented minorities in STEM fields is the transition from high school to college. A report from Building Engineering and Science Talent (BEST) demonstrates that underrepresented minorities begin college interested in STEM fields at rates equal to (if nor slightly above) their representation in both college and the population (25%). However, by the time they graduate, underrepresented minorities make up only 15% of STEM majors and only 9% of the STEM advanced degrees. Most of the attrition occurs during the first year of college, when large classes, a lack of mentors and challenging courses lead many students (from all backgrounds) to consider other majors.In 2012 I started the Boston University Pre-Majors Program (or BU Pre-MaP), which is modeled after the University of Washington Pre-Majors in Astronomy Program (UW Pre-MAP), a program for recruiting, mentoring and training underrepresented, first-year introductory astronomy students (and of which I was an architect). As a significant part of the Pre-MAP (or Pre-MaP) model, first-year students are engaged in a research project with a faculty or grad-student mentor and learn many of the skills needed to be successful in science.The BU Pre-MaP uses weekly seminars to introduce students to BU and the college environment, discuss ways to be successful in and out of the classroom, highlights the importance of peer mentoring and cohort building and serves as a mechanism to introduce first-year students to research skills. In teams of two, the Pre-MaP students select (with assistance) a research mentor and work with him/her on a original research project.In addition, Pre-MaP students attend several field trips including (but not limited to) viewing original science documents at the Boston Public Library (including a first edition Copernicus) and an observing run at Lowell Observatory in Arizona.

  3. The inflammatory kinase MAP4K4 promotes reactivation of Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus and enhances the invasiveness of infected endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darya A Haas

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma (KS is a mesenchymal tumour, which is caused by Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV and develops under inflammatory conditions. KSHV-infected endothelial spindle cells, the neoplastic cells in KS, show increased invasiveness, attributed to the elevated expression of metalloproteinases (MMPs and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2. The majority of these spindle cells harbour latent KSHV genomes, while a minority undergoes lytic reactivation with subsequent production of new virions and viral or cellular chemo- and cytokines, which may promote tumour invasion and dissemination. In order to better understand KSHV pathogenesis, we investigated cellular mechanisms underlying the lytic reactivation of KSHV. Using a combination of small molecule library screening and siRNA silencing we found a STE20 kinase family member, MAP4K4, to be involved in KSHV reactivation from latency and to contribute to the invasive phenotype of KSHV-infected endothelial cells by regulating COX-2, MMP-7, and MMP-13 expression. This kinase is also highly expressed in KS spindle cells in vivo. These findings suggest that MAP4K4, a known mediator of inflammation, is involved in KS aetiology by regulating KSHV lytic reactivation, expression of MMPs and COX-2, and, thereby modulating invasiveness of KSHV-infected endothelial cells.

  4. Genome-scale reconstruction and in silico analysis of the Ralstonia eutropha H16 for polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis, lithoautotrophic growth, and 2-methyl citric acid production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Tae

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ralstonia eutropha H16, found in both soil and water, is a Gram-negative lithoautotrophic bacterium that can utillize CO2 and H2 as its sources of carbon and energy in the absence of organic substrates. R. eutropha H16 can reach high cell densities either under lithoautotrophic or heterotrophic conditions, which makes it suitable for a number of biotechnological applications. It is the best known and most promising producer of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs from various carbon substrates and is an environmentally important bacterium that can degrade aromatic compounds. In order to make R. eutropha H16 a more efficient and robust biofactory, system-wide metabolic engineering to improve its metabolic performance is essential. Thus, it is necessary to analyze its metabolic characteristics systematically and optimize the entire metabolic network at systems level. Results We present the lithoautotrophic genome-scale metabolic model of R. eutropha H16 based on the annotated genome with biochemical and physiological information. The stoichiometic model, RehMBEL1391, is composed of 1391 reactions including 229 transport reactions and 1171 metabolites. Constraints-based flux analyses were performed to refine and validate the genome-scale metabolic model under environmental and genetic perturbations. First, the lithoautotrophic growth characteristics of R. eutropha H16 were investigated under varying feeding ratios of gas mixture. Second, the genome-scale metabolic model was used to design the strategies for the production of poly[R-(--3hydroxybutyrate] (PHB under different pH values and carbon/nitrogen source uptake ratios. It was also used to analyze the metabolic characteristics of R. eutropha when the phosphofructokinase gene was expressed. Finally, in silico gene knockout simulations were performed to identify targets for metabolic engineering essential for the production of 2-methylcitric acid in R. eutropha H16. Conclusion The

  5. RegPrecise 3.0--a resource for genome-scale exploration of transcriptional regulation in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novichkov, Pavel S; Kazakov, Alexey E; Ravcheev, Dmitry A; Leyn, Semen A; Kovaleva, Galina Y; Sutormin, Roman A; Kazanov, Marat D; Riehl, William; Arkin, Adam P; Dubchak, Inna; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2013-11-01

    Genome-scale prediction of gene regulation and reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in prokaryotes is one of the critical tasks of modern genomics. Bacteria from different taxonomic groups, whose lifestyles and natural environments are substantially different, possess highly diverged transcriptional regulatory networks. The comparative genomics approaches are useful for in silico reconstruction of bacterial regulons and networks operated by both transcription factors (TFs) and RNA regulatory elements (riboswitches). RegPrecise (http://regprecise.lbl.gov) is a web resource for collection, visualization and analysis of transcriptional regulons reconstructed by comparative genomics. We significantly expanded a reference collection of manually curated regulons we introduced earlier. RegPrecise 3.0 provides access to inferred regulatory interactions organized by phylogenetic, structural and functional properties. Taxonomy-specific collections include 781 TF regulogs inferred in more than 160 genomes representing 14 taxonomic groups of Bacteria. TF-specific collections include regulogs for a selected subset of 40 TFs reconstructed across more than 30 taxonomic lineages. Novel collections of regulons operated by RNA regulatory elements (riboswitches) include near 400 regulogs inferred in 24 bacterial lineages. RegPrecise 3.0 provides four classifications of the reference regulons implemented as controlled vocabularies: 55 TF protein families; 43 RNA motif families; ~150 biological processes or metabolic pathways; and ~200 effectors or environmental signals. Genome-wide visualization of regulatory networks and metabolic pathways covered by the reference regulons are available for all studied genomes. A separate section of RegPrecise 3.0 contains draft regulatory networks in 640 genomes obtained by an conservative propagation of the reference regulons to closely related genomes. RegPrecise 3.0 gives access to the transcriptional regulons reconstructed in

  6. Genome-scale NAD(H/(+ availability patterns as a differentiating feature between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Scheffersomyces stipitis in relation to fermentative metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Acevedo

    Full Text Available Scheffersomyces stipitis is a yeast able to ferment pentoses to ethanol, unlike Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it does not present the so-called overflow phenomenon. Metabolic features characterizing the presence or not of this phenomenon have not been fully elucidated. This work proposes that genome-scale metabolic response to variations in NAD(H/(+ availability characterizes fermentative behavior in both yeasts. Thus, differentiating features in S. stipitis and S. cerevisiae were determined analyzing growth sensitivity response to changes in available reducing capacity in relation to ethanol production capacity and overall metabolic flux span. Using genome-scale constraint-based metabolic models, phenotypic phase planes and shadow price analyses, an excess of available reducing capacity for growth was found in S. cerevisiae at every metabolic phenotype where growth is limited by oxygen uptake, while in S. stipitis this was observed only for a subset of those phenotypes. Moreover, by using flux variability analysis, an increased metabolic flux span was found in S. cerevisiae at growth limited by oxygen uptake, while in S. stipitis flux span was invariant. Therefore, each yeast can be characterized by a significantly different metabolic response and flux span when growth is limited by oxygen uptake, both features suggesting a higher metabolic flexibility in S. cerevisiae. By applying an optimization-based approach on the genome-scale models, three single reaction deletions were found to generate in S. stipitis the reducing capacity availability pattern found in S. cerevisiae, two of them correspond to reactions involved in the overflow phenomenon. These results show a close relationship between the growth sensitivity response given by the metabolic network and fermentative behavior.

  7. Genome-Scale NAD(H/+) Availability Patterns as a Differentiating Feature between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Scheffersomyces stipitis in Relation to Fermentative Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Alejandro; Aroca, German; Conejeros, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Scheffersomyces stipitis is a yeast able to ferment pentoses to ethanol, unlike Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it does not present the so-called overflow phenomenon. Metabolic features characterizing the presence or not of this phenomenon have not been fully elucidated. This work proposes that genome-scale metabolic response to variations in NAD(H/+) availability characterizes fermentative behavior in both yeasts. Thus, differentiating features in S. stipitis and S. cerevisiae were determined analyzing growth sensitivity response to changes in available reducing capacity in relation to ethanol production capacity and overall metabolic flux span. Using genome-scale constraint-based metabolic models, phenotypic phase planes and shadow price analyses, an excess of available reducing capacity for growth was found in S. cerevisiae at every metabolic phenotype where growth is limited by oxygen uptake, while in S. stipitis this was observed only for a subset of those phenotypes. Moreover, by using flux variability analysis, an increased metabolic flux span was found in S. cerevisiae at growth limited by oxygen uptake, while in S. stipitis flux span was invariant. Therefore, each yeast can be characterized by a significantly different metabolic response and flux span when growth is limited by oxygen uptake, both features suggesting a higher metabolic flexibility in S. cerevisiae. By applying an optimization-based approach on the genome-scale models, three single reaction deletions were found to generate in S. stipitis the reducing capacity availability pattern found in S. cerevisiae, two of them correspond to reactions involved in the overflow phenomenon. These results show a close relationship between the growth sensitivity response given by the metabolic network and fermentative behavior. PMID:24489927

  8. Mapping of DNA Hypermethylation and Hypomethylation induced by Folate Deficiency in Sporadic Colorectal Cancer and Clinical Implication Analysis of Hypermethylation Pattern in CBS Promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zaizhong; He, Yang; Tu, Xiaohuang; Huang, Sheng; Chen, Zhuo; Wang, Lie; Song, Jingxiang

    2017-04-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation patterns play a major role in tumorigenesis and the effects of nutrients, especially folate in the diet, on methylation changes is of great importance in colorectal cancer (CRC). Folate deficiency would disrupt methylation patterns; however, its exact effects on DNA methylation patterns in CRC are unclear. This study was performed to gain insight into the methylation changes induced by folate deficiency and the putative role of methylation pattern diversities of related genes in the clinical outcome of CRC. The NimbleGen MeDIP chip (Methylated DNA Immunoprecipitation chip) assay was used in high-resolution mapping of DNA methylation patterns in the normal human colon mucosal epithelial cell line, NCM460 cultured with or without folate. Aberrant CpG island methylation patterns in the promoter of genes were identified by chip assay and then were confirmed in paired colorectal tissues and corresponding non-malignant tissues obtained from patients by bisulfate sequencing PCR (BSP). Of the total, the expression of cystathionine-beta-synthase (CBS) involved in methyl metabolism and its important substrate, homocysteine, were all detected by realtime RT-PCR and immunostaining. We also analyzed the data of its hypermethylation level statistically correlated with pathological parameters and the clinical outcome in malignant tissues. The chip assay showed that there are 17 genes with hyper or hypomethylation in CpG islands of promoter on chromosome 21, and 8 of them seemed to be associated with tumorigenesis. Among the total, a hypermethylation patterns existed in the promoter of CBS in CRC (p CBS and the accumulation of homocysteine in vitro and vivo (p CBS hypermethylation level is correlated with age (p CBS hypermethylation level significantly correlated with recurrence rate (p = 0.039) and overall survival (p = 0.012) independent of pT stage, pN stage, and liver metastasis. Folate deficiency could induce aberrant DNA methylation patterns and gene

  9. Protein kinase D stabilizes aldosterone-induced ERK1/2 MAP kinase activation in M1 renal cortical collecting duct cells to promote cell proliferation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McEneaney, Victoria

    2010-01-01

    Aldosterone elicits transcriptional responses in target tissues and also rapidly stimulates the activation of protein kinase signalling cascades independently of de novo protein synthesis. Here we investigated aldosterone-induced cell proliferation and extra-cellular regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1\\/2) mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling in the M1 cortical collecting duct cell line (M1-CCD). Aldosterone promoted the proliferative growth of M1-CCD cells, an effect that was protein kinase D1 (PKD1), PKCdelta and ERK1\\/2-dependent. Aldosterone induced the rapid activation of ERK1\\/2 with peaks of activation at 2 and 10 to 30 min after hormone treatment followed by sustained activation lasting beyond 120 min. M1-CCD cells suppressed in PKD1 expression exhibited only the early, transient peaks in ERK1\\/2 activation without the sustained phase. Aldosterone stimulated the physical association of PKD1 with ERK1\\/2 within 2 min of treatment. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist RU28318 inhibited the early and late phases of aldosterone-induced ERK1\\/2 activation, and also aldosterone-induced proliferative cell growth. Aldosterone induced the sub-cellular redistribution of ERK1\\/2 to the nuclei at 2 min and to cytoplasmic sites, proximal to the nuclei after 30 min. This sub-cellular distribution of ERK1\\/2 was inhibited in cells suppressed in the expression of PKD1.

  10. Genome-wide identification of transcription start sites, promoters and transcription factor binding sites in E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Mendoza-Vargas

    Full Text Available Despite almost 40 years of molecular genetics research in Escherichia coli a major fraction of its Transcription Start Sites (TSSs are still unknown, limiting therefore our understanding of the regulatory circuits that control gene expression in this model organism. RegulonDB (http://regulondb.ccg.unam.mx/ is aimed at integrating the genetic regulatory network of E. coli K12 as an entirely bioinformatic project up till now. In this work, we extended its aims by generating experimental data at a genome scale on TSSs, promoters and regulatory regions. We implemented a modified 5' RACE protocol and an unbiased High Throughput Pyrosequencing Strategy (HTPS that allowed us to map more than 1700 TSSs with high precision. From this collection, about 230 corresponded to previously reported TSSs, which helped us to benchmark both our methodologies and the accuracy of the previous mapping experiments. The other ca 1500 TSSs mapped belong to about 1000 different genes, many of them with no assigned function. We identified promoter sequences and type of sigma factors that control the expression of about 80% of these genes. As expected, the housekeeping sigma(70 was the most common type of promoter, followed by sigma(38. The majority of the putative TSSs were located between 20 to 40 nucleotides from the translational start site. Putative regulatory binding sites for transcription factors were detected upstream of many TSSs. For a few transcripts, riboswitches and small RNAs were found. Several genes also had additional TSSs within the coding region. Unexpectedly, the HTPS experiments revealed extensive antisense transcription, probably for regulatory functions. The new information in RegulonDB, now with more than 2400 experimentally determined TSSs, strengthens the accuracy of promoter prediction, operon structure, and regulatory networks and provides valuable new information that will facilitate the understanding from a global perspective the complex and

  11. Genome-scale modeling of light-driven reductant partitioning and carbon fluxes in diazotrophic unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trang T Vu

    Full Text Available Genome-scale metabolic models have proven useful for answering fundamental questions about metabolic capabilities of a variety of microorganisms, as well as informing their metabolic engineering. However, only a few models are available for oxygenic photosynthetic microorganisms, particularly in cyanobacteria in which photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains (ETC share components. We addressed the complexity of cyanobacterial ETC by developing a genome-scale model for the diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142. The resulting metabolic reconstruction, iCce806, consists of 806 genes associated with 667 metabolic reactions and includes a detailed representation of the ETC and a biomass equation based on experimental measurements. Both computational and experimental approaches were used to investigate light-driven metabolism in Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, with a particular focus on reductant production and partitioning within the ETC. The simulation results suggest that growth and metabolic flux distributions are substantially impacted by the relative amounts of light going into the individual photosystems. When growth is limited by the flux through photosystem I, terminal respiratory oxidases are predicted to be an important mechanism for removing excess reductant. Similarly, under photosystem II flux limitation, excess electron carriers must be removed via cyclic electron transport. Furthermore, in silico calculations were in good quantitative agreement with the measured growth rates whereas predictions of reaction usage were qualitatively consistent with protein and mRNA expression data, which we used to further improve the resolution of intracellular flux values.

  12. Genome-scale modeling of light-driven reductant partitioning and carbon fluxes in diazotrophic unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Trang T; Stolyar, Sergey M; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E; Hill, Eric A; Kucek, Leo A; Brown, Roslyn N; Lipton, Mary S; Osterman, Andrei; Fredrickson, Jim K; Konopka, Allan E; Beliaev, Alexander S; Reed, Jennifer L

    2012-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models have proven useful for answering fundamental questions about metabolic capabilities of a variety of microorganisms, as well as informing their metabolic engineering. However, only a few models are available for oxygenic photosynthetic microorganisms, particularly in cyanobacteria in which photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains (ETC) share components. We addressed the complexity of cyanobacterial ETC by developing a genome-scale model for the diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142. The resulting metabolic reconstruction, iCce806, consists of 806 genes associated with 667 metabolic reactions and includes a detailed representation of the ETC and a biomass equation based on experimental measurements. Both computational and experimental approaches were used to investigate light-driven metabolism in Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, with a particular focus on reductant production and partitioning within the ETC. The simulation results suggest that growth and metabolic flux distributions are substantially impacted by the relative amounts of light going into the individual photosystems. When growth is limited by the flux through photosystem I, terminal respiratory oxidases are predicted to be an important mechanism for removing excess reductant. Similarly, under photosystem II flux limitation, excess electron carriers must be removed via cyclic electron transport. Furthermore, in silico calculations were in good quantitative agreement with the measured growth rates whereas predictions of reaction usage were qualitatively consistent with protein and mRNA expression data, which we used to further improve the resolution of intracellular flux values.

  13. Integrating Kinetic Model of E. coli with Genome Scale Metabolic Fluxes Overcomes Its Open System Problem and Reveals Bistability in Central Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad A Mannan

    Full Text Available An understanding of the dynamics of the metabolic profile of a bacterial cell is sought from a dynamical systems analysis of kinetic models. This modelling formalism relies on a deterministic mathematical description of enzyme kinetics and their metabolite regulation. However, it is severely impeded by the lack of available kinetic information, limiting the size of the system that can be modelled. Furthermore, the subsystem of the metabolic network whose dynamics can be modelled is faced with three problems: how to parameterize the model with mostly incomplete steady state data, how to close what is now an inherently open system, and how to account for the impact on growth. In this study we address these challenges of kinetic modelling by capitalizing on multi-'omics' steady state data and a genome-scale metabolic network model. We use these to generate parameters that integrate knowledge embedded in the genome-scale metabolic network model, into the most comprehensive kinetic model of the central carbon metabolism of E. coli realized to date. As an application, we performed a dynamical systems analysis of the resulting enriched model. This revealed bistability of the central carbon metabolism and thus its potential to express two distinct metabolic states. Furthermore, since our model-informing technique ensures both stable states are constrained by the same thermodynamically feasible steady state growth rate, the ensuing bistability represents a temporal coexistence of the two states, and by extension, reveals the emergence of a phenotypically heterogeneous population.

  14. The Synthesis Map Is a Multidimensional Educational Tool That Provides Insight into Students' Mental Models and Promotes Students' Synthetic Knowledge Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Ryan A.; Brame, Cynthia J.

    2015-01-01

    Concept mapping was developed as a method of displaying and organizing hierarchical knowledge structures. Using the new, multidimensional presentation software Prezi, we have developed a new teaching technique designed to engage higher-level skills in the cognitive domain. This tool, synthesis mapping, is a natural evolution of concept mapping,…

  15. The Synthesis Map Is a Multidimensional Educational Tool That Provides Insight into Students' Mental Models and Promotes Students' Synthetic Knowledge Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Ryan A.; Brame, Cynthia J.

    2015-01-01

    Concept mapping was developed as a method of displaying and organizing hierarchical knowledge structures. Using the new, multidimensional presentation software Prezi, we have developed a new teaching technique designed to engage higher-level skills in the cognitive domain. This tool, synthesis mapping, is a natural evolution of concept mapping,…

  16. Genome-Wide Mapping Targets of the Metazoan Chromatin Remodeling Factor NURF Reveals Nucleosome Remodeling at Enhancers, Core Promoters and Gene Insulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Yeon Kwon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available NURF is a conserved higher eukaryotic ISWI-containing chromatin remodeling complex that catalyzes ATP-dependent nucleosome sliding. By sliding nucleosomes, NURF is able to alter chromatin dynamics to control transcription and genome organization. Previous biochemical and genetic analysis of the specificity-subunit of Drosophila NURF (Nurf301/Enhancer of Bithorax (E(bx has defined NURF as a critical regulator of homeotic, heat-shock and steroid-responsive gene transcription. It has been speculated that NURF controls pathway specific transcription by co-operating with sequence-specific transcription factors to remodel chromatin at dedicated enhancers. However, conclusive in vivo demonstration of this is lacking and precise regulatory elements targeted by NURF are poorly defined. To address this, we have generated a comprehensive map of in vivo NURF activity, using MNase-sequencing to determine at base pair resolution NURF target nucleosomes, and ChIP-sequencing to define sites of NURF recruitment. Our data show that, besides anticipated roles at enhancers, NURF interacts physically and functionally with the TRF2/DREF basal transcription factor to organize nucleosomes downstream of active promoters. Moreover, we detect NURF remodeling and recruitment at distal insulator sites, where NURF functionally interacts with and co-localizes with DREF and insulator proteins including CP190 to establish nucleosome-depleted domains. This insulator function of NURF is most apparent at subclasses of insulators that mark the boundaries of chromatin domains, where multiple insulator proteins co-associate. By visualizing the complete repertoire of in vivo NURF chromatin targets, our data provide new insights into how chromatin remodeling can control genome organization and regulatory interactions.

  17. Genome-Wide Mapping Targets of the Metazoan Chromatin Remodeling Factor NURF Reveals Nucleosome Remodeling at Enhancers, Core Promoters and Gene Insulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Yeon Kwon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available NURF is a conserved higher eukaryotic ISWI-containing chromatin remodeling complex that catalyzes ATP-dependent nucleosome sliding. By sliding nucleosomes, NURF is able to alter chromatin dynamics to control transcription and genome organization. Previous biochemical and genetic analysis of the specificity-subunit of Drosophila NURF (Nurf301/Enhancer of Bithorax (E(bx has defined NURF as a critical regulator of homeotic, heat-shock and steroid-responsive gene transcription. It has been speculated that NURF controls pathway specific transcription by co-operating with sequence-specific transcription factors to remodel chromatin at dedicated enhancers. However, conclusive in vivo demonstration of this is lacking and precise regulatory elements targeted by NURF are poorly defined. To address this, we have generated a comprehensive map of in vivo NURF activity, using MNase-sequencing to determine at base pair resolution NURF target nucleosomes, and ChIP-sequencing to define sites of NURF recruitment. Our data show that, besides anticipated roles at enhancers, NURF interacts physically and functionally with the TRF2/DREF basal transcription factor to organize nucleosomes downstream of active promoters. Moreover, we detect NURF remodeling and recruitment at distal insulator sites, where NURF functionally interacts with and co-localizes with DREF and insulator proteins including CP190 to establish nucleosome-depleted domains. This insulator function of NURF is most apparent at subclasses of insulators that mark the boundaries of chromatin domains, where multiple insulator proteins co-associate. By visualizing the complete repertoire of in vivo NURF chromatin targets, our data provide new insights into how chromatin remodeling can control genome organization and regulatory interactions.

  18. ICT-enabled Social Innovation in support of the Implementation of the Social Investment Package (IESI) - Mapping and analysis of ICT-Enabled Social Innovation initiatives promoting social investment through integrated approaches to the provision of social services

    OpenAIRE

    MISURACA GIANLUCA; COLOMBO VILARRASA CLELIA; KUCSERA CSABA; CARRETERO GOMEZ STEPHANIE; BACIGALUPO MARGHERITA; Radescu, Raluca

    2015-01-01

    This report presents the results of the mapping and analysis of ICT-enabled social innovation initiatives promoting social investment through integrated approaches to the provision of social services, which was conducted as part of the research on ICT-Enabled Social Innovation in support of the Social Investment Package (SIP). The main goal of the research carried out by the European Commission's JRC-IPTS jointly with the Directorate General Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion, was to ex...

  19. Genome-scale study of the importance of binding site context for transcription factor binding and gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronne Hans

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of mRNA transcription is controlled by transcription factors that bind to specific DNA motifs in promoter regions upstream of protein coding genes. Recent results indicate that not only the presence of a motif but also motif context (for example the orientation of a motif or its location relative to the coding sequence is important for gene regulation. Results In this study we present ContextFinder, a tool that is specifically aimed at identifying cases where motif context is likely to affect gene regulation. We used ContextFinder to examine the role of motif context in S. cerevisiae both for DNA binding by transcription factors and for effects on gene expression. For DNA binding we found significant patterns of motif location bias, whereas motif orientations did not seem to matter. Motif context appears to affect gene expression even more than it affects DNA binding, as biases in both motif location and orientation were more frequent in promoters of co-expressed genes. We validated our results against data on nucleosome positioning, and found a negative correlation between preferred motif locations and nucleosome occupancy. Conclusion We conclude that the requirement for stable binding of transcription factors to DNA and their subsequent function in gene regulation can impose constraints on motif context.

  20. Genome-scale data suggest reclassifications in the Leisingera-Phaeobacter cluster including proposals for Sedimentitalea gen. nov. and Pseudophaeobacter gen. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breider, Sven; Scheuner, Carmen; Schumann, Peter; Fiebig, Anne; Petersen, Jörn; Pradella, Silke; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Göker, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Earlier phylogenetic analyses of the marine Rhodobacteraceae (class Alphaproteobacteria) genera Leisingera and Phaeobacter indicated that neither genus might be monophyletic. We here used phylogenetic reconstruction from genome-scale data, MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry analysis and a re-assessment of the phenotypic data from the literature to settle this matter, aiming at a reclassification of the two genera. Neither Phaeobacter nor Leisingera formed a clade in any of the phylogenetic analyses conducted. Rather, smaller monophyletic assemblages emerged, which were phenotypically more homogeneous, too. We thus propose the reclassification of Leisingera nanhaiensis as the type species of a new genus as Sedimentitalea nanhaiensis gen. nov., comb. nov., the reclassification of Phaeobacter arcticus and Phaeobacter leonis as Pseudophaeobacter arcticus gen. nov., comb. nov. and Pseudophaeobacter leonis comb. nov., and the reclassification of Phaeobacter aquaemixtae, Phaeobacter caeruleus, and Phaeobacter daeponensis as Leisingera aquaemixtae comb. nov., Leisingera caerulea comb. nov., and Leisingera daeponensis comb. nov. The genera Phaeobacter and Leisingera are accordingly emended.

  1. Genome-scale reconstruction of Escherichia coli's transcriptional and translational machinery: a knowledge base, its mathematical formulation, and its functional characterization.

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    Ines Thiele

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic network reconstructions represent valuable scaffolds for '-omics' data integration and are used to computationally interrogate network properties. However, they do not explicitly account for the synthesis of macromolecules (i.e., proteins and RNA. Here, we present the first genome-scale, fine-grained reconstruction of Escherichia coli's transcriptional and translational machinery, which produces 423 functional gene products in a sequence-specific manner and accounts for all necessary chemical transformations. Legacy data from over 500 publications and three databases were reviewed, and many pathways were considered, including stable RNA maturation and modification, protein complex formation, and iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis. This reconstruction represents the most comprehensive knowledge base for these important cellular functions in E. coli and is unique in its scope. Furthermore, it was converted into a mathematical model and used to: (1 quantitatively integrate gene expression data as reaction constraints and (2 compute functional network states, which were compared to reported experimental data. For example, the model predicted accurately the ribosome production, without any parameterization. Also, in silico rRNA operon deletion suggested that a high RNA polymerase density on the remaining rRNA operons is needed to reproduce the reported experimental ribosome numbers. Moreover, functional protein modules were determined, and many were found to contain gene products from multiple subsystems, highlighting the functional interaction of these proteins. This genome-scale reconstruction of E. coli's transcriptional and translational machinery presents a milestone in systems biology because it will enable quantitative integration of '-omics' datasets and thus the study of the mechanistic principles underlying the genotype-phenotype relationship.

  2. ToMI-FBA: A genome-scale metabolic flux based algorithm to select optimum hosts and media formulations for expressing pathways of interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Nazem-Bokaee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Total Membrane Influx constrained Flux Balance Analysis (ToMI-FBA algorithm was developed in this research as a new tool to help researchers decide which microbial host and medium formulation are optimal for expressing a new metabolic pathway. ToMI-FBA relies on genome-scale metabolic flux modeling and a novel in silico cell membrane influx constraint that specifies the flux of atoms (not molecules into the cell through all possible membrane transporters. The ToMI constraint is constructed through the addition of an extra row and column to the stoichiometric matrix of a genome-scale metabolic flux model. In this research, the mathematical formulation of the ToMI constraint is given along with four case studies that demonstrate its usefulness. In Case Study 1, ToMI-FBA returned an optimal culture medium formulation for the production of isobutanol from Bacillus subtilis. Significant levels of L-valine were recommended to optimize production, and this result has been observed experimentally. In Case Study 2, it is demonstrated how the carbon to nitrogen uptake ratio can be specified as an additional ToMI-FBA constraint. This was investigated for maximizing medium chain length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHA production from Pseudomonas putida KT2440. In Case Study 3, ToMI-FBA revealed a strategy of adding cellobiose as a means to increase ethanol selectivity during the stationary growth phase of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824. This strategy was also validated experimentally. Finally, in Case Study 4, B. subtilis was identified as a superior host to Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Synechocystis PCC6803 for the production of artemisinate.

  3. Evaluation of a genome-scale in silico metabolic model for Geobacter metallireducens by using proteomic data from a field biostimulation experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yilin; Wilkins, Michael J; Yabusaki, Steven B; Lipton, Mary S; Long, Philip E

    2012-12-01

    Accurately predicting the interactions between microbial metabolism and the physical subsurface environment is necessary to enhance subsurface energy development, soil and groundwater cleanup, and carbon management. This study was an initial attempt to confirm the metabolic functional roles within an in silico model using environmental proteomic data collected during field experiments. Shotgun global proteomics data collected during a subsurface biostimulation experiment were used to validate a genome-scale metabolic model of Geobacter metallireducens-specifically, the ability of the metabolic model to predict metal reduction, biomass yield, and growth rate under dynamic field conditions. The constraint-based in silico model of G. metallireducens relates an annotated genome sequence to the physiological functions with 697 reactions controlled by 747 enzyme-coding genes. Proteomic analysis showed that 180 of the 637 G. metallireducens proteins detected during the 2008 experiment were associated with specific metabolic reactions in the in silico model. When the field-calibrated Fe(III) terminal electron acceptor process reaction in a reactive transport model for the field experiments was replaced with the genome-scale model, the model predicted that the largest metabolic fluxes through the in silico model reactions generally correspond to the highest abundances of proteins that catalyze those reactions. Central metabolism predicted by the model agrees well with protein abundance profiles inferred from proteomic analysis. Model discrepancies with the proteomic data, such as the relatively low abundances of proteins associated with amino acid transport and metabolism, revealed pathways or flux constraints in the in silico model that could be updated to more accurately predict metabolic processes that occur in the subsurface environment.

  4. The synthesis map is a multidimensional educational tool that provides insight into students' mental models and promotes students' synthetic knowledge generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Ryan A; Brame, Cynthia J

    2015-01-01

    Concept mapping was developed as a method of displaying and organizing hierarchical knowledge structures. Using the new, multidimensional presentation software Prezi, we have developed a new teaching technique designed to engage higher-level skills in the cognitive domain. This tool, synthesis mapping, is a natural evolution of concept mapping, which utilizes embedding to layer information within concepts. Prezi's zooming user interface lets the author of the presentation use both depth as well as distance to show connections between data, ideas, and concepts. Students in the class Biology of Cancer created synthesis maps to illustrate their knowledge of tumorigenesis. Students used multiple organizational schemes to build their maps. We present an analysis of student work, placing special emphasis on organization within student maps and how the organization of knowledge structures in student maps can reveal strengths and weaknesses in student understanding or instruction. We also provide a discussion of best practices for instructors who would like to implement synthesis mapping in their classrooms. © 2015 R. A. Ortega and C. J. Brame et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  5. Genome-scale definition of the transcriptional programme associated with compromised PU.1 activity in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sive, J I; Basilico, S; Hannah, R; Kinston, S J; Calero-Nieto, F J; Göttgens, B

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional dysregulation is associated with haematological malignancy. Although mutations of the key haematopoietic transcription factor PU.1 are rare in human acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), they are common in murine models of radiation-induced AML, and PU.1 downregulation and/or dysfunction has been described in human AML patients carrying the fusion oncogenes RUNX1-ETO and PML-RARA. To study the transcriptional programmes associated with compromised PU.1 activity, we adapted a Pu.1-mutated murine AML cell line with an inducible wild-type PU.1. PU.1 induction caused transition from leukaemia phenotype to monocytic differentiation. Global binding maps for PU.1, CEBPA and the histone mark H3K27Ac with and without PU.1 induction showed that mutant PU.1 retains DNA-binding ability, but the induction of wild-type protein dramatically increases both the number and the height of PU.1-binding peaks. Correlating chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) Seq with gene expression data, we found that PU.1 recruitment coupled with increased histone acetylation induces gene expression and activates a monocyte/macrophage transcriptional programme. PU.1 induction also caused the reorganisation of a subgroup of CEBPA binding peaks. Finally, we show that the PU.1 target gene set defined in our model allows the stratification of primary human AML samples, shedding light on both known and novel AML subtypes that may be driven by PU.1 dysfunction.

  6. The 19 genomes of Drosophila: a BAC library resource for genus-wide and genome-scale comparative evolutionary research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiang; Goicoechea, Jose Luis; Ammiraju, Jetty S S; Luo, Meizhong; He, Ruifeng; Lin, Jinke; Lee, So-Jeong; Sisneros, Nicholas; Watts, Tom; Kudrna, David A; Golser, Wolfgang; Ashley, Elizabeth; Collura, Kristi; Braidotti, Michele; Yu, Yeisoo; Matzkin, Luciano M; McAllister, Bryant F; Markow, Therese Ann; Wing, Rod A

    2011-04-01

    The genus Drosophila has been the subject of intense comparative phylogenomics characterization to provide insights into genome evolution under diverse biological and ecological contexts and to functionally annotate the Drosophila melanogaster genome, a model system for animal and insect genetics. Recent sequencing of 11 additional Drosophila species from various divergence points of the genus is a first step in this direction. However, to fully reap the benefits of this resource, the Drosophila community is faced with two critical needs: i.e., the expansion of genomic resources from a much broader range of phylogenetic diversity and the development of additional resources to aid in finishing the existing draft genomes. To address these needs, we report the first synthesis of a comprehensive set of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) resources for 19 Drosophila species from all three subgenera. Ten libraries were derived from the exact source used to generate 10 of the 12 draft genomes, while the rest were generated from a strategically selected set of species on the basis of salient ecological and life history features and their phylogenetic positions. The majority of the new species have at least one sequenced reference genome for immediate comparative benefit. This 19-BAC library set was rigorously characterized and shown to have large insert sizes (125-168 kb), low nonrecombinant clone content (0.3-5.3%), and deep coverage (9.1-42.9×). Further, we demonstrated the utility of this BAC resource for generating physical maps of targeted loci, refining draft sequence assemblies and identifying potential genomic rearrangements across the phylogeny.

  7. Genome-scale identification of cell-wall related genes in Arabidopsis based on co-expression network analysis

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    Wang Shan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of the novel genes relevant to plant cell-wall (PCW synthesis represents a highly important and challenging problem. Although substantial efforts have been invested into studying this problem, the vast majority of the PCW related genes remain unknown. Results Here we present a computational study focused on identification of the novel PCW genes in Arabidopsis based on the co-expression analyses of transcriptomic data collected under 351 conditions, using a bi-clustering technique. Our analysis identified 217 highly co-expressed gene clusters (modules under some experimental conditions, each containing at least one gene annotated as PCW related according to the Purdue Cell Wall Gene Families database. These co-expression modules cover 349 known/annotated PCW genes and 2,438 new candidates. For each candidate gene, we annotated the specific PCW synthesis stages in which it is involved and predicted the detailed function. In addition, for the co-expressed genes in each module, we predicted and analyzed their cis regulatory motifs in the promoters using our motif discovery pipeline, providing strong evidence that the genes in each co-expression module are transcriptionally co-regulated. From the all co-expression modules, we infer that 108 modules are related to four major PCW synthesis components, using three complementary methods. Conclusions We believe our approach and data presented here will be useful for further identification and characterization of PCW genes. All the predicted PCW genes, co-expression modules, motifs and their annotations are available at a web-based database: http://csbl.bmb.uga.edu/publications/materials/shanwang/CWRPdb/index.html.

  8. Tiam1-Rac1 Axis Promotes Activation of p38 MAP Kinase in the Development of Diabetic Retinopathy: Evidence for a Requisite Role for Protein Palmitoylation

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    Rajakrishnan Veluthakal

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Evidence in multiple tissues, including retina, suggests generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and the ensuing oxidative stress as triggers for mitochondrial defects and cell apoptosis. We recently reported novel roles for Tiam1-Rac1-Nox2 axis in retinal mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death leading to the development of diabetic retinopathy. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that activation of p38 MAP kinase, a stress kinase, represents the downstream signaling event to Rac1-Nox2 activation in diabetes-induced metabolic stress leading to capillary cell apoptosis. Methods: Activation of p38 MAP kinase was quantified by Western blotting in retinal endothelial cells incubated with high glucose (20 mM for up to 96 hours, a duration where mitochondrial dysfunction and capillary cell apoptosis can be observed. NSC23766 and 2-bromopalmitate (2-BP were used to assess the roles of Tiam1-Rac1 and palmitoylation pathways, respectively. Results: Activation of p38 MAP kinase was observed as early as 3 hours after high glucose exposure, and continued until 96 hours. Consistent with this, p38 MAP kinase activation was significantly higher in the retina from diabetic mice compared to age-matched normal mice. NSC23766 markedly attenuated hyperglycemia-induced activation of p38 MAP kinase. Lastly, 2-BP inhibited glucose-induced Rac1, Nox2 and p38 MAP kinase activation in endothelial cells. Conclusions: Tiam1-Rac1-mediated activation of Nox2 and p38 MAP kinase constitutes early signaling events leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and the development of diabetic retinopathy. Our findings also provide the first evidence to implicate novel roles for protein palmitoylation in this signaling cascade.

  9. Tiam1-Rac1 Axis Promotes Activation of p38 MAP Kinase in the Development of Diabetic Retinopathy: Evidence for a Requisite Role for Protein Palmitoylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veluthakal, Rajakrishnan; Kumar, Binit; Mohammad, Ghulam; Kowluru, Anjaneyulu; Kowluru, Renu A

    2015-01-01

    Evidence in multiple tissues, including retina, suggests generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the ensuing oxidative stress as triggers for mitochondrial defects and cell apoptosis. We recently reported novel roles for Tiam1-Rac1-Nox2 axis in retinal mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death leading to the development of diabetic retinopathy. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that activation of p38 MAP kinase, a stress kinase, represents the downstream signaling event to Rac1-Nox2 activation in diabetes-induced metabolic stress leading to capillary cell apoptosis. Activation of p38 MAP kinase was quantified by Western blotting in retinal endothelial cells incubated with high glucose (20 mM) for up to 96 hours, a duration where mitochondrial dysfunction and capillary cell apoptosis can be observed. NSC23766 and 2-bromopalmitate (2-BP) were used to assess the roles of Tiam1-Rac1 and palmitoylation pathways, respectively. Activation of p38 MAP kinase was observed as early as 3 hours after high glucose exposure, and continued until 96 hours. Consistent with this, p38 MAP kinase activation was significantly higher in the retina from diabetic mice compared to age-matched normal mice. NSC23766 markedly attenuated hyperglycemia-induced activation of p38 MAP kinase. Lastly, 2-BP inhibited glucose-induced Rac1, Nox2 and p38 MAP kinase activation in endothelial cells. Tiam1-Rac1-mediated activation of Nox2 and p38 MAP kinase constitutes early signaling events leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and the development of diabetic retinopathy. Our findings also provide the first evidence to implicate novel roles for protein palmitoylation in this signaling cascade.

  10. Promoting Diversity in STEM through Active Recruiting and Mentoring: The Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP) at the University of Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwieterman, Edward; Binder, Breanna; Tremmel, Michael; Garofali, Kristen; Agol, Eric; Meadows, Victoria

    2015-11-01

    The Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP) is a research and mentoring program for underclassmen and transfer students offered by the University of Washington Astronomy Department since 2005. The primary goal of Pre-MAP is to recruit and retain students from groups traditionally underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) through early exposure to research. The Pre-MAP seminar is the core component of the program and offers instruction in computing skills, data manipulation, science writing, statistical analysis, and scientific speaking and presentation skills. Students choose research projects proposed by faculty, post-docs and graduate students in areas related to astrophysics, planetary science, and astrobiology. Pre-MAP has been successful in retaining underrepresented students in STEM fields relative to the broader UW population, and we've found these students are more likely to graduate and excel academically than their peers. As of spring 2015, more than one hundred students have taken the Pre-MAP seminar, and both internal and external evaluations have shown that all groups of participating students report an increased interest in astronomy and science careers at the end of the seminar. Several former Pre-MAP students have obtained or are pursuing doctoral and master’s degrees in STEM fields; many more work at NASA centers, teaching colleges, or as engineers or data analysts. Pre- MAP student research has produced dozens of publications in peer-reviewed research journals. This talk will provide an overview of the program: the structure of the seminar, examples of projects completed by students, cohort-building activities outside the seminar, funding sources, recruitment strategies, and the aggregate demographic and achievement data of our students. It is our hope that similar programs may be adopted successfully at other institutions.

  11. Promoting Inclusivity in STEM through Active Recruiting and Mentoring: The Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP) at the University of Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwieterman, Edward; Binder, Breanna A.; Pre-Major in Astronomy Program

    2016-01-01

    The Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP) is a research and mentoring program for entering undergraduate students offered by the University of Washington Astronomy Department since 2005. The primary goal of Pre-MAP is to recruit and retain students from groups traditionally underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) through early exposure to guided research projects. The Pre-MAP seminar is the core component of the program and offers instruction in computing skills, data manipulation, science writing, statistical analysis, and scientific speaking and presentation skills. Students choose research projects proposed by faculty, post-docs and graduate students in areas related to astrophysics, planetary science, and astrobiology. Pre-MAP has been successful in retaining underrepresented students in STEM fields relative to the broader UW population, and we've found these students are more likely to graduate and excel academically than their peers. As of fall 2015, more than one hundred students have taken the Pre-MAP seminar, and both internal and external evaluations have shown that all groups of participating students report an increased interest in astronomy and science careers at the end of the seminar. This talk will provide an overview of the program and the structure of the core seminar. In particular, the talk will focus on additions and revisions to the seminar course over the last few years, such as the introduction of a public speaking coach, career and internship modules, and the formalization of external lab tours.

  12. Electrostatic map of T7 DNA: comparative analysis of functional and electrostatic properties of T7 RNA polymerase-specific promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamzolova, S G; Beskaravainy, P M; Osypov, A A; Dzhelyadin, T R; Temlyakova, E A; Sorokin, A A

    2014-01-01

    The entire T7 bacteriophage genome contains 39937 base pairs (Database NCBI RefSeq N1001604). Here, electrostatic potential distribution around double helical T7 DNA was calculated by Coulomb method using the computer program of Sorokin A.A. (lptolik@gmail.com). Electrostatic profiles of 17 promoters recognized by T7 phage-specific RNA polymerase were analyzed. It was shown that electrostatic profiles of all T7 RNA polymerase-specific promoters can be characterized by distinctive motifs which are specific for each promoter class. Comparative analysis of electrostatic profiles of native T7 promoters of different classes demonstrates that T7 RNA polymerase can differentiate them due to their electrostatic features.

  13. Modeling the Differences in Biochemical Capabilities of Pseudomonas Species by Flux Balance Analysis: How Good Are Genome-Scale Metabolic Networks at Predicting the Differences?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parizad Babaei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, several genome-scale metabolic networks have been reconstructed. These models cover a wide range of organisms, from bacteria to human. Such models have provided us with a framework for systematic analysis of metabolism. However, little effort has been put towards comparing biochemical capabilities of closely related species using their metabolic models. The accuracy of a model is highly dependent on the reconstruction process, as some errors may be included in the model during reconstruction. In this study, we investigated the ability of three Pseudomonas metabolic models to predict the biochemical differences, namely, iMO1086, iJP962, and iSB1139, which are related to P. aeruginosa PAO1, P. putida KT2440, and P. fluorescens SBW25, respectively. We did a comprehensive literature search for previous works containing biochemically distinguishable traits over these species. Amongst more than 1700 articles, we chose a subset of them which included experimental results suitable for in silico simulation. By simulating the conditions provided in the actual biological experiment, we performed case-dependent tests to compare the in silico results to the biological ones. We found out that iMO1086 and iJP962 were able to predict the experimental data and were much more accurate than iSB1139.

  14. DNA sequence recognition by hybridization to short oligomers : experimental determination of accuracy of the method in a genome-scale search.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milosavljevic, A.; Savkovic, S.; Crkvenjakov, R.; Salbego, D.; Serrato, H.; Kreuzer, H.; Gemmell, A.; Batus, S.; Grujic, D.; Carnahan, S.; Tepavcevic, J.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology

    1996-01-01

    Recently developed hybridization technology enables economical large-scale detection of short oligomers within DNA fragments. The newly developed recognition method enables comparison of lists of oligomers detected within DNA fragments against known DNA sequences. We here describe an experiment involving a set of 4513 distinct genomic E. coli clones of average length 2kb, each hybridized with 636 randomly selected short oligomer probes. High hybridization signal with a particular probe was used as an indication of the presence of a complementary oligomer in the particular clone. For each clone, a list of oligomers with highest hybridization signals was compiled. The database consisting of 4513 oligomer lists was then searched using known E. coli sequences as queries in an attempt to identify the clones that match the query sequence. Out of a total of 11 clones that were recognized at highest significance level by our method, 8 were single-pass sequenced from both ends. The single-pass sequenced ends were then compared against the query sequences. The sequence comparisons confirmed 7 out of the total of 8 examined recognitions. This experiment represents the first successful example of genome-scale sequence recognition based on hybridization data.

  15. Genome-scale data suggest reclassifications in the Leisingera-Phaeobacter cluster including proposals for Sedimentitalea gen. nov. and Pseudophaeobacter gen. nov.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven eBreider

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Earlier phylogenetic analyses of the marine Rhodobacteraceae (class Alphaproteobacteria genera Leisingera and Phaeobacter indicated that neither genus might be monophyletic. We here used phylogenetic reconstruction from genome-scale data, MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry analysis and a re-assessment of the phenotypic data from the literature to settle this matter, aiming at a reclassification of the two genera. Neither Phaeobacter nor Leisingera formed a clade in any of the phylogenetic analyses conducted. Rather, smaller monophyletic assemblages emerged, which were phenotypically more homogeneous, too. We thus propose the reclassification of Leisingera nanhaiensis as the type species of a new genus as Sedimentitalea nanhaiensis gen. nov., comb. nov., the reclassification of Phaeobacter arcticus and Phaeobacter leonis as Pseudophaeobacter arcticus gen. nov., comb. nov. and Pseudophaeobacter leonis comb. nov., and the reclassification of Phaeobacter aquaemixtae, Phaeobacter caeruleus and Phaeobacter daeponensis as Leisingera aquaemixtae comb. nov., Leisingera caerulea comb. nov. and Leisingera daeponensis comb. nov. The genera Phaeobacter and Leisingera are accordingly emended.

  16. Effectiveness of Adaptive Concept Maps for Promoting Conceptual Understanding: Findings from a Design-Based Case Study of a Learner-Centered Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jacob; Williams, Christopher B.; North, Christopher; Johri, Aditya; Paretti, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Traditional instructional materials such as textbooks contain significant educational content, but the navigational mechanisms to access that content are limited and, more importantly, not designed with learning in mind. To address this gap, we present the Adaptive Map, a novel organization and navigation tool designed to help students better…

  17. Extracellular simian virus 40 induces an ERK/MAP kinase-independent signalling pathway that activates primary response genes and promotes virus entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangoria, N S; Breau, W C; Anderson, H A; Cishek, D M; Norkin, L C

    1996-09-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) binding to growth-arrested cells activated an intracellular signalling pathway that induced the up-regulation of the primary response genes c-myc, c-jun and c-sis within 30 min and of JE within 90 min. The up-regulation of the primary response genes occurred in the presence of cycloheximide and when UV-inactivated SV40 was adsorbed to cells. SV40 binding did not activate Raf or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP/ERK1), or mobilize intracellular Ca2+. The SV40-induced up-regulation of c-myc and c-jun was blocked by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, and by the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, calphostin C, but not by expression of the MAP kinase-specific phosphatase, MKP-1. These results suggest that the SV40-induced signalling pathway includes the activities of a tyrosine kinase and a Ca(2+)-independent isoform of PKC, but not of Raf or MAP kinase. Finally, SV40 infectious entry into cells was specifically and reversibly blocked by genistein.

  18. Data in support of FSH induction of IRS-2 in human granulosa cells: Mapping the transcription factor binding sites in human IRS-2 promoter

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    Surleen Kaur

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Insulin receptor substrate-2 (IRS-2 plays critical role in the regulation of various metabolic processes by insulin and IGF-1. The defects in its expression and/or function are linked to diseases like polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, insulin resistance and cancer. To predict the transcription factors (TFs responsible for the regulation of human IRS-2 gene expression, the transcription factor binding sites (TFBS and the corresponding TFs were investigated by analysis of IRS-2 promoter sequence using MatInspector Genomatix software (Cartharius et al., 2005 [1]. The ibid data is part of author׳s publication (Anjali et al., 2015 [2] that explains Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH mediated IRS-2 promoter activation in human granulosa cells and its importance in the pathophysiology of PCOS. Further analysis was carried out for binary interactions of TF regulatory genes in IRS-2 network using Cytoscape software tool and R-code. In this manuscript, we describe the methodology used for the identification of TFBSs in human IRS-2 promoter region and provide details on experimental procedures, analysis method, validation of data and also the raw files. The purpose of this article is to provide the data on all TFBSs in the promoter region of human IRS-2 gene as it has the potential for prediction of the regulation of IRS-2 gene in normal or diseased cells from patients with metabolic disorders and cancer.

  19. Integration and Validation of the Genome-Scale Metabolic Models of Pichia pastoris: A Comprehensive Update of Protein Glycosylation Pathways, Lipid and Energy Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomàs-Gamisans, Màrius; Ferrer, Pau; Albiol, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) are tools that allow predicting a phenotype from a genotype under certain environmental conditions. GEMs have been developed in the last ten years for a broad range of organisms, and are used for multiple purposes such as discovering new properties of metabolic networks, predicting new targets for metabolic engineering, as well as optimizing the cultivation conditions for biochemicals or recombinant protein production. Pichia pastoris is one of the most widely used organisms for heterologous protein expression. There are different GEMs for this methylotrophic yeast of which the most relevant and complete in the published literature are iPP668, PpaMBEL1254 and iLC915. However, these three models differ regarding certain pathways, terminology for metabolites and reactions and annotations. Moreover, GEMs for some species are typically built based on the reconstructed models of related model organisms. In these cases, some organism-specific pathways could be missing or misrepresented. In order to provide an updated and more comprehensive GEM for P. pastoris, we have reconstructed and validated a consensus model integrating and merging all three existing models. In this step a comprehensive review and integration of the metabolic pathways included in each one of these three versions was performed. In addition, the resulting iMT1026 model includes a new description of some metabolic processes. Particularly new information described in recently published literature is included, mainly related to fatty acid and sphingolipid metabolism, glycosylation and cell energetics. Finally the reconstructed model was tested and validated, by comparing the results of the simulations with available empirical physiological datasets results obtained from a wide range of experimental conditions, such as different carbon sources, distinct oxygen availability conditions, as well as producing of two different recombinant proteins. In these simulations, the

  20. The genome sequence of E. coli W (ATCC 9637: comparative genome analysis and an improved genome-scale reconstruction of E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli is a model prokaryote, an important pathogen, and a key organism for industrial biotechnology. E. coli W (ATCC 9637, one of four strains designated as safe for laboratory purposes, has not been sequenced. E. coli W is a fast-growing strain and is the only safe strain that can utilize sucrose as a carbon source. Lifecycle analysis has demonstrated that sucrose from sugarcane is a preferred carbon source for industrial bioprocesses. Results We have sequenced and annotated the genome of E. coli W. The chromosome is 4,900,968 bp and encodes 4,764 ORFs. Two plasmids, pRK1 (102,536 bp and pRK2 (5,360 bp, are also present. W has unique features relative to other sequenced laboratory strains (K-12, B and Crooks: it has a larger genome and belongs to phylogroup B1 rather than A. W also grows on a much broader range of carbon sources than does K-12. A genome-scale reconstruction was developed and validated in order to interrogate metabolic properties. Conclusions The genome of W is more similar to commensal and pathogenic B1 strains than phylogroup A strains, and therefore has greater utility for comparative analyses with these strains. W should therefore be the strain of choice, or 'type strain' for group B1 comparative analyses. The genome annotation and tools created here are expected to allow further utilization and development of E. coli W as an industrial organism for sucrose-based bioprocesses. Refinements in our E. coli metabolic reconstruction allow it to more accurately define E. coli metabolism relative to previous models.

  1. Integration and Validation of the Genome-Scale Metabolic Models of Pichia pastoris: A Comprehensive Update of Protein Glycosylation Pathways, Lipid and Energy Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Màrius Tomàs-Gamisans

    Full Text Available Genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs are tools that allow predicting a phenotype from a genotype under certain environmental conditions. GEMs have been developed in the last ten years for a broad range of organisms, and are used for multiple purposes such as discovering new properties of metabolic networks, predicting new targets for metabolic engineering, as well as optimizing the cultivation conditions for biochemicals or recombinant protein production. Pichia pastoris is one of the most widely used organisms for heterologous protein expression. There are different GEMs for this methylotrophic yeast of which the most relevant and complete in the published literature are iPP668, PpaMBEL1254 and iLC915. However, these three models differ regarding certain pathways, terminology for metabolites and reactions and annotations. Moreover, GEMs for some species are typically built based on the reconstructed models of related model organisms. In these cases, some organism-specific pathways could be missing or misrepresented.In order to provide an updated and more comprehensive GEM for P. pastoris, we have reconstructed and validated a consensus model integrating and merging all three existing models. In this step a comprehensive review and integration of the metabolic pathways included in each one of these three versions was performed. In addition, the resulting iMT1026 model includes a new description of some metabolic processes. Particularly new information described in recently published literature is included, mainly related to fatty acid and sphingolipid metabolism, glycosylation and cell energetics. Finally the reconstructed model was tested and validated, by comparing the results of the simulations with available empirical physiological datasets results obtained from a wide range of experimental conditions, such as different carbon sources, distinct oxygen availability conditions, as well as producing of two different recombinant proteins. In

  2. Data in support of FSH induction of IRS-2 in human granulosa cells: Mapping the transcription factor binding sites in human IRS-2 promoter

    OpenAIRE

    Surleen Kaur; Anjali, G.; Priya Bhardwaj; Jyoti Taneja; Rita Singh

    2015-01-01

    Insulin receptor substrate-2 (IRS-2) plays critical role in the regulation of various metabolic processes by insulin and IGF-1. The defects in its expression and/or function are linked to diseases like polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), insulin resistance and cancer. To predict the transcription factors (TFs) responsible for the regulation of human IRS-2 gene expression, the transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) and the corresponding TFs were investigated by analysis of IRS-2 promoter sequ...

  3. Mapping of long-range INS promoter interactions reveals a role for calcium-activated chloride channel ANO1 in insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhixiong; Lefevre, Gaelle M; Gavrilova, Oksana; Foster St Claire, Mark B; Riddick, Gregory; Felsenfeld, Gary

    2014-11-25

    We used circular chromatin conformation capture (4C) to identify a physical contact in human pancreatic islets between the region near the insulin (INS) promoter and the ANO1 gene, lying 68 Mb away on human chromosome 11, which encodes a Ca(2+)-dependent chloride ion channel. In response to glucose, this contact was strengthened and ANO1 expression increased, whereas inhibition of INS gene transcription by INS promoter targeting siRNA decreased ANO1 expression, revealing a regulatory effect of INS promoter on ANO1 expression. Knockdown of ANO1 expression caused decreased insulin secretion in human islets, establishing a physical proximity-dependent feedback loop involving INS transcription, ANO1 expression, and insulin secretion. To explore a possible role of ANO1 in insulin metabolism, we carried out experiments in Ano1(+/-) mice. We observed reduced serum insulin levels and insulin-to-glucose ratios in high-fat diet-fed Ano1(+/-) mice relative to Ano1(+/+) mice fed the same diet. Our results show that determination of long-range contacts within the nucleus can be used to detect novel and physiologically relevant mechanisms. They also show that networks of long-range physical contacts are important to the regulation of insulin metabolism.

  4. Mapping the methylation status of the miR-145 promoter in saphenous vein smooth muscle cells from individuals with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riches, Kirsten; Huntriss, John; Keeble, Claire; Wood, Ian C; O'Regan, David J; Turner, Neil A; Porter, Karen E

    2017-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus prevalence is growing globally, and the leading cause of mortality in these patients is cardiovascular disease. Epigenetic mechanisms such as microRNAs (miRs) and DNA methylation may contribute to complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We discovered an aberrant type 2 diabetes mellitus-smooth muscle cell phenotype driven by persistent up-regulation of miR-145. This study aimed to determine whether elevated expression was due to changes in methylation at the miR-145 promoter. Smooth muscle cells were cultured from saphenous veins of 22 non-diabetic and 22 type 2 diabetes mellitus donors. DNA was extracted, bisulphite treated and pyrosequencing used to interrogate methylation at 11 CpG sites within the miR-145 promoter. Inter-patient variation was high irrespective of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Differential methylation trends were apparent between non-diabetic and type 2 diabetes mellitus-smooth muscle cells at most sites but were not statistically significant. Methylation at CpGs -112 and -106 was consistently lower than all other sites explored in non-diabetic and type 2 diabetes mellitus-smooth muscle cells. Finally, miR-145 expression per se was not correlated with methylation levels observed at any site. The persistent up-regulation of miR-145 observed in type 2 diabetes mellitus-smooth muscle cells is not related to methylation at the miR-145 promoter. Crucially, miR-145 methylation is highly variable between patients, serving as a cautionary note for future studies of this region in primary human cell types.

  5. Using proteomic data to assess a genome-scale "in silico" model of metal reducing bacteria in the simulation of field-scale uranium bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabusaki, S.; Fang, Y.; Wilkins, M. J.; Long, P.; Rifle IFRC Science Team

    2011-12-01

    A series of field experiments in a shallow alluvial aquifer at a former uranium mill tailings site have demonstrated that indigenous bacteria can be stimulated with acetate to catalyze the conversion of hexavalent uranium in a groundwater plume to immobile solid-associated uranium in the +4 oxidation state. While this bioreduction of uranium has been shown to lower groundwater concentrations below actionable standards, a viable remediation methodology will need a mechanistic, predictive and quantitative understanding of the microbially-mediated reactions that catalyze the reduction of uranium in the context of site-specific processes, properties, and conditions. At the Rifle IFRC site, we are investigating the impacts on uranium behavior of pulsed acetate amendment, acetate-oxidizing iron and sulfate reducing bacteria, seasonal water table variation, spatially-variable physical (hydraulic conductivity, porosity) and geochemical (reactive surface area) material properties. The simulation of three-dimensional, variably saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport during a uranium bioremediation field experiment includes a genome-scale in silico model of Geobacter sp. to represent the Fe(III) terminal electron accepting process (TEAP). The Geobacter in silico model of cell-scale physiological metabolic pathways is comprised of hundreds of intra-cellular and environmental exchange reactions. One advantage of this approach is that the TEAP reaction stoichiometry and rate are now functions of the metabolic status of the microorganism. The linkage of in silico model reactions to specific Geobacter proteins has enabled the use of groundwater proteomic analyses to assess the accuracy of the model under evolving hydrologic and biogeochemical conditions. In this case, the largest predicted fluxes through in silico model reactions generally correspond to high abundances of proteins linked to those reactions (e.g. the condensation reaction catalyzed by the protein

  6. Using Social Network Analysis To Map Participation And Non-participation In Health Promotion and Community-building Among Vulnerable Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindhede, Anette Lykke

    In empowerment and asset-based approaches to community development, the ability to change local residents’ perception of themselves and their neighbours from that of persons with needs that can only be met with the help of professionals to that of a more self-reliant group with assets...... and capacities for collective and collaborative problemsolving is seen as key to successful community building (Kretzmann and McKnight, 1993). By using social network analysis and Bourdieu’s definition of capital, this study aimed to identify patterns of participation and non-participation in a community......-building project aiming at increasing upward mobility and social capital within the area and increase equity in health. This presentation will outline the tensions and contradictions which accompany policies and interventions that seek to strengthen local communities as a means of promoting health. Emerging...

  7. Mapping of RNA initiation sites by high doses of uv iradiation: evidence for three independent promoters within the left 11% of the Ad-2 genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, M.C.; Fraser, N.W.; Darnell, J.E. Jr.

    1979-04-15

    Cells infected with Ad-2 virus were irradiated so that uv-induced lesions were introduced every 500 to 1000 nucleotides in the genomes, consequently leading to the premature termination of RNA transcription. Such cells when labeled with (/sup 3/H)uridine accumulate labeled promoter proximal RNA. Hybridization of this RNA after size fractionation to restriction fragments of the Ad-2 genome allowed the identification of DNA sequences containing active RNA initiation sites. Early during the infectious cycle two active RNA initiation sites were found within the left 11% of the Ad-2 genome within the 0 to 3.0 and 4.4 to 8.0 restriction fragments. During late infection (15 hr) an additional uv resistant transcript was detected indicating that a newly activated RNA initiation site, presumably for protein IX, resides within the fragment 8.0 to 11.2.

  8. Distinct patterns of epigenetic marks and transcription factor binding sites across promoters of sense-intronic long noncoding RNAs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saurav Ghosh; Satish Sati; Shantanu Sengupta; Vinod Scaria

    2015-03-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a new class of noncoding RNAs that have been extensively studied in the recent past as a regulator of gene expression, including modulation of epigenetic regulation. The lncRNAs class encompasses a number of subclasses, classified based on their genomic loci and relation to protein-coding genes. Functional differences between subclasses have been increasingly studied in the recent years, though the regulation of expression and biogenesis of lncRNAs have been poorly studied. The availability of genome-scale datasets of epigenetic marks has motivated us to understand the patterns and processes of epigenetic regulation of lncRNAs. Here we analysed the occurrence of expressive and repressive histone marks at the transcription start site (TSS) of lncRNAs and their subclasses, and compared these profiles with that of the protein-coding regions. We observe distinct differences in the density of histone marks across the TSS of a few lncRNA subclasses. The sense-intronic lncRNA subclass showed a paucity for mapped histone marks across the TSS which were significantly different than all the lncRNAs and protein-coding genes in most cases. Similar pattern was also observed for the density of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). These observations were generally consistent across cell and tissue types. The differences in density across the promoter were significantly associated with the expression level of the genes, but the differences between the densities across long noncoding and protein-coding gene promoters were consistent irrespective of the expression levels. Apart from suggesting general differences in epigenetic regulatory marks across long noncoding RNA promoters, our analysis suggests a possible alternative mechanism of regulation and/or biogenesis of sense-intronic lncRNAs.

  9. Promoter Prediction on a Genomic Scale—The Adh Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohler, Uwe

    2000-01-01

    We describe our statistical system for promoter recognition in genomic DNA with which we took part in the Genome Annotation Assessment Project (GASP1). We applied two versions of the system: the first uses a region-based approach toward transcription start site identification, namely, interpolated Markov chains; the second was a hybrid approach combining regions and signals within a stochastic segment model. We compare the results of both versions with each other and examine how well the application on a genomic scale compares with the results we previously obtained on smaller data sets. PMID:10779494

  10. Inhibition of MAP kinase promotes the recruitment of corepressor SMRT by tamoxifen-bound estrogen receptor alpha and potentiates tamoxifen action in MCF-7 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Wei, E-mail: hongwei@tijmu.edu.cn [Department of Immunology, Tianjin Medical University, 300070 Tianjin (China); Department of Laboratory Medicine, Tianjin Medical University, 300070 Tianjin (China); Chen, Linfeng [Department of Medical Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, 02115 MA (United States); Li, Juan [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Tianjin Medical University, 300070 Tianjin (China); Yao, Zhi [Department of Immunology, Tianjin Medical University, 300070 Tianjin (China)

    2010-05-28

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ER{alpha}), a ligand controlled transcription factor, plays an important role in breast cancer growth and endocrine therapy. Tamoxifen (TAM) antagonizes ER{alpha} activity and has been applied in breast cancer treatment. TAM-bound ER{alpha} associates with nuclear receptor-corepressors. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) has been elucidated to result in cross-talk between growth factor and ER{alpha} mediated signaling. We show that activated MAPK represses interaction of TAM-bound ER{alpha} with silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT) and inhibits the recruitment of SMRT by ER{alpha} to certain estrogen target genes. Blockade of MAPK signaling cascade with MEK inhibitor U0126 promotes the interaction and subsequently inhibits ER{alpha} activity via enhanced recruitment of SMRT, leading to reduced expression of ER{alpha} target genes. The growth rate of MCF-7 cells was decelerated when treated with both TAM and U0126. Moreover, the growth of MCF-7 cells stably expressing SMRT showed a robust repression in the presence of TAM and U0126. These results suggest that activated MAPK signaling cascade attenuates antagonist-induced recruitment of SMRT to ER{alpha}, suggesting corepressor mediates inhibition of ER{alpha} transactivation and breast cancer cell growth by antagonist. Taken together, our finding indicates combination of antagonist and MAPK inhibitor could be a helpful approach for breast cancer therapy.

  11. An Empirical Study on College Students' Reading Promotion Based on Mind Mapping%基于思维导图的大学生阅读推广实证研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张泸月

    2016-01-01

    Applying experimental research methods, the article explores the influence of the mind mapping on the reading effect and interactive behavior of college students in the process of reading promotion. In reading promotional activities, 50 college students (exper-imental group and control group, 25 people) are recruited to participate in the comparison experiment in one-month period. Mind map-ping is applied to intervene the reading of experimental group members in order to test the effectiveness of mind mapping. And the ex-periment shows that there is a significant difference between the pre-test and the post-test in the experimental group, whereas there is no obvious difference between the pre-test and the post-test in contrast group. Meanwhile, in the pre-test, there is no significant differ-ence between experimental group and contrast group. However, the difference of the reading breadth, memory, comprehension and imagination has reached statistical significance (P<0.05) in the post-test. The aspects of communication and cooperation do not show any differences, but the mean value of experimental group is much higher than the other group in the post-test, which exposes that applica-tion of the mind mapping in the reading, to a certain extent, is beneficial to the reading range, quality and interactivity.%文章借助实验研究方法,探讨在阅读推广过程中,运用思维导图对大学生阅读效果及交互行为的影响。在阅读推广活动中招募50名大学生(实验组和对照组各25人)参与对比实验,在为期1个月的时间中,运用思维导图对实验组成员的阅读活动开展干预,以检验思维导图在阅读推广中的成效。结果显示:实验组前后测分值存在显著差异,对照组前后测分值无显著差异;两组间前测无显著差异,而后测中,在阅读广度、记忆力、理解力、联想与反思能力这四个方面的差异达到统计显著性(P<0.05),交流与合作

  12. Genome Wide Mapping of NR4A Binding Reveals Cooperativity with ETS Factors to Promote Epigenetic Activation of Distal Enhancers in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P Duren

    Full Text Available Members of the NR4A subfamily of orphan nuclear receptors regulate cell fate decisions via both genomic and non-genomic mechanisms in a cell and tissue selective manner. NR4As play a key role in maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis and are critical tumor suppressors of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Expression of NR4As is broadly silenced in leukemia initiating cell enriched populations from human patients relative to normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Rescue of NR4A expression in human AML cells inhibits proliferation and reprograms AML gene signatures via transcriptional mechanisms that remain to be elucidated. By intersecting an acutely regulated NR4A1 dependent transcriptional profile with genome wide NR4A binding distribution, we now identify an NR4A targetome of 685 genes that are directly regulated by NR4A1. We show that NR4As regulate gene transcription primarily through interaction with distal enhancers that are co-enriched for NR4A1 and ETS transcription factor motifs. Using a subset of NR4A activated genes, we demonstrate that the ETS factors ERG and FLI-1 are required for activation of NR4A bound enhancers and NR4A target gene induction. NR4A1 dependent recruitment of ERG and FLI-1 promotes binding of p300 histone acetyltransferase to epigenetically activate NR4A bound enhancers via acetylation at histone H3K27. These findings disclose novel epigenetic mechanisms by which NR4As and ETS factors cooperate to drive NR4A dependent gene transcription in human AML cells.

  13. Genome Wide Mapping of NR4A Binding Reveals Cooperativity with ETS Factors to Promote Epigenetic Activation of Distal Enhancers in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duren, Ryan P; Boudreaux, Seth P; Conneely, Orla M

    2016-01-01

    Members of the NR4A subfamily of orphan nuclear receptors regulate cell fate decisions via both genomic and non-genomic mechanisms in a cell and tissue selective manner. NR4As play a key role in maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis and are critical tumor suppressors of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Expression of NR4As is broadly silenced in leukemia initiating cell enriched populations from human patients relative to normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Rescue of NR4A expression in human AML cells inhibits proliferation and reprograms AML gene signatures via transcriptional mechanisms that remain to be elucidated. By intersecting an acutely regulated NR4A1 dependent transcriptional profile with genome wide NR4A binding distribution, we now identify an NR4A targetome of 685 genes that are directly regulated by NR4A1. We show that NR4As regulate gene transcription primarily through interaction with distal enhancers that are co-enriched for NR4A1 and ETS transcription factor motifs. Using a subset of NR4A activated genes, we demonstrate that the ETS factors ERG and FLI-1 are required for activation of NR4A bound enhancers and NR4A target gene induction. NR4A1 dependent recruitment of ERG and FLI-1 promotes binding of p300 histone acetyltransferase to epigenetically activate NR4A bound enhancers via acetylation at histone H3K27. These findings disclose novel epigenetic mechanisms by which NR4As and ETS factors cooperate to drive NR4A dependent gene transcription in human AML cells.

  14. Genetic Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fact Sheets Fact Sheets En Español: Mapeo Genético Genetic Mapping What is genetic mapping? How do researchers create ... genetic map? What are genetic markers? What is genetic mapping? Among the main goals of the Human Genome ...

  15. Concept Maps

    OpenAIRE

    Schwendimann, Beat Adrian

    2014-01-01

    A concept map is a node-link diagram showing the semantic relationships among concepts. The technique for constructing concept maps is called "concept mapping". A concept map consists of nodes, arrows as linking lines, and linking phrases that describe the relationship between nodes. Two nodes connected with a labeled arrow are called a proposition. Concept maps are versatile graphic organizers that can represent many different forms of relationships between concepts. The relationship between...

  16. Genome-scale lncRNAs Expressions Pattern in Lung Squamous Carcinoma%肺鳞癌全基因组 lncRNAs 表达研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王瑛; 尹继业; 李湘平; 陈娟; 钱晨月; 郑艺; 刘昭前

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide, and squamous carcinoma is the most common histological subtype. Clinical and molecular evidence indicated that lung squamous carcinoma is heterogeneous disease. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) were noncoding RNAs with more than 200 nucleotide length. They have been found to be involved in a variety of biological processes. Many studies indicated that they were aberrantly expressed in some types of carcinomas. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that some lncRNAs may correlate with lung cancer tumor genesis by detecting genome-scale lncRNAs expressions. 16 lung squamous cell carci-noma patients’paired normal and lung tumor tissues were obtained after surgery. First, extracted total RNA from frozen tissues by Trizol reagent; next, reverse-transcripted the total RNA to cDNA, got cRNA in vitro transcription synthesis, and then purified cRNA by spin columns, cRNA was transcribed into cDNA utilizing a random priming method and cDNA was labeled and hybridized to the Agi-lent human 4×180 K microarray. Processed signal data was obtained from hybridized images using Agilent Feature Extraction. Quantile normalization and differential expression data were performed using the Agilent GeneSpring. Data analyses were performed using R and Bioconductor. With abundant and varied probes accounting 38,361 lncRNAs in our microarray, the number of lncRNAs that expressed at a certain level could be detected is 28,055. From the results we found that there were 3,460 lncRNAs that differentially expressed (≥2 absolute fold-change) in lung squamous cell carcinoma tissues compared with normal tissue, among which 127 lncRNAs differentially expressed in all 16 lung squamous cell carcinoma samples. Our study is the first one to determine genome-wide lncRNAs expression pat-terns in lung squamous cell carcinoma by using microarray. The results indicated that clusters of lncRNAs were significantly differentially expressed. Of all

  17. A description of interventions promoting healthier ready-to-eat meals (to eat in, to take away, or to be delivered) sold by specific food outlets in England: a systematic mapping and evidence synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier-Brown, Frances C; Summerbell, Carolyn D; Moore, Helen J; Wrieden, Wendy L; Adams, Jean; Abraham, Charles; Adamson, Ashley; Araújo-Soares, Vera; White, Martin; Lake, Amelia A

    2017-01-19

    Ready-to-eat meals (to eat in, to take away or to be delivered) sold by food outlets are often more energy dense and nutrient poor compared with meals prepared at home, making them a reasonable target for public health intervention. The aim of the research presented in this paper was to systematically identify and describe interventions to promote healthier ready-to-eat meals (to eat in, to take away, or to be delivered) sold by specific food outlets in England. A systematic search and sift of the literature, followed by evidence mapping of relevant interventions, was conducted. Food outlets were included if they were located in England, were openly accessible to the public and, as their main business, sold ready-to-eat meals. Academic databases and grey literature were searched. Also, local authorities in England, topic experts, and key health professionals and workers were contacted. Two tiers of evidence synthesis took place: type, content and delivery of each intervention were summarised (Tier 1) and for those interventions that had been evaluated, a narrative synthesis was conducted (Tier 2). A total of 75 interventions were identified, the most popular being awards. Businesses were more likely to engage with cost neutral interventions which offered imperceptible changes to price, palatability and portion size. Few interventions involved working upstream with suppliers of food, the generation of customer demand, the exploration of competition effects, and/or reducing portion sizes. Evaluations of interventions were generally limited in scope and of low methodological quality, and many were simple assessments of acceptability. Many interventions promoting healthier ready-to-eat meals (to eat in, to take away, or to be delivered) sold by specific food outlets in England are taking place; award-type interventions are the most common. Proprietors of food outlets in England that, as their main business, sell ready-to-eat meals, can be engaged in implementing

  18. Data-driven assessment of eQTL mapping methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schughart Klaus

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The analysis of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL is a potentially powerful way to detect transcriptional regulatory relationships at the genomic scale. However, eQTL data sets often go underexploited because legacy QTL methods are used to map the relationship between the expression trait and genotype. Often these methods are inappropriate for complex traits such as gene expression, particularly in the case of epistasis. Results Here we compare legacy QTL mapping methods with several modern multi-locus methods and evaluate their ability to produce eQTL that agree with independent external data in a systematic way. We found that the modern multi-locus methods (Random Forests, sparse partial least squares, lasso, and elastic net clearly outperformed the legacy QTL methods (Haley-Knott regression and composite interval mapping in terms of biological relevance of the mapped eQTL. In particular, we found that our new approach, based on Random Forests, showed superior performance among the multi-locus methods. Conclusions Benchmarks based on the recapitulation of experimental findings provide valuable insight when selecting the appropriate eQTL mapping method. Our battery of tests suggests that Random Forests map eQTL that are more likely to be validated by independent data, when compared to competing multi-locus and legacy eQTL mapping methods.

  19. Map Projection

    CERN Document Server

    Ghaderpour, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce some known map projections from a model of the Earth to a flat sheet of paper or map and derive the plotting equations for these projections. The first fundamental form and the Gaussian fundamental quantities are defined and applied to obtain the plotting equations and distortions in length, shape and size for some of these map projections.

  20. Topographic mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) produced its first topographic map in 1879, the same year it was established. Today, more than 100 years and millions of map copies later, topographic mapping is still a central activity for the USGS. The topographic map remains an indispensable tool for government, science, industry, and leisure. Much has changed since early topographers traveled the unsettled West and carefully plotted the first USGS maps by hand. Advances in survey techniques, instrumentation, and design and printing technologies, as well as the use of aerial photography and satellite data, have dramatically improved mapping coverage, accuracy, and efficiency. Yet cartography, the art and science of mapping, may never before have undergone change more profound than today.

  1. A Potent Inhibitor of Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase (PI3K) and Mitogen Activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Signalling, Quercetin (3, 3', 4', 5, 7-Pentahydroxyflavone) Promotes Cell Death in Ultraviolet (UV)-B-Irradiated B16F10 Melanoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Rather A.; Quadri, Afnan; Nazir, Lone A.; Peerzada, Kaiser; Ganai, Bashir A.; Tasduq, Sheikh A.

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation–induced skin damage contributes strongly to the formation of melanoma, a highly lethal form of skin cancer. Quercetin (Qu), the most widely consumed dietary bioflavonoid and well known inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling, has been reported to be chemopreventive in several forms of non-melanoma skin cancers. Here, we report that the treatment of ultraviolet (UV)-B-irradiated B16F10 melanoma cells with quercetin resulted in a dose dependent reduction in cell viability and increased apoptosis. The present study has brought out that the pro-apoptotic effects of quercetin in UVB-irradiated B16F10 cells are mediated through the elevation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, calcium homeostasis imbalance, modulation of anti-oxidant defence response and depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨM). Promotion of UVB-induced cell death by quercetin was further revealed by cleavage of chromosomal DNA, caspase activation, poly (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage, and an increase in sub-G1 cells. Quercetin markedly attenuated MEK-ERK signalling, influenced PI3K/Akt pathway, and potentially enhanced the UVB-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation. Furthermore, combined UVB and quercetin treatment decreased the ratio of Bcl-2 to that of Bax, and upregulated the expression of Bim and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF). Overall, these results suggest the possibility of using quercetin in combination with UVB as a possible treatment option for melanoma in future. PMID:26148186

  2. A Potent Inhibitor of Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase (PI3K and Mitogen Activated Protein (MAP Kinase Signalling, Quercetin (3, 3', 4', 5, 7-Pentahydroxyflavone Promotes Cell Death in Ultraviolet (UV-B-Irradiated B16F10 Melanoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rather A Rafiq

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV radiation-induced skin damage contributes strongly to the formation of melanoma, a highly lethal form of skin cancer. Quercetin (Qu, the most widely consumed dietary bioflavonoid and well known inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K and mitogen activated protein (MAP kinase signalling, has been reported to be chemopreventive in several forms of non-melanoma skin cancers. Here, we report that the treatment of ultraviolet (UV-B-irradiated B16F10 melanoma cells with quercetin resulted in a dose dependent reduction in cell viability and increased apoptosis. The present study has brought out that the pro-apoptotic effects of quercetin in UVB-irradiated B16F10 cells are mediated through the elevation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS formation, calcium homeostasis imbalance, modulation of anti-oxidant defence response and depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨM. Promotion of UVB-induced cell death by quercetin was further revealed by cleavage of chromosomal DNA, caspase activation, poly (ADP ribose polymerase (PARP cleavage, and an increase in sub-G1 cells. Quercetin markedly attenuated MEK-ERK signalling, influenced PI3K/Akt pathway, and potentially enhanced the UVB-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation. Furthermore, combined UVB and quercetin treatment decreased the ratio of Bcl-2 to that of Bax, and upregulated the expression of Bim and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF. Overall, these results suggest the possibility of using quercetin in combination with UVB as a possible treatment option for melanoma in future.

  3. Invariant distribution of promoter activities in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslaver, Alon; Kaplan, Shai; Bren, Anat; Jinich, Adrian; Mayo, Avi; Dekel, Erez; Alon, Uri; Itzkovitz, Shalev

    2009-10-01

    Cells need to allocate their limited resources to express a wide range of genes. To understand how Escherichia coli partitions its transcriptional resources between its different promoters, we employ a robotic assay using a comprehensive reporter strain library for E. coli to measure promoter activity on a genomic scale at high-temporal resolution and accuracy. This allows continuous tracking of promoter activity as cells change their growth rate from exponential to stationary phase in different media. We find a heavy-tailed distribution of promoter activities, with promoter activities spanning several orders of magnitude. While the shape of the distribution is almost completely independent of the growth conditions, the identity of the promoters expressed at different levels does depend on them. Translation machinery genes, however, keep the same relative expression levels in the distribution across conditions, and their fractional promoter activity tracks growth rate tightly. We present a simple optimization model for resource allocation which suggests that the observed invariant distributions might maximize growth rate. These invariant features of the distribution of promoter activities may suggest design constraints that shape the allocation of transcriptional resources.

  4. Invariant distribution of promoter activities in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alon Zaslaver

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Cells need to allocate their limited resources to express a wide range of genes. To understand how Escherichia coli partitions its transcriptional resources between its different promoters, we employ a robotic assay using a comprehensive reporter strain library for E. coli to measure promoter activity on a genomic scale at high-temporal resolution and accuracy. This allows continuous tracking of promoter activity as cells change their growth rate from exponential to stationary phase in different media. We find a heavy-tailed distribution of promoter activities, with promoter activities spanning several orders of magnitude. While the shape of the distribution is almost completely independent of the growth conditions, the identity of the promoters expressed at different levels does depend on them. Translation machinery genes, however, keep the same relative expression levels in the distribution across conditions, and their fractional promoter activity tracks growth rate tightly. We present a simple optimization model for resource allocation which suggests that the observed invariant distributions might maximize growth rate. These invariant features of the distribution of promoter activities may suggest design constraints that shape the allocation of transcriptional resources.

  5. Effect of amino acid supplementation on titer and glycosylation distribution in hybridoma cell cultures-Systems biology-based interpretation using genome-scale metabolic flux balance model and multivariate data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimonn, Thomas M; Park, Seo-Young; Agarabi, Cyrus D; Brorson, Kurt A; Yoon, Seongkyu

    2016-09-01

    Genome-scale flux balance analysis (FBA) is a powerful systems biology tool to characterize intracellular reaction fluxes during cell cultures. FBA estimates intracellular reaction rates by optimizing an objective function, subject to the constraints of a metabolic model and media uptake/excretion rates. A dynamic extension to FBA, dynamic flux balance analysis (DFBA), can calculate intracellular reaction fluxes as they change during cell cultures. In a previous study by Read et al. (2013), a series of informed amino acid supplementation experiments were performed on twelve parallel murine hybridoma cell cultures, and this data was leveraged for further analysis (Read et al., Biotechnol Prog. 2013;29:745-753). In order to understand the effects of media changes on the model murine hybridoma cell line, a systems biology approach is applied in the current study. Dynamic flux balance analysis was performed using a genome-scale mouse metabolic model, and multivariate data analysis was used for interpretation. The calculated reaction fluxes were examined using partial least squares and partial least squares discriminant analysis. The results indicate media supplementation increases product yield because it raises nutrient levels extending the growth phase, and the increased cell density allows for greater culture performance. At the same time, the directed supplementation does not change the overall metabolism of the cells. This supports the conclusion that product quality, as measured by glycoform assays, remains unchanged because the metabolism remains in a similar state. Additionally, the DFBA shows that metabolic state varies more at the beginning of the culture but less by the middle of the growth phase, possibly due to stress on the cells during inoculation. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1163-1173, 2016.

  6. Mapping Deeply

    OpenAIRE

    Denis Wood

    2015-01-01

    This is a description of an avant la lettre deep mapping project carried out by a geographer and a number of landscape architecture students in the early 1980s. Although humanists seem to take the “mapping” in deep mapping more metaphorically than cartographically, in this neighborhood mapping project, the mapmaking was taken literally, with the goal of producing an atlas of the neighborhood. In this, the neighborhood was construed as a transformer, turning the stuff of the world (gas, wate...

  7. Metazoan promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenhard, Boris; Sandelin, Albin Gustav; Carninci, Piero

    2012-01-01

    Promoters are crucial for gene regulation. They vary greatly in terms of associated regulatory elements, sequence motifs, the choice of transcription start sites and other features. Several technologies that harness next-generation sequencing have enabled recent advances in identifying promoters...... and their features, helping researchers who are investigating functional categories of promoters and their modes of regulation. Additional features of promoters that are being characterized include types of histone modifications, nucleosome positioning, RNA polymerase pausing and novel small RNAs. In this Review, we...... discuss recent findings relating to metazoan promoters and how these findings are leading to a revised picture of what a gene promoter is and how it works....

  8. Mapping Yeast Transcriptional Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Timothy R; de Boer, Carl G.

    2013-01-01

    The term “transcriptional network” refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face....

  9. Polynomial mappings

    CERN Document Server

    Narkiewicz, Wŀadysŀaw

    1995-01-01

    The book deals with certain algebraic and arithmetical questions concerning polynomial mappings in one or several variables. Algebraic properties of the ring Int(R) of polynomials mapping a given ring R into itself are presented in the first part, starting with classical results of Polya, Ostrowski and Skolem. The second part deals with fully invariant sets of polynomial mappings F in one or several variables, i.e. sets X satisfying F(X)=X . This includes in particular a study of cyclic points of such mappings in the case of rings of algebrai integers. The text contains several exercises and a list of open problems.

  10. Participatory Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    2016-01-01

    practice. In particular, mapping environmental damage, endangered species, and human-made disasters has become one focal point for environmental knowledge production. This type of digital map has been highlighted as a processual turn in critical cartography, whereas in related computational journalism...... of a geo-visualization within information mapping that enhances embodiment in the experience of the information. InfoAmazonia is defined as a digitally created map-space within which journalistic practice can be seen as dynamic, performative interactions between journalists, ecosystems, space, and species...

  11. Mapping yeast transcriptional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Timothy R; de Boer, Carl G

    2013-09-01

    The term "transcriptional network" refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face. For most yeast TFs, data have been collected on their sequence preferences, in vivo promoter occupancy, and gene expression profiles in deletion mutants. These systematic studies have led to the identification of new regulators of numerous cellular functions and shed light on the overall organization of yeast gene regulation. However, many yeast TFs appear to be inactive under standard laboratory growth conditions, and many of the available data were collected using techniques that have since been improved. Perhaps as a consequence, comprehensive and accurate mapping among TF sequence preferences, promoter binding, and gene expression remains an open challenge. We propose that the time is ripe for renewed systematic efforts toward a complete mapping of yeast transcriptional regulatory mechanisms.

  12. Collection Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbour, Denise

    2002-01-01

    Explains collection mapping for library media collections. Discusses purposes for creating collection maps, including helping with selection and weeding decisions, showing how the collection supports the curriculum, and making budget decisions; and methods of data collection, including evaluating a collaboratively taught unit with the classroom…

  13. Causal mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    2006-01-01

    The lecture note explains how to use the causal mapping method as well as the theoretical framework aoosciated to the method......The lecture note explains how to use the causal mapping method as well as the theoretical framework aoosciated to the method...

  14. Affective Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    of environmental knowledge production. It uses InfoAmazonia, the databased platform on Amazon rainforests, as an example of affective geo-visualization within information mapping that enhances embodiment in the experience of the information. Amazonia is defined as a digitally created affective (map)space within...

  15. Fixing Formalin: A Method to Recover Genomic-Scale DNA Sequence Data from Formalin-Fixed Museum Specimens Using High-Throughput Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hykin, Sarah M.; Bi, Ke; McGuire, Jimmy A.

    2015-01-01

    For 150 years or more, specimens were routinely collected and deposited in natural history collections without preserving fresh tissue samples for genetic analysis. In the case of most herpetological specimens (i.e. amphibians and reptiles), attempts to extract and sequence DNA from formalin-fixed, ethanol-preserved specimens—particularly for use in phylogenetic analyses—has been laborious and largely ineffective due to the highly fragmented nature of the DNA. As a result, tens of thousands of specimens in herpetological collections have not been available for sequence-based phylogenetic studies. Massively parallel High-Throughput Sequencing methods and the associated bioinformatics, however, are particularly suited to recovering meaningful genetic markers from severely degraded/fragmented DNA sequences such as DNA damaged by formalin-fixation. In this study, we compared previously published DNA extraction methods on three tissue types subsampled from formalin-fixed specimens of Anolis carolinensis, followed by sequencing. Sufficient quality DNA was recovered from liver tissue, making this technique minimally destructive to museum specimens. Sequencing was only successful for the more recently collected specimen (collected ~30 ybp). We suspect this could be due either to the conditions of preservation and/or the amount of tissue used for extraction purposes. For the successfully sequenced sample, we found a high rate of base misincorporation. After rigorous trimming, we successfully mapped 27.93% of the cleaned reads to the reference genome, were able to reconstruct the complete mitochondrial genome, and recovered an accurate phylogenetic placement for our specimen. We conclude that the amount of DNA available, which can vary depending on specimen age and preservation conditions, will determine if sequencing will be successful. The technique described here will greatly improve the value of museum collections by making many formalin-fixed specimens available for

  16. Fixing Formalin: A Method to Recover Genomic-Scale DNA Sequence Data from Formalin-Fixed Museum Specimens Using High-Throughput Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hykin, Sarah M; Bi, Ke; McGuire, Jimmy A

    2015-01-01

    For 150 years or more, specimens were routinely collected and deposited in natural history collections without preserving fresh tissue samples for genetic analysis. In the case of most herpetological specimens (i.e. amphibians and reptiles), attempts to extract and sequence DNA from formalin-fixed, ethanol-preserved specimens-particularly for use in phylogenetic analyses-has been laborious and largely ineffective due to the highly fragmented nature of the DNA. As a result, tens of thousands of specimens in herpetological collections have not been available for sequence-based phylogenetic studies. Massively parallel High-Throughput Sequencing methods and the associated bioinformatics, however, are particularly suited to recovering meaningful genetic markers from severely degraded/fragmented DNA sequences such as DNA damaged by formalin-fixation. In this study, we compared previously published DNA extraction methods on three tissue types subsampled from formalin-fixed specimens of Anolis carolinensis, followed by sequencing. Sufficient quality DNA was recovered from liver tissue, making this technique minimally destructive to museum specimens. Sequencing was only successful for the more recently collected specimen (collected ~30 ybp). We suspect this could be due either to the conditions of preservation and/or the amount of tissue used for extraction purposes. For the successfully sequenced sample, we found a high rate of base misincorporation. After rigorous trimming, we successfully mapped 27.93% of the cleaned reads to the reference genome, were able to reconstruct the complete mitochondrial genome, and recovered an accurate phylogenetic placement for our specimen. We conclude that the amount of DNA available, which can vary depending on specimen age and preservation conditions, will determine if sequencing will be successful. The technique described here will greatly improve the value of museum collections by making many formalin-fixed specimens available for

  17. Fixing Formalin: A Method to Recover Genomic-Scale DNA Sequence Data from Formalin-Fixed Museum Specimens Using High-Throughput Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M Hykin

    Full Text Available For 150 years or more, specimens were routinely collected and deposited in natural history collections without preserving fresh tissue samples for genetic analysis. In the case of most herpetological specimens (i.e. amphibians and reptiles, attempts to extract and sequence DNA from formalin-fixed, ethanol-preserved specimens-particularly for use in phylogenetic analyses-has been laborious and largely ineffective due to the highly fragmented nature of the DNA. As a result, tens of thousands of specimens in herpetological collections have not been available for sequence-based phylogenetic studies. Massively parallel High-Throughput Sequencing methods and the associated bioinformatics, however, are particularly suited to recovering meaningful genetic markers from severely degraded/fragmented DNA sequences such as DNA damaged by formalin-fixation. In this study, we compared previously published DNA extraction methods on three tissue types subsampled from formalin-fixed specimens of Anolis carolinensis, followed by sequencing. Sufficient quality DNA was recovered from liver tissue, making this technique minimally destructive to museum specimens. Sequencing was only successful for the more recently collected specimen (collected ~30 ybp. We suspect this could be due either to the conditions of preservation and/or the amount of tissue used for extraction purposes. For the successfully sequenced sample, we found a high rate of base misincorporation. After rigorous trimming, we successfully mapped 27.93% of the cleaned reads to the reference genome, were able to reconstruct the complete mitochondrial genome, and recovered an accurate phylogenetic placement for our specimen. We conclude that the amount of DNA available, which can vary depending on specimen age and preservation conditions, will determine if sequencing will be successful. The technique described here will greatly improve the value of museum collections by making many formalin-fixed specimens

  18. Control of signaling in a MAP-kinase pathway by an RNA-binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Prinz

    Full Text Available Signaling-protein mRNAs tend to have long untranslated regions (UTRs containing binding sites for RNA-binding proteins regulating gene expression. Here we show that a PUF-family RNA-binding protein, Mpt5, represses the yeast MAP-kinase pathway controlling differentiation to the filamentous form. Mpt5 represses the protein levels of two pathway components, the Ste7 MAP-kinase kinase and the Tec1 transcriptional activator, and negatively regulates the kinase activity of the Kss1 MAP kinase. Moreover, Mpt5 specifically inhibits the output of the pathway in the absence of stimuli, and thereby prevents inappropriate cell differentiation. The results provide an example of what may be a genome-scale level of regulation at the interface of signaling networks and protein-RNA binding networks.

  19. CALS Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collin, Ib; Nielsen, Povl Holm; Larsen, Michael Holm

    1998-01-01

    To enhance the industrial applications of CALS, CALS Center Danmark has developed a cost efficient and transparent assessment, CALS Mapping, to uncover the potential of CALS - primarily dedicated to small and medium sized enterprises. The idea behind CALS Mapping is that the CALS State...... enterprise is, when applied in a given organisation modified with respect to the industry regarded, hence irrelevant measure parameters are eliminated to avoid redundancy. This assessment of CALS Mapping, quantify the CALS potential of an organisation with the purpose of providing decision support to the top...

  20. Mapping VADEMECUM

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    The work plan for the implementation of the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution under the UN Economic Commission for Europe (UN ECE) includes the production of maps of critical loads, critical levels, and exceedances as a basis for developing potential abatement strategies for sulphur and nitrogen. This Vademecum is designed to provide guidance to those responsible for calculating and mapping critical loads, critical levels, and exceedances on a national or regional scale. Th...

  1. Health Promotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Povlsen, Lene; Borup, I.

    2015-01-01

    In 1953 when the Nordic School of Public Health was founded, the aim of public health programmes was disease prevention more than health promotion. This was not unusual, since at this time health usually was seen as the opposite of disease and illness. However, with the Ottawa Charter of 1986......, the World Health Organization made a crucial change to view health not as a goal in itself but as the means to a full life. In this way, health promotion became a first priority and fundamental action for the modern society. This insight eventually reached NHV and in 2002 - 50 years after the foundation...... - an associate professorship was established with a focus on health promotion. Nevertheless, the concept of health promotion had been integrated with or mentioned in courses run prior to the new post. Subsequently, a wide spectrum of courses in health promotion was introduced, such as Empowerment for Child...

  2. Mapping Deeply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Wood

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This is a description of an avant la lettre deep mapping project carried out by a geographer and a number of landscape architecture students in the early 1980s. Although humanists seem to take the “mapping” in deep mapping more metaphorically than cartographically, in this neighborhood mapping project, the mapmaking was taken literally, with the goal of producing an atlas of the neighborhood. In this, the neighborhood was construed as a transformer, turning the stuff of the world (gas, water, electricity into the stuff of individual lives (sidewalk graffiti, wind chimes, barking dogs, and vice versa. Maps in the central transformer section of the atlas were to have charted this process in action, as in one showing the route of an individual newspaper into the neighborhood, then through the neighborhood to a home, and finally, as trash, out of the neighborhood in a garbage truck; though few of these had been completed when the project concluded in 1986. Resurrected in 1998 in an episode on Ira Glass’ This American Life, the atlas was finally published, as Everything Sings: Maps for a Narrative Atlas, in 2010 (and an expanded edition in 2013.

  3. Cognitive maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minder, Bettina; Laursen, Linda Nhu; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    2014-01-01

    . Conceptual clustering is used to analyse and order information according to concepts or variables from within the data. The cognitive maps identified are validated through the comments of some of the same experts. The study presents three cognitive maps and respective world-views explaining how the design...... and innovation field are related and under which dimensions they differ. The paper draws preliminary conclusions on the implications of the different world- views on the innovation process. With the growing importance of the design approach in innovation e.g. design thinking, a clear conception...

  4. Cognitive maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minder, Bettina; Laursen, Linda Nhu; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    2014-01-01

    . Conceptual clustering is used to analyse and order information according to concepts or variables from within the data. The cognitive maps identified are validated through the comments of some of the same experts. The study presents three cognitive maps and respective world-views explaining how the design...... and innovation field are related and under which dimensions they differ. The paper draws preliminary conclusions on the implications of the different world- views on the innovation process. With the growing importance of the design approach in innovation e.g. design thinking, a clear conception...

  5. Copenhagen Sonic Experience Map

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzfeldt, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    of assessment and management of environmental noise brings forth the disturbing and potentially damaging effect of environmental sound.1 But as maps of coloured streets start to circulate, and real estate prices drop in designated blue and red areas,2 it is worth remembering that sound itself is not a killer....... The challenge for planners, designers, and architects is to deal with the auditory not only as pollution but also as an integrated part of urban experience, promoting fellowship and liveliness as well as distress....

  6. Projective mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehlholm, Christian; Brockhoff, Per B.; Bredie, Wender Laurentius Petrus

    2012-01-01

    Projective Mapping (Risvik et.al., 1994) and its Napping (Pagès, 2003) variations have become increasingly popular in the sensory field for rapid collection of spontaneous product perceptions. It has been applied in variations which sometimes are caused by the purpose of the analysis and sometime...

  7. Mole Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crippen, Kent J.; Curtright, Robert D.; Brooks, David W.

    2000-01-01

    The abstract nature of the mole and its applications to problem solving make learning the concept difficult for students, and teaching the concept challenging for teachers. Presents activities that use concept maps and graphing calculators as tools for solving mole problems. (ASK)

  8. Participatory maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    looks at computer-assisted cartography as part of environmental knowledge production. It uses InfoAmazonia, the databased platform on Amazon rainforests, as an example of affective geo-visualization within information mapping that enhances embodiment in the experience of the information. Amazonia...

  9. Exploring Networks at the genome scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, M.C.; Puchalka, J.; Diez, M.S.; Martins Dos Santos, V.A.P.

    2010-01-01

    Systems biology is aimed at achieving a holistic understanding of living organisms, while synthetic biology seeks to design and construct new living organisms with targeted functionalities. Genome sequencing and the fields of ‘omics’ technology have proven a goldmine of information for scientists

  10. Genome-scale modeling for metabolic engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeonidis, E; Price, ND

    2015-01-13

    We focus on the application of constraint-based methodologies and, more specifically, flux balance analysis in the field of metabolic engineering, and enumerate recent developments and successes of the field. We also review computational frameworks that have been developed with the express purpose of automatically selecting optimal gene deletions for achieving improved production of a chemical of interest. The application of flux balance analysis methods in rational metabolic engineering requires a metabolic network reconstruction and a corresponding in silico metabolic model for the microorganism in question. For this reason, we additionally present a brief overview of automated reconstruction techniques. Finally, we emphasize the importance of integrating metabolic networks with regulatory information-an area which we expect will become increasingly important for metabolic engineering-and present recent developments in the field of metabolic and regulatory integration.

  11. Genome-scale modeling for metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonidis, Evangelos; Price, Nathan D

    2015-03-01

    We focus on the application of constraint-based methodologies and, more specifically, flux balance analysis in the field of metabolic engineering, and enumerate recent developments and successes of the field. We also review computational frameworks that have been developed with the express purpose of automatically selecting optimal gene deletions for achieving improved production of a chemical of interest. The application of flux balance analysis methods in rational metabolic engineering requires a metabolic network reconstruction and a corresponding in silico metabolic model for the microorganism in question. For this reason, we additionally present a brief overview of automated reconstruction techniques. Finally, we emphasize the importance of integrating metabolic networks with regulatory information-an area which we expect will become increasingly important for metabolic engineering-and present recent developments in the field of metabolic and regulatory integration.

  12. Genome-scale sequence data processing and epigenetic analysis of DNA methylation%基因组规模DNA 甲基化测序数据处理及其表观遗传分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王庭璋; 单杲; 徐建红; 薛庆中

    2013-01-01

    鉴定DNA 甲基化胞嘧啶(mC)并能制作基因组规模甲基化图谱的新方法--BS-Seq,最近已被开发,它是基于新一代高通量测序结合DNA 亚硫酸氢盐转换技术,不仅可以从基因组规模洞察不同生物之间在DNA 甲基化水平和模式上的差异,也能从不同基因组区域,包括基因、外显子、重复序列等方面,阐明DNA 甲基化环境和核苷酸偏好上的保守性,加深理解DNA 胞嘧啶(C)甲基化在调控基因表达和沉默转座子等重复序列中所起的表观遗传学影响.文章举例介绍了DNA 甲基化位点数据预处理的具体步骤,通过处理分别将参考序列中的胞嘧啶(C)替换成胸腺嘧啶(T),鸟嘌呤(G)替换成腺嘌呤(A),而将读序列中的胞嘧啶(C)替换为胸腺嘧啶(T).文章综述了全基因组DNA 甲基化分析的主要内容,包括:(1)不同序列环境下的胞嘧啶甲基化; (2)全基因组上的甲基化的分布情况; (3)DNA 甲基化环境和核苷酸的偏好; (4)DNA-蛋白质互作位点上的DNA 甲基化; (5)不同基因结构元件的胞嘧啶甲基化程度.DNA 甲基化分析技术为研究不同物种的表观基因组,环境和表观互作提供了强大的工具,并为进一步发展人体疾病诊断和治疗方法提供理论基础.%A new approach recently developed for detecting cytosine DNA methylation (mC) and analyzing the genome-scale DNA methylation profiling, is called BS-Seq which is based on bisulfite conversion of genomic DNA combined with next-generation sequencing. The method can not only provide an insight into the difference of genome-scale DNA methylation among different organisms, but also reveal the conservation of DNA methylation in all contexts and nucleotide preference for different genomic regions, including genes, exons, and repetitive DNA sequences. It will be helpful to under- stand the epigenetic impacts of cytosine DNA methylation on the regulation of gene expression and maintaining silence of repetitive

  13. MAPPING INNOVATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian Langhoff; Koch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    By adopting a theoretical framework from strategic niche management research (SNM) this paper presents an analysis of the innovation system of the Danish Construction industry. The analysis shows a multifaceted landscape of innovation around an existing regime, built around existing ways of working...... and developed over generations. The regime is challenged from various niches and the socio-technical landscape through trends as globalization. Three niches (Lean Construction, BIM and System Deliveries) are subject to a detailed analysis showing partly incompatible rationales and various degrees of innovation...... potential. The paper further discusses how existing policymaking operates in a number of tensions one being between government and governance. Based on the concepts from SNM the paper introduces an innovation map in order to support the development of meta-governance policymaking. By mapping some...

  14. Mapping filmmaking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilje, Øystein; Frølunde, Lisbeth; Lindstrand, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    This chapter concerns mapping patterns in regards to how young filmmakers (age 15 – 20) in the Scandinavian countries learn about filmmaking. To uncover the patterns, we present portraits of four young filmmakers who participated in the Scandinavian research project Making a filmmaker. The focus ...... is on their learning practices and how they create ‘learning paths’ in relation to resources in diverse learning contexts, whether formal, non-formal and informal contexts.......This chapter concerns mapping patterns in regards to how young filmmakers (age 15 – 20) in the Scandinavian countries learn about filmmaking. To uncover the patterns, we present portraits of four young filmmakers who participated in the Scandinavian research project Making a filmmaker. The focus...

  15. Promoting Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Zhao, Yongxin; Wu, Xiaofeng; Liu, Si

    There can be multitudinous models specifying aspects of the same system. Each model has a bias towards one aspect. These models often override in specific aspects though they have different expressions. A specification written in one model can be refined by introducing additional information from other models. The paper proposes a concept of promoting models which is a methodology to obtain refinements with support from cooperating models. It refines a primary model by integrating the information from a secondary model. The promotion principle is not merely an academic point, but also a reliable and robust engineering technique which can be used to develop software and hardware systems. It can also check the consistency between two specifications from different models. A case of modeling a simple online shopping system with the cooperation of the guarded design model and CSP model illustrates the practicability of the promotion principle.

  16. Identification of altered microRNAs and mRNAs in the cumulus cells of PCOS patients: miRNA-509-3p promotes oestradiol secretion by targeting MAP3K8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Liu, Chang; Hao, Cuifang; Tang, Qianqing; Liu, Riming; Lin, Shaoxia; Zhang, Luping; Yan, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine and metabolic disorder in women and is characterised by polycystic ovaries, hyperandrogenism and chronic anovulation. Although the clinical and biochemical signs of PCOS are typically heterogeneous, abnormal folliculogenesis is considered a common characteristic of PCOS. Our aim is to identify the altered miRNA and mRNA expression profiles in the cumulus cells of PCOS patients to investigate their molecular function in the aetiology and pathophysiology of PCOS. In this study, the miRNA expression profiles of the cumulus cell samples isolated from five PCOS and five control patients were determined by an miRNA microarray. At the same time, the altered mRNA profiles of the same cumulus cell samples were also identified by a cDNA microarray. From the microarray data, 17 miRNAs and 1263 mRNAs showed significantly different expression in the PCOS cumulus cells. The differentially expressed miRNA-509-3p and its potential target gene (MAP3K8) were identified from the miRNA and mRNA microarrays respectively. The expression of miRNA-509-3p was up-regulated and MAP3K8 was down-regulated in the PCOS cumulus cells. The direct interaction between miRNA-509-3p and MAP3K8 was confirmed by a luciferase activity assay in KGN cells. In addition, miRNA-509-3p mimics or inhibitor transfection tests in KGN cells further confirmed that miRNA-509-3p improved oestradiol (E2) secretion by inhibiting the expression of MAP3K8 These results help to characterise the pathogenesis of anovulation in PCOS, especially the regulation of E2 production.

  17. Acquisition of contextual discrimination involves the appearance of a RAS-GRF1/p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase-mediated signaling pathway that promotes long term potentiation (LTP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shan-Xue; Arai, Junko; Tian, Xuejun; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra; Feig, Larry A

    2013-07-26

    RAS-GRF1 is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor with the ability to activate RAS and RAC GTPases in response to elevated calcium levels. We previously showed that beginning at 1 month of age, RAS-GRF1 mediates NMDA-type glutamate receptor (NMDAR)-induction of long term depression in the CA1 region of the hippocampus of mice. Here we show that beginning at 2 months of age, when mice first acquire the ability to discriminate between closely related contexts, RAS-GRF1 begins to contribute to the induction of long term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 hippocampus by mediating the action of calcium-permeable, AMPA-type glutamate receptors (CP-AMPARs). Surprisingly, LTP induction by CP-AMPARs through RAS-GRF1 occurs via activation of p38 MAP kinase rather than ERK MAP kinase, which has more frequently been linked to LTP. Moreover, contextual discrimination is blocked by knockdown of Ras-Grf1 expression specifically in the CA1 hippocampus, infusion of a p38 MAP kinase inhibitor into the CA1 hippocampus, or the injection of an inhibitor of CP-AMPARs. These findings implicate the CA1 hippocampus in the developmentally dependent capacity to distinguish closely related contexts through the appearance of a novel LTP-supporting signaling pathway.

  18. Teaching and learning with concept maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, Jobeth

    2011-01-01

    Concept maps are teaching and learning tools that incorporate visual and written representations of related information. Nurse educators can employ concept mapping in various situations to promote a deeper level of learning and to improve retention of information among their students. Concept mapping has been suggested as a tool to assist in planning nursing care and developing critical thinking skills, as well as for evaluation of course learning. Evidence indicates that concept maps provide a more authentic assessment of participants' knowledge, understanding, critical thinking, and ability to link concepts than do traditional tests.

  19. Mapping as a visual health communication tool: promises and dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Roxanne; Hopfer, Suellen; Ghetian, Christie; Lengerich, Eugene

    2007-01-01

    In the era of evidence-based public health promotion and planning, the use of maps as a form of evidence to communicate about the multiple determinants of cancer is on the rise. Geographic information systems and mapping technologies make future proliferation of this strategy likely. Yet disease maps as a communication form remain largely unexamined. This content analysis considers the presence of multivariate information, credibility cues, and the communication function of publicly accessible maps for cancer control activities. Thirty-six state comprehensive cancer control plans were publicly available in July 2005 and were reviewed for the presence of maps. Fourteen of the 36 state cancer plans (39%) contained map images (N = 59 static maps). A continuum of map inter activity was observed, with 10 states having interactive mapping tools available to query and map cancer information. Four states had both cancer plans with map images and interactive mapping tools available to the public on their Web sites. Of the 14 state cancer plans that depicted map images, two displayed multivariate data in a single map. Nine of the 10 states with interactive mapping capability offered the option to display multivariate health risk messages. The most frequent content category mapped was cancer incidence and mortality, with stage at diagnosis infrequently available. The most frequent communication function served by the maps reviewed was redundancy, as maps repeated information contained in textual forms. The social and ethical implications for communicating about cancer through the use of visual geographic representations are discussed.

  20. Internal promoters of the his operon in Salmonella typhimurium.

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid, M. B.; Roth, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Two internal promoters in the his operon of Salmonella typhimurium have been precisely mapped genetically. The internal promoters are found in, or very close to, gene border regions in the his operon. The his operon was examined for the presence of additional internal promoters whose transcripts were sensitive to rho-mediated transcription termination and therefore had escaped detection. No new internal promoters were found. It is argued that the internal promoters described here are not like...

  1. Mapping of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed M. Arafat

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Land cover map of North Sinai was produced based on the FAO-Land Cover Classification System (LCCS of 2004. The standard FAO classification scheme provides a standardized system of classification that can be used to analyze spatial and temporal land cover variability in the study area. This approach also has the advantage of facilitating the integration of Sinai land cover mapping products to be included with the regional and global land cover datasets. The total study area is covering a total area of 20,310.4 km2 (203,104 hectare. The landscape classification was based on SPOT4 data acquired in 2011 using combined multispectral bands of 20 m spatial resolution. Geographic Information System (GIS was used to manipulate the attributed layers of classification in order to reach the maximum possible accuracy. GIS was also used to include all necessary information. The identified vegetative land cover classes of the study area are irrigated herbaceous crops, irrigated tree crops and rain fed tree crops. The non-vegetated land covers in the study area include bare rock, bare soils (stony, very stony and salt crusts, loose and shifting sands and sand dunes. The water bodies were classified as artificial perennial water bodies (fish ponds and irrigated canals and natural perennial water bodies as lakes (standing. The artificial surfaces include linear and non-linear features.

  2. Characterization and identification of microRNA core promoters in four model species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Zhou

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are short, noncoding RNAs that play important roles in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Although many functions of microRNAs in plants and animals have been revealed in recent years, the transcriptional mechanism of microRNA genes is not well-understood. To elucidate the transcriptional regulation of microRNA genes, we study and characterize, in a genome scale, the promoters of intergenic microRNA genes in Caenorhabditis elegans, Homo sapiens, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Oryza sativa. We show that most known microRNA genes in these four species have the same type of promoters as protein-coding genes have. To further characterize the promoters of microRNA genes, we developed a novel promoter prediction method, called common query voting (CoVote, which is more effective than available promoter prediction methods. Using this new method, we identify putative core promoters of most known microRNA genes in the four model species. Moreover, we characterize the promoters of microRNA genes in these four species. We discover many significant, characteristic sequence motifs in these core promoters, several of which match or resemble the known cis-acting elements for transcription initiation. Among these motifs, some are conserved across different species while some are specific to microRNA genes of individual species.

  3. An Integrated Map of Soybean Physical Map and Genetic Map

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Zhaoming; LI Hui; WU Qiong; SUN Yanan; LIU Chunyan; HU Guohua; CHEN Qingshan

    2009-01-01

    Soybean is a major crop in the world, and it is a main source of plant proteins and oil. A lot of soybean genetic maps and physical maps have been constructed, but there are no integrated map between soybean physical map and genetic map. In this study, soybean genome sequence data, released by JGI (US Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute), had been downloaded. With the software Blast 2.2.16, a total of 161 super sequences were mapped on the soybean public genetic map to construct an integrated map. The length of these super sequences accounted for 73.08% of all the genome sequence. This integrated map could be used for gene cloning, gene mining, and comparative genome of legume.

  4. Unit 02 - Maps and Map Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Unit 55, CC in GIS; Rhind, David

    1990-01-01

    This unit explores the map analysis roots of GIS. It discusses cartography and its relationship to GIS, including topics such as map types and characteristics, the concept of scale, map projections, applications of maps, computer-assisted cartography and geographic data display and analysis.

  5. Mapping Resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carruth, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Resilience theory is a growing discipline with great relevance for the discipline of planning, particularly in fields like energy planning that face great uncertainty and rapidly transforming contexts. Building on the work of the Stockholm Resilience Centre, this paper begins by outlining...... the relationship between resilience and energy planning, suggesting that planning in, and with, time is a core necessity in this domain. It then reviews four examples of graphically mapping with time, highlighting some of the key challenges, before tentatively proposing a graphical language to be employed...... by planners when aiming to construct resilient energy plans. It concludes that a graphical language has the potential to be a significant tool, flexibly facilitating cross-disciplinary communication and decision-making, while emphasising that its role is to support imaginative, resilient planning rather than...

  6. Mapping Resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carruth, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Resilience theory is a growing discipline with great relevance for the discipline of planning, particularly in fields like energy planning that face great uncertainty and rapidly transforming contexts. Building on the work of the Stockholm Resilience Centre, this paper begins by outlining...... the relationship between resilience and energy planning, suggesting that planning in, and with, time is a core necessity in this domain. It then reviews four examples of graphically mapping with time, highlighting some of the key challenges, before tentatively proposing a graphical language to be employed...... by planners when aiming to construct resilient energy plans. It concludes that a graphical language has the potential to be a significant tool, flexibly facilitating cross-disciplinary communication and decision-making, while emphasising that its role is to support imaginative, resilient planning rather than...

  7. Health Promotion in Schools: A Scoping Review of Systematic Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, Roy; Pearson, Mark; Anderson, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Schools are an important setting for a wide variety of activities to promote health. The purpose of this paper is to map the different types of health promotion programmes and activities in schools, to estimate the amount of published evaluations of health promotion within UK schools, and to identify any provisional "candidate…

  8. Human Mind Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Tom

    2016-01-01

    When students generate mind maps, or concept maps, the maps are usually on paper, computer screens, or a blackboard. Human Mind Maps require few resources and little preparation. The main requirements are space where students can move around and a little creativity and imagination. Mind maps can be used for a variety of purposes, and Human Mind…

  9. Conformal mapping for multiple terminals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weimin; Ma, Wenying; Wang, Qiang; Ren, Hao

    2016-11-01

    Conformal mapping is an important mathematical tool that can be used to solve various physical and engineering problems in many fields, including electrostatics, fluid mechanics, classical mechanics, and transformation optics. It is an accurate and convenient way to solve problems involving two terminals. However, when faced with problems involving three or more terminals, which are more common in practical applications, existing conformal mapping methods apply assumptions or approximations. A general exact method does not exist for a structure with an arbitrary number of terminals. This study presents a conformal mapping method for multiple terminals. Through an accurate analysis of boundary conditions, additional terminals or boundaries are folded into the inner part of a mapped region. The method is applied to several typical situations, and the calculation process is described for two examples of an electrostatic actuator with three electrodes and of a light beam splitter with three ports. Compared with previously reported results, the solutions for the two examples based on our method are more precise and general. The proposed method is helpful in promoting the application of conformal mapping in analysis of practical problems.

  10. Comparative analyses of bidirectional promoters in vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor James

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Orthologous genes with deep phylogenetic histories are likely to retain similar regulatory features. In this report we utilize orthology assignments for pairs of genes co-regulated by bidirectional promoters to map the ancestral history of the promoter regions. Results Our mapping of bidirectional promoters from humans to fish shows that many such promoters emerged after the divergence of chickens and fish. Furthermore, annotations of promoters in deep phylogenies enable detection of missing data or assembly problems present in higher vertebrates. The functional importance of bidirectional promoters is indicated by selective pressure to maintain the arrangement of genes regulated by the promoter over long evolutionary time spans. Characteristics unique to bidirectional promoters are further elucidated using a technique for unsupervised classification, known as ESPERR. Conclusion Results of these analyses will aid in our understanding of the evolution of bidirectional promoters, including whether the regulation of two genes evolved as a consequence of their proximity or if function dictated their co-regulation.

  11. ShakeMap

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — ShakeMap is a product of the USGS Earthquake Hazards Program in conjunction with the regional seismic networks. ShakeMaps provide near-real-time maps of ground...

  12. Mapping: A Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Paul M.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the history of cartography. Describes the contributions of Strabo and Ptolemy in early maps. Identifies the work of Gerhard Mercator as the most important advancement in mapping. Discusses present mapping standards from history. (CW)

  13. Lunar Map Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Map Catalog includes various maps of the moon's surface, including Apollo landing sites; earthside, farside, and polar charts; photography index maps; zone...

  14. Mapping with the Masses: Google Map Maker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfund, J.

    2008-12-01

    After some 15,000 years of map making, which saw the innovations of cardinal directions, map projections for a spherical earth, and GIS analysis, many parts of the world still appear as the "Dark Continent" on modern maps. Google Map Maker intends to shine a light on these areas by tapping into the power of the GeoWeb. Google Map Maker is a website which allows you to collaborate with others on one unified map to add, edit, locate, describe, and moderate map features, such as roads, cities, businesses, parks, schools and more, for certain regions of the world using Google Maps imagery. In this session, we will show some examples of how people are mapping with this powerful tool as well as what they are doing with the data. With Google Map Maker, you can become a citizen cartographer and join the global network of users helping to improve the quality of maps and local information in your region of interest. You are invited to map the world with us!

  15. LINKAGE MAPPING OF CANDIDATE GENES FOR INDUCE RESISTANCE AND GROWTH PROMOTION BY Trichoderma koningiopsis (Th003 IN TOMATO Solanum lycopersicum Mapeo de genes candidatos relacionados con inducción de resistencia sistemica y promoción de crecimiento por Trichoderma koningiopsis (Th003 en tomate Solanum lycopersicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAIME SIMBAQUEBA

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Induced systemic resistance (ISR is a mechanism by which plants enhance defenses against any stress condition. ISR and growth promotion are enhanced when tomato (Solanum lycopersicum is inoculated with several strains of Trichoderma ssp. This study aims to genetically map tomato candidate genes involved in ISR and growth promotion induced by the Colombian native isolate Trichoderma koningiopsis Th003. Forty-nine candidate genes previously identified on tomato plants treated with Th003 and T. hamatum T382 strains were evaluated for polymorphisms and 16 of them were integrated on the highly saturated genetic linkage map named “TOMATO EXPEN 2000”. The location of six unigenes was similar to the location of resistance gene analogs (RGAs, defense related ESTs and resistance QTLs previously reported, suggesting new possible candidates for these quantitative trait loci (QTL regions. The candidate gene-markers may be used for future ISR or growth promotion assisted selection in tomato.La resistencia sistémica inducida (ISR es un mecanismo mediante el cual las plantas aumentan sus defensas frente a cualquier condición de estrés. El objetivo de este trabajo fue localizar en el mapa genético de tomate, genes candidatos involucrados en ISR y promoción de crecimiento inducidos por la cepa colombiana nativa Th003 de Trichoderma koningiopsis. Se realizó una búsqueda de polimorfismos en cuarenta y nueve genes candidatos previamente identificados en plantas de tomate inoculadas con Th003 y la cepa T382 de T. hamatum. Diez y seis de estos genes candidatos fueron integrados en el mapa genético de tomate altamente saturado, llamado “TOMATO EXPEN 2000”. La ubicación de seis unigenes fue similar a la localización de genes análogos de resistencia (RGAs, ESTs relacionados con defensa y QTLs de resistencia previamente identificados, sugiriendo posibles nuevos candidatos para estas regiones de QTLs. Los genes candidatos o marcadores pueden ser usados

  16. Preferred reporting items for studies mapping onto preference-based outcome measures: The MAPS statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, Stavros; Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Dakin, Helen; Longworth, Louise; Oppe, Mark; Froud, Robert; Gray, Alastair

    2015-08-01

    'Mapping' onto generic preference-based outcome measures is increasingly being used as a means of generating health utilities for use within health economic evaluations. Despite publication of technical guides for the conduct of mapping research, guidance for the reporting of mapping studies is currently lacking. The MAPS (MApping onto Preference-based measures reporting Standards) statement is a new checklist, which aims to promote complete and transparent reporting of mapping studies. The primary audiences for the MAPS statement are researchers reporting mapping studies, the funders of the research, and peer reviewers and editors involved in assessing mapping studies for publication.A de novo list of 29 candidate reporting items and accompanying explanations was created by a working group comprised of six health economists and one Delphi methodologist. Following a two-round, modified Delphi survey with representatives from academia, consultancy, health technology assessment agencies and the biomedical journal editorial community, a final set of 23 items deemed essential for transparent reporting, and accompanying explanations, was developed. The items are contained in a user friendly 23 item checklist. They are presented numerically and categorised within six sections, namely: (i) title and abstract; (ii) introduction; (iii) methods; (iv) results; (v) discussion; and (vi) other. The MAPS statement is best applied in conjunction with the accompanying MAPS explanation and elaboration document.It is anticipated that the MAPS statement will improve the clarity, transparency and completeness of reporting of mapping studies. To facilitate dissemination and uptake, the MAPS statement is being co-published by eight health economics and quality of life journals, and broader endorsement is encouraged. The MAPS working group plans to assess the need for an update of the reporting checklist in five years' time.This statement was published jointly in Applied Health Economics

  17. Mapping the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Grace

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her fourth graders made ceramic heart maps. The impetus for this project came from reading "My Map Book" by Sara Fanelli. This book is a collection of quirky, hand-drawn and collaged maps that diagram a child's world. There are maps of her stomach, her day, her family, and her heart, among others. The…

  18. Mapping the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Grace

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her fourth graders made ceramic heart maps. The impetus for this project came from reading "My Map Book" by Sara Fanelli. This book is a collection of quirky, hand-drawn and collaged maps that diagram a child's world. There are maps of her stomach, her day, her family, and her heart, among others. The…

  19. USGS Map Indices Overlay Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS Map Indices service from The National Map (TNM) consists of 1x1 Degree, 30x60 Minute (100K), 15 Minute (63K), 7.5 Minute (24K), and 3.75 Minute grid...

  20. Marketing Maps: Illustrating How Marketing Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyure, James F.; Arnold, Susan G.

    2003-01-01

    Today's colleges and universities may tolerate the "idea" of marketing more easily, but marketers must continue to educate campus communities about marketing theories and practice. To promote a useful appreciation of how theories translate into initiatives, we propose incorporating "marketing maps"-user-friendly graphic representations of how…

  1. Mapping bicyclists’ experiences in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snizek, Bernhard; Sick Nielsen, Thomas Alexander; Skov-Petersen, Hans

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to the collection, mapping, and analysis of cyclists’ experiences. By spatially relating located experiences to the availability of bicycle facilities and other aspects of the urban environment, their influence on cyclists’ experiences can be analysed. 398 cyclists...... responded and sketched their most recent cycle route and a total of 890 points to locations along the route where they had had positive and negative cycling experiences. The survey was implemented as an online questionnaire built on Google Maps, and allowed up to three positive and three negative experience...... to the potential promotion of positive or negative experiences. Further, the method might be applied to assess the effect of proposed changes to the urban design in terms of cyclists’ experiences.Statistical analysis of the location attributes, traffic environments and conflicts, bicycle facilities, urban density...

  2. VEGETATION MAPPING IN WETLANDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. PEDROTTI

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The current work examines the main aspects of wetland vegetation mapping, which can be summarized as analysis of the ecological-vegetational (ecotone gradients; vegetation complexes; relationships between vegetation distribution and geomorphology; vegetation of the hydrographic basin lo which the wetland in question belongs; vegetation monitoring with help of four vegetation maps: phytosociological map of the real and potential vegetation, map of vegetation dynamical tendencies, map of vegetation series.

  3. -Deformed nonlinear maps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ramaswamy Jaganathan; Sudeshna Sinha

    2005-03-01

    Motivated by studies on -deformed physical systems related to quantum group structures, and by the elements of Tsallis statistical mechanics, the concept of -deformed nonlinear maps is introduced. As a specific example, a -deformation procedure is applied to the logistic map. Compared to the canonical logistic map, the resulting family of -logistic maps is shown to have a wider spectrum of interesting behaviours, including the co-existence of attractors – a phenomenon rare in one-dimensional maps.

  4. Google Maps: You Are Here

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    Librarians use online mapping services such as Google Maps, MapQuest, Yahoo Maps, and others to check traffic conditions, find local businesses, and provide directions. However, few libraries are using one of Google Maps most outstanding applications, My Maps, for the creation of enhanced and interactive multimedia maps. My Maps is a simple and…

  5. Web Mapping Using Logo on Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximing Hou

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The newly proposed Logo on Map (LoM system consists of three modules: picture extraction module (PEM, logo matching module (LMM and web mapping module (WMM. Since the first two modules were covered in our previous paper, the third module WMM is described here to present a complete LoM system. Current research is focused on geo-location distribution of brands on Google Maps. Pictures taken by ordinary people are extracted using Picture Extraction Module (PEM. The pictures containing relevant logos are obtained via Logo Matching Module (LMM. Brand distributions are overlaid on Google Maps. In this paper, GPS and brands are briefly described, and the implementation of Web Mapping Module (WMM based on Google Maps API is detailed. Then several experiments are carried out on the selected top brands. Finally the LMM-pictures are mapped on the Google Maps and the geographical distributions of the brands are visualised. Brand uniqueness is discussed and conclusion is drawn that with unique brand names web mapping can visually reflect the real economic activities of a company in the world.

  6. Mapping with Drupal

    CERN Document Server

    Palazzolo, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Build beautiful interactive maps on your Drupal website, and tell engaging visual stories with your data. This concise guide shows you how to create custom geographical maps from top to bottom, using Drupal 7 tools and out-of-the-box modules. You'll learn how mapping works in Drupal, with examples on how to use intuitive interfaces to map local events, businesses, groups, and other custom data. Although building maps with Drupal can be tricky, this book helps you navigate the system's complexities for creating sophisticated maps that match your site design. Get the knowledge and tools you ne

  7. Coded MapReduce

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Songze; Maddah-Ali, Mohammad Ali; Avestimehr, A. Salman

    2015-01-01

    MapReduce is a commonly used framework for executing data-intensive jobs on distributed server clusters. We introduce a variant implementation of MapReduce, namely "Coded MapReduce", to substantially reduce the inter-server communication load for the shuffling phase of MapReduce, and thus accelerating its execution. The proposed Coded MapReduce exploits the repetitive mapping of data blocks at different servers to create coding opportunities in the shuffling phase to exchange (key,value) pair...

  8. Some Semi - Equivelar Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Upadhyay, Ashish K; Maity, Dipendu

    2011-01-01

    Semi-Equivelar maps are generalizations of Archimedean Solids (as are equivelar maps of the Platonic solids) to the surfaces other than $2-$Sphere. We classify some semi equivelar maps on surface of Euler characteristic -1 and show that none of these are vertex transitive. We establish existence of 12-covered triangulations for this surface. We further construct double cover of these maps to show existence of semi-equivelar maps on the surface of double torus. We also construct several semi-equivelar maps on the surfaces of Euler characteristics -8 and -10 and on non-orientable surface of Euler characteristics -2.

  9. Mapping in the cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    This engaging text provides a solid introduction to mapmaking in the era of cloud computing. It takes students through both the concepts and technology of modern cartography, geographic information systems (GIS), and Web-based mapping. Conceptual chapters delve into the meaning of maps and how they are developed, covering such topics as map layers, GIS tools, mobile mapping, and map animation. Methods chapters take a learn-by-doing approach to help students master application programming interfaces and build other technical skills for creating maps and making them available on the Internet. Th

  10. Parabolic-like maps

    CERN Document Server

    Lomonaco, Luciana Luna Anna

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce the notion of parabolic-like mapping, which is an object similar to a polynomial-like mapping, but with a parabolic external class, i.e. an external map with a parabolic fixed point. We prove a straightening theorem for parabolic-like maps, which states that any parabolic-like map of degree 2 is hybrid conjugate to a member of the family Per_1(1), and this member is unique (up to holomorphic conjugacy) if the filled Julia set of the parabolic-like map is connected.

  11. Meso(topoclimatic maps and mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Plánka

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric characteristics can be studied from many points of view, most often we talk about time and spatial standpoint. Application of time standpoint leads either to different kinds of the synoptic and prognostic maps production, which presents actual state of atmosphere in short time section in the past or in the near future or to the climatic maps production which presents longterm weather regime. Spatial standpoint then differs map works according to natural phenomenon proportions, whereas the scale of their graphic presentation can be different. It depends on production purpose of each work.In the paper there are analysed methods of mapping and climatic maps production, which display longterm regime of chosen atmospheric features. These athmosphere features are formed in interaction with land surface and also have direct influence on people and their activities throughout the country. At the same time they’re influenced by anthropogenic intervention to the landscape.

  12. Prototype of Partial Cutting Tool of Geological Map Images Distributed by Geological Web Map Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonogaki, S.; Nemoto, T.

    2014-12-01

    Geological maps and topographical maps play an important role in disaster assessment, resource management, and environmental preservation. These map information have been distributed in accordance with Web services standards such as Web Map Service (WMS) and Web Map Tile Service (WMTS) recently. In this study, a partial cutting tool of geological map images distributed by geological WMTS was implemented with Free and Open Source Software. The tool mainly consists of two functions: display function and cutting function. The former function was implemented using OpenLayers. The latter function was implemented using Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL). All other small functions were implemented by PHP and Python. As a result, this tool allows not only displaying WMTS layer on web browser but also generating a geological map image of intended area and zoom level. At this moment, available WTMS layers are limited to the ones distributed by WMTS for the Seamless Digital Geological Map of Japan. The geological map image can be saved as GeoTIFF format and WebGL format. GeoTIFF is one of the georeferenced raster formats that is available in many kinds of Geographical Information System. WebGL is useful for confirming a relationship between geology and geography in 3D. In conclusion, the partial cutting tool developed in this study would contribute to create better conditions for promoting utilization of geological information. Future work is to increase the number of available WMTS layers and the types of output file format.

  13. Integrating Concept Mapping and the Learning Cycle To Teach Diffusion and Osmosis Concepts to High School Biology Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, Arthur L.; Kelly, Paul V.

    2001-01-01

    Explores the effectiveness of concept mapping, the learning cycle, expository instruction, and a combination of concept mapping/learning cycle in promoting conceptual understanding of diffusion and osmosis. Concludes that the concept mapping/learning cycle and concept mapping treatment groups significantly outperformed the expository treatment…

  14. Transcriptional directionality of the human insulin-degrading enzyme promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lang; Wang, Pan; Ding, Qingyang; Wang, Zhao

    2013-10-01

    Unidirectional promoters dominate among mammalian genomes. However, the mechanism through which the transcriptional directionality of promoters is accomplished remains to be clarified. Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a ubiquitously expressed zinc metalloprotease, whose promoter contains a CpG island. We previously showed that the basal promoter region of mouse IDE has bidirectional transcriptional activity, but an upstream promoter element blocks its antisense transcription. Therefore, we wonder whether the human IDE promoter contains an analogous element. Similarly, the basal promoter region of human IDE (-102 ~ +173 and -196 ~ +173 relative to the transcription start site) showed bidirectional transcriptional activity. However, the region from -348 to +173 could only be transcribed from the normal orientation, implying that an upstream promoter element between -348 and -196 blocks the antisense transcription of the human IDE promoter. Through promoter deletion and mutagenesis analysis, we mapped this element precisely and found that the upstream promoter element locates between -318 and -304. Furthermore, the transcription-blocking elements in the mouse and human IDE promoters inhibited the transcription of the SV40 promoter when put downstream of it. In conclusion, we identify an upstream promoter element which blocks the antisense transcription of the human IDE promoter. Our studies are helpful to clarify the transcriptional directionality of promoters.

  15. Dynamics of an advertising competition model with sales promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hui; Feng, Zhaosheng; Jiang, Guirong

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, an advertising competition model with sales promotion is constructed and investigated. Conditions of the existence and stability of period-T solutions are obtained by means of the discrete map. Flip bifurcation is analyzed by using the center manifold theory and three sales promotion strategies are discussed. Example and numerical simulations are illustrated which agree well with our theoretical analysis.

  16. Recovery Action Mapping Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Recovery Action Mapping Tool is a web map that allows users to visually interact with and query actions that were developed to recover species listed under the...

  17. Mapping Medicare Disparities Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Office of Minority Health has designed an interactive map, the Mapping Medicare Disparities Tool, to identify areas of disparities between subgroups of...

  18. NAIP Status Maps Gallery

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — NAIP Status Maps Gallery. These maps illustrate what aerial imagery collection is planned, whats been collected, when it is available and how it is available. These...

  19. NGS Survey Control Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NGS Survey Control Map provides a map of the US which allows you to find and display geodetic survey control points stored in the database of the National...

  20. Letter of Map Revision

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  1. Improving wetland mapping techniques

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Mapping wetland extent, structure and invasives using radar imagery. Acquiring optical, thermal, LIDAR, and RADAR images and analysis for improved wetland mapping,...

  2. MapBook

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Beginning with the systematic mapping of the lunar surface more than three decades ago, this database contains over 1600 maps of the planets and satellites of the...

  3. Invariants for Parallel Mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Yajun; WU Jiye; FAN Qinshan; HUANG Kezhi

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes the geometric quantities that remain unchanged during parallel mapping (i.e., mapping from a reference curved surface to a parallel surface with identical normal direction). The second gradient operator, the second class of integral theorems, the Gauss-curvature-based integral theorems, and the core property of parallel mapping are used to derive a series of parallel mapping invadants or geometri-cally conserved quantities. These include not only local mapping invadants but also global mapping invari-ants found to exist both in a curved surface and along curves on the curved surface. The parallel mapping invadants are used to identify important transformations between the reference surface and parallel surfaces. These mapping invadants and transformations have potential applications in geometry, physics, biome-chanics, and mechanics in which various dynamic processes occur along or between parallel surfaces.

  4. Mapping Mutations on Phylogenies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    This chapter provides a short review of recent methodologies developed for mapping mutations on phylogenies. Mapping of mutations, or character changes in general, using the maximum parsimony principle has been one of the most powerful tools in phylogenetics, and it has been used in a variety...... of different applications, for example, in the detection of correlated evolution and to identify selection acting on DNA sequences. However, many uses of parsimony mappings have been criticized because they focus on only one of many possible mappings and/or because they do not incorporate statistical...... uncertainty in the mapping. Recently developed probabilistic methods can incorporate statistical uncertainty in the character mappings. In these methods, focus is on a probability distribution of mutational mappings instead of a single estimate of the mutational mapping....

  5. Active Fire Mapping Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Active Fire Mapping Program Current Large Incidents (Home) New Large Incidents Fire Detection Maps MODIS Satellite Imagery VIIRS Satellite Imagery Fire Detection GIS Data Fire Data in Google Earth ...

  6. Lying with Maps

    OpenAIRE

    Monmonier, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Darrell Huff’s How to Lie with Statistics was the inspiration for How to Lie with Maps, in which the author showed that geometric distortion and graphic generalization of data are unavoidable elements of cartographic representation. New examples of how ill-conceived or deliberately contrived statistical maps can greatly distort geographic reality demonstrate that lying with maps is a special case of lying with statistics. Issues addressed include the effects of map scale on geometry and featu...

  7. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Olsen, Ole Fogh; Sporring, Jon

    2006-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  8. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Fogh Olsen, Ole; Sporring, Jon

    2007-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  9. Reading Angles in Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections…

  10. Curriculum Mapping. Focus On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molineaux, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    This "Focus On" discusses curriculum mapping, a process that allows educators to align the curriculum both within and across grades and to ensure that the curriculum is in line with school, local, and state standards. It outlines the steps of the curriculum mapping process from planning the mapping initiative to creating and editing curriculum…

  11. Mapping a Changing World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltman, Joseph P.

    1992-01-01

    Addresses the importance of maps for instruction in both history and geography. Suggests that maps have gotten recent attention because of the rapid political changes occurring in Europe and the quincentenary of Columbus' voyage. Discusses different map projections and the importance of media and satellite display of real pictures of the world.…

  12. Branched polynomial covering maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    1999-01-01

    A Weierstrass polynomial with multiple roots in certain points leads to a branched covering map. With this as the guiding example, we formally define and study the notion of a branched polynomial covering map. We shall prove that many finite covering maps are polynomial outside a discrete branch...

  13. Branched polynomial covering maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    2002-01-01

    A Weierstrass polynomial with multiple roots in certain points leads to a branched covering map. With this as the guiding example, we formally define and study the notion of a branched polynomial covering map. We shall prove that many finite covering maps are polynomial outside a discrete branch...

  14. RICE SUCROSE SYNTHASE PROMOTER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    A promoter is described. The promoter comprises a nucleotide sequence corresponding to that shown as SEQ ID No. 1 or a variant, homologue or derivative thereof.......A promoter is described. The promoter comprises a nucleotide sequence corresponding to that shown as SEQ ID No. 1 or a variant, homologue or derivative thereof....

  15. Cosmopolitan linkage disequilibrium maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibson Jane

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Linkage maps have been invaluable for the positional cloning of many genes involved in severe human diseases. Standard genetic linkage maps have been constructed for this purpose from the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain and other panels, and have been widely used. Now that attention has shifted towards identifying genes predisposing to common disorders using linkage disequilibrium (LD and maps of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, it is of interest to consider a standard LD map which is somewhat analogous to the corresponding map for linkage. We have constructed and evaluated a cosmopolitan LD map by combining samples from a small number of populations using published data from a 10-megabase region on chromosome 20. In support of a pilot study, which examined a number of small genomic regions with a lower density of markers, we have found that a cosmopolitan map, which serves all populations when appropriately scaled, recovers 91 to 95 per cent of the information within population-specific maps. Recombination hot spots appear to have a dominant role in shaping patterns of LD. The success of the cosmopolitan map might be attributed to the co-localisation of hot spots in all populations. Although there must be finer scale differences between populations due to other processes (mutation, drift, selection, the results suggest that a whole-genome standard LD map would indeed be a useful resource for disease gene mapping.

  16. Trypanosoma brucei: a putative RNA polymerase II promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayele, Henry K

    2009-12-01

    RNA polymerase II (pol II) promoters are rare in the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei because gene regulation in the parasite is complex and polycistronic. Here, we describe a putative pol II promoter and its structure-function relationship. The promoter has features of an archetypal eukaryotic pol II promoter including putative canonical CCAAT and TATA boxes, and an initiator element. However, the spatial arrangement of these elements is only similar to yeast pol II promoters. Deletion mapping and transcription assays enabled delineation of a minimal promoter that could drive orientation-independent reporter gene expression suggesting that it may be a bidirectional promoter. In vitro transcription in a heterologous nuclear extract revealed that the promoter can be recognized by the basal eukaryotic transcription complex. This suggests that the transcription machinery in the parasite may be very similar to those of other eukaryotes.

  17. On palaeogeographic map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng-Zhao Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The palaeogeographic map is a graphic representation of physical geographical characteristics in geological history periods and human history periods. It is the most important result of palaeogeographic study. The author, as the Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Palaeogeography, Chinese Edition and English Edition, aimed at the problems of the articles submitted to and published in the Journal of Palaeogeography in recent years and the relevant papers and books of others, and integrated with his practice of palaeogeographic study and mapping, wrote this paper. The content mainly includes the data of palaeogeographic mapping, the problems of palaeogeographic mapping method, the “Single factor analysis and multifactor comprehensive mapping method —— Methodology of quantitative lithofacies palaeogeography”, i.e., the “4 steps mapping method”, the nomenclature of each palaeogeographic unit in palaeogeographic map, the explanation of each palaeogeographic unit in palaeogeographic map, the explanation of significance of palaeogeographic map and palaeogeographic article, the evaluative standards of palaeogeographic map and palaeogeographic article, and the self-evaluation. Criticisms and corrections are welcome.

  18. Evolutionary trend of exceptionally long human core promoter short tandem repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohadi, M; Mohammadparast, S; Darvish, H

    2012-10-01

    Short tandem repeats (STRs) are variable elements that play a significant role in genome evolution by creating and maintaining quantitative genetic variation. Because of their proximity to the +1 transcription start site (TSS) and polymorphic nature, core promoter STRs may be considered a novel source of variation across species. In a genome-scale analysis of the entire human protein-coding genes annotated in the GeneCards database (19,927), we analyze the prevalence and repeat numbers of different classes of core promoter STRs in the interval between -120 and +1 to the TSS. We also analyze the evolutionary trend of exceptionally long core promoter STRs of ≥6-repeats. 133 genes (~2%) had core promoter STRs of ≥6-repeats. In the majority of those genes, the STR motifs were found to be conserved across evolution. Di-nucleotide repeats had the highest representation in the human core promoter long STRs (72 genes). Tri- (52 genes), tetra-, penta-, and hexa-nucleotide STRs (9 genes) were also present in the descending prevalence. The majority of those genes (84 genes) revealed directional expansion of core promoter STRs from mouse to human. However, in a number of genes, the difference in average allele size across species was sufficiently small that there might be a constraint on the evolution of average allele size. Random drift of STRs from mouse to human was also observed in a minority of genes. Future work on the genes listed in the current study may further our knowledge into the potential importance of core promoter STRs in human evolution.

  19. Map Projection Transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedjeljko Frančula

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Map Projection Transitions is a very successful web application about map projections. The web page (http://www.jasondavies.com/maps/transition pre­sents a world map with graticule and country borders in the oblique Aitoff projection, with the South Pole. The map is not static, but animated. The South Pole moves toward the bottom and Earth rotates around its poles. The animation lasts five seconds, after which the projection changes and movement continues for five seconds, after which the projection changes again. Names of projections appear in a separate window. There are a total of 56 projections. The South Pole eventually becomes invisible and the North Pole appears at the top. Various parts of Earth appear in the center of the map by rotating around the poles.

  20. Multi-moment maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swann, Andrew Francis; Madsen, Thomas Bruun

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a notion of moment map adapted to actions of Lie groups that preserve a closed three-form. We show existence of our multi-moment maps in many circumstances, including mild topological assumptions on the underlying manifold. Such maps are also shown to exist for all groups whose secon......-torus symmetry in terms of tri-symplectic geometry of four-manifolds. (C) 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  1. Classification of Lipschitz mappings

    CERN Document Server

    Piasecki, Lukasz

    2013-01-01

    The Lipschitz Condition Nonlinear spectral radius Uniformly lipschitzian mappings Basic Facts on Banach Spaces Convexity The operator norm Dual spaces, reexivity, the weak, and weak* topologiesMean Lipschitz Condition Nonexpansive and mean nonexpansive mappings in Banach spaces General case On the Lipschitz Constants for Iterates of Mean Lipschitzian Mappings A bound for Lipschitz constants of iterates A bound for the constant k∞(T)Moving averages in Bana

  2. On probabilistic Mandelbrot maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreadis, Ioannis [International School of The Hague, Wijndaelerduin 1, 2554 BX The Hague (Netherlands)], E-mail: i.andreadis@ish-rijnlandslyceum.nl; Karakasidis, Theodoros E. [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Thessaly, GR-38334 Volos (Greece)], E-mail: thkarak@uth.gr

    2009-11-15

    In this work, we propose a definition for a probabilistic Mandelbrot map in order to extend and support the study initiated by Argyris et al. [Argyris J, Andreadis I, Karakasidis Th. On perturbations of the Mandelbrot map. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 2000;11:1131-1136.] with regard to the numerical stability of the Mandelbrot and Julia set of the Mandelbrot map when subjected to noise.

  3. Choropleth Map Design for Cancer Incidence, Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas B. Richards, MD

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Choropleth maps are commonly used in cancer reports and community discussions about cancer rates. Cancer registries increasingly use geographic information system techniques. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control convened a Map Work Group to help guide application of geographic information system mapping techniques and to promote choropleth mapping of data from central cancer registries supported by the National Program of Cancer Registries, especially for comprehensive cancer control planning and evaluation purposes. In this 2-part series, we answer frequently asked questions about choropleth map design to display cancer incidence data. We recommend that future initiatives consider more advanced mapping, spatial analysis, and spatial statistics techniques and include usability testing with representatives of state and local programs and other cancer prevention partners.

  4. Choropleth Map Design for Cancer Incidence, Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas B. Richards, MD

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Choropleth maps are commonly used in cancer reports and community discussions about cancer rates. Cancer registries increasingly use geographic information system techniques. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control convened a Map Work Group to help guide application of geographic information systems mapping techniques and to promote choropleth mapping of data from central cancer registries supported by the National Program of Cancer Registries, especially for planning and evaluation of comprehensive cancer control programs. In this 2-part series in this issue of Preventing Chronic Disease, we answer frequently asked questions about choropleth map design to display cancer incidence data. We recommend that future initiatives consider more advanced mapping, spatial analysis, and spatial statistics techniques, and include usability testing with representatives of state and local programs and other cancer prevention partners.

  5. Discussions on the Attributes of Cartography and the Value of Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Jiayao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cartography and map are all very important to topography and geography. Experts and scholars in different historical periods have different views of the attributes of cartography and the value of map. The paper discussed the science attribute, technology attribute and engineering attribute of cartography, summarized the value of map from science, society, jurisprudence and military aspects. It will be helpful to understand the basic attributes of cartography and the value of map, promote the sustained and healthy development of them.

  6. Similarity transformations of MAPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersen Allan T.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the notion of similar Markovian Arrival Processes (MAPs and show that the event stationary point processes related to two similar MAPs are stochastically equivalent. This holds true for the time stationary point processes too. We show that several well known stochastical equivalences as e.g. that between the H 2 renewal process and the Interrupted Poisson Process (IPP can be expressed by the similarity transformations of MAPs. In the appendix the valid region of similarity transformations for two-state MAPs is characterized.

  7. Obesity Prevalence Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Adult Obesity Prevalence Maps Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Obesity Prevalence in 2016 by Education and Age Obesity ...

  8. Gaia: Mapping The Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, N. A.; Prusti, T.; Brown, A. G. A.; Jordi, C.; Klioner, S. A.; Lindegren, L.; Mignard, F.; Randich, S.; Soubiran, C.

    2012-08-01

    Gaia is an ESA cornerstone mission set to revolutionise our understanding of the Milky Way. Gaia is scheduled for launch in 2013, and is designed to map over one billion stars with three instruments to collect astrometric, photometric and spectroscopic data on stars in the Milky Way and in galaxies belonging to the Local Group, distant galaxies, quasars and solar system objects. Gaia builds on the expertise established in Europe through the successful ESA Hipparcos mission. This contribution provides updated information on the Gaia mission and notes the science performance capability of the mission. The GREAT (Gaia Research for European Astronomy Training) research network, which is taking a role in promoting scientific networking of the community building awareness and readiness in advance of the Gaia launch, is discussed.

  9. Promoting preschool reading

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The thesis titled Promoting preschool reading consists of a theoretiral and an empirical part. In the theoretical part I wrote about reading, the importance of reading, types of reading, about reading motivation, promoting reading motivation, internal and external motivation, influence of reading motivation on the child's reading activity, reading and familial literacy, the role of adults in promotion reading literacy, reading to a child and promoting reading in pre-school years, where I ...

  10. How Promotions Work

    OpenAIRE

    Robert C. Blattberg; Richard Briesch; Fox, Edward J.

    1995-01-01

    By synthesizing findings across the sales promotion literature, this article helps the reader understand how promotions work. We identify and explain empirical generalizations related to sales promotion; that is, effects that have been found consistently in multiple studies involving different researchers. We also identify issues which have generated conflicting findings in the research, as well as important sales promotion topics that have not yet been studied. This overview of the research ...

  11. Perceptions of health promoters about health promotion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-02-11

    Feb 11, 2013 ... formal written health promotion guidelines for families with adolescents orphaned ..... community: '…What worries me is the fact that they still become pregnant .... to learn about HIV risk factors, testing, treatment choices and.

  12. Developing a Promotional Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epley, Hannah K.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for Extension professionals to show clientele the benefits of their program. This article shares how promotional videos are one way of reaching audiences online. An example is given on how a promotional video has been used and developed using iMovie software. Tips are offered for how professionals can create a promotional video and…

  13. Occupancy Grid Map Merging Using Feature Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Gonzalez, “Toward a unified bayesian approach to hybrid metric-topological SLAM,” IEEE Transactions on Robotics , 24(2), April 2008, 259-270. [14] G...Risetti, C. Stachniss, and W. Burgard, “Improved Techniques for grid mapping with Rao-Blackwellized Particle Filter,” IEEE Transactions on Robotics , 23

  14. On circle map coupled map lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, E

    2002-01-01

    Circle map in one and two dimensions is studied. Both its stability, synchronization using bounded control and persistence is discussed. This work is expected to be applicable in ecology where spatial effects are known to be important. Also it will be relevant to systems where delay effects are not negligible.

  15. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Sporring, Jon; Fogh Olsen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    . To address this problem, we introduce a photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way, we preserve important illumination features, while...

  16. The Modern Geomorphological Map

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seijmonsbergen, A.C.; Switzer, A.; Kennedy, D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Classical geomorphological maps are representations of the spatial distribution of landforms, materials and of the processes responsible for their formation, in a single paper map. They contain a wealth of information that is generally documented with the aid of symbol and color legends. Uniformity

  17. Android Mapping Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalwhab Bakheet

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Location-aware and mapping applications have gone f rom a desirable feature to an essential part of any smart phone. Whether a user is checking into a social network, looking for a pharmacy in the middle of the night, or located in somewhere and needs help, the key is always the same: location. In this project, an Android mapping application is developed. The application is able to display the map of the whole world while online or, display a pre-downloaded map while offline, track the user’s location, display a compass to determine north, send the user’s location to others in case of emergency using SMS, receive and interpret received location from the message, display it on the map, and notify the user by the reception of the location. The application was developed using agile methodol ogy. It, met its objectives and successfully passed 91% of the final system test, recording that some limitations were discovered, the application needs further testing and can be implem ented for particular company or university using their own maps or editing the maps in OSM (op en street maps.

  18. Map-A-Planet

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Map-A-Planet website allows users to create and download custom image maps of planets and satellites from a variety of missions in an easy to use web interface

  19. Simplifying Massive Contour Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arge, Lars; Deleuran, Lasse Kosetski; Mølhave, Thomas;

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple, efficient and practical algorithm for constructing and subsequently simplifying contour maps from massive high-resolution DEMs, under some practically realistic assumptions on the DEM and contours.......We present a simple, efficient and practical algorithm for constructing and subsequently simplifying contour maps from massive high-resolution DEMs, under some practically realistic assumptions on the DEM and contours....

  20. BenMAP Downloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Download the current and legacy versions of the BenMAP program. Download configuration and aggregation/pooling/valuation files to estimate benefits. BenMAP-CE is free and open source software, and the source code is available upon request.

  1. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  2. Quaternionic versus complex maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asorey, M [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad de Zaragoza 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Scolarici, G [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita del Salento and INFN, Sezione di Lecce, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Solombrino, L [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita del Salento and INFN, Sezione di Lecce, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2007-11-15

    We discuss the relation between completely positive quaternionic maps and the corresponding complex maps obtained via projection operation. In order to illustrate this formalism, we reobtain the (complex) qubit subdynamics of maximally entangled Bell states, as complex projection of unitary dynamics between quaternionic pure states.

  3. Statistical air quality mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kassteele, van de J.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis handles statistical mapping of air quality data. Policy makers require more and more detailed air quality information to take measures to improve air quality. Besides, researchers need detailed air quality information to assess health effects. Accurate and spatially highly resolved maps

  4. Pore size distribution mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Strange, John H.; J. Beau W. WEBBER; Schmidt, S.D.

    1996-01-01

    Pore size distribution mapping has been demonstrated using NMR cryoporometry\\ud in the presence of a magnetic field gradient, This novel method is extendable to 2D and 3D mapping. It offers a unique nondestructive method of obtaining full pore-size distributions in the range 3 to 100 nm at any point within a bulk sample. \\ud

  5. MUTYH Associated Polyposis (MAP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Marie Louise Mølgaard; Bisgaard, M L

    2008-01-01

    MUTYH Associated Polyposis (MAP), a Polyposis predisposition caused by biallelic mutations in the Base Excision Repair (BER) gene MUTYH, confers a marked risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). The MAP phenotype is difficult to distinguish from other hereditary CRC syndromes. Especially from Familial...

  6. Iconicity as structure mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmorey, Karen

    2014-09-19

    Linguistic and psycholinguistic evidence is presented to support the use of structure-mapping theory as a framework for understanding effects of iconicity on sign language grammar and processing. The existence of structured mappings between phonological form and semantic mental representations has been shown to explain the nature of metaphor and pronominal anaphora in sign languages. With respect to processing, it is argued that psycholinguistic effects of iconicity may only be observed when the task specifically taps into such structured mappings. In addition, language acquisition effects may only be observed when the relevant cognitive abilities are in place (e.g. the ability to make structural comparisons) and when the relevant conceptual knowledge has been acquired (i.e. information key to processing the iconic mapping). Finally, it is suggested that iconicity is better understood as a structured mapping between two mental representations than as a link between linguistic form and human experience.

  7. Bodily maps of emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummenmaa, Lauri; Glerean, Enrico; Hari, Riitta; Hietanen, Jari K

    2014-01-14

    Emotions are often felt in the body, and somatosensory feedback has been proposed to trigger conscious emotional experiences. Here we reveal maps of bodily sensations associated with different emotions using a unique topographical self-report method. In five experiments, participants (n = 701) were shown two silhouettes of bodies alongside emotional words, stories, movies, or facial expressions. They were asked to color the bodily regions whose activity they felt increasing or decreasing while viewing each stimulus. Different emotions were consistently associated with statistically separable bodily sensation maps across experiments. These maps were concordant across West European and East Asian samples. Statistical classifiers distinguished emotion-specific activation maps accurately, confirming independence of topographies across emotions. We propose that emotions are represented in the somatosensory system as culturally universal categorical somatotopic maps. Perception of these emotion-triggered bodily changes may play a key role in generating consciously felt emotions.

  8. The projective heat map

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, Richard Evan

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces a simple dynamical model for a planar heat map that is invariant under projective transformations. The map is defined by iterating a polygon map, where one starts with a finite planar N-gon and produces a new N-gon by a prescribed geometric construction. One of the appeals of the topic of this book is the simplicity of the construction that yet leads to deep and far reaching mathematics. To construct the projective heat map, the author modifies the classical affine invariant midpoint map, which takes a polygon to a new polygon whose vertices are the midpoints of the original. The author provides useful background which makes this book accessible to a beginning graduate student or advanced undergraduate as well as researchers approaching this subject from other fields of specialty. The book includes many illustrations, and there is also a companion computer program.

  9. Geologic map of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Skinner, James A.; Dohm, James M.; Irwin, Rossman P.; Kolb, Eric J.; Fortezzo, Corey M.; Platz, Thomas; Michael, Gregory G.; Hare, Trent M.

    2014-01-01

    This global geologic map of Mars, which records the distribution of geologic units and landforms on the planet's surface through time, is based on unprecedented variety, quality, and quantity of remotely sensed data acquired since the Viking Orbiters. These data have provided morphologic, topographic, spectral, thermophysical, radar sounding, and other observations for integration, analysis, and interpretation in support of geologic mapping. In particular, the precise topographic mapping now available has enabled consistent morphologic portrayal of the surface for global mapping (whereas previously used visual-range image bases were less effective, because they combined morphologic and albedo information and, locally, atmospheric haze). Also, thermal infrared image bases used for this map tended to be less affected by atmospheric haze and thus are reliable for analysis of surface morphology and texture at even higher resolution than the topographic products.

  10. Health Promotion Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehn-Christiansen, Sine

    The paper discusses the implications of health promotion in education. The paper is based on my PhD project entitled “Health promotion education seen through a power/knowledge and subjectification perspective” (in prep). The PhD project explores how professional health promotion skills...... are conceived in a specific educational setting; namely the Danish social and health education programme. Here, health promotion is formally conceived as a qualification aimed at citizens and patients - and not at the students themselves. However, as the paper will demonstrate, conceptions of student...... health promotion workers should ideally act as health promotion role models. This claim leads to a series of educational and morally anchored dilemmas and challenges. Inspired by Foucault and others who have developed this line of thinking (eg. Signild Vallgårde) health promotion is viewed as a heartfelt...

  11. Mental Mapping: A Classroom Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Les

    1978-01-01

    Examines potential uses of mental maps in the classroom by reviewing research efforts, providing an example of the differences between mental maps of two student groups, and suggesting how to use mental maps in the geography curriculum. Mental mapping (or cognitive mapping) refers to individuals' processes of collecting, storing, and retrieving…

  12. nowCOAST's Map Service for Transportation Map Overlays

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST map service provides maps depicting the locations of major world airport runways, major U.S. seaports, and latitude/longitude grid...

  13. nowCOAST's Map Service for Political Map Overlays

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST map service provides map overlays depicting the boundaries of U.S. states, territories, counties and townships/county subdivisions,...

  14. Genome-wide mapping of transcription factor binding reveals developmental process integration and a fresh look at evolutionary dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yant, Levi

    2012-02-01

    How does evolution forge adaptive responses? Are many changes required or few? Just how complex are the transcriptional networks that control development? Diverse questions like these are being newly addressed by next-generation sequencing-based techniques. Facilitating a mechanistic understanding, these approaches reveal the direct in vivo interactions between transcription factors and their physical targets, combined with genome-scale readouts to comprehensively map adaptive gene regulatory networks (GRNs). Here I focus on pioneering work from the last 3 years that has leveraged these data to investigate diverse aspects of GRN circuitry controlling the reproductive transition in plants. These approaches have revealed surprising new functions for long-investigated key players in developmental programs and laid bare the basis for pleiotropy in many others, suggesting widespread process integration at the transcriptional level. Evolutionary questions begged by the recent deluge of GRN mapping data are being assessed anew, both by emerging work outside Arabidopsis thaliana and novel analyses within. These studies have swiftly exposed the distinctive power and adaptability of genome-wide GRN mapping and illustrate that this unique data type holds tremendous promise for plant biology.

  15. Mapping genes on human chromosome 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith, T.; Phipps, P.; Serino, K. [Collaborative Research, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    While a substantial number of genes have been physically localized to human chromosome 20, few have been genetically mapped. In the process of developing a genetic linkage map of chromosome 20, we have mapped microsatellite polymorphisms associated with six genes. Three of these had highly informative polymorphisms (greater than 0.70) that were originally identified by other investigators. These include avian sarcoma oncogene homolog (SRC), ribophorin II (RPN2), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1). Polymorphisms associated with two genes were determined following a screen of their DNA sequences in GenBank. These include dinucleotide polymorphisms in introl II of cystatin c (CST3) and in the promoter region of neuroendocrine convertase 2 (NEC2) with heterozygosities of 0.52 and 0.54, respectively. A sixth gene, prodynorphin (PDYN) was mapped following the identification of a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism (heterozygosity of 0.35) in a cosmid subclone from a YAC homologous to the original phage clone. CA-positive cosmid subclones from a YAC for an additional gene, guanine nucleotide binding protein, alpha (GNAS10), have been identified and sequencing is in progress. Similar efforts were utilized to identify a microsatellite polymorphism from a half-YAC cloned by W. Brown and localized by FISH to 20pter. This polymorphism is highly informative, with a heterozygosity of 0.83, and serves to delimit the genetic map of the short arm of this chromosome.

  16. Prevalence of the initiator over the TATA box in human and yeast genes and identification of DNA motifs enriched in human TATA-less core promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuhu; Bolotin, Eugene; Jiang, Tao; Sladek, Frances M; Martinez, Ernest

    2007-03-01

    The core promoter of eukaryotic genes is the minimal DNA region that recruits the basal transcription machinery to direct efficient and accurate transcription initiation. The fraction of human and yeast genes that contain specific core promoter elements such as the TATA box and the initiator (INR) remains unclear and core promoter motifs specific for TATA-less genes remain to be identified. Here, we present genome-scale computational analyses indicating that approximately 76% of human core promoters lack TATA-like elements, have a high GC content, and are enriched in Sp1-binding sites. We further identify two motifs - M3 (SCGGAAGY) and M22 (TGCGCANK) - that occur preferentially in human TATA-less core promoters. About 24% of human genes have a TATA-like element and their promoters are generally AT-rich; however, only approximately 10% of these TATA-containing promoters have the canonical TATA box (TATAWAWR). In contrast, approximately 46% of human core promoters contain the consensus INR (YYANWYY) and approximately 30% are INR-containing TATA-less genes. Significantly, approximately 46% of human promoters lack both TATA-like and consensus INR elements. Surprisingly, mammalian-type INR sequences are present - and tend to cluster - in the transcription start site (TSS) region of approximately 40% of yeast core promoters and the frequency of specific core promoter types appears to be conserved in yeast and human genomes. Gene Ontology analyses reveal that TATA-less genes in humans, as in yeast, are frequently involved in basic "housekeeping" processes, while TATA-containing genes are more often highly regulated, such as by biotic or stress stimuli. These results reveal unexpected similarities in the occurrence of specific core promoter types and in their associated biological processes in yeast and humans and point to novel vertebrate-specific DNA motifs that might play a selective role in TATA-independent transcription.

  17. Fractional standard map

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, Mark, E-mail: edelman@cims.nyu.ed [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer St., New York, NY 10012 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Stern College at Yeshiva University, 245 Lexington Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Tarasov, Vasily E. [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer St., New York, NY 10012 (United States)] [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2009-12-28

    Properties of the phase space of the standard map with memory are investigated. This map was obtained from a kicked fractional differential equation. Depending on the value of the map parameter and the fractional order of the derivative in the original differential equation, this nonlinear dynamical system demonstrates attractors (fixed points, stable periodic trajectories, slow converging and slow diverging trajectories, ballistic trajectories, and fractal-like structures) and/or chaotic trajectories. At least one type of fractal-like sticky attractors in the chaotic sea was observed.

  18. Map: Geospatial paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikonović Vesna

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available There are different definitions of map. There is no one which is accepted in whole world or at least from the most cartographers. In the paper it will be given several definitions which are, at the best way, (according to the author’s opinion reflecting essence of map as a model of reality. Map as a universal meaning of researching can’t serve only for representing particular geospace (spatial system or some its element, or to give only clear view about geographical dispersion of objects, phenomena and processes, but have to make possible studying the patterns of that dispersion, as well as their mutual connections and conditions.

  19. What do health-promoting schools promote?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simovska, Venka

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – The editorial aims to provide a brief overview of the individual contributions to the special issue, and a commentary positioning the contributions within research relating to the health-promoting schools initiative in Europe. Design/methodology/approach – The members of the Schools...... for Health in Europe Research Group were invited to submit their work addressing processes and outcomes in school health promotion to this special issue of Health Education. Additionally, an open call for papers was published on the Health Education web site. Following the traditional double blind peer...... review process, nine submissions were accepted for publication. Five of these are selected to be published in this issue and the rest will be published in a future issue of the journal. Findings – The five articles in this issue take a comprehensive approach to health promotion in schools and reflect...

  20. The Problem of Map Illiteracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, James D.

    1985-01-01

    Describes an approach to eliminating "map illiteracy" in college students. Map illiteracy is defined as the inability to read and draw meaning from simple maps used in history texts and teaching. (JDH)

  1. Tools for mapping ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, Ignacio; Adamescu, Mihai; Bagstad, Kenneth J.; Cazacu, Constantin; Klug, Hermann; Nedkov, Stoyan; Burkhard, Benjamin; Maes, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Mapping tools have evolved impressively in recent decades. From early computerised mapping techniques to current cloud-based mapping approaches, we have witnessed a technological evolution that has facilitated the democratisation of Geographic Information

  2. Northern Hemisphere Synoptic Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Daily Series of Synoptic Weather Maps. Part I consists of plotted and analyzed daily maps of sea-level and 500-mb maps for 0300, 0400, 1200, 1230, 1300, and 1500...

  3. What do health-promoting schools promote?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simovska, Venka

    2012-01-01

    for Health in Europe Research Group were invited to submit their work addressing processes and outcomes in school health promotion to this special issue of Health Education. Additionally, an open call for papers was published on the Health Education web site. Following the traditional double blind peer......Purpose – The editorial aims to provide a brief overview of the individual contributions to the special issue, and a commentary positioning the contributions within research relating to the health-promoting schools initiative in Europe. Design/methodology/approach – The members of the Schools...

  4. CONSTRUCTION METHOD OF KNOWLEDGE MAP BASED ON DESIGN PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Hai; JIANG Zuhua

    2007-01-01

    Due to the increasing amount and complexity of knowledge in product design, the knowledge map based on design process is presented as a tool to reuse product design process, promote the product design knowledge sharing. The relationship between design task flow and knowledge flow is discussed; A knowledge organizing method based on design task decomposition and a visualization method to support the knowledge retrieving and sharing in product design are proposed. And a knowledge map system to manage the knowledge in product design process is built with Visual C++ and SVG. Finally, a brief case study is provided to illustrate the construction and application of knowledge map in fuel pump design.

  5. SPORT PROMOTION STRATEGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Lucian MIHAI

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In sport marketing, the word promotion covers a range of interrelated activities. All of these activities are designed to attract attention, stimulate the interest and awareness of consumers, and of course, encourage them to purchase a sport product. Promotion is about communicating with and educating consumers. The purpose of a sport promotional strategy is to build brand loyalty and product credibility, develop image, and position the brand. A promotional strategy is similar to a marketing strategy, but the promotional strategy seeks short-term objectives, both direct and indirect. Promotional objectives usually include increased sales, stimulate impulse buying, raise customer traffic, and present and reinforce image. It also provides information about products and services, publicizes new stores or websites, and creates and enhances customer satisfaction.

  6. Mapping posthumanism: an exchange

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: posthumanism in question Noel Castree, Catherine Nash Mapping posthumanism Neil Badmington Modalities of posthumanism Bruce Braun Humanising posthumanism Jonathan Murdoch Humanism's excess: some thoughts on the 'post-human/ist' agenda Sarah Whatmore Organisors: Noel Castree, Catherine Nash

  7. FLOODPLAIN MAPPING, Bandera, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  8. PDS Planetary Maps API

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We are developing a set of NASA Extensions to the Google Maps API—and soon to other frameworks such as OpenLayers as well—that will make these platforms more useful...

  9. Haz-Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Haz-Map is an occupational health database designed for health and safety professionals and for consumers seeking information about the adverse effects of workplace...

  10. MAPPING IN MICRONESIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Randle W.; Swinnerton, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey has recently completed a series of new topographic maps of Micronesia in cooperation with the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, the Federal agency administering the islands. Monocolor 1:10,000-scale manuscripts were compiled, from which 1:25,000-scale metric quadrangles were derived with symbology consistent with USGS quadrangle mapping. The publication of these new maps coincides with the impending political changes resulting from self-determination referendums held in Micronesia. Local sources have helped considerably with field logistics and resolution of geographic name controversies. Technical aspects of this project included development of tropical feature symbology, location of cadastral subdivisions and associated boundaries and mapping of many outlying coral reefs.

  11. Public Waters Inventory Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This theme is a scanned and rectified version of the Minnesota DNR - Division of Waters "Public Waters Inventory" (PWI) maps. DNR Waters utilizes a small scale...

  12. Map of physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Based on bibliometric data from information-services provider Thomson Reuters, this map reveals "core areas" of physics, shown as coloured circular nodes, and the relationship between these subdisciplines, shown as lines.

  13. Mapping the EEZ

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    De, S.; Shashikumar, K.

    Mariana. Countries like Australia, Brazil, Chile, China, Ireland, New Zealand, Pakistan, Sweden and Venezuela are all actively running programs on EEZ surveys. Mapping the Oceans Assessment of EEZ resources requires comprehensive, accurate, and up...

  14. National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) National Coastal Mapping Program (NCMP) is designed to provide high-resolution elevation and imagery data along U.S....

  15. The CPD Maps System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — CPD Maps includes data on the locations of existing CDBG, HOME, public housing and other HUD-funded community assets, so that users can view past investments...

  16. Daily Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Several different government offices have published the Daily weather maps over its history. The publication has also gone by different names over time. The U.S....

  17. Formal genetic maps

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohammad Saad Zaghloul Salem

    2014-12-24

    Dec 24, 2014 ... Abstract Formal genetic maps are databases, represented as text or graphic figures, that can be ..... cantly, to our current vague and scanty knowledge of many, ...... similar to reverse engineering techniques, might be worthy of.

  18. TOXMAP®: Environmental Health Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — TOXMAP® is a Geographic Information System (GIS) that uses maps of the United States and Canada to help users visually explore data primarily from the EPA's Toxics...

  19. Minidoka - Invasive Species Mapping

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Locate and map, via the use of GPS, Rush skeletonweed on the refuge. Located areas then entered into GIS to allow refuge staff to pin point locations and treat this...

  20. Programming with Hierarchical Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørbæk, Peter

    This report desribes the hierarchical maps used as a central data structure in the Corundum framework. We describe its most prominent features, ague for its usefulness and briefly describe some of the software prototypes implemented using the technology....

  1. NOS Bathymetric Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This collection of bathymetric contour maps which represent the seafloor topography includes over 400 individual titles and covers US offshore areas including Hawaii...

  2. Marketplace Enrollment Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The maps show the distribution of consumers in a state who enrolled in marketplace plans through federally facilitated, partnership, and supported state-based...

  3. FLOODPLAIN MAPPING, Atascosa, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  4. Coupled analytic maps

    CERN Document Server

    Bricmont, J; Bricmont J; Kupiainen A

    1994-01-01

    We consider a lattice of weakly coupled expanding circle maps. We construct, via a cluster expansion of the Perron-Frobenius operator, an invariant measure for these infinite dimensional dynamical systems which exhibits space-time-chaos.

  5. USGS map quadrangles

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — USGS map quandrangle boundaries with names and unique identifiers for the 1:24,000 (7.5 minute) quadrangles. Additional attributes provide unique identifiers and...

  6. BaseMap

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The goal of this project is to provide a convenient base map that can be used as a starting point for CA projects. It's simple, but designed to work at a number of...

  7. Mapping Unknown Knowns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diogo de Andrade Silva, Elisa; Lanng, Ditte Bendix; Wind, Simon

    representative dimensions of travellers’ embodied ‘dwelling-in-motion’ (Urry, 2007) and experiences. The paper foregrounds a ‘Mapping-in-Motion’ graphic example, an experimental urban design student assignment aiming to map some of the less representative dimensions of journeys between A and B in Berlin......Mapping is often known as the entangled method of recognizing, representing and examining the existing physical conditions of a design site. Therefore, it becomes an evocative requirement to urban designers’ work in order to develop design proposals (Corner 1999). In this paper, we focus on mapping...... in relation to analysis, representation, exploration and design of everyday travelling in the city. Such ‘mobilities design’ (Jensen and Lanng 2017) concerns routes, sites and artefacts of mobilities, e.g., road networks, train stations, and bike parking facilities. Some dimensions of these structures...

  8. MetaMap

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MetaMap is a highly configurable application developed by the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications at the National Library of Medicine (NLM) to...

  9. IMPLEMENTATION OF THE NEW CAREER STRUCTURE SCHEME (MAPS)

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    This is to inform staff members that the Administrative Circular on MAPS*, announced in the Weekly Bulletin last year, has now been published. It has been sent to each individual staff member and is posted on the HR Division Web site, together with other documents on MAPS, at the following address : Human Resources: Information about the new career structure English and French versions are also available at Divisional Secretariats. Please note that the Annual Interview programme for this first year of implementation of MAPS will not follow the calendar normally foreseen in the Circular. This is to give sufficient time to hold MAPS seminars for supervisors in January and February. Consequently, individual interviews will take place after these seminars - apart from some specially justified cases that may arise. The next stage of implementation of MAPS is the planning for the 2002 advancement and promotion exercise, for which budgetary and numerical guidelines, together with the calendar, will also be announced...

  10. Complete Quasiconvex Mappings in Polydisc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Tai-shun; ZHANG Wen-jun

    2006-01-01

    In this paper,a class of biholomorphic mappings called complete quasiconvex mappings is introduced and studied in bounded convex Reinhardt domains of Cn.Through a detailed analysis of the analytic characterization for this class of mappings,it is shown that this class of mappings contains the convex mappings and is also a subset of the class of starlike mappings.In the special case of the polydisc,a decomposition theorem is established for the complete quasiconvex mappings,which in turn is used to derive an improved sufficient condition for the convex mappings.

  11. Is Lamb Promotion Working?

    OpenAIRE

    Capps, Oral, Jr.; Williams, Gary W.

    2007-01-01

    This objective of this study is to determine whether the advertising and promotion dollars collected and spent by the American Lamb Board on lamb promotion since the inception of the Lamb Checkoff Program have effectively increased lamb consumption in the United States. The main conclusion is that program has resulted in roughly 7.6 additional pounds of total lamb consumption per dollar spent on advertising and promotion and $41.59 in additional lamb sales per dollar spent on advertising and ...

  12. Olympic Maps Available

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Beijing is publishing a set of Olympic maps covering everything from the location of sporting venues to the city’s history As soon as Zhou Liyi hopped off the train from Shanghai to Beijing, he hurried to Wangfujing Xinhua Book Store,one of the largest of its kind in Beijing,to buy an Olympic map. Zhou is a Shanghai resident who came to Beijing on business and plans to return as a

  13. Maps and (no) Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Etienne

    As the title suggests, I examine the role of maps in accelerator theory, conveniently leaving simulation out of the picture for lack of time and space. This is really a primer on the map-based "Courant Snyder" theory as independently proposed by Dragt's group (author included) and Turchetti's group at Bologna. Quite obviously it is viewed here from the author's own perspective and prejudices.

  14. Wind Resource Maps (Postcard)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides high-resolution wind maps and estimates of the wind resource potential that would be possible from development of the available windy land areas after excluding areas unlikely to be developed. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to Wind Powering America's online wind energy resource maps.

  15. Irreversible quantum baker map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łoziński, Artur; Pakoński, Prot; Zyczkowski, Karol

    2002-12-01

    We propose a generalization of the model of classical baker map on the torus, in which the images of two parts of the phase space do overlap. This transformation is irreversible and cannot be quantized by means of a unitary Floquet operator. A corresponding quantum system is constructed as a completely positive map acting in the space of density matrices. We investigate spectral properties of this superoperator and their link with the increase of the entropy of initially pure states.

  16. Irreversible Quantum Baker Map

    CERN Document Server

    Lozinski, A; Zyczkowski, K; Lozinski, Artur; Pakonski, Prot; Zyczkowski, Karol

    2002-01-01

    We propose a generalization of the model of classical baker map on the torus, in which the images of two parts of the phase space do overlap. This transformation is irreversible and cannot be quantized by means of a unitary Floquet operator. A corresponding quantum system is constructed as a completely positive map acting in the space of density matrices. We investigate spectral properties of this super-operator and their link with the increase of the entropy of initially pure states.

  17. Health promotion in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Paulo Marchiori; de Carvalho, Antonio Ivo

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of health promotion within the Brazilian health system is examined, including an assessment of the intersectoral and development policies that have influenced the process. Particular attention is paid to the legal characteristics of the Unified Health System. Human resources formation and research initiatives in health promotion are outlined, with a summary of the obstacles that need to be overcome in order to ensure the effective implementation of health promotion in the future. Up to the end of the 20th Century health promotion was not used as a term in the Brazilian public heath context. Health promoting activities were concentrated in the area of health education, although targeting the social determinants of health and the principle of intersectoral action were part of the rhetoric. The situation has changed during the last decade, with the publication of a national policy of health promotion, issued by the Ministry of Health and jointly implemented with the States and Municipals Health Secretaries. More recently there has been a re-emergence of the discourse on the social determinants of health and the formation of intersectoral public policies as the basis of a comprehensive health promotion. Health promotion infrastructure, particularly around human resources and financing, requires strengthening in order to ensure capacity and sustainability in health promotion practice.

  18. Analysis of promotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Bozhkova

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Article describes the classification of promotions and determining the effectiveness of specific measures to stimulate sales (which isnt possible practically in most advertising companies.

  19. Creating Heliophysics Concept Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, N. A.; Peticolas, L. M.; Paglierani, R.; Mendez, B. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Center for Science Education at University of California Berkeley's Space Sciences Laboratory is creating concept maps for Heliophysics and would like to get input from scientists. The purpose of this effort is to identify key concepts related to Heliophysics and map their progression to show how students' understanding of Heliophysics might develop from Kindergarten through higher education. These maps are meant to tie into the AAAS Project 2061 Benchmarks for Scientific Literacy and National Science Education Standards. It is hoped that the results of this effort will be useful for curriculum designers developing Heliophysics-related curriculum materials and classroom teachers using Heliophysics materials. The need for concept maps was identified as a result of product analysis undertaken by the NASA Heliophysics Forum Team. The NASA Science Education and Public Outreach Forums have as two of their goals to improve the characterization of the contents of the Science Mission Directorate and Public Outreach (SMD E/PO) portfolio (Objective 2.1) and assist SMD in addressing gaps in the portfolio of SMD E/PO products and project activities (Objective 2.2). An important part of this effort is receiving feedback from solar scientists regarding the inclusion of key concepts and their progression in the maps. This session will introduce the draft concept maps and elicit feedback from scientists.

  20. Mars synthetic topographic mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S.S.C.

    1978-01-01

    Topographic contour maps of Mars are compiled by the synthesis of data acquired from various scientific experiments of the Mariner 9 mission, including S-band radio-occulation, the ultraviolet spectrometer (UVS), the infrared radiometer (IRR), the infrared interferometer spectrometer (IRIS) and television imagery, as well as Earth-based radar information collected at Goldstone, Haystack, and Arecibo Observatories. The entire planet is mapped at scales of 1:25,000,000 and 1:25,000,000 using Mercator, Lambert, and polar stereographic map projections. For the computation of map projections, a biaxial spheroid figure is adopted. The semimajor and semiminor axes are 3393.4 and 3375.7 km, respectively, with a polar flattening of 0.0052. For the computation of elevations, a topographic datum is defined by a gravity field described in terms of spherical harmonics of fourth order and fourth degree combined with a 6.1-mbar occulation pressure surface. This areoid can be approximated by a triaxial ellipsoid with semimajor axes of A = 3394.6 km and B = 3393.3 km and a semiminor axis of C = 3376.3 km. The semimajor axis A intersects the Martian surface at longitude 105??W. The dynamic flattening of Mars is 0.00525. The contour intercal of the maps is 1 km. For some prominent features where overlapping pictures from Mariner 9 are available, local contour maps at relatively larger scales were also compiled by photogrammetric methods on stereo plotters. ?? 1978.